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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

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[Document 18 — 1955.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1954. 



Boston, January 3, 1955. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston . 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the annual report of the Public Works 
Department and of the Public Improvement Com- 
mission for the year ending December 31, 1954. 

Fiscal. 

The total expenditures of the department for the year 
were $22,762,341.30, of which $3,313,909.84 represents 
water assessments levied by the Metropolitan District 
Commission, and $544,832.62 represents MetropoHtan 
District Commission sewer assessments. 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled $6,039,- 
268.46, and the revenue derived from the operation of 
the Sumner Tunnel reached a record high of $2,224,195. 

The operation of the Sumner Tunnel resulted in a 
record-breaking surplus of $901,398.72. For the first 
time since 1938 there was a deficit resulting from the 
sale of water in the amount of $116,562.91. 



2 City Document No. 18. 

Loan Orders. 
On July 6, 1954, a City Council order was approved 
by your Honor, which provided, under the provisions 
of section 7 of chapter 44 of the General Laws, that the 
sum of $2,000,000 be appropriated for the construction 
of public ways and the sum of $2,000,000 be appropriated 
for the construction of bridges, and on October 19, 
1954, that the sum of $800,000 be appropriated for the 
construction of an incinerator and the sum of $125,000 
be appropriated to construct buildings at the new 
Forest Hills Street Yard which is to replace the Child 
Street Yard. 

Street Construction Work. 
State- Aid Program. 
Last year we completed a considerable amount of 
street reconstruction under the Chapter 90 State-Aid 
Highway Reconstruction Program. The following im- 
portant main highways were constructed during the 
year under the State-Aid Program: 

Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, from Washington street 
to the Brookline line. 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park, from Cleary square to 
Metropolitan avenue. 

Washington street. City Proper, from Dover street to 
Northampton street. 

Morton street. West Roxbury, from Harvard street to 
Forest Hills street. 

The total cost of the Chapter 90 Construction Pro- 
gram in Boston for the year 1954 was $551,783.25, of 
which the State Department of Public Works, under 
the provisions of section 34 of chapter 90 of the General 
Laws, paid 49.1 per cent, thereby presenting a sub- 
stantial savings of $270,534.26 to the taxpayer. It is 
planned to again conduct an extensive program of 
street construction under this chapter in 1955. 

Non-State-Aid Program. 
We also completed a major street reconstruction pro- 
gram, comprising extensive construction and recon- 
struction, in every section of the city. In addition to 
work done on downtown streets, the department resur- 
faced several important traffic arteries, hsted as follows: 



Public Works Department. 3 

Bremen street, East Boston, from Sumner street to Porter 
street. 

Meridian street, East Boston, from Saratoga street to 
Condor street. 

Waldemar avenue, East Boston, from McLellan Highway 
to Crest way road. 

Columbia road. South Boston, from Old Harbor street to 
I street. 

Mt. Vernon street, Dorchester, from William T. Morrissey 
Boulevard, easterly. 

Poplar street. West Roxbury, from Canterbury street to 
Beech street, and from Washington street to Heathcote 
street. 

Weld street. West Roxbury, from Centre street to the West 
Roxbury Parkway, and from Church street to Maple street. 

In continuation of our policy of replacing brick side- 
walks with cement concrete in the older sections of the 
city, contracts during the year, totaling approximately 
$90,000, were awarded for this work. 

The following is a summarized financial statement of 
the expenditures made in 1954 for highway improve- 
ments : 

Budgetary Item. 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) . . . $2,081,107 46 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue Account) . . 147,856 56 

Reconstruction of Streets (Including Sidewalks) . . 42,994 45 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of . . . 89,973 07 

Total $2,361,931 54 

The following was a summarized record of the high- 
way improvement work done by the department in 
1954: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 170. 

Includes 48 new streets ordered laid out and constructed 
under the provisions of chapter 393 of the Acts of 1906. 

Miles of Streets Improved, 2t .99. 

Includes 4.22 miles of so-called Chapter 90 State-Aid High- 
way Improvements. 

Miles of Sidewalks Improved, 6.13. 

In addition to sidewalk improvements included in the above- 
noted street improvements. 

We also completed, during the year, the removal of 
235 gas lamps, which were replaced with an equal num- 
ber of 1,000- or 2,500-lumen electric lamps. It is our 
intention to continue with this program in 1955. 



4 City Document No. 18. 

Snow Removal. 

We were fortunate during the past year in that no 
snowstorms of major proportions occurred. Only two 
storms had snowfall of appreciable precipitation, Janu- 
ary 11 to 12, 8.3 inches, and December 21 to 22, 6.2 
inches, requiring removal by contract forces. We ex- 
perienced little difficulty in keeping the streets properly 
plowed and sanded throughout the winter months. 

There are 738 miles of pubUc streets that have to be 
plowed and maintained during the winter months. The 
department's fleet of thirty-three (33) snow fighters 
were used to plow, sand, and salt the streets of the 
downtown area. Most of the plowing work in the rest 
of the city was done by 250 trucks rented on an hourly 
basis from contractors. 

The cost of snow removal work for 1954 totaled 
$471,591.97. 

Andrew P. McArdle Bridge. 

The Andrew P. McArdle Bridge was dedicated and 
opened to traffic on August 22. This new bridge re- 
places the old Meridian Street Bridge, between East 
Boston and Chelsea, and was built under contracts 
awarded by the State Department of Public Works in 
accordance with chapter 785 of the Acts of 1951. The 
substructure was constructed by Meritt-Chapman & 
Scott Corporation, under a contract awarded November 
20, 1951, in the amount of $1,746,491. The super- 
structure was constructed by the American Bridge 
Company under a contract awarded June 20, 1952, in 
the amount of $2,939,976. The cost of this bridge was 
borne jointly by the City and the Commonwealth under 
an agreement made in 1951 so that, of the total cost of 
$4,686,467, the cost to the city was approximately 
$2,200,000. 

Refuse Disposal. 

Little progress has been made on the South Bay 
incinerator as we are still awaiting the acquisition of a 
site which we are trying to obtain from the State Depart- 
ment of PubHc Works. Metcalf and Eddy, consulting 
engineers, have practically completed the specifications 
for the South Bay incinerator equipment and we shall be 
ready to advertise for bids on this equipment just as 
soon as a site for the plant is acquired. 

The Brighton- Watertown Incinerator Authority did 
not develop as we had hoped. Chapter 523 of the Acts 



Public Works Department. 5 

of 1954 provided for creating a Brighton-Watertown 
Incinerator Authority with powers to construct and 
operate an incinerator for the disposal of refuse from 
both communities. This act was approved by your 
Honor and accepted by the Boston City Council but 
was turned down by the Watertown town meeting. 
Therefore, it will be necessary for us to make other 
provisions for the disposal of refuse from Brighton, 
either by providing sufficient capacity in the South Bay 
incinerator, or by constructing an incinerator for the 
Brighton district. 

Plans for having the M.D.C. construct an incinerator 
on the Neponset River marshes in the Cedar Grove 
section for the disposal of refuse from Dorchester also 
met with a setback. The M.D.C. was willing to con- 
struct, maintain, and operate an incinerator on this site 
in accordance with provisions of chapter 559 of the Acts 
of 1952. This act required the approval of the Mayor 
and City Council of the city in which the M.D.C. plans 
to erect an incinerator. In spite of your Honor's ap- 
proval and efforts, the City Council refused to approve 
the selection of this site for an incinerator. 

The failure to obtain incinerator sites aggravates a 
most pressing problem in refuse disposal, as our land 
dump sites approach exhaustion. 

Contracts for the collection of refuse awarded on 
April 1, 1954, provided that four (4) more collection 
districts would be provided with refuse trucks having 
the modern all-enclosed steel bodies. This makes a 
total of eleven (11) out of the seventeen (17) collection 
districts now being furnished with these modern and 
sanitary rubbish trucks. This improvement in sanitation 
was obtained with no appreciable increase in collection 
costs. It is planned to complete the furnishing of these 
enclosed trucks in the remaining districts of the city 
next year. 

Reorganization. 
On May 1, under the provisions of chapter 2, section 56, 
of the Revised Ordinances of 1954 (Reorganization 
Plan), practically all of the functions of the former 
Board of Street Commissioners and the Street Laying- 
Out Department relating to highways and sewerage 
works were transferred to the Public Works Depart- 
ment and to the Public Improvement Commission, 
which was set up in the PubUc Works Department. This 
ordinance also provided for the estabhshment of a Survey 



6 City Document No. 18. 

Division in the department. This division now performs 
engineering services comprising the laying out of public 
highways, taking of easements for sewerage works, 
surveys of land to be acquired by eminent domain, and 
also performs the administrative and engineering duties 
required by the Pubhc Improvement Commission. 

The Pubhc Improvement Commission, a Board in the 
Pubhc Works Department, is also established by the 
aforementioned ordinance and consists of the Commis- 
sioner of Pubhc Works, the Commissioner of Real 
Property, and the Chairman of the Traffic Commission, 
ex officiis. The functions of this commission include the 
processing of petitions, arranging pubhc hearings, pre- 
paring estimates and orders relating to land damages 
and street and sewer betterments, preparing orders for 
the laying out of streets and the construction of streets 
and sewers, preparing orders for eminent domain land 
takings and preparing orders for the granting of permits 
for the use of public highways, erections of poles, etc., 
and the maintenance of all records in charge of the 
commission. 

On June 2, 1954, the Bridge and Highway Division, 
estabhshed in 1950, was abolished, and two separate 
divisions were established to be known as the Bridge 
Division and the Highway Division. 

Purchase of Equipment. 
New equipment purchased during the year included 
one (1) Barber-Greene bucket loader, one (1) Trojan 
bucket loader, two (2) Elgin street sweepers, two (2) 
Wayne street sweepers, one (1) Buick sedan, two (2) 
Chevrolet sedans, thirteen (13) Ford sedans, two (2) 
Chevrolet pickup trucks, three (3) Chevrolet express 
trucks, one (1) Chevrolet truck with catch-basin cleaner, 
nine (9) Ford pickup trucks, three (3) Ford utility 
trucks, four (4) Ford one and one-half-ton dump trucks, 
two (2) Ford trucks to carry compressors, and one (1) 
Ford hydrant truck. 

Personnel. 
There were 2,052 employees in the department as of 
December 31, as compared with 2,166 employees on 
January 21, 1954. There was an actual reduction in 
personnel during the year of 174 because we acquired an 
additional 60 employees by transfer upon taking over 
the former Street Laying-Out Department personnel on 
May 1, 1954. 



Public Works Department. 7 

Detailed Reports. 
Appended hereto are reports submitted by the division 
engineers relative to the activities of their divisions in 
1954 and also a report of the Public Improvement Com- 
mission covering its activities from May 1 to the end 
of the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



8 



City Document No. 18. 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 2,050 persons ehgible for employment in the 
several divisions, and of that number 2,031 were upon 
the January 1, 1955, payrolls. 

Grade and Number of Employees. 





Services, 


Title. 


•3S 
O 


> 

o 

a 

o 

< 


£1 

."2 
pq 


bi 


03 

'3 
0! 


m 


a 
a 

3 
Eh 




> 

3 
CO 


■3 
o 


Commissioner. 


1 


















1 


Division engineers 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


6 


Chief engineer 




1 




















1 








1 

2 












1 






.... 

1 


1 


2 

13 



1 


1 


1 


2 


. . . . 


10 






13 






1 


11 
3 


2 
18 

2 
15 

2 


22 
4 
9 

1 


1 


1 
4 
1 
2 
1 


9 
4 
9 


6 


Principal senior and civil engineers. . . 


64 








14 


Senior engineering aids 






35 








1 


5 








1 


Automotive and senior electrical 




1 








2 






3 








2 










2 












1 
4 








1 


Pumping station engineers and sta- 


















4 












1 
7 
3 








1 










12 


5 

1 
2 
13 


2 


5 
6 




29 






10 


1 


23 






2 






1 


5 


66 


68 




18 
1 




171 


Legal assistant 




1 


Chief electrician 














1 
14 


1 








1 






2 






17 








1 








1 


Executive secretary, P.W.D 


1 
















1 


















2 


? 
























4 


15 


24 


124 


96 


66 


21 


42 


25 


417 







Public Works Department. 



Grade and Number of Employees. — Continued. 





Services. 


Title. 


go 
o 


_> 
o 

s 

o 

< 


0) 

■V 

'C 


til 

1:1 


03 

•a 




1 
a 

3 

H 


C 

o 

rt 
^ 


o 
> 

3 
M 


"3 
o 




4 
2 


15 


24 


124 


96 


66 


21 


42 


25 


417 


Senior personnel officer and assistants 


2 










1 

2 








1 






1 


1 


1 
1 

8 


1 


1 


3 


1 
1 

4 

1 
2 


11 


Principal clerks and secretaries 

Principal clerks, stenographers, ac- 


1 
1 


3 


3 


2 


2 


4 


1 


7 
1 

30 

16 

1 


32 




1 


Senior clerks, typists, stenographers, 
etc 


2 


4 
2 


1 

1 


3 
5 


3 
2 

1 


2 

1 




46 


Clerk-stenographers, clerks, typists. . 


29 
2 














1 
5 


1 








1 


1 






2 




9 






1 
1 


1 




2 












1 


1 

1 

6 
30 




3 












1 


Supervisor and special water meter 
















6 


















30 
















3 
46 


3 




















46 






1 

1 

13 














1 




















1 




















13 






128 

1 














128 








1 
1 

7 


1 










2 
















1 




















1 




















7 






1 














1 
















25 


1 

1 


25 


















1 


Photostat operators 












1 






2 






















10 


43 


159 


152 


107 


77 


79 


165 


36 


828 







10 City Document No. 18. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 





Sebvices. 


Title. 


-as 

go 
o 


> 

S 

o 

3 
< 


-a 




1 


is 


1 

3 


i 


> 

3 


o 




10 


43 


159 


152 


107 


77 


79 


165 


36 

1 


gog 


Principal duplicating machine oper- 


1 














5 
3 














1 


3 

4 
2 


1 




6 




14 








4 






1 


3 


1 


5 

2 

13 


1 


18 




3 1 






2 




















13 










1 
3 
1 






1 
78 

1 

22 
1 




2 






35 


2 


1 


10 


3 


132 






2 


Maintenance mechanics and helpers, 
etc 




3 




5 
7 

7 






30 






10 
2 


4 

2 

57 

1 


1 


1 


23 






3 


15 






2 
2 

1 




59 










16 
1 






19 










4 
19 
10 

1 
28 




6 












19 




















10 


Heavy motor equipment operators. . . 




2 

6 

19 

25 


6 


12 
50 


54 
110 


12 

2 

7 


17 
26 




98 
226 






21 






3 


82 

1 


302 
8 


18 


40 
4 




477 






13 
















Totals 


10 


137 


186 


375 


620 


196 


105 


384 


37 


2050 







Public Works Department. 



11 



Number of Employees Actually Employed January 1, 1954, and 
January I, 1955. 



>> 








> 


a 

C3 




-a 










m 


H 


o 


n 











0) 






?* 
















n" 


m 




«J.H 


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.S M 


Co 

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o 
is 








PL. 


ccO 


M 



January 1, 1954 
January 1, 1955 

January 1, 1954 
January 1, 1955 



106 
104 



197 
185 



418 
380 



385 
370 



681 
616 



215 
195 



135 
134 



2,148 
2,031 



Total Eligible Force. 






107 


11 


199 


421 


390 


682 


219 


137 


37 


105 


10 


186 


384 


375 


620 


196 


137 



2,166 
2,050 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, 
etc., of Employees. 







i 








s 




"5 


n 


S 










a 


il 






OS 




OS 


il 


>> a 










o 




•d 


>> 


Services. 
1954-1955, 


>> 


CO 

^5 a 


T5 

0) 


t5 


.s 




li 


1 


a 


03 
3 
O 
OS 
•-s 




3 

a 
o 

i-s 


So 


•3 a s. 

B O « 


3 

'53 


o 

Q. 
0, 


u 


« 


H 


H 


p 


tf 




H 


H 


rt 


< 






1 


?, 






11 


Central Office. . . 


10 


o 








2 


4 




3 






137 


Automotive 


137 


6 






3 


3 


10 


1 


1 




1 


199 


Bridge 


186 




2 




1 


7 


33 


4 


2 




3 


390 


Highway 


375 


8 


12 




13 


11 


45 




8 


2 


7 


682 


Sanitary 


620 


3 


6 




1 


?. 


19 


1 

o 


7 


1 


3 


219 
*35 




196 
37 


1 

4 


4 




.S 








1 


6 
36 




1 

1 


2 


1 

7 


107 
421 


Tunnel 


105 
384 


1 
1 






6 


a 


Water 


1 


2 


10 








31 


153 


9 


25 


5 


22 


2201 


Totals 


2050 


26 


25 


4 


39 









* May 1, 1954. 



12 City Document No. 18. 

maintenance appropriations and expenditures. 





Total Appropriations, 






Division or Sbevicb. 


Including 
Tranafera and Amounts 
Carried Over from 1953. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office . . . . 


$61,903 68 


$61,903 68 


$0 00 


Automotive Division 




688,667 17 


686,205 66 


2,461 51 


Bridge Division 




782,403 00 


771,737 87 


10,665 13 


Highway Division 






1,382,138 29 


1,381,887 79 


250 50 


Lighting Service 






1,341,372 80 


1,343,672 70 


00 


Sanitary Division 






4,932,536 12 


4,868,819 48 


63,716 64 


Sewer Division 






841,664 92 


826,479 69 


15,185 23 


Sumner Tunnel 






606,090 63 


599,052 25 


7,038 38 


Survey Division* 






112,199 30 


112,199 30 


00 


Water Division 






2,391,610 00 


2,323,072 10 


68,537 90 


Totals . . . . 


$13,140,585 91 


$12,975,030 52 


$164,855 29 



* From May 1. 



LOANS AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Title. 



Total Amount 
Available. 



Expenditures. 



Unexpended 
Balance. 



Bridges, Construction of (Revenue) 

Bridges, Construction of (Non- Revenue) 

Bridges, Repairs, etc. (Revenue) 

Reconstruction of Streets (Revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction (Revenue) 

Street Signs (Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 

Snow Removal (Revenue) 

Sewerage Works (Revenue) 

Sewerage Works (Non-Revenue) 

Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings Thereof (Non-Revenue) 

Incinerator Building, Construction and Equipping (Non- 
Revenue) 

Extension and Improvement of Water Mains (Revenue) 
Totals 



$318,536 59 

4,089,630 07 

384,683 50 

100,123 66 

130,397 21 

22,634 27 

157,000 00 

3,788,345 90 

529,423 73 

10,762 32 

873,940 86 

11,900 44 

1,200,000 00 
200,000 00 



«43,000 00 

1,985,723 69 

291,667 70 

42,994 45 

89,973 07 

21,199 99 

147,856 56 

2,081,107 46 

471,591 97 

7,818 03 

625,508 01 

3,239 35 

0,000 00 
116,888 04 



$275,536 59 

2,103,906 38 

93,015 80 

57,129 21 

40,424 14 

1,434 28 

9,143 44 

1,707,238 44 

57,831 76 

2,944 29 

248,432 85 

8,661 09 

1,200,000 00 
83,111 96 



$11,817,378 55 



$5,928,568 32 



$5,888,810 23 



Public Woeks Department. 



13 



REVENUE. 
On Account of Public Works Department. 



Central Office: 
Charges for plans and specifications 

Automotive Division: 
Sale of junk 



Bridge Service: 
Rents . . . . 
Damage to property 
Refund on drums 
Miscellaneous . 
Sale of junk 



Sumner Tunnel: 
Tolls . 



Lighting Service: 
Sale of junk 



$1,864 00 



$274 53 



$3,902 50 

8,245 61 

108 50 

584 00 

255 16 



$2,224,195 00 



$2,558 19 



Paving Service: 

From assessments (added to taxes) on 
abutters for cost of laying sidewalks 
in front of their premises . 

Permits 

Sale of materials 

Contributions from Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under chapter 90 of 
General Laws for construction of 
public ways 



Sanitary Division: 
Sale of garbage . 
Sale of junk 
Dumping . 



Sewer Division: 
Disposal of sewage 
Entrance fees . 
Rents . 
Refunds 
Miscellaneous . 



Water Division: 
Water rates 

Water rates added to taxes 
Service pipes for new takers, extending 

repairing, etc. 
Fees on overdue rates 
Sale of junk 
Damage to property 
Labor and materials 
Deposit account 

Elevator and fire pipe connections 
Miscellaneous income 



Grand total 




$4,430 38 

23,146 05 

1,191 97 



256,666 66 



$13,230 71 

29 59 

483 61 



$19,233 00 

13,518 46 

229 00 

438 55 

327 43 



$5,621,332 81 
284,478 02 

1,300 27 

6 60 

1,134 32 

1,579 88 

11,502 03 

81,104 51 

731 93 

500 61 



$1,864 00 
274 53 

13,095 77 

2,224,195 00 

2,558 19 



285,335 06 



13,743 91 



33,746 44 



6,003,670 98 

$8,578,483 88 



14 City Document No. 18. 

APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION FOR 
THE YEAR 1954. 



Boston, January 3, 1955. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I am submitting herewith the annual report of the 
Automotive Division of the Pubhc Works Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1954. This report 
covers the activities of the four garages and the offices of 
the Automotive Division, and the activities of the Mobile 
Patrol and the Motor Pool. 

The one hundred and twenty-seven employees charged 
to the Automotive Division are engaged in the following 
duties: One division engineer in charge of the division; 
ten employees assigned to office work; forty-seven 
employees assigned to repair and maintenance of auto- 
motive equipment, also twelve employees paid from the 
Water Division appropriation are assigned to this work; 
twenty-seven employees assigned to gasoline and oil 
dispensing, cleaning and watchman duties, etc.; thirty- 
nine men assigned to the Mobile Guard section; and 
three employees assigned to the Motor Pool. 

The office maintained by the Automotive Division 
at City Hall processed 2,332 requisitions in 1954, of 
which 1,240 were service orders, and 1,092 were purchase 
orders. Approximately 100 purchases a month, usually 
under $3 each, were made from a petty cash fund of 
$300. The City Hall office reports the following ex- 
penditures for 1954: 



Group 1. Personal services . 

Group 2. Contractual services 

Group 3. Materials and supplies . 

Group 4. Rents and registration fees 

Group 5. Purchase of new equipment 



$436,306 50 

50,274 65 

156,694 88 

12,372 79 

30,556 84 

$686,205 66 



Public Works Department. 



15 



The new equipment added to our fleet in 1954 con- 
sisted of the following: 

One Barber-Greene belt and bucket loader. 
One Ford utility truck. 

One Chevrolet truck with catch-basin cleaner. 
One Trojan front bucket loader. 

Replacements to the fleet in 1954 consisted of the 
following: 

One Buick sedan. 

Thirteen Ford sedans. 

Two Chevrolet sedans. 

Two Elgin sweepers. 

Two Wayne sweepers. 

Nine Ford pickup trucks. 

Two Chevrolet pickup trucks. 

Four Ford l|-ton dump trucks. 

Three Chevrolet covered express trucks. 

One Ford truck with Ingersoll-Rand compressor. 

One Ford truck to carry Gyro air compressor. 

Two Ford utility trucks. 

One Ford hydrant truck. 

The number of each type of automotive equipment in 
the Public Works Department as of December 31, 1954, 
was as follows: 



Passenger cars . 










68 


Trucks, |-ton 










67 


Trucks, 1- to l|-ton 










99 


Trucks, 2- to 3-ton 










88 


Trucks, 5- to 8-ton 










8 


Compressors 










12 


Trailer compressors 










2 


Crawler tractors 










2 


Street flushers . 










6 


Sidewalk rollers 










11 


Street sweepers . 










24 


Snow fighters 










37 


Snow loaders and bucket loaders 






7 


Front bucket loaders 






18 


Miscellaneous equipment 






47 


(trailers, lighting plants, generators, steam 


cleaners, lawn mowers, etc.) 


Total . 










496 



16 City Document No. 18. 

The repair shop performed about 100 overhaul jobs, 
1,000 major repair, and 12,000 minor repair jobs. 

Semiannual inspections are held, and a monthly 
lubrication schedule is maintained at which time in- 
spection of equipment is made. The repair and main- 
tenance crew was kept busy during the two hurricanes 
in 1954, and some of the equipment, especially the 
Trojan front bucket loaders, proved of great value. The 
Trojans were used in pairs to pick up debris, and the 
Walter snow fighters were put to use pulling stumps. 
The lack of a self-propelled crane for this type of 
emergency work became evident. Once again the 
lighting plants proved their worth in an occasion of 
this sort. 

During 1954 we completed the transfer of our Baugh- 
man sand spreaders from the Dodge and Ford 1^-ton 
trucks to new Ford F750 trucks (the equivalent of a 
2f-ton truck) which are better for a spreading and plow- 
ing operation. We have set up a heavy equipment 
group of repairmen who work during the winter months 
on snow fighters and Trojans, and then repair the 
street sweepers and flushers during the summer months. 

The welding shop employees continued the policy 
of scraping and painting the snow fighters and sand 
spreaders during the summer months. 

The Mobile Guard section operated satisfactorily 
during 1954 and the Motor Pool section expanded its 
services to the other city departments. The Motor 
Pool section now consists of one dispatcher, and nine 
drivers (two from the Automotive Division), and all 
of the latter are assigned to city-owned cars. Seven of 
these drivers are assigned to the commissioner and divi- 
sion heads of the Public Works Department, and report 
to the dispatcher, usually around 11 a.m. daily, after 
having discharged their duties for the individual to 
whom they have been assigned. 

Upon reporting, they are sent out on assignments 
which have been requested by those in authority either 
by telephone or by radio. When their specific tasks 
have been completed, they contact the base by radio to 
ascertain if additional requests have been made. All of 
these cars are equipped with two-way radios. The dis- 
patcher makes all assignments to the drivers, and also 
operates the base radio which is located at 174 West 
Second street, South Boston. Within the Pubhc Works 
Department there are 41 cars equipped with two-way 



Public Works Department. 17 

radios, and these cars were put to good use during the 
hurricanes when the pubhc communications systems 
broke down. 

The Motor Pool assignments outside the PubHc 
Works Department consist of the following: 

Welfare Department, conveying patients to Tewksbury 
and Long Island. 

Purchasing Department, conveying inspectors to sources 
of supplies. 

Public Library, checking mobile library units. 

Election Department, conveying voting machine inspectors, 
and work on election days. 

Assessing Department, Printing Department, Public Cele- 
brations, Mayor's Office, various assignments. 

The Mobile Guard section is assigned four motor 
vehicles, of which two are equipped with two-way 
radios. The mobile guards assigned to various shifts, 
4 P.M. to 12 midnight, and 12 midnight to 8 a.m., have 
the duty of making several tours of duty in each eight- 
hour shift to various locations in different parts of the 
city. To facilitate and to more expeditiously perform 
this work, the city is divided into three specific routes. 
The guards inspect all yards and ring watchclocks. 
They also patrol dumps, protect bridges in emergencies, 
and check oil burners, etc. The watchmen, also on 
different shifts, are permanently assigned to locations 
where experience has shown that it is advisable to have 
a man present at all times to protect city property. 

Respectfull}^ submitted, 

J. Leo McGrath, Division Engineer. 



18 



City Document No. 18. 



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Public Works Department. 19 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION. 



Boston, January 3, 1955. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Submitted herewith is the annual report of the Bridge 
Division, covering the income, expenditures, and oper- 
ation of the Bridge Service and the Sumner Tunnel for 
the year ending December 31, 1954. 

Prior to June 2, 1954, these two services comprised 
the Bridge Section of the former Bridge and Highway 
Division, which was abolished on that date with the 
establishment of the Bridge Division and Highway 
Division as separate divisions. 



Respectfully, 



John J. McCall, 
Division Engineer. 



20 



City Document No. 18. 



1. BRIDGE SERVICE. 

Summary of Budget Appropriations and Expenditures. 





Regular 
Appropriation 


Bridges, 
Repairs, Etc. 


Bridges, Construction of 




Revenue. 


Non-Revenue. 




$782,403 00 


$284,683 50 
200,000 00 


$161,536 59 
157,000 00 


$2,089,630 07 


1954 Appropriation 


2.000,000 00 


Total Credits 


$782,403 00 
771.737 87 


$484,683 50 
100,000 00 


$318,536 59 
43,000 00 


$4,089,630 07 










Expenditures 


$384,683 50 
291,667 70 


1,985,723 69 


Unexpended Balance 


$10,665 13 


$93,015 80 


$275,536 59 


$2,103,906 38 



Details of Expenditures on Tidewater Bridges. 

TIDEWATER BRIDGES — 1954. 



Bridge. 


Draw- 
tenders' 
Salaries. 


Mechanics' 
Wages. 


Material. 


Repair 
Bills. 


Supplies, 

Utilities, 

Etc. 


Total. 




$17,561 40 
72,455 90 
36,260 10 
48,286 95 
44,925 71 
16,538 70 
40,622 33 
50,882 72 
50,826 16 
44,216 36 
33,346 15 
17,170 40 


$3,305 07 

9,717 10 

2.083 46 

3.038 69 

5.229 56 

5.698 53 

5,850 92 

6,221 86 

5,544 78 

13,696 73 

10,599 84 

512 50 


$44 82 SS.'i Sfi 


$357 41 
967 55 
489 81 
738 56 
873 72 
360 72 
609 56 
813 20 

2,793 66 
794 30 
613 15 

1,262 49 


$21,352 56 
87,406 25 
39.675 34 
52.497 17 
52.535 20 
24.441 77 
47,989 57 
59,467 13 
61.623 35 
65,683 43 
48.177 04 
19,129 19 


Charlestown 


1,248 64 
244 39 
177 46 
449 86 

1,051 54 
563 29 
870 98 
640 22 

5,498 30 

2,301 47 


3,017 06 

597 58 

255 51 

1.056 35 

792 28 

343 47 

678 37 

1,818 53 

1.477 74 

1,316 43 

183 80 


Chelsea South 


Chelsea Street 

Congress Street 

Dover Street 


L Street 


Maiden 

Northern Avenue 

Summer Street 


Andrew P. McArdle 


Totals 


$473,092 88 


$71,499 04 


$13,090 97 


$11,620 98 


$10,674 13 


$579,978 00 



















Public Works Department. 21 

2. Special Appropriations: 

Bridges, Repairs, Etc. 

Contracts. 
Various Footbridges. 

Repairs and cleaning, etc., Charles A. 

Reynolds Company 

Charlestown Bridge Storehouses. 

Bituminous concrete pavements, John A. 

McCourt Company 

Babson Street and Dana Avenue Bridges. 
Redecking of bridges, Martin J. Kelly Com- 
pany, Inc 

Milton Bridge. 

Rebuilding upstream sidewalk over Ne- 
ponset River, Charles Callahan Com- 
pany 

West Fourth Street Bridge. 

Bituminous concrete pavement. Baker 

Company 

Winthrop Bridge. 

Repairs to bridge between Boston and 
Winthrop, Boston's share 60 per cent, 
John F. Shea Company, Inc. . 
Everett Bridge. 

Redecking of bridge, Martin J. Kelly 

Company, Inc 

Northern Avenue Bridge. 

Repairs to bridge, over Fort Point Channel, 
Rev-Lyn Contracting Company 
Maiden Bridge. 

Repairs to bridge over the Mystic River, 
Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc. 
Navigation Lights on Various Bridges. 

Renew and repair lights on bridges, W. H. 
Hughes Electric Service .... 
Summer Street Bridge. 

Repairs to drawbridge and foundation, 
the Crandall Engineering Company 
Chelsea Street Viaduct. 

Remove wearing surface, Rufo Construc- 
tion Company, Inc 

Maiden Bridge. 

Underwater inspection No. 1 by Nick 

Tracy 

Summer Street Bridge. (Reserved Channel.) 
Wash borings, etc.. Marine Diving and 

Ship Service 

Summer Street Bridge. 

Underwater inspection No. 2 by Nick 
Tracy 



1954 
Payments. 


$6,301 07 


428 10 


2,725 47 


8,0^0 79 


479 96 


3,749 92 


30,732 11 


136,850 10 


16,665 41 


1,432 00 


23,000 00 


2,446 00 


2,786 52 


1,622 55 


4,683 60 



22 City Document No. 18. 

Northern Avenue Bridge. 

Repairs to electric wiring, W. H. Hughes 

Electric Service $1,047 59 

Charlestown Bridge. 

Inspection of structural steel work, the 

Carney Construction Company . . 4,795 00 

Southampton Street and Cummins Highway 
Bridges. 

Redecking of bridges, Martin J. Kelly 

Company, Inc 20,160 43 

Maiden Bridge. 

Steel repairs on the bridge, Owen J. McGar- 

rahan Company 8,134 27 

(2) Highway and (1) Footbridge. 

Cleaning and pamting, H. Piken Com- 
pany 6,800 00 

Service Orders. 

Charged to Bridge, Repairs, etc., repairs to 

various bridges 8,608 81 

City Record. 

Advertising various contracts . . . 198 00 

Total $291,667 70 

Bridges, Construction of (Revenue) 
West Fourth Street Bridge. 

Concrete deck on Spans 3, 4, and 5, and 
repair sections. Spans 2 and 6, of West 
Fourth Street Bridge, C. J. Maney Com- 
pany, Inc $43,000 00 

Total $43,000 00 

Bridges, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 
Charlestown Bridge. 

Strengthening of the bridge, the Crandall 

Engineering Company .... $69,980 94 

Meridian Street Bridge. 

Engineering services in the construction 
of the bridge, Charles Maguire As- 
sociates 20,000 00 

Andrew P. McArdle Bridge. 

Rebuilding of bridge, formerly known as 
Meridian Street Bridge, American 

Bridge Company 1,718,689 01 

Broadway Bridge. 

Construction of concrete deck on bridge, 

Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc. . . 177,053 74 

Total $1,985,723 69 



Public Works Department. 23 

At the beginning of 1954 the Bridge Division oper- 
ated eleven drawbridges. On August 22, 1954, the new 
bridge at Meridian street, connecting East Boston with 
Chelsea, was officially dedicated as the Andrew P. 
McArdle Bridge and opened to traffic, making a total of 
twelve drawbridges operated by this division. 

The new McArdle Bridge was built under contracts 
awarded by the Massachusetts Department of PubHc 
Works, which agency furnished the field engineering and 
supervision. 

The cost of the new bridge was borne jointly by the 
city and the Commonwealth, under an agreement 
whereby the city paid $2,200,000 toward the total cost, 
which is expected to be $4,660,000. 

Under a related contract with the Charles A. Maguire 
Associates, consulting engineers, the city has paid 
$148,461.64 to that firm for the engineering services 
involved in designing the bridge, making contract plans, 
specifications, estimates, etc., and furnishing engineering 
supervision in the city's interest. Upon acceptance of 
the bridge by the Commonwealth, the city will make a 
final payment to the Maguire firm of $10,368.30. 

On November 26, 1954, the Warren Bridge was per- 
manently closed to all highway traffic and the draw- 
spans pulled off to allow unobstructed passage for marine 
traffic, as a result of the new Central Artery connection 
between Boston Proper and Charlestown being opened 
to two-way traffic. 

However, the Warren Bridge is being maintained in 
operable condition for possible emergency use until 
such time as the Charlestown Bridge has been restored 
to first-class condition by repairing and redecking. 

The Chelsea South Drawbridge is still in operation, 
serving as a highway' connection for minor traffic 
between Chelsea street, Charlestown, and the Mystic 
Docks. It is expected that the laying out and con- 
struction of Terminal street will commence in 1955; 
and upon completion of such work the Chelsea South 
Bridge will be put out of operation. For this reason 
the department is not making any repairs to this struc- 
ture except such emergency maintenance repairs as 
necessary to keep the bridge in operation. In general, 
the bridge is in very poor condition. 

As regards the other drawbridges, the rebuilding of 
the Summer Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel, a 
vitally needed improvement, has been deferred because 



24 City Document No. 18. 

of the apparent necessity for providing a wider waterway 
through the draw to accommodate sugar cargo vessels, 
which will require more extensive planning and addi- 
tional funds. 

The Maiden Bridge (Alford Street Bridge), over the 
Mystic River, which connects Charlestown with Everett, 
is in very poor condition and should be replaced as soon 
as possible by a new bridge. To this end the city has 
filed a bill with the 1955 Legislature, requesting that 
the Commonwealth be authorized to rebuild this bridge. 

The necessity of replacing this bridge as soon as 
possible was made clearly evident in 1954, when a con- 
tract was awarded to cover repairs to the steel decking 
and the steel floor system. After the initial cleaning of 
the main steelwork prior to making repairs, it was dis- 
covered that the main members of the floor system and 
counterweight tower span foundation were so seriously 
defective that the bridge was closed to highway traffic 
on April 7, 1954, and the contract covering the repair 
work was amended to permit much more extensive 
emergency repairs. This work was completed and the 
bridge reopened to trafEc on May 28, 1954. 

A subsequent contract was awarded in order to com- 
plete the minor portion of repairs by welding, etc., that 
could not be accomplished under the first contract 
referred to. 

An underwater inspection of the pile trestle approaches 
and masonry piers of this bridge was made in 1954, and 
the defective conditions found relative to the pile work 
(although not too serious at the present time) further 
stress the need of a new bridge at this location. The 
masonry landing pier for the drawspan was found to 
be in immediate need of repairs by resetting stones 
and pointing the joints; accordingly a contract was 
awarded for that purpose, as described hereinafter. 

The Charlestown Bridge has been in need of extensive 
repairs and redecking for some time and it is expected 
that such work will be commenced in 1955. 

In connection with this proposed work, an extensive 
inspection was made of the main steelwork of the entire 
bridge to determine the extent of repairs necessary. 

On December 18, 1954, the department advertised 
for bids for constructing steel decks on the Congress 
Street and Chelsea Street Bridges. 

An important improvement made in 1954 was the 
redecking of the drawspan of the Northern Avenue 



Public Works Department. 25 

Bridge. Very extensive steel repairs to the main steel- 
work of the floor system were found necessary because 
of the effect of the heavy freight car traffic which passes 
over this bridge. The entire wooden underdeck of the 
drawspan was renewed, using heavier plank, and a new 
wearing surface of asphalt plank installed. 

The mechanical operating plant of this bridge, in- 
cluding air compressors, motors, turning engines, etc., 
is in need of repairs, and it is intended to make a 
study as soon as possible toward the modernization of 
this system. 

A study was begun in 1954 to determine the feasi- 
bility of making solid fill approaches at the Summer 
vStreet Bridge, over Reserved Channel (L Street Bridge), 
to replace the wooden pile trestle structure, which is in 
need of extensive repairs. 

The Dover Street Bridge is also in need of extensive 
repairs and redecking. However, this work has been 
deferred until the location and layout of the new Central 
Artery in that area has been finally determined, in 
order that any work done on the present bridge will 
not be in conflict with the artery construction. 

The rebuilding of three spans of the West Fourth 
Street Bridge (over the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad tracks), which had been demohshed 
by fire late in 1953, was well under way at the beginning 
of the year. 

The work (described hereinafter) was executed under 
an agreement between the city and the New Haven 
Railroad, whereby the railroad company contracted for 
repairs to the masonry piers and erecting new steelwork 
and fences; and the city contracted for the construction 
of the new reinforced concrete deck, wearing surface, 
curbs, sidewalks and street light facilities. Both agencies 
negotiated with the same contractor, C. J. Maney 
Company. 

The work was completed and the bridge reopened to 
traffic on March 8, 1954. The total cost to the city 
was $43,000. 

With regard to the operation of drawbridges, it may 
be said that as time progresses there is less justification 
each year for these bridges operating on a 24-hour-a-day 
basis. This is borne out by the records which will show 
that since 1948 the total number of draw openings re- 
quired has decreased from 31,663 openings in 1948 to 
14,196 openings in 1954. 



26 City Document No. 18. 

In keeping with this trend, the department petitioned 
the U. S. Engineers for permission to restrict operation 
of the Broadway and Dover Street Bridges. This peti- 
tion was approved, and effective as of March 19, 1954, 
these two bridges operate from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, and otherwise only through prior 
notice of 24 hours in advance. 

With a view towards accompHshing the same result 
on other bridges, the department has also requested the 
U. S. Engineers to invite all interested parties to an 
informal discussion on this matter. 



Public Works Department. 



27 



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28 City Document No. 18. 

Major Construction Work and Repairs. 
A description of the major improvements and more 
important work undertaken in 1954 by the Bridge 
Service, is as follows: 

Strengthening the Piers of the Charlestown Bridge, Over 
the Charles River. 

The project of strengthening the masonry pier founda- 
tions of the Charlestown Bridge was completed on April 
12, 1954, under a contract awarded to the Crandall 
Engineering Company. This work was started in 1949 
as a result of the serious conditions discovered in an 
underwater inspection of the pier foundation, made that 
year. 

Under a series of successive contracts with the above- 
named company, all of the masonry pier foundations, 
except piers No. 1 and No. 10, were cofferdammed with 
steel sheeting, and after removing all loose mud, etc., 
from within the cofferdams and the cofferdams tied to 
the piers by means of steel anchor rods, the cofferdams 
were then filled with concrete to a grade of 2 feet above 
mean low water, thus consolidating the original con- 
crete foundations overlaying the wooden support piles. 
The steel cofferdams were left in place and cut off at 
the grade of the new concrete. The total cost of this 
project, which was commenced on August 17, 1949, 
was $826,624.69. 

Construction of Concrete Deck, Etc., on Broadway Bridge j 
Over Fort Point Channel. 
Under a contract which was awarded to Martin J. 
Kelly Company, Inc., in 1952 for this work, the work 
started on March 2, 1953, and was completed on March 
12, 1954, at a total cost of 1598,587.24. 

Repairs to the Winthrop Bridge, Between Boston and 

Winthrop. 
Work under this contract started on July 22, 1953, 
under a contract awarded to the John F. Shea Com- 
pany, Inc., and was completed on January 4, 1954, at a 
total cost to the City of Boston of $3,749.92, which 
represented 60 per cent of the total contract cost of 
$6,249.86. The Town of Winthrop paid $2,499.94, or 
40 per cent as its share of the cost. 



Public Works Department. 29 

Everett Street Bridge — Redecking. 

Under a contract awarded to the Martin J. Kelly 
Company, Inc., this work was commenced on March 15, 
1954, and completed on May 28, 1954. 

Because of the very poor condition of the existing 
wooden deck on this bridge, the bridge was closed to 
traffic, the entire old deck removed, and a new deck of 
heavier underplank and asphalt plank wearing surface 
installed, at a total cost to the city of $30,732.11. 

During this work the steel superstructure of the 
bridge, which is owned and maintained by the railroad 
company, was repaired by that company. 

West Fourth Street Bridge — Constructing New Reinforced 

Concrete Deck on Spans 3, 4, and 5, and Repairing 

Sections of Spans 2 and 6. 

As a result of the fire wiiich destroyed three spans of 

this bridge, as referred to elsewhere in this report, the 

city negotiated a contract with C. J. Maney Company, 

Inc., for constructing a new reinforced concrete deck 

on the steelwork which was erected by the railroad 

company. 

The work under the City of Boston contract com- 
menced on February 15, 1954, and was completed on 
March 9, 1954, at a total cost to the city of $43,000. 

Making Emergency Repairs to the Drawspan of the 
Summer Street Bridge, Over Fort Point Channel. 

As a result of the damage caused to the main girders 
and the track structure of the downstream drawspan of 
this bridge, it was necessary to negotiate an emergency 
contract for making the necessary repairs and putting 
the span back into operation. 

Under a contract negotiated with the Crandall En- 
gineering Company, work was started on March 29, 
1954, and completed on May 7, 1954, at a total cost of 
$23,000. 

Renewing and Repairing Navigation Lights. 
Under a contract awarded to the W. H. Hughes Elec- 
tric Service, the navigation lights on the following 
bridges were repaired and put in good operating condi- 
tion: 



30 City Document No. 18. 

Charlestown Bridge, over Charles River. 
Chelsea South Bridge, over Mystic River. 
Chelsea Street Bridge, over Chelsea Creek. 
Summer Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel. 
Northern Avenue Bridge, over Fort Point Channel. 
Congress Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel. 

Work commenced May 10, 1954, and was completed 
May 17, 1954, at a total cost of $1,432. 

Removing Wearing Surface, Chelsea Bridge Viaduct. 

In connection with the removal of the old Chelsea 
Viaduct connecting Chelsea South Drawbridge with 
the former Chelsea North Drawbridge, it was necessary 
for the city to award a contract for the removal of the 
roadway pavement on this structure. Such a contract 
was awarded to the Rufo Construction Company, Inc., 
who completed the work on June 9, 1954, at a cost of 
$2,446. The main structure was removed by the railroad 
company, which owned the entire structure except for 
the pavement, which was maintained by the city. 

Repairs to Maiden Bridge, Over Mystic River. 

A contract for repairing the steelwork of the Maiden 
Bridge was awarded to the Martin J. Kelly Company, 
Inc., under which work started on March 8, 1954. 

The work consisted of typical repairs to the steel 
floor system and decking of the drawspan and tower 
span. 

As the work progressed, the very serious condition of 
the steel work, as referred to elsewhere in this report, 
necessitated amending the contract to permit much more 
extensive repairs; the total cost not to exceed $68,000. 

After closing the bridge to traffic in order to expedite 
the repair work, work was completed on June 22, 1954. 

Steel Repairs, Maiden Bridge, Over Mystic River. 

Because of the necessity of making further repairs to 
the steelwork of this bridge a contract was awarded to 
Owen J. McGarrahan Company for completing such 
repairs as could not be accomplished under the previous 
contract, referred to above. 

Work under this contract started on July 8, 1954, 
and was completed September 24, 1954, at a total cost 
of $8,134.27. 



Public Works Department. 31 

Wash Boritigs, Summer Street Bridge, Over Reserved 
Channel. 

In connection with the study being made as to the 
feasibihty of constructing soHd fill approaches at this 
bridge to replace the pile trestle construction, a contract 
was awarded to the Marine Diving and Ships Service 
Company for making wash borings along the site of the 
existing approaches. 

This work was commenced on June 1, 1954, and com- 
pleted on June 18, 1954, at a cost of $1,622.55. 

Repairs to Electric Wiring, Northern Avenue Bridge, Over 
Fort Point Channel. 
Under a contract awarded in the amount of $1,047.59 
to the W. H. Hughes Electric Service, certain electrical 
wiring on this bridge pertaining to the operating con- 
trols and Hghting facilities was repaired. Work started 
on June 24 and was completed on July 1. 

Underwater Inspection, Maiden Bridge. 
In order to determine the extent of defective condi- 
tions of the masonry piers and pile trestle approaches 
of this bridge, a contract was awarded to Nick Tracy, 
diver, to make an underwater inspection of these struc- 
tures and file a report. This work was commenced on 
June 1, 1954 and completed on July 1, 1954, at a total 
cost of $2,786.52. 

Making an Inspection of the Structural Steelwork of the 
Charlestown Bridge, Over Charles River. 
Preparatory to drawing up plans and specifications 
for a major repair and redecking project at this bridge, 
a contract was awarded to the Carney Construction 
Company, Inc., to make a comprehensive inspection 
of the existing steelwork throughout the entire bridge. 
Work under this contract commenced June 7, 1954, 
and was completed August 31, 1954, at a total cost of 
$4,795. 

Underwater Inspection, Summer Street Bridge, Over 
Fort Point Channel. 
A contract was awarded to Nick Tracy, diver, to 
make an underwater inspection of the masonry piers 



32 City Document No. 18. 

and draw foundation of this bridge. Work commenced 
June 1, 1954, and was completed September 1, 1954, at 
a total cost of $4,685.60. 

Cleaning and Painting Two Highway Bridges and a 

Footbridge. 
Under a contract awarded to H. Piken & Co., the 
Allston Bridge, over the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
the Charlesgate West Bridge, over Ipswich street, and 
the Gove Street Footbridge, were cleaned and painted 
at a total cost of $6,800. The work began August 20, 
1954, and was completed October 25, 1954. 

Northern Avenue Bridge — Repairs. 
Under a contract awarded to the Rev-Lyn Contract- 
ing Company, the entire drawspan of the Northern 
Avenue Bridge was stripped of the old decking; major 
repairs made to the main steelwork; and the draw re- 
decked with heavier underplank throughout and an 
asphalt plank wearing surface placed. The steelwork of 
the bridge was also cleaned and painted and the side 
roadways of the approach spans were resurfaced with 
bituminous concrete. The total cost of this work was 
$137,261.35. Work began March 15, 1954, and was 
completed October 27, 1954. 

Redecking the Southampton Street Bridge and the Cummins 

Highway Bridge, Over the New York, New Haven S: 

Hartford Railroad. 

A contract was awarded to Martin J. Kelly Company, 

Inc., for removing the old decking on these two bridges 

and replacing with new underplank throughout, and 

asphalt plank wearing surfaces. The main steelwork on 

both bridges, which are maintained by the railroad 

company, was repaired by said company. The work 

commenced September 7, 1954, and was completed 

November 10, 1954, at a total cost of $23,943.15. 

Masonry Repairs to Maiden Bridge Piers and 
Abutments. 
As a result of the findings made in the underwater 
inspection of this bridge, referred to hereinbefore, a 
contract was awarded to M. Solimando for repairing 
the masonry piers of this bridge by resetting the stones 
and pointing the joints. The major portion of the work 



Public Works Department. 33 

was confined to the landing pier for the drawspan. 
Work commenced December 7, 1954, and is expected to 
be completed early in January, 1955. The total es- 
timated cost is $5,000. 

Roof Repairs to the Office and Storage Building, 8 Atkinson 

Street, Boston; the Charlestown Bridge Draw House, 

and the Northern Avenue Bridge Draw House. 

Under a contract awarded to the John F. Shea 

Company, Inc., in the amount of $2,030, the work of 

repairing the roofs of the above-named structures was 

commenced on October 18, 1954, and is expected to be 

completed early in 1955. 

Yard Forces. 

Throughout the year the maintenance force of the 
Bridge Service made typical emergency and routine 
repairs to bridge roadway decking, sidewalks, fender 
piers, retractile bridge tracks, stairways, railings and 
pertinent facilities. 

Other work included erecting and repairing barricades 
at snow dumps, dead end locations, painting of roadway 
gates, fences, machinery houses and barricades; re- 
moving and replacing counterweight elements on bascule 
bridges; and cleaning bridge sidewalks and stairways 
of ice and snow. 

Minor repairs to the various mechanical and electrical 
faciHties of the drawbridges were made by the main- 
tenance mechanics and electrician. 



Work Done for Other Divisions by the Bridge 

Division. 



Sanitary Division. 
Repairs to the Albany Street Disposal Station. 
Specifications were prepared by this division for 
making repairs to the above-named disposal station, and 
a contract was awarded to John F. Shea Company, 
Inc., under which work commenced on March 1, 1954, 
and was completed August 26, 1954, at a total cost of 
$8,442.46. The work consisted of repairing defective 



34 City Document No. 18. 

piles and bracing and the steel work pertinent to the 
dumping area of the station. Field engineering and 
inspection were furnished by this division. 

Dredging at the Albany Street Disposal Station. 
Under a contract awarded to the McKie Lighter 
Company for dredging the slip and adjacent channel 
area of the Albany Street Disposal Station, work started 
July 20, 1954, and was completed July 26, 1954, at a 
total cost of $1,984.67. The Bridge Division drew up 
the specifications and furnished the supervision for this 
work. 

Repairs to the Waling and Cross Bracing of the Fort Hill 
Disposal Station. 
Under the specifications drawn up by this division, 
a contract was awarded to the W. H. Ellis & Son Com- 
pany for making repairs to the pile work and fenders 
at the slips of the above-named station. Work began 
November 15, 1954, and was completed December 9, 
1954, at a total cost of $2,439.55. Field supervision was 
furnished by this division. 

Repairs to Wharf at Spectacle Island, Boston Harbor. 
In order to make necessary repairs to the wharf 
structure at Spectacle Island, where the disposal scows 
are tied up during unloading, a contract was awarded 
to the Rev-Lyn Contracting Company, under which 
work started December 7, 1954, and was completed 
December 19, 1954, at a total cost of $8,004.73. This 
division drew up the specifications and furnished field 
supervision. 

II. Sumner Tunnel. 

The Sumner Tunnel has just completed its most suc- 
cessful year since it was opened in 1934. The total 
traffic for the past year 1954 was 11,080,966 vehicles, 
which was an increase of 245,292 over 1953. The total 
revenue was $2,222,700.80. The record highest single 
day traffic for a 24-hour period was 35,800 vehicles on 
June 18, 1954; and the record highest hour ever recorded 
happened on May 12, 1954, between the hours of 4 p.m. 
and 5 p.m., when 2,692 cars passed through the tunnel. 

Upon the opening of the Central Artery between the 
Boston end of the tunnel and the Mystic Bridge and 



Public Works Department. 35 

Storrow Drive connection, the flow of traffic through 
the tunnel to Boston has been expedited and should in 
time permit even a greater increase in the volume of 
traffic through the tunnel. 

The tunnel plant, in general, is in good operating 
condition. Some anticipated repairs have been planned 
for the Boston ventilation building, the power trans- 
former platforms, and also to the invert of the tunnel 
fresh air duct. Repairs have been made to granite 
block roadway pavement during the past year, and 
further repairs will be made during the year 1955. 

All electrical and mechanical equipment throughout 
the plant is in very good condition, including all power 
transformers, circuit breakers, relays, motors, fans, tele- 
phones, and toll equipment. All equipment is under a 
daily routine inspection, and any required repairs or 
adjustments are made as needed. 

Contracts Awarded in 1954. 
1. Granite Block Roadway Repairs in Tunnel. 
During the past year, repairs were made to the tunnel 
roadway under a contract with D. Rufo Company, 
whereby 1,499 j^ards of granite block were removed and 
relaid at a cost of $20,595.91. This work started on 
April 20, 1954, and was completed on June 5, 1954. 

2. Cleaning Fresh Air, and Exhaust Air Duds, and 
Exhaust Fan Rooms in Ventilation Buildings. 
Every year the exhaust air duct and the exhaust fan 
rooms are cleaned, and all dust accumulations are re- 
moved from these areas. The fresh air duct is cleaned 
every other year. This arrangement insures a very 
efficient operating ventilation system. The 1954 con- 
tract for this work was awarded to the L. M. Mercer 
& Sons Co. The work started October 12, 1954 and 
completed December 20, 1954. Total cost, $2,395. 

2. Cleaning the Surface Drainage System. 
After the winter season, there is always a large accu- 
mulation of sand, dirt, etc., carried into the tunnel by 
vehicles, which falls on the plazas and roadway, and 
finds its way into the surface drainage system, and which 
is removed annually under contract. The contract for 
the year 1954 was awarded to the Albany Contracting 



36 City Document No. 18. 

Company, at a cost of $1,631, Work commenced De- 
cember 2, 1954. Work completed December 15, 1954. 

4. Waterproofing Exterior Walls and Installing a New 
Tar and Gravel Roof at the East Boston Ventilation 
Building of the Sumner Tunnel. 

The porous condition of the masonry of this building 
has required that the exterior walls be pointed and 
waterproofed; and the installing of a new tar and gravel 
roof, with new bents and flashings, etc. The contract 
for this work was awarded to the Patrick Ross Company 
at a bid price of $6,592.50. 

The work was commenced on April 15, 1954, and 
completed on December 21, 1954. 

5. Installing A New Lighting System in Exhaust Air 

Duct of the Sumner Tunnel. 

A permanent lighting system has been installed in 
the exhaust air duct of the tunnel. This new lighting 
system will facilitate working in this area for the in- 
spection and cleaning of this duct. The contract was 
awarded to John J. Finn Company at a bid price of 
$2,746. 

The work was commenced on February 8, 1954, and 
completed on February 19, 1954. 

To insure the efficient operation of the drainage and 
pumping system of the tunnel it is necessary to remove 
all mud, sand, etc., from the 72 drop inlets, 2 sand 
traps, and the 6-inch connecting pipe. This work was 
performed under a service order issued after receiving 
invitation bids, by Arthur H. Collins, at a cost of $660. 

Work was commenced on May 19, 1954, and com- 
pleted June 19, 1954. 



Public Works Department. 37 

1954 BUDGET SUMMARY. 

Credits: 

Regular appropriation, 1954 .... $553,765 00 

Balance from previous year .... 16,591 87 

Pensions 35,733 76 



Total credits $606,090 63 

Debits: 

Expenditures, 1954 $559,393 31 

Balance to next year 3,925 18 

Pensions 35,733 76 



Total debits $599,052 25 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1954 . $7,038 38 



SUMMARY OF 1954 TRAFFIC BY CLASSIFICATION. 

No. of 
Class. Toll. Description, Vehicles. 

1. $0 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacity. 

Tractor without trailer 472,100 

2. 20 Passenger car 10,323,991 

3. 20 Motorcycle 3,346 

4. 25 Truck over 2 tons and up to 5 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 5 tons 

capacity 58,014 

5. 20 Passenger car with trailer 15,167 

6. 35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity 

Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 10 

tons capacity 17,349 

7. 20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons 

capacity 2,972 

8. 1 00 Truck over 10 tons capacity .... 4,516 

9. 35 Bus with or without passengers .... 1,405 
*City Owned tl82,106 

Total traffic 11,080,966 

* M.T.A. and Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses included in this classification. 
t 6,531 M.T.A. and 83,372 Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses at 35 cents included 
in this total. 



38 



City Document No. 18. 



COMPARATIVE 5-YEAR SUMMARY OF OPERATION, FROM 
1950 TO 1954, INCLUSIVE. 





1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


Vehicular Traffic: 












Total number vehicles 


9,283,700 


9,466,660 


9,583,972 


10.835,674 


11.080.& 




773,641 


788,883 


798,664 


902,973 


923,4 


Weekly average 


178,045 


182,051 


184.307 


208,378 


212,5 


Daily average 


25.435 


25,936 


26,186 


29,686 


30,3 


Power Consumption: 














4,331,103 


4,196,904 


4,582,488 


4,966,604 


4,527,3 






Financial Results: 












Operating expenditure 


8462,975 30 


$479,198 19 


$541,705 30 


$591,327 09 


$595,127 


Balance to next year 


11,547 11 


13.135 89 


24,679 45 


16.591 87 


3,925 


Interest requirements 


832,453 75 


763,654 61 


683,105 13 


687.494 39 


740,213 




92 20 


721 95 


65 25 


440 60 


122 






Total Expenses 


$1,297,068 36 


$1,256,710 64 


$1,249,555 13 


$1,295,853 95 


$1,339,388 


Receipts 


$1,863,035 00 


$1,913,356 12 


$1,932,619 83 


$2,172,410 00 


$2,224,195 


Balance from previous year . 


— 


1,547 11 


13,135 89 


24,679 45 


16,591 


Total Receipts 


$1,863,035 00 


$1,914,903 23 


$1,945,755 72 


$2,197,089 45 


$2,240,786 


Net Result 


$565,966 64 
(Excess) 


$658,192 59 
(Excess) 


$696,200 69 
(Excess) 


$901,235 50 
(Excess) 


$901,398 




(Excess) 



Public Works Department. 39 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE HIGHWAY DIVISION. 

Boston, January 3, 1955. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

The following report of the income, expenditures, and 
operation of the Highway Division of the Public Works 
Department is hereby submitted for the year ending 
December 31, 1954. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTHFORD J. KeLLEY, 

Division Engineer, Highway Division. 



40 



City Document No. 18. 



HIGHWAY DIVISION. 



Paving Service. 
Summary of Budget Appropriations. 



Appropriation. 



Total Credits. 



Expenditures. 



Balance 
Unexpended. 



Paving Service 

Reconstruction of 

Streets 

Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Revenue). . . . 

Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Non-Reve- 
nue) 

Sidewalks, Construction 
and Reconstruction of 

Street Signs 

Snow Removal 



51,382,138 29 

100,123 66 

157,000 00 

3,788,345 90 

130,397 21 

22,634 27 

529,423 73 



51,381,887 79 

42,994 45 

147,856 56 

2,081,107 46 

89,973 07 

21,199 99 

471,591 97 



$250 50 

57,129 21 

9,143 44 

1,707,238 44 

40,424 14 

1,434 28 

57,831 76 



In the Permit Office, $80,321.05 was taken in; of this 
amount $19,399.30 was deposited with the City Col- 
lector for permit fees received, $57,370 was deposited 
with the City Collector for the Street Openings Account, 
and $3,551.75 was billed to the Public Service Corpora- 
tions. 

Under classes No. 1 and No. 2 of the schedule of 
permit fees, permits were issued for openings in public 
ways as follows: 



City Departments .... 

Public Service Corporations (Class 1) 
Public Service Corporations (Class 2) 
Public Service Corporations (Class 3) 
Public Service Corporations (Class 9) 



1,541 

1,855 

2,096 

3 

12 



5,507 



Under classes No. 1 to No. 9 of the schedule of permit 
fees, permits were issued for openings and occupation 
in public ways as follows: 



Public Works Department. 41 



Class 1. 


Permits for street openings 


943 


Class 3. 


Occupation permits for painting, 


re- 




pairs to buildings, etc. 


2,251 


Class 5. 


Erecting and repairing awnings 


32 


Class 7. 


Erecting and repairing signs 


167 


Class 8. 


Raising and lowering machinery 


59 


Class 9. 


Special permits .... 


684 



4,136 
Total permits issued 9,643 

There are now on file 2,238 bonds protecting the City 
of Boston against claims that may be made on account 
of permits issued. 

In September of 1953, we initiated a policy of requiring 
a deposit from applicants for new water services, an 
amount sufficient to guarantee the cost of restoration of 
pavements and sidewalks which had not been done 
previously. During 1954 we took in almost $50,000 on 
water openings, and increased substantially the amount 
taken in, in drain deposits. All old deposits from 1946 
to 1953 were completed by effecting the necessary re- 
pairs and refunding any balance due to the depositors. 
Also, during 1954, we checked all outstanding corpora- 
tion cuts, and have readied for the patch-paving con- 
tractors the orders to repair said cuts. 

With the completion of this work, all the records and 
work of the Permit Section, outstanding in previous 
administrations, have been taken care of. We have 
been successful in requiring the repairs of many thou- 
sands of dollars worth of sidewalks broken by builders 
and others, and bonding companies have been forced 
to make some of these repairs. The Permit and En- 
croachment Section of the Highway Division are operat- 
ing on a self-supporting basis, and making a substantial 
return to the treasury of the City of Boston. 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were em- 
ployed as usual in the maintenance of public streets, 
resurfacing and patching macadam pavements, patching 
permanent pavements, such as asphalt and granite 
block, and maintaining gravel, brick, and artificial stone 
sidewalks. 

In the snow removal season, division forces were 
employed in spreading rock salt and sand on icy streets 
and also supervised plowing work throughout the city 
by 250 contractors' hired plows after snowstorms. 



42 City Document No. 18. 

All snow removal bills for plowing, hauling, force ac- 
count work, cubic yard removal, etc., were processed 
through the Paving Service office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs: 

674 4-inch street sign posts erected 
21 new hero square signs for dedication erected 
99 hero square signs replaced 

983 new street signs installed 

334 old hand-painted street signs, damaged baked 
enameled signs, and obliterated signs removed 

211 bent or broken street sign posts (4-inch type) re- 
paired and straightened 

170 street sign frames, collars, and brackets on 4-inch 
street sign posts and Hght poles repaired 

191 pieces of old rope, wire, old tires, etc., from 4-inch 
street posts and light poles removed 

CQ2 poUars i ^^^^^H^^ on 4-inch street sign posts and 
106 adapters J ^^^ht poles 

407 4-inch acorns on 4-inch street sign posts installed 
217 "Private Way" signs on 4-inch posts and light 
poles installed 
47 "Private Way" signs from 4-inch posts and light 
poles removed because of making public ways 
1,006 4-inch sign posts painted 
1,800 street sign frames painted 
756 4-inch acorns on 4-inch posts painted 
954 street sign collars on street sign posts and light 
poles painted 
21 directional signs on 4-inch posts installed 
856 street sign plates washed and cleaned 
314 blanks for temporary name plates painted 

Contracts were awarded for the construction and 
reconstruction of 152 streets during the year and 98 of 
these streets were completed. Work was also completed 
on 59 streets which were unfinished from 1953. Con- 
tracts were awarded for the construction of artificial 
stone sidewalks in 19 streets and 17 of these were com- 
pleted. Sidewalk work was also completed on 9 streets 
which were unfinished from 1953. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares on which 
reconstruction work was completed in 1954 are as fol- 
lows: 

Bremen street. East Boston, from Sumner street to Porter 
street. 



Public Works Department. 43 

Meridian street, East Boston, from Saratoga street to 
Condor street, including William C. Kelly Square and Harry 
A. Keyes Square 

Waldemar avenue, East Boston, from William F. Mc- 
Clellan Highway to Crestway road. 

Otis street, City Proper, from Winthrop square to Summer 
street. 

Columbia road, South Boston, from Old Harbor street to 
I street. 

Columbus avenue, at Roxbury Crossing, from Station 
street to Roxbury street. 

Mt. Vernon street, Dorchester, from William T. Morrissey 
Boulevard to 3,300 feet easterly. 

Gallivan Boulevard, Dorchester, from Adams street to 
Kenmare road. 

Poplar street, West Roxbury, from Canterbury street to 
Beech street. 

Poplar street. West Roxbury, from Washington street to 
Heathcote street. 

Poplar street. West Roxbury, from Canterbury street to 
Heathcote street. 

Moss Hill road. West Roxbury, from Woodland road to 
1,000 feet southerly. 

Weld street. West Roxbury, from Centre street to West 
Roxbury Parkway, and Church street to Maple street. 

Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, from Washington street 
to Brookline line. 

Washington street. City Proper, from Dover street to 
Northampton street. 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park, from Pingree street to 
Metropolitan avenue. 

Morton street, West Roxbury and Dorchester, from 
Harvard street to Cemetery road. 

The following is a list of streets constructed and 
reconstructed and sidewalk work done by contract in 
the various wards of the city in the year 1954: 

Ward 1 — Ashley street, Orient avenue, Bremen street, 
Meridian street, Brigham street, and Waldemar avenue. 
Total cost, $160,693.40. 

Ward 2 — Rutherford avenue (sidewalks). Total cost, 
$3,915.42. 

Ward 3 — Bond street (sidewalks), Irving street. South 
Russell street, Temple street, Washington street (at Boylston 
street), Washington street (La Grange street to Boylston 
square) (sidewalks), Otis street, and Washington street 
(Dover street to Northampton street) (chapter 90). Total 
cost, $75,476.66. 

Ward 4 — Forsyth street (sidewalks), Huntington avenue 
(southerly side. Opera place to Forsyth street) (sidewalks), 



44 City Document No. 18. 

Tetlow street (sidewalks), Worthington street (sidewalks), 
Parker street (sidewalks), and Hemenway street (sidewalks). 
Total cost, $23,880.96. 

Ward 5 — Garden street, Irving street, and Revere 
street. Total cost, $9,256.85. 

Ward 6 — West Fourth street, East Fifth street, Silver 
street, Emerson street (sidewalks). West Seventh street 
(sidewalks), West Sixth street (sidewalks), E street (side- 
walks), and P street (sidewalks). Total cost, $21,539.86. 

Ward 7 — Southampton street (seeded rails), Bowen 
street, Brewster street, Columbia road, Covington street, 
Dixfield street, Douglas street, East Seventh street. Gold 
street, Hamlen street, Knowlton street, Springer street, 
Story street. Telegraph street, Thomas park, Tudor street, 
West Fourth street, East Fifth street, Sumner park, and 
Vinton street (sidewalks). Total cost, $43,159.58. 

Ward 8 — Allerton street, Pierson street, Southampton 
street (seeded rails), Washington street (seeded rails), James 
street, Washington street (chapter 90), Island street. Perch 
street, and Pike street. Total cost, $109,000.07. 

Ward 9 — Washington street (seeded rails), Columbus 
avenue (Roxbury Crossing), Parker street (sidewalks), and 
Washington street (chapter 90). Total cost, $79,724.85. 

Ward 10 — None. 

Ward 11 — Mendell Way, Hampstead road, St. Rose 
street, and Verona street. Total cost, $32,904.92. 

Ward 12 — None. 

Ward 13 — Hartford court. South view street, Mt. Vernon 
street (Wm. T. Morrissey Boulevard to 3,250 feet easterly), 
and Mt. Vernon street (700 feet east of Wm. T. Morrissey 
Boulevard to 3,100 feet east of Wm. T. Morrissey Boulevard). 
Total cost, $89,578.79. 

Ward 14 — Franklin Hill avenue. Total cost, $20,950.53. 

Ward 15 — Adams street (east to Park street) (sidewalks), 
Leonard street (sidewalks). Total cost, $1,400. 

Ward 16 — Adams street (East to Park street) (side- 
walks), Auriga street (sidewalks). North Munroe terrace 
(sidewalks). South Munroe terrace (sidewalks), Templeton 
street (sidewalks), Wrentham street (sidewalks), Dorchester 
avenue (Carney Hospital) (sidewalks), Gallivan Boulevard 
(sidewalk and traffic islands), Peabody square (sidewalk and 
traffic island), and Centre court. Total cost, $48,177.66. 

Ward 17 — Tonawanda street (sidewalks), and Dor- 
chester avenue (sidewalks). Total cost, $19,543.79. 

Ward 18 — Badger road, Cranmore road, Halsey road, 
Van Brunt street, Andria road, George street, Lockland 
road, Solaris road, Highfield road, Edgewater Drive (side- 
walks), Austin street. Beech street, Beram avenue, Bateman 
street, Deforest street, Grassmere road, Hallron street, 
MacDonald street, Wilton street, Mulvey street, Metro- 
politan avenue, Westminster street, Dana avenue, Neponset 



Public Works Department. 



45 



avenue, Milton avenue, Poplar street (Canterbury street to 
Beech street), Summit street, Hyde Park avenue (chapter 
90), Poplar street (Canterbury street to Heathcote street), 
Glendower road, and Morton street (chapter 90). Total 
cost, $623,166.09. 

Ward 19 — Elwell road, Furnival road, Asticou road, 
Avon street, Brookdale street. Goldsmith street, Hopkins 
road, Ridge street. Woodland road, Wachusett street, Moss 
Hill road, Poplar street, Rockwood street, Bussey street, 
Chestnut square, Glenvale terrace, Delford street, Pitsmoor 
road, Quarley road, Wyvern street. Prince street, Poplar 
street (Canterbury street to Beech street), Allandale street 
(chapter 90), Moss Hill road. Poplar street (Canterbury 
street to Heathcote street). Total cost, $227,824.69. 

Ward 20 — Alberta street, Latin road, Alward road, 
Lantern Lane, Andover road, Ledgedale road, Parklawn 
road, President road, Wedgewood road, Eugenia road, 
Ansonia road, Manthorne road, South Fairview street, South 
Walter street. Beryl street, Coniston road, Cornell street, 
Newburg street, Selwyn street, Zeller street, BiUing street, 
Gould street, Hemlock road, Bonad road (sidewalks), Wash- 
ington street, Buchanan road, Quinn Way, Quinn Way Ex- 
tension, Fernwood road, Oakmere street. Weld street (Walter 
street to Centre street), Allandale street (chapter 90), Church 
street. Weld street (Centre street to West Roxbury Parkway, 
and Church street to Maple street). Total cost, $440,542.41. 

Ward 21 — Beacon street (sidewalks) and Chestnut Hill 
avenue (chapter 90). Total cost, $146,393.15. 

Ward 22 — Empire street, Mayflower street, Dunboy 
street, Hatherly road, Mt. Vernon street. Shannon street, 
Windom street. Guest street, Ryder Hill road, and Presenta- 
tion road. Total cost, $95,075.23. 



Paving Service. 
Work Done by Contract in 1954. 



Item. 
Earth and services excavation 
Rock and wall excavation 
Bank gravel .... 
Crushed stone for edgestone . 
Existing base removed . 
Existing pavement removed . 
New straight edgestone . 
New circular edgestone . 
New 2-foot corners . 
Edgestone reset 
Edgestone hauled to city yards 
Macadam base 
OA asphalt .... 
Concrete base .... 



Quantity. Unit. 
85,311 cubic yards. 

1,680 cubic yards. 
78,323 tons. ' 

4,198 tons 

4,783 square yards. 
27,819 square yards. 
50,265 linear feet. 

5,896 linear feet. 

1,215 each. 
35,869 linear feet. 

6,389 linear feet. 
26,560 tons. 
238,299 gallons. 

2,029 cubic yards. 



46 



City Document No. 18. 



Item 
Concrete backing up sidewalks 
Bituminous concrete base (roadway 
Bituminous concrete top (roadway) 
Bituminous concrete base (sidewalk) 
Bituminous concrete top (sidewalks) 
Sheet asphalt top . 
Artificial stone sidewalks 
Artificial stone driveways 
Loam spaces 
Loam back of sidewalks 
Covers reset 
Bradley heads reset 
Brick courses . 

Catch basins or manholes rebuilt 
Catch basins or drop inlets built 
Sign posts set or reset 
Parking meters reset 
Stone bounds .... 



Quantity. LTnit. 
20 tons. 
25,797 tons. 
23,518 tons. 
1,430 tons. 
2,248 tons. 
820 tons. 
716,181 square feet. 
62,366 square feet. 
1 ,284 square yards. 

622 cubic yards. 

2,229 each. 

13 each. 

3,712 each. 

83 each. 

48 each. 

171 each. 

41 each. 

248 each. 



3,553 square yards. 
2,153 square yards. 
13,263 square feet. 



1(3, ^Do square leet. 
133,898 square feet. 
11,442 square yarc 
158 square yards 



Yearly Report of Work Done by Department 
Forces for 1954 

Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid . 
Gravel sidewalks, relaid 
Artificial stone sidewalks, laid (new) . 
Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid (old) . 
Bituminous concrete sidewalks 
Granite block roadway, laid . 
Artificial stone sidewalks, patched with 

blacktop 

Edgestone reset (old .... 
Macadam roadway patched . 
Macadam roadway resurfaced 
Asphalt or bituminous concrete roadway 

patched 

Asphalt or bituminous concrete roadway 

resurfaced 

Street cleaning 

Snow removal 



16,224 square feet. 

3,858 linear feet. 
78,982 square yards. 

5,221 square yards. 

27,107 square yards. 

1,875 square yards. 
10,158 cubic yards. 
46,635 cubic yards. 



PAVING SERVICE, 

Street Cleaning 

General Highway Expenditures 
Sidewalk and Curbing 
Snow and Ice Removal . 
Street Signs .... 



1954. 



$39,527 56 

911,753 37 

335,594 36 

79,342 75 

15,669 75 

$1,381,887 79 









Table 


Showing Length 


AND 


Area of Paving on Accepted Streets, 


Corrected to 


January 1 


, 1955. 










Length in Miles. 


Area in Squabe Yards. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Con- 
crete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Concrete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Year 1953 Report 


* 245. 05 
33.27 


t 270.80 
37.57 


134.43 
4.67 


0.24 
0.03 


0.44 
0.06 


0.50 
0.07 


§22.41 
3.04 


II 142.97 
19.41 


12.45 
1,09 


1..39 
0.19 


736.68 
100.00 


•4.941,744 
34.83 


t 5,323,586 
37.52 


t 887,041 
6.25 


0,367 
0.04 


11,264 
0.08 


8,865 
0,06 


§ 446,233 
3.15 


11 2,325,828 
10.39 


186,599 
1.32 


51,731 
0.36 


14,188,248 
100.00 




Jandary 1. 1955. 


60.88 
4.92 
4.91 
12. .36 
42.08 
39.01 
57.93 
21.13 
8.50 


28.30 
5.05 
19.15 
15.78 
29.09 
74.05 
70.33 
30.88 
18.97 


10.. 58 
0.10 
3.. 54 
7.35 
3.29 
1.21 
0.53 
0.42 
0.00 


0.07 
0.08 
0.01 
0.01 

0.03 
0.01 


0.10 
0.05 
0.02 
0.06 

0.04 
0.04 
0.08 
0.03 


0.32 

0.02 
0.02 
0.14 

0,01 


3.00 
0,79 
1,37 
0,42 
5,08 
4,44 
5,45 
1,23 
0,64 


2.74 
5,42 
9.14 
7.43 
13.05 
33 . 1 1 
30.70 
11.70 
10.75 


0.30 
0.01 
0.15 
0.18 
0,38 
1.20 
1,21 
0.27 
4,24 


O.OI 
0.04 
0.50 
0.00 
0.00 
0,01 

0.20 


90.29 
23.03 
.38.35 
44.11 
94.61 
153.06 
172.90 
05.71 
49.34 


1.122.704 
97.833 
1 1 1 .955 
266,336 
858.G52 
704,285 

1,100,989 
466,592 
149,716 


646,232 

86,107 

4,39,643 

295,410 

,543,021 

1.304,343 

1.297,041 

602,192 

380,978 


218,,572 
159,670 
72,583 
210,899 
65,657 
44,773 
28,921 
27,291 
45 


487 
2,011 
325 
642 
47 

364 

180 


3,623 

1.701 

3.55 

2.784 

983 

985 

1.231 

442 


4,308 

393 

349 

2,.54 1 

145 


96.224 
13. ,360 
46.852 
20.818 
78.244 
00.900 
87,155 
30,443 
10,086 


42,185 
75,302 
198,280 
126,760 
209,595 
530,097 
569,958 
187,347 
273,406 


1,9.57 
13,999 
2.976 
2,111 
4,872 
18,132 
17,675 
4.263 
67.870 


41 

812 

15.7.54 

27 

5.390 

24,477 

50 

4,506 


2,136,382 

450,024 

874,174 

940,863 

1,763,266 

2,729,503 

3,127,710 

1,319,409 

887,235 


CharleBtown 










Bri hton 






Total 


242.62 
32.88 


292.80 
39.07 


33.02 
4.47 


0.21 
0.03 


0.42 
0.06 


0.51 
0.07 


22.42 
3.04 


136.10 
18.44 


8,. 54 
1.16 


1 . 36 
0.18 


738.00 
100.00 


4,879,062 
34.29 


5.655,567 
39.75 


828,411 
5.82 


4,062 
0,03 


12,104 
0.09 


7,826 


444,082 


2,212,530 
15.55 


133.855 
0.94 


51,057 
0.36 


14.228,550 











Total Public Stree' 



- In the above table the city is subdivided substantially on the boundary lii 



I the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory annexed from Brookline included in City Proper. 



* Of this a 

t Of this t 

square yards if 



nount 0.09 mile or 810 square yards is Biturock. 
mount 0.02 mile or 185 square yards is cobble; and 19.89 
granite block paving on concrete base. 

0.06 mile or 405 sciuare yards is Blome granitoid 
or 1.9.^.5,24") square yards is bitumin 



,1 Of this amount 119.01 



0.11 mile or 1,533 square yards i 
block. Elastite .^splialt Plank; and 0.06 mile ( 

lam. Plank; and 0.15 mile or 818 square yards i 

yards is Tar Concrete. 
■ 334. G80 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included i 
iided in tliis table. In addition to this table there are 2.38 miles or U.SOG squi 



; and 0.03 mile or 595 square yards is Carey 
r 518 square yards is Johns-Manville .\sphalt 
I Asphalt Block; and 1.61 miles or 50.390 square 



Public Works Department. 47 

Lighting Service. 

Financial Statement. 
Total credits for 1954 .... $1,341,372 80 
Total expenditures for 1954 . . 1,343,672 70 



Deficit $1,299 90 

Individual Expenditures. 

Street and Park Lighting (Electric) : 
Boston Edison Com- 
pany . . .$1,134,060 86 
Boston Consolidated 
Gas Company (Char- 
lestown district) 50,489 08 
Boston Edison Com- 
pany (footways) . 1,612 03 

1,186,161 97 



Street Lighting (Gas) : 
Boston Consolidated 




Gas Company 
American Service Com- 


$51,169 46 


pany .... 


76,035 99 


Construction : 




Boston Consolidated 




Gas Company 
Boston Edison Com- 


$4,619 17 


pany (Installation, re- 
moval, relocation and 




modernization) . 


7,512 00 



Office furniture . . . $294 43 



Electrical maintenance 

and replacement parts . $1,621 98 



Transportation of per- 
sonnel .... $4 30 



127,205 45 



12,131 17 

Salaries : 

Administrative and En- 
gineering Personnel . $15,912 80 15,912 80 
Office supplies . . $340 60 

340 60 

294 43 

1,621 98 

4 30 



Total $1,343,672 70 



48 City Document No. 18. 

The following is a statement of work done by the 
Lighting Service of the Highway Division of the Public 
Works Department during the year 1954: 

Mercury Vapor Lighting Projects. 
In 1954 the following listed streets, main thorough- 
fares, and business areas were relighted with new 
modern mercury vapor lighting: 

Units. Lumen 
each. 

Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton ... 41 15,000 

From Beacon street to Washington street. 
Washington street, Boston, .... 49 15,000 

From Dover street to Northampton street 4 10,000 
Fields Corner Shopping area, Dorchester . 18 15,000 
Dorchester avenue, from Adams street to 

Gibson street 2 10,000 

Peabody square, Dorchester .... 8 15,000 
Intersection of Adams street and Gallivan 

Boulevard, Dorchester .... 9 15,000 
Haverhill street, Boston 6 15,000 

Conjunction with construction of Central 
Artery. 
Traverse street, Boston 2 15,000 

Conjunction with construction of Central 
Artery. 
Cross street, Boston 3 15,000 

Conjunction with construction of Central 
Artery, 
Beacon street, Boston 5 15,000 

From Massachusetts avenue to Hereford 
street. 
Bowdoin street, Dorchester .... 5 10,000 

Empire street, Brighton 1 10,000 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park ... 3 15,000 

North street, Boston 5 15,000 

Conjunction with construction of Central 
Artery. 
Washington Street North, Boston (Twin) . 2 15,000 
Washington street, Boston .... 49 15,000 

Washington street, Boston .... 4 10,000 

Market street, Brighton 5 15,000 

These new lighting units replaced obsolete and in- 
adequate lamps in many places, were favorably received 
by the business areas and reduced existing hazards at 
dangerous intersections, along with providing greater 
safety for vehicular and pedestrian traffic along main 
thoroughfares. 



Units. 


Lumen 




each. 


. 37 twin 


2,500 


2 single 


2,500 


. 46 single 


2,500 


16 twin 


6,000 


6 single 


10,000 


Bridge, 




5 single 


10,000 


. 10 single 


10,000 


. 13 single 


6,000 


12 single 


2,500 


16 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


. 12 single 


1,000 



Public Works Department. 49 

Incandescent Lighting Projects. 
These new installations and replacements of old 
lighting with units of larger candle power gave entirely 
adequate lighting to the several bridges and greatly 
reduced vandalism in the parks. 



Morton street, Dorchester 

Columbia Point Housing Development, 

South Boston 
Mt. Vernon street, Dorchester 

Dover street. West First Street 

South Boston 
Broadway Bridge, South Boston 
McArdle Bridge, East Boston 
Northern Avenue Bridge, Boston 
Columbia road, South Boston 

From I street to Farragut street 
Madison park, Roxbury . 
Washington park, Roxbury 

Incandescent Lamps. 
The following listed streets were given more lighting 
by the installation of 10,000 lumen incandescent lamps, 
these include intersections, various business districts, 
and main thoroughfares in the city: 

Adams street, Dorchester (1); Ash street, Boston (1); 
Congress street, Boston (2); Cross street, at Endicott 
street, Boston (1); Centre street, at Albert street, Roxbury 
(1); Dorchester avenue, Richmond street to Adams 
street, Dorchester (2); East Fourth street, South Boston 
(1); Freeport street, Dorchester (1); Hill Top street, 
Dorchester (1); Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park (1); 
Milk street, Boston (2); North street, at John street, 
Boston (1); North Washington street, Boston (1); New 
Way, Dorchester (2); Pearl street, Boston (2); Purchase 
street, Boston (1); Northern avenue, Boston (5). 

Incandescent electric lamps of 6,000 lumens were 
installed on the following streets: 

Mason street, Boston (1); North Harvard street, 
Brighton (1). 

Electric lamps of 4,000 lumens incandescent were in- 
stalled during 1954 on the following streets: 



50 City Document No. 18. 

Deaconess road, Roxbury (2); Eldon street, Roxbury 
(1); Fenway, Roxbury (2); Joslin road, Roxbury (2) 
James street, Boston (2) ; Maple street, West Roxbury (1) 
Oak street, Hyde Park (2) ; Paris street, East Boston (4) 
P street, South Boston (2); Parker street, Roxbury (1) 
Richmond street, Boston (2); Sidlaw road, Brighton (1) 
Heath street, Roxbury (4). 

Electric lighting units of 2,500 lumens were installed 
on newly accepted streets and as additional lighting 
where obsolete lamps were insufficient and inadequate 
to produce the desired Ughting: 

AUerton street, Roxbury (6); Arvale road, Dorchester 
(1); Academy Hill road, Brighton (1); Acton street, 
Boston (1); Agassiz park. West Roxbury (1); Aldrich 
street. West Roxbury (1); Adams street, Dorchester (1); 
Arlington street, Brighton (8); A street. South Boston 
(2); Benton street, Dorchester (2); Bynner street, West 
Roxbury (1); Bod well street, Dorchester (1); Bird street, 
Dorchester (1); Bond street, Boston (1); Bickford street, 
Roxbury (8) ; Beram avenue, West Roxbury (2) ; Bowdoin 
avenue, Dorchester (7); Bentley street, Brighton (1); 
Calder street, Dorchester (3); Circuit street, Roxbury 
(2); Columbia road, South Boston (3); Clifford street, 
Hyde Park (1); Clifford street, Roxbury (1); Carleton 
street, Boston (5); Canterbury street, West Roxbury (7); 
Cemetery road, Dorchester (1); Cornauba street, West 
Roxbury (2); Dove street, Roxbury (1); Deering road, 
Dorchester (5) ; Everett street, Brighton (8) ; East Second 
street, South Boston (2); Field street, Roxbury (1); Fair- 
banks street, Brighton (1); Frankfort street. East Boston 
(4); Favre street, Dorchester (1); Franklin Street Tunnel, 
Brighton (1); Gladstone Steps, East Boston (1); Garden 
terrace. West Roxbury (1); Hallet street, Dorchester (1); 
Heath street, Roxbury (1); Hyde Park avenue, Hyde 
Park (1); Highland street, Roxbury (1); Johnny court, 
Boston (1); Lamartine street, Roxbury (1); Lake street, 
Brighton (1); Leicester street, Brighton (3); May street, 
West Roxbury (1); Messinger street, Dorchester (1); 
McBride street. West Roxbury (2); Morton street. West 
Roxbury (6); Maple street. West Roxbury (13); Pierson 
street, Roxbury (2); Prince street. West Roxbury (3); 
Rusfield street, Roxbury (2) ; Radford Lane, Dorchester 
(2); Sumner park, Dorchester (1); South Fairview street, 
West Roxbury (2); Sigourney street. West Roxbury (5); 
St. William street, Dorchester (2); Telegraph street. 
South Boston (1); Vose avenue, Hyde Park (2); Vesta 
road, Dorchester, (3); William Jackson Way, Brighton 
(2); Wrentham street, Dorchester (3); Whittemore ter- 
race, Dorchester (1); Walnut avenue, West Roxbury (10); 



Public Works Department. 51 

Whitfield street, Dorchester (1); Willard street, Boston 
(1); Washburn street, South Boston (3); Whittier street, 
Roxbury (1); Whitmore street, Boston (1). 

Electric lamps of 1,000 lumen incandescent were in- 
stalled on the following secondary streets providing 
more adequate lighting for the many residential sections 
of the city: 

Ayles road, Hyde Park (5) ; Ahvin street, Hyde Park (3) ; 
Alwin court, Hyde Park (3); Bowditch Road Extension, 
West Roxbury (3); Billings street. West Roxbury (3); 
Brown Avenue Footway, West Roxbury (1); Bills court, 
Roxbury (1); Beaver street, Hyde Park (1); Brown ter- 
race. West Roxbury (1); Ballou place, Dorchester (1); 
Bartlett avenue. West Roxbury (1); Byrd avenue, Hyde 
Park (2); Belnel road, Hyde Park (1); Corrinth street, 
West Roxbury (3); Cerina road, West Roxbury (1); 
Clifford street, Hyde Park (1); Cheryl Lane, Hyde Park 
(3); Dresser street. South Boston (4); DeStefano road, 
West Roxbury (3); Dietz road, Hyde Park (3); Delaware 
place, Brighton (1); Edwardson street, Hyde Park (1); 
Estrella street. West Roxbury (1); Franklin court, Dor- 
chester (1); Furbush road, West Roxbury (2); Ferndale 
avenue, Dorchester (1); Glen vale terrace, West Roxbury 
(1); Haskell street, Brighton (1); Hill street, Boston (1); 
Robeson street, West Roxbury (1); Rose Garden Circle, 
Brighton (1); Robin wood avenue. West Roxbury (6); 
Southwick street, Dorchester (2); Spring Valley road. 
West Roxbury (1); Vallaro road, Hyde Park (2); Vose 
avenue, Hyde Park (2); Kilsyth road, Brighton (1); Lewis- 
ton street, Hyde Park (3) ; Lockland road (Hyde Park (3) ; 
Montfern avenue, Brighton (1); Norton street, Hyde Park 
(2); Orchardhill road. West Roxbury (1); Pine Grove 
terrace, Roxbury (1); Providence street, Hyde Park (1); 
Whipple avenue, Hyde Park (2); Westchester road. 
West Roxbury (1). 

Gas Lamp Replacement Program. 
During the year approximately 270 obsolete gas lamps 
were replaced with approximately 300 new modern 
luminaires with 2,500 lumen lamps. These new lamps 
in most instances are installed on long arms to diminish 
interference with trees and to eliminate glare from 
homes on residential streets. Plans calling for the re- 
placement of an additional 330 gas lamps with electric 
lamps were delayed, due to the heavy work load 
imposed on the utility companies by the two disastrous 
hurricanes. 



52 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 3, 1955. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Herewith I submit a statement of the activities of the 
Sanitary Division of the Public Works Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1954. 

The most striking experience during the year was 
without any doubt the impact upon the Sanitary 
Division of the two hurricanes, "Carol" and "Edna," 
on August 31, 1954, and September 11, 1954, with winds 
up to one hundred one miles per hour. 

The Street Cleaning Service was activated to open 
streets, and the shop mechanics were provided with 
power saws and other tools necessary to cut branches 
and small fallen trees. Trucks were hired to assist the 
city forces haul away the debris. 




Public Works Department. 



53 



The Sewer Division was assisted in clearing catch 
basins because of flooded conditions in the streets and 
the cellars of buildings. More than 5| inches of rain 
fell during a short period of the hurricane. 

State funds were provided to reimburse the Sanitary 
Division in the sums of $82,438.89 for overtime and 
$110,544.23 for regular time worked during the hurricane 
emergency clean-up. This latter amount in effect 
caused a saving in the personnel item of the division's 
budget appropriation. Also paid by the state were the 
costs of repairs to the roofs at the garbage receiving 
station at Victory Road and at the Albany Street shops. 

In the interests of sanitation continued progress was 
made in requiring contractors on waste collection to 
supply automatic closed bodies on their vehicles, so 
that now 60 per cent of the vehicles used are of this 
type. It is the poUcy of the division to continue this 
change so that eventually all vehicles will be of this 
type. Photos of the old and the new vehicles are 
appended. 

During the year the city acquired land for dumping at 
the Gardner Street dump. West Roxbury, amounting 
to 11.3 acres thus bringing the total area to 26 acres. 
The city operated this dump for the first time this year. 




54 City Document No. 18. 

Last year the contractor for the West Roxbury district 
was required to service also material originating in the 
Jamaica Plain and Hyde Park districts. This change 
was an improvement as it obviated jurisdictional dis- 
putes and also regularized the bidding procedures. 

A Quonset hut was erected at the Gardner Street 
dump to accommodate the bulldozer and to provide an 
office for the men at this location. The bulkhead line 
at the Calf Pasture dump was relocated by adding an 
area of approximately 600 x 1,500 feet of fiats. Thus 
the future taxable area of the city will be increased by 
about 1,000,000 square feet. 

The Jamaica Plain district office was moved from 
Child street to a temporary location at Forest Hills. 
Here construction of the Wilham T. Morrissey Memorial 
Building will provide headquarters for the Sanitary and 
other divisions. 

The division acquired two new motor-driven sweepers, 
seven Ford sedans, and two Ford dump trucks. Forty 
pushcarts were also purchased. 

The policy of appointing district supervisors in the 
various districts whereby both waste collection and the 
street cleaning activities come under one supervisor 
made it necessary to alter the boundaries of the street 
cleaning districts to coincide with the limits of the waste 
collection districts. These changes have been made in 
the outlying districts and will be extended to cover the 
whole city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Adolph J. Post, 

Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



55 



b+al Appropna+ion H 668, 819.48 







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56 City Document No. 18. 

1954 appropriation $4,868,819 48 

Motor vehicle cost 270,286 70 



Total cost $5,139,106 18 

Recapitulation : 

Waste collection $2,409,940 51 

Waste disposal 588,861 23 

Waste collection and disposal . . . $2,998,801 74 

Street cleaning 2,086,547 49 

Preventive 25,877 06 

Miscellaneous 27,879 89 



$5,139,106 18 













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60 City Document No. 18. 

Personnel changes in permanent force during the year 1964: 

Total personnel January 1, 1954 . , . *684 
Transfers in (from other departments and divi- 
sions) 8 

Reinstatements 2 

Appointments 1 

— 11 

695 

Deaths 11 

Resignations 8 

Retirements 45 

Transfers out (to other departments and divi- 
sions) 7 

Discharged or terminated 2 

— 73 
Total personnel January 1, 1955 . . , 

*622 

* Including two military leavea of absence. 
Total net loss of 62 employees. 



Public Works Department. 61 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 3, 1955. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and 
expenditures of the Sewer Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1954. 

Expenditures During 1954. — The activities of the 
Sewer Division during the year consisted of sewer con- 
struction at a contract cost of $442,043.73, as shown on 
attached schedule of the work done, and the mainte- 
nance and operation of the sewer system at a cost of 
$826,479.69. 

Co?} tract Work. — Contract work consisted of the ex- 
tension of the sewer system to provide drainage for new 
buildings and street construction and to eliminate cess- 
pools, the locations and cost of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work. — Maintenance work consisted of 
the cleaning of 1,890 catch basins by contract and 4,782 
by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers and catch 
basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, and catch 
basins by the yard forces and the operation of the pump- 
ing station and disposal works, the cost of which is 
attached. 

Covering in Open Brooks. — The work of relocating 
and enclosing Stony Brook in a conduit for a length of 
about 4,200 linear feet from the former line, between 
West Roxbury and Hyde Park, has been completed at a 
contract cost of $437,065.64. 

Plans have been completed for relocating and enclos- 
ing Stony Brook in a conduit from the end of the above 
project to Bald Knob road, a distance of about 5,320 
linear feet. This work will include the enclosing of 
Myopia Brook and the Providence Street Brook in con- 
duits and the construction of incidental surface drains 
at an estimated cost of $450,000. This work will 



62 City Document No. 18. 

complete the enclosing of Stony Brook in a conduit. It 
will make possible the reclamation of many acres of 
adjacent swamp land for building purposes, eliminate 
the hazard of an open brook and provide substantial 
relief for the basement flooding of dwellings, located 
adjacent to the brook, that now occurs when the ground 
water level is high. It is anticipated, that this work 
will start early in 1955. 

Proposed Construction Work. — The work of extending 
the sewer system to provide drainage for new street 
construction, new building construction, and the elimi- 
nation of cesspools will continue for many years in the 
future, and probably at the same rate as in the past. In 
addition, a long-range sewerage works program provides 
for the extension of main line surface drain conduits and 
the rebuilding of several miles of very old sewers that 
have settled or outlived their economic usefulness. De- 
tails of the long-range program are contained in a 
report on file in the Sewer Division. 

Special Problems. — The exclusion of tide water from 
the main intercepter sewer has always been a trouble- 
some problem, due to leaky, side-hung, wooden tide 
gates on the storm overflow that, with few exceptions, 
have been in service since the interceptor was put in 
operation in 1883. During 1954, the work of replacing 
25 wooden side-hung gates on the west side interceptor 
with top hung metal tide gates was completed at a 
contract price of $13,722.25. Since the new gates have 
been installed, measurements of the elevations of the 
water, during dry weather flow, on both sides of the 
gates, show that they are ''holding." This is a big 
improvement over the situation that prevailed before 
the new gates were installed and indicates that a large 
volume of tide water has been excluded from the west 
side interceptor and that the project was well worth 
while. It is recommended that the project be extended 
to replace side-hung wooden tide gates on the east side 
interceptor during the year 1955. 

The problem of low ground water level in and around 
Copley square was reopened this year by the Committee 
on Water Levels of Trinity Church. This problem had 
its inception in 1929 and has to do with the preservation 
of the wooden foundation piles of Trinity Church and 
other buildings in this area. The foundation piles are 
endangered by the ground water level faUing below the 
pile tops. Studies made between 1929 and 1933 con- 



Public Works Department. 63 

eluded that in some manner the public sewer in St. 
James avenue was a factor in the lowering of the ground 
water level, following which the City of Boston in 1933 
installed a weir and butterfly gate in the sewer at 
Copley square which would keep the water in the sewer 
sHghtly above the tops of the foundation piles, except 
when the butterfly gate was opened periodically to 
flush out the sewer. Records of ground water levels 
kept by Trinitj^ Church since the weir was installed 
indicate that, in general, when the gate is closed the 
ground water level is satisfactory, but this is not so 
when the gate is opened for any protracted period of 
time. 

The recent request of the Committee on Water Levels, 
referred to above, had to do, among other things, with 
finding a permanent solution for the problem rather 
than to depend on the butterfly gate, which they con- 
sidered a temporary measure. For this purpose a study 
was made by the Sewer Division which concluded that 
if the ground water was being lowered by draining into 
the sewer, that a permanent solution would result if an 
equal quantity were introduced into the ground and 
that this could be done by storing water in the Boylston 
Street surface drain. This was to be accomplished by 
laying perforated pipes in the Copley Square grass plot 
and connecting them to the Boylston Street surface 
drain. A contract was awarded to do this work at a 
cost of $8,480, which work has been completed. If the 
method proves successful, it will be necessary to make 
certain sewer changes in Dartmouth street, between 
Boylston street and Beacon street, which will provide a 
continuous supply of water for this purpose, whereas 
now it is necessary to secure this water by the opening of 
certain tide gates. If the experiment proves successful, 
the elimination of the Copley Square weir and the pro- 
posed sewer changes in Dartmouth street will greatly 
improve the drainage in this area upstream as far as 
Park square. 

The Sewer Division Labor Force consists of the follow- 
ing: 18 laborers, 2 carpenters, 30 motor equipment 
operators and laborers, 10 catch-basin machine oper- 
ators, 5 tide gate repairmen, 6 working foremen sewer 
cleaners, 20 sewer cleaners, 5 bricklayers, 3 yardmen, 
1 heavy motor equipment operator, 5 sewer district 
foremen, and 1 main drainage foreman. This makes a 
total of 106 men assigned to answering complaints, 



64 City Document No. 18. 

cleaning catch basins, cleaning sewers, repairs to man- 
holes and catch basins, repairing broken sewers, and 
other related work. 

Length of Sewers Built. — During the fiscal year 1954 
there were built by contractors and day labor 8.29 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains throughout the 
city. After deducting 0.16 miles of sewers and surface 
drains, rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase for 1954 
is 8.13 miles, which added to the existing 1,271.82 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains and 30.93 miles of 
intercepting sewers, makes a grand total of 1,310.88 
miles of all sewers belonging to the City of Boston, and 
under the care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 1955. 

There were 325 catch basins built or rebuilt and 64 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 261 catch basins and a grand total of 24,233 
catch basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1955. 

Permit Office Report. — Entrance fees to the amount of 
$13,518.46 have been deposited with the City Collector 
for collection from estates upon which no sewer assess- 
ments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordinances of 
1945, chapter 27, section 10. 

Nine hundred and sixty permits have been issued, 
viz.: 238 to district foremen and contractors and 722 to 
drainlayers for repairing or laying new house drains. 
Inspectors from this office have personally inspected the 
work done under these drainlayers' permits. 

Two thousand three hundred and seven complaints 
have been investigated and inspectors are instructed to 
report in writing in each case. 

One thousand five hundred and eleven catch basin 
complaints were received: 

Reported in writing on 2,635 municipal liens to the 
City Collector, in accordance with chapter 60, section 
25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
2,350 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the Ordinances of 1925, chapter 27, section 8, 
apprising them of the construction of new sewers or 
repairs to old sewers. 

Respectfully, 

Robert P. Shea, 
Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



66 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
December 31, 1954. 



Districts. 


BuUt by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 


Built by 
Private 
Parties. 


Total Lengths Built. 


City Proper 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 
8,231.00* 
555.00 


Linear Feel. 
8,231.00 
886.30 


Mties. 
1.5689 




331.30 
None. 

20.00 

None. 

2,438.88 

16,850.42 

2,845.25 

10,831.04 


0.1678 






East Boston 


1.458. OOt 


1.478.00 


0.2799 










2,438.88 
16.850.42 

2.845.25 
11.046.04 


0.4619 


West Roxbury 




3.1913 






0.5389 


Hyde Park 


215.00 


2.0919 






Totals 


33,316.89 


10.459.00 


43.775.89 


8.2909 







* Due to the construction of John F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 

t Built by D, P. W., Division of Waterways. Orient Heights Beach. 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January I, 1955. 





1950. 


1951. 


1952. 


1953. 


1954. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 
ments 


Linear Feet. 
31,208.93 

3,938.00 


Linear Feet. 
22,456.07 


Linear Feet. 
18,781.42 

16,484.50 


Linear Feet. 
27.469.81 

11,482.00 


Linear Feet. 
33,316.89 

10,459.00 








Totals 


35,146.93 


22,456.07 


35,265.92 


38,951.81 


43,775.89 







66 



City Document No. 18. 



Total Length of Sewers. 



DiSTBICTS. 



Total 

Lengths 

Built 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31. 1954. 



Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1954. 



Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1954. 



City Proper . . . 

Roxbury 

3outh Boston. . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown . . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury. 
Dorchester . . . . 
Hyde Park 



Linear Feet. 

8,231.00 

886.30 



1,478.00 



2,438.88 
16,850.42 

2,845.25 
11,046.04 



Linear Feet. 
635.00 
190.00 



Linear Feet. 

7,596.00 

696.30 



1,478.00 



2,438.88 
16,850.42 

2,845.25 
11,046.04 



Miles. 
1.4386 
0.1319 



0.2799 



0.4619 
3.1913 
0.5389 
2.0919 



Totals. 



43,775.89 



825.00 



42,950.89 



8.1344 



Miles. 
Common sewers and surface drains built previous to 

January 1, 1954 . . ... . . 1,271.82 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 

January 1 and December 31, 1954 . , . 8.13 

Common sewers and surface drains built ending 

December 31, 1954 . 1,279.95 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting with 

Metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1954 . . *6.81 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers to 

December 31, 1954 *24.12 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to 

December 31, 1954 1,310.88 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 
to January 1, 1955 708.65 



* No additional lengths built during 1954. 



Public Works Department. 



67 



Catch Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 



Districts. 


Catch Basins for Twelve Months 
Ending Decembeb 31, 1954. 


Total for Whole Citt 

IN Charge of Sewbb 

Division. 


Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 


Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 


Net 
Increase. 


Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1954. 


Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1955. 




202 

16 

8 

4 





35 

12 

48 


52 

4 





8 


150 

16 

4 

4 





35 

12 

40 


3,657 
3.458 
1,467 
1,217 
846 
2.087 
4.402 
5,632 
1,206 


3,807 




3,474 




1,471 




1,221 




846 




2.087 




4,437 


lester 


5,644 


Park 


1,246 






'otals 


325 


64 


261 


23,972 


24,233 







68 



City Document No. 18. 



Calf Pasture Pumping Station. 

Risume for Year 1954. 
Sewage Record 



Month. 



Total Gallons 
of Sewage 
Pumped. 



Average Gallons 

Per Day of 
Sewage Pumped. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December . 



Total 

Daily average. 



3,433.904,000 
3,381.319,000 
2,995,322,000 
3,190.136.000 
3,872,266,000 
4,043,889,000 
3,510,024,000 
3,869,905,000 
3,774.838,000 
3,694,784,000 
3,744,621,000 
3,696,448,000 



43,207,456,000 



110.771.097 
120,761,393 
96.623,290 
106,337,866 
125,742,200 
134,462,966 
113,226,580 
124,838,870 
125,827,930 
119,186,580 
124,820,700 
119,240,220 



118,376,592 



Fuel Oil Used. 



Month. 



Gallons 
No. 2 



Gallons 
No. 5. 



Cost. 



January . . . 
February . . 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November . 
December. 



200 
367 
448 
213 
209 



7,849 
15,880 



$21 13 

649 35 

1,280 47 

21 82 

20 64 



232 



22 33 



Totals. 



233 
189 
140 

2,231 



13,636 



11,709 



49,074 



1,027 59 

19 49 

920 72 

$3,983 54 



Public Works Department. 

Electricity Used. 



69 



Months. 



Kilowatt 
Hours. 



Cost. 



January 

February. . 

March 

April , 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 



540,100 
591,480 
530,080 
526,060 
669,040 
642,000 
576,000 
646,000 
607,520 
630,000 
668,640 
618,560 



$6,668 20 
7,183 71 
6,499 76 
6,260 27 
7,399 57 
7,298 94 
6.712 14 
6,973 46 
6,886 12 
7,195 67 
6,700 30 
7,046 54 



Totals . 



7,145,480 



S82,824 68 



Labor 

Edison power 
Fuel oil 
Supplies 
Service orders 



Cost Per Year. 



contracts 



Total 

Cost per million gallons of sewage pumped 



$128,977 83 

82,824 68 

3,983 54 

3,183 23 

20,455 89 

$239,425 17 

$5 56 



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84 City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE SURVEY DIVISION FOR 
THE YEAR 1954. 



Boston, January 3, 1955. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
organization and activities of the Survey Division, 
which was established on May 1 under the provisions of 
chapter 2, section 56 of the Revised Ordinances of 1954 
(Reorganization Plan). All of the functions of the 
former Board of Street Commissioners were transferred 
to the Pubhc Works Department or the Public Improve- 
ment Commission, which was set up in the Public Works 
Department, except those relating to the storage and 
sale of inflammables, filling stations and parking lots, 
which were transferred to the Committee of Licenses in 
the Public Safety Commission of the Building Depart- 
ment; and those relating to the abatement of taxes were 
transferred to the Real Property Department. Subse- 
quently, all work of the Public Works Department 
necessary for the performance of these functions, except 
the supervision of encroachments and the use of public 
ways for storage and sale of merchandise, were assigned 
to the Survey Division. 

Accordingly, this Division now performs engineering 
services for the various divisions of the Public Works 
Department and other city departments, boards and 
commissions. It also performs administrative and en- 
gineering duties required by the Public Improvement 
Commission for its operation. 

The principal engineering duties include: 

(a) the making of plans, surveys, estimates and reports 
relating to the laying out, widening, construction, and 
design of public highways; 

(b) the taking of easements for sewerage works; 

(c) staking out lines and grades for the construction of 
highways, sewerage, etc.; 



Public Works Department. 85 

(d) the making of property surveys of land to be 
acquired by the City of Boston by eminent domain; 

(e) the making of plans and surveys of city-owned 
land for purpose of sale, interdepartmental transfer or 
new development; 

(/) the making of various engineering surveys and 
plans required by other city departments. 

For the Public Improvement Commission, the admin- 
istrative functions include the processing of petitions, 
arranging public hearings, preparing estimates and 
orders relating to land damages and street and sewer 
betterments, preparing orders for the laying out of 
streets and the construction of streets and sewers, pre- 
paring orders for eminent domain land takings, pre- 
paring orders for the granting of permits for use of 
public highways, erection of poles, etc., and the main- 
tenance of all records in the charge of the Pubhc Im- 
provement Commission. 

Personnel : 

On May 1, 1954, thirty-six permanent and eight tem- 
porary employees, listed below, were transferred from 
the former Street Laying-Out Department to the newly 
created Survey Division. Also, one permanent em- 
ployee was transferred from the Central Office of the 
Pubhc Works Department. On December 1, 1954, three 
permanent employees of the former Street Laying-Out 
Department were transferred from the Sewer Division 
to this Division. 

Name Title 

Kenneth L. Benkart Senior Engineering Aide 

Charles E. Brewer Assistant Civil Engineer 

Arthur J. Brickley Junior Civil Engineer 

John A. Bullinerf Junior Engineering Aide 

George F. Buckley Junior Civil Engineer 

Joyce E. Campbell Clerk-Stenographer 

Elizabeth A. Clayton Head Clerk 

Edward J. Colman Title Examiner 

William F. Conway Senior Designing Engineer (Highways) 

Michael J. Corrao* Principal Clerk and Secretary 

George L. Creney§ Photostat Operator 

John J. Curley Senior Engineering Aide 

Salvatore C. Diliberto Assistant Civil Engineer 

William F. Duggan Principal Clerk and Stenographer 

Raymond L. Falesf Senior Engineering Aide (D) 

Harry M. Fletcher Assistant Civil Engineer 

Thomas O. Flood f Senior Engineering Aide 

* Transferred from Central Office, Public Works Department. 

t Temporary employees. 

§ Transferred from Sewer Division, Public Works Department, December 1, 1954. 

D Draftsman. 



86 



City Document No. 18. 



Name Title 

Edward P. Fogart}^ Head Clerk 

John L. Galvin Senior Engineering Aide 

Robert F. Gately Principal Clerk and Typist 

George H. Gilboy Senior Engineering Aide 

John F. Gilmore, Jr Senior Engineering Aide 

Samuel R. GoodwinJ Senior Clerk 

James W. Haley Chief Engineer 

George C. Hallisey Assistant Civil Engineer 

Leo P. Hughest Junior Engineering Aide 

Roland A. Hull Junior Civil Engineer 

Angelo J. laluna Assistant Civil Engineer 

John F. Kelley Senior Engineering Aide 

William L. Koelschf Senior Engineering Aide (D) 

Frank S. Lane Senior Engineering Aide 

Walter R. Luby Senior Civil Engineer 

William F. Maddenf Junior Engineering Aide 

Thomas P. McCusker Assistant Executive Secretary 

Francis McHugh Senior Engineering Aide 

Robert P. Mehegan Senior Clerk and Typist 

Frederick Milliken Senior Engineering Aide (D) 

A. Albert Minichiello Assistant Civil Engineer 

Philip A. Moynahan Senior Engineering Aide (D) 

James E. Murray Senior Engineering Aide 

John Murphy t Senior Engineering Aide 

William P. Norris§ Principal Duplicating Machine Operator 

John W. O'Brien Senior Engineering Aide 

Joseph C. Parsons Principal Clerk 

Thomas E. Rafferty Assistant Civil Engineer 

Albert J. Rodriguez . Senior Engineering Aide 

John J. Ryan Assistant Civil Engineer 

Charles D. Sullivan Principal Clerk and Stenographer 

Redmond L. Walsh § Head Photostat Operator 

Division Expenditures, May 1, 1954 to December 31, 1954, Inclusive. 



Survey 
Budget. 



Highway 
Loan 



Sewer 
Loan 



Personnel 

Pensions 

Contractual services 

Supplies and materials 

Current charges and obligations . 
Equipment 



$93,986 49 
9,238 07 
2,309 88 
4,154 60 
4 00 
2,506 26 



$30,363 81 
6,636 35 



$1,579 25 



Totals. 



$112,199 30 



$37,000 16 



$1,579 25 



Total Expenditukes $150,778 71 

During the period covered by this report, the Survey 
Division completed eighty-six (86) surveys and plans 
for the improving of existing highways or laying out of 

t Temporary employees. 

t On leave of absence without pay. 

§ Transferred from Sewer Division, Public Works Department, December 1, 1954. 

D Draftsman. 



Public Works Department. 87 

new ones totaling 9.79 miles. Thirty (30) surveys and 
plans for 2.16 miles of sewerage easements were also 
made. Sixteen (16) surveys and plans of city-owned 
land or land to be taken for municipal purposes were 
also made 

Field engineering work including the staking out of 
sixty-three (63) streets for the Paving Service of the 
Highway Division, twenty-five (25) streets for the Sewer 
Division, and miscellaneous services for other city de- 
partments. One survey and plan for a water easement 
totaling 1.44 miles in West Roxbury and Hyde Park was 
made and a survey and plan for a highway easement 
from Squantum Head to Long Island, 3.21 miles long 
was also made. Regular routine work included the re- 
surveying of street lines for private engineers wherever 
existing records were inadequate or obsolete, marking 
lines and grades for private construction abutting 
pubUc streets, examining land court plans for the Law 
Department, preparing land damage reports for the 
Public Improvement Commission, drafting charts, 
graphs, etc., for the Administrative Services Depart- 
ment, City Auditor, and others. Listed below are the 
major engineering surveys and plans completed during 
the period of this report. 
For the Public Improvement Commission: 

Forty-four (44) surveys and plans were made for the 
laying out of 4.10 miles of public highways, as follows: 



Charlestown in Feet. 

Terminal street 3,100 

Dorchester 

Arborcrest terrace 394 

Auriga street 235 

Bernard street 485 

Bluefield terrace 524 

Briarcliff terrace 418 

Cragmere terrace 300 

Grossman street 560 

Donwood terrace 353 

Gladeside avenue 1,790 

Itasca street 450 

Leahaven road 404 

Ledgebrook road 506 

Lin vale terrace 420 

Mamelon Circle 835 



88 City Document No. 18. 

Length 
in Feet. 

Meadowbank avenue 942 

Newcroft Circle 672 

Ridgeview avenue 1,310 

Southmere road 523 

Westville terrace 196 

Hyde Park 

Alwin street 1,111 

Ayles road 1,320 

Cheryl Lane 375 

Edwardson street 200 

Elliot street 460 

Frazer street 755 

Garfield avenue 364 

Lewiston street 305 

Safford street 900 

Stonehill road 999 

Westminster street 720 

Roxbury 

Ackley place 200 

South Bay avenue 935 

West Roxbury 

Bradeen Street Footway 170 

Brookway Footpath 432 

Brookway Road Extension 623 

Brookway terrace 441 

Cricket Lane 800 

Emmonsdale road 500 

Hackensack road 280 

Pomona street 230 

Sparrow street 300 

Twelve (12) surveys and plans were made for the 
widening and relocation of .80 mile of public highways 
as follows: 

Length 
Street in Feet. 

A street. South Boston 616 

Baker street. West Roxbury 900 

Brook Farm road. West Roxbury .... 775 

Canterbury street. West Roxbury .... 34 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park 375 

Morton street. West Roxbury at Canterbury street 140 
Morton street, West Roxbury (Cemetery road to 

Forest Hills street) 425 



Public Works Department. 89 



Mother Julia road, Dorchester . 
North square, Boston Proper 
Newmarket square, Roxbury 
Public Alley No. 908, Boston Proper 
West street, Hyde Park 



Length 
in Feet. 

223 

75 

800 

80 

62 



Three (3) surveys and plans were made for the dis- 
continuance of .04 mile of public highways as follows: 

Beech street. West Roxbury 65 

Centre street. West Roxbury 112 

Grove square, Boston Proper 56 

Twenty-seven (27) surveys and plans were made for 
the alteration (specific repair) of 5.85 miles of public 
highways as follows: 

Length 
in Feet. 

A street. South Boston 3,552 

Adams street, Dorchester, at Neponset avenue 
American Legion Highway, West Roxbury, at 

Cummins Highway 
Arlington street, Boston Proper, at Commonwealth 

avenue 
Atlantic avenue, Boston Proper, at northeasterly 

corner of Kneeland street 
Beacon street, Brighton, at Cleveland Circle 
Blue Hill avenue, at Talbot avenue 
Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester, at Geneva avenue 

Cemetery road, West Roxbury 657 

Charles street, Boston Proper (at southeasterly 

corner of Branch street and the northeasterly 

and southeasterly corners of Chestnut street) 
Charles street, Boston Proper (at the northeasterly 

and southeasterly corners of Revere street) 
Charles street, Boston Proper (at the southwesterly 

and northeasterly corners of Pinckney street) 
Chestnut street, Boston Proper, at West Cedar 

street 
Columbus avenue, Roxbury, at Roxbury Crossing 
Cummins Highway, West Roxbury and Dorchester 4,890 
Dorchester avenue, Dorchester, at Talbot avenue 
Dorchester street. South Boston .... 3,540 
Harrison avenue, Boston Proper .... 1,280 

Huntington avenue, Roxbury 2,225 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park, at Harvard street 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park and West Roxbury 9,370 



90 City Document No. 18. 



Length 
in Feet. 



Marlborough street, Boston Proper, at Public 

Alley No. 908 
Milton street, Hyde Park, at Sprague street 

Morton street, West Roxbury 5,201 

Mt. Vernon street, Boston Proper . . . . 180 
Stuart street, Boston Proper, at northwesterly cor- 
ner of Broadway 

Two (2) surveys and plans were made for the revision 
of grade of .27 mile of public highways as follows: 

Parklawn road. West Roxbury 145 

Rockland street, West Roxbury .... 1,302 

Thirty (30) surveys and plans were made for the 
taking of 2.16 linear miles of easements for sewerage 
purposes as follows: 

Length 
Brighton in Feet. 

Guest street 1,225 

Margo road 500 

Boston Proper 

Concord place 20 

Dorchester 

Groveland street 200 

Richrow street 293 

Violet street 270 

Hyde Park 

Daniel court 180 

Dietz road 1,105 

Dodge road 300 

Eastmont road 408 

Kristin court 225 

Leighton road 560 

Senders court 435 

Susanna court 230 

Wharton court 200 

West Roxbury 

Banks street 120 

Brownson terrace 400 

Brucewood street 390 

Cemo road 206 

Clarendon avenue 190 

Driftwood road 406 



Public Works Department. 91 

Length 
in Feet. 

Federal road 300 

Furbush road 192 

Glendower street 495 

Hackensack road 201 

Hackensack court 240 

Mossdale road 1,452 

Newfield street 346 

Sherman street 150 

Upland street 156 

Six (6) surveys and plans were made for the taking 
by eminent domain of 1,227,522 square feet of land for 
municipal purposes, as follows: 

Location. Area. Department. 

Morton street, Dorchester (at Fuller 

street) 19,630 Fire 

Faywood avenue, East Boston (at 

Crestway road) 37,300 School 

Faywood avenue, East Boston (at 

Montmorenci avenue) 69,281 School 

South Bay avenue, Roxbury (at 

Atkinson street) 320,413 PubUc Works 

(Sanitary) 
Gardner and High streets. West Rox- 
bury 492,397 PubUc Works 

(Sanitary) 
Cummins Highway, West Roxbury, to 

Grant Place, Hyde Park (easement) 278,501 Public Works 

(Water) 

For the Public Works Department (Highway Divi- 
sion), sixty -three (63) highways were staked out for 
construction. Lines were also given for the construc- 
tion of a new fence at the Moreland Street yard and the 
Forest Hills Street yard. 

For the Public Works Department (Sewer Division), 
sixty-eight (68) catch basins were staked out for con- 
struction. Also forty (40) reports recommending the 
location of ninety-four (94) new catch basins were made. 

For the Public Works Department (Bridge Division), 
four (4) surveys and plans of the abandoned ferry docks 
were made. 

For the Pubhc Works Department (Water Division), 
a survey and plan was made of city-owned land at 
Western avenue, Everett street, and Soldiers Field road, 
Brighton. 



92 City Document No. 18. 

For the Public Works Department (Sanitary Divi- 
sion), a survey and plan was made of city-owned land 
at South street and Child street, West Roxbury. 

For the Law Department, a survey and plan was 
made of No. 317 Dartmouth street, Boston Proper, and 
seven (7) surveys and plans were made of city-owned 
land at East Broadway, South Boston; Rutherford 
avenue and Cambridge street, Charlestown; Mackin 
street, Richardson street and Waverly street, Brighton; 
Warren avenue and Fairmount avenue, Hyde Park; 
Hastings street and Henshaw street. West Roxbury; 
Common street and Warrenton street, Boston Proper; 
and Rowe street and Seymour street. West Roxbury. 
Also forty-four (44) plans filed with Land Court petitions 
were examined and checked for street line references. 

For the Real Property Department, five (5) surveys 
and plans were made for off-street parking at Thomas 
street. West Roxbury; Winthrop street, Hyde Park; 
Uphams Corner, Dorchester; Ruggles street, Roxbury; 
and Mattapan square, Dorchester. A topographical 
plan was also made for the Mattapan Square site. Plans 
were made of city-owned land at Crossman street, Dor- 
chester; and Austin street, Summer street, and West 
street, Hyde Park. 

For the Library Department, a survey and plan was 
made of land on East Ninth street, South Boston. 

For the Institutions Department, a survey of the city 
boundary line at Deer Island was made. 

For the Hospital Department, a survey and plan was 
made of an access road easement from Dorchester street, 
Squantum to the Long Island Hospital, a distance of 
3.21 miles. 

For the Police Department, speed traps were staked 
out at various locations in Brighton. 

For the School Committee, the following school 
properties were staked out: Smith street, Roxbury; 
Dighton street, Brighton; and Lothrop street, Brighton. 

In addition to the foregoing engineering works done 
for the Pubhc Improvement Commission, other Public 
Works Department Divisions and other city depart- 
ments, the general operation of our own Survey Division 
included the following: 

(A) Stone Bounds. — In accordance with a policy 
estabhshed in 1950, stone bounds were set and drilled 
on the following newly constructed streets: 



Public Works Department. 93 

Number 
Street. District. of Bounds. 

Alberta street West Roxbury 8 

Andria road Hyde Park 3 

Austin street Hyde Park 8 

Badger road Hyde Park 2 

Cranmore road Hyde Park 12 

Crestway road East Boston 2 

Denby road Brighton 2 

Eastwood Circuit West Roxbury 16 

Empire street Brighton 5 

Faneuil street Brighton 10 

Fajrwood avenue East Boston 4 

George street Hyde Park 3 

Halsey road Hyde Park 4 

Mayflower street Brighton 2 

Rendall road West Roxbury 3 

SkyHne road Hyde Park 2 

Solaris road Hyde Park 5 

South view street Dorchester 9 

Stoughton Street place Dorchester 2 

Sunnybank road West Roxbury 4 

Van Brunt street Hyde Park 8 

Verona street West Roxbury 2 

Wakefield avenue Hyde Park 7 

Wenlock road Dorchester 5 

Whitby terrace Dorchester 2 

Wilton street Hyde Park 2 

Woodley avenue West Roxbury 2 

Worley street West Roxbury 4 

When suflficient personnel becomes available, it would 
be advisable to extend this program of setting stone 
bounds to every street in which construction is done. 
In this way, over a period of 20 or 30 years, street lines 
and street line records would be preserved on a great 
portion of our city streets. At least three additional 
survey parties would be needed for this work. 

(B) Private Street Survey. — In connection with the 
Public Improvement Commission's program of re- 
naming private streets to reduce the number of dupli- 
cations and eliminate some of the existing confusion in 
street names, all of the city's private ways numbering 
over 2,000 were viewed by engineers of this division 
during 1954. Many were found to be nonexistent, 
having been wiped out by redevelopment and new con- 
struction. These were dropped from our records. Of 
the remaining, approximately 1,500 open to public travel 
were checked for possible street name changes and 



94 City Document No. 18. 

recommendations were made in many cases. Those not 
open to public travel, approximately 600, including 
many so-called paper streets and alleys or passageways 
not large enough to accommodate vehicles, were listed 
and will hereafter be so identified in our records and in 
the forthcoming edition of "Boston's Streets" reported 
on below. 

(C) "Boston's Streets" (Street Book)— In June, 
1954, work was begun on the preparation of a new 
edition of ''Boston's Streets," the last one having been 
published in 1951. This book is the ''official" list of 
the city's streets, both pubhc and private. By De- 
cember 31, the work was approximately 80 per cent 
complete and it is estimated that printing will begin on 
or about April 1, 1955. 

(D) Reproduction Work. — On December 1, 1954, 
the Reproduction Unit, formerly a part of the Street 
Laying-Out Department, was transferred to this Division 
from the Sewer Division to which it had been attached 
on May 1, 1954. This unit makes blueprints, ozahds, 
autopositives, and photostatic copies of plans and 
records for all city departments. In December, the fol- 
lowing reproduction work was done: 

Department. PHSTS BPS OZS APS 

Administrative Services 

(Budget Division) 22 

Auditing 10 

Assessing 112 133 

Building 108 

City Clerk 56 

Treasury 

(Collecting Division) 18 

Health (Central Office) 114 

Health (Registry Division) 140 

City Planning 176 97 

Mayor's Office 

(Public Celebrations) 50 

Public Works 

(Central Office) 54 

(Bridge Division) 68 77 

(Highway Division) 242 192 175 5 

(Water Division) 48 

(Sewer Division) 220 39 

(Survey Division) 644 362 177 4 

Real Property 164 131 

Retirement 338 

School Buildings 16 

Registry of Deeds 24 

Rent Control 190 

Treasury 20 

City Council 36 

Miscellaneous 80 

Totals 2,940 554 889 9 



Public Works Department. 95 

(E) Assessments. — During the period reported on, 
estimates of benefit for assessment purposes were pre- 
pared on 373 parcels of land, amounting to $117,560.45. 
These estimates are included in orders for street and 
highway improvements. Also final assessments were 
prepared on 522 parcels of land, amounting to 
$169,581.31. 

(F) Engineering Injormation Services. — A report of 
this Division would be incomplete without covering the 
general engineering information provided the public. 
This service includes {a) furnishing street line data to 
land surveyors; (6) searching existing plans and records 
for lawyers, conveyancers, engineers, and architects for 
information relating to streets and private property 
within the city; (c) furnishing information on outstand- 
ing liens and assessments in connection with property 
transfers; and {d) making appearances in court with 
official plans and records. All of this is necessary but 
time-consuming work, and it is estimated that the equiva- 
lent of two full-time employees is required. 

This first report of the Survey Division is presented 
on a small but specialized group of services performed 
in the city government. Most of these services are in 
support of more impressive municipal operations, such 
as highway and sewer construction, the off-street park- 
ing program, new schools, hospitals, etc. Other services 
rendered to the public, while minor in nature, are, 
nevertheless, most necessary in a well-operated city. 
With forty-five employees as compared with eighty in 
1940, we are not only performing all original functions 
but several new and expanded ones. For example, our 
highway surveys now include practically all of the work 
formerly done by the construction survey of the High- 
way Division. The preparation of highway alteration 
plans (specific repairs) has become an important work 
of which there was very httle prior to 1940. Repro- 
duction work has been extended from the making of 
only blueprints in 1940 to include photostats, ozalid and 
autopositive copies of plans and records. Our personnel 
problem is still a serious one. When recent eligible lists 
were established for engineering aides, we were unable 
to secure a single applicant for any of eight existing 
vacancies. Men qualifying in Civil Service choose to 
go with the Commonwealth where basic salary rates are 
higher and much overtime work available. This con- 
dition will continue so long as the city's wage scale for 
engineering personnel is below the state's. 



96 City Document No. 18. 

In conclusion, it can be reported that the transition 
from Street Laying-Out Department to Pubhc Works 
Department Survey Division has been accompHshed 
with none of the confusion or time loss usually common 
to such a change. The newly-formed Public Improve- 
ment Commission served by this division was estab- 
lished and operating within a few days of the effective 
date of the reorganization. The employees, knowing 
their Civil Service rights, were in no way jeopardized, 
continued their work uninterrupted, and, in general, 
have performed their duties with competence and en- 
thusiasm in a manner which is a credit to the division, 
the Pubhc Works Department, and the City of Boston. 

Respectfull}^ submitted, 

James W. Haley, 
Chief Engineer, Survey Division. 



Public Works Department. 



97 



APPENDIX G. 



REPORT OF DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
WATER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 3, 1955. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the Water Division, operations and ex- 
penditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1954. 

The tremendous increase in petitions for the extension 
of water mains into newly developed areas not covered 
by the water system, in all sections of the city, and the 
increase in applications for new services to new homes, 
made it necessary to have a special $200,000 appropri- 
ation under the title of "Extension and Relay of Water 
Mains." 

During the year a total of 29,269 hnear feet, or 5.54 
miles, of main pipe was laid, varying in size from 8 inches 
to 16 inches, and 780 apphcations were received for 
installation of new service pipes into new homes. 

There were 24 petitions received for the extensions of 
water mains. The particular streets in which the above 
work was performed are shown on the accompanying 
tables. 

The districts in which the main pipe was laid and 
relaid are as follows: 



District. 

East Boston . 
City Proper . 
South Boston 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Brighton 



Laid. 



Relaid. 



Linear Feet. Linear Feet. 



97 





677.9 


4,671.0 





531.0 


8,676.2 


940.3 


3,200.5 





7,782.6 


444.5 


2,248.0 






Under the provisions of chapter 4 of the Ordinances 
of 1952, which deals with capital improvements, the 
Water Division submitted a capital improvement pro- 



98 City Document No. 18. 

gram, which program was not followed to any great 
extent due to the fact that all available funds were 
needed to extend water mains to provide water into 
residential areas. 

Engineering Office. 

The office force maintained its usual service to the 
public with information in relation to the Water Divi- 
sion, estimates on new service pipes, making out con- 
tracts, assisting the yard forces on Water Division 
matters, compiling official data, bringing the record 
plans to date, supervision of all construction and snow 
removal in areas Nos. 7 and 11. 

The various agencies (municipal, state, and federal) 
were assisted in the design and supervision of construc- 
tion of water mains on the following projects: 

Central Artery — City square to North Station to Fort 

Hill square, construction. Design from Fort Hill 

square to Kneeland street. 
William T. Morrissey Boulevard — South Boston and 

Dorchester. 
Embankment road — City Proper. 
South East Expressway — Dorchester. 
Bellevue Hill Tower — West Roxbury (new tower location 

and distribution mains). 
Long Island — Studies for new 12-inch steel main over 

viaduct. 
Housing Authority — Completed Projects: Bromley park, 

Jamaica Plain and Roxbury, Columbia Point, South 

Boston. 

The trestle that carried the 30-inch main that con- 
nected Charlestown with Chelsea at the Chelsea North 
Bridge over the Mystic River, has been dismantled, 
thus permanently discontinuing the water pipe connec- 
tion between Chelsea and Charlestown. 

The engineering forces were engaged in the latter part 
of 1954 in drawing plans for main pipe extensions in 
Providence street, Hyde Park, from Hyde Park avenue 
to Cleary square. Stony Brook Village, Hyde Park, 
main pipe extension, and plans for the installing of new 
meters on the unmetered Metropolitan water works 
connections of the High High service in West Roxbury. 

The Distribution Branch. 
The Distribution Branch, consisting of the main yard 
and four district yards, and responsible for the repair 



Public Works Department. 99 

and maintenance of main pipes, hydrants, service pipes, 
and gate valves, was assisted during the year by four 
contracting firms who assisted the department forces in 
the repairing of leaks and the laying of new and relaying 
of old service pipes. 

The Machine Shop. 

The machine shop and plumbing shop handled all the 
drilling and connecting of services in addition to the 
regular work carried on in these shops, such as the 
machining and assembling of gates, valves, and hydrants, 
and the department assisted the other branches of the 
Public Works Department in performing special jobs. 

The Meter Branch. 

The meter shop handled a total of 14,876 meters, 
divided as follows: 



Meters applied on new services 
Meters discontinued . 
Meters changed . 
Meters tested in shop 
Meters repaired in service 
Meters repaired in shop 
Meters reset 
Meters junked 



715 

733 

5,027 

5,264 

603 

1,380 

426 

728 



Total 14,876 

Business Office. 

This office performs all the work related to the 
processing of bills to property owners for water used 
and the maintenance of water meters. 

These operations include receiving applications for 
new services and fire pipes; reading 95,000 meters 
quarterly; computing and preparing 382,000 bills 
amounting to $6,230,000; keeping account of paid and 
unpaid bills; recording liens against delinquent con- 
sumers; testing, repairing, installing, and removing 
water meters. 

It is unfortunate that for many years the surplus of 
the Water Department was not allowed to accumulate 
a reserve fund which would have been available when 
water receipts failed to meet expenditures. In 1954, 
receipts of the Water Department failed to meet ex- 
penditures and the department ended the year with a 



100 



City Document No. 18. 



deficit of $116,562.91, which deficit had to be met from 
other sources than that of the sale of water. The de- 
partment is now faced with the problem of finding addi- 
tional revenue in order that the department may be 
self-supporting. 



Main pipe petitions received . 


. 24 


Domestic service applications 


. 693 


Fire pipe applications .... 


. 54 


Special meter tests 


. 51 


Hydrant permits issued .... 


. 12 


Repair deposits received .... 


. 78 


Miscellaneous deposits .... 


. 14 



Appropriations, Expenditures, and Revenue. 

Budget appropriation for 1954 $2,391,610 00 

Amount expended 2,323,072 10 



Unexpended balance. 



^,537 90 



Extension of main appropriation . . $200,000 00 
Extension of main expenditure. . . . 116,888 04 



Unexpended balance 83,1 II 96 

Total unexpended balance $151,649 86 

Amount expended from all sources $6,155,831 37 

Amount of money collected during the year 1954 6,039,268 46 

Deficit $116,562 91 

The metropolitan assessment for 1954 amounted to 
$3,313,909.84 at the rate of $80 per million gallons, a 
decrease of $31,486.80 over what the assessment for 
1953 would have been if based on the $80 per million 
gallon rate. 



Total amount billed for 1954 

Total amount collected for 1954 bills, as of December 31, 

1954 

Total amount abated for 1954 bills, as of December 31, 

1954 ; . 

Total amount collected in 1954 on bills rendered prior to 
1954 



$6,197,924 57 

$4,861,659 46 

$19,403 35 

$1,061,361 00 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers before placing of liens on premises has 
been continued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel M. Sullivan, 

Division Engineer, 



Public Works Department. 



101 



Financial Transactions 


, Water Service, 


1954 


Cash balance from 1953 
Receipts 

Water rates and services 

Tax titles, water 


$6,003,670 98 
35,597 48 


$674,706 93 
6,039,268 46 


Expenditures from Revenue 
Pensions and annuities 
Water Division 
Water mains .... 
Collector's Office 

Refunds 

Metropolitan water assessment 


$160,060 33 

2,323,072 10 

116,888 04 

187,114 75 

510 25 

3,313,909 84 


$6,713,975 39 


Transfer of 1953 surplus to redemp- 
tion of city loans 


$6,101,555 31 
533,649 12 


6,635,204 43 






Expenditures for Debt 
Boston water debt . 
Interest 


$36,000 00 
1,362 50 


$78,770 96 
37,362 50 






Cash balance December 31, 195^ 
Carried forward to 1955 


1 . . . . 


$41,408 46 
157,971 37 


Deficit December 31, 1954 




$116,562 91 



Construction Account 

Extensions of mains (from revenue) 

Cost of construction December 31, 1954 $24,916,068 00 

Cost of construction December 31, 1953 24,718,476 68 



Increase in plant cost during 1954 



$197,591 32 



Cost of existing works December 31, 1954 

Pipe yards and buildings . . $84,332 16 

Distribution system .... 24,916,068 00 

Hyde Park water works .... 175,000 00 



High pressure 



$25,175,400 16 
2,448,340 64 

$27,623,740 80 



102 City Document No. 18. 

Shutting Off and Turning On Water in 1954. 

Number of shut-offs for repairs 4,746 

Number of premises turned on after repairs , . 4,418 

Number of shut-offs for vacancy 631 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy . . 305 

Number of premises shut off for nonpayment of water 

rates 17 

Number of premises turned on again after being shut 

off for nonpayment 1 

Number of premises shut off on account of waste . . 102 

Number of premises turned on again after being shut 

off for waste 35 

Number of new service pipes turned on for the first 

time 266 



Total number of times water was shut off or turned 

on 10,521 



Public Works Department. 103 

Water Statistics for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1954. 

Mains. 
Kind of pipe: cast iron, wrought iron, steel 
Size : 2 inches to 48 inches 
Extended miles, 4.211 
Size, enlarged, miles 
Total miles now in use, 1,022.068 
Public hydrants added, 29 
Public hydrants now in use, 12,517 
Stop gates, added, 96 
Stop gates now in use, 16,467 
Stop gates smaller than 4 inches, 36 
Number of blowoffs, 861 
Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds 

Service. 

Kind of pipe and size: Lead and lead lined, |-inch; 
cast iron, 2-inch to 16-inch; wrought iron and cement 
lined, J-inch to 2-inch; brass and copper, f-inch to 2§- 
inch. Service taps added. Total service taps now in 
use as per metered services. 



104 



City Document No. 18. 



Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1954. 



DiBTMCT. 





^ 




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Brighton (public) 

* (private) 

Cbarlestown (public) 

" (private) 

City Proper (public) 

" (private) 

Dorchester (pubUc) 

* (private) 

East Boston (public) 

* (private) 

Hyde Park (public) 

" (private) 

Roxbury (public) 

" (private) 

South Boston (public) 

" (private) 

West Roxbury (public) 

" (private) .... 

Deer Island (private) 

Gallups Island (private) .... 

Long Island (private) 

Rainsford Island (private) . . . 
Thompson's Island (private) . 
Quincy 



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1 

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8 



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2 

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9 

598 

9 

144 

1 

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227 

8 

22 

37 

119 

1 

717 



150 

8 



267 
3 

164 
1 

311 



177 

4 

101 

14 

609 

15 

16 

3 

6 

3 

2 

9 



13 



666 



191 



632 



1,264 

2 

242 



729 



1,067 

2 

309 

3 

1,446 
1 
7 



56 



Total number (public) . . 
Total number (private) . 



Total number (public and 
private) , 



457 
33 

490 



247 
5 

252 



2,140 
29 



2,169 



2,122 
126 



2,248 



6.546 
17 

6,563 



91 
111 

202 



High pressure fire hydrants 



Total hydrants (all kinds). 



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106 City Document No. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System, 


18. 
December 31, 1954. 






Hydrants. 


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Private, December 31, 1953 


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33 

2 

7 

456 

33 


248 
5 


2,150 
29 


2,167 

126 

14 

63 

2,118 

126 


6,457 

17 

113 

24 

6,546 
17 


4 
13 


56 


6 


4 


91 
HI 


7 


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248 
5 


6 

2,144 

29 














Total, public, December 31, 1954. 
Total, private, December 31, 1954 


4 
13 


56 


6 


4 


91 
111 


7 


Total hydrants in ser 
Total hydrants estab 
Total hydrants aban( 
Total hydrants addec 
Total hydrants in ser 
High pressure fire hy 
Total hydrants (all k 


vice 

ish© 

lone 

Idui 

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dran 

inds 


1953 

d during 1954 . . . . 
d during 1954 . . . . 

•ing 1954 

December 31, 1954 . 

ts in service, 1954 

1 in service December 31, 1954 . 


129 
100 


11,985 

29 

12,014 

503 

12,517 


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112 City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX H. 



Report of the 

Public Improvement Commission. 

Boston, January 3, 1955. 
Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Through the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In accordance with the provisions of section 24, chapter 
3 of the Revised City Ordinances of 1947, the following 
report of the PubHc Improvement Commission for the 
period beginning May 1, 1954, and ending December 
31, 1954, is respectfully submitted. 

The PubHc Improvement Commission was estabhshed 
May 1, 1954, by the provisions of section 57, chapter 2 
of the 1954 Ordinances. This commission, consisting 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, the Commissioner 
of Real Property, and the Chairman of the Boston 
Traffic Commission, was assigned all of the powers and 
duties of the former Board of Street Commissioners, 
except: 

(a) Those relating to the storage and sale of inflammables, 
filling stations, and parking lots which were transferred 
to the Committee on Licenses in the Public Safety 
Commission ; 

(6) Those relating to the planting and removal of trees in 
public ways, the use of public ways for any temporary 
obstruction in, under, or over the same, and the use of 
public ways for the storage and sale of merchandise 
which were transferred to the Commissioner of Public 
Works; and 

(c) Those relating to the abatement of taxes which were 
transferred to the Real Property Department. 

Functions of the Board of Street Commissioners 
transferred to this commission include the authority 
to lay out, widen, relocate, alter, discontinue, or re- 
name public highways, and to order the making of 
specific repairs therein; to order the constructfon of 
sanitary sewers and storm drains; to take land by 
eminent domain for municipal purposes (except hous- 



Public Works Department. 113 

ing and off-street parking); to permit the opening of 
private ways for public travel; to levy assessments for 
street, sidewalk, and sewer betterments; and to issue 
permits for the location of wire-carrying poles, conduits, 
pipes, tracks, and similar uses of the public ways. 

The first meeting of the Public Improvement Com- 
mission was held May 7, 1954. Present were Public 
Works Commissioner George G. Hyland, who was 
elected Chairman; Commissioner of Real Property 
Herman Carp, who was elected Vice-Chairman ; and 
Chairman of the Boston Traffic Commission, William 
Arthur Reilly. Chief Engineer James W. Haley and 
Head Clerk Michael J. Corrao, both of the Survey 
Division of the Public Works Department, were desig- 
nated by the Commissioner of Public Works to serve 
as Chief Engineer and Secretary, respectively, to the 
Public Improvement Commission. 

Street Program. 

During the period covered by this report, sixty-seven 
(67) highway improvements, including the widening 
and relocation of twenty-five (25) public ways, the 
making of specific repairs in twenty-nine (29) existing 
streets, the laying out of eleven (11) new highways, 
and two (2) new footways, were ordered by the Public 
Improvement Commission. 

Of particular interest in these groups are the following 
projects: 

The laying out and construction of Terminal street, Charles- 
town, at an estimated cost of $85,089. This street will extend 
through the Mystic Docks, 3,100 feet from Chelsea street to 
the new Port Authority Terminal. It will be constructed in 
1955 under the State's Chapter 90 program. After its com- 
pletion, the Chelsea Street Drawbridge, now being operated at 
a cost of $35,000 per year, can be abandoned. 

The widening and relocation of Centre street, West Roxbury, 
from Spring street to Northdale road, at an estimated cost of 
$160,000. This street, one of the principal public ways in West 
Roxbury, has been unimproved since the time the town of 
West Roxbury was annexed to Boston, and the proposed wid- 
ening to a minimum of 50 feet will be a major improvement to 
the outer section of West Roxbury. 

The widening of A street, South Boston, from Congress street 
to Dorchester avenue, at an estimated cost of $84,000. A 
street has served as an alternate route from Old Colony avenue 
to downtown Boston for many years. Because of the many 



114 City Document No. 18. 

large warehouses with shipping doors directly on the street for 
loading large trailer trucks, the effective roadway width per- 
mitted only a single line of vehicular traffic to pass, and, conse- 
quently, one-way traffic has been in effect for some years. In 
the area where this constriction has occurred, the street has 
been widened 20 feet. Along the remaining sections, the road- 
way has been widened approximately 6 feet by reducing exist- 
ing sidewalk widths. 

The widening and relocation of Forest Hills street. West 
Roxbury, from Glen road to Cemetery road, and the widening 
of the roadway of Cemetery road, from Forest Hills street to 
Morton street, at an estimated cost of $120,000. This section 
of Forest Hills street, a steep and winding road, carries a 
moderately heavy volume of traffic. Several of the curves 
being eliminated by this improvement have been considered 
extremely dangerous. 

The improvement of Morton street, West Roxbury, from 
Forest Hills Overpass to Harvard street, consisting of the in- 
stallation of traffic divisional islands in connection with high- 
way reconstruction, at a total estimated cost of $140,000. 

The improvement of Hyde Park avenue. West Roxbury and 
Hyde Park, from Walk Hill street to Metropolitan avenue, 
consisting of the installation of traffic divisional islands in con- 
nection with highway reconstruction, at a total estimated cost 
of $308,000. 

The improvement of Cummins Highway, in West Roxbury, 
at American Legion Highway, and in Dorchester, from Harvard 
street to Mattapan square, consisting of the installation of 
traffic divisional islands in connection with highway recon- 
struction, at a total estimated cost of $240,000. 

All highway improvements ordered during the period 
of this report were as follows: 

Alwin street, Hyde Park district, from Turtle Pond Parkway 
to the Dedham Parkway; length, 1,111 feet; estimated cost, 
$23,621; estimated benefit, $11,724.69. 

Bradeen Street Footway, West Roxbury district, from 
Bradeen street to Brookway terrace; length, 170 feet; estimated 
cost, none; estimated benefit, none. 

Brookway Footpath, West Roxbury district, from Brookway 
terrace to Hyde Park avenue; length, 432 feet; estimated cost, 
none; estimated benefit, none. 

Brookway Road Extension, West Roxbury district, from 
Archdale road approximately 235 feet southerly, over and 
including a portion of Archdale road (without construction); 
length, 236 feet; estimated cost, none; estimated benefit, none. 

Brookway Road Extension, West Roxbury district, from 
Elven road to Archdale road (without construction); length, 
387 feet; estimated cost, none; estimated benefit, none. 



Public Works Department. 115 

Brookway terrace, West Roxbury district, from Brookway 
road to Brookway Footpath (without construction); length, 
441 feet; estimated cost, none; estimated benefit, none. 

Cheryl Lane, Hyde Park district, from Alwin terrace approx- 
imately 375 feet westerly and northerly; length, 375 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $6,438; estimated benefit, $3,940.50. 

Garfield avenue, Hyde Park district, from Faraday street 
approximately 162 feet northeasterly; length, 162 feet; esti- 
mated cost, none; estimated benefit, none. 

Merriam street. West Roxbury district, from Brookside 
avenue to Stony Brook and over Cable street to Minton street 
(formerly Cable and Merriam streets); length, 505 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $9,598; estimated benefit, $4,796.47. 

Ruggles court, Roxbury district, from Ruggles street approx- 
imately 258 feet southwesterly (formerly Goldsmith place); 
length, 258 feet; estimated cost, none; estimated benefit, none, 

Stonehill road, Hyde Park district, from Alwin street to 
Alwin street, over and including the private ways known 
as Alwin terrace and Alwin court (formerly Alwin terrace); 
length, 999 feet; estimated cost, $17,110; estimated benefit, 
$10,068.74. 

Terminal street, Charlestown district, from Medford street 
northerly and northeasterly for a distance of approximately 
3,100 feet; length, 3,100 feet; estimated cost, $85,089; estimated 
benefit, none. 

Widened or Relocated. 

A street, South Boston district, widened and relocated on the 
westerly side, approximately 617 feet southwesterly. 

Brigham street, East Boston district, widened at the north- 
westerly corner of Ida street and the northeasterly side of 
Brigham street. 

Canterbury street, West Roxbury district, widened at the 
northwesterly and southeasterly corners of Hyde Park avenue. 

Canterbury street. West Roxbury district, widened between 
Poplar street and Seymour street. 

Centre street. West Roxbury district, widened, relocated, 
and constructed from Spring street to Grove street. 

Chapman street, Charlestown district, widened and con- 
structed at the westerly corner of Rutherford avenue. 

Cummins Highway, West Roxbury district, widened and 
constructed at the southerly corner of Washington street. 

Fairway street, Dorchester district, widened and constructed 
at the northerly and easterly corners of Cummins Highway. 

Forest Hills street, West Roxbury district, widened, relo- 
cated, and constructed from Glen road to Cemetery road. 

Glenley terrace, Brighton district, widened at the southerly 
corner of Brayton road. 

Harvard street, Dorchester district, widened and relocated 
on the westerly side of the southerly corner of Franklin Hill 
avenue. 



116 City Document No. 18. 

Harvard street, West Roxbury district, widened and con- 
structed at the northerly corner of Cummins Highway. 

HolUngsworth street, Dorchester district, widened and con- 
structed at the southeasterly corner of Cummins Highway. 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park district, widened, relocated, 
and constructed between Metropolitan avenue and approxi- 
mately 250 feet southerly. 

Morton street. West Roxbury district, widened and con- 
structed at the southerly corner of Canterbury street. 

Morton street, West Roxbury district, widened and relocated 
from Cemetery road approximately 425 feet westerly over and 
including Arborway. 

Mother Julia road, Dorchester district, widened and con- 
structed on the southerly side from Dorchester avenue approxi- 
mately 225 feet westerly. 

Newmarket square, Roxbury district, part of the highway 
relocated and constructed from Massachusetts avenue approx- 
imately 800 feet northerly. 

Pond street. West Roxbury district, widened and relocated 
between Avon street and the Brookline boundary line. 

Pubhc Alley No. 908, Boston Proper district, widened and 
constructed on the southeasterly side, at the bend, approxi- 
mately 100 feet north of Marlborough street. 

Regis road, Dorchester district, widened and constructed at 
the northerly and easterly corners of Cummins Highway. 

West street, Hyde Park district, widened at the south- 
westerly and northwesterly corners of Hyde Park avenue. 

Grades Revised. 

Parklawn road. West Roxbury district, from Courtney road 
approximately 145 feet northerly. 

Rockland street. West Roxbury district, between Washington 
street and the Dedham line. 

Specific Repairs. 

A street. South Boston district, between Congress street and 
Dorchester avenue. 

Adams street, Dorchester district, at the intersection of 
Neponset avenue and Parkman street, consisting of the reduc- 
tion in width of the existing sidewalk and the installation of a 
traffic divisional island. 

Adams street, Dorchester district, between Minot street and 
GalUvan Boulevard, consisting of the reduction in width of the 
existing sidewalks. 

American Legion Highway, West Roxbury district, consisting 
of the construction of sidewalks and traffic divisional islands 
and the widening of existing roadways at Cummins Highway. 

Arlington street, Boston Proper district, consisting of the 
reduction in width of the existing sidewalk at the southeasterly 
corner of Commonwealth avenue. 



Public Works Department. 117 

Atlantic avenue, Boston Proper district, consisting of in- 
creasing the curb corner radius at the northerly corner of 
Kneeland street. 

Beacon street, Brighton district, consisting of the reduction 
in width of the existing northerly sidewalk to 10 feet between 
Chestnut Hill avenue and a point 100 feet easterly of Suther- 
land road. 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester district, consisting of the 
installation of traffic divisional islands, between Harvard street 
and Angell street. 

Blue Hill avenue, Roxbury district, consisting of the in- 
stallation of traffic divisional islands, between Geneva avenue 
and Warren street. 

Bowdoin street, Dorchester district, consisting of the instal- 
lation of a traffic divisional island at the intersection of Geneva 
avenue. 

Boylston street, Boston Proper district, consisting of the re- 
duction in width of the existing sidewalk at the northwesterly 
corner of Arlington street. 

Brigham street, East Boston district, consisting of the reduc- 
tion in width of the existing sidewalks to 3.5 feet. 

Charles street, Boston Proper district, consisting of increasing 
the curb radius at the southeasterly corner of Branch street 
and at the northeasterly and southeasterly corners of Chestnut 
street. 

Charles street, Boston Proper district, consisting of in- 
creasing the curb corner radius at the southwesterly and north- 
easterly corners of Pinckney street. 

Charles street, Boston Proper district, consisting of increas- 
ing the curb corner radius at the northeasterly and south- 
easterly corners of Revere street. 

Chestnut street, Boston Proper district, consisting of the 
reduction in width of the existing sidewalk at the northwesterly 
corner of West Cedar street. 

Columbus avenue, Roxbury district, consisting of the in- 
stallation of traffic divisional islands at the intersection of 
Tremont street. 

Cummins Highway, West Roxbury district, consisting of the 
relocation of the existing sidewalk on the easterly side between 
Harvard street and a point approximately 100 feet northerly 
thereof. 

Cummins Highway, Dorchester district, consisting of the re- 
duction in width of the existing sidewalks and the installation 
of a trafiic divisional island, between Woodhaven street and 
River street. 

Harvard avenue, Hyde Park district, consisting of the instal- 
lation of a traffic divisional island at the intersection of Hyde 
Park avenue. 



118 City Document No. 18. 

Huntington avenue, Roxbury district, consisting of the re- 
duction in width of the existing sidewalks from Tremont street 
to Riverway. 

Hyde Park avenue. West Roxbury and Hyde Park districts, 
from Walk Hill street to Metropolitan avenue, consisting of the 
reduction in width of sidewalks from 13 feet to 9 feet, and the 
installation of a di\'isional island. 

Marlborough street, Boston Proper district, consisting of 
increasing the curb corner radii at Public Alley No. 908. 

Massachusetts avenue, Boston Proper district, consisting of 
increasing the curb corner radii at Public Alley No. 908. 

Morton street, West Roxbury district, consisting of the in- 
stallation of a median island from Cemetery road to Harvard 
street. 

Mt. Vernon street, Boston Proper district, between Charles 
street and West Cedar street, consisting of the reduction in 
\ddth of sidewalks. 

Talbot avenue, Dorchester district, consisting of the reduc- 
tion in width of the existing sidewalk and the installation of 
traffic divisional islands at the intersection of Blue Hill avenue. 

Talbot avenue, Dorchester district, consisting of the reduc- 
tion in width of the existing sidewalk on the westerly side of 
Talbot avenue, at the intersection of Ashmont street, and the 
installation of traffic divisional islands. 

Discontinued. 

Centre street, West Roxbury district, westerly side, between 
Hillcroft road and Louder's Lane. 

Newmarket square, Roxbury district, from Massachusetts 
avenue approximately 800 feet northerly. 

Private Way Renamed. 
Chappie court, Charlestown district, leading from 60 Chappie 
street (formerly Mystic place). 

Sewer Program. 
During the period of this report the construction of 
2.61 miles of sanitary sewer, 2.76 miles of storm sewer, 
65 catch basins, and 5 drop inlets were ordered at a 
total estimated cost of S270,895. Estimated benefit 
to private property for the construction of the 2.61 
miles of sanitary sewer amounted to S78,436.67. 

Sewerage works ordered were as follows: 



Public Works Department. 



119 



LOCATIOX. 



o^ 







c 




03 


o 


PQ 


a 






JS 


ft 






<d 




O 


Q 



* 2 



Boston Proper 

Arlington street 

Newland street 

Brighton 

Cleveland Cirde 

*Margo road. ........ 

Charlestown 

Chapman street and 
Rutherford avenue. 
Dorchester 

Clearwater Drive . . . . 

Dorchester avenue. . . 
*Groveland street .... 
Hyde Park 

Alwin street 

♦Dell terrace 

♦Derry road 

♦Dietz road 

*Dodge road 

♦Daniel court 

♦Eastmont road 

♦Farwell avenue 

♦Kristin court 

♦Leighton road 

Norton street 

♦Senders court 

♦Sherrin street 

Summit street 

♦Susanna court 

West street 

Westminster street. . . 

♦Wharton court 

South Boston 

Bantr>' Way 

Silver street 



940 



785 



208 
645 

1,080 
384 
180 
465 
200 
162 

1,104 



435 
308 



225 



250 
ISO 



100 



27 



55 



645 

1,080 

394 



465 
200 
50 
1.067 
670 
250 
308 
260 



75 



17 



$350 00 


700 00 


400 00 


10.400 00 


500 00 


1.200 00 


2,600 00 


13,500 00 


9.400 00 


2.800 00 


9,160 00 


19,600 00 


7,000 00 


2,200 00 


8,700 00 


2.500 00 


2.500 00 


19,000 00 


7.485 00 


6,300 00 


4.500 00 


11,000 00 


2,700 00 


370 00 


7,810 00 


2,200 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 



$6,480 00 



5,040 00 



1.230 00 
3.870 00 
5.466 79 
1.500 00 
1.118 65 
2,850 00 
1,200 00 
1,800 00 
6.625 00 

3,090 49 
1,848 00 

1,426 38 



1,426 3S 



325 00 



120 



City Document No. 18. 



Location. 



u 






a 




OS 












<s 




OQ 


CO 



West Roxbury 

*Atwill road 

Bellevue Hill road.. 

Brook Farm road. . 
*Brownson terrace. . 
*Brucewood street . . 

Centre street 

Centre street 

Centre street 

♦Clarendon avenue . 

*Driftwood road 

♦Federal road 

*Furbush road 

*Glendower street . . 
*Mossdale road .... 

Moss Hill road. . . . 
*Newfield street 

Pond street 

♦Sherman street 

V. F. W. Parkway. 



660 
322 
50 
375 
720 
150 



180 
400 
150 
150 
500 
1,560 



400 



150 
325 



322 

50 

375 

720 

1,680 



180 
400 
150 
150 
490 
1,560 
782 
600 



150 
385 



$8,600 00 

4,800 00 

700 00 

5,500 00 

4,320 00 

25,000 00 
2,500 00 
2,000 00 
1,900 00 
4,500 00 
3,000 00 
9,300 00 
5,500 00 

17,000 00 
6,500 00 
5,200 00 
1,000 00 
1,200 00 
4,500 00 



$3,960 00 
1,000 00 



2,250 00 
4,319 98 



550 00 
2,058 00 
1.800 00 
1,200 00 
3,000 00 
9,702 00 

2,400 00 

900 00 



Total . 



13,798 



14,480 



65 



$270,895 00 



$78,436 68 



* Eastments taken. 



Eminent Domain Land Takings. 

During the period of this report the following land 
takings were made at the request of the Public Works 
Commissioner: 

A parcel of land, for use of the Sanitary Division, Public 
Works Department, containing 492,397 square feet, located in 
the vicinity of Gardner street, West Roxbury, that was taken 
November 22, 1954. 

An easement for the installation of a Public Works Depart- 
ment water main in private lands, between Cummins Highway, 
West Roxbury, and Grant place, Hyde Park, containing 
279,951 square feet, was taken December 6, 1954. 



Public Works Department. 



121 



Assessments. 

During the period of this report, the Highway Divi- 
sion of the Pubhc Works Department sent notice of 
completion of 20 streets at a total cost of $433,509.96. 
These streets were previously ordered constructed by 
the Board of Street Commissioners. On this work the 
Public Improvement Commission voted upon assess- 
ments in the amount of $113,129.11. During this same 
period the Sewer Division of the Pubhc Works Depart- 
ment reported the completion of construction of sanitary 
sewerage in 14 streets at a cost of $81,583.86, on which 
this commission levied assessments in the amount 
of $26,761.50. 

The completion of new sidewalks in four streets at a 
cost of $41,901.60, constructed by the City Council, 
was also reported by the Highway Division. On these, 
this commission levied betterment assessments totaling 
$18,392.70. 

Street Assessments. 



Street. 



District. 



Cost. 



Assessment. 



Andria road 

Austin street 

Badger road 

Beech street 

Beram avenue .... 
Cranmore road . . . 
Empire street .... 

Eugenia road 

George street 

Halsey road 

Lochland road .... 
Mayflower street . 
Oakmere street . . . 

Poplar street 

Presentation road. 

Solaris road 

Southview street . . 
Van Brunt street . 
Verona street .... 
Wilton street 



Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Brighton 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 



$5,000 43 
34,313 53 
22,905 50 
32,335 14 

7,322 04 
31,474 25 
19,009 32 

8,661 81 

8,681 72 
13,613 72 
17,854 05 

3.700 15 

38,382 00 

115,126 46 

6,416 91 
11,956 50 
10,655 01 
23.876 14 
10,849 91 
10,375 37 



$2,222 58 

10,045 12 

12,701 92 

1,361 22 

675 00 

8,869 32 

7,475 40 

3,436 23 

2,037 40 

7,780 94 

6,752 72 

1,263 54 

13,077 58 

10,169 23 

2,162 28 

4,975 06 

3,329 64 

9,473 86 

1,611 25 

3,807 82 



Totals . 



$433,509 96 



$113,129 11 



122 



City Document No. 18. 

Sewer Assessments. 



Street. 


District. 


Cost. 


Assessment. 


Alwin street, Alwin court, Alwin ter- 


Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 


$34,330 46 
5,300 00 
4,100 00 
3,047 00 
3,767 00 
1,570 97 
1,300 00 
3,043 70 
21,689 53 
3,435 20 


$12 063 60 


Ayles road, Westminster street 

Cricket Lane 


2,842 00 
1,000 00 
1,103 50 




Guest street 


1 260 00 




480 00 




708 00 


Kardon road 

William T. Morriasey Boulevard 


2,148 30 
3.866 10 
1,290 00 






Totals 




$81,583 86 


$26,761 50 









Sidewalk Assessments. 



Street. 


District. 


Cost. 


Assessment. 




West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 


$9,513 50 
10,876 30 
8,594 60 
12,917 20 


$4,414 49 


Hollywood road 


5,629 63 




4 248 58 




4,100 00 










$41,901 60 


$18,392 70 









Land Damages. 
On new street construction, 110 claims were filed for 
damages to property resulting from land takings or 
changes in grade. On these claims, this commission 
awarded damages in the amount of $22_,636.76. 

Street Name Changes. 
In conformance with chapter 55, Acts of 1951, as 
amended, a program was inaugurated for the naming 
and renaming of the private ways in the City of Boston. 
Until the passage of this legislation, private ways were 
named by the abutting property owners. Over a period 
of years, lack of municipal control had resulted in con- 
fusion and duplication in private street names throughout 
the city. 



Public Works Department. 



123 



During the past three months, pubhc hearings have 
been scheduled on the naming of all of the approximate- 
ly 2,000 private ways in the city. Wherever it was felt 
that the original name was unsatisfactory, a new name 
was assigned, provided there was no serious objection 
from the property owners. 

In connection with the renaming of private ways, a 
revised edition of ''Boston's Streets" has been prepared 
to be pubHshed in the early part of 1955. 

Miscellaneous Permits. 

During the period of this report, 437 permits were 
issued to utility companies for the placing and main- 
taining of poles for the supports of wires. 

Also, seven permits were issued for miscellaneous in- 
stallation or uses of the public highways of the City of 
Boston as follows: 



Street. 



Petitioner. 



Nature of Permit. 



Braintree street, Brighton 

Park and Clayton streets, 
Dorchester 

Columbus avenue, Roxbury 

Fruit street, Boston Proper 



East First street. South Bos- 
ton 



Meridian street, East Boston 
Franklin street, Hyde Park 



E. T. Ryan Iron Works, Inc. 
Sturtevant Mill Company 

Crystal Coal & Oil Company 

Massachusetts Eye & Ear In- 
firmary 

New England Greyhound 
Lines, Inc. 

Louis Vitale (Clieer Up Tavern) 

Worcester Gas Liglit Company 



Underground structure 
(steam pipe). 

Underground structure 
(steam line). 

Underground flushbox. 

Underground transformer 
vault. 

Underground steam line. 

Enlarge existing manhole 

Underground structure 
(gas main). 



Summary. 

As hereinbefore noted, this commission was estab- 
lished May 1, 1955, under the provisions of section 57, 
chapter 2 of the 1954 Ordinances. Within a few days 
the first meeting was held and the necessary organiza- 
tional work carried out in such a manner that the 
Board of Street Commissioner's functions were taken 
over without interruption or confusion of any nature. 

At the outset, the commission felt that a highway 
program, placing special emphasis on improvement of 
existing highways, was necessary. Accordingly, our 
activities have been primarily in this direction. Never- 
theless, careful consideration has been given the many 



124 City Document No. 18. 

petitions for acceptance of new streets and a program 
will soon be in operation to accept as many unpaved 
private ways as can be constructed from available funds. 
New sewerage works have been ordered wherever 
needed to meet the requirement of new building con- 
struction and plans are now being prepared for a long- 
range program for placing the remaining open drainage 
and brooks in the outlying sections of the city in conduits. 
In conclusion, we are most pleased to report that in 
its first year the commission Jhas accomplished a most 
successful program, made possible especially by the 
engineering and administrative assistance furnished by 
the personnel of the Public Works Department. 

George G. Hyland, 

Chairman. 

Herman Carp, 

Vice Chairman. 

Wm. Arthur Reilly, 

Member. 



City op Boston 

Administrative Services Department 

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