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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

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[Document 18 — 1956.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1955 



Boston, January 2, 1956. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Deak Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the annual report of the Public Works De- 
partment and of the Public Improvement Commission 
for the year ending December 31, 1955. 

Fiscal. 

The total expenditures of the department for the year 
were $21,288,729, of which $3,222,387.52 represents water 
assessments levied by the Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion, and $624,373.86 represents Metropolitan District 
Commission sewer assessments. 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled $6,237,- 
141.79, and the revenue derived from the operation of the 
Sumner Tunnel reached a record high of $2,413,231.59. 

Ihe operation of the Sumner Tunnel resulted in a 
record-breaking surplus of $1,022,063.14, and the surplus 
resulting from the sale of water amounted to $57,917.28. 



2 City Document No. 18. 

Loan Orders. 
On April 26, 1955, a City Council order was approved 
by your Honor, which provided, under the provisions of 
section 7 of chapter 44 of the General Laws, that the sum 
of $2,000,000 be appropriated for the construction of 
public ways and the sum of $1,000,000 be appropriated 
for the construction of sewerage works, and on May 3, 
1955, that the sum of $225,260.50 be appropriated for 
departmental equipment. 

Street Construction Work. 

State- Aid Program. 

Last year we completed a considerable amount of street 
reconstruction under the Chapter 90 State-Aid Highway 
Reconstruction Program. The following important main 
highways were constructed under the State-Aid Program : 

Cummins Highway, West Roxbury, from Washington 
street to Harvard street. 

Hyde Park avenue, West Roxbury, from AValk Hill street 
to Cummins Highway. 

Neponset avenue, Dorchester, from Adams street to 
Gallivan Boulevard. 

Southampton street, Roxbury and South Boston, from 
Massachusetts avenue to Andrew square. 

The total cost of the Chapter 90 Construction Program 
in Boston for the year 1955 was $548,570.57, of which the 
State Department of Public Works, under the provisions 
of section 34 of chapter 90 of the General Laws, paid 
45.8 per cent, thereby presenting a substantial savings 
of $251,058.05 to the taxpayers of Boston. Construction 
was started on Dorchester street, South Boston, and Ter- 
minal street, Charlestown, but was not completed in 1955. 
It is planned to again conduct an extensive program of 
street construction under this chapter in 1956. 

Non-State-Aid Program. 
We also completed a major street reconstruction pro- 
gram, comprising extensive construction and reconstruc- 
tion, in every section of the city. Several important traf- 
fic arteries resurfaced by the department during the year 
are listed as follows : 



Public Works Department. 3 

A street, South Boston, from Dorchester avenue to Con- 
gress street. 

Cambridge street. City Proper, from Charles street to 
Blossom street. 

Dock square, City Proper. 

Dorchester avenue, Dorchester, from Adams street to 
Hancock street. 

Huntington avenue, Roxbury, from Massachusetts avenue 
to Ruggles street. 

Longwood avenue, Roxbury, from Huntington avenue to 
the Brooklinc line. 

Perkins street, West Roxbury, from Chestnut street to 
Parkman Drive. 

Pond street. West Roxbury, from Avon street to Mt. 
Walley avenue 

Poplar street, Hyde Park, from Beech street to West 
street. 

Summer street. South Boston, from Fort Point Channel 
to B street. 

In continuation of our policy of- replacing brick side- 
walks with cement concrete in the older sections of the 
city, contracts during the year totaling approxmiately 
$84,000 were awarded for this work. 

The following is a summarized financial statement of 
the expenditures made in 1955 for highway improve- 
ments: 

Budgetary Item. 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) . . . $2,371,056 82 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue Account) . 146,226 51 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) . . . 64,898 34 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of . . . 31,742 47 

Total $2,613,924 14 



The following is a summarized record of the highway 
improvement work done by the department in 1955: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 157. 

Includes 43 new streets and 3 footways ordered laid out and 
constructed under the provisions of chapter 393 of the Acts 
of 1906. 

Miles of Streets Improved, 24-38. 

Includes 5.66 miles of so-called Chapter 90 state-aid high- 
way improvements. 

Miles of Sidewalks Improved, 2.79. 

In addition to sidewalk improvements included in the above- 
noted street improvements. 



4 City Document No. 18. 

We also completed during the year the removal of 274 
gas lamps, which were replaced with an equal number of 
1,000- or 2,500-lumen electric lamps. It is our intention 
to continue with this program in 1956. 

Snow Removal. 

We were fortunate during the past year in that no 
snowstorms of major proportions occurred. Only two 
storms had snowfall of appreciable precipitation — Feb- 
ruary 1, 3.8 inches, and March 4 to 5, 4.7 inches. No snow 
removal was required by contract forces, but contractors' 
plows were hired for plowing following the aforementioned 
two storms. 

There are 743.35 miles of public streets that have to be 
plowed and maintained during the winter months. The 
department's fleet of thirty-seven (37) snow fighters was 
used to plow, sand, and salt the streets of the downtown 
area. Most of the plowing work in the rest of the city 
was done by approximately 250 trucks rented on an hour- 
ly basis from contractors. 

The cost of snow removal work for 1955 was 
$240,019.43. 

Bridges. 

On May 13, 1955, the Fort Point Channel, above Dor- 
chester avenue, was declared nonnavigable by action of 
the Federal Government on petition of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts and the City of Boston. This 
act will allow the elimination of the drawspans of the 
Broadway and Dover Street Bridges, and provide a con- 
siderable savings in bridge operating costs. 

During the year we petitioned the Corps of Engineers, 
U. S. Army, for a change in the operating regulations of 
the Charlestown, Maiden, L Street, Summer Street, 
Northern Avenue, and Congress Street Bridges. The peti- 
tion requested a change in regulations similar to those 
granted for the Broadway and Dover Street Bridges in 
1954, which provided the bridges to be closed to naviga- 
tion from 4 P.M. until 9.30 a.m. each day. It is expected 
that this petition will be granted in 1956 and will result 
in a future substantial savings to bridge operating costs. 

On September 12, 1955, work was started on the recon- 
struction of the approach spans of the Charlestown Bridge 
under a contract awarded to Builders Iron Works in the 



Public Works Department. 5 

amount of $931,000. Charles A. McGuire & Associates 
were engaged to prepare plans and specifications for the 
repair and renewal of the drawspans for this bridge, in- 
cluding the operating mechanism. 

Hurricane Floods. 

As a result of rainfall as an aftermath of Hurricane 
Diane, the precipitation occurring on August 18 and 19, 
1955, was the heaviest in the history of the Boston 
Weather Bureau. The total ramfall over the two-day 
period was 11.94 inches, occurring in 36 hours. The 24- 
hour rainfall of 8.40 inches broke the previous record of 
6.04 inches on July 9, 1921. 

Extensive areas in the South End, Back Bay, and Rox- 
bury were flooded, and hundreds of cellars were pumped 
out by the department forces with some assistance from 
the Fire Department manning civil defense pumps. All 
available contractors' pumps were also engaged for this 
work. About the time we finished pumping out the cellars 
in these districts, the Neponset River, Charles River, and 
Mother Brook had reached their maximum crest. As a 
result, the Island Section in Hyde Park and Belnel Vil- 
lage in Dorchester were flooded, the water standing sev- 
eral feet deep in many of the basements, and deep enough 
in Belnel iroad and Margin street to require the use of 
rowboats to provide ferry service to the residents. Your 
Honor established an emergency committee under the 
direction of the Civil Defense Department with head- 
quarters in the Hyde Park Municipal Building. A rep- 
resentative of this department assigned to the committee 
furnished transportation to the Health Department for 
the distribution of chloride of lune to householders for 
dismfecting the water in their basements and provided 
for daily refuse collections in both areas. 

When the river subsided sufficiently, the department 
put all its available pumps and equipment into these 
areas and dewatered all the flooded basements. While 
waiting for the river flow to subside, the department made 
every effort to lower the depth of flow in the Neponset 
River and Mother Brook and to protect property and 
lives by clearing debris from the crest of Union Waste 
Paper Dam in Dedham, from the Jenkins Dam and from 
the upstream side of the Central Avenue Bridge, both in 
the Dorchester Lower Mills area, and by inducing the 



6 City Document No. 18. 

owners of the Jenkins Dam and the Walter Baker Dam 
to raise the dam sluice gates to their full opening in order 
to lower the depth of flow upstream. 

Refuse Disposal. 

During the year, we acquired 124,821 square feet of 
land, located northerly of South Bay avenue, Roxbury, 
by taking from the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, for a site for the South Bay Incinerator. On 
December 2, 1955, proposals were received for the fur- 
nishing of incinerator equipment, mcluding furnaces, 
waste-heat boilers, fly-ash controls, and other appurte- 
nances. Five bidders submitted proposals on three types 
of furnaces — namely, the circular furnace with a rotary 
stoker, a rectangular furnace with a reciprocal stoker, and 
a rectangular furnace with a traveling grate stoker. An 
award of this equipment contract will be made after eval- 
uation of the bids by the consulting engineers, Metcalf 
& Eddy, and the depasrtment, and then plans and specifi- 
cations will be prepared for the incinerator building. It 
is expected that construction of this plant will start early 
in 1956. 

Contracts for the collection of refuse and garbage, 
awarded on April 1, 1955, provided that five more collec- 
tion districts will be supplied with rubbish trucks having 
the modern all-enclosed steel bodies. This makes a total 
of sixteen (16) out of the seventeen (17) districts now 
being furnished with these sanitary refuse trucks. 

New Building. 
Architect William W. Drummey was engaged to pre- 
pare plans and specifications and supervise the construc- 
tion of the following three new facilities for the depart- 
ment in 1955. An ofiice building and garage at the new 
yard located at the Arborway and Forest Hills street, 
West Roxbury, to house the offices of the Highway, Sani- 
tary, Sewer and Water Divisions, and to provide storage 
for fifteen (15) snow fighters and one (1) snow loader. 
The work was done by the Park Construction Company 
at a cost of $146,706.90 and completed on September 4, 
1955. A garage to provide storage for six (6) snow fighters 
at the Western Avenue Yard, Brighton, constructed under 
contract with J. J. Bonavire, Inc., at a cost of $41,988, 
was completed on September 15, 1955. An addition to the 



Public Works Department. 7 

Highland Street Garage, Roxbury, to provide additional 
stockroom space, is being constructed by Kane & Diaferio 
Construction Company, at an estimated cost of $20,000. 
Work will be completed early in 1956. 

Purchase of Equipment. 
New equipment purchased during the year included 
two (2) Chevrolet carryalls, one (1) Ford sedan, one (1) 
Buick sedan, two (2) Ford |-ton trucks, seventeen (17) 
Ford 3-ton trucks, three (3) Diamond-T 5-ton trucks, 
one (1) Ford truck with back hoe and catch -basin cleaner, 
one (1) Ford wrecker truck, one (1) G.M.C. wrecker 
truck, two (2) Ford emergency utility trucks, one (1) 
Ford stake truck, one (1) Unit self-propelled crane, two 
(2) Walter snow fighters, nine (9) Hough front bucket 
loaders, and twenty-two (22) Baughman sanding bodies. 

Personnel. 
There were 2,022 employees in the department as of 
December 31, as compared with 2,050 employees on Janu- 
ary 1, 1955. 

Detailed Reports. 
Appended hereto are reports submitted by the Division 
Engmeers relative to the activities of their divisions in 
1955, and also a report of the Public Improvement Com- 
mission describing its activities for the year 1955. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



8 



City Document No. 18. 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 2,022 persons eligible for employment in the 
several divisions, and of that number 2,010 were upon 
the January 1, 1956 payrolls. 



Grade and Num 


ber of E 


mployees. 












Services. 


Title. 


go 
o 


6 
> 

o 

s 
s 

3 

< 


to 


is 


b 

'a 
a 

02 




a 
a 

a 


C 


> 

3 


"3 
o 
Eh 




1 
















1 






1 


1 


1 


1 






1 


r. 








1 




















1 








1 
2 












1 










3 
13 


1 


1 


2 




9 










13 






1 


11 

3 


18 

2 

15 




1 


4 


10 
3 
9 


7 




1 


21 
3 
7 
1 


64 








1? 








33 










4 


Senior public relations representative 
Automotive and senior electrical 








1 




1 








2 






3 








•2 










? 












1 
4 








1 


Pumping station engineers and sta- 


















4 






1 






1 
G 

68 
















12 

1 
GO 


5 

1 
2 

19 


2 


5 
5 




28 






10 


1 


22 






3 






1 


4 




17 




169 






1 
















1 

14 


1 








1 


1 




2 






IS 


Executive secretary, P.W.D 


1 








1 
















2 


? 
























4 


14 


21 


119 


96 


68 


21 


41 


25 


409 









Public Works Depart.ment. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Continued. 





Services. 


Title. 


SI 
go 


6 
> 

o 

S 
o 

3 
< 


o 
to 

m 


>>.s 

OS <^ 


a 
'a 

OS 

a. 






a 

3 
Eh 


S 


> 


"3 
o 




4 
2 


14 


21 


119 


96 


68 


21 


41 


25 


409 


Senior personnel officer and assistant 


2 










1 
1 








1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 




9 


Principal clerk and secretary 

Principal clerks, stenographers, ac- 


1 

1 


1 


2 


4 


9 


-") 


4 




6 

1 

32 

11 

1 


5 
2 


33 




1 


Senior clerks, typists, stenographers, 
etc • 


3 


5 

1 


1 


_ 


3 

1 
1 


2 

1 


1 


54 


Clerk-stenographers, clerks, typists. . . 


16 














1 
4 


1 










1 






1 




6 






1 
1 




1 




2 


Senior storekeeper and storekeepers. . 
















1 












1 

3 
29 




1 


Supervisor and special water meter 
















3 


















29 
















4 
42 


4 




















42 






1 

2 

13 














1 




















') 




















13 






127 

1 














i;>7 








1 
2 
6 


1 










2 
















1 




















9 




















fi 






1 














1 
















24 


1 
1 


24 


















1 














1 






2 




















Carried forward 


11 


42 


155 


14fi 


106 


78 


74 


153 


34 


799 











10 City Document No. 18. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 







Services. 






Title. 


— 1 ttJ 

go 
o 


6 
_> 

o 

a 

o 

3 


d 




•a 


0) 


"3 
§ 

3 

H 




> 

3 


o 




n 


42 


155 


146 


106 


78 


74 


153 


34 

1 


799 


Principal duplicating machine oper- 
ator 


1 


Sewer gateman 












5 

5 






5 


Yardmasters and yardmen 






1 


3 

2 

1 


1 




7 




17 


Road roller operators 






2 


Working foremen 




2 


3 


3 


6 

2 

10 


1 


20 




36 


Sewage screen operators 




2 


Firemen and oilers > 


















10 


Steamfitters 








1 
5 

1 






1 
78 

1 

22 
2 




2 






32 


2 


1 


7 


3 


128 


Crane operators 




2 


Maintenance mechanics and helpers, 
etc 




1 




5 
6 
2 

7 






28 


Carpenters and helpers 




12 


2 


1 




23 


Welders 




3 

2 








2 


2 
48 










14 






2 
1 
1 




50 


Blacksmith and helpers 








16 
1 






18 


Bricklayers . ... 








5 

17 
8 
1 

25 






Sewer cleaners 










17 


Catch-basin machine operators 


















8 


Heavy motor equipment operators. . . 
Motor equipment operators 




2 
5 


5 


11 
48 


56 
105 


13 


18 
20 

1 




101 
''08 


Junior building custodian 




1 


Garage attendants 




20 

22 










2 

7 


22 


Laborers ^ 




2 


87 

1 


316 
6 


20 


52 
3 


35 


506 






10 
















Totals 


11 


131 


182 


359 


631 


190 


101 


382 


2022 







Public Works Department. 



11 



Number of Employees Actually Employed January 1, 1955, and 
January 1, 1956. 







































lU 






















tH 










>, 






6 




11 






o 

B 
S 

3 
< 








a 
a 

3 

H 


go 
o 








1^ 

MO 


eg 


3 
O 




36 
35 


104 
99 


10 

11 


185 
181 


380 
380 


370 
357 


616 
629 


195 
188 


134 
130 


2,030 


January 1, 1956 


2,010 







January 1, 1955. 
January 1, 1956. 



Total Eligible Force. 



37 


105 


10 


186 


384 


375 


620 


196 


137 


35 


101 


11 


182 


382 


359 


631 


190 


131 



2.050 
2,022 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, 
etc., of Employees. 





S 














a 


il 








-3 

til 


•o 




(SO 






§c5 




1 


H 


H 


S 


« 



Services. 
1955-195G. 





pi 






CD 






>o 






O 


"*■"> 


b ca 










. 


■V>s 


•Sf, a 


•c 






tot 












00 .a 




03 


g 






1 


gO 


.s 

'3 


H 


H 


« 



10 
137 
186 
375 
620 
196 

37 
105 
384 

2,050 



Central Office. 
Automotive. . . 

Bridge 

Highway 

Sanitary 

Sewer 

Survey 

Tunnel 

Water 



Totals . 



11 
131 
182 
359 
631 
190 

35 
101 
382 

2 022 



14 



23 



103 



12 



City Document No. 18. 



MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Division or Sebvice. 


Total Appropriations, 

Including 
Transfers and Amounts 
Carried Over from 1954. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office 
Automotive Division 
Bridge Division . 
Highway Division 
Lighting Service 
Sanitary Division 
Sewer Division . 
Sumner Tunnel . 
Survey Division . 
Water Division . 






$61,611 68 

676,124 45 

724,485 17 

1,685,539 56 

1,431,032 84 

4,850,351 99 

929,596 73 

648,261 05 

136,068 24 

2,825,437 68 


$61,611 68 

673,206 45 

715.506 86 

1,512,577 24 

1,431,031 78 

4,811,648 42 

911,135 68 

641,098 96 

136,068 24 

2,572,383 47 


$0 00 

2,918 00 

8,978 31 

172,962 32 

1 06 

38,703 57 

18,461 05 

7,162 09 

00 

253,054 21 


Totals .... 


$13,968,509 39 


$13,466,268 78 


$502,240 61 



LOANS AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Title. 



Total Amount 
Available. 



Expenditures. 



Unexpended 
Balance. 



Bridges, Repairs, etc. (Revenue) 

Bridges, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 

Bridges, Construction of (Revenue) 

Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings Thereof (Non- Revenue) 

Reconstruction of Streets (Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Non- Revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of 
(Revenue) 

Street Signs (Revenue) 

Snow Removal (Revenue) 

Incinerator Building, Construction and Equipping 
(Non- Revenue) 

Sewerage Works (Non-Revenue) 

Totals 



S318,015 80 

2,103,906 38 

275,536 59 

133,661 09 

137,129 21 

166,143 44 

4,061,682 78 

108,924 14 

9,934 28 

349,767 15 

1,200,000 GO 
1,248,527 13 



$220,595 13 
341,103 55 
251,841 38 

125,000 00 

66,896 39 

144.228 46 

2,371,056 82 

31,742 47 

9,697 63 

240,019 43 

80 00 
444,599 11 



$97,420 67 

1,762,802 83 

23,695 21 

8,661 09 

70,232 82 

21,914 98 

1,690,625 96 

77,181 67 

236 65 

109,747 72 

1,199,920 00 
803,928 02 



$10,113,227 99 



$4,246,860 37 



$5,866,367 62 



Public Works Department. 13 

APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION FOR 
THE YEAR 1955. 



Boston, January 2, 1956. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I ani submitting herewith the annual report of the 
Automotive Division of the Public Works Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1955. This report covers 
the activities of the five garages, the Mobile Patrol, and 
the Motor Pool. 

The quota of employees assigned to the Automotive 
Division was one hundred thirty-nine, but, due to vacan- 
cies, the number of employees averaged one hundred 
thirty-two. These employees were assigned to the follow- 
ing duties: One temporary division engineer, in charge 
of the division; nine employees assigned to office work; 
four employees assigned to the stockroom; three em-, 
ployees assigned to wreckers; thirty-nine employees as- 
signed to repair work; thirty-seven employees assigned 
to maintenance of buildings, gasoline and oil dispensing, 
cleaning, watchmen's duties, and motor vehicle operation ; 
and thirty-nine employees assigned to the Mobile Patrol, 
which maintains a watch over Public Works Department 
property and equipment between the hours of 4 p.m. and 

8 A.M. 

The office maintained by the division at City Hall 
processed 1,973 requisitions in 1955, of which 1,105 were 
service orders and 868 were purchase orders. A petty cash 
fund of $300 was used to make about one hundred pur- 
chases a month, usually under $3 each. The City Hall 
office reports the following expenditures from the 1955 
appropriation. 

Personal services $468,200 00 

Contractual services . . . . 42,184 90 

Materials and suppHes . . . . 149,190 45 
Rents and registration fees . . . 12,085 59 
Purchases of new equipment . . . 1,545 51 

.$673,206 45 



14 City Document No. 18. 

An equipment loan was issued in 1955 to purchase new 
automotive equipment, and from this loan, and water 
division and snow removal funds, the following equip- 
ment was ordered. 

2 Chevrolet carryalls 
1 Ford sedan 

1 Buick sedan 

2 Ford ^-ton trucks 
17 Ford 3 -ton trucks 

3 Diamond-T 5-ton trucks 

1 Ford truck with back hoe and catch-basin cleaner 

2 Wrecker trucks, (one Ford, one G.M.C.) 
2 Ford emergency utility trucks 

1 Ford stake truck 

1 Unit self-propelled crane 

2 Walter snow fighters 

9 Hough front bucket loaders 
22 Baughman sanding bodies 

Delivery of the above equipment was made late in 
1955 and early in 1956. 

To provide additional garage space, and to enable the 
department to place snow fighters in strategic positions, 
two new garages were built in 1955, one at Forest Hills 
to store fifteen snow fighters, and one at Brighton to store 
two snow fighters and other snow-fighting equipment. 

The Forest Hills garage was equipped with a new air 
compressor piped throughout the building, and with small 
power tools, jacks, and stands, to expedite minor repairs 
on snow fighters. Three motor equipment repairmen were 
assigned to this garage for the winter months. One motor 
equipment repairman was assigned to the new Brighton 
garage during snow removal work. 

The Highland Street garage repair shop performed ap- 
proximately one hundred overhaul jobs, one thousand 
major repair jobs, and twelve thousand minor repair jobs, 
including tire repairs and lubrication check-ups. 

It is now our practice to assign men to specialized duty; 
one group is assigned to work on the thkty-six snow 
fighters ; other men are assigned to repair of the twenty- 
nine Sanders, and the twenty-eig'ht front bucket loaders 
and snow loaders. The men seem to feel more responsible 
when given the care of certain equipment, and, because 
much of the snow removal equipment is old, constant 
attention is necessary. During January, 1955, the M.T.A. 



Public Works Department. 15 

transferred four snow fighters to the City of Boston, when 
the city agreed to plow and sand streetcar and bus routes. 

In addition to the construction of two new garages, an 
addition to the Highland Street garage is being built to 
provide additional stockroom space. It has been difficult 
to operate efficiently in the present cramped quarters, 
and almost impossible to take inventory. Renovations 
were made to the Albany Street garage with the conver- 
sion of the direct current electrical system to alternating 
current. We expect this changeover to cut operating costs 
and allow us to operate modern equipment and tools. A 
new overhead door was also installed, and further im- 
provements are planned, including a larger air compressor. 

The Automotive Division received commendation from 
Mr. Joseph ]\Ialone, Director of Civil Defense, for work 
performed during the floods caused by the heavy rains 
in the month of August, 1955. The employees of the divi- 
sion worked on a 24-hour basis throughout the storm, not 
only repairing equipment, but manning various t5rpes of 
pumps used to pump out flooded cellars, etc. 

The year 1955 witnessed the retirement of two veteran 
employees of the Automotive Division, namely. Division 
Engineer J. Leo jMcGrath, and Superintendent of Auto- 
motive Maintenance Daniel J. Coughlin. Mr. McGrath 
entered the employ of the City of Boston on March 25, 
1912, and retired August 10, 1955. He served for many 
years with the Water Division before appointment as 
Division Engineer on January 23, 1950. Mr. Coughlin 
entered employment November 24, 1924, and retired 
February 15, 1955; all of his service was with the Auto- 
motive Division. 

The Mobile Patrol and the Motor Pool operated in a 
satisfactory manner during 1955. The Motor Pool consists 
of one dispatcher and nine drivers (one from the Auto- 
motive Division). The dispatcher makes all assignments 
to the drivers, and also has charge of the short-wave 
radio. Within the Public Works Department there are 
forty-one cars equipped with two-way radios. The Motor 
Pool assignments outside the Public Works Department 
consist of the following : 

Institutions Department, conveying patients to Tewks- 
bury, Long Island, and Nazareth. 

Purchasing Department, conveying inspectors to sources 
of supplies. 

Public Library, checking district libraries. 



16 City Document No. 18. 

Election Department, conveying voting machine inspec- 
tors, and work on election day. 

Assessing Department, Printing Department, Public Cele- 
brations, and Mayor's Office, various assignments. 

Real Estate Division, conveying city auctioneer to those 
locations where city-owned property is to be auctioned. 

The Mobile Patrol Section, with thirty-nine men and 
four vehicles, patrolled the city, protecting Public Works 
Department property. The fifteen mobile guards are as- 
signed to various shifts, 4 p.m. to 12 midnight, and 12 
midnight to 8 a.m., as well as around the clock on Satur- 
day, Sunday, and holidays. The guards inspect all yards, 
and at each location punch a Detex time clock. Watchmen 
are permanently stationed on locations where experience 
has shown that it is advisable to have a man p^resent at 
all times to protect city property. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James H. Stewart, 

Chief Automotive Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



17 



NUMBER OF EACH TYPE OF AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 
IN PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



Passenger cars . 












71 


Trucks, ^-ton 












67 


Trucks, i- to U-ton 












91 


Trucks, 2- to 3-ton 












94 


Trucks, 5- to 8-ton 












5 


Compressors 












10 


Trailer compressors 












2 


Crawler tractors 












4 


Street flushers . 












6 


Sidewalk rollers 












11 


Street sweepers . 












26 


Snow fighters 










36 


Snow loaders and bucket loaders 








7 


Front bucket loaders 








21 


Miscellaneous equipment 








44 


(trailers, lighting plants, generators, steam 


cleaners, lawn mowers, etc.) 


Total . 












495 



18 



City Document No. 18. 



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Public Works Department. 19 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
BRIDGE DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1956. 

To the Commissioner oj Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Submitted herewith is the annual report of the Bridge 
Division, covermg the operation, expenditures, and in- 
come for the Bridge Service and the Sumner Tunnel for 
the year ending December 31, 1955. 



Respectfully, 



John J. McCall, 

Division Engineer. 



20 



City Document No. 18. 



I. BRIDGE SERVICE. 

Summary of Budget Appropriations and Expenditures. 





Regular 
Appropriation 


Bridge 
Repairs, Etc. 


Bridges, Construction of 




Revenue. 


Non-Revenue. 


Balance from 1954 


$724,485 17 


$ 93,015 80 
225,000 00 


$275,536 59 


$2,103,906 38 


1955 Appropriation 




Total Credits 


S724,485 17 


S3 18,01 5 80 


$275,536 59 


$2,103,906 38 










Total Encumbrances 


$715,506 86 


$220,595 13 


$251,841 38 


$341,103 55 


Unencumbered Balance 


$ 8,978 31 


$ 97,420 67 


$ 23,695 21 


$1,762,802 83 



Details op Expenditures on Tidewater Bridges. 

TIDEWATER BRIDGES — 1955. 



Bridge. 



Draw- 
tenders' 
Salaries. 



Mechanics' 
Wages. 



Material. 



Repair 
Bills. 



Supplies, 

Utilities, 

Etc. 



Total, 



Broadway , 

Charlestown 

Chelsea South 

Chelsea Street 

Congress Street .... 

Dover Street 

L Street 

Maiden 

Northern Avenue . . . . 

Summer Street 

*Warren 

Andrew P. McArdle . 



$9,165 30 
72,074 65 
35,037 75 
48,467 78 
39,402 45 
18,206 65 
42,145 34 
50,148 58 
49,523 45 
37,147 79 

50,887 15 



$3,967 78 
5,822 07 
3,117 65 
2,552 13 
4,508 54 
3,421 74 
6,466 70 
3,201 99 
7,497 66 
6,738 32 
6,587 51 
3,379 19 



.§71 25 
1,169 69 
373 99 
138 17 
459 56 
228 37 
343 65 
256 70 
178 63 
821 07 
1,106 03 
270 86 



$953 05 

4,250 10 

215 61 

31 55 

354 62 

464 06 

469 71 

1,412 88 

1,448 01 

2,169 09 

445 50 

695 16 



$449 03 

1,151 37 

626 44 

980 63 

1,133 79 

377 84 

764 60 

1,045 72 

2,979 02 

704 18 

331 40 

2,303 57 



$14,606 41 
84,467 88 
39,371 44 
52,170 26 
45,858 96 
22,698 66 
50,190 00 
56,065 87 
61,626 77 
47,580 45 
8.470 44 
57,535 93 



Totals. 



$452,206 89 



$57,261 28 



i,417 97 



$12,909 34 



$12,847 59 



$540,643 07 



' Closed to highway traffic on November 26, 1954; but kept operable for possible emergency use. 



Public Works Department. 



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22 City Document No. 18. 

Throughout the year 1955 the Bridge Division operated 
twelve drawbridges. 

As of May 13, 1955, the Fort Point Channel above the 
Dorchester Avenue Bridge was declared by the Federal 
Government to be nonnavigable; and since then the 
Broadway and Dover Street drawspans have been oper- 
ated only on a standby basis to permit openings if re- 
quired, in connection with the passage of scows from the 
Albany Street disposal station, which will be permanently 
closed on April 1, 1956. At that time, the drawspans at 
Broadway and Dover streets will be permanently fixed. 
In connection with the elimination of these drawspans, 
the demolition and removal of the Dover Street draw- 
house and most of the fender pier system was begun under 
a contract awarded to George M. Bryne. The removal of 
these structures, which were in a state of advanced dis- 
repair, was necessary to eliminate a fire hazard of major 
proportions. This work should be completed early in 1956. 

A similar project is planned at Broadway Bridge for 
1956. 

Warren Bridge over the Charles River was not in oper- 
ation through the year 1955, having been closed to high- 
way traffic since November 26, 1954. The drawspan has 
been kept open to permit passage of waterborne traffic. 
This bridge has been maintained in operable condition, 
however, in the event that any emergency involving the 
Charlestown Bridge, which is undergoing major impairs, 
should require the reopening of Warren Bridge to passen- 
ger car and pedestrian traffic. 

The Chelsea South Drawbridge over the South Channel 
of the Mystic River is still in operation, serving a minor 
volume of highway traffic, as a connection to the Mystic 
Docks. It is expected that by June, 1956, the construction 
of Terminal street will be completed. At that time this 
bridge will be permanently closed, and it is planned to 
remove the structure as soon thereafter as possible. 

The extensive work of reconstructing the approach 
spans of the Charlestown Bridge was begun on September 
12, 1955, under a contract awarded to Builders Iron 
Works, This work is being executed on one-half the 
bridge at a time, with the other half maintained for traffic. 
It will take at least a year to complete this work and 
possibly longer, depending on the delivery of steel. This 
work consists of replacing the entire floor system of floor 
beams and stringers and constructing a new deck of re- 
inforced concrete. 



Public Works Department. 23 

It is also planned to make major repairs and renewals 
to the drawspan of this bridge, including the installation 
of a complete new operating mechanism to replace the 
existing system which was originally installed when the 
bridge was built in 1900. 

The city has engaged the firm of Charles A. Maguh'e 
& Associates, consulting engmeers, to draw up plans and 
specifications for this work; and it is expected that plans 
and specifications will be in final form and the work ad- 
vertised by the spring of 1956. The same firm prepai'ed 
the plans and specifications for the approach span project 
referred to above. 

The Maiden Bridge (Alford Street Bridge) over the 
Mystic River, conneotmg Charlestown and Everett, oper- 
ated reasonably well throughout 1955, although the entii^e 
structure is in very poor condition and should be replaced 
with a modern structure as soon as possible. 

A bill filed with the 1955 Legislature seeking authoriza- 
tion for the Commonwealth to rebuild this bridge was not 
acted upon. A similar bill has been filed with the 1956 
session of the legislature. 

The Summer Street Bridge over Fort Pomt Channel 
did not require any major repairs in the year 1955. How- 
ever, the entire structure is in a deplorable condition and 
should be rebuilt as soon as possible. This project has been 
deferred because of lack of funds. It is hoped that the 
necessary funds will be made available in the coming 
year. 

The McArdle and Chelsea Street Bridges over the 
Chelsea River and the Congress Street Bridge over Fort 
Point Channel are in first-class condition. The work of 
installmg steel mesh pavement on the Chelsea Street and 
Congress Street drawspans was completed late in 1955, 
except for some minor painting work which was deferred 
to the spring of 1950. 

The Northern Avenue Bridge over Fort Point Channel 
is in reasonably good condition except for the operating 
system of the drawspan. This is an antiquated compressed 
air system that should be replaced with a more modem 
type power plant. However, in view of the age and gen- 
eral structural condition of the bridge, it would be more 
economical to rebuild the bridge within the next few 
years if possible. 

Now that the Dover Street Bridge is no longer required 
as a drawbridge, it is important that this structure be re- 
placed as soon as possible by either a new bridge or a solid 



24 City Document No. 18. 

fill causeway. The condition of this structure throughout 
is very poor. The three truss spans of the West Fourth 
Street Bridge over the New Haven Railroad tracks (which 
were not rebuilt after the fire of 1955) are also in very 
poor condition. Since these two bridges foon an important 
traffic connection between South Boston and Boston 
Proper, it is hoped that the construction of the Central 
Artery facilities along Albany street will include the im- 
provement of these two bridges. 

The Summer Street Bridge over Reserved Channel is 
another example of a bridge that should be replaced by 
a solid fill connection. However, the necessity of main- 
taining the drawspan of this bridge makes a particular 
problem of this. Nevertheless, the condition of this bridge, 
particularly the pile trestle approaches, is such that it 
should be rebuilt with solid fill approaches. 

It is tentatively planned to replace the pile trestle ap- 
proaches with solid fill as soon as a satisfactory scheme 
for so doing (while maintaining traffic) can be developed. 

As pointed out in previous reports, the volume of cargo 
class waterborne traffic passing through most of our draw- 
bridges does not justify the expense borne by the city in 
operating and maintainmg the drawbridges on a 24-hour- 
a-day basis. 

Accordingly, late in 1955, a petition was filed with the 
U. S. Engineers, seeking permission to restrict the hours 
of operation of certain bridges, in order to minimize the 
interruption of highway traffic and eventually reduce the 
cost of operation. It is expected that this petition will be 
acted upon early in 1956. 

As regards the inland, or fixed, bridges w^hich are under 
the jurisdiction of this department, there were several 
improvements carried out in 1955, which are tabulated 
hereinafter. 

W. A. Fisher & Company, consulting engineers, were 
engaged by the city to draw up plans and specifications 
for the rebuildmg of the superstructure of the Massachu- 
setts Avenue Bridge over the New Haven Railroad. This 
project will involve removal of the existing superstructuire, 
which has two through girders in the roadway which are 
a hazardous impediment to traffic, and constructing a 
beam span-type bridge having a clear roadway width. 
This work is further justified by the condition of the ex- 
isting concrete deck which was built in the winter of 1925- 



Public Works Department. 25 

26, and which is showing signs of deterioration. It is pro- 
posed to rebuild the structure one third at a time, keeping 
two of the three roadways available to traffic at all times. 
A petition to the Massachusetts Dept. of Public Utilities, 
asking permission to do this work, is being drawn up ; and 
it is planned to advertise the work as soon as possible in 
1956, after that department acts on the petition. 

Sunilar type improvements should be made at such 
bridges as Broadway, over the Boston & Albany Railroad 
tracks, Bennington street, over the M.T.A. tracks; and 
Cummins Highway, Southampton street, Boston street, 
and Dorchester avenue, over the New Haven Railroad 
tracks. Studies have been started on the first two. The 
other four bridges are jointly maintained with the New 
Haven Railroad Company; and it will be necessary to act 
in conjunction with the railroad company as regards any 
studies involving those bridges. 

The end of the year 1955 marked the retirement of Mr. 
Thomas H. Keenan, Superintendent of Bridge Mainten- 
ance and Operation, who retired on December 31, 1955, 
after more than fifty years of service to the city. 

Throughout the year the Bridge Mamtenance Force 
performed routine and emergency duties related to the 
maintenance and upkeep of the bridges and pertinent 
facilities, mcluding the inspection of bridges and the in- 
spection and adjustment of bridge machinery, counter- 
weight structures, etc. ; repairing and renewing electrical 
cables, switches, servicing motors, etc. ; cleaning and paint- 
ing roadway gates, drawhouses, railings, etc.; renewing 
defective roadway and sidewalk planking and placing 
bituminous patching ; removing snow and ice from bridge 
sidewalks and foot bridges; erecting barricades, curbs, 
fences, etc. 

A description of the more miportant improvements and 
work undertaken by contract in 1955 by the Bridge Divi- 
sion is as follows : 

Making Einergency Repairs to the Central Tower 

Structure of the Charlestown Bridge Drawspan. 
Because of the defective operation of the Charlestown 
Bridge drawspan, a contract was negotiated with the 
General Ship & Engine Works, Inc., to investigate an 
apparent defect in the working of the slotted link mem- 
bers and structural pins at the top of the central tower 
structure of the draw. 



2G City Document No. IS. 

Minor repairs were effected which relieved the binding 
tendency of the pin joints, and the anticipated renewal 
of one of the truss pins was not necessary. 

The results of the inspection and investigation made 
under this contract served as a basis for determining the 
method of repairs to be made in the proposed reconstruc- 
tion of the drawspan operating machinery, etc. 

Work commenced January 31, 1955, and was completed 
March 18, 1955, at a cost of $1,500. 

Repairing the Drawspan of the Congress Street Bridge, 
Over Fort Point Channel, and the Chelsea Street 
Bridge, Over Chelsea River. 

Under a contract awarded to the Builders Iron Works, 
a new steel mesh roadway pavement and sidewalks were 
installed on the drawspans of the two subject bridges, 
replacing the original wooden decking. 

The approach span roadways were covered with bitu- 
minous pavement, and the entire steel structures of both 
l^ridges were cleaned and painted. 

Except for the final painting of the overhead counter- 
weight of the Chelsea Street Bridge Drawspan, which was 
deferred until the spring of 195G, for reasons of inclement 
weather, work under this contract was completed in No- 
vember, 1955. The work had started on March 14, 1955. 
The total estimated cost of completing the work is 
$166,390.50. 

Welding Repairs to Drawspan of the Summer Street 

Bridge, Over Reserved Channel, and the Charlestown 

Bridge, Over Charles River. 

Due to the breaking of welds and bars on the steel mesh 

pavements on the drawspans of the subject bridges, a 

contract was awarded to the General Ship & Engine 

Works, Inc., for making the necessary welding repairs. 

Work commenced April 7, 1955, and was completed 
May 31, 1955, at a cost of $6,076.66. 

Repairs to the Masonry Piers and Abutments of the 
Summer Street Bridge, Over Fort Point Channel. 

Because of the defective condition of the mortar joints 
of the masonry piers of the subject bridge, a contract was 
awarded to Nick Tracy for making the necessary repairs 
by pressure grouting the joints of the piers. 

Work was commenced on April 25, 1955, and because 
of the extent of work required on Pier No. 3, the work was 



Public Works Department. 27 

stopped at completion of that pier on June 14, 1955, with 
some work being done on Pier No. 4 and the South Boston 
abutment. The total cost of this work was $4,798.50. 

It was then decided to complete the other piers and 
abutments under a new contract, described hereinaftei', 
by conventional pointing methods, rather than pressure 
grouting; because the voids present in the inner cores of 
the piers would require an unjustifiable extent of grouting 
under pressure. 

Inspection of Piers of the Dover Street Bridge, Over 
Fort Point Channel. 

An inspection of the masonry piers and abutments of 
the Dover Street Bridge, including underwater inspection, 
was carried out under a contract with C. Roy Norris & 
Son. 

Work commenced May 3, 1955, and was completed 
June 9, 1955, at a cost of $1,746. 

Repairs to the Masonry Piers and Abutments of the 
Dover Street and Summer Street Bridges, Over Fort 
Point Channel. 

As a result of the underwater inspection at the Dover 
Street Bridge and the need of completing repairs to the 
Summer Street Bridge piers, as refeiTed to hereinbefore, 
a contract was awarded to the South Shore Waterproofing 
Company for the subject work. 

Because of unsuitable weather conditions, this work 
was deferred until early 1956. It is expected that the woirk 
will commence around March 1, 1956, and the estimaterl 
cost of completion is $4,560. 

Repairing Fender Piers, Warren Bridge. 

The defective conditions of the fender pier system at 
the waterway through Warren Bridge were corrected by 
repairs made under a contract awarded to the McKie 
Lighter Company. 

Work commenced April 26, 1955, and was completefl 
June 10, 1955, at a cost of $7,980.58. 

Redecking and Repairing the Summer Street Bridges, 
Over A Street, B Street, and C Street. 
A major improvement to the subject bridges was car- 
ried out under a contract awarded to the J. A. Singarella 
Company. 

The work, which commenced on May 23, 1955, consisted 
of removing the entire roadway and sidewalk pavement 



28 City Document No 18. 

and wooden iinderdeck of the A Street and B Street 
Biridges, repairing the steelwork throughout, and con- 
structing a new underdeck of reinforced concrete, topped 
with a bituminous concrete pavement. 

The work at the C Street Bridge consisted of placing a 
new bituminous w^earing surface on the existing granite 
block pavement, constructing new concrete sidewalks, and 
repairing the steelwork. 

The stairways at each of the bridges were also repaired ; 
those at the A Street Bridge being renewed in their en- 
tirety. 

As part of the work under this contract, it was decided 
to resurface the roadway of the truss bridge on Summer 
street, over the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road yards. 

The second half of the work at B street was postponed 
because of the winter conditions, and wUl be executed 
early in 1956, to complete the over-all project. 

The cost of completing the work under this contract is 
estimated to be $135,000. 

Repairiiig the Fender Piers of the Northern Avenue and 
Congress Street Bridges, Over Fort Point Channel. 

Extensive repairs were made to the fender piers, wal- 
ings and platforms of the subject bridges, under a con- 
tract awarded to the James B. Rendle Company. 

Work commenced July 6, 1955, and was completed 
September 10, 1955, at a cost of $14,030.58. 

Redecking Redfield Street Bridge, Over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad (Neponset). 

The maintenance of this bridge is jointly borne by the 
city and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
Company, the city's responsibility consisting of maintain- 
ing the wearing surface and underdeck. 

The wooden deck had become increasingly difficult to 
maintain and was a continual source of maintenance cost. 
It was decided to replace the wooden deck with a rein- 
forced concrete deck, and accordingly a contract was 
awarded to Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc., to so recon- 
struct the deck according to plans and specifications 
drawn by this office. 

The Railroad Company made repairs to the main steel 
structure in conjunction with the work under our contract. 

Work commenced September 6, 1955, and was com- 
pleted December 6, 1955, at a cost of $18,770. 



Public Works Department. 29 

Contract for Services of Engineers, Reconstruction and 
Alterations, Charlestown Bridge. 

The city engaged the services of Charles A. Maguire & 
Associates, consulting engineers, to prepare plans and 
specifications for the reconstruction of the approach spans 
of the Charlestown Bridge. Such plans and specifications 
were completed and approved in July, 1955, at a cost of 
$36,000. This contract includes having the consulting firm 
furnish supervision of the work, as requned, at an addi- 
tional cost not to exceed $18,000, making the total for the 
engineering services not to exceed $54,000. 

Under the contract referred to above, the consulting 
engineers furnished an engineering report to the city, on 
studies relative to the Charlestown Bridge drawspan, at 
a separate cost of $15,756. 

This report covered the structural and operating con- 
ditions and defects of the entire drawspan and included 
specific recommendations on repairs and alterations re- 
quired. 

As a result of this study and report it was decided to 
proceed with the alterations to the drawspan. According- 
ly, the same engineering firm was engaged, under a sep- 
arate contract, to draw plans and specifications covering 
the proposed alterations to the drawspan, consisting of 
redecking the entire span with steel mesh pavement, in- 
cluding an entire new steel floor system; repairing the 
main steelwork and installing an entire new mechanical 
operating system for the draw to replace the existing 
system, all at an estimated cost of approximately 
$500,000. 

The plans and specifications for this project are to be 
completed early in 1956, at a cost of $28,000. It is intended 
to advertise and award the work before the summer of 
1956. 

Reco7istruction of Charlestown Bridge, Over Charles 
River, Excluding Drawspan. 

In accordance with the plans and specifications referred 
to hereinbefore, the city awarded a contract to the Build- 
ers Iron Works for the reconstruction of the Charlestown 
Bridge approach spans. 

Work under this contract started on September 12, 
1955, and will not be completed for at least a year. 

This contract is of major importance and consists of 
removing the entire deck and steel floor system of the 
bridge and replacing with a new system of steel floor 



30 City Document No. 18. 

beams and stringers and a reinforced concrete deck with 
a bituminous concrete wearing surface and new bridge 
railings. 

The main girders are to be left in place and repaired. 

The roadway overlaying the storehouse units at the 
Charlestown end of the bridge is to be stripped of the ex- 
isting granite block and bituminous concrete pavement, 
waterproofed, and repaved with reinforced concrete and 
bituminous concrete. The steelwork within the storehouse 
units is being repaired and strengthened. 

The work is being carried out on one half the bridge at 
a time, with the other half kept open for traffic. 

The cost of completing this work is estimated to be 
approximately $900,000. 

Redecking and Repairing Reservation Road BridgSy 
Over Mother Brook. 

Under a contract awarded to Martin J. Kelly Company, 
Inc., the wooden deck of this bridge was removed, the 
strmgers renewed where required, a new wooden under- 
deck installed, and a new wearing surface of asphalt plank 
laid. 

The steel girders, floor beams, and bracmg were re- 
paired and painted, and new wooden sidewalks were 
placed. 

Work commenced September 14, 1955, and was com- 
pleted November 9, 1955, at a cost of $17,521.45. 

Demolition Work and Repairs to Fender System and 
Water Pipe Trestle, Dover Street Bridge, Over Fort 
Point Channel. 

After the Fort Point Channel, above Dorchester avenue, 
was declared nonnavigable, a contract was awarded to 
George M. Bryne for the demolition and removal of the 
draw fenders, house, and so much of the fender pier sys- 
tem as was deteriorated to the point of creating a serious 
fire hazard. 

Work under this contract also included repairs to the 
pile trestle at the upstream side of the South Boston end 
of the bridge, which carries two water pipe lines. 

Work commenced November 1, 1955, and will be com- 
pleted early in 1956, at an estimated cost of $11,074.90. 



Public Works Department. 31 

Resurfacing the Drawspan of the Dover Street Bridge, 
Over Fort Point Channel. 
To eliiniiiate a hazardous traffic condition at the draw- 
span of the Dover Street Bridge, due to the defective con- 
dition of the wood plank wearing surface, a contract was 
awarded to Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc., for the re- 
moval of the old wearing surface planking and repairing 
the under planking, and installing a new wearing surface 
of asphalt plank. 

Work commenced November 8, 1955, and was completed 
December 12, 1955, at a cost of $14,389.82. 

Redecking and Repairing the Perkins Street Footbridge, 
Over the Boston & Maine Railroad, Charlestown. 
On December 21, 1955, bids were received for the sub- 
ject work, which includes renewing the defective steel 
stairways and walkway plankmg. It is expected that a 
contract will be awarded early in 1956 for executing this 
work, at an estimated cost of $10,600. 

Work for Other Divisions. 

Water Division. 

Repairing Water Pipe Trestle, Fort Point Channel, 

Between Congress and Summer Street Bridges. 
The Bridge Division furnished the engmeering and in- 
spection services required to make the subject repairs. 

A contract was awarded to C. A. Foley, under which 
work commenced September 7, 1955, and was completed 
November 6, 1955, at a cost of $4,197.20. This work con- 
sisted of renewing defective pile bracing caps, strmgers, 
and planking. 

Automotive Division. 

Electrical Work at 634 Albany Street, Boston. 

This division prepared the necessary specifications for 
making certain electrical repairs at the Albany Street 
garage, in connection with the transfer of certain units 
from D. C power to A. C. power. 

A contract was awarded to the Suffolk Electric Com- 
pany, under which work commenced on December 14, 
1955. 

It is expected that work under this contract will be com- 
pleted early in 1956, at an estimated total cost of $2,918. 



32 City Document No. 18. 



II. SUMNER TUNNEL. 

1955 Budget Summary. 

Credits: 

Regular appropriations, 1955 .... $601,280 18 

Balance from previous year .... 3,925 18 

Pensions 43,055 69 



Total credits $648,261 05 

Debits 

E.xpenditures, 1955 $585,650 61 

Unliquidated encumbrances .... 6,203 93 

Balance to next year 6,188 73 

Pensions 43,055 69 



Total debits $641,098 96 

Unexpended and unencumbered balance . $7,162 09 

SUMMARY OF 1955 TRAFFIC BY CLASSIFICATION. 

No. of 
Class. Toll. Description. Vehicles. 

1. $0 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacity. 

Tractor without trailer 440,381 

2. 20 Passenger car 11,369,651 

3. 20 Motorcycle . 3,048 

4. 25 Truck over 2 tons and up to 5 tons capacit.y. 

Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 5 tons 

capacity 58,006 

5. 20 Passenger car with trailer 16,233 

6. 35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 10 tons 

capacity 16,851 

7. 20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons 

capacity 3,683 

8. 1 00 Truck over 10 tons capacity 1,190 

9. 35 Bus with or without passengers .... 2,271 
* Reserved Lane tl82,793 

Total traffic 12,094,107 

*M.T.A. and Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses included in this classification, 
t 6,942 M.T.A. and 78,515 Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses at 35 cents included 
in this total. 



Public Works Department. 33 

COMPARATIVE 5-YEAR SUMMARY OF OPERATION, FROM 
1951 TO 1955, INCLUSIVE. 




1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


tticular Traffic: 

"otal number vehicles 


9,466,660 

788,883 

182,051 

25,936 


9,583,972 

798,664 

184,307 

26,186 


10,835,674 

902,973 

208,378 

29.686 


11,080,966 

923,414 

212,513 

30,359 


12,094.107 
1,007,842 


Veekly average 


231,945 
33,135 






wer Consumption: 


4,196,904 


4.582,488 


4,966,604 


4,527,315 


5,236,214 






lanciai Results: 

Dperating Expenditure .... 

Balance to next year 

(nterest requirements 


$479,198 19 

13,135 89 

763,654 61 

721 95 


$541,705 30 

24,679 45 

083,105 13 

65 25 


$591,327 09 

16,.591 87 

687,494 39 

440 60 


$595,127 07 

3,925 18 

740,213 05 

122 85 


$628,706 30 

6,188 73 

760.100 00 

98 60 






Total Expenses 


$1,256,710 64 


$1,249,555 13 


$1,295,853 95 


$1,339,388 15 


$1,395,093 63 




$1,913,356 12 
1,547 11 


$1,932,619 83 
13,135 89 


$2,172,410 00 
24,679 45 


$2,224,195 00 
16,591 87 


$2,413,231 59 


ilance from previous year. . . 


3,925 18 


Total Receipts 


$1,914,903 23 


$1,945,755 72 


$2,197,089 45 


$2,240,786 87 


$2,417,156 77 


Net Result 


$6.58,192 59 
(Excess) 


$696,200 59 
(Excess) 


.?901,235 50 

(Excess) 


$901,398 72 
(Excess) 


$1,022,063 14 




(Excess) 



The Sumner Tunnel again had a very successful year 
of operation in 1955. 

The total traffic volume for the year reached a new 
record of 12,094,107 vehicles, an increase of 1,013,141 ve- 
hicles over 1954. 

A new record volume of traffic for a single day (24-hour 
period), occurred on May 27, 1955, when 39,536 vehicles 
were recorded ; and on the same day a new record volume 
of traffic for a single hour was established between 4 p.m. 
and 5 p.m., when 2,763 vehicles passed through. 

As previously anticipated, the completion of each new 
section of the Central Artery further expedites the move- 
ment of traffic at the Boston end of the tunnel. However, 
the flow of local traffic on Cross street, at certain times, 
still creates an interruption to the traffic entering and 
leaving the tunnel. 



34 City Document No. 18. 

The entire tunnel plant is in generally good condition. 
All mechanical and electrical operating equipment is in 
very good condition. 

Throughout the year the tunnel maintenance forces 
executed a daily routine of maintenance and inspection, 
making such repairs or adjustments as required on all 
units such as circuit breakers, transformers, relays, fans, 
motors, communication system, toll equipment, registers, 
and treadles. 

Following is a summaiy of the contracts awarded in 
1955, for repairs, etc.: 

Contracts Awarded in 1955. 
Repainng the Pavement of the Sumner Tunnel. 

Under a contract awarded to the Rufo Construction 
Company, approximately 1,600 square yards of the tunnel 
roadway pavement were removed and relaid, at a cost of 
$18,701.64. 

Work commenced March 8, 1955, and was completed 
May 15, 1955, all work beng done between the hours of 
1.30 A.M. and 5.30 a.m. with a minimum of interference to 
traflfic. 

Installing Lighting System, in the Fresh Air Ducts. 

A contract was awarded to the J. J. Finn Electric Serv- 
ice for installing a permanent lighting system in the fresh 
air duct, for the purpose of facilitating routine work and 
inspection within the area. 

Work commenced July 21, 1955, and was completed 
September 1, 1955, at a cost of $6,524. 

Repairs to Boston Ventilation Building. 

Due to the defective conditions present in the roofing 
and masonry walls of this building, a contract was awarded 
to the S. & S. Waterproofing Company, Inc., for installing 
a new roof, repairing the masonry joint work, and water- 
proofing the building. 

Work commenced September 28, 1955, and was com- 
pleted December 21, 1955, at a cost of $11,284.85. 

Cleaning the Surface Drainage System. 
It being necessary each year to remove the accumula- 
tion of sand and debris which collects in the surface drain- 
age system, a contract was awarded to James A. Freaney, 
Inc., for doing the necessary cleaning operation. 



Public Works Department. 35 

Work commenced November 15, 1955, and was com- 
pleted December 12, 1955, at a cost of $2,160. 

Cleaning Exhaust Duct and Exhaust Fan Rooms. 

A contract was awarded to the Bennington Contracting 
Company for the annual cleaning of the exhaust air duct 
and all exhaust fan rooms, which is necessary to maintain 
efficient operation of the ventilation system. 

Work commenced November 16, 1955, and was com- 
pleted December 15, 1955, at a cost of $1,280. 

Repairs to Granite Facing at Tunnel Portals. 
In order to effect necessary repairs to the granite facing 
of the portals at each end of the tunnel, consisting of re- 
pairing and securing loose and cracked panels, bids were 
invited for executing the necessary work, and a resulting 
order issued to the S. & S. Waterproofing Company, who 
completed the work at a cost of $860. 



36 City Document No. IS. 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE HIGIT^^IY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1956. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

The following report of the income, expenditures, and 
operation of the Highway Division of the Public Works 
Department is hereby submitted for the year ending 
December 31, 1955. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTHFORD J. KeLLEY, 

Division Engineery Highway Division. 



Public Works Department. 



37 



HIGHWAY DIVISION. 



Pa\^ng Service. 
Summary of Budget Appropriations. 



Appropriation . 



Total Credits. 



Expenditures. 



Balance 
Unexpended. 



Paving Service . 



Reconstruction of 
Streets 



Public Waj'S, Construc- 
tion of (Revenue). . . . 

Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Non-Revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction 
and Reconstruction of 

Street Signs 

Snow Removal 



§1,685,539 56 


137,129 


21 


166,143 


44 


4,061,682 


78 


108,924 


14 


9,934 28 


349,767 


15 



$1,512,577 24 

66,896 39 

144,228 46 

2,371,056 82 

31,742 47 

9,697 63 

240,019 43 



$172,962 32 
70,232 82 
21,914 98 

1,690,625 96 

77,181 67 

236 65 

109,747 72 



In the Permit Office, the following income was received 
for 1955: 

Signs, marquees, etc S72,148 80 

Notifications to abutters 100 00 

Licenses for storage and sale of merchandise in 

public highways, fees and rentals . . . 25,673 00 

Street opening account 101,647 87 

Permits, street openings, and occupation . . 45,443 03 

Total revenue received $245,012 70 



Number of Permits and Licenses Issued for 1955 

Sidewalk licenses 310 

Signs, etc 9,193 

Street opening permits 687 

Permits, street openings, and occupation . . 10,064 



Total 20,260 



38 City Document No. 18. 

Money received from permittees and charged to the 
Street Opening Account was spent for repairs of openings 
for drains and water services (new) during 1955 to the 
amount of $37,278.29. 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were employed 
as usual in the maintenance of public streets, resurfacing 
and patching macadam pavements, patching permanent 
pavements, such as asphalt and granite block, and main- 
taining gravel, brick, and artificial stone sidewalks. 

In the snow removal season, division forces were em- 
ployed in spreading rock salt and sand on icy streets and 
also supervised plowing work throughout the city by 
250 contractors' hired plows after snowstorms. All snow 
i-emoval bills for plowing, hauling, force account work, 
cubic yard removal, etc., were processed through the 
Paving Service office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs: 

Erected 181 4-inch street signposts. 
Erected 17 new hero square signs for dedication. 
Replaced 90 hero signs. 
Installed 1,095 new street signs. 

Removed 316 old hand-painted signs, damaged baked 
enameled signs, and obliterated signs. 

Repaired and straightened 274 bent or broken street sign- 
posts (4-inch type). 

Repaired 266 broken street frames, welded 82 4-incli 
street signposts (repairs made in blacksmith shop). 

Repaired 267 street signs, frames, collars, and brackets 
on 4-inch street signposts and light poles on location. 

Removed 143 pieces of rope, wire, old tires, etc., from 
4-inch street signposts and light poles. 

Installed 784 frames, 463 collars, 97 adapters, on 4-inch 
street signposts and light poles. 

Installed 309 4-inch acorns on 4-inch street signposts. 
Installed 158 "Private Way" signs on 4-inch posts and 
light poles. 

Removed 51 "Private Way" signs from 4-inch posts and 
light poles because of making of public ways. 
Painted 767 4-inch street signposts. 
Painted 827 street sign frames. 
Painted 513 4-inch acorns on 4-inch posts. 
Painted 774 street sign collars on street signposts and light 
poles. 

Installed 17 directional signs on 4-inch street signposts. 
Washed and cleaned 432 street sign plates. 
Painted 225 blanks for temporary name plates. 



Public Works Department. 39 

Ck)nt'racts were awarded for the construction and re- 
construction of one hundred sixty-six streets during the 
year, and ninety-five of these streets were completed. 
Work was also completed on forty-six streets which were 
unfinished from 1954. Contracts were awarded for the 
construction of artificial stone sidewalks in fifteen streets, 
and four of these were completed. Sidewalk w^ork was 
also completed on four streets which were unfinished 
from 1954. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares on which 
reconstruction work was completed in 1955 are as follows: 

Summit street, Ward 18, Wilhams avenue to Milton line. 

Washington street, Ward 18, Dana avenue to Neponset 
avenue. 

Summer street, Ward 6, Fort Point Channel to bridge over 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 

A street. Ward 6, Dorchester avenue to Congress street. 

Harrison avenue, AVard 3, Harvard street to Oak street. 

Newmarket square (north, south, and east roads). 

Theodore A. Glynn Way, Massachusetts avenue to South- 
ampton street. 

Pope's Hill street. Ward 16, Neponset avenue to Freeport 
street. 

Boston street, \\'ard 7, Dorchester avenue to bridge over 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 

Cummins Highway, Ward 18, Harvard street to Washing- 
ton street. 

Southampton street, AVards 7 and 8, Massachusetts ave- 
nue to Andrew square. 

Canterbury street, Wards 18 and 19, Poplar street to Sey- 
mour street. 

Neponset avenue, AA'ard 16, Adams street to Neponset 
traffic circle. 

Poplar street, AA^ard 18, Beech street to AVest street. 

Arlington street, AVard 5, St. James avenue to Columbus 
avenue. 

Huntington avenue, AA^ard 4, Massachusetts avenue to 
Ruggles street. 

Massachusetts avenue, AA^ards 4 and 9, St. Stephen street 
to Columbus avenue. 

Stuart street, AVard 5, Arlington street to Church street. 

Pond street, AA-'ard 19, Avon street to Mt. Walley avenue. 

Harvard avenue, AA^ard 21, Commonwealth avenue to 
Brookline line. 

Brookline avenue, AA^ard 4, Fenway to Park Drive. 



40 City Document No. 18. 

The following is a list of streets constructed and recon- 
structed and sidewalk work done by contract in the 
various wards of the city in 1955: 

Ward 1 — None. 

Ward 2 — None. 

"\^^ard 3 — Summer street, Harrison avenue, Oak street, 
Tyler street, and Bowdoin street (sidewalks). Total cost, 
$61,892.34. 

Ward 4 — Falmouth street, Norway street, St. Paul 
street, Longwood avenue, Huntington avenue, Massachu- 
setts avenue, and Brookline avenue. Total cost, $60,270.90. 

Ward 5 — Arlington street. Chestnut street, Mt. Vernon 
street. Beacon street, Stuart street, Boylston street, and 
Grove street. Total cost, $33,098.05. 

Ward 6 — Summer street, A street, and P street. Total 
cost, $120,472.78. 

Ward 7- — Southampton street (chapter 90) and Cole- 
brook street. Total cost, $39,726.43. 

Ward 8 — Newmarket square (east, north, and south 
roads). Service place, Theodore A. Glynn Way, Southamp- 
ton street, Albany street (chapter 90) and Newmarket 
square (Massachusetts avenue to approximately 750 feet 
northerly) . Total cost, $135,499.39. 

Ward 9 — Prentiss street, Newland street, and Massa- 
chusetts avenue. Total cost, $24,985.54. 

Ward 10 — Bickford avenue, Bickford street, Bromley 
street, Burney street, Conant street, Frawley street, Kemp- 
ton street, Longwood avenue. Mission street, Oscar street, 
Parkton road, and Stockwell street. Total cost, $68,666.18. 

Ward 11 — Dimock street, Merriam street, and Carolina 
avenue. Total cost, $14,355.11. 

Ward 12 — Dana place, Pickering avenue. Bower street, 
Maywood street, Munroe street, Warren street (traffic 
island) , and Morton street. Total cost, $54,259.45. 

Ward 13 — Mt. Vernon street, St. William street, Balfour 
street, Davern avenue, Peverell street, and Woodcliff street. 
Total cost, $39,433.12. 

Ward 14 — Ballou avenue, Floyd street, Harwood street, 
Jones avenue, Arvale road, and Bowdoin avenue. Total 
cost, $75,169.17. 

Ward 15 — Bowdoin street (traffic island) and Westville 
terrace. Total cost, $6,043.62. 

Ward 16 — Pope's Hill street, Westglow street (concrete 
wall and chain-link fence) , Auriga Street Extension, Banton 
street. South Munroe terrace, Humes road, Templeton street, 
Neponset avenue (chapter 90), Adams street (chapter 90), 
and Freeport street (chapter 90). Total cost, $93,310.55. 



Public Works Dkpak'I'ment. 



41 



Ward 17 — Mother Julia road (sidewalks) and Torrey 
street. Total cost, $8,907.05. 

AVard 18 — Wasiiington street, Hcminan street, Alvarado 
avenue, Chesterfield street, Danny road, Manila avenue, 
Reynold road, Vallaro road, Cummins Highway, Canterbury 
street, Highfield road (sidewalks), Garfield avenue, Hillis 
road, Poplar street, and West street. Total cost, $292,303.30. 

Ward 19 — Ballin place, Cerina road, Brookway Foot- 
path (underpass, stairs, and walks), Bradeen Street Foot- 
way (sidewalks), Brookway terrace (sidew^alks), Morton 
street, Burr street, Carolina avenue, Cheshire street, Dane 
street, Hawthorne street, Heathcote street, Perkins street, 
Sedgwick street, Bowditch road, and Pond street. Total cost, 
$117,572.50. 

Ward 20 — Cricket Lane, Ledgewood road, Searle road, 
Belle\'ne street (sidewalks), Corey terrace, Hartlawn road, 
Ardale street, Bellaire road, Cerdan avenue, Colby road, 
Corey street, Farquhar street. Maple street, Pinehurst 
street, Roslindale avenue (sidewalks), and South street 
(sidewalks) . Total cost, $189,014.76. 

AVard 21 — Linden street and Commonwealth avenue. 
Total cost, $18,741.55. 

Ward 22 — Abby road, Franklin street (chain-link fence 
and metal pipe hand rail), Chiswick terrace. Embassy road, 
Elmira street, Kenrick street, and Rose Garden Circle. 
Total cost, $35,980.89. 



Work Done by Contract in 1955. 



Item. 



Earth excavation 

Rock excavation 

Bank gravel 

Crushed stone for edgestone 

Base removed . 

Pavement removed 

Straight edgestone . 

Circular edgestone . 

Corners .... 

Edgestone reset 

Edgestone hauled 

Macadam base 

OA asphalt 

Concrete base . 

Concrete backing up sidewalk 

Bituminous concrete base roadway 

Bituminous concrete top roadway 

Bituminous concrete base sidewalk 

Bituminous concrete top sidewalk 

Sheet asphalt 



Quantity. 
44,942 cubic yards. 
850 cubic j^ards. 
50,176 tons. 
2,731 tons. 
10,724 square yards. 
34,235 square yards. 
27,660 linear feet. 
5,964 linear feet. 
868 each. 
51,605 linear feet. 
8,434 linear feet. 

16.491 tons. 
157,000 gallons. 

3,451 cubic yards. 
28 cubic yards. 
27,728 tons. 

24.492 tons. 
1,677 tons. 
1,801 tons. 
3,462 tons. 



42 



City Document No. 18. 



Item 
Artificial stone sidewalk 
Artificial stone driveway 
Loam spaces 
Loam . 
Covers 

Bradley heads reset 
Brick courses 
Catch basins and manholes rebuilt 
Catch basins and drop inlets built 

Sign posts 

Parking meters 

Stone bounds 

Bituminous concrete pavement 
Sheet asphalt pavement . 



Quantity 
675,964 square feet. 
59,619 square feet. 
2,740 square yards. 

396 cubic yards. 
2,483 each. 
7 each. 
3,626 each. 
101 each. 
62 each. 
306 each. 
233 each. 
127 each. 
360,536 square yards. 
59,179 square yards. 



Yearly Report of Work Done by Department 
Forces for 1955 



Brick sidewalks laid and relaid 
Gravel sidewalks relaid 
Artificial stone sidewalks laid (new) 
Artificial stone sidewalks relaid (old) 
Bituminous concrete sidewalks 

Block gutters 

Artificial stone sidewalks patched with 

blacktop 

Edgestone reset (old) 
Macadam roadway patched . 
Macadam roadway resurfaced 
Asphalt or bituminous concrete road- 
way patched 

Asphalt or bituminous concrete road- 
way resurfaced .... 

Street cleaning 

Snow removal 

Street cleaning 

General highway expenditures 

Sidewalk and curbing 

Snow and ice removal 

Street signs 



4,329 square yards 

2,384 square yards. 

16,764 square feet. 

123,847 square feet. 

14,023 square yards. 

53 square yards. 

15,556 square feet. 
2,400 linear feet. 
118,182 square yards. 
11,032 square yards. 

47,844 square yards. 

2,433 square yards. 
2,918 cubic yards. 
4,265 cubic yards. 



.$32,437 83 

689,122 84 

235,535 07 

42,550 24 

23,901 97 



Total 



[,023,547 95 



Highway Division, Lighting Service. 
Financial Statement. 

Total credits for 1955 $1,431,032 84 

Total expenditures for 1955 .... 1,431,03178 



Balance unexpended 



$1 06 



Table Showing Length and Area of Paving on Accepted Streets, Corrected to January 1, 1956. 



Length in Miles. 



Year 1954 Report.. . 
Percent 

January 1, 1956. 

City Proper 

Charleatown 

East Boston 

South Boston 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Brighton 

Hyde Park 

Total 

Per Cent 



292.80 
39.67 



33.02 
1.47 



0.21 
0.03 



0.42 
0.06 



0.51 
0.07 



136.10 
18.44 



8.54 
1.16 



738.00 
100.00 



Area in Square Yards. 



5,635,567 
39.75 



4,062 
0.03 



12,104 
0.09 



7,826 
0.05 



SConcrete. ||Macada 



2,212,530 
15.55 



133,855 
0.94 



51,037 14,228,556 
0.36 100.00 



51.17 
4.41 
2.98 
12.12 
43.12 
36.10 
55.87 
21.13 
8.20 



6.11 
21.07 
17.68 
32.76 
80.71 
76.74 
31.47 
21.88 



10.37 
5.50 
3.54 
5.91 
2.69 
1.19 
0.53 
0.42 
0.00 



0.06 
0.08 



0.09 
0.02 
0.02 
0.03 



0.02 
0.14 



0.04 
0.04 
0.08 
0.03 



3.01 
0.76 
1.39 
0.43 
4.59 
3.50 
5.17 
1.23 
0.64 



2.71 
5.31 
9.14 
7.43 
11.23 
31.77 
35.36 
11.16 
15.81 



0.23 
0.61 
0.19 
0.09 
0.46 
1.43 
1.86 
0.26 
3.64 



0.01 
0.04 
0.50 
0.00 
0.20 
0.02 



96.23 
22.81 
38.39 
44.21 
94.99 
154.94 
175.63 
65.75 
60.40 



1,134,707 
86,447 
64,443 
260,001 
872,901 
642,125 
1,062,827 
466,796 
145,243 



644,403 
164,003 
487.171 
347,979 
612,189 
1,493,360 
1.417,090 
611.334 
428,395 



209,879 
134,413 
72,527 
173,504 
46,516 
30.876 
19,926 
27,291 
45 



1,370 
2,561 



96,433 
13,897 
47,177 
21,011 
70,599 
48,578 
83,213 
30,443 
10,086 



42,185 
73.582 
198,280 
125,668 
161,459 
509,524 
545,812 
179,304 
256,208 



1.594 
13,999 
3,341 
1,024 
8,693 
21,197 
40,217 
4,163 
58,720 



2,137,135 

489,491 

874,499 

947,632 

1,774,945 

2,755,179 

3,172,290 

1,320,612 

903,645 



235. 10 
31.63 



316.67 
42.60 



30.15 
4.05 



0.17 
0.02 



0.35 
0.05 



0.50 
0.07 



20.72 
2.79 



129.95 
17.48 



8.77 
1.18 



0.97 
0.13 



743.35 
100.00 



4,735,490 
32.94 



6,205,924 
43.17 



3,056 
0.02 



9,244 
0.07 



8,867 
0.06 



421,437 
2.93 



2,092,022 
14.55 



152,948 
1.06 



31,463 
0.22 



14,375,428 
100.00 



Total Public Streets 743.35 Miles. 
Note. — In the above table the city is subdivided substantially on the boundary lines between the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory annexed from Brookline included in City Propel 



r 810 square yards is Biturock. 

or 185 square yards is cobble: and 17.10 miles or 501,473 
square yards is granite block paving on concrete base. 

§ Of this amount 0.06 mile or 405 square yards is Blome granitoid concrete block, 
y Of this amount 113.61 miles or 1.850.059 square yards is bituminous macadam. 



t Of this amount 68.20 miles or 1,321,689 square yards is bitulithic; and 2.60 miles 
or 42.023 square yards is Topeka: and 0.06 mile or 920 square yards is Filbertine; and 
O.ll mile or 1,533 square yards is Simasco; and 0.03 mile or 595 square yards is Carey 
Elastite .\sphalt Plank; and 0.06 mile or 518 square yards is Johns-Man\'ille Asphalt 
Plank: and 0.09 mile or 2,124 square yards is Asphalt Block; and 1.61 miles or 50,5908quare 



9 Tar Concrete. 

6.69 miles or 36,904 square yards public alleys included in this table; 2.84 miles or 88.035 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 9.80 miles or 323,832 square yards 
public streets in charge of Commonwealth of Massachusetts included in this table. In addition to this table there are 2.38 miles or 11,566 square yards of accepted footways. 



Public Works Department. 



43 



Individual Expenditures. 
Street and Park Lighting (Electric) : 

Boston Edison Company . $1,211,516 23 
Boston Gas Company 

(Charlestown District) . 51,760 34 

Boston Edison Company 

(footways) .... 1,906 50 

Company 



Boston Gas 
(footways) . 

Boston Edison 
(substations) 

Boston Gas 
(substations) 



Company 
Company 



Street Lighting (Gas) : 
Boston Gas Companj^ . 
American Service Company 

Construction : 
Boston Gas Company . 
Boston Edison Company 
Joseph Amara & Son (instal- 
lation, removal, relocation, 
and modernization) . 



221 59 



4,843 62 



2,546 34 



$46,520 07 
73,487 56 



;4,148 96 
1,038 47 



11,450 00 



Salaries : 

Administrative and engineering personnel 

Office supplies 

Office furniture 

Electrical maintenance and replacement parts 
Advertising 



,272,794 62 



120,007 63 



16,637 43 

19,603 30 

376 54 

234 78 

1,333 48 

44 00 



The following is an account of orders issued by the 
Lighting Service of the Highway Division of the Public 
Works Department during the year 1955. 



Mercury Vapor Lighting 
In 1955 the following listed streets, 
and business areas were relighted 
mercury vapor lighting: 



Andrew square. South Boston 
Atlantic avenue, Boston . 
Bowdoin street, Dorchester 
Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester 
Brookline avenue, Roxbury 
Beacon street, Brighton . 



Projects. 




main thoroughfares, 


with new 


modem 




Lumens 


Units 


Each 


7 single 


15,000 


3 single 


15,000 


6 single 


15,000 


8 single 


15,000 


4 single 


15,000 


9 single 


15,000 



44 



City Document No. 18. 



Beacon street, Boston 
Beverly street, Boston 
Charles street, Boston 
Centre street, Jamaica Plain . 
Cummins Highway, West Roxbury 
Cummins Highway, West Roxburj'- 
Cross street, Boston . 
Charlestown Bridge . 
Clinton street, Boston 
Canal street, Boston 
Causeway street, Boston 
Commonwealth avenue, Brighton 
Dorchester avenue, Dorchester 
Dock square, Boston 
Dock square, Boston 
Dorchester street. South Boston 
Dorchester street, South Boston 
Faneuil Hall square, Boston . 
Friend street, Boston 
Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park 
Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park 
Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park 
Market street, Boston 
Neponset avenue, Boston 
North street, Boston 
North street, Boston 
Peacevale road, Dorchester 
Peacevale road, Dorchester 
Park Drive, Boston . 
Portland street, Boston . 
Southampton street. South Boston 
Southampton street. South Boston 
Surface road, Fitzgerald Expressway 
Summer street, Boston 
Summer street, Boston 
Summer street. South Boston 
Summer street, South Boston 
State street, Boston 
Southampton street, Roxbury 
Southampton street, Roxbury 
Traverse street, Boston . 
Tremont street, Boston . 
Washington Street North, Boston 
Washington street, West Roxbury 
Washington street. West Roxbury 
Washington street. West Roxbury 
Washington street, Brighton . 



Units 
45 single 
3 twin 

1 single 
29 single 

3 single 
33 twin 

C single 

8 single 

4 single 

9 twin 
9 single 

2 twin 
24 single 

8 single 

5 twin 

3 twin 
36 single 

1 single 

7 single 

2 single 
57 single 

2 twin 
1 single 

36 single 

3 single 

1 single 

2 single 
1 twin 

12 single 
5 single 

32 single 
1 twin 

19 single 
5 single 

1 twin 

2 twin 
5 single 
1 twin 

1 twin 

8 single 
1 single 

1 single 

4 single 

2 single 
89 single 

2 twin 
1 single 



Lumens 
Each 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

20,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

20,000 

10,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

20,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

10,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

10,000 

10,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 



Public Works Department. 



45 



Incandescent Lighting Projects. 
In 1955 orders were issued for the installation 
and the replacement of old lighting units. 

A street, South Boston 
A street, South Boston 
Ardale street, West Roxbury 
Bennington street, East Boston 
Bennington street, East Boston 
Bowen street. South Boston 
Brainerd road, Brighton 
Brook Farm road, West Roxbury 
Beech Glen street, Roxbury 
Clarkwood street, Dorchester 
Carolina avenue, West Roxbury 
Child street, West Roxbury 
Centre street, Dorchester 
Canterbury street. West Roxbury 
Codman Hill avenue, Dorchester 
Dietz road, Hyde Park 
East Fourth street. South Boston 
Everton street, Dorchester 
Edwin street, Dorchester 
Floj'-d street, Dorchester 
Fowler street, Dorchester 
Fort avenue, Roxbury . 
Glendale street, Dorchester 
Greenough avenue. West Roxbur 
Hamilton street, Dorchester 
Howard avenue, Roxbury . 
Hazleton street, Dorchester 
Johnston road, Dorchester . 
Maple street. West Roxbury 
Margo street, Brighton 
Mossdale road. West Roxbury 
Marlborough street, Boston 
Newmarket square, Roxbury 
Nottinghill road, Brighton . 
Olney street, Dorchester 
Peacevale road, Dorchester 
Pinehurst street. West Roxbury 
Pickering place. South Boston 
Pond street. West Roxbury 
Pond street. West Roxbury 
Priesing street. West Roxbury 
Rexford street, Dorchester . 
Richfield street, Dorchester 
Robinson street, Dorchester 



of new 



ngle 


Lumens 


nits 


Each 


9 


4,000 


19 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


15 


6,000 


7 


10,000 


7 


2,500 


8 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


10 


2,500 


9 


2,500 


14 


4,000 


7 


6,000 


9 


2,500 


5 


2,500 


5 


2,500 


5 


2,500 


8 


2,500 


5 


2,500 


5 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


14 


2,500 


21 


2,500 


13 


2,500 


12 


2,500 


5 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


6 


2,500 


6 


2,500 


5 


4,000 


7 


6,000 


14 


2,500 


12 


2,500 


6 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


1 


1,000 


22 


2,500 


3 


4,000 


5 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


14 


2,500 


6 


2,500 



46 



City Document No. 18. 



Stratton street, Dorchester .... 

Surface road, Fitzgerald Expressway, Boston 

St. Stephen street, Roxbury 

St. Stephen street, Roxbury 

Torrey street, Dorchester . 

Templeton street, Dorchester 

Thomas park, South Boston 

Van Winkle street, Dorchester 

Wilcock street, Dorchester . 

Worcester street, Roxbury . 

West ]\Iilton street, Hyde Park 

West Milton street, Hyde Park 

West Milton street, Hyde Park 

Went worth street, Dorchester 

Willowdean avenue, West Roxbury 

Windermere road, Dorchester 

Wayland street, Dorchester 

West Brookline street, Boston 

Wrentham street, Dorchester 

Zeigler street, Roxbury 

Zeigler street, Roxbury 

Centre street, West Roxbury 

Dorchester a\enue, Dorchester 



Single 


Lumens 


Units 


lt!ach 


12 


2,500 


60 


6,000 


5 


4,000 


3 


2,500 


7 


2,500 


11 


2,500 


18 


2,500 


5 


2,500 


2 


2,500 


12 


4,000 


10 


4,000 


9 


6,000 


1 


1,000 


5 


2,500 


9 


2,500 


6 


2,500 


5 


2,500 


8 


6,000 


5 


2,500 


6 


2,500 


1 


4,C00 


21 


15,000 


1 


15,000 



Incandescent Lamps. 
Incandescent electric lamps of 6,000' lumens were in- 
stalled on the following streets: 

Alden road, Boston (1) ; Central street, Boston (4) ; D 
street, South Boston (2); Harvard street, Dorchester (1); 
India street, Boston (2) ; India square, Boston (1) ; India 
place, Boston (1); Milk street, Boston (2); Melville ave- 
nue, Dorchester (1); Montebello road, Dorchester (2); 
Mozart street. West Roxbury (1) ; Mall street, Roxbury 

(1) ; Parker Hill avenue, Roxbury (1) ; River street, Hyde 
Park (1); Sears street, Boston (2); Storer street, Boston 

(1). 

Incandescent electric lamps of 4,000 lumens were in- 
stalled on the following streets: 

Amory street, Roxbury (1) ; Bowdoin avenue, Dorchester 
(1) ; Baker street, West Roxbury (1) ; Colbert street, West 
Roxbury (2) ; Corning street, Boston (2) ; Elm Hill avenue, 
Roxbury (1) ; Eustis street, Roxbury (2) ; Fay wood street, 
East Boston (1) ; Francis street, Roxbury (4) ; Fenway, 
Boston (4) ; Hilbum street. West Roxbury (1) ; Kelley court, 
Brighton (1) ; Kingsdale street, Dorchester (1) ; Lamar- 
tine street, West Roxbury (1) ; Mt. Vernon street, Boston 



Public Works Department. 47 

(2) ; Maple street, Hyde Park (2) ; Mt. Pleasant avenue, 
Roslindale (4) ; Marvin street, Roxbury (2) ; Mall street, 
Roxbury (4) ; Redfield street, Dorchester (1) ; Reed street, 
Boston (2); Radford Lane, Boston (1); St. Joseph street. 
West Roxbury (1) ; Upton street, Boston (3) ; Walley 
street, East Boston (3) ; Washington street, Hyde Park 
(1); Whitford street. West Roxbury (1); West Canton 
street, Boston (3); Whitfield street, Dorchester (1). 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service for the 
installation of lighting units of 2,500 lumens as follows: 
Auckland street, Dorchester (1) ; A street, South Boston 
(2); Adair road, Brighton (1); Albano road, West Rox- 
bury (3) ; Auriga street, Dorchester (4) ; Alwin street, Hyde 
Park (4) ; Adamson street, Brighton (2) ; Allendale street, 
West Roxbury (1); Aliano road, West Roxbury (4); 
Bernard street, Dorchester (2) ; Brownson terrace, West 
Roxbury (2) ; Brucewood street, West Roxbury (2) ; Brook- 
way Footpath, West Roxbury (2) ; Blackwood street, Rox- 
bury (2) ; Brookview street, Dorchester (4) ; Beaufort road, 
West Roxbury (4) ; Bartlett terrace, Roxbury (1) ; Burney 
street, Roxbury (2) ; Bowdoin avenue, Dorchester (3) ; 
Bradeen Footway, West Roxbury (1) ; Bowdoin park, 
Dorchester (1); Burgoyne street, Dorchester (2); Bruce 
street, Dorchester (1) ; Caltha road, Brighton (1) ; Cawfield 
street, Dorchester (2) ; Cheshire street, West Roxbury (2) ; 
Colbert street, W^est Roxbury (1) ; Cross street, Boston 
(2) ; Cornell street. West Roxbury (1) ; Cambridge street, 
Dorchester (1) ; Charles street, Hyde Park (1) ; Colebrook 
street, South Boston (2) ; Cass street. West Roxbury (1) ; 
Carleton street, Boston (1) ; Dewar street, Dorchester (1) ; 
Dighton road, Brighton (1) ; Dorr street, Roxbury (4) ; 
Dyer court, Dorchester (1); Dane street, West Roxbury 
(2) ; Derry road, Hyde Park (2) ; Dania street, Dorchester 
(3) ; Driftwood road. West Roxbury (2) ; Dawes street, 
Dorchester (3) ; Englewood avenue, Brighton (2) ; Fay wood 
street, East Boston (1) ; Farquhar street, West Roxbury 
(4) ; Fenwick street, Roxbury (2) ; Farwell avenue, Hyde 
Park (2) ; Fowler street, Dorchester (2) ; Fabyan street. 
Dorchester (4) ; Glencliff road, West Roxbury (2) ; Guern- 
sey street. West Roxbury (1) ; Grantley street, Hyde Park 
(2); Harbor View street, Dorchester (1); Haviland road. 
West Roxbury (2) ; Hartley street, Dorchester (4) ; Haw- 
thorne street, West Roxbury (4) ; Hartlawn street, West 
Roxbury (2) ; Hillsboro street, Dorchester (4) ; Hall 
street, West Roxbury (4) ; Hopedale street, Brighton (1) ; 
Havelock street, Brighton (1); Halliday street, West 
Roxbury (1); Jacobs street, Dorchester (1); Jamestown 
terrace, Dorchester (1); Kittredge street, West Roxburv 



48 City Document No. 18. 

(3) ; Laurie street, West Roxbury (3) ; Leicester street, 
Brighton (2); Lorenzo street, Dorchester (1); Lakeville 
road, AVest Roxbury (4) ; Liberty place, South Boston (1) ; 
LilUe Way, West Roxbury (1) ; Lawton street, Hyde Park 
(1) ; Maple street, Hyde Park (3) ; Maple Street Extension, 
West Roxbury (2) ; Mt. Ida road, Dorchester (4) ; Michi- 
gan road, Dorchester (4) ; New Haven street, West Rox- 
bury (2) ; Nassau street, Boston (2) ; Newfield street, West 
Roxbury (3) ; Norwell street, Dorchester (2) ; Nevada 
street, Dorchester (1); Oak street, Hyde Park (1); Oak- 
ridge street, Dorchester (1) ; Pine street, Hyde Park (3) ; 
Pond street, Dorchester (1) ; Park Front road, West Rox- 
bury (2) ; Poplar street. West Roxbury (2) ; Parsons street, 
Brighton (1) ; Rollins street, Boston (2) ; Russett road, 
West Roxbury (1); Riverside square, Hyde Park (3); 
Radford Lane, Dorchester (1) ; South Munroe terrace, 
Dorchester (3) ; Supple road, Dorchester (3) ; Seaverns 
avenue, West Roxbury (1) ; Summer Street Extension, 
Hyde Park (3) ; Solaris road, Hyde Park (4) ; Staniford 
place, Boston (1) ; Staniford street, Boston (4) ; Sherrin 
street, Hyde Park (2) ; Turner street, Brighton (1) ; Vallaro 
road, Hyde Park (1); Vassar street, Dorchester (2); 
Walnut street. West Roxbury (1) ; Waldemar avenue. East 
Boston (1); Wilton street, Hyde Park (1); Willowwood 
street, Dorchester (1); Wliipple avenue, Hyde Park (2); 
Wilmington avenue, Dorchester (4) ; Wendeller street. 
South Boston (1) ; Waterford street, Roxbury (2) ; Went- 
worth terrace, Dorchester (4) ; Ware street, Dorchester 
(3) ; Willis street, Dorchester (4) ; York street, Dorchester 
(3). 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service during the 
year 1955 for the installation of 1,000-lumen lighting 
units as foUovi^s: 

Ayles road, Hyde Park (2) ; Ainsworth Street Footwav, 
West Roxbury (2) ; Allen street, West Roxbury (1) ; 
Browning avenue, Dorchester (1) ; Bellamy street, Brighton 
(2) ; Birchcroft road, Hyde Park (1) ; Baldwin place, 
Brighton (1) ; Daniel court, Hyde Park (1) ; Franklin place. 
East Boston (1) ; Federal road. West Roxbury (1) ; Forest 
street, Hj^de Park (2) ; Grandview street, AVest Roxbury 
(1); Hunnewell avenue, Brighton (1) ; Jones avenue, Dor- 
chester (1); Kardon road, Hyde Park (1); Moreland 
street, AA'est Roxbury (2) ; Pickering place, South Boston 
(1) ; Senders court, Hyde Park (3) ; Susanna court, Hyde 
Park (2) ; Union street, Brighton (1) ; AVedgewood road, 
AA^est Roxbury (1) ; AA'ayburn avenue, AVest Roxbury (3) ; 
AVildwood street, Dorchester (1) ; AVendell place. South 
Boston (1) ; AA^iarton court, Hyde Park (1). 



Public Works Departmikh 49 

Gas Lamp Replacement Progrw/d. 
During the year approximately 275 obsolete gas lamps 
were replaced with approximately 310 nev/ modern lumi- 
naires with 2,500-lumen lamps. These nev/ lamps in most 
instances are installed on long arms to dLaiinish inter- 
ference with trees and to eliminate glare from homes on 
residential streets. Plans calling for the replacement 
of an additional 300 gas lamps with ele'cirie lamps were 
delayed due to the heavy work load impofiO< I on the utility 
companies by the disastrous flood. 



50 City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1956. 

To the Coinmissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith a statement of the activities of the 
Sanitaiy Division of the Public Works Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1955. 

The following is a summarized financial statement of 
the expenditures made in 1955 by the Sanitary Division 
for refuse collection and disposal, for street cleaning, and 
for other activities of the division : 

Refuse collection contracts $2,107,982 52 

Refuse disposal contracts 438,256 59 

Refuse supervision payrolls 332,188 73 

Street cleaning payrolls 1,773,734 52 

Street cleaning expenses 42,530 74 

AU other expenditures 116,955 32 



Total expenditures $4,811,648 42 

Refuse collection contracts awarded in March pro- 
vided that five additional districts will have totally en- 
closed packer-type bodies on the refuse collection trucks 
operated by the contractors in each district. This makes 
sixteen of the seventeen collection districts now fur- 
nished with this modern equipment. It is planned to 
require this equipment in the seventeenth district next 
year. 

Over ninety^seven acres of marshland located in the 
Gardner Street area of West Roxbury became available 
for a rubbish dump when the city acquired seventy-one 
acres of land formerly used by the Town of Brookline 
for water supply purposes. Starting in September, rub- 
bish fill is being placed in a deep water hole on land in 
this vicinity between Gardner street and Rivermoor 
street, owned by the M. DeMatteo Construction Com- 
pany. This is advantageous to both parties as it conserves 



Public Works Department. 51 

the city-owned dumping area, eliminates a hazard to 
children in the area, and will provide a solid fill area 
when completed suitable for use by the owner for parking 
or similar purposes. 

In October the new ofiSce quarters provided for the 
division in the William T. Morrissey Memorial Building 
were occupied. This building, located in the yard at the 
Arborway and Forest Hills street, will also house yard 
offices of the Water, Sewer, and Highway Divisions. 

On May 13, 1955, the Fort Point Channel above Dor- 
chester avenue was declared by the Federal Government 
to be nonnavigable. This will require elimination of the 
scow operation from the iUbany Receiving Station on 
April 1, 1956. 

The city acquired a total of 124,821 square feet of 
land by taking from the New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad Company in an area northerly of South 
Bay avenue for an incinerator site. Bids were opened on 
December 2 for equipment (furnaces and appurtenances) 
for the South Bay Incinerator. An award will be made 
sometime early m 1956 after the bids have been evaluated. 

An unusual experience for the division resulted from 
the record-breaking rainfall that was an aftermath of 
Hurricane Diane on August 18 and 19. Flooded areas in 
Belnel Village, Dorchester, and the Island Section of 
Hyde Park were furnished with daily refuse collection 
by the division forces until the flood waters receded. The 
division also assisted the Health Department by provid- 
ing transportation to furnish the residents in the flooded 
areas with daily supplies of chloride of lime to disinfect 
their basements. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Adolph J. Post, 

Division Engineer. 



52 



City Document No. 18. 



SANITARY DIVISION — 1955 
Payments to Refuse Collection Contractors. 



District 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
Payments 






$10,500 
10,400 


$125,100 0( 




(First 3 months) 






(Last 9 months) 






6,762 
7,328 


86,238 0* 










3,953 


49,182 6- 






4 Brighton 




13,500 
13,400 


161,100 0' 










11,190 
10,350 


125,652 2 




(First 3 months) 






(Last 9 months) 






9,615 


115,380 






6A Dorchester — North 


Coleman Brothers Corporation 


25,900 


310,800 










29,100 


349,200 






7A Elm Hill 


William J. Banfield 


5,300 
5,310 


63,690 






7B Dudley 


M. DeMatteo Construction Company 

(First 3 months) 


6,729 
6,829 


81,234 






(Last 9 months) 


7C Mission Hill 




8,200 
8,140 


97,860 








M. DeMatteo Construction Company 

(First 3 months) 

United Contracting Company 


9,980 
9,980 


120,488 8 






(Last 9 months) 




Frank J. Cavaliere 


7,900 
7,170 


88,230 C 


9 South End 


(First 3 months) 








(Last 9 months) 




9A Back Bay 




4,572 
3,690 


47,465 C 








98 Stuart 




4,880 
3,560 


46,680 C 








10 North and West Ends 




14,300 


179,681 7 






1 1 Hyde Park 




5,000 


60,000 t 






Total 






«2, 107,982 £ 

















Public AVorks Department. 

Payments to Refuse Disposal Contractors. 



53 



District 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
Payments 




M. DeMatteo Construction Company 


83fi,980 
34,760 


$428,056 59 










000 
700 


10,200 00 








Total 






$438,256 59 


otal Payments to Contractors fo 






$2,546,239 11 









54 City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1936. 

To the Commissioner of Public Woi'ks. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and ex- 
penditures of the Sewer Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1955. 

Expenditures During 1955. — The activities of the 
Sewer Division during the year consisted of sewer con- 
struction at a contract cost of $422,213.89, as shown on 
attached schedule of the work done, and the maintenance 
and operation of the sewer system at a cost of $911,135.68. 

Contract Work. — Contract work consisted of the ex- 
tension of the sewer system to provide drainage for 
new buildings and street construction and to eliminate 
cesspools, the locations and cost of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work. — Maintenance work consisted of 
the cleaning of 5,739 catch basins by contract and 3,354 
by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers and catch 
basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, and catch 
basins by the yard forces and the operation of the pump- 
ing station and disposal works, the cost of which is 
attached. 

Covering in Open Brooks. — A contract in the amount 
of $439,077 was awarded to Pacella Brothers, Inc., for 
the covering in of Stony Brook, Myopia Brook, and 
Providence Street Brook, 

The main line of Stony Brook will be enclosed in a 
72-inch diameter concrete pipe conduit for a distance of 
about 5,058 linear feet, from opposite Willow avenue to 
Bald Knob road. 

Myopia Brook will be enclosed in a 48-inch diarneter 
concrete pipe conduit for a distance of about 769 linear 
feet, from the main line of Stony Brook to an existing 
conduit at the rear lot line between Gwinnett street and 
Austin street. 



Public Works Department. 55 

Providence Street Brook will be enclosed in a 36-inch 
diameter concrete pipe conduit for a distance of about 
1,214 linear feet, from the main line of Stony Brook to 
an existing conduit near Grant place. 

The work started in October, 1955, and is expected to 
be completed in one year. This work will complete the 
enclosing of Stony Brook in a conduit. It will make pos- 
sible the reclamation of many acres of adjacent swamp- 
land for building purposes, eliminate the hazard of an 
open brook, and provide substantial relief for the base- 
ment flooding of dwellings, located adjacent to the brook, 
that now occurs when the ground water level is high. 

Proposed Construction Work. — The work of extending 
the sewer system to provide drainage for new street con- 
struction, new building construction, and the elimination 
of cesspools will continue for many years in the future, 
and probably at the same rate as in the past. In addition, 
a long-range sewerage works program provides for the 
extension of main line surface drain conduits and the 
rebuilding of several miles of very old sewers that have 
settled or outlived their economic usefulness. Details 
of the long-range program are contained in a report on 
file in the Sewer Division. 

Special Problems. 

Hurricane Dianne — 1955. 

Boston escaped hurricane Dianne on August 18, 1955, 
but experienced torrential rains on August 18 and 19, 
causing widespread street and cellar flooding. On August 
18 the rain started at 6 a.m. and ended at 11 p.m., during 
which time 4.88 inches of rain fell. On August 19 the 
rain started at 3 a.m. and ended at 9 p.m., during which 
time 7.06 inches of rain fell. The United States Weather 
Bureau reported that the storm produced the heaviest 
rainfall ever experienced in this area and established new 
record rainfall totals and intensities. On August 19 the 
record three-hour intensity was 4.05 inches, and on Au- 
gust 18 and 19 the record 24-hour intensity was 8.40 
inches. 

The storm runoff caused the Neponset River and 
Mother Brook to rise and flood property adjacent to the 
Neponset River at Belnel Village and property adjacent 
to Mother Brook at Margin street, Hyde Park. 

Widespread street and cellar flooding occurred, particu- 
larly on August 19, adjacent to covered brook courses, 



56 ("lty Document No. 18. 

especially OjI Urn lower end of Stony Brook in the vicinity 
of Parker street, at which time it appears that the con- 
duit surcharged aJid the water backflowed through catch 
basins conLocfcod to the conduit, flooding Parker street to 
a depth of a.bout three feet. 

The time of concentration for the Stony Brook conduit 
from Bald Knob road to Parker street is about three 
hours. The itit/3nsity of the Flaherty 15-year rainfall 
curve for a. three -hour periwi is about one inch. The 
intensity fo ' the same period durmg Hurricane Dianne 
was about "f.o5 inches. It is believed that this increase 
in intensity r.'^.iiRc^d the conduit to surcharge and produced 
the flood. 

While widOwHpread street and cellar flooding occurred 
during Hunicane Edna in 1954, when about six inches 
of rain feH, th ere was very little public protest because 
everybody rcilked there had been a hurricane, whereas 
during Hurnerijic Dianne there was no physical evidence 
of a hurric^i.iio other than torrential rain, and the public 
reaction to ihe flooding was that the sewers were at fault. 

As previou.^ly stated, similar street and cellar flooding 
occurred adj. i.C/ent to other covered brook courses, both 
in 1954 ar.J. 1 9^15^ causing substantial property damage, 
mostly to oi) buraer motors. If we are to have such 
storms ye&.r)y\ or say, more often than once in fifteen 
years, evidently something should be done to meet the 
situation. Consideration should be given to building 
adequate pimnp wells where required, and the installation 
of float-opo'Ti.ted motor-driven pumps of the proper size 
at the end of .-surface drainage conduits to discharge the 
storm flows into the receiving streams. While the installa- 
tion of thcfio ).iumps would substantially reduce, if not 
entirely correct, widespread flooding adjacent to covered 
brook couiLC... during torrential rainstorms, it would in 
no sense prevent floodings that occur adjacent to the 
Boston ]\Ii-.in Drainage Intercepter and the Metropolitan 
North and Coutb. Intercepter Sewers. Both these sewers 
surcharged .^^nd caused street and cellar flooding during 
l^oth the r !o4 and 1955 hurricanes, and there is no way 
of determining how the extent of the resulting damage 
compared witli that caused by the surcharging of covered 
brook counret; previously mentioned, although street flood- 
ing was far more extensive adjacent to the covered brook 
courses th.'^.n ^.o the intercepter sewers. 



Public Works Department, 57 

While the completion of the metropolitan sewerage 
works program now in progress will no doubt result in 
greater capacity in the Boston Main Drainage Inter- 
cepter for storm flow, it will not prevent the intercepter 
from surcharging during torrential rainstorms, but it 
should shorten both the time of surcharge and of street 
flooding if it should occur. 

Sewer Changes Required by the Construction' of the 
Fitzgerald Expressway. 

The construction of the tunnel section of the Fitzger- 
ald Expressway required that sewers that now cross the 
tunnel location be siphoned underneath the tunnel or 
intercepted by a new sewer to be built on the northerly 
side of the tunnel and be reconnected to the Boston 
sewer system by new sewers located beyond the tunnel 
portals at Oliver street and Kneeland street. 

These new sewers are now under construction as part 
of the contract for the construction of the tunnel. 

One sewer starts at the east side intercepter near Oliver 
street, and has a storm overflow into the harbor at Fort 
Hill Wharf. From the intercepter it is located on the west 
side of Oliver street, between Atlantic avenue and Pur- 
chase street, then in Purchase street to Summer street 
and beyond to Columbia street and Essex street. The 
size of the sewer varies from 72-inch diameter to 48-inch 
diameter pipe. 

The other sewer starts in Kneeland street and is then 
located in private land on the easterly side of Albany 
street between Kneeland street and Harvard street, then 
in Harvard street with a branch in private land starting 
in Harvard street between Albany street and Hudson 
street to Beach street, and then crosses Beech street and 
Edinboro street to and in private land parallel to the 
tunnel to near Tufts street and Kingston street. The 
size of the sewer varies from 72-inch to 18-inch diameter 
pipe. 

The Sewer Division Labor Force consists of the follow- 
ing: 24 laborers, 1 carpenter. 30 motor equipment oper- 
ators and laborers, 10 catch-basin machine operators, 4 
tide gate repairmen, 6 working foremen sewer cleaners, 
17 sewer cleaners, 5 bricklayers, 3 yardmen, 1 heavy motor 
equipment operator, 5 sewer district foremen, and 1 main 
drainage foreman. This makes a total of 107 men as- 



58 City Document No. 18. 

signed to answering complaints, cleaning catch basins, 
cleaning sewers, repairs to manholes and catch basins, 
repairing broken sewers, and other related work. 

Lerigth of Sewers Built. — During the fiscal year 1955 
there were built by contractors and day labor 6.62 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains throughout the city. 
After deducting 0.27 miles of sewers and surface drains, 
rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase for 1955 is 6.35 
miles, which added to the existing 1,279.95 miles of com- 
mon sewers and surface drains and 30.93 miles of inter- 
cepting sewers, makes a grand total of 1,317.23 miles of 
all sewers belonging to the City of Boston, and under the 
care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 1956. 

There were 133 catch basins built or rebuUt and 11 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 122 catch basins and a grand total of 24,355 catch 
basins under the care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 
1956. 

Permit Office Report. — Entrance fees to the amount of 
$12,882 have been deposited with the Collector-Treasurer 
for collection from estates upon which no sewer assess- 
ments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordinances of 
1945, chapter 27, section 10. 

There were 1,085 permits issued, viz., 245 to district 
foremen and contractors and 840 to drainiayers for re- 
pair or laying new house drains. Inspectors from this 
office have personally inspected the work done under 
these drainiayers' permits. 

There were 2,513 complaints investigated and inspec- 
tors are instructed to report in writing in each case. 

There were 2,015 catch basin complaints received. 

Reported in writing on 2,952 municipal liens to the 
Collector-Treasurer, in accordance with chapter 60, sec- 
tion 25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
2,400 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the Ordinances of 1925, chapter 27, section 8, ap- 
prising them of the construction of new sewers or repairs 
to old sewers. 

Respectfully, 

Robert P. Shea, 
Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



59 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
December 31, 1955. 



Districts. 


Built by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 


Bunt by 
Private 
Parties. 


Total Lengths Built. 




Linear Feet. 

60.00 

141.50 

96.00 


Linear Feet. 
1.579.00 


Linear Feet. 

1,639 00 

141.50 

96.00 


Miles. 
0.3104 




0.0268 






0.0182 










42.00 

2,290.57 

12,091.14 

7,741.05 

10,775.22 




42.00 
2,290.57 

12.091.14 
7,741 .05 

10,891.37 


0.0079 






0.4338 






2.2899 






1.4661 


Hyde Park 


116.15 


2.0628 






Totals 


33,237.48 


1,695.15 


34,932.63 


6.6159 







Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January 1, 1956. 





1951. 


1952. 


1953. 


1954. 


1955. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 


Linear Feet. 
22.456.07 


Linear Feet. 
18,781.42 

16,484.50 


Linear Feet. 
27,469.81 

11,482.00 


Linear Feet. 
33,316.89 

10,459.00 


Linear Feet 
33,237.48 

1.695.15 








Totals 


22,456.07 


35,265.92 


38,951.81 


43,775.89 


34,932.63 







60 



City Document No. 18. 



Total Length of Sewers. 



DlSTBICTS. 


Total 

Lengths 

BuUt 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31. 1955. 


Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31. 1955. 


Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1955. 




Linear Feet. 

1,639.00 

141.50 

96.00 


Linear Feet. 
763.00 
141.50 


Linear Feet. 
876.00 




Miles. 
0.1659 








96.00 




0182 








Charlestown 


42.00 
2,290.57 

12,091.14 
7,741.05 

10,891.37 


42.00 
304.00 
150.00 






Brighton 


1,986.57 
11,941.14 

7.741.05 
10.891.37 




. 3762 




2.2614 




1.4661 


Hyde Park 




2.0628 








Totals 


34,932.63 


1,400.50, 


33,532.13 




6.3506 







Miles. 
Common sewers and surface drains built previous 

to January 1, 1955 1,279.95 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 

January 1 and December 31, 1955 . . . 6.35 

Common sewers and surface drains built ending 

December 31, 1955 1,286.30 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting with 
Metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1955 . . *6.81 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers 
toDecember 31, 1955 *24.12 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to 
December 31, 1955 . . . . . . . 1,317.23 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 

to January 1, 1956 711.87 

•No additional lengths built during 1955. 



Public Works Department. 



61 



Catch Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 



DiSTBICTB. 



Catch Basins fob Twelve Months 
Ending December 31, 1955. 



Number 
Built or 
RebuOt. 



Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 



Net 
Increase. 



Total for Whole Citt 

IN Charge of Sewer 

Division. 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1955. 



Grand Total 

to 

January I, 

1956. 



ity Proper . . 

oxbury 

7uth Boston. 
ast Boston . . 
harlestown . . 

righton 

^est Roxbury 
'orchester ... 
yde Park ... 

Totals ... 



1 

6 

4 





8 

28 

33 

53 



6 

4 





8 

26 

33 

53 



3,807 
3,474 
1,471 
1,221 
846 
2.087 
4,437 
5,644 
1.246 



3.799 
3,480 
1,475 
1,221 
84G 
2,095 
4,463 
5,677 
1.299 



133 



11 



24,233 



24,355 



CALF PASTURE PUMPING STATION 

Annual Report, Calf Pasture, 1955 

Total gallons pumped 42,589,626,000 

Daily average gallons pumped 116,818,000 

Cost per million gallons pumped $4 . 82 

Labor $108,333 04 

Edison Power 83,287 62 

Fuel 4,253 30 

Supplies 3,959 08 

Service orders 3,615 32 

Contracts 1,728 00 

Total $205,176 36 



62 City Document No. 18. 



SEWER DIVISION 
Maintenance Expenditure Details 1955 

Total 
Personal Services: 

Permanent employees $567,475 84 

Temporary employees 1,032 40 

Overtime 16,839 35 

S585,347 59 

Contractual Services: 

Communications 3,327 87 

Light, heat and power . . . . . 89,197 24 
Repairs and maintenance of buildings and 

structures . . . _ . . . . 46,340 47 

Repairs and servicing of equipment . . 4,007 99 

Transportation of persons .... 1,128 62 

Other contractual services .... 454 42 

144,456 61 

Supplies and Materials: 

Food supplies 17 55 

Heating supplies and materials , . . 6,378 54 

Household supplies and materials . . 413 75 
Medical, dental and hospital supplies and 

materials 13 07 

Office supplies and materials , . . . 2,741 71 

Other supplies and materials .... 11,296 37 

20,860 99 

Current Charges and Obligations 816 10 

Equipment 244 85 

Structures and Improvements 159,409 54 

Grand Total $911,135 68 



Public Works Department. 



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70 City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE SURVEY DIVISION FOR 
THE YEAR 1955. 



Boston, Januaiy 2, 1956. 

To the Covimissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the activi- 
ties of the Survey Division for the year ending December 
31, 1955. 

This division performs engmeering services for other 
divisions of the Public Works Department and other city 
departments, boards, and commissions. It also performs 
administrative and engineering duties required by the 
Public Improvement Commission for its operation. 

The principal engineering duties include: 

(a) the making of plans, surveys, estimates, and reports 

relating to the laying out, widening, construction, and 

design of public highway; 

(5) the taking of easements for sewerage works; 

(c) staking out lines and grades for the construction of 
highways, sewerage, etc.; 

(d) the making of property surveys of land to be 
acquired by the City of Boston by eminent domain; 

(e) the making of plans and surveys of city-owned land 
for purposes of sale, interdepartmental transfer, or new de- 
velopment ; 

(/) the making of various engineering surveys and plans 
required by other city departments. 

For the Public Improvement Commission, the admin- 
istrative functions include processing of petitions, arrang- 
ing public hearings, preparing estimates and orders relat- 
ing to land damages and street and sewer betterments, 
preparing orders for the laying out of streets and the con- 
struction of streets and sewers, preparing orders for emi- 
nent domain land takings, preparing orders for the 
granting of permits for use of public highways, erection 
of poles, etc., and the maintenance of all records in the 
charge of the Public Improvement Commission. 



Public Works Department. 



71 



Personnel: 

On December 31, 1955, there were thirty-five permanent 
and seven temporary employees in this division. 

During the year, two permanent employees, Edward P. 
Fogarty, Executive Secretary, and William F. Conway, 
Senior Designing Engineer, retired. Mr. Fogai'ty had 
been employed in this Division since 1906 and Mr. Con- 
way siQce 1923. Each of these employees was an expert 
in his work and is sorely missed. Three provisional en- 
gineering aides resigned during the year. One permanent 
employee, a junior clerk, transferred to the division from 
the Registry Division of the Health Department and two 
new provisional employees were hired, leaving three posi- 
tions vacant. 



Division Expenditures, January I, 1955, to December 31, 1955, 
Inclusive 



Survey 
Budget. 



Highway 
Loan. 



Sewer 
Loan. 



Personnel 

Pensions 

Contractual services 

Supplies and materials 

Current charges and obligations. 
Equipment 



$108,418 72 


$66,850 60 


18,350 97 


— 


2,657 14 


10,749 65 


6,061 89 


— 


109 00 


*43,914 50 


470 52 


— 


$136,068 24 


$121,514 75 



$2,091 25 



Totals. 



$2,091 25 



Total Expenditures $259,674 24 

* Land Damages 

During the period covered by this report, the Survey 
Division completed one hundred seventeen (117) surveys 
and plans for the improving of existing highways or lay- 
ing out of new ones totaling 8.10 miles. Thirty-eight (38) 
surveys and plans for 3.13 miles of sewerage easements 
were also made. Twenty-seven (27) surveys and plans 
of city-owned land or land to be taken for municipal pur- 
poses were also made. 

Field engineering work included the staking out of 
thirty- three (33) streets for the Paving Service of the 
Highway Division, thirty-eight (38) for the Sewer Divi- 
sion, and miscellaneous services for other city depart- 
ments. Regular routine work included the resurveying 



72 City Document No. 18. 

of street lin&s for private engineers wherever existing 
records were inadequate or obsolete, marking lines and 
grades for private construction abutting public streets, 
examining land court plans for the Law Department, 
preparing land damage reports for the Public Improve- 
ment Comj-nissioFi, drafting charts, graphs, etc., for the 
Administrative Sendees Department, City Auditor, and 
others. Listed below are the major engineering surveys 
and plans oompl&ted during the period of this report. 

For the Public [mprovement Commission: 

Forty-four (44) surveys and plans were made for the 
laying out of 3,36 miles of public highways, as follows: 

Lerigth 
Brighton in Feet. 

Eatoni.a .street 180 

West Son^GJito street 215 

Charlestown 

Termina.l Btroet Extension 200 

Dorchester 

Barna roaci 380 

Brockton street 206 

Evandale terrace 300 

Harrow street 321 

Howard place 204 

Maryknoll street 1,270 

Maryknoll terrace 181 

Mildred a.veiaue 150 

Range road 250 

Tanglewood road 186 

Wichita terrace 257 

East Boston 

Harmony street 250 

Marion court 165 

Hyde Park 

Brush riill terrace 400 

Cromwell- road 290 

Huntington avenue 1,473 

Irwin avenue . 175 

New Bedford street 550 

Stonehill terrace 140 



Public Works Department. 



73 



Koxhury 

Crestwood park 
Greenwich court 
Johnston park 
Kenway terrace 
La Fayette park 
Lamartine Street Extension 
Langford park 

South Boston 

Fargo street . 



Length 
in Feet. 

250 
100 
175 
175 
185 
731 
203 



466 



West Roxhury 

Agassiz park 230 

Brownson terrace 500 

Brucewood street 608 

Burley street 420 

Cheshire street 215 

Driftwood road 484 

Granada park 438 

Hampstead Lane 470 

Haviland road 650 

Laurie avenue 1,084 

Maple Street Extension 690 

Maple Street Footway 110 

Mossdale road 1,568 

Rocky Nook terrace 260 

Twenty-nine (29) surveys and plans were made for the 
widening and relocation of 2.52 miles of public highways 
as follows : 

Length 
in Feet. 



Albany street, Boston Proper 
Austin street, Hyde Park 
Bradston street, Roxbury . 
Brookline avenue, Roxbury 
Caltha road, Brighton . 
Congress street, Boston Proper 
Cummins Highway, Dorchester 
Dorchester avenue. South Boston 
Dorchester avenue, Boston Proper 
Fern wood road, West Roxbury 
Francis street, Roxbury 
Gardner street, West Roxbury 
Hall street. West Roxbury . 
Hill Top street, Dorchester 
Independence Drive, West Roxbury 



67 

80 

38 

207 

347 

8 

234 

54 

512 

180 

308 

1,943 

45 

40 

309 



74 



City Document No. 18. 



Kilsyth road, Brighton 
Kinross road, Brighton 
Lanark road, Brighton 
Leon street, Roxbury . 
Monument street, Charlestown 
Mt. Hope street. West Roxbury 
Old Colony avenue, Dorchester 
Poplar street. West Roxbury 
River street, Dorchester 
Selkirk road, Brighton . 
South street. West Roxbury 
Southampton street, Roxbury 
West street, Hyde Park 
Worcester square, Boston Proper 



Length 
in Feet. 

690 

530 

1,360 

7 

100 

26 

240 

1,973 

706 

980 

79 

14 

1,875 

375 



Three (3) surveys and plans were made for the discon- 
tinuance of .14 mile of public highways as follows: 



Clyde street, East Boston 
Central street, Boston Proper 
Public Alley No. 104, Boston Proper 



Length 
in Feet. 

450 
200 
116 



Thirty-four (34) surveys and plans were made for the 
alteration (specific repair) of 1.75 miles of public high- 
ways as follows: 

Length 
in Feet. 

Albany street, Roxbury 450 

Beacon street, Brighton 500 

Beacon street, Brighton, at Chestnut Hill avenue 
Beacon street, Boston Proper, at Charlesgate East 
Beacon street, Boston Proper, at Commonwealth 

avenue 
Boylston street, Boston Proper, at Clarendon 

street 
Brookline avenue, Roxbury, at Beacon street 
Bunker Hill street, Charlestown .... 1,650 
Bussey street. West Roxbury, at Walter street 
Bussey street. West Roxbury, at South street 
Chelsea street, Charlestown, at Joiner street 
City square, Charlestown, at Park street 
Commonwealth avenue, Boston Proper, at Beacon 

street 
Commonwealth avenue, Brighton . . . . 315 
Cummins Highway, West Roxbury and Dorchester 3,560 
Dock square, Boston Proper 



Public Works Department. 75 

Length 
in Feci. 

Everett street, Brighton, at approaches to bridge 
Harrison avenue, Boston Proper .... 250 
Main street, Charlestown, at Austin street 
Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, at Southampton 

street 
Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, at Theodore A. 

Glynn Waj'^ 
Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, at Magazine 

street 
Meridian street, East Boston, at Marion street 

Mildred avenue, Dorchester 820 

Morton street. West Roxbury, at Forest Hills Circle 
North street, Boston Proper, at Dock square 

Northampton street, Roxbury 125 

Southampton street, Roxbury, at Massachusetts 

avenue 

Southampton street, Roxbury 440 

Southampton street, Roxbury, at Theodore A. 

Glynn Way 
Summer street. South Boston, at Melcher street 
Theodore A. Glynn Way, Roxbury, at Newmarket 

square 

Washington street. Roxbury 1,148 

West Broadway, South Boston, at Dorchester 

street 

Three (3) surveys and plans for highway easements 
were made as follows: 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park . 1,800 sq. ft. (sloping) 
Terminal street, Charlestown . . . 300 ft. (wall) 
Westglow street, Dorchester ... 70 ft. (wall) 

Five (5) surveys and plans were made for the revision 
of grade of .33 mile of public highways as follows: 

Length 
in Feet. 

375 
140 
650 
300 
273 



Cheryl Lane, Hyde Park 
Brucewood street. West Roxbury 
Cricket Lane, West Roxbury 
Southampton street, Roxbury . 
Stonehill road, Hj^de Park . 



Six (6) surveys and plans were made for the taking by 
eminent domain of 525,401 square feet of land for mu- 
nicipal purposes, as follows: 



76 City Document No. 18. 

Location. Area. Department. 

Auburn street, Roxbury (at Oakburn 

Avenue) 6,494 School 

Mt. Vernon street, Dorchester 8,969 School 

Silver street, South Boston 1,566 School 

North Margin street, Boston Proper . 1,106 Park 
South Bay avenue, Roxbury (addi- 
tional taking) 30,711 Public Works 

(Sanitary) 

Hallet street, Dorchester 476,555 PubHc Works 

(Sanitary) 

Thirty-eight (38) surveys and plans were made for the 
taking of 3.13 miles of easements for sewerage purposes 
as follows: 

Length 
Brighto'i in Feet. 

Anselm terrace 410 

Guest street 1,431 

Lake street 170 

Charlestown 

Terminal street 320 

Dorchester 

Gorman road 738 

Gonstitution road 178 

Grossman street 182 

Dania street 760 

Faunce road 136 

Jamestown terrace 119 

Lena terrace 250 

Lorna road 840 

Messinger street 452 

Prairie street 60 

Sunset Lane 240 

Viking terrace 107 

East Boston 

Gladstone street 600 

Hyde Park 

Beaver street 567 

Belnap road 451 

Dodge road 537 

Joan road 806 

Leighton road 1,410 

Marston street 1,013 

Perry court 185 

Providence street 1,240 



Public Works Department. 



77 



Sherrin street 
Summer street 
Woodland road 
Woodland road 



Length 
in Feet. 

370 
523 

258 
259 



West Roxbury 

Ackley Place . 
Cutter road . 
David road 
Emelia terrace 
Hazelmere road 
Lillie Way 
New Haven street 
Rocky Nook terrace 
Wedgemere road . 



70 
260 
578 
235 
130 

85 
220 
250 

80 



Far the Public Works Department (Highway Divi- 
sion), thirty-three (33) highways were staked out for con- 
struction. 

For the Public Works Department (Sewer Division), 
one hundred thirty-two (132) catch basins were staked 
out for construction. Also, forty-eight (48) reports recom- 
mending the location of one hundred eighty-eight (188) 
new catch basins were made. 

For the Law Department, a survey and plan was made 
of land on East street, Boston Proper, and a sketch plan 
showing buildings on Stuart and Warrenton streets, Bos- 
ton Proper. Also, fifty-seven (57) plans filed with Land 
Court petitions were examined and checked for street 
line references. 

For the Real Property Department, a survey and plan 
was made of land on Taunton avenue, Hyde Park. Three 
(3) topographical plans were made of land on St. James 
avenue, Boston Proper; Scollay square, Boston Proper; 
Uphams Corner, Dorchester; and Winthrop street, Hyde 
Park. Four (4) surveys, plans, and topographical plans 
were made of land on Gove street, East Boston ; Harrison 
avenue, Boston Proper; Hollis street, Boston Proper; 
and Lincoln street, Dorchester. 

For the Library Department, a survey and plan was 
made of land on East Broadway, South Boston. 

For the Park Department, two (2) surveys and plans 
were made of land on Joyce Kilmer park, West Roxbury, 
and Victory road, Dorchester (Alsen Playground). 

For the Hospital Department, a survey and plan was 
made of a proposed road to Long Island Hospital (Am- 
bulance road). 



78 City Document No. 18. 

For the School Committee, the following school proper- 
ties were staked out: Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park 
Gordon avenue, Hyde Park; Needham road, Hyde Park 
Linwood street, Hyde Park; Auburn street, Roxbury 
Centre street, Dorchester; Auburn School in Brighton 
and Poplar street. West Roxbury. In addition, five (5) 
surveys and plans were made of land on Athens street, 
South Boston; Silver street, South Boston; Oakburn 
avenue, Roxbury; Mt. Vernon street, Dorchester; and 
Faywood avenue, East Boston. A topographical plan was 
also made for the Faywood avenue, East Boston, school 
site. 

For the Building Department, a survey and plan was 
made of land at Commercial street and Charter street, 
Boston Proper. 

Stone Bounds. — In accordance with a policy estab- 
lished in 1950, stone bounds were set and drilled on the 
following newly constructed streets: 

Number 
Street. District. of Bounds. 

Abby road Brighton 4 

Allerton street Roxbury 4 

Auriga street Dorchester 1 

Arvale road Dorchester 2 

Ballin place West Roxbury 1 

Banton street Dorchester 2 

Centre court Dorchester 4 

Cricket Lane West Roxbury 7 

Cerina road West Roxbury 4 

Canterbury street West Roxbury 4 

Corey terrace West Roxbury 4 

Eugenia road West Roxbury 4 

Hartford court Dorchester 2 

Hartlawii road West Roxbury 8 

Hemman street West Roxbury 3 

Lantern Lane West Roxbury 6 

Ledgewood road West Roxbury 7 

Newmarket square Roxbury 6 

Peirson street Roxbury 2 

Pheasant street West Roxbury 4 

Pitsmoor road West Roxbury 1 

Quarley road West Roxbury 3 

Ryder Hill road Brighton 3 

Sumner park Dorchester 2 

Westmount avenue West Roxbury 4 

Westville terrace Dorchester 1 

Zeller street West Roxbury 1 



Public Works Department. 79 

Private Street Survey. — In connection with the Public 
Improvement Commission's program of renaming private 
streets to reduce the number of duplications and eliminate 
some of the existing confusion in street names, the survey 
of 2,000 private streets begun in 1954 was completed, 
and recommendations for renaming, where favorable, 
were submitted to the Public Improvement Conamission. 

"Boston's Streets" (Street Book).— On April 30, 1955, 
the new edition of Boston's Streets, completed by this 
division, was issued. 

Reproduction Work. 

Department. PHSTS 

Administrative Services 524 

Printing Section 8 

Purchasing Division 26 

Assessing 1,466 

Auditor 1,916 

Boston Gas Company 4 

Boston Edison Company 

Building 1,576 

City Clerk 666 

City Council 2,130 

Civil Defense 262 

Compensation Review Board 486 

District Attorney's Office 48 

Finance Commission 26 

Fire 8 

Health 428 

Registry Division 1,178 

Housing Authority 

Law 1,480 

Licensing 82 

Mayor's Office 782 

Park 36 

Penal Listitutions 52 

Planning Board 1,753 

Public Works: 

Central Office 1,014 

Bridge Division 413 

Highway Division 582 

Encroachment 4 

Lighting 36 

Sanitary Division 18 

Sewer Division 3,588 

Survey Division 6,443 

Water Division 404 

Public Works (State) 154 

Real Property 1,570 

Buildings Division 126 

Registry (Court House) 404 

Rent Control Board 1,260 

Retirement 2,940 

School Buildings 24 

School Committee 104 24 

Carried forward 34,021 3,016 668 137 



BPS 


OZS 
100 


APS 


41 


1,390 

93 

141 

67 

2 
21 

8 

15 
12 

4 
49 


18 


4 


4 

12 

6 

685 




44 
3 


107 

879 
1,032 


5 
61 




463 


4 


64 

2,813 

32 

15 


599 
2,333 

47 
174 
568 

44 


49 



80 City Document No. 18. 

Reproduction Work — Continued 

Department PHSTS BPS OZS APS 

Brought forward 34,021 ;3,01G 668 137 

Traffic 864 18 561 

Treasurer's 212 

Collecting Division 86 

Veteran's Services 90 3 

Welfare 12 104 

White Fund 250 

35,535 3,034 9,547 137 

Assessments. — During the period reported on, estimates 
of benefit for assessment purposes were prepared amount- 
ing to $186,421.27. These estimates are included in 
orders for street and highway improvements. Also final 
assessments were prepared amounting to $220,984.52. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James W. Haley, 
Chief Engineer, Survey Division. 



Public Works Department. 



81 



APPENDIX G. 



REPORT OF DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
WATER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1956. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the ac- 
tivities of the Water Division, operations, and expendi- 
tures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1955. 

During the year a total of 27,839.1 linear feet, or 5.27 
miles, of main pipe was laid or relaid, varying in size 
from 4 inches to 16 inches, and 931 applications were re- 
ceived for installation of new service pipes, enlarged serv- 
ice pipes, and fire pipes, etc., in new or remodeled build- 
ings. 

There were 42 petitions received for the extension of 
water mains. The particular streets in which the above 
work was performed are shown on the accompanying 
tables. 

The districts in which the main pipe was laid and re- 
laid are as follows: 

District. 

East Boston . 
City Proper . 
South Boston 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park . 
Brighton 

Under the provisions of chapter 4 of the Ordinances of 
1952, which deals with capital unprovements, the Water 
Division submitted a capital improvement program, 
which program was not followed to any great extent due 
to the fact that all available funds were needed to extend 
water mains to provide water into residential areas. 



Laid. 


Rei.aid. 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 





2,048.6 





104.0 








5,462.9 





6,217.3 





10,867.9 


2,651.6 


456.8 


30. 



82 City Document No. 18. 

Engineering Office. 

The office force maintained its usual service to the 
public with information in relation to the Water Division, 
estimates on new service pipes, making out contracts, 
assisting the yard forces on Water Division matters, com- 
piling official data, bringing the record plans to date, 
supervision of all construction and snow removal in areas 
Nos. 4 and 10. 

The Engineermg Office assisted in design and supervi- 
sion of construction of water mains for the following 
major construction projects; their status being as follows: 

Central Artery. 
City square to Fort Hill square completed. 
Fort Hill square to beyond Kneeland street — design 
completed and construction started. 

William T. Morrissey Boulevard. 
Columbia Circle to Tolman street completed. 
Tolman street to across Neponset avenue — design com- 
pleted and construction started. 

Embankment Road or Storrow Drive. 

Nashua street to Boston University Bridge completed. 

Soldiers Field Road. 

Eliot Bridge to Western avenue completed. 

Western avenue to Cambridge street under construction. 

Southeast Expressway. 

Neponset Circle to Freeport street at William T. Mor- 
rissey Boulevard — construction started. 

Freeport street at William T. Morrissey Boulevard 
north of Columbia road, design completed — construc- 
tion to start in spring of 1956. 

Bellevue Hill Tower. 
New tower completed (elevation 392) — connection will 
be completed with Bellevue Hill road in spring of 
1956. 

Long Island. 
New 12-inch steel main laid on bridge, Moon Island to 
Long Island, completed, and the defective 12-inch 
pipe abandoned between Moon Island and Long 
Island. 

Projects being studied and in various stages of progress 
are as follows : 



Public Works Department. 83 

(a) Reinforcing Faulkner Hospital Area in West Rox- 
bury — construction to start in spring of 1956 by M.D.C. 
with 12-inch connection at Weld street and West Roxbury 
Parkway. 

(6) Reinforcing West Roxbury, Spring, Centre, Grove, 
Temple Streets Area by closing connections to 24-inch and 
20-inch main — Forest Hills to Manthorne road. 

(c) Reinforcing Hyde Park beyond Cleary square is 
one third completed (American Legion Highway to Provi- 
dence street) . During this year we anticipate extension of 
Providence street to West street. 

Hydrants. 

There were 30 new hydrants established, 149 hydrants 
changed, and 10 hydrants abandoned. 

Summation. 

System relaid 0.91 miles, extended 4.36 miles, 30 hy- 
drants established, and 10 hydrants abandoned, thus in- 
creasing the amount of water pipe in system by 4.36 miles 
and 20 hydrants. 

District Yards. 

The district yard forces were utilized in repairs of main 
pipe leaks, installation of new service pipes, new^ fire 
pipes, service pipe repairs, fire pipe repairs, meter changes, 
off and on calls, and general maintenance service to the 
public. 

The Distribution Branch. 

The Distribution Branch, consisting of the main yard 
and four district yards, and responsible for the repair and 
maintenance of main pipes, hydrants, service pipes, and 
gate valves, was assisted during the year by four con- 
tracting firms who assisted the department forces in the 
repairing of leaks and the laying of new and relaying of 
old service pipes. 

The contractual work was performed in a satisfactory 
manner and again proved the value of this type of con- 
tract in assisting the department forces to repair and in- 
stall new appurtenances. 

During the year the district yard responsible for w^ork 
in the West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, and Hyde Park area, 
with offices at 11 Child street, was abandoned and the 



84 City Document No. 18. 

property disposed of, and the activities transferred to 
new Public Works Building called the Morrissey Build- 
ing at the corner of Forest Hills street and Morton street. 

The Machine Shop. 
The machine shop and plumbing shop handled all the 
drilling and connecting of services in addition to the 
regular work carried on in these shops, such as the ma- 
chining and assembling of gates, valves, and hydrants, 
and the department assisted the other branches of the 
Public Works Department in performmg special jobs. 

The Meter Branch. 
The meter shop handled a total of 24,376 meters, di- 
vided as follows: 

Meters applied on new services . . . 855 

Meters discontinued 1,677 

Meters changed 5,767 

Meters tested in shop 11,534 

Meters repaired in service .... 548 

Meters repaired in shop 1,955 

Meters reset 769 

Meters junked 1,271 

Total 24,376 

Business Office. 

This office performs all the work related to the process- 
ing of bills to property owners for water used and the 
maintenance of water meters. 

These operations include receiving applications for 
new services and fire pipes; reading 95,000 meters quar- 
terly; computing and preparing 382,000 bills amounting 
to $6,211,110; keeping account of paid and unpaid bills; 
recording liens against delinquent consumers; testing, 
repairing, installing, and removing water meters and re- 
ceiving complaints from the water-consuming public. 

It is unfortunate that for many years the surplus of 
the W^ater Division was not allowed to accumulate a re- 
serve fund which would have been available when water 
receipts failed to meet expenditures. In 1955 receipts of 
the division showed a surplus of only $57,917.28, which 
was accomplished only by deferring much needed un- 
provements to the water system to a later date. 



Public Works Department. 



85 



1955 










Main pipe petitions received 42 


Domestic service applications 








872 


Fire pipe applications 








59 


Special meter tests . 








67 


Hydrant permits issued . 








11 


Repair deposits received . 








115 


Miscellaneous deposits 








25 



Appropriations, Expenditures, and Revenue. 

Budget appropriation, 1955 $2,825,437 68 

Amount expended 2,572,383 47 

Unexpended balance $253,054 21 

Amount of monej' collected from all sources during the year 

1955 $6,237,141 79 

Amount expended from all sources 6,179,224 51 

Surplus $57,917 28 

The metropolitan assessment for 1955 amounted to 
$3,222,387.52 at the rate of $80.00 per million gallons, an 
increase of $91,522.32 over the assessment of 1954, based 
on the $80.00 per million gallon rate. 

Total amount billed for 1955 .$6,198,424 41 

Total amount collected for 1955 bills, as of December 31, 

1955 $4,885,408 26 

Total amount abated for 1955 bills, as of December 31, 1955 $27,139 87 
Total amount collected in 1955 on bills rendered prior to 1955 $879,065 80 

By chapter 487, Acts of 1954, entitled "An Act Relative 
to Liens for Water Rates and Charges," effective January 
1, 1955, the law was changed so that liens for water rates 
take effect by operation of law without the necessity of 
recording a lien statement at the Registry of Deeds. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers at the end of the year has been con- 
tinued as a courtesy to the customer. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Daniel M. Sullivan, 
Division Engineer. 



86 



City Document No. 18. 



Cash balance from 1954 
Receipts 

Water rates and services 

Tax titles, water 



Expenditures from Revenue 
Pensions and annuities 
Water Division 

Refund 

Metropolitan water assessment 



Water Service, 1955 



Collecting Water and Automotive 
$1.30,000 + $43,543 



Expenditure for debt 
Boston water debt 
Interest 



Carried forward 
Surplus . 



),211,110 04 
26,031 75 



$196,603 00 

2,572,383 47 

704 40 

3,222,387 52 

$5,902,078 39 

173,543 00 

$6,165,621 39 



$12,000 00 
300 00 

$12,.300 00 



$157,971 37 

6,237,141 79 
$6,395,113 16 



6,165,621 39 
$229,491 77 



12,300 00 

$217,191 77 
159,274 49 

$57,917 28 



1955 
Summary of Water Division 
Collections and Expenditures 

Total Amount Collected 

Expenditures 

Current expenses (budget) . . $2,572,383 4', 



Pensions and annuities 

Collecting water 

Automotive 

Water debt 

Interest 

Refunded water rates 



M.D.C. assessment 

Less cash forwarded 1954 to 1955 

Plus cash forwarded 1955 to 1956 



196,603 00 

130,000 00 

43,543 00 

12,000 00 

300 00 

704 40 

$2,955,533 87 

3,222,387 52 

$6,177,921 .39 

157,971 37 

$6,019,950 02 

159,274 49 

$6,179,224 51 



$6,237,141 79 



6,179,224 51 



Surplus 



$57,917 28 



Public Works Department. 87 

Water Division, 1955 

Construction Account 

Extension of mains (from revenue) 

Cost of construction Dec. 31, 1955 $25,132,375 54 

Cost of construction Dec. 31, 1954 24,916,068 00 



Increase in plant cost during 1955 .... $216,307 54 

Cost of existing works Dec. 31, 1955 

Pipe yards and buildings . . $84,332 16 

Distribution system . . . 25,132,375 54 

Hyde Park water works . . . 175,000 00 



$25,391,707 70 
High pressure 2,448,340 64 

$27,840,048 34 



Water Statistics for the Fiscal Year Ending 
December 31, 1955. 
Mains. 
Kind of pipe: cast iron, wrought iron, steel. 
Size, 2-inch to 48-inch. 
Extended miles, 4.36. 
Size enlarged miles, 0.91. 
Total miles now in use, 1,026.428. 
Public hydrants added, 29. 
Public hydrants now in use, 11,640. 
Stop gates added, 51. 

Stop gates now in use, 27,887. ;., 

Number of blowoffs, 862. 
Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Services. 
Kind of pipe and size: 

I inch to 2 inches in diameter of lead or copper. 
4 inches and 6 inches in diameter of cast iron: 





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89 



TABLE NO. 11. 
Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1955. 



Hydrants. 



CQ 



a 



o a 
2 S 
Ji a 

OSEt, 



Public, December 31, 1954 

Private, December 31, 1954 

Established during 1955 

Abandoned during 1955 

Total, public, December 31, 1955 
Total, private, December 31, 1955 



457 

33 



4 

453 

33 



247 
5 

6 

241 
5 



2,140 

29 



30 

2,110 
29 



2,122 

126 

17 

65 

2,074 

126 



6,546 

17 

154 

45 

6,655 
17 



56 



91 
111 



11,620 
394 
171 
151 

11,640 
394 



Total hydrants in service, 1954 . 

Total hydrants established during 1955 

Total hydrants abandoned during 1955 

Total hydrants added during 1955 

Total hydrants in service December 31, 1955 

High pressure fire hydrants in service, 1955 

Total hydrants (all kinds) in service December 31, 1955 



171 
151 



12,014 



20 

12,034 

503 

12,537 



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c. 


cc 


OC 


c 


c^ 


























-c 






































c 


















c 










c 














































c 










c 


















cc 

0. 










a. 


a 
c 
















p 


t: 








K 


5 






t: 




> 


» c 






3 








"C 


2 




-c 


(h 




^ 


c 




C3 


■3 






c 
c 

< 


1 

< 


c 
c 

c 

c 
1. 
PC 


•v 
u 

a 

c 


c 

s 

1 


2: 

Q. 
J 



tr 


s 

1 


> 




> 

> 




.i 

X 

"c 
a: 


"o 





e 


e 


e 


e 


c 


e 


e 


e 


c 


c 


© 






(N 


fs 


M 


fs 


(N 


fS 


(S 


f^ 


n 


fS 


M 


n 







(94) 



Public Works Department. 



95 



TABLE NO. VI. 
Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1955. 



District. 



■^o 



Brighton (public) 

" (private) 

Charlestown (public) 

" (private) 

City Proper (public) 

" (private) 

Dorchester (public) 

" (private) 

(East Boston (public) 

" (private) 

Hyde Park (public) 

" (private) 

Roxbury (public) 

(private) 

South Boston (public) 

" (private) 

West Roxbury (public) 

" (private) 

Deer Island (private) 

Gallups Island (private) 

Long Island (private) 

Rainsford Island (private) . . . 
Thompson's Island (private) . 
Quincy (private) 



Total number (public) 

Total number (private) 

Total number (public and 
private) 



High pressure fire hydrants 



Total hydrants (all kinds) . 



12 



200 



22 

13 

373 

5 

25 

1 

4 

8 



90 

2 

308 

9 

598 

9 

143 

1 

41 



266 
3 

161 

1 

301 



453 

33 

486 



241 
5 

246 



2,110 

29 

2,139 



224 

8 

21 

37 

118 

1 

700 

141 



172 

4 

95 

14 

602 

15 

16 

3 

6 

3 



13 



669 
197 

634 

2 

1,293 

2 

253 

746 



1,073 

2 

316 

3 

1,476 
1 



2,074 

126 

2,200 



6,655 

17 

6,672 



56 



91 
111 
202 



11,640 

394 

12,034 

.503 



12,537 



96 



City Document No. 18. 



Table No. I. Statement of Work Done During the Year 1955. 



Make. 


"S. 
< 


i 

s 
a 

a 
o 




Meters 
Changed. 


e 


.9 
■Sfe 

1" 


Pi 


1 


73 

a 

3 
•-s 






Out. 


In. 


1 




804 
41 


1,403 

204 

10 

40 

3 

5 


3,794 

1,573 

171 

184 

10 

13 


5,494 
265 


9,288 

1,838 

171 

184 

10 

13 


446 
98 


1,658 
279 


747 
22 


119 

989 

47 

100 

3 

5 


23,753 




5,309 




399 






1 






509 










26 












36 




1 








1 


Nash ... 


2 
3 

1 


3 
9 
3 
2 

1 
4 


8 




3 
17 
3 
2 
1 
4 








1 


9 




7 


3 


17 




64 


Trident 




3 

1 


10 












5 














2 






1 








3 


12 














Pitt .... 














1 






1 




2 


5 














7 




















Totals 


855 


1.677 


5,767 


5,767 


11,534 


548 


1.955 


769 


1,271 


30.143 







Public Works Department. 



97 



Table No. 2. Meters in Service, December 31, 1955. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


% 


Va. 


1 


IVi 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 

Watch Dog 


69,458 

9,411 

591 

1,409 

52 

59 


5,152 

316 

7 

6 

3 


2,441 

467 

5 

2 


1,359 

731 

11 

6 


955 

416 

3 

5 


343 
236 


407 
70 


126 


39 


19 


10 


80,309 
11,647 


King 










617 


2 
1 
1 

1 

1 

19 

26 

1 












1,430 














56 


Federal 






1 
4 

1 












61 




1 
1 


2 


3 


4 










15 


Nash 


9 

4 








12 








1 
8 
9 










(> 




1 


2 


16 


17 


2 








63 


Trident 


1 
2 
3 








88 




1 












1 






1 












4 








1 












1 
















4 


1 






























Total 


80,999 


5,487 


2,920 


2,127 


1,402 


632 


499 


133 


40 


19 


10 


94.268 













Diameter in 


Inches. 






Total. 




y» 


Ji 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


No 
Size 


C. P'8 


1,676 
27 


22 
2 


42 
19 


9 

76 


24 
162 


3 
60 


1 
23 


3 

7 


2 


13 


1,782 


C. of B., C.P-8 


389 


Total 


1,703 


24 


61 


85 


186 


63 


24 


10 


2 


13 


2,171 



98 



City Document No. 18. 



Table No. 3. Meters in Shop, December 31, I95S. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Vs 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


12 


New. 


680 










3 

4 










683 


Hersey H. C. T 








1 




1 






6 






1 


1 


Watch Dog 














































Total 


680 








1 


7 




1 




1 


690 












Old. 
Hersey Disc 


350 


150 


30 




2 


5 


6 
5 
2 
1 












6 


6 


1 (10") 


18 


Watch Dog 








7 
2 


4 


5 


18 
















3 






















Total 


350 


150 


30 


9 


6 


10 


14 


6 


6 


1 (10") 


682 



Table No. 4. Meters Repaired in Shop in 1955. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


H 


»A 


1 


1}4 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


12 




1,298 


101 


52 


104 


83 


4 
2 


8 

2 


1 






1,651 


Hersey H. C. T 






4 


Hersey Detector 




















Watch Dog 


108 


19 


25 


53 


46 


23 


5 








279 


Hersey F. M 




2 


1 (10") 


3 


Arctic 








10 

1 


6 




1 




17 


Pitt 














1 
























Total 


1,406 


120 


77 


168 


135 


29 


16 


1 


2 


1 (10") 


1,955 







Public Works Department. 



99 



Table No. 5. Meters Repaired and Rebuilt at Factory in 1955. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


% 


Va. 


1 




2,250 


200 


50 


2,500 


Watch Dog 














Total 


2.250 


200 


50 


2,500 







Table No. SA. Meters Purchased New in 1955. 





Diameter in Inches 


Total. 


Make. 


Vs 


iVi 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




2.687 


30 


20 










2.737 


Hersey H. C. T 


10 


10 


1 




21 












Watch Dog 




































Total 


2,687 


30 


20 


10 


10 


1 




2,758 







Table No. 6. Meters Reset in 1955. 





Diameter in Inches. 


a 
'S. 

3 
u 

o 


(J S 

sag 

O 


Total. 


Make. 


% 


Ji 


1 


IJ^ 


2 


Hersey 


687 
19 


39 
1 


11 
1 


6 


4 
1 






747 


Watch Dog 


53 




22 






Total 


706 


40 


12 


6 


5 


53 


716 


769 







100 



City Document No. 18. 



Table No. 7A. Meters Changed in 1955. Meters Taken Out. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Makb. 


% 


Vi. 


1 


m 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




3,326 

1.410 

169 

182 

10 

13 


167 

27 


94 
39 


90 

35 

1 


71 
40 

1 
1 


30 
17 


15 
5 


1 




3,794 


Watch Dog 


1,573 


King 

Worthington 






171 






1 








184 














10 




















IH 






























7 


2 










9 


Trident 


1 
2 
1 
1 
3 






1 






1 (10") 


3 




































1 


Nash 






2 












3 










1 








4 




















Total 


5,118 


194 


133 


135 


115 


50 


20 


1 


1 (10") 


5,767 







Table No. 7B. Meters Changed in 1955. Meters Put In. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


% 


% 


1 


m 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




4,829 
100 


355 

27 


106 
32 


103 

54 

4 


64 

31 

4 


16 
20 


19 

1 


1 


1 (12") 


5,494 


Watch Dog 


265 








8 




















Total 


4,929 


382 


138 


161 


99 


36 


20 


1 


1 (12") 


5.767 







Public Works Department. 



101 



Table No. 8. Meters Repaired in Service in I9S5. 





m 


















ii, 
















Makk. 


o 

•go 

" a 
-0 J! 
o o 


a 


d 


e 
'3 


E 

V 

O 

V 
Jit! 


c 

3] 

a 

S 
a 


a 

's 

H 
t- 
'3 

a 


"3 








o 






;< 


0) 


o 




Q 


TO 


O 


^ 


03 


U 


tf 


H 


Hersey 


84 


203 


59 


21 


21 


58 




446 


Watch Dog 


23 


47 


17 


1 


2 


8 




98 

























1 












1 




1 


1 






1 






3 


Trident 































Total 


108 


252 


76 


22 


24 


66 




548 







Table No. 9. Meters Applied in 1955. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


Vs 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




685 


13 


14 


39 
5 
9 


36 

1 

10 


7 

1 


10 
1 






804 








7 


Watch Dog 


18 




3 






41 






1 




1 










1 






1 


2 




















Total 


703 


13 


17 


54 


47 


8 


12 


1 




855 







Meters applied on old service 8 

Meters applied on new service 845 

Connection pieces applied on new services .... 2 



Total. 



855 



102 



City Document No. 18. 



Table No. 10. Meters Discontinued in 1955. 



Make, 


Diameter in Inches. 


^ A • 
fl o £ 

ill 


d 
o 

■■ss 
S.I 


.2 

i 






% 


K 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


1 


Hersey 


1,215 

167 

10 

36 

2 


91 

4 


60 
10 


15 
7 


13 
5 


4 
10 


2 
1 


2 


1 (10") 


316 
51 

1 
3 

1 
1 


933 

128 

9 

36 

1 
2 
4 

1 


154 
25 

1 

1 

1 


1,403 


Watch Dog 


204 








10 




1 


1 




1 


2 








40 










3 










1 


2 






3 




5 














5 














1 








1 


Trident 












1 






1 


1 


Nash 


1 
5 








1 








2 


1 


2 


















4 


5 






















Total 


1,441 


96 


71 


22 


20 


18 


6 


2 


1 (10") 


378 


1,116 


183 


1,677 







Public Works Department. 



103 



Table No. II. Reason for Meter Change in Year 1955. 



Make. 



u 






^ 
















2 
'3 


to 




6 

13 

a 
1 

Q 


*2 




■a 


•X3 


O 


o 
o 




1 

o 
Q 


a 

"a 

3 

o 
O 


CI 


2 
'3 
o 
o. 
in 


m 

1 


a 


m 

W 


a 
o 

O 


1 





2,346 

1,231 

147 

157 

5 

7 

1 


496 
139 

17 
14 

1 
2 


104 

23 

1 

1 


372 

63 

14 

8 


51 
9 


65 
8 


174 

29 

5 

3 


30 
9 


100 

14 

2 

3 


44 
8 
1 

1 


32 
4 


3.814 

1.537 

187 


Watch Dog 








2 


189 
6 




Federal 


1 


5 
















15 


Empire 
















1 


Keystone 



























2 


1 
1 




5 






1 
1 










9 


Trident 














2 


Lambert 


1 
1 

1 


















1 


Nash 






1 
2 
















2 












1 










4 






















Total 


3,899 


671 


130 


470 


60 


75 


214 


39 


119 


54 


36 


5.767 





Table No. 12. Meters Junked in 1955. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 




Vb 


Vi 


1 


IV2 


2 


3 


4 


6 






94 

971 

44 

97 

3 

5 

1 

1 

2 

1 


3 

7 


3 
11 


4 


2 


10 


3 




119 


Watch Dog 


989 






3 








47 










3 






100 
















3 


Federal 
















5 


















1 


Trident 










2 






3 












1 




3 


Nash 












1 


Arctic 






































Total 


1,219 


10 


14 


4 


5 


15 


4 




1.271 





104 City Document No. 18. 

APPENDIX H. 



REPORT OF THE 
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION. 



Boston, January 2, 1956. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Through the Commissioyier of Public Works. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In accordance with the provisions of section 24, chapter 
3 of the Revised City Ordinances of 1947, the following 
report of the Public Improvement Commission for the 
year ending December 31, 1955, is respectfully submitted. 

The Public Improvement Commission was established 
May 1, 1954, by the provisions of section 57, chapter 2 of 
the 1954 Ordinances. This commission, consisting of the 
Commissioner of Public Works, the Commissioner of 
Real Property, and the Chairman of the Boston Traffic 
Commission, was assigned all of the powers and duties 
of the former Board of Street Commissioners, except: 

(a) Those relating to the storage and sale of inflammables, 
filling stations, and parking lots which were trans- 
ferred to the Committee on Licenses in the Public 
Safety Commission; 

(b) Those relating to the planting and removal of trees 
in public ways, the use of public ways for any tempo- 
rary obstruction in, under, or over the same, the use of 
public ways for the storage and sale of merchandise, 
and the designating of coasting streets, which were 
transferred to the Commissioner of Public Works ; and 

(c) Those relating to the abatement of taxes which were 
transferred to the Real Property Department. 

Functions of the Board of Street Commissioners trans- 
ferred to this commission include the authority to lay 
out, widen, relocate, alter, discontinue, or rename public 
highways, and to order the making of specific repairs 
therein; to order the construction of sanitary sewers and 
storm drains; to take land by eminent domain for munic- 
ipal purposes (except housing and off-street parking); 
to permit the opening of private ways for public travel; 
to levy assessments for street, sidewalk, and sewer better- 



Public Works Department. 105 

raents; and to issue permits for the location of wire- 
carrying poles, conduits, pipes, tracks, and similar uses 
of the public ways. 

The first meeting in 1955 was held on January 12. 
Present were Public Works Commissioner George G. 
Hyland, Chairman ; Commissioner of Real Property Her- 
man Carp, Vice Chairman; Chairman of the Boston 
Traffic Commission William Arthur Reilly. Also present 
were James W. Haley, Chief Engineer; and Michael J. 
Corrao, Secretary; both of the Survey Division. 

Street Program. 

During the period covered by this report, one hundred 
six (106) highway improvements, including the laying 
out of fifty-four (54) new highways and one (1) footway, 
the widening and relocation of seventeen (17) public 
ways, the making of specific repairs in thirty- four (34) ex- 
isting streets, were ordered by the Public Improvement 
Commission. 

Of particular interest in these groups are the following 
projects: 

Bunker Hill street, Charlestown district, from Chelsea 
street to Sullivan square, to be reconstructed with Chapter 90 
funds at an estimated cost of $120,000. AVork will include 
the reduction of existing sidewalk widths and the installation 
of traflEic islands at several intersections. 

Dock square, Boston Proper, completely redesigned and 
reconstructed to conform with the opening of the central 
artery ramps nearby, at an estimated cost of $26,786.80. 

Dorchester street. South Boston district, from Andrew 
square to Broadway, to be constructed with Chapter 90 funds 
at an estimated cost of $131,210 with the installation of a 
center divisional island and the reduction of sidewalk widths. 

Poplar street. West Roxbury district, and West street, Hyde 
Park district, widening and construction. This widening now 
provides a continuous 50-foot highway from Hyde Park 
avenue in Hyde Park to the junction of Poplar and Canter- 
bury streets. 

The following streets were ordered laid out as public 
ways during 1955 : 

Ackley place, West Roxbury (formerly Jackson place) , from 
Washington street approximately 215 feet northwesterly; 
length, 200 feet; estimated cost, $5,385; estimated benefit, 
$2,599.30. 

Arborcrest terrace, Dorchester, from Gladstone avenue to 
Ridgeview avenue; no construction; length, 394 feet. 



106 City Document No. 18. 

Auriga Street Extension, Dorchester, from Garner road 
approximately 235 feet northerly; length, 235 feet; estimated 
cost, $6,500; estimated benefit, $3,006.71. 

Ayles road, Hyde Park, between Safford and Edwardson 
streets; length, 1,320 feet; estimated cost, $37,023; estimated 
benefit, $15,230.84. 

Bluefield terrace, Dorchester, between Ridgeview and 
Gladeside avenues; no construction; length, 524 feet. 

Briarcliff terrace, Dorchester, between Gladeside and Ridge- 
view avenues; no construction; length, 418 feet. 

Brownson terrace, West Roxbury, from Allandale street 
approximately 500 feet southerly and northwesterly; length, 
500 feet; estimated cost, $15,455; estimated benefit, $6,894.06. 

Brucewood street. West Roxbury, from Veterans of Foreign 
Wars Parkway to Rickerhill road; length, 608 feet; estimated 
cost, $18,100; estimated benefit, $8,561.71. 

Brush Hill terrace, Hyde Park, from Dana avenue to 
Neponset avenue; length, 400 feet; estimated cost, $12,443; 
estimated benefit, $5,721.38. 

Cragmere terrace, Dorchester, between Gladeside avenue 
and Ridgeview avenue; no construction; length, 300 feet. 

Cricket Lane, AVest Roxbury, southwesterly and southeast- 
erly to Ledgewood road; length, 800 feet; estimated cost, 
$12,525; estimated benefit, $4,198.10. 

Donwood terrace, Dorchester, between Gladeside avenue 
and Ridgeview avenue; no construction; length, 353 feet. 

Eatonia street, Brighton, from West Sorrento street approx- 
imately 180 feet southwesterly; length, 180 feet; estimated 
cost, $5,767; estimated benefit, $2,819.82. 

Edwardson street, Hyde Park, from Lewiston street to Ayles 
road; length, 200 feet; estimated cost, $5,789; estimated 
benefit, $2,181.47. 

Ellard road, Hyde Park (formerly Elliot street), from 
Wood avenue to Ayles road; length, 460 feet; estimated cost, 
$11,959; estimated 'benefit, $2,021.16. 

Emmonsdale road. West Roxbury, from Howitt road to 
Martin street; length, 500 feet; estimated cost, $27,802; 
estimated benefit, $7,475.38. 

Fargo street, South Boston, from E street to Summer street; 
no construction; length, 466 feet. 

Frazer street, Hyde Park, from Wood avenue to Reddy 
avenue; length, 755 feet; estimated cost, $21,500; estimated 
benefit, $9,492.67. 

Garfield avenue, Hyde Park, from Faraday street to Cran- 
more road; length, 364 feet; no construction. 

Gladeside avenue, Dorchester, from River street approxi- 
mately 1,800 feet northerly and northeasterly; no construc- 
tion; length, 1,790 feet. 



Public Works Department. 107 

Granada Park, West Roxbury (formerly Byron court), from 
School street approximately 438 feet southwesterly; length, 
438 feet; estimated cost, $9,627; estimated benefit, $4,741.69. 

Hackensack road. West Roxbury, from south of Payson 
road to Hackensack Circle; length, 280 feet; estimated cost, 
$11,635; estimated benefit, $2,708.98. 

Hampstead Lane, West Roxbury, from Hampstead road to 
another portion of Hampstead road; length, 470 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $5,697; estimated benefit, $4,087.30. 

Harrow street, Dorchester, from Humphreys street to Beck- 
with street; length, 321 feet; estimated cost, $8,559; estimated 
benefit, $4,272.56. 

Itasca street, Dorchester, from Almont street to Mattapan 
street; length, 450 feet; estimated cost, $13,400; estimated 
benefit, $6,966.40. 

Kenway terrace, Roxbury (formerly Hawthorne avenue), 
from Washington street approximately 175 feet southeasterly; 
length, 175 feet; estimated cost, $3,884; estimated benefit, 
$1,916.78. 

Lamartine Street Extension, Roxbury, from Centre street 
to Heath street; no construction; length, 731 feet. 

Langford park, Roxbury (formerly Louise park), from 
Copeland street approximately 203 feet southeasterly; length, 
203 feet; estimated cost, $5,650; estimated benefit, $2,793. 

Laurie avenue, West Roxbury, from Gould street to Baker 
street; length, 1,084 feet; estimated cost, $30,710; estimated 
benefit, $15,573.37. 

Leahaven road, Dorchester, from River street to Meadow- 
bank avenue; no construction; length, 404 feet. 

Ledgebrook road, Dorchester, between River street and 
Meadowbank avenue; no construction; length, 506 feet. 

Lewiston street, Hyde Park, from Edwardson street to 
Frazer street; length, 305 feet; estimated cost, $8,911; esti- 
mated benefit, $3,982.25. 

Linvale terrace, Dorchester, between Mamelon Circle and 
Gladeside avenue; no construction; length, 420 feet. 

Mamelon Circle, Dorchester, from River street to another 
portion of River street; no construction; length, 835 feet. 

Maple Street Extension, West Roxbury (formerly part of 
Addington road), from Maple street to Corey street; length, 
690 feet; estimated cost, $15,518; estimated benefit, $3,410.88. 

Maple Street Footway, West Roxbury, from Maple street 
to Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway; length, 110 feet, 
estimated benefit, none. 

Marion place, East Boston (formerly Eutaw place) , from 
Marion street approximately 165 feet southwesterly; length, 
165 feet; estimated cost, $3,671; estimated benefit, $1,694.10. 

Maryknoll street, Dorchester, from Morton street to Man- 
chester street; length, 1,270 feet; estimated cost, $42,886; es- 
timated benefit, $14,039.59. 



108 City Document No. 18. 

Maryknoll terrace, Dorchester, from Maryknoll street 
approximately 180 feet northerly; length, 181 feet; esthnated 
cost, $5,893; estimated benefit, $3,146.85. 

Meadowbank avenue, Dorchester, from River street ap- 
proximately 950 feet southerly and westerly; no construction; 
length, 942 feet. 

Mildred Avenue Extension, Dorchester, approximately 150 
feet northwest of Norfolk street; length, 150 feet; estimated 
cost, $4,149; estimated benefit, $4,056. 

New Bedford street, Hyde Park, from Beacon street ap- 
proximately 550 feet southeasterly; length, 550 feet; estimated 
cost, $14,993; estimated benefit, $6,487.64. 

New England avenue, Dorchester, from Southern avenue 
to Norfolk street; length, 485 feet; estimated cost, $12,778; 
estimated benefit, $4,326.24. 

Newcroft Circle, Dorchester, from River street to another 
portion of River street; no construction; length, 672 feet. 

Pomona avenue. West Roxbury, from Sanborn avenue to 
Chesbrough road; length, 230 feet; estimated cost, $7,249; 
estimated benefit, $1,537.60. 

Ridgeview avenue, Dorchester, from River street approxi- 
mately 1,350 feet northwesterly and northerly; no construc- 
tion; length, 1,310 feet. 

South Bay avenue, Roxbury, from Atkinson street to 
Moore street; length, 935 feet; estimated cost, $33,600; esti- 
mated benefit, $13,344.88. 

Southmere road, Dorchester, from River street to Ledge- 
brook road; no construction; length, 523 feet. 

Sparrow street, West Roxbury, from Maplewood street to 
Searle road; length, 300 feet; estimated cost, $19,042; esti- 
mated benefit, $6,617.75. 

Stonehill terrace, Hyde Park, from Stonehill road approxi- 
mately 149 feet easterly; length, 140 feet; estimated cost, 
$2,683; estimated benefit, $1,094.16. 

Tanglewood road, Dorchester (formerly Churchill place), 
from Washington street approximately 200 feet westerly; 
length, 186 feet; estimated cost, $4,335; estimated benefit, 
$2,075.08. 

Terminal Street Extension, Charlestown, approximately 
200 feet northeasterly from a point approximately 3,100 feet 
northeasterly of Medford street; length, 200 feet. 

West Sorrento street, Brighton, from Hopedale street to 
Eatonia street; length, 215 feet; estimated cost, $6,713; esti- 
mated benefit, $1,645.62. 

Westville terrace, Dorchester, approximately 200 feet north- 
erly; length, 196 feet; estimated cost, $6,752.38; estimated 
benefit, $3,185.89. 



Public Works Department. 109 

Wichita terrace, Dorchester (formerly Johnson place), from 
River street approximately 257 feet northerly; length, 257 
feet; estimated cost, $5,567; estimated benefit, $2,514.06. 

Widened or Relocated. 

Albany street, Boston Proper, on the northerly side between 
Randolph and Union Park streets. 

Bradston street, Roxbury, at the easterly corner of South- 
ampton street. 

Brook Farm road. West Roxbury, between La Grange and 
Lyall streets, including revision of grade. 

Brookline avenue, Roxbury (without construction) , between 
Park Drive and Riverway. 

Congress street, Boston Proper, at the southwesterly corner 
of Dock square. 

Cummins Highway, Dorchester, between Brockton street 
and New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 

Dorchester avenue, South Boston, at the northwesterly cor- 
ner of Southampton street. 

Fernwood road, West Roxbury, from Landseer street ap- 
proximately 180 feet southeasterly. 

Hall street. West Roxbury, at the northerly corner of Call 
street. 

Hill Top street, Dorchester, at the northwesterly corner of 
Crockett avenue. 

Mt. Hope street. West Roxbury, at the southerly corner of 
Hyde Park avenue. 

Old Colony avenue, Dorchester, from a point approximately 
475 feet north of Mt. Vernon street, northerly approximately 
564 feet. 

Poplar street. West Roxbury (without construction), from 
Beech street to the Hyde Park boundary line. 

South street. West Roxbury, at the intersection of Bussej^ 
street. 

Southampton street, Roxbury, at the easterly corner of 
Hampden street. 

West street, Hyde Park (without construction) , from AVest 
Roxbury boundary line to Lodgehill road. 

Worcester square, Boston Proper, between Massachusetts 
and Harrison avenues. 

Specific Repairs. 
Albany street, Roxbury, between Massachusetts avenue and 
Hampden street, reduction in width of existing sidewalks, 
removal of three existing traffic islands, and installation of five 
new traffic divisional islands. 



110 City Document No. 18. 

Beacon street, Boston Proper, installation of traffic divi- 
sional island at the southwesterly corner of Charlesgate East. 

Beacon street, Brighton, reduction in width of existing 
northwesterly sidewalk from Ayr road approximately 435 feet 
southwesterly. 

Beacon street, Roxbury, reduction in width of existing side- 
walk in northerly side from Commonwealth avenue approxi- 
mately 100 feet easterly. 

Boylston street, Boston Proper, increasing curb radius at 
northwesterly corner of Clarendon street. 

Brookline avenue, Ptoxbury, installation of traffic divisional 
island at intersection of Beacon street. 

Bunker Hill street, Charlestown, reduction in wadth of 
existing sidewalks at various locations and the installation of 
a traffic divisional island near intersection of Elm street. 

Busse}'' street and South street, AVest Roxbury, installation 
of three traffic divisional islands. 

Bussey street and Walter street, West Roxburj', installation 
of traffic divisional island. 

Cemetery road, West Roxbury, between Forest Hills street 
and Morton street, consisting of reduction in width of the 
existing sidewalks. 

Chelsea street, Charlestown, at the southwesterly, north- 
westerly, and southeasterly corners of Joiner street, increas- 
ing the curb radii. 

City square, Charlestown, at the northeasterly corner of 
Park street, consisting of increasing the existing curb radius. 

Commonwealth avenue, Boston Proper, reduction in width 
of existing sidewalk on the northerly side between Deerfield 
and Beacon street, and extension of existing divisional island 
into Beacon street. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, between Harvard avenue 
and Thorndike street, construction of two crossovers in the 
southerly divisional island. 

Cummins Highway, Dorchester, between Harvard street and 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (Midland Divi- 
sion), installation of traffic divisional island and relocation 
of existing sidewalks at intersection of Greenfield road. 

Dock square, Boston Proper, reduction in width of existing 
sidewalks, alteration and relocation of existing traffic divi- 
sional island, installation of additional traffic divisional 
islands. 

Dorchester street. South Boston, between Dorchester avenue 
and East Broadway, reduction in width of existing sidewalks 
and the installation of traffic divisional islands. 

Everett square, Brighton, at the approaches to the Everett 
Street Bridge, relocation of the existing curb lines. 

Harrison avenue, Boston Proper, between Beach street and 
Kneeland street, reduction in width of westerly sidewalk. 



Public Works Department. Ill 

Main street, Charlestown, at the southerly corner of Austin 
street, increasing the existing curb radius. 

Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, at the intersection of 
Theodore A. Glynn Way, installation of traffic divisional 
island. 

Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, at the intersection of 
Southampton street, reduction in width of existing sidewalk. 

Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, at both corners of Maga- 
zine street, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

Meridian street. East Boston, at the intersection of Marion 
street, installation of a traffic divisional island. 

Mildred avenue, Dorchester, reduction in width of south- 
easterly sidewalk. 

Morton street. West Roxbury, at the intersection of Forest 
Hills Circle, relocation of southerly curb. 

North street, Boston Proper, reduction in width of southerly 
sidewalk, and installation of a new traffic divisional island at 
the intersection of Dock square. 

Northampton street, Roxbury, from Albany street approxi- 
mately 125 feet northwesterly, reduction in width of existing 
sidewalks. 

Southampton street, Roxbury, at the intersection of Massa- 
chusetts avenue, reduction in width of existing sidewalks, and 
installation of two traffic divisional islands, 

Southampton street, Roxbury, at the intersection of Theo- 
dore A. Glynn Way, the installation of a traffic divisional 
island. 

Southampton street, Roxbury, between Massachusetts ave- 
nue and Albany street, reduction in width of existing side- 
walks. 

Summer street. South Boston, at the southeasterly corner 
of Melcher street, increasing the existing curb radius. 

Theodore A. Glynn Way, Roxbury, at the intersection of 
Newmarket square, the installation of a traffic divisional 
island. 

West Broadway, South Boston, at the northeasterly corner 
of Dorchester street, the reduction in width of the sidewalk 
at the southwesterly corner of Dorchester street. 

Grades Revised. 

Brook Farm road. West Roxbury, between La Grange and 
Lyall streets. 

Cheryl Lane, Hyde Park, from Stonehill road approximately 
375 feet westerly and northerly. 

Cricket Lane, West Roxbury, southwesterly and southeast- 
erly from Ledgewood road. 

Stonehill road, Hyde Park, 292 feet northwesterly of Alwin 
street approximately 273 feet northwesterly. 



112 City Document No. 18 

Discontinued. 

Beech street, West Roxbury, at the southwesterly corner 
of Granville street. 

Clyde street, East Boston, from Marginal street approxi- 
mately 450 feet southwesterly. 

Highway Easement. 

Westglow street, Dorchester, easterly end of Westglow 
street (for wall construction). 

Terminal street, Charlestown, southeasterly side from Med- 
ford street, 350 feet northeasterly (for wall construction). 

Sewer Program. 

During the year 1955 the construction of 3.07 miles of 
sanitary sewer, 4.93 miles of storm sewer, 214 catch basins, 
and 50 drop inlets were ordered at a total estimated cost 
of $1,012,970. 

Estimated benefit to private property for the construc- 
tion of the 3.07 miles of sanitary sewer amounted to 
$171,613.22. 

Sewerage works ordered were as follows: 



Public Works Department. 



113 



Street. 



is « 
■s3 



0!3 



00 




fl 








c! 


^ 


« 


c 


J= 


a 






c3 




O 


Q 



Boston Proper 

Albany street 

Back street 

Beacon street 

Boylston street 

Columbus avenue 

'^Concord place (Alley 511) 

Congress street 

Dock square 

North street 

Brighton 



*Anselm terrace, 
private land. 



Beacon street 

Duncklee street 

Eatonia street 

Everett street 

*Guest street 

West Sorrento street . 
Charlestov^n 

Bunker Hill street. . . . 

Chelsea street 

♦Terminal street 

*Terminal street 

Terminal street 

Dorchester 



*Corman road (easement 
only) 



*Corman road 

•■"Constitution road. 
*Constitution road. 
*Crossman street. . . 
•''Dania street 

Harrow street 

* Itasca street 

Itasca street 



1,271 



235 
185 



170 



1,880 



230 

145 

165 

70 



310 



1,271 



235 
185 



125 



710 



300 



226 

161 

2,651 



230 
142 
109 
66 
682 



317 
500 



1 


1 


2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
3 
2 


2 
1 

1 
2 


1 


t 

1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


2 

12 

2 


2 






20 


. 


















2 




1 





S500 00 


52,000 00 


1,000 00 


500 00 


1,000 00 


500 00 


500 00 


1,500 00 


1,000 00 


2,800 00\ 
2,200 00/ 


350 00 


2,500 00 


500 00 


350 00 


19,500 00 


1,000 00 


6,300 00 


1,000 00 


2,798 00 


2,576 00 


50,000 00 


3,420 00 


2,160 00 


5,650 00 


5,637 00 


5,785 00 


1,200 00 


4,200 00 


5,000 00 



None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

S2,459 97 

None 
None 
None 
None 
$10,500 00 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 



$1,380 00 

None 
$870 00 
846 00 
None 
None 
1,860 00 
None 



* Easements taken 
t Combine 



114 



City Document No. 18. 



Street. 







^ -ti 












OlIJ^ 




^u 


>>* 


t?2 


<B 2 


ej a 


u d 


•s>3 


^3 






03 


3 


02 


m 



a 






•4J 


03 




n 


a 






ja 


ft 






03 




u 


P 



Dorchester — Continued. 
* Jamestown terrace. . . . 



*Linvale terrace 
Private land. 



*Loma road and 
Lena terrace. . 



Manchester street. 
Maryknoll street . . 
MaryknoU street . . 
Mildred avenue . . . 
Mt. Vernon street. 



New England avenue 
(formerly Bernard street) 



Old Colony avenue . 

*Prairie street 

*Richrow street 

*Sunset lane 



Tanglewood road (for- 
merly Churchill place) , 



* Viking terrace . . . 

* Violet street 

Westville terrace . 



Wichita terrace (formerly 
Johnson place) 



William T. Morrissey 
Boulevard , 



East Boston 

Marion court 

(formerly Eutaw place) 



Hyde Park 

Ayles road 

Barry street 

Brush Hill terrace . 

Cheryl Lane 

Child street 

Eaatmont road 

Edwardson street. 



BUard road 

(formerly EUiot street) 



145 



1,030 
450 



60 
230 
238 



145 
275 



145 



142 

250 

1,030 
450 



660 



100 



230 
244 

185 
142 
254 



1,140 



193 



$2,200 00 


5,425 00 


15,450 00 


5,175 00 


6,000 00 


3,500 00 


300 00 


5,200 00 


500 00 


1,000 00 


800 00 


3,800 00 


3,000 00 


3,200 00 


2,160 00 


3,600 00 


500 00 


1,000 00 


2,500 00 


900 00 


4,000 00 


20,500 00 


1,700 00 


500 00 


3,800 00 


1,500 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 



* Easements taken 



Public Works Department. 



115 



Stbeet. 



■3 3 



o a 






Hyde Park — Continued. 






2 

4 
2 
4 
7 
1 

7 

2 




SI, 000 00 

12,000 Oo| 
50,200 00 

8,600 00 
18,500 00 

2,700 00 

3,500 00 
1,000 00 

51,000 00 

91,000 00 

3,430 00 

800 00 

346,000 00 


None 




770 
325 
500 
1,170 
175 


305 
60 
430 
675 
165 




*Belnap road 






tS 17,639 67 






*Perry court 




Leighton road 


None 








None 


•^Marston street and 




1,100 

1,325 
245 


None 


'•■Providence street and 
private land 








None 


'•■Sherrin street 


245 






$1,469 97 




1 




None 


'•=Stony Brook, Beaver 




560 

3,289 
204 
607 
291 
265 

791 


None 


Private land existing 














































Bald Knob road 












*Summer street 


554 


4 
10 


10 


12,200 00 
1,800 00 
5,480 00 
2,800 00 

1,000 00 
2,600 00 

500 00 

200 00 

500 00 

1.000 00 

3,364 00 

2,100 00 

3,000 00 

500 00 

500 00 


S!2,299 65 


West street 


None 


* Woodland road 


205 
220 


205 


$1,230 00 


* Woodland road 






1,320 00 


Roxbury 

Albany street 




2 


2 


None 


Island street 


125 




S750 00 


Langford park (formerly 
Louise park) 




1 
1 
1 
2 


1 

1 
2 


None 


Massachusetts avenue. . . . 






None 








None 








None 


Regent street 


140 






Southampton street 




4 
6 

1 

1 


4 
6 

1 

1 


None 


Southampton street 






None 


Southampton street 






None 


South Boston 

Summer street 






None 











* Easements taken 
t Combine assessment of all five streets 



116 



City Document No. 18. 



Street. 






OS 

^3 



West Roxbury 

* Ackley place 

*Banks street 

Brucewood road . . . 

Canterbury street. 

Canterbury street. 

Cemetery road . . . . 

*Ceino road 

*Cutter road 



•*David road 

(Mossbank Footway). 



DeStef ano road ... 
Driftwood road . . . , 
Emmonsdale road . 
Forest Hills street. 



Granada park (formerly 
Byron court) 



Hall street 

*Hazelmere road 

La Grange street. . . . 

Laurie avenue 

*Lillie Way 

Mossdale road 

Merriam street 

*New Haven street . . . 

Pel ton street 

'''Rocky Nook terrace . 

Sparrow street 

Washington street. . . 
*Wedgemere road 



125 



700 



220 
180 



380 
290 



550 



345 



220 
635 



100 



60 
240 



150 
80 



195 
125 
25 
175 



220 
180 



380 
290 



170 



85 



230 



240 



150 
50 



10 



$1,600 00 


1,000 00 


2,250 00 


1,800 00 


8,000 00 


1,000 00 


3,000 00 


2,500 00 


9,950 00 


6,000 00 


900 00 


2,500 00 


4,300 00 


400 00 


350 00 


3,100 00 


8,500 00 


6,000 00 


1,750 00 


3,900 00 


2,000 00 


3,000 00 


600 00 


4,800 00 


2,500 00 


2,760 00 


1,400 00 



* Easements taken 



*«■« 



Public Works Department. 117 

Eminent Domain Land Takings. 
During the period of this report land takings were 
made for municipal purposes as follows: 

Public Works Department. 

1. The taking of approximately seventy and 87/100 
(70.87) acres of land near Gardner street, West Roxbury 
district, under an order of this commission and Mayor 
dated December 30, 1954, and recorded in the Registry 
of Deeds on January 27, 1955. This taking included ap- 
proximately fifty-seven and 97/100 (57.97) acres of land 
previously taken by the former Board of Street Commis- 
sioners on April 30, 1954, under chapter 80A of the Gen- 
eral Laws from the Town of Drookline. The Public 
Improvement Commission abandoned this order on June 
27, 1955. 

2. The taking of approximately ninety-four thousand 
one hundred one (94,101) square feet of land in South 
Bay avenue, Roxbury district, under an order of this 
Commission and Mayor dated January 20, 1955, and re- 
corded m the Registry of Deeds on February 1, 1955. 

3. The taking of approximately four hundred seventy- 
five thousand four hundred sixty-one (475,461) square 
feet of land near Hallet street, Dorchester district, under 
an order of this commission and Mayor dated February 
25, 1955, and recorded in the Registry of Deeds on March 
8, 1955. 

4. The taking of approximately thirty thousand seven 
hundred eleven (30,711) square feet of land in South Bay 
avenue, Roxbuiy district, under an order of this commis- 
sion and Mayor dated November 4, 1955, and recorded in 
the Registry of Deeds on November 18, 1955. 

Department of School Buildings. 

1. The taking of approximately nine thousand twenty- 
seven (9,027) square feet of land in Mt. Vernon street, 
Dorchester district, under an order of this commission 
and Mayor dated April 28, 1955, and recorded in the 
Registry of Deeds on May 4, 1955. 

2. The taking of approxunately six thousand four 
hundred ninety-four (6,494) square feet of land near Au- 
burn street and Oakburn avenue, Roxbury district, under 
an order of this commission and Mayor dated June 2, 
1955, and recorded in the Registry of Deeds on June 8, 
1955. 



118 



City Document No. 18. 



3. The taking of approximately seventy-six thousand 
six hundred seventy-three (76,673) square feet of land 
near Montmorenci and Faywood avenues and Tower 
street, East Boston district, under an order of this com- 
mission and Mayor dated June 10, 1955, and recorded in 
the Registry of Deeds on June 21, 1955. 

4. The taking of approximately four thousand sixty 
(4,060) square feet of land situated on Montmorenci 
avenue, East Boston district, under an order of this com- 
mission and Mayor dated November 10, 1955, and re- 
corded in the Registry of Deeds on November 15, 1955. 

Assessments. 

During the year 1955 the Highway Division of the 
Public Works Department sent notice of completion of 
forty-six (46) streets at a total cost of $589,807.93. Most 
of these streets were previously ordered constructed by the 
former Board of Street Commissioners. On this work 
the Public Improvement Commission voted assessments 
in the amount of $220,984.52. 

During the same period the Sewer Division of the Pub- 
lic Works Department reported the completion of con- 
struction of sanitary sewerage in forty-four (44) streets 
at a cost of $198,114.28, on which this commission levied 
assessments in the amount of $99,329.43. 

The completion of new sidewalks in five (5) streets at 
a cost of $52,802.56, authorized by the City Council, was 
also reported by the Highway Division. On these this 
commission levied assessments totaling $24,878.80. 



Street Assessments 



Street. 


District. 


Cost. 


Assessment. 


Abby road (formerly Waverly place) 
AUerton street 


Brighton 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 


$7,826 04 
23,034 13 
14,072 90 

7.713 73 
15,511 23 

5,130 27 
10,973 23 
20,847 80 
13,020 47 


S3,096 78 
7,373 12 


Alward road 


4,328 66 




2,423 30 




6,996 90 




1,834 68 


Bateman Street extension 


3,855 25 


Billings street 


7,694 82 


Bowditch Road extension 


3,823 70 












$41,427 21 











Public Works Department. 

Street Assessments. — Concluded. 



119 



Stkeet. 



District. 



Cost. 



Assessment. 



Brought forward 

Buchanan road , 

Centre court , 

Cerina road (formerly Cedar avenue) 

Chestnut square 

Corey terrace 

Cricket Lane 

Cricket Lane 

Dana place 

Deforest street 

Delford street , 

Fernwood road , 

Grassmere road 

Hallron street 

Hartford court 

Hartlawn street 

Hemlock road 

Highfield road , 

Lantern Lane , 

Ledgedale road , 

Ledgewood road 

MacDonald street 

Mendell Way 

Merriam street 

Parklawn Road extension 

Pickering avenue 

Peirson street 

Pitsmoor road 

President road , 

PubUc Alley No. 1001 

Quarley road , 

Quinn Way (formerly Garrett street) 

Ryder Hill road 

Searle road 

Sumner park , 

Wedgewood road 

Wyvern street 

Zeller street 



West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Roxbury 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 



S42,944 29 

2,975 01 

8,587 76 

13,132 78 

8,397 97 

10,075 33 

27,465 59 

1,801 89 

33,964 70 

5,819 09 

5,745 19 

19.276 10 

32,732 99 

3.582 95 
17,187 97 
23,090 56 
20,365 44 

7,525 38 

9,614 19 

14,905 73 

13,994 34 

14,033 37 

8,224 09 

3,835 19 

5.583 75 
11,394 12 

5,809 29 

9,818 76 

2,169 61 

7,256 38 

10,254 34 

11,335 15 

19,116 44 

5,144 05 

8,266 36 

22,173 78 

4,078 20 



$41,427 21 

11,719 61 

1,176 38 

3,812 48 

4,908 75 

3.938 64 
4,198 10 

11,821 20 
681 50 

14,530 68 
1,638 00 
2,299 56 
7,979 75 

14,847 28 
1,766 81 
7,235 44 

10,204 17 
4,925 50 
3,601 38 
3,098 14 
5,346 12 
6,934 53 
2,628 08 

3.939 70 
1,324 56 
2,622 46 
3,205 60 
2,104 05 
4,372 54 
1,647 60 
3,518 00 
3,294 36 
1,923 56 
7,712 70 
2,114 48 
2,074 67 
8,216 55 
2,194 38 



Totals . 



$589,807 93 



$220,984 52 



120 



City Document No. 18. 



Sewer Assessments 



Street. 



District. 



Cost. 



Assessment. 



Atwill road and private land 

Banks street 

Bellevue Hill road 

Brownson terrace 

Brucewood street 

Cemo road 

Clarendon avenue 

Cutter road 

Daniel court 

Danny road 

Dell terrace 

Derry road (formerly Reddy avenue) 
DeStefano road and private land ... 

Dietz road 

Dodge road 

Driftwood road 

Eastmont road 

Farwell avenue 

Federal road 

Furbush road 



Glencliff road (formerly Glendower 
street) 



Groveland street 

liackensack road and court . 

Kristin court 

Leighton road 

Lillie Way 

Manchester street 

iMargo road 

Margo road 

Mossdale road 

Newfield street 

Richrow street 

Rock wood street 

Savannah avenue 

Senders court 

Sherman street 



West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Brighton 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 



So, 876 84 
1,634 00 
2,948 49 
4,967 78 
4,241 52 
2,187 00 
1,862 00 
1,535 10 
1,717 00 
1,257 60 
2,061 00 
6,607 00 
4,859 GO 

10,236 70 
4,000 00 
3,600 00 
5,200 00 
2,944 00 
4,557 00 
647 40 

3,504 00 
9,154 50 
4,218 00 
2,000 00 

11,000 00 

858 50 

5,088 04 

5,760 00 

5,400 50 

13,970 00 
2,517 00 

3.388 00 
2.500 00 

2.389 00 
4,171 00 
3,557 43 



?3,960 00 

720 00 

1,000 00 

2,250 00 

2,468 56 

990 00 

550 00 

864 00 

1,188 65 

400 00 

1,230 09 

3,870 00 

2,100 00 

4,991 33 

1 ,500 00 

2,058 00 

2,850 00 

1,200 00 

1,800 00 

COO 00 

.■;,ooo 00 

4,760 00 
1,740 00 
1,800 00 
6,625 00 

600 00 
2,700 00 
3,480 00 
3,000 00 
9,702 00 
2,399 99 
1,380 GO 
1,200 GO 

540 GO 
3,090 49 

900 GO 



Carried forward . 



$79,944 02 



Public Works Department. 

Sewer Assessments. — Concluded. 



121 



Stheet. 



District. 



Cost. 



Assessment. 



Brought forward 

Slierrin street 

Silver street 

Summer street 

Susanna court 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway. 

Washington street 

Wharton court 

Whitford street 



Hyde Park 
South Boston 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 



S 1,896 00 
1,624 80 
7,683 25 
2,128 80 
1,851 20 

23,799 63 
1,848 20 
1,867 GO 



S79,944 02 
1,540 00 
350 00 
2,871 13 
1,426 38 
780 00 
6,399 00 
1,426 38 
1,028 52 



Totals . 



$198,114 28 



$99,329 43 



Sidewalk Assessments. 



Street. 


District. 


Cost. 


.\SSESSMENT. 




West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
East Boston 


$5,175 50 

275 19 

5,637 73 

25,353 85 

16,360 29 


$2,783 20 




137 59 




3,046 83 




10,739 49 




8,171 69 






Totals 




$52,802 56 


$24,878 80 









Land Damages. 
On new street construction 192 claims were filed for 
damage to property resulting from land takings or changes 
in grade. On these claims this commission awarded dam- 
ages in the amount of $43,914.49. 

Street Name Changes. 
Under the provisions of chapter 55, Acts of 1951, as 
amended by chapter 74, Acts of 1953, the Public Improve- 
ment Commission completed its program for the naming 
of private ways open to public travel in the City of Bos- 
ton. Public hearings were held on 1,464 streets. Of 
these, the commission voted to assign new names to 192. 
On February 28, 1955, the following order was recorded 
in the Registry of Deeds : 



122 



City Document No. 18. 



STREET NAME CHANGES 



City op Boston, 
In Public Improvement Commission, 

March 1, 1955. 

An order of this commission, approved by his Honor the Mayor, assignmg 
the names of private ways open to public travel in the City of Boston was recorded 
in the Registry of Deeds on February 28, 1955, in accordance with chapter 55, Acts 
of 1951, as amended by chapter 74, Acts of 1953. 

The renaming of the following private ways were included in this order: 

NEW NAME. 
St. Jude Terrace 
Maida Terrace 
Bannock Place 
Dade Street 

Maple Street (Extension) 
Aramon Street 
Circuit Terrace 
Altacrest Road 
Archway Street 
Pelham Terrace 
Ashwood Terrace 
Palermo Street 
Auburn Terrace 
Stoughton Terrace 

Balina Place 

Argyle Terrace 

Barry Street 

Bonell Terrace 

Centre Street Terrace (Extension) 

Linwood Square 

New England Avenue 

Vernon Street 

Roxbury Terrace 

Aaron Place 

Bismarck Street 

Imbaro Road 

Dakota Terrace 

Auton Way 

Sturtevant Street 

Quest Street 

Tufts Terrace 

Napa Street 

Candor Place 

Neville Place 



Abbotsford Terrace, Dorchester 

Adams Avenue, Hj-de Park 

Adams Place, Charlestown . 

Adams Place, Roxbury 

Addington Road, West Roxbury 

Airport Street, East Boston 

Alpine Terrace, Roxbury 

Alta Crest, West Roxbury . 

Arch Place, Boston Proper . 

Arlington Terrace, Boston Proper 

Ashland Terrace, West Roxbury 

Ashley Avenue, East Boston 

Auburn Avenue, Charlestown 

Austin Avenue, Dorchester 

Ballou Place, Dorchester (from Norfolk Street 

to railroad) .... 
Bancroft Street, Dorchester 
Barry Place, Hyde Park 
Bartlett Terrace, Roxbury . 
Batchelder Terrace, Roxbury 
Bellevue Terrace, Roxbury . 
Bernard Street, Dorchester 
Berwick Street, Hyde Park 
Bicknell Avenue, Roxbury . 
Binney Place, Roxburj^ 
Bismarck Street South, Dorchester 
Blanchard Street, Hyde Park 
Bowdoin Square, Dorchester 
Brighton Street Avenue, Boston Proper 
Brook Street, Dorchester 
Buffalo Street, Brighton 
Bunker Hill Terrace, Charlestown 
C Street, Roxbur}^ 
Calder Place, West Roxbury 
Camden Place, Boston Proper . 



Public Works Department. 123 

NEW NAME. 

Canton Street Court, Boston Proper Canton Court 

Canton Street Place, Boston Proper . Canton Place 

Caspar Street, West Roxbury .... Kiernan Road 

Cemo Road, West Roxbury .... Crockers Lane 

Clapp Street, Roxbury Toland Court 

Clarendon Avenue, West Roxbury . . . Claron Street 

Clarendon Court, West Roxbury . . . Delano Court 

Columbia Avenue, Dorchester .... Cottrell Street 
Cottage Avenue, West Roxbury (from Howitt 

Road to Sparrow Street) . . . .St. Theresa Avenue 
Cottage Avenue, West Roxbury (from Sparrow 

Street to Maplewood Street) . , . Maplewood Street 

Cottage Place, Roxbury Medina Way 

Cottage Street, East Boston .... Neptune Terrace 

Craft Street, Roxbury Craf tson Way 

Cranston Road, West Roxbury .... Courtney Road 

Cross Street Avenue, Charlestown . . Holston Street 

Cross Street Court, Charlestown . . . Hilary Street 

Cunimington Street, Boston Proper . . Babbitt Street 

D Street, South Boston Ramp Street 

Damrell Avenue, Hyde Park .... Danny Road 
Davis Place, Roxbury (from No. 879 Albany 

Street) Velmar Place 

Davis Place, Roxbury (from No. 32 Webber 

Street) Webber Place 

Depot Square, West Roxbury .... Woolsey Square 

Depot Street, Brighton Thor Terrace 

Devens Street Place, Charlestown . . Venden Place 

Dexter Court, Dorchester Sexton Court 

Dexter Place, South Boston .... Transit Street 

Downer Street, Dorchester Howe Terrace 

Dromey Avenue, Dorchester .... Dromey Street 

Dunn Court, Dorchester Dunn Street 

Dunn's Park, Dorchester Dunn Street 

Eliot Avenue, Hyde Park Ernest Avenue 

Elm Place, Hyde Park Business Terrace 

Farragut Court, South Boston .... Admiral Court 

Fencourt, Roxbury Fencourt Street 

Fenton Place, Dorchester Marlin Way 

Florence Street East, West Roxbury . Florian Street 

Forest Avenue, Hyde Park Forestvale Road 

Forest Street, Dorchester Fellsway Street 

Forest Street, Hyde Park Meadowview Road 

Fremont Place, Roxbury Nathan Street 

Fulton Street, Dorchester Franklin Street 

Furbush Court, Charlestown .... Gurnet Court 

Gerald Road, Hj^de Park Belnap Road 

Glendower Street, West Roxbury . . Qlencliff Road 

Granger Place, Dorchester Duncan Terrace 



124 



City Document No. 18. 



Grant Avenue, Brighton 

Grant Place, Brighton 

Greenmount Street Court, Dorchester 

Greenwich Street, Roxbury .... 

Groveland Street, Dorchester (from Man- 
chester Street to Maryknoll Street) . 

Groveland Street, Dorchester (from Mary- 
knoll Street, northerly) 

Hamilton Alley, Boston Proper . 

Hampstead Road, West Roxbury 

Harvard Place, Brighton 

Hawthorne Avenue, Roxbury 

Hawthorne Street, Hyde Park . 

Hayden Terrace, Roxbury . 

High Street, West Roxbury (from northeast 
of East to railroad) 

High Street, West Roxbury (from Stony Brook 
to 375 feet south of No. 4648 Washington 
Street) 

Highfield Street, Hyde Park 

Highland Park, Roxbury . 

Homer Street, East Boston 

Homestead Park, Roxbury . 

Humboldt Park, Roxbury . 

Hunneman Place, Roxbury 

Hutchins Avenue, Roxbury 

James Avenue, South Boston 

Jefferson Street, Hyde Park 

Langdon Street, Roxbury . 

Laurel Road, Hj^de Park 

Lawrence Avenue, Charlestown . 

Liberty Street, South Boston 

Linden Place, South Boston 

Linden Street, Hyde Park . 

Liverpool Avenue, East Boston . 

Longwood Terrace, Roxbury 

Lubec Street, East Boston (from Prescott 
Street to Lovell Street) 

Lubec Street, East Boston (from Swift Street 
to M.T.A. location) 

Lynde Avenue, Charlestown 

Madison Street, Hyde Park (from Hyde 
Avenue to beyond Brad lee Street) 

Mascoma Street, Dorchester 

McLellan Street, Boston Proper 

Mechanic Street North, Brighton 

Merriam Place, Roxbury 

Milton Street. East Boston 

Mission Street, Roxbury 

Monimient Lane, Charlestown . 



Park 



NEW NAME. 
Wilton Terrace 
Rotterdam Street 
Greenmount Place 
Greenwich Court 

Maryknoll Street 

Maryknoll Terrace 
Jenton Way 
Hampstead Lane 
Argus Place 
Kenway Terrace 
Millstone Road 
Archer Terrace 

Noone Street 



Highpoint Road 
Edgecliff Street 
Fort Avenue Terrace 
Wordsworth Terrace 
Ruthven Park 
Bower Court 
Lamar Place 
Nira Avenue 
Jason Terrace 
Cromwell Road 
Napa Street 
Camelia Road 
Lawrence Terrace 
Liberty Place 
Salerno Place 
Lawton Street 
Coppersmith Way 
Brookwood Terrace 

Lovell Street 

Swift Terrace 
Lynton Street 

Meacham Street 
Intervale Terrace 
Millburn Place 
Craftsman Street 
Thornton Terrace 
Horace Street 
Judge Street 
Boswell Lane 



Public Works Department. 



125 



Parker 



Moulton Avenue, Charlestown 
Mt. Ida Terrace, Dorchester 
Mt. Vernon Avenue, Brighton 
Myrtle Place, Dorchester . 
Neponset Street, Dorchester 
Newburn Place, Hyde Park 
Newburn Street, Hyde Park 
North Avenue, West Roxbury 
Oakdale Avenue, West Roxbury 
Oakland Avenue, Roxbury . 
Oakland Park, Brighton 
Oliver Place, Boston Proper 
Orleans Street, East Boston 
Parker Place, Roxbury (from 

Avenue) .... 
Parker Place, Roxbury (from Terrace 

to railroad) 
Percy Street, West Roxbury 
Plymouth Court, Roxbury . 
Plymouth Street, Dorchester 
Prentiss Place, Roxbury 
Prospect Avenue, Charlestown 
Prospect Street, West Roxbury 
Rena Street, Brighton . 
Richrow Street, Dorchester 
Riverside Place, Dorchester 
Roach's Court, Dorchester . 
Rockland Street, West Roxbury. 
Ross Terrace, Dorchester 
Roughan Terrace, Charlestown 
Rowe Place, West Roxbury 
Russ Terrace, Dorchester . 
St. Alphonsus Avenue, Roxbury 
Sharp Street, Dorchester 
Sinclair Place, Brighton 
Smith Avenue, Boston Proper 
Sorrento Street, Brighton . 
Spring Terrace, Roxbury 
Stanley Street, Hyde Park . 
Stark Avenue, Hyde Park . 
Struzziery Terrace, West Roxbury 
Sumner Road, Dorchester . 
Sunny Terrace, Roxbury 
Sunnyside Road, Hyde Park 
Sunset Circle, Dorchester . 
Tileston Square, Boston Proper 
Trumbull Street, East Boston 
Union Court, Charlestown . 
Union Terrace, West Roxbury 
Upland Street, West Roxbury 



Hill 

Street 



NEW NAME. 
Moulton Way 
Elba Terrace 
Rushmore Street 
Magnolia Place 
Point Road 
Navarre Place 
Navarre Street 
Northdale Avenue 
Pinecliff Road 
Bard Avenue 
Oakland Place 
Ping On Street 
Vienna Street 

Parker Hill Place 

Terrace Place 

St. Mark Street (Extension) 

Treadwell Court 

Dolphin Street 

Kenesaw Terrace 

Prospect Terrace 

Constance Road 

Western Place 

Caryl 1 Street 

Riverbank Place 

Druce Court 

Rockport Street 

Savin Hill Terrace 

Kresson Terrace 

Legion Place 

Fox Point Road 

Utah Way 

Mather Court 

Sinclair Road 

Sabine Avenue 

West Sorrento Street 

Bower Terrace 

Stanbro Street 

Vallaro Road 

Lilac Terrace 

Sumner Square 

Dewey Terrace 

Sunapee Road 

Stanley Street 

Teel Street 

Trident Street 

Ulene Court 

Vale Terrace 

Ascent Street 



126 



City Document No. 18. 



Unnamed Way, Boston Proper (from No. 118 
Oliver Street) 

Upton Court, Brighton 

Van Ness Place, Roxbury 

Vaughan Street, Hj^de Park .... 

Wait Place, Roxbury 

Wait Street, Roxbury 

Wales Place, Dorchester 

Walker Avenue, Charlestown .... 

Walnut Street Court, Dorchester 

Washburn Avenue, East Boston (from Walley 
Street to Belle Isle Inlet) .... 

Washington Avenue, East Boston 

Washington Street, Dorchester .... 

Washington Heights Avenue, West Roxbury . 

Washington Heights Avenue East, West 
Roxbury 

Waupello Road, East Boston 

Way Place, Roxbury . 

Welles Park, West Roxbury 

West Street, East Boston . 

Williams Court, Boston Proper . 

Williams Street Terrace, Roxbury 

Winslow Place, Ro.xbury 

Winslow Street, West Roxbury . 

Winthrop Place, Roxbury . 



NEW NAME. 

Boates Court 
Hague Street 
Dunreath Terrace 
Chesterfield Street 
Waymount Place 
Waymount Street 
Rockmount Street 
Biscoe Place 
Walnut Court 

Walley Street 
Chelsea Terrace 
Vulcan Street 
Weymouth Avenue 

Woodley Avenue 
Shawsheen Road 
Copeland Park 
Wellsmere Park 
Westbrook Street 
Pie Alley 
Williams Square 
Ballinger Place 
Sherbrook Street 
Gary Street 



George G. Htland, Chairman, 

Herman Carp, 

Wm, Arthur Reilly, 

Public Improvement Commission. 



A Trxje Copy 
Attest: 



Approved: 

February 25, 1955 
J. B. Hynes, 
Mayor of Boston. 



MldL^EIi J, CORRAO, 

Secretary. 



Public Works Department. 



127 



Miscellaneous Permits. 

During the period of this report 250 petitions from 
public utilities were approved for the placing and main- 
taining of poles for the support of wires. 

Also ten petitions were approved for miscellaneous in- 
stallations or uses of the public highways of the City of 
Boston as follows: 



Street. 


Petitioner. 


Nature of Petition. 


Arch street, Boston Proper 


Edith Foster 


Underground vault. 


Summer street, Boston 
Proper 


Edith Foster 


Underground vault. 


Arch street, Boston Proper 


Edith Foster 


Emergency door exit. 


Joslin street, Roxbury 


New England Deaconess 
Hospital 


Underground tunnel. 


Reservation road, Hyde 
Park 


Worcester Gas Light Com- 
pany. 


Underground gas main. 


Autumn street, Roxbury 


New England Deaconess 
Hospital. 


Underground exhaust duct. 


Pilgrim road, Roxburj' 


New England Deaconess 
Hospital. 


Underground tunnel. 


Collins street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Com- 
pany. 


L^nderground gas main. 


Congress and Devonshire 
streets at Dock square, 
Boston Proper 


Merchants National Bank of 
Boston 


Structural footings. 


Tremont street, Boston 
Proper 


Merchants Co-operative Bank 


Underground vault. 



Private Way Open to Public Travel. 

In 1937, when the Legislature passed an effective sub- 
division law, the City of Boston was excluded. Boston's 
control over the laying out of new private ways had been 
originally established in 1906 and provided for approval 
by the Board of Street Commissioners of the proposed 
location, direction, width, and grade of all private ways 
thereafter open to public travel in the City of Boston. 

In 1947, this law was amended to require approval also 
of the construction of any such private ways. However, 
neither the original law nor its amendments provided 
sufficient enforcement authority. Consequently, new de- 
velopers for many years after filing satisfactory plans 
neglected to follow up with the construction of the streets 
in accordance with the lines and grades shown on the filed 
plans. 



128 City Document No. IS. 

This practice often resulted in serious land damages 
when such private ways were laid out as public highways. 

In an effort to correct this situation, this commission 
has adopted a policy of requiring developers to guarantee 
proper construction of their streets in accordance with 
minimum standards established by the City of Boston. 

Since April of 1955, when this new policy was estab- 
lished, permits have been granted for the construction of 
the following private ways: David road. West Roxbury; 
Woodland road, Hyde Park; Corman road, Dorchester; 
and Violet street, Dorchester. 

"Boston's Streets" Publication. 
In accordance with two City Council orders dated May 
4, 1954, and June 28, 1955, a new edition of "Boston's 
Streets" was published on April 30, 1955. 

George G. Hyland, Chairman. 
Herman Carp, Vice Chairman. 
Wm. Arthur Reilly, Member. 



City op Bostcn 

Administrative Services Department 
Pbinting ^^^^ Section 



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