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[Document 18—1957.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1956 



Boston, January 2, 1957. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the annual report of the Public Works 
Department and of the Public Improvement Commis- 
sion for the year ending December 31, 1956. 

Fiscal 

The total expenditures of the department for the 
year were $22,540,853.59, of which $3,290,795.44 repre- 
sents water assessments levied by the Metropolitan 
District Commission, and $694,456.14 represents Met- 
ropolitan District Commission sewer assessments. 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled 
$6,297,311.74, and the revenue derived from the opera- 
tion of the Sumner Tunnel reached a record high of 
$2,550,125.00. 

The operation of the Sumner Tunnel resulted in a 
record-breaking surplus of $1,133,528.35, and the surplus 
resulting from the sale of water amounted to $271,990.01. 







2 City Document No. 18. 

Loan Orders. 
On May 15, 1956, a City Council order was approved 
by your Honor, which provided, under the provisions 
of section 7 of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, that 
the sum of $2,000,000 be appropriated for the con- 
struction of public ways and the sum of $1,000,000 be 
appropriated for the construction of sewerage works, 
and the sum of $346,385.00 be appropriated for depart- 
mental equipment, and on November 6, 1956, that the 
sum of $3,000,000 be appropriated for the construction 
of bridges. 

Street Construction Work 
State- Aid Prograrn 
Last 3"ear we completed a considerable amount of 
street reconstruction under the Chapter 90 State-Aid 
Highway Reconstruction Program. The following 
important main highways were constructed under the 
State-Aid Program : 

AKord Street, from 450 feet north of Arlington avenue to 
Everett line. 

Cummins Highway, from Har\'ard street to Mattapan 
square. 

Dorchester street, from Dorchester avenue to Broadway. 

Hyde Park avenue, from Walk Hill street to Metropolitan 
avenue. 

Huntington avenue, from Tremont street to Brookline line. 

River street, from Cummins Highway to Edge water Drive. 

Terminal street, from Medford street, northeasterly and 
easterly, 3,100 feet. 

Washington street, from Egleston square to Forest Hills. 

Grove street, from Spring street to Dedham hne. 

The total cost of the Chapter 90 Construction Pro- 
gram in Boston for the year 1956 was $658,980.09, of 
which the State Department of Public Works, under 
the provisions of section 34 of Chapter 90 of the General 
Laws, paid 52.4 per cent, thereby presenting a substantial 
savings of $344,912.66 to the taxpayers of Boston. It 
is planned to again conduct an extensive program of 
street construction under this chapter in 1957. 



Public Works Department. 3 

Non-State Aid Program 
We also completed a major street reconstruction 
program, comprising extensive construction and recon- 
struction, in every section of the city. Several impor- 
tant traffic arteries resurfaced bj" the department 
during the year are listed as follows: 

Adams street, Dorchester, from Bowdoiii street to Dor- 
chester avenue. 

Beacon street. City Proper, from Park street to Tremont 
street. 

Brookline avenue, City Proper, from Beacon street to 
Park Drive. 

Causeway street, City Proper, from Nashua street to 
Leverett street. 

Chelsea street. East Boston, from Bennington street to 
Chelsea Street Bridge. 

Dudley street, Roxbury, from Centre street to Washing- 
ton street. 

Friend street. City Proper, from Causeway street to Mer- 
rimac street. 

Maverick street, East Boston, from Chelsea street to 
Orleans street. 

Portland street. City Proper, from Hanover street to Mer- 
rimac street. 

Preble street. South Boston, from Old Colony avenue to 
Dorchester avenue. 

South street, West Roxbury, from Washington street to 
Asticou road. 

Traverse street, City Proper, from Portland street to 
Canal street. 

Washington street, Roxbury, from Williams street to 
Zeigler street. 

In continuation of our polic}' of replacing brick side- 
walks with cement concrete in the older sections of the 
city, contracts during the year, totaling approximately 
$110,000.00, were awarded for this work. 

The following is a summarized financial statement of 
the expenditures made in 1956 for highway improve- 
ments : 

Budgetary Item 

Public Waj's, Construction of (Loan Account) . . . $2,495,543 42 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue Account) . . 169,746 04 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) . . . 56,660 48 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of . . . 52,465 95 

Total .$2,774,415 89 



4 City Document No. 18. 

The following is a summarized record of the highway 
improvement work done by the department in 1956: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 221 . 

Includes 40 new streets ordered laid out and con- 
structed under the provisions of Chapter 393 of the 
Acts of 1906. 

Miles of Streets Improved^ 27.4i- 

Includes 6.14 miles of so-called Chapter 90 state-aid 
highway improvements. 

Miles of Sidewalks Improved, 2.82. 

In addition to sidewalk improvements included in the 
above-noted street improvements. 

We also completed during the year the removal of 
694 gas lamps, which were replaced with 750 2,500- 
lumen electric lamps. It is our intention to continue 
with this program in 1957. 

Snow Removal 

We were unfortunate during the past year in that 
8 snowstorms of major proportions occurred, the three 
bhzzards in March causing the most expense and 
trouble. Major storms were as follows: January 17 
— 6.1 inches, February 18 — 6.7 inches, March 16 — 5.4 
inches, March 19 — 13.2 inches, March 24 — 5.7 inches, 
April 8 — 3.1 inches, December 9 — 3.8 inches, and 
December 29 — 5 inches. Snow removal was performed 
by departmental forces and by contract forces and 
contractors' plows were hired for plowing following the 
aforementioned storms. 

There are 748 miles of public streets that have to be 
plowed and maintained during the winter months. 
The department's fleet of thirty-seven (37) snow fighters 
was used to plow, sand and salt the streets of the 
downtown area. Most of the plowing work in the 
rest of the city was done by approximately 250 trucks 
rented on an hourlj^ basis from contractors. 

The cost of snow removal work for 1956 was $1,333,- 
232.36. 



Public Works Department. 5 

Bridges 

During the period September 14 to November 14, 
the Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, permitted for a 
60-day trial period a change in the operating regula- 
tions of the Charlestown, L Street, Summer Street, 
Northern Avenue and Congress Street bridges. The 
change in regulations are similar to those granted for 
the Broadway and Dover Street bridges in 1954 and 
provided for the bridges to be closed to navigation 
from 4:00 p.m. until 9:00 a. m. each day. It is expected 
that these regulations will be established in 1957 and will 
result in a future substantial savings to bridge operating 
costs. 

A major part of the reconstruction of the approach 
spans of the Charlestown bridge under a contract 
awarded to Builders Iron Works was completed this 
year. Charles A. McGuire & Associates completed 
plans and specifications for the repair and renewal of 
the draw spans for this bridge including the operating 
mechanism and a contract in the amount of 1606,000 
was awarded the Builders Iron Works. Work started 
November 27, 1956, and will be completed late in 1957. 

South Bay Incinerator 
On Maj' 28, 1956, a contract was awarded to Geo. 
Allen & Sons for the furnishing of incinerator equip- 
ment including furnaces, w^aste-heat boilers, fly-ash 
controls and other appurtenances. Wash borings were 
made in August by the Raymond Concrete Pile Co. 
A contract for driving piles was awarded on November 7, 
1956, to the J. F. White Contracting Co. in the amount 
of $453,340. It is expected that the pile driving will 
be completed before April of 1957 when the building 
plans and specifications being prepared by Metcalf & 
Eddy, Engineers, will be ready. 

New Building 
Holmes & Edwards, Architects, were engaged to 
prepare plans and specifications and supervise the con- 



6 City Document No. 18. 

struction of a garage at the Highway Division's yard 
at Moreland Street, West Roxbury. The work is being 
done by Domenic Puleo at an estimated cost of $55,500 
and will be completed in 1957. An addition to the 
Highland Street Garage, Roxbury, to provide additional 
stock room space was completed this year by Kane & 
Diaferio Construction Co., at a cost of $20,161.94. 

Purchase of Equipment 
New equipment purchased during the year included 
four (4) carry-alls, thirty-six (36) sedans, twelve (12) 
^-ton trucks, eleven (11) 1-ton trucks, one (1) 2-ton 
truck, twenty (20) 2i-ton trucks, thirty (30) 3-ton 
trucks, one (1) 5-ton truck, two (2) wreckers, one (1) 
bulldozer, one (1) grader, one (1) power mower, three (3) 
sewer cleaning machines, twenty-six (26) snow plows 
and three (3) salt spreaders. 

Personnel 
There were 1,990 employees in the department as 
of December 31, as compared with 2,022 employees on 
January 1, 1956. 

Detailed Reports 
Appended hereto are reports submitted by the Divi- 
sion Engineers, relative to the activities of their divisions 
in 1956 and also a report of the Public Improvement 
Commission describing its activities for the year 1956. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Public Works Department. 

MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Division or Service. 



Central Office . 
Automotive Division 
Bridge Division . 
Highway Division 
Lighting Service 
Sanitary Division 
Sewer Division . 
Sumner Tunnel . 
Survey Division . 
Water Division . 



Total 



Total Appropriations, 

Including 
Transfers and Amounts 
Carried Over from 1955. 



Expenditures. 



S66,581 25 

769,808 80 

1,045,869 75 

1,712,187 28 

1,520,081 97 

4,871,683 07 

944,557 35 

690,018 73 

116,165 74 

2,606,646 49 



§14,343,600 43 



.$66,536 29 

768,700 16 

834,691 63 

1,540,005 65 

1,506,630 87 

4,843,072 44 

905,067 79 

601,579 27 

116,152 72 

2,212,603 54 



$13,395,040 36 



Unexpended 
Balance. 



$44 96 

1,108 64 

211,178 12 

172,181 63 

13,451 10 

28,610 63 

39,489 56 

88,439 46 

13 02 

394,042 95 



$948,560 07 



LOANS AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Title. 



Bridges, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 

Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings Thereof (Non-Revenue) 

Incinerator Building Construction and Equipping (Non- 
Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 

Sewerage Works (Non-Revenue) 

Snow Removal (Revenue) 

Totals 



Total Amount 
Available. 



$1,562,802 83 

8,861 09 

1,199,920 00 

3,072,939 58 

804,248 02 

1,333,332 36 



$7,982,103 88 



Expenditures. 



$695,417 66 



8,052 05 

2,495,543 42 

628,216 16 

1,333,332 36 



$5,160,561 65 



Unexpended 
Bal&nee. 



$867,385 17 

8,861 09 

1,191,867 95 
577,396 16 
176,031 86 



$2,821,542 23 



City Document No. 18. 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 1,990 persons ehgible for employment in the 
several divisions, and of that number 1,985 were upon 
the January 2, 1957 payrolls. 

Grade and Number of Employees. 





Services. 


Title. 


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1 








1 
2 












1 






1 




1 
14 

1 


1 




2 




8 






14 


Supervisors and assistants 


1 
1 


2 


1 

9 
3 


2 
16 

12 
2 






2 
4 

1 
2 


11 

5 
6 
1 


9 


Principal senior and civil engineers. . . 


22 
3 




63 
16 








?3 










3 










1 








1 


Automotive and senior electrical 












2 






9 










2 










9 












1 
4 








1 


Pumping station engineers and sta- 


















4 






1 




.... 


1 
7 
3 

71 








9 








1 
56 


5 

1 

2 

17 


2 


5 
5 




31 


Other foremen 




10 


1 


1>^ 






3 


Inspectors 




1 


3 




18 

1 




166 


Legal assistant 




1 
















1 
13 


1 


Electrician operators 








2 




2 






17 




1 










1 


Executive secretary and assistants 
















2 


9 






















Carried forward 


5 


16 


18 


114 


101 


63 


19 


41 


26 


403 







Public Works Department. 



Grade and Number of Employees. — Continued. 



Services. 





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Brought forward 

Senior personnel officer and assistant 

Head administrative clerks 

Head clerks 

Principal clerk and secretary 



Principal clerks, stenographers, ac- 
count clerks, etc 



Technical clerk . 



Senior clerks, typists, stenographers, 
etc 



Clerk-stenographers, clerks, typists. . 

Telephone operators 

Head cashier 

Senior cashier and cashiers 

Principal storekeepers 

Senior storekeeper and storekeepers . 
Chief water meter reader 



Supervisor and special water meter 
readers 



Water meter readers and clerks . 

Sergeant tollmen guards 

Tollmen guards 

Supervisor, mobile guard 

Sergeants, mobile guard 

Mobile guards 

Drawtenders and assistants . . . . 

Analytical chemist 

Chief and senior investigators . . 
Estimators and investigators . . . 

Dispatcher 

Plumbers 

Head photostat operator 

Photostat operators 



16 



18 



120 



10 



101 



63 



19 



31 



403 

2 



37 
1 

50 

10 
2 

1 
6 



31 
5 

40 
1 
3 

12 
120 



1 

21 

1 

2 



Carried forward. 



Ill 



73 



76 



156 



790 



10 City DocuiiExx Xo. 18. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 









Brought fortcard j 12 



Principal duplicating machine oper- 
ator 



Sewer gatemen 

Yardmasters and yardmen 

Road roller operators 

Working foremen 

Sewage screen operator 

Firemen and oilers 

Steamfitters 

Repairmen and roaintenancemen . 
Crane operator 



Maintenance mechanics and helpers, 
etc 



Carpenters and helpers 

Welders 

Painters 

Pavers 

Blacksmiths and helpers 

Bricklayers 

Sewer cleaners 

Catch-basin machine operators . . . . 
Heavy motor equipment operators. 

Motor equipment operators 

Junior building custodian 

Garage attendants 

Laborers 

Constables 



Totals. 



44 



30 



131 



143 



169 



141 



111 



73 



59 
109 



181 
1 

361 



287 
6 

615 



184 



76 



12 



199 



156 



20 



44 
3 

384 



34 



35 



Public Works Department. 



11 



Number of Employees Actually Employed January I, 1956, and 
January 1, 1957. 





























































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January 1, 1956 


35 


99 


11 


181 


380 


357 


629 


188 


130 


2,010 


January 1, 1957 


34 


98 


12 


168 


383 


361 


614 


184 


131 


1.985 







TotaJ Eligible Force. 



January 1, 1956. 
January 1, 1957. 



35 


101 


11 


182 


382 


359 


631 


190 


131 


35 


99 


12 


169 


384 


361 


615 


184 


131 



2,022 
1,990 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, 
etc., of Employees. 







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Services. 
1956-1957. 






|3 |5^ 









2 
2 






1 


4 


1 




2 


2 


9 




1 




2 


4 


12 


2 


5 


2 


10 


8 


21 


1 


6 


4 


11 


1 


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1 


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3 




1 
2 


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4 






1 
3 




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9 


13 


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14 


25 


72 


11 


27 


12 


46 



11 I Central Office. 
131 I Automotive... 

182 I Bridge 

359 I Highway 



631 
190 
35 
101 
382 

2,022 



Sanitarj-, 
Sewer. . . 
Survey. . 
Tunnel. . 
Water. . . 



Totals. 



12 

131 

169 

361 

.615 

184 

35 

99 

384 

1,990 



12 City Document No. 18. 

APPENDIX A 



REPORT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION 
FOR THE YEAR 1956 



To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I am submitting herewith the annual report of the 
Automotive Division of the Pubhc Works Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1956. This report 
covers the activities of the five garages, the Mobile 
Guard Section, and the Motor Patrol. 

The quota of employees assigned to the Automotive 
Division was one hundred thirty-nine, but, due to 
vacancies, the number of employees averaged one 
hundred thirty-one. These employees were assigned 
to the following duties: One chief automotive engineer, 
in charge of the division; nine employees assigned to 
office work; four employees assigned to the stock room; 
three employees assigned to wreckers; forty-one em- 
ployees assigned to repair work; thirty-seven employees 
assigned to maintenance of buildings, gasoline and oil 
dispensing, cleaning, watchmen's duties, and motor 
vehicle operation; and thirty-six employees assigned 
to the Mobile Guard Section which maintains a watch 
over Public Works Department property and equip- 
ment between the hours of 4.00 p.m. and 8.00 a.m. 

The office maintained by the division at City Hall 
processed 2,048 requisitions in 1956, of which 1,217 
were service orders, and 831 were purchase orders. A 
petty cash fund of $300.00 was used to make about one 
hundred purchases a month, usually under $3.00 each. 
The City Hall office reports the following expenditures 
from the 1956 appropriation: 



Public Works Department. 13 



Personal services . 
Contractual services 
Materials and supplies 
Rents and registration fees . 
Purchase of new equipment 



$464,763 00 

65,283 00 

211,929 00 

12,522 00 

12,184 00 

$766,681 00 



An equipment loan of $340,000.00 was issued in 1956 
to purchase new automotive equipment, and from this 
loan, and Water Division and Snow Removal funds 
the following equipment was ordered: 

For Sumner Traffic Tunnel: 
One wrecker 
One jeep 

For Highway Division: 

One crawler tractor with angle dozer 

One diesel road grader 

Sixteen sedans 

Two International travelalls 

Twenty three-ton three-yard dump trucks 

One five-ton five-yard dump truck 

One power lawn mower 

For Sewer Division : 

One half-ton pick-up truck 

Two International Travelalls 

One one-ton express truck 

One two-and-one-half-ton three-yard dump truck 

One three-ton three-yard dump truck 

Two two-ton two-yard dump trucks 

Two bucket machines (sewer cleaning) 

One sewer rodding machine (trailer) 

Miscellaneous sewer cleaning tools, sewer rodders, etc. 

Three sedans 

For Sanitary Division: 
Thirteen sedans 

Eighteen two-and-one-half-ton three-yard dump trucks 
Nine three-ton twelve-yard ash body trucks 
Eight half -ton pick-up trucks 
Six Dempster-Dumpster rubbish containers 

For Automotive Division : 
One wrecker 
One sedan 
Two half-ton pick-up trucks 



14 City Document No. 18. 

For Bridge Division: 

One half-ton pick-up truck 

One two-and-one-half-ton lumber truck 

Two sedans 

For Water Division: 
Ten express trucks 
One sedan 
One truck with hydraulic crane 

From Snow Removal funds : 

Three snow plows for heavy duty equipment 
Twenty-three snow plows for trucks 
Three Scotchman salt spreaders 

A complete list of all automotive equipment is attached. 

Several improvements to the buildings and equip- 
ment were made in 1956. We installed new lubrication 
equipment at the Highland Street garage, and we 
installed an air compressor at the Gardner Street dump. 
We changed the Albany Street garage from direct cur- 
rent to alternating current; this included the oil burner, 
the gas pumps, all doors, etc. 

The building at Highland street used as the welding 
shop was improved by the installation of glass block 
windows, and the oil burner at Highland street was 
thoroughly overhauled. The addition to the stockroom 
was completed, and new bins were installed giving us 
twice the space we formerly had, and increasing stock- 
room efficiency. 

The repair shop at Highland street performed ap- 
proximately one hundred overhaul jobs, one thousand 
major repair jobs, and twelve thousand minor repair 
jobs, including tire repairs and lubrication check-ups. 

The Mobile Guard and the Motor Pool operated in a 
satisfactory manner during 1956. The Motor Pool 
consists of one dispatcher, and nine drivers (one from 
the Automotive Division). The dispatcher makes all 
assignments to the drivers, and also has charge of the 
short-wave radio. Within the Public Works Depart- 
ment there are forty-one cars equipped with two-way 
radios. The Motor Pool assignments outside the Public 
Works Department consist of the following: 



Public AVorks Department. 



15 



Institutions Department, convejing patients to Tewks- 
bury, Long Island, and Nazareth. 

Purchasing Department, con^'eJ'ing inspectors to sources 
of supplies. 

Public Library, checking district libraries. 

Election Department, conveying voting machine inspectors, 
and work on election day. 

Assessing Department, Printing Department, Public Cele- 
brations, and Mayor's Office, various assignments. 

Real Estate Division, conveying city auctioneer to those 
locations where city-owned property is to be auctioned. 

The Mobile Guard Section, with thirtj-six men and 
four vehicles, patrolled the city, protecting Public 
Works Department property. The fifteen mobile guards 
are assigned to various shifts, 4.00 p.m. to 12.00 mid- 
night, and 12.00 midnight to 8.00 a.m., as well as around 
the clock on Saturday, Sunday, and holidaj^s. The 
guards inspect all yards, and, at each location, punch a 
Detex time clock. Watchmen are permanently sta- 
tioned on locations where experience has shown that it 
is advisable to have a man present at all times to protect 
city property. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James H. Ste\vart, 
Chief Automotive Engineer. 



\BER OF EACH TYPE OF AUTOWOTJVE EQUIPMENT 


IN THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTA\ENT 


Passenger cars 83 


Trucks, half-ton .... 






43 


Tmcks, 1 to U ton 






49 


Trucks, 2 to 3 ton 






137 


Trucks, 5 to 8 ton 






5 


Compressor (mounted on trucks) 






10 


Trailer compressors 






2 


Crawler tractors .... 






4 


Street flushers .... 






6 


Sidewalk rollers .... 






12 


Street sweepers .... 






26 


Snow fighters .... 






36 


Snow loaders and bucket loaders 






7 


Front bucket loaders . 






21 


Miscellaneous equipment 






56 


Total 






497 



16 



City Document No. 18. 



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Public Works Department. 17 

APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION. 



To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Submitted herewith is the annual report of the Bridge 
Division, covering the income, expenditures and opera- 
tion of the Bridge Service and the Sumner Tunnel for 
the year ending December 31, 1956. 

Respectfully, 

John J. McCall, 

Division Engineer, 
Bridge Division. 



18 



City Document No. 18. 



I. BRIDGE SERVICE. 

Summary of Budget Appropriations and Expenditures 



Regular 
Appropria- 
tion 



Bridges, 
Repairs, etc. 



Bridges, Construction of 



Revenue 



Non -Revenue 



Balance from 1955 

1956 Appropriation .... 


$718,512 00 


$133,867 76 
80,000 00 


$70,448 60 
150,000 00 


$1,762,802 83 
3,000,000 00 


Total Credits 


$718,512 00 
27,627 71 


$213,867 76 
47,000 00 


$220,448 60 


$4,762,802 83 


Transfers from 


Total 


$690,884 29 
690,884 29 


$166,867 76 
128,530 56 


$220,448 60 
199,876 24 


$4,762,802 83 
1,750,742 47 


Encumbrances 


Unencumbered Balance 


— 


$38,337 20 


$572 36 


$3,012,060 36 



Details of Expenditures on Tidewater Bridges 

TIDEWATER BRIDGES— 1956 



Bridge 


Draw- 
tenders' 
Salaries 


Mechanics' 
Wages 


Material 


Repair 
Bills 


Supplies, 

Utilities, 

Etc. 


Total 




$14,642 11 
70,703 86 
26,429 87 
53,809 87 
44,049 67 
1,238 60 
38,539 44 
51,414 14 
54,147 34 
41,765 98 

53,171 43 


$3,688 00 S9fi 34 


$317 54 

1,598 87 

25 35 

1,686 18 

131 98 

496 61 

1.777 38 
2,240 62 
5,979 32 

2.778 81 
1.450 20 

866 84 


$290 62 

1,615 29 

413 38 

877 85 

903 70 

6 52 

860 33 

990 37 

2,723 47 

5.59 21 

2 00 

2,585 69 


$19,034 6 
78,045 
29.208 :; 
59,707 G 
50,351 7 

5,484 9 
47,434 
58,198 6 
72,597 2 
55,150 8 

2,962 7 
59,934 7 




3,553 91 
2,278 28 
3,257 10 
4,883 65 
3,245 92 
5,814 41 
3,407 88 
9,211 97 
7,936 74 
1,326 81 
3.190 72 


573 14 

61 50 

76 61 

382 73 

497 25 

442 46 

145 65 

535 19 

2.110 09 

183 78 

120 02 


fChelsea South 

Chelsea Street 

Congress Street 

*Dover Street 

L Street 


Maiden 

Northern Avenue 

Summer Street 

tWarren 


Andrew P. McArdle . . . 


Totals 


S449,912 31 


$51,795 39 


$5,224 76 


$19,349 70 


$11,828 43 


$538,110 £ 





* Not operating as drawbridge but kept in operable condition for possible use during construction o 
Fitzgerald Expressway in Fort Point Channel area. 

t Closed to highway traffic on August 21, 1956. Demolition started August 27, 1956, and was sul 
stantially completed by end of year. 

t Closed to highway traffic on November 26. 1954 , but kept operable for possible emergency use. 



Public Works Department. 



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20 City Document No. 18. 

The Bridge Division maintained twelve drawbridges 
at the beginning of 1956. Three of these (Broadway, 
Dover Street and Warren Bridges) were not operated 
as such throughout the year; a fourth, Chelsea South 
Bridge, was closed to highway traffic on August 21, 
1956, and the demolition of this bridge began on 
August 27, 1956. 

Following is a list of the twelve drawbridges, showing 
their operating status as of the present writing: 
Fort Point Channel 
Broadway and Dover Street Bridges 

Not operating as drawbridges, but are being kept in 
operable condition for possible use during construction 
of Fitzgerald Expressway in Fort Point Channel area- 

Summer Street, Congress Street and Northern Avenue 

Bridges 
Fully operating. 

Reserved Channel 
Summer Street (L Street) Bridge 
Fully operating. 

Charles River 

Charlestown Bridge 

Fully operating. Will be closed to navigation for 

approximately 5 months during 1957, (May through 

September) to permit installation of new operating 

machinery. 

Warren Bridge 
Not operating. This bridge was closed to highway 
traffic on November 26, 1954; and the draw pulled 
off leaving the waterway open to navigation in operable 
condition as an emergency measure, pending the com- 
pletion of the Charlestown Bridge reconstruction. 

Mystic River 

Maiden Bridge 
Fully operating. 



Public Works Department. 21 

Chelsea South Bridge 

This bridge was closed to highway traffic on August 
21, 1956, (upon completion and opening of Terminal 
Street). Demolition of the bridge was commenced on 
August 27, 1956, and was substantially completed by 
the end of the year. 

Chelsea River 

Chelsea Street Bridge 
Fully operating. 

Andrew P. McArdle Bridge 
Fully operating. 

On June 30, 1956, Mr. John J. O'Neil, Head Clerk of 
the Bridge Division, retired after having completed 45 
years in the service of the City. 

Throughout the year 1956, one roadway of the 
Charlestown Bridge served to maintain traffic while 
the approach spans were being reconstructed. The 
upstream half of the bridge was completed as of 1956. 

Highway traffic was then diverted from the down- 
stream roadway to the new upstream roadway while 
the downstream half was reconstructed. The final 
deck slab was poured on December 28, 1956; and it 
is expected that finish pavement work, sidewalk recon- 
struction, etc., will be completed by early spring in 
1957. 

The reconstruction of the draw span was commenced 
under a separate contract, on November 27, 1956; and 
it is expected that work under this contract will be 
completed in October, 1957. A description of the work 
involved in the reconstruction of this bridge appears 
hereinafter. 

It is tentatively planned that when the Charlestown 
Bridge project is substantially completed, Warren 
Bridge will be discontinued as a public highway and the 
bridge structure removed. 



22 City Document No. 18. 

A study has been initiated to determine the possibiUtj'' 
of ehminating the drawbridge at Summer street (L 
street) over Reserved Channel. Until such time as this 
possibility is thoroughly explored, the work of repairing 
or rebuilding the bridge has been deferred. Meanwhile, 
plans for the rebuilding of the South Boston approach 
trestle are being drawn; and an underwater inspection 
of the Boston approach trestle and the draw foundation 
is being scheduled to be done early in 1957. 

The findings made under this inspection, together 
with the results of the study being made toward closing 
of the waterway above the bridge to navigation, will 
determine the manner of repairing or replacing the 
bridge. 

The Dover Street and West Fourth Street Bridges 
are expected to be closed to highway traffic sometime 
in 1957, for a period of at least 6 months because of the 
Fitzgerald Expressway construction, in that area, which 
is expected to begin in 1957. 

As part of the expressway project, the first two spans 
of the Dover Street Bridge nearest Albany street, are 
to be rebuilt by the Commonwealth. However, this 
will not be done until that part of Broadway Bridge 
which spans Lehigh street is rebuilt, which is also to be 
done by the Commonwealth as part of the expressway 
project. Traffic will be maintained over Broadway 
Bridge at all times, since the Lehigh street span will be 
rebuilt one-half at a time. 

It is hoped that the remainder of the Dover Street 
Bridge as well as the three truss spans of the West 
Fourth Street Bridge (which were not lost in the fire 
of 1953) can be rebuilt at the time the expressway is 
under construction; inasmuch as such an improvement 
has been needed for many years. 

The proposed rebuilding of the Summer Street Bridge 
over Fort Point Channel came nearer to realization 
with the authorization of a $3,000,000 bond issue for 
bridge construction, which was approved by the City 
Council and Mayor in October, 1956. 



Public Works Department. 23 

However, because of the possibility that the American 
Sugar Refining Company may decide to relocate its 
refinery outside the Fort Point Channel, definite plans 
for the Summer Street Bridge rebuilding have been 
deferred pending such a decision; since the removal 
of the refinery could lead to the elimination of a draw- 
span in that bridge. 

The Congress Street, Chelsea Street and McArdle 
Bridges are in first class condition. 

Maiden Bridge has been in need of rebuilding for 
many years; and it is expected that this improvement 
will be made possible by virtue of the Commonwealth 
undertaking the project in the near future. 

In connection with the operation of the City's draw- 
bridges, it should be noted that there has been a con- 
sistent decline in recent years in the volume of com- 
mercial and industrial types of waterborne traffic re- 
quiring drawbridge openings, with the exception of the 
oil traffic on the Chelsea River. 

At the same time, the cost of operating and main- 
taining the drawbridges has steadily increased. 

Following is an 11-year summary showing the yearly 
cost of operating each of our existing drawbridges, and 
the number of openings per year for each, through the 
period, 1946 to 1956, inclusive. 



24 



City Document No. 18. 



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Public Works Department. 25 

In addition to the cost factor, another problem re- 
lated to the operation of drawbridges is that of high- 
way traffic delays and disruption caused by bridge 
openings at times of heavy traffic loads, particularly in 
the area served by Northern avenue, Congress street 
and Summer street. 

An effort to remed}" this situation has been made 
through a petition to the Corps of Engineers, U. S. 
Army, for a change in regulations to permit closing 
certain bridges to navigation from 4.00 p.m. to 9.00 a.m. 
on weekdays except on 10-hour notice by shipping 
interests desiring an opening. Such regulations were 
put into effect by the U. S. Engineers for a 60-day 
trial period, ending November 14, 1956, on the follow- 
ing bridges : — 

Summer St., Congress St. and Northern Ave. bridges 

over Fort Point Channel. 
Charlestown Bridge over Charles River. 
Summer St. (L St.) Bridge over Reserved Channel. 

At the present time, these regulations are in effect 
at the Charlestown and Summer Street (Reserved 
Channel) bridges; and as regards the three bridges over 
Fort Point Channel, a final decision is expected by the 
U. S. Engineers early in 1957. 

With reference to the inland and fixed bridges, there 
is a total of 80 such bridges, including footbridges, 
maintained in whole or in part by this department as 
follows : — 



Maintained entirely by this department 



Maintained 
Maintained 
Maintained 
Maintained 
Maintained 
Maintained 
Maintained 



ointly with New Haven RR 
ointly with Boston & Albany RR 
ointly with Boston & Maine RR 
ointly with M.T.A. 
ointly with Town of Winthrop 
ointly with Town of Milton 
ointly with Town of Watertown 



49 
15 
10 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



Total SO 

During 1956, the ownership and maintenance of the 
Charlesgate West bridge over Ipswich street, was trans- 
ferred to the Metropolitan District Commission in ac- 
cordance with Chapter 581, Acts of 1956. 



26 City Document No. 18. 

The Rivermoor Street bridge in West Roxbury, over 
the old Cow Island Pond sluiceway, was removed in 
connection with the construction of Rivermoor street 
and Charles Park road. 

The Chelsea Viaduct (over the Mystic Docks) which 
formerly connected the Chelsea South and Chelsea 
North bridges, was demolished and removed by the 
Boston & Maine Railroad at the time of the demolition 
of the Chelsea South bridge by this department. 

On November 15, 1956, bids were received for the 
rebuilding of the Massachusetts Avenue bridge over 
the New Haven Railroad; and a contract was awarded 
on December 17, 1956, to the Builders Iron Works, the 
low bidder, in the amount of $143,854.75. 

This improvement will result in the elimination of 
the existing through girder type of bridge and provide 
for a single, clear roadway at this heavily traveled site. 
Work is expected to commence in the spring of 1957, 
and to be completed in six months. 

The rebuilding of Winthrop Bridge over Belle Isle 
Inlet, is scheduled for 1957 under a contract awarded by 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Works in 
October, 1956. The City of Boston and Town of 
Winthrop will share the cost of this project with the 
Commonwealth as follows : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts . . . 60% 

City of Boston 24% 

Town of Winthrop 16% 



100% 

The estimated cost of rebuilding is $133,000.00. 

An inspection of the steelwork of the Boylston Street 
Bridge over the Boston & Albany Railroad was com- 
pleted in December, 1956, under the supervision of the 
W. A. Fisher Co., Inc., Consulting Engineers, who 
were engaged for the purpose. An engineering report 
based on this inspection will be submitted in the very 
near future; and inasmuch as this bridge is in need of 



Public Works Department. 27 

redecking, it is intended to install a permanent type, 
concrete filled, steel deck, if the structural condition of 
the bridge warrants. 

The Broadway Bridge over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad is in poor condition and should be rebuilt. 
To this end, the department has requested that the 
City officially petition the Department of Public Utili- 
ties to approve an order for the rebuilding of the bridge. 

Major Construction Work and Repairs 
A description of the major improvements and more 
important work undertaken in 1956 by the Bridge 
Service is as follows: 

Beconstruction of Charlestown Bridge Over Charles River 
{Draw Span Only) 

Bids were received May 24, 1956, for the reconstruc- 
tion of the draw span of the Charlestown Bridge over 
Charles River and the contract was awarded to Builders 
Iron Works the low bidder. 

The work to be done consists of stripping the entire 
draw span of existing wearing surface materials; in- 
stalling a new steel floor beam and stringer system; 
installing new steel roadway and sidewalk grating and 
railings; replacing existing hydraulic operating machin- 
ery with new toggle end lift mechanism; installing a 
complete new electrical system; demolishing existing 
drawtender's house; erecting a new drawtender's house 
and control house; cleaning and painting all exposed 
metal work. 

Work commenced November 27, 1956, and it is ex- 
pected it will be completed in the fall of 1957. 

Estimated cost of this work is 1606,244.00. 

Reconstruction of the Superstructure of the Massachusetts 
Avenue Bridge Over the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad 

Bids for this project were received on November 15, 
1956. 



28 City Document No. 18. 

A contract was awarded to the low bidder, the Build- 
ers Iron Works, in the amount of $143,854.75. 

The work to be done consists of removing the entire 
present superstructure and parapet walls on the present 
abutments; the new bridge will consist of steel stringers, 
concrete filled steel grating sidewalks, reinforced con- 
crete roadway and a bituminous roadway wearing 
surface. 

Work will commence in the spring of 1957 and it is 
expected it will be completed in the fall of 1957. 

Removing and Disposing of the Superstructure and Draw- 
tender^s House of the Chelsea Bridge South over the 
South Channel of the Mystic River 

After the city had completed the construction of 
Terminal street, Charlestown, there was no further need 
for the above mentioned bridge. 

After receiving publicly advertised bids, a contract 
was awarded to the Builders Iron Works, low bidder, 
to demolish the entire superstructure and the draw- 
tender's house, and construct a new, heavy duty, steel 
beam barrier, with warning signs and reflectors, and a 
wire mesh fence at the dead end of Chelsea street. 

Work commenced August 27, 1956, and was sub- 
stantially completed by the end of the year, at a cost of 
$17,640.00. 

Redecking arid Repairing the Perkins Street Footbridge 
over the Boston & Maine Railroad 

Under a contract awarded in January, 1956, to the 
Builders Iron Works, new steel stairways were con- 
structed at the subject footbridge and the walkway was 
replanked. 

Work commenced April 4, 1956, and was completed 
May 25, 1956, at a cost of $9,818.43. 

Deck Repairs of Broadway Bridge over the 

Boston & Albany Railroad 

Due to the dangerous condition of the northerly side 

of the bridge deck a contract was entered into with the 

Albert C. Graglia Company to make the necessary 

repairs. 



Public Works Department. 29 

Because of very heavy vehicular traffic on normal work 
days, all work had to be done on weekends when the 
area to be repaired was closed to traffic. 

The main roadway of the northerly side of the bridge 
was stripped of all bituminous concrete and wood 
plank surfacing; and defective stringers and underplank 
removed. New stringers and underplank were placed 
and an asphalt plank wearing surface installed. 

Work commenced August 4, 1956, and was completed 
September 2, 1956, at a cost of $22,742.25. 

Reconstruction of Downstream Sidewalk of the Milton 
Bridge over the Neponset River 

To eliminate a hazardous condition of the existing 
wood plank wearing surface on the downstream sidewalk 
of the Milton Bridge, the subject work was advertised 
and a contract awarded to Martin J. Kelly Company, 
Inc., low bidder. 

The work consisted of removing the old wearing 
surface planking and wooden stringers; removing and 
resetting the metal bridge railing; and constructing a 
new reinforced concrete sidewalk with, high curbs and 
cleaning and painting the fence. 

Work commenced September 17, 1956, and was 
completed October 17, 1956, at a cost of $7,459.27. 

Emergency Replacement of Main Drive Shaft of the 
Chelsea Street Bridge over Chelsea River 

An emergency contract was negotiated with the 
General Ship and Engine Works, Inc., to make repairs 
to the operating machinery of the subject bridge. 

The defective main drive shaft (downstream unit) 
was removed and taken to the shop where the existing 
pinion gears, brake drums, etc. were removed. A new 
drive shaft was furnished including all machinery and 
shop work, with the existing pinion gears, brake drums, 
etc., being pressed into place. The new drive shaft 
was then installed in place, with several test openings 
being made to insure proper operation. 

Work commenced on May 28, 1956, and was com- 
pleted August 16, 1956, at a cost of $2,974.74. 



30 City Document No. 18. 

Emergency Repairs to the Operating Machinery of the 
Chelsea Street Bridge over the Chelsea River 

Because of the defective operation of the Chelsea 
Street Bridge drawspan due to a broken section of 
operating rack, a contract was negotiated with the 
General Ship and Engine Works, Inc., to make the 
necessary repairs. 

The existing broken starting rack was removed and a 
new starting rack, furnished by the City, was installed. 

Work was commenced March 17, 1956, and com- 
pleted April 26, 1956, at a cost of $2,750. 

Repairing Masonry Piers and Abutments of the Northern 
Avenue Bridge over Fort Point Channel 

As a result of a thorough inspection by engineers of 
the Bridge Division, it was deemed necessary to repair 
the subject bridge piers and abutments by means of 
pointing and pressure grouting. The work was adver- 
tised and a contract was awarded to the South Shore 
Waterproofing Company, low bidder, to accomplish the 
above mentioned repairs. 

Work commenced September 24, 1956, and was 
completed October 25, 1956, at a cost of $1,679.24. 

Repairs to Certain Pilework at Maiden Bridge over the 
Mystic River 

A contract was entered into with the James B. Rendle 
Company to make repairs to certain pilework of the 
Maiden Bridge. 

Defective piles were strengthened by fitting new 
double 6" x 12" intermediate caps with new 12" x 12" 
posts placed between the new intermediate caps and 
the existing girder caps. 

Work commenced November 14, 1956, and was 
completed November 19, 1956, at a cost of $2,260.24. 

Cleaning and Painting All Exposed Metalwork of the 
Blakemore Street, Cummins Highway, Belgrade Avenue, 
and Brooks Street Bridges 
Bids for this work were received on October 18, 1956, 

and a contract awarded to the R. & F. Painting Co., 

low bidder. 



Public Works Department. 31 

Work commenced on December 3, 1956, but due to 
weather conditions work has been suspended until the 
Spring of 1957. 

The estimated cost of this work is $2,650.00. 

Furnishing Inspection Services During Erection and 
Connection of Structural Steelwork, Using High 
Strength Bolts on the Approach Spans of the Charles- 
town Bridge over the Charles River 

In connection with the reconstruction of the Charles- 
town Bridge approach spans, wherein the use of high 
tensile strength bolts was allowed instead of con- 
ventional rivets for making structural field connections, 
a contract was negotiated with the Carney Construc- 
tion Co., Inc., to supply all the necessary technical 
services required to make a complete and thorough 
examination and inspection of the work involving the 
installation of steelwork with high tensile strength bolt 
connections. 

Work was commenced April 23, 1956, and completed 
December 13, 1956, at a cost of $2,500.00. 

Yard Forces 

The maintenance force of the Bridge Service is 
utilized in various repair operations of both emergency 
and routine nature in repairs to bridge roadway decking, 
sidewalks, fender piers, retractile bridge tracks, stair- 
ways, railings and pertinent facilities. 

Other work included erecting and repairing barricades 
at snow dumps, dead end locations, painting of road- 
way gates, fences, machinery houses, etc.; removing 
and replacing counterweight elements on bascule 
bridges; and cleaning bridge sidewalks and stairways of 
ice and snow. 

Minor repairs to the various mechanical and electrical 
facilities of the draAvbridges were made by the main- 
tenance mechanics and electrician. 



32 City Documext No. 18. 

Work Done for Other Divisions by the Bridge 

Division 

Sanitary Division 
Repairs to Victory Road Disposal Station 

The Bridge Division prepared the specifications and 
furnished the engineering and inspection services re- 
quired to make the necessary repairs. 

The work consisted of repairing the foundation at the 
rear of the building, and included removing old piles, 
driving new piles, placing new girder caps and cross 
bracing, and cleaning and painting the steel floor system. 

Incidental work included erection of a wire mesh 
fence at the site to close off access to the open area 
under the building at the shore line, thereby eliminating 
a hazardous condition. 

A contract was awarded to C. A. Foley to make the 
necessary repairs. 

Work commenced October 8, 1956, and was com- 
pleted October 20, 1956, at a cost of $6,660.69. 



Public Works Department. 33 

II. SUMNER TUNNEL. 

1956 Budget Summary 
Credits: 

Regular Appropriations, 1956 . . . $683,830 00 
Balance from Previous Year . . . 6,188 73 

Pensions 48,290 72 



Total Credits $738,309 45 

Debits : 

Expenditures — 1956 $601,579 27 

Balance to Next Year 28,924 02 

Pensions 48,290 72 

Total Debits $678,794 01 

Unexpended and Unencumbered Balance . $59,515 44 



SUMMARY OF 1950 TRAFFIC BY CLASSIFICATION 

No. of 
Class Toll Description Vehicles 

1. $0 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacity. 

Tractor without trailer 428,538 

2. 20 Passenger car 12,018,285 

3. 20 Motorcycle 2,312 

4. 25 Truck over*2 tons and up to 5 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 5 tons 

capacity 58,328 

5. 20 Passenger car with trailer 18,462 

6. 35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 10 

tons capacity 20,025 

7. 20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons 

capacity 3,105 

8. 1 00 Truck over 10 tons capacity .... 1,755 

9. 35 Bus with or without passengers .... 2,963 

* Reserved Lane 182,953 

Total traffic 12,736,726 

* M.T.A. and Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses included in this classification. 
7,475 M.T.A. and 75,846 Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses at 35 cents included 

in this total. 



34 


City Document 


No. 18. 






COMPARATIVE 5=YEAR SUMMARY OF OPERATION, FROM 
1952 TO 1956, INCLUSIVE 




1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


Vehicular Traffic: 












Total number of vehicles . . . 


9,583,972 


10,835,674 


11,080,966 


12,094,107 


12,736,7 




798,664 


902,973 


923,414 


1,007,842 


1,061,3 




184,307 


208,378 


212,513 


231,945 


244,5 




26,186 


29,686 


30,359 


33.135 


34,8 




Power Consumption: 














4,582,488 


4,966,604 


4,527,315 


5,236,214 


5,614,0 




Financial Results: 












Operating expenditure 


$541,705 30 


$591,327 09 


$595,127 07 


$585,650 61 


$649,869 


Balance to next year 


24,679 45 


16,591 87 


3,925 18 


6,188 73 


28,924 


Interest requirements 


683,105 13 


687,494 39 


740,213 05 


760,100 00 


743,991 




65 25 


440 60 


122 85 


98 60 








Total Expenses 


Sl,249,555 13 


$1,295,853 95 


$1,339,388 15 


$1,395,093 63 


$1,422,785 




$1,932,619 83 
13,135 89 


$2,172,410 00 
24,679 45 


$2,224,195 00 
16,591 87 


$2,413,231 59 
3,925 18 


$2,550,125 
6,188 


Balance from previous year . . . 


Total Receipts 


$1,945,755 72 


$2,197,089 45 


$2,240,786 87 

• 


$2,417,156 77 


$2,556,313 


Net Result 


$696,200 59 
(Excess) 


$901,235 50 
(Excess) 


$901,398 72 
(Excess) 


$1,022,063 14 

(Excess) 


$1,133,528 
(Excess^ 





Uncier the provisions of Chapter 465, Acts of 1956, 
which created the Massachusetts Port Authority, it was 
expected that control of the Sumner Tunnel would 
pass to the new Authority before the end of 1956. 

However, this did not occur and it is expected that 
the tunnel will not be so transferred until some time in 
1957; accordingly, the city petitioned the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Utilities for approval of extending 
the existing toll rates for six months beyond December 
31, 1956. The petition was amended at the hearing to 
extend the existing rates for a full year, to December 31, 
1957, unless otherwise previously changed in accordance 
with the law. The petition was so approved. 

The total traffic for the year 1956 amounted to 
12,736,726 vehicles. This figure sets a new and all-time 



Public Works Department. 35 

high record since the opening of the tunnel on June 30, 
1934, and an increase of traffic over the previous 3'ear 
of 1955 of 642,619 vehicles. 

The record high day of traffic for a 24-hour day oc- 
curred May 27, 1955, when the daily traffic amounted 
to 39,536 cars. This year the record high day was on 
June 14, 1956, when 41,130 cars passed through the 
tunnel in a 24-hour period, setting a new all-time high 
daily record. 

All of the electrical and mechanical equipment and 
all machinery throughout the tunnel is in good operating 
condition. All equipment is under a daily routine of 
maintenance and inspection, and any repairs or adjust- 
ments or replacements that may be required for efficient 
operation are made as required. 

Contracts Awarded ix 1956 

1. Repairs to Granite Block Roadway 
During the year 1956, 980 yards of granite block 
pavement were removed and relaid by the Eastern 
Roads Company at a cost of $13,576.00. All of this 
work was performed after midnight and before 7.00 a.m. 
and with no interference with vehicular traffic. 

2. Drainage System 
The surface drainage system of the Sumner Tunnel 
consists of three separate sections — Boston Plaza sec- 
tion. East Boston Plaza section, and the tunnel sec- 
tion. During the past year this work was completed 
by the Albany Contracting Company for the sum of 
$1,697.00. The work performed under this contract 
consisted of cleaning out the entire drainage system, 
including removing and disposing of all waste material, 
as required in written specifications covering this work. 

S. Cleaning Drop Inlets and Satid Traps 
An Invitation Bid was awarded to the Bennington 
Construction Company for the furnishing of all labor 
and tools, equipment, etc., to clean out and remove all 



36 City Document No. 18. 

dirt, sand, etc., from 72 drop inlets, 2 sand traps, and 
from the 6-inch pipe connecting the drop inlets and the 
sand traps, for the sum of $650.00. 

4. Cleaning Exhaust Air Ducts, Exhaust Fan Rooms in 
Ventilation Buildings 
During the past year a contract was awarded to the 
Albany Contracting Company to clean the entire 
exhaust air duct and all the exhaust fan rooms, for the 
sum of $2,033. This work is performed each year in 
order to maintain the efficiency of the ventilation system. 

5 — Rodding Ducts, Cleaning Chambers 
In anticipation of installing a new control cable 
during the year 1957, a contract was made with Hugh 
Nawn, Inc., to furnish all labor, and materials, tools 
and equipment to complete the following work of re- 
moving all splicing chamber covers, cleaning 13 splicing 
chambers, and rodding and cleaning 4,553 linear feet 
of 35-inch fibre duct for the sum of $1,600. This work 
was performed between the hours of 1.30 a.m. and 
5.30 A.M., and with no interference to vehicular traffic. 

6 — New Control Cable 

Specifications were written and a contract awarded 
to Grainger-Rush Company of Boston to furnish and 
supply 4,850 feet of 259 conductor. No. 19 copper, 
polyethylene and plastex jacketed cable. 

This new control cable is to replace one of the original 
259 conductor, lead and latox cables that was installed 
in the tunnel in 1934. 

This cable will be installed some time during the 
year 1957. 

7 — Testing Relays, Adjusting Circuit Breakers 
Each year an order is issued to the Boston Edison 
Company to check and adjust all power relays for cor- 
rect operation, test and sample the oil in all circuit 



Public Works Department. 37 

breakers and transformers for the proper oil viscosity, 
adding oil or replacing it as needed. The estimated cost 
of this work amounted to $1,500. 

8 — Painting, Cleaning Ventilation Equipment 
A contract was awarded to the Joseph and Nicholas 
Bello Company to clean and paint the ventilation 
equipment in the two Ventilating Buildings. There 
are 14 fans in each building, i.e., 7 blower fans and 7 
exhaust fans. All work is to be done in accordance with 
written specifications covering this work, all for the 
sum of $7,941. This work will be completed in 1957. 



38 City Document No. 18. 

APPENDIX C 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE HIGHWAY DIVISION 



To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

The following report of the income, expenditures, 
and operation of the Highway Division of the Public 
Works Department is hereby submitted for the year 
ending December 31, 1956. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTHFORD J. KeLLEY, 

Division Engineer, Highway Division. 



Public Works Department. 



39 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 



Paving Service 
Summary of Budget Appropriations 



Appropriation. 



Total Credits. 



Expenditures. 



Balance 
Unexpended. 



Paving Service 



Reconstruction of 
Streets 



Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Revenue) . . . . 

Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Non-Revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction 
and Reconstruction of 

Street Signs 

Snow Removal 



$1,712,187 28 

77,232 82 

176,084 08 

4,072,939 58 

193,681 67 

10,236 65 

1,333,232 36 



$1,540,005 65 

56,660 48 

169,746 04 

2,495,543 42 

52,465 95 

6,201 12 

1,333,232 36 



$172,181 63 

20,572 34 

6,338 04 

1,577,396 16 

141,215 72 
4,035 53 
None 



In the Permit Office, the following income was re- 
ceived for 1956: 



Signs, marquees, etc. 

Sidewalk Licenses 

Rents .... 

Notifications 

Driveway Applications 

Permits (Chapter 27 of Ordinances ) 

Deposits for Street Openings . 

Total revenue received 



$70,850 90 

24,177 15 

5,896 70 

150 00 

1,036 00 

51,384 37 

96,538 68 

$250,033 80 



Number of Permits and Licenses Issued for 1956 



Signs, etc 

Sidewalk licenses 

Street openings (deposits) . . . , 
Permits (occupation and street opening) 
Public utilities (street openings) 
City departments (street openings) 
Driveway applications . . . . 



10,516 

380 

666 

5,644 

2,998 

1,220 

500 



Total 21,924 



40 City Document No. 18. 

Money received from permittees and charged to the 
Street Opening Account was spent for repairs of open- 
ings for drains and water services (new) during 1956 
to the amount of $45,500. 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were employed 
as usual in the maintenance of public streets, resurfacing 
and patching macadam pavements, patching permanent 
pavements, such as asphalt and granite block, and main- 
taining gravel, brick, and artificial stone sidewalks. 

In the snow removal season, division forces were 
employed in spreading rock salt and sand on icy streets 
and also supervised plowing work throughout the city 
by 250 contractors' hired plows after snowstorms. All 
snow removal bills for plowing, hauling, force account 
work, cubic yard removal, etc., were processed through 
the Paving Service office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs : 

Erected 193 4-inch street signposts. 

Erected 15 new hero square signs for dedication. 

Replaced 121 hero square signs. 

Installed 729 new street signs. 

Removed 411 old hand-painted signs, damaged baked- 
enamel signs and obliterated signs. 

Repaired and straightened 265 bent or broken street sign- 
posts (4-inch type). 

Repaired 310 broken street sign frames. 

Welded 69 4-inch street signposts. 

Repaired 509 street sign frames, collars, and brackets on 
4-inch street signposts and light poles. 

Removed 156 pieces of rope, wire, old tires, etc., from 
4-inch street signposts and light poles. 

Installed 563 street sign frames. 

Installed 448 street sign collars on 4-inch street signposts 
and light poles. 

Installed 137 adapters on wooden poles. 

Installed 164 4-inch acorns on 4-inch street signposts. 

Installed 138 "Private Way" signs on 4-inch street sign- 
posts. 

Removed — 

77 "Private Way" signs from 4-inch posts and light poles 
because of the change to public ways. 



Public Works Department. 41 

Painted — 

911 4-inch street signposts 
1,043 street sign frames 
898 4-inch acorns on 4-inch posts 
942 street sign collars on street signposts and Ught poles 

Installed — 

14 directional signs on 4-inch posts 
Washed and cleaned — 

576 street sign name plates 
Painted — 

183 blanks for temporary name plates 

Contracts were awarded for the construction and 
reconstruction of 142 streets during the 3'ear, and 104 of 
these were completed. Work was also completed on 73 
streets which were unfinished from 1955. Contracts 
were awarded for the construction of sidewalks in 38 
streets, and 13 of these w^ere completed. Sidewalk work 
was also completed on 20 streets which were unfinished 
from 1955. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares on which 
reconstruction work was completed in 1956 are as 
follows : 

Alford street, from 450 feet north of Arlington avenue to 
Everett line. 

Cummins Highway, from Harvard street to Mattapan 
square. 

Dorchester street, Dorchester avenue to Broadway. 

Hyde Park avenue, from Walk Hill street to Metropolitan 
avenue. 

Huntington avenue, from Tremont street to Brookline line. 

River street, from Cummins Highway to Riverside Drive. 

Terminal street, from Medford street to northeasterly and 
easterly for 3,100 feet. 

Washington street, Egleston square to Forest Hills. 

Grove street, from Spring street to Dedham line. 

Adams street, Bowdoin street to Dorchester avenue. 

Beacon street. Park street to Tremont street. 

Brookline avenue. Beacon street to Park Drive. 

Causeway street, Nashua street to Leverett street. 

Chelsea street, Bennington street to Chelsea Street Bridge. 

Dudley street, Centre street to Washington street. 

Friend street. Causeway street to Merrimac street. 

Maverick street, Chelsea street to Orleans street. 

Portland street, Hanover street to Merrimac street. 

Preble street, Old Colony avenue to Dorchester avenue. 



42 City Document No. 18. 

South street, Washington street to Asticou road. 
Traverse street, Portland street to Canal street. 
Washington street, Williams street to Zeigler street. 

The following is a list of streets constructed and 
reconstructed and sidewalk work done by contract in 
the various wards of the city in 1956: 

Ward 1 — Drumlin road, Harmony street, Marion court, 
Montmorenci avenue, Haynes street, Maverick square, 
Maverick street, Webster street. Meridian street (corner 
cutback and traffic island). 

Ward 2 — Terminal street, Austin street (corner cutback), 
Alford street (chapter 90), Chelsea street (corner cutback). 
Monument street (roadway widening), Park street and City 
square (radius change). 

Ward 3 — Dock square, Cambridge street, Dorchester 
avenue. Mi. Washington avenue. Ash street, Bristol street, 
Broadway (chain-link fence). Post Office square. Beacon 
street. Causeway street. Friend street, Jolin F. Lindsay 
square, Market street, Portland street. Traverse street, 
Sudbury street, Merrimac street. Province court, Broadway, 
Harrison avenue, India street, Kneeland street, Atlantic 
avenue. Court square, Hawley street, Franklin street, At- 
lantic avenue (corner cutback). 

Ward 4 — Boylston street, Massachusetts avenue, Belvi- 
dere street, St. Cecilia street, Francis street (roadway 
widening), Leon street (corner cutback), Joslin road. 

Ward 5 — Charles street, Mt. Vernon street, Walnut 
street, Pinckney street (sidewalks). River street (sidewalks), 
Clarendon street and Boylston street (corner cutback), 
Stuart street and Broadway (corner cutback). Common- 
wealth avenue, Brookline avenue and Beacon street (corner 
cutback and traffic island), Jersey street, Boylston street, 
Massachusetts avenue, Tremont street, Chestnut street, 
Charles and Boylston streets (install traffic island). 

Ward 6 — Melcher street, Granite street, Dorchester street, 
Bowen street, E street, H street, Tudor street, O street. 

Ward 7 — Dorchester street, Harrow street, Eastman 
street, Humphreys street, Columbia road, E street, O street, 
Boston street (safety barriers). East Sixth street (safety bar- 
riers), Father Anthony Songin Way (chain-link fence). 

Ward 8 — Albany street, Harrison avenue, Wareham 
street, East Concord street, Warren street, Washington 
street, Massachusetts avenue (corner cutback), Worcester 
square (roadway widening). 

Ward 9 - — Warren street and Zeigler street (corner cut- 
back), Dudley street, Warren street, Washington street. 

Ward 10 — Centre street (sidewalks). Heath street (side- 
walks), Huntington avenue (chapter 90), Ellingwood street 
(chain-link fence), St. Alphonsus street. 



Public Works Department. 43 

Ward 1 1 — Washington street (sidewalk narrowing), 
Ackley place, Bancroft street, Boynton street. Hall street, 
Jamaica street, Marmion street, Minton street, Montebello 
road, Meehan street, Highland street (chain-link fence), 
Granada park, Hampstead Lane, Rocky Nook terrace, 
Washington street (chapter 90), Columbus avenue (chapter 
90), Child street, Morton street, St. Joseph street, Forest 
Hills street. 

Ward 12 - — Langford park. 

Ward 13 — Mt. Vernon street, Grampian Way. 

Ward 14 — Brookview street, Stratton street, Wilcock 
street, York street. Blue Hill avenue at Talbot avenue 
(traffic island). New England avenue, Woodrow avenue. 

Ward 15 ^ — Dorchester avenue. Evert on street, Juliette 
street, Mt. Ida road. Homes avenue (sidewalks), Adams 
street. 

Ward 16 — Hilltop street and Crockett avenue (corner 
cutback), Victory road, Dix street, Parkman street. 

Ward 17 — Peacevale road, Wilmington avenue, Man- 
chester street, Milton avenue (sidewalks), Mary knoll street, 
Tanglewood road, Wichita terrace, Woodrow avenue. 

Ward 18 — Austin street, Fairmount avenue, Glenwood 
avenue, Perkins avenue, Pleasant street, Vose avenue, West- 
minster street, Hyde Park avenue (chapter 90), Alwin street, 
Cheryl Lane, Stonehill road, Stonehill terrace, Alabama 
street, Itasca street. Savannah avenue, Mildred avenue 
(sidewalk narrowing), Milton street (chain-lmk fence), 
Cummins Highway (chapter 90), River street (chapter 90), 
Ayles road, Edwardson Street Extension, Ellard road, 
Frazer street, Lewiston street. Brush Hill terrace, Farwell 
avenue, Maryknoll street, Maryknoll terrace, IMildred Ave- 
nue Extension, New Bedford street, Brockton Street Ex- 
tension, Winthrop street, Harvard avenue, Cedrus avenue, 
Como road (roadway widening). 

Ward 19 — • Bussey street (roadway widening and traffic 
island). South street. 

Ward 20 — Emmonsdale road, Walworth street, Woodard 
road. Park street, Washington street, Brahms street (side- 
walks). Knoll street (sidewalks), Pelton street (sidewalks), 
Yorktown street (sidewalks), Westmount avenue (side- 
walks). Wren street (sidewalks), Brucewood street, Laurie 
avenue, Pomona avenue. Sparrow street, Rickerhill road, 
Brownson terrace. Cricket Lane (safety barriers), Walworth 
street (safety barriers), Bussey street (roadway widening 
and traffic island), Cricket Lane (sidewalks), Primrose 
street, Grove street (chapter 90), New Haven street. 

Ward 21 — Dustin street, Nottinghill road. Common- 
wealth avenue. Harvard avenue, Thorndike street, Beacon 
street (roadway widening). 

Ward 22 — Dustin street, Caltha road. Guest street 
(roadway and corner cutbacks), Brooks street (safety bar- 
riers). 



44 



City Document No. 18. 



Work Done by Contract in 1956 



Item 

Excavation, earth and services 

Excavation, rock 

Bank gravel .... 

Crushed stone for edgestone . 

Base removed .... 

Pavement removed . 

Edgestone, straight . 

Edgestone, circular . 

Corners 

Edgestone, reset and/or relocated 
Edgestone, hauled 
Macadam base (crushed stone) 
OA asphalt .... 
Concrete base .... 
Concrete, backing up sidewalks 
Bituminous concrete base for roadways 
Bituminous concrete top for roadways 
Bituminous concrete base for sidewalks 
Bituminous concrete top for sidewalks 
Sheet asphalt top 
Artificial stone sidewalks 
Artificial stone driveways 
Loam spaces .... 
Loam in back of sidewalks 
Covers reset .... 
Catch basins or manholes rebuilt 
Catch basins or drop inlets built 
Street sign posts set or reset . 
Parking meters reset 
Stone bounds .... 



Quantity 
54,819 cubic yards 
1,782 cubic yards 

53.725 tons 
2,24G tons 

11.726 square yards 
41,819 square yards 
27,213 linear feet 

4,790 linear feet 

965 each 
54,687 linear feet 
6,629 linear feet 
15,743 tons 
153,471 gallons 
5,422 cubic yards 
7 cubic yards 
38,263 tons 
31,142 tons 
1,721 tons 
1,529 tons 
1,780 tons 
790,731 square feet 
71,463 square feet 
3,815 square yards 

541 cubic yards 

3,335 each 

92 each 

64 each 

367 each 

171 each 

111 each 



Total Pavement 
437,492 square yards of bituminous concrete pavement 
25,020 square yards of sheet asphalt pavement 



Yearly Report of Work Done by Department 
Forces for 1956 



Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid 
Gravel sidewalks, relaid .... 
Artificial stone sidewalks, laid (new) 
Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid (old) . 
Bituminous concrete sidewalks 

Block gutters 

Artificial stone sidewalks, patched with 

black top 

Edgestone reset (old) .... 



3,675 square yards 

1,166 square yards 

15,727 square feet 

106,488 square feet 

8,727 square yards 

10 square yards 

10,355 square feet 
3,201 linear feet 









Table 


Showing Length and 


Area 


OF Paving 


ON Accepted Streets, 


Corrected to January 


1, 1957 


















Length 


m Miles. 




















Area in 


Square Yards. 












Sheet 
Asphalt. 


tAspholt 
Concrete. 


tGranite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


}Con- 


1 Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


tAsphalt 
Concrete. 


{Granite 
fllock. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick; 


$Con Crete. 


IIMacadam. 


Gravel 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Vear 1955 Report 


235.10 
31.63 


316.67 
42.60 


30.15 
4.05 


0.17 
0.02 


0.35 
0.05 


0.50 
0.07 


20.72 
2.79 


129.95 
17.48 


8.77 
1.18 


0.97 
0.13 


743.35 
100.00 


4,735,490 
32.94 


6.205,924 
43.17 


714,977 
4.98 


3,056 
0.02 


9,244 
0.07 


8,867 
0.06 


421,437 
2.93 


2,092,022 
14.55 


152,948 
1.06 


31,463 
0.22 


14.375.428 






Januabv 1. 1957. 


49.63 
4.43 
2.97 
11.34 
41.43 
35.28 
53.52 
21.13 
7.84 


30.14 
7.11 
21.98 
19,50 
34.75 
86,07 
81.32 
32.33 
24 , 24 


9.31 
4,98 
3.03 
5.71 
2.53 
0.03 
0.48 
0.29 
0.00 


0,06 
0.06 

0-00 


0.09 
0.02 
0.02 
0.03 


0.31 

0.02 
0.02 
0.14 

0.01 


3.01 
0.76 
1,39 
0.43 
4.58 
2.93 
5.17 
0.86 
0.64 


2.72 
5.30 
8.95 
6.63 
11.16 
29.97 
33.95 
10.61 
14.03 


0,30 
0.03 
0.22 
fl.U 
0.50 
2.39 
1.82 
0.47 
4.12 


0.01 
0.0-1 
0.50 
0.00 
0.00 
0.02 

0.20 


95.57 
22.70 
38.62 
44.27 
95.09 
166.71 
176.36 
65.77 
52.00 


1,100,192 
86,984 
64,352 
238.0S3 
840,326 
623,829 
1,011,286 
467,376 
134,509 


692,418 
189.103 
.502,499 
396,970 
656,380 
1,589,359 
1.521,307 
626,321 
473,016 


184,454 
120,512 
03,773 
105,099 
38,747 
3,098 
12,313 
23,791 
45 


278 
1.503 

355 


3.258 

1,098 

355 

892 


4.398 

321 
1,370 
2,561 

145 


96.408 
13,921 
47,177 
20,992 
70,122 
41,291 
83,059 
24,457 
10,086 


41,746 
73,410 
195,422 
110,403 
100,370 
483,184 
52,5,184 
171,043 
243.195 


6,087 
407 
3,635 
1,230 
8.364 
45,356 
30.13.'. 
7,466 
68.519 


41 

812 
15.754 
27 
5.390 
1.737 
50 
4.506 












South Boston 


951.754 
1.770.897 


West Roxbury 


0.03 


0.04 
0,04 
0.08 
0,03 


338 


983 

985 

1,231 

442 


2.792.490 
3.186,489 




1,321,735 




934,318 








227.57 
30.46 


337.44 
45.17 


26.36 
3.53 


0.15 
0.02 


0,35 
0.05 


0.50 
0.07 


19.77 
2.64 


124.22 
16.63 


9.96 
1.33 


0.77 
0.10 


747.09 
100.00 


4,573,537 
31.62 


0,047,373 
45.96 


611,832 
4.23 


2.474 
0.02 


9,244 
0.06 


8.795 
0.06 


407.513 
2.82 


2,003.957 
13.85 


171,205 
1.18 


28,317 
0.20 


14,464,247 


Percent 


100.00 



Total Public Streets 747.09 Mil: 



Note. — In the above tuble the city is subdivided aubatantially on the boiindarj' Hnea betwei 

0.02 mite or 185 square yards is cobble; and 14.52 miles or 4U,4S4 
granite block paving on concrete base, 
0.06 miles or 435 square yards is Blome granitoid concrete block. 
109.25 miles or 1,779,298 square yards is bituminous macadam. 



} they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory i 



:cd from Brookline included in City Proper. 



r 50.590 square yards is Tar Concrete; and 05.31 miles 
thic; and 2.28 miles or 37.317 square yards is Topeka; 
and O.Ofi miles' or 920 square yards is Filbertine; and 0.03 miles or 595 square yards is 
Carey Elastite Asplialt Plank; and O.OG miles or 518 square yards^i 
Asphalt Plank; and 0.04 miles or 572 square yards is i" 



square yards is Asphalt Block. 
r 36,904 square yards public alleys included in this table; 1.89 miles or 60,847 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 15.89 i 
public streets in charge of Commonwealth of Massachusetts included in this table. In addition to this table there are 2.41 i 



. SQII, 






Public Works 'Department. 



45 



Macadam roadway patched . 
Macadam roadway resurfaced 
Asphalt or bituminous concrete roadway 

patched 

Asphalt or bituminous concrete roadway 

resurfaced 

Street cleaning 

Snow removal 



128,119 square yards 
6,190 square yards 

98,475 square yards 

6,453 square yards 
2,991 cubic yards 
69,585 cubic yards 



Paving Service — 1956 



Street cleaning . . . . 
General highway expenditures 
Sidewalk and curbing 
Snow and ice removal 
Street signs . . . . 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 
Lighting Service 
Financial Statement 

Total credits for 1956 

Total expenditures for 1956 



Surplus 



Individual Expenditures 
Street and Park Lighting (Electric) : 

Boston Edison Company $1,280,064 19 

Boston Gas Company (Charles- 
town District) \ . . 54,883 93 

Boston Edison Company (foot- 
ways) 2,435 19 

Boston Gas Company (foot- 
ways) 299 53 

Boston Edison Company (sub- 
stations) 15,043 07 

Boston Gas Company (sub- 
station) 4,985 35 



Street Lighting (Gas) : 
Boston Gas Company 
American Service Company 

Pohce Spotlights: 

Boston Edison Company 
Boston Gas Company 



$40,166 41 
66,336 51 


$1,908 58 
29 72 



$25,164 83 
608,728 35 
231,350 11 
100,263 21 
24,249 70 



'50 20 



$1,520,081 97 
1,520,010 87 

$71 10 



$1,357,711 26 



106,502 92 



1,938 30 



46 



City Document No. 18. 



Construction: 

Installation, removal, relocation 
and modernization: 
Boston Edison Company 
Boston Gas Company . 
Joseph Amara 
Old Colony Construction 

Company 

J. Scimone .... 

Salaries: 
Administrative and engineering 
personnel .... 

Office supplies .... 

Electrical maintenance and re- 
placement parts 

Advertising 

Travel and carfare 

Spotlight poles .... 



$6,356 98 
2,823 98 
3,003 61 




240 00 




10,000 00 






$22,424 57 




$21,626 30 
440 65 


21,626 30 
440 65 


5,957 17 

25 00 

4 70 

3,380 00 


5,957 17 

25 00 

4 70 

3,380 00 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Lighting Service 
The following is an account of orders issued by the 
Lighting Service of the Highway Division of the Public 
Works Department during the year 1956. 

Mercury Vapor Lighting Projects 
In 1956 orders were issued on the following listed 
streets, main thoroughfares and business areas for re- 
lighting with new modern mercury vapor lighting: 



Atlantic Avenue, Boston 
Bigelow Street, Brighton 
Blue Hill Avenue, Dorchester 
Blue Hill Avenue, Dorchester 
Brookline Avenue, Roxbury 
Boston Street, South Boston 
Cummins Highway, West Roxbury 
Cummins Highway, West Roxbury 
Centre Street, West Roxbury 
Centre Street, West Roxbury 
Centre Street, West Roxbury 
Commonwealth Avenue, Roxbury 



Units 


Lumena 




Each 


17 single 


15,000 


1 single 


15,000 


102 twin 


15,000 


3 single 


15,000 


17 single 


15,000 


1 single 


15,000 


33 twin 


15,000 


2 single 


15,000 


31 single 


20,000 


1 twin 


10,000 


1 single 


15,000 


6 single 


15,000 



Public Works Department. 



47 



Commonwealth Avenue, Roxbuiy 

Charles Street, Boston . 

Dewey Square, Boston 

Dewey Square, Boston 

Dorchester Avenue, Dorchester . 

East Broadway, South Boston . 

The Fenway, Boston . 

Forest Hills Street, West Roxbury 

Fairmount Avenue, Hyde Park . 

Franklin Street, Boston 

Granite Avenue, Dorchester 

Huntington Avenue, Boston 

Huntington Avenue, Boston 

Humboldt Avenue, Roxbury 

Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park . 

Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park . 

Massachusetts Avenue, Roxbury 

Massachusetts Avenue, Roxburj- 

Park Drive, Boston 

Purchase Street, Boston 

Purchase Street, Boston 

Roxbury Street, Roslindale 

River Street, Dorchester 

River Street, Hyde Park 

Spring Street, West Roxbury 

South Huntington Avenue, Roxbury 

Talbot Avenue, Dorchester 

Tremont Street, Boston 

Tremont Street, Roxbury . 

Tremont Street, Roxbury . 

Washington Street, Dorchester . 

Walk Hill Street, Hyde Park . 

Washington Street, Roxburv and Jamaica 

Plain . . . . \ . 
Washington Street, Dorchester . 



Units 

3 twin 
1 twin 
1 twin 

1 single 
29 single 

4 single 

14 single 
1 single 

10 single 
1 single 
12 single 
22 twin 

3 single 
8 single 

4 single 
7 single 
1 single 
1 single 

12 single 

7 single 

1 twin 

2 single 

5 single 

8 single 

10 single 

1 single 

2 single 

11 single 
2 single 
2 single 

15 single 
1 single 



67 
2 single 



Lumens 
Each 

15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
20,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
20,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
20,000 
15,000 
20,000 
15,000 
15,000 

15,000 
15,000 



Incandescent Lighting Projects 

In 1956 orders were issued for the installation of new 
and the replacement of old lighting units. 



Almont Street, Dorchester . 
Bicknell Street, Dorchester . 
Colchester Street, Hyde Park 
Centre Street, West Roxbury 
Draper Street, Dorchester . 
Dakota Street, Dorchester . 



Units 


Lumens 




Each 


14 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


7 single 


2,500 


. 24 single 


2,500 


13 single 


2,500 


. 13 single 


2,500 



48 



City Document No. 18. 



Dana Avenue, Hyde Park . 
Forbes Street, West Roxbury 
Gleason Street, Dorchester . 
Homes Avenue, Dorchester 
Leon Street, Roxbury . 
Leighton Road, Hyde Park 
Moss Hill Road, West Roxbury 
Norton Street, Dorchester . 
Sunnyside Street, West Roxbury 
Shepton Street, Dorchester 
Samoset Street, Dorchester 
South Street, West Roxbury 
Woodlawn Street, West Roxbury 
Wachusetts Street, West Roxbun 
Fulton Street, Boston . 
Green Street, West Roxbury 
Princeton Street, East Boston 
Saratoga Street, East Boston 
Symphony Road, Roxbury . 
Terminal Street, Charlestown 
West Street, Hyde Park 
Charles Park Road, West Roxbury 
Fitzgerald Expressway, Boston 
Freeport Street, Dorchester 
Rutland Street, Boston 
West Dedham Street, Boston 
Worcester Square, Boston . 
Centre Street, West Roxbury 
Farragut Road, South Boston 
Oakland Street, Brighton 
Preble Street, South Boston 
South Street, West Roxbury 
Terminal Street, Charlestown 



Units 


Lumens 




Each 


14 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


5 single 


2,500 


7 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


7 single 


2,500 


10 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


7 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


16 single 


2,500 


7 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


6 single 


4,000 


16 single 


4,000 


5 single 


4,000 


6 single 


4,000 


6 single 


4,000 


22 single 


4,000 


17 single 


4,000 


6 single 


6,000 


21 single 


6,000 


13 single 


6,000 


7 single 


6,000 


6 single 


6,000 


7 single 


6,000 


2 single 


10,000 


2 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 



Incandescent Lamps 

Incandescent lamps of 6,000 lumens were installed 

on the following streets: 

Cabot street, Roxbury (1); Cunard street, Roxbury (3); 
Cortes street, Boston (3); Dana avenue, Hyde Park (1); 
Durham street, Boston (1); East Brookline street, Boston 
(4); Follen street, Boston (1); Harvard avenue, Hyde Park 
(2); Hampden street, Roxbury (1); Museum road, Roxbury 
(3); South street, West Roxbury (2); Sumner street, East 
Boston (1); West Springfield street, Roxbury (4); Walter 
street, West Roxbury (1); West Dedham street, Boston (6); 
West street, Hyde Park (1); West Canton street, Boston 
(2); Warren avenue, Boston (1). 



Public Works Department. 49 

Incandescent lamps of 4,000 lumens were installed 
on the following streets: 

Bayswater street, East Boston (1); Boylston street, 
West Roxbiiry (1); Central avenue, Hyde Park (1); Crescent 
avenue, Dorchester (4); Centre street, Dorchester (1); 
Coleridge street, East Boston (2); Dana avenue, Hyde 
Park (4) ; Fors34h street, Roxbury (3) ; Field street, Roxbury 
(1); Havre street. East Boston (2); Hilltop street, Dor- 
chester (3); Highland street, Roxbury (2); K street. South 
Boston (1); Lubec street, East Boston (3); Public Alley 
No. 819, Roxbury (1); River street, Hyde Park (1); Safford 
street, Hyde Park (2) ; St. Stephen street, Roxbury (4) ; South 
street. West Roxbury (4) ; Terrace street, Roxbury (2) ; 
Thatcher street, Hyde Park (1); Wordsworth street. East 
Boston (2); Wachusetts street. West Roxbury (3); West 
Milton street, Hyde Park (2); Walnut street, Hyde Park 
(1); Winthrop street, Hyde Park (3). 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service for the 
installation of lighting units of 2,500 lumens as follows: 
AUston street, Brighton (1); Albemarle street, Boston 
(2); Atherton street, West Roxbury (1); Appleton street, 
West Roxbury (1); Alleghany street, Roxbury (1); Alabama 
street, Dorchester (1); Austin street, Hyde Park (3); Baker 
street. West Roxbury (1); Brownson terrace, West Roxbury 
(1); Beethoven street. West Roxbury (4); Buckingham 
street, Hyde Park (2); Bremen street, East Boston (2); 
Boulevard terrace, Brighton (3); Bartlett square. West 
Roxbury (2); Buttonwood street, Dorchester (2); Bussey 
street, West Roxbury (2); Bradlee street, Hyde Park (1); 
Burnett street, Roxbury (2); Chapel road, Hyde Park (1); 
Canterbury street. West Roxbury (3) ; Corman road, Dor- 
chester (2); Caryll street, Dorchester (3); Cowper street. 
East Boston (3); Colchester street, Hyde Park (1); Central 
avenue, Hyde Park (2); Chilcott place, West Roxbury d); 
Cumberland street, Boston (2) ; Dumas street, Dorchester (] ) ; 
Dyer court, Dorchester (1); Donna terrace, Hyde Park 
(1); Dodge road, Hyde Park (2); Dix street, Dorchester (2); 
David road. West Roxbury (2); Durham street, Boston (1); 
Evans street, Dorchester (2); Ellis street, Hyde Park (2); 
Eastmont road, Hyde Park (2); Emeha terrace. West 
Roxbury (1); Ehvell road, West Roxbury (1); Field street, 
Roxbury (3); Florence street, West Roxbury (3); FoUen 
street, Boston (1); Forsyth street, Roxbury (2); Grampian 
Way, Dorchester (3); Gayhead street, Roxbury (1); Grant 
place, Brighton (1); Granada park. West Roxbury (3); 
Greenfield road, Dorchester (3) ; Garth road. West Roxbury 
(1); Groom street, Dorchester (1); Greenock street, Dor- 
chester (4); Grafton street, Dorchester (1); Greenchff road, 
Hyde Park (1); Hamilton street, Hyde Park (2); Homes 



50 City Document No. 18. 

avenue, Dorchester (5); Hackensack road, West Roxbury 
(3); Hester street, Brighton (1); Hillis street, Hyde Park 
(4); Harvard avenue, Dorchester (4); Harbell terrace, 
Dorchester (1); Hebron street, Dorchester (1); Hackensack 
court, West Roxbury (1); Harvard avenue, Hyde Park 
(2); Havre street. East Boston (2). 

Joan road, Hyde Park (4) ; Kittredge street. West Roxbury 
(3); Kennebec street, Dorchester (1); Lenoxdale avenue, 
Dorchester (1); Loring street. South Boston (1); Lorna 
road, Dorchester (3); Leon street, Roxbury (7); Leighton 
road, Hyde Park (6); Millstone road, Hyde Park (3); Murray 
Hill avenue. West Roxbury (2); Mascot street, Dorchester 
(3); Mt. Hope street. West Roxbury (3); Messinger street, 
Dorchester (3); Maplewood street. West Roxbury (2); 
Maple street, Hj'de Park (2) ; Mj'rtlebank avenue, Dorchester 
(1); Martin street, West Roxbury (1); Manion road, Hyde 
Park (2); Milton avenue, Dorchester (3); Mercer street, 
South Boston (1); Madeline street, Brighton (2); Marion 
street. East Boston (3); Xavillus terrace, Dorchester (1); 
North End park, Boston (2); Opera place, Boston (2); 
Providence street, Boston (4J; Perry court, Hyde Park (1); 
Powell street, West Roxbury (1); Princeton street. East 
Boston (2) ; Regis road, Dorchester (2) ; Round Hill street, 
Roxbury (2); Ridgewaj- Lane, Boston (4); Ronan street, 
Dorchester (1); Strathcona road, Dorchester (3); Spinney 
street. West Roxbury (1); St. Joseph street. West Roxbury 
(3); Safford street, Hyde Park (2); Sherrin street, Hyde 
Park (1); Saratoga street. East Boston (1); Teragram street, 
East Boston (1); The Fenway, Boston (3); Tavern road, 
Roxbury (4); Unity street, Boston (2); Violet street, Dor- 
chester (2); Vassar street, Dorchester (4); Woodcliff street, 
Roxbury (1); Woodlawn street. West Roxbury (7); Wade 
street, Brighton (1); Webster street, Hyde Park (4); West- 
erly street. West Roxbury (3); Wordsworth street, East 
Boston (1); Woodhaven street, Dorchester (1); Walnut 
park, Roxbury (4); Whitney street, Roxbury (1); Zeller 
street. West Roxbury (4). 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service during 

the year 1956 for the installation of 1,000 lumen lighting 

units as follows : 

Alleghany street, Roxbury- (8); Adams street, Dorchester 
(1); Banks street, West Roxbury (1); Constitution road 
Dorchester (1); Hampstead Lane, West Roxburj^ (1) 
Jarvis place, Roxbury (1); Keenan road, Brighton (2) 
Kristin court, Hyde Park (1); Lawley street, Dorchester (1) 
Lanark road, Brighton (1); Mt. Bowdoin terrace, Dorchester 
(1); Mj^opia street, Hj^de Park (1); Norris road, Hyde 
Park (1); Presby place, Roxbury (1); Rita road, Dorchester 
(1); Rosewood street, Dorchester (1); Ryan road, Brighton 
(1); Taft court. West Roxbury (1); Unity court, Boston (1). 



Public Works Department. 51 

Gas Lamp Replacement Program 
During the year of 1956 approximately 694 obsolete 
gas lamps were replaced with approximately 750 new 
modern luminaires with 2,500 lumen lamps. These new 
lamps, in most instances, are installed on long arms to 
diminish interference with trees and to eliminate glare 
from homes on residential streets. 

Maintenance of Police Spotlights 
Effective January 1, 1956 the Lighting Service 
assumed the responsibility' for the maintenance of the 
Police Spotlights in the City of Boston. 



52 City Document No. 18. 

APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1957. 

Mr. George G. Hyland, 

Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Herewith, I submit a statement of activities and ex- 
penditures of the Sanitary Division of the Pubhc Works 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1956. 

The personnel of this division was deeply saddened by 
the untimely death of our beloved head, Division Engi- 
neer Adolph J. Post, on February 12th. The duties of 
his office were taken over by the General Superintendent, 
Timothy J. O'Leary, and the program for the year was 
carried out under his direction. 

Following is a condensed statement of conditions en- 
countered and activities accomplished during the year 
of 1956: 

Blizzards. — There were four totally unexpected and 
severe blizzards occurring on March 16, 19 and 24, and 
on April 8, which deposited an official snowfall of nearly 
29 inches intown, and totaled much more in the out- 
lying districts of the City. These storms interrupted 
the start of the spring-cleaning program, as it was 
necessary to gear the facilities of the Sanitary Division 
quickly to emergency conditions. Employees were re- 
quired to work extremely long hours for about three 
weeks on plowing, sanding and removing snow and ice; 
and after these storms there was a heavier than usual 
burden of street-cleaning work to be done, which also 
required employees to work long hours. 

Incinerator. — After many conferences with Mr. Cun- 
niff and Mr. Murphy of the Finance Commission, and 



Public Works Department. 53 

also with the engineering firm of Metcalf & Eddy (the 
Boston consultants who were engaged in 1951 to pre- 
pare plans and specifications for an incinerator) you, 
as Commissioner of Public Works, submitted a com- 
plete report to his Honor, Mayor John B. Hynes, 
and his Honor approved the awarding of a contract, 
on April 30, 1956, totahng $963,867, to George Allen & 
Sons, Inc., of New York City, for installing four-burner 
incinerator facilities in the new plant to be erected in 
the South Bay area of the City. 

On July 10, a contract for wash borings was awarded 
the Raymond Pile Company in the amount of $2,900. 

On Juh" 25, a contract was re-negotiated with Metcalf 
& Eddy for plans, engineering and supervision of the 
construction of the incinerator. A ceiling of $258,000 
was placed on this contract. 

On November 7, the Pile Driving contract was 
awarded to the J. F. White Contracting Company in the 
amount of $453,340. 

The long-awaited future look of the Sanitary Division 
began with the driving of test piles for the new in- 
cinerator on December 5, by the J. F. White Contracting 
Company, under the direction of Metcalf & Eddy, 
consulting engineers. Three piles were driven to a 
depth of 163 feet, and were tested with a load of 140 
tons, meeting the Boston Building Code requirements 
for bearing. 

Much planning, strife and education for incineration 
have taken place over the past several years, but the 
first concrete step in the construction is now under 
way, and a major savings in the actual cost of disposal 
can be expected when this incinerator is put into opera- 
tion in the not-too-distant future. It is anticipated 
that it will be completed about April, 1958. 

Other Activities. — In October of this year, the Old 
Carpenter Shop, in the Albany Street Yard, was de- 
molished, allowing greater space for storing of salt and 
sand and equipment, which was badly needed. 



54 City Document No. 18. 

The Sale of Garbage contract with Kristoff Brothers 
was renewed, so that the City received $384.61 a month 
for this garbage during the entire year. 

In accordance with an Amendment to the Step 
Compensation Plan on Longevity Increment, the ten- 
and twentj^-year step-rate service requirement was 
reduced to seven and eleven years, so that 308 Sanitary 
Division employees were given step-rate increases 
effective Juh^ 4, 1956, in addition to the regular monthly 
increments allowed during the year. 

Equipment. — The Sanitary Division acquired the 
following-listed new equipment during the year, which 
was purchased by the Automotive Division: 

Type Total Cost 

13 Sedans $20,227 

18 2|-ton (3 yard) Dump Trucks 45,992 

9 3-ton (12 yard) Ash Body Trucks 40,196 

8 §-ton Pick-Up Trucks 10,926 

6 Dempster-Dumpster Rubbish Containers 3,678 



$121,019 



Expenditures 

Payments to Refuse Collection Contractors 

amounted to $2,103,346 .46 

Payments to Refuse Disposal Contractors 

amounted to 471,173 .99 



$2,574,520.45 



Payroll totals were as follows: 
Administrative and General 

Services $44,331 .90 

Shops and Storehouse 194,894.95 

Collection and Disposal 290,344 . 50 

Total Sanitary $529,571 .35 

Street Cleaning 1,582,317 .23 



Total Sanitary and Street Cleaning $2, 1 1 1,888 . 58 



Public Works Department. 55 

Overtime Payrolls were as follows: Total Cost 

Shops and Storehouse $4,297 .72 

Collection and Disposal 5,748.60 

Street Cleaning 40,185 .26 

Total Overtime 50,231 .58 

Total Payroll $2,162,120.16 

Payments on Other Contracts $48,884.91 

Supplies and Materials 50,577 . 87 

Miscellaneous 6,933 . 56 

Grand Total $4,843,036.95 

The total expenditures for the Sanitary Division of the 
Public Works Department for the year 1956 amounted 
to $4,843,036.95, making a per capita cost of $6,046 
for an estimated population of 801,000. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Timothy J. O'Leary, 
Division Engineer (Temporary), 

Sanitary Division. 



56 City Document No. 18. 

SANITARY DIVISION — 1956 
Payments to Refuse Collection Contractors 


' 


District 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
Payments 






$10,400 

7,328 

3,953 

13,400 

10,350 

9,615 

25,900 

29,100 

5,310 

6,729 

8,140 

9,980 

7.170 

3,690 

3,560 

14,300 

5,000 

6,390 


$124,774 65 
86,713 60 
48,184 16 
160,800 00 
125,061 13 
115,380 00 














5A West Roxbury . . . 








6A Dorchester — North 




310,800 00 


6B Dorchester — South 




349,200 00 


7A Elm Hill 


William J. Banfield 


63,720 00 


7B Dudley . . 




80,748 00 


7C Mission Hill 




97,680 00 






119,760 00 


9 South End 




86,040 00 


9A Back Bay. . . 




44,280 00 


9B Stuart 




42,720 00 


10 North and West Ends... 

1 1 Hyde Park 


Ward General Contracting Company. . . . 


174,974 92 




(First 3 months) 


72,510 00 




(Last 9 montlis) 




Total 






$2,103,346 46 











Payments to Refuse Disposal Contractors 



Description 



Contractor 



Monthly 
Price 



Total 
Payments 



Saugus Contract Dewey Daggett 



Disposal Contract . 



Rental 

Bulldozer Hire 

Gravel Supplied and Graded . 

Total 



M. DeMatteo Construction Company.. 



$900 00 

34.760 00 
Plus Ex- 
tra Labor 
39,090 00 



Boston Consolidated Gas Company . . . 

Dooley Brothers, Inc 

M. DeMatteo Construction Company. 



$10,800 00 

457,073 89 

2.400 GO 

220 60 

679 50 

$471,173 99 



Public Works Department. 57 

Personnel Changes in Permanent Force during the 

Year 1956. 

Total PersonnelJanuaiy 1, 1956 *632 

Transfers In (from other Departments and Divi- 
sions) 

Reinstatements 

Appointments 



Deaths 

Resignations 

Retirements 

Transfers Out (to other Departments and Divisions) 
Discharged or Terminated 

Total Personnel January 1, 1957 . . . . 

* Including 1 Military Leave of Absence, 
t Total net loss of 16 employees. 



13 




2 




18 


33 




665 


/ 




11 




20 




7 




4 


49 


, 


t616 



58 City Document No. 18. 

APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1957. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and 
expenditures of the Sewer Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1956. 

Expenditures During 1956 — The activities of the 
Sewer Division during the year consisted of advertising 
for sewer construction at a contract bid price of $446,- 
930.45, and the maintenance and operation of the 
sewer system at a cost of $908,067.79. 

Contract Work — Contract work consisted of the 
extension of the sewer system to provide drainage for 
new buildings and street construction and to ehminate 
cesspools, the locations and cost of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work — Maintenance work consisted 
of the cleaning of 8,004 catch basins by contract and 
3,609 by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers 
and catch basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, 
and catch basins by the yard forces and the operation 
of the pumping station and disposal works, the cost 
of which is attached. 

Covering In Open Brooks — On August 31, 1955, a 
contract w^as awarded in the amount of $439,077 to 
Pacella Bros., Inc., to enclose the main line of Stony 
Brook from AVillow Avenue to Bald Knob Road in a 
72" diameter reinforced concrete pipe conduit. This 
work is progressing satisfactorily and will be completed 
about June 1957. 

On October 17, 1956, a contract was awarded in the 
amount of $189,160 to Civitarese-Piatelli Corp. to 



Public Works Department. 59 

enclose the Canterbury Branch of Stony Brook for a 
distance of about 1280 Unear feet from the main hne of 
Stony Brook to beyond Canterbury Street in a 108" 
diameter reinforced concrete pipe conduit, which work 
is now in progress and is expected to be completed 
about June, 1957. 

This work will prevent widespread street flooding 
that occurred in this area during the torrential rains 
accompanying the hurricanes of 1954 and 1955. 

Proposed Construction Work — The work of extending 
the sewer system to provide drainage for new street 
construction, new building construction and the elimina- 
tion of cesspools w^ill continue for many years in the 
future, and probably at the same rate as in the past. 
In addition, a long-range sewerage works program 
provides for the extension of main line surface drain 
conduits and the rebuilding of several miles of very old 
sewers that have settled or outlived their economic 
usefulness. Details of the long-range program are 
contained in a report on file in the Sewer Division. 

Special Problems — In connection with the con- 
struction of the tunnel section of the Fitzgerald Highway 
it was necessar}' as part of the project to relocate about 
350 linear feet of the East Side Interceptor in Atlantic 
avenue between Oliver and Congress streets. The 
State Highway Department received permission from 
the State Health Department to discharge the flow of 
the interceptor upstream from Oliver street into the 
harbor while it was being relocated. The construction 
method consisted of bulkheading the interceptor at 
both ends of the section to be relocated. 

The interceptor is a 2-foot 8-inch by 4-foot 6-inch 
brick sewer, the lower half being a wood cradle, lined 
with one course of brick, the upper half having two 
courses of brick. When the section to be relocated was 
exposed, the brick work of the top half for the most 
part was found badly cracked and the cement joints 
disintegrated; the w^ood in the lower half was found for 



60 City Document No. 18. 

the most part in good condition. The invert elevation 
of the interceptor at this location is about Elevation — 
1.5. 

After the interceptor was bulkheaded and exposed, 
considerable water entered the sewer trench with the 
incoming tide. It was determined that this was tide 
water leaking through the ground that reached and 
flooded the interceptor. As far as could be determined, 
the quantity of water entering the sewer trench was 
handled by a 3-inch pump. While it has been known 
for a long period of years that the depth of flow in the 
interceptor fluctuates with the tide, a condition for 
which no solution has been found, it was never definitely 
known that the physical condition of the interceptor 
was involved, although the extent to which it is a factor 
is still unknown. 

Probably the most important information resulting 
from exposing the interceptor is that its physical condi- 
tion indicates the probability of the need for rebuilding 
as a future project. This probably could be accom- 
plished successfully by the use of Gunite. It also points 
out the need of rebuilding tide gates and overflows in 
order to reduce the quantity of tide water entering the 
interceptor. This is one of the M. D, C. projects pro- 
vided for in Chapter 645 of 1951. 

The Sewer Division Labor Force consists of the following 
— 24 laborers, 1 carpenter, 30 motor equipment oper- 
ators and laborers, 8 catch basin machine operators, 
3 tide gate repairmen and 1 working foreman tide gate 
repairman, 6 working foremen sewer cleaners, 16 sewer 
cleaners, 5 bricklayers, 2 yardmen, 1 heavy motor 
equipment operator, 5 sewer district foremen, and 1 
main drainage foreman. This makes a total of 103 men 
assigned to answering complaints, cleaning catch basins, 
cleaning sewers, repairs to manholes and catch basins, 
repairing broken sewers, and other related work. 

Length of Sewers Built — ■ During the fiscal year 1956 
there were built by Contractors and Day Labor 5.5012 
miles of common sewers and surface drains throughout 
the city. After deducting 0.5012 miles of sewers and 



Public Works Department. 61 

surface drains, rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase for 
1956 is 5.00 miles, which added to the existing 1,286.30 
miles of common sewers and surface drains and 30.93 
miles of intercepting sewers, makes a grand total of 
1,322.23 miles of all sewers belonging to the City of 
Boston, and under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1957. 

There were 167 catch basins built or rebuilt and none 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 167 catch basins and a grand total of 24,522 
catch basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1957. 

Permit Office Report — Entrance fees to the amount of 
$13,298.63 have been deposited with the Citj^ Collector 
for collection from estates upon which no sewer assess- 
ments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordinances 
of 1945, Chapter 27, Section 10. 

One thousand, one hundred and sixty-four permits 
have been issued, viz. : 186 to District Foremen and 
Contractors and 878 to drainlayers for repairing or 
laying new house drains. Inspectors from this office 
have personallj^ inspected the work done under these 
drainlayers' permits. 

Two thousand, one hundred and sixteen complaints 
have been investigated and inspectors are instructed 
to report in writing in each case. 

Two thousand, four hundred and sixty catch basin 
complaints were received. 

Reported in writing on 3,101 municipal liens to the 
City Collector, in accordance with Chapter 60, Section 
25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
2,400 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the Ordinances of 1925, Chapter 27, Section 8, 
apprising them of the construction of new sewers or 
repairs to old sewers. 

Respectfully, 

Robert P. Shea, 
Division Engineer, Sewer Division. 



62 City Document No. IS. 

Calf Pasture Pumping Station, 1956 

Total number of gallons of sewage pumped . . . 42,258,526,000 

Average number of gallons of sewage pumped dailj' . . 115,776,000 

Cost per million gallons pumped $4 75 

Costs 

Labor $105,652 94 

Edison Power 85,442 22 

Fuel Oil 4,519 92 

Liquid Petroleum Gas 115 20 

Supplies 2,023 47 

Repairs 2,912 56 

Total $200,666 31 

SEWER SERVICE 
Maintenance Expenditures, 1956 

1. Personal Services 

10. Permanent emploj-ees ....". $553,632 43 

11. Temporar}' emploj-ees 1,724 90 

12. Overtime 13,240 56 

$568,597 89 

2. Contractual Services 

21. Communications $3,194 55 

22. Light, heat and power 92,002 95 

26. Repairs and maintenance of buildings and 

structures 58,064 31 

27. Repairs and servicing of equipment . . 6,416 40 

28. Transportation of persons .... 1,020 55 

29. Other contractual services .... 1,151 38 

— 161,850 14 

3. Supplies and Materials 

32. Food supplies . . . . . . $12 15 

33. Heating supplies and materials . . . 6,698 57 

34. Household supphes and materials . . 393 60 

35. Medical, dental and hospital supplies and 

materials 18 08 

36. Office supplies and materials . . . 2,307 57 
39. Other supplies and materials . . . 9,103 62 

18,533 59 

4. Current Charges and Obligations 
49. Other current charges and obligations . $896 35 896 35 

5. Equipment 
59. Other equipment $489 52 489 52 

7. Structures and Improvements 
71. Other structures and improvements . . $154,700 30 154,700 30 

Grand Totals $908,067 79 



Public Works Department. 



63 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
December 31, 1956. 



Districts. 



Built by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 



Built by 
Private 

Parties. 



Total Lengtlis Built. 





Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 


Miles. 




1,90(1 00 




1,906.00 


0.3609 


Roxbury 


125 00 




125.00 


0.0237 


733.20 
278.00 




733.20 

278.00 

2,4.54.90 

1,984.00 


0.1388 






0.0527 




2,454.90 


0.4649 


Brighton 

West Roxbury 


1,984.00 


0.3758 


5,034.00 


417.00 


5,451.00 


1.0324 


Dorchester 


3,C51.51 


40.60 


3,692.11 


0.6992 


Hyde Park 


11,848.17 


574.89 


12,423.06 


2.3528 






Totals 


25,559.88 


3,487.39 


29,047.27 


5.5012 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January 1, 1957. 



1953 



1953 



1954 



1955 



1956 





Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . , 


18,781.42 


27,469.81 


33,316.89 


33,237.48 


25,-559.88 


Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 
ments 


16,484.50 


11,482.00 


10,459.00 


1,695.15 


3,487.39 


Totals 


35,265.92 


38,951.81 


43,775.89 


34,932.63 


29,047.27 







64 



City Document No 18. 



Total Length of Sewers. 



D16TRICT8. 



Total 

Lengths 

Built 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1956. 



Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1956. 



Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1956. 



City Proper . . . 

Roxbury 

South Boston . . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown . . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury. 
Dorchester. . . . 
Hyde Park 



Totals . 



Linear Feet. 

1,906.00 

125.00 

733.20 

278.00 

2,454.90 

1,984.00 

5,451 . 00 

3,692.11 

12,423.06 



29,047.26 



Linear Feet. 
1,906.00 



?33 . 20 



8.00 



2,647.20 



Linear Feet. 



125.00 



278.00 
2,454.90 
1,984.00 
5,451.00 
3,684.11 
12,423.06 



26,400.07 



Miles. 



0.0237 



0.0527 
0.4649 
0.3758 
1 . 0324 
0.6977 
2.3528 



.0000 



Miles. 
Common sewers and surface drains built previous 

to January 1, 1956 . . . . . . 1,286.30 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 

January 1 and December 31, 1956 . . . 5.00 

Common sewers and surface drains built ending 

December 31, 1956 . . ... 1,291.30 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting with 

Metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1956 . 6.81* 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers 

to December 31, 1956 24.12* 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to 

December 31, 1956 • . •. • • • • 1,322.23 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 

to January 1, 1957 713.64 



* No additional lengths built during 19.56. 



Public Works Department. 
Catch Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 



65 



DiSTHICTB. 



Catch Basins for Twelve Months 
Ending December 31, 1956. 



Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 



Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 



Net 
Increase. 



Total for Whole City 

IN Charge of Sewer 

Division. 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1956. 



Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1957. 



/ Proper . . 
bury. ... 
th Boston . 
■t Boston . . 
-rlestown . . 

;hton 

!t Roxbury 
Chester. . . 
le Park . . . 

Totals. .. 



1 





1 





2 





2 





24 





11 





55 





22 





49 






1 
1 

2 
2 
24 
11 
55 
22 
49 



3,799 
3,480 
1,475 
1.221 
846 
2,095 
4,463 
5,677 
1,299 



3,800 
3,481 
1,477 
1,223 
870 
2,106 
4,518 
5,699 
1,348 



167 



167 



24,355 



24,522 






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72 City Document No. IS. 

APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE SURVEY DIVISION FOR 
THE YEAR 1956. 



Boston, January 2, 1957. 

To the Commissioner of Piihlic Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the Survey Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1956. 

This Division performs engineering services for other 
divisions of the Public Works Department and other 
city departments, boards and commissions. It also 
performs administrative and engineering duties required 
by the Public Improvement Commission for its 
operation. 

The principal engineering duties include : 

(a) the making of plans, survej^s, estimates and reports 
relating to the laying out, widening, construction and design 
of public highways; 

(6) the taking of easements for sewerage works; 

(c) staking out lines and grades for the construction of 
highways, sewerage, etc.; 

(d) the making of property surveys of land to be acquired 
by the City of Boston by eminent domain; 

(e) the making of plans and surveys of city-owned land 
for purposes of sale, interdepartmental transfer or new 
development ; 

(/) the making of various engineering surveys and plans 
required by other city departments. 

For the Public Improvement Commission, the admin- 
istrative functions include the processing of petitions, 
arranging public hearings, preparing estimates and 
orders relating to land damages and street and sewer 
betterments, preparing orders for the laying out of 
streets and the construction of streets and sewers, 
preparing orders for eminent domain land takings, 



Public Works Department. 



73 



preparing orders for the granting of permits for use of 
public highways, erection of poles, etc., and the main- 
tenance of all records in the charge of the Public Im- 
provement Commission. 

Division Expenditures, January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1956 

Inclusive 





Survey- 
Budget 


Highway 
Loan 


Sewer 
Loan 




$106,981 38 

21,205 88 

1,931 21 

7,345 76 

12 00 

242 81 


$68,505 05 

10,094 27 

105 68 

*33,036 96 








Contractual Services 


$2 3''0 90 


Supplies and Materials 






* 4 200 00 










Totals 


$137,719 04 


$111,741 90 


$6 520 90 






*Land Da 
Total Expexditures .... 


mages 


. $2 


55,981 90 



During the period covered by this report, the Survey 
Division completed one hundred twenty-nine (129) 
surveys and plans for the improving of existing high- 
ways, laying out of new ones and discontinuances, 
totalling 12.03 miles. Twenty-eight (28) surveys and 
plans for 1.70 miles of sewerage easements were also 
made. Thirty (30) surveys and plans of city-owned 
land or land to be taken for municipal purposes were 
also made. 

Field engineering work included the staking out of 
forty-four (44) streets for the Paving Service of the 
Highway Division, forty-three (43) for the Sewer 
Division, and miscellaneous services for other city 
departments. Regular routine work included the re- 
surveying of street lines for private engineers wherever 
existing records were inadequate or obsolete, marking 
lines and grades for private construction abutting public 
streets, examining land court plans for the Law Depart- 
ment, preparing land damage reports for the PubUc 
Improvement Commission, drafting charts, graphs, etc., 



74 



City Document No. 18. 



for the Administrative Services Department, City 
Auditor and others. Listed below are the major engi- 
neering surveys and plans completed during the period 
of this report. 

For the Public Improvement Commission: 

Fifty-three (53) surveys and plans were made for the 
laying out of 4.55 miles of public highways, as follows: 

Length 
Boston Proper in Feet 

Castle street 700 

Troy street 300 

Brighton 

Margo road 865 

Rushmore street 430 

Dorchester 

Coffey street 1,035 

Daytona terrace 227 

Dudley terrace 133 

Favre Street Extension 280 

Hutchinson street 374 

Messinger street 700 

Royal road 315 

West Howell street 335 



East Boston 

Beachview road 
Vienna street . 



Hyde Park 

Ashville road . 
Derry road 
Dietz road 
Dodge road 
Eastmont road 
Farwell avenue 
Greenwood Circle 
Kardon road . 
Leighton road 
Meadowview road 
Melba Way . 
Millstone road 
Safford street 
Senders court 

Roxhury 

Joslin street . 



688 
320 



490 
500 

1,380 
300 
410 
450 
260 
270 

1,130 
890 
355 
240 

1,050 
440 



290 



Public Works Department. 



75 



South Boston 

Claflin street . 
Liberty place . 
Lovis street . 
Pickering place 



Length 
in Feet 
350 
125 
115 
125 



West Roxhury 

Ascent street . 
Ashland avenue 
Byrd avenue . 
Capital street 
Charles Park road 
Crockers Lane 
DeStefano road 
Furbush road 
Graham terrace 
Hackensack court 
Larch place 
Marlin road . 
Meyer street . 
Newfield street 
New Haven street 
Rosecliff terrace 
Selwyn street 
Sherbrook street 
Spinney street 
Welton road . 



320 
630 
500 
332 
1,150 
435 
480 
390 
200 
250 
200 
315 
220 
500 
870 
235 
200 
495 
316 
255 



Thirt3^-four (34) surveys and plans were made for the 
widening and relocation of 2.25 miles of public highways 
as follows : 



Asylum street, Boston Proper 

Austin street, Hyde Park .... 

Baker street, West Roxbury, at Newton line 

Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 

Centre street. West Roxbury 

Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton 

Como road, Hyde Park 

Cowper street. East Boston 

Cookson terrace, Dorchester 

D street. South Boston 

Fairway street, Dorchester . 

Forsyth street, Roxbury 

Gardner street. West Roxbury 

Guest street, Brighton . 

Harrison avenue, Boston Proper 



Length 

in Feet 

260 

78 

133 

280 

500 

108 

150 

300 

100 

20 

22 

800 

1,800 

57 

1,100 



76 



City Document No. 18. 



Hunter street, Charlestown 

Joiner street, Charlestown . 

Leon street, Roxbury . 

Montebello road, West Roxbury 

Monument street, Charlestown 

Morton street, Dorchester . 

Perkins street. West Roxbury 

Preble street. South Boston 

Poplar street. West Roxbury 

Ritchie street, Roxbury 

Ritchie street, Roxbury 

Rivermoor street, West Roxbury 

Ruggles street, Roxbury 

Saratoga street. East Boston 

Selkirk road, Brighton . 

Vine street, Charlestown 

Washington street, Boston Proper 

Washington street, Roxbury, at Arnold street 

Williams street. West Roxbury . 



Length 

in Feet 

181 

15 

20 

20 

100 

90 

750 

40 

200 

220 

160 

725 

500 

1,880 

352 

27 

820 

75 

16 



Twenty-one (21) surveys and plans were made for the 
discontinuance of 1.36 miles of public highways as 

follows : 

Length 
in Feet 
108 
770 
54 
320 
360 
125 
340 
490 
225 
153 
66 
430 
430 
30 
137 
Drive-in) 1,050 
495 
495 
115 
48 
950 



Beacon street (Building line), Boston Proper 

Chelsea street, Charlestown 

Crehore road. West Roxbury 

Davis street, Boston Proper 

Decatur street, Boston Proper 

Fairway street, Dorchester . 

Florence street, Boston Proper 

Genesee street, Boston Proper 

High street, Boston Proper 

Hillis road, Hyde Park 

Mt. Vernon street, Dorchester 

Oneida street, Boston Proper 

Oswego street, Boston Proper 

Providence street, Boston Proper 

Ramsdell street, Hyde Park 

Rivermoor street. West Roxbury (through 

Rochester street, Boston Proper 

Seneca street, Boston Proper 

Vienna street, East Boston . 

West Selden street, Dorchester 

Wexford street, Brighton 



Public Works Department. 77 

Seventeen (17) surveys and plans were made for the 
alteration (specific repair) of 3.51 miles of public high- 
ways as follows: 

Length 
in Feet 

Ash street, Boston Proper 440 

13,409 
100 
750 
460 
250 
20 



Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester and West Roxbury 
Boylston street, Boston Proper, at Charles street 
Centre street, Roxbury, at Columbus avenue . 
Columbus avenue, Roxbury, at Centre street . 

Francis street, Roxbury 

Franklin street, Boston Proper, at Hawley street 
Greenfield road, Dorchester, at Cummins Highway 20 
North Grove street, Boston Proper, at Fruit street 20 

Old Morton street, Dorchester 27 

Summer street. South Boston 2,360 

Troy street, Boston Proper 470 

Washington street, Boston Proper, at Hay ward place 10 
Washington street, Roxbury, at Eustis street . . 62 
Washington street, Roxburj^, at Warren street . 77 
Washington street, W>st Roxbury, at Forest Hills 

street 20 

Woodhaven street, Dorchester 27 



Four (4) surveys and plans were made for the revision 
of grade of .36 mile of public highways as follows: 

Brook Farm road. West Roxburj^ .... 1,030 

Brucewood street, West Roxbury .... 140 

Maryknoll street, Dorchester 400 

West Howell street, Dorchester 335 

Seven (7) surveys and plans were made for the taking 
by eminent domain of 110,545 square feet of land for 
municipal purposes, as follows: 

Location Area Department 

Tremont street, Boston Proper 10,715 Fire 

Neponset avenue, Dorchester 54,617 Fire 

GaUivan Boulevard, Dorchester 21,157 Fire 

Cummins Highway, Dorchester 20,716 Fire 

Hanson street, Boston Proper 3,130 Park 

Hawkins street, Boston Proper 79 AVelfare 

Sanderson place, Brighton 131 Public Works 

(Water) 



78 City Document No. 18. 

Twenty-eight (28) surveys and plans were made for 
the taking of 1.7 miles of easements for sewerage pur- 
poses as follows: 

Length 
Brighton in Feet 

Keenan road 300 

Ryan road 270 

Dorchester 

Caryll street 840 

Merola Park 300 

Messinger street 451 

Orlando street 108 

Savannah avenue 280 

Violet street 275 

East Boston 

Gladstone street 100 

Hyde Park 

Arborfield road 1,175 

Beech street 550 

Coleman street 225 

Greenbrook street 675 

Manion road 188 

Prospect park 325 

Ransom road 98 

Riley road 335 

Ruffing street 500 

West Roxbury 

Courtney road 425 

Furbush road 241 

Hackensack square 280 

Maplewood street 400 

Moreland street 650 

Partridge street 170 

Private land, Kershaw road 50 

Wilmont street 355 

Winchester terrace 235 

Rivermoor Street Outlet 130 

For the Public Works Department (Highway Divi- 
sion), forty-four (44) highways were staked out for 
construction. 

For the Public Works Department (Sewer Division), 
one hundred one (101) catch basins were staked out. 



Public Works Department. 79 

Also, forty-four (44) drainage surveys and reports were 
made. Lines we re given for six sewer easements. One plan 
was prepared for the abandonment of a sewer easement 
in private land adjacent to Wyvern street, WestRoxbury. 

For the Public Works Department (Sanitary Divi- 
sion) a survey and plan was made for an exchange of 
land at the West Roxbury disposal area on Gardner 
street. Also a topographic survey was made of the 
proposed incinerator site on Atkinson street, Roxbury, 
and a plan was made of an additional parcel of land 
at Atkinson street to be leased from the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. 

For the Law Department, four (4) surveys and plans 
for court purposes were made of Main street, Charles- 
town, Newbury street, Boston Proper, East Newton 
street, Boston Proper and Hammond street, Roxbury. 
Also approximately one hundred (100) plans filed with 
Land Court petitions were examined and checked for 
street line references. 

For the Real Property Board property plans were 
made for off-street parking sites as follows : 



Central street, Boston Proper 
Kingston street, Boston Proper 
High street, Boston Proper 
Blackstone street, Boston Proper 
Thomas street, West Roxbury 



Square 
Feet 

30,113 

27,426 

21,333 

8,363 

28,052 



Topographic and utility plans were also made for 
the foregoing sites. Other engineering work performed 
for the Real Property Board includes subdivision 
surveys and plans of city land on Tenean street, Dor- 
chester and River street, Hyde Park. Lines and grades 
were given for construction at St. James avenue, Boston 
Proper. River street, Dorchester, Belden street, Dor- 
chester and Hayward place, Boston Proper. Pre- 
liminary lines were given at High street, Boston proper. 
A survey for the site of the Brighton Court House 
was also made. 



80 City Docuivient No. 18. 

For the Library Department a survey was made for 
the erection of a fence at the rear of the Hazleton 
street, Dorchester Branch Library. 

For the Park Department a survey and plan of land 
on Nashua street, Boston Proper was made. Property 
hues were staked out at the Ripley Playground, Dor- 
chester and Smith Field, Brighton. 

For the Hospital Department a plot plan was made 
of the Boston City Hospital and an ambulance road 
staked out at Long Island Hospital. 

For the School Department a subdivision plan of the 
Boston Latin School on Avenue Louis Pasteur was made . 
Also a topographic plan of the Bigelow street addition 
in South Boston was drawn. Property lines were staked 
at the William Bacon School, Roxbury, Phineas Bates 
School, West Roxbury, Eldridge Smith School, Dor- 
chester, Greenwood School, Hyde Park and vacant 
land at Poplar and Dale streets, West Roxbury. 

For the Fire Department, topographic and utility 
plans were made for new Fire Station sites at Neponset 
avenue, Dorchester, Gallivan Boulevard, Dorchester, 
and Cummins Highway, West Roxbury. Also a plan 
was drawn showing a portion of Moon Island, Quincy, 
to be transferred to the Fire Department for a Training 
Centre. 

For the Building Department a survey was made of 
buildings at 41 Hanover street, Boston Proper. 

For the Planning Board a survey was made to 
determine Street Areas in the various Districts of the 
City. 

Stone Bounds. — In accordance with a policy established 
in 1950, stone bounds were set and drilled on the follow- 
ing newly constructed streets: 

Number of 
Street District Bounds 

Alvarado avenue Hyde Park 2 

Bantry Way South Boston 4 

Bowditch road West Roxbury 6 

Brucewood street West Roxbury 3 

Chesterfield street Hyde Park 3 

Colebrook street South Boston 2 

Danny road Hyde Park 3 

Hemman street West Roxbury 5 



Public Works Department. 81 

Number of 
Street District, Bounds 

Hillis road Hyde Park 6 

Itasca street Dorchester 1 

Laurie avenue West Roxbury 15 

Lochland road Hyde Park 2 

Manila avenue Hyde Park 3 

Oakmere street West Roxbury 10 

Pomona avenue West Roxbury 2 

Reynolds road Hyde Park 3 

Rocky Nook terrace West Roxbury 3 

Searle road West Roxbury 4 

Reproduction Work 

The Reproduction Unit of this division continued 
during the year in the making of photostats, blueprints, 
etc., for various City Departments. In April a new 
Pease Challenger White printing machine was installed 
to replace the obsolete Ozalid machine. With the new 
high speed white printer the demand for such prints 
greatly increased with a considerable drop in the making 
of blueprints. With this new machine we have also 
begun making reproductions of office papers, notes, etc. 
It is anticipated that such work will greatly increase as 
the various City Departments become aware of the 
variety of copy work that can be done. 

Effective December 1, 1956, a revised schedule of 
fees established by the City Council include a provision 
for charging one dollar per sheet for photostats, plans, 
etc. In arranging for the collection of this fee from the 
public, it was necessary to establish a system of written 
requisitions for reproduction work to be used by all 
City Departments. Approximately one hundred dollars 
was received during the month of November for this 
new service. While the revenue from these fees is not 
expected to be great, the charge will no doubt result 
in a sharp drop in the requests for copies of plans made 
when such copies were free. 

Early in 1956 this division set up a photographic 
service. A dark room has been built and equipped. 
During the year photographs were taken of all newly 
laid out streets showing conditions prior to construc- 
tion. It is expected that these photos will prove of real 



82 City Document No. 18. 

value in connection with the settlement of land damage 
cases. Of course photographic service is available to 
other Divisions and Departments. 

Reproduction work in 1956: 

Department. PHSTS BPS OZS APS 

Administrative Services 420 291 

Printing Section 

Purchasing Division 54 

Assessing 2,021 12 1,453 

Auditor 2,970 

Boston Gas Company 10 324 

Boston Edison Company 293 

Building 1,318 79 

City Clerk 590 

City Council 1,168 8 

Civil Defense 64 

Compensation Review Board 552 

District Attorney's Office 

Finance Commission 

Fire 574 36 

Health 314 

Registry Division 1,102 

Housing Authority 126 

Law.. 1,432 4 57 

Licensing 

Mayor's Office 1,272 222 

Park 72 7 

Penal Institutions 

Planning Board 1,652 578 8 

Public Works 

Central Office 986 584 

Bridge Division 482 72 977 

Highway Division 686 1,353 61 

Sanitary Division 14 8 

Sewer Division 2,350 165 537 

Survey Division 8,248 1,746 5,473 1 16 

Water Division 150 88 

Public Works (State) 320 83 

Real Property 1,336 700 

Building Division 

Registry (Court House) 52 

Rent Control Board 524 

Retirement 1,922 

School Buildings 28 4 

School Committee 

Traffic 150 625 

Treasurer's 224 

Collecting Division 506 17 

^''eteran8' Services 10 

Welfare 31 

White Fund 702 

Election Department 294 

Public Buildings 160 

Public Works (Highway Division). . . . 

Encroachment 216 68 

Lighting 174 272 22 

Total 35,235 2,009 14,168 207 



Public Works Department. 83 

Assessments. — During the period reported on, esti- 
mates of benefit for assessment purposes were prepared 
amounting to $356,363.85. These estimates are in- 
cluded in orders for street and sewer improvements. 
Also final assessments were prepared amounting to 
$212,599.98. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James W. Haley, 
Chief Engineer, Surveij Division. 



84 



City Document No. 18. 



APPENDIX G. 



REPORT OF DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
WATER DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1957. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the Water Division, operations and ex- 
penditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1956. 

During the year a total of 23,510.3 linear feet, or 
4.45 miles, of main pipe was laid or relaid, varying in 
size from 4 inches to 16 inches and 877 applications 
were received for installation of new service pipes, 
enlarged service pipes and fire pipes, etc., into new or 
remodeled buildings. 

There were 27 petitions received for the extension 
of water mains. The particular streets in which the 
above work was performed are shown on the ac- 
companying tables. 

The Districts in which the main pipe was laid and 
relaid are as follows: 

District 
City Proper 
East Boston 
South Boston 
Dorchester 
Hj'^de Park 
West Roxbiuy 
Brighton 
Charlestown 

Under the provisions of Chapter 4 of the Ordinances 
of 1952, which deals with capital improvements, the 
Water Division submitted a capital improvement pro- 
gram, which program was not followed to any great 



Laid 
inear Feet 


Relaid 
Linear Feet 








924.0 





366.0 





1,889.5 

11,105.4 

3,337.4 

1,238.0 




1,651.0 
1,944.5 




1,054.5 



Public Works Department. 85 

extent due to the fact that all available funds were 
needed to extend water mains to provide water into 
residential areas. 

Engineering Office 
The office force maintained its usual service to the 
public with information in relation to the Water Divi- 
sion, estimates on new service pipes, making out con- 
tracts, assisting the yard forces on Water Division 
matters, compiling official data, bringing the record 
plans to date, supervision of all construction and snow 
removal in areas number 4 and 10. 

The engineering office assisted in design and super- 
vision of construction of water mains for the following 
major construction projects ; their status being as follows : 
Central Artery. 

Fort Hill square to beyond Kneeland street — under 

construction. 
Kneeland street to Dover street — construction started. 

William T. Morrissey Boulevard, 
Tolnian street to Xeponset Circle — vuider construction. 

Soldiers Field Road. 

Boston University Bridge to beyond Harvard Stadium — 
completed. 

Southeast Expressway. 

Boston street to beyond Columbia Circle design com- 
pleted — construction to start in spring of 1957. 

Columbia road to William T. Morrissey Boulevard — 
construction started. 

WiUiam T. Morrissey Boulevard to Neponset Circle to 
Milton line near Adams street — now under contract 
and construction started. 

Projects under study or in progress are as follows : 

Reinforcing Faulkner Hospital Area in West Roxbury — 
construction started by M.D.C., 36 inches to new tank 
(elevation 392) with 12-inch connection to be installed at 
Weld street and West Roxbury Parkway. 

Studies being made to reinforce southern section of West 
Roxbury. 

Studies being made to bring H.H.S. to Stony Brook 
section of Hyde Park. 



86 City Document No. 18. 

Reinforcing Hyde Park beyond Cleary square (American 
Legion Highway M.D.C. connection to Cleary square) — 
completed to West street, final section to be completed in 
spring of 1957. 

Studies on New York streets area completed and buildings 
demolished and contract for reconstruction awarded, work 
to start in spring of 1957. 

Hydrants. 
There were 27 new hydrants established, 106 hydrants 
changed and 10 hydrants abandoned. 

Summation. 
System relaid 0.88 miles, extended 3.57 miles, 27 
hydrants estabhshed, and 10 hydrants abandoned, 0.10 
miles of water pipe abandoned; thus increasing the 
amount of water pipe in system by 3.47 miles and 17 
hydrants. 

District Yards. 

The district yard forces were utilized in repairs of 
main pipe leaks, installation of new service pipes, new 
fire pipes, service pipe repairs, fire pipe repairs, meter 
changes, off and on calls and general maintenance 
service to the public. 

The Distribution Branch. 

The Distribution Branch, consisting of the main 
yard and four district yards, and responsible for the 
repair and maintenance of main pipes, hydrants, service 
pipes, and gate valves, was assisted during the year 
by four contracting firms who assisted the department 
forces in the repairing of leaks and the laying of new 
and relaying of old service pipes. 

The contractual work was performed in a satisfactory 
manner and again proved the value of this type of con- 
tract in assisting the department forces to repair and 
install new appurtenances. 

During the year, the Gibson street, Dorchester, water 
yard garage and stable were demolished and contract 
awarded for new combination steel work shop and 
garages to be erected in spring of 1957. 



Public Works Department. 



87 



The Machine Shop 
The machine shop and plumbing shop handled all 
the drilling and connecting of services in addition to 
the regular work carried on in these shops, such as the 
machining and assembling of gates, valves, and hj^drants, 
and the department assisted the other branches of the 
Public Works Department in performing special jobs. 

The Meter Branch 
The meter shop handled a total of 10,117 meters, di- 
vided as follows: 



Meters applied on new services 
Meters discontinued . 
Meters changed . 
Meters tested in shop 
Meters repaired in service 
Meters repaired in shop 
Meters reset 
Meters junked 



656 
139 
5,261 
1,789 
369 
779 
718 
406 



Total 10,117 

Business Office 

This office performs all the work related to the proc- 
essing of bills to property owners for water used and the 
maintenance of water meters. 

These operations include receiving applications for 
new services and fire pipes; reading 95,000 meters 
quarterly; computing and preparing 382,000 bills 
amounting to $6,428,102,91; keeping account of paid 
and unpaid bills; recording liens against delinquent 
consumers; testing, repairing, and installing and remov- 
ing water meters and receiving complaints from the 
water consuming public. 

1956 

Main pipe petitions received 27 

Domestic service applications 820 

Fire pipe applications 51 

Special meter tests 51 

Hydrant permits issued 10 

Repair deposits received 68 

Miscellaneous deposits 33 



88 City Document No. 18. 

APPROPRIATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND REVENUE 

Budget appropriation, 1956 $2,457,025 00 

Amount expended 2,212,603 64 

Unexpended balance $244,421 46 

Amount of monej' collected from all sources during the \-ear 

1956 $6,297,311 74 

Amount expended from all sources 6,025,321 73 

Surplus $271,990 01 

The metropolitan assessment for 1956 amounted to 
$3,290,795.44 at the rate of $80 per miUion gallons, an 
increase of $68,407.92 over the assessment of 1955, 
based on the $80 per million gallon rate. 

Total amount billed for 1956 .... $6,428,10291 

Total amount collected for 1956 bills, as of 

December 31, 1956 $4,967,228 43 

Total amount abated for 1956 bills, as of 

December 31, 1956 $24,291 92 

Total amount collected in 1956 on bills ren- 
dered prior to 1956 $777,354 34 

By Chapter 487, Acts of 1954, entitled ''An Act 
Relative to Liens for Water Rates and Charges" effec- 
tive January 1, 1955, the law was changed so that liens 
for water rates take effect by operation of law without 
the necessity of recording a lien statement at the 
Registry of Deeds. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers at the end of the year has been con- 
tinued as a courtesy to the customer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. M. Sullivan, 
Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



89 



Balances from 1955 
Water Service Receipt 
Water Service . 



Water Service 1956 



Receipt 

Water Rates and Services 
Tax Titles, Water . 



Expenditures 

Pensions and Annuities . 
Water Division 

Refunds 

Metropolitan Water Assessment 
Collecting — Water . 
Automotive — Water 



Transfer of 1955 Surplus 



$57,917 28 
159,274 49 



5,262,017 09 
35,294 65 



$211,362 28 

2,212,603 54 

628 50 

3,290,795 44 

132,195 00 

91,200 00 



Carried forward to 1957 Water Division 
Surplus 



$217,191 77 



6,297,311 74 
56,514,503 51 



5,938,784 76 

$575,718 75 
57,917 28 

$517,801 47 
245,811 46 

$271,990 01 



1956 
Summary of Water Division 
Collections and Expenditures 

Total Amount Collected 

Expenditures 

Pensions and Annuities . . . $211,362 28 



Water Division (Budget) 
Refunds ... 
Collecting — Water . 
Automo tive — Water 



M.D.C. water assessment . 
Less cash forwarded 1955 to 1956 
Plus cash forwarded 1956 to 1957 



j,297,311 74 



2,212,603 54 

628 50 

132,195 00 

91,200 00 

$2,647,989 32 

3,290,795 44 

$5,938,784 76 

159,274 49 

$5,779,510 27 

245,811 46 

$6,025,321 73 6,025,321 73 



Surplus 



$271,990 01 



Water Division, 1956 



Construction Account 

Extension of mains (from revenue) 
Cost of construction Dec. 31, 1956 
Cost of construction Dec. 31, 1955 

Increase in plant cost during 1956 



$25,357,313 14 
25,132,375 54 



$224,937 60 



90 City Document No. 18. 



Cost of existing works Dec. 31, 1956 

Pipe yards and buildings . . $84,332 16 

Distribution system . . . 25,357,313 14 

Hyde Park water works . . 175,000 00 



$25,616,645 30 
High pressure 2,448,340 64 



$28,064,985 94 



Water Statistics for the Fiscal Year Ending 
December 31, 1956. 

Mains. 

Kind of pipe: cast iron, wrought iron, steel. 

Size, 2-inch to 48-inch. 

Extended miles, 3.57. 

Size enlarged miles, 0.88. 

Total miles now in use, 1,029.879. 

Public hydrants added, 17. 

Pubhc hydrants now in use, 12,554. 

Stop gates added, 45. 

Stop gates now in use, 16,558. 

Number of blowoffs, 864. 

Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Services. 
Kind of pipe and size: 

f inch to 2 inches in diameter of lead or copper. 
4 inches and 6 inches in diameter of cast iron. 

Shutting Off and Turning On Water in 1956 

Number of shut-offs for repairs 5,252 

Number of premises turned on after repairs 4,687 

Number of shut-offs for vacancy 506 

Number of premises turned on for occupancj^ .... 145 
Number of premises shut off for nonpayment of water rates . 10 
Number of premises turned on again after being shut off for non- 
payment 5 

Number of premises shut off on account of waste .... 32 

Number of premises turned on again after being shut off for waste 2 

Number of new service pipes turned on for the first time . . 484 

Total number of times water was shut off or turned on . 11,123 







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(91) 



92 City Document No. 18. 

TABLE NO. H. 
Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1956. 

































^ 
^ 


o 
a 


1 


11 

1- _ 


o 


1 

Ph 


o 


1 


■| 


s 




Hydrants. 


. 


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d 


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a 

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1 


P 


K 
a 


Pi 






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c 
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2 




3 




o 


PQ 


« 


o 


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s 


O 


Q 


s 


P3 


§ 


^ 


Public, December 31, 1955 


453 


241 


2,110 


2,074 


6,655 


4 




5 




91 


7 


11,640 


Private, December 31, 1955 


33 


5 


29 


126 


17 


13 


56 




4 


111 




394 












27 














27 









1 




5 


? 












10 


Total, public, December 31, 1956 


451 


241 


2,109 


2,074 


6,677 


2 




5 




91 


7 


11,657 


Total, private, December 31, 1956 


33 


5 


29 


126 


17 


13 


56 




4 


111 




394 



Total hydrants in service, 1955 . 
Total hydrants added during 1956 
Total hydrants abandoned during 1956 
Total hydrants in service December 31, 1956 
High pressure fire hydrants in service, 1956 

Total h3'drants (all kinds) in service December 31, 1956 



12,034 

27 

10 

12,051 

503 

12,554 



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(94) 



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II 



(96) 



Public Works Department. 



97 



Table No. I. Statement of Work Done During the Year 1956. 



Make. 


.2 

"S 

< 


Ci 

o 

(5-73 
_ o 


Meters 
Changed. 


a 

V 




a 


1 


a) 

Ci 
3 




Out. 


In. 




Hersey 


622 
35 


1,021 

145 

6 

25 

1 

2 


4,211 

1,246 

75 

140 

3 

5 


5,466 
277 


5,580 
1.420 


303 
97 


1,590 
295 


755 
26 


80 

220 

70 

136 

4 

4 


19,628 

3,761 

151 

301 


Watch Dog 


King 


Worthington 














■American 














g 


Federal 
















Sparling 
















Nash 






1 
4 
2 

1 
2 

1 












1 


9 


Arctic 


2 
1 


2 


1 


3 

2 


5 


3 




21 
9 
2 


Trident 




1 
1 
2 


Lambert 


















4 


Crown 




1 












o 




















Pitt 




























1 














1 






















Totals 


660 


1,203 


5,692 


5,746 


7,005 


405 


1,890 


781 


519 


23,901 





98 



City Document No. 18. 

Table No. 2. Meters in Service, December 31, 1956. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


Vs 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 




70,700 

8,512 

519 

1,269 

49 


5,146 
298 

7 
6 


2,434 

442 
4 
2 


1,372 

729 

9 

6 


974 

413 

3 

5 


335 

234 


409 
67 


126 


38 


20 


81,54^ 
10,69/ 

542 
1,29C 
4C 
14 
54 
11 

6: 

31 














2 






















1 


2 


3 


4 




3 










54 
S 
3 








1 






1 


1 

1 

17 

24 

1 
















1 
9 
9 










1 


2 


16 


16 


2 








1 

2 

1 








1 














1 










































4 


1 




94,32 


















Total 


81,118 


5,460 


2,887 


2,136 


1.416 


615 


498 


133 


39 


20 











Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


% 


'A 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


No 
Sise 


C. P's 


1,829 
39 


116 
3 


56 
25 


18 
80 


29 
160 


17 
66 


4 
25 


3 

7 


3 


13 


2,07 
41 


C. of B. C. P's . . 


Total 


1.868 


119 


81 


98 


189 


83 


29 


10 


3 


13 


2,49 





Public Works Department. 99 

Table No. 3. Meters in Shop, December 31, 1956. 





DlA.METEK IN InCHES. 


Totall 


Make. 


Vs 


Va. 


1 


iVi 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


New. 


621 




50 


35 


29 


10 
5 


15 
8 








760 


Hersey H C T 


2 






15 






































































621 




50 


35 


29 


15 


23 


2 






775 










Old. 


408 


20 


23 


12 


23 


4 


7 
4 
1 
2 

1 


5 

2 






502 




3 

1 


1 


9 


Hersey H C T 














3 


Watch Dog 








6 


4 


4 


16 
















3 






















Total 


408 


20 


23 


18 


27 


10 


15 


7 


4 


1 


533 







Table No. 4. Meters Repaired in Shop in 1956. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


% 


V4, 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 








1.275 


84 


75 


70 


47 


8 
10 


8 

2 

3 


3 






1,570 


Hersey H. C. T 






4 


Watch Dog 


150 


16 


42 


63 


20 








304 




1 
1 






3 


Hersey F. M 


















3 










2 


1 








3 


Trident 








3 










3 
























Total 


1,425 


100 


117 


135 


68 


23 


17 


5 






1,890 











100 City Document No. 18. 

Table No. 5. Meters Repaired and Rebuilt at Factory in 1956. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 

5 


Total. 




1,301 


1,301 






Total 


1,301 


1,301 







Table No. 5A. Meters Purchased New in 1956. 





Diameter in Inches. 




Make. 


5 


1 


1 


u 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Total. 




2.363 




50 


35 


30 








2,478 


Hersey H. C. T. . 


10 


15 


2 


27 
















Total 


2,363 




50 


35 


30 


10 


15 


2 


2,505 







Table No. 6. Meters Reset in 1956. 





Diameter in Inches. 


V 

'S 
3 
o 

O 


6 S 

sg.s 

o 


Total. 


Make. 


_5 


J 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 




696 
23 


38 
1 


14 


1 
2 


5 




1 






755 


Watch Dog. . 






26 
















Total 


719 


39 


14 


3 


5 




1 


63 


718 


781 



Public Works Department. 101 

Table No. 7A. Meters Changed in 1956. Meters Taken Out. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


V» 


¥4. 


1 


IV2 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


Hersey Disc 


3,662 

1,031 

72 

3 

140 

5 


251 
29 


135 
59 

1 


73 

88 

2 


57 
24 


18 
9 


11 
6 


3 


1 


4,211 


Watch Dog 


1,246 


King 






75 














3 


Worthington 


















140 




















5 























Arctic 








1 


1 


2 
2 








4 


Trident 














2 




1 

2 

1 
















1 




















9 


Nash 


















1 














1 






1 














1 






1 






















Total 


4,917 


280 


195 


164 


82 


32 


18 


3 


1 


5,692 







Table No. 7B. Meters Changed in 1956. Meters Put In. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


H 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


10 




4,904 
132 


245 
11 


128 
34 


86 
69 

1 


76 
21 


10 

7 


13 
3 
1 


3 


1 


5,466 


Watch Dog 


277 










Trident 










1 






1 






















Total 


5,036 


256 


162 


156 


97 


18 


17 


3 


1 


5,746 







102 City Document No. 18. 

Table No. 8. Meters Repaired in Service in 1956. 









» 














o 




.M 














•go 




d 
^ 


c 


1^ 

o3 


o 


a 
'3 




Make. 


•^a 


►-) 


M 




o 


ca 


H 






aM 


<a 


a 




c 


a 


u 






O 




3 


O 


B 

03 




o 







tc 


O 


:2: 


PQ 


B 


Pll 


Eh 




34 


155 


44 


18 


12 


40 




303 


Watch Dog 


20 


47 


16 


1 


1 


12 




97 




2 


1 






2 






5 














Total 


56 


203 


60 


19 


15 


52 




405 







Table No. 9. Meters Applied in 1956. 





Diameter in Inches. 




Make. 


f 


' 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


10 


Total 




510 
5 


10 


10 

7 


33 

12 

1 


36 
5 


8 
4 

1 
1 


4 
2 


11 


622 


Watch Dog 


35 




2 














1 




















Total 


515 


10 


17 


46 


41 


14 


6 


11 


660 







Meters applied on old services. . 
Meters applied on new services. 



Total . 



660 
668 



Public Works Department. 103 

Table No. 10. Meters Discontinued in 1956. 



Make. 


Diameter ts Inches. 


fl o © 
* S 3 


d 
.2 

"S <u 

0.2 

O 


• 
'S 

CI 
d 

1 






H 


H 


1 


IJi 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


o 




916 

138 

8 

9 


71 
3 


30 

8 


6 
3 


4 
3 


1 
1 


1 
1 






106 

27 
1 
2 


795 

114 

5 

3 


128 
16 
2 
4 


1,029 


Watch Dog 






157 


King . .... 






S 


Worthington 


















9 




























1 




1 








1 

1 


1 




2 


Federal 


1 












1 


























Trident. ... 












1 








1 






1 


Nash 
















































































Total 


1,072 


74 


38 


10 


7 


4 


2 






139 


918 


150 


1,207 











104 City Document No. 18. 

Table No. II. Reason for Meter Change in Year 1956. 



jMake. 


1 

"Si 

1 
o 

Q 


a 

p. 
a 
o 
O 


a 
'a 


0) 

S 

a 

Q 


"a 
'3 

(U 

eg- 


i 
1 




to 

% 


(3 
a) 
Jit 
o 

(S 

J<i 
o 
_o 

O 


o 

1 


2 


1 




3,121 

1,034 

64 

120 

3 

5 

2 


440 
109 

7 
12 


170 
18 

3 


83 

15 

1 


40 
13 


65 
5 


102 
23 


15 1 78 


29 
6 


68 
11 


4,211 


Watch Dog 




12 
3 

4 


1,246 




75 














1 


140 














3 


Federal 






















5 
























2 









































1 
1 










4 


Trident 
















<> 






















1 


Nash 






















1 
























1 
























1 


























Total 


4,356 


568 


191 


99 


54 


70 


127 


15 


97 


35 


SO 


5,6 2 







Table No. 12. Meters Junked in 1956. 





Diameter in Inches 




Make 


« 


J 


1 


U 


2 


3 


Total. 




70 

219 

70 

136 

4 

4 

1 

1 


1 


3 






6 


80 


Watch Dog 




1 


220 


King 








70 














136 














4 


Federal 












4 














1 


Nash 












1 


Trident 










1 


1 




2 










o 












7 




Total 


507 


1 


3 




1 


519 







Public Works Department. 105 

APPENDIX H. 



REPORT OF THE 
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION 



Boston, January 2, 1957. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayo?' of Boston. 
Through the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In accordance with the provisions of section 24, 
chapter 3 of the Revised City Ordinances of 1947, the 
following report of the Public Improvement Commission 
for the year ending December 31, 1956, is respectfully 
submitted. 

The Public Improvement Commission was established 
May 1, 1954, by the provisions of section 57, chapter 2 
of the 1954 Ordinances. This Commission, consisting 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, the Commissioner 
of Real Property, and the Chairman of the Boston 
Traffic Commission, was assigned all of the powers and 
duties of the former Board of Street Commissioners, 
except : 

(a) Those relating to the storage and sale of inflammables, 
filling stations, and parking lots which were transferred 
to the Committee on Licenses in the Public Safety 
Commission ; 

(b) Those relating to the planting and removal of trees in 
public ways, the use of public ways for any temporary 
obstruction in, under, or over the same, the use of 
public ways for the storage and sale of merchandise 
and the designating of coasting streets, which were 
transferred to the Commissioner of Public Works; and 

(c) Those relating to the abatement of taxes which were 
transferred to the Real Property Department. 

Functions of the Board of Street Commissioners 
transferred to this Commission include the authority 
to lay out, widen, relocate, alter, discontinue, or rename 
public highways, and to order the making of specific 



106 City Document No. 18. 

repairs therein; to order the construction of sanitary 
sewers and storm drains; to take land by eminent 
domain for municipal purposes (except housing and 
off-street parking) ; to permit the opening of private 
ways for public travel; to levy assessments for street, 
sidewalk, and sewer betterments; and to issue permits 
for the location of wire-carrying poles, conduits, pipes, 
tracks and similar uses of the public ways. 

STREET PROGRAM 
During the period covered by this report, one hundred 
seven (107) highway improvements, including the laying 
out of fifty-eight (58) new highways, the widening and 
relocation of thirty-one (31) public ways, the making 
of specific repairs in eighteen (18) existing streets, were 
ordered by the Public Improvement Commission. 

Of particular interest in these groups are the following 
projects: 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester district, from Columbia road 
to Mattapan square, to be reconstructed with Chapter 90 
funds at an estimated cost of $450,000. Work will include 
the removal of the existing streetcar reservation, the widening 
of both roadways and the installation of traffic divisional 
islands at various locations. 

New York Streets area, Boston Proper district, in coopera- 
tion with the Boston Housing Authority, the commission 
ordered the discontinuance of eight (8) public ways in the 
New York Streets area and also ordered the laying out of 
Castle street through the project and the widening of the 
remaining existing streets in the project, namely, Harrison 
avenue. Asylum street and Troy street. It is estimated that 
these highway improvements with sewer and water construc- 
tion will cost approximately $475,000. 

Charles Park road. West Roxbury district, this road has 
been laid out and constructed to provided access to a new 
industrial area of the same name adjacent to the Charles River 
in the West Roxbury district and will also provide better 
access to the city's West Roxbury disposal area. Estimated 
cost of $27,768. 

Summer street. South Boston district between B street 
and the Reserved Channel, to be constructed with Chapter 90 
funds at an estunated cost of $90,000. 

Jackson Square improvements, Roxbury district, includes 
the installation of traffic divisional islands and the reduction in 
width of existing sidewalks at Jackson square and the widening 



Public Works Department. 107 

and relocation of Ritchie street. This reconstruction will 
permit the relocation of traffic movement at this location by 
makmg the three streets one way and forming a rotary pattern 
which should greatly alleviate the congestion. 

The following streets were ordered laid out as Public 
Ways during 1956: 

Agassiz park, West Roxbury, from Burroughs street approxi- 
mately 230 feet southwesterly. Length 230 feet; estimated 
cost, $4,810; estimated benefit, $2,328.94. 

Ascent street, West Roxburj^, between New Haven street 
and Keystone street. Length 285 feet; estimated cost, 
$8,274; estimated benefit, $2,702.50. 

Barna road, Dorchester, between Galty avenue and Range 
road. Length 406 feet; estimated cost, $10,393; estimated 
benefit, $5,426.27. 

Beachview road. East Boston (formerly Montmorenci 
avenue), from Drumlin road approximately 688 feet south- 
easterly. Length 688 feet; estimated cost, $17,201; estimated 
benefit, $8,468.38. 

Brockton Street Extension, Dorchester, from Messinger 
street approximately 206 feet northeasterly. Length 206 feet; 
estimated cost, $5,268; estimated benefit, $2,619.18. 

Burley street. West Roxbury, between Metropolitan avenue 
and Dale street. Length 466 feet; estimated cost, $13,492; 
estimated benefit, $4,890. 

Byrd avenue. West Roxbury, between Neponset avenue and 
Starbird avenue. Length 519 feet; estimated cost, $14,084; 
estimated benefit, $6,985. 

Caltha road, Brighton, extended, widened and relocated 
from Undine road approximately 300 feet southerly. Length 
300 feet; estimated cost, $7,225; estimated benefit, $2,269.24. 

Capital street. West Roxbury, from Baker street approxi- 
mately 332 feet southwesterly. Length 332 feet; estimated 
cost $9,434; estimated benefit, $4,451. 

Castle street, Boston Proper, between Washington street 
and Albany street. Length 763 feet. (To be built by Boston 
Housing Authority.) 

Chapel road, Hyde Park (formerly Irwin avenue), between 
Tacoma street and Farrar avenue. Length 240 feet; estimated 
cost, $5,910; estimated benefit, $2,274.60. 

Charles Park road, West Roxbury, between Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Parkway and Rivermoor street. Length 1,200 
feet; estimated cost, $27,768; estimated benefit, $17,000. 

Cheshire Street Extension, West Roxbury, approximately 
215 feet northeasterly. Length, 215 feet; estimated cost, 
$4,371; estimated benefit, $2,140.44. 

Claflin street. South Boston, from D street approximately 
350 feet northwesterly. Length 350 feet. (Without con- 
struction.) 



lOS City Document No. 18. 

Crestwood park, Roxbury, from Townsend street approxi- 
mately 250 feet northeasterly. Length 250 feet; estimated 
cost, $6,847; estimated benefit, $2,417.70. 

Crockers Lane, West Roxbury, between Shaw street and 
Saint Theresa avenue. Length 435 feet; estimated cost, 
$11,175; estimated benefit, $6,259.09. 

Cutler court, South Boston (formerly Pickering place), from 
East Fifth street approximately 125 feet southerly. Length 
125 feet; estimated cost, $2,539; estimated benefit, $1,368.90. 

Dalin place, Roxbury (formerly LaFayette park) from 
Julian street approximately 190 feet northerly. Length 190 
feet; estimated cost, $3,832; estimated benefit, $1,816.05. 

Daytona terrace, Dorchester (formerly Maple park) from 
Centre street approximately 230 feet northerly. Length 230 
feet; estimated cost, $6,456; estimated benefit, $3,850.50. 

Derry road, Hyde Park, between Westminster street and 
Safford street. Length 481 feet; estimated cost, $13,385; 
estimated benefit, $6,843.50. 

DeStefano road, West Roxbury, from Hyde Park avenue 
approximately 480 feet southeasterly. Length 480 feet; 
estimated cost, $11,607; estimated benefit, $5,458.60. 

Dietz road, Hyde Park, between Alvin street and Leighton 
road. Length 1,340 feet; estimated cost, $39,749; estimated 
benefit, $12,782.50. 

Dodge road, Hyde Park, between Dietz road and Leighton 
road. Length 284 feet; estimated cost, $9,047; estimated 
benefit, $2,769. 

Driftwood road. West Roxbury, between Mossdale road and 
Mossdale road. Length 460 feet; estimated cost, $9,172; 
estimated benefit, $6,140.80. 

Dudley terrace, Dorchester (formerly Holden place), from 
Dudley street approximately 133 feet northeasterly. Length 
133 feet; estimated cost, $1,051; estimated benefit, $870. 

Eastmont road, Hyde Park, between Dietz road and Leigh- 
ton road. Length 408 feet; estimated cost, $12,417; estimated 
benefit, $4,245. 

Farwell avenue, Hyde Park, from Summit street approxi- 
matelv 450 feet southeasterly. Length 450 feet; estimated 
cost, $11,980, estimated benefit, $4,833.81. 

Favre street, Dorchester, from Messinger street approxi- 
mately 277 feet northeasterly. Length 277 feet; estimated 
cost, $6,581; estimated benefit, $3,187. 

Greenwich court, Roxbury, from Greenwich street approxi- 
matelv 100 feet southwesterly. Length 100 feet, estimated 
cost, $2,213; estimated benefit, $1,207.30. 

Harmony street. East Boston, between Bennington street 
and Horace street. Length 260 feet; estimated cost, $6,993; 
estimated benefit, $1,912.50. 



Public Works Department. 109 

Howard place, Dorchester, from Howard avenue approxi- 
mately 205 feet northwesterly. Length 205 feet ; estimated cost , 
$3,947; estimated benefit, $1,869. 

Huntington avenue, Hyde Park, between Collins street and 
Thatcher street. Length 1,486 feet; estimated cost, $33,624; 
estimated benefit, $11,427.50. 

Hutchinson street, Dorchester, between Gallivan Boulevard 
and Brookvale street. Length 374 feet; estimated cost, $9,913; 
estimated benefit, $5,078.43. 

Joslin road, Roxbury (formerly Austin street), between 
Brookline avenue and Pilgrim road. Length 288 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $9,969; estimated benefit, $2,031.80. 

Kardon road, Hyde Park, from Dietz road approximately 
300 feet southeasterly. Length 300 feet; estimated cost, $8,662; 
estimated benefit, $4,507. 

Leighton road, Hyde Park, between Alwin street and East- 
mont road. Length 1,100 feet; estimated cost, $31,699; esti- 
mated benefit, $13,006.50. 

Lorimer place, Roxbury (formerly Johnston park), from 
Warren street approximately 175 feet westerly. Length 175 
feet; estimated cost, $4,400; estimated benefit, $2,092.17. 

Lovis street. South Boston, between West Fifth street and 
Gold street. Length 128 feet; estimated cost, $2,500; esti- 
mated benefit, $1,021.50. 

Margo road, Brighton, betw^een Brayton road and the 
Newton boundary line. Length 888 feet; estimated cost, 
$23,114; estimated benefit, $14,731. 

Marlin road. West Roxbury (formerly Federal road), from 
Corey street approximately 340 feet southwesterly. Length 
340 feet; estimated cost, $10,078; estimated benefit, $4,253.50. 

Meadowview road, Hyde Park (formerly Forest street), from 
Stanbro street, approximately 880 feet southwesterly. Length 
880 feet; estimated cost, $22,786; estimated benefit, $11,368.30. 

Messinger street, Dorchester, between Brockton street and 
Orlando street. Length 718 feet; estimated cost, $16,400; 
estimated benefit, $8,986. 

Millstone Road Extension, Hyde Park (formerly Hawthorne 
street), between Colchester street and Meadowview road. 
Length 237 feet; estimated cost, $6,607; estimated benefit, 
$2,203.50. 

Mossdale road, West Roxbury, between Moss Hill road and 
Moss Hill road. Length 1,520 feet; estimated cost, $26,067; 
estimated benefit, $22,299.06. 

New Haven street. West Roxbury, from Northdale road to 
approximately 180 feet beyond Ascent street. Length 900 
feet; estimated cost, $24,245; estimated benefit, $13,642. 

Range road, Dorchester, between Dorchester avenue and 
Mercier avenue. Length 660 feet; estimated cost, $15,317; 
estimated benefit, $6,914.30. 



110 City Document No. 18. 

Rainier road, Dorchester and Hyde Park (formerly Royal 
road), between Greenfield road and Raleigh road. Length 329 
feet, estimated cost, $9,763; estimated benefit, $2,991. 

Robken road. West Roxbury (formerly Haviland road), be- 
tween Hazelmere road and Selwyn street. Length 601 feet; 
estimated cost, $15,266; estimated benefit, $8,386.65. 

Rocky Nook terrace. West Roxbury, from Glen road ap- 
proximately 260 feet northeasterly. Length 260 feet, estimated 
cost, $6,039; estimated benefit, $3,243.01. 

Rosecliff terrace, West Roxbury (formerly Wyman street), 
from Rosecliff street approximately 235 feet southwesterly. 
Length 235 feet; estimated cost, $5,346; estimated benefit, 
$3,107.02. 

SafTord street, Hyde Park, between Lewiston street and 
Huntington avenue. Length 1,056 feet; estimated cost, $38,347; 
estimated benefit, $13,838.22. 

Selwyn Street Extension, West Roxbury, between Coniston 
road and Haviland road. Length 200 feet; estimated cost, 
$5,017; estimated benefit, $2,309.93. 

Sherbrook street, West Roxbury, between Temple street and 
Perham street. Length 250 feet; estimated cost, $7,785; 
estimated benefit, $3,076.47. 

Spinney street. West Roxbury, between Sparrow street and 
Cowing street. Length 332 feet; estimated cost, $8,641; esti- 
mated benefit, $3,642.73. 

Troy street, Boston Proper, between Harrison avenue and 
Washington street. (To be built by Boston Housing Au- 
thority.) Length 300 feet. 

Vienna street, East Boston, between Neptune road and 
Bennington street. Length 300 feet. (Without construction.) 

Welton road. West Roxbury, from La Grange street ap- 
proximately 258 feet westerly. Length 258 feet; estimated 
cost, $7,390; estimated benefit, $3,280.79. 

West Howell street, Dorchester, from Boston street approxi- 
mately 351 feet westerly. Length 351 feet; estimated cost, 
$31,545; estimated benefit, $5,949.20. 

Widened or Relocated 

Asylum street, Boston Proper, between Harrison avenue and 
Washington street. 

Austin street, Hyde Park, at the northeasterly and south- 
easterly corners of Gordon avenue. 

Bunker Hill street, Charlestown, between Hunter street and 
Chelsea street. 

Centre street. West Roxbury, at various locations between 
Spring street and Grove street. 

Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton, at the northwesterly corner 
of Commonwealth avenue. 

Como road, Hyde Park, on the southeasterly side from Pine 
avenue approximately 180 feet northwesterly. 



Public Works Department. Ill 

Cowper street, East Boston, between Byron street and Words- 
worth street. 

Cookson terrace, Dorchester, on the northerly side for a 
distance of about 100 feet. 

D street, South Boston, at the southerlj^ corner of Summer 
street. 

Fairway street, Dorchester, between Blue Hill avenue and 
Cummins Highway. 

Forsyth street, Roxbury, from Ruggles street approximately 
850 feet northerly. 

Gardner street, West Roxbury, from Rivermoor street to 
the location of the Needham Branch of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad. 

Guest street, Brighton, at the northeasterly and southerly 
corners of Market street. 

Harrison avenue, Boston Proper, between Dover street and 
the Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Hunter street, Charlestown, between Bunker Hill street and 
Vine street. 

Leon street, Roxbury, at the southeasterly corner of Green- 
leaf street. 

Montebello road. West Roxbury, at the northwesterly and 
southwesterly corners of Washington street. 

Monument street, Charlestown, at the southwesterly corner 
of O'Reilly Way and from the southeasterly corner of O'Reilly 
Way approximately 100 feet northeasterly. 

Morton street, Dorchester, at the southwesterly corner of 
Blue Hill avenue (see abandonment order). 

Perkins street. West Roxbury, from Francis Parkman 
Drive to Prince street. 

Poplar street. West Roxbury, on the easterly side from a 
point approximately 300 feet north of Deforest street to 
approximately 200 feet northerly. 

Ritchie street, Roxbury, at the northeasterly and southeast- 
erly corners of Columbus avenue. 

Ritchie street, Roxbury, from Columbus avenue to Centre 
street. 

River street, Dorchester, from Mattapan square to a 
point approximately 500 feet northeasterly. 

Rivermoor street, West Roxbury, from Gardner street 
approximately 725 feet southwesterly. 

Ruggles street, Roxbury, between Columbus avenue and 
Leon street. 

Selkirk road, Brighton, between Chiswick road and Suther- 
land road. 

Vine street, Charlestown, at the southwesterly corner of 
Chelsea street. 

Washington street, Boston Proper, between Dover street 
and Motte street. 



112 City Document No. 18. 

Washington street, Roxbury, at the southwesterly corner of 
Arnold street. 

Williams street, West Roxbury, at the southwesterly corner 
of Washington street. 



Specific Repairs 

Ash street, Boston Proper, between Oak street and Bennett 
street, consisting of the reduction in width of the northwesterly 
sidewalk. 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester and West Roxbury, between 
Columbia road and River street, consisting of the abandonment 
of the existing street car reservation, construction of traffic 
divisional islands and the reduction in the width of existing 
sidewalks at various locations. 

Boylston street, Boston Proper, at Charles street, consisting 
of the installation of a traffic island. 

Centre street, Roxbury, from Amory street to a point 
approximately 100 feet northeasterly of Columbus avenue, 
consisting of the removal of existing traffic islands, reduction 
of sidewalk widths at various locations and the installation of 
new traffic divisional islands. 

Columbus avenue, Roxbury, between Centre street and 
Ritchie street, consisting of the removal of the existing traffic 
divisional island. 

Francis street, Roxbury, on the westerly side between 
Brookline avenue and the Riverway, consisting of the reduction 
in width of the existing sidewalk. 

Franklin street, Boston Proper, at the southeasterly corner 
of Hawley street, consisting of increasing the curb corner radii. 

Greenfield road, Dorchester, at the intersection of Cummins 
Highway, consisting of the construction of a traffic island. 

North Grove street, Boston Proper, at the southwesterly 
corner of Fruit street, consisting of the reduction in width of 
the existing sidewalk. 

Old Morton street, Dorchester, at the northwesterly corner 
of River street, consisting of increasing the curb corner radii. 

Summer street, South Boston, between "B" street (under) 
and the Reserved Channel, consisting of the installation of a 
traffic divisional island and the increasing of the curb corner 
radii at various locations. 

Troy street, Boston Proper, between Albany street and 
Harrison avenue, consisting of the reduction in width of 
existing sidewalks. 

Washington street, Boston Proper, at the northeasterly 
corner of Hayward place, consisting of increasing the existing 
curb radius. 

Washington street, Roxburj^ at Eustis street, consisting of 
the reduction in width of the existing sidewalk and the installa- 
tion of a traffic island. 



Public Works Department. 113 

Washington street, Roxbury, at Warren street, consisting 
of the reduction in width of the existing sidewalk and the 
installation of a traffic island. 

Washington street, Roxbury, between Northampton street 
and Warren street, consisting of the reduction in width of 
existing sidewalks and the installation of traffic divisional 
islands. 

Washington street, West Roxbury, between Montebello 
road and Forest Hills street, consisting of the installation of a 
traffic divisional island. 

Woodhaven street, Dorchester, at the northwesterly corner 
of Cummins Highwa}^, consisting of the reduction of the curb 
radius. 

Grades Revised 

Brook Farm road, West Roxbury, between Newfield street 
and Banks street. 

Brucewood street, West Roxburj^, from Rickerhill road 
approximately 140 feet northwesterly. 

Maryknoll street, Dorchester, between Clearwater Drive 
and Maryknoll terrace. 

West Howell street, Dorchester, from Boston street ap- 
proximately 335 feet northwesterly. 



Discontinuances 

Beacon street, Boston Proper, a portion of the building line 
on the northeasterly side from Charlesgate East approxi- 
mately 108 feet easterly. (Not recorded by order of Public 
Improvement Commission. ) 

Chelsea street, Charlestown, from a point approximately 
500 feet northeasterly of Medford street to approximately 
700 feet northeasterly. 

Crehore road. West Roxbury, at the southerly corner of 
West Roxbury Parkway. 

Davis street, Boston Proper, between Washington street 
and Harrison avenue. 

Decatur street, Boston Proper, between Washington street 
and Harrison avenue. 

Fairway street, Dorchester, on the northerly line, westerly 
from Blue Hill avenue. 

Fellows street, Roxbury, between Northampton street and 
Hunneman street. (Slope easement.) 

Florence street, Boston Proper, between Washington street 
and Harrison avenue. 

Genesee street, Boston Proper, a portion from Harrison 
avenue approximately 412 feet southeasterlJ^ 

High street, Boston Proper, from a point opposite Belcher 
Lane approximately 225 feet southwesterly. 



114 City Document No. 18. 

Hillis road, Hyde Park, on the northerly side approximately 
100 feet from River street. 

Mount Vernon street, Dorchester, on the southwesterly 
side at a point approximately 900 feet southwest of William T. 
Morrissey Boulevard. 

Oneida street, Boston Proper, a portion from Harrison Avenue 
to approximately 43 1 feet southeasterly. 

Oswego street, Boston Proper, a portion from Harrison 
avenue approximately 432 feet southeasterly. 

Providence street, Boston Proper, from a point approxi- 
mately 175 feet southwesterly from Berkeley street 30 feet 
southwesterly. 

Public Alley No. 104, Boston Proper, from Commercial 
street to North street. 

Ramsdell avenue, West Roxbury, at the southeasterly corner 
of Hyde Park avenue. 

Rivermoor street. West Roxbury, from Gardner street to 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkwaj'. 

Rochester street, Boston Proper, between Harrison avenue 
and Albany street. 

Seneca street, Boston Proper, between Harrison avenue and 
Albany street. 

Vienna street. East Boston, at the northeasterly corner of 
Neptune road. 

West Selden street, Dorchester, at the westerly and easterly 
corners of Merola park. 

Wexford street, Brighton, from Leo M. Birmingham Park- 
way approximately 950 feet westerly. 

Slope Easement 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park, westerly side approxi- 
mately 200 feet northerly from Metropolitan avenue and 
easterly side approximately 350 feet northerl}- from Metro- 
politan avenue. 

Abandonments 

Bussey and Walter streets. West Roxbury, order of the 
Public Improvement Commission and Mayor dated December 
28, 1955, which provided for the installation of one traffic 
island. 

Centre street. West Roxbury, order of the Public Improve- 
ment Commission and Mayor dated September 24, 1954, 
which provided for the widening, relocation and construction 
of Centre street from Spring street to Grove street. 

Farwell avenue, Hyde Park, order of the Board of Street 
Commissioners and Mayor dated April 30, 1954, which pro- 
vided for the lajdng out and construction of Farwell avenue, 
from Summit street to Milton avenue. (See new layout 
order). 



Public Works Department. 115 

Hanson street, Boston Proper, order of the Public Improve- 
ment Commission and Mayor dated September 12, 1956, 
which provided for the taking of land for Park Department 
purposes. 

Morton street, Dorchester, order of the Public Improvement 
Commission and Mayor dated June 28, 1956, which provided 
for a widening at the southwesterly corner of Blue Hill avenue. 

Water Main Easements 

Private land, Brighton, between R3^an road and Sanderson 
place. 

Sanderson place, Brighton, between Sanderson place and 
Rj^an road. 

Sewer Program 

During the year 1956, the construction of 2.00 miles of 
sanitary sewer, 1.79 miles of storm sewer, 214 catch 
basins and 56 drop inlets were ordered at a total esti- 
mated cost of $731,190. 

Estimated benefit to private property for the con- 
struction of the 2.00 miles of sanitary sewers amounted 
to $48,627.81. 

Sewerage works ordered were as follows: 



116 



City Document No. 18. 



Street 



O o 


ecS 


l^ 




2!^ 




OS 










^A 


^j 



Boston Proper 

Asylum street 

Franklin street 

Harrison avenue 

Harrison avenue 

Public Alley 801 

Troy and Albany ttreet*. 

Troy street (extension) . . 

Washington street 

Brighton 

Anselm terrace 

Caltha road 

Chestnut Hill avenue . . . 

Greycliff road 

Guest street 

*Keenan road 

Lake street 

*Lake street 

Marge road 

*Ryan road 

Selkirk road 

Charlestown 

Bunker Hill street 

Dorchester 

Barna road 

Blue Hill avenue 



Brockton street (exten- 
sion) 



*Caryll street .... 

Daytona terrace. 

Dudley terrace . . 

Howard place . . . 

Lorna road 

*Merola park. . . . 

Messinger street. 
*Messinger street . 



330 



390 



740 
400 

312 



70 



235 



267 



270 



250 



235 



174 



282 



630 



308 



395 



27 



$5,000 00 


400 00 


7,500 00 


1,000 00 


600 00 


07,500 00 


62,000 00 


7,500 00 


1,500 00 


2,050 00 


1,000 00 


500 00 


400 00 


2,400 00 


200 00 


4,100 00 


1,600 00 


2,600 00 


1,500 00 


350 00 


500 00 


30,000 GO 


1,000 00 


15,000 00 


1,200 00 


600 00 


1,200 00 


2,000 00 


6,800 00 


1,000 00 


6,500 00 



* Easements taken. 



Public Works Department. 



117 



Street 


Is 

0) 

02 


a a 
a e 


s 
s 

m 

o 


"a 

0. 
o 

Q 


d 
O 

1) 

5 

c 

H 


Is 

■■5CQ 


Dorchester (Continued) 






2 




$1,000 00 
2,800 00 
1,200 00 
1,200 00 
3,600 00 
3,600 00 
5,500 00 

4,000 00 

1,000 00 
2,000 00 

19,240 00 
600 00 
3,000 00 
1,200 00 
2,500 00 
2,100 00 
1,400 00 
2,100 00 
900 00 
700 00 
1,230 00 
5.770 00 
2,300 00 
1,000 00 
4,800 00 
1,200 00 
1,400 00 

4,600 00 
6,100 00 
2,100 00 






140 


145 


$600 00 




2 
2 






Richmere road 






None 




260 
275 
365 

200 


145 
254 


None 


*Violet street 






$2,100 00 








2,190 00 


Wm. T. Morrissey Boule- 








2,000 00 


East Boston 




2 




None 




130 

1,175 


130 
800 


$650 00 


Hyde Park 

*Arborfield road 






6,630 00 


Belnel road 


1 




None 




225 




SI, 350 00 






2 
3 




None 






65 
153 




Davidson street 


145 


$870 00 




2 
3 




None 












55 


57 




Kardon road 


1 




None 


*Manion road 




123 

548 


None 
















4 
2 
2 
2 


2 












New Bedford street 




375 


None 


Rainier road 




None 


♦Ransom road 


85 

310 
440 


93 


$360 00 


(Raleigh road) 






1,860 00 


*Ruff ng street 


440 






2,639 91 


Senders court 


3 




None 











118 



City Document No. 18. 



Street 



■3^ 



.as 

OJ SI 

03 



Hyde Park — Continued 

Susanna court 

Wharton court 

Roxbury 

Centre street 

Columbus avenue. . . . 

Crestwood park 

Forsyth street 

Francis street 

Greenwich court 

Ken way terrace 

Lorimer place 

Ritchie street 

Ritchie street 

Ruggles street 

South Boston 

Summer street 

West Roxbury 

Baker street 

Brook Farm road 

Brow^son terrace 



Burley street 

at Metropolitan avenue. 



Byrd avenue 

Canterbury street. 



■fCanterbury Branch 
(of Stony Brook) . 



Canterbury street 

(at Mt. Hope street) . 



Centre street 

Cheshire Street extension 
♦Courtney road 

Crockers Lane 

DeStefano road 

Emelia terrace 

♦Emelia terrace 



733 



632 



320 



582 



300 



100 



245 



$1,400 00 


700 00 


400 00 


500 00 


1,600 00 


2,800 00 


400 00 


500 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


500 00 


1,200 00 


1,000 00 


28,000 00 


2,600 00 


9,800 00 


2,100 00 


2,000 00 


4,500 00 


800 00 


212,000 00 


600 00 


500 00 


800 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


800 00 


1,000 00 


3,800 00 



Public Works Department. 



119 



Street 


4) U 

'■S-fi 
•Si s_ 

bo 
•sd 

in 


OS 


9 
m 
1 


— 

"a 

a 
o 

Q 


o 

O 

5 

S 


■■sm 


West Roxbury — Continued 
Forest Hills street 


375 
100 
280 


380 
120 
280 


5 


2 


$11,200 00 

1,200 00 

6,500 00 

1,300 00 

950 00 

500 00 

500 00 

2,500 00 

2,500 00 

23,600 00 

7,200 00 

7,500 00 

150 00 

3,200 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,050 00 

4,400 00 

3,000 00 


None 
$720 00 
2,150 00 


*Hackensack square 

Hampstead Lane 


2 
2 

1 
1 

1 
6 


1 
1 

1 






58 






















100 
175 




♦Partridge street 


165 
740 


$990 00 








4,440 00 




150 
740 


2 
6 


1 








Rosecliff terrace 










188 


1 
2 
1 


















Weld street 


85 
220 
253 


85 
260 
250 


$510 00 


*Wilmot street 


2 




1 320 00 


♦Winchester terrace 


1.518 00 









* Easements taken 

t 1,320 linear feet of 9 feet diameter reinforced concrete conduit 



120 City Document No. 18. 

Eminent Domain Land Takings 
During the period of this report, land takings were 
made for municipal purposes as follows : 

Fire Department 

1. The taking of approximately fifty-four thousand 
six hundred seventeen (54,617) square feet of land on 
Neponset avenue, Dorchester district, under an order 
of this Commission and Mayor dated April 13, 1956, 
and recorded in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds on 
April 20, 1956. 

2. The taking of approximately twenty-one thou- 
sand one hundred fifty-seven (21,157) square feet of 
land on Gallivan Boulevard, Dorchester district, under 
an order of this Commission and Mayor dated May 2, 
1956, and recorded in the Suffolk Registry- of Deeds on 
May 15, 1956. 

3. The taking of approximately twenty thousand 
seven hundred sixteen (20,716) square feet of land on 
Cummins Highway, West Roxbury district, under order 
of this Commission and Mayor dated December 5, 1956, 
and recorded in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds on Decem- 
ber 31, 1956. 

Parks and Recreation Department 
1. The taking of approximately three thousand one 
hundred thirty (3,130) square feet of land on Hanson 
street, Boston Proper district, under an order of this 
Commission and Mayor dated September 12, 1956, and 
recorded in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds on Septem- 
ber 26, 1956. The Public Improvement Commission 
abandoned this order on December 12, 1956, such 
abandonment order being recorded in the Suffolk Regis- 
try of Deeds on December 28, 1956. 

Overseers of Public Welfare 
1. The taking of approximately seventy-nine (79) 
square feet of land on Hawkins street, Boston Proper 



Public Works Department. 121 

district, under an order of this Commission and Mayor 
dated September 12, 1956, and recorded in the Suffolk 
Registry of Deeds on October 11, 1956. 

Department of School Buildings 
1. The taking of approximately thirteen thousand, 
six hundred fifty-five (13,655) square feet of land on 
Silver street. South Boston district, under an order of 
this Commission and Mayor dated October 17, 1956, 
and recorded in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds on 
October 19, 1956. 

Assessments 

During the year 1956, the Highway Division of the 
Public Works Department sent notice of completion of 
twenty-eight (28) streets at a total cost of $490,273.20. 
On this work the Public Improvement Commission 
voted upon assessments in the amount of $132,522.94. 

During the same period, the Sewer Division of the 
Public Works Department reported the completion of 
construction of sanitary sewerage in thirt}^ (30) streets 
at a cost of $107,371.96, on which this Commission 
levied assessments in the amount of $61,238.64. 

The completion of new sidewalks in four (4) streets 
at a cost of $37,994.62, authorized by the City Council, 
was also reported by the Highway Division. On these, 
this Commission levied assessments totaling $18,838.40. 



122 



City Document No. 18. 
Street Assessments 



Street 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



Alvarado avenue 

Alwin street 

Arvale road 

Auriga street 

Austin street 

Banton street 

Bantry Way 

Brucewood street 

Cheryl Lane 

Chesterfield street 

Colebrook street 

Danny road 

Dorchester avenue 

Emmonsdale road 

Hillis road 

Manila avenue 

Mt. Vernon street 

Newland street 

Pomona avenue 

Reynold road 

Service place 

Sparrow street 

Stonehill road 

Stonehill terrace 

Theodore A. Glynn Way . 

Vallaro road 

Westmount avenue 

Westville terrace 



Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
South Boston 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
South Boston 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
Boston Proper 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 



$8,448 07 

30,324 03 

5,444 53 

0,480 81 

34,313 53 

8,992 44 

5,905 04 

17,795 23 

11,658 31 

13,759 34 

6,051 33 

19,986 11 

12.631 39 
23,170 88 
25,474 21 

8,711 68 

139,023 46 
1,170 29 

5,337 08 

8,265 35 

2,098 36 

20.632 92 
18,728 95 

1,196 26 

42,613 97 

5,744 59 

373 10 

5,941 44 



$3,866 00 

9,585 69 

2,077 08 

3,006 71 

400 00 

4.536 01 
2,944 05 
6,091 66 
3,561 49 
5,404 31 
2,753 11 
8,565 31 
5,576 35 
4,996 13 
9,470 83 
4,570 99 

19,874 55 
908 40 

1.537 60 
3,516 19 

500 00 
6,617 75 
8,613 03 

547 08 
7,658 40 
1,921 65 

236 68 
3,185 89 



Totals. 



$490,273 20 



$132,522 94 



Public Works Department. 
Sewer Assessments 



123 



Street 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



Anselm terrace. 



Belnap road, Joan road, Dodge road, 
Leighton road, Perry court, Dietz 
road and Eastmont road 



Constitution road, Grossman street, 
Jamestown terrace. Viking terrace. 



Corman road 

David road 

Emelia terrace 

Guest street 

Hazelmere road 

Island street 

Itasca street 

Lorna and Lena terraces 

Messinger street. , 

Orlando street 

Pelton street 

Rocky Nook terrace 

Sunset lane 

Violet street 

Washington street 

Wedgemere road 

William T. Morrissey Boulevard. 
Woodland road 



Brighton 

Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park 



55,012 82 

20,575 95 

9,648 00 
2,028 80 
6,925 00 
3,341 88 

15,600 00 
2,325 00 
1,250 00 
2,436 71 

10,206 60 
3 ,,595 00 
1,108 50 
650 00 
3,777 00 
2,569 43 
4,200 00 
2,439 00 
810 00 
1,600 00 
7 272 27 



$2,459 97 

17.639 67 

3,456 00 

1,380 00 

4,020 00 

1,920 00 

10,500 00 

990 00 

750 00 

1,395 00 

6,180 00 

1,500 00 

600 00 

360 00 

1,440 00 

1,428 00 

1,650 00 

900 00 

480 00 

870 00 

1,320 00 



Totals. 



S107,371 96 



$61,238 64 



Sidewalk Assessments 



Street 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



Chiswick terrace. 
Embassy road . . . 
Poplar street .... 
West street 



Totals . 



Brighton 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 



$2,960 00 
7,762 80 

24,571 82 
2,700 00 

$37,994 62 



$1,126 61 
3,960 93 

12,414 55 
1,336 31 

$18,838 40 



124 City Document No. 18. 

Street Name Changes 

The names of the following public streets were 
changed effective March 1, 1956: 

Church Street, Boston Proper district, between 
Boylston Street and Providence Street; new name 
Hadassah Way. 

Congress Street, South Boston district, from north- 
easterly line of B Street approximately 50 feet; new 
name, B Street. 

Macallen Street, South Boston district, between 
Dorchester Avenue and Foundry Street; new name, 
Greenbaum Street. 

Marion Court, East Boston district, from 43 Marion 
Street approximately 165 feet southwesterly; new name, 
Marion Place. 

Ralston Street, South Boston district, between Dor- 
chester Avenue and Boston Street; new name. Father 
Anthony Songin Way. 

Land Damages 

On new construction, 118 claims were filed for damage 
to property resulting from land takings or changes in 
grade. On these claims, this Commission awarded 
damages in the amount of $33,036.96. 

On new sewer construction, one claim was filed for 
damage to property resulting from construction or 
changes in grade. On this claim, the Commission 
awarded damages in the amount of $4,200. 

Miscellaneous Permits 

During the period of this report, 362 petitions from 
public utilities were approved for the placing and 
maintaining of poles for the support of wires. 

Also, 33 petitions were approved for miscellaneous 
installations or uses of the public highways of the City 
of Boston as follows : 



Public Works Department. 



125 



Street 



Petitioner 



Nature of Petition 



Bennington street, East 
Boston 

Binney street, Roxbury 



Boylston Street, Boston 
Proper 

Braintree street, Brighton 

Brookline avenue, Roxbury 

C street. South Boston 

Chelsea street, East Boston 
Davison street, Hyde Park 

Davison street, Hyde Park 

Dedham street, Hyde Park 



Falmouth street, Boston 
Proper 

Garth road. West Roxbury 

Harrison avenue, Boston 
Proper 

Hawley street, Boston 
Proper 

High Street Place, Boston 
Proper 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde 
Park 

Kneeland street and Hudson 
street, Boston Proper 

Kneeland street, Boston 
Proper 

ManUa avenue, Hyde Park 



National street. South 
Boston 



North Harvard street, 
Brighton 



Old road, Dorchester 
Park street, Boston Proper 



Boston Gas Company 



New England Deaconess Hos- 
pital 

Brook Realty, Inc. 



Boston Gas Company 

New England Deaconess Hos- 
pital 

Boston Banana Company, Inc. 



Boston Gas Company 

Worcester Gas Light Com- 
pany 

Worcester Gas Light Com- 
pany 

Worcester Gas Liglit Com- 
pany 

Boston Edison Company 



Boston Gas Company 

City of Boston 

(Real Property Department) 

Boston Edison Company 



United Shoe Machine Com- 
pany 

Worcester Gas Light Com- 
pany 

Boston Edison Company 

Boston Edison Company 

Worcester Gas Light Com- 
pany 

Boston Gas Company 

Harvard L^niversity 

Boston Gas Company 
Boston Edison Company 



Underground gas main 

Underground steam pipe 

Bay window encroach- 
ment 

Underground gas main 

Underground steam pipe 

Underground concrete 
caissons 

Underground gas main 

Underground gas main 

Underground gas main 

Underground gas main 

Underground conduit and 
manholes 

Underground gas main 

Parking sidewalk en- 
croachment 

Underground conduit and 
manhole 

Underground vault 

Underground gas main 

Underground conduit and 
manholes 

Underground conduit and 
manhole 

Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Concrete conduits 

Underground gas main 

Underground conduit and 
manhole 



126 



City Document No. 18. 



Street 



Petitioner 



Nature of Petition 



Park street, Boston Proper 



Parklawn road. West 
Roxbury 

Pilgrim road, Roxbury 



Ricker Hill road, West 
Roxbury 

Ruskindale road, Hyde Park 



St. Theresa avenue, West 
Roxbury 

South street, Boston Proper 
Stuart street, Boston Proper 
Vining street, Roxbury 

Walter street, Hyde Park 



Society of St. Paul the 
Apostle 

Boston Gas Company 



New England Deaconess Hos- 
pital 

Boston Gas Company 



Worcester Gas Light Com- 
pany 

Boston Gas Company 
Boston Edison Company 



Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company 

Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, Division of Build- 
ding Construction 



Worcester Gas Light Com- 
pany 



Access shaft 
Underground gas main 
L'nderground steam pipe 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 



Underground conduit and 
manhole 

Underground oil tank 



Steel steam lines, steel 
conduits (2), tile pipe 
(2), water main (all 
underground) 

Underground gas main 



Private Ways 

During the year 1956, permission was given to prepare 

for public travel, the following private ways. 

Anselm Terrace, Brighton 

Arborfield Road, West Roxbury and Hyde Park 

Caryll Street, Dorchester 

Dow Road, West Roxbury 

Emelia Terrace, West Roxbury 

Garth Road Extension, West Roxbury 

Keenan Road, Brighton 

Manion Road, Hyde Park 

Maria Lane, West Roxbury 

Merola Park, Dorchester 

Messinger Street, Dorchester 

Orlando Street, Dorchester 

Ryan Road, Brighton 

Wilmot Street, West Roxbury 

Violet Street, Dorchester 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, Chairman. 
Herman Carp, Vice-Chair man. 
Wm. Arthur Reilly, Member. 

City of Boston 

Administrative Services Department 

Printing ^.^^^at. Section 



Jl^rl.?,^,''^^'-'^ LIBRARY 



II 

3 9999 oeaii' 975 "a 



mm 






K;, i!