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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

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[Document 18 — 1958.] 



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ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WOEKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1957. 



Boston, January 2, 1958. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the annual report of the Public Works 
Department and the Public Improvement Commission 
for the year ending December 31, 1957. 

Fiscal 

The total expenditures of the department for the 
year were $25,357,692.66, of which $3,328,696.68 rep- 
resents water assessments levied by the Metropolitan 
District Commission and $874,165.17 represents Metro- 
politan District Commission sewer assessments. The 
water assessments are $37,901.24 greater than those 
levied in 1956, and the sewer assessments show an 
increase of $179,709.03 in excess of those levied in 1956. 
The sewer assessments will continue to rise due to the 
large expenditures being made by the Metropolitan 
District Commission in providing for sewage treatment 
plants and deep rock tunnels to convey sewage to Deer 
Island and Nut Island, and also because of the policy 
(now curtailed to some extent) of admitting relatively 



2 City Document No. 18 

remote communities to the Metropolitan District Com- 
mission sewer system with Boston paying an unreason- 
ably large share of the cost of the connection. The full 
impact of the Metropolitan District Commission pro- 
gram will not be felt for four or five years, but even 
beyond that period the sewer assessments unquestion- 
ably will continue to increase. The present rate of $80 
per million gallons charged by the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Commission for water will also probably have to 
be increased to $100 or $120 within the next five years. 
Under the circumstances, Boston can look for no finan- 
cial relief in the foreseeable future, insofar as Metropoli- 
tan District Commission assessments are concerned. 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled $6,274,- 
964.54, and the revenue derived from the Sumner 
Tunnel reached a record high to $2,581,503. The 
operation of the Sumner Tunnel resulted in a record- 
breaking surplus of $1,194,586.30 and the surplus 
resulting from the sale of water amounted to $97,607.45. 

Loan Orders 

On July 26, 1957, a City Council order was approved 
by your Honor which provided, under the provisions of 
section 7 of chapter 44 of the General Laws, that the 
sum of $3,000,000 be appropriated for the construction 
of public ways. Ordinarily loan orders for street con- 
struction and reconstruction work provide for an 
amount of $2,000,000, but we requested the above- 
referenced larger sum in order that it would be un- 
necessary to request an additional loan order this year, 
which would automatically have added 10 cents to the 
1958 tax rate. 

Legislation 

Under the provisions of chapter 718 of the Acts of 
1956, the City of Boston was allocated the sum of 
$2,530,208.82 for the reconstruction of highways. This 
allocation — which was paid from the proceeds of the 
Highway Fund — was expended under the direction 
and in accordance with regulations estabhshed by the 
State Department of Public Works. It was of tre- 
mendous benefit in carrying out the department's 
highway program in 1957 and it was a factor in making 
it unnecessary to issue a loan order in 1958 for the con- 
struction and reconstruction of highways. 



(/'^^r<^3/]}j-S' 



Public Works Department 3 

Of the above-referenced amount, the sum of $250,000 
was earmarked for the installation of traffic signals 
under the direction of the Traffic Commission. 



Street Construction Work 

State- Aid Program 

The Chapter 90 Highway Program was continued 
at the same tempo that has characterized this program 
since 1951. In my opinion, our Chapter 90 Program 
for the improvement of main highways is second to 
none in the state. Since 1951, the cost of Chapter 90 
projects has averaged approximately $800,000 each 
year; of which from fifty to sixty per cent has been paid 
out of the State Highway Fund. I don't believe that a 
comparable program for highway improvements has 
ever been carried out in the history of the department. 
Incidentally, it would never have been possible to carry 
out such a program without the enthusiastic and whole- 
hearted support of the officials and engineers of the 
State Department of Public Works, both past and 
present. Their cooperation has been outstanding. 

Our Chapter 90 Program provides for the complete 
modernization of main highways with emphasis on 
safety features to protect pedestrians and motorists. 
Our Chapter 90 highways are well-hghted by means 
of mercury vapor luminaries and, where possible, a 
center divisional island of a minimum width of five feet 
is provided. The latter acts as a haven for pedestrians, 
separates vehicular traffic going in opposite directions, 
and unquestionably tends to reduce vehicular speed and 
prevents motorists from driving on the wrong side of 
the traveled way. A good example of modern urban 
highway reconstruction may be observed on Common- 
wealth avenue, from Brighton avenue to Warren street, 
and on Blue Hill avenue, from Columbia road to Matta- 
pan square. Both of these highways were reconstructed 
in 1957 as Chapter 90 projects, and they are concrete 
examples of the type of improvement that we have 
been able to effect under the Chapter 90 Program 
with the cooperation of the State Department of Public 
Works. 

I submit herewith a schedule of the Chapter 90 
activities in 1957 and those proposed in 1958: 



4 City Document No. 18 

Projects started in 1956 and completed in 1957 

Final Contract 
Project Contractor Bid Price Payment 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester: 

Reconstructed from (and includ- 
ing) Mattapan square to southerly 

S-^IS' °"^ '': '': ''■"■ * Z°n'SSL^Z;'""- 139,502 75 »ioo.i22 03 

and 
River street, Dorchester: 

Reconstructed from Mattapan 
square to approximately 500 feet 
northerly. 

Bunker Hill street, Charlestown : 

Reconstructed from Chelsea street 
to Main street and including side 
9 treets and approaches . . . Dooley Brothers, Inc. 123,401 00 140,793 12 

New bridge over Belle Island Inlet 

between East Boston and Win- Eastern Roads Com- 

throp pany 132,987 00 150,000 00 

Total $345,890 75 $390,915 15 

Projects started and completed in 1957 

Final Contract 
Project Contractor Bid Price Payment 

Centre street. West Roxbury: 

Reconstructed from Spring street 
to Grove street J. A. Susi & Sons, Inc. $158,881 80 $161,277 15 

and 
Baker street. West Roxbury: 

Reconstructed from Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Parkway to Newton 
line. 

Summer street. South Boston: 

Reconstructed from viaduct to 
East Second street (excluding draw- 
bridge and approaches of bridge 
over Reserved Channel) . . . Dooley Brothers, Inc. 118,206 00 125,321 73 

and 
L street. South Boston: 

Reconstructed from East Second 
street to East Fourth street. 

Washington street, Roxbury: 

Reconstructed from Northampton 
street to Eustis street . . . Dooley Brothers, Inc. 54,391 75 70,154 60 



Total $331,479 55 $356,753 48 



Public Works Department 



Projects started in 

Project 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester: 

Reconstruction from Columbine 
street to Columbia road 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester: 

Reconstruction from Woodhaven 
s treet to Columbine street 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton: 
Reconstruction from Brighton 
avenue to Warren street 

East Broadway, South Boston: 

Reconstruction from Dorchester 
street to L street .... 

Tremont street, Brighton: 

Reconstruction from Oak square 
to Newton line .... 

Summer Street Drawbridge over 
Reserved Channel: 
Repairing and strengthening of 
approaches and drawspan 



1957 — to be completed in 1958. 

Per Cent 
Contractor Bid Price Complete 

1957 

A. Singarella & Sons, 

Inc. $294,597 00 99% 



Manning Construction 
Company, Inc. 248,102 00 36% 



Rufo Construction 

Company 238,663 72 73% 



Baker & Co., Inc. 

Chesterbrook Con- 
struction Company 



Ralph Richard Con- 
struction Company 

Total 



100,721 50 8% 
45,100 00 0% 

234,326 00 0% 



[,161,510 22 



Additional Chapter 90 Projects Scheduled for 

Project 
Seaver street, Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Blue Hill avenue to Walnut avenue 
Columbus avenue, Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Walnut avenue to Egleston square 
Baker street. West Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Centre street to Veterans of Foreign W 

way 

Dorchester avenue, South Boston: 

Reconstruction from West Fourth street to Andrew square 
River street, Dorchester and Hyde Park: 

Reconstruction from Edgewater Drive to Wood avenue . 
Main street, Charlestown : 

Reconstruction from City square to Sullivan square 
Commonwealth avenue, Brighton: 

Reconstruction from Warren street to Lake street . 
Columbus avenue, Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Roxbury street to Centre street 
West Broadway, South Boston: 

Reconstruction from Dorchester avenue to Dorchester street 
American Legion Highway, West Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Blue Hill avenue to Cummins Highway 

Total 



1958 



Park 



Length 
4,130 feet 
1,240 feet 

6,700 feet 
4,350 feet 
4,000 feet 
5,100 feet 
9,450 feet 
2,600 feet 
4,120 feet 
11,030 feet 

52,720 feet 
or 10.0 miles. 



6 City Document No. 18 

Street Construction Work 

Exclusive of Chapter 90 Projects 

We also completed a major street reconstruction 
program comprising extensive construction and recon- 
struction in every section of the city. Several important 
traffic arteries resurfaced by the department during 
the year are listed as follows : 

Arlington street, City Proper, from Boylston street to 
Beacon street. 

Beech street, West Roxbury, from Kittredge street to 
Poplar street. 

Berkeley street. City Proper, from Boylston street to 
Beacon street. 

Boylston street, City Proper, from Tremont street to 
Charles street and from Arlington street to Berkeley street. 

Centre street, West Roxbury, from Eliot street to Prince 
street. 

Clarendon street. City Proper, from Boylston street to 
Beacon street. 

Day Square, East Boston. 

Jackson square and vicinity, Roxbury, including parts of 
Centre street, Columbus avenue and Ritchie street. 

Massachusetts avenue, City Proper and Roxbury, from 
Huntington avenue to Columbus avenue. 

Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park, from Beacon street to 
Milton Hne. 

North Harvard street, Brighton, from Hooker street to 
Western avenue. 

Parker Hill avenue, Roxbury, from Parker street to Sunset 
street. 

Perkins street, West Roxbury, from Prince street to 
Francis Parkman Drive. 

Ruggles street, Roxbury, from Columbus avenue to 
Leon street. 

Roxbury Crossing, Roxbury, from Tremont street to 
Roxbury street. 

In continuation of our policy of replacing brick 
sidewalks with cement concrete in the older sections 
of the city, contracts during the year, totaling approxi- 
mately $153,500, were awarded for this work. 

The following is a summarized financial state- 
ment of the expenditures made in 1957 for highway 
improvements : 



Public Works Department 7 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) . . . $1,785,406 98 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue Account) . . 84,147 12 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) . . . 19,069 46 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of . . . 165,711 01 

Expended under provisions of chapter 718, Acts of 1956 1,484,467 59 



Total $3,538,802 16 

The following is a summarized record of the highway 
improvement work done by the department in 1957: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 220. 

Includes 50 new streets ordered laid out and con- 
structed as public ways under the provisions of chapter 
393, Acts of 1906. 

Streets Improved, 37.66 miles. 

Includes 6.8 miles reconstructed as chapter 90 
projects. 

Sidewalks Improved, 6.35 miles. 

This item does not include sidewalks improved in the 
above-noted street improvements. 

Street Lights 

During the year, we removed 1,704 gas lamps which 
were replaced with electric lights of a 2,500 lumen 
intensity. It is our intention to continue this program 
in 1958 and, if possible, remove all of the remaining 
gas street lights located in Boston. As of December 31, 
there were only 710 gas lamps remaining. In the past 
eight years, we have removed 6,263 gas lamps and 
replaced them with modern street lights. Incidentally, 
for the past forty or fifty years, the city has had a 
contract for the servicing and maintaining of all gas 
lamps throughout the city. This contract service was 
terminated at midnight on December 31, as the con- 
tractor, the American Service Company, did not wish 
to continue the contract, in view of the small number 
of gas lamps remaining. Therefore, as of January 1, 
1958, we took over the maintenance and servicing of 
the remaining gas lamps, and we are employing — for a 
temporary period — three former employees of the 
American Service Company. Up to date, the servicing 
work being done by the department has proved very 
satisfactory. 



City Document No. 18 



Snow Removal 



While we did not encounter any major snow storms 
during the year; that is, those in excess of eight inches, 
we did encounter a series of small storms which neces- 
sitated extensive plowing, sanding, and salting opera- 
tions. Our sanding and salting program has been 
greatly accelerated over the past six years due to the 
necessity of eliminating hazardous driving conditions 
during the winter months. The number of vehicles now 
on the road makes it absolutely necessary to continue 
with an extensive sanding and salting program even 
when only light snowfalls are encountered. 

The plowing, sanding and salting operations are 
expensive as they involve the rental of contractors' 
equipment, overtime payment to department em- 
ployees, and the purchase of large volumes of sand and 
salt. The salt item alone is a major item as we now use 
from six to eight thousand tons a year, and it costs 
approximately $15.60 a ton. It is not unusual to use 
400 tons of salt in a single night to eliminate hazardous 
driving conditions caused by sleet or light snowfalls. 

The cost of snow removalworkin 1957 was $449. 797. 64.* 

* Not available. 

Bridges 

During the year, work continued on the major con- 
tract for rebuilding and repairing the Charlestown 
Bridge, which probably is the most important draw- 
bridge in the city as it is used by approximately 20,000 
motorists and M. T. A. passengers daily. The drawspan 
was closed to the passage of all marine traffic from 
May 1 to December 31, due to the necessity of effecting 
major repairs. We have had some difficulty in making 
the necessary adjustments for operating the draw, 
but we hope that we will be able to re-open the draw for 
marine traffic some time early in 1958. 



South Bay Incinerator 

During the year, the contract for the driving of 
foundation piles was completed by the J. F. White Con- 
tracting Company. This contract was awarded in 1956, 
and the final payment to the contractor totaled 
$419,000. 






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Public Works Department 9 

A contract was awarded to Coleman Brothers Corp. 
in June for the construction of the refuse storage bin. 
The bid price was $423,000 and the work was sub- 
stantially completed by the end of the year. 

Under date of November 25, a contract for the con- 
struction of the building was awarded in the amount of 
$2,693,793 to the Bowen Company. This contract has 
not started as yet, but it is expected to start verv early 
in 1958. 

Personnel 

There were 1,948 employees in the Department as of 
December 31, as compared with 1,990 employees on the 
rolls on January 1, 1957. 

Our Plans for 1958 

1. First — and of utmost importance — we will 
make every reasonable effort to reduce expenditures to a 
minimum consistent with the rendering of proper service 
to the public. We fully realize the necessity of observing 
an austerity program, and will be guided accordingly in 
connection with our expenditures. 

2. Every effort will be made to reduce personnel 
another 5 per cent, although we are scraping bottom in 
certain areas insofar as a future reduction in personnel is 
concerned. This is due, in part, to the fact that we have 
been carrying out a ''no hire — no fire" program for the 
past eight years as evidenced by the fact that the De- 
partment now has 582 employees less than we had on 
January 1, 1950. This reduction takes into consideration 
the transfer of 65 employees from the Street Laying-Out 
Department to this department on May 1, 1954. 

3. W^e intend to continue our accelerated Chapter 90 
Program for the improvement of main highways. 

4. We intend to place Boston's first incinerator in 
operation some time in 1958. 

5. We intend to complete our gas lamp elimination 
program. 

6. We are going to make an effort to close the 
Charlestown Drawbridge to marine traffic, thereby 
effecting a minimum saving of $70,000 a year to Boston's 
taxpayers. We are now required to maintain a three- 
man crew around the clock, seven days a week, to 
operate this drawspan for the benefit of scows and 
barges hauHng sand and oil upstream to plants located 



10 City Document No. 18 

in Cambridge. The maintaining of a drawspan at the 
Charlestown Bridge places an unreasonable burden on 
Boston's taxpayers, particularly in view of the fact 
that we receive no benefit as the vessels are hauling 
material to and from plants located in Cambridge. 

In addition to the excessive cost of operating this 
span, the motorists and M. T. A. passengers are sub- 
jected to an unreasonable inconvenience every time that 
the draw is opened for the passage of a boat. An aver- 
age of 20,000 motorists a day use this structure, as well 
as 80,000 M. T. A. passengers. Since May 1, 1957, the 
drawspan has been closed to all marine traffic in order 
to permit the repairing of the draw at a cost of approxi- 
mately $600,000.00. It seems reasonable to assume 
that if marine traffic got along without the opening of 
the draw for eight months, it might be able to get along 
permanently without a drawspan, thereby resulting in a 
substantial reduction in cost to the city and eliminating 
the inconvenience now caused to approximately 120,000 
people. Therefore, it is our intention to petition the 
U. S. Army Engineers to permit the closing of the draw- 
span and maintain the bridge structure as a fixed span. 
Incidentally, there is a vertical clearance of 23 feet 
under the drawspan at high water, thereby permitting 
scows, small tugs, small barges and pleasure-craft to 
pass through the channel without opening the draw. 
The only vessels requiring the operation of the draw- 
span are the large oil barges and large towboats. In 
view of the expense assumed by the city in maintaining 
and operating the draw, it does not appear unreasonable 
to require the owners of oil barges to use only the small- 
sized barges when making deliveries of oil upstream 
of the bridge to plants located in Cambridge. In any 
event, I feel that the entire matter should be thrashed 
out at a pubhc hearing before the Army Engineers, and 
I intend to petition for the closing of the drawspan as 
soon as we have prepared sufficient material to substan- 
tiate our opinion that the city should not be required 
to maintain the Charlestown High Bridge as a draw- 
bridge. 

7. We are going to make every reasonable effort to 
eliminate the contract which provides for the hauling 
of refuse material from the Fort Hill Wharf to Spectacle 
Island. This service, which costs the Department 
approximately $400,000.00 per year, will be eliminated 
when the incinerator is placed in operation. The present 



Public Works Department 11 

contract expires on March 31, and we can effect a 
substantial saving for the remaining nine months of 
1958 or until the incinerator is placed in service, if we 
can find other suitable areas in which to dump the refuse 
now hauled by scows to Spectacle Island. 

I was unsuccessful in my efforts in 1957 to eliminate 
this operation, but am hopeful that I will be more suc- 
cessful this year, particularly in view of the fact that 
the construction of the incinerator is well under way. 
It appears reasonable to assume that it should be in 
operation before the end of the current year. We must 
make a determined effort to eliminate the costly scow 
operation for the last nine months of 1958 to offset an 
anticipated increase in the cost of the refuse collection 
contracts. These contracts are bound to increase in 
cost in 1958 as the agreement with the Union provides 
for a 15-cent-an-hour wage increase to all employees 
engaged in refuse collection work, effective next April 1. 
We estimate that a 10-cent-an-hour increase to such 
employees will increase the cost of the contracts approxi- 
mately $75,000, and this cost normally is passed along 
to the city by the contractors. Therefore, we are faced* 
with an increased cost of refuse collection of approxi- 
mately $110,000, but this can be offset to some extent 
if we are successful in our efforts to terminate the 
Spectacle Island operation. 

Incidentally, the total cost of the refuse collection 
and disposal contracts in 1957 was $2,608,681. This 
compares favorably with the 1956 cost of $2,571,813 
when you consider that the hourly rate for the contrac- 
tors' employees in 1956 was $2 and in 1957 $2.15. The 
cost of these services in 1950 was $2,730,019 or $129,338 
in excess of our 1957 cost despite the fact that the hourly 
wage rate in 1950 was only $1.38. However, I am at 
my wits' end as to how to reduce the cost of refuse col- 
lection and disposal any further unless we are successful 
in eliminating the scow operation on April 1, 1958. We 
are working on a plan to accomplish such an objective, 
but I am not confident that we will be successful. 

8. We intend to continue with our program of en- 
closing hazardous open brooks with concrete conduits 
similar to the work done in Stony Brook in the past 
three years. The open Stony Brook has been entirely 
replaced with a concrete conduit, and a conduit has 
also replaced a section of the open Canterbury Branch 
of Stony Brook in Roslindale adjacent to American 



12 City Document No. 18 

Legion Highway. We intend to further enclose the 
Canterbury Branch between the terminus of the present 
conduit, which was installed in 1957, and Walk Hill 
street. This type of project is worth-while as open 
brooks are a hazard to children and act as a deterrent 
to the development of adjacent areas. They generally 
overflow during spring freshets or following heavy rains, 
causing flooding of cellars. 

Recommendations 

1. We should press for the passage of a law to per- 
mit the Massachusetts Port Authority to function. 
With said Authorit}^ in business, we will get a minimum 
of $7,619,380 for the Sumner Tunnel, and we might 
never obtain anything for it if we permit this oppor- 
tunity to pass. We can, of course, recover the $2,619,380 
paid out of real estate taxes to make up tunnel deficits 
for the period from 1935 to 1944. However, under the 
provisions of Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1929, the City 
can never derive a profit from the operation of the 
'tunnel. Section 12 of the Acts provides, in substance, 
that after the tunnel is debt free, a schedule of tolls 
shall be established sufficient to meet operating costs 
only. The tunnel revenue cannot be transferred to the 
General Fund of the city, nor can it be used to finance 
another tunnel or a bridge to span the harbor. If 
Boston retains ownership of the tunnel, it is faced with 
the prospect of operating the present inadequate tube 
for the foreseeable future without being able to apply a 
single penny of tunnel revenue to reduce the tax rate. 
The advantages that will accrue to Boston for the sale 
of the tunnel to the Port Authority are obvious. 

2. Transfer of vehicular roads from the jurisdiction 
of the Parks and Recreation Department to the Public 
Works Department. We are responsible for the con- 
struction, reconstruction, and maintenance of 750 miles 
of public highways, and I believe that there are approxi- 
mately 25 miles of public roads under the Park Depart- 
ment's jurisdiction. It makes sense to me to have all the 
highway work under the jurisdiction of one department 
from a point of view of efficiency and also economy. 
However, if the park roads are transferred to us, all 
personnel, plant, and equipment related to the mainte- 
nance and construction of the roads should also be 
transferred. 



Public Works Department 13 

3. As pointed out by Chief Engineer Haley in his 
report on the activities of the Survey Division, our in- 
abihty to attract engineers has reached the acute stage. 
This problem not only affects the Survey Division, but 
all divisions of the department, and all departments of 
the city. Many years ago, the city abandoned all hope 
of attracting college men to enter the municipal engineer- 
ing field, but we are now in the position of not being able 
to attract high school graduates. In 1957, conditions 
reached such a state that we reached into the labor ranks 
of the department and temporarily promoted four motor 
equipment operators to the position of senior engineering 
aids. We have been instructing them in the duties of 
transitmen. 

This is a problem that should be met head on in order 
to solve it. I think that a sitdown with the school 
officials might be of some help. As a springboard to 
further discussion, I suggest the following: 

Hire no rodmen during the summer months unless they 
are at least 16 years old, enrolled in a technical high school 
in Boston, and intend to follow the civil engineering field 
upon graduation from high school. 

This policy will give young men, who do not intend 
to go to college, an opportunity to become interested in 
the municipal engineering field and practically assure 
them of passing the civil service examination for 
rodmen on their graduation. We still have a wage 
differential to overcome to compete with the State 
Department of Public Works, but that matter can be 
adjusted if we find enough high school students interested 
enough in the program. The municipal engineering 
field has many attractions, and I am reasonably certain 
that we can get enough young men interested in such a 
career if we give them the opportunity to try it out. 

4. All proposed legislation concerning the M. D. C. 
should be carefully scrutinized and examined to make 
certain that its passage would have no detrimental 
effect on Boston. I know of several instances of laws 
being passed concerning the M. D. C. and which ap- 
peared to be innocuous, but which actually will cost the 
City of Boston many hundreds of thousands of dollars; 
and this statement is no exaggeration. The laws were 
passed before I got interested in studying such matters 



14 City Document Xo. 18 

folloT^ing a study that I made of the effect that the 
admitting of Randolph and Westwood into the ]\1. D. C. 
sewer system would have on Boston. 

I also view ^ith alarm the many strictly local improve- 
ments that the AI. D. C. has been undertaking over the 
past three or four years. These improvements not only 
have been effected in the other cities and towns of the 
metropoHtan area, but also in Boston. Regardless of 
where they are constructed, improvements strictly for 
the benefit of individual communities are contrary to 
the concept of metropolitan government and should be 
undertaken and paid for by the communities benefiting 
by them. The cost should not be spread over the entire 
!M. D. C. area unless the benefits or improvements are 
metropolitan in character. The trend (probably pro- 
moted by political pressure) to have the M. D. C. 
construct improvements of a local nature, should be 
stopped, and any legislation pertaining to them should 
be vigorously opposed by Boston and all other com- 
munities interested in restricting the ]\1. D. C. to 
projects or improvements that are metropolitan in 
character. In any event, I wish to emphasize the 
necessity of carefully studjdng any proposed law 
affecting the yi. D. C, in order to make certain that 
Boston is being fairly treated. 

5. As you well know, chapter 407 of the Acts of 
1957 provided for the alternate parking of vehicles on 
public wa\'s on alternate sides of the streets on alternate 
nights. In accordance with the provisions of this act, 
the Traffic Commission passed a vote under date of 
November 27 of 1957, implementing the law. A con- 
certed effort should be made to inform the public of the 
provisions of this law because if motorists are properly 
informed, I am certain that they will comply with it. 
The law was passed in the public interest and to increase 
safety and proxide for clean streets throughout the year 
and properly plowed streets during the winter months. 
Up to now, the law has been followed in the breach 
rather than in the observance, and I feel that the prin- 
cipal reason is due to the fact that people do not under- 
stand the precise provisions of the regulation. I feel 
that a card informing the motorists of the law should 
be placed under the windshield wiper of every vehicle 
parked in the public streets during the nighttime. It 
would be more effective if the Police Department 
placed these cards, but apparently said department is 



Public Works Department 15 

not desirous of undertaking such an assignment. There- 
fore, it is my intention to have some cards printed and 
have them so placed by P. W. D. employees. There 
probably are from 30,000 to 50,000 cars illegally parked 
ever}' night, so that we have a tremendous problem, 
but I think that we should make a start on it. Con- 
ditions have reached the point where we cannot properly 
plow residential streets, and we cannot keep them 
clean, due to the continuous occupation of curb space 
by parked cars during the nighttime. 

Appended are reports submitted by the di^-ision heads 
relative to the acti\'ities of their divisions in 1957, and 
also report of the Pubhc Improvement Commission for 
the same year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hylaxd, 
Co77i?7iissioner of Public Works. 



16 City Document No. 18 

MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 





Total Appropriations, 






Division or Service. 


Including 
Transfers and Amounts 
Carried Over from 1956. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office 


.$74,055 00 


$71,488 84 


.S2,.566 16 


Automotive Division . 


832.609 00 


812,185 00 


20,424 00 


Bridge Division . 


980,682 02 


906,420 26 


74,261 76 


Highway Division 


1,840,286 63 


1,600,040 04 


240,246 59 


Highway Program, Chapter 








718, Acts of 1956 . 


2,280,208 82 


1,484,467 59 


795,741 23 


Lighting Service . 


1,609,191 06 


1,609,191 06 


— ■ 


Sanitary Division 


4,993,418 75 


4,959,038 85 


34,379 90 


Sewer Division . 


799,552 08 


786,871 90 


12,680 18 


Sumner Tunnel . 


650,260 81 


629,284 79 


20,976 02 


Survey Division . 


113,900 00 


113,727 57 


172 43 


Water Division . 


2,711,529 46 


2,472,526 21 


239,003 25 


Totals .... 


$16,885,693 63 


$15,445,242 11 


$1,440,451 52 



LOANS AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Title. 



Total Amount 
Available. 



Expenditures. 



Unexpended 
Balance. 



Bridges, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 

Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings Thereof (Non-Revenue) 

Incinerator Building, Construction and Equipping 
(Non-Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue) 

Sewerage Works (Non-Revenue) 

Snow Removal (Revenue) 

Reconstruction of Streets (Revenue) , 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of (Reve- 
nue) 

Street Signs (Revenue) 

Totals 



$4,114,577 79 

8,661 09 

2,391,867 95 
5,160,141 16 

158,338 04 
1,176,989 81 

475,000 00 
45,572 34 

291,215 72 
14,035 53 



$1,403,879 06 



973,175 39 
1,785,406 98 

84,147 12 
815,389 44 
449,797 64 

19,069 46 

165,711 01 
13,012 60 



$2,710,698 73 

8,661 09 

1,418,692 56 

3,374,734 18 

74,190 92 

361,600 37 

25,202 36 

26,502 88 

125,504 71 
1,022 93 



$13,836,399 43 



55,709,588 70 



$8,126,810 73 



Public Works Department 



17 



REVENUE 
On Account of Public Works Department 

Central Office: 

Charges for plans and specifications $1,360 00 

Automotive Division : 

Sale of junk 411 63 

Bridge Division: 

Rents $1,170 00 

Miscellaneous 13,858 03 

15,028 03 

Sumner Tunnel: 

Tolls 2,589,725 00 

Lighting Service: 

Sale of junk 1,247 02 

Highway Division: 

From assessments (added to taxes) on 
abutters for cost of laying sidewalks 

in front of their premises $8,743 22 

Permits and Driveways 73,261 46 

Sale of materials, etc 375 19 

Rents 10,054 50 

Licenses 21,855 00 

Signs 87,620 78 

Contributions from Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under Chapter 90 of 
General Laws for construction of 
public wavs, including one bridge 
amounting' to $47,192.07 629,934 07 

831,844 22 

Sanitary Division: 

Sale of garbage and miscellaneous 5,566 68 

Sewer Division: 

Disposal of sewage $19,233,00 

Entrance fees 14,457 70 

Rents 849 00 

Refunds, etc 438 00 

34,977 70 

Water Division: 

Water rates $5,648,388 11 

Water rates added to taxes 510,722 08 

Service Pipes for new takers, extending, 

repairing, etc 1,925 59 

Fees on overdue rates 16 40 

Damage to property 2,789 59 

Labor and materials 2,757 74 

Deposit account 78,337 67 

Elevator and fire pipe connections 123 59 

Miscellaneous income 1,369 32 

6,246,430 09 

Grand Total $9,726,590 37 



18 



City Document No. 18 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 1,985 persons ehgible for employment in the 
several divisions, and of that number 1,945 were upon 
the January 2, 1958 payrolls. 

Grade and Number of Employees. 





Services. 


TlTLB. 


•as 

urn 
go 
o 


6 
> 

1 

< 


•a 
•c 

m 


■r 


5 

•a 

CQ 


1 


3 


1 


to 


•3 




1 


















1 






1 


1 


1 
1 






1 


1 










2 










1 








1 






1 














1 




1 
















1 








1 

3 












1 






1 




2 

14 

1 




1 


2 




10 






14 




1 
1 


2 


1 

9 
4 


2 

15 
5 
8 
2 






2 


11 

5 

7 


9 


Principal senior and assistant civil 


21 




61 




19 








21 










2 


Senior public relations representative 








1 










1 


Automotive and senior electrical 








1 

1 




2 






3 


Assistant electrical engineers 
















1 












4 








1 


Pumping station engineers and sta- 


















4 




















1 


District foremen 






11 

1 
63 


7 
3 

08 


2 
16 


2 


5 
3 




28 


Other foremen 




11 


1 


''1 






3 








3 




20 




171 


Legal assistant 




1 


Chief electrician 














1 
11 


1 










2 




2 






15 


















4 


17 


19 


117 


98 


62 


17 


41 24 1 


399 












1 





Public Works Department 19 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Continued. 





Services. 


Title. 


-38 

am 
so 
o 


> 
o 

i 

<: 


•c 

n 


ja.SP 


5 

■a 

09 
SO 


1 


•33 

5 




> 

a 


"3 
o 




4 
1 


17 


19 


117 


98 


62 


17 


41 


24 


.S99 


Executive secretary, P. W. D 


1 
















2 


?. 


Senior personnel officer and assistant . . 


2 
















2 






1 


1 


1 
1 








?, 






1 


1 




3 


1 


S 


Principal clerk and secretary 

Principal clerks, stenographers, ac- 


1 
1 


1 


2 


4 


11 


4 


5 


1 


8 
1 

32 
9 

2 


1 

3 

1 


37 




1 


Senior clerks, typists, stenographers. 


2 


6 
1 


1 


5 


2 

1 




1 


54 


Clerk-stenographers, clerks, typists. . . 


1?: 








2 
















1 
3 


1 










2 






1 




6 


Principal storekeepers 




1 

2 








o 


Senior storekeeper and storekeepers . . 








1 
1 

5 

31 




3 


Chief water meter reader 












1 


Supervisor and special water meter 
















5 


Water meter readers and clerks 
















31 


Sergeant tollmen guards 














5 

48 


5 


Tollmen guards 


















48 






1 
3 
9 














1 


Sergeants, mobile guard 


















3 


Mobile guards 


















g 


Drawtenders and assistants 




111 














111 


Analytical chemist 





















Chief and senior investigators 








2 

7 












2 


Estimators and investigators 


















7 


Dispatcher 




1 
















Plumbers 














19 


1 
33 


19 


Head photostat operator 




























71 


76 


154 




Carried forward 


11 


44 


136 


145 


107 


777 





20 City Document No. 18 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 





Services. 


Title, 


O 


o 
1 

< 


•e 


Highway- 
Lighting. 

Sanitary. 




a 
a 

3 

H 


a 


> 

3 


1 




11 


44 


136 


145 


107 


71 

1 


76 


154 


33 
1 

1 


777 




2 


Principal duplicating machine oper- 












7 














5 
2 






5 








1 


3 

2 

1 


3 




7 




13 








4 






1 


3 


9 

1 

10 


1 


20 




38 






1 




















10 










1 
3 










1 


Repairmen and maintenancemen .... 




30 


2 


1 


8 


3 


77 
1 

20 




124 
1 


Maintenance mechanics and helpers, 




1 


12 


2 
39 

1 


4 
7 
2 

7 






?5 






1 




22 






3 

2 


5 








1 






14 






1 




40 










18 
1 






19 










4 
13 
9 

1 
25 




1 




6 












13 




















9 


Heavy motor equipment operators. . . 




3 

2 


5 


18 
40 


61 
109 


12 


18 

24 




113 
205 













19 
5 










1 
8 






20 






4 


96 
1 


303 

6 


15 


36 
3 




467 






10 
















Totals 


11 


110 


165 


352 


631 


175 


102 


364 


35 


1945 



Public Works Department 



21 



Number of Employees Actually Employed January 1, 1957, and 
January I, 1958. 



>, 










t 

3 
CO 


3 

H 


on 


-d 





03 .a 

































CQ 




> 


>>^ 




O 


2 'a 
•as 




3 






mO 


OQ 


< 



January 1, 1957 
January 1, 1958 

January 1, 1957 
January 1, 1958 



34 
35 


98 
102 


12 
11 


168 
165 


383 
364 



361 
352 



614 
631 



184 
175 



131 
110 



1,985 
1,945 



Total Eligible Force. 



44 


112 


13 


183 


422 


394 


658 


210 


145 


43 


109 


13 


181 


423 


396 


663 


205 


128 



2,181 
2,161 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, 
etc., of Employees. 







i 


s 

o « 






lO 




00 


i§ 


i 






















o> 


tl 














T3 
Si 




^ 


Sbbvicbs. 




» _ oS 


•a 


•a 


T3 










t 

a 


1957-1958. 


a 


§5 




5 
'o 


(S 

Q 


(2 


go 


.a 
Q 


s 


a 
4 




a 
a 
•-1 


5" 


H 


(2 


a 
< 




2 




3 
19 

1 
6 






12 
131 
170 
361 


Central Office . . . 
Automotive 


11 
110 
165 
352 


3 

1 
3 
7 


1 
1 






1 


3 


6 

2 

5 


1 


9 


3 


7 
13 


3 


5 


1 


Highway 


5 


3 


7 


9 


20 


3 


3 


4 


9 


615 


Sanitary 


632 


18 


9 


2 


36 


3 


6 


1 


2 
2 


1 


4 


185 
36 




175 
35 


1 
1 




1 


5 












2 
2 


2 

1 


1 
11 


2 
12 


99 
384 


Tunnel 

Water 


102 
365 


1 

5 


1 
1 


1 
1 


7 


1 


17 


18 








18 


65 


11 


39 


20 


40 


1,993 


Totals 


1,947 


40 


18 


9 


80 









22 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX A 



REPORT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION 
FOR THE YEAR 1957 



Boston, January 2, 1958. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I am submitting herewith the annual report of the 
Automotive Division of the PubHc Works Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1957. This report 
covers the activities of the five garages, the Mobile 
Guard Section and the Motor Pool. 

The quota of employees assigned to the Automotive 
Division for 1957 was 143, but due to transfers and 
vacancies the number of employees dropped to an 
average of 115. These employees were assigned to the 
following duties: One chief automotive engineer in 
charge of the division, 9 employees assigned to office 
work, one dispatcher in charge of Motor Pool, four 
employees assigned to stockroom, three employees 
assigned to wreckers, 40 employees assigned to repair 
work, 38 employees assigned to maintenance of build- 
ings, gasoline and oil dispensing, cleaning, watchmen's 
duties, and motor vehicle operation, and 19 employees 
assigned to the Mobile Guard Section which maintains 
a watch over Public Works Department property and 
equipment between the hours of 4:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. 
weekdays, and all day Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. 

The office maintained by the division at City Hall 
processed 1,758 requisitions in 1957, of which 1,077 
were service orders, and 687 were purchase orders. 
A petty cash fund of $300 was used to make about 100 
purchases a month, usually under $3 each. The City 
Hall office reports the following expenditures from the 
1957 appropriation. 



Personal services . 
Contractual services 
Materials and supplies 
Rents and registration fees . 
Purchase of new equipment 



$452,301 00 
64,601 00 

181,070 00 
11,281 00 

102,932 00 

$812,185 00 



Public Works Department 23 

The following equipment was purchased in 1957 from 
budget appropriations and equipment loan: 

For Sanitary Division : 
Two street sweepers 
Two front bucket loaders 
Three 3-ton dump trucks 
Three Tarco salt spreaders 

For Highway Division: 
Two tractor shovels 
One core drill 

For Sewer Division : 
One sedan 

For Water Division: 
One derrick truck 
Four 2-ton dump trucks 
One 2-ton platform truck 
Six express trucks 
Four sedans 

For Automotive Division (Mobile Guard Section) : 
Three l§-ton pick-up trucks 

The department's fleet of 493 units of automotive 
equipment, under the supervision of this division, 
consists of 82 sedans and other vehicles used for trans- 
portation purposes, and 278 trucks of various sizes, 
including 36 snowfighters, ten compressors, four catch- 
basin cleaners, 35 pick-up trucks, 131 dump trucks, 
six wreckers, six flushers, three derrick trucks, two lumber 
trucks, one rack truck with crane, three platform 
trucks, 32 emergency trucks and nine miscellaneous 
trucks. There are 28 street sweepers, 11 gasoline road 
rollers, seven snow and bucket loaders, 19 front bucket 
loaders, two tractor shovels, four crawler tractors, 
one grader, and three trailer compressors, and 58 pieces 
of miscellaneous equipment ; 440 of these units are regis- 
tered under the motor vehicle law of the Commonwealth. 

The repair shop at the Highland street garage per- 
formed approximately 12,000 repair jobs, including tire 
repairs and lubrication check-ups. Six thousand repair 
work orders were made out by the motor equipment 
repairmen. Contracts in the amount of $10,000, and 
$6,000 were issued for the respective repair of Walter 
Snowfighters and F.W.D. trucks. 



24 City Document No. 18 

The Mobile Guard and the Motor Pool operated in a 
satisfactory manner during 1957. The laborer-watch- 
men in the Mobile Guard were transferred from the 
Automotive Division to the Sanitary and Highway 
Divisions. The Motor Pool consists of one dispatcher 
and seven drivers (one from the Automotive Division). 
The dispatcher makes all assignments to the drivers, 
and also has charge of the short-wave radio. Within 
the Public Works Department are 44 cars equipped with 
two-way radios. The Motor Pool assignments outside 
the Public Works Department consist of the following: 

Institutions Department — Conveying patients to Tewks- 
bury, Long Island, and Nazareth. 

Purchasing Department — Conveying inspectors to sources 
of supplies. 

Public Library — Checking district libraries. 

Election Department — Conveying voting machine in- 
spectors, and work on election days. 

Assessing Department, Printing Department, Public Cele- 
brations, and Mayor's Office — Various assignments. 

Real Estate Division — Conveying city auctioneer to loca- 
tions where city-owned property is to be auctioned. 

The Mobile Guard Section, with 19 men and three 
vehicles, patrolled the city, protecting Public Works 
property. The guards inspect all yards and at each 
location punch a Detex time clock. Watchmen are 
permanently stationed on locations where experience 
has shown that it is advisable to have a man present at 
all times to protect city property. 

Several improvements to the buildings and equip- 
ment were made in 1957. A new hoist with lubrication 
equipment was installed at the Forest Hills garage to 
take care of snow fighting equipment. New overhead 
doors were installed at the Albany street, and Hyde 
Park garages. The lubrication lift at the Highland 
street garage was remodeled to handle the latest models 
of passenger cars. A complete new Alemite system was 
installed at Highland street to replace the worn out 
system. 

If sufficient funds are available from Equipment 
Loans in 1958, considerable new equipment to replace 
worn out and outmoded automotive equipment will be 
purchased. 



Public Works Department 



25 



NUMBER OF EACH TYPE OF AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 
IN PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



Passenger cars 












82 


Trucks, half-ton . 












35 


Trucks, 1 to 1^ ton 












47 


Trucks, 2 to 3 ton 












133 


Trucks, 5 to 8 ton 












5 


Wreckers 












6 


Compressors . 












10 


Trailer compressors 












3 


Crawler tractors . 












4 


Tractor shovels 












2 


Front bucket loaders 












19 


Grader . 












1 


Street flushers 












6 


Street sweepers 












28 


Road and sidewalk rollers 










11 


Snow fighters 










36 


Snow and bucket loaders 










7 


Miscellaneous equipment 










58 


Total .... 










493 


Registered 












440 



Respectfully submitted, 



James H. Stewart, 
Chief Automotive Engineer. 



26 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX B 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1958. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

Submitted herewith is the annual report of the Bridge 
Division, covering the income, expenditures and opera- 
tion of the Bridge Service and the Sumner Tunnel for 
the year ending December 31, 1957. 

Respectfully, 

John J. McCall, 

Division Engineer, 
Bridge Division. 



Public Works Department 



27 



I. BRIDGE SERVICE. 

Summary of Budget Appropriations and Expenditures 





Regular 
Appropria- 
tion 


Bridges, 
Repairs, etc. 


Bridges, Construction op 


Revenue 


Non -Revenue 


Balance from 1956 

1957 Appropriation .... 


$699,786 00 


$61,570 37 
70,000 00 


$149,325 65 


$4,067,385 72 
47,192 07 


Total Credits 


$699,786 00 
9,639 00 


$131,570 37 


$149,325 65 


$4,114,577 79 


Transfers from 


Encumbrances 

Total Debits 


$676,659 51 
686,298 51 


$71,368 36 
71,368 36 


$148,753 39 
148,753 39 


$549,938 71 
853,940 35 




Unencumbered 

Balances 


$13,487 49 


$60,202 01 


$572 26 


$2,710,698 73 













Details of Expenditures on Tidewater Bridges 

TIDEWATER BRIDGES— 1957 



Bridge 


Draw- 
tenders' 
Salaries 


Mechanics' 
Wages 


Material 


T, . Supplies, 

Repair utUities, 

Bi^ Etc. 


Total 


*Broadway 


$15,290 15 
50,789 36 
58,194 42 
43,704 76 

41,893 99 
57,870 36 
56,701 30 
60,535 18 
46,812 74 


$1,092 10 
1,924 81 
3,736 64 
2,404 58 
3,465 34 
6,152 56 
2,295 76 
2,650 71 
8,179 56 

18,957 53 


$28 58 
16 40 

201 97 
87 68 

565 03 

472 77 
68 63 
73 80 

770 75 
13.551 85 


$192 20 

1,943 61 

328 16 

785 08 

176 40 

940 33 

1,022 69 

2,420 64 

4,443 18 

2,852 06 


$339 28 

1,271 55 

682 94 

658 24 

601 26 

870 46 

2,223 42 

2,485 27 

691 67 


$16,942 31 
55,945 73 
63,144 13 
47,640 34 
4,206 77 
50,060 91 
62,127 90 
64,069 87 
76,413 94 
82,865 85 


Charlestown 


Chelsea Street 

Congress Street 

♦Dover Street 


L Street 


Maiden 


Andrew P. McArdle.. . . 

Northern Avenue 

Summer Street 


Totals 


$431,792 26 


$50,859 59 


$15,837 46 


$15,104 35 


$9,824 09 


$523,417 75 





* Not operating as drawbridge but kept in operable condition 
Fitzgerald Expressway in Fort Point Channel area. 



for possible use during construction of 



28 



City Document No. 18 



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Public Works Department 29 

At the beginning of 1957, the Bridge Division main- 
tained eleven (11) drawbridges, three of which were not 
operated as such; Broadway, Dover Street, and Warren 
Bridge. 

The status and conditions of the various drawbridges 
are summarized as follows: 

Fort Point Channel 
Dover Street and Broadway Bridges 

These bridges were not operated during the year but 
were maintained in operable condition in the event that 
the construction of the Fitzgerald Expressway would 
require the use of waterborne equipment using the 
channelway. To date, this has not been necessary. 

In connection with the Dover Street Bridge, it has 
been decided to replace this structure with a solid fill 
causeway having culvert facilities to accommodate the 
tidal flow of the channel; and the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Works has agreed to execute the project 
under the provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90, of the 
General Laws, on condition that the City will contribute 
$350,000 which represents 50 per cent of the estimated 
cost of the project. 

This decision was based on an engineering study and 
report made for this department by William A. Fisher 
Company, Inc., consulting engineers. 

At the present time, the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Works are having plans and specifications 
drawn for the project; and it is expected that these will 
be completed and the work commenced within the next 
few months; more or less in conjunction with the con- 
struction of the Fitzgerald Expressway facilities at 
Dover and Albany streets. 

It is hoped that the replacement of Dover Street 
Bridge with a solid fill causeway will accelerate the 
filling-in of the channel at least to its upper end at 
Massachusetts avenue. 

Summer Street, Congress Street, and Northern Avenue 

Bridges 

These bridges are still fully operating. 

The rebuilding of the Summer Street Bridge is being 
deferred until the American Sugar Refinery has re- 
located in the Charlestown area; at which time it is 



30 City Document No. 18 

fully expected that the Fort Point Channel will be en- 
tirely closed to navigation, thereby permitting the 
replacement of the Summer Street Bridge with a fixed 
span. 

The Congress Street Bridge is in good condition. 

The Northern Avenue Bridge is operating satis- 
factorily but requires constant maintenance. Struc- 
turally, the bridge is of an age, type and condition that 
warrants replacement; and this project should be 
scheduled as soon as feasible, consistent with the ex- 
pected closing of the channel to navigation. 

Reserved Channel 
Summer Street Bridge (Formerly L Street Bridge) 

This bridge is scheduled for major repairs to the ap- 
proaches in the coming year. Under a Chapter 90 
project, with the City assuming 40 per cent of the cost 
and the Commonwealth 60 per cent, the South Boston 
approach is to be entirely rebuilt and the Boston ap- 
proach pilework repaired throughout. On the basis of 
bids received on December 10, 1957, the estimated cost 
is $234,326. 

The work to be done under this project is based on the 
findings of a professional inspection of the pilework 
and timberwork made by the Carnes Company, Inc., 
who were engaged by this department for the purpose. 
The inspection was made early in the year and com- 
pleted with a report on March 28, 1957. 

The drawspan of this bridge is not included in the 
work to be done. The draw is in good operating con- 
dition; and although the deck and superstructure will 
probably need repairs in the near future, it is hoped 
that the channelway can possibly be closed to navi- 
gation in the reasonably near future, thereby making it 
possible to build a fixed span to replace the draw span. 

Charles River 

Warren Bridge 

This bridge has been deactivated since November of 
1954; with the movable draw spans pulled back to leave 
the waterway unobstructed. Although the bridge was 
closed to highway traffic and the drawbridge out of 
operation, it was maintained in operable condition for 



Public Works Department 31 

emergency use until such time as the Charlestown 
Bridge reconstruction had progressed sufficiently to rule 
out the further need of Warren Bridge. 

In September, 1957, Warren Bridge was officially dis- 
continued as a public way from the pierhead line on the 
Charlestown end to the line of the Fitzgerald Express- 
way at the Boston end. 

Accordingly, the drawspan structures were dismantled 
and removed under contract late in 1957, at a cost of 
$1,497. 

It is hoped that the remaining pile trestle approaches 
can be removed in the reasonably near future under the 
provisions of Chapter 91, of the General Laws, with the 
Commonwealth and the City each paying 50 percent 
of the cost. 

Charlestown Bridge 

The drawspan of this bridge has been closed to navi- 
gation since May 1, 1957, in order to permit the removal 
of the old mechanical and electrical operating equipment 
and installation of the new system. 

This work is now near completion; and the drawspan 
will be restored to operation early in 1958. 

Otherwise, the reconstruction of this bridge is in its 
final stage. At the present time, the bridge is still 
carrying 2- way vehicular traffic on one roadway; and 
sometime in February, 1958, should be fully opened to 
traffic with all work completed. 

Chelsea River 
Chelsea Street and Andrew P. McArdle Bridges 

The two drawbridges spanning the Chelsea River at 
Meridian street and Chelsea street are in good condition 
and fully operating. 

At the Chelsea Street Bridge, it is intended to alter 
the fender pier construction to comply with an order of 
the Corps of Engineers, United States Army, to widen 
the navigable waterway under the bridge to 96 feet. It 
now varies from 70 feet at the upstream side to about 
98 feet at the downstream side. The alteration is made 
necessary because of the proposed permanent removal of 
the New York Central Railroad bridge immediately 
upstream of the City bridge. 



32 City Document No. 18 

Mystic River 

Maiden Bridge {Alford Street) 

This bridge is fully operating but is in very poor con- 
dition structurally, requiring constant maintenance. 

This bridge should be replaced by a new structure as 
soon as possible; and it is expected that this project will 
be undertaken by the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Works as soon as Federal Aid funds are available, 
around July 1, 1958. 

Inland Bridges 

This department is involved in the maintenance of 
80 inland bridges as follows: 



Maintained entirely by this department 
Maintained jointly with New Haven RR 
Maintained jointly with Boston & Albany RR 
Maintained jointly with Boston & Maine RR 
Maintained jointly with M.TA. . 
Maintained jointly with Town of Winthrop 
Maintained jointly with Town of Milton 
Maintained jointly with Town of Watertown 



49 
15 
10 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



Total 80 

During 1957, two major improvements were completed 
in the rebuilding of the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge 
over the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, 
and the Winthrop Bridge over Belle Isle Inlet. These 
projects are described in detail hereinafter. 

The Boylston Street Bridge over the Boston and 
Albany Railroad is in serious need of a new steel floor 
system and deck. It was intended to prosecute such 
work in 1957, but because of the uncertainty of final 
plans involving the use of the railroad right of way for 
an extension of the Massachusetts Turnpike as far as 
the proposed new Prudential Center, and the possibility 
that the present bridge may have to be rebuilt, the re- 
decking work has been deferred. 

The Broadway Bridge over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad is in poor condition, and the city has peti- 
tioned the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities 
on the matter of rebuilding. A hearing on the matter 
was held before the Department of Public Utilities on 
October 7, 1957, and was postponed to permit of further 
inspections and reports on the existing structure. 



Public Works Department 33 

The city engaged the services of the Charles A. 
Magiiire and Associates to furnish such inspection and 
report. 

Any action relating to this bridge may possibly be 
deferred until such time as it is decided whether the 
Massachusetts Turnpike will be extended to the South 
Station. 

The same is true of the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge 
over the Boston and Albany Railroad, which should be 
scheduled for major repairs or rebuilding within the next 
few years. 

In general, otherwise, the fixed bridges throughout the 
city are in good condition, although several should be 
rebuilt to provide modern structures to accommodate 
present day traffic conditions. 

Among these are the bridges located over the railroads 
at Tremont street (Arlington square), Southampton 
street, Boston street, Dorchester avenue, and Ben- 
nington street. East Boston. 

Major Construction Work and Repairs 
Reconstruction of Charlestown Bridge 

At the close of 1957, this project was nearing comple- 
tion under separate contracts covering the drawspan 
and the approach spans. The work has been fully 
described in previous reports, having started late in 
1955. 

The work should be entirely completed early in 1958, 
at an estimated cost of $615,000 for the drawspan; and 
1925,000 for the approach spans. The original esti- 
mated cost based on the bid of the contractor. Builders 
Iron Works, was $606,204 for the drawspan and 
$931,965.50 for the approach spans. 

Reconstruction of the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge 
Over the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road 

A contract for this work was awarded to the low 
bidder. Builders Iron Works, in the amount of 
$143,854.75. 

Work was commenced on April 8, 1957, and com- 
pleted on November 15, 1957, at a final cost of 
$144,978.36. 

This work was carried on without interfering with 
traffic by rebuilding the bridge one third at a ti 



34 City Document No. 18 

This work has resulted in a major improvement by 
replacing the old through girders with a deck type beam 
span thereby eliminating a dangerous traffic hazard 
and restriction. 



Rebuilding the Winthrop Bridge over Belle Isle Inlet 

Under the provision of Chapter 90, Section 34 of the 
General Laws, this bridge was rebuilt at a final cost of 
$148,942.05; which cost was apportioned as follows: 

Commonwealth (60%) .... $89,365 23 
City of Boston (24%) .... 35,746 09 
Town of Winthrop (16%) . . . 23,830 73 

The new bridge was built one half at a time in order 
to maintain traffic; and consists of a pile trestle founda- 
tion carrying a reinforced concrete deck and sidewalks. 
The new bridge is 10 feet wider than the old bridge 
which was of pile trestle construction with an all- wooden 
deck and sidewalks. The approaches were widened 
and improved to meet the new conditions. 

Under a contract awarded to the low bidder. Eastern 
Roads Company, Inc., work commenced on March 27, 
1957 and was completed on December 31, 1957. 

Reconstructing Span No. 3 of the Northern Avenue 
Bridge over Fort Point Channel 

Because of the badly deteriorated condition of some 
of the main steelwork in this span it was necessary to 
make a major improvement. Inasmuch as the defective 
condition of the steelwork was brought about mainly 
by the Union Freight Railroad traffic, the railroad 
company was asked to participate in the cost of repairs, 
to which they agreed. 

Accordingly, it was arranged for the city to remove 
the old decking, allowing the railroad to repair the steel- 
work, after which the city would construct a new deck. 

This work was commenced under a contract awarded 
to Frederick W. Byron for the city's portion of the 
work, on June 24, 1957. 

The railroad engaged the Groisser & Shlager Iron 
Works to make the necessary steel repairs and renewals. 



Public Works Department 35 

At this writing the work is two thirds completed and 
the final third is expected to be completed early in 1958. 
The final portion of work was of necessity postponed 
because of winter conditions. 

The total estimated cost to the city for this work is 
approximately $27,000, 

The railroad's cost is estimated to be approximately 
$20,000. 

Emergency Repairs to the Operating Machinery of the 
Congress Street Bridge over Fort Point Channel 

On April 10, 1957, a very serious defect was dis- 
covered in the gears of the operating machinery of the 
drawspan of this bridge, which made it extremely 
dangerous to attempt further openings of the draw. 

Accordingly, an emergency contract was awarded to 
the General Ship & Engine Works of East Boston for 
making the necessary repairs. This was necessary in 
order to make all possible speed in restoring the bridge 
to operation so that the important sugar cargo boats 
could be allowed to pass. 

Repair work was commenced on April 11, 1957, and 
finished on May 1, 1957, at a final cost to the city of 
$12,000. 

On the thirteenth of April, temporary repairs were 
made to permit one opening for a sugar cargo vessel 
which otherwise would have been held up for more than 
two weeks. 

Demolition and Removal of the Warren Bridge Draw- 
span 

Warren Bridge was closed permanently to highway 
traffic on November 26, 1954, and the two drawspan 
units drawn back to permit an unobstructed waterway. 
The bridge was kept operable until such time as the 
Charlestown Bridge reconstruction project was sub- 
stantially completed. 

In September, 1957, Warren Bridge was officially dis- 
continued as a highway under a contract awarded 
to James G. Grant Co., low bidder, for the removal and 
disposal of the two movable drawspan superstructures. 

The work was commenced on November 12, 1957, 
and completed on December 29, 1957, at a cost of 
$1,497. 



36 



City Document No. 18 



other Work Accomplished Under Contract By the Bridge Division 

During 1957 

Work Cost Contractor 

Resurfacing, etc. 

Arlington street over Boston and Al- „„, ,„ .1. ^ /^ r-. r 
bany Railroad $4,224 48 Albert C. Graglia 

Furnishing field inspection, services, etc. ^ , ^^ ^^ „ ^^ 

Charlestown Bridge .... 3,150 00 Carnes Co. 

Repairing the Fender System. 

^Thr„fr" ''"''' °"' ""' ' 8.081 28 W. H. Ellis & Son Co. 
Demolition and removal of buildings, 

SouSVerT" '"'"'""*' • • • 3.730 00 Lawrence Buildmg Wrecking Co. 

n'JriSfsSdgS'' ''■'''"''"'■. . . 5.173 00 J. J. Finn Electrical Service 

Inspection of Piling — Boston Approach 
and Dravirspan Foundation. 
Summer Street Bridge over Reserve 

Channel 1>700 00 Carnes Co. 

Yard Forces 

The maintenance force of the Bridge Service is utihzed 
in the various repair operations of both emergency and 
routine nature in repairs to bridge roadway deckmg, 
sidewalks, fender piers, retractile bridge tracks, stair- 
ways, raihng and pertinent facilities. 

Other work included placing barricades and trattic 
control signs necessary during the periods of pouring 
concrete deck slabs and the testing of mechanical and 
electrical facihties of bridges being repaired; and clean- 
ing bridge sidewalks and stairways of ice and snow. 



II. SUMNER TUNNEL 
1957 Budget Summary 

Credits: 

Appropriation Credits, 1957 
Pensions .... 



Total Credits 
Debits: 

Expenditures, 1957 
Unliquidated Encumbrances 
Pensions .... 



Total Debits . 
Unencumbered Balance 



$650,260 81 
45,639 63 

$695,900 44 

$629,284 79 

374 00 

45,639 63 

$675,298 42 
$20,602 02 



Public Works Department 



SUMMARY OF 1957 TRAFFIC BY CLASSIFICATIONS 



37 



Class Toll Description 

1. $0 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacit3\ 

Tractor without trailer 

2. 20 Passenger car 

3. 20 Motorcycle . 

4. 25 Truck over 2 tons and up to 5 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 5 tons 
capacity 

5. 20 Passenger car with trailer 

6. 35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 10 tons 
capacity 

7. 20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons capacity 

8. 1 00 Truck over 10 tons capacity 

9. 35 Bus with or without passengers .... 
* Reserved Lane 



No. of 
Vehicles 

400,893 

12,199,300 

3,807 



61,668 
19,740 



19,460 

2,810 

1,837 

4,755 

182,454 



Total Traffic 12,896,724 

* M. T. A. and Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses included in this classification. 
7,156 M. T. A. and 75,962 Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses at $0.35 included in 
this total. 

COMPARATIVE 5=YEAR SUMMARY OF OPERATION, FROM 
1953 TO 1957, INCLUSIVE 





1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


hicular Traffic: 

Total number vehicles 


10,835,674 

902,973 

208,378 

29,686 


11,080,966 

923,414 

212,513 

30,359 


12,094,107 

1,007,842 

231,945 

33,135 


12,736,726 

1,061,394 

244,552 

34,800 


12,896,724 

1,074,727 

248,014 

35 333 


Weekly average 

Daily average 






wer Consumption: 


4,966,604 


4,527,315 


5,236,214 


5,614,061 


6,079,026 




tiancial Results: 

Dperating expenditure 

Balance to next year 

nterest requirements 


$591,327 09 

16,591 87 

687,494 39 

440 60 


$595,127 07 

3,925 18 

740,213 05 

122 85 


$585,650 61 

6,188 73 

760,100 00 

98 60 


$649,869 99 

28,924 02 

743,991 37 


$674,924 42 

374 00 

748,762 50 

1 80 






Total Expenses 


$1,295,853 95 


$1,339,388 15 


$1,395,093 63 


$1,422,785 38 


$1,424,062 72 




$2,172,410 00 
24,679 45 


$2,224,195 00 
16,591 87 


$2,413,231 59 
3,925 18 


$2,550,125 00 
6,188 73 


$2,589,725 00 
28,924 02 


Jalance from previous year 


Total Receipts 


$2,197,089 45 


$2,240,786 87 


$2,417,156 77 


$2,556,313 73 


$2,618,649 02 


Net Result 


$901,235 50 
(Excess) 


$901,398 72 
(Excess) 


$1,022,063 14 
(Excess) 


$1 133 528 35 


$1,194,586 30 
(Excess) 




(Excess) 



38 City Document No. 18. 

SUMNER TUNNEL 

The Sumner Tunnel is a vehicular crossing between 
Boston proper and East Boston, and was opened for 
public use on June 30, 1934, and has been in continuous 
operation up to the present time. 

The total traffic for the past year of 1957, which has 
been the highest in its history; amounted to 12,896,724 
vehicles, an increase of 159,998 cars over the previous 
year of 1956. 

All of the electrical and mechanical machinery and 
equipment used in connection with the ventilating and 
operation of the tunnel is in good condition and operat- 
ing satisfactorily. 

The Toll Collecting equipment including all treadles, 
key boxes and toll registers are under constant supervi- 
sion and are recording and totalizing properly as per 
traffic requirements. All adjustments and repairs are 
made as may be required. 

On December 20, 1957 a hearing was held by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities relative 
to toll rates for the coming year, 1958. It was agreed 
that the present rates be continued without change. 

To date, the Massachusetts Port Authority which was 
created to consolidate several facilities, including the 
Sumner Tunnel, under one agency has not begun to 
function. Consequently, the operation, care and con- 
trol of the Sumner Tunnel remains with the City of 
Boston. 

Contracts Awarded in 1957 

1. Drainage System 

A contract was aw^arded to the Mercer Marine Com- 
pany after being properly advertised, for the sum of 
$1,910 to clean and remove all mud and dirt from all 
catch basins, 72 drop inlets, all sand traps, sumps, etc., 
of the tunnel drainage system. All of the work had to 
be performed between the hours of 12.30 a.m. and 
5.30 A.M. 

2. Oil Burner 

Invitation bids were sent to eight (8) of the larger 
oil companies for furnishing and installing a new oil 
burner in the Boston Ventilation Building, to replace 
the original burner that had been in continuous service 
since 1934. This contract was awarded to the Esso Oil 
Burner Company for the amount of $456. 



Public Works Department 39 

3. Boston and East Boston Ventilation Buildings 

Specifications were written and a contract awarded 
after advertising, to the Bond Painting Company for 
the sum of §14,321 to paint all of the steel and structures 
of these two buildings, including all glazing, and the 
removal of all existing glass louvers, and replacing them 
with Transite panels, all in accordance with the contract. 

4- Cleaning Exhaust Air Duct and Fan Rooms 

Bids were received after public advertisement for the 
''cleaning of exhaust air duct and fan rooms" and a 
contract awarded to the Mercer Marine Company for 
the cleaning and removal of all dust and dirt from the 
exhaust air duct and from 14 exhaust fan rooms. The 
total bid for this work amounted to $1,195. 

6. Cleaning and Painting Ventilation Equipment at 
Ventilation Buildings 

Specifications were WTitten and advertised, and a 
contract awarded to Joseph and Nicholas Bello, in the 
amount of $7,941 for the cleaning and painting of ventila- 
tion equipment at the Sumner Tunnel Ventilation 
Buildings. This work called for the cleaning and paint- 
ing of 28 ventilating fans, fan motors, dampers, damper 
operating mechanisms, fan housings, inside and outside, 
controllers, etc. 

6. Control Cable 

During the past year a contract was advertised and 
awarded to the Minot Construction Company for the 
sum of $5,691 to install 4,292 feet of new 259 conductor 
No. 19 A.W.G. control cable furnished by the City of 
Boston. All work performed as per contract and 
specifications. 

7. Splicing Chamber Cover Plates 

Bids were received after public advertisement and a 
contract awarded to the Albany Contracting Company 
for the sum of $1,830 to clean and paint all south wall 
chamber frames and cover plates. All work was per- 
formed as per specification and with no interference to 
vehicular traffic, all work between the hours of 12.30 
A.M. and 5.30 a.m. 



40 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX C 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE HIGHWAY DIVISION 



BcsTON, January 2, 1958. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

The following report of the income, expenditures, and 
operation of the Highway Division of the Public Works 
Department is hereby submitted for the year ending 
December 31, 1957. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTHFORD J. KeLLEY, 

Division Engineer, Highway Division. 



Public Works Department 



41 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 



Paving Service 
Summary of Budget Appropriations 



Appropriation. 



Total Credits. Expenditures 



Balance 
Unexpended. 



Paving Service . 



Reconstruction of 
Streets 



Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Revenue). . . . 

Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Non-Revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction 
and Reconstruction of 

Street Signs 

Snow Reomoval 



Chapter 718 — Acts of 
1956 



$1,840,286 63 

45,572 34 

158,338 04 

5,160,141 16 

291,215 72 

14,035 53 

475,000 00 

2,280,208 82 



$1,600,040 04 

19,069 46 

84,147 12 

1,785,406 98 

166,711 01 

13,012 60 

449,797 64 

1,484,467 59 



$240,246 59 
26,502 88 
74,190 92 

3,374,734 18 

125,504 71 

1,022 93 

25,202 36 

795,741 23 



In the Permit Office, the permits issued and monies 
received for 1957 are as follows: 



Permits Issued 



Signs 

Occupation permits . 
Sidewalk licenses 
Driveway applications 
Special permits . 
Department permits (free) 
Street opening permits 



7,361 
7,444 
330 
316 
392 
1,253 
505 



Total permits 17,601 



42 City Document No. 18 

Cash Received 

Occupation permits $72,631 46 

Signs 87,620 78 

Sidewalk license 21,855 00 

Plans and miscellaneous 16 75 

Driveway applications 630 00 

Notifications 110 00 

Rents 10,054 50 

Total income less street openings . . . $192,918 49 
Street openings 73,354 72 

Total income $266,273 21 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were em- 
ployed as usual in the maintenance of public streets, 
resurfacing and patching macadam pavements, patching 
permanent pavements, such as asphalt and granite 
block, and maintaining gravel, brick, and artificial stone 
sidewalks. 

In the snow removal season, division forces were em- 
ployed in spreading rock salt and sand on icy streets 
and also supervised plowing work throughout the City 
by 250 contractors' hired plows after snowstorms. All 
snow removal bills for plowing, hauling, force account 
work, cubic yard removal, etc., were processed through 
the Paving Service office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs : 

Erected 217 4-inch street signposts. 

Erected 8 new hero signs for dedication. 

Replaced 186 hereo square signs. 

Installed 752 new street signs. 

Removed 384 old hand-painted signs, damaged baked 
enameled signs and obliterated signs. 

Repaired and straightened 168 bent or broken street sign 
posts (4-inch type). 

Repaired 276 broken street sign frames and welded 59 
4-inch street sign posts in blacksmith shop. 

Repaired 598 street sign frames, collars, and brackets on 
4-inch street sign posts and light poles on location. 

Removed 132 pieces of rope, wire, old tires, etc. from 4-inch 
street sign posts and light poles. 

Installed 588 street sign frames. 

Installed 367 street sign collars on 4-inch street sign posts 
and light poles. 

Installed 57 adapters on wooden poles. 

Installed 201 4-inch acorns on 4-inch street sign posts. 



Public Works Department 43 

Installed 110 "Private Way" signs on 4-inch street sign 
posts and light poles. 

Removed 53 "Private Way" signs from 4-inch posts and 
light poles because of the making of public ways. 

Painted 602 4-inch street sign posts. 

Painted 898 street sign frames. 

Painted 397 4-inch acorns on 4-inch street sign posts. 

Painted 649 street sign collars on street sign posts and light 
poles. 

Installed 12 directional signs on 4-inch posts. 

Washed and cleaned 376 street sign name plates. 

Painted 293 blanks for temporary name platea. 

There were 220 streets constructed or reconstructed 
during the year. There were approximately 6| miles of 
sidewalks improved during the year 1957. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares on which 
reconstruction work was completed in 1957 are as 
follows : 

Commonwealth avenue, from Brighton avenue to Warren 
street (Chapter 90). 

Blue Hill avenue, from Columbia road to Mattapan square 
(Chapter 90). 

Centre street, West Poxbury, from Spring street to Grove 
street (Chapter 90). 

Baker street, West Roxbury, from Veterans of Foreign 
Wars Parkway to Newton line (Chapter 90). 

Summer street, South Boston, from viaduct to East 
Second street, excluding drawbridge and approaches of bridge 
over reserved channel (Chapter 90). 

L street, South Boston, from East Second street to East 
Fourth street (Chapter 90). 

Washington street, Roxbury, from Northampton street 
to Eustis street (Chapter 90) . 

Arlington street. City Proper, from Boylston street to 
Beacon street. 

Beech street. West Roxbury, from Kittredge street to 
Poplar street. 

Berkeley street. City Proper, from Boylston street to 
Beacon street. 

Boylston street, City Proper, from Tremont street to 
Charles street, and from Arlington street to Berkeley street. 

Centre street. West Roxbury, from Eliot street to Prince 
street. 

Clarendon street, City Proper, from Boylston street to 
Beacon street. 

Day square. East Boston. 

Jackson square and vicinity, Roxbury, including parts of 
Centre street, Columbus avenue, and Ritchie street. 



44 City Document No. 18 

Massachusetts avenue, City Proper and Roxbury, from 
Huntington avenue to Columbus avenue. 

Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park, from Beacon street to 
Milton line. 

North Harvard street, Brighton, from Hooker street to 
Western avenue. 

Parker Hill avenue, Roxbury, from Parker street to 
Sunset street. 

Perkins street, West Roxbury, from Prince street to Francis 
Parkman Drive. 

Ruggles street, Roxbury, from Columbus avenue to Leon 
street. 

Roxbury Crossing, Roxbury, from Tremont street to 
Roxbury street. 

The following is a list of streets constructed and 
reconstructed and sidewalk work done by contract in 
the various wards of the City in 1957. 

Ward 1 — Chelsea street, Orleans street, Shelby street, 
Eagle square. East Eagle street, Boardman street, Prescott 
street, Sea View avenue, Trenton street, Walley street. 
Day square, Ashley street, Leyden street. 

Ward 2 — Bunker Hill street (Chapter 90), Chelsea street 
(Chapter 90), Hunter street (Chapter 90), Moulton street 
(Chapter 90), Vine street (Chapter 90). 

Ward 3 — Bulfinch street (sidewalks), Tileston street 
(sidewalks), Bulfinch place (sidewalks), Wiggin street (side- 
walks). Commercial street (sidewalks), Bowker street, 
Chardon street, Devonshire street, Foster street, Hawkins 
street, Henchman street, Pitts street. Court street, Merrimac 
street, Tremont street. Green street, Hayward place, Har- 
rison avenue. Arch street, Franklin street, Tremont street, 
Washington street, High street, Matthews street. Leather 
square. North Bennett street. 

Ward 4 — Huntington avenue (sidewalks). Saint Cecilia 
street (sidewalks), Saint Stephen street (sidewalks), Stuart 
street (sidewalks), Gainsborough street (sidewalks), Hemen- 
way street (sidewalks). Saint Botolph street (sidewalks, 
Forsyth street, Dalton street (sidewalks), Falmouth street 
(sidewalks), Carleton street, Forsyth street (roadway 
widening), Ruggles street, Clarendon street, Massachusetts 
avenue (H — C), Saint James avenue, Massachusetts 
avenue (W — B). 

Ward 5 — Brookline avenue. Beacon street (sidewalks), 
Marlborough street (sidewalks), Hereford street (sidewalks), 
Newbury street (sidewalks), Berkeley street, Boylston 
street, Clarendon street. Public Alley No. 439, Arlington 
street. Beacon street, Dartmouth street, Exeter street, 
Hereford street, Boylston street, Eliot street, Stuart street, 



Public Works Department 45 

Tremont street, Beacon street (MA — CE), Pinckney 
street, Peterborough street (sidewalks), Dartmouth street 
(sidewalks). 

Ward 6 — East Fifth street, Northern avenue, Columbia 
road, East Fourth street, M street. West Fourth street. East 
Sixth street, L street and Summer street (Chapter 90), 
B street, Fargo street. 

Ward 7 — Dr. Michael Gavin Way (sidewalks), General 
Lawrence J. Logan Way (sidewalks). General William H. 
Devine Way (sidewalks), Kemp street (sidewalks), Major 
Michael J. O'Connor Way (sidewalks), Monsignor Dennis F. 
O'Callaghan Way (sidewalks), Mayhew street (sidewalks, 
Columbia road, Dudley terrace. 

Ward 8 — Washington street (Chapter 90), Eustis street 
(Chapter 90). 

Ward 9 — Greenwich court, Columbus avenue, Simmons 
street, Massachusetts avenue, Tremont street, Washington 
street (Chapter 90). 

Ward 10 — Alleghany street, Calumet street, Fisher 
avenue, Iroquois street, Parker street, Parker Hill avenue, 
Pontiac street. Saint Alphonsus street. Darling street, 
Walden street. 

Ward 11 — Fort avenue (safety barrier), Glen road. 
Forest Hills street, Cemetery road, McBride street (side- 
walks), Jamaica street, Columbus avenue. 

Ward 12 — Forest Hills street, Cemetery road, Crest- 
wood park, Lorimer place, Park View street. Blue Hill 
avenue (Chapter 90). 

Ward 13 — Mount Vernon street (sidewalks), Dalin 
place, Howard place. 

Ward 14 — Brunswick street. Blue Hill avenue (Chap- 
ter 90). 

Ward 15 — Homes avenue (sidewalks). 

Ward 16 — King street (sidewalks), Whitten street, 
Daytona terrace, Hutchinson street, Glide street (sidewalks). 

Ward 17 — Barna road. Range road. 

Ward 18 — Chapel road, Meadowview road. Millstone 
road. Beech street, Canterbury street. Deforest street, 
Rosa street, Harmon street, Richmere road, Loring street 
(sidewalks), Tyler street (sidewalks), Blue Hill avenue 
(Chapter 90), River street (Chapter 90), Brainard street, 
Cliftondale street, Harvard avenue. Metropolitan avenue, 
Prospect street, Radcliffe road, Rosemont street, Ruskin- 
dale road, Taunton avenue, Tileston street, Gordon avenue 
(sidewalks). Hale street (sidewalks), Daniel court, Dietz 
court, Dietz road. Dodge road, Eastmont road, Kardon 
road, Kristin court, Leighton road, Senders court, Susanna 
court, Wharton court, Belnap road. Greenwood avenue. 
Metropolitan avenue, Gordon avenue, Derry road, Green- 



46 



City Document No. 18 



wood Circle, Huntington avenue, Melba Way, Safford street, 
Barry street, Chestnut street, Byrd avenue, DeStefano 
road, Rosecliff terrace. 

Ward 19 — Louder's Lane, Wachusett street, Alveston 
street. Centre street, Dunster road, Granfield avenue. Moss 
Hill road, Patten street, Roanoke avenue, Elm street, 
Cummins Highway (sidewalks), Agassiz park, Cheshire 
Street Extension, Driftwood road, Mossdale road, Meyer 
street, Pershing road, Perkins street. 

Ward 20 — Eastbourne street, Edgemere road, Glen- 
burnie road, Keith street, Landseer street, Mendum street, 
Pelton street, Redgate road, Rockland street, Schiller road, 
Anawan terrace, Albright street, Libbey street. Maple 
Street Extension, Maple Street Footway, Carey street 
(sidewalks), Woodard Road (sidewalks), Alaric street (side- 
walks), Gretter road (sidewalks). Centre street and Baker 
street (Chapter 90), Gardner street, Rivermoor street, 
Charles Park road. Autumn street, Cohasset street, Dunwell 
street, Francesca street, Heldun street, Joyce Kilmer road, 
Lasell street, Manthorne road, Montview street, Peak Hill 
road, Perham street, Powell street. Saint Theresa avenue, 
Gretter road, Schirmer road, Grayfield avenue, Crockers 
Lane, Hackensack road, Marlin road, Sherbrook street, 
Spinney street, Welton road, Corey street. Church street, 
Jacqueline road, Willowdean avenue, Courtney road, Willow 
terrace. 

Ward 21 — Brookline avenue. Overland street, Englewood 
avenue. Beacon street (sidewalks), Commonwealth avenue 
(sidewalks), Colborne road, Hinsdale street, Keswick street, 
Medfield street, Blenford road. 

Ward 22 — Kenrick street (sidewalks), Athol street, 
Everett street, Holton street. North Harvard street. Lake 
Shore road, Eatonia street, West Sorrento street. 



Work Done by Contract in 1957 



Item 


Quantity 


Earth excavation .... 


60,799 cubic yards 


Rock excavation .... 


3,251 cubic yards 


Bank gravel 


57,527 tons 


Crushed stone for edgestone 


2,816 tons 


Base removed .... 


9,773 square yards 


Pavement removed 


51,712 square yards 


Straight edgestone 


32,388 lineal feet 


Circular edgestone 


7,825 lineal feet 


Corners 


1,154 each 


Edgestone reset or relocated 


62,823 lineal feet 


Edgestone hauled to City yard . 


7,300 lineal feet 


Macadam base .... 


41,013 tons 


OA asphalt 


229,558 gallons 









Table 


Showing Length and j 


Length in Miles. 




Sheet 
Aepbalt. 


tAsphalt 
Concrete. 


tOranite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


S." " 


Year 1956 Report 


227 . 57 
30.46 


337.44 
45 17 


26.36 
3.53 


0.15 
0.02 


0.35 

0,05 


0,50 
0,07 


19.77 
2.64 




Januahv 1, 1958. 


49.02 
4,31 
2.80 
11.61 
40.14 
34.48 
.53.85 
20.52 
7.87 


32.12 
7.59 
23.52 
20.57 
37,49 
95.91 
82.01 
33.49 
28 90 


8 39 
4.72 
2.96 
4,91 
2,32 
0.02 
0.48 
0.29 
O.OII 


0,06 
0,06 

0,00 


0,09 
0,02 
0.02 
0,03 


0,17 
0,02 
0,02 
01 


2,87 
0,74 
1,39 
0.32 
4.13 
2.27 
5.17 
0,78 
0,64 






South Boston 


West Roxhury 


0.03 


0.04 
0.04 
08 
03 








Total 

Percent 


224.66 
30-05 


301.66 
48.37 


24,09 
3.22 


0.15 
0.02 


0.35 
0.05 


0.22 
0.03 


18.31 
2.45 



-In the above table the 



bdivided substantially c 



tOf this amount 0.02 iiiilea or 185 square yards is eobbli 

square yards is granite block paving on concrete base. 

§0f this amount 0.00 miles or 435 square yards if Blorn 

II Of this amount 99.01 miles or 1,603.711 square yards i 





Area tn Square Yards. 


idam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Aspljalt. 


t.^aphalt 
Concrete. 


tGranite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


§Concrete. 


II Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


!4 22 
16,63 


9.96 
1.33 


0.77 
0.10 


747.09 1 
100,00 


4..573.537 
31.62 


6,647.373 
45.96 


611.832 
4.23 


2.474 
0.02 


9,244 
06 


8,795 
0.06 


407,513 
2.82 


2.003.957 
13 85 


171.205 
1.18 


28.317 
0,20 


14.404.247 
100.00 


2,46 
5.22 
7.59 
6.21 


0.30 
03 
0.22 
0.11 
40 
0,55 
1.27 
0,23 
2,54 


01 
0,04 
0,50 
0,00 
0.00 
0.03 

0.20 


95.48 
22.70 
38.62 
44.62 
95.31 
156.74 
176.18 
65.76 
52.61 


1,095.722 
84,404 
61,764 
245,327 
823,683 
608,002 
1,018,646 
4,54,207 
134,825 


733.055 
206.362 
536,648 
431,284 
704,089 
1,759,809 
1,547,329 
648,420 
553,799 


164.747 
105,674 
60,572 
134,984 
30.334 
3,098 
10,157 
22,881 
45 


278 
1,503 

21 


3,258 

1,098 

355 

892 


3.069 

321 
1,055 
1,188 

145 


93.001 
13.395 
47,177 
18,780 
63,041 
32.729 
83,059 
22,131 
10.086 


37,302 
71.866 
167.283 
102,874 
154.959 
381.727 
511,313 
100.928 
200.134 


6.087 
407 
3.785 
1.230 
7.312 
8.326 

21.257 
3,544 

40,611 


41 

812 

15.754 

4.000 

1.737 

50 

4.500 


2.137.179 
484.810 
878.717 
952,207 


23.47 
33.29 
10, .37 
12,37 


338 


983 

985 

1,231 

442 


2,798,674 

3,194,966 

1,319,392 

944,443 


11.79 
14.95 


5.65 
0.76 


0.78 
0.10 


747.66 
100.00 


4,526,640 
31,23 


7,120.795 
49.13 


532,492 
3,68 


2,140 
0.01 


9,244 
0.06 


5,778 
0.04 


383.999 
2.65 


1.794.440 
12,37 


92,565 
0,04 


26,927 
0.19 


14,495,023 
100.00 



Total Public Streets 747.66 Miles. 
indarj* lines between the districts as they existed when 
i miles or 356,848 



lexed to Boston. Territory 



nnexed from Brooklir 
53.311 square yards 



icluded in City Proper. 



tOf this amount 60.63 miles or 1,153.311 square yards is bituUthic; and 2.26 
or 36,998 square yards is Topeka; and 0.06 miles or 920 square yards is Filbertine 
0.03 miles or 595 square yards is Carey Elasute Asphalt Plank; and 0.06 miles c 
square vards is Johns-Manville Asphalt Plank; and 0.09 miles or 2.224 square yards i 



Asphalt Block; and 1.61 miles or 50,590 square yards is Tar Concrete. 
} or 61,291 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 15.90 miles or 533,120 square yards 
eluded in tliis table. In addition to this table there are 2.41 miles or 11,740 squa 



; yards of accepted footwn 



Public Works Department 



47 



Concrete base 


2,526 cubic yards 


Concrete backing up sidewalks . 


18 cubic yards 


Bituminous concrete base (roadway) 


54,770 tons 


Bituminous concrete top (roadway) . 


38,179 tons 


Bituminous concrete base (sidewalk) 


4,032 tons 


Bituminous concrete top (sidewalk) . 


3,797 tons 


Sheet asphalt 


6,559 tons 


Artificial stone sidewalks 


1,027,529 square feet 


Artificial stone driveways . 


95,337 square feet 


Loam spaces 


4,515 square yards 


Loam back of sidewalks 


1,462 cubic yards 


Covers reset 


4,331 each 


Catch basins or manholes rebuilt 


133 each 


Catch basins or drop inlets built 


70 each 


Sign posts set or reset .... 


450 each 


Parking meters reset .... 


524 each 


Stone bounds 


154 each 


Bituminous concrete pavement . 


501,196 square yards 


Sheet asphalt pavement 


81,698 square yards 



Yearly Report of Work Done by Department 
Forces for 1957 



Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid . 

Gravel sidewalks, relaid 

Artificial stone sidewalks, laid (new) 

Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid (old) 

Bituminous concrete sidewalks . 

Artificial stone sidewalks, patched 
with black top 

Edgestone reset (old) .... 

Macadam roadway patched 

Macadam roadway resurfaced . 

Asphalt or bituminous concrete road- 
way patched 

Asphalt or bituminous concrete road- 
way resurfaced 

Street cleaning 

Snow removal 



9,789 square yards 

1,631 square yards 

18,295 square feet 

143,377 square feet 

20,147 square yards 

9,580 square feet 
2,331 hnealfeet 
96,228 square yards 
5,330 square yards 

96,339 square yards 

3,267 square yards 
10,559 cubic yards 
45,952 cubic yards 



Paving Service — 1957 



Street cleaning 

General highway expenditures 
Sidewalk and curbing . 
Snow and ice removal . 
Street signs .... 



$35,120 36 

615,326 79 

252,125 95 

67,748 42 

29,012 59 



$999,334 11 



48 City Document No. 18 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 
Lighting Service 
Financial Statement 

Total Credits for 1957 $1,609,191 06 

Total Expenditures for 1957 .... 1 609 191 75 



Deficit 



Individual Expenditures 
Street and Park Lighting (Electric) : 

Boston Edison Company $1,392,808 07 

Boston Gas Company, Charles- 
town District . . . 64,643 43 

Boston Edison (footways) . 3,160 31 

Boston Gas Company, Charles- 
town (footways) . . . 502 19 

Boston Edison Company (sub- 
stations) 17,656 10 

Boston Gas Company, Charles- 
town (substation) . . . 4,958 37 

Street Lighting (Gas) : 

Boston Gas Company . . $21,687 82 
American Service Company . 40,667 44 



Police Spotlights : 

Boston Edison Company . $1,900 63 
Boston Gas Company, Charles- 
town 59 01 

Construction : 

Installation, removal, relocation 
and modernization : 
Boston Edison Company 
Boston Gas Company . 
James Scimone, gas post re- 
moval 

Emergency maintenance 

Salaries : 

Administrative and engineering 
personnel .... 

Office supplies .... 

Electrical maintenance and re- 
placement parts 

Advertising 

Travel expenses .... 

Office equipment .... 

Spotlight poles .... 



69 



[,483,728 47 



2,355 26 



$5,556 55 
8,725 97 


ripi,yoy D^ 


11,187 50 
2 50 






$25,472 52 




$25,817 95 
$353 24 


$25,817 95 
$353 24 


$5,181 40 

$24 50 

$3 40 

$295 37 

$4,000 00 


$5,181 40 

$24 50 

$3 40 

$295 37 

$4,000 00 



Public Works Department 



49 



Following is an account of orders issued by the Light- 
ing Service of the Highway Division of the Public Works 
Department during the year 1957: 



Mercury Vapor Lighting Projects 

In 1957 orders were issued on the following listed 
streets, main thoroughfares and business areas for re- 
lighting with modern mercury vapor lighting: 



Atlantic Avenue, Boston 
Bunker Hill Street, Charlestown 
Blue Hill Avenue, Dorchester 
Berkeley Street, Boston 
Beacon Street, Brighton 
Centre Street, Roxbury 
Chelsea Street, Charlestown 
Centre Street, West Roxbury 
Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton 
Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton 
Commonwealth Avenue, Boston 
Canterbury Street, West Roxbury 
Columbus Avenue, Roxbury 
Dudley Street, Roxbury 
East Broadway, South Boston 
Freeport Street, Dorchester 
Hunter Street, Charlestown 
Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park 
Eustis Street, Roxbury 
Harrison Avenue, Roxbury 
Keany Square, Boston 
Maverick Square, East Boston 
Maverick Square, East Boston 
Massachusetts Avenue, Roxbury 
Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 
Massachusetts Avenue, Boston 
Purchase Street, Boston 
Purchase Street, Boston 
Ritchie Street, Roxbury 
Ruggles Street, Roxbury 
Roxbury Street, Roxbury 
Roxbury Street, Roxbury 
Summer and L Streets, South Boston 
Summer and L Streets, South Boston 
Sumner Street, East Boston 
Theodore Glynn Way, Roxbury 
Tremont Street, Brighton . 
Tremont Street, Roxbury . 



Units 

15 single 

42 single 

1 single 

4 single 

4 single 

4 single 

1 single 
8 single 

32 twin 
55 single 

2 single 
8 single 
7 single 

17 single 

20 single 

7 single 

1 single 
39 single 

2 single 
2 single 

1 single 

6 single 

5 twin 

8 single 
12 single 

7 twin 
10 single 

2 twin 
1 single 
5 single 

10 single 
1 twin 

15 twin 
45 single 

1 twin 
5 single 

16 single 

21 single 



Lumens 
Each 

15,000 

15.000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

10,000 

15,000 

10,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

10,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 



50 



City Document No. 18 



Vine Street, Charlestown 
Washington Street, Boston . 
Washington Street, West Roxbury 
Washington Street, Roxbury 
Whittier Street, Roxbury . 
West Broadway, South Boston . 
Warren Street, Boston 
Warren Street, Roxbury 





4 single 


15,000 




3 single 


20,000 




84 single 


15,000 




23 single 


15,000 




1 single 


15,000 




1 single 


15,000 




1 single 


15,000 




4 single 


15,000 



Gas Replacement Program 

During the year 1957 approximately 1,700 obsolete 
gas lamps were replaced with approximately 1,755 new 
modern luminaries with 2,500 lumen lamps. These new 
lamps, in most instances, are installed on long arms to 
diminish interference with trees and to eliminate glare 
from homes on residential streets. 

Maintenance of Police Spotlights 

The maintenance of police spotlights continued during 
the year 1957. Program initiated for the installation of 
additional spotlights at the locations chosen by the 
Police Department. 



Incandescent Lighting Projects 

In 1957 orders were issued for the installation of new 
and the replacement of old lighting units. 



Academy Hill Road, Brighton 
Brookford Street, Roxbury 
Copeland Street, Roxbury 
Calumet Street, Roxbury 
Fisher Avenue, Roxbury 
Iroquois Street, Roxbury 
King Street, Dorchester 
Liverpool Street, East Boston . 
Leighton Road, Hyde Park 
Magazine Street, Roxbury . 
Newland Street, Boston 
Parker Hill Avenue, Roxbury 
Poplar Street, West Roxbury 
Ronan Park, Dorchester 
St. Theresa Avenue, West Roxbury 
St. Alphonsus Street, Roxbury . 
Wellesley Park, Dorchester 
Binney Street, Roxbury 



Units 


Lumens 




Each 


5 single 


2,500 


5 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


17 single 


2,500 


13 single 


2,500 


5 single 


2,500 


5 single 


2,500 


5 single 


2,500 


7 single 


2,500 


11 single 


2,500 


8 single 


2,500 


11 single 


2,500 


18 single 


2,500 


9 single 


2,500 


10 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


9 single 


2,500 


6 single 


4,000 



Public Works Department 



51 



Harvard Street, Dorchester 
Parker Hill Avenue, Roxbury 
Pembroke Street, Boston 
Townsend Street, Roxbury 
Waltham Street, Boston 
White Street, East Boston 
Camden Street, Roxbury 
Dwight Street, Boston 
Harvard Street, Dorchester 
Harrison Avenue, Roxbury 
Motte Street, Boston . 
Pleasant Street, Dorchester 
Perkins Street, West Roxbury 
Townsend Street, Roxbury . 
Troy Street, Boston 
Calumet Street, Roxbury 
Canterbury Street, West Roxbury 
Franklin Park, Dorchester . 
Highland Street, Dorchester 
Neptune Road, East Boston 
Parker Hill Avenue, Roxbury 
Savin Hill Avenue, Dorchester 
Terrace Street, Roxbury 



13 single 


4,000 


21 single 


4,000 


10 single 


4,000 


6 single 


4,000 


6 single 


4,000 


7 single 


4,000 


16 single 


6,000 


5 single 


6,000 


13 single 


6,000 


8 single 


6,000 


5 single 


6,000 


19 single 


6,000 


5 single 


6,000 


10 single 


6,000 


6 single 


6,000 


1 single 


10,000 


2 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 


1 single 


10,000 



Incandescent Lamps 

During 1957 incandescent lamps of 6,000 lumens each 
were installed on the following streets: 

Asylum street, Boston (2); Circuit street, Roxbury (1); 
Claremont Park, Boston (2); Devine Way, South Boston 
(1); Forest Hills street, West Roxbury (1); Garrison street, 
Boston (1); Hanson street, Boston (4); Lingard street, Rox- 
bury (2); Museum road, Roxbury (1); Playstead road, 
Roxbury (1); Regent street, Roxbury (1); Ringgold street, 
Boston (1) ; To^vn Field, Dorchester (3) ; Union Park, Boston 
(2); Way street, Boston (3). 

Incandescent lamps of 4,000 lumens each were installed 
on the following streets: 



Academy Hill road, Brighton (1); Bosworth street, Boston 
(1); Brooks street. West Roxbury (4); Crossman street, 
Dorchester (1); Calumet street, Roxbury (1); Circuit street, 
Roxbury (3); Crown Path, Dorchester (3); Douglas street. 
South Boston (1); Frawley street, Roxbury (1); Lamartine 
street, Roxbury (1); Magazine street, Roxbury (1); Sachem 
street, Roxbury (1); Seymour street. West Roxbury (1); 
Union Park street, Boston (2); Vining street, Roxbury (1). 



52 City Document No. 18 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service for the 
installation of lighting units of 2,500 lumens as follows: 

Alleghany street, Roxbury (4); Allston street, Dorchester 
(1); Autumn street, Roxbury (3); Bartlett street, Charles- 
town (1); Burton street, Roxbury (1); Belnap road, Hyde 
Park (2); Barnes avenue. East Boston (1); Bragdon street, 
Roxbury (1); Bayside street, Dorchester (1); B street, South 
Boston (3); Cross street, Charlestown (3); Clancy road, 
Dorchester (3); Chellman street, West Roxbury (2); Cordis 
street, Charlestown (3); Chadwick street, Roxbury (3); 
Claymount terrace, Dorchester (1); Cumston street, West 
Roxbury (1); Cornwall street, West Roxbury (2); Creighton 
street, West Roxbury (4); Carolina avenue. West Roxbury 
(3); Dodge road, Hyde Park (2); Delle avenue, Roxbury (1); 
Daly street, Dorchester (2); Draper's Lane, Boston (2); 
Dunmore street, Roxbury (2) ; Everett street. West Roxbury 
(2); Emmonsdale street, West Roxbury (1); Fourth street, 
South Boston (3); Field street, Roxbury (1); Fremont street, 
Dorchester (2); Fallon street. West Roxbury (3); Forest 
Hills street. West Roxbury (1); Fabin street, Boston (2); 
Frawley street, Roxbury (2) ; Green street, Charlestown (3) ; 
Gore street, Roxbury (1); Glen street, Dorchester (2); Gray 
street, Boston (4); Goodenough street, Brighton (2); Hazel- 
mere road, West Roxbury (1); Henry street. East Boston (1); 
Harleston street, Roxbury (2); Horace street. East Boston 
(2); Ivanhoe street, Boston (3); Lawn street, Roxbury (1); 
Maverick street. East Boston (4); Maryknoll street, Dor- 
chester (2) ; Minton street, Jamaica Plain (2) ; Mystic street, 
Charleston (4); Messinger street, Dorchester (1); Merola 
park, Dorchester (2); M street, South Boston (3); Mission 
street, Roxbury (2) ; Nevada street, Dorchester (2) ; Norfolk 
avenue, Dorchester (1); Oswald street, Roxbury (1); street, 
South Boston (2); Page street, Dorchester (2); Paris street, 
East Boston (1); Pleasant street, Charlestown (4); Rowe 
street. West Roxbury (3); Renfrew street, Roxbury (1); 
Rogers street. South Boston (1) ; Ringgold street, Boston (1) ; 
Ruggles street, Roxbury (2); Rawson street, Dorchester (1); 
South Hobart street, Brighton (1); Spaulding street, Dor- 
chester (3); Standish street, Dorchester (1); Sachem street, 
Roxbury (3); St. Charles street, Boston (1); Stockwell 
street, Roxbury (2); Savin Hill avenue, Dorchester (1); 
Soley street, Charlestown (2); Seymour street. West Rox- 
bury (1); Safford street, Hyde Park (4); Tupelo road, Rox- 
bury (1); Tuttle street, Dorchester (1); Taylor street, 
Boston (1); Trumbull street, Boston (3); Union park, Bos- 
ton (4); Wait street, Roxbury (3); Weymouth avenue. 
West Roxbury (2); Windsor street, Roxbury (4); Wilming- 
ton avenue, Dorchester (1); Wales street, Dorchester (2); 
Warner street, Dorchester (1). 



Public Works Department 53 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service during 
1957 for the installation of 1,000 lumen lamps as follows: 

Appian Place, East Boston (1) ; At will road, West Roxbury 
(1); Armstrong street, West Roxbury (1); Arborfield road, 
West Roxbury (4); Bickford street, Roxbury (1); Boswell 
Lane, Charlestown (2); Bayswater street, East Boston (1); 
Concord avenue, Charlestown (4); Calumet street, Roxbury 
(1); Canterbury street, West Roxbury; (1) Damrell street, 
South Boston (5) ; Desmond road, Dorchester (2) ; Filomena 
road, West Roxbury (1); Gordon avenue, Hyde Park (1); 
Gardenside street, West Roxbury (1) ; Garth road, Boston (2) ; 
Heron street. West Roxbury (1); Lexington avenue, Charles- 
toAvn (2); Maryknoll terrace, Dorchester (1); Meadowview 
road, Hyde Park (3); Maple Street Extension, West Rox- 
bury (1); Prospect park, Hyde Park (1); Stanwood street, 
Dorchester (2) ; Wilmot street, West Roxbury (2) ; Wedmore 
street, Dorchester (1); Willow terrace. West Roxbury (1); 
Whitby terrace, Dorchester (1). 



54 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX D 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1958. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works: 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith a statement of the activities of the 
Sanitary Division of the PubUc Works Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1957: 

Refuse Collection and Disposal 

Contracts for the collection of refuse, awarded in 
March, require that all the districts of the City now be 
provided with totally enclosed steel bodies on the col- 
lection trucks, which is an improvement in sanitation 
that has been a goal of the division for many years. 

Disposal contracts for the so-called contract area, 
for the first time, split the work between two con- 
tractors, the DeMatteo Construction Company to 
continue the scow-towing and Spectacle Island dump 
operation, and the Coleman Disposal Company to 
operate the Calf Pasture dump for a one-year period 
from April 1, 1957 to March 31, 1958. 

The total cost of refuse collection and disposal for 
1957 was approximately $2,600,000, which is more 
than $200,000 under the cost of the same service in 
1949. 

This holding the line in costs is remarkable in view 
of the increase in the wage rate for collectors from $1.30 
an hour in 1949 to $2.15 an hour in 1957, and the fact 
that fully enclosed packer-type truck bodies are now 
used in place of the open body trucks furnished pre- 
viously. The resultant savings to the City were made 
possible by acquiring control of the refuse dumping 
sites and the institution of authentic competitive bidding 
on the refuse collection and disposal contracts over the 
past seven years. 




\- 




A. 



D 
c 

3 

■a 






<K - 

O »^ 



55 



3 ^ 



§ B-. 







\ 



i'' 



&^ 



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r. 

7Z 

r. 



Lt* 



J 



(t 



Public Works Department 55 

Other disposal facilities have been maintained during 
the year by — 

(a) Renewal of the Daggett contract for disposal of the 
East Boston refuse at the Saugus dump. 

(6) Continuing the sale of garbage delivered at the 
Victory Road Receiving Station to a hog farmer in Sterling, 
providing an income of $4,615 per year. 

(c) Repairs to the roof of the Victory Road Station were 
done by J. F. Shea Company at a cost of Sl,475, and the 
interior steel work cleaned and painted by the C. A. Foley 
Company, at a cost of $2,549. 

(d) At the Gardner street dump, improvement was made 
by demolition of the old Brookline Water Works structures 
by Dooley Brothers, Inc., at a cost of $4,300. The excellent 
dumping operation conducted at this site demonstrates the 
sound judgment exercised in acquiring the ninety-seven 
acres purchased by the department during the past few 
years, commencing in 1951. 

Street Cleaning and Snow Removal 

Mechanization of the street cleaning function pro- 
ceeded with the acquiring of two new mechanical pick-up 
sweepers complete with cabs for the operators, and two 
new front-end bucket loaders. 

An appropriation of $200,000 was made for a new 
sweeper garage and office building at 650 Albany street. 
Borings were taken by the Carr Construction Corp., 
and preliminary architectural studies are in progress. 
Construction of this building may be commenced in 
1958. 

The division's street cleaning force removed snow from 
the streets in the down-town retail stores district follow- 
ing storms in excess of two inches, which occurred during 
the months of January, February and March. No snow 
fell during the fall months. 

The entire division was mobilized for the Spring 
Clean-Up Campaign, conducted from March 25 to 
April 20. At the end of this period, every section of the 
city was in a clean condition, and the winter's accumula- 
tion of sand in the gutters had been removed. 

Incinerator Construction 

Construction of the South Bay Incinerator proceeded 
without delay this year. The J. F. White Contracting 
Company completed driving 62,000 feet, or almost 
twelve miles, of concrete-filled twelve-inch steel pipe 



56 City Document No. 18 

piles, averaging a depth of 160 feet below the ground sur- 
face, at a cost of $419,000. A revision of the contract 
with George Allen Company was made on April 24, 
providing for furnishing six instead of four incinerator 
furnaces and appurtenances, thereby increasing the 
plant capacity from 600 tons to 900 tons per twenty-four 
hours. The cost was $462,264, the same price bid by 
the Allen Company sixteen months earlier, which 
brought the total amount of this equipment contract to 
$1,426,131. This contract was later assigned to the 
Tynan Incinerator Company. 

A contract for construction of the Refuse Storage Bin 
was awarded on June 3 to the low bidder, Coleman 
Brothers Corp., at a bid price of $423,000. Due to diffi- 
cult sub-soil and high ground water conditions, the bin 
was constructed in a cofferdam of steel sheeting. Work 
was approximately 95 per cent completed on this con- 
tract on December 31st. 

The plans and specifications for the incinerator build- 
ing were completed by the consulting engineers, Metcalf 
& Eddy, in September, and a contract was awarded on 
November 25 to the low bidder, the John Bowen Co., 
Inc., in the amount of $2,693,793. The Bowen Company 
plans to commence work early in 1958, as soon as the 
Coleman Brothers Corporation leaves the site, and is 
expected to complete the building within twelve months. 

The only remaining incinerator work not contracted 
for is the steam main for transmitting steam, to be 
generated by burning refuse at the incenerator, to the 
Boston City Hospital. Plans and specifications for this 
work will be completed early in 1958. Utilization of 
the waste heat of incineration will provide a saving of 
over $150,000 annually in fuel oil costs at the hospital. 
Additional revenue may be derived from the sale of 
surplus steam to the Boston Edison Company which 
has expressed an interest in this commodity. 

The undersigned was promoted to the position of Di- 
vision Engineer of the Sanitary Division on August 6, 
1957, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Division 
Engineer, Adolph J. Post, in February, 1956. The 
Acting Division Engineer in the interim was General 
Superintendent Timothy J. O'Leary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John F. Flaherty, Division Engineer, 

Sanitary Division, P. W. D. 




CQ 



Public Works Department 



57 



SANITARY DIVISION — 1957 
Payments to Refuse Collection Contractors 



District 



Contractor 



Monthly 

Contract 

Price 



Total 
Payments 



1 South Boston. 



2 East Boston. 

3 Charlestown. 



4 Brighton . 



5 A West Roxbury. 
5B Jamaica Plain . 



6 A Dorchester — North. 



6B Dorchester — South. 



7A Elm Hill. 



7B Dudley. 



7C Mission Hill. 



7D Roxbury. 



9 South End. 



9 A Back Bay. 



9B Stuart. 



10 North and West Ends. 



11 Hyde Park. 



Anthony J. Ryan, Jr. 
(First 3 months) . . 
(Last 9 months). . . 



Milano Brothers, Inc. 



Milano Brothers, Inc 

(First 3 months) 
Jeffries Disposal Corporation. 
(Last 9 months) 



Anthony J. Ryan, Inc 

(First 3 months) 
Frank J. Cavaliere Company, Inc. 

(Last 9 months) 



Frank J. Cavaliere Company, Inc. 



J. J. Moore Company, Inc. 

(First 3 months) 

(Last 9 months) 



Coleman Brothers Corporation. 

(First 3 months) 

(Last 9 months) 



Coleman Brothers Corporation. 

(First 3 months) 

(Last 9 months) 



William J. Banfield. 
(First 3 months) . 
(Last 9 months). . 



United Contracting Company. 

(First 3 months) 

(Last 9 months) 



Marinucci Brothers, Inc 

(First 3 months) 
Frank J. Cavaliere Company, Inc. 

(Last 9 months) 



L^nited Contracting Company. 

(First 3 months) 
James A. Freaney, Inc 

(Last 9 months) 



James A. Freaney, Inc. 
(First 3 months) . . . . 
(Last 9 months) 



Dooley Brothers, Inc. 
(First 3 months) . . . 
(Last 9 months). . . 



James A. Freaney, Inc. 
(First 3 months) . . . . 
(Last 9 months) 



Ward General Contracting Company . 

(First 3 months) 

(Last 9 months) 



Dooley Brothers, Inc. 
(P'irst 3 montlis) . . 
(Last 9 months). . . 



$10,400 
12,607 

7,328 + 
3,953 

4,832 

13,400 
14,420 

10,350 + 



9,615 
11,100 



25,900 
27,370 



29,100 
30,570 



5,310 
5,420 



6,729 
6,929 

8,140 

7,960 

9,980 
9,480 



7,170 
6,940 



3,690 
2,990 



3,560 
2,910 



14,300 
13,650 



6,390 
6,390+ 



Total . 



$144,663 

90,856 
55,347 

169,980 

127,550 
128,745 
324,030 
362,430 
64,710 
82,548 
96,060 

115,260 

83,970 

37,980 

36,870 

165,750 

77,542 
S2,164,29I 



58 



City Document No. 18 

Payments to Refuse Disposal Contractors 



Districts 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
Payments 


3 9 9A 9B and 10 


M. DeMatteo Construction Company 


$39,090 
30,980 

2,100 


$396,090 












1,7A, 7B, 7C, andTD 




18,900 


(Last 9 months) 




Total 






$414,990 











Payments for Rental of Dumps 



Dump 
Location 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
Payments 




Dewey E. Daggett 


$900 

200 
2,000 


$10,800 




Boston Gas Company 


18,600 
























$29,400 











Total Payments to Contractors for Refuse Collection and Disposal $2,608,681 



Expenditures in 1957 

Payments to Refuse Collection Contractors . 

Payments to Refuse Disposal Contractors . . 



Payroll totals were as follows: 
Administrative and General 

Services S55,062 88 

Shops and Storehouse 201,270 40 

Collection and Disposal 292,767 95 



$2,164,291 00 
.444,390 00 

$2,608,681 00 



Total Sanitary 
Street Cleaning . . 



Total Sanitary and Street Cleaning 



$549,101 23 
1,632,314 15 

12,181,415 38 



Overtime Payrolls were as follows: 

Shops and Storehouse $4,246 46 

Collection and Disposal 5,691 05 

Street Cleaning 47,355 69 



Total Overtime . 



57,293 20 



Total Payroll $2,238,708 58 



Public Works Department 59 

Payments on other Contracts $59,861 93 

Supplies and Materials 47,652 72 

Miscellaneous 4, 134 62 

Grand Total $4,959,038 85 

Equipment Acquired During 1957 

1 Wayne Sweeper $11,650 00 

1 Elgin Sweeper 12,000 00 

2 Trojan Front-End Loaders 15,800 00 

3 G. M. C. 3-Ton (4-yard) Dump Trucks. . . 13,500 00 

Total $52,950 00 

Personnel Changes in Permanent Force During the 
Year 1957 

Total Personnel, January 1, 1957 *616 

Transfers In (from other Departments and T)'w\- 

sions) 24 

Reinstatements 3 

Appointments 35 62 

678 

Deaths 9 

Resignations 9 

Retirements 21 

Transfers Out (to other Departments and Divi- 
sions) 6 

Discharges 3 48 

Total Personnel, January 1, 1958 .... t630 

* Including 1 Military Leave of Absence, 
t Total net gain of 14 employees. 



60 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX E 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1958. 
To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and ex- 
penditures of the Sewer Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1957. 

Expenditures During 1957 — The activities of the 
Sewer Division during the year consisted of advertising 
for sewer construction at a contract bid price of $141,- 
520.80, and the maintenance and operation of the sewer 
system at a cost of $786,871.90. 

Contract Work — Contract work consisted of the ex- 
tension of the sewer system to provide drainage for new 
buildings and street construction and to ehminate cess- 
pools, the locations and cost of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work — Maintenance work consisted of 
the cleaning of 10,882 catch basins by contract and 
1,894 by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers and 
catch basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, and 
catch basins by the yard forces and the operation of the 
pumping station and disposal works, the cost of which is 
attached. 

Major Accomplishments — Completion of enclosing 
Section 18 of Stony Brook, Hyde Park, in a conduit from 
Willow Street to Bald Knob Road, a distance of 4,678.45 
linear feet. The contract was awarded to Pacella 
Brothers, it was started October 3, 1955, and completed 
September 28, 1957. The total and final amount paid 
under the contract was $490,263.02. 

Completion of the enclosing of the Canterbury 
Branch of Stony Brook, West Roxbury, in a conduit 
from the main line of Stony Brook Conduit to beyond 
Canterbury Street, a distance of 1,321 linear feet. The 
contract was awarded to Civitarese-Piatelli Corporation, 
the work started November 5, 1956, and was completed 
June 28, 1957. The total final payment under the con- 
tract was $207,184.45. 



Public Works Department 61 

A contract was awarded to P. J. Riley & Co. at an 
estimated cost of $20,318, to furnish and install one main 
sluice gate at Calf Pasture Pumping Station. The work 
will start in 1958. 

The emergencj^ repair of sewers by advertised con- 
tract at a total cost of $25,453.52. 

The maintenance of about 1,200 miles of sewers and 
surface drains, the emergency cleaning of catch basins, 
the repair of broken sewers and catch basins, the answer- 
ing of house drain complaints, the operation of pumping 
stations and storage basins for the disposal of sewage by 
division forces. 

The keeping of records, the issuance of permits for and 
the inspection of the construction of house drains. 

Engineering, clerical and inspectional work in con- 
nection with the construction of sewerage works done 
by advertised contract. 

Proposed Work to he Done hy Advertised Contract Dur- 
ing 1958 is as Follows — 

Emergency repairs of sewers, estimated cost, $30,000. 

Cleaning of catch basins, estimated cost, $60,000. 

Extension of sewer system to provide drainage for 
new buildings and new street construction. Estimated 
cost, $300,000. 

The covering in of that part of open Bussej' Brook for a 
distance of about 1,400 linear feet, from the Dedham 
branch railroad to South street. Estimated cost, 
$110,000. 

The covering in that part of open Canterbury Branch 
of Stony Brook from Canterbury street to Walk Hill 
street, estimated cost, $130,000. 

The Sewer Division Labor Force consists of the following 
— 15 laborers, 1 carpenter, 30 motor equipment oper- 
ators and laborers, 9 catch basin machine operators, 
3 tide gate repairmen and 1 working foreman tide gate 
repairman, 8 working foremen sewer cleaners, 14 sewer 
cleaners, 4 bricklayers, 2 yardmen, 1 heavy motor 
equipment operator, 5 sewer district foremen, and 1 
main drainage foreman. This makes a total of 94 men 
assigned to answering complaints, cleaning catch basins, 
cleaning sewers, repairs to manholes and catch basins, 
repairing broken sewers, and other related work. 

Length of Sewers Built — During the fiscal 3^ear 1957 
there were built by contractors and day labor 4.06 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains throughout the 



62 City Document No. 18 

city. After deducting 0.05 miles of sewers and surface 
drains, rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase for 1957 
is 4.01 miles, which added to the existing 1,291.30 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains and 30.93 miles of 
intercepting sewers, makes a grand total of 1,326.24 
miles of all sewers belonging to the City of Boston, and 
under the care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 1958. 

There were 218 catch basins built or rebuilt and 42 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 176 catch basins and a grand total of 24,698 
catch basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1958. 

Permit Office Report — Entrance fees to the amount 
of $14,457.70 have been deposited with the City Col- 
lector for collection from estates upon which no sewer 
assessments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordi- 
nances of 1945, Chapter 27, Section 10. 

Seven hundred and seventy-five permits have been 
issued, viz.: 112 to district foremen and contractors and 
663 to drain layers for repairing or laying new house 
drains. Inspectors from this office have personally 
inspected the work done under these drain-layers' 
permits. 

Two thousand and one complaints have been in- 
vestigated and inspectors are instructed to report in 
writing in each case. 

Two thousand and sixty -four catch basin complaints 
were received. 

Reported in writing on 2,761 municipal liens to the 
City Collector, in accordance with Chapter 60, Section 
25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
2,200 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the- Ordinances of 1925, Chapter 27, Section 8, 
apprising them of the construction of new sewers or 
repairs to old sewers. 

Respectfully, 

Robert P. Shea, 
Division Engineer, Sewer Division. 



Public Works Department 



63 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
December 31, 1957. 



Districts. 


Built by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 


Built by 
Private 
Parties. 


Total Lengths Built. 




Linear Feel. 

216.70 
463.70 


Linear Feet. 
2,195.00 


Linear Feet. 

2,411.70 
463.70 


Jl/i7es. 
0.4567 




0.0878 






























382.00 
9,019.00 
1,553.87 
5,497.97 


308.00 
964.00 
438.60 
372.80 


690.00 
9,983.00 
1,992,47 
5,870.77 


0.1307 


West Roxbury 


1.8907 
0.3773 


Hyde Park 


1.1U9 


Totals 


17,133.24 


4,278.40 


21,411.64 


4.0551 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January 1, 1958. 





1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 


Linear Feet. 
27,469.81 
11,482.00 


Linear Feet. 
33,316.89 
10,459.00 


Linear Feet. 

33,237.48 

1,695.15 


Linear Feet. 

25,559.88 

3,487.39 


Linear Feet. 

17,133.24 

4.278.40 






Totals 


38,951.81 


43,775.89 


34,932.63 


29,047.27 


21,411.64 







64 



City Document No. 18 



Total Length of Sewers. 



Districts. 


Total 
Lengths 

Built 
During 
Twelve 
Months 
Ending 
December 
31, 1957. 


Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1957. 


Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1957. 




Linear Feet. 
2,411.70 
463.70 


Linear Feet. 
216.70 
33.60 


Linear Feet. 
2,195.00 
430.10 


Miles. 
0.4157 


Roxbury 


0.0814 
























G90.00 
9,983.00 
1,992,47 
5,870.77 




690.00 
9,983.00 

1,992.47 
5,870.77 


0.1307 


West Roxbury 




1.8907 




0.3773 


Hyde Park 




1.1119 






Totals 


21,411.64 


250.30 


21,161.34 


4.0077 



Common sewers and surface drains built previous 
to January 1, 1957 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 
January 1 and December 31, 1957 

Common sewers and surface drains built ending 
December 31, 1957 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting 
with Metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1957 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers 
to December 31, 1957 



Miles. 
1,291.30 
4.01 

1,295.31 

6.81* 
24.12* 



Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to 

December 31, 1957 ... . . . 1,326.24 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 

to January 1, 1958 714.94 



* No additional lengths built during 1957. 



Public Works Department. 



65 



Catch Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 



Districts. 


Catch Basins for Twelv 
Ending December 31 


E Months 
, 1957. 


Total for Whole City 

IN Charge of Seweb 

Division. 


Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 


Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 


Net 
Increase. 


Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1957. 


Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1958. 




1 

13 







41 

78 

42 

43 







5 
5 
32 



1 

13 







36 

73 

10 

43 


3,800 
3,481 
1,477 
1,223 
870 
2,106 
4,518 
5,699 
1,348 


3,801 




3,494 




1,477 




1,223 




870 


hton 


2,142 




4,591 


Chester 


5.709 


ie Park. . . . 


1,391 






Totals 


218 


42 


176 


24,522 


24,698 



66 City Document No. 18 

Calf Pasture Pumping Station, 1957 

Total millions of gallons pumped (annually) . . . 39,996,699,000 

Average cost per million gallons (annually) ... $5 08 

Costs 

Annual Total Operating Costs, 1957 

Labor $106,777 69 

Edison Power 83,894 29 

Fuel Oil No. 5 5,348 92 

Fuel Oil No. 2 107 92 

Bottled Gas Ill 10 

Supplies 3,101 28 

Miscellaneous Oil 219 02 

Service Orders 3,575 04 



2. Contractual Services 

21. Communications $3,139 64 

22. Light, heat and power . ... 90,073 80 

26. Repairs and maintenance of buildings 

and structures 104,102 63 

27. Repairs and servicing of equipment . 3,979 45 

28. Transportation of persons . . . 1,189 39 

29. Miscellaneous contractual services . 808 25 



3. Supplies and Materials 

32. Food supplies $14 85 

33. Heating supplies and materials . . 7,798 95 

34. Household supplies and materials . . 408 88 

35. Medical, dental and hospital supplies 

and materials 29 15 

36. Office supplies and materials . . 2,281 30 
39. Miscellaneous supplies and materials . 7,697 27 



Total $203,135 26 

SEWER DIVISION 
Budget Expenditures, 1957 

1. Personal Services 

10. Permanent employees .... $550,019 61 

11. Temporary employees .... 1,153 75 

12. Overtime 12,671 31 



$563,844 67 



203,293 16 



18,230 40 



4. Current Charges and Obligations 
49. Miscellaneous current charges and obli- 
gations $1,155 22 1,155 22 

5. Equipment 
5 9. Miscellaneous equipment . . . $348 45 348 45 

Grand total $786,871 90 



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(72) 



Public Works Department 73 

APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE 
SURVEY DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1958. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works: 

Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the Survey Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1957. 

This Division performs engineering services for other 
divisions of the Public Works Department and other 
city departments, boards and commissions. It also 
performs administrative and engineering duties required 
by the Public Improvement Commission for its operation. 

The principal engineering duties include: 

(a) the making of plans, surveys, estimates and reports 
relating to the laying out, widening, construction and design 
of public highways: 

(b) the taking of easements for sewerage works; 

(c) staking out lines and grades for the construction of 
highways, sewerage, etc. ; 

(d) the making of property surveys of land to be acquired 
by the City of Boston by eminent domain ; 

(e) the making of plans and surveys of city-owned land 
for purposes of sale, interdepartmental transfer or new 
development ; 

(/) the making of various engineering surveys and plans 
required by other city departments. 

For the Public Improvement Commission, the ad- 
ministrative functions include the processing of petitions, 
arranging public hearings, preparing estimates and 
orders relating to land damages and street and sewer 
betterments, preparing orders for the laying out of 
streets and the construction of streets and sewers, 
preparing orders for eminent domain land takings, 
preparing orders for the granting of permits for use 
of public highways, erection of poles, etc., and the 
maintenance of all records in the charge of the Public 
Improvement Commission. 



74 City Document No. 18 

Personnel — On December 31, 1957, there were 
thirty-five permanent and five temporary employees as 
listed below in this Division. 

Name Title 

Kenneth L. Benkart Sr. Engineering Aide 

Charles E. Brewer Assistant Civil Engineer 

Arthur J. Brickley Assistant Civil Engineer 

Oliver C. Brown Sr. Engineering Aide 

George F. Buckley Jr. Civil Engineer 

John A. Bulliner Sr. Engineering Aide 

Carmine D. Buono Sr. Engineering Aide (Prov.) 

Joyce E. Campbell Sr. Clerk & Stenographer 

Michael J. Corrao Assistant Executive Secretary 

George J. Creney. Photostat Operator 

John J. Curley, Jr Jr. Civil Engineer 

Saverio A. DeFronzo Sr. Clerk and Typist 

Salvatore C. Diliberto Assistant Civil Engineer 

William F. Duggan Principal Clerk and Stenog- 
rapher 

Harry M. Fletcher Assistant Civil Engineer 

Thomas 0. Flood Senior Clerk 

George H. Gilboy Sr. Engineering Aide 

John F. Gilmore, Jr Assistant Civil Engineer 

James W. Haley Chief Engineer 

Bernard Harrington Jr. Engineering Aide (Prov.) 

Leo B. Hughes Sr. Engineering Aide 

Roland A. Hull Assistant Civil Engineer 

Angelo J. laluna Assistant Civil Engineer 

James J. Kelly Sr. Engineering Aide (Prov.) 

Frank S. Lane Jr. Civil Engineer 

Walter R. Luby Principal Civil Engineer 

Thomas McCusker Executive Secretary 

Francis McHugh Jr. Civil Engineer 

Robert P. Mehegan Head Clerk 

Frederick J. Milliken, Jr Sr. Engineering Aide 

A. Albert Minichiello Assistant Civil Engineer 

Philip A. Moynahan Sr. Engineering Aide 

John Murphy Sr. Engineering Aide (Prov.) 

William P. Norris Principal Duplicating Ma- 
chine Operator 

Thomas E. Rafferty Assistant Civil Engineer 

Rose K. Reynolds Clerk-Stenographer 

Albert J. Rodriguez Jr. Civil Engineer 

John J. Ryan Principal Civil Engineer 

Robert J. Sheehan Sr. Engineering Aide (Prov.) 

Redmond L. Walsh Head Photostat Operator 

The personnel allowance of this division has been 
dropping steadily from 73 in 1935 to 57 in 1945 to 45 



Public Works Department 



75 



this year. Of the 45 positions, 10 are now permanent 
vacancies because of our inability to secure quaUfied 
personnel through Civil Service in competition with 
higher salaries offered by the State and other pubHc and 
private agencies. Obviously, this situation which has 
continued now for over 10 years, is a serious handicap 
to the division. 



Division Expenditures, January 1, 1957 to December 31, 1957, 

Inclusive. 



Survey 
Budget 



Highway 
Loan 



Sewer 
Loan 



Personnel 

Pensions 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Current Charges and Obligations . 
Equipment 



$103,300.00 


$65,924.95 


21,281.28 


— 


2,300.00 


9,025.31 


7,000.00 


31.50 


— 


76,872.21 


500.00 


— 


$134,381.28 


$151,853.97 



$907.95 



Totals. 



$907.95 



Total Expenditures $287,143.20 

During the period covered by this report, the Survey 
Division completed one hundred eighteen (118) surveys 
and plans for the improving of existing highways, laying 
out of new ones and discontinuances, totaling 11.95 
miles. Eleven (11) surveys and plans for .57 miles of 
sewerage easements were also made. Sixteen (16) 
surveys and plans of city-owned land or land to be 
taken for municipal purposes were also made. 

Field engineering work included the staking out of 
eighty (80) streets for the Paving Service of the Highway 
Division, twenty-seven (27) for the Sewer Division, 
and miscellaneous services for other City departments. 
Regular routine work included the resurveying of street 
lines for private engineers wherever existing records 
were inadequate or obsolete, marking Hues and grades 
for private construction abutting public streets, exam- 
ining land court plans for the Law Department, prepar- 
ing land damage reports for the PubHc Improvement 
Commission. 

Listed below are the major engineering surveys and 
plans completed during the period of this report. 



76 City Document No. 18 

For the Public Improvement Commission: 

Fifty-four (54) surveys and plans were made for the 
laying out of 4.73 miles of public highways, as follows: 

District Length 

in Feet 
Boston Proper 

Kilby place 68 

Brighton 

Argus place 240 

Baldwin place 210 

Nottingham Path 210 

Dorchester 

Belvoir road 215 

Blair road 200 

Brandon avenue 746 

Cassnet street 160 

Constitution road 231 

Crossman street 553 

Dania street 755 

Hallet street 1,075 

Hebron street 395 

Jamestown terrace 134 

Messinger street 250 

Monticello avenue 3,145 

Montpelier road 870 

Orlando street 800 

Savannah avenue 247 

Viking street 185 

Willow court 740 

Hyde Park 

Belnap road 365 

Daniel court 180 

Dietz court 170 

Dodge road 480 

Farwell avenue 225 

Joan road 750 

Kristin court 155 

Leighton road 1,350 

Radcliffe road 77 

Rosemont street 278 

Susanna court 200 

Westminster street 1,193 

Wharton court 180 

Woodland road 840 



Public Works Department 



77 



Roxbury 

Alleghany street . 
Darling street 
Parker Hill terrace 
Alley No. 822 
South Bay avenue 
Topeka street 
Waymount street . 

West Roxbury 
Celia road 
Claron street . 
Glencliff road 
Grandview street 
Hackensack court 
Hautevale street 
June street 
Leland road . 
Paulman Circle 
Pleasantdale road 
Rivermoor street 
Willow terrace 



692 
65 
180 
100 
930 
567 
110 

206 
290 
580 
450 
340 
209 
430 
630 
270 
800 
565 
232 



Twenty-two (22) surveys and plans were made for the 
widening and relocation of 1.68 miles of public highways 
as follows: 



District 

Boston Proper 

Clinton street 
Troy street 

Charlestown 

Lowney Way 
Park street 



Dorchester 

Hill Top street 
Rosselerin road 
Willow court . 



Hyde Park 

Brainard street 
Radcliffe road 
River street . 



Roxbury 

Darling street 
Sachem street 
St. Botolph street 
Seaver street . 
Norfolk avenue 



Length 
in Feet 

220 
94 



157 
38 

32 
415 
800 

20 

48 
43 

72 
128 

20 

3,665 

143 



78 



City Document No. 18 



South Boston 
D street 



30 



West Roxhury 

Anawan avenue 24 

Baker street 2,641 

Firth road 21 

Joyce Kilmer road 24 

South street 319 

Woodard road 36 

Eighteen (18) surveys and plans were made for the 
discontinuance of .54 miles of public highways as 
follows : 



District 

Boston Proper 

Blackstone street 
Cambridge street 
Central street 
Fulton street . 
Genesee street 
John street 
Lovering street 
Public Alley No. 
Pubhc Alley No. 
Oneida street . 
Oswego street 
Warren Bridge 

Brighton 

Ryder Hill road 

Hyde Park 

Chapel road . 
Saiford street 



702 
703 



Length 
in Feet 

122 
43 

214 

65 

80 

146 

291 

205 

192 

60 

60 

783 



14 

87 
238 

48 



Roxhury 

Public Alley No. 821 

West Roxhury 

Brook Farm road 30 

Maple street 190 

Twenty-four (24) surveys and plans were made for the 
alteration (specific repair) of 5.00 miles of pubHc high- 
ways as follows: 

District Length 

in Feet 
Boston Proper 

Berkeley street 265 

Clarendon street 245 



Public Works Department 79 

Columbus avenue at Stuart street .... 55 

Commonwealth avenue at St. Mary's street . . 37 
Massachusetts avenue between Columbus and 

Huntington 990 

Washington street at Hayward place ... 35 

Brighton 

Beacon street at Ayr road 75 

Beacon street at Cleveland Circle .... 747 

Commonwealth avenue 5,090 

Dorchester and Roxhury 

Blue Hill avenue 2,349 



Roxhury 

Columbus avenue — Washington street to Walnut 

avenue 

Columbus avenue at Ruggles street 
Elm Hill avenue at Cra^vford street 
Ruggles street at Columbus avenue 
Seaver street 



1,205 
35 
98 
12 

4,065 



South Boston 

East Broadway 2,714 

Dorchester avenue — West Fourth street to Andrew 

Square 4,250 

West Roxhury 

Baker street — Spring street to Veterans of Foreign 

Wars Parkway 4,402 

Brewer street at Thomas street 13 

Brewer street at Eliot street 15 

Centre street at South Huntington avenue . . 14 

Hagar street at Thomas street 10 

Hager street at Eliot street 15 

Walworth street 27 

Washington street at South 10 

Four (4) survej^s and plans were made for the revision 
of grade of .33 miles of public highways as follows : 

District Length 

in Feet 
Bost&n Proper 

Castle street 530 

Hyde Park 

Safford street 350 

West Roxhury 

Burley street 280 

Brook Farm road 731 



80 City Document No. 18 

Two (2) surveys and plans were made for the taking 
of eminent domain of 26,129 square feet of land for 
municipal purposes, as follows: 

Location Area Department 

700 Tremont street, Boston Proper . . . 2,881 Fire 

42-56 Worcester street, Boston Proper . 23,248 School 

Eleven (11) surveys and plans were made for the tak- 
ing of .57 miles of easements for sewerage purposes as 
follows : 

District Length 

in Feet 
Hyde Park 

Arborfield road 925 

Beech street 318 

Mansur street 960 

Millstone road (private land) 30 

West street (private land) 100 

Roxbury 

Kenway terrace 12 



West Roxbury 

Centre street (private land at Dedham Line) 

Dow road 

Grandview street 

Hackensack court 

Maria Lane 



70 
36 
455 
89 
15 



For the Public Works Department (Central Office), 
a plan was prepared for exchange of land at Gardner 
street, West Roxbury. Study plans were made of the 
following: Parker Hill avenue. Sachem street, Way- 
mount street, Roxbury; land bounded by Southampton, 
Bradston streets and Southeast Expressway; Metro- 
politan avenue and railroad location in Hyde Park. 

For the Public Works Department (Highway Divi- 
sion), eighty (80) highways were staked out for con- 
struction. 

For the PubHc Works Department (Sewer Division), 
eighty-three (83) catch basins were staked out. Also, 
thirty-four (34) drainage surveys and reports were made. 

For the Pubhc Works Department (Sanitary Divi- 
sion), locations of test piles at incinerator site, South 
Bay avenue, Roxbury, were checked periodically. Top- 
ographical plan of land adjacent to incinerator site was 
made. 



Public Works Department 81 

For the Real Property Department, surveys and plans 
were made of city lands on Battery street, Boston 
Proper; Sumner street, East Boston; Lewis street. East 
Boston; Eastern avenue, Boston Proper; Medford street, 
Charlestown, and Ritchie street, Roxbury. A plan was 
prepared showing the relocation of Fitzgerald Express- 
way at Fort Hill square. 

For the Law Department, a survey was made for 
encroachment on Harrison avenue at East Newton 
street. Accident plans were made for the following loca- 
tions: Arhngton street, Boston Proper at Chandler 
street; Boylston street, Boston Proper at Hemenway 
street; 1245 Columbus avenue, Roxbury and North Ben- 
net street, Boston Proper at North Bennet Street place. 
Lines were marked at 58 L street, South Boston, Ballard 
street and Custer street. West Roxbury. A survey and 
plan was made of boundary line between Boston and 
Winthrop. A plan of sewer easement in Wave avenue, 
Dorchester, was prepared. 

For the Building Department, property Unes were 
checked at 10 Grove street. West Roxbury, 38 Prospect 
street and 1 Mt. Vernon street, Charlestown; 41-51 
Hanover street, Boston Proper. A topographical plan 
of area adjacent to Lodgehill road and Beech street, 
Hyde Park, was made. 

For the Hospital Department, a plan was made 
showing the location of inflammables at City Hospital. 

For the Fire Department, a survey and taking plan 
and topographical and utihties plan was made of Tre- 
mont street and West Concord street, Boston Proper. 

For the School Buildings Department, a survey and 
plan of land on Worcester street, Boston Proper, for 
addition to Dwight School. Plans were prepared of 
Dorchester High School lot and EngHsh High School lot. 
A sketch plan was prepared of Greenwood School on 
Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park. Line and grade 
was furnished for new school on Warren avenue, Boston 
Proper. 

Stone Bounds — In accordance with a policy estab- 
hshed in 1950, stone bounds were set and drilled on the 
following newly constructed streets: 

Number of 
Street District Bounds 

Ackley place West Roxbury 3 

Ayles road Hyde Park 3 

Barna road Dorchester 1 



82 City Document No. 18 

Number of 
Street District Bounds 

Brockton street Dorchester 3 

Brush Hill terrace Hyde Park 4 

Edwardson street Hyde Park 3 

Ellard road Hyde Park 2 

Farwell avenue Hyde Park 1 

Frazer street Hyde Park 2 

Granada park West Iloxbury 2 

Harrow street Dorchester 4 

Howard place Dorchester 4 

Lewiston street Hyde Park 3 

Maple street West Roxbury 3 

Meadowview road Hyde Park 6 

Millstone road Hyde Park 2 

New Bedford street Hyde Park 1 

Range road Dorchester 3 

Rocky Nook terrace Dorchester 3 

Tanglewood road Dorchester 1 

Alvarado avenue Hyde Park 1 

Ansonia road West Roxbury 7 

Hillis road Hyde Park , 1 

Reynold road Hyde Park 1 

Solaris road Hyde Park 1 

Vallaro road Hyde Park 2 

Engineering Information Services 

The preservation of street line locations is one of the 
most important responsibilities of this division. As 
brought out in recent annual reports, we have been 
losing ground steadily in maintaining adequate records 
of these street line locations, due primarily to lack of 
personnel. To establish an adequate program for this 
work, it will be necessary to increase the engineering 
force by employing twelve additional competent engi- 
neering aides at a cost of S45,000 per year. With these 
additional men, we could establish four new survey 
parties to work exclusively on street line surveys. 

Atlases 

Second only to the street line problem is our need 
for new up-to-date atlases or maps of the city. The 
ages of our best atlases are as follows: 

Hyde Park 46 years 

South Boston 39 years 

East Boston-Charlestown . . . .36 years 

West Roxbury 34 years 

Brighton 33 years 



Public Works Department 83 

Roxbury 27 years 

Dorchester 25 years 

Boston Proper 20 years 

The need for new atlases is obvious, not only for our 
needs, but all city departments and many other public 
and private agencies. 

"Boston's Streets" (Street Book) 

On April 30, 1957, this division issued for the first 
time a Street Book "Supplement" showing all changes 
in street records occurring since the 1955 edition of the 
Street Book. The supplement was well received and it 
is proposed that each year a new supplement be issued 
with a new street book edition being published only once 
every five or six years. 

Preparation of the following private ways for public 
travel, as provided for in Chapter 393, Acts of 1906, as 
amended, was approved by the PubHc Improvement 
Commission to be done under the general supervision 
of engineers of this division. 

Altacrest road, West Roxbury 

Arborfield road. West Roxbury and Hyde Park 

Beech street, Hyde Park, between Sherrin street and 
Asheville road 

Corcoran road, Dorchester 

Desmond road, Dorchester 

Dow road. West Roxbury 

Gould street. West Roxbury, from Belle avenue to North- 
dale road 

Itasca street, Dorchester, northeast and southwest of 
Messinger street 

Kiernan road, West Roxbury 

Lodgehill road, Hyde Park, from Beech street to Goff 
street 

Manchester street, Dorchester, extension to Temple 
street 

Mansur street, West Roxbury and Hyde Park 

Merola park, JDorchester 

Messinger street, Dorchester, from Colorado street to 
Savannah avenue 

Northdale road, West Roxbury 

Surreyhill road, West Roxbury 

Reproduction Work 

On January 1, 1957, a new poHcy requiring signed 
requisitions for all reproduction work was put into 



84 City Document No. 18 

effect. Also, a charge to the pubHc of $1 per copy was 
begun in accordance with a revised schedule of fees 
established by the City Council, December 1, 1957. 

As expected, the total amount of work fell off con- 
siderably. One exception was ozalid printing which 
increased slightly. This increase was caused by one 
particular job, the South Bay Avenue Incinerator, of 
which over 8,000 prints were made. 

The new fee schedule brought an income of $623 to 
this division from the sale of copies of its plans and 
records. Other departments and divisions likewise 
received substantial new revenues from the sale of 
copies produced by our reproduction service. 

Following is the report of reproduction work of the 
division for the year 1957. 

Department PHSTS BPS OZS APS 

Administrative Services 1,288 226 

Assessing 770 2,094 

Auditing 546 

Building Department 906 20 934 

City Clerk 708 98 

City Council 2,104 352 

Civil Defense 574 116 

Compensation Review Board 286 

Finance Commission 142 

Fire Department 466 107 

Health Department 598 39 

Registry Division 920 

Boston Housing Authority 16 16 

Law Department 616 186 

Mayor's Office 3,244 212 

Park Department 62 

Penal Institutions 16 12 

Planning Board 966 633 

Public Works: 

Central Office 662 28 

Bridge Division 286 559 

Highway Division 624 97 1,969 126 

Sanitary Division 148 8,054 

Sewer Division 926 116 455 

Survey Division 3,130 1,926 6,929 22 

Water Division 338 7 453 

Public Works (Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts) 237 

Real Property 1,432 26 1,050 

Registry (Court House) 114 

Retirement Board 72 

School Buildings 230 87 

School Committee 52 

Traffic Commission 234 95 752 

Treasurer's Office 126 

Collecting Division 22 

Veterans Services 418 12 

White Fund 508 35 

Election Department 16 

Public Buildings 52 66 

Public Works Lighting Service 64 384 



Public Works Department 85 

Totals: 

Photostats '. 23,668 

Ozalids 26,179 

Blueprinting 2,287 

Autopositives 148 

52,282 

Photographic Service — In carrying out a policy intro- 
duced in 1956, we have established a Photographic 
Service for the Public Works Department and other 
city departments. As a part of this program we now 
take photographs of the location of all new highway 
layouts and proposed improvements, and lands taken 
for municipal purposes. The following is a summary 
of this work during the year 1957: 

Photo- 4x5 8 X 10 

Public Works Department graphs Prints Prints 

Sanitary Division 342 342 32 

Survey Division 380 380 20 

Sewer Division 150 150 

Bridge Division 178 176 56 

Highway Division 140 140 

Water Division 40 40 

Automotive Division 18 18 

Central Office 52 56 

Public Improvement Commission 160 160 

Totals 1,460 1,108 462 

Land Damages — -During 1957, 67 land damage reports 
recommending awards totaling $24,500 were submitted 
to the Public Improvement Commission. 

Assessments — During the period reported on, esti- 
mates of benefit for assessment purposes were prepared 
amounting to $241,503.01. These estimates are in- 
cluded in orders for street and sewer improvements. 
Also, final assessments were prepared amounting to 
$286,936.04. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James W. Haley, 

Chief Engineer. 



86 



City Document No. 18 



APPENDIX G. 



REPORT OF DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
WATER DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1958. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works: 

Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the Water Division, operations and expen- 
ditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1957. 

During the year a total of 22,282.6 hnear feet, or 
4.22 miles, of main pipe was laid or relaid, varjdng in 
size from 4 inches to 24 inches and 720 appHcations 
were received for installation of new service pipes, 
enlarged service pipes and fire pipes, etc., into new or 
remodeled buildings. 

There were 13 petitions received for the extension of 
water mains. The particular streets in which the above 
work was performed are shown on the accompanying 
tables. 

The districts in which the main pipe was laid and 
relaid are as follows: 



District 


Laid 

Linear Feet 


Relaid 

Linear Feet 


City Proper . 
East Boston . 
South Boston 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park . 
West Roxbury 


7,271.0 
80.0 
323.0 
3,809.0 
6,604.7 
2,326.0 


1,656.4 




212.0 



Under the provisions of Chapter 4 of the Ordinances 
of 1952, which deals with capital improvements, the 
W^ater Division submitted a capital improvement pro- 
gram, which program was not followed to any great 
extent due to the fact that all available funds were 
needed to extend water mains to provide water into 
residential areas. 



Public Works Department 87 

Engineering Office 

The office force assisted the pubUc in ascertaining 
official information in relation to water mains and 
service pipe locations, making studies and estimates 
on new mains and services and other assistance relating 
to water matters. The record plans, pressure charts 
and other official records were brought up to date. 
The office drew up plans and contracts for laying new 
and relaying old mains, supervised construction, and 
had supervision of snow removal in contract areas 4 
and 10. 

The engineering office assisted in design and super- 
vision of construction of water mains and appurtenances 
for the following major projects; their status being 
as follows: 

Central Artery. 

Fort Hill Square to South street, completed. 
South street to Dover street, one third complete. 

Southeast Expressway 

Dover street to Boston street, plans completed. 
Boston street to Columbia road, 90 per cent complete. 
Savin Hill Section, 90 per cent complete. 
William T. Morrissey Boulevard to beyond Neponset 
avenue, complete. 

Soldiers Field Road 

Eliot Bridge to Cambridge street, completed. 

Reinforced Faulkner Hospital Area, completed by connec- 
tion to new 36-inch M.D.C.H.H.S. Mam at Weld 
street and West Roxbury Parkway. 

Reinforced Hyde Park with 16-inch main on Providence 
street, completed. 

New York Street Area, completed. 

Temporary pump installation during summer months to 
raise pressure in Stony Brook Village, Hyde Park. 

Codman Hill Section of Dorchester reinforced by M.D.C. 
installation of 12-inch Det. Meter Gallivan Boulevard 
at Morton street. 

Projects Under Study 
(o) Reinforce southern section of West Roxbury. 
(6) Reinforce Stony Brook section of Hyde Park with 
H.H.S. 



88 City Document No. 18 

(c) Reinforce Low Service, Roxbury and South Boston, by 
cleaning and lining 30-inch-24-inch main Roxbury Crossing 
to Andrew Square. 

(d) Storage building for water works supplies in Albany 
Street Yard. 

Hydrants 
There were 24 new hydrants established, 136 hy- 
drants changed and 35 hydrants abandoned, a decrease 
of 11 hydrants. 

Summation 
System relaid .35 miles, extended 3.87 miles, aban- 
doned 2.95 miles, 24 new hydrants estabhshed and 35 
hydrants abandoned; an increase of .92 miles and a 
decrease of 11 hydrants. 

The Distribution Branch 
The Distribution Branch consisting of the main 
yard at 710 Albany street (with a small subyard in 
Charlestown) and three district yards are responsible 
for the repair and maintenance of main pipes, service 
and fire pipes, hydrants, gates, and providing emergency 
and general service to the public. The main yard main- 
tains emergency crews around the clock for any 
water service that might be required in any section of 
the city. 

The main yard and three district yards were assisted 
by three contracting firms, one in each yard with one 
contractor having two districts. The contractual 
work consisted of excavation and backfilling to allow 
the water division employees to repair leaks, lay or 
relay water services, change hydrants and repair or 
replace defective water appurtenances. This contrac- 
tual work was performed in a satisfactory manner and 
proved its value by giving service to the public. 

During the year the main yard was cleaned up on the 
northern side by removing the old sheds, placing an 
asphalt pavement over the area and erecting a mod- 
ern chain link fence from Albany street to the channel. 

District Yards 

The three district yard forces (West Roxbury, Dor- 
chester and Brighton) were utilized in general assistance 
to the public repairing leaks, installing new services, 
meter changes, hydrant changes, off and on calls, etc. 

A new combination garage and shelter of prefab steel 



Public Works Department 89 

was constructed in the Dorchester District Yard, re- 
placing the old wooden stable and garage, and chain 
link fence was installed on Gibson street, replacing 
the old wooden fence. 

The Machine Shop 
The machine shop and plumbing shop handled all 
drilling of services in the main yard and assisted in case 
of emergency in the district yards. The machine shop 
continues to machine and assemble all new gates up to 
and including 12 inches, tapping gates up to 6 inches. 
Gates 16 inches and larger are now purchased under 
contract made under Specifications of New York Pat- 
tern, M. D. C. Type. They machine and assemble all 
hydrants, repair defective hydrants, repair in the ground 
if possible defective gates and rebuild gates both cor- 
poration, tapping and high pressure. Along with this 
work they, both the plumbing and machine shop, are 
called on to assist other branches of the Public Works 
Department in many special jobs. 

The Meter Branch 
The meter shop handled a total of 17,981 meters, 
divided as follows: 

Meters applied on new services .... 626 

Meters discontinued 1,683 

Meters Changed Out 5,562 

Meters Changed In 5,440 

Meters tested in shop 6,809 

Meters repaired in service 570 

Meters repaired in shop 753 

Meters reset 733 

Meters junked 1,367 

Total 23,543 

Business Office 

This office performs all the work related to the 
processing of bills to property owners for water used 
and the maintenance of water meters. 

These operations include receiving applications for new 
services and fire pipes; reading 95,000 meters quar- 
terly; computing and preparing 382,000 bills amounting 
to $6,223,229.77; keeping account of paid and unpaid 
bills; testing, repairing, installing, and removing water 
meters and receiving complaints from the water- 
consuming public. 



90 



City Document No. 18 



It is unfortunate that for many years the surplus of 
the Water Division was not allowed to accumulate a 
reserve fund which would have been available when 
water receipts failed to meet expenditures. 

1957 

Main pipe petitions received 13 

Domestic service applications 659 

Fire pipe applications 61 

Special meter tests 34 

Hydrant permits issued 13 

Repair deposits received 84 

Miscellaneous deposits 30 

APPROPRIATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND REVENUE 



Budget appropriation, 1957 
Amount expended 



52,465,718 00 
2,472,526 00 



Amount of money collected from all sources during the 

year 1957 

Amount expended from all sources 



Surplus 



R6,274,964 54 
6,177,357 09 

$97,607 46 



The Metropohtan assessment for 1957 amounted to 
$3,328,696.68 at the rate of $80 per milUon gallons, an 
increase of $37,901.24 over the assessment of 1956, 
based on the $80 per milhon gallon rate. 

Total amount billed for 1957 .... $6,232,598 76 

Total amount collected for 1957 bills, as of 

December 31, 1957 $4,825,825 43 

Total amount abated for 1957 bills, as of 

December 31, 1957 $21,124 18 

Total amount collected in 1957 on bills ren- 
dered prior to 1957 $822,762 68 

By chapter 487, Acts of 1954, entitled "An Act Rela- 
tive to Liens for Water Rates and Charges" effective 
January 1, 1955, the law was changed so that hens for 
water rates take effect by operation of law without 
the necessity of recording a hen statement at the Regis- 
try of Deeds. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers at the end of the year has been con- 
tinued as a courtesy to the customer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. M. Sullivan, 
Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department 



91 



Balances from 1956 
Water Service Receipts 
Water Service . 



Receipts 

Water Rates and Services 
Tax Titles, Water . 



Expenditures 

Pensions and Annuities . 
Water Division 

Refunds 

Metropolitan Water Assessment 
Collecting — • Water . 
Automotive — Water 



Water Service 1957 



$271,990 01 
245,811 46 



5,223,229 77 
51,734 77 



$225,333 58 

2,472,526 21 

2,275 90 

3,328,696 68 

137,282 00 

125,191 00 



Transfer of 1956 Surplus 



Carried forward to 1958 Water Division . 

Surplus 

1957 
Summary of Water Division 
Collections and Expenditures 

Total Amount Collected 

Expenditures 

Pensions and Annuities . . . $225,333 58 

Water Division (Budget) . . 2,472,526 21 

Refunds 2,275 90 

Collecting — Water . . . 137,282 00 

Automotive — Water . . . 125,191 00 



M.D.C. Water Assessment 

Less cash forwarded 1956 to 1957 

Plus cash forwarded 1957 to 1958 



$2,962,608 69 

3,328,696 68 

$6,291,305 37 

245,811 46 

$6,045,493 91 

131,863 18 



$517,801 47 



6,274,964 54 
56,792,766 01 



6,291,305 37 

$501,460 64 
271,990 01 

$229,470 63 
131,863 18 

$97,607 45 



j,274,964 54 



6,177,357 09 



Surplus 



$97,607 45 



92 City Document No. 18 

Water Division 1957 

Construction Account 

Extension of mains (from revenue) 

Cost of construction Dec. 31, 1957 $25,439,829 36 

Cost of construction Dec. 31, 1956 25,357,313 14 



Increase in plant cost during 1957 .... $82,516 22 

Cost of existing worlcs Dec. 31, 1957 

Pipe yards and buildings . . $84,332 16 

Distribution system .... 25,439,829 36 
Hyde Park water works . . . 175,000 00 



$25,699,161 52 
High pressure 2,448,340 64 

$28,147,502 16 

Water Statistics for the Fiscal Year Ending 

December 31, 1957 

Mains 

Kind of pipe : cast iron, wrought iron, steel. 

Size, 2-inch to 48-inch. 
Extended miles — 3.87. 
Size enlarged miles, 0.35. 
Total miles now in use, 1,030.8. 
Public hydrants added, 24. 
Public hydrants now in use, 12,543. 
Stop gates added, 45. 
Stop gates now in use, 16,553. 
Number of blowoffs, 857. 
Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Services 
Kind of pipe and size : 

5/8 inch to 2 inches in diameter of lead or copper. 
4 inches and 6 inches in diameter of cast iron. 

Shutting Off and Turning On Water in 1957 

Number of shut-offs for repairs 5,089 

Number of premises turned on after repairs 4,475 

Number of shut-offs for vacancy 768 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy .... 187 
Number of premises shut off for nonpayment of water rates . 13 
Number of premises turned on again after being shut off for non- 
payment 2 

Number of premises shut off on account of waste .... 37 
Number of premises turned on again after being shut off for 

waste 

Number of new service pipes turned on for the first time . . 360 

Total number of times water was shut off or turned on . . 10,931 



Public Works Department 



93 



Table No. 1. Statement of Work Done During the Year 1957. 



Make. 


< 


a 
o 
u . 

Q§ 

— a 


Meters 
Changed. 


a 

il 


.2 
b > 


a 
So. 


5 


a 


•3 
1 




Out. 


In. 




600 
14 


1,353 

281 

20 

25 

1 

2 


4,584 

837 

46 

74 

1 
7. 

1 


5,300 
135 


5,738 

925 

46 

74 

7 

1 


461 
104 


653 
90 


731 
2 


367 

797 

72 

121 

1 

9 


19,787 




3,185 




184 












294 












5 












25 






1 






3 


Nash 
















o 




10 
1 


5 


13 

2 


3 

1 


8 






41 


Trident 






6 








































1 


1 




1 










3 
















Pitt 
























10 


















10 




















Totals 


626 


1,683 


5,562 


5,440 


6,809 


570 


753 


733 


1,367 


23,543 







94 City Document No. 18 

Table No. 2. Meters in Service, December 31, 1957. 





Diameter in Inches. 




Make. 


% 


V4. 


1 


IVi 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


Total. 


Hersey 

Watch Dog 


71,069 

7,878 

474 

1,196 

48 
47 


5,044 
261 

7 
6 


2,464 

393 

4 


1,421 

757 

8 

6 


1,012 

410 

3 

4 


349 

228 


425 
66 


123 


37 


18 


81,962 
9,993 


King 








496 


2 










1,214 












48 






















47 




1 
1 






4 

1 


.... 


2 








8 


Nash 


8 
3 










10 








1 
16 
23 

1 


1 

7 
9 








5 




1 




14 


16 


2 






56 


Trident 


1 
2 

1 






33 


















3 




















1 








































3 


1 




4 




















Total 


80,727 


5,321 


2,861 


2,206 


1,450 


620 


510 


129 


38 


18 


93,880 









Diameter in Inches 


Total 


Make 


% 


M 


1 


IV2 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


No 
Size 




2,377 

42 


177 
3 


60 

25 


20 

82 


29 
165 


17 
66 


4 
26 


4 

7 


4 
1 






2,692 


City of Boston, Connec- 


1 


10 


428 






Total 


2,419 


180 


85 


102 


194 


83 


30 


11 


5 


1 


10 


3,120 







Public Works Department 95 

Table No. 3. Meters in Shop, December 31, 1957. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totall 


Make. 


Vs 


% 


1 1>^ 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


New 


390 




















390 


Hersey H. C. T 














1 






1 


Hersey Detector 






















Watch Dog 
















































Total 


390 














1 






391 






















Old 
Hersey Disc 


170 


10 


5 


20 


18 


10 


8 
7 
1 


4 
5 


6 


1 


252 


Hersey Detector 


12 


Hersey H. C. T 












1 






2 






















Total 


170 


10 


5 


20 


18 


11 


16 


9 


6 


1 


266 







Table No. 4. Meters Repaired in Shop in 1957. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Vs 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 






Hersey Disc 


321 


129 


57 


78 


54 


1 
7 


1 
4 


1 






642 


Hersey H.C.T 






11 


Hersey Detector 




















Watch Dog 








52 


32 


4 


2 








90 


Hersey F. M 
















Arctic 








5 


2 




1 








8 


Pitt 
















Trident 












1 


1 








2 






















Total 


321 


129 


57 


135 


88 


13 


9 


1 






753 











Note: Approximately 1,400 meters are awaiting examination to determine whether they are repairable 
or not. 



96 City Document Xo. 18 

Table No. 5. Meters Repaired and Rebuilt at Factory in 1957. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


ToUl. 




404 


404 






Total 


404 


404 



Table No. 5A. Meters Purchased New in 1957. 





Diameter in Inches. 




Make. 


1 


1 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Total. 




2.440 


100 


50 


60 


4.5 








2,695 
23 


Hereey H. C. T 


10 


10 


3 
















Total 


2,440 


100 


50 


60 


45 


10 


10 


3 


2,718 





Table No. 6. Meters Reset in 1957. 





Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


ToUl. 




1 


J 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


Hersey Disc 


663 
2 


42 


17 


25 


3 


1 




751 


Watch Dog 


2 


















Total 


665 


42 


17 


25 


3 


1 




753 







Public Works Department 97 

Table No. 7A. Meters Changed in 1957. Meters Taken Out. 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 




H 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


Total 


ersey 


3,829 

637 

45 

73 

1 

7 


393 
38 


160 
54 


93 
57 

. . 1 


65 
36 


15 
11 


16 
4 


8 


2 


3 


4,584 
837 


'atch Dog 


ing 








46 


''orthington 








1 












74 


merican 


















J 


sderal 




















7 


rctic 






4 


3 


1 
1 


2 








10 


rident 














1 


rown 












1 








1 


marling 














1 






1 
























Total 


4,592 


431 


214 


155 


105 


28 


23 


9 


2 


3 


5,562 





Table No. 7B. Meters Changed in 1957. Meters Put In. 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


H 


?4 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


Jrsey 


4,506 
3 


291 

1 


190 
5 


142 

85 

2 


103 

33 

3 


29 
5 


32 
3 


5 


1 


1 


5,300 
135 


atch Dog 


ctic 








5 






















Total 


4,509 


292 


195 


229 


139 


34 


35 


5 


1 


1 


5,440 





98 City Document No. 18 

Table No. 8. Meters Repaired in Service in 1957. 























.M 
















Make. 




•3 
3 


1 


a 
'3 


s 

ai 
O 


1 

01 


a 

a 
'3 








_2 

.s 


a 
■ft 




a 


a 

"a 

c3 


t 


3 




















Q 


M 


O 


^ 


P3 


W 


Pi 


H 




171 


226 


28 


12 


2 


22 




461 


Watch Dog 


36 


62 


4 




2 






104 






2 






1 






3 




1 










1 




1 














1 


















Total 


209 


290 


32 


12 


5 


22 




570 







Table No. 9. Meters Applied in 1957. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total 


Make. 


f 


i 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Hersey 


486 


10 


22 


30 
6 


26 
6 
2 
3 


8 

1 


8 

1 


1 


591 


Watch Dog 


14 










2 






1 


1 




2 


3 




10 








Total 


486 


11 


23 


36 


37 


11 


12 


1 


617 







Meters applied on old service 9 

Meters applied on new service 607 

Connection pieces applied on new services 10 

Total 626 



Public Works Department 



99 



Table No. 10. Meters Discontinued in 1957. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


"* m 3 


a 
p 

O 


a 

o 




Vs 


H 


1 


iy2 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


c3 


Hersey 

Watch Dog 


1,211 

166 

26 

30 

1 


65 
6 


80 
27 


17 
8 
1 


12 
6 


3 
10 


3 

1 


2 


1 


1 


232 
35 

1 


1,017 

170 

29 


136 
20 

3 


2,780 
449 








57 


Worthington 






1 












34 






















1 












1 












2 


1 


4 




7 




















7 














1 














1 


Trident 












1 














1 














































1 










1 


2 




























Total 


1,441 


71 


107 


26 


19 


15 


5 


3 


1 


1 


268 


1,218 


161 


3,336 



100 City Document Xo. IS 

Table No. 11. Reason for Meter Change in Year 1957. 



Makj:. 


J 

1 

1 

o 
Q 


tc 
e 

"E 

9 
O 

u 


i 

'E 


c 
c 

J 

a 
c. 

Q 


is 


S 
2 


S 


s 

1 


a 
o 

s 

ca 

u 
O 

O 


o 
1 
1 


£ 




Hersey 


1.961 

42S 

22 

45 

1 
3 
3 
1 

1 
1 


96 

22 

1 


924 

159 

12 

15 


S3 
11 


27 
6 


62 
1 


37 
1 


35 
3 


77 

10 

1 

1 


41 
1 


215 
34 

2 


3 55S 


Watch Dog 


676 


King- 


40 


Wortldngton 






1 


1 




65 








1 


Federal 




4 


















7 


Arctic 


2 
















5 


Trident 




















1 


Crown 






















1 


Neptune . . . 






















1 


























Total 


2,466 


119 


1,114 


93 


33 


64 


39 


3S 


89 


44 


253 


4,355 



Table No. 12. Meters Junked in 1957. 



Make 






Diameter in Inches 








H 


H 


1 


m 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Total 


Hersey 


352 

712 

71 

121 

1 

9 


4 
43 


3 
40 

1 


2 
2 


3 


I 


1 


1 


367 


VTatcIi Dog 


797 


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72 














121 


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1 


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9 





















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Arctic 









































Total 


1,266 


47 


44 


4 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1,367 







Note — The number of meters lost in sennce in 1957 amounts to 308. 



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(101) 



102 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE NO. 11. 
Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1957. 























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241 


2,109 


2,074 


6,677 


2 




5 




91 


7 


11,657 


Private, December 31. 1956 


33 


5 


29 


126 


17 


13 


56 




4 


111 




394 




1 








123 














124 




14 




29 


80 


12 














135 


Total Public, December 31, 1957. 


438 


241 


1,980 


1,994 


6,787 


2 




5 




91 


7 


11,646 


Total Private, December 31, 1957 


33 


5 


29 


126 


17 


13 


56 




4 


111 




394 



Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1956 

Total hydrants added during 1957 

Total hydrants abandoned during 1957 

Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1957 

High pressure fire hydrants in service, 1957 

Total hydrants (all kinds) in service, December 31, 1957 



12,051 
124 
135 

12,040 
503 

12,543 



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Public Works Department 107 

APPENDIX H. 



REPORT OF THE 
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION 



Boston, January 2, 1958. 
Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Through the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In accordance with the provisions of section 24, 
chapter 3 of the Revised City Ordinances of 1947, the 
following report of the Public Improvement Commis- 
sion for the year ending December 31, 1957, is respect- 
fully submitted. 

The Public Improvement Commission was established 
May 1, 1954, by the provisions of section 57, chapter 2 
of the 1954 Ordinances. This Commission, consisting 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, the Commissioner 
of Real Property, and the Chairman of the Boston 
Traffic Commission, was assigned all of the powers 
and duties of the former Board of Street Commissioners, 
except : 

(a) Those relating to the storage and sale of inflammables, 
filling stations, and parking lots which were transferred 
to the Committee on Licenses in the Public Safety 
Commission ; 

(6) Those relating to the planting and removal of trees in 
public ways, the use of public ways for any temporary 
obstruction in, under, or over the same, the use of 
public ways for the storage and sale of merchandise, 
and the designating of coasting streets, which were 
transferred to the Commissioner of Public Works; and 

(c) Those relating to the abatement of taxes which were 
transferred to the Real Property Department. 

Functions of the Board of Street Commissioners 
transferred to this Commission include the authority 
to lay out, widen, relocate, alter, discontinue, or rename 
public highways, and to order the making of specific 
repairs therein; to order the construction of sanitary 
sewers and storm drains; to take land by eminent 



108 City Document No. 18 

domain for municipal purposes (except housing and 
off-street parking) ; to permit the opening of private 
ways for public travel; to levy assessments for street, 
sidewalk, and sewer betterments; and to issue permits 
for the location of wire-carrying poles, conduits, pipes, 
tracks, and similar uses of the public ways. 

STREET PROGRAM 

During the period covered by this report, eighty-three 
(83) highway improvements, including the laying out of 
thirty-nine (39) new highways, the widening and reloca- 
tion of seventeen (17) public ways, and the making of 
specific repairs in twenty-seven (27) existing streets, 
were ordered by the Public Improvement Commission. 
Of particular interest in these groups are the following 
projects: 

The improvement of Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, from 
Brighton avenue to Warren avenue, at an estimated cost of 
$270,000. With the volume of traffic on this main artery into 
Boston from the west greatly increased since the opening of the 
Massachusetts Turnpike, this Board has ordered the recon- 
struction of a particularly dangerous section between Brighton 
avenue and Warren avenue with the new construction to 
include a four-lane divided highway for through traffic and the 
service roads on either side altered to allow much additional 
parking area at the local business districts. 

The improvement of Blue Hill avenue, Seaver street, Colum- 
bus avenue, from Columbia road to Egleston square, at an 
estimated cost of $250,000. In 1956 we began at Mattapan 
square on the Milton boundary line ordering major improve- 
ments, most of which are now constructed, of Blue Hill avenue 
to Columbia road. In our current year, we have continued the 
improvement of this major route into the heart of the city 
from the south by ordering the construction of a wide divided 
highway throughout the length of Seaver street, using the 
abandoned street car reservation for a new road. 

The improvement of East Broadway, South Boston, from 
West Broadway to L street, at an estimated cost of $105,000. 
This improvement, consisting of the reduction in width of 
existing sidewalks, will widen the newly reconstructed road so 
as to allow ten feet additional for highway travel. 

The improvement of Massachusetts avenue, Boston Proper, 
from Columbus avenue to Huntington avenue, by installing a 
highway divisional island at an estimated cost of $13,000. 

The improvement of Cleveland Circle, Brighton, at an esti- 
mated cost of $50,000, by removing the existing circular 
traffic island and installing channelizing islands which will 
eliminate the rotary traffic movement and permit a well- 
controlled traffic intersection. 



Public Works Department 109 

The improvement of Baker street, West Roxbury, at an 
estimated cost of $100,000, will include the widening of the 
existing roadway to thirty feet throughout most of the length 
with an additional widening being made at the proposed site 
of the Central Catholic High School at the corner of Gardner 
street. Baker street is one of the principal thoroughfares 
across West Roxbury from the Newton boundary line to 
Dedham. 

The following streets were ordered laid out as Public 
Ways during 1957: 

Alleghany street, Roxbury, from Parker street approxi- 
mately 692 feet northwesterly. Length, 690 feet; estimated 
cost, $18,431; estimated benefit, $5,261.75. 

Asheville road, Hyde Park, from Deforest street approxi- 
mately 477 feet easterly. Length, 477 feet; estimated cost, 
$12,105; estimated benefit, $5,111.26. 

Belnap road, Hyde Park, from Eastmont road to Leighton 
road. Length, 341 feet; estimated cost, $11,375; estimated 
benefit, $3,784. 

Celia road. West Roxbury, from Bellevue street approxi- 
mately 210 feet northeasterly. Length, 210 feet; estimated 
cost, $6,323; estimated benefit, $3,252. 

Claron street. West Roxbury, between Beech street and 
Hautevale street. Length, 291 feet; estimated cost, $9,311; 
estimated benefit, $4,330. 

Coffey street, Dorchester, from Newhall street approxi- 
mately 375 feet easterly. Length, 279 feet; estimated cost, 
$9,249; estimated benefit, $5,239. 

Daniel court, Hyde Park, from Dietz road approximately 
180 feet easterly. Length, 180 feet; estimated cost, $5,924; 
estimated benefit, $2,516. 

Dietz court, Hyde Park (formerly Perry court), from Dietz 
road approximately 170 feet easterly. Length, 170 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $6,012; estimated benefit, $2,090. 

Dodge road, Hyde Park, from Leighton road approximately 
480 feet northwesterly. Length, 480 feet; estimated cost, 
$16,000; estimated benefit, $6,444.50. 

Farwell avenue, Hyde Park, extended from a point ap- 
proximately 450 feet southeast of Summit street to Milton 
avenue. Length, 385 feet; estimated cost, $13,475; estimated 
benefit, $4,329. 

Furbush road. West Roxbury, from La Grange street ap- 
proximately 402 feet northeasterly. Length, 402 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $10,386; estimated benefit, $5,387.50. 

Graham terrace. West Roxbury, from Maple street ap- 
proximately 200 feet southwesterly. Length, 200 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $6,060; estimated benefit, $1,492. 



110 City Document No. 18 

Grandview street, West Roxbury, from Beech street ap- 
proximately 450 feet southwesterly. Length, 450 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $10,260; estimated benefit, $5,405.75. 

Greenwood Circle, Hyde Park, from Greenwood avenue 
approximately 270 feet southwesterly and westerly. Length, 
270 feet; estimated cost, $5,878; estimated benefit, $2,650. 

Hautevale street. West Roxbury, from Claron street ap- 
proximately 209 feet northwesterly. Length, 209 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $7,654; estimated benefit, $3,101. 

Joan road, Hyde Park, from Leighton road to Dodge road. 
Length, 782 feet; estimated cost, $26,075; estimated benefit, 
$8,943. 

June street. West Roxbury (formerly Granville street), 
from Beech street approximately 430 feet southwesterly. 
Length, 430 feet; estimated cost, $10,505; estimated benefit, 
$5,401.25. 

Kilby place, Boston Proper, from Kilby street approximately 
63 feet northeasterly. Length, 63 feet; estimated cost, $1,600; 
estimated benefit, none. 

Kristin court, Hyde Park, from Dodge road approximately 
155 feet southwesterly. Length, 155 feet; estimated cost, 
$5,175; estimated benefit, $2,020. 

Larch place. West Roxbury, from Hyde Park avenue ap- 
proximately 185 feet westerly. Length, 185 feet; estimated 
cost, $4,804; estimated benefit, $2,405. 

Leighton road, Hyde Park, from the northerly end of East- 
mont road to the southerly end of Eastmont road. Length, 
1,300 feet; estimated cost, $43,350; estimated benefit, $16,809. 

Liberty place. South Boston, from Preble street approxi- 
mately 130 feet southerly. Length, 130 feet; estimated cost, 
$2,449; estimated benefit, $1,150. 

Melba Way, Hyde Park, between Tacoma street and Safford 
street. Length, 354 feet; estimated cost, $12,668; estimated 
benefit, $5,395. 

Messinger street, Dorchester, between Orlando street and 
Savannah avenue. Length, 270 feet; estimated cost, $6,060; 
estimated benefit, $1,492. 

Meyer street, West Roxbury, from Catherine street ap- 
proximately 220 feet northerly. Length, 220 feet; estimated 
cost, $5,043; estimated benefit, $2,600. 

Newfield street. West Roxbury, between Veterans of Foreign 
Wars Parkway and Fur bush road. Length, 433 feet; estimated 
cost, $15,406; estimated benefit, $6,262.50. 

Orlando street, Dorchester, from Messinger street approxi- 
mately 130 feet southwesterly and 134 feet northeasterly. 
Length, 264 feet; estimated cost, $9,290; estimated benefit, 
$3,951. 

Parker Hill terrace, Roxbury, from Parker Hill avenue 
approximately 175 feet westerly. Length, 175 feet; estimated 
cost, $4,375; estimated benefit, $1,170. 



Public Woeks Department 111 

Paulman Circle, West Roxbury, from Church street ap- 
proximately 270 feet northeasterly. Length, 270 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $9,643; estimated benefit, $4,731. 

Radcliffe road, Dorchester, extended from former boundary 
line between Hyde Park and Dorchester to Greenfield road. 
Length, 77 feet; estimated cost, $2,200; estimated benefit, none. 

Rosemont street, Dorchester, extended from approximately 
430 feet northeast of Tileston street to Taunton avenue. 
Length, 277 feet; estimated cost, $7,500; estimated benefit, 
$2,200. 

Rushmore street, Brighton, from Academy Hill road ap- 
proximately 420 feet northwesterly. Length, 420 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $8,704; estimated benefit, $4,108.25. 

Savannah avenue, Dorchester, from a point approximately 
166 feet northeast of Newcastle street to Messinger street, and 
from Messinger street approximately 124 feet northeasterly. 
Length, 290 feet; estimated cost, $9,564; estimated benefit, 
$5,139. 

Senders Court, Hyde Park, from Dietz road approximately 
170 feet easterly. Length, 170 feet; estimated cost, $11,745; 
estimated benefit, $6,332.50. 

South Bay avenue, Roxbury, between Atkinson street and 
Moore street. Length, 907 feet; estimated cost, $45,000; 
estimated benefit, $6,561. 

Susanna court, Hyde Park, from Dietz road approximately 
200 feet northwesterly. Length, 200 feet; estimated cost, 
$6,650; estimated benefit, $3,197. 

Topeka street, Roxbury, between Southampton street and 
South Bay avenue. (Formerly Burnham street). Length, 
832 feet; estimated cost, $27,644; estimated benefit, $12,837. 

Wharton court, Hyde Park, from Dietz road approximately 
450 feet southeasterly and southwesterly. Length, 450 feet; 
estimated cost, $6,425; estimated benefit, $2,132. 

Willow terrace, West Roxbury, from Willow street ap- 
proximately 240 feet southwesterly. Length, 240 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $5,135; estimated benefit, $1,350. 

Widened Or Relocated 

Anawan avenue. West Roxbury, at the northeasterly corner 
of Park street. 

Baker street, West Roxbury, between Centre street and 
Johnson street. 

Baker street. West Roxbury, between Spring street and 
Cutter road, and between Park Lane Drive and Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Parkway. 

Brainard street, Hyde Park, at Cleveland street. 

Darling street, Roxbury, at the southeasterly corner of Calu- 
met street. 

Joyce Kilmer road, West Roxbury, at Glenhaven road. 



112 City Document No. 18 

Lowney Way, Charlestown, on the northwesterly side be- 
tween Bunker Hill street and Tremont street. 

Park street, Charlestown, at the northwesterly corner of 
Warren street. 

Radcliffe road, Hyde Park, at Tileston street. 

Rosselerin road, Dorchester, on the southerly side between 
Train street and Daly street. 

Saratoga street, East Boston, from a point approximately 133 
feet east of Shawsheen road approximately 1,172 feet easterly. 

Saratoga street. East Boston, from a point approximately 195 
feet east of Annavoy street to the Boston- Winthrop boundary 
line. 

Seaver street, Roxbury, on the southwesterly side adjacent to 
Franklin park between Walnut avenue and Blue Hill avenue. 

South street, West Roxbury, at the northeasterly corner of 
Edgemont street. 

Troy street, Boston Proper, at the northerly and southerly 
corners of Albany street. 

Wachusett street, Hyde Park, at the easterly corner of River 
street. 

Woodard road. West Roxbury, at the northwesterly corner of 
Park street. 

Specific Repairs 

Baker street. West Roxbury, between Spring street and 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway, consisting of the reduction 
in width of existing sidewalks. 

Baker street. West Roxbury, from Spring street to the north- 
easterly portion of Johnson street, consisting of the reduction 
in width of the existing sidewalks. 

Beacon street, Brighton, at Ayr road, consisting of the widen- 
ing of the existing street car reservation crossover. 

Beacon street, Brighton, at Cleveland Circle, consisting of 
the removal of the existing traffic circle, the installation of new 
traffic divisional islands, and the reduction in width of sidewalks 
on the southerly side from Chestnut Hill avenue to the Brook- 
line boundary line. 

Berkeley street, Boston Proper, from Beacon street to Marl- 
borough street, consisting of the reduction in width of the 
existing sidewalks. 

Blue Hill avenue, Roxbury, between Franklin Park road and 
Seaver street, consisting of the reduction in width of the 
westerly sidewalk. 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester, on the easterly side between 
Landor road and Stratton street, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the existing sidewalks. 

Brewer street. West Roxbury, at the southwesterly corner of 
Thomas street and the southeasterly corner of Eliot street, con- 
sisting of increasing the curb radii. 



Public Works Department 113 

Centre street, West Roxbury, at the intersection of South 
Huntington avenue, consisting of the installation of a traffic 
island. 

Columbia road, Dorchester, at the northwesterly and south- 
westerly corners of Hamlet street, consisting of increasing the 
curb radii. 

Columbus avenue, Roxbury, consisting of the reduction in 
length of the existing traffic divisional island north of Ruggles 
street. 

Columbus avenue, Boston Proper, at the northwesterly corner 
of Stuart street, consisting of the installation of a traffic island 
and the extension of the existing traffic island at the intersection 
of Arlington street. 

Columbus avenue, Roxbury, between Washington street and 
Walnut avenue, consisting of the reduction in width of existing 
sidewalks and the installation of traffic divisional islands. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, between Brighton avenue 
and Warren street, consisting of the reduction in width of 
existing sidewalks at various locations, reduction in width of 
existing planting reservation, and the installation of a traffic 
divisional island in the main roadway. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, on the southerly side be- 
tween Fordham road and Reedsdale street, consisting of the 
reduction in width of the existing sidewalk and the reduction 
in width of the existing planting reservation. 

Commonwealth avenue, Boston Proper, consisting of in- 
creasing the curb radii at the southeasterly and southwesterly 
corners of St. Mary's street. 

East Broadway, South Boston District, from Dorchester 
street at the intersection of West Broadway to L street, con- 
sisting of the reduction in width of existing sidewalks. 

Elm Hill avenue, Roxbury, at the northeast corner of 
Crawford street, consisting of the reduction in width of the 
existing sidewalk. 

Hagar street. West Roxbury, consisting of increasing the 
curb radii at the southwesterly corner of Thomas street and 
the southeasterly corner of Eliot street. 

Massachusetts avenue, Boston Proper, between Columbus 
avenue and Huntington avenue, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the existing sidewalks and the installation of a traffic 
divisional island. 

River street, Hyde Park, consisting of the installation of a 
traffic divisional island at the intersection of Wachusett street. 

Ruggles street, Roxbury, at the intersection of Columbus 
avenue, consisting of the installation of a traffic divisional 
island. 

Seaver street, Roxbury, between Walnut avenue and Blue 
Hill avenue, consisting of the removal of the existing street 
car reservation, the reduction in width of the existing sidewalk, 
and the installation of traffic divisional islands. 



114 City Document No. 18 

Walworth street, West Roxbury, at the northeasterly 
corner of Belgrade avenue, consisting of increasing the curb 
radius. 

Washington street, Boston Proper, at the southeasterly 
corner of Hayward place, consisting of increasing the curb 
radius. 

Washington street. West Roxbury, at the intersection of 
South street, opposite Firth road, consisting of the installation 
of a traffic island. 

Woodard road. West Roxbury, at Wren street, consisting of 
the reduction in size of the existing island. 



Grades Revised 

Brook Farm road, West Roxbury, between Lyall street and 
Banks street. 

Burley street, West Roxbury, from Metropolitan avenue 
approximately 150 feet southerly. 

Castle street, Boston Proper, between Harrison avenue and 
Albany street. 

Safford street, Hyde Park, between Huntington avenue and 
Manion road. 

Discontinuances 

Brook Farm road, West Roxbury, at the northeasterly 
corner of Banks street. 

Cambridge street, Boston Proper, between Lindall place and 
West Cedar street. 

Central street, Boston Proper, from Kilby street approxi- 
mately 215 feet northeasterly. 

Chapel road, Hyde Park, on the easterly side between 
Tacoma street and Farrar avenue. 

Genesee street, Boston Proper, from a point approximately 
412 feet southeast of Harrison avenue to Albany street. 

Lovering street, Boston Proper, between Washington street 
and Harrison avenue. 

Maple street, West Roxbury, on the southeasterly side 
between Corey street and Chilton road. 

Motte street, Boston Proper, between Harrison avenue and 
Washington street. 

Oneida street, Boston Proper, from a point approximately 

431 feet southeast of Harrison avenue to Albany street. 
Oswego street, Boston Proper, from a point approximately 

432 feet southeast of Harrison avenue to Albany street. 
Public Alley No. 702, Boston Proper, between Worcester 

street and West Springfield street. 

Public Alley No. 703, Boston Proper, between Newland 
street and Public Alley No. 702. 



Public Works Department 115 

Ryder Hill road, Brighton, from a point approximately 176 
feet south of Bray ton road approximately 15 feet southerly. 
Warren Bridge, Boston Proper and Charlestown. 

Slope Easement 

Hunneman street, Roxbury, discontinuance of slope ease- 
ments between Washington street and Albany street. 

Eminent Domain Land Takings 

During the period of this report, land takings were 
made for municipal purposes as follows: 

Fire Department 

1, The taking of approximately eleven thousand 
seven hundred sixty-three (11,763) square feet of land 
on Tremont street, Boston Proper District, under an 
order of this Commission and Mayor dated January 4, 
1957, and recorded in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds on 
February 4, 1957. 

2. The taking of approximately two thousand three 
hundred eighty-six (2,386) square feet of land on 
Tremont street, Boston Proper District, under an 
order of this Commission and Mayor dated November 
20, 1957, and recorded in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds 
on November 26, 1957. 

School Department 

1. The taking of approximately twenty-three thou- 
sand two hundred forty-nine (23,249) square feet of 
land on Worcester street, Boston Proper District, 
under an order of this Commission and Mayor dated 
August 28, 1957, and recorded in the Suffolk Registry 
of Deeds on September 18, 1957. 

Sewer Program 

During the year 1957, the construction of .65 miles of 
sanitary sewer; .85 miles of storm sewer; 216 catch 
basins; and 94 drop inlets was ordered at a total 
estimated cost of $178,858. 

Estimated benefit to private property for the con- 
struction of the .58 miles of sanitary sewer amounted to 
$24,923.75. 

Sewerage works ordered were as follows: 



116 



City Document No. 18 



Street 


<g a 


OS 

03-t 

3 
CO 


n 

m 

OJ 


"a 

a 
o 

Q 


1 

o 

a 


.sg 


Boston Proper 


78 








$1,950 00 
1,000 00 
1,700 00 
1,250 GO 
5,500 ,00 

800 00 
4,550 00 

350 00 
2,500 00 

900 00 
1,600 00 
5,000 00 

600 00 
400 00 

2,000 00 
2,000 00 
4,800 00 
1,200 00 
2,600 00 
3,400 00 

2,000 00 

3,200 00 

1,700 00 

300 00 

150 00 

600 00 

3,800 00 

1.200 00 


None 






3 
3 


3 
1 


None 








None 




50 




None 






11 
4 


4 


None 








None 




181 




None 






1 
5 

5 
5 
3 

1 

14 
3 


5 
9 

2 
1 

14 


None 








None 


Brighton 






None 








None 






400 


None 


Charlestown 




None 








None 


Dorchester 

Blue Hill avenue . . . 






None 








None 




340 


319 


$2,040 00 




2 




None 




265 




$1,950 00 






6 
8 
3 


8 


None 


East Boston 






None 


Hyde Park 

Asheville road 


100 


102.5 
370 


$600 00 




None 






2 
1 
4 
2 
2 
8 


1 


None 








None 








None 




205 


205 


$1,600 00 




None 






590 


10.000 00 


None 













* Easements taken 



Public Works Department 



117 



Street 


4> ■£ 
a a 

id 


.9g 
gfc, 

3 


si 

m 
a 


a 

a 
o 

Q 


1 
O 
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"S 

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Is 
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Hyde Park (Continued) 
Huntington avenue 


135 


135 


8 


1 


81,900 00 
1,200 00 
2,000 00 

1,700 00 
1,200 00 

750 00 


$1,425 00 
None 






40 
115 




♦Millstone road 

Melba Way 




1 

2 

1 










None 


Taunton avenue 


40 


20 


•S562 50 










(Relocation of existing 
brook) 

Roxbury 






3 
3 

10 
1 


3 

10 

1 


3,000 00 
550 00 

3,000 00 
350 00 

1,250 00 
500 00 
500 00 

6,408 00 

1,150 00 

2,500 00 

14,850 00 

2,300 00 

600 00 

350 00 
900 00 
300 00 

400 00 

3,000 00 
1,200 00 
1.200 00 




Blue Hill avenue . . 






None 
















None 




50 










1 


1 
3 
1 

8 


None 
















7 
3 

8 












Forsyth street 








South Bay avenue 


321 




$3,600 00 




3 

1 


1 

1 
1 










South Boston 

Hill place 








East Third street 






1 












West Roxbury 

Ana wan avenue 






6 
2 
2 




Arborfield road and 
Metropolitan avenue at 

































* Easements taken 



118 



City Document No. 18 



Stbeet 



^•^ 



Q ^ 
^2 







a 






■a 


J 


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West Roxbury (Continued) 
♦Centre street 

Charles Park road 

Claron street 

Dow road 

Furbush road 

Furbush road 

Graham terrace 

♦Grandview street 

*Hackensack court 

Hautevale street 

Joyce Kilmer road 

June street 

Mansur street 

Maria Lane 

Marlin road 

Myer street 

Moreland street 

Newfield street 

Partridge street 

Pleasantdale road 

Perkins street 

Shandon road 

Williams street 

Woodard road 

Woodard road 



660 
80 



440 



400 



35 



52 



100 
120 



325 
80 



450 



405 



35 



670 



$1,500 00 

3,000 00 

300 00 

1,800 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

800 00 

11,800 00 

1,300 00 

100 00 

300 00 

1,200 00 

11,400 00 

1,000 00 

1,250 00 

500 00 

4,800 00 

1,000 00 

900 00 

1,800 00 

8,000 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

350 00 

300 00 



* Easements taken 



Public Works Department 



119 



Assessments 

During the year 1957, the Highway Division of the 
Pubhc Works Department sent notice of completion of 
forty-nine (49) streets at a total cost of $679,705.24. 
On this work the Public Improvement Commission 
levied assessments in the amount of $241,402.54. 

During the same period, the Sewer Division of the 
Public Works Department reported the completion of 
construction of sanitary sewerage in twenty-five (25) 
streets at a cost of $101,331.71, on which the Pubhc 
Improvement Commission levied assessments in the 
amount of $41,459. 

The completion of new sidewalks in two (2) streets at 
a cost of $8,840.08, authorized by the Boston City 
Council, was also reported by the Highway Division. 
On these, the Pubhc Improvement Commission levied 
assessments totahng $4,074.50. 

Street Assessments 



Street 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



Ackley place 

Agassiz park 

Alleghany street. . 

Ayles road 

Barna road 

Brockton street . . . 
Brownson terrace. . 
Brush Hill terrace . 

Caltha road 

Chapel road 

Cheshire street. . . . 
Driftwood road. . . . 

Drumlin road 

Edwardson street. . 

Ellard road 

Farwell avenue. . . . 

Frazer street 

Granada park 

Guest street 

Hampstead Lane. . 



West Ro.xbury 
West Roxbury 
Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Brighton 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
East Boston 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 



S5,598 69 
5,583 76 

17.867 57 

32.868 95 
9,902 50 
6,473 36 

15,894 98 
14,381 40 
12,169 85 

7,309 73 

3,021 01 
15,006 75 
17,340 56 

5,983 77 
13,246 92 
15,201 59 
25,474 74 

9,993 96 
31,313 43 

6,056 61 



S2,599 30 
2,328 94 
5,261 75 
12,470 36 
5,426 27 
2,619 18 
6,894 06 
5,721 38 
2,269 24 
2,274 60 
1,498 91 
6,140 80 
1,893 52 
2,181 47 
2,021 16 
4,831 91 
9,492 67 
4,741 6& 
10.152 51 
3,871 99i 



Carried forward.. 



$41,427 21 



120 



City Document No. 18 

Street Assessments. — Concluded. 



Street 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



Brought forward. 

Harmony street 

Harrow street 

Howard place 

Itasca street 

Joslin road 

Langford park 

Laurie avenue 

Lewiston street 

Lorimer place 

Maple street 

Marion place 

Marlin road 

Mary knoll street 

Maryknoll terrace 

Meadowview road 

Messinger street 

Mildred avenue 

Millstone road 

Mossdale road 

New Bedford street 

New England avenue. . . 

O'Donnell terrace 

Range road 

Rocky Nook terrace. . . . 

Savannah avenue 

Tanglewood road 

Welton road 

West Howell street 

Wichita terrace 



East Boston 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Hyde Park 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

East Boston 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 



8,323 20 
10,418 25 

4,945 75 
17,779 86 
11,398 39 

6,379 15 
35,106 85 

9,014 75 

5,769 91 
19,723 51 

5,095 12 
11,572 13 
57,055 59 

7,039 56 
24,095 18 

3,595 00 

9,954 04 

6,797 55 
42,138 06 
16,883 22 

9,672 90 

8,544 54 
16,147 70 

8,625 82 
16,552 34 

3,467 79 

7,383 37 
23,482 60 

6,052 98 



J41,427 21 
712 50 
3,075 76 
1,869 00 
6,586 40 
2,031 80 
2,793 30 

14,793 37 
3,982 25 
2,092 17 
3,410 88 
1,694 10 
4,253 50 

14,039 59 
3,146 85 

11,368 30 
1,500 00 
4,000 00 
2,203 56 

22,299 06 
6,487 64 
4,326 24 
3,850 50 
6,914 30 
3,249 01 
5,612 68 
1,540 72 
3,280 79 
3,082 50 
2,514 06 



Totals. 



$679,705 24 



$241,402 54 



Public Works Department 

Sewer Assessments 



121 



Street 



Arborfield road. 



Brook Farm road. . . 

Coleman street 

Davison street 

Furbush road 

Gladstone street. . . . 
Hackensack terrace. 

Keenan road 

La Grange street . . . 

Merola park 

Moreland street . . . , 
Partridge street . . . , 
Partridge street . . . , 

Prairie street 

Ransom road 



Riley road 

Rivermoor street . . . 

Ryan road 

RufBng street 

Safford street 

Sherrin street 

West Howell street . 

Wilmot street 

Winchester terrace. 
Woodland road 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



West Roxbury 
and Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

East Boston 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Dorchester and 
Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 

Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Hyde Park 



$12,017 00 
4,932 00 
2,256 00 
2,500 00 
2,450 00 
1,196 00 
3,191 00 
2,358 70 
8,992 00 
2,708 00 
2,830 00 
1,777 00 
350 00 
1,160 00 

820 00 

4,487 44 

19,000 00 

2,660 10 

5,100 00 

800 00 
2,900 00 
6,916 00 
2,274 00 
2,602 47 
5,054 GO 



$6,364 80 

3,360 00 

1,350 00 

870 00 

480 00 

650 00 

2,150 00 

1,400 00 

2,721 40 

2,200 00 

911 25 

990 00 

210 00 

360 00 

360 00 
1,860 00 
4,440 00 
1,600 00 
2,639 91 

600 00 
1,306 64 
1,095 00 

792 00 
1,518 00 
1,230 00 



Totals. 



$101,331 71 



$41,459 00 



Sidewalk Assessrnents 



Street 


District 


Cost 


Assessment 




West Roxbury 
Brighton 


$2,076 01 
6,764 07 


$1,007 50 




3,067 00 






Totals 




$8,840 08 


$4,074 50 









122 



City Document No. 18 



Street Name Changes 
The names of the following public streets were 
changed : 

Daytona Terrace, Dorchester District, from Centre Street 
approximately 230 feet northeasterly; new name: O'Donnell 
Terrace. 

Harrison Avenue, Boston Proper District, between Essex 
Street and Bedford Street; new name: Harrison Avenue Ex- 
tension. 

Main Street, Charlestown District, between Gardner Street 
and the SomerVille boundary line (southerly roadway only); 
new name: Maffa Way. (To be effective March 1, 1958). 

The names of the following private streets were 
changed : 

Chelsea Place, East Boston District, from Chelsea Street 
approximately 166 feet northwesterly; new name: Anthony J. 
Grieco Terrace. 

Hackensack Square, West Roxbury District, from Hacken- 
sack Road approximately 310 feet southerly; new name: 
Hackensack Terrace. 

Land Damages 

On new street construction, 95 claims were filed for 
damage to property resulting from land takings or 
changes in grade. On these claims, this Commission 
awarded damages in the amount of $22,310.18. 

During the period of this report, 374 petitions from 
public utilities were approved for the placing and main- 
taining of poles for the support of wires. 

Also, 66 petitions were approved for miscellaneous 
installations or uses of the public highways of the City 
of Boston as follows: 



Street 


Petitioner 


Nature of Petition 


Ansonia road, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Beacon street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Bennington street. East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Bosworth street, Boston Proper 


Old Colony Trust Company, et al 


Underground steam main 


Brainard street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Brook Farm road. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Bunker Hill street, Charlestown 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Cedar Grove street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 



Public Works Department 



123 



Street 


Petitioner 


Nature of Petition 


Clare avenue, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Clarendon street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Cleveland street, Hyde Park, Child 
street and Beaver street 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Columbia road, Dorchester 


Jenney Manufacturing Company 


Underground fill pipe 


Crown street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Curtis street. East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Dale street, West Roxbury, at Burley 
street 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Dale street. West Roxbury, at May- 
nard street 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Duxbury road, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


E street, South Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


East First street. South Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Edgemere road. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Farragut street. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Hackensack road, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Hallowell street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Harrison avenue, Boston Proper, 
northeast of Hayward pi 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Harrison avenue, Boston Proper, 
southwest of Norfolk pi 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Huntington avenue, Hyde Park, op- 
posite No. 339 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Huntington avenue, Hyde Park, near 
No. 260 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Jackson street, Charlestown 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Kelton street, Brighton 


Governor Apartments 


Underground conduits 


Kneeland street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduits 


Lyall street. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Lynn street, Boston Proper 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


MaryknoU street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Massasoit street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Massachusetts Avenue Bridge, Bos- 
ton Proper 


Boston Gas Company 


Relocate steel pipe 


Massachusetts avenue and Clearway 
street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Massasoit street, Hyde Park, from 
River street 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Mattakeeset street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Milk street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Metropohtan avenue. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Monponset street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Mossdale road. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 



124 



City Document No. 18 



Street 


Petitioner 


Nature of Petition 


Norton street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Norway street, Boston Proper 


First Church of Christ 


Pipe tunnels 


Pierce street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Porter street, East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Province street, Boston Proper 


Brook Realty Company, Inc. 


Projection 


Providence street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Readville street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


River street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground governor pit 


River street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Saratoga street. East Boston, 4,019 
feet of 12-inch 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground steel pipe 


Saratoga street, East Boston, 3,825 
feet of 12-inch 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground steel pipe 


South Waverly street, Brighton 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Southampton street. South Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Stuart street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Summer street. South Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Summer street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Tileston street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Vine street, Charlestown 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Wachusett street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


West Broadway, South Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


West Cedar street, Boston Proper 


Potter-Horn, Inc. 


Wood cornice 


Western avenue, Brighton 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Wyola place Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 



During the year 1957, permission was given to prepare 
for public travel the following private ways: 

Gorman road, Dorchester, from 350 feet north of Cummins 
Highway approximately 680 feet northeasterly. 

Desmond road, Dorchester. 

Gould street. West Roxbury, from Belle avenue to Northdale 
road. 

Itasca street, Dorchester, from Messinger street approxi- 
mately 120 feet northeasterly. 

Kiernan road, West Roxbury. 

Mansur street, West Roxbury and Hyde Park, from Metro- 
politan avenue to Grew avenue. 

Messinger street, Dorchester, from Savannah avenue to 
Colorado street. 



Public Works Department 125 

Northdale road, West Roxbury, from Gould street approxi- 
mately 295 feet southerly. 

Surreyhill road, West Roxbury, between Moss Hill Road and 
Slocum road. 

During the year 1957, permission was given to open 
for public travel the following private ways: 

Arborfield road, Hyde Park. 
Emelia road, West Roxbury. 
Garth road. West Roxbury. 
Keenan road, Brighton. 
Ryan road, Brighton. 
Wilmot street. West Roxbury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George C. Hyland, Chairman. 
Herman Carp, Vice-Chair man. 
Timothy J. O'Connor, Member. 



Crry op Boston 

Administrative Services Department 

Printing o^^^ Section 



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