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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

[DocuMEN r 18 — 1959.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WOEKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1958. 



Boston, Januarj 2, 1969. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the annual report of the Pubhc Works 
Department and the Public Improvement Commission 
for the year ending December 31, 1958. 

Fiscal 

The total expenditures of the department for the year 
were $24,091,546.44, of which $3,283,217.68 represents 
water assessments levied by the Metropolitan District 
Commission and $898,266.66 represents MetropoHtan 
District Commission sewer assessments. The water 
assessments are $45,479 less than those levied in 1957, 
and the sewer assessments are $24,101.49 more than 
those levied in 1957. 

The water assessment reduction is a reflection of the 
colder and wetter conditions prevaihng in 1957 which 
lowered the water usage and consequently lowered our 
assessment payable in 1958. Under normal conditions 
both the water and sewer assessments tend to increase 
nnd must be anticipated. 



^^2s>t 



^S-^^t-rf 






2 City Document No. 18 T'^M-r-'i^ 7/ j 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled $6,050,- 
716.55, and the surplus resulting from the sale of water 
was $78,924.81. The operation of the Sumner Tunnel 
resulted in a substantial surplus of $924,350.77. In 
comparison to the record previous year, this represents 
a drop in surplus of $270,235.53. This drop in revenue 
can be traced to the opening of the Northeast Express- 
way and the consequent loss of traffic to the Mystic 
River Bridge facihty. 

Loan Orders 

For the first time in many years, the department did 
not request a loan order for the construction of public 
ways. It was possible to refrain from a loan order 
request because of two factors. First, on July 26, 1957, 
your Honor approved a City Council order for a $3,000,- 
000 appropriation for the construction of public ways. 
Secondly, approximately $2,225,000 was made available 
to Boston under the provisions of Chapter 718 of the 
Acts of 1956. The total amount made available by these 
two provisions gave the department adequate funds for 
its construction needs for both 1957 and 1958, thereby 
eliminating any need for a loan order request for 1958. 

Street Construction Work 

St ate- Aid Program 

The Chapter 90 work, which has become a vital cog 
in our over-all highway improvement program, was 
carried forward with customary concentration. \\'e are 
rapidly approaching the much desired goal of having 
most of our main arteries thoroughly revamped to meet 
present-day traffic needs. 

With the completion of the final link in the chain 
consisting of the Seaver Street-Columbus Averuie con- 
tract now under construction, we will have developed 
a completely remodeled, divided highway' from Mat- 
tapan square to Egleston square by way of Blue Hill 
avenue, Seaver street, and Columbus avenue. It will 
have appropriate left-turn lanes, tlie latest in mercury 
vapor luminaries, and all the other adjuncts of present- 
day highway standards. 

I submit below a schedule of Chapter 90 projects 
which were under construction in 1958 and the list of 
Chapter 90 projects which we have earmarked for 1959 
consideration. 



Public Works Department 



$248,102 00 $250,755 94 



$238,663 72 $279,916 30 



PROJECTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN 1958 

Final Contract 
Project Contractor Bid Price Payment 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester: 

Reconstruction from Wood- 
haven street to Columbine street 

(started in 1957 and completed Manning Construction 
in 1958) Company 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton : 
Reconstruction from Brighton 
avenue to Warren street (started Rufo Construction 
in 1957 and completed in 1958) Company 

East Broadway, South Boston: 

Reconstruction from Dorches- 
ter street to M street (started in 
1957 and completed in 1958) . Baker & Co., Inc. $100,721 50 $100,687 81 

Tremont street, Brighton: 

Reconstruction from Oak square 
to Newton line (started and com- Chesterbrook Construc- 
pleted in 1958) .... tion Company 

River street, Hyde Park and 
Dorchester: 
Reconstruction from Wood ave- 
nue to Edgewater Drive (started 
and completed in 1958) 

Columbus avenue, Seaver street, 
Roxbury and Dorchester: 
Reconstruction from Egleston 
square to Blue Hill avenue 
(started in 1958 to be completed 
in 1959) John McCourt Company $215,642 50 

ADDITIONAL CHAPTER 90 PROJECTS SCHEDULED FOR 1959 



Baker & Co., Inc. 



$45,100 00 $50,843 08 



$39,928 25 $45,105 62 



Project 

Dorchester avenue, South Boston: 

Reconstruction from West Fourth street to Andrew square . 
Baker street, West Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Centre street to Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkwaj 
Columbus avenue, Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Roxbury street to Centre street 
Commonwealth avenue, Brighton: 

Reconstruction from Warren street to Chestnut Hill avenue 
West Broadway, South Boston: 

Reconstruction from Dorchester avenue to Dorchester street 
Main street, Charles town: 

Reconstruction from City square to Sullivan square 
Cambridge street, Charlestown: 

Reconstruction from Sullivan square to SomervUle line . 
River street, Hyde Park: 

Reconstruction from Wood avenue to Fairmount avenue 
Fairmount avenue, Hyde Park: 

Reconstruction from River street to Truman Highway . 
West street, Hyde Park : 

Reconstruction from River street to Hyde Park square . 
Beacon street, Boston Proper: 

Reconstruction from Kenmore square to Park Drive 
Bennington street. East Boston: 

Reconstruction from bridge over the MTA to Revere Ime 

Total 



Length 

4,350 feet 

6,700 feet 

2,600 feet 

5,700 feet 

4,120 feet 

5,100 feet 

2,000 feet 

4,050 feet 

1,400 feet 

1,500 feet 

1,930 feet 

2,300 feet 

41,750 feet 
or 7.9 miles 



4 City Document No. 18 

Street Construction Work 
Exclusive of Chapter 90 Projects 

The report of the Division Engineer of the Highway 
Division hsts in detail the varied highway constructions 
and reconstructions accompHshed throughout the city 
along with some of the more important roadways. 

The policy of replacing defective brick sidewalks 
with cement concrete sidewalks wherever conditions 
indicated the need for such improvement was somewhat 
curtailed due to the smaller amount of money allowed 
in the budget for this type of work. 

The following is a summarized financial statement of 
the expenditures made in 1958 for highway improve- 
ments : 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) . «1, 989,202 89 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue Account) 08,556 58 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) •10,494 70 

Sidewalks, Construction and reconstruction of . . 1 12,446 68 

Expended under provisions of Ch. 718, Acts of 1956 . 608,400 12 

Total $2,799,100 97 

The following is a summarized record of the highway 
improvement work done by the department in 1958: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 151. 

This total includes 35 new streets laid out and constructed 
as public ways under the provisions of Chapter 393, Acts of 
1906. 

Streets Improved, 24-4 Miles. 

This includes 4.7 miles reconstructed as Chapter 90 projects. 

Sidewalks Improved, 5.3 Miles. 

This item does not include sidewalks improved in the above- 
noted street improvements. 

Street Lighting 

We have continued our policy of replacing inefficient 
gas lamps with modern electric illumination. During 
the year we replaced just under 400 gas lamps, leaving 
only about 300 out of a total of approximately 7,000 
gas lamps that were in operation eight years ago. We 
hope to complete the gas lamp changeover during the 
coming year. 

A detailed hst of lighting installations and improve- 
ments is included in the report of the Lighting Section 



Public Works Department 5 

of the Highway Division. This hstiiig, plus a compila- 
tion of the total amount of modernization accomplished 
by relighting with modern mercury vapor lights of at 
least 15,000 lumens, highhghts the accelerated pace of 
our very important street lighting modernization 
program. 



TOTAL NUMBER OF UNITS OF MODERN MERCURY VAPOR 
LIGHTING ORDERED FOR PRINCIPAL STREETS. 

15,000 lumens 20,000 lumens 

single units . . 246 single units . .154 

*twin units . 58 Hvnn units . . 14 

* Twin units are used on streets having center islands or traflic divisional 
islands. 

Snow Removal 

The snow season of 1958 was highhghted by the 
snowstorm which began early Sunday morning on 
February 16 and continued with unabated fury through- 
out the day. It ended at approximately four o'clock 
on the morning of the next day, Monday, February 17. 

A modern-da.y record accumulation for one snowstorm 
was run up by this storm when it left a staggering 
total of 19.4 inches in the city proper and as much as 
22 inches in our suburban areas. 

The department mustered every possible piece of 
city and hired equipment in order to combat this 
paralyzing blow and worked around the clock to restore 
conditions approaching normal. 

As is increasingly noticeable with each storm, the 
parked cars greatly impeded the work of properly 
plowing the streets. Because of this problem of snowed- 
in vehicles, some of our smaller residential streets 
remained unplowed until we were able to haul out the 
offending cars. 

The storm took a major portion of the total outlay 
of $782,000 for snow removal work in 1958. The 
accumulation for the year was 49.3 inches according 
to the official records at the East Boston Airport 
weather station. 

On April 11, a rather unusual storm took place that 
deposited an accumulation of 2 inches to 3 inches of 
slushy snow. With the exception of only two other 



6 City Document No. 18 

years, this was the latest date upon which we have 
had any appreciable amount of snow within the last 
twenty years. 

Bridges 

The outstanding bridge project for this year was the 
complete reconstruction of the Summer Street Bridge 
over the Reserved Channel with the exception of the 
drawspan proper. 

This completes the last link in the modernization of 
Summer and L streets, which has been in progress for 
over a year. This has been a joint city-state Chapter 
90 project and has helped considerably to smooth the 
traffic flow over this much used highway. 

South Bay Incinerator 

Because of several strikes and delays in dehveries of 
materials, the construction of the incinerator was some- 
what behind schedule, but the very noticeable progress 
made is reflected in a comparison of the two pictures 
taken at the site at the beginning and end of the year. 

Personnel 

There were 1,885 employees in the department as of 
December 31 as compared with 1,948 employees on the 
rolls on January 1, 1958. 

On April 15 I assumed the office of Commissioner of 
Public Works, through appointment by your Honor, 
following the retirement of George G. Hyland who 
served in the position for a total of nearly fifteen years. 
His prior service with the city started in 1925. Mr. 
Hyland, because of hi? intimate knowledge of the 
department and its varied activities, gave his best 
efforts in all that he did, and he left a record of faithful 
and conscientious service not only to the Public Works 
Department, but to the city itself. 

I attach reports from the Division Engineers relative 
to the activities of their divisions in 1958, together with 
a report of the Public Improvement Commission cover- 
ing its work during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert P. Shea, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Public Works Department 



MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 





Total Appropriations, 






DlYIBION OB SebVICE. 


Including 
Transfers and Amounts 
Carried Over from 1957. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office 


$69,709 47 


$69,709 47 


_ 


Automotive Division . 


763,763 55 


710,968 16 


$52,795 39 


Bridge Division . 


785,537 76 


733,580 96 


51,956 80 


Highway Division 


1,629,197 50 


1,565,946 61 


63,250 89 


Highway Program, Chapter 








718, Acts of 1956 . 


1.045,741 23 


712,232 46 


333,508 77 


Lighting Service . 


1,723,619 04 


1,713,302 24 


10,316 80 


Sanitary Service . 


4,938,954 29 


4,934,719 29 


4,235 00 


Sewer Division 


905,614 72 


844,047 82 


61,566 90 


Sumner Tunnel . 


721,104 00 


619,898 79 


101,207 21 


Survey Division . 


94,743 04 


94,743 04 


— 


Water Division . 


2,817,504 81 


2,255,144 79 


562,360 02 


Totals .... 


$15,495,489 41 


$14,254,291 63 


$1,241,197 78 



LOANS AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS 



Title. 



Total Amount 
Available. 



Expenditures. 



Unexpended 
BiJanoe. 



Bridges, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 

Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings Thereof (Non-Revenue) 

Incinerator Building, Construction and Equipping 
(Non-Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Non-Revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue) 

Sewerage Works (Non-Revenue) 

Snow Removal (Revenue) 

Reconstruction of Streets (Revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of (Reve- 
nue) 

Street Signs (Revenue) 

Totals 



15899,115 73 

8,661 09 

4,118,692 56 

2,254,654 34 

74,190 92 

362,267 10 

840,202 36 

49,502 88 

190,504 71 
11,022 93 



$550,997 12 



1,858,881 35 

1,939,202 89 

68,556 58 

262,187 26 

782,531 23 

40,494 70 

142,446 68 
10,472 66 



$348,118 61 

8,661 09 

2,259,811 21 

315,451 45 

5,634 34 

100,079 84 

57,671 13 

9,008 18 

48,058 03 
650 27 



$8,808,814 62 



$5,655,770 47 



$3,153,044 15 



8 City Document No. 18 

The records of the department show tliat there are 
now 1,962 persons ehgible for employment in the 
several divisions, and of that number 1,884 were upon 
the January 2, 1959, payrolls. 



GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 





Sebvices. 


TiTLB, 


go 
o 


> 

o 

B 
o 

3 
< 


•a 

•c 




•a 

03 


03 


1 

a 

3 

H 




i 

3 


■3 




1 


















1 


Division Qnsineers 




1 


1 
1 


1 






1 


1 


6 


CJhifcf Iiiffliwav ©nffincer . . 






I 




















1 


Asflociate civil enarineer 


1 
















1 








1 

3 












1 


Superintendents and assistants 








2 
12 

2 




1 


2 




10 






12 




1 
1 


2 


1 

8 
4 


2 

14 
6 
7 
1 






2 

4 
1 

2 


11 

6 
5 


10 


Principal senior and assistant civil 


20 
3 


.... 


58 


Junior civil enffineers 


20 


Senior engineering aids 






18 


Junior enffineerinff aids . ... 








1 


Senior public relations representative 
Automotive and senior electrical 








1 










1 








1 
1 




O 






3 


Asjiiatant elf'Otrical enffineers 
















1 




















1 


Pumping station engineers and sta- 


















4 




















1 








11 

1 
62 


6 
3 

02 


2 
16 


2 


5 
3 




27 






11 


1 


21 






3 








2 


1 


20 

1 




164 






1 
















1 
13 


1 










1 




2 






16 
















CdtrtBd foTwavd 


4 


17 


17 


113 


89 


60 


20 


41 


23 


384 







Public Works Dh^partaient 



9 



GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES — Continued 



TlTI.«. 











Sebtices. 










6 


















> 




u 












urn 


a 

o 

3 
•< 


n 


1:1 

33 


"a 

OQ 


1 


a 

a 
a 
a 
H 


i 


r 

b 

5 



Brought foricard 

Executive secretary, P. W. D 

Executive secretary and assistants. . . 
Senior personnel oiEcer and assistant , 

Head administrative clerks 

Head clerks 

Principal clerk and secretary 



Principal clerks, stenographers, ac- 
count clerks, etc 



Technical clerk. 



Senior clerks, typists, stenographers, 
etc 



Clerk-stenographers, clerk.-*, typists . 

Telephone operators 

Head cashier 

Senior cashier and casliiers 

Principal store keei>ers 

Senior storekeeper and storekeepers . 
Chief water meter reader 



Supervisor and special water meter 
readers 



Water meter readers and clerks . 

Sergeant tollmen guards 

Tollmen guards 

Supervisor, mobile guard 

Sergeants, mobile guard 

Mobile guards 

Urawtenders and assistants .... 

Analytical chemist 

(yhief and senior investigators . . 
Kstimators and investigators. . . 

Dispatcher 

Plumbers 

Head photostat operator 



Carried forward . 



11 



17 



40 



17 



100 



121 



113 



11 



HO 



89 



97 



60 



68 



20 



76 



41 



7 
1 

33 

14 

3 



5 
30 



19 



159 



23 



31 



o 



384 
1 
2 
2 
2 
9 
1 

34 

1 

51 

16 
3 
1 
4 
3 
2 
I 

5 
30 

5 
45 



7 

100 



7 

1 

19 

1 

743 



10 



City Document No. 18 



GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES — Coucluded 





Sekviceb. 


Title. 


— to 
a o 

go 
o 


1 

o 

s 

2 

< 


73. 

'u 

m 




03 

•a 

CO 


S-t 

o 

% 


O 

d 

3 

H 


^ 
% 
^ 


i 
m 


1 


Hrouokt foTWordr 


11 


40 


121 


140 


97 


68 
1 


76 


159 


31 

1 
1 


743 




2 


Photoffraoher 
















1 














5 
2 






f> 










2 

1 
1 






7 





12 


Road roller ooerators 






1 


Workine foremen 




2 




3 


8 

1 

10 


2 


19 




38 


Sewasre screen ODerator 




1 








.... 












10 


Steamfitters 








1 
2 










1 


Renairmen and maintenaDCemen .... 




31 




1 


8 


1 


78 

1 

20 

1 




122 


Orane onerator 




1 


Maintenance mechanics and helpers, 
etc 






11 


1 


7 

7 
1 
3 






29 








1 




?0 


Welders 




.'J 

1 


4 








2 

43 

1 




1 






9 


Pavers 




1 




44 


BlackRmitha and helners 








18 

1 






19 










4 

10 

9 

1 

25 




1 




6 


Sewer cleaners 










10 


Oatch-haain macliine ooerators 


















9 






3 
3 


.... 


19 
43 


.... 

61 

106 


12 


18 

27 




114 


M*otor eouiDnient ODerators 




?09 


.Tiinior hiiildinff Custodian 











16 

6 










1 
7 






17 








85 

1 


297 
5 


12 


39 
3 


.... 


449 






9 




11 












Totals 


105 


148 


342 


007 


1G5 


100 


374 


33 


1885 







Public Works Department 



11 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ACTUALLY EMPLOYED 
JANUARY I, 1958, AND JANUARY I, 1959 

















+3 






















<V 






















Q> 












































-tJ 




















Ir 


. a 




> 










— "f 








h'3 




o 






> 


S 

3 


cO 


a) 
be 




^3 


5S 
1" 




a 

3 


3 




t» 


H 


O 


P3 


^ 


Ph 


CO 


w 


<; 


H 


January 1, 1958 


35 


102 


11 


165 


360 


352 


632 


175 


no 


1,948 


January 1, 1959 


33 


100 


11 


148 


374 


342 


607 


165 


105 


1,885 


Total Eligible Force 


January 1, 1958 


41 


105 


12 


166 


403 


379 


635 


177 


117 


2,035 


January 1, 1959 


39 


IDS 


11 


156 


393 


353 


621 


171 


110 


1,962 



APPOLNTMENTS, TRANSFERS, RESIGNATIONS, RETIRE^ 
MENTS, DEATHS, ETC., OF EMPLOYEES 







red 

er 

tments 


CD 

0.2 
-^ > 

^1 


^ 




00 

o 


Services 


05 

T-H 


2 2 


Transferred 
from Other 
Departments 


T3 


-e 


-a 

s 


-0 

■J 
O 

Pi 


"SO 2. 
a ^ '^ 


io 


M 
S 

"3 
Q 


C 

'i 
Pi 


3 
C 
C3 
►-3 


1958-1959 


3 

a 




to 

.3 


.S 
o 

a 
a 

< 




1 

8 
8 










11 

110 
165 


Central Office. . . 

Automotive 

Bridge 


11 
105 

148 








1 


3 








2 
o 


2 
1 


2 


1 


3 


5 


o 


o. 




o 


4 


9 


2 


4 


3 


7 


352 


Highway 


342 


3 


4 


4 


8 


11 


35 


1 


5 


1 


13 


632 


Sanitary 


607 


8 


6 


3 


24 





10 
1 


1 
1 


1 


3 


3 


175 
35 


Sewer 


165 
33 


1 




2 


7 




Survey. 




2 


3 
9 


1 


1 


4 


3 
13 


102 
366 


Tunnel 


100 
374 


2 
1 


1 


1 
3 


3 


6 


Water 


36 








33 


84 


8 


16 


11 


43 


1,948 


Totals 


1,885 


IS 


16 


14 


84 









12 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX A 



REPORT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1950. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

I am submitting herewith the annual report of the 
Automotive Division of the Pubhc Works Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1958. This report 
covers the activities of the five garages, the Mobile 
Guard Section, and the Motor Pool. 

The quota of employees assigned to the Automotive 
Division for 1958 was 116 employees, assigned to the 
following duties: 1 chief automotive engineer in charge 
of the division; 9 clerical employees; 1 dispatcher in 
charge of the Motor Pool; 4 employees assigned to the 
stockroom; 3 employees assigned to wreckers; 41 em- 
ployees assigned to repair work; 38 emplo.yees assigned 
to maintenance of buildings, gasoline and oil dispensing, 
cleaning, and watchmen's duties, and motor vehicle 
operation; and 19 employees assigned to the Mobile 
Guard Section which maintains a watch over Public 
Works Department property and equipment between 
the hours of 4 p.m., and 8 a.m. weekdays, and all day 
Saturdays, Sundays, and holiday's. Due to retirements, 
etc., there were 107 emplovees on the payroll at the 
end of 1958. 

The olhce maintained by the division at City Hall 
processed 1,799 requisitions in 1958, of which 1,141 
were service orders, and (358 were purchase orders. A 
petty cash fund of $300 was used to make about 100 
purchases a month, usually inider S3 each. The City 
Hall office reports the following expenditures from the 
1958 appropriation. 

Personal services $438,399 00 

Contractual services .... 57,980 00 

Materials and supplies 104,000 00 

Rents and registration fees . 10,140 00 

Purchase of new equipment 73,335 00 



$744,520 00 



Public Works Department 1 



o 



The following equipment was purchased in 1958 
from budget appropriations: 

For the Water Division: 

One Ford 2-ton platform truck, and one Chicago pneu- 
matic air compressor 
Two Ford 1-ton trucks, one emergency, and one meter 
Three Ford 2-ton trucks for mounting air compressors 
One Ford 2-ton truck with Gar Wood crane 
Two Ford 2-ton dump trucks 
One Ford sedan 
One Rambler sedan 

For the Sanitary Division : 

Two Wayne street sweepers 
For the Sewer Division : 

One Ford 2-ton chassis and cowl for 7-man cab emergency 
truck 

One Rambler sedan 

For the Highway Division : 

Two International Carryalls, for engineers 
One GMC Suburban, for engineers 

The department's fleet of 483 units of automotive 
equipment under the supervision of this division 
consists of 82 sedans and other vehicles used for trans- 
portation purposes, and 265 trucks of various sizes, 
including 36 snowfighters, 10 compressors, 4 catch- 
basin cleaners, 34 pickup trucks, 119 dump trucks, 
6 wreckers, 6 flushers, 3 derrick trucks, 2 lumber trucks, 
1 rack truck, 3 platform trucks, 32 emergency trucks, 
and 9 miscellaneous trucks. There are 26 street sweep- 
ers, 11 road rollers, 7 snow and bucket loaders, 19 front 
bucket loaders, 2 tractor shovels, 4 crawler tractors, 
1 grader, 3 trailer compressors, and 63 miscellaneous 
pieces. There are 436 of these units registered imder 
the motor vehicle law of the Commonwealth. 

The repair shop at the Highland Street garage 
performed approximately 12,000 repair jobs in 1958, 
including tire repairs and lubrication check-ups. Six 
thousand repair work orders were made out by the 
motor equipment repairmen. Contracts in the amount 
of $12,000 and $5,000 were issued for the respective 
repair of Walter snowfighters and F. W. D. trucks. 

The Mobile Guard and the Motor Pool operated in a 
satisfactory manner during 1958. The Motor Pool 
consists of one dispatcher and eight drivers (one from 
the Automotive Division). The dispatcher makes all 
assignments to the drivers, and also has charge of the 



14 



City Document No. 18 



short-wave radio. Within the PubUc Works Depart- 
ment are 44 cars equipped with two-way radios. The 
Motor Pool assignments outside the Pubhc Works 
Department consist of the following: 

Institutions Department — Conveying patients to Tewks- 
bury and Long Island, and children to various homes. 

Purchasing Department — Convej'ing inspectors to sources 
of supplies. 

Public Library — Checking distant libraries. 

Election Department — Conveying voting machine offi- 
cials and work on election days. 

Assessing Department, Printing Department, Public Cele- 
brations, Collector's Office, Mayor's Office, Real Estate Di- 
vision, City Planning Board — Various assignments. 

The Mobile Guard Section, with 17 men and 3 
vehicles, patrols the city, protecting Pubhc Works 
Department property. The guards inspect all yards 
and, at each location, punch a Detex time clock. Watch- 
men are permanently stationed on locations where 
experience has shown that it is advisable to have a man 
present at all times to protect city property. 

A survey of the Albany Street garage was made late 
in 1958 by the Thompson & Lichtner Company. They 
recommend that extensive repairs be made to this plant 
and the sum of $60,000 has been requested in the 1959 
budget for this purpose. 

VEHICLE ACCIDENT BREAKDOWN 
1950 THROUGH 1958 



Yeab 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Year's 
Total 


1950 


23 


31 


21 


22 


13 


18 


3 


13 


19 


15 


19 


20 


217 


1951 


32 


28 


24 


11 


24 


21 


11 


14 


14 


16 


17 


28 


240 


• 952 


33 


57 


17 


11 


18 


12 


12 


20 


16 


19 


12 


21 


248 


J953 


24 


29 


24 


17 


18 


21 


19 


9 


21 


16 


14 


9 


221 


1954 


42 


10 


13 


13 


11 


10 


15 


14 


20 


8 


11 


24 


191 


1955 


21 


15 


21 


10 


12 


13 


f) 


16 


14 


7 


17 


12 


163 


1956 


21 


26 


4C 


20 


7 


12 


6 


13 


8 


11 


15 


12 


197 


1957 


38 


13 


11 


9 


15 


16 


15 


11 


12 


9 


8 


9 


166 


1958 


28 


39 


10 


7 


7 


11 


15 


13 


10 


10 


7 


14 


171 



The Mayor's Automotive Advisory Committee and 
Accident Review Board were established in 1952. 



Timothy J. O'Leary, 
Director of Transportation. 



Public Works Department 15 

APPENDIX B 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

Submitted herewith is the annual report of the Bridge 
Division, covering the income, expenditures, and oper- 
ation of the Bridge Service and the Sumner Tunnel for 
the year ending December 31, 1958. 

Respectfully, 

John J. McCall, 

Division Engineer, 
Bridge Division. 



16 City Doc ument No. 18 

I. BRIDGE SERVICE 

SUMMARY OF BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 





Regular 
Appropria- 
tion 


Bridges, 
liepairs, etc. 


Bridges, Construction of 




Revenue 


Non -Revenue 


Balance from 1957 

1958 Appropriation .... 
From Bridge Revenue . . 


SI, 745 00 

679,499 00 

9,000 00 


860,202 01 
40,000 00 


$27,325 65 


$3,261,214 89 


Total Credits 


S690,244 00 


•S 100,202 01 


$27,325 65 


$3,261,214 89 


Transfers from 


$20,930 20 


— 


$11,303 64 


— 


Enbumbrances 


$669,313 74 


$80,220 82 


$11,865 15 


$1,059,839 80 


Total Debits 


$690,244 00 


$80,220 82 


$23,168 79 


$1,059,839 80 






Unencumbered 
Balances 


— 


$19,981 19 


$4,156 86 


$2,201,375 09 



Details of Expenditures on Tidewater Bridges 

TIDEWATER BRIDGES— 1958 



Bridge 


Draw- 
tenders' 
Salaries 


Mnchanies' 
Wage.9 


Material 


Repair 
Bills 


Supplies. 

Utilities. 

Etc. 


Total 


*Broadway 


«12,913 38 
48.681 26 
58.385 66 
41.430 95 
56,625 08 
59,748 21 
.59,118 82 
42,128 08 
40,953 70 


$3,670 01 
3,954 53 
4,670 20 
2.860 19 
4.143 30 
3,046 14 
4,717 48 
6.908 89 
6,773 68 


S278 12 

211 48 
145 82 
232 36 
63 00 
767 35 
673 56 
.557 48 


$240 32 

433 62 

864 55 

696 33 

1,419 00 

3.096 81 

862 43 

1.572 10 

1,165 18 


S274 43 

2.820 65 

679 02 

.534 17 

915 99 

2.178 67 

3,104 18 

.531 10 

691 34 


$17,376 26 


Charlostown 


55,890 06 


Chelsea Street 


64,810 91 


Congress Street 

Maiden 


45,667 46 
63,335 73 


Andrew P. McArdle 

Northern Avenue 

Summer Street (Ft. Pt.) 
Summer Street (L St.) . 


68.132 83 
68,570 26 
51,813 73 
50.141 38 


Totals 


S4 19.985 14 


$40,744 42 


$2,929 17 


S10.350 34 


$11,729 55 


$485,738 62 







* Not operating as drawbridge but kept in operable condition for possible use during construction of 
I'itzgerald Expressway in Kort Point Channel area. 



Public Works Department 



17 



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18 City Document No. 18 

Throughout the year 1958 the status and condition of 
the city's ten drawbridge faciUties remained practically 
unchanged from the previous year, and are specifically 
described as follows: 



1. Over Fort Point Channel 

Dover Street Bridge: On June 3, 1958, this bridge was 
permanently closed to all highway traffic. Prior to 
that, it had been closed to waterborne traffic since May 
13, 1955. 

As of this writing, the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Works has executed a contract for the complete 
removal of the bridge superstructure and its replace- 
ment with a solid fill causeway, with culvert facihties 
to be installed to accommodate tidal flow. 

Under this contract, which has been executed under 
the provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90, of the General 
Laws, the city will pay one half the cost, estimated to 
total $553,711, based on the low bid for the work. 

Related to this project is the construction of a trestle 
upstream from the bridge, necessary to carry the re- 
located water mains and other utilities as required by 
the replacement of the bridge. The trestle project, of 
necessity, is being executed in connection with the 
completion of the Fitzgerald Expressway in that area; 
and under an agreement with the Commonwealth, the 
city will assume one half the cost of the trestle project 
in an amount not to exceed $60,000.00. 

Broadway Bridge: This bridge has not operated as a 
drawbridge since May 13, 1955, but has been kept in 
operable condition against the possible necessity of 
making openings to accommodate the movements of 
waterborne equipment in connection with the construc- 
tion of the expressway project upstream of the bridge. 

It is expected that in the coming year it will be 
possible to exclude this possibility, and then fix the 
ends of the draw, remove the drawhouse, fender piers, 
machinery, etc. The bridge is in good condition. 

Summer Street, Congress Street, and Northern Avenue 
Bridges: These three bridges are fully operating. At 
the present time, it is expected that the American 
Sugar Refinery will be relocated at the Mystic River 
sometime in 1960, at which time the Summer Street 
and Congress Street Bridges need no longer be operated. 



Public Works Department 19 

The rebuilding of the Summer Street Bridge should 
proceed at that time, and new studies are being initiated 
to investigate the possibility of a solid fill replacement 
of the bridge. 

The Congress Street Bridge is in good condition. 

The Northern Avenue Bridge is operating satisfac- 
torily, but is in need of replacement structurally. It is 
hoped that the possibility of closing the entire channel 
to navigation in the near future will permit a solid fill 
replacement of this bridge. 

2. Over Reserved Channel 

Summer Street Bridge (Formerly L Street): This bridge 
has been undergoing major repairs during 1958. The 
entire South Boston approach trestle has been rebuilt; 
and the longer Boston approach has been repaired on 
the underside by renewing pile bracings and encasing 
defective piles with concrete. The entire surface of both 
approaches will be repaved. 

It is expected that this project will be completed 
before the end of the year. 

The work has been accomplished under a Chapter 90 
project, with the city assuining 40 per cent of the total 
cost and the Commonwealth the remainder. The total 
estimated cost is $271,000. 

The drawspan of this bridge, although in need of 
major repairs or replacement, was purposely excluded 
from the work because of the strong possibility that the 
movable span could be replaced by a fixed span at a 
much lower cost, due to the fact that the volume of 
commercial waterborne traffic above the bridge has de- 
clined to the point where closing of the draw would be 
justified. 

3. Over Charles River 

Charlestown Bridge: The work of reconstructing the 
approach spans and drawspan of this bridge has been 
completed except for minor details relating to the 
operating system of the drawspan. 

In connection with this project, which included com- 
plete removal of the steel floor systems, new concrete 
and steel decks, a new operating system for the draw- 
span and related steel repairs, etc., it was necessary to 
close the draw to waterborne traffic until the span was 
restored to full operation. 



20 City Document No. 18 

Accordingly, the drawspan was so closed on May 1, 
1957, and it was intended to have the bridge operating 
before the end of that year. 

However, because of the inherent structural and me- 
chanical problems involved in operating this span, and 
the danger of seriously interrupting the elevated train 
service of the M.T.A. which crosses this bridge, the 
bridge has not yet been restored to operation. 

Furthermore, the decline of waterborne traffic passing 
through the draw of this bridge makes it justifiable to 
close the span permanently to navigation except for 
vessels that can pass under the span. 

Accordingly, a petition has been filed with the United 
States Engineers for permission to convert the movable 
span to a fixed span, thereby eliminating a source of 
interruption and delay to transit and highway traffic, 
and, in addition, making possible an annual saving of 
approximately $100,000 for maintaining and operating 
the movable span. 

4. Over Chelsea River 

Andrew P. McArdle and Chelsea Street Bridges: Both 
of these bridges are fully operating and in good condition. 

5. Over Mystic River 

Maiden Bridge (Alford Street): This bridge is fully 
operating. The structure has been in very poor con- 
dition structurally for some years, requiring rather con- 
tinuous maintenance and repairs. 

Under an agreement with the Commonwealth, the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works has sched- 
uled the rebuilding of this bridge at an estimated cost of 
$4,000,000, with the Commonwealth assuming the full 
cost; it being understood that, on completion, the bridge 
will revert to the City of Boston for operation and 
maintenance. 

At the present time, the State Department has en- 
gaged a consulting firm of engineers to draw up plans 
and specifications for the new bridge, and it is expected 
that the project will be started in the latter part of 1959. 

G. Inland Bridges 

This division is concerned with the maintenance of 
79 inland bridges, including 14 footbridges, as indicated 
in the following breakdown: 



Public Works Department 21 



Maintained entirely by this department 
Maintained jointly with New Haven Railroad . 
Maintained jointly with Boston & Albany Railroad 
Maintained jointly with Boston & Main Railroad 
Maintained jointly with M. T. A. . . 
Maintained jointly with Town of Winthrop 
Maintained jointly with Town of Milton 
Maintained jointly with Town of Watertown 



48 
15 
10 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



Total . 79 

With few exceptions, the inland bridges are in fair 
condition. Certain necessary major improvements, in- 
volving the bridges over the Boston & Albany Railroad 
have been deferred, as previously reported, due to the 
proposed extension of the Massachusetts Turnpike into 
Boston; which development would automatically re- 
quire rebuilding most, if not all, of these bridges. 

However, because of the extreme need of immediate 
repairs to two of the bridges over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad, namely the Broadway and Boylston Street 
bridges, contracts for renewing the decks have been 
awarded as described hereinafter. 

Major Construction Work and Repairs 

Deck Repairs to the Broadway Bridge over the Boston 
& Albany Railroad: Due to the extremely defective 
condition of the bridge deck, a contract was entered into 
with John J. Botti to make the necessary repairs. 

Because of very heavy vehicular traffic on normal 
work days, all work had to be done on week ends, when 
the area to be repaired was closed to traffic. 

The roadways were stripped of all asphalt plank wear- 
ing surface ; defective stringers and underplank renewed ; 
and a new spruce plank wearing surface installed. 

Work commenced May 10, 1958, and was completed 
June 3, 1958, at a cost of $15,100. 

The structural condition of this bridge is such that it 
was considered advisable to close the bridge to all heavy 
trucking. This was done on May 27, 1958. 

Deck Repairs to the Sprague Street Bridge over the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: A contract 
in the amount of $12,345 was entered into with the 
Albert C. Graglia Company, Inc., to make repairs to 
the deck of this bridge. 



22 City Document Xo. IS 

This work consisted of replacing approximately 25 per 
cent of the deck planking, and laying a new wearing 
surface of bituminous concrete. 

Hov/ever, when the deck was uncovered it was found 
that all the underplank was defective to the extent that 
complete renewal was necessary, and, accordingly, the 
original contract was amended to cover the additional 
cost. 

The work commenced June 23, 1958, and was com- 
pleted October 10, 1958, at a cost of $28,979.11. 

Deck Repairs to the Boylston Street Bridge over the 
Boston d: Albany Railroad: Bids were received August 6, 
1958, for repairs to the deck of this bridge. The repairs 
include replacing defective stringers, renewing the entire 
underdeck and placing a new bituminous concrete wear- 
ing surface. 

Due to the contractor's inability to obtain early de- 
liveries of lumber, the start of this project has been 
tentatively postponed until early in 1959. 

The contract was awarded to the Martin J. Kelly 
Company, Inc., in the amount of $22,255. 

OTHER WORK ACCOMPLISHED UNDER CONTRACT BY THE 
BRIDGE DIVISION DURING 1958 

Work Cost Contractor 

Resurfacing Southampton Street Bridge 
over the New York, New Haveu & 
Hartford Railroad $1,238 00 Jolin J. Botti 

Deck repairs to Central Avenue Bridge 

over the Neponsct River 2,936 00 John J. Botti 



Work for Other Departments 

Demolition of the Piers at North End Park. In con- 
nection with the program of the Mayor's Waterfront 
RehabiUtation Committee, this office prepared plans 
and specifications for the subject work, and a contract 
for the same was awarded by the Massachusetts De- 
partment of Public Works under Chapter 91 of the 
General Laws, in the amount of $20,900. The cost will 
be shared equally by the Commonwealth and the city. 



Public Works Department 23 

Yard Forces 

The maintenance force of the Bridge Service is utihzed 
in various repair operations of both emergency and 
routine nature in repairs to bridge roadway decking, 
sidewalks, fender piers, retractile bridge tracks, stair- 
ways, railings, and pertinent facilities. 

Other work consists of placing and removing barri- 
cades and traffic control signs necessary when bridge 
repairs involve interference with traffic; also cleaning 
bridge sidewalks and stairways of ice and snow. 

Sumner Tunnel 

Under the terms of Chapter 598 of the Acts of 1958, 
the ownership, operation, and maintenance of the 
Sumner Tunnel will transfer to the Massachusetts Turn- 
pike Authority, at such time as the Authority may 
determine, after the issuance of bonds to provide for 
the construction of a new tunnel and the acquisition of 
the existing tunnel. 

It is expected that the actual transfer of title will take 
place about April, 1959. 

The total traffic for the year of 1958 amounted to 
11,721,627 vehicles. This is a decrease of 1,175,097 from 
the previous year of 1957 when 12,896,724 automobiles 
used the Sumner Tunnel. 

The decrease in traffic is attributed to the completion 
of the Northeast Expressway facilities by the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Public Works, which resulted 
in a natural deflection of traffic from the tunnel to the 
Mystic River Bridge. 

However, the anticipated net result of traffic volume 
loss for this reason is around 9 per cent, which is con- 
siderably less loss than was generally estimated. 

All of the electrical and mechanical equipment used 
in the daily operation of the tunnel is in good condition, 
and under a constant maintenance schedule. Any re- 
pairs or adjustments required are made as needed. 

The toll collecting equipment, including all toll regis- 
ters, key boxes, and treadles, are under constant super- 
vision, and any replacements, repairs, or adjustments 
are made as required. 

All other buildings, structures, automotive equipment, 
etc., belonging to the Sumner Tunnel are in first-class 
condition and no immediate repairs are anticipated. 



24 City Document No. 18 

Contracts Awarded in 1958 

1. Gas Water Heater 

Invitation bids were sent to several plumbing con- 
tractors and awarded to the J. McCusker Companj^, the 
lowest bidder, for the amount of S660, to replace a 
defective gas water heater in the basement of the 
Administration Building. 

2. Incline Walls and Portals 

Specifications were written and a contract awarded 
to the lowest bidder, F. C. Dolan & Sons, Inc., for the 
amount of $5,035, to repair, point, and clean the Boston 
and East Boston incline walls and the granite facing 
on the two portals. 

3. Treadle Frames 

Specifications were written and a contract awarded 
to the low bidder, Rossano Construction Company, for 
the amount of $1,860, to remove old treadle frames and 
install new frames on the Boston and East Boston 
plazas. 

If. Exhaust Air Dud and Fan Rooms 

Specifications were written and a contract awarded 
to the low bidder, F. C. Dolan & Sons, Inc., for the 
amount of $2,275, to clean exhaust air duct, fresh air 
duct, and exhaust fan rooms. 

5. Administration liuilding Sidewalk 

Specifications were written and a contract awarded 
the low bidder, John J. Botti Compan}^ for the amount 
of $1,430, to remove the old sidewalk around the 
Tunnel Administration Building, resetting old edge- 
stone, furnishing new edgestone and granohthic 
sidewalk. 

6. Cleaning Surface Drainage System 

Specifications were written and a contract awarded to 
the low bidder, James A. Freaney Compan}^ for the 
amount of $2,080, to clean the surface drainage 
system of the Sumner Tunnel. 



Public Wokks Department 



25 



SUMMARY OF 1958 TRAFFIC BY CLASSIFICATIONS 



Class Toll Description 

L $0 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacity-. 

Tractor without trailer 

2. 20 Passenger car 

20 Motorcycle 

25 Truck over 2 tons and up to 5 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 5 tons 

capacity 

20 Passenger car with trailer 

35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 10 tons 
capacity 

7. 20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons capacity 

8. 1 00 Truck over 10 tons capacity .... 

9. 35 Buses ......... 

* Reserved lane 

Total Traffic 



4. 



5. 



No. of 
Vehicles 

371,387 

11,079,669 

4,448 



53,192 
19,507 



18,639 

1,710 

1,506 

3,407 

168,162 

11,721,627 



* M. T. A. and Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses included in this classification. 
7,220 M. T. A. and 67,474 Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses at 35 cents included 
in this total. 

COMPARATIVE 5-VEAR SUMMARY OF OPERATION, FROM 
1954 TO 1958, INCLUSIVE 





1954 


1 955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


Vehicutair Traffic: 

Total number vehicles 

Monthly average 


11,080,966 

923,414 

212,513 

30,359 


12,096,107 

1,007,842 

231,945 

33,135 


12.736,726 

1,061.394 

244.552 

34,800 


12,896,724 

1,074,727 

248,014 

35,333 


11,721.627 

976,802 

225.416 

32.114 


Weekly average 


Daily average 




Power Consumption: 

Total kilowatts 


4,527,315 


5,236,214 


5,614.061 


6,079,026 


5.781.067 




Financial Results: 

Operating expenditure 

Balance to next year 

Interest requirements 

Refunded tolls 


?595,127 07 

3,925 18 

740,213 05 

122 85 


$628,706 30 

6,188 73 

760,100 00 

98 60 


8649,869 99 

28,924 02 

743,991 37 


$674,924 42 

374 00 

748.762 50 

1 80 


5664,287 92 

932 06 

755,646 25 

2 00 






Total Expenses 


$1,339,388 15 


$1,395,093 63 


$1,422,785 38 


$1,424,062 72 


$1,420,868 23 


Receipts 


$2,224,195 00 
16,591 87 


$2,413,231 59 
3.925 18 


$2,550,125 00 
6,188 73 


$2,589,725 00 
28,924 02 


$2,344 845 00 


Balance from previous year 


374 00 


Total Receipts 


52,240,786 87 


$2,417,156 77 


$2,556,313 73 


$2,618,649 02 


$2,345,219 00 


^fet Result 


$901,398 72 
(Excess) 


$1,022,063 14 
(Excess) 


$1,133,528 35 
(Excess) 


$1,194,586 30 
(Excess) 


$924 350 77 




(Excess) 



I 



26 City Document No. ]^ 

APPENDIX C 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE HIGHWAY DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

The following report of the income, expenditures, and 
operation of the Highway Division of the Pubhc Works 
Department is hereby submitted for the vear ending 
December 31, 1958. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTHFORD J. KeLLEY, 

Division Engineer, Highway Division. 



Public Works Department 



27 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 



Paving Service 

SUMMARY OF BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS 



Appropbiation 



Total Credits 



Expenditures 



Balance 
Unexpended 



Paving Service , 



Reconstruction of 
Streets 



Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Revenue) .... 

Public Waj's, Construc- 
tion of (Non-Revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction 
and Reconstruction of 

Street Signs 

Snow Removal 



Chapter 718 — Acts of 
1956 



§1,629,197 50 


49,502 88 


74,190 


92 


3,754,654 34 


190,504 


71 


1 1,022 


93 


840,202 


30 


795,741 


23 



$1,565,946 61 


40,4.94 


70 


68,556 


58 


1,939,202 


89 


142,446 


68 


10,472 


66 


782,531 


23 


608,400 


12 



$63,250 89 

9,008 18 

5,634 34 

1,815,451 45 

48,058 03 
550 27 

57,671 13 

187,341 11 



In the Permit Office, the permits issued and monies 
received for 1958 are as follows: 



PERMITS ISSUED 



Signs 

Occupation permits . 
Sidewalk licenses 
Driveway applications 
Special permits . 
Department permits (free) 
Street opening permits 

Total permits 



8,326 
6,369 
314 
287 
275 
902 
476 

16,949 



28 City Document No. 18 



CASH RECEIVED 




Occupation permits 


SG2,41G 85 


Signs 


88,077 52 


Sidewalk licenses 


22,029 75 


Plans and miscellaneous 


70 


Driveway applications 


574 00 


Notifications 


50 00 


Rents 


10,467 00 


Total income less street openings . 


S183,615 82 


Street openings 


79,646 06 



Total income $263,261 88 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were em- 
ployed as usual in the maintenance of public streets, 
resurfacing and patching macadam pavements, patching 
permanent pavements, such as asphalt and granite 
block, and maintaining gravel, brick, and artificial stone 
sidewalks. 

In the snow removal season, division forces were em- 
ployed in spreading rock salt and sand on icy streets 
and also supervised plowing work throughout the city 
by 250 contractors' hired plows after snowstorms. All 
snow removal bills for plowing, hauling, force account 
work, cubic yard removal, etc., were processed through 
the Paving Service office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs: 

Erected 176 4-inch street signposts. 

Erected 9 new hero square signs for dedication. 

Erected 1 new directional sign. 

Replaced 332 hero square signs. 

Installed 682 baked enamel street signs. 

Installed 160 hand-painted metal street signs. 

Removed 258 old hand-i)ainted signs, damaged baked 
enamel signs, and obliterated signs. 

Repaired and straightened 172 bent or broken street sign- 
posts (4-inch type). 

Repaired, in blacksmith shop, 212 broken .street sign 
frames and welded 36 4-inch street sign-posts. 

Repaired 351 street sign frames, collars, and brackets on 
4-inch street signposts and light poles on locations. 

Removed 257 pieces of rope, wire, old tires from street 
signs on 4-inch posts and light poles. 

Installed 667 street sign frames. 

Installed 291 street sign collars on 4-inch street signposts 
and light poles. 



Public Works Department 29 

Installed 68 pairs of adapters on wooden poles. 

Installed 209 4-inch acorns on 4-inch street signposts. 

Installed 61 "Private Way" signs on 4-inch street sign- 
posts and light poles. 

Removed 45 "Private Way" signs from 4-inch street sign- 
posts and light poles because public wa3\s were made. 

Painted 526 4-inch street signposts. 

Painted 712 street frames. 

Painted 248 4-inch acorns on 4-inch street signposts. 

Painted 607 street sign collars on street signposts and light 
poles. 

Washed and cleaned 241 street sign name plates. 

Painted 255 blanks for temporary name plates. 

There were 151 streets constructed or reconstructed 
during the year. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares on which 
reconstruction work was completed in 1958 are as 
follows : 

Lexington street, from Shelby street to Meridian street 
(including Lexington square). 

Maverick street, from Orleans street to Jeffries street. 

Porter street, from Bremen street approximately 100 feet 
south of Orleans street. 

Putnam street, from Bennington street to Bremen street. 

Saratoga street, from north side of bridge over M.T.A. 
to south side of bridge over M.T.A. 

West Eagle street, from Meridian street to Border street. 

Taylor street (sidewalks), D wight street to Milford street. 

Chatham street (sidewalks), from Commercial street to 
Merchants Row. 

Summer street (sidewalks — easterly side), from Devonshire 
street to approximately 70 feet southerly and (northerly 
side), from 114 Summer street to High street. 

Westland avenue, from Massachusetts avenue to Hemen- 
way street. 

River street, from Mt. Vernon street to Beacon street. 

Columbus avenue at Berkeley street, southeast and 
southwest corners. 

East Broadway, from Dorchester street to L street and 
from L street to M street. 

Grimes street, from West Seventh street to West Eighth 
street. 

St. Margaret street, from Boston street to Roseclair street. 

Columbia road, from Old Colony avenue to Old Harbor 
street. 

East Seventh street, from H street to N street. 

East Sixth street, from G street to H street. 

East Dedham street, from Harrison avenue to Albany 
street. 



30 City Document No. 18 

East Newton street, from Washington street to Albany 
street. 

Roxbury street, from Columbus avenue to John Eliot 
square. 

Williams street, from Washington street to Westminster 
street. 

Columbus avenue, from Massachusetts avenue to North- 
ampton street and (Roxbury Crossing) approximately 
200 feet east of Texas street to approximately 100 feet west of 
Roxbury street, and from Washington street to Walnut 
avenue. 

Weld Hill street, from Hyde Park avenue to dead end. 

Georgia street (sidewalks), from Blue Hill avenue to Elm 
Hill avenue. 

Grampian Way (sidewalks), from Evandale terrace to 
Savin Hill avenue. 

Grant street (sidewalks), from Crescent avenue to Harbor 
View street. 

Ba5rside street, from Savin Hill avenue to McConnell park. 

Bicknell street, from Harvard street to Bradshaw street. 

Blue Hill avenue, from Woodhaven street to Columbine 
street. 

Olney street, from Geneva avenue to Rosseter street. 

Claricson street (sidewalks), from Hendry street to Barry 
street. 

Adams street (sidewalks), from Ashmont street to Gallivan 
Boulevard. 

Ashmont street (sidewalks), from Adams street to Bur- 
goyne street. 

Boutwell street (sidewalks), from Neponset avenue to 
Train street. 

Bushnell street, from Ashmont street to Weyanoke street. 

Brookvalc street, from Dorchester avenue to Hutchinson 
street. 

Rosselcrin road, from Train street to Daly street. 

North Munroe terrace, from Train street to Neponset 
avenue. 

Washington street, from Mora street to Talbot avenue. 

Dakota street, from Washington street to Geneva avenue. 

Valley road, from Dorchester avenue to Washington 
street. 

Welles avenue, from Washington street to Talbot avenue. 

O'Connell road, from Washington street to Valley road. 

Messinger street, from Orlando street to Savannah avenue. 

Savannah avenue, from approximately IGG feet northeast 
of Newcastle street to Messinger street and Messinger 
street to approximately 124 feet northeasterly. 

Metropolitan avenue, from Greenwood s(|uaro to River 
street. 



Public Works Department 31 

Augustus avenue, from Poplar street to Metropolitan 
avenue. 

Cornell street, from Washington street to Poplar street. 

River street, from westerly line of Wood avenue to ap- 
proximately 235 feet east of Marcy road. 

Mariposa street, from Wood avenue to Blake street. 

Reddy avenue, from River street to the playground. 

Weybosset street, from Greenfield road to Mariposa street. 

Edgewater Drive, from approximately 135 feet south of 
River street to approximately 650 feet south of River street. 

Colgate road, from Washington street to railroad. 

Firth road, from Washington street to Florence street. 

Florence street, from Firth road to Blakemore street. 

Weld Hill street, from Hyde Park avenue to dead end. 

Glenhaven road, from Centre street to Joyce Kilmer road. 

Furbush road, from La Grange street to approximately 
402 feet northerly. 

Newfield street, from Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway 
to Furbush road. 

Elgin street, from Centre street to New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad. 

Hastings street, from Centre street to Corey street. 

Lorette street, from Centre street to Hillcrest street. 

Perham street, from Vermont street to New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad. 

Penfield street, from Birch street to Belgrade avenue. 

Rexhame street, from Belgrade avenue to Colberg avenue. 

Leland road, from Hackensack road to approximately 
631 feet southeasterly. 

Allston street, from Commonwealth avenue to Washington 
street. 

Rushmore street, from Academy Hill road to approxi- 
mately 420 feet northwesterly. 

Tremont street, from 600 feet northeast of Tip Top street 
to about Newton line. 

Hooker street, from North Harvard street to Royal street. 

Kenrick street, from Lake street to approximately 225 feet 
west of Brayton road. 

North Harvard street, from Western avenue to Soldiers 
Field road. 

The following is a list of streets constructed and re- 
constructed and sidewalk work done by contract in the 
various wards of the city in 1958. 

Ward 1 — East Eagle street, Lexington street, Maverick 
street, Porter street, Putnam street, Saratoga street. West 
Eagle street, Beachview road. Border street, Everett street, 
Maverick street, Sumner street. 

Ward 2 — Hill street. 



32 City Document No. 18 

Ward 3 — Taylor street (sidewalks), Billerica street 
(sidewalks), Cotting street (sidewalks), Congress street 
(sidewalks), Dorchester avenue (sidewalks), Arch street 
(sidewalks), Batterymarch street (sidewalks), Chatham 
street (sidewalks), Devonshire street (sidewalks), Federal 
street (sidewalks), High street (sidewalks), Milk street 
(sidewalks). Pearl street (sidewalks), State street (sidewalks), 
Summer street (sidewalks), Washington street (sidewalks), 
Atlantic avenue (sidewalks), Columbus avenue (sidewalks), 
Franklin street (sidewalks), Hull street (sidewalks), Oliver 
street (sidewalks), Salem street (sidewalks), Tremont street 
(sidewalks), Washington street (sidewalks), Well street 
(sidewalks). Court square (sidewalks). Commercial street 
(sidewalks), South Market street (sidewalks). Castle street, 
High street. 

Ward 4 — Westland avenue. Trinity place. 

Ward 5 — River street, Ipswich street, Columbus avenue. 

Ward 6 — N street (sidewalks). Cutler court, Lovis 
street. East Broadway, Beckler avenue, G street, Grimes 
street, K street, P street. 

Ward 7 — Liberty place, St. Margaret street, Columbia 
road. East Seventh street, East Sixth street, Frederick 
street, G street, Covington street. 

Ward 8 — East Dedham street. East Newton street. 
Mall street, Taber street, Thorndike street, Zeigler street, 
Harrison avenue, Topeka street. 

Ward 9 — Roxbury street, Guild Row, Williams street, 
Columbus avenue. 

Ward 10 — Parker Hill terrace, Alleghany street. 

Ward 11 — Roxbury street, Weld Hill street. 

Ward 12 — Alaska street (sidewalks), Georgia street 
(sidewalks). Elm Hill avenue. 

Ward 13 — Grampian Way (sidewalks), Grant street 
(sidewalks), Bayside street, Hancock street. 

Ward 14 — Bicknell street, Blue Hill avenue, Olney street. 

Ward 15 — Levant street, Tebroc street, Topliff street, 
Barry street (sidewalks), Clarkson street (sidewalks), Rich- 
field street (sidewalks), Stanley street (sidewalks), Bowdoin 
street, Dakota street, Duncan street, Cassnet street, Hancock 
street. 

Ward 16 — Adams street (sidewalks), Ashmont street 
(sidewalks), Boutwell street (sidewalks). Glide street (side- 
walks), Beal street, Ericsson street, Taylor street, Bushnell 
street, Coffey street, Adams street, Brookvale street, North 
Munroe terrace, Ainsley street, Neponset avenue, Redfield 
street. South Munroe terrace, Rosselerin road. 



Public Works Department 33 

Ward 17 — Moultrie street, Washington street, Adams 
street, Dakota street, Richmond street, Valley road, Welles 
avenue, O'Connell road. 

Ward 18 — Maple street, Oak street, Briarcliff terrace 
(sidewalks), Cragmere terrace (sidewalks), Gladeside ave- 
nue (sidewalks), Linvale terrace (sidewalks), Mamelon 
Circle (sidewalks), Newcroft Circle (sidewalks), Ridgeview 
avenue (sidewalks), Don wood terrace (sidewalks), Leahaven 
road (sidewalks), Burley street, Favre street, Messinger 
street (B-0), Rainier road, Orlando street, Asheville road, 
Claron street, Grandview street, Hautevale street, June 
street, Denton terrace, Malverna road, Rawston road, 
Messinger street (0-S), Savannah avenue, Far well avenue, 
Hebron street, Rosemont street. Metropolitan avenue, 
Augustus avenue, Cornell street, Kittredge street, Reserva- 
tion road. River street, Mariposa street, Reddy avenue, 
Weybosset street, Edgewater Drive. 

Ward 19 — Larch place, Colgate road, Firth road, Florence 
street, Mahler road, Weld Hill street, Brewer street, Hagar 
street, Centre street, Washington street. 

Ward 20 — Brook Farm road, Home wood road, Glen- 
haven road, Jacqueline road (sidewalks), Robken road, 
Selwyn Street Extension, Furbush road, Newfield street. 
La Grange street, Graham terrace, Buchanan road, Corey 
street, Elgin street, Hastings street, Hillcrest street. La 
Grange street, Lorette street, Perham street. South street, 
Weymouth avenue, Penfield street, Rexhame street, Leiand 
road. Wren street. Ascent street, Capital street. 

Ward 21 — Commonwealth avenue, Allston street, High- 
gate street, Naples road, Nevins street, Selkirk road. 

Ward 22 — Rushmore street, Margo road, Tremont street, 
Holton street, Hooker street, Kenrick street. Larch street, 
North Harvard street, Wirt street, Brayton road. 



WORK DONE BY CONTRACT IN 1958 

Item Quantity 

Earth and services excavation 
Rock and wall excavation . 
Bank gravel . 
Crushed stone for edgestone 
Existing base removed 
Existing pavement removed 
New straight edgestone 
New circular edgestone 
New corners (2-foot-O-inch radius) 
Existing edgestone reset or relocated 
Existing edgestone hauled to yard 
Crushed stone for macadam base 

OA asphalt 

Portland cement concrete base . 



36,340 cubic yards 
2,029 cubic yards 
45,598 tons 
1,551 tons 
8,067 square yards 
29,148 square yards 
16,180 lineal feet 
2,587 lineal feet 
931 each 
55,616 lineal feet 
6,813 lineal feet 
13,096 tons 
126,663 gallons 

2,128 cubic yards 



34 



City Document No. 18 



Portland cement concrete for backing 

up sidewalks .... 
Bituminous concrete base, roadway- 
Bituminous concrete top, roadway 
Bituminous concrete base, sidewalk 
Bituminous concrete top, sidewalk 
Sheet asphalt top . 
Artificial stone sidewalks 
Artificial stone driveways 
Loam spaces . 
Loam back of sidewalks 
Covers reset . 

Catch basins and manholes rebuilt 
Catch basins and drop inlets built 
Street signposts set or reset 
Parking meters reset 
Stone bounds .... 



13 

31,847 

24,407 

2,059 

1,719 

1,621 

827,564 

89,273 

2,406 

595 

2,725 

55 

45 

292 

111 

100 



cubic yards 

tons 

tons 

tons 

tons 

tons 

square feet 

square feet 

square yards 

cubic yards 

each 

each 

each 

each 

each 

each 



Total Areas 



Bituminous concrete pavement 
Sheet asphalt pavement 



336,584 square yards 
1 1 ,602 square yards 



YEARLY REPORT OF WORK DONE BY DEPARTMENT 

FORCES FOR 1958 



Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid . 

Gravel sidewalks, relaid 

Artificial stone sidewalks, laid (new) . 

Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid (old) . 

Bituminous concrete sidewalks . 

Artificial stone sidewalks, patched 
with black top 

Edgestone reset (old) .... 

Macadam roadway, patched 

Macadam roadway, resurfaced . 

Asphalt or bituminous concrete road- 
way, patched 

Asphalt or bituminous concrete road- 
way, resurfaced . . ... 

Street cleaning 

Snow removal 



5,943 square yards 

8,239 square j^ards 

19,020 square feet 

146,741 square feet 

13,784 square yards 

6,451 square feet 

1,931 lineal feet 

83,894 square yards 

1 ,776 square yards 

97,963 square yards 

! yards 




PAVING SERVICE. 1958 



Street cleaning 

General highwaj^ expenditures 
Sidewalk and curbing . 
Snow and ice removed . 
Street signs .... 



$16,246 76 

667,623 24 

229,605 66 

()9,910 40 

29,055 15 

Sl,012,441 21 



TABLE SHOWINQ LENGTH AND AREA OF PAVINQ ON ACCEPTED STREETS, CORRECTED TO JANUARY I, 1959 



Length in Miles. 


Area in Square Yards. 




Sheet 
Asphalt. 


tAsphalt 
Concrete. 


tGranite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 

on 

Bridges. 


Brick. 


§Con- 
crete. 


D Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


tAsphalt 
Concrete. 


{Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 

oo 

Bridges. 


Brick. 


§Concrete. 


JMaeadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Year 1957 Report. . . . 
Per Cent .... 


224 . 66 
30.05 


361.66 
48.37 


24.09 
3.22 


0.15 
0.02 


0.35 
0.05 


0.22 
03 


18.31 
2.45 


111.79 
14.95 


5.05 
0,76 


0.78 
0.10 


747.00 
100.00 


4.526.640 
31.23 


7,120,795 
49 13 


,532,492 
3.68 


2,140 
0.01 


9,244 
0.06 


5,778 
0.04 


383,999 
2.65 


1,794,446 
12.37 


92,565 
0.64 


26.927 
19 


14,495,026 
100 00 






Januabv 1, 1959. 
City Proper 


48,82 

4.31 

2.88 

11.28 

39 85 

32.00 

52.91 

19.99 

7.84 


32.70 
7.. 59 
25.08 
22.23 
38.07 
100.19 
87.03 
35.38 
31.17 


7.91 
4.72 
2.33 
4.85 
2.31 
0.02 
0.48 
0.29 
0.00 


o.or, 

0.00 


0.09 
0.02 
0.02 
0.03 


o.i; 

02 
0.01 


2.87 
0.74 
1.39 
0.32 
4.13 
1.97 
.5.12 
0.78 
0.24 


2.35 
5.22 
6.73 
5.00 

10 01 
22.39 
30.87 

9.08 

11 72 


0.39 
0.03 
0.10 
0.15 

42 
1 . 45 

1 . 57 
0.23 
3.71 


0.01 
0.04 
0.50 
0.00 
0.00 
0.02 

20 


95.30 
22.70 
38.57 
44.30 
95.41 
158.06 
178.08 
05 , 83 
54.90 


1,092,121 

84,404 

61,241 

238,724 

818,079 

575,292 

1,000,050 

423,834 

1.34,290 


743,.531 
206,362 
565,511 
469,990 
715,285 
1,8,52,819 
1,638,850 
718,336 
,591,515 


1.57,302 

105,674 

48,427 

129,739 

29,341 

997 

10,1,57 

15,949 

47 


278 
1,.503 


3,2.58 

1,098 

317 

892 


3,009 

1 ,055 
1.183 

145 


93,001 
13,395 
47.177 
18,780 
03,519 
28,148 
82,300 
19,204 
3.892 


35,038 

71,866 
150.794 

79,.331 
151,810 
302,845 
473,553 
147.159 
187,003 


7,023 

407 

1,982 

1,381 

7,307 

23,362 

25,990 

3.417 

59.938 


41 

812 

15,754 

27 

4,000 

1,737 

50 

4,506 


2,135,221 
484 810 


East Boston 


870,201 


South Boston 


955,646 
1,786,551 


West Roxbury 


0.03 


0.04 
0.04 
0.08 
0.02 


338 


983 

985 

1,231 

304 


2,848,446 
3,234,111 




1.329,180 


Hyde Park. . . 


982,101 






Total 


220.48 
29.25 


370.44 
50.33 


22.91 
3.04 


0.1.5 
0.02 


0.34 
04 


20 
03 


17. 50 
2.33 


103,97 
13,79 


8.05 
1.07 


0.77 
0.10 


753.87 
100.00 


4,428,101 
30 20 


7.502,205 
51.27 


497,033 
3.40 


2,119 
0.02 


9,008 
0.06 


5,452 
0.04 


,370,010 
2.53 


1,059,999 
11.33 


130,807 
0.89 


26,927 
0.18 


14,632,327 


Per Cent 


100.00 



Total Public Streets 753.87 Miles. 

Note. — In the above table the city ia subdivided substantially on the boundary lines between the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory annexed from Brookline included in City Proper. 



t Of this amount 57.29 miles or 1.079.040 square yards is bituhthic; and 2.03 miles or 
32,884 square yards is Topeka; and 0.06 miles or 920 square yards is Filbertine; 
and 0.03 miles or 595 square yards is Cary-KIastite .Asj-halt Plank; and O.Ofi miles or 
518 square yards is Johns-Manville Asphalt Plank; and 0.09 miles or 2,224 square 
yards is Asphalt Block. 

fi.62 miles or 30.614 square yards public alleys included in this table; 1.89 miles or 61,141 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 15.90 miles or 551,303 square yards 
public streets in charge of CommonweaUh of Massachusetts inchided in this table. In addition to this table there are 2.45 miles or 11,845 square yards of accepted footways. 



X Of this amount 0.02 miles or 185 square yards is cobble; and 12.13 miles or 330,142 

square yards is granite block paving on concrete base. 
§ Of this amount O.Ofi miles or 435 square yards is Blome granitoid concrete block. 
II Of this aijiount 91.07 miles or 1,470,092 square yards is bituminous macadam. 



Public Works Department 35 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 
Lighting Service 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Total Credits for 1958 $1,723,619 04 

Total Expenditures for 1958 .... 1,713,302 24 

Individual Expenditures 
Street and Park Lighting (Electric) : 

Boston Edison Company $1,525,710 05 

Boston Gas Company (Charles- 
town District) . . . 69,929 36 

Boston Edison Company (foot- 
ways) 3,952 70 

Boston Gas Company (Charles- 
town footways) . . 623 94 

Boston Edison Company (sub- 
stations) 17,034 35 

Boston Gas Company (sub- 
station) 4,782 03 

$1,622,032 43 

Street Lighting (Gas) : 

Boston Gas Company . $6,174 44 6,174 44 

Police Spotlights : 

Boston Edison Company . . $2,240 41 
Boston Gas Company (Charles- 
town) 39 78 



2,280 19 



Construction and Maintenance : 
Installation, removal, relocation 
and modernization : 
Installation of spotlight poles 



and services 


$7,378 61 




Boston Edison Company 


6,771 44 




Boston Gas Company . 


8,587 43 




James Scimone (gas post re- 
moval) .... 


6,525 00 


29,262 48 


Salaries : 






Administrative, engineering and 
maintenance personnel . 


$40,201 35 


40,201 35 


Office supplies .... 


$328 23 


328 23 



36 



City Document No. IS 



Maintenance Supplies: 

Replacement parts and fixtures 

for electric and gas lamps 
Spotlight poles .... 

Advertising 

Travel expenses .... 

Rental 

Office equipment .... 



$7,345 65 




3,027 67 






$10,373 32 


$83 00 


83 00 


$237 10 


237 10 


$2,040 00 


2,040 00 


$289 70 


289 70 



Mercury Vapor Lighting Projects 

In 1958 orders were issued on the following listed 
streets, main thoroughfares, and business areas for 
relighting with modern mercury vapor lighting: 

Lumens 
Each 

15,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

20,000 

15,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

10,000 

15,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

15,000 

20,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

20,000 



Amory street, Roxbury 
Avenue Louis Pasteur, Roxbury 
Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester 
Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester 
Boston street, Dorchester . 
Columbia road, Dorchester 
Columbia road, Dorchester 
Columbus avenue, Roxbury 
Columbus avenue, Roxbury 
Dorchester avenue, Dorchester 
Dudley street, Roxbury 
Dorchester avenue. South Boston 
Eustis street, Roxbury 
Franklin street, Boston 
Hampden street, Roxbury . 
Hanover street, Boston 
Hancock street, Dorchester 
Longwood avenue, Roxbury 
Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury 
Mall street, Roxbury . 
Northern avenue, Boston 
Northern avenue, Boston 
Northampton street, Boston 
Oliver street, Boston 
River street, Hyde Park 
Sumner street. East Boston 
Seaver street, Roxbury 
Seaver street, Roxbury 
Summer street. South Boston 
Summer street, South Boston 
South street, West Roxbury 
Savin Hill avenue, Dorchester 



Units 

1 single 

2 single 

1 single 

2 twin 
5 single 

5 single 

1 twin 

3 single 
28 twin 

3 single 
42 single 

39 single 

2 single 

6 single 

17 single 

18 single 

3 twin 

15 single 

21 single 
1 single 

3 single 

7 single 

22 single 

4 single 

40 single 

16 single 
4 single 

28 twin 
1 single 
1 twin 

17 single 
3 single 



Public Works Department 



37 



Stoughtoii street, Dorchester 
Tremont street, Boston 
Tremont street, Boston 
Union park, Boston 
Washington street, Boston . 
Webster street, East Boston 
Washington street, Roxbury and 

Roxbury 

Washington street, Brighton 
Washington street North, Boston 
Westland avenue, Boston . 



11 single 


15,000 


8 single 


20,000 


9 twin 


20,000 


4 single 


10,000 


1 single 


20,000 


1 single 


10,000 


West 




. 56 single 


15,000 


. 25 single 


20,000 


1 single 


15,000 


7 single 


15,000 



Incandescent Lighting Projects 

III 1958 orders were issued for the installation of new 
and the replacement of old lighting units as follows: 



Bellevue street, Dorchester 
Bellevue street, Dorchester 
Carson street, Dorchester 
Compton street, Boston 
Chelsea street, East Boston 
Everett street. East Boston 
Emerald street, Boston 
East Newton street, Boston 
Eustis street, Roxbury 
Fulda street, Roxbury . 
Greenfield road, Dorchester 
Garvey Playground, Dorchester 
Garvey Playground, Dorchester 
Hallet street, Dorchester 
Harbor View street, Dorchester 
Linden Park street, Roxbury 
Lucas street, Boston 
Lucas street, Boston 
Leonard street, Dorchester . 
Mendum street, West Roxbury 
Middlesex street, Boston 
Maverick street, East Boston 
Munroe street, Roxbury 
Munroe street, Roxbury 
Poplar street, West Roxbury 
Pleasant street, Hyde Park 
Stanley street, Dorchester . 
St. Thomas More road, Brighton 
St. Thomas More road, Brighton 
Service road. South Boston 
Southampton street. South Boston 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway 



Units 


Lumens 




Each 


8 single 


2,500 


4 single 


4,000 


5 single 


2,500 


8 single 


6,000 


8 single 


6,000 


10 single 


4,000 


7 single 


6,000 


9 single 


6,000 


7 single 


6,000 


6 single 


2,500 


8 single 


2,500 


10 single 


6,000 


3 twin 


6,000 


5 single 


2,500 


G single 


2,500 


8 single 


4,000 


5 single 


2,500 


2 single 


6,000 


7 single 


4,000 


5 single 


2,500 


6 single 


6,000 


6 single 


6,000 


4 single 


2,500 


6 single 


4,000 


15 single 


4,000 


5 single 


2,500 


7 single 


2,500 


5 single 


2,500 


2 single 


6,000 


14 single 


2,500 


9 single 


6,000 


17 single 


6,000 



, 


6 single 


4,000 


. 


6 single 


2,500 


Hyde 








32 single 


4,000 


Hyde 








16 single 


6,000 


. 


8 single 


4,000 


. 


2 single 


2,500 


. 


9 single 


4,000 


. 


2 single 


6,000 


• 


5 single 


4,000 




7 single 


6,000 


. 


11 single 


(),000 



38 City Document No. 18 

Williams street, Roxbury 
Williams street. West Roxbury . 
Walk Hill street, Dorchester and 

Park 

Walk Hill street, Dorchester and 

Park 

Waverly street, Roxbury 
Webster street. East Boston 
Webster street. East Boston 
Webster street. East Boston 
West Eagle street, East Boston . 
West Concord street, Boston 
Warren avenue, Boston 

Incandescent Lamps 

During 1958 incandescent lamps of 6,000 lumens each 
were installed on the following streets: 

Ashford street, Brighton (1); Albion street, Boston (4); 
Claybourne street, Dorchester (1); Doane street, Boston (2); 
East Eagle street, East Boston (2); Fenno street, Roxbury 
(1); Hawkins street, Boston (3); Lehigh street, Boston (1); 
Putnam street. East Boston (1); Porter street, East Boston 
(1); Savin Hill avenue, Dorchester (2); Trull street, Dor- 
chester (1); Thorndike street, Roxbury (4); Thane street. 
Dorchester (1); Village street, Boston (4); West Seventh 
street, South Boston (1). 

Incandescent lamps of 4,000 lumens each were in- 
stalled on the following streets: 

Ashford street, Brighton (1); Breed street. East Boston 
(1); Central avenue, Hyde Park, (1); Cedar square. West 
Roxbury (1); Cedar Grove street, Dorchester (1); Chiswick 
road, Brighton (1); Eutaw street, East Boston (3); Fenno 
street, Roxbury (1); F street. South Boston (2); Harold 
street, Roxbury (1); Hallct street, Dorchester (2); Lamson 
street, East Boston (1); Metropolitan avenue, West Roxbury 
(3); Mall street, Roxbury (4); P street, South Boston (4); 
Prescott street, Roxbury (2) ; Simmons street, Roxbury (3) ; 
St. Richard street, Roxbury (1); Seaver street. East Boston 
(2); Trull street, Dorchester (4); Taber street, Rox!)ury (1); 
Trenton street, p]ast Boston (3); Telegraph street. South 
Boston (3); Vining street, Roxbury (1); AA'est Seventh 
street. South Boston (1). 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service for the 
installation of lighting units of 2,500 lumens each as 
follows : 

Avon street, Boston (3); Allston street, Brighton (1); 
Alleghany street, Roxbury (1); Allen street, Hyde Park (1); 



Public Works Department 39 

Beech street, West Roxbury (2) ; Byron street, East Boston 
(3); Cedar Grove street, Dorchester (3); Cahimet street, 
Roxbury (3); Gorman road. West Roxbury (1); Canterbury 
street, West Roxbury (1); Caddy road, Dorchester (2); 
Dever street, Dorchester (1); Dow road, West Roxbury (3); 
Emmet place, East Boston (1); Everett court. East Boston 
(1); Everett place, East Boston (1); Elbow street, East 
Boston (1); Emmonsdale street. West Roxbury (1); East 
Seventh street, South Boston (3); East Eagle street, East 
Boston (1); Ferncroft road. West Roxbury (2); Fairland 
street, Roxbury (2); Grant street, Dorchester (4); Greaton 
road, W^est Roxbury (1); Green street, Charlestown (1); 
Glenburnie road, West Roxbury (3); Goethe street, West 
Roxbury (4); Glendon street, East Boston (3); H street. 
South Boston (1); Hoyt street, Dorchester (2); Itasca 
street, Dorchester (1); Kane street, Dorchester (1); Kiernan 
road. West Roxbury (1); K street, South Boston (1); Kings- 
bury street, Roxbury (1); King street, Dorchester (3); 
Lodgehill road, Hyde Park (1); Lorna road, Dorchester (1); 
Levant street, Dorchester (4); Montello street, Dorchestei' 
(1); Milton avenue, Dorchester (1); Milton street, Dor- 
chester (1); Maitland street, Boston (1); Mansur street, 
West Roxbury (3); Moore street. East Boston (1); Newport 
street, Dorchester (3); Putnam street, East Boston (1); 
Plymouth court, Roxbury (1); Partridge street, West 
Roxbury (1); Pierce street, Hyde Park (1); Quint avenue, 
Brighton (2); Raven street, Dorchester (1); Russell street, 
Charlestown (2); Rossmore road, Jamaica Plain (4); Rose- 
mont street, Hyde Park (4) ; Sherbrook street, West Roxbury 
(1); Savin Hill avenue, Dorchester (2); Sachem street, 
Roxbury (2); Southbourne road, Jamaica Plain (1); Sim- 
mons street, Roxbury (1); Savannah avenue, Dorchester 
(1); Shawsheen street. East Boston (2); Trask street, Boston 
(2); Temple street, West Roxbury (1); Train street, Dor- 
chester (1); Tilton street, Roxbury (2); Thatcher street. 
Hyde Park (4); Wigglesworth street, Boston (3); West- 
minster street, Hyde Park (4); Washburn street. South 
Boston (2); Wirt street, Brighton (1); Woodman street, 
Jamaica Plain (1); Westville street, Dorchester (1); Weld 
Hill street. West Roxbury (3); Williams street, Jamaica 
Plain (1). 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service during 
1958 for the installation of 1,000-lumen lamps as follows: 

Ahano road. West Roxbury (1); Altacrest road, Jamaica 
Plain (1); Alna place, East Boston (1); Bremen street, 
East Boston (1); Burrwood road. West Roxbury (1); Claxton 
street. West Roxbury (1); Courtney road. West Roxbury (1); 
Clarence street, Roxbury (1); De Soto road. West Roxbury 
(1); Freeman avenue, West Roxbury (1); Fox street, Dor- 



40 City Document No. 18 

Chester (2) ; Gordon avenue, Hyde Park (3) ; Gordon avenue, 
Hyde Park (1); High street, Dorchester (1); Hallet-Davis 
street, Dorchester (1); Hebron street, Dorchester (2); 
Kenrick street, Brighton (1); Maria Lane, West Roxbury 
(3); Monument court, Charlestown (1); North Mead court, 
Charlestown (1); Riley road, Hyde Park (2); South Munroe 
terrace, Dorchester (1); Savin Hill Lane, Dorchester (1); 
School street, Brighton (1); Stella road, West Roxbury (2); 
Tuttle street, Dorchester (1); Vincent road. West Roxburv 

CD- 
Gas Light Replacement Program 

During the year of 1958 approximately 376 obsolete 
gas lamps were replaced with approximately 385 modern 
electric luminaires of 2,500 lumens. These new lamps, 
in most instances, are installed on long arms to diminish 
interference with trees and to eliminate glare from 
homes on residential streets. 

Maintenance of Police Spotlights 

The maintenance of the police spotlights continued 
for the year 1958. During the year there were ten 
additional spotlights installed in locations approved by 
the Police Department. Many other locations have 
received the approval of the Police Department and 
await only favorable weather to commence installation. 



Public Works Department 41 

APPENDIX D 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



BosTox, .January 2, 1i)50. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works: 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith a statement of the activities of the 
Sanitary Division of the PubHc Works Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1958: 

Refuse Collection and Disposal 

Contracts were awarded in all seventeen of tlie refuse 
collection contract districts in March to eleven con- 
tractors. All were for a period of one 3'ear witli the 
exception of the contract for the Hyde Park district, 
which was awarded to Dooley Brothers, Inc., for a two- 
year period. The one-3'ear contract for the West Rox- 
bury district, awarded to Marinucci Brothers & Co., 
Inc., contained a renewal option for a second year at 
the same terms, if the city so elects. 

A disposal contract for the so-called ten-year contract 
area was awarded to the M. DeJMatteo Construction 
Company for conducting the disposal operations at 
Spectacle Island and the Calf Pasture for the same 
price as the aforesaid company had in the previous year 
for the Spectacle Island operation only. 

The total cost of refuse collection and disposal for 
1958 was approximately S2,580,000. This is $10,000 less 
than the cost for the same services in 1957, and this was 
accompUshed in spite of a 15-cent per hour wage increase 
to the labor force engaged for this work. 

Other disposal facihties have been maintained during 
the year by : — 

(a) A renewal of the Dagett contract lor disposal of tlio 
East Boston refuse at the Saugus Dunij). 

(6) Continued sale of garbage delivered at the Victor\- 
lload Receiving Station to u hog farmer, pro\'iding an 
income of .$4,615 for the vear. 



42 City Document Xo. 18 

(c) Keeping in repair the Fort Hill and the Victory lioad 
Ueceivmg Stations, and the installation of a new exhaust 
system for the Blacksmith Shop. 

((/) Continued operation of the Gardner Street Dump 
with Sanitary Division forces. An excellent dumping opera- 
lion is conducted at this site, and it serves the West Roxbury, 
Jamaica Plain, Hyde Park, and Brighton districts. 




SOUTH BAY INCINERATOR 
Picture of SL-alc Model 



Street Cleaning and Snow Removal 
The vStreet-cleaning function has been conducted as 
usual. Mechanization of this function did not progress 
satisfactorily during this year, for, although we did 
acquire two new mechanical pickup sweepers at this 
year's end, four of the oldest sweepers were turned in as 
part of the deal, which reduced the number of mechanical 
sweepers from twenty-eight to twenty-six. Further- 
more, many of these machines, whicli have been in 
operation for over ten years, break down frequently 
with considerable outage in service. A more adequate 
program for replacement of this equipment should be 
developed. 

Division street-cleaning forces removed snow from the 
streets in the downtown retail stores district, and there- 



Public Works Department 43 

after in other sections of the City Proper following 
storms in excess of two inches which occurred during the 
fall and winter months. 

The entire division was mobilized for the Spring 
Clean-up Campaign, conducted from March 24 to April 
18. At the end of this period, every section of the city 
was in a clean condition, and the winter's accumulation 
of sand in the gutters had been removed. A crew of relief 
recipients Avas obtained from the Welfare Department 
and was employed in cleaning up the city-owned vacant 
lots in the Lower Roxburv and South End districts. 



Incinerator Construction 

Construction of the South Bay Incinerator proceeded 
during the year. There was some delay occasioned by 
labor difficulties and material shortages. There were 
two strikes at the site, one by laborers and one by car- 
penters. There was a strike at the plant furnishing the 
precast concrete roof slabs, which delayed closing in the 
boiler room for fifty-six days; and delivery of structural 
steel was very slow. As a result, the construction of the 
incinerator is considerably behind schedule. 

The Coleman Brothers Corporation completed con- 
struction of the refuse storage bin on January 22 of this 
year. The John Bowen Company, Inc., commenced 
work on the incinerator building on January 20, and 
their work is still in progress. The Tynan Incinerator 
Company commenced work for installing the furnaces, 
boilers, and appurtenances on September 2. 

Plans and specification for the construction of a steam 
main from the incinerator to the Boston City Hospital 
have been completed, and an application for a permit to 
cross the Southeast Expressway with this steam main 
has been submitted to the State Department of Public 
Works. Negotiations have proceeded during the year 
with the Boston Edison Company for the purchase of 
surplus steam from the incinerator. It is now estimated 
that the incinerator will be ready for operation about 
July 1, 1959. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John J. Flaherty, Division Engineer, 

Sanitary Division, P. W. D. 



44 



City Document No. 18 



PAYMENTS TO REFUSE COLLECTION CONTRACTORS 



District 



1 South Boston. 

2 East Boston . . 



3 Charlestown . 

4 Brighton . . . . 



.5A West Roxbury. 



5B Jamaica Plain 

6A ■ Dorchr!stcr (North) . 

6B Dorchester (South) . 



7 A Elm HiU. 



7B Dudley 

7C Mission Hill. 



7D Roxbury. 



I) South End. 



9A Back Bay . 



9H Stuart. 



Contractor 



1 North and West F-nds . 



1 1 Hyde Park . 



Total . 



Anthony J. Ryan, Jr. 
(First 3 months) . . 
(Last 9 months) . . . 



Milano Brothers, Inc 

(First 3 months) 

Jeffries Disposal Corporation. 

(Last 9 months) 



Jeffries Disposal Corporation . 



Frank J. Cavaliere Company, Inc . 

(First 3 months) 

James A. Freaney, Inc 

(Last 9 months) 



Frank J. Cavaliere Company, Inc. 

(First 3 months) 

Marinucci Brothers Company, Inc. 

(Last 9 months) 



. J. Moore Company, Inc. 

(Firsts monihV) 

(Last 9 months^ 



Coleman Brothsrs Corporation. . . 

(First 3 months) 

Frank J. Cavaliere Company, Inc. 

(Last 9 months) 



Coleman Brothers Corporation . . . , 
(First 3 months) 

Frank J. Cavaliere Company, Inc. 
(Last 9 months) 



William J. Banfield 

(First 3 months) 

Carriere Construction Company. 

(Last 9 months) 



United Contracting Company. 

(First 3 months) 

(Last 9 months) 



Frank J. CavaUere Company, Inc . 

(First 3 months) 

Dooley Brothers, Inc , 

(Last 9 months) 



Monthly 

Contract 

Price 



James A. Freaney, Inc 

(First 3 months) 

United Contracting Company of Boston. 

(Last 9 months) 



James A. Freaney, Inc. 

(First 3 months) . . . . 
Joseph Amara & Son . . 

(Last 9 months) 



Dooley Brothers, Inc. 
(Kirst 3 months) . . . 
( Last 9 months) . . . 



James A. Freaney, Inc. 
(First 3 months) . . . . 
(Last 9 inontlis) 



Ward Grneral Contracting Company. 

( I'irst 3 months) 

(Last 9 months) 



Dooley Brothers, Inc. 
(First 3 months) . . . 
(Last 9 months). . . 



512,607 
12,600 



7,328+ 
9,608 
4,832 

14,420 
14,620 

10,350+ 
11,990 



11,100 
11.400 



27,370 
25,630 

30,570 
28,430 

5,420 
5.320 



6,929 
7,429 



7.960 
7,500 

9,480 
8,098 

6,940 
6,719 



2.990 
3.290 



2,910 
2,385 



13,650 
12,500 



6,390+ 
6,690 



Total 
Payments 



$151,212 00 

109.644 00 
57,984 00 

174,840100 

140,363 00 
135.900 00 

312,780 00 

347.580 00 

64.140 00 
87.648 00 

91,380 00 

101,322 00 

81,291 00 
38,580 00 
30,195 00 
153,450 00 
79,778 00 



$2,158,087 00 



Public Works Department 



46 



PAYAIENTS TO DISPOSAL CONTRACTORS 



District 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
Payments 




Coleman OisDOsal Corooration 


S2,100 
30,980 








$6,300 00 




M. DeMatteo Construction Company 


371,760 00 


Total 






$378,060 00 










PAYMENTS FOR RENTAL OF DUMPS 



Saugua 

Calf Pasture . 



Total . 



Dewey E. Daggett. 
(First 3 months) . 
(Last 9 months) . 



Boston Gas Company. 



$900 
1,916 50 

2,000 



Total Disposal 

Total Payments to Contractors for Refuse Collection and Disposal . 



$19,948 50 
24,000 00 



S43,948 50 

$422,008 50 
$2,580,095 60 



Expenditures in 1958 

Payments to Refuse Collection Contractors. $2,158,087 00 
Payments to Refuse Disposal Contractors. . 422,008 50 

$2,580,095 50 
Payroll Totals Were as Follows : 
Administrative and General 

Services $58,492 70 

Shops and Storehouse 205,044 81 

Collection and Disposal .... 296,251 49 

Total Sanitary $559,789 00 

Street Cleaning 1,644,910 73 

Total Sanitary and Street Cleaning $2,204,699 73 

Overtime Payrolls Were as Follows: 

Shops and Storehouse $1,551 08 

Collection and Disposal .... 4,318 37 

Street Cleaning 32,651 49 

Total Overtime 38,520 94 

Total Payroll $2,243,220 67 

Payments on Other Contracts 48,631 78 

Supplies and Materials 50,245 89 

Miscellaneous 12,525 45 

Grand Total $4,934,719 29 

Equipment Acquired During 1958 
2 Wayne Sweepers $27,000 00 



46 City Document No. 18 

Personnel Changes in Permanent Force During the 
Year 1958 

Total Personnel, January 1, 1958 *630 

Transfers In (from Other Departments and 

Divisions 13 

Reinstatements 3 

Appointments 24 40 

670 

Deaths 11 

Resignations 13 

Retirements 34 

Transfers Out (to Other Departments and 

Divisions) 5 

Discharges 1 64 

Total Personnel, January 1, 1959 t606 

* Including 1 Military Leave of Absence, 
t Total Net Loss of 24 Employees. 



Public Works Department 47 

APPENDIX E 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION 



Boston, Jaiiuaiy 2, 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and 
expenditures of the Sewer Division for the vear ending 
December 31, 1958. 

Expenditures During 1958: The activities of the Sewer 
Division during tlie year consisted of advertising for 
sewer construction at a contract bid price of $98,658.16, 
and the maintenance and operation of the sewer system 
at a cost of $748,462.45. 

Contract Work: Contract work consisted of the ex- 
tension of the sewer system to provide drainage for new 
buildings and street construction and to eliminate cess- 
pools, the locations and cost of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work: Maintenance work consisted of 
the cleaning of 3,883 catch basins by contract and 1,535 
by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers and catch 
basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, and catch 
basins by the yard forces and the operation of the 
pumping station and disposal works, the cost of which is 
attached. 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the maintenance 
of about 1,295.31 miles of sewers and surface drains, 
the emergency cleaning of catch basins, the repair of 
broken sewers and catch basins, the answering of house 
drain complaints, the operation of pumping stations 
and storage basins for the disposal of sewage by division 
forces; the keeping of records, the issuance of permits 
for and the inspection of the construction of house 
drains; engineering, clerical, and inspectional work in 
connection with the construction of sewerage works 
done by advertised contract. 



48 City Document No. 18 

An advertised contract was awarded to the lowest 
bidder for tlie emergency repair of sewers at a bid price 
of $17,260. 

Two advertised contracts were awarded to the lowest 
bidders for the cleaning of catch basins in the sum of 
$22,950. 

Proposed Work to Be Done by Advertised Contract 
During 1959 Is As Follows: 

Emergency repairs of sewers. Estimated cost, §20,000. 

Cleaning of catch basins. Estimated cost, $15,000. 

Extension of sewer S3'stem to provide drainage for 
new buildings and new street construction. Estimated 
cost, $300,000. 

The covering in that part of open Canterbury Branch 
of Stony Brook from Canterbury street to Walk Hill 
street. Estimated cost, $155,000. Would be built under 
Chapter 91, under which the state would assume one 
half of the cost. 

The covering in of an open tidal creek known as 
Neponset River and Squantum Bay (Davenport Brook), 
between the end of the existing Davenport Brook 
Conduit near Hallet street, Dorchester, and highway 
culvert recently constructed in connection witli the 
Southeast Expressway'. Estimated cost, $90,000. Would 
be built under Chapter 91, under which the state would 
assume one half of the cost. 

The covering in of Spring Street Brook, between 
Gould street and 1,200 feet south of Gould street. West 
Roxbury. Estimated cost, $120,000. 

The rebuilding of the existing 3-foot by 4-foot brick 
sewer built in 1881 with a twin 30-inch diameter inverted 
siphon located within the Prudential area and the tracks 
of the Boston & Albany Railroad, between Huntington 
avenue and Garrison street and Boylston street at Fair- 
field street. Estimated cost, $236,800. 

The Sewer Division Labor Force Consists of the Follow- 
ing: 14 laborers, 1 carpenter, 28 motor equipment oper- 
ators and laborers, 9 catch-basin machine operators, 3 
tide gate repairmen and 1 working foreman-tide gate 
repairman, 8 working foremen-sewer cleaners, 10 sewer 
cleaners, 4 bricklayers, 2 yardmen, 1 heavy motor equip- 
ment operator, 5 sewer district foremen, and 1 main 
drainage foreman. This makes a total of 87 men assigned 



Public Works Department 49 

to answering complaints, cleaning catch basins, cleaning 
sewers, repairing manholes and catch basins, repairing 
broken sewers, and other related work. 

Length of Sewers Built: During the fiscal year 1958 
there were built by contractors and day labor 2.69 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains throughout the 
city. After deducting 0.16 miles of sewers and surface 
drains, rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase for 1958 
is 2.53 miles, which, added to the existing 1,295.31 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains and 30.93 miles 
of intercepting sewers, makes a grand total of 1,328.77 
miles of all sewers belonging to the City of Boston, and 
under the care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 1959. 

There were 120 catch basins built or rebuilt and none 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 120 catch basins and a grand total of 24,818 
catch basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1959. 

Permit Office Report: Entrance fees to the amount of 
$11,619.23 have been deposited with the City Collector 
for collection from estates upon which no sewer assess- 
ments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordinances of 
1945, Chapter 27, Section 10. 

There were 704 permits issued, viz., 140 to district 
foremen and contractors and 564 to drain layers for 
repairing or laying new house drains. Inspectors from 
this office have personally inspected the work done under 
these drain-layers' permits. 

There were 1,989 complaints investigated, and in- 
spectors are instructed to report in writing in each case. 

There were 1,920 catch-basin complaints received. 

Reported in writing on 3,605 municipal liens to the 
City Collector, in accordance with Chapter 60, Section 
25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
1,800 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Respectfully, 

Edward G. A. Powers, 
Division Engineer, Sewer Division. 



50 



City Document No. 18 



SUMMARY OF SEWER CONSTRUCTION FOR TWELVE 
MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1958 



DisnucTS. 


BuUt by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day lAbor. 


Built by 
Privato 
Parties. 


Total Lengths Built. 


Citv ProDer 


Linear Feet 


Linear Feet 

1,883.00 
955.00 


Linear Feet 

1,883.00 
1,393.50 


Aft{e« 
0.3560 


Roxbury 


438.50 


0.2639 


South Boaton 




Eaat Boston 










Charlestown 










Brighton 










West Roxbury 

Dorchester 


4.349.00 
2,059.10 
1,422.66 


1,624.00 

218.50 

1,288.71 


5,973.00 
2,277.60 
2,711.37 


1.1312 
0.4314 


Hyde Park. 


0.5136 






Totals 


8,269.26 


5,969.21 


14,238.47 


2.6966 







SUMMARY OF SEWER CONSTRUCTION FOR FIVE YEARS 
PREVIOUS TO JANUARY I, 1959 





1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


I95S 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 
ments 


Linear Feet 
33,316.89 
10,459.00 


Linear Feet 

33,237.48 

1,695.15 


Linear Feet 

25,559.88 

3,487.39 


Linear Feet 

17,133.24 

4,278.40 


Linear Fett 
8,269.26 
5,969.21 


Totals 


43,775.89 


34,932.63 


29,047.27 


21,411.64 


14,238.47 







Public Works Department 



51 



TOTAL LENGTH OF SEWERS 



Districts. 


Total 

Lengths 

Built 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1958. 


Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31. 1958. 


Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1958. 


City Proper 


Linear Feel 
1,883.00 
1,393.50 


Linear Feet 
475.00 
390.00 


Linear Feet 
1,408.00 
1,003.50 


MiUi 
2666 


Roxbury 


0.1901 


South Boston 




East Boston 










Charlestown 










Brighton 










West Roxbury 


5,973.00 
2,277.60 
2,711.37 




5,973.00 
2,277.60 
2,711.37 


1.1312 


Dorchester 




0.4314 


Hyde Park 




0.5135 








Totals 


14,238.47 


865.00 


13,373.47 


2.5328 







Common sewers and surface drains built previous 
to January 1, 1958 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 
January 1 and December 31, 1958 



Miles. 
1,295.31 
2.53 



Common sewers and surface drains built ending 
December 31, 1958 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting 
with Metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1958 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers 
to December 31, 1958 



1,297.84 

6.81*= 
24.12* 



Grand total of common and intercepting sewers 
to December 31, 1958 1,328.77 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 

to January 1, 1959 716.12 



* No additional len/rths built during 1958. 



52 



City Document No. 18 



CATCH BASINS IN CHARGE OF SEWER DIVISION 



DieTRICTS. 



Catch Basins for Twelve Months 
Ending Decbmbeb 31, 1958. 



Total for Wholb Citt 

IN Charge of Sewbb 

Division. 



< 



Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 



Number 

Abandoned 

or Removed. 



Net 
Increase. 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1958. 



Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1959. 



City Proper . . 

Roxbury 

South Boston. . 
East Boston. . . 
Charlestown. . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury, 
Dorchester. . . , 
Hyde Park 

Totals 





27 

U 

4 



3 

46 

18 

11 



120 

















27 

11 

4 



3 

46 

18 

11 



3,801 
3,494 
1,477 
1,223 
870 
2,142 
4,591 
5,709 
1,391 



120 



24,698 



3,801 
3,521 
1,488 
1.227 
870 
2,145 
4,637 
5,727 
1,402 



24,818 



Public Works Department 53 

REPORT OF CALF PASTURE PUMPING STATION, 1958 

Total millions of gallons pumped (annually) . . . 46,448.025 

Average cost per million gallons (annually) ... $4 57 

ANNUAL TOTAL OPERATING COSTS, 1958 

Labor $105,607 33 

Edison Power 93,392 32 

Fuel Oil No. 5 3,927 28 

Bottled Gas 101 00 

Supplies 2,526 75 

Miscellaneous Oil 170 18 

Service Orders 6,405 50 



$212,130 36 

SEWER DIVISION BUDGET EXPENDITURES, 1958 

10. Permanent Employees .... $548,784 91 

11. Temporary Employees .... 1,840 05 

12. Overtime . ' 16,529 15 

—— $567,154 11 

21. Communications $3,174 67 

22. Light, Heat, Power . ... 104,269 53 

26. Repairs and Maintenance of Buildings 

and Structures 42,187 10 

27. Repairs and Servicing of Equipment 6,544 05 

28. Transportation of Persons . 1,047 00 

29. Miscellaneous Contractual Services . 705 64 

_— 157,927 99 

32. Food Supplies $9 45 

33. Heating Supplies and Materials . 6,407 99 

34. Household Supplies and Materials . 465 91 

35. Medical, Dental, and Hospital Supplies 

and Materials 39 87 

36. Office Supplies and Materials . . . 2,379 37 
39. Miscellaneous Supplies and Materials . 12,060 62 

— — 21,363 21 

49. Miscellaneous Current Charges and 

Obligations $1,387 00 

1,387 00 

59. Miscellaneous Equipment . . . $630 14 

630 14 

Grand Total $748,462 45 



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(57) 



58 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX F 



REPORT OF THE 
SURVEY DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1951). 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the ac- 
tivities of the Survej^ Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1958. 

This division performs engineering services for other 
divisions of the Public Works Department and other 
city departments, boards, and commissions. It also 
performs administrative and engineering duties re- 
quired by tlie Public Improvement Commission for its 
operation. 

The principal engineering duties include: 

(a) the making of plans, surveys, estimates and reports 
relating to the laying out, widening, construction, and 
design of public highways; 

(6) the taking of easements for sewerage works; 

(c) staking out lines and grades for the construction of 
highways, sewerage, etc. ; 

(d) the making of property surveys of land to be acquired 
by the City of Boston by eminent domain; 

(e) the making of plans and surveys of city-owned land 
for purposes of sale, interdepartmental transfer, or new 
development ; 

(/) the making of various engineering surveys and plan.s 
required by other city departments. 

For the Public Improvement Commission, the ad- 
ministrative functions include the processing of petitions, 
arranging public hearings, preparing estimates and 
orders relating to land damages and street and sewer 
betterments, preparing orders for the laying out of 
streets and the construction of streets and sewers, pre- 
paring orders for eminent domain land takings, pre- 
paring orders for the granting of permits for use of 



Public Works Department 



59 



public highways, erection of poles, etc., and the mainte- 
nance of all records in the charge of the Public Improve- 
ment Commission. 

Personnel: On December 31, 1958, there were 33 
permanent and 4 temporary employees as listed below 
in this division. 



Name 
Kenneth L. Benkart 
Charles E. Brewer 
Arthur J. Brickley 
Oliver C. Brown . 
George F. Buckley 
John A. Bulliner 
Carmine D. Buono 

Joyce E. Campbell 
Michael J. Corrao 
George J. Creney . 
John J. Curley, Jr. 
Saverio A. DeFronzo 
tSalvatore C. Diliberto 
William F. Duggan 
Harry M. Fletcher 
Thomas O. Flood . 
George H. Gilboy . 
John F. Gilmore, Jr. 
James W. Haley . 
Bernard Harrington 

Leo B. Hughes 
Roland A. Hull 
Angeio J. laluna . 
James J. Kelly 

Walter R. Luby 
Thomas McCusker 
Francis McHugh . 
Robert P. Mehegan 
h'rederick J. Milliken, . 
A. Albert Minichiello 
Philip A. Moynahan 
William P. Norris . 
Thomas E. Rafferty 
Albert J. Rodriguez 
John J. Ryan 
John A. Rohanna . 
Robert J. Sheehan 

Redmond L. Walsh 



Title 
Senior Engmeering Aide 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Senior Engineering Aide 
Junior Civil Engineer 
Senior Enginnering Aide 
Senior Engineering Aide (Pro- 
visional) 
Principal Clerk-Stenographer 
Assistant Executive Secretary 
Photostat Operator 
Junior Civil Engineer 
Senior Clerk-Typist 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Principal Clerk-Stenographer 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Senior Clerk 
Junior Civil Engineer 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Division Engineer 
Junior Engineering Aide (Pro- 
visional) 
Senior Engineering Aide 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Senior Engineering Aide (Pro- 
visional) 
Principal Civil Engineer 
Executive Secretary 
Junior Civil Engineer 
Assistant Executive Secretary 
Senior Engineering Aide 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Senior Engineering Aide 
Photographer 
Assistant Civil Engineer 
Junior Civil Engineer 
Principal Civil Engineer 
Junior Engineering Aide 
Senior Engineering Aide (Pro- 
visional) 
Head Photostat Operator 



60 



City Document No. 18 



The personnel allowance of this division has been 
dropping steadily, from 73 in 1935 to 57 in 1945 to 41 
this year. Of the 41 positions, 8 are now permanent 
vacancies because of our inability to secure qualified 
personnel through Civil Service in competition with 
higher salaries offered by the state and other pubhc and 
private agencies. Obviously, this situation, which has 
continued now for over 10 years, is a serious handicap 
to the division. 



DIVISION EXPENDITURES, JANUARY 1, 1958, TO DECEMBER 

31, 1958, INCLUSIVE 





Survey- 
Budget 


Highway 
Loan 


Sewer 
Loan 


Personnel 


$83,840 88 

21,287 28 

2,857 72 

7.179 42 


S101,527 54 

4,573 05 

39,699 75 




Pensions. . 




Contractual Services 


S639 75 


Supplies and Materials 




Current Charges and Obligations 










$115,165 30 


$145,800 34 


$639 75 



Total Expenditures $261,605 39 

During the period covered by this report, the Survey 
Division completed 109 surveys and plans for the im- 
proving of existing highwaj's, lajdng out of new ones 
and discontinuances, totaling 12.05 miles. There were 
23 surveys and plans for 1.50 miles of sewerage ease- 
ments and 10 surveys and plans of city-owned land or 
land to be taken for municipal purposes made. 

Field engineering work included the staking out of 50 
streets for the Paving Service of the Highway Division, 
20 for the Sewer Division, and miscellaneous services 
for other city departments. Regular routine work in- 
cluded the resurveying of street lines for private engi- 
neers wherever existing records were inadequate or 
obsolete, marking lines and grades for private con- 
struction abutting public streets, examining Land Court 
plans for the Law Department, preparing land damage 
reports for the Public Improvement Commission. 



Public Works Department 



61 



Listed below are the major engineering surveys and 
plans completed during the period of this report. 

For the Public Improvement Commission: 

There were 58 surveys made, and plans for the laying 
out of 7.45 miles of public highways were made as 
follows : 

Length 
District in Feet 

Boston Proper: 

Dover street 350 



Brighton : 

Fidelis Way . 
Nottingham Path . 
Rotterdam street . 

Charlestown : 
Walford Way 

Dorchester: 

Colorado street 
Fermoy Heights avenue 
Frazer street . 
Freeport Way 
Messinger street . 
Milton Street Extension 
Savannah avenue . 
Shandon road 
Standard street 
Woodbole avenue . 
Woodmere street . 
Woodruff Way 
Woodgate street . 



1,725 
205 
580 



1,890 



335 

365 

335 

440 

250 

245 

325 

750 

1,100 

2,200 

200 

1,400 

800 



East Boston: 

Fay wood avenue 1,385 

Orient avenue 100 

Swift street and terrace 250 

Vallarroad 1,260 

Hyde Park: 

Bow street 680 

Bradlee street 350 

Braeburn street 520 

Child street 530 

Garfield avenue 1,320 

Lodgehill road 275 



62 



City Document No. 18 



Magee street 
Meadow road 
Metropolitan avenue 
Norris road 
Providence street . 
Ruffing street 
Sherrin street 
Tracton avenue 
Westville road 
Woodland road 
Westminster street 
Woodglen road 

Kg X bury: 

Alley No. 2301 
Copeland park 
Quincy place . 
Orchard Park street 



730 
800 
270 
396 

2,480 
515 
920 
130 
200 
880 

1,385 
270 



790 
130 
130 

180 



South Boston: 

Flaherty Way 
Hill place 
Patterson Way 



990 
150 
940 



Wkst Roxbury 

Altacrest road 
Aldwin road . 
Atwill Road Extension 
Bobolink street 
Gilmore terrace 
Meyer street . 
Pheasant street 
Sigourney Street Extension 



280 
150 
240 
380 
200 
620 
330 
860 



There were 14 surveys and plans made for the widening 
and relocation of .90 miles of public highways, as follows: 

District 

Boston Proper: 

Belvidere street 

Harrison avenue and Dover street 

Tyler street and Curve street .... 

West Newton street 



Length 
in Feet 

1,280 

60 

38 

160 



Dorcfiester: 

Harvard street and Walk Hill street 
Hill Top street and Hallet street 
Willow court 



191 
31 

880 



Public Works Department 63 

Hyde Park: 

Prescott street 1,300 

Roxbury: 

Ceylon street and Quincy street .... 83 
Huntington avenue 580 

There were 5 surveys and plans made for the dis- 
continuance of .10 miles of public highways, as follows: 

District Length 

in Feet 
Boston Proper: 

Blackstone street 80 

Clinton street 68 

Dalton street 275 

West Newton street 160 

South Boston: 

Gillette park 17 

There were 2 surveys and plans made for the dis- 
continuance of the following sewer easements: 

District Length 

in Feet 
West Roxbury: 

Bertson avenue and Dent street .... 100 
Dow road 60 

There were 23 surveys and plans made for the altera- 
tion (specific repair) of 3.60 miles ofpubhc highways, as 
follows : 

District Length 

in Feet 
Boston Proper: 

Columbus avenue and Stuart street .... 8,910 
Huntington avenue, Norway street to Gainsboro 
street 1,260 

Brighton : 

Commonwealth avenue 5,300 

Charlestown: 

Chelsea street and Gray street 21 

Sullivan square island 



64 City Document No. 18 

Dorchester: 

Babson street and Norfolk street .... island 

Dorchester avenue 4,600 

Fairmount avenue and Washington street . . island 

Hancock street and Pleasant street .... island 



East Boston: 

Bennington street and Porter street 
William C. Kelly square 
Maverick square .... 
Meridian street and Porter street 
Saratoga street .... 



island 
island 
island 
island 
360 



Hyde Park: 

Fairmount avenue and River street .... island 

Milton street and Sprague street .... island 

Roxbury: 

Centre street and Tremont street (Columbus 

avenue) 2,270 

Newmarket square, Glynn Way .... island 

Simmons street 630 

South Boston: 

West Broadway 4,000 

West Roxbury: 

Crehore road 100 

South Huntington avenue and Centre street . . island 

South street and Washington street .... island 

There were 23 surveys and plans made for the taking 
of 1.50 miles of easements for sewerage purposes, as 
follows : 

District Length 

in Feet 
Boston Proper: 

Central and Kilby streets 55 

Hereford street 180 

Dorchester: 

Manchester street 570 

Manor street 705 

St. Clare road 150 

East Boston: 

Bennington street and Belle Island Inlet . 347 



Public Works Department 



65 



Hyde Park: 

Asheville road 
Austin street . 
Beech street . 
Sherrin street 
Windham street 

Roxbury: 

Kenway terrace 

West Roxbury: 

Highfield terrace 
Lyall terrace . 
Florian street 
Florian Way . 
Martinwood road 
Moreland street 



525 
185 
650 
400 
240 



15 



155 
210 
480 
290 
50 
435 



For the Public Works Department (Central Office) 
a study plan was prepared of Huntington avenue, 
Tremont street, St. Alphonsus street, Heath street and 
South Huntington avenue, Roxbury. 

For the Public Works Department (Highway Divi- 
sion), fifty (50) highways were staked out for con- 
struction. 

For the PubUc Works Department (Sewer Division), 
sixty-seven (67) catch basins were staked out. Also, 
forty-five (45) drainage surveys and reports were made. 

For the City Council plans were prepared of public 
land, private off-street parking locations and historical 
sites and Boston- Winthrop boundary lines. 

For the Real Property Department plans were 
prepared of Northern avenue, Boston Proper, Willow 
court, Dorchester, and Meyer street. West Roxbury. 
Property surveys were made of ofT-street parking loca- 
tions at Chnton street and Fort Hill square, Boston 
Proper. 

For the Park Department plans were prepared of 
Hemenway and Forsyth streets, Roxbury, Sigourney 
street. West Roxbury, Parkman and Christopher streets, 
Dorchester. A property survey was made of Hanson 
street, Boston Proper, Playground and Hyde Park 
avenue and Glenwood avenue, Hyde Park. 

For the Building Department zoning district boundary 
lines were marked at Roxbury Court House; 446 
Western avenue, Brighton; and Howard street, Boston 
Proper. 



66 City Document No. IS 

For the Law Department a plan was prepared of Elm 
street and Everett street, West Roxbury. 

For the Fire Department a survey and plan was 
prepared of Moon Island, Boston Harbor, and a topo- 
graphical plan of Fire Department site at Tremont and 
West Concord streets, Boston Proper. 

Stone Bounds: In accordance with a poUcy estabhshed 
in 1950, stone bounds were set and drilled on the follow- 
ing newly constructed streets: 

Street District Number of 

Bounds 

Alvarado avenue Hyde Park 1 

Ansonia road West Roxbury 7 

Bowditch road West Roxbury 2 

Brockton street West Roxbury 3 

Brush Hill terrace Hyde Park 4 

Byrd avenue West Roxbury 3 

Caltha road Brighton 1 

Canterbury street West Roxbury 1 

Crestwood park Roxbury 2 

Dalin place Roxbury 2 

Delf ord street West Roxbury 1 

Derry road Hyde Park 3 

DeStefano road West Roxbury 2 

Driftwood road West Roxbury 3 

Eatonia street Brighton 1 

Farwell avenue Hyde Park 1 

Glenley terrace Brighton 1 

Greenwood Circle Hyde Park 3 

Harrow street Dorchester 3 

Highfield street West Roxbury 2 

Hillis road Hyde Park 1 

Howard place Dorchester 4 

Huntington avenue Hyde Park 2 

Maple Street Extension West Roxbury 3 

Marlin road West Roxbury 2 

Melba road Hyde Park 1 

Meyer street West Roxbury 2 

Mossdale road West Roxbury 9 

New Bedford street Hyde Park 1 

Poplar street West Roxbury 4 

Quinn Way West Roxbury 4 

Reynolds road Brighton 1 

Rocky Nook terrace West Roxbury 1 

Roseciiff terrace West Roxbury 2 

Safford street Hyde Park 8 

Sherbrook street West Roxbury 1 

Solaris road Hyde Park 1 

Summit avenue Hyde Park 22 

Tanglewood road Dorchester 1 



Public Works Department 67 

Vallaro road Hyde Park 2 

Veterans of Foreign Wars Pkwy . . West Roxbury 3 

West Sorrento street Brighton 1 

Wyvern street West Roxbury 1 

Reproduction Work: On January 1, 1957, a new policy 
requiring signed requisitions for all reproduction work 
was put into effect. Also, a charge to the public of $1 
per copy was begun in accordance with a revised sched- 
ule of fees established by the City Council, December 1, 
1957. 

The new fee schedule brought an income of S240 to 
this division from the sale of copies of its plans and 
records. Other departments and divisions likewise re- 
ceived substantial new revenues from the sale of copies 
produced by our reproduction service. 

Following is the report of reproduction work of the 
division for the year 1958: 

Department PHSTS BP8 OZS APS 

Administrative Services 910 291 

Assessing 778 1 ,717 20 

Auditing 330 

Building Department 1,056 910 

City Clerk 554 420 3 

Citv Council 1,896 650 

Civil Defense 358 70 

Collecting 148 

Compensation Review Board 936 

Election 48 

Finance Commission 86 

Fire Department 248 209 

Health Department 664 89 

Law Department 684 250 

Mayor's Office 1,876 25 344 

Park Department 51 

Penal Institutions 130 538 

Planning Board 1,096 33 1,298 4 

Public Buildings 112 

Public Works: 

Bridge Division 236 81 1 

Highway Division 532 39 1 ,912 1 4 

Permit Office 88 190 

Central Office 250 131 

Sanitary Division 248 419 

Sewer Division 1,004 13 619 

Street Lighting 146 509 

Water Division 294 6 456 

Survey Division 3,593 1 ,289 10,825 601 

Real Property ] ,338 15 1,558 

Registry 554 

School Buildings 224 161 

School Committee 56 

Traffic Commission 332 

Treasury 196 

Veterans Services 1,847 22 

White Fund 484 180 

Total 23,442 1,420 24,530 642 



68 



City Document No. 18 



Photographic Service: In carrying out a policy intro- 
duced in 1956, we have established a Photographic Serv- 
ice for the Public Works Department and other city 
departments. As a part of this program we now take 
photographs of the location of all new highway layouts 
and proposed improvements, and lands taken for mu- 
nicipal purposes. The following is a summary of this 
work during the year 1958: 



Building Department 

Public Works Department: 

Automotive Division 

Bridge Division 

Central Office 

Highway Division 

Public Improvement Commission 

Sanitary Division 

Sewer Division 

Survey Division 1 ,700 

Water Division 

Real Property Department 

Miscellaneous 

Total 3,417 2,694 1,351 

Preparation of the following private ways for public 
travel, as provided for in Chapter 393, Acts of 1906, as 
amended, was approved by the Public Improvement 
Commission to be done under the general supervision of 
engineers of this division: 



Nega- 


4x5 


8x10 


tives 


Prints 


Prints 


80 




80 


65 




65 


192 


142 


136 


245 




245 


116 


116 




118 




118 


318 


318 


160 


184 


184 




1,700 


1 ,700 


250 


56 


56 




225 


60 


225 


lis 


118 


72 



Dow road 
Florian Way 
Highfield terrace . 
Manor street 
Maplewood street 
Martinwood road 
Matignon road 
Mattapan street 
Moreland street 
St. Clare road 
Sherrin street 
Slocum road 
Windham road 



West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 



Engineering Services: This is the tenth annual report 
submitted by the undersigned. From 1949 to 1954 as 
Chief Engineer of the old Street Laying-Out Depart- 
ment, and from 1954 to date as Survey Division Engi- 
neer, I have been primarily concerned with the mainte- 



Public Works Department 69 

nance and development of professional engineering 
services for public works and other city activities. 
During this entire period, the strength and caliber of 
the city engineering forces has suffered seriously. We 
lose the better men to more attractive positions paying 
higher salaries. Likewise, we are unable to attract 
competent men to the beginning grades. As a result, 
our engineering program is suffering seriously. In this 
division we are attempting to carry on with a total of 
38 employees the work formerly done by 73, with the 
38 comparing unfavorably in training and experience 
with the former group. And, to make the problem 
more serious, we are assigned many new functions. 
These include construction surveys, highway construc- 
tion plans, specific repair plans, setting of stone bounds 
on new streets, inspection of private way construction, 
and reviewing plot plans for all new buildings in the city. 

Our reproduction work, which originally consisted of 
making blueprints of our own Engineering Division 
plans, now also includes the making of blueprints, 
ozalids, autopositives, and photostatic copies for most 
city departments. 

We have also established a full-time photographic 
service. 

Redevelopment programs are now looming larger and 
larger in both city engineering and public works pro- 
grams. Urban redevelopment involves discontinuance 
of old streets and laying out new ones. Currently we are 
making a comprehensive survey of all the streets in the 
so-called "Government Center" area. This work covers 
the re-establishment of approximately 7 miles of street 
lines in a section probably without compare in the 
entire country for crooked and irregular streets. 

Attempting to carry on all of this work with an inade- 
quate force means incomplete projects and postpone- 
ment of whatever can be put off. Obviously we perform 
no miracles. We are forced to operate on a day-to-day 
basis which, in the long run, will prove to be the most 
inefficient and expensive way to accomplish an effective 
engineering program. Low pay, short-handed survey 
parties, and "short-cut" engineering have all had an 
adverse affect on morale, making the general problem 
more serious each year. 

It is recommended that a careful study be made of the 
entire matter of municipal engineering. In my opinion 
"consultants" should be engaged for large or special 



70 City Document No. 18 

projects, but this will do little to solve our problem. A 
new fresh policy must be established, fixing qualifica- 
tions, duties, wages, and general working conditions for 
engineering personnel that will compare favorably with 
similar positions in other Government and private 
activities. 

Damages: During 1958, 133 land damage reports 
recommending awards totaling $36,305.95 were sub- 
mitted to the Public Improvement Commission. 

Assessments: During the period reported on, estimates 
of benefit for assessment purposes were prepared amount- 
ing to $255,861.50. These estimates are included in 
orders for street and sewer improvements. Also, final 
assessments were prepared amounting to $305,031.65. 

Respectfully submitted, 

* James W. Haley, 

Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department 



71 



APPENDIX G 



REPORT OF DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 

WATER DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the Water Division, operations and ex- 
penditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1958. 

During the year a total of 17,810.4 linear feet, or 3.37 
miles of main pipe was laid or relaid, varying in size 
from 4 inches to 12 inches, and 569 applications were 
received for installation of new service pipes, enlarged 
service pipes, and fire pipes, etc., into new or remodeled 
buildings. 

There were 23 petitions received for the extension of 
water mains. The particular streets in which the above 
work was performed are shown on the accompanying 
tables. 

The districts in which the main pipe was laid and 
relaid are as follows: 

District 

City Proper . 
East Boston . 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Roxbury . 

Under the provisions of Chapter 4 of the Ordinances 
of 1952, which deals with capital improvements, the 
Water Division submitted a capital improvement pro- 
gram, which program was not followed to any great 
extent due to the fact that all available funds were 
needed to extend water mains to provide water into 
residential areas. 



Laid 
Linear Feet 


Relaid 
Linear Feet 


114.0 


827.0 


46.1 

3,051.7 

603.0 


2,074.8 
2,844.0 



6,276.8 
1,872.0 


101.0 




72 City Document No. 18 

Engineering Office 

The office force maintained its usual service to the 
public with information in relation to the Water Di- 
vision, estimates on new service pipes, making out con- 
tracts, assisting the yard forces on Water Division 
matters, compiling official data, bringing record plans to 
date, supervising all construction and snow removal in 
areas Nos. 4 and 5. 

The engineering forces assisted in design and super- 
vision of water mains for the following major projects, 
their status being as follows: 

Central Artery 

Fort Hill square to Kneeland street — completed. 
Kneeland street to beyond Dover street — design com- 
pleted and under construction. 

Dover Street Bridge — syphon under channel dis- 
continued and new trestle built for 20-inch L.S. and 
12-inch H.S. 

Southeast Expressway 

Roxbury Canal, across Southampton street to William 
T. Morrissey Boulevard — design completed and 
under construction. 

William T. Morrissey Boulevard to Milton line — 
completed. 

Projects being studied and in various stages of progress 
are as follows: 

(a) Reinforce southern section of West Roxbury by 
utilizing abandoned Brookline water mains. 

(&) Reinforce Stony Brook section of Hyde Park with 
H.H.S. 

(c) Reinforce Low Service, Roxbury and South Boston, 
by cleaning and lining 30-inch-24-inch main, Roxbury 
Crossing to Andrew square. 

(d) Storage building for water works supplies in Albany 
Street yard. 

(c) Warren Bridge, relocation of 20-inch L.S. and 16-inch 
H.S. to allow demolition of bridge. 

(/) Extension of M.T.A. Highland Division from Beacon 
street at Maitland street, plans completed and under con- 
struction. 

Hydrants: There were 23 new h^'drants established, 
101 hydrants changed, and 7 hydrants abandoned. 



Public Works Department 73 

Summation: System relaid 1.11 miles, extended 2.27 
miles, 23 hydrants established and 7 hydrants aban- 
doned — an increase of 16 hydrants. 

The Distribution Branch 
The Distribution Branch, consisting of the main yard 
at 710 Albany street (with a small subyard in Charles- 
town) and three district yards, is responsible for the 
repair and maintenance of main pipes, service and fire 
pipes, hydrants, gates, and providing emergency and 
general service to the public. The main yard maintains 
emergency crews around the clock for any water service 
that might be required in any section of the city. 

The main yard and three district yards were assisted 
by three contracting firms, one in each yard, with one 
contractor having two districts. The contractual work 
consisted of excavation and back-filling to allow the 
Water Division employees to repair leaks, lay or relay 
water services, change hydrants, and repair or replace 
defective water appurtenances. This contractual work 
was performed in a satisfactory maimer and proved its 
value by giving service to the public. 

District Yards 
The district yard forces were utilized in repairs of 
main pipe leaks, installation of new service pipes, new 
fire pipes, service pipe repairs, tire pipe repairs, meter 
changes, off and on calls, and general maintenance 
service to the public. 

The Machine Shop 
The machine shop and plumbing shop handled all 
drilling of services in the main yard and assisted in case 
of emergency in the district yards. The machine shop 
continues to machine and assemble all new gates up to 
and including 12 inches, tapping gates up to 6 inches. 
Gates 16 inches and larger are now purchased under 
contract made under specifications of New York Pat- 
tern, M.D.C. Type. They machine and assemble all 
hydrants, repair defective hydrants, repair in the 
ground if possible defective gates, and rebuild gates 
both corporation, tapping, and high pressure. Along 
with this work they — both the plumbing and machine 
shop — are called on to assist other branches of the 
Public Works Department in many special jobs. 



74 



City Document No. 18 



The Meter Branch 

The meter shop handled a total of 11,026 meters, 
divided as follows: 



Meters applied on new services 
Meters discontinued . 
Meters changed out 
Meters changed in 
Meters tested in shop 
Meters repaired in service 
Meters repaired in shop 
Meters reset 
Meters junked ... 

Total 



BUSINESS OFFICE 



492 

1,627 

5,662 

5,570 

159 

553 

435 

906 

1,284 

16,688 



This office performs all the work related to the proc- 
essing of bills to property owners for water used and 
the maintenance of water meters. 

These operations include receiving applications for 
new services and fire pipes; reading 95,000 meters quar- 
terly; computing and preparing 382,000 bills amounting 
to $6,014,801.04; keeping account of paid and unpaid 
bills; testing, repairing, installing, and removing water 
meters; and receiving complaints from the water- 
consuming public. 

It is unfortunate that for many years the surplus of 
the Water Division was not allowed to accumulate a 
reserve fund which would have been available when 
water receipts failed to meet expenditures. 

1958 

Main pipe petitions recorded in Registry ... 6 

Domestic service applications 517 

Fire pipe applications 52 

Special meter tests 32 

Hydrant permits issued 12 

Repair deposits received 93 

Miscellaneous deposits 29 

APPROPRIATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND REVENUE 



Budget appropriation, 1958 
Amount expended 



$2,822,901 18 
2,255,144 79 



Amount of money collected from all sources during the 

year 1958 

Amount expended from all sources 



$6,056,716 56 
6,977,791 74 



Surplus 



$78,924 81 



Public Works Department 75 

The metropolitan assessment for 1958 amounted to 
$3,283,217.68, at the rate of $80 per miUion gallons, and 
decrease of $45,479.00 under the assessment of 1957, 
based on the $80 per million gallon rate. 

Total amount billed for 1958 .... $6,212,601 61 

Total amount collected for 1958 bills, as of 
December 31, 1958 4,656,361 78 

Total amount abated for 1958 bills, as of 

December 31, 1958 20,907 23 

Total amount collected in 1958 on bills ren- 
dered prior to 1958 518,673 72 

By Chapter 487, Acts of 1954, entitled ''An Act 
Relative to Liens for Water Rates and Charges," 
effective January 1, 1955, the law was changed so that 
hens for water rates take effect by operation of law 
without the necessity of recording a lien statement at 
the Registry of Deeds. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water 
bills to the consumers at the end of the year has been 
continued as a courtesy to the customer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. M. Sullivan, 
Division Engineer. 



WATER SERVICE, 1958 

Balances from 1957: 

Water Service Receipts . $97,607 46 

Water Service 131,863 18 



Receipts in 1958: 

Water Rates and Services $6,014,801 04 

Tax Titles, Water .... 41,915 51 



$229,470 63 



6,056,716 55 
16,286,187 18 



E.xpenditures in 1958: 

Pensions and Annuities . 
Water Division 

Refunds 

Metropolitan Water Assessment 
Collecting, W^ater 
Automotive, Water . 



$241,005 24 

2,255,144 79 

361 40 

3,283,217 68 

145,352 00 

118,007 00 



6,043,088 11 
$243,099 07 



76 City Document No. 18 

Transfer of 1057 Surplus $97,607 45 



$145,491 62 
Carried Forward to 1959 Water Division 6(j,566 81 



Surplus $78,924 81 

Water Division, 1958 
Construction account: 

I']xtonsion of mair\s (from revenue) 

Cost of construction Dec. 31, 1958 $25,521, oil 21 

Cost of construction Dec. 31, 1957 25,439,829 36 



Increase in plant cost during 1958 .... $81,481 88 

Cost of e.xisting works Dec. 31, 1958: 

Pipe yards and buildings $100,332 16 

Distribution system 25,439,829 36 

Hvde Park water works . . . 175,000 00 

$25,715,161 52 

2,448,340 64 



$28,163,502 16 



WATER STATISTICS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1958 

Mains 

Kind of pipe: cast-iron, wrought-iron, steel. 

Size, 2-inch to 48-inch. 
Extended miles, 2.2. 
Size enlarged miles, .7 miles. 
Total miles now in use, 1,033. 
Public hydrants added, 16. 
Public hydrants now in use, 12,559. 
Stop gates added, 27. 
Stop gates now in use, 16,580. 
Number of blowoffs, 857. 
Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Services 
Kind of pipe and size: 



-inch to 2 inches in diameter of lead or copper. 



4 inches and 6 inches in diameter of cast-iron. 

Domestic service applications 517 

Fire pipe applications 52 

SHUTTING OFF AND TURNING ON WATER IN 1958 

Number of shutofTs for repairs 5,370 

.Number of proini.'^cs turned on after repairs 4,767 

Number of Hluitoffs for vacancy 669 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy .... 118 

Number of premises shut off for nonpayment of water rates 13 
.Numb(;r of premises turned on ;igain after IxMiig sluit olT for 

nonpayment 4 

Number of i)remis(;a shut olY on account of wast(> .... 40 

Number of premises turned on again after being sliut ()fT for waste 3 

Number of new service pi]K'3 turned on for the first time 318 

Total number of times water was shut olT or turned on 11.302 



Public Works Department 



77 



TABLE NO. I. STATEMENT OF WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR 1958 



Make 



.2 

"n 

Q. 



Meters 
Changed 



Out 



In 



a 






o 


















-oco 






Is 


.S 




■3-r! 


■oS 




<D O 


ID.S 










•3S 


So 


a> 


&H 


&» 


en 


si 


Pi 


p:; 



-a 

3 



Hersey 

Watch Dog 

King 

Worthington 

American 

Federal 

Sparling 

Nash 

Arctic 

Trident 

Lambert 

Empire 

Crown 

Keystone 

Pitt 

Connection piece . 

Totals 



466 
17 



492 



1,467 

124 

5 

28 



1,627 



4,626 

773 

104 

249 

4 

30 

2 

1 

4 

4 

1 



814 



6,613 



5,446 
123 



1,248 



6,818 



423 

7 



435 



481 

69 

1 



553 



893 
13 



900 



202 
739 
161 
147 
4 
31 



1.284 



78 



City Document No. IS 



TABLE NO. 2. METERS IN SERVICE, DECEMBER 31, 1958 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


H 


V4. 


1 


\V2 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


71,729 

7,301 

372 

951 

45 

17 


5,506 

234 

7 

6 


2,478 

339 

3 


1,446 

761 

S 

6 


1,016 

412 

3 

4 


359 
234 


420 
68 


127 


37 


18 




82,692 


Watch Dog 


9,349 


King 










393 


Worthineton 














967 


American 














45 


Federal 






















17 


Crown 


1 
1 






4 
1 




1 










7 


Nash 


7 
2 












9 


Lambert 






1 
15 
20 

1 


1 

8 










4 


f 

Arctic 


1 




14 


15 


2 








53 


* 




1 
2 

1 








29 


Kevatone 


















3 


n - 




















1 


Nentune 
























)fc-fc . M 




















































Totals 


80,428 


5,306 


2,820 


: 2,235 


1,455 


630 


510 


130 


37 


18 




93,569 







Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


% 


% 


1 


1J4 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Connection Pieces (regular).. 

City of Boston, Connec- 
tion Pieces 


2,734 
49 


210 
4 


79 
27 


24 
82 


35 
105 


17 
69 


4 
20 


6 
7 


4 
1 






3,113 


1 


10 


W 

441 






Total 


2,783 


214 


106 


106 


200 


80 


30 


13 


5 


1 


10 


3,554 







Public Works Department 



79 



TABLE NO. 3. METERS IN SHOP, DECEMBER 31, 1958 



Makb 


DiAMETEB IN INCHES 


Total 


Vs 


H 


1 


iy2 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Old 

Hersey Disc 


700 


48 


45 




8 


11 

1 


O 

1 
7 










815 


Hersey Compound Train .... 


1 

7 

1 








3 


Hersey Detector 












7 


3 


1 


25 


Heraey Model " D " 














1 


Watch Dog 








3 


4 


8 


6 








21 




















Total 


700 


48 


45 


3 


12 


20 


17 


9 


7 


3 


1 


865 






New* 
Heraey 










15 














15 



























TABLE NO. 4. METERS REPAIRED IN SHOP IN 1958 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


H 


H 


1 


I'A 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Heraey 


160 


68 


10 


80 
2 
1 


60 
1 

4 


21 

2 


17 
2 


6 


1 






423 


Watch Dog 






7 


Arctic 
















5 
























Total 


160 


08 


10 


83 


65 


23 


19 


6 


1 






435 











TABLE NO. 4A. 


METERS 


AWAITING REPAIR OR 1 


f^EBUlLDINQ 


Make 


Diameter in Inches 




% 


H 


1 


ly. 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 


Heraey 


2.578 


258 




















2 763 


Watch Dog 








4 
5 

6 

15 


1 
3 

1 










5 


Arctic 








1 












9 


Trident 
















7 
























Total 


2,578 


258 




1 




5 










2.784 













80 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE NO. 5. METERS REPAIRED AND REBUILT AT FACTORY IN 1958 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


% 


Vi 


1 


Wz 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


2,976 
10 






















2,976 


Watch Dog 






















10 


























Total 


2,986 






















2,986 



























TABLE NO. 5A. AlETERS PURCHASED NEW IN 1958 





Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 




% 


M 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 




100 


75 


10 


20 












1 


208 



















TABLE NO. 6. METERS RESET IN 1958 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


Vs 


M 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


827 
2 


35 


16 


5 
5 


5 
5 


3 
1 




2 








893 


Watch Doe 








13 




















Total 


829 


35 


16 


10 


10 


4 




2 








906 













Connection pieces removed . 
Occupancy 



817 
89 



Total. 



906 



Public Works Department 



81 



TABLE NO. 7A. METERS CHANGED IN 1958. METERS TAKEN OUT 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


^ 


M 


1 


1J4 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


4,014 

607 

106 

103 

4 

30 

1 


269 
27 


166 
36 


77 
37 


62 
28 


18 

32 
4 


15 
6 


5 






1 


4,626 


Watch Dog 






773 


Worthinffton 










110 


King 




1 
















104 


American 


















4 


Federal 






















30 


Nash 






















1 


Trident 










3 


1 










4 


Lambert 


1 


















I 


Crown 




1 


















1 








1 


1 


1 


1 










4 


SDarline 








2 








2 


























Total 


4,867 


296 


204 


115 


91 


58 


23 


7 






1 


5,662 











TABLE NO. 7B. METERS CHANGED IN 1958. METERS PUT IN 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


% 


V4. 


1 


IVi 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


4,680 
15 


281 


181 
2 


183 
41 

1 


67 
30 


28 
38 


16 

7 


9 






1 


5,446 


Watch Dog 






123 


Arctic 










1 


























Total 


4.695 


281 


183 


225 


97 


66 


23 


9 






1 


5,670 











82 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE NO. 8. METERS REPAIRED IN SERVICE 



Make. 



on 














M 




a 










"So 


^ 


•3 


a 


s 


o 


a 


"a 

§2 


.2 

1 


Q. 

3 




o 

a 
<u 


1 






O 




u 




a> 


Q 


00 


O 


12; 


« 


w 


tf 



5 



Hersey. . . . 
Watch Dog . 

King 

Arctic 

Trident . . . . 



94 
15 



212 

43 

1 

1 



26 
5 



140 
4 



481 

69 

1 

1 

1 



Total. 



110 



257 



31 



145 



553 



TABLE NO. 9. METERS APPLIED IN 1958 



Make 


Diameter I^f Inches 


Total 


Vb 


H 


1 


IK 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 




369 


15 


15 


36 

7 


14 
4 
3 


6 
3 


6 
3 
1 


5 








466 


Watch Doe 








17 


Connection Pipce 


4 




1 










9 














Total 


373 


15 


L 6 


43 


21 


9 


10 


5 








492 













Meters applied on old service 

Meters applied on new service , 

Connection pieces applied on new service . 



Total . 



17 

466 

9 

492 



TABLE NO. 10. METERS DISCONTINUED IN 1958 



Makk 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


H 


H 


1 


1^ 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


1,297 

103 

25 

4 


90 
3 


42 
3 


17 
5 


13 

5 


4 




1 


2 








1,467 


Watch Doe 








124 


Worthincrton 










28 


King 




1 
















5 


Spa.rling 










. .1 








1 


Federal 


1 
1 






















1 


Connection Piece . 






















1 


























Total 


1,432 


93 


46 


22 


18 


7 


7 


•> 
•J 








1,627 













Public Works Department 



83 



TABLE NO. II. REASON FOR METER CHANGE IN YEAR 1958 



Make 


.2 
'bi 

o 

o 
Q 


■g. 

o 
O 


a 

-3 

a 

'5. 
m 


QQ 

H 

a 

4) 

a 

a 
Q 


CO 

« 

CO 


.2 

o 


U 


03 


c: 

1 

o 

o 

O 




03 

o 


Hersey 


2,404 

442 

66 

36 

4 

2 

3 


18 

2 
2 


720 

154 

22 

7 


110 

16 

1 


28 
3 


68 


47 
2 


31 
1 
1 


57 
4 
2 


72 
5 
1 


171 


Watch Dog. 


14 


Worthington 




King 








2 


American 


1 
















Federal 




















Trident 
















1 






Arctic 


1 


















Crown 




















1 


Lambert 


1 












































Total 


2.958 


23 


903 


128 


31 


68 


49 


33 


64 


78 


188 







TABLE NO. 12. METERS JUNKED IN 1958 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


Vs 


'A 


1 


IJ^ 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


186 
601 
160 
147 
32 
5 


5 

68 


4 
9 

1 




1 
1 




3 


2 


1 






202 


Watch Dog 






679 


King 














161 


Worthington 


















147 


Federal 






















32 


American 






















5 



























Total 


1,131 


73 


14 




2 




3 


2 


1 


' 




1,226 









Note: The number of meters lost in service in 1958 amounts to 337. 



c 
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85 



TABLE NO. II. 
Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1958. 







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241 


2,063 


1,945 


6,833 


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75 


14 


51 


11,662 


Total Private, December 31, 1958 


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29 


126 


17 


13 


56 




4 


111 






394 











Total hydrauts in service, December 31, V.)o7 . 

Total hydrants added during 1958 

Total hydrants abandoned during 195S 

Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1958 

High pressure fire hydrants in service, 1958 

Total hydrants (all kinds) in service, December 31, 1958 



12,040 

115 

99 

12,056 
503 

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88 City Document No. IS 

APPENDIX II 



REPORT OF THE 
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION 

Boston, January 2, 1959. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Through the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In accordance with the provisions of Section 24, 
Chapter 3, of the Revised City Ordinances of 1947, the 
following report of the Public Improvement Commission 
for the year ending December 31, 1958, is respectfully 
submitted. 

The Public Improvement Commission was established 
May 1, 1954, by the provisions of Section 57, Chapter 2, 
of the 1954 Ordinances. This Commission, consisting 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, the Commissioner 
of Real Property, and the Chairman of the Boston 
Traffic Commission, was assigned all of the powers and 
duties of the former Board of Street Commissioners, 
except : 

(a) Those relating to the storage and sale of inflammables, 
filling stations, and parking lots, which were trans- 
ferred to the Committee on Licenses in the Public 
Safety Commission; 

(6) Those relating to the planting and removal of trees in 
public ways, the use of public ways for any temporary 
obstruction in, under, or over the same, the use of 
public waj'^s for the storage and sale of merchandise, 
and the designating of coasting streets, which were 
transferred to the Commissioner of Public Works; 

(c) Those relating to the abatement of taxes, which were 
transferred to the Real Property Department. 

Functions of the Board of Street Commissioners 
transferred to this Commission include the authority 
to lay out, widen, relocate, alter, discontinue, or rename 
public highways, and to order the making of specific 
repairs therein; to order the construction of sanitary 
sewers and storm drains; to take land by eminent 
domain for municipal purposes (except housing and 



Public Works Department 89 

off-street parking); to permit the opening of private 
ways for public travel; to levy assessments for street, 
sidewalk, and sewer betterments; and to issue permits 
for the location of wire-carrying poles, conduits, pipes, 
tracks and similar uses of the public ways. 

Street Program 

During the period covered by this report, 98 highway 
improvements, including the laying out of 46 new 
highways, the widening and relocation of 17 j>ublic 
ways, the making of specific repairs in 18 existing 
streets, the alteration of 1 public way, the discontinuance 
of 11 streets, and the revision of grade of 5 streets were 
ordered by the Public Improvement Commission. 

Of particular interest in these groups are the following 
projects: 

The improvement of Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, 
from Warren street to Chestnut Hill avenue, at an estimated 
cost of $340,000. Last year Commonwealth avenue was recon- 
structed from Brighton avenue to Warren street under the 
Chapter 90 Program, and the improvements included in the 
reconstruction have been very favorably noticed. This year's 
project provides for continuing the divided highway concept 
through the construction of a new roadway to carry west- 
bound traffic in the section that is now a grassed reservation. 
The present easterly roadway is to be divided into a two-lane 
road for through traffic and a 22-foot-wide service road. 

The improvement of Columbus avenue, Roxbury, from 
Roxbury Crossing to Jackson square, at an estimated cost of 
S85,000. This work includes the reduction in sidewalk widths 
and the construction of a new type rumble strip highway 
divider. This section of Columbus avenue is part of a principal 
route through the city from Mattapan square to Park square. 
In the past two years the section from Mattapan square to 
Egieston square has been completely reconstructed and im- 
proved. ^ 

The improvement of Dorchester avenue. South Boston, from 
West Fourth street to Dorchester street, at an estimated cost 
of -1120,000. The reconstruction of this street will include 
the reduction of existing sidewalk widths so as to allow an 
additional eight feet for highway traffic. 

Layouts with Construction 

The following streets were ordered laid out and con- 
structed as pubhc ways during 1958: 

Aldwin road, West Roxbury, from Washington street to 
Brookway road. Length, 150 feet; estimated cost, $6,750; 
estimated benefit, $3,374.59. 



90 City Document No. 18 

Altacrest road, West Roxbury, from Ansonia road approxi- 
mately 285 feet southeasterly. Length, 280 feet; estimated 
cost, $6,848; estimated benefit, $3,960. 

Ascent street, West Roxbury, between Keystone street and 
Riverview street. Length, 358 feet; estimated cost, $12,638; 
estimated benefit, $4,419.50. 

At will road. West Roxbury, from Richwood street approxi- 
mately 240 feet southwesterly. Length, 240 feet; estimated 
cost, $5,000; estimated benefit, $2,500. 

Bobolink street. West Roxbury, from La Grange street to 
Pheasant street. Length, 380 feet; estimated cost, $12,747; 
estimated benefit, $5,730. 

Bradlee street, Hyde Park, between Safford street and 
Tacoma street. Length, 350 feet; estimated cost, $10,537; 
estimated benefit, $5,268. 

Cassnet street, Dorchester, from Dickens street approxi- 
mately 160 feet northerly. Length, 160 feet; estimated cost, 
$3,973; estimated benefit, $1,781. 

Child street, Hyde Park, from Gordon avenue to Chestnut 
street. Length, 530 feet; estimated cost, $10,280; estimated 
benefit, $5,140. 

Copeland park, Roxbury, from Copeland street approxi- 
mately 130 feet southeasterly. Length, 130 feet; estimated 
cost, $2,187; estimated benefit, $1,093.50. 

Constitution road, Dorchester, from Faunce road approxi- 
mately 280 feet southeasterly. Length, 280 feet. 

Dania street, Dorchester, from Faunce road to Cookson 
terrace. Length, 825 feet. 

Dania terrace, Dorchester, from Dania street approximately 
110 feet northwesterly. Length, 110 feet. 

Faunce road, Dorchester, extended in part over Grossman 
street, between Cookson terrace and West Selden street. 
Length, 560 feet. 

Jamestown terrace, Dorchester, from Dania street approxi- 
mately 130 feet southeasterly. Length, 130 feet. 

Viking terrace, Dorchester, between Dania street and Lin vale 
terrace. Length, 175 feet. 

Estimated cost for the foregoing six streets, $65,283; esti- 
mated benefit for the foregoing six streets, $32,641.39. 

Freeport Way, Dorchester, from Frccport street approxi- 
mately 440 feet easterly. Length, 440 feet; estimated cost, 
$12,320; estimated benefit, $5,583.96. 

Gilmore terrace, Roxbury, from Park street approximately 
200 feet southwesterly. Length, 200 feet; estimated cost, 
.$7,172; estimated benefit, $3,586. 

Glencliff road, West Roxbury, from Poplar street approxi- 
mately 580 feet southeasterly. Length, 580 feet; estimated 
cost, $14,000; estimated benefit, $9,456. 



Public Works Department 91 

Glenellen road, West Roxbury (formerly River view street), 
between Northdaie road and Ascent street. Length, 770 feet; 
estimated cost, $26,547; estimated benefit, $14,660. 

Hallet street, Dorchester, from Hill Top street southeasterly 
and southwesterly, approximately 1,075 feet. Length, 1,075 
feet; estimated cost, $29,960; estimated benefit, none. 

Hebron street, Hyde Park, from Mariposa street approx- 
imately 400 feet northeasterly. Length, 400 feet; estimated 
cost, $11,560; estimated benefit, $4,842.50. 

Leland road. West Roxbury, extended from Hackensack 
road approximately 631 feet southeasterly. Length, 630 feet; 
estimated cost, $17,485; estimated benefit, $7,725. 

Lodgehill road, Hyde Park, from Ruffing street to Goff 
street. Length, 275 feet; estimated cost, $9,453.90; estimated 
benefit, $4,726.96. 

Magee street, Hyde Park, from Austin street to Lodgehill 
road. Length, 730 feet; estimated cost, $21,734; estimated 
benefit, $10,867.07. 

Meyer street, West Roxbury, from Catherine street approx- 
imately 290 feet southwesterly. Length, 290 feet; estimated 
cost, .$8,259.46; estimated benefit, $4,129.73. 

Newhill place. South Boston (formerly Hill place), from East 
Third street approximately 150 feet southerly. Length, 150 
feet; estimated cost, $2,331; estimated benefit, $1,166.48. 

Pheasant street, West Roxbury, from approximately 30 feet 
northwest of Swan street to approximately 330 feet north- 
westerly. Length, 330 feet; estimated cost, $10,815; estimated 
benefit, $4,302. 

Public Alley No. 822, Roxbury, from St. Botolph street to 
Public Alley No. 821. Length, 100 feet; estimated cost, $3,000; 
estimated benefit, none. 

Quincy place, Roxbury, from Quincy street approximately 
130 feet southwesterly. Length, 130 feet; estimated cost, 
$2,022; estimated benefit, $1,011. 

Ruffing street, Hyde Park, from Sherrin street to Lodgehill 
road. Length, 515 feet; estimated cost, $17,875; estimated 
benefit, $8,937.45. 

Sherrin street, Hyde Park, from Magee street to Beech 
street. Length, 920 feet; estimated cost, $28,197; estimated 
benefit, $14,098.50. 

Sierra road, Hyde Park (formerly Westville road), from 
Neponset Valley Parkway approximately 200 feet northeasterly. 
Length, 200 feet; estimated cost, $6,648; estimated benefit, 
$3,324. 

Stimson street. West Roxbury, from Veterans of Foreign 
Wars Parkway approximately 220 feet easterly. Length, 220 
feet; estimated cost, $6,160; estimated benefit, none. 

Tracton avenue, Hyde Park, from Tileston street approxi- 
mately 130 feet westerly. Length, 130 feet; estimated cost, 
$4,063; estimated benefit, $2,031.50. 



92 City Document No. 18 

Vogel street, West Roxbury, between Ascent street and 
Stimson street. Length, 1,105 feet; estimated cost, $34,252; 
estimated benefit, $21,458. 

Westminster street, Hyde Park, from Huntington avenue to 
Wood avenue. Length, 1,385 feet; estimated cost, $42,599; 
estimated benefit, $11,584.68. 

Layouts Without Construction 

The following streets were ordered laid out as public 
ways during 1958: 

Atwill road, West Roxbury, from Richwood street south- 
westerly and southeasterly approximately 625 feet. Length, 
625 feet. 

Beechland street, West R,oxbury, between Washington street 
and Beram avenue. Length, 392 feet. 

Belvoir road, Dorchester, from Brandon avenue to Monti- 
cello avenue. Length, 230 feet. 

Blair road, Dorchester, from Brandon avenue to Monti- 
cello avenue. Length, 205 feet. 

Bow street, Hyde Park, between Dana avenue and Garfield 
avenue. Length, 570 feet. 

Brandon avenue, Dorchester, from Monticello avenue to 
Mt. Vernon street. Length, 760 feet. 

Garfield avenue, Hyde Park, from Newacre road approxi- 
mately 110 feet east of Faraday street. Length, 110 feet. 

Meyer street. West Roxbury, from Catherine street to Organ 
Park street. Length, 620 feet. 

Monticello avenue, Dorchester, from Mt. Vernon street to 
Mt. Vernon street. Length, 3,015 feet. 

Montpelier road, Dorchester, from Monticello avenue to 
Monticello avenue. Length, 870 feet. 

Nottingham Path, Brighton, between Nottinghill road and 
Leamington road. Length, 210 feet. 

Woodglen road, Hyde Park, from approximately 450 feet 
southeast of Washington street to Garfield street. Length, 
259 feet. 

Widenings and Relocations 

Clinton street, Boston Proper, between North street and the 
John F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 

D street. South Boston, at the northeasterly corner of Dor- 
(jhester avenue. 

Dalton street, Boston Proper, between Scotia street and 
Cambria street. 

Dorchester avenue. South Boston, at the northeasterly 
corner of Old Colony avenue. 

Fernwood road, West Roxbury, from Landseer street approxi- 
mately 190 feet southeaster l3^ 

Firth road. West Roxbury, at the southeasterly corner of 
Florence street. 



Public Works Department 93 

Hackensack road, West Roxbury, between Hackensack court 
and Hackensack Circle. 

Harrison avenue, Boston Proper, on the northerly side, from 
Dover street approximately 65 feet southwesterly. 

Hill Top street, Dorchester, at the southeasterly corner of 
Hallet street. 

Norfolk avenue, Roxbury, at the northeasterly (jorner of 
Magazine street. 

Norfolk avenue, Roxbury. at the southeasterly corner of 
Magazine street. 

Norfolk avenue, Roxbury, at the northeasterly corner of 
Shirley street. 

Pleasantdale road. West Roxbury, on the easterly side, ap- 
proximately 350 feet south of Stimson street. 

Sachem street, Roxbury, at the easterly corner of Parker Hill 
avenue. 

St. Botolph street, Roxbury, at the northerly corner of 
Gainsborough street. 

Tyler street, Boston Proper, at the northwesterly corner of 
Curve street. 

Willow court, Dorchester, between Boston street and Field's 
court. Estimated cost, 18,728; estimated benefit, $7,216. 

Specific Repairs 

Alford street, Charlestown, at Sullivan square, consisting of 
the extension of division islands at various locations and the 
construction of traffic signal protection bumpers. 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester, at the intersection of River 
street (Mattapan square), consisting of the relocation and re- 
construction of existing and proposed traffic divisional islands. 

Broadway, South Boston, from Dorchester avenue ap- 
proximately 250 feet northwesterly, consisting of the reduction 
in width of the northeasterly sidewalk. 

Cambridge street, Charlestown, at Sullivan square, consisting 
of the extension of divisional island at various locations and 
the construction of traffic signal protection bumpers. 

Chelsea street, Charlestown, at the southeasterly corner of 
Gray street, consisting of increasing the curb radius. 

Columbia road, Dorchester, between Hamlet street and 
Dudley street, consisting of the installation of a fence in the 
existing traffic divisional island. 

Columbus avenue, Roxbury, between Tremont street and 
Centre street, consisting of the installation of a traffic divi- 
sional island. 

Columbus avenue, Roxbury, between Tremont street and 
Centre street, consisting of the reduction in width of existing 
sidewalks. 



94 City Document No. 18 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, between Kelton street 
and Chestnut Hill avenue, consisting of the relocation of the 
existing streetcar reservation from approximately 100 feet 
northeast of Kelton street to approximately 500 feet south- 
easterly thereof, and the reduction in width of the existing 
streetcar reservation from Wallingford road to Chestnut Hill 
avenue; the construction of a new traffic roadway adjacent to 
the northwesterly side of this relocated streetcar reservation 
and the existing streetcar reservation from Kelton street to 
Wallingford road; the reduction in width of the existing traffic 
divisional island between Kelton street and Boulevard terrace, 
and the construction of a new traffic divisional island from 
Boulevard terrace to Chestnut Hill avenue; the reduction in 
width of the existing service road adjacent to the northwesterly 
side of Commonwealth avenue from Warren street to Fidelis 
Way and from Washington street to Wallingford road; the 
widening of the existing service road from Fidelis Way to 
Washington street; the reduction in width of the existing 
sidewalks on the southeasterly side from Commonwealth 
terrace to Chestnut Hill avenue and on the northwesterly side 
from Warren street approximately 100 feet southwesterly of 
Fidelis Way, from Euston road to Leamington road, and from 
Wallingford road to Chestnut Hill avenue; and the relocation 
of existing roadways, sidewalks, reservation and streetcar 
reservation crossings at various locations. 

Crehore road. West Roxbury, at the northeast intersection 
of West Roxbury Parkway, consisting of the relocation of the 
existing sidewalk. 

Cummins Highway, Dorchester (Mattapan square), ap- 
proximately 50 feet northwest of River street, consisting of the 
elimination of the crossover in the existing traffic divisional 
island. 

Dorchester avenue. South Boston, between W^est Fourth 
street and Dorchester street, consisting of the reduction in 
width of existing sidewalks and the installation of traffic 
divisional islands at various locations. 

Hancock street, Dorchester, consisting of the installation 
of traffic divisional islands at Pleasant street. 

Harrison avenue, Boston Proper, between Dover street and 
Fay street, consisting of the reduction in width of the north- 
westerly sidewalk. 

Main street, Charlestown, at Sullivan square, consisting of 
the extension of divisional islands at various locations and the 
construction of traffic signal protection bumpers. 

Massachusetts avenue, Dorchester, on the southwesterly 
side from the Midland Division location of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad to Clapp street, consisting 
of the reduction in width of the existing sidewalk. 



Public Works Department 95 

Pleasant street, Dorchester, at Hancock street, consisting 
of the installation of traffic divisional islands. 

Rutherford avenue, Charlestown, at Sullivan square, con- 
sisting of the extension of divisional islands at various locations 
and the construction of traffic signal protection bumpers. 

Grade Revisions 

Belnap road, Hyde Park, from Eastmont road to Leighton 
road. 

Dodge road, Hyde Park, from Leighton road approximately 
480 feet northwesterly. 

Far well avenue, Hyde Park, from approximate! j'- 450 feet 
southeast of Summit street to Milton avenue. 

Joan road, Hyde Park, from Leighton road to Dodge road. 
Leighton road, Hyde Park, from the northerly end of East- 
mont road to the southerly end of Eastmont road. 

Discontinuances 

Blackstone street, Boston Proper, between North street and 
Clinton street. 

Centre street, West Roxbury, a portion at the westerly side 
between Autumn street and Alaric street. 

Clinton street, Boston Proper, at the northerly corner of 
Fulton street. 

Dalton street, Boston Proper, from Scotia street to ap- 
proximately 50 feet northwest of Cambria street. 

Fulton street, Boston Proper, between Clinton street and 
the John F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 

Gillette park. South Boston, a portion on the northerly side 
between Dorchester avenue and Granite street. 

Hackensack road, West Roxbury, a portion on the westerly 
side between Hackensack court and Hackensack Circle. 

John street, Boston Proper, between North street and 
Fulton street. 

Public Alley No. 821, Roxbur}^, between Gainsborough 
street and Public Alley No. 822. 

Safford street, Hyde Park, on the northerly and southerly 
sides between Huntington avenue and Bradlee street. 

West Newton street, Boston Proper, from Falmouth street 
approximately 116 feet northerly. 

Alterations 

South Bay avenue, Roxbury, between Atkinson street and 
Moore street, consisting of alterations in the proposed con- 
struction as approved by the Mayor August 7, 1957. 



96 City Document No. 18 

Sewer Program 

During the year 1958 the construction of 1.29 miles 
of sanitary sewer, 1.49 miles of storm sewer, 133 catch 
basins, and 24 drop inlets was ordered at a total esti- 
mated cost of $256,097.25. 

Estimated benefit to private property for the con- 
struction of the 1.29 miles of sanitary sewer amounted 
to $36,462.71. 

The following sewer easements were ordered aban- 
doned : 

Cutter road, West Roxbiiry, at Dow road. 

Private land, West Roxbury, adjacent to Bertson avenue. 

For sewerage works ordered see table on following 
pages. 



Public Works Department 



97 



SEWERAGE WORKS ORDERED 



Street 



^« 

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en 



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Boston Proper 

♦Clinton street 

Harrison avenue. . . 
*Hereford street. . . . 
Dorchester 

Constitution road . 

Dania street 

Dania terrace 

Faunce road 

Freeport Way 

Freeport Way 

Jamestown terrace. 
^Manchester street . 
♦Manor street 

Mattapan street. . . 



*St. Clare road, from 

Boutwell street approx- 
imately 200 feet north- 
westerly 



St. Clare road 

Savannah avenue. 

Train street 

Hyde Park 

♦Asheville road 

♦Austin street 



♦Beech street 1 . 
♦Lodgehill road/ . 



Beech street. . . 
Bradlee street. . 
Chestnut street . 
Child street. . . . 
♦Child street 



Child street, between 
Linwood street and 
Perkins street 



Dodge road.. 
Goff street. . . 
Grew avenue. 



178 



235 



230 
185 



597 



180 



138 



400 



65 
1.310 



55 



600 
280 



510 

100 

662\ 
75/ 



360 

135 

485 

88 

400 



70 



$10,000 00 

650 00 

47,000 00 

450 00 
1,900 00 

450 00 
1,500 00 
2,900 00 
3,100 00 

630 00 

1.800 00 

11,000 00 

1.346 25 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,700 00 

300 00 

2,310 00 
1,900 00 

3,334 00 

1,400 00 
5,800 00 

750 00 
5,650 00 

600 00 

6,000 00 

1,300 00 

2,000 00 

14,900 00 



None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

None 
SI. 500 00 

1,500 00 

None 

None 
S4,829 98 

None 

$1,500 00 
None 
None 
None 

None 
$225 00 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

$3,000 GO 
None 
None 
None 



♦ Easements taken 



98 



City Document No. 18 



Street 



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C3 

W 



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3 
02 



03 




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Hyde Park (Continued) 

Hebron street 

Lodgehill road 



♦Private land, between 
Austin street and Stony 
Brook 



Rosemont street. . . . 

Ruffing street 

*Sherrin street 

Sherrin street 

Tacoma street 

Viking terrace 

♦Windham road 

Roxbury 

Columbus avenue . . 

Copeland park 

Norfolk avenue 

Parker Hill terrace . 

Quincy place , 

Sachem street 

South Bay avenue. 
South Boston 

D street 

Newhill place 

West Roxbury 

Altacrest road 

Ascent street 

Atwill road 

Bobolink street 

Centre street 

Firth road 

♦Florian street 

♦Florian Way 

Glencliff road 

Glenellen road .... 

Gould street 



420 



315 



285 



450 



125 



480 
290 



165 



410 



315 



110 



285 



280 



480 

290 



690 



14 
1 



14 



81,300 00 
2,200 00 

7,940 00 
1,200 00 
2,000 00 
4,150 00 
3,000 00 
1,500 00 
900 00 
4,000 00 

4,200 00 
700 00 
200 00 
500 00 
700 00 
300 00 
25,000 00 

400 00 
900 00 

750 00 
0,000 00 
800 00 
800 00 
400 00 
200 00 

11.000 00 

7,102 00 

500 00 

10,000 00 
900 00 



None 
None 

None 

None 

None 
S2,025 00 

None 

None 

None 
51,800 00 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
$5,400 00 

None 
None 

None 
$700 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
S3,600 00 
2,503 44 
None 
None 
None 



* Easements taken 



Public Works Department 



99 



Street 



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02 



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3 
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as 






West Roxbury (Continued) 

*Grandview street 

*Highfield terrace 

La Grange street 

Leland road 

♦Lyall terrace 

♦Maplewood street 

♦Martin wood road 

*Moreland street 

Pheasant street 



Veterans of Foreign Wars 
Parkway 



Vogel street. 



215 



210 



500 



90 
160 



210 

262 



300 



$900 00 


990 00 


2,150 00 


400 00 


3,000 00 


1,400 00 


795 00 


1,990 00 


800 00 


7,500 00 


3,500 00 



None 

None 
$1,612 60 

None 
$1,350 00 

None 

None 

None 

None 

$4,916 79 
None 



* Easements taken 



100 



City Document No. 18 



Assessments 

During the year 1958, the Highway Division of the 
PubUc Works Department sent notice of completion of 
62 streets at a total cost of $697,513.17. On this work 
the Public Improvement Commission levied assess- 
ments in the amount of $277,359.15. 

During the same period, the Sewer Division of the 
Public Works Department reported the completion of 
construction of sanitary- sewerage in 11 streets at a 
cost of $64,984.14, on which the PubUc Improvement 
Commission levied assessments in the amount of 
$27,672. 

The completion of new sidewalks in one street at a 
cost of $11,291.46, authorized by the Boston City 
Council, was also reported by the Highway Division. 
On this the Public Improvement Commission levied an 
assessment of $5,234.25. 



STREET ASSESS A\ENTS 



Stbeet 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



Ascent street . . . 
Aaheville road . . 
Beachview road . 
Burloy street . . . 
Byrd avenue ... 
Capital street . . 
Claron street.. . 
Cofifey street ... 
Crestwood park . 
Crockers Lane.. 
Cutler court . . . 

Dalin place .... 

Daniel court . . . 

Derry road .... 

DeStefaao road 

Diets court .... 

Dietz road .... 

Dodge road. . . . 

Dudley terrace . 

Eastmont road . 

Eatonia straet. . 



West Roxbury 


$12,559 84 


S2.702 50 


Hyde Park 


12.208 85 


4,807 51 


East Boston 


25,483 24 


5,711 16 


West Roxbury 


17.630 42 


4.890 00 


West Roxbury 


15,322 47 


6.985 00 


West Roxbury 


12,099 68 


4.451 00 


West Roxbury 


8,836 20 


4,330 00 


Dorchester 


11,457 76 


5.239 00 


Roxbury 


9,184 32 


1,970 55 


West Roxbury 


16.632 20 


6,259 09 


South Boston 


1,836 27 


936 86 


Roxbury 


4,067 28 


1,816 05 


Hyde Park 


3,446 27 


2,139 76 


Hyde Park 


13.629 39 


6,843 50 


West Roxbury 


11.026 89 


5,458 60 


Hyde Park 


3.356 16 


1,797 50 


Hyde Park 


34,846 55 


12.782 50 


Hyde Park 


6.097 51 


2,354 50 


Dorchester 


2,656 80 


876 00 


Hyde Park 


7.861 46 


4,073 75 


Brighton 


6,593 76 


2,819 82 



Public Works Department 



101 



STREET ASSESSMENTS — Continued 



Stbebt 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



Farwell avenue 

Favre street 

Forsyth street 

Furbush road 

Graham terrace 

Grandview street 

Greenwich court 

Greenwood Circle 

Hackensack road 

Haute vale street 

Huntington avenue 

Hutchinson street 

June street 

Kardon road 

Kristin court 

Larch place 

Leighton road 

Liberty place 

Levis street 

Margo road 

Melba Way 

Messinger street, between Orlando 
and Savannah avenue 

Messinger street, between Brockton 
and Orlando 

Meyer street 

Newfield street 

Orlando street 

Parker Hill terrace 

Rainier road 

Robken road 

RosecliS terrace 

Rushmore street 

Safford street 

Savannah avenue 

Selwyn street 

Senders court 

Sherbrook street 

Spinney street 



Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
South Boston 
South Boston 
Brighton 
Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Roxbury 



Dorchester and 
Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Brighton 

Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 



S 12. 987 62 

8.083 77 

21,233 43 

13.501 91 

5,377 04 

14,836 53 

3.724 92 

5.937 73 

13.104 19 

6.628 61 

28.146 54 

10.968 48 

12.784 53 

4,399 09 

4,034 10 

5,631 95 

31.230 76 

3,620 81 

2,957 33 

28.565 28 

12.267 41 

5.798 00 

29.392 94 

4.696 51 

13,595 85 

10,348 64 

3,966 11 

10,647 29 

17,205 23 

6.318 50 

13.148 36 

32.877 96 

14.877 76 

6.281 88 

6,707 19 

7,604 06 

9,924 26 



$4,329 00 
3,187 00 

13,335 84 
5.387 50 
1.502 00 
5.405 75 
1.207 30 
2.650 00 

2.708 98 
3,101 00 

10,360 50 
3,319 68 
5,401 25 
3,919 00 
1,718 50 
2,405 00 

12,421 50 
1,150 00 
1,021 50 

14,731 00 
5,395 00 

1.950 00 

8,986 00 
2,600 00 
6,262 50 

3.951 00 
1,170 00 

2.709 00 
7.991 65 

3.107 02 

4.108 25 
13.474 38 

5,139 00 
2,309 93 
5,431 50 
3,076 47 
3,642 73 



102 



City Document No. 18 



STREET ASSESSMENTS — 


Concluded 




Street 


District 


Cost 


Assignment 


RiiRAnnA court 


Hyde Park 
Brighton 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 


S4,127 60 
7,417 38 
3.989 69 
1,732 61 


S2,723 75 




1,641 27 


WTiarton court . . 


1,833 75 




1,350 00 






Totals 




$697,513 17 


$277,359 15 









SEWER ASSESSMENTS 



Street 



District 



Cost 



Assessment 



Aflheville road 

Gorman road 

Farwell avenue .... 
Gallivan Boulevard . 
Grandview street . . . 
Huntington avenue. 

Mansur street 

Parkway 



South Bay avenue, between Topeka 
and Moore 



South Bay avenue, between Atkinson 
and Cummings 



Valencia road . 



Totals . 



Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 
Hyde Park 



$1,006 00 
3,144 00 
1,766 00 

3,680 00 
9,000 00 
1,367 50 
6,200 00 
1.164 00 

18,672 37 

18,284 27 
700 00 



S64,984 14 



S600 00 
2,040 00 
1,324 50 
1.950 00 
5,850 00 
1,020 00 
4,575 00 
750 00 

5,400 00 

3,600 00 
562 50 



$27,672 00 



SIDEWALK ASSESSMENT 


Street 


District 


Cost 


Assessment 


Willowdean avenue 


West Roxbury 


$11,291 46 


$5,234 25 







Street Name Changes 
The name of the following pubUc street was changed : 

Buena Vista street, Roxbury District, between Warren 
street and Walnut avenue; new name: St. Richard street. 

Land Damages 
On new street construction 133 claims were filed for 
damage to property resulting from land takings or 
changes in grade. On these claims, this Commission 
awarded damages in the amount of $36,305.95. 



Public Works Department 



103 



During the period of this report 150 petitions from 
pubHc utihties were approved for the placing and 
maintaining of poles for the support of wires. 

Also, 65 petitions were approved for miscellaneous 
installations or uses of the public highways of the 
City of Boston as follows: 



Street 


Petitioner 


Nature of Petition 


Asheville road, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Undergroimd gas main 


Asticou road, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Baker street, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Beacon street, Boston Proper 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Belvidere street, Boston Proper 


New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Company 


Telephone cable 


Binney street, Roxbury 


Children's Cancer Research Foun- 
dation 


Underground conduit 


Blake street, Hyde Park, at River 
street 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Blake street, Hyde Park, at Mariposa 
street 


Worcester Gae Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Boutwell street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Buchanan road. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Causeway street, Boston Proper 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Clarendon street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Colorado street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Dale street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Dartmouth street, Boston Proper 


The Commonwealth School 


Pile caps 


Davison street, Hyde Park, at Fair- 
mount avenue 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Davison street, Hyde Park, at Arling- 
ton street 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


DeSoto road. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Eagle street, East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Foundation 


Egremont road, Brighton 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Falmouth street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Federal street, Boston Proper 


Blue Cross-Blue Shield 


Footing and caps 


Gardner street, Brighton 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Harrison avenue, Boston Proper 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground conduit 


Hemenway street, Boston Proper 


Boston Conservatory of Music 


Foundation and canopy 


Heme n way street, Boston Proper 


Boston Conservatory of Music 


Oil tank 


High street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Hudson street, Boston Proper 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Huntington avenue, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Hyde Park avenue. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 



104 



City Document No. 18 



Street 


Petitioner 


Nature of Petition 


Itascastreet, Dorchester at Messinger 
street 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Itasca street, Dorchester, at Croyden 

street 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


La Grange street, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Laurie avenue, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Locust street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Mariposa street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Mattapan street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


New Haven street, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Norway street, Boston Proper 


First Church of Christ Scientist 


Underground conduit 


Old Colony avenue. South Boston 


V. S. H. Realty Company 


Foundation 


Peabody street, Roxbury 


Children's Cancer Research Foun- 
dation 


Underground conduit 


Pheasant street, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Pierce street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Porter street, East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Prescott street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Public Alley No. 424, Boston Proper 


The Commonwealth School 


Pile caps 


Public Alley No. 442, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Rossolerin road, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Savannah avenue, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Scliool street, Boston I'ropor 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


South street. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Southampton street. South Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Sparrow street. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Thatcher street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Tyler street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Valley road, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Victory road, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Wachusett street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Webster street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


West street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Wood avenue, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gbs Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Woodard road, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Wooddale avenue, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Woodland road, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Woodstock street, Brighton 


Governor Apartments, Inc. 


Underground conduit 



Public Works Department 105 

Private Ways 

During the year 1958 permission was given to prepare 
for public travel the following private ways: 

Dow road, West Roxbury, from approved portion north- 
westerly. 

Florian Way, West Roxbury, from Florian street approxi- 
mately 300 feet southerly and southwesterly. 

Highfield Terrace, West Roxbur}'-, from Highfield street 
approximately 150 feet northwesterly. 

Manchester street, Dorchester, from a point approximately 
570 feet west of Temple street approximately 300 feet easterly. 

Manor street, Dorchester, from Rosselerin road to approxi- 
mately 50 feet beyond Matignon road. 

Maplewood street, West Roxbury, from St. Theresa avenue 
to Petrel street. 

Martinwood street, West Roxbury, from South street to 
Asticou road. 

Matignon road, Dorchester, between Manor street and 
Train street. 

Moreland street. West Roxbury, from Laurie avenue to 
Belle avenue. 

St. Clare road, Dorchester, from Boutwell street approxi- 
mately 200 feet northwesterly. 

Sherrin street, Hyde Park, from Austin street approxi- 
mately 75 feet south of Windham road. 

Windham road, Hyde Park, from Austin street to Sherrin 
street. 

During the same period, permission was given to 
open for public travel the following private ways: 

Gorman road, Dorchester, beginning at a point approxi- 
mately 350 feet north of Cummins Highway to a point ap- 
proximately 680 feet northerly and northeasterly. 

Desmond road, West Roxbury. 

Dow road, West Roxbury, from a point approximately 
70 feet southeast of Cutter road approximately 460 feet north- 
westerly. 

Kiernan road, West Roxbury. 

Lorna road, Dorchester, from Lena terrace approximately 
450 feet southwesterly. 

Maria Lane, West Roxbury. 

Merola park, Dorchester. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Herman Carp, Chairman, 
Robert P. Shea, Vice-Chair man, 
Timothy J. O'Connor, Member. 



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