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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




[Document 18—1960] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC AVORKS DEPAETMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1959 



BosTox, Deceml)er 31, 1959. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the annual report of the Pubhc Works 
Department and the Public Improvement Commission 
for the year ending December 31, 1959. 

Fiscal 

The total expenditures of the department for the 
3^ear were $22,887,290.99 of which $3,239,311.04 rep- 
resents water assessments levied by the Metropolitan 
District Commission and $984,758.04 represents Metro- 
pohtan District Commission sewer assessments. The 
water assessments are $43,906.64 less than those levied 
in 1958 and the sewer assessments are $86,491.38 
more than those levied in 1958. 

The water assessment reduction is a reflection of the 
colder and wetter conditions prevailing in 1958 which 
lowered the water usage and consequently lowered our 
assessment payable in 1959. Under normal conditions 
both the water and sewer assessments tend to increase 
and must be anticipated. 



City Document No. 18 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled 
$6,270,735.76 and the surplus resulting from the sale 
of water was $54,043.89. 

Loan Orders 

Since the department refrained from a loan order 
in 1958, it was necessary to request a loan order for 
the construction of public ways in the amount of 
$2,000,000.00. 

Street Constrttction Work 
St ate- Aid Program 

I submit below a schedule of Chapter 90 projects 
which were under construction in 1959 and a hst of 
Chapter 90 projects which we have earmarked for 
1960 consideration. 



PROJECTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN 1959 



Project 
Columbus avenue, Seaver street, 
Blue Hill avenue, Roxburj^ 
and Dorchester: 
Reconstruction from Egleston 
square to Columbia road 
(started in 1958 and com- 
pleted in 1959) 

Dorchester avenue. South Boston: 

Reconstruction from West 

Fourth street to Andrew 

square (started in 1959 and 

completed in 1959) 

Baker street, West Roxbury: 
Reconstruction from Centre 
street to V.F.W. Parkway 
(excluding between Spring 
street and Cutter road) 
(started in 1959 and com- 
pleted in 1959) 

Columbus Avenue, Roxbury: 
Reconstruction from Roxbury 
street to Centre street 
(started in 1959 and com- 
pleted in 1959) 

Albany street, Massachusetts 
avenue, Southampton street 
(miscellaneous traffic islands 
and widenings at intersection) 
(started in 1959 and com- 
pleted in 1959) 



Contractor 



John McCourt 
Company 



John McCourt 
Company 



J. J. Botti Co., Inc. 



Doolev Bros., Inc. 



John McCourt 
Company 



Final Contract 
Bid Price Payment 



$215,642 50 $231,685 60 



$115,555 30 $135,317 07 



$94,983 45 $96,413 50 



.$86,365 95 $92,594 84 



$34,979 75 $39,029 14 



Note: 70 per cent paid by state, 30 per cent paid by city 



Public Works Department 



ADDITIONAL CHAPTER 90 PROJECTS SCHEDULED 

Project 
Baker street, West Roxbury: 

(Excluding bridge over railroad) 
Reconstruction from Spring street to Cutter road . 



FOR 



Commonwealth avenue, Brighton: 

Reconstruction from Warren street to Chestimt Hill avenue . 

West Broadway, South Boston: 

Reconstruction from Dorchester avenue to Dorchester street 

American Legion Highway, West Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Blue Hill avenue to Cummins Highway 

Cambridge street, Charlestown: 

Reconstruction from Sullivan square to Somerville Line 

River street, Hyde Park: 

Reconstruction from Wood avenue to Fairmount avenue 

Fairmount avenue, Hyde Park: 

Reconstruction from River street to Truman Highway . 

Dorchester avenue. South Boston and Dorchester: 

Reconstruction from Andrew square to Columbia road . 

Columbia road, Dorchester: 

Reconstruction from Edward Everett square to Southeast Expressway 

Centre street, West Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Grove street to Dedham Line 

Beacon street, Boston Proper: 

Reconstruction from Kenmore square to Park Drive .... 

Bennington street. East Boston: 

Reconstruction from bridge over MTA at Walley street to Revere Line 

Atlantic avenue, Boston Proper: 

Reconstruction from Kneeland street to over Summer street 

Atlantic avenue, Boston Proper: 
Reconstruction from Storer street to Commercial street . 

Commercial street, Boston Proper: 
Reconstruction from Atlantic avenue to Prince street 

Causeway street, Boston Proper: 

Reconstruction from Prince street to Medford street 

Harvard street, Dorchester: 

Reconstruction from Washington street to Blue Hill avenue 

Amory street, Roxbury and West Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Atherton street to Green street 

La Grange street. West Roxbury: 

Reconstruction from Washington street to Newton Line 



Total 73,092 feet 



1960 

Length 

2,000 feet 
5,700 feet 
4,120 feet 

10,934 feet 
2,000 feet 
4,050 feet 
1,400 feet 
3,300 feet 
2,800 feet 
4,000 feet 
1,930 feet 
2,320 feet 
1,244 feet 
2,344 feet 

3,02S feet 

682 feet 

4,780 feet 

3,380 feet 

13,080 feet 



4 City Document No. 18 

Street Construction Work 

Exclusive of Chapter 90 Projects 

The report of the Division Engineer of the Highwa}'- 
Division lists in detail the varied highway constructions 
and reconstructions accomplished throughout the city 
along with some of the more important roadways. 

The following is a summarized financial statement of 
the expenditures made in 1959 for highway improve- 
ments : 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) . . $1,827,863 11 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue Account) . . 58,125 67 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) . . 26,315 78 

Sidewalks, Construction and reconstruction of . 72,700 66 



Total $1,985,005 22 



The following is a summarized record of the highway 
improvement work done by the department in 1959: 

N timber of Streets Constructed or Beconstructed, 168 

This total includes 28 new streets laid out and con- 
structed as public ways under the provisions of Chapter 
393, Acts of 1906. 

Streets Improved, 20.7 Miles 

This includes 4.0 miles reconstructed as Chapter 90 
projects. 

Sidewalks Improved, 1.6 Miles 

This item does not include sidewalks improved in the 
above-noted street improvements. 

Street Lighting 

We have continued our polic}^ of replacing inefficient 
gas lamps with modern electric illumination. During 
the 3'ear we replaced just under 97 gas lamps, leaving 
only about 203 out of a total of approximately 7,000 gas 
lamps that were in operation nine years ago. We hope 
to complete the gas lamp changeover during the coming 
year. 

A detailed list of lighting installations and improve- 
ments is included in the report of the Lighting Section 
of the Highway Division. This listing, plus a compila- 
tion of the total amount of modernization accomplished 
by relighting with modern mercury vapor lights of at 



Public Works Department 5 

least 20,000 lumens, highlights the accelerated pace of 
our very important street lighting modernization pro- 
gram. 

Recommendations 

Grade Damage Claims and the Public Improvement 
Commission 

When 393 streets are constructed, the cit}- awards 
damages to abutters who suffer grade damages. A sub- 
stantial amount of the time of the Public Improvement 
Commission is spent adjusting such claims, and a large 
amount of paper work is involved, much of which could 
be avoided if the contract for the construction of the 
street carried the necessary items to repair the damage. 
A careful survey would have to be made to determine 
what work would be required, in each case, and this 
should be shown on the contract plan with the necessary 
items in the proposal covering the work. 

Before the work is done, a damage claim release 
should be signed by the property owner, which release 
should contain a description of the work to be done. 

Highway and Sewer Loans 

All highway construction and reconstruction, and all 
sewer construction is paid for from separate loan ac- 
counts. The highway loan for two million dollars is 
authorized annually, the sewer loan for one million 
dollars either annually or every other year. The loans 
originate bj^ the Mayor's requesting the City Council 
to pass orders authorizing the loans, which consist of 
two parts; namely, the ''down payment" of about 
$150,000 for each loan, which sum is derived from 
taxes, and the loan proper. 

Normally, the loans do not become available for use 
until June of the year in which they are authorized. 
Consequently, the awarding of construction contracts is 
delayed, so that they cannot be completed in the year 
that they are awarded. This could, to a large extent, 
be avoided if the Mayor and the City Council acted in 
regard to the loans as soon after January 1 as possible. 

Where a loan is authorized annually, if the amount 
of the loan were increased to provide funds needed for a 
two-year period, this would result during the second year 
of a ten cent saving in the tax rate, with no additional 
interest charges, because only the amount of loan re- 
quired in the first year would be issued in that year. 



6 City Document No. 18 

Ce7itralize Labor Force Activities 
For the purpose of promoting economy and efficiency, 
it is recommended that a study be made as to the advis- 
abihty of centraHzing all activities of the labor forces of 
all divisions of the Pubhc Works Department in one 
location rather than, for example, maintaining the 
twelve district yards of the Highway Division, which — 
to a large extent — is a relic of the pre-motor vehicle 
era. This study should also include the determination 
of the size of the labor force and the number and type of 
motor vehicles and other mechanical equipment re- 
quired to furnish the quahty of service to \\hich the 
public is entitled, keeping in mind the number and type 
of trucks needed for spreading sand during the winter 
months. 

If this centralization is implemented, it would require 
the construction of suitable buildings to house the 
activities which probably would be located on the city- 
owned land on Albany street, and would entail the 
demoUtion of the present buildings which are old and 
unsuitable, with the exception of the garage building 
which is in need of complete renovation and extension. 

A study may reveal that it is inadvisable to abandon 
modern Public Works Department buildings located 
at Western Avenue, Brighton and at Forest Hills, 
Jamaica Plain, but it is my opinion that all sections 
of the City, with the possible exception of Brighton, 
can be efficiently serviced from one central location 
and that such a plan would result in substantial econo- 
mies, particularly if a pool were established for the 
use of motor trucks by all divisions of the department. 

Minor Repairs 
In 1958, a policy was adopted to make minor repairs 
by advertised contract to defective edgestone and 
sidewalks that could cause pedestrian accidents. There 
is a large amount of similar work yet to be done. The 
program proved to be successful and very much worth- 
while. It is recommended that it be continued. 

Roxbury Canal 
In 1959, a Special Commission was appointed by 
the Legislature to make a study of the advisabiUty 
of filling in the Roxbury Canal from Dorchester Avenue 
to Massachusetts Avenue. This is a natural surface 
water outlet for about 1,200 acres of contiguous area 



Public W ores Department 7 

and has several sewer overflow outlets that discharge 
into it. The need for constructing a suitable storm 
water conduit and filling in the canal has been recom- 
mended for a great many years, as it constitutes an 
open cesspool that emanates foul odors, this condition 
being made substantially worse by the construction 
of the Southeast Expressway. This is explained in some 
detail in the letter of transmittal contained in the 
report. The work was to be built and paid for by 
the state. 

The Committee on Metropolitan Affairs reported 
the bill out favorably, but the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee recommend further study by a Legislative 
Committee. 

Every effort should be made to have this committee's 
report favorable to the project, and to urge the enact- 
ment of legislation that will result in the construction 
of this most needed project. 

Construction of 393 Streets 

In 1958, the Public Improvement Commission adopted 
a policy that all new streets shall be first-class con- 
struction, that is, have granite edgestone and artificial 
stone sidewalks; whereas, formerly, petitioners had a 
choice of a somewhat lower cost construction which 
omitted the granite edgestone and artificial stone 
sidewalk and substituted various forms of bituminous 
concrete sidewalks. 

This policy was adopted because the use of granite 
edgestone and artificial stone sidewalk produces a 
finished street with long- wearing qualities, which re- 
duces maintenance cost to a minimum; whereas, a 
bituminous sidewalk, especially without edgestone, has 
a relatively short life, and, consequently, a high main- 
tenance cost. It is recommended that this policy be 
continued. 

1. Legislation: The city should press for early 
action in the next legislative session on the following 
items which have already been filed : 

A. Filling in of the upper Fort Point Channel, 
from Massachusetts avenue to Dorchester avenue. 

B. Acquisition of "water rights'' in the Lower 
Fort Point Channel, from Dorchester avenue to 
Northern avenue, by the state, preparatory to closing 
the channel to navigation. 



8 City Document No. IS 

C. In the interest of an early replacement of the 
Summer Street Bridge, the city should seek Federal 
permission for converting this bridge to a ''fixed 
span" as soon as the American Sugar Refinery 
ceases operations at its present plant, expected in 
1960. This would at least eliminate the necessity 
of manning and operating the drawspan which is 
in deplorable condition. 

D. Transfer of boundary bridges (connecting the 
City of Boston with another city or town) to the 
state. 

2. Proposed Legislation:, A bill (already submitted 
to the Law Department for filing) asking the state's 
approval for the closing of the Charlestown Bridge 
drawspan to navigation; state approval being necessary 
as well as Federal permission. It is hoped that federal 
approval will be given in 1960 on the basis of a petition 
and hearing previously held. 

The city should explore the possibility of converting 
the bridge at Reserved Channel to a fixed span, thereby 
allowing the replacement of the draw span with a pile 
trestle span or girder span; and eliminating the expense 
of operating the draw. 

3. Railroad Bridges: The city should consider a 
program of studies and conferences with the various 
railroads and other agencies, including the Massa- 
chusetts Turnpike Authority and Massachusetts De- 
partment of Public Works, to determine the best line 
of action and programming of repairing and rebuilding 
of the many bridges now owned and maintained by 
the railroads or by the railroads and the city jointly. 
The present status of the railroads in Boston indicates 
that some form of governmental action may be required 
to insure that these bridges will not be allowed to 
deteriorate and that the city's interest will be protected. 

State and/or federal aid possibilities should be 
explored thoroughly. 

4. Drawbridge Operation: It is recommended that 
the position of " Drawtender " be reclassified to a 
higher grade, permitting a salary increase of at least 
$10 per week. The fact that this position currently 
pays only $6 more per week than the First Assistant 
Drawtender makes it increasingly difficult to interest 
assistants in taking the Drawtender position when a 
vacancy occurs. Inasmuch as there are only eight 



Public Works Depart.mext 9 

sucli positions now, and it is expected that there will 
be less in another year, this is not an unreasonable 
request. Furthermore, considering the responsibility 
and quaHfications required, the position of Drawtender 
is underpaid. 

Commissioner of Public Works 

The responsibilities of the Commissioner of Public 
Works are to direct the functions of the Public W^orks 
Department, which fall into three main classifications, 
namely. Administrative, Engineering, and Operational. 
In addition, he is a member of the PubUc Improvement 
Commission, and usually the Chairman, The Traffic 
Commission, the Government Center Commission having 
to do with the building of the new City Hall and the 
Urban Redevelopment Co-ordinating Committee. 

The Administrative duties, aside from routine duties 
relating to general correspondence and answering com- 
plaints which takes too much of his time and actually 
should never reach the Commissioner but which must 
be satisfactorily resolved in order to promote good 
public relations, consist primarily of keeping informed 
of the activities of the seven divisions of the Depart- 
ment. This requires daily consultations with the 
Division Engineers to discuss their problems and the 
making of decisions regarding same. 

The engineering duties consist of reviewing and 
approving plans and specifications relating to contract 
construction work. In addition, engineering studies 
are required relating to proposed bridge, highway, 
sewer, and incinerator design. 

Operational duties relate to maintenance work by 
the labor forces of the department, including the 
operation of motor vehicles, refuse incinerator, sewerage 
pumping stations, water distribution, snow plowing, 
sanding and removal. 

As a member of the Public Improvement Commission, 
the Commissioner must spend the best part of one day 
a week and to do the right kind of a job, especially, as 
chairman, he should devote more time to it. As a 
member of the Traffic Commission, he must spend 
about one half a day a week, and while at present the 
meetings of the Government Center Commission are 
infrequent, the Commissioner will have to devote a 
substantial amount of time to this important Com- 
mission, starting in the year 1960. 



10 City Document No. 18 

For the Commissioner to devote as much time as 
possible to all of the above activities, leaves no time 
for constructive thinking and planning required to 
formulate policies that will promote increased economy 
and efficiency of the Public Works Department. 

There is only one way that this situation can be 
changed, and that is to provide the Commissioner with 
two Engineering Assistants — one to be his First Assist- 
ant and have the title of Chief Engineer to take charge of 
all engineering activities of the department, including 
studies and investigations relating to same, including 
the approval of all plans and specifications relating to 
contract construction work, the preliminary study and 
planning for a new incinerator which the city must 
build. He would also organize and direct snow plowing 
and removal work. This position should be filled by a 
career employee, at Grade 42, with a maximum salary 
of S210.75 per week. 

The Second Assistant should have the title of As- 
sistant Chief Engineer and be in charge of operational 
activities, that is, maintenance work done by the yard 
forces to the extent of formulating programs, introduc- 
ing new methods, and to measure progress and to keep 
the Commissioner informed accordingly. It is recom- 
mended that the present Associate Engineer who is 
now an Assistant to the Commissioner and an ex- 
ceptionally loyal and competent employee, be appointed 
Assistant Chief Engineer with a grade of 40, and a 
maximum salary of $198.75 per week. 

The salary of the Commissioner of Pubhc Works 
should be increased to $15,000.00 per year. 

Personnel 

There were 1,788 employees in the department as of 
December 31 as compared with 1,885 employees on the 
rolls on January 1, 1959. 

I attach reports from the Division Engineers relative 
to the activities of their divisions in 1959, together with 
a report of the Public Improvement Commission 
covering its work during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert P. Shea, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Public Works Department 



11 



MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 





Total Appropriations, 






Division or Service 


Including 
Transfers and Amounts 
Carried Over from 1958 


E.xpenditures 


Unexpended 
Balance 


Central Office 


$70,749 00 


$67,391 17 


$3,357 83 


Automotive Division . 


767,297 39 


735,389 72 


31,907 67 


Bridge Division . 


755,565 80 


741,392 09 


14,173 71 


Highway Division 


1,620,695 49 


1,432,122 24 


188,573 25 


Highway Program, Chapter 








718, Acts of 195G . 


1,825,572 20 


1,820,437 62 


5,134 58 


Lighting Service 


5,098,200 00 


4,936,951 72 


161,248 28 


Sanitary Service 


815,010 90 


779,429 52 


35,581 38 


Sewer Division . 


— 


— 


— 


Sumner Tunnel . 











Survey Division 


104,550 00 


103,294 54 


1,255 49 


Water Division . 


2,736,525 81 


2,454,164 34 


282,361 47 


Totals .... 


$13,974,898 89 


$13,170,177 61 


$804,721 28 



LOANS AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS 



■I'lTLfc 


Total Amount 
Available 


E.xpenditures 


Unexpended 
Balance 


Bridges Construction of (Non-Revenue) 


■11,030,100 4.5 

8,001 09 

2,459,811 21 
4,001,814 52 
155,634 34 
001,143 15 
417,071 13 
41,008 25 

98,058 03 
10,550 27 


$413,177 92 

3,240 00 

2,268,120 40 
1,827,863 11 
58,125 67 
426,495 97 
382,388 82 
20,315 78 

72,700 GO 
8,016 47 


$022 938 .53 


Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings Thereof (Nfon-Revenue) 


5 421 09 


Incinerator Building, Construction and Equipping 


191,690 81 




2 173 951 41 


Public Ways Construction of (Revenue) . 


97 508 67 




174,647 18 


Snow Removal (Revenue) 


35 282 31 




14,692 47 


Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of (Reve- 


25,357 00 


Street Signs (Revenue) 


1 933 80 






Totals . . 


$8,830,408 44 


$5,487,044 30 


$3 343 423 27 







12 



City Document No. 18 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 1,945 persons eUgible for employment in the several 
divisions, and of that number 1,788 were upon the 
January 2, 1960, payrolls. 

GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 





Services 


Title 


o 


1 

s 


1 


i 


s 
•a 


1 


1 


> 
1 


1 




^ 


















Division engineers 




1 




1 




1 


1 
















1 
















1 




















1 














Superintendents and assistants. . . . . 




1 


2 
13 
2 

1 




2 




g 






13 




1 


1 


1 

7 
4 


13 
6 
8 


19 
3 
3 


2 

4 
1 
2 


11 
6 

7 

1 


9 


Principal senior and assistant civil engi- 


55 


Junior civil engineers 






20 








20 










4 


Senior public relations representative 








1 






1 






1 














Automotive, principal and senior electrical 


















Assistant electrical engineers 
















1 












4 








Pumping station engineers and stationary 










5 






9 


General foreman 




1 










1 








59 


4 
3 

67 


5 

1 

Id 


5 
3 




26 


Other foremen ... . . 




13 


1 


21 


Chief inspectors 




3 






1 


2 


20 

1 




104 


Legal assistant 




1 












' 


2 


4 


E.xecutive secretary and assistants 










2 
























3 






112 


100 


57 


41 


28 













Public Works Department 13 

GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES — Continued 











Services 








Title 


11 

go 
u 


% 

< 






>> 

i 
1 




1 
1 


5? 
t 
5 


1 




3 
2 


19 


17 


112 


100 


57 


41 


28 


m 


Executive secretary, P. W. D 

Senior personnel officer and assistant 


1 
















2 






1 

1 


1 


1 








Head clerks 


1 
1 


1 


1 


3 




9- 




1 


Principal clerks, stenographers, account 
clerks, etc 


2 


3 


■■ 


4 


4 


9 
1 
31 
17 
3 
1 
1 


3 
1 


3r> 








Senior clerks, typists, stenographers, etc.. . 


2 


4 
1 




4 


3 
1 


2 


47 
19 










3 










1 


2 

1 










1 
2 




3 


Senior storekeeper and storekeepers 






















1 

5 

32 




1 
































3-> 






1 
3 
8 










1 


Sergeants, mobile guard. . . 
















3 


Mobile guards 
















S 


















1 








93 










93 





















Chief and senior investigators 








2 










2 




















Dispatcher. . 




1 












^ 














17 


1 
1 

1 


^^ 


Head photostat operator 














1 














1 




•■> 














1 














5 

2 












1 


1 




7 




11 










Carried forward 


10 


43 


11.5 


140 


113 


73 


169 


35 


698 



14 



City Document No. 18 



GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES — Concluded 





Services 


Title 


CO 
O 


> 

s 

3 

< 


m 


ri 

K 


.1 
S 


S 

& 




>> 

1 

CO 


1 




10 


43 


115 


140 


113 


73 


169 


35 


698 






Working foremen 




3 


3 




3 


9 
1 
9 


20 




38 


















4 






13 










2 












28 


• 


e 

8 
G 

3 


: 


81 

1 
18 




125 


Crane operator .... 




9 


Maintenance mechanics and helpers, etc.. . 






10 


' 


26 








16 


Welders. . 




1 






4 






3 


1 
38 

1 








8 












38 


Blacksmiths and helpers. ... 








15 








16 










4 
9 
9 


1 




6 












9 


















9 






3 
4 


4 


19 
33 


07 
94 
18 


17 
26 




107 






185 


Incinerator stokers 




18 





















Garage attendants 




15 
4 














15 






3 


83 

1 


308 
5 


14 


3 




437 


Constables 




9 












Totals . 


10 


103 


140 


320 


658 


161 


361 


35 


1788 







Public Works Department 



15 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ACTUALLY EMPLOYED 
JANUARY I, 1959, AND JANUARY I, I960 

















^ 






















h 










































«?f 


... 










1 


a 

a 

3 

H 


IJ 




fS 


P 






3 


3 




33 


100 


11 


148 


374 


34 ■> 


607 


165 


105 


1,885 


January 1, 1960 


35 




10 


140 


361 


320 


658 


161 


103 


1,788 







Total Eligible Force 



January 1 
January 1 


, 1959. . 


39 
39 


108 


^^ 


156 
156 


393 
393 


353 
353 


621 
711 


171 
171 


110 
111 


1,962 


, I960 


1,945 







APPOINTMENTS, TRANSFERS, RESIGNATIONS, RETIRE- 
MENTS, DEATHS, ETC., OF EMPLOYEES 





















a m 












« 


rI 






s 




s 


o% 


S 


































?si 


go 


■g 




^- 


Services 


^- 


V. 




•a 


"? 


Q 


1 


H^ 


Q 




i 


1959-1960 


s 


P 


1 
a 
■53 


1 




1 




1 






11 


Central Office 


10 




1 






3 


4 






. 




105 


Automotive 


103 


2 




3 


1 


o 


4 




.. 




, 


148 


Bridge 


140 








1 


4 


16 




8 


8 


6 


342 


Higliway 


320 


2 


2 


4 


13 


10 


26 




2 


5 


15 


607 


Sanitary 


658 


17 




7 


63 


6 


3 
8 


3 


1 


3 

7 


10 


165 
33 
374 




161 
35 
361 


1 


1 




14 








3 


Water. 


2 




^ 


13 








:>8 


62 


6 


23 


25 


35 


1,785 




1,788 


24 


28 


20 


110 









16 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX A 



REPORT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION 



Boston, December 31, 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I am submitting herewith the annual report of the 
Automotive Division of the Pubhc Works Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1959. This report 
covers the activities of the four garages, the Mobile 
Guard and the Motor Pool. 

The four garages are located at 624 Albany street, 
Boston, a two-story building with a floor area of 22,000 
square feet used for garaging cars; 280 Highland street, 
Roxbury, a one-story building with a floor area of 8,200 
square feet used for repair work; 162 Hancock street, 
Dorchester, a one-story building with a floor area of 
8,800 square feet used for garaging cars; 327 Forest 
Hills street, Jamaica Plain, a one-story building with a 
floor area of 8,400 square feet used for repair work. 
The above garages also dispense gasoline and oil. There 
are five other gas and oil stations located in district 
yards. 

The Motor Pool and Mobile Guard are located at 
174 West Second street, South Boston, where we have 
a two-way radio base station. Forty-eight of our 
vehicles are equipped as mobile stations. 

The Automotive Division is primarily concerned with 
the repair and maintenance of the automotive equipment 
of the Public Works Department which consists of: 

81 Passenger cars, including carryalls, etc. 
31 34-Ton pickup trucks 
118 134- to 15-ton dump trucks 
28 1-Ton utility trucks 
5 2-Ton derrick and lumber trucks 

4 2-Ton trucks Avith catch basin cleaners 

3 5-Ton trucks with Dempster Dumpster Units 

5 l3/2-Ton 7-man cab emergencj^ trucks 
3 2-Ton to 10-ton wreckers 

2 3-Ton gate closing trucks 

3 ly^- to 3-ton platform trucks 



Public Works Department 17 

9 13^-Ton trucks with compressors 
9 Miscellaneous trucks 

2 Gutter vacuum cleaners 
25 Street sweepers 

5 Street flushers 

40 Snow fighters 

3 Snow loaders 

4 Rear bucket loaders 
22 Front bucket loaders 

3 Crawler tractors 
3 Compressor trailers 
11 Gasoline road rollers 

1 Road grader 
65 Items of miscellaneous equipment, portable 
crane, tool box trailers, lighting plants, lawn 
mowers, etc. 

Four hundred thirtj^-two of these units are registered 
under the motor vehicle law of the Commonwealth. 

The one-hundred and two employees of this division 
are engaged in the following duties: 

The Director of Transportation in charge of the 
division, eight employees assigned to office work, 38 
employees assigned to repair work, 30 employees 
assigned to maintenance of buildings, gasoline and oil 
dispensing and watchman duties. Five employees 
assigned to the stockroom, three employees assigned to 
operation of wreckers, one dispatcher, one Inspector of 
Driver Training, and fifteen employees assigned to the 
Mobile Patrol which maintains a w'atch over Public 
Works Department Property and equipment between 
the hours of 4:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. on weekdays and 
all day on Saturda}', Sunday, and holidays. 

The City Hall Office of the Automotive Division 
processed 1,713 requisitions in 1959 of wdiich 540 w-ere 
purchase and 1,173 were service orders. Approximately 
100 purchases a month usually under $5.00 each are 
made from petty cash funds. 

The expenditures for 1959 are as follows: 
1. Personal services .... $432,169 GO 



2. Contractual services 

3. Supplies and materials 

4. Current charges 

5. Equipment 



65,263 03 

144,315.28 

10,131 97 

83,510 13 

$735,389 72 



18 City Document No. 18 

New equipment added to our fleet in 1959 consisted 
of the following : 

Sanitary Division: 

Two Tarco gutter vacuum cleaners mounted on Willys 
13^-ton trucks 

One Chevrolet sedan 

Three White trucks, 15-ton, for incinerator 

One International tractor caterpillar for incinerator 

One Willys jeep for incinerator 
Highway Division: 

One Michigan front end loader 

One International carryall 

One Chevrolet carryall 

Two Root weed cutters 
Sewer Division : 

Two Ford emergency trucks with 7 man cabs 
Automotive Division: 

One Chevrolet sedan 
Bridge Division: 

One Chevrolet sedan 
Water Division: 

Three Ford express trucks 

Two Ford F-250 chassis and cab for compressor 

Two Ford sedans 

One Buick 2 door Sedan 

The Automotive Division recommends that the 
following projects be done in 1960: 

A survey of the Albany Street Garage was made in 
1958 by the Thompson and Lichtner Engineering 
Company and they recommend major repairs to the 
building including a new roof. Thev estimated a sum 
of $60,000.00 be spent. 

The easterh^ wall of the Dana Avenue Garage should 
be repointed at an estimate of $2,000.00. 

At the Highland Street Garage, a water hydrant 
should be located to provide for the washing of vehicles 
and the yard should be smooth surfaced with hot top, 
total costs, $2,000.00. Provision has been made in the 
division budget for 1960 for replacement of equipment 
over seven years old or beyond repair. 

Timothy J. O'Leary 
Director of Transportation. 



Public Works Department 19 

APPENDIX B 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE DIVISION 



Boston, December 31, 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Submitted herewith is the annual report of the 
Bridge Division, covering the income, expenditures, and 
operation of the Bridge Service and the Sumner Tunnel 
for the year ending December 31, 1959. 



Respectfully, 



John J. McCall, 

Division Engineer, 
Bridge Division. 



20 City Document No. 18 

During the year 1959, the Bridge Division operated 
8 drawbridges, i. e.: 

Summer street over Fort Point Channel 
Congress street over Fort Point Channel 
Northern avenue over Fort Point Channel 
Summer street over Reserved Channel 
Charlestown Bridge over Charles River 
Maiden Bridge over Mystic River 
McArdle Bridge over Chelsea River 
Chelsea street over Chelsea River 

The former Dover Street Bridge over Fort Point 
Channel has been removed; and its replacement by 
solid fill is in progress as a Chapter 90 project, with the 
city and state sharing equally in the cost, estimated to 
be approximately $600,000. 

The Broadway Bridge over Fort Point Channel has 
been permanently closed as a drawbridge. During the 
past year, the operating machinerj^ has been removed, 
ends fixed, the drawtenders' house and fender platform 
removed, and the open steel deck of the draw roadway 
filled solid and paved with bituminous concrete. 

Following is a description of the conditions, planning 
and status relating to the 8 operating drawbridges: 

1. Fort Point Channel 

Summer Street Bridge: This bridge is in extremely 
poor condition; and its replacement is being deferred 
until the American Sugar Refinery has relocated its 
plant in Charlestown, approximately one year from now. 
It has been decided that at such time the present bridge 
will be replaced with a solid fill roadway facility (similar 
to that now building at Dover street) ; and to that end, 
an engineering contract has been awarded to W. A. 
Fisher Company, Consulting Engineers, for furnishing 
plans and specifications. 

It is assumed that with the closing of the sugar 
refiner}^ it will be possible to close the present bridge to 
navigation and to proceed with its replacement. 

Congress Street Bridge: This drawbridge is in good 
condition. 

It is expected that, with the closing of the sugar 
refinery, this bridge also may be closed to navigation. 

Northern Avenue Bridge: Northern Avenue Bridge, 
although operating satisfactorily, should be scheduled 



Public Works DeparTxMent 21 

for rebuilding; or replacement by solid fill as soon as 
practicable. The choice hinges on when the entire 
channel may be closed to navigation. 

With the elimination of the disposal scow movements 
through this draw, and the anticipated closing of the 
American Sugar Refinery in South Boston, the Northern 
Avenue Bridge will be operating for the sole benefit of one 
commercial user of the waterway. 

Accordingly, it seems logical to assume that this 
bridge, in addition to Congress Street and Summer 
Street Bridges, may be eliminated as a drawbridge in the 
near future. 

Legislation has been sought l\y the city to accomplish 
full closure of Fort Point Channel, thereby permitting 
the improvements referred to above. 

2. Reserved Channel 

Summer Street Bridge {Formerly L Street) : The South 
Boston approach trestle of this bridge has been com- 
pletely rebuilt; and the Boston approach pile work has 
been repaired, and a new pavement laid. 

The drawspan, although in relatively poor condition, 
has been purposely excluded from a major repair pro- 
gram because of the possibility that the movable draw- 
span could be ehminated in the near future. 

At present, only one commercial unit uses the water- 
way for transporting minor cargoes of fuel oil by barge. 

Accordingly, it is hoped that by the time the draw- 
span requires replacement, the inner channel can be 
closed to navigation and the drawspan replaced by a 
fixed span or trestle at considerable saving to the city. 

3. Charles River 

Charlestown Bridge: At the present time, this bridge 
is in very good condition; having been reconstructed 
and repaired throughout, in 1957-58. 

The city still hopes to have this drawspan fully closed 
to navigation on the basis presented in a petition to the 
United States Engineers at a hearing held on April 16, 
1959. As a partial concession, the Engineers have per- 
mitted restricted operation, confined to the hours 11.00 
P.M. to 6.00 A.M. Inasmuch as there is only one com- 
mercial user of the waterway requiring openings, at a 
decreasing rate, there is every reason to believe that full 
closure of this drawspan can be realized soon. 



22 City Document No. 18 

4. Mystic River 

Maiden Bridge: This bridge is in very poor condition 
and is scheduled for complete rebuilding. The project 
has been delayed pending a definite decision of the 
United States Engineers regarding the width of water- 
way to be constructed in the new bridge. 

The rebuilding is to be executed by the state at no 
expense to the cit3\ 

The new bridge will be turned over to the city for 
operation and maintenance. 

5. Chelsea Ri,ver 

McArdle and Chelsea Street Bridges: Both of these 
drawbridges are in good operating order and structural 
condition. 

From the standpoint of waterborne traffic these are 
the busiest and most important of our drawbridges, 
inasmuch as they accommodate the movement of fuel 
oil cargo vessels (on a major basis) servicing the oil 
storage farms in Chelsea, Revere and East Boston. 

However, since oil is almost exclusively the only 
type cargo invoh^ed, it seems advisable to explore the 
feasibility of pipe fines in the Chelsea River, to minimize 
the need of these drawbridges. 

6. Inland Bridges 

At the present time, this department is involved in 
the maintenance of 80 inland bridges as follows: 

Maintained entirely by this department ... 49 
Maintained jointly with New Haven Railroad . .15 

Maintained jointly with Boston & Albany Railroad . 10 

Maintained jointly with Boston & Maine Railroad . 1 

Maintained jointly with MTA 1 

Maintained jointly with Town of Winthrop . . 1 

Maintained jointly with Town of Milton ... 2 

Maintained jointly with Town of Watertown . . 1 

Total 80 



It should be noted, in connection with the inland 
bridges over railroads, that there is room for much 
improvement on these structures, many of which should 
be rebuilt in order to provide modern bridges of ample 
capacit}^ with clear roadways (without center girders 
or trusses) to accommodate present day traffic safely. 



Public Works Department 23 

However, such a program is necessarily being deferred 
for the following reasons: — ■ 

In the case of the bridges over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad, the possibility of the Massachusetts Turnpike 
being extended to Boston over this right-of-way makes 
it inadvisable to proceed with anj^ program other than 
emergency or necessary repairs until the Turnpike 
Extension is either abandoned or a reality. 

Concerning most of the bridges over the New Haven 
Railroad, the city has little control except for main- 
taining wearing surfaces and underdecks; and inasmuch 
as most of these are still of wooden construction, it 
becomes by far the most expensive part of the main- 
tenance of these bridges. 

For many years the railroads have been pleading 
lack of funds as the main reason for not rebuilding such 
bridges. 

In connection with the anticipated elimination of 
Summer Street Bridge as a drawbridge, an engineering- 
contract has been awarded to Wm. A. Fisher Co., 
consulting engineers, (in an amount not to exceed 
$45,000) for engineering and designing (including 
furnishing plans and specifications) for a sohd fill 
bridge replacement with culvert facilities to accom- 
modate tidal flow. 

To furnish necessary preliminary information, this 
division is engaged in making a survey and soundings, 
and has contracted with the Carr Construction Corp. 
for making borings and taking sub-soil samples. 

With the commencement of w^ork on the Prudential 
Center and the proposed Civic Auditorium to be built 
by the city, it becomes necessary to construct a new 
bridge at Dalton street (extended) to span the Boston 
& Albany Railroad property and connect with Boylston 
street, adjacent to the proposed new Auditorium. 

Accordingly, an engineering contract (in an amount 
not to exceed $36,750) has been awarded to Metcalf & 
Eddy for the design of the new bridge, including fur- 
nishing plans and specifications. 

This division is making the necessary survey and has 
contracted with Carr Construction Corp. for making 
the necessary borings. 

The solid fill replacement of Dover Street Bridge 
is being accomplished under a Chapter 90 contract 



24 



City Document No. 18 



awarded by the state. The city will bear one-half 
the cost, estimated at this time to be approximately 
$300,000. 

The necessity of relocating various utilities, including 
water mains, electric cables, etc., required construction 
of a trestle upstream of the solid fill project. The 
trestle was completed in January, 1959. The city's 
share of the cost of this trestle amounted to $60,000.00. 

7. 1959 Contract Work 

The more important contract work executed during 
1959, is as follows: 



Description 


Contractor 


Cost 


Starting 
Date 


Completion 


Boylston St. Bridge, over B. & 
A. R.R., deck repairs. . . 


M.J. Kelly Co., Inc.... 

John J. Botti Co., Inc.. . 

General Ship & Engine 
Works, Inc. 

Foley Corporation 

Foley Corporation 

H. Piken Co., Inc 

Frederick W. Byron .... 
Carr Construction Corp. 


«33,975 00 
10,734 00 
3,248 00 

17,050 00 

5,450 00* 
8,440 00 
3,073 70 
3,363 80 


Mar. 2, 1959 
May 18, 1959 
June 7, 1959 

July 16, 1959 

Aug. 0, 1959 
Oct. 20, 1959 
Oct. 5, 1959 
Nov. 5, 1959 


May 8, 1959 
Aug. 4, 1959 
June 30, 1959 


Massachusetts Ave., underpass. 


Northern Ave. Bridge, repairs 
to end lifts and compressor. . . . 

Broadway Bridge over Ft. Pt. 
Channel, removing drawhouse, 
fenders, machinery, etc. and 


Temple St. Underpass, W. Rox. 
and River St. Bridge, H. P., 
concrete repairs and painting. 

Various bridges, cleaning and 


Oct. 20, 1959 
Dec. 26, 1959 
Nov. 22 1959 
Dec. 15, 1959 


Maiden Bridge, repairs to steel 
grid roadway of drawspan 

Summer St. Bridge over Ft. Pt. 
Ch. and Dalton St., borings. . . 



* Reimbursable by Railroad $2,100. 



8. Proposed Work — 1960 
Proposed new bridge construction which has been 
scheduled for 1960, as part of the City-State Chapter 
90 program includes a new bridge superstructure at 
Bennington street, East Boston, over the M.T.A. 

The estimated cost of this improvement is as follows: 



Location 
Bennington St. 



State 

Share 

$75,000 



City 

Share Total 

$75,000 $150,000 



Public Works Department 25 

Other work which this division expects to undertake 
in 1960, involves an alteration of the fender system 
of the Chelsea Street Bridge, to provide a channelway 
96 feet wide, to conform to an order of the United 
States Engineers, expected to be issued soon. 

The need for this change arises from the collapse 
and abandonment of the Boston & Albany Railroad 
bridge adjacent to the city's highway bridge. The 
railroad bridge defined a waterway only 70 feet wide, 
which hmited the size and type of oil cargo vessels 
passing through. 

Although the estimated cost of the proposed altera- 
tion (including removal of the old railroad bridge 
piers, etc.) approximates $240,000, the work relating 
directly to city-owned facilities amount to approxi- 
mately $100,000; and of that figure, all but $8,000 is 
reimbursable from Federal funds, under the provisions 
of the Truman-Hobbs Act as amended. 



9. Maintenance Force 

Work done by the bridge maintenance force during 
the year included regular routine operations such as 
renewing bridge floor planking; sidewalk planking; 
repairing defective areas of bridge pavements; cleaning 
and painting bridge gates, fences, guard rails, etc. 

Other work includes cleaning, checking, testing and 
making minor repairs and renewals to bridge operating 
machinery. 

As required, the maintenance force assists in emer- 
gency contract work, demolition and clean-up work, 
snow removal, etc. 

10. Work Done With Other Agencies 

The Bridge Division drew up the preliminary plans 
and specifications covering the demolition and removal 
of the old North End Park Piers; and the work was 
executed as a Chapter 91 contract, with the city and 
state equally sharing the cost. The work was done by 
C. Ray Norris Co. at a final cost of $20,900, and was 
completed April 18, 1959. 

The Bridge Division also made the preliminary plans, 
specifications and cost estimates covering the demoHtion 
and removal of the old subway entrance "hump" in 



26 City Document No. 18 

Maverick square, East Boston. On the basis of these 
plans, the MTA contracted for the work and the City 
agreed to assume one-half the cost. The work was 
clone b}'^ Rich Construction Co., Inc. at a final cost of 
$35,436, and was completed on September 8, 1959. 

11. Recommendations 

Incidental to the foregoing report, it is urged that the 
city take action as far as may be possible in relation to 
the following recommendations: 

1. Legislation: The city should press for early 
action in the next legislative session on the following 
items which have already been filed: 

A. Filling in of the upper Fort Point Channel, 
from Massachusetts avenue to Dorchester avenue. 

B. Acquisition of "water rights" in the lower Fort 
Point Channel, from Dorchester avenue to Northern 
avenue, by the state, preparatory to closing the 
channel to navigation. 

C. In the interest of an early replacement of the 
Summer Street Bridge, the city should seek Federal 
permission for converting this bridge to a ''fixed 
span" as soon as the American Sugar Refinery 
ceases operations at its present plant, expected in 
1960. This would at least eliminate the necessity 
of manning and operating the drawspan which is in 
deplorable condition. 

D. Transfer of boundary bridges (connecting the 
City of Boston with another city or town) to the 
state. 

2. Proposed Legislation: A bill (already submitted 
to the Law Department for fihng) asking the State's 
approval for the closing of the Charlestown Bridge 
drawspan to navigation; State approval being necessary 
as well as federal permission. It is hoped that federal 
approval will be given in 1960 on the basis of a petition 
and hearing previously held. 

The city should explore the possibihty of converting 
the bridge at Reserved Channel to a fixed span, thereby 
allowing the replacement of the draw span with a pile 
trestle span or girder span; and eliminating the expense 
of operating the draw. 



Public Works Department 27 

3. Railroad Bridges: The city should consider a 
program of studies and conferences with the various 
raih-oads and other agencies, including the Massa- 
chusetts Turnpike Authority and Massachusetts De- 
partment of Public Works, to determine the best line 
of action and programming of repairing and rebuilding 
of the many bridges now owned and maintained by the 
railroads or by the railroads and the city jointly. The 
present status of the railroads in Boston indicates that 
some form of governmental action may be required to 
insure that these bridges will not be allowed to de- 
teriorate and that the city's interest will be protected. 

State and/or federal aid possibilities should be 
explored thoroughly. 

4. Drawbridge Operation: It is recommended that 
the position of "Drawtender" be reclassified to a 
higher grade, permitting a salary increase of at least 
$10 per week. The fact that this position currently 
pays onh^ $6 more per week than the First Assistant 
Drawtender makes it increasingly difficult to interest 
assistants in taking the Drawtender position when a 
vacancy occurs. Inasmuch as there are only eight 
such positions now — and it is expected that there will 
be less in another year — this is not an unreasonable 
request. Furthermore, considering the responsibihty 
and quahfications required, the position of Drawtender 
is underpaid. 

Sumner Tunnel 

In accordance with the terms of chapter 598, Acts 
of 1958, the Sumner Tunnel was transferred to the 
Massachusetts Turnpike Authority for ownership, op- 
eration and maintenance. 

In the office of Mayor Hynes, on April 29, 1959, 
the City of Boston officially transferred title of the 
quarter-centurj^-old Sumner Tunnel to the Massa- 
chusetts Turnpike Authority. The consideration was 
a check for $10,850,062.60. A second payment of 
$1,548,722.22 to the city's sinking fund was made 
by the purchaser to clear the books of all outstanding 
Sumner Tunnel bonds. The city, in turn, made a pay- 
ment of approximately $300,000 to the Turnpike 
Authority, representing tunnel toll revenues since the 
first of the year. 



^ City Document No. 18 

As a result of the transaction, 98 permanent employees 
of the City of Boston became employees of the Massa- 
chusetts Turnpike Authority, with all their civil service 
and state-city retirement rights full}' protected. The 
personnel involved in the transfer were the super- 
intendent of the tunnel, 49 tollmen-guards (officers 
and men), 43 maintenance personnel, and 6 clerical 
employees. 

At this time it should be noted that since the day 
of its opening, June 30, 1934, the operation and main- 
tenance of the Sumner Tunnel has been under the 
direct charge of Superintendent Thomas B. Ryan, 
who is to be commended for the efficient manner in 
which he has kept the tunnel operating under in- 
creasingly severe traffic conditions. 



Public Works Department 29 

BRIDGE DIVISION 
Budget Expenditures, 1959 

1. Personal Services 

10 Permanent employees $581,(525 57 

11 Temporary employees .... 5,000 00 

12 Overtime 33,170 05 



$619,801 62 



2. Contractual Services 

21 Communications $1,216 54 

22 Light, heat, and power .... 8,583 99 

26 Repairs and maintenance of buildings 

and structures 8,776 46 

27 Repairs and servicing of equipment . . 454 34 

28 Transportation of persons .... 179 70 

29 Other contractual services .... 293 13 



3. Supplies and Materials 

33 Heating supplies and materials . . . $3,193 08 

34 Household supplies and materials . . 297 62 

35 Medical, dental, and hospital supplies and 

materials 48 71 

36 Office supplies and materials . . . 1,419 30 
39 Other supplies and materials . . . 10,970 35 



4. Curre.nt Charges and Obligations 
49 Other current charges and obligations. . $373 34 



5. Equipment 
59 Other efjuipment $252 89 



7. Structures and Improvements 
71 Other structures and improvements . . $3,335 33 
(711 bridges, construction) 
(712 bridges, repairs) structures and im- 
provements 76,132 69 

(714 bridges, repairs) resurfacing, paint- 
ing, deck repairs, etc 6,063 00 



$19,504 16 



$15,929 06 



$373 34 



$252 89 



$85,531 02 



6-53-11 Loan Account (Non-Revenue) 

( Unencumbered ) ( Unencumbered ) 

1958 1959 Balance to 

Balance Expenditure 1960 

Bridges, construction of $2,201,375 09 $413,177 92 $2,277,771 65 



30 



City Document No. 18 



Details of Expenditures on Tidewater Bridges 

TIDEWATER BRIDGES — 1959 



Bridge 


Draw- 
tenders' 
Salaries 


Mechanics' 
Wages 


Material 


Repair 
BiUs 


Supplies, 

Utilities, 

Etc.* 


Total 




$8,978 30 
30,330 41 
63,846 59 
41,219 65 
62,541 72 
64,783 76 
60,629 43 
49,090 18 
44,663 06 


$1,530 26 
2,224 80 
3,731 59 
2,787 59 
3,528 88 
3,053 84 
6,439 47 

11,255 40 
4,461 73 


$36 00 
246 15 
108 02 
153 36 
151 98 
80 06 
408 34 
3,027 02 
384 45 


$75 70 

737 53 

215 55 

468 66 

1,380 51 

1,850 13 

1,677 80 

2,505 70 

506 02 


$232 24 

2,058 51 

763 55 

619 20 

974 81 

2,298 81 

3,066 24 

841 03 

522 44 






35 597 40 


Chelsea Street 

Congress Street 

Maiden . . 


08.665 30 
45,248 46 
08,577 90 

72.666 00 
72,221 28 
07,319 99 
50,537 70 


Andrew P. McArdle.... 

Northern Avenue 

Summer Street (Ft. Pt.) 
Summer Street (L St.). . 


Totals 


$426,083 10 


.$39,619 62 


$5,195 98 


$9,417 66 


$11,376 83 


$491,693 19 







Amounts tentative pending final clearance of bills t Fixed span — July 15, 1959 — start of contract 



Public Works Department 



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32 City Document No. 18 



APPENDIX C 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE HIGHWAY DIVISION 



Boston, January 4, 1960. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

The following report of the income, expenditures, 
and operation of the Highway Division of the Public 
Works Department is hereby submitted for the year 
ending December 31, 1959. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTHFORD J. KeLLEY, 

Division Engineer, Highway Division. 



Public Works Department 33 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 



Paving Service 

SUMMARY OF BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS 



Appropriation 


Total Credits 


Expenditures 


Balance 
Unexpended 




$1,620,695 49 
41,008 25 
155,634 34 


$1,432,122 24 
26,315 78 


$188,573 25 


Reconstruction of 
Streets 


14,692 47 


Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Revenue) 


58,125 67 


97,508 67 


Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of ( Non-Revenue ) 


4,001,814 52 


1,827,863 11 


2,173,951 41 


Sidewalks, Construction 
and Reconstruction of 


98,058 03 


72,700 66 


25,357 37 


Street Signs 


10,550 27 
417,671 13 


8,616 47 
382,477 02 


1,933 80 




35,194 11 







In the Permit Office, the permits issued and monies 
received for 1959 are as follows: 

PERMITS ISSUED 

Signs . . 8,065 

Occupation permits 6,566 

Sidewalk licenses 291 

Driveway applications 281 

Special permits 325 

Department permits (free) 1,277 

Street opening deposits 541 

Total 17,346 

CASH RECEIVED 

Occupation permits $66,399 86 

Signs 85,868 00 

Sidewalk licenses 22,299 25 

Plans and miscellaneous 35 

Driveway applications 570 00 

Notifications 110 00 

Rents 10,467 00 

Total income less street openings $185,714 46 

Street openings 95,880 7 1 

Total income $281,595 17 



34 City Document No. IS 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were em- 
ployed as usual in the maintenance of pubhc streets, 
resurfacing and patching macadam pavements, patching 
permanent pavements, such as asphalt and granite 
block, and maintaining gravel, brick, and artificiai 
stone sidewalks. 

During the snow season, division forces were em- 
ployed in spreading salt and sand on ic}' streets, plowing 
snow throughout the City, and removing snow in the 
business areas. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs: 

Erected 94 4-inch street signposts. 

Erected 11 new hero square signs for dedication. 

Replaced 138 hero square signs. 

Installed 532 baked enamel street signs. 

Installed 97 hand-painted metal street signs. 

Removed 271 old hand-painted signs, damaged baked 
enamel and obliterated signs. 

Repaired or straightened 126 bent or broken street sign 
posts (4-inch type). 

Repaired, in blacksmith shop, 242 broken street sign 
frames and welded 36 4-inch street signposts. 

Repaired 158 street sign frames, collars, and brackets on 
4-inch street signposts and light poles. 

Removed 207 pieces of rope, wire, old tires from signs on 
4-inch posts and light poles. 

Installed 416 street sign frames. 

Installed 193 street sign collars. 

Installed 54 pairs of adapters on wooden poles. 

Installed HI acorns on top of 4-inch street signposts. 

Installed 182 "Private Way" signs on 4-inch street sign 
posts and light poles. 

Removed 54 "Private Way" signs because of making 
public ways. 

Painted 425 street signposts. 

Painted 662 street sign frames on 4-inch posts and light 
poles. 

Painted 554 street sign collars on 4-inch posts and light 
poles. 

Painted 413 acorns on 4-inch posts. 

Washed and cleaned 265 street sign name plates. 

Painted 200 metal blanks for temporary street sign plates. 

There were 168 streets constructed or reconstructed 
during the year. 



Public Works Department 35 

Some of the more important thoroughfares on which 
reconstruction work was completed in 1959 are as 
follows : 

Warren street, at Park street. 

Atlantic avenue, from Richmond street to Clinton street 
on westerly side. 

Doane street, from Kilby street to Broad street. 

Franklin street, from Broad street to Pearl street. 

Oliver street, from Milk street to Purchase street. 

Summer street, Atlantic avenue to bridge over Fort 
Point Channel. 

Beach street, from Atlantic avenue to Harrison avenue. 

Exeter place, from Harrison avenue to Chauncy street. 

High street, from Congress street to Summer street, and 
Oliver street to Pearl street. 

Lincoln street, from John F. Fitzgerald Expressway to 
Summer street. 

Milk street, from Broad street to Batterymarch street. 

Pearl street, from High street to Purchase street. 

Summer street, from Chauncj^ street to John F. Fitz- 
gerald Expressway. 

Thomas Whalen Circle, at junction of Kilby street, Milk 
street, and 01i\'er street. 

Utica street, from Kneeland street to Beach street. 

Summer street, from Chauncy street to Washington street. 

Atlantic avenue (easterly side) from State street approxi- 
mately 600 feet south. 

Curve street, from Hudson street to approximately 75 
feet easterly. 

Harrison avenue, from Broadway to Oak street. 

Hudson street, from Curve street to Kneeland street. 

Kneeland street, from Washington street to Atlantic 
avenue. 

Tyler street, from Broadway to Oak street, and Harvard 
street to Kneeland street. 

Canal street, westerly side of Traverse street to Hay- 
market square. 

Post Office square, from Water street to across Milk 
street. 

Milk street, from Congress street to Pearl street. 

Castle street, from Harrison avenue to Albany street. 

Stuart street, from Clarendon street to Trinity place. 

Wales street, from Blue Hill avenue to Harvard street. 

Boyd street, Westville street to Dakota street. 

Freeport Avay, from Freeport street to approximately 440 
feet easterly. 

Ditson street, from Charles street to Westville street. 

Hamilton street, from Bowdoin street to Homes avenue. 

Norton street, from Bowdoin street to Richfield street. 



36 City Document No. 18 

Welles avenue, from Talbot avenue to Dorchester avenue. 

River street, at Old Morton street. 

Ellison avenue, from Gallivan Boulevard to Morton street. 

Pine Ridge road, from Gallivan Boulevard to Morton 
street. 

Allston street, from Centre street to Melville avenue. 

Lyndhurst street, from Washington street to Allston 
street. 

Dunlap street, from Washington street to Whitfield street. 

Kenberma road, from Washington street to Elwyn road. 

West Tremlett street, from Washington street to Whit- 
field street. 

Glencliff road, from Poplar street to approximately 580 
feet southeasterly. 

Business street, from River street to River street. 

Tyler street, from Truman Highway to Loring street. 

Ellis street, from River street to Hillis road. 

Franklin street, from Sunnyside street to Thompson street. 

Prescott street, from Wolcott square to Millstone road. 

Summer street, from Gordon avenue to Parrott street. 

Sprague street, from Sprague Street place to New York, 
New Haven & Hartford property line. 

Belnap road, from Eastmont road to Leighton road. 

Dodge road, from Leighton road to approximately 480 
feet northwesterly. 

Joan road, from Leighton road to Dodge road. 

Leighton road, from northerly end of Eastmont road to 
southerly end of Eastmont road. 

Constitution road, from Faunce road to approximately 
280 feet southeasterly. 

Dania street, from Faunce road to Cookson terrace. 

Dania terrace, from Dania street to approximately 110 
feet northwesterly. 

Faunce road, from West Selden street to Cookson terrace. 

Jamestown terrace, from Dania street to approximately 
130 feet southeasterly. 

Viking terrace, from Dania street to Linvale terrace. 

Sierra road, from Neponset Valley Parkway to approxi- 
matel}'- 200 feet northeasterly. 

Montgomery street, from Clarendon street to West 
Canton street. 

Massachusetts avenue, from Newbury street to and 
including bridge over railroad. 

Cedar Lane way, from Chestnut street to Pinckney 
street. 

Chestnut street, from Walnut street to Charles street. 

Spruce street, from Beacon street to Chestnut street. 

WilloAV street, from Chestnut street to Mount Vernon 
street. 



Public Works Department 37 

Dorchester avenue, from Andrew square to West Fourth 
street (chapter 90). 

Newhill place, from East Third street to approximately 
150 feet southerly. 
Hampden street, from Albany street to Eustis street. 
Magazine street, at Norfolk avenue. 

Albany street, construction of traffic islands (chapter 90). 
Massachusetts avenue, construction of traffic islands 
(chapter 90). 

Southampton street, construction of traffic islands (chapter 
90). 

Fairland street, from Mount Pleasant avenue to Moreland 
street. 

Elmwood street, from King street to Roxbury street. 
Haskins street, from Ruggles street to Vernon street. 
Oakland street, from Washington street to Thornton 
street. 

Sachem street, at Parker Hill avenue. 
Westerly street, from Centre street to Sunnyside street. 
Columbus avenue, from Jackson square to Roxbury 
Crossing. 

Custer street, from South street to Arborway. 
Atherton street, from Washington street to Amory street. 
Bainbridge street, from Walnut avenue to Dale street. 
Cedar street, from Centre street to Columbus avenue. 
Kingsbury street, from Bainbridge street to Washington 
street. 

Oakland street, from Washington street to Thornton 
street. 

Seaver street, from Walnut avenue to Blue Hill avenue. 
Homestead street, from Elm Hill avenue to Walnut 
avenue. 

Copeland park, from Copeland street to approximately 
130 feet southeasterly. 

Howland street, from Elm Hill avenue to approximately 
231 feet west of Humboldt avenue. 

Paulding street, from Dale street to Bainbridge street. 
Woodbine street, from Blue Hill avenue to Warren street. 
Blue Hill avenue, from Columbia road to Seaver street. 
Seaver street, from Columbia road to Erie street. 
Tracton avenue, from Tileston street to approximately 
130 feet westerly. 

Westminster street, from Huntington avenue to Wood 
avenue. 

Child street, from Gordon avenue to Chestnut street. 
Lodgehill road, from Ruffing street to Goff street. 
Magee street, from Austin street to Lodgehill road. 
Ruffing street, from Sherrin street to Lodgehill road. 
Sherrin street, from Magee street to Beech street. 



38 City Document No. 18 

Metropolitan avenue, from Washington street to Kit- 
tredge street. 

Moraine street, from Centre street to Jamaicaway. 

Wren street, from Woodard road to Robin street. 

INIartin street, from Belle viie street to Park street. 

Celia road, from Belle vue street to approximately 210 
feet northeasterly. 

Paulman Circle, from Church street to approximately 
270 feet northeasterly. 

Pleasantdale road, from Stimson street to approximately 
870 feet southerly. 

New Haven street, from about 125 feet south of the 
southerly line of Ascent street to about 370 feet northerly. 

Ascent street, from Keystone street to Glenellen road. 

At will road, from Rich wood street approximately 240 
feet southwesterly. 

Bobolink street, from La Grange street to Pheasant street. 

Glenellen road, from Northdale road to Ascent street. 

Pheasant street, from approximately 30 feet northeast of 
Swan street to approximately 330 feet northwesterly. 

Vogel street, from Ascent street to Stimson street. 

Baker street, from \TW parkway to Centre street (chapter 
90). 

Altacrest road, from Ansonia road to approximately 285 
feet southwesterly. 

Gilmore terrace, from Park street to approximately 200 
feet southwesterly. 

Colberg avenue, from Beech street to West Roxbury 
parkway. 

The following is a list of streets constructed and 
reconstructed and sidewalk work done by contract 
in the various wards of the city in 1959. 

Ward 3 — Atlantic avenue, Doane street, Franklin street, 
Oliver street, Summer street. Beach street, Exeter place. 
High street, from Congress street, Summer street, and Oliver 
street to Pearl street, Lincoln street. Milk street. Pearl 
street, Summer street, from Chauncy street to John F. 
Fitzgerald Expressway, Thomas Whalen Circle, Utica street. 
Summer street, from Chauncy street to Washington street, 
Atlantic avenue, Curve street, Harrison avenue, Hudson 
street, Kneeland street, Tyler street. Canal street, Post 
Office square. Milk street. Cooper street (sidewalks), Friend 
street (sidewalks), Haymarket square (sidewalks), Sudbury 
street (sidewalks), Lynn street (sidewalks), Thacher street, 
(sidewalks). High street (sidewalks). Congress street (side- 
walks). Castle street, from Harrison avenue to Albany 
street, Albany street (sidewalks), Harrison avenue, Troy 
street (sidewalks), Harrison avenue (sidewalks). 
Ward 4 — Stuart street, Montgomer^^ street. 



Public Works Department 39 

Ward 5 — Massachusetts avenue, Arlington street (side- 
walks), Bay State road (sidewalks), Boylston street (south 
side), from Hereford street to and including 925 (sidewalks), 
Hereford street (sidewalks), Providence street (sidewalks), 
Sherborn street (sidewalks), Boylston street, from Fairfield 
street to Gloucester street (sidewalks), Boylston street 
(south side), from Arlington street to Hadassah Way (side- 
Avalks), Fairfield street (sidewalks), Cedar Lane Way, Chest- 
nut street. Spruce street, Willow street. 

Ward 6 — I street (sidewalks). South Bay avenue, Dor- 
chester avenue (part in ward 7), Newhill place. 

Ward 7 — Massachusetts avenue (sidewalks), Dorchester 
avenue (part in ward 6). 

Ward 8 — Hampden street. Magazine street, Albany 
street, Massachusetts avenue, Southampton street, Dearborn 
square (sidewalks), Fairland street (part in ward 12). 

Ward 9 — Elmwood street, Haskins street, Oakland 
street (part in ward 11). 

Ward 10 — Sachem street, Westerly street. 

Ward 11 — Columbus avenue, Custer street (part in 
ward 19), Atherton street, Bainbridge street (part in ward 
12), Cedar street, Kingsbury street, Oakland street (part 
in ward 9). 

Ward 12 — Seaver street, from Walnut avenue to Blue 
Hill avenue. Homestead street, Kearsarge avenue (sidewalks), 
Warren street (sidewalks), Copeland park, Bainbridge 
street (part in ward 11), Fairland street (part in ward 8), 
Howland street, Paulding street, Woodbine street. 

Ward 14 — Blue Hill avenue, from Columbia road to 
Seaver street, Seaver street, Wales street. 

Ward 15 — Boyd street, Freeport way, Ditson street, 
Hamilton street, Norton street. 

Ward 16 — Welles avenue, from Talbot avenue to Dor- 
chester avenue. 

Ward 17 — River street, Ellison avenue, Pine Ridge road, 
AUston street, Lyndhurst street, Dunlap street, Kenberma 
road, West Tremlett street. 

Ward 18 — Glencliff road, Business street, Ellis street, 
Franklin street, Prescott street, Summer street, Tyler street, 
Rosewood street (sidewalks), Sprague street, Belnap road, 
Dodge road, Joan road, Leighton road, Constitution road, 
Dania street, Dania terrace, Faunce road, Jamestown ter- 
race. Viking terrace. Sierra road, Tracton avenue, West- 
minster street, Child street, Lodgehill road, Magee street. 
Ruffing street, Sherrin street, Kittredge street, Metropolitan 
avenue, Hollingsworth street (sidewalks). 

Ward 19 — South street. May street, Moraine street, 
Custer street (part in Ward 11). 

Ward 20 — Wren street, from Woodard road to Robin 
street, Martin street, Celia road, Paulman circle, Pleasant- 



40 



City Document No. 18 



dale road, New Haven street, Ascent street, from Keystone 
street to Glenellen road, Atwill road. Bobolink street, 
Glenellen road, Pheasant street, Vogel street, Baker street, 
Altacrest road, Gilmore terrace, Colberg avenue. Park 
street, Walworth street. 

Ward 22 — Commonwealth avenue (north side), from 
No. 2005 to South street (sidewalks), Letitia way (sidewalks). 



WORK DONE BY CONTRACT IN 1959 



Item 



Earth and services excavation . 
Rock and wall excavation . 

Bank gravel 

Crushed stone for edgestone 
Base removed .... 
Pavement removed 
Straight edgestone 
Circular edgestone 

Corners 

Edgestone reset and relocated . 
Edgestone hauled .... 
Macadam base .... 

OA asphalt 

Concrete base .... 
Concrete backing up sidewalk 
Bituminous concrete base, roadway 
Bituminous concrete top, roadway 
Bituminous concrete top, sidewalk 
Bituminous concrete base, sidewalk 
Sheet asphalt .... 

Artificial stone sidewalks 
Artificial stone driveways . 

Loam spaces 

Loam for back of sidewalks 

Covers 

Catch basins or drop inlets rebuilt 
Catch basins or drop inlets built 

Sign posts 

Parking meters .... 
Stone bounds .... 

Total length 

Total area of bituminous concrete 
Total area of sheet asphalt . 



38,709 

1,017 

50,178 

1,708 

6,647 

21,597 

19,843 

4,633 

832 

47,477 

5,324 

17,930 

172,572 

2,296 

40 

23,512 

21,735 

946 

1,215 

1,286 

656,768 

79,820 

2,518 

543 

2,342 

117 

45 

266 

100 

107 

96,700 

277,129 

19,422 



Quantity 
cubic yards 
cubic yards 
tons 
tons 

square yards 
square yards 
lineal feet 
lineal feet 
each 

lineal feet 
lineal feet 
tons 
gallons 
cubic yards 
cubic yards 
tons 
tons 
tons 
tons 
tons 

square feet 
square feet 
square yards 
cubic yards 
each 
each 
each 
each 
each 
each 

lineal feet 
square yards 
square yards 



YEARLY REPORT OF WORK DONE BY DEPARTMENT 
FORCES FOR 1959 



Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid . 
Gravel sidewalks, relaid 
Artificial stone sidewalks, laid (new) 
Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid (old) 



2,350 square yards 

1,137 square yards 

15,600 square feet 

118,286 square feet 



TABLE SHOWING LENGTH AND AREA OF PAVING ON ACCEPTED STREETS, CORRECTED TO JANUARY 1, I960 



LenOTH in MlLEB. 


Area in Sohabe Yards. 


Sheet tAsphalt 
Asphalt. Concrete. 


JGranite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
BriTges. 


Brick. 


5Con- 
crete. 


IMacadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


tAaphalt 
Concrete. 


tGranite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


IConcrete. 


IIMacadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


ToUls. 


Year 1959 Report 


220.48 
29.25 


379.44 
50.33 


22.91 
3.04 


0.15 
0.02 


0.34 
0.04 


0.20 
0.03 


17.56 
2.33 


103.97 
13.79 


8.05 
1.07 


0.77 
0.10 


753.87 
100.00 


4,428,101 
30.26 


7,502,205 
51.27 


497,633 
3.40 


2,119 
0.02 


9,068 
0.06 


5,452 
0.04 


370,016 
2.53 


1,059,999 
11.35 


130,807 


26.927 
0.18 


14,632,327 
100.00 




January 1. 1960 


46.43 
4.31 
2.88 
10.60 
37.81 
32.00 
52.48 
19.99 
7.83 


34.17 

2 5.. 59 
23.12 
41.06 
103.68 
91.66 
36.35 
33.77 


4.72 

4.83 
2.29 
0.02 
0.48 
0.29 
0.00 


0.01 
0.06 


0.09 
0.02 
0.02 
0.03 


0.16 

0.02 
0.01 


2.86 
0.74 
1.39 
0.32 
3.93 
1.78 
5.12 
0.78 
0.24 


2.19 

5.16 
6.73 
5.00 
9.39 
20.85 
29.33 
8.44 
10.88 


0.39 
0.03 
0.19 
0.09 
0.35 
1.97 
1.66 
0.22 
3.43 


0.01 
0.04 
0.50 
0.07 
0.00 
0.02 

0.12 


92.51 
22.64 
39.17 
44.49 
95.52 
160.34 
180.83 
66.15 
56.29 


1,053,178 
84,424 
61,241 
220,863 
771,259 
564,175 
993,833 
423,701 
134,015 


780,704 
206,452 
575,622 
494,934 
808,654 
1,912,586 
1,725.759 
738,046 
036,082 


128.127 

105.674 

48,427 

129,123 

25,715 

997 

8,952 

15,949 

32 


40 


3,258 
1.098 
317 
892 


3,025 

1,055 
1,183 

145 


91,413 
13,395 
47,177 
18,780 
60,517 
25,854 
82,171 
19,204 
3,898 


33,252 
70,954 
150,794 
79,224 
132,834 
338,170 
450,569 
134,233 
174,879 


7,023 
407 
3,270 
1,024 
6,749 
34,368 
27,395 
3,417 
.M,714 


812 
15,754 
1,825 
4,000 
3,337 
50 
3.408 


2,100,020 






887,560 
961,649 
1 808 736 


South Boston 


West Roxbury 

Dorchester 


0.03 


0.04 
0.04 
0.08 
0.02 


338 


985 
1,231 
304* 


2,881,133 
3,293,484 


Brighton 


1,335,831 












214.33 
28.28 


397.59 
52.46 


21.17 
2.79 


0.10 
0.01 


0.34 
0.04 


0.19 
0.03 


17.16 
2.26 


97.97 
12.93 


8.33 
1.10 


0.76 
0.10 


757.94 
100.00 


4,306,689 
29.18 


7.879,339 
53.38 


462,990 
3.13 


1,881 
0.01 


9.068 
0.06 


5,408 
0.04 


362,409 
2.46 


1,564,909 
10.60 


138,367 
0.94 


29,227 
0.20 




Percent 


100.00 



above table the city 'S subdivided aubstantially on the boundary lini 
! yards is cobble; and 10.88 miles or J 



',243 square yards i 



this table; 1.89 i 



BLic Streets 757.94 Miles. 

I the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. 



nnexed from Brookline included in City Proper. 



Block, 



54.79 miles or 1 ,020,918 square yards is bitulithio; and 2.02 miles or 
I Topeka; and 0.0(1 miles or 920 square yards is Filbertine; and O.Oli 
yards is Cary-Elaetite Asr'halt Plank; and 0-06 miles or 518 square 



Manville Asphalt Plank; 
charge of Park Department included ii 



■ 2.224 square yards is Asphalt 
I miles or 551,303 square yards 



Public Works Department 



41 



Bituminous concrete sidewalks 

Block gutters 

Artificial stone sidewalks, patched 

with black top .... 
Edgestone set (new) 
Edgestone reset (old) . 
Macadam roadway patched 
JMacadam roadway resurfaced . 
Asphalt or bituminous concrete road 

wa}^ patched .... 
Asphalt or bituminous concrete road 

way resurfaced .... 
Street cleaning .... 
Snow removal .... 

PAVING SERVICE 

Street cleaning 

General highway expenditures 
Sidewalk and curbing . 
Snow and ice removed . 
Street signs .... 



10,385 square yards 
10 square yards 

32,456 square feet 
284 lineal feet 

1,883 lineal feet 
79,581 square yards 

3,945 square yards 

93,378 square yards 

3,601 square yards 
1,152 cubic yards 
15,907 cubic yards 



1959 



$12,961 27 

657,035 62 

237,184 98 

48,364 29 

17,052 97 

$972,599 13 



42 City Document No. 18 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 
Lighting Service 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Total Credits for 1959 $1,825,572 20 

Total Expenditures for 1959 1,82-1,643 20 

Individual Expenditures 
Street and Park Lighting (Electric): 

Boston Edison Co $1,633,043 07 



Boston Gas Co. (Charlestown District) 
Boston Edison Co. (footways) . 
Boston Gas Co. (Charlestown footways) 
Boston Edison Co. (substations) 
Boston Gas Co. (substations) . 



70,110 74 
3,907 04 
578 04 

18,064 77 
4,309 70 



1,730,013 36 



Street Lighting (gas lamps) : 

Boston Gas Co $3,540 99 3,540 99 

Police Spotlights: 

Boston Edison Co 2,849 48 

Boston Gas Co. (Charlestown District) . 19 03 2,868 51 



Construction and Maintenance: 

Installations, removals, relocation and modernization 

Boston Edison Co $16,982 36 

Boston Gas Co 3,580 39 

- abandoned gas post removal contract: 
Robert Menz- carried forward to 1960 . 4,215 58 

- expended in 1959 4,991 75 



29,770 08 

Salaries: 

Administrative, engineering and mainte- 
nance personnel $42,515 86 42,515 86 

Office Supplies: 302 03 302 03 

Maintenance Supplies: 

Replacement parts and fixtures for electric 

and gas lamps. Poles for spotlights 8,803 48 8,803 48 

Advertising 28 00 28 00 

Travel Expenses 141 19 141 19 

Rental 1,418 75 1,418 75 

Office Equipment 296 95 296 95 

Mercury Vapor Lighting Projects 

In 1959 orders were issued for relighting with modern 
mercury vapor Ughting units on the following listed 
streets, main thoroughfares and business areas: 

Units Lumens 
Each 

Albany street, Boston 26 single 20,000 

Blue Hill Avenue Bridge, Dorchester . 2 single 20,000 

Beach street, Boston 12 single 20,000 

Curve street, Boston 3 single 20,000 



Public Works Department 



43 



Castle street, Boston . 
Cambridge street, Brighton 
East Concord street, Boston 
High street, Boston 
Harrison avenue, Boston 
Broadway Bridge, Boston . 
Beacon street, Brighton (Cleveland 
Belgrade avenue. West Roxbury 
Custom House street, Boston 
Commonwealth avenue, Brighton 
Dover street, Boston . 
Dorchester avenue, Dorchester 
D street. South Boston 
Glenway street, Dorchester 
Hudson street, Boston . 
Harrison avenue, Boston 
Kneeland street, Boston 
Kilby street, Boston 
Lincoln street, Boston . 
Louis Prang street, Roxbury 
Milk street, Boston 
Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury 
Meridian street. East Boston 
Newbury street, Boston 
Old road, Dorchester . 
Pearl street, Boston 
River street, Hyde Park 
Shawmut avenue, Boston . 
South street, Boston 
Summer street, Boston 
Stuart street, Boston 
Tyler street, Boston 
West Broadway, South Boston 
Washington street, West Roxbury 
Whittier street, Roxbury 



Circle) 



12 single 


20,000 


26 single 


20,000 


9 single 


20,000 


13 single 


20,000 


10 single 


20,000 


2 single 


20,000 


9 single 


20,000 


10 single 


20,000 


1 single 


20,000 


1 25 single 


20,000 


17 single 


20,000 


16 single 


20,000 


1 single 


20,000 


1 single 


20,000 


11 single 


20,000 


11 single 


20,000 


15 single 


20,000 


2 single 


20,000 


8 single 


20,000 


4 single 


20,000 


3 single 


20,000 


15 single 


20,000 


17 single 


20,000 


3 single 


20,000 


4 single 


20,000 


3 single 


20,000 


24 single 


20,000 


13 single 


20,000 


1 single 


20,000 


6 single 


20,000 


3 single 


20,000 


12 single 


20,000 


31 single 


20,000 


1 single 


20,000 


2 single 


20,000 



Incandescent Lighting Projects 

In 1959 orders were issued for the installation of new 
and the replacement of old lighting units as f ollo\vs : 

Addison street, East Boston 
Addison street, East Boston 
Allston street, Dorchester . 
Abbot street, Dorchester 
Browning avenue, Dorchester 
Centre street, Dorchester . 
Carruth street, Dorchester . 
East Eagle street. East Boston 
Ellington street, Dorchester 
Concord square, Boston 







1 single 


4,000 






6 single 


2,500 






5 single 


4,000 






5 single 


2,500 






7 single 


2,500 






4 single 


2,500 






8 single 


4,000 






4 single 


4,000 






10 single 


2,500 






6 single 


6,000 



44 



City Document No. 18 



East Eagle street, East Boston 

Erie street, Dorchester 

East Springfield street, Boston 

Emmonsdale road, West Roxbury 

Elmer road, Dorchester 

Elmwood street, Roxbury . 

Hewins street, Dorchester . 

Highland street, Roxbury . 

Stanwood street, Roxbury . 

Seaver street, Dorchester . 

Asheville road, Hyde Park . 

Alicia road, Dorchester 

Bristol street, Boston . 

Cabot street, Roxbury 

Cushing avenue, Dorchester 

Dunlap street, Dorchester . 

East Brookline street, Boston 

Burnett street, West Roxbury 

Evelyn street, Dorchester . 

Fuller street, Dorchester 

Greenwood street, Dorchester 

Greaton road. West Roxbury 

Haskins street, Roxbury 

Harvard street, Charlestown 

Howland street, Roxbury . 

Greenwood street, Dorchester 

Jacob street, Dorchester 

Kittredge street, West Roxbury 

Lithgow street, Dorchester . 

Lovell street. East Boston . 

Montgomery street, Boston 

McLellan street, Dorchester 

Millet street, Dorchester 

Moraine street, West Roxbury (JP) 

Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park 

Norwell street, Dorchester . 

New England avenue, Dorchester 

Nightingale street, Dorchester 

Public Alley No. 705, Boston 

Patterson way. South Boston 

Pedestrian Walkway, Sydney street to 

Columbia road, Dorchester 
Rosseter street, Dorchester 
Ripley road, Dorchester 
Ruthven street, Roxbury 
Redlands road, West Roxbury 
Rita road, Dorchester . 
Spencer street, Dorchester . 
School street, Dorchester 



Units Lumens 




Each 


6 single 


6,000 


6 single 


6,000 


5 single 


6,000 


4 single 


2,500 


11 single 


2,500 


4 single 


2,500 


5 single 


2,500 


14 single 


2,500 


5 single 


4,000 


6 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


4 single 


6,000 


4 single 


6,000 


6 single 


4,000 


5 single 


2,500 


5 single 


6,000 


4 single 


4,000 


5 single 


2,500 


18 single 


2,500 


4 single 


6,000 


11 single 


2,500 


4 single 


2,500 


4 single 


2,500 


9 single 


2,500 


14 single 


4,000 


6 single 


2,500 


4 single 


4,000 


4 single 


2,500 


4 single 


4,000 


8 single 


6,000 


5 single 


4,000 


6 single 


2,500 


10 single 


2,500 


9 single 


4,000 


20 single 


4,000 


5 single 


2,500 


5 single 


2,500 


6 single 


2,500 


7 single 


4,000 


5 single 


6,000 


9 single 


2,500 


4 single 


4,000 


9 single 


2,500 


13 single 


2,500 


4 single 


2,500 


11 single 


4,000 


4 single 


2,500 



Public Works Department 



45 



Sydney Street extension, Dorchester 
Sanborn avenue, West Roxbury 
Sedalia road, Dorchester 
Sydney street, Dorchester . 
Spruce street, Boston . 
Selwjai street. West Roxbury 
Spring Park avenue, West Roxbury . 
Selwyn street. West Roxbury 
Undine road, Brighton 
Vernon street, Roxbury 
Vogel street. West Roxbury 
Vale street, Roxburj^ . 
Wildwood street, Dorchester 
Wood avenue, Hyde Park . 
Winston road, Dorchester . 
Wachusett street, Hyde Park 
Warner street, Dorchester . 
Wolcott street, Dorchester . 
Westville street, Dorchester 
Westcott street, Dorchester 
West Springfield street, Boston 
Wheatland avenue, Dorchester 
Waldeck street, Dorchester 



ester 


6 single 


6,000 




12 single 


2,500 




4 single 


2,500 




5 single 


6,000 




4 single 


2,500 




4 single 


2,500 


ury . 


9 single 


2,500 




4 single 


4,000 




11 single 


2,500 




14 single 


6,000 




5 single 


2,500 




5 single 


2,500 




6 single 


2,500 




10 single 


4,000 




6 single 


2,500 




5 single 


2,500 




4 single 


2,500 




5 single 


2,500 




6 single 


2,500 




6 single 


2,500 




9 single 


6,000 




5 single 


2,500 




5 single 


4,000 



Incandescent Lamps 

During 1959 incandescent lamps of 6,000 lumens each 
were installed on the following streets: 

Brent street, Dorchester (2) ; Cobb street, Boston (3) ; 
Claremont street, Boston (1); Highland street, Roxbury (1); 
Harvard avenue, Dorchester (2) ; Atherton street, Boston 
(1); Dickens street, Dorchester (3); Ball street, Roxbury (3); 
Bradford street, Boston (3) ; Frankfort street. East Boston 
(1); Glenway street, Dorchester (1); Garland street and 
place, Boston (2); Greenwich park, Boston (3); Jenner 
street, Charlestown (1); Kingsdale street, Dorchester (1); 
London street. East Boston (3) ; London street, vie. Tunnel, 
East Boston (1); Magnolia street, Dorchester (2); Marginal 
street. East Boston (1); Mount Pleasant avenue, Roxbury 
(1); Nightingale street, Dorchester (2); Old Harbor street, 
South Boston (3); Russett road. West Roxbury (1); St. 
Francis DeSales street, Roxbury (2); Sydney street, Dor- 
chester (2); Standard street, Dorchester (1); St. Brendan 
road, Dorchester (1); Thomas park, South Boston (1); 
Wilkes street, Boston (1). 

Incandescent lamps of 4,000 lumens each were in- 
stalled on the following streets : 

Aspinwall road, Dorchester (1); Bernard street, Dor- 
chester (3); Buzzard street, Dorchester (1); Call street. 



46 City DocUxMent No. 18 

West Roxbury (Jamaica Plain) (1); Cedar street, Roxbury 
(1); Carruth street, Dorchester (1); Eldon street, Dorchester 
(1); Standish street, Dorchester (3); Anawaii avenue, West 
Roxbury (1); Devon street, Dorchester (1); Deforest 
street, Hyde Park (1); Ernest street, Hyde Park (2); Fuller 
street, Dorchester (2) ; Greenbrier street, Dorchester (3) ; G 
street (near Eighth st.), South Boston (2); Greenwood st., 
Dorchester (1); Iroquois street, Roxbury (2); Joseph street, 
Dorchester (1); Kingsdale street, Dorchester (1); London 
street. East Boston (2); Mt. Bowdoin terrace, I3orchester 
(1); New England avenue, Dorchester (3); Nightingale 
street, Dorchester (1); North Bennet street, Boston (1); 
Ronald street, Dorchester (1); Ripley road, Dorchester (2); 
School street, Dorchester (2) ; St. Francis DeSales street, 
Roxbury (1); St. Marks road, Dorchester (1); Undine road, 
Brighton (1); Woodmont street, Brighton (1); Whitby street. 
East Boston (1); Wainwright street, Dorchester (2); West- 
ville street, Dorchester (2) ; Whitfield street, Dorchester (2) ; 
Wheatland avenue, Dorchester (2); West Fifth street, 
South Boston (3). 

Orders were issued by the Lighting Service for the 
installation of lighting units of 2,500 lumens each as 
follows : 

Argyle street, Dorchester (2) ; Atherton street, Dorchester 
(1); Brent street, Dorchester (2); Brenton street, Dorchester 
(2); Bradshaw street, Dorchester (2); Boyd street, Dor- 
chester (2); Braxton street, West Roxbury (1); BuUard 
street, Dorchester (1); Carruth street, Dorchester (1); 
Croftland avenue, Dorchester (3); Church street. West 
Roxbury (1); Cedar street, Roxbury (2); Cliftondale street. 
West Roxbury (1); Darling street, Roxbury (2); Drummond 
street, Dorchester (2) ; East Eagle street. East Boston (2) ; 
Eldora street, Roxbury (3); East Second street, South 
Boston (2); Eldon street, Dorchester (1); Ellsworth street. 
West Roxbury (1); Havelock street, Dorchester (3); Harlem 
street, Dorchester (2); Harvard park, Dorchester (1); 
Powelton road, Dorchester (2); Samoset street, Dorchester 
(2); Sharp street, Dorchester (1); Alpha road, Dorchester 
(1); Anawan avenue. West Roxbury (1); Atwill road. West 
Roxbury (2) ; Beech street, Hyde Park (1) ; Birchland terrace. 
West Roxbury (1); Blackwell street, Dorchester (1); Ban- 
field avenue, Dorchester (2); Clifton place, Roxbury (2), 
Centre place. West Roxbury (1); Devens street, Charles- 
town (1); Doris street, Dorchester (1); Donald road, Dor- 
chester (3); Dromey street, Dorchester (1); Dungarven 
road. West Roxbury (1); East Third street. South Boston 
(3); Eliot terrace, Roxbury (1); Eldora street, Roxbur}^ (1); 
Ellard street, Hyde Park (1); Evergreen street, Roxbury 



Public Works Department 47 

(1); Fenelon street, Dorchester (2); Frankfort street, East 
Boston (1); Fredonia street, Dorchester (1); Freeport 
Way, Dorchester (1); Glenarm street, Dorchester (1); 
Gould street, AVest Roxbury (1); Henley street, Charlestown 
(1); Harvard square, Charlestown (3); HoUis place, Brighton 
(1); Highfield terrace. West Roxbury (1); Hartland street, 
Dorchester (2); Hackensack terrace. West Roxbury (1); 
Jenner street, Charlestown (1); Kingman road, Dorchester 
(2); Kingsdale street, Dorchester (1); Kittredge street, 
West Roxbury (1); Lucerne street, Dorchester (2); Linden 
street, Roxbury (3); Lodgehill road, Hyde Park (2); Lawton 
street, Hyde Park (2); Matignon street, Dorchester (1); 
Manor street, Dorchester (2); Mercier avenue, Dorchester 
(2); Marion street, Hyde Park (1); Morse street, Dor- 
chester (2); Merrill street, Dorchester (3); Melbourne 
street, Dorchester (3); Mt. Bowdoin terrace, Dorchester 
(2); Mattapan street, Dorchester (2); Manchester street, 
Roxbury and Dorchester (3); Merola park, Dorchester (1); 
Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park (2); Maple street exten- 
sion. West Roxbury (3); Xorth Mead street, Charlestown 
(3); Northdale road extension. West Roxbury (3); Normandy 
street, Dorchester (1); Newbern street, West Roxbury (2); 
Orchardale street, Dorchester (1); Olnej^ street, Dorchester 
(3); Orlando street, Dorchester (1); Parker Hill terrace, 
Roxbury (1); Priscilla road, Brighton (2); Paulding street, 
Roxbury (3); Prescott street, Charlestown (2); Parmelee 
street, Boston (2); Poydras street, Hyde Park (2); Paul 
Gore street, West Roxbury (1); Roxton street, Dorchester 
(2); Rosedale street, Dorchester (2); Robken road. West 
Roxbury (1); Riverview street, West Roxbury (2); Raven 
street, Dorchester (1); Rita road, Dorchester (4); Ruggles 
Place, Dorchester (3); Rosselerin road, Dorchester (1); 
River street, Hyde Park (3); Riverdale road, Dorchester 
(1) Rockway street, Dorchester (1); Surreyhill road. West 
Roxbury (2); Sachem street, Roxburj^ (1); Shanley street, 
Brighton (2); St. Brendan road, Dorchester (3); Slocum 
road. West Roxbury (3); Tread way road, Dorchester (1); 
Victory road, Dorchester (2); Westminster street, Hyde 
Park (1), Willow street, Boston (3); Westville terrace, 
Dorchester (1); Wales street, Dorchester (2); West Park 
street, Dorchester (2); Waterlow street, Dorchester (1); 
Weymouth avenue. West Roxbury (1); Washington street, 
Charlestown (2); Wildwood street, Dorchester (3). 

Gas Light Replacement Program 
During the ^ear of 1959 approximately 97 obsolete 
gas lamps were replaced with approximately 115 modern 
electric luminaires of 2,500 lumens. 



48 City DocuxMent No. 18 

Maintenance of Police Spotlights 

The maintenance of the police spothghts continued 
for the year 1959. During the year there were forty- 
three (43) additional spotlights installed in locations 
approved by the Police Department. Many other 
locations have received the approval of the Pohce 
Department and await only favorable weather to 
commence installation. 



Public Works Department 49 



APPENDIX D 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, December 31, 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works: 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith a statement of the activities of the 
Sanitary Division of the Public Works Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1959: 

Refuse Collection and Disposal 

Contracts were awarded in fifteen of the seventeen 
refuse collection contract districts in March to ten 
contractors, all being for a period of one year from 
April 1, 1959 to March 31, 1960. Of the two remaining 
districts, Hyde Park is being serviced under a two-year 
contract awarded the previous year, and in West 
Roxbury the city elected to exercise its option to renew 
the contract in that district for a second year. 

A disposal contract for the so-called ten-year contract 
area with the M. DeMatteo Construction Company 
for conducting disposal operations at Spectacle Island 
and the Calf Pasture was extended for the period 
April 1, 1959 to September 30, 1959 at the same price 
as the previous 3'ear, except that the city paid for the 
increased labor cost due to a raise in wage rates granted 
the Contractors' employees on April 1, 1959. When 
the South Bay Incinerator was placed in full operation 
on October 1, 1959, this contract was terminated and 
the refuse disposal facilities at the Fort Hill Receiving 
Station and at Spectacle Island were abandoned. The 
Calf Pasture dump was then operated by this division's 
labor force to dispose of the incinerator residue and 
non-combustible materials. 

The total cost of refuse collection and disposal 
contracts for 1959 was approximately $2,446,000. 



50 City Document No. 18 

Incinerator Construction and Operation 

The South Bay Incinerator building was accepted 
as being substantially complete on June 25, 1959 in 
order to obtain use of the trolley cranes for training 
the crane operators and for instalhng the furnace 
charging gates and hoppers. A dedication ceremony 
officially opening the incinerator on August 13, 1959 
was attended by Mayor Hynes, members of the City 
Council, the Commissioner of Public Works and various 
other city officials. 

Acceptance tests were conducted and satisfactorily 
completed on September 16, 17, and 18. All ten (10) 
districts to be served by the incinerator were deUvering 
refuse to the plant by October 1, and on that date, 
the disposal contract with its scows and dumps was 
abandoned. 

Considerable difficulty has been encountered with 
the trolley cranes, the controls not operating satis- 
factorily, and on October 30 and on November 5, 
rotors on 60-horsepower hoisting motors burned out. 
The Westinghouse Corporation agreed to rewind all 
eight crane motors without cost to the city. 

On October 21, Clair Ray Desjardin, a crane oper- 
ator, fell from a staging, fractured his skull, and died 
at the City Hospital eight hours later. He was one of 
the best of the Division's employees, and his loss was 
felt keenly by the undersigned and his fellow employees. 

The total cost of the incinerator, not including land, 
was approximately $5,635,900, broken down as follows: 



Engineering — Metcalf & Eddy 
Borings — Corrosion Survey, etc. 
Pile Foundation — ,J. F. White 
Storage Bin — Coleman Bros. . 
Building — .John Bowen Co. 
Furnaces, etc. — Tynan Co. 
Equipment — Trucks, B.D., etc. 
Steam Main — DeMatteo 



$283,280 

40,000 

418,890 

412,660 

2,785,390 

1,448,760 

79,160 

167,760 



Approximate Total — less land cost . $5,635,900 

Steam Main Construction 

A contract for construction of a twelve (12) inch 
diameter steam main encased in a twenty-one (21) 
inch Ric-Wil conduit was awarded to M. DeMatteo 
Construction Co., Inc., on May 21, 1959. This main 
is 1,995 feet in length, and will be used to transmit 



Public Works Department 51 

steam at 250 p.s.i. and 450°F. from the incinerator 
to the Boston City Hospital boiler room. Steam gen- 
erated from the combustion of refuse will be used at 
the hospital for heating, cooking, launch'}^, sterilization, 
etc. This work was 99 per cent completed at the end 
of the year, at a cost of $167,755. 

Street Cleaxintg and Snow Removal 

The street-cleaning program was conducted as in 
prior years. On the whole, the results of our efforts 
were unsatisfactory due to the shortage of available 
mechanized sweepers. Of 26 of these machines, only 
10 to 12 are in service at any one time. Much of this 
equipment is over ten years old, and breakdowns are 
frequent. An adequate program for equipment procure- 
ment should be provided. 

Two Gutter- Vacs were purchased from the Tarrant 
Manufacturing Company, mounted on 4-wheel drive 
Willys Jeeps, at a total cost of $10,300. These giant 
vacuum cleaners are intended to supplement the work 
of the hokey-men downtown, and have been operated 
on an evening shift to get the going-home and after- 
theatre litter. Some refinements in design are necessary 
before we purchase more of these units. 

An Anti-Litter Campaign was instituted in con- 
junction with the annual Spring Clean-Up Campaign. 
A committee was formed of members from several of 
the city's civic organizations. Considerable newspaper, 
radio, and TV publicity was hoped for, but, except for 
radio, the results were very disappointing. No appre- 
ciable cooperation in regard to a reduction in littering 
was observed. One hundred new, open-mesh litter 
baskets were placed in the downtown shopping area 
and these proved to be satisfactory. An additional 
250 litter baskets were purchased late this year to be 
set out in new locations in the City Proper next spring. 

The number of Welfare recipients provided by the 
Welfare Department and employed in cleaning city- 
owned vacant lots in Lower Roxbury and the South 
End dwindled to one or two by the year's end. Obtain- 
ing laboring assistance from this source does not appear 
to be promising. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John F. Flaherty, Division Engineer, 

Sanitary Division, P. W. D. 



52 



City Document No. 18 



PAYMENTS TO REFUSE COLLECTION CONTRACTORS 



District 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
PaymentB 






$12,600 
12,090 
11,990 

9,608 
9,800 

4,832 
5,000 
5,500 

14,620 
14,499 
11,990 

11,400 
11,369 

25,630 
24,630 

28,430 
27,430 

5,320 
4,998 

7,429 

7,680 
7,500 

7,500 

7,390 
7,300 

8,098 
7,460 

6,719 

6,610 
6,550 

3,290 
4,200 

2,385 
2,940 

12,500 
12,000 
12,200 

6,690 
6,690+ 






(First 3 months) .... 






(6 months) 










2 East Boston . 
















117,024 00 


3 Charlestown 


Jeffries Disposal Corp 










(6 months) 








60,996 00 


4 Brighton .... 








(First 3 months) 












(Last 9 months) 


174 351 00 


5A West Roxbury 

5B Jamaica Plain 


Marinucci Brothers Company, Inc 


143,880 00 










(Last 9 months) . . 


136 521 00 










(First 3 months) 
















6B Dorchester (South) 














Dooley Brothers Inc . . 








332,160 00 


7A Elm Hill 








(First 3 months) 






W. J. Banfield 






(Last 9 months) 


60 942 00 


7B Dudley . 


LTnited Contracting Company of Boston.. 

(First 3 months) 

Carriere Construction Company 










(Last 3 months) . . . . 


90 867 00 


7C Mission Hill . 














United Contracting Company of Boston. . 








88,740 00 


7D Roxbury 


United Contracting Company of Boston. . 


















91,434 00 










(First 3 months) 






United Contracting Company of Boston.. 








79,467 00 


9A Back Bay 
















47,670 00 


9B Stuart 














(Last 9 months) 


33,615 00 


10 North* West Ends.... 


Ward General Contracting Company. . . . 






(6 months) 

(Last 3 months). . . . 


146,100 00 


1 1 Hyde Park 








(First 3 months) 






(Last 9 months) 


60 971 43 








Total 






$2 109,608 43 












Public Works Depautment 53 

PAYMENTS TO DISPOSAL CONTRACTORS 



District 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
Payments 




M. DeMatteo Construction Company. . . . 
(First 3 months) 


$30,980 
30,980 + 
















Total 






$281,647 67 










PAYMENTS FOR RENTAL OF DUMPS 



Saugus. 



Dewey E. Daggett . 
(First 3 months) . 
(Last 9 months). 



Boston Gas Company 

(First 3 months) 

Coleman Brothers Corporation. 

(3 months) 



Total Disposal 

Total Payments to Contractors for Refuse Collection and Disposal . 



$1,916 50 
2,000 00 



2,000 00 
2,000 00 



23,749 50 



$317,397 17 
$2,427,005 60 



Expenditures in 1959 

Payments to Refuse Collection Contractors $2,109,608 43 

Payments to Refuse Disposal Contractors 317,397 17 



Total Payments to Collection and Disposal Contractors $2,427,005 60 

Payroll Totals were as follows: 

Administrative and General Services. . . . $57,445 20 

Shops and Storehouse 194,632 49 

Collection and Disposal 297,759 67 



Total Sanitary 549,837 36 

Street Cleaning 1,783,503 55 



Total Sanitary and Street Cleaning $2,333,340 91 



Overtime Payrolls were as follows: 

Shops and Storehouse 

Collection and Disposal 

Street Cleaning 



$2,588 08 
11,920 07 
52,899 93 



Total Overtime . 



67.408 08 



Total Payroll $2,400,748 99 



Payments on other Contracts . 

Supplies and Materials 

Miscellaneous 



39,387 86 
56,426 72 
13,382 55 



Grand Total $4,936,951 72 



54 City Document No. 18 

Equipment Acquired During 1959 

2 Gutter Vacuum Machines $10,300 00 

Personnel Changes in Permanent Force During the Year 1959: 

Total Personnel January 1, 1959 *606 

Transfers in (from other Departments and Divisions) 8 

Reinstatements 7 

Appointments 20 35 

641 

Deaths 10 

Resignations 7 

Retirements 24 

Transfers Out (to other Departments and Divisions) 4 

Terminated or Discharged 2 47 

Total Personnel (Sanitary Service) January 1, 1960 594 

Total Net Loss (Sanitary) of 12 Employees 

Total Personnel (Incinei-ator) January 1, 1960 80 

Total Personnel (Incmerator and Sanitary) January 1, 1960 . . 674 

* Including 1 Military Leave of Absence. 



Public Works Department 
APPENDIX E 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION 



Boston, December 31, 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and 
expenditures of the Sewer Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1959. 

Expenditures During 1959: The activities of the 
Sewer Division during the year consisted of advertising 
for sewer construction at a contract bid price of 
$456,861.38, and the maintenance and operation of the 
sewer system at a cost of $779,429.52. 

Contract Work: Contract work consisted of the 
extension of the sewer system to provide drainage for 
new buildings and street construction and to eliminate 
cesspools, the locations and cost of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work: Maintenance work consisted of 
the cleaning of 1,327 catch basins by contract and 1,923 
by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers and catch 
basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, and catch 
basins by the yard forces and the operation of the 
pumping station and disposal works, the cost of which 
is attached. 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the main- 
tenance of about 1,302.01 miles of sewers and surface 
drains, and 30.93 miles of intercepting sewer, the 
emergency cleaning of catch basins, the repair of broken 
sewers and catch basins, the answering of house drain 
complaints, the operation of pumping stations and 
storage basins for the disposal of sewage by division 
forces. 

The keeping of records, the issuance of permits for 
and the inspection of the construction of house drains. 

Engineering, clerical and inspectional work in con- 
nection with the construction of sewerage works done 
by advertised contract. 



56 City Document No. 18 

An advertised contract was awarded to the lowest 
bidders for the cleaning of catch basins in the sum of 
$16,900. 

An advertised contract was awarded to the lowest 
bidder for emergencv repairs of sewers in the sum of 
$16,825. 

Proposed Work to Be Done by Advertised Contract 
During 1960 Is As Follows: 

Emergency repairs of sewers, estimated cost $14,000. 

Cleaning of catch basins, estimated cost $20,000. 

Extension of sewer system to provide drainage for 
new buildings and new street construction. Estimated 
cost $300,000. 

Covering In Open Brooks: In keeping with the poHcy 
of covering in brooks throughout the city, the Sewer 
Division proposes that the following natural outlets 
for surface water from contiguous areas be enclosed: 

(1) Davenport Brook, between Southeast Expressway and 
Hallet street, Dorchester. 

449 lineal feet of 12-foot by 10-foot reinforced concrete 
box conduit. 
Estimated cost, $92,000. 

(2) Canterbury Branch of Stony Brook, between Canterbury 
street and Walk Hill street, West Roxbury. 

890 lineal feet of 9-foot diameter reinforced concrete pipe. 
Estimated cost, $152,000. 

(3) Spring Street Brook, West Roxbury. 

1,600 lineal feet of 84-inch concrete pipe. 
Estimated cost, $200,000. 

(4) Bussey Brook, private land, West Roxbury. 

1,400 lineal feet of 60-inch and 72-inch reinforced 
concrete pipe. 
Estimated cost, $111,000. 

(5) Elmwood Street Brook, New Haven street and private 
land. West Roxbury. 

700 lineal feet of 8-foot reinforced concrete pipe. 
Estimated cost, $86,000. 

The order of priority for these projects is not neces- 
sarily the same as given above. We have asked for 
State aid under Chapter 91 for the construction of the 
first three brook projects. 

Lengths of Sewers Built: During the fiscal year 1959 
there were built by contractors and day labor 4.45 
miles of common sewers and surface drains throughout 



Public Works Department 57 

the city. After deducting 0.28 miles of sewers and 
surface drains, rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase 
for 1959 is 4.17 miles, which added to the existing 
1,297.84 miles of common sewers and surface drains and 
30.93 miles of intercepting sewers, makes a grand 
total of 1,332.94 miles of all sewers belonging to the 
City of Boston, and under the care of the Sewer Division 
on January 1, 1960. 

There were 197 catch basins built or rebuilt and 
none were abandoned or removed during the year, 
making a net gain of 197 catch basins and a grand 
total of 25,015 catch basins under the care of the Sewer 
Division on January 1, 1960. 

Permit Office Report: Entrance fees to the amount of 
$7,361.01 have been deposited with the City Collector 
for collection from estates upon which no sewer assess- 
ments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordinances of 
1945, chapter 27, section 10. 

Seven hundred fifteen permits have been issued, 
viz.: 156 to district foremen and contractors and 559 
to drain layers for repairing or laying new house drains. 
Inspectors from this office have personally inspected 
the work done under these drain-layers' permits. 

One thousand nine hundred ninety complaints have 
been investigated and inspectors are instructed to 
report in writing in each case. 

Two thousand catch basin complaints were received. 

Reported in writing on 4,186 municipal liens to the 
City Collector, in accordance with Chapter 60, Section 
25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
2,160 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Respectfully, 

Edward G. A. Powers, 

Division Engineer, Sewer Division. 



58 City Document No. IS 

SEWER BUDGET EXPENDITURES FOR 1959 

1. Personal Services 
Code 

10. Permanent employees .... $563,823 89 

11. Temporary . .' 2,417 25 

12. Overtime 15,391 72 

Total Personal Services $581,632 86 

2. Contractual Services 

21. Commmiications $3,201 21 

22. Light, heat, and power . . . 96,642 25 

26. Repairs and maintenance of buildings 

and structures 19,247 45 

27. Repairs and servicing of equipment . 4,451 57 

28. Transportation of persons . . . 1,136 40 

29. Miscellaneous contractual services . 466 30 

Total Contractual Services 125,145 18 



3. Supplies and Materials 

32. Food supplies $17 55 

33. Heating supplies and materials . . 5,344 73 

34. Household supplies and materials . . 391 83 

35. Medical, dental, and hospital supplies 

and materials 20 96 

36. Office supplies and materials . . 2,015 25 

37. Miscellaneous supplies and materials . 8,217 41 



Total Supplies and Materials 16,007 73 

4. Current Charges and Obligations 
49. Other current charges and obligations . $1,140 52 

Total Current Charges and Obligations . . . 1,140 52 

5. Equipment 
59. Miscellaneous equipment . . . $1,088 60 

Total Equipment 1,088 60 

7. Structures and Improvements 
71. Other structures and improvements . $54,414 63 

Total Structures and Improvements . . . . 54,414 63 

Grand Total $779,429 52 

REPORT OF CALF PASTURE PUMPING STATION, 1959 

Total gallons pumped 41,543,045,000 

Total millions of gallons pumped (annually) . . . 41,543.045 

Average cost per million gallons (annually) ... $4 80 



Public Works Department 



59 



ANNUAL TOTAL OPERATING COSTS, 1959 

Labor $105,930 17 

Edison Power 

Fuel Oil No. 5 

Bottled Gas 

Supplies 

Miscellaneous Oil 

Service Orders 



83,779 74 
2,835 77 

121 20 
2,256 09 

110 33 
4,290 52 



Total . 



$199,323 82 



SUMMARY OF SEWER CONSTRUCTION FOR TWELVE 
MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1959 



Districts 


Built by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor 


Built by 
Private 
Parties 


Total Lengths Built 




Linear Feet 

884.00 

2,320.20 

450.00 


Linear Feet 
252.00 


Linear Feet 

1,136.00 

2,320.20 

450.00 


Miles 




4394 


South Boston 




0852 








Charles town 




20.00 


20.00 


0038 


Brighton 






West Roxbury 

Dorchester . 


4,718.60 
1.043.65 
11,048.19 


1,647.89 

245.90 

1,140.23 


6,366.49 
1.289.55 
12,188.42 


1.2058 
2442 


Hyde Park 


2 3084 






Totals 


20.464.64 


3,306.02 


23,770.66 


4.5120 







SUMMARY OF SEWER CONSTRUCTION FOR FIVE YEARS 
PREVIOUS TO JANUARY I, 1960 





19SS 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 
ments 


Linear Feet 

33,237.48 

1,695.15 


Linear Feet 
25,559.88 
3,482.39 


Linear Feet 
17,133.24 
4.278.40 


Linear Feet 
8,269.26 
5,969.21 


Linear Feet 
20.464.64 
3,306 02 






Totals 


34.932.63 


29.047.27 


21,411.64 


14.238.47 









60 



City Document No. 18 



TOTAL LENGTH OF SEWERS 





Total 


Lengths 






Lengths 


Removed or 






Built 


Abandoned 






Dunng 


During 


Additional Lengths 


DISTBICT8. 


Twelve 


Twelve 


for the 




Months 


Months 


Twelve Months Ending 




Ending 


Ending 


December 31, 1959. 




December 


December 






31, 1959. 


31, 1959. 







Linear Feet 

884.00 

2,320.20 

450.00 

20.00 


Linear Feet 
426.00 
1,050.00 


Linear Feet 

458.00 

1,270.20 

450.00 

20.00 


Miles 
0.0867 


Roxbury .... 


2406 




0852 


East Boston 




0038 


















West Roxbury 


6,366.49 
1,289.55 
12,188.42 




6,366.49 
1,289.55 
12,168.42 


1 2058 




2442 


Hyde Park 


20.00 


2.3046 








23,518.66 


1,496.00 


22,022.66 


4.1712 







Common sewers and surface drains built previous 
to January 1, 1959 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 
January 1 and December 31, 1959 



Miles. 



1,297.84 
4.17 



Common sewers and surface drains built ending- 
December 31, 1959 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting 
with Metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1959 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers 
to December 31, 1959 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers 
to December 31, 1959 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 
to January 1, 1960 

* No additional lengths built during 1959. 



1,302.01 



6.8r 



24.12* 



1,332.94 
720.29 



Public Works Department 



61 



CATCH BASINS IN CHARGE OF SEWER DIVISION 



Catch Basins for Twelve Months 
Ending December 31, 1959 



Totals tor Whole City 

IN Charge of Sewer 

Division 



Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt 



Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed 



Net 
Increase 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1959 



January 
1960 



City Proper. . 

Roxbury 

South Boston. 
East Boston.. 
Charlestown. . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester. . . 
Hyde Park ... 

Totals . . . . 



.3,801 
3,521 
1,488 
1,227 
870 
2.145 
4,637 
5,727 
1,402 



3,801 
3,560 
1,521 
1,227 
871 
2,145 
4,659 
5,745 
1,486 



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(67) 



68 City DociTment No. 18 

APPENDIX F 



REPORT OF THE 
SURVEY DIVISION 



Boston, December 31 , 1959. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the ac- 
tivities of the Survey Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1959. 

This division performs engineering services for other 
divisions of the PubHc Works Department and other 
city departments, boards, and commissions. It also 
performs administrative and engineering duties re- 
quired by the Public Improvement Commission for its 
operations. 

The principal engineering duties include: 

(a) the making of plans, surveys, estimates, and reports 
relating to the laying out, widening, construction, and design 
of public highways; 

(b) the taking of easements for sewerage works; 

(c) the staking out of lines and grades for the construc- 
tion of highways, sewerage, etc.; 

(d) the making of property surveys of land to be acquired 
by the City of Boston by eminent domain ; 

(e) the making of plans and surveys of city-owned land 
for purposes of sale, interdepartmental transfer, or new de- 
velopment ; 

(/) the making of various engineering surveys and plans 
required by other city departments. 

For the Public Improvement Commission, the ad- 
ministrative functions include the processing of petitions, 
arranging public hearings, preparing estimates and 
orders relating to land damages and street and sewer 
betterments, preparing orders for the laying out of 
streets and the construction of street and sewers, pre- 
paring orders for eminent domain land takings, prepar- 
ing orders for the granting of permits for use of pubhc 
highways, erection of poles, etc., and the maintenance of 



Public Works Department 



69 



all records in the charge of the Public Improvement 
Commission. 

Personnel: On December 31, 1959, there were thirty- 
five permanent and four temporary employees as 
listed below in this division. 



Name: 
Charles R. Beale . 

Kenneth L. Benkart 
Charles E. Brewer 
Arthur J. Brickley 
Oliver C. Brown . 
George F. Buckley 
John A. BuUiner 
Carmine D. Buono 

Joyce E. Campbell 
William T. Chaput 
Michael J. Corrao 

George J. Creney . 
John J. Curley, Jr. 
Salvatore Dihberto 
William F. Duggan 
Harry M. Fletcher 
Thomas O. Flood . 
George H. Gilboy . 
John F. Gilmore, Jr. 
James W. Haley . 
Bernard Harrington 

Leo B. Hughes 
Roland A. Hull 
Angelo J. lauluna . 
James J. Kelly 

Virginia A. Ksypka 
James P. Lapsley . 
Walter R. Luby . 
Francis McHugh . 
Robert P. Mehegan 
A. Albert Minichiello 
Philip A. Moynahan 
William P. Norris . 
Thomas E. Rafferty 
Albert J. Rodriguez 
John J. Ryan 
John M. Sheehan . 
Robert J. Sheehan 
Redmond L. Walsh 



Title: 
Senior Engineering Aid (Pro- 
visional) 

Junior Civil Engineer 

Assistant Civil Engineer 

Assistant Civil Engineer 

Senior Engineering Aid 

Junior Civil Engineer 

Senior Engineering Aid 

Senior Engineering Aid (Pro- 
visional) 

Principal Clerk-Typist 

Junior Engineering Aid 

Executive Secretary — Survey 
Division 

Photostat Operator 

Junior Civil Engineer 

Assistant Civil Engineer 

Principal Clerk-Stenographer 

Assistant Civil Engineer 

Principal Clerk 

Junior Civil Engineer 

Assistant Civil Engineer 

Division Engineer 

Junior Engineering Aid (Pro- 
visional) 

Senior Engineering Aid 

Assistant Ci^jil Engineer 

Assistant Civil Engineer 

Senior Engineering Aid (Pro- 
visional) 

Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

Senior Engineering Aid 

Principal Civil Engineer 

Junior Civil Engineer 

Assistant Executive Secretary 

Assistant Civil Engineer 

Senior Engineering Aid 

Photographer 

Assistant Civil Engineer 

Junior Civil Engineer 

Principal Civil Engineer 

Senior Engineering Aid 

Senior Engineering Aid 

Head Photostat Operator 



70 



City Document No. 18 



DIVISION EXPENDITURES, JANUARY 1, 1959, TO DECEMBER 
31, 1959, INCLUSIVE 





Survey 
Budget 


Highway 
Loan 


Sewer 
Loan 




$93,968 26 
21,287 28 
2,678 13 
6,425 88 

765 70 


$98,738 37 
5,214 78 
64,217 11 




Pensions . . . 






$1,597 00 


Supplies and Materials . . 




Current Charges and Obligations 














$125,025 25 


$168,170 26 


$1,597 00 



ToTAi, Expenditures $294,792 51 

During the period covered by this report, the Survey 
Division completed one hundred and seventeen (117) 
surveys and plans for the improvement of existing 
highway, laying out of new ones and discontinuances 
totalling 7.57 miles. Seventeen (17) surveys and plans 
for 1.31 miles of sewerage easements were also made. 

Field engineering work included the staking out of 
twenty-seven (27) streets for the Paving Service of the 
Highway Division, forty-seven (47) for the Sewer 
Division and miscellaneous services for other city 
departments. Regular routine work included the re- 
surveying of street lines for private engineers wherever 
existing records were inadequate or obsolete, marking 
lines and grades for private construction abutting 
pubhc streets, examining Land Court plans for the 
Law Department, preparing land damage reports for 
the Public Improvement Commission. 

Listed below are the major engineering surveys and 
plans completed during the period of this report. 
For the Public Improvement Commission: 

Thirty-three (33) surveys and plans were made for 
the laying out of three miles of pubUc highways, as 
follows : 



Length 
in Feet 



District 
Dorchester 

Ames street 1,077 

Balina place 184 

Caryll street 833 



Public Works Department 71 

Length 
District in Feet 

Franklin Hill avenue 785 

Hallet-Davis street 230 

Hoyt street 620 

Lorna road 718 

Itasca street 625 

Murray terrace 119 

Stratton street 206 

St. Clare road 177 

Westview street 1,089 

East Boston 

Shandon road 814 

Hyde Park 

Beaver street — 

LaAvton street 597 

Myopia road 525 

Ransom road 565 

Summer street 731 

Walter street 345 

ROXBURY 

Ambrose street 445 

Orchard street 338 

Parker Street Extension 973 

West Roxbury 

Appleton court 179 

Bartlett avenue — 

Cutter road 218 

Dow road 669 

Florian street 581 

Harvvood street 708 

Meyer court 150 

Pleasant dale road 221 

Quarley Street Extension 266 

Rambler road 472 

Tobin Road Extension 329 

Fifteen (15) surveys and plans were made for the 
widening and relocation of .42 miles of public highways 
as follows: 

District Length 

Boston Proper in Feet 

Dalton street 296 

Belvidere street 600 



72 City Document No. 18 



District 
Brighton 


Length 
in Feet 


Farrington avenue at Highgate street 
Washington street at Matchett street 


41 
. . 53 


Dorchester 




Clapp street at Massachusetts avenue 

Grossman street 

Norton street 


49 
29 
26 



East Boston 

Bennington street 831 

Hyde Park 

West street 28 

West Roxbury 

Bellevue street 68 

63 
15 

28 
41 



Bogandale road .... 
Landseer street at La Grange street 
Potomac street at Jennett avenue 
Redlands road at Alameda road . 
Walter street 



Thirty-three (33) surveys and plans were made for 
the discontinuance of 2.5 miles of pubhc highways as 
follows : 

District Length 

Boston Proper in Feet 

Ashland street 195 

Auburn street 605 

Barton caurt 125 

Barton street 386 

Brighton street 798 

Gausewaj^ street 301 

Ghambers street 1,794 

Gotting street 250 

Eaton street 174 

Fruit street — 

Green street 309 

Hammond avenue 124 

Kennard avenue 212 

Leverett street 1,477 

Lyman street 158 

McLean court 297 

McLean street 295 

Milton street 295 

Minot street 287 



Public Works Department 73 

Length 
District in Feet 

North Russell street 437 

Poplar street 1,159 

Prospect street 294 

Public Alley No. 12 70.91 

Public Alley No. 13 60 

Public Alley No. 14 467 

Public Alley No. 15 78 

South Margin street 36 

Spring street 621 

Stoughton street 221 

Wall street 650 

Willard street 240 

ROXBURY 

Wigglesworth street 451 

Worthington street 203 

One (1) survey and plans was made for the dis- 
continuance of the following sewer easement : 

District Length 

Boston Proper: in Feet 

Huntington avenue and Boylston street . . 847 

Twenty-five (25) surveys and plans were made for 
the alteration (specific repair) of 1.94 miles of public 
highway as follows: 

District Length 

Boston Proper: in Feet 

Stuart street (Clarendon to Dartmouth) . . . 500 

Harrison avenue island 

Brighton: 

Commonwealth avenue 6,000 

Commonwealth avenue at Chestnut Hill avenue . 480 

Foster street island 

Matchett street curb cutback 

Parsons street curb cutback 

Charlestown: 

Alford street island 

Cambridge street island 

Rutherford avenue island 

Dorchester: 

Bowdoin street curb cutback 

Columbia road (from Eastman to Massachusetts 
avenue) 1^180 



74 City Document No. IS 

Length 

District in Feet 

Massachusetts avenue at Clapp street . . . 650 

Norfolk street curb cutback 

East Boston: 

Bennington street . 830 

Hyde Park: 

Fairmount avenue (River street to N. Y., N. H. & 

H. R. R.) 600 

River street island 

West Milton street island 

ROXBURY : 

Columbus avenue island 

Massachusetts avenue at Albany street . . . island 
Massachusetts avenue at Southampton street . island 

Tremont street (Benton to Camden) . . . 650 

West Roxbury: 

Centre street curb cutback 

Poplar street curb cutback 

Temple street curb cutback 

Walk Hill street curb cutback 

Seventeen (17) surveys and plans were made for the 
taking of 1.31 miles of easements for sewerage purposes 
as follows: 

District Length 

Dorchester: in Feet 

Itasca street 595 

Hyde Park: 

Goff street 200 

Greenbrook road 540 

Leseur road 176 

Prospect park 325 

Windham road 1,502 

Roxbury : 

Alley No. 933 

West Roxbury: 

Baker street 380 

Banfield avenue 324 

Birchland terrace 426 

Macullar road 423 

Maplewood street 389 



Public Works Department 75 

Length 
District in Feet 

Meyer court 250 

Meyer street 150 

Powell street and Miami terrace .... 367 

Vogel street 380 

Salman street (sewer assessment plan) . . . 535 

For the Public Works Department (Highway Divi- 
sion) twenty-seven (27) highways were staked out for 
construction. 

For the proposed government center in the Scollay 
square area 9.15 miles of land was hned, graded and 
marked. 

For the School Department survej's and plans were 
made for school taking purposes as follows: Bigelow 
School, South Boston; High and Summer streets, 
Charlestown; Bolster and Mozart streets, Roxbury. 

For the Public Works Department (Sewer Division) 
136 catch basins were staked out. Also six (6) survey 
reports were made. 

For the Real Property Department a survey and 
plan was made of Freeport street, Dorchester. 

For the Fire Department a topographical survey 
and plan of the proposed road from Long Island Bridge 
was made also designing grades on roads and buildings. 

For the Institutions Department, Long Island Hospi- 
tal Chapel, a survey and plan and staking out of line 
and grade was made. 

Approximately thirty-three (33) requests for lines 
and grade by miscellaneous private engineers and 
other departments were complied with. 

Stone Bounds: In accordance with a policy established 
in 1950, stone bounds were set and drilled on the follow- 
ing newly constructed streets : 

Number of 
Street and District Bounds 

Brighton 

Margo road 5 

Rushmore street 6 

Selkirk road 1 

Dorchester 

Cassnet street 2 

Coffey street 4 

Favre street 2 



76 City Document No. 18 



Hutchinson street 2 

Messinger street 2 

O'Donnell terrace 2 

Orlando street 1 

Rosselerin road 4 

Savannah avenue 2 

East Boston 

Beachview road 2 

Drumhn road 2 

Hyde Park 

Belnap road 2 

Daniel court 2 

Dietz court 2 

Dietz road 9 

Dodge road 4 

Eastmont road 2 

Joan road 6 

Kardon road 2 

Leighton road 10 

Senders court 3 

Susanna court 1 

Wharton court 1 

ROXBURY 

Deaconess road 2 

Joslin road 2 

Parker Hill terrace 1 

Topeka street 3 

West Roxbury 

Agassiz park 2 

Berkeley street 4 

Capital street 1 

Crockers Lane 3 

Fairlane road 3 

Furbush road 4 

Graham terrace 2 

Hampstead Lane 3 

Hebron street 1 

Larch place 1 

Newfield street 4 

Robken road 2 

Selwyn street 1 

Re-production Work: On January 1, 1957, a new 
policy requiring signed requisitions for all reproduction 



Public Works Department 77 

work was put into effect. Also, a charge to the pubHc 
of $1 per copy was begun in accordance with a revised 
schedule of fees established by the City Council, Decem- 
ber 1, 1957. 

The new fee schedule brought an income of $432 to 
this division from the sale of copies of its plans and 
records. Other departments and divisions likewise 
received substantial new revenue from the sale of 
copies produced by our reproduction service. 

Following is the report of reproduction work of the 
division for the year 1959: 

Department PHSTS BPS OZS APS 

Administrative Services 840 1,117 

Assessing 684 1,927 2S 

Auditing 266 

Building Department 984 1,455 

City Clerk 520 728 

City Council 1,636 668 

Civil Defense 104 

Collector's Office 148 

Election Department 68 

Finance Commission 46 

Fire Department 212 198 

Law Department 604 195 

Mayor's Office 1,848 464 

Park Department 43 

Penal 164 433 

Planning Board 1,140 1,477 

Public Buildings 48 45 

Public Works: 

Bridge Division 214 731 

Central Office 226 175 

Highway Division 428 2,147 35 

Permit Division 42 125 

Sanitary Division 196 411 

Sewer Division 1,104 513 

Street Lighting 132 433 

Survey Division 3,412 1,087 9,977 487 

Water Division 224 485 

Real Property 1,246 1,531 

Registry 612 

School Buildings 178 

School Committee 46 

Traffic Commission 288 166 

Treasury 172 

Veterans' Services 1,726 

White Fund 384 168 

Totals 19,942 1,087 25,612 550 

Photographic Service: In carrying out a policy in- 
troduced in 1956, we have established a photographic 
service for the Public Works Department and other 
city departments. As a part of this program we now 
take photographs of the location of all new highway 
layouts and proposed improvements and land taken 



78 City Document No. 18 

for municipal purposes. The following is a summary 
of this work during the year 1959: 

Nega- 4x5 8 x 10 

Department tivea Prints Prints 

Building Department 36 36 

Public Works: 

Automotive Division 78 78 

Bridge Division 204 190 46 

Central Office 260 260 

Highvva}^ Division 318 318 52 

Sanitary Division 296 296 140 

Sewer Division 146 146 32 

Survey Division 1,800 1,800 110 

Real Property Department 120 40 120 

Miscellaneous 140 140 80 

Totals 3,498 2,966 918 

Preparation of the following private ways open for 
pubUc travel as provided for in Chapter 393, Acts of 
1906, as amended, was approved by the PubUc Im- 
provement Commission to be done under the general 
supervision of engineers of this division: 

Banfield avenue Dorchester 

Birchland terrace West Roxbury 

Delhi street Dorchester 

Greenbrook road Hyde Park 

Lodgehill road Hyde Park 

Maplewood street West Roxbury 

Meyer court West Roxbury 

Miami terrace West Roxbury 

Vogel street West Roxbury 

Wachusett street Hyde Park 

Damages: During 1959, 131 land damage reports 
recommending awards totalling $64,217.11 were sub- 
mitted to the Public Improvement Commission. 

Assessments: During the period reported on, estimates 
of benefit of assessment purposes were prepared amount- 
ing to $325,700.89. These estimates are included in 
orders for street, sidewalk and sewer improvements. 
Also, final assessments were prepared amounting to 
$170,537.33. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James W. Haley, 

Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department 79 

APPENDIX G 



REPORT OF DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE WATER DIVISION 



Boston, December 31, 1959. 

To the Cominissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the ac- 
tivities of the Water Division, operations and expendi- 
tures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1959. 

During the j'ear a total of 11,801 Hnear feet, or 2.24 
miles of main pipe was laid or re laid, varying in size 
from 4 inches to 48 inches and 615 applications were 
received for installation of new service pipes, enlarged 
service pipes and fire pipes, etc. into new or remodeled 
buildings. 

There were 12 petitions received for the extension of 
water mains. The particular district in which the above 
work was performed is shown on the accompanying 
table. 

The districts in which main pipe was laid and relaid" 
are as follows: 

Laid Relaid 

District Linear Feet Linear Feet 

Brighton 

City Proper 950.0 902.0 

Dorchester 739.0 

East Boston 

Hyde Park 3,341.0 1,654.0 

Roxbury 1,673.0 

South Boston .... 

West Roxbury .... 1,803.0 739.0 

Under the provisions of Chapter 4 of the Ordinances 
of 1952, which deals with capital improvements, the 
Water Division submitted a capital improvement pro- 
gram, which program w^as not followed to any great 
extent due to the fact that all available funds were 
needed to extend water mains to provide water into 
residential areas. 



80 City Document No. 18 

Engineering Office 

The office force assisted the pubhc in ascertaining 
official information in relation to water mains and serv- 
ice pipe locations, making studies and estimates on 
new mains and service and services and other assistance 
relating to water matters. The record plans, pressure 
charts and other official records were brought up to 
date. The office drew up plans and contracts for laying 
new and relaying old mains, supervised construction and 
had supervision of snow removal in areas Nos. 4 and 10. 

The engineering office assisted in design and super- 
vision of construction of water mains and appurte- 
nances for the following major projects; their status 
being as follows : 

Central Artery 

South street to Dover street completed. 

Southeast Expressway 

Boston street to Milton completed. 

Extension of M.T.A. Highland Division from Beacon 
street at Maitland street 
Connection at Beacon street completed. 

New East Boston Vehicular Tunnel 

Plans completed and construction started. 

Projects Under Study 

(a) Reinforce southern section of West Roxbury by 
utilizing abandoned Brookline water mains. 

(6) Reinforce Stony Brook section of Hyde Park with 
H.H.S. 

(c) Reinforce low service, Roxbury and South Boston, 
by cleaning and lining 30 inch-24 inch main Roxbury 
Crossing to Andrew Square. 

(d) Storage building for water works supplies in Albany 
Street yard. 

(e) The relocation of the 20-inch L.S. and 16-inch H.S. 
to allow the demolition of the Warren Bridge has been post- 
poned until a final decision has been reached by the U. S. 
Army Engineers. 

(/) A study of all 6-inch water mains laid prior to 1890 
shows that they should be replaced with new and larger 
water mains to provide adequate water for domestic purposes 
and fire protection. 



Public Works Department 81 

Hydrants 
There were 12 new hydrants estabhshed, 62 hydrants 
changed and 4 hydrants abandoned, an increase of 8 
hydrants. 

Summation 
System relaid 0.95 miles, extended 1.29 miles, aban- 
doned .10 miles, 12 new hydrants established and 4 
hydrants abandoned; an increase of 1.19 miles and an 
increase of 8 hydrants. 

The Distribution Branch 

The Distribution Branch consisting of the main 
yard at 710 Albany street (with a small subyard in 
Charlestown) and three district yards are responsible 
for the repair and maintenance of main pipes, service 
and fire pipes, hydrants, gates and providing emergency 
and general service to the public. The main yard main- 
tains emergency crews around the clock for any water 
service that may be required in any section of the city. 

The main yard and three district yards were assisted 
by three contracting firms, one in each yard with one 
contractor having two districts. The contractual work 
consisted of excavation and backfilling to allow water 
division employees to repair leaks, lay or relay water 
services, change hydrants and repair or replace defective 
appurtenances. This contractual work was performed 
in a satisfactory- manner and proved its value by giving 
service to the public. 

District Yards 

The three district yard forces (West Roxbury, Dor- 
chester and Brighton) were utihzed in general assistance 
to the pubhc repairing leaks, installing new services, 
meter changes, hydrant changes and off and on calls, etc. 

A new office building of prefab steel was constructed 
in the Dorchester District yard, replacing the old 
wooden storage and office building. 

The Machine Shop 
The machine shop and plumbing shop handled all 
drilling of services in the main yard and assisted in case 
of emergency in the district yards. The machine shop 
continues to machine and assemble all new corporation 
and tapping gates up to 6 inches. Gates 8 inches and 



82 City Document No. 18 

larger are now purchased under contract made under 
specifications of New York Pattern, M.D.C. Type. 
They repair defective hydrants, repair in the ground if 
possible defective gates and rebuild gates both corpora- 
tion, tapping and high pressure. Along with this work 
they, both plumbing and machine shop, are called on to 
assist other branches of the Public Works Department 
in many special jobs. 

The machine shop has discontinued the practice of 
machining and assembling B & F hydrants which have 
been the standard hydrants since 1919. New hydrants 
are now purchased under advertised contracts and 
hmited to three manufacturers: Mueller Co., A. P. 
Smith Manufacturing Co., and DarUng Valve and 
Manufacturing Co. 

The Meter Branch 
The meter shop handled a total of 13,390 meters, 
divided as follows: 

Meters applied on new services 615 

Meters discontinued 1,235 

Meters changed out 6,180 

Meters changed in 6,525 

Meters tested in shop 945 

Meters repaired in service 530 

Meters reset 1,000 

Meters repaired in shop 1,080 

Meters junked 1,460 

Total 13,390 

Business Office 

This office performs all the work related to the 
processing of bills to property owners for water used, 
and the maintenance of water meters. 

These operations include receiving applications for 
new services and fire pipes; reading approximately 
93,000 meters quarterly'; computing and preparing 
385,000 bills amounting to $6,200,000; keeping account 
of paid and unpaid bills; testing, repairing, installing 
and removing water meters, and receiving complaints 
from the water consuming public. 

It is unfortunate that for many years the surplus of 
the Water Division was not allowed to accumulate a 
reserve fund which would have been available when 
water receipts failed to meet expenditures. 



Public Works Department 83 

1959 

Main pipe petitions received 12 

Domestic service applications 545 

Fire pipe applications 70 

Special meter tests 31 

Hydrant permits issued 13 

Repair deposits received 83 

Miscellaneous deposits 13 

By chapter 487, Acts of 1954 entitled "An Act Rela- 
tive to Liens for Water Rates and Charges" effective 
January 1, 1955, the law was changed so that liens for 
water rates take effect by operation of law without the 
necessity- of recording a lien statement at the Registry 
of Deeds. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers at the end of the year has been con- 
tinued as a courtesy to the customer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. M. Sullivan, 
Division Engineer. 



84 City Document No. 18 

WATER STATISTICS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER SI, 1959 

Mains 
Kind of pipe: cast iron, wrought iron, steel. 

Size, 2-inch to 48-inch. 
Extended, miles, 1.29. 
Size enlarged, miles, .7. 
Total miles now in use, 1,034.3. 
Public hydrants added, 8. 
Public hydrants now in use, 12,536. 
Stop gates added, 19. 
Stop gates now in use, 16,599. 
Number of blowoffs, 857. 
Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Services 
Kind of pipe and size : 

I inch to 2 inches in diameter of lead or copper. 
4 inches and 6 inches in diameter of cast iron. 



1959 

Domestic service applications 545 

Fire pipe applications 70 

SHUTTING OFF AND TURNING ON WATER IN 1959 

Number of shut-oft's for repairs 6,040 

Number of premises turned on after repairs .5,194 

Number of shut-offs for vacancy 512 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy . . . . 153 

Number of premises shut off for nonpayment of water rates . 5 
Number of premises turned on again after being shut off for 

nonpayment 5 

Number of premises shut off on account of waste .... 59 

Number of premises turned on again after being shut off for waste 2 

Number of new service pipes turned on for the first time . . 213 

Total number of times water was shut off or turned on . 12,183 



WATER SERVICE REPORT, 1959 

Balances from 1958: 



Receipts $78,924 81 

Appropriations 66,566 81 



Receipts: 

Water Rates and Services . . $6,204,138 41 
Tax Titles, Water .... 66,597 35 



$145,491 G-2 



6,270,735 76 
$6,416,227 38 



Public Works Department 



85 



Expenditures : 

Pensions and Annuities . 
Water Division 

Refunds 

Metropolitan Water Assessment 
Collecting, Water 
Automotive, Water . 



Transfer of 1958 Surplus 



$251,087 91 

2,454,164 34 

506 11 

3,239,311 04 

166,999 00 

99,872 00 



Carried Forward to 1960 Water Division 
Surplus, December 31, 1959 



$6,211,940 40 

$204,286 98 

78,924 81 



$125,362 17 
71,318 28 

$54,043 89 



TABLE NO. 1. STATEMENT OF WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR 1959 



Make 


■2 

1 


1 

1 


Meters 
Changed 


0. 

1 

e 

i 


1^ 


a 


1 


■g 




Out 


In 


•-5 




572 
26 


1,106 

155 

2 

11 


5,343 

876 

81 

92 

2 


5,980 
108 


798 
107 


704 
75 


798 
107 


956 
11 


305 


Watch Dog 


905 


King 


83 


Worthington 














94 


American 
















Federal 


















Sparling 






1 
1 
3 
2 














Nash 
















\rctic . . 






3 


1 


4 


1 


1 




Trident 






















Empire 








































Keystone 




















Pitt 




















Connection pieces 






854 


833 




























Totals. 


599 


1,276 


7,255 


6,924 


906 


783 


906 


968 


1 389 







86 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE NO. 2. 


METERS 


IN 


SERVICE, 


DECEMBER 3 


, 1959 




Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


% 


Vi. 


1 


iy2 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 




72,476 

6,589 

291 

859 

44 

17 


5,394 

204 

7 

6 


2,434 

309 

3 


1,490 

765 
8 
6 


1,019 

405 

3 

4 


357 
238 


426 

71 


128 


37 


18 




83,779 


Watch Dog 


8,581 


King . . 










312 


Worthington 














875 


American 














44 


Federal 






















17 




1 
1 






4 

1 




1 










7 




6 
2 





















1 
14 
19 

1 


1 










4 


Arctic 


1 




15 


15 










45 




1 
2 
1 


7 










27 




















3 


. 




















1 














































































Totals 


80,288 


5,614 


2,746 


2,784 


1,451 


630 


506 


129 


37 


18 




93.703 







Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


% 


Ji 


1 


IJ^ 


2 


3 


4 


6 


' 


10 


12 


Connection Pieces (regular)... 
City of Boston, Connec- 


2,665 
49 


217 
4 


100 
.7 


42 
82 


40 
165 


15 
69 


2 
26 


7 
7 


4 
1 






3,092 


1 


10 


441 








2,714 


221 


127 


124 


205 


84 


28 


14 


5 


1 


10 


3.533 







Public Works Department 



87 



TABLE NO. 3. METERS IN SHOP, DECEMBER 31, 1959 





Diameter in Inches 


Total 




% 


H 


1 


IM 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey Disc 


800 








10 


8 
8 


3 

4 
7 


1 








822 
















12 














8 


8 




2 


25 


Watch Dog 










3 


3 


6 
























Total 


800 








13 


19 


14 


9 


8 




2 


865 













TABLE NO. 4. METERS REPAIRED IN SHOP IN 1959 



Make 








Diameter in Inches 




Total 


% 


¥4. 


1 


iVz 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 




532 


38 


10 


86 

38 

1 


95 
43 


20 

22 


14 
4 


2 




' 




798 


Watch Dog . 


107 


















1 
























Total 


532 


38 


.„ 


125 


138 


42 


18 


2 




1 




906 






Meters in shop to be re- 


120 


100 


' 


















227 






















Total 


120 


100 


7 


















227 























City Document No. 18 



TABLE NO. 5. METERS REPAIRED AND REBUILT AT FACTORY IN 1959 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


% 


M 1 


IK- 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 




1,046 






















1.046 
























Total 


1,046 






















1,046 

























TABLE NO. 5A. METERS PURCHASED NEW IN 1959 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


% 


Ji 


1 


IVi 


2 


3 4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Heraey Disc 


850 






71 


35 














956 


Hersey Compound Train. . 






20 


18 










38 


Watch Dog 
















































Total 


850 






71 


35 


20 


18 










994 



















TABI 


.E NO. 6. 


METERS 


RESET 


IN 


1959 










Make 


Diameter in Inches 




'A 


V4. 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 




Heraey 


866 

1 


49 
3 


16 
3 


12 
3 
1 


10 

1 


1 


1 


1 








956 


Watch Dog 



















































Total 


867 


52 


19 


16 


11 


1 


^ 


1 






968 













Connection pieces removed . 
Occupancy 



854 
114 



Public Works Department 



89 



TABLE NO. 7A. METERS CHANGED IN 1959. METERS TAKEN OUT 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


% 


V4. 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


" 




4,703 
712 
81 
92 

1 


262 
30 


148 
30 


87 
34 


101 
45 


22 


18 
3 


2 








5,343 


Watch Dog 








876 


King 










81 


Worthington 






















92 




1 






















Federal 
















































Arctic 








1 


1 


1 
1 












3 


Trident 


















2 
























Empire 












- 














Nash 


1 
























Crown 






































I 


































Total 


5,598 


293 


178 


122 


147 


46 


22 


3 








6,401 











TABLE NO. 7B. METERS CHANGED IN 1959. METERS PUT IN 



Make 








DiAMETEB IN 


Inches 










Total 


H 


*A 


1 


IV2 


2 


3 


4 


' 


« 


10 


12 




5,450 


150 


104 


131 

38 
2 


104 

38 

1 


20 
26 


18 
6 


3 








5,980 


Watch Dog 








108 


















3 
























Total 


5,450 


150 


104 


171 


143 


46 


24 


3 








6,091 













90 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE NO. 



METERS REPAIRED IN SERVICE IN 1959 







































Make. 


If 
is 


1 
1 


•3 

a 

1 


J 
1 


1 


a 


a 

1 


. 




137 
37 


182 
33 


54 
5 


3 




322 


6 


704 




75 


King 


















Worthington . . . 




















' 


3 












4 


Trident 

































Total 


175 


218 


59 


3 





322 


6 


783 







TABLE NO. 9. METERS APPLIED IN 1959 





Diameter in Inches 


Total 




H 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


424 


9 


23 


72 
15 

1 


22 
3 


8 
4 


11 
4 


3 






572 








26 












































Total 


424 


9 


23 


88 


25 


12 


15 


3 








599 













Meters applied on old service. . 
Meters applied on new service. 



23 
576 



Public AVorks Department 



91 



TABLE NO. 10. METERS DISCONTINUED IN 1959 





Diameter in Inches 


Total 




H 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 




923 

87 
2 

n 


88 
10 


37 
12 


14 


24 
13 


8 
12 


3 










1,106 


Watch Dog 








1.^5 




































11 






































1 












J 
































































































































1 




























1,023 


98 


49 


36 


37 


21 


10 


2 








1,276 













Permanent 338 Connection Pieces Installed 833 Vacancy 105 

TABLE NO. n. REASON FOR METER CHANGE IN YEAR 



1959 



Makk 


1 

1 
o 


1 

bC 

.9 

0. 

J 


1 

.2 

13 

a 
a 
xn 


1 

1 


I 
1 


1 
1 


t 
1 


g 
1 


o 


1 


"3 

I 


Hersey . . 


3,084 

542 

24 

61 

3 


93 


680 
121 


106 
20 


28 


46 
4 


21 

4 


86 


88 
20 


101 
2 


4,333 


Watch Dog 


730 


King 


24 


Worthington 




16 










■ 


1 




81 




3 


Federal . 






































































Arctic 


2 














1 
1 






3 


Trident 


















2 






















Nash 


1 




















1 
















































Totals 


3,717 


93 


817 


127 


35 


51 


25 


100 


109 


103 


5,177 







92 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE NO. 12. METERS JUNKED IN 1959 



Make 


Diameter in Inches 


Total 


H 


Ji 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey 


297 
883 
83 
94 
2 


5 

15 


1 

7 


1 


1 














305 


Watch Dog 














905 




















83 
























94 
























2 


Federal ... 


















































Trident 




















































Nash 


1 






















1 


Arctic . 


















































Totals 


1,360 


20 


8 


1 


1 














1,390 



















Note: The number of meters lost in service in 1959 amounts to 280. 



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(93) 



94 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE NO. II. 
Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31 



1959. 









2 


1 


ll 


S 


1 


s 


1 


on 


§ 


1 




Hydrants 


i 


1 


p; 
1 


>> 

a 
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1^^ 


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a 
1 




1 


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1 


1 


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« 


n 


O 


m 


^ 


o 


Q 


^ 


PQ 


^ 


<j 


H 


Public, December 31, 1958 


431 


241 


2,063 


1,945 


6,833 


2 




7 




75 


14 


51 


11,662 


Private, December 31 , 1958 


33 


5 


29 


126 


17 
17 


13 


56 


6 


4 


111 






394 


Added during 1959 


9 


57 


89 




5 


1 


21 


24 


21 










8 








Total Public, December 31, 1959. . 


426 


240 


2,042 


1,938 


6,812 


2 




13 




67 


22 


108 


11,670 


Total Private, December 31, 1959 . 


33 


5 


29 


126 


17 


13 


56 




4 


111 






394 











Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1958 . 

Total hydrants added during 1959 

Total hydrants abandoned during 1959 . . 

Total hydrants in service December 31, 1959 . 

High pressure fire hydrants in service 1959 

Total hydrants (all kinds) in service December 31, 1959 



12,056 
89 
81 

12,064 
472 

12,536 



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(97) 



City Document No. 18 
APPENDIX H 



REPORT OF THE 
PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT COMMISSION 



Boston, December 31, 1959. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Through the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In accordance with the provisions of Section 24, 
Chapter 3, of the Revised City Ordinances of 1947, 
the following report of the Public Improvement Com- 
mission for the year ending December 31, 1959, is 
respectfully submitted. 

The Public Improvement Commission was established 
May 1, 1954, by the provisions of Section 57, Chapter 2, 
of the 1954 Ordinances. This Commission, consisting 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, the Commissioner 
of Real Property, and the Chairman of the Boston 
Traffic Commission, was assigned all of the powers and 
duties of the former Board of Street Commissioners, 
except : 

(a) Those relating to the storage and sale of inflammables, 
filling stations, and parking lots, which were trans- 
ferred to the Committee on Licenses in the Public 
Safety Commission; 

(6) Those relating to the planting and removal of trees in 
public ways, the use of public ways for any temporary 
obstruction in, under, or over the same, the use of 
public ways for the storage and sale of merchandise, 
which were transferred to the Commissioner of Public 
Works ; 

(c) Those relating to the abatement of taxes, which were 
transferred to the Real Property Department. 

Functions of the Board of Street Commissioners 
transferred to this Commission include the authority 
to lay out, widen, relocate, alter, discontinue, or rename 



Public Works Department 99 

public highways, and to order the making of specific 
repairs therein; to order the construction of sanitary 
sewers and storm drains; to take land by eminent 
domain for municipal purposes (except housing and 
off-street parking); to permit the opening of private 
ways for public travel; to levy assessments for street, 
sidewalk, and sewer betterments; and to issue permits 
for the location of wire-carrying poles, conduits, pipes, 
tracks, and similar uses of the public ways. 

Street Program 
During the period covered by this report, 153 high- 
way improvements, including the laying out of 51 new 
highways, the wiclening and relocation of 22 public 
ways, the making of specific repairs in 31 existing 
streets, the revision of grade of 2 streets, the discontinu- 
ance of 44 streets, the abandonment of 1 order, the 
taking of an easement for water purposes, and the taking 
of an easement for sloping purposes, were ordered by 
the Pubhc Improvement Commission. 

Layouts with Construction 
The following streets were ordered laid out and 
constructed as Public Ways during 1959: 

Bradlee street, Hyde Park, extended from Thatcher street 
to CoHins street. Length, 1,510 feet ; estimated cost, $41,089.00; 
estimated benefit, $20,544.46. 

Braeburn road, Hyde Park (formerly Beaver street), from 
Beaver street approximately 140 feet beyond Chestnut street. 
Length, 140 feet; estimated cost, $l(), 470.30; estimated benefit, 
$8,226.19. 

Bryant road. West Roxbury, from Stimson street approxi- 
mately 210 feet northeasterlv. Length, 210 feet; estimated 
cost, $11,902.00; estimated beWfit, $5,950.98. 

Colorado street, Dorchester, extended between Almont 
street and Mattapan street. Length, 340 feet; estimated 
cost, $13,695.00; estimated benefit, $6,847.50. 

Cutter road, West Roxbury, from Baker street to Dow 
road. Length, 235 feet; estimated cost, $7,057.00; estimated 
benefit, $2,353.36. 

Dow road. West Roxbury, from a point approximately 
65 feet southeast of Cutter road approximately 750 feet north- 
westerly. Length, 750 feet; estimated cost, $22,080.00; 
estimated benefit, $11,029.30. 

Enterprise street, Dorchester, approximately 230 feet 
southwesterly to Clapp street. Length, 230 feet; estimated 
cost, $14,587.00; estimated benefit, $1,778.52. 



100 City Document No. 18 

Fairlane road, West Roxbury (formerly Ascent street)* 
from Centre street to Glenellen road. Length, 235 feet; 
estimated cost, $8,041.00; estimated benefit, $1,648.91. 

Florian street, West Roxbury, extended from Wyvern 
street to Hyde Park avenue. Length, 660 feet; estimated 
cost, $17,433.00; estimated benefit, $8,716.51. 

Glenellen road. West Roxbury (formerly Riverview street), 
from Fairlane road to Stimson street. Length, 1,030 feet; 
estimated cost, $26,607.00; estimated benefit, $18,545.47. 

Hallet-Davis street, Dorchester, from Milton street to 
Hill Top street. Length, 240 feet; estimated cost, $6,854.00; 
estimated benefit, $2,440.50. 

Kingsland road, West Roxbury (formerly Harwood street), 
from Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway to Lasell street, 
Length, 595 feet; estimated cost, $18,544.00; estimated benefit, 
$9,271.99. 

Lawton street, Hyde Park, from Colchester street approxi- 
matelj^ 612 feet easterly. Length, 612 feet; estimated cost, 
$18,615.00; estimated benefit, $9,307.51. 

Lorna road, Dorchester, extended from Lena terrace approxi- 
mately 750 feet southwesterly. Length, 750 feet; estimated 
cost, $27,289.00; estimated benefit, $13,643.52. 

Marist road, Dorchester (formerly Caryll street), from 
Morton street to Maryknoll street. Length, 800 feet; estimated 
cost, $23,173.00; estimated benefit, $11,586.50. 

Meadow road, Hyde Park, from Neponset Valley Park- 
way approximately 1,800 feet southwesterly. Length, 1,800 
feet; estimated cost, $80,516.00; estimated benefit, $40,258.00. 
Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park, from Edith street to 
Truman Highway. Length,^ 300 feet; estimated cost, $12,540; 
estimated benefit, $7,926.20. 

Meyer court. West Roxbury, from Meyer street approxi- 
mately 140 feet southwesterly. Length, 140 feet; estimated 
cost, $5,962.00; estimated benefit, $2,981.01. 

Milton street, Dorchester, from Hallet-Davis street approxi- 
mately 245 feet westerl^^ Length, 245 feet; estimated cost, 
$11,547.50; estimated benefit, $5,773.75. 

Myopia road, Hyde Park, extended from Braeburn road to 
West street. Length, 810 feet; estimated cost, $24,688.00; 
estimated benefit, $12,344.10. 

Norris road, Hyde Park, from Metropolitan avenue approxi- 
mately 396 feet southwesterly. Length, 396 feet; estimated 
cost, $12,648.00; estimated benefit, $4,936.33. 

Oakcrest road, Hyde Park (formerly Woodland road), 
from River street to Ralston road. Length, 830 feet; estimated 
cost, $24,022.00; estimated benefit, $12,011.00. 

Patterson street, Dorchester (formerly Murray Terrace), 
extended from Brookvale street approximately 220 feet south- 
easterly. Length, 220 feet ; estimated cost, $7, 140.00 ; estimated 
benefit, $3,570.00. 



Public Works Department 101 

Pleasantdale road, West Roxbuiy, extended from Tobiii 
road to Centre street. Length, 255 feet; estimated cost, 
$9,062.00; estimated benefit, $4,531.00. 

Quarley road, West Roxbury, extended from a point approxi- 
mately 274 feet northeast of Wyvern street approximately 30 
feet northeasterly. Length, 30 feet; estimated cost, $1,695.00; 
estimated benefit, $510.00. 

St. Clare road, Dorchester, from Boutwell street approxi- 
mately 190 feet northerly. Length, 190 feet; estimated cost, 
$6,620.00; estimated benefit, $3,310.00. 

Salman street. West Roxbury, from Fairlane road to Stimson 
street. Length, 1,180 feet; estimated cost, $36,426.00; esti- 
mated benefit, $21,184.98. 

Stimson street. West Roxbury, from Centre street to Cross- 
town avenue. Length, 970 feet; estimated cost, $40,000.00; 
estimated benefit, $17,905.97. 

Summer street, Hyde Park, extended from a point approxi- 
mately 551 feet north of Parrott street approximately 780 feet 
northerly to West street. Length, 780 feet; estimated cost, 
$20,309.00; estimated benefit, $10,154.50. 

Swift street, East Boston, from Frankfort street approxi- 
mately 200 feet southeasterly. Length, 200 feet; estimated 
cost, $7,228.00; estimated benefit, $3,071.90. 

Swift terrace. East Boston, from Swift street approximately 
250 feet southwesterly. Length, 250 feet; estimated cost, 
$7,517.00; estimated benefit, $3,194.73. 

Wilna court, West Roxbury (formerly Willow court), from. 
Willow street approximately 193 feet southeasterly. Length, 
193 feet; estimated cost, $5,489.00; estimated benefit, $2,744.50. 

Layouts Without Construction 
The follow'ing streets were ordered laid out as public 
ways during 1959: 

Ames street, Dorchester, from West view street approximately 
970 feet southeasterly. Length, 970 feet. 

Cambridge Street avenue, Boston Proper, from Cambridge 
street, approximately 50 feet northerly. Length, 50 feet. 

Dover street, Boston Proper, from the southeasterly line of 
the John F. Fitzgerald Expressway approximately 350 feet 
southeasterly. Length, 350 feet. 

Fay wood avenue. East Boston, from Vallar road to Orient 
avenue. Length, 1,350 feet. 

Fermoy Heights avenue. West Roxbury, from Franklin Hill 
avenue to Shandon road. Length, 380 feet. 

Fidelis Way, Brighton, from Washington street to Common- 
wealth avenue. Length, 1,670 feet. 

Orient avenue. East Boston, from a point approximately 187 
feet west of Montmorenci avenue approximately 103 feet 
westerly to Faywood avenue. Length, 103 feet. 



102 City Document No. 18 

Parker street, Roxbiiry, from Heath street to Bickford street • 
Length, 930 feet. 

Patterson Way, South Boston, from Old Colony Avenue to 
East Eighth street. Length, 870 feet. 

Shandon road. West Roxbury, from Franklin Hill avenue to 
Fermoy Heights avenue. Length, 765 feet. 

Standard street, Dorchester, from approximately 250 feet 
south of Woodgate street to Woodbole avenue. Length, 1,055 
feet. 

Stratton street, Dorchester, extended from Lyford street 
approximately 286 feet easterly. Length, 286 feet. 

Vallar road. East Boston, from Fay wood avenue approxi- 
mately 1,200 feet westerly. Length, 1,200 feet. 

Westview street, Dorchester, extended from Blue Hill avenue 
approximately 1,244 feet easterlJ^ Length, 1,250 feet. 

Woodbole avenue, Dorchester, from Woodgate street to 
Standard street. Length, 2,000 feet. 

Woodgate street, Dorchester, from Morton street to Standard 
street. Length, 930 feet. 

Woodmere street, Dorchester, from Morton street to Wood- 
bole avenue. Length, 200 feet. 

Woodruff Way, Dorchester, from Woodbole avenue approxi- 
mately 1,600 feet southerly. Length, 1,600 feet. 

Construction 

The following street w'as ordered constructed in 1959: 

Meyer street, West Roxbury, from a point approximately 290 
feet southwest of Catherine street approximately 355 feet 
southwesterly and northeasterly to Organ Park street. (Note: 
Ordered laid out November 5, 1958.) Length, 355 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $10,503.00; estimated benefit, $5,251.49. 

Widenings and Relocations 

Albany street, Roxbury, between Massachusetts avenue and 
Southampton street. 

Bellevue street. West Roxbury, at the northeasterly corner 
of Robin street. 

Belvidere street, Boston Proper, from Dalton street to Hunt- 
ington avenue. 

Bennington street. East Boston, at the northeasterly corner 
of Walley street, and on the southerly side between Leyden 
street and Walley street. 

Bogandale road, West Roxbury, on the northeasterly side 
approximately 800 feet southeast of Centre street. 

Ceylon street, Dorchester, at the southeasterly and north- 
easterly corners of Quincy street. 

Clapp street, Dorchester, at the northeasterly corner of 
Massachusetts avenue. 



Public Works Department 103 

Grossman street, Dorchester, at the southeasterly corner of 
Babson street. 

Dalton street, Boston Proper, from Belvidere street to 
Boylston street. 

Farrington avenue, Brighton, at the northwesterly corner of 
Linden street. 

Highgate street, Brighton, at the northeasterly and north- 
westerly corners of Farrington avenue. 

Landseer street. West Roxbury, at the southwesterly corner 
of La Grange street . 

Matchett street, Brighton, at the southeasterly corner of 
Perthshire road. 

Norton street, Dorchester, at the northeasterly corner of 
Richfield street. 

Orchard Park street, Roxbury, from a point approximately 
180 feet south of Ambrose street to Eustis street. 

Potomac street. West Roxbury, at the southwesterly corner 
of Jennett avenue. 

Redlands road, West Roxbury, at the northeasterly and 
southeasterly corners of Alameda road. 

Southampton street, Roxbury, on the southwesterly side at 
Massachusetts avenue. 

Walk Hill street. West Roxbury, at the northeasterly corner 
of Harvard street. 

Walter street, Hj-de Park, at the southwesterly corner of 
Pierce street. 

Washington street, Brighton, at the northeasterly and south- 
easterly corners of Matchett street. 

West street, Hyde Park, at the northeasterly corner of 
River street. 

Specific Repairs 

Bennington street. East Boston, from Leyden street ap- 
proximatelj'' 700 feet northeasterly, consisting of the relocation 
of the existing roadway and the construction of a divisional 
island ; the construction of a traffic divisional island at the south- 
westerly intersection of Leyden street and the intersection of 
Austin avenue. 

Bowdoin street, Dorchester, at the northeasterly and north- 
westerly corners of Norton street, consisting of increasing the 
curb radii. 

Brighton avenue, Brighton, at both corners of Reedsdale 
street, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

Gentre street, West Roxbury, at both corners of Landseer 
street, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

Columbia road, Dorchester, from East Gottage street ap- 
proximately 500 feet southwesterly and between Massachu- 
setts avenue and Elder street, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the southeasterly sidewalk and the reduction in width 
of the existing traffic di\'isional island. 



104 City Document No. 18 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, at both corners of Foster 
street, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, from Washington street 
approximately 300 feet southwesterly, consisting of the reduc- 
tion in width of the southeasterly sidewalk. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, on the northeasterly side 
from Chestnut Hill avenue to Chestnut Hill drive, consisting 
of the reduction in width of the existing sidewalk. 

Fairmount avenue, Hyde Park, from River street to the 
Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, consisting of the reduction in width of the existing 
sidewalks. 

Foster street, Brighton, at both corners of Mt. Vernon 
street, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

Foster street, Brighton, at both corners of Rose Garden 
Circle, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

Foster street, Brighton, at Washington street, consisting of 
the relocation of the existing traffic island. 

Harrison avenue, Boston Proper, between Castle street and 
Troy street, consisting of the construction of loamed spaces in 
the existing divisional island. 

Ivory street, West Roxbury, at both corners of Temple 
street, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

Massachusetts avenue, Dorchester, from approximately 
150 feet southeast of Clapp street for a distance of approxi- 
mately 300 feet northwesterly, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the northeasterly sidewalk. 

Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, at the intersection of 
Southampton street, consisting of the installation of a traffic 
divisional island. 

Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, on the northeasterly side 
from a point approximately 80 feet east of Bradston street 
approximately 300 feet westerly, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the existing sidewalk. 

Matchett street, Brighton, at four (corners of Hunnewell 
avenue, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

Matchett street, Brighton, from Perthshire road, consisting 
of the extension of the northerly sidewalk on Perthshire road 
to the westerly side of Matchett street. 

Norfolk street, Dorchester, at the intersection of Babson 
street, consisting of the installation of traffic divisional islands. 

Parsons street, Brighton, at the northeasterly and north- 
westerly corners of Bennett street, consisting of increasing the 
curb radii. 

River street, Hyde Park, at the northwesterly corner of 
Central avenue, consisting of increasing the curb radii. 

River street, Hyde Park, at Fairmount Avenue, consisting of 
the installation of traffic islands. 

Southampton street, Roxbury, on the northeasterly side from 
a point approximately 80 feet east of Bradston street ap- 



Public AVorks Department 105 

proximately 300 feet westerly, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the existing sidewalk. 

Southampton street, Roxbury, at the intersection of Mas- 
sachusetts avenue, consisting of the installation of a traffic 
divisional island. 

Stuart street, Boston Proper, between Clarendon street and 
Dartmouth street, consisting of the reduction in width of the 
existing sidewalks. 

Temple street. West Roxbury, at the northerly, southerly, 
easterly, and westerly corners of Keith street, consisting of 
increasing the curb radii. 

Temple street, West Roxbury, at the northerly, easterly, 
southerly, and westerly corners of Vermont street, consisting 
of increasing the curb radii. 

Tremont street, Roxbury and Boston Proper, between 
Camden street and Cabot street, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the existing sidewalks and the installation of a traffic 
divisional island. 

Walk Hill street. West Roxbury, at the northwesterly corner 
of Harvard street, consisting of the relocation of the existing 
curb line. 

West Milton street, Hyde Park, at the intersection of Milton 
street, consisting of the installation of traffic islands. 

Grade Revisions 

Court street, Boston Proper, on the northerly side, from a 
point approximately 96 feet west of Washington street ap- 
proximately 104 feet westerly. 

Meadow road, Hyde Park, from Neponset Valley Parkway 
approximately 1,800 feet southwesterly. 

Discontinuances 

Ambrose street, Roxbury, at the intersection of Orchard Park 
street. 

Ashland street, Boston Proper, from Leverett street to 
Chambers street. 

Auburn street, Boston Proper, from Poplar street to Charles 
street. 

Bartlett street, Charlestown, between Pearl street and 
School street. 

Barton court, Boston Proper, from Brighton street to 
Barton street. 

Barton street, Boston Proper, from Milton street to the 
John F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 

Belvidere street, Boston Proper, at the intersection of Fal- 
mouth street and West Newton street. 

Brighton street, Boston Proper, from Allen street to the John 
F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 



106 City Document No. 18 

Causeway street, Boston Proper, from Leverett street to 
Lowell street. 

Chambers street, Boston Proper, from Allen street to Charles 
street. 

Chambers street, Boston Proper, from Cambridge street to 
Eaton street. 

Cotting street, Boston Proper, from Leverett street to 
Lowell street. 

Eaton street, Boston Proper, from Chambers street to North 
Russell street. 

Falmouth street, Boston Proper, at the intersection of Belvi- 
dere street and West Newton street. 

Green street, Boston Proper, from Staniford street to Cham- 
bers street. 

Hammond avenue, Boston Proper, from Chambers street to 
Leverett street. 

Hartford street, Boston Proper, from Purchase street to 
High street. 

Kennard avenue, Boston Proper, from Allen street to Poplar 
street. 

Leverett street, Boston Proper, from Green street to the 
John F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 

Lyman street, Boston Proper, from Staniford street to 
Leverett street. 

Lynde street, Boston Proper, from Green street approxi- 
mately 340 feet southerly. 

McLean court, Boston Proper, from McLean street ap- 
proximately 260 feet southerly. 

McLean street, Boston Proper, from Chambers street to 
Blossom street. 

Milton street, Boston Proper, from Spring street to Brighton 
street. 

Minot street, Boston Proper, from Leverett street to the 
John F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 

North Russell street, Boston Proper, from Cambridge street 
to Eaton street. 

Orchard Park street, Roxbury, at the intersection of Am- 
brose street. 

Orchard Park street, Roxbury, on the easterly side ap- 
proximately 180 feet south of Ambrose street. 

Parkman street, Boston Proper, from North Russell street 
to Blossom street. 

Poplar street, Boston Proper, from Chambers street to 
Charles street. 

Prospect street, Boston Proper, from Merrimac street to 
Lyman street. 

Public Alley No. 12, Boston Proper, from Poplar street to 
Public Alley No. 14. 

Public Alley No. 13, Boston Proper, from Poplar street to 
Public Alley No. 14. 



Public Works Department 107 

Public Alley No. 14, Boston Proper, from Public Alley No. 
15 approximately 440 feet easterly. 

Public Alley No. 15, Boston Proper, from Poplar street to 
Public Alley No. 14. 

South Margin street, Boston Proper, from Staniford street 
to Prospect street. 

Spring street, Boston Proper, from Leverett street to Allen 
street. 

Stoughton street, Boston Proper, from Harrison avenue ap- 
proximately 226 feet southeasterly. 

Summer street, Charlestown, between Pearl street and 
School street. 

Wall street, Boston Proper, from Minot street to Causeway 
street. 

West Newton street, Boston Proper, at the intersection of 
Falmouth street and Belvidere street. 

Wigglesworth street, Roxbury, from Huntington avenue to 
Long wood avenue. 

Willard street, Boston Proper, from Leverett street to the 
John F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 

Worthington street, Roxbury, from Huntington avenue to 
Longwood avenue. 

Abandonment of Order 

Quincy place, Roxbury, from Quincy street approximately 
130 feet southwesterly. 

Water Easement 

Dover street, Boston Proper, from Dover street approxi- 
mately 590 feet southeasterly and northeasterly. 

Slope Easement 

Fay wood avenue. East Boston, discontinuance of slope ease- 
ments on the southerly side from a point approximately 416 
feet west of Tower street approximately 80 feet westerly. 

Eminent DoxMAin Land Takings 

During the period of this report, land takings were 
made for municipal purposes as follows: 

School Buildings Department 

1. The taking of approximately forty-eight thousand 
five hundred forty-four (48,544) square feet of land 
bounded by High street, Pearl street, and School 
street, Charlestown District, under an Order of this 
Commission and Mayor dated July 8, 1959, and recorded 
in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds on July 24, 1959. 



108 



City Document No. 18 



2. The taking of approximately three thousand 
nine hundred eighty (3,980) square feet of land in West 
Fourth street, South Boston District, under an Order of 
this Commission and Mayor dated October 14, 1959, and 
recorded in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds on October 
21, 1959. 

Sewer Program 

During the year 1959 the construction of 1.24 miles 
of sanitary sewer, 2.11 miles of storm sewer, 132 catch 
basins, and 22 drop inlets were ordered at a total 
estimated cost of $442,215. 

Estimated benefit to private property for the con- 
struction of the 1.24 miles of sanitary sewer amounted 
to $28,905.94. 

The following sewer easement was ordered dis- 
continued: 

Private land, Boston Proper, between Boylston 
street at Fairfield street and Huntington avenue oppo- 
site Garrison street. 

Sewerage works were ordered as follows: 

SEWERAGE WORKS ORDERED 



Street 


Sanitary Sewer 
(Linear Feet) 


II 

OS 


.1 
1 

XI 

o 


1 
a 

Q. 


I 

1 
1 
1 




Boston Proper 

*Alley No. 933 




GO 




1 


$1,000 00 

5,000 00 

600 00 

225,000 00 
1,200 00 

350 00 

4,000 00 

750 00 

6,000 00 


None 


Beaver place . 


170 


None 


Kilby street 




1 




None 


Private land between 
Boylston street at 
Fairfield street and 
Huntington avenue op- 


880 






Stuart street. 





6 
1 


6 
1 

1 


None 


Charlestown 

Chelsea street 






None 


Dorchester 


210 


215 


$1,828 00 




None 


♦Itasca street 




580 


None 













Easements taken 



Public Works Department 



109 



5-5 



Id I 



■■Sn 



Dorchester (Continued) 
Massachusetts avenue.. 




45 










400 




Kast Boston 

Bennington street 


1,350 


*Glad3tone street, from 
700 feet west of Breed 
street approximately 
150 feet westerly 

Gladstone street, oppo- 


80 


90 


Swift street 1 






From Frankfort street 
approximately 450 feet 
southeasterly and south- 
westerly. 

Swift terrace 






Hyde Park 





750 


Braeburn road . . . 




540 


*GofT street 


135 


135 


*Greenbrook road 


540 






347 


Lodgehill road 






M eadow road .... 




190 


Metropolitan avenue, ap- 
proximately 837 feet 
north of Thatcher 
street 






Metropolitan avenue, 
from Edith street to 












Oakcrest road, formerly 










275 


Sherrin street ... 


65 


65 




678 


Westminster street . 




145 




1,465 


1,465 







S400 00 
2,000 00 
6,200 00 



500 00 
1,500 00 



None 

None 

$1,950 00 



•S500 00 

None 

None 



1,500 00 


None 


4,000 00 


None 


8,000 00 


None 


1,620 00 


$810 00 


3,930 00 


None 


2.400 00 


None 


500 00 


None 


9,000 00 


None 



1,200 00 


None 


1,800 00 


None 


1,200 00 


None 


2,500 00 


None 


2,000 00 


None 


1,100 00 


None 


8,000 00 


None 


8,100 00 


None 


26,975 00 


•19,888 00 



* Easements taken 



110 



City Document No. 18 



SEWERAGE WORKS ORDERED — Concluded. 



S;3 423 



.9 « 

01 S 

m £ 

■g ft 

ta £ 

O Q 



Roxbury 

Bickford street. . . 
South Boston 

Broadway 

West Roxbury 

Aldwin road 

AUandale street . . 
*Baker street 

Baker street 

*Birchland terrace . 

Birchland terrace. 

Bryant road 

Canterbury street . 

Glenellen road . . . 

Macullarroad.. . . 

Magee street 

Maplewood street . 
♦Mapiewood street . 
*Meyer court 



Meyer street, from 
Catherine street, ap- 
proximately 290 feet 
southeasterly 



Meyer street, from Organ 
Park street, approxi- 
mately 300 feet south- 
westerly 



*Powell street 1 
Miami terrace/' 



^Private land, between 
Meyer street and Stony 
Brook 



♦Salman street . 

Salman street . 

Stimson street. 
*Vogel street. . . 

Vogel street.. . 



435 
135 



S19,000 00 



900 00 

500 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

400 00 

7,000 00 

3,900 00 

800 00 

800 00 

9,200 00 

1,400 00 



2,520 00 


2,400 00 


1,720 00 


7,400 00 


3,000 00 


2,300 00 


6,190 00 


800 00 



' Easements taken 



Public Works Department 



111 



Assessments 

During the year 1959 the Highway Division of the 
Pubhc Works Department sent notice of completion of 
twenty-one (21) streets at a total cost of $314,834.73. 
On this work the Public Improvement Commission 
levied assessments in the amount of $152,070.22. 

During the same period the Sewer Division of the 
Public Works Department reported the completion of 
construction of sanitary sewerage in sixteen (16) streets 
at a cost of $42,038.07, on which the Public Improve- 
ment Commission levied assessments in the amount of 
$27,700.81. 

The completion of new sidewalks in one (1) street at 
a cost of $5,664.64, authorized by the Boston City 
Council, was reported by the Highway Division. On 
this the PubUc Improvement Commission levied an 
assessment of $2,832.60. 

STREET ASSESSMENTS 



Street 


District 


Cost 


Assessment 




West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

West Roxbury 

Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester and 
Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

Brighton 

Roxbury 

West Roxbury 


$12,186 69 

5,298 17 

6,396 61 

14.506 48 

4,705 00 

6,105 38 

9,746 46 

17,586 13 

23,739 57 

15,973 88 

11.990 71 

31,136 48 

19.372 63 

25,954 95 

11,112 32 

9,246 56 

7,895 48 
12,431 40 
10,337 00 
22,872 04 
36,240 79 


$4,419 50 


Atwiil road 


2 500 00 


Belnap road 


3,784 00 




5,730 00 


Cassnet street. . ... 


1 179 00 




2,890 92 


Dodge road 


6 438 00 






Glenellen road • . 


12 958 00 




4.842 50 
8.943 50 








7.725 00 
11 904 30 


New Haven street 




4,731 OO 


Pheasant street 


4 302 00 








2,360 00 
3,640 50 


Selkirk road . 


3 162 00 




12,837 00 
21 458 00 


Vogel street. . . 






Totals 




$314,834 73 


$152,070 22 







112 



City Document No. 18 



SEWER ASSESSMENTS 



Street 


District 


Cost 


Assessment 




West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Dorchester 
Dorchester 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 


$1,000 00 
1,134 00 
3,952 03 
6,162 00 
8,000 00 
1,954 00 
2,131 00 
2,150 00 
2,235 00 
628 00 
4,898 00 
2,000 00 
3,042 00 
8.647 04 
1,754 00 
2,663 00 


$700 00 




225 00 




3,000 00 


Florian Way . 


2,209 52 




3,000 00 


Goff street 


810 00 


Hackensack court 


850 00 




997 50 




1,350 00 


Magee street 


360 00 




3,672 00 


St. Clare road 


1,500 00 




1,800 00 


V. F. W. Parkway 


4,916 79 


Weld street 


510 00 




1,800 00 










$52,350 07 


$27,700 81 









SIDEWALK ASSESSMENT 



Street 


District 


Cost 


Assessment 




Dorchester 


$5,664 64 


$2,832 60 







Street Name Changes 
The names of the following public streets were changed : 

Ascent street, West Roxbury District, from New Haven 
street to Glenellen road; new name: Fairlane road. 

Asylum street, Boston Proper District, between Washington 
street and Harrison avenue; new name: William E. Mullins 
Way. 

Castle street, Boston Proper District, from Tremont street 
to Albany street; new name: Herald street. 

Willow court, Dorchester District, from Boston street to 
Pield's court; new name: Enterprise street. 



Public Works Department 



113 



Street Names 
The following names were designated for unnamed 
ways : 

Sydney street, Dorchester District, between Crescent avenue 
and Moseley street. 

Von Hillern street, Dorchester District, 
Chester avenue and Mt. Vernon street. 



between Dor- 



Land Damages 

On new street construction 133 claims were filed for 
damage to property resulting from land takings or 
changes in grades. On these claims, this Commission 
awarded damages in the amount of $49,311.61. 

During the period of this report 264 petitions from 
pubhc utilities were approved for the placing and main- 
taining of poles for the support of wires. 

Also, 63 petitions w^ere approved for miscellaneous 
installations or uses of the public highways of the 
City of Boston, as follows: 



Street 


Petitioner 


Nature of Petition 


Adams street, etc., Dorchester 


Joan R. Dixon 


Canopy 


Albany street, Roxbury, on the north- 
westerly side 


Boston City Hospital 


Underground conduit 


Albany street, Roxbury, Massacliu- 
setts avenue to East Concord 


Boston City Hospital 


Underground conduit 


Batterymarch street, Boston 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Bolton street. South Boston 


Gillette Safety Razor Company 


Fuel tank 


Bowditch road. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Boylston street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Brooks street. East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Brucewood street, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Central street, etc., Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Centre street, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Chelsea street. East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Cross street, Boston Proper 


Quincy Market Cold Storage 


Brine main 


Crossman street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Custer street. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Davison street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Dorchester street. South Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Eastwood Circuit, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Fairmount avenue, Hyde Park, Da- 
vison to Pierce 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 



114 



City Document No. 18 



Street 


Petitioner 


Nature of Petition 


Fairmount avenue, Hyde Park, at 
Highland street 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Fenwood road, Roxbury 


Department of Mental Health 


Underground conduit 


Geneva avenue, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Gladstone street, etc., East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Glencliff road. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Hayward place, Boston Proper 


Washington Essex Trust 


Fuel tank 


Huntington avenue, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Laurie avenue, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, on 
the northerly side 


Boston City Hospital 


Underground conduit 


Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, Al- 
bany to Harrison avenue, E-2 


Boston City Hospital 


Underground conduit 


:Mas8achu8etts avenue, Roxbury, Al- 
bany to Harrison avenue, E-3 


Boston City Hospital 


Underground conduit 


Mattapan street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Maverick street. East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Metropolitan avenue, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Navarre street, etc., Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


North square, Boston Proper 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Pleasantdale road, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Porter street. East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Prospect street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Public Alley No. 4.39, Boston 


Boydar Realty Company 


Oil tank 


Public Alley No. 442, Boston 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Savannah avenue, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Sheridan street, etc., Roxbury and 
West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Stoughton street, Boston 


Boston University 


Underground steam main 


Stuart street, Boston Proper, 160 feet 
northeast of Berkeley 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Stuart street, Boston Proper, 140 feet 
northeast of Berkeley 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Stuart street, Boston Proper, at Trin- 
ity place 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Summer street, Boston Proper 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 


Thatcher street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Governor pit 


Victory road, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Walk Hill street. West Ro.xbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Washington street, Boston 


S. S. Kresge Company 


Projection 


Water street, Dorchester 


Boston Gas Company 


Control regulator 


West Newton street, etc., Boston 


Boston Edison Company 


Underground conduit 



Public Works Department 



115 



Street 


Petitioner 


Nature of Petition 


Webster street, East Boston 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Webster street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Weld street, West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


West street, etc., Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Westminster street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Weybosset street, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Windom street, Brighton 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 


Wolcott court, Hyde Park 


Worcester Gas Light Company 


Underground gas main 


Wyvern street. West Roxbury 


Boston Gas Company 


Underground gas main 



Private Ways 
During the year 1959, permission was given to prepare 
for public travel the following private ways: 

Banfield avenue, Dorchester, from Wooddale avenue 400 
feet northeasterly. 

Birchland terrace, West Roxburj^, from Ashland avenue. 

Delhi street, Dorchester, from Wooddale avenue 325 feet 
northeasterly. 

Greenbrook road, Hyde Park, from Chestnut street to Austin 
street. 

Itasca street, Dorchester, from Monterej' avenue to a point 
approximately 115 feet southwest of Messinger street. 

Leseur road, Hyde Park, from Fairmount avenue approxi- 
mately 175 feet southwesterly. 

Lodgehill road, Hyde Park, from Goff street to Beach street. 

Manchester street, Dorchester, from Temple street 270 feet 
westerly. 

Maplewood street. West Roxburj', from Petrel street to 
Eagle street. 

Meyer Court, West Roxbury, from Meyer street 130 feet 
southwesterly. 

Miami terrace. West Roxburj-, from Miami avenue 190 feet 
northwesterly. 

Prospect Park, Hyde Park, from Warren avenue 325 feet 
northeasterly. 

Ring road, Boston Proper, from Belvidere street 480 feet 
easterly. 

Ring road, Boston Proper, from Dalton street 900 feet 
easterly. 

Slocum road, West Roxbury, from a point approximately 73 
feet northeast of Surrey hill road approximately 157 feet 
northeasterly. 

Vogel street. West Roxbury, from Stimson street to Cross- 
town avenue. 



116 City Document No. 18 

Wachusett street, Hyde Park, from Neponset River Reser- 
vation 270 feet northwesterly. 

Winham road, West Roxbury and Hyde Park, from Sherrin 
street to Dale street. 

During the same period, permission was given to 
open for public travel the following private ways: 

Itasca street, Dorchester, from Messinger street approxi- 
mately 115 feet northeasterly. 

Manchester street, Dorchester, from Temple street approxi- 
mately 570 feet westerly. 

Mansiir street. West Roxbury and Hyde Park, from Metro- 
politan avenue to Grew avenue. 

Mattapan street, Dorchester, from Colorado street approxi- 
mately 170 feet northwesterly. 

Messinger street, Dorchester, from Savannah avenue to 
Colorado street. 

Messinger street, Dorchester, from Orlando street to Savan- 
nah avenue. 

Orlando street, Dorchester, from Messinger street approxi- 
mately 145 feet northeasterly. 

Wachusett street, Hyde Park, from Neponset River Reserva- 
tion approximately 270 feet northwesterl3^ 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert P. Shea, Chairman, 
William T. Doyle, V ice-Chairman, 
David Lasker, Member. 



City of Boston- 
Administrative Services Department 
Printing °«^^!° Section 



f680 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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