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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

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ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1960. 




Hon. John F. Collins, Mayor 
James W. Haley, Commissioner of Public Works 
John J. McCall, Engineering Division Engineer 
RuTHFORD J. Kelley, Highway Division Engineer 
John F. Flaherty, Sanitary Division Engineer 
Edward G. A. Pqwers, Sewer Division Engineer 
Daniel M. Sullivan, Water Division Engineer 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

I960 ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Letter of Transmittal 3 

Reorganization 3 

Personnel 6 

Central Office 6 

Engineering Division 8 

Highway Division 11 

Sanitary Division 12 

Sewer Division 14 

Water Division 16 

Water Break — Boston Common 18 

Snow Removal 18 

Fiscal 19 

Public Improvement Commission Report ... 21 

Appendices : 

Statistical and Other Data 

A. General Orders No. 2 33 

B. Central Office 33 

C. Engineering Division 41 

D. Highway Division 58 

E. Sanitary Division 66 

F. Sewer Division 74 

G. Water Division 76 



ORGANIZATION CHART 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



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Prepared by Baglneerlilg PlTlalon, Publle »or>e 1 



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[Document 18 — 1961. 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1960. 



Boston, January 2, 1961. 

Hon. John F. Collins, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of Section 24 of 
Chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit' herewith the annual report of the Public 
Works Department and the Public Improvement Com- 
mission for the year ending December 31, 1960. 

Public works is one of the largest activities of the 
city. It is responsible for many public services, the most 
important being included in the department's major 
programs; namely, highway, water, sewer, and sanita- 
tion. The extent of these programs is indicated by 
their cost, which in recent years has varied from a 
minimum $18,696,829 in 1950 to a maximum $22,871,451 
in 1958. 

Reorganization 
The most outstanding accomplishment of the year 
was a major reorganization of the department, the first 
since 1911. Upon assuming charge of fjhe department 
in January, I began a careful assessment of its organiza- 
tion, personnel, plant, equipment, procedures, func- 
tions, efficiency, and costs. Like most other city de- 



4 City Document No. 18 

partments, Public Works fell far short of what it could 
be — and should be. It operated at high costs — yet 
with extremely low paid employees. Its plant and 
equipment were in particularly poor condition. Methods 
and procedures have failed to keep abreast of the times. 

During the past year, the department has been com- 
pletely reorganized around the following principles 
aimed at placing our public works program on a par 
with the best in the country: (1) centralization of 
administration ; (2) simplification of organizational struc- 
ture; (3) centralization of engineering design and 
planning; (4) regrouping of functions on a more logical 
basis; (5) improved efficiency; and (6) reduction in 
personnel. 

Regrouping and consolidations were manifested. The 
many administrative and engineering functions of the 
Highway, Water, Sewer, and Sanitation' Divisions were 
consolidated under new groupings. Each division was 
assigned all work related to its own prime function from 
those units discontinued. 

On January 1, 1960, of the 1,800 employees of the 
department only ten were working under the direct 
supervision of the Commissioner. The remainder were 
working in virtually independent divisions with only 
general supervision emanating from the Commissioner's 
office. A new Central Office, complementing the 
original ten of the Commissioner's staff, were given the 
added functions of personnel, time and payroll records, 
supply procurements, contracts, inventory control, ac- 
counts and budget control. All permit activities were 
consolidated in a Central Permit Office. The Automo- 
tive Division was abolished, and a new Maintenance 
Branch activated to carry on motor and building 
maintenance. 

The Survey Division was expanded into a new Engi- 
neering Division to which were transferred the engi- 
neering functions of the Highway, Water, Sanitary, 
and Sewer Divisions. The Bridge Division was abolished 
and its functions assigned to the Highway Division, 
which also was given responsibility for street cleaning, 
a former Sanitary Division task, together with catch- 
basin cleaning, previously performed by the Sewer 
Division. 



Public Works Department. 5 

In order to relieve Division Engineers of many 
routine duties, and provide more time for attention to 
major city and department projects, Construction and 
Maintenance Sections were established under the direct 
charge of responsible engineers, in the Highway, Water, 
Sanitary, and Sewer Divisions. Additional sections, 
namely a Street Lighting Section in the Highway Divi- 
sion and a Revenue Section in the Water Division, were 
likewise organized. 

Reassignment of duties and responsibilities to the 
reorganized divisions permitted major consolidation of 
district yards. Six yards were completely closed down 
at Atkinson Street, Roxbury; Matthews Street, Dor- 
chester; Rutherford Avenue, Charlestown; Walter 
Street, West Roxbury; Battery Street, Boston Proper; 
and Washington Street, Jamaica Plain. Sanitary, 
Sewer and Water Sections were closed at all but three 
yards, which were retained. 

Under the reorganization major yards were estab- 
lished at 700 Albany Street, Boston Proper; 327 Forest 
Hills Street, Jamaica Plain; and 196 Hancock Street, 
Dorchester. At these yards Highway, Water, Sewer, 
and Sanitary Divisions maintain branches. Each yard 
also operates a garage for equipment maintenance. 

Seven additional yards were retained for local highway 
maintenance at 315 Western Avenue, Brighton; 174 
West Second Street, South Boston; 40 Moreland Street, 
West Roxbury; 58 Gibson Street, Dorchester; 58 Dana 
Street, Hyde Park; 320 East Eagle Street, East Boston; 
and 60 Ritchie Street, Roxbury. 

For all public works maintenance activities, the city 
was divided into three areas and subdivided into ten 
districts. Highway maintenance is carried out with a 
yard at each district. All other activities are carried 
out on an area basis. 

Area 1 Yard at Albany Street services Boston Proper, 
Roxbury, and East Boston; Area 2 Yard at Forest Hills 
services Jamaica Plain, West Roxbury, Hyde Park, and 
Brighton; Area 3 Yard at Hancock Street services 
North Dorchester, South Dorchester, and South Boston. 
At each area yard a highway district headquarters, 
numbered the same is located. Other highway district 
yards are located at East Boston (District 9) ; Roxbury 
(District 10); West Roxbury (District 6); Hyde Park 
(District 8); Brighton (District 4); South Dorchester 
(District 9); and South Boston (District 5). 



6 City Document No. 18 

Personnel* 

The departmental reorganization permitted a major 
reduction in the actual total work force. The total 
budget positions of 1,945 of all classifications January 2, 
1960, were decreased to 1,690 as of December 31, 1960. 
This reflected the elimination of 255 total budget posi- 
tions. From a total of 1,788 on the payrolls January 2, 
1960, a reduction of 164 was effected during the year, 
leaving 1,624 on the payrolls as of December 21, 1960. 
Normal attrition due to retirements, deaths, resigna- 
tions, transfers, and releases left unfilled positions for 
which no work was then available under the reorganiza- 
tion. 

The largest shift in personnel was the transfer of 342 
employees from the Sanitary Division to the Highway 
Division, occasioned by the enlarged duties of the latter 
unit. 

A year-end objective appraisal determined that not 
only was there a substantial savings in tax dollars, but 
that the over-all efficiency of the department had been 
improved. Further reductions in personnel and econo- 
mies can be anticipated in the future. 



Central Office 

The Central Office is composed of three sections: an 
Administrative Branch in the charge of the Depart- 
ment Executive Secretary, a Maintenance Branch in the 
charge of the Director of Transportation, and a Permit 
Branch in the charge of a Supervisor of Permits. 

The Administrative Branch function included the 
preparation and processing of correspondence, purchase 
supply requisitions, service orders, contracts, payrolls, 
personnel requisitions for transfers, promotions and 
terminations, the keeping of all required records and 
files, and provides all services required by the Public 
Improvement Commission. 

The Maintenance Branch provided for the repair and 
maintenance of the departmental automotive equip- 
ment; the supervision and maintenance of all depart- 
mental buildings and property; the operation of four 
garages; the operation of a blacksmith shop, a sweeper 



Public Works Department 7 

repair shop, and a building maintenance shop; and the 
around-the-clock operation of a two-way radio station 
and switchboard. The Motor Maintenance Section pro- 
vided for the maintenance and repair of 400 vehicular 
units ranging from passenger cars to fifteen-ton dump 
trucks. Approximately 8,000 automotive service jobs 
are performed yearly, and the stock room holds an inven- 
tory of $50,000 worth of repair parts, tires, batteries, etc. 
A schedule of monthly lubrications is established and 
vehicles inspected at that time. The Highland Street 
Garage, a one-story building with a floor area of 8,200 
square feet, is used for general repair work, stock room, 
lubrications, and dispensing of gasoline. The Albany 
Street Garage, a two-story building with a floor area 
of 22,000 square feet, is used for garaging vehicles and 
dispensing gasoline. The Hancock Street Garage, 
a one-story building with a floor area of 8,800 square 
feet, is used for garaging vehicles and dispensing gaso- 
line. The Forest Hills Garage, a one-story building 
with a floor area of 8,400 square feet, is used for repair 
work, lubrication, and dispensing gasohne. During the 
winter season both the Albany Street Garage and the 
Hancock Street Garage are used for repair work. 

During the year more than 100 motor equipment 
operators were trained in the operation of new large 
dump trucks and other heavy duty equipment, and 
approximately fifty men attended classes in the opera- 
tion and repair of new street sweepers. Various manu- 
facturers and local dealers assisted in the driver training 
program, and plans are being made to examine and test 
all drivers and issue permits to drivers of the various 
types of departmental equipment. 

The Shop Section located at Albany Street provided, 
at the Blacksmith Shop, for the maintenance of street 
sweeper brooms and runners, snow plows, etc. and per- 
forming any required welding work; at the Sweeper 
Repair Shop for the maintenance of the mechanical 
street sweepers and, in the winter, for repairs on the 
snow fighting equipment ; and at the Maintenance Shops, 
the services of carpenters, painters, tinsmiths, and other 
mechanics provide for the maintenance on department 
buildings and the repair of refuse disposal boxes, the 
erection of fences and platforms and similar work. 



8 City Document No. 18 

The Permit Branch issued all permits under the 
jurisdiction of the department and collected the fees 
required therefor. The processing of various permits, 
formerly performed by different divisions of the depart- 
ment, are now handled by the Permit Branch staff, who 
receive the applications, route them for processing, 
issue the permits, and collect the fees. During the year 
14,939 permits were issued, and the cash receipts for all 
permits were $167,713.27. 



Engineering Division 

The newly organized Engineering Division, the former 
Survey Division, and officially renamed by City Ordi- 
nance on October 19, 1960, performed all the former 
duties of the Survey Division and, in addition, fur- 
nished the engineering services required by the other 
divisions of the department, along with those requested 
from the PubUc Works Department by the PubUc 
Improvement Commission and other city departments, 
boards, or commissions. The division was organized 
into four sections with sixty positions divided as fol- 
lows: Administration, 9; Planning and Programming, 6; 
Survey, 24; and Design, 21. 

The Administrative Section performed all duties of an 
administrative nature relating to the processing and 
maintenance of records pertaining to personnel, supplies, 
reproductions, correspondence, and engineering costs. 
The reproduction unit of this section furnished blue- 
prints, ozalid prints, auto-positives, photostats, and 
photographs, as required by the various divisions of the 
department. Units of work of this section comprised 
22,956 photostats, 970 blueprints, 24,115 ozalids, 461 
auto-positives, 2,020 negatives, and 2,257 prints. 

The Planning and Programming Section provided for 
the preparation, planning, and programming of the 
various engineering and construction programs of the 
department, involving highway, bridge, sewer, sanita- 
tion, water, and street lighting facilities. Work also 
included coordinating departmental programs with those 
of other agencies such as the Redevelopment Authority, 
the Public Utilities, Housing Authority, State Depart- 
ment of Public Works, and performing engineering 
services for the Public Improvement Commission. 



Public Works Department 9 

Over 500 miles of the 758 miles of our city's streets were 
field inspected and classified as to the condition and 
need for repair. The remaining 258 miles have all had 
resurfacing done between 1947 and the present, and are 
generally in good condition with only need for minor 
maintenance. 

As a result of this inspection and classification of a 
4-year program for highway construction was devel- 
oped as foUow^s: 

HIGHWAY RECONSTRUCTION PROGRAM 
(Including Chapter 90 Projects) 

Year Mileage of Approximate 

Started Streets Cost 

1960 19 $1,700,000 

1961 41 5,100,000* 

1962 24 2,500,000** 

1963 24 2.500,000** 

* Includes approximately $1,400,000 of State 90 money, Chapter 1. 
** Includes approximately $500,000 of State 90 money, Chapter 1. 

The Survey Section is required to make surveys and 
plans in connection with (a) laying out, widening, 
design, and construction of highways, (b) taking ease- 
ments for sewerage, (c) discontinuance of public high- 
ways, (d) land to be acquired by eminent domain, 
(e) sidewalk assessments, and (f) specific repairs. This 
section's work also included the staking out of line and 
grade for construction of public works; staking out and 
setting bounds; surveys and plans of areas involved in 
major developments; surveys and plans of city-owned 
land ; and surveys and plans as may be required by other 
departments. 

Work accomplished during the year by this section 
included thirty-four surveys and plans for the laying out 
of 3.4 miles of public highways; twenty-six surveys and 
plans for the widening and relocation of one mile of public 
highway; five surveys and plans for the discontinuance 
of 0.29 miles of public highway; one survey and plan 
for the discontinuance of a sewer easement; fifteen 
surveys and plans for taking 1.4 miles of easement for 
sewerage works; twenty-six profiles for 2.3 miles of 
sewer construction; seven sidewalk assessment plans; 
eight sewer easement plans; setting out twenty-seven 
stone bounds; fifteen surveys and plans for 1.1 miles of 
minimum pavements; for the Highway Division, thirty- 
six streets staked out for construction; for the Sewer 



10 City Document No. 18 

Division, forty-four catch basins staked out; for the 
Sanitary Division, four topographical surveys and plans; 
for the Water Division, line, grade, and staking out for 
water works; and survej^s and calculations in connec- 
tion with the proposed extension of the Government 
Center. 

The Design Section functions during the year included 
the preparation of all plans, estimates, specifications, 
and contract forms relating to the design and construc- 
tion of highway, sewer, and water facilities; the prepara- 
tion of designs, plans, and specifications required for 
proposed structures and appurtenances to be con- 
structed by the operating divisions ; the design of grades 
in connection with the construction of highways and 
sewers; the checking of all plot plans submitted to the 
Building Department for approval with regard to grades 
and the availability of sewer and water facilities; 
checking proposed construction over existing sewers; 
making tracings of all plans prepared by the Survey 
Section; the preparation of various maps, plans, and 
charts, etc. required by the department; and making 
estimates and preliminary plans for the Public Improve- 
ment Commission. 

During the year this section completed plans, esti- 
mates, and specifications for highway construction 
estimated to cost $330,012; for highway reconstruction 
estimated to cost $481,810; sewerage works estimated 
to cost $53,960; sewer and water works estimated to 
cost $102,191; water works estimated to cost $6,900; 
and the construction of fender piers at the Chelsea 
Street Bridge estimated to cost $180,000. Plans, esti- 
mates, and specifications were completed for work to be 
advertised in 1961 for highway reconstruction esti- 
mated to cost $152,099 and for sewerage works estimated 
to cost $104,101. This section also completed the design 
of twenty-nine street grades and thirty-one sewer 
grades, the making of 159 various tracings, examining 
and checking 240 plot plans, and making forty-six 
investigations and reports on street lighting conditions. 

The development of the new Engineering Division 
into an efficiently working unit of the department will 
require continued modification and coordination of the 
engineering functions and duties formerly provided in 
six separate divisions. It is expected that during the 
coming year the Engineering Division will be organized 



Public Works Department 11 

to its best capacity for executing its assigned duties and 
responsibilities. However, much depends on the pos- 
sibility of obtaining and training qualified engineers in 
the lower grades who are interested in civil service 
careers in municipal engineering. This becomes in- 
creasingly important with the advent of extensive 
programs involving urban redevelopment and renewal, 
state highway systems, and the expansion of sewerage 
and water systems within the city. 

Highway Division 

The Highway Division is comprised of four sections: 
Administration, Construction, Maintenance, and Street 
Lighting, and supervises and performs all the services 
incidental to the construction of streets and sidewalks; 
highway maintenance work including pavement mainte- 
nance, snow removal, street cleaning, and catch-basin 
cleaning; the operation and maintenance of bridges; and 
the installation and maintenance of street lights. 

The Administrative Section performed all duties of 
an administrative nature including the preparation and 
processing of correspondence, initiating supply requisi- 
tions and service orders, and the preparation of contract 
payments. 

The Construction Section supervised the construction 
or reconstruction of eighty-one streets during the year 
at an expenditure of $2,004,400, and expended $22,862.06 
for the construction or repair of bridges. Chapter 90 
projects completed during the year were Baker Street 
from the V.F.W. Parkway to Spring Street, West Rox- 
bury; and Beacon Street from Kenmore Square to 
Park Drive in the Back Bay. Work was started but not 
finished on Commonwealth Avenue from Warren Street 
to Chestnut Hill Avenue, Brighton. 

The Maintenance Section performed sidewalk and 
roadway repairs on and cleaned and flushed the 75S 
miles of streets; cleaned 2,070 of the over 25,000 catch 
basins in the city; maintained and operated eight draw- 
bridges; maintained eighty-three other bridges; and 
maintained, by repairing and replacing, existing street 
signs and the installation of new street signs where 
required. 

The Street Lighting Section has the custody of 28,715 
street lights and supervised the installation of new 



12 City Document No. 18 

lights and the replacement of existing lights totaling 
126 units; also thirty- three obsolete gas lamps were 
replaced with fifty modern electric units of 2,500 lumens 
each. There are 193 gas lamps remaining in the city, 
located where facilities for installing electric units are 
not readily available. Maintenance of the police spot- 
lights for traffic officers on night duty continued during 
the year. 

The Highway Division supervised the work of snow 
plowing and snow removal with the assistance of per- 
sonnel and equipment from the other divisions of the 
department at a total expenditure for the year of 
$892,900. 



Sanitary Division 

The Sanitary Division is composed of three sections — 
Administration, Collection and Disposal, and providing 
for the collection and removal of all solid waste, either 
by contract operation or by the division labor force, and 
providing for the disposal of all collected wastes by the 
operation of an incinerator and open land dumps. 

The Administrative Section provided all the services 
of an administrative nature including the preparation 
and processing of correspondence, initiating requisitions 
and supply orders, the preparation of the division 
budget, processing of applications for permits for the 
transportation of refuse, the preparation of contract 
payments and the keeping of all required records and 
files. 

The Collection Section supervised the work of the 
contractors and division labor forces in the collection 
and removal of refuse throughout the city. Contracts 
were awarded in all seventeen of the refuse collection 
districts to eleven contractors, all being for a period of 
one year, from April 1, 1960, to March 31, 1961. These 
contracts were awarded as a result of negotiations from 
which it was agreed that the eleven contractors would 
absorb a five cents an hour increase in union employees' 
wages (this increase was paid into the newly established 
Union Pension Fund), and perform the contract work 
for the same price as the previous contract. The total 
collection contract costs for the year were $2,124,552. 



Public Works Department 13 

In addition to the refuse collected and removed by the 
contractors, alley cleaning crews continued to clean 
various alleys in the South End and Lower Roxbury 
sections of garbage and refuse deposited in those alleys 
by residents or passers-by. The night market cleaning 
crew continued to operate through the year, cleaning up 
the garbage and refuse thrown in the gutters of the 
market district by pushcart peddlers, storekeepers, and 
other commercial establishments. The Dempster- 
Dumpster service was carried on through the year, 
servicing boxes in various locations of the South End 
and Roxbury, but with an additional service being pro- 
vided to neighborhood clean-up groups, under the 
direction of the Mayor's Citizen Relations Committee, 
by providing Dempster boxes in various locations 
throughout the city over week ends for the depositing 
of clean-up material. 

The Disposal Section provided for the disposal of the 
city's refuse at four land dumps and at the incinerator. 
This was the first full-year operation of the South Bay 
Incinerator, and the plant adequately serviced the ten 
districts for which it was originally designed, serving a 
total population of approximately 287,000 people. 
Starting April 1, refuse from the Dorchester North 
District was delivered to the incinerator, making the 
total population serviced 385,000, or approximately 
54 per cent of the entire population of the city. On 
three occasions during the year refuse had to be diverted 
from this plant and dumped at the Calf Pasture Dump 
because of the inability of the plant to handle the 
material being delivered, on account of equipment 
breakdown or failure. 

During the year considerable difficulty was experienced 
with the overhead trolley cranes. The Westinghouse 
Corporation spent considerable time and effort adjusting 
and servicing the controls on the cranes, and towards 
the end of the year this problem appeared to be solved. 
There were also failures of a mechanical nature, the two 
principal ones being cracked pillow boxes on the main 
shafts and cracks in the drums of the hoisting and lower- 
ing mechanism. Considerable difficulty was also en- 
countered in keeping the three residue trucks in opera- 
tion. On the whole the operation of this plant during 
the year was difficult, and appeared to have more than 
the normal amount of trouble that is to be expected in 
the breaking in of a new plant. 



14 City Document No. 18 

The steam main from the incinerator to the entrance 
at the Boston City Hospital boiler room was completed 
in January. The connection from this main to the main 
heater in the hospital was completed by the Hospital 
Department in December, and steam was first trans- 
mitted into the hospital plant from the incinerator on 
December 21. During this initial transmission, some 
difficulty was occasioned by a slug of water getting into 
the turbines at the hospital, and the transmission of 
steam was suspended until the cause and remedy for 
this condition could be determined. 

At the Gardner Street Dump we experimented with 
some controlled burning in pits adjacent to the former 
water filtration tanks. It is not possible to burn all 
the material delivered to this dump, due to the in- 
adequate size of the pits available for burning. No 
complaint was received of the burning operations. 

The Hallet Street Dump is rapidly approaching 
exhaustion. Two severe fires occurred at this dump 
during the year, and it was decided to abandon the use 
of the city-owned land in this area as a dump on March 
31, 1961. 

The incinerator residue dump at the Calf Pasture 
has provided an excellent source of disposal for this 
material. The old rubbish dump, being used for dis- 
posal of unacceptable materials at the incinerator, 
has not worked out as well, due to the difficulty in 
obtaining better separation by the collection contractors' 
workmen. 

The Saugus Dump was used through the year for 
the disposal of refuse from East Boston, and has proven 
to be very satisfactory for this purpose. 

On March 16 the shops of the Sanitary Division on 
Albany Street, along with forty-six men assigned to 
work there, were transferred to the jurisdiction of the 
Central Office, Automotive Section, and on June 1 
the street-cleaning function of the Sanitary Division, 
including 342 men and all the equipment used in that 
function, was transferred to the Highway Division. 

Sewer Division 

The Sewer Division is organized in three sections: 
Administration, Construction, and Maintenance, and 
provided for the construction, replacement, maintenance, 
and repair of sanitary sewers, drains, catch basins, and 



Public Works Department 15 

various appurtenances, and for the operation of pump- 
ing stations and disposal plants. 

The Administrative Section provided for the prepa- 
ration of correspondence, initiating requisitions and 
service orders, preparing contract pa^'ments and the 
maintenance of all files and records relating to the 
sewerage system. 

The Construction Section supervised the construction 
of various sewerage and drainage projects, totahng 7,143 
linear feet at an over-all expenditure of $278,491.47. A 
breakdown of the 1.18 miles of sewers and appurtenances 
constructed in 1960 is shown on Table 2 of the Appendix. 
This section proposes completion of the program of 
placing brook courses in conduits by constructing 
sections of Davenport Brook, Dorchester; Canterbury 
Branch of Stony Brook, West Roxbury; and Spring 
Street Brook in West Roxbury; a total of approximately 
2,940 Hnear feet of conduit at an estimated cost of 
$444,000. 

The Maintenance Section is responsible for the 
operation of the sewerage system, comprising 1,303.19 
miles of common sewers and 30.93 miles of intercepters; 
pumping stations at the Calf Pasture, Union Park 
Street, Symphony Station, Summer Street, and Sullivan 
Square; and a disposal works at Moon Island. The 
Calf Pasture Pumping Station total pumpage for the 
year was 27,813 miUion gallons, with an average per 
day of 76,200,000 gallons at a cost of $7.24 per milhon 
gallon. The total expenditure for maintenance in 
1960 was $680,632.46, making a total expenditure for 
the year for the Sewer Division of $959,123.93. 

Sewage from Boston Proper, South Boston, parts 
of Roxbury, Dorchester, and West Roxbury outlets 
through the Calf Pasture — Moon Island Disposal Plant. 
Sewage from East Boston and Charlestown flows into 
the metropolitan system for discharge at Deer Island, 
and sewage from Brighton, Hyde Park, and parts of 
Roxbury, Dorchester, and West Roxbury flows into 
the metropohtan system and is discharged at Nut 
Island. A small portion of Dorchester and Milton in 
the metropohtan sewage area, lying at an elevation 
too low to drain into the metropolitan high level sewer, 
is discharged into the Boston main drainage system, 
for which disposal in 1960 the Metropohtan District 
Commission paid the city $28,656.76. 



16 City Document No. 18 

The Metropolitan District Commission sewerage 
assessment procedure was changed by the enactment 
of Chapter 612, Acts of 1959. Assessment for interest 
and sinking fund requirements, formerly based on 
taxable valuations of properties in the various cities 
and towns as established by the General Court, will 
be assessed as follows: 

''The proportion to be paid by each city and town 
of the total annual amount shall be determined by 
the aggregate capacity of municipal sewers connected 
to the district sewers provided, however, that in no 
case shall the aggregate capacity of any municipal 
sewer used in the determination of such ratio be greater 
then the prorated capacity of the district sewer at 
the point of connection. At every point on the metro- 
poHtan sewerage system at which the capacity of the 
main sewer is less than the aggregate capacity of the 
sewers converging at that point, the available capacity 
of the main sewer shall be apportioned among the two 
or more lines converging at such points in proportion 
to the capacities of such converging lines." Chapter 
612 also provided that the cost of construction of 
extensions shall be borne by the cTfies and town 
benefited. 

A change in ordinance pertaining to sewer entrance 
permits was made when on April 21, 1960, the following 
ordinance was approved: 

"(260) Sewer Entrance Permit. The fee for a permit 
granted by the Commissioner of Public Works under sec- 
tion 10 of chapter 27 of these ordinances to enter a particular 
drain into a public sewer shall be $25.00. " 

Water Division 

The Water Division is composed of four sections: 
Administration, Construction, Maintenance, and Reve- 
nue; and provides for the construction, replacement, 
maintenance, and repair of water mains, supply lines, 
meters, hydrants, and various appurtenances; meter 
reading; and assessing charges to consumers. 

The Administrative Section handled the preparation 
and processing of correspondence, initiated requisitions 
and supply orders, prepared contract payments and 
maintained all of the required files and records relating 
to the water system and its operation. 



Public Works Department 17 

The Construction Section furnished the engineering 
and inspection force supervising the laying and relaying 
of 2.5 miles of main pipe and on water works in con- 
junction with major projects such as the Central 
Artery, Southeast Expressway, Boston Common Garage, 
Callahan Vehicular Tunnel, and Urban Redevelopment, 
(Whitney Street and West End). Major projects re- 
quiring future construction are : 

(a) Reinforce southern section of West Roxbury by 
utilizing abandoned Brookline water mains. 

Cleaning and hning 24-inch water main from the Arbor- 
way to Spring Street. 

(b) Reinforce Stony Brook Village with H.H.S. 

(c) Reinforce Low Service, Roxbury and South Boston, 
by cleaning and lining 30-inch-24-inch mains from Roxbury 
Crossing to Andrew Square. 

(rf) Reinforce northeasterly section of city by extending 
24-inch H.S. main from the Custom House. 

(e) Replacement of 20-inch L.S. and 16-inch H.S. after 
demolition of Warren Bridge. 

(/) Replacement of 6-inch water mains laid prior to 1890. 

The Maintenance Section is responsible for the opera- 
tion and maintenance of the water distributing system, 
comprising 1,035.5 miles of pipes including 18.64 miles 
of high pressure fire service, ranging in size from 2-inch 
to 48-inch in diameter and including gates, valves, 
hydrants, and other appurtenances. 

This section provides for the repair of main pipes, 
service pipes, hydrants and gates, and furnishes emer- 
gency service on a 24-hour per day, seven day per week 
basis. The section forces are augmented by contractors' 
personnel for excavating and backfilling trenches. Con- 
tracts for this work awarded in 1960 totaled $267,180. 

This section also operates a maintenance shop which 
comprises a machine shop, plumbing shop, and meter 
shop. This unit handles drilling services and the 
machining and assembly of all new corporation and 
tapping gates up to six inches. Also machined and re- 
paired are defective hydrants and defective gates at the 
site, if possible. Assistance to the other divisions of the 
Pubhc Works Department is rendered as required. New 
meters are installed, and old meters are changed, tested 
and repaired. 

The Revenue Section performs all of the work in- 
volved in processing bills, customer relations, and com- 
plaints of plant maintenance. These operations include 



18 City Document No. 18 

applications for new services, reading 97,370 meters 
quarterly, and preparing 390,000 bills, as well as the 
bookkeeping entailed in these accounts, and the is- 
suance of statements of outstanding water bills to the 
consumers at the end of the year as a courtesy to the 
customer. 

Water Break — Boston Common 
On Thursday, April 21, 1960, at 5:15 a.m. a break 
occurred in the main 42 -inch pipe under the Boston 
Common. The Foundation Company of New York, 
contractors for the Boston Common Garage, had piled 
excavated material to a height of approximately twenty- 
five feet above the normal grade of the baseball field. 
The pressure from this mound of excavated material 
caused the break. The Foundation Company worked 
around the clock and restored normal service on Satur- 
day, April 23, at 3 a.m. The entire expense for making 
repairs was assumed b}^ the company. The entire 
expense to the City for the pipe, sleeves, emergency 
crews, and dissipated water amounted to only $6,000. 

Snow Removal 

The worst single snowstorm in the history of the city 
started on March 3, reached blizzard proportions on 
March 4, and finally subsided on March 5, 1960. The 
total accumulation was 19.8 inches. This storm wiped 
out a record of 19.4 inches set only two years before, on 
February 16-17, 1958. 

The department mobihzed every possible piece of city 
equipment, hired approximately 270 contract plows, 
utihzed all available department personnel on an 
around-the-clock basis, and finally restored the city to 
conditions approaching normal. 

As is increasingly noticeable with each storm, the 
parked cars greatly impeded the work of properly 
plowing the streets. Because of this problem of snowed- 
in vehicles, some of our smaller residential streets re- 
mained unplowed until we were able to haul out the 
offending cars. 

The earliest snowfall in twenty-six years of weather 
bureau records hit Boston on October 25, dropping 
four inches of snow. On December 12 another bhzzard 
dropped eighteen inches of snow on outljdng wards and 
fifteen inches on mid-city. 



Public Works Department 19 

During 1960 the department's trucks spread 6,000 
tons of salt and 18,000 tons of sand to keep the city 
streets in a safe condition. The total cost to the city 
in combating hazards of winter was $892,900.84. 

Fiscal 

Total expenditures in 1960 for public works amounted 
to $20,324,172.88, of which $3,386,461.28 represents 
water assessments, and $1,364,240.33 represents sewer 
assessments paid to the Metropolitan District Com- 
mission. The water assessments were $147,150.28 
more, and the sewer assessments $379,482.29 more 
than those levied in 1959. 

The most significant reduction in department fiscal 
expenditures was realized in the elimination of 164 
employees from the public works payroll. With greater 
efficiency resulting, and an actual increase in services 
to the taxpayer, a saving of $768,000 was accomplished. 
This single item reflected a 50-cent cut in the tax rate. 
A more definitive picture on personnel reduction will 
be developed subsequently in this report. 

The increase in water assessments, noted above, 
indicated that acute avoidable losses were taking place. 
Accordingly, a four-year survey was initiated by the 
Pitometer Associates, New York City, specialists in 
water research engineering. This firm quickly discovered 
losses which, once corrected, would result in considerable 
savings to the city. 

Lost water — that is, water which is purchased from the 
Metropohtan District Commission but for which the 
city receives no monetary return — may be divided into 
two classes. The first represents necessary water that the 
city uses for all of its municipal services such as public 
buildings, fire, park, and other departmental activities. 
The second and most important is avoidable losses 
that accrue from leakage and waste, underground 
malfunctions of deteriorated piping, inadequate valves, 
abandoned services, and a variety of other causes. 

The initial findings of the engineers more than justified 
the undertaking of this survey. Faulty meters which 
were incorrectly registering the total volume of water 
consumed by the city were uncovered. (This finding 
resulted in an abatement of $16,880 given to the city 
by the Metropolitan District Commission.) From this 
and other survey findings, $68,600 were saved in the 



20 City Document No. 18 

first year, and there is indication, when the survey is 
completed, it will have resulted in an annual saving 
of $100,000. 

A roinor, but significant, saving of $10,000 resulted 
from the removal of twenty-five water fountains through- 
out the city. It is noteworthy that only one citizen 
complaint was registered in protest to the curtailment 
of this service. 

The fiscal picture of the department was further 
brightened when the year-end final evaluation of all 
activities were determined. More major highway 
reconstruction was completed, or under way, more 
sewer and water pipes were laid or repaired, more 
bridges and sidewalks were repaired, more new equip- 
ment was purchased, and as many general services 
rendered as in the previous fiscal year, under the previous 
administration, and all this accomplished with a budget 
of $2,000,000 less than the previous fiscal year. 

This is the policy that this department, under this 
administration, is dedicated to pursue. Every saving, 
wherever it njight be found, will be found. The taxpayer 
will get a dollar's worth for every dollar spent. 

The end of 1960 found the reorganization plan running 
smoothly, with a minimum of inconvenience to our 
department personnel. While undue optimism can be 
a pitfall, we in Pubhc Works respectfully submit that 
public works costs do not contribute to high property 
taxes. 

Appended hereto is the report submitted by the 
PubUc Improvement Commission and statistical data 
relative to the activities of the various divisions in 1960. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James W. Haley, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Public Works Department 21 

Public Improvement Commission 

The Public Improvement Commission was established 
May 1, 1954, by the provisions of Section 57, Chapter 2, 
of the 1954 Ordinances. This commission, consisting 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, the Commissioner 
of Real Property, and the Chairman of the Boston 
Traffic Commission, was assigned all of the powers 
and duties of the former Board of Street Commissioners, 
except : 

(a) Those relating to the storage and sale of inflammables, 
filling stations, and parking lots which were transferred to the 
Committee on Licenses in the Public Safety Commission. 

(6) Those relating to the planting and removal of trees in 
public ways, the use of public ways for any temporary 
obstruction in, under, or over the same, the use of public 
ways for the storage and sale of merchandise, and the 
designating of coasting streets, which were transferred to the 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

(c) Those relating to the abatement of taxes which w^ere 
transferred to Real Property Department. 

Functions of the Board of Street Commissioners 
transferred to this commission include the authority 
to lay out, widen, relocate, alter, discontinue, or rename 
public highways, and to order the making of specific 
repairs therein; to order the construction of sanitary 
sewers and storm drains; to take land by eminent 
domain for municipal purposes (except housing and 
off-street parking); to permit the opening of private 
ways for public travel; to levy assessments for street, 
sidewalk, and sewer betterments; and to issue permits 
for the location of wire-carrying poles, conduits, pipes, 
and similar uses of the pubhc ways. 

Layouts with Construction 
The following streets were ordered laid out and 
constructed as pubhc ways during the year 1960: 

Balina Place, Dorchester, from Norfolk street approximately 
184 feet northwesterly. Length, 184 feet; estimated cost, 
$5,504; estimated benefit, $2,752. 

Birchland Avenue, West Roxbury (formerly Ashland avenue), 
from Cass street to Johnson street. Length, 675 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $19,296; estimated benefit, $9,647.98. 

Birchland Terrace, West Roxbury, from Birchland avenue 
approximately 175 feet northwesterly. Length, 175 feet; 
estimated cost, $6,706; estimated benefit, $3,352.99. 



22 City Document No. 18 

Gorman Road, Dorchester, from Cummins Highway to 
Hallowell street. Length, 736 feet; estimated cost, $24,084; 
estimated benefit, $12,042.01. 

Greenbrook Road, Hyde Park, from Chestnut street to 
Austin street. Length, 706 feet; estimated cost, $15,877; 
estimated benefit, $7,938.50. 

Hackensack Terrace, West Roxbury, from Hackensack road 
approximately 320 feet southerly. Length, 320 feet; estimated 
cost, $11,754; estimated benefit, $5,877. 

Hoyt Street, Dorchester, from Dorchester avenue approxi- 
mately 330 feet easterly. Length, 330 feet; estimated cost, 
$8,846; estimated benefit, $4,422.99. 

Itasca Street, Dorchester, extended between Almont street 
and Monterey avenue. Length, 718 feet; estimated cost, 
$23,602; estimated benefit, $11,794.18. 

Kittredge Court, West Roxbury (formerly Metropolitan 
terrace), from Kittredge street approximately 222 feet south- 
easterly. Length, 222 feet; estimated cost, $6,182; estimated 
benefit, $3,090.99. 

Linley Terrace, South Boston (formerly Lincoln park), from 
East Third street approximately 185 feet southerly. Length, 
185 feet; estimated cost, $3,666; estimated benefit, $1,832.98. 

Rambler Road, West Roxbury, extended from a point ap- 
proximately 480 feet west of Centre street approximately 110 
feet westerly. Length, 110 feet; estimated cost, $3,432; 
estimated benefit, $1,715.99. 

Swan Street, West Roxbury, between La Grange street and 
Pheasant street. Length, 333 feet; estimated cost, $11,109; 
estimated benefit, $5,554.48. 

Tobin Road, West Roxbury, extended from Kerna road ap- 
proximately 294 feet northwesterly. Length, 294 feet; esti- 
mated cost, $8,521; estimated benefit, $4,260.51. 

Discontinuances 

Conant street, Roxbury, from Huntington avenue to St. 
Alphonsus street. 

Enterprise street, Dorchester, on the northeasterly side from 
a point approximately 375 feet northeast of Boston street 
approximately 185 feet northeasterly. 

Gillette park. South Boston, between Dorchester avenue and 
A street. 

Granite street. South Boston, from Gillette park approxi- 
mately 170 feet northeasterly. 

Granite street, South Boston, from Baldwin street approxi- 
mately 27 feet southwesterly. 

Shetland street, Roxbury, on the southeasterly side at 
Shirley street. 

Shirley street, Roxbury, on the southeasterly side at Shet- 
land street. 



Public Works Department 23 

Smith street, Roxbury, from Worthington street to St. 
Alphonsus street. 

Whitney street, Roxbury, from Tremont street to Conant 
street. 

Sidewalks 

In connection with the recently enacted Chapter 245 
of the Acts of 1958, the Public Improvement Com- 
mission ordered the installation of artificial stone side- 
walks on the following streets : 

Bogandale road, West Roxbury, from Centre street approxi- 
mately 785 feet southeasterly (monolithic sidewalks). 

Carruth street, Dorchester, at various locations between 
Ashmont street and Gallivan boulevard. 

Fletcher street, West Roxbury, between Centre street and 
South street, consisting of increasing the present four-foot 
artificial stone sidewalks to six feet. 

Grove street. West Roxbury, adjacent to 203-209. 

Richmond street, Dorchester, on the southerly side between 
Wachusett street and Belnel road. 

Savin Hill avenue, Dorchester, between Southview street and 
Evandale terrace. 

West Howell street, Dorchester, on the southwesterly side, 
from Boston street approximately 348 feet northwesterly. 

Woodhaven street, Dorchester, between Blue Hill avenue and 
Cummins highway. 

Private Ways 

During the year 1960 permission was given to prepare 
for public travel the following private ways: 

Belle avenue. West Roxbury, from Northdale road 400 feet 
northerly. 

Danny road, Hyde Park, from Reynold road 250 feet south- 
easterly. 

Jo-Anne terrace, Dorchester, from Adams street 290 feet 
westerly. 

Mattapan street, Dorchester, from 35 feet northwest of 
Colorado street 70 feet northwesterly. 

Soldiers Field place, Brighton, from Soldiers Field Road 
Extension 820 feet southerly and easterly. 

Violet street, Dorchester, from French street to Delhi street. 

During the same period permission was given to open 
for public travel the following private ways: 

Banfield avenue, Dorchester, from Wooddale avenue 400 feet 
northeasterly. 

Centre Lane, West Roxbury (formerly Baker street), from 
Centre street 265 feet southeasterly. 

Danny Road, Hyde Park, from Reynold road 250 feet 
southeasterly. 

Itasca street, Dorchester, between Monterey avenue and 
Messinger street. 



24 City Document No. 18 

Leseur road, Hyde Park, from Fairmount avenue 175 feet 
southwesterly. 

Lodgehill road, Hyde Park, from Goff street to Beech street. 

Maplewood street. West Roxbury, between Petrel street and 
Eagle street. 

Maplewood street, West Roxbury, from St. Theresa avenue 
to Petrel street. 

Martinwood road. West Roxbury, from South street to 
Asticou road. 

Miami terrace. West Roxbury, from Miami avenue 190 feet 
northwesterly. 

Moreland street, West Roxbury, between Laurie avenue and 
Belle avenue. 

Prospect Park, Hyde Park, from Warren avenue 325 feet 
northeasterly. 

Trilling Way, South Boston, between Northern avenue and 
Ramp street. 

Assessments 

During the year 1960 the Highway Division of the 
Public Works Department sent notice of completion of 
twenty-nine streets at a total cost of $453,949.15. On 
this work the Public Improvement Commission levied 
assessments in the amount of $177,915.92. 

During the same period the Sewer Division of the 
Public Works Department reported the completion of 
construction of sanitary sewerage in ten streets at a cost 
of $48,064.40, on which the Public Improvement Com- 
mission levied assessments in the amount of $23,019.40. 

With the abolishment of sewer entrance fees by the 
Supreme Court in 1959, the Public Improvement Com- 
mission was empowered to assess parcels of land within a 
seasonable time after connections were made to sewers 
from estates that had never paid an assessment for the 
original improvement. The following is a list of streets 
in which connections were made: 



Atherton avenue Hyde Park $176 00 

Gould street West Roxbury 336 00 

Grove street West Roxbury 82 00 

Hallowell street Dorchester 60 00 

Hemlock road West Roxbury 100 00 

Lawn street West Roxbury 370 00 

Metropolitan avenue Hyde Park 123 00 

Meyer street West Roxbury 1 12 50 

Morton street Dorchester 1 10 00 

Northdale road West Roxbury 1,394 00 

Prairie street Dorchester 60 00 

Private land (Adams street) Dorchester 183 00 

Salman street West Roxbury 161 60 

Van Brunt street Hyde Park 180 00 

West HoweU street Dorchester 730 00 

Total $4,177 50 



Public Works Department 25 

The completion of new sidewalks in one street at a 
cost of $2,340.50, authorized by the Boston City Coun- 
cil, was reported by the Highway Division. On this the 
Public Improvement Commission levied an assessment 
of $1,170.25. During the year 1960 the Highway 
Division of the Public Works Department sent notice 
of completion of sidewalks in four streets at a total cost 
of $48,883.22. On this the Public Improvement Com- 
mission levied assessments of $19,278.44. 

Sewer Program 

During the year 1960 the construction of 1.59 miles of 
sanitary sewer, 1.06 miles of storm sewer, 31 catch 
basins, and 2 drop inlets, was ordered at a total estimated 
cost of $101,340.75. 

Estimated benefit to private property for the con- 
struction of the 1.59 miles of sanitary sewer amounted 
to $28,211.78. 

The following sewer easements were ordered aban- 
doned : 

Connolly street, Harrison terrace, Boston Proper and 
Roxbury, from Fellows street approximately 290 feet north- 
westerly. 

Private land, Brighton, from Washington street at Fairbanks 
street approximately 170 feet southerly and easterly. 



26 City Document No. 18 

Sewerage works were ordered as follows : 

SEWERAGE WORKS ORDERED 



Stbbbt 


1! 

r 


11 

il 
1^ 


1 


& 
Q 


1 


Is 

u 


Brighton 

♦Soldiers Field place 

Dorchester 


826 
190 


875 


5 

2 
4 




$25,320 00 

3,260 00 
7,300 00 
5.444 45 
460 00 
4,640 00 

20.211 00 
175 00 

950 00 
6,009 30 
7,900 00 

500 00 

15,741 00 

1,600 00 

830 00 

1,000 00 


$8,062 92 
1,500 00 




440 
280 
73 
365 

868 




*Jo-Aiine terrace . . 


275 


$2,079 60 








None 






2 
4 

1 

2 


1 


None 


*Violet street and Delhi 


600 


$6,553 44 


East Boston 




Hyde Park 




50 
338 
465 


None 




336 


None 




4 

1 

4 


1 


None 







None 


West Roxbury 

*Belle avenue 


878 
120 


1,052 
132 


$9,465 82 




550 00 




2 




None 




90 




None 














3.315 


4,938 


31 


2 


$101,340 75 


$28,211 78 







* Easements taken 



Street Name Changes 

The names of the following public streets were 
changed: 

Enterprise street, Dorchester District, from Field's court 
approximately 90 feet southeasterly. New name: Willow 
court. 

Helen F. Burgess Footway, Dorchester District, from Burt 
street to Bailey street. New name : Carmela lane. 



Public Works DepartxMent 



27 



Main street, Charlestown District, between Gardner street 
and Cambridge street (southerly roadway). New name: 
Maffa way. 

Marist road, Dorchester District, from Morton street to 
MaryknoU street. New name: Caryll street. 

Swan's court, Dorchester District, from OIney street approxi- 
mately 220 feet southeasterly. New name: MacNeil way. 

Troy street, Boston Proper District, between Albany street 
and Washington street. New name: Traveler street. 

Westville road, Hyde Park District, from Sierra road approxi- 
mately 220 feet northeasterly. New name: Sierra road. 

Land Damages 

On new street construction eighty-five claims were 
filed for damage to property resulting from land takings 
or changes in grades. On these claims this commission 
awarded damages in the amount of $21,445.22. 

During the period of this report 205 petitions from 
public utihties were approved for the placing and 
maintaining of poles for the support of wires. 

Also, fifty-nine petitions were approved for miscel- 
laneous installations or uses of the public highways of 
the City of Boston, as follows: 



Street 
Adams street, Dorchester 
Ansonia road, West Roxbury 
Baldwin street, Charlestown 
Batterymarch street, Boston Proper 
Boston street. South Boston 
Caton street, Hyde Park 
Central avenue, etc., Hyde Park 
Charles street, Boston Proper 
Charlesview street, Brighton 
Collins street, Hyde Park 
Corey street. West Roxbury 
D street. South Boston 
Decatur street, East Boston 
Dent street. West Roxbury 
Dorchester avenue. South Boston 
E street. South Boston 
East First street. South Boston 
Edgemere road. West Roxbury 



Petitioner 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Terminal Realty Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Fishelson The Florist 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 



Nature of Petition 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Permanent marquee 
Underground gas main 
Riser 

Underground gas main 
Colonial lamp post 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 



28 



City Document No. 18 



Emerson street, South Boston 

Foundry street, South Boston 

Glenwood avenue, Hyde Park 

Gordon street, Brighton 

Greenbaum street. South Boston 

Highland street, Hyde Park 

Hopedale street, Brighton 

Huntington avenue, Hyde Park 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park (at 
West street) 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park (from 
797-846) 

Itasca street, Dorchester 

London street, East Boston 

Macullar road. West Roxbury 

Main street, Charlestown (at Bald- 
win street) 

Main street, Charlestown (at South 
Eden street) 

Main street 1 
Sullivan street/ 

Maplewood street, West Roxbury 

Merrimac street, Boston Proper 

Meshaka street. West Roxbury 

Mt. Pleasant street, Hyde Park 

Northdale road, etc., West Roxbury 

Pond street, Hyde Park 

Readville street, Hyde Park (at Cross 
street) 

Readville street, Hyde Park (at 
Danny road) 

Reynold road, Hyde Park 

Richmond street, Boston Proper 

Seattle street, Brighton 

State street, Boston Proper 

Stimson street, West Roxbury 

Summer street, Hyde Park 

Vallaro road, Hyde Park 

Vershire street. West Roxbury 

Walk Hill street, West Roxbury 

Washington street, Brighton 

Water street, Dorchester 

West street, Hyde Park 

West Second street, South Boston 

Wexford street, Brighton 

Williams avenue, Hyde Park 

Wolcott court, Hyde Park 

Worley street. West Roxbury 



Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Berman Realty Trust 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 



Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Heating main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 



Worcester Gas Light Company Underground gas main 



Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 

Boston Gas Company 

Boston Gas Company 

Boston Gas Company 
Rose B. Kabitsky 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 



Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 

Underground gas main 

Underground gas main 

Underground gas main 
Sidewalk door 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 



Worcester Gas Light Company Underground gas main 



Worcester Gas Light Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Terminal Realty Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Charles Petitti 
Boston Gas Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Boston Gas Company 
Boston Edison Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Worcester Gas Light Company 
Boston Gas Company 



Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Permanent marquee 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Marquee 

Gas main and regulator 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Poles 

Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 
Underground gas main 



Public Works Department 29 

STREET ASSESSMENTS 



Street 


District 


Cost 


Assessment 


Aldwin road 


West Roxbury 


«6,280 59 


$3,374 99 






10.119 00 


3,960 00 


Banfield avenue 


Dorchester 


2,571 00 


1,828 10 


Belle avenue 


West Roxbury 


10,094 00 


1,394 00 


Bradlee street 


Hyde Park 


8,225 89 


4,962 01 


Child street 


Hyde Park 


13,446 21 


5,140 00 


Colorado street . 


Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 


13,747 22 
2,608 75 


6 276 12 




1,093 50 


Faunce road, et al 


66,434 88 


32,641 39 


Freeport Way 


Dorchester 


10 803 54 


5,583 96 


Gilmore terrace 


West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 


7,140 00 
3 576 00 


3 585 60 


Gould street 


336 00 




Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 




4,726 96 


Magee street 


19 332 32 


10 867 07 






2,144 04 


Meyer street (Catherine street 290 




3,479 83 


Meyer street (290 feet southeast of 
Catherine to Organ Park street) . . . 


10,016 53 


5,008 22 


Metropolitan avenue 


Hyde Park 


12 006 81 


7 597 76 




8,613 67 
2,713 72 
1,705 00 
17 919 34 


4,306 83 


NewhilJ place 


South Boston 


1 166 48 




West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 


510 00 


RufEng street . . ... 


8 937 45 




43,228 78 
28,493 09 


21,184 98 
14,098 50 




Sierra road 


7,138 00 
71,117 12 
3,970 00 
3,209 40 
43,157 00 


3 324 00 




6,561 00 


Tracton avenue 


2 031 50 




2,206 49 
9 587 14 


Westminster street 






Totals 




$453,865 19 


$177,913 92 







30 City Document No. 18 

widenings and relocations 

Brighton street, Charlestown, at the northeasterly corner of 
Cambridge street. 

Centre street, West Roxbury, from Grove street to the 
Dedham Boundary Line. 

High street, Charlestown, at the northeast corner of School 
street and the southeast corner of Pearl street. 

Longwood avenue, Roxbury, on the southwesterly side, 
from St. Alphonsus street to Huntington avenue. 

Park street, Dorchester, between Ashland street and Free- 
port street. 

St. Alphonsus street, Roxbury, on the northwesterly side, 
from Tremont street to Longwood avenue, and southeasterly 
side, from a point approximately 110 feet southwest of Mc- 
Greevey way approximately 380 feet northeasterly to Hunting- 
ton avenue. 

Specific Repairs 

Cambridge street, Charlestown, from Crescent street ap- 
proximately 835 feet easterly, consisting of the reduction in 
width of the existing sidewalks. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, consisting of the reduction 
in width of the northwesterly sidewalk between Wallingford 
road and Chiswick road and the corresponding widening of the 
streetcar reservation adjacent thereto; the reconstruction of the 
proposed traffic divisional island at Wallingford road; the 
construction of an opening in the proposed divisional island at 
Kinross road; the construction of an opening in the streetcar 
reservation and the proposed divisional island at Strathmore 
road; and the elimination of the proposed cross-over in the 
existing streetcar reservation at Sutherland road. 

Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, at Wallingford road, con- 
sisting of the construction of a cross-over in the street car 
reservation. 

Longwood avenue, Roxbury, at the northwesterly corner of 
Binney street, consisting of increasing the curb radius. 

Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, at the intersection of 
Southampton street, consisting of the extension of the existing 
traffic islands. 

St. Alphonsus street, Roxbury, at Longwood avenue and 
Huntington avenue, consisting of the installation of traffic 
islands. 



Public Works Department 31 

Eminent Domain Land Taking 

During the period of this report the fpllowing land 
taking was made for municipal purposes: 

School Buildings Department. — The taking of ap- 
proximately 23,568 square feet of land bounded by 
Wyman street, Bolster street, and Mozart street, 
Roxbury District, under an order of this commission 
and Mayor dated April 13, 1960, and recorded in the 
Suffolk Registry of Deeds on April 29, 1960. 

Street Program 

During the period covered by this report, forty-two 
highway improvements were ordered by the Public 
Improvement Commission, including the laying out of 
thirteen new highways, the construction of eight new 
sidewalks, the widening and relocation of six public 
ways, the making of specific repairs in six existing streets, 
and the discontinuance of nine streets. 



32 



City Document No. 18 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS 



Stbeet 


District 


Cost 


Assessment 




Dorchester 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park and 
West Roxbury 


$2,571 00 
10,094 00 
6,860 00 
5,400 00 
497 00 

900 00 

1,026 00 
3.209 40 
5,697 00 

11,810 00 


$1,828 10 


Belle avenue. 


1,394 00 
3,000 00 
3,510 00 






Meyer court. . . . 


373 75 


Meyer street (from Catherine street 
290 feet southeasterly) . . . 


112 50 


Meyer street (from Organ Park street 
300 feet southwesterly) . 


763 56 




2,206 49 




975 00 


Windham road 






8,856 00 


Totals. . . . 




$48,064 40 


S23 019 40 









SIDEWALK ASSESSMENTS 



Street 


District 


Cost 


Assessment 


Bogandale road 


West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
West Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Dorchester 


$6,241 31 
2,340 50 
1,678 83 
12,195 41 
28,767 67 


$3,252 94 
1,170 25 


Drury road 




Savin Hill avenue. ... 


6 098 66 




9,087 36 




Totals .. 




$48,883 22 


$20,448 69 







Public Works Department 33 

APPENDIX A 
GENERAL ORDERS NO. 2 

APPENDIX B 

CENTRAL OFFICE 

Department Personnel 

Table 1 — Grade and Number of Employees 

Table 2 — Number Actually Employed 

Table 3 — Appointments, Transfers, Deaths, etc. 

Loan Orders — Outstanding Debt 
Table 1 — Public Ways 
Table 2 — Sewerage Works 
Table 3 — Bridges 

Automotive Equipment 

Table 1 — List as of December 31, 1960 
Table 2 — Added or Ordered in 1960 

Permits 

Table 1 — Permits Issued and Cash Receipts 



34 



City Document No. 18 



Department Personal 

TABLE I 

GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 

(As of Decmeber 31, 1960) 





1 












1 










1 




1 


5 














1 1 
















I 














3 


4 
















1 




1 


3 


2 


1 






8 


Supervisors and assistants 


1 


12 


3 









21 


Principal senior and assistant civil engineers 


1 


13 


2 


14 




u 


48 






6 








13 


19 






fi 




?. 




9 


18 











1 




1 


4 








1 








1 




1 












1 


Automotive, principal, and senior electrical engi- 




, 










1 
















1 
















1 


Pumping station engineers and stationary engi- 






4 


4 






8 




2 












2 


District foremen . . . 








5 






7 










4 


Other foremen 


14 




7 


1 
1 






29 




2 




1 


73 


4P 


14 


15 




152 










2 






4 




2 












2 


















25 


129 


70 


46 


31 


45 


346 







Public Works Department 



35 



TABLE I. GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES— Continued 





25 

1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
12 


129 


70 


46 


31 


45 


346 








1 
1 


1 


1 






3 








9 




1 




5 


1 
2 








2 


Principal clerks, stenographers, account clerks, etc. . 


3 


10 

27 




33 
1 




9 
1 
3 
1 

2 
2 




2 


2 


43 




16 










4 






2 




4 




3 


Senior storekeeper and storekeepers 








2 


Chief water meter reader. 








30 




1 














Water meter readers and clerks . . 










30 




1 
3 
7 








1 














3 














7 






' 








1 


Drawtenders and assistants . 




88 








88 




2 
7 
1 










2 














7 


Dispatcher ... . . 












1 














15 


Head photostat operator . 
























1 
2 2 








' 






1 










4 
2 










2 








10 








Carried forward . . . . 


83 


228 


79 


58 


144 


52 


644 







36 City Document No. 18 

TABLE I. GRADE AND NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES— Concluded 





83 
4 


228 
3 


79 
4 

7 


58 
9 
9 


144 

18 


52 


644 




38 




16 








18 
74 

1 
3 




19 




28 


5 
9 


7 


116 


Crane operators 


10 




4 

5 
4 
4 


10 


s 


Carpenters and helpers 






15 


Welders 










4 




30 










8 


Pavers 










30 




14 

1 










15 






2 
8 
6 
1 
16 


1 




4 








8 






2 
60 
95 


24 
23 
15 






8 




5 

4 


17 
26 




107 




167 




15 


Garage attendants 


12 
5 

1 




. 






12 




266 


73 1. 


23 




379 








1 
















Totals 


174 


703 


239 


128 


325 


52 1 1,624 







TABLE 2 

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ACTUALLY EMPLOYED 

JANUARY 1, 1960, AND JANUARY I, 1961 







s 


















^ 


O 












•3 


























1 




1 


1 


s 


s 
1 


1 


s 

5 


1 


January 1. 1960 


35 


10 


140 


3«, ! 


320 


fi.'iS 


161 


103 


1,788 


January 1 1961. 


52 


174 




-1 


706 


239 


129 




1,624 







January 1, 1960. 
January 1, 1961. 



Total Eligible Force 



353 711 
723 762 



111 1,920 
— 2.190 









Public 


"Works Department 






37 








TABLE 3 


APPOINTMENTS, 


TRANSFERS, RESIGNATIONS, RETIRE- 






MENTS, 


DEATHS, ETC., OF EMPLOYEES 






„ 


RS 






o 




CO 


pE 


:»> 










■^ss 




1 




^. 


Sebvicbs 


-1 


n 


,2| 

g5! 


13 


-0 






s^s 










1960-1961 


^ 




* 


s 




























1 


1 




H=« 


1 

Q 


1 


3 
1 




1 


go 


m 


1 


1 

< 


1 


7 


4 


5 




3 


10 


Central Office. . . 


174 


184 






1 


2 






101 
140 






103 
140 
























Bridge . . 












10 


39 


5 


32 


7 


8 


320 


Highway 


706 


486 




1 




4 


10 


5 


393 


10 


13 


658 


Sanitary 


239 


1 


6 


3 


6 


■> 


11 


2 


13 
6 


1 


3 
2 


161 
35 


Sewer 


129 

52 










1 


26 








S 


16 




10 


5 


3 


361 


Water. 


324 






















23 


83 


16 


700 


23 


32 


1,788 


Totals 


1.624 


697 


6 


4 


7 



Loan Orders — Outstanding Debt 

It was necessary to request a loan order for the con- 
struction of public ways in the amount of $2,000,000, 
and the sewerage works construction was funded for 
$975,000, This brings the bonded debt for pubUc ways 
construction to a total of S8, 500, 000 and for sewerage 
works to $6,772,000. The bonded debt for bridge con- 
struction and repair was unchanged, totahng $4,422,000 
for completed programs. Issues for pubhc ways un- 
retired date back to 1951, for sewerage works to 1934, 
and for bridges to 1941. 



38 



City Document No. 18 



Outstanding Bonded Debt 

TABLE 1 
PUBLIC WAYS — CONSTRUCTION 

Inside Debt Limit Issued Series Due Amount 

2s 1951 10/1/61 $100,000 

Outside Debt Limit 

2Us 1952 4/1/62 200,000 

2M 1953 10/1/63 600,000 

li^s 1954 10/1/64 800,000 

2}4s 1955 4/1/65 1,000,000 

3s 1956 11/1/62-66 600,000 

3s 1957 5/1/67 700,000 

5s 1957 10/1/67 350,000 

5s 1958 10/1/68 800,000 

4s 1959 10/1/69 1,350,000 

3J4s I960 11/1/70 2,000,000 

Total .... $8,500,000 

TABLE 2 
SEWERAGE WORKS 

Inside Debt Limit Issued Series Due Amount 

31/4's 1934 11/1/64 $100,000 

3s 1937 9/1/67 28,000 

2Ms 1937 12/1/67 35,000 

2Hs 1938 6/1/68 128,000 

l^s 1939 8/1/69 36,000 

l^is 1940 7/15/70 25,000 

2s 1941 12/15/71 67,000 

2s 1942 12/1/72 120,000 

lUs 1943 12/1/73 130,000 

iWs 1944 8/1/74 88,000 

iWs 1945 12/1/75 195,000 

lUs 1946 7/1/76 320,000 

1^8 1947 5/1/77 545,000 

2s 1948 12/1/78 90,000 

21/s 1949 12/1/79 520,000 

lUs 1949 11/12/79 285,000 

1^8 1950 6/1/80 350,000 

1^8 1951 11/1/71 275,000 

Total $3,337,000 

Outside Debt Limit Issued Series Due Amount 

2 Us 1952 10/1/72 $300,000 

21^8 1953 10/1/73 650,000 

2s 1955 3/1/75 375,000 

2^8 1955 10/1/75 375,000 

slle 1957 5/1/77 425,000 

3Us 1957 10/1/77 425,000 

2CI8 I960 11/1/79 475,000 

2^8 I960 11/1/80 500,000 

Total $3,525,000 

Inside Debt Limit 3,247,000 

Outside Debt Limit 3,525,000 

Total $6,772,000 



Public Works Department 39 

TABLE 3 

BRIDGES — RECONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR 

Inside Debt Limit Issued Series Due Amount 
I3^s 1950 6/1/70 $205,000 

Construction 

2s 1941 12/15/61 10,000 

I3^s 1942 12/1/62 24,000 

13^3 1943 11/1/63 21,000 

iMs 1945 12/1/65 42,000 

Outside Debt Limit 

2s 1952 4/1/72 300,000 

23^s 1952 10/1/72 190,000 

2Ms 1953 4/1/73 405,000 

214s 1954 4/1/74 970,000 

28 1955 4/1/75 375,000 

21^8 1955 10/1/75 375,000 

38 1956 11/1/62-75 600,000 

3s 1956 11/1/61 40,000 

3i^s 1957 5/1/77 170,000 

31^8 1957 10/1/77 425,000 

3^s 1959 11/1/79 475,000 

Total $4,422,000 

Automotive Equipment 

TABLE 1 
LIST AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1960 

The automotive equipment of the Pubhc Works De- 
partment consists of the following: 
56 Passenger cars 
13 Carryalls 
28 Yo-ton pickup trucks 
119 13/9- to 15-ton dump trucks 
28 1-ton utility trucks 
5 2-ton derrick and lumber trucks 
3 2-ton catch-basin cleaning trucks 
5 13/2-ton 7-man cab emergency trucks 
3 2- to 10-ton wrecker trucks 

2 3-ton gate closing trucks 

3 1^- to 3-ton platform trucks 

9 134-ton trucks with compressors 
9 Miscellaneous trucks 

2 Gutter vacuum cleaners 
25 Large street sweepers 

5 Street flushers 
27 Snow fighters 

3 Snow loaders 

22 Front bucket loaders 
3 Crawler tractors 
3 Compressor trailers 
8 Gasoline road rollers 
1 Road grader 



40 City Document No. 18 

TABLE 2 

New equipment added to the fleet in 1960 or ordered 
for delivery in 1961 consisted of the following: 
10 Ford F850 trucks with 4-yard dump bodies 
10 Jet Sanders 
4 Wayne street sweepers 
2 Heavy duty snow-fighting trucks 
14 Ford F850 Ford chassis and cabs 
14 Large dump bodies 
31 Snowplows 

Permits 

TABLE 1 

CASH RECEIPTS 

Signs $82,760 20 

Permits 43,330 92 

Driveway applications 20 00 

Sidewalk licenses 21,836 25 

Notifications to abuttors 90 00 

Sewer inspection fees 8,800 00 

Total $156,837 37 

Bad check — collected 92 50 

$156,929 87 

Corporation permits 5,996 40 

Rents for city land 14,787 00 

Total — all permits $177,713 27 

STREET OPENING ACCOUNT 

Total deposits received $80,897 12 

Total number of deposits 513 

STREET OPENING ACCOUNT — SPECIAL 

Amount Payments 

Committed Received 

Boston Gas Company $126,321 50 $30,503 00 

Boston Edison Company 82,202 05 13,721 00 

Worcester Gas Company 35,032 00 7,270 00 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Com- 
pany 29,908 00 9,137 00 

Quincy Market Company 1,329 00 1,329 00 

PERMITS ISSUED 

Signs 7,764 

Permits (cash) 3,634 

Special permits 201 

Driveway applications 10 

Sidewalk licenses 296 

Sewer inspections 277 

Utility permits 1,858 

City permits — no fee 899 

Total permits 14,939 



Public Works Department 41 



APPENDIX C 



ENGINEERING DIVISION 



42 



City DofTJMRNT No. 18 



TABLR I 



REPRODUCTIONS 





Photostats 


Blueprints 


Ozalds 


Auto 
Positives 


S'J 




1,1.-50 

!)((8 

1 ,f)ri8 

tr,<; 

^r>(^, 

1.'184 

H-l 

182 

ir,2 

7(1 

:m 

r,m 

1 ,r,02 

CA 
108 

01 

3.fl64 

940 
420 

,'t(t(l 

i(;8 
wu 
i;«i 

702 

1 ,:i72 

WW 

2(;i 

(18 
(132 
102 

I ,r,:i8 

448 




1,100 

1 ,!)!»8 

1,781 

043 

043 

r>:i() 

90 






AsseflfiinK 




28 




BuildinK 






City niork 








City Clerk 












Civil Dofonse 






Collocting 




12 








104 












Fire 




335 
487 






Law 






















Porml 




240 

1,828 

45 

7.044 

1 ,823 
774 

117 

3'I3 














Publio HiiildinKn 






Public Works: 

lOnKiruwirinn Division 

r'ontriil Offioo 


697 
373 


372 

49' 


113 


iri|{liwiiv Division . 










Hiinitivry Divinion 






Sower Division 




400 

157 

954 

1,489 














Wiitor Division 






Roiil I'r'ipcrly 
















Soliool HiiildinKs 




121 






Boliool O.iiiuiiltoo 












019 
























White Fund 




















Totals 


23,228 


970 


24,7«8 


461 


118 







Public Works Department 



43 



The photographic service furnished by the Repro- 
duction Unit includes photographing all locations of new 
highway layouts and other proposed improvements; 
lands taken for municipal purposes; progress of public 
works projects; snowstorm and other emergency con- 
ditions. Following is a summary of such work for the 
year 1960: 



Department 


Negatives 


4x5 Prints On 


8x10 Prints 


Public Works: 


1,200 

215 
25 

340 

210 

30 


1,200 


32 




420 


Maintenance Branch 




25 


Highway Division . . 


250 
180 
30 


90 




30 


Water Division 








Totals 


2,020 


1.660 


697 







44 



City Document No. 18 



Z 

u 

> 
a 





o 

.2 
Q 


'a "a 'a a 
:: § S g 

CO d oo' d 


1 . 

1 




.205 


•§■ •§■ a' •§ 
2 S 2 2 


'a 

o 




00 

.2&h" 

.Ik 

Q 


6.03 mi. 
3.40 mi. 
4. 16 mi. 
1.59 mi. 


'a 

00 






7.13 mi. 
5.40 mi. 
6. 11 mi. 
4. 18 mi. 


a 




CD 


■§ a' i i 

2 5 S So 


'a 

O 




U5 

I" 


i i i i 

§ S ^ 8 


3 




.2-- 


5.86 mi. 
4.20 mi. 
5.34 mi. 
1.23 mi. 


'a 
S 

CD 




is 


4.77 mi. 
5.33 mi. 
4.18 mi. 
1.01 mi. 


a 
n 

12 




1^ 

5 


8.08 mi. 
3.92 mi. 
5.96 mi. 
2.79 mi. 


1 




aJ 


9.92 mi. 
8.19 mi. 
9.91 mi. 
3.23 mi. 


'a 




i 

•< 

! 

u 


i 


•i 


1 






1 








Public Works Department 45 

TABLE 3 
SURVEY SECTION WORK 

Following is a report of the major works accomplished 
by the Survey Section in the year 1960: 

Thirty-four surveys and plans were made for the 
laying out of 3.4 miles of public highways as follows: 

District Length 

in Feet 
Brighton 

Langley road 400 

Hopedale street 2 

Dorchester 

Baker court 550 

Corman street 820 

Elm Lawn 480 

Itasca street 1,500 

Manor street 800 

Matignon street 200 

Menton street 310 

Merola park 400 

Park street 860 

Hyde Park 

Ashville road 400 

Beech street 1,100 

Buckingham street 500 

Greenbrook road 590 

Harvard avenue 100 

Lodgehill road 500 

Maida terrace 200 

Providence street 400 

Ransom road 400 

ROXBURY 

Copenger street 185 

South Boston 

Lincoln park 125 

Webb park 125 



46 



City Document No. 18 



District 
West Roxbury 

Birchland terrace 
Brookstone street 
Chester place 
Cornauba street 



Length 
in Feet 

200 

100 

250 

630 

Centre street 2,300 

Hackensack terrace 300 

Metropolitan terrace 220 

Stimson street 1,000 

Swan street 360 

Twenty-six surveys and plans were made for the 
widening and relocation of one mile of pubUc highways 
as follows: 

Boston Proper 
Allen street 
Blossom street 
Staniford street 1,000 

Brighton 

Wirt street 

Dorchester 

Ceylon street at Quincy street . 

Roxbury 

Longwood avenue 

St. Alphonsus street 

Binney street .... 

West Roxbury 

Ashland avenue .... 
Canterbury street .... 
Bardwell street at South street . 
Bardwell street at Ballard street 
Florence street at Poplar street . 
Florence street at Murray Hill road 
Florence street at Rowe street . 
Florence street at Hawthorne street 
Florence street at Bexley road . 
Florence street at Sycamore street 
Robin street at La Grange street 
Sycamore street at Prospect street 
Sycamore street at Brookdale street 
Sycamore street at Ridge street 

Hyde Park 

Harvard street at Winthrop street 
West street at Hyde Park avenue 
at Central avenue 
at Elm street 



700 



250 

85 

130 

1,300 

20 

620 
550 
38 
31 
34 
20 

38 
33 
37 
23 
41 
41 
33 

120 
120 



Public Works Department 47 

Five surveys and plans were made for the discon- 
tinuance of 0.29 miles of public highways as follows: 

Length 
District in Feet 

Dorchester 

Enterprise street 185 

Shirley street 82 

South Boston 

Gillette park 831 

Granite street 190 

West Roxbury 

Germania street 227 

One survey and plan was made for the discontinuance 
of the following sewer easement: 
Brighton 

Washington street 100 

Fifteen surveys and plans were made for the taking 
of 1.4 miles of easements for sewerage purposes as fol- 
lows: 
Brighton 

Soldiers Field place 840 

Hyde Park 

Beechmont terrace 976 

Chesterfield street 730 

Crane street 240 

Danny road 25 

Sefton street 400 

West Roxbury 

Belle avenue 800 

Caledonian avenue 140 

Coleman street 127 

Eagle street 780 

Goff street 375 

Heron street 1,260 

Northdale Road Extension 600 

Rockwood terrace 540 

Stella road 220 



48 



City Document No. 18 



Twenty-six profiles for highway 
made as follows (2.3 miles) : 

District 
Boston Proper 
Eastern avenue 

Brighton 

Hopedale street 

Dorchester 

Gorman road . 
Annapolis street 
Evandale terrace 
Menton road . 
Park street 

Hyde Park 

Buckingham street 
Greenbrook road . 
Lawton street 
Maida terrace 
Providence street . 

West Roxbury 
Ashland avenue 
Brook Farm road 
Brookway road 
Gentre street . 
Florence street 
Florian street 
Highfield road 
Hackensack road 
Ivory street . 
Joyce Kilmer road 
Pleasantdale road 
Swan street . 
Tobin road 
Walk Hill street at Harvard street 



construction were 

Length 
in Feet 



340 

150 

450 
300 
300 
200 
860 

400 
590 
600 
200 
300 

1,000 
300 
100 

3,000 
360 
300 
650 
150 
334 
225 
100 
360 
400 
200 



Twenty-three profiles for sewer construction were 
made as follows (2.3 miles) : 

Length 
District in Feet 

Brighton 

Soldiers Field road 2,5C0 



Public Works Department 49 

Length 

District in Feet 
Charlestown 

Bartlett street 180 

High street 240 

Pearl street 390 

School street 440 

Slimmer street 180 

Dorchester 

Balina place 500 

Violet street 600 

Delhi street 230 

French street 360 

Hyde Park 

Danny road — 

Norway park 800 

Raldne road 1,000 

Pleasantdale street 300 

Silvia court 315 

Stonehill road 120 

West Roxbury 

Ashland avenue 100 

Beechmont terrace 680 

Belle avenue 1,250 

Burroughs street 1,320 

Macullar street — 

Northdale road 450 

Northdale terrace 135 

Seven sidewalk assessment plans were made as fol- 
lows (1.9 miles): 

Dorchester 

Carruth street 1,800 

Richmond street 1,000 

Savin Hill avenue 1,590 

Woodhaven street 1,700 

Hyde Park 

Drury road 200 

West Roxbury 

Bogandale road 800 

Centre street 3,000 



50 City Document No. 18 

Eight sewerage assessment plans were made as fol- 
lows (0.8 mile) : 

Length 
District in Feet 

Brighton 

Soldiers Field road 900 

Dorchester 

Balina place 150 

Violet street 200 

Hyde Park 

Chesterfield street 700 

Sefton street 400 

West Roxbury 

Belle avenue 800 

Northdale Road Extension 600 

Rockwood terrace 540 

Stone Bounds. In accordance with a policy estab- 
lished in 1950, stone bounds were set and drilled on the 
following locations: 

District Number 

Hyde Park 

Asheville road 4 

Lodgehill road 3 

Magee street 3 

Ruffing street 2 

Rainier road 4 

Sherrin street 4 

Sierra road 2 

West Roxbury 

Altacrest road 1 

Gilmore terrace 2 

Pleasantdale road 2 

27 



Public Works Department 51 

Fifteen surveys and plans were made for minimum 
pavements as follows (1.1 miles): 

Length 
District in Feet 

Dorchester 

Banfield avenue 450 

Delhi street 325 

Itasca street 275 

Hyde Park 

Danny road 250 

Leseur road 150 

Lodgehill road 450 

Prospect park 300 

Windham road 1,500 

West Roxbury 

Baker Street Extension 275 

Birchland terrace 200 

Maplewood street 550 

Martinwood road 360 

Miami terrace 200 

Salman street 410 

Vogel street 350 

For the Public Works Department, Highway Division, 
thirtj^-six streets were staked out for construction. 

For the Public Works Department, Sewer Division, 
forty-four catch basins were staked out. 

Surveys and plans were made for specific repairs and 
widenings on Commonwealth avenue, Brighton, from 
Chestnut Hill avenue to Warren street, and Walter 
street, Hyde Park, at Davison street and at Pierce 
street. 

Fourteen requests for information relative to line 
and grade were received from private engineers and 
other agencies, and data furnished. 

For the Public Works Department, Sanitary Division, 
the following information was furnished: 

Albany Street Yard, topographical survey and plan. 

Hallet Street Dump, Dorchester, topographical survey 
and plan. 

Condor Street City Yard, East Boston, topographical 
survey and plan. 

Gardner Street Dump, West Roxbury, topographical 
survey and plan. 



52 City Document No. 18 

For the Public Works Department, Water Division, 
line, grade, and staking out was furnished for Meyer 
court and Meyer street. West Roxbury, and survey and 
plan for water easement in Centre street, West Rox- 
bury. 

Survey, plotting, and calculations were made in con- 
nection with proposed extension of the Government 
Center. 

Plans of city -owned property were made for the Real 
Property Department as follows: 

Charlestown 

Rutherford avenue (city yard) 

Dorchester 

Boston Sanatorium 
Mathew street (city yard) 

Roxbury 

Atkinson street (city yard) 

Washington street at Egleston square (fire station) 

South Boston 

Broadway and Dorchester avenue 

West Roxbury 

Centre street and Walter street (city yard) 

For the Building Department survey and plans were 
made for Wall street, Charlestown and East Lenox 
street, Roxbury (Green Shoe Company). 

For the School Department survey and plan was 
made of West Springfield street. City (Dwight School). 

For the Law Department surveys and plans were 
furnished for Stuart street. City, and Sydney and Car- 
son streets, Dorchester. 

For the Library Department survey, plan, and cross- 
sections were made of Parmenter street. City. 



Public Works Department 



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58 



City Document No. 18 



Table 1 
Table 2 
Table 3 
Table 4 
Table 5 
Table 6 
Table 7 
Table 8 
Table 9 



APPENDIX D 
HIGHWAY DIVISION 

- Work Done by Contract 

- Street Construction Work 

- Highway Maintenance Work 

- Catch Basins 

- New Street Lights 

- Street Sign Work 

- Drawbridge Expenditures 

- Waterborne Traffic 

- Mileage and Area of Pavements 

TABLE I 
WORK DONE BY CONTRACT IN 1960 



Item 



Earth and services excavation 

Rock and well excavation 

Bank gravel 

Crushed stone for edgestone 

Existing base removed 

Existing pavement removed 

New straight edgestone . 

New circular edgestone . 

New two-foot radius corners 

Existing edgestone reset or relocated 

Edgestone hauled to yard or disposed of 

Crushed stone for macadam base . 

OA asphalt 

Portland cement concrete base 
Bituminous concrete base, roadway 
Portland cement concrete for backing 

sidewalk 

Bituminous concrete top, roadway 
Bituminous concrete base, sidewalk 
Bituminous concrete top, sidewalk 
Sheet asphalt top 
Artificial stone sidewalks 
Artificial stone driveways 
Loam spaces 

Loam back of sidewalks . 
Covers reset 

Catch basins and manholes rebuilt 
Catch basins and drop inlets built 
Street sign posts set or reset . 
Stone bounds .... 



Total Areas 
Bituminous concrete pavement 
Sheet asphalt pavement . 



Quantity 
42,067 cubic yards 

1 ,033 cubic yards 
32,510 tons 

1,708 tons 

6,126 square yards 
18,686 square yards 
20,444 lineal feet 

7,909 lineal feet 
872 
49,373 lineal feet 

6,451 hneal feet 
11,923 tons 
110,456 gallons 

1,928 cubic yards 
24,066 tons 

35 cubic yards 
18,287 tons 
618 tons 
779 tons 
548 tons 
690,009 square feet 
106,523 square feet 
1,096 square yards 
1,008 cubic yards 
2,112 
84 
57 
219 
92 

266,245 square yards 
6,900 square yards 



TABLE SHOWINQ LENGTH AND AREA OF PAVING ON ACCEPTED STREETS, CORRECTED TO JANUARY I, 1961 



Square Yards 





Asplllt 


tAsphalt 
Concrete 


*§K" 


Wood 
Block 


Plank 


Brick 


§Con- 


IIMacadam 


Gravel 


Not 
Graded 


Totals Sheet 
Asphalt 


tAsphalt 
Concrete 


""b:^ 


Wood 
Block 


Plank 
Bridges 


Brick 


§Concrete 


IIMacadam 


Gravel 


G^^'ed 


Totals 


Year 1959 Report.... 


214.33 
28.28 


397.59 
52.46 


21.17 
2.79 


0.10 
0.01 


0.34 
0.04 


0.19 
0.03 


17.16 
2.26 


97.97 
12.93 


8.33 
1.10 


0.76 
0.10 


757.94 
100.00 


4,306,689 
29.18 


7.879,339 
53.38 


462,996 
3.13 


1,881 
0.01 


9,068 
0.06 


5.408 
0.04 


362,409 
2.46 


1,564,909 
10.60 


138,367 
0.94 


29.227 
0.20 


14,760,293 
100.00 




JANTIAET 1, 1961 


46.43 
4.30 
2.85 
10.42 
37.58 
31.19 
52.16 
19.64 


34.17 

25.91 
23.11 
41.86 
107.96 
94.70 
37.11 
34.91 


6.21 
4.62 
2.33 
4.81 
2.29 
0.03 
0.48 

0.00 


0.01 
0.06 


0.09 
0.02 
0.02 
0.03 


0.16 
0.01 


2.86 
0.74 
1.39 
0.32 
3.93 
1.23 
5.12 
0.78 
0.24 


2.19 
4.75 
6.53 
5.00 
9.37 
19.11 
27.13 
8.03 
10.26 


0.39 
0.03 
0.10 
0.12 
0.18 
1.30 
1.43 
0.23 
3.07 


0.01 
0.04 
0.50 
0.08 
0.00 
0.03 

0.12 


92.51 
22.64 
39.17 
44.31 
95.31 
160.86 
181.13 
66.16 
56.45 


1,053,178 
84,708 
60,931 
217,587 
767,802 
551,828 
989,185 
422,902 
134,015 


780,704 
215,468 
581,492 
494,675 
814,005 
1,976,225 
1,814,533 
748,360 
654,498 


128,127 

101,114 

48,427 

128,830 

25,715 

997 

8,946 

16,526 

32 


40 
1.503 


3,258 
1,098 
317 
892 


3,025 

1.055 
1.183 

145 


91,413 
13,487 
47,177 
18,780 
60,517 
17,634 
82.171 
19.204 
3.898 


33,252 
65,895 
146,549 
79,224 
132,732 
315,130 
417,297 
128,121 
164,568 


7,023 
407 
1,982 
1,349 
2,166 
23,056 
23,854 
3,417 
50,168 


41 
812 
15.754 
1.825 
4.000 
3.337 
50 
3,408 


2,100,020 

483,721 

887,687 

958.146 

1.805.945 

2.889.753 

3.340.791 

1.338,8U 

1.010,891 






South Boston 


WestRojtbury 


0.03 


0.04 
0.04 
0.08 
0.02 


338 


983 
985 
1,231 
304 


Bri hton 








212.40 
28.00 


407.84 
63.77 


21.06 
2.78 


0.10 
0.01 


0.34 
0.04 


0.19 
0.03 


16.61 
2.19 


92.37 
12.18 


6.85 
0.90 


0.78 
0.10 


758.54 
100.00 


4,282,136 
28.90 


8,079,960 
54.54 


457,714 
3.09 


1,881 
0.01 


9,068 
0.06 


5,408 
0.04 


354.181 


1,482.768 
10.01 


113.422 
0.76 


29,227 
0.20 




Percent 


100.00 



Total Public Streets 758.54 Miles 

Note. — In the above table the city is subdivided substantially on the boundary lines between the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory annexed from Brookline included in City Proper. 

■ 299,468 t Of this 1 

or 32,80! 

, block. a°d 0.0; 



X Of this amount 0.02 miles or 185 square yards is cobble: and 10.85 mi 

square yards is granite block paving on concrete base. 
§ Of this amount 0.06 miles or 435 square yards is Blome granitoid 
II Of this amount 81.45 miles or 1,321,423 square yards is bituminous 



, 53.01 
or 32,808 square yards 
and 0.03 miles or 595 squ, 
miles or 518 square yards i 
2,224 square yards is Asphalt Block. 



)55 square yards public alleys included in this table; 1.89 miles or 61,141 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 15.90 miles or 55 
public streetfi in charge of Commonwealth of Massachusetts included in this table. In aHdition to this table there are 2.45 miles or 11,845 square yards of accepted footways. 



551.363 square yards 



Public Works Department 59 

TABLE 2 
STREET CONSTRUCTION WORK 

The following is a summarized record of the highway 
improvement work done by the department in 1960. 
Number of streets constructed or reconstructed 81 

This total included twenty-four new streets 
laid out and constructed as public ways 
under the provisions of Chapter 393, Acts 
of 1906. 

Streets improved 13.16 miles 

This included one-third of a mile recon- 
structed as a Chapter 90 project. 

Street Construction Work 
(Exclusive of Chapter 90 Projects) 

The following is a summarized financial statement 
of the expenditures made in 1960 for highway improve- 
ments: 

Highway 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) $1,831,004 77 
Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue 

Accounts) 171,784 87 

Reconstruction of Streets 1,447 39 

Reconstruction of Sidewalks .... 15 45 

Reconstruction of Sidewalks .... 147 80 



$2,004,400 28 



Bridge 

Bridges, Construction of (Loan Account) . $21,650 69 
Bridges, Repair of (Structures and Improve- 
ments) 1,211 37 



$22,862 06 



Chapter 90 
Projects Under Construction in 1960 

Bid Price 
Commonwealth avenue, Brighton . . , $414,135 50 

(Warren street to Chestnut Hill avenue) 
Beacon street (Kenmore square to Brookline 

Line) 56,397 00 

Baker street. West Roxbury .... 48,967 42 

(VFW Parkway to Spring street) 



60 City Document No. 18 

There were eighty-one streets constructed or re- 
constructed during the year. Some of the more im- 
portant thoroughfares on which reconstruction work 
was completed in 1960 are as follows: 

Atkinson street, from South Bay avenue to approximately 

400 feet southerly 
South Bay avenue, from Atkinson street to Moore street 
Robinwood avenue, from Centre street to Rockview street 
Drury road, from Sunnyside avenue to dead end 
Warren avenue, from Truman Highway to Summit street 
Central avenue, from Webster street to River street 
Oakland street, from Washington street to Faneuil street 
Savin Hill avenue, from Hubbardston road easterly to Old 

Colony terrace 
Woodhaven street, from Blue Hill avenue to Cummins Highway 
Bogandale road, from Centre street to approximately 793 feet 

easterly and southerly 
lona street, from Belgrade avenue to Beech street 
Landseer street, from Centre street to La Grange street 
Potomac street, from Vermont street to Jennett avenue 
Redlands road, from Centre street to Alameda road 
Theodore Parker road, from Weld street to Halford road 
Beacon street, at Cleveland Circle 

Charlotte street, from Blue Hill avenue to Bradshaw street 
Harlem street, from Glenway street to Greenwood street 
Carruth street, from Ashmont street to Gallivan Boulevard 
Elmer road, from Carruth street to Adams street 
Pierce avenue, from Adams street to Plain street 
Richmond street, from Dorchester avenue to Adams street 
Greaton road, from Esther road to Weld street 
Willow street, from Centre street to Farrington road 
Baker street (Chapter 90), from Cutter road to Spring street 
Fletcher street, from South street to Montclair avenue 
Concord street, from Monument square to Bunker Hill street 
Frankfort street, from Maverick street to Porter street 
Pleasant street, from Main street to High street 



Public Works Department 



61 



TABLE 3 
HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE WORK 



Brick sidewalks relaid .... 

Artificial stone sidewalks, new 

Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid 

Bituminous concrete sidewalks, relaid . 

Artificial stone sidewalks and bitumi- 
nous concrete roadways temporarily 
patched 

Bituminous concrete and asphalt road- 
ways permanently patched 

Edgestone reset 

Catch basins cleaned .... 



535 square yards 
1,974 square feet 
192,393 square feet 
2,068 square yards 



26,162 square yards 

21,975 square yards 
1,748 hnealfeet 
2,070 



TABLE 4 
CATCH BASINS IN SYSTEM 



Catch Basins fob Twelve Months 
Ending December 31, 1960 


Totals fob Whole City 
IN Charge of Division 


District 


Number 
Built or 
RebuUt 


Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed 


Net 
Increase 


Previous 
Report to 
January 1, 


Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1961 


ity Proper 





4 

19 
37 
12 
29 







10 








4 

9 
37 
12 
29 


3,801 
3.560 
1,521 
1,227 
871 
2,145 
4,659 
5,745 
1.486 


3,801 




3,560 


outh Boston. 


1,521 




1,231 


harlestown . . 


871 


righton 


2,154 




4,696 


)orclxe8ter 


5,757 


fyde Park 


1,515 






Totals . . 


101 


10 


91 


25,015 


25 106 







62 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE 5 
STREET LIGHTING 

Street lighting, which has always been a function of 
the Highway Division, has the custody of approxi- 
mately 28,715 street Ughts, varying from 2/200 lumens 
to the 20,000-volt mercury lights. 

Mercury Vapor Lighting Projects 

In 1960 orders were issued on the following listed 
streets, main throughfares, and business areas for 
rehghting with modern mercury vapor hghting: 



Bennington street, East Boston . 
Bennington street, East Boston . 
Brighton avenue, Brighton . 
Commonwealth avenue, Brighton 
Walley street, East Boston . 



Units 


Each 


10 single 


20,000 


3 twin 


20,000 


1 single 


20,000 


1 single 


20,000 


1 single 


20,000 



Incandescent Lighting Projects 

In 1960 orders were issued for the installation of new 
and the replacement of old lighting units as follows : 

Lumens 
Units Each 
Clapp street, Dorchester 
Cottage street. East Boston 
Norfolk street, Dorchester . 
Porter street, East Boston . 
North Bennet street, Boston 
Enterprise street, Dorchester 
Fleet street, Boston 
South street, West Roxbury 
Sarsfield street, Roxbury 
Winchester street, Boston . 
Bradlee street, Hyde Park . 
Cedarwood street, Dorchester 
Dodge road, Hyde Park 
Enterprise street, Dorchester 
Elton street, Dorchester 
Eldridge road. West Roxbury 
Farwell avenue, Hyde Park 
Florian Way, West Roxbury 
Gartland street, West Roxbury 
Hillcroft road. West Roxbury 
Oakman street, Brighton 
Orlando street, Brighton 







1 single 


6,000 






12 single 


6,000 






4 single 


6,000 






2 single 


6,000 






1 single 


4,000 






1 single 


4,000 






4 single 


4,000 






3 single 


4,000 






1 single 


4,000 






1 single 


4,000 






8 single 


2,500 






6 single 


2,500 






1 single 


2,500 






5 single 


2,500 






3 single 


2,500 






7 single 


2,500 






3 single 


2,500 






2 single 


2,500 






3 single 


2,500 






4 single 


2,500 






1 single 


2,500 






1 single 


2,500 



Public Works Department 63 







Lumens 




Units 


Each 


Pheasant street, West Roxbury . 


3 single 


2,500 


Rice street, Dorchester 


1 single 


2,500 


Romsey street, Dorchester . 


4 single 


2,500 


Rockdale street, Dorchester 


11 single 


2,500 


Sagamore street, Dorchester 


9 single 


2,500 


Wahiut street, Dorchester . 


3 single 


2,500 


Waldridge street, Brighton . 


3 single 


2,500 


Wessex street, Dorchester . 


2 single 


2,500 


TABLE 6 






STREET SIGNS 







The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs : 
Erected 109 6-inch street signposts 
Erected 5 new hero signs for dedication 
Replaced 11 broken hero signs with new hero signs 
Regilded 245 metal hero signs 

Replaced 65 wooden hero signs with new metal hero signs 
Installed 473 baked enamel signs 
Installed 91 hand painted signs 
Removed 278 old hand painted signs, damaged baked enameled 

signs, and obliterated signs 
Repaired 94 bent or broken 4-inch street signposts 
Straightened 27 welded 4-inch posts 

Repaired 391 broken street sign frames and collars, in black- 
smith shop 
Repaired and adjusted 301 street frames, collars, and brackets 

on 4-inch posts and light poles on locations 
Removed 1,304 pieces of rope, wire, old tires, political signs 

from 4-inch posts, frames, and light poles 
Installed 395 street sign frames on 4-inch street signposts, 

light poles, and wooden poles 
Installed 215 street collars on 4-inch posts and light poles 
Installed 72 pairs of adapters on wooden poles 
Installed 119 4-inch acorns on 4-inch street signposts 
Installed 91 "Private Way" signs on 4-inch posts, light poles, 

and wooden poles 
Removed 41 "Private Way" signs because public waj^s were 

made 
Painted 1 ,344 4-inch posts and hero signposts for May 30 
Painted 965 street sign frames 
Painted 639 4-inch acorns 

Painted 786 street sign collars on 4-inch posts and light poles 
Washed and cleaned 517 street sign name plates 
Painted 117 blanks for temporary name plates 
Removed 76 broken or badly bent 4-inch posts from location 

and repaired sidewalks 



64 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE 7 

DETAILS OF EXPENDITURES ON TIDEWATER BRIDGES 

FOR THE YEAR I960 



Bridge 


Draw- 
tenders ' 
Salaries 


1 

Mechanics ' Material 
Wages 


Repair 
Bills 


Supplies, 

UtiUiies, 

Etc. 


Total 


Charles town 


$22,701 28 
62,550 52 
45,936 78 
68,054 73 
63,658 28 
63,929 23 

50,597 55 

49,674 38 


$4,084 59 
1,858 24 
3,528 60 
2,447 41 
3,351 77 
6,874 15 

6,554 45 

5,061 09 


$27 00 $278 50 
10 45 P>fi 00 


$1,343 95 

762 21 

641 07 

739 25 

1,151 18 

2,014 93 

601 38 

448 39 


$28,435 32 
65,239 42 
50,295 37 
71,419 07 
68,798 37 
74,576 74 

58,452 98 

55,759 32 


Chelsea Street. . 


Congress Street 

Maiden 

Andrew P. McArdle. . . . 

Northern Avenue 

Summer Street (Fort 
Point Channel) 

Summer Street (L Street) 
(Reserved Channel) . . 


97 87 

112 68 

272 91 

1,239 48 

699 60 

359 75 


91 05 

65 00 

364 23 

518 95 

215 62 


Totals. . . 


$427,102 75 


$33,760 30 


$2,819 74 


$1,591 35 


$7,699 36 


$472 976 50 







Public Works Department 



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66 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX E 

SANITARY DIVISION 

Table 1 — Payments to Refuse Collection Contractors 
Table 2 — Summary of Expenditures 
Table 3 — Incinerator Performance 
Table 4 — Incinerator Tonnage Burned 
Table 5 — Incinerator Fiscal Account 



Public Works Department 



67 



TABLE 1 
PAYMENTS TO REFUSE COLLECTION CONTRACTORS 



PAYMENTS FOR RENTAL OF DUMPS 

Saugus Dewey E. Daggett $2,000 

Total Payments to Contractors for Refuse Collection and Hire of Dump 



District 


Contractor 


Monthly 

Contract 

Price 


Total 
Payments 


lA Charlestown .... 


Jeffries Disposal Corporation 


$5,500 
12,200 
4,200 
2,940 

6,550 
11,369 
24,630 
14,499 
11,990 
11,990 
27,430 
6,690 
9,800 
4,998 
7 500 


$66,000 
146,400 
50 400 


IB North and West Ends.. 
IC Back Bay 


Ward General Contracting Company 

Dooley Brothers Inc . . . 






35,280 


IE South End 


United Contracting Company, Inc., of 
Boston 




78,600 
136,428 
295.560 
173 988 


2 Jamaica Plain 


J J. Moore Company, Inc 






4 Brighton. . . 


F J Cavaliere & Co Inc 


5 South Boston 


J. F. Ryan, Inc 


143.880 
143,880 
329.160 






7 Dorchester (South) . . . 


Dooley Brothers Inc .... 


8 Hyde Park 




9 East Boston. . . . 


Jeffries Disposal Corporation 


117,600 
59,976 
on nnn 


lOA Elm HiU 




lOB Dudley 




IOC Mission Hill 


United Contracting Company, Inc., of 






7,300 
7,460 


87 600 






89,520 






Total 






$2 124 552 










$24,000 
$2,148,552 



68 City Document No. 18 

TABLE 2 
EXPENDITURES 

Expenditures in 1960 

Payments to refuse collection contractors . . . $2,124,552 00 
Payments for rental of Saugus Dump .... 24,000 00 

Total collection contract and dump rental payments $2,148,552 00 



Payroll totals were as follows 

Administrative and General Services . $58,892 80 

Collection supervision 266,773 90 

Street cleaning (January to June) 879,020 44 

Shops and storehouse (January to June) . 61,436 55 
Special cleaning (Dempster-Dumpster, 

market and alleys) 247,321 10 

151,344 79 



Disposal: 

Incinerator $353,838 29 

Dumps 50,392 10 

404,230 39 

Total payroll $1,917,675 18 



Overtime payrolls were as follows: 

Collection, supervision, and special 

cleaning $11,502 38 

Street cleaning (January to June) . . 14,329 64 
Disposal — incinerator and dumps . 33,208 32 

Total overtime payrolls $59,040 14 

Total Sanitary Division payroll $1,976,715 52 



Incinerator operation and maintenance costs (other than 

labor) $60,770 04 

Payments on other contracts 9,668 86 

Supplies and materials (other than incinerator) . . . 20,190 80 

Miscellaneous 6,188 46 

Grand total of expenditures $4,222,085 68 



Public Works Department 69 

TABLE 3 
SOUTH BAY INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE 

Expenditures 

Personal services $339,483 60 

Contractual services for maintenance of 

incinerator, including utilities 22,491 04 
Supplies and materials for operation of 

incinerator excluding fuel oil . . 15,772 83 

Fuel oil 5,452 26 

Insurance costs 1,537 08 

Equipment 630 90 

Maintenance costs and depreciation: 

Charges for three residue trucks, one 

jeep, and one bulldozer .... 25,046 25 

Total operational cost .... $410,413 96 
Loan amortization 429,650 00 

Total chargeable expenditures for 1960 . . . $840,063 96 



Performance 

The South Bay Incinerator served an area with a population of 



approximately 380,000 during 1960. 

Source and amount of refuse received at incinerator: 



Contractors 

Sanitary Division, dumpsters 
Sanitary Division, alley service . 
Sanitary Division, market detail 
City Hospital .... 
Private dumpers .... 



Total tonnage from all sources . 
Revenue received from private dumpers 



111,514 tons 

3,391 tons 

1,726 tons 

10,311 tons 

955 tons 

539 tons 

128,436 tons 



$3,005 00 



Operational Data 

$410,413 96 = $3.20 per ton cost for incineration. 
128,436 

$410,413 96= $1.08 per capita cost for incineration excluding loan 

' 380 000 amortization. 

$840^063 96 = $2.21 per capita cost for incineration including loan 

380 000 amortization. 

$410,413 96 = $ .64 per cubic yard cost for incineration excluding 

642 180 loan amortization. 

$840,063 96 = $1.31 per cubic yard cost for incineration including 

642,180 lo^^ amortization. 

128,436 X 2,0 00=676 pounds of refuse per capita. 
380,000 



70 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE 4 
SOUTH BAY INCINERATOR TONNAGE BURNED 





Contractor 


Private 


Alley 


Dumpster 


Market 


Hospital 


January 

February 

March 


7,997.19 
8,148.76 
9,110.23 
9,174.03 
9,683.70 
9,921.11 
7,963.21 
9,741.74 
9,976.64 
9,970.20 
9,454.16 
10,372.75 


13.44 
58.32 
25.73 
92.48 
29.34 
49.29 
34.58 
66.72 
43.44 
49.38 
44.52 
41.64 


153.81 
164.84 
193.17 
112.94 
137.84 
163.26 
123.96 
163.59 
114.51 
120.70 
123.23 
154.49 


263.49 
281.33 
286.86 
296.60 
305.37 
267.39 
270.13 
331.76 
296.12 
304.62 
243.00 
244.53 


1.103.80 

1,034.40 

931.30 

1,166.45 

1,026.60 

1,072.80 

945.50 

643.74 

628.19 

586.59 

567.90 

603.90 


51.76 
121.23 
120.84 


AprU 


154.94 


May 


109.27 




105.66 


July, . 


109.27 




109.20 


September 


72.59 






Uecember 








Totals 


111,513.72 


538.88 


1,726.34 


3,391.20 


10,311.17 


954.76 



Gross over-all tonnage received 128,436.07. 



TABLE 5 

FISCAL ACCOUNT OF THE SOUTH BAY INCINERATOR 

FOR I960 





Dumping 
Fees 


Dump 
Ticket 

Sales 


Total 
Revenue 


Deposits 
with 

Collector 


January 


$48 75 
312 65 
135 90 
161 75 
150 75 
240 00 
195 00 
365 25 
221 25 
231 05 
287 50 
230 50 


$25 00 
50 00 

300 00 
25 00 

25 00 


$73 75 
362 65 
135 90 
461 75 
150 75 
240 00 

220 00 
365 25 

221 25 
231 05 
287 50 
255 50 






$73 75 


March 


362 65 




597 65 


j^jay 






150 75 




240 00 




220 00 




365 25 


October 


427 80 




175 75 




391 75 








$2,580 35 


$425 00 


$3,005 35 


$3,005 35 







Public Works Department 



71 






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72 



City Document No. 18 



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74 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX F 
SEWER DIVISION 

Table 1 — Sewerage Works Contracts 

Table 2 — Sewer Construction 1960 

and Summary of System 



Public Works Department 



75 



TABLE 2 
SEWER CONSTRUCTION, 1960 



Districts. 


Total 
Lengths 

Built 
During 
Twelve 
Months 
Ending 
December 
31. 1960. 


Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31. 1960. 


Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31. 1960. 


City Proper. . .... 


Linear Feet 


Linear Feet 


Linear Feet 


Miles 


Roxbury 


63 


970 


—917 


—0.17 


South Boston 






178 




178 


0.03 








Brighton . . . 


1.733 

2,346 

989 

1,834 




1,733 

2.346 

989 

1,834 


0.32 


West Roxbury 




0.44 




0.19 


Hyde Park 




0.35 








Totals 


7,143 


970 


6,226 


1.18 







SUMMARY OF SYSTEM 

Miles. 
Common sewers and surface drains built previous 

to January 1, 1960 . . ... . . 1,302.01 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 

January 1 and December 31, 1960 . . . 1.18 

Common sewers and surface drains built ending 
December 31, 1960 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting with 

metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1960 . . 6.81"* 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers 

to December 31, 1960 24.12=" 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers 
to December 31, 1960 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 

to January 1, 1961 720.61 

* No change during 1960. 



1,303.19 



30.93 



1,334.12 



76 City Document No. 18 

APPENDIX G 

WATER DIVISION 

Table 1 — Appropriations, Expenditures and Revenue 

Table 2 — Meter Work Done in 1960 

Table 3 — Meters in Service December 31, 1960 

Table 4 — Meters in Shop December 31, 1960 

Table 5 — Meters Repaired in Shop in 1960 

Table 6 — Meters Repaired at Factory in 1960 

Table 7 — Meters Purchased New in 1960 

Table 8 — Meters Reset in 1960 

Table 9 — Meters Changed in 1960 — Taken Out 

Table 10 — Meters Changed in 1960 — Put In 

Table 11 — Meters Repaired in Service in 1960 

Table 12 — Meters Apphed in 1960 

Table 13 — Meters Discontinued in 1960 

Table 14 — Meters Changed — Reasons For 

Table 15 — Meters Junked 

Table 16 — Length of Pipe and Number of Valves in 

Service 
Table 17 — Hydrants in System 
Table 18 — Replacement of Main Pipe Costs 
Table 19 — Extension of Main Pipe Costs 
Table 20 — Business Office Work Orders 



Public Works Department 77 

TABLE I 

APPROPRIATIONS, EXPENDITURES AND REVENUE 

Budget appropriation $2,804,000 00 

Amount expended 5,983,171 82 

Amount collected from all sources 6,136,198 46 

Amount expended from all sources 6,115,136 26 

Surplus $21,062 20 

Balances from 1959: 

Receipts $54,043 89 

Appropriation 71,318 28 

$125,362 17 

Receipts: 

Water Rates and Services . . $6,072,041 96 

Tax Titles, Water 64,156 50 

6,136,198 46 

$6,261,560 63 



Expenditures: 

Pensions and Annuities . 
Water Service . 
Refund . . . . 
MDC Water Assessment 
Collecting, Water 
Automotive, Water . 



$238,937 80 

2,076,807 09 

2,286 65 

3,386,461 28 

164,246 00 

114,433 00 



$5,983,171 82 



Transfer of 1959 Surplus 



$278,388 81 
54,043 89 



$224,344 92 



Carried For\\'ard to 1961 Water Division 
Surplus 12/31/60 .... 



203,282 72 
$21,062 20 



The metropolitan assessment for 1960 amounted to $3,386,461.28 at 
the rate of $80 per million gallons, an increase of $147,150.24 over the as- 
sessment of 1959, based on the .$80 per million gallon rate. 

Total amount billed for 1960 $6,304,992 74 

Total amount collected for 1960 bills, use as of De- 
cember 31, 1960 4,557,387 94 

Total amount abated for 1960 bills, as of December 31, 

1960 7,308 90 

Total amount collected in 1960 on bills rendered 

prior to 1960 409,385 80 



78 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE 2 
METER WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR 1960 



Make 


a 
•< 


3 

.9 
Q 


Meter 
Changes 


.g 

1 


a 

il 


a 

h 


1 






Out 


In 


>-> 




527 
28 

1 


1,268 
60 
3 
4 


4,986 

1,009 

28 

67 


6,621 
71 


547 

141 

1 


1,000 
151 

1 


547 
141 

1 


1,502 
4 


118 


Watch Dog 


7. 


King 


30 




77 
















Federal 






1 












1 




















Nash 






5 
















1 




4 


7 


4 


7 


2 
















































1 


4 












1 


















Pitt 


























1,327 


913 




























Total 


557 


1.336 


7,429 


7,611 


696 


1,158 


696 


1,508 


306 







Public Works Department 



79 



TABLE 3 
METERS IN SERVICE, DECEMBER 31, 1960 

Diameter in Inches 



Make 


% 


Vi 


1 


IK2 


2 


3 


4 


6 


■ 


10 


12 


Total 




73,915 

5,785 

265 

793 

44 

16 


5.435 
185 

7 
6 


2.474 

268 

3 


1,536 

748 
8 
6 


1,041 

361 

3 

3 


366 

223 


431 

71 


127 


34 


10 




85,369 




7,641 


King 










286 
















808 
















44 


Federal 





















16 










1 
1 




1 










3 


Nash 


5 
2 


1 














7 








13 
18 

1 


1 












Arctic. . . 


' 




15 


15 










44 


Trident 


1 

1 


7 










26 


Keystone 


















3 


Empire 




















1 


























Sparling. . 




















































Total 


80,829 


5,635 


2,745 2,313 


1,425 


623 




•?4 


10 








i 1 ! 







TABLE 3 — Continued 
METERS IN SERVICE, DECEMBER 31, I960 

Diameter in Inches 



Make 


% 


Ji 


1 


IM 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 




2,258 
49 


203 

4 


105 
27 


40 
82 


41 
165 


15 
69 


3 

26 


7 
7 


5 
5 






2,678 


City of Boston, connection 


1 


10 


441 






Total ... 


2,307 


207 


132 


122 


206 


84 


29 


14 


10 


1 


10 


3 119 







80 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE 4 
METERS IN SHOP, DECEMBER 31, I960 





Diameter in Inches 






% 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 




782 








10 


8 
8 


2 
4 
7 


1 








803 
















12 














8 


8 






23 













3 


3 






6 
























Total 


782 








13 1 19 


13 


' 


8 






. .844 





















TABLE 5 
METERS REPAIRED IN SHOP IN I960 











Diameter in 


Inches 






Make 


% 


y. 


1 


1^ 


' 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 




205 


19 


29 


120 

55 

1 

4 


■ 37 

76 


3. 
9 


5 
1 






1 


547 


Watch Dog 








141 


King 


















1 










3 














7 
















, 






Total 


205 


" 


29 


180 


216 


41 


6 










696 








■•■y' 





TABLE 6 
METERS REPAIRED AND REBUILT AT FACTORY IN I960 





Diameter in Inches 




Make 
























Total 




% 


Va 


1 


IM 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 





xier ey 


482 
















482 
















■ 






Total 


482 
















482 




















TABLE 7 
METERS PURCHASED NEW IN 


I960 











Diameter in 


Inches 












Make 


% 


% 


1 


\y2 


2 


3|, 


6 


^ 


10 


12 


Total 


Hereey 


5 


30 


30 


50 


15 


15 


5 


2 








152 












Total 


5 


30 


30 


50 


15 


5 


' 


2 








152 













Public Works Department 



81 





TABLE 8 
METERS RESET 


IN I960 
















Diameter in Inches 




Make 


Vs 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 10 12 


Total 


Hersey 


1,381 


es 


23 


14 


14 
3 
2 


2 
1 












1,502 
















Arctic 




















2 














.... 












Total 


1,381 


68 


23 


14 


19 


3 












1,508 














181 


Connection Piece (Out) 
























1 327 





























TABLE 9 
METERS CHANGED IN 1960 — METERS TAKEN OUT 





Diameter in Inches 




Make 


H 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 


Hersey 


4,213 
804 
26 
66 


298 


189 
41 


117 

68 

2 


123 
60 


26 
17 


13 


4 


3 






4,986 

1,009 

28 


Watch Dog 






King 












Worthington 










1 










67 


American 
























Federal 


























Keystone 
























Arctic 








3 


1 


1 
1 














Trident 




















Lambert 


















































Nash 
































1 


1 




1 












Sparling 










































Total 


!5,112 


317 


230 


191 


185 


46 


15 


4 


3 






6,102 











82 



City Document No. 18 

TABLE 10 
METERS CHANGED FN 1960 — METERS PUT IN 











Diameter in 


Inches 












Make 


H 


y^ 


1 


IM 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 


Hershey 


5,682 


346 
1 


229 


163 
51 
2 
3 


145 
16 


35 

2 


18 


3 








6 621 










70 


King 














2 


Arctic 








1 














4 
























Total 


5,682 


347 


229 


219 


162 


37 


18 


3 








6,697 













TABLE 11 
METERS REPAIRED IN SERVICE IN 1960 























1 


•i 


1 

►J 


a 


1 


1 


.3 
2 




Make 


-ID 


1 

a 


1 
a 

I 




1 


a 

e8 


H 


3 




P 


m 


o 


•z 


P3 


H 


rt 


^ 


Hersey 


237 


234 


39 


4 




486 




1,000 


Watch Dog 


57 


46 


7 




1 


40 




151 














1 

1 
1 




1 


Arctic 


2 

1 


1 








4 


Trident 








2 














Total . . . 


297 


281 


46 


4 


1 


529 




1,158 





TABLE 12 
METERS APPLIED IN I960 





Diameter in Inches 




Make 


% 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 




6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 


Hersey 


397 


14 


15 


52 
14 
1 
1 


29 

> 


7 
5 


12 










527 










28 


Arctic 


















1 


King 






















1 



























Total 


397 


14 


15 


63 


38 


12 


12 








557 













Meters applied on old service. . 
Meters applied on new service . 



551 
557 



Public Works Department 



83 



TABLE 13 
METERS DISCONTINUED IN I960 





Diameter in Inches 




Make 


Vi 


*A 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 




1,069 

44 

1 

4 


102 

1 


38 
5 
1 


23 
4 
1 


20 
5 


4 


7 

1 


2 


3 






1.268 
60 








King 










3 




















American 
























Arctic 


























Federal 


























Crown 










■ 














1 


























Nash 


























Sparling 




















































Total . 


1.118 


103 


44 


28 


26 


4 


8 


2 


3 






1,336 









Permanent 357 



Vacancy 



Connection Pieces 913 

TABLE 14 
REASON FOR METER CHANGE IN YEAR I960 



Make 


1 

12: 


1 
1 
1 


1 

.2 


I 
1 


1 
1 


1 

1 


a 

t 
1 

n 
1 


c 

1 
CQ 

1 


1 


£ 


H 


Hersey 


2.906 
630 
57 
18 


48 
12 
1 


522 

107 

12 

4 


112 
10 


38 
2 


74 
4 


39 
14 


112 
29 


203 
16 
2 


27 


4,081 
825 
72 
22 




Worthington . . . 


King 












American 


















Federal 


1 




















\ 


Empire 
















































2 














1 






3 


Trident 










































Nash 


1 
3 






















Crown 




















3 
























Total 


3,618 


61 


645 


122 


40 


78 


53 


142 


221 


28 









84 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE 15 
METERS JUNKED IN I960 











Diameter in 


Inches 












Make 


% 


« 


. 


Wi 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Total 


Hersey 


99 
73 
28 
77 


9 

4 
1 


9 








1 










118 


Watch Dog 




2 












79 


King 


1 
















30 


Worthington 


















77 


























Federal 


1 






















1 






























































1 














1 














































































Total 


278 


14 


10 




3 




1 










306 















Note: Meters lost in service during the year 1960, 250. 



Public Works DapARTMSNT 



85 



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CO 


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s 


S 


ri 








lO 




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CO 






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03 




h 


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s 




















^ 


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03 
















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a 






















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CO 












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CD 


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n 






















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CO 






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in 










£ 




CO 






















CO 








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o 

i 






































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F 


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s 


>!■ 


IT 




c 
















i 

u- 


lO 




CO 






00 


;z 


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?: 






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lO - 










C<' 


c<- 


c 




















CO - 








;? 


i 






















c 














§ 


ir 


c 


2 








: § 










i? 


o to 






o 


ir 














• t- 






















Tf 


o- 






















oc 
















^ 


i? 






















Tt 


"• 








r< 


CT 






















a 














'f 


!£ 






















• CC 














u- 




C 






















o - 








00 


? 


o. 


«: 


'■ 








: 5 










CO - 








■* 


u- 








^ 




















































s 




































fe £ 






































■ -S s 






































la 


































c 




















1 








c 


1 




; 1 




g 


c 








1 


























■c 












fe 








I 


1 




1 


1 


t 


• .£ 




a 


1 
1 

i 
1 


g| 


i 


a 




OO 

£ 






1 




i 
1 


1 

1 




J 


! 1 

11 


1 
1 

i 
1 

D a 


1 

i 


11 
111 


1 


£ 

i 


1 


td 

i 

i 

a 

J3 








s 




S 


J 


1 




& ^ 


> 


g 


1 






to 






"& « 


•s 


t 


i 




°l 


.t 




.h 


i 


« eotc 


_t 


_c 


a 






go 


c 


•< 


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II 



.a 3 



City Document No. 18 



TABLE 17 

TOTAL NUMBER OF HYDRANTS IN SYSTEM, 

DECEMBER 31, 1960 



Hydrants 




1 
1 
1 


1 


1 
1 

O 


|| 
1.9 


1 
1 


1 

c 
< 

6 


1 

.9 
P 


1 

GO 

1 


1 

? 


1 

1 


1 

1 


^ 




426 
33 

3 
423 
33 


240 
5 

240 
5 


2,042 
29 

15 

2,027 

29 


1,938 
126 

25 

1,913 

126 


6,812 
17 
5 
26 

6,791 
17 


2 
13 

2 
13 


56 
66 


13 
13 


4 
4 


67 
111 

67 
111 


22 
53 
62 


108 

7 

115 


11,670 




394 


Added during 1960 


65 




69 


Total PubUc, December 31, I960.. 
Total Private, December 31. I960.. 


11.653 
394 



Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1959 

Total hydrants added during 1960 

Total hydrants abandoned during 1960 . 

Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1960 

High pressure fire hydrants in service 1960 

Total hydrants (all kinds) in service, December 31, 1960 



12,536 
65 
69 

12,060 
469 

12,529 



Public Works Department 



87 



o. 
z 

< 

O 

< 

a 
u 
(^ 

u. 
O 

t/) 

O 



Z 

5 


1 
S 

pa 

o 

03 


q 

5 

'E 

1 


c 

1 

s 

1 


>> 

a 

1 

g 

e 
1 


1 
1 

is 

1 

a 

1 
1 
1 

O 


I 

i 

1 
> 


a 
u 

1 

a 

1 
1 

c 


a 

1 

1 

i 
1 

1 

o 


1 

1 








Is 

1 


§ 










00 

o" 


n 


1 






ci CI 




^5 

2 


jl 








si 


1 i 




s 
i' 




gS^|S|g|g 




11 


OtNOOOOOOOOOOJO 






1 


IS 
IT 

f 


• 1 

■s 

c 

4 


i 
1 


1 


1 

1 

c 


! 
s 
J 

ii 
1 


c 
C 


1 

i 
' 1 


5 




1 




1 

5 


rta50c^'^ooo«r» 




< 




- 




1 (N 


- 


- 




- 











City Document No. 18 



11 

z 

u 
H 
X 
u 

u. 
o 



I 


c5 
1 

a 
1 

a 

1 
1 


Perini Company 
P?rini Company 


o 

a 

o 

I 

i 


c 

U 
c 

1 
c 

6 

1 
1 


1 

E 

O 
1 

1 


Mystic Construction Company 
Mystic Construction Company 


> 


1 

o 

c 
.2 

1 

cS 

1 

1 

o 


J. Freaney Co., Inc. 
J. Freaney Co., Inc. 
Charles & Louis Construction Company 


> 
6 

i 
< 


i 

a 
S 

1 

a 1 

51 


g 
5 
















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g 

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1 


1 
1 


1 
I 


1 

■s 


1 

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c 


1 

1 


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1 


1 


1 

i 


1 

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1 


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1 

£ 




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5 


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CN 


o 


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- 


cs 




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c 


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C' 


c 


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« 









Public Works Department 89 



TABLE 20 
WATER BUSINESS OFFICE 

Main pipe positions received 4 

Domestic service applications 576 

Wire pipe applications 64 

Special meter tests 40 

Hydrant permits issued 13 

Repair deposits received 101 

Miscellaneous 24 

Shutting off and turning on water: 

Shut-offs for repairs 5,288 

Turned on after repairs 4,695 

Shut-off for vacancy 522 

Turned on for occupancy 121 

Shut-off for nonpayment 22 

Shut-off for waste 49 

Turned on after waste 7 

New service pipes turned on 650 

12,176