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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

THE 

I^IRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS & EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

Citij iif Ciinrnrt 

FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 1, 

1854, 

rOGETHEK WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




CONCORD, N. PL : 

ATE CAPITAL REI'ORTEIl OFFICE,— BARTON & JIADLEY. 

1854. 



University of New Hampshire 
Library 



THE 

PIRST ANNUAL EEPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS & EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

Citi| nf Cnnrnrit, 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY I, 

1854, 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERtJ 
RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




CONCORD, N. H. : 

STATE CAPITAL REPORTER OFFICE,— BARTON &. HADLEY. 

1854. 



C7M 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution to publish and distribute the Fii-st Annual Report 
of the City Government. 

Resolved, By the City Council of the City of Concord : 
That the Committee on Finance be, and hereby are instructed, to 
prepare and cause to be published in pamphlet form, 1500 copies of 
extended digest of receipts and disbursements of the first financial 
year of the City Government. 

And the several Ward Clerks are instructed to cause one copy to 
be left at each dwelling in their respective Wards, as soon as may 
be, after their publication. 

In Common Council, Feb'y 25, 1854 ; Passed. 

CYRUS BARTON, President, 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb'y 25, 1854 : Passed. 
JOSEPH LOW, Mayob. 
A true copy : Attest,— 

JOHN F. BROWN, City Clerk, 



STATEMENTS 



OF 

OUTSTANDING ACCOUNTS WITH JOHN C. PILLSBURY. 



REPORT. 

The Joint Standing Committee on Accounts have duly 
considered the application, and carefully examined tke evi- 
dence in support of the claim of John C. Pillsbury, Collector 
of Taxes for the town of Concord, for the year 1S51, asking 
allowance for sundry taxes remaining upon his list, which 
he has advanced the town, but has hitherto been unable to 
collect ; and from evidence deduced, we recommend an 
allowance of the following list, beginning with John D. Davis 
and ending with Charles E. West, amounting to fifty-six 
dollars eighty-four cents, ($56.84,) and such allowance 
being made, shall constitute a final settlement of his account 
as Collector for that year, leaving a balance due the town 
(city) of ninety-eight dollars forty cents ($98.40 ;) for which 
results, we refer to statement A herewith submitted. 

We ask leave further to state, that as a final result of our 
investigation of the outstanding accounts against the town in 
connection with John C. Pillsbury, late acting Treasurer, we 
find a balance due him of fifty dollars forty-nine cents, 
($50.49,) which will more fully appear by reference to 
statement B hereto annexed. 

Balance due the town (city) per statement A, $98 40 
." " J. C. Pillsbury, per statement B, 50 49 

'' " town (city) as per statements A&B,$47 91 
wiiich has been paid into the City Treasury. 

In offering the City Council this our last report of the out- 
standing affairs of the town, in connection with John C. 
Pillsbury, late acting Treasurer and Collector, together with 
his agency for repairing the highway known as the Free 



Bridge Railroad crossing which was under indictment, we 
would respectfully refer to a written statement accompany- 
ing this report marked C, signed by John C. Pillsbury and 
Benjamin Grover, two of the Selectmen for 1852-3. 

In relation to any known or supposed interest the town 
may sustain, as a consequent result of that agency, or aris- 
ing from the use of the credit of the town to obtain a loan 
of six hundred dollars borrowed and received of Abraham 
Bean by the aforesaid persons, we hereby refer to the before 
mentioned document C. All which is respectfully submit- 
ted by ROBERT DAVIS, 

JOSIAH STEVENS, 

MOSES SHUTE, y Committee. 

MOSES HUMPHREY, 

THOMAS BAILEY, 
February 18, 1854. 



List of Taxes for Abatement to J. C. Pillsbury. 

Sebool-houie Town 
Taxes. Taxes. 

John D. Davis, 1 80 1 80 

Reuben R. Lock, 2 57 159 4 16 

James O. Merrill, 2 57 1 59 4 16 

Moses Sargent, 1 74 1 74 

Moses Sargent, Jr., 1 59 1 59 

Mark Sargent, 1 86 I 86 

Benjamin D. Abbott, 1 59 1 59 

Reuben D. Buswell, 159 159 

Nathan Dunlap, 1 59 1 59 

Calvin Dustin, 1 59 1 59 

Joseph Glines, 1 59 1 59 

Isaiah Hoit, 1 59 1 59 

Luke B. Tower, 159 159 

Pierce Bickford, 25 1 59 1 84 

Philip Carter, 46 1 59 2 05 

John S. Dimond, 25 159 184 

John E. Lamprey, 60 2 13 2 73 

Samuel B. Lock, 25 1 59 1 84 

B.F.Marshall 25 159 184 

Heirs of David Rimmick, .... 2 12 2 12 

Richard Swain, 25 1 59 1 84 

Charles F. Tower, 25 1 59 1 84 

George H. Taylor, 26 1 59 1 85 

Thomas Cloudman, 1 59 1 59 

John Leaver, 1 59 1 59 

Moses Stickney, 1 59 1 59 

Daniel P. Webster, 1 59 1 59 

Charles E. West, 4 25 4 25 

$56 84 



[A.] 

JOHN C. PILLSBURY, Collector for 1851, in account with 
the Town of Concord, Db. 

1851. 



To amount resident, State 


, county, 


town and school taxes, ' 17372 80 


" non-resident, State, 


county, 


town and school taxes, 201 42 


" non-resident highway 


tax, 40 08 


" school-house tax Dist. 


No. 9, 660 71 


" 10, 1021 33 


(( (( (( i. 


^ 19, 627 12 


(( It u t 


' 15, 97 80 


t( (I (I i 


' 20, 319 61 


t( (C (( i. 


' 23, 14 13 




074Q 70 


To taxes not included in 


the above, 23 85 



$20378 85 
To undercharged in the above account, 177 89 



Ce. 



By paid State Treasurer, 
" county, 

• " school orders. No. 1 to 23 inclusive, 
" town orders. No. 1 to 30 inclusive, 
" non-resident highway receipts, 
" acting town treasurer, 



commission for collector, 

sundry abatement of taxes by the 

Selectmen— (see Collectors ace. 

pages 363-365,) 
charged to new ace. as acting trea'r, 



1705 20 


1871 


58 


4292 72 


3133 


61 


15 68 


3600 


19 


2013 93 


191 


16 


365 60 


200 00 


233 


95 


2755 


23 



$20378 8f 



1851. By overcharged in above account, 22 65 

By annexed list of taxes abated, 56 84 

By carried and charged to new account, 98 40 

$177 89 



[B.] 

JOHN C. PILLSBURY in ace. with the Town of Concord 
for outstanding accounts for 1852-3, Cr. 

1852, ) To cash received Joel C. Danforth, 

1853. i liquor agent, 595 00 

To cash received J. F. Witherell, 

liquor agent, 255 00 

To cash received John S. Rollins, 

liquor agent, 340 58 

To cash received Seth E. Pecker, 

for liquor returned, 64 93 

-1255 51 



Cash received of County of Merrimack, 


to wit : 




For support 


of Joshua Chandler, 43 33 


u 


Judith Chandler, 43 33 


" 


Eliza Sargent, 43 33 


" 


Sarah J. Sargent, 43 33 


a 


Thomas Lynch, 12 50 


" 


Sophia Cogswell and 




two children, 26 67 


(( 


Alpheus Chickering, 37 50 


" 


Cath.Shuham& child, 41 74 


u 


Georgiana Wentworth,18 75 


« 


Mary Scammel and 




two children, 33 58 


" 


Lucy J. Clark & child, 17 50 


" 


Thomas Marraga, 32 66 


u 


Nelly Clifford, 15 75 


" 


Elizabeth Copp, 8 30 


(( 


Charles Emmons, 65 00 


i( 


Mitchel Lehey, 17 17 



8 



For support of Wm. M. Savage, 
Mary Halpin, 
Dennis Sullivan, 
Sarah Magoon, 
Sarah P. Magoon, 
Asenath Brewster, 
Maria Stockdale and 

child, 
Joseph Barney, 
Augusta A. Clark, 
Thomas Kealey, 
Susan A. Buekman, 
Mary Harrington, 
Michael Harrington, 
Peter Harrington, 
Kate Harrington, 



12 50 
28 00 
15 98 

9 99 

9 99 

50 00 

20 56 

7 50 

13 30 
50 00 
65 60 

8 00 
11 50 
23 00 
11 50 



-8837 86 



FOK INCIDENTAL EXPENSES, 



Cr. 



. 1. 

2. 


By paid Lowell Eastman, 3 00 
William P. Foster, 3 00 


3. 
4. 
5. 


" Henry E. Baldwin, 12 00 
" Shadrach Seavey, 4 42 
" S, C. Badger, 5 00 


6. 


Smart & Sevvall, 50 


7. 


" Benj. Farnum, stone work, 74 25 


8. 
9. 


" C. E. Savory & Co., 1 00 
" Dan'l Holden, school money 

for alms house, 10 00 


10. 


" South Cong. Society for use 

of Ward 6, 12 00 


11. 


Postage, 65 


12. 


" C. J. Connor, for notice 




Montreal Railroad, 3 58 


13. 


" D. Dunlap, ballot box, 2 50 


14. 
15. 


J. M. Ordway, 75 
" D. Abbott, Jr., services as 




selectman, 35 00 


16. 


" Atkinson Webster, services 




as selectman, 36 00 



No. 17. " J. C. Pillsbury, services as 

selectman, 55 00 

18. " Josiah Minot, plan of town- 

hall, 10 90 

19. " P. Brown, recording deeds, 1 50 

$271 05 

FOR NIGHT WATCH. 

No. 1. By paid H. H. Holt, watchman, 35 00 

2. " L. R. Cook, " 45 00 

3. " J. J. Wyman, " 85 00 

4. " C.H.Norton, "room rent 15 00 

5. " S. B. Whicher, 76 25 

$206 25 

FOR COUNTY PAUPERS. 



No. 1. 


By paid Dr. C. P. Gage, (5 bills,) 


55 00 


2. 


(( 


Insane Asylum, 


32 


00 


3. 


" 


Horace Chase, 


2 00 


4. 


(( 


James Woolson, 


94 00 


5. 


n 


S. C. Badger, 


60 47 


7. 


" 


Bullock & Sargent, 


11 


68 


8. 


a 


S. S. Briggs, 


16 


15 


9. 


" 


Martin Casey, 


10 


00 


10. 


" 


Ellen Coleman, 


2 


00 


11. 


u 


William Damon, 


1 


00 


12. 


(( 


E. S. Chadwick, 


1 


50 


14. 


It 


Catharine Knee, 


45 


50 


15. 


" 


Joseph Brown, 


3 


00 


16. 


(( 


George Dame, 


5 


50 


17. 


" 


Dr. E. G. Moore, 


6 


00 


18. 


" 


Dr. J. F. Sargent, 


31 


50 


19. 


u 


S. C. Badger, 


37 


91 


20. 


" 


Pillsbury & Andrews, 


8 


67 


21. 


44 


Michael Coleman, 


33 00 


22. 


U 


H. B. Foster, 


2 66 


23. 


" 


Cheney & Co. Express, 


15 


75 


24. 


(4 


J. C. Pillsbury, sundry ex- 










penses paid, 


40 


63 


25. 


44 


E. S. Chadwick, 


1 


55 
— $517 47 



10 



No. 



Less for paid Ellen Coleman, 2 00 
Michael Coleman, 33 00 
H. B. Foster, 2 66 



37 66 













$479 81 






FOR WINES AND 


LIQUORS. 




1. 


By paid 


Seth E. Pecker, 






991 00 


2. 




John A. Gault, 






125 28 


3! 




E. H. Rollins, 






338 54 


4. 




E. H. Rollins, 






1 00 


5. 




John S. Rollins, 






339 62 


6. 




J. F. VVitherell, 
as a^ent. 


se 


•vices 


88 00 


7. 


u 


Seth E. Pecker, 






49 94 

1QQQ UR 



FOR FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

By paid Thompson Rowell, Engine No. 3, 18 00 

" N. P. Webster, Engine No. 3, 38 01 

" C. H. Robinson, for firemen's service, 45 00 

" David Symonds, Hook & Ladder Co., 1 20 

" J. H. Moulton, for firemen's service, 74 25 

" Daniel A. Hill, Hook & Ladder Co., 3 75 

" B. F. Dunklee & Co., horses at fire, 3 25 

" Warde & Walker, for Engine No. 4, 38 59 

" J. E. Baker, Hook & Ladder Co., 1 95 

" J. G. Day, " " 4 75 

" L. L. Mower, " " 4 50 

" C. E. Savory & Co., " 4 10 

" L. A. Walker,firemen's service No. 2, 33 50 

" J. D. A. West, sundries, No. 2, 69 82 

" J. D. A. West, sundries, No. 2, 67 25 

" True Osgood, services as clerk, 6 00 

" C. H. Dow, for horses at two fires, 5 50 

" R. H. Thompson, firemen's suits No. 7, 14 00 

" John Abbott, firemen's service No. 6, 41 25 



-$474 67 



FOR CITY PAUPERS. 



By paid town of Campton for Austin, 4 00 

" town of Nashua for Mrs. S. S. Dow, 20 00 



11 

By paid Chaso Hill, for W. Puffer, 1 50 

John M. Dearborn, for Wm. Sargent, 8 51 
Dr. Moses Carter, for E. Burnham, 5 00 
Moses Shute, " 

Eben'r Eastman, for Mrs. L. Abbot 
Jos. Hutchinson, for E. Burnham, 
town of Loudon, for Sarah Powell, 
town of Loudon, for Sarah Powell, 
M. H, Faanum, for C. Dustin, 
town of Northwood for D. Davis' wife 
town of Loudon, for Sarah Powell, 
Benjamin Howe, for Mrs. Quimby, 
Dr. C. P. Gage, for Mrs. Quimby, 

&c., Aims-House, 
John Golding for W. Storin family, 
Seth Eastman, for Mrs. Cilley, 

Less for paid John Golding, 



FOR POLICE. 

By paid Blackmer & Walker for P. Badger, 

"• C. D. Drew, for service as police, 

" Moses Cass, " " 

N. H. State Prison, for keeping prisoners, 

FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. 

By paid John H. George, 90 00 

" Ira Perlcy, 50 00 

140 00 

FOR HIGHWAYS. 

By paid Asa P. Tenney, 2 00 

" Ephraim Hutchins, land damages, 25 00 

" Emerson & Cutting, plank, 88 

" L. D. Sherburn, on F. B. Road, 8 00 

" Jonathan Tenney, on H. Hill Bridge, 2 50 

" Wm. Pecker, on Federal Bridge, 20 50 

" Wm. Wallace, on Free Bridge, 3 75 

" Heman Sanborn, on Federal Bridge, 7 87 

" N. P. Fogg, 2 50 

" J. H. Whittier, on Fisherville Bridge, 4 50 



4 00 


15(5 00 


5 00 


35 50 


6 00 


6 00 


e, 4 00 


9 00 


20 03 


49 25 


8 00 


16 50 


$358 '''9 


8 00 


$350 29 


5 00 


4 37 


3 00 


4 00 


$16 37 



12 

By paid E. S. D. Ordway, 
B. G. Davis, 
James Thampson, Suncook Hill, 

N. P. ForrcT, 

Benjamin Coffin, Jr., 

S. McConnell, plank, 

H. C. Boyes, 

L. George &; Co., 

H. M. Robinson, Free Bridge, 

David White, 

FOR PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



;144 09 



By paid Cyrus Barton, 

E. B. Tripp, 

Butterfield & Hill, 

John F. Brown, 

Butterfield & Hill, 

Rufus Merrill, 

McFarland & Jenks, 22 13 

B. W. Sanborn, 30 62 

Fogg & Wiggin, 8 00 

$257 99 



JOHN C. PILLSBtlRY, acting Treasurer, in account with 
the Town of Concord, for Outstanding Accounts for 
1852-3, Dr. 

1853. 

March 3. To balance of account per Audi- 
tor's report, 1021 21 
" 12. To cash of A. Bean, Collector, 400 00 
April 2. " " " 200 00 
" 11. " " " 200 00 
" 13. To paid note " " 200 00 
Nov. 4. " " Thos. S. Eastman, 100 00 
To interest on note, 8 83 
To Cash received County of Merrimack for 

the support of sundry paupers, 837 86 

To Cash received from liquor agents, 1255 51 

To Balance due J. C. Pillsbury, and credit- 
ed to him in new account, 50 49 

4273 90 



13 

RECAPITULATION. 



Cr. 



By paid for Incidental Expenses, 271 05 

Night Watch, 206 25 

County Paupers, 479 81 

Wines and Liquor Agency,. 1933 38 

Fire Department, 474 67 

City Paupers, 350 29 

Police, 16 37 

Professional Service, 140 00 

Highways, 144 09 

Printing and Stationery, 257 99 

$4273 90 

To undercharged in Collector's account, 98 40 
By over paid on Treasurer's account, 50 49 

Balance due, and paid city, (see Treasur- 
er's Report,) $47 91 



[C] 

To the Chairman of Committee on Accounts : 

Dear Sir : — In consequence of a seeming disparity in 
relation to the financial affairs between me and the town of 
Concord, I wish to make the following statement of facts : 

The note which I hold against the Concord & Claremont 
Railroad for five hundred dollars, and a note given by me 
and Col. Benjamin Grover to Abraham Bean, for six hun- 
dred dollars, was not reported by me in my account as act- 
ing Treasurer for the town of Concord, for the fiscal year 
ending March, 1853 — and for the following reasons : 

The five hundred dollar note from the Railroad was given 
in consideration for repairing the highway known as the 
Free Bridge Crossing, it being the amount assessed by the 
Court of Common Pleas against the town of Concord ; 
which Court appointed me an agent to repair said highway ; 
and in the discharge of my duty as agent of the Court, — 
being also an agent of the town by virtue of my office as 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, — I expended upon 



14 

said highway, and also upon Main street, a much larger sum 
than was assessed by the Court, in order to make the said 
highways in a safe and passable condition. I expended five 
hundred dollars more than appears in my account, for which 
I took the Railroad note, and assumed the note for six hun- 
dred dollars which we gave Mr. Bean, one hundred of which 
I am credited in my last year's account, which I designed 
as an ofTset, and never calculated to bring it into the town 
account at all. 

After my settlement with the Auditors, last year, I was 
taken sick and confined to my house, and during my con- 
finement, my office was burglariously broken open, as was 
also my trunk in said office, and all my vouchers and papers 
relating to this matter were abstracted and carried away, 
and 1 have never been able to recover them. There was a 
large bundle of accounts and receipts belonging to Captain 
Peter Paddleford and myself, taken at the same time, but 
the loss of them is of no great consequence. There were 
various other articles taken that were of value to me alone. 

The papers thus taken, contained the exact financial af- 
fairs between me and the town of Concord in relation to 
this matter, and if I had them, would show you substantially 
the following result : 

I expended five hundred dollars more than I charged the 
town, for which I took the five hundred dollar Railroad note. 
It was given on time for nine months, and, as some doubt 
was entertained that the Railroad note would ever be paid, 
I took the note, and was to pay the Bean note of six hundred 
dollars, having given myself credit for one hundred dollars, 
which made the matter square. I regret exceedingly that I 
am unable to furnish you with them ; but, for reasons above 
.stated, it is utterly impossible for me to do so. All of which 
is respectfully submitted to the favorable consideration of 
the Committee on Accounts, of v/hich you have the honor 
to be Chairman. J. C. PILLSBURY. 

To the genflcmcn composing the Committee on Accovnts in 

the city of Concord : 

Dear Sirs : — Flaving had the honor of holding the office 
of selectman for one year ending March, 1853, 1 was con- 
versant with the subject matter, for the most part, of the 
within statement of my associate, J. C. Pillsbury, Esq., and 
I cheerfully add my testimony to the truthfulness and cor- 



15 

rectness of the within statement, except the abstraction of 
papers which happened after I left the office, of which, of 
course, I had no knowledge, except in common with other 
citizens. Very respectfully yours, 

B. GROVER. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Cash 


received by J. E. LANG, City Treasurer. 


1853. 






June 23. 


Rec'd of J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 


$200 00 


25. 


u u u u u 


100 00 


27. 


tl !.(. U CI u 


100 00 


July 2. 


u u u u u 


200 00 


4. 


" " Joseph Low, for Literary Fund 


, 477 13 


6. 


" " J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 


100 00 


" 


u tt a u u 


200 00 


7. 


11 i.1 a (( u 


400 00 


8. 


u u a It tc 


200 00 


9. 


u u u tt u 


200 00 


16. 


(( U (( u u 


300 00 


18. 


" for License for Hippodrome, 


30 00 


19. 


" " " " " additional, 


20 00 


21. 


of J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 


400 00 


22. 


H tt li It tt 


200 00 


27. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


200 00 


30. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


100 00 


Aug. 5. 


tt tt tt t( tt 


200 00 


8. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


300 00 


10. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


400 00 


13. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


200 00 


15. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


100 00 


29. 


" " A. H. Drown, for Eng. House sold, 100 00 


Sept. 8. 


" " J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 


1000 00 


13. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


200 00 


19. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


600 00 


22. 


.t tt tt tt tt 


400 00 


24. 


" " Jno. Abbot, for Eng. House sold 


, 55 00 


30. 


" " J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 


1000 00 


Oct. 8. 


" for License for Circus, 


50 00 


" 


" of J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 


500 00 


22. 


tt tt tt t.t tt 


400 00 


28. 


tt tt tt tt tt 


1213 00 



Oct. 


29. 




30. 


Nov 


. 1. 




2. 




7. 




14. 




18. 




22. 




29. 


Dec. 


1. 




6. 




19. 




28. 


1854. 


Jan': 


y 5. 




10. 




24. 




ni. 



17 



Rec'd of J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 300 00 
" " A. Bean, for outstanding taxes, 200 00 
" for Lumber sold from Poor Farm, 
" of J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 



Joseph LoAv, for Railroad Tax, 
J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 



" Sam'l Hill, for rent of House 
and for Grass, 
" " J. C. Pillsbury, City Collector, 
Feb. 8. " " " " " 

11. " " Jno. Abbot for Stone sold from 

Poor Farm, 
16. " " J. C. Pillsbury, Citv Collector. 
21. 
" " " A. Bean, by Joseph Low, for 

out-standing taxes, 200 00 

" " " County of Merrimack by J. C. 

Pillsbury, 837 86 

24. " " Town of Pembroke by Joseph 

Low for support of Pauper, 36 00 

" " " J. C. Pillsbury, as balance due 

from him as Collector and acting Treasurer 
of Town of Concord, as perstatement A & B, 47 91 
24. Received of Calvin Ainsworth, Police 
Judge, for fees and fines as per report to 
Mayor and Aldermen, 178 92 

27,494 93 
Cash borrowed, 2,700 00 



572 97 


300 00 


500 00 


1500 00 


100 00 


500 00 


400 00 


300 00 


3813 50 


440 00 


700 00 


700 00 


700 00 


1000 00 


1000 00 


54 64 


800 00 


400 00 


68 00 


1200 00 


500 00 



$30,194 93 



18 

Cash paid out by J. E. LANG, City Treasurer. 

Roads and Bridges. 

1853. 

Aug. 27. Paid Order 

No. 29, Simpson, Balch& Co., 2,386 25 

" 30, Hiram Simpson, 4 25 

29. "31, Jos. Low, for C. R. E., 1 88 

" 32, Aaron Q. Farnum, 28 42 

" 33, Stephen Brown, 48 22 

" 34, James F. Lund, 150 76 



Sept. 23. " 55, Jona. P. Leavitt, 15 25 

" 56, Giles W. Ordway, 41 65 

Oct. 24. " 63, Edward Gould, 13 10 

" 64, William Pecker, 26 21 

" 65, Moses M. Davis, 17 55 

" 66, F. B. Carter, 1 1 50 

" 67, James F. Lnnd, 984 82 

" 68, Thomas W. Abbot, 22 65 

"81, Peter Paddleford, 600 00 



2,619 78 
56 90 



,675 83 



Nov. 1. " 82, Peter Paddleford, 654 32 

" 83, John Abbot, 730 66 
" 84, J. C. Pillsbury, (Col.) 1000 00 

" 85, Peter Paddleford, 572 97 

21. " 89, Albert Ordway, 2 50 
" 93, A. G. Saltmarsh, 40 00 

22. " 97, W. H. Bartlett, (City Sol.) 57 10 
26. " 98, David Abbot, Jr., 218 16 

" 100, William Pecker, 40 00 

" 101, John Jarvis, 12 50 

" 102, J. C. Briggs, 58 00 

" 103, A. Q. Farnum, 57 85 

" 104, B. G. Davis, 12 00 

" 105, James F. Lund, 342 85 



Dec. 24. " 118, Benj. Parker, 12 00 

" 119, John Lock, 3 70 

" 120, Nathan Farley, 1 50 



■3,798 91 



17 20 



19 



1854. 








Jan. 13. 


" 117, Isaac Virgin, 


23 50 




18. 


" 127, Hiram Simpson, 


144 96 




26. 


" 128, William Pecker, 


5 50 


173 96 


Feb. 2. 


" 180, C. H. Dow, 


4 25 


3. 


" 139, Henry Martin, Jr., 


7 30 




7. 


" 193, C. W. Paige, 


69 79 






" 154, Haman Sanborn, 


10 25 






" 153, R. B. Hoit, 


2 00 




10. 


" 132, J. F. Potter, 


9 72 






" 131, S. D. Colby, 


5 28 




15. 


" 130, Joseph Eastman, 


27 98 




20. 


" 225, James F. Lund, 


233 62 






" 221, John Langley, 


38 50 




21. 


" 208, James M. Ordway, 


50 






" 246, John Abbot, 


4 56 




24. 


" 224, H. Rolfe & Sons, 


7 25 


421 00 


Mar. 1. 


" 129, Robert Knowlton, 


2 21 


3. 


" 227, John Jarvis, 


8 00 








$s 


10 21 




1,773 79 



Fire Department. 

1853. 

Aug. 29. Paid Order 

No. 39, L. R. Peacock, Agent, 
" 40, A. H. Drown, 
" 41, James M. Bennett, 

Sept. 23. " 57, N. P. Fogg, 

24. " 58, Tilton & Oilman, 
" 59, Concord R. R. Co., 

Oct. 24. " 76, Nathan Stickney, 
•' 77, John Abbott, 

1854. 

Jan'y 23. " 138, Geo. D. Abbot, 

26. " 144, M. Darling, 

28. " 143, C. W. Davis, 



8179 

259 07 

8 00 


9 25 
10 50 
4 50 


75 00 
413 85 


5 00 
20 87 
42 14 



348 86 

24 25 
488 85 



20 



Jan'y 30. 

31. 

Feb'y 1. 
3. 

4. 

6. 

7. 

8. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 

17. 

18. 
20. 

22. 
27. 

March 2, 



165, 0. G. Ingalls, 


204 11 






166, H. M. Moore, 


108 72 






145, Hunneman & Co., 


249 00 










629 


84 


169, H. H. Holt, 


10 50 






177, L. P. Fuller, 


14 82 






178, Warde & Walker, 


196 






147, H. Fessenden, 


11 42 






167, E. H. Houston, 


35 00 






148, C. W. Paige, 


125 






168, Lowell Eastman, 


40 32 






200, G. W. Ingalls, Agent, 


110 25 






204, A. H. Wiggin, 


168 19 






203, J. D. A. West, Agent, 


16 42 






205, Charles E. Robinson, 


135 00 






186, H. M. Moore, 


3 00 






187, Noah P. Webster, 


28 50 






202, " 


146 75 






188, N. G. Carr, 


74 00 






229, G. W. Ingalls, 


25 38 






206, Charles Mayo, 


6 00 






228, E. S. CoUey, 


19 17 






176 1-2, Chandler Eastman, 


, 104 00 










951 


93 


146, Blackmer & Walker, 


6 67 






230, M. Humphrey, 


5 00 








8S 


11 


67 




J,455 40 



Salaries of City OiBKeeirs, 



1853. 








Aug. 29. 


Paid Order 








No. 50, Moses Cass, 




21 00 


Nov. 26. 


" 87, Moses Gill, 




150 00 


1854. 








Jan. 31. 


" 157, J. S. Noyes, 




36 00 


Feb. 2. 


" 158, .1. E. Lang, 


17 50 




6. 


" 173, Nathan Call, 


32 00 




8. 


" 156, John Abbot, 


30 00 




y. 


" 151, J. E. Lang, 


100 00 




10. 


" 197, Nathan Chandler, 


15 00 




15. 


" 174, Wm. Pecker, 


34 00 





21 



Feb. IT). '• 184, Jno. F. Browa, 400 00 

20. " 195, Amos Hadlev, 100 00 

24. " 241, Calvin Ainsworth. 250 00 

27. " 197,, W. H. Bartlett, 50 00 



■1,028 50 



$1,285 50 



Police and l¥atcli. 



1853. 

Aug. 29. Paid Order 

No. 45, Jos. Low for J. Greely, 8 00 

" 46, " " " 1 50 

Sept. 6. " 52, J. J. Wyman, 103 00 

23. " .53, Sumner & Swift, 8 00 

" 54, T. W. PiUsbury, 28 65 



Oct. 24. " 78, T. A. Ambrose, 
" 79, James Jones, 

Nov. 21. " 90, Dan'i A. Hill, 
^' 94, D. S. Webster, 

Dec. 24. " 112, J. L. CiUey, 

" 113, Geo. C. Robinson, 
" 114, J. J. Wyman, 
" 115, John Pettingill, 
" 116, J. S. Durgin, 

1854. 

Jan'y26. " 142, J. P. Whitcher, 

" 140, Isaac Eastman, 

27. " 141, True George, 

30. " 155, James Hoit, 

Feb'y 1. " 160, J. J. Wyman, 

2. " 170, S. B. Whitcher, 

4. " 172, Thos. P. Hill, 

7. " 171, Moore, Cilley & Co. 
" 164, C. H. Norton, 

" 192, Josiah Stevens, 

8. " 168, Lowell Eastman, 



2 75 


3 50 


6 50 


75 


41 15 


40 35 


9100 


8 84 


38 25 


250 00 


2 50 


8 83 


20 45 


64 00 


31 00 


10 00 


9 97 


20 00 


24 00 


19 00 



9 50 

139 6r. 

6 25 

7 25 

219 59 

281 7S 



22 



•ebV 9. 


" 190, Geo. C. Robinson, 


13 50 


15. 


" 211, Concord Gas Co., 


3 00 


17. 


" 210, E. G. Kilburn, 


3 00 


20. 


" 220, Abraham Bean, 


9 07 


21. 


" 215, J. C. PiUsbury, 


14104 




" 208, Jas. M. Ordway, 


6 25 


24. 


" 209, G. Sanders & Co., 


9 53 

363 36 






$1027 38 



Scliool Districts. 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

1854. Feb. 16. Paid order No. 1, John Sawyer, Jr., 93 55 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

1853. Dec. 31. Paid order No. 2, Eben F. Elliot, 69 35 

DISTRICT NO. 3. 

1854. Jan. 31, Paid order No. 3, Andrew Jackson, 218 41 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

1853. Dec. 16. Paid order No. 4, Hazen Abbot, 66 88 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 

1854. Jan. 26. Paid order No. 5, Jacob N. Flanders, 80 58 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 

1854. Feb. 24. Paid order No. 6, Ezra Ballard, 63 92 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 

1854. Jan. 2. Paid order No. 7, Dan'l Knowlton, 83 71 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 

1853. Dec. 31. Paid order No. 8. L. S. Flanders, 104 92 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 

18.54. Feb. 9. Paid order No. 9, L. D. Stevens, 794 71 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 

1854. Feb. 17. Paid order No. 10, W. Odlin, 2071 48 

DISTRICT NO. 11. 

1854. Feb. 21. Paid order No. 11, A. Fowler, 690 07 



23 



DISTRICT NO. 12. 

1854. Jan. 30. Paid order, No. 12, Chas. Sanborn, 145 24 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 

1854. Jan. 26. Paid order No. 13, Reuben Goodwin, 94 52 

DISTRICT NO. 14. 

1853. Dec. 31. Paid order No. 14, Belknap Bartlett, 65 64 

DISTRICT NO. 15. 

Paid order No. 15, S. Kimball, in part, 15 00 

DISTRICT NO. 16. 

1853. Dec. 2. Paid order No. 16, Alex. Thompson, 48 01 

DISTRICT NO. 17. 

1854. Feb. 6. Paid order No. 17, B. Green, 36 68 

DISTRICT NO. 18. 

18.54. Feb. 22. Paid order No. 18, G. W. Ordway, 110 91 

DISTRICT NO. 19. 

1854. Jan. 28. Paid order No. 19, John Sanders, 125 41 

DISTRICT NO. 20. 

1854. Jan. 18. Paid order No. 20, H. H. Amsden, 308 32 

DISTRICT NO. 21. 

1854. Jan. 24. Paid order No. 21, Abram Bean, 70 41 

DISTRICT NO 22. 

1854. Feb. 9. Paid order No. 22, H. B. Barton, 47 08 

DISTRICT NO. 23. 

Paid order No. 23, R. Hall, 28 95 

DISTRICT NO. 24. 

1854. Jan. 14. Paid order No. 25, A. Buswell, 2 22 

DISTRICT NO. 8, IN HOPKINTON. 

18.54. Sept. 8. Paid order No. 24, Sam'l Crowell, 2 95 



$5,438 90 



24 
School-house Tax. 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 

1853. Nov. 22. Paid order No. 96, Jas. F. Lund, 564 00 

1854. Feb. 27. " " 214, E. Chickering, 236 00 



$800 00 

DISTRICT NO. 20. 

1854. Jan. 5. Paid order No. 125, H. H. Brown, 8432 00 

State Tax. 

1853. Dec. 6. Paid order, No. 109, State Treas., 82,342 25 

County Tax. 

1853. Oct. 28. Paid order No. 72, S. K. Jones, 

County Treasurer, 83,114 1)6 



Printing and Stationery. 

1854. 

Aug. 29. Paid order 

No. 44, Butterfield & Hill, $3 87 

Sept. 23. " 60, John F. Brown, 143 88 

Oct. 24. " 74, Cyrus Barton, 55 50 

" 75, Barton & Hadley, 4 50 

1854. 60 00 

Jan. 26. " 150, Morrill & Silsby, 38 7 1 

Feb'y 2. " 163, Wm. Butterfield, 29 75 

3. "161, McFarland & Jenks. 35 50 

6. " 181, Barton & Hadley, 39 50 

20. " 216, Geo. G. Fogg & Co., 28 25 

24. " 218, Jno. F. Brown, 28 28 

" 162, E. B. Tripp, 6 25 

167 53 

8413 99 

Parsona§^c Fund. 

1854. 
Jan. 9. Paid order No. 126, A. Fowler, Committee, 8233 80 



25 

Interest Accoiant. 

185H. 
July 23. Paid order No: 27, N. H. Savings BanK, 67 70 

Oct. 31. " " 80, M. G. Stickney, Treas., 56 00 



8113 70 
Teachers Institute. 

1853. 

Nov. 12. Paid order No. H6, Hall Roberts, 135 51 

AbateiMcist «f Taxes. 
1853. 

July 9. Paid order No. 2G, Paul Wentworth, 1 99 

1854. 

Jan. 30. " '^ 176, L. D. Stevens, 10 98 

Feb. 24. •' " 243, Isaac Farnum, 1 46 



City Paupers. 
1853. 

Oct. 24. Paid order 

No. 6*, Joseph Brown, 

Nov. 21. " 95, Andrew I. Hill, 
26. " 99, Town of Hooksctt, 
" 107, James F. Sargent, 



1854, 
Jan. 16. " 137, J. Osgood for Town of Loudon, 25 00 

Feb. 7. " 154, Heman Sanborn, 
" 149, Eben Eastman, 
" 191, J. S. Durcrin, 
9. ^' 190. Geo. C. Robinson, 

20. " 231, Jas. F. Sargent, 

21. " 215, J. C. Pillsbury, 
" 179, A. H. Robinson, 

25. " 189, Kimball & Hoit, 
" 234, E. Eastman, 

91 62 

8208 70 



5 50 


5 50 


19 00 


30 00 


32 08 


udon , 
4 00 


30 83 


100 


1 50 


15 00 


25 75 


4 50 


4 04 


5 00 



14 43 



li 0«) 



SI 08 



26 

County Paupers. 

1853. 

Aug. 29. Paid order 

No. 35, M. Coleman, 33 00 

" 36, H. B. Foster, 2 66 

" 37, J. Low, for Ellen Coleman, 2 00 
" 38, " " Jno. C4olding, 8 00 



45 66 



1854. 








Feb. 9. 


" 190, Geo. C. Robinson, 


5 25 




21. 


" 215, Jno. C. PiUsbury, 


45 22 




24. 


" 242, 


18 64 




25. 


" 189, Kimball & Hoit, 


2 17 






u 244, 


3 04 










74 32 



119 98 

I^nroHing Militia. 

1853. 

Aug. 29. Paid order No. 42, Francis Farnum, 4 00 

" 43, B. F. Watson, 5 00 

9 00 

Ilealtli lOepartment. 
1853. 

Nov. 30. Paid order 

No. 108, James F. Sargent, 8 00 

1854. 
Feb. 20. " 231, " " 3 25 

21. " 236, Wm. Prescott, 2 00 

5 25 

March 2. " 152, Timothy Haynes, 6 00 

19 25 

Cemeteries. 

1854. 
Feb. 7. Paid order No. 154, Heman Sanborn, 6 36 



Poor Farsn. 

1853. 

July 30. Paid order No. 28, Moses Gill, 150 00 



27 



1854. 

Feb. 15. Paid order No. 137, Joseph Eastman, 
March 2. " " 230, M. Humphrey, 



14 76 
1 50 



166 26 



1853. 


Oct. 


8. 


Nov 


. 4. 




16. 




26. 


Dee, 


. 7. 


1854. 


Feb. 


7. 




10 




21. 



.TanV 2. 



Outstanding Town IDebt. 

Paid order 

No. 62, James Hoit, 266 32 

" 121, A. Q. Farnum, 108 83 

" 88, Baker & Peabody, 218 75 

" 106, Zebulon Smith, 75 00 

" 110, Caleb Page, 532 58 

" 153, Robert B. Hoit, 3 00 

" 183, John P. Johnson, 26 55 

" Sundry bills out-standing 

against Town of Concord, 
see Gen. Davis' report, 837 86 
" 140, Isaac Eastman, 4 50 



2,073 39 



Professional Services. 

1853. 
Dec. 27. Paid order No. Ill, George & Foster, 40 00 

1854. 
Feb. 18. " " 219, Asa Fowler, 70 00 



110 00 



Incidental Expenses. 
1853. 

Aug. 29. Paid order 

No. 47, Jos. LowforH.C. Sanborn, 83 
" 49, Geo D. Abbot, 13 00 

" 51, Joel Frazier, 2 00 



Sept 24. " 61, G. Sanders, 
Oct. 24. " 71, Jacob Carter, 
" 73, H. E. Baldwin, 



1 56 
7 00 



15 83 

6 81 



56 



28 



Ncv. 21. 


No. Itl, Henry Farnum, 


4 25 






" 92, J. F. Brown, 


1 S3. 


5 58 


Dec. 31. 


'^ 122, C. Smith, 


2 00 






" 123, Ira Abbot, 


4 25 






" 124' David Staniels, 


3 50 


9' 7r. 


1854. 








Jan. 30. 


"• 155, James Hoit, 


150 




31. 


" 157, J. S. Noyes, 


30 00 


31 5f 


FebV 1. 


" 160, J. J. Wyman, 


50 




2. 


" 158, J. E. Lang, 


4 00 




7. 


" 191, J. S. Durgin, 


6 00 




-S. 


" 156, Jno. Abbot, 


27 00 




13. 


" 182, James Prescott& Co., 


20 50 










58 00 



$136 03 



OutstandiJig Town Debts, Paid by iJie City. 

Zebulon Smith, for land damage, 75 00 

Note to Caleb Page, princ. $500, int. 832.58, 532 58 
Isaac Eastman, 3 days' police service, 4 50 

Execution, Insane Asylum vs. Town, 218 75 

Note, Lowell Eastman for Engine Co. No. 

3 ; principal 8250, interest ^16.32, 266 32 

Note, Thomas S. Eastman charged to J. C. 

Pillsbury, 108 S3 

Robert B. Hoit, for snowing Horse Hill 

Bridge three times, 3 00 

John P. Johnson, services as town clerk, 26 55 

1235 53 



>ceipt 


s and 


Dis- 


the 


fiscal 


y€^a.r 


3,813 50 

477 13 

100 00 

^, 100 00 

;, 55 00 





29 

Jiecapitulation of Hevenue, lie 
bursements of the City, for 
.>;:ding February 1, 1854. 

Kucoived proportion of Railroad Tax, 
'•'• '•'• of Literary Fund, 

•• for license to showmen, 
" from sale of old ens;. houseNo.8, 

'•■• from sale of timber and stone 

from city farm, n40 97 

'•'• from Abraham Bean, for out- 
standing taxes 1852, 400 00 
^' from Samuel Hill, for rent of 

house and land, 54 64 

'■'• from town of Pembroke, for 

support of pauper, 36 00 

" from J. C. Pillsbury, balance of 

accts. as pr. statement A&B, 47 91 
" from Calvin Ainsworth, Police 
Justice, as per statement 
rendered of fines, 178 92 

i~ " from, borrowed fund account, 837 86 
" of J. C. Pillsbury, from taxes 
committed for collection the 
current year, 21,053 00 

827,794 m 

Balance uncollected in Pillsbury's hands, 2588 35 
To excess of disbursements over receipts, 596 S2 

3,185 17 



.$30,980 10 



To paid outstanding town debts, 1235 53 

• State tax, 2342 25 

'• County tax, 3114 96 

"■ for schools, 5476 79 

''• for school-house tax Dist. No. 9, 800 00 

" for " " " "10, 1150 00 

'• for " " " "20, 432 00 

" for Teachers's Institute, 135 51 

" foi Sewall's Falls Bridge, 6339 86 



30 

To paid for Roads and Bridges, 2454 40 

" for Fire Department, 2496 12 

" for Police and Night Watch,. . . 1037 38 
" for Piinting and Stationery,. . .. 413 99 

" for Incidental Expenses, 154 23 

f 27,583 03 

To paid for Salariesof City Officers, to wit: 
For Mayor, $200 ; City Marshal, $500, 700 00 
City Clerk, $300, and $100 for extra serv's, 400 00 
City Treasurer, $ 100; Police Justice,$250, 350 00 
City Solicitor, $50 ; Clerk Common Coun- 
cil, $75 and $25 extra, 150 00 
Overseer City Farm, $300 ; and gratuity 

to matron,' $25, ' 325 00 

Superintending School Com'tee, $221.33 ; 

Assessors, $198.50, 419 83 

City Messsenger, $21, 21 00 

2,365 83 

To paid for City Paupers, 224 20 

" for Interest on City Debt, 113 70 

" for County Paupei-s, 12178 

"• for enroling Militia, 9 00 

" for Cemeteries, 6 36 

" for Health Department, 24 75 

" for Professional services, 110 00 

" for permanent repairs City Farm, 166 26 
" for Parsonage Fund, distributed, 233 80 
" for abatements from City Treas'y, 21 39 

1,031 24 

$30,980 10 

It may properly be stated here, that from the outstanding 
assets in the hands of the late acting Treasurer and Col- 
lector of the town, amounting to three thousand three hun- 
dred four dollars, seventy-one cents, (3304.71) (as per 
Auditor's report of March last,) that only four hundred 
dollars (400) of that sum has reached the City Treasury ; 
while there remains outstanding and available only about 
seven hundred dollars (700.) Leaving over two thousand 
dollars, (2000) which was confidently relied upon in part to 
meet the current expenses of the city, which has been con 
sumed in town debts. 



31 

In addition thereto, the following sums have been drawn 
from the City Treasury : 

To paid outstanding town debts from City Trea'ry, $1235 53 
" interest on Parsonage Fund, 233 80 

" charged to Borrowed Fund account, which 
was received from the county for sup- 
port of paupers, 837 86 
" interest account on town debts, 113 70 



$2420 89 



Showing conclusively that, from the taxes alone, between 
two and three thousand dollars might have been applied to 
the payment of loans to the town, from the City Treasury, 
the past year, were it not for the unexpected and unparal- 
leled amount of outstanding indebtedness of the town. 



Statement of J. C. PILLSBURY'S account as Collector 
for 1853. 

To amount of resident. State, county, 

town and school taxes for 1853, " 820,985 22 

To amount of non-resident, ditto, 174 42 

" " " highway tax, 34 31 

208 73 



school-house tax Dist. No. 9, 839 93 
'^ " " 10, 1205 70 
" " " 20, 446 54 



2492 17 

To undercharged balance of (errors) invoice book, 199 38 



823,885 50 



By receipts paid City Treasurer, 21053 00 

By allowance for abatements as per list 

and resolutions of Mayor and Aldermen, 231 23 
By amount of non-resident highway rec'ts, 12 92 
To balance outstanding and uncollected, 2588 35 

$23,885 50 



32 

CITY PROPERTY IN FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



The Joint Standing Committee, to which was referred the 
joint resolution passed by the City Council, Feb. 4th, 1854, 
instructing the said committee to appraise the property of 
the Fire Department, have attended to the duty, and report 
the following statements here annexed. 

THOMAS BAILEY, ) ^ 
MOSES HUMPtlREY, | ^«"*^«^"e«- 

Invoice of the Fire Dep^^rtment isi the City of 
Concord, Febrtaary 13tlt, 1854. 

COMPANY NO. 2. 

House liable to be moved, as it stands on 
the State Prison land, valued at 

Engine newly repaired, " 

Hose carriage, 

250 feet hose, at 55 cents per foot, 

250 " " " 40 " 

200 " " not to be relied upon, ex- 
cept in certain cases, 20 cts. per foot, 

5 suits oil clothing, 

6 spanners, at 25 cents each, 
6 " belts, at 1 shilling each, 

1 crotch wrench, 
'S torch lamps, at 75 cents each, 
i three gallon jug, 
20 badges, at 2 shillings each, 

2 stoves and funnel, 
9 settees, 63 feet, at 38 cents per foot., 
4 chairs, at 30 cents each, 
1 office chair, 
1 table, 

1 Grecian table, 
8 spit-boxes, 25 cents each, 
1 tin camphene can, 

1 " " filler, 

2 side lamps, at $1.25 each, 
2 small camphene lamps, 
! roll-book, 
1 record- book, 



300 00 


800 00 


57 00 


137 50 


100 00 


40 00 


5 00 


1 50 


1 00 


17 


2 25 


43 


G 67 


7 00 


23 94 


1 20 


1 25 


8 00 


1 20 


2 00 


30 


17 


2 50 


75 


2 00 


1 00 


«tl50;? n 



33 




COMPANY NO. 3. 




House and land valued at 


700 00 


Engine, " 


750 00 


Hose carriage, " 


75 00 


350 feet hose, at 55 cents per foot, 


192 50 


150 " " " 33 " 


49 50 


10 spanners, at 25 cents each, 


2 50 


10 " straps, at 12 cents each, 


1 20 


1 coach wrench, 


1 34 


1 crotch " 


17 


6 suits oil clothing. 


5 00 


1 shovel. 


90 


2 brass lanterns with name ground in glass 


, 5 00 


1 pail, 17 cents ; 2 brooms, 25 cents. 


42 


1 dust brush, 25 cents ; 1 dust pan, 25 cts. 


, 50 


10 feet of rope, 


75 


1 five gallon tin can. 


2 00 


1 three quart " 


50 


2 two quart tin cans, 


75 


1 lamp filler. 


25 


2 hose brushes. 


1 25 


1 wash boiler. 


2 00 


2 gallons neats foot oil. 


2 00 


1 quart lamp oil, 


25 


51 badges at 42 cents each, 


21 42 


7 feet wood. 


4 00 


4 fluid lamps at 75 cents each. 


3 00 


1 pine table. 


1 25 


2 stoves and funnel, 


8 00 


6 chairs at 25 cents each. 


1 50 


8 spittoons at 33 cents each, 


2 64 


6 settees, 45 feet, at 35 cents per foot. 


15 75 


1 looking-glass, 


1 50 


1 brass snozzle. 


6 66 


1 iron 


4 00 


1 iron bar, 


1 25 


1 roll-book, $1 ; 1 record-book, $2, 


3 00 

i 



$1867 75 



34 
COMPANY NO. 4. 
House and land, with Hook and Ladder 



house, valued at 


1200 00 




Engine, newly repaired, valued at 


775 00 




1 hose carriage, cost 


102 06 




1 " " valued at 


20 00 




200 feet hose at 55 cents per foot, 


110 00 




200 " " " 33 " 


66 00 




200 " " not to be relied upon except 




in certain cases, at 20 cents per foot, 


40 00 




3 sets second-handed brakes, 


3 GO 




1 six gallon tin oil can, 


2 12 




1 wash boiler. 


2 50 




1 fluid can, 


25 




1 oil filler, 


17 




2 dippers, 


30 




1 sink, 


2 50 




1 dust brush, 17 cts. ; 1 dust broom, 12 ( 


cts., 29 




1 hose " 25 cts. ; 1 broom, 17 cts., 


42 




1 shovel, 83 cts. ; 1 dust pan, 17 cts.. 


1 00 




2 torch lights. 


1 51 




40 new badges at 50 cents each, 


20 00 




12 old badges at 12 cents each. 


1 44 




2 lanterns, 


1 00 




4 fire caps, 


2 GO 




5 woolen coats. 


5 00 




4 suits oil clothing. 


4 GO 




12 straps for hose at 1 shilling, 


2 00 




1 monkey wrench, 


75 




4 spanners at 25 cents each, 


1 00 




2 spanner belts, 


25 




7 settees, 63 feet, at 35 cents per foot. 


22 05 




8 chairs at 33 cents each. 


2 64 




1 new table. 


8 00 




5 lamps and hangings, 


1 67 




2 side fluid lamps. 


1 50 




1 glass fluid lamp. 


62 




4 spittoons at 33 cents each, 


1 32 




2 stoves and funnel, 


14 00 




1 pine table, 


1 00 




3-4 cord of wood, 


4 00 




1 wrench, 


17 






62421 


5?^ 



35 

COMPANY NO. 6, West Village. 



House (new) valued at 


413 00 


Engine, \i^lued at 


550 00 


Hose carriage, valued at 


25 00 


100 feet hose, at 50 cents per foot, 


50 00 


200 " " " 33 " 


66 00 


5 spanners at 25 cents each, 


1 25 


3 " straps, at 1 shilling each, 


50 


7 straps, at 25 cents each, 


1 75 


1 Jack wrench, 


50 


1 crotch wrench. 


17 


2 torch lamps 75 cents each. 


1 50 


1 gallon castor oil. 


1 25 


1-2 can blacking for hose. 


75 


1 three gallon tin can. 


67 


4 suits oil clothing, 


4 00 


1 stove and funnel, 


4 00 


6 pine benches at 75 cents each, 


4 50 


2 small tin cans. 


34 




<»1 IOC 10 






COMPANY NO. 7, East C 


ioNCOKD. 


House (new) and land, valued at 


270 00 


Engirxe, valued at 


550 00 


Hose carriage, 


25 00 


200 feet hose at 55 cents per foot, 


110 00 


100 " " " 33 " 


33 00 


8 spanners at 25 cents each. 


2 00 


4 " straps at 1 shilling each, 


67 


40 badges, (new,) 


17 00 


3 torch lamps. 


4 00 


4 suits oil clothing. 


4 00 


2 stoves and funnel. 


11 00 


5 settees, 42 feet, at 38 cents per foot, 


15 96 


4 chairs at 33 cents, 


1 33 


1 pine table. 


1 00 


1 looking-glass, 


1 25 


3 lamps and hangings, 


1 00 


1 lantern. 


25 


1 fire hook. 


8 00 


2 whiffletrees and chains, 


2 50 




$1,057 96 



36 

COMPANY NO. 8, Fisherville. 



House (new) and land, valued at 


500 00 


Engine, cost about $800, valued at 


700 00 


1 hose carriage, valued at 


20 00 


1 .« " (new,) cost 


102 06 


400 feet hose (nearly new) valued at 55 




cents per foot. 


220 00 


100 feet hose, some worn, valued at 40 




cents per foot. 


40 00 


2 stoves and funnel. 


8 50 


6 suits oil clothing, 


10 00 


6 common chairs at 2 shillings each. 


2 00 


7 settees, 60 feet, at 37 cents per foot. 


22 20 


1 axe. 


1 00 


1 oil can. 


17 


1 fluid can. 


50 


2 quarts fluid, . 


33 


1 iron bar. 


1 25 


6 spanners at 25 cents each. 


1 50 


3 " straps at 1 shilling each, 


50 




$1,630 01 



HOOK & LADDER COMPANY. 

House and land joining Company No. 4, taken 

in that Company's valuation. 
Carriage for hooks and ladders, valued at 
10 ladders 30 feet long, at 33 cts. per foot. 
2 ladders 12 feet long, " " 

2 large hooks with chains, 

1 No. 2 hook 
1-2 dozen pike hooks, 
4 axes, $1.25 each. 
About 175 lbs. rope at 15 cents per lb., 

2 shovels, 
2 pitch-forks, 
2 iron bars, 

2 brass lanterns, name ground in the glass 
1 monkey wrench, 
1 whiflletree, 
1-2 cord wood, 
1 hammer. 



150 00 


99 00 


7 92 


20 00 


8 00 


3 00 


5 00 


26 25 


1 50 


1 67 


1 50 


5 00 


1 00 


1 50 


2 75 


1 00 



37 



1 bell. 


12 00 


1 marling-spike. 


1 00 


2 stoves and funnel. 


14 00 


6 settees, 51 feet, at 38 cents per fool, 


19 38 


6 chairs at 33 cents, 


2 00 


2 office chairs. 


3 00 


1 pine table. 


1 25 


10 spittoons at 33 cents. 


3 30 


1 tin can, 


25 


1 broom. 


25 


3 side lamps at 81.25, 


3 75 


42 badges and keys at 50 cents, 


21 00 

,.<t 



i416 27 

ENGINE NO. 5, at N. B. Baker's barn, valued at 100 00 
" "1, valued at 5 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



COMPANY NO. 2, 
" 3, 

" 6,' 

" 7, 
" 8, 

Hook & Ladder Company, 

Engine No. 5, 

u 1, 


1,503 13 

1,867 75 

2,421 43 

1,125 18 

1,057 96 

1,630 01 

416 27 

100 00 

5 00 




$10,126 73 


BLIC RESERVOIRS— value of 


$2,500 00 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of 
the City of Concord : 

The undersigned, Chief Engineer of the Fire Depart- 
ment, reports that the department has been called out at the 
following times and places, since March 7, 1853. 

At about ten o'clock in the evening of March 9, 1853, a 
fire broke out in the basement of a building near the Rail- 
road Depot. The building was owned by Hosea Fessenden. 
The basement, in which the fire originated, was, or had 
been occupied as a carpenter's shop, by J. K. Green. The 
fire was speedily extinguished by the department. The 
goods of Blackmer & Walker, silver platers, in the story 
above the basement, were somewhat injured by smoke and 
water. Damage about $50,00. 

March 18, 1853, at about seven o.clock in the evening, 
there was a partial alarm of fire at Thompson's Block, on 
Main street, but the fire was soon extinguished, and with 
trifling damage. 

August 12, 1853, there was a partial alarm of fire at the 
residence of Dr. Gate, on Main street, occasioned as it is sup- 
posed, by the bursting of a bottle containing phosphorus. 

November 8, 1853, at five o'clock, A. M., there was a 
fire at the East Village, at the house of Gyrus T. Moore. — 
The house and nearly all the furniture was consumed. The 
loss was estimated as follows: Flouse, $1000 ; insured for 
$700. Personal property, $250, insured for $75. 

January 16, 1854, at about eight o'clock in the evening, a 
fire broke out at the " Pest House" in the West Village, — 
The building was entirely consumed: Loss estimated at 
$250. 

The department was never in a better condition. The 
engines, hose-carriages, hooks and ladders, are all in good 
repair. The Companies now organized are numbered and 
located as follows : 



39 

No. 2, at North end of State street. 
No. 3, at South end of Main street. 
No. 4, on Warren street. 
No. 6, at West Village. 
No. 7, at East Village. 
No. 8, at Fisherville. 
The Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, is located on 
Warren street. 

Besides the Engines belonging to the Companies above 
mentioned, the City have an interest in two other old Engines. 
One of these has been well repaired, during the year past, 
by a company of young men. A large portion of the re- 
pairs has been paid by private subscription. 

A list of the public reservoirs and a list of the Members of 
each Engine Company and of the Hook and Ladder Com- 
pany, will be found annexed hereto. 

I have paid out during the year past, various small bills 
for clearing off ice and snow from the reservoirs ; for horse 
hire and expenses when attending to the business of the de- 
partment, and for stationery and postage, amounting in all 
to $15 04. 

I have made no charge for my services as Chief Engineer. 
Respectfully submitted : 

N. B. BAKER, 

Chief Engineer of the Fire 
Department of Concord. 
Concord, February 1, 1854. 



The Public Reservoirs are as follows: 

One at South End Main street, opposite Abbot's Carriage 
Manufactory. 

One opposite the Thomsonian building, Main street. 

One near South Church at intersection of Main and Pleas- 
ant streets. 

Four in front of State House. 

One at intersection of Centre and Main streets. 

One opposite Merrimack County Bank, Main street. 

One in front of house of John H. George, Main street. 

One on State street, near Sewell Hoit's house, at head of 
Winter street. 



40 



One on South street, near N. B. Baker's house, opposite 
head of Wall street. 

One on Prince street near Carpenter's Shop. 

One on School street, near the Unitarian Church, located 
easterly from School House and opposite James R. Hill's 
premises. 

One on State street, near A. B. Currier's house. 

One on corner of West and State streets, near School 
house in District No. 9. 

One on Pleasant Street, near R. H. Sherburne's house, 
nearly opposite Geo. H. H. Silsby's house. 

One on Main street, near F. N. Fisk's house. 

Besides these, there are several others not strictly public 
reservoirs, as follows : Three near Warren street, between 
Main and Green streets ; one in roar of Call's Block ; one at 
the intersection of State and Washington streets ; one at the 
intersection of Main and Franklin streets, and various others 
of small capacities. 

At Fisherville, about 1000 feet from the canal, are three 
reservoirs. 



Officers and Meiii1>ers of Esi^iue Company No. 2. 



C. H. Morrison, - 
Geo. L. Kimball, 
B. G. Carter, 

A. H. WiGGIN, - 

E. E. Sturtevant, 

Luther Roby, 
True Osgood, 
Geo. F. Hill, 
Charles Pettingill, 
E. N. Doyen, 
R. Smith, 
H. S. Hodgdon, 
John D. A. West, 
M. Drew, 

C. F. Rolfe, 
W. F. Speed, 

D. W. Smith, 



Foreman. 

- 2nd Foreman. 
3rd Foreman. 

- Clerk. 
Treasurer. 

F. La Bonta, 
George Perry, 
Clinton Shaw, 
Gilman Leavitt, 
Timothy Flanders, 
Joseph L. Osgood, 
Charles Barker, 
H. H. Rolfe, 
Charles F. Woodbury, 
C. C. Drake, 
E. A. Miller, 
John Miller, 



41 



J. W. Wallace, 
Edward Hoit, 
James Tucker, 
C. D. Drew, 
P. P. Bixby, 
E. B. Robinson, 
John Glover, 
Benj. Leigh ton, 
Andrew Edmonds, 
C. E. Andrews, 



James Allen, 
John Leighton, 
Aaron Furguson, 
James H. Goodrich, 
H. J. B. Hudson, 
Daniel S. Moulton, 
Geo. H. Chickering, 
B. F. Popple, 
F. B. Leavitt. 



Officers and Members of Eug:iue Company No. 3. 

Charles W. Davis, Foreman. 

George S. Nye, Assistant Foreman and Chairman 

of Standing Committee. 

Ellis Robinson, ) q* j- n 

A r> } Standing Committee. 

Asa Clark, ) ° 

L. K. Peacock, Treasurer. 

Noah P. Webster, Clerk. 

Hiram Rolfe, Foreman of Hose. 

T. F. Newhall, L. L. Mower, 

J. C. Harvey, Alfred Rushlon, 

James M. Otis, Moses Rosebush, 

I. A. Hill, Lyman Davis, 

Thomas J. Mallard, Andrew J. Langley, 

E. C. Downs, Joseph Weeks, 

Samuel McCoUey, Lewis Dube, 

Leonard Bell, Andrew L. Lane, 

Geo. F. Whittredge, George N. Newhall, 

Joseph H. Lane, Alexander Laton, 

Joshua Goodrich, William B. Blake, 

Caleb S. Rodgers, John Burgum, 

Edwin Houston, James H. Smith, 

Wm. H. Sargent, Daniel Lynch, 

Wm. H. Allison, Jonathan Merrill, 

John Lull, Albert Fellows, 

William Carter, Samuel B. Duke, 

George Houston, Wells Sargent. 



42 



Officers and Members of £ng^nc Company No. 4. 

B. H. Lincoln, Foreman. 

Manley Darling, 2nd Foreman. 

Stephen Blanet, Treasurer. 

N. G. Carr, Clerk. 

L. P. Fuller, 3rd Foreman. 

John L. French, W. H. Prescott, 

John Stewart, B. F. Ham, 

H. A. Crumitt, G. W. Young, 

Joseph Wiser, A. Lamprey, Jr., 

H. B. Nealy, J. S. Black, 

W. B. Abbot, Charles Parmelee, 

Cyrus Peasley, F. A. Smith, 

W. Cushman, G. W. Stone, 

L. Sherman, W. H. Seavey, 

Geo. L. Boardman, J. W. Lamprey, 

John McCullough, Charles Abbot, 

S. Jennison, C. H. Shattuck. 



Officers and Members of Eng^ine Company No. 6. 

John Abbott, Foreman. 

Andrew Jacicson, Assistant Foreman. 

Chandler Eastman, Clerk. 

Daniel Holden, Treasurer. 

Simeon Abbott, Hiram Farnum, 

B. F. Dow, G. W. Brown, 
Joseph Eastman, A. P. Fenney, 2nd., 

C. li. Brown, Freeman Ferren, 
W. J. Clough, E. C. Fcrt-en, 
John Quinn, Moses Humphrey, 
J. H. Emeison, Sam'l Harden, 
W. H. Brown, J. Crosby, 
Jeremiah Upton, William Bcdd, 

M. F. Clough, Elisha Thomas, 

Emery Burgess, G. G. Jones, 

J. F. Dow, C. B. Knight, 

B. F. Holden, Charles Upton, 

R. L. Hall, O. A. Williams, 



43 



C. H. Clough, 
A. W. Clough, 
M. F. Farnum, 
C. F. Fletcher, 
H. Goodridge, 
Thomas Igo, 
Samuel Ames, 



Charles Herst, 
A. Willams, 
L. Humphrey, 
A. H. Baker, 
S. W. Killam, 
L. Sawyer, 
L. Fenney. 



Officers and Members of Engine Company No. 7. 

Ephraim S. Colley, Foreman. 

Chakles E. Robinson, Clerk. 

Thomas Carleton, Treasurer, 

Ebenezer Eastman, ^ 
Thomas Carleton, > Trustees. 
Charles P. Adams, j 

Cyrus Robinson, George W. Moody, 

Isaac Eastman, James Sanborn, 

Heman Sanborn, Mellen C. Eastman, 

William Page, Washington Hill, 

James M. Carleton, Theodore S. Clark, 

A. B. Seavey, Mark Floyd, 

Charles H. Sanborn, Jonathan Stimpson, 

Isaac Quimby, Edward A. Cilley, 

Winthrop St. Clair, Abraham B. Sanborn, 

John Jarvis, Jonathan E. Pecker, 

Smith Bean, James H. Carleton, 

Silas T. Bean, Geo. E. Lou gee, 

Jeremiah Sullivan, John T. Batchelder, 

Lewis Bean, Wm. L. Batchelder, 

James Frye, Richard Egan, 

Gardner Tenney, Cyrus R. Robinson, 

Josiah Tcel, Wm. Smith, 

Jonathan Kimball, Isaac T. Willis. 
L. B. Sleeper, 



44 



Officers and Meirabers of Engine Company No. §. 

Albert H. Drown, Foreman. 

David A. Brown, Assistant Foreman 

Samuel Merriabi, Clerk. 

Alpheus G. Howe, Daniel J. Pickard, 

Jacob P. Sanders, David Marsh, 

John A. Coburn, Jonathan C. Shepard, 

Samuel R. Flanders, Jeremiah S. Durgin, 

Pearly Knowles, Isaac G. Howe, 

Charles W. Hardy, Benj. Morrill, 

Moses H. Fifield, Benj. F. Stephens, 

Wm. H. Allen, Abram O. Blanding, 

Nathaniel Rolfe, Jacob C. Whidden, 

Hazen Knowlton, Jared Sparks, 

John G. Warren, Samuel Holt, 

Samuel C. Pickard, Daniel Cutting, 

Abial Rolfe, Sherman S. Briggs, 

Charles;.L. Batchelder, Albert L. Smith, 

Jacob B. Rand, Amos S. Alexander, 

Timothy C. Rolfe, Charles G. Knowles, 

Sylvester G. Long, Edmund Worth, 3rd, 

Lewis E. Edgerly, Daniel W. Martin, 

Charles Abbot, Henry F. Brown, 

Nathan Emerson, Benj. F. Caldwell, 

Jedediah S. Shepard, Edward McArdle. 
George B. Elliot, 



Officers and Members ©f Hook and Ladder 
Company No. 1. 

Charles E. Savory, Foreman. 

J. H. Jameson, 2nd do. 

G. W. Ingalls, Clerk. 

Chas. W. Batchelder, B. M. Locke, 

John Berry, .Tames H. Landers, 

Charles F. Barton, Amos H. Morrison, 

C. C. Currier, Geo. W. Mitchel, 

E. A. Crummitt, James H. Moulion, 

William Day, .lohn J. Morgan, 



45 



Joseph B. Ellis, 
Sam'l Edmonds, 
J. S. Fiske, 
John W. Ferrin, 
S. S. Graves, 
Smith L. Gale, 
Francis J, Griffin, 
J. C. Hager, 
Caleb Hanson, 
A. P. Hutchinson, 
Geo. H. Ingalls, 



Sam'l C. Moore, 
James M. Ordway, 
Charles W. Palmer, 
Isaac Page, 
Thomas J. Sawyer, 
Isaac S. St. Clair, 
Charles C, Shaw, 
John D. Teel, 
David A. Warde, 
Jno. B. Weeks, 
William Williamson. 



Report of Committee to Appraise 
CLTY FARM. 



Agreeably to a joint resolution of the City Council, passed 
February 4, 1854, the undersigned, standing committee on 
City Farm, met at the Alms House on Wednesday February 
8th, for the purpose of taking an inventory and making an 
appraisal of the Farm and personal property belonging 
thereto, and respectfully submit the subjoined schedule as 
the result of their deliberation. 

The committee would be unjust to the convictions of duty, 
to allow the first annual report of the city government to 
appear before our citizens, without some special reference 
to the interest of the city connected with that institution — an 
institution, as we believe, full of hope both for the unfortu- 
nate, as well as economy to the city, while under the hu- 
mane and prudent oversight of its excellent Overseer and 
Matron, Mr. and Mrs. Gill. 

We are at loss for items from which to report expendi- 
tures for support of the unfortunate at the City Farm. If 
the avails of the farm could be retained and expended for 
improvements thereon, and appropriated for the support of its 
inmates, we should be able to present a rare spectacle — that 
of a self-supporting asylum of twenty-five persons, nearly 
all of whom can render but little if any service. 

Since the purchase of the farm, the town has received 
into its treasury, from the various clippings, — in the sale of 
house-lots, timber, stone, railroad-crossing, &c., — a sum 
about equal to the original cost. Could the Overseer have 
retained the sum received the past year from the sale of 
timber alone, not a dollar would need have been drawn 
from the treasury, even for Overseer's salary, and without 
wliich there has not been drawn therefrom but a l^ow dollars, 
except for that and permanent improvements. 

Furthermore, if the sum received from the county for the 
support of paupers at the farm, had been paid ti.e Overseer, 



47 

or into the city treasurer, then, too, it would have been a 
self-sustaining establishment. 

From the sale of timber and stone, the receipts have 
reached the treasury. But for the large outlay for support 
of county paupers, not a cent has been realized, but the 
whole sum has been dissipated in the liquidation of the out- 
standing indebtedness of the town, which will more fully 
appear under its appropriate head. 

We assure the City Council and our fellow-citizens, that 
upon the Matron, mainly, devolves the oversight so essential 
to economy, as well as comfort to the unfortunate, and to 
the good judgment, firm, at the same time, mild deportment 
of that excellent woman, are we largely indebted for our 
success, to whom belongs the commendation of " well done" 
— and it affords us pleasure to know that a gratuity has been 
awarded her for that faithfulness. 

We beg a careful examination of the inventory and ap- 
praisal of the City Farm, stock, hay, grain, provisions, &c., 
belonging thereto ; and a family of twenty-five persons de- 
pending upon its income and good management for support; 
and with that, we challenge a comparison with any other 
farm in the city to show similar results from any thing like 
corresponding circumstances. 
Which is submitted by 

ROBERT DAVIS, 

JOSEPH EASTMAN, 

MOSES SHUTE, V Committee. 

HEMAN SANBORN, 

MOSES HUMPHREY, 
February 25, 1854. 



48 



Inventory and Appvaisal of Real and Personal 

Estate of and belonging: to the City Farm, 

February 8, 1854. 

Farm, 100 acres at fSO per acre, 5,400 00 

Buildings, 1,600 00 

$7000 00 

1 horse, 125 00 

4 oxen, 240 00 

7 cows, 150 00 

3 two years old heifers, 50 00 

4 yearlings, 32 00 

22 sheep, 60 00 

21 tons English hay at $16, 336 00 

7 tons brook hay at $10, 70 00 

Lot straw and corn fodder, 30 00 

4 shoats, 40 00 

125 bushels corn, 125 00 

6 " rye, 6 GO 

170 " oats, 85 00 

3 " peas, 3 00 

15 •' beans, 30 00 

6 " barley, 5 00 

300 " potatoes, 120 00 

12 " beets and carrots, 3 00 

15 " turnips, 2 50 

4 " slacked lime, 1 00 

3 1-2 barrels clear pork, 70 00 

3 1-2 " beef, 40 00 

2 " soap, 10 00 

1 " vinegar, 4 00 

1-2 " pickles, 2 50 

2 " flour, 16 00 

15 gallons molasses, 4 00 

18 lbs. dried apples, 1 20 

12 " tea, 2 50 

$1,663 70 

524 lbs. cheese, 52 40 

52 " butter, 10 40 

138 " lard, 13 80 



49 



192 lbs. ham, 19 20 

260 " tallow, 26 00 

16 " candles, 2 50 

100 " soap grease, 8 00 

62 "• green hide, 3 50 

278 " fresh beef, 19 46 

30 " " pork, 2 10 

15 " wool and rolls, 7 50 

43 yards flannel, 21 50 

10 " frocking, 5 00 

1 sleigh and harness, 25 00 

1 gig wagon, 20 00 

2 carts and pair wheels, 28 00 

6 ploughs, 28 00 

3 harrows, 8 00 

8 saws and axes, 8 00 

8 shovels and hoes, 5 00 

10 forks and rakes, 5 00 

5 scythes and snaiths, 5 00 

1 winnowing mill, 6 00 

2 sleds and barrow, 6 00 

Dry casks, boxes and tubs, 10 00 

1 cauldron kettle, 5 00 

6 stoves and funnel, 50 00 

Cheese press and hoops, 4 00 

" tub, basket, &c., 4 00 

1 time-piece, 3 50 

1 horse rake 8 00 

Horse collars, trace chains,whiflletrees,&c., 2 00 

15 feather beds at $5, 75 00 

15 bedsteads and cribs, 10 00 

19 pair blankets, 19 00 

30 pair sheets, 15 00 

7 coverlets, 7 00 

25 comforters, 25 00 

24 quilts, 24 00 

30 pairs pillow cases, 6 00 

18 bedsteads, 12 00 

16 straw ticks, 8 00 



2 beetles, 5 wedges, 2 00 

2 grind-stones, 4 00 

4 



$408 36 



$214 50 



50 



1 cultivator, 3 00 

4 ox-yokes, 8 00 

5 chains and bar, 5 00 

3 augers and chisels, 1 00 

25 cords hard wood at $3.50, 87 50 

25 " soft " "$2.50, 62 50 



40 plates, 1 00 

27 cups and saucers, 1 00 

30 spoons, 1 25 

40 tin milk pans, 6 00 

1 churn, 5 00 

10 pails, 2 00 

15 pail kettles, 1 25 

1 pot, 75 

3 pairs shovel and tongs, 1 00 

10 tables, 8 00 

Tin ware, 5 00 

4 chests and drawers, 2 00 

2 wheels 2 00 

30 knives and forks, 2 00 

44 chairs, 5 00 

2 looking-glasses, 1 00 

1 pair andirons, 1 50 

4 sad irons, 1 50 

Alleviator for the helpless, 15 00 



$173 00 



$62 25 
$9,521 81 



Cof^t and Estimated Value of Bridges. 

V^^hen Built. 

Free Bridge, 1849-50 

Federal Bridge, 1850-51 

2 bridges at Fishcrville,. . . 1849-50 

Horse-Hill Bridge, 1852 

Sewall's Falls " town paid, 1852 
" " " city " 1853 



Original Cost. 


Pie.scnt Value. 


$16,753 


$12,000 


15,950 


12,000 


5,150 


4,000 


2,676 


2,000 


1,735 




6,335 


8,000 



$38,000 



$100 


$240 


65 


165 


65 


165 


65 


165 


65 


165 




. $900 



51 

Estimated value of Property connected with 
Cejneteries. 

Hearses. Houses. Value. 

iVorth Cemetery, $140 

East Village, 100 

West Village, 100 

Fisherville, 100 

Mill Village, 100 

Total value, exclusive of lots and fence, 



Inventory of Property at City Clerk's Office. 

1 long writing table, 6 draws, valued at 10 00 

1 short " " 2 " " 5 00 

4 arm-chairs and one cushion, 6 00 

2 book racks, 2 00 

1 " case, 2 00 

1 stove and funnel, 4 00 

2 lamps and fluid can, 1 25 

Shovel, tongs, brush, dust pan, pitcher, and 

sundry other indispensables, 2 00 

1 small trunk, 1 25 

Sundry ink-stands, pen racks, scissors, sand- 
boxes, stationery, &c., in all valued at ... . 5 00 

1 Compiled Laws of N. H., 1 83 

1 " " " in Police C. Room, 83 

1 Town Officer, 75 

1 Geology of New-Hampshire, 2 87 

1 Boston City Ordinances and Municipal Reg., 3 00 
N. H. Reports are as follows, viz : 

1 part 3, vol. 6, N. H. Reports, 1 00 

1 " 3, " 8, " " 1 00 

1 each parts 1 and 2, vol. 9, N. H. Reports,. 2 00 

1 " "1,2 and 3, vol. 10, " » 3 OO 

1 » " " " " 11," " 3 00 

1 part 1 of vol. 13, " " 1 00 

1 each parts 1, 2 and 3, vol. 14, " " 3 00 

1 vol. 15 N. H. Reports, (bound,) 3 50 

1 each vols. 1 and 2 Foster's Reports, (bound,) 7 00 

$72 28 



52 
Inventory of Property at Marshal's Office, 

1 writing table, 8 00 

1 stove and funnel, 9 00 

Stationery, &c., 2 00 

5 sets of handcuffs, 6 67 

2 arm-chairs, 2 00 

1 copy of Codified Laws, 1 83 

$29 50 



CITY MARSHAL'S REPORT. 



To the Hon. Joseph Low, Mayor, and the Aldermen of the 
City of Concord : 

Agreeably to an ordinance, it becomes my duty to sub- 
mit the following Report of the doings of the Police from 
April 6th, 1853, to date. 

There have been one hundred and twelve arrests made by 
the Police and Night Watch, and for the following offences, 
viz : 

For Assault and Battery, 16 

Lacency, 18 

Burglary, 1 

Shop Breaking, 2 

Keeping Disorderly House, 1 

Making disturbance in Streets, 14 

Common Drunkards, 26 

Violation of License Law, 23 

Violation City Ordinance, 10 

Complaint to keep the Peace, 1 

112 

Of the above, 94 have been put upon trial, 17 were dis- 
charged by order of Court, and 18 were discharged without 
trial. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. C. PILLSBURY, City Marshal. 



REPORT OF POLICE JUSTICE. 



To the Hon. Joseph Low., Mayor, and the Aldermen of the 
City of Concord : 

Agreeably to the provisions of the City Charter, I herewith 
submit a report of the business of the Police Court since the 
8th day of April last, to the 1st day of February, 1854. 

You will also find annexed a statement of the fees and 
fines received by me during the same period of time. 

The whole dumber of entries on the civil docket is 47 ; of 
which, 19 have been contested cases. One Bastardy case 
transferred to the Court of Common Pleas, one transferred 
by appeal and one where question ai'ises as to title to real 
estate. 
The whole number of entries on the Criminal docket is 94 

viz : Assault and Battery, 14 

Larceny, 14 

Burglary, 1 

Shop-breaking, 1 

Concealing stolen property, 1 

Highway robbery, 1 

Bringing Pauper into the State, 1 

Obtaining goods by false pretences, 1 

Keeping disorderly house, 1 

Making disturbance in the street, 9 

Common Drunkards, 16 

Violation of License Law, 21 

Violation of City Ordinances, 10 

Perjury, 1 

Subornation of Perjury, 1 

On complaint to keep the Peace, 1 

— 94 
Of the foregoing 

Have been discharged, 17 

Transferred by appeal, 6 

Sentenced to Common Jail, 2 

" " House of Correction, 16 



55 

Recognized and committed for trial in C. C. P.,. 28 

Sentenced to pay fines, 24 

Bound to keep the Peace, 1 

— 94 

The whole amount of fees paid and charged is 270 46 

" " " fines paid is 126 00 



<fSS96 46 
CALVIN AINS WORTH, 

Police Justice. 
Concord, Feh. 1, 1854. 



CALVIN AINSWORTH, Police Justice, 





To the City of Concord, Dr. 


1854. 






Feb. 1. 


To Cash received for fees as per 
specifications on account book, $109 36 
To Cash received for fines, 126 00 
" " " " blanks sold, 12 77 


$248 13 








Cr. 






By Paid for Police Court Seal, 13 13 






Blanks, 40 50 






Morrill & Silsby's bill for 






dockets and acc't book, 11 95 






By cash received for complaints and 






warrants per George & Foster, 3 00 






By paid for repairing seal, 63 








69 21 



Balance in hand, $178 92 

CALVIN AINSWORTH, 

Police Justice. 
Concord, Feb. 1, 1854. 



TOWN PUNDS. 



The Committee having in charge the various funds be- 
longing to the City of Concord, respectfully submit the fol- 
lowing statement of the amount and present condition of 
those funds. 

Parsouag:e Fund. 

The available Parsonage Fund reported March, 

1853, was i4,296 76 

This sum is now invested as follows . 
4 shares of Mechanick's Bank stock, cost, 400 00 
Loaned town on certificate of Selectmen, 3,896 76 
Making a present available parsonage fund of $4,296 76 

The income of this fund for 1853, was as follows : 
Dividend on 4 shares Mechanick's Bank stock, 48 00 

Interest on loan to Town, 233 80 



Amounting to 8281 80 


This amount was apportioned by the Mayor and Aldermen, 


and has been paid or is ready to be paid 


to the several reli- 


gious societies as follows : 




North Congregational Society, 


$46 17 


South 


40 92 


West 


22 10 


East 


17 74 


Fisherville " 


8 77 


Unitarian " " 


33 17 


Baptist Society, 


29 42 


" " at Fisherville, 


11 37 


Methodist Society, 


15 87 


Episcopal " 


14 79 


Christian " 


6 93 


Universalist " 


25 16 


Freewill Baptist Society, 


7 98 


West Methodist " 


141 


Making in 


all, $281 80 



57 

School Fund. 

The available School Fund reported March, 1853, 

was $8,188 58 

Interest last year about 489 42 

Making a present available school fund of about 8,678 00 

This fund is invested as follows : 
Loaned Town on certificate of Selectmen, principal, 5,471 14 
Interest on same about 3,206 86 

Making a present available school fund of about $8,678 00 

It will be seen by the foregoing statement, that 

the City owes to the various funds about $12,576 65 

That is to say, to the Parsonage Fund, 

principal, 3,896 76 

Interest to Feb. 1, 1854, about 18 72 

To the School Fund, principal, 5,471 14 

And interest to Feb. 1, 1854, about. . 3,206 86 

Total indebtedness of Town to Funds, $12,593 48 

All which is respectfully submitted. , 

ASA FOWLER, /or the Committee. 
Concord, Feb. 27, 1854. 



EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD, 

UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF THE 

MAYOR AND ALDERMEN 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 1, 1854, UNDER 

THE APPROPRIATE HEAD, AND DETAILED UNDER 

THE VARIOUS EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY. 



State Tax. 

Paid State Treasurer, 2,342 25 

County Tax. 

Paid County Treasurer, 3,114 96 



-$5,457 21 



For Schools. 



For Dist 



ict No. 



93 35 

" 2, 69 35 

" 3, 218 41 

" 4, 66 88 

" 5, 80 58 

" 6, 63 92 

" 7, 83 71 

" 8, 104 92 

" 9, 794 71 

" 10, 2071 48 

" 11, 690 07 

" 12, 145 24 



59 

For District No. 13, 94 52 

u "14 oO d4 

" 15;." 5'^ 09 

,; u 16, 48 01 • 

u "17 36 68 

" is' 110 91 

" " 19,' 125 41 

u 20 308 32 

" 22''.'.".''*. ^0 41 

" " 23 28 95 

Alexander Farm, 2 95 

Andrew Buswell, ^^^^^^^ ^.g 

For Sclaool-HoMse Taxes. 

District No. 9, to Lund & Chickering,. • • ^00 00 

u ;. 10," Woodbrldge Odlin, 1,150 00 

" "20,"H.H.B,w„, fil%,382 00 

Teacliers' IiislitMte. 

Hall Roberts, $135 5 1 

Otitst^uding Town Bcltets Paid by tlic City. 

Zebulon Smith, for land damage,. .... ... 75 00 

Note to Caleb Page, princ.$500, nit. $32.58, 532 58 
Isaac Eastman, 3 days' police service,. .. .4 5W 

Execution Insane Asylum vs. town,. .... .21b /o 

Note to Lowell Eastman, land for Engme 

House No. 3, .......266 32 

Note Thomas S. Eastman, prmcipal and 

interest charged J. C. Pillsbury,. . . ... .108 83 

R. B. Hoit for snowing Horse-HiU Bridge ^ ^^ 

three times, • ';"*,' ^^ p- r 

.lohn P. Johnson for services as Town Cler k, 2b 55 ^ ^^^ ^^ 

For Scu all's Falls Bridge. 

Simpson, Balch & Co., per contract with 

the Selectmen for 1852 for stone work, 2,386 25 

Peter Paddleford, for lumber and materi- 
als, and labor constructing said bridge 
per contract with Selectmen, 3,5D7 95 



60 

Hiram Simpson, for extra stone work, 144 96 
David Abbot, Jr., for lumber, filling and 

grading abutments, 218 16 

Joseph Eastman, labor and expenses, 27 98 
Paid interest on city order No. 83, to 

John Abbot, 4 56 



-$6,339 86 



Expeaidittires on Roads and Bridges. 

Hiram Simpson for fence at Sand Bank, 4 25 
Concord Railroad Co. for plank, 1 88 

Aaron Q. Farnum,Burnham's Brook Br., 28 42 

James F. Lund, lumber for Dist. No. 28 : 
Paid George Frye, used in Ward 6, 91 05 

" G. W. Ordway, " " 7, 6 25 

" A. B. Holt, " " 5, 6 86 

" Robert Chase, " " 5 and 6, 46 60 

Jona, P. Leavitt, labor in Dist. No. 8, 15 25 

G. W. Ordway for new bridge at Iron Works, 41 68 
Edw. Gould, plank' for Lower Suncook Br., 13 10 
W. Pecker, labor near J. M.Dearborn's store, 26 21 
Moses M. Davis, in District No. 20, 17 55 

F. B. Carter, " " 30, 11 50 

Albert Ordway, " " 27, 2 50 

Thos. W. Abbot, " " 20, 22 65 

John Jarvis, " " 6, 12 50 

A. Q. Farnum, " " 1, 57 85 

W. Pecker, labor and expense at Fed. Br., 40 00 



B. G. Davis, labor on Soucook Hill and Br., 12 00 
Road Commrs., city rs. Montreal R. Co., 57 10 
A. G. Saltmarsh, per order of City Council, 

at head of Franklin street, 40 00 

John C. Briggs, engineering, 58 00 

Isaac Virgin, labor in District No. 3, 23 50 

Benjamin Parker, for surveying, 12 00 

John Lock, for labor in District No. 7, 3 70 

Nathan Farley, marble for permanent bounds, 1 50 
Wm. Pecker, labor at Federal Bridge, 5 50 

J. F. Potter, highway & culvert Dist. No. 4, 9 72 
Henry Martin, Jr., on new road " " 19, 7 30 

C. H. Dow, horse & wagon Lund &; Ordway, 4 25 
H. Sanborn, snowing Fed. Bridge 3 times, 10 25 



$446 10 



$244 82 



61 

Cyrus Paige, surveyor District No. 9, to re- 
move the indictment on Main street, 69 79 
James F. Lund, agent for City Council, for 
Warren street. 
Main " 
Soucook Bridge, 
East side the river, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 
His services 13 days, at $1.50, 

James F. Lund, agent, for expenses on 
Main street, 

Common sewer on State street, 
Sundry bills for labor, 
Hopkinton road, 
South Bog " 

Stephen Brown, for lumber Dist. No. 27, 
R. B. Hoit, snowing H. Hill Bridge twice, 
S. D. Colby, plank used at Josiah Hardy's 
J. D. Watkins, labor in Dist. No. 12, 
Robt. Knowlton, " " " 15, 

J. M. Ordway, " Free Bridge, 
John O. Langley, Soucook " 

John D. Teel, repairing Free Bridge, 

James F. Lund, for bal. on roads indicted, 

Henry Rolfe & Sons, for plank, 

G. W. Ordway, services on road, 

Dan. D. Clark, repair'g highway Dist. No.2^ 

John Jarvis, " " " " 6, 



Fire Departisicnt. 

Engine Co. No. 3, repairs, painting, &c., 81 79 

A. H. Drown, new engine house for No. 8, 259 07 

J. M. Bennett, painting Engine No. 2, 8 00 

Concord R. R. Co., freight of " " 4 50 

Tilton & Gilman, repairs of Nos. 2 and 6, 10 50 

Nathan Stickney, reservoir at West's Brook, 75 00 

John Abbot, new engine house for No. 7, 413 85 

$852 71 



108 95 




49 10 




32 93 




58 92 




73 45 




19 50 




1 


cjio fi4 


24 37 


]?4:14 D'i 


390 04 




200 61 




71 75 




298 05 




48 22 




2 00 




, 5 28 




5 14 




2 21 




50 




38 50 




<!t 


1,086 67 


2 75 


233 62 




7 25 




2 50 




I, 10 05 




8 00 






^ORA ^^ 




$2,454 40 



62 

N. P. Fogg, repairing reservoirs, 9 25 

Geo. D. Abbot, painting and lettering En- 
gines 2, 4, 8, 5 00 
Hunneman &Co., for repairs Engine No. 2, 249 GO 
H. Fessenden,repair'g hose & badges, " 4, 11 42 
H. M. Moore,new tower, Engine house," 2, 108 72 
H. H. Holt, services in care of Engine 

and house No. 2, 10 50 

Engine Company No. 3, for sundries, 42 14 

" " " 4, sundries and stew- 

ardship, 20 87 

E, H. Houston, repairing hose carriage for 

No. 3, 35 00 

L. P. Fuller, sundries and stewardship No. 4, 14 82 
Warde & Walker, shovel and brush, " " 1 96 
Cyrus W. Paige, repairing reservoir, 1 25 

O. G. Ingalls, for 2 hose carriages for Nos 

4&8. 
Paid E. H. Houston, ironing hose carr'ges, 

" J. C. Plarvey, for painting " 

" Hunneman & Co., for springs, 

" Blackmer & Walker, plated work, 

" Wm. F. Carr, 2 hose boxes. 
Wheels, axletrees and reel drum, 

Lowell Eastman, repairing reservoir north 

end, 20 17 

Lowell Eastman, Engine house No. 4, 20 15 

Blackmer & Walker, figures No. 4, 6 67 
H. H. & J. S. Brown, Engine house and 

hose shaft, No. 8, 5 95 

H. M. Moore, serv'es as assistant engineer, 3 00 

Engine Company No. 3, for sundries, 28 50 

Firemen's services 1 year Eng. Co. No. 6, 92 00 

Steward's " " " " 12 00 

Geo. Dame, horses to draw engine to fire, 2 00 
N. B. Baker, expenses paid out as Chief 

Engineer, 15 00 

Engine Co. No. 8, for stewardship, $10 ; 

and incidentals, $7.77, 17 77 

E. S. Collcy for Eng. Co. No. 7, sundries, 19 17 



111 50 


25 00 


1 25 


7 75 


15 00 


43 61 



$509 93 



$204 11 



$205 44 



63 



Moses Humphrey, for making appraisal of 

the property belonging to Fire Dept., 5 00 

Engine Co. No. 3, firemen's services, 60 75 

'• " " 2, " " 15 75 

" " 2, 67 

" " " 2, sundries, 41 94 

'• " " 2, firemen's services, 126 25 

" " 7, " " 135 00 

a u 4^ u u 74 00 

" " " 4, wood and sawing, 6 00 

Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1, services, 110 25 

" " " stewardship & sundries, 25 38 

Engine Co, No. 3, firemen's services, 86 00 



-$723 93 
$2,496 12 



Police and AVatcIi. 



John Greely for building Lobby, 8 00 

1 50 
Jos. J. Wyman, Watchman, May 20, to 

August 31, 103 00 
Sumner & Swift, 6 pair handcuffs, 8 00 
J. W. Pillsbury, Lumber for Lobby, 28 65 
Thos. A. Ambrose, horse and wagon. Pills- 
bury, et. als., 2 75 
James Jones, extra keys for Lobby, and 

office, &c., 3 50 
Daniel A. Hill, desk and table for Police 

Court room, 6 50 
J. L. Cilley, service as Police and assistant 

Marshal, 41 15 

True George, boai'ding prisoners &c., fees, 8 83 

D. S. Webster, moving lumber to lobby, 75 

C. H. Norton, rent &c^, for Watchmen, 20 00 

Moore, Cilley & Co., hardware for lobby, 9 97 

J. J. Wyman, Watchman Sept. 1 to Dec. 31, 19 00 

G. C. Robinson, Policeman up to Aug. 12, 40 35 

John Pettcngill as Constable, 8 84 
S. B. Whicher, Watchman May 1, to 

Dec. 31, 250 00 

Isaac Eastman, police service, 2 50 

J. S. Durgin, building Lobby at Fisherville, 38 25 



64 



James Hoit, police services and expenses, 20 45 
J. J. Wyman, Watchman, Dec. 1, to Jan. 

31, 1854, 62 00 

J. J. Wyman, bed covers for lobby and paid 

for horse, 2 00 

Lowell Eastman, police service, 19 00 

J. B. Whicher, \Vatchman, Dec. 31 to Jan. 

31, 1854, 31 00 

Thos. P. Hill, police service, 10 00 

Josiah Stevens, ass't. Justice Police Court, 24 00 
G. C. Robinson, police services and irons 

for lobby, 13 50 



Lincoln & Shaw, for rent for Marshal, 10 00 

G. Sanders & Co., Stove for Marshal's office, 9 53 
J. M. Ordway, police and night watch, 6 25 

E. G. Kilburn, police expense, 3 00 

Concord Gas Light Co., for the City Marsh'l, 3 00 
Abraham Bean, for police service and ex- 
pense paid, 9 07 

JohnC. Pillsbury, for paid 

Jos. J. Wyman, Night Watch, 62 50 

L. R. Cook, " " 2 bills, 37 25 

H. H. Holt, " " 23 75 

John C. Pillsbury for paid 

John B. Sanborn for wood, 4 78 

T. A. Ambrose for Horse and Wagon to 

Fisherville, 1 00 

Charles R. Brown, for Wood, 4 50 

H. C. Sanborn, for posting bills, 50 

For sundry small items not enumerated, 6 76 



855 49 



40 85 



123 50 



17 54 



$1,037 38 



Printing and Stationery 

Butterfield & Hill, for Printing, 
John F. Brown, Books and Stationery, 
Cyrus Barton, printing Blanks and Ordi- 
nances, 
Barton & Pladlcy, Printing, 



3 87 
143 88 



55 50 
4 50 



65 

Morrill & Silsby, Printing and Stationery, 38 71 

McFarland & Jenks, " " 35 50 

Wm. Buttcrtield, " " 29 75 

Barton & Hadley " " 39 50 

E. B. Tripp, blanks for Marshal, 6 25 
G. G. Fogg & Co., printing Ordinances &c., 28 25 

J. F. Brown, for Stationery, 28 28 

Incidental Expenses. 

J. J. Wyman, for repairing office window, 50 

J. E. Lang, 2 trips to Manchester to examine 

books, 4 00 

J. S. Noyes, making taxes, school district No. 
9, 10, 20, and Collector's Book, 15 days, 
at $2,00, 30 00 

James Hoit, putting up signs to city offices, 1 50 
David Staniels, cord wood, P. Court room, 3 50 
Ira Abbot, cord hard wood, C. Clerk's room, 4 25 

C. Smith, sawing 2 cords wood, 2 00 
N, D. Dunlap, sawing and splitting wood for 

City clerk, 1 33 

Henry Farnum, cord hard wood for C. clerk, 4 25 
Henry E. Baldwin, City Seal, 7 00 

J. Carter, Postage bill, 1 56 

G. Saunders & Co., for Jury boxes, 6 81 

Joel Frazier, use, and cleaning State house, 2 00 
G. D. Abbot, 3 signs for City offices, 13 00 

J. Carter, for Postage, 2 24 

H. C. Sanborn, posting bills, 83 

John Abbot, 5 days making taxes, a $2, 10 00 

2 1-2 School-house taxes, 5 00 

3 to divide school money ,6 00 

3 " Parsonage " 6 00 27 00 

J. S. Durgin, use of Hall 2 days for Ward 

meetings, 6 00 

J. Carter, for Postage, 2 85 

J. Prescott & Co., damage of Buggy, 15 00 

D. A. Hill, large table for Marshal's office, 8 00 
J. P. Durgin, freight of Guns from Fishenalle,2 00 
Geo. Dame, horse and carriage per order of 

Mayor, 8 62 



413 99 



$154 24 



66 

Salaries of City Officers 

Moses Cass, City Messenger, 

Moses Gill, Overseer at City Farm, 

J. S. Noyes, 18 days assessor and making 

taxes, 
Jona. E. Lang, 8 3-4 days as assessor, 
Nathan Call, 16 " " 

Wm. Pecker, 17 " « 

John Abbot, 15 " " 

Nathan Chandler, 7 1-2 " 

Wm. M. Carter, 17 days as assessor. 
Superintending School Committee, 
For Mayor, 
City Clerk, 

" Treasurer, 

" Marshal, 

" Solicitor, 
Clerk Common Council, 
Moses Gill in full as Overseer City Farm, 
Police Justice, 



2,365 
City Paupers not at the Alms House. 

Joseph Brown, coffin and attending funeral, 5 50 
" " 2 coffins and robes for Mrs. 

Abbot and a child, 5 50 

Town of Loudon for Sally Brown, 25 00 

Andrew I. Hill, wood for sundry paupers, 19 OO 
Dr. James F. Sargent for Eben Burnham, 32 08 
Town of Hooksett for Powell child, 30 00 

Eben. Eastman for Mrs. Abbot, 30 83 

H. Sanborn, funeral expenses Mrs. Abbot,&c., 4 00 
Jer.S.Durgin, removing pauper to Almshouse, 1 00 
Augustus H. Robinson for C. W. Robinson, 4 50 
Geo. C. Robinson, carrying D. Davis and 

family to Almshouse, 1 50 

D. A. Hill, coffin for E. Burnham and a child, 2 75 
Dr. J. F. Sargent, services at Almshouse, 12 00 
Kimball & Hoit for David Dunlap, 4 04 

Eben. Eastman, in full for Mrs. L. Abbot, 5 00 



2100 




150 00 




36 00 




17 50 




32 00 




34 00 




30 00 




15 00 






335 50 


34 00 




221 33 




200 00 




400 00 




100 00 




500 00 




50 00 




100 00 




175 00 




250 00 




noA 00 





67 



12 75 
3 00 



Town of Hooksett for Powell child. 
Dr. J. F. Sargent for Mrs. L. Abbot, 

John C. Pillsbury, for paid — 
N. P. Fogg, wood for Mrs. Arlin, 
Charles R. Brown, wood for D. Dunlap, 
C. H. Norton for Joel Puffer, 
J Prescott & Co. for horses and carriage hire, 17 25 

$224 20 

Interest Account. 

Paid interest on note to Concord Female 

Charitable Society, 
Paid interest on note to Savings Bank, 



3 50 

4 50 
50 



56 00 

57 70 



$113 70 



County Paupers. 



George C. Robinson, for moving Mrs Magoon 

and daughter to Alms House, 
Paid J. Prescott & Co. for team for do., 
For carrying insane man to Asylum, 
" taking Billy Barnes from Dark Plain to 

Alms House, 
For team for do., 
Kimball & Hoit, for Mrs. Burk, 

John C. Pillsbury, for paid — 
S. M. Currier, wood for John Drew, 
W. H. Brown, wood for Dorety, 
J. Dorety, for Mrs. Burk, 
John Abbot, wood for John Murphy, 
Dr. H. J. M. Cate, for Wm. Savage, 
Insane Asylum for Dennis Scammell, 

John Golding for Mrs. Story's children, 
H. H. & J. S. Brown, for Mrs. Claney, 
Kimball & Hoit, for Mrs. Gates, 
Michael Coleman, for support of Maraga, 
H. B. Foster, for medicine for " 

Ellen Coleman, for nursing sick man, 

ITIilitia. 

Francis Farnum and J. N. Flanders, for en 

roling men, 
B. F. Watson, for do., 



1 25 


1 25 


50 


1 25 


1 00 


3 04 


4 00 


4 50 


1 50 


4 25 


3 50 


18 64 


27 47 


8 00 


1 80 


2 17 


33 00 


2 66 


2 00 

$ 


4 00 


5 00 



$121 78 



$9 00 



68 

Cemeteries. 

Heman Sanborn, for repairing fence, $6 36 

lleal(]i Department. 

Dr. Timothy Haynes, 6 00 
J. Prescott & Co., horse and carriage, Drs. 

Carter and Chadbourne, 5 50 

Dr. James F. Sargent, about small pox, 8 00 

" " " " for vaccination, 3 25 

Dr. Wm. Prescott, advice in small pox, 2 00 



$24 75 



Professiona.1 Services. 

George &, Foster, 40 00 

Asa Fowler, 70 00 



-$110 00 



For Permanent ISepairs on City Farm. 

To paid Moses Gill, 150 00 

" Joseph Eastman, 14 76 

" Moses Humphrey, 1 50 

$166 26 

Distribution of Farsonag^e Fnnds. 

Paid Asa Fowler for distribution, $233 80 

Abatement of Taxes by orders oaa Treasury. 



Paul Wentworth, over 70, 


1 99 


Isaac Farnum, " " 


146 


L. D. Stevens, taxed for house not his, 


10 98 


Arthur Fletcher, for error, 


2 47 


Hiram Richardson, " 


103 


B. F. Libby, 


146 


Enoch Fk Eastman, " 


2 00 




21 39 


Recapitulation. 




For Outstanding Town Debts, 


1235 53 


State Tax, 


2342 25 


County Tax, 


3114 96 


Schools, 


r>476 79 



For School house Taxes, 




District No. 9, 800 




" 10, 1 150 




" 20, 432 


2382 00 


Teacher's Institute, 


135 51 


Sewall's Falls Bridge, 


6339 86 


Highways and Bridges, 


2454 40 


Fire Department, 


2496 12 


Police and Watch, 


1037 38 


Printing and Stationery, 


413 99 


Incidental Expenses, 


154 24 


Salaries of City Officers, 


2365 83 


City Paupers not at the Farm, 


224 20 


Interest on City debt, 


113 70 


County Paupers, 


12178 


Militia, 


9 00 


Cemeteries, 


6 36 


Health department, 


24 75 


Professional services, 


110 00 


Permanent improvement on city Farm 166 26 


Distribution of Parsonage Fund, 


233 80 


Abatement of taxes by order on 




Treasury, 


2139 


Abatement of taxes by Mayor and 




Aldermen, 


231 23 




31,211 33 



A list of Outstanding Orders on the City Trea- 
surer, which were not presented to him for 
payment before settling his accounts. 

Roads and Bridges. 



Jason D. Watkins, No 

Daniel D. Clark, 

John D. Teel & Co., 

Giles W. Ordway, ' " 


. 194, 
223, 
226, 
222, 


5 14 

10 05 

2 75 

2 50 


Salaries of City Officers. 


Joseph Low, Mayor, No 
John C. Pillsbury, City Marshal, " 
Wm. M. Carter, Asssessor, " 
Superintending School Com,, " 
Moses Gill,Overseer of the Poor," 


. 196, 
233, 
232, 
175, 
213, 


200 00 
500 00 
34 00 
231 33 
175 00 



20 44 



1,140 33 



Fire Department. 

Engine Company No. 8. 

A. H. Drown, No. 207, 17 77 

N. B. Baker, " 201, 15 00 

H. H. & J. S. Brown, " 185, 5 95 



38 72 



School Order. 

Samuel Kimball, Dist. No. 15, 38 09 

City Paupers. 



Town of Hooksett, No. 235, 12 75 

" 159, 2 75 



15 50 



Police and Watch. 

Lincoln & Shaw, No. 217, 10 00 



71 
County Panpers. 

H. H. & J. S. Brown, No. 135, 1 80 

Abatement of Taxes. 



Hiram Richardson, No. 238, 
E, F. Eastman, '• 240, 
Arthur Fletcher, " 212, 
B.F. Libbey, " 239, 


1 03 

2 00 
2 47 
1 46 


6 96 


Incidental Expenses. 






No. 159, 
J. P, Durgin, " 199, 


8 00 
2 00 


10 00 



$1,281 84 



HIGHWAY TAX, 



EXPENSES !N LIBOR AT 10 CENTS PER HOVB. 



Surveyors Accounts for tlie Year euding 
February I, IS 34. 



Dr. 






Cr. 


To amount of Taxes committed to Surveyors. 




Bv am't expended. 


1853. 






1854. 


May 12. A. Q. Farnum, 


No. 1, 


36 25 


Feb. 1. 34 59 


Enoch Jackman, 


2, 


24 77 


26 67 


Isaac Virgin, 


3, 


37 38 


36 36 


J. F. Potter, 


4, 


32 14 


31 20 


(( (( 


4, 


7 48 non resid't 7 48 


Amos Paul, 


5, 


47 04 


48 35 


John Jarvis, 


6, 


153 66 


14147 


John Lock, 


7, 


17 41 


20 37 


Jona. P. Leavitt, 


8, 


30 69 


30 00 


Cyrus W. Paige, 


9, 


747 11 


675 61 


Daniel Holden, 


10, 


101 99 


94 35 


Asa A. Blanchard, 


11, 


16 29 


16 29 


Jason D. Watkins, 


12, 


252 47 


252 47 


Kufus D. Scales, 


13, 


39 95 


36 50 


Sherman D. Colby, 


, 14, 


22 22 


18 50 


Robert Knowlton, 


15, 


14 40 


14 40 


Josiah Runnels, 


16, 


23 14 


26 25 


Wm. D. Colby, 


I'J', 


20 74 


20 74 


Henry Farnum, 


18, 


4185 


36 58 


Henry Martin, Jr., 


19, 


24 11 


24 11 


Francis Farnum, 


20, 


23 33 


no return. 


Daniel Farnum, 


21, 


36 89 


(( 


Samuel B. Hall, 


22, 


36 58 


" 



73 



May 12. 



Atkinson B. Webster, 


23, 02 29 Feb. 


1. 52 13 


Daniel D. Clark, 


24, 16 96 


16 96 


Nelson Young, 


25, 57 61 


55 79 


Thomas W. Abbot, 


26, 25 44 


25 44 


Stephen Brown, 


27, 1195 84 


1146 78 


James F. Lund, 


28, 974 77 


974 77 


Alexander Thompson, 


29, 19 72 


22 95 


Franklin B. Carter, 


30, 22 06 


22 06 


Total 


, $4,152 58 ^ 


$3,909 17 


Balance in g 


5urveyors hands, 


243 41 



$4,152 58 



REPORT 

OF 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 



Your committee have devoted much time and attention to 
the manner of assessing and making the taxes for the first 
year under a city government ; and whilst due allowance is 
to be made for inexperience, we regret to say there are er- 
rors, both in the assessment, and in the computation of the 
taxes, which requires a large share of charity to explaiii — 
unless from a want of experience — which alone may over- 
come the evil. 

In the examination of the taxes made and committed to 
John C. Pillsbury, for the current year, if our cast be cor- 
rect, there is an undercharged balance in favor of the city, 
of one hundred-and-ninety-nine dollars, thirty-eight cents ; 
(199.38;) and from the best evidence afforded us, we find 
that there should be allowed him on his list, the sum of two 
hundred-thirty-one dollars, twenty-three cents, (231.23,) 
agreeably to the annexed list, a large share of which arises 
from errors in assessment of the taxes. 
Which is respectfully submitted by 

ROBERT DAVIS, ^ 

JOSIAH STEVENS, | 

MOSES SHUTE, } Committee. 

MOSES HUMPHREY, I 

THOMAS BAILEY, J 
February 18, 1854. 



75 

liist of Taxes, 'which for various causes are re- 
commended for Abatement on the Tax Book, 
committed to John €. Pillshury, for 1853-4. 

WARD 1. 

School 
house. 

Cutting, John O., over seventy, 1 47 

Danforth, Geo. C, not in the city taxing time, 1 47 52 1 99 

Jackman, John, dead, 1 47 52 1 99 

Mitchell Leonard, not known, 1 47 52 1 99 

Palmer, Israel A., left early in May, 1 47 52 1 99 

Patterson, Cyrus, gone, 1 47 52 1 99 

Wilkinson, W. A. I., gone, 1 47 

12 89 
WARD 2. 

Graham, B. R, left town in 1852, 1 47 

Hay ward, Luther, returned to Vermont, 1 47 

Holt, Cyrus, belongs in Loudon, taxed twice,. . . .3 30 

Parker, Benjamin, 2nd, in Massachusetts, 1 47 

Price, Andrew J., poor, 1 47 

9 18 

WARD 3. 

Abbot, Albert, in Massachusetts, 1 47 

Abbot. Benj. D., gone West, 1 47 

Arlin, Charles L., poor, 1 47 

Beedle, Milo, in Canada, 1 47 

Harrington, John A., not to be found, 1 47 

Knowles, G. K., a sick man, 1 47 

8 82 

WARD 4. 

Aldrich, Wm. H., non. est., 1 47 

Ayer, James, infirm sick man, 1 47 

Bailey, Bartlett, not to be found, 1 47 

Brown, Ira E, 2nd, not known, 1 47 

Brown, Rufus, belongs and pays taxes in 

Kingston, 1 47 

Blackstone, Robert, lives and paid taxes in 

Ward 6, 1 47 

Calef, John F., in New York, 1 47 

Clark, William, not to be found, 1 47 

Collins, John, not of age, 147 22 169 



76 

Connell, Benj., left town July, 1852, 1 47 

Cross, Othniel, poor man, only one arm,. . 1 4T 
Cutter, Asa S., taxed twice in Ward 4,. . . 1 47 
Davis, Henry C, not been in U.S. for 3yrs 1 47 

Davis, Charles R., 1 47 

Dutton, Ashley C, gone, 1 47 

Earle, Horace A., was taxed in Lebanon,. 1 47 

Eagle, O. A., gone, 1 47 

Fisk, John B., in California, 1 47 22 1 69 

Gibson, Ebenezer, non. est., 1 47 

Haines, James H., Epsom Almshouse,. . . 1 47 

Herbert, Samuel S., gone, 1 47 

Hooker, Lewis H., Student from Vermont, 1 47 

Jacobs, Enoch, left before tax was made,. . 1 47 22 1 69 

Lyons, Henry D., gone West, 1 47 22 1 69 

Page, Erasius, at Lawrence, 1 47 

Pease, C. C, lives in Lowell at last date,. . 1 47 

Pillsbury, Joseph, 73 years old, 1 47 22 1 69 

Pillsbury, Amos, in Virginia over a year, . 1 47 

Paul, Horace A., taxed twice, 1 47 

Robhison, J. L., belongs in Lowell, 1 47 

Robinson, Charles A., belongs in Vermont, 1 47 

Robv, James, misfortune, 1 47 

Rassett, Aholph, gone, 1 47 22 1 69 

Spead, William F., minor, 1 47 

Stickney, Moses, dead, 1 47 

Sladen, Abraham, non. est., 1 47 22 1 69 

Waldren, Andrew L, a student, 1 47 

Watts, William, " dead, 1 47 

Wardwell, John, not of age, 1 47 22 1 69 



WARD 5. 

Ayer, Charles 2nd, gone, 1 47 

Boynton, George, 1 47 

Bellows, A. H., taxed in Wards 5 and 6,. . . 
Batchelder, Amos G., lives in Epping, .... 1 47 
Carleton, Thomas C, taxed in Wards 4 & 5, 

Carleton, John, not to be found, 1 47 

Crockett, Thomas S., unknown, 1 47 

Dodge, W. M., a minor, 1 47 

Dunlap, Henry S., taxed in Wards 4 and 5, 





59 09 


22 


169 


22 


169 




1 47 


22 


169 




147 


22 


169 


22 


169 


22 


169 




147 



77 



French, Josiah 2ncl, taxed in Lowell, 1 47 

Fisk, William P., in New York, 1 47 

Gilman, Albert H., in Boston, 1 47 

Greenough, James, left suddenly, 2 70 

Green, Josiah K., gone to Texas, i 47 

Griffin, Francis J., taxed in Wards 2 and 5,1 47 
Hall, William, " " 4 and 5, 

Hale, Enoch, left for Vermont in April,. . .1 47 

Harriman, Kobeit G., non. est., 1 47 

Harvey, Edward, a minor, 

Johnson, Joseph, not known, 1 47 

Lake, Wingatc N., 1 47 

Lawrence, Isaac, gone, 1 47 

Leach, Samuel B., not to be found, 1 47 

Mayhan, Barney, taxed in Wards 5 and 6,.l 47 
Peaslee, Cyrus C, " " " 

Pratt, James, gone, 1 47 

Spiller, Joseph B. and D., poor and infirm, 1 47 
Smith, Plorace B., taxed in Wards 4 and 5, 
Stevens, Otis E., left for parts unknown,. .1 47 
Smart, William R., belongs to Hopkinton,.! 47 
Tripp & Osgood, the same properjy taxed 

twice, 4 88 

Webster, Ward H., in California, 1 47 

Wheeler, Charles L., gone, 1 47 

Wiggin, A. H., taxed in Wards 5 and G,. .1 47 
Whidman, Charles, not known, 1 47 



WARD 6. 
Abbott, Geo. W., gone 1 47 

Batchelder, David, belongs in Bristol, 1 47 

Bennett, Moses, over 70, 1 47 

Barber, James, taxed twice in Ward 6,. . . . 

Cloudman, Thomas, gone, 1 47 

Cook, Lorin R., taxed twice in Ward 6,. . . 

Dunklee, John W., a minor, 

Dearborn, John, unknown, 1 47 

Dadman, John, taxed in Wards 5 and 6,. . . 1 47 
Fellows, George A., belongs in Grafton,. .1 47 
Fellows, Portus A., " " i 47 

Fletcher, Edward H., lives in Alabama,. . . 
Fletcher, George S., " " 



22 


169 


22 


1 69 


22 


169 


40 


3 10 


22 


169 


22 


169 




1 47 


22 


169 


22 


169 




1 47 


22 


1 69 


22 


169 


22 


169 


22 


169 


22 


169 




147 


22 


1 69 


22 


169 




1 47 


22 


169 


22 


169 


72 


5 60 


22 


1 69 


22 


169 


22 


169 


22 


169 



62 93 



36 


183 


36 


1 83 


36 


183 




4 60 


36 


183 




147 




147 


36 


183 


36 


1 83 


36 


183 


36 


183 




147 




147 



78 

Fifield, J. K., unknown, 147 36 183 

Greeley, John P., belonged in Lebanon,. . .1 47 36 1 83 

Garland, Dexter D., gone, 147 36 183 

Kenney, Otis C, unknown, 1 47 36 1 83 

Page, John M., in Henniker Almshouse,. , . 1 47 36 1 83 

Palmer, Samuel, over 70, 1 47 36 1 83 

Sanborn, George W., killed in Lawrence,. .1 47 36 1 83 

Squires, Justice, in State Prison, 2 70 66 3 36 

St. Clair, Isaac P., never found him, 1 47 36 1 83 

Stanley, Samuel, " " " 1 47 36 1 83 

Shaw, W. G., taxed twice in Ward 6, 4 88 1 20 6 08 

49 56 
WARD 7. 

Akeley, Thomas J., lives in Maine, 1 47 36 1 83 

Barker, Philip A., taxed in Wards 6 and 7, 1 47 36 1 83 

Burk, John, poor old Irishman, 1 47 36 1 83 

Connell, David, could never find,. 1 47 36 1 83 

Connell, Philip, " " " 1 47 36 1 83 

Shute, Aaron, over 70, 2 44 

Stickney, Moses, dead, 147 36 183 

$13 42 
ON NON-RESIDENT LIST. 

Parker, Benjamin, Mcdford, taxed twice, 5 84 

Tallant, Samuel, Canterbury, taxed twice 5 12 

Fifield, Winthrop, New Market, taxed twice,. . . 4 38 

15 34 

RECAPITULATION OF ABATEMENT BY WARDS. 

Ward 1, 12 89 

2, 9 18 

3, 8 82 

4, 59 09 

5, 62 93 

6, 49 56 

7, 13 42 

Non resident, i 15 34 

8231 23 



ASSETS OF THE CITY, 
FEBRUARY 1, 1854. 



Four shares Mechanick's Bank Stock, $400 00 

George Bradley's Note, interest to Feb. 1, 1854, 121 97 
Amount due from Concord & Claremont Railroad 

for land damages, with interest to Feb. 1, 1854, 327 50 
Town Hall and Lot, 3,000 00 

Dearborn Place, purchased of J. W. Noyes, (not 

paid,> 6,656 00 

Balance due from Abraham Bean, as per report 

of Committee appointed to settle with same, 852 58 

Balance due from J. C. Pillsbury, on List of Tax- 
es uncollected for 1853, 2,588 35 



$13,946 40 



Note. — Since this account has been prepared for the press, 
J. C. Pillsbury has paid into the Treasury on Taxes collect- 
ed, $300, which makes the amount due from him on uncol' 
lected Taxes, for 1853, $2,288 35 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Superintending School Committee 

OF CONCORD, FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH, 1854. 



The Superintending Committee, having attended to the duties 
assigned them, submit the following report : 

EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS. 

Public notice was given both in Spring and Fall, that the Com- 
mittee would meet on stated days, for the examination of such per- 
sons as proposed to teach in our city. These examinations were 
designed to be thorough and impartial, and especially in respect to 
the elementary principles of the studies to be taught. With a large 
majority of the candidates the Committee were well satisfied. In 
the case of a few there appeared some deficiencies, but as these were 
not of a very marked character, certificates were given, with an ex- 
press understanding that so far as possible, by a carefiil and vigorous 
effort, such deficiencies should be remedied. 

And the state of the schools diiring the year, has, in most cases, 
fully justified the confidence thus reposed. 

VISITING THE SCHOOLS. 

It was agreed at the commencement of the year, that each mem- 
ber of the Board should have the oversight of the schools in his 
own Ward, calling to his aid other members as he might deem 
proper. The large schools have been visited by two or three of the 
Committee. All the schools, summer and winter, were visited at 
least twice, and several of them more frequently. A careful attention 
was given, both as to the method of instruction and that of govern- 
6 



82 

ment, and when any defect appeared, s-ich defect was in a proper 
time and manner pointed out, and improvements suggested. 

Sucli remarks as would be likely to promote the interetls of the 
schools were made, and the great importance of sound morality and 
religion urged. 

BOOKS, &c. 

The Committee, at the commencement of the year, thought best 
to recommend a change in part of the books then in use. They 
recommended this, partly because they judged the new books to be 
superior to the old, but principally because the most of the scholars 
had become so familiar with the old that reading was but little else 
than repeating from memory. The following -,, i\e list of books 83 
recommended : 

Town's series of Reading Books ; North American Spelling 
Book ; Webster's or Worcester's Dictionary ; Emerson's, Colburn's 
and Adams' New Arithmetic ; Weld's and Smith's Grammar, and 
Smith's First Book and Quarto Geography. 

In several of the districts, our new books have taken the place of 
the old ; but still the use of many books is, in most of the districts, 
a great evil. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

In Districts No. 3, 9, 10, 11, 19 and 20, new and, in most respects, 
excellent houses have been built within a few years past. There is, 
however, in some of them a great want of room for additional schools. 
It certainly cannot be good policy to crowd 70 or 80 scholars 
into one room, and place them under the tuition of one teacher. 
However skillful and. diligent that teacher may be, he, not being 
omnipresent, can give but the attention of a hurried moment to each 
scholar, and every exercise must be crowded into the least possible 
space of time. Every one must see that the interests of such a 
school must suffer. 

In the districts not named above, the houses are not what they 
ought to be. Some are too small, some sadly out of repair, and 
many of them inconvenient in their location or internal arrange- 
ment. How can our citizens who dwell in their own line houses, 
— pleasantly located, substantially built, neatly finished and elegant- 
ly furnished, — content themselves with school houses badly located, 
inconvenient, unfinished and unfurnished ? Are they aware of the 
influence exerted on the tastes and habits of their children ? Do 
they not recollect their own school-boy days ? How a i)oor dilapi- 
dated or meanly constructed house presented temptations too strong 



83 

to be resisted, to hasten the work of decaj- by the exercise of their 
Yankee propcusities, while visions of new, neat houses passed before 
them? 

It is surprising how easily the right kind of a school house may 
be kept from injury. Some of ours may be seen where no repairs 
have been made for three or four years, and yet scarce a spot or a 
scratch can be seen. Let our school houses be (if not the best) at 
least equal to the average of oux dwelling houses, in location, ar- 
rangement, repair and furnishing. 

DISTEICT NO. 1. 

in this district the summer term was taught by Mrs. Elizabeth 
D. Hoit, who gave good satisfaction to her employers. 

The winter term was kept by Mr. George Foss. A more efficient 
government and rigid discipline, and a proper regard to scholarlike 
conduct on the part of some of the larger boys, would have added 
greatly to the pleasantness and usefulness of the school. Several 
scholars made respectable progress. 

DISTRICT NO. 3. 

7'Ac Superintending Committee for the Third School District in Con- 
cord, make the following Report : 

The summer school in the first division, was taught by Miss Mary 
Tenney. This school has enjoyed a fair reputation for improvement 
and conduct for the past few years, and the present has been one of 
commendable progress in most of the branches taught. The classes 
in recitations appeared very well, but wanted life and spirit. The 
reading participated of the same character, especially a class that 
read in concert was much below the standard. There is a general 
want of energy and spirit in our schools, and we must look to those 
teachers who possess energy, enthusiasm and zeal enough to impart 
a corresponding feeling to their scholars, to bring about a reform. 
The general deportment and morals of the scholars were well re- 
ported. 

The second division was taught by Miss Mary E. F. Brett. Near 
the commencement of the term, circumstances occurred which 
marred the peace and harmony of the school, but afterwards they 
were restored and maintained. The committee were pleased with 
the appearance of the school at the closing examination. The 
classes in reading showed considerable improvement ; and also most 
of the classes in the several branches taught were prompt in their 



84 

recitations, especially a class in geography, which recited in concert, 
and the fourth class in Town's Reader. The order in this school 
underwent great improvement from what it was in the commence- 
ment. From the School Records it appears that the whole number 
of scholars in the first division, in attendance, was 40 ; average, 29. 
In the second division, whole number was 48 ; average, 38. Amount- 
ing to a loss of one-fovirth of the money expended in the first 
division, and nearly one-fifth in the second division. Schools were 
kept in each of the divisions the past winter. Mr. Wm. K. Rowell 
taught in the first division. We were agreeably entertained with 
the exercises at the close of the term. The order and appearance 
of the scholars was good. The recitations were prompt, and the 
scholars appeared thorough in their studies. A class in Colburn's 
Arithmetic excelled. Also a class in Adams' Revised Arithmetic 
did themselves much credit in wrought exercises on the black- 
board. The reading was very correct, but quite too low. The writ- 
ing, for neatness and improvement, was excellent, shoAving compe- 
tition for premiums. The second division was taught by Mr. Wm. 
A. Hazelton. He labored perseveringly to inspii-e a zeal and love 
of study in his pupils ; although some did not seem to appreciate 
their value, his efi'orts were not in vain. The reading was of a good 
quality. A class that read in concert were loud and prompt. Two 
classes in the higher branches, viz., in Algebra and Astronomy, 
were advanced, manifesting much zeal and perseverance. Exercises 
were also shown upon the black-board. But little improvement 
was made in the ^Titing. 

We believe teachers generally do not consider the vast influence 
they are exerting on the present generation. Tliey should ever 
bear in mind that the Constitution and Laws of NcAV-Hampshire 
" require all persons entrusted with the instruction of the young, 
diligently to impress upon their minds the principles of piety and 
justice ; a sacred regard to truth ; love of country, industry and 
frugality ; chastity, moderation and temperance ; and all other vir- 
tues, which are the ornament and support of human society ; and to 
endeavor to lead them into a particular understanding of the tend- 
ency of all such virtues to preserve and perfect a republican form of 
government, to secure the blessings of liberty, and to promote their 
future happiness, and the tendency of the opposite vices to degra- 
dation, ruin and slavery." 

Studies pursued in the District. — Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, 
English Grammar, Geography, History, Physiology, Spelling, Al- 
gebra and Astronomy. 



85 
TABULAR REPORT. 

Xumber of scholars above 4 years of age, attending scliool 

2 weeks — average both summer and winter, - - 07 . 

Number of scholars in both divisions — Winter, - 97 

" " " " Summer, - - 88 

Average attendance — Winter, . . . _ 94 

" " Summer, - - - - 67 

Number of scholars under 16 years of age, - - 89 

« " over " " - - - 10 
Number of children between 4 and 14 not attending school 

any where, ..._-... 4 

Aggregate length of schools in weeks — Winter, - 11 

" " " " Summer, - - 10 

Number of Teachers in Winter — Males, - - . 2 

" " Summer — Females, - . - 2 
Wages of male teacher, including board — AVinter, $20 00 

" female " " *' Summer, $10 00 

Number of visits by Superintending Committee — Summer, 4 

" " " " Winter, 3 

Prudential Committee— Winter, 2 

Citizens — Summer, ...... 10 

Amount of money raised by tax for the District, $218 41. 

BOOKS USED. 

In Reading — Town's series, and Bible. 

In Spelling— Webster's Spelling Book ; Town's Speller and Definer. 

In Aiithmetic — Adams' Revised edition ; Colburn's and Emerson's. 

In Geography — Smith's Quarto and First Book ; also, Mitchell's. 

In Grammar — Smith's and Welds. 

Parley's History, and Willard's U. S. History. 

Davies' Algebra. 

Cutler's Physiology, Burritt's Astronomy. 

SIMEON ABBOTT, ^ Su2}erintendi7ig 
ANDREW JACKSON, ( Committee 
ROBERT L. HULL, { of the Third 
MOSES H. FARNUM, I School District. 



February 28, 1854. 



DISTRICT NO. 4. 



Miss Sarah P. Carter was the teacher of the summer school. The 
school was in all respects in good condition. Miss C. is calm and 
quiet ; but, by securing the love and confidence of the scholars, the 
task becomes easy to enforce obedience and industry. 

Thewinter term was kept by Miss Janette C. Morse. The excel- 
lent and advanced scholarship of the school was apparent as usual. 
The order was not quite what it had been at some times. The pro- 
gress in reading and spelling was very marked. But we think an 



86 

error was committed in several of the studies pursued, in spending 
the whole time on lessons that had been often and successfully 
studied before. Thoroughness is desii-able, and may be had in con- 
nection with progress. 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 

The summer term was taught by Miss Hannah R. Busv/ell. The 
school was small and the scholars young. Miss B., though not 
enjoying good health, was able to do good justice to them. It was 
an orderly, studious and successful school. 

Mr. John E. Abbott kept in the winter. The school was larger 
than it had been for several previous terms. The scholars did 
themselves great credit by their good behavior, and by the proofs 
they furnished of a busy and studious term. Mr. Abbott is a young 
but promising teacher. 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 

The summer term was engaged by Miss Hannah R. Buswell, who, 
after four weeks of very encouraging success, was compelled to 
leave by reason of ill health. The remaining part of the term was 
kept by Miss E. D. Hoyt, an experienced teacher, who gave good 
satisfaction. 

The winter term was kept by Mr. Harlan P. Gage, who, though 
quite young, managed very prudently, and the school made com- 
mendable progress. The inhabitants of this small district are de- 
serving of much commendation for the interest they take in the 
education of their children. 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 

The Summer School was taught by Miss E, C. Davis. The in- 
struction was thorough and the government commendable. This 
was Miss D.'s first attempt to teach, and the result gives promise of 
future usefulness. 

The Winter School was taught by Mr. George Marden. The in- 
struction has been thorough. The demonstrations by the teacher in 
the various branches were plain and intelligible, and if there was 
any defect it was in discipline. 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 

The Summer School Avas taught by Miss Caroline E. Hazcltinc, 
who was unceasing in labor and effort for the advancement of her 
scholars ; but from kindness of heart was, perhaps, more indulgent 
than good government would justify. 



87 

The Winter School was taught by Mr. Robert F. Waldron. This 
was his first attempt at teaching, and it is but justice to say that he 
gave promise of becoming a useful teacher. The defects in the 
school were, want of application by some members, and a disposi- 
tion on the part of others to a laxness of discipline. For this the 
teacher may not be responsible. Parents must co-operate with and 
sustain the teacher, or his efforts will be in a great degree unavail- 
ing. 

DISTRICT NO. a. 

The past year has been one of marked prosperity with this district. 
All the teachers have been continued in the various departments 
through the three terms into which the year has been divided, with 
the exception of that taught by Miss S. L. Pickering, who, owing to 
ill health, was compelled to retire the last term, much to the regret 
of aU. 

The highest department was taught by Mr. Wm. A. Clough. 
Mr. C. is eminently qualified in all respects for the office of a teach- 
er. There are few, if any, who happily combine so many qualifica- 
tions which render him so successful in winning the esteem and 
confidence of his pupils. Also in establishing and maintaining good 
government, notwithstanding the crowded state of the school. — 
There has been great advancement made, and we have reason to 
expect that many of these scholars will be favorably known in fu- 
ture as useful members of society. 

The second or middle department in the south building, was 
taught by Miss D. Pickering, and the higher department in the 
north building by Miss S. L. Pickering. They are most highly 
qualified for teachers, both as exemplary ladies and thorough schol- 
ars. They have evinced remarkable judgment in making and en- 
forcing those good and wholesome rules so indispensable to the 
prosperity of every school. Miss S. A. Healy, who took the place 
of Miss S. L. Pickering, at the commencement of the last term, is 
an excellent lady of good education, but we are not able to report 
her progress, as she was compelled to leave her school some weeks 
prior to the expiration of the term, on account of ill health. 

The two Primary Schools taught by Miss M. J. Corning, in the 
north school-huose, and Miss E. A. "West, in the south school-house, 
are indeed an honor to our city. Few have equalled them in 
method of discipline and instruction, and in the proficiency made 
in reading, spelling, and vocal music ; and we can but add that 



none ever within our observation lias excelled them. All who have 
visited them have expressed then- delight in the warmest terms. 

The citizens of this district may justly congratulate themselves on 
the great success of the past year. With well located and comfort- 
able houses, with the indefatigable labors of C. H. West, Esq., 
Prudential Committee, and with five such teachers as those of the 
last year, we do not wonder their schools have excelled. 

JAMES W. SAKGEANT, 

Supt. Com. Ward Six, 

DISTEICT NO. 10. 

The S^iperintending School Committee of District No. 10, in Concord, 
submit the folloioing Report of the Schools in said District, for the 
March, 1854 ; 



The Primary Schools in the district, five in number, have, for the 
past year, been under the instruction of Misses Pamelia A. Chap- 
man, Lucretia E. Shute, Mary J. Wilson, Mary W. Emery, and 
Adaline M. French. 

The Committee are somewhat at loss to find terms exactly appro- 
priate and just in which to speak of the qualifications and merits of 
the several teachers, and the advancement of the different schools. 

Miss Chapman and the school under her charge, — as the Commit- 
tee have had occasion to state in a former report, — deserve honorable 
mention. The orderly and respectful demeanor of the scholars 
towards the teacher, and the quiet and commanding appearance of 
the teacher among her pupils, have drawn the attention of the com- 
mittee to Miss Chapman's qualifications as a superior teacher. She 
is deserving a situation in one of the intermediate schools. The 
other primary teachers have commended themselves to us for their 
earnest, patient and renewed endeavors to do all in their power to 
promote the welfare of the several schools under their charge. 

We deem it not inappropriate here to remark, that the general 
fault of teachers here and elsewhere, is, to be regardless of their own 
advancement in educational pursuits, while laboring earnestly and 
faithfully for the improvement of their scholars. It is not unfre- 
quently the case that teachers, after a year's experience in their 
vocation, upon a re-examination show no mental advancement, nor 
exhibit any addition to their previous stock of knowledge. Such a 
stand-still policy is not in keeping with the enterprising spirit of our 
times, nor in accordance with the reasonable expectations of the 
friends of education. These remarks are not made as being particu- 



89 

iarly appropriate to the several primary teachers of this district— on 
the other hand, they have elevated the character and condition of 
their several schools— but simply to make the suggestion in relation 
to what will hereafter be the reasonable expectation of the district 
when any one of the primary teachers shall be applicants for situa- 
tions in the intermediate schools. 

There is another fault of our teachers, not a new one, nor confined 
to us alone. Order, that first law of heaven, was the first to be 
transgressed, and has, since the world began, been the most difticult 
to enforce. Without its proper and vigorous enforcement, human 
eifort is without avail ; and in a populous place like this district* 
where there are so many diff'erent sections and departments, where 
order is most needed it is with the greatest difficulty maintained. 
The united efforts of us all should be directed to the maintenance 
and regularity of our schools. 

The most important drawback to our progress, is the almost un- 
precedented number of absences— an evil that no teacher or com- 
mittee can obviate ; it lies with the scholars and their parents, who, 
by a neglect of a most sacred and imperative duty, permit their 
children to wander about our streets in idleness, hopeful candidates 
of vagrancy, or let them grow up in ignorance at home, to be pack- 
horses in after life to carry the burdens of the more intelligent and 
the better educated. An important question was discussed for sev- 
eral evenings in one of our Teachers' Institutes, to wit : What kind 
of treatment should a teacher adopt towards his scholars to ensure 
a full and constant attendance. After a long discussion, it was sug- 
gested by an old and experienced teacher, that the main point of 
the matter of difficulty was not reached by the question ; for unless 
you could get the scholars all there once, the teacher could adopt no 
system of treatment towards them at all. And that is the main 
difficulty here ; that the parents and guardians of children do not 
compel them to attend school so as to come within the influence and 
under the discipline of the school. 

Those children who are habitually absent, have, however, an effect 
by far worse upon our schools than those who stay away entirely ; 
perhaps not upon community in general. They introduce disorder 
and confusion into their classes, retard, by their own neglect and 
failiu-e, the progress of others, become poor and deficient scholars 
themselves, and induce others to adopt idle and lazy habits. One 
day's or one week's absence from his class and his recitations, makes 
a rugged space in the steep hill of science, which the greatest effort 
of the scholar will hardly make smooth and easy, and habitual 



90 

absences make the entire ascent craggy and precipitous. Parents of 
District No. 10 : many of you are much, at fault in this matter, and 
it is an error which your children will hereafter be least willing to 
forgive. 

The intermediate schools have been in charge of Misses Elizabeth 
K. Brown, Susan E.. Moulton, Mary W. Chickcring and Sarah E. 
Atwood. Miss Chickering had charge of her school during the 
Spring and Summer term, and was succeeded by Miss Atwood. 
Miss Chickering sustained the high expectations which she had 
heretofore given promise of, and our hopes for her and the school 
under her care were fully realized. Miss Atwood has been success- 
ful, and gives promise, by continued effort, of an accomplished 
teacher. 

The Committee regret the withdrawal of ^liss ISIoulton from our 
list of teachers, and we should be doing her injustice to withhold 
an expression of the exalted opinion we entertain for her as a teach- 
er. The decided progress made by the school under her instruction 
is greater than that of last year, which was then worthy of com- 
mendation from the Committee. 

Miss Erown seems to have been assiduous and faithful in the dis- 
charge of her duties, but from reasons that the Committee are not 
able readily to ascertain, the school, under her direction, has not 
made that progress which they would have been i^leased to see. 
She has labored under disadvantage not known to the other schools. 

Miss Sarah J. Sanborn has been the teacher in the Grammar 
School for the past year, with no assistant as in years past. The 
Committee, in their report of last year, remarked of Miss Sanborn, 
that " she commanded their unqualified approbation." "We have 
nothing to take from that statement this year. They further stated 
that they should regret her departui-e from our district as a loss that 
could not easily be supplied. We say that her loss, in our opinion, 
cannot he supplied at all. 

Mr. Samuel P. Jennison has had the charge of the High School, 
with no assistant, as was the case during the winter term of last 
year. Mr. Jennison is a thorough scholar and an excellent teacher 
and disciplinarian, and the Committee hazard nothing in saying 
that having been acquainted with the schools for the last four or 
five years, the scholars, and the district generally, have received 
advantages from his services and instruction rarely to be met with. 
The Committee feel call-cd upon to say, that in the enforcement of 
strict order in and about the school-house, — which has produced a 
dislllcc to the school in the minds of some, and a witlidrawal of 



91 

scholars by others-Mr, Jennison has at aU times had the unquaU- 
fied assurance and approbation of every member of the Committee. 
The frequent complaints which have heretofore come to the Com- 
mittee, of scholars committing depredations upon the property near 
the school-house, of insults and outrages to the passers-by, and 
abuse of small scholars by larger ones, have in no single instance 
reached the ears of the Committee during the past year. Mr. Jen- 
nison is entitled to great credit in this particular. Upon examina- 
tion, the school exhibited a regularity of conduct, a dignity of de- 
portment, and a mental vigor and activity, which would have done 
credit to any academy in New-England. In Reading, Grammar, 
Arithmetic, and in the higher branches of mathematics, such as 
Algebra and Geometry, and in the Latin and Greek, a great im- 
pro°vement was made upon last year. Many of the pupils exhibited 
a maturity of scholarship which would have done honor to chUdren 
of a much larger growth. 

The Committee wiU regret the necessity of Mr. Jennison's sepa- 
ration from the school to finish a liberal education— now three years 
suspended by teaching. He has won upon our good opinions for 
his untii-ing energy, strict fidelity and superior capabilities as a 
teacher. 

Which is respectfully submitted. 

Cli IIILES P. GAGE, ) Super intending 
JOHN MOORE, > School Committee for 

HENRY P. ROLFE, > District No. 10. 

DISTRICT NO. 11. 

This district is divided into three schools. The primary depart- 
ment has been under the tmtion of Miss Louisa Chandler during 
the whole year. The teacher has done well. There has been a 
visible improvement in most of the scholars during the three terms 
of her instruction. 

The middle school has been kept by Miss Tucker, a young lady 
of uncommon abiUty a» a school teacher. Prompt and energetic, 
she has trained her school to a miUtary promptness and exactness. 
The discipline of this school has been excellent, and its progress 
quite encouraging. 

The higher department was instructed during the summer and 
fall term°bv ^liss Mary W. Bean, who was beloved and respected 
by her pupils, and kept a good school. Her methods of govern- 
ment and instruction were good, and she succeeded in giving good 
satisfaction to the committee, the parents, and aU concerned. 



92 

The winter term was kept by Mr. S. T. Bean, a teacher long and 
favorably known. He has labored with zeal and acceptance, and 
the school has made good proficiency. No marked instance of 
disobedience has occurred, but quietness and good conduct have 
characterized the scholars with very few exceptions. 

The district is under great obligations to Asa Fowler, Esq., who, 
for many years, has been an active member of the Superintending 
and Prudential Committees, and who has been instrumental in pro- 
curing maps and other apparatus for the school. 

With convenient and well furnished houses, and schools of medi- 
um size, the hope may be reasonably indulged that this district 
may sustain a high position among the schools of our city. 

ELEAZER SMITH, 
Superintending Committee Ward No, 4. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Summer Term. This school commenced under the instruction of 
Miss Ann M. Smart, and went on prosperously so long as her health 
permitted her to remain in charge of it — six weeks. Miss Mary 
Pecker continued the school six weeks to the end of the term, and 
fuUy sustained the interest, and rendered the exercises pleasant and 
profitable by a mild and firm government. 

The winter term as well as the summer, was interrupted by the 
failing health of the teacher ; but at the time of writing this report, 
it is in successful operation. Mr. Enoch Jackman kept the school 
six weeks, and left on account of bad health. Mr. S. Allen Mer- 
rill, having successfully taught in District No. 15, now continues 
this school. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 

The summer school was taught by Miss H. J. Melville. Her in- 
terest in the school is apparent in all her labor — even in the school- 
register, which was made out carefuUy and correctly. In her return 
she says : " The school has been made very pleasant by the united 
efforts of the parents and scholars." It is hoped that such efforts 
may be made in time to come. 

The winter school was kept by Mr. W. A. Wadsworth. After 
making all reasonable allowance for a small and poor house, it is 
thought that there is a general want of interest on the part of the 
scholars. Whispering was a prominent fault— it will make any 
school noisy and disorderly. The teacher says : " The order has 
not been as good as could be desired at aU times." This is alto- 
gether within the truth. 



93 

DISTRICT NO. 11. 

The Summer School was kept by Miss M. Folsom. The order 
was good under a mild government, and the progress of the school 
was commendable. 

The "Winter School was kept by Mr. Calvin W. Shepard. It did 
not correspond to the usual character of the school in this district. 
So many scholars were taken out on account of dissatisfaction that 
but five remained at the close of the term. Thus the object for 
which schools were established was not secured. 

DISTRICT NO. 15. 

The Summer School was ke^it by Miss Susan C. Woodman, whose 
instruction was thorough, and whose government was good. 

The Winter School was equally fortunate in its instruction and 
government. Fourteen of the twenty scholars are marked high in 
deportment. A good school-house and successful instructors have 
raised the character of this school the last two years. In his return^ 
Mr. ^Merrill says : " The people of the district seem to appreciate the 
advantages of good education, and are willing to uphold the teacher 
in his endeavors to instruct and govern their children, not being of 
that fault-finding disposition too often found in country towns." 

DISTRICT NO. 16. 

The Summer School was taught by Miss C. E. Goodspeed, and 
the Winter Term by S. M. Emery. Both gave good satisfaction to 
parents, and it is believed the improvement made was as good as 
could be reasonably expected. 

DISTRICT NO. 17. 

This is a Union District, composed of citizens of Concord and 
Hopkinton. The Summer Term was taught by Miss Eliza A. Smith. 
The Committee were gratified with the good order of the school and 
the faithful manner of imparting instruction, will render Miss S. a 
valuable teacher. 

The Winter School was taught by Mr. Ela. The government of 
the school was good. It was manifest at the final examination that 
Mr. E. had been unremitting in his labors to advance his scholars in 
the several branches to which their attention had been directed. A 
want of clearness of perception and of energy was manifested by 
some of the pupils. 



94 

DISTRICT NO. 18. 

The Summer Scliool was taught by Miss Malvina Green. The 
appearance of the School was commeiidable and the progress such 
as to evince faithfulness on the part of the teacher, whose efforts 
were satisfactory to the district 

The Winter Term was under the tuition of Mr. Lougee. Few 
teachers have succeeded better during the Winter past, in govern- 
ment and instruction. In this school are some excellent scholars of 
both sexes, whose energy and perseverance have been crowned with 
happy results. It is surprising that parents, not wanting in means, 
should suffer their children — while zealously engaged in pursuit of 
knowledge — to have their intellects contracted by being compressed 
within the compass of a small box, as a substitute for a good school- 
room. 

DISTRICT NO. 19. 

The Summer School was kept by Miss Clara Batchelder. The 
instructress spared no pains in the discharge of her duty. The or- 
der and progress of the school was good. The interest was kept up 
to the close of the long term as it could not have been in a poor 
school-house. 

The Winter School, taught by Mr. J. W. Eaton, was very much 
affected by the sickness of the scholars. The interest, however, 
was vt^ell sustained to the close, and the teacher gives the scholars 
generally, credit for good conduct and commendable progress. — 
Spelling and defining was an exercise of very great interest in the 
highest class. In such a school-room, where each scholar has a seat 
and desk entirely to himself, it may be reasonably expected that 
there should be no interruption by whispering or other interference 
of one scholar with another. This can be effected by the united 
efforts of scholar and teacher, when sustained by parents and guar- 
dians. 

DISTRICT NO. 20. 

The Superintendin(j School CGininiitce of District No, 20, in Concord, 
for the Year ending March, 1854, submit the following Report : 
It has been the object of the Committee to carry out the provi- 
eions of the " Somersworth Act," relative to the management of 
schools, so far as practicable. It has now been in operation three 
years, and they arc lully satisfied that its adoption bas been benefi- 
cial to the district. The coutinued change, which is constantly 



95 

taking place in our schools, caiised by scholars coming in from 
diiferent towns, thereby bringing together a large variety of school 
books, renders it extremely difficult for the committee to pursue 
such a plan of operaciou as they would desire; however, profiting 
by the example of the previoixs committees, they have to a great 
measure obviated the difficulty, and produced a greater uniformity, 
in school books then might be expected, under the circumstances. 
There is a general degree of willingness, on the part of the j)ai-entsj 
to cheerful] y acquiesce in all the plans of the committee for the 
management of the school, with a few exceptions. Some parents 
do not recognize any different management as being necessary in 
schools like ours, from what it should be in smaller districts. It is 
now a conceded fact that our larger schools require a greater degree 
of discipline than formerly, and more stringent measures for the 
preservation of good order should be adopted than heretofore required 
and nothing but a cheerful acquiesence on the part of the parents, 
will insure that success which the case demands. The primary 
school was taught in the Summer by Miss Myra C. McQuestion of 
Fisherville, who always manifested that degree of patience and in- 
dustry which will ever warrant true success. Her manner -was 
mild, and she soon won the respect and affection of the little ones 
entrusted to her care. 

The higher school was under the charge of Miss Martha Whitte- 
more of Fisherville. Her deportment in school was mild and pleas- 
ant, yet very decided. She required strict order, and her scholars 
cheerfully complied with the requirement. In her report she says i 
" The schoflars usually manifested a good degree of studiousness, 
and kind regard for the regulation of the school and with a few ex- 
ceptions they have endeavored to attain the standered of good or- 
der." Both schools were conducted satisfactorily. Term, 12 weeks. 

The primary school of Winter was taught by Miss Flora M. Mor- 
rill, of Warner. Miss Morrill has a happy tact in governing as 
weU as in teaching. Her regulations were cheerfully complied with. 
In her report she says : " The scholars have been very regular in 
their attendance and have made good progress in their studies." As a 
successful teacher she merits the confidence of the community. — 
The higher school was under the instruction of Mr. S. F. Batchelder 
of Loudon. A marked improvement was soon discernable in the 
conduct of the scholars, and had the school continued, we are satis- 
fied that hia labors would have been crowned with success. The 
teacher says : " The deportment of the scholars has been very com- 
mendable and under favorable circiimstanccs, we have every reason to 



96 

believe that their improvement would have been deserving of much 
praise." Perhaps it is due to the credit of the district to state that 
owing to a contagioiis malady which broke out in the village, our 
school was closed at the end of 8 1-2 weeks, thus robbing the schol- 
ars of 4 weeks schooling, which no doubt would have been profita- 
bly spent. The committee have been highly pleased with all the 
schools, and congratulate the district in being favored with so com- 
petent and faithful teachers. 

TABULAR REPORT OF SCHOOLS IN DISTRICT NO. 20. 

The following is a statement of the schools in District No. 20, in 
accordance with the provisions of the Revised Statutes : 

No. of sholars above 4 years of age, attending school two weeks, 240 

No. of sholars in all the schools, (winter,) 123 

" " " '• (summer,) 117 

Average attendance, (winter,) 102 

" " (summer,) 82 

Number under 16 years attending school, .... 215 

*' over «< «' << « . . . . 25 

Aggregate length of schools in winter, 8 1-2 weeks. 

" " " " summer, 13 " 

Number of teachers in winter, 2, — 1 male and 1 female. 

" " summer, 2 ; both females. 

Average wages per month, exclusive of board. Males, $28 00 

" " " " Temales, 12 00 

BOOKS USED. 

The Bible, Town's Series of Reading Books, Town's Speller and 
Definer ; Colburn's, Adam's, and Greenleaf's Arithmetic ; "Weld's 
Grammer; Smith's Geography; Wulard's History; Comstock's 
Philosophy ; Davies' Algebra ; Cutter's Physiology ; Botany ; Chem- 
istry and Rhetoric. 

ABIAL ROLFE, ^ Superintending School 
H. H. BROWN, V Committee for District 
S. MERRIAM. S No. 20, in Concord. 



DISTRICT NO. 21. 

The Summer School was taught by Miss Susan F. Cogswell, who 
was successful in her efforts to maintain good order and secure the 
progress of her scholars. It is gratifying to be able to say that this 
school is advancing in those things for which the common school is 
instituted. 

The AVintcr Term, though short, did much to advance the school 
in the good beginning made in the Summer. The attendance in 
this school this Winter, has been better than in any other district 
in Ward Two. Some of the scholars were neither absent nor tardy 



97 

during the term. Careful and fliorough instruction was given by 
the Teacher, Mr. Geo. T. Sanborn. A clean house and a clean school 
register, •witness the care and interest of the teacher and the scholars. 

DISTRICT NO. 22. 

The Summer School was kept by Miss Jackman, whose energetic 
efforts could hardly fail to elevate the school. The last examination 
was quite satisfactory. 

The Winter School, taught by Miss Richardson, gave promise of 
being well regulated at the first examination, and during the term, 
LTOod satisfaction was given. 

H. A. KENDALL, 

Supf. Com. Ward Three' 

DISTRICT NO. 23. 

This a Union District, composed of citizens of Concord and Bovr. 
The Summer School was taught by Miss Sarah J. Davis. In aU tho 
duties of a teacher. Miss D. was not found wanting. 

The Winter School was taught by Miss H. E. Frye, a lady of ex- 
perience and admirably qualified to instruct and govern pupils of 
any age. Few teachers could be more devoted to their work, than 
Miss F. She is accurate in her instructions, and energetic in th« 
performance of every duty, exacting the same promptitude on the 
part of the scholars. 

From observation and reflection, as weU as from the opinion of 
others, we believe that were a majority of our winter schools sup- 
plied with female teachers of the right sort, (such for instance as 
the Misses Pickering, or Miss Tucker, of No. 11,) who make teaching 
a profession, it wotdd be found preferable to the employing of inex- 
perienced young men, who only make teaching a temporary occu- 
pation or a Becondary object. 

JOSIAH STEVENS, 
Supt. Com. Ward Seten. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



TAEI.E I. 













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$14 00 


$C 00 


$93 55 




2 


_ 


_ 


_ 






8 00 


69 35 




3 


3 




_ 




20 00 


10 00 


218 41 




4 






_ 




12 00 


5 00 


61 88 


$23 CO 


5 


1 




_ 




15 00 


5 00 


80 33 




r; 


1 




_ 




12 00 


6 00 


C3 92 


32 00 


7 


1 




_ 




IG 00 


5 00 


83 71 




8 


1 




_ 




14 00 


5 00 


104 92 


1 OS 


9 


1 




1 




31 00 


8 50 


794 91 




10 


1 




1 




50 00 


13 45 


2071 48 




11 


1 








30 00 


10 ) 


690 07 




13 


1 




_ 




20 00 


7 00 


145 24 




13 


1 




_ 




20 00 


6 00 


94 48 




14 






_ 




13 00 


6 00 


65 64 


I 25 


15 


I 




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10 00 


(J 00 


5G 00 


2 91 


1<) 


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5 50 


48 01 




17 


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_ 




IG 00 


6 00 


36 68 




18 


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- 




25 00 


e 00 


:iO 91 




19 


1 




_ 




25 00 


8 00 


125 49 




■20 


1 




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28 00 


12 00 


308 32 




21 






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17 00 


8 00 


72 00 


2G CO 


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C 00 


47 06 




23 


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38 93 





Expended in all, 



$5,530 70 



SCHOOL STATISTICS— Continued. 



TABLE II. 



40 


34 


30 


28 


20 


24 


43 




34 




31 


32 


93 


97 


88 


94 


63 


89 


42 


33 


2G 


27 


24 


33 


Ql 


19 


9 


18 


8 


17 


13 


12 


12 


9 


9 


10 


20 


18 


14 


15 


13 


15 


31 


28 


23 


21 


19 


28 


515 


342 


398 


260 


264 


495 


658 


428 


482 


336 


320 


654 


218 


162 


152 


137 


124 


211 


60 


55 


40 


45 


35 


55 


65 


50 


42 


38 


37 


47 


24 


20 


22 


12 


19 


24 


20 


19 


16 


10 


13 


15 


8 


8 


7 


6 


5 


7 


15 


13 


12 


11 


10 


15 


37 


33 


31 


28 


25 


28 


60 


48 


39 


38 


33 


51 


240 


123 


117 


102 


82 


215 


21 


18 


17 


17 


16 


21 


35 




31 


21 


26 


38 


25 


9 


23 


8 


20 


25 



11 

9 

lOi 
12" 
12 
11 
11 
12 
13 
12 
12 

8 
10 
10 
12 
13 

9 

8i 

&■ 
10 
10 



I'olal, 2,300 1,595 1,612 1,302 1,221 2,160 



100 

From the foregoiug Tables it •will bo seen that the whole number 
of scholars is 2,300, of which number 140 were over 16 years of age. 
The whole amount of instruction was, in winter 298 weeks ; in 
summer, including spring and fall, 471. The amount of money 
expended, $5,-536.70, being $2.40.7 to each scholar. 

In conclusion, your Committee add, that while we find much, 
very much, that is defective, and especially a want of that deep in- 
terest which parents and guardians ought to feel in the education o i 
the young, there is nevertheless considerable progress observable in 
our schools. A very large proportion of our teachers are possessed 
of the requisite qualities to insure eminence in their calling, and 
with proper encouragement, we have much to hope from their eer- 
vices in years to come. 

EDMUND WORTH, ^ 

A. P. TENNEY, I Superintending 

H. A. KENDALL, ] School Committed 

ELEAZER SMITH, )■ of the City of 

C. P. GAGE, I Concord. 

J. W. S All GENT, I 

JOSIAH STEVENS, J 






^ 



aW—