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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

I~-^-^ 



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^e-^ 



THE TWENTY-THIRD 



ANNUAL REPORT 



f^edeipt^ kr^d J^xpeqelitm^e^ 



CITY OF CO^COED, 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

FEBRUARY 1, 1876, 

TOGETHEI^ WITH OTHEF^ ^^NNUAL f^EPOF^S AND PaPERS 
fR.ELATING TO THE ^FFAII^ OF THE ClTY. 




CONCORD, N. H. : 

PRINTED BY THE REPUBLICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION. 
1876. 



STATE LIBRARY 



X!^ 



X. 



THE TWENTY-THIRD 



ANNUAL REPORT 



^edeicpt^ ki\d 5{xcper\elittife^ 



OF THE 



CITY OF COIsTCOKD, 



POK THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



FEBRUARY 1,1876, 



TOGETHEI^ ■WITH OTHEI^ ^NNUAL RePOI^S AND PaPEI^ 
j^ELATING TO THE yiPFAII^ OF THE piTY. 




CONCORD, N. H. : 

PRINTED BY THE REPUBLICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION. 
1876. 



3S2..09 
LI A 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 



City Clerk's Office, > 
City of Concord, Feb. 1, 1876. \ 

To persons having claims against the City : 

All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, or aid to city 
paupers, should be particular to take the name of the person ordering 
such service, material, or aid, and should know that the person is duly 
authorized to contract said liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or delivered on city 
pauper account, except on the written order of the Overseer of the Poor, 
and for no longer time than until his successor shall have been appointed 
and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by the city, fur- 
nished on county pauper account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person authorizing 
the charge; and unless this is done, no action can be had upon the bill 
by the committee on accounts, and no order will be given for its pay- 
ment. 

When bills are certified to as above, and left with the city clerk 
before twelve o'clock of the day of meeting of the committee on 
accounts, they will be audited by them, and, if approved, be ready for 
payment on the Wednesday following. 

Meetings of the committee are held on the Thursday next preceding 
the last Saturday of each month, at two o'clock p. M., which will occur 
the present year, Feb, 24, March 23, April 27, May 25, June 22, July 
27, Aug. 24, Sept. 28, Oct. 26, Nov. 23, Dec. 28, Jan. 25, Feb. 22. 

C. F. STEWART, Ciiij Clerk. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 

CONCORD, N. H., 1875-6. 



MAYOK, 



JOHN KIMBALL. 



BOARD OF ALDEKMKN. 

Ward 1. Charles H. Amsden. 

" 2. John B. Curtis. 

*' 3. Andrew J. Holmes. 

« 4. Abner C. Holt. 

" 5. George A. Cummings. 

" 6. James L. Mason. 

« 7. Isaac N. Abbott. 

C. F. Steavart, City Clerk. 

COMMON COUNCILMEN. 

Charles W. Moore, Preside7it. 

1. Andrew P. Bennett, Rufus Cass. 

2. Zebina C. Perkins, Elbridge Emery. 

3. Lyman Sawyer, Charles H. Merrill. 

4. Charles W. Moore, George H. Hill. 

5. Moses B. Critchett, George A. Foster. 

6. Alonzo Downing, Calvin C. Webster. 

7. "William Stevenson, Henry Churchill. 

Lewis L. Mower, ClerJc. 



Ward 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance — The Mayor, Alderman Arasden ; Councilmen 
Critcliett and Hill. 

On Accounts and Claims — Alderman Holt; Councilmen 
Downing and Perkins. 

On Lands and Huildings — Alderman Curtis ; Councilmen 
Sawyer and Foster. 

On Public Instruction — Alderman Abbott ; Councilmen Cass 
and Webster. 

On Streets and Cotnmons — Alderman Holmes; Councilmen 
Churchill and Emery. 

On Roads and Bridges — Alderman Mason ; Councilmen Per- 
kins and Stevenson. 

On Fire Department — Alderman Mason ; Councilmen Critch- 
ett and Churchill. 

On Lighting Streets — Alderman Cummings; Councilmen 
Webster and Bennett. 

O71 City Farm — Alderman Holt; Councilmen Stevenson and 
Merrill. 

On Cemeteries — Alderman Amsden ; Councilmen Foster and 
Hill. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Flections and Returns — Alderman Abbott. 
On Fngrossed Ordinances — Alderman Curtis. 
On Rills in Second Reading — Alderman Cummings. 
On Police and Licenses — Alderman Holmes. 
O71 Sewers and Drains — The Mayor, Aldermen Mason and 
Cummings. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elections — Messrs. Cass, Churchill, and Emery. 
Rills in Second Reading — Messrs. Webster, Bennett, and 
Hill. 

Fngrossed Ordinances — Messrs. Sawyer, Foster, and Emery. 

CITY OFFICERS. 

City Clerk— Q. F. Stewart. Office in City Hall Building, 
south entrance ; house, 267 Main street. 

City Treasurer — Samuel C Eastman. Office, Kumford block. 
Main street, up stairs. 

Assessors — Cyrus Runnells, John B. Sanborn, Jehiel D. 
Knight, Shadrach Seavey, Curtis White, George S. Dennett, 
Andrew S. Smith. 

3Iessenger — R. P. Sanborn. 

City Solicitor — Charles P. Sanborn. 



Collector of Taxes — William H. Allison. Office, Kumford 
block. 

City Marshal — John Connell. 

Assistant Marshal — John Chadwick, Fislierville. 

Night Watch — James E. Rand, Charles H, Jones. 

Citij PhysiciaJi — Granville P, Conn. 

Assistant City JPhyscian — N. P. Taplin, Fisherville. 

Overseer of the Poor for Wards S, 4, 5, 6, and 7 — C. F, Stew- 
art. 

Health Officers — John Connell, Dr. G. P. Conn, and Alder- 
man Cnmmings. 

Police Justice — Sylvester Dana. 

JSjjecial Police Justice — A. B. Thompson. 

Clerk of the Police Court — Herbert F. Non-is. 

Superintending School Committee for Wards 1, 2, 3, and 7 — 
Lyman T. Flint, Abiel Rolfe, and Rev. A. Burnham. 

Trustees of the Public Library — Ward 1, Albert W. Fiske ; 
Ward 2, Josej^h T. Clongh ; Ward 3, Omer L. Shepard ; Ward 
4, Amos Hadley ; Ward 5, George E. Jenks ; Ward 6, H. G. 
Saftbrd ; Ward 7, Amos Blarfchard. 

Board of Water Com^nissioners — John Kimball, President; 
John Abbott, to March 31, 1876; Samuel S. Kimball, to March 
31, 1876; John S. Russ, to March 31, 1877; Abel B. Holt, to 
March 31, 1877; B. A. Kimball, to March 31, 1878; John M. 
Hill, to March 31, 1878; John Kimball, ex officio. B. A. Kim- 
ball, Clerk ; V. C. Hastings, Superintendent. Office, White's 
block. 

Old and Blossom Hill Cemetery Co'tnmittee — C. C. Lund, 
Charles Woodman, and George A. Blanchard. 

East Concord Cemetery Committee — John T. Batchelder, 
William A. Bean, and Joseph E. Plummer. 

Fisherville Woodlaion Cemetery Committee — John G. War- 
ren, Charles C. Bean, and John A. Coburn. 

West Concord Ceinetery Committee — Chandler Eastman, 
Timothy Carter, and Simeon Abbott. 

Undertakers — For Old and Blossom Hill Cemeteries, Charles 
Crow; Ward 1, Fisherville, John A. Coburn; Ward 2, George 
W. Moody ; Ward 3, Simeon Partridge ; Millville, William H. 
Currier ; Horse Hill Cemetery, George Abbott. 

Superintendent of Repairs of Highways and Bridges — John 
Kimball. 

Jjamplighter — John L. T. Brown. 

Police Officers — John Connell, Charles H, Jones, James E. 
Rand, Jacob E. Hutchins, Harrison Partridge, James M. Jones, 
Charles W. Davis, and John Chad wick. 

Liquor Agents — Joseph E. Cliffiard ; C. C. Toplift" Fisher- 
ville. 



KEPORT 



COMMITTEE ON FINANCE, 



FEBRUARY i, 1876. 

Tlie Joint Standing Committee on Finance herewith respect- 
fully submit their annual report of the receipts and expendi- 
tures of the financial department of the city government for 
the year ending the 31st day of January, 1876. 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand February 1, 1875, $12,616.33 

Wra. H. Allison, taxes 1872, 100.00 

« 1873, 1,800.00 

« " 1874, 28,300.00 

« " 1875, 142,000.00 

Interest on « 1873, 300,00 

" 1874, 1,175.00 

Interest on $27,500, Water-works bonds, 705.00 

$27,500 Water- works bonds sold, and 

interest, 27,704.84 
$68,000 State House bonds sold, and 

interest, 68,134.34 
$44,400 Precinct State House notes 

sold, and interest, 44,414.00 

Borrowed of sundry individuals, 45,500.00 

County of Merrimack paupers, 1,932.86 
State of New Hampshire Savings Bank 

tax, 13,876.79 

State of New Hampshire, Railroad tax, 19,838.50 

« « Literary fund, 1,093.06 

« *' Insurance tax, 1.87 



W. H. Brown, stone quarry, $29.62 

Putney & Chad wick, stone quarry, 57.88 

Roberts & Crowley, " 22.22 

A. L. & J. E. Gay, " 30.00 
Crowley & Quinn, « 21.50 

B. McDermott, city paupers, 4.00 

C. F. Stewart, " 80.00 
Jeremiah Brown, " 75.50 
Anthony Coleman, " 104.00 
City ofManchester, " 9.50 
Town of Weare, " 37.00 
J. E. Rancl, licenses, 220.00 
S. Dana, police justice, 844.10 
Blossom Hill Cemetery, sale of lots, 1,129.85 
C. P. Sanborn, liquor tines, 25.00 
J. E. Clifford, profits liquor agency, 200.00 
Harrison Partridge, city farm, 362.77 
County of Merrimack, incidentals, 9.00 
Charles Woodman, sale of wood, inci- 
dentals, 116.23 

R. P. Sanborn, incidentals, 2.20 

A. Burnhara, « 1.00 

Whittemore & Kimball, incidentals, 66.67 

C. F. Stewart, " 4.00 

John Kimball, « 18.00 

Connell & Savory, " 75.00 

John Kimball, land sold, 100.00 

150.00 

Henry W. Clapp, « 510.00 

John Kimball, sprinkling strefts, 355.50 

horses sold, 150.00 

" sewer-pipe sold, 2,160.27 

" roads and bridges, 161.36 

« buildings sold, 139.00 

J. E. Brown, highway districts, 2.83 

J. M. Stewart, " 5.00 

Moses Ordway and others, Walker legacy, 749.50 

Good Will Hose Co., gas, 12.50 

F. G. Proctor, oxen sold, 207.50 

Total receipts, $417,691.09 



EXPENDITURES. 

Printing and stationery, 1,324 52 

Precinct, 20,138.32 

County tax, 17,112.73 

School-house taxes, 9,527.33 

Professional services, 200.00 

Public library, 500.00 

State tax, 19,152.00 

Notes paid, 43,200.00 

Walker legacy, 1,000.00 

Sewers and drains, 14,790.07 

Committee service, 902.00 

City farm, 1,773.26 

Fire station, 23,362.60 

Dog tax, 38.00 

Parsonage fund, 54.44 

Schools, 29,098.45 

Salaries, 5,212.50 
Superintendent of repairs of highways 

and bridges, 9,749.43 

Fire department, 10,287.27 

Police and watch, 4,697.30 

County paupers, 2,417.07 

City " 2,514.65 

Highway districts, 3,980.72 

Incidentals, 7,782.93 

Roads and bridges, 17,898.81 

Interest, 18,271.09 

Bonds paid, 104,200.00 

Precinct notes paid, • 45,100.00 



Total expenditures, $414,275.49 

Cash on hand, 3,415.60 



$417,691.09 

Concord, Feb. 1, 1876. 
We have examined the treasurer's books, and those of the 
city clerk, and find that all the payments therein recorded 
are duly authenticated by appropriate vouchers, the several 
items correctly cast, and the cash balance in the treasurer's 
hands is three thousand four hundred fifteen dollars and sixty 

JOHN KIMBALL, 1 Committee 

CHA'S H. AMSDEN, 1 

MOSES B. CRITCHETT, ^ ^^ 



GEORGE H. HILL, ' J Finance. 



EXPE]^DITUEES 

OF THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR THE YEAR END- 
ING FEBRUARY 1, 1876. 



STATE TAX. 




Paid State Treasurer, 


$19,152.00 


COUNTY TAX. 




Paid County Treasurer, 


$17,112.73 


PAUPER ACCOUNT. 




Unexpended balance, 1874, 


1,976.38 


Appropriation, 1875, 


2,400.00 


Received of Merrimack county, for sup- 




port of county paupers, 1874, 


1,932.86 


Received of B. McDermott, 


4.00 


C. F. Stewart, 


30.00 


" Jeremiah Brown, 


75.50 


" Anthony Coleman, 


104.00 


" City of Manchester, 


9.50 


" Town of Weare, • 


37.00 



CITY PAUPERS. 

EXPENDITURES. • 



Paid as follows : 



N. P. Taplin, medical attendance Mrs. 

Baker, 3.75 

David Fowler, wood, 239.50 

G. K. Knowles, board of son, 78.00 

F. J. Proctor, 34.00 

George Abbott, bm-ial of Naomi Baker, 2.00 

H. H, Amsden & Sons, wood, 1.50 

Town of Loudon, aid to George family, 93.41 

J. B. Merrill, 5.00 



10 



G. P. Conn, medical attendance at alms- 
house, one year, $17.00 
State Reform School, 221.44 
John Harrington, support of son, 100.44 
Martha M. Smith, aid to Lewis Emer- 
son's son, 20.00 
New Hampshire Asylum, 989.47 
Timothy E. Hoit, aid for Mrs. Page, 58.50 
W. S. Collins, medical attendance George 

Himily, 23.00 

Town of Loudon, aid to George family, 24.79 

Beede & Ballard, 4.00 
C. C. AVebster, aid to G. C. Becket 

fomily, 10.00 

C. C. Webster, aid to John K. Lang, 5.00 
Joshua S. Griffin, rent, 8.00 
George B. Whittredge, aid to Geo. W. Foote, 10.00 
City Water-works, water for Mrs. Lar- 

kin and Mrs. Walker, 12.00 

John Chadwick, transient paupers, 1.3.18 

Charles Crow, burial of J. D. Cooper, 17.00 

D. A. Macurdy, aid to Mrs. Tho's Connor, 26.00 
Frank E. Ingalls, medicine, 9.54 
Charles Crow, burial of O. Dudley, 15.00 
Mrs. John Hutchins, aid to son's family, 20.00 
Franklin Evans, aid to Mrs. O. Dudley, 32.76 
G. P. Conn, medical attendance, J. H. 

Emery, 7.50 

City Water-works, water for Mrs. Dudley, 2.75 

G. W. Moody, buriaj of Mrs. Danforth, 2.00 

John A. Coburn, coffin for " 12.25 

Wm. K. Holt & Co., wood, 246.37 

G. S. Locke, wood, 8.00 

Martha M. Sanborn, aid for Rufus Atwell, 6.00 

C. Thorn & Son, shoes, - 4.50 

Currier & Larkin, aid for Z. Arlin, 5.00 

« « Mrs. O'Brien, 5.00 

C. E. Ballard, « " 3.00 
Lyman Merrill, " C. H. Johnson, 

John K. Lang, and Mrs. O, Dudley, 62.00 

F. A. Stillings, certificate for A. F. Durgin, 1.00 

J. E. Clifford, boots for C. H. Johnson, 3.00 
O. V. & W. H. Pitman, aid for Mrs. John 

Davis, 2.00 

J. F. Hoit, aid for Mrs. Flynn, 50.00 



$2,514.65 



11 

COUNTY PAUPERS. 



Paid as follows : 



Julia Sullivan, care of Mrs. Burke, 8.00 

N. P. Taplin, mecl. att., paupers, Ward 1, 52.60 

Loisa Raney, care of Jere. Arlin, 8.00 

Mary Lyna, care of Mrs. W. Burke, 13.00 

Northern Railroad, tickets for poor, 2.75 

John Connell, aid to transient poor, 28.15 
John A. Coburn, burial of Tho's Previer's child, 9.00 
John McNeil & Co., aid to E. Truet and 

others, 42.00 

Beede & Ballard, aid for James Rowe, 2.00 

H. H. Amsden & Son, wood for Mrs. Baker, 5.50 

Northern R. E. tickets for three persons, 4.13 

W. C. Powell, aid for Georgianna Powell, 8.00 

Joseph Bergeson, board of C. Jolens, 4.00 
E. D. Clough & Co., aid Mary Storin and 

others, 16.00 

Hubbard & Campbell, aid to T. Previer, 7.68 
John McNiel & Co., aid for I. Mason and 

others, 54.00 
John C. Linnehan, aid for Nancy O'Harra 

and others, 96.02 

Joseph Trecott and family, 10.00 

S. E. Hamilton, rent of house, 48.00 

C. B. Thompson, teaming, 1.00 

Northern Railroad tickets, 2.75 

Geo. W. Abbott, rent for paupers, 9.50 

C. H. Amsden, tickets for ten persons, 45.65 

Nancy Dority, aid to Thomas Flynn, " 42.75 

Hall & Foote, aid for T. Previer, 17.97 

C. P. Virgin, rent for Mrs. Coty, 96.00 

Beede & Ballard, aid for J. Rowe and others, 4.00 

C. F. Stewart, six tickets for J. Trecott, 22.50 
Mrs. William Powers, aid of Georgianna Powers, 35.00 

Eastman & Shepard, aid for Mrs. Deveney, 85.71 

Charles Crow, burial of five persons, 38.50 

C. F. Stewart, tickets to Canada, 13.13 
Philip Pelkey, aid for Mrs. Bedette, 2.50 
E. P. Prescott, rent for Honora Noland, 37.50 
Elizabeth Marguette, fares, 2.60 
John C. Linnehan, aid to Mary Owens, 34.25 

D. A. Macurdy, aid for B. M. Pratt, 5.00 
Woodworth Brothers, aid for H. G. Harrison, 12.12 

E. D. Clough & Co., aid for paupers, 2.00 
Northern Railroad, tickets for four persons, 9.75 



12 



Charles CroAv, burial ofG. H. Gerard, $13.00 

" " Thomas Flynn, 10.00 

Andrew Harwood, aid for C G. Edmunds, 13.50 

Northern Railroad, tickets for five persons, 9.75 

John Chadwick, aid to transient persons, 10.25 

Concord Railroad, tickets for four persons, 21.55 

" " to Montreal, 8.00 

J. E. Sewell, teaming goods, 2.80 

G. P. Conn, medical attendance, 134.50 

Partridge & Phillips, aid for Mrs. Deveney, 45.00 

Willard Jacqueth, aid for R. Welch, 18.25 

Nancy Dority, 4.00 
Brown & Foote, aid for I. Mason and others, 73.29 

Mrs. Nancy Pearson, 4.50 
John C. Linnehan, aid for Mrs. Owens and 

others, 119.00 

John Chadwick, aid to transient persons, 7.75 

G. S. Locke & Co., wood, 10.00 

B. C. & M. R. R., tickets for four, 8.10 
Nancy Pearsons, aid, 6.00 
Concord Railroad, tickets, 2.75 
Josephine Lord, aid to S. Burgess, 36.00 
Mrs. W. Marsh, aid, 6.00 
Sarah P. Lamprey, aid to Mary Pattee, 26.00 

C. Thorn & Son, shoes, 7.22 
J. A. Coburn, burial of child, 8.50 
David Abbott, care of Mrs. Pearsons, 4.00 
Nancy Pearson, aid, 12 00 
J. W." Edgerly and B. G. Tucker, 11.00 
George F. Bean, lodgings, 6.00 
Underbill & Kittredge, medicine, 1.65 
Currier & Larkin, aid to P. Flannegan, 11.00 

D. A. Macurdy, aid to poor, 29.00 
A. C. Carter, aid to Israel Shepard, 13.00 
C. E. Ballard, aid to poor, 22.00 
Ellen Geary, aid to Mrs. Hannegan, 4.00 
Lyman Merrill, aid to J. Lynch, 6.00 

F. A. Stillings, med. att. Sophia Burgess, 11.60 
W. P. Underbill, aid to J. B. Smith, .75 
John C. Linnehan, aid to poor, 73.00 
Susan P. Lamprey, aid to M. Pattee, 9.00 
Woodworth Brothers, aid E. Bazro, 5.00 

G. K. Knowles, aid to self, 65.00 
J. W. Edgerly & Co., aid to B. G. Tucker, 5.00 
Nancy Dority, rent, 12.00 
C. H. Amsden, aid to paupers, 69.05 
S. M. Emery, med. att. Bassett family, 20.25 



13 

John A. Coburn, burial of Bassett child, $13.00 

John McNeil & Co., aid, 22.00 

John A. Coburn, burial of Nockson, 11.00 

C. C. Webster & Co., aid to Mrs. Flyrapton, 28.00 

Eastman & Fitch, medicine, 11.20 

Eastman & Co., medicine, .80 

Franklin Evans, aid to K. Bresnahan, 25. 50 

Callahan McCarty, 51.00 

Brown & Foote, aid to poor, 149.00 

G. P. Conn, medical attendance, 83.50 

N. P. Taplin, medical attendance, 25.75 

Lyman W. Sargent, 1.20 

$2,417.07 

14,031.72 

Balance unexpended, $1,037.52 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Unexpended balance, 1874, $86. 11 

Appropriation, 1875, 10,000.00 

Received of John Kimball, sale of horses, 150.00 

" " watering streets, 355.50 

$10,591.61 



Paid as follows: 

Welcome & Batchelder, repairs, 4.00 
Webster & Morgan, furniture, G. W. Hose Co., 48.74 

Solomon Whitehouse, straw, 27.65 
George E. Minot, watchman at engine house, 22.00 

" service as steward, 11.00 

A. M. Stickney, repairs on Kearsarge, 5.00 

J. H. Morse, hose and couplings, 3.79 

4.00 

J. J. Wyman, oil, 3.00 

D. C. Allen & Co., repairs, 7.25 

F. H. Odione, coal, 24.00 

D. Arthur Brown & Co., coal, 45.25 

Nathan Abbott, services. 4.20 

Lewis A. Wriglit, teamster, 116.67 

Samuel Eastman & Co., hose, 1,906.55 

Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 199.58 

Thomas Murphy, washing, 5.00 

L. A. Wright, " 5.00 

R. P. Sanborn, drawing Alert Hose, 37.50 

City Water-works, water, 28.00 

Nathaniel White, one horse, 250.00 



u 

H. B. Foster, supplies, $3.12 

F. C. Wilkinson, professional services, 4.00 
Norris & Dnnklee, horse for G. W. Hose, 6.00 
Webster & Morgan, 13.80 
J. H. Sanders, thawing hydrants, 12.00 

C. H. Sanders, " 6.00 

D. Arthur Brown & Co., repairs on Pioneer, 209.37 
Concord Gas Light Co., 120.16 
George Syraonds, repairing hose, 6.50 

PAY EOLLS, SIX MONTHS, TO AUGUST 1, 1875. 

Engineers, 220.50 

Kearsarge, 280.00 

Eagle Hose, 243.00 
Alert, ■ 243.00 

Good Will, 243.00 

Hook and Ladder, 403.00 

Pioneer, 253.00 

Old Fort, 123 00 

Cataract, 123.00 

Gov. Hill, 3 months, 140.25 

steavard's services. 

G. W. Johnson, 15.00 
Fred Favor, 15.00 
W. E. Dow, 15.00 
Ned Shattuck, 15.50 

miscellaneous bills. 

Amoskeag Man'fg Co., repairing Kear- 
sarge, 405.48 
Gust. Walker, hardware, 4.43 
Woodworth Bros , supplies, 8.31 
A. Crooker, repairing harnesses, 9.00 
R. Mayers, cotton cloth, 1.67 
C. H. Martin k Co., 9.28 
Samuel Eastman, suction hose, 288.12 
J. S. Merrill, incidentals, 32.20 
Northern Railroad, repairs, 1.86 
James R. Hill & Co., oil, 2.25 
Concord Railroad Co., freight on steamer, 7.20 
James Wright, hydrant gates, 48.00 
Amoskeag Co., repairs, 10.50 
T>. B. Varney, repairing dome, 9.40 
N. H. Dunbar, steward of pioneer, 18.35 
M. H. Fifield, drawing engine, 5.00 



15 



W. P. Ford & Co., stores, East Concord, $15.19 

Bushey & Bowser, rent of stable, 517.50 

City Farm, keeping horses, 50.00 

D. Arthur Brown & Co., coal, 20.50 

E. A. Bingham, watchman, 10.00 
Boswell & Ladd, hay, 24.19 
George F. Bean, lodging, 1.50 
A. Crooker, repairing harness, 4.25 
"NVoodworth Brothers, supplies, 4.85 
Lewis C. Stevenson, washing, 21.00 
K. J. Goodhue, " 21.00 
William K. Norton, drawing fire apparatus, 127.75 
Eastman & Fitch, suppUes, .90 
J. E. McShane, shoeing horses, 107.50 
Lewis C. Stevenson, teamster, 483.33 
M. H. Bradley, hay, " 52.40 
J. S. Merrill, supplies, 88.80 

PAT-EOLLS, SIX MONTHS, TO FEB. 1, 1876. 

Engineers, 220.50 

Kearsarge, 280.50 

Eagle Hose, 243.00 

Alert Hose, 243.00 

Good Will Hose, 243.00 

Hook and Ladder, 403.00 

Pioneer, 253.00 

Old Fort, 123.50 

Cataract, 123.00 

MISCELLANEOUS BILLS. 

H. D. Webster, steward, 18.12 

N. H. Dunbar,' " 18.05 

Fred Favor, « 17.50 

G. W. Johnson, " 15.00 

A. P. Richardson, " 5.00 

L. R. Bannell, « 12.83 

J. D. Waller, « 4.00 

NedShattuck, " 15.00 

Gust. Walker, 2.33 

F. D. Batchelder, 3.60 
Flanders, White & Houston, 5.50 
Walker & Co., rent, 10.00 
Moses Humphrey, 4.00 
C. H. Martin & Co., 7.78 
William K. Norton, 24.00 



16 



Hall B. Rand, $5.00 

D. W. Long & Co., 12.00 

Joseph S. Merrill, 56.25 

J. D. Waller, 8.62 

J. H. Sanders, 25.00 

A. & G. A. Foster, 2.50 



Total for fire department, $10,287.27 



Balance unexpended, $304.34 

INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Appropriation for 1875, * 7,500.00 
Sale of lots in Blossom Hill cemetery, 
$1,129.85, less amount paid on the debt, 

$1,019.70, 11015 

Sale of wood from B. H. cemetery, 116.23 

Cash received of sundry persons, 175.87 

Balance unexpended, app. for Ward House, 182.93 



Paid as follows : 

C. C. Lund, surveying, 25.00 

Samuel Holt, brick, 50.80 

Geo. L. Whittredge, rent of hall, 27.00 

Edson C. Eastman, books, 4.70 

Rev. J. D. Adkinson, services at city^farm, 15.00 

Ordway & Ferrin, mason work, 35.15 
John Kimball, use of horse and carriage one 

year, 100.00 

C. H. Johnson, damage, 20.00 

F. S. Crawford, numbering bonds, 3.00 

B. F. Gale, surveying, 40.00 

S. W. Shattuck, furniture, 2.50 

S. Burnham, books for schools, 1.80 

George Goodhue, gas fixtures, 7.29 

Elijah Knight, repairing clock, 2.00 

Dyer H. Fay, land damage, 10.00 

S. H. Wade, return of births and deaths, 4.50 

Webster & Morgan, Ward 6 ward house, 74.99 

Gage & Conn, return of births and deaths, 20.75 

A. C. Holt, repairing furniture, city hall, 17.20 

Young People's Union, use of hall, 10.00 

A. H. Wiggin, poisting notices, 10.25 

Warren IJpham, surveying, 4.12 

F. A. Stillings, return of births and deaths, 2.50 



^,085.18 



17 



Isaac S. French, damage to sleigh, S6.00 

R. P. Sanborn, services as janitor, 174.65 

A. C. Holt, repairs city lial'l, 25.75 

M. W. Russell, returns of births and deaths, 9.50 

Geo. W. Abbott, rent of hall, 20.00 

John W. Wilkinson, damage to horse, 20.00 

Concord Gas Light Co., 228.48 

R. P. Staniels, rent of collector's office, 100.00 
C. F. Stewart, recording returns of births, 

deaths, and marriages, 18.60 
Hutcliins & Co., cement "Ward 6 ward house, 73.72 
Connell & Savory, repairs city hall, 116.93 
John Eves, repairs city hall, 8.53 
Coffin & Cochran, cement, 16.03 
John A. "White, expense of third semi-cen- 
tennial celebration, 71.00 
F. Low, expense to Newburyport, 5. 15 
Ranlet & Prcscott, coal, 52.00 
Ordway & Ferrin, repairs city hall, 94.80 
" cement, cellar "Ward 6 house, 63.00 
J. G. Taylor, repair of lock on safe, 2.25 
J. C. W. Moore, return of births and deaths, 2.50 
Porter E. Blanchard, stone watering trough, 122.50 
C. F. Stewart, cash paid out, 8.92 

C. Gr. McAlpine, expense of county com- 
missioners, for laying out Blake street, 121.85 

J. C. Pillsbury, land damage Beacon street, 150.00 

Moses T. Willard, land damage, 400.00 

Eliza A. Morse, land damage, 216.83 

Georgia Morse, " 216.83 

Martha M. Dow, « 216.83 

Arthur Fletcher, costs in suit, 26.42 

R. P. Staniels, insurance of library, 16.20 

Hutchins & Co., cement. Alert hose cellar, 21.34 

Sargent & Chase, judgment, 9.40 

D. A. Hill, repairs to city hall, 6.00 
Geo. F. "Whittredge, rent of hall, 27.00 
S. & S. C. Eastman, insurance, 18.00 
John H. Morse, water-pipe. Alert, 6.41 
Simeon C. Drake, damage to himself, 300.00 
Gilbert Bullock, cash refunded, 34.46 
George Goodhue, repairs to gas fixtures at 

city hall, 942 

J. C. Hazen, three views of Concord, 9.00 

W. M. Darrah, roofing city hall, 220.62 

Humphrey & Dodge, 1.96 

2 



18 



Andrew Banker, repairing blinds, 12.75 
Patrick McKeen, repairing Ward 2 ward house, 12.00 

J. B. Dodge, books for poor children, 4.18 

Webster & Morgan, Ward 6 wai'd house, 9.25 
Ordway & Ferrin, cementing Alert hose house, 37.71 

Whittemore & Kimball, incidentals, 13.93 

Morrill & Danlbrth, insurance, 78.00 

R. P. Staniels, " 78.00 

Upton & St. Clair, sign, 10.00 

Connell & Savory, painting bridges, 23.50 

John Kimball, cash paid out, 27.41 

John P. Kimball, pasturing, 15.00 

Ford & Kimball, castings, Alert house, 9.90 

A. C. Holt, putting furnace into city hall, 17.07 

Hammond & Ayers, oil cloth, 3.10 

J. H. Chase, stove and pipe, 7.00 

City Water Works, ^ 39.00 

J. H. Flood, stone for centennial, 18.00 



EXPENSE OF LOBBY. 

Mead, Mason & Co., lumber and cai*penter 

work, 408.90 

Ordway & Ferrin, chimney, 10.83 

S. D. trussell, iron work, 26.90 

Connell & Savory, painting, 61.20 

Ford & Kimball, grates, 66.13 

Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, 7.87 

Gust. Walker, ^ " 62.90 

Geo. Goodhue, water-pipes, 14.48 
Total cost, $659.21 



EEPAIKS WEST CONCORD ENGINE HOUSE. 

100.07 

26.25 

49.10 

31.97 

16.15 

39.42 

16.00 

6.81 

7.50 

6.40 

15.50 

4.50 

43.95 



City farm, drawing stone, 

John H. Kellum, laying stone, 

Mead, Mason & Co., lumber, 

A. D. Powell, painting, 

Wel»ster & Morgan, labor, 

T. J. Carpenter, painting, 

P. W. Follansbee, raising building, 

James Moore & Sons, hardware, 

W. T. Clough, labor, 

Lowell Eastman, windows, 

E. S. Reed, laying stone, 

A. D. Powell, painting furniture, 

A. C. Holt, services. 

Total expenditure, $363.62 



19 



EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

D. S. Webster, lumber, 
Welch & Lake, stone wall, 
Elbriclge Emery, posts, 
Seth A. Bunnell, hearse house, 

" building fence, 

W. W. Hazelton, teaming, 

B. E. Badger, surveying, 

L. D. Bunnell, planing boards, 

J. E. Frye, painting, 

S. Eastman & Co., 

John T. Batchelder, sawing, 

James Moore & Sons, hardware, 

Total expenditure, $617.03 

OLD CEMETERY. 

C. Woodman, outstanding indebtedness, 
1874, 

C. Woodman, April pay roll, 

" May « 

" June " 

« July " 

" August " 

W. G. Shattuck, painting, 
Eastman & Fitch, paints and oils, 

Total expenditure, $296.90 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 

Thomas Carley, bill of 1873, 
Charles Woodman, bill of 1874, 

" April pay roll, 

" May « 

" June " 

" July « 

*' August " 

« Sept. « 

*' October « 

" Nov. and Dec, pay roll, 

Francis Hodgman, building wall, 
J. G. Hodsden, teaming, 
William K. Holt, lumber, 
Miscellaneous items of expenditure, 
M. A. West, money refunded. 
Cash deposited with treasurer, 

Total expenditure, ^1,682.04 

Add amount with treasurer, as above stated, 
Balance unexpended, 



86.24 

121.00 

44.00 

168.00 

52.30 

1170 

15.7.5 

20.50 

44.25 

37.53 

4.36 

11.40 



165.35 
5.50 
23.50 
10.00 
13.50 
20.25 
27.40 
31.40 



106.00 
114.98 

32.75 
178.76 
153.62 
272.48 
142.87 
113.00 

94.50 

53.75 
102.00 

5100 
2.63 

29.93 

9.00 

224.77 



$7,782.93 

302.25 
224.77 

$527.02 



20 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 



Appropriation, 1875, 



$11,000.00 



Nov. 27, 1875, 3,000.00 

" Jan. 29, 1876, 4,000.00 

Boston, Concord & Montreal R. R^ for 

rubbling pier of Federal bridge, 111.75 

John Kimball, miscellaneous receipts, 49.61 

Paid as follows : 
J. & J. T. Batchelder, 7.00 
Ford & Kimball, castings, 181.90 
C. C. Lund, surveying, 225.99 
Charles H. Clough, 3.49 
W. A. Tupper, lighting Free bridge, 52.50 
Hall & Foote, 56 30 
Northern Railroad, freight on lumber, 40.32 
John Kimball, services as agent for build- 
ing Sewall's Falls bridge, 300.00 
Rufus Virgin, watering trough, 3,00 
Abner D. Farnum, watering trough, 3.00 
Charlotte Lewis, lighting Concord bridge, 05.00 
William Locke, watering trough, two years, 6 00 
T. H. Ford, edge-stone, 36.00 
G. W. Russell, lighting Twin bridge, 29.50 
John Whittaker, lumber, 20 61 
H. H. Amsden & Sons, lumber, 14.08 
John Kimball, services as agent to erect 

Fisherville bridge, 300.00 
M. H. Johnson, removing pier, Concord 

bridge, 121.90 

Mary E. Pecker, watering-trough, 3. 00 

Wood worth Bro's, oil to light bridge, 4.69 

M. H. Johnson, drawing lumber, 45.00 
" planking Concord bridge, 122.25 

N. Chandler, watering-trough, 3,00 

George F. Hay ward, plank, 6.27 

Eastman & Smart, teaming, 69.77 

J. C. Cochran, iron work, 25.27 

L-a Foster, one horse, 300.00 

Daniel Flagg, watering-trough, 3.00 

C. C. Lund, surveying, 67.12 

Charles Graham, lumber, 17.00 

William H. Brown, stone for bridge, 41.62 

" " 11.25 

Joseph S. Merrill; repairs, 10.75 



$18,161.36 



21 



Chase Whitcher, lumber, $54.00 

George F. Sanborn, stone culvert, 25.50 

C. C. Be.in, grading and railing bridge, 
making crossing, laying sewer pipe, etc., 555.15 

Pattee & Perloy, plank, 152.26 

Northern Railroad, freight, 5.00 

Geo. F. Sanborn, repairing culverts, 68.11 

Concord Granite Co., stone for culverts, 21.02 

Charles G. Davis, painting signs, 16.50 

Thornton, Farnum & Co., flagging, 51.50 

City form, plank, 29.70 

D. C. Allen & Co., machine work, 64.25 
N. P. Richardson, bridge plank, 28.24 
J. G. Brockway, " 176.96 
Northern Railroad, freight, 2.81 
John H. Flood, sharpening tools, 30.37 
Huntress & Mansur, painting bridge, 9.90 
H. H, Amsden & Sons, lumber, 134.56 
John Whittaker, plank, 24.11 
Gust. Walker, hardware, 83.43 
George W. Emerton, stone posts, 185.50 
Wrought Iron Bridge Co., iron fence, 10.00 
H. Bean & Son, knuber, 7.33 
City Water Works, 50.00 
W. K. Holt & Co., lumber, 90.89 

" railing Free bridge road, 18.66 

John Kimball, concrete sidewalks, 1875, 1,047.44 

« edge-stone, 1875, 371.74 

A. B. Holt, gravel, at Whale's Back, 1,000.00 
Concord Railroad, one anvil, 3.42 
Morrill Dunlap, rollers, 1.50 
M. T. Willard, rent of land, 15.00 
George Goodhue, gas fixtures, 30.82 
Charles Smith, watering-trough, 3.00 
Thompson Rowell & Co., concrete : 

On Concord bridge, 250.35 

Fislierville bridge and crossing, 149.06 

Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, 80.86 

Brown, Russ & Co., railing, 72.54 

Robert B. Hoit, rejiairing Horse Hill bridge, 9.59 

B. E. Badger, surveying, 46.00 
L. R. Fellows, repairing drain, 2.25 
Nutter & Evans, posts, 14.00 
Evans & Reed, lumber, 35.82 

E. B. Hutchinson, car-work, 16.26 
Daniel Flagg, watering-trough, 3.00 
John Whittaker & Co., lumbei', 10.32 



22 

Savage Bros., oil for Free bridge, $4,65 

H. H. Amsclen & Sons, lumber, 22.70 

Ford & Kimball, castings, 103.54 

O. V. & W. H. Pitman, oil, 1,06 

Humphrey & Dodge, tools, 1,97 

W. B. Stearns, chimneys, 1.70 

REPAIRS, TWIN BRIDGE, FI8HERVILLE. 

H. K. Farnum, laying stone, 372.61 

A. J. Holmes, stone, 213.60 

H. H. Amsden & Sons, lumber, 144.90 

C. and J. C, Gage, " 85.58 
John Kimball, pay-roll, putting in arch, 163.00 

D. Arthur Brown, iron work, 66,53 
Hutchins & Co, cement, 42,68 

Grading, some of the teaming, and hard- 
ware, chai'ged in other accounts. 

Total cost, $1,088.90 

CESS-POOLS, SEWER INLETS AND CONNECTIONS. 

Samuel Holt, brick, 756.62 
H. W. Clapp, seventy-three sewer inlets, 

and iron castings connected, 1447.25 

City precinct, sewer pipe, 608.70 

M. H. Johnson, pay roll to July 10, 328. 25 

" " 31, 470,98 

" « Aug, 31, 533,24 

" « Sept. 30, 270.25 

C. C. Bean, « « 199.09 
Hutchins & Co., cement, 265.78 

Total cost, $4,880.16 

THOMPSON BRIDGE, SOUCOOK RIVER. 

D. S. Webster, drawing stone, 96.19 
S, J. Shaw and men, payroll, 151.12 
Hutchins & Co., cement, 7.76 
Town of Pembroke, one half of superstruc- 
ture, 132.69 
Grading charged to repairs of hisjh ways. 

Total cost," $387,76 

CULVERT, WATER STREET, 

Josiah Cooper and men, pay roll, 30.75 

S, J. Shaw, « " 22150 

A. J. Holmes, stone capping, 24,60 

Hutchins & Co., cement, 9,70 

Grading and railing charged to repairs 
of highways. 

Total cost, $286.55 



23 

RUBBLING EIVER BANK, WARD 7. 

M. H. Johnson, pay roll, $149.81 

" pay of teams, 229.00 
Loading stone, and stone from sewers, 
charged in other accounts. 

Total cost, $378.81 

BUILDING WATTANUMMON BRIDGE. 

Eastman & Smart, drawing stone, 201.94 

Abijah Hollis, stone, 145.25 

Porter Blanchard, stone, 93.05 

A. J. Holmes, « 38.58 
Fuller & Pressey, « 110.63 
Thornton & Farnum, 152.00 
Jeremiah Brown, excavating, 180.25 
S. W. Morrill and men, pay roll, Aug. 360.00 

" " " Sept. 641.74 

« « « Oct. 17.75 

City Farm, lumber, 72.54 

" teaming, 600 

Ford & Kimball, iron girders, 256 41 

Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 5.00 

Wrought Iron Bridge Co., railing, 60.00 

B. C. & M. R. R., freight, 4.55 
Thompson Rowell, concrete, 37.00 
Hutchins & Co., cement, 27.16 
Brown, Russ & Co., Lumber, 94.53 

Grading the road, painting railing, and 
hardware, charged in other accounts. 

Total cost," $2,404.38 

CULVERTS WEST CONCORD ROAD. 

Fuller & Pressey, stone, 56.90 

Thornton & Farnum, stone, 32.06 

S. J. Shaw and men, pay roll July, 228.62 

« « « Sept. 18, 169.49 

" " « " 30, 81.68 

« '_' " Nov. 8, 307.68 

City Farm, drawing stone, . 177.75 

Hutchins & Co., cement, 15.52 

" 11.64 

Total cost, $1,081.34 

$17,898.00 

Balance unexpended, $262.55 



24 



COMMITTEE SERVICE. 



Paid as follows : 
John B. Carter, 
Daniel HoMen, 
A. C. Holt, 
George A. Pillsbury, 
James L. Mason, 
Jacob E. Hutchins, 
Rufus Cass, 
Daniel G. Holmes, 
John G. Tallant, 
Z. C. Perkins, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
Lyman Sawyer, 
Richard M. Ordway, 
Charles W. Moore, 
Joseph A. Cochrane, 
Moses B. Critchett, 
Moses B. Smith, 
Alonzo Downing, 
John Hazeltine, 
James Thompson, 



$50.00 
84.00 
91.00 
70.00 
79.00 
50.50 
28.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
35.00 
50.00 
30.00 
60.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
34.50 



POLICE AND WATCH. 

Appropriation, 1875, 88,500.00 

Merrimack county, fines, 25.00 

Sylvester Dana, fines and costs, 844.10 

Paid as follows : 

Sylvester Dana, salary, 600.00 

Herbert F. Norris, salary, 200.00 

John Connell, salary, 900.00 

James E. Rand, salary, 13 months, 866.71 

Charles H. Jones, salary, 13 months, 866.71 

John Chadwick, services, 371.00 

" expenses, 69.86 

George W. Corey, services, 32.80 

" expenses, 3.05 

R. M. Ordway, services, * 2.00 

A. C. Ferrin, « 2.00 

Joseph C. Eaton, « 4.00 

N. H. Haskell, " 4.00 

J. S. Merrill, « 4.00 

Hall B. Rand, " 41.00 



$902.00 



14,369.10 



25 

Charles T. Lane, services, $30.00 

James M. Jones, « 25.00 

L. II. Carroll, « 2.00 

Daniel E. Howard, « 4.00 

E.A.F. Hammond, « 25.00 

J. E. Hutchins, « 13.75 

George W. Lake, " 23.50 

N. M. Bond, " 3.00 

S. W. Shattuck, « 16.50 

E. A. Miller, « 3.00 

S. M. Griffin, « 2.00 

R. P. Sanborn, « 7.25 

C. H. Jones, burying horse, 2.00 

Seth K. Jones, rentV office, 200.00 

Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 75.77 

Stevens & Dunklee, 1874, 42.89 

Ordway & Ferrin, mason-work, 6.33 

Humphrey & Dodge, 8.56 

A. & G. A. Foster, horse hire, 128.25 

City Water Works, 3.00 

Concord Gas Light Co., 69.12 

John Connell, expenses, 39.25 



$4,697.30 



Appropriation overdrawn, $328.20 

SCHOOLS. 

Appropriation, 1875, $19,000.00 

Union District, 9,133.00 

« District No. 3, 175.00 

Interest on A. Walker legacy, 60.00 

Literary fund, 1,093 06 



Paid as follows : 

Edward Rnnnells, Committee, Dist. No. 1, 185.58 

Joseph Knowles, " « 2, 160.58 

Harrison Partridge, " " 3, 873.58 

Timothv Carter, « « 4, 128.58 

W. B. Thompson, « "5, 115.58 

John Jordan, " "6, 122.58 

William A.Dow, " « 7, 131.58 

John Hargate, « « 8, 176.58 

P. B. Coo;swell, Union Dist., No. 9, 10, 11, 24,145.74 

Sam'l E.^Cliffi>rd, Committee, Dist. No. 12, 240.16 

John W. Carter, " " 13, 277.16 



$29,461.06 



26 

John W. Bouvlet, Committee, Dist. No. 14, $185.58 

Charles D. Rowell, « « 15, 118.58 

Charles E. Thompson, « « 16, 67.20 

Giles Wheeler, " « 18, 281.58 

John B. Dodge, « « 20, 1,471.58 

Ira P. Kempton, « « 22, 201.58 

Jeremiah B. Ellis, " " 23, 68.37 

E. A. Boutwell, " « 24, 64.29 

Samuel S. Buswell, in Hopkinton, « 18, 35.29 

John Harcrate. 1874, :« 8, 46.70 

K P. Richardson, 1874, " 22, 50.00 



129,098.45 



Balance unexpended, $362.61 

SALARIES. 

Appropriation, 1875, $5,500.00 

Paid as follows : 

John Kimball, Mayor, _ 500.00 
John Kimball, superintending repairs high- 
ways and bridges, 300.00 
C. F. Stewart, city clerk, 800.00 
" overseer of the poor, 12500 
S. C. Eastman, treasurer, 400.00 
C. P. Sanborn, solicitor, 100.00 
W. H. Allison, collector, _ 1,557.00 
L. L. Mower, clerk of common council, 50.00 
Board of Education, Union District, 225.00 
Abial Rolfe, school com. dist. No. 20, 27.00 
WymanW-IIolden, school com.dist.No. 3, 18.00 
Isaac N. Abbott, " " 56.66 
Abial Rolfe, « « 56.67 
A. Burnham, « " 56.67 
Cyrus Runnels, assessor, Ward 1, 75.00 
John B. Sanborn, assessor. Ward 2, 78.00 
Jehiel D. Knight, " " 3, 5400 
Shadrach Seavey, « " 4, 135.00 
Curtis White, « " 5, 189.00 
George S. Dennett, " " 6, 172.50 
Andrew S. Smith, « " 7, 102.00 
Fred G. Chandler, selectman, Ward 1, 5.00 
Hazen Knowlton, " " 1, 5 00 
Ephraim F. Sweatt, « " 1, 5.00 
John T. Tenney, « " 2, 5.00 
A. H. C. Knowles, « " 2, 5.00 



27 



W. W. Holden, " « 

Abijah Hollis, " « 

Ira C. Phillips, « " 

Charles H. Jones, " « 

Geortje S. Young, " " 

G. S.^Blanchard, " " 

Daniel F. Secomb, " " 

Araiu B. Smith, « « 

D. L. Neal, « " 
Charles E. Cummin»s," " 

E. A. F. Hammond,'" " « 
Joseph E. Brown, " " 
Samuel B. Upton, « « 
D. Warren Fox, Ward clerk, " 
John E. Frye, " « 
John H. Kimball, « " 
A. L. Harden, « « 
Geo. F. Underhill, " " 
D. A. Macurdy, " " 
Geo. B. Whittredge, « « 
George O. Dickerman, 1874, 



$5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
500 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
500 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 



Balance unexpended, 

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. 



5,212.50 

$187.50 



Unexpended balance, 1874, 
Appropriation, 1875, 

Paid as follows : 
Sanborn & Clark, 

Balance unexpended, 

DOG TAX. 



$85.00 
400.00 



200.00 



$485.00 

$200.00 

$285.00 



Paid as follows : 
John P. Locke, 
Crosby Knox, 
Edward Runnells, 
John B. Sanborn, 



8.00 

6.00 

4.00 

20.00 



$38.00 



28 



PARSONAGE FUND. 



Paid as follows : 
Fisherville Cong'l Society, 
Methodist " 

Fisherville Baptist " 
Free Will Baptist Society, 
Fisherville, 



$7.07 
18.00 
16.00 
11.31 
2.06 



154.44 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Unexpended balance, 1874, 


$204.50 




Appropriation, 1875, 


800.00 


^1,004.50 






Paid as follows : 






Republican Press Association, 


900.00 




E. C. Bailey, 


64.95 




F. S. Crawford, 


6.00 




Woodbury & Batchelder, 


12.00 




C. C. Pearson & Co., 


59.10 




Morrill & Silsby, 


280.47 




E. C. Eastman, 


2.00 


$1,324.52 







Appropriation overdrawn, 



320.02 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Appropriation, 1875, 




$500.00 


Paid as follows : 






F. S. Crawford, 




500.00 


CITY PRECINCT. 






Unexpended balance, 1874, 
Appropriation, 1875, interest on $50,000 
precinct State liouse bonds. 


$4,835.11 

3,500.00 




Appropriation, 1875, water-works, 

" " lighting streets, 


13,500.00 
2,800.00 




" " sewers, 
Sewer pipes sold. 


10,000.00 
2,160.27 


^(\ 7Q?; 5^8 



29 



Paid as follows : 
Interest on state house bonds, $50,000, $3,614.50 

Amount assessed for interest on water- 
works bonds, 113.500.00 

Paid for ligliting streets as follows : 

John L. T. Brown, lamplighter, 751.00 

Concord Gas Light Co., gas, 2,200.94 

Tufts Brothers, 30.60 

R. C. Danforth, repairs, 17.17 

T. J. Carpenter, « 8.11 



3,013.82 



Paid bills for sewers as follows : 

M. H. Johnson and men, pay rolls, 5,327.92 

Akron Sewer-pipe Co., sewer-pipe, 5,924.93 

Samuel Holt, brick, 913.50 

Hutchins & Co., cement, 450.08 

Chase Whitcher, lumber, 60.00 

James Moore & Sons, hardware, 39.81 

Concord Gas Light Co., balance on derrick, 20.00 

Carroll Hutchins, surveying, 26.00 

Joseph E. Clifford, boots, 11 00 

Concord K. R., freight, 30.95 

N. T. Staples & Son.s, sewer-pipe, 454.13 

N. M. Keyes, mending pipe, 6.75 

Concord Carriage Co., wheelbarrow, 15.00 

James L. Mason, expenses to Ohio, 73.85 

Webster & Morgan, handles, 1.20 

C. C. Lund, surveying, 85.37 

E. B. Hutchinson, lumber and patterns, 66.76 

Ford & Kimball, castings, 305.27 

Beede & Ballard, oil, .80 

Gust. Walker, hardware, 88.10 

M. T. Ladfl, lumber, 44.91 

N. T. Staples & Sons, pipe, 75.00 

Concord R. R., freight, 8.26 

Jesse C. Cochran, iron work, 11.49 

Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, 110.12 

Smith & Dei'ry, smith's work, 27.82 

C. Thorn & Son, boots, 15.00 

M. H. Johnson, sand, 39.80 

J. F. Hoit, oil, 1.60 

B. G, Carter, sharpening tools, 152.54 

L. S. Richardson, rubber gloves, 8.00 



30 



S. Butterfield, oil, $5.34 

O. V. & W. H. Pitman, powder, 2.77 

COMMITTEE ON SEWEKS. 

John Kimball, 150.00 

James L. Mason, ninety-two days, 230.00 

Geo. A. Cummings, 15.00 



^14,790.07 



Total expense of precinct, $34,918.39 

Balance unexpended, $1,876.99 



HEP^OHT 



OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS 
AND BRIDGES. 



To the City Council : 

The nndersignecl, superintendent of highways and bridges, 
respectfully presents the statement of his receipts and expendi- 
tures in each district from February 1, 1875, to February 1, 
1876,— districts No. 9, 26, 27, 28, and 29, being one district, 
under the immediate supervision of the superintendent. 

JOHN KIMBALL, Superintendent. 

DISTRICTS NUMBER 9, 26, 27, 28, AND 29. 

John Kimball, Superintendent of Repairs of Highways and Bridges, 

De. 

To appropriation, 1875, $7,200 

Dec. 25, 1875, 2,000 

$9,200.00 



Cr. 










By amounts exper 


ided from Feb 


'. 1, 1875, 




to Feb. 1, 1876, 


, as follows : 






Paid Jeremiah Brown and 


men, 


pay roll, 




(( 




u 


Feb., 


287.04 


u 




(( 


March, 


277.24 


(( 




u 


April, 


278.42 


(( 




(( 


May, 


351.91 


(( 




(( 


June, 


495.67 


(( 




(( 


July, 


582.73 


(« 




w 


Aug., 


479.18 


c 




(( 


Sept., 


689.61 


cc 




(( 


Oct., 


695.01 


(( 




(( 


Nov., 


399.84 


Thomas Murphy, 


teamster, 


two 


and one 




third months. 








116.67 


K. J. Goodhue, teamster. 


nine 


and two 




thirds months, 








483.33 



$5,136.65 



32 



en,payi 


foil, Feb., 
Mar., 


$258.35 
387.57 


« 

u 


Ap'l, 
May, 
June, 


321.32 
167.91 
160.19 


u 
u 

u 


July, 
Aug., 
Sept., 
Oct., 


164.36 
202.23 
461.68 
840.30 


u 


Nov., 


564.16 


(( 


Dec, 


278.34 


cc 


Jan^ 


222.87 




$4,029.28 


SUPPLIES. 





By paid Sliaw & Drew, blankets, $10.00 
John Kimball, cash paid out, 2.70 
James E. McShane, shoeing, 36.25 
Jonathan George, breaking side- 
walks, 56.00 
Woodworth Bros., grain, 361.21 
John Kimball, scraper, 17.42 
J. S. Merrill, repairs, 6.00 

A. Crooker, repairing harness, 5.15 
W. P. Ford & Company, repair- 
ing plow, 1.80 

David Hamtnand, carrots, 9.00 

M. H. Jolmson, sand and gravel, 81.40 

John S. Thompson, teaming, 22.25 

B. G. Carter, smith work, 24.32 

1583.50 



Appropriation overdrawn, 



9,749.43 

$549.43 



DISTRICT REPORTS. 

Whole amount expended for the year 

ending Feb. 1, 1876, 
Appropriation, 1875, $2,800.00 

Received of J. M. Stewart, 5.00 

J.E.Brown, 2.83 



$3,980.72 



33 



Amount overdrawn, and expended for 
breaking roads through the drifting 
snows of Feb. and March, 1875, 1,002.78 

Amount overdrawn, and used in summer 

of 1875, by order of mayor, 170.11 



DISTRICT NO. 1. 



Simeon Farnum, Surveyor, 1874, 

Aaron Q. Farnum, '* 1875, De. 

To appropriation, 1875, $100.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 47.76 



Cb. 

By labor of Simeon Farnum, $47.76 

A. Q. Farnum, 60.75 

Charles Andrews, 5.37 

Samuel K. Choate, 8.00 

A. S. Yeaton, 7.42 

James Locke, 5.67 

William French, 12.79 



DISTRICT NO. 2. 

W. S. Carter, Surveyor^ Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $70.00 

unexpended balance, 1874, 5.88 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 7.54 

Cr. 

By labor of W. S. Carter, winter bill, $13.42 

J. W. Ashcroft, 10.00 

E. P. Farnum, 11.15 

J. Quimby, 5.00 

W. Hayward, ■ 5.50 

W. S. Carter, 24.70 



$3,980.72 



amount overdrawn for winter bill, 28.62 

3 



$147.76 



$147.76 



$83.42 



).77 



Cash in hands of surveyor, $13.65 

DISTRICT NO. 3. 
John Buckland, Surveyor^ Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $70.00 



$98.62 



34 

Cr. 

By labor of John Bacldand, $26.75 

Mark Sargent, 6.57 

David Sargent, 3.75 

H. S. Ballou, 3.50 

J. C. Bartlett, 2.62 

Rnfiis Virgin, 41.62 

Jonathan Varney, 9.00 

Lyman Hall, 4.81 



DISTKIOT NO. 4. 

Henry H. Potter, Surveyor^ Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $85.00 

unexpended balance, 1874, .88 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 25.87 

« " summer bill, 6.04 



Cr. 

By labor of H. H. Potter, $45.12 

Thomas A. Sears, 7.87 

Charles Potter, 1.75 

W. L. Batchelder, 5.25 

Lyman Tilton, 5.25 

A. Tilton, 5.25 

J. P. Locke, 10.50 

John T. Tenney, 6.25 

J. F. Potter, 5.25 

John Potter, 16.50 

Thomas Potter, 1.75 

J. F. Potter, gravel, .80 

Charles D. Rowell, 5.25 



DISTKICT NO. 5. 

John B. Sanborn, Surveyor, 1874, 

John G. Tallant, " 1875, Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $80.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 86.14 



Cr. 

By labor of John B. Sanborn, $85.71 

Moody S. Farnum, 7.86 

R. E. S. Wells, 10.32 

John G. Tallant, . 57.75 

A. J. Morrill, 5.00 



$98.62 



$116.79 



S116.79 



$116.14 



$116.14 



35 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 



Joseph E. Plummer, Surveyor^ 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1875, 


8300.00 


unexpended balance, 1874, 


16.94 


amount overdrawn for winter bill, 


80.15 




<|Q07 no 


Cr. 




By labor of William P. Stevens, 


■$5.62 


Washington Hill, 


16.62 


G. W. Locke, 


24.62 


Daniel B. Sanborn, 


21.45 


Thomas Smith, 


5.62 


G. W. Moody, 


14.87 


F. P. Emerson, 


18.80 


W. W. Hazelton, 


12.75 


E, Emery, 


31.62 


Joseph E. Plummer, 


102.50 


Curtis Dubia, 


8.75 


William Ballard, 


6.12 


Henry G. Maxon, 


6.00 


B. P. Smith, 


3.00 


0. W. Coon, 


27.40 


Henry C. Dubia, 


1.50 


Ami Dubia, 


17.25 


S. C. Sanders, 


6.75 


Joseph T. Clough, 


36.75 


Joseph B. Hussey, 


3.00 




*q7n 00 







Cash in the hands of surveyor, $26.10 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 
Samuel M. Locke, Surveyor, 1874, 
JosiAH S. Locke, ' 1875, 

To appropriation, 1875, 

unexpended balance, 1874, 



Cr. 
By labor of B. L. Larkin, 

Josiah S. Locke, 
Samuel M. Locke, 



$20.00 
30.40 


$5.62 
7.50 
8.25 



$50.40 



$21.37 



Balance unexpended, $39.03 

Amount expended in summer not in- 
cluded in the above account. 



36 



DISTRICT NO. 8. 



William T. Locke, Surveyor^ De, 

To appropriation, $100.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 77.00 



Cr. 






By labor of William T. Locke, 




^106.00 


Edwin Hanson, 




28.00 


Thomas Greenough, 




14.25 


Ezra Jenness, 




3.00 


Frank Carter, 




4.00 


Wra. C. Greenough, 




9.00 


J. S. Hanson, 




3.75 


Hiram Davis, Jr., 




3.00 


Plank, nails, &c., 


10. 


6.00 


DISTEICT NO. 




Harrison Partridge, Surveyor, 


1874, 




Hiram Farnum, " 


1875, 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 




$230.00 


amount overdrawn for winter bill. 




34.75 


Cr. 




By labor of Abner R. Farnum, 




$16.38 


Timothy Green, 




5.25 


Walter S. Lougee, 




8.75 


L. L. Farwell, 




4.37 



Hiram Farnum has drawn $200, but has 
not made his report. 

DISTEICT NO. 11. 
Jonathan M. Stewart, Surveyor^ Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $40.00 

amount expended for winter bill, 33.84 

Cr. 

By labor of J. M. Stewart, winter, 118.87 

Hiram Quimby, " 1.00 

A. C. Abbott. « 13.97 

J. M. Stewart, men and teams, 40.00 



$177.00 



$177.00 



$264.75 



$34.75 
6230.00 



$73.84 



$73.84 



37 



DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Asa H. Morkill, Surveyor , 1874, 

Charles C. Bean, " 1875, Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $450.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 93.65 

" summer bill, 48.42 



Cb. 




By labor of Asa H. Morrill, 


$26.50 


Nathan Colby, 


3.00 


Frank Emerson, 


8.80 


S. Florence, 


.40 


M. H. Fifield, 


7.50 


C. Roby, 


1.00 


Eugene Moore, 


2.60 


0. Moore, 


3.70 


Nelson Davis, 


.80 


C. Davis, 


3.70 


Geo. Bean, 


1.50 


J. P. Boyce, 


4.50 


S. Currier, 


1.20 


John Sawyer, 


.35 


C. Emerson, 


1.20 


L. K. Cheney, 


1.60 


G. Morrill, 


.20 


H. Morrill, 


.25 


E. Sebra, 


.80 


L. Sebra, 


.80 


C. Smith, 


.60 


John Bean, 


.50 


Henry Perrin, 


.75 


Nathan Chandler, 


1.00 


C. C. Bean, 


16.40 


A. H.Morrill, fifty loads gravel, 


4.00 



C. C. Bean, 90.25 

" team, 68.00 

Patrick Burey, 14.92 

A. Hatch, 23.55 

Napoleon Sebra, 31.57 

M. H. Fifield, 45.27 

John Larkin, 24.22 

James Shea, 32.25 

John Prescott, 7.50 
Albert Stone, • 10.50 



^592.07 



$93.65 



38 



By labor of C. L. Ferrin, $2.25 

Hubbard Williams, 15.00 

Evans & Gale, 2.64 

T.O.Wilson, 2.00 

Henry Hall, 10.62 

Oilman Shaw, 8.25 

Mrs. Speed, gravel, 2.90 

E. Lambert, .75 

M. H. Bruce, 5.50 

John Roberts, 20.85 

Jeremiah P. Boyce, 22.50 

Emery Hoyt, 12.75 

D. Arthur Brown, .70 

Roger McNamara, 9.75 

Nathan Danforth, 9.63 

Leroy Bean, 7.50 

Frank O'Niel, 1.50 

Frank Sanborn, 20.00 

D. Warren Fox, 600 

$509.12 
Less cash received for brick andcement, 10.70 



DISTKICT NO. 13 

Geo. F. Sanborn, Surveyor^ Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, ^ $80.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 89.95 

« " summer bill, 63.70 



Cr. 

By labor of G. F. Sanborn, $40.60 

Fred Conner, 1.75 

Joseph Elliott, 2.98 

Frank L. Elliott, 3.78 

John Whittaker, 4.00 

Geo. E. Blanchard, 2.07 

A. W. Uran, 3.24 

Lowell B. Elliott, 7.40 

Timothy E. Hoit, 2.34 

Rufus D. Scales, 10.19 

Henry Merrill, .75 

Geo. Fanieuf, 1.05 

John S. Fisk, 2.00 



$498.42 
$592.07 



$233.65 



39 



By labor of Araos Elliott, 


$3.15 


G. M. Gage, 


4.65 


Total for winter work, 


$89.95 


By labor of Geo. F. Sanborn, putting up 




railing, 


10.90 


Geo. F. Sanborn, 


70.93 


"Wm. Eastman, 


C.G8 


Timothy E. Hoit, 


8.92 


Wm. Hutchinson, 


4.G7 


Frank L. Elliott, 


7.26 


Alvin Uran, 


4.92 


Joseph Elliott, 


5.50 


Joseph Story, 


1.05 


Geo. Blanchard, 


1.65 


Geo. Gage, 


2.00 


Jonathan Hoit, 


3.00 


J. S. Fisk, 


3.00 


Lowell B. Elliott, 


1.50 


Evans & Gale, spikes. 


2.22 


Paid for gravel. 


9^50 


DISTRICT NO. 14. 




Sherman D. Colby, Surveyor^ 


De. 


To appropriation, 1875, 


$60.00 


amount overdrawn for winter bill. 


36.27 


" " summer bill. 


1.34 


Cr. 




By labor of Sherman D. Colby, men and 




teams. 


$82.18 


Frank Colby, 


1.67 


Gilman I. Colby, 


3.39 


Solon Sanborn, 


1.00 


Samuel Dow, 


1.00 


Henry Powell, 


1.87 


H. Eastman, 


6.00 


John Bean, 


.50 



DISTRICT NO. 15. 



Andrew P. Bennett, Surveyor, 1874, 
Moses E.Long, " 1875, Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $80.00 



$233.65 



$97.61 



$97.61 



40 

To unexpended balance, 1874, $3.35 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 12.28 

" « by A. P. Bennett, 35.88 



Ce. 




By labor of A. P. Bennett, 


$37.75 


Moses E. Long, 


35.38 


E. F. Sweatt, 


11.38 


Charles Sweatt, 


7.00 


Cyrus Runnells, 


1.75 


Addison Annis, 


34.25 


Francis Runnells, 


4.00 


DISTKICT NO 16. 




Edward Runnells, Surveyor, 1874, 




ROBEKT B. HoiT, « 1875, 


De. 


To appropriation, 


$65.00 


amount overdrawn for winter bill. 


52.32 


Cb. 




By labor of Edward Runnells, 


$19.02 


Jerome Runnells, 


16.60 


Willis Runnels, 


4.00 


Edwin Sawyer, 


4.00 


Edwin Terry, 


9.25 


E. E. Terry, 


4.11 


L. W. Powell, 


9.55 


Amos Sawyer, 


10.75 


Robert B. Hoit, 


29.36 


Albert G. Dow, 


8.05 


Jacob Ordway, 


2.63 



DISTKICT NO. 17. 

A, C. Carter, Sicrveyor,l'$>14:, 

G. H. DiMOND, « 1875, De. 

To appropriation, 1875, $60.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 73.50 

" " summer bill, 10.68 



Ce. 

By labor of A. C. Carter, $19.07 

G. H. Dimond, 14.00 

Joel Conner, 1.58 



$131.51 



$131.51 



$117.32 



$117.32 



$144.18 



41 



By labor of James Conner, 


13.15 




Willis Crane, 


5.25 




T. J. Crane, 


1.75 




F. G, Richardson, 


3.85 




R. K. Buswell, 


7.00 




S. S. Buswell, 


6.82 




Timothy R. Carter, 


4.55 




R. S. Davis, 


4.73 




C. H. Currier, 


1.75 


173.50 


G. H. Dimond, 


25.90 


A. C. Carter, 


16.80 




Joel Conner, 


6.65 




James Conner, 


3.50 




S. J. Crane, 


5.25 




Willis Crane, 


2.62 




George Fuller, 


1.75 




Jeremiah Abbott, 


3.50 


$65.97 






Robert S. Davis, 


2.10 




S. S. Buswell, 


.87 




T. R. Carter, 


.87 




Joshua Downing, 


.87 


$4.71 







DISTRICT NO. 18. 



Henrt Farnum, Survey or, 1874, 

Andrew S. Farnum, " 1875,, Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $90.00 
amount overdrawn for winter bill, 13. 65 



Cr. 




By labor of Henry Farnum, 


$10.50 


Andrew S. Farnum, 


41.47 


R. S. Emery, 


15.75 


Isaac F. Ferrin, 


26.12 


Samuel Calef, 


2.09 


Edward S. Barrett, 


1.02 


Stephen Carlton, 


6.20 


Edwin Dow, 


.50 



^144.18 



1103.65 



$103.65 



42 



DISTKICT NO. 19. 
Stephen K. jLittle, Surveyor, 1874, 
Eeuben K. Abbott, " 1875, Dr. 



To appropriation, 1875, 






$100.00 


amount overdrawn, for winter bill, 


66.92 


« " sum: 


mer 


bill, 


14.00 


Cb. 




By labor of Stephen K. Little, 






$11.37 


D. C. Tenney, 






10.50 


R. K. Abbott, 






'8.75 


A. D. Swan, 






9.62 


John K. Abbott, 






8.31 


Albert Saltmarsh, 






7.87 


Stephen K. Little, 


bah 


ince due 




him for 1874, 






10.50 



Reuben K. Abbott has drawn $114. No 
report has been received. 

DISTRICT NO. 20. 
Jacob IST. Flanders, Surveyor, Dk. 

To appropriation, 1875, $60.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 27.99 

« " summer bill, 2.06 



Cr. 




By labor of Jacob N. Flanders, 


$10.15 


L. B. Thompson, 


6.83 


Frank W. Thompson, 


6.82 


William Fagan, 


4.03 


John E. Saltmarsh, 


16.45 


C. H. Merrill, 


25.37 


C. B. Merrill, 


3.94 


William B. Thompson, 


3.50 


Peter Fagan, 


3.50 


F. J. Emerson, 


7.71 


Albert Saltmarsh, 


1.75 


DISTRICT NO. 21. 




Lowell Brown, Surveyor, 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1875, 


§80.00 


unexpended balance, 1874, 


25.25 


amount overdrawn, winter bill. 


3.20 



$180.92 



$66.92 



$90.05 



).05 



$108.45 



43 



Cr. 






By labor of Lowell Brown, 


$57.70 




B. F. Griffin, 


5.00 




Charles Fiske, 


7.00 




Daniel Farnura, 


22.00 




John Ballard, 


12.75 




John Jordan, 


4.00 


$108.45 


DISTRICT NO. 22. 




Charles Hall, Surveyor, 


Dr. 




To appropriation, 1875, 


$75.00 




unexpended balance, 1874, 


1.50 


$76.50 


Cb. 




By labor of Charles Hall, 


$65.99 




Bridge plank, 


10.50 


$76.49 







Balance unexpended, -01 

DISTKICT NO. 23. 
Isaac N. Abbott, Swveyor, 1874, 



Jeremiah S. Abbott, " 1875, 


Dr. 




To appropriation, 1875, 


125.00 




amount in hands of I. N. Abbott, 


5.77 




unexpended balance. 


55.80 


$186.57 


Cr. 




By labor of Isaac N. Abbott, 


1465 




Daniel K. Abbott, 


4.00 




John E. Baker, 


3.00 




I. H. Proctor, 


2.50 




J. E. Proctor, 


2.40 




F. G. Corless, 


5.00 




John Bodwell 


.80 






$32.35 




Jeremiah S. Abbott, 


24.25 




Isaac N. Abbott, 


20.12 




D. K Abbott, 


6.12 




Isaac H. Proctor, 


2.62 




Frank G. Proctor, 


.87 




John E. Baker, 


3.94 




Daniel Wyman, 


1.75 


$92.02 







Balance unexpended, ^94.55 



Cr. 




By labor of Moses B. Abbott, 


$60.38 


William Abbott, 


6.12 


Ira Abbott, 


5.25 


K. H. Batchelder, 


4.80 


Samuel Blood, 


1.75 


Fred Clough, 


2.62 


Charles Flanders, 


4.17 


John L. Gordon, 


4.62 


C. B. Hildreth, 


1.75 


R. W. Mitchel, 


4.37 


J. C. and I. F. Wheeler, 


20.99 


J. G. Rowell, 


1.75 


M. T. Ladd, 


1.75 


F. Hartshorn, 


1.75 


Stone, 


3.00 


Charles Abbott, 


1.00 


Daniel Hammond, 


.70 


Andrew Watson, 


.75 


W. W. Clark, 


.50 


Giles Wheeler, 


1.00 



151.14 



44 



DISTEICT NO. 24. 
Jesse H. Goodwin, Surveyor, De. 

To appropriation, 1875, 

cash in hands of surveyor, 1874, 

Cr. 

By labor of Jesse H. Goodwin, 
Joseph E. Brown, 
Andrew S. Smith, 
Edgar Wheeler, 

$49.18 

Cash in hands of surveyor, 1.96 

DISTRICT NO. 25. 

Moses B. Abbott, Surveyor^ Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $100.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 29.02 

$129.02 



45.00 


6.14 


17.55 


10.50 


15.88 


5.25 



$129.02 



45 



DISTRICT NO, 30. 

Fkank B. Carter, Surveyor, Dr. 

To appropriation, 1875, $60.00 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 34.71 



Cr. 




By labor of Frank B. Carter, 


$18.50 


Timothy Carter, 


16.25 


Davitl Carter, 


11.00 


Albert Cooper, 


6.12 


William Broad, 


7.00 


Elbridge Dimond, 


3.67 


Charles Currier, 


5.05 


Geo. Fuller, 


.87 


John J. Thompson, 


26.25 


DISTRICT NO. 31. 




R. K. LouGEE, Surveyor, 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1875, 


820.00 


unexpended balance, 1874, 


2.3.04 


Cr. 




By labor of R. K. Lougee, and plank, 


$13.05 


Geo. H. Carter, Jr., 


4.20 


Samuel E. Clifford, 


2.80 


" horses. 


4.50 


Peter Harden, 


2.00 



To appropriation, 1875, $45.00 

unexpended balance, 13.25 



Cr. 

By labor of John T. Gilman, $36.50 

George Holt, 4.50 

Geo. Tucker, 3.00 



.71 



$94.71 



$48.04 



$26.55 

Balance unexpended, $16.49 

DISTRICT NO. 32. 
John T. Gilman, Surveyor^ Dr. 



$58.25 



$44.00 



Balance unexpended, $14.25 



46 

DISTKICT NO. 33. 



R, H. Potter, Surveyor, 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1875, 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 


$60.00 
5.15 


Cr. 




By labor of R. H. Potter, 


$35.15 


Geo. T. Abbott, 


5.62 


W. A. Bean, 


9.00 


A. Hibbard, 


3.77 


Fred Doeplace, 


1.50 


E. Emery, 


4.50 


Thomas Bean, 


1.50 


J. T. Batchelder, 


4.11 


DISTKICT NO. 34. 




Charles Graham, Surveyor, 


Dr. 


To appropi'iation, 1875, 

amount overdrawn for winter bill, 


$50.00 

57.82 


Expended by order of Mayor, on Can- 
terbury road, 


25.50 


Cr. 




By labor of Charles Graham, 


$18.37 


John W. Bourlet, 


8.22 


Geo. Graham, 


17.50 


Andrew Moody, 
David Sargent, 


11.20 
1.05 


Mark Sargent, 


1.48 


Moses C. Sanborn & Sons, 


25.50 


Charles Graham, |50 drawn, 




but no report received. 





$65.15 



$65.15 



$133.32 



$133.32 



47 
SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 







SCHOOL-HOUSE TAXES. 


Appi 


•opriation, 


Union District, 


$8,500.00 




u 


District No. 3, 


230.53 




(C 


13, 


700.00 




« 


18, 


50.00 




u 


22, 


50.00 



Paid as follows : 
John Kimball and E. Gerrish, Union Dist., $8,500.00 
Daniel Holden, District No. 3, 230.53 

Albert Stevens, " 13, 700.00 

Giles Wheeler, « 18, 50.00 

Ira P. Kempton, " 22, 46.80 



$4,137.48 

Appropriation, 1875, 20,000.00 

Jan. 29, 1876, 3,000.00 

John Kimball, buildings sold, 139.00 



),530.53 



),527.33 



Balanced unexpended, $3.20 

CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 

Unexpended balance, 1874, $5,171.94 

Amount refunded to G. Bullock, $34.46 
Deduct land sold on State street, 1,000.00 

1.034.46 



Paid as follows : 

Jeremiah Brown, excavating, $357.35 

Porter E, Blanchard, foundation, 920.50 

J. T. Clough & Son, brick, 2,942.40 

Ordway & Ferrin, mason work, 3,212.22 

C. C. Lund, engineering, 16.62 

C. E. Parker, architect, 500.00 

J. H. Flood, stonework, 1,515.28 

Brown, Russ & Co., lumber, 490.89 

Knapp & Putnam, « 562.72 

M. H. Johnson, drains, 126.50 

Henry W. Clapp, sewer inlets, 37.27 
Mead, Mason & Co., carpenter work and 

lumber, 5,941.22 



$27,276.48 



48 



Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, 
Gust. Walker, « 

Ford & Kimball, iron work, 
Jesse C. Cochran, " 

D. C. Allen & Co., " 
John W. Drew, rent of land, 
A. J. Wilkinson, steel tape, 
Hutchins & Co., cement, 
Harris & Co., vane, 

W. M. Darrah, slating, 

L. W. Cushing & Sons, canopy, &c., 

A. A. Moore, lightning rod, 

John H. Morse, gas and water pipe, 

Thompson Rowell & Co., concrete, 

Stevens & Dunklee, furnace, 

C. H. Martin & Co., paints and oils, 

Edward Dow, plans, 

Williams & Co., soapstone, 

Bowker, Torrey & Co., marble, 

Lowell Eastman, windows, 

Northern R. 11., iron rails, 

Geo. Goodhue, water supply, 

" gas fixtures, 

City Precinct, sewer pipe, 
Andrew Bunker, doors and sash, 
J. K. Hicks, copper, 

E. A. Bingham, splicing ropes, 
Daniel F. Secomb, services, 
Concord R. R., freight, 

John Eves, plumbing, 
W. P. Ford & Co., stove, 
Calvin Howe, land, 



$536.77 

205.96 

444.04 

72.25 

66.43 

15.00 

14.00 

87.30 

22.50 

1,623.82 

225.00 

76.65 

277.89 

104.00 

150.00 

209.03 

69.30 

5.42 

48.61 

300.38 

51.54 

45.74 

205.33 

292.69 

449.02 

50.28 

8.50 

1.50 

3.64 

362.54 

14.50 

700.00 



$23,362.60 



Balance unexpended, 

CITY FARM. 

Appropriation, 1875, 
Harrison Partridge, balance in his hands, 
John Kimball, oxen sold, 
" land sold, 

Paid as follows : 
L. L. Farwell, sup't of farm, 
Moses Humphrey, shingles, 
Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, 
Webster & Morgan, labor, 



§3,913.88 



5,000.00 

362.77 
200.00 
250.00 



1,000.00 

39.00 

25.51 

134.35 



$2,812.77 



49 



W. K. Holt & Co., lumber, $117.15 

Union Steam Mill Co., 9.09 

Lowell Eastman, 30.55 

James Moore & Sons, 7.55 

L. L. Farwell, sup't, moving stone, 108.98 

board of R. Atwell, 3.50 

A. A. Moore, lightning rod, 16.05 

A. C. Holt, labor and lumber, 49.85 

Webster & Morgan, labor, 28.50 

Mead & Mason, lumber, 55.10 

A. C. Holt, lumber and labor, 148.08 



$1,773.26 



Balance unexpended, $1,039.51 

CITY PROPERTY, FEB. 1, 1876. 

City Hall lot, and half of building, $40,000.00 

City farm, 15,000.00 

Personal property at firm, by appraisal, 4,649.34 

Gravel lots at East Concord, 100.00 

Gravel lot on Washington street, 2,000.00 

Lot on Warren and Liberty streets, 700.00 

Land and buildings on Warren street, 10,000.00 

Land in Ward 2, 400.00 

Ward house, Ward 2, 1,000.00 

Ward house. Ward 6, 6,000.00 

City storehouse, lot, lumber, and stone, 5,000.00 

Tools in hands of sup't highways, 1,000.00 

Receiving tomb, 350.00 

Furniture in City Hall building, 200.00 

Furniture in city clerk's office, 100.00 

Furniture in city marshal's office, 100.00 

Furniture in collector's office, 100.00 

Five horses, S300, 1200, $250, $250, $100, ^ 1,100.00 

Harnesses and stable fixtures, . 350.00 

Street sprinklers, pipes, and fixtures, 500.00 

Legacy of Abial Walker, for schools, 1,000.00 

Legacy of G.. P. Lyon, for library, 1,000 00 

Legacy of Franklin Pierce, for library, 1,000.00 

City librarv. 4,000.00 

Gravel on A. B. Holt's lot, 800.00 

Old cemetery fund, city bonds, 700.00 

Central Fire Station, 32,662.00 

Property in hands of fire department, 37,338.00 

City Water Works, 350,000.00 

4 $517,149.34 



50 
CITY DEBT AND ASSETS. 

FUNDED DEBT, PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS. 



When due. 


Rate of int. 


Payable. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1, 1876. 


6 


matured 


$500 


April 1, 1876. 


6 


semi-annually 


3,000 


Jan. 1, 1877. 


6 


annually 


8,000 


April 1, 1877. 


6 


semi-annually 


3,000 


Jan. 1, 1878. 


6 


annually 


7,000 


Jan. 1, 1878. 


5 


annually 


6,000 


Nov. 1, 1878. 


6 


semi-annually 


4,000 


Jan. 1, 1879. 


6 


annually 


3,000 


April 1, 1879. 


6 


semi-annually 


4,000 


Nov. 1, 1879. 


6 


semi-annually 


1,000 


Jan. 1, 1880. 


6 


annually 


8,000 


April 1, 1880. 


6 


semi-annually 


3,000 


Nov. 1, 1880. 


6 


semi-annually 


1,000 


Jan. 1, 1881. 


6 


annually 


7,500 


April 1, 1881. 


6 


semi-annually 


3,000 


Nov. 1, 1881. 


6 


semi-annually 


3,000 


Jan. 1. 1882. 


6 


annually 


5, 00 


April 1, 1882. 


6 


semi-annually 


4,000 


Nov. 1, 1882. 


6 


semi-anntially 


1,000 


Jan. 1, 1883. 


6 


annually 


5,000 


Jan. 1, 1883. 


5 


annually 


6,000 


Nov. 1, 1883. 


6 


semi-annually 


3,000 


Jan. 1, 1884. 


6 


annually 


2,000 


April 1, 1884. 


6 


semi-annually 


7,000 


Nov. 1, 1884. 


6 


semi-annually 


5,000 


Jan. 1, 1885. 


6 


annually 


2,000 


April 1, 1885. 


6 


semi-annually 


5,000 


Nov. 1, 1885. 


6 


semi-annually 


9,000 


Jan. 1, 1886. 


' 6 


annually 


1,500 


April 1, 1886. 


6 


semi-annually 


1,000 


Nov. 1, 1886. 


6 


semi-annually 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 1887. 


6 


annually 


1,500 


Oct. 1, 1887. 


6 


semi-annually 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 1888. 


6 


annually 


1,000 


Oct. 1, 1888. 


6 


semi-annually 


8,500 


Jan. 1, 1889. 


6 


annually 


2,000 


Oct. 1, 1889. 


6 


semi-annually 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 1890. 


6 


annually 


2,000 


Oct. 1, 1890. 


6 


semi-annually 


10,000 


J-an. 1, 1891. 


6 


annually 


1;000 



51 



"WTien due. 


Rate of int. 


Amount. 


Payable. 


Oct. 1, 1891. 


6 


semi-annually 


$6,250 


Nov. 1, 1891. 


6 


semi-annually 


6,000 


Oct. 1, 1892. 


6 


semi-annually 


2,000 


Nov. 1, 1892. 


6 


semi-annually 


10,000 


Oct. 1, 1893. 


6 


semi-annually 


4,250 


Nov. 1, 1893. 


6 


semi-annually 


8,000 


Oct. 1, 1894. 


6 


semi-annually 


4,000 


Nov. 1, 1894. 


6 


semi-annually 


7,000 


Oct. 1, 1895. 


6 


semi-annually 


3,000 



State House bonds, 6 per cent, gold, called, 
but not yet presented for payment, 



State House precinct notes, 6 per cent, 
gold, called, but not yet presented for 
payment, 

State House precinct notes, 6 per cent.^ 
semi-annually, payable Dec. 1, 1876, 

" 1878, 

" 1879, 

" 1880, 
1881, 

« 1882, 

" 1883, 

" 1884, 

« 1885, 

« 1886, 

" 1887, 

« 1888, 

« 1889, 

« 1890, 

« 1891, 

" 1892, 

« 1893, 

« 1894, 

« 1895, 

« 1896, 



There are on hand unsold of these notes, 

Leaving as the bonded debt of precinct 
for the state house, 



$228,000 

2,000 

$230,000 



4,900 



$1,000 
1,500 
500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,500 
2,500 
3,000 
8,500 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 

10,000 
7,000 



654,900 
4,600 



$50,300 



52 

Of the cash in the treasuiy $300 belongs 
to the precinct, to be applied to the 
payment of called notes, so that the 
unsold notes and cash will redeem the 
called notes, and leave the $50,000 cur- 
rency notes as the j^recinct debt on this 
account. 

Interest, including coupons due and un- 
paid, 14,525 

Funded debt and interest Feb. 1, 

1876, $284,825 

FLOATING DEBT AND OUT-STANDING CLAIMS. 



* Notes, $13,800.00 

Interest, 433.00 



Due for salaries and committee sei-vice, $2,000.00 
school districts, 283.29 

for unpaid orders, 120.15 



$14,233.00 



$2,403.44 



Debt, not including water-works, Feb. 1, 1876, $301,461.44 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Cash in city treasury, $3,415.60 

Due from tax list, 1874, 1,698.92 

Due from tax-list, 1875, 33,205.12 

Due from Merrimack county, 2,726.92 

Invested in liquor agency, 864.17 

Due from Blossom Hill Cemetery, 4,000.00 

Due on note, Moses Ordway et al.^ 200.00 



),110.73 



Indebtedness above assets, Feb. 1, 1876, $255,350.71 

Indebtedness above assets, Feb. 1, 1875, 258,596.45 



Decrease of indebtedness for the year, $3,245.74 

* $13,800 has been borrowed : to pay for addition to Blossom Hill Cemetery, ^3,500; 
gravel on Whale's Back, $1,000; for land, for central fire station, $7,200 ; and amount 
expended on fire station in excess of the amount raised $2,100. 



53 

TRUST FUNDS. 



Walker School Fund. This fund was a legacy of Abial Walk- 
er. Will dated Jan. 3, 1855. " To the city of Concord aforesaid I 
give and bequeath one thousand dollars, in trust, to be added to the 
school fund of said city, the interest whereof to be divided in due pro- 
portion among all the districts in the city at the time the dividend 
takes place, to be paid over to said city in one year after my decease." 
The amount of this fund is $1000, and is invested in a note of that 
sum of the Concord City Precinct, due in 1895. 

Lyox Legacy is from G. Parker Lyon. Will dated Jan. 23, 
1865. " I give and bequeath to the city of Concord, in the county 
of Merrimack, in trust for the increase of the free public library of 
said city, the annual income thereof only to be annually expended in 
the purchase of books for said public library, the sum of one thousand 
dollars." One precinct note of $1000, interest 6 per cent., due 1896. 

Pierce Legacy is from Franklin Pierce, ex-President of the 
United States. Will dated Jan. 22, 1868. " 16th. To the city of Con- 
cord I give and bequeath, in trust for the ' Concord Public Library,' 
one thousand dollars, the interest of said sum to be expended annually 
in the purchase of books, and the principal to remain as a perpetual 
fund for the object indicated." One city bond of $1,000, due 1885. 

Countess Rujiford Legacy is from the Countess of Rumford. 
Will dated Nov. 10, 1852. "To the town of Concord aforesaid, in trust 
for the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society, an associa- 
tion in said town, two thousand dollars, to be applied to the charitable 
uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. And in 
case the said town should be incapable of, or decline said trust, then 
the same is given and t-o be paid over to any two persons whom the 
executor of my will may elect and name to administer said trust." 
Two bonds of $500 each, and one of $1,000, of city of Concord, payable 
in 1877. 

Old Cemetery Fund. There have been invested of the proceeds 
of sales of lots $700 in water works bonds, bearing 6 per cent interest. 
The income from this fund is devoted to the care of the old cemetery. 



54 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and personal 
estate in the city of Concord since 1860 : 



Year. 


No. of Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1860 


2,577 


$4,307,192 


$47,082.25 


1861 


2,497 


4,423,936 


46.290.48 


1862 


2,350 


4,308,568 


50,945.01 


1863 


2,454 


3,775,206 


60,293.82 


1864 


2,539 


3,832,800 


89,931.97 


1865 


2,495 


5,549,002 


158,787.29 


1866 


2,762 


4,934,082 


116,192.97 


1867 


2,822 


5,006,774 


145,173.49 


1868 


3,120 


5,378,365 


126,889.71 


1869 


3,205 


5,581,459 


146,791.04 


1870 


3,187 


5,751,928 


133,953.94 


1871 


3,338 


5,891,993 


137,844.70 


1872 


3,767 


5,917,054 


141,122.97 


1873. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


439 


S818,435 


$12,044.47 


9 


219 


381,532 


7,196.69 


3, 


188 


380,088 


5,721.93 


4, 


861 


1,943,302 


35.326.70 


5, 


730 


2,707,238 


48,778.06 


6, 


789 


2,188,426 


38,610.42 


7, 


387 


593,629 


8,131.65 


Non-resident, 


3,613 




2,471.21 




$9,012,650 


$158,281.13 


1874. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


"Ward 1, 


422 


$805,608 


$11,340.85 


2, 


225 


386,990 


7,026.93 


3, 


211 


357,770 


5,322.76 


4, 


884 


1,993,632 


39,008.44 


5, 


736 


2,693,625 


53,137.14 


6, 


833 


2,198,626 


43,538.19 


7, 


473 


564,275 


8,949.07 


Non-resident, 


3,784 




2,722.23 




$9,000,526 


$171,045.61 


1875. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


467 


$802,007 


$10,719.19 


2, 


241 


409,001 


5,941.11 


3, 


228 


367,007 


5,370.06 


4, 


951 


1,974,173 


40,105.68 


5, 


752 


2,678,964 


54,077.75 


6, 


817 


2,306,361 


46,761.42 


7, 


485 


678,683 


9,468.86 


Non-resident, 






3,190.61 



3,941 



3,216,195 



175,234.68 



EEPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON THE APPRAISAL OF PROPERTY 
FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF TAXES. 



The undersigned, a committee appointed by the Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Concord on the 28th day of 
August, 1875, to equalize the appraisal of property for the as- 
sessment of taxes, agreeably to an act of the legislature ap- 
proved July 10, 1874, and an act in amendment of said act ap- 
proved July 3, 1875, having attended to the duty assigned them 
submit the following report : 

Your committee entered upon their duties in the early part 
of September, and visited each farm and residence within the 
limits of the city, and for this purpose spent sixty days each. 
We herewith make return of the valuation of the real estate, as 
made by us in the several wards in said city, as follows : 



Ward 1, 

" 3, 
" 4, 
" 5, 
" 6, 


$613,550.00 

338,470.00 

305,525.00 

1,637,019.00 

2,114,095.00 

1,879,725.00 


" 7, 


711,710.00 


Total valuation, 


$7,600,700.00 



Concord, Jan. 29, 1876. 



GEO. A. PILLSBURY, 

CHARLES H. NORTON, ">■ Committee. 

NATHAN CHANDLER, 



56 



FOUETH a:n:nual eepoet 

OP THE BOAED OP WATEK COMMISSIONERS TO THE CITY 
COUNCIL OP CONCORD, N. H., POR THIRTEEN MONTHS 
ENDING JANUARY 31, 1876. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



JOHN KIMBALL, Mayor, ex officio. 



BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL, 
JOHN M. HILL, . 
ABEL B. HOLT, . 
JOHN S. RUSS, . 
JOHN ABBOTT, . 
SAMUEL S. KIMBALL, 



to March 31, 1878. 
to March 31, 1878. 
to March 31, 1877. 
to Marcli 81, 1877. 
to Mardi 31, 1876. 
to March 31, 1876. 



OFFICERS. 

JOHN KIMBALL, President. 

B. A. KIMBALL, Clerh. 

CHARLES C. LUND, Consulting Engineer. 

V. C. HASTINGS, Superintendent. 



67 

REPORT. 

To the City Council: 

Tlie Boiird of Water Commissioners present tliis their fourth 
Annual Report for thirteen months ending January 31, 187G. 

An ordinance of the city passed January 30, 1875, requires 
this report to be made February 1, in each year, instead of Jan- 
uary 1, as heretofore. 

The statement of the City Treasurer, following, shows the 
financial condition of the works in detail, which is substantially 
as follows : 

Water-works bonds, outstanding, with ac- 
crued interest from Oct. 1, 1875, $353,000.00 
This amount comprises the entire lia- 
bilities to date of this report. 
There is a cash balance on hand of $2,282.69 

We are gratified to state that the expectations of the Board, 
as expressed in our last Annual Report, have been realized. 
The demand for water supply has gradually increased, which 
gives assurance that the time is not far distant when the 
receipts will be sufiicient to p.ay the interest on the funded 
debt and the expense of maintenance. 

BECEIPTS. 

Amount received, as per register from Jan. 

1 , 1875, to Feb. 1, 1876, $16,593. 64 
" " extra per cent, from de- 

linquents, 107.43 

" " for building purposes, 63.18 

" " use of meters, 32.67 

« " rentof stable at dam, 0.00 

« " rent of Cooledge house, 60.00 

« " old bills in 1874, 34.32 

§10,921.24 



BXPENDITURES. 

Paid Geo. Goodhue, as per his contract, $2,853.09 

heirs of W. P. Cooledge, land, 2,250.03 

V. C. Hastings, salary, 13 months, 1,300.00 

Isaac A. Hill, clerk hire, 85.00 

" " 20.00 

F. P. Andrews, " 65.00 



58 

Paid Nathaniel White, rent, $300.00 

Charles H. Norton, horse liire, 15.50 

A. & G. A. Foster, " 45.00 

V. C. Hastings, incidentals, 25.54 

Morrill & Silsby, printing, etc., 92.65 

Andrew S. Farnum, land damage, 135.00 

F. R. Currier, « 17.50 
Concord Gas Light Co., gas, 16 32 
Levi Roby and others, labor, &c., 120.20 
Lowell Eastman, windows, 14.90 
R. D. Wood & Co., hydrants, 13l).00 
George Frye, lumber, 8.30 
T. B. Tamblyn, repairing road, 5.50 

D. C. Allen & Co., iron work, 27.44 
Hugh Adnms, pay rolls, 667.19 
National Meter Co., 30.00 
Lowell Brown, rei)airing road, 19.00 
Ludlow Valve Co., 59.60 
Concord Railroad, freight, 17.85 
Ford & Kimball, castiiigs, 119.42 
American Water and Gas pipe Co., 77.18 
C. F. Stewart, recording deed, 2.00 
Stevens & Dunklee, 21.19 
Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, 23.20 
James Moore & Sons, " 6.76 
Gust. Vf alker, « 5.68 

G. S. Locke & Co., coal, v 21.50 
Ranlet & Prescott, " 21.50 
R. C. D;inforth & Co , iron work, 5.35 

E. B Hutchinson, lumber and labor, 21.79 
J. F. Cotton &, Co., cement, 7.50 
Wood worth Bros., seed, &c., 17.99 
Smith & Derry, smith work, 24.96 
John H. Morse, valve, 8.60 
E. C. Bailey, advertising, 2.40 
S. Sewell, teaming, 13.99 
William K. Holt, lumber, 23.89 
Batchelder & Co., salt, 7.37 



Total expenditures, ^8,752.85 

Divided as follows : 

For land and flowage, 2,402.50 

Distribution and service pipes, 2,853.09 

Expense of office, 1,829.32 

All other expenses, 1,667.94 

$8,752.85 



59 

Since our last annual report we have purchased of the heirs 
of W. P, Cooledge tlie remainder of that estate, comprising the 
homestead of the late Levi Ilutchins, and the lot of land next 
north of the school-house in District No. 3. 

The deed is dated Feb. 26, 1875. The amount paid was 
$2,250. This lot secures to the city all of the land necessary for 
the protection of the works at the dam and pond. 

Claims have been made upon the Board for damage to land 
on the shore of the pond. Two have been adjusted during the 
year by the payment of $152.50. To have the right to raise the 
water in the pond to 185 feet, which is ten feet higher than the 
overflow, renders it necessary to acquire about fourteen acres of 
land. The commissioners desire to settle all these claims on 
equitable terms. 

The superintendent estimates the amount of water drawn 
from the pond daily to be about 468,000 gallons. The meters 
have been used part of the time, and the above estimate is made 
from actual measui-ement while the meters were in use. 

There has been laid during the year 3,712 feet of one inch 
and three-fourths inch pipe, and 138 service pipes. 

ESTIMATE OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR 1876. 

KECEIPTS. 

From water rents, $17,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

For interest on the water debt, $21,000.00 

maintenance and care, 2,500 00 

extension of mains, 500.00 

new service pipes, 500.00 

$24,500.00 



Excess of expenditures over receipts 

to be provided for by taxation, $7,500.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL, 

JOHN M. HILL, 

ABEL B. HOLT, Board of 

JOHN S. RUSS, \ Water 



JOHN ABBOTT, 
SAMUEL S. KIMBALL, 
JOHN KIMBALL, 



Commissioners. 



60 



Summary of Main, Distribution, and Service Pipes, now laid 

and in use. 



30-inch 


main 


, 


16-incli 


(( 




14-incli 


(( 




14-inch distribution 


12-inch 




n 


10-incli 




il 


8-inch 




« 


6-inch 




a 


4-inch 




u 


1-inch 




a 


f-inch 




a 



Total, 
— equal to 24 miles. 
1,271 service pipes, or 27,120 feet 
92 public hydrants. 
7 private liydrants. 
127 stop-gates. 

Water is now supplied for the 

1494 families, 
98 bath-tubs, 
1^7 water-closets, 
221 wash-basins, 

25 urinals, 
611 yard hydrants, 
92 fire hydrants, 
7 private fire hydrants, 

7 heating apparatus, 
4 hotels, 
1 griienhouse, 

16 fountains, 
4 churches, 
4 school-houses, 
1 State-house, 1 state prison 

8 livery stables, 
177 private stables, 

1 Odd^Fellows' hall, 
1 Masonic hall, 
6 city buildings, 
47 offices, 
6 banks, 



1,950 ft. 


151 


(( 


13,556 


a 


3,704 


(( 


1,622 

3,034 

8,667 

35,943 

42,609 


ii 


8,576 


( 


6,908 


iC 


126.716 


i( 



following uses : 

1 post ofiice, 
87 stores, 

3 railroads, 

1 gasworks, 

22 stationary engines, 

2 book binderies, 

4 printing establishments, 

2 organ manufactories, 

4 carriage manufactories, 

1 soap manufactory, 

3 public watering troughs, 

7 photographers, 

2 founderies, 

1 tannery, 

2 bakeries, 

4 eating houses, 

21 mechanical shops, 

8 barber shops, 
11 saloons, 

Ijail, 

3 cemeteries, 

2 street siDrinklers. 



61 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE 

CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 



Samuel C. Eastman, Treasurer, in account loitli the xoater-worJcs 
for the year ending January SI, 1876. 

Dr. 
To balance Feb. 1, 1875, 835,279.54 

casli from sale of ^20,000 bonds and 



interest, 


20,233.41 




casli from precinct tax, 


13,51)0.00 




cash from rents, 


16,921.24 


$85,934.19 








Cr. 




Paid notes, 


^52,000.00 




interest. 


22,898.6'. 




maintenance and extensions, 


8,752.85 


S83,651.50 






Balance, cash on hand. 


82,282.t)9 


Water-works bonds outstanding Feb. 


1, 




1875, 


$830,000.00 




Bonds sold since 


20,000.00 






*QnA Ann c\c\ 




% 


'^t/V/jWV\, t\J\J 


Notes outstanding Feb. 1, 1875, 


^52,000.00 




Paid since. 


52,000.00 





Respectfully submitted, 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN, Treasurer. 

Concord, N. H.", Feb. 1, 1876. 
We have examined the foregoing account, and find that all 
the payments therein recorded are duly authenticated by proper 
vouchers, the several items correctly cast, and the amount of 
cash on hand to be $2,-282.G9. 

JOHN KIMBALL, 1 Committee 

CHARLES H. AMSDEN, ' 
MOSES B. CRITCHETT, f ^'^ 

GEORGE H. HILL, J Finance. 



62 



HEPORT 

OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON" CITY FAEM. 



To the City Council : 

The undersigned, joint standing Committee on the City Farm, 
respectfully present the twenty-third Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City Farm, for the year ending 
February 1, 1876, together with the inventory of the property 
of the city belonging thereto. In presenting this report, your 
committee are of opinion that the welfare of the inmates at the 
farm has been carefully considered by the overseer and matron, 
and, judging from the financial exhibit of the past year, that the 
farm has been well manaered. 



ABNER C. HOLT, 
CHARLES H. MERRILL, 
WILLIAM STEVENSON, 



Committee on 
City Farm. 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY AT CITY FARM, FEB. 1, 1876- 
City Farm and buildings, $15,000.00 



2 yokes of oxen, 
6 cows, 
1 bull, 

1 horse, 
5 hogs, 

2 fat hogs, 
52 fowls, 



ANIMALS. 

a $200.00 
a 40.00 



20.00 
40.00 



1400.00 

240.00 

30.00 

150.00 

100.00 

80.00 

40.00 



» 


HAY AND GRAIN. 




15 tons No. 1 hay, 


a 


$19.00 


$285.00 


14 tons No. 2 hay. 


a 


14.00 


196.00 


4 tons oat straw, 


a 


14.00 


56.00 


4 tons corn fodder, 


a 


14.00 


56.00 


200 bushels corn, 


a 


1.00 


200.00 


92 bushels oats, 






00.00 


5 bushels rye. 


a 


1.00 


5.00 



$1,040.00 



58.00 



63 



FARMING TOOLS. 



2 ox-cnrts, 

1 ox-wagon, 

5 plows, 

1 ox-slo(l, 

1 ox travel's sled, 

1 express wagon, 

1 Concord wagon, 

1 pung sleigh, 

1 mowing-machine, 

1 horse rake, 

2 buffalo robes, 

5 yokes, 

2 cultivators, 

3 harrows, 

1 hay-cutter, 
1 set harness, 
1 single harness, 
1 set draft harness, 

1 fan mill, 

7 hay-forks, 
10 feed boxes, 

2 splices, 

4 baskets, 

1 set dry measures, 

1 two-horse pole, 
10 chains, 

7 hoes, 

2 garden hoes, 

2 manure claws, 

3 halters, 

1 drag-rake, 
3 planes, 

3 angers, 

6 axes, 

1 grindstone, 

4 scythes and snaths, 
50 feet rope, 

12 rakes, 
1 spread chain, 
4 wood-saws, 
1 wheelbarrow, 
4 ladders, 
2500 feet lumber, 

1 meat-saw, 

2 stone-drags, 



1135.00 
70.00 
G5.00 
20.00 
60.00 
11)0.00 
40.00 
57.00 
60.00 
25.00 
32.00 
25.00 
15.00 
20.00 
18.00 
40.00 
35.00 
15.00 
14.00 
3.50 
2.00 
5.00 
3.00 
1.50 
5.00 
12.00 
3.00 
1.25 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.50 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
4.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.00 
3.00 
7.00 
4.00 
35.00 
1.25 
6.00 



64 



1 stone body, 

4 shovels, 

5 manure-forks, 
1 pick, 

7 whiffletrees, 

1 spread-chain, 

2 iron bars, 

1 witch chain, 

1 monkey-wrench, 

1 hammer, 

4 corn-cutters, 
4 ox-muzzles, 

2 pairs steelyards, 
1 mallet, 

4 chisels, 

1 garden rake, 

1 cross-cut saw, 

1 jack-screw, 

1 brace and bits, 

1 scalding tub, 

1 hand-saw, 

1 pair ])ole straps, 

1 garden fork, 

1 saw-set, 

1 busli scytlie and snath, 

3 files, 

1 branding-iron, 

1 hatchet, 

1 oil-stone, 

1 whitewash brush. 



HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. 



Beds and furniture, 
1 washing-machine, 
1 clothes-wringer, 
6 cider casks, 
63 dry casks, 



110.00 
3.00 
4.50 
1.00 
12.00 
1.50 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 

.50 
1.25 
2.00 
1.50 

.50 
2.00 

.40 
3.00 
5.00 
5.00 
4.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.25 
1.00 
2.00 

.32 
1.00 

.50 
1.25 
2.00 



$600.00 

10.00 

8.00 

6.00 

6.80 



PROVISIONS AND FAMILY STORES. 



225 lbs. ham, 
150 lbs. salt beef, 
250 lbs. salt pork, 
60 lbs. sausage, 
65 lbs. fresh meat, 
52 lbs. lard, 



$37.50 
15.00 
40.00 
10.00 
9.75 
10.40 



$1,129.47 



§630.30 



65 



30 

1500 

100 

25 

30 

3 

If 

2 

2 

2 

319 

37 

18 

50 

25 

6 

10 

60 

10 

8 

10 

100 

40 

70 



lbs. butter, 

lbs. squash, 

lbs. pop-corn, 

lbs. granulated sugar, 

lbs. brown sugar, 

bbls. apples, 

bbls, cider, 

bbls. soap, 

bbls. salted pickles, 

bbls. flour, 

bbls. meal, 

bush, potatoes, No. 1, 

busli. potatoes, No. 2, 

bush, beets, 

bush, carrots, 

bush, parsnips, 

bush, white beans, 

bush, colored beans, 

bush, turnips, 

gal. pickles, 

gal. molasses, 

gal. vinegar, 

cabbages, 

cords dry wood, 

cords green Avood, 



Total inventory, 



RECEIPTS. 

Lucius L. Farwell, /Sup't, 
To outstanding bills due, 

cash for labor, men, and teams, 
vegetables, 
wood and lumber, 
hay and straw, 
potatoes, 
meat and lard, 

pigs, 
stock, 

calves, 

milk, butter, and eggs, 
corn and beans, 
sundries, 
cash from city treasurer, for wagon, 
sleigh, and necessary articles of fur- 
niture and tools, 
5 



$9.00 

30.00 

3.00 

2.87 

3.00 

9.00 

12.00 

7.00 

IG.OO 

17.00 

5.00 

159.50 

9.25 

18.00 

25.00 

12.50 

18.00 

25.00 

18.00 

6.00 

4.00 

4.00 

10.00 

200.00 

245.00 



6991.57 
$19,649.34 



Dk. 

$110.57 
330.03 

36.60 
121.83 

49.38 
120.33 

84.19 

90.50 
715.00 

29.00 
174.51 

58.85 
106.39 



1,000.00 



3,027.18 



66 
EXPENDITURES. 



Lucius L. Faewbll, SupH, 


Cr. 


By cash paid for labor, 


61,092.20 


groceries, 


685.17 


meat and fish, 


63.79 


dry goods, boots, and shoes, 


190.04 


blacksmith work. 


110.29 


stoves and tin-ware, 


101.41 


hay and grass. 


163.22 


hardware and crockery. 


119.48 


wagons, sleigh, and robes. 


335.00 


two yokes of oxen, 


470.00 


meal, rye, and grinding, 


102.84 


pigs, _ 


41.00 


snndries, 


514.50 


city treasurer. 


200.00 


overseer's salary, 


700.00 




*1 019 94 




JpTt, >^T:O.C'rt 



Deficiency, $1,921.76 

STATEMENT. 

Ajipraised value of farm and buildings, 

Feb. 1, 1876, $15,000.00 

Appraised value of personal property, 
Feb. 1, 1876, 4,649.34 

119,649.34 



Appraised value of farm and buildings, 

Feb. 1, 1875, 15,000.00 

Appraised value of personal property, 

Feb. 1, 1875, 4,159.19 



$19,159.19 



Increase during the year, $492.15 

The superintendent of the farm claims that the in- 
ventory of 1875 was erroneous in some respects: 
viz., the amount of hay and grain supposed to 
be on hand fell short; some of the provisions were 
in a bad condition, which rendered them unfit for 
use; and other deficiencies, amounting to 501.38 

There is due from the county of Merrimack for sup- 
port of paupers since August last, about 512.00 
Leaving a deficiency of 416.23 

$1,921.76 



67 



Names of paupers at farm Feb. 1, 1876 : 



James "VV. Powers, aged 72 years. 
Eleazer Davis, " 85 " 

John B. Cnimmett, " 68 " 
Edward L. Fisk, " 85 " 

Joseph Gliiies, " 79 " 



Joseph H. Jlorrill, age unknown. 

Orrilla Batchcldcr, aged 64 years. 
Sarah J. Sargent, " 45 " 

John Euran, " 68 " 

James Drew, " 65 " 



Names of paupers who have died or have been discharged 
during the year 1875 : 

John D. Cooper, aged 71 years, died March 17, 1875. 

Charlotte Lovejoy, aged 76 years, died Dec. 13, 1875. 

Katie Kiggins, discharged April 15, 1875. 

Sylvester Kiggins, discharged April 15, 1875. 

Michael Haniilton, admitted Feb. 3, 1875 ; discharged Feb. 23, 
1875. 

Rufus Atwell, admitted Feb. 20, 1875; discharged Feb. 20, 
1875. 

Edward D. Wilson, discharged March 13, 1875. 

Lucinda Wilson, discharged March 29, 1875. 

Minnie F. Brown, discharged April 17, 1875. 

Joseph Bi-own, discharged May 8, 1875. 

Henry Babb, admitted May 11, 1875; discharged Dec. 7, 1875. 

Edward Welch, admitted July 22, 1875; discharged July 28, 
1875. 

James Drew, discharged May 4, 1875; admitted Dec. 3, 1875. 

Number of paupers at the Farm, Feb. 1, 1876, 10 

Number of different paupers at the Farm during the year, 23 

Average number of different paupers at the Farm one year, 12 

Number of paupers lodged one night or more, 23 

Number sent to house of correction, 7 



68 



EIGHTH AIsT^UAL EEPOET 

OF THE 

OVERSEER OF THE POOR FOR THE YEAR END- 
ING JANUARY 31, 1876. 



To the City Council : 

The undersigned resi^ectfnlly submits his eighth annual report 
of expenditures on pauper account, exclusive of those at the 

almshouse, for the year ending January 31, 1876: 

CITY PAUPEES. 

Aid to John Harrington, Irish, $130.42 

Mrs. Wm. Rundell, American, 18.00 

" Edward Morrison, American, 12.00 

" James Flynn, Irish, 6 months, 25.00 

" James K. Page, American, 78.00 

" Rosanna Larkin, American, 6.00 
" Washington George and family, 

American, 141.20 

" Thomas Connor, Irish, 44.00 

" Orrison Dudley, American, 87.51 

« John O'Brien, Irish, 31.00 

Miss Priscilla C. Walker, American, 6 00 

" Catherine Baker, American, 2.00 

Joshua Griffin, American, 8 00 

Josiah Knowles, American, 78.00 

John Davis, American, 3.50 

Hiram Davis, American, .94 

J. H. Emery, American, 7-50 

Isaac Lewis Emerson, American, 20.00 

Rufus Atwell, American, 9.50 

William Fagan, Irish, 6.00 

John K. Lang, American, 22.00 

George W. Foote, American, 10.00 

George C. Beckett, Irish, 13.00 

Zachariah C. Arlin, American, 5.00 

J. Everett Hutchins, American, 30.00 

Benj. F. Danforth, American, 14.25 

i808.82 



69 



Paid State Reform School, — 

For maintenance of Martha Clisby, S26.00 

« Eugene Callahan, 20.58 

« Emma J. Sargent, 70.86 

« Bernard Dorien, 104.00 



Refunded by Anthony Coleman, for sup- 
port of Bernard Dorien , 8104.00 

city of Manchester, for aid 

to Rufus Atwell, 9.50 

town of Weare, for aid fur- 
nished Cha's H. Johnson, 37.00 

sundry persons, 30.00 



Amount paid for support of insane paupers 
at the asylum, as follows : 

George Bickford, 8247.16 

Samuel McDaniels, 202 61 

Bridget Kirley, 222.04 

Ellen Summers, 224.97 

Betsey Haynes, 83.59 

Orrison Dudley, 9.10 

COUNTY PAUPERS. 



$221.44 

11,033.26 



$180.50 



2.76 



6989.47 



Aid furnished to county paupers residing in Concord, as fol- 
lows: 

Callahan McCarty, Irish, $55.10 

Eleazer Bazro. French, 5.00 

Mary Storin, Irish, 22.00 

Mrs. Wm. Hannagin, Irish, 14.00 

Amasa Ramsdell, American, 8.00 

Mary Owens, Irish, 106.00 

Eli Jacobs, French, 3.00 

Ellen Woods, Irish, 6.00 

Mrs. Thomas Coty, French, 102.00 

Georgiana Powers, American, 52.00 

Mrs. Martin Deveney, Irish, 200.99 

Kate Bresnehan, Irish, 25.50 

Gardiner K. Knowles, American, 65.00 

Mrs. James Flynn, Irish, 25.00 



70 



Edward Walsh, Irish, $12.00 

Clara Jolens, French, 9.00 

John Pickett, Irish, 5.00 

George Washington, colored, 6.00 

Jeddie Welcome, French, 3.00 

Mrs. Nancy O'Hara, Irish, 164.27 

Honora Noland, Irish, 37.50 

Patrick Larkin, Irish, 52.00 

Mrs. Amelia Bassett, French, 113.50 

Thomas Wheeler, American, 5.00 

Charles G. Edmunds, American, 13.50 

Thomas Flynn, Irish, 98.09 

John B. Smith, American, 10.75 

Joseph Godett, French, 6.50 

James Rowe, American, 14.50 

George Keaton, American, 3.00 

Willis Beard, French, 27.00 

Jeremiah Arlin, American, 8.00 

Michael Florence, French, 11.70 

Edward Tract, French, 87.40 

Isaac Mason, French, 184.75 

Simeon Rogers, American, 22.50 

Michael Hamilton, Irish, 31.00 

Mrs. Levi Fortia, French, 20.00 

John F. Brown, 2d, American, 47.00 

Elizabeth Market, Irish, 2.60 

Mrs. Daniel Blackstone, Irish, 7-00 

Joseph Trucott, French, 32.50 

Mrs. Orlando Philbrick, American, 48.00 

Lewis Langley, French, 8.00 

Bennett M. Pratt, An-verican, 11.65 

Charles Wiser, American, 36.57 

Elizabeth Clary, Irish, 3.00 

James Plimpton, English, 48.10 

Nancy Dorety, Irish, 26.00 

Michael Martin, Irish, 10.00 

Richard Welch, Irish, 38.25 

Patrick Flannigan, Iri.sh, 25.87 

Mrs. Nancy Pearson, American, 26.50 

Israel Shepard, American, 13.00 

Mrs. Mary Pattee, American, 35.00 

Benjamin G. Tncker, American, 16.00 

Samuel Floyd, American, 6.00 

Narcissus LeClair, French, 18.00 

Miss Sophia Burgess, French, 53.60 

Theophilus Langelier, French, 6.00 

Benjamin Robinson, colored, 3.00 



71 

Mrs. "VYm. IMiirsl), American, IG.OO 

ElltMi Goiiry, Irisli, 4.50 

Eugene CiKscy, Irish, 12.32 

Patrick Couuhlin, Irisli, 20.00 

Jeremiah Lynch, Irish, 4.00 

Julius K;ms(Mn, French, 20.00 

Edmund N. Clinton, American, 6.00 

James Hall, American, 10.00 

George II. Gerard, American, 13.00 

Thomas Pre vie, French, 91.07 

Transient paupers, 173.28 



82,577.36 

The number of applications for aid during the year, in Wards 
3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, was 246, exclusive of transient persons aided at 
this office, and by the city marshal. The number chargeable to 
the county, who have been helped by the city the past year, 
was 228 ; the number having a settlement in the city, assisted 
during the same time, was 94; total, 322. Nine have died dur- 
ing the year: 7 males, 2 females. Two were infants; one 
drowned, aged 16 years; 1 aged 19 years, of consumption ; 1 
insane, aged 53 years ; the others, aged respectively 73, 75, 78, 
and 95, died of old age and general debility. 

The act of the legislature of last June, abolishing all settle- 
ments acquired prior to 1860, changes the relation of a large 
proportion of those heretofore aided as town or city paupers ; 
so that most of those who were prior to that date chargeable as 
town or city i)aupers, will, if continued aid should be required, 
be transferred and chargeable to the county. Thanking His 
Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen for their kind 
assistance in the discharge of the duties assigned me, this re- 
port is 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. STEWART, 

Overseer of the Pdor. 



72 



REPORT 



or THE BUILDING COMMITTEE, APPOINTED APRIL 24, 1875, " TO CON- 
TKACT FOR AND SUPERINTEND THE ERECTION OP BUILDINGS FOR 
A CENTRAL FIRE STATION, TO BE SITUATED ON WARREN STREET." 



For more than ten years the subject of locating and building 
a central fire station has been before the city council and the 
public. Several locations have been suggested, and land at 
three different places in the city purchased. The following 
is a brief liistory of the action of the city council relating to 
these locations and purchases: 

February 23, 1867, the city council appropriated $4,300 for a 
lot of land, situate on the north side of School street, for a 
" Fire Engine House and City Stables." This lot was bought 
of William Brown for 14,244.88. It appears that this location 
was not satisfactory to all, for the record shows that J. Stevens 
Abbot and 141 others remonstrated against this purchase, and 
the lot was sold July 29, 1868, to Jacob "Woods for the sum of 
^3,390. Some of those who opposed the location on School 
street favored a site on the south side of Warren street, in 
rear of Central Block. The city was the owner of a small lot 
there, bought of N. G. Ordway by Mayor Humphrey, Dec. 18, 
1862, for a police station, for $1,150.00 

July 14, 1868, during the administration of Mayor 
Stevens, additions were made to this lot by land 
purchased of James H. Chase, 850.00 

By land purchased of Morrill & Silsby, 4,143.00 

« « Edward Dow, 1,060.00 



17,203.50 



Up to May 30, 1874, this subject was frequently before the 
people of the city, but no definite action was taken or plan 
agreed to until the city council appointed a committee, consisting 



73 

of Mayor Kimball, Aldermen Pillsbury and Mason, and Council- 
men Cochran and Ordway, to purchase laud adjoining the old 
No. 4 engine house, on the north side of Warren street, between 
State and Green streets, and appropriated ten thousand dollars 
($10,000) to pay for the same. The original No. 4 engine 
liouse had been raised, enlarged, and the steam fire engines 
kept there for several years. 

The lot on which it stood was purchased of Lowell Eastman 
July 1, 1851, for $425.00 

This committee added a lot, of J, C. Dunklee, 2,035.00 

« A. J. Prescott, 740.00 

« F. J. Batchelder, 3,747.52 

« Calvin Howe, 700.00 

« John W. Drew, 100.00 



Total cost of Warren street lot, $7,747.52 

It is 125 feet in length on Warren street, 98^ feet in width 
with projection on the north-west corner for tower, 12 feet by 
19|- feet. Whole number of feet, 12,546. 

This location, being satisfactory to a larger number of people 
than either of those previously described, was unanimously 
agreed to by the City Council, the Board of Engineers, and the 
committee appointed to secure it; but there were those Avho 
reside at the westerly side of the precinct, who claimed that 
the buildings should be located near the high land, and Sept. 
29, 1874, they presented a petition signed by L. D. Stevens and 
thirty-six others against the Warren street location, and in favor 
of a site on the hill. After a hearing where all parties who de- 
sired were heard, the petitioners had leave to withdraw, and 
the present location was generally acceded to. At a meeting 
of the City Council, held April 3, 1875, the sum of $20,000 was 
appropriated for the erection of buildings for a central fire sta- 
tion, to be situated on the Warren street lot; and April 24, 
1875, the undersigned were appointed a building committee, to 
contract for and superintend the erection of said buildings. 
Plans and specifications had been received from three architects, 
and after visiting several of the modern structures of this kind 
in New England, your committee adopted the plan offered by 
C. E. Parker, of Boston, with modifications. 



74 

The main building is 62 by 52 feet, two stories high, with 
tower 12 by 12 feet on the north-west corner, 90 feet high. The 
barn adjoining on the east end is 57 by 36 feet, two stories 
high, with shed at riglit angles southward 26 by 46 feet, one 
story liigh. All of these buildings are of brick, with slated 
roofs, and the main building and barn have cellars beneath. 
On the east end of the barn there are six rooms for a family, 
and suitable apartments for the teamsters and superintendent of 
streets. 

April 26, 1875, the old buildings on the lot were sold at auc- 
tion for one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and the ground 
was broken the following week for the cellar and foundations 
of the new buildings. 

The following-named persons and firms have performed the 
several parts of the work for which they contracted, and the 
amount they received has been set against each name for gen- 
eral information : 

Jeremiah Brov/n, excavating, 357.? 5 

Porter E. j^laiichard, stone foundation, 920.50 

J. T. Clough, brick, 2,942.40 

Ordway & Ferrin, mason work, 3,212.22 

Charles C. Lund, engineering, 16.62 

Charles E. Parker and other'y, architect, 569.30 

John H. Flood, hammered stone, 1,515.28 

George W. Brown, lumber, 490. 89 

Knapp & Putnam, lumber, 562 72 

M. PI. Jolmson, sewers, 263. 77 

Mead, Mason & Co., carpenter work, 5,941.22 

Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, 554.13 

Gust. Walker, hardware, 205.r6 

Ford & Kimball, iron work, 444.04 

J. C. Cochran, smith Avork, 72.25 

A. A. Moore, liglitning rod, 76.65 

Stevens & Duncklee, i'nrnace, 150.00 

T. Rowel] & Co., concrete, 104.00 

J. H. Morse, gas and waterpipe, 277.89 

C. H. Martin & Co., paints and oils, 209.03 

Lowell Eastman, glass and glazing, 300.88 

George Goodhue, gas fixtures, 251.07 

Andrew Bunker, sash and doors, 449.02 

John Eves, plumbing, 362.54 

L. W. Cushing, vane and canopy, 225.00 

W. M. Darrah, slating, 1,623.82 



75 



Hutcliins & Co., cement, 187.30 

W. P. Ford & Co., stoves, 14.50 

D. C. Allen & Co., machine work, 66.43 

All others, 396.32 



Expended on building to Feb. 1, ,^22,602.60 

for land « _ ^ 7,222.52 

Required to complete the building, 3,893.88 

Total, 133,779.00 

The sum estimated to complete the building, bowever, will 
depend upon the quality and quantity of the fixtures and furni- 
ture to be placed therein, and the amount expended for con- 
ci'ete and stone work in fi-ont of the building. 

ESTIMATJE FOR 1876. 

Raised by taxation in 1875, 120,000.00 

Received for buildings sold, 799.00 

Required to pay for land and complete the work, 
beino; the sum appropriated May 30, 1874, and 
January 29,1870, 13,000.00 

Total, $33,799.00 

The buildings are of sufficient size to accommodate 

The Board of Engineers, 
Two steam fire engine companies. 
Two hose companies. 
One hook and ladder company, 
Eight horses, 
One street sprinkler, 
Two city carts. 
One express wagon. 
Apartments for steward and teamsters, 
And necessary conveniences to carry on the business 
of the city at this place. 

We have endeavored to construct buildings to meet the 
wants of the city, in a plain but permanent manner. If the 
experience of years to come shall confirm the judgment of the 
City Council who ordered and the committee who superintend- 
ed their erection, our labor will not have been in vain. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN KIMBALL, ) p .;,. 

JAMES L. MASON, [ (^ZviZ 
HENRY CHURCHILL,) committee. 



76 



REI^OIIT 



COMMITTEE ON SEWEES 



To the City Council : 

The Committee on Sewers ask leave to report, that during 
the year they have continued the construction of sewers in 
different parts of the city precinct, as follows : 

MAIN STREET. 

From a point commencing at the granite opening, near the 
residence of Ivory Hall, south to Centre, egg-shaped, of brick, 
20 by 30 inches, 253 feet long. 

From Centre, south to a point opposite the state house, of 
Akron pipe, 12 inches,- 510 feet long. 

From a point opposite Freight, south to Cross, of Akron pij^e, 
12 inches, connecting at the junction of Cross with a 10-inch 
sewer from Ward Six ward-house, 1,004 feet long. 

CENTRE STREET. 

From Main, west to tlie junction with Spring, of brick, egg- 
shaped, 16 by 24 inches, 1,545 feet long. 

From the termination of the above, west, of Akron pipe, 12 
inches, 51 feet long. 

UNION STREET, 

From Centre, north to a man-hole, 90 feet south from Wash- 
ington, of Akron pipe, 12 inches, 901 feet long. 



77 



MAPLE STREET. 

From Union, west to Spring, of Al^ron pipe, 10 inches, 375 
feet long. 

SPRING STREET. 

From Centre, south to a point opposite Prince, of Akron 
pipe, 12 inches, 260 feet long. 

GREEN STREET. 

From Centre, south to a point opposite Prince, of Akron 
pipe, 12 inches, 360 feet long. 

BEACON STREET. 

From the New Hampshire state prison sewer, west to a manj 
hole, of Akron pipe, 15 inches, 440 feet long. 

From man-hole, west to Bethel, of Akron pipe, 12 inches, 
433 feet long. 

From same man-hole, to old stone culvert across Jackson 
street, south-westerly, of Akron pipe, 12 inches, 70 feet long. 

"WASHINGTON STREET. 

From large cess-pool, west to a point opposite Alert Hose 
Company's house, of brick, 16 by 24 inches, 138 feet long. 

STATE STREET. 

From "Washington, south, of Akron pipe, 12 inches, 191 feet 
long. 

From Centre, north, of Akron pipe, 12 inches, 983 feet long. 

From Centre, south to a point opposite the state house, of 
Akron pipe, 12 inches, 461 feet long. 

From School, south, of Akron pipe, 12 inches, 60 feet long, to 
a man-hole. 

From Pleasant, south to a point near Fayette, of Akron pipe, 
12 inches, 592 feet long. 

PARK STREET. 

From Main, west, of Akron pipe, 8 inches, 60 feet long. 

BLAKE STREET. 

From the cement pipe sewer, laid in 1874, west, of Akron 
pipe, 8 inches, 100 feet long. 

WALL STREET. 

From Elm, east, of Akron pipe, 8 inches, 180 feet long. 



78 







KECAPITULATION. 










Brick. 


Akron pipe. 


Main street, 






253 feet. 


1,514 feet. 


Centre " 






1,545 « 


51 " 


Union " 








901 « 


Maple « 








875 « 


Spring " 








260 « 


Green " 








860 " 


Beacon " 








943 « 


Washington street, 




138 « 




State 


" 






2,237 " 


Park 


t< 






60 « 


Blake 


(C 






100 « 


Wall 


sewer, 






180 " 


No. feet, brick 


1,936 


6,981 « 


" Akron pipe sewev 


■, 6,981 





Total No. feet laid in 1875, 8,617 

Total cost, see finance committee's report, page 30, §14,790.07 
Deduct for pipe sold, 2,160.27 



Total net cost, 
or about $1.42 per foot. 

The committee have pipe on hand worth 
" tools and fixtures, 

" uncollected bills, 



$12,629.80 

$308.22 

217.00 

36.08 



Total, $561.25 

There is a bill against the city, for surveys and plans which 
were not completed at the date of this report, amounting to 
about $150. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN KIMBALL, 

JAMES L. MASON, ^ Committee. 

GEORGE A. CUMMINGS, 



79 



EEPOET 



CEIS^IETEIBIY COiy^dllTTEE. 



To the City Council: 

The Cemetery Committee beg leave to submit tlie following 
annual report : 

By reason of a change in the ordinance of the city relating to 
cemeteries, the entire receipts from sale of lots and other sources 
have been paid into the city treasury, to be appropriated as the 
city council should think proper; and the expenditures made in 
both the old and new cemeteries have been paid from time to 
time by the city. The superintendent has received and paid 
into the treasury, from the sale of lots in the old North Ceme- 
tery, the sum of $35.00 
And the interest on the cemetery fund, invested in 

city bonds, amounts to 42.00 



$77.00 



There has been paid the indebtedness reported last 

year to C. Woodman, with interest on the same, $165.3.5 

For care of grounds (per vouchers), 72.75 

building and painting fence, 27.40 

paints and oils (Eastman & Fitch), 81.40 

$296.90 
From the Blossom Hill Cemetery the receipts from 

the sales of lots have been the sum of $1,183.58 

From sale of wood and lumber, 101.23 

grass, and for use of hose, 15.00 

$1,299.81 



80 

The expenditures have been as follows : 

Thomns Carley, bill, 1874, and interest, $106.00 

Charles Woodman, bill, 1874, and interest, 114.98 

For labor in old part, on grounds and avenues, 771.73 

labor in new part, clearing the ground, 270.00 

moving and building wall, 153.00 

tools and incidentals, 29.93 

money refunded M. A. West (over-payment for 

lot), 9.00 

Total expenditure, $1,454.64 

Deducting the amount of indebtedness, 220.98 

Expenses of the year, $1,233.66 

This amount has been used in keeping the gTOunds in order, 
and in clearing up the new part of the cemetery, removing the 
wall between the two parts, and preparing the way to lay the 
same out in lots. 

In the avenues of the original cemetery thirty-five rods of 
leaving have been laid to protect against wash in showers. For- 
ty-five rods of new wall have been built along the west end 
of the old and new parts, and the gaps in the wall around the 
whole cemetery have been filled. About twenty rods more of 
wall remain to be built upon the west line of the new part, the 
stone for wliich has been drawn upon the ground; and when 
this is done, the entire cemetery will be enclosed with stone 
wall. 

The partition wall between the old and new parts has been 
removed, and the brush left on the new part has been piled and 
burned, and the ground raked over and put in order for the lay- 
ing out of avenues and lots. The small hard pine growth at 
the west end has been thinned out and trimmed up, and the 
avenues and grounds in the old part have been kept in good 
order and condition, and many permanent improvements made 
therein. 

In the spring, as soon as the ground is in suitable condition, 
the committee contemplate laying out a part of the recent pur- 
chase into lots, and grading some of the principal avenues there- 
in. The surveys for this work have been commenced, and will 
be completed as early as possible. 



81 

There is a great necessity for the building of some slielter, at 
some suitable spot in the cemetery grounds, where visitors who 
are surprised by sudden showers may repair for protection. 
The cemetery is at so great distance from the city, that during 
the season many ladies have been caught in showers when they 
have visited the cemetery to care for the lots, and the necessity 
for some such place of refuge from storms is most apparent. 
And there is a further necessity tliat a water-closet should be pro- 
vided at some place in the grounds. 

These two structures would promote the comfort of those 
who have lots in the cemetery more than any other improve- 
ments that the committee can suggest, and we hope we may 
be granted for the coming year sufficient funds to enable us to 
build them. 

We estimate that there will be required during the coming 
season the following sums to be expended for the purposes be- 
low specified, viz., — 

For keeping the cemetery grounds in a suitable con- 
dition, $800.00 
laying out lots in the addition, 300.00 
grading avenues in the addition, 900.00 
building house, &c., above named, 500.00 



$2,500.00 



Respectfully submitted, 



GEORGE A. BLANCHARD,) ^ , 
CHARLES C. LUND, i- J^^^^^fjy 

CHARLES WOODMAN, ) ^o^^*«'«^- 



Concord, N. H., Feb. 11, 1876. 



To the City Council : 

The East Concord Cemetery Committee ask leave to report 
that they have built a hearse-house on the new lot near Linden 
street, the old house on Shawmut street having become unsuit- 
able for further use. 

The new fence required for tlie lot recently purchased on Lin- 
den street has been built, the grounds laid out into lots, and 
some improvement therein made. A much needed wall on 
6 



82 

Shawmut street, to protect the embankment against the high- 
way, is included in our expenditures. 

We have received from the city treasury 

on account of the above, $617.03 

Received for okl fence, 2.50 

" " old hearse-house, 4.75 

Total receipts, $624.28 

We have expended, as per our bills al- 
lowed by the Committee on Accounts 

(for details see page 19), $617.03 

Outstanding claims, 12.25 



JOSEPH E. PLUMMER, }■ Committee. 
JOHN T. BATCHELDER, 



$629.28 



Balance due committee, $5.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM A. BEAN, 



83 



REP O RT 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the City Council: 

The library now contains six thousand five hundred and 
twelve volumes. Of this number one hundred and thirty-three 
were added in 1875. Among the additions are thirteen vol- 
umes of the new edition of Appleton's American Cyclopedia, 
and other valuable books. 

Twenty-two volumes have been added by donation, as fol- 
lows : — From the Cobden Club, London, Bastiat's Political 
Economy; Proceedings of the Club, 1874, 3 vols.; Essays on 
Free Trade, 2 vols. Report of the United States Commis- 
sioner on Education, for 1873 ; also. Circulars ISjTos. One and Two, 
Bureau of Education, Washington, D. C. J. G. Hines, Explor- 
ations of the Colorado River, 1871-1874. N. B. Baker, Ad- 
jutant General's Report, Iowa, 1875. J. O. Adams, Reports of 
Board of Agriculture, 1871-1874; one volume of Agriculture 
of Massachusetts ; one volume Geological Survey of Indiana. 
Supplementary Catalogue of Boston Public Library. Moses 
Humphrey, Pamphlets relating to the Town of Hingham, Mass. 
One volume of Library Reports. 

The number of cards in use for the whole or a portion of the 
year, is 831,-22 less than in 1874. 

The librarian has prepared a book-mark, to be inserted and 
kept in every volume, on Avhich is printed the regulations which 
are to govern the taking and use of books. These are to be 
kept as frontlets before the eyes of all patrons of the library. 

The financial condition of the library is presented in the fol- 
lowing statement of its treasurer. A claim of 832 failed to be 
presented to the board in season to be acted upon, which will re- 
duce the amount of apparent cash on hand, to be carried to ac- 
count of 1876. 



84 

The trustees deem it desirable that the library be so centrally 
situated that it can be resorted to as a reading-room for the 
purpose of using its books of reference, and for the greater 
general convenience of all the inhabitants of the city who 
would like its privileges. Provision is also needed whereby it 
can be kept open day and evening for the public use. A more 
liberal appropriation seems to be very desirable to correspond 
with the other educational facilities afforded by the city. A 
great disparity now exists. The appropriation for the support 
of our schools, in 1875, amounted to about $39,000. The appro- 
priation for the library was $500. This sum is very insignificant 
as compared with what other places, of the importance and abil- 
ity of Concord, have granted. From this appropriation the ser- 
vices of the librarian and incidental expenses are to be defrayed, 
leaving but a pittance to be expended for new books. The re- 
ceipts from the annual twenty-five cent tax are expended most- 
ly for rebinding worn books, and other repairs. 

An annual appropriation of a sum not less that $1,000 is needed 
to increase the usefulness of the library to what it should be, as 
an educational power in the present and coming years. 

Respectfully submitted, 



A. W. FISKE, 
JOSEPH T. CLOUGH, 
OMER L. SHEPARD, 
AMOS HADLEY, V 

GEO. E. JENKS, 
H. G. SAFFORD, 
AMOS BLANCHARD, 



Trustees of 
Public Library. 



Concord, Jan. 31, 1876. 



85 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Wm. P. FisJce, Treasurer, in account with tJie Concord 
Public Library. 



1875. 


Dr. 




Feb. 1. 


Cash in the hands of the late 






treasurer, as per last rej^ort, 


S100.72 


Oct. 14. 


City appropriation, 


500.00 


1876. 






Jan. 7. 


Interest on Lyon fund, 


66.50 




Interest on Pierce fund, 


60.00 




Receipts of library, by F. S. 






Crawford, 
Cr. 


166.00 


1875. 




Feb. 


Bills paid by the late treas- 





urer : 
T. M. Lang, $9.80 
R. P. Sanborn, 3.15 
D. F. Secomb, 2.25 
F. S. Crawford, 75.00 
Oct. 14. Paid S. C. Eastman, 8.00 
F. S. Crawford, for 12 
vols. American Cyclo- 
pedia, 60.00 
Life of S. P. Chase, 4.00 
F. S. Crawford, salary, 150.00 
Republican Press Asso., 1.30 

E. C. Eastman, 88.25 
1876. 

Jan. 17. E. C. Eastman, 52.70 

F. S. Crawford, salary, 75.00 
F. S. Crawford, binding, 

&c., 155 00 

Balance cash on hand, 208.77 



$893.22 



$893.22 



WM. P. FISKE, Treasurer. 
Concord, K H., Feb. 16, 1876. 



86 



REPORTS 



CITY LIQUOR A.aENTS 



To the City Council: 

The undersigned respectfully submits the following report 
of his agency, in the purchase and sale of wines and liquors 
in the city of Concord, from Feb. 1st, 1875, to Feb. 1st, 1876 : 

Amount of stock and fixtures, Feb. 1, 1875, ^802.17 
Since purchased, 2,441.35 

Amount of profit on sales, 488.27 



Contra. 

Amount of stock and fixtures, Feb. 1, 1876, ^864.17 
Received for liquors and casks, 2,867.62 

CASH ACCOUNT. 

Received for liquors and casks, $2,867.62 

Cash on hand Feb. 1, 1875, 39.81 



Contra. 

Cash paid for liquors, $2,441.35 

Freight and expenses, 47.61 

Cash paid for incidentals, 49.13 

" into city treasury, 50.00 

« agent's salary, 300.00 

Cash on hand, 19.34 



68,731.79 



83,731.79 



$2,907.43 



Number of sales, 5,447. 



$2,907.43 



J. E. CLIFFORD, Agent. 



State of New Hampshire, Merrimack ss. ) 
February 1, 1876. \ 

Sworn and subscribed before me, 

JOHN KIMBALL, Justice of the Peace. 



87 

To the Citrj Council : 

The undersigned respectfully submits the following report of 
his agency in the purchase and sale of spirituous liquors at 
Fisherville : 



$533.20 



Liquors on hand Feb. 1, 1875, 
Since purchased, 
Freiglit and express, 
Agent's salary, 


$250.00 

200.00 

8.20 

75.00 


Contra. 

Sales to date, 
Liquors on hand. 
Fixtures, 
Cash on hand. 


$275.00 

225.00 

18.20 

15.00 



$533.20 
Respectfully submitted. 

C. C. TOPLIFF, Agent. 

State of New Hampshire — Merrimack ss. > 
February 1, 1876. | 

Sworn and subscribed before me, 

"VYm. H. Bell, Justice of the Peace. 



REPORT 



CITY SOLICITOR 



To the City Council: 

The usual amount of business pertaining to this office has 
been performed during the year. There are four suits against 
the city, upon the docket of the circuit court for Merrimack 
county, for damages alleged to have been caused by defective 
highways, as follows : 

Jonathan Kimball v. Concord, William R. Cook v. Concord, 
Harlan P. Gage v. Concord, Ada J. Clark v. Concord ; and one, 
John B. Giles v. Concord, for damages alleged to have resulted 
from the neglect of the authorities of the city, in not properly 
taking care of a culvert, whereby his house at West Concord 
was undermined and overturned. 

The bill in equity, John S. Brown et als. v. Concord et als., 
brought to restrain the city from collecting certain taxes as- 
sessed for the purpose of providing water for the fire department 
of the city, has been argued before the superior court, and noth- 
ing remains to be done but to await the decision of the court. 

The several petitions of John S. Brown, Daniel Holden, and 
Charles H, Amsden, asking for an abatement of their taxes, de- 
pend upon the decision in the bill in equity, 

CHARLES P. SANBORN, 

City Solicitor. 



89 



REPORT OF THE POLICE JUSTICE. 



To the Mayor and Aldennen of the City of Concord: 

The Police Justice herewith submits tlie twcnty-tliirJ annual 
report : 

The number of civil actions entered in the police court, during 
the financial year now about ending, has been forty-eight. 

Ninety-six persons of foreign birth during said year have been 
fully naturalized, and fifty-four others have filed in the court 
their declarations of intention to become citizens. 

The Avhole number of arraignments for alleged criminal of- 
fences during the year has been one hundred and eighty-six. 

The character of the ofiences of those prosecuted by the city 
authorities, and the results of such prosecutions, appear in the 
reports of the city marshal and of the assistant city marshal of 
this date. 

The Police Justice charges himself as follows : 

Costs received in criminal prosecutions 

belonging to the city, $220.83 

Fines received, 600. .50 

Fees received in civil actions, 31.57 



And discharges himself as follows : 
Paid for blanks and expenses, S8.80 

Paid city treasurer, 844.10 



$852.90 



$852.90 



During the past month there has been a marked diminution 
in the number of prosecutions growing out of the use of intox- 
icating beverages. 

SYLVESTER DANA, 

Concord, Jan. 31, 1876. Police Justice. 



90 



EEPOET OF THE CITY MAESHAL. 



To the Oitij Council: 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to present, for your consid- 
eration, my report of the business of tlie police department of 
the city of Concord for the year ending Jan. 31, 1876. 

The whole number of arrests made during the year, not includ- 
ing those made at Fisherville, was 336, as follows : 

Intoxication, 132 

Assaidt, 36 

For being out late at night, . 39 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 31 

Larceny, 17 

Noise, brawl, and tumult, 13 

Suspicious persons, 10 

Disturbing tlie peace, 8 

Common drunkards, 6 

Evading railroad fare, 6 

Vagabonds, - 4 

Common loafers, 3 

Breaking and entering, 3 

Insane, 3 

Selling liquor, 3 

Moving signs, 3 

Threatening, 3 

Gambling, 3 

Embezzlement, 2 

Keeping open saloon after 10 o'clock, 2 

Injury to buildings, 2 

Cruelty to animals, 2 

Keeping a gnmbling-house, 1 

Common prostitute, 1 

Adultery, 1 

Driving horse firther than stipulated, 1 

For setting lire to a building, 1 

Murder, 1 

Total, 336 



91 

Of the foregoing cases, 155 were arraigned before the police 
court, charged with the following oflences, to wit : 

Intoxication, GO 

Assault, 27 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 21 

Larceny, 11 

Common drunkards, 6 

Evading railroad fare, 5 

Breaking and entering, 3 

Selling liquor, 3 

Gandjling, 2 

Keeping open saloon after 10 o'clock, 2 

Injury to buildings, 2 

Vagabonds, 2 

Keeping a gambling-house, 1 

Common prostitute, 1 

Adultery, 1 

Driving horse farther than stipulated, 1 

Embezzlement, 1 

Threatening, 1 

Cruelty to animals, 1 

Setting fire to a building, 1 



155 



And were disposed of as follows : 

Sentenced to pay fines, 117 
Ordered to recognize to appear at the circuit court, 23 

Sentenced to the house of correction, 5 

Dismissed or nol prossed, 4 

Sentenced to jail, 3 

Sentenced to the county farm, 2 

Sentenced to the reform school, 1 



155 



"Whole number of lodgers accommodated at the sta- 
tion-house during tlie year, 335 
Whole number of prisoners and lodgers, 671 
Discharged Irom custody without complaint for 
what seemed to be good and sufficient reasons, 181 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN CONNELL, 

Concord, January 31, 1876. Citi/ Marshal. 



92 

To the City Council : 
The undersigned respectfully submits the following report of 

the police department in Ward 1, for the year ending January 

31, 1876: 

Whole number of arrests made during the year, 37 

Intoxication, 12 

Assault, 4 

Larceny, 5 

Evading railroad fare, 1 

Keeping open saloon after ten o clock, 1 

Embezzlement, 1 

Vagrants, 4 

Suspicious persons, 3 

Swindling, 1 

Not providing for family, 1 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 2 

Driving horse faster than stipulated, 1 

Breaking and entering, 1 

37 
Of the above cases 26 were arraigned before the police court 
charged with the following offences, to wit : 

Intoxication, 9 

Assault, 4 

Larceny, 4 

Evading railroad fiire, 1 

Keeping open saloon after ten o'clock, 1 

Embezzlement, 1 

Vagrants, 3 

Not providing for family, 1 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 1 

Breaking and entering, 1 

26 
And were disposed of by the police court as follows : 
Sentenced to pay fines, 19 

Ordered to recognize to appear at the circuit court, 3 
Sentenced to house of correction, 1 

Sentenced to county farm, 3 

26 

Whole number of lodgers accommodated at the station- 
house during the year, 85 
Number of prisoners and lodgers, 122 
Discharged from custody Avithout complaint, 11 
Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN CHADWICK, 
January 31, 1876. Asst. City Jlarshal. 



93 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To the City Council: 

Tlie chief engineer of the fire department herewitli submits 
his third annual report, for the year ending Jan. 31, 1876. 

The whole number of men connected with the department is 
one hundred and eighty-seven, — seventy-four within the precinct, 
and one hundred and thirteen without. Six engineers reside in 
the precinct, and one each in Wards 1, 2, and 3. May 1, 1875, 
by vote of the city council, the steam fire engine company. Gov. 
Hill, was relieved from further service. This company was or- 
ganized in 1862, having served the city well for thirteen years. 
The engine now located in the Central Fire Station is in good 
repair and ready for any emergency. No other change has 
been made in the apparatus, with the exception that 1,200 feet 
of new leather hose has been added during the year. 

The new Central Fire Station was so lar completed as to be 
occupied Nov. 25, 1875, seven months from the time the ma- 
chines were removed from the old steamer-house. This build- 
ing has been needed a long time, and the hope expressed in my 
last report has been fully realized by placing the Fire Depart- 
ment at the central part of the city, in a building which, in its 
several appointments, is admirably adapted to our requirements, 
and equal to the best in New England's inland cities. The cel- 
lars of the Alert and Good Will companies' houses have been 
cemented, which completes the construction of those buildings, 
so that we are able to express our satisfaction in being in pos- 
session of brick buildings thoroughly constructed, and well 
adapted to the wants of the entire department in the precinct. 
Substantial changes have been made in the Pioneer engine, 
Ward 1, and two hundred feet of new hose added to the appa- 
ratus there. 



94 

The Cataract engine house in Ward 3 has been raised, sup- 
plied with new foundation, painted, and is now in good repair, 
at an expense of $363.62. 

LIST OF FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR. 

Feb. B. Fire broke out in the cotton mill of H. H. Brown & 
Sons. Loss, $500; fully insured. 

Feb. 4. Slaughter-house of J. B. Goldsmith & Co., Fisherville. 
Loss, $1,200; insured. 

Feb. 12. Ford & Kimball's foundry. Loss, §200 ; insured. 

Feb. 26. Alarm from New Hampshire State Prison. Loss, 
SIOO. 

March 7. Mrs. Labonta's house, Washington street. Loss, 
$200; insured. 

April 3. A. Leavens's building, Spring sti'eet. Loss, $600; in- 
sured $400. 

April 5. False alarm. 

May 3. Shed in rear of J. R. Hill & Co.'s store. Damage, ^200 ; 
insured. 

May 4. New Hampshire State Prison. Damage trifling. 

May 5. False alarm. 

May 13. W. P. Ford's house, Church street. Loss, $100 ; 
insured. 

May 31. Alarm caused by burning brush at South end. 

July 31. Vogler Brothers, Main street. No damage. 

Aug. 2. J. R. Hill, Main street. Damage small. 

Sept. 4. Dwelling-house owned by M. T. Willard, near lower 
bridge. Loss, $1,300 ; insured, $800. 

Sept. 9. Old sleepers at Concord Railroad. Loss small. 

Oct. 6. Woodman Brothers, machine shop, near Turnpike 
street. Loss, $11,000 ; insured, $8,184. 

Oct. 26. Ivory Hall, Main street. Caused by burning out a 
chimney. 

Nov. 5. Concord Tea Store, Main street. Loss, ^10 ; in- 
sured. 

Dec. 7. I. F. Williams's house, Main street, owned by E. G. 
and G. A. Cumraings. Loss, $700 on buildings, $500 on furni- 
ture ; insured. 



95 

Jan. 10, 1876. New Hampshire State Prison. No loss. 

Jan. 11. J. N. Patterson's house, Wahmt street. Loss 
$1,000; insured. 

Jan. 12. David Lynch's house, Monroe street. Loss estima- 
ted $500. 

Jan. 22. Woodman Brothers' machine-shop, near gas works. 
Loss, $2,.300; insured. 

Jan. 25. ALarm in response to a call from Suncook village. 
Kearsarge Co. was sent by railroad immediately. 

The department has been called out twenty-five times, being 
ten more than in 1874 or 1873. 

Total amount of losses in 1875, §20,410 

" " insurance in 1875, 10,294 

" " loss in the precinct, 18,710 

" " loss without the precinct, 1,700 

CONCLUSION. 

It was my fortune to have assumed the duties of Chief at the 
time of the introduction of the Long Pond water. The success 
of this great enterprise has been well attested in tlie largely 
decreased losses by fire, assuring us of a reasonable immunity 
hereafter from disastrous conflagrations. 

I have held a continuous service of three years, and, acting 
upon my own strong inclinations, and in consonance with the 
action of my predecessors, I have declined a continuance of this 
trust. 

To the Mayor and Committee on the Fire Department, and 
Members of the City Council generally, I tender my sincere 
acknowldgements for their hearty cooperation and support in 
all matters promoting the interests of my charge. To the 
Board of Engineers, and the officers and men of the entire de- 
partment, is due this expression of my most cordial apprecia- 
tion of their unvarying courtesy, and thorough discipline and 

efficiency. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH S. MERRILL, 

Chief Engineer. 



96 



EOLL OF THE FIEE DEPAETMEI^TT 



FOTl 1876. 



Ifames. 
JAJIES N. LAUDER, 



CHIEF ENGINEEK. 

Occupations. 
Master Mechanic Northern R. R. 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 



JOSEPH S. MERRILL, 
N. H. HASKELL, 
CHARLES M. LANG, 
WILLIAM D. LADD, 
DANIEL B. NEWHALL, 
JOHN AVHITTAKER, 
CYRUS R. ROBINSON, 
WYMAN W. HOLDEN, 



Carriage Manufactiu'er, 
Painter, 
Painter, 
Iron Mercliant, 
Saloon-keeper, 
Manufacturer, 
Manufacturer, 
Manufacturer, 
WILLIAM D. LADD, Clerk. 



Hesidences. 
Franklin street. 



State street. 
Perley street. 
Centre street. 
Rumf ord street. 
School street. 
Ward one. 
Ward two. 
Ward three. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY. 

Six fire suits, $75 ; 6 badges, $48 ; 8 fire hats, $64 ;— total, $187.00. 

Miscellaneous Property not in service. 

2 hose-carriages, $325; 2 brass trumpets, $10; 3 bells, $8; 1 set new grates for 
steamer, $7 ; 2 brass crank boxes, $4 ; 1 lignum-vitfe crank box, $3 ; 3 extra lathes for 
pump packiug, $3 ; 3 extra pump valve guides, $3 ;— total, $363. 



97 



KEAKSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY. 



OFFICEnS. 



G. L. LovEJOT, Foreman. 

G. A. Glovek, Assistant Foreman. 



B. F. Hardt, Clerh. 

J. H. Sanders, Engineer. 



Names. 
G. L. Lovcjoy, 
G. A. Glover, 

B. F. Hardy, 
W. H. Corning, 
J. H. Sanders, 

C. H. Sanders, 
A. L. Currier, 

D. P. Caldwell, 
G. E. Minot, 

D. W. C. Everett, 

E. A. Bingham, 
C. S. Packard, 
L. C. Stevenson, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Painter, 
Tinsmith, 
Clerk, 

Hair Dresser, 
Painter, 
Machinist, 
Baggage Master, 
Wood-worker, 
Painter, 
Clerk, 
Tinsmith. 
Painter, 
Teamster, 



Residence. 
Fayette street. 
State street, cor. West. 
Fayette street. 
Greeu street. 
State street, cor. Cross. 
South street. 
Laurel street. 
Turnpike street. 
Greeu street. 
Aiiljurn street. 
Fayette street. 
Green street, cor. Warren. 
Engine House, Warren st. 



Schedule of Property — Steamer Kearsarge. 

Steamer, $3,200 ; hose-carriage, $200 ; 12 lire suits and 13 fire hats, $232.25 ; 10 reefing 
jackets, $75; 2 blunderbusses, with spray nozzles, $53; 1 hydrant coupling, $16; 3 lan- 
terns and 2 water-buckets, $12 ; 1 smoke stack, $10 ; 10 spanner belts, $10 ; 10 sets span- 
ners, $10; 7 wrenches, $5; 1 shovel, 1 bar, 1 axe, $4; 1 poker, 1 oil-can, 5 feet rubber 
hose, 1 hammer, $3.50; 1 reducer, $2.50; 2 horse blankets, $10; 1 mud apron, $5; 1 
jack-screw, $5 : 2 gallon oil-cans, and 2 hydrant wrenches, S5 ; 1 feather duster, 1 baud 
brush, $3.75;— total, $3,862. 



98 



EAGLE HOSE COMPANY, No. 1. 



OFFICERS. 

John H. Morsr, Foreman. 

Eben F. Richardson, Asst. Foreman. 



Names. 
John H. Morse, 
Eben F. Richardson, 
George W. Johnson, 
Reuben R. Grant, 
Frank W. Blake, 
Charles E. Barrett, 
Frank T. Morse, 
"William T. Packard, 
John H. Toof, 
John H. Dauforth, 
J. Warren Gordon, 
Charles H. Sewell, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Plumber, 
Machinist, 
Painter, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Engineer, 
Carpenter, 
Moulder, 
Carpenter. 
Carpenter, 
Grocer, 
Teamster, 



Geo. "W. Johnson, Cleric. 



Residences. 
Spring street, near "Warren. 
Railroad square. 
24 Main street. 
School street, near Main. 
16 Thompson street. 
Cor. State and Munroe. 
32 Warren street. 
Centre street. 
Warren street. 

53 State street. 
Warren street. 

54 Warren street. 



Schedule of Property — Eagle Hose, No. 1. 

One four-wheeled hose-carriage, $700 ; 1 two-horse pole, $30 ; I hand pole and rope 
reel, $10; 30 feet % inch rope, $2; 12 fire hats, S75; 12 reefing jackets, $90; 14 canvas 
corts, 14 canvas overalls, $140 ; 2 hand lanterns, $5 ; 1 axe, $3 ; 1 iron bar, $2 ; 2 leather 
hose pipes, 1 Allen's spray and stop nozzle, 1 common nozzle, $45; 2 reducing castings, 
$5; 2 pails, $1; 1 sprinkler, $1; 2 chamois skins. $1.25; 1 whip, $1.25; 1 horse blanket, 
$5; 2 oil-cans, $1; 2 hydrant wrenches, $4; 2 ladder straps, $2; 4 sets spanners, $; 4 
spanner belts, $3.25; 1 broom, .25;— total, $1,133. 



99 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 



OFFICERS. 



C. C. Chesley, Foreman. 
Henry Tuckek, Asst. Foreman. 



J. F. Scott, Clerk. 

G. B. Buzzell, Treasurer. 



Barnes. 
C. C. Chesley, 
Henry Tucker, 
J. F. Scott, 
G. B. Buzzell, 
C. A. Herbert, 
B. F. Tucker, 
B. Billsborough, 

F. K. Favour, 
Wm. E. Tucker, 
H. H. Proctor, 
W. A. Bean, 

G. H. Dixou, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Carpenter, 
Moulder, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Organ-maker, 
Painter, 
Harness-maker, 
Organ-maker, 
Watchman, 
Organ-maker, 
Organ-maker. 



liesidenccs. 
Prince stree 
Franklin street. 
Franklin street. 
Franklin street. 
State street. 
Maple street. 
Essex street. 
AYalnut street. 
Heni-y street. 
Walnut street. 
Centre street, 
Maple street. 



Schedule of Property— Alert Hose, No. 2. 

Brick house and furniture, $2,500; 1 four-wheel hand hose-carriage, $600; 12 fire 
suits, $150; 12 fire hats, $75; 6 spanner belts, $9; 12 spanners, $9; 2 blunderbusses and 
nozzles, $40 ; 1 wrench and shovel, $2,50 ; 2 hydrant wrenches, $4 ; sponge and chamois 
skin, $1.40; water-pail and dipper, $1; dust-brush and broom, $1; 13 straps for suits, 
etc., $5; feather duster, $4; copper boiler, $8.50; carriage jack, $2.60; 1 axe, $1.50; 
rubber hose and nozzle, $12.50;— total, $3,427. 



100 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, No. 3. 



OFFICERS. 



Stekling CoIjBY, Foreman. 
John McNultt, Asst. Foreman. 



NOERis A. DtJNKLEE, Clerl: 
Norman G. Caeb, Treasurer. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 
Sterling Colby, 
John McNulty, 
X. A. Dunklee, 
N. G. Carr, 
W. E. Dow, 
J. F. Bartlett, 
D. J. Rolfe, 
L. N. Farley, 
H. D. AVebster, 
H. F. Deming, 
Levi G. Woods, 
Walter S. Page, 



Occupations. 

Merchant, 

Machinist, 

Stable-keeper, 

Jeweller, 

Painter, 

Blacksniitli, 

Painter, 

Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 

Clerk, 

Machmist, 

Clerk, 



Residences. 
State, corner Laurel. 
State, corner Perley. 
Fayette street. 
Thompson street. 
Turnpike street. 
West street. 
State, corner Laurel. 
Grove, comer Perley. 
Grove, corner Perley. 
Warren street. 
Wari'en street. 
Marshall street. 



Schedule of Property— Good Will Hose Company, No. 3. 

Brick house and furniture, $3,000; 1 four-wheel hand hose-carriage, $600; 12 fire 
suits, S150; 12 fu"e hats, $75; 6 spanner belts, $9; 12 spanners, $9; 2 blunderbusses and 
nozzles, $40; 2 hydi-ant wrenches, $4; sponge and chamois skin, $1.40; water-pail 
and dipper, $1; 1 feather duster, $4; 1 broom and shovel, $2; mop and spittoons, 
$4.50; copper kettle, $8.50; 50 feet hand hose, $12.50; carriage jack, $3.50; screw 
wrench, $.60;— total, $3,925. 



101 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, "CITY OF CONCORD." 



OFFICERS. 



S. W. Shattuck, Foreman. 

N. B. BuKLEiGH, Asst. Foreman. 



Geo. L. Williams, Clerk and Treas. 
Ned Shattuck, Steward. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 
S. W. Shattuck, 
N. B. Burleigh, 
Geo. L. ■Williams, 
Xed Shattuck, 
K. H. Shattuck, 
E. C. Runnels, 
Benjamin Oulette, 
C. A. Wright, 
C. F. Wason, 
R. B. Morgan, 
John L. T. Bro'wn, 
John S. Blodgett, 
S. W. Emerson, 
Philip Plummer, 
Herman Shattuck, 
John R. Smith, 
Herbert L. Shattuck, 
A. H. Webster, 
Geo. H. Green, 
Walter F. Hoit, 



Occupations. 
Auctioneer, 
Macliiuist, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Auctioneer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Carpenter, 
Car-builder, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage-builder, 
Carpenter, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Painter, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage-builder, 
Teamster, 
Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
State, corner Walker street. 
3 Maple street. 
27 Union street. 
Beacon street. 
17 Union street. 
Perkins street. 
3 Jefferson street. 
65 State street. 
Badger street. 
Beacon street. 
Thorndike street. 
Essex street, near Centre. 
33 Downing street. 
138 Spring street. 
State, corner Walker street. 
Beacon street. 
17 Union street. 
44 State street, 
5 Call's block. 
9 Maple street. 



Schedule of Property — Hook and Ladder Company, "City of Concord." 
Carriage and apparatus, §1,500; 20 fire suits, §250; 20 fire hats, §125;— total, 81,875. 



102 



PIONEER ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 1. 



Hand Engine, Fisherville, 



OFFICERS. 



RuFus Cass, Foreman , 
J. B. Dodge, Clerk, 



George W. Corey, Asst. Foreman. 
Nathan H. Du^ibak, Steioard. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 

Rufus Cass, 
George W. Corey, 
J. B. Dodge, 
Robert Crowther, 
Nathan H. Dunbar, 
Henry T. Foote, 
E. E. Rolfe, 
Eli Hanson, 
Joseph E. Sanders, 
John \T. Powell, 
John H. Moore, 
John S. Boutell, 
John H. Rolfe, 
"William \Y. Allen, 
Charles Abbott, 
H. P. Austin, 
Moses H. Bean, 
James S. Crowther, 
Charles Couch, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Michael Corbitt, 
John A. Cobuni, 
George N. Dutton, 
E. P. Ererett, 
Moses H. Fifleld, 
D. Warren Pox, 
Patrick Foley, 
J. B. Goldsmith, 
Michael GriflSn, 
Horace Holcombe, 
Hazen Knowlton, 
James Kelley, 
John C. Liuehan, 



Occupations. 

ISIachinist, 

Carpenter, 

Glazier, 

Overseer, 

Teamstei-, 

Merchant, 

Cabinet-maker, 

Cabinet-maker, 

Carpenter, 

Moulder, 

Machinist, 

Turner, 

Door-maker, 

Merchant, 

Teamster, 

Cabinet-maker, 

Stone-mason 

Door manufacturer. 

Teamster, 

Teacher, 

Flour packer, 

Harness-maker, 

Carver, 

Mechanic, 

Teamster, 

Shoe-dealer, 

Axle-maker, 

Butcher, 

Axle-maker, 

Machinist, 

Carpenter, 

Carver, 

Merchant, 



Residences. 

High street. 
Charles street. 
Charles street. 
Summer street. 
Summer street. 
Charles street. 
Chvu-ch street. 
Main street. 
Summer street. 
Higli street. 
Elm street. 
Summer street. 
Summer street. 
Main street. 
Merrimack street. 
High street. 
Merrimack street. 
Depot street. 
Summer street. 
Depot street. 
Crescent street. 
Cross street. 
Main street. 
Merrimack street. 
High street. 
Elm street. 
Spring street. 
"Washington street. 
Depot street. 
Church street. 
Depot street. 
Church street. 
Charles street. 



103 



MEMBERS — CONTINUED. 



Jffames. 
J. E. Harden, 
W. H. Moody, 
Amos O. Mansiir, 
Abial Rolfe, 
A. W. Rolfe, 
James Riley, 
Heury Rolfe, 
Isaac L. Rogers, 
Daniel Smith, 
Emanuel Sebra, 
Samuel G. Sanborn, 
W. O. Tucker, 
William Walsh, 
O. J. Fifield, 
Fi-ank O. Emerson, 
Charles A. Morse, 
Arthur F. Rolfe, 



Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Hack-driver, 
Tainter, 

Insurance agent. 
Door manufacturer. 
Carver, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Butcher, 
Teamster, 
Blaclcsmith, 
Jig-sawyer, 
Overseer, 
Harness-maker, 
Axle-maker, 
Clerk, 
Book-keeper, 



Residences, 
Summer street. 
Summer street. 
Main'street. 
Depot street. 
Depot street. 
Church street. 
Depot street. 
Summer street. 
Summer street. 
Merrimack street. 
Main street. 
High street. 
Spring street. 
Main street. 
Summer street. 
Merrimack Street. 
Depot street. 



Schedule of Property — Pioneer, No, 1, 

Engine house, IJI.OIO; 1 engine (hand), §800; 2 hose carriages, $150; GOO feet, 2-in. 
leather hose (new), 5!900; 300 feet 2-in. leather hose (old), §100; 1 set rimners, $5; 5 
lanterns, $5 ; 3 axes, $2 ; 1 crowbar, §3 ; 6 fire jackets, §30 ; 2 stoves and funnel, §40 ; 
6 settees, §20; 6 chairs, §3; 1 oil-can and 4 lamps, §2; 1 fire hook and rope, §25: 1 sig- 
nal lantern, S2.00; 6 spanners and wrenches, Sf3;— total, S3.000. 

This is a Button machine, playing two powerful and effective streams. The house 
and entii-e apparatus are in good order. There are five reservoirs at Fisherville, valued 
at §1,300. 



104 



Robert H. Potteb, Foreman. 
John N. Hill, Asst. Foreman 



OLD FORT, NO. 2. 

Hand Engine, East Concord. 
OFFICERS. 

John E. Frye, Clerk, 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 
Robert H. Potter, 
John N. Hill, 
John E. Frye, 
Frank P. Emerson, 
Albert H. C. Knowles, 
George \V". Moody, 
Frank V. Osgood, 
Edmund S. Curtis, 
George H. Curtis, 
William A. Bean, 
Elbridge Emery, 
Daniel B. Sanborn, 
Edward R. Noyes, 
Lauren Clough, 
Josiah C. Chesley, 
Orra Hodge, 
Job C. Jeime, 
Charles P. Wliite, 
Joseph E. Pliuner, 
George W. Lake, 
Frank E. Sleeper, 
Lucius D. Bunnell, 
John M. Smith, 
Harrison Carpenter, 
Lucius A. Bunnell, 
Ami Dubia, 
"William Flanders, 
William P. Curtis, 
Walter T. Lake, 
Joseph S. Austin, 



Occupations. 
Farmer, 
Section man, 
Farmer, 
Carpenter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Carpenter, 
Blacksmith, 
Carpenter, 

Musical instrument maker. 
Butcher, 

Wood and lumber dealer. 
Farmer, 
Brick-maker, 
Station agent, 
Blacksmith, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Hose-maker, 
Carpenter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Hose-maker, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Hose-maker, 



Residences. 
Appleton street. 
Peuacook street. 
Peuacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Shawmut street. 
Portsmouth street. 
Penacook street. 
Curtisville. 
Portsmouth place. 
Shawmut street . 
Penacook street. 
Shaker street. 
Shawmut street. 
Shawmut street. 
Penacook street. 
Mill street. 
Clinton street. 
Pembroke street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Shawmut street. 
Penacook street. 
Eastman street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Curtisville. 
Penacook street. 
Peuacook street. 



Schedule of Property — Old Fort, No. 2. 

House, .?300; engine and hose-carriage, fuOO; 371 feet new leather hose, $500.50; 300 
feet old leather hose, f 150 ; 1 pole, for 2 horses, $16 ; fire hook and rope, $15 ; 1 set run- 
ners, $10 ; 6 settees, $24 ; 2 stoves and funnel, $6 ; 2 axes and 1 bar, $3 ; 2 lanterns and 
lamps, $4 ; 2 fire suits, $8 ; 6 chairs and table, $3 ; 4 buckets, $8 ; 2 whiflietrees and 
chains,* $2; stand, glass, and brush, $1; 1 shovel, $1; trumpet, $5; 2 hose and ladder 
straps, $3; 2 spanners, $1.50;— total, $1,561. 

This is a Hunneman machine. Its hose and other apparatus are in good repair. 



105 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, No 3. 



Hand Engine, West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



Patrick Crowley, Foreman. 
John E. Gay, Asst. Foreman. 
J. M. CuossMAN, Clei-k. 



Harrison Partridge, Treasurer. 
JosL D. Waller, StewimL 
Geo. S. Kellom, Foreman Rose, 



Names. 
Patrick Crowley, 
John E. Gay, 
J. M Crossiuan, 
Harrison Partridge, 
Joel D. Walk-r, 
George S. Kellom, 
H. H. Faruuin, 
George Partridge, 
John Madison, 
John Harrington, 
F. P. Crossman, 
Albridge M. Hoyt, 
Jeremiah Qninn, 
Michael Jenkins, 
I. H. Farnum, 
George H. Speed, 
Frank P. Kemp, 
James Bemon, 
George W. Beriy, 
Barney Donalien, 
Walter S. Lougee, 
George Kemp, 
M ichael T. Hayes, 
Thomas P. Dailey, 
Patrick Conway, 
Robert J. Crowley, 
Henry K. Ranulett, 
John JIurphy, 
P. E. Blanchard, 
Charles Dramond, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 

Quarryman, 

Quarryman, 

Blacksmith, 

Merchant, 

Mechanic, 

Stone-cutter, 

Teamster, 

Kit-maker, 

Quarryman, 

Mill operative, 

Quarryman, 

Blacksmith, 

Mill operative. 

Mill operative, 

Quarryman, 

Stone-cutter, 

Clerk, 

Quarryman, 

Mill operative, 

Quarryman, 

Quarryman, 

Mill operative. 

Mill operative, 

Stone-cutter, 

Mill operative, 

Quarryman, 

Teamster, 

Quarryman, 

Stone-cutter, 

Quarryman, 



Residences. 
Main street. 
Abhottville. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
High street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Abbottville. 
High street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
jMain street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Hutchins street. 
Main street. 
IMaiu street. 
Mill street. 
Higli street. 
Iilain street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Abbottville. 



Schedule of Property — Cataract N'o. 3. 

House, $911.80 ; engine and hose-carriage, §600 ; 550 feet 2-inch leather hose, §412.50 ; 
31G feet new hose, §440.95; 3 hose clamps, §10.50; 1 pole, §16; 1 set runners, §10; 3 
axes, 1 crow-bar, §5; 2 fire suits, §8; 4 buckets and 2 lanterns, §12; 1 trumpet, §5; 2 
stoves and funnel, §10; 8 settees, §32; 1 signal lantern, §3; 6 spanners and belts, §5; 
1 chain and whiffletree, §2 ; 2 torches, §1 ; 1 monkey-wrench, $1.2.5 ; 3 hytlrant wrenches, 
§6; 3 reducers, §7.50; 1 oil-can, .50;— total, §2,088.20. 

This is a Huunemau machine. House been repaired, and apparatus in good condi- 
tion. 



106 
SUMMARY OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

IN PRECINCT. 

Engineers, 6 

Steamer members, .12 

Hose members, 36 

Hook and Ladder members, 20 

— 74 

WITHOUT PKECINCT. 

Members at Fisherville, 50 

Members at East Concord, 30 

Members at West Concord, 30 

Engineers, 3 

— 113 

Total, 187 



SCHEDULE OF CITY PROPERTY— FIRE DEPARTMENT, 

Engine house and lot, $32,662 

Hose, 6,000 

Engineers' department, 187 

Steamer Gov. Hill, 1,600 

Steamer Kearsarge, 3,862 

Eagle Hose, No.l, L133 

Alert Hose, No. 2, house and furniture, 3,427 

Good Will Hose, No. 3, house and furniture, 3,925 

Hook and Ladder, No. 1, 1,875 

Pioneer, No. 1, Fisherville, including house, 8,000 
Old Fort, No. 2, East Concord, including house, 1,561 
Cataract, No. 3, West Concord, including house, 2,500 

Miscellaneous property, not in use, 363 

Reservoirs and pipes attached, 7,905 

Total, ' $70,000 



107 



PUBLIC RESERVOIRS. 



Capacity- 

1. Main street, near Abbot Downing Co.'s, 

2. " near Harvey, Morgan & Co.'s, 

3. " corner of Pleasant street, 

4. " middle front state house yard, 
6. " rear of city hall, 

6. State street, corner of Washington street, 

7. " opposite Winter street, 

8. " in high school yard, 

9. " corner of Pleasant street, 

10. " near Geo. H. Emery's, 

11. " corner of West street, 

12. South street, corner of Cross street, 

13. " near A. Downing's, 

14. Thompson street, near Geo. W. Crockett's, 

15. Ruraford street, near Josiah Minot's, 

16. Orchard street, corner of Pine street, 

17. School street, near J. V. Barron's, 

18. Centre street, corner of Union street, 

19. Gas-holder, rear of Main street, 

20. ^School street ; well in front of N. White's. 

21. Main street, near Thorndike street, 

22. Franklin street, near Henry street, 

23. Iron pipe to state house reservoir, and to gas 

holder tank, 

Total, $7,905.00 

♦Supplied from reservoir in Union District, high school yard. 



-Cubic feei 


t. Value. 


1,000 1300.00 


1,000 


300.00 


*1,500 


450.00 


*1,500 


450.00 


2,000 


300.00 


500 


200.00 


500 


100.00 


3,000 


700.00 


1,000 


300.00 


1,000 


300.00 


800 


100.00 


800 


200.00 


1,000 


300.00 


1,100 


300.00 


1,000 


300.00 


4,000 


500.00 


3,500 


500.00 


1,000 


300.00 


44,000 




1,500 


555.00 


1,.500 


550.00 


is- 


900.00 



108 



WATEEI]^G THE STEEETS. 



The following account of the receipts and expenditures for 
watering the streets during the year 1875, is inserted in this re- 
port for the information of all those who are interested. 



RECEIPTS. 

From persons on the east side of Main street. 



Onslow Stearns, $10.00 

J. P. Stickney, 5.00 

S. Butterfield & Co., 5.00 

Savage Brothers, 5.00 

Calvin Thorn & Son, 3.00 

E. G. Fisher, 2.00 

George Noyes, 2.00 

J. E. Clifford, 5.00 

William C. Elkins, 2.00 

Elijah Knight, 5.00 

James Moore & Son, 6.00 

Gage & Conn, 2.00 

W. B. Stearns, 5.00 

H. H. Aldrich, 5.00 

C. C. Webster, 5.00 

N. H. Savings Bank, 5.00 

W. P. Underhill & Co., 5.00 

Eagle Hotel. 10.00 

J. H. Morrill, 5.00 

E. C. Eastman, 2.00 

Jane L. Crawford, 3.00 

Humphrey & Dodge, 10.00 

W. G. Shaw, 5.00 

Clarke Brothers, 5.00 

Eobinson & Tilton, 5.00 

J. T. Sleeper, 5.00 

J. W. Little, 2.00 

John Jackman, 2.00 

Hood & Wright, 3.00 

M. B. Critchett, 3.00 

M. M. Smith, 5.00 

T. W. & J. H. Stewart, 6.00 

S. & S. C. Eastman, 2.00 

W. H. Allison, 2.00 



Frank Low, ^2.00 

Henry Churchill, 5.00 

A. T. Sanger, 5.00 

C. M. Towle, 2.00 
L. D. Stevens, 2.00 
F. B. Underhill, 6.00 
Herman Strauss, 5.00 
John Y. Mugridge, 2.00 
Samuel G. Lane, 2.00 
Stanley & Ayer, 5.00 
E. W." Woodward & Co., 6.00 
R. Mayers, 5.00 
Phenix Hotel, 10.00 
Gust Walker, 6.00 
Woodworth Brothers, 6.00 
J. H. Gallinger, 2.00 
Cummings & Young, 3.00 
L. S. Richardson, 5.00 
Republican Press Assdciation, 5.00 
J. E. Pecker, 2.00 
N. G. Carr, 3.00 
A. W. Gale. 2.00 
J. T. Batehelder & Co., 5.00 
R. C. Danforth, 5.00 
Carter Brothers, 5.00 

D. A. Macurdy, 5.00 
Elm House, 5.00 
Farley Brothers, 2.00 
James R. Hill, 7.00 
Leland A. Smith, 5.00 
J. E. D wight, 3.00 
Ford & Kimball, 5.00 



$289.00 



109 



West side of 3Iain street. 



Asa Fowler, 
J. H. Abbott, 
J. S. Norris, 
J. S. Nurris & Co., 
Frank Evans, 
Ciimniinss Bros., 
Kilburn & Glennon, 
Charles Crow, 
J. Frank Hoit, 
Davis & Morey, 
Perkins & Dudley, 
C. H. Martin & Co., 
John S. Green, 
A. Souza, 
H. C. Sturtevant, 
J. S. Hubbard, 
William Gilman, 
James H. Chase, 
IVLorrill & Silsby, 
S. F. Morrill & Co , 
Charles P. Moore, 
J. K. H. Davis, 
"William Marshall, 
L. H. Carroll, 
H. B. Foster, 
State Capital Bank, 
Tappan «& Albin, 
Frank Marden, 
M. Flanders, 



$5.00 
5.00 
2.00 
6.00 
6.00 
5.00 
3.00 
8.00 
6.00 
2.00 
5.00 
6.00 
2.00 
1.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
6.00 
5.00 
5.00 
200 
1.50 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
2.00 
5.00 
5.00 



Stevens & Duncklee, 
(t. H. Adams, 
First National Bank, 
Page & Norris, 

C. W. Allen, 
S. Cheney, 

A. P. Sherburne, 
J. R. Hill & Co., 
James Haselton, 

A. Leavens, 
Sargent & Chase, 
Morrill & Dan forth, 
Harris & Co., 
Underbill & Kittredge, 

D. L. Guernsey, 
John S. Blanchard, 
Dickinson & Curamings, 
F. H. Pierce, 

E. N. Shepard, 
Sewing Machine Co., 
Hammond & Ayers, 
D. B. Jones, 

J. M. Jones, 
Edwin C. Bailey, 
Sanborn & Clark, 

B. W. Sanborn & Co., 
D. G. Marsh, 



§219.50 



Warren street. 



Charles H. Norton, 
John Kimball, 
Ordway & Ferrin, 
James E. McShane, 
F. D. Batchelder, 
Alden Crooker, 



"William B. Durgin, 
M. T. "Willard, 
John H. Morse, 
Minot & Co., 



$5.00 
5.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 


J. E. Larkin, 
Albert Foster, 
C. B. Lcighton, 
F. C. Beede, 


$2.00 
5.00 
1.00 
2.00 


1.00 


$26.00 


School Street. 




3.00 
6.00 
9. no 


Savings Bank, 
A. H. "Wiggin, 


$2.00 
2.00 



5.00 



$19.00 



Concord Gas Light Co., 
Geo. Goodhue, 



Capitol street. 

5.00 I Cheney & Co., 

2.00 



$15.00 
$22.00 



110 

Whole amount collected, 1875, $575.50 

From which I have paid for collecting, $20.00 
" " Concord Water-works, 200.00 

" " city treasury, 355.50 

Total, ' $575.50 

Amount collected in 1873, $654.00 

1874, 608.00 

" " 1875, 575.50 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN KIMBALL, 
Superintendent Repairs of Highways. 
Jan. 30, 1876. 



Ill 



REPORT 



CITY PHYSICIAN AND BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the City Council: 

I have the honor to report that the sanitary condition of our city, 
for the past year, has been fully an average one with those of the past 
decade. 

Among those obliged to ask aid of the city, but few have required 
medical attendance. The whole number of families requiring assistance 
from the overseer of the poor, was between sixty and seventy, but only 
fifteen have required medical treatment, and in only a few instances 
has it been necessary to visit them but a few times. There is an occa- 
sional case, where the principal support of a family becomes incapacitated 
for labor by chronic disease, and they become a tax upon our charity 
for long periods. However, the per centage of such cases in Concord 
is very small, and I believe our appropriation for the poor is less in 
proportion to our population than that required by towns and cities 
generally, of the same number of inhabitants. 

ALMSHOUSE. 

The number of inmates at our almshouse, during the past year, has 
been about the average of the last three years, and much has been done 
to improve its sanitary condition, so as to render the inmates as com- 
fortable as possible with the present buildings. 

The health of those whose misfortunes have forced them to seek a 
home provided by the city has been as good as could reasonably be ex- 
pected, considering that the most of them are broken down in mind 
and body in their struggles with the " problem of life." I have often 
wondered that they so soon become satisfied with their lot, and, giving 
up all hope of again attempting to support themselves, settle down into 



112 

a quiet but chsei'ful way of living upon the bounty provided, and tak- 
ing but little thought what is necessary for future maintenance. 

I am satisfied that having a home, and throwing off all care, contrib- 
ute much towards their health and happiness. Only two deaths have 
occurred at the almshouse since the last report, both occasioned by dis- 
ease of tlie brain, incident to a broken down constitution, or old age. 

The superintendent and the matron have done all that could be done, 
with the present accommodations, to furnish each of the inmates a com- 
fortable home, and have been indefatigable in their efforts to keep the 
iustitution and premises in a good sanitary condition. It is to be re- 
gretted that a certain class of criminals are sent to the farm without the 
necessary accommodations to keep them from mingling with such as 
have not transgressed the law, for however patent it may be that crime 
and poverty are often found inhabiting the same localities when free 
from restraint, yet it is equally a fact, that good order and the true 
comforts of a home are not found in such retreats. 

Considerable repairs have been made upon the buildings during the 
past season, involving some expense, but only such as were actually 
necessary for the purpose of protecting the property and its inmates. 

Our increasing population seems to demand an institution originated 
with a view to accommodate the different classes to be taken care of, 
and as these buildings were not originally intended for this purpose, 
and are getting to be old and out of repair, it would be impossible, 
without greater expense than to build anew, to change the present 
buildings into the proper apartments to suitably accommodate the 
wants of our city. I earnestly hope it will be but few years before we 
shall have a comfortable home for the poor, a house of correction for 
those found guilty of misdemeanors, where they will be punished 
as criminals, not merely supported as a class whose poverty demands 
our attention, and, at the same time, that we shall have hospital ac- 
commodations where the homeless can be cared for when ill, pajdng 
for their care when able, and in any event having that attention their 
circumstances may require. With the growing necessity of an institu- 
tion having such departments, all of which could be under the care of 
the same superintendent, it is of doubtful expediency to expend more 
money on the present old buildings. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

As a member of the board of health, I have taken considerable inter- 
est in our public works that have an influence upon the health of our 
population. While it is true that public improvements, like the intro- 
duction of water and a system of sewers, cannot be made without ex- 
pending large sums of money, yet it is equally true that we cannot 



113 

afford to do without them, for sickness costs more than improvements, 
and, wherever people are crowded together on small areas of ground, 
then the object to be effected becomes greater than individual eff"ort is 
able to accomplish, and combination or public authorities are called 
upon to provide what is a common benefit to every citizen. 

The sanitary condition of our city compares favorably with that of 
other cities similarly situated ; and our undertaker's report shoAvs that 
our death-rate has not been more than an average of the past eight 
years. Yet we should not relax our eff'orts, nor allow any known 
means of promoting the health of our citizens to be omitted, for our 
future prosperity depends upon the health and wealth of the inhabi- 
tants, the latter never increasing unless the former is a prominent and 
well marked characteristic feature. 

Analysis shows our water supply to be one of the purest and best 
ever brought into a city for public use; and it belongs to you, as the 
guardians of all our public works, to so protect the water-shed supply- 
ing the natural reservoir of our water supply, by such ordinances as will 
forever place Long Pond beyond the possibility of pollution or future 
contamination. The erection of buildings upon the shores, or slaughter- 
houses upon the hillsides, the converting of its surface in winter into a 
race-course, or any other source of contamination, should at once be 
interdicted; and if, on insj)ection, any of the buildings now owned and 
occupied around the pond are, by drains or otherwise, in danger of pol- 
luting the water, they should at once be restrained, and be otherwise 
provided for. 

FIRST ELEMENTS. 

Pure air and pure water are among the first elements of health; and 
when these are to be found, with a comfortable home, upon dry soil free 
from miasm, we have Nature's three essentials to good health and lon- 
gevity. With these we may safely assert that much of disease may be 
prevented, if people will only take proper care of themselves and their 
surroundings. And this leads me to call your attention to the next 
important feature looking towards the health and comfort of our popu- 
lation, viz., cleanliness, or the removal of filth and effete matters that 
of necessity are constantly accumulating in the midst of an increasing 
and prosperous city. There is no royal road of escape from the re- 
sponsibility that the production of eiiete and waste materials entails 
upon us. Our own individual immunity from disease cannot be secured 
without looking after the safety of our less prosperous neighbors. The 
refuse matters thrown into the street, back yard, or alley from the 
poorest house in town, and threatening the health of the family living 
in that house, may, in some mysterious way, cause sickness and death 
8 



114 

in any number of dwellings; and all who may eventually suffer from 
the sickness commencing in that family have as clear a right to prevent 
the cause, as they would have to place the family in quarantine were 
they suffering from small-pox. Public sanitary improvement is not the 
affair of the philanthropist alone; neither is the interest of the individ- 
ual satisfied when he has made his own domicile and surroundings 
perfect. The health of each is important to all, and all must join in 
securing it. 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

I would not take your time and attention in this matter if New 
Hampshire, like some other states, had a department of " state medi- 
cine;" for, with a state board of health, much might and would be 
done that now is left to local authorities. Every intelligent person 
takes an interest in what is of vital importance to every person and 
community, viz., to prevent in every possible way the introduction of 
disease from abroad, or its development in our midst. Tlie inquiries 
are often made, Are diseases preventable? Are their causes so far 
understood that we are justified in saying that they may be avoided? 
Or, are they mysterious, a part of the plan of creation, a punishment 
inflicted for our good, and not to be averted by human foresight? 

I cannot better answer tliese questions than by quoting the language 
of one most eminently qualified by a long course of study and investi- 
gation into the sanitary laws governing the health of individuals and 
communities, and, as secretary of the Massachusetts Board of Health, 
had ample opportunity to verify, by practical demonstrations, the po- 
sition he assumes:* 

" The history of medicine shows that until recent times the most de- 
structive diseases have been practically regarded as quite beyond the 
power of man to prevent. Plague and pestilence have been thought to 
be providential, and only to be averted by the prayers of tlie church. 
It is true that the great fathers of medicine left behind them rules for 
the maintenance of health, which have had a certain currency in the 
world. 

•'They were glimpses of what is now known as sanitary economy; 
but, not being founded upon demonstrable truth, they fell to the 
ground. 

" In the oscillations of medical opinion at the present time, the pen- 
dulum swings, first in one direction and then in the other, over the im- 
mutable truths of physical, chemical, and pathological science, each day 
bringing us nearer to a just appreciation of the wonderful processes 
which give rise to the various j)henomena of health and disease. 

* Dr. Derby. First Report Mass. Board of Health, pp. 42 and 43. 



115 

" Now, the brilliant generalizations of the chemical philosopher almost 
lead us to believe that the mysteries of vital action are revealed through 
the laboratory, or even by the microscope we seem to be peering into 
the human laboratory itself, and reading, as in an open book, secrets 
which have been concealed since the creation ; but patient and careful 
students of disease follow up these revelations, and clearly show that so 
complex a machine as the human body cannot yet be regarded as a 
piece of inanimate material. Meanwhile the sum of clear and con- 
nected and practical knowledge of vital processes is constantly and 
rapidly increasing. 

"In the prevailing discredit of drugs as weapons for attacking and 
driving out disease, there are wise and good men whose enthusiasm in 
the idea of the self-limited and inevitable character of the most de- 
structive diseases, when once established, leads to the encouragement of 
a kind of fatalism. They would persuade us that the causes of epidem- 
ics are unknown, that contention with them is vain, and that the best 
we can do is to prepare for an easy death by cholera, or fever, or what- 
ever else providence may send, and be thankful it is no worse. 

" It is almost a repetition of the dogma of necessity and predestina- 
tion, so familiar to our fathers. But there is another side to the ques- 
tion : free will is as applicable to the physical as the moral man. 

" We have only to open our eyes to the demonstrations of these lat- 
ter days to be assured that immunity from some of the most destruc- 
tive diseases is within our power — not, perhaps, within our individual 
power, but that they are capable of control, limitation, extinction even, 
by associated eflfort. 

" Such demonstrations as those to v.'hich we have referred were not 
possible until the system of registration of population and of mortal 
diseases became a part of the established law of civilized communities. 
Political economists and statesmen had seen the waste of life, and 
philanthropists had seen the suffering ; but, in the absence of vital 
statistics, no one could prove what many intelligent minds perceived. 

"At the present day, v/e stand face to face with facts of the deepest 
interest, showing the comparative duration of life in different commu- 
nities, the causes of deaths, the influences of soil, of climate, of race, of 
inheritance, of occupation, of contagion, of putridity." 

VITAL STATISTICS. 

At a glance, we are able to comprehend that all this contemplates a 
most thorough registration of vital statistics, and, in order to fully in- 
vestigate the cause and exercise due care in preventing the develop- 
ment and spread of disease, we need municipal regulations that will 
ensure prompt and accurate returns. In support of the question of 



116 

preventive medicine or public hygiene, we know it to be a fact that 
in England, where the system of collating and publishing the returns 
of vital statistics has attained a perfection second to none other, many 
towns have, by thorough, persistent, and united action in furnishing 
for the inhabitants pure water, sewers for the streets, and obliging 
every property-holder to properly and efficiently drain his premises, 
and all to live above ground in uncrowded apartments, been able to 
reduce their death rate from 38 to 20 per thousand. 

Latham, in a work on sanitary engineering, gives a tabulated state- 
ment of the health of different localities, before and after the construc- 
tion of sewers, from which he was able to show that the mortality from 
all diseases was lessened from 30 to 32 per cent. ; while the saving of 
life from typhoid fever Avas 75 per cent. ; from consumption, 30 per 
cent., — and this in large towns and cities. 

We all have some idea of the destruction of human life in times of 
war; but statistics prove that England, in twenty-two years of contin- 
uous war, lost 79,700 men, while in one year of cholera lIi,Ii,JOO persons 
died. 

Theoretically, a thorough system of drainage should be constructed 
prior to the introduction of an increased water supply; but, practically, 
it seldom receives attention until the superabundance of water forces 
upon the people the disagreeable fact that the soil, that otherwise would 
be comparatively dry, has become saturated, and thus has no further 
power to oxidize the waste material hitherto made innoxious by com- 
ing in contact with the earth. 

With our excellent water supply the necessity of public drains be- 
comes imperative, if we would escape the liability to serious epidemics; 
for, with this increase of water, the area of pollution from each cess- 
pool becomes extended, the soil becoming saturated and unable longer 
to retain the mephitic gases, and they become mixed with the air we 
breathe. 

Thus two of the elementary principles of life become contaminated; 
and the Avell are made sick and the sick made worse, because effete and 
waste substances cannot be carried away before decomposition takes 
place. 

It matters not whether the vehicle that conveys the germs of disease 
into our bodies be drinking-water made foul by human excrement, sink- 
drains, or soiled clothing; or air made foul in inclosed places, by drains 
or decaying animal or vegetable matter; or in open places by pigsties, 
stagnant water, or accumulations of filth of any sort: the one thing 
present in all these circumstances is decomposition. Therefore, in the 
construction of our system of sewers, one great object should be to re- 
move from our midst the sewage with all possible dispatch. This is 



117 

only accomplished iu minimum grades by constructing smiiU sewers, or 
of the smallest diameter actually necessary to convey the possible sew- 
age of the territory to be drained. The nearer full a sewer pipe may 
be, the greater its velocity and the less danger to its becoming filled 
with sand, or its contents becoming putrid in its course. 

Sewers, like all public works, are intended for the public good, in 
removing waste material, and thus preventing it from becoming a nui- 
sance and source of disease. This being the object, every property- 
holder should be required to use it for that purpose, instead of sinking 
cess-pools that sooner or later return into the dwellings which they 
drain a new product, born of decomposition, and growing and festering 
with each new victim that disease lays its hand upon. 

Too often the "little ones of our day and generation," by being sen- 
sitive to impressions that stronger bodies might resist, indicate the ter- 
rible danger to which we are exposed, by being the first to get ill, as 
surely as does the barometer foretell the storm that is approaching. 

During the past season there has been but very little of typhoid fever 
among the strong and robust; but it has been almost totally confined 
to children under twelve years of age, — so mucli so that it has been the 
remark with some of our physicians, that they have seen typhoid fever 
in the child this year for the first time. I have not learned of a case of 
typhoid fever iu any dwelling being drained into our new sewers and 
using Lond Pond water. It may have occurred, as I have not had re- 
turns from all the physicians to v/hom I addressed circulars on this 
point. 

Although it is only a small portion of our city (hat has the new sys- 
tem of sewers, still enough has been constructed, and the results are so 
much commended, that you should be encouraged to proceed with the 
great work as fast as circumstances will permit; and allow me to add, 
that I fully believe our citizens are watching your action and appropria- 
tion for another year with great interest, and, like true public-spirited 
men, expect you will push on this public sanitary work as much in the 
year to come as it has been advanced during the year past. 

I submit to you it should be borne in mind that, in the construction 
of our sewers, the object will only have been partially accomplished, 
unless cognizance by the proper authorities is taken of the manner in 
which house drains are connected with street mains. It is customary 
in laying sewers to insert branch pipes of proper size, for the purpose 
of allowing private drains to enter without disturbing the street pipe; 
but, in order to meet the expectations of those most interested, all the 
drains, whether public or private, should be inspected with much care, 
and the connections and plumbing should always be done to the accept- 
ance of a competent supervisor. 



118 

The majority of people heave never taken the trouble to inform them- 
selves of what is necessary to protect themselves and families from the 
dangers of a public sewer, and are only too anxious to be able to use it, 
without a thought of its being a subterranean conduit to every house 
in the section, thereby rendering it a passage-way for gas or dis- 
ease. Now, unless these pipes are securely connected and properly 
guarded, they v/ill be found a curse instead of a blessing. No connection 
should he allowed, ivhether of cellar, sink, or closet-drain, ivltJioui being 
properly trapped^ and the pipe should always he as-good and well put to- 
gether as the street main. 

It would be but poor return for the expense of street mains to have 
property-holders make connections with loose board drains, and untrap- 
ped sink-pipes, thus in a very short time completely destroying the san- 
itary influence they are intended to have upon the health of those resid- 
ing on the streets they are to drain. 

A single leaky, misconstructed soil-pipe would, in case of an epidemic 
in that house, be in danger of transmitting its influence through the 
whole line. The question at once arises. What shall we do to protect 
our houses from the possible dangers of our neighbors? 

First. Let the superintendent of sewers see that cdl persons connect 
with the main in a secure and substantial manner, and not use any 
material that does not meet with his approbation. 

Second. Not only securely trap all your drains, but ventilate your 
pipes by connecting them securely with the flue of a chimney that has 
no opening in the house, or carry the soil-pipe direct to the top of the 
house, entering it with trapped sink and closet pipes on the side, when 
. it at once becomes self-ventilating, and there cannot be any pressure 
on the water-traps. 

Without ventilation there are but few houses, especially on high 
ground, but that would, at times, be in danger; for, as soon as the 
water in the trap becomes saturated with gas, it will be set free from 
the surface, and contaminate the rooms in proportion to the time the 
water in the trap remains unchanged. 

It would seem unnecessary to call attention to the fact that sewer 
gas may escape into our rooms in dangerous quantities, were it not 
that this poisonous gas is known chiefly by its effects; that its odor is 
rarely a marked one; — and danger is believed to lurk, not so much in 
those foul stenches that appeal to our senses, as in the odorless, mawk- 
ish exhalations that announce themselves first by headache and debility. 

I would only suggest, in conclusion, that physicians generally con- 
cede, and the returns of deaths confirm the opinion, that a considerable 
portion of Ward Six is in need of thorough, systematic drainage, as 



119 

well as some portions of Ward Four, especially a section bordering the 
old cemetery, and including the lot of the Walker school. 

There is a section west and north of the old cemetery, that, at certain 
seasons of the year, collects large quantities of water that only escapes 
by evaporation and percolation, thereby saturating the soil for consid- 
erable extent, rendering other sections damp that otherwise would be 
dry. 

The rapid increase of population in Ward One will ere long demand 
your attention for a water supply and for a sewerage system, for they 
are wholly dependent upon wells for water; and nothing worthy of 
the name of a sewer has yet been constructed. 

It is a well known fact, that, in closely settled communities deriving 
their water supply from wells situated near dwellings, the earth soon 
becomes contaminated from the waste matters accumulating about the 
premises; and it is only a matter of time before sickness becomes prev- 
alent, fatal epidemics appear, and the expense attending one such visit- 
ation often would have placed the whole section under a system of 
drainage that would have prevented all zymotic disease in the locality. 

Gentlemen, I suggest these facts and reflections for your considera- 
tion, and through you to the people of this city, in the sincere hope 
that they will tend to awaken in the minds of our citizens a desire to 
investigate for themselves the best manner of securing a return, for 
each and every family, on the financial investment we have made in a 
supply of pure water and system of drainage. 

GEORGE A. CUMMINGS, 
JOHN CONNELL, 

G. P. CONN, 

February 18, 1876. 




120 



* APPROPRIATIONS 1875. 



Paupers, 

Fire department, 

Incidentals, 

Roads and bridges, 

Committee services, 

Police and watch, 

Printing and stationery, 

Professional services. 

Salaries, 

Interest on city debt, 

Bonds due, 

Library, 

Central fire station, 

State tax. 

County tax, 

Schools, 

Highways, 

Sewers, 

Lighting streets. 

Water-works, 

School-house taxes, 

City farm, 



Deduct amount received from state, 

Amount added by the assessors. 
Amount raised by taxation, 



$2,400.00 
10,000.00 

7,500.00 

11,000.00 

900.00 

3,500.00 
800.00 
400.00 

5,500.00 
19,500.00 

9,500.00 
500.00 
20,000.00 
19,152.00 
17,112.00 
28,308.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 

2,800.00 
13,500.00 

9,530.00 

2,000.00 

$203,902.00 
34,810.22 

169,091.78 
6,545.98 

$175,637.76 



* Accidentally omitted from page 50. 



INDEX. 



Page 

Appropriations for 1875 120 

Appraisal of real estate 55 

Available assets 52 

Central fire station 47, 72 

County tax ^ 

City paupers 9. 68 

County paupers 11, 69 

Committee service 24 

City officers 3 

City property 49 

City debt 52 

Claims outstanding 52 

City farm report 48, 62 

Cemetery committees 19, 79, 81 

Dog tax 27 

Expenditures 8 

Finance committee report 6 

Fire department 13, 93 

Funded debt 50 

Floating debt 52 

Highways and bridges 31 

Highway districts 32 

Incidentals 16 

Land damages 16 

Liquor agents 86, 87 

Marshal 90, 92 

Municipal regulations 2 

Police and watch 24 

Professional services 27 

Printing and stationery 28 

Public library 28, 83 

Parsonage fund 28 

Precinct 28 

Physician Ill 

Poor, overseer of, report 69 

Police justice 89 

Keceipts 6 

Roads and bridges 20 

State tax 9 

Schools 25 

School-house taxes 47 

Salaries 26 

Special appropriations 47 

Sewers 29, 76 

Solicitor 88 

Trust funds 53 

Valuations 54 

Water commissioner's report 56 

Water-works, financial statement 61 

Watering the streets 108 

Wattanummon bridge 28