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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"




NEW HAMPSH, 
STATE LIBRARY 



THE TWENTY-FOURTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

f{edeicpt$ kqd I^xpeqditufe^ 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD, 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

FEBRUARY 1, 1877, 

Together with other ^nnual Reports and Papers 
Relating to the ^lffairs of the City. 




CONCORD, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY THE REPUBLICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION. 
1877. 



35*07 

C74 

187/ 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 



City Clerk's Office, ) 
City of Concord, Feb. 1, 1877. > 

Toperso7is having claims against the city: 

All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, or aid to city- 
paupers, should be particular to take the name of the person ordering 
such service, material, or aid, and should know that the person is duly 
authorized to contract said liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or delivered on city 
pauper account, except on the written order of the Overseer of the 
Poor, and for no longer time than until his successor shall have been 
appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate cqpies will be required of all bills payable by the city, 
furnished on county pauper account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person authorizing 
the charge; and unless this is done, no action can be had upon the bill 
by the committee on accounts, and no order will be given for its 
payment. 

When bills are certified to as above, and left with the city clerk 
before twelve o'clock of the day of meeting of the Committee on Ac- 
counts, they will be audited by them, and, if approved, be 'ready for 
payment on the Wednesday following. 

Meetings of the committee are held on the Thursday next preceding 
the last Saturday of each month, at two o'clock p. at., which will oc- 
cur the present year, Feb. 22, March 24, April 26, May 24, June 28, 
July 26, August 23, Sept. 27, Oct. 25, Nov. 22, Dec. 27, Jan. 24, 
1878, Feb. 21. 

C. F. STEWART, City Clerk. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 

CONCORD, N. H., 1876-7. 



Ward 


1. 


IC 


'2. 


(C 


3. 


H 


4. 


« 


5. 


(( 


G. 


« 


7. 



MAYOR, 

GEO. A. PILLSJ3URT. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

John Whittaker. 
John G. Tallant. 
Andrew J. Holmes. 
Samuel W. Shattuck. 
George A. Cummings. 
Byron G. Merrill. 
Isaac N. Abbott. 

Charles F. Stewart, City Clerk. 

COMMON COUNCILMEN. 

Henry Churchill, President. 

Ward 1. Andrew P. Bennett, Frank G. Chandler. 

« 2. Elbridge Emery, John T. Tenney. 

" 3. Charles H. Merrill, Benjamin T. Putney. 

» 4. George H. Hill, John C. Thorn. 

" 5. George A. Foster, George F. Underbill. 

" 6. Calvin C. Webster, Lewis B. Hoit. 

" 7. Henry Churchill, William Stevenson. 

Lewis L. Mower, Cleric. 



( 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance — The Mayor, Alderman Abbott; Councilrnen 
Hill and Underbill. 

On Accounts and Claims — Alderman Cummings; Council- 
men Webster and Thorn. 

On Lands and Buildings — Alderman Whittaker; Council- 
men Thorn and Tenney. 

On Public Instruction — Alderman Abbott; Councilrnen 
Bennett and Putney. 

On Streets and Commons — Alderman Holmes ; Councilrnen 
Emery and Chandler. 

On Roads and Bridges — Alderman Shattuck; Councilrnen 
Foster and Emery. 

On Fire Bepartment — Alderman Merrill ; Councilrnen Stev- 
enson and Underhill. 

On Lighting Streets — Alderman Shattuck; Councilrnen 
Webster and Hoit. 

On City Farm — Alderman Cummings ; Councilrnen Steven- 
son and Merrill. 

On Cemeteries — Alderman Tallant ; Councilrnen Foster and 
Hill. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Elections and Returns — Alderman Abbott. 

On Engrossed Ordinances — Alderman Tallant. 

On Bills on Second Beading — Alderman Whittaker. 

On Police and Licenses — The Mayor and Alderman Shat- 
tuck. 

On Sewers and Brains — Mayor Pillsbury; Aldermen Cum- 
mings and Merrill. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Elections and Returns — Councilrnen Bennett, Webster, 
and Emery. 

On Bills on Second Reading — Councilrnen Stevenson, Putney, 
and Hill. 

On Engrossed Ordinances — Councilrnen Foster, Chandler, 
and Hoit. 

CITY OFFICERS. 

City Clerk— C. F. Stewart. Office in City Hall building, 
south entrance ; house, 267 Main street. 

City Treasurer — Samuel C. Eastman. Office, Rumford block, 
Main street, up stairs. 

City Solicitor — Charles P. Sanborn. Office, Sanborn's block, 
corner Main and Capitol streets, up stairs. 



City Marshal — John Conncll. Office, corner Main and War- 
ren streets, up stairs. 

Assistant marshal — John Chadwick, Fisherville. 

City Physician — Granville P. Conn. House, Main street, 
opposite Montgomery street. 

Assistant City Physician — Win. II. Ilosmer, Fisherville. 

Collector of Taxes — Charles T. Ilnntoon. Office, Brown's 
block, Warren street, up stairs. 

Police Justice — Sylvester Dana. y 

Special Police Justice — A. B. Thompson. 

Clerk of Police Court— R. P. S tan i els. 

Hoard of Education Union School District — Elisha Adams, 
P. Brain aid Cogswell, Henry J. Crippen, Oliver Pillsbury, 
Charles P. Sanborn, Warren Clark, D. C. Allen. 

Overseer of the Poor for Wards 3, 4, '5, 6, and 7 — C. F. 
Stewart. 

Health Officers — John Connell, Dr. G. P. Conn, and Alderman 
Cummings. 

Night Watch — James E. Rand, Charles H. Jones. 

Messenger — R. P. Sanborn. 

Assessors — Cyrus Runnells, John B. Sanborn, Timothy Carter, 
Charles Woodman, Curtis White, George S. Dennett, Andrew 
S. Smith. 

Superintending School Committee for Wards 1, #, 3, and 7 — 
Rev. A. Burnham, Abiel Rolfe, William W. Flint. 

Trustees of the Public Library — Ward 1, Rev. A. W. Fiske ; 
Ward 2, Joseph T. dough ; Ward 3, Rev. J. W. Colwell ; Ward 
4, Rev. F. D. Ayer; Ward 5, George E. Jenks; Ward 6, John 
L. Stanley ; Ward 7, Amos Blanchard ; Librarian, F. S. Craw- 
ford. 

Hoard of Water Commissioners — Benjamin A. Kimball, 
term expires March 31, 1878; John M. Hill, term expires March 
31, 1878; Samuel S. Kimball, term expires March 31, 1879; 
Luther P. Durgin, term expires March 31, 1879; John S. Russ, 
term expires March 31, 1877; Abel B. Holt, term expires March 
31, 1877; George A. Pillsbnry, ex-officio. President, Benjamin 
A. Kimball; Clerk, John M. Hill; Superintendent, V. C. Hast- 
ings. Office, White's Block. 

Superintendent of Pepairs of Highways and Pridges — Geo. 
A. Pillsbury. 

Old and Plossom Hill Cemetery Committee — Charles C. 
Lund, Charles Woodman, James IT. Chase. 

Hast Concord Cemetery Committee — John T. Batchelder, 
William A. Bean, and Joseph E. Plummer. 

Fisherville Woodlaicn Cemetery Committee — Charles C. Bean, 
John G. Warren, John A. Coburn. 



6 

West Concord Cemetery Committee — Simeon Abbott, Chan- 
dler Eastman, Timothy Carter. 

Engineers of the Fire Department — Chief Engineer, James 
1ST. Lauder; Assistant Engineers, N. IT. Haskell, Daniel B. 
Newhall, C. M. Lang, Joseph S. Merrill, William D. Ladd, 
Moses H. Bean, Cyrus R. Robinson, Wyman W. Holden. 

Steward of Central Fire Station — Eben F. Richardson. 

Superintendent of Poor Farm — Lucius L. Farwell. 

Police Officers — John Connell, Charles H. Jones, James E. 
Rand, Jacob E. Hutchins, Harrison Partridge, James M. Jones, 
Charles W. Davis, John Chadwick. 

Undertakers — For Old and Blossom Hill Cemeteries, Charles 
Crow; Ward 1, Fisherville, John A. Coburn ; Ward 2, East 
Concord, George W. Moody ; Ward 3, West Concord, Simeon 
Partridge ; MiiivihV, William H. Currier ; Horse Hill Cemetery, 
George Abbott. 



REPORT 



co]noi:itte:e on finance, 

FEBRUARY i, 1877. 

The Joint Standing Committee on Finance respectfully 
submit their annual report of the receipts and expenditures 
of the financial department of the city government for the 
year ending January 31, 1877. 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand February 1, 1876, $3,415.60 

Win. H. Allison, collector, taxes 1874, 1,695.00 

" " " 1875, 30,250.00 

Interest on taxes, . 1874, 285.00 

1875, 500.00 
C. T. Huntoon, collector, taxes 1876, ' 134,000.00 
Borrowed of sundry individuals, 52,200.00 

County of Merrimack paupers, 2,801.25 

State of New Hampshire Savings Bank 

tax, 14,473.59 

State of New Hampshire, Railroad tax, 16,632.56 
" " Literary fund, 1,132.20 

" " Insurance tax, 1.87 

Interest on Water-works bonds, 120.00 

Charles Woodman, incidentals, 251.77 

County of Merrimack, 15.77 

Geo. A. Pillsbury, Fire Department, 

horse sold, 125.00 

Geo. A. Pillsbury, land sold, 100.00 



8 



H. Partridge, city farm, $18.65 

County of Merrimack, city farm, 471.32 

Good Will Hose Co., Fire Department, 15.50 

J. E. Clifford, Liquor Agency, 50.00 

C. F. Stewart, « 8.00 
Geo. A. Pillsbury, « 146.33 

D. A. Macurdy, city pauper, 5.00 
C. F. Stewart, " 87.00 
C. H. Amsden, " 2.00 
A. Coleman, " 34.86 
Town of Weare, " 137.00 
Ruel West, « 3.50 
$5,600 Precinct notes, and interest, 5,620.95 
James E. Rand, licenses, 115.00 
Crowley .& Quinn, stone quarries, 71.89 
Asa H. Morrill, bridge lumber, 30.00 
Sewer notes, . 40,000.00 

" premium on same, 2,480.00 

" interest on same, 698.07 

Sylvester Dana, Police Justice, 895.27 

State of N. H., sewer on Capitol street, 210.80 

Horace Call, dog tax, 2.00 

Geo. A. Pillsbury, roads and bridges, 561.50 

C. T. Huntoon, " 230.48 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, sales, 2,028.65 

Geo. A. Pillsbury, sewers and drains, 43.71 
H. Ordway and others, interest on note, 12.00 
'Geo. A. Pillsbury, stone sold, incidentals, 2.00 



$311,981.69 



EXPENDITURES. 

Printing and stationery, $1,059.57 

Precinct, 14,489.48 

County tax, 16,344.22 

School-house taxes, 9,228.34 

Notes paid, 56,200.00 

Sewers and drains, 53,928.06 

Salaries, 5,105.00 

Fire department, 8,899.36 

Police and watch, 4,648.18 

Roads and bridges, 20,479.00 

Bonds paid, 12,500.00 



Professional services, $215.00 

City farm, 2,621.52 

Fire station, 3,979.28 

County paupers, 2,586.05 

City paupers, 2,118.74 

Public library, 1,331.67 

Highway districts, 4,885.35 
Superintendent of repairs of highways 

and bridges, 12,414.11 

Schools, ' 28,917.49 

State tax, 19,152.00 

Committee service, 798.00 

Interest, 14,830.87 

Dog tax, 89.00 

Incidentals, 4,909.33 

Precinct notes paid, 5,900.00 

Cemeteries, 2,215.40 



$309,840.02 
Balance cash on hand, 2,141.67 



$B11,981.69 



Concord, Feb. 1, 1877. 
We hereby certify that we have examined the books of the 
city treasurer, and those of the city clerk, and find that all 
the payments therein recorded are properly authenticated by 
appropriate vouchers, the several items correctly cast, and 
the cash balance in the hands of the treasurer is $2,141.67. 

GEO. A. PILLSBURY, ^ Committee 
ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 1 
GEO. H. HILL, f on 

GEO. F. UNDERHILL, J Finance. 



10 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 

OF THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR THE YEAR END- 
ING FEBRUARY 1, 1877. 



State tax, paid State Treasurer, $19,152.00 

County tax, paid County Treasurer, 16,344.22 

PAUPER ACCOUNT. 

Unexpended balance, 1875, $1,637.52 

Appropriation, 1876, 2,500.00 

Received of Merrimack county, for sup- 
port of paupers, 1875, 2,801.25 

Received of D. A. Macurdy, money 

refunded, 5.00 

Received of C. F. Stewart, sundry per- 



sons, 


76.00 




Received of C. H. Amsden, 


2.00 




" Anthony Coleman, 


34.86 




" Ruel West, 


3.50 




" Town of Weare for support 






of Charles H. Johnson, 


137.00 




Received of Dr. Crosby, money re- 






funded, 


11.00 


$7,208.13 






Transferred to Supt. Repairs Highways 






and Bridges, 




2,000.00 




$5,208.13 


CITY PAUPERS. 






Paid as follows: 






Timothy Eastman, 


$19.50 




John Connell, 


28.80 




J. W. Edgerly, 


15.00 




Martha M. Smith, 


10.00 




Timothy E. Hoit, 


19.50 




Batchelder & Co., 


5.00 




George W. Corey, 


1.00 





11 



John Cliadwick, 


$3.75 


City water-works, 


3.00 


State Reform School, 


52.00 


John Harrington, 


34.05 


N. H. Asylum for the Insane, 


228.66 


Lyman Merrill, 


31.00 


Ann M. Parker, 


4.00 


City water-works, 


3.00 


John C. Edgerly, 


10.00 


Edward Hodgman, 


2.74 


George B. Whittredge, 


5.00 


John Chadwick, 


3.00 


Dr. A. H. Crosby, 


11.00 


C. C. Webster, 


10.00 


George S. Locke & Co., 5 bills, 


17.50 


John Harrington, 


36.78 


N. H. Asylum for Insane, 


185.19 


State Reform School, 


34.86 


Daniel S. Webster, 


3.50 


Dr. G. P. Conn, 


10.00 


D. A. Macurdy, 


3.00 


James Presby for J. S. Burke, 


75.00 


Fred Bnrnham, " " 


75.00 


W. S. Blanchard, " " 


42.00 


Henry Churchill, " " 


1.92 


Dr. G. P. Conn,' " " 


69.00 


John Chadwick, 


5.00 


Lucy Hutcliins, for, Everett Hutchins, 


10.00 


John Harrington, 


34.63 


William Williamson, 


10.00 


John Chadwick, 


9.25 


City water-works, 


6.00 


N. H. Asylum for Insane, 


145.44 


Timothy E. Hoit, 


19.50 


State Reform School, 


26.00 


John Cliadwick, 


2.25 


Lyman Merrill, 


60.00 


Dr. J. H. Gallinger, 


14.00 


C. C. Webster & Co., 


23.00 


J. W. Edgerly, 


10.00 


H. F. Campbell, ten cords wood, 


55.00 


Benjamin Thompson, 


10.00 


John Harrington, bill 1875, 


29.98 



12 



Dr. G. P. Conn, bill 1875, 

Timothy E. Hoit, 

Albert Leavens, rent, 

John Chadwick, 

Mary E. Drake, 

Walter Blanchard, groce ies, 

H. F Campbell, wood, 

Timothy Dorety, 

George S. Locke & Co., 

John H. Hill, 

Underbill & Kittredge, 

Charles E. Ballard, 

J. W. Edgerly, 

C. Thorn & Son, 
Timothy E. Hoit, 

N. H. Asylum for Insane, 
Dr. G. P. Conn, 
John Chadwick, 
John Harrington, 
Woodworth, Dodge & Co., 
Eastman & Fitch, 
Currier & Larkin, 
State Reform School, 
Lyman Merrill, 

D. A. Macurdy, 
Carter Brothers, 
J. Frank Hoit, 



$2.00 

19.50 

30.00 

5.74 

3.00 

62.14 

52.50 

10.00 

3.50 

3.40 

1.65 

2.00 

10.00 

2.00 

19.50 

188.03 

14.50 

1.95 

37.38 

10.00 

22.81 

26.00 

26.00 

18.00 

6.00 

5.34 

7.00 



COUNTY PAUPERS. 



Paid as follows: 
Josephine Lor, 
William C. Powell, 
L. W. Sargent, 
Charles Crow, 
Eastman & Shepard, 
Susan Edmunds, 
William Marsh, 
J. W. Edgerly, 
W. S. Baker, 
Concord Railroad fare, 



EXPENDITURES. 



$6.00 

9.00 

2.10 

13.00 

70.28 

20.00 

6.00 

5.00 

21.00 

2.75 



$2,113.74 



13 

Eastman & Shepard, $39.28 

John C. Linehan, 63.00 

Brown & Foot, 40.00 

David Abbott, 1.00 

Jeremiah Smith, 10.00 

Polly Davis, 9.00 

Charles Dudley, 24.00 

A. C. Carter, 18.00 

Priscilla Walker, 2.00 

Sarah E. Hamilton, 12.00 

Nancy Dorety, 12.00 

City water-works, 3.00 

A P. Bennett, 1.75 

H. H. Aldrich, 2.00 

John Whittaker, 5.50 

William Powell, 13.00 

Brown & Foote, 45.00 

John C. Linehan, 15.00 

Concord Railroad, 2.00 

Eli Jacob, Jr., 4.00 

Mrs. II. M. Fletcher, 19.50 

Sarah P. Lamprey, 26.00 

William H. Allen, 3.25 

Moses D. French, 4.00 

John C. Edgerly, 10.00 

C. C. Webster, six bills, 27.00 

Win. L. Buswell, 5.62 

H. C. Sturtevant, 12.00 

C. P. Virgin, 32.00 

John Whittaker, 29.04 

John C. Linehan, 62.50 

Mrs. Charles Dudley, 24.00 

Clara J. Dolan, 12.00 

Charles E. Ballard & Co., 33.00 

Northern Railroad, 2.75 

Sarah E. Hamilton, 12.00 

Gardner K. Knowles, 65.00 

Underbill & Kittredge, 1.00 

Horace A. Brown, 19.50 

C. C. Webster, eight bills, 31.00 

Eastman & Fitch, 17.90 

Brown & Foot, 44.00 

C. Thorn & Son, 24.00 



14 



G. S. Locke & Co., $17.00 

Nancy Dorety, 12.00 

"William C. Powell, 13.00 

J. W. Edgerly & Co., 23.00 

Sarah P. Lamprey, 38.00 

A. C. Carter, 13.00 

Daniel S. Webster, 7.00 

Levi Thompson, . 15.00 

Dr. G. P. Conn, 110.00 

D. A. Macnrdy, 19.98 
Concord Railroad, 3.00 
M. E. Clough, wood, 1.87 
Charles Crow, 20.00 
Eastman & Shepard, 43.71 
John S. Fiske, 31.00 
John Whittaker, 21.00 
Sarah E. Hamilton, 8.00 
Mrs. Charles Dudley, 26.00 

E. D. Clough & Co., 5.00 
Ann Holland, 23.00 
City water-works, 3.00 
Dr. C. C. Topliff, 30.00 
Nancy Dorety, 12.00 
Mrs. H. M. Fletcher, 19.50 
A. C. Carter, 13.00 
W. P. Underbill & Co., ".90 
William C. Powell, 13.00 
John C. Linehan, 42.00 
C. C. Webster, 13.00 
J. W. Edgerly, 15.00 
James H. Eastman, 6.00 
Concord Railroad, 3.15 
George W. Weeks, 5.00 
Charles P. Virgin, 32.00 
Benj. A. Thompson & Co., 10.00 
M. E. Clough, 21.63 
Edward A. Clinton, 8.00 
Concord Railroad, 17.50 
Charles Dudley, 24.00 
John Whittaker, 10.00 
C. Thorn & Son, 26.75 
Concord Gns Light Co., 2.40 
Samuel C. Clifford, 10.00 



15 



Mrs. Patrick Desmond, 


$13.50 




A. C. Carter, 


13.00 




Geo. S. Locke & Co., 


11.50 




Benj. Thompson & Co., 


3.00 




Chas. E. Ballard, 


33.90 




J. W. Edgerly, 


13.00 




Chas. P. Virgin, 


32.00 




C. Thorn & Son, 


3.00 




Wm. C. Powell, 


13.00 




Gardner R. Knowles, 


65.00 




Dr. G. P. Conn, 


42.00 




Geo. B. Whittredge, 


18.00 




H. H. Amsden & Son, 


1.50 




John Whittaker, 


46.70 




C. C. Webster, 


60.00 




S. L. French, 


11.00 




Currier & Larkin, 


66.00 




John Connell, 


14.40 




Eastman & Shepard, 


35.14 




Woodworth, Dodge & Co., 


25.00 




Chas. Dudley, 


9.00 




Susan G. Wood, 


32.50 




Nancy Dorety, 


12.00 




Mrs. James H. Eastman, 


13.50 




Philip Welcome, 


5.00 




Mrs. L. D. Brown, 


13.00 




Mrs. H. M. Fletcher, 


19.50 




D. A Macurdy, 


13.00 




E. D. Clough & Co., 


3.00 




J. Frank Hoit, 


61.00 




Geo. B. Whittredge r 


17.00 




Franklin Evans, 


56.15 




John Whittaker, 


8.40 




H. Moore, Agent, 


4.00 




John Whittaker, 


7.25 




C. E. Ballard, 


5.00 




Ira Plummer, 


4.00 


$2,586.05 







$5,208.13 
Balance unexpended, $508.34 



16 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Balance of Appropriation 1875, unex- 
pended, $304.84 
Appropriation 1876, 9,000.00 
Good Will Hose Co., 15.50 
George A. Pillsbury, for horse sold, 125.00 

Paid as follows : 

W. P. Underbill, 1875, $ .65 

Thomas O. Farrington, 1875, 61.10 

William H. Allison, 1875, 8.00 

Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 1875, 105.00 

F. B. Underbill & Co., 1875, 1.65 

D. Arthur Brown & Co., 1875, repairs, 12.12 
Vogler Brothers, table, 10.00 
Nathan Abbott, 2.40 
Mrs. J. S. Bean, 1.80 

E. H. Bracook, furniture, 246.00 
James R. Hill, harness, &c, 1875, 55.95 
James E. McShane, shoeing horses, 21.75 
R. P. Sanborn, use of horse, 10.50 
Shattuck & Emerson, 35.00 
N. H. Haskell, painting and varnishing 

steamer and hose carriages, 225.00 

City water-works, 26.00 

M. H. Johnson, 15.92 

Concord Railroad, freight, 5.88 

John C. Ordway, hay, 18.80 

L. C. Stevenson, teamster, 156.50 

Charles Nixon, hay, 34.22 

Concord Gas Light Company, 122.96 

George E. Minot, washing, 4.00 

Samuel Eastman & Co., hose, 700.28 

W. C. Elkins & Co., repairs, 2.62 

George A. Wilder, teamster, 100.00 

Concord Railroad, freight on c a 3.60 

M. E. Clough, wood, 6 bills, 31.50 

Joseph Palmer & Co., repairs, 1.75 

F. H. Odiorne, coal, 23.00 



),444.84 



17 



PAY ROLLS TO AUGUST 1, 1876. 



Engineers, 

Kearsarge, 

Eagle Hose, No. 1, 

Alert Hose, No. 2, 

Good Will Hose, No. 



Hook and Ladder 
Pioneer, No. 1, 
Old Fort, No. 2, 
Cateract, No. 3, 



No. 1. 



$220.50 
280.50 
243.00 
243.00 
243.00 
397.48 
253.00 
123.00 
123.00 



George S. Minot, teamster, 

D. S. Webster, wood, 

George S. Minot, washing, 

K. J. Goodhue, washing, 

J. D. Sleeper, straw, 

L. W. Sargent, 

Concord Gas Light Co., 

H. J. Chandler, hay, 

S. N. Cate, hay, 

F. B. Underhill & Co., 

J. W. Hatch, hay, 

Abram Bachelder, hay, 

W. H. Garvin, hay, 

Samuel Eastman & Co., repairs, 

Hammond & Ayers, 

City water-works, 

Long & French, refreshments at annual 

parade, 
Underhill & Kittredge, supplies, 
John H. Morse, repairs, 
D. C. Allen & Co., repairs, 
John H. Morse, repairs gas pipe, 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, 
James E. McShane, horse-shoeing, 
Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 

John St. Clair, 

Benjamin French, 

Stevens & Duncklee, supplies 1875, 

M. H. Johnson and others, 

D. W. Long, repairs, 
Ordway & Ferrin, repairs, 

2 



2,126.48 

112.00 

15.00 

6.25 
12.50 
12.13 
23.70 
21.30 

8.75 
19.40 

2.00 
20.90 
11.60 
38.00 

3.50 

1.25 
26.00 

150.00 
55.31 
73.25 
27.62 

8.80 
16.29 
34.00 
165.00 
15.00 
11.25 
19.59 
21.16 

5.30 
11.08 



18 



Concord Gas Light Co., 




170.72 


George S. Young, 




2.45 


J. H. Lamprey, carrots, 




5.00 


T. J. Carpenter, 




.95 


J. P. Le^vitt, hay, 




27,05 


Rufus P. Virgin, straw, 




18.90 


Cyrus Marden, hay, 




9.23 


PAY ROLLS TO FEBRUARY 1, 


1877. 


Engineers, 


$220.50 




Kearsarge, 


280.50 




Eagle Hose, No. 1, 


243.00 




Alert Hose No. 2, 


243.00 




Good Will Hose, No. 3, 


243.00 




Hook and Ladder, No. 1, 


396.32 




Pioneer, No. 1, 


253.00 




Old Fort No. 2, 


123.00 




Cateract, No. 3, 


123.00 






$2,125.32 


L. A. Wright, teamster, 




242.31 


Eben F. Richardson, steward, 




450.00 


MISCELLANEOUS BILLS. 




Humphrey, Dodge & Co., 




$7.10 


James R. Hill & Co., 




4.50 


Stevens & Duncklee, 




8.81 


N. H. Dunbar, 




19.55 


Herman D. Webster, 




20.00 


Joel Weller, 




8.75 


Wyman W. Holden, 




3.55 


Charles H. Norton & Son, 




133.50 


A. & G. A. Foster, 




20.00 


Union Steam Mill, 




15.25 


L. A. Wright, 




13.00 


Woodworth, Dodge & Co., 




1.20 


John H. Morse, 




.20 


Underhill & Kittredge, 




11.80 


K. J. Goodhue, 




13.00 


Gust Walker, 




17.19 


Stevens & Duncklee, two bills, 




80.26 


Flanders, White & Houston, 




24.07 


Philip Church, 




1.25 



19 



D. Arthur Brown & Co., 
Mrs. J. S. Bean, 
Evans & Gale, 

L. A. Bunnell, 
Samuel Eastman & Co., 

E. H. Dixon, hay, 

Balance unexpended, 



$15.83 

8.50 

1.66 

8.20 

20.65 

15.00 



$8,899.36 
545.48 



,444.84 



INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Feb. 1, balance of appropriation 1875 

unexpended, $527.02 

Cash of county of Merrimack, 15.77 

Appropriation for 1876, 6,000.00 

Geo. A. Pillsbury, stone sold, 2.00 

Received for licenses, 115.00 



Paid as follows : 

C. P. Stewart, cash paid out, 
F. D. Batchelder, 

B. W. Sanborn & Co., books for poor 

children, 
Stanley & Ayer, care of clock, Board 

of Trade building, 
Concord Carriage Co., repairs, 
John H. Morse, repairs, 
John Kimball, horse hire, 
Union Steam Mill, 

D. A. Hill, repairs, 
Concord Railroad. 

E. B. Craddock, 
Dr. Geo. W. Cook, return births and deaths 

S. H. Wade, 

F. A. Stillings, 

E. E. Graves, 

M. W. Russell, 
Drs. Gage & Conn, 
Dr. S. H. Wade, 
Charles H. Norton, damage for defect 

in highway, 
D. E. Davis, " 



freight, 



$4.10 
6.75 

31.36 

54.00 

31.50 

17.40 

100.00 

10.59 

23.00 

6.60 

7.00 

i, 2.00 

6.50 

3.50 

1.50 

13.00 

12.50 

2.00 

15.00 
10.00 



1,659.79 



20 



J. S. Ordway, damage for defect in 

highway, $5.00 

F. H. Locke, " 200.00 
William Winslow, " 10.00 
Hawthorne & Greene, attorneys for Clarke 

& Cook, suits for damages, 150.00 
D. L. Guernsey, books for poor children, 18.13 

R. P. Sanborn, janitor, 51.35 

Vogler Brothers, table for hose house, 4.50 

Estate of W. H. Fisk, stationery, 1.40 

Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 21.50 

G. S. Locke & Co., 41.25 
J. S. Brown and others, 84.72 
H. A. & C. E. Stewart, 20.00 
City water-works, water, 10.00 
Franklin Low, rent of Rumford Hall, 29.00 
Geo. W. Abbott, rent of hall, ward 1, 20.00 
H. H. Aldrich, furniture for offices, 128.75 
D. Dudley & Co., 3.00 
John Kimball, for postage, &c, 5.52 
C. G. Pressy and others, referees, Frank 

Adams's claim for damages, 11.00 
Vogler Brothers, chairs for office, City 

Hall, 21.25 

Whitney & Mason, repairing sprinklers, 81.62 

R. P. Staniels, rent for collector's office, 50.00 

C. D. House, two Directories, 4.00 
Enos Blake, land damage, 1875, 193.00 
Sylvester Dana, " 20.00 
Arthur Fletcher," 5.00 

D. S. Webster, making Badger street, 141.00 
R. P. Staniels, insuring storehouse, 35.00 
A. J. Holmes, stone watering-trough, 

West Concord, 70.00 

Hammond & Ayers, sundries, 3.15 

Concord Gas Light Co., 161.60 

Public Library, sundry bills, 64.50 
Scott & Buswell, building fence, Beacon 

street, as per agreement with J. C. 

Pilsbury, 83.24 

Estate James Rounsefell, painting signs, 6.00 
Banfield & Forristall, fire-works 4th 

July, 425.00 



21 



A. W. Gale, expense putting up same, $5.00 
Geo. A. Pillsbury, sundry bills 4th 

July celebration, 493.27 

C. H. Amsden, 4th July bill, 4.50 
Stevens & Duncklee, old bill for putting 

furnace into City Hall, 211.16 

R. P. Sanborn, janitor, 54.32 

Humphrey, Dodge & Co., 1.15 

Samuel Blood, 2.75 
R. P. Staniels, balance rent collector's 

office, 13.88 
Thornton & Farnum, stone watering- 
trough, south end Main street, 80.00 
Connell & Savory, 9.43 
George F. Whittredge, rent hall for 

Ward 7, 27.00 

A. A. Moore, one half expense putting 
lightning rods City Hall building, 173.57 

Concord Gas Light Co., 40.80 
J. W. Bliss, repairs, 2.65 
Catherine Speed, gravel lot West Con- 
cord, 75.00 
Humphrey, Dodge & Co., .83 
W. C. Blkins, 2.60 
J. H. Morse, 1.10 
City water-works, 15.75 
Robert Hall, expense hearing before 
committee legislature in regard to 
school district No. 23, 15.00 
C. F. Stewart, 16.50 
R. P. Sanborn, janitor, 83.55 
Miller & Sanborn, 15.00 
Albert Fellows, damage, 125.00 
T. B. Tamblyn, water-trough, 15.00 
S. W. Morrill, foundation for fountain 

State House yard, 200.00 

R. P. Staniels, insurance, 30.00 
Isaac N. Abbott, repairs hearse-house, 

Millville, 14.00 

Geo. W. Abbott, rent of hall, Ward 1, 20.00 

Lewis M. Brown, lettering guide-boards, 5.00 

B. F. Gale, surveying roads and plans 

of same, 15.00 



22 



S. & S. C. Eastman, 


$63.75 


Andrew J. Holmes, stone posts for 




guide-board, bolts, &c, 


15.34 


A. & G. A. Foster, hacks &c, election 




day, 


38.00 


George H. Gale, bill, 1875, 


3.00 


Nahum Robinson, bill, 1875, 


18.87 


Dr. E. E. Graves, 


1.25 


G. S. Locke & Co., 


17.00 


Page & Norris, rent Mayor's office, 


29.00 


E. B. Hutchinson, 


2.00 


B. E. Badger, 


79.36 


Concord Gas Light Co., 


53.40 


C. F. Stewart, 


9.99 


R. P. Sanborn, janitor, 


47.67 


Lyman Jackman, insurance, 


15.00 


Gust Walker, 


20.00 


Dr. G. P. Conn, 


25.00 


D. L. Guernsey, for books, 


6.85 


E. C. Eastman, 


3.85 


C. H. Norton & Son, 


40.00 


B. W. Sanborn, stationery, <fcc, 


22.40 


R. P. Sanborn, janitor, 


23.75 


George W. Abbott, rent of hall, 


10.00 


William P. Ford & Co., repairs, 


5.70 


Eves & Munn, 


12.96 


S. C. Eastman, 


19.60 


J. L. Pickering, 


12.00 


Daniel A. Hill, 


7.00 




"hi 009 33 




tJPTjt'UL'»yt> 


Balance unexpended, 


1,750.46 



$6,659.79 
ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Unexpended balance of appropriation, 

1875, $262.00 

Appropriation, 1876, 12,000.00 

^Appropriation, extra, 1876, 8,000.00 

Received of Asa Morrill, bridge timber 

sold, 30.00 

Received of Geo. A. Pillsbury, water- 

ing streets, 561.50 

*This sum was appropriated for the purpose of putting catch basins on the line of 
sewers beiug laid in the precinct. 



23 



Received C. T. Huntoon, sidewalks, $230.48 

Received Geo. A. Pillsbury, stone sold, 2.00 

Paid as follows : 

Fuller & Pressy, stone, $6.20 

John A. Lewis, lighting lower bridge, 2G.00 

C. & J. C. Gage, lumber &c, 37.88 

Charles C. Lund, engineering, 66.00 

H. N. Farley & Co., 4.75 

Rufus Virgin, watering-trough, 3.00 

Mrs. Mary Pecker, watering-trough, 3.00 

J. E. Clifford, watering-trough, 3.00 

William Tuppcr, lighting Free bridge, 22.00 

R. K. Buswell, bill 1875, 13.35 

George F. Sanborn, 64.30 

C. C. Bean, 10.92 

E. Hodgeman, stone, 8.00 

M. W. Johnson, pay roll, 625.31 

Porter E. Blanchard, 949.70 

A.'J. Holmes, 1,228.12 

H. K. Farnum, bill 1875, 21.49 

H. E. Perkins, 14.30 

Thomas Dadmun, 7.50 

A. J. Holmes, 150.00 
H. H. Amsden & Son, 101.24 
C. H. Norton, stone, 25.00 
Bond & Carter, 250.25 
City water-works, 30.00 
Thompson Rowell & Co., 752.55 
Alvertus Evans, plank, 52.80 
Carroll Hutchins, engineering, 29.88 
Newell Sanborn, 5.00 
M. H. Johnson, pay-roll, 357.'00 
Rebecca Blanchard, stone, 43.75 
William Tapper, 30.00 
Concord Railroad, freight, 33.25 
Humphrey, Dodge & Co., hardware, 17.03 
George W. Lake, 111.33 
George F. Sanborn, 76.00 
James Eastman, stone-work, 338.28 

B. C. & M. Railroad, freight, 24.92 
John Hanrahan, 1.00 



$21,085.98 



24 



John Genty, $29.10 

D. S. Webster, 19.12 
Samuel J. Shaw, stone-work, Fisherville, 189.50 
Granite Railway Co., 15.00 
C. C. Bean, pay-roll, 334.30 
Thornton, Farnum & Co., 105.12 
J. F. Cotton & Co., cement, 52.38 
Ira Whitcher, lumber, 113.14 
Woodworth, Dodge & Co., cement, 97.00 

E. Hodgman, 3.50 
Fuller & Pressy, stone, 65.25 
Scott & Newman, repairs Horse Hill 

bridge, 181.60 
Alvertus Evans, plank for Horse Hill 

bridge, 129.62 

Daniel S. Webster, 200.20 

Samuel J. Shaw, stone-work, 31.75 

Robert Hall, work on roads, 96.25 
Connell & Savory, painting iron bridge, 

East Concord, 122.38 

John Whittaker, lumber, 7.09 
A. C. Holt, railing on road to East 

Concord, 69.55 

H. H. Amsden & Son, lumber, 59.22 

Smith & Derry, 13.63 

Elbridge Emery, posts for railing, 33.34 

Pat. Finn, work paving, 13.00 

J. P. Kempton, building culvert, 40.00 
M. H. Johnson, pay-roll, 2,199.08 

Evans & Gale, 19.38 

Charles C. Lund, engineering, 21.50 

Humphrey, Dodge & Co., 62.85 

A. J. Holmes, stone work, 206.90 t 
Levi Roby, laying stone, &c, 81.75 
Geo. F. Sanborn, 17.95 
City water-works, 30.00 
Abial Smart, drawing stone, 23.30 
Gust Walker, hardware, 67.52 
Woodworth, Dodge & Co., cement, 315.40 
H. W. Clapp, 3,185.00 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, watering-trough, 3.00 
E. G. Haynes, Akron pipe, 110.40 

B. W. Sanborn, cement pipe, 18.90 



25 



Thompson & Stratton, powder, 




$70.21 


Hiram Farnum, 




24.75 


Geo. Goodhue, Akron pipe, 




54.32 


D. S. Webster, drawing off stone, 


101.00 


Henry F. Campbell, building culvert, 


10.00 


M. H. Johnson, pay-roll, 




847.61 


Thomas Abbott, 




12.00 


W. K. Holt, lumber for bridge, 


Millville, 


, 76.82 


Thompson Rowell & Co., 




540.06 


Dutton Wood, repairing Sewell Falls 




bridge, 




219.05 


Samuel Holt, brick, 




1,040.85 


L. D. Bunnell, 




14.00 


C. & J. C. Gage, 




7.75 


Geo. A. Fillsbury, sundry bills 


for con- 




crete sidewalks, 




275.00 


Nathan Chandler, grade, 




13.36 


Elbridge Emery, lumber, 




5.60 


Gust Walker, 




14.97 


George Frye, 


* 


51.90 


E. Lamprey, 




21.10 


John D. Teel, 


, 


2.50 


John H. Morse, 




7.47 


Woodworth, Dodge & Co., 




298.92 


David 0. Smith & Co., 




3.50 


Zebulon Smith, 




3.00 


H. G. Belknap, 




7.70 


Abial Rolfe, 




5.83 


D. Arthur Brown & Co., 




12.03 


Mrs. C. W. Sargent, 




4.75 


Gust Walker, 




94.20 


S. D. Trussell, 




7.50 


Daniel Farnum, 




8.20 


Gust Walker, 




1.85 


C. H. Norton & Son, 




9.50 


Woodworth, Dodge & Co. 




1.20 


A. &. G. A. Foster, 




14.00 


B. G. Carter, 




157.08 


Stevens & Duncklee, 




15.43 


Jonathan M. Stewart, 




7.00 


Flanders, White & Houston, 




2.75 


City water-works, 




200.00 


J. Frank Hoit, 




2.26 



26 

Frank Evans, $2.88 
Wm. B. Stearns, 3.80 
¥m. P. Ford & Co., 13.71 
H. G. Belknap, 22.50 
Savage Bro's, 6.00 
Fisherville Precinct Committee, 38.82 
John Genty, 16.32 
T. Rowell & Co., 765.72 
Concord Carriage Co., 12.81 
John A. Lewis, 13.50 
3176 ft. 8-in. sewer pipe, 846.94 
672 " 12-in. " 50 cts., 336.00 
84 " 12-in. " 50 " 42.00 
246 " 6-in. " 20 " 49.20 
125 " 10-in. " 40 " 50.00 
12 « 12-in. branches, $1, 12.00 
2 6x8-in. branches, 1.06 
4 10-in. curves, 5.60 
Clough & Son, brick, East Concord, 28.40 
E. B. Hutchinson, patterns for catch- 
basins, 11.25 
Concord Railroad, freight on pipe from 

Manchester, 5.40 

-$20,479.00 

Balance unexpended, 606.68 

$21,085.98 

POLICE AND WATCH. 

Appropriated, 1876, $3,900.00 

Received of S. Dana, police justice, 895.27 



Paid as follows : 

S. Dana, salary, $600.00 

Ranlet & Prescott, 17.90 

S. W. Shattuck, 12.90 

Wm. T. Locke, 19.00 

John Connell, cash paid out, 224.36 

Rand & Jones, services one year, 1,600.06 
John Connell, salary as city marshal, 900.00 

Seth K. Jones, rent, 200.00 

Stevens & Duncklee, stoves, &c, 43.88 

George W. Corey, 6.20 



$4,795.27 



27 



H. F. Norris, clerk police court, 


$100.00 


Ranlet <fc Prescott, coal, 


71.70 


John Chadwick, salary and expenses as 




assistant marshal, 


447.94 


Concord Gas Light Co., 


75.80 


City water-works, 


6.00 


Hall B. Rand, 


14.00 


A. & G. A. Foster, horse hire, 


56.50 


A. H. Wiggin, 


4.25 


N. Bond, 


8.00 


Humphrey, Dodge & Co., 


2.25 


Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 


8*.87 


Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 


17.90 


James H. Davis, 


15.00 


J. L. Pickering, 


4.00 


Ordway & Ferrin, 


5.50 


Concord Gas Light Co., 


28.20 


John H. Morse, 


9.87 


Stevens & Duncklee, 


1.50 


R. P. Stanfels, clerk police court, 


86.10 


A. & G. A. Foster, horse hire, 


59.75 


Flanders, White & Houston, 


.75 




%A 618 IS 






Balance unexpended, 


147.09 



COMMITTEE SERVICE. 



Appropriation, 1876, 




Paid as follows : 




J. B. Curtis, 


$50.00 


A. C. Holt, 


78.00 


Geo. A. Cummings, 


50.00 


Chas. H. Amsden (two years cash paid 




out), 


50.00 


James L. Mason, 


50.00 


Isaac N. Abbott, 


50.00 


Andrew J. Holmes, 


50.00 


Rufus Cass, 


30.00 


Andrew P. Bennett, 


30.00 


Zebina C. Perkins, 


30.00 


Elbridge Emery, 


30.00 



^95.27 



$900.00 



28 



Lyman Sawyer, $30.00 

Charles H. Merrill, 80.00 

Charles W. Moore, 80.00 

George H. Hill, 30.00 

Moses B. Critchett, 30.00 

Geo. A. Foster, 30.00 

Alonzo Downing, 80.00 

Calvin C. Webster, 30.00 

William Stevenson, 80.00 

Henry Churchill, 30.00 



$798.00 
Balance unexpended, 102.00 



$900.00 



SCHOOLS. 

Appropriation, 1876, $18,500.00 

" Union district, addi- 

tional, 8,966.00 

" Dist. No. 3, additional, 175. 0a 

" dog tax, 800.00 



" literary j 


fund, 






1,132.20 


" interest 


on A. 


Walk 




legacy 








60.00 












«joq ao.9 on 




"™ VPmd*J .VOU • *JV/ 


Paid as follows : 












John M. Bean, Committee, Dist. No. 1, 


$195.32 


Joseph Knowles, 


u 




a 


2, 


170.32 


Harrison Partridge, 


C( 




a 


3, 


485.00 


Timothy Carter, 


« 




a 


4, 


133.32 


Jacob N. Flanders, 


(( 




a 


5, 


119.32 


John Jordan, 


a 




a 


6, 


128.32 


John E. Baker, 


a 




a 


7, 


125.00 


John Hargate, 


a 




a 


8, 


185.32 


P. B. Cogswell, 




Union Dist., ' 


24,150.96 


Samuel E. Clifford, 


a 


Dist. 


No, 


,12, 


527.00 


Hugh Tallant, 


iC 




a 


13, 


188.00 


John Buckland, 


a 




a 


14, 


134.32 


Charles D. Rowell, 


a 




a 


15, 


120.32 


Chas. E. Thompson, 


a 




a 


16, 


78.40 


Giles Wheeler, 


u 




a 


18, 


281.32 


George P. Meservey, 


a 




a 


20, 


1,554.32 


George G. Jenness, 


a 




u 


22 


181.32 



29 



F. W. Colby, Committee, Dist. No. 23, 


$94.45 




Andrew S. Smith, " " 24, 


65.16 


$28,917.49 






Balance unexpended, 




715.71 




$29,633.20 


SALARIES. 






Balance of appropriation, 1875, 


$187.50 




Appropriation, 1876, 


5,500.00 


$5,687.50 






Paid as follows : 






Charles P. Sanborn, solicitor, 1875, 


$100.00 




George A. Pillsbury, assessor, 1875, 


195.00 




Charles II. Norton, " " 


186.00 




Nathan Cbandler, " " 


186.00 




William H. Allison, copying for asses- 






sors, 1875, 


60.00 




L. L. Mower, clerk of common council, 


50.00 




H. J. Crippen, for Board of Education, 






Union District, 


225.00 




Abiel Rolfe, S. S. Committee, 


76.66 




Rev. A. Burnham, " 


56.67 




L. T. Flint, " 


56.67 




Abiel Rolfe, for District No. 20, 


27.00 




C. F. Stewart, overseer of poor, 


125.00 




" salary city clerk, 


800.00 




S. C. Eastman, city treasurer, 1875, 


400.00 




John Kimball, Mayor, balance salary, 






1875, 


250.00 




John Kimball, supt. roads and bridges, 


300.00 




Wm. H. Allison, collector of taxes, 


450.00 




Harrison Partridge, S. S. Committee, 






District 3, 


18.00 




Cyrus Runnells, assessor Ward 1, 


87.00 




John B. Sanborn, " " 2, 


90.00 




Timothy Carter, " " 3, 


54.00 




Charles Woodman, " " 4, 


99.00 




Curtis White, " " 5, 


195.00 




George S. Dennett, " " 6, 


177.00 




Andrew S. Smith, " " 7, 


96.00 




Geo. N. Dutton, ward clerl^, 


5.00 




John E. Frye, " 


5.00 





30 



Walter L. Lougee, ward clerk, 




$5.00 




A. L. Marden, " 






5.00 




Geo. W. Underbill, " 






5.00 




David A. Macurdy, " 






5.00 




Geo. B. Whittredge, " 






5.00 




Hazen Knowlton, selectman, Ward 1, 


5.00 




E. F. Sweat, 


u 


1, 


5.00 




D. Warren Fox, 


t< 


1, 


5.00 




A. H. C. Knowles, 


« 


2, 


5.00 




N. P. Richardson, 


it 


2, 


5.00 




E. R. Noyse, 


it 


2, 


5.00 




Abijah Hollis, 


u 


3, 


5.00 




Ira C. Phillips, 


(( 


3, 


5.00 




Charles L. Rowe, 


it 


3, 


5.00 




Charles H. Jones, 


a 


4, 


5.00 




N. H. Shattuck, 


u 


4, 


5.00 




Wm. H. Kenney, 


a 


4, 


5.00 




Aram B. Smith, 


a 


5, 


5.00 




Henry A. Mann, 


a 


5, 


5.00 




George S. Locke, 


a 


5, 


5.00 




George 0. Dickerman, 


u 


6, 


5.00 




David L. Neal, 


a 


6, 


5.00 




Charles E. Cnmmings, 


a 


6, 


5.00 




Samuel 13. Upton, 


a 


7, 


5.00 




Wm. W. Critchett, 


a 


7, 


5.00 




Jacob E. Hntchins, 


a 


7, 


5.00 




Henry A. Mann, 1875, 


(( 


5, 


5.00 




Chas. T. Huntoon, collector. 


i 




600.00 


$5,105.00 






Balance unexpended, 








582.50 




$5,687.50 


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. 




Appropriation, 1876, 






$400.00 




Unexpended balance, 1875, 






285.00 


$685.00 






Paid as follows : 










Sanborn & Clark, 






$200.00 




John Y. Mugridge, 






15.00 


$215.00 
470.00 


Balance unexpended, 









$685.00 



31 



DOG TAX. 



Paid Albert Stevens, 1875, $80.00 

John G. Tallant, 1876, 4.00 

Sylvester G. Hoit, 5.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Appropriation, 1876, $800.00 

" overdrawn, 259.57 



Paid: 




Edson C. Eastman, 


$9.00 


D. L. Guernsey, 


1.50 


C. C. Pearson & Co., 


66.00 


Republican Press Association, 


677.65 


Woodbury & Batchelder, 


47.25 


E. C. Bailey, 


59.75 


Morrill & Silsby, 


188.32 


B.'W. Sanborn & Co., 


10.10 


PUBLIC LIBRARY. 


Appropriation, 1876, 


$1,000.00 


" overdrawn, 


331.67 


Paid: 




F. S. Crawford, librarian, 


$1,000.00 


Isaac A. Hill, rent, 


250.00 


Stevens & Duncklee, repairs, 


14.37 


John H. Morse, repairs, 


21.45 


Connell & Savory, painting, 


45.85 



$89.00 



$1,059.57 



$1,059.57 



L,331.67 



.. L.331.67 
CEMETERIES— OLD AND BLOSSOM HILL. 

RECEIPTS. 

Received of J. W. Leighton and Geo. 

L. Gibson, $45.00 

George Prescott, 30.00 

Geo. W. Craig and C. W. Harrington, 45.00 



32 



A. M. Holt and G. N. Greeley, 
V. Atkins, 

Heirs of J. D. Kelley, 

Frank T. Bean, 

Moses B. Page, 

Charles H. Herbert, 

Henry 0. Glidden, 

George Myhofer, 

Hiram B. Tebbetts, 

David Fowler, 

Charles A. Dole, 

John S. Blanchard, 

Freeman Webster, 

L. A. Smith, 

George F. Whittredge, 

Joshua B. Merrill, 

Clara E. Palmer, 

William B. Durgin, 

Olive B. Pitman, 
Lyman R. Fellows, 
John H. Albin, 
William P. Ford, 
Dexter Fitts, 
Zelotes Stevens, 
John S. Thompson, 
Mary Woodmancy, 
N. B. Marston, 
William H. Allison, 
George W. Lawrence, 
Frank Coffin, 
E. H. Woodman, 
Calvin Thorn & Son, 
Charles Woodman, 



EXPENDITURES. 

Charles C. Lund, engineer, 
John McClintock, " 
Carroll Hutchins, " 
Gust Walker, hardware, 
Humphrey, Dodge & Co., hardware, 
Union steam mills, 



$45.00 
21.60 
45.00 
30.00 
45.00 
21.60 
27.00 
10.50 
123.00 
46.00 
45.00 
88.00 
95.00 
90.00 
91.00 
21.60 
3.00 
81.00 
93.00 
103.00 
90.00 
90.50 
54.00 
30.00 
56.25 
10.50 
32.40 
90.00 
111.50 
69.70 
67.50 
81.00 
251.77 



$2,280.42 



$105.74 

145.25 

6.76 

16.85 

10.60 

13.75 



33 

Charles Woodman and others, labor, $1,916.45 

' $2,215.40 

Balance of receipts over expenditures, 65.02 



,280.42 



CITY FARM. 

Appropriation, 1875, unexpended, $1,039.51 

Received of Harrison Partridge, 18.65 

county of Merrimack, 471.32 

for land sold, 100.00 

of Crowley & Quinn, stone 

quarries, 71.89 



$1,701.37 
Deficiency, 920.05 



$2,621.42 



Paid as follows : 

*L. L. Farwell, schedule bills, 1875, 1,361.74 

*L. L. Farwell, balance salary, 1875, 560.78 

J. L. T. Brown, for horse, 185.00 

Stephen Sewell, " 200.00 

L. L. Farwell, on account, 200.00 

Daniel Wyman, for cows, 114.00 



$2,621.42 



CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 

Balance of appropriation, 1875, unex- 
pended, $3,913.88 

Amount expended more then appro- 
priated, 65.40 

$3,979.28 

Paid as follows: 

Hutchins & Co., bill, $161.95 

John Kimball, building committee, 350.00 

James L. Mason, " 100.00 

Henry Churchill, " 50.00 

H. H. Amsden & Son, furniture, 60.00 

Stevens & Duncklee, fixtures, 237.14 

♦These bills, amounting to $1,922.52, have been paid on account of deficiency for 
1875. See report of Committee on City Farm last year. 



34 



D. C. Allen & Co., $12.70 

Union Steam Mills, three bills, 200.70 

Ordway & Ferrin, 127.97 

Mead & Mason, two bills, 962.57 

George Goodhue, 32.90 

John H. Flood, stone work, 360.40 

Hammond & Ayers, fixtures, . 72.00 

Geo. E. Minot, painting, 30.80 

M. H. Johnson, pay-roll, 145.50 
Charles E. Parker, architect (balance), 130.70 

Lowell Eastman, glass, 17.41 

Humphrey, Dodge & Co., hardware, 9.66 

Gust Walker, hardware, 51.22 

Northern Railroad, freight, 12.00 

Thompson, Rowell & Co., concreting, 570.50 

C. H. Martin & Co., paints and oils, 79.32 
Vogler Brothers, furniture, 36.90 

D. C. Allen & Co., 2.45 
Andrew Bunker, doors, &c, 79.90 
Samuel Holt, brick, 10.80 
H. H. Aldrich, furniture, 22.00 
Concord Railroad, freight, 5.88 
Stevens & Duncklee, fixtures, 45.41 



,979.28 



REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT OF REPAIRS OF HIGHWAYS 
AND BRIDGES.. 



To the City Council: 

The undersigned, superintendent of repairs of highways .and 
bridges, herewith respectfully presents a statement of receipts 
and expenditures in each highway district within the city, from 
February 1, 1876, to February 1, 1877— districts Nos. 9, 26, 27, 
28, .and 29 being one district, under the immediate supervision 
of the superintendent. The appropriation made for this .pur- 
pose in April last was ten thousand dollars. It was found that 
quite a sum had been expended in the months of February and 
March, 1876, in breaking roads caused by drifting snows; also, 
the months of December, 1876, and January, 1877, being 
unusually severe, more so than for many years past, it was 
found that quite a large sum had been necessary to keep the 
roads and streets in a suitable condition for public use. To 
provide for these expenditures, the city council, at their regular 
meeting in January last, appropriated the sum of $2,878.06 for 
highway districts Nos. 9, 26, 27, 28, and 29, and the sum of 
$2,121.94, to be divided among the remaining districts. 

GEO. A. PILLS BURY, SupX '• 

GEO. A. PILLSBURY, SUPT. DISTRICTS NUMBERS 

9, 26, 27, 28, and 29. 

Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $7,200.00 

" additional, Jan., 1877, 2,878.06 

amount transferred from city pauper acc't, 2,000.00 

amount overdrawn, 336.05 

$12,414.11 



36 



Cr. 
By amount expended from Feb. 1, 1876, to Feb. 1, 1877, as 
follows : 

M. H Johnson's men, as per pay-roll, 

Feb., 



March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

Sept., 

Nov., 

Dec., 

Jan., 



K. J. Goodhue, teamster, 

A. P. Noyes, 

S. D. Trussell, blacksmi thing, 

Jona. George, breaking roads, 

E. O. Murphy, repairing harnesses, 

M. H. Johnson, cash paid out, 

Woodworth, Dodge & Co., grain &c, 

Underbill & Kittredge, 

Northern Railroad, freight, 

Bond & Carter, flagging stone, 

Gust Walker, hardware, 

Humphrey, Dodge & Co., hardware, 

J. H. Lamprey, carrots, 

D. W. Long, 

Flanders, White & Houston, 



$411.22 

48K.00 

721.75 

554.49 

1.203.48 

942.37 

1,749.84 

2,107.63 

915.87 

916.86 

996.09 

600.00 

2.60 

58 05 

70.80 

15.35 

15.92 

245.45 

5.20 

7.05 

113.75 

91.59 

149.85 

14.70 

5.45 

10.75 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT REPORTS. 

Appropriation, 1876, $2,800.00 

Balance of appropriation, 1875, unex- 
pended, 246.06 
Additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, for 
breaking roads in the months of Feb- 
ruary, March, and December, 1876, and 
Jan.*, 1877, 2,121.94 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Aaron Q. Farnum, /Surveyor, 1875. 

1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $100.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 64.22 



i,414.11 



$5,168.00 



$164.22 



37 



Cr 

Paid A. Q. Farnum, bill for breaking 

roads 1875 and 1876, $25.97 

A. Q. Farnum, bill for breaking 

roads 1876 and 1877, 38.25 

George F. Robinson, labor, 4.37 

Joseph Emery, " 12.00 

James Larhie, " 3.50 

Alexander S. Yeaton, " 4 37 

Charles H. Daniels, " 3.50 

Moody S. Farnum, « 7.00 

A. Q. "Farnum, « 65.26 



DISTRICT NO. 2. 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 



Wit. S. Carter, Survey or, 1875. 

1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $70.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, .57 

Cash in hands of surveyor, last year, 13.68 



Cr. 

By bill rendered for summer bill, $43.60 

" " winter 1876-7, 40.65 



John Buckland, Surveyor, 1875. 

" " 1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $70.00 

extra appropriation, Jan., 1877, 74.17 



Cr. 








By bill breaking roads win 


ter 1875 and : 


$7.44 


cc u 


1876 


and 1877, 


44.62 


By cash paid J. Buckland, 


labor, 




32.62 


R. Virgin, 


(C 




21.43 


D. Sargent, 


(( 




3.50 


A. Sargent, 


a 




3.50 


H. Ballou, 


u 




1.75 


J. Bartlett, 


a 




1.75 


C. Abbott, 


u 




1.75 


Lyman Hall. 


a 

i 




5.69 


C. Buckland. 


a 
i 




16.62 


C. Farnum, 


plank, 




3.50 



$164.22 



$84.25 



$84.25 



$144.17 



- $144.17 



38 



DISTRICT NO. 4. 




Henry IT. Potter, Surveyor, 1875. 




« " 1876. 


Dr. 


Appropriation, 1876, 


$85.00 


Additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 


37.75 


Cr. 




By bill breaking roads 1875 and 1876, 


$7.00 


1876 and 1877, 


27.75 


By paid John P. Locke, labor, 


4.00 


F. Knowles, " 


3.00 


Thomas Sears, " 


8.75 


T. Tenney, 


5.25 


John Potter, " 


12.00 


Charles Rowell, « 


10.50 


Martin Rowell, " 


3.50 


J. F. Potter, 


7.00 


W. L. Bachelder, " 


7.00 


II. II. Potter, 


27.00 


DISTRICT NO. 5. 




John G. Tallant, Surveyor, 1875. 




David A. Morrill, " 1876. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1876, 


$80.00 


extra appropriation, Jan., 1877, 


29.74 


Cr. 




By winter bill 1875 and 1876, 


$29.74 


cash paid John G. Tallant, laborer, 


12.00 


Hugh Tallant, ' " 


22.50 


Richard Wells, « 


4.50 


David A. Morrill, " 


41.00 


DISTRICT NO. 6. 




Josefh E. Plitmmer, Surveyor, 1875. 




Geo. W. Lake, « 1876. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1876, 


$300.00 


extra appropriation, Jan., 1877, 


60.22 


cash in hands of J. E. Plummer, 


26.10 


Cr. 




By amount winter bill 1875 and 1876, 


$26.10 


1876 and 1877, 


87.15 



$122.75 



$122.75 



$109.74 



$109.74 



$386.32 



39 



By cash paid T. Smith, labor, $18.00 

Elbiidge Emery, labor, 62.80 

« lumber, 8.20 

R. Brown, labor, 12.37 

C. Dudley, « 3.00 
E. R. Noyes, " 12.00 

D. Sanborn, " 8.00 
W. Welch, " 7.50 
A. H. Moores, " 13.05 
Thomas Young, " 4.50 
W. George, « 3.00 
D. Shaw, " 8.00 
O. W. Coon, « 12.00 
Geo. Virgin, « 9.00 
Jona. Kimball, « 3 50 
W. Virgin, " 1.00 
Geo. W; Lake, « 87.15 



DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Josiah S. Locke, Surveyor, 1875, 

« « 1876, Dr. 

To balance unexpended, 1875, $29.03 

appropriation, 1876, 30.00 

extra appropriation, Jan., 1877, 17.07 

Cr. 

By cash paid Samuel M. Locke, $24.10 

" ' Benpn. L. Larkin, 7.50 

« Josiah S. Locke, 26.50 

winter bill, 1876 and 1877, 18.00 



DISTRICT NO. 8. 

William T. Locke, Surveyor, 1875, 

David Campbell, Surveyor, 1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $100.00 

extra appropriation, Jan. 1877, 20.71 

Cr. 

By winter bill W. T. Locke, 1875 and 1876, $49.75 
bill labor, David Campbell, 70.96 



$386.32 



$76.10 



$76.10 



6120.71 



$120.71 



40 



DISTRICT NO 10. 



Hiram Farnum, Surveyor, 1875. 

H. H. Farnum, Surveyor, 1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $230.00 

extra appropriation, Jan., 1877, 115.50 

Cr. 

By winter bill 1875 and 1876, Hiram Farnum, $59.00 
" 1876 and 1877, H. Harvey Far- 



num, 




56.65 


By cash paid Benjaman Merrill, 


labor, 


1.50 


D. B. Webber, 


« 


1.25 


Thomas Welch, 


a 


3.00 


L. L. Farwell, 


a 


10.00 


Isaac H. Farnum, 


« 


10.12 


A. R. Farnum, 


a 


5.62 


William Putnam, 


u 


3.75 


B. Donahue, 


C( 


3.75 


Peabody Morse, 


U 


14.25 


A Putney, 


tt 


3.00 


Leonard Speed, 


u 


4.87 


Patrick Daly, 


a 


10.87 


Walter S. Lougee, 


(( 


22.50 


George Speed, 


(( 


24.56 


H. Harvey Farnun 


b" 

T NO. 11. 


110.81 


DISTRIC 




Jonathan M. Stewart, Surveyor, 1S75. 




U l< 


1876. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1876, 




$40.00 


extra appropriation, Jan., 18' 


n, 


68.06 


Cr. 




By winter bill 1875 and 1866, 




$21.81 


" 1876 and 1877, 




37.00 


cash paid A. C. Abbott, labor, 


3.25 


" Jona. M. Stewart, 


labor, 
;t no. 12. 


46.00 


DISTRIC 




Charles C. Bean, Surveyor, 


1875. 




U a 


1876. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1876, 




$45000 


extra appropriation, Jan., 1877, 


434.88 



$345.50 



$345.00 



$108.06 



$108.06 



41 



Ck. 

By cash paid C. C. Bean, winter bill 1875-6, $107.56 

1876-7, 189 83 

" labor and team, 213.60 

Emery Hoit, labor, 'J 1.55 

Michael Griffin, labor, 63.50 

Jeremiah Boyce, team, 33.25 

John Roberts, labor, 63. 00. 

George B. Badger, labor, 8.25 

Daniel Spencer, " 975 

Charles Hardy, " .50 

Albert Dariforth, " .60 

James Shea, " 64.95 

John B. Foley, " 3.00 

George Vincia, " 10 35 

Patrick Gahagan, " 5.55 

Hiram Currier, " 5.00 

M. H. Bean & Co., " 10 18 

Nelson Davis, « 4.50 

Carlos Roby, " 5 00 

George Meserve, " 2. 50 

J. C. Pearson, supplies, 1.60 

Northern Railroad, freight, .56 

Warren Johnson, labor, 6 50 

Frank Emerson, " 11 25 

George Bean, " 9.00 

N. Colby, " 1.25 

C. & J. C. Gage, lumber, 1.00 

J. P. Durgin, labor, 3.o0 

Asa H. Morrill, labor, .60 

W. Blanchard, 16.16 

H. H. Amsden & Son, 12.24 



$884.88 



DISTRICT NO. 13. 

George F. Sanborn, Surveyor, 1875. 

1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $80.<>0 

extra appropriation, Jan., 1877, 21065 

Cr. 

By cash paid winter bill 1876 and 1877, $83.18 

J. S. Fiske, labor, 9.88 

Jeremiah Sanborn, labor, 1.25 

L. B. Elliott, " 2. 30 

Samuel Floyd, " .75 



$290.65 



42 



By cash paid Frank L. Elliott, labor, $11.05 

Timothy E. Hoit, « 9 75 

William F. Emery, " 11.40 

George Blanchard, " 12.15 

Luther Knowles, " 8.70 

Alfred Uran, " 11.08 

Fred. Connor, " 13.40 

J. D. Fife, " 1.05 

Arthur Connor, " .38 

Jolin F. Abbott, " 4.80 

T. Carter, " . 3.75 

Joseph Elliott, " 7.75 

A. Hough, " .75 

Amos Elliott, " 3.75 

H. Gage, " .75 

Wm. Hutchinson, " 3.50 

John Hoit, " .50 

Arthur Connor, " 1.00 

W. W. Whittier, " 1.05 

Granite stone quarry, stone, 5.00 

for chestnut posts, 1.00 

for use of plough, 4.00 

for powder and drills, .50 
Geo. F. Sanborn, self and team, 76.23 



DISTRICT NO. 14. 

Sherman D. Colby, Surveyor, 1876. 

" 1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $60.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 102.48 



Cr. 

By cash paid winter bill 1875 and 1876, 120.67 

1876 and 1877, 79.80 

Hiram Eastman, labor, 5.00 

Gil man J. Colby, " 5.00 

S. D. Colby, « 48.01 

for timber, 4.00 



DISTRICT NO. 15. 

Moses E. Long, Surveyor, 1875. 

. " * 1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $70.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 29.45 



$290.65 



$162.48 



$162.48 



$99.45 



43 



Cr. 

Bv cash paid winter bill 1875 and 1876, $22.88 

" 1876 and 1877, 19.95 

Moses E. Long, labor, 30.22 

Gilman Gomo, 15.90 

D. Perkins, .75 

John Perkins, 3.00 

Charles Sweat, 4.50 

A. Hammond, 2.25 



DISTRICT NO. 16. 



Robert B. Hon, Surveyor, 1875. 

1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $65.00 

additional appropriation, 1877, 31.23 



Cr. 






ly cash paid winter bill 1876 ar 


id 1877, 


$50.68 


Robert B. Hoit, 


labor, 


14.40 


Edward Runnells, 


CC 


4.75 


W. E Runnells, 


c< 


3.75 


Edwin Sawyer, 


cc 


3.00 


L. W. Powell, 


cc 


3.75 


IT. J. Powell, 


cc 


2.25 


Edwin Terry, 


cc 


7.50 


Albert G. Dow, 


cc 


6.15 



DISTRICT NO. 17. 

Gilman II. Diamond, Surveyor, 1875. 

" 1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $60.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 109.15 

Cr. 

By amount of winter bill 1875 and 1876, $22.75 

1876 and 1877, 84.00 

By cash paid G. H. Diamond, labor, 27.75 

Chas. H. Currier, " 4.50 

Joel Connor, " 3.75 

James S. Connor, " 5.25 

Simeon J. Crane, " 5 25 

A. C. Carter, « 13.50 

John Whittaker, lumber, 2.40 



$99.45 



$96.23 



$96.23 



8169.15 



$169.15 



44 



DISTRICT NO. 18. 



Andrew S. Farnum, Surveyor, 1875. 

1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $90.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 42.38 



Cr. 

By cash paid winter bill 1876 and 1877, $27.50 

Isaac F. Ferrin, labor, 24.75 

Henry Farnum, " 8.59 

Richard S. Emery, " 20.75 

Samuel E. Califf, " 3.00 

Hazen K. Fiske, « 3.00 

Edward S. Barrett, " 2.25 

Benj. T. Putney, " 2.25 

H. H. Farnum, " 1.50 

Lyman Sawyer, " .75 

Andrew S. Farnum, " 37.04 

Crowley & Quinn, stone, 1.00 

DISTRICT NO. 19. 

Reuben K. Abbott, Surveyor, 1875. 

1876. Dr. 

Cr. 

By appropriation, 1876, $100.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 91.00 



Cr. 






By cash paid winter bill 1875 ar 


id 1876, 


$17.20 


" 1876 an 


d 1S77, 


73.80 


R. K. Abbott, ] 


labor, 


29.86 


John K. Abbott, 


cc 


1125 


D. C. Tenney, 


a 


7.88 


Albert Saltmarsh, 


1 1 


14.25 


A. D. Swan, 


(C 


7.13 


C. H. Merrill, 


a 


14.25 


J. E. Saltmarsh, 


NO. 20. 


15.38 


DISTRICT 




Jacob N. Flanders, Surveyor, 1875. 




(C (t 


1876. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1876, 




$60.00 


additional appropriation, Jan. 


, 1877, 


41.09 



$132.38 



$132.38 



$191.00 



$191.00 



$101.09 



45 



By cash paid winter bill 1875 and 1870, 


$3.32 


« 1876 and 1877, 


20.70 


Jacob N. Flanders, 


labor, 


15.75 


Frank W. Thompson 




5.25 


Win. B. Thompson, 


u 


4.50 


John E. Saltmarsh, 


« 


9.75 


Win. Fagan, 


« 


6 00 


Peter Fagan, 


u 


0.75 


Abner Jones, 


u 


5.25 


Charles H. Merrill, 


u 


8.70 


F. J. Emerson, 


it 


712 


Charles B. Merrill, 


a 


2.00 



$101.09 

DISTRICT NO. 21. 

Lowell Brown, Surveyor, 1875. 

Daniel Farnum, " 1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $80.00 

Cr. 

By cash paid Lowell Brown, winter bill, $9.40 

Daniel Farnum, " 8.75 

Daniel Farnum, summer bill, 9.50 

Balance unexpended, 52.35 

$80.00 



DISTRICT NO. 22. 




Charles Hall, Surveyor, 1875. 




1876. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1876, 


$75.00 


additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 


15.00 


Cr. 




By cash paid Benja. Horn, winter bill, 


$3.00 


Charles Hall, " 


5.00 


for plank. 


10.50 


Charles Hall, labor, 


71.50 



DISTRICT NO. 23. 

Jeremiah S. Abbott, Surveyor, 1875. 

1870. Dr. 

To balance in hands of J. S. Abbott, 1870, $94.55 

appropriation, 1876, 125.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 95.00 

Cr. 

By cash paid J. S. Abbott, winter bill 1875-6, $94.55 

F. S. Corliss, " 5.25 



$90.00 



$90.00 



$315.21 



46 



By cash paid J. S. Abbott, winter bill 1876-7, 


$142.39 


" labor, 


7.00 


" plank, 


4.00 


Fred Drew, labor, 


4.37 


Charles Drew, labor, 


2.17 


Stephen Currier, labor, 


5.25 


John E. Proctor, " 


6.12 


J. H. Proctor, " 


7.00 


Frank G. Proctor, " 


4.37 


John Corliss, " 


6.12 


John Bod well, « 


2.62 


Frank E. Abbott, " 


■ 1.75 


John E Baker, " 


12.25 


Daniel Farnum, stone, 


10.00 


DISTRICT NO. 24. 




Jesse II. Goodwin, Surveyor, 1875. 




Andrew S. Smith, " 1876. 


Dr. 


To cash in hands of Jesse II. Goodwin, 1875 


, $1.96 


appropriation, 1876, 


45.00 


additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 


15.64 


Cr. 




By cash paid winter bill, J. H. Goodwin, 




1875-6, 


$7.62 


Andrew S. Smith, labor, 


33.70 


Win. R. Smart, " 


3.50 


Jesse H. Goodwin, " 


3.90 


Joseph E. Brown, " 


13.88 


DISTRICT NO. 25. 




Moses B. Abbott, Surveyor, 1875. 




Frederick Clough, " 1876. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, 1876, 


$100.00 


additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 


119.50 



Cr. 

By cash paid John C. Wheeler, winter bill 

1875-6, 30.79 
Frederick Clough, winter bill 

1876-7, $104.84 

Fred Clough, labor, 25.50 

B. A. Blood, « 11.75 

J. C Wheeler, " 9.62 

Isaac Wheeler, " 8.75 



$315.21 



$62.60 



$62.60 



$219.50 



47 



By cash paid Henry Ordway, labor, $8.75 

W. S. Bachelder, labor, 3.00 

Giles Wheeler, labor, .50 

for lumber, 16.00 



DISTRICT NO. 30. 

Frank B. Carter, Surveyor, 1875. 

1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $60.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 170.22 



Cr. 

By cash paid winter .bill 1875-6, $40.85 

" 1876-7, 71.02 

F. B. Carter, labor, 28.50 

Charles H. Currier, labor, 9.00 

John J. Thompson, " 3.00 

Edwin Terry, " 6.00 

Elbridge Diamond, " 6.75 

William Broad, " 9.U0 

David Carter, " 25.50 

Timothv Carter, « 30.00 



DISTRICT NO. 31. 

Robert K. Lougee, Surveyor, 1875. 

1876. Dr. 

To amount in hands of surveyor, 1875, $16.49 

appropriation, 1876, 20.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 55.60 



Cr. 

By cash paid winter bill 1875-6, $17.25 

Robert K. Lougee, labor, 45.16 

D. S. Webster, plank, 7.48 

for plank, 2.80 

for spikes, 2.15 

Samuel E. Clifford, plank, 1 75 

for drawing rails, 2.50 

for timber, 13.00 



DISTRICT NO. 32. 

John T. Gilman, Surceyor, 1875. 

" '< 1876. Dr. 

To balance in hands of surveyor, 1875, $14.25 
appropriation, 1876, 45.00 



$219.50 



$230.22 



$230.22 



$92.09 



$92.09 



$59.25 



48 



Cr. 

By cash paid for winter bill 1875 and 1876, $8.75 

John T. Oilman, labor, 28,00 

L. K. Hinds, " 12.37 

Unexpended, 10.13 



DISTRICT NO. 33. 

Robert H. Potter, Surveyor, 1875. 

Henry H. Bean, " ° 1876. Dr. 

To appropriation, 1876, $60.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 27.93 

Cr. 

By cash paid winter bill 1875 and 1876, $8.77 
Henry H. Bean, winter bill 

1876 and 1877, 29.78 

Henry H. Bean, labor, 35.37 

F. Doplace, " 3.50 

A. Atwood, " 1.75 

S. Dustin, " 2.63 

T. Bean, « 2.63 

C. F. Bailey, « 3.50 



DISTRICT NO. 34. 

Charles Graham, Surveyor, 1875. 

John W. Bourlet, " 1876. Dr. 

To cash in hands of surveyor, 1875, $50.00 

appropriation, 1876, 50.00 

additional appropriation, Jan., 1877, 42.07 

Cr. 
By cash paid Chas. Graham, winter bill 

1875 and 1876, $12.38 
By cash paid Chas. Graham, summer bill 

1875, 37.62 
By cash paid John W. Bourlet, winter bill 

1876 and 1877, 44.55 
By cash paid John W. Bourlet, labor, 22. 50 

Andrew Moody, " 7.00 

Charles Graham, " 14.52 

Moses Sanborn, " 3.50 



$59.25 



$87.93 



$87.93 



$142.07 



$142.07 



Grand total, $5,168.00 



49 
SPECIAL APPKOPKIATIOSTS. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE TAX. 

Union High School District, for pay- 
ment of debt and interest, $8,300.00 
District No. 3, for payment of debt and 

interest, 392.14 

District No. 12, debt and insurance, 167.00 

18, repairs and insurance, 91.00 

20, « 275.00 



$10,225.14 



Paid as follows : 
Geo. G. Jenness, committee, Dist. No. 22, $3.20 

Giles Wheeler, " " 18, 91.00 

John Kimball, " Union Dist., 1,000.00 

Geo. P. Meserve, " Dist. No. 20, 275.00 

Wm. A. Bean, ' " " 12, 167.00 

Dan'lHolden, " " 3, 232.14 

Harrison Partridge, " « 3, 160.00 

John Kimball, " Union Dist., 7,300.00 



— $9,228.34 
Balance undrawn, 996.80 



$10,225.14 



CITY PRECINCT. 

APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1876. 

For payment of principal and interest 

on State House loan, $4,000.00 

payment of interest on Water-works 

debt, 7,500.00 

payment lighting streets, 2,800.00 

received interest on Water-works 

bonds, 120.00 

appropriation overdrawn, 69.48 



Paid as follows : 
J. L. T. Brown, lamplighter, $195.55 

J. A. Dadmun, repairs, 13.75 



$14,489.48 



50 



O. C. Cole, painting lamp-posts, $46.65 

Edwin Evans, gas-burners, 24.00 

Concord Gas Light Co., 4 months, 758.60 

" " 2 months, 368.38 

Lowell Eastman, repairs, 9.00 

Flanders, White & Houston, 2.25 

J. A. Dadmun, 3.50 

Concord Gas Light Co., 564.10 

Tufts Bros., burners, 10.20 

Concord Gas Light Co., 580.50 
S. C. Eastman, interest on Water-works 

debt, 7,500.00 

" precinct State house 

note, 1,000.00 

" interest on State house 

debt, 3,413.00 



SEWERS. 

Balance of appropriation, 1875, unex- 
pended, $1,876.99 

Appropriation, April, 1876, 12,000.00 

« additional, June, 1876, 40,000.00 

Premium on loan $40,000, 2,480.00 

Interest on same, 698.67 

Received of state of N. H., sewer on 

Capitol street, 210.80 

Received of Geo. A. Pillsbury, pipe 

sold, &c, 43.71 

Pipe, tools, and fixtures on hand, as ' 

per report of committee last year, 525.22 



$14,489.48 





$57,835.39 


Paid as follows : 




Akron Sewer Pipe Co., 


$26,905.18 


" " for labor, sun- 




dry bills, and 


i 


pay-rolls, 


20,193.64 


C. C. Lund, for engineering, 


355.28 


Carroll Hutchins, " 


545.01 


John McClintock, " 


6.00 


Providence Water-works, for inverts, 


256.00 


Samuel Holt, for brick, 


1,473.92 


Ira Whitcher, for lumber, 


133.07 


A. A. Cox, lumber, 


96.08 



51 



E. B. Hutchinson & Co., lumber, $102.55 

Charles Nutting, " 6.20 

Flanders, White & Houston, lumber, 101.11 

Scott & Newman, lumber, 83.68 

Freight on lumber, 78.97 

Smith & Deny, blacksmith, 137.44 

S. M. Chesley, " 64.83 

D. 0. Smith, « 13.81 

B. G. Carter, « 40.27 

Nath'l M. Weeks, " 32.90 

S. D. Trussell, " 3.30 

Gust Walker, hardware, 209.79 

Humphrey, Dodge & Co., hardware, 316.31 

Thornton & Farnum, stone, 45.20 

Bond & Carter, " 298.20 

Fuller & Pressy, " 204.96 

Ira Foster, " 51.00 

Abial Smart, " 84.50 

Woodworth, Dodge & Co., cement, 687.29 

J. F. Cotton, cement, 432.62 

Ford & Kimball, castings, 612.71 

Thompson & Stratton, powder, 74.93 

Stevens & Duncklee, incidentals, 33.66 

B. G. Merrill, expenses to Akron, Ohio, 36.74 
Woodbury & Batchelder, printing, 2.25 
Abbot Downing Co., 4.50 
Concord Gas Light Co., 18.12 
J. C. Ingalls, damage, 9.75 
John H. Morse, repairs, 15.02 
George Goodhue, repairs, 15.00 
Chas. H. Norton, horse hire, 13.75 
Geo. A. Pillsbury, telegraphing, &c, 13.84 
J. F. Hoit, oil, ' 12.35 
L. S. Richardson, 1.50 
D. C. Allen & Co., repairs, 3.10 
W. S. Blanchard, oil, 6.46 
Geo. A. Pillsbury, harness, 12.00 
Lyman R. Fellows, cash paid out, 11.53 
Concord Railroad, freight, 5.40 
S. W. Morrill, use of tools, 10.00 

C. J. Rowe, labor, 1.87 
Joseph Wentworth, rent of land, 40.00 
Stevens & Duncklee, sundries, 8.67 



$1.05 




33.25 




1.50 




20.00 






853,928.06 






3,907.33 



52 

Gust Walker, sundries, 

B. C. & Montreal Railroad, freight, 

Flanders, White & Houston, 

H. S. Jenks, rent, 

Balance unexpended, 

$57,835.39 
The committee have pipe on hand 

worth, $1,064.06 

" " tools and lumber 

worth, 629.66 

Balance unexpended as above, 3,907.33 

$5,601.05 

CITY PROPERTY, FEB. 1, 1877. 

City Hall lot, and half of building, $40,000.00 

City farm, 15,000.00 

Personal property at farm, by appraisal, 4,483.00 

Gravel lots at East Concord, 100.00 

Gravel lot on Washington street, t 2,000.00 

Lot on Warren and Liberty streets, ' 700.00 

Land and buildings on Warren street, 10,000.00 

Land in Ward 2, 400.00 

Ward house, Ward 2, 1,000.00 

Ward house, Ward 6, 6,000.00 

City storehouse, lot, lumber, and stone, 5,000.00 

Tools in hands of sup't highways, 1,000.00 

Receiving tomb, 350.00 

Furniture in City Hall building, 200.00 

Furniture in mayor's office, 125.00 

Furniture in city clerk's office, 100.00 

Furniture in city marshal's office, 100.00 

Furniture in collector's office, 100.00 

Four horses, $300, $200, $250, $250, 1,000.00 

Harnesses and stable fixtures, 400.00 

Street sprinklers, pipes, and fixtures, 550.00 

Legacy of Abial Walker, for schools, 1,000.00 

Legacy of G. P. Lyon, for library, 1,000.00 

Legacy of Franklin Pierce, for library, 1,000.00 

City library, 5,000.00 

Gravel on A. B. Holt's lot, 700.00 



53 



Old cemetery fund, city bonds, 

Central fire station, 

Property in hands of fire department, 



APPROPRIATIONS 1876. 

Paupers, 
Fire department, 
Incidentals, 
Roads and bridges, 
Committee service, 
Police and watch, 
Printing and stationery, 
Professional services, 
Salaries, 

Interest on city debt, 
Payment of city bonds due, 
Public library, 
State tax, 
County tax, 
Schools, 

Repairs of highways, 
School-house taxes, 
Sewers, 

Lighting streets, 
City water-works. 
Payment of floating debt, 
Payment of principal and interest, state house 
debt, 



Deduct amount received from state, — 



$700.00 
34,000.00 
36,614.00 

$168,622.00 



$2,500.00 

9,000.00 

6,000.00 

12,000.00 

900.00 

3,900.00 

800.00 

400.00 

5,500.00 

16,000.00 

11,000.00 

1,000.00 

19,152.00 

16,344.22 

27,641.00 

10,000.00 

9,205.14 

12,000.00 

2,800.00 

7,500.00 

13,000.00 

4,000.00 

1191,942.36 



Railroad tax, 
Savings bank tax, 
Literary fund, 
Insurance tax, 



Amount added by assessors, 
Amount raised by taxation, 



$16,632.56 

14,473.59 

1.132.20 

1.87 



52,240.22 

$159,702.14 
4,066.15 

$163,768.29 



54 
CITY DEBT AND ASSETS. 

FUNDED DEBT, PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 



When due. 


Rate of int. 


Payable. 


Jan. 1, 1877, 




matured, 


April 1, 1877, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1878, 


6, 


annually, 


Jan. 1, 1878, 


5, 


annually, 


Nov. 1, 1878, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1879, 


6, 


annually, 


April 1, 1879, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Nov. 1, 1879, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1880, 


6, 


annually, 


April 1. 1880, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Nov. 1, 1880, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1881, 


6, 


annually, 


April 1, 1881, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Nov. 1, 1881, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1882, 


6, 


annually, 


April 1, 1882, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Nov. 1, 1882, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1,1883, 


6, 


annually, 


Jan. 1, 1883, 


5, 


annually, 


Nov. 1, 1883, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1884, 


6, 


annually, 


April 1, 1884, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Nov. 1, 1884, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1885, 


6, 


annually, 


April 1, 1885, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Nov. 1, 1885, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1886, 


6, 


annually, 


April 1, 1886, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Nov. 1, 1886, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1887, 


6, 


annually, 


Oct. 1, 1887, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1888, 


6, 


annually, 


Oct. 1, 1888, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1889, 


6, 


annually, 


Oct. 1, 1889, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1890, 


6, 


annually, 


Oct. 1, 1890, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


Jan. 1, 1891, 


6, 


annually, 



Amount. 

11,000 
3,000 
7,000 
6,000 
4,000 
3,000 
4,000 
1,000 
8,000 
3,000 
1,000 
7,500 
3,000 
3,000 
5,000 
4,000 
1,000 
5,000 
6,000 
3,000 
2,000 
7,000 
5,000 
2,000 
5,000 
9,000 
1,500 
1,000 

10,000 
1,500 

10,000 
1,000 
8,500 
2,000 

10,000 
2,000 

10,000 
1,000 



55 



When due. 


Rate of int. 


Payable. 


Amount. 


Oct. 1, 1891, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


$6,250 


Nov. 1, 1891, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


G,000 


Oct. 1, 1892, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


2,000 


Nov. 1, 1892, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


10,000 


Oct. 1, 1893, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


4,250 


Nov. 1, 1893, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


8,000 


Oct. 1, 1894, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


4,000 


Nov. 1, 1894, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


7,000 


Oct. 1, 1895, 


6, 


semi-annually, 


3,000 



|217,500 



FLOATING DEBT AND OUTSTANDING CLAIMS. 



Notes, 
Interest, 



$9,800.00 
461.00 



Due for salaries and committee service, $2,182.00 
school districts, 809.76 



$10,261.00 



orders unpaid, 



785.00 





«pu,i . u.i v 




$231,537.76 


AVAILABLE ASSETS. 


Cash in city treasury, 


$2,141.67 


Due from tax list 1875, 


3,455.12 


1876, 


29,768.29 


Due from Merrimack county, 


3,381.70 


on account of liquor agency, 


678.42 


Blossom Hill Cemetery, 


4,000.00 


on account of sidewalks laid, 


593.04 


" rent, 


125.00 


note Moses Ordway and other 


s, 200.00 


from city of Manchester,* 


26.50 


from town of Campton,* 


28.40 




f1 1 398 1i 




^pttrt^O 0<J , J.^ 


Indebtedness above assets, Feb. 1, 


1877, 187,139.62 




$231,537.76 



* Since paid. 



56 



Indebtedness Feb. 1, 1876, above 

assets, $200,525.71 

Indebtedness Feb. 1, 1887, 187,139.62 



Decrease of city debt for year 1876, $13,386.49 

CITY PRECINCT DEBT AND ASSETS. 

State House precinct notes, 6 per cent., 
semi-annually, payable Dec. 1, 1878, $1,500 

1879, 500 

1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.500 
2,500 
3,000 
3,500 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
10,000 
7,000 



u 


1880, 


a 


1881, 


a 


1882, 


a 


1883, 


(( 


1884, 


(C 


1885, 


a 


1886, 


f< 


1887, 


a 


1888, 


a 


1889, 


u 


1890, 


u 


1891, 


a 


1892, 


u 


1893, 


a 


1894, 


it 


1895, 


a 


1896, 



PRECINCT PROPERTY. 



$49,000 



Precinct notes for sewers, 6 per cent., 

payable $8,000 annually on and 

after Dec. 1, 1882, 40,000 

City Water-works, 350,000 



$439,000 



City Water-works, ■ $350,000.00 

Indebtedness of precinct above 

assets, 89,000.00 

$439,000.00 



57 



INDEBTEDNESS OF PRECINCT FEB. 1, 1876. 

State house debt, $50,300.00 

Water-works, 350,000.00 

$400,300.00 

*Increase of debt during the year, 33,098.99 

INDEBTEDNESS OF PRECINCT FEB. 1, 1877. 

State house debt, $49,000.00 

Water-works debt, 350,000.00 

Sewers debt, 40,000.00 

$439,000.00 

Less cash in hands of treasurer on 

sewer account, 5,601.01 



$433,398.99 



♦Increased indebtedness on sewer account authorized by City Council, June 24, 1876. 



58 
TRUST FUNDS. 



Walker School Fund. This fund was a legacy of Abial Walk- 
er. Will dated Jan. 3, 1855. "To the city of Concord aforesaid I 
give and bequeath one thousand dollars, in trust, to be added to the 
school fund of said city, the interest whereof to be divided in due pro- 
portion among all the districts in the city at the time the dividend 
takes place, to be paid over to said city in one year after my decease." 
The amount of this fund is $1000, and is invested in a note of that 
sum of the Concord City Precinct, due in 1895. 

Lyon Legacy is from G. Parker Lyon. Will dated Jan. 23, 
1865. " I give and bequeath to the city of Concord, in the county of 
Merrimack, in trust for the increase of the free public library of said 
city, the annual income thereof only to be annually expended in the 
purchase of books for said public library, the sum of one thousand 
dollars." One precinct note of $1000, interest 6 per cent., due 1896. 

Pierce Legacy is from Franklin Pierce, ex-President of the 
United States. Will dated Jan. 22, 1808. " 16th. To the city of 
Concord I give and bequeath, in trust for the ' Concord Public Li- 
brary,' one thousand dollars, the interest of said sum to be expended 
annually in the purchase of books, and the principal to remain as a 
perpetual fund for the object indicated." One city bond of $1,000, 
due 1885. 

Countess Rumford Legacy is from the Countess of Rumford. 
Will dated Nov. 10, 1852. " To the town of Concord aforesaid, in trust 
for the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society, an associa- 
tion in said town, two thousand dollars, to be applied to the charitable 
uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. And in 
case the said town should be incapable of or decline said trust, then 
the same is given and to be paid over to any two persons whom the 
executor of my will may elect and name to administer said trust." 
Note, Isaac A. Hill, $2000, dated Jan. 27, 1877, secured by mortgage 
of real estate and surety. 

Old Cemetery Fund. There has been invested of the proceeds 
of sales of lots $700 in Water-works bonds, bearing 6 per cent, interest. 
The income from this fund is devoted to the care of the old cemetery. 



59 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 

Tho number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and personal 
estate in the city of Concord, since 1800 : 



Year. 


No. of Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1860 


2,577 


$4,307,192 


$47,082.25 


1861 


2,497 


4,423,936 


46.290.48 


1862 


2,350 


4,308,568 


50,945.01 


1863 


2,454 


3,775,206 


60,293.82 


1864 


2,539 


3,832,800 


89,931.97 


1865 


2,495 


5,549,002 


158,787.29 


1866 


2,762 


4,934,082 


116,192.97 


1867 


2,822 


• 5,006,774 


145,173.49 


1868 


3,120 


5,378,365 


■ 126,889.71 


1869 


3,205 


5,581,459 


146,791.64 


1870 


3,187 


5,751,928 


133,953.94 


1871 


3,338 


5,891,993 


137,844.70 


1872 


3,767 


5,917,054 


141,122.97 


1873 


3,613 


9,012,650 


158,281.13 


1874. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


422 


$805,608 


$11,340.85 


2, 


225 


386,990 


7,026.93 


3, 


211 


357,770 


5,322.76 


4, 


884 


1,993,632 


39,008.44 


5, 


736 


2,693,625 


53,137.14 


6, 


833 


2,198,626 


43,538.19 


7, 


473 


564,275 


8,949.07 


Non-resident, 


3,784 




2,722.23 




$9,000,526 


$171,045.61 


1875. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


467 


$802,007 


$10,719.19 


2, 


241 


409,001 


5,941.11 


3, 


228 


367,007 


5,370.06 


4, 


951 


1,974,173 


40,105.68 


5, 


752 


2,678,964 


54,077.75 


6, 


817 


2,306,361 


46,701.42 


7, 


485 


678,683 


9,468.86 


Non.-resident, 


3,941 




3,190.61 




$9,216,195 


$175,234.68 


1876. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


424 


$831,137 


$10,500.61 


2 


252 


411,918 


5,066.28 


3', 


242 


383,533 


5,396.26 


4, 


937 


1,974,072 


36,956.22 


5, 


743 


2,635,025 


49,949.42 


6, 


818 


2,306,911 


43,794.41 


7, 


495 


680,029 


9,516.76 


Non-resident, 


3911 




2,588.33 




9,222,625 


163,768.29 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS TO 
THE CITY COUNCIL, FOR YEAR ENDING JAN- 
UARY 81, 1877. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Geokge A. Pillsbury, Mayor, ex officio. 

Abel B. Holt to March 31, 1877. 

John S. Russ to March 31, 1877. 

Benjamin A. Kimball to March 31, 1878. 

John M. Hill '. to March 31, 1878. 

Samuel S. Kimball to March 31, 1879. 

Luther P. Durgin to March 31, 1879. 



OFFICERS. 



B. A. Kimball, President. 
John M. Hill, Clerk. 
Charles C. Lund, Engineer. 
V. C. Hastings, Superintendent. 



61 



REPORT. 



To the City Council: 

The Board of Water Commissioners present this their Fifth 
Annual Report for the year ending January 31, 1877. 

RECEIPTS. 

Amount received, as per register from 

Jan. 31, 1876, to 

Feb. 1, 1877, $18,574.93 

extra per cent, from 

delinquents, 73.60 

for building purposes, 64.96 

use of meters, 57.06 

rent of stable at dam, 50.00 

rent of Cooledge 

house, 135.02 

old bills in 1875, 45.50 



$19,001.07 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid John H. Morse, as per contract, $1,108.55 

V. C. Hastings, salary, , 1,200.00 

Nathaniel White, rent, 300.00 

Morrill & Silsby, printing, 40.27 

Charles C. Pearson & Co., printing, 24.35 

Woodbury & Batchelder, " " 3.50 

E. C. Eastman, « 1.65 

Concord Gas Light Co., 17.30 

A. & G. A. Foster, horse hire, 16.00 

Charles H. Norton, " 13.00 

• Ranlet & Prescott, coal, 27.38 

G. S. Locke & Co., " 16.50 

V. C. Hastings, incidentals, 21.83 

Humphrey, Dodge & Co., hardware, 27.03 

Gust Walker, « 15.54 

R. C. Danforth, iron-work, 2.50 



62 

Paid Stevens & Duncklee, iron-work, $7.92 

D. C. Allen, " 31.54 

Geo. Goodhue, drain pipe, &c, 60.83 

James Hazelton, pipe and labor, 15.46 

Ford & Kimball, castings, 30.77 

Smith & Derry, smith-work, 12.66 

D. B. Webber, smith-work, 3.00 
R. D. Wood & Co., hydrants, 190.60 
National Meter Co , 66.00 
Concord Railroad, freight, 9.56 
S. Sewell, trucking, 9.77 
J. F. Cotton, cement, 9.00 
American Water & Gas Pipe Co., cement, 4.35 

E. B. Hutchinson, lumber and labor,' 8.35 
Webster & Morgan, " 5.35 
Connell & Savory, paint and labor, 8.99 
'Batch elder & Co., salt, &c, 5.35 
Vogler Brothers, cushions, 3.00 
L. Holmes, boat, 51.44 

F. P. Andrews, 15.00 
A. J. Holmes, stove and labor, 23.47 
Edwin Byrnes, labor, 123.75 
H. Adams, pay-roll, 309.24 
Levi Roby, " 312.50 
M. H. Johnson, pay-roll, 71.50 
F. A. Merrill, labor, 10.50 
Morgan Howe, " 3.00 
Chas. O. Foss, " 1.00 
T. B. Tamblyn, land damage, 200.00 
Moses H. and C. R. Farnum, land damage, 155.15 
John Ballard, " 137.50 
Lowell Brown, " 105.93 
John Jordan, " 99.51 
Ballard & Griffin, « 61.52 
I. A. Hill, making deeds, 9.00 
Josiah Minot, legal services, 90.00 

Total expenditures, $5,097.91 

Divided as follows : 

For land damages, . $759.61 

distribution and service pipes, 1,477.97 

care and maintenance of works, 2,476.33 

expenditures at Long Pond, 384.00 

$5,097.91 



63 

The unexpected demand for new service pipes, the additional 

expenditures for raising the road at the head of Long Pond, 
together with the large number of claims for flow age which 
have been settled during the year, have obliged the Board to 
exceed their estimates, which have been partly met by the in- 
creased receipts, and the balance, from cash standing to credit 
of Water- Works at the close of last year. 

The very considerable increase in the cash receipts for the cur- 
rent year was not anticipated, and is very gratifying, largely ex- 
ceeding the estimate therefor, made -in the last annual report. 
The amount is $19,001.07 for 1876, against $10,921.24 for 1875— 
a gain of $2,079.83. This gain has been made during a year of 
great financial depression, and a consequent tendency to all pos- 
sible economy on the part of our citizens. It augurs most favor- 
able results upon the return of our wonted business prosperity. 

The gross receipts have now reached a point where, with the 
allowance for hydrant use ordinarily paid by inland cities of 
New England, the Works would be self-supporting. The annual 
interest on the bonded debt ($350,000) is S21,000 ; and the ex- 
pense for maintenance during the year has been $2,476.33 ; — 
total, $23,476.33. The cash receipts are $19,001.07, and the use 
of ninety-three hydrants, at fifty dollars each, would have added 
$4,650 ;— total, $23,650. 

The period is not far distant when the Works will not only 
afford a water supply for fire purposes, free to the precinct, but 
stand as a source of permanent revenue. 

The hydrants and their connections were put in with the laying 
of the street mains, and have since been cared for and maintained 
by the Water-Works. The expense of this care and maintenance 
for the last year was $315. Prior to the projection of the Works, 
the cost of new reservoirs, and the maintenance of others in the 
precinct, entailed upon the city an annual expense of several 
thousand dollars, increasing largely during the four or five years 
immediately preceding the introduction of Long Pond water. 
These reservoirs, at best, afforded a scanty and often inadequate 
supply of water in ordinary exigencies. Without enlarging 
upon our present ample means for security, we desire simply to 
advert to the fact of the relief to the city from this large and 
growing expenditure. 



64 



The superintendent estimates the average amount of water 
drawn daily during the year to be 525,000 gallons. The above 
estimate is made from meter measurements at different seasons 
of the year. 

There has been laid during the year for distribution pipes, &c, 

1,200 feet of 6-inch, 1 public hydrant, 

402 feet of 1-inch, 1 private hydrant, 

73 feet of f-inch, 2 stop gates ; 

and 118 service pipes, or 2,671 feet, which supply 140 families, 
4 bath-tubs, 16 water-closets, 10 wash-basins, 24 yard hydrants, 
1 heating apparatus, 1 green-house, 1 church, 1 school-house, 1 
livery-stable, 13 private stables, 1 office. 



ESTIMATE OF EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR 1877. 



RECEIPTS. 



From water rents, 



$20,000.00 



EXPENDITURES. 



For interest on the water debt, $21,000.00 

maintenance and care, 2,500.00 

extension of mains, 500.00 

new service pipes, 500.00 



-$24,500.00 



Excess of expenditures over receipts, to be 

provided for by taxation, $4,500.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL,! 
JOHN M. HILL, 

ABEL B. HOLT, Board of 

JOHN S. RTJSS, J. Water 

.SAMUEL S. KIMBALL, Commissioners. 

LUTHER P. DURGIN, 
GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 



65 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 



Samuel C Eastman, Treasurer, in account with the Water- 
Works for the year ending January 81, 1877. 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance of cash on hand February 1, 1876, $2,282.69 
Received from the city of Concord, being 

the precinct tax, 7,500.00 

Received for water rents, 19,001.07 



&28,783.76 



EXPENDITURES. 



Interest on bonds, $20,898.00 

Maintenance, extensions, &c, 5,097.91 



$26,995.91 



Balance, cash on hand, $2,787.85 

Respectfully submitted, 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN, Treasurer. 

Concord, N. H., February 1, 1877. 

We have examined the foregoing account, and find that all 
the payments therein recorded are duly authenticated by proper 
vouchers, the several items correctly cast, and the amount of 
cash on hand to be $2,787.85. 

GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, ] 
ISAAC N. ABBOTT, ! Committee on 

GEORGE H. HILL. Finance. 

GEORGE F. UNDERBILL, 



66 
REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON" CITY FARM. 



To the City Council: 

The undersigned, joint standing Committee on the City 
Farm, respectfully present the twenty-fourth Annual Report 
of the receipts and expenditures of the City Farm, for the 
year ending February 1, 1877, together with the inventory 
of the property of the city belonging thereto. In presenting 
this report, your committee are of the opinion that the 
inmates at the farm have been properly cared for by the 
overseer and matron, who by their tender care have made 
them comfortable homes, and, judging from the financial 
exhibit of the past year, that the farm has been well man- 
aged. 

GEORGE A. CUMMINGS, ) Committee 
WILLIAM STEVENSON, ) on 
CHARLES H. MERRILL, ) City Farm. 

INVENTOEY OF PEOPEETY AT CITY FAEM, FEB. 1, 1877. 

City Farm and buildings, $15,000.00 

ANIMALS. 



12 cows, 


$40.00 


$480.00 




2 horses, 


200.00 


400.00 




11 hogs, 


10.00 


110.00 




100 fowls, 


.60 


60.00 




1 horse at city stable, 




100.00 


$1,150.00 


HAY AND GRAIN. 






7 tons No. 1 hay, 


19.00 


$133.00 




8 tons No. 2 hay, 


14.00 


112.00 




4 tons oat straw, 


14.00 


56.00 




1 ton rye, " 


19.00 


19.00 





67 



7 tons corn-fodder, 


14.00 


$98.00 


225 bu. corn, 


1.00 


225.00 


55 bu. oats, 


.60 


33.00 


36 bu. rye, 


1.00 

A.KMING TOOLS. 


36.00 


F. 




2 ox carts, 




$135.00 


1 ox wagon, 




70.00 


5 plows, 




65.00 


1 ox sled, 




20.00 


1 ox traverse sled, 




60.00 


1 ex. wagon, 




185.00 


1 Concord wagon, 




35.00 


1 pung sleigh, 




50.00 


1 two-horse traverse 


sled, 


50.00 


1 mowing machine, 




50.00 


1 horse rake, 




25.00 


2 buffalo robes, 




30.00 


5 yokes, 




20.00 


2 cultivators, 




15.00 


3 harrows, 




, 20.00 


1 hay cutter, 




15.00 


1 set harness, 




40.00 


1 single harness, 




30.00 


1 set draft harness, 




15.00 


1 fan mill, 




14.00 


7 hay forks, 




3.50 


12 feed boxes, 




2.00 


2 splices, 




5.00 


10 baskets, 




5.00 


1 set dry measures, 




1.50 


1 two-horse pole, 




5.00 


10 chains, 




12.00 


6 hoes, 




3.00 


2 garden hoes, 




1.00 


2 manure claws, 




2.00 


4 halters, 




4.00 


1 drag rake, 




1.00 


3 planes, 




3.50 


3 augers, 




2.00 


5 axes, 




3.00 



$712.00 



68 

1 grindstone, $2.00 

4 scythes and snaths, 4.UU 

50 feet rope, 1-JjJJ 

lu raKes, „ „„ 

4 wood-saws, £• 

1 wheelbarrow, ^ 

4 ladders, ' 
1000 feet lumber, L tr£i 

1 meat saw, • 

1 stone drag, °'^ 

1 stone body, °'™ 
6 shovels, 

5 manure forks, *-™ 

•^ P^ c Hi, 10 00 

5 whiffletrees, ti" - o 

1 spread chain, ^ 

2 iron bars, ^"JJ 
1 witch chain, *- vu 
1 monkey wrench, 1 -"" 
1 hammer, • 

1 corn-cutter, J-Jj? 
4 ox muzzles, -■"JJ 

2 pairs steelyards, J--^ 
1 mallet, ■ 
4 chisels, 



.40 
6.00 

1 jackscrew, £.0 

i i.__ ^ Kifa 5.00 



1 garden rake, 

2 cross-cut saws, 



1 brace and bits, 

1 scalding tub, 4.UU 

1 handsaw, ' 

1 pair pole straps, <>•"" 

1 garden fork, J.uu 

1 saw-set, • 

4 bush scythes and snaths, o.uu 

6 files, " n 

1 branding iron, 1 -^ 

1 hatchet, -ju 

1 oil stone, *■"" 

1 whitewash brush, £.uu 

1 grain cradle, ^ 

1 ox cart body, i& - uu 



.,151.40 



69 



HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. 



Beds and furniture, $600.00 

1 washing-machine, 10.00 

1 clothes- wringer, 8-00 

10 cider casks, 10.00 

38 dry casks, 4.00 



PROVISIONS AND FAMILY STORES. 

400 lbs. ham, $50.00 

100 lbs. salt beef, 8.00 

50 lbs. fresh beef, 5.00 

750 lbs. salt pork, 90.00 

150 lbs. fresh pork, 15.00 

50 lbs. sausage, 7.50 

100 lbs. lard, 15.00 

5 lbs. butter, 1.50 

4000 lbs. squash, 40.00 

20 lbs. gr. sugar, 2. HO 

7 bbls. apples, 9.00 

4 bbls. cider, 8.00 

U bbls. soap, 6.00 



li bbls. salt pickles, 12 00 

12 gal. pickles, 7.00 

24 bbls. flour, 22.00 
2| bbls. meal, 6.00 

140 bush, potatoes, No. 1, 110.00 

10 bush, potatoes, No. 2, 3.00 

80 bush, beets, 64.00 

6 bush, white beans, 18.00 

7 bush, colored beans, 17.00 
20 bush, turnips, 6.00 

30 gal. vinegar, 9.00 

25 head cabbages, 2.00 
38 cords dry wood, 190.00 

31 cords green wood, 108.50 
2 vinegar casks, 3.00 

U bush, salt, 2 50 



$632.00 



$837.60 



Total inventory, $19,583.00 



70 



Lucius L. Farwell, Supt. 






Dr. 


To outstanding bills due, 


$110.67 


cash from city treasurer, 


314.00 


for labor, men and teams, 


489.71 


for wood and lumber, 


250.35 


for potatoes, 


52.69 


for hay and straw, 


130.86 


for vegetables, 


41.52 


for meat and lard, 


24.81 


for milk, butter, and eggs, 


263.57 


for stock, 


440.00 


for corn, oats, and beans, 


35.72 


for pigs, 


11.00 


for calves, 


10.00 


due from county of Merrim 


ack for 


board of county paupers, 


697.76 


for sundries, 


86.98 



$2,969.64 

EXPENDITURES. 

Lucius L. Farwell, Supt. 

Cr. 

By cash paid for labor, $985.00 

groceries, 485.58 

grain and meal, 116.24 

blacksmith work, 103.01 

meat and fish, 64.52 

fowls, 28.90 

swine, 50.00 

stock, 434.00 

dry goods, boots and shoes, 60.70 

one pair horses, 380.00 

sundries, 191.19 

Overseer's salary, 600.00 

$3,499.14 

Deficiency, 429.50 



71 



STATEMENT. 

Appraised value of farm and buildings, 

Feb. 1, 1876, $15,000.00 

Appraised value of personal property, 

Feb. 1, 1876, 4,649.34 

$19,649.34 

Appraised value of farm and buildings, 

Feb. 1, 1877, 15,000.00 

Appraised value of personal property, 

Feb. 1, 1877, 4,483.00 

$19,483.00 



John Euran, aged 82 years. 

James Drew, " 66 " 

Henry Babb, " 55 " 

George H. Young, " 13 " 

Charles H. Thompson, " 15 " 



Decrease during the year owing to de- 
preciation in valuation, $166.34 

Names of paupers at city farm Feb. 1, 1877 : 

James W. Powers, aged 74 years. 
Eleazer Davis, " 86 " 

John B. Crummett, " 69 " 
Joseph Glines, " 80 " 

Joseph H. Morrill, age unknown. 
Sarah J. Sargent, aged 46 years. 

No death has occurred during the year. 
Number of paupers at farm Feb. 1, 1877, 11 

" " during the year, 17 

Average number during the year, 10 

Names of paupers discharged during the year ending Feb. 
1,1877: 

Orrilla Batchelder, April 15, 1876. 
Edward L. Fisk, June 24, 1876. 
James Drew, June 4, 1876. 
Annie Wadsworth, Sept. 28, 1876. 
Daisy A. Wadsworth, Sept. 28, 1876. 
Charles F. Purrinton, Dec. 27, 1876. 
Charles Merrill, Dec. 8, 1876. 
Number of tramps lodged one night, 23 

" " sent to house of correction, 2 



72 
MOTH ANNUAL REPOET 



OVERSEER OF THE POOR FOR THE YEAR END- 
ING JANUARY 31, 1877. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen : 

Gentlemen : The undersigned herewith submits his ninth 
annual report of the expenditures for the poor, exclusive of 
those at the almshouse, for the year ending January 31, 1877 : 

CITY PAUPERS. 

Names. Nationality. Amount. 

Joshua S. Griffin, American, $15.00 

Mrs. James K. Page, American, 78.00 

Isaac Lewis Emerson, American, 10.00 

Mrs. Roxanna Larkin, Irish, 6.00 

George W. Foote, American, 5.00 

Zachariah C. Arlin, American, 17.00 

J. Everett Hutchins, American, 40.00 

Mrs. John O'Brien, Irish, 10.00 

Mrs. Sarah Haines, American, 3.00 

Mrs. Clarissa Randall, American, 16.50 

Nathan K. Emery, American, 3.50 

Mrs. Orrison Dudley, American, 125.25 

William Fagan, Irish, 5.00 

John Harrington, Irish, 142.84 

John J. Burke, Irish, 357.45 

Mrs. Jane R. Purrington, American, 3.00 

John L. Shackford, American, 14.00 

Joseph P. Carpenter, American, 38.50 

Charles H. Johnson, American, 137.00 

Win. L. George, American, 3.00 

Edward Hodgman's family, American, 28.40 

Henry G. Harrison, English, 8.00 

Moses D. French, American, 1.00 

Calvin Worth, American, 2.00 

Henry W. McMichael, Irish, 15.00 

Timothy Dorety, Irish, 10.00 

$1,094.44 



73 

Received from the town of Weare, for 
support of Charles II. Johnson and 

family, $137.00 

Received from D. A. Macurdy, 5.00 

Cha's H. Amsden, 2.00 

Dr. Crosby, 10.00 

Geo. F. Whittredge, 1.00 

sundry persons, 76.00 

Due from the town of Campton,* 28.40 

Due from the city of Manchester,* 26.50 



Paid State Reform School for mainten- 
ance of Bernard Dorien, $34.86 

Paid State Reform School for mainten- 
ance of Emma J. Sargent, 104.00 



$138.86 
Refunded by Anthony Coleman, 34.86 

Paid for the support of insane persons at the 
asylum, as follows : 

Abner F. Durgin, $243.88 

Ellen M. Summers, 222.30 

Samuel McDaniels, 150.71 

Betsey Haines, 57.41 

Joseph P. Carpenter, 34.23 



COUNTY PAUPERS. 



$285.90 

$808.54 



$104.00 



$708.53 
1,621.07 



Aid furnished county paupers residing in Concord, as follows: 

Mrs. Joseph Mossey, French, $3.14 

Mrs. Emily Suppry, French, 46.90 

Mrs. Ellen Woods, Irish, 3.50 

Mrs. Martin Deveney, Irish, 113.13 

Hiram Stevens, American, 1.75 

Kate Bresnehan, Irish, 2.50 

* Since paid. 



74 



Mrs. James Flynn, Irish, $67.00 

Mrs. Lucretia Danforth, American, 7.40 

Sylvester Kiggens, Irish, 21.00 

Joseph Godett, French, 5.75 

Isaac Mason, French, 75.25 

Patrick Gannon, Irish, 4.00 

George W. Foote, American, 5.00 

Thomas Prevey, French, 1.75 

Mrs. Orlando Philbrick, American, 32.00 

Michael Florence, French, 8.40 

Lewis Langley, French, 10.00 

Bennett M. Pratt, American, 20.00 

Elizabeth Clary, Irish, . 14.50 

James Plimpton, English, 30.00 

Nancy Dorety, Irish, 66.75 

Nancy Pearson, American, 78.00 

Israel Shepard, American, 52.00 

Mrs. Mary Pattee, American, 64.00 

Mrs. Patrick Flanagan, Irish, 52.50 

Narcissie LeClair, French, 15.75 

Theophilus Langelier, French, 3.00 

Mrs. William Marsh, American, 6.00 

James Rovve, American, 19.00 

Edward N. Clinton, American, 40.00 

Eugene Casey, Irish, 3.98 

Mrs. William Hannagin, Irish, 14.90 

Mrs. Thomas Wheeler, American, 3.50 

Patrick Coughlin, Irish, 10.50 

Mary Storin, Irish, 15.00 

Mrs. Levi Fortia, French, 17.00 

Nancy O'Hara, Irish, 43.50 

Patrick Larkin, Irish, 7.00 

Mary Owens, Irish, 142.60 

Amelia Bassett, French, 56.00 

Mrs. Amasa Ramsdell, American, 26.00 

Gardiner K. Knowles, American, 130.00 

James M. Drew, American, 4.00 

Benj. G. Tucker, American, 2.00 

John F. Brown 2d, American, 92.75 

Mrs. Daniel Blackstone, Irish, 11.49 

George Washington, colored, 7.00 

Lovell J. Sherman, American, 3.00 

Eleazer Bazro, French, 32.25 



75 



Mrs. Calahan McCarty, Irish, $51.08 

Moses Danforth, American, 11.00 

Mrs. Thomas Coty, French, 102.50 

Georgianna Powell, American, 62.00 

Ellen Geary, Irish, 6.05 



.,725.07 

The foregoing list of county paupers are those who have 
previously been aided. 

The following are the names of those added the past year, 
viz. : 

Martin Farrill, Irish, $20.50 

William S. Prescott, insane, died, 38.79 

Lucian Shepard, American, 4.00 

David Hogg, English, 21.00 

Joseph Cote, French, 8.00 

Mrs. Robert T. Orr, American, 22.00 

John K. Lang, American, 16.50 

Fred Baldwin, American, 16.00 

Sarah J. Robinson, American, 15.00 

Mary Stone, French, 2.75 

Paul Mvartt, French, 38.63 

George'C. Beckett, Irish, 19.50 

William Tonkin, English, 8.50 

Mrs. Richard Cooper, American, 32.50 

Charles Merrill, American, 7.75 

Edward R. Stevens, American, 6.50 

Charles M. Buckman, American, 8.00 

Frank Ubitt, French, 11.60 

Fred Trudeau, French, 8.00 

John T. French, American, 5.50 

Joseph O. Perkins, 7.40 

Fred Larry, Irish, 6.50 

Levi Marston, American, 5.00 

Anna Collins, Irish, 19.95 

James B. Henry, American, 3.00 

Reuben H. Palmer, American, 14.32 

Sarah C. Stevens, American, 14.50 

John Chartree, French, 4.00 

Timothy Mahoney, Irish, 7.50 

Moses Lull, American, 10.00 

Moses Lull, Jr., American, 5.00 



76 



Arvillie Boutin, French, $20.50 

Johnson Wells, American, 3.50 

Isaac Lor, French, 49.50 

William L. Buswell, American, 3.50 

Rhoda Robinson, Irish, 14.21 

Bridget Lee, Irish, 1.75 

William F. Drew, American, 7.00 

Lizzie Woodward, American, 61.00 

Charles A. Kimball, American, 15.00 

Arthur Shay, Irish, 12.50 

Miss Priscilla C. Walker, American, 55.00 

Mrs. Anna Holland, American, 36.00 

Simon F. Drew, American, 28.00 

John B. Cilley, American, 26.62 

Edward Ozier, French, 12.00 

Maria Bacon, American, 15.00 

Felix LeRue, French, 36.25 

Patrick Desmond, Irish, 25.48 

Sarah A. Dudley, American, 107.00 

Thomas W. Scott, Scotch, 16.00 

Clara J. Dolan, Irish, 17.00 

Transient persons, 41.39 

Amount charged to county pauper ac- 
count, off the city farm, 



Eleven persons chargeable to the county 
have been supported at the city 
almshouse the past year at an ex- 
pense of 

Total expenditures on county pauper 

account the past year, 
Received March 14, 1876, on the above 

account, 



M ,012.42 
1,725.07 
^2,737.49 

$693.71 

53,431.20 
49.50 



Balance due, audited, and allowe^d by 

the county commissioners, $3,881.70 

Four hundred and forty-eight applications for aid were 
received at this office the past year, the larger part of whom 
received more or less assistance, as the exigencies of the 



77 

cases required. The number of persons constituting; the sev- 
eral families and individuals aided as above was 422, being 
100 more than the year preceding. Of this number 87 only- 
had acquired a legal settlement in the city. Seven have 
died the past year, — 3 males and 4 females, one of whom was 
88 years old. 

Thanking His Honor the Mayor, the Board of Aldermen, 
and all others who have aided in the discharge of this branch 
of city service, this report is 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. STEWART, 
Overseer of the Poor. 



78 



EEPOET 



COMMITTEE ON SEWERS. 



To the City Council : 

The Committee on Sewers and Drains respectfully report 
that 45,8-14 feet, or 8.68 miles, of sewers have been laid 
within the precinct. 

The annual appropriation made in April last ($12,000), 
was barely sufficient for the construction of the main Brook 
sewer, so called, from West to Pleasant street, which was to 
form the main outlet for most of the sewers to be laid in 
the streets in that portion of Wards 6 and 7 comprised in 
the first or southern drainage district, and which was to be 
of sufficient capacity to drain about 200 acres of land. 

Frequent complaints had been made (and not without 
cause) of the unhealthy condition of the portion of the city 
to be drained through this main, by reason of defective sew- 
erage, and many petitions were presented and applications 
made asking that sewers be laid in other parts of the city. 
The introduction of Long Pond water seems to necessitate 
the construction of sewers, as it was found that many per- 
sons wished to avail themselves of the water, but could not 
do so unless they could dispose of the waste water. 

This matter finally came before the city council for action 
in June last, and it was unanimously voted that the precinct 



79 

be authorized to borrow, on the credit of the city, the sum 
of $10,000, in addition to the amount voted at the time of 
making the annual appropriations to be expended by your 
committee during the year. 

This sum of money has been borrowed at a rate of in- 
terest a little less than 5 per cent., on notes for $8,000, dated 
June 1, 1875, payable annually after five years. It was 
supposed that with this sum nearly five miles of sewer could 
be laid, but, owing to the low price of material, and the 
abundance of labor, and the extremely favorable weather, 
8.68 miles have been laid. 

It will be noticed, by referring to the report of the water 
commissioners, that the receipts for water are $2,079.83 
more than for the year previous. These receipts are largely 
due to the fact that means have been provided to get rid of 
the waste water. 

Of the amount expended during the year, $20,193.64 has 
been for labor. This sum has been distributed, to a great 
extent, among those who are dependent upon their daily 
labor for the support of their families, and had it not been 
for the work thus furnished them, they would have been de- 
pendent upon the city for their support. 

The wisdom of authorizing the expenditure of this addi- 
tional amount during the past year cannot be questioned, and 
it will meet the approval of the tax-payers generally, as they 
will have the use of the sewers by paying the interest on the 
cost of the same ; and we have no doubt that they would 
have been willing to pay at least three 'times as much for 
the privilege, to say nothing of the benefits resulting from 
the construction of the sewers as a sanitary measure. 

In proceeding with the construction of the sewerage sys- 
tem, it lias been found necessary to build two new outlets at 
large expense. One of these outlets, for the first division, 
known as the Brook sewer, extends from a point 169 feet 
south of West street northerly through the low ground, fol- 
lowing most of the way as nearly as practicable the course 



80 

of the former brook across West, Downing, Perley, Laurel, 
Thorndike, and Monroe, to South street, and through South 
street to Fulton, and through Fulton to the old brook again, 
thence coming north in the low ground across Lincoln to 
Pleasant street. From the present mouth of the sewer, for 
a distance of 2,624 feet, it is built of brick, laid in cement, 
24x36, egg-shaped, upon 8-inch Akron pipe inverts. The 
remainder, from near Fulton to Pleasant street, 766 feet, is 
24-inch round Akron pipe, with cement joints. This sewer 
now discharges itself into the brook a short distance below 
West street, and the sewage passes away in that brook which 
was formed by the natural drainage of the low ground west 
of State street and at the foot of the hill. This brook 
empties into the river nearly down to Bow crossing. It will 
probably become necessary to extend this sewer to the river 
at some convenient point, probably near the Countess of 
Rumford place, before many years. 

The. other main outlet of the 4th division extends from 
the Merrimack river, at a point about 400 feet north of the 
Free bridge, north-westerly across the Ferry road, the 
Boston, Concord & Montreal, Northern, and Concord & 
Claremont railroads to Main street near Fisk's store, and 
across Main and Fisk streets to the easterly end of Church 
street — 3,510 feet in all. The first 80 feet from the outlet is 
24-in., and the remainder is 20-in., round Akron pipe. At 
the mouth in the river bank the pipe is protected by a retain- 
ing wall of solid stone masonry, laid in cement, 20 ft. long, 
14 ft. high, and an average of 8 ft. thick, and around the 
ends of the wall and in front the bank is well rubbled. 

The following tabular statement shows the amount and 
sizes of pipe sewers laid in the streets : 



81 





Sizes of Pipes. 


STREETS. 


8-in. 


10-in. 


12-in. 


15-iu. 


18-in. 




160 

75 
60 

90 

145 

178 

172 

150 

75 

200 
100 

200 
250 


240 

206 

500 

50 

500 

500 

400 

380 

750 

223 
425 
368 

205 
375 

350 
242 

300 
325 

386 
485 

566 

525 


400 

356 
690 

350 

265 
535 

14 
425 

1152 
130 
325 
196 

350 

185 
265 

365 

600 
550 

460 


250 
710 
























Church, west from Fiske 


4n0 














Depot Street and Railroad Square, Main 
Street to Railroad 


780 


East from Brook Sewer 




Elm, north from Thompson 




North from Fayette 




Essex, south from Washington 




Fayette, east from South 












West from Walnut to Brook 




Fremont, north from Pleasant 




Fulton, west from Brook Sewer to Spring 
Garden, west from Rumford to Huntington 
Hanover, north from School 




Henry, north from Franklin 




Huntington, south from Centre 




Jackson, north from Washington 








Jefferson, south from Thompson 




Laurel, east from Brook Sewer 




Liberty, north from Pleasant 




Lincoln, west from Brook Sewer 




Main, north from Washington to Pearl... 








Merrimack, north from Pleasant to Or- 




North from Warren 




Monroe, east from Brook Sewer 












Orchard, west from Merrimack to Pine.... 













82 



STREETS. 



Perley, east from Brook Sewer 

Pierce, north from Perley 

South from Perley 

Pine, south from Orchard 

Pleasant, east from Brook Sewer 

West from Brook Sewer 

Rumford, north from Pleasant 

North from School 

South from Centre 

South from Short 

School, west from Spring 

Short, west from Rumford 

South, north from Fulton 

South from Monroe 

Spring, south from Thorndike 

South from Cross 

South from Fulton 

North from Fulton 

North from Lincoln 

North from Pleasant 

North from Maple 

State, north from Cross 

South from Church 

North from Fiske 

Summit, south from Centre 

South from School 

Tahanto, north from Warren 

Thompson, east from South 

Thorndike, east from Brook Sewer 

West from South 

Wall, east from South 

Walnut, north from Beacon 

Warren, west from Merrimack 

Washington, west from Alert Hose House 
West, west from Brook Sewer 

Total, 



Sizes of Pipes. 



198 
148 
140 



40 



90 
150 



333 
295 



84 



3333 



400 



265 



240 
140 
135 
525 
335 
475 
413 
205 



425 
440 



500 
25 
325 
265 
310 



12-in. 



450 



25 

978 
555 
175 



716 

660 
535 

215 
382 

230 
485 



215 



825 
300 



552 
286 

585 



13724 15782 3475 2630 



15-in. 18-in. 



450 
735 



450 



1400 



SUMMARY. 



8-in. 


P 


ipe, 




10-in. 




' 




12-in. 




c 




15-in. 




( 




18-in. 




< 




20-in. 




c 


Northern Outlet, 


24-in. 




c 


Brook Sewer, &c. , 


24x36 b 


ricl 


:, Brook Sewer, 



3,333 feet. 
13,724 
15,782 

3,475 

2,630 

3,430 
846 

2,624 



45,844 feet,=8.68 miles. 



83 

All the above pipe-sewer is of Akron round pipe, with 
meets inserted for entering the sewer, to accommodate each 
house and vacant lot. There have also been constructed 
eighty-nine 8-inch lamp-holes, and fifty-five 18-inch man- 
holes, at suitable places for inspecting and cleaning the sew- 
ers. The 18-inch pipe, laid through Depot street and Rail- 
road square, was intended to take in a sewer, should be it 
necessary, extending northerly in the rear of the buildings 
on the east side of Main street, and was extended to and 
into the Main street sewer, a short distance below the junc- 
tion of the Warren street main. It is believed that the 
effect of thus tapping the Main street sewer at this point will 
relieve that sewer, so that no further trouble will be expe- 
rienced from back-water therefrom in sudden, violent show- 
ers. 

Complete plans have been prepared embracing the sewers 
laid this year, and all sewers previously laid of which there 
were no plans, which show the location of the sewers in the 
streets, with the location of the various man-holes, lamp- 
holes, catch-basins, and other appurtenances of the system, 
with profiles showing the grades. The position of each inlet 
is indicated on the plans, to which reference may be had, 
from time to time, as entrances are made. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Street. Ft. 

Academy, 160 

Beacon, 400 

Cambridge, 315 
Capitol, • 416 

Centre, 896 

Chapel, 500 

Church, 1,100 

Court, 500 

Cross, 1,390 

Depot and Railroad Square, 780 

Downing, 839 

Elm, 323 



84 



Street. Ft. 

Essex, 380 

Fayette, 922 

Fisk, 710 

Franklin, 1,282 

Fremont, 325 

Fulton, 196 

Garden, 223 

Hanover, 425 

Henry, 368 

Huntington, ' 150 

Jackson, 655 

Jefferson, 200 

Laurel, 700 

Liberty, 242 

Lincoln, 185 

Main, 265 

Maple, 300 

Marshall, 325 

Merrimack, 751 

Monroe, 1,085 

Montgomery, 550 

Myrtle, 200 

Orchard, 566 

Oak, 250 

Park, 460 

Pearl, 525 

Perley, 850 

Pierce, 346 

Pine, 140 

Pleasant, 2,148 

Eumford, 1,150 

School, 851 

Short, 525 

South, 2,005 

Spring, 2,595 

State, 1,840 

Summit, 628 

Tahanto, 500 

Thompson, 850 

Thorndike, 890 

Wall, 310 

Walnut, 552 



85 

Street. Ft. 

Warren, 370 
Washington, 1,850 
West, 585 
From east end of Church street to Merri- 
mack river, 3,510 
Brook Sewer, 766 
Brook Sewer, brick, 2,624 

Total No. feet laid in 1876, 45,844 
Total cost (see finance committee's report, 

page 20), $53,928.06 
Less amount received from State on sewer, 



Capitol street, 
amount for pipe sold, 
amount balance stock 
bills paid 1875, 


on hand, 


$210.80 

43.71 

1.168.50 

201.19 

ftl 6°1 °0 


• 




Total net cost for 1876, 
or $1.14 T 1 o per foot. 


$52,303.86 



It will be observed that the cost per foot for sewers laid 
in 1876 is much less than in any previous year, owing to the 
causes above specified. It has been our endeavor to have 
them constructed in the most scientific and thorough man> 

ner. 

GEO. A. PILLSBURY, ) Committee 
BYRON G. MERRILL, \ on 
GEORGE A. CUMMINGS, ) Sewers. 



86 



EEPORT 



CEMETEEY COMMITTEE. 



To the City Council: 

The Cemetery Committee beg leave to submit the following 
annual report : 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 



Receipts. 




From sale of lots, 


$15.00 


interest on fund, 


42.00 




$57.00 


Expenditures. 




Keeping avenues and grounds in order, 


55.20 



Balance in hands of City Treasurer, $1.80 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 

Receipts. 

From sale of lots, $2,028.65 

Expenditures. 

For general care of cemetery, $653.93 

grading and laying out new addition, 1,506.17 

$2,160.10 

The bills and pay-rolls for which have been audited by the City 
Council. 



87 

The larger expenditure during the year has been for grading 
a portion of the new addition, to put it in suitable shape for 
selling, and the cost of this grading has been added to the price 
of lots. Sufficient ground has been graded to lay out lots to 
the value of about $8,000, all which lots will be well situated. 
The necessary expenses for the coming year will be only such as 
are necessary to keep the grounds in order, say about $1,000. 

Plans and estimates have been procured for a building such 
as was recommended in last year's report, but the erection of 
the same has not yet been finally determined upon. We hope 
to build it in the coming spring. We also hope for an appro- 
priation to build a good fence around the whole cemetery, so 
that the grounds may be protected from trespassers, in the ab- 
sence of the superintendent and his men. The cemetery will 
not be in satisfactory condition till this is done. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES C. LUND, ) „ t 

(_ Cemetery 



CHARLES WOODMAN, }■ ^"^ '!/ 
JAMES H. CHASE, ) ^ ommUtee - 



88 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OE THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



To the City Council: 

The Trustees of the Public Library present the following re- 
port for the year ending February 1, 1877. 

The library now contains six thousand seven hundred and 
sixty-one volumes — having been increased the past year, by pur- 
chase and donation, two hundred and thirty-nine volumes. In 
addition to the above, Mr. Geo. E. Jenks has presented to the 
library many volumes of "The Scientific American." These 
have not yet been placed upon the catalogue, as a few numbers 
are missing; but when completed, as they soon will be, they 
will add a valuable set of books for reference in the departments 
of Mechanics and Science. 

"The Architect and Builders' News," a weekly paper, is 
received, and the back volume has been purchased. The num- 
bers of Dr. Jasper's "Birds of the North" are procured as fast 
as published. 

Among the valuable books purchased are the volumes which 
complete the set of "The New American Cyclopedia," "Life and 
Letters of Lord Macaulay," "Allibone's Dictionary of Authors," 
"Complete Works of Count Rumford." Also, "Discoveries at 
Ephesus," by J. F. Wood, F. R. S. Fifty volumes of "Harper's 
Magazine," with complete index, have been placed upon the 
shelves, and will furnish a very valuable set for reference in 
many departments of study. A new supplement to the cat- 
alogue will soon be published, giving these volumes added. 

The number of volumes charged and taken from the library 
by subscribers is twenty-four thousand nine hundred and six- 
teen, — showing that the books are in use. Twelve hundred and 



89 

forty-one persons have taken books the whole or a part of the 
year, which is an increase upon the number of last year of four 
hundred and ten. This is owing largely, no doubt, to the re- 
moval of the library to a more central location — a suggestion 
which was made by the Trustees last year, and early acted upon 
by the City Council, resulting not only in convenience to those 
using the library, but also in an increase of the number avail- 
ing themselves of its privileges fifty per cent. 

The financial condition of the library is presented in the fol- 
lowing statement of its treasurer. The privileges now offered 
by the library should not merely be continued : they should be 
increased each year, and for this an appropriation will be needed 
equal to, if not exceeding, that of last year. 

The desire of the Trustees is to open new and valuable ave- 
nues of service by these books. Acting upon this desire, and 
believing that the public library is a public educator — the ad- 
junct and supplement of the common school — they have opened 
the library every afternoon and evening, Sundays excepted, for 
the exchange of books. They have also recently voted to extend 
the privileges of the library to persons of surrounding towns, 
upon the payment annually of one dollar each. 

New facilities for reference will soon be offered. There are 
now quite a number of Cyclopedias and valuable books of refer- 
ence, which may be of great service if used. A place and table 
for consulting these books will be provided, and it is hoped that 
any who have need of such books will avail themselves of these 
opportunities. One of the great benefits of a public library is, 
that it can offer books which but few individuals can buy, and 
give the privilege of consulting authorities at once when a ques- 
tion or subject shall rise for investigation. The value of this 
privilege depends entirely upon the use we make of it individ- 
ually; and if each one who has desire for information on any 
subject will go to the librarian, find what is in the library and 
use it, or suggest any valuable works of reference not now there, 
he will not only aid himself, but the trustees also, in purchasing 
books in the future. Mechanics, artists, those engaged in spe- 
cial studies, can thus, by suggesting books they need to read, help 
many others, and secure the enlargement of the library in the 
direction most needed. 



90 

Many mechanics and artists, many young men, are now avail- 
ing themselves of these advantages, — but they are yet too few; 
and many, after the labors of the day, might gain much informa- 
tion which would be valuable. While the public library should 
furnish the incentives and supplies for thorough reading, its use- 
fulness depends upon the individual improvement of its privileges. 
Respectfully submitted, 



A. W. FISKE, 
O. T. CLOUGH, 
J. W. COLWELL, 



Trustees 



F. D. AYER, V of 



GEO. E. JENKS, 
J. L. STANLEY, 
AMOS BLANC HARD, J 



Public Library. 



F. S. CRAWFORD, Librarian. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Wm. P. Fiske, Treasurer, in account with the Concord 
Public Library. 

1876. Dr. 

Feb. 1. To balance from last year, $208.77 

June 10. appropriation (in part), 250.00 

July 5. " « 10000 

Aug. 19. " " 250.00 

Nov. 14. " " 200.00 

Dec. 29. " " 200.00 

1877. 

Feb. 1. receipts from library, 243.03 

interest on Lyon Fund, 60.00 

Pierce " ' 60.00 



1876. Cr. 

Feb. By paid gas bill, $26.24 

Mar. 4. E.C.Eastman, 37.29 

Ba V State Paper Co., 33.42 

81. F. S. Crawford, salary, 75.00 

May 4. Ranlet & Prescott, 11.45 

29. H. Vincent Butler and 

Statesman Building, 35. 00 

June 20. E. C. Eastman, 115.25 



$1,572.40 



91 



July 1. By paid F. S. Crawford, salary, $112.50 

gas bill, 21.00 

3. E. C. Eastman, 78.23 

6. H. V. Butler, 5.00 

Aug. Republican Press Associat'n, 50.25 

Sept. 1. F. S. Crawford, salary, 75 00 

Oct. 10. gas bill, 30.00 

1. F. S. Crawford, salary, 37.50 

Nov. 1. " " 37.50 

28. Ranlet & Prescott, 8.75 
Dec. 1. F. S. Crawford, salary, 37.50 

23. Ranlet & Prescott, 17.75 

29. E. C. Eastman, 212.37 
1877. 

Jan. 1. F. S. Crawford, salary, 37. 50 

20. for subscription books, etc., 98.66 

Republican Press Associat'n, 9.50 

Feb. 1. F. S. Crawford, 37.50 

F. S. C, for binding, etc., 206.67 

By balance cash on hand, 125.57 



$1,572.40 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, Treasurer. 
Concord, N. H., Feb. 22, 1877. 



92 



REPOET 



CITY LIQUOR AGENT 



To the City Council: 

The undersigned respectfully submits the following report 
of his agency, in the purchase and sale of wines and liquors 
in the city of Concord, from Feb. 1st, 1876, to July 1st, 
1876: 
Amount of stock and fixtures Feb. 1, 

1876, $864.17 

Since purchased, 470.48 

Amount of profit on sales, 131.24 



$1,465.89 



Contra. 

Amount of stock and fixtures July 1st, 

1876, $678.42 

Received for liquors and casks, 787.47 



CASH ACCOUNT. 

Received for liquors and casks, $787.47 

Cash on hand Feb. 1, 1876, 19.34 



$1,465.89 



$806.81 



Contra. 

Cash paid for liquors, $470.48 

Freight and expenses, 10.00 

Cash paid for incidentals, 5.00 

Shrinkage on liquors, 50.00 



93 



Agent's salary, $125.00 

Cash paid into city treasury, 146.3-3 



All bills paid. 

Number of sales, 2,027. 



$806.81 



J. E. CLIFFORD. 



State of New Hampshire, Merrimack ss. 



November 



irrimack ss. \ 
23, 1876. / 



Personally appeared the above-named J. E. Clifford, and 
made oath that the above statement by him subscribed is 
true. Before me, 

THEOPHILUS B. MARTIN, 

Justice of the Peace. 

REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON CITY LIQUOR AGENCY. 

To the City Council : 

At a meeting of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen, held 
on the 21st day of March last, the following vote was 
passed : 

Voted, That the appointment of a Liquor Agent at Fisherville be 
indefinitely postponed. 

And at a regular meeting of the City Council, held on the 
29th day of April last, the following ordinance was passed : 

CITY OF CONCORD. 

In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six. 

An Ordinance abolishing the City Liquor Agency. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the Mayor and the Committee on Police and Licenses be 
instructed to close out and abolish the city Liquor Agency on or before 
July 1, 1876. 

In board of Mayor and Aldermen, April 29, 1876. Passed. 
GEO. A. PILLSBURY, Mayor. 

In Common Council, April 29, 1876. Passed in concur- 
rence. 

HENRY CHURCHILL, President. 



94 

In accordance with the vote passed on the 21st day of 
May, no agent has been appointed at Fisherville during the 
year. 

On the first day of July last the Mayor and committee 
on police and licenses caused an inventory of all the liquors, 
fixtures, and other property connected with the agency to be 
taken, and the same was appraised at $678.42. The balance, 
as shown by the report of the liquor agent, amounting to the 
sum of $146.33, was paid into the city treasury. The agency 
was closed at that time, and the liquors and other property 
connected with the same were removed to the basement of 
the City Hall building, and remain, subject to the order 
of the City Council. 

GEO. A. PILLSBURY, ) Special 
SAMUEL W. SHATTUCK, \ Committee. 

Concord, Feb. 1, 1877. 



•-, 



EEPOET 



CITY SOLICITOR 



To the City Council : 

At the present time there remain upon the docket of the 
court three cases in which the city is a party, viz., Harlan 
P. Gage and wife v. Concord, John F. Edgerly and wife v. 
Concord, and John B. Giles v. Concord. Since my last 
report, the suits William R. Cook v. Concord and Ada I. 
Clark v. Concord have been settled, on terms satisfactory 
to the city. They were both suits for damages alleged to 
have been occasioned by a defective highway. The case of 
Jonathan Kimball v. Concord has been tried by a jury, and 
resulted in a verdict for the city. The suit was similar to 
the two last named. The case of Gage and wife v. Concord, 
above-mentioned, has also been tried by a jury, and resulted 
in a disagreement. This was an action to recover damages 
for a broken leg, caused, as the plaintiffs allege, by a slippery 
sidewalk. The Giles case has been referred to in previous 
reports ; — at the last term of the court a non-suit was ordered, 
exceptions were taken, and it has been transferred to the 
law term of the court. 

Mrs. Edgerly claims $15,000 damages for injuries received, 
as she says, by reason of her horse becoming frightened at a 
stream of water thrown from one of our hydrants by the 
fire department while testing its efficiency, overturning her 
carriage, and throwing her upon the ground. This case has 
not been reached. 



96 . 

Many complaints of course have arisen from time to time 
about injuries alleged to have been received from defective 
highways, but by the prompt, wise, and prudent action of 
the city authorities, litigation has been avoided. We can well 
congratulate ourselves that but three cases of this character 
have been tried by a jury during the last six years, in two of 
which the city obtained a verdict, and in the other the jury 
disagreed with most of the jurors in favor of the city. 

CHAS. P. SANBORN, City Solicitor. 

Concord, Feb. 24, 1877. 



97 



EEPOET OF THE POLICE JUSTICE. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord: 

The Police Justice herewith submits the twenty-fourth an- 
nual report : 

Thirty-nine civil actions have been entered in the Police 
Court during the financial year ending with this date. 

One hundred and four foreigners during the year have 
been fully naturalized, and thirty-eight others have filed their 
declarations of intention to become citizens. 

One hundred and eighty-nine arraignments for alleged 
criminal offences have taken place before the court during 
the year. 

Such of those prosecutions as have been participated in by 
the officers of the city, are more fully described in the reports 
of the city marshal and of the assistant city marshal of this 
date. 

On the first of August last, a vacancy occured in the clerk- 
ship of the Police Court by the resignation of Herbert F. 
Norris, Esq., in pursuance of an intention announced by him 
early in the year, and Capt. Rufus P. Staniels was subse- 
quently appointed clerk. 

The Police Justice charges himself as follows : 

For costs belonging to the city, received in 

criminal prosecutions, $171.78 

fines received, 708.87 

fees received in civil actions, 21.03 

$901.68 



And discharges himself, as follows : 

Paid for blanks and expenses, $6.41 

city treasurer, 895.27 

$901.68 

The business of the court will probably be much increased 
hereafter, in consequence of the act passed by the last legis- 
lature, giving to police courts jurisdiction in civil actions in- 
volving sums not exceeding one hundred dollars. 

SYLVESTER DANA, 

Police Justice. 
Concord, January 31, 1877. 



99 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



To the City Council : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to present, for your con- 
sideration, my report of the business of the Police Depart- 
ment of the city of Concord for the year ending Jan. 31, 
1877. 

The whole number of arrests made during the year, not 
including those made at Fisherville, was 291, as follows : 



Intoxication, 


110 


Assault, 


39 


Rude and disorderly conduct, 


31 


For being out late at night, 


28 


Keeping liquor for sale, 
Larceny, 


18 
16 


Suspicious persons, 
Noise, brawl, and tumult, 


11 
9 


Evading railroad fare, 


5 


Cruelty to animals, 

Driving horse farther than stipulated, 

Common drunkards, 


3 
3 

2 


Insane persons, 


2 


Keeping open saloon on Sunday, 
Threatening, 


2 

2 


Common street-walker, 


2 


Bastardy, 


2 


Fornication, 


2 


For not providing for family, 

For allowing a horse to go at large, 


2 

2 



Total, 291 



100 

Of the above cases, 137 were arraigned before the police 
court charged with the following offences, to wit : 

Assault, 36 

Intoxication, 31 

Keeping liquor for sale, 18 

Larceny, 14 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 10 

Noise, brawl, and tumult, 5 

Evading railroad fare, 4 

Driving horse farther than stipulated, 3 

Common drunkards, 2 

Keeping open saloon on Sunday, 2 

Fornication, 2 

Threatening, 2 

Assaulting officer, 2 

Common prostitute, 2 

For not providing for family, 1 

For allowing a horse to go at large, 1 

Common street- walker, 1 

Bastardy, 1 

137 
And were disposed of as follows : 

Sentenced to pay fines, 97 
Ordered to recognize to appear at the supreme 

court, 28 

Dismissed or nol prossed, 6 

Sentenced to the house of correction, 3 

Sentenced to jail, 1 

Discharged, 1 

Ordered to recognize to keep the peace, 1 

137 

Discharged from custody without complaint, 154 

Total, 291 
Whole number of lodgers accommodated at 

the station-house during the year, 352 

Whole number of prisoners and lodgers, 643 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN CONNELL, 
Concord, January 31, 1877. City Marshal. 



101 



To the City Council : 

The undersigned respectfully submits the following report 
of the Police Department in Ward 1, for the year ending 
January 31, 1877 : 

Whole number of arrests made during the year, 56. 



Intoxication, 


16 


Assault, 


8 


Larceny, 


5 


Disorderly conduct, 


2 


Insane, 


2 


Snow-balling in street, 


1 


Running away from home, 


1 . 


Bastardy, 
Noise and brawl, 


1 J 

2 


Evading railway fare, 


2 


Attempt to commit rape, 


1 


Keeping liquor in saloon, 
Keeping liquor for sale, 


1 
2 


Exposure of person, 


2 


Playing ball Sunday, 

Kindling fire on land not his own, 


8 
1 


Breaking and entering, 


1 



56 

Of the above cases, 27 were arraigned before the police 
court charged with the following offences, to wit : 

Intoxication, 7 

Assault, 8 

Larceny, 4 

Keeping liquor in saloon, 1 

Breaking and entering, 1 

Keeping liquor for sale, 2 

Attempt to commit rape, 1 

Kindling fire on land not his own, 1 

Noise and brawl, 2 

27 



102 

And were disposed of by the police court as follows : 

Sentenced to pay fines, 23 

Ordered to recognize to appear at supreme court, 2 
Discharged, 2 

27 
Whole number of lodgers accommodated at 

the station, 97 

Number persons and lodgers, 153 . 

Persons discharged from custody without com- 
plaint, 29 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN CHADWICK, 

Assistant City Marshal. 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To the City Council: 

In compliance with Sec. 3 of an Ordinance relating to the 
Fire Department, it becomes my duty as chief engineer to report 
to you the condition and workings of the department, for the 
year ending January 31, 1877. 

It has not been necessary to make any large outlay for repairs 
of apparatus the past year, but such repairs have been made, 
from time to time, as seemed to be necessary to keep the ma- 
chinery in the most effective condition. 

The entire precinct apparatus (with the exception of the 
steamer " Gov. Hill," out of commission) has within the year 
been thoroughly varnished, and such other repairs made as 
to leave it in the most perfect order, and making it unnecessary 
to provide for any large expenditures for maintenance of ma- 
chinery for the coming year. At the commencement of the 
year the hose belonging to the precinct was found to be in bad 
condition. It was immediately tested, and such as was found 
to be defective was put in as good condition as its age would 
warrant, and the whole amount thoroughly oiled. Five hun- 
dred feet of new hose was purchased of Samuel Eastman & Co., 
making a total of 4,900 feet now in use in the precinct. Of the 
above amount, 650 feet has been in service so long as to be in- 
capable of sustaining with safety the pressure when attached to 
hydrants in the lower portions of our city, and results in much 
delay at fires by the bursting of hose, oftentimes at the most 
critical moment in the progress of a fire. In view of this fact I 
would recommend the purchase of at least one thousand feet of 
hose immediately. 

The department has occupied the new station on Warren st. 
for over a year, and there seems to be nothing lacking for the 



104 

comfort and convenience of the men, and also for the safety of 
the apparatus, except the method of heating the building. The 
present method of heating, which is by means of a hot air fur- 
nace, is very defective, — warming only a portion of the building, 
and making it necessary to use a stove for heating the tower 
while drying hose. It seems to me that the most perfect and at 
the same time the most economical method of heating the build- 
ing would be by steam ; and I most earnestly recommend that 
measures be taken the coming summer to provide means for 
heating it in the manner proposed. 

It has been evident for a long time that the means we have at 
present for communicating an alarm of fire are very poor, and 
as our city extends its limits, the evil is aggravated. It seems 
to me that the time has come for us to provide better means for 
communicating alarm to our firemen, and I would recommend 
that as soon as practicable a telegraphic fire alarm be procured, 
thus ensuring a greater degree of safety for the lives and proper- 
ty of our citizens from that terrible enemy, fire. 

To the gentlemen constituting the Committee on Fire De- 
partment, for the cordial support and cooperation that have 
been given the past year ; to the Board of Engineers, and the 
officers and men of the entire department, for their thorough 
discipline and efficiency ; and to the chief and officers of the 
police force, for preserving order at fires, and rendering all the 
assistance in their power, I would express my sincere thanks. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES N. LAUDER, 

Chief Engineer. 



105 



LIST OF FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR. 

Feb. 15, 1870. Paint shop, corner Walnut and Beacon streets. 
Loss, $10U; fully insured. 

Mar. 8. Calvin Couch's house. Turnpike street. Loss, $1,000; 
insured, $000. 

Mar. 17. J. M. Blake's house and buildings, Church street. 
Loss, 810,000 ; insured, $8,000. 

Mar. 18. Michael Callahan's house, Tremont street. Loss, 
$50 ; fully insured. 

Mar. 24. Old Barracks near gas-house. Loss trifling. 

Mar. 30. Christopher Allen's barber shop, Main street, build- 
ing owned by J. R. Hill. Loss, $50; fully insured. 

April 4. Alarm caused by burning out chimney at Dr. Mor- 
rill's house. No damage. 

April 10. Alarm caused by explosion of lamp, old Post Office 
building, School street. No damage. 

April 19. Barn owned by B. Biddle, on interval near R. R. 
Depot. Loss, $700; fully insured. 

May 19. Buildings known as old Whitney house in Ward 7. 
No loss. 

May 30. House owned by W. W. Hill, Centre street. Loss, 
$50 ; fully insured. 

June 3. Barn and farming tools belonging to Kelley & Kee- 
nan, near Sewall's Falls. Loss, $800; insured $500. 

July 6. House and Barn owned by J. M. Corliss, at Fisher- 
ville. Loss $900 ; insured. 

July 8. House owned by Win. Carroll, on the Weston lot. 
Loss, $800; fully insured. 

July 15. Fire at Caldwell's shop, south end of Main street. 
Loss small. 

Aug. 2. V. Cahagan's house, corner State and Cross streets. 
Loss, $300 ; fully insured. 

Sept. 1. False alarm. 

Oct. 25. Fire at Cotton's flour store. Loss trifling. 

Nov. 21. Alarm caused by burning chimney at Page Belting 
Company. 

Dec. 3. Fire at county jail. Loss, $1,200; insured. 

Dec. 16. Barns and contents belonging to J. H. and Miss Sa- 
rah Herbert. Loss, $2, 000; insured,"$l,500. 

Dec. 23. Alarm caused by fire in Bow. 

Jan. 26, 1877. Fire at gas house. Loss, $50; no insurance. 



106 



EOLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FOR 1877. 



Names. 

Jambs N. Lauder, 



CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Omi/iation. 

Master McclnuiicN. K 11. 



Residence. 

Franklin street. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 



.losKTii S. Merrill, 
N. II. Haskell, 
Ciias. M. Lang, 
AVm. D. Ladd, 
Daniel B. Newhall, 
Moses II. Bean, 
(; vitus R. Robinson, 
Wyman W. IIolden, 



Carriage Trimmer, 
Painter, 
Fainter, 
Iron Merchant, 
Saloon-keeper, 
Manufacturer, 
Manufacturer, 
Manufacturer, 
William D. Ladd, Clerk. 



State street. 
Ferley street. 
Centre street. 
Rum ford street. 
School street. 
Ward one. 
Ward two. 
Ward three. 



SCHEDULE OF PROPERTY. 
six lire suits, $75; 6 badges, 848; 8 fire hats, $64; 6 lanterns, $30 ;— total, $217. 

tVixrclldiK nils property not in service. 
2 hose-carriages, $825; 2 brass trumpets, $10; 3 bells, .18; 1 set new grates Cor steam- 
er, ST; 2 brass crank boxes, $4; 1 lignum-vitae crank box, $3; 3extra lathes for pump 
parking, $3; 3 extra pump valve guides, 13;— total, #303. 

Schedule of Properly at Central Fire Station. 
1 wheelbarrow, 86; 2 vises, $12; 1 Are pot, $4; 1 step-ladder, 18.50; 1 ash pail, $3; 3 
set hose elaiups, 14.50; 3 riveting bars, $4; 1 setting-tool, $1.50; 1 pair cut nippers, $1.50; 
Lot punches, 82 ; l / 2 ton cannel coal, 111.50; 3 cords slabs, $6; 8 tons hard coal, $68; 
4 barrels coke, $6; 1 grindstone, $8;— total, $140.50. 



107 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY. 



Gko. L. Lovejoy, Foreman. 
Geo. A. Glover, Assist. Foreman. 



B. Frank Hardy, Clerk. 
J as. II. SANDERS, Engineer. 



Names. 
Geo. L. Lovejoy, 
Geo. A. Glover, 

B. Frank Hardy, 
"Warren F. Corning, 
.las. II. Sanders, 
Chas. II. Sander-, 
A. L. Currier, 

D. W. C. Everett, 

C. S. Packard, 
C. C. Blanchard, 
K. A. Rix, 

A. P. Davis, 
Lewis Wright, 



Occupni 'it>n. 
Carriage Painter, 
Tinsmith, 
Clerk, 

Hair Dresser, 
Carriage Painter, 
Machinist, 
Baggage Master, 
Clerk, 
Painter, 

Carriage Painter, 
Carriage Trimmer, 
Fnight Conductor, 
Driver, 



/•' sidence. 
Fayette street. 

Stale street, cor. West. 
Payette street. 
Green street. 

1 reet, cor. Cross. 
South street. 
Prince si reet. 
Auburn street. 
Green st., cor. "Warren. 
Warren street. 
State -i reet. 

'., cor. Downing. 
Engine House, War. st. 



ScTu dule qf Property — Steamer Kearearge. 
Steamer, 83,200; hose-carriage, $200; 12 fire suits and 13 fir.- hats, 1282.25; 10 reefing 
Jackets, 875; 2 blunderbusses, with spray nozzles, 863; l hydrant coupling, 816; .'; lan- 
terns and 2 water-buckets, 812; l -moke stack, $10; 10 spanner belts, 810; 10 sets span- 
ners, c ie; 7 wrenches, 85; l shovel, I bar, 1 axe, 84; l poker, l oil-can, 5 feet rubber 
hose, 1 hammer, 83.50; 1 reducer, 82.60; 2 horse blankets, 810 ; 1 mud apron, 96; I 
jack-screw, 85; 2 gallon oil-cans and 2 hydrant wrenches, 85; 1 feather duster, l hand 
brush, 88.75;— total, $3,862. 



108 



EAGLE HOSE COMPANY, No. 1. 

OFFICERS. 



John H. Morse, Foreman. 
Frank W. Blake, Asst. Foreman. 



G. W. Johnson, Clerk. 



Names. 
John C. Morse, 
Frank W. Blake, 
G. W. Johnson, 
Reuben R. Grant, 
C. Ernest Barrett, 
Frank F. Morse, 
Wm. T. Packard, 
Jos. H. Toof, 
J. H. Danforth, 
Chas. E. Sewall, 
John Marsh, 
B. F. Colby, 



Occupation. 
Plumber, 
Clerk, 
Painter, 
Blacksmith, 
Engineer, 
Carpenter, 
Moulder, 
Stable-keeper, 
Carpeuter, 
Teamster, 
Driver, 
Fireman, 



Residence. 
Spring st., near Warren. 
No. 16 Thompson street. 
No. 24 Main street. 
School st., near Main. 
Mills street. 
No. 32 Warren street. 
Centre street, 
State st., near Pleasant. 
No. 53 State street. 
No. 54 Warren street. 
Spring st., near Pleasant. 
Main street. 



Schedule of Property— Eagle Hose, No. 1. 
One four-wheeled hose-carriage, $700 ; 1 two-horse pole, $30 ; 1 hand pole and rope 
reel, $10; 30 feet % inch rope, $2; 12 fire hats, $75; 12 reefing jackets, $90; 14 canvas 
coats, 14 canvas overalls, $140; 2 hand lanterns, $5; 1 axe, $3; 1 iron bar, $2; 2 leather 
hose pipes, 1 Allen's spray and stop nozzle, 1 common nozzle, $45; 2 reducing castings, 
§5 ; 2 pails, $1 ; 1 sprinkler, $1 ; 2 chamois skins, $1.25 ; 1 whip, $1.25 ; 1 horse blanket, 
$5 ; 2 oil-cans, $1 ; 2 hydrant wrenches, $4 ; 2 ladder straps, $2 ; 4 sets spanners, $4 ; 
spanner belts, $3.25; 1 broom, .25;— total, $1,133. 



109 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 

OFFICERS. 



Chas. C. Chesley, Foreman. 
Henry Tucker, Asst. Foreman. 



B. F. Tucker, Clerk. 



Names. 
Chas. C. Chesley, 
Henry Tucker, 
J. F. Scott, 
G. B. Buzzell, 
E. H. Dixon, 
B. F. Tucker, 
W. E. Tucker, 
B. Billsborough, 
W. A. Bean, 
W. H. Davis, 

E. A. Saltraarsh, 

F. S. Johnson, 



members. 

Occupation. 
Carpenter, 
Moulder, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Organ Manufacturer, 
Organ Manufacturer, 
Painter, 

Organ Manufacturer, 
Tailor, 
Moulder, 
Harness-maker, 



Residence. 
Prince street. 
Franklin street. 
Franklin street. 
Franklin street. 
Fremont street. 
Jackson street. 
Henry street. 
Essex street. 
State street. 
Washington street. 
"Walnut street. 
State street. 



Schedule of Property— Alert Hose, 1V0. 2. 

Brick house and furniture, 82,500 ; 1 four-wheel hand hose-carriage, $600 ; 12 fire 
suits, §150; 12 fire hats, $75; 6 spanner belts, $9; 12 spanners, $9; 2 blunderbusses and 
nozzles, $40; 1 wrench and shovel, $2.50; 2 hydrant wrenches, $4; sponge and chamois 
skin, S1.40; water-pail and dipper, §1; dust-brush and broom, §1 ; 13 straps for suits, 
etc., $5; feather duster, $4; copper boiler, §8.50; carriage jack, $2.60; 1 axe, $1.50; 
rubber hose and nozzle, $12.50;— total, $3,427. 



110 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, No. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

Sterling Colby, Foreman. Norris A. Duncklee, Clerk. 

John McNulty, Asst. Foreman. 



Names. 
Sterling Colby, 
John McNulty, 
Norris A. Duncklee, 
Norman G. Carr, 
Herman D. Webster, 
John F. Bartlett, 
David J. Kolfe, 
Wm. E. Dow, 
Benjamin E. Bickford, 
Levi G. Woods, 
Frank Pendergast, 
Henry B. Shute, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupation. 
Clerk, 
Machinist, 
Stable-keeper, 
Jeweller, 
Wood-worker, 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Painter, 
Farmer, 
Machinist, 
Stone-worker, 
Wood-worker, 



Residence. 
State st., cor. of Laurel. 
State st., cor. of Perley. 
Fayette street. 
Thompson street. 
Grove st., cor. of Perley. 
West street. 

State st., cor. of Laurel. 
Turnpike street. 
Main street. 
Warren street. 
Allison street. 
State street. 



Schedule of Property — Good Will Hose Company, No. 3. 
Brick house and furniture, $3,000; 1 four-wheel hand hose-carriage, $600; 12 fire 
suits, $150; 12 fire hats, §75; 6 spanner helts, $9; 12 spanners, $9; 2 blunderbusses and 
nozzles, $40; 2 hydrant wrenches, $4; sponge and chamois skin, $1.40; water-pail and 
dipper, $1 ; 1 feather duster, $4 ; 1 broom and shovel, $2 ; mop and spittoons, $4.50 ; 
copper ketle, $8.50 ; 50 feet hand hose, §12.50 ; carriage jack, $3.50 ; screw wrench, 8.60 , 
—total, $3,925. 



Ill 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, " CITY OF CONCORD. 



N. B. Burleigh, Foreman. 

J. L. T. Brown, Asst. Foreman. 



Names. 
N. B. Burleigh, 
J. L. T. Brown, 
Andrew L. Lane, 
Jos. H. Lane, 
C A. Wright, 
Benjamin Oulette, 
N. H. Shattuck, 
A. H. "Webster, 
S. W. Emerson, 
Philip Plummer, 
N. E. Flint, 

C. H. Smith, 

D. D. Jameson, 
Jas. Kennedy, 
Jas. L. Johnson, 
F. S. Abbott, 

C. C. Nutter, 
Henry Gibney, 
Ned Shattuck, 

E. C. Runnels, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupation. 
Machinist, 
Carriage-builder, 
Carriage-builder, 
Carriage-builder, 
Car-builder, 
Carpenter, 
Auctioneer, 
Carriage-builder, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Teamster, 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Painter, 
Clerk, 
Painter, 
Painter, 
Carpenter, 
Stone-cutter, 



Andrew L. Lane, Treasurer. 
N. E. Flint, Clerk. 

Residence. 
No. 3 Maple street. 
Thorndike street. 
No. 1 Perley street. 
No. 1 Laurel street. 
No. 30 Perley street. 
No. 3 Jefferson street. 
State st., cor. Maple. 
No. 44 State street. 
No. 33 Downing street. 
No. 138 Spring street. 
No. 7 Maple street. 
Ferry street. 
Thorndike street. 
Essex street. 
Main street. 

Rumford st., cor. Short. 
Spring st., cor. Camb'ge. 
Marshall street. 
Beacon street. 
Walnut street. 



Schedule of Property— Hook and Ladder Company, " City of Concord." 
Carriage and apparatus, $1,500; 20 fire suits, $250; 20 fire hats, $125;— total, $1,875. 



112 



PIONEER ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1. 



OFFICERS. 



Robert Crowther, Foreman. 
John II. Rolfe, Asst. Foreman. 



J. B. Dodge, Clerk and Treas. 
E. E. RoLFK, Steward. 



Names. 
Robert Crowther, 
John H. Rolfe, 
J. B. Dodge, 
E. E. Rolfe, 
John H. Moore, 
Rufus Cass. 
Eli Hanson, 
Geo. W. Corey, 
John W. Powell, 
"W. O. Tucker, 
"Wm. Walsh, 
Wm. W. Allen, 
H. P. Austin, 
M. D. Boyce, 
N. C. Bean, 
Jas. S. Crowther, 
Charles Couch, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Michael Corbett, 
Geo. N. Dutton, 
Augustus Davis, 
Samuel N. Burdick, 
Frank O. Emerson, 
E. P. Everett, 
Fred Ferrin, 
Andrew Foley, 
O. J. Fifleld, 
Patrick Foley, 
J. B. Goldsmith, 
Michael Griffin, 
Horace Hoi com be, 
Hazen Knowlton, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupation. 
Overseer, 
Door-maker, 
Glazier, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Carpenter, 
Moulder, 
Mechanic, 
Overseer, 
Merchant, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Excelsior-maker, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Teamster, 
Farmer, 
Flour-packer, 
Carver, 
Blacksmith, 
Machinist, 
Axle-maker, 
Axle-maker, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Axle-maker, 
Harness-maker, 
Axle-maker, 
Butcher, 
Laborer, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 



Residence. 
Summer street. 
Summer street. 
Charles street. 
Merrimack street. 
Elm street. 
High street. 
Main street. 
Charles street. 
Centre street. 
High street. 
Centre street. 
Main street. 
High street. 
Depot street. 
Merrimack street. 
Summer street. 
Summer street. 
Depot street. 
High street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Summer street. 
Tremont street. 
Merrimack street. 
High street. 
Centre street. 
Washington street. 
Centre street. 
Washington street. 
Rolfe street. 
Church street. 
Depot street. 



113 



MEMBERS— CONTINUED. 



Names. 
John C. Linehan, 
Chas. G. Morse, 
K. G. Morrill, 
J. E. Marclen, 
W. H. Moody, 
Amos O. Mansur. 
Abial Rolfe, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Abial W. Rolfe, 
Arthur P. Rolfe, 
George H. Sayer, 
Lewis J. Sebra, 
Daniel Smith , 
Samuel G. Sanborn, 
Nathan H. Dunbar, 
Geo. "W. Vanica, 
John G. Ward, 
Harry A. Clark, 



Occupation. 
Merchant, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Teamster, 
Machinist, 
Butcher, 
Painter, 

Insurance Agent, 
Carpenter, 
Door Manufacturer, 
Book-keeper, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Butcher, 
Blacksmith, 
Teamster, 

Excelsior manufacturer, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Cabinet-maker, 



Residence. 
Charles street. 
Merrimack street. 
Washington street. 
Summer street. 
Summer street. 
Main street. 
Depot street. 
Depot street. 
Depot street. 
Depot street. 
High street. 
Merrimack street. 
Summer street. 
Main street. 
Summer street. 
Depot street. 
Charles street. 
High street. 



Engine house, 



Schedule of Property — Pioneer, No. 1. 
1,010; 1 engine (hand), $800; 2 hose carriages, $150; 600 feet 2-inch 



leather hose (new), $900; 300 feet 2-inch leather hose (old), $100; 1 set runners, 
lanterns, $5; 3 axes, $2; 1 crowbar, $3; 6 fire-jackets, $30; 2 stoves and funnel, : 
settees, $20 ; 6 chairs, $3 ; 1 oil-can and i lamps, $2 ; 1 fire hook and rope, $25 ; 1 sig- 
nal lantern, $2; 6 spanners and wrenches, $3;— total, $3,100. 

This is a Button machine, playing two powerful and effective streams. The house 
and entire apparatus are in good order. There are five reservoirs at Fisher ville, valued 
at $1,300. 



114 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 



Robert H. Potter, 
John N. Hill, Asst. 



Names. 
Robert H. Potter, 
John N. Hill, 
John E. Frye, 
Albert H. C. Knowles, 
Geo. W. Moody, 
Frank V. Osgood, 
Edmund S. Curtis, 
Geo. H. Curtis, 
"Wm. A. Bean, 
Elbridge Emery, 
Daniel B. Sanborn, 
Edward R. Noyes, 
Lauren Clough, 
Ora Hodge, 
Job C. Jenne, 
Chas. P. White, 
Jos. E. Plummer, 
Geo. W. Lake, 
Frank E. Sleeper, 
Lucius D. Bunnell, 
John M. Smith, 
Harrison Carpenter, 
Lucius A. Bunnell, 
Ami Dubia, 
"Wm. Flanders, 
Wm. P. Curtis, 
Walter F. Lake, 
Chas. C. Chesley, 
Stephen Dustin, 
Edward A. Newell, 



officers. 

Foreman. 
Foreman. 

MEMBERS. 

Occupation. 
Butcher, 
Section man, 
Farmer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Carpenter, 
Blacksmith, 
Farmer, 

Musical instrumen 
Butcher, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Teamster, 
Station agent, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Hose-maker, 
Carpenter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Hose-maker, 
Farmer, 
Butcher, 
Blacksmith, 
Brick-maker, 
Teamster, 



John E. Frye, Clerk. 
Geo. H. Curtis, Treasurer. 



Residence. 
Shawmut street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Shawmut street. 
Portsmouth street. 
Penacook street. 
Curtisville. 
t maker, Portsmouth street. 
Shawmut street. 
Shawmut street. 
Shaker street. 
Shawmut street. 
Shawmut street. 
Mill street. 
Penacook street. 
Pembroke street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Shawmut street. 
Penacook street. 
Eastman street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Curtisville. 
Penacook street. 
Penacook street. 
Shawmut street. 
Penacook street. 



Schedule of Property— Old Fort, No. 2. 

House, $300; engine and hose-carriage, $500; 371 feet new leather hose, $500.50; 300 
feet old leather hose, $150; 1 pole, for two horses, $16; fire hook and rope, $15; 1 set 
runners, $10 ; 6 settees, $24 ; 2 stoves and funnel, $6 ; 2 axes and one bar, $3 ; 2 lanterns 
and lamps, $4 ; 2 fire suits, $8 ; 6 chairs and table, $3 ; 4 buckets, $8 ; 2 whiffletrees and 
chains, $2; stand, glass, and brush, $1; 1 shovel, $1; trumpet, $5; 2 hose and ladder 
straps, $3; 2 spanners, $1.50 ;— total, $1,561. 

This is a Hunnenian machine. Its hose and other apparatus are in good repair. 



115 



CATAKACT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 



OFFICERS. 



John E. Gay, Foreman. 

G. S. Kellom, Asst. Foreman. 



J. M. Crossman, Cleric. 
Harrison Partridge, Treasurer. 



Names. 
John E. Gay, 
G. S. Kellom, 
J. M. Crossman, 
Harrison Partridge, 
"W. S. Lougee, 
F. P. Crossman, 
Patrick Crowley, 
Joel D. Waller, 
H. H. Farnum, 
George Partridge, 
John Madison, 
John Harrington, 
Jeremiah Quinn, 
Michael Jenkins, 
Geo. H. Speed, 
James Bemon, 
George Kemp, 
Michael T. Hayes, 
Thomas Haley, 
Patrick Conway, 
Robert Crowley, 
Henry K. Randlett, 
John Murphy, 
P. E. Blanchard, 
Chas. Dimond, 
A. D. Powell, 
O. A. Downing, 
S. A. Remington, 
John Roberts, 
John St. Clair, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupation. 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Merchant, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Quarryman, 
Mechanic, 
Teamster, 
Kit-maker, 
Quarryman, 
Mill operative, 
Mill operative, 
Mill operative, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Mill operative, 
Mill operative, 
Stone-cutter, 
Mill operative, 
Blacksmith, 
Teamster, 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Painter, 
Quarryman, 
Teamster, 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 



Residence. 
School street. 
High street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Hutchins street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
High street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Abbottville. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Mill street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Main street. 
Abbottville. 
High street. 
Abbottville. 
School street. 
Hutchins street. 
Main street. 



Schechile of Property— Cataract, No. 3. 

House, §911.80; engine and hose-carriage, §600; 550 feet 2-inch leather hose, $412.50; 
316 feet new hose, $440.95; 3 hose clamps, §10.50; 1 pole, $16; 1 set runners, §10; 3 
axes, 1 crow-bar, §5; 2 fire suits, §8; 4 buckets and 2 lanterns, §12; 1 trumpet, $5; 2 
stoves and funnel, $10; 8 settees, $32; 1 signal lantern, §3: 6 spanners and belts, §5; 
1 chain and whiffletree, $2; 2 torches, $1; 1 monkey-wrench, $1.25: 3 hydrant wrench- 
es, $6; 3 reducers, $7.50; 1 oil-can, .50;— total, $2,088.20. 

This is a Hunneman machine. Apparatus in good condition. 



116 
SUMMARY OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

IN PRECINCT. 



Engineers, 


6 


Steamer members, 


12 


Hose members, 


36 


Hook and Ladder members, 


20 
— 74 


WITHOUT PRECINCT. 




Members at Fisherville, 


50 


Members at East Concord, 


30 


Members at West Concord, 


30 


Engineers, 


3 
— 113 




187 



SCHEDULE 0E CITY PROPERTY-EIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Engine house and lot, #34,000.00 

Property at Central station, 146.50 

Hose, 5,200.00 

Engineer's department, 217.00 

Steamer Gov. Hill, 1,500.00 

Steamer Kearsarge, 3,862.00 

Eagle Hose, No. 1, 1,133.00 

Alert Hose, No. 2, house and furniture, 3,427.00 

Good Will Hose, No. 3, house and furniture, 3,925.00 
Hook and Ladder, No. 1, 1,875.00 

Pioneer, No. 1, Fisherville, including house, 3,000.00 
Old Fort, No. 2, East Concord, including house, 1,561.00 
Cataract, No.3,West Concord, including house, 2,500.00 
Miscellaneous property, not in use, 363.00 

Reservoirs and pipes attached, 7,905.00 

Total, $70,614.50 



117 



PUBLIC RESERVOIRS. 



Capacity— 

1. Main street, near Abbot-Downing Co.'s, 

2. " near Harvey, Morgan & Co.'s, 

3. " corner of Pleasant street, 

4. '' middle front state house yard, 

5. " rear of city hall, 

6. State street, corner of Washington street, 

7. " opposite Winter street, 

8. " in high school yai'd, 

9. " corner of Pleasant street, 

10. " near Geo. IT. Emery's, 

11. " corner of West street, 

12. South street, corner of Cross street, 

13. " near A. Downing's, 

14. Thompson street, near Geo. W. Crockett's, 

15. Rumford street, near Josiah Minot's, 

16. Orchard street, corner of Pine street, 

17. School street, near J. V. Barron's, 

18. Centre street, corner of Union street, 

19. Gas-holder, rear of Main street, 

20. *School street: well in front of N. White's. 

21. Main street, near Thorndike street, 

22. Franklin street, near Henry street, 

23. Iron pipe to state house reservoir, and to gas- 

holder tank, 

Total, $7,905 

♦Supplied from reservoir in Union District, high school yard. 



■Cubic feet. 


Value. 


1,000 


$300 


1,000 


300 


*1,500 


450 


*1,500 


450 


2,000 


300 


500 


200 


500 


100 


3,000 


700 


1,000 


300 


1,000 


300 


800 


100 


800 


200 


1,000 


300 


1,100 


300 


1,000 


300 


4,000 


500 


3,500 


500 


1,000 


300 


44,000 




1,500 


555 


1,500 


550 




900 



118 

FIRE-HYDRANTS. 




Main. 



Turnpike. 
State. 



Green. 
South. 



Spring. 



Bradley. 
Walnut. 



Church. 

Franklin. 

Centre. 

Washington. 
School. 

Warren. 



South-west corner Main and Penacook 

East side Main, near J. B. Walker's 

West side Main, opposite Church 

North-west corner Main and Franklin 

North-west corner Main and Washington 

East side Main, opposite Chapel 

North-west corner Main and Court 

East side Main, opposite Montgomery 

South-east corner Main and Free Bridge road 

South-west corner Main and Park 

North-west corner Main and Capitol 

North-west corner Main and School 

East side Main, opposite Merrimack block 

North-west corner Main and Warren 

South-east " Depot 

North-west " Pleasant 

North-east " Freight 

North-west " Fayette 

East side Main, opposite Thompson 

North-west corner Main and Cross 

North-west corner Main and Thorndike 

North-west corner Main and Perley 

E:ist side of Main, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s shop 

North- west corner Main and West 

West side Turnpike, opposite Gas 

North-west corner State and Penacook 

" " Walker 

" " Church 

" " Tremont 

North-east " Washington 

South-east " Downing 

North-east " West 

North-east " Turnpike 

West side State, opposite Court 

North-west corner State and Maple 

North-east corner State and Centre 

East side State, opposite state house 

South-west corner State and School 

North-west corner State and Warren 

North- West corner State and Pleasant 

East side State, opposite Wall 

North-west corner State and Thompson 

South-west corner State and Monroe 

East side State, opposite Laurel 

East side Green, opposite Prince 

North-west corner houth and Fulton 

West side South, opposite Monroe 

" " Laurel 

" " Downing 

West side South, opposite Wall 

South-west corner Spring and Oak 

West side Spring, opposite Cross 

West side Spring, opposite Perley proposed extension.. 

East side Bradley, opposite Highland 

North-east corner Walnut and Franklin 

West side Walnut, opposite Beacon 

North-west corner Walnut and Washington 

North side Church, opposite Henry 

North-west corner Franklin and Jackson 

North-west corner Centre and Rumf ord 

North-west corner Centre and Spring 

.South-west corner Washington and Union 

North-west corner School and Spring 

" School and Merrimack 

" Warren and Rumford 



119 

FIRE-HYDRANTS. 



STREETS. 



LOCATIONS. 



Warren. 



Duncklee. 
Jackson. 
Pleasant. 



West. 
«< 

Railroad. 
Pine. 

Perley. 

Laurel. 

Thorndike. 

Cross. 

Fayette. 

On main pipe, 



North-west corner Warren and Green 

" " Spring 

" " Tahanto 

South-east corner Warren and Liberty 

South-west corner Warren and Merrimack 

North side Warren, opposite Fruit 

North-west corner Duncklee, opposite West 

North-west corner Jackson, opposite Beacon. . . . 

South side Pleasant, opposite Rumford 

North-west corner Pleasant and Green 

South side Pleasant, opposite Pine 

South side Pleasant, opposite Liberty 

North side West, near Mills 

North side West, opposite Dakin 

North-west corner Railroad and Railroad square 

South-west corner Pine and Centre 

North-west corner Perley and Grove 

North-east corner Laurel and Pierce 

North-east corner Thorndike and Grove 

South side Cross, opposite Jefferson 

South side Fayette, opposite Elm 

East side State, at Fosterville 

West side State, at intersection of Walnut 

" near city farm buildings 

" near Mr. Kilburn's 

" near G. E. Holden's 

Hill's avenue 

Total 

PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

State prison yard 

Abbot-Downing Co.'s yard 

Page Belting Co.'s yard 

W. P. Ford& Co 

Total 



92 



120 



EEGULATIONS 



FOR THE 



CONCORD PRECINCT FIRE DEPARTMENT, 

ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS, JANUARY, 1874. 



Article 1. Any engine or hose company, running out a line 
of hose from a hydrant or steamer, shall be entitled to the pipe, 
although the hose of other companies may be attached in order 
to reach the fire ; and any company coming to a fire, and find- 
ing an incomplete line of hose laid out from a hydrant or steamer, 
shall attach to and lengthen out such line, in lieu of laying aline 
of its own. 

Art. 2. When two or more engine or hose companies are 
playing in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the com- 
pany attaching to the hydrant or steamer, as provided in the 
foregoing article ; but any company furnishing the entire line, 
and receiving water from a steamer, the pipe shall belong to 
such company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Each engine and hose company shall have equal claim 
to the hydrants; but it is enjoined upon the engine companies 
to draught their own water from a reservoir, wherever a suitable 
one can be found within reasonable distance. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant or 
reservoir, unless their hose and apparatus for attaching to the 
same are at hand and ready for use. The company which shall 
be thus ready shall be entitled to such hydrant or reservoir ; 
but, upon the order of an engineer, another company may attach 
a second line of hose from such hydrant or steamer, in case the 
same may be necessary, — such company having first laid its hose, 
and being ready to attach the same. 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning from 
fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, and it is 



121 

required of officers of companies to maintain perfect order and 
decorum in their respective commands during all such service. 

Art. 6. No company, while returning from a fire,' will be 
allowed to proceed faster than a walk, and at all times to keep 
on the right of the street. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in 
proceeding to a fire, to use the utmost care and caution consis- 
tent with promptness. Racing between companies is forbidden, 
under any circumstances. Any collision or casualty occurring 
to horses or apparatus will be considered a sufficient cause for 
the suspension of the driver in charge at the time. 

Art. 7. The bells will at first ring a general fire alarm ; and, 
when the locality of the fire is known, the number of the ward 
will be struck, and repeated for the space of at least ten minutes. 

Art. 8. No member of any company shall leave the city 
without first informing his foreman ; no foreman or assistant 
engineer, without first notifying the chief engineer, — in each 
case the party so leaving providing a substitute. 

Art. 9. In case of fire, the foreman first arriving shall be in 
command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 10. Any order issued by the chief) or an assistant en- 
gineer, shall be promptly obeyed. 



122 



WATERING THE STREETS. 



The following account of the receipts and expenditures for 
watering the streets during the year 1876, is inserted in this 
report for the information of those who are interested, 

RECEIPTS. 

From persons on the east side of Main street. 

Dr. G. P. Conn, 
Onslow Stearns, 
Joseph P. Stickney, 
Thompson & Stratton, 
Savage Brothers, 
C. Thorn & Son, 
E. E. Fisher, 
J. D. Johnson, 
G. W. Wadleigh, 
W. C. Elkins & Co., 
J. E. Clifford, 
Elijah Knight, 
James Moore & Sons, 
W. B. Stearns, 
H. II. Aid rich, 

C. C. Webster, 
W. P. Underbill & Co., 
N. H. Savings Bank, 
Eagle Hotel, 
J. H. Morrill, 
C.J Dow, 
E. C Eastman, 
Jane L. Crawford, 
Humphrey, Dodge & Co., 
Prescott Organ Co., 
W. G. Shaw, 

D. E. & C. W. Clarke, 
J. T. Sleeper, 
W. K. Day, 
John Jackman, 



10 


Upham & Upton, 


$2 


10 


Wright & Hood, 


2 


5 


Eagle Book-store, 


2 


5 


M. M. Stearns, 


1 


5 


Ciitchett & Marden, 


5 


o 
o 


Mrs. M. M. Smith, 


4 


2 


T. W. & J. H. Stewart, 


5 


1 


S. & S. C. Eastman, 


2 


1 


R. P. S tan i els, 


2 


3 


Chas. F. Huntoon, 


3 


5 


Henry Churchill, 


5 


5 


Dr. E. Morrill, 


2 


5 


Woodward & Baker, 


5 


5 


A. T. Sanger & Co., 


5 


5 


Joseph Welcome, 


2 


5 


S. Cheney, 


2 


5 


C. N. Towle, 


2 


5 


L. D. Stevens, 


2 


10 


F. B. Underbill & Co., 


6 


5 


H. Strauss, 


5 


o 


J. Y. Mugridge, 


2 


2 


S. G. Lane, 


2 


4 


Shattuck & Emerson, 


5 


7 


Vogler Brothers, 


3 


2 


Stanley & Ayer, 


5 


5 


Phenix Hotel, 


10 


5 


Gust Walker, 


5 


4 


J. H. Gallinger, 


2 


1 


Cummings & Young, 


3 


1 


Loren S. Richardson, 


5 



123 



East side of Main street — continued. 



Woodworth Brothers, $5 

A. W. Gale, 3 

G. W. Weeks, 5 

Concord Savings Bank, 5 

Eastman & Fitch, 5 
Republican Press Association, 5 

Norman G. Carr, 3 

Mrs. T. H. Brown, 1 

John Batchelder, 5 
R. C. Danforth, 

Carter Brothers, 5 



D. A. McCurdy, 


$5 


Flanders & Emmons, 


5 


Elm House, 


5 


Charles Moore, 


2 


Farley Brothers, 


2 


James R. Hill, 


7 


L. A. Smith, 


5 


J. E. Dwight, 


3 


Ford & Kimball, 


3 



$323 



West side of Main street. 



Asa Fowler, 
Mrs. J. S. Abbot, 

F. Evans, 

J. S. Norris, 
J. S. Norris & Co., 
Cummings Brothers, 
J. F. Hoit & Co., 
Perkins & Dudley, 
Kilburn & Glennon, 
J. H. Morey, 
C. H. Martin & Co., 
A. J. Souza, 
J. S. Hubbard, 
William Gilman, 
H. C. Sturtevant, 
James Davis, 
J. H. Chase, 
Morrill & Silsby, 
S. F. Morrill & Co., 
William Marshall, 
L. H. Carroll, 
H. B. Foster, 
State Capital Bank, 
Frank Marden, 
Miss Flanders, 
Stevens & Duncklee, 

G. H. Adams, 
Rev. J. A. Barry, 



First National Bank, $5 

John H. Albin, 2 

A. P. Sherburne, 1 

J. R. Hill & Co., 8 

F. E. Ingalls, 3 
James Hazelton, 5 
A. Leavens, to July, 3 
Sargent & Chase, 3 
Morrill & Danforth, 3 
Harris & Co., 3 
Underbill & Kittredge, 3 

D. L. Guernsey, 3 
John S. Blanchard, 5 
Dickinson & Cummings, 5 
Frank H. Pierce, 2 

E. N. Shepard, 5 
Hammond & Avers, 5 
Mrs. D. B. Jones, 5 
James M. Jones, 5 
Sanborn & Clark, 2 
Josiah B. Sanborn, 5 
John H. Hill, 2 
Mrs. O'Brien, 2 
N. W. Moores, 2 
S. Nutter, 2 

G. L. Hooper, 2 

$199 





124 






Warren street. 




Frank Beede, 
J. L. Pickering, 
C. W. Allen, 
J. A. Dadmun, 
F. D. Batchelder, 


$1 
3 
1 
1 
1 


T. W. Williams, 
J. E. McShane, 
Ordway & Ferrin, 
John Kimball, 


$1 
1 
2 
5 

116 




/School street. 




W. B. Durgin, 
J. E. Larkin, 
James Hazelton, 
John H. Morse, 
Misses Knee & Knay, 


$3 
5 
2 
2 

1 


Minot & Co., 
Savings Bank, 
John Coleman, 
Chas. F. Batchelder, 


$5 
2 

2 

2 

$24 




Capitol street. 




Concord Gas Light Co., 
George Goodhue, 
C. H. Pearson, 


$5 
2 
3 


Cheney & Co., 


$15 
$25 



Whole amount collected, 1876, 

From which I have paid for collecting, $20.00 

" " city water-works, 200.00 

" « city treasury, 361.50 



Amount collected in 1873, 

1874, 

« " 1875, 

« " 1876, 



$654.00 
608.00 
575.00 
581.50 



$581.50 



$581.50 



Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 
Supt. Repairs of Highways. 



REPORTS 

OF THE 

CITY PHYSICIAN, BOAED OF HEALTH, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEER 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD, N. H., 

FOR THE YEAR 1876-7. 



G. P. CONN, ) 

G. A. CUMMINGS, \ Board of Health. 
JOHN CONNELL, ) 

CHARLES C. LUND, Civil Engineer. 



CITY PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the City Council: 

So far as I have been able to learn, our city has for the 
past year suffered as little from disease as at any time since 
it was incorporated. There has been no severe form of epi- 
demic, or contagious influence, afflicting any particular sec- 
tion, and our death-rate compares favorably with other places 
having an equal population. 

The rate of mortality, as shown to be normal by registrars 
of vital statistics in this country, is 17 in 1,000, while in 
Concord, estimating our population to be 14,000, it has been 
14| in 1,000, or 1 in 65. The greatest number of deaths 
occurred during the month of August, and the smallest in No- 
vember. The largest number in any ward was in Ward 4 
(61) ; the least in Ward 2, which was only 8. This is about 
the usual ratio in proportion to population. 

Among those requiring assistance of the Overseer of the 
Poor, I think there have been quite as few cases of sickness 
as in years past ; and the health of the inmates of the alms- 
house has been remarkably good, considering the broken- 
down mental and physical condition of many of those re- 
maining in the institution. 

This alone is prima facie evidence of the good care and 
treatment they receive at the hands of the superintendent 
and his wife. 

The distance of the almshouse from the precinct renders 



128 

it an inconvenient place to take persons accidentally injured, 
or those suddenly taken ill, having no place to call a home. 

The Overseer of the Poor should have a room or rooms 
at his disposal, near our business centre, to which such cases 
can be taken and temporarily provided for, until some better 
arrangement can be made, or their friends notified of their 
misfortunes. 

It is generally conceded that the city must very soon have 
a building erected for the use of the police department ; and 
I would respectfully submit to you, that, in considering a plan 
to meet the requirements of this department, it would be well 
to take this matter into consideration, and provide suitable 
rooms, properly furnished, for this class of persons, within 
the same building. 

As now provided, there is no place to take an injured per- 
son, having neither money nor friends, except to the station- 
house or lock-up ; and any one who has ever inspected this 
building will admit, without argument, that it was never in- 
tended for a hospital. 

I think the amount paid annually to boarding-houses and 
hotels for this class of persons would do considerable towards 
fitting up rooms where they could be made comfortable at a 
small expense ; and, as accidents are liable to occur in and 
about our railroad station, I have no doubt the different 
roads centring here would deem it a privilege to do some- 
thing towards fitting up rooms for this purpose, as they 
have done in other cities. 

As a member of the Board of Health I have had but little 
to do, as the city marshal is the executive officer, and gen- 
erally attends to the complaints without being obliged to call 
a meeting of the Board ; but the subject of ventilating our 
sewers having been referred to the Board for a report there- 
upon at some future meeting of the city council, it has been 
thought proper that such report and explanations be made 
at this time, that the public may receive the greatest benefit 
from the construction of sewer mains. 



129 

Feeling that the matter of ventilating our sewers was of 
paramount importance to the public, the subject has been re- 
ferred to Mr. Lund, who, having superintended the surveys 
for all our street mains, and given the subject that attention 
every sanitary engineer should in order faithfully to perform 
his duty, is fully qualified to express his views, and his re- 
port is submitted for your consideration. 

I would also call your attention to the report of A. H. 
Crosby, m. d., on the Water Pollution of this city. This 
is a matter of serious import to the people of Concord ; 
and, while we are doing so much to improve its sanitary 
condition by sewers and drains, we should not ignore the 
fact that pure water is one of the first elements of health, and 
should provide against any possible contamination of our 
water-supply. 

Gentlemen, in conclusion, allow me to call your attention 
to the fact that our municipal regulations are very imperfect 
in the manner of collecting vital statistics ; that our records 
of deaths and burials are kept in such a manner as to be of 
but little use for reference ; that the statute in regard to the 
registration of births is not enforced, nor is there any way 
provided for the publication of registration returns. 

This is a matter of interest to the public and the physician, 
as showing the relative sanitary condition of the several sec- 
tions of the town, as well as the prevalent diseases to be 
guarded against. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. P. CONN, m. d., City Physician. 

February 22, 1877. 



ON THE NECESSITY OF 



A THOROUGH SYSTEM OF 



MUNICIPAL SUPERVISION 

OF OUR SEWERS, 



BOTH PUBLIC AND PRIVATE, THAT OUR CITIZENS 

MAY, IN THE BEST MANNER, UTILIZE 

THEIR USE. 



BY G. P. CONN, M. D., 

CITY PHYSICIAN, AND MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



183 



THE NECESSITY 



MUNICIPAL SUPERVISION AND REGULATION. 



The removing from our habitations of waste and effete 
matter, by means of what has been termed water-carriage, has 
been fully tested in other cities, and is regarded, by all who 
have made the subject a study, as the best now known. 

No one will dispute but that it is an expensive method, not 
only in manner, but in material. The question of utiliza- 
tion of sewage is being investigated by engineers and sani- 
tarists in this country and in Europe ; but until some way 
is developed, by far less expensive than any yet devised, we 
must use such as are acknowledged to be in good repute. 

Irrigation has been tried in many places, but has not proved 
satisfactory to the friends of the system ; for, while the ex- 
pense so far exceeds the income, it is useless to expect it to 
come into general use, for the friends of the system advocate 
its merits on the broad ground of utility, and have in Europe 
obtained charters, organized stock companies, and purchased 
land to carry out this idea. I do not know that any enter- 
prise of this kind has proved a financial success. 

The changes of temperature incident to our climate at once 
render all plans perplexing, and any system, that would be 
practically useless for four months or more in a year, should 
be passed by without further consideration. 

The city having brought pure water into our houses, and 
constructed sewer mains in nearly every street, thus furnish- 
ing the channel and means of transmission, the question 



134 

naturally arises, Have you anything more to do, or will this 
investment take care of itself ? 

I think there are hut few, certainly none that have 
given the matter any considerable attention, but that will an- 
swer that your work has but justbegun ; that a careful and 
vigilant supervision must be maintained ; that the construc- 
tion of private sewers must be attended to by competent per- 
sons, of known honesty and integrity ; that the people must 
be made aware of the great danger they will incur if imper- 
fect or misconstructed pipes are used, or unskilful workman- 
ship is allowed, thus rendering this great expenditure of 
money in vain, — for a broken or misconstructed drain is 
worse for the health and happiness of those who use it than 
none ; and not only those, but, by means of the subterranean 
communication thus established, all that have connection 
with the common sewer are exposed to the direful effects of 
another's carelessness or inefficiency. 

Thus it becomes a matter of serious import to all who have 
entered, or who propose to enter, our street drains, that a 
rigid system of municipal supervision be exercised over 
every part of the whole plan, as in all matters of this 
kind there can be no discrimination between the rich and the 
poor, the mansion or the tenement. All have a common ob- 
ject in view, and all must be governed by the same rules and 
regulations. 

That I may be better understood, you will pardon me if I 
call your attention to a few of the many dangers to be 
guarded against while our citizens are endeavoring to utilize 
the advantages you have so liberally presented for their 
use and occupancy. First, the sewer is intended to carry 
away our water-supply after becoming soiled, together with 
the various impurities from public and private buildings, the 
end and object being to remove all deleterious matters in 
such a manner that no offence be given to sight or smell. 
If this could be practically accomplished, so that all filth 
could be deposited in running water beyond the termini of 



135 

each section before fermentation or putrefaction was in any 
manner developed, your supervision would be unnecessary. 
Unfortunately, facts prove this to be a delusive theory, and 
that decomposition is a constant factor in all sewers, whether 
public or private, while the new compounds, developed by 
putridity, are direct agents of destruction to life to all living 
within the range of its contamination. Dr. William Stokes, 
one of the first authorities in Sanitary Science, says,"* — 
" Sewers, streams, rivers, damp localities, collections of ref- 
use — not alone of putrefying animal and vegetable matters, 
but of materials in no way offensive — have in turn proved 
to be manufactories of disease, not of cholera alone, but, in 
an enterprising mercantile spirit, of great variety, so as to 
suit the market." Virchow f thinks that ordinary putrefac- 
tion will, under certain circumstances, all of which at present 
are not known, produce some of the Zymotic diseases, es- 
pecially typhoid fever, dysentery, and diphtheria. 

Liebermeister's J opinion is rapidly gaining ground among 
medical men, whether disciples of Pettenkofer's germ theory 
or not, that filth furnishes a formidable foe to health, and a 
favorable nidus in which disease finds conditions ready for 
rapid development. 

Pettenkofer, § fully believing in the germ theory, holds that 
a specific poison exists for Zymotic diseases, and that each 
disease can be produced only by its own virus or germ; 
and compares filth to charcoal in gunpowder. It is neces- 
sary to have it present in order to produce the explosion ; 
but sulphur and saltpetre must also be there, and the mix- 
ture must be in the right proportions, otherwise the spark pro- 
duces no fire. 

In England sentiment is somewhat divided as to whether it 
is filth alone, or filth plus some particular germ or poison. 
Yet the fact stands unquestioned, that the removal of filth 
lowers the death-rate. 

•Lectures on Sanitary Science, 1873. t Lectures in Berlin, 1874. % Zur iEtcologie dea 
Typhus, 1876. § Zeitschrift fur Biologic 



136 

Mr. Simon, chief medical officer of the Privy Council, 
and of the Local Government Board of Great Britain,* 
says, — " A point that needs to be recognized by all who are in 
any way responsible for the prevention of Filth-Diseases is, 
that filth does not only infect where it stands, but can trans- 
mit its infective power afar by certain appropriate channels 
of conveyance ; that, for instance, houses, which have un- 
guarded drainage communication with cess-pools, or sewers, 
may receive through such communication the same filth- 
infections as if excrement stood rotting within their walls ; 
and that public or private water-reservoirs, or water-conduits, 
giving accidental admission to filth, will carry the infection 
of the filth whithersoever their outflow readies." " Thus it 
has again and again happened that an individual house, with 
every apparent cleanliness and luxury, has received the con- 
tagium of enteric fever through some one unguarded drain- 
inlet ; or that numbers of such houses have simultaneously 
received the infection, as an epidemic, in places where the 
drain-inlets in general have been subject to undue air-pres- 
sure from within the sewer." " Secondly, a very large dan- 
ger to the public health, and particularly to the better-off 
classes of society, has of late years consisted in the reckless- 
ness with which house-drains, receiving pipes from water- 
closets, sinks, cisterns, baths, &c, in the interior of houses, 
and often actually within bedrooms or adjoining dressing- 
rooms, have been brought into communication with sewers. 
Among architects and builders there seems to have been very 
imperfect recognition of the danger which this arrangement 
must involve in event either of unskilful first construction, 
or of subsequent mismanagement or want of repair. Then, 
in regard to construction, an almost unlimited trust has been 
placed in artisans who, in not a few instances, have evidently 
failed to apprehend that even their mechanical work requires 
conscientious execution, so that under this influence there 
have been left in innumerable cases all sorts of escape-holes 

•Filth-Diseases and their Prevention. 



137 

for sewer effluvia into houses, and disjointed drains effusing 
their filth into basements; while, under the other deficiency, 
house-drainage, though done with good workmanlike inten- 
tions, has often, for want of skilful guidance, been left entirely 
without exterior ventilation, and sometimes has, in addition, 
had the over-flow pipes of baths, or cisterns, acting as sewer- 
ventilators into the house. It is almost superfluous to say 
that, under circumstances of this sort, a large quantity of en- 
teric fever has been insured ; and I should suppose that also 
a very large quantity of other filth-diseases must have sprung 
from the same cause." In our country, the members of the 
Massachusetts Board of Health have reprinted this Essay on 
Filth-Diseases, and say, — ' : If the practical suggestions made 
therein were acted upon by all citizens, hundreds of lives, now 
annually doomed to destruction, would be saved, and the health 
and comfort of the people greatly increased." As illustrating 
the extreme danger arising from decomposing filth, the in- 
vestigation into the causes of an epidemic of typhoid fever 
which occurred in 1864 at the Maplewood Young Ladies' In- 
stitute, at Pittsfield, Mass., by several of the professors in 
tile Berkshire Medical College, affords an instructive warn- 
ing. There were in this building at this time, of teachers, 
students, and servants, a family numbering one hundred and 
twelve persons; of these, fifty-six, or fifty per cent., had 
typhoid fever, of whom sixteen died. This epidemic oc- 
curred, too, in a season when, in a town of eight thousand 
inhabitants, all the physicians in practice testified that, aside 
from the cases at the institution, there was but very little 
typhoid fever, and none that proved fatal. 

Had this been other than a local cause, and the inhabitants 
of the whole town been afflicted in the same ratio, there 
would have been four thousand cases of typhoid fever, with 
eleven hundred and forty deaths. It was, " however, so en- 
tirely local, that some physicians in Pittsfield had no cases, 
others only two or three." Prof. Palmer says of this epi- 
demic, — " Before the investigation the matter was spoken of 



138 

as an act of a mysterious providence, to whose rulings all 
must submit. Looking with the eye of science, upon the 
overflowing cess-pools and reeking sewers as inevitable causes, 
and with the eye of humanity upon the interesting and inno- 
cent victims languishing in pain and peril, or mouldering 
in their shrouds, I could but regard such implications of 
providence, though perhaps sincerely made, as next to blas- 
phemy, especially when uttered by agents who were to be 
held responsible, — though the prayer of charity might have 
been, ' Father, forgive them, they know not what they do.'" 

The sanitary reforms recommended by the Investigating 
Board of Physicians being carried out, Maplewood became 
and still remains free from diseases attributable to miscon- 
structed sewers. 

Dr. Bowditch long since gave the profession, as an aphor- 
ism, •" All filth is an absolute poison ; " and a sewer, being 
the receptacle of all manner of filthy material, may be con- 
sidered as the typical Upas-tree that we should at all times 
guard our families from, it being one of those necessary evils 
that the massing of population requires. 

This poisonous sewer gas cannot be clearly defined as it 
appears in its most dangerous form ; but it is believed to be 
some product of organic matter undergoing decomposition in 
the presence of superabundant water, and in the absence of 
light and free ventilation. The dangers to which we are 
liable, and the necessity of public supervision, become more 
and more self-evident as we investigate the causes of disease. 
Col. Waring,* Civil Engineer, says, — " In doing away with 
cess-pools, and substituting sewers, unless proper precautions 
are taken, we simply make an elongated cess-pool, rarely 
sufficiently cleansed, and often grossly foul, and communi- 
cating with the interior of every dwelling-house. If typhoid 
excreta are thrown into a sewer a mile away from us, we 
have no security against the danger that its poisonous con- 
tagium will not float in the gas of the sewer, and enter our own 

* Sanitary Condition of Houses and Towns. 



139 

living-room." "This is a grave difficulty, but it may be almost 
entirely removed by a proper arrangement of the drainage- 
works of the house itself." 

Again he says, — " Singularly enough, no one whose premi- 
ses are subject to these influences seems willing to be told 
the truth with regard to them." " No man likes to confess 
that his own well and his own cess-pool occupy the same 
permeable stratum in his garden ; that decaying vegetables 
in his cellar are the source of the ailments in his household ; 
or that an obvious odor from his adjacent pig-sty, or from 
his costly marble-topped wash-stand, has to do with the dis- 
eases his physician is contending against." " That the im- 
perfections of our own premises are a nuisance to our neigh- 
bors is a still more irritating suggestion, and such criticism 
seems to invade the domain of our private rights." " Yet 
surely there can be no equitable or legal private right, whose 
maintenance endangers the well-being of others, — as our wide- 
spread disregard of the defects in our own houses does en- 
danger the well-being of our fellow-townsmen." 

The following from the pen of Dr. William Child, in a 
report to the New Hampshire Medical Society,* commends 
itself as a self-evident truth to any one who has had occasion 
to investigate cases of this kind. He says, — " The people 
are not only apparently ignorant of the most common sani- 
tary laws, but have a morbid sensitiveness on the subject. 
You may maltreat a man, and lie will grant you pardon; 
but suggest to him that his cellar is not clean, or that, his 
drains are bad, or that his well is contaminated, or his privy 
is disgustingly odorous, and he will never forgive you. He 
calls you to treat his sick with drugs, not to tell him of his 
sink-drain or water-closet. He is willing that you should 
pocket a fee, but do not suggest to him that his premises are 
disagreeably filthy. He will follow his family to the grave, 
but you must not disturb that little but lively devil, personal 
pride." I presume there is scarcely a physician in this city, 

*N. H. Med. Soc. Trans., 1875. 



140 

who has not, while seeking for information as to the probable 
cause of some enteric disease that affected his patient, had 
the truth of the above forced upon him, perhaps sometimes 
more forcibly than elegantly expressed. 

I trust enough has been said to show some of the possible 
dangers consequent upon the introduction of our sewers ; 
and, as people have to be educated in the use of everything 
that is new to them, it may not be out of place to give a few 
hints as to what is absolutely necessary in order that we may 
attain the object for which they were intended. 

I believe it is universally acknowledged by all who have 
given the subject any serious consideration, that it is of 
prime importance to have all sewers thoroughly ventilated ; 
and, as Mr. Lund will in another place give the results of his 
investigations, especially concerning the mains, I will only 
refer to the necessity of ventilation of our private drains for 
our own protection. 

Mr. Simon, to whom I have before referred, states, in his 
report of 1874, the following, as imperative conditions that 
should be insisted on whenever water-closets are allowed : 

" 1. That the closets will universally receive an unfailing 
sufficiency of water properly supplied to them. 

" 2. That the comparatively large volume of sewerage that 
the system produces can be in all respects satisfactorily dis- 
posed of. 

" 3. That on all premises which the system brings into 
connection with the common sewers, the construction and 
keeping of the closets, and other drainage relations, will be 
subjected to skilled direction and control." 

In his explanatory remarks, he states " that a sufficient 
supply of water is a supply that will enable each closet to be 
well flushed whenever used, and that the supply must be not 
only professedly, but actually constant. The best way to se- 
cure this is to supply each closet from an independent cistern 
immediately above it. That every privy drain must be prop- 
erly trapped and ventilated, and properly constructed, ven- 
tilation of the soil-pipe above the roof being imperative." 



141 

Dr. I)e Chaumont says, — "Under no circumstances ought 
there to be a water-closet opening directly into a bedroom, 
the merely occasional convenience of such an arrangement 
being more than counterbalanced by its danger, and generally 
objectionable situation." 

Col. Waring states, in regard to house drains, — " Tbat, 
from a sanitary point of view, a most important feature is a 
complete ventilation of fhe drain leading to the sewer, so 
that by no possibility can there be a forcing back into the 
house of gases formed in the sewer, or in the main drain. 
As already stated, a usual water-trap, no matter how deep, 
does not suffice to secure this. A water-trap having a bend 
of even two feet would resist a pressure of only about one 
pound to the square inch, while a sudden filling of the sewer, 
by rising tide or falling rain, to such an extent as to reduce 
its air-space one half, would bring to bear a pressure of fifteen 
pounds to the square inch ; and, whether the filling be sudden 
or gradual, the degree to which the increased pressure would 
affect any given outlet would depend on the facilities offered 
elsewhere for the air to find vent. In our ordinary town 
sewerage works, it is never safe for the householder to de- 
pend on other vents than his own connecting drain being 
available. He must in self-defence assume that his own 
drain is the only channel of escape, and make it impossible 
that air escaping there should find its way into the house." 
All offensive smells proceeding from any works intended for 
house drainage, indicate the fact of the detention and de- 
composition of ordure, and afford decisive evidence of mal- 
construction, or ignorant or defective arrangement. A sink 
without a trap, or an open cess-pool or drain, thus al- 
lowing sewerage air to find access into our dwellings, can- 
not fail to produce a pernicious effect upon all who may be 
brought within its influence. 

These important matters have been too much neglected, 
and it cannot be doubted but that very serious results follow 
the neglect of the proper means to preclude the escape of the 



142 

poisonous air generated in sewers and drains. As lias been 
observed before in this paper, the evil effect of sewerage air 
is not confined to the premises at fault. The closest observ- 
ance of sanitary rules avails one but little if his neighbors 
give no heed to its claims upon health. Hence the impor- 
tance of a thorough inspection and supervision of the con- 
struction of drains, and a speedy remedy of any defects that 
may be made apparent. 

The importance of this subject claims your attention, as 
well as those who, in their professional character, are en- 
trusted with the care of the public health. 

We often hear it said, by persons in apparently sound 
health, that the conditions under which they live must be good 
and healthful, because they do not suffer. Again: we are 
told that all this talk about filth, as a cause of disease, is a 
fraud, a hobby of medical men, and, in support of this theory, 
will refer you to this or that family or neighborhood, living 
in apparent health amidst surroundings that are surely repul- 
sive to the sight and smell. Much self-deception is practised 
in this way. Unwholesome influences may for a long time 
be resisted by a vigorous constitution, yet the time arrives at 
last when they show their power. 

It is difficult to explain why an intelligent appreciation of 
disease, and a reasonable knowledge of the ordinary means 
of its prevention, are so slow in forcing themselves upon the 
attention of communities. 

In our city, those having water-closets in their dwellings 
have put in the so-called pan-closet, which is condemned by 
those who have made the system a study. Mr. Waring, who 
has been quoted before in this paper, says, — " The usual pan- 
closet is in several ways objectionable ; chiefly, as containing 
in the chamber beneath the pan a certain quantity of fouled 
water, above which is an unventilated air space — sometimes, 
from imperfect construction, leaking its gases into the room, 
always sending up a foul whiff when the pan is tipped." 
Baldwin Latham, who stands unquestioned as authority in 



143 

Sanitary Engineering, speaks of it " as a cumbrous appliance, 
■which cannot be introduced into a house without sooner or 
later creating a nuisance." Mr. Philbrick, C. E.,* says, — 
" Its defects are numerous, but its great defect arises from the 
reservoir of foul air always present in the iron receiver below 
the crockery bowl. The inside of this receiver is necessarily 
foul ; it is quickly smeared with filth when first put to use ; 
its interior is inaccessible, and can therefore never be cleansed. 
Directly below is the large metal trap, whose contents gen- 
erally emit noxious gas from their decomposition ; and this 
trap cannot safely be dispensed with. Whenever the pan is 
tilted and discharged, there is suddenly dropped into this re- 
ceiver several quarts and sometimes a pailful of water. This 
must, of course, displace its own volume of the foul air pent up 
there, for' which there is no escape in any direction but up- 
ward, with a rush past the tilted pan into the bowl, when it 
mixes freely with the air of the room." Another reason is, 
that the bowl and receiver are connected together with a 
putty joint, as well as the water-pipe connection. This prac- 
tice among plumbers is but little better than a rag packing ; 
for in our climate the changes from heat to cold, alternately 
expanding and contracting the metal, are sure to make cracks 
in the joints, — and, even if they did not crack, it is a well- 
known fact that sewer gas will find its way through putty, 
mortar, or cement ; — therefore cement-pipes must be glazed in 
order to answer the requirements of house drainage. 

I do not lay any claim to originality in this paper. These 
facts have been published again and again in works on Sani- 
tary Engineering, and any one who will take the trouble 
may inform himself on all these important points. It would 
be well if more would do so ; for, * " however well a system of 
house drainage may be planned and constructed, it cannot 
be expected to be entirely automatic, or serve its owner for 
an unlimited period, without intelligent supervision. In 
fact, ' eternal vigilance ' is the price of safety in such 

* Mass. Board of Health, 1876. 



144 

matters in a climate where such violent and sudden changes 
occur as in ours. Sometimes a trap may freeze in January, 
and dry up in July ; deep frosts sometimes break up drains 
and leave them leaky ; rats burrow into and gnaw into drains, 
if not thoroughly built ; the gases given off by sewage often 
corrode lead pipes, and the ammonia in water-closets corrodes 
the copper pans ; valves become leaky by wear ; counter- 
poises get loose. But frost is our greatest enemy : a frozen 
water-pipe often does much damage, but a frozen drain is the 
climax of discomfort. With the extended use of plumbing 
come the increased risks of such mishaps. 

" The risks of leakage of drains are of course very serious, 
and the difficulty of tracing such troubles to their sources 
renders it imperative to keep a careful record of their po- 
sition, and to take alarm from the only sense by which we 
can often be led to detect them, acting vigorously to repair 
the defect when found." 

Instances might be cited to show how little is known 
about ventilation, water-traps, or the materials that should be 
used in the construction of private drains. 

Let us have rigid municipal rules and regulations to gov- 
ern and guide our citizens, and a competent and judicious 
supervisor or superintendent, to whom any and all may 
apply for information and advice, who will carefully inves- 
tigate into every individual case, and see that nothing is left 
undone to secure exemption from the evils incident to a neg- 
lected or misconstructed sewer or private drain. 

Then we can rest assured that an accidental sporadic case 
of any infectious disease, occurring in any part of our city, 
will not, by reason of negligence or ignorance on the part of 
the friends of the patient, communicate the same infection 
to their neighbors on the same street, or to others residing 
a mile away on the hill-side, perhaps in blissful ignorance 
that a case of infectious or contagious disease exists within 
the limits of the city. 

If any have connected their premises with our sewer mains, 



145 

and not done it in a thorough manner so that there can be 
no risk with ordinary care and supervision, let them attend 
to it at once, and do so intelligently, — never trusting to the 
artisan, who has no interest beyond the number of his days' 
work, and, oftentimes, has no better recommendation than 
that he can make a good looking joint outside, though water 
will scarce run through the pipe from its imperfections 
within. 

To others, who intend to make use of our sowers, I would 
say, " Go slow." Be sure you fully understand what you 
want in the way of drains and house-pipes before you begin, 
and then see that none but the best materials and workman- 
ship are used, and you will have fewer troubles in tearing 
out and building over, and less anxiety for the safety of 
your families. 

10 



ON THE 



IMPORTANCE OF YENTILATION 



IN A SYSTEM OF 



SEWERAGE WORKS. 



BY CHARLES C. LUND, C. E. 



VENTILATION OF SEWERS. 



The experience of the winter has made it obvious that some 
attention must be given to this subject at an early date. The 
results foreshadowed by my articles, published in the Monitor 
last fall, have already been produced in the more elevated 
portions of the city ; and, inasmuch as this report will be 
placed in a more permanent form than the articles above 
referred to, I may be pardoned if I repeat some of the sug- 
gestions there made. I may also state that I do not claim 
that the suggestions here offered are to any great extent 
original. I shall quote freely from the works of the sanitary 
engineers who have written upon this subject, my object 
being simply to put before our citizens information gathered 
from sources which are not generally accessible to persons 
who give no special attention to the matter. 

The evil effect of sewer air upon the public health is not a 
modern discovery, for it appears that in the flourishing days 
of the Roman empire " the prsetor took care that all the 
sewers should be cleaned and repaired for the health of the 
citizens, because uncleaned or unrepaired sewers threaten 
a pestilential atmosphere, and are dangerous." They had a 
clear knowledge of the necessity of ventilation for under- 
ground conduits, and made provision for such ventilation in 
the construction of their aqueducts where they pass beneath 
the surface. The Cloaca Maxima was one of the most per- 
fect and stupendous works of that age, and was kept in a 
state of efficiency by a stream of surplus water from the 
aqueducts. During the republic, the surveillance of the 
cloacae was one of the duties performed by the censors. They 



150 

were subjected to repair by Cato, and his colleague in the 
censorship, Agrippa, when iEdile obtained praise for his 
exertions in cleansing the cloaca?, and is reported to have 
passed through them in a boat. Many of their ventilating shafts 
are still in perfect order, after a lapse of nearly 3,000 years. 
They were constructed at intervals of about 120 feet, and 
served for ventilation, and admitting light and air and work- 
men to make repairs. An examination, made by Mr. Cresy, 
of the drainage works of the Coliseum at Rome, revealed 
drains constructed within its massive walls so as to be en- 
tirely hidden from view, which conducted away the sewage 
and rain-water, and that careful provision was made to pre- 
vent the odor therefrom from entering the building. 

Every descending drain was open at its head, and the heads 
of all the drains of the building terminated in the outer cor- 
ridors, which were open to the atmosphere. 

The dangerous elements which exist in sewers are either 
the direct contagion of infective diseases from the dejecta of 
sick-rooms, or the result of the decomposition of animal and 
vegetable matter which finds its way to the sewer from our 
sinks and water-closets. The gases produced by decompo- 
sition of animal matter, though offensive to the smell, are 
not particularly dangerous to health. But the results of 
vegetable decomposition are most fatal to health, while some 
of the most subtle and deadly vapors arising therefrom can- 
not be detected by their odor. 

Thus, the proximity of slaughter-houses may be very offen- 
sive by reason of the animal matter in various stages of de- 
composition almost inseparable therefrom, but they do not 
create an unhealthy neighborhood ; but the proximity of 
undrained swamps, where vegetable matter is in a constant 
state of decomposition, is most unhealthy, producing fevers 
and epidemics. 

The gases found in sewers are carbonic acid, nitrogen, 
carburetted hydrogen, sulphuretted hydrogen, ammoniacal 
compounds, and foetid organic vapor. 



151 

Carbonic acid is produced by all the ordinary processes of 
combustion — by respiration, fermentation, and by the decay 
of animal and vegetable products. When diluted with air it 
may be breathed without difficulty, but if the proportion in 
which it exists in the air exceeds four per cent., it acts as a 
narcotic poison. A proportion of ten or twelve per cent, is 
speedily destructive to animal life, and so small a quantity 
as one or two per cent, is deleterious and depressing. The 
drowsiness and headache experienced in crowded and ill-ven- 
tilated apartments are chiefly due to carbonic acid as the re- 
sulting product of respiration. 

Nitrogen is one of the most abundant of the elements. It 
will not support life in its pure state, yet it has not been 
shown to be a poisonous gas. It constitutes four fifths of 
the atmosphere. It is found largely in animal, and, in small 
quantities, in vegetable products. One fifth of the weight of 
dried flesh is nitrogen. It is colorless, tasteless, and odor- 
less in itself ; but organic bodies which contain a large 
amount of nitrogen emit a most offensive odor when they 
decay, and a peculiarly offensive odor when they are burned. 
The odor occasioned by the putrefaction of human flesh, 
which is rich in nitrogen, is one of the most offensive in 
nature. 

Carburetted hydrogen is a constant product of the decom- 
position of wood and other carbonaceous bodies, under water. 
It is the gas which arises when the mud is stirred in the 
bottom of stagnant pools, and, in connection with atmos- 
pheric air, forms the explosive compound known to miners 
as fire-damp ; and it is therefore unsafe to enter an unven- 
tilated sewer with naked lights. It explodes with great 
violence ; and care should be taken to ascertain as to its pres- 
ence before introducing lanterns into the lamp-holes for pur- 
poses of inspection of sewers. 

Sulphuretted hydrogen is always present in sewers in 
which the sewage has assumed a certain degree of putridity. 
It has a disgusting odor, like rotten eggs. It is heavier than 



152 

air, and burns with a blue flame, with a smell of sulphur. It 
is the most poisonous of all gases of known composition, and 
when present in very small quantities is fatal to the lower or- 
ders of animals. When inhaled, it acts directly on the blood, 
thickening it and turning it black. It is this gas which 
makes an open or foul sewer so destructive of health to any 
district in which it may be situated. It is produced in large 
quantities in sewers and cess-pools by the decay of organic 
matter, and its presence may often be detected in marshes, 
where vegetable matter alone is undergoing decay. Experi- 
ments show that one of the gas to two hundred and fifty of 
air will kill a horse ; one in five hundred will kill a dog ; 
one in fifteen hundred will kill small birds ; and a rabbit was 
killed in a few minutes by being placed in a bag of this gas, 
though its head was not enclosed, and it was free to breathe 
pure air. Numerous deaths have been recorded in times 
past among the workmen employed in emptying cess-pools in 
which this gas had accumulated. 

Ammonia is produced during the decomposition of animal 
and vegetable substances which contain hydrogen and nitro- 
gen, and in almost every process of oxidation in the presence 
of moisture. It has an extremely pungent smell, and instantly 
kills an animal ^immersed in it, but when largely diluted 
with air is an agreeable stimulant. 

But little is known of the nature and composition of the 
foetid organic vapor, which is more or less present in all 
sewers ; yet it is conceded to be the most subtle and danger- 
ous matter present in the sewer. It is either in itself the 
cause of disease, or it causes the germs of disease which float 
about on the air of sewers. It is not distinguishable by any 
characteristic odor, like the gases above named. This vapor 
can be effectually absorbed and destroyed by the use of char- 
coal. 

Experiments made by Dr. Letheby (says Latham) on the 
generation of sewer gas from sewage, show that a gallon of 
sewage, containing 128.8 grains of organic matter, gave in 



153 

nine weeks 1.2 cubic inches of gas per hour, consisting of 
73.833 of marsh gas, 15.899 carbonic acid, 10.187 of nitro- 
gen, and 0.081 of sulphuretted hydrogen. But this was a 
laboratory experiment, and gave larger results than would 
be probably obtained from sewage taken at random from our 
sewers. 

The effect of this sewer air upon the health of a commu- 
nity, and the diseases which are directly traceable thereto 
classed as Filth-Diseases, will be set forth in another portion ■ 
of this report. 

In the construction of a system of sewerage, it would be 
desirable to give the sewers so great a pitch that the contents 
thereof would pass quickly away before decomposition could 
take place ; for it is the decomposition of the organic matters 
found in sewage that liberates the harmful elements above 
described. 

But in practice many instances will occur where grades 
must be so flat that the ordinary flow of water will not be suf- 
ficient to carry along the solid matter, and it will lie as if in 
a cess-pool until flushed out by storm-waters, or by an arti- 
ficial flow introduced from the hydrants. Some seasons 
many weeks will elapse before the flow from storm-waters 
will be sufficient to accomplish this, and in the mean time 
gases are generated which will constantly be seeking an 
*avenue of escape into houses through the sinks and privy 
drains, unless, the most thorough precautions are taken against 
them. 

The expansion of the sewer air by heat ; the natural draft 
upwards through the main sewers, as through a chimney ; 
the rarefied air of our houses, by reducing the atmospheric 
pressure on the traps ; the displacement of the air in the 
sewer, by varying ebb and flow of the sewage ; the wind 
blowing into the outlets ; the expansive nature of the gases 
themselves ; variations in barometrical pressure, — all tend 
to expel the sewer air through the various openings made to 
admit the sewage itself ; and against these forces we interpose 



154 

the water-trap, which, without the aid of ventilation, will 
prove an insufficient barrier. The power exerted by the 
forces above specified is very much underestimated. It is 
easily demonstrable to far exceed the resisting power of the 
traps in ordinary use ; and it acts with greatest intensity in 
the more elevated portions of the system. And gentle- 
men who have established their residences on the hill for 
the purpose of obtaining pure air, should take especial care 
lest their locations become the most unhealthy by reason of 
the transference of the sewer gas from the lower portions, to 
find its easiest escape into their kitchens and bedrooms by 
way of their sink drains, and by the waste-pipes to their fixed 
wash-basins and bath-tubs. I might cite numerous instances 
where whole communities have suffered from epidemics of 
typhoid fever, directly traceable to this cause alone. It is 
to be constantly borne in mind, that the householder, who con- 
nects his house-drain with the public sewer, has not only to 
protect himself against the results of the decomposition of 
the waste matters of his own house, but also from all other 
houses whose drains empty into the river by the same outlet ; 
and it becomes of the first importance, now that we have 
got our system of sewerage, to learn so to take care of it and 
use it that we may realize the great benefits which it ought 
to confer. Our system of sewerage — I mean what is known 
as the water-carriage system — is undoubtedly the best yet 
devised ; but it requires the utmost care on the part of the 
individuals using the drain to make the plumbing arrange- 
ments of their houses perfect. 

The antidote and preventive to be employed against the 
sewer gas is ventilation. So great a purifying power resides 
in the atmospheric air, that it burns up the harmful ele- 
ments, liberated by decomposing matter, as by fire. It 
purifies by oxidation, which is a slow combustion ; and, if 
we can mingle sufficient pure air with the tainted air of our 
sewers, we shall have no trouble. And so our house-drains 
should be so constructed that currents of pure air may be 



155 

induced through them ; and, above all, so that sewer air, if it 
is forced through the traps, should find an escape outside; the 
walls of our houses. 

The thorough and systematic ventilation of the public 
sewers themselves is of great importance, because it adds to 
the security that the house-traps afford by furnishing an 
easier escape for sewer gas than through the trap; and if 
such ventilation were provided, probably the ordinary traps 
in use would be sufficient to bar the passage of air from the 
main sewer into our houses. They would act as safety- 
valves, so that pressure enough to force the traps could not 
be brought to bear. But it is not easy to suggest a system of 
ventilation for our street mains that shall be effective in this 
climate, and under the conditions which must always exist 
here. A system of ventilation by the man-holes, which are 
provided with perforated covers, is the best yet known, either 
with or without the use of disinfectants and deodorizers. 
But such a system would be ineffective here for half the year, 
when snow and ice would completely seal up the vents. Dur- 
ing the present winter there has been absolutely no ventila- 
tion for our sewers, except through the catch-basins left 
untrapped, and on the hill a few of these basins have fur- 
nished all the ventilation which has been had ; and the resi- 
dents near the localities of these basins unite in the testi- 
mony that the odors therefrom are not apparently fresh " from 
the spicy groves of Araby the blest." When two or three 
outlets of this kind do duty for a whole city, we should ex- 
pect a pretty strong odor. 

There have been numerous theories and experiments, for 
many years, having reference to this subject of ventilation of 
main sewers, and the prevention of the formation of sewer 
gas : The deodorization of sewage by chemical agents, as it 
flows through the sewers, has been proposed ; absorbing ma- 
terials, placed within sewers to absorb the sewer gases as they 
were generated ; chemical agents, introduced to give off gases 
which might destroy the noxious properties of sewer gas ; elec- 



156 

trie and galvanic agency has been proposed as a means of de- 
stroying the noxious properties of sewer air ; suggestions for 
the use of high shafts, or chimneys, aided by artificial heat, 
have been made ; a very common proposition is, to make use 
of chimney shafts of manufactories, but such use naturally 
interferes with their use as chimneys ; special pipes, usually 
of metal, have been carried from the crown of the sewer un- 
der the roadway, and up the external walls of adjoining 
houses ; rain-water pipes have been adopted for ventilation, 
but not with good results — on the contrary, with very fatal 
results — and they were obliged to be abandoned; ventilation 
by means of the lamp-posts, assisted by the heat evolved from 
the gas jets; cowl-headed shafts, operated by the wind ; and 
other devices too numerous to mention, — all have resulted in 
failure as ventilators. But the system of conducting metallic 
pipes from the crown of the sewer, up the walls of ad- 
joining houses, acted efficiently in allowing the air to escape 
when it became compressed, so operating as a safety-valve. 

The system of ventilating by means of man-holes, hav- 
ing perforated covers placed at frequent intervals, not ex- 
ceeding two hundred feet apart, in the centres of streets, has 
proved most effective in milder climates than ours. The ob- 
ject has been to take a small portion of the gas at every 
man-hole, and thus discharge it as fast as it arises in any 
part of the system. Some of these man-holes will act as down- 
cast shafts, and some as up-cast shafts ; and the varying con- 
ditions of the atmosphere will induce currents of air through 
the sewers, which accomplish the desired results. But, as 
before remarked, it is essential to the success of this method 
that the man-holes be kept open, and this would be prac- 
tically impossible in this climate during the winter months. 
I am as yet unable to learn how this problem has been 
solved in any other city whose climate and situation is sim- 
ilar to our own. The climate of Lowell is milder than that 
of Concord, of course, but the conditions are somewhat sim- 
ilar a portion of the year, and the report of Mr. David W. 



157 

Cunningham, engineer, in 1873, informs us that the simple 
method of leaving the street gully untrapped, and with an 
open iron grating, has been, and still is, employed in Lowell 
as the only ventilation. He says, — "The effect of it is, that 
the offensive gases are thrown out into the streets at the 
edge of the sidewalk, and too near the front doors and win- 
dows of houses : " and further adds, — " that the best method 
he can suggest for economical ventilation, and that giving 
the least annoyance, will be to perforate the iron covers of 
the man-holes in the centres of the streets, and to connect 
the rain-water pipes from the houses with the sewers with- 
out traps : and this is the plan now generally adopted." 

It is objected, however, that in times of storm, when large 
quantities of water are passing into the sewer through the 
gullies, and, of course, displacing as much air, which is 
trying to escape, the water will also be passing into the 
sewer through the rain-water pipes, and thus preventing their 
doing duty as ventilators in times when they are most needed. 
But in the summer season, if both the rain-water pipes are 
connected and man-hole covers perforated, they might, to- 
gether, furnish sufficient ventilation during the summer, but 
in the winter we should be compelled to rely on the water- 
pipes alone. 

Mr. Shedd, the chief engineer of the Providence Water- 
Works and sewer construction, employed perforated covers 
to the man-holes alone, as I gather from his report in 1874. 
He has placed man-holes at intervals of about one hundred 
feet apart on the smaller sewers, and varying distances, 
greater than this, on the larger ones, so that the sewers may 
be easily inspected and obstructions removed. In our Con- 
cord system we have not placed man-holes as frequently as 
perhaps we ought, because of their cost ; and I am inclined to 
think that additional ones will be found necessary after a little 
experience. Such was the result in the city of Worcester, 
where they had, from motives of economy, left long intervals 
between the man-holes in the original construction of the sewer. 



158 

Such openings should be made sufficiently often to enable 
the sewer to be easily and conveniently inspected and 
cleansed, and a neglect to provide these necessary appur- 
tenances to our sewers when they are being constructed is a 
mistake. Frequent man-holes are necessary in all sewers, 
and the smaller the sizes the oftener should the man-holes be 
inserted, especially on the flat grades. They are necessary 
as ventilators ; they are necessary for the proper inspection 
of the sewer ; and, in case obstructions begin to form in 
any small sewer having man-holes at one hundred feet inter- 
vals, the obstructions can be removed without taking up and 
re-laying. With man-holes at long intervals, the sewers can 
neither be inspected nor properly flushed, and the result is, 
that the difficulty of cleansing leads to postponement of the 
work until the complete choking of the sewer compels it to 
be done, and then the sewer must be uncovered, broken into, 
and patched up, to its material and permanent injury ; and 
in the mean time the choked sewer is an elongated cess-pool, 
full of all manner of filth, putrefying and festering corruption, 
sending its foul odors and deadly miasmata abroad. And 
when the angel of death spreads his wings in our midst, and 
children, tender women, strong men, succumb to the pesti- 
lence bred in such a sewer, as I fear they already have here in 
our own city, it is not a visitation of Providence, but the pen- 
alty for the almost criminal neglect of the must obvious 
precautions. 

And this leads to the subject of keeping the sewers clean. 
As I have before remarked, it has not been found practi- 
cable in this city to give so great a pitch to all our sewers 
that they will keep themselves clean by their own flow. 
They would carry away, even in the flattest places, a vast 
amount of pure water, but much of the sewage is not suffi- 
ciently diluted to flow away freely, and obstructions are 
liable to occur at any time, in any sewer, by reason of im- 
proper substances which find their way there. We should 
expect more or less sand from our unpaved streets ; but 



159 

shavings, sticks, coal, bones, garbage, bottles, spoons, knives, 
forks, apples, potatoes, hay, shirts, towels, stockings, floor- 
cloths, broken crockery, old clothes, boots and shoes, are 
but a portion of the substances found in the sewers, which 
have no business there, and which they are not intended to 
carry away. 

I have never yet heard of a housekeeper vigilant enough to 
prevent a servant girl from thrusting everything which she 
wished to get rid of down the sink-spout, provided only that 
the sink-spout is large enough to receive it. To accomplish 
this, either the sink-spout or the servant girl must be abol- 
ished. I have no doubt that if these dumb receptacles had 
tongues with which to speak, they would answer the often 
repeated conundrum, Where do things go to ? 

Convenient facilities for inspection, and opportunities for 
flushing, intelligently employed, ought to keep our entire 
sewerage system in as cleanly a condition as sewers are ever 
capable of being kept ; and, if so kept free, the dangers from 
sewer gases are much diminished, because of the prompt re- 
moval of the matters in which they have their origin. Such 
timely attention and flushing will do much to help out insuf- 
ficient ventilation, and to render the exhalations from the 
ventilators less offensive. 

Experience has shown that the points in a line of sewer 
where obstructions are most likely to occur, are found a short 
distance below the point where a steep grade intersects a 
flatter one — as at the foot of the high land on Pleasant, 
School, Warren, Centre, and all streets coming down from 
the hill to the more level land below. The swift flow of the 
water down the hill is checked at the foot on the flatter 
grades, and a kind of reaction takes place, which precipitates 
the material held in suspension in the swift flowing water, 
and sometimes packs it so hard that flushing cannot remove 
it until it is loosened by dragging. Such obstructions may 
be removed by a claw drawn from man-hole to man-hole by 
means of a rope, a smaller cord having first been passed 



160 

through by a float, by means of which the rope attached to 
the drag or claw is drawn through the sewer. It is rarely 
found that such obstructions make it necessary to take up a 
sewer, provided sufficient man-holes are constructed, and 
timely attention is given. 

Having constructed our sewers, the next subject which de- 
mands attention is the manner in which the house-drains are 
constructed — a subject which comes more particularly within 
the province of the architect and builder, and demands the 
individual attention of every householder and tenant, as well 
as the general supervision of the public authorities ; for, how- 
ever well sewers may be built and arranged, if the house 
drainage is imperfectly or unskilfully executed, it will bring 
its train of evils to plague us. In this subject the public 
also have an interest. No man has the right, by incurring 
the risk of disease in his own family, to endanger others to 
whom his disease may be communicated. I propose to make 
a few general suggestions as to the manner in which such 
drains should be constructed. 

It should be first borne in mind that the prime object 
should be to remove refuse from the premises with all pos- 
sible speed ; and where cess-pools or grease-pots are con- 
structed, because of the need of separating the grease from 
kitchen drains, they should be as small as possible. 

The drains should be no larger than is absolutely necessary 
to perform their office, and there is little danger of making 
them too small ; all increase of size above what is absolutely 
necessary is an injury, by diminishing the scouring power of 
the current. There is probably no building within the limits 
of our sewerage system, including the asylum for the insane 
and the state prison, that would not be amply drained by a 
6-inch pipe, laid with a fall of from Hto 2 feet per hundred. 
Col. Waring, in his recent book on the Sanitary Drainage 
of Houses and Towns, relates an instance which illustrates 
the capacity of small pipes. A 6-inch drain pipe was laid to 
drain a single house. Other houses were built adjacent, and 



161 

the drain was extended to accommodate them, and so on, 
until, after the lapse of a few years, one hundred and fifty 
houses were connected with that 6-inch drain, which answered 
its purpose perfectly, and kept itself clean, and gave no 
trouble. Of course, the drain was used only for the waste 
of the families, and not for storm- waters. 

A 6-inch pipe, laid with a fall of 1 in 100, will discharge 
41.75 cubic feet of water per minute, or 587 barrels per hour, 
if running full — an amount far exceeding the probable re- 
quirements of any institution within our city limits. A 4-inch 
pipe, under the same circumstances, will deliver 15 cubic 
feet per minute, or 211 barrels per hour. 

All house drains should be trapped, and the place where 
the trap should be located is outside the house walls, on the 
main house drain, after it has collected all its branches ; and 
this trap should have a ventilating pipe of say 4 inches in 
diameter, leading from the hole in the trap up the side of 
the house, like a rain-water spout, to the highest points of 
the roof, so that sewer air, if forced through the trap, may 
there escape. 

Cement-pipe is not a suitable material for drains inside 
the house or under it. It is too porous to stop sewer gas. 
Iron, with lead joints painted, makes the best material for 
this purpose. Mr. Philbrick, on the subject of House Drain- 
age, in the Report of the Massachusetts Board of Health for 
1876, states that he has seen a drain well laid with Scotch 
pipe and full cement joints, and covered with a concrete of 
hydraulic cement on the cellar floor, giving off, through the 
cement, an amount of stench that made the cellar nauseous, 
even though the soil-pipe above was ventilated. Metallic 
pipe, not buried under the cellar bottom, but carried along 
above it, with well caulked joints, painted, and so placed 
that it can be easily inspected and repaired in case any leak- 
age shows itself, is the best possible material for drains in- 
side houses. 

The trap outside the premises is intended to stop gas from 
11 



162 

the main sewer. It is obvious that more or less decomposi- 
tion will take place in the drain-pipes leading into this trap. 
This should be most carefully guarded against. It is a com- 
mon practice in our best modern houses to place wash-basins 
in sleeping-rooms, and in dressing-rooms opening directly into 
sleeping-rooms. The most careful provision should be made 
for trapping and ventilating the waste-pipes to these con- 
veniences, so that by no possibility can they act as conductors 
of foul air from the drain into the room. To accomplish 
this we must imitate the example of the Romans, nearly three 
thousand years ago, and let the head of every drain ter- 
minate in the open air outside our buildings. 

The idea of inserting the head of the drain into the chim- 
ney is a^popular one, and at first thought would seem to be 
a good one, that the draft of the chimney might effect the nec- 
essary ventilation. I can only say that those who have tried 
this method have been compelled to abandon it, so far as I 
can learn. The better way is to carry the soil-pipe, full size, 
up beside'the chimney if possible, through the roof. 

It is easy for the architect to provide for this in the con- 
struction of new houses; and in houses already constructed, 
where plumbing arrangements are introduced, such arrange- 
ments may be made at small expense. Those who have the 
means usually Jiave the desire, also, to make these arrange- 
ments perfect in this respect ; but those whose means are 
more limited are apt to neglect such precautions, because 
they think they cannot afford it, and perhaps they do not 
sufficiently appreciate their importance. No man is so poor 
that he can afford to neglect them, or so poor that he need 
be filthy. He cannot afford the expenses of sickness and 
death in his family consequent upon breathing the foul exha- 
lations from the public sewer. I have endeavored not to 
overstate the dangers that threaten us as a community if the 
subject is neglected. We have no right to suppose that our 
experience will differ from the experience of other cities in 
this regard. I have only stated facts well known to every 



163 

man who has given attention to this subject, and which may 
be verified by anybody who will take the trouble to make the 
investigation for himself. It is a subject on which I might 
write a volume. The entire report of Mr. Philbrick, above 
quoted, as published in the Report of the Massachusetts 
Board of Health, is worthy of being republished here for the 
practical information it contains on the subject of house 
drainage ; and those who are putting in house drains can- 
not do better than follow its most excellent suggestions. 



Note. — Dr. A. II. Crosby's report on the " Water Pollution 
of this city," not having been furnished to the printer in season, 
is necessarily omitted here. 



INDEX. 

PAGE 

AppropriationsVor 1876 53 

Available assets 55 

City farm appropriations 33 

Central fire station 33 

County tax 10 

City paupers 10 

County paupers 12 

Committee service 27 

City officers 3 

City property 52 

City debt 54 

Claims outstanding 55 

City precinct debts and assets 56 

City precinct appropriations 49 

City farm report 66 

Cemetery committee's report 86 

City marshal's reports 99, 101 

City physician's report 127 

Cemeteries, Old and. Blossom Hill 31 

Chief engineer's report 103 

Dog tax 31 

Expenditures, detailed statement 10 

Finance committee report 7 

Fire department 16, 103 

Funded debt 54 

Floating debt -. 55 

Highways and bridges 35 

Highway districts, reports 36 

Incidentals and land damages 19 

Liquor agent's report 92 

Liquor agency abolished 93 

Municipal supervision of sewers 133 

Municipal regulations 2 

Police and watch , 26 

Professional services 30 

Printing and stationery 31 

Public library 31 

Precinct debts and assets 56, 57 

Precinct fire department regulations 120 

Physician's report 127 

Poor, overseer of, report 72 

Police justice 97 

Precinct property 56 

Report of trustees of public library 88 

Keceipts 7 

Koads and bridges 22 

Report of engineer of fire department....' 103 

Report of committee on sewers 78 

State tax 10 

Schools 28 

School-house taxes 49 

Special appropriations 49 

Salaries 29 

Sewers 50 

Solicitor 95 

Trust funds 58 

Valuation table and taxes assessed 59 

Ventilation of sewers 149 

Water commissioner's report 61 

Water-works, financial statement 65 

Watering the streets 122