(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

't mmm 



(iJlP^lw/^MliI 



City of Concord 







Fortieth 

Annual - 
Report ^ 



For the Year Ending 
December 3 1, 1892 






18^2, 

THE FORTIETH 

ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



City of Concord 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DKCENIBKR 31, 1892 

Together with other Annual Reports and Papers relating to 
THE Affairs of the City 




Coiuortr, |l. p. 

Republican Press Association, Railroad Square 
1892 



352.07 
CIA- 
\Q9k. 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

FOR PAYMENT OF BILLS AGAINST THE CITY. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, or aid 
to the city poor, should be particular to take the name of the 
person ordering such service, material, or aid, and should Icnow 
that the person is duly authorized to contract said liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or delivered 
on city pauper account, except on the written order of the Over- 
seer of the Poor, and for no longer time than until his successor 
shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by the 
city, furnished on county pauper account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge; and. unless this is done, no action can 
be had upon the bill by the Com'raittee on Accounts, and uo 
order will be given for its payment. 

When bills are certified to as above, and left with the city 
clerk before 12 o'clock of the day of meeting of the Committee 
on Accounts, they will be audited by them, and, if approved, be 
ready for payment on the Thursday following. 

Meetings of the Committee are held on the Thursday next 
preceding the second Tuesday in each month, at 2 o'clock p. m. 
JOSEPH A. COCHRAN, City Clerk. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 

CONCORD, N. H. 

Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, biennially. 



1892. 
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Elected by inhabitants biennially in November. 
Salary, $1,0H0 per annum. 

HENRY W. CLAPP. 

Office: No. 7 Bailey's Block, North Main St. 



ALDERMEN. 



Elected by inhabitants of each ward biennially in November. No salary as such, but 
allowed $60 each for committee service. 

Ward i— JOHN O'NEILL. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 
Ward 5^ WILLI AM A. COWLEY. 
Ward 5— ADAM P. HOLDEN. 
Ward 4— JAMES K. KENNEDY. 

HENRY McFARLAND. 

HENRY J. CRIPPEN. 

EDWARD B. WOODWORTH. 
Ward 5— GEORGE F. UNDERHILL. 

WILLIAM J. FERNALD. 
Ward 6— OILMAN B. JOHNSON. 
• JOSEPH C. ORDWAY. 

JAMES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 7— FRANK P. QUIMBY. 

GEORGE H. MILLS. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, _$800 per annum. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

Office: City Hall Building. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elected by inbabitants of each wiird biennially in November. No salary as such, but 
allowed |!30 each for committee service. 

President— OILMAN K. CROWELL. 
Ward 1— HENRY T. FOOTE. 

FRANK P. ROBERTSON. 
Ward 2— CHARLES L. WORTHEN. 
FarcZ 5— CHARLES W. BLANCHARD. 
Ward 4— OILMAN K. CROWELL. 

HENRY W. HAYDEN. 

NATHAN MANSUR. 

JOHN H. COUCH. 
TFard 5— PATRICK H. COLEMAN. 

CHARLES E. PALMER.* 
Ward 6— LEONARD W. BEAN. 

FRED E. CLOUDMAN. 

CHARLES C. NUTTER. 
Ward 7— SIDNP:Y S. UPHAM. 

CHARLES W. BROWN. 

CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 
Elected by Common Council biennially in January. Salary, $50 per annum. 

EDWARD M. NASON. 

Office: :i8 Terley St. 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Aldermen appointed by Mayor, and Councilmen appointed by President of Common 
Council, biennially in January. 

On Finance — The Mayo^" ; Aldermen Underbill and McFarland ; 
Conncilmen Coueli and Blanchard. 

♦Resigned. 



CITY GOVEKNMENT. 

On Accounts and Claims — Aldermen Ciippen and Ordway ; 

Conncilmen Coleman and IJean. 
On Lands and Buildings — Aldermen Quimby and Woodworth ; 

Conncilmen Palmer and Rol)ei'tson. 
On Public Instruction — Aldermen Crippen and Holden ; Couu- 

cilraen Cloudman and Upluim. 
On Parks and Commons — Aldermen Johnson and Kennedy ; 

Conncilmen Hayden and Brown. 
On Roads and Bridges — Aldermen Mills and Sanders ; Couu- 

cilmen Bean and Worthen. 
On Fire Department — Aldermen Kennedy and Uuderhill ; Coun- 

cilmeu Hayden and Nutter. 
On Lighting Streets — Aldermen Fernald and Ordway ; Council- 
men Coleman and Upliam. 
On Cemeteries — Aldermen Woodworth and Dodge ; Conncilmen 
Foote and Mansur. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Appointed by Mayor bieunially in January. 

On Elections and Returns — Alderman Cowley. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — Alderman O'Neill. 
On Bills, Second Reading — Mdcvxwsixi Fernald. 
On Police and Licenses — Alderman McFarland. 

ON SEWERS AND DRAINS. 
Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

The Mayor ; Aldermen Quimby, McFarland, Dodge, and Holden. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN COMMON COUNCIL. 
Appointed by President of Common Council biennially in January. 

On Elections and Returns — Conncilmen Conch and Robertson. 
On Bills, Second Reading — Conncilmen Cloudman and Blan- 

chard. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — Conncilmen Nutter and Palmer. 



b CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Bonil to the acceptance of Board of 
Mayor and Alderiuen. Salary, §2.50 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, .*0C>0 per annum. 

EDWARD H. DIXON. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Bond within six days 
to satisfactiim of the Board. Sal;iry, five mills for each dollar of first §60 000; 
seven and one half mills for each dollar over ^60,000. 

ALBERT I. FOSTER. 

Office: Martin & Lugcomb's Block, Depot St. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Union School-District. 

Three elected annually in March by inhabitants of Union School-District. Salary, 
S225 per annum for the Board. 

HARRY P. DEWEY, Term expires March, 1893. 

MARY P. WOODWORTH, " " 1893. 

WILLIAM YEATON, " '' 1893. 

PARSONS B. COGSWELL, " " 1894 

SHADRACH C. MORRILL, " " 1894. 

JOHN C. ORDWAY, " " 1894. 

WILLIAM M. CHASE, " " 1895. 

AUSTIN S. RANNEY, " " 1895. 

HENRY C. BROWN, " " 1895. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 7 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Union School-District. 
Appointed by Board of Education annually in July. Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 

Office: High School Building, School St. 

EAST CONCORD— District No. 12. 

One member elected annually in March by inhabitants of district. Salary, $18 per 
annum for the Board. 

EDMUND S. CURTIS, Term expires March, 1893. 
WILLIAM E. VIRGIN, '' " 1894. 

WILLIAM A. COWLEY, " '' 1895. 

PENACOOK— District No. 20. 

One member of Board of Education elected annually in March by inhabitants of dis- 
trict. Salary, .^27 per annum for the Board. 

DR. J. H. FRENCH, Terra expires March, 1893. 
JOHN CHADWICK, '' " 1894. 

JOHN C. FARRAND, " " 1895. 

TOWN DISTRICT. 

Comprising all districts in the city except Nos. 3, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 20. Elected annually 
in March by inhabitants of district. Salary, reasonable charge for actual services. 

ISAAC N. ABBOTT, Term expii-es March, 1893. 
FALES P. VIRGIN, - " 1894. 

GEORGE T. ABBOTT, '' " 1895. 



TRUANT OFFICERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary as such, 

none. 

GEORGE S. LOCKE. 
JAMP:S E. RAND. 
WILL C. SHEFFIELD.* 
DANIEL S. FLANDERS. 
CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
HORACE ROBINSON. 
JOHN E. BAKER. 
FRED M. EATON. 

* Resigned. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Elected bieanially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 2— JOSEPH T. CLOUGH. 
Ward 5— PAUL R. HOLDEN. 
TFard 4— WILLIAM L. FOSTER. 
TFard 5— CHARLES R. CORNING. 
Ward 6— JAMES S. NORRIS. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Appointed annually by Trustees of Library. Salary, $1,000 per anuum. 

DANIEL F. SECOMB. 
ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, .$400 per annum. ' 

CLARA F. BROWN. 
ADAH M. COLBY. 

Fowler Library Building. 



ASSESSORS. 

Elected biennially by inbabitants of eacb ward. Salary, $3 per day of actual service. 

Ward i— IRA C. PHILLIPS. 
Ward 2— ALBERT STEVENS. 
Ward 5— HARRISON PARTRIDGE. 
Ward 4— GILBERT H. SEAVEY. 
Ward 5— CURTIS WHITE. 
Ward 6— GEORGE S. DENNETT. 
Ward 7— JONATHAN B. WEEKS. 

Chaiiman — Jonathan B. Weeks. 

Clerk — Gilbert H. Seavey. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



CITY WATER- WORKS. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two annually appointed in March, for three years, by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Salary, none. 

HENRY W. CLAPP, Mayor, ex officio. 



JAMES L. MASON, 

JOSEPH H. ABBOT, 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, 

GEORGE A. YOUNG, 

JAMES H. CHASE, 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 

JOHN WHITTAKER, 

HENRY E. CONANT, 

President — William P. Fiske 
Clerk — Arthur H. Chase. 



Term expires Ma 



ch 31, 1893. 
1893. 
1894. 
1894. 
1895. 
1895. 
1896. 
1896. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Elected annually in April by Water Commissioners. Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

V. CHARLES HASTINGS. 

Office: White's Block, Capitol St. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $200 per 

annum. 



CHARLES A. DAVIS. 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and AldcTinen. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $100 each per annum. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 
JOHN J. McNULTY. 
WILLIAM E. DOW. 

FOR I'EXACOOK. 

Salary, $15 per annum. 

WILLIAM W. ALLEN. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

JOHN E. FRYE. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

MILES McSWEENEY. 



STEWARD CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, 8f 600 per 

annum. 

NAPOLEON B. BURLEIGH. 



ASSISTANT STEWARD CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, S600 per 

annum. 

JOHN H. TRUE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

ENOCH E. ROLFE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 
JOSEPH E. PLUMMER. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 11 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 
PATRICK CONWAY. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE ALARM. 

Appointed annually in January by Hoard of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $200 per 

annum. 

NAPOLEON B. BURLEIGH. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Appointed annually In January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, §85 per 

annum. 

RICHARD H. AYER. 



INSPECTOR OF ELECTRIC WIRES. 

Elected annually on or before April 1st. Salary, -10 cents per hour for actual service 
rendered, paid by the person or company owning the wires. 

JOSEPH W. ROBINSON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $800 per annum, fixed by City Council. 

BENJAMIN E. BADGER. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, .S2 per day of actual service. 

AMOS J. SHURTLEFF. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January bv City Council. Salary, .^500 per annum. 

HARRY G. SARGENT. 

Office: 60 North Main St. 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLERK OF POLICE COURT. 

Apjiointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by Legislature. 

GEORGE M. FLETCHER. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed biennially in January by Board of ^layor and Aldermen. Bond of $300 
required. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

GEORGE S. LOCKE. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed bienuially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Bond of $300 
required. Salary, S800 per annum. 

WILL C. SHEFFIELD.* 

Office; Penacook. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $800 each 

per annum. 

James E. Rand, Captain of Night Watch. 

Daniel S. Flanders, Fred M. Eaton, 

Charles H. Sanders, Levi F. Cole, 

Horace Robinson, Arthur E. Poor. 
John E. Baker, 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 
Chakles L. Gilmoke, Captain. 

Amos B. Sanborn, Jacob E. Hutchius,t 

George H. Silsby, Orrin H. Bean, 

John T. Batchelder, W. H. H. Patch, 

William A. Flanders, J. P. W. Roach, 

William A. Little, Charles E. Kelley, 

Irving B. Robinson, Charles H. Greene, 

George W. Chesle}', Hovt Robinson. 
Cliarles P. Webster, 

♦Resigned. f Deceased. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



la 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $2 each, 
per day for actual service. 



Henry E. Chamberlain, 
Robert Crowther, 
.John E. Tucker, 
Eli Hanson, 
Whitney D. Barrett, 



•Joseph E. Plnmmer, 
Ross W. Gate. 
Palmer C. Leavitt, 
Horatio Huzzey, 



Simeon Partridge, 
Miles McSweeney, 
George W. Waters, 
.Justus O. Clark, 
Clarke D. Stevens, 



Samuel M. Griffln, 
John T. Kimball, 
Charles T. Huntoon, 
Edward H. Dixon, 
Orlando I. Godfrey, 
George L. Williams, 

George A. Foster, 
Alvah C. Ferrin, 
Frank H. Locke, 
Edwin C. Sanborn, 
Joseph C. Eaton, 
Cliarles E. Savory, 
James F. Warde, 



WARD 1. 

Benjamin F. Philbrick, 
Alvin H. Urann, 
Eugene H. Davis, 
Elmer Welsh, 
Charles H. Greene. 

WARD 2. 

Hugh Tallant, 
Henry Giddis, 
Moody S. Farnum, 
James H. Huzzey. 

WARD 3. 

Oscar F. Richardson, 
Harrison Partridge, 
Cornelius A, Giles, 
Charles N. Morgan, 
Chauncy W. Davis. 

WARD 4. 

Joseph G. Taylor, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
Joseph H. Ford, 
James E. Randlett, 
George R. Clarke. 

WARD 5. 

Reuben C. Dauforth, 
Edward Dow, 
Napoleon B. Burleigh, 
David L. Neal, 
John H. True, 
William Wright, 
Andrew M. Baker. 



14 



CITY OF CONCOIM). 



WARD 6. 



John H. Cnrr, 
JCugeue Savage, 
Daua N. Allen, 
Silvester P. Danfoilii, 
Edward M. Nason, 
Milton Colby, 
M. Lee Moxlev, . 



Amos S. Abbott, 
Joseph W. Robinson, 
Thomas Hill, 
John H. Mercer, 
Joseph W. Walker, 
Horace O. Mathews, 
Horace Robinson, 



Edward H. Houston, 
Norris A. Dunklec, 
George A. Hnntoon, 
Cyrus A. Abbott, 
Waltei- F. Simmons, 
Frank E. Heath. 



WARD 7. 



George E. Davis, 
Thomas Sheehan, 
Albert S. Trask, 
Horace Plummer, 
Truman R. Parker, 
Hovt Rol)inson. 



SPECIAL POLICE AT RAILROAD. 



James M. Jones, 
Orrin C. Hodgdon, 
Charles H. Butters, 
John H. Hamilton, 
Charles Norris. 
Michael E. Haggerty,* 
Elmer Lowrey, 
Charles H. Rowe, 
George Peaslee, 
Granville P. Mason, 



Albert F. Smith, 
Herman W. Clough, 
Henry T. Coombs, 
Henry K. Randlett, 
Frank W. Hancock, 
Winslow D. Hodgdon, 
Robert P. Blake, 
Walter L. Riford, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Otis S. Aldrich. 



SPECIAL POLICE AT CONCORD STREET RAILROAD. 



Nathan H. Dunbar, 
Benjamin F. Sherburne, 



John B. Crosby, 
William G. Crosby. 



* Deceased. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 



15 



RAILROAD POLICE. 

Appointed on petition of the Concord & Montreal Railroad Company. Compensation 
for services paid by the Corporation. 

C. W. Adams, Tilton, Conductor and Station Agent. 

Leon L. Adams, "West Rumney, Station Agent. 

David W. Anderson, Manchester, Station Baggage Master. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Assistant Foreman Wood Shop. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Train Baggage Master. 

Car House. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Baggage Master. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Train Baggage Master. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Yard Conductor. 

Clerli Freight House. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Freight Handler. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Telegraph Operator. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station A^ent. 



L W. Arliu, 
W. V. Ashley, Bath, 
H. E. Abbott, Concord, 
W. W. Badger, Hooksett, 
F. W. Baird, WoodsVille, 
S. Barrett, Nashua, 

D. B. Barton, Woodstock, 
James M. Bedee, Meredith, 

E. A. Bennett, Concord, 
Benjamin Berry, Greenland, 
George L. Billings, Rumney, 

F. W. Blake, Concord, 
R. B. Blake, Concord, 
E. Bombard, Nashua,* 
V. W. Boyden, Zealand, 

G. W. Boyuton, Manchester, 
Myron Browley, Plymouth, 
A. B. Brown, Concord, 
C. L. Brown, Concord, 
L. P. Brown, Candia, 
Miles M. Bunker, Brentwood, 
A. H. Burbank, Concord, 

E. H. Burnes, Nashua, 

F. P. Burnham, 
J. H. Burnes, Concord, 

F. R. Butterfield, Concord, 

G. F. Butterfield, Nashua, 
C. J. Byron, North Weare, 
J. L. Cameron, Newmarket Junction, 
A. F. Carr, 

George A. Carr, North Haverhill, 
N. T. Caswell, Warren Summit, 

*Deceaied. 



16 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



W. F. Challis, Concord, 

W. Chamberlain, Manchester, 

H. E. Cliandler, Concord, 

H.J. Chapman, Newmarket Junction, 

F. L. Chase, Woodsville, 

Frank II. Chesley, Newmarket June, 

J. E. Chesley, Epsom, 

S. U. Clark, Woodsville, 

John B. Clifford, Wing Road, 

Chandler Clouoh, Manchester, 

F. B. Clough, Concord, 
Hermon W. Clough, Concord, 
George H. Colby, Plymouth, 
James B. Colby, Concord, 

G. A. Collins, Concord, 
C. R. Conant, Concord, 
Wm. Conner, Whitefield, 
p]. S. Cook, Laconia, 

H. T. Coombs, Concord, 
G. H. Corliss, Concord, 
W. B. Corliss, Concord, 

C. W. Cross, Concord, 
G. K. Crowell, Concord, 
J. J. Crowley, Concord, 

Geo. E. Cumraings, Woodsville, 
A. L. Currier, Concord, 
J. W. Currier, Concord, 
John E. Davis, Warren, 
Egar Davison, Lisbon, 
E. H. Den no, Concord, 
J. E. Dimick, Portsmouth, 

D. Dinwoodie, Auburn, 
T. Dobbin, Manchester, 
W. H. Dodge, Woodsville, 
I). J. Donovan, Concord, 
J. J. Donovan, Concord, 
G. M. Dow, Woodsville, 
C. E. Durgin, East Tilton, 
A. E. Eastman, Woodsville, 



Ticket Agent. 

Yardman. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Baggage Master. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Baggage Master. 

Station Agent. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Yardman. 

Station Baggage Master. 

Switchman. 

Station Agent. 

Car Agent. 

Switchman. 

Yard Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Ticket Agent. 

Freight Agent. 

Switchman. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Yard Master. 

Station Baggage Master.. 

Assistant Superintendent. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Train Baggage Master. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Yardman. 

Carpenter. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Train Baggage Master. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Passenger Conductor. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



17 



John C. Eastman, Lancaster, 

Nath'l P. Eastman, Concord, 

R. B. Eastman, Jefferson, 

A, Edmunds, Manchester, 

A. J. Edmunds, Stratham, 

George H. Elliott, Concord, 

L. K. Ford, Woodsville, 

A. H. Foxhall, Nashua, 

W. C. French, Northfield, 

H. P. Gage, Thornton's Ferry, 

H. C. Gale, 

A. H. George, Goffstown, 

C. A. Gile, Concord, 

C. L. Gilmore, Concord, 

G. W. Griffin, p:ast Candia, 

E. M. Hadley, Weare, 

M. M. Hall, North Woodstock, 
J. H. Hamilton, Concord, 

F. W. Hancock, Concord, 
Henry Harmon, Manchester, 
J. F. Harris, North Concord, 
W. F'. Harris, Ashland, 

E. W. Harvey, Mauchestery 
E. H. Haskell, Concord, 
C. G. Hastings, Manchester, 
L. E. Heywood, Lake Village, 
A. W. Head. Hooksett, 
L. L. Heath, Concord, 
V. C. Heath, 
Archie Hill, Manchester, 
O. C. Hodgdon, Concord, 
C. P. Hook, Concord, 
H. L. House, Manchester, 
W. C. Howe, Nashua, 
Joseph B. Hussey, East Concord, 
H. D. Hutchinson, Concord, 
Bert Jack man, Fabyan's, 
J. H. Jenkins, Barnstead, 
A. B. Johnson, Weare, 
2 



Station Agent, 
iggage Master. 
Station Agent. 
Freight Conductor. 
Station Agent. 
Carpenter. 
Freight Conductor. 
Freight Clerk. 
Station Agent. 
Station Agent. 
Freight Conductor. 
Station Agent. 
Freight Conductor. 
Ticket Agent. 
Station Agent. 
Station Agent. 
Station Agent. 
Clerk General Freight Office. 
Switchman. 
Yardman. 
Station Agent. 
Station Agent. 
Station Agent. 
Station Baggage Master. 
Yard Master. 
Station Agent. 
Passenger Conductor. 
Spare Passenger Conductor. 
Freight Conductor. 
Yardman. 
Watchman. 
Station Baggage Master. 
Yardman. 
Telegraph Operator. 
Station Agent. 
Train Baggage Master. 
Station Agent. 
Station Agent. 
Station Agent. 



18 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



F. F. Johnson, 

Frank W. Johnson, Woodsville, 

J. Johnson, Manchester, 

N. Johnson, Pembroke, 

F. C. Jones, Concord, 

James M. Jones, Concord, 

J. F. Jones, Merrimack, 

T. E. Joubert, Haverhill, 

John P. Kellej, Concord, 

A. H. Kendall, West Thornton, 

W. E. Keniston, Woodsville, 

N. 8. Knight, Woodsville, 

F. P. Knox, Epping, 
L. B. Landoii. Concord, 
E. B. Lane. 
O. A. Lang, 
R. A. Lantry. Hooksett, 
Wm. La Plant, Concord, 
George Law, Portsmouth, 
A. C. Leavitt, Laconia, 
C. E. Leavitt, Laconia, 
C. H. Leavitt, Newmarket Junction, 
C. E. Littlefield, Manchester, 
J. F. Leonard, Woodsville, 
W. H. Little, Woodsville, 
J. B. Lyons, Manchester, 
H. C. Mace, Concord, 

G. E. McConnell, 
A. E. Mclntire, 
Martin McMahon, Concord, 
George H. Maun, 
Hosea B. Mann, 
Melvin J. Mann, 
Pliilip Martelle, Nashua, 
W. Martin, AUenstown, 
W. P. Martin, North Weare, 
L. M. Mathews, Groveton, 
C. 8. Miller, 
J. F. Moonev, Concord, 



Freight Conductor. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Yardman. 

Station Agent. 

Passenger Conductor. 

General Baggage Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Machinist. 

Station Agent. 

Freight Conductor. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Switchman. 

Spare Passenger Conductor. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Switchman. 

Yard Master. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Clerk. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Switchman. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Passenger Conductor. 



Station Baggage Master. 

Station Agent. 

Spare Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Baggage Master. 

Passenger Conductor. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



19 



F. H. jNIoore, Nashua. 

G. A. Moore, Nashua, 

L. P. Moore, Goft's Falls, 
M. W. Morgan, Bow, 
F. D. Morey, Wentworth, 
J. F. Nichols, Reed's Ferry, 
Frank Now, Manchester, 
Charles Norris, Concord, 
W. C. Norris, Nashua, 

F. H. Nourse, Lancaster, 

C. H. Noyes, Concord, 
W. W. Odikirk, Concord, 

D. A. Parker, Concord, 
.1. A. Patten, Manchester, 
John C. Pennock, 
Manus H. Perkins, 

A. Pickard, North Weare, 

C. Poor, Raymond, 

A. A. Puffer, Manchester, 

T. L. Quimby, Manchester, 

Win. M. Rainnie, Concord, 

J. H. Raymond, Manchester, 

W. L. Riford, Concord, 

James Riley, Concord, 

C. C. Rinehart, Woodsville, 

S. S. Rinehart, Woodsville, 

H. W. Ring, Manchester, 

G. E. Robblns, Goffstown, 
F. E. Roby, 

Thomas Robie, Plymouth, 
W. H. Rollins, West Alton, 

E. J. Ross, Whitefield, 
Sam'l Ross, Manchester, 
S. B. Rowell, Concord, 
W. S. Rowell, Goffstown, 
N. Saltus, Concord, 
Fred Sanborn, Nashua, 

F. C. Sanborn,' Concord, 

F. E. Sargent, Bethlehem Junction, 



Freight Conductor. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Baggage Master. 

Station Agent. 

Spare Station Agent. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freightman. 

Passengei' Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Freightman. 

Station Agent. 

Switchman. 

Freight Conductor. 

Yard Conductor. 

Yard Conductor. 

Clerk. 

Clerk. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Freight Conductor. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 



Station Agent. 

Freight Conductor. 

Yard Master. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Ajjent. 



20 



CITY OK CONCORD. 



L. W. Sargent, Concord, 

E. F. Sherburne, Manchester, 
George G. Shute, Woodsville, 
Walter Simons, Concord, 

C. A. Simpson, Scott's, 
A. F. Sraitli, Concord, 
George F. Smith, 
H. W. Smitli, P^ast Epping, 
A. S. Sprague, Concord, 
L. C. Stevenson, Concord, 

F. E. Stokes, Concord, 

G. H. Sweatland, Concord, 
W. S. Taylor, Pittsfield, 

J. B. Tennant, Short Falls, 
Charles Tewksbury, Manchester, 

C. H. Thompson, Belmont, 

F. E. Titus, Woodsville, 

G. C. Towle, Chichester, 
J. L. True, West Epping, 
W. F. True, East Haverhill, 

E. A. Tyrrell, Hooksett, 

F. E. Wadleigh, Littleton, 
S. D. Walker, Concord, 
Charles Washburne, Manchester, 
F. A. Weare, Concord, 

D. S. Webster, Nashua, 
H. E. Wells, 

Scott Wells, 

A. H. Wheeler, Freight Conductor, 

L. A. Wheeler, Hooksett, 

W. 11. Wheeler, Canterbury, 

H. W. Titcomb, Nashua, 

Henry A. White, Plymouth, 

I. C. Whittemore, JNIanchester, 

O. V. Wilcomb, Weirs, 

H. F. Wilson, Concord, 

J. S. Wilson, Concord, 

W. C. Winters, 

N. W. Wood, Northumberland, 



Freight Conductt^r. 

Assistant Yard Master. 

Janitor. 

Yard Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Switchman. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Yard Conductor. 

Watchman. 

Switchman. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Yardmnn. 

Station Agent. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Station Agent. 

Passenger Conductor. 

Yardman. 

Yardman. 

Station Baggage Mastei'. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Spare Passenger Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Yard Master. 

Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 

Passenger Brakeman. 

Freiglit Conductor. 

Freight Conductor. 

Station Agent. 



CITY GOVKUNMENT. 21 

Elmer E. Young, Conconi, Yiud Coriductor. 

James E. Scott, Lakepoit, 
W. N. Johnson, Hooksett, 
David Sinclair, Raymond. 
V,. Pronk, Hooksett. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 

COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS, 



Elected annually lu January by City Council. Bond salisfactory to lioard of Mayor 
and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 



ALFRED CLARK. 



OflBce: No. 8 Warren St. 



LICENSED DRAIN-LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. No salary. 

Lyman R. Fellows, James W, Welsh, 

Leonard W. Bean, O. H. T. Richardson, 

E. H. Randall, Alvah C. Ferrin, 

George Goodhue, William A. Lee, 

Edward F. Paige, Michael Bateraan, 

Nathaniel S. Gale. Isaac Baty, 

Hiram J. Morrill, John Murdoch, 

Frederick Booth, W. Arthur Bean, 

Patrick A. Clifford, Eli Hanson, 

Fred 8. Bacon, Henry H. Morrill, 

William Rowell, Fred Plummer, 

James M. Crossraan, Miles F. Farmer. 
Simeon Partridge, 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

F:iected biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldennen. 

FOR WARD 1. 

Salary, $25 per annum. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 

Penacook. 



FOR WARD 2. 
Salary, §10 per annum. 

WILLIAM A. COWLEY. 

East Concord. 



FOR WARDS 3, 4, 5, 6, AND 7. 
Salary, $150 per annum. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

City Hall. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected bieiiniiilly in January by City Council. Salary, f 1 for each visit to paupers. 

DR. EDGAR A. CLARK. 

OflBce: 36 South State St. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN, 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to paupers. 

DR. ALFRED E. EMERY. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 23 

HEALTH OFFICERS. 

One elected annually in March by City Council for three years. Salary, $25 per annum. 

EDGAR A. CLARK, M. U., Term expires March, 1893. 

CHARLES R. WALKER, M. D., - " 1894. 

EDWARD N. PEARSON, - " 1895. 



SANITARY OFFICER. 

Nominated by Board of Health in April, and confirmed by the City Council. Salary, 

$700 per annum. 

HENRY A. ROWELL.* 
CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: No. 8 Warren St. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Ckrk is made Registrar by (Jeneral Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each birth 
marriage, and death received, recorded, and returned to State Registrar. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 

Appointed annually by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen in January. Salary, $600 

per annum. 

MOSES LADD. 

Office: No. 168 North Main St. 
* Resigned. 



24 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually for three years by Board of Mayor and Aldermen In January. 

No salary. 



William P. Fiske, 


Term expires January, 1893. 


George A. Young, 


1893. 


Ben C. White, 


1894. 


Edgar H. Woodman,* 


1894. 


Willis G. C. Kimball, 


1894. 


Benjamin S. Rolfe, 


1895. 


John F. Jones, 


1895. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PENACOOK PARK. 

Elected annually in January by City Council Salary, $bO per annum. 

O. F. RICHARDSON. 

West Concord. 



CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (e.\cept wards 4, 5, G, consolidated) elected annually in January, 
by City Council for three years. Salary, none. 

WARD 1. 

JOHN A. COBURN, Term expires January, 1893. 

JOHN G. WARREN,* " '' 1894. 

JOHN WHITAKER, '' " 1895. 

WARD 2. 

JOSEPH E. PLUMMER, Term expires January, 1893. 

ALBERT H. C. KNOWLES, '' " 1894. 

JOHN E. FRYE, " " 1895. 

WARD 3. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, Term expires January, 1893. 

'' " 1894. 

" 1895. 



JOHN E. GAY, 
JAMES M. GROSSMAN, 



•Deceased. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



WARD 7. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, Term expires January, 1898. 

ISAAC N. ABBOTT, '' " 1894. 

EDWIN W. ROBINSON, " " 1895. 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

FOK WARDS 4, 5, AND 6. 
Two members appointed annually in tlie month of March, for three year*. 

Charles S. Parker/ Term expires March 31, 1893. 

Obadiah Morrill, " " 1893. 

Frank J. Batchelder, " " 1894. 

George O. Diekerraan. •• " 1894. 

John E. Robertson, '• " 1895. 

Charles G. Reraick, '• ■• 1896. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 
FOR OLD AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

H. A. KENDALL. 
JOSEPH H. LANE. 
GEORGE W. WATERS. 
CHARLES E. PALMER. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS. 
OLIVER J. FI FIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCOKD CEMETERY. 

JOSEPH E. PLUMMER. 

FOR WEST ( ONCORL) CEMETERY. 

ANDREW J. ABBOTT. 

FOR MILVILLE CEMETERY. 

WILLIAM H. CURRIER. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

JONATHAN P. LEAVITT. 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD OFFICERS. 

MODERATORS. 

Elected biennially in November by voters of each ward. Salary, $3 each per aunum. 

Ward i— GEORGE E. HUFFMAN. 
Ward 2— CHARLES H. SANBORN. 
TFard 5— JOSEPH E. SHEPARD. 
TFarcZ 4— P,ENJAMIN E. BADGER. 
TFa/d 5— CHARLES C. DAN FORTH. 
Ward (?— SOLON A. CARTER. 
Ward 7— BENJAMIN GREEN. 



SELECTMEN. 

Elected biennially in November by voters of each ward. Salary, $5 each per aununm. 

TFard i— GEORGE W. HOLMES. 

LEANDER C. PRESCOTT. 

JAMES FARRAND. 
Ward 2— ISAAC F. POTTER. 

george a. hoyt. 
charlp:s welsh. 

TTard 5— HENRY H. FARNUM. 

FRANK H. CURRn^:R. 

HIRAM E. QUIMBY. 
Ward 4— EDWARD H. DIXON. 

WILLIAM H. HURD. 

ALBERT I. FOSTER. 
Ward 5— CURTFS WIIirE. 

delbert a. welles. 
jamp:s e. sewall. 

Ward 6— EDWARD H. HOUSTON. 

gp:orge a. huntoon. 
richard m. patten. 

Ward 7— HORACE F. PAUL. 

FRANK S. PUTNAM. 
JOSEPH N. ABBOTT. 



CITY (iOVEKNMENT. 27 

WARD CLERKS. 

Elected biennially in November by voters of eacli ward. Salary, $10 each per annum. 

Ward i— ARTHUR D. FARNUM. 
Ward 5— FRED A. MERRILL.* 

FRED ROLLINS. 
Ward 3— DANIEL W. WILCOX. 
Ward4—FllFA} S. JOHNSON. 
Ward 5— GEORGE E. CHESLEY. 
Ward 6— HOWARD M. COOK. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Fees, one fourth 
cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

HENRY T. COOMBS. 



PISH AND GAME WARDENS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. No fees 

MARTIN E. YOUNG. 
.]. IRVING HOYT. 
FALES P. VIRGIN. 
DANIEL C. TENNEY. 
JOHN H. SEAVEY. 
GEORGE F. SEARLE. 
ELIJAH JACOBS. 
DANIEL B. NEWHALL. 
CHARLES L. WORTHEN. 
HARLEY B. ROBY. 
JOHN P. GEORGE. 
CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
FRANK BATTLES. 
EZRA 1]. CRAPO. 
WILLIAM ROBY. 

^Resigned. 



28 CITY OF OONCOUU. 



FENCE- VIEWERS. 

Elected annually in January by (Mty Council. Feps, |2 each per day, paid by parties 

interested. 



GEORGE W. CHESLEY. 
CHARLES P. ROWELL. 
MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



POUND-KEEPER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. P'ees, two cents each for ImpoundlDK 
sheep, and five cents each for all other creatures, paid by owners of creatures. 

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, for sealing each scale beam, steel- 
yard, or scale, 25 cents, and for each mea.sure, 10 cents, five or more to one persoa 
half price — paid by owners of scales or measures. 



REUBEN C. DANFORTH. 

OflSce: City Hall. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Elected annually in January by C ty Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person 

employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE. 
- CYRUS R. ROBINSON. 
DAVID E. EVERETT. 
FRED N. MARDEN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



29 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Kleoted biennially in January by City Council. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 
34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; butt staves, 4-5 cents; hoops, 50 cents; heading, 33 
•euts per M— paid by party for whom culling is done. 

georgp: f. heyward. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Eleoted annually in January by Oity Council. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by 
party requiring service. 



Orin T. Carter, 
Joseph H. Al)bot, 
Arthur G. Stevens, 
D. Arthur Brown, 
George R. Purington, 
Sylvester Stevens, 
John N. Hill, 
Hiram 0. Marsh, 
Thomas Hill, 
John H. Mercer, 
A. H. Campbell, 
O. F. Richardson, 
Henry E. Chamberlin, 
Charles H. Day, 
Solon R. Baker, 
J. Frank Hoit, 
Charles M. Field, 
Edward M. Proctor, 



Alvah L. Powell, 
Seth R. Dole, 
Lewis B. Hoit, 
Patrick H. Larkin, 
Henry W. Ranlet, 
Omar L. Shepard, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Samuel B. Davis, 
Wm. W. Flint, 
Charles T. Page, 
Wm. F. Carr, 
Daniel Eastman, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Frederick H. Savory, 
Timothy R. Elwell,* 
P^dmund H. Brown, 
Everts McQuesten. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Fees, reasonable price, paid by party 



Blected annually in January by City Council 

employitif 



Edward Dow, 

Giles Wheeler, 
Edward A. Moulton, 



Charles K. Savory, 
Benjamin Bilsborough, 
George Abbott, Jr. 

Deceased. 



30 CITY OK CONCOHU. 

SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Elected annually in Jauiiary by City Council. P'ces, reasonable pricp, paid by party 

eniplfiyin;;. 

Nahum Robinson, Lyinaii R. Fellows, 

Giles Wheeler, Leoiuud W. Bean, 

Edward Dow, O. II. T. Richardson, 

Peter W. Web.ster, Moses B. Smith, 

Alvah C. Ferrin. Daniel C. Woodman. 
William H. Kennev, 



SURVEYORS OF STONE. 

Elected annually in .January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party 

employing. 

Simeon Abbott, Albert H. C. Knowles, 

Edward Dow, George F. Sanborn, 

George W- Emerton, Charles L. Rowe. 
Giles Wheeler, 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER, AND BARK. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, for surveying shingles and clap- 
boards, 4 cents per M ; boards and timber, 16 cents per M ; measuring cord wood, 
4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords— paid by person 
employing. 

Arthnr G. Stevens, Edwin D. Clongh, 

John Ballard, Thomas D. Aver}^ 

Albert A. Currier, Timothy Carter, 

James F. Nelson, Weston Cofran, 

Jonathan B. Weeks, Augustine C. Carter, 

Charles Couch, John A. Blackwood, 

Wallace M. Howe, W. W. Cochran, 

Daniel K. Richardson, Philip Flanders, 

John H. Rolfe, Gilbert H. Seavey, 

William Ballard, Cyrus Runnells, 

John T. Batchelder, David E. Everett, 



CITY GOVEKNMKNT. 



31 



William A. Chesley, 
Silvester P. Danforth, 
Jeremiah S. Noyes, 
Charles W. Hardy, 
Nathaniel S. Shaw, 
Charles Kimball, 
Stephen K. Little, 
Alfred Clark, 
Daniel A. Brown, 
Joseph S. Abbot, 
John F. Scott, 
John Whitaker, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
Nathaniel H. Shattuck, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Peter W. Webster, 
George W. Abbott, 
Alvertus Evans, 
George Partridge, 
Oliver J. Fitield, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Charles H. Day, 
W. Annis Bean,* 
Hiram O. Marsh, 
Edward Runnels, 



Charles H. Brown, 
Lowell Eastman, 
Joseph T. Clough, 
Andrew S. Farnura, 
.John C. Linehan, 
Curtis White, 
John N. Hill, 
Abner C. Holt, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles H. Sanborn, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Joseph E. Hutchinson, 
Thomas Hill, 
Charles T. Page, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
John H. Mercer, 
John P. Jewell, 
Cyrus F. Fletcher, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
John Potter, 
George C. Morgan, 
Edward H. Dixon, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Horace F. Paul, 
Minot G. Spaulding. 



♦Deceased. 



32 CITV OK CONCORD. 

CITY COUNCIL-ELECT. 

FOR 1893-1894. 

Elected by voters, November, 1892. 

MAYOR. 
PARSONS H. COGSWELL. 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward i— HENRY E. CHAMBERLAIN. 

ALFRED E. EMERY. 
TFard^— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
Ward 3— ADAM P. HOLDEN. 
Ward 4— F.DW ARD P. COMINS. 

AUSTIN S. RANNEY. 

WILLIAM H. PERRY. 

TIMOTHY P. SULLIVAN. 
TFard 5— HENRY W. STEVENS. 

CHARLES R. WALKER. 
Ward 6— CHARLES C. NUTTER. 

JAMES H. SANDERS. 

JOHN H. SPELLMAN. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM A. COBB. 

JOHN H. MERCER. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Ward 7— EDDIE C. DURGIN. 

ROBERT W. HOIT. 
Ward 2~SAMUEL L. BATCHELDER. 
TFard5— LOULS A. ENGEL. 
TFard4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 

FRANK S. MOULTON. 

LEWLS B. PUTNEY. 

HENRY W. HAYDEN. 



CITY govkknmf:nt. • 33 

TFarrZ o— HENRY O. ADAMS. 

HOWARD A. DODGE. 
Ward 6— ARTHUR E. DOLE. 

GEORGE 8. FORREST. 

WILLIAM A. LEE. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. CRITCHETT. 

FRANK L. SAWYER. 



ASSESSORS-ELECT. 

Ward i— FRANKLIN A. ABBOTT. 
Ward 2— CHARLES H. SANBORN. 
Ward 3— ALVyERT W. HOBBS. 
Ward 4— GILBERT H. SEAVEY. 
Ward 5— CURTIS WHITE. 
Ward 6— GEORGE S. DENNETT. 
Ward 7— JONATHAN B. WEEKS. 



ELECTION INSPECTORS. 

November election, 1892. 

TFardi— JAMES H. FRENCH. 

FARWELL P. HOLDEN. 

GILMAN H. DIMOND. 

JOHN C. FARRAND. 
Ward ^—SAMUEL D. BATCHELDER. 

fred s. farnum. 
albp:rt h. c. knowles. 
william a. cowley. 

Ward 5— OMAR L. SHEPARD. 

PAUL R. HOLDEN. 

WILLIAM A. J. GILES. 

HENRY H. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN M. MITCHELL. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN. 

FRANK S. STREETER. 

JOHN W. BOURLET. 



3 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward 5— JAMP:S H. ROWELL. 

PARSONS B. cogswp:ll. 

FRANK H. LOCKE. 

WILLIAM I. LEIGHTON. 
Ward 6— GP:0RGE O. DICKERMAN, 

FRANK CRESSY. 

FRANK D. ABBOTT. 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 
Ward 7— JONATHAN B. WEEKS. 

HORACE L. INGALLS. 

GILES WHEELER. 

THOMAS C. HARROLD. 



WARD OFFICERS-ELECT. 
MODERATORS. 

TFajcZ i— JAMES H. FRENCH. 
Ward 2— EDWARD J. LYLE. 
Ward 5— SIMEON PARTRIDGE. 
Ward 4— GEORGE S. KELLOM. 
Ward 5— CHARLES C. DANFORTH. 
Ward 6— SOLON A. CARTER. 
Ward 7— BENJAMIN GREENE. 



SELECTMEN. 

Ward I— EUGENE H. DAVIS. 

WILLIAM TAYLOR. 

GEORGE H. TUCKER. 
Ward 5— GEORGE A. HOIT. 

HENRY M. STEVENS. 

GEORGE M. C. SANBORN. 
TTard 5— ANDREW J. ABBOTT. 

FRANK E. DIMOND. 

JOHN CALDBECK. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 35 



Ward 4— EDWARD H. DIXON. 

ALBERT I. FOSTER. 

CHARLES H. SINCLAIR. 
Wards— JAMES E. SEWALL. 

DELBERT A. WELLES. 

CURTIS WHITE. 
Ward 6— FRANK CRESSY. 

JOSEPH S. MERRILL. 

JAMES F. NELSON. 
Ward 7— DAVID A. CURRIER. 

HORACE F. PAUL. 

ARTHUR W. PRESCOTT. 



WAKD CLERKS. 

Ward i— ARTHUR FARNUM. 

Ward 5— ARTHUR P. SWAIN. 

Ward 5— JEREMIAH QUINN, JR. 

Ward 4— EDWARD C. DUTTON. 

Ward 5— GEORGE E. CHESLEY. 

Ward e— FRANK E. GALE. 

Ward 7— GP:0RGE B. WHITTREDGE. 



36 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MAYORS OF THE CITY OF CONCORD. 



The original charter of the city was adopted by tlie inhabitants March 10, 1853, and 
until 1880 the mayor was elected annually. Since 1S80 the mayor has been elected for 
two years at each biennial election in November. 



Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 

rufus clement,* 
john abbott, 
mosp:s t. willard, 
moses humphrey, 
benjamin f. gale, 
moses humphrey, 
john abbott, 
lyman d. stevens, 
abraham g. jones, 
john kimball, . 
george a. pillsbury, 

HORACE A. BROWN,t . 
GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,! 
EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, . 
STILLMAN HUMPHRP:Y, 
HENRY W. CLAPP, 



1855- 



1853- 

•'5G-'57- 
1859- 
1861- 
1863- 



1866- 
1868- 
1870- 
1872-'73-'74- 
1876- 
878-'79- 
^80-'81- 
'84-'85- 
1887- 
1889- 
1891- 



. 1^ 

. 1( 

1883- 



'54. 
'55. 

'58. 
'60. 
'62. 
'64. 
'65. 
'67. 
'69. 
'71. 
'75. 
•'77. 
'80. 
'82. 
'86. 
'88. 
'90. 
'92. 



* Died in office. 

t Term closed in November, 1880. 

X Term commenced November, 1880. 



TRUST FUNDS. 



CITY TREASURER'S ACCOUNTS 

AS CUSTODIAN OF TRUST FUNDS. 



The iucome from these trusts is paid only upon the Mayor's special order, certifyiuj 
that the requirements of the trusts are fulfilled. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

From Trust Funds held by the city, during th(! year 1892. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 

IFor the benefit of the School Fund. Income to be dividei in du? proportion among 
all the school-districts in the city. 

€apital, $1,000.00 

Invested in note of Concord, — city pre- 
cinct, due 1895, 6 per cent., . . ' 1,000.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, interest on city note, ..... $G0.00 

EXPENDED. 

Credited to School Fund, $G0.OO 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

G. PARKER LYON TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Public Library. Annual income to be expended in the purchase- 
of books for the Public Library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 ^ 

Invested in note of Concord, — citv pre- 
cinct, due 1896, 6 per cent., . . 1,000.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, $60. Oa 

EXPENDED. 

Paid W. P. Fiske, treasurer city library, . . . $60.00' 



FRANKLIN PIERCE TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Public Library. Annual income to be expended in the purchase 
of books for the Public Library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Invested, — 

In City of Concord bond, due 

1905, at 4 per cent., $500.00 

Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, .... 500.00 

$1,000.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, ....... $41.25 

EXPENDED. 

Paid W. P. Fiske, treasurer city library, . . . $41.25 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Income to be applied to the purchase of school-books for poor children. 

Capital, $200.00 

Invested in City of Concord bond, due 

1905, 4 per cent., .... 200.00 



TRUST FUNDS. 39 



INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, .... S77.5o 
Cash, for interest, ..... 8.00 

$85.55 

Balance on hand, ....... $85.55 



COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be applied to 
the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Invested in notes of the Eagle and Plie- 

nix Hotel Company, due Oct., 1902, 
■ secured by itiortgage of real estate, 

5 per cent., 2,000.00 

INCOME RECEIVED, 

Cash, for interest, $100.00 

EXPENDED. 

Paid Elizabeth L. Walker, treasurer of the society, $100.00 



OLD CEMETERY FUND. 

One half of proceeds of sales of lots. Income to be devoted to the care, protection, 
and ornamentation of the Old Cemetery, through its committee. 

Capital, $715.00 

Invested, — 

In Concord Water-Works bonds, 

4 per cent., .... $200.00 

Concoixl (Penacook precinct) 

Sewer bonds, 4 per cent., . . 500.00 

Merrimack County Savings Bank, . 15.00 

$715.00 



INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, $32.26 



40 CITV OF CONCORD. 

EXPKNDEI). 

Paid C. G. Remi-jk for Cemetery Committee, S18.26 
Paid premium on Concord bonds, . . 14.00 



$32.26 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

One half of proceeds of sales of lots. Income for the cave, protection, and ornamenta- 
tion of Blossom Hill Cemetery, through its committee. 

Capital, Jan. 1, 1892, . . . $10,845.44 

Added during 1892, .... 1,554.20 

$12,399.64 

Invested — 

In U. S. bonds, 4 per cent., . . . $550.00 

Merrimack county bonds, 5 per cent., 500.00 
City of Concord bonds, 4 per cent., 1,900.00 
N. H. Savings Bank, . . 1,802.55 

Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 7.647.09 

$12,399.64 



incomp: received. 
Cash, for interest, 1892, $458.54 

EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, for Cemetery Committee, $413.54 
Premium and accrued int. on Concord bonds, 45.00 



$458.54 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

One half of proceeds of sales of lots. Income to be devoted to the care, protection, and 
ornamentation of West Concord Cemetery, througli its committee. 

Capital, Jan. 1, 1892, . . . $156.00 

Added during year, ..... 20.00 

$176.00 



Invested in Merrimack County Savings 

Bank, $176.00 



TRUST FUNDS. 41 



INCOME RECEIVED. 



Balance on hand from last year, . . $19.10 

Interest to Oct. 1, 1892, .... 7.00 

$26.10 

Cash balance on hand, ...... $26.10 



EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

One half of proceeds of sales of lots. Income to be devoted to the care, protection, and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery, through its committee. 

Capital, Jan. 1, 1892 $127.50 

Added during year, ..... 10.00 

$137.50 



Invested in N. H. Savings Bank, .... $137.50 



INCOME RECEIVED. 



Balance on hand from last year, . . $30.29 

Interest to Jan. 1, 1893, . . •• • 6.26 



$36.55 
Balance on hand, ....... 136.55 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

Provided by subscription from interested parties. Income to be devoted to the care, 
protection, and ornamentation of Millville Cemetery, through its committee. 

Capital, Jan. 1, 1892, .... $150.00 

Invested by deposit in Loan and Trust 

Savings Bank, 150.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand from last year, . . $20.53 

Interest to July 1, 1892, .... 6.92 



$27.45 
Balance on hand, ....... $27.45 



42 CITY OF CONCORD 

PAUL WENTWORTH TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 61, South Division, Old Cemetery. 

Capital, Jan. 1, 1892, .... $200.00 

Invested in U. S. bonds, due 1907, at 

4 per cent., 200.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand from last year, . $6.94 

Received for interest to Dec. 31, 1892, 8.00 

$14.94 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, $9.00 

Balance on hand, ..... 5.94 

$14.94 



THEODORE FRENCH TRUST. 

Inccme to be devoted to the care of his lot in the Old North Cemetery. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in U. S. bond, due 1907, at 4 

per cent., 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Received interest for 1892, $4.00 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . . . $4.00 



TRUST FUNDS. 43 

JAMES McQUESTEN TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to tlie care of lot No. 65, Block F, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $200.00 

Invested iu City of Concord 4 per cent. 

bond, due Oct., 1912, . . . 200.00 

INCOME RI'XEIVED. 

Received interest for 1892, $8.00 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . . . $8.00 



SARAH M. K. ADAMS TRUST. 

So much of the income of the trust as necessary, to be devoted to the care of lot No. 
179, Block M, Blossom Hill Cemetery; balance of income, for building cemetery 
fence, etc., under conditions. 



Capital, $700.00 

Invested in deposit at Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 700.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance on baud from last year, . . $66.79 

Received interest for 1892, . . . 31.19 

$97.98 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $31.00 

Balance on band, ..... 66.98 



$97.98 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EDWARD L. KNOWLTON TRUST. 

So much of tlie income of the trust as necessary, to be devoted to the care of lot No. 
177, Block M, Blossom Hill Cemetery; balance of income, for buildiog cemetery 
fence, etc., under conditions. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Invested in deposit at N. H. Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand from last year, . . $242.68 

Received interest for 1892, . . . 49.68 

$292.36 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $30.50 

Balance on hand, ..... 261.86 



$292.36 



ELIZA W. UPHAM TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 27, Block H, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, ...... $200.00 

Invested in Merrimack County Savings ^ 

Bank, 200.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand from last year, . . $1.89 

Received interest for 1892, .... 8.27 

$10.16 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Reraick, expense incurred, . $9.50 

Balance on hand, .... .66 



$10.16 



TRUST FUNDS. 45 

GEORGE G. FOGG TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 36, Block K, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, .... . $200.00 

Invested in two sliares of stock of the 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Raih-oad, 
given by testator, .... 200.00 

INCOME KECEIVKD. 

Balance on hand from last year, . . . . . $9.70 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $4.50 

Balance on hand, . . . . . 5.20 

$9.70 



MRS. C. H. NEWHALL TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 16, Block L, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $175.00 

Invested by deposit in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, ..... 175.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . , $0.17 

Received interest for 1892, . . . 7.20 



^37 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $7.17 
Balance on hand, ..... .20 



$7.37 



46 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

MARY CROW TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to tlie care of lot No. 21, Hlock H, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $200.00 

Invested bv deposit in Union Gnarauty 

Savings Bank, 200.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, .... $32.80 
Received interest for 1892, . . . 14.00 

$46.80 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Reraick, expense incurred, . $16.10 
Balance on hand, ..... 30.70 



$46.80 



MARY D. HART TRUST. 

Income devoted to care of lot No. 52, Block H, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $200.00 

Invested in two shares of stock of Pemi- 

gewasset Valley R. R., given by donor, 200.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Received interest for 181)1, $12.00 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $11.00 
Balance on hand, ..... l.OO 

$12.00 



TRUST FUNDS. 47 

ASA FOWLER TRUST. 

Income, so far as necessary, to be devoted to the care of lotsNos.85 and 86, New Addi- 
tion, Blossom Hill Cemetery, and balance for improvement of cemetery. 

Capital, $500.00 

Invested by deposit iu Loan and Trust 

Savings Bank, 500.00 

INCOMK RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $32.45 

Received interest for 1892, . . . 21.82 

$54.27 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $24.87 

Balance on baud, ..... 29.40 



$54.27 



MARY WILLIAMS TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to care of lot No. 2, Block F, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $50.00 

Invested by deposit iu Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 50.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $0.02 

Received interest for 1892, . . . 2.03 



82.05 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $2.00 

Balance on baud, ..... .05 



$2.05 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ABIGAIL SWEETSER TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to care of her lot, No. — , in the Old Cemetery. 

Capital, $200.00 

Invested by deposit in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 200.00 

INCOME KECEIVED 



Balance from last year. 
Received interest for 1892, 



^3.98 
8.25 



[2.23 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . §5.00 

Balance on hand, ..... 7.23 



$12.23 



TRUE OSGOOD TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to care of lots Nos. 40 and 41, Old Cemetery. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested by deposit in Merrinaack County 

Savings Bank, 100.00 



INCOME RECEIVED. 



Balance from last 3'ear, 
Received interest for 1892, 



^0.37 
4.05 



[.42 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $4.00 

Balance on baud, ..... .42 



$4.42 



TRUST FUNDS. * 49 

SETH EASTMAN TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of his lot in the Old North Cemetery. 

Capital SI 00.00 

Invested in one share of Abl)ot-Downing 

stoek, given b}' testator, . . . 100.00 

INCOMK UECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, .... $1.90 

Received interest for 1892, . . . 6.00 

$7.90 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $3.00 

Balance on hand, ..... 4.90 



$7.90 



SARAH E. IRISH TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 86, Block K, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital $100.00 

Invested by deposit in New Hanii)shire 

Savings Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest to Dec. 31, 1892, . . . $4.00 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . . . $4.00 



MARY E. WALKER TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of her lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, .... . . $200.00 

Invested by deposit in New Hampshire 

Savings Bank, 200.00 

4 



50 CITY OP CONCORD. 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balauce on hand from last year, . . $7.64 

Cash, for interest to Dec. 31, 1892, . 8.28 



15.92 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Reraick, expense incurred, . $15.00 

Balance on hand, . . . . . .92 

$15.92 

GEORGIANA P. ELA TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of the Samuel Clark lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested b}' deposit in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 



Balance on hand from last year, . . $0.04 

Cash, for interest to Oct. 1, 1892, . . 4.05 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $4.00 
Balance on hand, ..... .09 



$4.09 



$4.09 



WILLIAM PAGE TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of his lot iu Pine Grove Cemeterj-, East Concord. 

Capital, $25.00 

Invested by deposit iu Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, ..... 25.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest to Oct. 1, 1892, . . . . $1.02 

Balance on hand, ....... 1.02 



TRUST FUNDS. Ol 

JOHN AND BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of their lots, Nos. — , Block — , Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $200.00 

Invested by deposit in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 200.00 

incomp: received. 

Balance from last year, . . . . . SO. 13 

Cash, for interest to Oct. 1, 1892, . . 8.10 

$8.23 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $8.00 
Balance on baud, ..... .23 



$8.23 



MRS. E. A. PECKER TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to. the care of her lot, No. 46, South Grand Division, Old North 

Cemetery. 

Capital, $200.00 

Invested by deposit in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 200.00 

• INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $0.06 

Cash, for interest to Oct. 1, 1892, . . 8.27 

' $8.ot> 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $7.67 
Balance on band, ..... .66 



$8.33 



52 CITY OP CONCORD. 

DANIEL E. GALE TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to thecareof liis lot, No.—, Block—, Pine Grove Cemetery, East 

Concord. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested by deposit in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest to Oct. 1, 1892, .... $4.09 
Balance on hand,. ....... 4.09 



MATILDA BENSON TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of grave of Annie Johnson, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $50.00 

Invested by deposit in Union Guaranty 

Savings Bank, 50.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, .... $0.62 
Cash, for interest, . . . . . 2.12 



$2.74 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $2.00 

Balance on hand, . . . . . .74 



!.74 



HIRAM RICHARDSON TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of his lot, No. — , North Division, Old North Cemetery. 

Capital, $500.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 500.00 



TRUST FUNDS. 53 



INCOME KECEIVED, 



Balance from last year, .... $8.36 
Cash, for interest, 21.59 



$29.95 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Reinick, expense incurred, . $15.00 

Balance on hand, ..... 14.95 



529.95 



B. L. LARKIN TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of Lot 24, Block R, Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Capital, $50.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 50.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, ....... $2.12 

Balance ou hand, . . . . . . . 2.12 



BENJ. F. CALDWELL TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of his lot, No. 27, Block F, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $250.00 

Invested in Union- Guaranty Savings Bank, 250.00 

m 
INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, .... $0.72 

Cash, for interest, ..... 10.62 

$11.34 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $10.72 

Balance on hand, ..... .62 



$11.34 



54 CITY OF CONCORD. 



MARY M. FARNUM TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of C. D. Fariium's half lot, No. 36, Block H, Blossora 

Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, 1100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 



).1& 



Balance from last year, 

Cash, for interest, .... 


$1.87 
4.29 


EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . 
Balance on hand, ..... 


$5.50 
.66 







$6. la 



LYDIA F. EDGERLY TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of her lot, No. 20, Block E, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $1.00 

Cash, for interest, .... 4.29 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $5.00 

Balance on hand, ..... .29 



$5.29 



$5.29 



HARVEY J. GILBERT TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of his lot in Old North Cemetery. 

Capital, $50.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 50.00 



TRUST FUNDS. 55 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, ....... $2.12 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $2.00 

Balance on liand, . . . . . .12 

82.12 



MRS. JOSIAH COOPER TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 80, Block K, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $75.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 75.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, ....... $3.18 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $3.00 

Balance on hand, . . . . . .18 

$3.18 



WILLIAM T. LOCKE TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of his lot in Old North Cemetery. 

Capital, $100,00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $1.09 

Cash, for interest, .... 4.29 



$5.38 



56 CITY OF CONCORD. 



EXPENDED, 



Paid C. G. Reniick, expense incurred, . S4.25 

Balance ou liaud, ..... 1.13 

S5.38 



J. L. LINCOLN TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 3, Block R, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, S50.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 50.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $0.04 

Cash, for interest, . . . . 2.12 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $2.04 

Balance on band, . . . . . .12 



$2.16 



!.16 



ABBY L. SANBORN BAILEY TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 2, Block J, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $0.92 

Cash, for interest, .... 4.25 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $4.92 

Balance on hand, ..... .25 



,17 



^5.17 



TKUST FUNDS. 57 

HARRIET W. BUTTERS TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 20, Block L, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, ^100.00 

iDvested in Uuion Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, ...... $4.25 

. EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remiclf, expense incurred, . $4.00 

Balance on hand, ..... .25 

$4.25 

GEORGE A. GLOVER AND C. A. OSGOOD TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 27, Block F, Blossom Hill Cemetery _ 

Capital, $50.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 50.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $0.50 

Cash, for interest, . . . . 2,12 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $2.50 

Balance on hand, . . . . . .12 



$2.62- 



1.62: 



E. W. WOODWARD TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 9, Block F, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 



-58 CITY OF CONCORD. 



INCOME RECEIVED. 



IBalance from last year, 
■Cash, for interest, 

$4.29 





$0.04 




4.25 


»:pended. 




incurred, . 


$4.00 


• 


.29 







33alance on hand, 

$4.29 



GREENOUGH AND EVARTS McQUESTEN TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 23, Block 9, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, .... $0.16 

'Oash, for interest, . . . , 4.25 



EXPENDED. 



IPaid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $4.16 

.{Balance on hand, ..... .25 



$4.41 



$4.41 



TIMOTHY K. BLAISDELL TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. — , Block — . 

•Capital $200.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 200.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $4.25 

Cash, for interest, .... 8.67 



$12.92 



TRUST FUNDS. 59 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $10.80 

Balance on baud, ..... 2.12 

$12.92 



JONATHAN SANBORN TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 59, Block S, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, ....... $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $3.00 

Cash, for interest, .... 4.37 



;7.37 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $4.00 

Balance on hand, ..... 3.37 



E. H. ROLLINS TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 2, Block 8, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $300.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 300.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, ....... $12.75 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $6.00 

Balance on hand, ..... 6.75 

— $12.75 



60 CITY OF CONCORD 

JAMES D. BLAISDELL TKUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. — , Block — . 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty [Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $2.00 

Cash, for interest, .... 4.33 



$6.33 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Reraick, expense incurred, . $4.00 

Baalnce on hand, ..... 2.33 



5.33 



JOHN C. THORNE TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care "of lot No. 3, Block I, Blossom Hill.Cemetery. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $1.66 

Cash, for interest, .... 4.29 



).95 



EXTENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $3.50 

Balance on hand, ..... 2.45 



$5.95 



TRUST FUNDS. 61 

NATHANIEL BOUTON TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 625, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $200.00 

Invested in City of Concord bonds, 4 

per cent., 200.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand, ...... $8.00 

Cash, for interest, .... 8.00 

$16.00 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $5.00 

Balance on hand, ..... 11.00 



$16.00 



MRS. S. LIZZIE PIXLEY TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 50, Block F, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $75.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty tSavings 

Bank, 75.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . $0.25 

Cash, for interest, . . . . 3.18 



!.43 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $.3.00 

Balance on hand, ..... .43 



83.43 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MRS. MARY D. ALLISON TRUST. 

Income to be devote 1 to the care of lot No. 31, New Part, Blossom Hill Cemetery; anc 
lot No. 140, North Graud Division, Old North Cemetery. 

Capital, $50.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 50.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year, . . . SO. 16 

Cash, for interest, . . • • 2.12 



EXPENDED. 



Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $2.00 

Balance on band, ..... .28 



$2.28 



WILLIAM ABBOTT TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of his lot. 

Capital, $300.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 300.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, ....... $12.75 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . $2.00 

Balance on hand, . . . . , 10.75 

$12.75 



TRUST FUNDS. GB^ 

SAMUEL AND DAVID L. MORIIILL TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot Ko. 88, Old North Cemetery. 

Capital, $150.00 

Invested in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 150.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, SS.Oa* 

' EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . . . $3.00 



SAMUEL M. CHESLEY TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 178, Block M, Blossom Hill Cemetery-. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, $1.6S 

EXPENDED. 

Paid C. G. Remick, expense incurred, . . . $1.6& 



NATHAN STICKNEY TRUST, 

Income to be devoted to the care of his lot in Old North Cemetery. 

Capital, $50.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 50.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, $1.66 



i64 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

NATHAN F. CARTER TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 82, Block R, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

I'apital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

dash, for interest, ....... $3.33 



JOHN B. SARGENT TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 78, Block S, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

'Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 

INCOME RECEIVED. 

Cash, for interest, . . . . . . . $3.00 



ELLEN C. BIXBY TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 16, New Part, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital, $89.53 

Invested in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 89.53 



JACOB HOYT TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 14, Section P, Pine Grove Cemetery, East 

Coucord. 

Capital, $100.00 

Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank, 100.00 



TRUST FDNDS. 65 

ROBERT WOODRUFF TRUST. 

Income to be devoted to the care of lot No. 33, Block H, Blossom Hill Cemetery 

Capital, .... . . $200.00 

Invested in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 200.00 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1892, .... $1,559.97 

Received for interest, .... 63.33 

" city Concord, . . . 500.00 

$2,123.30 



1892. 

Population of the City (Census 1890), . . 17,004 

Valuation of the City -$10,788,498.00 

Tax assessed for the year, as corrected, . $191,733.39 

Rate of Taxation, 112.50 per $1,000. 

Rate for Union School District, $2.80 additional per $1,000. 

Rate for Precinct, $2.50 additional per $1,000. 

Total Rate, $17.80 per $1,000. 

Total Rate for 1891, $19.60 per $1,000. 

Decrease for the year 1892, $1.40 per $1,000. 



€8 CITY' OF CONCORD. 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 



The number of polls, and the tax assessed ou the real and 
personal estate in the city of Concord, since 1860 : 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1860 


2,577 


$4,-307,192 


$47,082.25 


1861 


2,497 


4,423,936 


46,290.48 


1862 


2,350 


4,308,568 


50,945.01 


1863 


2,454 


3,775,206 


60,293.82 


1864 


2,539 


3,832,800 


89,981.97 


1865 


2,495 


5,549,002 


158,787.29 


1866 


2,762 


4,934,082 


116,192.97 


1867 


2,822 


5,006,774 


145,173.49 


1868 


3,120 


5,378,365 


126,889.71 


1869 


3,205 


5,581,459 


146,791.64 


1870 


3,187 


5,751,928 


138,953.94 


1871 


3,338 


5,891,993 


137,844.70 


1872 


8,767 


5,917,054 


141,122.97 


1873 


3,613 


9,012,650 


158,281.13 


1874 


3,784 


9,000,526 


171,045.61 


1875 


3,941 


9,216,196 


175,234.68 


1876 


3,911 


9,222,625 


163,768.29 


1877 


4,015 


9,405,117 


177,040.27 


1878 


3,869 


9,241,485 


162,038.53 


1879 


3,536 


10,604,465 


155,964.99 


1880 


3,672 


10,150,586 


172,831.12 


1881 


3,505 


10,062,894 


153,285.55 


1882 


3,661 


10,308,052 


151,941.54 


1883 


3,816 


10,023,216 


169,498.95 


1884 


3,734 


9,877,874 


148,290.26 


1885 


3,821 


9,774,714 


153,613.92 


1886 


3,773 


9,703,458 


158,994.83 


1887 


3,938 


9,852,337 


151,292.66 


1888 


3,959 


9,984,120 


165,090.57 


1889 


4,090 


10,048,556 


184,968.08 


1890 


4,190 


10,243,857 


176,081.04 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES. 



6& 



1891. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


457 


$860,530 


$16,186.95 


2, 


242 


387,754 


5,215.22 


3. 


340 


478,465 


7,207.88 


4, 


1181 


2,606,560 


48,915. la 


5, 


831 


3,261,597 


63,797.16 


6, 


916 


2,629,875 


52.003.49' 


7, 


531 


698.300 


11.438.15 




4,498 


110,923,081 


1204,763.98 


Non-resident, 


' 


' 


1,615.28 




$206,879.26, 


1892. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


444 


$861,100 


$15,977.85. 


2, 


245 


389,215 


5,091.20 


3, 


287 


462,543 


7,649.16 


4, 


1103 


2,496,345 


45,669.81 


6, 


733 


3,244,011 


57,616.73 


6, 


862 


2,626,100 


46,960.03 


7, 


554 


707.184 


11.345.10 




4,288 


$10,786,498 


$190,309.88 


Non-resident, 






1,423.57 



11,733.45 



70 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MUNICIPAL FUNDED DEBT. 

CITY BONDS PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 



When due. 

October 1, 1893, 
November 1, 1893, 
October 1, 1894, 
November 1, 1894, 
October 1, 1895, 



Rate of interest. 

6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 
6, 



Payable. 

semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 



Amount. 

$4,250 
8,000 
4,000 
7,000 
3,000 









$26,250 




POLICE STATION BONDS. 




When due. 

July 1, 1903, 


Rate of interest. 

4, 


Payable. 

semi-annually. 


Amount. 

$17,000 


WIDENING PLEASANT STREET EXTENSION. 


When due. 

June 1, 1905, 


Rate of interest. 

4, 


Payable. 

semi-annually, 


Amount. 

$13,800 




MEMORIAL ARCH BONDS. 




When due. 
July 1, 1897, 
July 1, 1898, 
July 1, 1899, 
July 1, 1900, 


Rate of interest. 

4, 
4, 
4, 

4, 


Payable. 

semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 

BONDS. 


Amount. 

$5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 




$20,000 




BRIDGE 




When due. 

July 1, 1904, 
July 1, 1905, 
July 1, 1906, 
July 1, 1907, 


Rate of interest. 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 


Payable. 

semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually. 


Amount. 

$5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 



Funded city debt. 



$20,000 
'7,050 



FUNDED DEBT. 



71 



CITY DEBT NOT FUNDED. 



Notes, ..... 
Interest accrued, not yet due, . 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 
Due school districts. 
Dog tax, undivided, 

Funded city debt, 



$50,000.00 

704.75 

532.00 

17,395.85 

1,773.89 



- $70,406.49 
97,050.00 

$167,456.49 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Cash in treasury, .... $14,565.29 

Bridge bonds unsold, . . . 20,000.00 

Memorial Arch bonds unsold, . . 20,000.00 

West Concord sewer bonds unsold, 14,000.00 

Taxes of 1891, uncollected, . . 770.89 

1892, •• . 13,778.45 

Liquor, etc., at agency, . . 1,139.05 

Due from Merrimack count}', . . 6,041.68 

Due for rent at West Concord, . 150.00 

Indebtedness above assets, Jan. 1, 1893, . 
Indebtedness above assets, Jan. 1, 1892, . 



590,445.36 
77,011.13 
45,137.83 



Increase for the year. 



;i,873.30 



PRECINCT FUNDED DEBT. 



€ITY PRECINCT BONDS (STATE-HOUSE LOAN) PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 



When due. Rate of interest. Interest payable. 

Dec. 1, 1893, 6, semi-annually, 

Dec. 1, 1894, 6, semi-annually, 

Dec. 1, 1895, 6, semi-annually, 

Dec. 1, 1896, 6, semi-annually, 



Amount. 

$2,000.00 
3,000.00 

10,000.00 
7,000.00 



$22,000.00 



72 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEWER BONDS. 
When due. Rate of interest. Payable. Amount. 

July 1, 1904, 4, semi-annually, $12,000.00 

WATER PRECINCT BONDS. 
When due. Rate of interest. Payable. Amount. 

April 1, 1894, 6, semi-annually, $130,000.00 

April 1, 1895, 6, semi-annually, 20,000.00 

Nov. 1, 1896, 4, semi-annually, 10,000.00 

Nov. 1, 1897, 4, semi-annually, 10,000.00 

Nov. 1, 1898, 4, semi-annually, 10,000.00 

Nov. 1, 1899, 4, semi-annually, 10,000.00 

Oct. 1, 1912, 4, semi-annually, 45,000.00 

Jan. 1,1922, 4, semi-annually, 400,000.00 

$635,000.00 



$669,000.00 



PRECINCT DEBT NOT FUNDED. 

Water precinct notes, 4 per cent., . $40,000.00 

Bonds overdue, not presented, . . 1,200.00 

Coupons overdue, not presented, . 195.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, . . 350.00 



$41,745.00 
Precinct funded debt, . . . 669,000.00 



Precinct debts, $710,745.00 

Less water-works bonds on hand, . 42,000.00 



Net precinct debts, .... $668,745.00 

Precinct debt, Jan. 1, 1892, . . 552,070.00 



Increase of precinct debt for the year, $116,675.00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT BONDS. 73 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT BONDS. 



When 


due. Rate of in 


teresi 


t. Interest payable. 


Amount. 


July 1, 


1893, 


4. 




semi-anuually. 


S3, 000 


July 1, 


1894, 


4, 




semi-annually. 


5,000 


July 1, 


1895, 


4, 




semi-annually, 


7,000 


July 1, 


1896, 


4, 




semi-annually. 


9,000 


July 1, 


1897, 


4, 




semi-annually. 


15,000 


July 1, 


1898, 


4, 




semi-annually. 


15,000 


July 1, 


1899, 


4, 




semi-annually, 


15,000 


July 1, 


1900, 


4, 




semi-annually. 


15,000 


July 1, 


1901, 


4, 




semi-annually, 


15,000 


July 1, 


1902, 4, 
■est account, 


not 


semi-annually, 
yet due. 


15,000 


lutei 


$114,000.00 
2,280.00 

f 1 1 P, "^so no 







SCHOOL DISTRICT NO, 20 BONDS. 



When due. Rate of interest. Interest payable. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1893, 


4, 


semi-annuall}'. 


$500 


July 1, 1894, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


500 


July 1, 1895, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


500 


July 1, 1896, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


500 


July 1, 1897, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


500 


July 1, 1898, 


4, 


semi-anuually. 


500 


July 1, 1899, 


4, 
ued. 


semi-annually, 
not yet due. 


500 


Interest accr 


70.00 


Net lial)ility 


on account of school-districts. 


. $119,850.00 



These bonds were issued under ordinances of the city council, 
as authorized to do by the act of the legislature of New Hamp- 
shire, approved August 14, 1889, entitled "An act authorizing 
the city of Concord to borrow money in aid of its school-dis- 
tricts." These school-districts have, by their votes and by their 
agents duly authorized, bound themselves to the city to season- 
ably pay to the city sufficient sums of money to enable it to 
meet the payments of interest and principal upon their indebted- 
ness, and all incidental expenses, as the same shall become due. 
6 



74 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WEST CONCORD SEWER BONDS. 

Wlien due. Hate of interest. Interest payable. Amount. 

October 1, 1902, 4, semi-annually, $5,000.00 

October 1, 1907, 4, semi-annually, 5,000.00 

October 1, 1912, 4, semi-annually, 7,000.00 



S17,000.00 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT. 

Sewer Bonds, payable as follows : 



When due. Kate of interest. 


Interest payable. 


Amount. 


August 1, 1898, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


$5,000.00 


August 1, 1903, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


5,000.00 


August 1, 1908, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


6,000.00 


May 1, 1913, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


5,000.00 


July 1, 1914, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


500.00 


July 1, 1915, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1916, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1917, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1918. 


4, 


semi-annually, 


500.00 


July 1, 1919, 


4, 
not yet due, 


semi-annually. 


500.00 


Interest accrued. 


$24,000.00 
360.00 



$24,360.00 
Amount of the sinking fund accumulated, 

including interest $2,123.30 

Net indebtedness on account of Penacook 

sewer precinct, Jan. 1, 1893, . 22,236.70 

$24,360.00 

Net indebtedness on account of Penacook sewer, 

Jan. 1, 1892, $19,740.03 

Decrease for the year, ..... $563.33 

The above bonds were issued under ordinances passed by the 
city council, establishing a sewer precinct in Penacook, and 



RECAPITULATION. 



iO 



authorizing loans on the credit of the city for the establishing 
of said system. The ordinances also provide that the yearly 
interest and a portion of the principal shall be raised each year, 
for the purpose of creating a sinking fund to pay said bonds as 
the}' mature, as follows : 

S500 annually for ten years from August 1, 1888, 
$1,000 annually for five years from August 1, 1898, 
SI, 200 annually for five years from August 1, 1903, 
SI, 000 annually for five years from May 1, 1908, 
SoOO annually for six years from July 1, 1914, 
by taxation upon the taxable property in Penacook Sewer Pre- 
cinct, said sums, as soon as received, to be placed at interest 
bv the finance committee. 



RECAPITULATION". 

Net regular municipal debt above assets, . $77,011.13 

Net precinct debt above assets, . . . 668,745.00 

Net school-district debt, .... 119,850.00 

Net Penacook sewer debt, .... 19,740.03 

Net West Concord sewer debt, . . . 17,000.00 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

Jan. 1, 1893 $902,346.16 

Aggregate indebtedness over available~assets, 

Jan. 1, 1892, 739,366.19 



Increase for the year. 



$162,979.97 



76 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PROPERTY 

r.I.I.OXGINd TO THE CITY, AND IIAVINO AN ACTUAL CASH VALUK, 
BUr NOT CONSIDERED AS AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



Real Estate. 
City hall lot and half of building, 
City farm pasture and quarries, 
Penacook park, .... 
City storehouse and lots, 
Engine-house, West Concord, 
Engine-house, East Concord, 
Alert hose-house, Washington street, 
Good Will hose-house, . 
Central fire station, 
Pioneer engine-house, Penacook, . 
Gravel banks, East Concord, 
House and lot on Plains, 
Ward-house, West street, 
Children's play -ground, 

White park, 

Police station and market-place, 
House on Warren street, 

Fire Department. 

Steamer " Eagle," 

Steamer " Governor Hill," 

Steamer '• Kearsarge," . 

Steamer " Pioneer," 

Hook and Ladder carriage, 

Kearsarge hose-carriage. 

Eagle hose-carriage, 

Alert hose-carriage, 

Good Will hose-carriage. 

East Concord hand-engine. 

West Concord hand-engine. 

Leather and fabric hose. 

Implements in charge of fire companies. 

Fire alarm, . 



825,000 00 
3.000.00 
2,500.00 
4,000.00 
8,500.00 
3,000.00 
3,200.00 
6,500.00 

35,000.00 
7,500.00 
100.00 
3(J0.00 
4,500.00 
1,500.00 
9,300.00 

25,000.00 
3.000.00 



-S141,900.0(> 



$3,800.00 

3,000.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,500.00 

400.00 

400.00 

400.00 

400.00 

400.00 

300.00 

4,000.00 

3,500.00 

7,000.00 



PRECINCT PROPERTY, 



Five horses, ..... 
Harness and stable fixtures, . 
Supply wagon and sleigh. 
Wagon and sleigh for Central station, 
New hose-carriage, Central station, 



SI, 000. 00 
600.00 
200.00 
100.00 
300.00 



831,350.00 



Street Department. 

Lumber, stone, etc., at city storehouse, 

Two horses, . 

Two stone rollers. 

Five street sprinklers, 

Stone-crusher, engine, and building. 

Street sweeper. 

Horse-cart and wagon. 

Three road machines, 

Large horse-sled, . 

Small horse-sled, . 

Two-horse dump-cart. 

One derrick. 

Two snow rollers, 

Picks, shovels, and small tools. 

Miscellaneous. 

Books in city library, 
Furniture, city hall building, 
Furniture, city marshal's office, 
Furniture for liquor agency, . 
Furniture, mayor's office, 



$400.00 

400.00 

250.00 

1,100.00 

2,000.00 

25.00 

50.00 

450.00 

50.00 

15.00 

100.00 

100.00 

170.00 

400.00 



^6,500.00 
1,000.00 

300.00 
35.00 

200.00 



$5,510.00 



$8,035.00 



iO CITY OF CONCORD. 

PRECINCT PROPERTY 

BELONGING TO THE WATER PRECINCT, AND HAVING AN ACTUAL. 
CASH VALUE, BUT NOT CONSIDERED AS AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



City water-works, 



$783,000.00 



REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1892. 



For payment of state tax, 
county tax, 
city bonds, 
interest on city debt, 
support of city poor, 
fire department, 
incidentals, land damages, etc 
roads and bridges, . 
sidewalks and crossings, 
repairs to concrete sidewalks, 
paving streets, 
laying rubble to protect the lower 

bridge, 
committee service, . 
police and watch, . 
Ijrinting and stationery, 
legal expense, 
Blossom Hill cemetery, . 
Calvary cemetery, 
Old North cemetery. 
West Concord cemetery, 
White park, . 
Penacook park, 
salaries, 
public librar}', 
beds at Margaret Pillsbury hospital 
Memorial Day, 
board of health, 
discounts and abatements. 



^31,650.00 

32,042.94 

12,000.00 

3,527.00 

1,000.00 

14,000.0(> 

5,000.00 

30,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 

1,500.00 

1,410.00 

8,000.00 

2,250.00 

800.00 

3,000.00 

800.00 

350.00 

150. 0(^ 

2,500.00 

450.00 

8,200.00 

6,000.00 

2,000.00 

300.00 

1,000.00 

2,000.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



79 



For aid to dependent soldiers and tlieir 

families, $500.00 

expense at voting places for the new 

ballot law, .... 600.00 

public school text-books, . . 4,000.00 

schools, 22,225.00 



-$201,754.94 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1892. 



For laud for public park corner Center 
and North State streets, . 

repairing pest house, 

soldiers' memorial arch, . 

memorial arch dedication. 

Borough bridge, 

safe for tax collector's office, . 

Blossom Hill cemetery, land, . 

West Concord sewerage precinct, 

improving approaches to iron bridge, 

widening Main street, Penacook, 
Willow hill, . . . . 

grading and repairing engine-house. 
Ward 2, 



$25,500.00 

200.00 

20,000.00 

1,200.00 

1,000.00 

150.00 

575.00 

17,000.00 

700.00 

1,500.00 



200.00 



$68,025.00 



PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1892. 



For payment of precinct bonds, 
interest state-house loan, 
interest sewer bonds, 
lighting streets, 
sewers, .... 
hydrants. 



$2,000.00 
1,450.00 
480.00 
9,000.00 
2,000.00 
6,000.00 



$20,930.00 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 



PENACOOK PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1892. 

For payment of sinking fund, . . $500.00 ' 

interest on precinct sewer bonds, . 840.00 

repairs of sewers, .... 100.00 

to complete the sewerage system,* 3,000.00 

$4,440.00 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

For payment of interest on bonds . $6,640.00 

$6,640.00 



*The appropriation was #4,500, but $1,500 of this amount was cancelled, leaving it 
$3,000. 



TAXES. 



81 



EEPOET OF COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



1891. 

List as committed for coUeotiou, 
Interest, 1891 taxes, 

Paid treasurer 1891 taxes, 
"■ interest, 

* Deposited First National Bank, 
Abatements, .... 
Discounts, .... 
Uncollected, .... 

1892. 

List as committed for collection. 
Interest, 1892 taxes, . 

Paid treasurer taxes 1892, 
Interest, " " 

Abatements, 
Discounts, 

* Deposited First National Bank 
Uncollected, 



$206,089.72 
426.01 



$206,515.73 



)5,512.52 

426.01 

674.68 

5,414.55 

3,717.08 

770.89 



-$206,515.73 



$191,733.45 
95.30 



$191,828.75 



$167,646.86 

95.30 

915.78 

3,431.48 

5,960.93 

13,778.45 



191,828.75 



ALBERT I. FOSTER, 

Collector 



* Those amounts on deposit trausferred to treasurer after his book was closed. 



82 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



< 

H 

>^ 
H 

o 






o 
o 






w..^ .. ^^.-^ ^^.. .. ... .^_o 

~ O CO 1^ O CO -^ '^O G~) O >0 O O^O ^D CO '^^ "^^""^ "-^'-^ '^ 



O O' ^^ O CO O lO o 



CO 



I -t^ (>) 



Ph 



S 5 






<D 









5 eg a> 

;'? ^ ^ ^ 



o Q Ph o o o o cQ ^ cq 



(^ 9 - r,'^ o 'Td t*^ 3; oj •_J3 ^ ,^ ,-1 n^ 

>-- 25 ^ cS S oj 'rl.rH S -S 









c3 



G c5 (1) , 



o c o .ti ^ ^ o 



O 03 



■ocoiasoxiix;'— iiraooo-^ooicoooouoiooooO'Ooo 

^0'Or-^O1-10;C0(^^OOO^OC0t>;lC(MO'OC^I'-^M0U0OOCOO 

oi CO oJ o "^ i-^ oi i-H oi c^i o) r-^ o o CO yj --H CO t-^ -H o co" i^ o o o lo 10 

■rt(r-(-+l— (lO^ GOOiCOT-H T— llCl^t^COCOCO^^OlOOl 1—1 

1--. ^ t^ T— I lO -# (» 1— I -rtl CO oi 



CI 



Ti 



,0 

■p4 



CO Ci oi 5 






• F^ CO 



^5 cS 

C <D 

r-i 05 



^ - - ^ _tJ 



CO cS f- 'O 

E£ J^ '^ 

• ^'Ji !^ o 

cc:=^ CO o 



o q; 

o p 



fee o 






O ■::? G 



S ^ 



r- ^ ^ — Oj ;h 

;:; '73 ^ > O 



?fc 



h-H 'O 






c/i 



C3 



50 



^ J - ^ ^ ^-' W 









m ID 









7^ fl a; o 



• r-T 02 



fee o 






S-2 






be 



p^^« 

d iz 



CITY TKEASURKK S KEPORT. 



83 



O d 

O lO 
O CO^ 



CI o ■* 
oo O c: 

C^I O T— I 



Cl-HOOt^OCOOO; 
l^iOOOOOtr^COO} 
r^dddc;doi-Hio 
oj 71 lO o .— I lo o ir 50 
i^ lO^co CO ^ i-H '-^■^ o^ 



2 ^ 



,=: c3 ?:= 



. 


• • 'w 


• n 










„ o 


o 




oj aJ 


tn 










o c 




r; <u 


3 0) 




i'? 


o-^ 
















^■^^ 






S 'g^^ 


o 




'~''t. o 

OJ .S -1-' 


o5 


t» 


— Ch— i 


'« 








:^^'< 


^ 



. '-^ -yT ;^ (B ^ 
O =£ S ^^ 






S O CC 



^ o C 
^ 5 o ^ "^ 



o ^ "E .5 -" o o 
=* o-^ S.S -s;-e 



:=! o-i:; !". 



wcaS^;^ 



•rr>! 



53 2 



MOO 



coooi^r^ oooo-— loo 

ooO'O^H'— ' oociocqoo 

O?0 30-* COi— iCCOrHCOOOClOiO 
1-1 OO'O OCIO'— (O 



O kO CO O O CI o 
O CI 00 00 CO ^ o 

d lO to ^ rr cc d d a6 '^ S ^' d 

co^o^cOt— ici-— I >— ' occoo 

OSC^-^iO^i— ICO rH ,— I i—li—l 



•pq 



o 
O 

o 



o ^ 



o "S 



-^ CO 'O , 






2 ^ 

.;3 oj 



oj oT 



i: . ^ 



'CD 



?: 3J ;: ^ i >2r-'~ dp c 



2 t- 6 ^"^ ^ ^ -S =s 



<D j3 ^ y j2 



. <v 



E.'S 



5 ii, o 



fi '" O oT C 
c; „- O J- s 

^ ?"„ tc ^ o 



'5 O 



t^.;2 CB cS .« 



'^ J: f-i~ -s 



"^ g 5 5 ^^ 






0..3 S 



S o 



■ Oi 









^ rS ^ C 



r^i O ri. w' «=^ 



^ tc 


S c€J£ 










• i^. & 


;^ r^'t 




dj -^ 




y-,.^ 


. •" rt 4i! 


o8 




o 


X S "? O 


a ci 


<B ;. ^, ci 






'o ^ 


o o^ S 

^ <^ ,-^ Ph 



o 





b.-r 


c5 " ■* " 6^ 


ffi 


^53 


^ 


^'^^ 


QJ 


^- S^ 


;< 


i^>- 


<^H :: 


. -- r^^ 


o 








bl° 



-i^ . CO E ^ ^ 

S ^ ? K CD o4 -t^ 
O O • H, . ^ ^T • 



H scs^d ^ 



g-^v S' 



ooK ffio^oM 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 



EEPORT OF COMMITTEE OIST FIl^AlN^CE. 



The books of the cit}' treasurer have been examined, and 
compared with those of the city clerk, by the committee ou 
finance, and all the accounts are found to be correctly kept, 
with proper vouchers on file for all payments. All the bills 
allowed by the committee on accounts and claims have been 
paid, and no claims against the city which the city would be 
liable to pay are known to remain outstanding, witii the excep- 
tion of those mentioned under the heading of unfunded debts ; 
and the balance in the hands of the treasurer is fourteen thou- 
sand five hundred sixty-five dollars and twenty-nine cents 
($14,565.29). 

HENRY W. CLAPP, 
GEORGE F. UNDERBILL, 
HENRY McFARLAND, 
JOHN H. COUCH, 
CHARLES W. BLANCHARD, 

Committee on Finance. 



CITY EXPENSES. 

FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1892. 

Being an itemized account, made up from the hooks of the City 

Clerk, of the payments made by the City Treasurer 

on account of 

RUNNING- EXPENSES. 



The arraDgement of the details of expenditure which follows 
is intended to furnish such information as is desired by the pub- 
lic, and is in accordance with suggestions received from various 
sources. Items of payment to the same individual at sundry 
times are included in the aggregate amount given, if paid for 
the same objects. Every effort has been made to ascertain and 
pay all the bills for the current year ; and in all cases, so far as 
known, payments of rent, etc., Jiave been made to December 
31, 1892, and salaries and committee service have been paid for 
the full municipal year. The expenses of the year, which are 
included in the general running expense, may be seen in the 
aggregate at the end of the detailed account here given. This 
is intended to include interest, but not the payment of maturing 
bonds. 



STATE TAX. • 

Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer, . . . $31,650.00 



COUNTY TAX. 
Paid Edward H, Carroll, county treasurer, . . $32,042.94 



INTEREST. 
Paid coupons and interest account, . . . $3,497.50 



86 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY POOR. 



A[)i)ro[»i'iation, .... 
Merrimack county, wood sold, 

E. H. Dixon, wood sold, 
John O'Neill, invalid bed sold. 

Balance carried to transfer account. 

Paid as follows : — 
Margaret Smith, aid, 
Lvdia S. Couch, " 
David O. Smith, " 
Ranlet & Marsh, coal and wood, 
Hiram O. Marsh, " " " 
Batchelder & Robinson, wood. 
Concord Water- Works, for D. O. Smith 
Frank P. Chesley, aid, . 
Dr. E. A. Clark, services, 
State Industrial School, board, 
Pilsbury & Day, coal, . 
Andrew Foley, board, . 
N. H. Asylum for Insane, board, 
Fifield & Hubbard, supplies, 
P. H. Larkin, 

F. S. C. Association, " 
C. C. Webster, " 

G. B. Whittredge, " 



$1,000.00 

382.50 

8.75 

15.00 

$1,406.25 
369.75 



$96.00 

84.00 

156.00 

15.50 

16.38 

352.50 

5.00 

6.00 

2.00 

91.72 

3.75 

51.41 

32.61 

4.25 

114.35 

1.03 

2.00 

2.00 



$1,036.50 



$1,036.50 



Aid to Dependent Soldiers and their Families. 

Appropriation, $500.00 

Deficiency brought from transfer account, 227,72 

Paid as follows : — 

Ranlet & Marsh, wood and coal, . . $12.25 

E. McQuesten, groceries, . . . 45.41 

N. H. Asylum, board, .... 105.33 



j727.72 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



H. H. Aldricli, uid, 

A. C. Sanborn, groceries, 

Pilsbnry & Da}', coal, . 

Fred Reed & Co., groceries, , 

C. H. JMartin & Co., medicines, 

Dr. A. P. Chesley, services, . 

H. W. Ranlet, rent, 

H. O. Marsh, wood, 

Fred Reed & Co., groceries, , 

H. 0. Marsh, coal and wood, 

C. C. Webster & Co., groceries, 



87 



$44.00 

48.00 

7.50 

47.95 

97.05 

141.25 
72.00 
5.50 
57.60 
31.88 
12.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation, .... 

N. B. Burleigh, 

C. A. Davis, ..... 

W. W. Allen, rent of hall, . 
Deficiency brought from transfer account. 



Paid as follows : — 
Pay-roll Central fire station, 
J. E. McShane, shoeing, 
Hugh Tallant, hay, 
Mrs. B. M. Pratt, cleaning, 
William Wright, livery, 
J. F. Scott, labor and lumber, 
Pilsbury & Day, coal, . 
J. C. French, supplies, . 
Ranlet & Marsh, coal, . 
Eli Hanson, slabs, 
Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., lumber, 
Batchelder & Robinson, wood, 
G. F. Thompson, sawing wood, 
W. S. Wakefield, teamster, . 
N. A. Dunklee, livery, . 
W. S. Davis & Sou, repairs. 



$14,000.00 

2.45 

51.20 

43.00 

658.13 



S14,754.78 



1,479.75 

185.10 

173.46 

62.50 

1.00 

42.28 

90.00 

1.75 

123.75 

48.00 

20.64 

50.00 

15.00 

50.00 

5.50 

160.47 



88 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Brown & Abbott, use of horses, 

Concord Water- Works, 

Concord Gas Light Co., 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies 

C. M. Boynton, supplies, 

R. J. McGuire, veterinary surgeon 

Underbill & Kittredge, supplies, 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, 

Manchester Locomotive Works, repairs 

Eureka Fire Hose Co., hose, 

J. Hinraan, supplies, 

Thompson & Hoague, supplies, 

Huntly & McDonald, repairs, 

Humphrey & Dodge, supplies, 

A F. Fitch, supplies, . 

J. D. Johnson & Son, supplies, 

Kimball, Danforth & Forrest, labor, etc 

Concord Foundry Co., castings, 

N. B. Burleigh, cash paid, 

C. A. Eastman, hay, 

Geo. Abbott, painting, . 

A. S. Jackson, supplies, 
H. E. Conant, laundry, 

B. Bilsborough, painting, 
J. H. Rowell, concrete work, 
P. A. Clifford, plumbing, 
McShane & Gienty, use of horses, 
Stevens & Duncklee, supplies, 
Globe Horseshoeing Co., labor, 
J. M. Jones, straw, 
J. H. Toof, laundry, 
W. J. Fernald, chairs, . 
H. O. Marsh, coal, 
Concord Ice Co., . 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 
W. M. Darrah, repairs, 
Ross W. Gate, " 
Geo. Goodhue, supplies, 
L. Eastman, glass. 



$52.00 

95.00 

346.01 

2.15 
18.00 
13.95 

9.75 

37.26 

314.00 

210.50 

36.38 

19.37 

1.35 
56.33 

1.20 
66.90 
18.71 

1.35 

6.97 
211.30 

3.45 

66.75 

12.45 

29.14 

242.09 

5.30 
69.00 
24.47 
10.00 
30.86 

2.75 

13.50 

116.00 

17.59 

8.64 
11.80 

2.50 

3.25 

3.12 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



89 



Kimball, Danfortli & Forrest, lumbei', 
Fairfield & Co., supplies, 
Munns & Paige, repairs, 

F. W. Scott & Co., repairs, 
B. Bilsborougb, repairs, 
L. A. Smith, supplies, . 
J. C. Freucb, supplies, . 

G. A. Berry & Co., supplies, 

E. B. Hutchiusou, lumber, 

F. H. George, furnace supplies, 
J. R. Hill Harness Co., supplies, 
Mrs. Geo. Jones, storage, 
A. L. Proctor, teaming. 
Concord Ice Co., use of horse, 
D. Downs, use of horse, 
I. C. Evans, printing, . 
Silsby & Son, supplies, 
W. E. Dow, supplies, firemen's parade, 
F. E. Colburn, " " 
Third Regiment band, " 
Reed & Mudgett, supplies " 
F. Reed & Co., " '' 
S. Wardner & Co., " " 
Concord Street R. R., fares, firemen's 

parade, ...... 

S. G. Potter, supplies, firemen's parade, 
J. C. Norris, " " '' 

American House, dinners " " 



$3.02 

2.87 

2.25 

28.77 

1.81 

.75 

.65 

.25 

2.80 

16.80 

1.00 

13.00 

2.75 

3.00 

5.00 

4.50 

2.97 

28.90 

56.98 

50.00 

48.02 

22.18 

18.00 

8.40 
7.20 
3.03 
6.30 



),041.,54 



Fire Alarm. 

N. B. Burleigh, superintendent, 
F. W. Landon, supplies, 
Northern Electrical Co., supplies, 
Davis & Smith, supplies, 
N. E. Gamewell Co., supplies, 
N. E. Gamewell Co., gong, . 



6 



$200.00 

12.78 

4.89 

19.20 

102.49 

30.00 



$369.36 



90 



CITY OF COKCORD. 



Hook and Ladder Company. 
Pay-rolls, .... 

Board of Engineers. 
Pay-rolls, .... 

Kearsarge Steamer Company. 
Pay-rolls, .... 



Eagle Hose Company. 

Pay-rolls, S960.50 

Abbot-Downiug Co., liose wagons, . 350.00 

Alert Hose Company. 

Pay-rolls, $786.00 

C. C. Hill, use of horses, . . . 116.66 

G. F. Livingston, steward, . . . 30.00 

W. E. Leavitt, driver, . . . . 25.00 

J. H. Seavey, " . . . . 25.00 

Good Will Hose Company. 

Pay-rolls, $786.00 

W. S. Davis & Son, hose wagon, . . 262.80 
H. P]. Houston, use of horse and wash- 
ing 212.15 

J. A. Mills, steward, .... 30.00 



Pioneer Steamer Company. 

Pay-rolls, .... 
Davis Bros., use of horses, . 
Davis Bros., coal and wood, . 
Isaac Baty, supplies, 
Taylor, Durgin & Sebra, repairs, 
W. W. Allen, supplies, 
Penacook Electric Light Co., labor 
E. E. Rolfe, steward and janitor, 
•Concord Axle Co., supplies, . 



$1,206.00 



$540.50 



,076.00 



$581.00 

128.09 

135.55 

15.35 

182.45 

49.62 

98.50 

75.00 

9.25 



,310.50 



i2.66 



$1,290.95 



,274.81 



INCIDENTALS, ETC. 



91 



Old Fort Company. 

Pay-rolls, 

J. T. Morgan, repairs, . 
J. E. Frye, supplies, 
A. B. Youug, supplies, 
T. E. Alexander, water, 

Cataract Company. 

Pay-rolls, 

Patrick Conway, steward,- 
G. & H. Partridge, labor, 
A. W. Holden, supplies, 
J. H. Harrington, coal, 
J. W. Welsh, use of horse. 



$246.00 

1.45 

12.00 

10.28 

8.00 



$246.00 
15.00 
22.88 
3.35 
72.50 
25.00 



^277.73 



$384.73 
$14,754.78 



INCIDENTALS, LAND DAMAGES, AND 
ABATEMENTS. 



Appropriation, ..... 


$5,000.00 


for discounts and abate- 




ments, 


2,000.00 


for safe for tax collector's 




office, 


150.00 


Received of Crowley & Quinn, rent of 




quarries, .... 


100.00 


B. T. Putney, rent of quarries, 


100.00 


E. H. Dixon, rent of city hall. 


103.00 


J. E. Rand, licenses, . 


82.00 


Whitney Barrett, " 


2.00 


W. C. Sheffield, 


2.00 


J. A. Cochran, billiard table 




licenses, .... 


280.00 


G. & H. Partridge, rent of 




pasture, .... 


30.00 


E. H. Osgood, rent of land. 


3.00 


G. W. Waters, " 


25.00 



92 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Received of H. W. Clapp, grass sold, . $15.00 

iand " . 300.00 
Concord Gas Liglit Co., in- 
spection of electric wires, 10.80 
Penacook Electric Light Co., 

inspection of electric wires, 37.20 

Deficiency brought from transfer account, 1,658.60 

Paid as follows : 

Incidentals. 

J. A. Cochran, cash paid out, . . $64.77 

H. W. Clapp, "... 64.41 

J. B. Dodge, "... 1.85 

H.W. Clapp & Co., " ... 7.50 

E. H. Dixon, "... 4.65 

" cash paid out and team, . 8.25 

F. E. Williams, repairs, . . . 1.87 
W. U. Telegraph Co., rent of clock, . 10.00 
E. H. Randall, repairs, . . . 7.45 
J. H. Chase, settees for city hall, . 90.00 
Concord Water Works, water bills, . 52.00 
Concord Gas Light Co., gas bills, . 399.88 
N. E. Telephone Co., use of telephones, 231.00 
Amoskeag Man'f. Co., scow, . . 100.00 
Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, etc., . 8.98 
Howard M. Cook, type-writing copy, . 1.00 
Geo. R. Connell, " . 1.50 
Stevens & Duncklee, supplies, . . 5.50 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs, . . 29.00 
Ranlet & Marsh, coal bills, . . . 14.50 
South Cong. Society, settees for City hall, 189.00 
Dr. F. A. Stillings, medical attendance, 10.00 
C. F. Batchelder, posting notices, . 1.95 
Foss & Merrill, surveying, . . . 116.30 
N. A. Dunklee, livery, .... 25.00 
M. Bateman, repairs, .... .50 
M. Bateman, plumbing at East Concord 

ward-house, ..... 37.58 



1,898.60 



INCIDENTALS, ETC. 



93 



Fairfield & Co., supplies, . . . $2.30 

J. Lucier, sawing wood, . . . 3.00 

N. J. Bachelder, blanks, . . . 5.50 

Wheeler Reflector Co., lanterns, . . 21.80 

Pilsbury & Day, coal, .... 11.45 

Geo. Goodhue, repairs, . . . 3.25 

C. H. Herbert, on circus contract, . 25.00 
Deunison & Brown, water bonds, . . 7.25 

D. L. Mandigo, furnace pipe, . . 1.00 
W. G. C. Kimball, platinum of ex-Mayor 

Clement, . . ' . . . 10.00 

Mosely Safe Co., safe for collector's office, 150.00 

P. C. Whittier, vacation of city messenger, 5.00 

H. H. Cochran, work in vacation, . . 15.00 

L. W. Bean, mason work, . . . 7.75 

Howard M. Cook, expense Ward Six, . 1.37 

Wright & Mercer, livery, . . . 8.50 

llcShane & Gienty, " ... 48.20 

H. O. Marsh, coal bills, . . . 50.75 

F. W. Scott & Co., labor, . . . 1.25 
H. O. Marsh, wood, .... 4.00 
Concord lee Co., bills, .... 142. G6 

G. W. Chesley, expense to East Concord, 2.00 
Kimball, Danforth t^ Forrest, building 

fence, ...... 22.44 

American Bank Note Co., bonds, . . 92.00 

R. H. Ayer, repairing clock, . . 7,00 

A. I. Foster, reut of office, . . . 150.00 

-J. A. Cochran, returns vital statistics, . 150.00 

J. W. Robinson, inspector electric wires, 273.90 

H. H. Cochran, copying ordinances, . 7.50 

Pay-roll, marriage returns, . . . 35.50 

Pay-roll, birth and death returns, . . 205.50 

I. W. Hill, ringing bell, July 4, 1892, . 2.00 

D. Reardon, " " . 2.00 

G. P. Mason, " " . 2.50 

Ghas. Boardman, " " . 2.00 

Geo. A. Sibley, " " . 2.00 

I. W. Hill, ^ " Columbus Dav, 3.00 



94 



CITY OF CONCORU. 



Geo. A. Sibley, ringing bell Columbus Day, S2.00 




Chas. Boardman, " " 


2.00 




G. P. Mason, 


2.00 




W. W. Allen, vital statistics, 


16.80 


$2,991.61 


Insurance. 




Jackman & Lang, insurance, 


$36.00 




Eastman & Merrill, " 


20.00 




Morrill & Danforth, 


169.40 




J. H. Ballard, .... 


6.00 


$231.40 






Tax Abatements. 






National State Capital Bank, 


$404.96 




Mechanicks National Bank, . 


452.76 




Amoskeag Man'f. Co., . 


810.06 




N. F. Carter, 


26.40 


$1,694.18 


Personal Damages. 




J. E. Fitzgerald, . 


$50.00 




Bridget Stickney, . 


. 2,200.00 




Wright & Mercier, damage to team 


75.00 




F. F. Dolloff, 


9.61 


$2,334.61 


Land Damages. 




James Coleman, 


. $2,321.80 




H. H. Chase, 


100.00 




A. Mollis 


25.00 




J. W. Edgerly, . 


100.00 




T. H. Ford, ... 


100.00 


$2,646.80 


• 






$9,898.60 



PUBLIC PARK, CORNER OF STATE 
AND CENTER STREETS. 



Appropriation, $25,500.00 

Balance carried to transfer account, . 11,022.38 



1,477.62 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



95 



Paid as follows : 
James F. Ward, land damages, 
Edson C. Eastman, land damages, 
H. S. & E. F. Ordway, land damages. 



H, 756. 95 
2,918.25 
6,802.42 



$14,477.62 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation for highways, 

" paving,, . 

" special. 
Appropriation for sidewalks and cross- 


$30,000.00 
1,000.00 
3,400.00 




ings, 


2,000.00 




Appropriation for re-coating sidewalks. 


1,500.00 




" rubbling, . 


1,500.00 


139,400.00 






Received from street sprinkling. 


$1,263.00 




Received from account collection for 






sidewalks, . . . . . 


1,430.15 




Received from Concord Mfg. Co., iron 






pipe, 

Received from George W. Dudley, gravel, 


10.00 
2.00 




" P. Clifford, use of pump, 


.50 




" George 0. Moulton, brick. 


• 4.00 




Received from J. H. S. AYillcox, gravel 






and labor, ..... 


2.00 




Received from Huntley & McDonald, 






cart wheels, ..... 


15.00 




Received from Thomas Hallinan, gravel 






and labor, ..... 


2.50 




Received from James S. Norris, labor, . 


15.00 




Received from Concord Water-Works, 






labor and use of crusher. 


310.00 




Received from Odd Fellows' Hall Asso- 






ciation, labor, etc.. 


34.25 


$3,088.40 






Balance carried to transfer account, 




$42,488.40 
1,484.74 

$41,003.66 



96 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid as follows : 

CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

Comprising parts of Wards 2 and 3, all of Wards 4, 5, 6, and 7. 

ALFRED CLARK, Commissioner of Higliways^ in charge. 



General Repairs. 

Labor pa3'-rolls, 

Pillsbnry street pay-rolls, 

C. G. Brown, agent, sand on Pillsbury 

street, .... 
Mrs. Julia A. Low, saud on Pillsbury 

street, .... 
Fred H. Savory & Co., grain, 
Foss & Men-ill, surveying, 
W. S. Davis & Son, snow-plow, 
Frank Adams, gravel and stone, 
H. N. Farley, repairing window, 
Humphrey & Dodge, hardware. 
Concord Railroad, freight, 
Huntley & McDonald, repairs, 
M. H. Bradley, gravel, 
Kilburn & Critchett, posts, 
Amos Turner, teamster, 
George A. Foster, chains, 
Concord Water- Works, water, 
L. W. Bean, mason work, 
Frank J. Batchelder, rent, 
Frank J. Batchelder, printing, 
Eureka Hose Co., hose. 
Concord Foundry Co., grates and traps, 
Frank Coffin, cement, 
John Hadlock, edges for machine, 
J. D. Johnson & Sou, repairing, 
J. II. Rowell, sand, 
Perkins & Berry, oil, 
Crawford & Stockbridge, time-boo 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil, 



;7,582.79 
1,203.47 

102.50 

132.00 

489.97 

1.57.45 

112.75 

16.20 

3.70 

301.41 

.90 

121.25 

12.90 

10.00 

200.00 

2.50 

203.00 

121.05 

41.67 

9.90 

165.00 

262.29 

34.80 

16.75 

41.80 

37.00 

3.16 

20.37 

4.86 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



97 



^. J. Magiiire, veterinary services, . $7.85 

George Goodhue, plumbing, . . . 71.09 

George Abbott, Jr., painting, . . 1.80 

R. W. Gate, blacksmitliiug, . . . 136.55 

W. H. Pitman, stone, .... 3 00 

Joseph Sticl\ney, rent, .... 12.00 

George L. Theobald, bank wall, . . 552.26 

Greenough & Hazeltiue, rubber boots, . 2.50 

Nathan Marden, watering-trough, . 3.00 

J. J. Wyman, oil, .... 6.42 

H. W. Clapp, fountain, • . . . 150.00 

J. E. Randlett, gravel, . . . . 31.10 

Samuel Holt, brick, .... 172.52 

J. S. Noyes, gravel, . . . . 15.10 

Stevens & Duncklee, dippers, . . 3.48 

Batchelder & Co., oil, .... .21 

Franklin R. Thurston, gravel, . . 302.90 

Oliver Racine, gravel, .... 9.30 

Woodworth & Co., cement, . . . 9.00 

Samuel Eastman & Co., couplings, . 50.50 

Concord Gas Light Co., . . . 9.50 

E. B. Hutchinson, lumber, . . . 33.63 

Thompson & Hoague, hardware, . . 2.83 

B. E. Badger, surveying, . . . 19.50 

J. H. Rowell, repairs, .... 62.00 

Frank Adams, gravel and stone, . . 53.85 

Bridges and Culverts. 

Labor pay-rolls, S43.87 

Nelson & Durrell, oil and can, . . 4.14 
Mary Adams, lighting bridge, . . 39.00 
J. E. Carter, labor on bridge, . . 4.56 
Emerson & Savory, painting East Con- 
cord bridge, . . . . . 145.00 
E. A. F. Hammond, lighting bridge, . 52.00 
Charles Thompson, Jr. , plank, . . 15.14 
A. C. Sanborn, oil, .... 4.39 
Concord Gas Light Co., light on Free 

bridge 20.64 



$13,133.33 



S328.74 



98 



CITY' OF CONCORD. 



Fences and Signs. 

Labor pa^'-roUs, ..... $20.00 

George Presoott, painting signs. . . 27.30 

Macadamizing. 

Labor pay-rolls, ..... $946.11 
Hartford Steam Boiler Co., iusnrance on 

boiler, 15.00 

M. H. Bradley, rent, .... 60.00 

Geoi-ge T. Com ins Co., wood, . . 12.00 

American Express Co., . . . 16.40 

Page Belting Co., lacings and belt, . 10.96 
Farrel Foundi'y Machine Co., toggles for 

crusher, . . . . . 24.71 

Concord Water- Works, . . . 3.00 
Farrel Foundry Machine Co., pitman and 

plates for crusher, .... 101.80 

George F. Sewall, trucking, . . .75 

Hiram O. Marsh, coal, . . . . 141.75 

Concord Railroad, freight, . . . 4.64 

N. P. Stevens, repairs on crusher, . 27.68 

Sidewalks and Crossings. 

Labor pay-rolls, 11,921.38 

M. H. Johnson, curbstone, etc., . . 604.80 

Foss & Merrill, surveying, . . . 38.15 

Thomas Tandy, curbstone and labor, . 408.45 

Merrill Dyer, setting curbstone, . . 34.78 

John H. Flood, curbstone, . . . 44.80 

A. Reynolds & Co., curbstone, . . 160.00 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete, . . 2,038.14 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairs, . . 1,756 59 

Cleaning and Sprinkling. 

Labor pay-rolls, $4,068.49 

C. H. Martin & Co., paint, oil, etc., . 12.38 

Amos Turner, teamster, . . . 250.00 

Abbot-Downing Co., repairing sweeper, 31.50 



$47.30 



,364.80 



$7,007.09 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



99^ 



"W. S. Davis & Son, cushion for sprinkler, 
Aaron Turner, labor, .... 
Concord Water- Works, 
H. M. Cooke, printing, etc., 
H. M. Cooke, collecting sprinkling sub- 
scription, . . . . . 

Winter Expenses. 

« 

Labor pay-rolls, ..... 
Daniel Crowley, teamster^ 
Amos Turner, ^' ... 

Holt Brothers, snow rollers, . 

Rubbling Bank of River. 
Labor pay-rolls, ..... 



3.00 




23.23 




400.00 




5.50 




80.00 






84,874.10 




.^1,099.26 




100.00 




50.00 




170.00 






$1,419.26 






$1,478.87 



EAST CONCORD RIVER DISTRICT. 

JosiAH S. Locke in charge. 
Josiah S. Locke, pay-rolls, ..... 



55.40- 



EAST CONCORD VILLAGE DISTRICT. 



Andrew S. Farnum in charge. 



Andrew S. Farnum, pay-rolls, 

Fred Drew, labor, 

N. E. Granite Works, stone, 

Concord Foundry Co., grates, etc., 

Robinson & Runnells, brick, 

Charles C. Graham, watering-trough, 

Cyrus R. Robinson, water for trough, 

F. P. Virgin, watering-trough, 

James H. Rowell, concreting fire station, 

Building wall and grading fire station, . 



$518.15 

5.62 

5.50 

8.00 

3.50 

3.00 

20.00 

3.00 

148.10 

155.37 



;70.24 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HORSE HILL DISTRICT. 
Robert W. Hoit in charge. 

Robert W. Hoit, pay-rolls, . . . . $105.05 

John Whitaker, plank, .... 80.53 



MILLVILLE DISTRICT. 

George O. Moulton in charge. 

George O. Moulton, pay-rolls, . . $1,924.06 

George O. Moulton, posts and spikes, . 21.66 

George B. Little, labor, . . . 4.50 

Charles M. Morgan, labor, . . . 2.80 

Mrs. Trull, gravel, .... .80 

F. H. Currier, labor, .... 40.50 



$185.58 



HOT HOLE POND DISTRICT. 

L. L. Locke in charge. 
L. L. Locke, pay-rolls, $23.80 



LITTLE POND ROAD DISTRICT. 

Frank Griffin in charge. 
Frank Griffin, pay-rolls, $2.25 



LONG POND NORTH DISTRICT. 

Albert W. Hobbs in charge. 
Albert W. Hobbs, pay-rolls, $52.75 



MAST YARD DISTRICT. 

Andrew P. Bennett in charge. 

Andrew P. Bennett, pay-rolls, .... $34.25 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



101 



St. Paul's School, lumber, 
Downs & Whipple, lumber, 
Charles Nutting, gravel, 
James Mercer, " 

George Laraphrey, labor, 
John W. Paige, gravel, 



$6.90 

36.92 

3.30 

5.50 

8.25 
38.90 



MOUNTAIN DISTRICT. 

Hugh Tallant in charge. 
Hugh Tallant, pay-rolls, . . . . 



$2,094.09 



.75 



NORTH CONCORD DISTRICT. 

John C. Kilbukn in charge. 



John C. Kilburn, pay-rolls, 
Emerson & Savory, paint, 
John T. Dodge, plank, . 



!12.95 

1.50 

10.20 



NUMBER FOUR DISTRICT. 

F. E. DiMOND in charge. 
F. E. Dimond, pay-rolls, .... 



EGYPT DISTRICT. 

George G. Jenness in charge. 

$249.78 
3.00 
6.00 



George G. Jenness, pa3'-rolIs, 

S. C. Jenness, watering-trough, 

E. F. Jenness, watering-trough, 1891-'92, 



$224.65 



$219.55 



$258.78 



PENACOOK AND BOROUGH DISTRICT. 
Davis Brothers in charge. 
Davis Brothers, pay-rolls, . . . $4,175.00 



Frank Sanborn, 



83.42 



102 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Striitton, Merrill & Co., sand, 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, watering-trough 

1891-'92, .... 

Fred Chandler, gravel, . 
Andrew Linehan, lighting bridge, . 
Taylor, Diirgin & Sebra, labor, 
N. S. Gale & Co., hardware, 
George W. Chandler, gravel, 
A. H. Urann, painting, 
A. M. Gage, gravel, 
C S. Ward, repairing wagon, 
Foote, Brown & Co., paint, oil, etc., 
C. H. Fowler, paint, 
Edward McShane, blacksmithing, . 
E. Ordway, sand, .... 
Andrew Keenan, sand Willow Hollow, 
Crowley & Qiiinn, stone. Willow Hollow 
James H. Rowell, concreting. 
Granite Railway Co., stone, . 
Mrs. E. M. Runnells, land damage, 
Andrew Keenan, " " 

•Concord Foundry Co., grates and traps, 
H. W. Knowlton, mason work, 
George Neller, mason work, 
S. G. Sanborn, blacksmithing, 
W. H. Bell, powder, etc., 
Granite Railway Co., stone, 
George H. Speed, stone, 
John Rines, brick, 
Charles Davis, painting, 
0. J. Fifield, sand, 
Davis Brothers, brick, . 
John Whitaker, lumber, 
Henry Morrill, wall at Borough bridge, 
Penacook Electric Co., . 
Isaac Baty, labor, etc., . 
Tallant & Morrill, plank. 
Ford & Kimball, iron posts, 
Luther Hoit, labor. 



17.40 

G.OO 

1.80 

100.00 

16.38 

52.11 

15.20 

55.98 

85.50 

1.75 

19.79 

2.47 

6.64 

9.50 

121.00 

3.50 

413.29 

4.00 

10.00 

10.00 

64.25 

4.00 

15.09 

15.35 

1.21 

7.20 

5.00 

6.00 

.75 

12.50 

6.00 

23.82 

108.48 

9.37 

3.62 

29.61 

14.76 

1.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



103 



C. A. Giles, stone, 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 

S. F. Patterson, sliinoiin<i; twin bridge. 



$2.00 

3.80 

270.00 



$5,804.54 



PENACOOK INTERVALE DISTRICT. 

John F. Oilman in charge. 

John F. Oilman, pay-roll, 1891, . . $20.70 

" '' 1892, . . 60.45 

Ai Smith, watering-trongh, . . . 3.00 



POTTER STREET DISTRICT. 
John F. Tenney in charoe. 



John F. Teune}', pay-rolls, 
John F. Tenney, water for trough, 
John F. Batchelder, gravel, . 
Robinson & Runuells, brick, . 
Frank Coffin, cement, 



$255.44 
3.00 
9.04 
3.50 
2.90 



SANBORN DISTRICT. 

N. S. Sanborn in charge. 
N. S. Sanborn, pay-rolls. 



VIRGIN DISTRICT. 

F. P. Virgin in charge. 
F. P. Virgin, pay-rolls. 



WEST CONCORD DISTRICT. 

Oeorge Partridge in charge. 

Oeorge Partridge, pay-rolls, . . . $697.04 

C. A. Oiles, stone and gravel, . . 13.77 

Chandler FLastmau & Son, repairs, . 2.00 



$84.15 



$273.88 



$12.50 



.54 



104 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



"William L^Mich, laying culvert, 
Concord Foundry Co., catch-basin and 



$3.00 



traps, ...... 


68.94 




Simeon Partridge, blacksraithing, . 


5.70 




Simeon Partridge, snow plow. 


6.00 




Thompson & Hoague. hardware, . 


6.52 




S. F. Patterson, shingling Sewall's Falls 


• 




bridge, ...... 


180.00 


$982.97 




[CT. 


STICKNEY HILL DISTR 




A. S. Smith in charge. 






A. S. Smith, pay-rolls, .... 


- 


$3.50 


Total expenditures. 


$41,003.66- 


Balance, ..... 




$1,484.74 



POLICE AND WATCH. 

Appropriation, $8,000.00 

Received of B. E. Badger, police justice, 155.18 
A. J. Shurtleff, associate 

justice, .... 10.00 
G. S. Locke, fees, . . 2,547.28 
F. M. Eaton and H. Robin- 
son, fees, . . . 2.31 
W. C. Sheffield, fees, . . 1.25 
Deficiency brought from transfer account, 367.76 

Paid as follows : 

Pay-roll of regular officers, . . . $8,029.88 

" special police, . . . 781.50 

B. E. Badger, salary police justice, . 800.00 

A. J. Shurtleff, associate police justice, 38.00 

G. M. Fletcher, salary clerk police court, 200.00 

V. E. Kimball, cleaning office, . . 116.70 

H. A. Mullen, janitor, .... 90.00 



$11,083.7» 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



105 



J. R. Miller, labor, 

Davis Bros., supplies, . 

J. A. Cobiu'ii, rent, 

X. A. Dunklee, livery, . 

D. Evans & Co., police supplies, . 

Concord "Water-Works, water bills, 

Concord Gas Light Co., gas bills, . 

Ranlet & Marsh, coal bills, . 

H. O. Marsh, coal bills, 

N. C. Nelson, clock, 

Knox, " the hatter," police hats, . 

Judsou Becker, police badges, 

Hnmphrev & Dodge, supplies, 

Munns & Paige, supplies, 

George W. Hale, book. 

Sleeper & Hood, repairs, 

Lee Bros., repairs, 

Kimball, Danforth & Forrest, repairs, 

Huntley & McDonald, repairs, 

George Goodhue, plumbing, . 

C. H. Fowler, oil, . ^ . 

Stevens & Duncklee, supplies, 

Davis Bros., wood. 

Northern Electrical Supply Co., 

G. & H. Partridge, rent, 

John Chadwick, livery and telephone, 

Batchelder & Co., supplies, . 

Peuacook Electric Light Co., 

Concord Ice Co., ice bills, 

H. E. Chamberlain, police services, 

Sarah E. Dennis, cleaning, 

H. L. Harris, livery. 



$2.00 

3.85 

31.00 

282.00 

15.00 

15.00 

210.60 

135.25 

144.13 

12.50 

12.50 

5.00 

3.45 

19.29 

2.50 

3.00 

7.30 

2.55 

.75 

27.55 

1.15 

3.25 

2.50 

.25 

12.00 

22.50 

21.34 

10.64 

5.00 

6.00 

2.10 

5.75 



$11,083.78 



COMMITTEE SERVICE, 



Appropriation. . . • . . $1,410.00 

Balance carried to transfer account, . 15.00 



Sl,395.00 



106 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid as follows : 




John O'Neill, alderman, 


$60.00 


John B. Dodge, " 


60.00 


Williatn A. Cowley, " 


60.00 


Adam P. Holden, 


60.00 


James K. Kennedy, " 


60.00 


Henry McFarland, 


60.00 


Henry J. Crippeu, " 


75.00 


Edward B. Woodworth, 


60.00 


Oeorge F. Underbill, " 


60.00 


William J. Fern aid, • " 


60.00 


Oilman B. Johnson, " 


60.00 


Joseph C. Ordway, " 


75.00 


James H. Sanders, " 


60.00 


Frank P. Quimby, " 


60.00 


George H. Mills, '• 


60.00 


Henry T. Foote, councilman, 


30.00 


Frank P. Robertson, " 


30.00 


Charles L. Worthen, 


30.00 


dharles W. Blanchard, '" 


30.00 


Oilman K. Crowell, " 


30.00 


Henry W. Hayden, " 


30.00 


Nathan Mansur, " 


30.00 


John H. Couch, " 


30.00 


Patrick H. Coleman, " 


45.00 


Oharles E. Palmer, " 


15.00 


Leonard W. Bean, " 


45.00 


Fred E. Cloudman, " 


30.00 


Charles C. Nntter, " 


30.00 


Sidney S. Upham, " 


30.00 


•Charles W. Brown, " 


30.00 







,395.00 



SALARIES, 



Appropriation, $8,200.00 

3)eficiencv brouoht from transfer account, 130.65 



5,330.65 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



107 



Paid as follows : 
Henry W. Clapp, ma3'or, 
Alfred Clark, eommisslouer of highways 
Joseph A. Cochran, city clerk, 
Joseph A, Cochran, overseer of the poor 
Harr\' G. Sargent, city solicitor, . 
Edward H. Dixon, city messenger, 
William F. Thayer, city treasurer, 
Albert I. Foster, collector of taxes, 
Edward M. Nason, clerk, of common 

council, ..... 
Board of Education, Union School Dis 

trict, ..... 
Board of Education, District No. 12, 
" " " " 20, 

Town District School Board, . 
Ira C. Phillips, assessor. Ward 1, . 
Albert Stevens, " '' 2, . 

Harrison Partridge, "• "■ 3, . 

Gilbert H. Seavey, '• '* 4, . 

Curtis White, " " 5, . 

George S. Dennett, " " 6, . 
Jonathan B. Weeks, '• " 7, . 

Pay-roll of ward officers, 
John B. Dodge, overseer of poor 

Ward 1, .... 

William A. Cowley, overseer of poor 

Ward 2, .... 

R. H. Ayer, superintendent of clocks 
Fred Rollins, Ward 2 records, 
Fred I. Johnson, "4 " 
Howard M. Cook, ''6 " 



M, 000. 00 
1,383.34 
800.00 
150.00 
500.00 
600.00 
250.00 
1,232.31 

50.00 

225.00 
18.00 
27.00 
300.00 
159.00 
141.00 
138.00 
276.00 
156.00 
204.00 
297.00 
301.00 

25.00 

10.00 

85.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 



S8,330.65 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Appropriation, S2,250.00 

Balance carried to transfer account, . 98.45 



$2,151.55 



108 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid as follows : 




N. H. Democratic Press Co., 


$107.03 


Frank J. liatchelder, 


96.15 


Ira C. Evans, .... 


71.35 


Crawford & Stockbridge, 


7.95 


Silsby & Son, .... 


158.39 


Republican Press Association, 


. 1,710.08 







S2, 15 1.55 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Appropriation, $800.00 

Received from estate of Mrs. B. Burleigh, 110.26 

Merrimack Co., . . 8.27 



Balance cari-ied to transfer account, 



Paid as follows : 
W. L. Foster, services, 
E. H. Dixon, witness fees, 
W. L. Foster, services, 
H. G. Sargent, expense, 
H. F. Hollis, services, . 



5918.53 
608.99 



$212.00 


26.87 


44.00 


11.67 


15.00 



$309.54 



$309.54 



SCHOOLS. 

Unexpended balance of 1891, . .$20,827.25 

Appropriation, 1892, .... 22,225.00 

Walker Fund, interest, .... 60.00 

Additional appropriation in Union Dist., 10,608.00 

Text-books and supplies, . . . 4,000.00 

Industrial education 2,000.00 

Sub-Primary, 850.00 

District No. 12, additional, . . . 200.00 

'• " 20, " ... 1,500.00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



109 



Town district, .... 

Literary fund, .... 

Dog tax, . . . . . 

Dog licenses, .... 

Balance due school districts, . 



$600.00 
3,513.60 
1,191.75 
1,210.90 

568, 786. 50 
17,395.85 



S5 1,390. 65 



Paid as follows : 
L. J, Rundlett, financial agent, Union 

School District $43,981.15 

I. N. Abbott, Town District, . . 2,196.75 

John Chadwick, District No. 20, . . 4,249.35 

W. A. Cowley, " " 12, . . 963.40 



$51,390.65 



SCHOOL-HOUSE TAXES. 

Appropriation Union School District, 

payment of debt, ..... 

Paid H. J. Crippeu, Union School Dis- 
trict. ....... 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Appropriation, 






. 


Paid as follows : 


D. F. Secorab, salary, .... ^^1, 000. 00 


D. F. Secorab, incidentals. 






100.70 


Adah M. Colby, . 






400.00 


Clara Brown, 






400.00 


W. I. James, 






152.70 


H. G. Upton, 






16.25 


Janitor, 






187.38 


N. S. Gale, . 






78.00 


W. B. Cunningham, 






78.00 


Publication papers, etc.. 






221.03 


Insurance, 






156.50 



S5,000.00 



5,000.00 



$6,000.00 



110 



CITY OP CONCORD 



Republican Press Association, 

Edsou C. Eastman, 

Silsby & Son, 

W. E. Hunt, 

Jaraes E. Abbe, 

J. P. Lippincott & Co., 

Cliarles Scribner's Sons, 

Library Bureau, 

Gas, 

Coal, . 

Humphrey & Dodge, 

Plumbing and repairs, 

People's Gas Light Co 

Ira C. Evans, 

Charles R. Corning, 

M, R. Tanner, 

Grace Secomb, 

Sundries, 



^670.71 

554.11 

300.77 

309.54 

447.15 

96.27 

94.05 

36.30 

159.30 

306.50 

26.97 

38.12 

37.43 

7.75 

43.90 

19.75 

3.25 

57.57 



$6,000.00 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Appropriation $1,000.00 

Balance carried to transfer account, . 2.98 

Paid as follows : 

H. A. Rowell, sanitary officer, . . $338.78 

C. E. Palmer, " . . 361.22 

E. N. Pearson, salary, member of boaid 

of health, 25.00 

Dr. E. A. Clark, salary, member of board 

of health, 25.00 

H. A. Rowell, cash paid out, . . 61.58 

C. E. Palmer, " . . 123.61 

F. J. Batchelder, printing, . . . 21.50 
George Prescott, signs, . . . 4.50 
Concord Water- Works, . '. . 8.34 
Repu])lican Press Association, printing, 4.13 



$1,002.98 



MEMORIAL DAY. 



Ill 



Macdouald & Fisher, office chairs, . 
George L. Theobald, biasing animals, 
Concord Gas Light Co., 



S9.00 
16.00 
4.32 
$1,002.98 



Appropriation, 
Received of 0. F 
pavilion," 



PENACOOK PARK. 

S450.00 



Richardson, rent of 



24.00 



Deficiency brought from transfer account, 

Paid as follows : 
Pay-rolls, .... 
O. F. Richardson, superintendent, 
Humphrey & Dodge, supplies, 
Eastman & Co., " 

Scribner & Britton, *■• 
C. H. Martin & Co., " 
.1. M. Crossman, repairs. 
Concord Manufacturing Co., 
A. H. Urann, painting. 



174.00 
36.64 
$510.64 



385.63 

50.00 

.60 

4.17 

2.80 

17.90 

12.84 

3.75 

32.95 



WHITE PARK. 



Appropriation, 

Paid W. P. Fiske, treasurer, 



MEMORIAL DAY. 

Appropriation, ....... 

Paid as follows : 
J. H. French, for W. I. Brown Post, . $75.00 

J. M. Crossman, for Davis Post, . . 30.00 

L. S. Richardson, for E. E. Sturtevant 

Post, 195.00 



$510.64 



$2,500.00 

2,500.00 



$300.00 



$300.00 



112 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MARGARET PILLSBURY GENERAL 
HOSPITAL. 

Appropriation, $2,000.00 

Paid W. F. Thayer, treasurer, .... 2,000.00 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 

Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Appropriation for purchase of laud, . 575.00 

$3,575.00 

Paid C. G. Remick, treasurer, .... 3,575.00 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 

Appropriation, $350.00 

Paid C. G. Remick, treasurer, .... 350.00 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

Appropriation, ....... $150.00 

Paid O. L. Shepard, 150.00 



CALVARY CEMETERY. 

Appropriation, $80Q.OO 

Paid C. G. Remick, 800.00 



precinct: 



113 



PRECINCT. 

Unexpended balance of 1891, 
Appropriation for interest on state-honse 
loan, ...... 

Appropriation for interest on sewer 
bonds, ...... 

Appropriation for ligliting streets, 
" "• hydrants, . 

" " sewers, • . 

H. W. Clapp, sewer account 1891, 

Deficiency in precrinct account, 



Paid as follows : 

Lighting Streets. 

Concord Gas Light Co., electric lights, . 

, " " "• gas lights, 

Thompson & Hoague, glass, . 
Concord Land & Water Power Co., 
electric lights, .... 

Hydrants. 

Concord Water-AVorks, 

Interest. 
Interest on state-hoqse loan, . 

Sewers. 

* Paid H. ^y. Clapp, labor pay-rolls, 
Alfred Clark, " " 

J. H. Lamprey, damages, 
Foss & Merrill, surveying, 
Ferrin & Woodman, mason work. 
Nutting & Hayden, supplies and 
repairs, . . . . . 



M,114. 

1,440, 

480. 
9,000. 
6,000. 
2,000. 

220. 



84 

.00 

.00 
,00 
,00 
,00 
00 



S26,254.84 
7,367.90 

$33,622.74 



$4,338, 

3,009, 

2 



39 
74 
50 



976.50 



$6,752 

235 

75 

142 

1,210 

56. 



.86 
.84 
.00 
.10 
,00 



$8,327.13 



$6,000.00 



. $1,440.00 



05 

Of this amount, §.3,095.42 was expended on tlie brick sewer in Allison street. 



114 



CITY -OF CONCORD 



Paid W. F. Carr, supplies, 

B. F. Putney, " 
E. A. Cushiog, trucking, 
Perkins & Berry, supplies, 
Humphrey & Dodge, supplies. 
Concord Foundry Co., " 
Thompson & Hoague, 

L. W. Bean, mason work, 
Greenough & Hazeltine, rubber 
Harden & Co., rubber boots, 
Ross W. Cate, repairs, . 
A. W. Mitchell MTg Co., 
checks, 

C. & M. R. R., freight, . 
Geo. L. Theobald, use of horse 
E. B. Hutchinson, lumber, 
Wood worth & Co., cement, 
J. F. Ward, carting, 
Geo. L. Theobald, carting, 
Samuel Holt, brick, 
Scribner & Britton, supplies. 
Ford & Kimball, castings, 
Frank Coffin, cement, 



boots 



brass 



$0.34 


39.48 


91.75 


8.88 


1,304.28 


68.78 


21.28 


223.00 


10.00 


7.20 


54.95 


2.25 


.26 


74.25 


355.36 


152.20 


9.00 


10.50 


317.25 


2.40 


30.04 


27.55 



511,282.85 



North End Sewer. 



Paid pay-rolls, W. B. Howe, agent, 
Foss & Merrill, surveying, 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., derrick, 
Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, 
B. French, labor and lumber, . 
Greenough & Hazeltine, rubber 

boots, .... 
Holt & Bros., supplies, . 
A. P. Jenness, labor, 
Geo. L. Theobald, labor, 
A. L. Proctor, teaming, . 
L. R. Fellows, mason work, . 
Dickerman & Co., cement, 



1,765.75 
197.15 

28.00 
205.20 

16.01 

27.50 

2.50 

15.37 

107.00 

1.00 

676.60 

421.61 



SOLDIEKS MEMORIAL ARCH. 



115 



Paid E. B. Hutcliiiisou, lumber, 
Holt M'f'g Co., supplies, 
J. H. Mead, repairs, 
J. F. Ward, teaming, 
Ford & Kimball, castings, 
Ferrin & Woodman, mason work. 
Samuel Holt, brick, 
G. L. Theobald, teaming. 
Proctor Bros., teaming, . 
W. Silver, teaming, 
Thompson & Hoague,- liardvvare, 



S189.71 

3.50 

2.80 

3.25 

52.50 

24.00 

778.65 

39.00 

1.25 

.75 

13.66 



$6,572.76 
$33,622.74 



SOLDIERS' MEMORIAL ARCH. 

Appropriation, $20,000.00 

" for dedication of arch, . 1,200.00 

Received of H. W. Clapp for cloth sold, 5.00 

" " programmes, . 50.00 



Balance carried to transfer account, 



$21,255.00 
3,793.11 



$17,461.89 



Paid as follows : 

Anderson, Sweusou & Co., on con- 
tract $4,706.91 

Anderson, Swenson & Co., on con- 
tract, 3,629.34 

H. W. Clapp, cash paid out, . . 3.32 
Anderson, Swenson &Co., on contract, 2,193.75 
" " " 1,213.50 
Foss & Merrill, engineering, . . 8.25 
J. G. Chase, packing plans, . . .50 
T. F. McGann, contract for lanterns, 350.00 
Anderson, Swenson & Co., on con- 
tract,* 2,000.00 

* The committee on the Soldiers' Memorial Arch have reserved $2,956.50, tlie 
balance of the contract, and to be paid Anderson, Swenson & Co., upon the completion 
of the arch. 



116 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid J. R. Hawley, for oration, July 4, 1892, S50.00 
H. W. Clapp, bills for dedication of 

arcb, 1.815.49 

T. F. McGann, contract for lanterns, 550.00 

G. L. Theobald, gravel and carting, 8.50 

F. W. Landon &Co., electric supplies, 132.26 

Giles Wheeler, cashjpaid, expenses, 28.07 

C. H. McKenny & Co., brackets, . 17.00 

McShane & Gienty, livery, . . 5.00 

Peabodv & Stearns, plans for arcli, 750.00 

$17,461.89 

H. W. CLAPP, 
JOHN C. LINEHAN, 
P. B. COGSWELL, 
F. E. CLOUDMAN, 
L. W. BEAN, 
W. J. FERNALD, 
HENRY W. STEVENS. 

GILES whp:eler, 

GILMAN B. JOHNSON, 
JOHN H. COUCH, 
HENRY McFARLAND, 
H. H. FARNUM, 
JAMES K. EWER, 
Committee on the MemMrial Arch . 



BOROUGH BRIDGE. 

Appropriation, ..... :M,000.00 
Received from C. H. Amsden, . . 100.00 



$1,100.00 
Deficiency brought from transfer account, 420.54 



SI, 520. 54 



Paid as follows : 

Henry Morrill, on contract, . . . $946.44 

B. & M. Railroad, freight, . . . 26.52 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, . . 3.20 



VOTING PLACES UNDER THE NEW BALLOT LAW. 



117 



George McQuesteu & Co., lumber, 

A. M. & A. W. Rolfe, plauk, 

John Whitaker, lumber, 

Taylor, Durgin & Sebra, carpentering, 

N. S. Gale & Co., spikes, 

Henry Morrill, teaming, 

C. E. Thompson, Jr., lumber, 

Foss & Merrill, surveying, 



S257.90 


.75 


3.38 


58.45 


1.05 


14.50 


56.50 


151.85 



,520.54 



REPAIRING PEST-HOUSE. 

Appropriation, ..... $200.00 

Bahmce carried to transfer account, . 5.32 

Paid as follows : 

George Abbott, Jr., painting, . . $16.63 

L. W. Bean, mason work, . . . 92.15 

F. W. Scott & Co., labor and lumber, . 85.90 



$194.68 



.94.68 



VOTING PLACES UNDER THE NEW 
BALLOT LAW. 



Appropriation, $600.00 

Balance carried to transfer account, . 180.93 

Paid as follows : 

H. F. Paul, cash paid for supplies, . $0.75 

I. F. Potter, labor, etc., . . . 30.15 

A. W. Holden, carpentering, . . 21.78 

F. W. Scott & Co., labor and lumber, . 134.23 

George Goodhue, gas fitting, . . 21.01 

Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, . . 1.00 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., tables, . . 1.50 

F. S. Johnson, expenses, . . . .75 

Taylor, Durgin & Sebra, labor and lumber, 68.65 



$419.01 



118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Isaac Baty, gas fitting, 

v.. B, Hutchinson, lumber and labor, 

C. H. Fowler, varnish, . 



$16.39 

11 1). 80 

3.00 



Appropriation, 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 



. $17,000.00 
123.12 



$17,123.12 
Balance carried to transfer account, . 7,956.34 



Paid as follows : 
Labor pay-rolls, A. P. Holden, agent, . 
Foss & JMerrill, surveying, 
Portland Stove Manufacturing Co., pipe, 
Perria, Seamans & Co., hardware and 

supplies, .... 

Greenough & Hazeltine, rubber boots, 

A. W. Holden, labor and lumber, . 
Thompson & Hoague, supplies, 
Simeon Partridge, shingles, . 
Simeon Partridge, repairs, 

G. & H. Partridge, supplies, 
G. & H. Partridge, lumber, . 
G. «fe H. Partridge, labor, 
Humphrey & Dodge, hardware. 
Concord & Claremont Railroad, freight. 
Brown Brothers & Co., iron, 

B. F. Putney, supplies, 
Crawford & Stockbridge, books, 
Simeon Abbott, laud damage, 
John Whitaker, lumber. 

Concord Manufacturing Co., lumber, 
Eastman & Co., supplies. 
Concord Foundry Co., castings, 

C. Eastman & Sons, lumber. 



S4,802.20 

141.55 

3,030.75 

195.29 

83.00 

22.75 

15.95 

13.50 

219.85 

8.43 

9.20 

20.98 

22.07 

2.30 

1.35 

60.40 

15.50 

25.00 

31.71 

28.00 

6.40 

106.41 

5.50 



S419.07 



WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRE- 
CINCT. 



,166.78 



PENACOOK SKWERAGE PRECINCT. 



119 



J, M. Grossman, supplies, 
Samuel Holt, brick, 
J. E. Shepard, teaming. 
Mead, Mason & Co., lumber. 
Concord Manufacturing Co., 
Silsby & Sons, stationery. 
Wood worth & Co., cement, . 
American Bank Note Co., bonds. 



$13.84 




78.55 




18.90 




14.75 




2.20 




2.00 




90.45 




78.00 






$9,166.78 



PENACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 



Balance of appropriation, 1891, 
Appropriation for sinking fund, 
Appropriation for interest on precinct 

bonds, ..... 
Appropriation for repairs of sewers, 
A[)propriation to complete the sewer sys 

tem, $4,500 less $1,500 cancelled. 
Premium and interest on bonds sold, 

Paid as follows : 
Pay-rolls, J. B. Dodge, agent, 
Pay-rolls, H. Morrill, . 
Poss & Merrill, engineering, 
Isaac Baty, labor and supplies, 
Isaac Baty, sewer-pipe, etc., 
Thompson & Hoague, hardware, 
Foote, Brown & Co., 
Concord Foundry Co., castings. 
Wood worth & Co., cement, . 
Ford & Kimball, castings, 
Penacook Sewer Precinct, sinking fund, 
American Bank Note Co., bonds, 
Interest on precinct bonds. 

Balance, cash on hand. 



.27 
500.00 

840.00 
100.00 

3,000.00 
164.22 



$1,431.19 

763.60 

75.50 

33.61 

868.83 

21.45 

7.31 

6.00 

21.60 

39.05 

500.00 

18.30 

840.00 



$4,703.49 



1,626.44 

77.05 



$4,703.49 



120 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



LIGHTING STREETS, PENACOOK. 



Appropriation, .... 
Balance carried to transfer account, 

Paid Andrew Linehan, treasurer, . 



$1,000.00 
350.00 



$650.00 
650.00 



RECAPITULATION. 


State tax, 






$31,650.00 


County tax, . 






32,042.94 


Interest, 




. 


. 3,497.50 


City poor, 






. 1,036.50 


Aid to dependent soldiers anc 


1 fam 


ilies, 


727.72 


Fire department, . 






14,754.78 


Incidentals, land damages. 


and . 


ibate- 




raents, .... 






9,898.60 


Public park, . 






14,477.62 


Highway department, 






41,003.66 


Police and watch. 






11,083.78 


Committee service, 






1,395.00 


Salaries, 






8,330.65 


Printing and stationery. 






2,151.55 


Legal expenses, 






309.54 


Schools, .... 






51,390.65 


School-house taxes. 






5,000.00 


Public library. 






6,000.00 


Board of health, . 






1,002.98 


Penacook park, 






510.64 


White park, .... 






2,500.00 


Memorial Day, 






300.00 


Margaret Pillsbury hospital, . 






2,000.00 


Blossom Hill cemetery. 






3,575.00 


Old North cemetery. 






350.00 


West Concord cemetery. 






150.00 


Calvary cemetery, 






800.00 


Precinct, .... 






33,622,74 


Soldiers' memorial arch. 






17,461.89 



TRANSFER ACCOUNT. 



121 



Repairing pest house, 
Borough bridge, 

Voting pUxces for new ballot law, 
West Concord sewerage precinct, 
Penacook sewerage precinct, 
Lighting streets, Penacook, . 



$194.68 

1,520.54 

419.01 

9,166.78 

4,703.49 

650.00 



-$303,678.24 



ACCOUNTS KEPT BY THE CITY CLERK FOR CONVENIENCE OF REFER- 
ENCE, BUT NOT INVOLVING EXPENSE TO THE CITY. 

TRANSFER ACCOUNT. 

Made up from unexpended balances of appropriations, and 
drawn upon, as allowed b3'city ordinance, to meet deficiencies 
by transfer to other appropriations. 

' Dr. 

Balance brought from transfer account of 1891, . $10,731.68 

To amount brought from city poor account, . . 369.75 

" '' public park, . . . 11,022.38 

'' " highway department, . 1,484.74 

" '• committee service, . . 15.00 

" '• printing and stationery, . 98.45 

" " legal expenses, . . 608.99 

" " board of health, . . 2.98 

" " soldiers' memorial arch, . 3,793.11 

" " repairing pest house, . 5.32 
" " West Concord sewerage 

precinct, . . . 7,956.34 

" " lighting streets, Penacook, 350.00 

" . '' voting places, . . . 180.93 

$36,619.67 
Cr. 

By amount carried to dependent soldiers, $227.72 

" " fire department, . 658.13 

" " incidentals, etc., . 1,658.60 
7 



122 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



By amount carried to police and watch, 


367.76 


" " salaries, 


130.65 


" " Penacook park. 


36.64 


" " Borough bridge. 


420.54 


Balance carried to transfer account 




(1893), 


33,119.63 







),619.67 



DOG TAX. 



Received as follows : 
Amount of dog tax for 1892, 
Amount of dog license for 1892, 



S470.00 
1,391.64 



Paid as follows : 








K. B. Locke, sheep killed, . . . $7.50 


J. S. Locke, 






28.00 


W. G. Roach, hens killed, 






6.25 


J. P. Clifford, sheep killed, 






15.00 


S. M. Locke, 






6.00 


S. P. Colby, 






20.00 


John Jordan, " 






5.00 


Amount carried to school fun( 


1, 




1,773.89 



STONE QUARRIES. 



Received of Crowley & Quinn, 
B. T. Putney, . 
G. W. Waters, . 



$100.00 

100.00 

25.00 



,861.64 



,861.64 



$225.00 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



Cxii of Concotrb, (U» ^. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1892. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

HENRY W. CLAPP, Mayor, ex officio. 

JOHN WHITAKfiR, to March 31, 1896. 

HENRY E. CONANT, to March 31, 189G. 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, to March 31, 1895. 

JAMES H. CHASE, to March 31, 1895. 

GEORGE A. Y^OUNG, to March 31, 1894. 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, to March 31, 1894. 

JAMES L. MASON, to March 31, 1893. 

JOSEPH H. ABBOT, to March 31, 1893. 

ARTHUR H. CHASE, Clerk. 



OFFICERS. 



WILLIAM P. FISKE, President. 
V. C. HASTINGS, Superintendent. 



COI^COKD WATEE BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members : 

Abraham G. Jones, ex officio, . . 1872 — three months. 

John M. Hill, 1872-1878. 

Benjamin A. KimbaU, .... 1872-1878. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872 Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

David A. Warde,* 1872-1874. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* .... 1872 Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

Benjamin S. Warren,* .... 1872-1873. 

John Kimball, ex officio, . • . 1872-1876. 

John Abbott,* 1873-1876. 

John S. Russ,* 1874-1877. 

Abel B. Holt,* 1874-1877. 

Samuel S. Kimball, 1875 Resigned July 1, 1891. 

George A. PiUsbury, ex officio, . 1876-1878. 

Luther P. Durgin, 1876-1885. 

John Kimball, 1877 Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William M. Chase, 1877 Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Horace A. Brown, ex officio, . . 1878-1880. 

James L. Mason, 1878 Now in office. 

James R. Hill,* 1878 Died 1884. 

Oeorge A. Cummings, ex officio, . 1880-1883. 

Edgar H. Woodman, ex officio,* 1883-1887. 

Joseph H. Abbot, 1884 Now in office. 

Oeorge A. Young, 1885 Now in office. 

John E. Robertson, ex officio, . 1887-1889. 

Stillman Humphrey, ex officio, . 1889-1891. 

Henry W. Clapp. ex officio, . . 1891 Now in office. 

W^iUis D. Thompson, .... 1891 Now in office. 

William P. Fiske, 1891 Now in office. 

James H. Chase, 1891 Now in office. 

John Whitaker, ...... 1892 Now in office. 

Henry E. Conant, 1892 Now in office. 

* Deceased. 



WATER df,partmp:nt. 129 

PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872 Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, .... 1874-1875. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* . . . 1875 Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

John Kimball . 1875-1876. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, .... 1876-1878. 

John Kimball ". . 1878 Resigned July 1, 1891. 

WiUiam P. Fiske, ..... 1891 Now in office. 

* Deceased. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



Concotb, (Ylt))) ^ampB^ire, H^aUx^^l^oxkB. 



Population of the city by census of 1890, . . 17,004 

Population of that portion of the city included within 

the water-precinct, estimated, .... 15,000 

Date of construction, 1872 ; additions since. 
Works are owned by the city. 
Source of supply, Penacook lake, a natural body of water con 

taining 265 acres, situated about three miles and a half 

from the state-house, and about 125 feet higher than Main 

street in front of the state-house. 
Mode of supply, gravity and pumping to reservoir. 



WATER DEPAUTMENT. 



131 



FIN^AIS^CIAL. 



maintenance; 



Receipts. 



From consumers (mostly 

for domestic iises and 

at fixed rates), . .$17,427.14 
From rents, etc., . . 468.19 

From pipe, etc., sold, . 456.19 



.$18,851.5: 



Expenditures. 

For management and 
repairs, .... |3,410.2O 

For new distribution- 
pipes, 5,279.5a 

For new service-pipes, 1,795.00 

For labor on shores of 

Penacook lake, . . 725.18 

For maintenance of 
pumping station, . ' 793.36 

For incidental expenses, 760.00 

Abatements, .... 68.19 



$12,831.46 
Amount required to pay 

interest on bonded 

indebtedness, . . . 28,400.00 
Balance, 7,120.06 



3,351.52 



CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of Land Damages, Flowage, and Water-Rights : 
Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water-rights, . . $60,000.00 
Concord Manufacturing Co., for water- 
rights, ....... 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill-privilege and land, 
W. P. Cooledge, for Hutchins house and lot, 



Humphrey & Farnum, for kit-shop priv 
Mary C. Rowell, for land, . 
A. S. Ranney, for land, 
Alfred Roberts, for land, 
Moses H. Bradley, for land, 
Joseph B. Walker, for land, 
John Hook, for land, . 
Flowage-rights about Penacook lake. 



ilege. 



83,000.00 
5,500.00 
2,250.00 
5,000.00 
1,.500.00 
1,350.00 
1,275.00 
5,000.00 
2,214.00 
370.00 
4,094.61 



-$171,553.61 



132 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cost of property and rights of Torrent Aqueduct 
Association, . . 

dam, gate-house, and appurtenances, 

conduit and upper gate-house, .... 

mains (one from the dam to Runiford St., one 
from the dam to Penacook St., one from the 
pump to the reservoir, fire-main through North 
and South Main and Turnpike Sts., and one 
from near the dam to Stark St.), 

distribution-pipe, 

service-pipe, .... 

reservoir, .... 

pumping station, 

pumping machinery, 

engineering and superintendence, 

incidentals, .... 

Cost of the works, Jan. 1, 1803, . 

Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said cost as 
follows; 



20,000.00 
20,886.52 
29,484.05 



151,447.30 

261,839.03 

35,342.40 

42,460.09 

20,030.17 

7,915.00 

14,140.56 

6,. 33 1.1 9 

8781,629.92 



When due. 

April 1, 1894, 
1895, 

Nov. 1, 1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 

Oct. 1, 1912, 

Jan. 1, 1923, 



Eate. 

6 
6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



Amount. 
SI 30,000.00 
20,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
4.5,000.00 
400,000.00 

1635,000.00 



"WATER DEPARTMENT. 133 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the Cit>j Council : 

The Board of Water Commissioners submit berewitli tlieir 
report for tlie year ending December 31, 1892. 

Your attention is respectfully called to the report of the 
superintendent for the details of maintenance and construction. 

The works show a steady increase in receipts, and the cost of 
maintenance remains about the same. The 3'ear has been one 
of importance in this department, and the work undertaken in 
1891 has.been completed with, thus far, satisfactory results. 

The work on the "High Service" has occupied the attention 
of the board, and a committee from the members of the board 
was chosen to have direct supervision together with the super- 
intendent. The committee consisted of George A. Young, 
Willis D.Thompson, and William P. Fiske, and they have given 
much time and attention to the details of the work. The work 
has with but one or two exceptions been done by contract, and 
has been done satisfactorily. The pipe laying was completed 
under the contract of Mr. C. H. Eglee early in the summer, 
and has thus far proved satisfactory. The superintendent in 
his report has given a detailed report of the pipe laid, which 
will be seen to have covered the most exposed parts of our city 
with pipe sufficient in size to meet all the requirements for 
years to come. 

PUMPING STATION. 

The pumping station, together with the coal-shed, shop, and 
stable, have been erected during the year, the foundation for 
the pumping station having been constructed the year before. 
The work was done under contract by Mr. E. B. Hutchinson, 
of Concord, under the supervision of Mr. Charles S. Piper; the 



134 CITY OF CONCORD. 

buildings are substantinlly built, and present a very attractive 
appearance. The plan of the pumping station is similar to 
many of those found in other cities, and is very simple in out- 
line. It has separate rooms for the pumping-engine and for 
the boilers, with a deep, well-lighted basement under the engine- 
room, into which the pipes are brought. The walls of the 
engine-room are of brick laid in colored mortar, with a wain- 
scoting of buff brick. Afire-place is constructed in one corner. 
The roof of this room is supported by iron trusses and is ceiled 
with Norway pine. The boiler-room is 38 by 32 feet, with 
monitor roof, and is large enough for three boilers. The chim- 
ney is 80 feet in height, being 12 feet square at the base, and is 
connected with the boiler room with a 36-inch wrought-iron flue. 
The entire cost of this plant is $20,030.17. A track has been 
laid into the grounds from the main line of the Concord & 
Claremont division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, which will 
enable a better handling of coal and transportation of necessary 
supplies to the buildings. A system of pipes is laid just out- 
side the foundation of the station, with gates so arranged as to 
provide a full and easy control of the mains from the lake at 
this point. 

PUMPING MACHINERY. 

The committee, after careful consideration and examination 
of the different makes of pumps, and visits to quite a number 
of pumping stations, finally awarded the contract for the pump- 
ing-engine to Henry R. Worthington, of New York city, for the 
sum of S9,200. 

The pump is a "Worthington triple expansion condensing 
pumping-engine," with a surface condenser, an independent 
air pump, cast-iron hot well, with suction air chamber, together 
with all the necessary appurtenances. 

There are two high pressure steam cylinders, 9 inches in diam- 
eter ; two intermediate steam cylinders, 14 inches in diameter; 
two low pressure steam cylinders, 22 inches in diameter ; two 
double-acting water-plungers, 12 inches in diameter, all of 18 
inches stroke. It is placed upon solid brick piers resting upon 
a solid foundation of cement and brick, and is bolted thereto. 

The water is taken from the 14-inch main into the pump under 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 135 

pressure, through a surface condenser, and is then forced into 
the reservoir through a 20-inch pipe. 

The pumping- engine has not yet been delivered to the city, 
but is being completed, and will soon be tested in accordance 
with the contract, and the duty guaranteed will be accomplished 
before the acceptance. 

The duty of the pumping-eugiue was tliat " the engine will 
be capable of delivering, when properly supplied with water, 
2,000,000 United States gallons of water in twenty-four hours, 
when running at a piston speed not exceeding 125 feet per min- 
ute, when furnished with ah effective steam pressure of not less 
than 100 pounds per square inch at the engine, and will deliver 
this quantity against a total load (including suction) on the 
plungers not exceeding 83 pounds per square inch." 

Two boilers, each 54 inches in diameter and 15 feet in length, 
have been set in brick-work in the boiler-room, and have thus 
far proved satisfactory. They furnish heat for the building 
aside from the regular work. 

RESERVOIR. 

The contract for building the reservoir was awarded to Mr. 
G. W. Hendrick, of Easthampton, Mass, Test pits were sunk 
over the proposed location, and it was found that a large amount 
of rock excavation would have to be made. The work of strip- 
ping the land and removing the soil revealed a larger amount of 
rock to be removed, more than was estimated, and upon blast- 
ing it was found that what seemed to be a hard, solid granite 
ledge was in fact a mass of disintegrated rock, which at once 
presented serious complications. The engineer in charge 
advised changes in construction ; the work was abandoned on 
account of the cold weather, and nothing was done until spring 
of this year. In the mean time new plans were made, under the 
advice of Mr. J. Herbert Shedd, of Providence, R. I., a noted 
engineer, with a complete change in shape and construction. 
Mr. Hendrick was unwilling to carry on the work under the 
change of plans, but was willing to dispose of his share of the 
■contract, with all tools, etc. ; a settlement was readily effected, 
and the work was at once carried forward more expeditiously 
under our engineer-iu-charge, Mr. W. B. Fuller, of Maiden, 



136 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mass., who had prepared the plans, with Mr. Shedd as con- 
sulting engineer. The work has been well and thoroughly done, 
and great care has been taken to make the construction the best 
in every respect. The present plan gives a greater elevation, 
and is much more symmetrical. 

The capacity of the reservoir is 2,000,000 gallons, and will 
furnish the supply for what is to be designated in our system 
as the " High Service." The results already shown from a 
partial trial of it give every reason of a success of the under- 
taking. 

A substantial fence has been constructed around the top of 
"the reservoir, giving space for a walk outside. The sides are 
to be grassed over, and everything will be done to protect and 
preserve the place. 

The grounds occupied for the site of the reservoir contain 
about nine acres, and as they are improved from time to time 
will offer an opportunity of much pleasure for those who visit 
them, for the view from this spot of the surrounding country 
and the valley of the Merrimack is unsurpassed. 

PENACOOK LAKE. 

The commissioners have realized the importance of protect- 
ing the water-supply from all sources of pollution, and, with 
that end in view, have secured by purchase about seventy-five 
acres of land bordering on the lake. More should be done in 
this line, and eventually the city should own and control all the 
land bordering the shores of said lake. 

INTAKE. 

It has been evident for some time that an extension of the 
conduit into the lake would improve the quality of the water 
and facilitate the draught when the lake is low. In fact, when 
the works were built it was the intention of the designing engi- 
neer to so extend the intake from the gate-house ; and in the 
winter of 1872-'73 soundings were taken in the lake for that 
purpose ; but high water came on in the spring, and the con- 
duit was built no farther than the upper gate-house just below 
the old dam. A number of years ago a saw-mill was located 



WATKK DKrAUTMENT. 137 

just above the dam on the northerly shore, and there accunui- 
hited fiom one to three feet of sawdust. In times of low water 
this sawdust and the remains of the old dam were so near the 
surface, and the water around the gate-house was so shallow, 
that a strong south-west wind would stir it up and blow the 
sawdust directly into the intake. In 1880 the water here was 
so shallow that it was necessary to cut a channel through the 
dam to allow the water to reach the conduit ; moreover, animal 
and vegetable growth flourish best in such shallows, and are 
easily drawn down to the screens. Under such circumstances 
it seemed necessary to extend the conduit over this accumula- 
tion of sawdust and waste into deeper water, and the low condi- 
tion of the lake this summer offei-ed a favorable opportunity for 
the work. 

FINANCIAL. 

In April of the present year $200,000 of 6 per cent, water- 
bonds matured, and these were taken care of by an issue of 
S200,000 of 4 per cent, bonds, dated January 1, 1892, running 
thirt}^ years ; an additional issue of S200,000 of 4 per cent., 
thirty years bonds, of the same date, was also made in accord- 
ance with the ordinance passed by your body. These have 
been sold at an advance above their par value, yielding a hand- 
some income. 

The bonded debt of the work will be $075,000, with an annual 
interest payment of $28,400 until the years 1894 and 1895, 
when, by refunding the bonds now bearing a higher rate of 
interest, it will be reduced by about $3,000. It is expected 
that the revenue from the work, besides the cost for all main- 
tenance and necessary extensions, will be sufficient to establish 
a sinking fund to take care of bonds maturing in the years fol- 
lowing 1895. 

It is a matter of great gratification that the commissioners 
have been able to settle with the Concord Manufacturing Com- 
pany, by which the company relinquish all their right and title 
in the waters of Penacook lake for the sum of $80,000, thus 
giving the city the absolute control of their water-supply. This 
matter has long been under consideration, and no little anxiety 



138 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

has been felt as to the outcome of it, for the large quantity of 
water used by our citizens would necessitate a larger supply to 
meet the demands in the near future. This we confidently 
expect will for many years give an ample supply of water. 

Our water-supply has been called into question during the 
fall, with statements of the impurity of the water. This has 
caused many people to be alarmed. During the fall, on account 
of the low condition of the lake and the necessary work upon 
the intake, much sediment has found its way through the pipes, 
and caused some inconvenience ; but the record of twenty years' 
use of the water is suflHcient to establish the quality of water as 
good, if not superior to ixny supply of pond water in New Eng- 
land. 

We have caused analyses to be made, and they will be found 
below, together with a report by Professor Angell, which we 
feel sure will satisfy all fair-minded people as to the purity of 
the supply. 

Our superintendent, Mr. Hastings, has been untiring in the 
multiplied duties and responsibilities placed upon him during 
the construction of this new work, and he has proved himself 
equal to the task, and much credit is due to him in the success- 
ful completion of the high service extension. 

All of which is respectfully submitted : 

JOHN WHITAKER, 
HENRY E. CONANT, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
JAMES H. CHASE, 
GEORGE A. YOUNG, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
JAMES L. MASON, 
JOSEPH H. ABBOT, 
HENRY W. CLAPP, ex officio, 

Water Commissioners. 



WATKR DKPARTMENT. 



139 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTP:NDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners : 

I herewith present to you the twent3'-first annual report of 
the operations of this department, showing the receipts, expen- 
ditures, and ahatenoents, together with a statement of exten- 
sions and improvements made, during the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1892. 



RECEIPTS. 



For water from consumers, 
From delinquents, 
For use of meters, 

rent of Cooledge house, 

rent of shanty, 

rent of office, 

pipe and stock sold, 

horses sold. 

Deduct abatements. 
Total receipts for 1892, 



,369.17 
57.97 
94.95 
93.75 

221,15 
58.34 

301.19 

155.00 



$48,351.52 
68.19 

$48,283.33 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid V. C. Hastings, superintendent, . $1,500.00 
Elmer L. Gove, .... 740.00 

Alice G. Cochran, .... 471.00 

John St. Lawrence, labor, . . 200.00 

P. A. Gurley, '^ . . 200.00 

Nathaniel White, Jr., rent of office, 300.00 

S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop in Penacook, 24.00 
N. H. Democratic Press Co., printing, 27.35 
Ira C. Evans, heating and printing, 106.25 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Paid Crawford & Stockbridge, books, . $36.50 

Silsby & Son, stationery, etc., . 48.86 
Artliur H. Cliase, auditor and clerk 

of water board, . , . 25.00 

W. E. Hunt, hook, . . . 3.50 

Concord Gas-Lioht Co., gas, . . 32.40 
N. E. Telephone & Telegrapli Co., 

telephones, .... 148.11 

Humphrey & Dodge, hardware, . S8.59 

Thompson & Hoague, " . 80.72 

N. S. Gale & Co., " . 3.25 

Batchelder & Co., grain, etc., . 69.20 

W. W. Allen, room paper, . . 6.85 

C. H. Martin & Co., lead and oil, . 28.95 

Stevens & Duncklee, . . . 30.77 

W. .T. Fernald, furniture and repairs, 19.00 
J. M. Stewart & Sous Co., wall 

paper, etc., .... 123.87 

E. B. Hutchinson, lumber and labor, 127.50 

Benjamin Bilsborough, painting, . 37.71 

George Abbott, Jr., painting, . 73.77 

W. P. Ford & Co., stove, etc., . 13.91 

W. S. Davis & Son, repairs, . . 19.75 

Huntley & McDonald, repairs, . 8.65 

E). B. Hanchay, smith-wt)rk, . . 47.60 

S. G. Sanborn, " . . 3.15 

Richardson & Adams, rubber mittens, 6.50 

Dickerman & Co., cement, . . 8.00 

Frank Coffin, " . . 29.32 

Woodworth & Co., " . . 19.75 

M. H. Bradley, hay, . . . 58.18 

J. M. Jones, straw, . . . 6.40 

George L. Theobald, team-work, . 110.55 

Cavis G. Brown, agent, team-work, 74.50 

McSiiane & Gienty, '' 32.50 

Proctor Bi-others, " 30.75 

George F. Sewall, " 11.05 

W. B. Cunningham, " 5.75 

Davis Brotliers, " 2.65 



WATKU DKl'AKTMKNT. 



141 



Piiid D. Philhriek- 

Pilsburv & Day, wood, . 

N. A. Dmiklee, wagon, . 

Abbot- Downing Co., wagon. . 

C. C. Keniick, 

George A. Foster, assignee, . 

Jaines R. Hill & Co., harness, 

J. D. Johnson & Son, harness am 

repairs, .... 
Insurance, .... 
Star Brass Mfg. Co., gauges, . 
National Meter Co., meters, . 
Thomson Meter Co., '' 
Walworth Mfg. Co., l)rass goods and 

tools, .... 

Gilchiist & Taylor, wronght-iron pipe 
Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., valves, 
Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., " 
George Goodhue, |)ipe and labor, 
P. A. Clifford, 

Chadwick Lead Mfg. Co., lead, 
R. D. Wood & Co., cast-iron pipe, 
Davis & Farnum Mfg. Co., castings, 
Builders Lon Foundry, " 

Henry A. Rowell, engineer. 
Page Belting Co., oil tank. 
Vacuum Oil Co., oil, 
E. & T. Fairbanks Co., scales, 
George W. Hendrick, shanty, 
E. E. Clarke, 

Benjamin T. Putney, dynamite, 
B. F. Griffin, team-work, 
Incidentals, .... 
Pav-roU, labor. 



*34.70 

6. GO 

oO.OO 

200.00 

21O.00 

42.00 

o2.2o 

64.40 

125.00 

44.00 

14.05 

23G.79 

312.28 

113.23 

8.19 

61.26 

18.79 

423.19 

2,395.72 

39.68 

18.20 

339.18 

34.20 

59.48 

128.17 

150.00 

7.05 

75.43 

25.25 

141.49 

2,230.08 



$12,763.27 



The expenses are divided as follows : 

For management and repairs, . . $3,410.20 

new service-pipes, .... 1,795.00 
new distribution pipes, . . . 4,546.30 



142 CITY OF CONCORD. 

For gates for new work, . . . $113.23 
relayitip; i)i|)e in Penacook and Con- 
cord streets and Hill's avenue, G20.00 
labor on shore of Penacook lake, . 725.18 
maintenance of pumping station, . 793.36 
incidental expenses, . . . 760.00 



$12,763.27 



The water rents have increased $1,684.63 over those of 1891, 
and all the rents for the year have be<?n collected, and it is 
pleasant to record that we have not been compelled to shut off a 
supply to enforce collection since 1887. 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Main- and distril)uti(Mi-pipes have been laid, and hydrants set, 
during the year, as follows : 

In Penacook street^ 

east from North State street, 92 feet 10-inch pipe. 
In Beacon street^ 

753 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Bow street, so called, 

from South to Warrenston street, 590 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Wari'enston street, 

west from Broadway, 290 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Warrenston street, 

east from Bow street, so called, 130 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Glen street, 

south from West street, 375 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Depot street. West Concord, 

west from Main street, 350 feet 6-inch pipe and 1 hydrant. 
In North Essex street, 

north from Rlanchard street, 218 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Woodman street, 

west from Fruit street, 112 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Charles street, 

north from Beacon street, 275 feet 4-inch pipe. 
In Abbott street, 

east from Rumford street, 264 feet 4-inch pipe. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 143 

la. Myrtle street, 

nortli from Concord street, 225 feet 4-inch pipe. 
Ill, Elm street, 

north from Wall street, 210 feet 4-inch pipe. 
Til Granite avenue, 

west from Prospect street, 210 feet 4-inch pipe. 
In Sinnmit avenue, 

soutii from School street, 172 feet 4-inch pipe. 
7/1 Perry avenue, 

north from Centre street, 125 feet 4-inch pipe. 
In Harrod street, 

north from Beacon street, 58 feet 4-inch pipe. 
In Penacook street, 

east from North State street, 24 feet 10-inch pipe, relaid in 
place of 6-inch. 
In Penacook street, 

east from North Main street, 434 feet 6-inch pipe, relaid. 
In Church street, 

east from Rnmford street, 75 feet 6-inch pipe relaid in 
place of 4-inch, and 1 hydrant set. 
In Concord street, 

from South to South Spring street, 250 feet 4-iuch pipe, 
relaid. 
In HiWs avenue, 

west from Railroad street, 75 feet 4-inch pipe, relaid. 

IN PENACOOK. 

In Winter street, 

west from High street, 400 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Union street, 

west from Main street, 225 feet 4-inch pipe. 
On hydrant branches, 36 feet 6-iuch pipe and 17 feet 4-inch pipe. 
On blow-off at reservoir, 132 feet 10-inch pipe. 



144 



CITV OF CONCORD. 



Summary of the Foregoing. 



Pipes. 
1-in., 535 feet. 
4-in., 1,781 " 
6-in., 3,154 " 
10-in., 224 -' 



5,694 feet, 
— equal to 1.08 miles 



Hydrants. 

Tahanto street, 1 

Harrison " 1 

Church '* 1 

Depot street, West 
Concord, 1 



Stop-Gates. 




4-in., 


9 


6-in., 


11 


8-in., 


1 


10-in., 


2 


12-in., 


1 


14-in., 


3 


20-in., 


1 



28 



SERVICE-PIPES. 



Tliere have been laid during the year, and connected with the 
main-pi[)e, 137 service-pipes, consisting of, — 

132 1-iuch, 2,88o feet. 

2 2-inch, 42 " 

2 4-incb, 205 " 

1 6-iucli, 60 '' 



137 



3,192 feet. 

Whole number service-pipes, 2,725 ; number discontinued, 3 ; 
number in use at the present time, 2,722. 

Whole number feet, 63,697, equal to 12.06 miles. 

There have been repaired during the year, 26 leaks: 11 from 
rust holes, 9 from pick boles, o on 'service-pipes, and 1 joint 
leak. 

The following table shows the height of water in Penacook 
lake on the first dav of each month : 



January, 


. 176.05 


July, 


174.50 


February, 


. 175.95 


August. 


173.60 


March, 


. 175.00 


September, 


173.80 


April, 


. 174.65 


October, . 


173.80 


May, 


. 174.50 


November, 


172.70 


Jnne, 


; 175.15 


December, 


172.20 



The lowest point reached was December 31, being 171.20; 
the highest was January 18, 176.30; — mean height, 174.32, 



watp:h depaktmknt. 145 

wliicli was 0.68 feet lower than (luring the year 1891. The 
record for December 31 was eight tenths of a foot lower than 
at an\' time since the lake has been used as a water-supply ; 
two days later, however, a rain storm raised the lake one foot, 
so that at present the water is about the level of the winter of 
1880-81. 

The low water has afforded an ext-ellent o|)portunity for clear- 
ing the shores of the lake, and this work, which was l)eguu in 
1891, has l)een continued at intervals during the year and has 
been completed, except a small ])ortion on the northerly side. 

HIGH SERVICE. 

The new high service system is practically completed, and has 
been put in partial operation. In connection with this work, 
several new features were introduced this year, which, while not 
directly included in the system, seemed to be necessary for its 
best operation, notably, the extension of the conduit and the 
construction of a shop and a stable on the pumping-station 
grounds. Below is the construction .account of the high service 
system and the extension of the intake, also the land and water 
damages for the past year. 

HIGH SERVICE CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 

Reservoir. 

Paid pay-roll, labor S2;3,8G4.09 

N. E. Granite Works, block paving, 2,428.80 

G. H. Sampson, dynamite, . . 111.75 

B. T. Putney, >' . . 108.70 

E. E. Fisher, '' . . 7.00 

town of Clinton, Mass., road roller, GO. 00 

George A. P^oster, assignee, . . 84.00 

J. E. Robertson, " . . 43.75 

Ames Plow Co., .... 28.41 

Deane Steam Pump Co., . . 81.48 
James A. Ordway, use derrick and 

engine, ..... 263.00 

Pilsbury & Day, coal, . . . 109.25 

H. O. Marsh, "... 60.00 



146 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid E. B. Hutchinson, lumber and labor, §44.02 
Kimball, Danforth & Forrest, lum- 

l)er and labor, . . . 113.40 
Dickerman & Co., cement, . . 189.30 
Wood worth & Co., " . . 176.40 
Builders Iron Foundry, castings, . 11.20 
Ford & Kimball, " . 39.44 
Vacuum Oil Co., oil, . . . 17.01 
Thompson & Hoague, hardware, . 295.41 
Humphrey & Dodge, "■ . 165.70 
George L. Theobald, team-work, . 68.50 
Proctor Brotliers, " . 11.75 
A. C. Sanborn, grain, etc., . . 264.12 
C. H. Ayer, hay, .... 21.80 
J. H. Coburn, hay, . . . 23.95 
W. S. Davis & Son, repairs, . . 24.35 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs, . 19.45 
Nutting & Hayden, smith- work, . 13.42 
E. B. Hanchay, " . 40.30 
T. P. Conroy, .... 70.5l» 
I. H. Ordway, .... 23.00 
George Goodhue, pipe, . . . 62.16 
Cross & Tolles, pattern-work, . 21.75 
N. P. Stevens, machine-work, . 25.00 
Frank H. George, supplies, . . 11.20 
Concord highway department, mac- 
adam 300.00 

George W. Hendrick, . . . 5,700.94 

Incidentals, ..... 50.18 



^35,004.54 



Reservoir Grounds. 

Paid pay-roll, labor $1,079.00 

M. H. Johnson, stone posts, . . 77.00 

Concord Foundry Co., iron posts, . 37,80 

E. B. Hutchinson, building fence, . 172.25 

George Abbott, Jr., painting fence, 25.00 

M. H. Bradley, grade, . . 130.00 



,521.05 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



147 



Pipe and Special Castings. 

Paid R. D. Wood & Co., pipe, . . 89,837.99 
Builders Iron F'oiindrv, castings, . G3.68 

N. P. Stevens, maeliine-work, . 3(5.07 

P^ord & Kimball, " . 33.80 

Concord & Montreal Railroad, freight, 70.17 

Incidentals, 104.22 

Gates and Hydrants. 

Paid Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., gates and 

hydrants SI, 11 9. 00 

Walworth Mfg. Co., gate-boxes, . 83.53 

Concord & Montreal Railroad, freight, 21.00 



$10,145.93 



SI. 223. 53 



Laying Pipe, Setting Gates and Hydrants, etc. 

Paid Charles H. P:glee, labor, . . Si 2,599.36 
(!avis G. Brown, agent, drawing pipe, 383.79 
Ferrin & Woodman, labor and mate- 
rials 24.36 

Concord Gas-Light Co., . . . 16.93 

Concord highway department, . 10.00 



S13,034.44 



Pumping Station. 

Paid E. B. Hutchinson, building pumping 
station, coal-house, shop, stable, 
and shed, as per contract, 
E. B. Hutchinson, extra labor and 
materials, 

D. H. Andrews, iron roof trusses, 

E. Hodge & Co., uptake, 
Manchester Locomotive Works, 
Ford & Kimball, castings, 
George H. Davis, stone-work, 
M. H. Johnson, " 

Ferrin & Woodman, foundation fo 
pum[), .... 



$9,961.00 

2,064.54 
760.00 
137.50 
77.50 
217.51 
134.51 
187.00 

500.07 



148 



CITY OF CONCOKO 



Paid^Samnel Holt, brick, 

Miles F. Farmer, mason-work, 

Rowell & Flu miner, " 

Concord &jMontreal Railroad, stock 
and freight, 

W. M. Darrah, 

Walworth Mfg. Co., pipe and fix- 
tures, . . . . . 

George Goodhue, pii)e and fixtures, 

Gilchrist & Taylor, " 

George Abbott, Jr., painting. 

Wood worth & Co., cement, 

Caleb P. Little, grade, . 

George W. Chesley, grade, 

E. H. Runnells, 

C. T. Huntoon, lightning rods, 

Concord Foundry Co., 

George L. Theobald, bank wall and 
boiler foundation, 

James H. Rowell, concrete. 

Pay-roll, labor. 

Incidentals, .... 



32.07 
110.40 

67.32 
12.40 

108.05 

86.74 

50.67 

147.07 

199.10 

99.00 

334.28 

435.60 

74.55 

14.46 

820.05 
334.27 
467.24 
129.01 



117,615.16 



Pumping Machinery. 

Paid Henry R. Worthington, on account, 

as per contract, . . . $6,900.00 

Henry R. Worthington, extra cast- 
ings and valves. 



Incidentals. 

Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, laying 
track, ..... 

N. Y. Evening Post, advertising 
bonds, ..... 

Traveller Publishing Co., advertis- 
ing bonds, .... 



1,015.00 

S448.43 
42.00 
25.00 



$7,915.00 



Boston Advertiser, advertising bonds, 21.00 



WATEK DEPARTMENT. 



149 



Paid Journal Publishing Co., advertising 

bonds S21.00 

American Bank Note Co., bond j)late, 27.5.00 

T. M. Drown, water analysis, . 20.00 

Extension of Intake. 

Paid pay-roll, labor, .... $2,479.34 

E. B. Hutchinson, lumber, . , 1,598.38 

William H. Ward, . . . 429.00 

Samuel Holt, brick, . . . . 300.00 

Rowell & Plumraer, mason-work, . 604.15 

Frank Coffin, cement, . . . 112.95 

Wood worth & Co., cement, . . 14.00 

Dickerman & Co., " . . 8.25 

George & H. Partridge, team-work, 53.65 

O. F. Richardson, team-work, . 86.45 

George L. Theobald, " . 41.00 

H. O. Marsh, coal, . . . 48.74 

John C. Thorne, rubber boots, . 39.75 

Greenough & Hazeltine, rubber]boots, 25.00 

J. M. Grossman, smith-work, . 85.60 

N. P. Stevens, machine-work, . 20.00 

Walworth Manufacturing Co., . 65.93 

Thompson & Hoague, hardware, . 202.71 

Humphrey & Dodge, " • 176.72 

D. B. Varney, brass castings, . 225.17 

Ford & Kimball, pattei'n-work, . 72.39 

Concord Street Railway, . . 108.85 

Incidentals, 33.91 



Land and Water Rights. 

Paid Concord Mfg. Co., water rights, . ^80,000.00 
Joseph B. Walker, land for reser- 
voir, 2,214.00 

A. S. Rauney, land around lake, . 1,350.00 
Alfied Roberts, land around lake, . 1,275.00 
John Hook, land for reservoir, . 370.00 



^52.63 



), 83 1.94 



55,209.00 



150 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid engineoiing $2,026.59 

Summary of Accounts. 

For reservoir, ..... S35,004.54 
reservoir giouuds, . ... . 1,521.05 
pipe and special castings, . . 10,145.93 
gates and liydiants, . . . 1,223.53 
laying pipe, setting gates and hy- 
drants, etc., .... 13,034.44 
pumping station, .... 17,615.16 
pumping machinery, . . . 7,915.00 
incidentals, ..... 852.63 
extension of intake, . . . 6,830.94 
land and water rights, . . . 85,209.00 
engineering, ..... 2.026.59 

$181,378.81 



Work on the reservoir was resumed in April. Owing to 
changes in form and construction, the contract with George W. 
Hendrick was annulled, and the work was carried on by the 
water-works, under the direct supervision of William B. Fuller, 
C E., of Maiden, Mass. It is now completed excepting the 
gi'ading, which will be finished in the spring. Water was let 
into it on the third day of December, and we are satisfied that 
it is a model reservoir, both in design and construction. 

The work of laying pipe and setting gates and hydrants by 
Mr. Charles H. Eglee was finished early in the season, and was 
very satisfactory ; it was carried on with dispatch and thorough- 
ness, and it was evident that Mr. Eglee was the right man in 
the right place. 

Pipes were laid, and gates aiad hydrants set, as follows : 

In Penacook street^ 

from pump to reservoir, 2,930 feet 20-inch pipe and 2 
hydrants. 
In reservoir, 

240 feet 24-inch pipe. 
In Penacook street, 

from reservoir to Columbus avenue, 300 feet 14-inch pipe. 
In Columbus avemte, 

from Penacook to Auburn street, 2,100 feet 14-inch pipe. 



WATER DEPARTMKNT. 151 

In Auburn street, 

east from Columbus uvenue, 3G feet 14-incli pipe. 
In North and South Main streets, 

from Centre street to Hill's avenue, 2,192 feet 20-inch 
pipe and 5 hydrants. 
In South 3fain street, 

from Hill's avenue to Turnpike street, 2,422 feet 16-iucli 
pipe and 5 hydrants. 
In Turnpike street, 

south from South Main street, 174 feet 16-inch pipe and 1 
hydrant. 
In Caijitol street, 

from North Main to North State street, 508 feet 10-inch 
pipe and 1 hydrant. 
In Centre street; 
I from North Main to Huntington street, 2,088 feet 10-inch 

pipe and 3 hydrants. 
In Green street, 

from Centre to Prince street, 340 feet 10-inch pipe and 1 
hydrant. 
In Franklin street, 

from Rumford to Auburn street, 2,154 feet 12-iuch pipe 
and 3 hydrants. 
In Bradley street, 

63 feet 10-inch pipe and 1 hydrant. 
In Hill's avenue, 

69 feet 8-inch pipe and 1 hydrant. 
In North Spring street, 

26 feet 8-inch pipe and 1 hydrant. 
On hydrant branches, 159 feet 10-inch and 474 feet 6-inch 
pipe. 
• On blow-offs, 8 feet 6-inch and 12 feet 4-inch pipe. 

On connections, 436 feet 6-inch, 12 feet 12-inch, 42 feet 
16-inch, 194 feet 18-inch, 32 feet 20-inch, pipe. 

Extension of intake, 270 feet 30-inch brick conduit. 



152 



CITV OF CONCORD. 



Summary of the Foregoing. 



4-in., 
6-In., 
8-in., 
K^in., 
12-in., 
14-m., 
16-in., 
18-in., 
20-in., 
24-in., 
30-in., 



Pipes. 

12 feet. 

918 

93 

3,158 

2.166 

2,456 

2,638 

194 

5,154 

240 

270 



-equal 



17,301 feet, 
to 3.27 miles. 



Hydrants. 




Stop- 


Gates. 




North Main street, 4 


4-in., 






3 


South 


6 


6-in., 






24 


Turnpike street, 


1 


8-in., 






2 


Penacook " 


2 


10-in., 






17 


Franklin " 


3 


12-in., 






3 


Centre " 


3 


14-in., 






1 


Capitol " 


1 


16-in., 






2 


Green " 


1 


18-in., 






4 


Bradley '' 


1 


20-in., 






5 


Hill's avenue. 


1 


24-in., 






1 


North Spring street, 1 


• 










24 








62 


Number of hydrants 


Whole 


number gates 


discontinued during 


now in use, high 


and 


the year, 4. 




low 


service, 551 




Whole number 


hy- 










drants now in 


use, 










high and low 


ser- 










vice, 228. 













The contract for the stable, shop, and coal-house was let to 
INIr. E. B. Hutchinson, which is a guarantee in itself that they 
are well and substantially built. A suitable workshop and 
store-room have been needed for some time, and will be of great 
convenience in the care of the works. Only a portion of the 
grounds have been graded, but when in the condition in which 
we trust that next season will place them, the whole set of build- 
ings will present a very creditable appearance. 

The 30-inch brick conduit has been extended 270 feet into the 
lake, according to your directions ; the water is introduced through 
three brass castings near the end, each pierced with 370 holes, 
one and one half inches in diameter. Owing to the low water, 
we could not supply the city from the lower gate-house, Init 
were obliged to take the water at the upper gate-house, near 
where the work was going on ; this roiled the water more or 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 153 

less during the extenaion, and with the limited draught at this 
point, we could not flush the system and clear the pipes of this 
sediment until after all the work was done. 

RECOMMENDATIONS . 

We need a better system of screenage for the water-supply ; 
this would necessitate another gate-house below the dam, and I 
would recommend the construction of such a building where the 
final screening should be done ; thus the water would pass first 
through the one and one half inch openings of the brass castings 
at the end of the intake, next through half-inch screens at the 
lower gate-house, and finally through quarter-inch and eighth- 
inch screens at the proposed gate-house. 

Moreover, this new gate-house should be built so as to pro- 
vide a separate well or compartment for the Penacook main and 
for the main that supplies the pump, so that a heavy draught on 
any one of the several mains would not atfect the others. 

Since we have supplied the higli service district from the res- 
ervoir, it has become evident that the pressure is too great for 
the pipe now in use in some localities, and we have had serious 
trouble with leaks in certain streets, notably in Pine street, 
where the pipe was struck by lightning a few years ago and thus 
weakened. 1 would therefore recommend that in certain por- 
tions of this district the cement-lined pipe be replaced by cast- 
iron. 

I have had analyses made of the water of Penacook lake, 
according to your instructions ; Professor Angell's report, 
together with the analyses, is appended to this, and shows the 
water to be of the same good quality as when the first analysis 
was made twenty years ago ; and certainly we are to be con- 
gratulated upon possessing one of the finest natural water sup- 
plies in New England. 

Respectfully submitted : 

V. C. HASTINGS, 

Superintendent. 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CO 
Oi 
00 



1-5 

O 

o 
o 

Pm 
P3 

O 

cc 
t— ( 

<5l 



> o 
5 ® 






4) ® 
S . 

M ^ J> 



!7 ^a 



« o 2 



(T) C rt 



^iil ^ 03 



®®®gg«5 

£ rt rl U f^ •71 S 






^ ^„ lO S ^ Cl , „ 

n3(uaia)cc<x)iciocooi-ii'OOf^ 



• 0) 

. t*- ■■ d o 
. ^ >i '/J ^ 



« ® 01 g : 

c_. ri rt ^ 



'^. a).-j;~t~ooinioeooi-i3JOO] 



>a^ 



:^ laa 









c3 +^ <D 

^-2 1->;2 a 

•£<iia)So«S S 
92£ddS^sg®-gS 



Id 



o <v 



sa 



SStfl 



oo 



■o*d**^«'^S 
05.2 mo flS.s c«a o 29 - 



a o 






WATER DEPARTMENT. 155 



REPORT BY PROF. E. R. ANGELL. 



Derry, N. H., Jan. 12, 1893. 
Mr. V. C. Hastings, 

Superintendent Concord Water- Works : 

Dear Sir, — I have^made a very careful anah'sis of the three 
samples of water which you sent me from Penacook lake. The 
results demonstrate beyond question the purity and excellence 
of the water. 

There is a remarkable agreement in the results given by these 
samples taken at such different points ; the uniformly good 
quality of the water is further corroborated by a recent analysis 
of a sample taken from the pipes at St. Paul's School. 

Experience establishes truth. No general ill effects from the 
use of this water can be alleged. The conditions caused by 
man which surround the lake and its tributaries are, probably, 
the same as they have been for a period of years, and certainly 
the natural conditions by which the lake is supplied with water 
have not changed. These facts are a good guaranty of the con- 
tinued purity and healthfulness of the water. Its excellence is 
apparent also from comparison with other waters used for public 
supply. 

The analyses show that the organic nitrogen and carbon are 
small in_quantity. Briefl3', every result is favorable. 

[Signed] EDMUND R. ANGELL. 



156 CITY OF CONCORU. 



PURITY OF WATER SUPPLY. 



[communication from dr. I. A. WATSON.] 

The State of New Hampshire, 
State Board of Health, 

Concord, N. H., Jan. 20, 1893. 
W. P. FisKE, Esq., 

President Concord Water Board, Concord, N. H. 
Dear Sir, — Yonr favor of this date, inclosing the report of 
Prof. E, R. Angell, dated Jan. 12, 1893, upon the analysis of 
three samples of water from Penacook lake, and asking if any- 
thing more could be done to establish the fact of the purity of 
the water-supply of the cit}' of Concord, is at hand. 

In reply, I would say that I have carefully examined the 
report, as well as that of other analyses made at different times, 
and I do not hesitate to say that, in my opinion, it is entirely 
unnecessary to seek any further evidence of the healthfulnesa 
of the water-supply of this city. 

The very low amount of total solids, with a relatively small 
quantity of nitrogenous matter, places this lake in the front 
rank of potable waters, and in this respect it is far superior to that 
which supplies many of the cities of this country, even among the 
list of those possessing healthful waters. Infusoria are found in 
all lake waters and are believed to be entirely harmless. Bacte- 
ria are likewise always present, more or less, and, excepting 
disease-producing germs, which are only introduced through 
sewage, or some other sanitary neglect, are regarded as not in- 
imical to health. 

The city should regard itself as exceedingly fortunate in pos- 
sessing such an excellent water, and if a rigid and watchful 
sanitary supervision is exercised over the lake and its surround- 
ing water-shed, I believe that no question need arise as to the 
healthfulness of the water furnished from this lake to the peo- 
ple of Concord. 

Very truly yours, 

[Signed] IRVING A. WATSON, 

Secretary. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 157 

AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



Concord, N. H., Jauiiary 13, 1893. 
To the Board of Water Commissioners : 

I certify that I have examined the books showing the receipts 
of the Concord Water-Works from January 1, 1892, to Decem- 
ber 31, 1892, and find the same correct, and that the total 
amounts given therein correspond with the amounts of receipts 
given by the superintendent, V. C. Hastings, in his report for 
the year. 

ARTHUR H. CHASE, Auditor. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



W. F. Thayer, Treasurer. 

In account with Concord Water- Works. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1892. . . -^9,315.45 

Bonds, 3r,8,000.00 

" premium, 16,519.25 

" interest, 3,539.90 

Coupons due July 1, 1892, bonds on hand, 1,500.00 

Notes, 40,000.00 

Income of Water- Works, . . . 48,283.33 
Balance due treasurer, .... 24,075.15 

$501,233.08 



EXPENDITURES. 

Interest on Water- Works bonds, . . S26,560.00 

note, . . 1,230.00 
Maintenance and extension, . . . 114,143.08 

Notes, SO, 000. 00 

Bonds, 199,300.00 

Concord M'f'g Co., purchase of water 

rights, 80.000.00 

$501,233.08 



158 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



APPEISTDIX. 



I. 

Receipts for each Year since the Completion of the Works. 



For the year ending January 31, 1874, 
For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875 
For the year ending April 1, 1876, . 

1877, . 

1878, . 

1879, . 

1880, . 

1881, . 

For nine months ending Dec. 31, 1881, 
For the year ending December 31, 1882, 

' 1888, 

' 1884, 

1885, 
' 1886, 
' 1887, 
' 1888, 

1889, 
' 1890, 
' 1891, 
' 1892, 

Total receipts for twenty years, 



$4,431.10 
17,535.00 
16,921.24 
19,001.07 
20,763.03 
21,869.86 
22,451.53 
26,744.58 
25,534.01 
27,243.0& 
28,255.48 
28,915.65 
30,222.54 
30,862.64 
34,047.52 
38,441.32 
40,237.53 
42,133.41 
46,075.16 
48,351,52 

$570,037.25 



11. 
Mean Height of the Water Each Year. 



1873, 








175.86 


1883, 








176.40 


1874, 








179.50 


1884, 








178.18 


1875, 








180.00 


1885, 








176.80 


1876, 








180.28 


1886, 








178.10 


1877, 








176.46 


1887, 








179.04 


1878, 








179.50 


1888, 








181.96 


1879, 








179.74 


1889, 








180.91 


1880, 








175.30 


1890, 








181.90 


1881, 








174.70 


1891, 








180.00 


1882, 








179.15 


1892, 








174.32 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



159 



III. 

Main- and Distribution-Pipes Laid and Now in Use. 

30-incli main, 2,220 feet. 



24-incli " 
20-inch " 
18-inch " 
16-inch " 
14-inch " 
12-inch " 
14-inch distribution, 
12-inch " 

10-inch 

8-inch " 

6-inch " 

4-inch ' ' 

2-inch " 

1-inch " 

|-inch " 

Total, 
— equal to 51.85 miles. 



240 
9,025 

13,537 
2,789 

26,491 
1,351 
8,686 

15,454 
9,612 

24,015 

74,397 

67,750 
907 

10,552 
6,782 



273,358 feet. 



IV. 



Water is Now Supplied for the Following Uses: 



3,359 families, 

2,226 water-closets, 

509 bath-tubs, 

80i) wash-bowls, 

218 heating" apparatus, 

10 water motors, 

5 elevators, 

60 urinals, 

833 yard-hydrants, 

228 fire-hydrants, 

27 private fire-hydrants, 

3 drinking-fountains, 

10 public watering-troughs, 

12 street-sprinklers, 
16 churches, 

1 library, 

13 public schools, 
3 private schools, 
8 city buildings, 

1 state-house, 
silver manufactory. 



2 undertakers, 
31 meters, 

1 tannery, 

2 bakeries, 
107 offices, 
112 stores, 

10 drug stores, 
12 markets, 
5 restaurants, 

5 green-houses, 

6 fountains, 

9 barber-shops, 

28 mechanic shops, 

6 plumber shops, 

26 stationary engines, 

6 printing establishments, 

1 organ and piano manufactory, 

3 carriage manufactories, 

2 book-binderies, 
5 photographers, 
2 coal-yards. 



160 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



1 post-ofifice, 
1 Masonic hall, 

1 Odd Fellows hall, 
4 banks, 

4 hotels, 

2 railroads, 

1 gas-works, 

3 foundries, 

1 electric light company, 

4 billiard-halls. 



1 dye-house, 
4 laundries, 
8 livery stables, 
721 horses, 
157 cattle, 
6 saloons, 
1 jail, 

1 state prison, 
6 cemeteries 
1 cotton-mill. 



WATEK DEPAKTMKNT. 



161 



FIRE-HYDRANTS. 




North Main 



South 



Main. 



Turnpike 



Water. 

Hall. 

Fiske. 

Summer. 

Durgin. 

North State. 



South 



State. 



South-west corner North Main and Penacook 

East side North Main, near J. P>. Walker's 

Junction North Main and Fiske 

East side North Main, near Larkin's store 

North-west corner North Main and Franklin 

East side North Main, opposite Pearl 

North-west corner North Main ;uid Washinjjton 

West side North Main, op|i(i>ii(> Historical Society rooms. 

East side North Main, opposite Cliapel 

North-west corner North Main and Court 

North-west corner North Main and Pitman 

North-west corner North Main and Montgomery 

East side North Main, opposite Montgomery 

North-west corner North Main and Centre 

South-east corner North Main and Bridge 

South-west corner North Main and Park 

East side North Main, opposite Park 

j North-west corner North Main and Capitol 

! North-west corner North Main and School 

1 West side Noith Main, at Centennial block 

I East side North Main, opposite Centennial block 

I East side North Main, in rear Eagle Hotel 

i East side North IMain, in rear Woodward block 

1 North-west corner North Main and Warren 

[ West side North Main, at Central block 

South-east corner North Main and Depot 

North-west corner North Main and Pleasant 

South-east corner South Main and Pleasant.. 

North-east corner South Main and Freight 

North-west corner South Main and Fayette 

East side South Main, opposite Fayette 

East side South Main, opposite Tlionipson 

South-east corner South JNIain and Chandler 

North-west corner South Main and Wentworth avenue.. . . 

Xorth-west corner South Main and Thorndike 

East side South Main, opposite St. John's church 

North-west corner South Main and Perley 

West side South Main, near Abbot Downing Co.'s 

East side South Main, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s 

North-west corner South Main and West 

East side 'J'urnpike, near West 

West side Turnpike, opposite Gas 

West side Turnpike, near J. B. Weeks's 

West side Water, near Capt. James Thompson's 

West side Hall, below Rolfe and llumford Asylum 

West side Fiske, near North State 

North-east corner Summer and Pitman 

West side Durgin, near Toofs laundry 

South-west corner North State and Penacook 

North-west corner North State and Walker 

North-west corner North State and Church 

North-west corner North State and 'I'remont 

North-east corner North State and Washington 

VVest side North State, opposite Court 

North-west corner North State and Maple . 

North-east corner North State and Centre 

East side North State, opposite government building 

South-west corner North State and School 

North-west corner North State and Warren 

North-west corner North Stale and Pleasant 

East side South State, opposite Wall 

North-west corner South State and Thompson 

South-west corn(>r South Slate and Monroe 

East side South State, ojiiiosite Laurel 

South-east corner South State and Downing 

North-east corner South State and West 



12 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co/iiiHuecZ. 



STREETS. 


LOCATIONS. 


E 

3 


"3 
1 


South State. 
Mills 




7 




Dakin. 

Broadway. 

Green. 


We.st side Mills, near Levi Call's 

West side Dakin, near C. E. Harriman's 


2 

1 
1 






2 


South. 








,, 






,, 






,, 






,, 






,1 


West side South, near Abbot farm 




I, 


West side South, opposi'e Smith farm 


g 


Bradley. 










Union. 

Lyndon. 
No. Spring. 
So. Spring. 

Kumford. 


East side Bradley, opposite Highland 

North-west corner Union and Maple 


3 
1 
1 




1 






West side South Spring, opposite Concord 

West side South Spring, opposite I'erley proposed extension 
West side Kumford, opposite Perkins . . 


3 


If 






II 






" 


North-east corner Kumford and Cambridge 


g 


Tahanto. 


North-west corner Tahanto and School 


1 


Pine. 




1 


High. 


North-west corner High and Auburn 








14 




3 


Giles. 




1 


Fruit. 












II 




3 


Minot. 


West side Minot, near Odd Fellows' Home 


I 












"> 


Highland. 
Church. 


North-east corner Highland and Kumford 


1 




North-east corner Church and Kumford 


2, 








11 


South side Franklin, opposite W. J Aheru's 




II 




4 


Beacon. 
Blanchard. 


North-west corner Beacon and Jackson 


1 
1 


Ferry 
Washington. 


North side Ferry, east of C. & M. Railroad 


I 






Valley. 
Auburn. 
Centre. 


North side Washington, opposite Perry avenue 


3 

1 


North-west corner Auburn and Forest 


1 








■ 1 






II 






<• 






<i 






II 




7 


Bridge. 
Capitol. 




1 


North-east corner Capitol and North State 


1 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



163 



FIRE UYT>RAWrS.—Co7itinued. 



STREETS. 


LOCATIONS. 


a; 
S 


1 


School. 












I, 






,1 






,, 




f> 


Depot. 




1 












,, 






,1 






,, 






<i 






11 


















,( 






,, 






,, 






(1 






« 






It 






11 






<, 






,, 






,, 






,, 




n 






1 








Fayette. 


South-west corner Hill's avenue and Kailroad square 


2 












Thorndike 






Laurel. 
Perley. 


North-east corner Laurel and Tierce 






9. 


West. 












,, 




fr 






1 


Allison. 
Prospect. 


North-west corner Allison and Mills 


1 
1 




1 










North-east corner West Concord road and Foster 




j^ 


West side West Concord road, near Calvary cemetery 


5 




WEST CONCORD. 










It 






11 






11 






11 






11 






Electric. 










?, 


High. 








9. 


Depot. 




1 










?. 


Pen'c'kRoad 






(1 11 


West side Penacook road, near Mr. Currier's 


2. 



164 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Conc^McZeoZ. 



STREETS. 


LOCATIONS. 


s 

S5 


"3 
o 

H 




PENACOOK. 


1 

6 
4 
3 
1 

6 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 










,, 






11 






,1 






,, 






I, 


North side, near iron bridge 


7 


High. 










,t 




9, 


Washington. 










,( 






,( 


South side Washington, near Contoocook bridge 


4 


Charles. 


South-west corner Cliarles and Warren 








2 


West Canal. 




1 












^ 










North side Merrimack, opposite D. W. Fox's 




" 


North side Merrimack, opposite Cross 

SoutJi side Merrimack, opposite Holfe's sliop 




(> 






>t 




6 












<> 


Spring. 
Centre. 




1 


Nortli-west corner Centre and Spring 


1 


Cross. 




1 


Rolfe. 






« 




2 






228 




PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 






Northern Railroad yard, 4 post hydrants 






























W. P. Ford & Co 's yard 
































fri 









STREET DEPARTMENT. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS. 

During the past year Sewall's Falls bridge has been shingled 
at an expense of $180.00, also the Twin bridge at Penacook at 
an expense of S270.00. The iron bridge at East Concord has 
been painted at an expense of $145.00. 

The culvert at Willow Hollow has been extended about thirty 
feet east and a fill of about 1,200 yards put in ; and Main street 
at Penacook lias been widened, the expense being $1,200.00, 
and a large fill at the new bridge in the Borough. 

Pillsbury street, running west from Turn[)ike street, near the 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, has been built, and also a number 
of short streets have been graded. 

These will furnish desirable lots upon which to erect dwellings. 
The bank on tlie east side of the river, just above the lower 
bridge, has been rubbled. A good job has been done there, and, 
with a small amount expended each year in the future, the bank 
can be preserved from being washed away by the spring 
freshets. 

I would recommend the relaying of the stone pavement for 
the whole distance that it occupies on North Main street. It has 
been dug up so many times during the past few years that it is 
impossible to repair it in a satisfactory manner without relay- 
ing it. 

I hope the board of aldermen will take some action the pres- 
ent year in regard to the paving of Bridge street from its 
junction with North Main street to the bridge over the railroad 
tracks. The muddy condition of the sti'eet at that point seems 
to require it. I would also call the attention of the board to 
the condition of the Free bridge. It has been built about forty- 
three years and it is doubtful if it can be repaired with economy. 
It is my opinion that it should be replaced at once by a new 



168 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



structure. The piers and abutments are probably in a good 
condition, and the expense of rebuilding would be materially 
lessened on that account. 

I recommend the purchase of a new street sweeper, as the 
one in use is nearly worn out. There ought also to be one, if 
not two, new street spriniilers procured. The tub sprinkler has- 
been in service for a number of years and ought to be replaced 
by a new one. And another new sprinkler could be used to 
advantage on some of the streets where, on account of a lack of 
sprinklers we have been unable to go. There were twenty-nine 
streets sprinkled the past season, and the calls that are annually 
made for more sprinkling can only be met by having more 
sprinklers to do the work. The month of December last was a 
very favorable one for our highway department on account of 
the light fall of snow, and as a result a balance is left in favor 
of the department for the year 1892. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Commissioner of Highways. 

There has also been paid to the city treasurer the sum of 
$1,430.15 for amounts collected of abutters for their proportions 
of concrete sidewalks, as follows : 





RECEIPTS. 




E. A. Sewell, $19.35 


John & William Tebau. . 




23.48 


G. K. Whitman, . 






15.76 


William Prowse, 






22.49 


D. Cutting, . 






14.13 


W. A. Thompson, . 






14.22 


E. T. Morrison, 






41.75 


Seth R. Dole, 






10.87 


C. H. Swain, 






11.67 


W. W. Allen, 






13.95 


S. S. Brown, 






20.25 


Mrs. H. Brown, 






18.75 


W. A. Kenney, 






7.56 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



109 



J. M. Moore, 

W. D. Chaudler, 

E. McQuesteo, 

S. C. Eastman, 

H. G. Biiswell, 

A. W. Davis, 

S. N. Brown, 

Mrs. L. E. Kelley, 

L. W. Jnmes, 

L. B. Hoit, . 

Ellen E. Fay, 

W. H. Pitman, 

Tabanto Real Estate Ass 

Michael Shine, 

W. J. Moore, 

John Dalvin, 

J. M. Mitchell, 

Joseph Collins, 

James Sanborn Estate, 

Miss Howe, . 

D. Parker, . 

W. S. Bates, 

William Taylor, 

L. H. Carroll, 

W. H. Barry, 

Fred E. Clondman, 

Dr. A. C. Alexander, 

Patrick Hagerty, . 

N. E. Martin, 

Martin & Lnscomb, 

John M. Fletcher, 

Cumraings Brothers, 

M. H. Bradley, 

G. W. Stewartsou, 

Patrick Reardon, 

H. E. Conant, 

Hannah Sargent, 

Zeb. F. Swain, 

Geo. Patterson, 



$21.87 
14.45 

8.71 
34.52 

9.98 
11.61 
17.40 
12.28 
10.13 
10.71 
12.50 
31.34 
17.07 

9.00 
10.14 
42.90 
25.65 
22.50 

6.28 
11.40 
11.24 
75.07 
13.28 

5.80 

6.16 

5.80 
14.65 

9.49 
53.62 

9.76 

19.64 

17.72 

111.10 

6.43 
12.73 
45.16 
16.8& 
10.08 
12.73 



170 



OITY OF CONCORD. 



F. C. Lang, . 






S8.00 


John B. Sherburne, 




13.83 


John L. Jordan, 




3.68 


G. W. Mooney, 




17.56 


J. A. Gervais, 




11.06 


B. French, 




10.12 


Mrs. Mary A. Parker, . 




8.62 


B. L. Ring, . 




9.24 


Betsey Warren Estate, 




5.47 


G. T. Comins, 




28.53 


Frank Cressy, 




13.59 


James G. Leighton, 




31.56 


W. W. Kennedy, . 




8.52 


Geo. Clough, 




9.40 


Mary E. Twomey, . 




19.44 


W. b. Hayden, 




11.57 


Mrs. C. Hall, 




10.00 


Frank Collins, 




26.59 


T. P. Sullivan, 




122.72 


H. F. Brown, 




15.00 


B. G. Merrill, 




8.82 


Catherine Lee, 




4.84 


The concrete bills remainiuo 


<■ unpaid are those of. 


I. M. Savage, $75.79 


W. S. Blanchard, . 






8.95 


Nancy Dutton, 






18.05 


Contoocook Co., 






50.02 


Howard Trevette, 






31.11 


P. Glennon, . 






7.65 


T. McCarthy, 






8.97 


Boscawen Mills, 






34.75 


T. Murphy, . 






18.22 


A. 0. Mansur, 






10.39 


H. Mansur, . 






10.39 


Geo. Mansur, 






20.62 


F. Petti ngill, . 






25.94 



,430.15 



S320.85 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



171 



SPRINKLING THE STREETS. 



The following account of the receipts and expenditures for sprink- 
lino- the streets, for the season of 1892, is inserted for the infoi'mation 
of the public : 

RECEIPTS. 
NORTH MAIN STREET. 



G. B. Emmons, 

Moseley & Co., 

N. H. Democratic Press Co., 

Scribner & Britton, 

Batchelder & Co., 

G. A. Berry & Co., 

J. E. Pecker, 

First JSTational Bank, 

A. P. Fitch, 

E. H. Rollins & Sons, 
C. F. Sherburne, 

F. E. Colburn, 
N. G. Carr, 

F. Reed, 
Thompson & Hoague, 

G. A. Young, 
Phenix, 

F. E. Nelson, 

W. A. Thompson, 
Brown cV: Currier, 
Holland & Derby, 
L. J. Utfenheimer, 
M. Wolff, 

Thurston & Emmons, 
C. N. Towle, 

G. K. Mellen, 
Smith & Jenkins, 
E. B. Crapo, 

H. W. Stevens, 



EAST 


SIDE. 




$3.00 


C. W. Clark, . 


$2.00 


2.00 


D. E. Murphy, 


3.00 


3.00 


T. W. & J. H. Stewart, 


5.00 


2.00 


F. P. Mace, 


3.00 


5.00 


E. B. Davis, 


1.00 


3.00 


Sleeper & Hood, 


5.00 


1.00 


Piper & Ballou, 


3.00 


5.00 


J. C. Thorne, 


5.00 


3.00 


W. G. ShaAv & Co., 


3.00 


3.00 


Humphrey & Dodge, 


10.00 


2.00 


Eagle, 


6.00 


2.00 


W. U. Tel. Co., 


3.00 


2.00 


N. H. Savings Bank, 


5.00 


5.00 


J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., 


5.00 


5.00 


W. P. Underbill & Co., 


3.00 


1.00 


T. R. Sandford, 


2.00 


7.00 


J. Welcome, 


1.00 


5.00 


G. W. Wadleigh, 


1.50 


3.00 


S. Wardner, 


2.00 


3.00 


E. E. Fisher, 


2.00 


3.00 


H. W. Brickett, 


3.00 


3.00 


A. C. Sanborn, 


3.00 


5.00 


E. H. Randall, 


2.00 


3.00 


Mrs. O. Stearns, 


5.00 


1.00 


W. H. Pitman, 


2.00 


3.00 


G. P. Conn, 


5.00 


3.00 


W. Odlin, 


2.00 


3.00 


W. K. & Mrs. A. McFarlaud, 


5.00 


1.00 


J. F. Morrill, 


2.00 



172 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



S. A. Dow, 

Mrs. M. C. H. Scavey, 

C. H. Cook, 

Mrs. J. Abbott, 

C. S. Parker, 

W. G. Carter, 

P. H. Larkin, 

C. T. Page, 



Perkins I'e Berry, 

G. W. Dudley, 

W. L. Collins, 

D. W. Sullivan Sz Co., 

C. H. Martin tt Co., 
G. H Moore, 

T. S. Lovely, 

D. M. Camp, 

H. F. Wyatt & Co., 
State Capital Bank, 
Stevens & Duncklee, 

F. A. Bates, 
Morrill Bros., 

A. P. Sherburne, 
J. P. Hill Co., 
J. Hazelton & Son, 
H. X. Xewell, 

D. II. Bean, 
Streeter ife Walker, 
Morrill & Danforth, 
Meclianicks National Bank, 

G. T. Comins, 
W. E. Hunt, 

P. F. Robinson, 

W. C. & I. T. Chesley, 

Silsby & Son, 

J. S. Hubbard, 

J. B. Sanborn, 

E. W. Willard, 
E. Lapierre, 



$2.00 


W. W. Xiles, 


$2.00 


2.00 


J. F. Healey, 


1.00 


1.00 


J. B. Walker, 


5.00 


2.00 


F. S. Streeter, 


3.00 


2.00 


J. A. White, 


3.00 


5.00 


S. S. Kimball, 


7.00 


2.00 






2.00 




$228.50 


WEST 


SIDE. 




$5.00 


E. E. Clarke, 


$1.00 


3.00 


J. M. Runals, 


2.00 


1.50 


W. H. Dunlap & Co., 


3.00 


3.00 


J. Broggini, 


2.00 


3.00 


L. E. Currier, 


2.00 


2.00 


H. J. Lowell, 


5.00 


2.00 


Reed & Mudgett, 


2.00 


3.00 


J. H. Lamprey, 


2.00 


3.00 


S. A. Bowers, 


3.00 


5.00 


W. D. Merrick, 


5.00 


3.00 


Miss S. Stickney, 


1.00 


3.00 


F. Battles, 


1.00 


3.00 


Mrs. C. P. Blanchard, 


1 .00 


2.00 


Miss S. G. Perkins, 


1.00 


5.00 


W. P. Ford it Co., 


3.00 


3.00 


G. H. Marston, 


2.00 


3.00 


A. P. Carpenter, 


3.00 


3.00 


G. F. Page, 


2.00 


2.00 


H. McFarlaud, 


5.00 


2.00 


J. P. George, 


2.00 


5.00 


M. R. Holt, 


2.00 


2.00 


W. P. Fiske, 


5.00 


2.00 


E. Gerrish, 


5.00 


2.00 


E. S. Nutter, 


2.00 


3.00 


Mrs. F. Pearson, 


2.00 


3.00 


Underhill & Kittredge, 


3.00 


1.50 


W. K. Day, 


1.50 


3.00 
3.00 








$154.50 


2.00 







SOUTH MAIN STREET. 



S. C. Morrill, 
E. G. C^ummings, 
Cummings Bros., 
E. J. Hill, 



$3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
5.00 



L. A. Smith, 

D. J. Murphy, 

H. O. Marsh, 

Mrs. H. B. Tebbetts, 



$3.00 
2.00 
3.00 
5.00 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



173 



Mrs. J. L. Pickering, S3.00 

G. B. Whittredge, S.OO 

W. E. Hood, 1.00 

G. W. Greer, 1.00 

C. C. Webster, 2.00 

J. C. Norris & Co., 3.00 

W. J. Feruald, 2.00 

I. L. Pickering, 2.00 

J. E. Barry, 5.00 

F. Evans, 2.00 

J. S. Norris, 2.00 

Mrs. W. Abbott, 1.00 

St. Mary's School, • 3.00 

Mrs. F. Low, 2.00 

Mrs. C. C. Lund, 3.00 



S. A. Carter, 


$3.00 


B. A. Kimball, 


3.00 


C. H. Thorudike, 


3.00 


Miss A. Downing, 


10.00 


Abl)ot-Uowning Co., 


5.00 


H. K. Bugljee, 


1.00 


Mrs. J. A. Eames, 


5.00 


Nelson & Durrell, 


3.00 


Mrs. S. A. Holt, 


3.00 


Concord Ice Co., 


2.00 


W. Gage, 


1.50 


J. M. Hill, 


3.00 



$102.50 



NORTH STATE STREET. 



H. H. Dudley, $3.00 

John Kimball, 5.00 

F. W. Rollins, 5.00 
C. E. Burnside, 2.00 
J. E. Robertson, 3.00 
Mrs. O. Pillsbury, 3.00 
Miss Mary Pierce, 3.00 
W. L. Foster, 3.00 
N. White, 3.00 
J. F. Webster, 3.00 
W. F. Thayer, 3.00 

G. T. Comins, 3.00 
Mrs. L. S. Morrill, 2.00 
First Baptist Society, 3.00 
J. S. Mathews, 1.00 
Mrs. S. C. Hamilton, 2.00 
P. Kittredge, 3.00 
G. Walker, 3.00 
J. C. Ordway, 2.00 
J. H. Gallinger, 2.00 
H. E. Abbott, 2.00 



J. W. Merrill, 


$2.00 


B. E. Badger, 


2.00 


J. A. Dadmuu, 


2.00 


Mrs. L. B. Morrill, 


2.00 


N. F. Lund, 


2.00 


K. T. Crowell, 


2.00 


H. L. Rand, 


2.00 


F. Allison, 


1.00 


Mrs. J. B. Stanley, 


1.00 


Mrs. C. B. Hill, 


1.00 


J. F. Harriman, 


1.00 


C. R. Sanborn, 


1.00 


A. J. Batchelder, 


1.00 


B. F. Virgin, 


2.00 


A. D. Ayling, 


3.00 


M. W. Russell, 


2.00 


P. M. Randall, 


2.00 


F. Leighton, 


2.00 



$90.00 



SOUTH STATE STREET. 



James Minot, 
S. F. Morrill, 
A. P. Chesley, 
J. C. Norris, 
D. D. Taylor, 
G. H. Emery, 



$3.00 


G. B. Emmons, 


$2.00 


2.00 


F. E. Gale, 


2.00 


3.00 


N. E. Elkin, 


2.00 


3.00 


W. H. Alexander, 


2.00 


3.00 


C. P. Virgin, 


2.00 


3.00 


E. A. Clark, 


2.00 



174 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



P. Flanders, 


$2.00 


P. Crane, 


$1.00 


J. Burgum, 


2.00 


H. C. >Sturtevant, 


1.00 


H. Eolfe, 


1.00 


0. Ballon, 


1.00 


I. S. R. Sanborn, 


1.00 


J. L. Mason, 


1.00 


F. B. Scribner, 


1.00 


W. Bnrbank, 


1.00 


H. W. Clapp, 


2.00 


C. Nntting, 


1.00 


S. Holt, 


2.00 


0. S. Snell, 


1.00 


F. Webster, 


2.00 


C. W. Pearl, 


1.00 


D. D. Brainerd, 


2.00 


T. Sargent, 


2.00 


W. S. Wilson, 


2.00 


J. B. S. Fletcher, 


1.00 


S. P. Danforth, 
A. Atherton, 


2.00 
1.00 








$60.00 



GREEN STREET. 



J. A. Cochran, 


$2.00 


P. F. Stevens, 


2.00 


C. H. Dnnklee, 


2.00 


C. C. Danforth, 


2.00 


M. Gilmore, 


2.00 


A. B. Sargent, 


2.00 


T. W. Young, 


2.00 


Unitarian Society, 


2.00 


Mrs. M. S. Osgood, 


2.00 


Union Stable, 


2.00 



Mrs. W. Walker, 
F. W. Messe, 
H. O. Adams, 
Mrs. X. M. Locke, 
Mrs. G. Bullock, 
D. C. Woodman, 
H. W. Clough, 
W. W. Stone, 



$2.00 
2.0O 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

$35.. 50 



SCHOOL STREET. 



J. H. Rowell, 


$3.00 


W. B. Durgin, 


$2.00 


Mrs. N. White, 


3.00 


L. E. Currier, 


2.00 


L. R. Fellows, 


2.00 


N. C. Nelson, 


1.00 


W. S. Baker, 


2.00 


F. W. Landon* Co., 


1.00 


J. Woods, 


2.00 


P. A. Clifford, 


1.00 


P. Pillsbury, 


1.00 


E. W. Abbott, 


1.00 


F. S. Crawford 


2.00 
1..50 






Mrs. L. M. Morrill, 




$24.50 



PLEASANT STREET. 



N. H. Asylum, 
H. E. Chamberlin, 

E. Dow, 

L. Downing, 
G. L. Stratton, 
Mrs. J. P. Bancroft, 
Mrs. R. N. Corning, 
W. Russell, 

F. A. Stillings, 



$10.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



American Tea Co., 
H. A. Macdonald, 

D. E. Clarke, 
.Jerome Ford, 
S. R. Dole, 
Morrison & Searles, 
Wright & Mercer, 

E. N. Spencer, 
Mrs.lS.jF. Silsby, 



$2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



175 



CAPITOL STREET. 



Concord Gas Light Co., 
George Goodhue, 
I. C. Evans, 
Mrs. N. White, 



$3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
5.00 



A. W. Davis, 



Mrs. M. J. Marshall, 


$2.00 


Mrs. H. W. Fuller, 


$3.00 


Mrs. E. G. Crockett, 


2.00 


D. E. Willard, 


2.00 


J. T. Sleeper, 


2.00 








Lee Bros, 


1.00 




$74.00 


W. L. Himes, 


1.00 








WARREN STREET. 




Mrs. J. Minot, 


$5.00 


C. B. Crane, 


$2.00 


Mrs. H. A. Bridge, 


5.00 


J. M. Collins, 


2.00 


S. Humphrey, 


3.00 


Mrs. A. Fletcher, 


2.00 


0. Morrill, 


3.00 


J. D. Perkins, 


2.00 


H. W. Stevens, 


3.00 


H. C. Sturtevant & Son, 


2.00 


H. E. Worcester, 


• 3.00 


N. P. Rines, 


2.00 


J. H. Toof, 


3.00 


H. A. Mann, 


2.00 


M. Humphrey, 


3.00 


T. Kerley, 


2.00 


W. G. C. Kimball, 


2.00 


Bouchard & Dupont, 


2.00 


A. C. Ferrin, 


2.00 


P. Planchette, 


2.00 


D. Hazelton, 


2.00 


S. Sewall, 


1.50 


Aldrich & Dudley, 


2.00 


T. W. Illman, 


1.50 


F. E. Brown, 


2.00 


Mrs. S. K. Blanchard, 


1.00 


H. Huntress, 


2.00 


Mrs. C. E. Thompson, 


1.00 


W. W. Taylor, 


2.00 








W. A. Clough, 


2.00 




$69.00 



$1.00 



United States Government, 25.00 



$38.00 



PARK STREET. 



W. M. Mason, 

C. R. Walker, 

D. E. Sullivan, 

E. A. Stockbridge, 



$2.00 

1.00 

■ 1.00 

1.00 



Mrs. A. L. Drevs^, 

United States Government, 



SOUTH STREET. 



H. W. Ranlet, $5.00 

J. F. Jones, 5.00 

G. C. Hopkinson, 5.00 

Mrs. A. Downing, 5.00 

Mrs. W. Harriman, 5.00 

H. C. Brown, 3.00 

J. P. Nutter, 3.00 

W. M. Colby, 2.00 



$1.00 
25.00 

$31.00 



N. M. Carter, 


$3.00 


Mrs. E. J. Little, 


4,00 


Mrs. C. E. Hutchins, 


3.00 


C. C. Perkins, 


2.00 


C. H. Wiggin, 


2.00 


J. K. Ewer, 


1.00 


J. H. Caswell, 


1.00 


F. Cressy, 


3.00 



176 

T. H. Barker, 
L. Rollins, 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

$2.00 L. Eollins, 1S91, 
2.00 

FREIGHT STREET, 



NORTH SPRING STREET. 



$2.00 



$58.00 



Ranlet & Marsh, 
Geo. Bodwell, 
J. G. Crowley, 


$3.00 
1.00 
1.00 


H. T. Dickerman, 
A. P. Davis, 


$1.00 
1.00 


$7.00 




BRIDGE STREET. 




Fairfield & Co., 


$2,00 


Dickerman & Co., 


$3.00 




$5.00 



D. Merrill, 


$2.00 


J. Brice, 


$1.00 


G. A. Foster, 


2.00 


D. Young, 


1.00 


F. A. Tenney, . 


2.00 


Mrs. M. A. Craigue, 


1.00 


L. C. Merrill, 


2.00 


F. V. Osgood, 


1.00 


Mrs. A. C. Heath, 


2.00 


Mrs. 0. Reed, 


1.00 


L. H. Buntin, 


2.00 


D. L. Gage, 


1.00 


H. A. Macdonald, 


2.00 


J. W. Fletcher, 


1.00 


Mrs. F. A. Huntingt 


on, 1.00 


D. S. O'Connell, 


1.00 


G. A. Brown, 


1.00 


G. W. Hill, 


1.00 


J. R. Miller, 
H. H. Metcalf, 


1.00 
1.00 








$28.00 


H. Goodwin, 


1.00 








SOUTH SPRING STREET. 




J. E. Rand, 


$2.00 


Mrs. B. M. Locke, 


$1.00 


L. H. Carroll, 


2.00 


C. H. Osgood, 


1.00 


S. A, Currier, 


2.00 


Mrs. A. Wood, 


1.00 


A. S. Marshall, 


2.00 


J. Y. Lane, 


1.00 


R N Phill)vipk 


1.00 






Mrs. W. W. Storrs, 


1.00 




$14.00 




THOMPSON STREET. 




J. W. Sleeper, 


$2.00 


Mrs. R. M. Morgan, 


$2.00 


S. A. Carter, 


2.00 


O. T. Carter, 


2.00 


Mrs. C. C. Lund, 


2.00 


W. J. Greene, 


2.00 


E. N. Spencer, 


2.00 


W. M. Colby, 


1.00 


N. G. Carr, 


2.00 


C. H. Sibley, 


1.00 


G. W. Dudley, 


2.00 


C. L. Brown, 


2.00 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



177 



G. K. Mellen, 


$1.00 


J. C. Ordway, 


$2.00 


C. H. Sanders, 


1.00 


F. P. Virgin, 


2.00 


C. B. Flanders, 


1.00 


T. W. Pillsbury, 


2.00 


Mrs. N. M. Carter, 
W. H. Durant, 


1.00 






1.00 




§34.00 


W. Sargent, 


1.00 







FISKE STREET. 



V. C. Hastings, 
S. C. Eastman, 
S. S. Kimball, 
M. D. Cummings, 
A. C. Hardy, 



$5.00 


Mrs. I. W. Hammond, 


$3.00 


5.00 


A. A. Currier, 


2.00 


5.00 
5.00 








$27.00 


2.00 







CENTPvE STREET. 



George Cook, 


$2.00 


H. S. Ordway, 


$1.00 


J. C. Badger, 


2.00 


F. S. Jolinson, 


1.00 


H. M. Sinclair, 


2.00 


J. Rollins, 


1.50 


D. Webster, 


2.00 


D. B. Newhall, 


1.00 


N. P. Stevens, 


2.00 


G. Walker, 


2.00 


D. C. Allen, 


2.00 


M. Gvirley, 


1.00 


G. M. Savage, 


2.00 


W. T. Packard, 


1.00 


Mrs. J. C. Sliaw^, 


2.00 


J. H. Gallinger, 


1.00 


N. Saltus, 


2.00 


I. A. Watson, 


2.00 


J. ^y. Bourlet, 


2.00 


C. C. Hill, 


2.00 


H. A. Rowell, 
C. A. Kendall, 


2.00 
2.00 








$37.50 



FAYETTE STREET. 



K. C. Young, 


§2.00 


M. B. Smith. 


$1.00 


Mrs. J. S. Lund, 


2.00 


Mrs. C. H. Ordway, 


1.00 


J. E. Dwight, 


2.00 


Mrs. J. F. Emei'son, 


1.50 


St. Mary's School, 


2.00 


J. Smith, 


1.00 


F. E. Cloudman, 


2.00 


W. E. Emerson, 


1.00 


G. H. Emery, 


2.00 


A. Clark, 


2.00 


J. B. Sherburne, 


1.50 


W. K. Day, 


1.50 


G. W. Wales, 
B. F. Hardy, 


2.00 
2.00 








$28.00 


C. G. Remick, 


1.50 







DEPOT STREET. 



Republican Press Asso., 
L. A. Smith, 



$3.00 H. E. Conant, 
2.00 



$2.00 
$7.00 



178 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
WASHINGTON STEEET. 



LAUREL STREET. 



E. B. Hutchinson, 
L. H. James, 
S. F. Prescott, 
T. Sweeney, 
L. W. Bean, 
J. H. Lane, 
G. W. Abbott, 



H. A. Dodge, 
G. F. Unclerhill, 
F. K. Jones, 



Mrs. E. H. Rollins, 
Mrs. H. Ricliardson, 
F. D. Ayer, 



Mrs. G. W. Pliipps, 
J. A. Dearborn, 
H. W. Ferrin, 
J. B. Runals, 



$5.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 



ORCHARD STREET. 



$2.00 I A. G. Jones, 



2.00 
2.00 



A. P. Sherburne, 



FRANKLIN STREET. 



First Cong. Soc, 


!?3.00 


W. D. Thomes, 


$1.00 


H. W. Brickett, 


2.00 


M. F. Rogers, 


1.00 


G. P. Cleaves, 
S. M. Griffin, 


1.00 






1.00 




$10.00 


J. R. Howe, 


1.00 








COURT STREET. 




E. B. Wood worth, 


$3.00 E. F. Mann, 


$2.00 


J. H. Pearson, 
J. B. Rand, 


3.00 
2.00 








$10.00 




MERRIMACK STREET. 




Mrs. M. Marden, 


$3.00 


F. K. Jones, 


$3.00 


F. Moseley, 


2.00 


G. F. Underbill, 


2.00 


J. S. Ci'ockett 


1.50 












$11.50 




PINE STREET. 




H. A. Dodge, 


$3.00 


Mrs. E. H. Woodman, 


.$2.00 


W. D. Thompson, 


2.00 








Mrs. A. Dodge, 


2.00 




$9.00 



$1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 

$24.00 



$2.00 
1.00 

$9.00 



$5.00 


J. C. French, 


$2.00 


3.00 


R. F. Robinson, 


2.00 


2.00 







$14.00 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



179 



PEARL STREET. 



M. J. Pratt, 


$3.00 


Mrs. N". Merrill, 


S2.00 


W. D. Wallace, 


1.00 


C. Smart, 


1.00 


S. C. Edgerley, 


1.00 


J. T. Woodbury aud 




F. E. Healey, 


1.00 


H. L. Sanders, 


1.00 


H. S. Dimlap, 
E. H. Dixon, 


1.00 
1.00 








S12.00 



ELM STREET. 



E. McQuesten, 
W. E. Tenney, 
Mrs. L. Hoit, 
P. C. Bean, 
Mrs. J. F. Cotton, 
J. T. Gordon, 



$2.00 


F. 


D. 


Holmes and 


,2.00 


F. 


T. 


Benn, 


1.00 


D. 


E. 


Willard, 


1.00 








1.00 








1.00 









$1.50 
1.00 

S10.50 



180 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



RECAPITULATION. 



North Main street, East side, 

North Main street. West side, 

South Main street, 

Nortli State street, 

Soutli State street. 

Green street. 

School street, 

Pleasant street, 

Warren street, 

Capitol street. 

Park street. 

South street, 

Freight street, 

Bridije street. 

North Spring street. 

South Spring street, 

Thonii)son street, 

Fiske street. 

Center street, 

Fayette street. 

Depot street, 

Washington street. 

Court street, 

Merrimack street, 

Pine street, . 

Laurel street,. 

Orchard street, 

Franklin street, . 

Pearl street, 

Elm street, . 



$228.50 
154.50 
102.. 50 
90.00 
60.00 
85..50 
24.. 50 
74.00 
69.00 
38.00 
31.00 
58.00 

7.00 

5.00 
28.00 
14.00 
34.00 
27.00 
37.50 
28.00 

7.00 
10.00 
10.00 
11.50 

9.00 
24.00 

9.00 
14.00 
12.00 
10.50 

•f. 1,263. 00 



The collection of subscriptions for the street sprinkling has been at- 
tended to as heretofore by Mr. Howard M. Cook, and the results are 
as satisfactory as could be expected under the present system. 

The full account of individual subscriptions is presented for the 
information of the public. 

All which is respectfully submitted, as supplementary to the report, 
by 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Co7mnissioner of Highways. 



STREET DEPAKT3IENT. 



181 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SEWERS 
AND DRAINS. 



To the City Council : 

The committee on sewers and drains would respectfully submit, 
their report for the year ending December 31, 1892. 

New sewers have been laid during the year in the following 
streets, and the cost of laying the same as near as can be ascer- 
tained from the pay-rolls, and other expenses incurred, is as follows : 



Thompson street, 82 feet 8-inch pipe, . 
Jackson street, 110 feet 10-incli pipe, . 
North State street, 372 feet 12-inch pipe, 
North Essex street, 130 feet 8-inch pipe, 
Highland and Rumford streets, 475 feet 8-inch 
Daldn street, 700 feet 10-inch pipe. 
Beacon street, 325 feet 10-inch pipe, . 
Gi'anite avenue, 250 feet 8-inch pipe, . 
West Concord road, 850 feet 10-inch pipe, 
Rumford street, 100 feet 8-inch pipe, . 
Morton street, 170 feet 8-inch pipe, 
School street, 800 feet 10-inch pipe, 
Holt street, 62 feet 8-inch pipe, . 
Relaying Bradley street. 



pipe. 



S78.30 
155.91 
681.29 

74.67 
171.41 
622.72 
683.74 
110.27 
493.82 

34.75 

66.74 
889.07 

34.76 
131.58 

$4,229.03 



Work Avas also commenced on a brick sewer to extend from its 
junction with the South End sewer in Allison street, some 1,500 feet 
west to South street. The sewer is 24 by 36 inches in size and 
about 392 feet of it was laid the past season. The expense in- 
curred thus far in its construction is as follows : 



Labor pay-rolls, . 

Mason work, 

G. L. Theobald, use of horse, 



J,095.42 

803.00 

85.87 



182 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Samuel Holt, brick, . 
Woodwortli & Co., cement, 
Lumber and repairs, . 



$229.50 

105.00 

60.00 



$4,378.79 

During the year of 1892, Mr. Alfred Clark, commissioner of 
highways, had charge of the construction of sewers in the central 
wards. The South End sewer proved to be expensive ; the ground 
was fuU of springs and quicksand and required lots of curbing. 

The sewer committee elected by the city government are H. W. 
Clapp, F. P. Quimby, Henry McFarland, John B. Dodge, Adam 
P. Holden. 

NORTH END SEWER. 

Concord, N. H., January 21, 1893. 

To the Committee on Sevjers and Drains: 

Gentlemen, — The following is a statement of expenditures on 
the " North End Sewer " for the year 1892 ; also, the cost per foot 



tor the portion completed : 




Tools, 


$252.46 


Curbing and patterns, 


205.72 


Cement, ...... 


421.61 


Brick, ...... 


778.65 


Castings, ...... 


52.50 


Pay-rolls laborers, .... 


3,781.52 


Masons' labor, ..... 


700.60 


Rubber boots, ..... 


27.50 


Removing surplus earth, . 


39.00 


Rebuilding masonry at outlet, . 


107.00 


Trucking, ..... 


6.25 


Repairs on tools, .... 


2.80 


Engineering and superintendence, 


197.15 


Total amount expended, . 




Dedvicting cost of masonry at outlet, 


$107.00 


Tools and material on hand, 


311.00 



>,572.76 



418.00 



Total expended on sewer, . 



5,154.76 



STREET BEPAUTMENT. 183 

There is built 1,725 feet of 24-incli by 36-inch brick sewer, mak- 
ing the cost per foot $3.56. The remaining portion of the sewer, 
yet to be built, can be built at much less cost per foot, as the 
deeper portion is now completed, and the water from the river will 
not prove so much of a hindrance as it did in the fall of 1892. 
The work was commenced September 7, and was carried on con- 
tinuously with the exception of a few stormy days, and three days 
owing to high water in the river. All work was stopped Decem- 
ber 5. 

I would suggest that work be commenced on the remaining por- 
tion as soon as the season will permit, and in this way avoid the 
fall rains, as they add materially to the expense of construction. 

Respectfully yours, 

W. B. HOWE. 



184 CITY OF CONCORD. 



WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 



On petition of the inhabitants of West Concoi'd, this precinct 
was formed and plans and estimates prepared by the engineer for 
a sewerage system embracing the entire village. 

The amount of pipe required for the woi-k, when completed, will 
be nearly two and one half miles, estimated to cost, when laid and 
ready to receive sewage, $17,000. An ordinance has been passed 
authorizing an issue of bonds for this amount, for a sinking fund 
for the payment of the same at maturity. 

This season there has been laid 1,400 feet 15-inch pipe, 4,600 
feet 12-inch, and 2,650 feet 10-inch. Pipe sufficient to complete 
the entire sewer has been bought and is now on the gromid. 

The amount of money expended for the entire amount of pipe, 
and for all labor and material employed for the past season, was 
$9,166.78. 

ADAM P. HOLDEN, 

Agent. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 185 



REPORT OF THE PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT. 



To the City Council : 

I have the honor to report that during the past season the origi- 
nal plan of the sewerage system has been completed. The total 
amount of bonds issued by the city is $24,000, which is somewhat 
under the original estimate. 

The work done in 1892 consists of an extension of the Brook 
sewer in the rear of Main street six hundred feet, constructed with 
18-inch Akron sewer pipe ; eight hundred and fifty feet of lo-inch 
pipe on Penacook street ; one thousand one hundred and fiity feet 
of 12-incli pipe and five hundred and fifty feet of 8-inch pipe on 
Rolfe street. 

These extensions were built by contract by Mr. Henry MorriU, 
in accordance with plans and sj^ecifications drawn by Mr. William 
B. Howe. 

The extremely low price of sewer pipe during the summer, and 
very favorable terms on the part of the contractor for building the 
sewer, were the cause of effecting a saving of about fifteen hundred 
dollars from the original estimates for this part of the work, and 
at the last meeting of the city council in January, bonds to that 
amount were ordered canceled. 

We now have a system that will probably supply the needs of the 
village for several years, with a few short lines which may be called 
for by the completion of new streets. 

I would respectfully suggest to the citizens living upon such 
streets that it will be necessary to present a petition to the city 
council for such extensions, as all that was originally laid out by the 
city has been completed. 

I would also call the attention of those who contemplate making 
connections with the public sewers to the provisions of chapter 22, 
of the city ordinances, and particularly to section 15 of that chapter, 
which provides '" If any person shall enter or cause to be entered 
any common sewer for the purpose of drainage, or for any other 



186 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



purpose, without the permission in writing of the committee on 
sewers and drains, or shall enter such sewer or drain in a manner 
different from tliat prescribed by this chapter, or shall obstruct or 
iniure any common sewer, he shall, on conviction thereof, be fined 
not less than ten nor more than twenty dollars for each offence." 

At the time of the burning of Sanders's block, December 31, 
1891 a large amount of cinders was carried into the sewer on 
East Canal street, which, with the great quantity of sand from the 
catch-basin on Main street, allowed to overflow into the sewer, 
completely filled it and necessitated the taking up of some three 
hundred feet, causing an expense of nearly four hundred dollars. I 
would renew my recommendation of last year, that, if possible, more 
care should be exercised by the highway department in keeping the 
catch-basins free from sand. 

The following is a financial statement of receipts and expenses 
for the year : 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance from last year. 
Appropriation for 1892, 
Bonds told. 
Premium and interest, 



$99.27 

100.00 

3,000.00 

164.22 



$3,363.49 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Foss & Merrill, for plans, . 

Isaac Baty, sewer pipe and supplies, 
Thompson & Hoague, hardware, 
Foote, Brown & Co., " 

Concord Foundry Co., castings. 
Ford & Kimball, castings, 
Woodworth & Co., cement, 
contracts and labor pay-roUs, 
American Bank Note Co., printing 
bonds, .... 

Cash on hand, ..... 



$75.50 

902.44 

21.45 

7.31 

6.00 

39.05 

21.60 

2,194.79 

18.30 

77.05 



$3,363.49 



Respectfully submitted 

JOHN B. DODGE, 

Setver Comtnittee. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 

To the City Council: 

The trustees of the Public Library respectfully invite your atten 
tioii to the accompanying reports of the librarian and the treasurer, 
showing in detail its condition, management, and financial situa- 
tion. 

The very extensive circulation of books, and the very large num- 
ber of people who continue to avail themselves of the advantages of 
the reading-room and of the reference department, furnish the 
clearest indication of the favor with which the institution is 
regarded. 

The action of the legislature of 1891 in the passage of an "Act 
to promote the establishment and efficiency of free public libra- 
ries," and the large number of towns that have taken advantage of 
the legislative provisions in that respect, as well as that manifest 
popularity of our own library, clearly establish the fact that such 
institutions are not merely luxuries, but have become necessities 
hardly less essential to the moral and the literary culture of the 
peojile than the chiu'ch and the public schools. 

We believe that our library contains every variety of useful and 
entertaining literature. Hardly any department is unrepresented 
therein to some extent. 

As in every town and city, so here a large proportion of the read- 
ing public indulges in light literature, such as novels and stories. 
Imagination has not perished from the earth, and dull and heavy 
would society become if it ever should or could ; and, therefore, 
works of fancy continue to be in great demand. In this depart- 
ment we have endeavored to include only wholesome and harmless 
books, and we trust our endeavor has not been unsuccessful. 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

But the tastes and habits o£ life, and of study of all classes o£ 
men, women, and children, have been regarded in our selections. 

Popular works, relating to the arts and sciences, mechanics, archi- 
tecture, commerce, trade and manufactures, books of travels, ancient 
and modern history, biography, poetry, philosophy, politics, and 
religion, will be found upon our shelves ; and therefore business 
men and professional men, farmers, mechanics, artisans, teachers, 
and men and women of leisure may confidently resort to the library 
with assurance of profit, education, and recreation. 

The inevitable expenses of the institution (which we have endeav- 
ored to restrict as much as possible) leave but a small margin of 
funds for the purchase of books ; and while we are grateful for your 
generosity in the past, we urgently ask that as large appropriations 
for the future may be made as are consistent with other municipal 
necessities. 

The trustees, in behalf of the public, thankfully acknowledge the 
receipt from Mr. William P. and Miss Clara M. Fowler of excel- 
lent portraits of their father and mother, in memory of whom their 
munificent gift of the library building was made. 

The zeal, industry, and efficiency of our librarian and his assist- 
ants continue to merit the highest commendation. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, Ward 1. 

JOSEPH T. CLOUGH, " 2. 

PAUL R. HOLDEN, " 3. 

WILLIAM L. FOSTER, " 4. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, " 5. 

JAMES S. NORRIS, " 6. 

WILLIAM W. FLINT, " 7. 

Concord, January, 1893. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



191 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 



To the Board of Trustees : 

The library has been open every working day during the past 
year, and the number of books deHvered to its patrons each day and 
week during that time has been as follows : 

CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 

From January 1 to June 30, both dates inclusive. 









Mon. 


Tues. 


Wed. 


Tliur. 


Fri. 


Sat. 


Days. 


Total. 


Jan. 1 to Jan. 2, inclusive 










282 


463 


2 


745 


AVeek ending Jan. 9, 


278 


273 


115 


191 


314 


552 


6 


1723 




' ' 


" 16, 


241 


228 


124 


166 


141 


794 


6 


1694 




( (■ 


' " 23, 


195 


285 


230 


193 


248 


656 


6 


1807 




i i 


" 30, 


223 


239 


146 


196 


261 


720 


6 


1785 




i i 


' Feb. 6, 


216 


326 


174 


189 


308 


645 


6 


1858 




I i 


" 13, 


218 


325 


212 


102 


375 


643 


6 


1875 




I I 


" 20, 


253 


329 


173 


210 


340 


628 


6 


1933 




I i 


' " 27, 


124 


444 


227 


171 


319 


744 


6 


2029 




( I 


' Mar. 5, 


262 


370 


175 


134 


436 


658 


6 


2035 




t i 


" 12, 


263 


224 


336 


195 


215 


810 


6 


2043 




( ( 


" 19, 


261 


427 


259 


210 


169 


734 


6 


2060 




( ( 


" 2G, 


325 


429 


148 


285 


339 


646 


6 


2172 




' 


' Apr. 2, 


269 


341 


225 


217 


287 


664 


6 


2003 




i i 


' " 9, 


227 


266 


196 


37 


307 


667 


6 


1700 




i' I 


" 16, 


221 


323 


186 


177 


261 


550 


6 


1718 




i 1 


" 23, 


201 


279 


161 


115 


261 


623 


6 


1640 




(( i 


" 30, 


189 


286 


138 


127 


317 


163 


6 


1220 




i (, 


' May 7, 


226 


289 


235 


191 


262 


634 


6 


1837 




i i 


' " ^ 14, 


183 


299 


107 


204 


278 


517 


6 


1588 




i i 


' " 21, 


214 


279 


171 


168 


158 


501 


6 


1491 




i 1, 


" 28, 


285 


288 


178 


173 


257 


577 


6 


1758 




i i 


' June 4, 


20 


288 


149 


130 


286 


569 


6 


1442 




n t 


' " 11, 


163 


215 


137 


149 


280 


504 


6 


1448 




( t 


' " 18, 


102 


175 


178 


139 


213 


599 


6 


1406 




i ( 


" 25, 


136 


202 


170 


139 


237 


500 


6 


1384 


4( 


lays end 


ing June 30, 


163 


229 


114 


154 






4 


660 



5,458 7,658 4,664 4,362 7,151 15,761 156 45,054 



192 CITY OF CONCORD. 





From July 1 to December 31, both dates inclnsive. 












Mon. 


Tues. 


Wed. 


Thur. 


Fri. 


Sat. Days. 


Total. 


July 1 to July 2, inclusive 


> 








305 


446 


2 


751 


Week 


ending 


July 9, 


26 


262 


180 


153 


299 


477 


6 


1397 


a 


(f 


" 16, 


173 


207 


134 


162 


236 


536 


6 


1448 


a 


u 


" 23, 


162 


257 


185 


152 


226 


462 


6 


1444 


(( 


(( 


" 80, 


124 


227 


160 


108 


207 


458 


6 


1279 


(( 


u 


Aug. 6, 


176 


219 


138 


126 


235 


288 


6 


1177 


(( 


a 


" 18, 


208 


215 


126 


113 


181 


424 


6 


1267 


(f 


a 


" 20, 


200. 


241 


139 


116 


251 


320 


6 


1267 


It 


a 


" 27, 


207 


248 


177 


76 


231 


315 


6 


1254 


(1 


a 


Sept. 3, 


191 


277 


172 


195 


213 


459 


6 


1507 


a 


a 


" 10, 


7 


326 


156 


165 


258 


472 


6 


1884 


« 


a 


" 17, 


123 


235 


69 


142 


263 


517 


6 


1349 


(( 


li 


" 24, 


171 


232 


136 


161 


245 


473 


6 


1418 


« 


ii 


Oct. 1, 


188 


224 


168 


166 


254 


547 


6 


1542 


li 


it 


" 8, 


123 


232 


152 


137 


228 


536 


6 


1408 


(I 


u 


" 15, 


166 


257 


165 


103 


202 


554 


6 


1447 


« 


(( 


" 22, 


157 


235 


172 


168 


20 


711 


6 


1458 


(I 


(( 


" 29, 


200 


239 


102 


158 


244 


517 


6 


1460 


a 


u 


Nov. 5, 


200 


277 


87 


142 


217 


564 


6 


1487 


a 


a 


" 12, 


240 


28 


359 


98 


298 


582 


6 


1600 


a 


a 


" 19, 


146 


197 


152 


219 


218 


593 


6 


1525 


a 


li 


" 26, 


196 


225 


256 


17 


311 


603 


6 


1608 


u 


a 


Dec. 3, 


179 


294 


114 


174 


279 


590 


6 


1630 


(( 


a 


" 10, 


206 


301 


161 


103 


304 


605 


6 


1680 


(( 


a 


" 17, 


183 


259 


121 


184 


251 


584 


6 


1582 


i( 


a 


" 24, 


157 


248 


171 


114 


236 


232 


6 


1158 


a 


a 


" 31, 


15 


364 


252 


167 


300 


540 


6 


1638 



4,124 6,826 4,194 3,609 6,512 13,400 158 88,165 
Summary, 1892. 

Mon. Tues. Wetl. Tliur. Fri. Sat. Days. Total. 
Jan. 1 to June 30, inc., 5458 7658 4664 4862 7151 15761 156 45054 
July 1 to Dec. 81, inc., 4124 6826 4194 3609 6512 13400 158 38165 



9,582 13,984 8,858 7,971 13,668 29,161 314 88,219 
Summary, 1891. 

Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Days. Total. 
Jan. 1 to June 30, inc., 5843 8587 5448 4607 7832 17177 155 49494 
JulyltoDec.31,inc , 4896 6870 4920 8988 6368 12602 158 89639 



10,739 15,457 10,368 8,590 14,200 29,779 313 89,133 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 193 

Eight tliousand eight hundred and sixty-one of the hooks given 
out have been sent to Penacook in the care of Mr. N. S. Gale. 
These hooks are exchanged on Tuesday and Friday of each week. 

The reading-room, furnished with newspapers and magazines for 
all classes of its patrons, has been open every day during the year, 
and is well patronized. 

Eight hundred books have been purchased during the year ; 79 
books and 162 pamphlets, including reports of government officers, 
maps illustrating the official records of the Civil War, and magazines 
have been received as donations ; also catalog-ues and reports have 
been received in exchange with other libraries. 

We have again been kindly remembered by Mr. William P. 
Fowler and Miss Clara M. Fowler in the presentation of fine por- 
traits of their parents, Hon. Asa Fowler and Mrs. Mary C. K. 
Fowler. 

The library now contains 18,500 volumes ; — of these, 11,500 vol- 
umes are books for circulation ; 2,000 volumes, including books for 
reference, local history, and biography, are included in the reference 
library, and the balance, made up largely of government publica- 
tions, are seldom, most of them never, called for, which take up a 
large amount of room on the shelves in the upper book-room and 
balcony. A room should be finished and furnished in the base- 
ment for their storage, and provision made for its warming and 
lighting when necessary. This or some other provision for their 
keeping must be made soon, as the shelves in the lower book-room 
are already crowded with books of the circulating library, and the 
shelves in the upper book-room and balcony are needed for the 
proper accommodation of additional books for the circulating and 
reference departments. 

Respectfully submitted : 

D. F. SECOMB, 

Librarian. 

January 2, 1893. 



194 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



To the City Council : 

The balance in the hands of the treasurer, January 1, 1892, was 
$367, to which has been added the city appropriation of $6,000, 
and receij)ts from the library amounting to $43.73, making a total 
of $6,410.73 as available funds for the purposes of the library. 

Of this sum $6,000 has bean expended as per itemized account 
in the expenses of the city, and $310.62 from the funds on hand, 
leavingf a balance in the hands of the treasurer of $100.11. 



BALANCE SHEET. 






Dr. 






Cash on hand January 1, 1892, 
Received from city, . . . . . 
" sale of catalogues, etc., 


$367.00 

6,000.00 

43.73 


$6,410.73 






Cr. 






Paid as per itemized account, 

" Republican Press Association, . 
Cash on hand, ...... 


$6,000.00 
310.62 
100.11 


$6,410.73 






TRUST ACCOUNT. 






Dr. 






Cash on hand, ...... 

Received from Lyon fund, 
" Pierce fund. 


$102.50 
60.00 
41.25 


$203.75 






Cr. 






By paid for books, . . . . . 


. , 


$203.75 



Respectfully submitted : 



WILLIAM P. FISKE, 

Treasurer. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

To the City Council : 

The board of health are able to again report that the past year 
has been one of improvement in sanitary matters in our city. The 
cooperation of citizens, — property owners and tenants, — in the work 
of the board and its executive officer, has been as hearty as in the 
recent previous years, which have witnessed gratifying progress 
toward the goal of the best possible sanitary conditions for a city 
which is higlJy favored by location, inhabited by enterprising, intel- 
ligent people, and which ranks among the healthiest, as well as 
most beautiful, of the smaller municipalities of the country. 

THE HEALTH OFFICER. 

The board learned with regret of the desire of their executive 
officer, Henry A. Rowell, who had faithfully, impartially, and intel- 
ligently performed his duties, to engage in a different occupation. 
His successor, Charles E. Palmer, quickly mastered the responsibil- 
ities and requirements of the position, and the board can truthfiilly 
say that their work has in no respect suffered on account of the 
necessity that an experienced officer should give place to one who 
must for a time labor under the disadvantage of being new to the 
position. Mr. Palmer has worked in season and out of season in 
the performance of his duties, and has exhibited at all times excel- 
lent judgment and a true appreciation of the responsibilities of the 
work in which he is engaged. Under his supervision there can be 
no backward steps in our city's sanitary management. Attention 
is called to his report printed elsewhere, which bears its own wit- 
ness to his industry and attention to duty. 



U)8 CITY OF CONCORD. 



PRECAUTIONS AGAINST CHOLERA. 



The prevalence o£ cholera in New York city and elsewhere led 
the board to take precautionary steps in anticipation of possible 
danger, and upon their recommendation an appropriation was made 
for the purpose of putting the city pest-house near the camp-ground 
in condition for the reception of patients in the event that it should 
be needed. The appropriation was judiciously expended under the 
direction of Health Officer Palmer, and by vote of the city council 
the house is now under the supervision of the board of health. 

CONTAGION. 

Our citizens have shown a most gratifying interest the past year 
in the effoi'ts of the board to limit the spread of contagious diseases. 
The advantage to the community of our card of warning posted on 
an infected house meets with more recognition than ever before. 
Too much care cannot be exercised by the adults of the household 
lest they carry contagion as they go about our streets and public 
places. Books can well serve as a medium for conveying the 
poisonous little scales of skin that rattle off a scarlet-fever case, and 
hence all teachers should see that no schoolbooks are carried to the 
school room from an infected house. It is also a question if books 
should be allowed to be taken from the public library by members 
of such a household. In any contagious disease the future safety 
of the neighborhood depends much on the thoroughness of the fumi- 
gation after convalescence has taken place. Many cases come to 
the knowledge of the board where the work, through ignorance or 
want of skill, has been most inefficiently performed, and often 
because of the fancied security given it is worse than useless. In 
all instances where the family desire it the health officer will be 
pleased to attend to the details of the fumigation at no expense to 
them other than the cost of the materials used, which at most is but 
a trivial outlay. The board trust the public will fully avail them- 
selves of the health officer's services. 

PLUMBING INSPECTION. 

The time has come when the board feel that they but voice the 
sentiments and wishes of our most thoughtful citizens in asking that 
the plumbing of the city be done subject to the approval of a com- 
petent inspector. The health of a tenant's family should not be put 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 199 

in jeopardy by the penuriousness of his landlord in contracting for 
only second-class work, and the householder should be protected 
against his own cupidity and ignorance in putting fixtures into his 
house that can but prove a source of continued expense and of sick- 
ness, not only to himself, but perhaps a plague-spot to the whole 
section of the city. The board feel that laws should be passed 
defining the size and material of soil-pipes and how they shoidd be 
ventilated ; the location of water-closets, and how supplied, trapped, 
and ventilated ; the ventilation and connection of sinks, bowls, and 
bath tubs to tlie soil-pipe. All new work should be tested by hav- 
ing all openings plugged and the whole system filled with water to 
where the soil pipe leaves the roof, or in some other satisfactory 
way, in order to have positive proof that there is no improjjerly 
constructed joint or cracked pipe through which may come in the 
future the death-dealing sewer-gas, to strike down our loved ones. 
It is certainly within the bounds of truth to say that to-day seventy- 
five per cent, of the plumbing of Concord will not stand a proper 
test of safety. The death of a man earning $600 per year is a 
direct loss to the city of $10,000 capital ; six jjer cent, on $10,000 
is $600. The death of ten such men would be as great a loss as if 
$100,000 had been transferred from our midst to some more fortu- 
nate city. From a financial standpoint, to say nothing of a human- 
itarian one, we cannot afford to continue our present negligent way 
of ignoi'ing this all-important subject. The board would, therefore, 
most respectfully urge upon the city council the necessity of an 
early and thorough consideration of this question of the appoint- 
ment of a competent inspector of plumbing, and the enactment of 
ordinances similar to those in force in many progressive cities. 

LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Much complaint and trouble in the past have arisen from the fact 
that competent employers have allowed utterly incompetent men 
to lay drain-pipes and make connections with the sewers. This 
work should under no circumstances be done except by men of 
experience, and it is the opinion of the board that licenses should 
be granted only to competent workmen ; that no work should be 
done except by such men, and that the safety of the health of our 
citizens demands that this law be most strictly enforced. 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

While organic matter must not be allowed to accumulate and 
decay around our dwellings, the plumbing and drainage must be 
made perfect, and every possible contamination of food and drink 
must be guarded against. A pure water-supply is of first import- 
ance in warding off preventable disease. It has been shown from 
analyses by eminent authorities that the water of Penacook lake is 
good, and yet it could be made better, and it is one of the hopeful 
characteristics of our city, that it will never be long satisfied with 
anything less than the best. Every effort that is practicable in tliis 
direction should enlist the aid and sympathy of all. In several 
cities experiments ai^e being made for the inirification of the water 
on a large scale before it enters the mains. Some of them have 
demonstrated the possibility of a removal of from seventy-five to 
ninety per cent, of the living organisms. This is a matter which 
should receive thorough investigation. 

DISEASES OF INFANCY. 

An inspection of the mortality statistics of cities shows that a 
large j^roportion of all deaths — from ten to thirty per cent. — are 
among children under one year of age, largely from cholera 
infantum. Concord still maintains a creditable position in this 
respect ; her death-rate, much below that of most cities, comjjares 
very favorably with her sister cities in New Hampshire, as will be 
seen by the following table from Report of State Board of Health 
for 1891 : 

CHOLERA INFANTUM, BY CITIES. 



Manchester, 131 112 88 122 148 117 86 146 



Dover, 


7 


10 


15 


15 


13 


19 


5 


12 


Nashua, 


15 


14 


13 


30 


20 


39 


43 


56 


Portsmouth, 


4 


3 


9 


6 


4 


9 


9 


8 


Concord, 


9 


12 


5 


7 


8 


11 


13 


8 


Keene, 


9 


6 


2 


7 


5 


2 


8 


5 



Consumption causes more deaths than any other disease, and yet 
statistics show that Concord is a favored city for consumptives. 
Table from Report of State Board of Health for 1891 : 



sanitary department. 201 

Percentage of Deaths feom Consumption to the Total Moetal- 
iTY OF the Cities of the State for the Years 1883 to 1890, 
Inclusive. 



Manchester, 


14.89 


14.28 


13.03 


15.01 


11.1.5 


12.37 


9.30 


10.29 


Concord, 


11.41 


8.66 


10.68 


8.60 


10.13 


10.23 


9.81 


9.13 


Nashua, 


16.96 


13.72 


14.86 


10.49 


9.73 


8.20 


8.64 


10.69 


Dover, 


20.97 


16.60 


16.17 


21.17 


14.57 


12.01 


10.31 


16.40 


Portsmouth, 


16.02 


14.74 


12.18 


17.84 


16.26 


13.26 


7.73 


14.34 


Keene, 


16.91 


16.00 


22.80 


16.00 


11.90 


9.47 


9.62 


10.25 



We have suffered from no general epidemic except la grippe, and 
Concord adds another year to her enviable record as a healthy city. 

E. A. CLARK, M. D., 
C. R. WALKER, M. D., 
E. N. PEARSON, 

Board of Health. 



202 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE HEALTH OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health : 

Gentlemen : In accordance with the usual custom, I have the 
honor to submit the following report of the sanitary work for the 
year ending- Dec. 31, 1892 : 

RESIGNATION OF HENRY A. ROWELL. 

Henry A. Rowell, who had served the board and the public as a 
very efficient health officer since 1889, resigned June 25, 1892, and 
much of the work that has been accomplished by this department 
is due to his diligent and faithful labor in laying out the plans. 

His services in behalf of improvement in the condition of the 
city have been very vahiable, and in accepting the position to carry 
on the work I have looked to him for counsel, which has always 
been kindly given. 

The report and accompanying tables give a detailed statement of 
the nuisances found and the orders issued for their abatement. 



Accumulation of decayed fruit, vegetable matter, and 

old papers in rear of store, .... 

Accumulation of tin cans and coal ashes in back 



13 



yards, . . . . 








29 


Bad well water, 








5 


Bad sink drainage, . 








24 


Broken sewer traps. 








13 


Catch basins not trapped. 








24 


Dead animals. 








12 


Decayed meat and fish, . 








8 


Defect in house sewers, . 








5 


Dimiping rubbish, . 








15 


Damp cellars. 








. 15 


Dropping manure in street, 








. 5 


Filthy stables, 








. 12 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



203 



Filthy cellars, 

Filthy swill barrels, .... 

Filthy back-yards, ..... 

Filthy alley-ways, ..... 

Filthy bedding for horses in alley-ways, . 

Foul and offensive cesspools, . 

Keeping hogs and pigs, .... 

Keejnng hens, ..... 

Night soil not properly covered. 

Nuisances in hall-ways, . . . .• 

Offensive manure heaps, .... 

Offensive cow yards, .... 

Offensive privies and vaults. 

Offensive catch-basins on street. 

Open sewers under dwellings, . 

Privy-vaults full, and owner notified to r 

contents, ...... 

Stoppages in house sewers. 

Sinks found without traps, 

Stagnant water in stable cellars, 

Stagnant water on lots in rear of dwelling 

ordered fiUed, ..... 
Street sewers obstructed, 
Throwing swill in alley-ways, . 
Tlu'owing swill in ash barrels in business blocks 
Throwing coal ashes into the street. 
Throwing slops from meat markets into catch 
Throwing slops into street. 
Water-closets without sufficient watei'-supply. 
Water-closets not ventilated. 
Water-closets foul and offensive, 
Water-closets without water-supply. 
Water in cellars, ..... 
Water-closets out of repair, 

Total, ...... 



and 



basins 



5 
12 

7 
8 
2 

20 

19 

10 

2 

7 

16 

3 

138 

26 

3 

73 
13 
20 



4 

4 

11 

2 

18 

4 

3 

12 

11 

37 

8 

15 



709 



The above complaints have been carefully investigated, and a dis- 
position to conform to the requirements of the health ordinances 
and general statutes of New Hampshire has been manifest. 



204 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



In nearly all instances the complainant has had good reason for 
so doing. 

The following table shows the total number of coni])laints each 
year since 1880 : 



Total number of 


complaints 


in 1880, 






17 


it it. 




1881, 






17 


a (( 




1882, 






12 


u u 




1883, 






14 


u« a 




1884, 






17 


u u 




1885, 






39 


u u 




1886, 






28 


a ii 




1887, 






176 


a a 




1888, 






109 


a u 




1889, 






383 


u u 




1890, 






516 


u u 




1891, 






622 


a u 




1892, 






709 



SANITARY INSPECTION. 

House inspection has been continued where it appeared the most 
improvement could be made in the sanitary condition of the prem- 
ises, while streets, alley-ways, and back-yards have been attended to. 

During the year inspections have been made as follows : 

143 private dwellings, 
328 tenements, 

4 boarding-houses, 
38 stables, 

5 meat markets, 

13 store cellars, 
2 hotels, 

11 business blocks, 
2 manufactory shops, 

14 schoolhouses, 
13 alleys, 

47 back-yards, 

2 slaughter-houses, 

— making a total of 622. 

Second inspections have been made in 179 cases. Third, fourth, 



SANITARY DEPAUTMENT. 205 

and even fifth inspections have been required at times to deter- 
mine whether the orders of the health officer had been carried out. 
There have been mailed 604 formal notices, embodying sugges- 
tions of the following natvire : 

116 for abatement of nuisances, 
97 for cleaning vaults and privies, 

8 for closets without water-supply, 
68 for connecting with the sewer, 
10 for removal of hens, 

67 for removing old privies. 

26 for removal of hogs, 

89 for obstructed sewers, street and private, 

25 for removal of offal, 

2 for unburied dead horses, 

9 for unburied dead cats and dogs, 

31 for thi'owing out coal ashes and tin cans, 
56 for providing water-closets. 

In 146 cases, vaults and old privies bave been removed and 
closets substituted. 

Eighty-five additional ones have been placed in houses built dur- 
ing the year, viz. : 

76 private dwellings, 

138 tenement houses, 

5 business blocks, 

5 public institutions, 

4 boarding-houses, 

1 manufactory shop, 

1 market, 

1 barber shop. 
Total 231. 

CLEANING PRIVY VAULTS. 

The present method of removing the contents from these recep- 
tacles is an open cart, ofttimes leaky and unsuitable, making 
doubly offensive the odor which pollutes the air through every sec- 
tion where such vehicle may be driven, and I would recommend 
that suitable persons be regularly licensed by the health board, and 
a list of charges prescribed. 



206 



CITY OF CO^X'ORD. 



If such arrangements could be made the result would un- 
doubtedly be beneficial, as by restricting the number of licenses 
the parties who engaged in the business woidd be enabled to pro- 
cure suitable conveniences for carrying on the work. 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

Physicians have reported the various cases to this office by 
months as follows : 

Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

Scarlet-fever, 50001410 

Typhoid fever, 00000001 

Diphtheria, 00004021 

Measles, 01001000 



2 2 13 7 

3 2 2 
3 4 




Patients having been distributed by wards, thus : 



Ward 1, 

" 2, 

" 3, 

" 4, 

" 5, 

" 6, 

" 7, 

Total, 



Scarlet-Fever. 





4 
16 

3 

3 
11 

37 



Typhoid Fever. 




5 
1 
1 




Diphtheria. 



1 


7 
1 

4 

13 



Measles 




2 






Total. 

1 

4 

30 

5 

4 

15 

59 



Of the above, only seven proved fatal, viz., — typhoid, 1 ; scarlet- 
fever, 3 ; diphtheria, 3. 

SCARLET-FEVER, 

although much more prevalent than in 1891, fortunately has 
been of a mild type, so that there was no increase of mortality. 
Investigations of the cases reported were carefully made ; isolation 
of those attacked has been required. Houses where scarlet fever 
and diphtheria existed have been placarded, children exposed were 
excluded from the schools, and teachers where such pupils attended 
have been notified. The health officer has disinfected, or caused to 
be done so, every house, at the termination of the illness, such 
fumigation being accomplished by burning sulphur in tightly closed 
rooms with the presence of moistiu'e. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 207 

Monthly statements have been forwarded the secretary of the 
state hoard of heaUh, giving the number of contagious diseases 
reported, those known to have proved fatal, number of infected 
houses, and names of physicians reporting, together with what 
action was taken in each case by the health officer. 

PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES. 

In view of the widespread prevalence of cholera at the present 
time in Europe and Asia, and the imminent danger of its obtaining 
an alarming foothold in this country, and possibly in the state, I 
have distributed three thousand circulars, furnished by the state 
board, embodying suggestions for the prevention and restriction of 
cholera and other contagious diseases. 

CITY PEST-HOUSE. 

By instructions from the board of health, and in accordance with 
a vote passed by the city government in September last, appropri- 
ating two hundred dollars for repairs on said building, and placing 
the same under the control of the board of health, the house has 
been vacated, shingled, plastered, underpinned, and painted inside. 
A new shed has been built, so that now we have a very comfortable 
place of retreat, of four rooms, which can be in readiness for occu- 
pancy at short notice. 

SEWER CONNECTIONS. 

In compliance with the city ordinance, the health officer has 
endeavored to perform his duty in regard to the enforcement of 
the rules and regulations relating to sewers and drains. In all 
cases, so far as known, he has been notified in season to personally 
see the work completed. 

Of the one hundred and twenty-six private sewer connections 
made, a complete record has been filed, giving date, location of 
inlet, location of trap inside or out of house, size and kind of pipe 
used, rate of fall per foot, total length of pipe, and name of 
licensed drain-layer doing the work. Akron and cast-iron material 
have been used in all instances, and a statement of the various 
sizes follows : 

534 feet 8-inch Akron pipe, 
1,747 feet 6-inch Akron pipe, 



208 CITY OF CONCORD. 

7,138 feet 5-inch Akron pipe, 

138 feet 4-incli Akron pipe, 

448 feet 5-inch iron pipe, 

75 feet 4-inch iron pipe, 
— making a total of ten thousand and eighty feet or an average of 
eighty feet for each lateral sewer laid. 

This amount of drainage has been furnished for 

50 private dwellings, 
65 tenements, 

1 boarding-house, 

5 public institutions. 

5 business blocks. 

During the year there have been abandoned and discontinued by 
order of board, 

45 cesspools, 

32 surface drains, 

2 old stone drains, 
1 stable drain, 

3 drains discharging into pond, 

and seven sewers relaid with larger pipe for the purpose of con- 
necting water-closets. 

SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Additions to this system being extended to various sections of 
the city, and the large number who have availed themselves of con- 
necting therewith, shows very conclusively that they are duly 
appreciated. 

Bradley street sewer, which in time past had given much trouble 
by being overgrown with roots, was taken up and relaid early in 
the spring, thus affording better facilities in that locality. 

A new sewer has been laid in Granite avenue, providing accom- 
modations for seven houses, all of which have been connected, also 
one on Dakin street, which provides for eight houses, and a large 
number of house lots, five of which have been connected. 

One on North State street, near the prison, provides for four 
houses, and two have connected with same. 

That in Beacon sti*eet has an extension nearly to White street, 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



209 



and provides for five dwellings. Three of these are connected, and 
on Morton street the extension makes provision for three houses, 
all of which are connected. 

The Highland street extension provides for five residences, while 
that on Holt and School streets has provision for ten, eight of 
which have been connected. 

A system of sewerage has been established at West Concord, and 
will be carried on until all parts of the village have the benefit of a 
complete sewerage arrangement. 

The school house and fourteen dwellings have availed themselves 
of this opportunity for better drainage. Further improvements 
may be expected during the coming year. 

Monthly statements have been prepared from returns made to 
the city registrar, giving information as to the number and causes 
of deaths, death rate per thousand, locality, sex, color, condition, 
age, and place of burial, also the number of marriages and births. 

These statistics have been furnished to the daily papers and sent 
in exchange to the following cities : 



Auburn, N. Y., 
Atlanta, Ga., 
Aurora, 111., 
Butte City, Mont., 
Boston, Mass., 
Burlington, Vt., 
Binghamton, N. Y., 
Brockton, Mass., 
Columbus, Ohio, 
Cleveland, Ohio, 
Davenport, la., 
Des Moines, la., 
Denver, Col., 
Evansville, Ind., 
Fall River, Mass., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Galveston, Texas, 
Hartford, Conn., 
Keokuk, la., 
Knoxfield, Tenn., 
Kansas City, Mo., 



Lynn, Mass., 
Louisville, Ky., 

Lowell, Mass., 
Los Angeles, Cal., 
Manchester, N. H., 
Milwaukee, Wis., 
Mobile, Ala., 
Mansfield, Ohio, 
Newport, R. I., 
New Haven, Conn., 
Nashville, Tenn., 
Newton, Mass., 
New York city, 
Oakland, Cal., 
Portland, Me., 
Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Pasadena, Cal., 
Pensacola, Fla., 
Rochester, N. Y., 
Reading, Pa., 
Springfield, Mass., 



210 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Savannah, Ga., 

St. Paul, Minn., 

San Antonio, Tex., 

State Board of Health, laboratory 

for water analysis, Boston, 

Mass., 
San Diego, Cal., 
Salt Lake City, Utah, 
St. Louis, Mo., 
Sioixx City, la.. 



Surgeon-general's office, 

Washington, D. C, 
Spokane, Wash., 
Toledo, Ohio, 
Tacoma, Wash., 
Utica, N. Y., 
Washington, D. C, 
Wilmington, Del., 
Yonkers, N. Y., 
Dover, N. H. 



Respectfully submitted : 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Health Officer, 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 211 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the City Council : 

The City Physician presents herewith his fourth annual report : 

Whole number of visits, ..... 36 

Consultations at office, ..... 2 

Confinements attended, ..... 1 

The duties of the past year have been unusually light. 
Respectfully submitted : 

E. A. CLARK, M. D., 

City Physician. 



212 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



00 



CO 

u 
V 

e 

o 
Q 

C 

G 
(U 

>^ 

u 
o 



1-4 

o 
a 

0^ 



o 



i 

<5 


•UMOn^IUQ 














•08 JaAQ 




: - ^ ; : : ; : 


'^ i ^ ; ; ! • : 


•OSOiOi 


'- - ^ 


M -H ■ rH • .-i C-1 


: : ^ ^ : : : 


■Oi o; 09 






.* '• • . C^ • —1 


^ - : 


ea • 


'09 oj OS 
"05 04 0^ 


- 




• r-l IN • • • ; 


rH 1 CO 1 


^ : : 


CO 








i ^ : 


: " - 


•Of' o» 08 










^ -H : 




■08 01 OS 














•02 OJ 91 














•ST 0% 01 














•01 01 Q 














•S o; I 












: '^ : 


•T Japan 






; i CO * i : 




; . i CO • • * 


5 

s 

o 


lIAlOU>(lIfl 












•Sa[BU13^il 


: ^ : 


CO • rH • i-H • CJ 


• i^ -co '• CO ■* 


■seium 


m ; — — 1 ci : w : s^ : '^ 


• IM rH T)< j j -H 


•S[BJOX 


lCr-lr-li-l<M -T}! -CO -lO 


• C5 T-H L^ ^ CO "O 


33 
< 
Q 

o 
a 

o 

■< 


< < 


Anaemia ... 

Apoplexy 

Apoplexy 

Asphyxia 

Asthma 


<4. 

c 
c 

c 
1 


Brain, disease of 

Brain, disease of 

l?rain, soltening of 

Rrnnoliitis. 


Bronchitis 

Burns and scalds 

Cancer 


o 


•(I.ttOU^Ufl 






::::::- 




•j^qiusoaa 










Cd Tj( . rt J - j 


•jaqnidAOx 


: " : 


^ : : : : : 




: ^ : 


-^ : : 


•aaqojoo 


■* 




^ : : : : : 








•jaquia^dag 






IM rH '■ j j • 




■ IM • 




•jsnSnv 






-::::: 






: : - 


•Anf 
aunp 






:--:::: ^ - :: : 








• ; ; ; i-i • 


- : : : 




■Xt3i\[ 




- 


:;-::: 




: : -^ 


^ ^ : 


ludv 


-- 


: ^ ; : -" i i " ^ 




rH 


•qo.iTJJvr 


-!— . 




•":::: 




:::-'::: 


•j£jBnjq3J 




: : ^ -" -^ : 




' ; ; IM ' i-l j 


•Xj^nuBf 






™ : : : ! : : 






^ • : 




■xas 


S fa 


s s 


S fa S fa S fa S 


fa 


S fa 3 S 


fa fa S 



MORTALITY TABLES. 



213 

























































































: - 




- 












,H ^ ; 




rH Cq rH 






— • 


■^ : 




(N : rH — 


(M rH 




- 


- 


— <M 1 












-^ 








r. ^ 




: ^ : 






- - : 










-^ 












- : 














>-l O tH j 
































; rl 






lO >o " 


- 


~ 


— 


— 


— 




















CO ; 










IM 




















^ : 










































i -H 








































- rH ; 


































rH M 


-- : ^ ^ 














^ 
















C2 CO 


OS ; rH 


CO 










rH ^ 
























: -^ 
















. IM 


^ : - 


rH --1 


:^ ^ 


12 i 




on rH 


• rH ; 1^ 






• : -" 


-H : ^ • : i^" 


• 00 


^ 


j CO — 


• • " 


^ 


. rH ■* 


• C-l <^ 


: - ^ « : - 53 


: '^ « 


iQ 


CO CO 


rH Cq 


CO 


rH -<H 


■ o = 


i 1 


2 1 i 

5 O "C 


I i 


' o t 


: c 


i £ 

5 c 


J c 

2 £ 


! 

! - 

: £ 


r £ 


L 1 J 




3 t 


^ ' 


^ ' 




1 ? 


1 J 


: i 






3 
I 



C:)OOt»C:>WCJC?"r^r^f-HV3fi>'> 

caaccapH^oooBcacs 

c(:Jc3:3c4c3030S.S.S.a.SOOOO 



ii S S <u 



QQQQQQQQ 





















- 


-• 






: -^ : : : : : : 




• 01 rH 




-- 






rH : j j 1 1 j I ,H (M ■ 


1 CO M 














-^ 




• CO cq 


- 


- 


-■ - 


- • 


■: \ \ 








^•■•••N-*-rHrH 






rnjjj.j.jjoOrHrHJ-H 


:---::: 




-' 




;;:::;;:--:"-- 








-^ 


'■ 








• — ' cq 












- 
















: ': : -^ -^ 


-- 




- : : : - -^ : : 




i : ^ 








. : : rH . 














! ; CO rH 


: ^ : 




■■'"'; 














.— 


- '• 7-1 


t-l 


.... 2 














CO • ; I I ; ; : : 


- 


: - 







































•^ A ^ 



&4§&Hg?=,fag&^fegc=.gtMSs&^i^SfeSfeSa 



214 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MO 

6 



u 
O 

a 



rt 



60 

< 


•UMOnJinfi 














: • : 




•08 J8A0 










: : - 




■'::■. ^ 


Cl 


08 0% oi 




• ^ • • 


: " : • 




: : ; ; ^ ^ 


'J' 


•Oi o:> 09 




: -^ : : 




: : - • 


• l-H • j l-H t~ 


•09 0) OS 












•":::::: 


S-1 


09 0% Of 






: " • 








::;-:: 


- 


W 01 OS 














^ t-t - • - 




08 oj OS 






: : - 


. -H : ,-, 






iq 


OS oj SI 


















•Siojoi 


















01 o»S 










i-H . 






: -- 


■5 0^1 










• CT 






■[ japufi 






" : 






:---::::: 




V 

s 

o 


aM.0U5taxi 
















■sa[KHiaj[ 
•seiBK 




cq : ; 


ri ■ -* 


- (N ■ -1-1 • (N • iH ■ 






■ IM i-H 


: ^ : ^ ^ 


• i-H i-H : <M ; '"' : "^ 


•[Bjox 


i-i 


IM rt iM 


lO ■ l-H CO 


1-1 W ■ ^ • 1-1 iH OO 


< 

Q 
O 
a 

CO 


c 


a 
C 


M a ft 


£ 
1 


Enteritis 

Epilepsy 

Erysi| elas 

Fever, typhoid 

Fever, typlioid 

Fracture 

Gangrene 

Gastritis 

Heart disease 


c 
o 


■uMoujiaxi 
















•aeqmaoaQ 














: - : ^ ^ : 


cq 


■jaqiaaAOd 






-- i 




: ; ^ ^ 




!N 


■Joqo4oo 








- : : 








•jeqwajdag 










■ C-l 




- : : -^ : : 


C^l 


■jstiSny 




N 1-1 • 




: - 






- 


•jCinf 










^ w 


!'-::::::: 


ffj 


eunp 


-: 


-• 


~: — ; 












■AisK 


'- : : 




::-::: 


-^ 


•IF-tdr 




• " 










" 


•IIDJBH 












:--:::::;: 


<M 


•Xa^niqaj 














^ : : : : I rH ^ 


iJBnUBf 














: : . : ,_, rt : ^' 


■xas 


s 


fc 


s s s 


tn 


S fe S 


S fe 


g s :=; s fe s fe 


s 



MORTALITY TABLES. 



215 



























'.'.'.-. r^ ,-1 










iM • • • I . 






lO 


•^ '• ■ ; • 05 (N 




1-1 


1-1 1-1 


; 1 ; ; rH 






rH 


(» 1-1 r1 ■ j rH i-t 




i-H (M 




: -^ : : : -- : 




^ ; 




IN 1 «) 1 j j 
























: : -^ 






: : '^ 




: : : : : ^ 










: • : ^ " 








• rH • rH ! 






















'"' ■ ■ ; i '"' 


-^ 




: ^ 




























































j eq : : IM . : 






















• rH Cq rH ■* • • 












rH -J i-H N 








j 03 ei • e* : : 


























- 




<jj : ^ : ""I : "^^ 




^ : ^ ^ ^ 


00 • Oi IM 


03 






• n 


.-I • l^ 


- 


• CO 


• • t- • (N ^ OS • N 




: ro 


CO 


IM . -* 


i-H rH ; •* 


r-t r-i ta .' rH • lO • lO 




; rH 


S « a- 
$ 5 S 


) • : • 

a - J , 




C 

a 


: o c 

SO? 

3 1 1 


C 

c 


a 
o 

3 

a) 3 


IS 

is 

Bright's disease 






j 

i 

1 

1 





h r r a. 



be .- .2 .« 

^ t^ l^ u 



aa35:=5S»?^;-)^^-iass 



;25 » ?5 ;« 













-^ 






::::.-::^::'^;:: 


-• 






: 1 ; ; '. r^ '. '. : rH • ^ ■ • '. 


IM 


^ : 




'.'.'.'.'.'. —1 '. in '.'.'.. '. 


'^ 


^ : 




• •IIrHIM03---r'--r 










; ; ; ; j IM rH rH j rH . : . . j 


: -> 






■ '■■'■'.'- r^ r^ d '■'•'•'•'■ '• 








: • '^ 


: :::-::: l;;; : 






-- ^ : : : 


i-^::::::-:-:--:- 


'- 


rH • 




^OJ - '• - . -r- '■ •■•<N -rH 


!M 






'. '^ '. 


:!'-:::;:-;'-'-::: 


- 






-, ^ 


:::•••"■: ^ : : : : 


: ^ -, : 


• --o o • 


i:''"':'^:"::':::"* 













Si^S3(i(Sii<SHfeSic<SfcMSi<3tMS3 



216 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



^ 






o 
a 



cd 



i 


•uMoaiiaxi 
08 J9A0 
•08oiOi 
•Oi o; 09 


























W rH N 




(M CO j _ 












N 1 j .H j 


■*■*;: 












-H CO -H (M 


I- CJ I 












•09 0% OS 
•09 oj Ot 
■Of 0} 08 






CO OS • 


•* ■* 


: '- . 
















- 


f, : : 










- '. • 








- 




; ^ 




-■ 


: - : 


•08 o; OZ 

•OS 0? 9T 

•91 04 01 

01 o; 9 

•9 0^1 










CO l-H '■ 


. .«< 








; " 








I-H 


'" : : 


(M 






















iM ; 


-^ 




(N 












T-H rl j 




'^ 




rl • 




- 






-H rH 


: : -^ 








l japnn 










-^ : 


• CO <M ■ • 






! : '"' 


0) 

a 

O 


•nAvouj[un 


















•saiBnia^ 


O 


to 


" 


to j C» 1 ; 


(M : 1-1 ; "3 : 




>o 


05 


O • CO 


e^ o» i-i 


-* 


1-1 CO. 


SIBIO.I. 




IH 


O 


.-I • IC 


CJ 05 CO 


CI 


to • t- 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 


t 

C 


^ 'a 

5 0. 


I 1 

S a 

4 |1 


? c 

il 


> _c 

•1 


: c 
4 0- 


• 5 - 

a ■s = 

Ph Ph ^ 


! ■ a 

OI 
• 73 

i • •5 

I a £ 3 


3 » 


ti 

i =2 I 

5 2 s 

JOS 
2 t» 7 


Septicemia 

Septicaemia 

Stillborn 


c 
o 


•nAvouJiun 


r- 
















•jaqraaoaa 


, ^ ^ ^ 




(N • 




- 




: : -" 


•jeqraaAOK 




: ! - - 






• • cq 






'.'•'■ s-x 


•jaqo^oo 




. ^ ^ r^ 






• • N 








'Jdqmatdac; 


N • 








! : "^ 


• - 






•IsnSnv 




• - 


• N 










- 


:- : : : 






! "^' 














'• t-H ec. 


•annp 

•ifBK 


i-< t— ( 


: - 




tH 










'• iH C^ 


-- : 




I ,rt . I 


: - : 






: - : - - 


•[Udv 


,^ • lO 1-1 • 


: " : 








^ — (M N 


•qoJTJK 
•jfjBnjqa^il 


— — w • ■ pq iM • 


: : ^ 








■ : : -^ 


: : : ^ : - : : 


: : ^ 










•jCj^naBc 


■*• • 


H < 


j ^ c<i — (N w : .- -H 






: : : - 




•xas 


b 


- ? 


5 ►= 


■ & 


1 % 


' fc ?? & 


; ^ S S 


U 


, % 


^ 


S fe S 



MORTALITY TABLES. 



217 







































: ^ : 






^^ 






- ~ : 


— ; 


- 






- : 
































-■ 


























































•* 




^ '•. 
















^ - 


r-( (rq 


-' 




: -^ : : -^ 


! 




rH ,-1 ^ N ffq 




5 


c 
3 c7 




- 
;: 


O t 




) 












































- - 
















: : -- 




^ 


: -< 




■ 


-^ 






• : : -^ 


- 


















: ^ 


























: -^ : 














•: -^ 



































(£< f^ 



&H En fa S 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

OVERSEER OF THE POOR FOR THE YEAR 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1892. 

To the City Council : 

Gentlemen : The undersigned herewith submits the twenty- 
fifth annual report of expenditures for tlie poor, including 
Wards 1 and 2, for the year ending December 31, 1892, as 
follows : 

Families and individuals having a settlement in the city have 
been aided, in part or in full, during the time, to the amount set 
opposite their respective names. 



Lydia S. Couch, . 


$84.00 


Margaret Smith, . 


96.00 


David 0. Smith, . 


196.63 


Frank P. Chesley, 


17.15 


Peter Keenan, 


55.66 


Mrs. Wm. O'Neill, 


159.35 


Fid ward P. Farnum, 


34.61 


E. Sweatt, 


1 .03 


Paid State Industrial Schoc 


>1 - 


William Matthews, 


$32.36 


Frank Knee, 


40.50 


John Murphy, 


20.36 



$644.43 



93.22 



Amount expended for city poor, 



$737.65 



222 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COUNTY POOR. 



Stephen YouDg, 








^81.50 


Annie Rushlow, 






48.00 


Mrs. 0. Philbrick, 






92.00 


Clifford children (two), 






102.25 


Kate Dornan, 






168.33 


Mrs. John Williams, 








56.63 


Arminda Caples, . 








49.00 


Mrs. Daniel Sullivan, 








132.03 


Edgeworth children (twc 


), 






104.00 


John Storin, . 








78.00 


Mar\' Bean, . 








6.00 


James H. Craigue, 








235.28 


John Kemp, 








127.70 


Mrs. J. Melanson, 








207.62 


Allen B. Richardson, 








94.68 


Mrs. A. E. Hoyt, 








184.45 


Mary Ayotte, 








49.95 


Thomas Mulligan, 








32.22 


Stephen A. Marstou, 








188.64 


Bridget Collins, 








55.50 


Mary Collins, 








63.50 


Thomas Healey, . 








44.83 


Roxanna Anderson, 








22.05 


Harriet Crummett, 








51.00 


Ann R. Guild, 








92.25 


Nancy J. Guild, . 








33.14 


Charles L. Quimby, 








12.00 


Mary Durgin, 








28.50 


Henry Averill, 








8.00 


Mrs. David Morrow, 








100.00 


Charles Truchon, . 








62.16 


Robbins T. Orr, 








20.45 


Thomas Previe, 








14.14 


Mary Byrne, 








147.66 


Charlotte B. French, 








55.00 


Peter Allard, 








86.40 


Mrs. Joseph Conduy, 








33.25 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



223 



Mrs. Louis Langley, 








$15.00 


Alonzo Quimb}', . 








9.00 


George F. Thompson, 








19.00 


G. H. Lougee, 








14.00 


Henry Durant, 








7.50 


Fred W. Nudd, . 








21.25 


Joseph Clinton, 








11.65 


B. G. Tucker, 








10.00 


Joseph Lamothe, . 








25.50 


John Welcome, 








4.00 


John Charta, 


. 






29.30 


Peter Venne, 








38.10 


Urban Charette, 








24.19 


Felix Dnchette, 








3.00 


Child of William Atwoo( 


1, . 






17.00 


Jane Kelley, . 








16.00 


Mrs. A. D. Chase, 








36.55 


Mary J. Paine, 








100.85 


Lizzie Kenersou, . 








8.00 


George A. Mausou, 








49.15 


Frank Ash, . 








6.00 


Edward Auger, 








99.44 


Mrs. N. G. Danforth, 








20.00 


Mrs. William Jeraery, . 








19.03 


Joseph Lucier, 








40.50 


Charles La Belle, . 








2.85 


Annie Johnson, 








50.25 


Frank Laplante, 








2.00 


Mrs. D. R. Tandy, 








20.00 


Frank E. Woods, . 








25.78 


Stephen F. Cilley, 








125.00 


Mrs. Z. C. Arlin, . 








21.00 


Transient account. 








416.48 



Amount paid for support of city poor, . $737.65 
Amount paid by the city for support of 

county poor for the year, . . 4,275.61 



t,275.61 



Total amount paid on poor account for the year 



$5,013.26 



224 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Amount paid for medical attendance, — 

Chargeable to the city, . • • $2.00 

" " county, . . 591.10 



S593.10 



Respectfully submitted : 



JOSEPH A. COCHRAN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



Aid to Dependent Soldiers and their Families rendered 
during the year 1892. 



chargp:able to city. 



Henry M. Sanborn, 


$65.04 


Benjamin P. Davis, 


58.50 


H. H. Aldrich, 


44.00 


Thomas Wilder, 


105.33 


George W. Johnson, 


457.85 



$730.72 



CHARGEABLE TO COUNTY. 



Michael Storin, 
Edward N. Pinkham, 
George B. Tilton, 
Oliver E. J. Fuller, 
Margaret Clancy, . 
Mary A. Morrison, 
Mrs. Charles C. Howard 
Mrs. John Crowther, 
E. E. Sturtevant Post, 

J. B. Croraack, 
W. H. Sargent, . 
John B. Stickney, 
John H. Heath, . 
Charles M. Davis, 
Lucretia A. Danforth,* 
Harriet Ash, 



G. 



A. R 



for 



$182.00 

418.00 

358.57 

150.46 

8.30 

34.50 

125.12 

22.86 

20.00 
34.25 
9.00 
16.00 
17.75 
41.10 
19.40 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



225 



\ 



Gilmau P. Abbott, 






S9.15 




Olive Archibald, . 






15.33 




William Burke, 






2.00 




William D. Locke, 






36.00 




Eliza B. Tandy, . 






7.00 




William Wallace, . 






100.73 




Mary Blackstoue, 






28.85 




Emeliue C. Drew, 






52.00 




John F. Guild, 






18.45 




William Maher, 






30.25 




D. H. Purington, . . . 






9.00 




* 




$1,766.07 




Total amouut, ...... 


$2,496.79 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 

To the City Council: 

Gentlemen : I respectfull}' present The following report of 
the Police Department for the year ending December 31 , 1892 : 

ORGANIZATION. 

City Marshal — G. Scott Locke. 
Captain Night Watch — James E. Rand. 
Patrolman — Daniel 8. Flanders. 

" Charles H. Sanders. 

" John E. Baker. 

" Fred M. Eaton. 

" Levi F. Cole. 

" Horace Robinson. 

" Whitney D. Barrett. 

" Charles P. Webster. 

" James Kelley. 

SPECIAJ. RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Charles L. Gilraore, Captain. 

Amos B. Sanborn. Orrin H. Bean. 

George H. Silsby. W. H. H. Patch. 

John T. Batchelder. J. P. W. Roach. 

W. A. Flanders. Charles E. Kelley. 

W. A. Little. Charles H. Greene. 

Irving B. Robinson. Hoyt Robinson. 
George W. Chesley. 

1892 1891 

Whole number of arrests (including Penacook), 699 691 
Whole number of arrests at Penacook, . . 72 47 

Brought before the court, ..... 487 536- 



230 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Total amount received for fines and costs, — 
1892, $3,027.78; 1891, $3,306.92. 

Total amount paid out,— 1892, S480.50 ; 1891, 
S462.21. 

Nol pressed, ....... 

Discharged without being brought before the court, 
Whole number of lodgers (including Penacook), 
Whole number of lodgers at Penacook, 
Number doors found open and secured (includin 

Penacook) , . 
Number doors found open and secured at Pena 

cook, ...... 

Lost children returned to their parents. 
Number boys cautioned to attend school. 
Number girls cautioned to attend school. 
Called to quell disturbances. 
Stray teams found, .... 

Number of times city ambulance required. 
Assault, ...... 

Assault with intent to kill and murder, 
Arrest for out of town officers, 
P>reaking and entering. 
Common drunkard, .... 

Can-ying concealed weapons, 

Cruelty to animals, .... 

Drunkenness, ..... 

Escaped from house of correction. 
Evading railroad fare. 
Escaped from jail. 
Escaped from Orphans' Home, 
Forgery, .... 

Fugitive from justice, . 
Horse stealing, . 
Idle and disorderly person, 
Insane, .... 

Keeping disorderly house, . 
Keeping malt liquor for sale. 
Keeping spirituous liquors for sale. 



2 


16 


140 


116 


584 


608 


97 


93 



103 



108 



11 


14 


18 


21 


21 


18 


4 


4 


44 


56 


13 


14 


29 


31 


31 


25 


1 


3 


4 




1 


23 


4 


6 


1 




2 


2 


399 


400 


3 


11 


5 


10 


1 




3 




1 


1 


1 


1 


4 


1 


1 


1 


9 


8 


1 


2 


13 


9 


7 


5 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



231 



Keeping saloon open after 10 p. m., 

Keeping saloon open on Sunday, 

Neglecting to support minor child, 

Obtaining money under false pretences 

Runaway boys, . 

Rude and disorderly conduct. 

Receiving stolen property, . 

Resisting an officer, 

Safe keeping. 

Stealing, .... 

Street-walkers, . . ' . 

Selling spirituous liquor. 

Selling cider, 

Stealing a ride, . 

Stubborn children. 

Selling mortgaged property. 

Threatening to do bodily harm. 

United States prisoner, 

Vagrant, .... 

Number of arrests made b}' G. Scott Locke, 

Will C. Sheffield, 
James Vj. Rand, 
•Daniel S. Flanders, 
Charles H. Sanders, 
Horace Robinson, 
John E. Baker, 
Fred M. Eaton, 
Levi F. Cole, . 
Arthur E. Poor, 

Assisted in making arrests, G. S. Locke, 

W. C. Sheffield, 
J. E. Rand, 
D. S. Flanders, 
C. H. Sanders, 
Horace Robinson, 
J. E. Baker, . 
F. M. Eaton, . 
L. F. Cole, 
A. E. Poor, 



2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


5 


15 


4 




18 


11 


1 


1 


1 


2 


. 59 


29 


. 25 


27 


3 


1 


2 


4 


2 


1 


1 




7 


6 


1 




1 




1 


2 


5 




18 


41 


. 41 


32 


60 


83 


73 


77 


27 


47 


21 


70 


. 34 


31 


. 32 


30 


50 


18 


20 


5 


3 


5 




7 


. 63 


75 


. 35 


46 


. 40 


55 


. 35 


33 


. 32 


32 


. 37 


44 


. 29 


10 


25 


14 



232 CITY OF CONCORD. 

That our city is vapidly growing is evident, and tlie number 
of industries in tlie suburbs will tend to increase the number of 
residences in those localities. The city is broadening from the 
centre, making a larger territory for the officers to cover on 
their patrol duty. I have two plans to suggest to meet this 
demand for officers : A larger force, or, a more feasible plan, 
the adoption of the police signal system. The first is evident 
to all, to shorten the beats, thus making less territory to cover. 
The second plan has many perceptible advantages. 

The police signal and patrol wagon system would make the 
force far more capable than it now is. With this system the 
officers on duty can be quickly summoned within call, and bet- 
ter control can be kept over them. Much unnecessary work 
can be saved, as the officers can be quickly brought together, 
and citizens desiring the aid of an officer can call one far more 
conveniently than now. Our people can be saved from seeing 
many revolting sights. In fact, in many ways the advantages 
of this system over the present one are so plainly to be seen 
that it seems unnecessary to do more than place the facts clearly 
before the public. Concord believes in progression, and should 
apply it to the police department as well as to others, and I trust 
the time is not far distant when we will have the police signal 
and patrol wagon system. 

CITY AMBULANCE. 

The city ambulance requires some improvement, as its springs 
are so heavy that it is painful for an injured person to ride 
in it. 

DEMAND ON THE OFFICERS. 

A large amount of business is required and performed by the 
police department that is impossible to be shown in reports. 
The year 1892 has been unusually quiet as regards crime. The 
list of offences will show that no serious outbreaks have occurred 
to disturb the peace and prosperity of our beautiful city ; but 
when crime has been committed I have allovved neither time 
nor distance to prevent the pursuit of criminals, several having 
been overtaken and brought back from other states and cities, 
and punished for their offences. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 233 



PENACOOK. 



The office of assistant city marshal is vacaut, on account of 
the resignation of Will C. Sheffield, who was stationed at Pena- 
cook. I would recommend that two regular officers be appointed 
or assigned there. Tlie record shows a large increase of police 
business at that place. An officer should be on duty there at 
all times. 

DISCIPLINE. 

I believe in discipline, and I have attempted to place the 
force on as good a footing as possible for one of its numbers ; 
as to the result, I will leave it to the good people of Concord to 
judge for themselves. 

I have only the highest praise for the officers, who have done 
all in their power to assist me in carrying out each and every 
order given them. 

A WORD TO THE PUBLIC. 

A few years ago there existed in this city a strong prejudice 
against the police department, which at this time has not 
entirely disappeared. Whether or not that prejudice was well 
founded, should not be discussed here ; but whether the causes 
for it, if causes there were, have not disappeared, is something 
which every fair-minded person should inform himself. People 
who are constantly finding fault with the police are standing in 
their own light, for they are their servants and they should be 
supported. The police department belongs to the taxpayers, 
whose money sustains it, and they should, to sa}' the least, do 
their fault-finding with discrimination, and they should not 
withhold their praise when praise is fairly due. The depart- 
ment should be a mutual affair. The interest the authorities 
take in it should never exceed that of the public generally, and 
both should join hands in an effort to make it as serviceable as 
possible, for as it becomes serviceable, property becomes better 
protected and the city more desirable to dwell in. 

No police department that does its work fearlessly and well 
can hope for general favor. Every year hundreds of individ- 
uals are arrested and punished for violations of known laws, 



234 CITY OK CONCORD, 

and it is not expected that they or their friends will call a mass 
meeting and pass resolutions commendatory to the department 
or any of its members. 

IN CONCLUSION. 

I would extend ray sincere thanks to the board of mayor and 
aldermen and city council for the considerate treatment this 
department has received from them. 

T wish to thank His Honor Mayor Clapp for the assistance 
rendered this department, and for the kind consideration shown 
us. 

We have found Mr. H. G. Sargent, city solicitor, most cour- 
teous, and ready to aid us at all times, for which he has our 
thanks. 

Respectfully submitted : 

G. SCOTT LOCKE, 

CUy Marshal. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 235 



REPORT OF THE POLICE COURT. 



To the City Council : 

The police justice herewith submits his annual report for the 
year 1892 : 

The number of civil actions entered in police court, 142 

The number of arraignments for criminal offenses in 

said court, ....... 508 

The nature and disposition of the prosecutions that were 
brought before the court in behalf of the city are set forth in 
the report of the city marshal for the year 1892. 

The police justice charges himself as follows : 

For fees from criminal prosecutions, . . . $54.68 

For fees from civil actions, ..... 100.50 



$155.18 
And discharges himself as follows : 
Paid city treasurer, ...... $155.18 

B. E. BADGER, 

Police Justice. 
Concord, N. H,, December 31, 1892. 



236 CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE SPECIAL JUSTICE. 



To the City Council : 

The special justice of the police court submits the following 
report : 

I have held court eleven da^'s during the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1892. 

I have collected no fees. 

A. J. SHURTLEFF, 

Special Justice. 



CITY SOLICITOk's REPORT. 237 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Council: 

The cases in which the city was interested as a party, referred 
to in my last annual report, have been disposed of as follows : 

The four cases of Amoskeag Manufacturing company against 
Concord, for an abatement of taxes on their property at Garvin's 
Falls, were compromised by the abatement of a part- of tlie sum 
assessed against said comi)any, and the suits have been dis- 
missed. 

The case of Charles R. Burnham against Concord has been 
continued, and will probably be tried at the next April terra. 

The case of the city against Betsey J. Burleigh, which was 
pending in the law term on exceptions taken by the defendant 
to the verdict rendered in favor of the city, was decided in 
favor of the city and the exceptions taken were overruled. 

The case of Betsey J. Burleigh against Concord for $1,000 
was dismissed, Betsey J. Burleigh having deceased and the 
administrator not desiring to continue the suit. 

The suit of Bridget Stickney against the city of Concord was 
to recover the sum of 110,000 for personal injuries on account 
of an all-eged defect in a highway. By my advice, it was set- 
tled by the payment of $2,300 to the plaintiff. The injury was 
a very serious one, and there was considerable evidence, in 
favor of the plaintiff, as to liability. 

In my last report, I alluded to the fact that a notice had been 
filed by Anne Currier against the city, claiming $1,000 for per- 
sonal injury occasioned by alleged defect iu a highway. Since 
that time suit has been brought, and it is now claimed that the 
injuries are more serious than were at first supposed and notice 
has been given to me that application will be made to the court 
to increase amount of damages claimed. 



238 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The claim of Auson C. Alexander for $1,000, on account of 
injuries caused by an alleged defect in a highway, was rejected 
by the committee on accounts and claims, and no suit has 
been brought. It is understood that the claimant, Alexander, 
will not press the claim further. 

At the April term, 1892, a suit was brought against the city 
by Mark Upton to recover a sum exceeding $300 for shingles 
sold, which were laid on the lower bridge. The suit was tried 
at the October term, 1892, by the jury, Streeter & Walker 
appearing for the plaintiff and the solicitor for the city, and a 
verdict was rendered in favor of the city. 

Higgins against Concord is an appeal from the assessment of 
damages by the board of mayor and aldermen. The alleged 
damages were caused by the laying of a sewer, and the claim- 
ant, Higgins, was dissatisfied with the amount of damages 
allowed him by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Scully V. Concord is a suit brought by the plaintiff to recover 
damages for injuries to his team caused by an alleged defect in 
a highway. The defect, if any, was caused by a rail of the 
Concord Street Railway, and any judgment which may be 
recovered against the city must be paid by the Concord Street 
Railway, 

Gustavus Walker v. Concord is an appeal from the decision 
of the board of mayor and aldermen in assessing damages on 
his property, which was taken by the city as a portion of the 
public park near the library building. All the other parties 
whose land was taken for the public park have been settled 
with, 

Edgar Hunt against Concord is a suit brought to recover 
$10,000 for personal injuries alleged to have been caused by 
defect in a highway in Penacook. The suit was eutered at the 
April terra, 1892, and is now pending in court. 

HARRY G. SARGENT, 

City Solicitor. 



CITY LIQUOR AGENT S REPORT. 



239 



REPORT OF CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 



To the City Council : 

In compliance with section 11, chapter 109, of the General 
Laws of this state, and the resolution of the board of mayor 
and aldermen of May 26, 1888, establishing this agency, I re- 
spectfully report the transactions of this office for the year 1892. 

ON HAND JANUARY 1, AND PURCHASED DURING THE YEAR. 

Wines and liquors on hand January 1, per report 
was 239f gallons, 99 bottles, and 62 bottles 

malt liquors, $1,177.1.5 

Purchased of N. S. Brown, state liquor commis- 
sioner, wines and liquors 790|- gallons, 108 
bottles, and 312 bottles malt liquors. 
Total, 1,030|- gallons, 207 bottles, and 374 bottles 

malt liquors, 2,272.81 

Freight, cartage, and express on goods purchased, . 20.76 

Empty bottles on hand January 1, 163, . . . 3.77 

Empty bottles purchased during the year, 216, . 8.10 



Total stock, 



MATERIAL AND EXPENSE OTHER THAN STOCK. 



1,482.59 



Purchased stationery and bench, . 


$2.30 




wrapping paper and corks, 
rate book, 


7.66 
12.00. 




register book. 


6.50 




postage stamps, 

fuel, .... 


1.00 
21.75 




gas, .... 


19.08 




water, .... 


5.00 




relining stove. 


5.05 




Byron Moore, 12 days' work, 


24.00 




Rent of office, .... 


276.00 




Salary of agent, .... 


600.00 


$980.34 







t,462.93 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Wines and liquors, and malt liquors foi' medicinal 
' use ; number of sales, 5,374, and 800| gallons 

and 420 bottles, $3,187.75 

Empty bottles sold, 368, 30.44 

Empty casks sold, 17, . . . . . . 20.75 



;,238.94 



ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1893. 

Wines and liquors, 239f gallons, 161 bot- 
tles $1, 177. 15 

Less shortage, 12^ gallons, . . . 41.87 



,135.28 
P^mpty bottles on hand, 163, ..... 3.77 



SI, 139. 05 



COST OF GOODS SuLD, AND EXI'KNSKS. 

Wines and liquors, and malt liquors, . S2,397.95 
Empty bottles sold, .... 17.30 

Other expenditures, .... 980.34 



Cash on hand January 1, 1892, . . S56.02 

Cash received for sales, . . . 3,238.94 



Cash deposited with city treasurer, . $3,265.00 

Cash on hand January 1, 1893, . . 29.96 



1,539.35 



;,294.96 



;, 294.96 



Respectfully submitted : 

MOSES LADD, City Liquor Agent. 
Concord, N. H., Dec. 31, 1892. 



State of New Hampshire, 

Merrimack County ss. 
Personally appeared Moses Ladd, and made oath that the 
foregoing account by him rendered is correct, according to his 
best knowledge and belief. 

Before me : 

J. A. COCHRAN, 
Justice of the Peace. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



REPORT OF THE PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

To the City Council: 

The fourth annual report of the park commissioners for the 
year 1892 is herewith submitted : 

Mucli progress has been made in the development of White 
park during the year. The amount of the appropriation, $2,500, 
was larger than the previous year, and it has enabled the com- 
missioners to do more, and such work that has a degree of per- 
manency in it. 

Mr. Andrew Taylor was continued as superintendent, and 
work was begun early in April, continuing through October, 
with a force of six men and with team as needed. 

Early in the season the commissioners consulted with Mr. 
Charles Eliot, of Boston, in regard to planting trees and shrub- 
bery, and it resulted in the purchase of a large number of trees 
and shrubs from the Shady Hills Nursery, of Cambridge, Mass., 
amounting to $337.75. The aim was to select such trees and 
shrubs as are hardy, and to introduce shrubs not now found 
upon the grounds of the park, and by grouping those of the 
same family, and planting in such manner that the effect in 
years to come will be natural and beautiful. 

There have been placed some thirty additional settees through 
the park, and a summer-house has been erected on one of the 
prominent places. 

Much has been done to reclaim the wet and low parts, and 
quite a number of the trees have been taken out to make room 
for new growths. 

It has been found necessary to have police supervision dur- 
ing some of the time, for manv are not as careful as the com- 



244 CITY OF CONCORD. 

missioners would wish iu tlie use of the grounds, for in order 
to make the whole park a success all must cooperate with the 
management iu preserving order and in the desire to help in the 
development of the grounds. 

Many things might be done to enhance the loveliness of this 
beautiful spot, but it cannot be accomplished at once, or with- 
out the expenditure of money ; but much can be done each 3'ear 
with the appropriations received, and will gradually accomplish 
the completion of the plan upon which we are now at work. 

It is hoped that the appropriation the coming year will allow 
the erection of one or more entrances to the park ; also a much 
needed bridge over the outlet of the pond. There are now no 
real eiitrances to designate the grounds, as there should be. 
The city is now in position to take the land adjacent to the 
park on Beacon street, and it is hoped that the same will be 
accepted ; and the appropriation of $700, which was made in 
March, 1891, will be available for that purpose. 

The commissioners would also suggest the purchase of the 
corner now owned by James H. Rowell, which would give to 
the park a territory entirely surrounded by streets, thus pre- 
venting any objectionable feature contiguous to the borders of 
the park. 

The park has been frequented by thousands, during the past 
summer, to enjoy the beauties and the restful features of the 
place, and refresh themselves at the spring, which has so abun- 
dantly supplied the citizens who have visited the i)ark, and in 
their own homes. 

The commissioners would also suggest that tlie appropriation 
for the coming year be such as to warrant them in still further 
developing White park, realizing that the money spent in this 
manner brings its returns in a manifold way to our citizens, from 
the enjoyment derived therefrom. 

Another feature has been called to the attention of the park 
commissioners, whereby, if their duties were enlarged so that 
all the parks and commons could be placed under their super- 
vision, it would afford a means of beautifying different localities 
in our city which are now lying in disuse. 

In the death of Hon. E. II. Woodman the board lost a val- 
uable member, one whose taste and skill in such matters was 



PUBLIC PARKS. 245 

unexcelled. He gave much time to it, aud was thoroughly iu- 
terested iu the development of the park. 

Mr. W. G. C. Kimball was chosen to fill Mr. Woodman's 
place upon the board. 

Respectfully submitted : 

HENRY W. CLAPP, 
GEORGE A. YOUNG, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
B. C. WHITE, 
W. G. C4KIMBALL, 
BENJAMIN S. ROLFE, 
JOHN F. JONES. 



246 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



William P. Fiske, Treasurer, 

In account with Park Commissioners. 



Dr. 



To city appropriation, 
casli for wood sold, 



Cr. 



B}' paid : 

Labor, as per pay-rolls, . 

Jos. Breck & Sons, seed, 

Charles Eliot, services, . 

Interest, ..... 

John T. Scott, summer-house, 

M. H. Bradley, turf, 

Shady Hill Nursery, trees and shrubs, 

C. Little, street sweeping, 

Humphrey & Dodge, settees and 

supplies. .... 

Kimball, Danforth, and Forrest, 

lumber, ..... 
E. B. Hutchinson, 
Sundries, freight, stationery, etc., . 
Stone-work, . . , . . 

Respectfully submitted : 



$2,500.00 
70.00 



$1,959.35 
16.50 
30.00 
35.00 
13.54 
45.00 
337.75 
16.00 

79.61 

7.88 

7.30 

16.07 

6.00 



$2,570.00 



$2,570.00 



W. P. FISKE, 

Treasurer, 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT, 



REPORT OF THE 



COMMISSIONERS 
TERIES. 



OF CEME- 



To the City Council: 

The Comraissioiiers of Cemeteries respectfully submit the 
following report for the year ending December 31, 1892 : 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance on hand, includ 


ng special 


Dec 






31, 1891, .... 




$366.37 


Appropriation for Blossom Hill cemetery 






1892, 


. 


3,000.00 


Appropriation for Calvary cemetery, 1892 


> 


800.00 


From Wm. F. Thayer, city treasurer 






interest on invested funds, 


. 


413.54 


From Wm. F. Thayer, city treasurer, or 


I 




account of trust funds, as follows : 






James McQuesteu, 




$8.00 




Sarah M. K. Adams, 








31.00 




Edward L. Knowlton, 








30.50 




Eliza W. Upham, . 








9.50 




Geo. G. Fogg, 








4.50 




Mary Crow, . 








16.10 




Mary D. Hart, 








11.00 




Mrs! C. H. Newhall, 








7.17 




Asa Fowler, . 








24.87 




Mary Williams, 








2.00 




Mary E. Walker, . 








15.00 




Georgia P. Ela, 








4.00 





250 



CITY OF CONCOKD 



Joliu and Beuj. A. Kimball, . 


$8.00 




Sarah E. Irish, 


4.00 




Matilda Beusou, 


2.00 




•Benj. F. Caldwell, 


10.72 




Josiah Cooper, 


3.00 




Mar}' M. Faruham, 


5.50 




Lydia F. Edgerly, 
Abbie L. Sanborn Bailey, 
E. W. AVoodward, 


5.00 
4.92 
4.00 




Geo. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, 


2.50 




Greenough and Evarts McQuesteu, 
Edward H. Rollins, 


4.16 
6.00 




James D. Blaisdell, 


4.00 




Harriet W. Butters, 


4.00 




J. L. Lincoln, 


2.04 




Jonathan Sanborn, 


4.00 




John C. Thorne, . 


3.50 




Rev. Nathaniel Boutou, 


5.00 




Lizzie S. Pixley, . 


3.00 




Mary D. Allison, . 


2.00 




Samuel M. Chesley, 


1.66 


$252.64 
$3,108.40 


From sale of lots, . 





Bills of 1889, '90, & 



Sidney W. Upham, care of lot 


$4.50 


Charles Barker, " 


4.50 


Charles Kimball, " 


4.00 


George Prescott, " 


2.00 


Miss Maria Putnam, " 


2.00 


Mrs. F. P. Emerson, "• 


2.00 


" Jane Spain, " 


1.00 


" Abbie C. Trussell, 


3.75 


Miss Edith Foss, '' 


2.00 


Zadack Packard, " 


1.50 


Miss Elizabeth B. Hayues, " 


2.50 


Blazing Star lodge, " 


6.00 


J. D. Gale, 


3.00 


E. E. Sturtevant Post, 


5.00 



'91. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



251 



A. R. AN'ers, care of lot, 


$2.00 


Miss J. M. Otis, " 


1.50 


Mrs. S. A. Staniels, " 


2.00 


" Wm. Whittemore, " 


1.00 


" Elizabetli Bixby's estate, " 


2.00 


'' C. H. Jones, " 


1.00 


^- J. M. Blake, 


1.00 


'' Sarah L. Manuiug, " 


.75 


'' Nellie Carter, " 


2.50 


'• L. G. Brown, " 


2.00 


'' E. N. Doyen, " " 


2.50 


- Ella F. Mansfield, 


1.50 


- N. P. Clouah, 


1.50 


'• Geo. H. Adams, " 


2.00 


"• Mary Hawkins, ''• 


1.00 


'• Charlotte Merrill, '^ 


4.00 


Miss Josie Dunklee, " 


2.00 


J. C. Bailey, " 


1.00 


Rev. W. W. Niles, 


3.00 


N. H. Asylum, Moody Kent lot, care o 




lot, 


3.50 


H. M. Sinclair, care of lot. 


2.00 


W. E. Morton, " 




1.50 


J. M. Otis, 




1.50 


J. L. Gordon, ' 




1.50 


W. D. Garvin, 


I 


2.00 


0. F. Packard, 


i 


1.00 


J. R. Stokes, ' 




1.50 


Rev. C. W. Bradlee, 




1.50 


Geo. A. Cnramings, ' 


( 


2.50 


F. E. Brown, ' 




3.00 


Joseph W. Hildreth, ' 




1.50 


George G. Hatch, ' 




1.50 


Joseph Palmer, ' 




3.00 


L. N. Sinclair, ' 




1.00 


Harriet Dame, ' 




3.00 


J. D. Teal, ' 




2.40 


Charles Abbott, ' 




2.00 


C. E. Cook, 




1.50 



252 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. C. Fisher, care of lot, . . $2.00 
E. H. Dixon, " . . 2.00 

C. A. Bond, '^ . . 1.50 

B. C. Hill, '• . . 4.50 
Henry M. Clongh. - . . 1.00 
E. F. Phimnier, •• . . 1.00 
E. D. Libby, '' . . 1.50 
P. 8. Smith, " . . 1.50 
P. M. Kent, '■ . . 3.00 
Wra. P. Ford, '' . . 2.00 
Charles C. Palmer, " . . 2.25 
Ira C. Edgerly estate, *' . . 1.00 
W. J. B. Johnson, •• . . 2.00 
Rev. R. 8. Mitciiell, ^' . . 4.50 
George Brown, repairs on lot, . . 1.00 
J. E. Holt, care of lot, bulbs and plants, 5.75 
Benevolent society, care of lot and grading, 13.00 
Mrs. J. B. Fogg, care of lot and dressing, 5.00 
Mrs. C. H. Sanders, repairs on lot, . 1.00 
George F. Bnswell, '^ . . 10.00 
W. H. Turcott, '' . . 10.00 

D. B. Webster 4.50 

Mrs. Ida M. Wright, repairs on lot, . y.50 
Mrs. Ida M. Wright, care of lot, bulbs 

and plants, ..... 8.00 

W. D. Ladd, bulbs and dressing, . . 3.25 

A. S. Spragiie, care of lot and plants, . 3.50 

Taylor Ladd, '* and repairs, . 3.00 

E. M. Nason, *•' and plants, . 5.75 

C. S. Flanders, •' and bulbs, . 4.00 

F. J. Young, '' and dressing, 2.00 
Miss Ida B. Stone, cai'e of lot, . . 2.00 
Miss L. A. Lane, care of lot and dress- 
ing, ...... 2.50 

A. G. McAlpine, bulbs, . . . 2.00 

Mrs. E. 8. Tidd, dressing, . . . 1.00 
Mrs. C. W. Ash, care of lot, plants, and 

repairs, ...... 7.50 

T. E. Currier, care of lot and repairs, . 4.50 



CEJIKTEKY DKPAKTMKNT. 



253 



Henn' T. Hatchelder, care of lot, plants 

and buUis, 
Ann P. Oidvvay, care of lot, 
Frank L. Sanders, grading, 
Mrs. Henry Bnrleigh estate, care of lot 

and repairs, .... 
L. J. Brown, grading, . 
A. C. Fisher, grave digging, . 
J. E. Randlett, repairs and dressing, 
A. B. Brown, care of lot, repairs, 
E. E. Lane, 
C. P. Rowell, 
C. E. Jones, " 

J. F. Peters, " 

John W. Rand, 
C. H. Fuller, repairs, 
J. M. Landers, care of lot, 
C. L. Fellows, 
Elmer E. Young, 
M. B. Smith, 
Mrs. G. L. Nutter, 
Mrs. I. W. Bushey, 
J. P. Sargent, 
David Clark, 
C. B. Newhall, 

Bills, 1892 

T. H. Arey, grading, . 
Mrs. Warren Clark, grading, 

'' F. M. Choate, 

- Sarah H. Silsby, " 

" A. L. Norton, " 

'' Emily P. Reed, " 

" C. H. Ordway, 

"■ Margaret Mclntire, grading, 

" R. M. Morgan, '^ 

" C. H. Adams, '' 

" Nancy Barr Moore estate, grading, 

" L. A. Hastings, grading, 



$7.00 

2.00 

60.00 

6.00 
9.00 
8.00 
5.00 
5.50 
4.50 
6.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.25 
2.00 
1.50 
2.50 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 



S13.50 
35.20 
30.10 
60.00 
36.00 
35.20 
26.40 
32.00 
53.40 
23.32 
77.04 
31.50 



;7.65 



254 



Mrs. J. A. Ricliardsou, 


111 Kjr uvji\<-/UUi» 

grading, . 


$54.00 


" C. C. Kelley, 




I k 


10.00 


*•' Lizzie P. Paige, 




(I 


10.00 


" Mai-ion C. Seavey, 




( ; 


82.50 


" G. S. Foster, 




1 1 


30.00 


B. M. Locke estate. 




I i, 


84.00 


J.T. Sleeper and Setb Dole, 


'•'■ 


80.00 


W. D. Smith and others 




1 1, 


75.00 


Harlan N. Sargent, 




b 1. 


29.14 


Charles W. Lynam, 




11 


43.00 


J. W. & D. W. Hobbs, 




b I 


43.72 


George H. Russ, 




(.i. 


74.40 


Fred A. Carr, 




Cl 


46.40 


L. H. Carroll, 




fci 


34.32 


Matilda A. Hustiu, 




- 


17.55 


E. H. Randall, 




ki 


44.44 


Charles A. Herbert, 




'' 


38.40 


H. J. Crippen, 




11 


105.46 


P. Haggerty, 




1 1 


24.20 


A. C. Hardy, 




(k 


78.20 


Charles H. Locke and 


T. 


W. strong 




grading. 




. 


19.80 


W. K. Day, 




u 


38.50 


W. H. Brown estate, 




I ( 


11.30 


Luther Morrill estate. 




1 1 


26.55 


L. H. James, 




1, k 


12.20 


Nelson Abbott, 




4( 


40.74 


Albert W. Gale, 




1 1 


51.98 


E. C. Healey, 




bl 


18.00 


John R. Scales, 




11 


20.00 


George W. Harding, 




(( 


11.20 


Mrs. Belle 0. Perkins, 




11 


9.00 


" Belle 0. Perkins, g 


L-ave digging. 


3. GO 


H. P. Brown, removal of 


body and grave 




digging. 






4.00 


H. P. Brown, grading, . 




. 


13.50 


Charles Trenoweth, grave d 


iggiiigi 


3.00 


G. H. Bnzzell, 


ifc 




3.00 


G. H. Bnzzell, grading. 




. 


13.50 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



255 



Walter A. Mitchell, grading, 






$13.50 


Charles Trenoweth, '^ 








9.50 


Mrs. C. H. Adams, grave digging, 






3.00 


James G. Sargent 


( I 






3.00 


E. M. White estate, 


k i 






8.00 


H. G. Mclntire estate, 


a 






8.00 


W. K. Day, 


it 






3.00 


Geo. W. Collins estate, 


- 






3.00 


J. C. Ordway, 


1 1 






8.00 


Mrs. Mclntire, 


a 






3.00 


." C. S. Kelley, 


i> 






3.00 


'' R. M. Morgan, 


Ik 






4.50 


'' F. M. Choate, 


ii 






3.00 


C. S. Mellen, 


a 






10.00 


Cyrus W. Page, 


a 






6.00 


C. Heath, 


u 






3.00 


Mrs. C. H. Ordway, 


1 1 






3.00 


T. H. Arey, 


i i 






2.00 


C. H. Sanders, 


(( 






2.00 


F. A. Carr, 


ii. 






8.00 


Mrs. J. M. Otis, 


u 






8.00 


Mrs. R. M. Morgan, 


'' 






9.00 


F. A. Knight, 


i; 






3.00 


John Tebaii, 


a 






2.00 


P. Haggerty, 


.( 






4.00 


C. H. Locke, 


u 






2.00 


Albert G. Smith, 


u 






4.00 


0. F. Plumraer, 


" 






2.00 


Moses B. Critchett, 


1 1 






3.00 


William Partridge, 


u 






2.00 


Samuel Rrunell, 


a 






3.00 


E. C. Healey, 


ii 






3.00 


A. H. Curtice estate, 


'. i 






3.00 


Geo. H. Russ, grave digging and. removal, 


10.00 


Mrs. M. C. Seavey, grave digging and 




removal. 


. 


12.00 


W. H. Brown, grave digging and removal. 


15.00 


Mrs. J. P. Bancroft estate, grave digging 




and trimming, 








8.00 



256 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



George E. Todd estate, grave digging 

and trimming, .... $10.00 

Mrs. E. H. Greeley, trimming grave, . 5.00 

" E. H. Blood, removal of remains, . 5.00 
"■ C. C. Kelley, removal of remains 

and box, ..... 9.50 

John Gear estate, removal of remains, . 3.00 

Mrs. E. H. Woodman, repairs on grave, 1.00 

C. E. Pierce, single grave, . . . 3.00 

Samuel Briinell, " ... 3.00 

C. C. Titcomb, '' ... 3.00 

J. C. Ordway, vases, .... 1.40 

Plants and vases sold, .... 1.80 

Sod sold, ...... 16.56 

Single grave, ..... 3.00 

C. Hiitchins, grave digging, . . . 2.00 

E. F. Plummer, removal of remains, . 4.00 

Harry Phillips, grave digging, . . 2.00 

Mrs. Hugh Phillips, grave digging, . 3.00 

E. H. Randall, " . 3.00 
Mrs. Judith Richardson, removal of re- 
mains, ..'... 6.00 

Grave digging, ..... 232.25 

Plants and bulbs, 10.80 

Perry Kittredge, grave digging, . . 8.00 

T. H. Ford estate, "' . . 9.50 

Mrs. L. Arlin, " . . 3.00 

Thomas B. Jones, care of lot, . . 1.50 

Mrs. J. H. Rigney, - . . 1.50 

James Sedgerly, "• and repairs, 4.00 

Mrs. G. H. Foster, '' and plants, 3.50 

N. G. Carr, - '^ 3.50 

O. C. Cole, repairs, .... 2.25 

W. H. Page, repairs, . ... . 1.00 

H. W. C. Lull, care of lot, ... 1.50 

F. A. Carr, care of lot and plants, . 3.50 
Peter W. Myers, care of ^ lot, . . .50 
Mrs. L. A. Hastings, care of lot, . . 2.00 



CEMKTEKY DKPAUT.AIENT. 



257 



Mrs. Charlotte Merrill, care of lot, re- 
pairs, and dressing, . . . $6.50 
Mrs. C. W. Ash, care of lot, . . 1.50 
B. C. Hill, water for lot, • . . .50 
J. F. Hoit, repairs, .... 1.00 
Mrs. A. L. Woodward, care of lot, . 2.00 
J. B. Greaton, " . 2.00 
John Gear estate, '' . 2.00 
Mrs. Paul R. George, care of lot and 

dressing, . . . . . 5.00 

T. H. Ford estate, repair^, . . . 42.00 

Moses B. Critchett, '' ... 1.00 

Thomas W. Goad, '.. . 15.00 

Frank L. Sanders, care of lot, . . 2.00 

E. F. Plummer, repairs, . . . 2.25 

Wm. Ladd, care of lot and plants, . 3.00 
Mrs. E. H. Greeley, care of lot and 

dressing, ..... 3.00 
Miss A. L. Merrill, repairs, . . . 1.00 
P. S. Smith, care of lot, ... 1.50 
Mrs. James Spain, care of lot and re- 
pairs 2.00 

George K. Todd estate, care of lot and 

dressing, ..... 5.00 

George H. Russ, care of lot, . . 4.00 

E. D. Libbv, '■ • • • 1.50 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care of lot and 

dressing, ..... 2.50 
Mrs. E. P. Schiitz, care of lot and dress- 
ing, 5.50 

Mrs. E. P. Schiitz, repairs and trimming, 3.25 
J. P. Bancroft estate, care of lot, re- 
pairs, and dressing, . . . 19.00 
C. E. Hiitchins, care of lot, repairs, and 

dressing, . . . . . 6.25 
Mrs. Henry Burleigh estate, repairs, . 28.00 
P. M. Kent, care of lot and dressing, . 4.50 
Mrs. E. B. Webster, care of lot and dress- 
ing, 3.00 



^258 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. J. Hill, care of lot and dressing, . SI 1.50 
C. J. Joy estate, care of lot and dressing, 4.0Q 
Mrs. George L. Lovejoy, care of lot and 

dressing, ..... 4.50 

J. D. Johnson, care of lot and dressing, 3.75 

C. V. Dudley, '' '' - 5.00 
George P. Hatch, care of lot, repairs, 

dressing, plants and bulbs, . . 4.75 

F, E. Stokes, care of lot and repairs, . 3.50 
Mrs. Martha Sinott, care of lot and re- 
pairs 2.50 

A. P. Fitch, care of lot and dressing, . 5.00 
S. F. Morrill, care of lot, dressing, and 

repairs 4.00 

R. D. Burt, care of lot, bulbs and plants, 3.50 
Mrs. Nathaniel White, care of lot, dress- 
ing, and repairs, .... 35.00 
J. H. Abbot, care of lot, dressing, bulbs 

and" plants, ..... 68.25 
Mrs. Anna L. Norton, care of lot, dress- 
ing, 2.50 

George L. Brown, care of lot, dressing, 4.00 
Emma E, Brown estate, care of lot, re- 
pairs, and dressing, . . . 5.50 
Oliver Ballon, care of lot, repairs, dress- 
ing, plants and bulbs, . . . 6.50 
J. C. Badger, care of lot and dressing, . 4.00 
Mrs. J. M. Stewart, care of lot, plants 

and bulbs, ..... 12.00 

F. G. Edgerly, plants, .... 1.50 

Wm. P. Fowler, " . . . . 2.50 

J. F. Webster, care of lot and dressing, 3.50 

James H. Chase, " and plants, . 5.00 

H. Maria Woods, " and dressing, 4.00 

A. C. Currier, care of lot and dressing, 2.50 

Charles T. Somers, '' " 2.50 

W. H. Allison, '^ " 2.50 

Howard A. Dodge, '' "• 7.00 

Mrs. James Minot, '• "• 4.50 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



•259 



Mrs. F. J. Hoyt, care of lot and dressing, $3.00 
Thomas Stuart, " " 8.00 
John D. Gale, '' " 4.50 
Dr. J. H. Gallinger, care of lot, dress- 
ing, and plants, . . . 7.50 
E. B. Hutchinson, care of lot, repairs, 

dressing, and bulbs, . . . 27.85 
Jonathan Brown estate, care of lot, dress- 
ing, repairs, and bulbs, . . . 3.50 
Wm. H. Kimball, care of lot and repairs, 2.50 
S. K. Jones, care of lot, dressing, and 

bulbs, 8.00 

Mrs. Warren Clark, plants, . . . 3.50 

Peter Dudley estate, care of lot and bulbs, 3.75 

R. E. Pecker estate, " and dressing, 4.50 
Wm. E. Chandler, care of lot, dressing, 

plants and bulbs, .... 17.90 

Mrs. H. W. Paul, plants and bulbs, . 3.00 

Mrs. F. E. Colburn, care of lot and bulbs, 6.50 

Wm. H. Horner, -' and repairs, 2.50 

Wm. Underbill, •' - 24.50 

Mrs. Onslow Stearns, •' and plants, 5.00 

Cyrus Page estate, '• and repairs, 3.50 
Mrs. R. P. Staniels, care of lot, plants 

and bulbs. ..... 5.2o 

Mrs. A. F. Holt, care of lot, dressing, 

and plants, ..... 33.75 

W. H. Perry, care of lot, dressing, plants 

and bulbs, ..... 6.75 

Edward P]. Dow, care of lot, dressing, 

and plants, ..... 3.50 

Mrs. R. M. Morgan, care of lot, plants 

and bulbs, . . . .. . 5.75 

E. M. Nason, care of lot, dressing, and 

plants, ...... 4.25 

J. H. Lane, care of lot and plants, . 3.00 

J. M. Hill, - and dressing, . 5.00 
J. M. Hill (Lincoln lot), care of lot and 

dressing, ..... 3.00 



260 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



C. L. Fellows, care of lot and plants, 
W. E. Morton, '' and repairs, 
John MeCaully, 

Mrs. Moses Page, '' '• 

Mrs. A.J. Laugley, care of lot and bulbs 

J. W. Lakin, dressing, 

Gilbert Bullock estate, " 

L. A. Perry, grading. 

Miss Mary Ann Abbott, care of lot and 

repairs, ..... 
Mrs. G. L. Nutter, care of lot and repairs 
E. D. Robinson, 
J. L. Nelson, 
Mrs. David Abbott, '' and dressing, 
Mrs. James Hill, 

D. R. Corser, 

E. Sawyer, 
Geo. L. Stratton, 
C. C. Danforth. 
James T. Gordon, '^ dressing, and 

plants, ...... 

John W. Wardwell, care of lot, dressing, 

and repairs, ..... 
S. S. Sprague, care of lot and repairs, . 
Geo, W. Pliipps, '' 
Mrs. Charles C. Blanchard, care of lot, 

plants, bulbs, and dressing, 
Geo. A. Foster, care of lot and plants, 
Josiah Batchelder, " and grading, 

Mrs. G. B. Johnson estate, grave digging, 
H. W. C. Lull, 



Charles H. Schute, 

L. H. Carroll, 

David Clark, 

C. W. Harrington, 

N. P. Clough, 

John Swenson, 

Charles Kimball, 

Rev. C. E. Harrington, 



care of lot. 



$4.00 
2.50 
2.75 
2.00 
2.50 
1.00 
1.00 

10.00 

1.75 
2.50 
3.00 
2.50 
3.00 
2.00 
2.50 
5.00 
5.00 
4.00 

6.50 

7.00 
3.00 
3.00 

5.00 
5.50 
11.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.50 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 261 



C. B. Newhall, 

E. E. Stuitevant Post, 

John Tebeau, 

Taylor Ladd, 

C. J. Smith, 

Mrs. A. B. Weed, 

Mrs. Elizabeth C. Chandler, 

J. P. Sargent, 

Andrew B. Carter, 

Blazing Star Lodge, 

W. A. Brown, 

L. J. Gordon, 

H. M. Clongh, 

G. B. Emmons, 

Mrs. C. P. Lvon, 

Mrs. C. H. Marsh, 

Miss Sarah J. Sanborn, 

J. E. Sargent, 

Perry Kittredge, 

Naluim Robinson, 

J. B. Merrill, 

Geo. H. Marston, 

J. H. Albin, 

John T. Batchelder, 

Warren K. Da}^ 

J. E. Rand, 

H. W. Greenough, 

C. G. Blanchard, 

H. D. Hammond, 

E. C. Eastman, 

J. H. Lamprey, 

J. T. Sleeper, 

W. E. Hood, 

Stillman Humphre}', 

H. M. Sinclair, 

O. V. Pitman, 

E. H. Randall, 

Geo. W. Heath, 

R. F. Robinson, 



care of lot. 


SL50 


a 


5.00 


'• 


2.00 


a 


2.00 


*• 


2.00 


•• 


3.00 


(• 


2.50 


'' 


1.00 


I i, 


2.00 


1 1 


6.00 


lb 


1.50 


I i 


1.50 


4 (, 


1.00 


kC 


2.00 


" 


1.00 


>' 


3.00 


'' 


1.50 


>• 


3.50 


> I 


2.50 


" 


3.00 


'' 


2.00 


'' 


2.00 


" 


2.00 


'• 


3.00 


> ; 


1.00 


- 


2.00 


•• 


2.00 


'• 


2.00 


- 


2.00 


k 1. 


2. Of 


'• 


1.00 




1.50 


- 


2.00 


'• 


2.50 


(• 4 


2.00 


'' 


3.00 


a 


.75 


•• 


1.00 


.( 


2.00 



-262 



CITY OF CONCORI*. 



J. E. Randlett, 
W. J. Coffin, 
Mrs. F. Pearson, 
Stevens & Duncklee, 
John H. Couch, 
W. F. Thayer, 
H. B. Bartlett, 
Geo. A, Berry, 
L. K. Peacock, 
J. R. H. Davis, 
C. M. Boynton, 
Stephen Sewall, 
O. Bullock estate, 
W. D. Thompson, 
W. E. Green estate, 
H. C. Brown, 
Geo. K. Mellen, 
Mrs. Josiah Stevens, 
Rev. C. W. Bradlee, 
F. W. Boardman, 
Alba Woods, 
W. B. Dnrgin, 
Moody Kent estate, 
F. P. Mace, 

S. C. Eastman, 

L. J. Uffenheimer, 

A. N. Follett, 

Henry McFarland, 

Rev. F. D Ayer, 

W. M. Chase,"^ 

J. B. Colby, 

S. G. Mills, 

8. J. and A. E. Leaver, 

J. A. Cochran, 

N. G. Nelson, 

Geo. Clough, 

Thomas B. Hill, 

C L. Gilmore, 

F. E. Quimby, 



3are of lot. 


SI. 50 


'' 


1.50 




1.00 


>' 


6.00 


t , 


2.00 


i I 


2.50 




1.00 


i i 


1.50 


I i 


2.00 


'^ 


1.50 


'• 


1.00 


1. i 


1.00 


<■' 


1.00 


" 


1.50 




2.50 


it 


2.00 


" 


2.00 


11 


2.00 


^'• 


1.50 


'' 


1.00 


( ( 


2.00 


i 1. 


2.50 




2.50 


" 


2.00 




1.00 


'' 


■ 2.00 




1.50 




3.00 


n 


2.00 




2.00 


i t 


2.50 


"■ 


1.50 


'' 


2.50 


'• 


2.00 


" 


1.00 


" 


6.00 


" 


1.00 


" 


2.00 


(( 


2.50 



CKMETEKY DEPARTMENT. 263 



E. E. Brown, 


care of lot. 


$1.50 


F. E. Browu, 


n 


3.00 


M. D. Curamings, 


(, I 


4.00 


C. C. Webster, 


K 


2.00 


L. W. Nichols estate, 


li 


2.00 


E. C. Jameson, 


u 


2.00 


Joseph Palmer, 


(( 


3.00 


S. K. Gill, 


(( 


2.00 


Weston Cofran, 


11 


2.00 


J. C. Bailey, 


( i 


1.00 


Rev. S. Curtis, 


.- 


1.00 


M. W. Russell, 


'' 


3.00 


John S. Blanchard, 


'' 


2.00 


A. C. Ferrin, 


1. 1. 


1.50 


W. G..C. Kimball, 


'' 


4.00 


Mrs. Charles Dudley, 


ii 


2.00 


'■' J. A. West, 


kl 


2.00 


"■ Margaret Mclntire, 


I ( 


1.25 


'• C. H. Adams, 


" 


1.00 


" L. F. Lund, 


I i 


5.00 


;' J. L. Pickering, 


i I 


3.00 


'' L. A. Nelson, 


kl 


2.00 


"• A. Bunker, 


'' 


1.00 


" 8. Wardner, 


(( 


2.00 


*•* J.C. Shaw, 


11 


2.00 


" E. G. Emerson, 


ti 


2.00 


'' H. B. Tebbetts, 


bl 


3.00 


- C. A. Dole, 


( . 


3.00 


■"■ Mary E. Doyen, 


1. i 


2.50 


•' I. W. Hammond, 


(I 


2.00 


'■' G. H. Adams, 


11 


2.00 


'• Judith Richardson, 


11 


1.00 


'' P. M. Eaton, 


u 


1.00 


'• M. E. Davis, 


i ( 


1.00 


*' Rosana Adams, 


i; 


3.00 


'• Wm. Fletcher, 


(.i 


2.00 


^' Dexter Fitts, 


1, i 


2.50 


'' J. C. Ordway, 


1, t. 


2.50 


-' D. A. Warde, 


n 


3.00 



264 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. C. H. Jones, care 


of lot. 


$1.00 


" J. ^y. Leighton, 


I (. 


1.50 


" D. B. Favor, 


a 


1.00 


" M. E. Bnrnside, 


'' 


2.00 


•' George E. Jenks, 


li 


2.00 


" Henry A. Mann, 


'' 


1.00 


" F. B.' Underbill, 


I L 


2.00 


'^ Geo. W. Crockett, 


ii 


2.50 


" Mary J. Marshall, 


- 


3.00 


'' J. T. Mooney, 


i.i 


1.50 


" C. A. Herbert (^ season). 


k i 


.75 


" T. A. Freeman, 


il. 


2.00 


^' H. M. Miller, 


i 1. 


1.50 


" Geo. F. Tandy, 


i( 


2.00 


"■ Geo. L. Wbitney, 


" 


2.00 


'' Wm. H. Hurd, 


- 


2.00 


"■ J. M. Jones, 


i I 


2.00 


'' H. E. Perkins, 


i i, 


2.00 


"• S. A. Saltmarsh, 


H 


1.00 


'• Ira Perley, 


11 


4.00 


Miss Mabel J. Ordway, 


I i 


2.00 


'• Clara E. Edgerley, 


'• 


1.00 


''• N. S. Haynes, 


i I 


2.50 


Mrs. J. N. Lauder, 


; i 


1.50 


^' Mary L. Pecker, 


i( 


1.00 


Miss Clara Noyes, 


i i 


1.50 


Josiah Lane, 


I i 


2.50 


Charles E. Palmer, 


; 1, 


1.25 


Geo. F. Ambrose, 


« ( 


3.00 


Charles Barker, 


i I 


1.50 


John W. Drew, 


1 1 


2.25 


Geo. E. Lawrence estate. 


'' 


3.00 


W. W. Cochran, 


a 


2.00 


W. Odlin, 


a 


2.50 


W. C. Batchelder, 


u 


1.00 


W. P. Ford, 


u 


1.00 


B. F. Yirgin, 


ii 


1.50 


G. B. Buzzell, 


'' 


1.00 


Hosea Quimby, 


Ik 


2.00 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 265 



J. E. Currier, 


care of lot. 


S2.00 


Rev. R. S. Mitchell, 


(( 


1.50 


Wm. Blakely, 


a 


2.00 


Nathan Mausur, 


i.i 


2.00 


Wm. Badger, 


a 


2.50 


Geo. F. Buswell, 


ii 


1.50 


Joseph Wyman, 


11 


2.00 


Joseph W. Hildreth, 


(( 


1.50 


Geo. F. Page, 


11 


2.00 


E. H. Runnells, 


11 


2.00 


Wm. Ray, 


it 


1.50 


Geo. A. Cummiugs, 


1,1 


2.50 


Waldo A. Russell, 


a 


2.00 


J. V. Barron estate, 


1. i 


2.00 


S. F. Patterson, 


i i 


2.00 


E. Morrill, M. D., 


11 


2.00 


Walter G. Rich, 


i: 


1.50 


S. F. Morse, 


U 


1.50 


Luther Lawrence, 


ki 


1.50 


Elmer E. Young, 


i i 


I 00 


Wm. Yeatou, 


a 


1.50 


E. H. Dixon, 


11 


2.00 


C. S. Flanders, 


u 


2.00 


J. W. Little estate, 


a 


3.00 


Bishop Niles, 


a 


3.00 


John W. Rand, 


i( 


1.25 


Ira J. Hutchinson, 


(( 


1.50 


J. E. Dwight, 


n 


2.00 


C. P. Virgin, 


a 


2.00 


M. B. Smith, 


ii 


1.50 


J. C. Lane, (i) 


(( 


.75 


J. F. Peters, 


(( 


1.50 


Geo. G. Williams, 


i( 


2.50 


F. J. Young, 


u 


1.50 


C. H. Clough, 


(( 


1.50 


M. E. V. Corning, 


(( 


1.00 


G. D. Huntley, 


u 


1.50 


Zadock Packard, 


(( 


1.50 


A. B. Sargent, 


u 


2.50 



266 CITY OF CONCORD. 



C. W. Lyuam, 


care of lot, 


$1.00 


Daniel Holden, 


u 


4.00 


John T. Hubbard, 


(( 


.50 


H. C. Sturtevaut, 


11 


2.00 


C. H. Martin, 


(( 


2.00 


B. M. Locke estate, 


n 


2.00 


Henry W. Raulet, 


u 


3.00 


C. H. Fuller, 


(( 


1.50 


J. N. Lauder, 


(( 


1.50 


Sidney Upbam, 


a 


1.50 


A. J. Souza, 


u 


1.50 


Kimball Flanders, 


ii 


1.00 


W. D. Garvin, 


' a 


2.00 


I. N. Farley, 


u 


2.50 


J. C. Ordway, (i) 


ii 


1.00 


E. E. Lane, 


i( 


1.50 


W. A. Dauforth, 


11 


1.00 


H. F. Gerrisb, 


it 


1.50 


J. H. Couuell, 


li 


2.00 


Geo. H. Emery, 


ii 


3.00 


H. N. Sargent, 


(1 


1.00 


Porter Crane, 


(( 


2.00 


J. H. and M. A. Teel, 


a 


2.00 


C. E, Jones, 


it. 


1.00 


H. A. Kendall, 


u 


1.00 


A. B. Brown, 


i( 


1.50 


Miss Ida B. Stone, 


i; 


2.00 


" J. A. Lane, 


li 


.75 


" Lizzie Haskell, 


a 


1.50 


" Josie Dunklee, 


u 


2.00 


" Maria Putnam, 


I i 


1.00 


" C. Violette, 


11 


1.00 


Mrs. E. M. Sawyer, 


i(. 


2.00 


'' F. M. Choate, 


11 


1.50 


'' J. C. Eaton, 


i( 


2.00 


" 0. C. Morrill, 


;( 


3.00 


" Sarah F. Silsby, 


C( 


2.00 


" Emma E. Hawkins, 


( i 


1.00 


" C. L. Eastman, 


u 


2.00 



f 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



267 



Mrs. James Rounsfel, 


care of lot. 


$2.00 


" Cyrus Hill, 


u 


2.50 


" I. W. Bushey, 


(( 


1.00 


" Nathan H. Dunbar, 


ii 


1.00 


" C. Haley, 


i I 


1.00 


" Warren Eraerson, 


a 


2.00 


" M. A. Chesley, 


u 


2.00 


" Emily P. Reed, 


I c 


1.25 


" John H. Sargent, 


i I 


2.25 


" Ellen F. Mansfield, 


i k 


1.50 


" C. A. Kendall, 


bi 


1.00 


" J. D. Blaisdell, 


4( 


2.00 


'^ J. M. Dodge, 


1 i 


2.00 


" Wm. Stevenson, 


i( 


1.00 


" Marion C. Seavey, 


ii 


3.00 


" L. P. Gordon, 


ii 


2.50 


" John Burgum, 


(I 


.50 


" J. M. Otis, 


k( 


3.00 


" M. Blake, 


C. 


1.00 


'■'■ Nellie Carter, 


(I 


2.50 


Isabella A. Lockerby, 


'' 


1.50 


Nellie Dearborn, 


lb 


1.50 


Mrs. C. H. Ordway, 


11 


1.00 


C. P. Rowell, 


'' 


2.00 


W. W. Hill, care of lot, plan 


ts and bulbs, 


6.75 



!,555.72 



1,884.32 



EXPENDITURES. 



C. p. Little, sweepings, 


§9.00 


"• teaming. 


49.25 


Geo. A. Simonds, 


u 


190.00 


E. H. Runnells, 


i I 


102.00 


Geo. L. Theobald, 


1 1 


314,50 


Geo. W. Chesley, 


" and labor. 


869.13 


M. G. Gannon, 


pointing wall. 


46.00 


John R. McDonald, 


lb 


116.00 


A. E. Bodwell, services, 


69.75 



268 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Ross W. Gate, 

Kimball, Danforth & Forrest, 
M. D. Joues & Co., fountaiu. 
Builders' Iron Foundry, iron pipe. 
Concord Water Works, " 
Lee Brothers, laying pipe, 
L. L. Sargent, teaming, 
" manure, 

Geo. A. Simonds, loam, 
M. Whalen, manure, 

J. F. Ward, 
J. F. Scott, 
W. C. Chambers, 
H. M. Clough, 
Mrs. Ordway, 
V. W. Haliack & Son, bulbs, etc., 

F. & J. Farquah & Co., seeds, 
C. E. Allen, 

W. S. Evvell, Jr., plants, 

Essex Heights Floral Co., plants, etc. 

W. S. Wilson, plants, . 

Pitcher & Mander, plants, etc., 

S. Carter Morgan, " 

J. Wilkinson Eliot, plants, 

W. M. Colby, plants, bulbs, etc., . 

E. H. Randall, pipe and labor, 

A. G. McAlpine & Co., cleaning stones 

E. E. Fisher, keys, 

H. W. Clapp and F. J. Batchelder, ex 
pense to Boston, 

G. J. Benedict, incidentals, . 
H. W. Brickett, grass seed, . 
Perkins & Berry, 

Foss & Merrill, services and plans, 

F. J. Batchelder, paper and printing, 
Geo. L. Theobald, teaming, . 

C. P. Little, sweepings, 
Concord Water Works, rent, 
0. Morrill, incidentals, 



$1.50 
33.33 
237.50 
11.24 
76.73 
54.19 
12.00 
32.50 

4.00 
20.00 
30.00 

6.00 

4.00 
11.25 

4.00 
27.23 

2.00 
10.00 
13.50 

9.10 
40.00 
12.50 
26.00 

2.16 
188.57 

4.05 

14.40 

.75 

8.79 
49.69 
L3.80 
22.60 

513.70 
30.25 

662.10 

46.00 

80.00 

1.00 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



■269 



Concord Foundry Co., . 

E. B. Hutchinson, lumber, etc., 

Humphrey & Dodge, 

Scribner & Britton, 

Thompson & Hoague, . 

Geo. Abbott, Jr., painting, . 

Flanders Bros., 

C. G. Reraick, 

Kendall & Lane, boxes, 

G. J. Benedict, supt., services, 

Geo. O. Dickermau, 

Labor, as per pay-rolls, 



City treasurer, one half sale of lots. 
Balance on hand December 31, 1892, 



.50 




48.57 




90.75 




54.43 




18.02 




2.80 




3.58 




29.00 




11.25 




900.00 




34.15 




3,204. GS 






S8,479.79 




1,554.20 




] ,850.33 




$11,884.32 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand December 31, 1891, . . . $18.78 

Appropriation, 1892, 350.00 

From Wm. F. Thayer, city treasurer, interest on 

invested funds, ....... 18.26 

From Wm. F. Thayer, city treasurer, on account of 

trust funds, as follows : 



JL clUl »» cut V>U1. til, 

Theodore French, . 






4.00 


Seth Eastman, 






3.00 


Abigail Sweetser, . 






5.00 


True Osgood, 






4.00 


Mrs. E. A. Pecker, 






7.67 


Hiram Richardson, 






15.00 


Wm. T. Locke, 






4.25 


Harry J, Gilbert, . 






2.00 


William Abbott, 






2.00 



270 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Samuel and David L. Morrill, 
Timothy K. Blaisdell, 



3.00 

10.80 



$69.72 



H. C. Blakely, grave digging, 

Daniel Farnum estate, " 

W. W. Critohett, " 

G. S. Locke, " 

A. F. Stone estate, " 

Burgum estate, " 

Thompson estate, " 

Mrs. E. Walker estate, " etc 

A. B. Holt estate, " 
Grave digging, labor, etc., 
Lizzie A. Curtice, care of lot, 
Mrs. S. T. Gushing, " 
Eliza A. Gage, repairs on lot, 
W. C. Sheffield, grading, 
Lucretia B. Gilbert, " 
Mrs. N. C. Farrah, " 

" C. J. Johnson, repairs, . 
" Nathan Carter, care of lot, 

B. F. Hardy, grading, . 
For stone post, 

Joseph Stickney estate, care of lot, 
A. S. Hubbard, care of lot and dressing, 
Mrs. A. Glover, care of lot 1890-'91-'92, 
J. M. Jones, repairs, . . . . 

J. F. Wilson, care of lot 1891-92, 

H. T. Chickering, 

Miss Mary Ann Downing, " " 
Mrs. Sarah E. Hamilton, grave digging, 



EXPENDITURES. 



$3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 
4.50 
8.00 
3.00 
8.00 
8.00 

50.50 
LOO 
L50 
3.00 

11.50 
8.00 

22.00 
6.25 
1.00 

15.00 
1.50 
5.00 
2.50 
2.75 
2.00 
3.00 
5.00 
2.00 
8.00 



$184.00 
$640.76 



Scribner & Britton, 
E. B. Hutchinson, 
Humphrey & Dodge, 



$18.00 

.95 

235.07 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



271 



Ross W. Gate, 


8.50 




P. A. Clifford, 


84.93 




George A. vSimoncls, .... 


14.00 




W. H. Pitmau, 


3.20 




E. H. Runnells, 


3.00 




Concord Water-Works, .... 


10.00 




Repairs on Paul Wentworth monument. 


2.00 




Labor, as per pay rolls. 


246.00 


S625.65 
15.11 


Balance on hand December 31, 1892, 





Respectfully submitted : 



$640.76 



H. W. CLAPP, 
CHARLES S. PARKER, 
FRANK J. RATCHELDER, 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
OBADIAH MORRILL, 
GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, 
CHARLES G. REMICK. 

Commissioners of Cemeteries. 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 



To the City Council : 








The report of your committee for 


the 


year 


ending Decembei 


31, 1892, is as follows: 








Received, — 








Jan. 1, 1892, cash on hand, . 






80.66 


for lot No. 24, 






15.00 


" 124, 






12.00 


Feb. 20, 1892, " 104, 






10.00 


Mar. 1, " " 32, 






5.00 


Aug. 25, " " 55, 






10.00 



Paid,— 
Jan. 1, 1892, George Partridge, bill, 



$1.50 



272 
Mar. 30, 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



N. K. Farnum, 1891 bill, 10.00 
'' Concord Water-Works, 

1891 bill, . . 6.00 
Oct. 17, '• Concord Water-Works, 

1892 bill, . . 6.00 
City treasurer, one half sale of lots, . 26.00 
Jan. 1, 1893, cash on band, . . . 3.16 



Respectfully submitted 



$52. 66 



JOHN E. GAY, 
J. M. CROSSMAN, 
O. L. SHEPARD, 

Cemetery Committee. 



Account of receipts and expenditures for fence, West Con- 
cord cemetery (special appropriation 1892, $150.00). 



Nov. 23, 1892, cash of city treasurer. 
Paid,— 

Nov. 24, 1892, A. C. Powell, bill, 
C. F. Fletcher, ^' 
H. Partridge, " 
John Whitaker, " 
J. M. Crossman, " 
Eastman & Co., " 
C. F. Fletcher, '' 
A. C. Powell, 

Jan. 9, 1893, C. H. Martin & Co., 

Cash on hand, .... 



25, 



26, 

Dec. 14, 

24, 



Respectfully submitted 



$18.00 

18.00 

20.30 

25.12 

15.55 

.68 

5.30 

5.20 

20.99 

20.76 



$150.00 



$150.00 



O. 



L. SHEPARD, 

For Committee. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 273 



REPOPvT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF CEME- 
TERIES. 



To the City Council of the City of Concord : 

The commissioners of cemeteries herewith present their sec- 
ond annual report, which covers the work of the year 1892. A 
large amount of work has been accomplished during the year. 
The commissioners have prepared and put in suitable condition 
for sale the large block of lots on the beautiful western slope of 
the cemetery- A new block has been graded and added in the 
northern portion of the cemetery, a fountain i)laced in the cen- 
ter, avenues and drives consti'ucted, making this lot one of the 
most desirable in the whole cemetery. The commissioners have 
contracted for two large central |)osts for the gateway, wliich, 
when placed in position, will add greatly to the beauty of the 
entrance. 

The work of extending the wall along the front of Calvary 
cemetery has progressed in keeping with your appropriation 
therefor, and will be completed in the early spring. 

A nice carriage drive has been built from the tomb to the 
northern portion of the cemetery, and to the north entrance, 
which, we trust, is a great improvement. 

The appropriation for the Old North cemetery has been ex- 
pended in repairing walks and driveways, in removing the 
unsightly tool-house, and in placing extra hydrants so that 
water can be accessible to all lot owners. 

During the coming 3'ear the commissioners propose to set a 
large amount of shrubs and trees, and to still further adorn 
and beautify these hallowed spots. The amount that can be 
expended for this work rests with your honorable body. That 
it will be a liberal appropriation placed in our hands, we have 
no doubt. 

GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, 

Secretary of Commissioners of Cemeteries. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Council : 

In accordance to rules and customs governing the fire depart- 
ment, I herewith submit the report of work done by tliis depart- 
ment in the year 1892. 

We have had an exceptional year in the small amount of loss by 
fires and an increase of still alarms, which have been promptly 
responded to by details from the several stations to which they were 
sent, a large majority being sent by telephone to the central sta. 
tion, this being the only station connected by telephone ; and here 
we wish to say that we think it only just that for the free use of our 
streets the telephone company should, without detriment to themselves, 
allow us a wire without any other customers, to run from their cen. 
tral ofiice to the central fire station, which would save delay and 
annoyance many times a day. 

It would be wise in our judgment to have telephones at each hose 
house and one at the chief's residence. 

The attention of the past city council was called to the horse ser- 
vices at hose houses 2 and 3. I am of the opinion that it is economy 
for the city to own horses for these companies and have them used 
the same as the horses at the central fire station. 

A new pair of horses are needed for use on the hook and ladder 
truck and should be furnished by the street department. 

I would suggest that the alarm boxes be put in at East and 
West Concord as a safeguard. In case of a fire of any magnitude 
help must be sent from the precinct, and delay and confusion would 
be saved by this arrangement. 

These Wards 2 and 3 are now protected by hand fire engines, 
which at best are heavy and hard to get to the fires with the num- 
ber of men that could be miistered quickly, and I would recommend 



278 CITY OF CONCORD. 

that small four-wheel chemical engines he pui'chased and that the 
hand-engines be disposed of. 

The central fire station is overcrowded, and in the near future 
additional apparatus will be needed at the North End, and it would 
ba wise to secure the vacant lot east of the Alert house and then a sta- 
tion could be built that will accommodate one steamer, hose wagon, 
and a ladder truck. Then Washington street gives easy access to 
the Hill district, which will soon be calling for additional protection. 

This year the Eagle hose wagon was purchased without additional 
appropriation, and the steamer " Governor Hill" was repaired at 
the Manchester Locomotive Works. A new set of copper flues was 
put in and other minor repairs made and now it is in first-class 
condition. 

There are two hose reels not in use and it would be well to dis- 
pose of them at a fair price. 

FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The precinct department has responded to eighteen box and 
thirty-nine still alarms. At Penacook there were ten bell and four 
still alarms, which are recorded as follows : 

LIST OF FIRES AND FIRE ALARMS FOR 1892. 

January 26 — Still, 1 : 45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
W. S. Baker, North Hunting-ton street. No damage. 

5 : 35 a. m. At Concord Axle Co., Boscawen. Pioneers re- 
sponded. 

January 27 — Penacook. Still alarm at Knowlton's block. Chim- 
ney fire. No loss. 

February 5 — 10 : 10 p. m. Box 5. Slight fire in a car of pota- 
toes in front of the freight station. Loss on car, $5 ; on potatoes, 
nothing. Cause overheated stove. Eight hundred and fifty feet of 
hose wet. 

February 17 — 9 : 15 a. m. Still. Chimney fire in house at the 
corner of School and Rumford streets. 

3 : 30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of G. S. Locke on Green 
street. 

5 : 45 p. m. Still. Chimney fire in Stickney block. 

February 17 — 11 : 30 a. m. Penacook. Tenement house of W. 
W. Eastman on Summer street. Caused by overtui'ning of kero- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 279 

seiie stove, it is supposed. Mary Bean, the occupant of the tene- 
ment, was burned so that she lived but a few moments. No loss 
on building. 

February 27 — 5 : 40 p. m. Still. Slight fire on roof of railroad 
bridge on Bridge street. Kearsarge Hose responded ; one hundred 
feet of hose wet. Loss, $5. 

March 2 — 4 : 45 p. m. Still. Chimney fire in Nutting's block, 
corner Pierce and Laurel streets. 

March 5 — 9 : 20. Still. Chimney fire in residence of Dr. S. C. 
Morrill, on South Main street. 

10 : 1.5. Second alarm for chimney fire at same place. 

March 6 — 7 : 30 p. ra. Still. Slight fire under a radiator in the 
office of the Eagle stable. 

March 7—3:48 p. m. Box 13. House of Mrs. Daniel B. 
Favor on Beacon street. One hundred feet of hose wet. Loss on 
building, $20 ; insurance paid, $20. 

March 13 — 6 : 40 a. m. Box 5. Slight fire in the office of Train- 
Master Clough, Concoi'd and Montreal railroad. Cause, overheated 
flue. Loss, $10. Foiu* hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 

March 14 — 10 : 20 p. m. Box 35. Slight fire in First National 
bank, corner Main and Depot streets. Loss, $12. Eight hundred 
feet hose wet. 

March 17 — 9 : 30 a. m. StiU. Chimney fire in residence of 
G. H. Carter, 55 School street. 

11 : 30 a. m. Second alarm for chimney fire for the same place. 

March 28 — 9 : 45 a. m. Still. Chimney fire in residence of Mrs. 
J. E. Sargent, corner Merrimack and School streets. No damage. 

March 30 — 10 : 08 p. m. Box 48. Fire in grass in Asyhun yard. 
No damage. 

April 3—12 : 22 p. m. Box 32. Brush fire on land of West End 
syndicate. No damage. 

2 : 55 p. m. Box 13. Fire in grass west of Rumford street 
street and north of Franklin. Nine hundred feet of hose wet. 
No damage. 

April 8 — 12 : 30 p. m. Still. Chimney fire in residence of L. S. 
MorriU on North State street. No damage. 

12 : 40 p. m. Penacook. Dwelling house on Washington street, 
owned and occupied by Martha J. Morrill. Loss, $14.36 ; insur- 
ance, $14.36. 



280 CITY OF CONCORD. 

April 12 — 12 : 30 p. m. Still- Chimney fire in residence of Dr. 
D. E. Sullivan on Park street. 

8 : 14 p. m. Box 15. Fire in residence of Frank S. Streeter on 
North Main street. 

Loss. Ins. paid. 

On building S5 S5 

On contents ........ 185 185 



Total S190 S190 

April 14. Still. Slight fire at W. P. Ford & Co.'s ; extinguished 
by members of Alert Hose company. 

April 15 — Still, 4 p. m. Fire on the jilains. Extinguished by 
Engineer Dow and a gang of six men. 

April 16 — 4 : 40 p. m. Penacook. Tenement house of W. W. 
Eastman, on High street. Caused by cliildren playing with matches 
in the barn connected. Loss on buildings, S2,000 ; insurance, 
$1,000. Loss on building of Julia A. Abbott, adjoining, S214 ; in- 
surance, $214. Loss on furniture of Jidia A. Abbott, $195 ; insur- 
ance, $195. Frank P. Robertson, loss on furniture, $150 ; no in- 
surance. Mary Owens, loss on furniture, $25 ; no insurance. 
George Griffin, loss on furniture, $15 ; no insurance. Thomas 
O'Brien, loss on furniture, $25 ; no insurance. Franklin A. Abbott, 
loss on shed adjoining, $10 ; no insurance. Farrand and Chandler, 
loss on Eagle block and outbuildings, $125 ; insurance, $125. 

April 17 — 6 a. m. Still. Fire in office of Ferrin & Woodman, on 
School street, caused by a burning cigar in a wooden spittoon. Ex- 
tinguished by Officer Sanders. Loss, $10. 

10 a. m. Still. Fire in woods, corner of Auburn and Franklin 
streets. Extinguished by Chief Davis and members of Alert Hose 
company. 

1 : 45 p. m. Still. Fire in woods in rear of Blossom Hill cemetery. 

2 p. m. Still. Fire in grass in rear of Ranlet & Marsh's coal shed ; 
responded to by Good Will hose company ; later, in response to a 
call for a steamer and more hose, the Keai'sarge and Eagle reels 
were sent down ; 1,050 feet of hose wet. This fire destroyed the 
shooting house of the Gun club at the South End. 

3 : 25 p. m., 11-11. Fire in woods north of Odd Fellows' home. 
April 19 — 3 : 55 p. m. Still. Chimney fire in Board of Trade 

building. No damage. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 281 

11 : 20 p. m. Still. Fire in brush near the stone crusher. No 
(Jamage. 

April 21 — 2 p. m. Penacook. Still alarm for brush fire on land 
of Mrs. John Sawyer, near Main street. 

April 25 — 4 : 46 p. m., 11-11. Brush fire on the plains east of 
Sugar Ball road ; extinguished with shovels by the department and 
Old Fort Engine company. 

April 26 — 12 : 10. Still. Chimney fire in residence of Charles 
Welcome on Warren street. No damage. 

April 27 — 3 : 57 p. m., box 34. Fire in woods on Long pond 
road. 

9 : 15 p. m. Still. Cliimney fire in residence of L. H. Clough, 
South State street ; extinguished by members of Good Will hose 
company. 

April 29 — Still. Fire in tar between Durgin's and Hill's blocks, 
rear of Main street. No damage. 

May 6 — Still, 10 : 10 a. m. Fire in waste paper and coal bins of 
the Monitor estabhshment, Depot street. Eagle hose wagon sent 
out. Damage $25 ; fully insured. 250 feet of hose wet. • 

Still, 1 : 30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of George H. Saw- 
yer on South Main street, extinguished by members of Good Will 
hose company. 

May 7 — Still, 1 : 30 p. m. Chimney fire at same place. 

May 9 — Still, 7 : 30 a. m. Cliimney fire in residence of Mrs. 
Curamings on Downing street; damage, $10. 

Still, 2 : 30 p. m. Brush fire rear state prison. 

Still, 7 : 30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of Albert Grant on 
Franklin street. Extinguished by members of Hook and Ladder 
company. 

May 19 — Still, 9 : 40 a. m. Chimney fire in Nutting's block on 
Pierce street. No damage. 

May 22 — Box 26, 10 : 12 a. m. Fire in house on Maple street 
owned by W. D. Merrick and occupied by Mrs. Emma Dame. 
Cause, overheated stove funnel in barn. 

Loss. Ins. paid. 

W. D. Merrick, building, $187 $187 

Emma Dame, contents, 225 125 

$412 $312 



282 CITY OF CONCORD. 

June 5 — Still, 11 : 45. Chimney fire in residence of C. F. West 
on Warren street. No damage. 

June 15 — Box 35, 8 : 39 p. m. Fire in barber shop of Symonds 
& Pearl. Moore's block, caused by the fall of a kerosene lamp. 
Symonds & Pearl ; loss, $10 ; no insurance. Damage to building, 
$50 ; insurance paid, $50. 

1 : 15 a. m. Penacook. Concord Manufacturing Co., waste- 
house on Washington street. Loss on building, $25 ; no insurance. 

July 4 — Box 24, 12 : 44 p. m. Slight fire in lumber shed in 
Hall's court. Loss, $1 ; no insurance. 

July 27 — Box 23, 8 : 50. Fire in house owned by Mrs. Titcomb 
on Chapel street, occupied by Charles Yeaton. Loss, $10 ; no in- 
surance. 

9 : 45 p. m. Penacook. Chimney fire in Knowlton's block. 
Extinguished by members of company. No general alarm. 

August 27 — Still, 3 : 50 p. m. Brush fire on Long Pond road. 

SejDtember 26 — 5 : 20 a. m. Penacook. Dwelling house and 
Larn of B. Frank Varney on Washington street. House struck by 
lightning. Loss on building and contents, $4,000 ; insurance paid, 
$2,625. 

September 27 — Still, 3 : 50 p. m. Chimney fire in house of Nor- 
ris A. Dunklee on Fayette street. No damage. 

October 3 — Still, 1 : 45 p. m. Chimney fire in house of Charles 
Rowe on Fayette street. No damage. 

October 24 — Still, 2 : 20 p. m. Chimney fire in house of Dr. S. 
C. Morrill. No damage. 

October 27 — Box 5, 8 : 07 p. m. Fire in rear of Concord railroad 
shop. No damage. 1,400 feet of hose wet. 

November 5 — Still, 11:10 a. m. Chimney fire in house of J. 
Smith on Fayette street. 

November 22 — 7 : 10 p. m. Penacook. Chimney fire in house 
of E. Sebra. Extinguished by members of the company. No gen- 
eral alarm. No loss. 

November 25 — 12 : 30 p. m. Penacook. False alarm. Not yet 
accounted for. Alarm received by telephone. 

November 26 — Box 24, 11 : 47 a. m. Fire in store of Joseph 
Welcome. Loss, $40 ; insui'ance paid, $31. 

November 29 — Box 45, 2 : 45 p. m. Fire in Charles E. Thomp- 
son's house. West street. Loss, $25. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 283 

December 4 — 3 : 20 p. m. Penacook. Slight fire on roof of 
dwelling house of the heirs of Joseph Knowlton, on the interval be- 
yond B. & M. R. R. Loss, $2.65 ; insurance, $2.65. 

December 13 — Still, 1 : 15 p. m. Chimney fire in house of L. 
R. Fellows, North Spring street. 

December 18 — Still, 10 : 35 a. m. Fire in house of James Blake 
on Montgomery street. 12 : 45 p. m., fire in the same house. 

December 21 — 8 : 45 p. m. Penacook. Tenement house of W. 
W. Eastman on West Canal street. Chimney fire. No loss. 
Streams put on from hydrant. 

December 22 — Still, 4 : 45 p. m. Chimney fire in the house of 
E. S. Nutter, Montgomery street. 

December 24 — 11 : 45 p. m. Penacook. False alarm. All the 
apparatus taken out. 

December 25 — Still, 1 : 30 p. m. Chimney fire in the house of 
Clark Dearborn on Fayette street. 

December 31 — Still, 8 : 45 a. m. Chimney fire in house of Mrs. 
Shaw, 50 Center street. No damage. 



Losses 
summary 


Losses on 
buildings. 


Insurance Net Losses on 
paid. loss. contents. 


Insurance 
paid. 


Net 
loss. 


Precinct, 


$340.00 


S262.00 $78.00 $495.00 


$366.00 


$129.00 


Penacook, 


5,391.01 


3,356.01 2,035.00 1,410.00 


810.00 


600.00 


Totals, 


85,731.01 


$3,618.01 $2,113.00 $1,905.00 

HYDRA2fTS. 


81,176.00 


$729.00 



There are 228 public and 27 private hydrants, 24 public hydrants 
having been put in this year. 

APPARATUS AND FORCE. 

The force of the department is as follows : Precinct, located at 
the Central Fire Station, one first-class Amoskeag engine, " Eagle," 
with Eagle Hose Company (15 men) ; two second-class Amoskeag 
engines, '• Kearsarge," with Kearsarge Hose Company (16 men) ; 
"Gov. Hill," relief steamer, in charge of an engineer and fireman 
belonging to " Kearsarge Company ; " the Hook and Ladder Com- 
pany, ''City of Concord" (20 men). There are seven horses, owned 
by the department, kept at this station. 



284 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The Alert Hose Company (13 men), located on Washington street, 
has a modern hose wagon, and has a liorse at the house at all hours. 

The Good Will Hose Company (13 men), located on the corner 
of Concord and State streets, has a modern hose wagon, and has a 
horse at the house at all hours. 

All the members, excepting stewai'd, assistant steward, and three 
drivers at the Central Fire Station, are call men. 

The Precinct companies have swing harnesses on all apparatus. 

The "Pioneer " steamer, at Penacook (28 men), is a fourth-class 
Silsby, with second-class Amoskeag reel (4 wheels). The steamer 
can be drawn by hand or horses, as necessity requires. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has a Hun- 
neman 6-inch cylinder hand-engine, and a second-class 4-wheel reel, 
Amoskeag make, drawn by one horse and provided with swing hai'- 
ness. 

Old Fort, at East Concord (30 men), has a 5-inch cylinder Hun- 
neman hand-engine. 

In conclusion we wish to express thanks to His Honor Mayor 
Clapp for the interest he has shown in this department, and his 
warm support of it ; to the fire committee we are under many 
obligations for favors during this year ; to the police depart- 
ment for their services, which have been prompt and well managed, 
and to the members of the department for their interest in all the 

details of the service. 

CHARLES A. DAVIS, 

Chief Engineer. 



PUBLIC RESERVOIRS. 

1. Main street, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s, 

2. " middle front state-bouse yard, 

3. " rear city hall, 

4. State street, corner of Washington street,* 

5. Rimiford street, near Josiah Minot's, 

6. Orchard street, corner of Pine street,* 

7. School street, corner of Summit street,* . 

8. Centre street, corner of Union street, 

9. Gas-holder, rear of Main street,* 

10. Franklin street, corner of Lyndon street,* 



Capacity— Cubic foet. 
1,000 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
4,000 
3,500 
1,100 
. 44,000 
1,500 



*Brick, cemeuted. 



FIRK DKl'AKTMENT. 285 



EOLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

1 803. 



Chief Engineer. 

Charles A. Davis, Carriac;e manufacturer, 25 Washington St. 

A.ssista.nt Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

William E. Dow, Painter, Academy St. 

John J. McNulty, Macliinist, West St. 

William C. Green, Machinist, 31 Fayette St. 

John J. McXultt, Clerk of Board. 

WARD 1. 

William W. Allen, Merchant, Merrimack St , Penacook 

WARD 2. 
John E. Frye, Farmer, Penacook St., East Concord. 

WARD 3. 

Miles McSweeney, Overseer, Main St., West Concord 



Superintendent; Fire A.lai'm. 

N. B. Bduleigh, Steward Central Fire Station, Central F'ire Station. 

A.ssistant Ste>varcl. 

John H. True, Central Fire Station. 



286 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



KEARSARGE" STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY No. 2. 



OFFICERS. 



Sylvester T. Ford, Foreman. 
B. J. Cate, Asst. Foreman. 



Chas. H. Swaiv, Clerk. 
James H. Sanders, Engineer. 



MEJIBliRS. 

Occupations. 



Badge No. Names. 

11 Sylvester T. Ford, Moulder, 

12 Brinton J. Cate, Carriage painter, 

13 Chas. H. Swain, Carpenter, 
15 James H. Sanders, Carriage painter, 
IG Frank E. Heath, Upholsterer, 

19 Charles H. Barrett, Barber, 
23 Henry O. Powell, Blacksmith, 

84 Thomas J. Morrison, Carriage painter, 

85 Harry S. Leavitt, Carriage painter, 
17 Elmer H. Farrar, Machinist, 
21 Fred M. lugalls, Carriage painter, 
IS Charles H. liurgum, Carpenter, 

20 Lewis B. Putney, Carpenter, 

86 Charles Powell, Teamster, 
li Geo. B. Davis, Carriage painter, 
83 A. H. Britton, Hardware dealer, 

87 Henry C. Robinson, ( 

14 Mark Wakefield, 
Steamer, second-size Amoskeag, drawn by two horses. 

Abbot-Downing Co., drawn by one horse. 



( Drivers, 



Residences . 
26Thorndikest. 
4 Monroe st. 
1 West Washington s.t. 
45 Perley st. 
4 Monroe st. 
44 Washington st. 
16 North Spring st. 
32 Downing st. 
30 West St. 
78 South State st. 
21 Tremont st. 

1 Myrtle st. 
3 Abbott St. 
105 School St., 

2 Freight st. 
8 Tahanto st. 

j Central Fire Station. 
( Central Fire Station. 
Hose wagon, four-wheel 



EAGLE" STEAMER AND HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 



OFFICERS. 



James Hoit, Foreman 

Walter J. Coffin, Asst. Foreman. 

ME.MBERS. 

Badge No Names. Occupations. 

24 James Hoit, Clerk, 

25 Walter J. Coffin, Shipping-clerk, 

26 John T. Kent, Piano-maker, 

27 John C. McGilvery, Jig-sawyer, 

35 L. "W. Tozier, Hair-dresser, 

29 Thomas (iannon. Machinist, 
34 George E. Blanchard, Car-builder, 

30 Charles H. Sanders, Gas-fitter, 

88 John W. Spellmaii, Blacksmith, 

31 Orrin C. Hodgdon, Clerk, 

33 Frank Corson, Marketnian, 

36 Daniel Adams, Janitor, 

32 William W. Brown, Photographer, 

37 Daniel Crowley, Janitor, 

28 William A. Sewall, Harness-maker, 

89 Fred Young, Driver, Stable-keeper, 
Steamer, first-size Amoskeag, drawn by two horses. 

Downing Co., drawn by one horse. 



John T. Kent, Clerk and Treasurer. 



Residences. 
Central Fire Station. 
19 Green st. 
24 Fayette st. 
26 Maple st. 

3 Prince st. 
113 Warren st. 
46 Monroe st. 

28 Huntington st. 
33 Concord st. 
84 North Main st. 

4 Oak St. 

107 North Main st. 
56 Green st. 
11 Ford's ave. 
66 School St. 
14 Green. 
Hose wagon, four-wheel Abbot- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



287 



' GOVERNOR HILL " STEAMER. 

RELIEF ENGINE. 

Assigned to Kearsarge Company. 



Elmer H. Fariar, Engineer, 
Henry O. Powell, Fireman, 
Second-size Amoskeag, drawn by two horses 



ALERT " HOSE COMPANY No. 2. 

OFFICERS. 



Fred Lkighton, Foreman. Elmer 

Fred W. Scott, Asst. Foreman. James 

Charles C. Chesley, Steicard. 
MEMBERS. 



L. Gove, Clerk. 

K. Kennedy, Treasurer 



Badge No. Names. 




'Occupations. 


Residences. 


37 


Fred Leighton, 




Editor, 


98 North State st. 


38 


Fred W. Scott, 




liuilder. 


55 Franklin st. 


39 


Elmer L. Gove, 




Overseer, 


185 North Main st. 


49 


James K. Kennedy, 




Hair-dresser, 


Blanchard st. 


43 


Fred Earle, 




Moulder, 


41 Jackson st. 


47 


Charles C. Hill, 




Hackman, 


18 Centre st. 


48 


John U. Seavey, 




Stone-cutter, 


62 North Springs!, 


40 


Ira W. Sanborn, 




Stone-cutter, 


27 Union st. 


45 


George F. Livingston, 




Stone-cutter, 


13 Jackson st. 


41 


Charles C. Chesley, 




Carpenter, 


11 Piince St. 


44 


Henry Tucker, 




Moulder, 


Lyndon st. 


46 


Edward A. Saltmarsh, 




Moulder, 


49 Washington st. 


42 


William A. Carr, 




Grocer, 


Spring St. 




John 


H. beavey. Driver. 




Hose 


wagon, four-wheel W. S. 


Davis & Son, dravi^n by 


one horse. 



"GOOD WILL" HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

John C. Mills, Foreman. Elba F. Horn, Clerk. 

Geobqe H.Sawy'er, Asst. Foreman. Charles C. Nutter, Treasurer. 

Fred Sawyer, Steward. 

MEMBERS. 

Occupations. Residences. 

Blacksmith, 34 Downing st. 

Blacksmith, 45 South Main st. 

Carpenter, 10 Liberty st. 

Blacksmith, 22 Perley st. 

Wood-worker, 18 Mills st. 

Painter, 39 Laurel st. 

Blacksmith, 23 Monroe st. 

Painter, 1 Freight st. 

Blacksmith, 10 Elm st. 

Blacksmith, 34 Downing st. 

Wood-worker, 45 South State st. 

Blacksmith, 15 Montgomery st. 

Clerk, 19 Thompson St. 



Badge No. Names. 

50 John C. Mills. 

51 George H. Sawyer, 
Elba F. Horn, 
Harry E. Houston, 
John E. Gove, 
Charles C. Nutter, 
Elmer J. Brown, 
Hiram T. Dickerman, 
Fred Sawyer, 
James A. Mills, 
Charles A. Richards, 
George W. Patterson, 
Charles F. Bunker, 



52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 



Harry E. Houston, Driver. 
Hose wagon, four-wheel W. S. Davis & Son, drawn by one horse. 



288 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



" CITY OF COXCORD " HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY No. 1. 

OFFICERS. 



Edward E. Lane, Foreman. 
George S. Kellom, Asst. Foreman. 



John J. Teenoweth, Clerk. 
Chas. E. Palmer, Treasurer. 



MEMBERS. 



Badge No. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


63 


Edward E. Lane, 


Carriage-builder, 


5 Fremont st. 


64 


George S. Kellom, 


Stone-cutter, 


90 Washington st. 


65 


John J. Trenoweth, 


Stone-cutter, 


73 Franklin st. 


66 


H. L. Trevette, 


Stone-cutter, 


71 Washington st. 


67 


Charles J. Moulton, 


Silversmith, 


18 Maple st. 


68 


Fred A. Dodge, 


Wood-worker, 


3 Hill's ave. 


69 


George Worth, 


Silversmith, 


North State st 


70 


C. A. Haiues, 


Teamster, 


North Main st. 


71 


Lucius D. Caldon, 


Carriage-builder, 


9 West St. 


72 


Will A. King, 


Machinist, 


55 Franklin st. 


73 


John A. Sargent, 


Carpenter, 


Hill's ave. 


74 


George A. Huutoon, 


Carriage-builder, 


13 Laurel st. 


76 


Henry V. Tittemore, 


Team.ster, 


41 Downing st. 


76 


Benjamin Ouellette, 


Carpenter, 


10 Jefferson st. 


77 


Harris Goodwin, 


Carpenter, 


5 North Spring st. 


78 


Thomas F. Symonds, 


Barber, 


28 Grove st. 


79 


George W. G rover. 


Carriage-maker, 


Grove St. 


80 


Will W. Kennedy, 


Upholsterer, 


104 Rumford st. 


81 


John G. Wells, 


Painter, 


30 Grove st. 


82 


Frank J. Hodgdon, 


Blacksmith, 


Laurel st. 



Hook and ladder truck made by Abbot-Downing Co., Concord, N. H. 
by two horses. 



It is drawn 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



289 



PIONEER" STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 

Penacook. 



OFFICERS. 



John H. Rolfe, Foreman. 
Abial W. Rolfe, Asst. Foreman. 
JoHK B. Dodge, Clerk and Treasurer. 



Henry Rolfe, Foreman of Hose. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 
Enoch E. Rolfe, Steward. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 

John H. Rolfe, 
Abial AV. Rolfe, 
John B. Dodge, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Walter H. Rolfe, 
George H. Sager, 
Enoch E. Rolfe, 
Frank O. Emerson, 
Leslie H. Crowther, 
William C. Akerman, 
David S. Marsh, 
Stimuel G. Sanborn, 
Ed. B. Prescott, 
George H. Tucker, 
Harper S. Allen, 
Ed. C. Durgin, 
Fred C. Ferrin, 
Whitney D. Barrett, 
Lester W. Prescott, 
Arthur G. Yinica, 
Ruel G. Morrill, 
James Kelley, 
Thomas C. French, 
Peter A. Keenan, 
Daniel Smith, 
Arthur D. Farnum, 
Fred M. Dodge, 
Lawrin W. Rolfe, 



Occupations. 

Wood-worker. 

Door manufacturer, 

Glazier, 

Carpenter, 

Machinist, 

Machinist, 

Cabinet-maker, 

Stationary engineer. 

Cabinet-maker, 

Machinist, 

Cabinet-maker, 

Blacksmith, 

Butcher, 

Blacksmith, 

Door-maker, 

Carpenter, 

Cabinet-maker, 

Blacksmith, 

Saw-maker, 

Carpenter, 

Butcher, 

Expressman, 

Carpenter, 

Cabinet-maker, 

Butcher, 

Blind-maker, 

Electrical instrument maker, 

Carpenter, 



Residences. 

Summer st. 
Penacook st. 
Merrimack st. 
Penacook st. 
Merrimack st. 
High St. 
Church St. 
Elm St. 

Washington st. 
Washington st. 
Centre st. 
Union st. 
Main st. 
High St. 
Merrimack st. 
Summer st. 
High St. 
Charles st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Washington st. 
Church St. 
Charles st. 
High St. 
Summer st. 
Meri'imack st^ 
Merrimack st. 
Summer St. 



Steamer, fourth-size Silsby. Hose carriage, four-wheel Amoskeag. 



290 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



"OLD FORT" ENGINE COMPANY, No 2. 

Eciiit Concord. 
OFFICERS. 

ELBRiDdK Emery, Foreman. John C. Hutchins, Treasurer 

Samuel Batchelder, Asst. Foreman. C. E, Robinson, Clerk. 

Joseph E. Pluumer, Steward. 



2\'ames. 

Elbridge Emer}^ 
Samuel L. Batchelder, 
John C. Hutchins, 
Cyrus E. Robinson, 
H. H. Carpenter, 
O. W. Coon, 
Joseph E. Plumtner, 
Daniel B. Sanborn, 
William L. Bachelder, 
William H. Smith, 
James L. Potter, 
Samuel G. Potter, 
George O. Robinson, 
Henry P. Hutchins, 
Fred Rollins, 
Charles P. White, 
William E. Virgin, 
Arthur Swain, 
George Field, 
Parker French, 
Chase Boyntoii, 
Daniel Pettingill, 
Albert H. C. Knowles, Jr. 
James H. McKeagh, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 

Farmer, 

Clerk, 

Engineer, 

Clerk, 

Hose-maker, 

Farmer, 

Painter, 

Farmer, 

Farmer, 

Farmer, 

Milk-dealer, 

Milk-dealer, 

Salesman, 

Engineer, 

Painter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Carpenter, 

Moulder, 

Belt-maker, 

Butcher, 

Belt- maker. 

Farmer, 

Stone-cutter, 

Butcher, 



Residences. 

Potter St. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Portsmouth st. 
Portsmouth st. 
Penacook st. 
Shaker st. 
Potter sf. 
Shaker st. 
Potter 8t. 
Appleton St. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Shaker st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Mill St. 

East Clinton st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 



Hunneman 5-inch cylinder hand-engine, with hose jumper — drawn by hand. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



291 



"CATARACT" ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 

' West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



John T. Mdrphy, Foreman. 
Jeremiah Cottkr, Asst. Foreman. 
Frank H. McXulty, Clerk. 



Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 
Patrick Conway, Steioard. 
Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



Names. 

John T. Murphy, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Frank H McNulty, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Patrick Conway, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Herbert B. Feabody, 
George W. Kemp, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
James E. Fannon, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Sylvanus E. Danforth, 
Cornelius A. Giles, 
Thomas P. Hearu, 
John H. Crowley, 
Nathan H. Martin, 
James W. Welsh, 
Fred W. Peabody, 
John Caldbeck, 
James W. Powers, 
William J. Sullivan. 
Hugh McDonald, 
Timothy J. Murphy, 



MEMBERS. 



Occupations. 

Stone-cutter, 

Blacksmith, 

Mill operative, 

Farmer, 

Engineer, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Mill operative, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Quarryman, 

Carpenter, 

Quarryman, 

Engineer, 

Blacksmith, 

Mill operative. 

Expressman, 

Steam driller. 

Mill operative. 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 



Residences. 

Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 

Hopkinton road. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main. St. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Hutchins st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 



Hunneman 6-inch cylinder hand-engine; one hose jumper, drawn by hand; one four- 
wheel Amoskeag reel, drawn by one horse. 



292 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REGULATIONS OF THE CONCORD PRECINCT FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 

ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS, AUGUST, 1888. 



Article 1. Any engine or hose company running out a line of hose 
from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled to the pipe, although the 
hose of other companies may be attached in order to reach the fire ; and 
any company coming to a fire, and finding an incomplete line of hose laid 
out from a hydrant or steamer, shall attach to and lengthen out such 
line in lieu of laying a line of its own. 

Art. 2.- When two or more engine or hose companies are playing in 
a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the company attaching to 
the hydrant or steamer, as provided in the foregoing article ; but any 
company furnishing the entire line, and receiving water from a steamer, 
tlie pipe, shall belong to such company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Each engine and hose company shall have equal claim to the 
hydrants ; but it is enjoined upon the engine companies to draught their 
own water from a reservoir, whenever a suitable one can be found within 
a reasonable distance. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant or reservoir, 
unless their hose and apparatus for attaching to the same are at hand and 
ready for use. The company which shall be thus ready shall be entitled 
to such hydrant or reservoir ; but, upon the order of an engineer, another 
company may attach a second line of hose from such hydrant or steamer, 
in case the same may be necessary, such company having first laid its 
hose, and being ready to attach the same. 

Art. 5. No engineer shall interfere with, or attempt to give orders 
relative to the location or use of, a line of hose when he has ascertained 
that another has command of it, unless by consent of the engineer in 
charge of it, or by orders of the officer in command at the fire; and it 
shall be his duty to inquire whether there is an officer in charge. 

Art. 6. In proceeding to, working at, or returning from, fires, noisy 
demonstrations are strictly prohibited, and it is required of officers of 
companies to maintain perfect order and decorum in their respective com- 
mands during all such service. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. ^ 293 

Art. 7. No company, while returning from a fire, will be allowed to 
proceed faster than a walk, and it must at all times keep on the right of 
the street. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding to a fire, to use 
the utmost care and caution consistent with promptness. Racing between 
companies is forbidden under any circumstances. Any collision or 
casualty occurring to horses or apparatus will be considered a sufiicient 
cause for the suspension of the driver in charge at the time. 

Art. 8. No member of any company shall leave the city without first 
informing his foreman; no foreman, or assistant engineer, without first 
notifying the chief engineer, — in each case the party so leaving providing 
a substitute. 

Art. 9. In case of fire, the foreman first arriving shall be in command 
until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 10. Any order issued by the chief or an assistant engineer shall 
be promptly obeyed. 



RULES FOR DRIVERS. 

The drivers shall be required to occupy sleeping apartments in the 
central station, each being allowed two nights off each week, from 9 
o'clock p. ra. to 6 o'clock a. m., upon particular nights to be designated 
by the steward. 

They shall be at or near the station at all times, except when employed 
by the superintendent of streets, or absent by permission of the steward 
or an engineer, and shall perform such duties as the steward or chief 
engineer may direct. 

They shall groom and take proper and trusty care of their horses ; 
shall keep the stables clean, and the harnesses and all things pertaining 
to their department in order ; shall have the horses harnessed as directed, 
and not leave the station without everything in readiness for immediate 
service ; shall exercise their horses when required by the steward or chief 
engineer, and practise care and economy in feeding and general manage- 
ment. 

In proceeding to Main street, via Warren street, the drivers shall trot 
their horses, and have them under complete control until the turn has 
been made. 

In case of fire, the drivers shall be subject to the orders of any engi- 
neer. 



294 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

NUMBER AXD LOCATION OF FIRE-ALARM BOXES. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire-alarm boxes, the 
<;ity is divided into five districts, viz. : 

District 1 Embraces that section of the city north and west of 
Washington street, box 17 of this division being located on the south side 
of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washington streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School streets. 

Districts 4 and 5. Embrace all south of Pleasant street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the district. 



District No. 1. 



13. Franklin and Rumford. 

14. State and Penacook. 

15. Main and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. Greeley & Todd's store. 



District No. 2. 

23. Main and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 

25. Main and School. 

26. Centre and Union. 

27. School and Merrimack. 

District No. 3. 

32. AVarren and Pine. 

34. Central Fire Station. 

35. Main and Pleasant. 

36. Pleasant and Spring. 

37. Junction Pleasant and Washinjrton. 



District No. 4. 



41. South and Thompson. 

42. Good AVill Hose House. 

43. Main and Fayette. 
45. L. B. Hoit's store. 



FIRE DKPARTMENT. 295 



46. Perley and Grove. 

47. South, opposite Downing. 

48. Thorndike and South. 

49. West and Mills. 



District No. 5. 



-52. Turnpike and Allison. 
56. S. PauPs School. 

Private Boxes. 

5. Concord and Northern Railroads — north end Passenger Depot. 

6. The Abbot-Downing Company. 

7. New Hampshire Asylum tor the Insane. 

8. Page Belting Company. 
33. State-house. 

Names of key-holders will be found on the boxes. 



FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

1. Alarms rung in from boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, and 56, 
■will not be responded to by the Alert Hose until signalled. The signal 
to proceed to the fii'e will be a second alarm ; the signal of dismissal, three 
strokes of the bells. 

2. Alarms rung in from boxes 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 23, 26, and 66, will 
not be responded to by Good Will Hose until signalled. They will be 
governed by the same signals as the Alert Hose. 

3. Eleven consecutive strokes of the bells, following any regular box 
alarm, or during any fire, is a call for the relief steamer (Gov. Hill). 

4. Two rounds of each eleven strokes of the bells, with an intermission 
of one minute between the rounds, without any regular box alarm, will 
signalize the requirement of a steamer from outside the Precinct, and 
will be responded to by Kearsarge and Eagle Hose companies alone. 
In case further aid is necessary, the box-alarm 34 (Central Station) will 
follow. 

(These rounds of eleven strokes, which are signals for the relief 
•steamer, or a call from out of town, must not be confounded with an 
.alarm from private boxes 5, 6, 7, or 8.) 



296 CITY OF CONCORD. 

From the above, it will be seen that the companies are subject to calls 
as follows : 

Steamer Kearsarge and Hose — To all calls. 

Eagle Hose — To all calls. 

Hook and Ladder — To box alarms only. 

Alej't Hose — To box alarms only above Pleasant street, all private 
boxes, and upon second alarm to boxes below. 

Good Will Hose — To box alarms only below Centre street, all private 
boxes, and upon second alarm to boxes above. 

The signal for dismissal (three strokes) is used only for the purpose of 
notifying the companies not on duty that their services are not required, 
and does not* imply that the fire is out, or that the companies on duty are 
dismissed. 



TESTING SIGNALS. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of the fire-alarm 
telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every Monday afternoon at 4 : 30 
o'clock precisely. It will be one single round only, indicating by the 
strokes on the bells the number of the box ; and the box will then be cut 
out, and no additional round sounded. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bell will be struck 
from the button of a box, alternating as before mentioned. 



THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH 

Is the " Gamewell " patent. It embraces twenty-four miles of wire on the 
main lines, and seven miles of extension wire for call-bells. 

On the main line are twenty-six fire-alarm boxes belonging to the city, 
and five private boxes, — in all, thirty-one. There are three alarm 
bells, — one of 3,724 pounds (bell-metal), one of 3,740 pounds (bell- 
metal), and one of 2,000 pounds (American steel). There are also seven 
engine-house gongs, four mechanical tappers, one four-circuit repeater, 
and three indicators. 

On the extension line are twenty-three call-bells. 

The battery consists of 103 cups for the main line, and five cups for 
the extension. 

The alarm was put in in 1880 by Edwin Rogers, 27 Federal street, 
Boston, Mass. 



TABLES OF VITAL STATISTICS. 



a; ^ 



CD 

u 

l-H 

H 
m 

l-H 

H 
< 

en 

l-H 



O QJ 




^ 




■73 




n >-H 


^ 


c^ :; 


« 


CC "t^ 


O^ 


ii. 


00 


M 


O « 




-1-^ i- 


»^ 




M 


O rt 


CO 










c/5 a 


Vh 




<L) 


S ^ 


^ 


o <1> 


e 


V. -M 


(U 


bD a 




•H o 


Q 






^':^ 


bJO 


S 6 


C 


^^ 


• ^H 


t^ "^ 


73 


00 f; 


c 


00 ~" 


<D 


O 


^ 




rt 


C m 


<L) 




>^ 


O 


<u 







'~ o 



l"l 



c3 •:: 






o 
o 
= C 

« o 

a; 



g C3 
c5 S 






•73 M 













^ -s 




(U 


S-^ 




J=! 


c =<-< 




+-< 


<rt 






'§-? 






S 




'O 


F 




(D 


-^ 






►:; i 




(U 














S 




bn 


5 
w 




(L> 


Q 


n 


>^ rt 




43 


H ■- 





+-> 


1— 1 ■J— » 


et^ 


;-i 


^ ci 




•»-« 


a jz 


QJ 


ffl 


K .2 


-M 




H 5 


,^ 




^ 


P 




H^ 


^ 







D 





:>-S 



S-^ c ^ S 
.i" o a^ a 



5 — 



;!z;o 









g. 5 



O A 



Jj S S S at;= 
>eqoooo 



" £; g : 



Hi 



I-o 



5 a' 



^ — c^^abi^ 

' c t: -'"'-' "^ * ■ 
K ci _:: = at p c 



: o a ^ o 2 o 

'0^60^0 



a V 5: V^ 

S § g 25 g 



a g" 






:»; -ja 



a oj 

'So ., 

ij o Ci &< Ccc X' S 



e3; c3 o S:;; _:: 



■g-^i 



o-a 2'" 
o >. a t- 
0000 



as c 



? S3 S 2-2 
2 5-".= -S^ 



O !- 



02 = 



<u o [^ o 






-^.•^ t- 0; il -•- 
■ -;"-,> 

pqM (u 2 3 ^o 

0) OS'S =s^ " 



ES 5 ■ 






n 3 "^ Q ■" J "3 



»^, 



>.^ -CS c« 



. . • m 

: :st 

i3 . O o- 
^ ■ '^ O 
C3 o O^ 

ta g . >^ 



2 S'"5 






g<! • S'a 
■5 « s?-t: Ja ►- 






— ."50 . cX 
oJ^I i:i to 

™ ht^ 3) ii a a 
a i- , ■ := t: •-- c 
^ ofLi— «:;; o 

o a' .b.-=-= — 



:2 

S "3 









cfl 




a 


etc 








bn 




J 




^ 


cb 


6J. 


OJ 


^ 


a 


1 

Ph 


^^. 


< 


a 







ff 


aj 


s 


d 






:^S-==S 



>-5 0>i;'i-ioP5cc 



M "^^ aJ- o- 

a '^ - t ' 
S g-c ^ 

O C5 <^ 03 



u 3:;3 Q~ o 



4^ fe fl 
— On3 aj 



•joioo 






00 o CO 1-1 01 








a ■ 










c - 


JD a 






> 


« > 






hJ 


c/21-3 



O 6C 

- ;: ; ^_a: 



■5681— 3*Ba 



,:» 









^ ^ >< ^ P^ pH pi ^ P^ ^ ^ P^ rl ^ C^ C^l iM CSI W N 



.-is 
■>^^^ 

■ c "u 2 
•a g 5?-3 a s o 

es-H 0,0 si Ei o 



« O O 3 03 o^ O^ 



. O 5 0) 



- «, t. "S .2 5 

" S 3 V 5 (^ 
.-)aico-/}-ia3 go* 



^5 



5-^o^Ji 

OS a ^ M .2 -^ 

S'^— . „. 1- ., 



1>1 












■r £ cs .Or 



S »s « 



o:^.'^ 5 o £ 



«*' Lj !T1 u» 



(M T— 1 1^ CO i^ CO cr T 









o5^~ c^o^i^ =1— «-o o>-' e s S 



■5-5 2 x 



a 



■2 « 2 K — s = a 5f Wj s 



:i:'S ci 



uaHOoagcQ2;oo<ioo^jza:;jp:;ao>^^;j£H<i!KgMug«CH;ai3 






§^ 



S' a* 2 = i-' 



^ &: t bJC-n S ^ C C 

: tpi>=; O.CS « o 3 
J i5 Oh a 1/3 O ^; CJ 03 



,-?>^ 






• <0 








•J^ ' 






PhZ 






:•«■ 


^■c 


o o 


o 


5 c 




■ cS 
3 — 



CS ^ - 

,^3 CS 



>^ 



= s 



cs J2 



o) o 



*i o , 

Mt3 



1« 



5 -^ ^ S .^ 



5- .. J 3 o ° 

fc ig 3 js o g g 



3 5^.-2 2- 111 



5:o^OUg^Meo;g;a30 faig;|>MO 



es :.5 



a >" ;5 .s- X 



t.-^ 3 a - 

nOJo.St-ox,-: 
i: li, rt Sf' § ^ 2 ~ 
M 55 15 a o' J cc !»i 



a" o.= s 



S o 






3'S m'i.a 

o n y3 i ^ 
V -B S S ■= 



U 03 









^5^; 



rj«c3«::;:;:j 
. c 3 a 
. o c o 
-03-iO 



i 3 

g3-2g'§°i§l 

* =* a -"^ Ph ^ r, 
P^.S'cs-S a a §)2 

a < ca a a 1-5 ►n 




a 


J= d 


• t- 


O 


fc-Si 

o 


ll 




:)q 


o 


- 2 


ci 3 


O 


a^ 


<ja 



— > S '-^ eft w 

<i> ci £ oi oj — 

MaaoaH 



.;:-i.3^3^t,m 



, - -73 ^ -^-a • 



CO(M i-H ' 



iOC'lrlMiO'-ICOi—l 



lOf-H C^l " CO 



cS a; 



— cs 








<tH 
















































o 






U 










































<D 




s 




<U 




:> 
















> 












o 


•c 


o 

o 

2 ? 


11 


a" 
E = 




E. Island 
rthfleld, 
mbroke . 

nada 

azie, Me. 


_2g • 


nchester 
rlington, 
gland... 
ly 

w York . 
verhill . . 












Im 










































O 














. ^ 






• 






^ 


• 












a 














•S 






eS 






a 


i_i 












a 


2 








C 




:§ 






§ 


a 








■o t 






Si 


S 


^1 




CJ 


■E if 






id., 
rlan 
leste 
hill. 




M 




So- 5 = a £ S.^i; 2 s =.= -3=: a & S bc:S a > 




o 












^ ; 














• U 






a 






a 






.^ . 












<u i; 






C3 

a 

D 

« 
O 


u 

OJ 

5 
3 


Stone-cutte 
Foundryma 


'5 
C 


Silversmith 
Harness-ma 
Machinist.. 
Hod-carriei 


Quarryman 
Carpenter. . 
Marketman 
Blac^ksmith 
Merchant. . 
Stone- work 
Stone-cutte 
Stationer . . 
Wool-pcour 
Granite-cut 
Plumber. . . 
Loc. firema 








; • :'a • • : : : 




o 

a 

0) 

"2 


<n 


: .i! :.^ S : a ' ii - 




■^ 


'^ O'^Oo'C O'Oo'a 












nco 

nac 

nco 
nac 
Co 
nco 

nac 
nco 
nac 
nco 




vj 


o a)oa;'-..o a,Oa'o 
O Sh Ofa>0 c-ocmo 












•sin9 


^. ... = ....:.: = = ..r..c. 


-OTd JO aoioo 




tw 












0) ;^ 














o 




















= . ^^ ■■= W ■ 




0) 

a 

s 


u 
.a 


c 




b 


.av^S c 

M-l 3.2 


= »: Is 




.a 

o 

3 




Libbey. 
Kenda 

<ey 

Pentlai 
Bulloc 
ickey... 
a Bianc 
. Georg 
nock... 




•a 
'S 


a 


Kate Bol 
Sadie P> 
Nora Kil 
Julia Ke 
Philome 
Alice M. 
Ellen O'l 
Armenia 
Flora Sa 
Josephin 
Mary E. 
Mary Du 
Annie T. 
Nancy B 


Mary E. 
Carrie E 
Ellen Ca 
Lizzie O. 
Hattie L 
Louisa H 
Katherii 
Hattie S 
lola Pen 








a 
o 




2 










ii.:-i:^ '■■ 


■ oj ; 










o 

a 
■ 


Stephen A. Marst 
Alexander Lyon. 
Edward Kenney. 
William F. Gallas 


o a o^ 3 


h 

a 

"it 

C 


Napoleon Laundr 
James L. Quinn.. 
Frank W. Mayna 
Edward F. Doyle 
Granville W. Lor 
Chas. W. Wilcox 
Martin H. Spain. 
Frederick L. Bess 
George H. Silsby 

\TotfllQl,r Hafriio 


a 
^- 

s 


'S 

c 

c 

Q 

s 


a 
& 

o 

fa 

"-a 

fa 






•joioo 


\^z z zz z z z z z ^z zz z t-i :i 


; :;: : 


' - 






T3 
























2 c4J 












o 
















■" — ■^■"-< .a _, .w .a *^ .a *i ^ ,- — ■« — .a*j_ 










1-l(MCOi-(C0 «OC^C0COWt~rH(M TO^i-l" CQrt<r-IC<l 














-5 

o 














o a 




g : 


o 






6* o 


to O tH) 


'Cj 






a .£} 


e--::--------.aa---------- 












CS 






> s 


-* r^ > 


>< 






)-) w 


J «3 


c« 






a 


0) 

"3 

a 




















































































fa 


fa 




















o3 




QJ 
























































e3 




CS 




















































g 




s 






















■« 














































• !-< 














































.a 






^ 












H 










a 


















tH 












o 






























































j^ 


•^•^ 












Ji! 


'• $ 








V 






























• is 




















o 


ai 


It 










"3 
pq 


c3 






















— 


a 0) 










is 










o 

a 




■2 

OS 










— 3 

w5 










a 




:'3 








o 

fa 




is 




•Z6i 


I- 


-ajTJQ 


rH 


<M 


■*< 


tDO> 


05 


o 

r-l 


o 


coia 


CO 


t- 


C-05 


o> 


S 


S 


S5 


CI 


CD 
IM 


§ 


00 
C<l 


00 


s 



-xcSa fttco-a 
ii C.C3 i) ei °~ O a 



; is 

•"S = a 

J= C J2 3 
*- o X t- 



5 e= 






Sfafa^g;! 



; o c o « >"- ^ ■ ^ 
)HOi-;-3KfaMO 



Coo 

a a a 

O a> o 
OP-iO 



:.S5 

'fa'^fa,, 

3 S Jj cS^ 



2J^5- 



.__^a^„ 

*0 O 5 2J 1^ 
— o "^ — ^ 

5j a; .2 .«< .S 



.2 t; 

"i E S 



a SjhcS S 

£d_ a a 

fc. ciJ3 

• « t^ o 



i^;;)aOfaQfafai-5 



S^cSr-^a^C-l' i-Hl-^ 



a- 



ir^ioiocot^b-coosc^co 



>• >■ ■!-> 



'- :^^ 






:« 












S- 



o o 

^2. 







g 3 i; >,gz^t:,^ S s = 'i'^62'?' 






"si §-< °- 



^ S 5 o '^ Q 'ow^ri-^^iri^B 



^.. 




0SC0 03OOtDt-;t:;C0C0ffiO5^Ng5^^S^tqN0qeq 



c.co-*^»oocoOL-oo^«ooa.o.coco^;g^SS 















= 






o t^ 



-jud JO J0(0.-) 






c o 



Ho 




3 ■ a; I* -^ • ^r?^ J Q ^ 






■joioo 






1^0, 






3 5 



E: : 






Si! 



•S681— a;Ba 



S<J 



cie^NNc^<Mc^i?)s^cqcoeoco 



oS :ji 






^ " ti— ^S ?^ " "^ c '■'= Z » c ■ 
= = o o S ^ = 5--=^^ = 55 
cc2§ooo°:;:--oc->? 
>-i;,Hxai-ioaHg:aoJr^ 






o gt: X - t- oj-c o a- o-r;^ o o r c o 
o = § ^= c §§ ci: o =•-: o S^ffo 



-"■ M p ^^ 

r- r- - t-, 



_ . 05 OS 

HKCH 03-5 



.-^3a)'a^o5rt::^«c: 



5« 



s c ^ c - i:5§ 

ci 5 d =S'3 :J t- • 



o 

t> c - - 



oj o 



^: 



CS s c = • ■ o 

" o) 00 : 

C CS !^ W = N^O 

<i; ■< f5 Si •< ti *<l 



O cjS cs-i =^ 

^ .S -S S -e <ii '^ f^ 

?t=i 03= ^m n, 






S 5 32 -C < 1-1 S -^ ! 






>>5 a o o 

■" Oy c! S 9 Mn 



S fct J I 



+3 S b C ft c^ 

..^ n* — 5* ^ a r- JZ 



i^i 



;>;z. o r- fe 

— ►^ ^^ :^ ^ 



I-l ' MtHC^I • •* N ^ CO 1-1 H •* CO 



t-1 lO i-i ;o t~ 



.& 5 •- 5 •- 
3 M 3 S J 



.0 a> ; 

111 

g o fcT 
s: !- o 
-^ re a> 



■a - 
to 



rHIN<MCO«Dl— t-000000000-"lMC-lCO'*-*'"mcO 



B c3 — -js ci 






^1; 



■ « : ^ : : *^' S : 

Z 9^ o^ o-c ©-4 o 
o S o— o cs " 0? o 



ii o 






C 3 :■ = -V, P 



;o;j 



m U S to s ? a 
oooo_:o30o 
CQ 2h O — -/;0>-^^ 



■ Oi 



:.S :s; 



• « : OS 
= 5 ■ B 



:^ : :£b 



O ca - cJ « =* ® — ^ ^ '^ 






s "p ■£ ^ 



■ OS 



Concord .. . 
Penacook . . 
Concord ... 


Penacook . 
E. Concord 
Concord.... 
W.Concord 
Penacook.. 


Concord. ... 
Penacook .. 
Concord ... 


Peniicook . 
Concord ... 


o 
o 
o 


^.z. 




— -- : 


iZZZ 


^ . 



l£ 



• -2 . O • • • = .;- ■ O " 



!= — 



-5 t. i. = 



I ^ = a 



SlS'g g-o; S = 5.=S ^i: s«i.£ => = 2.2 S'^^S 




A 

p 



hsS^-^O^^HO^^ 



^.:... 





^§jMSSaNSSc^cqcN(M<NN 



^1 : ;^J§-:^;;^ 

5-3 733p^oWo2go-a 

OjOcjtS^O'DOC-'OoS 






a g- 03 S- 



t« 5 V, 9 



a bo 
S 53 ?; cs o a 



. o .^ ^ ^ a — 

. X "d .S o r - 



6 Kc 



; a- 

) o <u 






52o, ■«, 

— So:: «: 

bJDt. a = 

a a) o cj 



1^ 1-s sg 

S « £ c3 o a 
pqo wU OW 



1^ s =»-s 



h^pshe 



' ■ ■ OJ « c 

; : :-^r 5_ 

! OS cS .^.w ^ tu t< 0) ^ 

< -3 ^in O X3 cc HM-ii^ 



a ^ 

a" 



oi-i 



a^ a " 
o ■ o 
OHO 



= o§^ 
• o 
HO 



^- — . 



! iH, . .to . -r ■ 

- « o. • a • s - 
! .a c j;^-5 • 5 g : -^ 

i<S • ° 2 est* °^ 
S 3^ ^ O -'.= ■-- ' 






« a 

• a> 3 o 




rHsqo3X.t-rHNcici;f5t;;t:;SS55»2SS§§^^ 













> 

s 



a = c fea; n « c 



-OOZoDUOO 



'■c 




1 

a 







SW TO j^ C3 CS-^ O 
C C ? JD C - '-5 



■sjna 
-jBd JO J0[oo 



•J3 a 



^ tr= ftp 

ca OS « t 
1^1 oSHO 






5 o-s « 



;3s'aj I a; c3 



H-> ^ -J '^ .S 



■.^ : :- 



O G g = S — ^ « 



•jojoo 



■a 




O 












j= 




<*! 










o 




- 


'-' 


^ 


-SJ2 


,^J 


o 


















eo";i- 


»co 


































to 










;z; 




t— 1 










(m 












o 




9 








be 




O 


60 






£i3 




^ 


S i 


^ 
















> 




r;^ 


> 


















^ 




CO 


1^ 








Q) 




























a 




S.: 




- . . , 










QJ 










1X4 




fa 











a 



"CCOT 7V\Vt-T COODODCOODOOOO 



§ ° i- 

Ms s; 

a o « 

wok 



.c4?'t-cojiJ.'S8ia)aoc3°°«'a3o 



=S « o 
MoaO 



■r-. ■ r- : !*, 






;a K 

bi! 



tj crj 1) 

q a<a 



'''laS Wfi — .2<^s~"aS W)^ a ^ -= = = « — := t; 
s^o) . a ^ u y, o a .^ ^ o ^ -i^ ^ ^ ^ o 'A <i' '^^2. 
HH> PHO>aMK)O^t-iUa3H.:0O<iau>-jQaa3H 




60 
N 



O 



o5 5 



-t- QO « cj 0) O 



ijmaa 



t^ J3 a 



faccOOM 



;:a ci ^' 4^ *— ' W <^ 



a 



M >>5! . "2 2 d 
^^«^l^a 

N N g 'n "g g 

^ ^ uij'.:: —■"to, — — o-Scu^a 



— 3 « d q ^"^ £ S s •" •■ 






<^< 



S 'S 'C •- a- 

■2 - i P-= 



fa 



"d rt "^ fl_i -^ 



''Z^ 






Qfa 



?aa^;5Ha 



5:— s ? 2 • i- 

^cs _-=; o'— _, 
^ > a i- y t, a 

:_ >^ cS a 03^ 

0; 'd o ^ -^ ja o 

s^fa'-5a>yi-? 



,- "dM- ' •!3~'a 



J« 2.2 
5 "Si 

■a -^ — 

^ 5. jj 

ill 



rHi-li-lr-lr-lt-lrH(MCqiM<MlMC^CQlMN(M 



e3 



o— 1 -a -3 
a £^ as 



§ a" 






a a 
o a 
00 



tr ■ OS t.~< 

2 o-g, o c 



= o 



— >.s a o 



Cj£:«^S^ 






= ^ a 
•- O es 



6^ 









I— iwi c 









Oi-sMSyf-t 



o 

ij 3 : .'• 

;§-= a g_3 
^ i .= 5 ^ 9 5 

St* o S o ° cs 






j= "3 o" i ■ 



i; = « S 5 P 



.Z -1^ ■• a u f' "' — ^ i> c :r > ~ M- -^ ^ 
^^qffl?>o^p « « S^ a: ;?; O M ? S M 



m 

■ a** 
> o = 



0) 



«-^-o =5 



I § 



fe a = a" 



o ; 



Ss 



OB. II 53^ ^ 



So: 



- o 

Ed 



o - 



iSao 



) !- ?^ >- 



.2 3 



01 J3 - 
^1 



S a - "3 a 

0'-5 l-!-5 



00 0) "^ 

fej= '= 
S -- ° 

5S ^ 
St, .2 

. CJ (h 

CO a. <y 

tn O Q) 



bi« -a 

■ cs-3 I'M *" 

>>§.= >;>•:: t- 

« a3 S^ 3. 



- (V, CT__ 



O' 
^ C3 t^ 



.^S : 



B -. 0^ 



a; 



S"" oS 



! : ; '2 o . • , 

■ • • ^'£ -.Si 

01 S 5 O -O > J 

q ;- - .= o Si 



jaanSSa; 



a s .:: o o 

«* g 3 =3 Z" ^ 
Q « a or ,• 



bS-a^ .-a 



l-^-s: 



•■3 
.f-i o ~ o c "^ 



2g 



ag 

a S 
a 60 
.a N 



. S£4).2 5Pa;pi^yr-M .igcsg'^ 
I !- J, S^ -H -5 |2 ^ „ .= -5 ■^'-SS^ 

:-a aiJ ci ??a.S.2 i; E'i::S =*-e3 b'^ '-i 
5c83'aJo«d'^S'*Bra'a;::a.Q=sa1 



OS 



o■6cg^ 



2-303 






=. . — i: 3 : ^ a a 



a -50 



y5t2~*:_._i--/:Kj^a__-, 



o - 



•< c = S o ■' 



a a 
7% *> 



£ 2 „; * ^ £;> a -t g C? 5 o ■£ [^ 5 ^ .^ 2 
S 5 50.S ^ o S-3 ^f|3 =^"5 ta = a 
K >.— aOi2°-o^ = a — ^^t.oat-^ 



s,^-^ 



■* i-H Mrl 






t^05 O C5 Oi 



'5 53 



pHl0^cDl-*l>■050^rH1-Hc*^cccocoTt^cDt^l^^-l'^^^l2^c■lcocoo»c»oolr-•ooxasooo 
^HIHrHrHl-1^-ll--^rHrH^-^r^^H(^^c^^(^I(^^l^1(^^c^c^1t^1!^^ca(^^!^l<^Is^lcooocc 



IJ 



g-oo*ic •— -aa) tit's 

bjtH = JJ C C s^ 03 p 
C c3 O ^ O $ ntj. t- ci 



2i^ 

1^ 



i;i hS i;i CO iS o o i^ImKc 



; c o 









o s a, -c -^ , 



»— I c3 ^ O a, 

M= C S 

C es O O 






O C o 



J3 

-if 



s^ ll* 






r • 






= ^C 



cchjeQ 






C3 C 0-" ii c 



3°,.- 



o o 
a E 



■sjue 



c -ii -2 



ffl 



'Eo 









54: -g 









3ca 
S-c I 

III 



qPh 



o_; k 



O ^---r^.^ SC 



p C3 o5 CC_2 oj 






^ (-^ 5; r^n V ^ T ^ ^ 



■5 =i Sr 






o 



p>-^ ai 












■C2 ■ " 

1^ 



-Pi — 
r' =^ 

fan p"^ 
- K C 



O O > 0,' - 

»■• -^ o •:; o 



as- . E r- . 
1-5 ;S O >-: H5 p: 



c s o^ 



-■"&* = 

S ^ ^ !-. : 

-^'■§^ 

ci .-a c 
III!" 



o M c r- "- — 

ci o S S ■= = 

•5^ c o^ 



■JOIOQ 



'Z3 


u 














^ 


cftj 






























tM 


<M 




■Sm - 


-c - ; - 


- "SSts 


TS-C! - "S££t3- 


S-£'££55-c£73T3 




, 




t^r-l ' 


CO 


■* T-1 ioCO 


CO C^ rl I- «D CO 


r-lrH00a51OCCIM-*C0M 





m 














'A 


'^ 

































;; 






p . 




C 


— • 
















be 





tjj 


b£ 




be 


SB 




.0 








--^c---- 


















> 


:^ 


> 


Z^ > 




r^ > 


r^ > 
















h-1 


'/} 


>- 




OiU 




coJ 


CO J 






•5681— a^'BO 



'>-5Ml-5 

MMCOCOCOCJ—'— li-l(MCO'i<Tt<iCCD01000C- . 
r-l'-lr-li-lr-(i-liHi-lrH^Ca(M>)Cqc 



Slt^CDCTCOt-'OOOOOi— t 
1 CI IN IM (M C<1 01 N CO CO 



o a> 
OS 



o oj rt 



52 



- a 









= o-S «3 c-s u 05 o o 

ix! CO-, C-=-^ >>= c^ o i C" = tlH O o O = « = S£_ 
^l<Cgil03 = *'OOO?J=Oc:OOS ■^bi.!Hc81-03CcS« 









- ? 



-a-p 



— S "* 55 § 3 S 
.2- S-Mc t~ 
^^o?'co5.?' 
O g aa J M O .X ^ 






G^^'a;wQji3Cfl3ajOS«s-'0 



■to = s = 



>a 



. c 

Ca r i 5 " 

te S -a c 5 3 

C OJ OJ o §fi 



i-Ss 



^"C ? 






J 


^ 


3 


E 



J P-c 



: be • t>c 2 = 

■ = 2 = C c4 

c >> - 
_ bt' 



be 



:i-i "^ C!-= £ 



« V: 



1 *- p t. 3 t. 



fU w q; _^ 



C-. CO c wx O c -/3 c; u 5? ca 






o Si; ° ao ■ 
^ --^ . o^i: 

ce 2 3 t- o ei i; 



coCu 



•a 5-a 



o ' :; - :; 



^5 



04<! . 
O Ot3 
cot; 
000 






:i::^:i::- =^r z z -^ 



"S 3 • ? «.2 






C' ni= ■^-T 



3 >>« 



o E 55 



:>>l .5 



,2 6C~ 



N >- M ^ :i; =- -^ 



c 5?S_;S 

'^ .j5 C3 rH 



za3> 






o — 



5S 



o 



S ta^ '^^ I — 



O'— ^»- 1-1 



'— o 



-So 



•^2 

o >: 












; le-l t-'— 
^«~^ — 

J -a ci 

:?s o 

" it .- o 



o c ^ t. 






■a a* 
ti b. a 
-5 a 

^ C2t> a 

rt o 5*1; o ® d d 



M^ 



— a; » c3 g 
"^ o oo-S 



O C3 

= -:&.: 

^ PS 



i - > »r; rt .a^ 



.~~ m : ■OT3 ■ 



-OS- c» 



NrH (MiO 



r40<Dl-t-COOOO-H^H2^1N;*2;5:SSSS^'r;SSS§S§?lC?S§SSc5SS§ 




•5681— »;^a 



^iMoqcOTt..a>ocDoocooj05wC<jL002u3co22rag"=ggggS§^53S3 



and 
per- 
ried. 




o 


o 


s § 


■f 1 1 


^ ri 

° Is 

^ 


""3 


^'1 § - 
1 2 b " 1 c 

M (§ « 


« o 


5 2 t> 


4- S 


- O 1^ 


C ..OS 


as c 


_ c t. 


lidence 
ation 
bom m 


o c n 


= ° C o 
1-1 O a, u 

>- o "S 


. -2 ^ 
» o « 


d a f^ ^ ^ 
P Hj d g 


.a 




1 1 1 


> . _ 










n - - 








1 


Pi 








•aStsuj'Bui 


+ 


- ''3 "K - 

- 1^ ^ - 


: : i 


IM ^ - - 


CO ^ - - 


a 




















! .2 
















a : • • • • ■ 




11 










<2 


<2 


.' ■ '. ^&. 


%£ '•■ : -fi :£ 


0) • • 

• . » - . y_| . • 


A 




























> c ^ 


: : : = s a ^ : : t;& 5S 


: : ji : s3^ : : 












S j; <u 


■ ■ . Oj ^ 


aj a> . . a; 0) i< a 


. s s a^ : ' 


o 










sag 

o fe o 


• • • a.2 


^3 . . o a o p 
O o . • § o'S c 


• • a • a ^ : : 

• • c3 • eS 9 • • 












KfeW 


: : :o3: 


mM : :ui!i-!i 


: :&^ ifeW : : 


1 ^ 
















: : : : : ':>■ 


;;;:;;;; 


o 




















i O) en 
















A \ : : : M 




y o *- 
















o 






"S 




3 J 










._.... . oji ....... . 

S : : : : s ! « . ■ : 


.H' a 


o 




^ a -c 




-d 


o. : : : : :x 


. : e S . • . - 


it:* 






§ «- c- 2- = 


, n , , , 


M a 


• • cs a * * ' ' 


s 




: : 


o-S- OS- £- c 

o 8 '5' [2 = 

2102 h5 S El 


:: _g :: : :: 


55 : : :;2; :fL 


: • « £_; : • • 

• -o^S • • • 

: :mp^M : : : 


i 






























'^ 


-g£ 


• >>>> • 


: : ! : :~ : 


: : : : : 'a' • * 


Names of par 




^ o 


Ok 

3-9 
so 

3 a 


S & 0-g.o c 

■2X3 ■- 03 > r 


C S O - 

Mil 

a"^ os-3^ 


lit ||^llil||C^| 

a - a C^ s*>>"tr3o-'-' <^.Sq-" a m 
S3 = <b<;j;sSg-ao-ng^.aH 
oosc — ^L2oi'eS^B"3 5«oS 


o 






D. 


J 






: : : K-i 




o § 


^j 




^ 


• aJ 




■g i : !^' 




i 


1 S S -^ s 

g § o = - 

.2 o ^ "S 5 

o la c» hi; £i3 


: -a 

a o , 

K § 


c. -s : 5 

^ S « ? 
^ O Z 01 


i 1 : 


■s 1 










; O 




! ; ; aj 




c ^ 










I s 




> 




•2 ^ 




o 


: ^ § 


: ; -2 

: o 


i 5 i 2 

'^ ^ ^ a 


J : : « 

a • • 

§ : S3 ^ 


Occu 
com 


1 1 S i M 

•§ § •§ g ^ 


oj al OJ 

a .£ s 

O jj o 


OJ <U Oi " 

n ° o S 


•a <u 5 S 
2 £ .s S 

i 3 cS 


bC 


>3 a >5 W 55 


H « ffl 


p-i tl y s 


g i2i cu a 


•joioo 


^ . . . : 


: : ; 


;: : : s 


: s : :: 


•aSv 


(33 l^ 1-, CO W 


30 00 lO 


1-H O O CO 


OS •N 3; jg 


S -H CO (M (M 


rt M IM 


CO <M N r-H 


CO W3 CO CN 














nee 
time 
iage. 












eside 
;hat 
marr 


o _ , , ^ 


i 1 

O « i 


- V. * -. 


.- s. .* - 


1 cj S 


a " "■ " ' 
o 


a § 








O 


w o 






[ o 






: : "2 • 




Name and surnam 
of groom and bride 


.a 

g J 


: o " : 

Mil 
I ^. » ^ 

' ^ "£ P3 
: .S ,S? c 

3 C3 M H, 


fl ^ >• 
a a ~ 

S fe es 

=^ H 5 
^ H s 

33 S S 
g Q S 


i ^ > ■■ 
B V. S >. 
W o o ^ 

<D " 4/ 01 

2 5 ^ H 
^ g 5 1 

^ w H 5 


£ §5 i- : 

aJ T- "2 : 

2 E a a 
02 '-' a ^ 

^' "^ M "I 
.Q 1 .2 ^ 

§ « S g 
>? S ^ a 




t3 




-a 


■o 




;-! 




t^ 


tH 


B CM CJ 


: o 







J 


3 o bjQ 









M 




■s c 


■•d 




2 a 


0) -S 


t^ o 


^ 








1 » r 
OS 3 




o 


: 


8 u 




5 ^ 


s 


^ 


1 fei 


. -sesi-a^i^a 


1 " 






5 




lO 


lO 


05 CO 
I—t 


CO CD 
1-1 r-l 



•aSBUJBpi 



s 




B 


g 






ja 


O 


ft 






m 



o w 5 



- fe _' 



s 




o 


o o 








Cu 3 




Tl 


O 


Ocoo 


o 






ti 



>. O X o 



"o *5 »c 



W!» 



C^ ^ (N ^ 



faDjS 






T!^ 

d =* 



f=Ht^ r- OJ a 



03 » bc-a 






SS 



i-lffi 



E 3 

OS o 






:> 






.1?S 
- ;; ■ o a^ 

a £:;Sfa OS o •, 






•S ? i := ^ »■. O; >- ■= -' . '-' CD "^ 



J o — 



O C3 



<^) 



14^ 



S a 



> A u 



^ O U < S 



f" & 



Ph a o ca 



^ E 



Q U Q &d X ^ S 



.io[oo 



•8Sy 



CO Oi CO C3 Oi o^ 
CO <M CO <M CO C^ 



I^ rH jq (M Cd (M 




•- fcJ3 



-s! g S t* 



2 a 
q a 



2 ^ 



o c — s 

K H < K 



^ S 6 



'zeu-^^'-a I S 



a ^ (5 



O; o) g » 



3 ° 



52 = 



C3 ^ C3 ^ 






. H >^ rt' • a "S S 

3 t; S ^-n Sd^ m 



^ g 



o 


« 


>3 


c« 


^ 


: 


- 


: 


!§ 


^ 


g 


lO 



1-1 


m 






w 


S 


o 


J3 




<) 


_C 






a! 












OS 


es 


H 


S 


S 



a '^ ^ 



t^ f^ " 



O o 


|Jh 


o « 




js a 


•Ti 


o o 




*rcBy 


n 


0-3 


6 


<P^ 






See 


^ 


, 


K 




H 



p3 ^ H »3~ ^ 



faM 



2S 































• Oj 




















• +j 








































■ fc i* 




^Sr/S ^:s 


.-go^oSoSo? 


tcii 
use 
me 

use 


. 3 s 


'.:/ 


a; cu 3 1-; K ;5 ffi fi< :cqiU(Eq 



° S o « 




^H « o 
.aba '^S " S a-d £? 













































K 


: 




> 


.- 














> 






Eg 

C3 






a 




a 




> 






;^ 






< 


, 

T 


i C3 

3 

,a 




c 


a 
1- 


1 




> 


5 


c 


"3 
is 




? 


1 

F 


r 
c 


'c 


"t 


!- 

i 


c 


> 


C 

1 


13 

s 


:; 


















c 



























a 




cr 


C 


> ^ 




C 


g 






iz 


tu 


C 


ij 


',3- 


a 


3 H 


± 




U. 


1^ 




a 


:j 






a 










c 






c 


■c 





5 






C 






b 








0) 

a 


"C 




J 


E 


•^ 




t. 




a 


0. 




c 




a 




a 


g 


t 












^ 






0) 














c 






























<. 




c 

1 


'« 


c 




1 




a. 

c 


^ 1 


3 


a: 




£ 
c 


j: 


c 


a 


!2 




g 
S 
tr 






c4 


1 


^ ....:. r .::... = ..:..... . 








cc 
















OS 








c 




C£ 




^ cr 


c> 


o 




(M 


m 




OT 




Oi 


e^ 


^ 




Cil 











Cv 


c^ 




















-c 














> 


^ -c 


- 


■c 


^ 

s 










1 


- "Z 




c 




T 




^ 




















r 


•r 




;:3 












i. 






c 




— 





* >» 



fr, o fc( u 1-; o 



o ~ — 



5^ S *-^ '■r ^^ 



^ tq ^ y5 



■^ p-l 



^ ^ CD a 



y, o 



iJ -:; 



— _ o 



kj > ^ a fa C5 W 



C5 o 



»^ 


w 


■s 


0) 


*»! 


A 





£> 


pa 








J 


S 






,*s 



E e 







T1 




■a 




TS 




























o 




























P 




a 




J3 


S 




V 


o 


X 


o 


* 


O 






i 

5 


U 




u 


< 


U 


? 




« 




W 




Q 




M 




o 




•-S 




&H 




H 








_ 




^ 




. 




0) 
















M 
















^" 04 




••loioo ] ^ - 



OOOOCJlOSMCOCOjOg 



o I ^NT If) r~- 1^- r-» m ou uu wj wj >-'^ 



cq iM <y< 'yi 



o J Q o 



■° ij 



a 


f-i 


oi 

pq 


g 


d 


g 



■^ rrt 



M pq 



r: OS s 



.2 •= 



3 P5 iJ £M_ffl__^ 



<,< g H fa 



Q ^ I 

.2 a <! 

5 3 S 



^ ^ c!> W w 1-^ 



I -sesi— 8»«a 



2 K U M 



^ ^ 



_M 
















































x: 


- 


:: 


5< 


■a 


2 


= 


■a 


~ 


■a 


;s 


= 


- 


- 


(M 


2 


- 


- 


- 


v: 


:: 


- 


- 



t," is "O S S 

0) 0) 0) ^ '- 

S 2 5; ?** 

JJ O O C OS 



Ill 



5 ^ I- -^ S 
fa Mi; :»3 



ItS 



EbM 



^ K = S 
O a; O S 



- 4J 

^ S 



f— ^3 Q tH 



- s ^ 

BOO 



P c C8 
■§■21 o o 

33 s ~ 3 c 5 

Sh O C^ ->3 << 3 



:ca 






> 3 



i; o ra a 9 S 



? o -! 1? 22 K 12; a^ CO 02 



o a> o cj 






= <- o 









.3 3 
•=■5 53 



« s^^ 



M^S^Sz 









■^ *■• " a oj ■ 



? is oJ ~ 









333 -^ o 






a 


c 


> 


swork 

jkeeper 







E i 



r^ tS 



a 


Q 


li( 


M 





iz; 


w 


S 


s 


3 


H 


1= 





a 


M 


a: 


ea 


a 


IS 


« 


fa 


a 


a 


3 


^ .:........:...:.:::.:. . 


s 


CO 




IM 





S 


05 




iM 


s 


^ 


C<1 


^ 


ffq 


IM 


S 


§ 


?S 


s 


C<5 
IM 


?5 


■M 
IM 


g? 




IM 






i. s ■= 



O O O hT ti. 

O O C 5: ^ 



< O 



12; u 12; o 



?* fa b; 









a; 


w 


5 


a 


H 


a 


1-5 



fi. w 



Q ti &: a ;:;. 



o a 



^ S ■" 0) .IK 

Z > < < 'i 



i^ 








o 
o 
o 

C3 
P 




^' 




"d 




73 -C 
^ I- 


"?* j< 




■d 


■a 


■B 


•o o 








o 

c r 


o 

a 


o c 
o t 

p a 


§ 1 


o 
o 

s 




O 

o 

a 


O 

o 

13 a 


S ^ 








5 ^ 


o 


o c 


o 




o 


r o 


a <o 








w - o c 


u 


o a w 




-o 


s 


Ph 


b" 


^ 


o 


t^ 


C m fl( o 




c 






2.2 


0) 






C3 

a 


a 


a 

a 


^ 


K 5 ^. 




-5) 


C3 


£ 1 


s 
s 

o 


a 




<-i 


o 


!^ 


W 


^" t« 14 




P 




o 


g 




^ 


O 


^^ 


'TS 


H^ < ►^^ 




fe 


a 


S .2 




t»' 






<j 


> 




, 




, 






OS 'o 


<i> 








QJ 














^ 




« 






i-s 


« 














•oSbujuk 


2 


: 


z 


73 


T^ "* 


: :: : 


■: : ^ : : 


: 




■ ,5 " 


si 


































t 






a 














i \ I \ 


: '.£ '.& ■ '^ ; 1 -' 




; ;• 


0) : : 






2l 


cs a 










• J- 


S s; • ^ 


: li's tl'g si'S t^ '-^ 




!r.S s- 




■g : : 


o 




s s 




; ; c 




• a 


a; t. 2 


•a.ajQj.i)t,(D« .2 




a''S a 




•^ • . 


O 




o 2 


OJ ^ 




. . c 




• E 


2 o . E 


;iipli|:t 




£ g£ 




22 ■ • 






II 




. • cr. 

: :l 






iJ2 • !- 

° es -OS 




ci O ^ • S ° • ■ 

foafa ihB : : 


































C8 
























• c- 








O 












£ 








: : :j : : k: 


! "c 






•D a - 


O 












OS 

. . .Si 


a ci 
.2 - "? - - 


2 

= 5 - - 


'g^i^ i X a 
2 5 :-'* 5 2 

'c:>- •a^'*- a-— - 




':> 












' " £ a 


bo"* r^ 




.S: f • t. c t- — 


i"? 




; t 


oj o 


^ 










o c 


a c3 


'o; 


O a; • c3 n 0) vT 








<L.^ 


s 




t-t 






-AC 


S Q 


>i 


:c 


— CO 


'■aoi-^ 


s 

0) 








c 




• ■ 




• • ^ 






a • ^ • _1 ■ -^ • • 




• a" ■ • 


^c 


J. : : 


p. 
o 

Q 




c 

t 

T 

e 

c 
c 


E 
> 

3 


II 


25 

_C3 — 

^ a 

'r| 

i-lS 


5 : 

be . 
- i- ■ «. 

o ; K 
a :S 

o : r 
i-s .rf 


a 


'• • '> ^ = 
- • 1 t^ a a 
t- a; ei > 

^ 1 g^ti 
-aa'^.^J 


P : : . •- . c ■ >, . 2 • -::r • i: 

lllilMilllpli 

?« ==-^"3^ ^-^ >^ s-e = £ 

-— •— ff,C ".i- >-'-^ — ~ ^ s^ a r- 

a rt < p., W K -:'a ^^ o o- u cc h^ S 


~ : is ■ 

a c 

M 

ai 


- OJ 


Saa :s- 

- O^^ O 

§a<5<5g 


g 


















• J : i ^ 








: 1 


t-i 






























^ 
















• > : S a' 




> 




^ C 


o 




"w 






(V 


■d : 




cS -c 


: . : _ o 
= 5 : £? w 




i^ 




0) 


o 


Ch 








« 


d • 




c a 


"^ oi ; 3 a 




c 




c o 


u 


o 


c3 














■c &t . S ;= 








" !3 












a> 


Tc ; 




a -r 


a oj • _ 1, 




a 




a o 


E 




1 






a 


K : 




3 ^ 


o >> • "- a 




o 
O 




o — 


5H 




^ 


ID 






6 • 
















O -a 






> 






_> : 
















§ s 

S O 

J- 


a! 
2 


C3 

a 
s 

C3 

o 


& 
o 

i 


a 
a 

OS 

S 


^ : 

o 
is t.' 

s 1 
1 1 


& i 




\ 1 I 

B S ^ 

o O c 

i: vj iz 


^ 1 i - 

g i 1 - £ 

J D p: O 


V 

1 


a; 

a 
o 

o 


;^ 

o 

a 
o 

a 




•J0[00 


^ 


- 


-• 


: : 


: ; 


: c r 




- 


- 




: i 




aSv 


CD 


CO 


kO 


CO CO 


00 l- 


» o cc 


C^ CO 05 t* lO 


>o 


-n 


* 


M ^0~ 




<M 


(M 




iM ira 


Ci (M 


-H CO CQ 


<N (N r- rl <M 


M 




■o 


M CI 


tw OJ 


























° s 


























ai -^ 


.s 








o 
















5 y 


oi 
S 


o 
o 
c 


^ 


- 


o 

■• a 


-3 

O 

a 


: . . 




^ 


J 




: : 


<U 03 


%-i 


o 






» 


o 














^ * 


o 


O 






5- 


O 














(^ 






^' 






• 1) 














o 


























g 


2 




2 
















J 


= : 


s 

n 
3 




o 


3 

o 


2 


a 1 


a 


a ^" 


2 : i : ; 

Qj - © -a 
M -3 S -a 5 


5 


p 




2 '6 


■a 


n 

03 


P 




d 
o 


'S ^ 


: ^ 




-. K » a §. -s 


u 


3 


5 


a; 

g 

o3 


E 
o 

o 
u 


2 




o !^ 


i -2 


^ £ z 

i s s 


^ J 3 ^ a 

>- 5; :^ a a 

oj O _ .„ a 

a ta c- s s 




[3 


ii 

3 


Z .2 
a a 


» 




OS 




■3 






g ^ c: 


o 


5 


< 


* 1-5 


CM 


0) 
























o 


.s 


.±4 












.i^ —■ 










C5 


tH 


o 




"p 








o V 










c4 


u 






^ 








o ?; 












d 






o 








o ^ 










P^ 


B 


a 




c 
o 


















S681— s^^a 




c^ 




'J' 




l- 


03 




;ii 


<M •* •* 
I-H ■-( t-H 




tD 




7i 



^ ^ 






-O- - :: ci:: 



3 O 

aw 



9 c i „ -. 
§"03 o glj 



O :i3 <1 ;5 ij Q ;?; ^ ^ ai ;3-^-l -5 -^ o CI 



'^ — _1 



o a- o- - M W' 



rs " •„ 



«- 


B- 


s 


J 


C-- 


H 


CL, 


a 


^ ..: = .: : 


to 


s 


?? 


Ol 


S 


^ 


§§ 


s 



a 


J 






K- 


- 


,^ 


a 


a 
a 


1-5 




— 

is 


a 


e 
> 


3 

0) 


CI 

a 


5C 


a 


r® 


■a 


i 


C3 
■3 











■a 

s-> 
o 
o 


o 
o 




o 
o 






o 
o 


o 
o 




a' 


§ 






O X 


5 


a 
o 




a 
o 


a 
o 


^ 


es 


a 
o 


* 


U a 


a- 


O 




O 


O 


a 


o 


U 




bti 


« ^ 










•a 


« 


g 


C3 




a 


ffl 




c 


^ 




o 




M 






a 


a 




O 


<1 


H 




^ 


ii 




:3 


ti 




fa 




-5 


1-5 




i-s 


•-5 




►-5 


'^ 




o 




i) 


> 












































:kH 






















•a 


^ 


^ 


: "^ 


*j 


, 


. 










ci 


rt 


c^ 


w 


" 


" 


"* 


" 


■" 


. 






; ^ '. : • 








•: eg : £" : -^ :& 




'. s 
1^ ST 




^si 


a 




• S^ ? r" ? ^ 


fr^ 


u S :^ t. is^ g 


;-i 


ii^^ -uS 


s 




•"3 S 
• a; 2 






CJ 0) 0^ 0) c 






»-. ^ oj : a; S 


a) 
O 

03 


o 

)3 




a 

fa 


s a : a e = F a 

i^a .-faafaE 


fa 
fa 


1 = 1 ta§ 
^afa .faa 


























>^ : 


















>^ : 








"A : 


















^i' i 








CS-JH 








'■> 












; a 


• • w 


•§.2 




- 


- 




; o 'a 
5 5 : 5 - 


z : 


a 


o "3 


:: : 


a -^ 




"3 <£ 






dZ. 


3 i- £ 




o 






o (. 




A j3 


M 




■^S 


;>^ ^ 




CJ 


m in 






: :a 


^H 


















































^ 






, t^ 














































c 










,^ c 






'■ -B -' 


A M • 










■ s 

a_> 


a 
.2 


=*-Sl 




o 


:i 5 


°2 


a •; 


~ . . c 

a • '' 
S A3 

*: «^ 

--a- 

t* - 

O 'Z 
z> r 
;3 !2 


■J 5 a 


fix 

St 


"o 
s 

a 
o 






a -^ 




.x-jfal 
fa' 1 1 " 


la's >> 














X : 






















f5 -6 














;> 








a OS 






a 


L4 




-^ 




*3 




■a 


* 


r3 


<o 


<D 


■a 


r 


2 


5 -2 








o 


* - 2 


c3 


t 


o 


a s 


- 


a 


a W 




o 


'J 

X 


a c 








>- s 










o 


O 


5 ^ 






§ 


fa i 




O 


22 a, 




o 


















33 










3 




2 


•• i 


3 


o 

•a 
o 
o 


c o 






o 






a 

c 
I 




a tK 


01 

o 

a 


o 1 

a M 


Q 


s 

It 


1) 

o 
3 


o - 


^ ::...:..: = . = . 








•— t f-H 




o 


03 M 


Ol 




CO 




CO 




) 1*1 












■^ 


(N 
















^-l 
















"S •« 






S^'^' 






1 


S «' 


t^ 






2 o 
a o 

c a 














a 


- 


- 


: 


; 


3 = 


: 


- 




a (o 

S fi 


o 






1. o 






u O 








- o 


y 






fa O 






a; o 






23 


a o 


a 






• r^ 




1-5 


: 5 


3 








o 

S 

3 


C 


-, fi 

1 o 

! 1-5 


.o a 


to 

s 


p 

fa 


" 1 


S 
5 


c 

■A 
fa 

a 


.2 


o : 




'i 


- 1-5 


1 :! 


s 


> 




1 


s 
























-d 












































o 


















a 




o 


T3 




O 


•p 










^ 




o 
O 


o 






o 




^ 


^ 








^j 


a 




























o 
















_9 




b 












« 




W 






e« 




lO 


00 




1— 1 




'^ 


























rH 




tH 







S E 



o s w 



<s 


cq 


^ 


6 


eq 


> 



«- o a 

O m 

^1 



•aSBiJaBji ^ 



fc(:::fs<B 



0) OJ q; c 0) 

«i S C'- ft M 

= ;: = ? = 

S ^ S cc 33 






ESS 






Sfc^ 



Qj 0) d* Q> t, qj 

sgagos 

g o 53 o B o 

taat,a3hjs 



^ :c^ : : : .'sM^ 

5 s S o 2 § d 5 g a a 



5 S 






._. t- ^ O -H -- O 






: o 
St; c, 

Q,0 » 







® TS T 



o i. > 



= o 



O c- 

J o 



1 i 5 



H td u — o ffi 



^ s 



o Q 



cS cS cS 
J 1-1 O 



•J0[03 



(M (M CO CO C-l M PI (N (M 



«? — 00 CO 





■^ ^ ^ 



■a r. s 



;: >- 



^ ^ 



a <! 3 a 



o n3 j; ^ a 



.t: 


& 






^ 


;< 


M 


k:; 


^ 


ni 










fe 




a 





•2 E 



a Q s a g <! 



>. -5! 




S68I— a^^a I 3 




o a: 



3 a 


f. 


p 




u U 




c 


ej 


^ ty 


i^ 


0. 


O 








b 




^ 




o 




u 








o 




ni 



a ^ 



o 


X 


J 


H 


U 


a 


&4 


m 


^ .:.... . 


?7 


S 


■5 


o 


?3 


c5 


on 

lO 


(M 

in 



J a '^ 

a M t: 



3 p. 


t, 


;^ 




^ 


O 




P5 


h^ 


C 




cc 


« 










;. 


















i <^ 




a 


a 


0) 

p. 

0) 


1 


1!^ 
O 

1 




y 


1 




a) 


o 

a; 



- a o 



s 


a 


s 


Q 


CQ 


B 


P3 


a 


a 


^ 


kJ 


S 


o 


a 


^ 


- 


- 


^ 


: 


: 


; 


: 


^ 


- 


- 


- 


; 


; 


00 


a> 


s 


o 


o 


05 


CM 


2 




03 


Cd 


!3 


lO 


(M 



O Ph o 



y s 



"? 3 a 



a :: ch 



g 5 



o a = 



X — Oi 



o a 



> <; 2 «!) S 5 w 



o ^ 


•p 






o 




;-< 
o 




V 


1 


•a o 


o 


o 






nee, a 
of pe 
ried. 

Hoo 




U 


&^ 




■o o S ^ 


a 






d 


"S 'c £ = 






,^ 




s 




■M 




f^ 




a 


" ■S S = 










: 


oT - 2 "= 


1-5 




"^ 


^ 1 


E .S - 






















cj o * a 












^ a: 




























•aSeujEK | 5= 


S - 


(M 


;ii 


■C CO 1 

P3 -< 1 


n 


































































upat 
mitI 


. a 






-.2 






;- 
























Oc 
Black 


• s 


2 b 

a, o 


: 3 

• o 






a 
(- 




- 


<M 


















O 




















<!> r/ 






































ft £ : 






T3 


o - 




•c 


■ .'req 


t. ft : 


5»a^|S 


a — 




C 

■■c 


a • '^^ 




£s|§s 










n : 




* ^ 


- z "^ 


•c : o 
















oj c .-s a 2 


o a; 




c 


O • u 




asiH^oxi:; 




^ 


J :« 


"? • 


i • 


































B : 












• • .s 
























C3 

ft ; 

o $ 
S 




0^ 

o 


S o 

|1 


a - 








a :^ 


^^ g a S 


<< 


o « 


s S a : 

3 cS 


H o aO 

. « as ^^ 




s a > .;: -r 
i H a a X 


ll 




2b£"= 


■^2/3 Q 
5PhZ>-5 


J3 




































« .B 










;> ^ 


o o) 


■ -3 B 

; o M 


a 


■3 
O 


•5 


■? B 


rf t 




o 


o 


c« 


ii. o 














a. ^ 


■ O in 




o 




5 H 


1-1 












o -a 
























§ « 


■ "? o 


rn 


Oj 


^ 


^ 2 


-" - t 


I L-^ -i^ 








;S ei 


Occupa 
grooti 
bride 


1 1 1 




o 

3 
O 

'/3 


3 
O 

a 


= B 


■J0[00 1 ^' : :: ^ :; : : : 


■aSv 1 g 


3 --< CO 
1 SQ C-I 


TO 




00 


S ^ 


!t-l OJ • , 












e 
tim 
iage 














3 








3 
S 


3 « =4 5 

S 1 =« = 
Mao ■, 




- 


- 


: 


^ 
















o 
















2 i 
















i 2 s 


; a' 




OJ 

a. 




"a! 


■3 c 






5 2 -3 
3 o &^ 


S 


~ 


a 

a 




1 2 -. 




0) 


O 

O 


pq . 
£ .2 




J H o 
3 i-s O 


"3 


o 


s 


1 ^ 


tu ai 












o to 












Ol .3 T 


3 
























3 










5 i ^ 

" c 


3 i 




- 




- 


c 


) 










•?68X— ^I'Ba 1 g 








H 




CO 






;5 


1 



2 -s o 






3J . JJ C Q) 

j,i» — [> — S^E^t-^i-f^^S 

"^gS^cS'SScS'-S^Sb* 
^sgsga^sgB.aags 
S°So sO.S o s ° SO^oiO 

;ja;x<apMaba^aEHaha 



^=B g s,^ 
"? S S osfr'g 



•=oE55^-^t,=: 



5 oiH 






W 



0<- 



'£5r 



OS 



:a:5 



H cS ^ .= ^. _ ,,, 



A^^l-i^rJ'^. S 



B S 
"©"o O 



^^ ^ IV 1_- V r- L 

|-^^►^a^'-sC 






■■^ aJ-5K >..••:; 









E s 



a c t. c — 
Q o Z a M 



o O Ph 



o >; t: 



5 




a 


5 


^ 


a 


o 


a 


Ph 


a 


^ ..-.:.... -- 


CO 


CO 


^ 


5<I 


ro 


S3 


S 


S 


09 


IM 



•a ^ -B 



Q g S <1 O a 0_^Ph_M 










Sj ^ ;;; c/: P^ 






J2 = ^ - 



^ 


= 


:; 


3 


sz 


K 


J 


s 


u2 


E 


> 


a 


p-( 


a 


&:- = = - = = "--" = = ■ 


s 


•* 


>i 


i:; 


■^ 
S 


^ 






03 


i^ 


05 
CO 


CO 


cq 


?i 



__^ Q^ J2 "" 



z 


•- 


3 


r^ 


J3 


a 


33 


^i 


■Ji 


:£ 


w 


;h 


J 


E 


a 



- o ■>- 



5 i; ■^ s 

:- 3 K ^ 



afi,s£-<;3<!i?> 



, o 



S ■r' ii -"S aj — ■ • •- i S ; 

>-3r'3r'3r3r-s.- 
cj a o a O K a a i; 3 a 



= be 

■£ a 3 3 



«) 


5 


c; 


s 


^ 


S 


^ 


S 










oca 




"^ 



Qj CD <u a) 

t. 3 £ 3 

cj O 53 O 



^ O O p 






*< I . -cc^ 



£ biD r. i 3 = ii 



Z>^x;a:^a-^::,-5<i:»^SS-/:H§ 



r-35i>>i'SSbB 

^ - s - X S o '^ 

r =i o g 2 =* 



_ it ~- 



0) jn 



o •-) § o 



Ih 


a: 


t» 


3 


O 


3 


O 


3 


^ .:.:-. ^ 


S 


CTJ 




§ 


CO 


CO 


i5 


(M 



=:* 



O .5 -7- 



!z; u o 



;t; .i^i 3 

O it, « 
* d "^ 






h-1 :?; 



m 


o 










•a -o 


0^ 




= 


S 




-2 "S 


■a 


o 










» o 


a 


o 








o 





O 


■a 


0) 








S o 


a 


o 


a -i ^ 2 




a 


o 


O 


a 
o 


a 




•a* 




- ,a n 






- OS - 






3 




a 


o 




'p, 




1 g » ^ &- 


5 oT u 1 1 "fe 1 ^ E" 
a ~ 3 >• -3 


b o 
b ^ f ^ fe- 


o 




O 




a 




- »^ ci CD 

^ S Q 


CS 


1 ^ 


5 IB 


03 


3 


fa 




1 


"S 




a 

o 




i z ^ 


a 


td 


a 


'A 


S 


W 




oT 


^ 




i 


5 ^ w 


^ 


d 


K 


•-5 


d 


i-S 




B 


"rt 




>> 




> • . 








H 










03 


'3 




.2 




OJ - - 


















?5 








« 








■T) 










•aSBUJBit 




T3 ■" - - -a 


rH 


: : 


t i 




■s 




: ; 


•z 




a 















• OJ 














hi ■ u 


C '. 






p 














• ^ 














V . 0) 


K . 
















C . • a) 


.OJ * 


■ 3 OJ • 


.11 


SL ■ : 








ft • ft 


ft 


'<;£ 












;« • 


, . . d 
















Oj ■ Oj 


o, • 






ft 










si : S ^ a 


'5 : 


i|"^s^t 


i ■• • 








OJ ■ S 


a> ■_ 


!r"^ 




7 








1 C .* ^ ! ^ 0^ * 


S £ » >- 


v . 


.=2 Oi 1- (U 1. 


^ . '. 








OJ . Oj 


"3 ; 


0) 0) 




O 

o 
O 








: : : : m 

. .... 3 . 

o • 


OS • eS ° o: 


3 ■ 
O • 


• -sBgc 


3 : • 
o . . 








3 1 3 


3 : 
o . 


5 3 

'3 o 












: : : : : :s : 


fa iijs^B : 


:S«t,Su. 


a : : 








j«_:w_ 


s : 


Ma_ 




s 










; :.^ 




















■ o 






<n 










: :'! 






■ ^ ' 










oi ; 


•I*? o ■ • 




O 


















• 






S-at 


:cg : •■ 




o 

a 








a . 

" " " " ' — a 




■a 


3^^ 
" " S S ^ 








- - 


<o-rcj-S033H 












QJ ^ V 


s 


O Oi 0) 






2 


o ^^ 03 ~ a- CS >-. 












'■:::'.: '.-p 


























B 
0) 

CIS 

A 

O 

B 
;2; 






a 

£ 
£ 

1- 


' '. ', '■'•'•'•'?. 

J3^ 

; : : ; ~ : : « t- 

. . . . X • • = a 

: : : : 3 S??-"! 
; . J oi c .5 5 c 

: :-5S^S^^ 

o • • . § S^ 6 c 


'. 3 o J, c 

~ • "O ". 1. ts 

's^a.i.s 


Fa 

3 " 


01 ;. 

o.o; 

5J 


5SS£ 


2 • ■ 

"3 ■ : 

3 ; . 

a : : 




• - • ^ - ^ • ' rx • • I 

_;:::;«;; 3 -pxi ; 

ga o 3 S!> ^5 ffl^- 


5 












i£ 


















k 


h 










; cj 


'. .2 






^ 










• aJ 


>^ 


3 




o 

OS 






1 s 


: % 

- c 






"^ 








^ ^- 


3 
J2 


O 










i - - - 1 


3 ? 

a « 


C 


^ i ^ 




■a 
o 




- 2 

3 "3 
OJ -c 


a 


cd 









V ' ' I 






) o 


is 

0) 




o 

o 

o 




2 -a 

1 1 


o 
















o 

a 


■a 










oJ ; 






o 




u 




;. * 




o 


03 








- i * -^ ' 


3 










1> 


• s 


O" 




'eS 


a 




cj 




-' i '■^ 1 1 

OJ 1 OJ ^ ^ 


t« 


(K 1 


i i. 


0; 




"a 


.ca 


^ 2 




P< 


o 




C 




o 


a; 


Qj ft 




•a 


a « 




u 

o 


p 
5: 




A 




o .M c 2 " 

.Cl O .Q = s- 

=3 o OS o a. 
J O '-^ M S 


*J o 

ft ~ 

3 53 




3 J3 O 
3 03 — 


oJ : ; 
a : : 

E : : 


OJ 

o 


i 1 


B 5 


a 

o 

w 




•JO 


00 


p: --"- = ""'--- ^ - = - - ^ - - 






. _ 


^_ 




-H o th OS ^ 


CC (M I 


-5 -* 


(M O 


o 


03 I 


^ .r: Til — 1 


CO 










D lO 03 .-1 CD 


Tji (M 5 


M O. 


^q M c 


M 


:^1 1- 


•^ TO IM Ol 


"M 


o 


-s 
















H-( 










(U 


01 

s 




aJ 
















■ <"• 






M 




« 




bO 




;n 












- • oT 






03 






■-C 




e3 
T 




: 5 i 






fl 




: : o 






S 




2 


e« 




C4 




a S "g 






^ -2 


s "^ S 


■6 




^- 


•a 




o 




s 




§ 1 s = - 

o =2 o 


: :: 


: : 


g 3 


1 1 1 

o3 3 O 




: :: 


"3 


1 




0) 












O O 


t, O IH 


o 




o 


o 










C 


J S o 






ca o 


H O ?-l 


O 




1-3 


O 


o 






















3 








a> 




» 
















- '- 


O 




• 




e 

OS 

n 
s 

01 




C 
a 

i 

o 

2 

6fl 




t 


<u ; ; : • 

S : c : "2 
a £ o : J 

s s ;] 5 « 

J S fe S <sJ 


i i. 

< 1 ^ 


3 S 

2 = 

C J; 
S tt 
ci 

■4 1 


1 

"3 
Pi 

-5 


.2 

J 

ffl" 


Sir 

— u C3 


a 

o 


i i 

§ Q 


: .5 


a 

03 

s 


a 

OS 






c 


0) _! 


% or 


^ •§ ; 


«i OJ br 

3 5 s 


5 




5 fa 


£ 

fa 


O 

o 










Oj 

1 '2 




a 
c 


"a 

3 S 


Oj 


E 














C^ 






X o - 




t 


) 3 




o 








S 




a 






3 a 




c: 


fa 


2 
5 


S 








•5681- 


-a;«a 


r 


j3j C-l Tf 


■^ 




5 


1 


H 


05 




g 


5 


o\ 







2 ^ 

si 

6 



fa 



SH 






=* — C 'O S 'C c« 

lliL^- Ills 

S =^ £ s * 5 



■^ S -S •..••=■ s S • 2 :•>■ S: 



S 0"^ H^ G * 



2 5«^SiiSS(5a^G = ^a^ 
J= • o= o^-c o SlS^m-s—' oJ2 



• '-4 






o 


c: 


o 




■ h 














a. 






5 




g 


^ 


: ;« 


a 


^ 


h 




0) 


s 



Q 


M 


i-l 


as 


n 


ffi 


o 


a 


^ -. z . , z z . 


o 


N 


05 
(M 


S 


S5 


S 


in 

CO 


?§ 



w .5 3 -o" 






p; w 






^ la 



= O C3 
S O Q* 



5 C3 _ 



^M 



S cfa^£-«^ ■■a S' 



ans 



lg 



-.= = 2 c.ci.2w ■= S 



HS 









O CS 






- -^ S a- ' 



;S I =5-5-2i.2a = 



<3 






;0- c <^'B 






Ha-/3Q} 









^lo 



5a-a 



= 0= a- 50 

r-^T Jr -H rK ^ *T^ 



^_ „ o E: on a g 
CO 1-: H^ H !^ CHwoi 



p M- o a c 

O :» S B S « erf 



J3 — O 



a- G iJ o 



ii s -^ = -g ^ 



-2 


m 


&: 


a 


« 


a 


5 





Q 


a 




a 


g 


W 


^ 


r 


- 


: 


= 


= 


- 


t 


: 


:: 


- 


: 


:: 


z 


■* 


c3 


§3 


t- 


CO 


c5 


?5 


S 


S 




S 


^ 


§5 


^ 



< a 



o a M 



<jo^ofa:2;MS 



•^ C i. 






■ri 


. 


n-i 




TJ 




■a 




-c 




-d 




•6 




n-i 




■c 




































;-< 






03 &, g 














O 








o 




o 




o 








o 






















o 


1-4 


o 












o 


g' O g 








tT^ 


3 




c 






^ 






s 




G 


„ 


G 


^ 






»- 


O 




o 


.*■ 


o 




c 


OJ 


o 


l-J 


o 


' 


O 


t»^ 


C 


>^ 


c 


£.2i 

2 ^ ^ 




OS 
O 


O 




o 


es 


u 


O 


U 


5 


U 




U 


a- 


o 


3 

pq 


U 


cq 


o 


■« 2 e 




TJ 
> 




Km 












S3 




o 
< 




1-5 




















































12; 




W 




















t-5 




« 












•8i)BUJBI\[ 




: 


^ 


: 


i 


:: 


: 


- 


- 


: 


: 


:: 


:: 


13 


•s 


^ 


- 


: 



ss 



ga 



t£cc2 
""ills 



S;i S& tii ^ ^ 5, 

ni^i ^i Si's 



IS 



1- t( "^ ■ T 
3^ £ SoJ 2i 4' 



a^ a) £ oj 2i 4' 
g jc c g E * 

S o-S o3 a 

faa>-j 



api<a 






^ E c 

O K t- 



c S 3 » I-i: — 
o o o,= o.t; 9 



>!> 



rt = 5 t •" 

_a|a|M 









o o'O'ai 



^^e 






o sa 



■"Z B cb-" J; 



'^ « — „ -c ^ .« 



•= t-g C--S 2 5 1 1 S£ = i g o' 2; g =^i:£ S ^ t ?; t « uS C'S'^ 5 C-g g 

cS'5<!H5-,h,gH3«i!^<3^,Ko^iJ-flagPHaoSjaa:<5o:?5?S^SSs 



H o 25 a u 



o^ 2 = "^ 5 
a o "5 c 0^ 

a ^^ J ^ '" 



5 g 



be 


•-5 


a 


s 


a 


1-5 


a 


hJ 


a 


P3 


w 


CO 


S 


O 


a 


ij 


a 


W 


Q 


•J0|00 


^ 


: 


: 


-■: 


- 


: 


= 


z 


: 


- 


, 


, 


, 


- 


: 


- 


: 


, 










•aSv 






g 


8 


g 


(M 


o 


00 


g 


g 


00 


00 


s§ 


g 


S 


c5 


S 


cq 



■3 B 



a o 



o s 



^ 




a 


>: 


■f^ 


& 


o 


< 


.2 




2 


B 




iJ 


1 


o 


a) 


O 


0) 

Eb 

o 
;5 


fa 






S ^ g D 



s 


bt 


cj 


— 


o 


rt 
S 


CO 

o 




C8 

o 

Oh 


o 




b 




.a 




W 


H 


S 


1-5 


a 



® ^ ." 



Pi 



•J68I— ST'Ba I g 



y ^ o 



= S = c)o5c= = 
W (I, K g S ft- ffi S 3 



4^ p S-c IS !h^ C s fci 

3 s^ I s S s^ s^ 






i Sic'? tils 

3 O 3 S S 5 3 

O « O 2 o-S O 
33MDHSPhM 



23 



._, . .^^'^ . . 

S^a-a -S-^ = S G 

>3 S 5 a ili, a ig h^ 



° c 2. 
H •£ — - 

O CO 

OfSK 



g'g 

O 3 



_CS^ 







< 




oo 


H 


CS 


M 


3: 


a 


05 

1-; 


Q 


o 


3 


rjr> 


5 


^ 


w 


,** 


3 


ly 


a 


03 


ffi 


ca 


a 


^ 


: 


: 


i 


: 


- 


: 


^ 


- 


^ 


: 


: 


z 


- 


- 


= 


= 


- 


= 


- 


= 


- 


:: 


- 


n 


g3 


CO 


CO 


s 


?3 


as 

CO 


o 


o 


S 


?3 


c5 


s 


§3 


s 


53 


s 


OS 


CO 


OS 


l~ 


§ 


S 





r"- 


O 


y 




s 




i; 


C 






_ 


O 




















































X 










































^ 








_S 




01 

s 

o 


O 










o 




b 


} = 


s 


1 
fc 


> 




> 

a 


■" 1 




OS t 


a 
o 






c 

o 
o 




s 

M 


>< 


"3 
o 


^ 

u 


a 


a 


^ 


a 


a 


« 


3 


^ 


?= 




(U 


O) 


S 


es 


^ 


o 






03 




N 


a 




<5 


U 


U 


i-s 



? 3 'c a 



W *< 5 






> — ™ 



o a H o a a a <! 



S Q S 



■A !*• 








■6 






■6 


73 






"3 


'6 




a 




•6 


c 




° p 






c 




O 


p 




O 


o -^ 




o 


o 


O o 


T3 O 






o 




o 








« :;: 






o 


o o 






o 




o 


a 

o 




O 


§ . ^ 




a 

o 


OS 

3 


a a 
o o 


. ft 


•d 


^ 


U 


C 


i;i 




c 


CJ 


o 


C 


O 


i (^ 






0) 








^ 




o 




(D 






;d 


a a 




tn 


>i 




^ 




-« 


Oi 


>> 


oS 


^ 






~ 


> eS 




2 o 




< 




a 




ffi 


^ 


<; 


ffi 


a 






^ a o 




g o 


a 


Q 




t> 




» 


d 


Q 


d 


;> 






ji' ^ £5 




^ -^ 


s 

o 






























U> •— 1 


i^ 




i-j 




1-5 


C» 


a 


H 


hj 






< ^ O 




S .2 


•a 


> 

0) 




; 




- 


; 


: 


- 


,. 








; - 




^2; 




K 




























•eSBua^U 


rS 




^ 




: : 


: 


^ :: 


:: ' i 


: 


'T 




i i 


: : : ^ 




o 


































• t- 




I ^ b I - I 




"S 






A 


; ^ 


^ .QJ 






o£ 


rc2 :c2 


5t£ I 




^ 


iJ.a 




• t 


g ■£ [ 


. . 0* . • . 

: :£- -=2 : 


ij 


Pi 

3 




^'^ 


fcii 


11^ 




':M -i 


2 ^ 


Si ri 


|i i 


: t^ ^ 


o S 




; t. 


is '- 


• • ^^ t-i > • 


? 


8 

o 




S 2 


al 


s s ^ 




• S^ S ? 


^ * 


i5! • 5 
a 3 : = 


2 = • 


0) a 
•Si 


i| : 


■ c 


; ; oi 0, 0) ; 

■ •' a i = • 

■ • o S o • 


3 






« c 


^ o t 




: § i c 


c ^ 


O o ■ c 


a o . 


• 5 = 


o c 






o S • 


O 






■^x 


jSKHIi 




:ffife=: 


OE 


S= :te 


ss : 


:a=: 


-2M : 


S 


Eo : 


: ;aaa : 


K_ 


o 


QJ 










C3 






1>^ 




>-i 










: 03 : : 
:S : : _ 






2" 




■c 






11^ 






«_ 


■2 


^ 


K- 


& 




• o ': '• c 

:Sa •■ § 


•d : :»-■ : 
1 -■ ■u 1^ ; 


2 


u 




o 


cS 


ac» a 




c 




5 - ^ ^ 


sT r:z 


o 




« 5 i; : 

aj K O •• 


"3 
en 


n 




OS 


cS - 


£ s - 




cS - - " 


o » 




i r ^ t s 








<*- O -1 ^ 


^ 03 O^i . 


93 






a 


cS 


^ o c 


p 




=s.- 


Ml* " " 


a o &• o § ■ 




nK z 




-M 






u 


O 


_u5?;g 


^ 


u 


_SaHa 


ca x4 


(JX 


. 


:<;oa z 


s_ 


i 




































0/ • : 

Ol ^ 


lib,... 




c 




































. . qj . - . 












































£ 












a 




: : o 




















a ' Tj -i- 


: 'H : >. J 




OS 

o. 

Cm 
O 

s 

es 




< 

i- 

c 


t 

a 

or 

> 




fed? 

'«.2S 
"2 »^ 

> a £ 


"a 


cS~o-- 


^a? 

eS^ 


. so . 

' ■ >5 -2 = 

l^al 


.2 S 
^ 1 - 
,e ■ o 

■ >.s 

lfe = 


o 

^= 

> a 

■/Jit 


X 

^ 
:« 

^ 

C 
X 


■•5t 


-bit 

5 

& 
a 


^c;ai^32:Saaoas 


O 
03 

a 
■Ji 


u 
















£g : 


I>-| 1 




> 










o 


1 




CS 


> 


^3 




"P 


> 

jS 

3 "2 


;i = 


o 


S) 


H 1" 


O T3 S -d 


Q) 


tw 


o 


-c 




5 








O 3 




£ 




D ^ 


- o . o 


_2 


o 


o 

a 


2 


a; 


s - 


o 


5 "Sj 


tt - 

a m 


« 


^ 




2 o ,« o 
!- a !- a 


S 




o 


S 




OS 


a* 






a ci 


o 


_i 




O ra 


o o o o 




O 


u 


c; 


a 


HH 


U 


> a 


C2 Z 


C5 




J Cft . 


M o >• :j 














^ ; 


















a '• '• 




.2 


dj 


1 


o 


a 


o 


1 1 


t«' 


3 


: : 


j 


Ol 








OS • : 

i ^1 




O. o 
3 O 


£ 


o 


CK 




K 




OJ 


OJ i 


oi a OJ 
a i^ S 


S 


£ 




i i . 


(U 2 

ii a -3 E 


i 


O bjc 




'cs 


5 


es 


3 


5 o 


• ^ 


o 5 


o i; 3 


CS 


c 




0) c 


o 0) c 


> 


O 




tf 


B 


e: 


E 


e a 


^ 


E ^_ 


a ^ ;?; 


U 


Z 




J E 


ii tc g a 




•joioo 


^ . = .:...... = :. = ..:. . 




Bgy 


,^ 


!M 


CO 


* 


^ (M 


CO 


^ CO 


r-r 03 e-l 


o 


(M 




■O CO 


o o • c- 


1 




(M 


C^ 


IM 




!>» Ol 




(N (M 


(M (M IM 


IM 


CJ 




M e-1 


-^ <M • e> 


1 


° s 


60 

2 






























C -u 


'u 


•a 




"S 












■d 












QJ C3 


u 


u 


OS 












c3 


t- 












TS 




o 


■« 


o 










3 


o 












•s -a 


E 


o 


CS 


o 




^ ■• 


;; 


^ z 


- - ^ 


o 


* 






; H * - 




1 § 






c 


s 










'a 


a 














o 


cS 


o 










eS 


o 












o 


U 


Q 


'~J 










/5 


O 












CM 

o 

01 

s 


"2 










: a 


a 

03 
X 
C3 

a 


■ a 






* 








o « 




s 

s 
-a 

CS 
0) 

s 

CS 


si 

a 

o 

o 

be 


o 
X> 

'5 

a 

C5 


o 
o 

H 

9 


Q 

S 


-1 

3 


1 ? 

3 g 

2 1 


3 5 


: £ a 
a _ 

•1 ^ £ 

O ^ o 

^ .2 03 

■2 = g 


•^ 




) 


< ^ '■ 

a 2 


a H- 
. OS a .;, 

^ a 'Z - 

a, oS .g a 
a- - > a 


i 


^ 




IH 


^ 


•o 


O 


•~ 03 


^ 


j= £ 


►3^5 


^ 


c 




V u 


d g a ;. 






b 


«« 


u 


J 


S u 


< 


< a 


d: 




13 O I 


3 


o 


6 

bB 


































a 


T3 


















"S 












cS 


K 


u 














G 














5 


05 

a 


§ 

a 

o 

CJ 




' 




' 


= 


^ 


O 

1 


o 

a 
o 








- - 




■S681— 9)«a 


c 


■^ 




( 


^ 




s 


~ 


S 


^ 


c 


5 




S 






^ 


25 S 





^ ^ 



O il o - a ii 6 

^ rif f 

^ H, ^ 

d a <!! 



m t: ^ 




5 ^ I fc I cr c S ;i; -5 ^^ 
o 5 "?> S 3 ^ :>. ^5 A = ::i^ 



<!) H 



a ffi ^ <5 



-" ^ --, s 



O C; i< i/j CO C? 



53 & 



_ ci s 



s -S 



a a 



3 


W 


s 


s 




Q 


pq 


X 


g 


tE 


s 


B 


2 


W 


:3 


w 


05 


M 


3 


w 


^ 


i 


i 


- 


: 


= 


:: 


= 


= 


: 


:: 


: 


: 


- 


: 


- 


= 


- 


: 


; 


8 


U3 


^ 


00 


CO 


S? 


N 


S 




ca 


S 




-* 
w 


00 


oo 

CO 


^ 


C<1 


IM 


IM 


^ 



— OS 



1^ J 



= a 

^ CO 



o — — 



CO s S ^ = 



_ t. «!, 



r — ^ 



M -!l 



M -2 






IS 2 <! O 5^ W 



t; - 3 



a m a o 


















• ■a . • 


'■ >> ■. 


: 5S : 


M 




; 2 • ; 




•73 g : 



5 z a !?; -/) 12; ^ £2 S a S PhwcoSw 



o 2 ^ : cs 

cc • o .5 • ~ 

K J » P-i 1-5 M 







O o3 






;Sfd 



02i 



Boo 






o ^ 






O c3 ^ =" •- t- 



o ci 5 --n C o 

s mi: CD it o 
o o T- * .-t; I. 






Ol - cs t; 












3 fc-g = cjt; 






E • cS g-c g-fc 



•2i°2i-- ° 



'3x 



> ^ .0) 



•pa.v\op!.v\ 
JO 'pauj^m 



:— : a 



w^': : S; ^^ 



i: g: 



j^'g:&:^«gc> 



5. m - 3-C - 

B ao s a o 



SS5 



ci > 
^ C 

5-< 



^ r - S oj i 



: On: ■ 



"Sv ^^' 






^>; 



■sX^Cf 15322 :S 



smuox\[ I S*^;^ :^ 



*SJB9J^ 



05 c^ (Tl C^ t-^ 



< 00 ■ CJ iM t^ <M OS T-H cq I— ■ o 01 1— I o 



■ L^ C; »0 O I— I GO 



L— to oi 1-- t— »o I- 1— 00 '<*4 00 00 as 



1— tO CO o ^:! I- rM 



COCOOOil--.— ItJ^C^IC^ 



CD t-- O Ol l--^ C5 10 CO ^ ?— I 
OOCDlOiOOOCD i--cDas 



a 5; "5 

.3- a ts »- a 



i'::i £^1 i ^ I 

_..« fj a 0) a^ 



^i5--2='S^P 






r-,3 



X a y 

o CS 3 

2iZx 



E- 



- t; > S ;> X OJ.S 

J^ ^i?"^ '^ OJD — 



0% g 

>; ci !; u S^ i. o 



S — — oeo'ot.-a 

jj3^3a)l"3CMS 



'TeCjT ■atr/T I ^^ r<Cl CO C^ Ti^ tJT-^tJ* CS- O X t^t^'CO OCO:^05000--^^r^O■l'MC^^^OCOCOCO-^«lOt-00 

ObOl O+^U r-Tr^ T-f.^ r^rH i-H'rH T-fi-Hi-1 rt i-lr-1 rlrli-H 



\ 



0£ 



a Z C .. . o—^ 



t' >>ja -3 2 2: - 
(» o CO ■< hj 23 a 






.-S c! 2 - ■; .• t. a. it, 

S t«— Zh cS S o = . 
_ o I- 



--= r « 

1-5 -^ a •< v5 -J >^ 5 <! 



o o t- S i: a~ " " 






O O 



■^11 






• K CS u 

6 a 



:<! 



1^ V- > 



.2 5 = 
JOB 



o-^ . -- O sj 
S^M'S CSS 



*C — ^ Q^ 

= 2§S^ 



^.^ 



:5 -5 ;!<;*!; -5 H 



5 o =^ - 



" P S ■£ S H 



:0UH0a 



s^s : 3 ; 
050 .0 . 



0) Q^ 

a) — : 
35 -5j; 



X5S 



o< 






9-^ 



■I ^33^ 



— ^ V .^ « 

V ^ d ^ ^ 



3-2 

^ S - X ^ 



■^ a '5 « a 
s 3 5j a.3 
S 1^ a a - 1 



^S^'oiS; ; ; ^S- : ccSaj: ^:: S: ccS^Sai: ^: :: 



a :* 

o o 



. o v 









._"a"-csoSx!°=io° = i^ = a''3 = 

-K— ;:o— iOa2 = 5S— soso" 



<Jo2;a±;; 



Ir-lOCO 




00 10 


: :!-; 


•T-H (M 


■ c 




COCOiOlO • 
IMIM rl • 


10 




-^ 


n^jO: 


N-H 


0010 




r-l t~ 


: :S 


. — 


• -^ 


^ 


CO ^ t- • 


CO.* 




03 


•(MOJ -^ 






ION 


C CO 1- 


rara — 
;C CO t- 


^g 


'- 


i-HOOOt- 
•OCOOQO 


Sf:: 


CO 10 




:g 


CD CO 



S-Tl . « o . . ._ c ii 






0-3 3 a 



*- <".= ^ »i i _ .= es » ^.i^ ?? s »J *~J s 
o Srf^ =-i^= esq- o-r*^ 2-3-= = 9^ ~-? 






S2 :a :-3 



s «"iE 



cOQOoo^ocos^O'— tT-ir^it<ico^^co^*^T?io-^--o:ocDQOOia5a3aiO— < 
r-l r^ — rH T-t ^ cq c<i r^ c<j c-i cq M (M c<i n C-? c^i n c^i r^ C^l C^l "^ c^ c^ c-i c^ ro 



§53; 



Su^^ 



ss^ 



IK . "3 

=; 3'-o 









e c3 s 



a H oJ 



^^:2 



i Wo 



w^ :^ 



-I 



1"^ 



a,j3 o c3p5 
.2 = "Sd 

J:5 cs «•=► 



O O '^ ! 



: X 

•a 3 






2 C.O 



^:!»:Sjsa3::^:::S»::S 



O o Oj 

«0 w 



«*s o, 



a o 

15 



- - sg.2 2g- .2 
a => 3 a 



• 03 i-l • ■ O OS • CO 



(N lOO • 3i X!CO 



•<MC3O00CCC*5l— COO 



rj*i>-3St :a>o" ^i «^- 




r-l(MC^COrC03COCOOO: 



I 'M CO -^ «C (^ I— 



.■PHi:;<;'^K a^'^O 

.i-5^ata»>ca5Hi-s 



: o 
• *- 



^•|.Sg :S 






~^^.S„: ■ S cj a o 



o s - ^ ~ 

^ O C !. o 
^7;, 1 n '- ^^ 



: cs o 



:ai 



■paAvoptAv 
.10'pai.iaBiu 



g: ccScc^: «:^g 








S-^BQ 1 


I— 1 (M CM r^ ffq • ^ 


bo 


SlUUOJIf 1 


I— ■ • th ■ :d 00 . -co 


■SJB3A 1 


(M CD • i-H (M 00 - . Tjl CO 
CO GO • 10 rJ CO • • I- CD 



^ a- .« fsH ^ 



■^T.- ^ 



11 55 

jn o^ 05^ o S 3 o 



■S681— a^^a 



r-l(M IM 1-1 C-1 <M C<1 n N ffq 



^ -^ o c n S •/■ ■ " 


















•^ OS 



: J S oj «• s « !►. a • 

M 2 u c sc ° S ~ .t^ B 
hhKccs.- t:.= " 



:~T. ■ '■ '■ '.s 

.'^ o a< . . : O 

.fe t. sc»cc ; -i 

• '1' o y, „ • _ 

■T3 j= K ci z: • ^ 
a> *- ^3 '^ -3 * pG 



■ CO 5 l' C3 

::§£ ^-s 



i^oM^MA^^^oo^ --^ :^H^^ 



: . a; : cj ts . . : ^ : s: ;- OS ; : : : : : : : : 
■o •'5 -gg • ^- •'*' -^B,^ • : • • --S •-■ • 

g = 2 :-«5 :1 :^ -aSS • S • • -j: • « • 
o£o :cst^:o -1. -£=5 •£ • • •£ .3 . 
o^Q bi^ -.^j :> :sjch : ^ : : :<; :o : 

i i :;■ i ::;:::! 5 '■■• '^ • • 

: i ;^ ; i ; : ij ; : i4i i i i : :s ii 

• :: i; ■ t.: •• ^ ::• !>-.u ••••:>.■ .2 

o • -^ -08 :S .sr.c''3= : . . . .3 : 
= ^-253S :f :S:||^5^ : : :^^-H-- 
S = §-^^= :« ^2 Sa-°^3 : -• :oS53 

°="ocso>.-:;3 -03 •coi — r^* • • -o— 00 



•S ■ •& 



.K : .-s 



2385 



: >» 

• & 

• c« 



fu^^ ^-i 



^tcSI 



S>ai^: aJS^g i^'wg: - 



i^: oaS^ 



■'■■'?. :-:'2:r:-t:-=-^-':o:^ 

■ • -o : : -o ■> ^ -etc- • -j^ .0 •» 

•-H -Oi-HO^iOi-^ • • "(M -O -t— • -lO 

<M ■ ^ (M C^l t-H • • • i-c . ri 

I— I .O^^^T:JirH -as -CMCOOO -i— I • -O 'OlO - • 

(M C<1 - O CD • '^rH (M •»J^r-ll^t--l0^i— I'^'t** CTl O •>! »0 

iQlQ -0010 ■1-00 to • IQ Tt< TjH L- CO C^ -^ U- t^ i-H 10 lO 



So' 



^§ -.E-s 






5r 


>, 




s 




0,' 


•^ c 




H^ 


5 




a 


?w 




s-^ 


■fi 




a 


fc--l 




C*u 






0. 




OS 








: . ■ — 'C .oj w 

• ca'S'^d • §.'■; 

■ t. >-.^ 3 t. ~ 3 

• o i: -iJ c o j3 o 



c3gu:;HO:i:HHHiu-Qa 



""gHt « 

C« >i OS rj rj 

MO b t- t. 

-c 3 i2 '1' " 



■-I T- I-H <-i i-l i-l i-H ^H ,-1 rl C-lIM IM N I-l C-1 CT IM 



•r ■ o^ 




:2J 


COO • 


!0 


03r-l 


M 


•^ : 


CO 


^ 


" 


§S 


r: 



' Z 


"i 


^ 







ai a) n - „, 

o £ ::q >> : : c 

o c3 = ui; . .•- 

tuo — «^ _ • = 

S •5'^«~ :.S 

-S-^ S*^ :« 

. c3 -5 " "S ^ ; i; 

w'^ S C3 s ^ • '^ 

cs 3 c— ;: t. ! o 

— ^ rt gj TO cs • ^ 



c 60 : Q) ^ £ g s 

— '^xa'-D-r ->^ 

o • X w a: "r ° — 

. t- i cs" = t- S 



« o 



_g S ^ - be 



o .S I i: -^ 



? = S 



o XJ o bi X >> p 

'E — ■£ = =5 s a 






S-! 



c3 a;^ =3 
CSS =2 



7. '^ C5 . 

i^ c = : 

. = OS B a. 

rVi - cs *- 1?^ "c o ' 

« .^ « d o • ' 

. „ p o - = ^ 



- K OS : 

1 ^ c +1* fe- 
es V J - ■* 

HH ,— ^ rn ,^ 
05 o" -' 



c._i s - - o ;: 



) a^ o 



o cs .'oi o 

1-5 CC I-; a O "-a 



£ i- N 'S 

— ^ X c ni 






.^ i- OJ a^ 






c«2 '^SS o: 



cc: S^S^- S: : ^:: 






^5s 



■^ '■'S c3 

o = o aj 



> 'D > • 



~j "^ a> 
o STO o 



CCS^J 



a : 






.2 S-::'^ o c £ 



o 'ic.Xz: 's.a:z--l 



:=:".- ~ c i o oj .' "■ ' 



S ,^ ^ ^ > > J: .- ,^ P ? 



- lO t^ O "* -^ »o 

- M rH — i-H 



•10 - COC» CO 



CT00^tO00'HC-l-*CO«)t~- 
03 to CO t^ "» >0 ■tJ< t^ (M 00 CO C 



^ai. 



— - c; 



b^a-§ ^ ^M^^2 



.2 £"2 

§5 s 



<;5b-^ 

C<lCC'S<-*»0t-^C000OC<lC>lrr'<S^l^0000C5OrHCl-rt*iac3iO 
I— I— IrHrHi— 11— If— (I— ti— ((MC^NC^^^CICO 









;,o >. 









3 o o o 



00 CO l~ l~ 



■ •a o 
og >? >„ _ V- ^ a 

= ;~ -1- * Cj "^ .0* 






'H >? 5 S ■§ ii 



^^Tl— cs .'r>D3^-nQ 



r B= H 0)^:^ 5^ !■ E 0) 




_• OS . „ 

_c "-a J ^ " ^ 
bt» s'bco — 
a a* o Ci= P 
aQaaMH.^ 



S 






a Mr 



a"^ 



a JJ rt = Sf^-d o 3 

be 33 £ mt;^ g S 
c oj aa 3 cu 2 0) 



gj : S^'tnr : SaiS 



J3- 



:S 



• : 2 : : •. o 

TS >- -^ a "J t- ^ 

— a a M cu s 3 
^ O C-. — SJ o o 

ao-3aa^as 



>l 



CDIMCDlMl^ rH -l-cqiO 



CO ■* O C-1 • CO t-- 



. — ■- u 

O; •= -^ a, = -'^ ■_ 02-36^ 
'^ 5 ^^.2 5 £ i^ t! M a 
B K C £ t - C > ~ B^ 

r-l Cq Ol TO 03 T«( ^ CO CO t^ t- 

































: fi 














o 










\ UZZ ' 


■ S 








;^ t" 








° 2 




: o - 

o - 

-1 




• i ? 5 • <u 

..a fe o a bjc 

: S o - 9 ■« 


: " : fe : « : 1^ 
: ;: • £ •• ^ g - £ 

• .£ .S <! 5 i" =^ S -a 

: zt c3^Mu3 .-3 

• b s - ^ .»■ oj 0; -1 

a; g ^ JS.Si ^-S 










• .5 a == s c3 cs 






1-3 — « <! 




:qk^«3:33 


.^HaKZP-:=a 




u 






























fi 


.S s 


■= 




• t< 






: S oi :^ 




• hn 


:i 




O 

s 






M a; 2^' :i;"5) .« ba W) -a .2 

"=^ = -'2j= -bCeS"— cs — 

^|ig.l|s^.s|g|^;s|^ 




rt 






.aca*--— la-'^a^c-^caaa 








<C-j-5Ec3SC:U3SHO;i-:H5H 






















: 


















0) 


















• a. 








■>■ 








o 


x 






TJ 










• £ 








ja 








s 














t.-TST-a : ^-a 


5 =«'^' = 


















^ 




c 


a 




- & a- fe-" --S- 


■S §— M 












aoogojj' -ajg 




ItH 




03 


O 




osoi>'-.i5 rffiil 


xo^ii'S 


O 

01 

o 
















" 






c 
c 




















a. 


^> 


5 

c 
'a - 

s 










a. 








n '- 








5 

fcN 


5fe 




"C 


fcT-rt 

€2 


s 

c: 
331 


: s-c 
: •£ = 




0-- - 




n 












n c o 


a cu . '-.l; 


a s j" a 1 






CQ^ 


« 




y<)i:) 


55^ ron-i; 


^a;i;a | 












u 






























a 








— 


^ 






s 


















o 








— 


j£ 






E Sr'fc 


• ^ 


















cs 
















a. 








r) 


a 






- ^-S fc £■ = 


3 a.,c 


















a) oj 0-5 0, 








"3 JT : 


fed 








W-^ & S .^^ ^ 






o 


. OJ J 


B 


0) 






E 3 i £ 2 






O 


. .^ t, . 

• a; oj • 

iMfa : 




a 

u 
es 






a 
SEE 




•peMopiM 










JO 'paujBui 


t»^: OJ: 


SoJ^OD 


^g^S:^.«5^g: 


a 


'ajSuig 


















aj 




'•5 


o 












o 


o 


&: 




u 




























1 
































cS 


oi • 


























s 


S 








, 






, 


^ 


, 


, 


J J 






























fa 


fa 


























• 




• . . • . . . 1 














































. « : 5 i 






























" 








.a 
















































































































J3 








S 







0. 


.a 






■a 
- 










O 

(D 

s 




.« o 


1^ 

« c 

o c 




■2 K 

K^ 
oj 9- 


= .3 

£ S'S 
= ^ £S 


•x: 

a. 


H 
la-? 


•a 
5 


; 






liSi-o 


o-ccao ;?;- a,c-.= Q 


axia 


bo 


•sXBa 


oo.O':£>co-* 


'Mt-— ivD -to .TfTj-OO .IC 
•-I (M — • r-l • N C-) ■ — 


S2 :g 


•Binuow 


•OOrH . 


OO^rtTtl • ■ . .00 1- -c- 


(Mt1< -l^ 


•sjBaj;^ 


SS'^ • 


t^rHlCiM c:DC':D-<^coc^oncocoaj— ' 1 






















































o 






















































































<D 


























. ^ 










^ 




-a -a 
g 2 

S 

03 
















































1) . 












a 










^« = 

ill 

^ ij S 

cS OJ o 


.a 

cog 

;^^ 
■cfa 

« !; 
6 - 


E 

cj 

•a 

<t 

£ 1 

tCS CO 

— > 
OK 


-a • 

— O 

0-5 




si; H 

111 
III 


■•a 

IS| 

3 a;.a 

ill 


^fa 

£.2 

J'.o 


J : 


•«2 
11 




568l-3}T!a 


az 


00 


at 


00 o- 


= 




T*- 


cc 

i-H 


« 


S 


S 


s 


ss 


Tt 




S 


00 


C3 


« 



















• : 










■ ■ a 




















• 1 


. — 


• : £ j a 








S Isl 


: i-ago 
• a 9 3— . 




■ I'l 














die 3 
lieri 
ncy 1 
na A 
icy- 
ry J 
villa 
ly H 
ry K 
ma I 
ry M 
ry H 
ZieF 






'OaraCaao-ga-aaN 








. ^ 












' ^ ' w 
















:'5 ■-■o 

• bc-e = 




2S fc^ ! 

a_aj jj 




S-5 




?- S ^ 


Jo 
un 
ow 
er. 
is. 
int 
eCl 




Fred Saw} 
Robert J. 
William 1 
George A. 
K. JIucbni 
J. Coiton 

William C 
Samuel Br 
Jabez Fo.xt 
I'eter Mor 
John E. Cl 
William L 








:s' 








• .a . 










S^ 






■ ■ te • 

: : a : 






a 




> 




^ ui . 








0) 


• *i .3 3 • .a . 






S -a •£ ^ 3 J) • a : • -a 1 








Nova 

Scotia 

Mane 

Londc 

Pierm 

Sand« 

Bosca 

Moult 
Maine 
Canad 

Conco 








;i 








' '^ '. 




























s 








■ 3 ■ 
: : 


ffit* 




a' 



a; u, 


• £ : : 


a . 




■css^a-s? .= ; 


.a 
t^..a 




.0 =* .= 3 " -iiioo — 
5g5-= S = = : a £-3 . 
















!- t 








w 










<2 


a. . ' 






^ 












III 
a 






p 










3 








b 










B 


SfaQ 








cc^'«gi : 


Mg 


aj : 




ai 
















>■ 












a; 
































a 
















£ 


- - J 


, 




.. « 






















0) 














i=< 












6 




























a: 


























g 
















J 
























S 










bio 
3 




















tu 








Sm 






.5^53 












^"^i r.Q . 






cord 

chea 

cord 

•reii 

dwic 

'icy, 

terbi 

Hon 

ivan 

cord 








t2 Oii a = a ° 3 ; 




. 03 • -..OOCTi T»< t~ cn 5D • • • 






-H > rH 




. • • 








00 • -o • 




















t^ — COTT' IC to CO ■ 








00 


CO t- CO CD >0 






L. 




















i-s 


















V 




_^ 


1) 


O) • 










■- ri 


3 S 


E 3 aj : a : 






bc>> 

a 


tC£ 


3 S m -2 ■ 
u o : e : 






SK 


^^li^^.s: 






.a 3 


- -r-1 * « i^ * • 
0) — a T- — a) . m • 

^2aa££ -1 : 






oa '" as > ■= t^-" :y. -1 






KZ ffiMao'/3 0. 


3: . 




c^ 


cq 


iC 


cc 


to 


00 


cr 


S 


CC 


cc 


•* 


CDl^ 



? 






























» 


■% 














1 






2 






>,io 




























: ai 




u • 


• : t;.a; 

• (D .- O 

" a^ o 




^rlsil-iii tills tiSi 


2^ 

SO 


■ ■t -a 
2j|- 






»< »« 1-3 rf!i — l-H 


•^ 










= •-5 


: = :-S : 








J ; • ; 


: 




: fi 


c 


i 


a 


■goT 

Hi 


■- oj :^ XI a, u S 




D . -« . . . 

t : S J J 1 


o -^ OJ c£~~— c 


— ^ . C— O 00 


m 

c 
o 

2 

5 


< 


- O O K^ 












d • 




































































o 








■C cs 








ca 






















a 














§ a 
















_: 




tS ^ " 


cSt,.^ C3 


cj = c ■« i^ •« cS 


k 




2 e- 


ja 




«2s 


= c > c 


2a' |lg5| 


c 


• = =' c= 5 








c3 o o J- o g a 








aS5i5 


UOiZ^iO 


oH cac5o±;o 


c 


:oHotS 


















































g 








^ 




































o 


















































e; 


2 






ci 




"S 


■c 


K 




>: 




■73 - 

_ ; 


5 




, c c 


•r - OT3 


~--'a^ s o =•« 




. ^ cS S ^ 




-2 o ?^ 


sisg 


c3 gas « 2 « 5 

«Soa)a<5?'3 


c 






g5± 


Owoo 


yltC^'.io.ZU 




•OH>M 










































































. 0) 


p. 
















01 












.Cj 






• o. 


:=2 ; 






J 




^ t- 


u 
K 




Q) 


s 






nn 


:g : 










0) a> 






(U 


D 




t. 0) 


Pi 








fci 




Sb 


S 




s 


3 




o 2 


a 


; 3 ; 






^ 






c 






pli 




O 

33 


O 

X 




. o . 






li 


■/j 


s 


y. ; : 


^oQgccajgiK^aJ^x 


MgM- :: 


3 














® : 




















































03 • 


























b • 


















































0) • 


























■^ • 


















6 


















"3 : : 


































^ 






















































o 






^ 


T3 




2 










1=/-; 








l^ = 




c — 


2^ C 


• n 


■a 




shII- I5-- s^lliilliail 


J-a o 




• c c ' " 




vjOSO >^. -SoOS Q;oJ-'.<^C 


• OS O 




Socjo ja '^oMo i;o-azc 


:oo 






■J ■ I- CO T-1 






I— < n 




— ^ 






o 


■ l~ Tt( CO CO 


00(M00'*Ol~tD -r^r-tir 


.-HlO -« 


■* 


















•OOCDi-H 




?5t- 


C-ICO (M 




00 ro 


50 


U5--1- 






^ 






















































_ 








s 


-rt 




a 






: o •.?; 




15 : 








"3 ® 


'E'.|2 1=?- 


■1 = ^ 


;l;Jl 


- E ■ 


> 






^ 2 5 2 J 


iibe^l^l 




^i-gi2 


SoSsilsS 


3 3; ^ £ b = IT'S M -^ * 


^ S = = -2 


OKI 


XJi<X&i 


a>?<aSH-/)s:-?aia 


uJ-5-3i.<: 






1^ 00 O —• f-l 










" 


'"' 


'-' 


■" 


'^ 


(M 


?j 


c^ 


(N 






C>) 
















1 




• 3 ; <u .'TS 

_: a • tt^ = 
oi >- cs : o cs rt 

g=Snc.>-t..--o 



gcj 



O 0) 



fes 



2bS 

^ — o 
o a' u 






IS : S c H 

i: • * o 3. 



•^i;:; -"^a— 6 — — •?i' ■= •.= « 
_OX^<^K -: O ^ < O r- ^ — a -'J O (J P-i 



= T3 






a ^ ^ 

J E o 

3"? C« * ' 



1) = y 

« 2 a s: b 5:13 
-t 2 ?, E o = 

i- >^ r"^ Ih (i; fc- 



au^ = o»'ai:-'0— = g:^«— og; 



^ 3 
' ." £ ^ 



3 p. 

3:a 



^»: ^: t»: 



• 4/ 



3^e■ 

K = 25^ 'j^SS ^1 
o ; a x-^ o c j= E 2 ' "S - 
= j;= =s 5 u 3_ g Oj 

O Jy3>Uc»<00 ^: 



eta fl' 
o o o 



00 CI . CO •* o -^ n ^ I- . Tj- o o c-i »o t^ t^ 

(MCO— +05 1^ "C^— ^MrH^^OCO^-^ -l-HCO 



COOOOO f-l -00 



O =5 fc .-S^ 



3 aJ "3 



3 3 

O O 

'■« u 

3 h 






■a 6 



^§E2g.S3ffly-:=ciaa>S-2 • 

o-=?5'£^a>.goJo*feSjs«a 
a<?^aiSo-J±:"^M-5?Hoag:i3 



I-HrtrHrti-IIMOOCOCO- 



■X00<»OO O 



a oi 

a ■- 






O r • --■ OJ S 



'^^ 









-^_ 5-2^ o-c t- n o 
■i = S ■< . '^ c =■— "^ 

■ft o « ^ a; « * ° "^ ^ 



o c = o-J c^ 

C = " X &— - 

o 0) 3^ = a' a; oi 
c- ffi >:: ffl ^ i; ;j 



O « s CB g 

,-, n* OJ r3 CD aj rt< 






O 5 ^i S OJ g es 



a. Pi* 



ci os_: n 






P 

CS OS 



s^s: 









a r^ 

^ o c: o 2 
0; o ai o aJ 



;= o 



•pBAVOpiM 
10 'pai.UBUl 



gt»: S- ^^«jc»: g-/j^i»; 



s o >- 
o t, a- 



sxsa 



B^ 






C3CJ 



OJjSOj'OcSCO-O 






SABQ I 



■sin'ioi\f I 



■SJB3A I m' 



5 &i-I 



i-H ;■*■<*< M 



■S o £ 03 






• — . 0^ O - ■— . ■ »- 3 






S Q ^ H >'• H S ^'h 



MS 



«-Q 






•568T— '^^Ba 



I— ffC-fCC050003C 



u':tiO^00QCO5a5<35.— '^H— * 



■< C<1 C^ W !M CI M IM CI W C<l CO CO CO 



•" o 



" H 



«^Ss„fe,ta 



-^ <u 









Q^ li, a 



• : 6C • ^ 

s = s S s 

= fci 2- :S a 



S O/ :- = t. "- 

•^ — 's s 1 5: 

S c3|J . . o: R 
~X= .Xo3=-^- 



Iw 



a^ffih4- 



0^ c— « c 

— c t. u: > 



S?^-^K 



> C8 



S c °-c = a;-D S S o E S « 

E = ^a:5355'S°ooa.<» 



es P c3 



03 -C^ 



a.cs £ 03 iS ra aj^ o o >.« 



03 _ QJ K O O >^^ 



S<»^ 






K 



aj^ceSao^: ccz 



So. 



CV jj o o 03 (2.aJ 
fcu I? i tt J :i K Si 



■a s 



^r^ 



rH-^"*** -t-HrJ't— OiO- 



2^ (M I— I CO CC CO 



i-H ;j t. 3 - t^*- . o a 
* ■S.'ccSsfcd^'g- 



03.i ?' 

3 5 '= c "5 ; 

OjCCOIO^i 031 

pHa>jaa^<Haa< 

I— icoi^<:oooc3^— 'dcoiocooO' 



3 c 3 c tc I N f* « 
5j ci o 1 0^ t . 



MS. 









S a> crt c3 ^ s ^ 



3 i O 

.5 — -a es _ tjo „ 

'C ^ ^"O o "^ o 



S_ 



•a o 5:3 o 2 



n o 2 OS o 



bl 








. ■ » 








• Qj- a 




















: &-« 








OJ 




. 3 3 


^ 




• o o 






:XM 









> — 

03 a 



C 5 — 
C3 O g 



I ^.5 






S-IXSM 



t»^acc>'M; S^'^: :: ^ 



u £t.3u c-Oc — ■» X 
o sGOo ■=£--3-=,« 

;33 



. CO Til 00 — 



l- 03 00 ^ ■-■ ■ 



bfitao : 



s; ^ -J c = " • : 

-=""12:^^^ 500 = 

i-( C>] CM Ca C-KM (^ (M CM C^l C') 05 CO 



B3 o J 



•■O 

•■3 S 

5 ~ a'S >.3 2 cs 5 



i - 5 ^ii =5 o aS 
^« fc,;0— « 0) 0) o! 






S o ^' „ 
te"^ ° f= g 



o-o-fl 
o a ^ 



AS 



an r? 
. = »' o 



5 t^^ o on 

O " . <n ^ — 
C: 0>^ a! <D 0) 



5!»^ 



cS >, 



S c K 

t> -H"rt i^ 'E "3 ' u 

|^ = c3^S>,t3 

"£r:3o«SoS;2 



J<j Si 1"^ = 3 

o . a) ." 5 -■- 03 r; 






C g 



■^ t 



&r 



fcrSi 



S E 

Mcfc 






&S 



■C X 



0) 0) a< S 



SKB;^ 






Si 






S:: ^S»S: aa's'i ^ 



•^— 3 03 « C3 .f' 



sc 03 r 5 « " •: 

.— N 5; c tH a ( 
•^— a 03 « 03 .2 
<! a CO 3 g^ Z i-i 



;s ^2; o o 03 /i 

O 3 .t:g5-i^ 
. o tq 03 _ r/ 

en >, OJ ^ O 'S « 
2 i-'E ra-O =1:; 
g a ej-s a 5; 03 
«i!-= 00 t-3 



ill'lili 

3 g 03 .- S S 



•43 •a *_ai 



-s 3 
£•? 



U S h» ■- . — 03 






a- X 

3 oi: 



S S 



^g:: a:^ 



E: 



• o^ oO o « -K 



3^3-53 



S£g2t:S3H-i5S>>- " 

o^°oo^>?o "5 SIbJ o 



iCO ■ 10 



IM I- CO l^ 



^■"^-S 



^t~ • ■CDOOOOU;CC"-Hr-> 
C-I ^ . • — ClrH CM 



• ■* Tf Tt* 00 rH l^ r 



05 CO 00 l^ 1^ ^H lO o 
(Xi CO CO 10 1^ -^ "^ 



o ? 









2 3 3 

• ^^ Of 

:-^3 



= _t> 



-.5 o 



5i»-; o3< = s o 



J .-as 

: 3 g--c 



'^ s = 

O O 03- 



CM -ooeo 



OiCOC^ICSOO 



3 a ■^ "! 

A^ en .^ 

r- 03 =a 2 
aj E "— - 

tiiaH;j3 



3 o 
= Q 

CO . 

>. u 
— a- 

E-§ 



rH— 1— li-ii-'i— (i-HrHr-ir-lr-irHi-HC*lC*1C^l(MCQC^C<IC^ 



p.^ ,: > : : :_; ,■ ; -• : c ^_; 

° n J C » "- ft" = E^" = S 

o- -C, tj= 



He' 



.f-O 



3l^ 

K — — 1* 









o 2^ 






oajJ;oag;^ixi3:a>Qe^gao^ 



l-^o-i 



O eS 



^1 .s 






■pa.v\opi.H 
JO 'pai-UBiu 



cc^coS 



C 3 



C3 S IS 

c « a 



5 soK = S :'g 



;2i&,B :o 



': t»§5i !»; ^sD^asSoi 





•Z68I— a»«a 



bf- ^ a^ 5 a; 2; 

r-n-Hr-(rHrHi-(r-<(N(MC<lMN<>>(NraCO 






__ >. . 0- ei ^- — 
= - - - j; tx.2: rs 



°&-= 1 = ^=- 
J3 -03 — j;^.CJ;O!03 



C 3i « 

c-l S-^ £ &? = o ^ E'S~c 

= .2l>^ £►?- '^^ =- « O; « B 






c u 



£"3 S 

J2« 53 



?H i- s 5 5 2=-^ =—3 ir 



• 0.1. 
■ 0) o 

Sag 

S :xg 



E s-c 



Si OS a; 



O 0) 



03 :xS-/J: ^S: i ^^c 




M — ^ ■ i-i 



(M • l^iO 



^ci o? :cco ■ lOCO 



00 CO ^QtOOO Tj< 



3 > 

X 

a: 



o ^ t- 2 =3-3 



M :cM-^:g<&.r-. 



.2 E 



^a 



. i, — _a; 
« - = 



2 i ./ ^ .^ 






52- -51 



C 3« - 

OS c 



X — 

£ -5 s j; 

O re g ^ U. 



03 :: g: ^ai^ 



■?-.-'- .-a 



= t^^ = - _ 

£ = .^ = « 5 = 
-1- w O ij -/. ;, ^ 



tx 



00— ■ = 



'J'OC^i-* 



; O 
Ho 



fe ~ c ^ — r n 

.i > — «^ 

« C < - S 

Tj< -t- -h IC OC CC — ' 

CI c-i c^i i-i e-i (N CO 



N 




a» 




00 




H 




j-T 




CO 




i-i 




(U 




J3 




a 




(U 

o 


H 


Q 


^ 
^ 


hjo 


rr 




^ 


^ 


H 


c 




V 


H 


u 


¥ 


rt 


H 




h 


(U 


K 


^ 





•M 






k 


;-i 




O 


g 


(/3 


p 


c 


1 


o 


h 


+J 


'^ 


■4-< 


rr 






C/3 


^ 


C 




hH 


hH 




H 


O 








^^ 




^ 


^ 


P 




PL, 





CO 
(L> 

Q 






3 r 3 
c 5 o 



o o 

»3: 



s = s 
c 2 S 



OPM 



gg 



•pa.wopj.vv 
JO 'prtuiuui 



■J 3- S 3- 

H-ia oa 



02 



i S: ^: :: m^: gtc; gxt^Sai^S: w^^ 



■ 1- ? 

3 3. ^-^ ft « 

£ £ 1 S =_ . . 



•Sif^fl 



•siHiioi« I 



•SJBaji^ I 



COCOl— — lOl— 35iM'*X'eOCO?3^iO'* = i-; — 0O005O£-;* 



= = ¥'^°tT-^T ga 5^ i^ y £< 2 ^ o.-E" cs 



•E68I— 8»«a 



; ;3 — - a < w X S! :^ ;^ 23 w la pj-->j^' H -5 i-s < •*:_» 



c - , - XJ - - - 
"-5 !*( 



rHr-ir-CrHC-KNCOf-HClC^r-INIvlTO 



D 



-^3 



- a.- - 



x^^s 



E 3 b r j3 

3 O O ° 03 



•pSAVOpiAV 

JO 'paujBui g; :: (/j; 



•^ 



ffi is I £ & £ fe 

ra t3^ C3 (X; ,jj Qj ^j 



•S^BQ I 



•sqniOK 



aj«^^\ I to »o CO CO -^ -^ lO 



- (M OO lO ■* ■* 



c -a ■ : " i = 






SQ 






3 3 «£ 5:^ t4 S 2 

^j g a -J <l g <J ii<_ 

CCCCHOOOI^-OOOONOO 



■S681— ■9i'!a !j >■ 



























!>^ • 




>. 




















bn 










5 
'3 


J2 




: o o 

. too 








CS '^ 

^3 




3 

B 

0/ 


W 


,'■5 




I'-S'-' 6! 




3 eg 

3<3 


■J^ 




.a 


t- 




>-g- 




C3 M 


: S 


e3 


a! 




^3^5 






: 










- • a 
















a> 






. m O 
















> 


hi 




•to. 
















1" 


a 

3 




"2 3 : 




3 =*•« 


iS 






S 


H 








a! 




3 




















n 


t. 




■ B 9 ■»■ 




K^^ 


F 3 




^ 








rt * O 




— o o 






O 


1-5 


CD 




Xl'J^ 




0-5-^ 


^o 




■-5 










6 










































« : 








































T5 




a^ 


























. 1^ o 






S"^ c 












C3 
"3) 




3? 






-ggs 


t; 3 




s 






3 




« 3 






'$.9u 


o o 




d* 






W 




ajOS 






CO^itl 


ss:j 




.^ 


































































r^ 






















a 






M 






















S5 






i-^ 




















3 




: 5 o 
g5g 




= 


-a aj 


•c-a 




■c 








O 






"Sli 






s 






02 




^5^ 




& ?* 2 


3 o 




■t 


























: c 
























































. u 
























. 3 








3 * J 




" ■ 


c£" 


.-Sri i 


armer . 
ousewi 

rakema 
alnter . 
rakema 

achlnis 
alnter . 
ouseke 


CJ 3 - 
C3 3 


? s; _• s g 

a, 0) j- . « 


btX rasinsiBStHa: 'mh 


caE-:KX 


S^ jasS 


Soil ^'ai: Sk 


:^S:: CO 


QJ 
















fe: 






01 • 
















































03 • 
























a • • 






; 




- 5 : 




•- 










fci '■ '. 






















6 '• 
























a . " ; " :: 




































































. s 


















-o :>. 






r^ 


» S^ • 








nS 




O .. • CI 






^ 














2 -J^r 








«S to- : 








o 




• ! 


• H O; 
















:^l 




tuoo) ^ 0) 


y^j;-^ 


5 o 


SS:^| 


3 - =3 3 




I =^-& i 


[•r ii .J 03 


2 « o =s 


a. o s I' o 


W15-/3U 


OSsr 


^ 


-cS^x.a 








- Cl • • 




C<I • 




•<M • • 


■1-103 • 


TO • • 


• >o— ' • • • 


. O • ■ • 








(Ml- CO— CO 






CO l-rHIM CD 


Mffq^CTco lOTO — 




oj • • • 












> ; : : CO ^ •" ■ 




















•g^ "•- » 3 1.=: s co^*^ 

p i£ cs o — — •a t; « t. ■/! 


^ J.- 

be ; 0) 


0) . 

J : 

-;j - 
w c«*- 

- E? 


• u — 

• cs a. 

■•? 3 

IJ 


§^5!^^^^5a==44 


«.== = 


:-3 o 

:a-ji 


I- 3> TO o CO I- TO •# — CO C CO CC 1~ 








— J<l C-l IN 1 






►-5 


: 


- - 


^ 
fe 


C! 


: 


: 






e: 


■ 3 
•-5 


3 
1-5 




5 


;^ 





.c 










«i : 
















es ■ 








03 . 


















S c 
































as 








1-3 








Si 








o 








o 








e 








63 








t. 










03 • 








^ : 








a • 








o : 








o t 








1 


' 


H 






Fryeburg, 
















3D 






•> 




M 






3D 


a 


P? 






^ 




^ 









a 

c 




^^ 


i 


[i< 


a 


(t 


2. 
■3 


P 
P 




— 


fr 









b 












a 





















^ 














s-r 








g-g 




£ 




















003 




fr 





■*i-l 










to . 




If 


) 




a: 




t-t- 




cc 










> 




























^0^ 




^ 




p° 




c 




^^^ 






^ 






t 




qI 




c 































ftg- 






< 


to 




12 





m%z 


^O) 


6 


: : 



u Seas 



(M CO i-l IC •<l( 
00 !M •* CO CO 



• • >^ ■ : 



CO 00 00 CO CO 



fefcRSl-jOj 



t^ ^ C5 l^ 'to 
O t^ '^ iC l^ 
^ -— I CO 



- 1: ^ 1- 

O a; G f^ 



o 

4—1 



a ? x: 



« -^ 



Cl, oi 



o 



o 
o 



ffl 
o 

1-5 



a 
o 
O 
1-1 
o 






.2 05 ^ 



Ol 


bf) 







Cu 




(t; 


CO 


-u 


"r^ 


05 


c3 


J3 


-a 
be 




a 


X2 


!d 


-73 





03 

-1^ 



















xi 


03 


;-■ 








02 


m 


_♦ 


^ .^ 


^ 


•-^ 


X2 

s 




va V* 


^ 


bC 































bD 



OS 



xi 



4 



APPENDIX. 



m:eiveoria.l a.rch. 



THE SOLDIERS' MEMORIAL ARCH. 



CONCORD'S TRIBUTE TO HER FALLEN HEROS. 

The soldiers' monument was dedicated July 4, 1892. A beautiful 
memorial arch of undecaying granite, erected by the willing contribu- 
tions of a grateful people, has been formally devoted to the memory 
of the men who fought the battles of the Union and died that the 
Union might be perpetuated. Surrounded by the bright colors sym- 
bolizing our nationality, amid the strains of martial music, by the 
voice of prayer and the tongue of eloquence, with solemn ritual and 
in the presence of surviving comrades in arms, the monumental struc- 
ture has been made sacred for all coming time. Hereafter it will 
stand a reminder to the old of the days of strife, and an inspiration to 
the young to fidelity and patriotism. 

The dedication could not have taken place on a more appropriate 
or more auspicious day. Ushered in with the sounds of exploding 
powder and ringing bells, it was a day of special significance wherever 
the stars and stripes were floated, and eminently fitted for remember- 
ing and honoring the deeds of American soldiers and sailors. Nor was 
anything lacking so far as the weather was concerned; the copious 
rain which fell on the evening previous was followed by clearing skies 
and cooling breezes, which made a perfect summer day, and from first 
to last there was nothing to interrupt the order of the exercises, which 
was carried out as arranged many days before. The city's hospitality 
was found amjjle for the guests, who included men of eminent dis- 
tinction, besides many of those veterans of the army who survive, and 
who desired to have a part in dedicating this memorial of their fallen 
comrades. 

HISTORY OF THE ARCH. 

The erection of the soldiers' memorial arch was the culmination of 
a plan which had long been forming. For many years the question of 
building a monument to the soldiers and sailors of Concord liad been 
discussed, and finally the city council, as well as the surviving com- 
rades, decided that the time had come when such a monument should 
be biiilt. Accordingly, on the 13th day of January, 1891, the council 
passed the following ordinance : 



b CITY OF CONCORD. 

Section 1. That a sum not to exceed $20,000 be and hereby is ap- 
]iropriated for a soldiers' monument or memorial, to commemorate 
the patriotism of the men of Concord who served their country on 
land or sea, in the several wars, to establish, defend, and maintain the 
unity of the republic. 

Sec. 2. Such monument or memorial shall be located in White's 
park, or in front of the city hall, or in some other suitable place. 

Sec. 3. The mayor and two members of each branch of the city 
council, whose terms of office begin on the fourth Tuesday of January, 
1891, together with three citizen taxpayers, to be severally hereafter 
appointed by the mayor, and three veteran soldiers, to be selected by 
the Grand Army posts of the city, shall be a committee, of which the 
mayor sliall be chairman, to carry into effect the purpose of this ordi- 
nance; and such committee shall have full power to determine the 
site, procure and agree upon plans, accept proposals, and sign con- 
tracts for the construction and erection, and make all necessary 
arrangements for the apjiropriate dedication of such monument or 
memorial upon completion. 

When the legislature convened, in the same month, the following 
resolution was passed : 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Bepresentatives in General Court 
convened : That the governor, by and with the advice and consent of 
the council, and under such rules and regulations as they may pre- 
scribe, may grant the privilege to the city of Concord to erect, at its 
own expense, at the central front entrance to the State House park in 
said city, a suitable memorial arcli to the Union soldiers and sailors 
of the War of the Rebellion, at a cost of not less than $20,000 : 
provided, however, that the designs and plans for said arch shall first 
be approved by the governor and council. 

This was ajjproved by the governor April 10, 1891. 

The ordinance provided further for the appointment of a committee 
of members of the city government, citizens, and veteran soldiei'S, 
which should have "full power to determine the site, procure and 
agree upon plans, accept proposals, and sign contracts for the con- 
struction, and make all necessary arrangements for the appropriate 
dedication of such monument or memorial upon its completion." 

This building committee was appointed April 21, 1891, and was con- 
stituted as follows: Mayor Henry W. Clapp; Aldermen Gr. B. John- 
son, Henry McFarland, W. J. Fernald; Councilmen John H. Couch, 
Leonard W. Bean, F. E. Cloudman; and Messrs. Giles Wheeler, P. B. 
Cogswell, Henry W. Stevens, John C. Linehan, James K. Ewer, and 
H. H. Farnum. Six members of this committee saw sei'vice in the 
Union army during the War of the Rebellion. 

At a meeting of the building committee, held on May 5, 1891, Messrs. 
Giles Wheeler, John C. Linehan, Henry McFarland, G. B. Johnson, 
and P. B. Cogswell were appointed a committee to agree upon a 
design. 

Considering the geographical features of the city, and with a desire 
to reach the best possible result, the committee deemed it Avise to 



SOLDIERS MEMORIAL AKCH. 7 

consult Mr. Frederick Law Olmstead, the emiiient landscape arclii- 
tect, in regard to both the site and the design. Mr. Olmstead visited 
all the sites proposed, and advised the building of an arch at the main 
gateway of the State House park, a situation which had been favor- 
ably considered by the committee. Permission to build an arch at 
the central front gateway had been granted by the state legislature, 
as above, by a joint resolution, approved April 10, 1891. 

The whole State House park was given to the state by citizens of 
Concord in 1816, also all the stone used in the construction of the 
building. In 186-1 the city of Concord bore the expense of rebuilding 
the state house and improvements to the square, at a cost of $175,000. 

On the 6th of October, 1891, a design for the arch, submitted by 
Messrs. Peabody & Stearns of Boston, was accepted, and on December 
26, 1891, a contract was made with Messrs. Ola Anderson, John Swen- 
son, and L. O. Barker of Concord, for the building of the monument, 
the material to be Concord granite. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE COMMITTEE, AND RECORD OF ITS MEETINGS. 

In response to a call from Mayor Henry W. Clapp, the committee 
chosen to erect a soldiers' monument for the city of Concord met at 
the mayor's office, in Bailey's block, at 7: 30 o'clock p. m.. May 1, 1891. 

There were present Henry W. Clapp, Parsons B. Cogswell, William 
J. Fernald, Giles Wheeler, Leonard W. Bean, Henry H. Farnum, James 
K. Ewer, Henry W. Stevens, Henry McFarland, and Fred E. Cloudman. 

On motion of P. B. Cogswell, a temporary organization was formed, 
■with F. E. Cloudman as clerk. 

By request, H. W. Stevens read the city ordinance in relation to the 
erection of a monument or memorial arch. 

After an expression of opinion by various members of the committee 
relative to the work to be done, it was voted that Messrs. Cogswell, 
Wheeler, and McFarland be appointed a committee to correspond with 
artists and architects for designs for a monument or arch. 

On motion, it was voted to adjourn to Tuesday evening. May 5, at 
7: 30 o'clock, at the same place. 

F. E. Cloudman, 

Clerk pro tern. 

A meeting of the committee was held at the mayor's office. May 5, 
1891, at 7:30 o'clock p. m., agreeably to adjournment. There were 
present Messrs. Clapp, Ewer, Wheeler, Johnson, Couch, Bean, Cogs- 
well, Stevens, Linehan, Farnum, and Cloudman. 

The record of the former meeting was read by the clerk. 

On motion of J. C. Linehan, it was voted that a sub-committee be 
appointed by the mayor to present to the committee a list of names of 
officers for a permanent organization. 

The mayor appointed Messrs. Ewer, Wheeler, and Cogswell as the 
committee, and they reported as follows: Clerk, Henry W. Stevens; 



O CITY OF CONCORD. 

treasurer, Henry McFarland; committee on desi^^ns, Giles Wheeler, 
John C. Linehan, Henry McFarland, Gilman B. Johnson, and Parsons 
B. Cogswell. 

The report of the committee was accepted and adopted. 

On motion of John C. Linehan, it was voted that a committee con- 
sisting of Henry W. Clapp and Henry W. Stevens be appointed and 
instructed to examine the right of the city and state as to land be- 
tween the state house and Main street, in front of the state house. 

On motion, it was voted that when we adjourn, it be to meet again 
at the call of the chairman. 

On motion, it was voted to adjourn. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee held at the mayor's office, July 6, 1891, at 
7:30 o'clock p. m., agreeably to the call of the mayor. There were 
present Messrs. Clapp, McFarland, Wheeler, Cogswell, Ewer, Johnson, 
Fernald, Bean, Couch, Cloudman, and Stevens. 

The report of the special committee on design being called for, Mr. 
Wheeler, for that committee, made a report embodied in a letter sent 
to the committee by Frederick Law Olmstead, which was read. 

On motion of Mr. Ewer, it was voted that the report of the commit- 
tee be accepted and placed on file. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, it was voted that the location of the 
monument l)e as recommended by Mr. Olmstead ; that it be in the form 
of an arch, and constructed of Concord granite. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee held at the mayor's office September 23, 
1891, at 11: 20 o'clock a. m., agreeably to the call of the mayor. 

There were present Messrs. Clapp, Ewer, Cogswell, Wheeler, John- 
son, Farnum, Fernald, Cloudman, Couch, and Stevens. 

Various plans by Peabody & Stearns of Boston were shown to the 
committee and discussed. 

On motion of Mr. Ewer, it was voted to place the plans in some 
suitable place to be exhibited to the public, until the next meeting of 
the committee. 

On motion, it was voted to adjourn to meet again at the mayor's 
office on September 30, at 7: 30 o'clock p. m. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee held at the mayor's office, September 30, 
1891, at 7 : 30 o'clock p. m., agreeably to adjournment. There were 
present Messrs. Clapp, Wheeler, Ewer, Cogswell, Farnum, Fernald, 
and Stevens. 

Mr. Peabody of Boston, architect, was present, and further explained 
his plans. 



SOLDIERS MEMORIAL ARCH. 9 

On motion of ISIr. Cogswell, it was unanimously voted that the plans 
submitted by Peabody & Stearns be presented to the governor and 
council to see if they are satisfactory to them, and whether they have 
further suggestions or criticisms to make. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee held at the house of Maj. Henry McFar- 
land, October 6, 1891, at 7 o'clock p. m., agreeably to the call. 

There were present Messrs. Clapp, Cogswell, Wheeler, Linehan, 
Ewer, McFarland, Bean, Farnum, Johnson, and Stevens. 

Expressions of opinion were given by various members of the com- 
mittee with regard to the -modified plan presented by Messrs. Pea- 
body ct Stearns. 

Tlie following resolution offered by Mr. Cogswell was, upon motion 
of Col. Linehan, unanimously adopted: 

Besolved, That the committee accept as a design for a soldiers' 
memorial monument, to be erected by the city of Concord in front of 
the State House park, the modified sketch submitted by Messrs. Pea- 
body & Stearns of Boston, Mass., provided it can be erected within the 
appropriation, subject to the approval of the governor and council, to 
whom the sketch and the city oi'dinance relating to the erection of a 
soldiers' monument in Concord are respectfully submitted. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, it was voted that the mayor appoint two 
committees — one for the purpose of writing an appropriate inscription 
for the monument, the other to collect the names to be inscribed upon 
the monument. 

The mayor named as such committees the following gentlemen : 

To serve on the first committee, Messrs. McFarland, Ewer, and Lin- 
ehan. 

To serve on the second committee, Messrs. Cogswell, Stevens, and 
Wheeler. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, it was voted that as many inembers of 
the committee as possible be present at the next meeting of the gover- 
nor and council, to present and explain to them the plan which has 
been adopted. 

On motion, it was voted to atljourn at the call of the chairman. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee held at the mayor's office, October .31, 
1891, at 4 o'clock p. m., agreeably to notice. 

In the absence of the chairman and secretary, Col. John C. Linehan 
was chosen chairman pro tern, and P. B. Cogswell was chosen clerk 
jrro tern. 

On motion of Mr. Wheeler, it was unanimously voted that Mr. 
Peabody be requested to complete all of the necessary plans and speci- 
fications for the proposed memorial arch at the earliest i^ossible time, 
and submit the same to the committee. 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mr. Wheeler was authorized to communicate to Mr. Peabody, at his 
earliest convenience the action of the committee. 

Mr. Cogswell was authorized to correspond with Mr. Mead concern- 
ing bas-reliefs, and obtain any further desirable information from 
him. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

P. B. Cogswell, Clerk pro tern. 

Meeting of the committee held at the mayor's office at 7 : 30 o'clock 
p. m. on November 28, 1891. 

There were present the mayor and Messrs. Cogswell, Ewer, Wheeler, 
Johnson, Fernald, Cloudman, and Stevens. 

The plans of Peabody & Stearns were examined, and the matter of 
securing bids from contractors for the construction of the monument 
was discussed by the committee. 

Correspondence between Mr. Wheeler and Peabody & Stearns, and 
the specifications and contract for building, were read over and dis- 
cussed. 

On motion of Mr. Wheeler, it was voted that in the section of the 
specification referring to the " backing " of the stone work, the word 
" stone " be stricken out, so that the section shall provide for a "back- 
ing" of brick and cement only. 

On motion of Mr. Ewer, it was voted that the committee publish an 
invitation containing conditions for bids for construction of the arch 
in the Concord daily newspapers, stating when and where the plans 
can be seen, and limiting the time within which bids will be received. 

On motion, it was voted that Messrs. Cogswell, Wheeler, and 
Stevens be a committee to draw up and get published such invitation 
for bids. 

On motion it was voted that the proposed form of contract be so 
changed that the only stone called for in the construction of the arch 
should be the best Concord granite. 

On motion, voted to adjoui-n. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

The committee that was ajipointed to draw up and publish invita- 
tions for bids attended to their duty, and caused the following notice 
to be published in the Concord Eveyiing Monitor and the People and 
Patriot : 

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS. 

Sealed proposals will be received until December 12, 1891, for the 
entire construction of the Soldiers' Monument, Concord, N. H. Plans 
and si^ecifications may be seen at the office of the mayor or at the 
architects, Peabody & Stearns, Exchange Building, Boston, Mass. 

The stone must be of Concord granite, and from quarries satisfactory 
to the committee. Each bidder must submit with liis proposal a sam- 
ple of the stone he proposes to use, with the kind of cutting and finish 
called for; also to state in his bid the time in which he proposes to 



SOLDIERS MEMORIAL ARCH. 11 

complete the work. The quality of the stone and the time required 
will be considered in awarding the contract. 

Bids for the construction of the monument will be considered only 
from such contractors as can refer to work of this character and mag;- 
nitude performed by them. All bids should be made on the blank 
form furnished for the purpose, and to be obtained at the office of the 
mayor, or of the architects. 

The committee reserves the right to reject any or all proposals, if it 
shall be deemed for the best interests of the city. 

P. B. Cogswell, 
Giles Wheeleb, 
Henky W. Stevens, 

For Committee. 
Concord, Nov. 30, 1891. 

Meeting of the committee, held at the mayor's office, Dec. 12, 1891, 
at 7 : 30 o'clock p. m. 

There wei-e present the mayor and Messrs. Linehan, Cogswell, 
Wheeler, Cloudman, Ewer, Farnum, Couch, Stevens, and .Johnson. 

On motion it was unanimously voted to open the bids of the con- 
tractors for the construction of the monument. 

The clerk read aloud all the bids received by the committee, and 
which were as follows: Timothy P. Sullivan, $19,287; Xew England 
Granite Works, $18,474.50; Granite Railway Co., $16,700 and $19,265; 
Ola Anderson and John Swenson, $16,866; Milford Pink Granite Co., 
$22,250. 

On motion it was voted that the mayor confer with the two lowest 
bidders with reference to their bids, and that the committee keep the 
matter of the bids secret. 

On motion it was voted to adjourn to Monday evening, Dec. 14, at 
at 7 o'clock p. m., at the mayor's office. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office at 7 o'clock p. m., 
December 14, agreeably to adjournment. 

There were present the mayor and Messrs. McFarland, Wheeler, 
Cogswell, Linehan, Johnson, Ewer, Farnum, Cloudman, and Stevens. 

A letter from T. P. Sullivan to the committee was read, and remarks 
were made by the various members. 

On motion of Major McFarland, it was voted that the order of pro- 
cedure be as follows : 

1. That we do not accept or reject either bid at present. 

2. That Messrs. Anderson & Swenson be invited to repoint the 
face of their sample of stone, cutting the crevices a little deeper, to 
make the sample what we understand the architect requires, and to 
return the sample to the mayor's office. 

3. That then each of the four Concord bidders be asked to state 
at what price they will execute the contract for the monument, accord- 
ing to the architect's specifications; taking Mr. Swenson' s stone for a 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

sample of quality and workmanship, omitting the bronze bas-reliefs 
and lanterns from the specifications, the committee to supjily the 
bronzes by separate contract. 

On motion, it was voted that when the meeting adjourn, it adjourn 
to meet at the mayor's office, at 7 o'clock p. m., on Tuesday, Decem- 
ber 17, next. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office at 7 o'clock, Decem- 
ber 17, 1891. 

There were present Mayor Clapp and Messrs. Linehan, Ewer, John- 
son, Farnum, Wheeler, and Cogswell. 

In the absence of the secretary, P. B. Cogswell was chosen clerk 
jyro tern. 

After a statement by the mayor relative to bids received, it was 
voted to give Mr. Sheldon until Saturday evening next to revise his 
bid, as he had been unable to do so by reason of his being out of the 
city. 

On motion, it was voted to adjourn to meet again on Saturday even- 
ing, December 19, next, at 7 o'clock p. m., at the mayor's office. 

P. B. Cogswell, CZerfc pro f em. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office, at 7 o'clock p. m., 
December 19, 1891. 

There were present Mayor Clapp and Messrs. Linehan, Johnson, 
Ewer, Wheeler, Farnum, and Cogswell. 

In the absence of the secretary, P. B. Cogswell was chosen clerk 
pro teni. 

On motion of John C. Linehan, it was voted to open the bids, which 
were iowr in number, as follows : 

T. P. Sullivan, $1(3,690; Granite Pvailway Co., $18,765; Anderson & 
Swenson, $16,700; New England Granite Works, $17,774. All the 
above named bids were exclusive of bronze work. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, voted unanimously that the committee 
select the bronze work, and that Mayor Clapp, Giles Wheeler, and 
P. B. Cogswell be a special committee to select the bronze lamps, etc., 
and report to the full committee. 

On motion of Mr. Wheeler, it was unanimously voted that the con- 
tract for erecting the monument be awarded to T. P. Sullivan, the 
stone to be taken from the quarry of John Swenson, provided it shows 
sufficient quantity and quality after the blast soon to be made. 

On motion of Mr. Wheeler, the clerk was instructed to notify Mr. 
Sullivan of the acceptance of his bid by the committee, and also to 
notify the other bidders to whom the contract had been awarded, and 
to furnish them with a statement of the several bids. 

On motion of Mr. Ewer, it was voted that P. B. Cogswell be in- 
structed to extend by writing, in behalf of the committee, an invita- 



soldiers' memorial arch. 13 

tion to President Walker of the Institute of Technology, in Boston, to 
deliver the oration at the dedication of the memorial arch. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, Mayor Clapp was instructed to secure 
the services of the Third Eegiment band for the occasion of the 
dedication of the memorial arch. 

On motion, voted that the matter of arranging for the participation 
of the Grand Army of the Republic in the dedication of the soldiers' 
memorial be referred to Messrs. Linehan, Ewer, Johnson, Farnum, 
and Bean. 

On motion, voted to adjourn at the call of the chairman. 

P. B. Cogswell, Clerk pro tern. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office at 7 o'clock p. m., 
December 22, 1891. 

There were pi'esent Mayor Clapp and Messrs. McFarland, Ewer, 
Wheeler, Cogswell, Johnson, Couch, and Stevens. 

A letter from T. P. Sullivan to the committee declining the award 
of the contract for building the memorial was read. 

After considerable discussion, the meeting was adjourned to meet 
at the mayor's office, on Saturday evening, December 26, at 7:30 
o'clock p. m. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office, at 7:30 o'clock p. m., 
December 26, 1891, agreeably to adjoui-nment. 

There were present Mayor Clapp and Messrs. McFarland, Ewer, 
Cogswell, Wheeler, Johnson, and Stevens. 

It being known to the committee that Mr. T. P. Sullivan had de- 
clined the contract awarded to him on December 19, and Messrs. Ola 
Anderson and John Swenson being the next lowest bidder, and careful 
inquiry as to tliier ability to execute the contract having resulted sat- 
isfactorily, it was voted unanimously, on motion of Mr. Ewer, that the 
contract be awarded to Messrs. Ola Anderson, John Swenson, and 
L. O. Bai'ker, to be executed in stone from the Swenson quariy, 
agreeably to the drawings and specifications of Peabody & Stearns, 
the terms of the contract to be hereafter executed. 

On motion, voted to adjoui-n. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office, at 7 o'clock p. m., 
January 27, 1892. 

There were present Mayor Clapp, and Messrs. Wheeler, Cogswell, 
Johnson, Cloudman, Couch, and Stevens. 

On motion of Mr. Couch, it was voted that the special committee 
l)efore chosen to select the bronze lamps for the memorial arch be 
authorized and given full power to purchase such lamps. 

On motion of Mr. Johnson, it was voted that the mayor and Messrs. 
Cogswell and McFarland be a committee to see what can be done by 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

raising funds outside of the ajjpropriation to purcliase bronze bas- 
reliefs. 

On motion, voted to adjourn to the call of the chairman. 

Henky W. Steven's, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office, at 7: 30 o'clock p. m., 
February 20, 1892. 

There were present Mayor Clapj) and Messrs. Cogswell, Wheeler, 
and Stevens; also Major H. F. Gerrish, D. B. Newhall, James Minot, 
O. W. Crowell, and J. A. Tuck, of E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. K. 

Upon motion of Mr. Cogswell, it was unanimously voted that it is 
the sense of those present at this meeting that the Grand Army posts 
of this city be requested to choose a special committee of not less than 
five from E. E. Sturtevant Post, and not less than three each from 
William I. Brown Post and Davis Post, to join with this committee in 
making and perfecting arrangements for the dedicatoi-y exercises of 
the memorial arch. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

Henry" W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office at 4 o'clock p. m., 
March 24, 1892. 

There were present Mayor Clapp and Messrs. Ewer, McFarland, Lin- 
ehan, Cogswell, Johnson, Bean, Cloudman, Couch, and Stevens. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, it was voted that an invitation be ex- 
tended to the Department of New Hampshire, Grand Army of the 
Republic, to attend the dedicatory exercises of the memorial arch, 
and that said invitation be signed by the chairman and secretary of the 
committee. 

On motion of Major McFarland, it was voted that Messrs. Cogswell, 
Ewer, and Linehan be a committee to secure an orator for the dedica- 
tion. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, the following inscription to be put on 
the arch was unanimously adopted : 

"To the Memory of Her Soldiers and Sailors, in the War for the 
Union, the City of Concord Builds this Monument, A. D. 1892." 

On motion, it was voted that the committee, with the committees of 
the Grand Army posts of the city joined, hold a meeting within two 
weeks to perfect arrangements for the dedication of the arch, to be at 
the call of the mayor. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office, at 4 o'clock p. m., 
April 9, 1892. 

There were present Messrs. McFarland, Cogswell, Johnson, Fernald, 
Ewer, Cloudman, Farnum, Couch, Stevens, and Bean. 



soldiers' memorial arch. 15 

In the absence of the mayor, Major McFarland was chosen chairman 
pro tern. 

The matter of the programme for the day of dedication was talked 
over, but no action was taken in re<i,ard to it. 

On motion it was voted to reconsider the action by which an in- 
scription for the monument was adopted. 

On motion of Mr. Couch it was unanimously voted to place the fol- 
lowing inscription on the monument: 

To THE Memoky of Her Soldieks and Sailors, 

The City of Concord Builds This Monument, A. D. 1892. 

1776. . 1861-5. 1812. 

On motion, it was voted to adjourn. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office at 7 : 30 o'clock p. m.. 
April 16, 1892. There were present the mayor and Messrs. Cogswell, 
Wheeler, Linehan, Johnson, Ewer, Bean, Couch, Farnum, and Stevens, 
of the committee, and Messrs. Newhall, Cogswell, Hai^peny, Gerrish, 
Davis, and George of the Grand Army post. 

On motion of Mr. Cogswell, it was voted that a committee of three 
be appointed by the chair, to report a programme for the dedication 
exercises. Messrs. Linehan, Cogswell, and Ewer were appointed such 
a committee. 

On motion of Maj. Gerrish, the committee were given power to ar- 
range the committees and report later. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, Col. Solon A. Cai'ter was chosen chief 
marshal of the dedication ceremonies. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, it was voted that when the meeting ad- 
journ it meet at the mayor's office at 7 : 30 o'clock p. m., Saturday 
next. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office at 7 : 30 o'clock p. m. 
April 23, 1892. There were present the mayor and Messrs. Cogswell, 
Linehan, Johnson, Ewer, and Stevens of the arch committee, and 
Messrs. Gerrish and Happeny of the Grand Army post. 

The committee on the selection of an orator made a report of the 
acceptance of Gen. Joseph R. Hawley, of the invitation to deliver the 
oration at the dedication of the monument. 

The committee appointed to report a programme, and committees 
for the dedication exercises reported a list of names of the various 
committees, and on motion of Maj. Gerrish the report was accepted 
and adopted. The committees were as follows: 

General Committee of Arrangements.— Mayor H. W. Clapp, Oilman 
K. Crowell, Hon. Moses Humphrey, Hon. John C. Linehan, Hon. John 



16 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Kimball, Gen. G. B. Johnson, lion. L. D. Stevens, James L. Qniun, 
John M. Hill, Hon. John G, Tallant, Hon. C. H. Amsden, Henry J. 
Crippen, Hon. Henry Robinson, Giles Wheeler, Maj. Abijali HoUis, 
Cornelius E. Sullivan, D. Arthur Brown, Emri LaPierre, Maj. J. E. 
Kandlett, Samuel F. Brown, Hon. John M. Mitchell, Gen. Howard L. 
Porter, Albert P. Davis, Joseph A. Cochran, G. Scott Locke. 

Transportation. — Hon. B. A. Kimball, H. E. Chamberlin, Frank E. 
Brown, Major H. F. Gerrish, Josiah A. Dadmuu, George W. Abbott, 
Capt. J. W. Johnston. 

Order of Exercises and Printin;/. — Major Henry McFarland, P. B. 
Cogswell, Allan H. Robinson, Ira C. Evans, Fred E. Cloudman. 

On Invitation. — Henry W. Stevens, Loren S. Richardson, Major D. B. 
Donovan, John H. Couch, Harry G. Sargent. 

Entertainment. — Capt. D. B. Xewhall, Henry E. Conant, Ethan N. 
Spencer, John T. Batchelder, John A. Tuck, John J. McNulty, Gard- 
ner B. Emmons, Austin S. Ranney, Arthur C. Sanborn, Thomas A. 
Pilsbury, Frank H. George, Hiram O. Marsh, AVilliam F. Carr. 

Decorations. — Capt. W. A. Happeny, E. B. Crapo, Everett W. Willard, 
David E. Murphy, Charles G. Blanchard, James C. Badger, Oliver J. 
Pelren, A. B. Batchelder, Capt. E. H. Dixon, Perry Kittredge, 
Austin T. Sanger, Arthur C. Stewart, Charles A. Davis, William J. 
Eernald, Edward M. Nason, Orlando 1. Godfrey. 

Music. — Hon. John C. Linehan, Louis J. Rundlett, Dr. William G. 
Carter. 

Carriayes. — Xorris A. Duuklee. Leonard W. Bean, Daniel H. 
Gienty, Millard F. Bickford, Andrew L. Lane, Harry S. Harris. 

Finance. — William F. Thayer, John F. Jones, Josiah E. Fernald 
William P. Fiske, Frank P. Andrews, William Yeaton. 

Reception. — Gen. A. D. Ayling, Gen. J. N. Patterson, Hon. Stillman 
Humphrey, Hon. A. G. Jones, Hon. J. E. Robertson, Capt. G. A. Col- 
bath, Col. C. C. D.inforth, Col. Frank W. Rollins, Maj. Arthur H. 
Chase, Gen. F. A. Stillings, Dr. Granville P. Conn, Dr. Ezekiel Mor- 
rill, Dr. Thomas Hiland, Dr. Charles R. Walker, Dr. George M. Kim- 
ball, Dr. D. E. Sullivan, Dr. Edgar A. Clark, Dr. James H. French, 
John Whitaker, Paul R. Holden, George F. Page, AYilliam E. Hood, 
John P. George, George F. Durgin, John F. Webster, Thomas C. Be- 
thune, A. Southard Marshall, Moses I^add, Timothy P. Suliivan, Patrick 
H. Larkin, J. Irving Hoyt, Edmund H. Brown, William W. Allen, and 
iill the members of both branches of the city govtn-nment. 

On motion, the committee adjourned. 

Henry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Meeting of the committee at the mayor's office at 4 o'clock. May 21, 
1892. 

There were present Mayor Clapp and Messrs. McFarland, Ewer, 
Wheeler, Fernald, Linehan, Johnson, Cloudman, and Couch. 



SOLDIKKS MEMORIAL ARCH. 17 

In the absence of tlie clerk, John II. Couch was chosen clerk 
pro tem. 

It being stated that the architect of the monument found the in- 
scription too long for tlie frieze of the arch, it was voted 'to amend the 
inscription by omitting the dates, so that it^should read as follows: 

" To the memory of lier 8.)ldiers and Sailors, the city of Concord 
builds this monument." 

On motion of Mr. Ewer, it was voted that the Rev. D. C. Roberts, 
D. D., act as chaplain of the day on the occasion of the dedication of 
the monument. 

On motion of Mr. Fernald, it was voted that all the active pastors in 
this city be added to the reception committee. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

John II. Coucii, Clerk pro tem. 

Meeting at the mayor's office at 1 : 30 o'clock p. m., June 10, 1892. 

There were present the mayor and Messrs. Wheeler, McFarland, 
Bean, Johnson, Couch, Fainum, and Stevens. 

The matter of funds for the dedication expenses]was discussed. 

On motion of Mr. Couch, it was voted j^that Maj. McFarland be a 
committee of one to draw up a form for an ordinance to provide funds 
for the expenses of dedicating the memorial arch, to be presented to 
the city council at their next meeting. 

On motion, it was also voted that the mayor appoint-a committee of 
two to procure all the necessary badges, and Messrs. Coucli and Cloud- 
man were appointed as this committee. 

On motion, the committee on badges were instructed to see if official 
programmes of the dedication exercises can not be issued to the pecu- 
niary advantage of the city. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

Hexry W. Stevens, Clerk. 

Final meeting of the committee before the dedication exercises of 
July 4, at the mayor's office at 7 : 30 o'clockip. m., June 28, 1892. 

There were present Mayor Clapp; and Messrs. Wheeler, Linehan, 
Fernald, Cogswell, Cloudman, Couch, ^Johnson, McFarland, and Beau. 

On motion, it was unanimously voted that Mr. Cogswell present the 
monument in behalf of the committee. 

The committee on the order of exercises and printing, through Maj. 
McFarland, made a rejiort recommending a programme, which was 
read and adopted. 

On motion of Col. Linehan, it was voted that a platform for one 
thousand persons be erected near the arch for the dedication cere- 
monies. Various other matters relating |to the dedication exercises 
having been discussed, the committee^adjourned-without day. 

Hexuy W. Stevens, Clerk. 

At a meeting of the committee held at jthe mayor's office July 27, 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

1892, at 4 o'clock p. m., there were present Mayor C'lapp and Messrs. 
McFarland, Fernald, Couch, Cloudman, Linehan, Wheeler, and Coiis- 
well. 

Maj. McFarland reported that the bills presented for the expenses* 
incurred at the dedication of the soldiers' monument on the 4th of 
July last, amounted to $1,865.49, and they were approved. 

Col. Linehan oft'ered the following resolution, which was unani- 
mously adopted : 

Eesolred, That a sum not exceeding .$06.5.49 of the city's appropria- 
tion of twenty thousand dollars for a soldiers' and sailor.s' monument 
be applied to defraying the expenses of the dedication. 

On motion, voted to adjourn. 

P. B. Cogswell, Clerk pro tern. 

*The total expenditure on account of memorial arch will be found on pp. 
115'116, under the head, " City Expenses. " 



SULDIKKS :\IEMOKIAL AUCII. 11) 



THE DEDICATION. 



The dedication, as lias 'been stated, toob place on July 4, 
1892. It was preceded by a parade under the direction of 
Col. Solon A. Carter, chief marshal, and Gen. A. D. Ayl- 
ing, chief of staff, with twenty-two aids. 

A platoon of Concord police, C. L. Gilnioi'e, captain, 
headed the procession, and following came the Third Regi- 
ment Band, A. F. Nevers, leader; Company C, Third Regi- 
ment, W. C. Trenoweth, captain ; (Company E, Third 
Regiment, H. B. Brown, captain ; Pillsbury Division, Uni- 
formed Rank Knights of Pythias, J. E. Tucker, captain ; 
Laconia Division, Uniformed Rank Knights of P3'thias, J. B. 
Fernald, captain; Sons of Veterans' Battalion, one hundred 
men, as escoit to Department Commander, Col. Daniel 
Hall, and the Posts of the Grand i\rray of the Republic, 
commanded by F. E. Smith; Camps of the Sons of Vet- 
erans from Penacook, Manchester, South Lyndel)Orough, 
Lebanon. Nashua, Plymouth, Bradford, and Laconia; De- 
partment Commander, Col. Daniel Hall, and staff in car- 
riages ; Rublee's Band, A. F. Rublee, leader, and the fol- 
lowing Grand Army Posts: E. E. Sturtevant Post, No. 2, 
Concord, H. F. Gerrish, commander ; W. L Brown Post, 
No. 31, Penacook, W. H. Sargent, commander ; Davis Post, 
No. 4L West Concord, James Quinn, commander ; Storer 
Post, No. 1, Portsmouth, W. G. Evans, commander; Louis 
Bell Post, No. 3, Manchester, A. D. Scovell, conunander ; 
John G. Foster Post, No. 7, Nashua, T. M. Shattuck, com- 
mander ; William K. Cobb Post, No. 29, Pittsfield, W. W. 
Gould, commander ; Jo4in L. Perley, Jr., Post, No. 37, 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Laconia, W. II. Lamprey, commander; George F. Sweatt 
Post, No. 38, Franklin Falls, C. H. Flagg, commander; 
Nelson Post, No. 40, Bristol, D. K. Cummings, commander: 
Oilman Sleeper Post, No. '^60, Salem, S. E. Stinclifield, com- 
mander ; George H. Hoyt Post, No. (36, Greenfield, J. A. 
Edmunds, commander; Thomas H. Huse Post, No. 92, 
Barnstead, H. H. Young, commander ; unattached veterans, 
army and navy under command of Col. Dana W. King, of 
Nashua ; state and city officials, orator, chaplain, and 
invited guests, in can-iages. 

Arriving at the site of the memorial arch at the close of 
the parade, the veterans gathered in fi'ont of tlie speaker's 
stand, forming a solid mass extending in one direction to 
Capitol street and in the other to the center of Main street. 
The guests were escorted to the places reserved for them on 
the commodious platform ; Mayor Clapp, as president of the 
day, called the company to order, and the exercises com- 
menced with the rendering of Keller's " National Hymn " 
by the Thiid Regiment J^and. Rev. D. C. Roberts. D. 1)., 
the chaplain of the occasion, offered pi'ayer, after which the 
flags which veiled the arch were removed, and Hon. P. B. 
Cogswell, in behalf of the building committee, addressed 
Mayor C'lapp and delivei'ed the memoiial arch, through 
him, to the care and custody of the city of Concord. The 
mayor responded, accepting it in behalf of the city. 

Following these addresses were the ceremonies of the ded- 
icatioUi under the direction of Col. Daniel Hall, department 
commander of the Grand Army of the Republic of New 
Hampshire, and which were in accordance with the ritual 
of that organization. Mayor Clapp then introduced Gen. 
Joseph R. Havvley, United States senatoi- from Connecti- 
cut, the orator of the day, who delivered the oration. 



SOLDIKRS' JIKMOIUAL ARCH. 21 

ORATION BY GEN. JOSEPH R. HAWLEY. 
Mr. PE.ESIDENT AND FeLLOW-CiTIZENS OF NeW 

Hamrshire: — All old soldiers and sailors, and tlieii- fami- 
lies and their friends, and all lovers of the goo 1 cause and 
the dear old flag, look toward you to-day with love and 
gratitude for your good work in raising this noble monu- 
ment to your defenders of the Union. 

And you have chosen a good day for a good deed. This 
is the day of patriotism. ' It is the day of Americanism, the 
day of the hopeful, of the undoubting. the day on wliich all 
Americans must believe that this is indeed the land of the 
free, the home of the ideal republic. This day they shall 
believe that the institutions and the laws of America aie 
the perfection of human wisdom, that the growth and the 
glory of the future are secure. For one day tjie North and 
the South, the East and the West, shall think and speak 
and sing only of things in which they all agree — this day 
of the Declaration, the Constitution, the Union, and the 
Flag 

The old-fashioned celebration had its lessons of priceless 
value. Then were i-ead the immortal declaration, and 
poems, and orations unrestrained in their congratulations 
and laudations, and in their gi-atitude to Almighty God. 
All these things educated the youth of the republic. To 
the elder men of this day, these observances have a signifi- 
cance that we sometimes fear is no longer recognized, but 
to them was in great measure due the everywhere pervad- 
ing spirit of love and devotion that has made the Union 
indestructible and demonstrated to the world the success of 
the great experiment of self-government. Thence came the 
inspiration which called more than two millions of men to 
the preservation of the Union. 

It is not a selfish day. It is not a time for local, or sec- 
tional, or international enmities. It is another time of 
peace on earth and goodwill toward men, the saints' day of 
a democratic Christianity and a Christian democracy. 



'22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Upon reflection, it is not sti-ange that thoughtful philos- 
ophers and poets of ancient times, in their speculations and 
dreams concerning the possibilities of a perfect government 
and an ideal nation, should seem to have sometimes spoken 
like inspired prophets. 

Charles Sumner collected with scholarly curiosity and 
nicety a volume of prophetic voices concerning America. 
Seneca, the Roman stoic philosopher, even at the very 
beginning of the Christian era, said, — '■'• There shall come a 
time in later ag-es, when ocean shall relax his claims, and a 
vast continent appear, and a pilot shall find new worlds, 
and no longer shall Thule be earth's extreme bound." 

But I speak rather of later days. John Adams wrote in 
1768, — "I always considei- the settlement of America with 
reverence, as the opening of a grand scene and a design in 
Providence fq,r the illumination of the ignorant, and the 
emancipation of the slavish parts of mankind." 

And after the formation of the Union, Jefferson declared 
our constitutional government " destined to be the primitive 
and precious model of what is to change the condition of 
man over the g'obe." 

Evei'y day's record of the proceedings of the Continental 
Congress that declared our independence, and the great con- 
vention that draughted our constitution, shows that those 
plain men of a little people of three millions were building 
for the centuries, and talked as if they, too, had walked 
with God and known his counsels. 

It can haidly be said that they builded better than they 
knew, for they looked forward with an absolute cotainty to 
a nation of countless numbers, boundless resoui-ces, and glo- 
rious freedojn 

Hear George W'^ashington in his general order addressed 
to his disbanding army at Newburg: 

*•' While the general recollects the almost infinite variety 
of scenes through which we have passed, with a mixture of 
pleasure, astonishment, and gratitude — while he contera- 



soldiers' memorial ai;ch. 23 

plates tlie prospects before us with rapture — lie cannot help 
wishing that all the brave men, of whatever condition they 
may be. who have shared in the toils and dangers of effect- 
ing this glorious revolution, of rescuing millions from the 
hands of opj)ression, and of laying the foundation of a great 
empire, might be impressed with a proper idea of the digni- 
fied part they have been called to act (under the smiles of 
Providence) on the stage of human affairs, for happy, thrice 
happy shall they be pronoun ed hereafter, who have con- 
tributed anything, who have performed the meanest office 
in erecting this stupendous fabric of freedom and empire, 
on the bi'oad basis of independency ; who have assisted in 
protecting the rights of human nature, and establishing an 
asylum for the poor and oppressed of all nations and reli- 
gions." 

And on the 3d of July, 1776, in a letter to his wife, John 
Adams wrote: 

"• Yesterday the greatest question was decided which was 
ever debated in Amei'ica, and a greater, perhaps, never was 
nor will be decided among men. I am apt to believe that 
it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great 
anniversary festival. It might be commemorated as the 
day of deliverance by solemn acts of devotion to God 
Almightv. It ought to 1 e solemnized with pomp and 
parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, boiifir. s. and 
illuminations, from one end of this continent to tlie other, 
from this time forwaid, forevermorc. You will think me 
transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well 
aware of the toil and blood and treasure that it will cost us 
to maintain this declaration and support and defend these 
states. Yet, through all the gloom, 1 can see the ray of 
ravishing light and glory, and that posterity will triumph 
in that day's transaction, even although we should rue it, 
which I trust in G d we shall not." 

But there was to come a light and a gloi'V which no man 
foresaw or could have iuiau:ined, when tlie three millions of 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

1776, eighty-five years afterwai'd, had grown more than ten- 
fold to thirty-two millions, like an unheralded earthquake 
came a civil war to save that Union of states in which the 
defenders alone sacrificed seven thousand millions of treas- 
ure and more than three hundred thousand lives. 

Comrades and Fellow-Citizens : How wotiderful the story 
is! Sometimes we plod along in the drudgery of our tame 
and common life for wrecks or months, the memories of the 
war out of mind. Suddenly, perhaps the sight of a maimed 
soldier, perhaps the roll of a drum, the call of a bugle, even 
the leisurely rustle of the old flag peacefully rustling, brings 
back in a tumultuous rush the recollections of that magnifi- 
cent and awful time. 

In our previous history there had been many skirmishes 
with Indians, the unsatisfactory but not altogether inglori- 
ous war of 1812, and a short struggle with Mexico ; but we 
thought of war. — real, great, glorious, desperate, prolongetl 
war, straining the full energies of thirty or forty millions of 
people, and marshaling armies by the hundred thousand, — 
as something of which substantially the last had probably 
been seen under Napoleon. How many boys read and read 
of great battles, and wondered and wondered how it would 
seem ! As their pulses leaped at the description of the great 
thunderings of cannon, the rattle of musketry, the wild yell- 
ing cheers of the charge, they asked, '' Could I go through a 
battle? How should I feel ? How do wounded men look 
and act? What do they say?" And the long night march, 
the bivouac on the wind-swept plain or in deep woods I " I 
wish I could see it all," said many a lad. 

At half-past four on the afternoon of April 12, 1861, a 
cannon-shot of devilish malignity, speeding from jMorris 
Island, South Carolina, toward Fort Sumter, '' slapped the 
face of Liberty." The lightning carried the news. Sud- 
denl}^ arose seventy-five thousand men — three hundred thou- 
sand — three hundred thousand more — a million on one side 
only of a great war. Dying men by the liundred thousand. 



SOLDIERS JIKMOUIAL AKCH. -J,) 

blood in sti-eaiiis, debt by tlie tliousnnd million, a nation's 
life trenddiiig in the balance, black clouds of sorrow and 
despair covering the whole land I The boys who doubted 
their own liearts fovgot to ask questions. They stood np 
by regiments, brigades, divisions, and grand armies, and the 
world never saw bi'aver soldiei'S nor more terrible battles. 
It was an indescribable, astounding revelation of the true 
soul of a nation. 

It was the cause — thedear land we love — the Flag — the 
Declaration — the Union — the foremost Republic in the 
world's Instory — the grand experiment of gf)vernnient by 
the people — a continent dedicated to Liberty — a nation set 
apai't of God to work out the great problem of self-govein- 
ment, of free government, education, peace, justice, equal 
rights — good will among men — all leading mankind toward a 
future nobler than our lichest dreams ! Should this vision of 
unutterable glory be blotted out? Should we have disunion 
— two republics — a dozen — with petty ambitions, factions, 
revolutions, repudiation, dishonor, anarchy — a wretched, 
crushed continent, begging for kings to take all and give 
peace? For answer the grand " Fall in !" rang and rolled 
day and night. The air quivered, hummed, thrilled, and 
shuddered with multitudinous drumming. By hundreds of 
thousands, young men, dropping all works and thoughts but 
of war, stood erect shoulder to shoulder. From valleys and 
rocky hills, prairies and towns, fresh from studies and shops, 
grimy from mines and furnaces — they came down in long 
swinging raidis, with the "clash, clang, and loll of stormy 
war music," to right the great wrong. 

The wife thanked Heaven that her husband was a man 
and a patriot. The mother asked God's blessing upon her 
boy, and promlly and tearfully sent him away. The chil- 
dren knew they would not be ashamed of their fathers. It 
was worth a century to live in those four years. 

The enemies of free government looked with grim delight 
for the coming fulfilment of their prophecies. They said 



26 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



we had certainly tliriven as to mere numbers. They said 
we could fight like a mob ; we were the descendants of 
uneasy and rebellious colonists; our land was the refuge of 
the enemies of all government. Theysaid we had no his- 
tory, no historic consciousness, no cohesion. They said we 
were only a loose congeries of states that would fall apart 
upon a quarrel, with no centi'al commanding power to com- 
pel organization and obedience. They said we had lost 
faith in human nature; we believed all men purchasable; 
we worshipped the dollar; we hungered for sensual and 
material things. They believed that no democratic nation 
could impose heavy taxes, create great debts and pay them, 
or long endure self-imposed sorrow and pain. We asserted 
that there is no power on eai'th equal to that of a free peo- 
ple ; that all men together know more than one man; that 
whatever is to be done by a whole people can best be done 
by a free people. It was for us to show how a free people 
can carry on a long war, and to exhibit unity, submission, 
organization, discipline, obedience, perseverance, devotion, 
self-sacrifice, not because a king commanded, but because 
we felt and willed it. 

The struggle was of infinite importance, because the fail- 
ure of this republic would have delayed the world a century. 
There is not a year or page of subsequent European history 
that is what it would have been if we had failed. There is 
no measuring the influence of this republic on other nations. 
Our wonderful growth in population, social, material, and 
educational development, trade and commerce — our small 
standing army — have been making their impress on the 
people of the Old World. No gi-aces of ]-hetoric can add 
strength to the statistics that pi-ove our material prosperity, 
our elasticit}^ our burden-bearing and debt-paying capacity. 
Call other governments what you will, public opinion is 
rapidly coming to rule them. It will be more and more 
felt as intelligence spreads; and intelligence and intellectual 
growth cannot be stopped. We were fighting the battle of 



SOLDIERS MEMORIAL ARCH. 27 

the centuiies. It was not for the North ; it was not against 
the South. It was not for the southern slave or the bhiek 
man or the white man, nor against the slaveholders. It 
was /'>r the JNorth, for the South, for the slave, for the 
master, — for the whole people and all people. It was the 
battle of the world and of humanity. 

Not all men reasoned elaborately about it. That com- 
bination of truths and traditions, feelings, beliefs, intellect- 
ual and moral discovery and growth that we call civiliza- 
tion, compelled us. The common soldier felt it in his soul 
and gloried in the drama, without waiting for philosophic 
speculations. 

The contest was worth all it cost. The world could not 
have afforded to let it end otherwise. A divided republic, 
several republics, would have meant eternal war. And the 
nation determined to end the question of unity then and 
forever. 

The day of enduring peace is far away. Conflict is the 
law^ of the universe. The mystery of the Divine Govern- 
ment is beyond our comprehension. Everywhere there are 
duality and strife. There are up and down, right and left, 
heat and cold, light and darkness, day and night. Growth 
and decay, good and evil, contend for the mastery. There 
is no rest. The good cannot rest if it would. The bad is 
falsehood, selfishness, hatred, malignity, destruction. They 
are the stronger peoples who live where there is a well-bal- 
anced struggle with nature. There will be peace only 
when all evil shall have vanished. It is well said that 
"Nothing is settled that is not right," and that "Unsettled 
questions have no pity for the repose of mankind." 

What is this terrible and inevitable thing called war? 
It is the sudden and violent disruption of all peaceful indus- 
tries. The air becomes tremulous with the roll of drums, 
the resonant notes of bugles, and the clang of bells. Theie 
come the marshalling and arming of m3aiads of men, the 
rumble and chuck of ponderous artillery and endless trains 



"28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of wagons. There come the sundering of families, the weeping 
and the blessing of fathers, mothers, wives, and sweethearts, 
the high flush of noble emotions, of pride, patriotism, and 
devotion. And, again, the hasty instruction, the marching 
and camping under blazing suns, or in frost and snow ; the 
•delving in mud; some morning the quick, sharp shots of 
the skirmish line ; combats now at dawn, now in darkness ; 
and in time the full battle array ; the rattling, swelling, and 
diminishing volleys of musketry ; the irregular boom of 
cannon; the whistling, humming rifle ball; the Satanic 
screech of heavy shot and shell; tumultuous shouts and 
yells, now near, now far. Then come hospitals, crowded 
by the wounds of battle, and the more deadly wounds of 
disease; populous grave-yards; the muffled drum and 
mourners going about the streets ; debts, private and pub- 
lic ; rags, starvation, and cripples. 

War is an unspeakable calamity, and the wickedest thing 
in the universe is a selfish and wicked war between wicked 
rulers and peoples, unless it be a cotvardly peace — a peace 
that will see justice and liberty stricken down and stand by 
silent and idle. Wrong and oppression are a challenge to 
heaven and all just men. War rouses men to great thoughts 
and deeds, and calls men to sacrifice. Unbelief in human 
nature grows in peace, fostering a conviction that all men 
are selfish. With war and sacrifice comes a sense of the 
value of the country. Our soldiers learned the incalculable 
worth of regularity, fidelity, courage, cheerfulness, and the 
beauty of absolute obedience to orders because they are 
orders, which is next to doing right because it is right. 
Victor Hugo says the soldier and the priest are at heart the 
same: one is devoted to his country down here; the other 
to his country up there. 

See that young man as he enters the ranks, fresh from 
the plow, the workshop, or counting-house. It may be that 
at first his manly spirit rebels against the sharp, peremp- 
tory order of an oflicer, his equal and nothing more at home. 



SOI.PIEHS' MEMORIAL ARCH. 29 

He shrugs bis shoulders in reluctant obedience. He may 
grumble over his bard-tack, and weary of the endless round 
of camp duty. But, as tlie months roll on, see bini salute 
with bead erect and flashing eye. With what alacrity be 
springs to duty wlierever and whenever he finds it — PROUD 
now of submission, obedience, and self-sacrifice. He has 
learned to obey, be is ready to do and die. And that is 
the lesson we taught two million boys — a grand lesson to be 
learned, even amid the carnage of bloody war. Nor did it 
end there. 

There was with some a feeling of dread — born of the old 
world's history — of the time when these soldiers, trained in 
the rough routine of. military camps, and accustomed to 
deeds of blood, should be turned back upon society. But 
when the discharge came, the veterans quietly stepped back 
into the ordinary vocations of life, resuming its peaceful 
duties, all the better fitted because of the sacrifices they had 
made. Multitudes to-day are better citizens for having been 
soldiers. 

They are to be fouiid in every field and corner of the land, 
from shore to shore, — such as I see before me, in all employ- 
ments, professions, and grades, staunch lovers of liberty, law, 
and order, worshippers of the glorious ideal of what this land 
is to be. They have spread through every distant territory, 
ever the truest and foremost among the founders of future 
states. 

Everywhere they stand, a solid wall guarding the civil 
power. So loving the country that they could die for it in 
the storm of war, they are not the men to destroy its insti- 
tutions. 

It was a just war, and no othei- was ever conducted like it. 
Read the story of great European campaigns, save as modi- 
fied at times by special relations and to an increasing degree 
by our example. '^ Fire and sword" was the cry. Desola- 
tion followed the soldier — not that the enemy might be 
starved into defeat, but that the invader might divide plun- 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

der as a legitimate portion of his pay, and an additional mo- 
tive for his service. The capture of cities was followed by- 
insane orgies, trampling upon order and discipline, robbery, 
nameless outrages upon the defenceless non-combatants, fire, 
and brutal mui-ders of the defeated enemy. On the other 
hand, save where, as in the Shenandoah or in Sherman's 
march, the subsistence of the army was drawn from the 
country, or the destruction of the support of the enemy was 
demanded by military policy, the army of the Union carried 
with it protection to property, protection to life and person^ 
and the punishment of disorder. As various regions came 
again under the old flag, the starving were freely fed from 
the army supplies, teachei's and preachers opened churches 
for a gospel free to all, and the Freedmen's Bureau took 
charge of the black man — free, surely, yet owning nothing 
but himself. With the flag went fair play and fair wages 
to all men. The Sanitary Commission and the Christian 
Commission marched with or upon the heels of the army, 
carrying blessings without leservation or distinction. Nevei' 
before did war accompany its hoi-rors with so many of tlie 
mitigations of a Christian civilization. 

The political history of a few months that immediately 
preceded the war is instructive, if not flattering. They 
were full of doubt and dread. So much did loyal men love 
peace and union, and so much, it must be confessed, did 
they doubt the great hearts and high courage of the 
loyal millions, that they offered terms of settlement which 
one wishes could be forever blotted from the record, save 
that they acquit the states that stood by the Union of ^ the 
crime of desiring war. And it was long before the nation 
was driven, under the chastening hand of the Almighty, to 
lift its hand against the underlying causel^of itsjcalamities, 
the belated barbarism, human slavery, struggling for a per- 
manent intrenchment in the republic, and in despair striv- 
ing for its destruction. But as the poet hath it : 

"Above the bayonets bloom the lilies and palms of God." 



SOLDIERS'* MEMORIAL ARCH. 31 

With the restored Union came universal liberty. And of 
the terms granted our conquered brethren of the Soutli, Gen- 
eral Lee said: "General Grant's treatment of the army of 
southern Virginia is without a parallel in the history of the 
civilized world." Confiscations ceased. There were no 
executions for treason. No seditious army remained to 
dominate the government and justify the prophecies of our 
enemies, nor did roving bands of guerillas harass a weary 
people. 

It was indeed a great war, and in nothing greater than in 
its close, and in the results that justify it. Its gigantic 
labors, sorrows, debts, and deaths won something, and what- 
ever was thus won is to be preserved and maintained. 
Upon this much we can all agree : 

An indissoluble Union was restored. The theory of seces- 
sion appealed to the last dread tribunal within the reach of 
man. It lost, and it is dead, as a rule of possible action. 
No man asserts to the contrary. 

Universal liberty was established. Human slavery van- 
ished. No man is heard to lament it, and most of its former 
champions rejoice. 

By constitution and statute, the equality of rights has 
been established, for the ballot box, the jury box, the wit- 
ness box, and the cartridge box. There are mourners, but 
they are helpless. 

There is but one theory of political society. In theory 
at least, there shall hereafter be no master and no slave ; no 
noble, no peasant ; no dominant class, no inferior class. 
Every man has a right to be all that he can be. Even our 
late enemies concede all this, and most of it most cordially 
and sincerely. For it our dead brothers gave their lives. 
Failure to maintain it would be an infinite shame. 

One of our high duties has been thus far nobly discharged. 
Every dollar of the debt has been held as sacred as a 
soldier's grave. More than two thousand millions of it has 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

been paid. Had it been treated with dishonor or trifling, 
there would have been lacking one large element in the 
demonstration that a free people can endure and govern. 

Let us remember that " Liberty is a burden, not a re- 
lease." It is easier to live under a reasonable despotism 
than in a republic. Where one man rules, it is the para- 
dise of those who lament the existence of parties and polit- 
ical agitations. The American citizen has assumed the sov- 
ereignty and cannot escape its duties. All political 
thoughts, debates, and conflicts concern him, and he can 
never reach the end of his care. 

We have the unspeakable happiness to have lived twenty- 
seven years after the close of the war, and to see the great 
changes in fundamental law and statute necessary to confirm 
the judgment thereof ; to see our country first in financial 
credit; first in the harmonious justice and freedom of its in- 
stitutions, and soon to be first in numbers and wealth. No 
man who has contributed, however humbly, to this wonder- 
ful advance has lived altogether in vain. 

By immeasurable sacrifices in war and peace a new and 
solemn sanction has been given to the duties of citizenship. 
Let no man trifle with the honor of the great Republic, or 
deny its authority, or corrupt its ballot boxes. 

We read in the Scriptures that when King David was 
encamped over against Bethlehem, which was in the hands 
of the Philistines, three of his thirty chieftains came down 
to see him. 

" And David longed and said : ' Oh, that one would give 
me to drink of the water of the well of Bethlehem which is 
by the gate ! ' 

" And the three mighty men brake through the hosts of 
the Philistines, and drew water out of the well of Bethle- 
hem, which is by the gate, and took it and brought it to 
David ; nevertheless, he would not drink thereof, but 
poured it out unto the Lord. 



soldiers' mkmouial arch. 33 

" And he said : ' Be it far from me, O Lord, that I should 
do this ; is not this the blood of the men that went in jeop- 
ardy of their lives?' Therefore he would not drink it." 

More than three hundred thousand men went in jeopardy 
of their lives and shed their blood for the Republic. 

When the moralist dwells upon the beauty of peace and 
the sin and barbarism of war, he too often paints the 
soldier only as one divested of all fine, pure elements of 
humanity, going out to kill his fellow-men and lay waste 
their homes. Such are some warriors ; such were not ours. 
Before the contest opened, and during its earlier years, the 
defenders of the Union had less of hatred than ever pre- 
vailed in a people going to battle. They longed for signs 
of changed conviction, or dying passion and returning 
amity. At any moment, the news that our opponents had 
abandoned strife and stretched out right hands would have 
been received with joy indescribable and far surpassing that 
of the capture and enforced surrender of Appomattox. It 
was the stronger brother restraining the weaker from the 
destruction of things of old dear to both, and the heavy 
hand of relentless war, more deadly to the attacking force 
than to the defenders, was really not raised in the East until 
the campaigns of 1864. 

Napoleon's dictum, " The worse the man the better the 
soldier," only reveals the character of his wars. He would 
have discovered that it was not alone barbarous in morals, 
but a blunder in true military science, had he led in such 
causes, that a truly intelligent people could have daily 
wrestled in prayer with Almighty God for his success. Said 
David to Goliath, " Thou comest to me with a sword, a 
spear, and a shield ; but I come to thee in the name of the 
Lord of Hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom thou 
hast defied." 

We venture to say that the great mass of our soldiery 
thought not so much of sending death to others, as of their 
belief that then, if never before, they were serving God and 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

their country, and were willing to die for the good cause, if 
need be. 

The true soldier is not a boaster. Saving and excepting 
the few great leaders, he well knows that he was one 
among two and a quarter millions ; only one, yet proud to be 
counted there. When all was over, Dr. Bushnell said, on 
an occasion similar to this, " The heroes of the war are the 
dead men." True, but there were other heroes than either 
dead or living soldiers. Remember the mothers and wives- 
While to the soldiers some days and weeks were as holidays, 
to the beloved at home nearly all days were days of battle,, 
and every hour carried the possibility of sorrowful tidings. 
Remember such as the Massachusetts mother, losing all her 
five sons; to whom Abraham Lincoln wrote of the solemn 
pride that must be hers to have laid so costly a sacrifice 
upon the altar of freedom. 

Remember the little army of nurses, who gave many lives 
with a courage not surpassed on the field. 

Remember those whose work at home was indispensable 
and who had faith. In 1864 Grant said the Union would 
be saved if the North stood firm. The army sometimes 
looked as anxiously northward as southward. Remember 
the farmers and mechanics who could not go ; who sent 
sons and brothers, staying at home to maintain families ; 
sending cheer and comfort to their boys in the field; voting 
as seemed best to them, but always at heart voting for the 
Union. Remember our legislators, who ordered army after 
army, and debt after debt, with a grand audacity, a splen- 
did faith in Heaven and the people, until 1864 saw the 
Union with the greatest array the world ever saw, near a. 
million and a quarter of men, the best armed, equipped^ 
clothed, fed, paid — and pensioned — the world ever saw. 

Forget not the true Union men of the border and south- 
ern states, who stood by union and liberty, while neighbor 
was arrayed against neighbor, brother against brother, son 
against father ; where the soldier often heard that his fields 



soldiers' memorial arch. 35 

were ravaged, liis home buiiied, his family houseless, and, on 
furlough, he could only visit them by stealth. What had 
we of New England to suffer by the side of these, our com- 
rades of the South ? Remember among them the black 
man. Remember our comrades of foreign birth who were 
with us from Sumter to the end, and those who came from 
foreign lands to join us. 

The New Testament, nowhere reflecting upon the profes- 
sion of the soldier, and full of the metaphors that inter- 
change easily between the campaigns of the evangelist and 
the warrior, gives us a charming story of a Roman captain, 
a pagan, engaged in the ungrateful work of enforcing the 
dominion of Rome over the conquered Hebrews. He had a 
servant who was dear unto him, and who was sick and 
ready to die. The generous soldier, having heard of one 
Jesus, who was the friend of sorrow and suffering, and did 
great wonders in healing men, sent to Him certain elders of 
the Jews, beseeching Him to come and heal the servant. 
The Scripture proceeds to say : 

" And when they came to Jesus they besougiit Him in- 
stantly, saying, ' That he was worthy for whom He should 
do this, for he loveth our nation, and he hath built us a syn- 
agogue.' " 

Here was a broad and liberal, as well as wealthy soldier, 
possibly not a strong believer in the gods of Rome and 
Greece, but still less likely to believe in a gospel from 
Judea, and yet he gave liberally to the alien race over 
whom he was on guard. 

" Then Jesus went with them, and when He was now 
not far from the house, the centurion sent friends to Him, 
saying unto Him: 'Lord trouble not Thyself, for I am not 
worthy that that Thou shouldst enter under my roof; where- 
fore, neither thought I myself worthy to come unto Thee ; 
but say in a word, and my servant shall be healed. 

" ' For I also am a man set under authority, having under 
me soldiers, and I say unto one, " Go," and he goeth ; and to 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

another, " Come," and he cometh ; and to my servant " Do 
this," and he doeth it.' 

" When Jesus heard these things He marvelled at him, 
and turned about and said unto the people that followed 
Him : ' I say unto you, I have not found such faith, no, not 
in Israel.' " 

Thus kindly did the Divine Master look upon the pagan 
captain : " A soldier and a gentleman " of Rome. 

Mr. President: — I am not a stranger to all of you. I 
have met a few. I have been curiously scanning these faces, 
striving after twenty-six or twenty-seven years of separation 
to recognize more of the Second Brigade, First Division, 
Tenth Corps, Army of the James. Associated for nearly two 
and a half years in the Department of the South, the Third 
and Seventh New Hampshire and the Sixth and Seventh 
Connecticut composed the brigade I had the honor to com- 
mand for nearly a year at the close of the war. Of the ear- 
lier commanding officers of your regiments I know little. 

But General Joseph C. Abbott, of the Seventh, my next 
in command, was a dear friend until his death. 

Lieutenant Heber J. Davis and Ferdinand Davis, of the Sev- 
enth, served most gallantly as aides upon my staff. 
" Heber," as we called him, was twice badly wounded. Colonel 
Rollins, Colonel Randlett (severely wounded in a noble 
charue). Major Trickey, Dr. Buzzell, who died of typhus fever 
contracted in the hospitals at Wilmington, Captain Kendall, 
and Major Edgerly, and others, stand out clearly in my mem- 
ory. At the blood}^ fight of Deep Run, August 16, 1864, a sol- 
dier of the Seventh touched my elbow. I turned to see Col- 
onel Josiah I. Plimpton, one of the bravest of the brave, who 
fell at my very side, killed in an instant. Colonel Hender- 
scn, gallant scholar, soldier, and gentleman, was badly wound- 
ed near by, dying in a few hours. No better regiment went 
from New England. 

Mr. President: — I congratulate the city of Concord and 
the state of New Hampshire upon this noble testimonial for 



SOLDIERS MEMORIAL ARCH. 37 

the dead. Let us prefer to believe that their spirits are per- 
mitted to witness this inspiring scene. In the dreary days 
of toil, in the idle hours of waiting camp-life, in the dread 
moment of supreme trial, ever and anon there came to the 
young soldier the question, " What are they thinking of me 
at home?" It flushed his cheeks, brightened his eyes, 
lightened his sorrow, and I'aised his courage. "If we go 
home victors, how glorious it will be ; if we fall, they will 
surely remember us." 

But monuments are not for the dead alone. Justice to 
ourselves and a wise provision for future trials require them. 
They say to the young: " This, and more too, shall be done 
for all who so love their flag and their country." 

Forget not the wonderful time when millions were uplift- 
ed by the great call, many to suffer labor, sorrow, and pain 
and death for something outside of, above, and beyond them- 
selves, joining the noble army of maityrs. Raise a monu- 
ment in every town, where it shall meet the eyes of the mul- 
titudes for centuries to come, forever telling the story of the 
great salvation of free government. Call children to it and 
tell them the tale, fully and truly — the causes and reasons, 
and issues and results. Let the skilful sculptor and painter, 
and the cunnino; ensri'aver set forth the countless romances 
and nobilities of the long struggle. Let the poet, orator, and 
historian perpetuate the significance of that demonstration 
of the wisdom, power, justice, liberty, and truth of the Re- 
public. 

Perhaps you have heard idle and wicked hopes and proph- 
ecies that the memories of the war will pass away. Never ! 
Never ! God have mercy upon a people that could forget or 
desire to forget I With " malice toward none and charity 
for all," remembering that those who were wrong are to be 
personally judged by the light they had, and their cause by 
the light posterity will have, the grandeur of the struggle 
and the majesty of the conclusion will remain in the minds 
of all the world. While the individual names of all save a 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

noble few of the leaders will grow dim in the misty and 
distant past, the splendor of their valor will blend with the 
purple and gold of your sunrise and sunset forever and 
ever. 

Only a few words more. Assisting upon many similar 
occasions, I have made it my custom, as a most worthy part 
of an appropriate liturgy, to read, at the close, the immor- 
tal words of Abraham Lincoln, delivered at the dedication 
of the cemetery at Gettysburg, twenty-eight years ago. 
Standing upon Cemetery hill, before him the panorama of 
hill and valley, magnificent in three days of awful battle 
and now supeilatively beautiful and holy in the sunshine of 
peace, he declared a vow and a covenant that we renew to- 
day. He said : 

" Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth 
upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and 
dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. 

"• Now we are engaged in a great civil war, t sting 
whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so ded- 
icated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield 
of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it as 
the final resting-place of those who here gave their lives 
that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and 
proper that we should do this. 

"• But in a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot 
consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, 
living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far 
above our power to add or detract. The world will little 
note nor long remember what we SAY here, but it can never 
forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather 
to be dedicated here to the unfinished work that they have 
thus far so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to be here 
dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from 
these honored dead we take increased devotion to the cause 
for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that 
we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died 



soldiers' memorial arch. 39 

in vain — that the nation shall, under God, have a new birth 
of freedom, and that the government of the people, by the 
people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth." 

The oration being ended, the bands played '■'• America " 
and the benediction was pronounced. 

THE BANQUET. 

At Phenix hall, immediately after the conclasion of the 
exercises at the arch, tables were spread by Dooling of Bos- 
ton, and the guests of the city sat down to the discussion of 
an elaborate menu, grace being said by Rev. D. C. Rob- 
erts, D. D. 

The hall was beautifully decorated Avith festoons and 
flags, and the back of the stage was hung with heavy blue 
draperies, upon which were emblazoned in letters of gold 
the names of the ensfaeements in which the soldiers of Con- 
cord were engaged. 

During the repast, the Third Regiment band, which was 
stationed in the gallery, rendered choice musical selections, 
one of which, a cornet solo by Arthur F. Nevers, called for 
the cheers of the party. 

General Hawley was obliged to leave the hall before the 
conclusion of the dinner, and before he left he was given 
three rousing cheers. 

The post prandial exercises were participated in by Rev. 
F. D. Ayer, D. D., Hon. J. W. Patterson, Col. Frank G. 
Noyes, and Col. David R. Pierce. Miss Harriet P. Dame, 
who was present, was introduced and was greeted with 
cheers. Cheers for Mayor Clapp completed the pro- 
gramme. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 



THE CONCLUSION OF THE WHOLE MATTER. 

The corner stone of the arch was laid without ceremony 
on May 14, 1892, and the cap-stone was placed June 17, 
1892, the one hundredth anniversary of the battle of Bunker 
Hill. 

The arch has been often used to commemorate the deeds 
of heroes. The monumental arches of Italy and France are 
famous, and this one of Concord adds another to the list of 
enduring memorials by which each age is wont to honor 
brave deeds. The height of this arch is 33 feet 6 inches. 
On the summit it is intended there shall be a winged figure 
of Victory. The archway is 11 feet 4 inches wide between 
the piers, and 21 feet 4 inches high to its crown. The en- 
tire width, including the side walls, is 53 feet. The height 
of the side walls is 11 feet 4 inches, and on them a space 
has been prepared for bas-reliefs, representing military and 
naval scenes in the last war in which Concord men bore a 
conspicuous part. 

The treatment of the design is Florentine in character, 
uniting elegance with strength. The body of the structure 
is strengthened, as well as ornamented, by projecting cush- 
ions or bossages, which are rough liammered. The mould- 
ings are finished to the finest degree. The shields at the 
corners are to impart a military character, and the wreaths 
on the posts are appropriately employed. The lower stone 
of the pedestal for the Victor}'^ is to bear the date " 1892," 
and the panel in the frieze will have an inscription in raised 
granite letters, — 

" To THE Memory of Her Soldiers and Sailors 
THE City of Concord Builds this Monument." 

The bronze lanterns attached to the piers of the arch 
were made from special designs by Messrs. T. F. McGann 



soldiers' memorial arch. 41 

& Co., of Boston. Messrs. John Evans & Co., of the same 
city, are under contract to do the carving, which is partially 
completed. 

When completed, with its bronze bas-reliefs, its crowning 
Victory, and its imperishable granite, the arch will be a 
monument of which Concord may be justly proud. 

It is worthy of remembrance on such an occasion that 
Concord has always been a patriotic town. In the early 
days prior to 1762 she was engaged in French and Indian 
warfare. In 1775 she' had two companies at Bunker Hill, 
Captain Gordon Hutchins's and Captain Joshua Abbott's, 
and part of another company, Captain Aaron Kinsman's. 
Concord aided in defence of the sea-coast in 1812, had men 
in the Mexican War, and sent men enough for a whole regi- 
ment to the War for the Union. The history of Merrimack 
county gives the names of nine hundred and sixteen of the 
last soldiers of Concord, and this list is admitted to be in- 
complete. The Grand Ai-my posts decorate annually the 
graves of more than two hundred soldiers and sailors within 
the city limits. 

The stately arch which the city has built to the memory 
of the soldiers and sailors, stands appropriately near the 
spot where the first recruiting tent in the state was pitched 
in 1861. It was within the length of its early morning 
shadow that the First, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Ninth, Eleventh, 
Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Sixteenth 
regiments received the state colors which they carried in the 
War of the Rebellion. 

The monument is believed to be worthy of and appropri- 
ate to its place, worthy of the city, and an honor to the 
state. 

OPINIONS OF THE ARCH. 

General Hawley, who left on the 5 o'clock train, said, 
just before going away, that when the arch is finished, with 
the bas-reliefs and statuary, he should consider it as beau- 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tiful as anything of the kind in the counti-y, considering the 
size and cost. 

Colonel Thomas E. Barker, of the Twelfth New Hamp- 
shire, now of Maiden, Mass., expressed himself in the most em- 
phatic terms, not only as to the appropriateness of the loca- 
tion, but as to the beauty and finish of the monument. 
Said he, as he sat looking out of the parlor window at the 
New Eagle hotel: '•'On that vei-y spot, twenty-seven years 
ago, I sat on my horse and turned over to the state of New 
Hampshire the colors which I had brought back from the 
war. I can remember it well, as my wife called my atten- 
tion to my horse, whose head was drooping as though 
mourning at parting with the colors. There is no place in 
the state of New Hampshire more appi'opriate foi* a soldiers' 
monument than the entrance to the state-house yard, and no 
monument so fitting as the arch beneath whose shadow so 
many of our boys marched to the front between '61 and '65. 

This opinion expressed by Colonel Barker was heartily 
endorsed by the group of distinguished veterans who stood 
around him as he spoke, including General Michael T. Dona- 
hue, commander of the old Tenth, Colonel James E. Lai'kin of 
the Fifth, Colonel W. H. D. Cochrane of the Tenth, and Ma- 
jor R. O. Greenleafof the Fourth ; and the words of Colonel 
Barker as to the location and beauty of the monument were 
almost a repetition of the language used by Colonel Benson, 
late of the First Maine Cavahy, in the Eagle hotel. 

NOTES OF THE DAY. 

The bells were rung for half an hour, morning, noon, and 
night. 

The number of people on the streets is variously estimated 
at from 10,000 to 15,000. 

Some of the veterans who were in the marching column 
hadn't been there before since the '60s. 

The following past department commanders were pres- 



soldiers' memorial arch. 4-3 

ent : Larkin, Trickey, Lineliau, Wyatt, Grimes, Cogswell, 
and Hiise. 

Ex-Governor Berry of Bristol, New Hampshire's old war 
governor, ninety-six years old last September, was one of 
the most conspicuous guests. 

Much of the credit for the success of the affair was due to 
the efforts of Marshal Solon A. Carter, who made, withal, a 
most excellent officer. 

In the park west of the city hall. Caterer A. J. Farrar 
furnished food and drink for many hundred hungry and 
thirsty people beneath canvas roofs. The bill of fare was 
excellent and substantial, and it was well served. 

Both of the bands did excellent service. Rublee's band 
arrived on the early morning train, and played on the plat- 
form from 8 :.30 until eleven o'clock. The Third Regiment 
band began pla^nng at 9 o'clock and played until noon, and 
both played in the procession and gave a concert during the 
banquet. 

The old soldiers and their younger successors vied with 
each other in precision of step and movement, and the 
thousand or more men in line presented a fine appearance. 
The route covered was as follows : Main street to Franklin, 
Franklin to State, State to Capitol, Capitol to Green, Green 
to Pleasant, Pleasant to State, State to Thorndike, Thorn- 
dike to Main, Main to State House park. 

At the dedicatory ceremonies the monument was unveiled 
by B. F. Morse of Penacook, representing the army, and A. 
S. Roundy, representing the navy. William A. Happeny 
was officer of the day, and Captain Er H. Dixon officer of 
the guard. Waldo Crockett, A. S. Roundy, and James Rob- 
inson represented the navy, and J. A. Dadmun, George P. 
Clark, and James T. Rooney the army. The color-bearers 
were Charles C. Chesley and William A. Silver. 

Governor Berry had the honor of sending out during his 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

administration all of the New Hampshire regiments of vol- 
unteers in the War of the Rebellion except the Fii'st and 
Eighteenth, and the First New Hampshire Cavalry. The 
First New Hampshire Light Battery and three companies 
of sharpshooters were also sent out by him. He is emphat- 
ically the war governor of our sl^ate, and the oldest surviv- 
ing war governor in our country. 

The members of the platoon of police who were on duty 
were Capt. Gilmore, and Officers Bean, Webster, Chesley, 
Silsby, Little, Batchelder, Flanders, Robinson, Patch, 
Roach, Kelley, Green, and Moxlee. The night men were 
on duty in the afternoon, the following being present: Offi- 
cers Sanders, Baker, Eaton, Poor, Robinson, Cole, and Flan- 
ders. City Marshal Locke and Captain Rand weie actively 
engaged all da}^ in looking after the crowd, and good order 
})revailed. 

Mayor Henry W. Clapp, perhaps more than any other citi- 
zen, has reason to be congratulated on the success of the dedi- 
cation. He has worked with the utmost faithfulness to se- 
cure the erection and completion of the arch, and has been 
devoted to the interests both of the veterans and the city. 
Notwithstanding the opposition and difference of opinion 
that he encountei-ed, he kept straight on in the path of 
public duty until complete success had been attained. 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 



ORDlKAISrCES AKD JOINT RESOLUTION'S 

PASSED DURING THE MUNICIPAL TERM ENDING 
January 24, 1893. 



CITY OF CONCORD, 
ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance Increasing the Salary of the City Messenger. 

Section 1. That section 1 of an ordinance passed March 

31, 1888, establisliing the salary of city messenger, be 

amended by striking out the word "five" in tlie second 

line of said section, and inserting instead thereof the word 

" six," so that the first part of said section shall read as 

follows: " Tlie city messenger shall receive in full for his „ , 

■^ * Salary $600 

services the sum of six hundred dollars per year, payable per annum. 

monthly." 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, 
and shall apply to the present municipal term of office of 
tlie city messenger. 

Passed February 17, 1891. 



An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to 
be Raised for the Ensuing Financial Year for the Use of 
the City. 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby 
ordered to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within 
said city, the sum of forty-eight thousand dollars, to defray 
the necessary expenses and cbarges of the city for the ensu- 
ing year, which, together with the sums that may be raised Annual ap- 
by taxes on railroads, and from other sources, shall be ap- the^us^*^'of \he 
propriated as follows : city. 

For the payment of city bonds as they may become due, 
thirteen thousand two hundred and fifty dollars. 

For the payment of interest on the city debt, four thousand 
two hundred and sixty-two dollars. 



48 CITY OF CONXORD. 

For the support of the city poor, one thousand dollars. 

For the fire department, fourteen thousand dollars. 

For incidentals and land damages, five thousand dollars. 

For roads and bridges, thirty thousand dollars. 

For sidewalks and crossings, two thousand dollars. 

For repairing and recoating concrete sidewalks, one thou- 
sand dollars. 

For paving streets, twenty-five hundred dollars. 

For committee service, fourteen hundred and fifty dollars. 

For police and watch, eight thousand dollars. 

For printing and stationery, twenty-two hundred and fifty 
dollars. 

For printing old records of the town, two hundred and 
fifty dollars. 

For legal expenses, five hundred dollars. 

For Blossom Hill cemetery, and to extend the bank wall 
from northeast corner of Blossom Hill to northeast corner 
of Calvary cemetery, three thousand dollars. 

For the Old IS^orth cemeteiy, three hundred and fifty dol- 
lars. 

For White park, eighteen hundred dollars. 

For an addition to White park, seven hundred dollars. 

For Penacook park, tliree hundred and fifty dollars. 

For salaries, eighty-two hundred dollars. 

For the public library, six thousand dollars. 

For beds at Margaret Pillsbury General hospital, twelve 
hundred dollars. 

For decorating soldiers' graves on Memorial Day, three 
hundred dollars. 

For the board of health, one thousfind dollars. 

For discounts and abatements, two thousand dollars. 

For a payment toward city note (part of the extraordinary 
liighway expenses of last year), four thousand dollars. 

For support of dependent soldiers and their families, five 
hundred dollars-. 

For renewal of fire hose, six hundred dollars. 

For repair of the ward house in Ward Six, six hundred 
■dollars. 

For the care and improvement of Rollins park, three hun- 
dred dollars. 

Sec. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of 
twenty-two thousand two hundred and twenty-five dollars, 
for the support of schools for the ensuing year, which, to- 
gether with the income from the Abial Walker fund, shall 
■be divided among the several school districts according to 
the valuation thereof. 

Passed March 17, 1891. 



oudinances. 49 

An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to 
BE Raised on the Property and Inhabitants within the Limits 
of the Gas and Sewerage Precinct for the Ensuing Financial 
Year. 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby 
ordered to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within 
the precinct of said city, the sum of nineteen thousand five 
hundred and forty dollars, to defray the necessary expenses 
and char<;es of the precinct for the ensuing year, which shall 
be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of precinct bonds, as they become due, 
on the precinct state-house loan, two thousand dollars. Annual ap- 

For the payment of interest that may become due on the propriation for 
precinct state-house loan, fifteen hundred and sixty dol-cjjjct. 
lars. 

For the payment of interest that may become due on 
sewer bonds, four hundred and eighty dollars. 

For lighting the streets in said precinct, eight thousand 
five hundred dollars. 

For the construction and maintenance of sewers in said 
precinct, seven thousand dollars. 

Passed March 17, 1891. 



An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to 

BE EaISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 

THE Limits of the City Water Precinct for the Ensuing Finan- 
cial Year. 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby 

ordered to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within Annual ap- 

the water precinct of said city, the sum of six thousand dol- propriation lor 
,,-.,. , , ^ , , use of city water 

lars, to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the precinct. 

water precinct for the ensuing year, which shall be appro- 
priated as follows : 

For water for hydrant service, six thousand dollars. 

Passed March 17, 1891. 



An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to 
BE Raised on the Taxable Property and Inhabitants within 
THE Limits of the Penacook Sewerage Precinct for the Ensu- 
ing Financial Year. 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby 

ordered to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within 

the Penacook sewerage precinct, the sum of fifteen hundred 

nd forty dollars, to defray the necessary expenses and 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 

charges of said preciuct for tlie ensuing financial year, 

which shall be applied as follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 
Annual ap- ^ "^ ■, r- -, -i ^ 

propriation for with an ordinance creating a sinking fund, five hundred 
use of Penacook ,i„n„,.„ 
sewerage pre- ""^^'^i'^- 
clnct. For the payment of interest that may become due on the 

precinct bonds, eight hundred and forty dollars. 

For the repair of sewers, two hundred dollars. 

Passed March 17, 1891. 



An Ordinance in Amendment of Sec. 21 of Chap. 17 of the Re- 
vised Ordinances, in Regard to the Salary of the Steward 
OF Pioneer Steamer Company, 

Section 1. That section 21 of chapter 17 of the Revised 

Ordinances be amended by inserting after the words " thirty 

dollars per annum," in the fifth line, the following: "and 

when performing the duties of janitor of the building, he 

shall receive an additional sum of forty-five dollars per an- 

^ . num." so that the first part of the section shall read, — " Stew- 

Salary $75, , „ -r,. ^ , . 

when perform- ards for Pioneer steamer company and engine companies 

of^ianitor^"**'^^ -'^^^* ^ ^^^^ ^ shall be appointed by the mayor and alder- 
men, and shall receive for all sei vices performed by them 
in that capacity the following sums: For Pioneer steamer 
company, thirty dollars per annum, and when performing 
the duties of janitor of the building, he shall receive an 
additional sum of forty-five dollars per annum." 

Sec. 2, This ordinance shall take effect upon its pas- 
sage, and shall apply to the present year. 

Passed March 17, 1801. 



An Ordinance Fixing and Detekmining an Amount of Money' to 
BE Raised fok the Current Financial Year for the Use of 
the City^ 

. . Section 1. There shall be raised, and thei-e is hereby 
Appropriation , i , i_ ■J.^ ■ 

for use of the ordered to be raised, on the jjolls and rata.ile estates within 

^''^y* said city, the sum of four thousand three hundred and fifty 

dollars, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

School text- For providing public school text-books and school sup- 

^" plies, agreeably to the act of the legislature passed July 30, 

1889, four thousand dollars. 

Street sprink- For the purchase of a new street sprinkler, three hundred 

^^'■- and fifty dollars. 

Passed April 21, 1891. 



ORDINANCES. 



51 



An Okdinance in Amendment of an Ordinance Passed January 13, 
1891, Entitled "An Ordinance Appropriating a Sum Not Exceed- 
ing Twenty Thousand Dollars, for the Erection of a Soldiers' 
Monument or Memorial." 

Section 1. That the ordinance passed January 13, 1891, 
entitled "An ordinance appropriating a sum not exceeding 
twenty thousand dollars for the erection of a ' soldiers' mon- Amending 
ument or memoi-ial,' " is hereby amended by striking out ordinance ap- 
section three of said ordinance, and inserting in place thereof money for sol- 
the following : <1 i e r s' monu- 

" , - 1 -1 1 ,. ment or memo- 

" Section 3. The mayor, three members of the board of rial. 

aldermen and three members of the common council, whose 
term of office begins on the fourth Tuesday of January, 1891, 
together with three citizen taxpayers, to be severally appoint- 
ed hereafter by the mayor, and three veteran soldiers, to be 

selected by the Grand Army posts of the city, shall be a Committee to 

, 1 , 1 ,, 1 , . , carry into effect 

committee, of which the mayor shall be chairman, to carry the purposes of 

into effect the purposes of this ordinance; and such com- °'"'^'°*"*^®' 

mittee shall have full power to determine the site, procure 

and agree upon the plans, accept proposals, and sign con- Powers of 

tracts for the construction and erection, and make all neces- '^"'"""^^ 

sary arrangements for the appropriate dedication of such 

monument or memorial upon completion." 

Passed April 21, 1891. 

An Ordinance Providing for a Loan to the City. 

Section 1. That whereas the sum of twenty thousand 

dollars was appropriated on January 13, 1891, to defray the Loan of $20,- 

, -, ., 1. , ,. , T ., , , 000 for soldiers' 

cost of building a soldiers and sailors monument or memo- and sailors' 

rial, to be located and built agreeably to the provisions of nio""Pf'it or 

luemoriai. 
an ordinance of that date, therefore the city treasurer is 

hereby authorized to borrow for that purpose, on the credit 
of the city, the said sum of twenty thousand dollars, and 
bonds of the city shall be issued therefor, signed by the Issue of bonds, 
mayor and city treasurer, and countersigned by the city 
clerk, as provided in the ordinance relating to loans. Said 
bonds shall be in the usual form, beai'ing such date and Rate of inter- 
such rate of interest, not exceeding four per cent, per an-^®^- 
num, as the mayor and city treasurer shall determine, and 
shall be made payable, five thousand dollars on the first day When paya- 
of July, 1897, five thousand dollars on the first day of July, 
1898, five thousand dollars on the first day of July, 1899, and 
five thousand dollars on the first day of July, 1900. Said 
bonds shall be exempt from taxation when owned by resi- Exemption, 
dents of Concord. 
Passed May 19, 1891. 



52 city of concord. 

An Ordinance Amending Chapter 18 of the Eevised Ordinances, 
Eelating to the Fire Department. 

Amending SECTION 1. That chapter eighteen of the Eevised Ordi- 

cnapter 18 of . i , -, ^ -, ■, 

Revised Qrdi- nances is hereby amended by striking out sections one and 

nances,^relat- ^^^,g|yg ^j ^^^^ chapter, and inserting in place thereof the 

partment. following sections: 

"Section 1. 'ilie tire department shall consist of a chief 
engineer, six assistant engineers (three of whom shall reside 
within the precinct), and engine-men, hose-men, and hook- 
and-ladder-men, to be divided into companies as follows: 
Steamer Kearsarge No. 2 and hose, sixteen men, including 
Fire compa- an engineer, and one eneineer and one fireman for relief 
steamer; steamer Eagle No. 1 and hose, fifteen men, includ- 
ing an engineer. Hose companies Nos. 2 and .3, thirteen 
men each; Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, twenty men; 
steamer Pioneer No. 3, not less than twenty nor more than 
forty men; Engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, not less than 
twenty nor more than thirty men each; and a steward and 

men. assistant steward for the central fire station. The appoint- 

ment of said engineers and other members of the department 

shall be made by the mayor and aldermen in the month of 
By whom ap-- ,/ ., , , ,, , - i 

pointed. January annually; promded, however, that vacancies may be 

filled at any time. The said engineers shall constitute the 
board of engineers, and shall perform the duties and exer- 
cise the powers of fire wards. No person shall be appointed 
a member of either of the aforesaid companies, excepting 
Aee of mem- Engine Company No. 2, who is less tlian twenty-one or more 
bers. than sixty-five years of age. 

"Section 12. The annual pay of members of the depart- 
ment shall be as follows: Chief engineer, two hundred 
dollars; within the precinct, assistant engineers, one hun- 
dred dollars each, engineers of steamers, one hundred and 
fifteen dollars each, members of steamer, hose, and hook 
and ladder companies, sixty dollars each; outside the pre- 
cinct. Engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, two hundred and 
forty dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer Company No. 3, 
five hundred dollars, said sums to be divided among the 
members as each company shall direct; assistant engineer 
at Penacook, fifteen dollars; assistant engineers at East and 
West Concord, ten dollars each. The steward of the cen- 
tral fire station shall receive six hundred dollars per annum 
for his services as steward, and two hundred dollars addi- 
tional for his services as superintendent of the fire alarm, 
payable monthly, together with the use of a tenement pro- 
vided by said city. The assistant steward shall receive 
six hundred dollars per annum for his services, payable 
monthly." 



ORDINANCES. 



Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect wpou its passage, 
and shall apply to the pay of members of said companies 
during the present municipal year. 

Passed June 16, 1891. 



An Ordinance Modifying the Limits of the Water Precinct as 
Now Established. 

Section 1. That the limits of the water precinct as now 

established are hereby modified by excluding from said 

precinct all the territory that is situated in that part of Limits of 
•^ •' . ^ water precinct 

School Distiict jSTo. 20 in Ward One of said city lying and modified. 

situate north of the Contoocook river. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 18, 1891. 



An Ordinance in Amendment of Chapter XXI of the Kevised 
Ordinances, Kelating to the Board of Water Commissioners. 

Section 1. That section 1 of chapter 21 of the Revised 
Ordinances be amended by striking out the word "six " and Number of 
inserting in place thereof the word "eight." commissioners. 

Sec. 2. That said chapter be further amended by striking- 
out the first eight lines of section 2 and inserting in place 
thereof the following: "The mayor and aldermen, in the When elected, 
month of March, 1892, shall appoint four commissioners, 

two for a term of three years each, and two for a term Length of 

term 
of four years each; and thereafterwards annually, in the 

month of March, shall appoint two commissioners for a 

term of four years each, in the places of those whose terms 

of office expire at that time. Whenever a vacancy in the vacancies 

board of commissioners shall occur from any cause, it shall how filled. 

be filled by an apjiointment by the mayor and aldermen; 

and the person so appointed shall hold office for the balance 

of the term he is appointed to till. 

Sec. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 20, 1891. 



An Ordinance Authorizing a Temporary Loan for Bridge Re- 
building. 

The city treasurer is hereby authorized to borrow, on the 
credit of the city, such sums of money as may be needed to Loan of $25,- 
pay for the re-building of the Lower bridge over the Merri- '^• 
mack river, not exceeding in all the sum of twenty-five thou- 



54 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Term, six sand dollars, for a term not exceeding six months, at a rate 

of interest not exceeding five per cent, per annum, the notes 

T. X ^. X which shall be given therefor to be executed in accordance 
Kate of inter- ^ ■, ■, ^ 

est. with the provisions of the ordinance relating thereto. 

Passed November 17, 1891. 



An Okdinance Authokizing a Temporary Loan for Water- 
Works. 

Loan, $100,- The city treasurer is hereby authorized to borrow, on the 
^^- credit of the city, such sums of money as may be necessary to 

pay for the enlargement and improvement of the city water- 
works the present season, not exceeding in all the sum of 
mont\i^™' *^^oiie hundred thousand dollars, for a term not exceeding six 
months, at a rate of interest not exceeding five per cent, per 
est. annum, the notes which are given therefor to be executed 

in accordance with the provisions of the ordinance relating 
thereto. 
Passed November 17, 1891. 



An Ordinance Authorizing a Loan to Enlarge and Improve the 
City Water-Works. 

Section 1. That the city treasurer be and hereby is 
authorized to borrow, on the credit of the city, such sums as 
may be necessary and needed, to an amount not exceeding 
000^°^°' *^"°' two hundred thousand (1200,000) dollars, for the payment of 
the cost of enlargement and improveinent of the city water- 
works, agreeably to a resolution of the city council passed 
May 28, 1891. 

Sec. 2. That said sum, or such part thereof as may be 

I s e of bonds ^'^'l"^''®^ ^or the purpose aforesaid, shall be raised by said 

city by the issue of its bonds, under its municipal seal, 

signed by the mayor and city treasurer and countersigned 

by the city clerk, of such denominations and form, and of 

Rate of inter- such date, and at such rate of interest, not exceeding four 
eit 

per cent, per annum, as the mayor and city treasurer may 

Term. determine, and payable thirty years from date. 

Sec. 3. That all of said b >nds that shall be owned by cit- 

Exemption. izens of said city of Concord shall be exempt from taxation, 

as provided in chapter o'P, section 11 of the General Laws. 

Passed November 17, 1891. 



ordinances. 55 

An Ordinance Authorizing a Loan for the Purpose of Refunding 
Certain Wateb Precinct Bonds. 

Section 1. That the city treasurer be and hereby is au- 
thoi'ized to borrow, on the credit of the city, a sum of money Loan of $200- 
not exceeding two hundred thousand ($20:),000) dollars, forpo^ for refund- 
the payment of the water precinct bonds maturing April 1, cinct bonds. 
1892. 

Sec. 2. That said sum, or such part thereof as may be 
required for the purpose aforesaid, shall be raised by said 
city by the issue of its bonds, under its municipal seal. Issue of bonds, 
signed by the mayor and city treasurer and countersigned 
by the city clerk, of such denominations and form, and of Rate of inter- 
such date, and at such rate of interest, not exceeding four ^* " 
per cent, per annum, as the mayor and city treasurer may 
determine, and payable thirty years from date. Term. 

Sec. 3. That all of said bonds that shall be owned by 
citizens of said city of Concord shall be exempt from taxa- Exemption, 
tion, as provided in chapter 53 section 11 of the General 
Laws. 

Passed November 17, 1891. 



An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to 
be Eaised for the Ensuing Financial Year for the Use of the 
City. 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby 
ordered to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within Annual ap- 
said city, the sum of forty-two thousand dollars, to defray propnations for 
the necessary expenses and charges of the city for the ensu- city, 
ing year, which, together with the sums that may be raised 
by taxes on railroads and from other sources, shall be ap- 
propriated as follows: 

For the payment of city bonds as they become due, twelve 
thousand dollars. 

For the payment of interest on the city debt, three thou- 
sand five hundred and twenty-seven dollars. 

For the support of city poor, one thousand dollars. 

For the fire dei^artment, fourteen thousand dollars. 

For incidentals and land damages, five thousand dollars. 

For roads and bridges, thirty thousand dollars. 

For sidewalks and crossings, two thousand dollars. 

For repairs to concrete sidewalks, fifteen hundred dollars. 

For street paving, one thousand dollars. 

For laying rubble to protect Lower bridge, fifteen hun- 
dred dollars. 



56 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

For committee service, fourteen hundred and ten dollars. 

For police and -watch, eight thousand dollars. 

For printing and stationery, two thousand two hundred 
and fifty dollars. 

For legal expenses, eight hundred dollars. 

For Blossom Hill cemetery, three thousand dollars. 

For extending bank wall on street line east of Calvary 
cemetery, eight hundred dollars. 

For Old North cemetery, three hundred and fifty dollars. 

For renewal of fence at West Concord cemetery, one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars. 

For White park, twenty-five hundred dollars. 

For Penacook park, four hundred and fifty dollars. 

For salaries, eight thousand two hundred dollars. 

For public library, six thousand dollars. 

For beds at Margaret Pillsbury General hospital, two 
thousand dollars. 

For decorating soldiers' graves on Memorial Day, three 
hundred dollars. 

For board of health, one thousand dollars. 

For discounts and abatements, two thousand dollars. 

For aid to dependent soldiers and tlieir families, five hun- 
dred dollars. 

For adapting voting-places to the use of the new ballot 
law and procuring ballots, six hundred dollars. 

For public school text-books and school supplies, four 
thousand dollars. 

Sec. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of 
twenty-two thousand two hundred and twenty-five dollars, 
for the support of schools for the ensuing year, which, to- 
gether with the income from the Abial Walker fund, shall 
be divided among the several school districts according to 
the valuation thereof. 

Passed March 15, 1892, 



An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to 

BE EAISED on the PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE LIMITS 

OF THE Gas and Sewerage Precinct for the Ensuing Financial 
Year. 

Se;ction 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby 
ordered to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within 
propriation for ^^^ precinct of said city, the sum of fourteen thousand nine 
use of city pre- hundred and twenty dollars, to defray the necessary ex- 
penses and charges of the precinct for the ensuing year, 
which shall be appropriated as follows: 



ORDINANCES. 57 

For the payment of precinct bonds as they may become 
due on the precinct state-house loan, two thousand dollars. 

For the payment of interest as it becomes due on the pre- 
cinct State-house loan, fourteen hundred and forty dollars. 

For the payment of interest on the sewer bonds of the 
precinct, four hundred and eighty dollars. 

For lighting the streets in said precinct, nine thousand 
dollars. 

For the construction and maintenance of sewers in said 
precinct, two thousand dollars. 

Passed March 15, 1892. 



An Ordinaxce Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to 
BE Raised on the Taxable Property and Inhabitants within 
the Limits of the City Water Precinct for the Ensuing Finan- 
cial Year. 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby 
ordered to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within Annual ap- 
tJie water precinct of said city, the sum of six thousand }Jge^"f^^'*water 
dollars, which shall be appropriated as follows: precinct. 

For water for hydi-ant service, six thousand dollars. 

Passed March 15, 1892. 



An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to 
be Raised in the Penacook Sewerage Precinct for the Ensu- 
ing Financial Year. 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby 

ordered to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within 

the Penacook sewerage precinct, the sum of fourteen hun- Annual ap- 

dred and foriy dollars, to defray the necessary expenses yggofpp'n "cook 

and charges of said precinct for the ensuing year, which sewerage pre- 

o .; ? . cinct 

shall be applied as follows. 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 
with an ordinance creating a sinking fund, five hundred 
dollars. 

For the payment of interest that will become due on the 
bonds of said precinct, eight hundred and forty dollars. 

For the repair of sewers, one hundred dollars. 

Passed March 15, 1892. 



58 city of concord. 

An Ordinance Increasing the Salary of the Commissioner of 

Highways, 

Section 1. That the annual salary of commissioner of 
highways is hereby increased from twelve hundred dollars 
to fourteen hundred dollars. 
Sa ary $1,4 0. ^^^^ ^^ This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, 
and apply to the present municipal term. 

Passted March 15, 1892. 



An Ordinance Supplementary to "an Ordinance Passed November 
17, 1891, as to Refunding Bonds. 

That the bonds of the city authorized by an ordinance 

Issue of bonds. Passed on the 17tli of November, 1891, for the payment of 

the water precinct bonds maturing on the 1st of April, 1892, 

^ shall be issued for the aggregate principal sum of two hun- 

Date and term. o i i 

' dred thousand dollars, and shall bear date the 1st of Jan- 
uary, 1892, and be payable to the bearer thereof in thirty 
Rate of inter- yg^^.g f^-Qm the said date, with interest at the rate of four 
per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually on the 1st of 
January and the 1st of .July in each year, upon presentation 
When paya- Qf ^lie coupons attached to such bonds respectively. 
Passed March 29, 1892. 



An Ordinance Supplementary to an Ordinance Passed on the 
17th day of November, 1891, as to Issue of Water Bonds. 

That the bonds of the city authorized by an ordinance 
Issue of bonds P^^^^d on the I7th of November, 1891, for the payment of 
the cost of enlargement and improvement of the city water- 
works, shall be issued from time to time, as the money shall 
be required for the purj^oses, for the aggregate sum of two 
Date and term, hundred thousand dollars, and shall bear date the 1st of 
January, 1892, and be payable to the bearer thereof in thirty 
Rate of inter- years from the said date, with interest at the rate of four 
per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually on the 1st of 
When payable ^''^ii^i^i'y ^^^ the 1st of July in each year, upon presentation 
of the coupons attached to such bonds respectively. 
Passed March 29, 1892. 



ordinances. 59^ 

An Ordinance Providing for a Loan of Forty-five Hundred Dol- 
lars FOR Penacook Sewerage System. 

Section 1. That the treasurer of said city is hereby au- 
thorized to procure by loan, on the credit of the city, the 
sum of forty-five hundred dollars, for the purpose of defray- Loan, $4,500. 
ing the cost of completing tlie system of sewerage in Pena- 
cook sewerage precinct. 

Sec. 2. Bonds of said city shall be issued for said loan, issue of bonds. 

signed by the mayor and treasurer and countersigned by 

the city clerk, as provided in the ordinance relating thereto. 

Said bonds shall be dated July 1, 1892, and shall be num- Date. 

bered consecutively from forty-four to fifty-two inclusive. Numbers. 

and shall be for the sum of five hundred dollars each. Bond ^^qq g^^^jj 

numbered "44" shall be due and payable on the 1st day of 

July, 1914, and thereafter annually, on the 1st day of July in ^le. P ^ " 

each year, one of said bonds, in their order as numbered, _, 

Coupons, 
shall be due and payable. Said bonds shall have coupons 

for the semi-annual interest attached, payable on the Istj^j^ ° paya- 

day of July and January in each year during the term the 

bonds run, at the rate of four per cent, per annum. Said est. 

bonds shall be exempt from taxation when owned bv resi- ^ 

^ -^ Exemption, 

tlents of Concord. 

Sec. 3. All money paid on account of said bonds, whether 
as pi'incipal or interest, shall be charged to said Penacook 
sewerage precinct. A sum sufficient to pay the interest ac- 
cruing on said bonds shall be raised by an annual tax on the ^ Annual tax 

° •' for interest. 

property and polls of said Penacook sewex'age precinct, as 

provided by law. The sum of five hundred dollars per year, Annual tax 
for the nine years commencing in 1914, shall be raised by an of * 500, to pay 
annual tax on the property and polls of said precinct, to pay mature, 
said bonds as they mature. 

Sec. 4. The treasurer is authorized to invite proposals 
for the sale of said bonds hereby authorized, and such bids g^ie of bonds, 
as seem for the best interest of the city shall be accepted by 
him, provided the same is approved by the mayor. 

Passed April 19, 1892. 



An Ordinance Enlarging the Fire Precinct. 

Section 1. That the fire precinct for said city, as estab- 
lished by an ordinance passed June 10, 1890, entitled "An Territory In- 
ordinance enlarging the limits of the fire precinct," is hereby eluded in en- 
enlarged so as to include all the territory situated within fire^|recinct. ° 
the square formed by Maple, Union, Center, and State streets 
in said city. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 19, 1892. 



60 city of concord. 

An Ordinance J^stablishing the West Concord Sewerage Pre- 
cinct. 

Section 1. A sewerage precinct for the accommodation 
of the inhabitants of the village of West Concord, in said 
city, as authorized by the act of the legislature entitled "An 
act in amendment of the charter of the city of Concord, ap- 
proved June 27, 1857," is hereby fixed and established as 
Aame of pre- i ? ^ 

ciiict. follows: Said i)recinct shall l)e known as the West Concord 

sewerage precinct, and shall embrace all the territory, to- 
gether with its inhabitants, within the following described 
limits, to wit: 
Beginning at an elm tree, designated by a bench mark cut 
Limits of pre- thereon, located on the west shore near the northerly end of 
the old channel of the Merrimack river, on land of George 
W. Brown, and running in a straight line westei'ly across 
land of said Brown, also land of Concord Land and Water 
Power company, to the southeasterly corner of the West 
Concord cemetery; thence along the southerly line of said 
cemetery to its southwesterly corner; thence in a straight 
line across the highway leading from Concord to Penacook, 
and across land belonging to the heirs of William T. Clough 
and the track of the Concord & Claremont R. R. to the 
northeasterly corner of land of Edward S. Parmenter ; theuce 
by the northerly line of said Parmenter' s land to the north- 
west corner of his property; from this point southerly, by 
the westerly boundary of said Parmenter' s land and land of 
George F. Parmenter and Daniel Crowley, to a point on said 
boundary line 200 feet northerly of Hutchins street; thence 
westerly, in a line paralleled to said Hutchins street and the 
West Parish road, to the westerly boundary of land of Pat- 
rick Ryan; thence southerly along the stone wall forming 
said boundary to the highway ; thence across said highway 
and along the westerly side of the roadway leading to the 
dam of the Concord water-works to said dam; thence in a 
straight line along the westerly rail of said dam and to a 
point ;300 feet southerly of High street; thence easterly and 
southerly on a line paralleled to said High street, to a point 
550 feet westerly from the center of the track of the Concord 
& Claremont R. R. ; thence southerly on a line paralleled 
to said railroad to the southerly line of Ward 3; thence east- 
erly along said line to a point 500 feet westerly of the center 
of the track of the Northern R. R. ; thence northerly on 
a line paralleled with said Northern railroad track to the 
old channel of the Merrimack river; thence northerly along 
said channel to the point first mentioned. 
Sec. 2. All the provisions of chapter 22 of the Revised 



ORDINANCES. 61 

'Ordinances of said city, so far as the same are applicable, 
sliall apply to and be in force in said West Concord sewer- 
age precinct. 

Sec. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 17, 1892. 

An Ordinance in Amendment of Section 3, Chapter XXII of the 
Revised Ordinances, in Relation to Sewers and Drains. 

That section 3 of chai^ter 22 of the Revised Ordinances, as 
amended May 26, 18SS, be further amended by striking out j, , ^ 

the word "three" in the second line and inserting in place committee en- 
thereof the word "four." That the committee on sewers j^g^jjg^g^ """^ 
and drains shall be enlarged to four at the present time, and 
that hereafter the board of aldermen shall biennially, in the 
month of January, choose by ballot four members of said When chosen 
board, who, together with the mayor, shall constitute a ^^^ ^^ whom, 
committee on sewerage; which committee shall, under the 
direction of the board of aldermen, take general supervision 
of all common sewers which now or hereafter may be built Duties, 
and owned by the city, or which may be permitted to be 
built by its authority, and shall take charge of the building 
and repairs of the same, and make all contracts for the sup- 
ply of labor and materials therefor. 

Passed June 21, 1892. 

An Ordinance Increasing the Salaries of Selectmen. 

Section 1. That section 13 of chapter 32 of the Revised 
■Ordinances be hereby amended by striking out the word 
"five" in the third line and inserting in place thereof the 
word "ten," so that said section as amended shall read: 
The moderators shall each receive the sum of three dollars Salary, $io 
per annum, the selectmen shall each receive the sum of ten ^^^ annum, 
■dollars per annum, and the ward clerks shall receive the sum 
of ten dollars per annum, in full for their services. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage, 
and shall include the year ending Xovember, 1892. 

Passed June 21, 1892. 

An Ordinance Providing for the Loan of Seventeen Thousand 
Dollars for Sewers in the West Concord Sewerage Precinct. 

Section 1. That the treasurer of said city is hereby au- 
thorized to procure by loan, on the credit of the city, the l"0*" $17,000. 
sum of seventeen thousand dollars, for the purpose of de- 



62 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



fraying the cost of establishing and constructing a sewerage 

system in the West Concord sewerage precinct. 

Bonds issued. '^^^" ^' ^^onds of said city sliall be issued for said loan, 

signed by the mayor and treasurer and countersigned by 

the city clerk, as provided in the ordinance relating to loans. 

^"""'^^'■f- Said bonds shall be numbered from one to thirtv-four inclu- 
$500 each. . i , 

sive, and shall be for the sum of five hundred dollars each. 

Ten of said bonds, in their order' as numbered, commencing 

with number " one," shall be due and payable on the 1st 

day of October, 1902; ten of said bonds, in their order as 

When paya- ""mhered, commencing with number "eleven," shall be due 

lile. and payable on the 1st day of October, 1907; and fourteen 

of said bonds, in their order as numbered, commencing with 

CouDons number "twenty-one," shall be due and payable on the 1st 

Whe Da a ^^^^ *^^ October, 1912. Said bonds shall have coupons at- 

ble. tached for the semi-annual interest payable on the 1st day 

Rate of inter- °* -^^pi'il and October in each year during the term the bonds 

est. run, at the rate of four per cent, per annum. Said bonds 

Exemption, shall be exemiit from taxation when owned by residents of 

Concord. 

Sec. 3. All money paid on account of said bonds, whether 
as principal or interest, shall be charged to said West Con- 
cord sewerage precinct. A sum sufficient to pay the inter- 
Annual tax est accruing on said bonds shall be raised by an annual tax 
tor iiiti6r6sc< 

on the property and polls of said West Concord sewerage 

Raising of pi'ecinct, as provided by law. The sum of five hundred dol- 
sinking fund, lars per year for the term of ten years from October first, 1892, 
one thousand dollars for the term of five years from October 
first, 1902, and fourteen hundred dollars per year for the term 
of five years from October first, 1907, shall be raised by a tax 
on the i^roperty and polls of said West Concord sewerage 
precinct, for the purpose of creating a sinking fund to pay 
said bonds as they mature. Said sinking fund, as soon as 
paid over to the city from year to year, shall be invested by 
the finance committee of said city, subject to the approval 
of the board of mayor and aldermen. Said sinking fund 
shall be applied to the payment of said bonds as they ma- 
ture. 
Proposals. Sec. 4. The treasurer is hereby authorized to invite pro- 

posals for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized, and svich 
bids as seem for the best interest of the city shall be ac- 
cepted by him, provided the same are approved by the 
mayor. 
Passed July 19, 1892. 



ordinances. 63 

An Ordinance Appropiuating Fifteen Hundred Dollars for 
Grading and Constructing Pillsbury Street. 

That tlie sum of fifteen liundred dollars ($1,500) is hereby 
appropriated, out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for the purpose of c;radino- and construct- , 

, » o Appropria 

mg Pillsbury street, so called. Said sum, or such portion tion. f 1,500. 

thereof as may be necessary, shall be expended by the com- 
missioner of highways. 
Passed July 19, 1892. 



An Ordinance Establishing the West Concord Gas Precinct. 

Section 1. A gas precinct for the accommodation of the 
inhabitants of the village of West Concord, in said city, as 
authorized by the act of the legislature entitled "An act in 
amendment of the charter of the city of Concord, approved 
June 27, 1857," is hereby fixed and established as follows: 
Said precinct shall be known as the West Concord gas pre- 
cinct, and shall embrace all the territory, with its inhabi- 
tants, within the following described limits, to wit: Begin- 
ning at an elm tree, designated by a bench mark cut thereon, 
located on the west shore near the northerly end of the old 
channel of the Merrimack river, on land of Geo. W. Brown, 
and running in a straight line westerly across land of said t jj^j^g „£ ^^^^ 
Brown, also land of Concord Land and Water Power com- precinct. 
IDany, to the southeasterly corner of the West Concord cem- 
etery; thence along the southerly line of said cemetery to 
its southwesterly corner; thence in a straight line across 
the highway leading from Concord to Penacook, and across 
land belonging to the heirs of William T. Clough and the 
track of the Concord & Claremont railroad to the north- 
easterly corner of land of Edward S. Parmenter; thence by 
the northerly line of said Parmenter's land to the north- 
west corner of his property; from this point southerly by 
the westerly boundary of said Parmenter's land, and land of 
George K. Parmenter and Daniel Crowley, to a point on said 
boundary line 200 feet northerly of Hutchins street; thence 
westerly, in a line paralleled to said Hutchins street and the 
West Parish road, to the westerly boundary of land of Pat- 
rick Ryan; thence southerly, along the stone wall forming 
said boundary line to the highway ; thence across said high- 
way and along the westerly side of the roadway leading to 
the dam of the Concord water-works to said dam ; thence in 
a straight line along the westerly rail of said dam and to a 
point 300 feet southerly of High street; thence easterly and 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

southerly, on a line paralleled to said High street, to a point 
550 feet westerly from center of the track of the Concord & 
Claremont raih'oad; thence southerly, on a line paralleled to 
said railroad, to the southerly line of Ward 5; thence easterly 
along said line to a point 500 feet westerly of the center of the 
track of tlie Northern railroad; thence northerly, on a line 
paralleled with said Northern railroad track to the old chan- 
nel of the Merrimack river; thence northerly along said 
channel to the point first mentioned. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 16, 1892. 



An Ordinance Appropriating Twenty Thousand Dollars for De- 
fraying THE Expense of Re-building the Bridge Across Merri- 
mack River Known as the Lower Bridge, and Providing a Loan 
for the Same. 

Section 1. The city treasurer is hereby authorized to 
Loan of $''0 - Pi'ocure by loan, on the credit of the city, the sum of twenty 
000. thousand dollars. Bonds of the city shall be issued for said 

' loan, which shall be signed by the mayor and city treasurer 

Issue of bonds. ^^^'^ countersigned by the city clerk, as provided in the ordi- 
nance relating to loans. 

Sec. 2. Said bonds shall be of sucli form and denomina- 
tions as the mayor and city treasurer may determine; shall 

Date and rate bear date July 1, 1892, and interest at the rate of four per 
of interest. . j ■> i i 

cent, per annum, and shall be made payable as follows: Five 
thousand dollars on the 1st day of July, 1904, five thousand 
^^ When paya- dollars on the 1st day of July, 1905, five thousand dollars on 
the 1st day of July, 1906, and five thousand dollars on the 
1st day of July, 1907. 

Sec. 3. The city treasurer is hereby autliorized and in- 

Proposals. structed to invite proposals for the sale of said bonds hereby 

authorized, and such bids as seem to be for the interests of 

the city shall be accepted by him, subject to the approval 

of the mayor. 

Sec. 4. The before-mentioned bonds are hereby author- 
ized to be issued in accordance with a joint resolution passed 
August 18, 1891, apjjropriating said sum to be expended in 
the re-building of said bridge, and the proceeds shall be 
placed in the city treasury to cover the amount iireviously 
drawn out, as provided in said joint resolution. 

Passed August 16, 1892. 



ORDINANCES. 65 

• 

An Ordinance in Amendment of "An Ordinance Governing the 
Introduction and Use of Telephonic, Telegraphic, Electric 
Power, or Illuminating Wires and Fixtures in the Public 
Streets and Ways of the City of Concord," Passed January 
4, 1890. 

Section 1. That section 3 of an ordinance entitled "An 
ordinance governing the introduction and use of telephonic, 
telegraphic, electric power, or illuminating wires and fix- 
tures, in the public streets and ways of the city of Concord," 
passed January 4, 1890, be and the same is hereby amended 
by striking out the words "cylindrical in shape," so that 
said section as amended shall read as follows: 

"Sec. 3. All work of consti-uction, after permission has 
been granted, shall be thoroughly performed, and all kinds 
of material used shall be of the best quality obtainable, and 
subject to the approval of the said board of mayor and alder- 
men, or its appointed officer or agent. The poles shall be 
sound, smooth, and straight, firmly set in the ground, and Quality of ma- 
of such height, and erected at such points and in such a nerof coustruc- 
nianner, and the wires secured with such insulators, or ^^°"- 
other fixtures or fastenings, as shall preclude all danger 
from fire or other injury to persons or property; and said 
poles shall be painted before erection or immediately there- 
after, and all poles from which are suspended wires unsafe 
to be touched shall be plainly marked ' dangerous wire ' 
with metallic plate or stenciled letters; and the location of 
such poles, wires, or other fixtures may at any time be altered 
or changed by the dirction of said agent, and shall be re- 
moved, when so directed by the board of mayor and alder- 
men, after sixty (60) days' notice. All pavements removed 
in the erection or removal of poles shall be pro^jeiiy replaced, 
and all removal of earth for the same purpose shall be proji- 
erly restored and the streets left in a condition which shall 
fully satisfy the commissioner of highways." 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 20, 1892. 

An Ordinance Authorizing a Loan for the Building of Sewers. 

That the city treasurer be and hereby is authorized to Loan, S20,000. 
borrow, on the credit of the city, such sums of money as 
may be needed the present year for the construction of sew- Term, 
ers, not exceeding twenty thousand dollars, for the term of 
one year, or less, at a rate of interest not to exceed five per Rate of inter- 
cent. iDer annum, and the same is hereby appropriated for 
the above-mentioned purpose. 

Passed September 20, 1892. 



66 CITY OF CONCORD. 

* 

An Ordinance Enlarging the Water Precinct. 

Section 1. That the limits of the water precinct of said 
city, as now existing, are liereby enlarged so as to include 
within its limits, in addition to the territory at present in- 
cluded, the following described tract of land: Beginning 
at the point where the highway leading from Penacook to 
the "Borough" (so called) first crosses the "outlet" (so 
called), thence running westerly and southerly by said high- 
way to the corner of said highway and tlie corner of another 
Territory in- 
cluded in en- highway leading from the highway first mentioned to the 

largement of,jjj^jjj j-o^d from Penacook to Concord; thence by said last- 
water precinct. ' ■' 

mentioned highway to the northwest corner of land now or 

formerly owned by Frank Davis; thence easterly by said 

Davis's land about twenty rods, more or less, to land now 

or formerly of Martha W. Sanborn ; thence northerly by said 

Sanborn land to the center of the "outlet;" thence down 

said " outlet" to the place of beginning. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 20, 1892. 

An Ordinance Authorizing a Temporary Loan. 

The city treasurer is authorized to borrow, on the credit 
of the city, for a term of not more than six months, at a rate 
of interest not exceeding five per cent., a sum of money, not 

Loan of $60,- exceeding sixty thousand dollars, for the purpose of paying 
000 authorized; o j ^ x x x ./ o 

rate of interest! an existing note of twenty thousand dollars, and for meet- 
ing other obligations of the city, all of which are ultimately 
to be provided for by the sale of city bonds. 
Passed October IS, 1892. 



An Ordinance in Relation to the Pay of Assistant Steward and 
Permanent Drivers of the Fire Department. 

Section 1. That section twelve of chapter eighteen of 
the Revised Ordinances, amended June 16, 1891, be further 
amended by adding the following: "The assistant steward 
and permanent drivers shall be allowed fireman's pay in 
Pay and uni- addition to the pay they now receive. The steward, assist- 
ant steward, and permanent drivers shall wear at all times 
when on duty the regulation parade uniform now worn by 
the fire department." 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take effect from January 1,. 
1893. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 



A Resolution in Relation to Paying Salaries and Rents. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the mayor be and hereby is authorized to draw his warrant on 
the city treasurer for tlie payment of all regular salaries and rents as the 
same shall become due, during the present municipal term; and all bills 
so paid shall be laid before the committee on accounts and claims at 
their next meeting. 

Passed January 27, 1891. 



A Resolution in Relation to Regular Meetings of the City 

Council. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

Until otherwise ordained, regular meetings of the city council shall be 
held on the third Tuesday of each month, instead of the second Tuesday 
of each month as has been the custom heretofore, and shall take effect 
from and after the passage of this resolution. 

Passed January 27, 1891. 



A Resolution Appropriating a Sum of Money, not Exceeding 
One Thousand Dollars, to Defray the Expense of Establish- 
ing AND Operating a Ferry across Merrimack River. 

Besohed by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloujs: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars be and the same is hereby 
appropriated to defray the expense of constructing and oijerating a ferry 
across the Merrimack river at the South End, the same to be expended 
under the direction of the commissioner of highways. 

Passed April 21, 1891. 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution in Relation to Dog Licenses. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloios: 

That any person taking out a dog license running from May 1, 1891, ta 
May 1, 1892, under tlie act of the legislature of the state, passed January 
session, 1891, entitled "An act to prevent the destruction of sheep, and 
other damages by dogs," shall be entitled to a return of one quarter part 
of any fee heretofore paid by them for a license which expires August 1, 
1891, granted under the city ordinance passed July 8, 1890; and the city 
clerk is hereby authorized to make such retui-n out of any funds received 
by him for new licenses; and any action of his heretofore taken in con- 
formity herewith is hereby approved. 

Passed May 19, 1891. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Execution and Delivery of a. 
Deed of a Cemetery Lot to Jeremiah Halloran. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the mayor and city clerk are hereby authorized and instructed 
to execute to Jeremiah Halloran a proper deed of the lot in the old origi- 
nal cemetery, on the corner of the second avenue, grand division, on the 
plan of said cemetery, and to deliver said deed to him upon application 
therefor. 

Passed May 19, 1891. 



A Resolution in Regard to Rebuilding a Bridge across the 
Merrimack River. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That to replace the Lower bridge, recently partially destroyed by flood,, 
a covered wooden bridge be built, of the most approved design, with a 
roadway eighteen (18) feet wide, and a walk on the south side five feet. 
wide, at the site of the old bridge; that the necessary piers and the abut- 
ments be rebuilt in a substantial manner; that the mayor and the com- 
mittee on roads and bridges be authorized to contract with the lowest 
responsible builder for such rebuilding, at a cost not to exceed seventeen, 
thousand dollars ($17,000). 

Passed May 28, 1891. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 69 

A Resolution in Relation to the Enlargement and Improve 

MENT OF the WaTER-WoRKS. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the bo:ird of water commissioners be and hereby is authorized to 
enlarge and improve the water-works of the city of Concord, as the board 
may see fit, and to purchase or take, in the name and behalf of the city, 
such lands, water rights, and other rights in land as the board may deem 
necessary for making such enlargement and improvements, providing 
that tlie expense of such enlargement and imi^rovements, aside from the 
cost of land, water, and other rights, shall not exceed the sum of two 
hundred thousand dollars. 

Passed May 28, 1891. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Purchase of Real Estate for 
Use by the Fire Department. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sura of three thousand dollars be and the same is hereby 
apijropriated for the ijurpose of purchasing a house to be used as a 
dwelling for the steward at the central fire station and his family, and 
that the same be paid for out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise apijropriated ; and the mayor is hereby authorized to draw his war- 
rant for said amount. 

Passed May 28, 1891. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Mayor to Purchase Certain 
Real Estate for the City. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the mayor be and liereby is authorized to jmrcliase for the city 
the lot of land and buildings thereon, owned by Thomas W. Young and 
situated west of the engine house on Warren street, in accordance with 
a joint resolution passed this day. 

Passed May 28, 1891. 



4V CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolutiox IX Amendment of a Resolution in Regard to 
Rebuilding a Bridge across the Merrimack River, Passed 
May 28, 1891. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloivs: 

That a resolvition entitled "A resolution in regard to rebuilding a 
bridge across the Merrimack river," passed May 28, 1891, be amended by 
striking out the word "seventeen" in said resolution, and inserting in 
place thereof the woi'd "twenty-five," so that said resolution as amended 
shall read as follows : 

Reaolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloios: 

That to replace the Lower bridge, recently partially destroyed by flood, 
a covered wooden bridge be built, of the most approved design, with a 
roadway eighteen (18) feet wide, and a walk on the south side five feet 
wide, at the site of the old bridge; that the necessary piers and the 
abutments be rebuilt in a substantial manner; that the mayor and the 
committee on roads and bridges be authorized to contract with the low- 
est responsible builder for such rebuilding, at a cost not to exceed 
twenty-five thousand dollars. 

Passed June IG, 1891. 



A Resolution Providing for Securing Land for a Public Park. 

Whereas, The public good requires that there shall be an additional 
park in tlie central portion of the city; and whereas, the state of New 
Hampshire has purcliased, or is about to purchase, two lots of land, one 
at the corner of State and Park streets, and the other adjoining tliereto, 
upon which to erect a State Library building, and is willing to dedicate 
that portion of the same which is not required for the location of said 
building, its appurtenances and approaches, to public use as a park, pro- 
vided the city of Concord will procure and dedicate to like use the land 
adjoining it on the north (situated at the corner of State and Center 
streets); and provided, further, that the state shall have the right to use 
such portions of said adjoining land as it may from time to time find 
necessary for making extensions to its library building and appurte- 
nailces; and provided, further, that the state shall improve and per- 
petually care for and maintain all said adjoining land; Now, therefore, 

Be it Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, That said 
city will, within three years, procure title to the tracts of land situated 
at the corner of State and Center streets, bounded southerly by land now 
or formerly belonging to the widow and devisees of William Walker, and 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 71 

land of the Guild attached to St. Paul's church, westerly by State street, 
northerly by Center street, and easterly by the easterly line of the Guild 
lot, i^rojected in a northerly direction to Center street, so as to make a 
continvious straight line, and will dedicate the same to use as a public 
l^ark, in connection with the land purchased, or about to be purchased, 
by the state for a library building, as aforesaid, subject to the provi- 
sions named in the preamble, and to such other provisions and condi- 
tions in relation to the uses and control of such park as may be agreed 
upon by the commissioners ai)i)ointed to build said building, and a com- 
mittee of the city council, consisting of the mayor and two members of 
the board of aldermen and two members of the common council, here- 
after to be appointed by the mayor, who are empowered to act for the 
city council in making such agreement, subject to the a|5proval of the 
council. 
Passed June 30, 1891. 



A Resolution in Relation to Leasing Stone Quarry. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the stone quarry at West Concord now leased by Cornelius A. 
Giles, which lease expires May 1, 1892, be on that date leased again to 
said Giles for the term of five years and for the same annvial rental as 
required in the present lease, and that the mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute said lease in the name of the city. 

Passed July 21, 1891. 



A Resolution Appropriating Three Thousand Dollars (|3,000) 
TO BE Expended in Building High and Other Streets. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of three thousand dollars be and the same hereby is 
appropriated for the purpose of defraying the expenses of constructing 
High and other streets recently laid out, and that the mayor is hereby 
authorized to draw his warrant on the treasurer for the same in such 
sums, not exceeding said sum of three thousand dollars, as he may deem 
advisable. 

Passed August 18, 1891. 



72 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A Resolution AppropriatixNG Three Hundred Dollars to Defray 
THE Expense of Changing the System of Heating at the Police 
Station on Warren Street. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloics: 

That the sum of three hundred dollars be and the same is hereby- 
appropriated to defray the expense of changing the system of heating 
the police station on Warren street, the same to be expended under the 
direction of the committee on lands and buildings. 

Passed August 18, 1891. 



A Resolution Appropriating Money for Building the Lower 

Bridge. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That a sum not exceeding twenty-five thousand dollars be and the 
same is hereby appropriated for the purpose of building a bridge across 
the Merrimack river in said Concord at the South End, in accordance 
with a resolution passed June 16, 1891, and the mayor is hereby author- 
ized to draw his warrant on the treasurer for such sums, not exceeding 
in all the above amount, as may become necessary to pay for construct- 
ing said bridge, the same to be paid out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated. And said sum so drawn and expended is to 
be paid back into said treasury from the sale of bonds, which are here- 
after to be issued by said city to cover the amount so used. 

Passed August 18, 1891, 



A Resolution for the Discontinuance of a Part of High Street. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That so much of High street, as formerly laid out, as extends from a 
stake in said High street near its junction with Washington street, 
southerly to Warren street, be and the same is hereby discontinued. 

Passed August 18, 1891. 



A Resolution Discontinuing a Portion of Harrison Street. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloios: 
That so much of Harrison street, so called, laid out May 2, 1889, as is 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 73 

located west of the west line of Charles E. Thompson's land, be and the 
same is hereby discontinued, meaning and intending to discontinue that 
portion of said street laid out through land of B. E. Badger and W. S. 
Badger. 
Passed August 18, 1891. 



A Resolution Appropriating Money to Defray the Expense of 
Ferry across the Merrimack River. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of four hundred dollars be and the same is hereby appro- 
priated to defray the expense of operating a ferry across the Merrimack 
river at the South End, the same to be expended vmder the direction of 
the commissioner of highways, and the mayor is hereby authorized to 
draw his Avarrant on the treasurer for said amount, to be paid ovit of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated. 

Passed September 15, 1891. 



A Resolution Appropriating Money to Defray the Expense of 
Heating Apparatus for the City Council Rooms. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars be and the same is hereby appro- 
priated to defray the expense of putting in a new steel tubular boiler 
for heating the city council rooms, the old one having become useless, 
and that the special committee, consisting of Aldermen Woodworth and 
Kennedy and President Crowell and Councilman Palmer, are hereby 
authorized to expend said amount for the purpose above-named, and the 
mayor is hereby authorized to draw his warrant for the same out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated. 

Passed October 20, 1891. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Sale of Land to the Concord 
Street Railway. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That vipon the payment or tender of the sum of three hundred dollars 
by the Concord Street Railway to the city of Concord, the mayor of said 



74 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

city of Concord is hereby given full power and authoi'ity, and is hereby 
instructed, in behalf of said Concord, to sign, execute, and deliver to the 
Concord Street Railw^ay a good and sufficient conveyance of a certain 
piece of land out of the tract of land owned by said Concord, located 
between Center and School streets, near White park, for station, car 
house, and other railroad purjjoses, said piece of land to be taken from 
the northeastei'ly corner of said land of said Concord, and to extend 
seventy-five feet" on the southerly side of said Center street, and to be 
one hundred and twenty-five feet in depth. 
Passed November 17, 1891. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Sale of Land to the Concord 
Street Eailway, 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloios: 

That a resolution passed by the city council November 17, 1891, and 
entitled "A resolution authorizing the sale of land to the Concord Street 
liailway " be and the same is hereby repealed, and in place thereof, 

Eesolved, That the mayor is hereby directed and instructed to exe- 
cute and deliver to the Concord Street Railway, upon the payment by 
said railway of three hundred dollars, a deed of the following described 
tract or parcel of land, to wit: Beginning at a stone bound on the south- 
erly side of Center street in said Concord, one hundred and thirty-eight 
{138) feet from northeasterly corner of land owned by said Concord, 
thence running at right angles to said street one hundred and twenty- 
five (125) feet to a stone bound, thence running westerly on a line parallel 
with said Center street seventy-five (75) feet to a stone bound, thence 
northerly on a line at right angles to said street one hundred and twenty- 
five (125) feet to a stone bound, and thence along the southerly side of 
said Center street seventy-five (75) feet to the bound begun at. 

Passed December 15, 1891. 



A Resolution Authorizing a Loan of Ten Thousand Dollars 
FOR the Soldiers' Memorial Arch. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloivs: 

The city treasurer is hereby authorized to borrow, on the credit of the 
city, a sum not exceeding ten thousand dollars, for the purpose of making- 
payments to the contractors for the Soldiers' Memorial arch, as they 
mature, at a rate of interest not exceeding four per cent, per annum, 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 75 

the note or notes given therefor to be executed in accordance with the 
provisions of the Revised Ordinances relating thereto. 
Passed March 15, 1892. 



A Resolution in Relation to Hiring Horses and Drivers for 
Hose Companies Nos. 2 and 3. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloivs: 

That the committee on fire department be authorized to procure the 
use of a horse and the services of a driver for each of the following hose 
companies: Alert Hose No. 2 and Good- Will Hose No. 3, the same not to 
exceed three hundred dollars at each house per annum. 

Passed March 15, 1892. 



A Resolution in Relation to New Rules for the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Resohed by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows. • 

That the chief engineer and committee on fire department be and are 
hereby authorized to draft new rules to govern the fire department, after 
their approval by the city council. 

Passed March 15, 1892. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Mayor to Lease Stone Quarries. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the mayor be and hereby is authorized, on behalf of the city, to 
renew the leases of the stone quarries and land in West Concord, belong- 
ing to the city, expiring May 1 and June 1, 1892, for a term of five years; 
that the amount of rental shall be fixed at such sums as the mayor and 
the committee on lands and buildings may deem best (with the excep- 
tion of the lease to Cornelius A. Giles, which was provided for by a joint 
resolution passed July 21, 1891). 

Passed April 19, 1892. 



76 CITV OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution Approving the Settlement of the Suit of Bridget 

Stickney. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord asfolloivs: 

That the settlement of the suit of Bridget Stickney against the city of 
Concord for tlie sum of twenty-two hundred dollars is hereby ratified 
and approved, and the mayor and city clerk are hereby directed to draw 
an order on the city treasurer for said sum in favor of said Bridget 
Stickney. 

Passed April 19, 1892. 



A Resolution to Correct an Error in Taxation. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

Whereas, The board of assessors, by its chairman, has informed the 
city council that the said assessors have voted to abate a tax erroneously 
assessed last year on certain shares of stock owned by the National State 
Capital bank, said shares being valued at twenty-one thousand three 
hundred dollars ($21, .300), and the said bank having paid the tax on said 
shares under protest to the amount of four hundred and four 96-100 dol- 
lars (^^Oi 96-100): Now, in view of the said abatement by the board of 
assessors, it is ordered that the city treasurer refund to the said bank 
the said sum of four hundred and four 96-100 dollars, taking a proper 
voucher therefor. 

Passed April 19, 1892. 



A Resolution to Correct an Error in Taxation. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

Whereas, The board of assessors has informed the city council that 
the said assessors have voted to abate a tax erroneously assessed last year 
on certain shares of stock owned by the Mechanicks National bank, 
said shares being valued at twenty-three thousand one hundred dollars 
($2.3,100), and the said bank having paid the tax on said shares under 
protest to the amount of four hundred and fifty-two 76-100 ($452 76- 
100): Now, in view of the said abatement by the board of assessors, it is 
ordered hereby that the city treasurer refund to the said bank the said 
sum of four hundred and fifty-two 76-100 dollars, taking a proper 
voucher therefor. 

Passed June 21, 1892. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 77 



A Resolution Appropriating Money for Dedicating Monument. 

Resolved bij the City Council of the City of Concord m follows : 

That a sum not exceeding twelve liundred dollars ($1,200) be and hereby 
is appropriated for the purpose of defraying the expenses of dedicating, 
on July 4 next, the monument built by the city to the memory of her 
soldiers and sailors, the arrangements for such dedication having been 
instituted by the monument committee, agreeably to section 3 of the 
ordinance passed January 13, 1891; and the mayor is hereby authorized 
to draw his warrant for the said sum, out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated; and the said sum of money, or such portion 
thereof as is necessary, shall be expended under the direction of the said 
committee. 

Passed June 21, 1892. 



A Resolution Appropriating Seven Hundred Dollars, to be Ex- 
pended IN Improving the Approaches to the Iron Bridge over 
the Tracks of the Concord & Montreal Railroad, on Water 
Street. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the sum of seven hundred dollars be and the same is hereby ap- 
propriated for the purpose of defraying the expense of improving the 
ajiproaches to the iron bridge on "Water street over the tracks of the 
Concord & Montreal railroad, and that the mayor is hereby authorized 
to draw his warrant on the treasurer for the same, in such sums as he 
may deem advisable. 

Passed June 21, 1892. 



A Resolution Appropriating One Thousand Dollars to be Ex- 
pended in Widening Main Street and Willow Hollow, at 
Penacook. * 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the sum of one thousand dollars be and the same hereby is ap- 
propriated for the purpose of defraying the expense of widening Main 
street between Spring and Pleasant streets, and at Willow hollow in 
Penacook, recently voted by the board of mayor and aldermen ; and 



78 CITY OF CONCORD. 

that the mayor is hereby authorized to draw his warrant on the treasurer 
for the same, in such sums as he may deem advisable. 
Passed June 21, 1892. 



A Resolution Authorizing a Loan of Two Hundked Dollars for 
THE Repairs of the Penacook Sewerage System. 

Resolved hi/ the City Council of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

That the mayor and city treasurer be and hereby are authorized to 
borrow, on the credit of the city, tlie sum of two hundred dollars, the 
same to be used in the completion of necessary repairs on the Penacook 
sewerage system, the amount to be charged to the said Penacook sewer- 
age system. 

Passed June 21. 1892. 



A Resolution Appropriating Money for Improvements on Engine 
House and Ward Room Property at East Concord. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as folloivs : 

That a sum not to exceed two hundred dollars be and is hereby appro- 
priated for the proper grading around the engine house and ward room 
in East Concord and the construction of a stone wall on the westerly 
side of said building, the same to be paid out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated, and the mayor is authorized to draw his 
warrant for the same. 

Passed July 27, 1892. 



A Resolution to Authorize the Purchase of a Safe for the 
Collector's Office. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as folloivs : 

That the collector of taxes be and hereby is authorized to purchase a 
suitable safe for use in his office, at a cost of not over one hundred and 
fifty dollars ($150), to be paid for out of any money in the treasury not 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 79 

otherwise appropriated, and the mayor is hereby authorized to draw his 
warrant for the same. 
Passed July 27, 1892. 



A Resolution Authorizing a Contract with Concord Land and 
Water Power Company. 

Resolved by tlie City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the mayor is authorized and directed to make a contract with 
the Concord Land & Water Power company for the lighting of streets 
by electric lights, in accordance with the proposal submitted by said 
company, for ten years from July 1, 1892. Said contract shall not 
include the provisions for rebate or discount. 

Passed August 4, 1892. 



A Resolution Requiring a Bond from the Concord Land and 
Water Power Company. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the Concord Land & AVater Power company be required to give 
a bond in the sum of ten thousand dollars for the performance of their 
contract with the city, which bond shall be satisfactory to the mayor, 
the city solicitor, and the finance committee. 

Passed August 4, 1892. 



A Resolution Relating to Electric Lights. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as folloios : 

That, agreeably to the provisions of the contract between the Concord 
Land & Water Power company and the city of Concord, dated August 
16, 1892, said Concord Land & Water Power company be notified that 
said city desires said corporation to light said city all night instead of 
until one o'clock each night, with lights of twelve hundred candle power 
capacity, and the city clerk is instructed to furnish said Concord Land & 
Water Power company with an attested copy of this resolution. 

Passed August 16, 1892. 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution Authorizing the Building of a Bridge over the 
Outlet at Penacook, and Appropriating Money to Pay for 
the Same. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

Section 1. That the committee on roads and bridges be and are 
hereby authorized and instructed to cause a bridge to be built over the 
outlet, so called, on Washington street, at Penacook, the same to be not 
less than two and one half feet above the level of the present structure, 
and to be completed by November 1, 1892. 

Sec. 2. That the sum of one thousand dollars be and the same hereby 
is appropriated to pay for said bridge ; and the mayor is hereby author- 
ized to draw his warrant on the treasurer for said sum, the same to be 
paid out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated. 

Passed September 20, 1892. 



A Resolution Relating to the City Pest-House. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the board of health be and hereby is authorized to expend the 
sum of two hundred dollars in repairing and cleansing the premises on 
the " Plain," formerly used as a pest-house, payment to be made out of 
the appropriation for incidental expenses, and the board of health is 
directed hereby to assume and keep, until othei'wise ordered, the care and 
control of the said premises. 

Passed September 20, 1892. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Sale of Certain Property of 

THE City. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as foUoios : 

That the superintendent of highways be and is hereby authorized to 
sell certain cart wheels, for which the city has no further use, and that 
he account for the proceeds of such sale to the city treasurer. 

Passed October 18, 1892. 



JOINT KESOLUTIONS. 81 

A Resolution in Relation to the Sale of Property Belonging 

TO THE City. 

Eesolved hi/ the City Council of the City of Concord as folloios : 

That the conimittee on fire department be anthorized to dispose of the 
two hose carriages and two hose sleighs belonging to the city that are 
now out of commission. 

Passed October 18, 1892. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Purchase of Land for use of 
Blossom Hill and Old North Cemeteries, and Appropriating 
Five Hundred and Seventy-Five Dollars therefor. 

Resolred by the City Council of the City of Concord as foUoivs : 

That the cemetery commissioners are hereby authoriz-^d and instructed 
to purchase a suitable tract of land for obtaining loam for the cemeteries 
above named, and the sum of five hundred and seventy-five dollars is 
hereby appropriated, out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, to be expended by said commissioners for the purchase of 
said land. * 

Passed October 18, 1892. 



A Resolution to Proa'ide for Repairs at the City Hall. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the committee on lands and buildings be and is hereby requested 
to have the walls and woodwork of the south hallway in the city hall 
building repainted in a suitable manner, the expense thereof to be paid 
out of the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed October 18, 1892. 



A Resolution in Regard to a Walk for Foot Passengers on 
Railroad Bridge, so called, on Bridge Street. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Concord & Montreal railroad, and the Concord division of the 
Boston & Maine railroad, are hereby requested to immediately construct 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

a walk for foot passengers on the north side of the raih'oad bridge on 
Bridge street, and the city clerk is instructed to furnish to each of said 
corporations a copy of this resolution. 
Passed December 20, 1892. 



A Resolution in Relation to Clearing the City Pasture at 

West Concord. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the mayor be authorized to have the city pasture on Rattlesnake 
hill, at West Concord, cleared of its present growth of birch and other 
small trees, and put in a condition suitable for the pasturage of stock. 

Passed December 20, 1892. 



A Resolution to Limit the Cost of Binding City Reports. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows: 

That hereafter, and until otherwise ordered, no copies of the annual 
report of the city be bouud at the expense of the city at a cost to 
exceed thirty cents per copy, except such copies as are actually used in 
the city offices ; and that none of the latter be allowed to exceed seventy- 
five cents per copy for cost of binding. 

Passed December 20; 1892. 



A Resolution Instructing the City Solicitor to Collect Fees 
FOR Inspection of Electric Wires. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That the city solicitor is hereby instructed to collect of all telephone, 
electric lighting, and electric railway companies that are maintaining 
wires in the streets of the city of Concord, the amounts paid by said city 
to its electric inspector for inspection of the wires of said respective com- 
panies. 

Passed December 20, 1892. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 83 

A Resolution Appropriatino Money to Purchase Land on Cen- 
ter Street for a Public Park. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as folloics : 

Whereas, The city council did, on June 30, 1891, vote to acquire cer- 
tain lands on Center street, to be used as a public park in connection with 
the state library lot, and the board of mayor and aldermen did, on 
April 10, 1892, vote to take such lands under authority granted by the 
legislature of New Hampshire, and whereas no appi'opriation has 
heretofore been made for the payment of the sums awarded to the own- 
ers of such lands and buildings thereon : 

Now, therefore, the sum of twenty-five thousand five hundred dollars, 
for the payment of such awards, is hereby appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appi'opriated. 

Passed December 20. 1892. 



A Resolution Providing for the Acceptance of Rollins Park. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

Whereas, On the 15th of Septembei", 1891, certain real estate in said 
city was tendered in writing by Frank W. Rollins, trustee, to said city 
for a public park, to be known as Rollins park, on certain terms and 
conditions named in said writings ; 

Now, therefore, said city hereby accepts said real estate, to be kept 
entire and used for the proper purposes of a public park, and for none 
other, and the same shall be forever known as Rollins park, in memory 
of Edward H. Rollins, late of said Concord, deceased. 

And said city hereby agrees to enclose said lot of real estate with a 
suitable fence, lay out walks, introduce water, and assume the future 
maintenance of the premises in a proper and reasonable condition for 
the purpose aforesaid. 

Passed liecember 20, 1892. 



A Joint Resolution Approving of the Purchase of Land and 
Water Rights of the Concord Manufacturing Co., and 
Appropriating a Portion of the Purchase Money Thereof. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as folloics : 

That we hereby approve of the contract between the City of Concord 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and the Concord Manufacturing company, for the purchase by said city^ 
for the sum of eighty thousand dollars, of all the rights of said Concord 
Manufacturing company in and to the waters of Penacook lake, and all 
lands underlying and surrounding the same owned by said Concord Man- 
ufacturing company, said contract to be dated December 15, 189"2, and 
executed by Far well P. Holden, Paul R. Holden, and Adam P. Holden, 
on the part of said Concord Manufacturing company, and the board of 
water commissioners, by its president and clerk, on the part of said city 
of Concord. 

The city treasurer is hereby authorized to borrow by temporary loan, 
upon the credit of the city, the sum of forty thousand dollars, to be used 
in part payment of the amount due said Concord Manufacturing com- 
pany, under the aforesaid contract. 

Passed December 20, 1892. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Exemption from Taxation of 
Certain Property in the City of Concord. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

Whereas, It is the policy of the city of Concord to encourage the 
introduction of new manufactures by the exemption of the capital in- 
vested therein for the term of ten years; and whereas Charles H. Ams- 
den, of said Concord, the owner of certain water power and other real 
estate in Penacook, has erected and is about to erect and complete cer- 
tain buildings to be occupied for manufacturing purposes, and has made 
and is about to make certain other improvements upon his water power, 
which improvements have not heretofore been taxed ; and whereas the 
Whitney Electrical Instrument company is to occupy a portion of said 
mill for the purpose of manufacturing electrical instruments, which 
manufacturing is a new industry in the city of Concord; and whereas 
said improvements have already resulted in the erection of houses and 
increase in the value of real estate in the vicinity, therefore. 

Resolved, By the city council of the city of Concord that all additional 
property invested by said Charles H. Amsden on his mill site and water 
privilege on the Contoocook river just west of the premises of the Con- 
cord Manufacturing company, and which have not heretofore been 
taxed, and the machinery, stock, and capital invested by the Whitney 
Electrical Instrument company, used in the building erected by the said 
Amsden, be and the same hereby are exempt from taxation for the 
period of ten years from and after the passage hereof, or for so much of 
said period as the said Amsden and the said Whitney Electrical Instru- 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 85 

ment company shall continue to use the same for manufacturmg pur- 
poses as aforesaid ; provided that the entire property hereby exempt from 
taxation shall not exceed $500,000; and provided also that this resolu- 
tion shall not be construed to exempt any property of the said Amsden, 
or of the Whitney Electrical Instrument company, that has heretofore 
been taxed ; and provided further that this resolution shall not include 
any dwelling or tenement house. 
Passed December 20, 1892. 



A Resolution Authorizing the Lease of Certain Land Belong- 
ing TO the City on Warren Street. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as folloios : 

That the committee on lands and buildings be and hereby is author- 
ized and instructed to lease the land belonging to the city, now occupied 
by Kimball, Danforth & Forrest, for a term of two years from Jan. 1, 
1893, and to collect from Kimball, Danforth & Forrest rent for said 
land for the time it has been occupied by them, at the same rate as shall 
be provided for in the lease from January 1, 1893. 

Passed December 30, 1892. 



A Resolution to Correct an Error in Taxation. 
Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as folloivs : 

Whereas, The board of assessors has voted to rebate a tax assessed 
erroneously to Calvin Barnard in Ward Four, for the year 1891, amounting 
with interest, which has accrued since an erroneous tax sale, to nineteen 
and ninety-nine one hundredths dollars : Now, in view of said abatement, 
it is ordered that the city treasurer be authorized to refund the said sum 
of nineteen and ninety-nine one hundredths dollars, taking a receipt there- 
for from the rightful claimant. 

Passed December 30, 1892. 



A Resolution Authorizing the City Treasurer to Cancel Cer- 
tain Sewer Bonds. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

That the city treasurer be and hereby is authorized to cancel bonds 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Nos. 50-51-52, issued in favor of the Peuacook sewer precinct, by an or- 
dinance passed April 19, 1892. 
Passed January 17, 1893. 



A Resolution in Regard to the Bridges Across the Merrimack 

River. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord as follows : 

That hereafter, in ail city records and documents, the city bridges 
across the Merrimack be called as follows : The most northerly bridge 
as "Canterbury" bridge; the next bridge as " Sewall's Falls " bridge ; 
the next bridge as " Federal " bridge; the next bridge as "Loudon" 
bridge ; the next bridge as " Pembroke " bridge. 

Passed January 17, 1893. 



INDEX 



Accounts and claims 2 

Appropriations, 1892 '. 78 

Assessors 8 

Assets of city 71 

Assistant engineers 10 

Board of 'education, Union School District 6 

health 23 

Borough-bridge 116 

Bridges'and culverts, expenses 97 

Cemeterj' committees 24 

Cemetery, Blossom Hill, fund 40 

East Concord , fund 41 

Millville, fund 41 

Old, fund 39 

West Concord, fund 40 

Chief engineer 9 

City- clerk 4 

council for 1891-'92 3, 4 

expenses 85-122 

liquor agent 23 

marshal 12 

messenger 6 

officers elect 1893-'94 32 

poor, expenses 86 

physician 22 

assistant 22 

property 76, 77 

solicitor 11 

treasurer 6 

Clerk of common council 4 

police court 12 

Collector of taxes 6 

Commissioner of highways 21 

Commissioners, cemeteries 25 

water-work s 9 

Committees, joint standing 4, 5 

standing 5 

service, expenses 105, 106 

Concrete receipts 168 

County poor 222 

County tax 85 

Culler of staves 29 



88 INDEX. 

70 
Debts of City ' 

Decorating soldiers' graves, expenses 

Dog tax 21 

Drain layers 

^ . 28 

Fence-viewers 

294 

Fire-alarm boxes 

, 295 

signals 

Fire department expenses ^' 

property ^^^ 

regulations ''"'' 

roll of members 285 

27 

Fish and game wardens 



Health officers 

0^^-104 

Highway department, expenses oj xu* 



Legal expenses 

Librarian and assistants — 

Lighting streets, expenses.. 

Penacook 



23 
04 
113 



Hydrant expenses 

Hydrants, location of 



Incidentals and land damages, expenses ''^ 

27 

Inspector of petroleum 

electric wires 



Justice police court 

special 

108 

8 

113 



120 
36 



Mayors of Concord, list of 

Ordinances and joint resolutions— Appendix 47 



24 
Park commissioners 

Penacook park 



toc^ vvci uv^i-idS, 

sewer precinct 



117 

Police and watch expenses 



Pest-house repairs 

104 



Policemen ^ ^^ 

Police, special 

Polls from 1869 to 1892 f°^ 

Poor, overseers of the 

Population of the city 

Pound-keeper 

Precinct appropriations 

expenses 

funded debt '^^ 

debt not funded '^^ 

107 

Printing and stationery, expenses 

Public Library expenses ^^ 

trustees 



INDEX. 89 

Public reservoirs 284 

Purity of water supply 154-156 

Registrar of vital statistics 23 

Report of Blossom Hill Cemetery 249 

board of health 197 

chief engineer 277 

city marshal 229 

city physician 211 

city solicitor 237 

city treasurer 82 

city liquor agent 239 

collectors of taxes 81 

commissioner of highways 167 

finance committee . 84 

health officer 202 

librarian 191 

mortality 212 

Old North Cemetery 269 

overseers of the poor 221 

park commissioners 24a 

Penacook sewer precinct 185 

police justices 235, 236 

sewers and drains committee 181 

superintendent of water- works 139 

treasurer of library 194 

treasurer of water- works 157 

treasurer of parks 246 

trustees of public library 189 

water commissioners 133 

West Concord cemetery 271 

sewerage precinct 184 

Salaries 10& 

School boards 7 

School district No. 20 bonds 73 

Schools, expenses of 108 

School-house taxes 109 

Sealer of leather 28 

Sealers of weights and measures 28 

Sewers, expenses 113 

Soldiers' Memorial Arch — Appendix 5 

expenses 115 

Sprinkling streets 171 

State tax 85 

Stone quarries, receipts 122 

Stewards, Are stations 10 

Superintendent of city clocks 11 

fire alarm 11 

Penacook park 24 

schools 7 

water- works 9 

Surveyors of masonry 30 

painting 29 

stone 30 

wood, lumber, and bark 30 



90 INDEX. 

Taxes assessed from 1860 to 1892 68 

Transfer account 121 

Truant officers 7 

Trust funds 37 

Abbott, William 62 

Adams, S. M. K 43 

Allison, Mrs. Mary D 62 

Bailey, Abby L. Sanborn 56 

Benson, Matilda 52 

Bixby, Ellen C 64 

Blaisdell, James D 60 

Blaisdell, Timothy K 58 

Bouton, Nathaniel 61 

Butters, Harriet W 57 

Caldwell, B. F 53 

Carter, Nathan F 64 

Cemetery, Blossom Hill 40 

East Concord 41 

Millville 41 

Old North 39 

WestConcord 40 

Chesley , Samuel M 63 

Cooper, Mrs. Josiah 55 

Crow, Mary 46 

Eastman, Seth 49 

Edgerly, Lydia F 54 

Ela, Georgianna P 50 

Farnum, Mary M 54 

Fogg, George G 45 

Fowler, Asa 47 

French, Theodore 42 

Gale, Daniel E 52 

Gilbert, Harvey J 54 

Glover and Osgood 57 

Hart, Mary D 46 

Hoyt, Jacob 64 

Irish, Sarah E 49 

Kimball, John and B. A 51 

Knowlton, Edward L 44 

Larkin, B. L 53 

Lincoln, J. L 56 

Locke, William T 55 

Lyon, G. Parker 38 

McQuesten, Greenough and Evarts 58 

McQuesten, James 43 

Morrill, Samuel and David L 63 

Newhall, Mrs. C. H 45 

Osgood, David 38 

Osgood , True 48 

Page, William 50 

Pecker, Mrs. E. A 51 

Penacook sewer precinct sinking fund 65 

Pierce, Franklin 38 

Pixley, Mrs. S. Lizzie 61 

Richardson, Hiram 52 

Rollins, E. H 59 



INDEX. 91 

Trust funds — Rumford, Countess of 39 

Sanborn, Jonathan 59 

Sargent, John B 64 

Stickney , Nathan 63 

Sweetzer, Abigail 48 

Thorne, John C 60 

Upham, Eliza W 44 

Walker, Abial 37 

Walker, Mary E 49 

Wentworth, Paul 42 

Williams, Mary 47 

Woodruff, Robert 65 

Woodward, E. W 57 

Trustees of library '. 8 

Undertakers 25 

Union School District bonds 73 

Valuation from 1860 to 1892 68, 69 

Vital statistics, births Appendix. 

deaths Appendix. 

marriages Appendix. 

Voting places 117 

Ward officers 26 

Water department 127 

Water report, appendix 158 

Water-works, expense 131 

receipts 131 

Weighers of hay, coal, etc 29 

West Concord sewer bonds 74 

sewerage precinct 118