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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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1897. 

FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DKCEMBER 31, 1897, 

Together with other Annual Reports and Papers 
Relating to the Affairs of the City. 




CONCORD. N. H.: 

THE RUAFOKb FRE55. 
1898. 



N 
352.07 
(L1A- 
l&QY 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 

FOR PAYMENT OF BILLS AGAINST THE CITY. 



AH persons furnishing materials or service for the city, or aid 
to the city poor, should be particular to take the name of the 
person orderino; such service, material, or aid, and should know 
that the person is duly authorized to contract said liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or delivered 
on citv pauper account, except on the written order of the Over- 
seer of the Poor, and for no longer time than until his successor 
shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by the 
city, furnished on county paujjcr account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action can 
be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Hills so certified should be left with the City Auditor on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved bv hira and by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, they will be ready for payment on Thursday follow- 
iuo- the regular monthly meeting of the City Government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the City Government occur 
on the second Tuesday of each month. 

JAMES 0. LYFORD, 

Citt/ Auditor. 



Mayor Woodworth's Inaugural Address. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : 

It would be ungracious in me not to express my deep appre- 
ciation of tlie confidence which the citizens of Concord have 
shown by trusting to me the highest executive office in their 
gift. But I can truly say that my realization of the anxieties 
and perplexities of the office has been so great that I have 
never had any ambition to assume such responsibilities. Nev- 
ertheless, I did not feel at liberty to refuse to obey the call of 
my fellow-citizens ; and in assuming the duties of the maj^or- 
alty of our beloved city, I can but promise to bring to it all the 
ability and energy that in nie lie, only regretting that I have not 
a much greater aptitude for the requirements of the office. 

It is with a profound sense of our dependence on Almighty 
God for the greatest blessings of life, that I enter upon the 
duties of so important an office, — and in the responsibilities that 
are shared by the strong, honest, and conscientious men consi- 
tuting the board of aldermen and common council, may we ever 
act for the best interests of the city which we serve, remem- 
bering always that whatever honor we gain is measured only 
by the honor we bring to the discharge of our duties. 

FINANCE. 

The examinations of the auditor of the city and his compila- 
tion of the city report have proceeded far enough to enable him 
to give some interesting figures pertaining to the city's indebted- 
ness. These figures may be varied slightly by the adjustment 
of the accounts of the several departments, but in the main are 
correct. 

What is known as the municipal funded debt of the city 
remains the same as last year, no bonds maturing in 1896. 

The municipal debt not funded has been reduced $19,550, by 
the payment of outstanding notes. 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The available assets of the city are reduced $25,000, by the 
settlement with the bondsmen of Albert I. Foster. 

The uncollected taxes for the years 1893, 1894, and 1895 are 
but $1,148.87, George A. Foster having collected, including 
interest, $15,931.55 of those uncollected at the date of his 
appointment. 

The water debt has been reduced $10,000, by the payment of 
that amount of maturing bonds. 

The precinct debt has been reduced by the payment of $8,000 
of the state-house bonds, closing out this obligation of the city 
incurred many years ago. 

The floating debt of the precinct has also been reduced by the 
payment of $10,000 of outstanding notes. 

The school-district debt has been reduced by the payment of 
$9,000 of Union School-district bonds, and $500 of the bonds 
of School-district No. 20. 

After taking care of the loss occasioned by the settlement of 
the city with the bondsmen of Albert I. Foster, the net reduc- 
tion in the aggregate indebtedness of the municipality, the pre- 
cinct, the school-districts, and the sewer precincts, is about 
$33,000. 

The following recapitulation is substantially correct, and will 
only be varied by the consideration of outstanding coupons due, 
but not presented, and by accrued interest not yet due. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt above assets . . $73,019.97 

Net precinct debt 727,021.67 

Net school-district debt 93,330.00 

Net Peuacook sewer debt 19,924.17 

Net West Concord sewer debt .... 15,109.93 
Net East Concord sewer debt .... 2,185.00 
Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, Jan- 
uary 1, 1897 930,590.74 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, Jan- 
uary 1, 1896 963,960.64 



Decrease during the year ..... $33,369.90 



MAYOR WOODWORTH S ADDRESS. O 

It must be very gratifying to every tax-payer of the city to 
see this most satisfactory reduction of the municipal indebted- 
ness during the past year. It shows that the affairs of the city 
have been well conducted, and that the system employed in their 
management is as good as can be desired, in its practical results. 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS. 

In looking over the addresses of my predecessors, it has been 
very gratifying to see how completely have been carried out the 
various wishes they have expressed for the improvement of our 
city. There are, indeed, but very few changes for the better, 
that they have recommended, which have not already been made. 
About twenty-five years ago, when Concord had attained con- 
siderable strength as a well-conducted municipality, there was 
begun a rather ample plan of permanent improvements, which 
have been carried on with a steadiness and persistency that 
have made our small city botii substantial and beautiful. All 
this advantage which we now possess has been acquired not 
without large expenditures ; and, from the time when it was 
necessary for the city to raise the large sum of one hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars to be continued as the capital of the state, 
a great deal of money has been expended for the improvements 
generally demanded by our citizens. 

Among the first improvements were the water-works and the 
system of sewerage, the central fire station, and the iron bridges 
at Penacook and East Concord, and from that time on, the con- 
cession of betterments has had little interruption. 

The ward six building, the fire stations at Penacook, East 
Concord, and West Concord; the Walker, Chandler, Franklin, 
Kimball, High, and Cogswell schools ; the purchase of valuable 
land for the federal and state library buildings ; the new police 
station, the lower bridge, the new iron free bridge, the wall and 
gateway of Blossom Hill cemetery, and the park improve- 
ments, including laying out of White street, are the principal 
objects which have aggregated a very large sum of money. 
All these works, substantial and finely built, are now our 
permanent possessions. We have them, and we must main- 



6 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tain them ; there is uo choice in the matter ; and it is ex- 
tremely doubtful, if the opportunity could be given to our citi- 
zens to go back to the time when we were without all these 
things, if any considerable number of people could be found 
who would for a moment entertain any such desire. We all 
believe that for the money laid out in public buildings, we 
have received its full value in the additional advantages which 
we have gained. 

PARKS. 

We are so fortunate as to have had the gift of two parks, 
which have added greatly to the beauty and comfort of our city. 
Particularly since the street railway has extended to White 
park, it has been most gratifying to see the great number of 
men, women, and children who have made use of the shady 
paths and the quiet resting-places so well arranged for their 
enjoyment. The children could be counted by hundreds who 
have been made happy by feeding the swans that were generous- 
ly given by a lady who has not long been a resident of the 
town ; and if her example could be followed by others in gifts 
that would give as great pleasure, it would be a happy thing 
for all. 

Considering the amount of the appropriations that have 
been made for all the parks, the results have been surprisingly 
good. There is nothing that gives to a stranger a better 
impression of a city than a piece of land, however small, that 
is beautiful and adorned for the public good, nor is there any- 
thing more thoroughly appreciated by the average citizen of 
good, wholesome taste. 

The building of a permanent fence for the south side of 
White park has been recommended by one of my predecessors ; 
and that is a matter which it would be especially gratifying to 
me to have done, ouly it should extend along the east side as 
well. It was one of the conditions of the gift that the land 
should be fenced, and the temporary railing that was necessarily 
put up in the beginning must be replaced by a substantial fence 
as soon as it can possibly be provided for. When the regular 
appropriations are called for, for both White and Rollins parks, 



MAYOR WOODWORTH S ADDRESS. i 

it is to be hoped that they will be within limits that can be 
granted. 

TAXES. 

While the present tax rate, $2.40, is a high one, the taxes of 
Concord are not high because of the low assessed valuation of a 
portion of the valuable property. If our assessors could get 
near the true value of the business property, merchandise, and 
money at interest, I have no doubt that the inventory would be 
so increased as to lower the rate to a very great degree. As an 
illustration of what I mean, a case can be mentioned of apiece 
of property that is on the tax-list at $12,000 which recently 
sold for $30,000. 

Instead of trying to reduce the valuation of property to the 
very lowest point, there should be a disposition on the part of 
all, as there undoubtedly is on the part of man%', to aid the 
assessors in getting at a true valuation. Every man should be 
as just in dealing with his city as with individuals. His public 
spirit should be great enough to insure this. 

The burden of taxation is always most keenly felt by people 
of moderate circumstances, who have invested the largest part 
of their accumulations in modest homes. The frugal, thrifty, 
and industrious people, those who save their earnings to buy 
and support homes, constitute a large and most valuable part 
of our population. They should have absolutely fair dealing; 
and in order to secure this and to give perfect justice to all, 
those who have more property should be taxed in proportion to 
the full value of their possessions. It is just here that the 
assessors need to exercise not only sagacity and good business 
judgment, but above all. a spirit of fairness and impartiality. 
They should act as a body, and the fixing of the valuation 
should not be determined by the individual member of the 
board elected from the ward where the valuation is made. 
Surely this is a city where taxes ought to be cheerfully borne, 
we have so much to show for the expenditures of the past. I 
do not know that Concord Avill ever be a place whei'e one can 
live especially cheaply ; but since it combines so many advan- 
tages of city and country, has so high a moral tone, and pro- 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

vicles so thoroughly for the educational needs of its children, it 
should attract in the future, as it has in the past, many who are 
looking for the most desirable kind of a community to dwell in, 
as well as for a suitable place to engage in business or manu- 
facturing. 

CHARITIES. 

For scores of years, Concord has taken the lead in organiza- 
tions of a helpful and charitable nature, and it has naturally 
become the centre of many institutions devoted to different 
kinds of people needing assistance. We have cause for just 
pride in the work that has been done for more than eighty 
3'ears by the Concord Female Charitable society, the first one 
of the kind in New England and said to be the first in the 
United States. With such an influence in our midst, it is no 
wonder that every church in the municipality has its charitable 
organization which tries to reach every needy and deserving 
person. We have two homes for children, the Rolfe and Rum- 
ford Home for girls born in Concord, and the Orphans' Home 
near St. Paul's School, which was the first one in New Hamp- 
shire to care for needy little ones ; and two others for adults, 
the Centennial Home for the Aged, and the Odd Fellows' Home. 
We are not called upon for direct assistance by any of these, 
but they are a great blessing in our midst both to those who 
give and receive, and they have our full sympathy. 

For the Margaret Pillsbury hospital an appropriation of two 
thousand dollars a year has been made in the past, as is most 
suitable, for the support of free beds, and doubtless you will be 
asked to appropriate the same amount. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Our public schools have attained a very high degree of 
practical efficiency, and each year sees some advance over the 
year before, as must be the case where there is healthy life. 
We take very young children and give tiiem the superintending 
care of thoughtful and experienced teachers, where every influ- 
ence is directed towards the moral and mental development of 
the individual pupil, — but where consideration for others is 



MAYOR WOODWORTH's ADDRESS. 9 

also a strong principle. From the beginning with the smallest 
children to the end of the course, it is the purpose of our super- 
intendent and teachers to train our pupils to become good citi- 
zens. In no other city of New Hampshire are the children 
better fitted for college and technical schools than in Concoid, 
while we give our pupils a far better preparation for the practi- 
cal duties of life in the instruction they here enjoy in wood- 
work, sewing, and cooking. There is a great call, not only in 
our own but in foreign countries, for an effort to invest manual 
labor with the true dignity that should belong to all honest 
work, aud if there is any way to do this so good as to have 
manual training put into our schools, as a supplement to, 
and on a level with, intellectual work, I do not know what 
it is. 

Whatever training there is in our schools to make our boys 
aud girls skilful with their hands and willing to use them, com- 
mands my hearty approval. Yet, greatly as our expenses have 
increased in the past ten years, like those of all the other 
oities of the laud, the cost of education per capita is smaller 
than in several of the towns where fewer advantages are given. 
Probably no intelligent or progressive citizen would wish the 
present educational standard to be lowered, but in this depart- 
ment as in all others, it is greatly to be desired that the appro- 
priations asked for be made as low as is possible, consistent 
with good aud effective school management. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

It is a matter for congratulation that there is nothing but 
good to say of the work of the board of health and their effi- 
cient sanitary officer. Under them the various sanitary regula- 
tions of the city are thoroughly and quietly carried out, and 
this important part of the public service is well performed. 

CEMETERIES. 

There is no point of interest that appeals more universally to 
our people than the care of our cemeteiies, and nothing gives 
us more sincere satisfaction than to see these hallowed resting- 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

places of our beloved dead grow more beautiful as the years go 
by. Fifteen years ago, there were but seven trust funds in 
possession of the city for the improvement of any of the ceme- 
teries, but now there are ninety-two, a fact that testifies to a 
most laudable and growing interest in their care and adorn- 
ment. It would be a gi-acious act if some benevolent heart 
should feel moved, in the near future, to erect in Blossom Hill 
cemetery a tasteful and appropriate chapel which is so much 
needed for the use of those who, having severed their ties with 
Concord, bring back their dead for interment here. If the 
financial condition of the city should warrant such an expendi- 
ture, I should feel moved to recommend the building of such a 
chapel, since those who know the needs best feel that it is a 
matter which should be promptly attended to. The board of 
cemetery commissioners feel that a larger appropriation is 
needed than was given last year, and their report closes with 
these words : " We cannot think for a moment that any good, 
respectable citizen ever thinks that anything is too good for the 
dead, or feels that taxation is burdensome owing to too large 
an appropriation for this department." 

STREETS. 

Probably, very few people realize the extraordinary length in 
miles of the streets and highways that we possess, and that must 
be kept in order. The town of Concord is nearly eight miles 
square, and six miles square is considered a large township. The 
last census gave 300 miles of streets and highways in Concord, 
while Manchester had but 147 (recent reports give 201), 
Nashua 80, and Dover 65 miles. The large cities of Lowell 
and Worcester had but 104 and 145 miles respectively, and 
even the great city of Boston is credited with but 408 miles of 
streets. This shows something of what we have to contend 
with comparatively in oar efforts to maintain good streets and 
roads, and it will be well for all who have been disposed to 
complain that they have not all been kept in the best condition, 
to retlect carefully upon the stubborn facts just quoted concern- 
ing our actual state of affairs. The regular and fixed expenses 



MAYOR WOOD worth's ADDRESS. 11 

of the highway department, such as ploughing snow from the 
sidewalks and sanding icy places, keeping clear the catchbasins, 
carrying on the night cleaning of the business portions of the 
town, and the general cleaning of spring and fall, average 
about nine thousand dollars a year. All this, like many other 
things in life, is a necessary requirement, but has nothing to 
show for it. 

No material interest of our city appeals more strongly to 
me personally than this matter of good roads, and it seems to 
me absolutely essential to keep those which we now have in as 
good condition as at present ; but with the high tax-rate now 
required it would seem wise to keep at the very minimum 
appropriations for new streets, and for permanent improve- 
ments in this particular direction. 

We labor under the great disadvantage of not having very 
good material for road building, the crushed granite, which has 
been mostly used, wearing away into very fine dust that is bad 
enough when dry, but is worse when it turns to mud in rainy 
weather. It is to be hoped that future experiments may bring 
to light something better in the way of road material that can 
be used to advantage on our streets. It will probably be well 
for the city, when it can be afforded, to buy a portable stone- 
crusher to save hauling stone the long distances now necessary 
from the crusher to the points where it needs to be used. 

STREET LIGHTING. 

The street lighting department shows a great increase iu 
expenses during the past ten years, and I have no hesitation 
in declaring Concord to be now one of the best lighted of cities. 
This condition of things may be regarded as a great luxury, 
but it has come to seem to every one a strict necessity. 

WATER WORKS. 

There are water-works bonds to the amount of $680,000, 
which are properly put down as a liability of the city, but they 
constitute in reality a valuable property, which is not only self- 
sustaining, but which will undoubtedly return a sufHcient revenue 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

to meet the bonds as they become clue, tea thousand dollars hav- 
ing been discharged the past year. It is important for all our 
citizens to recognise the fact that the water works, are owned 
by the property owners of Concord, and that the officials are 
but our agents. The superintendent is a man to be commended 
for the thoroughness and impartiality of his management of this 
important department. The introduction of meters is increasing 
as fast as possible, and in using water that is measured every 
one pays for what he uses, so that there can be no unfairness. 
It is not expected that the revenue will be increased by the uni- 
versal use of meters, but it is certain that a great deal of waste 
will be prevented, and that is a matter of the utmost importance 
to us all. We are favored now with higher water in Penacook 
lake than for many years, but we cannot tell how soon it may be 
greatly decreased in quantity by want of rain, and we need to 
prevent having it wantonly or thoughtlessly wasted. F'ew, 
probably, realize the great amount of gratuitous service given 
to the city by the water commissioners, and it is doubtful if 
any other city in the country has received anywhere near as 
much of this gratuitous service as Concord has in this depart- 
ment. We are to be congratulated that in two branches of so 
much importance as the water-supply and schools, we are 
entirely free from any political influence or interference. 

SEWERS. 

Next to the abundant supply of good water follows the 
necessity of providing for carrying it off by means of proper 
sewerage. Two years ago, my predecessor, in his inaugural 
address, indicated the pending need of the near future as fol- 
lows : "We shall be asked to enlarge the central sewerage 
system during the year at a large expense. There will un- 
doubtedly be a demand for the extension of the South End 
sewer, from its terminus at the junction of Allison and South 
streets into and through the Bow Brook valley, which is ex- 
pected to meet the growing needs of the territory west of Bow 
Brook and that near the jail and west of Auburn street." 
Petitions for this extension were brought before the board of 



' MAYOR WOODWORTH'S ADDRESS. 13 

aldermen and referred to the sewer committee, before which 
hearings were held, and the matter was referred to the incoming 
board. Therefore this important subject will come up, and 
you will be required to take action upon it. There is no doubt 
of the need of this extension. As I understand it, there are 
forty-five houses, besides the Odd Fellows' home, the jail, and 
Bow Brook school with eighty or more children, in gi-eat need 
of sewer accommodations. Wherever children go to school in 
large numbers, it is essential that all sanitary conditions should 
be so good as to offer no menace to good health. If an appro- 
priation for this sewer extension should be granted, it might 
be met by a twenty-year loan, which could doubtless be carried 
at the rate of three and one-half per cent., and, in my judg- 
ment, long before the expiration of that time, the taxable prop- 
erty would be so increased, as a result of the building of the 
sewer, that the city would gain more than its cost. 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

The engineering department, a comparatively new one, is 
indeed most important, embracing as it does all the work on 
public grounds, the care of bridges, the laying of water-pipes 
and sewers, the establishing of grades, and the care of all plans 
of public works and improvements. I am informed by the 
city engineer that one of the bridges over the Contoocook at 
Penacook will need to be replaced in the near future by a new 
and safe structure. 

POLICE. 

Good order and protection of person and property are 
demanded of every municipal government. So far as I know, 
this city has been very fortunate in its police officers, and I 
hear no complaint of inefficiency on the part of any one of the 
force. Up to the time that Concord had between 14,000 and 
15,000 inhabitants, a city marshal and four assistants consti- 
tuted our regular police force. About ten years ago this force 
began to be increased considerabl}', and during the construc- 
tion of the Sewall's falls dam, when a good many foreigners 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

-were employed, it was only acting the part of prudence to 
employ a suftlcient force to ensure safety and good order. It 
is always easier to increase than to diminish, and the police 
commission do not see the way clear to reduce the force when 
the public demand more rather than less service of this kind. 
The last census shows that Concord had nearly the smallest per 
cent, of police force to the number of inhabitants of any town 
or city in the United States, and as one policeman to one thou- 
sand inhabitants is considered a low average, it will be seen 
that we still maintain a considerably less force than comes 
within that limit. The request of the city marshal for pneu- 
matic tires for the ambulance is one that seems to me should be 
granted, since too much care cannot be taken to ease those suf- 
fering from accidents or illness, but I am of the opinion that 
we cannot now afford a stable, which is asked for, desirable as 
it would he if conditions were different. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Our iiro department is now i)lanned on a scale that would be 
adequate to the needs of a considerably larger town than we are 
at present. During the last two years twenty-nine new tap- 
pers have been added, making the whole number connecting 
with houses of firemen, forty-five, and eight new fire-alarm 
boxes have been put in. The chief asks for three more to 
still further increase the efficiency of the department. The new 
batter}' service is a great improvement and is not only a great 
saving of expense, but it is supposed to be always in working 
order. The past year has been marked by but one large fire, 
the burning of the Prescott Piano factory ; and the promptness 
with which calls for assistance have been met by the depart- 
ment has resulted in the extinguishing of such fires as 
it has been called upon to attend to, so that no confla- 
grations have occurred, with the single exception mentioned. 
Judging as well as I can from the necessarily superficial 
knowledge which I have been able to obtain, I am impressed 
with the belief that the chief of the department desires to keep 
the expenses as low as may be, and that he will do his best to 



MAYOR WOODWORTH'S ADDRESS. 15 

maintain its efficiency with such appropriations as you may 
think it wise and necessary to set apart for this department. 

LIQUOR EVIL. 

The liquor evil will always be with us while human passions 
remain as they are, and I have always been an interested 
observer of the practical effects upon this evil, of the different 
policies pursued in dealing with it. It has seemed to me that 
the prohibitory law was the best one for New Hampshire, since 
it can be thoroughly enforced in many towns, and in all of 
them the authorities can work towards that end. Many people 
are clamoring for a law that can be lived up to in this matter 
of intemperance, but it has always seemed to me an absurdity 
to limit a law to what can be absolutely enforced. "Thou 
shalt not" is the beginning of each prohibitory command of the 
Moral Law, although each one has been continually broken 
since it was given forth. Following that model, we do well to 
enact the strongest law that we can have, and then we want to 
work towards the best possible enforcement of that law. I 
have no quarrel to make with those who believe honestly in a 
license law. If I knew that such a law would certainly lessen 
the evil of drunkenness, I should doubtless favor it, since that 
is the end which I most desire, but I have never yet been con- 
vinced of its value as a policy for the suppression of that great- 
est of evils. 

INDEMNITY BONDS. 

In the light of recent experience, I would recommend, in 
every case where a bond is required from officials handling pub- 
lic funds, that the same be secured from some one of the fidel- 
ity insurance companies. The advantage to the official would 
be that he is freed from personal obligation in seeking bonds- 
men, and to the city that it would have the security of corpo- 
rate rather than individual guarantee, as well as the supervi- 
sion of the company over its insurance. 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

It cannot by any one be called invidions if I state here that 
in no department of progress have there been snch strides made 
as in the improvements at the public library. The new and 
improved inethods of cataloguing and shelving of the books 
have entailed vast labor upon the librarian and her assistants, 
for it was only by their unremitting help that the great work of 
making the card catalogue was reduced to one year, instead of 
requiring the estimated two years for its accomplishment. If 
the public would learn briefly and completely what has been 
done at the library, they should read with great care the libra- 
rian's report to the trustees. The most cordial spirit of encour- 
agement to come and use the books and periodicals, either in 
the reading-room or at home, is apparent to all, and while the 
rules are thoroughly enforced, as they must be for true efficiency 
and for tiie best good of all, every effort is made to secure to 
each patron exactly what he seeks. Just what the spiiit of the 
institution is can be shown by a few words from the librarian's 
report, which I gladly quote : " The joy the librarian feels when 
a child aspires or can be led to something better in his reading, 
is as keen as that felt by parents or teachers over an upward 
step, and it is an equally great pleasure to have an adult seek 
and find on our shelves the literary tools he craves to make him 
a cleverer artisan or a more profound thinker." In this depart- 
ment of public growth, it is to be hoped that the usual appro- 
priation will be cheerfully granted. 

PETITIONS. 

I wish to speak a word of caution about signing petitions for 
public improvements, because it is a notorious fact that many 
do this without care or thought of what they are signing. One's 
name should never be lightly given, and above all things, one 
should never sign a petition without reading it carefully, and 
deciding that it is in behalf of a cause which he desires to pro- 
mote. If this should always be done, petitions would mean 
more than they do at present, and they would be of far more 
value to the ones to whom they are presented, as indicating the 



MAYOR WOODWORTH'S ADDRESS. 17 

exact wishes of their constituents. It may be added that they 
would not be so numerous as they now are. 

With all possible earnestness I want to urge upon the heads 
of departments that they manage the appi'opriations set aside 
for them, with the greatest economy and care. It is by no 
means necessary to spend a certain sum of money because it 
has been appropriated, and any saving that can be made 
without injury to the interests entrusted to the care of public 
guardians will be regarded as an evidence of prudence and 
economical management. 

One of the most gratifying characteristics of the great 
national campaign of last year was the intense spirit of unsel- 
fish patriotism that was shown all over the country. Men 
everywhere were more anxious for the well-being of the whole 
country than for their own individual good. We heard much 
about lionor, integrity, and honesty as the very foundation 
upon which the safety and continuance of our republic rest. 
And it is just such a spirit of loyalty to the public good of this 
city that I should like to see actuating every man who has been 
chosen as a public servant to help administer municipal affairs. 
We shall have many commonplace duties to perform, but in the 
aggregate they will all be important as parts of a great whole, 
and we cannot be too careful to bring to their consideration 
sincere purpose and conscientious action. 
2 



Ordinances and Joint Resolutions 



PASSED DURING THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 26, 1898. 



CITY OF COISrCORD. 
OEDINANOES. 



An Ordinance Pkoviding for the Furnishing of Official 
Bonds by City Officers. 

Be it ordained b>/ the Citi/ Council of the C'iti/ of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. Bonds shall be required of the following city oflS- 
cers as follows: City treasurer, twenty-five thousand (25,00*0) 
dollars; tax collector, twenty-five thousand (25,000) dollars; 
city auditor, five thousand (5,000) dollars; city clerk, five thou- 
sand (5,000) dollars; commissioner of highways, three thousand 
(3,000) dollars; city liquor agent, two thousand (2,000) dollars; 
city marshal, five hundred (500) dollars; assistant city marshal, 
five hundred (500) dollars. 

Sec. 2. Bonds required of the foregoing officers shall be those 
of surety companies licensed by the insurance commissioner to 
do business in this state, if in terms such bonds comply with the 
requirements of the city ordinances and the laws of this state 
and the board of mayor and aldermen are satisfied of the finan- 
cial ability of the company as such surety; otherwise, a bond 
may be given in double the amount specified in the foregoing 
section, with sureties to the satisfaction of the board of mayor 
and aldermen; provided such sureties are owners of unencum- 
bered real estate to the value of the penal sum of said bond. 

Sec. 3. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 20, 1897. 



city ordinances. 19 

An Okdinance fixing the Salaky of the Police Commission- 
ers AND IN amendment OF SECTION 13 OF CHAPTER 37 OF THE 

Eevised Ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. Eacli member of the board of police commissioners 
shall receive in full for his services the sum of fifty dollars per 
annum, to be paid to him at the expiration of each year during 
his term of oflfice. 

Sec. 2. Section 13 of Chapter 37 of the Eevised Ordinances is 
hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take eflfect upon its 
passage. 

Passed March 9, 1897. 



An Ordinance enlarging School Di.strict No. 20, Street- 
lighting Pkecinct. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That School District No. 20, Street-lighting Pre- 
cinct, shall be, and hereby is, enlarged by the addition thereto 
of the territory on the southwesterly side of said jsrecinct, be- 
ginning at the intersection of the southerly line of said pre- 
cinct, with Main street; thence by said Main street to the inter- 
section of the Borough road, so-called, with Main street near 
the southeast corner of land owned by John Chadwick; thence 
running westerly by said Borough road to the land of A. C. 
Bean; thence southerly and westerly by land of said Bean and 
Amos C. Elliot to the road leading from said Borough road to 
the Claremont railroad near the Ferrin ledge; thence southerly 
by said road to the southeast corner of the farm of the late Eufus 
D. Scales; thence westerly and northerly by said farm to the 
land of Elmer E. Welch; thence Avesterly and northerly by land 
of said Welch and land of Frank P. Davis to the Borough road, 
before mentioned; thence by said road to the southwest corner 
of the farm of the late Martha J. Morrill, meaning to include in 
the addition all the land included between the above described 
line and the present boundary of said Street-lighting precinct. 

Sec. 2. This act shall take eflfect upon its passage. 

Passed March 9, 1897. 



20 city of concord. 

An Ordinance placing Certain Lands under the Control op 
THE Board of Water Commissioners. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, a» 
folloivfi: 

Section 1. That all tlie land owned by the city of Concord^ 
formerly a portion of the city farm, lying on the northerly and 
westerly sides of Lake street and the highway leading in con- 
tinuance thereof along the shore of Forge pond to the land pur- 
chased by the city of Concord through its board of water com- 
missioners from Mary C. Rowell, be, and the same hereby is, 
placed under the management and control of the board of water 
commissioners. 

Sec. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent 
with this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance 
shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 9, 1897. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the Amount of Money 
TO BE Raised for the ensuing Financial Year for the Use 
OF the City. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, a» 
' follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the 
sum of fifty-seven thousand dollars (.f 57, 000), to defray the neces- 
sary expenses and charges of the city for the ensuing financial 
year, which, together with the sums that may be raised by taxes 
on railroads and from other sources, shall be approj)riated as 
follows: 



For payment Memorial Arch bonds . 

For payment of interest ..... 

For support of the city jjoor .... 

For incidentals and land damages, including expense 

of indemnity bonds for city officers 
For committee service ..... 

For printing and stationery .... 

For legal expenses ...... 

For beds at Margaret Pillsbury Hospital . 
For Decoration Day ...... 



$5,000.00 

4,000.00 

700.00 

5,000.00 
1,410.00 
2,500.00 

200.00 
2,000.00' 

345.00 



ClXr ORDINANCES, 



21 



Tor aid dependent soldiers 
IFor public school text-books 
'For open-air concerts 
For Blossom Hill Cemetery 
For Old North Cemetery . 
For West Concord Cemetery 
For Old Fort Cemetery, for completion of wall by 
contract ...... 

For Millville Cemetery 

For Horse Hill Bridge Cemetery 

For White Park 

For Eollins Park .... 

For Peuacook Park .... 

For imiDrovement public commons 

For lobby at Penacook, by contract not exceeding 



.S500.00 

2,800.00 

300.00 

2,500.00 

350.00 

100.00 

300.00 
100.00 
50.00 
3,250.00 
750.00 
100.00 
175.00 
900.00 

$33,330.00 



rOK SALAKIES. 

Mayor 

City clerk . 

Overseer of poor, Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 
and 9 . . . 

Overseer of poor, Ward 1 

Overseer of poor, Ward 2 

Oity auditor 

City solicitor 

City treasvirer 

City messenger . 

Oare of city clocks 

Clerk of common council 

Board of Education, Union School District 

Board of Education, District No. 20 

Town District school board 

Nine assessors 

Nine moderators 

Nine ward clerks 

Twenty-seven selectmen 

Judge police court 

Clerk of police court . 

.Collector of taxes, so much as may be nec- 
essary of the sum of ... , 



$1,000.00 
1,200.00 

200.00 

30.00 

10.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

250.00 

600.00 

85.00 

50.00 

250.00 

25.00 

200.00 

2,700.00 

27.00 

90.00 

135.00 

800.00 

200.00 

1,600.00 



$10,952.00 



22 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PUBIjIC LIBKAKY. 

For salary of librarian, assistants, and jani- 
tor ........ 

For purchase of books and magazines 

For printing, including new fiction cata- 
logue ....... 

For fnel and lights ..... 

For binding ...... 

For incidentals ...... 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

For salary of health officer 
For salary of board of health 
For rent ..... 
For lights ..... 
For care of pest-house 
For assistance in sanitary inspection 
For bacteriological tests 
For materials for fumigation 
For incidental expenses of contagious dis- 
eases ....... 



POIilCE AND WATCH. 



Salary city marshal 
Salary deputy 
Salary eajstain of watch 
Pay nine patrolmen 



$1,200.00 

900.00 

850.00 

7,200.00 



^2,550.00 
1.200.00 

400.00 
350.00 
500.00 
500.00 



S800.00 

75.00 

108.00 

12.00 

15.00 

100.00 

150.00 

27.00 

175.00 



.i$5,500.00' 



Pay of janitor ..... 

Pay of special policemen 

Fuel of city jn-oper .... 

Fuel, Penacook ..... 

Board of horse and shoeing 
Extra horse hire in city 
Extra horse hire in Penacook 
Lights ...... 

Rent at Penacook .... 

Telephone and street gong at Penacook 

Water 

Ice ....... 



.fl0,150.00 

225.00 

300.00 

200.00 

25.00 

285.00 

30.00 

30.00 

190.00 

108.00 

50.00 

28.00 

15.00 



•SI, 462. 00 



CITY ORDINANCES. 



23 



Repairs and incidentals 
Helmets and buttons . 
Uniforms for special jjolice 
Police commissioners 
New boiler . ... 



KOADS AND BEIDGES. 

For salary of commissioner of highways . 
For general maintenance and repairs 
For permanent work, including portable 
stone crusher ...... 

For cleaning streets ..... 

For new concrete (sidewalks and crossings) 
For repairing concrete .... 

For catch basins, construction and cleaning 



.$100.00 

75.00 

50.00 

150.00 

350.00 



•SI 2,. 301. 00 



.D;l,400.00 
18,000.00 

8,000.00 
4,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,500.00 
800.00 



.>i?3r,,700.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



City engineer, salary 

Assistants, salary 

For supplies 

For repairs 

For rent 

For incidentals . 



$1,500.00 

1,000.00 

100.00 

50.00 

204.00 

146.00 



.$3,000.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Chief engineer, salary . . .$950.00 
Assistant engineers (precinct), 

salary 250.00 

Permanent men, pay-rolls . . 5,568.00 
Kearsarge Steamer Co., pay-rolls 1,010.00 
Eagle Steamer Co., pay-rolls . 1,010.00 
Hook and Ladder Co., pay-rolls . 1,615.00 
Governor Hill Relief Co., pay- 
rolls 195.00 

Alert Hose Co. , pay-rolls . . 815.00 
Good Will Hose Co., pay-rolls . 815.00 
Pioneer Steamer Co., pay-rolls . 500.00 
Pioneer Steamer Co., salary en- 
gineer 75.00 



24 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Pioneer Steamer Co., salary as- 
sistant engineer 

Pioneer Steamer Co., steward 

Pioneer Steamer Co., janitor 

Cataract Co., pay-rolls 

Cataract Co., salary assistant en 
gineer .... 

Cataract Co., steward . 

Cataract Co., janitor . 

Old Fort Co., pay-rolls 

Old Fort Co., salary assistant en 
gineer .... 

Old Fort Co. , steward 

Rent of rooms. Veteran Fire- 
men's Association . 

For extra men for vacation 



.$25. 

30. 

45. 
240. 

10. 

15. 

15. 

240. 

10. 
15. 

150 
218 



00 
00 
00 
00 

00 
00 
00 
00 

00 
,00 

,00 
,00 



For forage . 

For fuel 

For lights . 

For water . 

For horse shoeing 

For hats, five dozen 

For three alarm boxes 

For relining old hose 

For new wagon for chief engineer 

For one pair of horses 

For horse hire .... 

For washing .... 

For current for fire alarm . 

For labor, wire, etc., fire-alarm line 

For supplies for open circuit batterie 

For supplies for chemical engine 

For supplies for pony extinguishers 

For hose and incidentals 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



$13,816.00 

1,411.00 

640.60 

500.00 

116.50 

280.00 

315.00 

225.00 

150.00 

160.00 

300.00 

300.00 

105.00 

36.00 

300.00 

25.00 

50.00 

12.00 

1,257.90 



^20,000.00 



city ordinances. 25 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the Amount of Money 
to be raised on the property and inhabitants within the 

LIMITS OF THE CtAS AND SeWERAGE PrECINCT FOR THE ENSU- 
ING Financial Year. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the gas and 
sewerage precinct of said city the sum of sixteen thousand one 
hundred and eighty-seven dollars and fifty cents ($16,187.50) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of the precinct for 
the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as fol- 
lows : 

For the payment of interest that may become due on 

sewer bonds .$1,670.00 

For the payment of city precinct note . . . 500.00 

For the payment of interest on note .... 17.50 

For the lighting of streets in said precinct . . 10,500.00 

For the construction and maintenance of sewers in 

said precinct ........ 3,500.00 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the Amount of Money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

within the LIMITS OF THE PeNACOOK SeWERAGE PrECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YeAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follou's : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook 
sewerage precinct the sum of fourteen hundred and sixty dollars 
(.$1,460) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said pre- 
cinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accord- 
ance with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . .$500.00 
For the payment of interest that may become due on 

precinct bonds ........ 960.00 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



26 city of coxcord. 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the Amount of Money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE EaST OoNCORD SeAVERAGE PrE- 
CINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YeAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of tlic City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. Tliere shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East 
Concord sewerage precinct the sum of four hundred and twenty- 
eight dollars and seventy-five cents (.'$428.75) to defray the nec- 
essary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accord- 
ance with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . .$100.00 

For the payment of interest that may V)ecome due on 

precinct bonds ....... 70.00 

For the payment of maturing note .... 2.50.00 ' 

For the payment of interest on note .... 8.75 

Passed March .30, 1897. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the Amount of Money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 

within the limits of the West Concord Sewerage Pre- 
cinct FOR THE ensuing FINANCIAL YeAR. 

Be it ordained l)y the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West 
Concord sewerage precinct the sum of eleven hundred and eighty 
dollars (.$1,180) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of 
said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be 
appropriated as follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accord- 
ance with an ordinance creating the sinking fund .$500.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on 

precinct bonds 680.00 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



city ordixaxces. 27 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the Amount of Money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
WITHIN THE Street Sprinkling Precinct for the ensuing 
Financial Year. 

Be it ordained by the City Coimcii of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and theie is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street 
sprinkling precinct of said city the sum ot iova thousand dollars 
($4,000) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the 
street sprinkling precinct for the ensuing financial year, which 
shall be appropriated as follows : 

For sprinkling streets, $4,000, 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the Amount of Money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE CiTY WaTER PrECINCT FOR THE 

ENSUING Financial Year. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the water 
precinct of the city the sum of six thousand dollars ($6,000) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of the water precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
follows : 

For water for hydrant service, $6,000. 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money 
TO BE Raised for the Ensuing Financial Year for the 
Support of Schools. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and-ratable estates within said, city 
the sum of thirty-four thousand seven hundred and five dollars 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

($34:, 705) for tlie support of schools for the ensuing financial 
year, which, together with the income from the Abial Walker 
fund, shall be appropriated and divided among the several 
school districts according to the valuation thereof. 
Passed April 13, 1897. 



An Ordinance Authorizing the Mayor and Committee on 
Lighting Streets to Make a Contract with the Concord 
Land and Water Power Company. 

Be if ordained bi/ the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follou'n: 

Section 1. That the committee on lighting streets, with the 
mayor added, be, and hereby are, authorized to sign a contract 
on behalf of said city, with the Concord Land and Water Power 
Company, for twelve (12) police lamps, more or less, of twenty- 
four (24) candle i^ower, four thousand (4,000) hours each per 
year, all night, and every night, same to be lighted by the Elec- 
tric Light Company, and extinguished by the police, at fifteen 
dollars ($15) per annum per light. Said contract to date from 
the earliest possible time in which above lights can be projierly 
equipped by the comj^any, and to continue for five (5) years, 
and all lamjjs and material, including repairs and maintenance, 
be furnished by the company. 

Passed April 13, 1897. 



An Ordinance Eegulating the Opening and Obstruction of 

Streets and Sidewalks. 

Be it ordained by the City Coimcil of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs: 

Section 1. The authority now vested in the mayor and board 
of aldermen to grant licenses to persons to dig up, obstruct, or 
encumber the streets, sidewalks, and highways of the city, is 
herewith conferred ujion the commissioner of highways, under 
such rules and regulations as he shall establish. 

Sect. 2. No person shall break or dig up the ground or 
stones in any street or sidewalk, or erect any staging for build- 
ing, or place or deposit any stones, bricks, timber, or other 
building materials thereon, without first obtaining a written 



GITY ORDINANCES. 29' 

license from the commissioner of highways and comijlying in all 
respects with the conditions of such license. 

Sect. 3. Any person violating any of the provisions of this 
ordinance or who fails to comply with the rules and regulations 
established by the commissioner of highways, shall be fined a 
sum not exceeding ten dollars ($10.00) for each offense. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 13, 1897. 



An Ordinance Making an Additional Appkopeiation for the 
Completion of the Wall at Old Fort Cemetery. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of one hundred and seventy-four 
dollars (.$174) is hereby appropriated in addition to the sum al- 
ready appropriated for the completion of the wall at Old Fort 
Cemetery, and that the same be j)aid out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise approjDriated. 

Passed April 13, 1897. 

An Ordinance Defining the Eights and Duties of the Joint 
Standing Committee on Lands and Buildings Relative to 
the Care and Renting of the Various City Buildings, and 
IN Amendment of Chapter 37, Section 10, of the Revised 
Ordinances Relating to the Salary of the City Messen- 
ger. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. The joint standing committee on lands and build- 
ings shall have the superintendence of all city buildings and all 
land owned by the city, excepting such as is under the super- 
vision of a commission, and shall have the renting of all build- 
ings, halls, or grounds for public, social, or charitable jjurposes. 
They shall charge for " City Hall," when used for social pur- 
poses, two dollars and fifty cents (,1)2.50) per hour ; for "Ward 
rooms," when used for social pur^joses, one dollar (.$1.00) -per 
hour. For public, charitable, or other purposes, they shall 
charge such rate as they shall deem just under the circumstances 
of the case. 

Sect. 2. In case any part of any city building or any of the 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

heating or sanitary apparatus or otlier fixtures contained therein 
become, through accident or other cause, suddenly unfit for use, 
it shall be the duty of said committee to take all necessary means 
to repair the same and report such action to the next regular 
meeting of the city council. 

Sect. 3. The city messenger shall receive for services per- 
formed when the City Hall is used in the evening for the above 
purposes, the sum of twenty-five cents ($0.25) per hour until 
midnight, and the sum of fifty cents (.$0.50) per hour thereafter. 

Sect. 4. So much of the provisions of chapter 37, section 10, 
of the Eevised Ordinances as are inconsistent with this ordi- 
nance, and all other ordinances and parts of ordinances that are 
inconsistent with this ordinance, are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take eff'ect upon its passage. 

Passed April 13, 1897. 



An Ordinance Authorizing the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings, with His Honok, the Mayor, Added, to Make 
A Contract avith the Concord Light and Power Company 
FOR Concord Gas Light Company for Gas Lights. 
Be if ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the committee on lands and buildings, with 
His Honor, the mayor, added, be authorized, and the same 
hereby are authorized and instructed, to contract with the Con- 
cord Light and Power Comjiany for the Concord Gas Light 
Company, to furnish gas at the rate of .SI. 50 per thousand cu- 
bic feet, and to furnish and maintain Welsbach burners on all 
fixtures in the following buildings and offices: City Hall, Public 
Library, all fire department buildings, and all city buildings 
and city offices. 

Passed April 13, 1897. 



An Ordinance Providing for the Construction of an Exten- 
sion OF THE South End Sewer, Providing Means for 
Defraying the Expense Thereof, and Authorizing an 
Issue of Bonds Therefor. 
Be it oi'dained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 

follows: 

Section 1. That for the puriDOse of defraying the exijense of 

constructing the sewer authorized by vote of the board of mayor 



CITY ORDINANCES. 31 

and aldermen May 28, 1897, bonds of said city sliall be issued to 
an amount not exceeding (.$25,000) twenty-five thousand dollars, 
in the manner and for the amounts hereafter specified. 

Sect. 2. Bonds. of said city shall be issued for the purposes 
aforesaid, signed by the mayor and the city treasurer, and coun- 
tersigned by the city clerk, and shall in all respects comply 
with the provisions of the " Municipal Bonds Act of 1895." 
Said bonds shall be dated July 1, 1897, numbered consecutively 
from one to twenty-five inclusive, and shall be for the sum of one 
thousand dollars each, and shall be due and payable on the first 
day of July, 1917. Said bonds shall be payable to the bearer 
with interest at a rate not exceeding three and one-half (3|) per 
centum per annum, payable semi-annually on the first days of 
January and July in each year, upon the presentation of the 
coupons attached to said bonds respectively. 

Sect. 3. The treasurer is hereby authorized to procure pro- 
posals for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized, and such bids 
as seem for the best interest of the city shall be accepted by him, 
provided the same are apjjroved by the finance committee. 

Sect. 4. That all of said bonds owned by citizens of said city 
of Concord shall be exempt from taxation as provided in Chapter 
55, Section 14, of the Public Statutes. 

Passed June 8, 1897. 



An Ordinance Authorizing the Use of Certain Fund.s of 
the Gas and Sewerage Precinct for the Construction 
and Maintenance of Sewers. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the unexpended balance of the approjariations 
for the gas and sewerage precinct for the year 1896, viz., the sum 
of six hundred and fifty-one dollars and forty-one cents (.'$651.41) 
and the miscellaneous receipts credited to the account of said 
precinct for the year 1896, viz., the sum of sixty-nine dollars and 
forty-two cents (."$69.42), a total of seven hundred and twenty 
dollars and eigthy-three cents (.'$720.83), are hereby aj^propri- 
ated for the construction and maintenance of sewers of said i^re- 
cinct. 

Passed September 14. 1897. 



32 city of concord. 

An Okdinance Making an Additional Appkopkiation for the 
Cake and Maintenance of Blossom Hill Cemeteey. 

Be it ordained hi/ the City Council of the City of Concord, as , 
follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of tweuty-seveu hundred dollars 
($2,700.00) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise api^ropriated as an addi- 
tional appropriation for the care and maintenance of Blossom 
Hill Cemetery. 

Passed September l-t, 1897. 



An Ordinance Making an Additional Appropriation for 
KoADS AND Bridges. 

Be if ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) be,- 
and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, for roads and bridges, for 
the construction and cleaning of catch basins. 

Passed October 12, 1897. 



An Ordinance Making an Appropriation for Change in the 
Location of Concord Street E. K. in Ward One. 

Be if ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of six hundred and twenty-five dol- 
lars ($625) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated for the pur- 
pose of meeting the expense incident to the carrying out of an 
agreement with the Concord Street E. E. for the change in the 
location of their track on Main street in Ward One, and that the 
same be charged to incidentals. 

Passed October 12, 1897. 



EESOLTJTIOlSrS. 



A Joint Eesolution in relation to paying Salaries, Pay- 
rolls, AND Eents. 

Resolved bij the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the mayor be and hereby is authorized to draw his war- 
rant on the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, pay- 
rolls, and rents as the same shall become due and be approved 
by the city auditor during the present municipal term, and all 
bills so paid shall be laid before the committee on accounts and 
claims at their next meeting. 

Passed January 26, 1897. 



A Eesolution relating to a Ee-appraisal of Taxable Prop- 
erty. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the assessors of said city acting together as a board are 
hereby requested to make a specific re-appraisal, prior to the 
assessment of taxes for the current year, of all property, real 
and personal, in the business section of the city, and of the 
stock in trade of all merchants. 

Passed March 9, 1897. 



A Eesolution offering a Eeward of Three Hundred Dol- 
lars. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloxvs: 

That the sum of three hundred dollars is hereby offered as a 
reward for the arrest and conviction of the party or parties con- 
cerned in the desecration of the grave of Mrs. Zelotus Stevens, 
in Blossom Hill cemetery, Sunday morning, February 21, 1897. 

Passed March 9, 1897. 
3 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution in favok of John J. Trenoweth. 

JResolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, ns follows: 

That tlie sum of thirty-seven dollars and sixty-three cents 
(S37.63) be paid to John J. Trenoweth ont of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, in full settlement of his 
claim for unpaid salary as a member of Hook & Ladder Co. 
No. 1 for the years 189-i and 1895. 

Passed March 9, 1897. 



ResoijTjtions providing for the EEMOvAii OF Plans and Sec- 
tions. 

Hesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the city clerk be authorized and instructed to permit the 
city engineer to take from the vaults containing the same vol- 
umes one and two of plans and sections showing street grades 
for use in the office of said city engineer, the same to be ra- 
turned Avheu the purpose for which they are taken is com- 
pleted. 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



Eesolution Exempting the Penacook Manufacturing Company 
FROM Taxation. 

Whereas, The Penacook Manufacturing company, a corpora- 
tion organized under the general laws of state of New Hamp- 
shire, purposes to purchase the manufacturing plant, including 
real estate, machinery, tools, and other personal property known 
as the " H. H. Amsden & Co. plant" in Ward 1, in said city of 
Concord, for the purpose of putting the same in operation for 
manufacturing plumber's supplies of all kinds, and for the work- 
ing of woods and metals. Now, therefore, be it 

Resolved by the city council of the city of Concord, that said 
plant and the capital used in operating the same be exempt from 
taxation to said Penacook Manufacturing company, for the 
term of ten years from the passage hereof, according to the pro- 
visions of section 11 of chapter .55 of the Public Statutes of New 
Hampshire. 

Provided that said company shall within thirty days invest in 
said plant a sum not less than fifteen thousand dollars. 



RESOLUTIONS. 35 

Provided, also, that after oue year said exemption shall con- 
tinue for only such part of said ten years as said corporation 
shall employ a force of at least twenty-five operatives on said 
plant. 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the Mayor and Committee 
ON Lighting Streets to make a Contract with the Con- 
cord Light and Power Company for Concord Gas Light 
Company for Gaslights. 

Resolved by the Cltij Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the committee on lighting streets, with the mayor added, 
be and hereby are, authorized to sign a contract on behalf of 
said city with the Concord Light and Power company, for the 
Concord Gaslight company, to furnish gas, lighting and extin- 
guishing one hundred and thirteen (113) street lamps (more or 
less), burning five (5) cubic feet of gas per hour, one thousand 
four hundred and sixty-three (1,463) hours each per year, sun- 
set to midnight, twenty (20) nights each month, twelve dollars 
(.$12.00) per annum per lamp, extra nights pro rata. Said con- 
tract to be for five (5) years from March 1, 1897. 

Passed March 30, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee ON Lands and Buildings to Build a Lobby in 
Ward 1. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows. • 

That the joint standing committee on lands and buildings of 
the city council be, and the same hereby are, authorized and 
instructed to have built a substantial brick building adjoining 
the fire station at Penacook, for the use of the police depart- 
ment. Said building to contain four brick cells, suitable sani- 
tary arrangements, and to be heated by steam taken from fire 
station boiler. 

Said committee to procure proposals for constructing the 
same, and to let the work by contract to the lowest bidder, at a 
total cost not exceeding nine hundred dollars (.$900.00), to be 
charged to the appropriation made for the same. 

Passed April 13, 1897. 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Joint Eesolijtion relating to the Premises belonging to 
THE City heretofore occupied by Kimball, Danforth & 
Forrest in the rear of Police Station. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the commissioner of highways is hereby instructed in 
behalf of said city to take possession of the premises in the rear 
of the police station belonging to said city, heretofore occupied 
by Kimball, Dauforth & Forrest as a lumber yard, and to clear 
the same and keep the same clear and open for public use. 

Passed April 13, 1897. 



A Kesolijtion authorizing the Publication of the Eeal Es- 
tate Valuation of the City Assessors. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the board of assessors be requested to prepare for publi- 
cation in the Daily Monitor and Daily People and Patriot a 
list of the real estate valuations of Concord as established by 
them for the assessment of taxes for the year 1897, describ- 
ing the property by street, number, and owner's name; and 
that the mayor be authorized to contract with said newspapers 
for publishing said list, jirovided such publication can be had at 
an expense not exceeding .^150. 00 for each pa^jer. 

Passed April 13, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution appointing a committee to purchase a 
portable Stone Crusher. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a committee of three, consisting of the mayor, the com- 
missioner of highways, and Alderman Eowell, be appointed to 
purchase a portable stone crusher for the city, with full power 
to make such selection as in their judgment the interests of the 
city demand. 

Passed May 11, 1897. 



rp:solutions. 37 

A Joint Resolittion appropriating money for re-imbursing 

CERTAIN PERSONS FOR OVERPAID TAXES- 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the sum of one hundred and sixty-one dollars and eight 
cents ($161.08) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated to be 
paid as follows : To Arthur Bourlet, over-valuation in 1896, 
twelve dollars and ninety-two cents ; to B. W. Couch, excess in 
taxes 1895, five dollars and eighteen cents ; to Henry W. Stev- 
ens, trustee Woodward estate, error in taxes, 1896, four dollars 
and eighty cents ; to Samuel Holt, for over-charge in taxes, 1888 
to 1896, inclusive, one hundred and thirty-eight dollars and 
eighteen cents. And that the same be charged to the appropri- 
ation for incidentals. 

Passed June 8, 1897. 



A Joint EESoiiUTioN providing for a temporary loan of 

TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS (.$25,000) IN PAYMENT OF THE 
NOTE FOR THAT AMOUNT BECOMING DUE JuNE 10, 1897, THE 
SAME HAVING BEEN GIVEN FOR A TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Mesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the city treasurer, under the advice and direction of the 
committee on finance, be, and he hereby is, authorized to pro- 
cure, by temporary loan upon the credit of the city, the sum of 
twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000), at the lowest practical per 
centum, to be used in the payment of the note given by the city 
for a temporary loan for that amount, which said note was issued 
December 10, 1896, and becomes due June 10, 1897 ; and the 
said sum of twenty-five thousand dollars (.$25,000) is hereby 
appropriated for that purpose. 

Passed June 8, 1897. 



A Resolution providing for temporary loan not exceeding 

IN TOTAL FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS, TO MEET THE USUAL 
AND CURRENT EXPENSES OF THE PRESENT FISCAL YEAR AS THEY 
MAY BECOME DUE. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the city treasurer, under the advice and direction of the 
committee on finance, is hereby authorized to procure for sixty 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

days, by temporary loans upon the credit of the city, such sum 
as may be necessary, not exceeding in total fifteen thousand dol- 
lars ($15,000), at the lowest practical per centum, to be used 
exclusively in meeting the usual and current expenses of the 
city during the present fiscal year, as they become due. 
Passed June 8, 1897. 



A Joint REsoiitiTiON authorizing the Committee on Lands 
AND Buildings to procuee New Carpets for the rooms 

OCCUPIED BY THE CiTY CoUNCIL AND CiTY ClERK. 

Resolved by the Cit}j Council of the City of Concord, as foUoivs: 

That the committee on lands and buildings be, and is hereby, 
authorized to procure for the rooms occupied by the city council 
and city clerk, new carpets at an expense not exceeding one hun- 
dred dollars, said sum to be paid from the funds in the hands of 
the city treasurer appropriated for incidentals. 

Passed June 8, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing an Additional Expenditure 
FOR the Old Fort Cemetery wall. 

Resolved by the City Council in the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of ten dollars ($10.00) is hereby appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for the completion of the wall of the Old Fort Cemetery. 

Passed July 13, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing Repairs on the Rooms in 
City Hall building occupied by Military Companies. 

Resolved by the City Council in the City of Concord, as folio ws: 

That the committee on lands and buildings be, and hereby 
are, authorized to cause such repairs to be made on the rooms 
occupied by the two military companies in City Hall building, 
as they may think proper, the amount to be expended not to 
exceed the sum of fifty dollars and to be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidentals. 

Passed September 14, 1897. 



RESOLUTIONS. 39 

A Joint Resolution authorizing the use of any Unexpended 
Balance op the Proceeds of the Sale op Bonds issued for 
THE Construction op the South End Sewer. 

Resolved bfj the Citij Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That any part of the proceeds of the sale of bonds, authorized 
by ordinance of the city of Concord, passed June 8, 1897, not 
required for the construction of the South End sewer, may be 
used in the construction of lateral connections therewith, and 
the sum of thirty-five hundred dollars ($3,500.00) of said balance 
is hereby appropriated for the construction of lateral connections 
with said South End sewer during the year 1897. 

Passed September 14, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution making available Certain Unexpended 
Balances of the Appropriation for the Fire Department. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That so much as may be necessary of the unexpended balance 
of the appropriation for the fire department, allotted to the pur- 
chase of forage and horses, be and the same is hereby made 
available for relining old hose. 

Passed September 14, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution providing for a Railing around a Por- 
tion OP THE City Market Place. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs:- 

That the committee on lands and buildings be and are hereby 
authorized and instructed to expend not exceeding ,$35 to defray 
the expense of placing railings on the city market lot, said rail- 
ings to be placed as follows : One railing to be placed sixty feet 
south from Warren street and parallel therewith extending from 
the police station building to Odd Fellows' avenue, so-called ; 
also a railing extending from the southeast corner of the police 
station building to the building occupied by W. G. C. Kimball ; 
also a railing extending from the southAvest corner of said 
building occupied by W. G. C. Kimball, westerly to Odd Fel- 
lows' avenue, so-called, along the north side of the passway lead- 
ing to Main street, leaving openings for passage of teams. The 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

expenditure thus authorized to be charged to the approi^riation 
for incidentals. 

Passed November 9, 1897. 



A Joint EESoiiXiTioN in kelation to the use of the Appko- 

PKIATION FOK KOADS AND BRIDGES. 

Resolved hy the City Council in the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars (i$200.00) apj^ropriated for 
permanent work on highways be and the same is hereby made 
available for catch basins in addition to the amount already 
appropriated for that purjjose. 

Passed November 9, 1897. 



A Joint Eesolution making Available Funds fok the Main- 
tenance OF Public Commons. 

Resolved by the City Council in the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the sum of fifty dollars (.$50.00) appropriated for 
White park be and the same is hereby made available for the im- 
provement of public commons in addition to the sum already 
approjjriated for that purpose. 

Passed November 9, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to the Eefunding of Cer- 
■ TAIN Taxes. 

Resolved by the City Council in the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of thirteen dollars and seventy-four cents 
(.$13.74) be refunded to Gustavus Walker and the sum of two 
dollars and seven cents (.$2.07) be refunded to A. H. Britton, 
these sums having been paid by them respectively in excess of 
the just tax assessed against them for the year 1897, and that 
the same be paid out of the appropriation for incidentals. 

Passed November 9, 1897. 



KESOLUTIOXS. 41 

A Besolution appbopkiating One Hundred Dollars to de- 
fray THE Expense of Clearing the Ice on the Pond in 
White Park. 

Resolved by the City. Couneil of the City of Concord, as folloivs : 
That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated to defray the expense of keeping the ice 
on the pond in White park cleared of snow for skating purposes, 
the same to be paid from the amount appropriated for incidental 
expenses; the same to be expended under the direction of the 
park commissioners. 

Passed December 14, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution relating to the appropriation for Roads 
AND Bridges. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 
That the sum of two hundred and sixty-six dollars and fifty- 
six cents of the approjiriation for roads and bridges now allotted 
to sidewalks and crossings be, and the same is hereby, made 
available for use in cleaning streets. 
Passed December 30, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution inviting Bids for Printing the Annual 
City Report. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs : 
That the city auditor is hereby instructed to invite bids for 
printing the annual report of the city of Concord and the finance 
committee is hereby authorized to accept that bid which in its 
judgment is most advantageous to the city. 

Passed December 30, 1897. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating Fifty Dollars for Extra 
Services of City Messenger. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of fifty dollars ($50.00) be, and the same is 

hereby, appropriated for the purjjose of paying the city messen- 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ger for extra services in taking care of the extra rooms used by 
the N. H. military comijanies of Concord and that the same be 
charged to the approjiriations for incidentals. 
Passed December 30, 1897. 



A Joint Kesolution pkoviding fob the Acceptance of Cer- 
tain Land for Park Purposes. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the triangular tract of land situated in said city and 
bounded by Center street, Ridge road, and Park Ridge street 
be, and hereby is, accepted for park purposes from AVilliam F. 
Thayer, Albert B. Wood worth, Edward B. Woodworth, and Aus- 
tin S. Ranney, subject to the condition that said tract shall, 
within two years from the passage of this ordinance, be properly 
graded and seeded to grass, and thereafter be suitably main- 
tained for park purposes, and be known as Ridge Road Park, 
said tract to be deeded to said city of Concord immediately after 
the passage of this resolution. 

Passed January 11, 1898. 



A Joint Resolution making available Funds for Care op 
THE City Poor. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That so much of the appropriation for aid of dependent sol- 
diers as is necessary be made available for the payment of bills 
for care of city poor in excess of the appropriation for that pur- 
pose. 

Passed January 11, 1898. 



A Joint Resolution making available Funds for Use of 
Seavers. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That so much of the appropriation for lighting streets as is 
necessary be made available for the payment of bills for sewers 
in excess of the appropriation for that purpose. 

Passed January 11, 1898, 



RESOLUTIONS. 



43 



Joint Resolution appbopkiating Money to Cover Deficien- 
cies IN THE Several Departments. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of eighteen hundred and ninety-four dollars and 
forty-six cents (.$1,894.46) be, and the same is hereby, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 



priaieu lo pay out 
Fire Department 


SLauaiug (. 


.laiui 


s, as 


[0110\ 


V s: 




$336.91 


Auditor 














34.69 


Assessors 














130.00 


Tax Collector 














16.92 


Public Library 














89.69 


White Park . 














144.58 


Rollins Park 














233.84 


Penacook Park 














3.72 


Blossom Hill Cemetery 












430.97 


Old North Cemetery . 












128.85 


West Concord Cemetery 












54.30 


Liquor Agency 














289.99 



Passed January 11, 1898. 



L, 894. 46. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 

CONCORD, N. H. 

Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, biennially. 



1897-8. 
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Elected biennially in November by the people. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

ALBERT B. WOODWORTH. 

Office: Acquilla Building. 



ALDERMEN. 



Elected biennially in November by voters of each ward. No salary as such, 
but an allowance for committee service. 

TVard i— CHARLES E. FOOTE. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 2— GEORGE A. HOIT. 
Ward 5— FRANK E. DIMOND. 
Ward4—KARRY R. HOOD. 

JOHN G. McQUILKEN. 

JOHN F. WEBSTER. 
Ward 5— HENRY O. ADAMS. 

JAMES H. ROWELL. 
Ward ^—HOWARD A. KIMBALL. 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT. 
Ward 7— HENRY E. CONANT. 

ALBERT S. TRASK. 
Ward 8— WILJ.IAM A. LEE. 
Ward 9— JAMES M. KILLEEN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 45 

CITY CLERK. 

Elected Biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $800 per annum. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

Office: City Hall Building. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elected biennially in November by voters of each ward. No salary as sucb, 
but an allowance for committee service. 



President— GEORGE W. BUNKER. 
Ward i— WILLIAM C. SPICER. 

WILLIAM TAYLOR. 
Ward ^— JOHN W. SANBORN. 
Ward 5— RUSSELL P. SHEPARD. 
Ward .4— FRED W. SCOTT. 

FRANK H. SMITH. 

EBEN M. WILLIS. 
Ward 5— GEORGE W. BUNKER. 

EDWARD E. LANE. 
Ward 6— HENRY B. COLBY. 

ETHAN N. SPENCER. 
Ward 7— ALBERT P. DAVIS. 

DAVID A. WELCH. 
Ward 8— CiiARI.ES L. NORRIS. 
Ward 5— ALBERT GRANT. 

CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 
Elected biennially in January by Common Council. Salary, $50 per annum. 

HARVEY P. SANBORN. 

Office: Sanborn's Block. 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

Aldermen appointed by Mayor, and Councilman appointed by President of 
Common Council, biennially in January. 

On Finance — The Mayor ; Aldermen Webster and Sanders ; Coun- 
cilmen Spencer and Willis. 

On Accounts and Claims — Aldermen Hood and Adams ; Council- 
men Colby and Shepard. 

On Lands and Buildings — Aldermen Adams and Trask ; Council- 
men Scott and Norris. 

On Public Instruction — Aldermen Sanders and Conant ; Council- 
men Willis and Shepard. 

On Parks and Commons — Aldermen Kimball and Killeen ; Coun- 
cilmen Davis and Smith. 

On Roads and Bridges — Aldermen Rowell and Dimond ; Council- 
men Smith and Welch. 

On Fire Department — Aldermen Sturtevant and Lee ; Councilmen 
Scott and Spicer. 

On Lighting Streets — Aldermen McQuilken and Kimball ; Coun- 
cilmen Lane and Grant. 

On Cemeteries — Aldermen AVebster and Kimball; Councilmen 
Taylor and Sanborn. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 
Appointed bienially by the Mayor. 

On Elections and Returns — Aldermen Hood and Lee. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — Aldermen Hoit and Webster. 
On Bills, Second Reading — Aldermen Trask and Foote. 
On Police and Licenses — Aldermen Killeen and McQuilken. 

ON SEWERS AND DRAINS. 
Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 
The Mayor ; Aldermen Rowell, Dimond, Sanders, and Hoit. 

ON STREETS AND SIDEWALKS. 
Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 
The Mayor ; Aldermen Conant, Foote, and Sturtevant. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 47 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN COMMON COUNCIL. 
Appointed biennially in January by President of Common Council. 

On Elections and Retur7is — Councilmen Spencer and Taylor. 
On Bills, Second Reaclinff — Councilmen Colby and Lane. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — Councilmen Spicer and Norris. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Bond to the acceptance of 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $250 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY AUDITOR. 

Appointed biennially by the Mayor with the approval of the Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

JAMES O. LYFORD. 

Office: City Hall Building. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: 17 Dutton's Block, North Main Street. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $600 per annum. 

EDWARD A STEVENS. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Bond within 
six days to satisfaction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of 
first $60,000; seven and one half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

WENDELL P. LADD. 

Office: Smith's Block. 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

Three electetl annually in March by voters of Union School District. Salary, 
$250 per annum for the Board. 

AMOS J. SHURTLEFF, Term expires March, 1898. 

AUSTIN S. RANNEY, " " " 1898. 

HENRY C. BROWN, " " " 1898. 

HARRY P. DEWEY, " " " 1899. 

MARY P. WOODWORTH, " « " 1899. 

ELIPHALET F. PHILBRICK, " " " 1899. 

JOHN C. ORDWAY, " " " 1900. 

SUSAN J. WOODWARD, " " " 1900. 

HENRY F. HOLLIS, " " " 1900. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 
Appointed annually in July by Board of Education. Salary, $1,800 per annum.. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 

Office: High School Building, School Street. 

PBNACOOK— District No. 20. 

One member of Board of Education elected annually in March by voters of 
District. Salary, $27 per annum for the Board. 

JOHN CARTER, Term expires March, 1898. 

HENRY ROLFE, " " " 1899. 

IRA PHILLIPS, " " " 1900. 

TOWN DISTRICT. 

Comprising all districts in the city except Union School District and No. 20. 
Elected annually in March by voters of district. Salary, $125 per annum for 
the Board. 

GEORGE T. ABBOTT, Term expires March, 1898. 

ALBERT SALTMARSH, " " " 1899. 

JOHN VANNEVAR, " " " 1900. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 49 

TRUANT OFFICERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary as 

such, none. 

JAMES E. RAND. 
DANIEL S. FLANDERS. 
FRED N. EATON. 
JAMES KELLEY. 
CHARLES E. KELLEY. 
CHARLES W. HALL. 
W. D. BARRETT. 
JOHN E. GAY. 
ELMER J. BROWN. 
CHARLES H. ROWE. 
THOMAS P. DAVIS. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 

Ward 1— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Wtrd S—JOWN E. FRYE. 
Wards— ¥AVL R. HOLDEN. 
Ward 4— JOH'N M. MITCHELL. 
Ward 5— AMOS J. SHURTLEFF. 
Weird 6— JAMES S. NORRIS. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward 6'— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward 9— MOSEH H. BRADLEY. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Appointed annually by Trustees of Library. Salary, $800 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $450 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. 
ADAH M. COLBY. 
WINNIE I. JAMES. 

Fowler Library Building. 



ASSESSORS. 

Elected biennially by voters of each ward. Salary, $3 per day of actua 

service. 

Ward i— OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 
Ward ^—WILLIAM A. COWLEY. 
Ward 5— JOSEPH E. SHEPARD. 
Ward 4— DANIEL C. WOODMAN. 
Ward 5— GEORGE F. UNDERHILL. 
Ward 6— GEORGE S. DENNETT. 
Ward 7— JONATHAN B. WEEKS. 
Ward S— JOHN J. LEE. 
Ward £>— JAMES AHERN. 



CITY WATER- WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four year.s, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, Mayor, ex-offido. 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, Term expires March 31, 1898. 



WILLIAM E. HOOD, " 

WILLIAM M. MASON, 

EDSON J. HILL, 

JOHN WHITAKER, 

EBENEZER B. HUTCHINSON, 

SOLON A. CARTER. 

FRANK D. ABBOT, 

President — William P. Fiske. 

Clerk — Akthur H. Chase. 



1898. 
1899. 
1899. 
1900. 
1900. 
1901. 
1901. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 51 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Elected annually in April bj' Water Commissioners. Salary, $1,800 per annum. 

V. CHARLES HASTINGS. 

Office: White's Block, Capitol Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Term unlimited. Salary, $950 
per annum, and rent of house. 



WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Term unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $125 each per annum. 

JOHN J. McNULTY. 
WILLIAM E. DOW. 

FOR PENACOOK. 
Salary, $25 per annum. 

ABIAL W. ROLFE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salarj', $10 per annum. 

JOHN E. FRYE. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $10 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

LESLIE H. CROWTHER. 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 
CHAS. P. WHITE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 
PATRICK CONWAY. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

JOHN P. PAIGE. 



INSPECTOR OF ELECTRIC WIRES. 

Elected annually on or before April 1. Salary, 40 cents per hour for actual 
.'service rendered, paid by the person or company owning the wires. 

FRED W. LANDON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $800 per annum, fixed by City 

Council. 

BENJAMIN E. BADGER. 

OfHce: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Aijpointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $2 per day of actual service. 

AMOS J. SHURTLEFF. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $500 per annum. 

HARRY G. SARGENT. 

Office: 60 North Main Street 



CITY <;OVERNMENT. 53 

CLERK OF POLICE COURT. 

Appointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by Legislature. 

*GEORGE M. FLETCHER. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Bond of $300 required. 
Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

GEORGE S. LOCKE. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Salary, $900 per 

annum. 

JAMES E. RAND. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, $800 each per annum. 

Daniel S. Flanders, Captain of Night AVatcli. 

Fred M. Eaton, Cliarles W. Hall, 

Whitne}' D. Barrett, John G. Putnam, 

James Kelley, Charles H. Rowe, 

.John E. Gay, Samuel L. Batchelder. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Geo. H. vSilshy, Captain and Drill Master. 

John T. Batchelder, Alviu H. Urann, 

Wm. H. H. Patch, Geo. D. Worth, 

"W. A. Little, Wm. R. Green, 

W. A. Flanders, Thomas P. Davis, 

O. H. Bean, Abiel C. Abbott, 

Hoyt Robinson, Harvey H. Oakes, 

Irving B. Robinson, Geo. N. Fellows, 

Geo. W. Chesley, Charles E. Kelley. 

* Resigned, and Harry R. Hood appointed December, 1897. 



54 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed bj' Police Commissioners. Salary, $2 each per day for actual service. 



Robert Crowther, 
Eli Hanson, 
Clark D. Stevens, 
Moody S. Farnum, 
Almah C. Leavitt, 
Oscar F. Richardson, 
Orlando I. Godfrey, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
Edward H. Dixon, 
AVilliam J. Ahern, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowell, 
Joseph C. Eaton, 
Napoleon B. Burleigh, 
Edward H. Haskell, 
John H. Carr, 
Edwarfl M. Nasou, 
James M. Jones, 
Albert F. Smith, 
Charles H. Dudley, 
George E. Davis, 
Charles M. Norris, 
John J. Crowley, 



Alphonso Vene, 
Robert Hill, 
John T. Kimball, 
James F. Ward, 
Horace Plummer, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Justus O. Clark, 
Charles H. Richardson, 
Ira C. Phillips, 
Lewis C. Stevenson, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Moses T. Rowell, 
Charlie C. Plumer, 
Edward C. Hussey, 
Horace B. Annis, 
John Knowltou, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
Milton Colby, 
Ashbury F. Tandy, 
Henry J. Durrell, 
Patrick McGuire. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Bond $3,000. Salary, $1,400 per 

annum. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: 4 Dutton's Block, North Main Street. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



55 



LICENSED DRAIN-LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. No salary, 



Lyman R. F'ellows, 
Leonard W. Bean, 
William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
George S. Milton, 
Clarence W. Williams, 
O. H, T. Richardson, 
Michael J. Lee, 
Daniel Mandigo, 
Edward H. Randall, 
Michael C. Casey, 
Timothy Keuna, 
James Cassidy, 
B. Frank Varuey, 
Alvah C. Ferrin, 



Isaac Baty, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
Henry H. Morrill, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
Miles F. Farmer, 
Charles L. Norris, 
Charles L. Fellows, 
Thomas Mathews, 
1). Warren Fox, 
Daniel Haslam, 
Michael Bateman, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Seth R. Hood, 
Rufus E. Gale. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Ward 1— CHARLES E. FOOTE, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 2— GEORGE A. HOIT, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9— JOSEPH A. COCHRAN, 
City Hall. 



Salary, $200 per annum. 



56 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to 

city poor. 

DR. CHANCPTY ADAMS. 

Office: 15 South State Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary $1 for each visit to 

city poor. 

DR. HENRY C. HOLBROOK. 



Office: Penacook. 



HEALTH OFFICERS. 

'One elected annually in March, for three years, by City Council. .Salary, $25 

per annum. 

EDWARD N. PEARSON, Term expires March, 1898. 

EDGAR A. CLARK, M. D., *' " 1899. 

DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, M. D., " " 1900. 



SANITARY OFFICER. 

Nominated by Board of Health in April and confirmed by the City Council. 
Salary, $800 per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: 3 Button's Block, North Main Street. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each 
birth, marriage, and death received, recorded, and returned to the State 
Registrar. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 57 

CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 

Appointed annually in January by the Board of Maj^or and Aldermen. 
Salary, $600 per annum. 

MOSES LADD. 

Office: 168 North Main Street. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. No salary. 

BENJAMIN S. ROLFE, Term expires January, 1898 

JOHN F. JONES, " " 1898 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, " " 1899 

GEORGE A. YOUNG, " " 1899 

BEN C. WHITE, " " 1900 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, " " 1900 



CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7, consoli- 
dated) elected annually in January, for three years, by City Council. 
Salary, none. 

WARD 1. 

JOHN WHITAKER, Term expires January, 1898. 

JOHN A. COBURN, " " 1899. 

D. WARREN FOX, " " 1900. 

WARD 2. 

CYRUS R. ROBINSON, Term expires January, 1898. 

JOSEPH E. PLUMER, " " 1899. 

SCOTT FRENCH, " " 1900. 

WARD 3. 

JAMES M. CROSSMAN, Term expires January, 1898. 

GEORGE R. PARMENTER, " " 18:t9. 

JOHN E. GAY, '' " 1900. 

WARD 7. 

ALFRED CLARK, Term expires January, 1898. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, " " 1899. 

ISAAC N. ABBOTT, " " 1900. 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

FOR WARDS 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, AND PART OF WARD 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, none. 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, Term expires March, 1898. 

FRANK P. ANDREWS, ^- " 1898. 

CHARLES S. PARKP:R, " '' 1899. 

OBADIAH MORRILL, " " 1899. 

GEORGE A. F0STP:R, " " 1900. 

GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, " " 1900. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 
FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

HAMILTON A. KENDALL. 
GEORGE W. WATERS. 
FRANK A. DAME. 
AUSTIN W. JONES. 
LOUIS A. LANE. 
OLIVER M. SHEPLEE. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS. 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

JOSEPH E. PLUMER. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

ALVIN C. POWELL. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

WILLIAM H. CURRIER. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

GEORGE G. JENNESS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 59 



INSPECTOR OP PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Fees, one 
fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 



Oeorge h. rolfe. 



FENCE-VIEWERS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, $2 each per day paid by 
parties interested. 

GEORGE W. CHESLEY. 
CHARLES P. ROWELL. 
MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



FISH AND GAME WARDENS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. No fee." 

J. IRVING HOYT. 
FALES P. VIRGIN. 
JOHN H. SEAVEY. 
DANIEL B. NEWHALL. 
HARLEY B. ROBY. 
CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
FRANK BATTLES. 
WILLIAM ROBY. 
JOSEPH A. MOORE. 
LOREN S. RICHARDSON. 
FRANK S. MOULTON. 
FRANK L. WORTHEN. 
HENRY McGIBNP:Y. 
HARRISON A. ROBY. 
CHARLES TRENOWETH. 



POUND-KEEPER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, two cents each for im- 
pounding sheep, and five cents each for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. 



60 CITY OF CONCORD, 



SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid 
by person employing. 



JOHN C. THORN E. 
CYRUS R. ROBINSON. 
DAVID E. EVERpyrX. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, for sealing each scale 
beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, and for each measure, 10 cents: five or 
more to one person, half price — paid by owners of scales or measures. 

E. M. COGSAVELL. 

Office: City Hall. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents, 
hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoops, 50 
cents; heading, 33 cents per M— paid by party for whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OP HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price per load; 
paid by party requiring service. 

Orin T. Carter, George B. Whittredge, 

Arthur G. Stevens, Charles T. Page, 

D, Arthur Browu, William F. Carr, 

John N. Hill, Frank E. Gale, 

Hiram O. Marsh, Frederick H. Savory, 

Thomas Hill, Evarts McQuesten, 

John H. Mercer, Oscar E. Smith, 

A. H. Campbiell, Amos Blanchard, 

O. F. Richardson, Mark M. Blanchard, 

Charles H. Da}', Lurman R. Goodrich, 

Edward M. Proctor, James H. Harrington, 

Alvah L. Powell, Simeon Partridge, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



61 



Seth R. Dole, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Lyman B. Foster, 
Lewis B. Hoit, 
William H. Meserve, 
Hiram Browu, 



Daniel Crowley, Jr., 
Fred A. Crocker, 
Alfred Beddow, 
Charles H. Cook, 
M. L. Parteh. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 



Elected annually In January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 



Giles Wheeler, 
Edward A. Moiilton, 
George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles E. Savory, 



Benjamin Bilsborough, 
Alvin H. Urann, 
Fred Rollins. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 



Giles Wheeler, 
Peter W. Webster, 
Alvah C. Ferrin, 
AVilliam IL Kenne}^ 
Lyman R. Fellows, 
Fred L. Plnmmer, 



Leonard W. Bean, 
O. H. T. Richardson, 
Moses B. Smith, 
James E. Randlett, 
William Rowell. 



SURVEYORS OF STONE. 

Elected annually in Januar3' by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 



Giles Wheeler, 



Georoe F. Sanborn. 



62 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER, AND BARK. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, for surveying shingles 
and clapboards, 4 cents per M; boards and timber, 16 cents per M; measur- 
ing cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty 
cords — paid by person employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Johu Ballard, 
James F. Nelson, 
Jonathan B. Weeks, 
Charles Couch, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
Daniel K. Richardson, 
John H. Rolfe, 
William Ballard, 
John T. Batchelder, 
Thomas D. Avery, 
Timoth}'^ Carter, 
Weston Cofran, 
Augustine C. Carter, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Walter W. Cochran, 
Philip Flanders, 
Gilbert H. Seavey, 
Cyrus Runnells, 
David K. Everett, 
Silvester P. Dan forth, 
Charles W. Hardy, 
Alfred Clark, 
John F. Scott, 
John AVhitaker, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
P2dgar D. Eastman, 
Peter W. Webster, 
George W. Abbott, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
Alvertus P^vans, 
John C. Far rand, 
Fred W. Scott, 



George Partridge, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Charles H. Day, 
Hiram O. Marsh, 
Edward Runnels, 
Lowell P^astman, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
John C. Linehan, 
Curtis AVhite, 
John N. Hill, 
Abner C. Holt, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Joseph E. Hutchinson, 
Thomas Hill, 
Charles T. Page, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
John Potter, 
George C. Morgan, 
Edward H. Dixon, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Horace F. Paul, 
P^ugene H. Davis, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus O. Clark, 
William Badger, 
Silas Wiggin, 
P'rank L, Sawyer, 
Edward Stevens, 
Edward L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 63 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SELECTMEN. 

Ward 1— HORACE D. BEAN. 

JOHN M. MESERVE. 

A\" ALTER H. ROLFE. 
Ward 2— RUFUS C. BOYNTON. ' 

ALBERT J. MORRILL. 

JOSEPH AVELCOME. 
Ward 3— JUSTIN O. CLARK. 

CHARLES W. CORSER. 

ALBERT W. HOBBS. 
Ward 4— ROY E. GEORGE. 

j. wesley plummer. 
gp:orge f. smith. 

Ward 5— JAMES E. SEWALL. 

CHARLES E. SMITH. 

CURTIS WHITE. 
Ward 6— HARLAN A. FLANDERS. 

J. EDWARD MORRISON. 

EDWIN H. CARTER. 
Ward 7— ARTHUR E. MAXAM. 

WILLIAM H. PAIGE. 

ALFRED H. WALKER. 
Ward 8— ARTHUR COLTON. 

ALMAH C. LEAYITT. 

WILLIAM E. STANDISH. 
Ward !)— FRED C. COATES. 

JOHN OPIE. 

JAMES McGUIRE. 



SUPERVISORS OF CHECK LISTS. 

Ward 1— WILLIAM H. MESSERVE. 
EDAVIN B. PRESCOTT. 
HORACE B. SHERBURNE. 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward 2— JAMES C. CARLETON. 

ALBERT H. C. KNOWLES.* 

FRANK V. OSGOOD. 
Ward 3— TIMOTHY GREEN. 

CHARLES H. QUINN. 

FRED F. TUCKER. 
Ward 4— EDWARD H. DIXON. 

JOHN A. JAQUITH. 

EVERETT H. RUNNELLS. 
Ward 5— WILLIAM M. MASON. 

ROBERT H. ROLFE. 

JOSEPH P. SARGENT. 
Ward ()— LYSANDER H. CARROLL. 

FRANK CRESSY. 

WILLIAM H. KING. 
Ward 7— JAMES F. KELLEY. 

DANA G. PRESCOTT. 

FORREST L. WELLMAN. 
Ward 8— GEORGE G. JENNESS. 

FREDERICK .1. SEXTON. 

ALBION B. STEARNS. 
Ward D— CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

MICHAEL G. GANNON. 

FRED J. SANBORN. 



WARD CLERKS. 

Ward 1— LESLIE H. CROWTHER. 
Ward 2— SAMUEL L. FRENCH. 
Ward 3— GEORGE N. ROBERTSON. f 
Ward 4— HARVEY P. SANBORN. 
Ward 5— GEORGE E. CHESLEY. 
Ward 6— HOWARD M. COOK. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward 8— MEDARD M. ISABEL. 
Ward 0— DAVID SULLIVAN. 



* Deceased. 

t Resigned, and Thomas E. Pentland elected. 



CITY (iOVEHNMENT. 



65 



Ward 1- 
Ward 2- 
Ward 3- 
Ward 4- 
Ward 5- 
Ward 6- 
Wdrd 7- 
T^ard 8- 



MODERATORS. 
-SAMUEL N. BROWN. 
-SAMUEL L. BATCHELUER. 
-DANIEL W. WILCOX. 
-BENJAMIN E. BADGER. 
-CHARLES C. DANFORTH. 
-DANIEL E. HOWARD. 
-GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT. 
JAMES T. GORDON. 
-FRED N. MARDEN. 



MAYORS OF THE CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 1853, 
and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor has 
been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW . 

" RUFus clp:ment * 

'' JOHN ABBOTT 

'' MOSES T. WILLARD 

'' MOSES HUMPHREY 

'' BENJAMIN F. GALE 

" MOSES HUMPHREY 

'' JOHN ABBOTT 

'' LYMAN D. STEVENS 

•• ABRAHAM G. JONES 

- JOHN KIMBALL 
>' GEORGE A. PILLSBURY 
" HORACE A. BROWN t 

'^ gp:orge a. cummings t 

'' EDGAR H. WOODMAN . 

- JOHN E. ROBERTSON 
^* STILLMAN HUMPHREY 
" HENRY W. CLAPP 
'' PARSONS B. COGSWELL 

- HENRY ROBINSON 
'• ALBERT B. WOOD WORTH 



1853-'54. 

'55. 

. 1856-'57-'58. 

1859-'60. 
1861-'62. 
1863-'64. 

'65. 

1866-'67. 
1868-'69. 
1870-'71. 

1872-'73-'74-'75. 

1876-'77. 

. 1878-'71)-'80. 

. 1880-'81-'82. 

1883-'84-'85-'86. 

1887-'88. 

1889-'90. 

1891-'92. 

1893-'94. 

1895-'9G. 

1897-'98 



* Died in office January 13, 1856. 
t Term closed in November, 1880. 
i Term commenced November, 1880. 



CITY PROPERTY 

Having Value but not considered Available Assets. 



The following is au abstract of tlie iuveutory of the property 
of the city January 1, 1898, made by the city auditor, the item- 
ized statements of which are on file in his oftiee. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Central Fire Station. 

Building and lot ... . $35,000.00 

Miscellaneous property in main building 1 ,158.50 

" "• basement 



shed 
shop 
stable 



Ten horses 



124.75 

53G.50 

75.60 

162.50 

1,500.00 



-$38,557.85 



Kearsarge Steamer Company. 

1 steam fire engine .... $3,000.00 
Miscellaneous property . . . 646.60 



$3,646.60 



Eagle Steamer Company. 

1 steam fire engine . . . $3,800.00 

Miscellaneous property . . . 618.50 



Governor Hill Steamer Company. 

1 steam fire engine .... $3,000.00 
Miscellaneous property . . . 35.90 



,418.50 



$3,035.90 



CITY PROPERTY. 



67 



Hook and Ladder Company. 

1 ladder truck .... $400.00 

Ladders and miscellaneous property . 727.25 



Chemical Engine Company. 

1 chemical engine .... $1,550.00 

Miscellaneous property . . . 136.75 



Good Will Hose Company. 

Building $6,500.00 

1 hose wagon ..... 300.00 

1 horse 40.00 

Miscellaneous property . . . 321.90 



Building 

1 hose wagon 

1 horse 



Alert Hose Company. 

. $3,200.00 
300.00 
150.00 



Miscellaneous property 



379.25 



Pioneer Steamer Company. 



Building and lot 
Heating apparatus 
1 steam fire engine 

1 hose wagon 

2 pony extinguishers 
Miscellaneous property 



$7,500.00 

400.00 

2,000.00 

100.00 

50.00 

131.00 



$1,127.25 



.,686.75 



$7,161.90 



t, 029. 25 



$10,181.00 



Old Fort Engine Company. 

Building and lot .... $3,000.00 

1 Hunneman hand-engine . . . 200.00 

3 pony extinguishers .... 75.00 

Miscellaneous property . . . 111.75 



;,386.75 



68 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cataract Engine Company. 

Building and lot .... $8,500.00 

1 Huuneman band-engine . . . 200.00 

1 hose reel 50.00 

Heating apparatus .... 100.00 

Miscellaneous property . . . 117.75 



$8,067.75 



S86, 199.50 



F'ire-alarm apparatus . . . $8,550.00 
Fabric hose, 11,400 feet; leather hose, 

450 feet good, 550 feet poor . . 6,000.00 

Residence chief engineer . . . 3,000.00 

Heating apparatus .... 100.00 



Pioneer Engine House. 

Ward room and hall furniture 



Furniture 



Furniture 



Old Port Engine House 
Cataract Engine House 



$17,650.00 



'0.50 



69.00 



'1.25 



$104,060.25 



STREET DEPARTMENT 
Central District. 

1 steam roller .... 

9 sprinklers and fixtures 

1 portable crusher 

1 statiouarj' crusher and boiler 

5 horses .... 

1 sand house .... 

3 sets double harnesses 

1 single harness 

1 tip-cart harness 

3 two-horse carts 



$2,500.00 

2,700.00 

1,462.00 

1,500.00 

500.00 

100.00 

100.00 

10.00 

10.00 

300.00 



CITY PROPERTY. 



69 



1 one-horse cart . . . . 


$40.00 


1 stake wagon 


50.00 


1 stone wagon 


50.00 


2 two-horse sleds 


150.00 


1 two-horse dump- sled 


40.00 


1 one-horse sled 


15.00 


2 snow rollers . . . 


160.00 


2 stone rollers 


100.00 


2 road machines 


100.00 


4 wing snowplows 


150.00 


7 common snowplows 


35.00 


1 street sweeper 


150.00 


1 hand-cart 


35.00 


1 boom derrick 


100.00 


1 furnace for burning garbage 


300.00 


Lumber .... 


234.00 


Miscellaneous property 


685.40 



Penacook District. 

Miscellaneous property . • • $50.00 

West Concord District. 
Miscellaneous property . . . 33.75 



1,576.40 



$11,660.15 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Police station 








$25,000.00 


1 horse 








150.00 


1 harness 








25.00 


1 two-seated wagon 








85.00 


1 pung sleigh 








20.00 


1 ambulance 








175.00 


1 safe 








50.00 


2 robes 








12.00 


1 roll-top desk . 








20.00 



70 



CITV OF CONCOKl). 



1 roll-top desk .... 


$15.00 


Blankets .... 


4.00 


Desk and chair at Penacook 


20.00 


fi tables .... 


24.00 


11 settees .... 


41.00 


37 chairs .... 


50.00 


2 clocks .... 


15.00 


70 police badges 


70.00 


l(j policemen's coats . 


128.00 


28 belts .... 


20.00 


28 night clubs .... 


28.00 


14 short clubs .... 


14.00 


11 Colt's revolvers 


100.00 


15 pairs handcuffs 


60.00 


54 helmets .... 


26.00 


Miscellaneous property 


17.50 




.S26, 169.50 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



1 Buff & Berger transit 


$150.00 


1 Buff & Berger level 


50.00 


1 planimeter 


25.00 


1 case drawing instruments 


12.00 


1 twelve-foot drawing table 


75.00 


1 seven-foot drawing table 


20.00 


1 blue-print frame 


30.00 


1 typewriter .... 


50.00 


1 safe .... 


50.00 


1 desk .... 


25.00 


Miscellaneous property 


107.75 







5594.75 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

1 Lidgerwood double drum hoisting engine $500.00 
1 engine house .... 40.00 

4 dozen sewer braces . . . 60.00 





CITY PROPERTY 


• 




2Edsou pumps 


• . . 


$20.00 


40 feet suctiou hose 










40.00 


500 feet fabric hose 










300.00 


48 picks 










20.00 


1 Dean steam pump 










75.00 


1 dozen shovels 










5.00 


Pipe aud slants 










115.30 


Miscellaneous property 








73.35 






a-i 






lGE 


^i, 


WEST CONCORD 


SEWERiS 


PRECINCT 


1 Edson pump . 




$20.00 


20 feet suction hose 










10.00 


2 tool boxes 










10.00 


1 derrick tripod . 










3.00 


1 set steel blocks 










3.00 


19 lanterns 










4.00 


2 chains 










3.00 


Miscellaneous property 








13.75 


CITY MESSEN( 


3}ER'S DEPARTMENT. 


City C 


ounci 


1 Rooms. 




3 office desks 






$45.00 


1 library table . 








7.00 


29 members' desks 








290.00 


35 rotary chairs 








175.00 


1 cottage stove and pipe 








10.00 


2 carpets 








60.00 


Miscellaneous propert/j 


I 








14.75 



71 









CITY AUDITOR S OFFICE. 


1 desk 


$25.00 


1 filing case 


. . . . 13.00 



$66.75 



$601. 



$38.00 



72 



CITY OF CONCORl>. 



CITY HALL. 



42 nine-foot folding settees 

20 seven-foot folding settees 

16 common chairs 

1 No. 36 Monitor stove and pipe 

8 old settees . 

8 board tables 

Heating and lighting 

hall building 
Miscellaneous property . 





S168.00 




80.00 




4.00 


pipe . 


10.00 




8.00 




S.OO 


ires in cilv 






400.00 




12.00 







$690.00 



PROPERTY IN AND ABOUT CITY HALL. 



1 eight-foot ste[)- ladder 
50 feet rubber hose 

10 lawn settees 

2 lawn mowers 

1 pair of hedge shears 
1 Stillson wrench . 
1 Wheeler lantern . 
Miscellaneous property 



$2.00 
4.00 

15.00 

15.00 

2.00 

1.00 

.50 

11.35 



;50.85 



1 table 



OLD POLICE COURT ROOM. 

- $2.00 



1 office chair 

14 common chairs . 

1 sheet-iron stove and pipe 

1 wood box . 

1 old desk 



1.00 
3.50 
2.00 
.50 
1.00 



flO.OO 



FURNITURE STORED AT CITY HALL. 

1 coal stove and pipe . . • ■ $5.00 

5 office chairs . . • • • 5.00 

1 zinc board . . • • 1-00 

1 pine table 2.00 



fl3.00 



CITY PROPERTY 



73 



CITY CLERK S OFFICE. 



1 roll-top desk 

1 office desk . 

1 clock . . . 

1 walnut book case 

1 pine book case . 

1 map of Concord . 

1 carpet 

1 desk . 

3 chairs 

135 copies old town records 

Miscellaneous property • 



$25.00 

20.00 

12.00 

15.00 

10.00 

5.00 

20.00 

7.00 

5.00 

337.50 

21.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Pest house and lot ' . . . . $500.00 

Office furniture 40.00 

Pest house furniture .... 25.00 







MAYOR'S OFFICE. 




1 oak roll-top desk .... 


$20.00 


1 carpet . . 


40.00 


1 oak revolving table .... 


3.00 


6 chairs ...... 


9.00 


1 mirror ...... 


2.00 


1 small oak table ..... 


1.00 


Miscellaneous property .... 


2.00 







77.50 



$505.00 



f77.00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES OFFICE. 

Weights, measures, balances, etc. . $225.00 



CITY LIQUOR AGENCY. 



Stove and pipe 
Chairs and lounge 



$15.00 
11.00 



74 



CITY OF COXCORO. 



1 office table 

6 brass locks and keys 

Miscellaneous property 



$1.00 

6.00 

13.60 



$46.60 



TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 



1 safe ...... 


$150.00 


5 curtains ..... 


7.50 


1 desk chair ..... 


4.50 


3 cane-seat arm chairs . 


3.75 


1 ash office table .... 


3.50 


1 money drawer .... 


2.00 


Miscellaneous property . 


9.20 







$180.45 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' DEPARTMENT. 
Property at White Park. 

40 settees $50.00 

3 push shovels 



2 iron rollers . 

2 gravel screens 
200 feet garden hose 
4 wheelbarrows 

3 lawn-mowers 
1 horse-scraper 
1 push-cart . 

1 two-wheel dump-cart 
1 horse lawn-mower 
Miscellaneous property 

Books in Public Library 



9.00 

10.00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

8.00 

15.00 

6.00 

25.00 

65.00 

41.30 



f 244.30 
$9,000.00 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS' DEPARTMENT. 

Miscellaneous articles at Blossom Hill 
Cemetery ..... 



Furniture in commissioners' office 



$338.50 
18.00 



$356.50 



CITY PROPERTY. 



75 



CITY HISTORY COMMISSION. 

1 typewriter and table .... SIOO.OO 
1 Bonton's History .... 10.00 



$110.00 



REAL ESTATE. 

RKAL ESTATE BELONGING TO THE CITY NOT INCLUDED IN ANY OK 
THE FOREGOING INVENTORIES. 



City hall lot and half of building 

City farm pasture and quarries 

City storehouse 

Gravel banks. East Concord 

Ward house, West street 

Play-ground on intervale 

White Park . 

Rollins Park . 

Penacook Park 

Market-place on Warren street 



S25,000.00 
3,000.00 
4,500.00 
100.00 
4,500.00 
1,500.00 

12,000.00 
6,000.00 
2,500.00 

10,000.00 



$69,100.00 



INVENTORY 

OF THK PKOPKltTY OF THE WATER DEPARTMENT, INCLUDING THE 
PLANT AND WATER RIGHTS AND ALL THE REAL ESTATE AND 
PERSONAL PROPERTY IN THEIR POSSESSION, JANUARY 1, 1898. 



WATER RIGHTS AND PLANT. 

Water rights from B. F. & D. Holdeu . 860,000.00 
Water rights from Concoid Manufactur- 
ing Company 83,000.00 

Flowage rights around Penacook Lake . 4,37.5.61 

Dam, gate bouse and appurtenances . 30,756.17 

Conduit and gate house . . . 29,484.05 

Main pipes ... . . 154,960.92 

Distriljution pipes ..... 279,247.68 

Service pipes ..... 40,789.95 

Reservoir and site ..... 45,044.09 
Pumping station, shop, stable, storeliouse 

and site 27,000.00 

Pumping machinery .... 10,215.00 
Water and flowage rights in Long Puud, 

Webster 5,000.00 

Mill privilege and land of W. P. Cool- 
edge, West Concord, about 15 acres . 5,500.00 
Kit shop privilege from Humphrey & 
Farnum, West Concord, about 2 

acres 5,000.00 

Hutchins house and lot, West Concord, 

from W. P. Cooledge, about 6 acres . 2,250.00 
Land in West Concord, from Mary C. 

Powell, 18 acres .... 1,500.00 
Land in West Concord, from Alfred 

Roberts, 25|^ acres .... 1.275.00 



CITY PROPERTY. 



Land in West Concord, from O. F. Rich- 
ardson ..... 

Land in West Concord, from Mary G 
Carter, 10 acres 

Land in West Concord, from Ciiarles E 
Ballard, 6 acres 

Land in West Concord, from Charles E 
Ballard, 15 acres 

Land in West Concord, from CofHn & 
Little, 17^ acres . . . . 

Land in West Concord, which includes 
the Martin place, the Swan place, and 
a portion of the Carlton place, about 
llOi acres ...... 

Land at south end of Penacook Lake, 
from Robert Crowlev, about 10 acres . 



$100.00 
1,250.00 

500.00 
1,200.00 

800.00 

6,3G4.50 



3,000.00 



-S798,612.97 



Water Office, 11 Capitol Street. 



1 roller-top desk . 


$40.00 


1 counter and fixtures 


50.00 


1 typewriter and desk . 


75.00 


1 Howard eight-day clock 


25.00 


1 safe ..... 


400.00 


1 record card case 


30.00 


Miscellaneous property . 


15G.16 







$776.16 



Water Commissioners' Room. 



1 long table ...... 


$10.00 


10 chairs ..... 


7.50 


1 carpet ..... 


3.00 


1 case of water reports . 


3.00 


Miscellaneous i)roi)erty . 


.95 



?24.4; 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Pumping Station. 

1 roller-top desk 
1 eiglit-dav clock' 
9 chairs 

1 recording gauge 

1 platform scales 

Miscellaneous property, including stock, 

supplies, etc. ..... 



$15.00 

10.00 

9.00 

10.00 

50.00 

456.13 



Shop at Pumping Station. 

Miscellaneous property, including fittings, 
pipe, tools, brass goods, etc. 



8540.13 



Stable and Basement at Pump 


ing Station 


2 horses ...... 


sioo.oo 


2 express wagons ..... 


80.00 


1 new express wagon .... 


80.00 


1 road wagon . . , . 


15.00 


1 heavy sleigh ..... 


70.00 


1 pung sleigh ..... 


20.00 


3 harnesses ...... 


20.00 


Miscellaneous property, including sup- 




plies ....... 


186.20 







Storehouse. 

Miscellaneous pro[)erty, including hydrants, water 
gates, curves, branches, etc. .... 



Pipe Yard and City Shed. 
Cast-iron pipe and supplies . . . . 



S571.20 



$521.50 



$4,035.90 



Shop at Penacook. 
Miscellaneous property, including pipe, etc. 



$102.88 



CITY PROPERTY. 



79 



Shop at West Concord, 
Miscellaneous property, including pipe, etc. 



1.44 



RECAPITULATION" OF WATER DEPARTMENT. 



Plant and real estate . 

Water office 

Water commissioners' room 

Pumping station 

Shop at pumping station 

Stable and basement . 

Storehouse 

Pipe yard and cit}' shed 

Shop at Penacook 

Shop at West Concord 



8798,612.97 
776.16 

24.45 
540.13 
900.25 
571.20 
521.50 
4,035.90 
102.88 

43.44 



GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 

Fire department . . . $104,060.25 

Street department .... 11,660.15 

Police department .... 26,169.50 

Engineering department . . . 594.75 

Sewer department .... 1,248.65 

West Concord sewer . . . . 66.75 

City messenger department . . 601.75 

City auditor's office .... 38.00 

City hall 73.85 

City clerk's office .... 477.50 

Health department .... 565.00 

Mayor's office . . . . . 77.00 

Sealer of weights and measures . . 225.00 

City liquor agency .... 46.60 

Tax collector's office .... 180.45 

Park commissioners .... 244.30 

Cemetery commissioners . . . 356.50 

City history commission . . . 110.00 

Books in public library . . . 9,000.00 

Real estate 69,1 00. Oil 

Water department .... 798,612.97 



$806,128.88 



41,023,508.97 



1897. 



Population of the City (Census 1890) . . 17,004 

Valuation of the City $11,200,690.00 

Tax assessed for the year .... $233,761.58 

Rate of Taxation, S15.00 per SI, 000. 

Rate for Union School District, $3.30 additional per SI, 000. 

Rate for Precinct, $2.90 additional per $1,000. 

Total rate, $21.20 per $1,000. 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES. 



81 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 



The number of polls and the tax assessed on the real and 
personal estate in the city of Concord since 1860 : 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1860 


2,577 


$4,307,192 


$47,082.25 


1861 


2,497 


4,423,936 


46,290.48 


1862 


2,350 


4,308,568 


50,945.01 


1863 


2,454 


3,775,206 


60,293.82 


1864 


2,539 


3,832,800 


89,931.97 


1865 


2,495 


5,549,002 


158,787.29 


1866 


2,762 


4,934,082 


116,192.97 


1867 


2,822 


5,006,774 


145,173.49 


1868 


3,120 


5,378,365 


126,889.71 


1869 


3,205 


5,581,459 


146,791.64 


1870 


3,187 


5,751,928 


133,953.94 


1871 


3,338 


5,891,993 


137,844.70 


1872 


3,767 


5,917,054 


141,122.97 


1873 


3,613 


9,012,650 


158,281.13 


1874 


3,784 


9,000,526 


171,045.61 


1875 


3,941 


9,216,195 


175,234.68 


1876 


3,911 


9,222,625 


163,768.29 


1877 


4,015 


9,405,117 


177,040.27 


1878 


3,869 


9,241,485 


162,038.53 


1879 


3,536 


10,604,465 


155,964.99 


1880 


3,672 


10,150,585 » 


172,831.12 


1881 


3,505 


10,062,894 


153,285.55 


1882 


3,661 


10,308,052 


151,941.54 


1883 


3,816 


10,023,216 


169,498.95 


1884 


3,734 


9,877,874 


148,290.26 


1885 


3,821 


9,774,714 


153,613.92 


1886 


3,773 


9,703,458 


158,994.83 


1887 


3,938 


9,852,337 


151,292.66 


1888 


3,959 


9,984,120 


165,090.57 


1889 


4,090 


10,048,556 


184,963.08 


1890 


4,190 


10,243,857 


176,081.04 



82 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Year. 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1891 




4,498 


$10,923,081 


$206,379.26 


1892 




4,288 


10,786,498 


191,733.45 


1893 




4,380 


10,890,960 


204,585.27 


1894 




4,385 


11,189,294 


222,110.35 


1895 




4,838 


11.566,083 


217,399.83 


1896 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


433 


$830,000 


$19,697.13 


(( 


2, 


181 


315,504 


6,040.37 


I i 


3, 


269 


417,570 


9,110.74 


a 


4, 


967 


2,467,345 


58,801.53 


11 


5, 


668 


3,102,425 


72,525.28 


ii, 


fi, 


802 


2,080,000 


49,667.04 


ki 


7, 


593 


871,481 


18,260.38 


a 


8, 


315 


843,000 


18,659.50 


a 


9, 


435 
4,663 


301,190 


6,892.45 




$11,228,515 


$259,654.42 


Non- 


•esideut 






934.63 


Omis 


sious . 






1,665.94 




$262,254.99 


1897 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


457 


$811,544 


$17,449.47 




2, 


206 


308,050 


5,612.44 




3, 


279 


397,376 


8,533.47 




4, 


973 


2,451,366 


51,647.35 




5, 


649 


3,113,730 


64,969.62 




6, 


812 


2,080,000 


44,025.09 




7, 


628 


877,542 


17,121.20 




8, 


378 


852,000 


17,226.58 




9, 


430 
4,812 


308,755 


6.218.92 




$11,200,363 


$232,804.14 


Nou- 


resident 


. 


. 


957.44 



$233,761.58 



TRUST FUNDS. 



CITY TREASURER'S ACCOUNT 

AS CUSTODIAN OF TRUST FUNDS. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 

For the benefit of the School Fund. 

Capital $1,000.00 

Income received, 1897 ...... 35.00 

Paid in to tlie citv treasurv ..... 35.00 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

For the purchase of school books for poor children. 

Capital S200.00 

Balance from last year .... S117.55 
Income received, 1897 .... 11.50 

$129.05 



COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Female Charitable Society. Income to be applied to the 
charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital $2,000.00 

Income received, 1897 ...... 100.00 

Paid Fanny E. Minot, treasurer of the society . 100.00 



84 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTS. 



aB 



Lyon, G. Parker - $1,000.00 

Pierce, Franklin 1,000.00 

I 
Valpey, Thiomas G 500.00 



$35.00 
37.19 
17.50 



$35.00 
37.19 
17.50 



♦Specially appropriated by city council. 

JAMES O. LYFORD, 

Auditor. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



o 



garH 

kl o) fl 

<s ti a 

t3 






Blossom Hill.. 
Old Cemetery. 
West Concord 
East Concord. 
Millville 



$15,888.42 
715.00 
223.50 
182.50 
150.00 



$535.91 ' $16,424.33 



28.50 
2.50 
50.00 



252.00 
185.00 
200.00 



$56.38 

63.49 

5.95 



$617.06 

28.48 

8.90 

7.96 

5.90 



t$617.06 
28.48 



$65.28 
71.45 
11.85 



* Provided for by general appropriations. 

t Of this amount, $35.55 used in payment of accrued interest and premium on 

bond purchased. 

JAMES O. LYFORD, 
Auditor. 



TRUST FUNDS. 



85 



CEMETERY TRUSTS. 



NAME. 





^ 




2> 


■a 

0) 










^^ 




05 


-on . 


0) 




4) 05 


u 




d O OS 

y S " 




-a 

•a 
a 


® 03 
5 OO 




a 




M 


P 


M 


H 



° 9 
ai-3 



cj O cd 

cq 



Abbott, William 

Adams, Sarah M. K 

Allison, Mary B 

Atherton, Alonzo 

Bailey, Abbj' L. Sanborn 

Benson, Matilda 

Bisby, Ellen C 

Blaisdell, James D 

Blaisdell, Timothy K 

Bouton, Nathaniel 

Bradford, James 

Buntin, Mary N. Preston.. . 

Butters, Harriet W 

Caldwell, Benjamin F 

Carter, Nathan F 

Chaffln, JohnF 

Cheney, Lyman and Mary F 

Chesley, Samuel M 

Clark, Caroline 

Clough, Frederick 

Clough, Mrs. N. P 

Colburn, Amos L 

Cooper, Mrs. Josiah 

Crow, Mary 

Danforth, Cordelia A 

Danf orth, Charles S , 

Drown, Matilda 

Eastman, Seth 

Eaton, Stephen B 

Edgerly, Lydia F 

Ela, Georgianna P 



300.00 


$36.45 


700.00 


71.60 


50.00 


.07 


100.00 




100.00 


.16 


50.00 


.03 


89.53 


.45 


100.00 


2.24 


200.00 


18.54 


200.00 


14.50 


50.00 




200.00 


9.79 


100.00 


.66 


250.00 


.19 


100.00 


3.83 


50.00 


.78 


50.00 


3.55 


100.00 


1.16 


100.00 




100.00 




50.00 


.12 


50.00 


.07 


75.00 


.05 


200.00 


41.42 


50.00 


.87 


50.00 




100.00 




100.00 


1.90 


50.00 


.81 


100.00 


.45 


100.00 


.03 



$11.53 
25.25 
1.75 
2.30 
3.43 
1.75 
2.93 
3.50 
7.48 
8.00 
1.56 
7.00 
3.43 
8.58 
3.50 
1.75 
1.75 
3.50 
3.50 
2.30 
1.75 
1.75 
2.62 
8.27 
1.75 
1.25 
.58 



1.62 
3.43 
3.50 



$4.00 

21.00 

1.00 



3.00 
1.25 
3.00 
3.50 
4.00 
12.50 



3.00 
2.75 



3.00 
1.50 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.25 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
4.00 



3.25 
3.00 



$43.98 

75.85 

.82 

2.30 

.59 

.53 

.38 

2.24 

22.02 

10.00 

1.56 

13.79 

1.34 

8.77 

4.33 

1.03 

2.30 

1.66 

1.50 

.05 

.87 

.82 

1.17 

45.69 

2.62 

1.25 

.58 

.15 

2.43 

.63 

.53 



86 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CEMETERY THJJSTS.— Continued. 



NAME. 



, 


.^ 




at 


■a 


03 


■O G 




00 


(D K 


O 


*"* 


■o-M fc! 


01 


01 


fl O eS 


h 






sa M 


®03 


O 00 


c< 





ni O rt 



Farley, Lydia A 

Farnum, Mary M 

Fogg, George G 

Fowler, Asa 

French, Theodore 

Gale, Daniel E 

Gale, John D 

Gear, John 

Gilbert, Harvey J 

Glover, George A., and C. A. Osgood. 

Had ley, Betsy 

Harding, George M 

Hart, Mary D 

Herbert, Mary 

Hoyt, Elisha and Sarah C 

Hoyt, Jacob 

Hutchins, Mrs. Samuel 

Irish, Sarah E 

Kimball, John and Benjamin A 

Kimball, Joseph S 

Knowlton, Edward L 

Lang, Abigail W 

Larkin, B. L, 

Lincoln, J. L 

Little, J. W. and E.J 

Locke, William T 

McCauley, John 

McQuesten,Greenough and Evarts... 

McQuesten, James 

Mathews, H. W. and H. O 

Merrill, J. B 



$100.00 


$1.39 


100.00 


.24 


300.00 


3.37 


500.00 


41.42 


100.00 




100.00 


18.26 


200.00 




50.00 


.04 


50.00 


.04 


50.00 


.04 


100.00 




50.00 


.87 


200.00 


8.37 


100.00 




100.00 


3.64 


100.00 


8.79 


100.00 




100.00 




200.00 


.04 


100.00 


12.39 


1,000.00 


364.50 


100.00 


4.71 


50.00 


8.95 


50.00 


.04 


100.00 


16.50 


100.00 


2.03 


100.00 




100.00 


.16 


200.00 


4.25 


100.00 




100.00 


.77 



$3.50 
3.50 
3.50 

17.85 
4.00 
3.50 
5.00 
1.75 
1.75 
1.75 
3.50 
1.75 

12.00 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
.58 
3.50 
7.00 
3.50 

44.33 
3.50 
1.75 
1.75 

11.00 
3.50 
1.45 
3.43 
8.00 
.58 
3.50 



$3.00 


$1.89 


2.00 


1.74 


4.00 


2.87 


15.00 


44.27 


4.00 




9.50 


12.26 




5.00 


1.00 


.79 


1.00 


.7? 


1.00 


.79 


3.50 




1.00 


1.62 


10.50 


9.87 





3.50 


2.00 


5.14 


8.00 


4.29 




.58 


2.00 


1.50 


6.00 


1.C4 


10.00 


5.89 


16.75 


392.08 




8.21 


7.00 


3.70 


1.00 


.79 


3.00 


24.50 


4.00 


1.53 


.75 


.70 


3.00 


.59 


5.00 


7.25 




.58 


3.00 


1.27 



TRUST FLXDS. 



87 



CEMETERY TRUSTS —Continued. 



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92 
o a 

gi-5 

Oc|» 



Merrill, S.F 

Morrill, Samuel and David L — 

Moses, Mary J 

Newhall, Mrs.C. H 

Nutter, Eliphalet S 

Ordway, Eugene A 

Osgood, True 

Page, William 

Paige, Cyrus W 

Pecker, Mrs. E. A 

Phipps, Hannah E 

Pitman, W. H 

Pixley, S. Lizzie 

Eeed, George L 

Richardson, Hiram 

Richardson, Judith A 

Rollins, B . H 

Russell, Moses W 

Sanborn, Jonathan 

Sargent, John B 

Shaw, Mary A 

Southmaid, Hattie R 

Stickney, Nathan 

Stuart, Thomas 

Sweetser, Abigail 

Tenney, Harriet N 

Thorne, John C 

Tidd, Pliny 

Upham, Eliza W 

Walker, Mary E 

Walker, Timothy and Abigail B. 



$100.00 


$0.77 


150.00 


4.65 


100.00 




175 00 


8.50 


100.00 


1.85 


50.00 


.12 


100.00 


.04 


25.00 


2.31 


100.00 


2.04 


200.00 


5.68 


100.00 


2.14 


100.00 


.96 


75.00 


.10 


100.00 


.58 


500.00 


47.98 


100.00 


1.33 


300.00 


24.77 


200.00 




100.00 


2.66 


100.00 


2.30 


100.00 




50.00 


1.00 


50.00 


1.07 


100.00 


.08 


200.00 


9.26 


100.00 


2.08 


100.00 


3.17 


50.00 


.37 


200.00 


9.86 


200.00 




200.00 


1.32 



$3.50 
5.25 
.58 
6.13 
3.50 
1.75 
3.50 
.87 
3.50 
7.00 
3.50 
3.50 
2.63 
3.50 

18.79 
3.50 

11.13 
7.00 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
1.75 
1.75 
3.50 
7.00 
3.50 
3.50 
1.75 
6.82 
7.00 
6.90 



$3.00 
4.00 



4.50 
3.00 
1.50 
3.00 
2.31 
4.00 
5.50 
1.50 
3.00 
1.50 
2 25 
11.25 
3.00 
5.00 
2.75 
3.00 
4.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.50 
2.00 
5.00 



4.50 
4.50 
6.00 



$1.27 

5.90 

.58 

10.13 

2.35 

.37 

.54 

.87 

1.54 

7.18 

4.14 

1.46 

1.23 

1.83 

55.52 
1.83 

30.90 
4.25 
3.16 
1.80 
1.50 
1.25 
.32 
1.58 

11.26 
5.58 
3.67 
2.12 

12.18 
2.50 
2.22 



88 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CEMETERY TUVSTS— Concluded. 







^ 




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O 



Wentworth, Paul $200.00 

Whittredge, George F ! 100.00 

Williams, Mary ' 50.00 

Woodruff, Robert 200.00 

Woodward, E.W ' 100.00 



$15.44 
15.79 



10.93 
2.05 



$8.00 
3.50 
1.75 
7.00 
3.50 



$16.00 
3.00 
1.50 
3.00 
3.00 



$7.44 

16.29 

.25 

14.93 

2.55 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 



Balance, January 1, 1897 
Income received 
Received, city of Concord 



1,535.83 
168.02 
500.00 



$5,203.85 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND 



Balance, January 1, 1897 
Income received 
Received, citv of Concord 



. $2,080.07 

72.00 

500.00 



$2,652.07 



EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 



Balance, January 1, 1897 
Income received 
Received, city of Concord 



$100.00 

3.12 

100.00 



$203.12 



CITY BONDS. 



89 



MUNICIPAL FUNDED DEBT. 

POLICE STATION BONDS. 
When due. Rate of interest. Payable. 

Julv 1, 1903, 4, serai-aunually, 



Amount. 

[7,000.00 



WIDENING PLEASANT STREET EXTENSION. 
When due. Rate of interest. Payable. Amount. 

Juue 1, 1905, 4, semi-annually, $13,800.00 



When due. 

July 1, 1898, 
July 1, 1899, 
July 1, 1900, 



When due. 

July 1, 1904, 
July 1, 1905, 
July 1, 1906, 
July 1, 1907, 



When due. 

June 1, 1914, 



MEMORIAL ARCH BONDS. 

Rate of interest. Payable. 

4, semi-annually, 

4, semi-annually, 

4, semi-annually. 



BRIDGE BONDS. 

Rate of interest. Payable. 

4, 
4, 
4, 

4, 



semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
serai-annuallv, 



PUBLIC PARK BONDS. 

Rate of interest. Payable. 

31 semi-annually. 



Funded city debt 



CITY DEBT NOT FUNDED. 

Orders 1260 and 2467 outstanding. 
Interest on bonds, accrued, not yet due . 
Coupons overdue, not presented 



Amount. 

$5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

$15,000.00 



Amount. 
$5,000.00 

5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

$20,000.00 



Amount. 

$25,000.00 
$90,800.00 



$2.00 

1,158.91 

161.25 



90 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Due school districts 

Dog licenses to school fund 

Due Concord Laud & Water Power Co. 



Funded city debt 



$17,734.65 

1,396.44 

100.00 

$20,553.25 
. 90,800.00 

^111,353.25 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Cash in treasury January 1, 1897 . f 21,179.22 
Taxes of 1893 uncollected . . . 196.16 
'' 1894 " ... 566.50 
1895 " ... 59.69 
*Cash in hands of George A. Foster, col- 
lector 360.70 

Taxes of 1896 uncollected . . . 356.45 
1897 '' ... 34,940.44 

Casii in hands of AY. P. Ladd, collector . 85.72 

Liquor agency, stock on hand . . 1,203.20 

Due from Merrimack county . • • 6,131,04 

Due for rent of quarries . . . 481.00 

Due for rent of land on Warren street . 62.50 
Due for building and repairing concrete 

sidewalks 408.85 

Due for electrical inspection . . . 104.25 

fSubscriptions for city history . . 2,758.00 
Due from state of New Hampshire, rent 

of armory 300.00 

Due from state of New Hampshire, boun- 
ties -50 

Daniel B. Webber, wood from city farm . 7.50 



Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1898 
Decrease for the year ..... 

Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1897 



$69,201.72 

$42,151.53 
30,967.94 

$73,119.47 



* Includes $34.18 interest. 
t December 31, 1897. 



CITY BONDS. 



91 



PRECINCT FUNDED DEBT. 

SEWER BONDS. 



When due. 


Rate of interest. 


Payable. - 


Amount. 


July 1, 


1904, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


$12,000.00 


June 1, 


1914, 


3i, 


semi-annually. 


25,000.00 


Dec. 1, 


1914, 


sh 


semi-annually, 


9,000.00 


July 1, 


1917, 


3i, 


semi annually, 


25,000.00 




$71,000.00 




WATER PRECINCT BONDS. 




When due. 


Rate of interest. 


Payable. 


Amount. 


Nov. 1 


1898, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


$10,000.00 


Nov. 1 


1899, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Nov. 1 


1900, 


3i, 


semi-annually. 


15,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1901, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1902, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1903, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1904. 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1905, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1906, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1907, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1908, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan, 1, 


1909, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1910, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1911, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


5,000.00 


Oct. 1, 


1912, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


45,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1913, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1914, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1915, 


4, 


semi-annnall\', 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1916, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1917, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1918, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1919, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1922, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


400,000.00 


Mar. 1 


, 1922, 


3^, 


semi-annually. 


20,000.00 




$670,000.00 



$741,000.00 



92 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PRECINCT DEBT NOT FUNDED. 

Coupous overdue, sewer bouds, not presented . $110.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, sewer bonds . . 776.67 

Interest accrued, not yet due, water bonds . . 12,304.17 



$13,190.84 
Precinct funded debt 741,000.00 



Precinct debt $754,190.84 

Less available assets, cash on band, water de- 
partment 11,192.83 



Net precinct debt January 1, 1898 . . .$742,998.01 

Net precinct debt January 1, 1897 . . .724,463.81 

Increase $18,534.20 



UNION SCHOOL 


DISTRICT BONDS 




When due. 


Rate of interest. 


Payable. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1898, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


$15,000.00 


July 1, 1899, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


15,000.00 


July 1, 1900, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


15,000.00 


July 1, 1901, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


15,000.00 


July 1, 1902, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


15,000.00 




$75,000.00 


Interest 


accrued, not yet due . . . . 


1,500.00 




$76,500.00 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 20 BONDS. 

When due. Rate of interest. Paj'able. Amount. 

July 1, 1898, 4, semi-annually, $500.00 

July 1, 1899, 4, semi-annually, 500.00 



$1,000.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due .... 20.00 



$1,020.00 



Net liabilitv of school districts . . . $77,520.00 



CITY BOXDS. 93 

These bonds are issued under ordinances of the city council, 
as authorized by the act of the legislature of New Hampshire, 
approved August 14, 1889, entitled " An act authorizing the 
city of Concord to borrow money in aid of its school districts." 
These school districts have, by their votes and by their agents 
duly authorized, bound themselves to the city to seasonably pay 
to the city sufficient sums of money to enable it to meet the pay- 
ments of interest and principle upon their indebtedness, and all 
incidental expenses, as the same shall become due. 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECIKCT. 
SEWER BONDS PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 



When due. 


Rate of interest. 


Paj'able. 


Amount. 


Aug. 1, 1898, 






4, 




semi-annually. 


$5,000.00 


Aug. 1, 1903, 






4, 




semi-annually. 


5,000.00 


Aug. 1, 1908, 






4, 




semi-annually. 


6,000.00 


May 1, 1913, 






4, 




semi-annually. 


5,000.00 


July 1, 1914, 






4, 




semi-annually, 


500.00 


July 1, 1915, 






4, 




semi-annually, 


500.00 


July 1, 1916, 






4, 




semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1917, 






4, 




semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1918, 






4, 




semi-annually, 


500.00 


July 1, 1919, 






4, 




semi-annually. 


500.00 




S24,000.00 


Interest i 


accrr 


led 


1, not 


yet due 


360.00 


Coupons 


due, 


bi 


it not 


presented 


120.00 



824,480.00 

Amount of sinking fund accumulated, including 

interest $5,203.85 

Net indebtedness on account of Penacook sewer 

precinct, January 1, 1898 .... $19,276.15 

Net indebtedness on account of Penacook sewer 

precinct, January 1, 1897 .... $19,924.17 

Decrease for the year ...... $648.02 



94 CITY OF COXCORD. 

The above bonds were issued under ordinances passed by the 
city council, establishing a sewer precinct in Penacook, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city for the establishing 
of said system. The ordinances also provide that the yearly 
interest and a portion of the principal shall be raised each year, 
for the purpose of creating a sinking fund to pay said bonds as 
they mature, as follows : 

$500 annually for ten years from August 1, 1888, 
$1,000 annually for five years from August 1, 1898, 
$1,200 annually for five years from August 1, 1903, 
$1,000 annually for five years from May 1, 1908, 
$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914, 

by taxation upon the taxable property in Penacook sewer pre- 
cinct, said sums, as soon as received, to be placed at interest by 
the finance committee. 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 
SEWER BONDS PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 

Payable. Amount. 

semi-annually, $5,000.00 

semi-annually, 5,000.00 

semi-aunuallv, 7,000.00 



AVhen due. 


Rate of 


interest. 


Oct. 1, 1902, 




4, 


Oct. 1, 1907, 




4, 


Oct. 1, 1912, 




4, 



117,000.00 
Interest accrued, not vet due . . . $170.00 



$17,170.00 



Amount of sinking fund accumulated, including 

interest • . 2,652.07 



Net indebtedness on account of West Concord 

sewer precinct, January 1, 1898 . . . $14,517.93 

The above bonds were issued under ordiuances passed by the 
city council, establishing a sewer precinct in West Concord, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the citv for the establishing of 



CITY liONDS. 95 

said system. The ordinances also provide that the yeaily in- 
terest and a portion of tlie principal shall be raised each year, 
for the purpose of creating a sinking fund to pay said bonds as 
thev mature, as follows : 

S500 annually for ten years from October 1, 1892. 
SI, 000 annually for five years from October 1, 1902, 
$1,400 annually for five years from October 1, 1907, 

by taxation upon the taxable property in West Concord sewer 
precinct, said sums, as soon as received, to be placed at interest 
by the finance committee. 



EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 
SEWER BONDS, PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 



When due. 


Rate of interest. 


Payable. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1900, 


3^, 


semi-annually. 


$500.00 


July 1, 1905, 


3L 


semi-annually. 


500.00 


Julv 1, 1910, 


oh 


semi-annually, 


500.00 


July 1, 1915, 


3i, 


semi-annually. 


500.00 



$2,000.00 
Interest accrued, not vet due . . . 35.00 



$2,035.00 



Amount of sinking fund accumulated . . . 8203.12 

Net debt East Concord sewer precinct, 1897 . 2,185.00 

Added to sinking fund in 1897 . . $103.12 

Note paid 250.00 



353.12 



Net debt East Concord sewer precinct, 1898 . $1,831.88 

The above bonds were issued under ordinance passed by the 
city council authorizing a loan on the credit of the city. The 
ordinance also provides that the yearly interest and a portion of 
the principal shall be raised each year, for the purpose of creat- 
inga sinking fund to pay said bonds as they mature, as follows : 

One hundred dollars annually for twenty years from July 1, 



96 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



1895, by taxation upou the taxable property in East Concord 
sewer precinct, said sums, as soon as received, to be placed at 
interest bv the finance committee. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt above assets 

Net precinct debt above assets . . . . 

Net school district debt . . . . . 

Net Penacook sewer debt . . . . . 

Net West Concord sewer debt . . . . 

Net East Concord sewer debt . . . . 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, Jan- 
uary 1, 1898 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, Jan- 
uary 1, 1897 

Decrease during the year . . . . . 

REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS FOR 

$34,705. 

33,769. 

34,705. 

5,000. 

4,000. 

700. 



For the payment of state tax . 

the payment of county tax 

support of schools 

pavment of Memorial Arch bond 

payment of interest . 

support of the city poor . 

incidental and land damages, in 
eluding expense of indemnity 
bonds for city officers 

committee service 

printing and stationery 

legal expenses . 

beds at Margaret Pillsbury Hos 
pital 

Decoration Day 

aid dependent soldiers 

public school text-books 

open air concerts 



$42,151.53 

742,998.01 

77,520.00 

19,276.15 

14,517.93 

1,831.88 

$898,295.50 

928,132.38 
$29,836.88, 

1897. 

00 
77 
00 
00 
00 
00 



5,000, 
1,410. 

2,500, 
200, 

2,000. 

345. 

500. 
2,800. 

300. 



00 
00 
00 
00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



97 



3r Blossom Hill Cemetery 


$2,500.00 


Old North Cemetery . 


350.00 


West Concord Cemetery . 


100.00 


Old Fort Cemetery', for comple 




tion of wall by contract . 


300.00 


Millville Cemetery . 


100.00 


Horse Hill Cemetery 


50.00 


White Park 


3,250.00 


Rollins Park . 


750.00 


Penacook Park 


100.00 


improvement jjublic commons 


175.00 


lobby at Penacook by contract 


not exceeding 


900.00 




f iQfi KQq 77 




»IP 1 UU,.Jv/J7. i i 


FOR SALARIES. 


)r Mayor .... 


SI, 000. 00 


City clerk 


1,200.00 


Overseer of poor, Wards 3, 4 




5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 . 


200.00 


Overseer of poor, Ward 1 . 


30.00 


Overseer of poor, Ward 2 . 


10.00 


City anditor 


1,000.00 


City solici'^or . 


500.00 


City treasurer .... 


250.00 


City messenger . 


600.00 


care of city clocks, . 


85.00 


clerk of common council . 


50.00 


Board of Education, Unioi] 




School District 


250.00 


Board of Education, District 




No. 20 


25.00 


Town district school board 


200.00 


nine assessors .... 


2,700.00 


nine moderators 


27.00 


nine ward clerks 


90.00 


"twenty-seven selectmen 


135.00 


judge police court 
7 


800.00 



98 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



For clerk of police court . . . S200.00 

collector of taxes, so much as 
may be necessary of the sum 
of 1,600.00 



$10,952.00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



or salary of librarian, assistants. 








and janitor .... 


$2 


,550.00 




purchase of books and magazines 


1 


,200.00 




printing, including new fiction 








catalogue .... 




400.00 




fuel and lights .... 




350.00 




binding ..... 




500.00 




incidentals .... 




500.00 


$5,500.00 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

For salary of health officer 

salary of board of health . 
rent ...... 

lights ..... 

care of pest house 
assistance in sanitary inspection 
bacteriological tests . 
materials for fumigation . 
incidental expenses of conta- 
gious diseases 



$800.00 




75.00 




108.00 




12.00 




15.00 




100.00 




150.00 




27.00 




175.00 






11,462.00 



POLICE AND WATCH. 

For salary city marshal . . $1,200.00 

salary deputy . . . 900.00 

salary captain of watch . 850.00 

pay nine patrolmen . . 7,200.00 

pay of janitor .... 
pay of special policemen . 
fuel of city proper 



$10,150.00 
225.00 
300.00 
200.00 



API'KOPRIATIONS. 



99 



For fuel Penacook . 

board of horse and shoeing 

extra horse hire in city 

extra horse hire in Penacook 

lights .... 

rent at Penacook 

telephone and street gong at 

Penacook 
water .... 
ice . 

repairs and incidentals 
helmets and buttons . 
uniforms for special police 
police commissioners 
new boiler 



$25.00 
285.00 
30.00 
30.00 
190.00 
108.00 

50.00 

28.00 

15.00 

100.00 

75.00 

50.00 

150.00 

350.00 



.? 12,36 1.00 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

For salary of commissioner of high- 
ways $1,400.00 

general maintenance and repairs 18,000.00 

permanent work, including port- 
able stone crusher . . 8,000.00 

cleaning streets . . . 4,000.00 

new concrete, (sidewalks and 

crossings) .... 3,000.00 

repairing concrete . . . 1,500.00 

catch basins, construction and 

cleaning .... 800.00 



KNGINEKUING 


DEPARTMENT. 


V city engineer, salary 


. $1,500.00 


assistants, salary 


. 1.000.00 


supplies .... 


100.00 


repairs .... 


50.00 


rent .... 


204.00 


incidentals 


146.00 



$36,700.00 



$3,000.00 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIKE DEPARTMENT. 

For cliief engineer, salary . $950. 00 

assistant engineers (pre- 
cinct), salary . • 250.00 

permanent men, pay-rolls 5,568.00 

Kearsarge Steamer Co., 
pay-rolls 

P^agle Steamer Co., pay- 
rolls .... 

Hook & Ladder Co., pay- 
rolls .... 

Governor Hill Relief Co., 
pay-rolls 

Alert Hose Co., pay-rolls 

Good Will Hose Co., pay- 
rolls .... 

Pioneer Steamer Co., pay- 
rolls .... 

Pioneer Steamer Co., sal- 
ary engineer 

Pioneer Steamer Co., sal- 
ary assistant engineer . 

Pioneer Steamer Co , stew- 
ard .... 

Pioneer Steamer Co., jani- 
tor .... 

Cataract Co., pay-rolls . 

Cataract Co., salary as- 
sistant engineer . 

Cataract Co , steward 

Cataract Co., janitor 

Old Fort Co., pay-rolls . 

Old Fort Co., salary as- 
sistant engineer . 

Old Fort Co., steward . 

rent of rooms. Veteran 
Firemen's Association 

extra men for vacation 



1,010.00 


1,010.00 


1,615.00 


195.00 


815.00 


815.00 


500.00 


75.00 


25.00 


30.00 


45.00 


240.00 


10.00 


15.00 


15.00 


240.00 


10.00 


15.00 


150.00 


218.00 


S13,816.00 



APPROrRIATIONS. 



101 



V forage ..... 


. $1,411.00 


fuel 


640.60 


liglits ..... 


500.00 


water . . • . 


116.50 


horse shoeing .... 


280.00 


hats, five dozen 


315.00 


three alarm boxes . 


225.00 


relining old hose 


150.00 


new wagon for chief engineer . 


160.00 


one pair of horses . 


.300.00 


horse hire .... 


300.00 


washing .... 


105.00 


current for fire alarm 


36.00 


labor, wire, etc., fire-alarm line 


300.00 


supplies for open-circuit batteries 


25.00 


supplies for chemical engine . 


50.00 


supplies for pony extinguishers 


12.00 


new hose and incidentals 


1,257.90 




<ffi-^0 000 00 








$226,484.77 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Old Fort Cemetery 


Jl l^.lL 


>Jll Ull 


SIIIS 


<B!.JUU.UU 

184.00 




fire department 








336.91 




city auditor 








34.69 




assessors 








130.00 




tax collector 








16.92 




public library . 








89.69 




White Park " . 








144.58 




Rollins Park . 








233.84 




Penacook Park 








3.72 




Blossom Hill Cemetery * 






3,130.97 




Old North Cemetery 






128.85 




West Concord Cemetery 






54.30 




liquor agency . 






289.99 














$5,078.46 



*Reappropriation of income deposited in treasury, 



102 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1897. 



For interest, sewer bonds 
lighting streets 
sewers .... 
payment of note 
payment of interest on note 



$1,670.00 

10,500.00 

3,500.00 

500.00 

17.50 



$16,187.50 



SPECIAL PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1897. 

For Sontli p]nd sewer lateral connections . . $3,500.00 



WATER PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1897. 
For hydrants $6,000.00 



STREET SPRINKLING APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1897. 
For sprinliling streets $4,000.00 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

FOR 1897. 



For payment of bonds 
interest on bonds 



$15,000.00 
. 3,300.00 



$18,300.00 



PENACOOK PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1897. 



For sinking fund . 

interest, sewer bonds 



$500.00 
960.00 



$1,460.00 



WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR 1897. 



For sinking fund $500.00- 

interest on bonds .... 680.00 



$1,180.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 103 

EAST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR 1897. 

For sinking fund $100.00 

payment of interest on bonds . . 70.00 

payment of note .... 250.00 
payment of interest on note . . 8.75 

$428.75 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 20. 

For payment of bond .... $500.00 

interest GO. 00 

$560.00 



104 



CITY OF CON'COKD. 



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CITY TKEASUKER's REPORT. 105 

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106 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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CITY EXPENSES. 

FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1897. 

Beimj an itemized account, made up from the hooks of the City 
Auditor, of the payments made by the City Treasurer ■■ 
071 acccount of 

RUNNING- EXPENSES. 



The arrangement of the details of expenditure which follows 
is intended to furnish such information as is desired by the 
public, and is in accordance with suggestions received from 
various sources. Items of payment to the same individual at 
sundry times are included in the aggregate amount given, if 
paid for the same objects. Every effort has been made to 
ascertain and pay all the bills for the current year ; and in all 
cases, so far as known, payments of rent, etc., have been 
made to December 31, 1897, and salaries and committee service 
have been paid for the full municipal year. The expenses of 
the year, which are included in the general running expense, 
may be seen in the aggregate at the end of the detailed account 
here given. This is intended to include interest, but not the 
payment of maturing bonds. 



STATE AND COUNTY TAXES AND INTEREST. 

Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer . . $34,705.00 

Warren Abbott, county treasurer . . 33,769.77 

coupons and interest account . . 3,906.31 



CITY POOR. 

Regular approiiriation ..... $700.00 

Transferred from Dependent Soldiers, city . 41.01 



Paid as follows : 

Lydia S. Couch, aid .... $14.00 

Glanville Tonkin, aid .... 20.00 

Margaret Robinson, rent . . . 12.00 



$741.01 



108 



CITV OF COXCDUI) 



1). J. Doherty, rent 

C. F. Thompson, administrator, rent 

J. P. Diirrell, rent 

Grace E. Foster, rent . 

Fllizabeth R. Curtis, rent 

C. C» Webster & Co., groceries 

Foote, Brown & Co., 

C. R. Sclioolci'aft, 

C. F. Swain tt Co., 

C. (t. Coffin & Co., 

F. A. Abbott, provisions 

Concord Coal Co., wood and coal 

H. O. Marsh & Co., '• 

E. L. Davis, wood 

Dr. H. C. Holbrook, medical services 

Dr. N. W. McMurphy, medical services 

C. H. Sanders, supplies 

County Cheshire, care Josiah Littlefield 

St. Patrick's ()i'i)hanage, board 

State Industrial School, board 

H. A. Kendall, undertaker . 

Andrew Foley, board of Peter Keenan 

Mrs, J. Leary, nnrsiuo- 

Catherine Leary, care T. H. Clark 

W. P. Curtis, milk 



$12.00 
Ifi.OO 
96.00 
14.00 
12.00 
55.00 
17.91 
2.00 

105.00 

;5.oo 

10. Tit 

52.42 

42.27 

6.50 

7.00 

8.00 

8.50 

81.35 

21.67 

78.00 

15.00 

18.00 

3.00 

1.50 

8.10 



741.01 



AID TO DEPENDENT SOLDIERS AND THEIR FAMILIES. 



Appropriation ....... 

Transferred to city poor ..... 

Paid as follows : 

Sarah J. Williams, aid . . . $32.00 

Orrin Larkin, aid .... 87.00 

H. O. Marsh & Co., wood and coal . 24.34 

Concord Coal Co., " '' . 34.55 

Catherine Elliott, care Mrs. C. P. Savory 36.00 



$500.00 
41.01 

$458.99 



CITY EXPENSES. 



lOD 



Diua Truett, care Mrs. C. P. Savory, 

Lewis De Camp, " " " 

Geo. I. Ingham, " " " 

Foote, Brown & Co., groceries 

Fred Reed & Co., " 

C. C. Perkins, 

Amos Blancbard, " 

W. W. Allen, dry goods 

Henry W. Ranlet, rent 

F. E. Williams, rent 

Dr. A. P. Chesley, medical services 

Dr. N. W. McMurphy, " 

Dr. Chancey Adams, " 

Baker & Knowlton, medicine 

Underbill & Kittredge, " . 

C. H. Martin & Co., medicine 



S2.00 

14.00 

10.00 

17.38 

6.00 

5.05 

3.00 

3.52 

22.00 

56.00 

15.00 

2.00 

14.00 

2.05 

3.45 

1.75 



!91.0D 



tkansferreu from aid dependent soldiers county 
January 1, 1898. 

H. O. Marsh & Co., wood and coal 

Unexpended balance ...... 



$3.70 
64.20 



$458.99 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Regnlar appropriation .... 
Overpayment deposited with city treasurer 
Special appropriation .... 



Paid as follows : 
Permanent men, pay-rolls . . .$6,518.00 

Extra men, vacations, pay-rolls . . 214.16 

Board of engineers, " . . 295.00 

Eagle Steamer Co., No. 1, " . . 1,010.00 

Kearsarge Steamer Co., No. 2, pay-rolls 1,010.00 



$20,000.00 

.04 

336.91 

$20,336.95 



110 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Hook & Ladder Co., No. 1, pay-rolls $1,615.00 
Governor Hill Relief Steamer, " 195.00 
Alert Hose Co., No. 2, " 815.00 
Good Will Hose Co., No. 3, " 815.00 
Pioneer P^ngine Co., No. 3, " 575.00 
'^ " '' " L. H.Crow- 
tber, steward and janitor . . 75.00 
Old Fort Engine Co. No. 2, pay-rolls . 240.00 
" " C. P. White, 
steward . . . . . 15.00 
Cataract Engine Co., pay-rolls . . 240.00 
" " Patrick Conway, 
steward and janitor . . . 30.00 
Veteran Firemen's Association, rent . 150.00 

Forage. 

Arthur N. Day, oats .... $410.63 

George L. Theobald, hay and straw . 152.87 

J. H. Dodge & Co., hay and straw . 680.63 

D. Hammond & Son, carrots . . 4.00 

Fuel. 

Concord Coal Co., coal and wood . 8491.«2 

H. O. Marsh & Co., coal and wood . 16.24 

E. L. Davis, coal .... 56.00 
Estate Horatio Hussey, wood . . 6.00 

Lights. 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas . . $310.95 

Concord Land & Water Power Co. , lights 85 .42 

Horseshoeing. 

James E. McShane .... $130.50 

Globe Horseshoeing Shop . . ' . 125.75 

Daniel Crowley 20.85 

M. E. Sexton 20.60 



$13,812.16 



$1,248.13 



$570.06 



$396.37 



$297.70 



CITY EXPENSES. 




Washing. 




Mrs. D. F. Crowley . . . . 


$15.50 


Conant's Laundry . . . . 


54.50 


Mrs. Catharine Haggerty 


10.15 


Mrs. Ira W. Sanborn 


5.50 


James A. Mills . . . . . 


3.75 



111 



1.40 



Supplies Chemical Engine. 



A. P. Fitch 
Diekerman & Co. 



5.68 

4.48 





Horse Hire. 




M. F. Bickford . 


• • • ■ 


. $102.50 


George L. Theobald 






112.00 


Fellows & Davis . 






56.00 


E. L. Davis 






100.00 


D. H. Gienty 






14.00 


W. J. Bailey 






10.50 


James Welch 






25.00 


George 0. Robinson 






10.00 


Norris A. Duuklee 






1.50 


J.H.Toof . 






1.00 



[0.16 



!2.50 



Current, Fire Alarm and Water. 

Concord Land & Water Power Co., current $36.00 



Coucord Water Works, water 
Leodore E. Alexander, '• 



108.50 
8.00 



$152.50 



Fire Hats and Alarm Boxes. 



Hopkins & Wright, hats 
N. E. Gamewell Co., boxes 



^315.00 
320.00 



$635.00 



112 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Purchase Horses and Wagon. 

Caleb P. Little, horse .... $100.00 
George L. Theobald, horse . . . 75.00 

Abbot-Downino; Co., waoou . . . 160,00 



Relining Old Hose. 
George W. Wales .... $195.00 

Manhattan Rubber Manufacturing Co. . 135.00 



Supplies Open Circuit. 



P^lcctric (ias Light Co. 
C. ^y. Dadmun . 



$15.12 
6.70 



Labor, Wire, &c.. Fire Alarm, 



George H. Downing, labor 

N. E. Gamewell Co., inspection 

Lewis B. Hoit, poles 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls labor 

W. C. Green, cash paid out . 

B. Billsborough, supplies 

C. H. Martin & Co. . 

Concord Land & Water Power Co., cemen 

F. A. Scott & Co., repairs 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 
Huntley & Tenney, supplies and repairs 
C. W. Dadmun, supplies 
E. L. Cady, supplies 

Incidentals. 
Charles T. Halloway, chemical supplies 
J. T. McKean, repairs . 

G. W. Brown, polish 
Eugene Sullivan, supplies 



^39.00 

9.10 

7.50 

24.45 

11.76 

93.50 

72.50 

7.73 

8.38 

6.00 

5.05 

10.37 

20.28 

2.70 

1.02 



$20.00 

7.65 

2.00 

10.25 



55.00 



$330.00' 



^21.82: 



$319.34 



CITY EXPENSES. 



/ 



113 



J. W. Powers, labor 
James Mercer, driver Good Will Hose 
J. E. Fariuim, labor 
N. G. Carr, repair of clock . 
George L. Theobald, burying horse 
A. B. Stearns, labor 
Humphrey, Dodge Co., supplies 
W, C. Green, cash paid for labor, etc 
National Tube Works, supplies 
George Abbott, Jr., white lead 
N. E. Gamewell Co., supplies 
N. H. Electric Co., supplies . 
Charles W. Wilcox, carpet 
Stovene Manufacturing Co., supplies 
C. W. Dadmun, supplies 
A. S. Jackson, supplies 
C. R. Dame, supplies 
Lee Brothers, plumbing 
Arthur Bruce, witch hazel 
O. N. Davis, supplies . 
O. N. French, supplies 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies 
Baker & Knowlton, supplies . 
James R. Hill & Co., supplies 
W. A. Sleeper, lap robe 
Mrs. A. B. Young, supplies . 
John Caldbeck, carting 
H. D. Hammond, supplies 
American Soap & Washoline Co., sup 
plies ...... 

E. B. Hutcliinson Building Co.. repairs 
Michael Corbett. watciiing fire 
Foote, Brown & Co , fighting fiie 

F. W. Scott & Co , repairs 
Concord Machine Co., repairs 
Concord Foundry Co., repairs 
J. A. Dadmun & Co., repairs 
Huntley & Tenney, repairs 

8 



$1.83 

11. .^4 

1.33 

2.r)() 

5.00 

IG.HO 

G4.90 

70.27 

34.40 

17.25 

42.70 

G.0() 

2.80 

10.00 

14.53 

;57.10 

G.OO 

85.35 

7.50 

2.48 

2.00 

15.98 

3.72 

19.10 

2.5(> 

10.12 

4.20 

5.32 

G.OO 

8.00 

2.00 

G.50 

164.84 

43.16 

2.50 

8.18 

99.57 



114 



eiTV OF CONCORD. 



Abhot-Downiiig Co., repairs 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies . 
Rowell & Pluinmer, repairs 
Robert J. Macguire, veterinary sing 
Mrs. George Jones, storage 
F. S. Farniim, repairs 
Parmenter & Co., supplies 
Norris A. Dunklee, clipping horses 
Stiirtevant & Son, supplies 
J. U. Johnson & Son, supplies 
Cusiiman Electric Co., supplies 
C. Pelissier & Co. 
A. H. Britlon & Co., repairs . 
City liquor agency, alcohol 
Underiiill & Kittredge, supplies 
Lowell Eastman, repairs . 
W. M. Darrah, lalior and materials 
Samuel Eastman & Co., supplies 
A. P. Fitch & Co., supplies 
W. V. Tliayer, treasurer, pay roll 
bor ...... 

Boston Belting Co., supplies 

Frank H. George, repairing furnace 

F. E. Coburn, su[)plies 

H. P. Bennett, su[)plies . 

American Fire P^ngine Co., grate 

Manchester Locomotive Works, rep 
steamer .... 

Mrs. Ida Sanborn, repairs 

Concord Axle Co., labor . 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairs on 
Crete ..... 

Concord Ice Co., ice . . 

W. Carpenter, repairs 

Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice 

W, C. Spicer, supplies 

Isaac Baty, supplies 

Taylor, Durgin & Sebra, supplies 

2^. B. Burleigh 



con 



37.?)'.) 
3G.1U 
72.82 
1 2 00 

.5.40 
14.4(5 

S.OO 
29.00 
39 90 

2.50 
30.. 56 
94.10 

3 00 
.7o 

9.G3 
20.01 

7.00 

2 00 

48.35 
4.00 
1.65 
1.50 
1.92 

11.85 

126.29 

1,15 

.50 

2.50 
13.74 

4.53 
11.56 
13.03 
17.20 

1.15 

1.00 



CITY EX1'KN.SE.>^ 



115 



S. C. Maiden, pasliiring lior.se 

,1. C. Carlton, supplies 

O. W. Wales, relining old hose 



f2.00 
o 00 
4.39 



S1.G8G..S1 
^20,336.95 



INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGE. 



Appropriation .... 

Paid as follows : 

D. J. Donovan, guardian, land damage . S2r> 00 
N. E. Telephone and Telegraph Co., use 

of telephones . . . . . 5^<S.I4 
F. W. Landon, inspector of wires . . 151.25 
Concord Coal Co., fuel at city hall . . 93.35 
Jackman & Lang, insurance . . . 30.50 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance . . . 24.00 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance . . . 213.70 
INIartin & Luscomb, rent ma3'or's office . 12.50 
Heirs J. H. Chase, rent mayor's office . 150.00 
W. P. Ladd, rent tax collector's office . 91.06 
Estate Cyrus Hill, rent cemetery commis- 
sioners' office . . . . . 36.50 
P^astman & Merrill, bonds for city officers 80.00 
Chase & Martin, bonds for city officers . 150 00 
Dr. N. W. McMurphy, vaccination . . 5.00 
Dr. Chancey Adams, vaccination . . 10.00 
Charles C. Danforth, salary police com- 
missioner, 1896 100.00 

Giles Wheeler, salary police commissioner, 

1896 125 00 

Josiah P^. Dwight, salary police commis- 
sioner, 1896 100.00 

Concord Light and Power Co., gas . . 140.00 
Concord Land and Water Power Co., 

lights 215.40 

B. W. Couch, taxes refunded , . . 5.18 



$5,000.00 



116 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



Artliur Bouilet, taxes refunded 

Samuel Holt, taxes refunded . 

Henry W. Stevens, taxes refunded . 

Gustavus Walker, taxes refunded 

J. A. Coeliran, city clerk, vital statistics 

189G 

W. F. Tiiayer, pay roll return marriage 

certiticates ..... 
W. F. Thayer, pay roll return births aiK 

deaths ...... 

J. A. Cochran, city clerk, vital statistic: 

to January 26, 1897 
J. A. Cochran, city clerk, collecting names 

of children, returned to treasury . 
J. A. Cochran, city clerk, vital statistics 

1897, returned to treasury 

E. H. Randall & Co., repairs city hall 
J. T. Fiske, repairs tools 

Lee Brothers, plumbing city hall 
N. B. Burleigh, repairs lawn mower 
W. M. Darrah, repairs city hall 

F. W, Scott & Co., repairs city hall 
F. \Y. Scott & Co., fence city hall lot 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., carpets, rugs 
and repairs ..... 

L. R. Fellows, repairs police station 

Stevens & Duncklee, repairs city hall fur 
nace ...... 

Stevens & Duncklee, repairs 

C. L. Norris, repairs Good Will hose 
house ...... 

Globe Horseshoeing Shop, repairs city hall 
])oiler ...... 

Ellard Brothers, painting city hall armory 

W. Carpenter, rej^airs city hall 

Norris A. Dunklee, livery, city govern 
ment ...... 

D. H. Gienty, livery, city government 
Fellows & Davis, livery, city government 



$12.92 

138.18 

4.80 

18.74 

1G0.45 
29.00 

191.75 

10 50 

35.75 

138.00 

3.00 

.75 

25.71 

4.85 

27.51 

46.51 

18.05 

100.85 
16.00 

41.68 
2 98 

23.00 

1.50 
41.00 

6.00 

31.50 
8.00 
3.00 



CirV EXl'KNSES. 



11 



Eugene H. Davis, livery, city government |;5.00 

John Chadwick, livery, city government . 2.00 
C. F. Batchelder, posting notices for city 

government ...... 13.50 

H. O. Adams, typewriting for city govern- 
ment 2.00 

F. P. Curtis, overseer poor, livery . . 6.00 

M. E. M. Flanders, return death certificate .50 

A. Carlson, return marriage certificates . 2.75 
E. H. Dixon, city messenger, cash paid 

out ....... 4.75 

J. A. Cochran, city clerk, cash paid out . 46.71 

Town School District, registering children 6.25 
Edward A. Stevens, city messenger, cash 

paid out . . . . . . 10.15 

J. J. Trenoweth, i)ay as fireman, 1894, 

1895, and 1896 37.63 

J. A. Cochran, city clerk, bounty . . .50 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., use of furniture 

in ward room ..... 2.50 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., furniture mayor's 

office 58 18 

Chancey Adams, M. D., medical services 3.00 
Howard Watch and Clock Co., repairs 

city clock 2.50 

Edward A. Stevens, services at city hall . 9.38 

Stevens & Duncklee, lawn mower . . 9.77 

W. W. Allen, burial permits . . . 8.55 

"Concord Water Works, water . . . 55.00 
N. H. Democratic Press Co., advertising, 

for cemetery commissioners . . . 4.20 

Edson C. Eastman, supplies . . . .50 

J. H. Ford, substitute for city messenger 20.00 
American Express Co., express city re- 
ports ....... 1.08 

J. N. Inman, ringing bell, July 4 . . 2.00 

A. W. Walker, ringing bell, July 4 . 2.00 

Ouy L. Crosby, ringing bell, July 4 . 2.00 

John Fanning, ringing bell, July 4 . . 2.00 



118 CITV Of CONCORD. 

W. H. Putnam, ringing bell, July 4 . 82.00 

Howard M. Cook, substitute for city clerk 26 00 

Frank L. Sanders, book .... 11.0.") 

W. S. Wilson, plants, etc., INIemorial Arch l.i.OO 
E. H. Dixon, care of armory rooms, 1896 .50.00 
Boston & IVIaine Railroad, judgment . 201.07 
W. A. Greenough, city directories . . 18.00- 
T. S. Buck, rubber stamps . . . 6.93 
Silsby & Son, parchment, Humphrey testi- 
monial '...... .40^ 

W. E. Hunt, frame, Hiimphie\' testimo- 
nial l.SO' 

E. H. Randall, railing Memorial Arch . 40.00 

F. W. Scott & Co., repairs at armory . 10.26 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, i)ay roll ujuving 

street railway at Penacook . . . 70.37 
Henry Morrill, as per contract, moving 

street railway at Penacook . . . rj.V2.20 

A. P. Fitch, supplies cleaning city hall . 2.00 

George A. Foster, services as ai)praiser . 3.00 

George A. Place, typewriter ribbon . . 1.00 

Edward A. .Stevens, care of armory rooms 50.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll, clearing 

ice. White Park 28.65 

Town School District, enumerating chil- 
dren 15.00 

George H. Prescott, bill files . . . 3.00 

Ruth A. Minot, preparing vital statistics . 17.00 

Silsby & Son, supplies . . . . .57 

A. J. Shurtleff, special justice . . 8.00 

A. L. Mellows, order outstanding . . 1.00 

S4,916.8G 

Unexpended balance . . . 83.14 

$5,000.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



lltt 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Appropriation for general maintenance 

and repairs . . . $18,000.00 
" for permanent work includ- 
ing portable stone crush- 
er . . . . 8,000.00 
" for cleaning streets . . 4,000.00 
" for new concrete . . 3,000.00 
"■ for repairing concrete . 1,500.00 
•' for catch basins . . 800.00 
•' for street sprinkling . 4,000.00 
'' for salary of commissioner 1,400.00 
Special appropriation for catch basins . 300.00 



Paid as follows : 

Ai)propriation for general maintenance 
and repairs ...... 



!841,000.00 



$18,000.00 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay rolls .... $4,441.18 

J. S. Dutton, rent 108.00 

Concord Light and Power Co., gas . . 2.54 
Concord Land and Water Power Co., 

lights 92.80 

C. H. Martin & Co., paints, oils, etc. . 14.84 
Humphrey, Dodge & Co , hardware . 133.76 
H. C. Stnrtevant & Son, grain . . 243.50 
*Republican Press Association, books, 

printing, etc. . . . . • 61.95 

.J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., office table . .8.00 

Samuel K. Gill, hay .... 60.48 

Huntley & Tenney, repairs . . . 75.15 

D. H. Gienty, bay horse .... 100.00 
Concord Water Works, water . . . 124.00 
Hugh Tallant, plank .... 36.51 
Frank W. Paige, plank .... 87.48 



120 



CITY OK CONCORD. 



Alfred Clark, postage, express, etc. 
*Ira C. Evans, printing . 
C. H. Johnson, hay for bedding 
Hutchinson Building Co., lumber and 

labor ..... 
John Hadlock, edges and repairs 
Robert J. Macguire, services . 
A. H. Britton & Co., hardware 
S. F. Patterson, picks 
Frank Coffin & Co., hay . 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs . 
Stevens & Duncklee, pipe, etc. 
Alfred Clark, gravel 
P. A. Richardson, gravel 
E. H. Runnells, mowing . 
George Partridge, pasturing horse 
E. H. Runnells, sand 
J. Elizabeth Hoyt, gravel 
F'rank Adams, gravel 
Charles H. Noyes, gravel 
Samuel Holt, labor . 
N. M. Stetson, tubs 
James E. McShane, horseshoeing 
George A. Dow, blacksmithing 
Nutting & Hayden, labor 
William P. Ford & Co., plow points 
Holt Brothers' Manufacturing Co., labor 

etc. ...... 

C. C. Perkins, oil . 
Cushman Electric Co., labor 



Shade Trees. 



Labor pay rolls 



Bridges. 

Labor pay rolls ... 

Nelson & Durrell, oil . . , 
John A. Lewis, lighting bridge 
Hutchinson Building Co., lumber 



^20.9.3 

13.25 

9.90 

16.82 
67.8.5 
21.7.5 
1.3.71 
15.39 
29.70 
36.75 
30.85 
33.20 

3.70 
49.00 

3.00 

3.60 
54.60 
19.90 

7.20 
16.60 

1.25 
90.00 

3.50 
.25 

1.50 

2.85 
2.0) 
9.75 



S7.21 

3.94 

55.00 

16. .50 



;,168.99 
$83.15 



CITY EXPENSES. 



121 



Humphrey-Dodge & Co., bolts 
Fred. Farnum, labor .... 

Holt Brothers' Manufacturing Co., while 
oak ....... 



Lai)or pay rolls 
W. H. Perry, grout 



Culverts. 



Fences. 



Labor pay rolls .... 

Macadamizing. 
Labor pay rolls .... 

Concord Water Works, water . 
'O. S. Kelly Co., roller spikes, etc. . 
Cuslunan Electric Co., labor, etc. 
H. O. Marsh & Co., coal 
Morrill & Danfortli, insurance on crusher 
Page Belting Co., tallow . 
Goodhue & Milton, repairs 
E. H. Randall, repairs 
M. H. Bradley, rent of land 
€. H. Martin & Co., oil, etc. 

Winter Expense. 

Labor pay rolls .... 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., snow-shovels 
^Republican Press Association, postals 
Albert Thompson, breaking roads 

Sanding. 
Labor pay rolls .... 

Joseph Stickney, rent of land . 

Paving. 
Labor pay rolls .... 

Ola Anderson, paving blocks . 



50.61 
7.50 

.80 



151.23 

3.50 



567.76 

6.00 

16.10 

17.50 

60.50 

15.00 

1.60 

3.85 

6.65 

60.00 

4.85 



SI, 322. 48 
3.00 
8.00 
5.83 



$382.51 
12.00 



$326.18 

56 87 



$91.56 



$154.73 



1.92 



$259.81 



$1,339.31 



J94.51 



$383.05 



122 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Sidewalks. 



Labor pay rolls 

Hutchinson Buildino- Co., lumber 



5539.39 
35.56 



Labor pay rolls 
Labor pay lolls 



Crossings. 
City Teamsters. 



WEST CONCORD DISTRICT. 



General Repairs. 

Labor pay rolls . . . . . 

Concord Water Works, water . 
Thompson & Hoague, dipper . 
Simeon Partridge, sharpening picks . 
George Partridge, oil ... . 

C H. Martin & Co., paint 

Culverts. 

Labor pay rolls .... 

Concord Street Railway, tickets 
J. M. Crossman, blacksmithing 
John Swenson, stone 
Dickerman & Co., salt 
Crowley & Quinn, stone . 



55 19. 72 

40.00 

.40 

4.30 

.70 

6.60 



$196.34 

5.00 

2.23 

6.00 

.60 

12.00 



Labor pay rolls 
Labor pay rolls 



Macadamizing. 
Winter Expense. 



PENACOOK DISTRICT. 
General Repairs. 
Labor pay rolls ..... $701.43 

Concord Water Works, water . . . 40.00 



5574.9.7 



;12.24 



$900.00 



|;571.72' 



$222.17 
$214.29 

$158.39 



CITY KXPEXSES. 



123- 



N. S. Gale & Co., i)i[)e, etc. . 
J. E. Syinonds & Co., luiiil)ei' . 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, liiinl)er . 
W. Arthur Benn, laljor . . . . 

Foote, Brown & Co., nails 
Concord P\:)iindry Co., repairing fountain 
8. G. Sanborn, hlacksmithing . 
C. M. & A. \y. Rolfe, use of watering 
trough ....... 

Frank P. Coll)V, use of watiMing trough . 

Culverts. 
Lai)or pay rolls ..... 

Bridges. 
Labor pay rolls .... 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, i)lauk . 
S. F. Patterson, repairing bridge 
Penacook Electric Light Co., lights 
Taylor, Durgin & Sehra. labor 
N. S. Gale & Co., nails . 



Labor pay rolls 
Labor pay rolls 



Sidewalks, 

Crossings. 

Winter Expense. 



Labor pay rolls 

N. S. Gale & Co., snow shovels 



Sanding. 



3 
o 

r 

30 
•20 



.69 
81 
39 
.50 
GO 
00 
61 

.00 
00 



74 
33 

75 
8 
5 



,17 
34 
,17 

00 
22 
93 



$344. 



09 
80 



$813.43 
$9.86- 



Labor ])ay rolls 



5204.83 
&174.45 

$4.94 

^344.89 
$66.23 



POTTER STREET DISTRICT. 
General Repairs. 

Labor pay rolls SI 39.48 

John T. Tenney, powder, spikes, etc. . 4.15 

Charles Rowell, grade .... .72 

John Hutchinson, labor .... 2.50 



$146.85. 



124 



Labor pay rolls 

Labor pay rolls 

John T. Teuney, "nails 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

Culverts, 
Winter Expense. 



$30.00 



EGYPT DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay rolls 

George G. Jenness, plank 

George G. Jenness, hardpan 

Esther C. Jenness, use of watering trough 

E. T. Jenness, use of watering trough 



$145.40 
3.78 
7.80 
3.00 
3.00 



Winter Expense. 



Labor pay rolls 



EAST CONCORD VILLAGE DISTRICT. 



General Repairs 

Labor pas' rolls .... 

A. B. Young, oil, etc. 

Fred Carter, lighting street lamp 

Rufus Virgin, lumber 

Hugh Tallant, lumber 

Gyrus R. Robinson, use of watering trough 

George E. Gate, blacksmithing 



$428.71 
8. -21 
14.00 
4.00 
2.40 
20.00 
2 80 



Labor pay rolls 
Labor pay rolls 
Labor pay rolls 



Culverts. 



Sidewalks. 



Winter Expense. 



!i!3.37 



$30.78 



62.-')8 
534.65 



$480.12 
$31.04 

$8.10 



CITY EXrKXSES. 



125 



MILLVILLE DISTRICT. 
General Repairs. 



Labor pay rolls 






$1,627.87 


St. Paul's School, labor, etc. 




32.37 


St. Paul's School, gravel . 






11.70 


Town of Hopkinton, gravel 






2.70 


Mrs. E. D. Massison " 






2.90 


Nathaniel White, Jr. " 






18.60 


Charles Nutting '* 






16.80 


Peter Clark '' 






10.90 


J. W. Paige " 






10.20 


W. H. Dow, picks 






3.00 



Winter Expense. 



Labor pay rolls 



-.04 



$60.37 



EAST CONCORD INTERVAL DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay rolls . . . . . $24.62 

Charles C. Graham, use of watering trough 6.00 

S: M. Locke, sleepers .... .oO 

J. S. Locke, plank, bolts, etc. . . . 1.65 



Labor pay rolls . 



Winter Expense. 



532.77 



S24.08 



VIRGIN DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay rolls ..... $151.75 

Fales P. Virgin, use of watering trough 

1896 and 1897 6.00 

Fales P. Virgin, lumber .... 4.25 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., nails . . . .48 



$162.48 



126 



CITY OF CONCOKl). 



IfORTH CONCORD DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay rolls 
•John C. Kilbuin, [vosts 
Cliarles Saabora, grade 
Albert Morrill, posts 
HurapUrey-Dodge Co., nails 
George Prescott, painting signs 
Moody Boyce., labor . 





$279.08 




1.16 




5.76 




2.44 




.75 


s 


3.75 




2.00 



Winter Expense 



Labor pay rolls . 



MOUNTAIN DISTRICT. 
General Repairs. 



Labor pay rolls 

E. W. Laugmaid, grade . 



$112.35 

18.75 



Winter Expense. 



Labor pay tolls 



HOT HOLE POND DISTRICT 
General Repairs. 
Labor pay rolls ..... 



A. G. Moore, plank 



11.70 
6.57 



Winter Expense. 



Labor pay rolls 



UUMBER FOUR DISTRICT. 
General Repairs. 



Labor pay rolls 



S294.!»4 



! 24.95 



8131.10 
$21 66 



$18.27 
S5.90 



1172.28 



CITY KXl'ENSES. 127 

Culverts. 

L;il)or pay. rolls ..... ^38.62 

Johnson & Simpson, covering stone . . 14.40 

F. E. Dimond, stone, etc. .... 3.30 

$56.32 



Winter Expense. 
Labor pay rolls $32.72 



LONG POND NORTH DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 
Labor pay rolls ..... $202.59 

Winter Expense. 
Labor pay rolls ..... $25.34 



HORSE HILL DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay rolls $100.71 

R. W. Hoit, grade 2.70 



Culverts. 

Labor pay rolls 

R. W. Hoit, lighting road 

Crowley & Quinn, stone 



$' 


78.54 




1.20 




8.10 



$103.41 



187.84 



MAST YARD DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 
Labor pay rolls $92.60 



SANBORN DISTRICT. 

General Repairs. 
Labor pay rolls $62.40 



128 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PENACOOK INTERVAL. DISTRICT. 
General Repairs. 



Labor pay rolls .... 
Ai J. Smith, use of watering trough 
E. L. Batchelder, lumber . 
George Prescott, painting signs 

Winter Expense. 
Labor pay rolls .... 

Balance on hand * . 



Appropriation for permanent work 



ant 



$25.75 

3.00 

10.30 

2.50 



841.55 

$4.50 
492.8a 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

Macadamizing. 

Labor pay rolls 

Hutchinson Building Co., stakes 

A.B.Woodworth, expense account crusher 

Climax Road Machine Co., crusher \ 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

H. O. Marsh & Co., coal 

J. H. Houghton, spikes and pins 

Cushman Electric Co., labor 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, grain 

Thomas J. Nolan, duck cover . 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., hose, belting, etc 



!,446.44 

1.50 

18.24 

385.22 

76.78 

160.72 

14.04 

8.30 

26.00 

22.00 

11.80 



Labor pay rolls 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

Concord Street Railway, tickets 



PENACOOK DISTRICT. 
Macadamizing. 

SI, 813. 27 



60.57 
30.00 



,000.00 
,000.00 



$5,171.04^ 



* This amount is increased $83.20 by transfer of printing bills to printing- 
and stationery. 



CITY EXPENSES. 



129 



N. S. Gule & Co., hardware . 
Foote, Brown & Co., oil, etc. . 

D. Warren Fox, waste, etc. 

C. R. Dame, powder and fuse . 

E. L. Davis, coal 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., rope, etc. 
Climax Road Machine Co., chain 
C. A. Bailey, crushed stone 
Concord Axle Co., labor, etc. . 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, etc. 
Mrs. Charles H. Rowe, use of land 

Transferred to catch-basins appropr 
Balance on hand 



iation 



$6.77 
16.19 

1.97 

2.50 

138.15 

27.20 

1.20 
491.11 

3.27 
13.18 

7.50 



Appropriation for catch basins . . $800.00 
Transferred from permanent work appro- 
priation 200.00 

Transferred from money on deposit . • 300.00 



S2,612.88 

200.00 

16.08 

$8,000.00 



Sl,300.00 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

Building Catch Easins. 

Labor pay rolls ..... S81.32 

Concord Foundry Co., traps, etc. . . 139.66 

Joseph Giddis, mason work . . , 63.00 

Frank Coffin & Co., cement . . . 21.25 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., pipe . . . 78.23 

Samuel Holt, brick ..... 63.75 

Rowell & Phimmer, labor . . . 2.70 



Cleaning Catch-Basins. 

Labor pay rolls 1654.06 

Stevens & Duncklee, sewer dippers . . 2.00 

Proctor & Burt, rubber boots . . . 7.50 



S449.91 



8663.56 



130 CITV OF COXCOHD. 

WEST CONCORD DISTRICT. 
Building Catch-Basins. 

Labor pay rolls $13.11 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., pipe . . . 8.10 

Concord f'oiindry Co., traps, etc. . . 6.38 

Wood worth & Co., cement . . . 1.25 



PENACOOK DISTRICT. 
Building Catch-Basins. 

Labor pay rolls ..... S21.33 

John E. Rines, brick .... 7.00 

George Neller, mason work . . . 7.35 



S28.84 



Cleaning Catch-Basins. 
Labor p;iy rolls ..... So. 25 



S35.68 



Cleaning Catch-Basins. 
Labor pay rolls ..... $59.24 



EAST CONCORD VILLAGE DISTRICT. 
Cleaning Catch-Basins. 

Labor pay rolls ..... SI. 50 

Balance on hand ..... 56.02 



$1,300.00 
Appropriation for cleaning streets . . S4.000.00 
Transferred from new concrete appropria- 
tion 266.56 

$4,266.56 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 
Cleaning Streets. 

Labor pay rolls $3,226.88 

*Repnblican Press Association, printing, 

etc 7.20 

*By transfer to printing and stationery tliere is left a balance of if 7. 20 of this 
appropriation. 



CITY EXPENSES. 



131 



Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 
Hickory Broom Fibre Co., brooms 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., rakes 



$94.00 
3.50 
8.50 



Night Collection Ashes. 



Labor pay rolls 



Labor pay rolls 



Night Collection Paper. 



S3, 340. 08 
$396.19 
S333.17 



WEST CONCORD DISTRICT. 
Cleaning Streets. 



Labor pay rolls 



114.96 



PENACOOK DISTRICT. 
Cleaning Streets. 



Labor pay rolls 



$147.81 



EAST CONCORD VILLAGE DISTRICT. 

Cleaning Streets. 
Labor pay rolls ..... $34.35 



^$4,266.56 



Appropriation for sininkling 



$4,000.00 



CENTRAL DISTRICT. 

Labor pay rolls .... $2,630.17 

C. H. Martin & Co., paint, etc. . . 27.69 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., seat s[)rings . . .85 

Samuel Eastman & Co., hose, etc. . . 62.00 

Concord Foundry Co., re[)airs . . . 2.75 

Huntley & Tenney, repairs . . . 53.70 

Goodhue & Milton, repairs . . . 28.60 

*By transfer to printing and -stationerj' there is left a balance of $7.20 of this 
appropriation. 



132 



CITY OF CONCORO. 



Coucoid Water Works, water . 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 
Stevens & Duncklee, sprinkler 

Balance on hand 



Appropriations for new concrete 

Central District. 

Labor pay rolls 

J. H. Rowell & Co., new concrete 

Johnson & Simpson, edgestone 

Daniel Weathers, edgestone 

New England Granite Works, edgestone 

Ola Anderson, edgestone . 

Lonis Coinolli, edgestone . 

Frank J. Batchelder, stone step 



$700.00 
11.75 
•21.00 



$3,000.00 



$349.06 

1,204.39 

244.69 

81 25 

196.91 

282.10 

11.03 

1.50 



;,538.51 
461.49 



14,000.00 



$2,370.93 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay rolls ..... 

J. H. Rowell & Co., new concrete 

Transferred to cleaning streets appropria- 
tion ....... 

Balance on hand ..... 



$1.63 
207.08 



Appropriation for repairing concrete $1,500.00 

Central District. 

Labor pay rolls S25.94 

J. H. Rowell & Co., .repairing concrete 1,474.06 



Appropriation for salary commissioner 

highways $1,400.00 

Paid Alfred Clark, commissioner . 1,400.00 

Appropriation for moving street railway 



1208.71 

$266.56 

153 80 

$3,000.00 



$1,500.00 



$625.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



133 



Labor pay rolls 

Henry Morrill, contract 

N. S. Gale & Co., pipe, etc. 

Balance on deposit 



$60.41 
552.20 

9.96 

12.43 



POLICE AND WATCH. 

Regular appropriation .... 
Paid as follows : 

Pay Rolls. 

Marshal, Deputy Marshal, captain of 

watch and nine patrolmen . . $9. 

Special police ...... 

Janitor ....... 



;622.57 
- $625.00 

$12,361.00 



875.48 
263.00 
216.00 



Fuel. 




Concord Coal Co., coal and wood 


. S199.26 


E. L. Davis, coal and wood at Penacook . 2S.46 


Board of Horse and Shoeing. 


Fellows & Davis, board of horse 


. $151.66 


Eugene Davis, board of horse . 


25.13 


A. C. Sanborn, pasturing horse 


2.00 


M. F. Bickford, board of horse 


98.32 


James E. McShane, shoeing horse 


25.00 


Horse Hir 


e. 


M. F. Bickford 


S9.50 


John Chadwick, Penacook 


47.00 


Lights. 




Concord Laud & Water Power Co. 


. $96.93 


Concord Light & Power Co. 


28.50 


Penacook Electric Light Co. . 


31.90 



$10,354.48 



S227.72 



$302.11 



$56.50 



$157.33 



134 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Rent Penacook. 




Union Guaranty Savings Bank . 


. $27.00 


C. H. Sanders 


81.00 



Telephone and Street Gong, Penacook. 

Penacook Electric Light Co., labor . . $4.58 

A. H. Hoyt, supplies . ... . 38.25 

Local Telephone Exchange, service . . 2.50 

John Chadwick, messenger service, . . 25.00 



Water and Ice. 

Concord Water Works, water, . 
Concord Ice Co., ice ... 



S28.00 
7.35 



Helmets and Buttons. 
Knox, the hatter, helmets and belts . 

Uniforms Special Police. 
Sleeper & Hood, coat .... 

New Boiler, Police Station. 
Albert S. Trask ..... 

Repairs and Incidentals. 

Batchelder & Co., crackers for transients . $30.70 

Silsby & Sons, supplies .... 22.50 

P. H. Coleman, painting wagon . . 16.00 

John C. Farrand, supplies, transients . 10.73 

A. C. Mantle, book .... 5.00 

E. L. Davis, moving goods . . . 3.00 
Robert F. Keane, pressing and repairing 

coats ....... 8.50 

John T. Fiske, repairs .... 2.05 

Huntley & Tenney, repairs . . . 12.85 

James R. Hill & Co., supplies . . . 8.35 

Stevens & Duncklee, supplies . . . 5.60 

Lee Brothers, plumbing .... 3.20 



$108.00 



$70.33 

$35.35 

$34.50 

$20.00 

8332.20 



CITY EXPENSES. 



135 



Humphrey-Dodge Co., hose 
C. Pelissier & Co., mattress 
Philbriek Furniture Co., mattress 
A. P. Fitch, supplies 
John R. Miller, repairs 

Unexpended balance . 



$6.00 
1. 10 
1.95 
3.00 
1.00 



S141.53 
520.95 

$12,361.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Appropriation ..... 
N. H. Democratic Press Co., advertising 
N. H. Democratic Press Co., printing 

check-lists ..... 
Republican Press Association, advertising- 
Republican Press Association, printing 
Republican Press Association, school re 

ports ...... 

Ira C. Evans, miscellaneous printing 
Ira C. Evans, city report . 
Ira C. Evans, department reports 
Silsby & Son, supplies, 
Stockbridge & Sanders, supplies, 
Frank L. Sanders, supplies 
J. W. McMurphy, printing 
Frank J. Batchelder, printing 
Edson C. Eastman, supplies 
A. E. Martel, letter book . 
H. E. Chandler, copy book 
J. G. Chase, agent, supplies 
Unexpended balance 



.52,500.00 



$117.24 

4.00 
179.95 
259.85 

123.60 

460.80 

964.47 

102.00 

126.21 

17.25 

13.51 

25.77 

12.25 

8.95 

5.00 

1.50 

1.60 

76.05 



$2,500.00 



The expenses of printing and stationery were incurred by the 
several departments as follows : 

Mayor, including publication of inaugural 

address $29.40 



136 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



City clerk and overseer of poor, including 

books S125.61 

City auditor, including books . . 91.70 

City solicitor, briefs .... 12.75 

City treasurer, receipt books . . . 13.25 

Assessors, including advertising . . 108.26 

Highway department, including advertising, 138.85 

Engineering department . . . 13.10 

Police and watch . . . . . 61.25 

Tax collector, receipt books . . . 96.50 
Tax collector, stamped envelopes and 

printing 180.40 

Tax collector, tax notices . . . 21.77 

Tax collector, advertising and stationery, 44.79 

Board of health 23.50 

Publishing ordinances .... 118.55 

Fire department . . . . . 34.70 

City report ...... 964.47 

Departmental reports .... 102.00 

School report . . . . . 123.60 

City government, committees, etc. . . 74.25 

Police judge, complaints . . . 4.00 

Public library 17.00 

Miscellaneous ..... 24.25 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 



Appropriations 

Paid as follows : 
Harry G. Sargent, costs advanced 
Harry G. Sargent, fees advanced 
Joseph Welcome, costs 
Harry G. Sargent, serving notices 
Unexpended balance 



$29.86 


36.88 


15.49 


ia.95 


103.82 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 
Appropriation ..... 

Chas. E. Palmer, health officer, salary . $800.00 



62,423.95 



$200.00 



$200.00 



,462.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 137 

J. S. Button, rent .... $108.00 

E. N. Pearson, member board of health . 25.00 
Edward A. Clark, member board of 

health 25.00 

D. E. Sullivan, member board of health 25.00 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas . . 4.65 

$987.65 



Care of Pest House. 

W. A. Feruald, furniture . . . $10.00 

W. R. Heath, supplies .... 4.64 

$14.64 

Assistance Sanitary Inspector. 

J. P. W. Roach, substitute health officer . . . $31.30 

Bacteriological Tests. 
Arthur K. Day, M. D., service . . $131.45 

Harold D. p:rnst, M. D., service . . 3.00 

Edmund R. Angell, service . . . 9.55 

$144.00 



Material for Fumigation. 
Woodworth & Co., sulphur . . . $5.63 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies . . 6.18 

A. H. Britton & Co., cylinder for fu- 
migation . . . . . . 1.25 



Incidentals. 

F. L. Sanders $1.40 

W. J. Feruald, recovering office table . 2.25 

Charles E. Palmer, cash paid out . . 44.03 

Norris A. Dunklee, livery . . . 51.00 

Danforth, P^orrest & Morgan, supplies . 3.47 

O. C. Phillips, burying dead horse . . 3.00 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies . . 17.75 
George L. Theobald, service and horse 

hire 10.00 

George L. Theobald, burying dog and cat 4.00 



$13.06 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



John H. Coburn, burying dog 
DeWitt C. Howe, hack hire . 
Eugene H. Davis, livery 

Unexpended balance 



$1.00 
1.00 

1.00 



$139.90 
131.45 

$1,462.00 



COMMITTEE SERVICE. 



Appropriation 

Paid as follows : 
Charles E. Foote, alderman . 
Charles H. Sanders, alderman 
George A. Hoit, alderman 
Frank E. Dimond, alderman . 
Harry R. Hood, alderman 
John G. McQuilken, alderman 
John F. Webster, alderman . 
Henry O. Adams, alderman . 
James H. Rowell, alderman 
Howard A. Kimball, alderman 
Arthur F. Sturtevant, alderman 
Henry E. Conant, alderman . 
Albert S. Trask, alderman 
William A. Lee, alderman 
James M. Killeen, alderman . 
William C. Spicer, councilman 
William Taylor, councilman . 
John W. Sanborn, councilman 
Russell P. Shepard, councilman 
Fred W". Scott, councilman . 
Frank H. Smith, councilman . 
Eben M. Willis, councilman . 
Geo. W. Bunker, councilman 
Edward E. Lane, councilman 
Henry B. Colby, councilman . 
Ethan N. Spencer, councilman 



.$1,410.00 



S60.00 
GO. 00 
60.00 
60.00 
75.00 
60.00 
60.00 
75.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
45.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
45.00 
30.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



139 



Albert P. Davis, couucilmau . 
David A. AVelch, councilman 
Chai-les L. Norris, councilman 
Albeit Graut, couucilmau 



SCHOOLS. 

Unexpended balance of 1896 . 
Appropriation .... 

Walker fund, interest . . . . 

Additional appropriation. Union district 
Text-books ...... 

Industrial education, Union district 
Military drill, High school . ' . 
Additional appropriation. District No. 20 
Additional appropriation. Town district . 
Literary fund . . . . . 

Dog licenses . . . . . 

Paid as follows : 

L. J. Rundlett, agent Union district 
I. N. Abbott, agent town district 
Henry Rolfe, agent District No. 20 

Balance due school districts 



$30.00 
30.00 
30.00 
30.00 



$17,284.98 

34,705.00 

60.00 

9,232.00 

2,800.00 

2,700.00 

300.00 

1,000.00 

600.00 

1,846.98 

1,284.47 



$1,410.00 



$71,813.43 



$47,039.00 
. 3,700.00 
. 3,439.78 



$54,178.78 
17,634.65 

$71,813.43 



SCHOOL HOUSE TAXES. 

Appropriation for repairs and insurance : 

District No. 20 .... $100.00 

Unexpended balance . . . . 100.00 



PRECINCT. 

Unexpended balance, 1896 
Appropriation, interest on sewer bonds 



$651.41 

1,670.00 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriation, to pay note . . . $500.00 

Appropriation, to pay interest on note . 17.50 
Appropriation, for lighting streets 10,500.00 

Appropriation, for sewers . . . 3.500.00 

Received rent of pumps, 1896 . . 6.00 

Received sale of rubber boots . . 2.28 

Received sale of sewer pipe . . 43.84 
Received for labor and material on White's 

park 17.30 

Appropriation for rent of pumps, 1897 . 90.76 

Paid as follows : 
Interest paid .... $1,760.00 

Note paid 500.00 

Lighting Streets. 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas . $1,628.38 

Concord Land & Water Power Co., 

electric lights ..... 8,158.73 

Sewers. 

Pay rolls, work on sewers . . . $2,829.00 

Penacook sewer precinct, pipes . . 24.80 

Thompson & Hoague, pipes . . . 209.10 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., pipes . . . 217.00 

Berry & Ferguson, pipes .... 67.50 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete . . . 20.50 

E. A. Gushing, trucking . . . . 34.50 

Geo. F. Sewell, trucking . . . 7.00 

W. L. Riford, trucking .... 18.20 

J. F. Healey, trucking .... .50 

Geo. L. Theobald, t)ucking . . . 40.60 

Woodworth & Co., cement . . . 62.30 

Stockbridge & Sanders, binding . . 1.50 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., hardware . . 14.28 

Thompson & Hoague, hardware . . 68.27 

Geo. L. Theobald, gravel and teams . 17.45 

Geo. W. Waters, hose and couplings . 300.85 



$16,999.09 



^2,260.00 



$9,787.11 



CITY EXPENSES. 



141 



A. H. Biitton & Co., hardware 

Lee Bros., valve and labor 

H. C. Sturtevant & Sou, oil 

Highway department, paving . 

C. R. Martin & Co., supplies . 

Danforth, Forrest & Morgan, labor, etc. 

Rowell & Plumraer, labor and supplies 

Goodhue & Milton, valves and repairs 

Concord Foundry Co., manhole covers 

Ford & Kimball, castings 

Globe Horse-shoeing shop, repairs . 

W. A. Thompson, rubber boots 

E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., lumber 

Samuel Holt, brick and sand 

Boston & Maine railroad, freight 

Unexpended balance 

Water Precinct. 
Appropriation ..... 
Paid Concord Water Works 



S6.55 

6.74 

5.40 

6.50 

.71 

2.19 

46.92 

24.25 

22.48 

81.98 

1.00 

7.50 

64.00 

126.91 

6.00 



$4,342.48 
609.50 

$16,999.09 

86,000.00 
6,000.00 



SALARIES. 



Regular appropriation 
Special appropriation 



$10,952.00 
181.61 



Paid as follows : 
Albert B. Wood worth, mayor . 
Joseph A. Cochran, city clerk . 
Joseph A. Cocfiran, overseer jioor 
Charles P^. Foote, overseer poor, Ward 1 
George A. Hoit, overseer poor, Ward 2 
James O. Lyford, auditor 
Harry G. Sargent, city solicitor 
William F. Thayer, city treasurer . 
Edw^ard A. Stevens, city messenger 
Harvey P. Sanborn, clerk common council, 
E. H. Dixon, care city clocks . 



$11,133.61 



U, 000. 00 

1,173.08 

200.00 

30.00 

10.00 

1,034.69 

500.00 

250.00 

600.00 

50.00 

21.25 



142 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



J. P. Paige, care city clocks . 

Board of Education, Union school district 

Town district school board 

Board of Education, school district No. 20 

A. W. Hobbs, assessor, Ward 3 (1896) 



O. J. Fifield, 

W. A. Cowley, 

Joseph E. Shepard, " 

D. C. Woodman, " 

George F. Underbill, " 

George S. Dennett, " 

Jonathan B. Weeks, " 7 

John J. Lee, " 8 

James Ahern, " 9 

Pay-rolls, moderators 

Pay-rolls, ward clerks 

Pay-rolls, selectmen 

Benjamin F^. Badger, judge police court 

George M. Fletcher, clerk police court 

W. P. Ladd, tax collector, taxes 1896 

W. P. Ladd, tax collector, taxes 1897 

Unexpended balance 



WHITE'S PARK. 

Regular appropriation . . . . 

Transferred to parks and commons 

Special appropriation . . . . . 

Paid as follows : 
Pay-rolls, employees, .... 
Salary of superintendent . . . . 

Ola Anderson, stone bridge contract 
N. H. Democratic Press Co., advertising- 
Ira C. Evans, printing placards 
Danforth, Forrest & Morgan, materials and 

labor ....... 



163.75 
250.00 
200.00 

25.00 
6.00 
258.00 
276.00 
381.00 
276.00 
345.00 
393.00 
280.00 
249.00 
366.00 

27.00 

90.00 
135.00 
800.00 
200.00 
318.49 
1,298.43 

26.92 



Sll,133.61 



$3,250.00 
50.00 

$3,200.00 
144.58 

$3,344.58 



$1,099.38 

1,080.00 

313.13 

3.00 

7.25 

204.78 



CITY EXl^ENSKS. 



143 



W. H. Richardson, supplies 

C. S. Flanders, care of swans and ducks 

R. & J. Faraquat & Co., supplies 

Peter Daley, labor 

Horace S. Chaplin, wheelbarrow 

John C. Thorne, rubber boots 

John H. Ramsey, trees 

Woodworth & Co., cement . 

George L. Fogg, repairs 

Alma J. Herbert, interest on note 

George W. Chesley, horse purchased 

George W. Chesley, labor, sand and loam 

Shady Hill Nursery, supplies 

J. D. Johnson & Son . 

Thompson & Hoague, hardware . 

J. G. Taylor, rent of stall for horse 

Frank Coffin & Co., forage for horse 

Garden and Forest subscription . 

George Abbott, Jr., paint 

W. L. Riford, freight and trucking 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 

Ross W. Cate, repairs 



S2.25 

25.00 

6.70 

2.00 

7.00 

4.25 

9.00 

2.50 

2.20 

70.00 

40.00 

255.38 

51.70 

21.12 

2.25 

15.25 

45.37 

400 

1.21 

2.25 

58.46 

9.15 



$3,344.58 



ROLLINS PARK. 



Regular appropriation 
Special appropriation 



$750.00 
233.84 



Paid as follows : 
Pay-rolls, employees 
Danforth, Forrest & Morgan, supplies 
A. S. Chadbourne, trees and shrubs 
W. H. Ricliardson, supplies 
Shady Hill Nui'sery 
W. L. Riford, trucking 
W. H. Richardson, cash paid out 
Goodhue & Milton, supplies 
W. G. C. Kimball, supplies 



S983.84 



$357.63 

7.19 

58.00 

3.25 

92.80 

5.46 

2.55 

130.47 

5.45 



144 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



George W. Chesley, teams . 






$87.63 


Boston & Maine R. R., freight 






1.35 


Thompson & Hoague, hardware 






14.26 


John Iba, rent of barn 






4.00 


G. W. Lougee, storage 






2.00 


Ira B. Shallies &, Co., himber 






151.63 


George Abbott, Jr., painting 






10.62 


Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 






46.55 


Concord Water Works, water 






3.00 


PENACOOK PARK. 


Regular appropriation .... 


Special appropriation . 









Paid as follows : 
Pay-rolls, employees 
C. H. Stevens & Co., lumber 
Foote, Brown & Co., paints, oils, etc., 
Parmenter & Co.. supplies . 
Thompson & Hoague, supplies 
O. F. Richardson, labor 



$66.90 
16.48 
5.82 
6.87 
1.10 
6.55 



PARKS AND COMMONS. 



RepiUar appropriation 
Transferred from White's Park 



Paid as follows : 
Pay-roll employees 
W. H. Richardson, cash paid out 
R. & J. Faraquat & Co., 
Shady Hill Nursery, trees and shrubs 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight 
J. H. Cunningham, supplies 
W. L. Riford, trucking and freight 
Goodhue & Milton, bibbs, 
Concord Water Works 



f 50.50 

3.20 

9.40 

96.50 

.40 

16.34 

3.46 

2.60 

3.00 



$983.84 



.$ 100.00 
3.72 

$103.72 



$103.72 



fl75.00 
50.00 

^225.00 



CITT EXPENSES. 



145 



Danforth, Forrest & Morgan 
George W. Chesley, teams and loam 
Unexpended balance 



$1.53 

31.80 

6.27 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Regular appropriation . . . $5,500.00 

vSpecial appropriation, income trust funds, 89.69 



Pay-rolls. 

Salary, librarian, assistants, and janitor . 

Purchase of Books, Magazines, Etc. 



Charles F. Batchelder, newspapers 

Woodbury E. Hunt, books 

The C. A. Nichols Co., books 

S. Raymond Roberts, books . 

The Outlook Co., magazine . 

E. C. Eastman, books . 

E. C. Eastman, magazines 

N. H. Democratic Press Co., newspaper 

rU-anite Monthly, subscription 

Publishers' Weekly, index 

E. F. Bigelow, periodical 

Republican Press Association, Monitor 

D. Appleton & Co., books 

Balch Bros., books 

N. F. Cartel-, history Pembroke 

C. C. Haskell & Son, Abbott's Civil War, 

Jordan & Marsh, books 



$142.98 
790.52 

30.00 
6.00 
3.00 

61.68 
181.80 
6.00 
3.00 
3.50 
1.00 
3.00 

45.00 

28.00 
4.25 
4.00 

10.10 



Printing Non-fiction Catalogue, Etc. 

Ira C. Evans, cards, etc. . . . $29.10 

Ira C. Evans, 500 tinding lists . . 364.60 

Ira C. Evans, book slips . . . 12.25 

10 



$225.00 



i, 589. 69 
>, 700.05 



.,323.83 



$405.9^ 



146 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Fuel and Lights. 



Concord Light & Power Co., gas 
Concord Coal Co., coal and wood 
H. O. Marsh & Co., wood 



Binding. 



Stockbridge & Sanders . 
Frank L. Sanders . 
Boston Book Binding Co. 
Silsby & Son 



$121.90 

1.S8.44: 

1.98 



$63.06 
77.93 

161.44 
21.52 



^312.32 



$323.95 



Incidentals. 

vSilsby & Sou, stationer}' supplies . . $94.63 
Thompson & Hoagne, hardware . . 6.85 
Grace Blanchard, librarian, cash paid out 46.97 
Miller Bros'. Cutlery Co., pens . . 2.25 
Benjamin Bilsborough, repairs and paint- 
ing ....... 55.85 

'AV. Fj. Parker, supplies . . . . 1.75 

Ira B. Shallies & Co., repairs . . 62.66 

Lee Brothers, repairs . . . . 20.11 

C. G. Coffin & Co., grass seed . . 1.19 

A. H. Britton & Co., repairs and supplies, 7.50 
"W. B. Cunningham, transportation books 

to Penacook ..... 52.00 

N. S. Gale, care books at Penacook . 52.00 

Concord Water Works, water . . 10.00 

W. S. Davis & Son, repairs . . . 1.10 

Hood & Robbins, repairs . . . 2.35 

Library Bureau, supplies . . . 5.97 

Concord Ice Co., ice . . . . .75 

Stevens & Duncklee, repairs . . . 11.55 

Frank L. Sanders, pens . . . 1.50 

E. H. Randall, repairs . . . . 3.25 

T. H. Castor & Co., supplies . . 1.28 



CITY EXPENSES. 



u; 



J. M. Stewart & Sous Co., supplies 
Unexpended balance 



MEMORIAL DAY. 

Appropriation ..... 

Paid as follows : 
D. Arthur Brown, for W. I. Brown Post, 
Frank Battles, for E. E. Stnrtevant Post, 
A. C. Powell, for Davis Post 



$49 7.. 51 
26. OH 



$7.0.00 

220.00 

.■)0.00 



S965.10 



$5,589.69 



$345.00 



$345.00 



MARGARET PILLSBURY GENERAL HOSPITAL. 



Appropriation 

Paid Wm. F. Thaj^er, treasurer 



$2,000.00 
2.000.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Regular appropriation .... 

Paid as follows : 
Salary, engineer 
Pay-rolls, employees 
E. Cx. Sullivan, supplies 

Stockbridge & Sandei's, 



Silsby & Son, 

Frank L. Sanders 

J. G. Chase, agent 

George A. Berry & Co. 

F. W. Scott & Co. 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., 

C. Irving Swan, 

George A. Place, supplies and repairs 

W. & L. Greeley, repairs 

John T. Fiske & Co., repairs 



$1,500.00 
957.25 
66.84 
3.20 
8.40 
28.35 
2.35 
1.30 
2.88 
1.00 
9.52 
5.50 
6.40 
.75 



$3,000.00 



148 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



George W. Wilson, supplies . . . S4.50' 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas . . 1.65 
W. B. Howe, cash paid out, postage, car- 
fare, etc 8.S.08 

Norris A. Diinklee, livery . . . 72.00 

E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., stakes . 20.00 

J. S. Dutton, rent .... 204.00 

Unexpended halaiice .... 16.03 



83,000.00^ 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 

Regular appropriation . . . $2,500.00 

Special appropriations, of which S2,92!).26 
is income of trust funds, receipts from 
sale of lots, grading, etc., deposited 
with city treasurer 



Paid as follows : 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, includ 

ing salary of superintendent 
A. S. Chadbourne, trees and shrubs 
Vj. H. Dixon, trees 
George L. Theobald, horse 
Thelon H. Barker, shrubs and plants 
George Main, plants 
^y. M. Colby, plants 
Humphrey-Dodge Co.. supplies 
E. H. Randall, Vepairs . 



3,130.97 



85,270.58 
111.50 
58.50 
40.00 
21.70 
9.00 
84.74 
21.23 
13.72 



^$5,630:97 



S5,630.97 



The treasurer of tlie Cemetery connnission accounts for funds 
coming into his hands as follows : 



Receipts. 

Balance on hand from 1896 

Received from sale of lots and grading 

Sale of lots 



S9.77 

1.071.81 

757.11 



*Not included in tlie above is $535.91, half the income from sale of lots, car- 
ried to Blossom Hill cemetery fund. 



CITY EXPENSES. 



149 



Received from burials, care of lots, etc 

Mrs. D. D. Stanyan, care, 

A. C. Ferrin, . 
John D. Gale, care and repairs 

B. I. Poore, care and repairs 
Mrs. Stephen Webster, care and repairs 
Mrs. Lowell Brown 
Henry W. Greenough 
J. S. Hubbard 
William Ray 
George Lincoln 
John Swenson 
■John Swenson, foundation 
Mrs. T. A. Freeman, care 
J, E. Dwight, care . 
Mrs. E. H. Greeley, care 
Mrs. Edwin Sanborn, care and repairs 
Mrs. A. 8. Marshall, care 
Frank Presby, burial 
A. M. FoUett, care . 
Ivimball Flanders, care 
Mrs. George Kellom, care 
Hosea Quimby, care 
R. E. Pecker estate, care 
Mrs. Mary Pecker estate, care 
A. S. Sprague, care 
Archie Leighton, burial . 
Charles G. Blauchard, care 

C. H. Shute, care 
C. J. Smith, care 

•George W. Crockett, care and repairs 
Mrs. L. 8. Morrill, care . 
L. H. Carroll, care . 
Enoch Gerrish, care 
C. H. Noyes, care . 
J. M. Hill, 2 lots, care . 
H. N. Sargent, care 
Mary Per ley, care . 



$1.00 
1.50 
2.75 
1.00 
2.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.25 
1.00 
1.00 
9.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
1.75 
2.00 
4.00 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
6.00 
2.00 
3.60 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
5.(10 
1.00 
3.00 



150 



CITY OK CONCORD. 



H. W. Tarbox, burial .... S3. 00 

W. H. Kimball, care .... 1.00 

Mrs. D. A. Warde, care .... 2.00 

Benjamin F. Virgin, caie . . . 1.50 

John Allison, care ..... 1.50 

William H. Allison, care and repairs . 2.50 

Joseph H. Lane's estate, care and burial . 4.50 

Miss P. Eaton, care .... 2.00 

E. B. Hutchinson, care and plants . . 8.75 
Jonathan Brown's lot, care . . . 1.00 

J. B. Palmer, care 2.00 

Sidney Upham, care .... 2.00 

Fred. U. Lane, care .... 1.50 

Henry W. Ranlet, care .... 2.00 

Henry Mason, care ..... 2.00 

Mrs. M. L. Brown, care . . . . 1.00 

Mrs. F. Dodge, care .... 2.00 

Mrs. G. N. Johnson, burial . . . 3.00 

John S. Blanchard, care .... 2.00 

Augustus Bean, repairs .... 1.25 

Mrs. L. E. Flagg's estate, burial . . 3.00 

W. E. Dow, care 1.00 

W. J. Blakely estate, care and burial . 6.00 

C. P. Smith, care and repairs . . . 2.00 

Mrs. G. L. Lovejoy, care . . . 2.00 

W. M. Mason, labor .... .50 

I. A. Hill, care 6.00 

W. G. Shaw, care 2.00 

Mrs. I. W. Hammond, care . . . 1.50 

J. W. George, care 1.50 

F. D. Owens estate, burial . . . 3.00 
Mrs. George E. Todd, care . . . 3.00 
L. S. Packard, burial .... 4. GO 
L. S. Packard, care .... 1.50 
Daniel Wyman, burial .... 4.0O 
George W. Heath, care .... 1.00 
George W. Thompson, burial . . . 3.00 
F. H. Clement, care .... 1.00 
E. G. Kilburn lot, repairs . . . 1.50' 



CITY EXPENSES. 



151 



Mrs. W. M. Mackay, H. J. Eaton's lot, 

repairs ..... 

John C. Blake, care 

Mrs. J. McCarty (Mrs. Morrow), burial 
Rev. E. O. Jameson, burial 
C. A. Herbert, care 
W. H. Rogers, G. F. Weeks's burial 
W. P. Paul's estate, burial 
Mrs. Fred Pearson's estate, burial 
George Connell, care 
Mrs. Abbott, Burbank lot, care 
Miss Sarah Sanborn, care 
S. N. Jackman estate, care 
Mrs. H. B. Tibbetts estate, burial . 
H. H. Hussey's estate, burial , 
H. A. Kimball, care 
C. W. Spaulding, use of tomb 
Zelotus Stevens, burial 
Mrs. Fifield, use of tomb 
Miss Lindquist, single grave and burial 
Mrs. Warren Clark, care . 
C. M. Saltmarsh, care 
Mrs. C. B. Lawrence, care 
Mr. Pennington, burial 
Dr. Chancey Adams, care 
Mrs. Sargent estate lot, repairs 
N. H. Asylum (John Miller), burial 
N. H. Asylum (Stephen Plant), burial 
Ellen M. Bixby, repairs . 
Mr. Ahlstrom, burial 
Cummings Brothers, posts 
Mr. Estey, burial .... 
Miss J. Duncklee, care 
F. D. Abbot, care .... 
Mrs. May H. Beckett, single grave . 
Mrs. May H. Beckett, burial . 
H. J. Crippen estate 
F. E; Clark, burial .... 
Cummings Brothers, posts 



S.3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
4.00 
1.00 
3.00 
.3.00 
3.00 
■2.00 
1.75 
1.50 
2.00 

10.00 
3.00 
1.50 
1.00 
4.00 
1.00 
8.00 
2.50 
1.00 
2.00 
3.00 
2.00 

10.00 

3.50 

3.50 

5.00 

1.00 

1.50 

.50 

2.00 

1.50 

5.00 

.50 

.28 

3.00 

1. 00 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mary A. Page, care 
Mrs. N. G. Mead, care . 
R. A. Marshall, burial 
W. H. Johns, burial 
Mrs. G. Grant, removal . 
Fred. Bacon, burial . 
George W. Waters, burial 
George W. Hall, use of tomb 
F. E. Cogswell estate, burial 
W. C. Batchelder, burial 
D. Courser, care 
A. B. Farnum, use of tomb 
Geo. J. Barney estate, burial 

F. H. Clement, burial 
Vases sold 

J. F. Hill, single grave . 
J. F. Hill, burial 

G. W. Whittredo;e, dressing 
Mrs. Abbott, use of tomb 
A. P. Sherl)urne, shrubs . 
Clapp and Rolfe, care 
Mrs. \y. Bates, care 
Miss C. Wyatt, labor 
W. H. Hurd, care . 
C. W. Ash, care of plants 
Geo. A. Blauchard estate, burial 
Frank Swasey, removal , 
L. P. Durgiu, burial and repair 
Moses D. French estate, burial 
A. Martin, repairs . 
Mrs. W. Stevenson, care . 
Geo. G. Hatch, care 
Mrs. Mary A. Franklin, burial 
Gordon and Edgerly, care 
C. P. Virgin, care . 
J. A. Moore, care and repairs . 
Benevolent Society, care and repairs 
Mrs. J. E. Riues, removal 
Mrs. J. E. Sargent estate, burial and care 



15. .50 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 

.50 
1.00 

.50 
1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.50 

.50 
3.00 
3.00 

.40 
5.00 
3.00 

.36 
1.00 

.50 
2.50 
2.00 

.25 
2.00 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
5.50 
3.00 

.75 
1.00 
1.50 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.50 
2.00 
3.00 
9.75 



CITY EXPENSES. 



153 



H. W. Matthews estate, burial and care 

Fred Sawyer, burial 

Benj. I. Poore estate, burial 

J. T. Welch, burial 

W. Tonkins, burial . 

Mrs. W. E. Norton, care 

Mrs. Keyes and Miss Seavey, repairs 

J. J. Wyman estate, burial 

Mrs. N. T. Smith estate, burial 

Geo. W. Waters, burial . 

John McCauley estate, burial 

Mr. Hemphill, burial 

James Hazelton, burial 

A. G. Estabrool<, care 

Everson & Co., foundation 

Rev. R. S. Mitchell, care 

Nahum Robinson estate, repairs 

Waldo Emerson, burial 

Geo. H. Whitman, burial 

Geo. H. Rider, burial 

F. H. Ellis, burial . 

L. E. Bos well, burial 

Mrs. Geo. H. Hutchius, burial 

C. W. Harrington, burial 

F. Cummings, removal 

G. L. Crowell, burial 
J. B. Cutha, burial . 
W. F. Hannaford, l)urial . 
Mrs. R. Adams, care 
Mrs. A. W. Kimball, repairs 
A. A. Grant, repairs 
S. T. Ford, repairs . 
Mrs. B. M. Locke estate, burial and 
Mrs. Fernald, repairs 
J. M. Duncklee, care 
Mrs. Newhall, repairs 
M. A, Trivette, burial 
Horace Plummer, removals and box 
C. E. Burnside, care 



$10.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.50 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
4.00 

.50 
3.00 
1.50 
3.50 
1.50 
9.15 
1.50 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
8.00 
3.00 
3.00 

.50 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.00 
5.50 

.75 
1.00 
4.00 
3.00 
5.00 
2.00 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Betsey Hadley, burial 

Josiah Batchelder, burial . 

Fred Proctor, burial 

Jeremiah Smith, burial 

W. G. Shaw, burial 

W. W. Storrs, burial 

C. A. Wasto, burial 

Miss E. Sedgley, repairs and care 

L. W. Glysson, care and repairs 

H. W. Marcy (Jackson lot), repair 

Zelotus Stevens, repairs . 

Mr. Beard, labor 

Geo. F. Bond, foundation 

C. A. Hutchins, burial 

John Lugg, burial and labor 

Sylvester Dana, burial and repairs 

William Yeaton estate, burial . 

David Moses, burial 

William Ladd, care. 

Mrs. Nancy Hill estate, burial 

Mrs. Sarah E. Bickford estate, burial 

George A. Berry, care 

Norman G. Carr, care 

N. H. Shattuck, care 

R. F. Robinson, care 

J. C. Badge I', care . 

A. P. Sherburne, care 

Samuel F. Morrill, care . 

F. Mosely & Sons, care . 

Frederick Booth, burial . 

Harry D. Hammond, care 

Mrs. C. J. Whitney, care 

John C. French, care one-half lot 

George H. Russ, care 

W. E. Baker, care . 

John Connell estate, care and repair 

Charles W. Clarke, care . 

Mrs. J. Morgan estate, care 

Miss E. Sturtevant, care . 



$3.00 
3.00 
1.50 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 

12.00 
2.00 

16.00 
1.00 
1.50 
6.00 
8.00 
2.50 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
8.00 
3.00 
1.5U 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.50 
3.00 
2.00 
1.00 
.75 
4.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



15& 



Woodbridge Odlin, care aud burial 

C\'rus Sargent, care and burial 

Herman C. Jewell, burial 

Mrs. A, C. Heath, care. . 

Frank Coffin, care . 

James Minot (Pickering lot), care 

James Minot (Burleigh lot), car 

Charles F. Batchelder, care 

Mrs. George E. Jenks, care 

William L. Foster estate, burial 

George H. Mars ton, care 

William P. Ford, 

Mrs. H. E. Perkins, " 

Mrs. G. L. Nutter, 

John P. Nutter, " 

S. C. Eastman, " 

William E. Chandler, plants and car 

Seth R. Dole, care . 

Frank P. Mace, care 

Fred S. Johnson, care 

J. Connelly estate, burial 

H. R. Hood, burial . 

Allan Blodgett, burial 

Horse sold 

Collar sold 

George F. Page, care 

Mrs. G. H. H. Silsby, care 

F. J. Batchelder, 

W. D. Thompson, 

N. T. Smith estate, '' 

J. W. Drew, 

Mrs. Dearborn (Stevens lot), care 

Mrs. John A. West, 

C. J. Smith, 

N. H. Asylum (Kent lot), 

H. B. Tebbetts, repairs and care 

Fred W. Boardman, care 

Joseph Palmer estate, care 

E. 0. Jameson, care 



810.00 
1.75- 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00' 
1..50' 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00' 
3.0O 
2.0O 
l.OO 
2,00' 
2 OO 
l.OO 
l.OO 
6.0O 
l.OO 
2.0a 
2.75 
3.0O 
2.50 
1.00 

20.00- 
1.00 
3.00 
2.00^ 
1.50 
1.50 
l.OO 
3.00 
2.0O 
2.0O 
2.0O 
3.00- 
3.75 
1.50 
2.0O 
•2.0O 



156 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



•Charles S. Mellen, care . 

W. K. Day estate, burial and care 

Mrs. L. J. Uflfenbeimer, care 

Daniel Holden, care 

Frank P. Jones, burial 

Mrs. G. Bullock, care 

Mrs. A. S. White, care . 

Mrs. J. H. Chase, care and plants 

Benjamin I. Poor's estate, care 

John W. Wardwell, care 

John M. Runals, care 

Mr. Heath, burial . 

P. S. Smith, care 

C. P. Bancroft, care 
Mrs. George H. Adams, care 
Mrs. Loran Clough, care 
Rev. C. W. Bradlee, care 

D. B. Dow. burial . 
George B. Davis, burial 
Miss Mary Perley, care 
O. S. Snell, care 
Mrs. R. V. Merrill, care 
■Charles O. Stearns, care 
William M. Chase, care 
Randall Burt estate, care 
Charles E. Palmer, care 
G. B. Emmons, care 
Henry McFarland, care 
Charles A. Dole, care 
Mrs. G. A. Holt, care 
George L. Lincoln, care and burial 
Aunah J. Kimball, care . 
Joseph Wentworth, burial 
J. Stephen Abbot estate, plants and care 
Gerald Wyman, burial 
Edson J. Hill, care . 
Charles Joy, care 
Bert E. Manley, care and plants 
Dr. E. Morrill, care 



$5.00 
5.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 

25.00 
6.25 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 
5.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.25 
2.00 
3.00 
2.50 
5.00 
4.50 
2.00 
8.00 

17.85 
1.50 
8.00 
1.50 
3.00 
1.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



157 



William Badger, care 








S2.00 


Mrs. Coleman, care 








1.00 


William Murdock, remov 


al 






1.50 


E. C. Elastraan, care 








2.00 


H. A. Dodge, care . 








3.00 


A. T. Whittemore, care 








1.00 


L. A. Smith, care . 








2.00 


Charles L. Gilmore, care 








2.00 


J. W. Robinson, burial 








3.00 


H. C. Brown, care . 








2.00 


William B. Dnrgin, care 








2.50 


S. Blaney, care 








2.00 


F. L. Sanders, care . 








2.00 


J. T. Batchelder, care 








2.50 


E. W. Brooks, burial 








1.50 


J. C. Easton, care . 








1.00 


Mrs. R. M. Morgan, care 








2.00 


Dr. E. H. Foster estate. 


use of tomb 


1.00 


Miss Maria Woods, 


care and repairs. 


3.00 


Mrs. E. Dow, 




1.50 


Underi)ill Brothers, 








2.00 


Mrs. A. Bunker, 








1.50 


J. E. Dwight, 








2.00 


H. E. vSturtevant, 








1.50 


W. H. Horner, 








1 25 


Thomas Young estate. 








1.50 


John F. Webster, 








2.00 


El. p]. Brown, 








1.50 


George L. Stratton, 








3.00 


Miss M. Martin, 








1.50 


George F. Buswell, 








1.50 


C. C. Dan forth. 








3.00 


George L. Brown, 








2.00 


S. N. Jackman estate. 








2.00 


Clara Edgerly, 








1.00 


Mrs, Donovan (Patterson 


lot), care i 


ind pi 


ants 2.00 


E. B. Hutchinson, care and plants 




7.50 


Jonathan Brown, care 


. 




2.00 


E. H. Randall, care 


, 






1.50 



158 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



W- K. Hood, care and burial 

■J. T. Sleeper, care . 

W. A. Russell, care 

Mrs. I. D. Hmitley, care 

Mrs. A. W. Hevenor, care 

Mrs. W. Emerson, care . 

Mrs. E. Adams (Sanborn lot), care 

Mrs. George E. Todd, care 

Mrs. L. F. Lund, care 

C. W. Latie, care 

■C. C. Webster, care 

J. G. Leigh ton, care 

Oeorge D. Waldrou, burial 

Mrs. J. E. Sargent estate, care 

David Young, care. 

Mrs. R. H. Emerson, care 

Mrs. George Kellora, care 

Mrs. F. B. Underbill, care 

Mrs. C. L. Eastman, care 

Mrs- T. A. Freeman, care 

Morey and Whitney, care 

W. I. Leighton, care 

Mrs. C. L. George, care and plants 

Mrs. Wahlron, care 

Datiiel Spline, foundation 

Mrs. .J. L. Pickering, care 

Mrs. J. Rounsefel, care . 

Miss M. A. Abbott, care 

Mrs. J. B. Sanborn, care 

H. E. Richardson, dressing 

Abba Woods, care . 

Uvfoa Moore, care . 

William E. McQuilliu, burial 

W. Bates, care 

■Converse Smith, foundation 

F. E. Currier, care . 

Doa Aldrich, labor . 

Oreaville Buzzell, care 

Hiram Gerrish, care and burial 



110.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.50 
2.00 
3.00 
5.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.75 
6.511 
1.00 
4.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
2.00 
7.00 
2.00 
.50 
1.00 
9.75 



CITY EXPENSES. 



159 



F. K. Jones, care 


. 


$3.00 


J. P. Kittredge, 




. 


2.00 


L. H. Carroll, 






2.00 


Mrs. Poor, 






2.00 


B. W. Couch, 






2.00 


H. W. Ranlet, 






2.00 


Mrs. W. Wright, 






1.00 


Mrs. A. A. Carrier, 






1.50 


H. A. Rowell, 






2.00 


H. E. Conant, 






1.50 


L. K. Peacock, 






2.00 


A. C. Hardy, 






2.00 


H. B. Bartlett, 






1.00 


B. Billshorough, 






1.00 


G. D. B. Prescott, 






1.00 


Mrs. J. M. Jones, 






1.50 


J. Frank Hoit, 






1.00 


Mrs. L. J. Trask, 






1.50 


Mrs. C. H. Ordway, 






1.00 


J. E. Hutchinson, 


'• 




1.00 


CM. Brown, 


'• 




1.00 


Mrs. 'J\ W. Young estate, 


jnrial 


3.00 


Mrs. J. S. R. Sanborn, 


care and plants 


1.50 


A. C. Ferrin, care and 


plan 


ts . 


1.50 


B. C. White, plants 


. 


. 


1.75 


A. J. Souza, care . 






1.50 


J. E. Robertson, labor 


and 


care 


25.00 


W. F. Thayer, care 


. 


. 


4 75 


Miss H. Dame, care 


. 




3 00 


Mrs. Hannah Young estate 


burial . 


3.00 


Gordon and Edgerly, care 


. 


2.00 


E. M. Howe esta»^e, bu 


rial 


. 


3.00 


H. E. Chandler, care 




. 


1.50 


Mrs. Charlotte Morrill, 


care 


2.00 


Mrs. H. E. Webster, care 


. 


1.50 


Dr. W. H. Allison, care . 


. 


2.00 


Mrs. A. 8. Marshall, 




care 


2.00 


Mrs. J. Neville, 




a 


1.00 


J. A. Cochrane, 




a 


2.00 



KO 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. S. Webster, care 

Mrs. C. H. Adams, " 

Samuel K. Gill, *' 

Mrs. S. Wardner, '' 

Mrs. J. C. Ordway, Adams estate, care 

B. F. Virgin, care 
Fitch and Coll)y, care 
Mrs. A. W. Gale, care 

C. L. Fellows, care 
A. M. Follett, care 
J. pj. Rand, care 
W. E. Green, cai'e . 
Merrimack County, burial 
J. H. Green, care 
J. S. Hubbard, care 
Miss P. Eaton, care 
Mrs. N. G. Mead, care 
Dr. J. H. Gallinger, care 
Mrs. H. O. Flanders estate, burial 
Nelson Abbott, care 

D. C. Allen, care 
J. H. Lamprey, care 
George C. Roy, care 
William P. Fiske, care 
First Congregational Society (Merri 
Mrs. E. N. Shepard estate, care and 
F. E. Quimby, care 
F. E. Brown, care . 
C. W. Lynam, care 
Mrs. R. R. Shaw, two years' care 
Hiram A. Brown, care 
C. E. Smith, burial 
R. G. Smith, burial 
H. N. Sargent, care 
John M. Hill, two lots, care 
C. A. Herbert, care 
Mrs. T. H. Ford, care 
Mrs. James Lauder, " 
Mrs. J. M. Stewart, 



ill 



lot), car 
burial 



SI. 5a 

1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.5Q 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
1.00 
2.00 

16.00 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.50 
3.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.00 
2.00 
2.50 

; 1.00 
5.50 
2.00 
1.50 
1.00 
4.00 
1.50 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
5.00 
1.50 
2.50 
1.50 
6.00 







CITY EXPENSES. 




Amos Blancbard, 


care 




$2.00 


J. R 


H. Davis, 


a 






1.50 


W. G. C. Kimball, 


i 1, 






2.00 


Char 


les Baker, 


a 






1.50 


W. Carpenter, 


n 






1.00 


C. A 


. Lockerby, 


li 






1.50 


Miss 


Morse, 


c; 






1.50 


Fred U. Lane, 


(( 






1.50 


Laura Roby estate. 


a 






3.00 


Mrs. 


J. Y. Mngridge, 


it 






2.00 


Mrs. 


E. S. Schultz, 


a 






9.00 


Mrs. 


C. H. Jones, 


1 1 






1.00 


Nath 


an Mansur, 


a 






1.00 


Mrs. 


S. A. Staniels, 


a 






1.50 


Mrs. 


S. Edmunds, 


ii 






1.00 


Mrs. 


J. T. Barker, 


a 






1.50 


Mrs. 


A. J. Langley, 


i 1, 






1.00 


D. J. 


Rolfe, 


a 






1.00 


A. A 


. Chesley, 


'' 






2.75 


R. E 


Pecker lot. 


a 






2.00 


Dr. Quimby, 


a 






2.00 


Mary Pecker lot. 


a 






1.00 


F. H 


Clement, repairs 








7.00 


E. A 


Ordway, repairs 








2.00 


A. S. 


Sprague, care 








1.50 


C. G 


Blancbard, care 








2.00 


D. G 


Lowell, care . 








1.00 


G. F. 


Sleeper, single g 


rave. 


burial . 


8.00 


B. G. 


Carter, care . 


. 




1.50 


Sturtevant Post, G. A. 


R., 


care 


5.00 


S. J. 


Leaver, 




a 


2.00 


C. P. 


Smith, 




a 


1.00 


F. J. 


Young, 




n 


2.00 


H. N 


Sinclair, 




14 


2.00 


Mrs. 


Abbott (Burbauk 


lot), 


a 


1.00 


C. H. 


Abbott, 




n 


2.00 


H. A 


Church, 




'» 


2.00' 


Miss 


S! C. Sargent, 




i( 


2.00' 


Collins and George, 




(( 


1.50 




11 











161 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



S. S. Kimball, care 


$2.50 


Mrs. E. G. Carter, 


1.50 


D. 0. Smith estate, burial 


3.00 


Mrs. J. J. Wymau, care 


1.50 


Mrs. I. W. Hammond, care 


1.50 


Rollins Young, care 


2.00 



$1,330.29 



Income From Trust Funds. 



Robert Woodruff, . 








S3. 00 


Mary Williams, 








1.50 


P:. W. Upham, 








4.50 


Mary P]. Walker, 








4.50 


George Wbitridge, . 








3.00 


J. C. Thorne, . 








3.00 


Thomas Stewart, 








2.00 


H. Sonthmaid, 








1.50 


Mary A. Shaw, 








2.00 


John B. Sargent, 








4.00 


Jonathan Sanborn, . 








3.00 


Moses W. Russell, . 








2.75 


George S. Reed, 








2.25 


Judith A. Richardson, 








3.00 


E. H. Rollins, 








'5.00 


S. L. Pixley, . 








1.50 


W. H. Pitman, 








3.00 


H. K. Phipps, 








1.50 


S. M. K. Adams, 








21.00 


M. B. Allison, 








1.00 


A. L. S. Bailey, 








3.00 


E. W. Woodward, . 








3.00 


Matilda Benson, 








1.25 


E. C. Bixby, . 








3.00 


J. D. Blaisdell, 








3.50 


Dr. Nathaniel Bouton, 








12.50 


M. N. P. Buntin, . 








3.00 


H. W. Butters, 








2.75 


N. F. Carter, 








3.00 


S. M. Chesley, 








3 00 



CITY EXPENSES. 




Caroline Clark, $2.00 


Frederick ClougL, 2.25 


N. P. Clough, 








1.00 


A. L. Colburn, 








1.00 


Josiah Cooper, 








1.50 


Mary Crow, 








4.00 


Mrs. L. F. Edgerly, 








3.25 


G. P. Ela, 








3.00 


L. A. Farley, . 








3.00 


Mary M. Faruura, . 








2.00 


George G. Fogg, . 








4.00 


Asa Fowler, 








15.00 


John Gear, 








1.00 


Glover and Osgood, 








1.00 


George M. Harding, 








1.00 


Betsey Hadley, 








3.50 


Mary D. Hart, 








10.50 


S. E. Irish, . 








2.00 


J. and B. A. Kimball, 








6.00 


E. L. KnowltoD, 








16.75 


J. L. Lincoln, 








1.00 


J. W. and E. J. Little, 








3.00 


John McCauley, 








.75 


G. and E. McQuesten, 








3.00 


James McQuesten, . 








5.00 


S. F. Merrill, 








3.00 


J. B. Merrill, . 








3.00 


C. H. Newhall, 








4.50 


E. S. Nutter, . 








3.00 


E. A. Ordway, 








1.50 


C. W. Paige, . 








4.00 


I 


3xpei 


iditu 


res. 





163 



Silsby & Son, journal 
P. C. Whittier, manure . 
George W. Bullock, manure 
M. L. Partch, 



$3.37 

25.00 

33.00 

4.65 



$226.50 
3,395.48 



164 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



R. P. Sanborn, posts . . . . $1.80 

Danforth, Forrest & Morgan, . . 7.45 

Republican Press Association, . . 3.00 

Republican Press Association, . . 1.20 
Trip to Forest Hills, Robertson & Andrews, 5.50 

C. Barker, ashes ..... 2.36 

W. M. Colby, shrubs . . . . 2.00 

M. L. Partch, 7.51 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer .... 1,300.00 

M. L. Partch, provisions . . . 4.28 

Caleb P. Little, turf .... 8.25 

H. A. Kendall, box .... 3.00 

E. B. Hutchinson & Co., stakes . . 5.50 
William King, repairs on mowers . . 3.25 
Arthur N. Day, grain .... 2.25 
Concord Water Works, .... 80.00 
H. A. Kendall, box .... 1.50 

A. N. Day, grain 2.40 

A. N. Day, grain ..... 1.70 

A. N. Day, 1.70 

Daniel Crowley, shoeing .... 8.00 

Silsby & Son, books . . . . 5.75 

Frank J. Batchelder, printing . . . 4.50 

Thompson & Hoague, shovel . . . 1.25 

Holt Brothers, 1.95 

William S. Wilson, flowers . . . 6.00 

James Hart, services .... 2.50 

Danforth, Forrest & Morgan, lumber . 2.68 

Dame & Jones, services .... 1.00 

F. H. George, watering-pot . . . .90 

G. J. Benedict, plants .... 6.25 
C. H. Martin & Co., plants . . . 12.68 
C. F. Swain, grass seed .... 6.84 
A. H. Britton & Co., tools . . . 8.15 
William S. Wilson, plants . . . 15.20 
J. E. Robertson, dressing . . . 60.00 
A. G. McAlpine & Co., labor . . . 4.70 
E. B. Hanchay, sharpening tools . . 1.40 
J. H. Coburn, dressing .... 10.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 



165 



E. A. Moulton, sundries 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer 
Pay-rolls, .... 

F. P. Andrews, treasurer, salary 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer . 



$4.18 

1,239.51 

66.12 

25.00 

389.75 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 

Unexpended balance, 1896 . 

Regular appropriation ..... 

Special appropriation from income of trust funds 
care of lots, etc. ..... 

Balance of income unappropriated 



Paid as follows : 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls . $478.85 

Unexpended balance . . . . 113.94 



$3,395.48 



$14.14 
350.00 

128.85 
99.80 

$592.79 



$592.79 



The Treasurer of the Cemetery Commission accounts for 
funds coniinff into his hands as follows : 



Receipts. 

Balance from 1896 

Mrs. Wm. Butterfield estate, burial 

Mrs. N. Carter, care 

Mrs. E. M. Richards, repairs 

C. A. Hardy 

Mrs. Albert Johnson, repairs 

Fred Leighton, burial and repairs 

W. C. Prescott, N. Curtis estate, repairs 



N. Curtis estate, 
F. A. Tenney estate, 
Mrs. W. A. Knight, 
Emma E. Brown, 
Abbie King estate. 



burial 



$8.00 
1.50 
5.00 
2.00 
2.00 
6.00 

18.40 
3.00 
4.00 
5.00 
3.00 
3.00 



$14.14 



166 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Joseph B. Smart estate, 


burial . 


$3.00 


Wm. Wadleigh, 


ii, 


1.00 


"Walter Gage estate, 


(. i 


3.00 


Mrs. E. R. Walker estate, 


a 


3.00 


Mrs. D. G. Fuller 


i i 


3.00 


George Ripley, 


1 1 


3.00 


J. ¥j. Hoyt, labor 


. 


2.25 


L. B. Flanders, 


burial . 


3.00 


Mrs. S. N. Farnsworth, 


i i 


3.00 


Horace Paul, 


i i 


2.50 


Calvin Smart estate, 


a 


3.00 


Wm. Nichols " 


t, (. 


3.00 


J. C. Clough '' 


a 


3.00 


Oliver Whidden, foundation . 


4.00 


John H. Saben, burial . 


. 


3.00 


Henry AYalker, repairs 


. 


5.00 


Mrs. M. A. Pratt estate. 


burial 


3.00 


Josiah Minot, repairs . 


. 


.75 


Posts sold . 




2.00 


Sally Loveriug estate, burial 


3.00 


John F. Wilson, care . 


. 


1.00 


Joseph Stickney, " 


■ 


■ 5.00 


Hopkins lot, " 


. 


1.00 


Oliver Hart estate, burial 


4.00 


Mrs. Ira Philbrick, 


(( 


3.00 


John A. Tuck, 


a 


3.00 


Geo. L. French estate. 


i I 


3.00 


Ira C. Evans, repairs . 


. 


2.00 


J. F. Webster, care 


. 


,.50 


Mrs. N. Carter (Flanders 


lot), care 


1.50 


Miss Farnsworth, care . 


. 


.75 


Daniel Spline, foundation 


. 


3.00 


Mrs. S. F. Gushing, care 




2.00 


Cummings Bros., posts 


. 


4.00 


Dr. J. C. W. Moore estate, burial 


3.00 


Mrs. Farrar, care 


• 


1.00 



.55.15 





CITY 


EXPENSES. 




Income from Trust Funds 


' 


Paul Weutworth . 


$16.00 


Wm. Abbott 








4.00 


F. K. Blaisdell . 








4.00 


John F. Chaffln . 








1.50 


Seth Eastman 








1.75 


Theodore French . 








4.00 


H. J. Gilbert 








1.00 


W. T. Locke 








4.00 


L. and D. L. Morrill 








4.00 


True Osgood 








3.00 


E. A. Pecker 








5.50 


Hiram Richardson 








11.25 


Nathan Stickney . 








2.50 


T. and A. B. Walker . 








6.00 


Abigail Sweetser . 








5.00 


Expenditures. 


Pay-rolls $12.03 


Concord Water Works 




10.00 


Thompson & Hoague, scythe 




1.00 


C. G. Coffin & Co., grass seed 




3.40 


J. W. Rankin, labor 




4.00 


J. H. Coburu, dressing 


. 




3.00 


Cummings Bros. . 


. 




4.00 


W. F. Thayer, treasurer 


. 




130.86 


W. F. Thayer, treasurei 


. 


. 




74.50 



167 



$73.50 
$242.79 



$242.79 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 



Regular appropriation 
Special appropriation 



$100.00 
54.30 



$154.30 



168 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid as follows : 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls . S140.08 

Concord Water Works, water . . 6.00 

J. A. Grossman, labor . . . . 3.75 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies . . 4.47 



Paid as follows : 

W. F. Tbaj'er, treasurer, pa3^-roll, labor $36.50 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . . 13.50 

R. W. Hoit, posts .... .72 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies . . 19.28 



.54.30 



OLD FORT CEMETERY. 

Appropriation ....... $300.00 

Special appropriations ...... 184.00 

$484.00 
Paid as follows : 

Thomas Nawn, as per contract .... $484.00 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

Appropriation . . . . . . . $100.00 

Paid Isaac N. Abbott, treasurer . . . . 100.00 



HORSE HILL CEMETERY. 

Appropriation ....... $50.00 

From sale of hearse and hearse-house . . . 20.00 



$70.00 



$70,00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



169 



PENACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 

Uuexpeuded balance of 1896 
Appropriation for sinking fund 

" " interest on bonds 

Receipts for 1897 



Paid as follows : 

Henry Morrill, labor . . . . $11.55 
C. H. Sanders, cash advanced on pay- 
rolls 89.14 

C. H. Sanders, freight . . . .35 
" rubber boots . . 4.00 
Perrin, Seamens & Co., hose and cou- 
plings 32.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund . 500.00 

Interest on bonds .... 940.00 

Foote, Brown & Co., cement . . 1.71 

Uuexpended balance .... 218.54 



$312.49 

500.00 

960.00 

24.80 

.,797.29 



;i,797.29 



WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 



Unexpended balance of 1896 
Rent of pumps, 1896 . 
" " 1897 . 
Appropriation for sinking fund 

" " interest on bonds 



Paid as follows : 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll 

" sinking fund 

Interest on bonds 
Unexpended balance . 



$1,205.01 

11.00 

7.50 

500.00 

680.00 

$2,403.51 



$13.83 


500.00 


700.00 


1,189.68 



1,403.51 



170 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EAST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 

Unexpended balance of 1896 . . $164.51 

Appropriation for sinking fund, . . 100.00 

" " interest on bonds . 70.00 

'' " payment of note . 250.00 

" " " of interest on 

note . 8.75 



Paid as follows : 








"W. F. Thayer, treasurer. 


sinking 


fund. 


$100.00 


Interest on bonds 


. 




70.00 


Note paid . 






250.00 


Interest on note 






14.36 


Unexpended balance . 


• 




158.90 







$593.26 



$593.26 



LIGHTING STREETS, PENACOOK. 

Appropriation, ....... $1,400.00 

Paid W. H. Bell, treasurer . . $1,050.00 

Alfred PL Emery, treaurers . 350.00 

$1,400.00 



OPEN AIR CONCERTS. 

Appropriation ....... $300.00 

Paid C. H. Burgum, account order A. F. Nevers, 300.00 



CITY HISTORY. 

Unexpended balance $2,569.20 

Paid as follows : 

*F. L. Sanders, record books . . $3.75 
Kepublican Press Association, prospec- 
tuses 93.00 

* Included in payments of 1896 by mistake. 



CITY EXPENSES. 



171 



Republican Press Association, letter- 
heads and envelopes . . . $35.50 
Ira C. Evans, canvass books . . 26.50 
Geo. E. Carter, canvassing . . 226.80 
Edward A. Jenks, writing " Bench and 

Bar" 200.00 

Frances M. Abbott, writing "Social 

History" 200.00 

Blanche Newhall, services . . . 196.00 

Unexpended balance . . . . 1,587.65 



RECAPITULATION. 



State tax .... 

County tax 

Interest .... 

City poor .... 

Aid to dependent soldiers and families 

Fire department 

Incidentals and land damage 

Roads and bridges 

Street sprinkling 

Police and watch 

Printing and stationery 

Legal expenses 

Board of health 

Committee service 

Schools .... 

Precinct .... 

Water precinct . 

Salaries .... 

White Park 

Rollins Park 

Penacook Park . 

Parks and commons . 

Public Librai-y . 

Memorial Day 



$34,705.00 

33,769.77 

3,906.31 

741.01 

391.09 

20,336.95 

4,915.86 

36,190.87 

3,538.51 

11,840.05 

2,423.95 

96.18 

1,330.55 

1,410.00 

54,178.78 

16,389.59 

6,000.00 

11,106.69 

3,344.58 

983.84 

103.72 

218.73 

5,563.61 

345.00 



$2,569.20 



172 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 


. $2,000.00 


Engineering department 


2,983.97 


Blossom Hill Cemetery 


5,630.97 


Old North Cemetery . 


478.85 


West Concord Cemetery 


154.30 


Old Fort Cemetery 


484.00 


Millville Cemetery 


100.00 


Horse Hill Cemetery . 


70.00 


Penacook Sewerage Precinct 


1,578.75 


West Concord Sewerage Precinct 


1,213.83 


East Concord Sewerage Precinct 


434.36 


Lighting streets, Penacook 


1,400.00 


Open air concerts 


300.00 


City history .... 


981.55 




$271,641.22 



SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 20. 

Appropriation for payment of interest $60.00 

Appropriation for payment of bonds . 500.00 

Interest paid $60.00 

Bonds paid 500.00 



$560.00 



$560.00 



DOG LICENSES. 



Received from dog licenses. 

Paid as follows : 
Geo. McC. Sanborn, sheep killed 
H. B. Hammond, sheep killed 
John B. Sanborn, sheep killed 
Geo. E. Runnels, sheep killed 

Balance carried to school fund 



$5.00 

19.00 

4.00 

2.50 



$1,426.94 



$30.50 
1,396.44 



$1,426.94 



CITY EXPENSES. 



173 



LIQUOR AGENCY. 

Received from sale of liquors 
Appropriation to cover deficit 



Paid as follows : 
Moses Ladd, agent, salary 
Moses Ladd, cash paid 
Concord Coal Co., coal 
Concord Light and Power Co., gas 
U. S. License 
Joseph Stickney, rent 
Adams, Taylor & Co., liquors 
D. T. Mills tt Co., alcohol 
Fisher & Co., liquors 



$600.00 

17.88 

18.72 

5.55 

25.00 

283.00 

1,058.60 

246.64 

9.60 



STONE QUARRIES. 



G. M. Davis, rent of quarries 
Crowley & Quinn, rent of quarries 
Geo. W. Waters, rent of land 



$25.00 

150.00 

25.00 



$1,975.00 
289.99 

$2,264.99 



^2,264.99 



$200.00 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



CITY OF CONCORD, N. H. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1897. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, Mayor, ex officio. 

SOLON A. CARTER to Marc 

FRANK D. ABBOT to Marc 

JOHN WHITAKER to Marc 

EBENEZER B. HUTCHINSON to Marc 

WILLIAM M. MASON to Marc 

EDSON J. HILI to Marc 

WILLIAM R FISKE to Marc 

WILLIAM E. HOOD to Marc 

FRANK D. ABBOT, Clerk. 



-ll 31. 


1901. 


h 31, 


1901. 


h 31- 


1900. 


h 31- 


1900. 


h 31. 


1899. 


h 31, 


1899. 


h 31, 


1898. 


H 31. 


1898. 



OFFICERS. 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, President. 

V. C. HASTINGS, Superintendent. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN, Clerk at Water Office. 

HENRY A. ROVVELL, Engineer at Pumping Station. 



CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and lensrth of service of members. 



Abraham G. Jones, ex officio . 


1S72- 


-three 


months. 




John M. Hill 


1S72- 


1878. 






Benjamin A. Kimball 


1872- 


187S. 






Josiali Minot* 


1S72. 


Resig 


ned Jan. 10, 


1S74 


David A. Warde* . 


1872- 


1874. 






Edward L. Knowlton* . 


1872. 


Resig 


ned Sept. 25 


1875 


Benjamin S. Warren* 


1S72- 


iS73- 






John Kimball, ex officio 


1872- 


1876. 






John Abbott* ' . 


1S73- 


1876. 






John S. Russ* 


1874- 


1877. 






Abel B. Holt* 


1S74- 


1877. 






Samuel S. Kimball 


iS75- 


Resig 


ned July i, 


1891 


George A. Pillsbury, ex officio 


1876- 


1878. 






Luther P. Durgin . 


1876- 


1885. 






John Kimball 


1877. 


Resig 


ned July i , 


1891 


William M. Chase . 


1877. 


Resig 


■•ned July i, 


1891 


Horace A. Bi-own, ex officio . 


1878- 


1880. 






James L. Mason 


1878- 


1S93. 






James R. Hill* 


1878. 


Died 


1884. 




Geo. A. Cummings, ex officio 


iSSo- 


1883. 






Edgar H. Woodman, ex officio* 


1S83- 


1887. 






Joseph H. Abbot* 


1884- 


1893. 






George A. Young 


1885- 


1894. 






John E. Robertson, ex officio . 


1S87- 


1889. 






Stillman Humphrey, ex officio* 


1889- 


1891. 






Henry W. Clapp, ex officio* . 


1891- 


1893. 






Willis D. Thompson 


1891- 


1895. 






William P. Fiske . 


1891. 


Now 


in office. 




James H. Chase* . 


1891. 


Died 


1893. 




John Whitaker 


1892. 


Now 


in office. 




* Dece 


ased. 









WATER DEPARTMENT. 



179 



Henry E. Conant . 
Parsons B. Cogswell, ex officio* 
Solon A. Carter 
Frank D. Abbot . . . 
William M. Mason 
William E. Hood . 
Ebenezer B. Hutchinson 
Etlson J. Hill 



1892. Resigned Jan. S, 1895. 
I 893- I 895. 

1893. Now in office. 

1593. Now in office. 
1893. Now in office. 

1594. Now in office. 

1595. Now in office. 
1S95. Now in office. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD. 



Josiah Minot* 
Benjamin A. Kimball 
Edward L. Knowlton* 
■John Kimball 
Benjamin A. Kimball 
John Kimball 
William P. Fiske . 



1873. Resigned Jan. 10, 1894. 

1874-1S75. 

1875. Resigned Sept. 35, 1875 

1875-1S76. 

1876-1878. 

1878. Resigned July i, 1891. 

1891. Now in office. 



Deceased. 



SUMMARY STATISTICS. 



CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WATER-WORKS. 



Population of the city by census of 1890 17,004. 

Population of that portion of the city included within 

the water precinct, estimated 15,000 

Date of construction, 1872; additions since. 

Works are owned by the city. 

Source of supply, Penacook lake, a natural body of water 
containing 265 acres, situated about three miles and a half from 
the state house, and about 125 feet higher than Main street in 
front of the state house. 

Mode of supply, gravity and pumping to reservoir. 



FINANCIAL. 



MAINTENANCE. 
Receipts. Expenditures. 



From consumers (mostly 

for domestic uses) . . 5^55,202.25 
From rents . . • 90.00 

From pipe sold, etc. . . 61.54 



*i^55.353-79 



For management and re- 



pairs .... 


$3,419.40 


For new distribution pipes 


9,482.01 


For new service pipes 


967.19 


For maintenance of pump- 




ing station 


2,163.54 


For inspection . 


600.00 


For reservoir grounds 


68.00 


For meter account 


1,979.08 


For work at and near the 




outlet of Penacook lake 


2,637.87 


For incidentals . 


511. 19 


For abatements 


197-37 


Amount required to pay 


$22,025.65 


interest on bonded in- 




debtedness 


27,025.00 


Balance . . . . 


6,303-14 



$55-353-79 



182 CITY OF CONCORD. 



CONSTRUCTION. 

Cost of land damages, flowage, and water rights : 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., for 

water rights 83,000.00 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill privilege 

and land 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for kit- 
shop privilege 5,000.00 

Flowage rights around Penacook 

lake 4,375-6i 

W. P. Cooledge, Hutchins house 

and lot 2,250.00 

Mary C. Rowell, for land 1,500.00 

Moses H. Bradley, " 5,000.00 

Joseph B. Walker, " 2,214.00 

John G. Hook, " 370.00 

A. S. Ranney, " 1,350.00 

Alfred Roberts, " 1,275.00 

Charles E. Ballard, " 2,500.00 

Mary G. Carter, " 1,250.00 

Elizabeth Widmer, " 1,564.50 

A. L. Proctor, " 450.00 

Robert Crowley, " 3,000.00 

Miles Hodgdon, " 2,200.00 

■ Cofifin & Little, " 800.00 

O. F. Richardson, " 100.00 

C. H. Amsden, water and flowage 

rights 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Torrent 

Aqueduct Association .... 20,000.00 
dam, gate-house, and appur- 
tenances 30,756.17 

conduit and gate-houses 29,484.05 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 183 

Cost oi mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Fenacook street, force 
main from the pump to the 
reservoir, fire-main through 
North and South Main and 
Turnpike streets, and sup- 
ply main from near the dam 
to Stark street) $154,960.92 

distribution pipe 280,431.38 

service pipe 41,489.95 

reserv'oir 42,460.09 

pumping station, shop, stable, 

and storehouse 22,000.00 

pumping machinery 10,215.00 

engineering and superintend- 
ence 14,913.12 

incidentals 6,531.19 

Cost of the works, January i, 1898,. . . • $841,940.98 

Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said cost 
as follows: 

When due. Rate. Amount. 

Nov. I, 189S, 4, $10,000.00 

Nov. I, 1899, 4, 10,000.00 

Nov. I, 1900, 3:^, 15,000.00 

Jan. I, 1 901, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. I, 1902, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. I, 1903, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. I, 1904, 4, 10,00000 

Jan. I, 1905, 4, 10,00.000 

Jan. I, 1906, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. I, 1907, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. I, 1908, 4, 10.000.00 

Jan. X, 1909, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. I, 1910, 4, 5,000.00 

Jan. I, 191 1, 4, 5,000.00 

Oct. I, 191 2, 4, 45,000.00 

/ 



184 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



When 


due. 


Jan. I 


, 1913^ 


Jan. I 


. I914, 


Jan. I 


, 1915. 


Jan. I 


, I916, 


Jan. I 


, 1917. 


Jan. I 


, I91S, 


Jan. I 


) 1919' 


Mar. I 


, 1922, 


Jan. I 


1923, 



Bate. 

4' 

4. 

4. 

4' 

4' 

4. 

4' 

3h 

4- 



Amount. 

$10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10.000.00 
10,000.00 
10.000 00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
20,000.00 

400,000.00 



$670,000.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



185 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



To the City Council: 

The Commissioners present herewith their annual report and 
would respectfully call your attention to the report of the Su- 
perintendent, which is made a part of this report. 

In many ways the last year marks one of the most interesting 
years in the history of the water works. Never before has the 
water stood as high as during the year. In June we were visit- 
ed by very heavy rains, and especially the night of the 9th, which 
was almost unprecedented, showing a fall of nearly six inches of 
water during twenty-four hours. This necessarily brought the 
lake to a very high point, and much solicitude was manifested 
as to the ability of controlling the water. However, the dififi- 
culty was successfully coped with. This experience led to an 
examination of the natural water-ways from the lake, and re- 
sulted in the expansion of culverts and passage-ways, thus en- 
abling a free flow of water to the river. 

Another matter was carefully looked into, the raising of the 
height of the difi'erent ooints at the outlet of the lake by a per- 
manent core wall, which will demonstrate the ability to hold 
back a larger amount of water than we have yet had to deal 
with. 

The long-anticipated beginning of a new pipe to the pond has 
resulted in the laying of 1,780 feet of 20-inch pipe, and it is the 
policy of the Board to still continue this from year to year. 

As will be seen from the Superintendent's report, various ex- 
tensions of both the high and low service, and the re-laying of 
pipe in certain streets where the old pipe had proved not only 
insufficient, but unsatisfactory, has aggregated a mile and three 
quarters, and the time will not be far distant before other con- 
necting lines at the South end will be needed to meet the growth 
of that part of the city. 

The high service system has proved its efficiency during the 



186 CITY OF CONCORD. 

past year and the pumping station and reservoir we find to be 
in excellent condition. 

Satisfactory analyses of the water have been made during the 
past year, still showing the excellent quality. The Commis- 
sioners have considered the matter of moving the cottage at the 
lake and doing away with all the barns and outhouses, thus re- 
moving any possibility of contamination from that source. It 
will be the policy of the Board to prevent any possible pollution 
of the water from source.*- surrounding the lake. 

Bonds maturing November ist, 1897, to the amount of 
$10,000, were paid from the income of the works. 

We bear testimony to the efficient work of the Superintend- 
ent and his assistants in the unusual and trying periods during 
the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SOLON A. CARTER, 

FRANK D. ABBOT, 

JOHN WHITAKER, 

EBENEZER B. HUTCHINSON, 

WILLIAM M. MASON, 

EDSON J. HILL, 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, 

WILLIAM E. HOOD, 

ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, ex officio. 
Water Commissioners. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 187 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the twenty-sixth annual report of 
the operations of this department, showing the receipts, expen- 
ditures, and abatements, together with a statement of exten- 
sions and improvements made during the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1897. 

RECEIPTS. 

For water from consumers by fixed 

rates $34773-17 

water from consumers by meter 

rates 20,178.70 

From dehnquents 81.60 

For water used for building purposes. . 166.78 

rents 90.00 

shutting ofif and turning on water. . 2.00 

pipe and stock sold, etc 61.54 

$55,353-79 

Deduct abatements 197-37 

Total receipts for 1897 $55,156.42 

EXPENDITURES. 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid V. C. Hastings, salary as superin- 
tendent, $i,Soo.oo 

Pay-rolls, salaries, and labor, 5,902.12 

Nath'l White, Jr., rent of office .... 300.00 

S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop in 

Penacook 24.00 

Ira C. Evans, stamped envelopes 

and printing 1 16.30 

Republican Press Assn., printing. 6.90 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

Stockbridge & Sanders, books, etc. 2.75 

F. L. Sanders, " " 5.10 

Silsby & Son, stationery, etc ii-44 

Concord Land & Water Power 

Co., electric lights 22.60 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas. 6.90 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., telephones 131.68 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies 2.45 

Stevens & Duncklee, " 5.55 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., hardware. 5I-02 

Thompson & Hoague, " . 66.63 

Batchelder & Co., oil, etc 1348 

Arthur N. Day, grain and straw. . . 53-79 

Frank Coffin & Co., straw 2.05 

A. Perley Fitch & Co., lead, oil, etc. 3.70 

C. H. Martin & Co., " " 2.04 

H. O. Marsh & Co., wood 9.40 

C. H. Stevens & Co., " 1.50 

Woodworth & Co., cement 232.45 

Dickerman & Co., " 50-i5 

John T. Fiske & Co., dynamite, etc. 4.50 

Fitz, Dana & Co., sheet-iron 9.51 

Sewall & Day Cordage Co., manil- 

la rope 6.51 

M. J. Drummond, cast-iron pipe. . 2,445.54 
R. b. Wood & Co., " 

and hydrants 2,083.66 

Warren Foundry & Machine Co., 

cast-iron pipe 487.80 

Builders Iron Foundry, castings, 24.17 

Ford & Kimball, " . 23.99 

Concord Foundry Co., " . 3.85 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., gates. . . , 359-92 

Hays Mfg. Co., service-boxes. . , , 67.50 
Chadwick Lead Works, pig lead 

and lead pipe 161.29 

John Walker, pig lead 5.76 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

J. H. Cunning-ham Co., pipe and 

fittings 82.97 

E. H. Randall, fittings i.oo 

Walworth Mfg. Co., tools and 

fittings 35-33 

Perrin, Seamans & Co., tools and 

wire rope 20.02 

Waldo Bros., pipe cutter 30.00 

Smith & Anthony, repair bands . . 4.80 

L. M. Ham & Co., steel beams 53.37 

Union Water Meter Co., meters. . 833.50 
National Meter Co., " . . 579-20 
Henry R. Worthington, " . . 166.43 
T. M. Harrison & Co., use of der- 
rick 5.00 

John Swenson, granite 158.00 

New England Granite Works, 

grout . . 48.00 

Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 35-00 

Huntley & Tenney, " 27.00 

J. D. Johnson & Son, " 19.75 

Chandler Eastman & Sons, repairs 7.50 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., " 3.82 

E. B. Hanchay, smith-work 79' 17 

J. M. Crossman, " 59-77 

Ross W. Cate, " 21.40 

Rowell & Plummer, mason-work. 69.75 
Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., sawing lum- 
ber 2.34 

George Abbott, Jr., painting 31-93 

B. Bilsborough, " ... 17.06 

N. A. Dunklee, livery 5.00 

O. F. Richardson & Son, team- 
work and labor 288.48 

Geo. L. Theobald, team-work. . . . 202.85 

Cavis G. Brown, " 70.80 

C. P. Little, " 38.40 



189 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

C. R. Farnuni, team work 22.00 

C. H. Farnum, " 16.00 

Simeon Partridge, " 12.00 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concreting. . . 447-34 

E. S. Barrett, bags 34-00 

Stratton & Co., " 11.24 

Smith & Savage, " • 2.82 

D. W. Wilcox, " 2.50 

J. T- T. Searles, " 1.90 

H. W. Brickett, " .90 

Lyman Sawyer, damages at time 

of high water i5-00 

Boston & Maine Raih'oad, freight 991.48 

Engineering News 5.00 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance. . . 14-25 

Eastman & Merrill, " ... 7.50 

E. R. Angell, water analyses 9.00 

V. C. Hastings, cash paid out. . . . 97-75 

incidentals 323.1 1 

town of Webster, taxes i45-3i 



$19,664.74 



PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 

Paid pay-rolls, engineer and fireman. . $1,421.65 

C. H. Stevens & Co., coal 419-30 

labor, unloading coal 15-75 

H. O. Marsh & Co., coal 4.00 

E. A. Boutwell & Son, wood 77-5° 

A. W. Harris & Co., oil 32.25 

Thompson & Hoague, packing 

and hardware 4.65 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., packing 

and hardware 4.62 

R. F. CHfTord & Co., packing 15-19 

A. P. Fitch & Co., supplies ,, 4.04 

C. H. Martin & Co., " . 3.00 

Locke Regulator Co., valve 1.55 

Walworth Mfg. Co., " 5.76 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 191 

Henry R. Worthing-ton, valve 

springs S-S^ 

The Fairbanks Co., repairing 

valve 3-00 

E. H. Randall & Co., supplies. . . . 3.57 

Concord Foundry Co., castings. . 1.50 

Putnam Machine Co., combination 

chuck 17.00 

Geo. Abbott, Jr., painting 4.70 

Rowell & Plummer, mason-work. 7.00 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing con- 
crete 2.00 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas. 9.30 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight .65 

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 

and Insurance Co., insurance 100.00 

$2,163.54 

Total expenditures for 1897 $21,828.28 

The expenses are divided as follows: 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

For management and repairs $3,419.40 

new service pipes 967.19 

new distribution pipes 9,482.01 

inspection 600.00 

reservoir grounds 68.00 

meter account 1,979.08 

work at and near the outlet of 

Penacook Lake 2,637.87 

incidentals 5ii-i9 

$19,664.74 

PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 

For salaries, engineer and fireman. . . . $1,421.65 

fuel used 516.55 

- oil, packing and other supplies. . . . 225.34 

$2,163.54 



192 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Main and distribution pipes have been laid and hydrants set 
during the year as follows : 
In North State street, 

north from near the pumping station to a little north of 
the cemetery gate, 1,769 feet 20-inch pipe. 
In North State street, 

to make connection at the pumping station, 36 feet 18- 
inch pipe. 
In North State street, 

on connection between the mains at cemetery gate, 40 
feet 14-inch pipe. 
In Turnpike street, 

south from near West street to junction South State street, 
1,026 feet 14-inch pipe and 2 hydrants. 
In Turnpike street, 

south from junction of South State street to Langdon 
street, 1,193 ^^^t 12-inch pipe and i hydrant. 
In Langdon street, 

east from Turnpike street, 360 feet lo-inch pipe. 
In Pleasant street, 

west from Spring street to Pine street, 1,230 feet lo-inch 
pipe and 2 hydrants. 
In Merrimack street, 

to make connection with Pjeasant street pipe, 6 feet 6- 
inch pipe. 
In High street, 

north from Valley street to Chestnut street, 982 feet 6-" 
inch pipe. 

In Penacook street, 

east from near Pettingill's Crossing, 933 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Rockingham street, 

east from South street, 314 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Ridge Road, 

extended north, 307 feet 6-inch pipe. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 193 

In Broadway, 

extended. south, 154 feet 6-inch pipe. 
In Odd Fellows avenue, 

south from Warren street, 201 feet 4-inch pipe. 
In Centre street at Ridge Road, 

I hydrant. 
On hydrant branches, 

140 feet 6-inch pipe. 
Also 308 feet i-inch and 74 feet 3-4-inch pipe. 

Alain and distribution pipes have been discontinued during 
the year, as follows: 

In North State street, 

north from near the pumping station to a little north of 
the cemetery gate, 1,789 feet 14-inch cement-lined pipe. 
In Pleasant street, 

west from Rumford street to Pine street, 900 feet 6-inch 
cement-lined pipe. 
In High street, 

south from Chestnut street, 502 feet 6-inch cement-lined 
pipe. 
In Penacook street, 

east from near Pettingill's Crossing, yy^y feet 6-inch and 
160 feet 4-inch cement-lined pipe. 
In Rumford street, 

south from School street to Pleasant street, 1,203 f^^t 4- 
inch cement-lined pipe. 
On hydrant branches, 

^2 feet 6-inch cement-lined pipe. 
Also 306 feet i-inch i)ipe. 
14 



194 



citV of concord. 



Summary of the Foregoing. 



NEW PIPES, HYDRANTS, AND STOP-GATES. 





Pipes. 


Hydrants. 




St 


op- 


Gates. 




i-in. 
4-in. 
6-in. 


, 3S3 feet. 
, 201 '' 
, 2,836 " 


Pleasant street, 
Turnpike street. 
Centre street, 


2 

3 

I 


4-in., 

6-in., 

lo-in., 








2 

10 

I 


lo-in. 
12-in. 
14-in, 
i8-in. 
20-in. 


, 1,590 '' 

, 1-193 " 
, 1,066 " 

, 36 - 

, 1,769 '' 

9,073 feet. 






14-in., 
20-in., 








2 
I 


equal 


to 1. 7 1 miles. 




6 










16 




PIPES AN 

Pipes. 


D STOP-GATES DI 


SCO 


NTINUED. 

Stop- 


Ga 


tcs. 




I -in. 

4-in. 

6-in. 

14-in. 


, 306 feet, 

, 1-363 '' 
, 2,247 " 

,1,789 " 






4-in,, 
6-in., 








2 

I 


equal 


5,705 feet, 
to 1.08 miles. 














3 



Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 303,- 
050 feet, equal to 57.39 miles. 

Total number of hydrants now in use, 252. 
Total number of gates now in use, 701. 



SERVICE-PIPE. 

There have been laid during the year and connected with the 
main pipes, 58 service pipes, consisting of 58 3-4-inch, 1,389 feet 
in length. 

Number discontinued during the year, i ; whole number in 
use at the present time, 3,173; total length of service pipes, 74,- 
520 feet or 14.1 1 miles. 



WATER DETARTMENT. 



195 



All the water rents for the year have been collected; one sup- 
ply was shut off to enforce the payment, which was soon made 
with the fine. 

We have set 132 meters during the year; 2 have been taken 
out, making- the total number now in use, 632. 

The following table shows the height of water in Penacook 
Lake on the first day of each month : 



January 


180.35 


July . . 


1 84. 90 


February 


180.40 


August 


185.00 


March 


180.70 


September . 


184.40 


April . 


183.50 


October 


184.10 


May . 


1S4.50 


November . 


. 1S3.65 


June . 


185.25 


December . 


184.20 



The lowest point reached was January 13, being 180.20; the 
highest was June 10, 186.25; mean height, 183.33, which was 
4.37 feet higher than the mean height for the year 1896. 

At its highest record, the water stood 11.94 feet above the 
lowest record of 1896, and 5.15 feet above the highest point of 
that year; and comparing this highest record of June 10, with all 
previous records of the heig'ht of water, it stood 18.20 feet high- 
er than the lowest point ever reached, and 1.65 feet higher than 
the highest point ever reached, since 1872. 

The water has-been running over the overflow one hundred 
and seven days during the year. The continued high water pre- 
vented us from undertaking any extended repairs and improve- 
ments around the outlet until quite late in the season. How- 
ever, nearly all the work was completed which you proposed in 
this direction. 

A core-wall two feet thick and varying from one to four feet 
in depth, was built from the north line of the Hopkinton road to 
the overfllow, a distance of 152 feet; also commencing at the 
overflow, passing around the rear of the cottage and buildings, 
into the road and across the dam, a distance of 670 feet. This 
now makes the top of the core-wall on a level with the top of the 
stone work at each end of the overflow, and 28 inches above the 
overflow. 



196 CITY OF COXCORD. 

A water-way was constructed from the overflow to the cul- 
vert under the road, about i8o feet in leng'th. At the overflow, 
it is 40 feet wide, the entire width of the overflow, and then it 
narrows down to 25 feet; it has a concave bottom, concreted, 
and curbing rising 10 inches above the concrete, making the 
depth 22 inches from the top of the curbing to the centre of the 
channel. In the construction, the hard pan was removed three 
or four feet in depth, the entire length, and replaced by 18 inch- 
es of sand, to protect the concrete from frost. The earth thus 
excavated was used to raise the road leading around the lake, 
which is now of such height that probably the water will never 
flow over it again. 

A new culvert was built to replace the one destroyed by high 
water in June; it is 7 by 12 feet and 25 feet long; the stone work 
was done by the day by M.H.Johnson, and like all work done 
by Mr. Johnson, is a fine piece of masonry, thoroughly con- 
structed. The brick arch covering it was not completed, owing 
to the lateness of the season. The present cost of the culvert is 
$671.95. 

From the culvert, a water-way was cut leading down through 
the woods to near the city culvert at Quaker street, thus com- 
pleting a clear channel from the overflow through the water- 
works land, and I believe that the present arrangement for car- 
ing for high water is equal to any probable emergency. When 
the culvert is finished, this will complete the work which you 
directed to be done this season, with the exception of the grad- 
ing of the road from the cottage to the Hopkinton road. 

The most serious break of the year was on the main line near 
M. H. Farnum's; the culvert at this place was inadequate to 
care for the large amount of water occasioned by a heavy rain 
on July 14, and the water washed out the road, undermining and 
breaking one of the main pipes. We re-laid the cement-lined 
pipe with cast-iron, and also repaired the road, over thirty 
loads of grade being required to fill the washout. 

We commenced this year an important work in the beginning 
of a new main to replace the original 14-inch cement-Hned pipe, 
laid in 1872. A 20-inch pipe was laid from the pumping sta- 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 197 

tion to a little north of the cemetery gate; and I would urgently 
recommend that this new main be continued from year to year 
as circumstances will allow, until the old 14-inch pipe may be 
discarded. 

I would also recommend that Monroe street be re-laid with 
6-inch cast-iron pipe in place of 4-inch cement-lined, as we have 
had a number of leaks on that street from the old pipe; also that 
the Broadway pipe be extended from the north gate of Rollins 
Park to McKinley street, and through McKinley street to Turn- 
pike street. 

In January last, John St. Lawrence, foreman of the street 
work for nearly three years, died very suddenly. He had 
worked for the department about six years, and his faithfulness 
and increasing efficiency made him a valuable and trustworthy 
employee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

V. C. HASTINGS, Superintendent. 



198 CITY OF CONCORD. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



W. F. Thayer, Treasurer, 

In account with Concord Water-Works. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand January i, 1897 $14,928.69 

Income of water-works 55,156.42 

$70,085.11 

EXPENDITURES. 

Interest on water-works bonds $27,064.00 

Bonds 10,000.00 

Maintenance and extension 21,828.28 

Balance on hand January i, 1898 11,192.83 

$70,085.11 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I have examined the foregoing accounts of the Superintend- 
ent of the Water- Works and City Treasurer and find them to 
be correct. 

JAMES O. LYFORD, 

Citv Auditor. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 199 

SANITARY ANALYSIS OF WATER. 

SAMPLE FROM OVER INTAKE, PENACOOK LAKE. 

Water is a mineral substance, composed of two elements. Hydrogen forms 
one ninth of its weight, and oxygen, eight ninths. This is water chemically 
pure, or pure water. As found in nature, it always contains other substances. 
Water sanitarily pure need not be chemically pure. Water sanitarily impure, 
designated as polluted, or contaminated, contains substances or organisms 
injurious to health; animal matter, vegetable material, disease germs, 
poisonous metals, as lead, zinc, copper, manganese, etc. 

The figures in the analysis represent parts per 100,000. To convert into parts 
per million, multiply by 10; into parts per United States gallon, by 0.583722; 
into parts per English gallon, by 0.7. 

Odor.— Slight. 

Color.— Slight yellowish tint. 

Transparency. — Clear. 

Pure water is odorless, colorless, clear, and tasteless. Water sanitarily pure 
may have one or all of these properties. Polluted water may be free from 
some or all of them. 

Behavior During Evaporation.— Some foamy. 

Appearance of Residue. — Little yellowish; some circles. 

Water containing vegetable juices is a thin syrup. Such water foams during 
•evaporation. Circles and irregular figures are marked on the dish where the 
last bubbles break in drying away. Animal matter seldom causes water to 
behave in this manner. 

Total Solids. — 3.4. 

The amount of solids in water, sanitarily pure, varies greatly. Good well 
water in this state seldom contains more than 15 parts. Good pond water 
contains less than half of this quantit.y. 

Ignition of Residue. — It blackens. 

The residue blackens in proportion to the amount of organic carbon present, 
provided there is no excess of nitrates. Nitrates are present excessively more 
•often in animal polluted waters; hence the residue of such waters blackens 
less than that of vegetable contaminated waters, both because animal matter 
•contains less carbon as a rule, and because the nitrates supply oxygen to 
consume it quickly. Vegetable carbon often blackens intensely and the 
blackening persists. 

Loss ON Ignition of Residue. — 1.5. 

This consists of the combustible and volatile portion of the organic matter, 
and volatile mineral substances,— carbonic acid, nitric acid, water of crystalli- 
zation, zinc, and other volatile metals. The proportion of mineral solids is 
larger in well water than in pond water, because well water settling through 
the earth has come in contact with more soluble minerals. On the other hand, 
ipona water contains more organic solids, because the soluble organic matter 
received from the surface of the ground has not been removed by the filtering 
action of earthy strata. It is seldom that the character and quantity of 
natural, mineral solids condemn a water. Vegetable matter is less harmful 
than animal matter. Both are more harmful in well water than in pond water 
because light and sunshine tend to destroy deadly germs. 

Hardness. — 1.5. 

Alkalinity. — 1.0. 

The figures are given in terms of carbonate of lime, i. e., so many parts of 
carbonate of lime would give the same figures. Hardness and alkalinity give 
■considerable information about the mineral constitution of water and often 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

concerning its sanitary condition." Hardness is due chiefly to the salts of lime 
and magnesia, most often, their carbonates and sulphates. Alkalinity is 
caused only by their carbonates, or by the carbonates of potash, soda, ammo- 
nia, or some other alkali. Water hard from the salts of lime and magnesia^ 
other than their carbonates, shows no alkalinity, unless the .substances last 
named above are present. The carbonates of lime, or magnesia give nearly 
the same degree of hardness and alkalinity, lime especially. Sewage increases 
the alkalinity which then becomes an indication of pollution. 

Free Carbonic Acid.— 1.98. 

Combined and -Bicarbonate Carbonic Acid. — .88. 

As the largest part of organic matter is carbon, so the largest product of 
decay is carbonic acid. Natural waters are weak solutions of carbonic acid. 
ThroHgh its agency the carbonates of lime, magnesia, iron, lead, and zinc, are 
dissolved and kept in solution in water. Expel the carbonic acid by boiling 
and these carbonates precipitate, rendering the water turbid and forming a 
scale on the kettle. Water which contains much decaying organic matter, 
contains much carbonic acid; hence polluted water attacks lead pipe more 
freely than pure water. Combined carbonic acid is that which is united with a 
metallic base, forming a carbonate; bicarbonate carbonic acid holds the 
carbonate in solution; the free carbonic acid is that which is simply dissolved 
in water. 

Free Ammonia. — 0.0024. 

Albuminoid Ammonia. — 0.014. 

Ammonia results from the decomposition of organic matter; the free, is that 
which the natural process of decay has produced, and points to what extent 
decay has been going on in the water; the albuminoid, results from the artifi- 
cial decomposition of organic matter during analysis and points to the quan- 
tity of organic matter actually present. In good well water the albuminoid 
ammonia should not exceed 0.009 part, and in good pond water 0.015 part. In 
neither should the free ammonia exceed 0.005 part. 

Chlorine. — 0.2. 

Chlorine is a constituent of common salt. Sewage is rich in salt, hence the 
value of chlorine as an indication of pollution. Good water should not contain 
more than 0.5 part of it, unless the locality is near the sea coast, or is naturally 
rich in salt. 

Nitric Acid.— Trace. 

This is a constituent of saltpetre which is produced by the fermentation of 
manures and sewage. Good well water should not contain more than 0.5 part 
of it, and pond water not more than 0.02. Excess of chlorine, or nitric acid in 
water always indicates either actual contamination, or dangerous proximity to 
sources of tilth. In this case, the water contains filtered sewage. Nitric acid 
often results from the oxidation of ammonia, or vegetable matter. If the quan- 
tity of chlorine is normal while the nitric acid is excessive, the water is prob- 
ably contaminated with vegetable matter, unless other results deny it. 

Nitrous Acid. — None. 

This is a lower oxide of nitrogen than nitric acid. It is a transition product 
between ammonia, or organic matter, and nitric acid. Its presence shows that 
the source of pollution is so near that time enough has not elapsed for the 
complete oxidation of its nitrogen in its progress toward the water supply. 
Good water should contain none of it, or but a mere trace. 

Oxygen Consumed in Oxidation.— 0.142. 

Good well water should require less than 0.1 part of oxj'gen, and good pond 
water less than 0.2 for the oxidation of its dissolved organic matter. In no 
case should it exceed 0.4. Some bad waters may require less than 0.05 part. 
Vegetable material, comparatively richer in carbon than animal substances^ 
requires more oxygen for oxidation; while animal substances, being richer in 
nitrogen, yield more ammonia and other nitrogen compounds. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 201 

Poisonous Metals. — None. 

Water should not contain more than 0.03 part of lead, or copper, or more than 
0.05 part zinc. 

Iron. — Trace. 

Good water ought not to contain more than 0.1 part iron. 

Sediment. — Very little. 

Good water .should deposit no sediment, or scarcely any. 

Microscopic Examination and Biological Character of Sediment. — Dia- 
toms and algfe. 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood Temper- 
ature in Alkaline Agar Medium.— 2. 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood Temper- 
ature in Agar Medium Containing Parietti's Solution. — None. 

Disease germs grow at the temperature of the body. Many harmless bacteria 
also flouri.sh at this temperature. It a sample of water contains none which 
grow at this temperature, disease germs are evidently absent. The disease 
germ more usually found in waters of this latitude is the typhoid bacillus. 
The bacillus coli communis, whose original habitat is in the intestines, though 
not strictly a disease germ, is preeminently the sewage bacterium, and conse- 
quently all waters in which it is found should be condemned. The presence of 
any other sewage bacterium should also condemn a water for drinking pur- 
poses. The typhoid bacillus, the coli communis, and a few others will grow in 
agar medium, containing Parietti's solution, but to distinguish and identifj- 
them, special cultures and examinations must be made. Bacteria multiply 
very rapidly after water is taken from its source and raised to summer tem- 
perature. Since the kind of bacteria is more important than their number, the 
delay necessarily caused by transportation of the sample, if not too long, is 
favorable instead of objectionable, because a very few disease germs in a 
large quantity of water might escape discovery, but detection of them would 
be much more certain after their multiplication. 

Disease Germs. — None. 

This is good water. 

EDMUND R. ANGELL. 

August 13, 1897. 



202 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF PUMPING STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water-Works. 
V. C. Hastings, Superintendent: 

Sir, — I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping staition is in good working condition. 

Following will be found a statement of the coal and supplies 
used at the pumping station during the year, with a table show- 
ing the work for each month : 

STATEMENT. 

loi tons, 1,366 lbs. Pocahontas coal. 
45 cords of wood. 
43 gallons of oil. 
27 pounds of waste. 

ENGINE RECORD. 



Date. 


Pumping 
time. 

h. TO. . 


Gallons 

water 

pumped. 


Daily 
average 
pumped. 


Total 

coal 

burned. 


Daily 
average 

coal 
burned. 


♦Gallons 
pumped 

per 
pound of 

coal. 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


111:30 
111:30 
116:00 
97:45 
97:00 
99:45 
111:25 
88:30 
106:15 
107:45 
98:45 
121:10 


9.557,125 
8,994,685 
9,683,205 
8,011,815 
8,308,335 
8,655,010 
9,674,840 
7,776,510 
9,125,760 
9,345,665 
8,546,405 
10,206,280 


308,294 
321,238 
312,361 
267,060 
268,010 
288,500 
312,091 
250,885 
304,192 
301,473 
284,880 
329,234 


21,228 
20,332 
20,538 
17,378 
17,937 
18,567 
19,691 
16,187 
18,498 
19,022 
17,392 
20,836 


684 
729 
662 
579 
578 
466 
635 
522 
616 
613 
579 
672 


450 
442 
471 
461 
468 
467 
491 
480 
493 
491 
491 
489 


Total 


1,267:10 107,885,635 


295,577 


227,606 


623 1 474 




Dally average.. 


3 : 28 9!9S fi77 




623 













*Amount of coal consumed includes that used for heating the building and 
banking flres. 

Amount of coal consumed per thousand gallons pumped, 2.10 
pounds. , 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Ensfineer. 



APPKNDIX. 



204 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A. 

Receipts for each Year since the Completion of the Works. 

For the year ending January 31, 1874 $4,431.10 

For fifteen months ending April i, 1875 17,535.00 

For the year ending April i, 1876 16,921.24 

" " 1877 19,001.07 

" " 1878 20,763.03 

1879 21,869.86 

1880 22,451.53 

1881 26,744.58 

For nine months ending December 31, 1881 25,534.01 

For the year " " 1882 27,243.06 

1883 28,255.48 

1884 28,915.65 

1885 30,222.54 

1886 30,862.64 

1887 34,047-52 

1888 38,441.32 

1889 40,237.53 

1890 42,13341 

" 1891 46,075,16 

1892 48,351-52 

1893 52,299.66 

1894 53.230.10 

1895 55,343-19 

1896 56,557-81 

• " " " 1897 56,156.42 

Total receipts for 25 years "... $843,624.43 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



205 



Mean Height of the Water Each Year. 



^S73 






175.S6 


1 886 






178.10 


1874 






179-50 


1887 






179.04 


1875 






180.00 


1 888 






181.96 


1876 






1S0.2S 


18S9 






180.91 


1877 






176.46 


1890 






181.90 


1S7S 






179-50 


1891 






180.00 


1S79 






179.74 


1892 






174-32 


iSSo 






175-30 


1^93 






173-3S 


18S1 






174.70 


1894 






173.81 


18S3 






179.15 


'S95 






171-15 


1883 






176.40 


1896 






178.96 


1884 






178.1S 


1S97 






183-33 


188=5- 






1 76. So 











206 



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210 



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WATER DKPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS. 



211 




North Main 



South Main 



Turnpike. 



Water. 

Hall. 

Hammond. 

Fiske. 

Summer. 

Durgin. 

North State, 



South State. 



South-west corner North Main and Penacook 

East side North Main, near J. B. Walker's '.'.'. 

Junction North Main and Fiske ! ...., 

East side North Main, near Larkin's store 

North-west corner North Main and Franklin 

East side North Wain, opposite I'earl ."" 

North-west corner North Main and Washington 

West side North Main, oppofife Historical Society rooms!! 

East side North Main, opposite Chapel 

North-west corner North Main and Court !!!.!.!!! 

North-west cornt'r North Main and I'itman !!!.!.!..'.! 

North-west corner North Main and Montgomery..!!! !!! !! 

East side North Main, opjiosite Montgomery 

North-west corner Xoith .Mnin and Centre ! !! 

South-east corner Nortli Jlain and Bridge !!!!!!!!!! 

South-west corner North Main and I'ark !!!!.!!'" 

East side North Main, opposite Tark !!!!!! 

North-west corner North Main and Capitol 

North-west corner North Main and School !!..!.!! 

West side North Main, at Centennial block 

East side North Main, opjiosite Centennial block 

East side North Main, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side North Main, in rear Woodward block! !'!!!' 
Nortli-west corner North Main and Warren 

West side North Main . at Central block !!!!!!" 

South-east corner North Main and Depot 

North-west corner North Main and Pleasant ! ! ! " ! ! 

Soutli-east corner South Main and Pleasant ' 

North-east corner South Main anil Freight 

East side South Main, opposite Fayette .'.'.'.'.'. 

East side South Main, ojiixj^ite Tliompson. !!..!!!!!'.'.!".".'.." 
South-east corner Soulli Main and Chandler.!!!!.',... !." .".'., 

North-west corner South .Main and Wont worth avenue 

North-west corner South Main and Tliorndike 

East side South Main, opposite St. John's church! ! ! ! !!!! ! ! ! 

North-west corner Soutli Main and Perley 

West side South Main, near Abbot-Downing Co.'s'.!!!! 

East side South Main, opposite Abbot-Downing Co "s ! " 

North-west corner South Main and W.est • 

East side J'urnpike, near West 

West side Turnpike, opposite Gas. 



27 



12 



West side rnrnpike, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg Co 
Southwest corner Turnpike and South State '. 



Northwest corner Turnpike and Pill.sbury 
East side Turnpike, opposite Pillsburv .. 

West side Turnpike, at .1 . H . i.ampre y 's 

West side Turnpike, at W. J. Sawyer's 

West side Water, near Capt. James Thompson's. . . 
West side Hall, below Rolfe and Kumford Asylum. 

North side Hammond, near Bridge 

West side Fiske. near North State '. !! ! 

North-east corner Summer and Pitman 

West side Durgin, near Toofs laundry 

South-west comer North State and Penacook 

North-west corner jNorth State and Walker 

North-west corner North State and Church.. 
North-west corner North State and Tremont. 



North-east corner North State and Washington 
West side North State, opposite Court 



North-west corner North State and Maple! 

North-east corner North State and Centre 

East side North State, opposite government buildina 

South-west corner North State and School 7 

North-west corner North State and Warren 
North-west corner North State and Pleasant. 
East side South State, opposite Wall.... 



12 



21-2 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Cori^nmecZ. 



STREETS. 



LOCATIONS. 



South State. 



Mills. 

Dakin. 

Dunklee. 

Broadway. 

Green. 

South. 



Bradley. 



Union. 

Lyndon. 
No. Spring. 
So. Spring. 



Rumford. 



Tahanto. 
Pine. 
High. 



Giles 
Fruit. 



Minot. 
I'enacook. 



Highland. 
Church. 



Franklin. 



Beacon. 
Blanchard. 

Ferry 
Washington 



Valley. 



North-west corner South State and Tliompson 

South-west corner South State and Monroe 

East side South State, opposite Laurel 

South-east corner Soutli State and Uowiiiug .... 

North-east corner South State and West 

Junction of South State and Turnpike 

South-east corner Mills and Downing 

West side Mills, near Levi Call's 

West side Dakin, near C. E. Harriman's 

North- west corner Dunklee and Pillsbury 

West side Broadway, near precinct line 

North-west corner Green and I'rince 

East side Green, opposite I'rince 

West side South, opposite Wall 

North-west corner South and Thompson 

West side South, opposite Monroe 

West side South, opposite Laurel • 

West side South, opposite Downing 

West side South, opposite Allison 

West side South, near Abbot farm 

West side South, opposite Smith farm 

North- west corner South and Kockingham 

Southwest corner Bradley and I'enacook 

West side Bradley, opposite Walker 

East side Bradley, opposite Highland 

North-west corner Union and Maple 

South-west corner Lyndon and Trcmont 

South-west corner North Spring and Centre 

South-west corner South Spring and Oak 

West side South Spring, opposite Concord 

West side South Spring, opposite I'erley proposed extension 

West side Rumford, opposite I'erkins 

North-east corner Rumford and Franklin 

West side Rumford, opposite Beacon 

North-east corner Rumford and Abbot 

North-east corner Rumford and Cambridge 

North-east corner Rumford and School 

North-west corner Tahanto and School 

South-west corner Pine and Centre 

North-west corner High and Auburn 

East side High, opposite Forest 

South-west corner High and Franklin 

South-east corner Giles and School 

North-east corner Fruit and Clinton 

East side Fruit, opposite Wm. W. Critchett's 

North-west corner Fruit and Woodman 

West side Minot, near Odd Fellows' Home 

South fide I'enacook, near P. B Co.'s bark house 

South side I'enacook, near P. B. Co.'s office 

Southea-t corner Penacook and North Main 

South-west corner Penacook and Rumford 

South-east corner Penacook and Columbus avenue 

North-east corner Highland and Kumford 

North side Church, opposite Lyndon 

North-east corner Church and Rumford 

North-west corner Franklin and Jackson 

South-west corner Franklin and Rumford 

South side Franklin, opposite W.J. Ahern's 

North-east corner Franklin and Auburn. 

North-west corner IJeacon and Jackson 

North-west corner Blanchard and Essex 

North side Ferry, east ot C. & M. Railroad 

South-west corner Washington and Union 

North-west corner Washington and Rumford 

North side Washington, opposite Perry avenue 

North side Valley, opposite Forest 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



213 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co»i/i/?(ed. 



STREETS. 



Auburn. 
Centre. 



Bridge. 
Capitol. 
School. 



Depot. 
Warren. 



Pleasant. 



Mill Koad, 

St. P. School. 

Marshall. 

Freight. 

Hill's ave. 

Fayette. 

Chandler. 

Conconl. 

Thorndike. 

Laurel. 

Perley. 

West. 



Harrison. 

Allison. 

Kockinjili'm. 

Prosj)uct. 
Curtice ave. 
On main line 



LOCATIONS. 



North- west corner Auburn and Forest 

North-east corner Centre and Nortli State 

South-west corner Centre and Green 

North-west corner Centre and Union 

North-west corner Centre and North Spring 

North-west corner Centre and Kumford 

South side Centre opposite Essex 

South-west corner Centre and Summit avenue 

Northeast corner Centre and liridg • Koad 

South side Bridge, near easterly barn 

North-east corner Capitol and North State 

North-west corner School and Green 

North-west corner School and North Spring 

North-west corner School and Merrimack 

North side .""Chool, near city storehouse 

North side School. oppof.ite E. B Wood worth's 

North-west corner Depot and Railroad square 

South side Depot at pn<l ol' train shed 

Nortli- west corner Warren and Green 

North-west corner Warren and N orth Spring 

North-west corner Warren and Humford . . . . 

South-west corner Warren and .Merrimack 

North-west corner Warren and Tahauto 

North-east corner Warren and High 

Junction Warren and Pleasant, near Fruit 

North-west corner Pleasant and Railroad Square 

North west corner Pleasant and Creen 

Southwest Corner Pleasant and Spring 

South side Pleasant, opposite Kumford 

South side Pleasant, ojiposite .Meirimack 

South side Pleasant, opposite Pine 

South side I'leasant. ojjposite Liberty 

North side Pleasant, near Salem 

South si e Pleasant, near M rs. Eddy's 

North side Pleasant, near Mrs. Lai. e's 

North side Pleasant, near .L McC. Hammond's 

South side Pleasant, opposite Pond road 

South side Pleasant, near J. Mil nor Coit's 

North side Pleasant, opposite Infirmary 

South side Pleasant, near the mill 

East side Mill road, near ITppcr School cottage 

North side Mill road, at Orplians' Home 

North side .Marshall, ()i)posite Fuller . 

JS^orth side Freight :it south-west corner passenger station. 

North-east corner Hill's avenue and Soutli Main 

South-west corner Hill's avenue and Railroad square 

North-west corner Fayette and Elm 

South side Chandler, opposite Railroad 

South side Concord, opposite .lefTerson 

.Morlh-east corner Thorndike and Grove 

North-east corner Laurel and Pierce 

North-west corner Perley ami Grove 

South side J'erley, near old brook 

North side West, near Badger 

North side West, opposite Uakin 

North side We-t, at intersection Broadway 

North-west corner Harrison and Morton 

North-west corner Allison and Mills 

North-east corner Rocking' am and Broadvvay 

North-west corner Prospect and (iranite avenue 

North side Curtice avenue, near John C. Kenney's 

West side West Concord road, at water-works storehouse.. 

North-east corner West Concord road and Foster 

East side West Concord road, near cemetery gate 

West side West Concord road, near Calvary cemetery 



15 



214 



CITY OF COXCOKI). 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— ro»c/Mf?erL 




WKST CONCORD. 

On main line East side, West Concord road near Asa L. Uay'g. . 
" East side West Concord road, near C. K. Farnuni's 

" 1 Ea«t side West Concord road, near stone cut 

Main. East side Main, near old city farm 

" ! East side IMain, near enfjine-house 

East side Main, opposite D. Holden's 

VV^est side Main, near north mill 

East side Main, opposite Geo. W.Brown's 

East side Main, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side Main, opposite A. Hollis's 

" I East side Mail), near Sewall's Fiills road 

Electric. ' North-east eornerof Electric and Main 

" Nortli side Electric, near power station 

Lake. East side Lake, near S. W. Kellom's 

" ' East side Lake, near Mrs. G. E. Uolden's 

Knight. ' South side Knight, opposite railroad station 

Hutchins. North side Hulchins, near 1$. T. Putney's 

" Nortli side Hutchins, near C. & C. Railroad 

Fen'c'kKoHd West side I'eiiacook road, near Warner road 

" " West side I'enacook road, near Mr. Currier's. 



1' EN A COOK. 



West Main. 
High. 

Washington. 



Charles. 



West Canal. 
East Canal. 



Crescent. 
Merrimack. 



Summer. 

Spring. 
Centre. 
Cross. 
Rolfe. 

Penacook. 



West side Main, opposite Stark 

West side Main, near Mr. Prescott's 

South-west corner Main and Union 

Washington square. op])osite Washington 

North-west corner JIain and Charles 

North side Main, opposite East Canal 

North side Main, near iron bridge 

West side West Main, opposite Cemetery 

East side High, opposite .Summit 

North-west corner High and Maple 

North-west corner High and Spring 

South-east corner Washington and Union 

South side Washington, opposite John Whitaker's. 

South side Washington, opposite Charles 

South side Washington, near Contoocook bridge 

South-west corner Charles and Warren 

North side Charles, near Geo. W. Corey's 

South-east corner West Canal and Warren 

North side East Canal, near Contoocook Mfg. Co.. 

North side East Canal, near Crescent 

North side Crescent, ea.-t of Canal 

South side Merrimack, opposite Merrimack avenue. 

North side Merrimack, opposite D. W. Fox's 

North side Merrimack, opposite Cross 

South side Merrimack, opposite Rolfe's shop 

North side Merrimack, near road to Island 

North-west corner Merrimack and Penacook 

North side Summer, opposite High 

North-east corner Summer and Centre 

North-east corner Spring and Church 

North-west corner Centre and Spring 

South-west corner Cross and Summer 

North side Rolfe, near James Corbett's 

North-west corner Rolfe and Penacook 

West side Penacook, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 



Whole number public hydrants 



2 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 

252 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FlRE-KYDRAWrS.— Continued. 



215 



STREETS. 



LOCATIONS. 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard. 6 post and 3 flush 

liydrants 

Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops 

New state prison 

Abbot-Downing Co.'s yard 

Page Belting Co.'s yard 

W. P. Ford & Co.'s yard 

N. H. Asylum for Insane yard 

Concord Gas Light Co.'s yard 

St. Paul's school. 

Water-works pumping station grounds 

Whole number private hydrants 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS 



To the City Council: 

Gentlemen: — In submitting my annual report as commis- 
.sioner of highways, I will touch briefly upon the work accom- 
plished during the past year. 

Not much has been done on new streets, McKinley street be- 
ing the only one of much importance. This street was nearly 
finished to grade. There has been a fill made on Langdon 
street of 704 loads which makes it passable, and a temporary 
plank walk built from Turnpike street to the railroad shops for 
the accommodation of the employees of the works. 

A petition for the grading of High street from Centre to 
Franklin was presented to the city council in March and re- 
ferred to the committee on streets and sidewalks. By them it 
was recommended that the matter be referred to the commis- 
sioner of highways and that the street be graded as far as prac- 
ticable this season. Work on the same was commenced in 
June. The material excavated was a good quality of gravel 
and was used to advantage in repairing the streets. About 
1,200 loads of stone and 1,833 loads of gravel were removed. 
This gravel was very valuable, as the many heavy rains caused 
numberless washouts and the stone was crushed with our por- 
table plant at a small expense. There is still considerable work 
to be done on the street which will make a fine street when com- 
pleted and be a great improvement to that part of the city. 

Of the work done on bridges this year $137.39 was expended 
in replanking and repairing the "Twin bridge" at Penacook. 
In March this bridge was inspected by a bridge builder and 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



217 



thoug'ht to be safe for another season, but it should soon be re- 
placed with an iron bridge. The bridge on the South Pem- 
broke road over the Soucook river was repaired by the city, the 
Town of Pembroke paying one half the expense of $67.60. The 
stringers of the bridge over the Turkey river at St. Paul's School 
are decayed and will have to be replaced next year. There is 
considerjtble travel over this bridge and a new one with side- 
walks is needed, and I think the School would bear a portion of 
the expense of constructing a modern iron bridge. The Lou- 
don and Federal bridges across the Merrimack, the Iron bridge 
at Penacook and the one at Horse Hill across the Contoocook 
will have to be painted next season, which will be quite an ex- 
pense. 

In June, the heavy rainfall raised Penacook lake, the source 
of the city water supply, so 'that it overflowed and did consider- 
able damage. Hutchins street from the lake to West State 
street was badly washed. The culvert 011 Quaker street proved 
insufficient to carry the water and was therefore enlarged at an 
expense of $144.49. ^^ this same time the culvert over Bow 
brook on Clinton street was enlarged, the expense being $36.95. 
A portion of the culvert on West State street opposite the Con- 
cord Manufacturing Company's mill will have to be rebuilt next 
year. 

The work of cleaning streets this year has been done under a 
separate appropriation. The spring and fall cleaning work in- 
creases each year, and this season 2,595 loads of garbage were 
removed. This work is a great help toward the good appear- 
ance of our city. The residents seem to take more pride in 
keeping their yards and vacant lots neat, since the city removes 
the ashes and rubbish. This season the work of keeping Main 
street from Pleasant to Centre and Warren and Capitol streets 
from State to Main clean, was given to one man with a hand- 
cart. The method has proved very satisfactor}- and another 
year, I think, it would be advisable to add another cart and to 
extend the work over a larger portion of the city. The busi- 
ness section has been cleaned by night as years before. There 
are still many calls to have the section extended. 

The snows of the past winter have been removed from the 



"218 CITY OF CONCORD. 

sidewalks by the owners or occupants of the premises. Several 
hundred notices were sent out during the season ordering the 
walks cleaned, but in only a few cases were second notices nec- 
essary. One case was referred to the city soHcitor for action 
and the matter was brought before the poHce court. An appeal 
was made to the higher court for a decision, but the case is still 
unsettled. 

During the summer there were many hard rain storms, often 
three or four in succession. This, of course, filled up the catch- 
basins and necessitated considera]>le work on them. The num- 
l)er is large and increasing each year, and therefore the appro- 
priation of $800 was soon exhavisted and the city asked to ap- 
propriate more money. From the money collected by the de- 
partment $300 was transferred to the appropriation. This sum 
was still insufficient and more money called for. By this may 
be seen that a much larger sum will have to be appropriated 
next year. 

"The appropriations for the Highway Department for 1897 
were made under difTferent heads as follows: General mainte- 
nance and repairs, $18,000; permanent work, $8,000; cleaning 
streets, $4,000; sidewalks and crossings, $4,500; construction 
and cleaning catch-basins, $800; making a total of $35,300. 
This amount was formerly appropriated in one sum, excepting 
that for sidewalks and crossings, and the public generally under- 
stood that it was expended wholly on the streets and thought 
that we had but little to show for the money expended. By the 
appropriation being divided it may be seen just what the 
amounts are expended for. I 'hope that the appropriation for 
permanent work may be increased another year. 

In my last report I recommended the purchase of a portable 
stone crusher plant, which the city thought advisable to buy this 
season. At the meeting of the city council in May, a resolution 
was passed appointing a committee of three, consisting of the 
Mayor, Commissioner of Highways and Alderman Rowell, to 
purchase a portable stone crusher for the city with full power to 
make selection as in their judgment the interests of the city de- 
manded. The committee examined plants in operation in sev- 
eral places and found that they all gave satisfaction. Bids were 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 219 

called for and six were received, which were as follows : Earl C. 
Bacon, Farrel Crusher, $2,040; Good Roads Machinery Co., 
Champion, $1,677; S. C. Nightingale & Ohilds, Austin, $1,795; 
Climax Road Machine. Co., Climax, $1,462; Austin & Western 
Co., Western, $1,500; Gates Iroii Works, Invincible, $1,950. 
The bid of the Climax company being the lowest, it was ac- 
cepted. We experienced considerable delay in receiving the 
crusher, but by the last of July it was installed at a gravel bank- 
on the main road between Penacook and West Concord. It 
was difficult to obtain much stone only by running the gravel 
through the crusher. This, of course, gave a large amount of 
fine stone, but about 600 loads were crushed and used on the 
Penacook road below Willow Hollow. From there the crusher 
was moved to High street where it was used during the re- 
mainder of the season, and it may be used there another season 
to good advantage. 

A portion of the appropriation for permanent work was ex- 
pended for the new portable stone crusher and the remainder 
for macadamizing. The followine table shows the work done : 



220 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



•;soo iBjox 



-pBa'jds JO jsoo 



•Sot 

-^B.VBOXa JO jsoo 



•auojs 
paqsnjo spBoq 



■qiPIM 



•qjSnaq 









OMlOINlOt^tMlOCCO 






r-4CO.-ICOi-ir^>-H«.-llC 



iMeo«me^coeoco.-irH 






:: x ■- <ij 



•a o ;f' a o q ^-le o 
c '^— ■; o ^- ® o ji 

fe o c- Q o &H a, < a, 



^ 03 tS 

^z Si §: 



ce o 

as 






HIGHWAY DEPAliTMENT. 



221 



The stone for these several pieces of work was the material 
from High street crushed with the portable crusher, with the ex- 
ception of that used on North State street, which came from the 
stationary crusher and that on Merrimack street in Penacook. 
Material was not plenty there and it was found that it could be 
delivered there from Suncook at less expense. Another year, I 
think it ^^■ould be advisable to expend a portion of this appro- 
priation for a good piece of paving. There has been a petition 
presented to the city council for the paving of Bridge street from 
Main street to the Railroad bri Ige, but no action has been taken. 
North Main street from Centre to Pitman is still in poor condi- 
tion and it seems that paving would be the thing for the place. 
All the freight and travel from the railroad station is over 
Freight street and I think the public deserves a better street. 
On account of the heavy traffic, paving is certainly what is 
needed. 

I would recommend the establis'hing of the street line on the 
Hopkinton road from Fruit street to Pleasant View, the home of 
Mrs. Mary B. G. Eddy, and putting in a macadam road from 
Fruit street to St. Paul's School. There is more pleasure driv- 
ing over this road than any other leading from the city and mac- 
adam would doubtless be greatly appreciated. 

The matter of moving the street railway track at Penacook, 
which has been before the city government for many years, was 
finally settled at the October meeting. By an agreement with 
the street railway company the location was to be excavated and 
filled by the city according to plans and specifications drawn up 
by the city engineer and the railway company to move their 
tracks and pay the sum of $75 toward the work of excavating 
and filling. The contract was awarded Henry Morrill of Pena- 
cook for $552.20, and the work completed by him in December. 
It is expected that the railway company will move their tracks 
early in the spring and When that is done it will be necessary to 
put in a bank wall opposite the premises of John Wilde and Har- 
ry A. Cleveland. 

In November the railway company commenced the work 01 
laying new rails on North Main street, which was rather late in 
the season for work of that kind. The paving had to be taken 



222 CITY OF CONCOUD. 

Up and as the cold weather soon came on it was impossible to 
^et it back in good condition. The thaw and rains which fol- 
lowed took the frost out of the ground and left the street in a 
terrible condition. The company repaired it as well as they 
could, but it will all have to be relaid another year. 

The city council this year amended the City Ordinances in 
regard to the issuing of permits for opening and obstructing 
!--treets. There had been no written permits issued but by the 
amendment of the ordinances the matter was left with the Com- 
missioner of Highways. A form of permit was made out and 
approved by the city council. Although it is not yet generally 
understood in regard to obtaining permits, the people have in 
most cases, obtained them before commencing the work. The 
permits give the name of the person calling for the same, the 
street and number, length and width of obstruction or opening, 
date of issuing, date when work is to be completed, and the rules 
and regulations governing the work. This is signed by the 
person obtaining the permit and a duplicate copy given him 
which is to be returned when tiie work is completed and is filed 
with the original permit. They are valuable as a protection to 
the city and have proved so in cases where the street has not 
been left in a proper condition, as there has been some means of 
reaching the party doing the work. 

In closing, I desire to thank His Honor the Alayor, the city 
council, the committees on streets and sidewalks, roads and 
bridges and city solicitor for the many courtesies extended the 
highway department. 

Respectfullv submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 
Com. of Highways. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMEKT. 223 

RECORD OF LABOR ON STREETS. 

■ WARD ONE. 

Merrimack Avenue: 

Repairing sidewalk $ 0.57 

Summer Street: 

Repairing sidewalk 13-53' 

Cross Street: 

Repairing sidewalk between Merrimack and 

Summer streets 2.13, 

Church Street: 

Repairing sidewalk 2.13. 

Spring Street: 

Repairing sidewalk 4-2/ 

Horse Hill Road: 

Raking stones .(>Y 

Elm Street: 

General repairs by Hardy's and Colby's 32.35 

Grading walk for concrete at Main 50-57 

Building gravel walk on north side 57-63 

Centre street : 

Grading walk for concrete at Spring 36.93 

High Street: 

General repairs 2.59 

Setting edgestones at C. E. Foote's 29.58 

Pleasant Street: 

General repairs 4.46 

River Road: 

Repairing culverts 15.03 

Merrimack Street: 

General repairs 4.94 

Grading near Fowler's 65.67 

Putting in drive box at B. F. Varney's i.oo 

Repairing sidewalk 22.44 

Macadamizing near R. R. station 854.36 



224 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Main Street: 

General repairs $ 8.47 

Repairing gutters i5-o6 

Repairing sidewalks 29.50 

Grading on hill near hotel 148-77 

IMoving Street Railway per contract 552.20 

General repairs account moving track 70.37 

Washington Street: 

General repairs 21.12 

Grading 16.57 

Repairing sidewalks 6.88 

Repairing fountain in square 47-70 

W^arren street: 

Repairing gutter .17 

East Canal and Walnut Street: 

General repairs 17-93 

Repairing Twin Bridge 137-39 

Grading sidewalk 25.67 

Repairing gutters .40 

Repairing sidewalks 1.41 

WARD TWO. 

Curtis Road: 

General repairs $ 18.00 

East Clinton Street : 

General repairs 8. 10 

Penacook Street: 

General repairs 16.50 

Grading 107.30 

Laying rubble drain 6.60 

Repairing culvert at Bowen brook 8.40 

Pembroke street: 

General repairs 41.1-0 

Grading g^^ 

Repairing sidew^alks 6,60 

Shaker Road: 

General repairs 82.34 

Repairing culverts 70^ 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 225 

Eastman Street: 

General repairs i 30 

Portsmouth Street: 

General repairs i3-70 

Kearsarge Street: 

Grading 1102 

Mills Street: 

General repairs i-6o 

Grading 1 1 .70 

Mountain Road (No. Concord District) : 

General repairs on hill by sohooilhouse 9.21 

Penacook Road (No. Concord District) : 

General repairs 45-78 

Loudon Roaid (No. Concord District) : 

General repairs ii4o2 

WARD THREE. 

Quaker Street : 

Painting fence $ i.ii 

Repairing sidewalk 1.57 

Rebuilding culvert and building wall at ice house .144.49 

Knig^ht Street : 

General repairs 4.37 

Grading 11.10 

Building sidewalk and paving gutter by H. H. 

Chase's 12.22 

Peabody Street: 

Grading 6.42 

''Kit Shop" Road: 

General repairs 2.17 

West Parish Road: 

General repairs 47.88 

Hu'tchins Street : 

General repairs i c.-j^ 

Grading sidewalk 14.78 

Painting fence 2. 99 

Repairing sidewalk 1.7^ 

16 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Repairing culvert at Grossman's 8.61 

Building- blind drain by Deacon Barrett's 144.28 

Filling washouts account of pond overflow 50.87 

Engel Road: 

General repairs 6.07 

Bog Road: 

General repairs 7.61 

Lake Street: 

General repairs 5.61 

Painting fence 2.92 

Repairing sidewalk 4.37 

Building culvert under walk 2.68 

West State Street : 

General repairs 185.43 

General repairs account overflow 43-75 

Painting fence 4.92 

Repairing sidewalk by Moses Farnum's, account 

washout 8.99 

Repairing sidewalks 9i-30 

Repairing culverts 7.86 

Building sidewalk at Swenson's and Farnum's. . . 42.01 

Mew Street: 

Repairing sidewalk 5.90 

Second Street: 

General repairs 54-66 

Sewall's Falls Road: 

General Repairs 19-36 

Building sidewalk 35-78 

Laying over culvert 6.98 

WARD FOUR. 

Chapel Street: 

General repairs ^ 25.93 

Building sidewalk 22.5!; 

Court Street : 

General repairs 2.66 

Maple Street: 

General repairs 1 1 .63 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 227 

Abbott Street : 

Building sidewalk on south side 24.22 

Buiilding sidewalk on north side 23.33 

Grading walk for concrete 4.97 

Building crossing at Rumford 3.40 

Pearl Street: 

General repairs 10.70 

Rollins Court: 

General repairs , . . . 1.83 

White Street: 

General repairs 1.50 

Vernon Street : 

General repairs 1.92 

Ridge Road: 

Cutting to grade 211. 13 

Building sidewalk 20.90 

Building plank walk 3.93 

Beacon Street: 

General repairs 24.46 

Washington Street : 

General repairs 50.72 

Grading walk for concrete on south side between 

Academy and Rumford 8.23 

Repairing walk on south side between State and 

Main j q^ 

Repairing walk on south from Peny avenue. ... 1.65 

Grading off banking between Academy and 

Rumford 1 2 07 

Removing trees ^ g . 

Park Ridge: 

Building sidewalk 11 jt, 

Jackson West Count : 

Repairing sidewalk . .q 

Chestnut Street: 

General repairs 18 82 

Valley Street: 

Repairing sidewaJks j . 28 



228 CITY' OF CONCORD. 

Perry Avenue : 

General repairs 1507 

Repairing- sidewalks 2.23 

Essex Street : 

General repairs .28 

Forest Street : 

General repairs 1.43 

Academy Street: 

General repairs 2.74 

Albin Street : 

Repairing- sidewalks 41 92 

Lyndon Street: 

General repairs 23.63 

Grading walk for concrete from Abbott Street 

west 4.36 

Repairing sidewalk between Franklin and Tre- 

mont • 4.33 

Pitman Street: 

General repairs 10.19 

Union Street: 

General repairs 34-45 

Trimming- trees 3.96 

Tremont Street: 

General repairs 10.92 

Setting edgestone and g^rading walk for concrete 77-13 

Paving g-utter 27.40 

Montgomery Street: 

General repairs 3.02 

WARD FIVE. 

Woodman Street: 

General repairs 3 7.53 

Repairing culvert 14-75 

Removing tree 2.35 

Prince Street: 

General repairs 147 

Tahanto Street: 

General repairs ^ 77 

Trimming trees 2.6s 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



229 



Blake Street: 

General repairs ^-37 

Removing tree 33-12 

Setting edgestone .and grading walk for concrete 42.32 

West Washington Street: 

Building sidewalk 70.62 

Garden Street: 

General repairs ^-3° 

Liberty Street: 

General repairs 2.84 

Repairing sidewalk between Centre and School . . i .80 

Grading walk for concrete by Chas. Clarke's 6.89 

Merrimack Street: 

General repairs i-i8 

H u n ti n gd on Street: 

Building sidewalk on east side between School 

and Garden streets 6.18 

Holt Street: 

Building sidewalk 9.67 

Odd Fellow's Avenue: 

General repairs i .73 

Drawing and setting edgestone 79-17 

Building plank walk 5.80 

Park Street : 

General repairs 7.38 

Short Street: 

General repairs 5.98 

Paving gutter on south side 35-75 

Re-setting edgestone 4.40 

Pine Street: 

General repairs 7.65 

Repairing gutter by Mrs. Clough's 23.22 

Repairing sidewalks between School and Centre 

streets 1.47 

Setting edgestone and grading walk for concrete 62.06 

Green Street: 

General repairs 7.88 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Giles Street: 

General repairs -57 

Warren Street: 

General repairs 7449 

Paving gutter between Liberty and Blanchard's 

store 132-93 

Repairing culvert at Bow Brook 9.10 

Setting edgestone and grading walk for concrete 

by J. C. Derby's 102.32 

Setting edgestone and grading walk for concrete 

by Mrs. Gannon's 38.22 

Setting edgestone and grading walk for concrete 

by Seth Dole's 26.38 

Setting edgestone and grading walk for concrete 

by J. Crowley's 30.08 

Setting edgestone on north side opposite police 

station 17.60 

Repairing walk on north side between Liberty 

and Washington 4.87 

Repairing drive box at jail 3.54 

Macadamizing at Green 19.62 

School Street: 

General repairs 96.17 

Repairing culvert at Bow Brook 4.83 

Setting stone step at 116 School street 5.02 

Relaying gutter at Gustavus Walker's 2.40 

WARD SIX 

Pierce Street: 

Grading $ 29.55 

Thompson Street : 

Paving gutter on both sides 30.07 

Jefferson Street: 

Grading 8.55 

Wall Street: 

General repairs 170 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



231 



Beaver Street: 

Grading 3-73 

Repairing- sidewalk 3-^7 

Grove Street: 

General repairs 25.52 

Monroe Street: 

General repairs 21.71 

Removing tree i-86 

Clough Avenue: 

General repairs i-S^ 

Fayette street: 

General repairs 10.25 

Repairing gutter between State and Main 6.47 

Re-sCtting edgestone between State and Main . . . 3.75 

Concord Street: 

General repairs 16.94 

Grading 45-20 

Paving gutters on both sides east of State street 36.09 

Repairing walk between Beaver and Jefferson. . . 14-53 

Repairing walk between Beaver and State 10.17 

Thorndike Street: 

General repairs 49-70 

Removing tree 2.78 

Paving gutter on both sides from Main street west 35-33 

Building sidewalk 10.75 

Myrtle Street: 

General repairs 1.25 

Elm Street: 

General repairs 2.15 

Grading walk for concrete 3.58 

South Spring Street: 

General repairs 40.93 

Paving gutter 47.00 

Perley Street: 

General repairs 2.18 

Setting edgestone between Main and State 72.25 



232 CITY OF CONCORD. 



WARD SEVEN. 

Birchdale Road: 

General repairs $ 8.03 

Cutting bushes 3.47 

Repairing bridge 2.27 

Hall Street: 

General repairs .70 

Rockingham Street : 

General repairs 14-59 

Langdon Street: 

Filling 1 14.07 

Building plank walk 41-58 

Pillsbury Street : 

General repairs 4.37 

Birch Street: 

General repairs 8.47 

West Street: 

General repairs 14.48 

Cutting hiil to grade and re-setting curb by 

Brooks's store 143.90 

Mills Street: 

General repairs 5.59 

St Paul's Sdhool Road : 

Grading 1 5.05 

Minot Street: 

General repairs 11 .85 

Noyes Street: 

General repairs 3.74 

Tuttle Street: 

General repairs 16.13 

Bow Street: 

General repairs 4.31 

Building sidewalk 0.90 

Iron Works Road: 

General repairs 31-74 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 233 

Allison Street: 

General repairs 35-73 

Building sidewalk between Eastman and Broad- 
way ■ 34-o8 

Harrison Street: 

Laying drain i -66 

Building sidewalk 21.37 

Gas Street : 

General repairs 3-^3 

Delano Road: 

Cutting bushes 4-3^ 

"Mo'se Brown" Road: 

General repairs 8.1 1 

Tamblyne Road : 

General repairs 16.41 

Abbott Road: 

General repairs 1 1-36 

Saltniarsli Road : 

General repairs 32.80 

Stickney Hill Road: 

General repairs 3695 

Planking bridge over Turkey river 38.15 

Silk Farm Road: 

General repairs 5.65 

Cutting bushes 3.47 

Hopkinton New Road: 

General repairs 41-55 

Hopkinton Old Road: 

General repairs 33-0/ 

Fiske Road: 

General repairs 105.26 

Repairing walk by St. Paul's School 2.13 

Dimond Hill Road: 

General repairs 89.25 

Broadway : 

Building sidewalk from Pillsbury to Carter street 7.70 

McKinley Street: 

Cutting and grading 280.1 1 



234 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Water street: 

Rubbling around lower bridge i4-90 

General repairs 27.56 

Removing tree 1-85 

Glen Street: 

General repairs 18.61 

Cutting to grade i45-09 

Bog Road: 

General repairs 399-67 

Clinton Street: 

General repairs 81. 1 1 

Enlarging culvert over Bow Brook 36.95 

Turnpike Street: 

General repairs 73-52 

Building fence opposite Railroad shops 17.12 

Building sidewalk on west side between McKinley 

and Rockingham streets 16.40 

Building sidewalk on west side at Langdon street 28.80 
Repairing sidewalk on west side between Pills- 
bury and Allison streets 7.97 

Repairing sidewalk on west side opposite hospital 3.37 

Hopkinton Road: 

General repairs and grading 393-39 

Building sidewalk 129.56 

Repairing bridge by laundry at St. Paul's School. . . 45-55 

Laying over culverts 37-38 

WARD EIGHT. 

South Pembroke Road: 

General repairs 239.10 

Repairing bridge over Soucook river 67.60 

Pembroke Road: 

General repairs 16.31 

Pittsfield Road: 

General repairs 1 17.57 

East Pembroke Road: 

General repairs 2.27 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 235 



General repairs "-^3 



"Sheep Davis" Road: 

General rej 
Chandler Street: 

General repairs ^-^S 

Hill's Avenue: 

General repairs °-59 

Freig^ht Street: 

General repairs 24.78 

Depot Street: 

General repairs 22.38 

Turnpike Road: 

General repairs 12.94 

Sugar Bowl Road: 

General repairs 5-io 

Break O Day Road: 

Cutting bushes 9-00 

"Tim Chase" Road: 

General repairs 10.08 

Loudon Road: 

General repairs 1 50-65 

Ferry Street: 

General repairs 81.65 

Bridge Street : 

General repairs 96.78 

Repairing Loudon bridge 9.10 

WARD NINE. 

Hig'hland Street: 

General repairs $ 4.23 

Setting edgestone at Louis Boulay's 106.02 

Repairing walk between Jackson and Bradley 

streets 5.93 

Charles Street: 

Genera! repairs i .88 

PavHng gutter on east side 34-8i 

Repairing sidewalk 2.13 

Foster Street: 

Grading 26.25 

Building sidewalk 6.37 



236 OITY OF CONCORD. 

Long Pond Road: 

General repairs ward 3 222.08 

General repairs ward 7 24.24 

General repairs ward 9 89.24 

Laying- over culvert at Crowley's, ward 9 3.05 

Building culvert west of John Jordan's, ward 9. . 4.67 

Repairing culvert by Frank Griffin's, ward 9. . . . 5.70 

East Concord Road: 

General repairs ward 4 28.90 

General repairs ward 8 4.00 

General repairs ward 9 3.19 

Grading ward 8 1 17-43 

South Street: 

General repairs ward 6 104.79 

General repairs ward 7 34-09 

Removing trees at Downing and CHnton streets 

ward 7 6.50 

Penacook Road: 

Grading with stone chips, ward 3 275.32 

General repairs, ward i 22.60 

General repairs, ward 3 7443 

Macadamizing below Willow Hollow, ward i. . 1.748.95 

Auburn Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 3025 

General repairs, ward 9 ^3-^3 

Rumford Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 .'.... 14-94 

General repairs, ward 5 .74 

General repairs, ward 9 12.08 

Repairing sidewalk between Church and Frank- 
lin streets, ward 4 6.58 

Repairing sidewalk near Washington street, 

ward 4 2.70 

Building sidewalk on east side between Washing- 
ton and Abbott streets, ward 4 25.07 

Cutting sidewalk to grade on west side between 

Church and Wyman, ward 9 18.37 

Removing tree at B. S. Rolfe's, ward 5 4.65 



f 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 237 

North Main street: 

General repairs, ward 4 69.80 

General repairs, ward 5 3-69 

General repairs, ward 8 39-"° 

Grading between Fiske and Penacook streets, 

ward 4 3268 

Repairing macadam, ward 4 6.48 

Relaying paving between Warren and School 

streets, ward 5 129.59 

Removing tree at Larkin's store, ward 4 22.77 

Removing tree ait Dr. Carter's, ward 4 4-57 

Trimming tree at S. S. KimbaU's, ward 4 13.70 

Trimming tree at J. B. Walkers, ward 4 11.05 

Pleasant Street: 

General repairs, ward 5 S^-^S 

General repairs, ward 6 16.49 

General repairs, ward 7 3i-i6 

High Street: 

Cutting to grade, ward 4 920.20 

Building sidewalk, ward 5 9.30 

Penacook Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 3.32 

General repairs, ward 9 28.69 

Repairing sidewalk with crushed stone between 

Main St. and Tannery, ward 4 28.95 

North State Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 38.38 

General repairs, ward 5 34-46 

General repairs, ward 9 61.15 

Setting edgestone at Miss H. S. Ordway's, 

ward 4 9.12 

Setting edgestone and grading for concrete walk 

at Ola Anderson's, ward 9 5 ^-30 

Paving gutter between Franklin and Church 

streets, ward 4 40.10 

Macadamizing between Franklin and Fiske 

streets, ward 4 1,01 1.67 



238 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Removing trees between Pleasant and Blake, 

ward 5 3-25 

Removing trees at Franklin street, ward 4 4-57 

Removing trees at Church street, ward 4 2.98 

Trimming trees at Fosterville, ward 9 1-82 

Repairing walk between Chapel and Court streets i .63 
South State Street: 

General repairs, ward 6 80.80 

Removing trees between Pleasant and Fayette 

streets, ward 6 22.27 

Trimming trees at J. Foley's, ward 7 2.30 

Macadamizing from Perley to Downing street, 

ward 6 320.59 

Macadamizing from Downing to West, ward 7. . 582.50 
Filling stone drain opposite Penacook school, 

ward 7 108.15 

South Main Street: 

General repairs, ward 6 120.83 

General repairs, ward 7 32.47 

General repairs, w-ard 8 6.75 

Setting edgestone at Morrill's block, ward 8. . . . 28.58 

Relaying paving at Morrill's block, ward 8. . . . 5.33 

Relaying brick walk opposite Mrs. Pickering's. . 11.07 
Macadamizing between Concord and Thorndike 

street, ward 6 244.72 

Macadamizing between Thorndike and Perley 

street, ward 6 562.56 

Macadamizing between Perley street and Abbot- 
Downing shop, ward 6 362.28 

Macadamizing between Abbot-Downing shop 

and watering trough, ward 7 372.45 

North Spring Street : 

General repairs, ward 4 6.20 

General repairs, ward 5 3.51 

Downing Street: 

General repairs, ward 6 1.30 

General repairs, ward 7 14-37 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



239 



\ 



Repairing gutter, ward 6 2.80 

Repairing sidewailk between South and Pierce 

street, ward 6 2-°3 

Fruit Street : 

General repairs, ward 5 2.20 

General repairs, ward 7 3-9^ 

Church Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 S-^S 

Grading walk for concrete at Schoolcraft's, 

ward 4 1-95 

General repairs, ward 9 i-93 

Walker Street : 

General repairs, ward 4 8.88 

Repairing sidewalk on north side between State 

and Bradley, ward 4 21.53 

Repairing walk on south side between Rumford 

and Bradley, ward 9 10.60 

Setting edgestone at Louis Comolli's, ward 9. . . 26.72 

Bradley Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 4.93 

General repairs, ward 9 .28 

Repairing sidewalk on east side between Walker 

and Penacook streets, ward 9 9.79 

Setting edgestone at R. A. Jeffers', ward 4 68.22 

Centre Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 55-90 

General repairs, ward 5 40.58 

Taking down tree at Union, ward 4 3.85 

Grading walk for concrete from Mrs. Barnes' 

east line to Ridge Road, ward 4 7.68 

Setting edgestone by Mrs. Barnes's, ward 4. . . . 32.97 

Jackson Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 38.23 

General repairs, ward 9 1.34 

Repairing sidewalk on west side between Wash- 
ington and Church, ward 4 25.89 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Franklin Street: 

General repairs, ward 4 26.30 

General repairs, ward 9 41-45 

Paving gutter, ward 4 iO-32 

Paving gutter opposite Charles Street, ward 9. . 41-43 
Setting edgestone and grading walk for con- 
crete on north side opposite Stewart's and 

Jeffers's, ward 4 96.69 

There has been paid to the city treasurer the sum of $1,032.47 
collected of abuttors for their proportion of concrete sidewalks 
as follows: 

Henry W. Stevens, Trustee $ 82.60 

L. D. Caldon 22.05 

Louis Boulay 92.52 

D. W. GhelHs 11.51 

M. S. Schoolcraft 9.18 

W. C. Davis i'o.9i 

Foote & Sanders 28.75 

C. E. Foote 1 1 .78 

J. W. Bean 48.75 

E. W. Brooks 87.09 

Bridget Gannon 24.90 

Mrs. W. G. Leavitt 19.08 

S. G. Morrill 28.24 

D. E. Murphy 33-75 

Mrs. Fred Gould 19.45 

Jeremiah Growley 24.10 

S. R. Dole 17.06 

W. P. Ford 5.70 

Louis Comolli 7.40 

A. G. Stewart 30.34 

H. A. Foster 10.85 

J. F. Cook 10.68 

Mrs. Georgie Barnes 24.15 

Mrs. Ellen Callahan 12.28 

William H. Hurd 8.65 

Masonic Building Asso 41.85 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



241 



George Abbott, Jr 13-54 

Ida Greenleaf "-^5 

Nancy J. Langmaid 25.32 

Miss H. S. Ordway ^94 

Horace Groves 4-0/ 

F. N. Marden ii-32 

Ola Anderson 34-58 

Mrs. H. V. Clough 38-40 

James C. Manning 4-4° 

R. A. Jeffers 85-45 

J. W. Rankin 24.83 

C. W. Clark 15-67 

Mrs. Grace E. Foster 7-i9 

C. S. Woods 6.77 

Frank Adams 8.53 

F. E. Coates 5-00 

Josep'h Eastman 4-44 

$1,032.47 
The following concrete bills remain unpaid: 

A. O. Mansnr . $ 10.39 

T. Murphy 18.22 

Howard Trevette 21. 11 

Mrs. C. G. Blanchard Estate 149-72 

John Healy 7.60 

F. E. Coates 3.33 

Jackman & Hall 47-96 

James Coleman 16 96 

George W. Brown 10.00 

Mrs. Lewis Brown 8.55 

Concord Water Works, labor, etc 115-01 

$ 408.85 

Paid to the city treasurer the sum of $170.50, received for la- 
bor, crushed stone, etc. 

C. N. Barton, crushed stone $ 1.20 

Robert Wilson, crushed stone 10.00 

17 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Trae S. Swett, use of pump .50 

Mead, Mason & Co., crushed stone 22.50 

W. C. Edwards, cmshed stone 1 1-25 

Town of Hopkinton, labor 4.70 

Asa Gage, crushed stone 1.25 

H. C. Holbrook, crushed stone 1.25 

E. H. Runnells, crushed stone 10.00 

Town of Pembroke, repairing bridge 33-79 

J. L. A. Chellis, crushed stone 1.25 

Daniel Holden, crushed stone 3.00 

John S. Moses, crushed stone 4.00 

John Walker, crushed stone i7-5o 

N. H. Asylum for Insane, crushed stone 28.75 

Geo. W. Chesley, crushed stone 1.25 

Lee Bros., labor 4.20 

Stratton & Co., flushing sewer 1.66 

Sam'l. S. French, crushed stone 1.25 

F. M. Knowles, labor 1.25 

Concord Sewer Dept., labor 0.95 

$170.50 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SEWERS AND 

DRAINS. 



To the City Council: The committee on sewers and drains 
held eight meetings during the year, and the members thereof 
made frequent inspections of the work while it was in progress. 
The extension of the "South end sewer," so-called, was the most 
important work of the season and was built under contract by 
Mr. John Walker of Newmarket, N. H. Proposals were asked 
for and the following were received : Lyman R. Fellows & Son 
and George L. Theobald, Concord, N. H., $22,513; A. W. Bryne 
Construction Co., West Medford. Mass, $20,880; P. H. Harri- 
son & Sons, Hartford, Conn., $20,459.52; T. H. & G. M. Bryne, 
. West Medford, Mass, $18,668.92; John Walker, Newmarket, N. 
H., $17,861.02. During the year 85 permits for sewer con- 
nections w'ere issued by the clerk of the committee. The 
amount received for rent of pumps was $90.76 to the credit of 
the city precinct, and $7.50 to the credit of the West Concord 
precinct. No new work was done in the East Concord pre- 
cinct. In the West Concord precinct a small amount was ex- 
pended for flushing and ordinary repairs. In the Penacook pre- 
cinct the usual repairs and flushing were made; none of the out- 
side precincts expended any large amounts during the past sea- 
son. 

PETITIONS RECEIVED AND ACTION TAKEN. 

Mary J. Sanders and others, for sewer in Pillsbury street; 
granted and built. 

Charles S. Brown, for sewer in Broadwav; granted and built. 



244 CITY OF CONCORD, 

F. H. Hill and others, for lowering sewer in Abbott street; pe- 
titioners were given leave to withdraw. 

W. A. Sleeper and others, for sewer in White street ; further 
time asked. 

George H. Morey and others, for sewer in Broadway; grant- 
ed and built. 

W. D. Kimball and others, for sewer in South street; granted 
and built. 

Mead, Mason & Co., for sewer in Cedar court; granted and 
built. 

Mrs. A. Chase and others, for sewer in Pleasant street ; further 
time asked. 

Amos Blanchard and others, for sewer in Warren and Pleas- 
ant streets; granted and partially built. 

G. J. Johnson and others, for sewer in Clinton street; granted 
and built. 

Levi W. Everett and others, for sewer in Winter street (Pen- 
acook); further time asked. 

George A. Cummings and others, for sewer in Broadway; 
granted. 

Western Cofran and others, for sewer in North Spring street; 
granted. 

Charles F. Nichols and others, for sewer in Park Ridge and 
Ridge Road ; granted and partially built. 

W. B. HOWE, 
Clerk of Committee. 



ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: 

The work done during the past year under this department 
has been all that we could reasonably ask for. The several 
companies have maintained their lines up to the usual good con- 
dition. 

DEAD WIRES. 

There has been a large amount of dead wires taken down 
that were abandoned by the owners. There still remains a 
large amount to be removed, and is being cared for as fast as 
circumstances will permit. 

PRIVATE LINES. 

I would call the attention of your honorable body again to 
the custom of granting permits for private lines. It seems to 
me that there should be some arrangement whereby the permits 
granted should be referred to the inspector of electric wires, as 
these lines are often put up by incompetent parties and in a 
short time abandoned and left to be cared for by the city, and 
in many cases become a source of danger by their crossing with 
other wires of a high potential. 

In conclusion, I think as a whole, our electrical sei-vice will 
compare favorably with any of a like nature. The city has been 
free from any accidents caused by electrical wires, either by 
fire or otherwise, during the past year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

F. W. LANDON, 
Inspector of Electrical Wires. 



REPORT OF THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



To the City Council: 

I herewith submit the report of collection of taxes to the close 
of business December 31, 1S97. 

1S96 Report. 

Resident list as committed .... $359,654.42 

Errors and omissions (res. list) as per last report 2,673.74 

"■ "■ " added since last report 103.25 



Resident list, as corrected to date, Dec. 31, 1897 $262,431.41 

Non-resident list as committed . . . 934.63 
'• " errors corrected to date, Dec. 31, 

1S97 ....... I. 00 

Int. collected at time of last report, Dec. 31, 1896 37-72 

" since last report .... SS5.29 

Unadjusted account . . . . . 2=^.18 



Total ....... $264,315.23 

Cash paid treasurer as per last report, 

Dec. 31, 1S96 .... $218,856.79 

Cash paid treasurer since last report to 

Dec. 31, 1S97 .... 34,706.00 



Discounts .... 

Abatements as per last report Dec 

1896 .... 

Abatements since last report, Dec 

1896 to Dec. 31, 1897 
Cash in office Dec. 31, 1897, . 
Uncollected* .... 

Total .... 



31 



31' 



3'6ii.3i 
4773-02 

2,008.36 
3-30 

35645 



$264,315.23 



'Of tbis amount ^285 is secured by real estate. 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



247 



1S97 Report, 

Resident list as committed 

Errors and omissions (resident list) . 

Resident list as corrected 
Non-resident list as committed 
Interest collected to date, Dec. 31, 1S97 

Total 

Cash paid treasurer . . . ^ 

Discounts ..... 

Abatements ..... 
Cash in office at closing Dec. 31, 1S97 
Uncollected at closing Dec. 31, 1S97 



$232^743-44 
1,036.56 

$233,780.00 

957-44 
24.99 

$234,762.43- 



)i93,i25.oo 
3,404.02 

3.151-07 

85.72 
34,996.62 



$234,762.43 



Total 

Very respectfully : 

WENDELL P. LADD, Collector. 
Concord, Jan. 10, 1898. 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council of the city of 
Concord: Gentlemen,— I herewith submit the report of the 
work done in the city engineer's and sewer departments for the 
year ending December 31, 1897: 

The following statement shows the expenses of the engineer's 
department for the year: 

Paid for salaries, $2,457.25 

for supplies, 98-49 

for repairs, I4-I5 

for rent, 204.00 

for incidentals, 210.08 

$2,983.97 
Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Total expenditure, 2,983.97 



Unexpended balance, $16.03 

The cost attending the construction of all sewers built during 
the season of 1897 will be found upon the following pages. 
Considerable time was spent by this department upon the prep- 
aration of plans, etc., for the construction of the extension of 
the "South End sewer," so-called, from the junction of Allison 
and South streets to the junction of Giles and Centre streets. 
The greater portion of this sewer was through private property, 
which was so of necessity, owing to the contour of the city, to 
meet the demands of the district to be drained. 

The completion of this main will relieve a section of the city 
hitherto without any sewer facilities, which, from a sanitary 
view, were greatly in need of relief; it also provides an outlet for 
some years to come, for the westerly portion of the city, which 
was cut off from the older system of sewers. 



CITY ENGINEER S REPORT. 



249 



■ The work on this sewer was done under contract, by Mr. 
John Walker of Newmarket, N. H., at a price about $4,600 be- 
low the bid of local parties. The cost of this work will be found 
in the statement of cost of sewers attached to this report. Un- 
usual expenses attended the repairs upon the sewers, especially 
in North State street, at Walker street, and in North Main 
street, near the store of P. H. Larkin, caused by the excessive 
rains of the past season. 

So much of the time of this department was required on sewer 
work that the work upon the general survey of the city was cut 
short, and we were not able to complete the work mapped out 
for the season. 

The demands upon this office for information concerning 
street lines and grades have steadily increased, and the necessi- 
ty for saying that the lines of some streets are indefinite, is at 
times somewhat embarrassing. 

I will quote from my report of 1895: "At the time when 
manv of our streets were laid out the value of the land taken was 
very small, and in many cases the land was given, for the street, 
bv the owners. To-day the values are different, and each abut- 
tor, probably honestly, claims more land than the old records in- 
dicate. In many cases the old Hues are described as 'starting at 
a pair of bars and ending near an apple tree,' both the 
bars and the apple tree have long since disappeared, and the 
'oldest inhabitant' has no knowledge of them.. In view of these 
facts I would respectfully recommend that a little work be done, 
each year, in establishing and permanently marking the lines of 
some of these streets; this would greatly assist the heads of all 
departments in their work upon them." 

I would again respectfully submit that some of this work 
should be taken up before further encroachments are made 
upon the highways. 

The employees of this department during the season of 1897 
were: Frank W. Brown, assistant engineer; Fred W. Lang, 
transitman; Charles H. Chandler, H. C. Hill, and C. F. Moore, 
rodmen, who have cheerfully attended to the duties entrusted 
to them. 



250 CITY OF CONCORD. 

GRADES ESTABLISHED. 

West sidewalk, Park Ridge. 

East and west sidewalks, Ridge Road. 

North sidewalk, Highland street from Bradley street west, 
132.5 feet. 

West sidewalk, Bradley street from Highland to Albin street. 

West sidewalk, Broadway south from Pillsbury street, 350 
feet. 

South sidewalk, West street opposite L. D. Caldon's. 

South sidewalk, Allison street from Eastman to Kimball 
street. 

West sidewalk. Holt street. 

South sidewalk, Abbott street. 

South sidewalk, Warren street from Liberty street west. 

West sidewalk, Lyndon street from Abbott street northerly, 
54 feet. 

West sidewalk. Main street (Penacook) from Elm street to 
the iron bridge. 

South sidewalk, Spring street (Penacook) from Centre street 
west. 

North sidewalk. Centre street (Penacook) from Spring street 
southerly. 

South sidewalk. Elm street (Penacook) from Main street 
west 137.4 feet. 

North sidewalk, Tremont street from State to Jackson street. 

South sidewalk, Knight street (West Concord). 

South sidewalk, Wyman street. 

Wyman street. 

West sidewalk, Rumford street from Wyman. street southerly. 

East and west sidewalks. Glen street. 

North sidewalk, Harrison street. 

East sidewalk, Liberty street, opposite the premises of C. W. 
Clarke. 

South sidewalk, Washington street east from Academy street, 
81 feet. ' 

East sidewalk. Odd Fellows' avenue. 

North sidewalk, Abbott street. 



CITY engineer's REPORT. 251 

South sidewalk, Washington street, Rumford to Academy 
street. 

East sidewalk, North State street opposite Ola Anderson's. 

East sidewalk, Rumford street from Washington street to 
Abbott street. 

East sidewalk, West State street from bound No. 21 to No. 
22. 

North sidewalk, Centre street from Ridge Road easterly, 
132.6 feet. 
' McKinley street. 

West sidewalk. South State street from Harrison street 
southerly, 132 feet. 

South sidewalk, Blake street. 

North sidewalk, Allison street from Turnpike to Badger 
street. 

West sidewalk, Mills street from West street to Allison 
street. 

STREET LAID OUT. 

McKinley street. 

COST OF SEWERS LAID, 1897. 

PILLSBURY STREET. 

693 feet of 15-inch pipe. 
200 feet of lo-inch pipe. 
743 feet of 8-inch pipe. 
Paid for labor $1,932.56 

pipe 375-66 

brick 47.25 

cement 31 -OS 

castings 22.87 

wrought iron 1.20 

trucking 29.45 

hardware 9.55 

lumber 10.64 

oil 3.90 

A r ^ . $2,464-13 

■ Average cost per foot, $1,506. 

Materials excavated, sand and soft clay. 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SOUTH STREET FROM PILLSBURY STREET 
NORTHERLY. 

285 feet of 8-inch pipe. 

Paid for labor $47.00 

pipe 40.90 

brick 6.75 

cement 3.45 

castings 7-59 

wrought iron .43 

$106.12 
Average cost per foot, $0,372. 
Material excavated, sand and loam. 

CEDAR COURT. 

267 feet of lo-inch pipe. 

Paid for labor $71.22 

pipe 49-59 

brick 6.75 

cement 4.60 

castings 8.13 

wrought iron .36 

trucking 5.60 

repairing concrete walk 3.13 

$149.38 
Average cost per foot, $0,559. 

Material excavated, loam and sand. 

REPAIRS. 

Beacon street $9.00 

Goodrich sewer 4.85 

At B. & M. R. R. new shops 30.79 

South State street, on account of macadamizing. . . 92.98 

Bradley street 17.99 

Valley street. i -jo 

North State street, at Walker 391 -80 

Abbott street ^q 



CITY engineer's repout. 253 

Tremont street 12.85 

Ferry street 37-65 

Third Division outlet 19-97 

Chandler street 3-5^ 

Downing street 6.24 

South Main street, on account of macadamizing. , . 4.12 

Warren street, 1896 bills 12.49 

Glen street 9.72 

Stickney's field 67.85 

North Main street, at P. H. Larkin's 424.68 

Highland street 4.50 

Twenty-inch outlet 1.37 

Flushing 122.10 

Tool account 378-35 

Binding sewer plans 1.50 

Total repairs $1,655.90 

NEW WORK. 

Pillsbury street $2,464.13 

South street 106.12 

Cedar court 149-38 

$2,719.63 

Repairs 1,655.90 

Total expenditure $4-375-53 

Less materials from city shed 33-05 

Net amount expended $4,342.48 

Total appropriation for sewers, city precinct. . 4,220.83 

Overdraw^n $121.65 

SOUTH END SEWER LATERALS. 

Broadway, south from Pillsbury street : 

435 feet of 12-inch pipe. 

Paid for labor $444.42 

P^P^ 97-75 



254 CITY OF CONCORD. 

brick 27.00 

cement ii-S^ 

castings i5-^5 

trucking 1275 

wrought iron .63 

oil . . i.oo 



$610.20 
Average cost per foot, $1,402. 
Material excavated, sand and soft clay. 

BROADWAY NORTH FROM ALLISON STREET. 

480 feet of lo-inch pipe. 

Paid for labor $107.01 

pipe 88.14 

brick 6.75 

cement 5.75 

castings "8.21 

trucking 3.75 

tools 1.56 

oil .50 

$221.67 
Average cost per foot, $0,461. 

Materials excavated, sand. 

CLINTON STREET. 

300 feet of lo-inch pipe. 

Paid for labor $126.72 

pipe 60.86 

brick 6.75 

cement 4.60 

castings 8.21 



wrousfht iron 



•30 



trucking 3.75 

oil 1.00 

$212.19 
Average cost per foot, $0,707. 

Materials excavated, sand and muck. 



CITY engineer's REPORT, 255 



P7\RK RIDGE AND RIDGE ROAD. 

400 feet of 8-inch pipe. 

Paid for labor ■ $245.06 

pipe 54-29 

brick 6.75 

cement 3-45 

castings 7-5^ 

trucking 10.20 

blacksmithing 38-33 

sand 1. 10 

oil .50 

$367.24 
Average cost per foot, $0,918. 
Material excavated, hard-pan. 

WARREN STREET. 

Paid L. R. Fellows & Son, under contract $512.00 

inspector 28.75 

$540.75 
Balance of contract to be completed in the spring of 1898. 

SOUTH END SEWER. 

Paid John Walker, under contract $17,861.02 

inspector, land damage, and labor, not in con- 
tract 495.93 

$18,356.92 

EXPENDITURES CHARGED TO SOUTH END SEWER 
APPROPRIATION. 

Main sewer $18,356.95 

Broadway, south from Pillsbury street 610.20 

Broadway, north from Allison street 221.67 

Clinton street 212.19 



256 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



Park Ridge and Ridge Road 
Warren street, under contract 

Less materials from citv shed 



367.24 
540.75 



$20,309.00 
87.92 

$20,221.08 



APPROPRIATION. 



Sale of bonds $25,000.00 

Premium on bonds 1,356.50 

Interest on bonds 226.04 



Total $26,582.54 

Expended 20,221.08 



Unexpended balance. Jan. i, 1898 $6,361.46 



SEWERS BUILT, 1S97. 



S-inch pipe 

ID-inch " 

12-inch " 

15-inch •■' 

iS-inch " 

24-inch brick, circular. 
24-inch cast-iron pipe. 
30-inch brick, circular. 
30-inch cast-iron pipe. 



2,043 

1,247 

891 

693 
892 

I-5I5-5 
1,576 
316 

' .054-5 



feet. 



Total 10,228 

SEWERS BUILT IN CITY PRECINCT TO DECEMBER 

31, 1S97. 

S-inch pipe 19,512 feet. 



lo-inch 
12-inch 
15-inch 
I S-inch 
20-inch 
24-inch 



42,160 
36,024 
10,627 

5.5H 
3,434 

''749 



CITY engineer's REPORT. 257 

30-inch pipe 969 feet. 

Brick, 12-inch X 14-inch 2,758 

16-inch X 24-inch 1,848 

14-iiich X 22-inch 350 

20-inch X 32-inch 2,537 

24.inch X 36-inch 1 7,937 

2S-inch X 48-inch 883 

24-inch circular 1,515.5 

30-inch " 402 

38-inch "• 4,080 

24-inch cast-iron pipe ''576 

30-inch " " 1,054.5 



Total 154,920 

Total miles in cit\' precinct, to date, 29.340. 

WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 

No new sewers have been built in this precinct the past sea- 
son. The cost of maintenance is as follows : 

Paid for flushing $8.50 

repairs at outlets 5-33 

Total $13 83 

Balance on hand, January i, 1897 $1,205.01 

Rent of pumps, 1896 i i.oo 

" ^897 7.50 

Total credits $1,223.51 

Expended, 1897 13-83 

Balance, January i, 1898 $1,209.68 

EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 

No work has been done in this precinct the past season. 
The unexpended balance of last year remains $164.51. 
The demands from other departments of the city for serivces, 
have, so far as we were able, been promptly responded to, and 
IS 



258 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



we have met with the same treatment when we have had occa- 
sion to apply to them for information or services. 

I wish to express to the mayor and the city council my appre- 
ciation of their support and co-operation during the past sea- 
son. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. HOWE, 
City Engineer. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the City Council: The trustees of the Public Library 
herewith transmit the report of the librarian, which contains a 
full account of the work done during the past year. It is fit- 
ting that at this time and place the services of Judge Foster, so 
long a member of this board, be suitably remembered. His 
death left a vacancy not easily filled, for he ever took an active 
and sympathetic interest in the welfare of the library, and it 
was, perhaps, the only public institution which so much occu- 
pied his thought. His eminence as an advocate and jurist has 
been commemorated by the bar of which he was a leader, in 
resolutions recorded by the court of which he had been a distin- 
guished member, and his many sterling qualities were known 
to every citizen; but we cannot refrain from expressing for him 
our personal regard. We shall not soon forget the simple and 
gracious dignity with which he presided at our meetings, im- 
parting to all present that subtile, pervasive influence of har- 
mony and human interest which is unconsciously diffused by 
such rich natures. He was known to every one as a learned and 
eloquent law^yer and as a polished gentleman; but he was also a 
man of fine literary tastes, and a discriminating reader of the 
best books; and the shelves of the Library owe no small part of 
the richness of their accumulations to his cultivated judgment. 



260 CITY OF CONCORD. 

It is hardly necessary for us to commend the work of the li- 
brarian and her assistants, for the public have daily experience 
of their zeal and fidelity and are fully conscious of the patience 
and courtesy with which their wants are served. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, 
JOHN E. FRYE, 
PAUL R. HOLDEN, 
JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
AMOS J. SHURTLEFF. 
JAMES S. NORRIS, 
WILLIAM W. FLINT, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 261 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 



7c the Boai-d of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen: The forty-first annual report of the library is 
herewith presented: 

The past year has been a normal one; 1895 and 1896 saw 
accomplished proportionately more work than has been report- 
ed by any other library in the land. But during 1897 only one 
large piece of work has been done, and that was pushed through 
in four months. I refer to the printing of the fiction finding- 
list. Care was taken before printing to bviy standard stories 
which by inadvertence were not already on our shelves. 

The more difficult task of preparing copy for a non-fiction 
catalogue has already begun, and to complete that will be the 
main work of 1898. As it would be a pity to put in black and 
white those departments of the library which are now short of 
material, we shall, before printing, compare our shelves with the 
list of the model library shown at the World's Fair, and with 
other approved lists, and spend thought and money in buying 
the leading books we do not already possess. For a few 
months before arranging our final copy, recommendations from 
experts as to the best works in their departments will be wel- 
comed and solicited. 

After the entire contents of the library are again in print, as 
they will be through the printing of the non-fiction, persons liv- 
ing at a distance will not be at the disadvantage they now are 
compared with those who can come easily to consult the card 
catalogue. 

Yet here let me state that it has been a surprise to see the 
number who prefer to use the cards when selecting fiction, even 
though a printed list of the same books lies at their elbow. 

1897 not only reverted to more nearly an average year's work 
in general ways, but the circulation declined from last year's fig- 
ures, though it still gives Concord the lead in the state. We 



262 CITY OF CONCORD. 

echo the words of Brooklyn's hbrarian when he says: "I would 
like to inquire whether the bicycle has caused any decrease of 
reading. Nearly everyone rides a wheel in these days, and it 
would seem that this takes some of the time formerly devoted 
to literature." 

For the first time in the history of the library, registration of 
the circulation by classes has been taken, and the result shows 
that in 1897 Concord's use of fiction was 85 per cent out of the 
total 100; the circulation of magazines was over 5 per cent, of 
literature over 2 per cent, of history (including biography) over 
3 per cent; of the remaining classes, philosophy, religion, socio- 
logy, philology, natural science, useful arts, and fine arts, less 
than I per cent. 

It is to be hoped that a growing use of the non-fiction card, 
which has already been enjoyed by hundreds, will reduce this 
large percentage of fiction reading. 

It is now the custom for libraries to accord teachers the-privi- 
lege of taking several books on science, history, etc., to their 
school-rooms, that lessons may be enlivened and the pupils 
glean different items to recite. Concord teachers will find us 
striving to bring about this modern close union between schools 
and library. 

It is gratifying that we have almost 600 new borrowers. It 
has been a pleasure to have many of the men newly employed 
at the railroad shops, apply for library cards. Our reading- 
room is more than full on cold Sunday afternoons. 

And most gratifying of all the statistics is the record of only 
2 books lost out of the 85,000 circulated. The librarian and de- 
linquents could tell at what cost of mutual worriment this loss of 
city property is reduced so low. 

A large number of books have been discarded as too soiled 
and torn for further loaning, and have been sent to a contagious 
hospital where they are read once and burned. Many old du- 
plicate periodicals have been given to places where they may 
have further usefulness. 

A dirty and dreaded task was finished last month, — the sort- 
ing of the helerogeneous mass of material in the basement; gov- 
ernment publications, duplicates, newspapers, pamphlets, city 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 263 

and state papers, have been looked over one by one and cata- 
logued so as to become a live part of the library's resources. 

There is now nothing under this roof which has not passed 
in review and been subjected to the question whether it was 
creditable. 

The roof itself needs your wise attention directed to its repair. 

The outside of the building looks well with its new coat of 

paint, and the inside we are trying to make strike the incomer 

as progressive, whether he regard the practical appliances, the 

lessening of barriers, or our latest list of books. 

The "Monitor" and "Patriot" have kindly continued to pub- 
lish our purchases, and these lists are eagerly seized upon by all. 
I send copies to be hung up in Penacook, West Concord and 
East Concord. 

Grateful mention should be made of the gift from Mrs. Ar- 
menia White of the valuable "National Cyclopaedia of Ameri- 
can Biography," a 12-volume work. We are indebted to her 
also for subscriptions to "The Woman's Journal" and "The 
Philanthropist." 

Other regular donations to the reading room are as follows: 

Anti-vivisection organ. 

Boston & Maine Railroad Men, from Railroad Y. M. C. A. 

Christian Register from Woman's Unitarian AlHance. 

Christian Science Journal from Mrs. Eddy. 

Cook's Excursionist. 

Denver Evening Post. 

Good Roads from League American Wheelmen. 

Granite State Outlook from W. C. T. U. 

Manifesto from Shakers. 

New Earth. 

Paradise of the Pacific. 

Revue des Deux Mondes from Mr. S. C. Eastman. 

Tennessee Univ. Magazine. 

Southern Workman from Miss M. A. Downing. 

Unitarian from Miss M. A. Downing. 

Union Signal from W. C. T. U. 

Volunteer from High School. 

War Cry from Salvation Army. 



264 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Donors of books which have been accessioned in 1897 are Mr. 
H. H. Metcalf, Mr. John Kimball, Mrs. Mary A. Livermore, 
Mrs. Eddy, Mrs Helen Kendrick Johnson, Mrs. Carrie J. 
Blanchard', Mr. T. W. Balch, Mrs. A. M. Potter, the U. S. Gov- 
ernment and City and State Departments. 

Though the gentlemen of the Board are the ones to speak 
most fittingly of the services rendered the library by Judge Wm. 
L. Foster, for 14 years president of the trustees, I wish to add 
the librarian's tribute to his courteous, encouraging treatment 
of our staff. 

The assistance of the rest of the library corps has continued 
most commendable. And gratitude is due the trustees for their 
faith that our planning and working has had only one aim — the 
good of the public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OK BOARD OK HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: Gentlemen, 
— The report of the sanitary inspector which is herewith sub- 
mitted, covers in detail the work of the health department dur- 
ing the year 1897. The statistics therein contained, show that 
our city was unusually fortunate during the year in all matters 
pertaining to the public health. The number of deaths result- 
ing from diseases of a contagious nature was remarkably small, 
and our people were spared any serious epidemic of any char- 
acter. The board are of the opinion that Concord's immunity 
in this respect, in comparison with other cities of equal popula- 
tion, can be accounted for in great part by the co-operation 
given by the public generally in carrying out the rules and regu- 
lations which municipal and state enactment has provided for 
safe-guarding the public health. 

The work of the department has been carried on throughout 
the year without friction, and all matters requiring attention 
have been considered by the board and acted upon, without re- 
course to higher authority than that vested in the board. 

The advancement each year in the compliance by the public 
with the sanitary regulations of the city is notable, and can but 
result in excellent sanitary conditions. In no respect is this 
more marked than in the faithfulness with which the regulations 
afifecting quarantine are observed. On several occasions dur- 
ing the year, cases of contagious diseases appeared in localities 
and amid surroundings which would be likely to result in seri- 
ous epidemics but for the greatest care by every one in guard- 
ing against the spread of contagion. In more than one in- 



266 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Stance serious results could only be avoided by the greatest 
painstaking on the part of the infected families. It may be 
noted in this connection that a large number of the cases of con- 
tagious diseases which are brought to the attention of the 
health department owe their origin to exposure in other towns 
and cities, and our people are cautioned against carelessly im- 
parting contagion in this manner. Especially is this important 
in the case of young persons leaving their homes to enter educa- 
tional institutions. 

The board has been unable to find a proper substitute for sul- 
phur fumigation, although no efTort has been spared in the di- 
rection of investigating the most promising agent offered, — 
formaldehyde. 

A method adopted by the board to determine the efftciency 
of this proposed substitute is explained at length in the report of 
the sanitary ofihcer. 

Only words of commendation can be spoken for the faithtul- 
ness, industry and efficiency of Charles E. Palmer, sanitary in- 
spector. He has carried out to the letter, the instructions given 
him by this board, and has shown at all times the same fitness 
for his position, which the board have taken occasion to com- 
ment upon in former reports. The amount of labor which the 
sanitary inspector must perform in the discharge of the mani- 
fold duties imposed upon him requires earnest, constant and 
wisely directed efforts, and these, as the statistics of his report 
show, have not been withheld in any direction. 

His report gives evidence that the improvement in the sanitary 
condition effected by the substitution of modern plumbing and 
drainage for the older and unsanitary systems shows no diminu- 
tion, and the excellent sewerage system which the city has pro- 
vided at a large expense, is taken advantage of by a very large 
percentage of property owners. The board has not departed 
during the year from its long established policy of insisting up- 
on strict compliance with the regulations affecting house drain- 
age, and in very few cases have its efforts in this direction met 
with opposition. The extension of the South End sewer, so- 
called, relieves that growing and beautiful section of our city 
from a serious impediment to development, and carries out sug- 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 267 

gestions often made to this board and by it embodied in its an- 
nual reports. The results of analyses of Penacook water pro- 
cured by the sanitary inspector with the approval of this board, 
demonstrate anew the excellence of Concord's water supply. 
The circumstances under which the samples were procured and 
the known ability of the chemist who has reported upon them, 
give great weight to the conclusions reached. 

The thanks of the board are due his honor the mayor and 
your honorable body for co-operation given them throughout 
the year, and for courtesies extended to the board and its execu- 
tive officer. 

The bacteriological examination in the cases of patients sus- 
pected of having diphtheria have been attended throughout the 
year with results fully warranting this method of proceedure. 
The board consider themselves very fortunate in having at their 
command the services of Dr. Arthur K. Day as bacteriologist. 
The fact of his residence in our city gives an advantage of sev- 
eral hours in the time necessary to determine the character of 
the cultures submitted for examination, and the board are thus 
able to learn of the presence of danger with the least possible de- 
lav. 

E. A. CLARK, M. D. 

E. N. PEARSON, 

D. E. SULLIVAN, M. D. 

Board of Health. 



268 CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF SANITARY INSPECTOR. 



To the Boa?-d of Health : 

I herewith submit my report as health officer for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1897, and present a summary of the work 
accomplished under your honorable body. Animated by an 
earnest wish to be able to cope successfully with the various dif- 
ficulties that surround this important branch of the public ser- 
vice, my labors have been directed towards one common end, — 
to promote the public heakh, and to make more secure, day by 
day, the life, health and comfort of every citizen. 

The work has proceeded during the year with almost abso- 
lute smoothness. We still can boast of a remarkably healtliful 
city, as the year's record of vital statistics will show, and in com- 
parison with that of other cities similarly situated. The total 
number of deaths was 349, the death rate being 13.95 per one 
thousand. In making up the death rate, deaths in public insti- 
tutions and still-births are not included. 



SANITAKY DEPARTMENT. 



269 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following^ table shows the number of conta.s^ious dis- 
eases reported during each month of the year, and the deaths 
resulting therefrom: 



January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November.. 

December . 

Totals.. 





Diph- 


Scarlet 


♦Typhoid 


Measles. 




theria. 


Fever. 


Fever. 




Months. 




m 




m 




m 




A 




ti 


a 


OC 


Xi 


m 


A 


to 


Si 




« 




































« 


ffl 


<A 


4) 


cS 


<S> 


sa 


® 




O 


Q 


o 


Q 


O 


Q 


O 


Q 



138 



*Typhoid fever brought to hospital from other places, ten; deaths, two. 



270 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The table followino^ contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the years 
since and including 1890: 



Diph- 


Scarlet 


Typhoid 














Measles. 


Tot 


theria. 


Fever. 


Fever. 








M 




m 




x 




!» 




m 


J3 


K 


JS 


aj 


A 


K 


.a 
























oi 




c3 




oj 




si 




cS 


<s 


03 


OI 


oi 


» 


a 


a 







Q 





Q 





Q 





Q 






1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 



6 
12 
13 
48 
17 
38 
55 
13 


2 
3 
3 

3 

8 
8 

1 


9 

7 
37 
41 
113 
44 
4 
22 


3 

6 

8 

1 


17 
14 
7 
13 
13 
21 
15 
17 


5 
6 
1 

3 
3 
5 
2 


6 

2 

2 

300 

21 

158 

452 

138 




38 
35 
59 
402 
164 
258 
526 
190 



By a glance at the above table it will be seen-that the number 
of cases of contagious diseases reported has increased since 
1893, from the fact that an act of the legislature requiring physi- 
cians to report measles, and increases the penalty, for the fail- 
ure of any householder or physician to report any of the above 
named cases to the board of health. 

For the years 1890. 1891, 1892, but 37 cases of diphtheria were 
reported, with 8 deaths; in 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, 171 
cases were reported, with but 20 deaths, proving that in other 
diseases as well as in diphtheria, many cases existed up to the 
year 1893 which were not reported. The regulations for the 
restriction and prevention of such diseases have been effectually 
enforced with as little inconvenience to the people affected as 
possible. I have seen to it that all persons were supplied with 
the actual necessities of life, and very little hardship has resulted 
from the enforcement of the regulations. 

The same method in making cultures from throats of patients 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 271 

suspected of having diphtheria, has been continued during the 
year. Such work if properly done, cannot fail to be of great 
benefit, both in diagnosis of doubtful cases and also in determ- 
ining the time at which patients suffering from the disease are 
no longer capable of transmitting it. Eighty-four bacteriologi- 
cal examinations have been made. Thirteen proved to be posi- 
tive, nineteen neg^ative, and fifty-two were re-examinations to 
determine when it was safe to discharge the patient. The ex- 
pense for this branch of our work the past year has been $134.45. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

Scarlet fever prevailed in a mild form during the months of 
January, February, March, May, August, November, and De- 
cember. Seeral cases which appeared at Millville were the 
cause of some anxiety, but they were immediately quarantined 
and the spread of the disease was thus prevented. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 

As will be seen by reference to the table, there has been about 
the usual number of cases of typhoid fever, which were not con- 
fined to any particular locality. In response to several requests 
two analyses of the public water supply were made: Analysis 
No. I taken from West Concord; analysis No. 2, taken from the 
Reservoir. 



SANITARY ANALYSES OF WATER. 

For Health Officer Charles PL Palmer, Concord, N. H. 

SAMPLE NO. 1. 

[The figures in the analysl.s represent parts per 100,000. To convert into parts 
per million, multiply by 10; into parts per U. S. gallon, by 0.583722; into parts 
per English gallon, by 0.7. ] 

Odor. — Scarcely any. 
Color.— Slightlj- yellowish. 
Transparency. — Clear. 

Behavior During Evaporation.— Foamy. 
. Appearance of Residue.— Nearly white with circles. 
Total Solids. — 5.8. 
The amount of solids in water, sanitarily pure, varies greatly. Good well 



272 CITY OF CONCORD. 

water in this state seldom contains more than 15 parts. Good pond water 
contains less than half of this quantity. 

Ignition of Residue.— It blackens. 

The residue blackens in proportion to the amount of organic carbon present, 
provided there is no excess of nitrates. Nitrates are present excessively more 
often in animal polluted waters; hence the residue of such waters blackens 
less than that of vegetable contaminated waters, both because animal matter 
contains less carbon as a rule, and because the nitrates supply oxygen to 
consume it quickly. Vegetable carbon often blackens intensely and the 
blackening persists. 

Loss OF Ignition of Residue. — 1.2. 

This consists of the combustible and volatile portion of the organic matter, 
and volatile mineral substances, — carbonic acid, nitric acid, water of crystalli- 
zation, zinc, and other volatile metals. The proportion of mineral solids is 
larger in well water than in pond water, because well water settling through 
the earth has come in contact with more soluble minerals. On the other hand, 
pond water contains more organic solids, because the soluble organic matter 
received from the surface of the ground has not been removed by the filtering 
action of earthy strata. It is seldom that the character and quantity of nat- 
ural, mineral solids condemn a water. Vegetable matter is less harmful than 
animal matter. Both are more harmful in well water than in pond water, 
because light and sunshine tend to destroy deadly germs. 

Hardness. — 1.8. 

Alkalinity. — 1.0. 

The figures are given in terms of carbonate of lime, i. e., so many parts of 
carbonate of lime would give the same figures. Hardness and alkalinity give 
considerable information about the mineral constitution of water and often 
concerning its sanitary condition. Hardness is due chiefiy to the salts of lime 
and magnesia, most often, their carbonates and sulphates. Alkalinitj' is caused 
only by their carbonates, or by the carbonates of potash, soda, ammonia, or 
some other alkali. Water hard from the salts of lime and magnesia, other 
than their carbonates, shows no alkalinity, unless the substances last named 
above are present. The carbonates of lime, or magnesia, give nearly the same 
degree of hardness and alkalinity, lime especially. Sewage increases the 
alkalinity which then becomes an indication of pollution. 

Free Carbonic Acid. — 2.20. 

Combined and Bicarbonate Carbonic Acid. — .88. 

As the largest part of organic matter is carbon, so the largest product of 
decay is carbonic acid. Natural waters are weak solutions of carbonic acid. 
Through its agency the carbonates of lime, magnesia, iron, lead, and zinc, are 
dissolved and kept in solution in water. Expel the carbonic acid by boiling 
and these carbonates precipitate, rendering the water turbid and forming a 
scale on the kettle. Water which contains much decaying organic matter, 
contains much carbonic acid; hence polluted water attacks lead pipe more 
freely than pure water. Combined carbonic acid is that which is united with a 
metallic base, forming a carbonate; bicarbonate carbonic acid holds the car- 
bonate in solution; the free carbonic acid is that which is simply dissolved in 
water. 

Free Ammonia.— 0.0024. 

Albuminoid Ammonia. — 0.0216. 

Ammonia results from the decomposition of organic matter; the free, is that 
which the natural process of decay has produced, and points to what extent 
decay has been going on in the water; the albuminoid results from the artifi- 
cial decomposition of organic matter during analysis and points to the quan- 
tity of organic matter actually present. In good well water the albuminoid 
ammonia should not exceed 0.009 part, and in good pond water 0.015 part. In 
neither should the free ammonia exceed 0.005 part. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 273 

Chlorine. — 0.2. 

Chlorine is a constituent of common salt. Sewage is rich in salt, hence the 
value of chlorine as an indication of pollution. Good water should not contain 
more than 0.5 part of it, unless the localitj' is near the sea coast, or is naturally 
rich in salt. 

Nitric Acid. — 0.05. 

This is a constituent of saltpetre which is produced by the fermentation of 
manures and sewage. Good well water should not contain more than 0.5 part 
of it, and pond water not more than 0.02. Excess of chlorine, or nitric acid, 
in water always indicates either actual contamination, or dangerous proximity 
to sources of filth. In this case, the water contains filtered sewage. Nitric 
acid often results from the oxidation of ammonia, or vegetable matter. If the 
quantity of chlorine is normal while the nitric acid is excessive, the water is 
probably contaminated with vegetable n^atter, unless other results deny it. 
Nitrous Acid. — None. 

This is a lower oxide of nitrogen than nitric acid. It is a transition product 
between ammonia, or organic matter, and nitric acid. Its presence shows that 
the source of pollution is so near that time enough has not elapsed for the 
■complete oxidation of its nitrogen in its progress toward the water supply. 
Good water should contain none of it, or but a mere trace. 
Oxygen Consumed in Oxidation. — 0.284. 

Good well water should require less than 0.1 part of oxygen, and good pond 
water less than 0.2 for the oxidation of its dissolved organic matter. In no 
xjase should it exceed 0.4. Some bad waters may require less than 0.05 part. 
Vegetable material, comparatively richer in carbon than animal substances, 
requires more oxygen for oxidation; while animal substances, being richer in 
nitrogen, yield more ammonia and other nitrogen compounds. 
Poisonous Metals. — None. 

Water should not contain more than 0.03 part of lead, or copper, or more 
than 0.05 part zinc. 
Iron.— Strong trace. 

Good water ought not to contain more than 0.1 part iron. 
Sediment.— Considerable. 

Good water should deposit no sediment, or scarcely any. 

Microscopic Examination and Biological Character of Sediment. — Fresh 
water plants— Infusoria. 

Number op Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood Temper- 
ature in Alkaline Agar Medium. — 11. 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood Temper- 
ature in Agar Medium Containing Parietti's Solution. — None. 

Disease germs grow at the temperature of the body. Many harmless bac- 
teria also flourish at this temperature. If a sample of water contains none 
which grow at this temperature, disease germs are evidently absent. The 
disease germ more usually found in waters of this latitude is the typhoid 
bacillus. The bacillus coli communis, whose original habitat is in the intes- 
tines, though not strictly a disease germ, is preeminently the sewage bacte- 
rium, and consequently all waters in which it is found should be condemned. 
The presence of any other sewage bacterium should also condemn a water for 
drinking purposes. The typhoid bacillus, the coli communis, and a few others 
will grow in agar medium, containing Parietti's solution, but to distinguish 
and identify them, special cultures and examinations must be made. Bacteria 
multiply very rapidly after water is taken from its source and raised to sum- 
mer temperature. Since the kind of bacteria is more important than their 
number, the delay necessarily caused bj' transportation of the sample if not 
too long, is favorable instead of objectionable, because a very few disease 

19 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 

germs in a large quantitj- of water might escape discovery, but detention of 
them would be much more certain after theirimultiplication. 

Disease Germs.— None. 

There is more albuminoid ammonia, and more oxygen is required for oxida- 
tion than desirable, but the organic matter in solution is vegetable, and I think 
in this case it does not render the water injurious. 



December 8, 1897 



EDMUND'R. ANGELL. 



SAMPLE NO. 2. 



Odor. — Scarcely any. 

Color. — Little yellowish. 

Transparency. — Clear. 

Behavior During Evaporation. — Foamy. 

Appearance of Residue. — Little yellowish and circles. 

Total Solids. — 4.0. 

Ignition of Residue.— It blackens. 

Loss of Ignition of Residue. — 1.6. 

Hardness. — 1.8. 

Alkalinity. — 1.0. 

Free Carbonic Acid.— 1.36. 

Comrined and Bicarbonate Carbonic Acid. — .88. 

Free Ammoni.a.— 0.0064. 

Albuminoid Ammonia. — 0.0204. 

Chlorine. — 0.2. 

Nitric Acid. — 0.05. 

Nitrous Acid. — None. 

Oxygen Consumed in Oxidation.— 271. 

Poisonous Metals.— None. 

Iron. — Strong trace. 

Sediment.— Some. 

Microscopic Examination and Biological Character of^ Sediment. — 
Mineral particles — Diatoms — Fresh water vegetation. 

Number of B.4.cteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood Temper- 
ature in Alkaline Agar Medium. — 9. 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood Temper- 
ature in Agar Medium Containing Parietti's Solution. — None. 

Disease Germs. — None. 

The same remarks apply to this as to No. 1. 

EDMUND R. ANGELL. 

December 8, 1897. 



MEASLES. 



During the year the prevalence of measles has not been as 
great as in 1896, and no deaths resulted therefrom. I think 
nearly all the cases were reported. Although there are many 
cases that are not seen by any physician, householders have 
been prompt to comply with the law, in reference to reporting 
such cases. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 275 

DISINFECTION. 

The work of disinfection has been carried on as heretofore. 
]\Iuch attention has been given by our bacteriologist, Dr. A. K. 
Day, and myself to testing the practical use of formaldehyde 
gas. Dr. Day says of our experiments: 

"At the suggestion of Mr. Palmer, some experiments have 
been made during the past year to determine the efificacy of 
formaldehyde gas as a disinfectant, when produced by some of 
the apparatus at present in the market. The conditions aimed 
at were such as would exist in any ordinary dwelling to be dis- 
infected, — small rooms of a capacity of 800 to 1,600 cubic feet, 
with simply such closing of leaks as could be easily effected, no 
attempt being made to make the apartments air-tight. The 
lamps used were the Mofifatt formaldehyde generator and Pro- 
fessor Robinson's formaldehyde lamp. Two quarts of wood 
alcohol were used in each experiment. The tests consisted of 
exposing cultures of various disease germs to the action of the 
gas. 

"In some instances glass sHdes smeared with the cul.urcs were 
used; in others, sterile culture tubes of blood serum were inocu- 
lated with the bacteria and freely exposed to the gas. In no 
case was the experiment a success, as far as disinfection was 
concerned; the inoculated -tubes, after an exposure of twelve 
hours or more to the formaldehyde vapor, produced an abun- 
dant growth when placed in the incubator at yj degrees Centi- 
grade, while the culture tubes inoculated from the slides that 
had been exposed, produced equally abundant cultures. These 
experiments repeated several times, and always with the same 
result, have rendered me very skeptical as to the safety of adopt- 
ing any of the formaldehyde generators at present oil the mar- 
ket." 

HOSPITAL FOR CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The importance of establishing a hospital for persons suffer- 
ing with disease dangerous to the public health has been recom- 
mended and discussed in your annual reports. While the need 
of such an institution may not have been so great during the 
past year, such a hospital is absolutely needed, and should be in 



276 CITY OF CONCORD. 

readiness to perform its functions in times of need, becoming a 
means of protection to the community at large. I again pre- 
sent this subject for your early consideration. 

NUISANCES, COMPLAINTS, INSPECTIONS. 

The number and nature of requests for investigation and com- 
plaint of existing nuisances, and those found by house inspec- 
tion, are shown by the following table : 

Accumulation of decayed fruit, coal ashes 22 

Bad well-water i 

Bad sink-drainage 15 

Broken sewer-traps 7 

Catch-basins not trapped 19 

Dead animals 23 

Decayed meat and fish 9 

Defect in house-sewer 7 

Dumping rubbish 23 

Dropping manure in street 5 

Defective plumbing 22 

Filthy stables 11 

Filthy cellars 9 

Filthy swill barrels 3 

Filthy yards , 16 

Filthy alleyways 7 

Foul and offensive cesspools 9 

Keeping hogs 10 

Keeping hens o 

Offensive manure-heaps 10 

Offensive privy-vaults 4c 

Odors arising from water 10 

Offensive odor in house 24 

Offensive odors from stables n 

Privy vaults full 2^ 

Private sewers obstructed 1 1 

Sinks found without traps 3 

Sewer-gas in house ^ 

Stagnant water on vacant lots c 

Street-sev^er obstructed - 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



277 



Sewers not properly ventilated 1 1 

Slaughter houses 3 

Surface sink-drains 7 

Throwing swill in alleyways 3 

Throwing swill in ash-barrels 8 

Throwing ashes in street 4 

Throwing slops into street 2 

Water-closets without water supply 1 1 

Water-closets foul and offensive i5 

Water-closets not ventilated 9 

Water-closets out of repair 7 

Water in cellars 27 

Sewerage backed into cellars 27 

Total 516 

The fore-going complaints include the main sources of nui- 
sance in the city. 

No matter how trivial a complaint may be, or in what form it 
is presented, it has received careful investigation, and orders 
have been issued for abatement. 

It is worthy of note that in not a single instance has it been 
necessary to invoke the penalties of the law in order to secure 
compliance with its requirements, which is certainly very cred- 
itable to our citizens. 

HOUSE INSPECTION. 

The inspection of blocks and dwellings has been done as 
thoroughly as time would allow. With the calls for the inspec- 
tion of premises complained of, the inspection of private sewers, 
care of contagious diseases, and the amount of work required in 
the office, it is impossible for the health officers to inspect the 
entire city annually. I have endeavored to carry on this work 
where it appeared that the most improvement in the sanitary 
condition of premises could be made. The removal of vaults 
and substitution of water-closets, the ventilation of house 
plumbing, and the addition of traps under fixtures, have been 
marked features in the improvement noted. A striking prac- 
tice disclosed by these examinations is the placing of water- 



278 CITY OF CONCORD. 

closets in cellars under stairs, and in dark halls where daylight 
and ventilation cannot well be secured. These examinations 
have shown poor construction and repairs in old houses, and 
faulty construction in new ones also. The question of more 
stringent regulations for this work has often been recom- 
mended to the city council, as the board of health has no author- 
ity to order any special kind or quality of work and can only in- 
sist that leaks shall be stopped. 

PREMISES INSPECTED. 

Private dwellings 89 

Tenement houses I74 

Stores 67 

Stables 49 

Markets 5 

Factories 8 

Hotels • 2 

Schoolhouses 15 

Business blocks 47 

Alleyways 33 

Inspections made at Penacook lake 12 

Inspections made at reservoir 26 

Total 527 

SEWER INSPECTION. 

In compliance with the provision and requirement of the 
city ordinance, ninety-seven sewer inspections have been made, 
providing for 105 buildings. A complete record has been filed 
in the office of the board of health and copies sent monthly to 
the city council. These records are found to be of much ser- 
vice to persons who are obliged to dig up the sewer on account 
of obstruction or other causes. The following table shows the 
various sizes and kinds of pipe used: 

1,126 feet of 15 inch akron pipe 
359 " " 8 " " " 

935 " " 6 " 
4,208 " " 5 " " " 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 279 

528 feet of [4 inch Akron pipe 
"65 " " 8 " iron " 
125 " " 5 " 
200 " " 4 " 
50 •" "2 " 
A total of 7,596 feet, or an average of aboiit 79 feet for each 
lateral sewer. 

This amount of drainage has been furnished to the following 
classes of buildings: 

Private dwellings 47 

Tenement houses 42 

Business blocks 9 

Factories 5 

Churches i 

Stables i 

Total 105 

Water-closets put in I54 

Privies abolished 81 

Cesspools abolished 24 

Surface drains abolished 29 

SEWERAGE SYSTE^I. 

Additions to this system have been made in various parts of 
the city, the most important ones being the so-called "South 
End" sewer, wdiich extends to the west end of the city and will 
provide for a large number of dwellings and public institutions. 
Fifteen houses have already been connected and many others 
will avail themselves of the opportunity as soon as the season 
opens the coming year. 

SUMMARY. 

Houses placarded in cases of contagious diseases 149 

Placards removed 149 

Visits made to cases of contagious disease 646 

Funerals attended 2 

Rooms fumigated 184 

Pieces of bedding burned 63 



280 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Pieces of clothing disinfected at pest-house 147 

Pounds of sulphur used in fumigating 450 

Burial permits issued 

Burial permits issued to non-residents 70 

Transfer permits issued 105 

Certificates issued for children to return to school 53 

Peppermint tests of plumbing made 21 

Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to state 

board of health 52 

Number of monthly mortuary reports sent in exchange to 

other cities 984 

A table appended exhibits the mortuary statistics for the year 
1897. 

I most respectfully return sincere thanks to his honor the 
mayor and members of the city council, to the board of health, 
and to other city ofificials for many courtesies shown me in deal- 
ing with matters relating to the health department. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PAOIER, 
■ ' ' ' " Sanitary Inspector. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



282 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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288 CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To His Hotior the Mayoj- and City Council : 

I have the honor to submit herewith my first annual report 
for the year ending December 31, 1897: 

Number of visits 59 

Children vaccinated 36 

Office consultations 3 

Respectfully, 

CHANCEY ADAMS, 

City Physician. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



THIRTIETH 

ANNUAL REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 

FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1897. 



To the City Council: 

Gentlemen, — The undersigijed herewith submits the thirtieth 
annual report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards i 
and 2, for the year ending December 31, 1897, as follows: 

Families and individuals having a settlement in the city have 
been aided, in part or in full, during the time, to the amount set 
opposite their respective names. 

Glanville Tonkin $ 20.00 

Mrs. Thomas H. Clark 313-67 

Samuel Truett 42.20 

Elmer S. Quimby 13-97 

Peter Keenan 26.50 

Mrs. Charles Dennen 32.58 

Dennis Donovan I5-70 

Ernest Beliveau, paid State Industrial 

School 78.00 

James Clinton 14.00 

Lydia S. Couch 21.40 

Mrs. J. B. Tyler 14.80 

George V. Perry i5-00 

Elizabeth R. Curtice 12.00 

Mrs. G. S. Wilson 6.17 

William S. Paige 12.00 

Patrick Keenan paid St. Patrick's Orphan- 
age 21.67 

Josiali Littlefield paid County of Cheshire 81.35 

$74 LOT 

20 



290 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COUNTY POOR. 

Mrs. Stephen Young $ 5.81 

James H. T. Craigue i33-ii 

Kate Dornan 104.94 

Mrs. A. E. Hoyt 68.58 

Mrs. O. Philbrick 76.96 

Mary Byrne 84.00 

J. W. Richardson 8.00 

Bridget Collins 75-62 

Mary Collins 3.70 

Robbins T. Orr 166.35 

Mary J. Paine 56.00 

Mrs. J. Melanson 104.63 

Coleman Bray 166.40 

Maxim Melanson 154-27 

Chester F. Laird 68.62 

Clarence E. How 35-00 

John Storin " 104.00 

Annie Rushlow 123.00 

Frederick Paradis 213.07 

Samuel Truett 129.59 

Charles H. Cook 55-99 

W. G. Tandy 32.96 

Glanville Tonkin 40.00 

Lydia S. Couch 88.88 

Joseph Benoit 46.22 

Levi Chenette 5.93 

Mary Dorgan 11 -50 

Frank Bordeau 22.69 

Elmer S. Ouimby 14-99 

Sarah Abbott 21.65 

B. G. Tucker 41-54 

Benjamin Cahir 12.00 

Fred W. Heath 3.85 

Frederick W. Story 1 15-64 

Joseph Miner 45-00 

George Miner 9.00 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 291 

A. Lapierre 47-84 

P. Lapierre 48.24 

Helen Cotter 16.00 

John Kelley 22.99 

Mrs. Wm. Hunneyman 192.43 

George W. Smith 22.95 

Edward Osier 66.00 

Mrs. Ella Friend 35.76 

Isaac Leonard 91-94 

Mrs. John Williams 87.10 

John Scanlan 16.00 

Frank Houstin 71.26 

Charles L. Quimby 27.16 

George Noble 10.03 

Lewis Carrow 18.93 

William S. Paige 60.00 

Dennis DonoA^an 60.00 

William Silver 30.00 

Mrs. Charles Dennen i54-o8 

James Clinton 72.50 

Mrs. Wm. Chenette 16.15 

Mrs. Edward Miner 12.80 

Mrs. M. Howe 96.00 

Peter Keenan 101.50 

Melinda Howard 4.59 

Peter Keenan paid St. Patrick's Orphan- 
age 43.33 

J. E. Emerson 20.00 

Anna Jones 28.75 

Benjamin Johnson 5.00 

Warren G. Chase 12.00 

E. A. Murry 12.00 

John G. Peterson 5.49 

Mary E. Gendron 4.00 

William H. Ash 4.00 

Joseph Lavail 14-33 

Celina Barabeau - 6.00 

Henry McCloud 5.00 



292 CITY OF CONCORD. 

George F. Thompson 8.97 

Mrs. E. Dennis 8.59 

Peter Durant 22.60 

Michael J. O'Connell 19-99 

Frank H. Ash 5-25 

Charles Dennis 1346 

Tyler Philbrick 2.00 

J. B. Fraser 27.32 

Mrs. Polly Woodbury 44-00 

Albert Mason 22.97 

Mrs. Moses Heltz 40-i5 

Mrs. C. Abbott 27.59 

Willie Davis 5-82 

William C. Baker. 5-49 

George S. Drew 29.55 

George W. Landon 20.00 

Mrs. Frank Wheeler 6.00 

Mrs. Henry Champion 1.60 

Charles E. Pierce 3.00 

Patrick Bray 9.00 

Transient account 311.02 

— • $4,626.01 

Amount paid for support of city poor. ... $ 741.01 

Amount paid by the city for the support 

of county poor 4,626.01 

Total amount paid on account of poor. . $5,367.02 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 

Aid to Dependent Soldiers and their families rendered during 
the year 1897. 

CHARGEABLE TO CITY. 

Mrs. Henry M. Sanborn $ 62.29 

George W. Johnson 61.55 

Stephen Lamprey 88.00 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 293 

Orrin Larkin 97-^S 

C. P. Savory 82.90 

Benjamin P. Davis 3-00 

$394-79 

CHARGEABLE TO COUNTY. 

Edward N. Pinkham $i5i-56 

George W. Johnson 15246 

Michael Storin 182.00 

Harriet Ash 51.21 

William Wallace 129.16 

Helen Griswold 41-74 

Otis H. Reister 83.88 

Honora Sullivan 1 16.98 

Lester Fletcher 67.53 

Mrs. L. A. Danforth 29.00 

Mary A. Morrison 18.14 

W. H. Sargent 176.75 

Eli Sturgeon 65.28 

Mrs. John H. Heath 27.00 

Erastus B. Tucker 49-25 

Eliza B. Tandy 11.72 

C. D. Thompson 2.00 

N. W. Davis 84.00 

George Papino .50 

Sarah Abbott 6.00 

John F. Guild 3.00 

Mary J. Oakley 45.99 

Arthur Lawrence 5.98 

$1,501.13 

Total amount $1,895.92 

It will be noticed that several names appear in both the City 
and County lists, which is accounted for by a chano-e in the law 
at the last session of the Legislature. 



Police Department. 



REPORT OF CITY MARSHAL. 



To the Board of Alayor and Aldermen : 

I herewith submit my annual report of the police department 
for the year 1897: 

1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 
Whole mimljer of arrests (including Pena- 

cook) 699 697 720 649 876 876 

Whole number of arrests at Penacook 72 50 44 65 83 • 73 

Brought before the court 487 560 62S 617 720 698 

Discharged by the court 2 17 4 8 2 

Discharged without being brought before 

the court 140 no 93 85 157 178 

Total amount received for fines and costs, — 

1891, $3,306.92; 1892, $3,027.78; 1893, 
$5,352.19; 1894, .$4,396.60; 1895, $6,- 
418.92; 1896, $5,874.16; 1897,17,078.72. 

Total amount paid out, — 1891, $462.21 ; 

1892, $480,150; 1893, $363.73; 1894, 
$557.23; 1895, $933.64; 1896, $555.35; 

i897>$595-io- 
Paid city treasurer in 1896, $5,318.81 ; 1897, 

$6,483.62. 
Whole number of lodgers, including Pena- 
cook 5S4 936 1 166 908 854 1099 

Whole number of lodgers at Penacook 94 170 251 201 158 316 

Number doors found open and secured 

(including Penacook) 103 68 184 290 252 233 

Number doors found open and secured at 

Penacook 11 6 9 22 iS 26 

Lost children returned to their parents 18 15 21 18 14 21 

Number boys cautioned to attend school. . . 21 21 28 19 16 18 
Number girls cautioned to attend school. . . 4 3 2 3 4 6 

Called to quell disturbances 44 61 80 72 81 90 

Stray teams found 13 13 16 12 7 3 



1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 






3 


3 


2S 


31 


49 


59 


19 


16 


17 


19 


I 


I 


I 


I 
I 
I 


2 


3 


5 


10 


14 


18 


9 


3 


3 


5 


- 


I 
I 






I 


3 
I 




2 


4 


2 


36s 


37S 


48S 


425 


30 


60 


63 


54 
I 

I 


I 


3 


I 
S 


3 
6 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 295 

1892. 1893. 

Stray horses found 

Number times city ambulance required 29 38 

Assault 31 18 

Aggravated assault 3 

Attempt to rape 

Animal running at large 

Adultery 

Breaking and entering i 14 

Bastardy , i 

Beating board bill 

Common seller 

Contempt of court 

Cruelty to animals 

Drunkenness (including Penacook) 399 340 

Drunkenness at Penacook 35 

Driving job team without license 

Defacing building '. 

Evading railroad fare 5 i 

Escaped from House of Correction 

Escaped from Industrial School i 

Fast driving 2 5 5 

Firing revolver i 

Forgery i 2 

For out of town officers 2 i 11 

Fornication 2 9 4 

Gambling 16 10 2 12 

Idle and disorderly persons i i i 1 7 5 

Illegal fishing 2 2 

Insane 9 6 8 4 11 6 

Injury to real estate i 2 

Keeping dogs without a license 

Keeping malt liquor for sale 13 64 

Keeping malt for sale, second offence 

Keeping cider for sale 

Keeping spirituous liquor for sale 7 47 

Keeping spirituous liquor, second offence. . . 

Larceny from the person i c 

Noise and brawl 5 iS 2 

Neglecting to support family i 2 

Neglecting to clear sidewalk i 

Obtaining goods under false pretences i 

Obtaining team by false pretences i 

Obstructing an officer i 

Rude and disorderly conduct 18 14 13 6 7 29 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk 9 c 3 

Ringing false alarm i 



ID 


9 


6 


-7 


53 


n 


54 


69 




I 


4 
I 


5 
I 


33 


57 


49 


60 
I 



296 CITY OF CONCORD. 

1892. 1893. 1894. 

Safe keeping 59 87 45 

Stealing 25 28 28 

Selling spirituous liquor 2 4 i 

Setting bonfire 

Street walkers 

Stubborn children 7 3 6 

Threatening to do bodily harm 

Tramp 

United States prisoner i 2 i 

Vagrant 5 - ' 

Number of arrests made by James E. Rand 88 

Daniel S. Flanders 21 

Fred M. Eaton 69 

Whitney D. Barrett 19 

James Kelley 11 

Charles E. Kelley 22 

John E. Gay i 

Charles W. Hall i 

Elmer J. Brown 

Irving B. Robinson 

Charles H. Rowe 

Thomas P. Davis 

John G. Putnam 

Oliver Tappan 

George N. Fellows 

Samuel L. Batchelder. . . . 

Assisted in making arrests, James E. Rand 65 

Daniel S. Flanders 42 

Fred M. Eaton 29 

John E. Gay 3 

Charles W. Hall 9 

Whitney D. Barrett 7 

James Kelley 9 

Charles E. Kelley 10 

Elmer J. Brown 

Irving B. Robinson 

Charles H. Rowe 

Thomas P. Davis 

John G. Putnam 

George N. Fellows 

Arrests made by special ofificers 38 

Special officers assisted in making arrests 48 



1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


4> 


89 


116 


5 


'9 


22 



2 


I 


6 


3 


5 


I 


44 


135 


157 


34 


66 


70 


49 


48 


24 


39 


47 


43 


25 


40 


30 


26 


45 


3 


27 


85 


78 


20 


39 


63 


16 


21 


2 


9 


26 


29 


8 


82 


105 

7 

62 

II 

21 

6 


33 


37 


19 


53 


34 


57 


36 


34 


5 


29 


21 


19 


7 


3 


31 


5 


4 


9 


5 


I 


4 


22 


18 


4 


9 


6 


I 


I 


5 


7 




24 


45 
10 
12 

5 


50 


34 


20 


3- 


7 


6 



POLICE DEPARTMENT, 297 

The organization of the police department at the present time 
is as follows : 

Police Commissioners. 
Charles C. Uanforth, Giles Wheeler, Josiah E. Dwight. 

G. Scott Locke, city marshal. 

James E. Rand, assistant marshal. 

Daniel S. Flanders, captain night watch. 

Fred M. Eaton, regular police and night watchman. 

Whitney D. Barrett, " " Penacook. 

James Kelley, " " " 

John E. Gay, " " 

Charles W. Hall, 

Charles H. Rowe, " " 

John G. Putnam, " " 

Samuel L. Batchelder, " " 

Special Reserve Officers. 

George H. Silsby, captain. 

John T. Batchelder, William R. Green, 

O. H. Bean, Alvin H. Urann, 

Willie A. Little, Harvey H. Oakes, 

W. A. Flanders. George N. Fellows, 

George W. Chesley, Abiel C. Abbott, 

W. H. H. Patch, Thomas P. Davis, 

Hoyt Robinson, Irving B. Rgbinson, 

George D. Worth, Charles E. Kelley. 

I will renew my recommendation for a stable suitable for a 
horse, wagon and ambulance. 

It can be built after the same architectural design as the police 
station for $i,ooo. 

A telephone line from the South end to Penacook would be 
of great assistance to thi^ department, and could be built for 
$500. 

In submitting my report I desire to express my gratitude to 
the board of police commissioners, His Honor Mayor A. B. 
Woodworth, and the city council for their considerate treatment 
of this department. Thanks are due to Harry G. Sargent, city 
solicitor, for valuable assistance rendered. 



298 CITY OF CONCORD. 

To all who have contributed to our success we extend our 
thanks. 

To the members of the force my grateful acknowledgment 
and thanks are tendered, for their efficiency and promptness in 
the discharge of their duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. SCOTT LOCKE, 

City Marshal. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT., 299" 



Report of Clerk of Police Court. 

To the City Cozmcil : 

I submit the following report of the Police Court for the year 
1897: 

Number of civil cases entered 123 

Received for entry fees $61.50 

trials and continuances 14-25 

$75-75 
Paid city treasurer $75-75 

GEO. M. FLETCHER, 
Clerk of Police Court. 



300 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Report of City Solicitor. 



To the City Coimcil : I hereby submit my annual report as 
solicitor : 

The case of "Mary J. Gay et al v. Concord," pending at the 
date of my last annual report, is still undisposed of, no action 
having been taken by the plaintiff to bring the case to a trial, but 
it probably will be disposed of within a month or two. 

The suits against the bondsmen of Albert I. Foster pending 
at the date of my last annual report, were terminated on accoimt 
of the compromise agreement made by the city council to accept 
33 1-3 per cent, in full settlement of the amounts claimed against 
the bondsmen. 

In April, 1897, Trueworthy L. Fowler commenced a suit 
against the city to recover damages for injuries to his h(jrse, 
caused as alleged, by negligently leaving unfastened the cover 
of a sewer. The amount of damages claimed is $50. Arrange- 
ments are being made for a compromise of this suit, and it will 
probably be disposed of in a short time. 

In December, 1897, claims against the city were filed with the 
board of mayor and aldermen, in favor of Arthur Henry, Ed- 
mund M. Proctor, Laura P. Clough, and John Callahan, for 
damages caused by surface water, as alleged, on account of the 
raising of Pine street. These claims altogether amount to 
$2,000. Under my advice, by agreement with counsel repre- 
senting the claimants, these claims will be tried by a referree, 
whose decision will be final. 

During the year advice and assistance have been furnished 
by me to the officers of the different departments of the city 
•government, as requested. 

HARRY G. SARGENT, City Solicitor. 
Concord, X. H., December 31, 1897. 



REPORT OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS. 301 



Report of Police Commissioners. 



The following is a report of the doings of the Police Commis- 
sioners for the year ending Dec. 31, 1897: 

April 30, 1897. Met at the office of Morrill & Danforth. 
The resignation of Charles E. Kelley, a regular police officer, 
was presented and accepted. 

H. C. Oaks, George N. Fellows and Oliver Tappan were ap- 
pointed special police officers. 

Adjourned, to meet at the call of the chairman. 

May II, 1897. Met at the office of Morrill & Danforth. 
John G. Putnam was appointed a regular police officer. 

Adjourned, to meet on call of the chairman. 

August 2, 1897. Met at the office of Morrill & Danforth. 
Thomas P. Davis and Irving B. Robinson were appointed spe- 
cial police officers. 

Adjourned, to meet on call of the chairman. 

December 21, 1897. Met at the office of Morrill & Danforth. 
The resignation of Eugene H. Davis, a special police officer, was 
presented and accepted. 

Samuel L. Batchelder was appointed a regular police officer. 

Charles E. KeUey and Milton Colby were appointed special 
police officers. 

Adjourned, to meet on call of the chairman. 

GILES WHEELER, 

Clerk Police Commission. 



302 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Report of City Liquor Agent. 



To the City Council: 

In compliance with Section lo, Chapter 112, of the Pubhc 
Statutes of this State, and the resolution of the Board of Mayor 
and Aldermen of May 26, 1888, establishing this agency, I re- 
spectfully report the transactions of this oflfice for the year 1897. 

ON HAND JANUARY i AND PURCHASED DURING 
THE YEAR 1897. 

Wines and liquors on hand January i per report 
was 225 gallons, 100 bottles liquors and malt 

liquors $1,203.46 

Purchased of Geo. W. Weeks, liquor commissioner, 
wines and liquors, 448 4-8 gallons, 108 bottles 

liquors and malt liquors 1,314.84 

Total, 673 4-8 gallons, 208 bottles liquors and 
malt liquors. 
Freight, cartage and express on goods purchased. . 9.30 

Empty bottles on hand January i, 42 .92 

Empty bottles purchased during the year, 188 6.00 

$2,534-52 
MATERIAL AND EXPENSE OTHER THAN STOCK. 

Salary of agent $600.00 

Rent of office 276.00 

U. S. internal revenue special tax 25.00 

Fuel for the year 18.72 

Gas 5.55 

Water i.oo 

Postage stamps .^o 

4 gross corks 1.68 

E. M. Cogswell, sealer and measure .40 

$3,469-37 



REPORT OF LIQUOR AGENT. 303 

SOLD DURIXG THE YEAR 1897. 

Wines, liquors and malt liquors, number of sales, 
3,385, and 478 6-8 gallons, 68 bottles liquors and 

malt liquors $1,943.75 

Empty bottles sold during the year, 201 16.35 

Empty casks sold, 12 12.00 

$1,972.10 

ON HAND JANUARY i, 1898. 

Wines and liquors, 185 2-8 gallons, 144 

bottles liquors and malt liquors $1,239.80 

Less shortage, 13 1-8 gallons 39-50 $1,200.30 

Empty on hand January i, 129 2.90 

$1,203.20 

Cost of goods sold and expenses $1,387.80 

Wines, liquors and malt liquors. 

Empty bottles sold during the year, 201, cost 4.02 

Other expenditures 934-85 

$2,326.67 

Cash on hand January i, 1897 $ 12.60 

Cash received for sales in 1897 1,972.10 

Cash deposited with city treasurer $1,975.00 

Cash on hand January i, 1898 9.70 $1,984.70 

Respectfully submitted, 

MOSES LADD, Liquor Agent. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



The park commissioners submit herewith their annual re- 
port for the year ending December 31, 1897: 

The appropriations for the last year were made as follows: 

■ White Park, $3,250.00 

Rollins Park, 750.00 

Penacook Park, . 100.00 

Parks and commons, i75-00 

WHITE PARK. 

The most marked improvement at White Park during the 
season has been the completion of the stone bridge and the sur- 
roundings, making a most harmonious efifect. The increase of 
completed area in the park brings with it an increased expense 
for maintenance. Much filling has been accomplished this year 
and sub-draining. The season was so wet last summer that 
the necessity of a water supply was not needed, yet that cannot 
always be counted upon and provisions will have to be made to 
meet any emergency. 

The improvements have reached such a stage that any 
marked improvement gives a completeness to the plan which 
has been followed, so that the coming year this new work 
should be increased. There are important additions that 
should be made at an early date : First, the completion of 
the play-ground with the accessories to such a place in the way 
of bicycle paths, tennis courts, etc. This is needed very much 
as it has been so difficult to exercise control over the other parts 
of the park. People, not perhaps always wilfully, but thought- 
lessly, do that which has caused much time and labor and which 



PUBLIC PARKS. 305 

is, to say the least, aggravating to the commissioners and super- 
intendent to see destroyed. It would seem the best way to 
provide certain localities for certain purposes, and that would 
in a more or less degree obviate any complaint. 

Another needed improvement, which is a necessity, is the 
building of a tool house, in which to house and protect the prop- 
erty of this department, which now suffers from lack of sufficient 
protection. This can be built at an expense of not over $600. 

Another improvement is the great need of a combination 
shelter and public comfort building at the entrance of Pine 
street, which can be constructed in a very substantial and artis- 
tic manner for a reasonable figure. The commissioners have 
had plans made along these lines, and hope that they will be able 
under the appropriation that will be made this year to carry out 
these needed improvements. 

The temporary fence has been extended to the corner of Bea- 
con and White streets, along which have been planted a row of 
Lombardy poplars, which will be a great feature of that part of 
the park. The commissioners would also call attention to that 
piece of ground which belongs to the park, but which the city 
has not paid for, and they would suggest that an appropriation 
should be made for this. 

The wet season has developed more or less malaria upon that 
part of the ground which has not as yet been reclaimed, and this 
was the cause of a serious illness which incapacitated our super- 
intendent for a few months. 

The appropriation has been exceeded by a small amount, 
which came about from some unpaid bills of the previous year, 
which could not be gotten in. 

ROLLINS PARK. 
The appropriation at Rollins Park has been insufficient to 
carry out the desires of the committee in charge. The needs of 
this park demanded the services of a man continuously, so that 
during the summer there has been a man on the ground all the 
time working out the contemplated improvements, also taking 
charge of the park. A very attractive artificial pond has been 
constructed and shrubs and trees have been planted; water has 
21 



306 CITY OF CONCORD. 

been introduced, providing a drinking fountain. Tables have 
been erected and seats placed in different parts of the park. 
The right has been obtained to use a spring in an adjoining 
piece of land, and a pump has been put in to draw the water. 

During the season the commissioners have consulted with 
landscape architects, and as a result of this a rustic shelter has 
been constructed in the center of the park, which will prove a 
very attractive feature. Other pieces of rustic work are con- 
templated. Plans have also been submitted to the commission- 
ers for the improvement of other parts of the park, including a 
system of ponds and walks. This will necessitate a greater ex- 
penditure than we have heretofore made, but the features al- 
ready incorporated in the park, and the popularity of the same, 
have demonstrated the wise use of the funds. 

The appropriation has been exhausted and over-run, but 
comes within the original appropriation which has been re- 
ceived heretofore. 

PEXACOOK PARK. 

The appropriation for Penacook Park has been exceeded by 
$3.72. The income has been less from different sources from 
this park and some needed repairs have been made which has 
caused this; otherwise, the same results have been obtained as 
last year, the care consisting mainly in keeping the grounds 
clean and the buildings in repair. 

PARKS AND COMMONS. 

The piece of ground which has been developed under the 
head of parks and commons has been given a fitting and appro- 
priate name by the city government as Bradley Park. The 
amount appropriated for this piece of improvement, which 
was begun the previous year, was insufficient, as a correct esti- 
mate could not be made as to its completion. However, the 
appropriation was not over-run very much, and the completion 
of the park has been very satisfactory and only demonstrates 
what can be done along the same lines in other sections of the 
city, — the more we have of just such bits of adornment, the 
more attractive will our city become. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 307 

The tract which has been recently donated to the city at the 
West End can be made a very attractive spot, and we are glad to 
see that our citizens are beginning to appreciate the work al- 
ready begun, and anticipate results which will arise from such 
improvement. 

There are other pieces of ground which should be taken up at 
no Jate day and improved. 

ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, Chairman. 

JOHN F. JONES, 

BENJ. S. ROLFE, 

BENJ. C. WHITE, 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 

GEORGE A. YOUNG, 

WILLIAM P. FISKE. 



308 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES BY THE PARK 
COMMISSIONERS. 



White Park Account. 




Labor $2,305.01 




Lumber ...... 204.78 




Stone bridge 3^3-^3 




Loam 132. 00 




Trees, slirubs, and seed . . . 67.40 




Horse and care ..... I09-77 




Tools 5846 




Incidentals 84-^3 




Interest 70.00 


$3'344-58 


Rollins Park Account. 


- 


Labor $447.06 




Piping and plumbing .... I30-47 




Tools and hardware .... 59-^^ 




Construction of shelter .... 151-63 




Trees, shrubs, and seed . . . 150.80 




Incidentals ...... 44.22 


$983.84 




Penacook Park Account. 




Labor $73-45 




Incidentals . . . . . . 30-27 


$.03.72 




Bradley Park Account. 




Labor $53-7o 




Trees, shrubs, and seed . . . 105.90 




Loam 31-80 




Incidentals 27.33 


$218.73 




Balance ....... 


6.27 



$22^.00 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



309 



General Fund. 



Balance on hand : 
Penacook Park .... 
Rollins Park .... 

Cash received : 
Wood sold, account White Park 

(I H ii 

"■ " Rollins Park, from 

J. H. Rowell 
Rebate, account subscription to "Garden 

and Forest " . 
Income from Penacook Park . 



Bills paid : 
J. M. Grossman, account Penacook Park, 
C. H. Stevens & Co-, "■ ■■• 

O. F. Richardson, " " 

E. Coutchi, account parks ami commons, 
Geo. Malcolm, " " 

bk a a 

Morgan, Grossman & Co., rubber stamp. 
Subscription to "American Gardening," 
Balance paid to city treasurer 



$26.57 
43.12 

3.00 
4.00 

10.50 

2.38 
11.00 



$5-55 
2.50 

2-95 

4-50 

15.00 

7-50 

.90 

2.00 

5S.67 



$99.57 



$99-57 



310 CITY OF CONCORD. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



To the City Council: Your commissioners of cemeteries, in 
making their annual report, look with no little satisfaction upon 
the work accomplished during the past year. The larger part of 
the appropriation placed at our disposal has been expended in 
grading, and removing the unsightly gravel hill, which has so 
long marred the beauty of Blossom Hill Cemetery. The Old 
North Cemetery has been put in good condition and will need 
no great outlay during the coming year. 

There have been one hundred and sixty (i6o) burials during 
the year, a fact that calls our attention to the rapidity with 
which our cemeteries are being occupied, and also testifies to the 
wisdom of your honorable body in providing for the future by 
the purchase of the additional land on the south of Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. 

We had hoped that you could see your way clear to make an 
appropriation for a chapel and waiting room this year. Of its 
necessity there is no doubt. When we consider that almost all 
of ithe money appropriated for cemeteries finds its way back to 
the treasury of the city, it seems to us that such appropriation 
would meet with public favor, and therefore merit your early at- 
tention. 

Having already made your appropriation for cemeteries, any 
suggestions from your commissioners would appear unneces- 
sary. We had hoped for a larger one, but shall endeavor to ex- 
pend what you have named in a manner to win your approval. 

GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, 
Secretary Board of Commissioners. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 311 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

To the Hottorable Mayor and City Council: 
Financial report of the Millville Cemetery Committee: 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from city treasurer $100.00 

Received from interested individuals 33-00 

Total $13300 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid A. H. Britton & Co., mower and hard- 
ware $12.65 

C. W. Brown, hauling loam 17.10 

W. Oscar Proctor, work i7-5o 

J. N. Abbott 2.00 

W. H. Currier 6.75 

C. H. Martin & Co., lead and oil 8.60 

added to fund 25.00 

Paid the amount "expended above receipts" 

as per last report 13-89 

Total $103.49 

Balance on hand $29.51 

Respectfully submitted, 

I. N. ABBOTT, 
F. G. PROCTOR, 
A. CLARK. 

Committee. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Honorable Mayor and City Co7iticil : 

I have the honor to submit the followhig report of the Fire 
Department for the year 1897. 

The precinct department responded to thirty-two (32) box 
alarms and eighty (80) still alarms. 

At Penacook thirteen (13) alarms were responded to; at East 
Concord six (6), and at West Concord two (2). 

BOX ALARMS. 

Box 24. Jan. i6th, 5:12 P. M. Slight fire in room 17, upper 
Stickney block, occupied by H. H. Buzzell. Caused by stove 
blacking igniting while being applied to stove. No loss. Re- 
call, 5:16 P. M. 

Box 42. Jan. i8th, 12:57 P- ^I- Fi^^ in closet in residence 
rear of 65 So. Main St., owned by J. J. Lee and occupied by Ed- 
ward Ryan. Cause unknown. 450 feet hose wet. Recall, 
1:10 P. M. 

Value Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $3,000.00 $15.00 $2,000.00 $15.00 
Contents, 30.00 None. None. 

Box 49. Jan. 20th, 9:14 P. M. Slight fire in residence 74 
West St., owned by Mrs. Sophia Shaw and occupied by J. J. 
Mills. Caused by over-heated chimney. Extinguished with 
pony extinguishers. Recall, 9:25 P. M. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $3,000.00 $6.55 $1,000.00 $6.55 

Box 24. Feb. 27th, 7:21 A. M. Fire in photograph gallery, 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 313 

corner Centre and No. Main Sts., owned by W. J. Chadbourne 
and occupied by W. W. Brown. Cause unknown. 650 feet 
hose wet. Recall, 7:33 A. M. 

Value Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $900.00 $900.00 $800.00 $615.00 

Contents, $1,000.00 700.00 700.00 622.08 

Box 37. Mar. 17th, 12.33 A. M. Fire in out-buildings cor- 
ner No. Fruit and Pleasant Sts., owned by L. D. Brown. Cause, 
incendiary. Recall, 2:54 A. M. 200 feet hose wet. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $150.00 $150.00 None. None. 

Contents, 200.00 200.00 None. None. 

Box 24. Mar. 21 St, 4:46 P. M. Slight fire in Carroll House, 
Centre St. Caused by kerosene stove. Recall, 4:51 P. M. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $3,500.00 $20.00 $2,000.00 $20.00 

Box 24. April 4th, 12:43 P- J^- Fire in residence 15 Centre 
St., owned by Guild of St. Paul and occupied by Dr. A. W. Hill. 
Residence adjoining, owned and occupied by Ella A. Wad- 
leigh damaged. Cause of fire unknown. 2,750 feet hose wet. 
Recall, 1 :03 P. M. 



Guild of St. Paul 








Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. pd. 


Building, $3,000.00 


$1,000.00 


$2,500.00 


$542.00 


Contents, 2,000.00 


100.00 


None. 


None. 


E. A. Wadleigh 








Building, $3,000.00 


$89.35 


$2,500.00 


$89.35 


i i-MTf^*-\f f 


7-50 




7-50 


V^Vllll.V.11 lo^ ■" 




Box 36. April 13th, I 


133 P. M. Fire in tenement house, 6 



and 8 So. Spring St., owned by Fred P. Smart and Horace 
Thompson. Occupied by J. F. Liberty, B. G. Tucker, G. H. 
May, and E. B. Craddock. 

Box 36. April 13th, 1 :4o P. M. Second alarm. Cause of 
fire unknown. 3,450 feet hose wet. Recall, 2.28 P. M. 
Building: Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

F.P. Smart $2,500.00 $1,050.00 $1,800.00 $1,050.00 

H. Thompson 2,500.00 1,200.00 2,100.00 1,200.00 



314 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Building. 


Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. pd. 


J. F. Liberty, 


$1,400.00 


$500.00 


$1,000.00 


$390-34 


B. G. Tucker, 


300.00 


200.00 


None. 


None. 


G. H. May, 


100.00 


50.00 


None. 


None. 


E. B. Craddock, 




20.00 


None. 


None. 



Bo.x 49. April 22nd, 4:50 P. M. Grass fire Pillsbury St. 
Needless alarm. 250 feet hose wet. Recall, 4.59 P. M. 

Box 23. April 24th, 1 :25 A. AL Fire in building, 210 No, 
Main St., known as the Union House. Owned by Jacob Chad- 
wick. Practically destroyed by previous fire. Unoccupied. 
Cause incendiary. 2,250 feet hose wet. Recall, 1 150 A. M. 

Box 35. April 24th, 6:15 P. M. Fire in shed rear C. H. 
Martin's drug store. Extinguished by Chemical Co. See still 
alarm same date. Recall, 6:19 P. M. 

Box 19. ]\Iay 2ist, 10:01 P.AL False alarm. Recall, 10:08 
P. M. 

Box 9. j\Iay 22nd, 1 1 :20 A. 'M. Brush fire near Claremont 
R. R. crossing. Alarm given in West Concord also. 2,050 
feet hose wet. No loss, although for some time this fire had a 
very serious aspect, valuable houses being in imminent danger. 
Recall, 12:17 P. M. 

4-4-4. May 23rd, 9:00 P. M. Brush fire near J. H. S. Will- 
cox property, Millville road. Extinguished by detail from fire 
department. Wood owned by Lewis B. Hoit destroyed. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Wood, $292.50 $50.00 $255.70 $50.00 

Box 37. June 22nd, 8:16 P. M. Fire in barn rear 167 Pleas- 
ant St., owaied by E. G. Harris. Caused by over-turned lan- 
tern. Extinguished before the arrival of department. No loss. 
Recall S.23 P. M. 

Box 42. July 7th, 10:15 P. M. Slight fire in residence, 20 
Concord St., owned by Mrs. Sarah J. Adams. Unoccupied. 
Caught in waste paper. Cause unknown. No loss. Needless 
alarm. 

Box 13. Aug. i8th, 7:30 A. AI. Fire in residence, 95 Frank- 
lin St., owned by James M. Collins and occupied by James Mc- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



315 



Bain. Caught in shavings in cellar from some cause unknown. 
400 feet hose wet. Recall, 7:58 A. M. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $3,000.00 $150.00 $2,500.00 $115.00 

Contents, i. 000.00 i5-00 None. None. 

Box 56. Sept. 26th, 6:00 P. M. Slight fire in residence of 
W. H. Foster, Hopkinton road near St. Paul's School. Caused 
by curtain coming in contact with gas jet. Extinguished be- 
fore arrival of department. No loss. Needless alarm. Recall, 
6:14 P.M. 

Box 14. Oct. 9th, 7:38 A. M. Slight fire in wardrobe in 
residence, 19 Perkins St., owned by James E. Randlett and oc- 
cupied by Everett Eddy and Richard H. Tippet. Cause, chil- 
dren playing with matches. No hose wet. Recall, 7:58 A. M. 
Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $2,800.00 $20.00 $2,000.00 $20.00 
Contents, 40.00 None. None. 

Box 24. Oct. 1 2th, 8:44 A. M. Fire in building, 135 1-2 
No. Main St., owned by Mrs. Ellen O'Brien and occupied as 
follows: P. Descoteau, boot and shoe store, E. S. Carroll, resi- 
dence. Chin O'Kee, laundry, Leonard Mudgett, and Chas. H. 
Fradd, storage. Cause, unknown. 1,650 feet hose wet. Re- 
call, 8:59 A. M. 

Value. Loss. 

$1,500.00 $31975 



Building, 
Contents: 
P. Descoteau, 
E. S. Carroll, 
Chin O'Kee, 
L. Mudgett, 
C. H. Fradd, 



4-4-4. 
Home, 
loss. 

4-4-4. 
Home. 

ii-ii. 



250.00 

300.00 

20.00 

100.00 

1 50.00 

Oct. i6th, II :i3 P. M. Brush fire near Odd Fellows' 
Extinguished by detail from fire department. No 



Ins. 


Ins. pd. 


$1,000.00 


$319-75 


800.00 


132.80 


None. 


None. 


None. 


None. 


None. 


None. 


None. 


None. 



Oct. 17th, 4:48 A. M. Brush fire near Odd Fellows' 

Extinguished by detail from fire department. No loss. 

Oct. 17th, 3:20 P. M. Call from Bradford, N. H., 



316 CITY OF CONCORD. 

for assistance. Gov. Hill steamer, relief reel and i,8oo feet of 
hose sent. Engine worked one hour. 

4-4-4. Oct. 25th, 11:50 A. M. Brush fire head of Call St., 
near N. H. State Prison. Exting-uished by detail from fire de- 
partment. No loss. 

Box 35. Oct. 31st, 8:33 P. M. Fire in J. C. Norris & Co.'s 
bakery, 18 So. Main .St. Extinguished by Chemical Co. Cause 
unknown. Recall, 8:50 P. "SI. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $8,000.00 $100.00 $4,000.00 $100.00 

Contents, 1 5.000.00 None. 8,000.00 None. 

Box 12. Nov. 3rd, 8:40 A. M. Slight fire in closet in resi- 
dence, 170 No. State St., owned by John Healey and occupied 
by E. Swedmark. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $2,500.00 $5.00 $1,500 $5.00 
Contents, I5-00 None. None. 

Box 23. Nov. 6th, 7:59 P. M. Fire in unoccupied building 
in old N. R. R. yard. Cause, unknown. 1,950 feet hose wet. 
Recall, 8:08 P. M. Building of no material value. 

Box 14. Nov. loth, 9:12 P. M. Slight fire in residence of C. 

J. French. 5 Perkins St. Cause, unknown. Recall, 9:20 P. M. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $1,600.00 None. $1,000.00 None. 

Contents, 1.500.00 $25.00 950.00 $25.00 

Box 47. Nov. 20th, 2:49 P. M. Fire in shed adjoining resi- 
dence, 47 Downing St., owned by ]\Irs. D. D. Brainerd and oc- 
cupied by F. W. Story and Lewis Brown. Cause, unknown. 
1,650 feet hose wet. No water, however, used in the building. 
Recall, 3:12 P. M. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $1,000.00 $104.50 $700.00 $100.00 

Contents, 500.00. 1500 None. None. 

Box 41. Nov. 24th, 3:59 A. M. Fire in residence, 37 South 
St., owned by John B. Baker and occupied by W. G. Fletcher. 
Cause, unknown. 1,100 feet hose wet. Recall, 5:05 A. M. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $2,500.00 $906.25 $1,500.00 $906.25 

Contents, 600.00 250.00 None. None. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 317 

Box 42. Nov. 26th, 3:00 A. M. Fire in residence, 34 So. 
State St., owned by Mrs. Sarah T. Colby and occupied by Di. 
Fred Dessaint. Cause, over-heated chimney, 2,550 feet hose 
wet. Recall, 3 44 A. M. 

Valiie. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $4,500.00 $315-00 $3,500.00 $3i5-00 

Contents, 2,000.00 300.00 1,800.00 300.00 

STILL ALARMS. 

Jan. 7th, 7:01 P. M. Chimney fire in residence, 6 Downing- 
St., owned by Mrs. C. B. Lawrence and occupied by Rosanna 

Paradis. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $3,500.00 $20.00 $2,000.00 $20.00 

Jan. 8th, 9:55 A. M. Chimney fire in residence ol F. C. West, 
16 Pierce St. No loss. 

Jan. loth, 10:00 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Miss 
Hattie Tucker, 44 Downing St. Extinguished by members of 
Good Will Hose Co. No loss. 

Jan. 13th, 9:12 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of F. E. 
Nelson, corner Warren and Merrimack Sts. No loss. 

Jan. 17th, 5:35 P. M.. Chimney fire in residence of Abial 
Thompson, 131 Warren St. No loss. 

Jan. i8th, 6:37 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of John 
Maguire, 4 Downing St. No loss. 

Jan. 26th, I :o5 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Fred 
Leary, 71-2 So. State St. No loss. 

Jan. 26th, 9:30 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Stephen 
Sewall, 90 Warren St. No loss. 

Jan. 26th, 3 :45 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Mrs. Olive 
A. Evans, 18 Short St. No loss. 

Jan. 30th,, 3:47 I'. M. Chimney fire in residence of J. E. Em- 
erson, 18 Water St. No loss. 

Feb. 6th, 4:20 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Henry 
McCloud, 19 Prince St. No loss. 

Feb. loth, 8:40 A. M. Chinmey fire in L^nion St. school- 
house. No loss. 

Feb. 19th, I :oo P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Michael 



318 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Bateman, 17 Green St. Extinguished by Central station men. 
No loss. 

Feb. 20th, 8:57 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Mrs. El- 
len O'Brien, 20 Thorndike St. Extinguished by members of 
Good Will Hose Co. No loss. 

Feb. 27th, 4:58 P. M. Chimney fire in Currier's block, No. 
Main St. No loss. 

Mar. 3rd, 9:25 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of E. A. 
Gushing, 19 So. Main St. No loss. 

Mar. 5th, 3:04 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of James 
Burns, 63 Franklin St. No loss. 

Mar. 9th, 9:10 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Jeremiah 
Smith, 25 Fayette St. No loss. 

Mar. nth, 6:20 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of H. H. 
Bean, 121 Rumford St. No loss. 

Mar. I2th, 7:02 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Mrs. 
E. R. Sanborn, 31 Fayette St. No loss. 

Mar. i6th, 3:39 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Rev. D. 
C. Babcock, corner Thompson and State Sts. No loss. 

Mar. 1 8th, 1 157 A. M. Fire in residence, 3 Wentworth Ave., 
owned by Joseph Wentworth and occupied by Geo. Reed. 
Caused by over-heated chimney. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $3,000.00 $60.00 $1,000.00 $60.00 

Mar. 20th, 7:05 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Mrs. J. 
B. Coleman, 2 Montgomery St. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Contents, $1,200.00 $15.00 $700.00 $15.00 

Mar. 29th, 8:08 A. M. Chimney fire in W. J. Chadbourne's 
photograph gallery, Exchange block. No loss. 

Mar. 31st, 8:53 A. M. Chimney fire in W. J. Chadbourne's 
photograph gallery, Exchange block. No loss. 

April 2nd, 5:12 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Miss 
Nora Cull, 5 Jefiferson St. No loss. 

April 6th, 8:56 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Wm. 
Yeaton, 66 1-2 No. State St. No loss. 

April 7th, 7:40 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Wm. R. 
Dudley, 65 Pleasant St. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 319 

April nth, 8:45 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Frank 
Magnam, 71 Downing St. No loss. 

April 13th, 11:45 ^- ^^- Chimney fire in residence of Wm. 
O'Connor, 171 Rumford St. No loss. 

April 13th, 1:15 P; M. Brush fire in rear of J- H. Dodge's 
grain store. Extinguished before arrival of firemen. 

April 13th, 2:10 P. M. Fire on roof of residence, 57 Pleasant 
St., owned by the Amos Wood estate. Caused by brand from 
burning Smart-Thompson property. Extinguished by detail 
from the fire department. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $3,500.00 $8.00 $2,500.00 $8.00 

April 14th, 10:42 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of A. V. 
Morrison, 20 Broadway. No loss. 

April 19th, 8:10 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of A. W. 
Bond, g Dakin St. No loss. 

April 19th, 1:15 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of J. A. 
Pillsbury, 34 Washington St. Extinguished by members of 
Alert Hose Co. No loss. 

April 19th, 2:49 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of E. D. 
Clark, Millville road. No loss. 

April 24th, 6:15 P. M. Fire in shed rear C. H. Martin's drug 
store. No loss. 

April 26th, 7:05 P. M. Fire on dumping ground Free Bridge 
road. Extinguished by detail from Kearsarge and Eagle Cos. 
200 feet hose wet. 

May i8th, 10:45 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Henry 
Ash, 29 Pierce St. No loss. 

May 20th, i :o5 P. M. Fire in pile of old sleepers in B. & M. 
R. R. yard near shoe factory. Extinguished by detail from 
Eagle, Kearsarge and Alert Cos. 200 feet hose wet. 

May 22nd, 1 1 :o5 A. M. Brush fire near Claremont railroad 
crossing. See alarm from box 9, same date. 

May 23rd, 10:15 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of John 
Maguire, 4 Downing St. No loss. 

May 23rd, 10 :5o P. M. Brush fire on Long Pond road. Ex- 
tinguished by detail from fire department. No loss. 



320 CITY OF CONCORD, 

May 25th, 9:26 A. M. Chimney fire in McShane's block, 
Warren St. Extinguished by Central station men. No loss. 

June 23rd, 10:37 A. M. Fire in residence, 194 No. State St., 
owned by Mrs. Clara Alclntire and occupied by Frank Plankey. 
Caused by explosion of kerosene lamp. Extinguished before 
the arrival of firemen. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $1,000.00 $12.00 $700.00 $12.00 

June 30th, 7:00 P. j\I. Fire in residence, 63 Perley St., owned 
by Patrick Haggerty and occupied by Geo. L. Conant and J. 
Callahan. Caused by child playing with Japanese lantern. 
Extinguished by owner before the arrival of firemen. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $2,000.00 $6.00 $1,800.00 $6.00 
Contents, i5-00 None. None. 

July 4th, 4:14 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of J. E. 
Thompson, 41 Warren St. Extinguished by Central station 
men. No loss. 

July 7th, 4:22 A. M. Fire in house, 210 No. Main St., known 
as the L^nion House. Unoccupied. Third fire in same build- 
ing. No loss. 

July loth, 7:30 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of R. Bishop, 
228 No. Main St. No loss. 

July 31st, II :47 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Thomas 
Downs, 25 Concord St. No loss. 

Aug. 3rd, 12:48 P. M. Chinmey fire in residence of Homer 
S'hippee, 12 Ford's Ave. No loss. 

Aug. 7th, 9:21 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of F. Palmer, 
rear 68 No. Main St. No loss. 

Aug. 28th, 9:45 P. M. Slight fire in basement of Y. M. C. A. 
building, corner Warren and State Sts. Extinguished by oc- 
cupants before the arrival of firemen. No loss. 

Sept. 3rd, 5:40 P. M. Chinmey fire in residence of John Ma- 
guire, 4 Downing St. Extinguished by members of Good Will 
Hose Co. No loss. 

Sept. 8th, 9 :5o A. M. Chimney fire in residence of C. F. Wel- 
come, 28 Warren St. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 321 

Sept. i8th, 2:46 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of F. W. 
Brown, 43 Laurel St. No loss. 

Sept. 19th, 1:42 P. M. Chimney fire in residence o-f Patrick 
Bray, 26 1-2 Warren St. No loss. 

Sept. 23rd, 3 :23 P.M. Fire in shed rear 23 Mills St. Owned 
by Victor Breton and used as a store house for shing^les. 
Caused by boys playing with matches. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $10.00 $10.00 None. None. 

Contents, 8.00 5.00 None. None. 

Sept. 27th, 5 :25 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of John H. 
Kelley, 1 1 Pierce St. No loss. 

Oct. 3rd, 3:35 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Wm. Mc- 
Farland, 196 No. Main St. No loss. 

Oct. 3rd, 6:50 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Edward 
Norton, 21 Concord St. Extinguished by members of Good 
Will Hose Co. No loss. 

Oct. nth, 6:46 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Geo. 
Smith, 17 Morton St. No loss. 

Oct. 14th, 3:40 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of O. R. 
Farrar, 87 No. Spring St. Extinguished by members of Alert 
Hose Co. No loss. 

Oct. 19th, 3:58 P. M. Fire on dumping ground. Free Bridge 
road, near H. O. Marsh & Co.'s coal shed. Extinguished by 
detail from the fire department. 250 feet hose wet. 

Oct. 22nd, 9:15 A. M. Slight fire in residence, 56 Centre St., 
owned by C. C. Webster and occupied by William S. West. 
Cause, over-heated furnace. Extinguished by owner before 
the arrival of firemen. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $3,000.00 $12.00 $2,000.00 $12.00 

Oct. 25th, 4:45 A. M. Slight fire in rubbish rear Dow's 
block. Free Bridge road. No loss. 

Nov. 6th, 6:30 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of E. L. Pea- 
cock, 67 So. State St. Extinguished by members of Good Will 
Hose Co. No loss. 
22 



322 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Nov. 7th, 9:00 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Cornelius 
Dougherty, 9 Freight St. No loss. 

Nov. 19th, 11:22 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of James 
Benson, 4 Perley St. No loss. 

Nov. 19th, 9:15 P. M. Slight fire in residence, 112 No. State 
St., owned by J. C. French and occupied by P. A. Murphy. 
Cai:sed by over-heated chimney. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $2,500.00 $25.00 $2,000.00 $25.00 

Contents, 750.00 18.00 500.00 12.00 

Nov. 22nd, 10:24 A. M. Chimney fire in grocery store, 163 
No. State St., occupied by E. Isabel. No loss. 

Nov. 23rd, 7:45 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of Mrs. 
Lydia A. Abbott, 8 Chapel St. Extinguished by members of 
Alert Hose Co. No loss. 

Nov. 26th, 4:35 A. M. Fire discovered breaking out anew 
in residence, 34 So. State St., after dismissal of department. 
See alarm from box 42 same date. Alarm given by detail left 
to watch. Chemical engine and Kearsarge wagon sent. 250 
feet hose wet. No loss. 

Dec. 1st, 10:45 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of A. W. 
Thompson, 114 So. State St. No loss. 

Dec. 1st, 7:30 P. M. Chimney fire in residence of A. W. 
Thompson, 114 So. State St. No loss. 

Dec. 7th, 10:24 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of Dr. F. W. 
Grafton, 41 Green St. No loss. 

Dec. nth, 9:50 A. M. Slight fire in closet in drug store, 81 
No. Main St., occupied by Underbill & Kittredge. Building 
owned by the Hill Associates. Cause, unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $45,000.00 $25.00 $25,000.00 $25.00 
Contents, 95-00 9500 

Dec. 24th, 10:35 A.. M. Chimney fire in residence of Mary C. 
Caswell, 121 Warren St. 

Dec. 29th, 7:28 P. M. Chimney fire in Merchant's block, No. 
Main St., owned by Geo. D. B. Prescott and occupied on first 
floor by owner and H. C. Bailey. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 323 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $9,000.00 $5.00 $5,000.00 $5.00 

Contents, 5,000.00 6.50 3,500.00 6.50 

Dec. 31st, 5.44 P. M. Chimney fire in Lee's block, Chandler 
St. No loss. 

All of the above not otherwise credited were extinguished by 
Chemical Co. 

PENACOOK. 

Jan. 19th. Chimney fire in residence of Isaac J. Tetreault, 
Main St. No loss. 

Feb. 9th, 3 40 A. M. Fire in store house owned and occupied 
by C. M. & A. W. Rolfe near Penacook R. R. station. Two 
freight cars owned by B. & M. R. R. also damaged. Cause, 
stove in one of the cars. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $400.00 $400.00 $250.00 $250.00 

Contents, 2,388.97 2,388.97 750.00 750.00 

Cars, 199.00 Blanket 199.00 

April 9th, 7:45 P. M. Fire in block. Main St., owned by A. 

C. Alexander and occupied by Isaac Baty, merchant. Caused 
by fall of kerosene lamp. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $10,000.00 None. $6,500.00 None. 

Contents, 7,000.00 $20.00 3,500.00 $20.00 

April 19th, 9:35 A. M. Fire on roof of residence occupied by 
W. A. Bean, Centre St. Caused by sparks from chimney. No 
loss. 

June I2th, 8:20 P. M. Fire in residence, corner of Spring 
and Centre Sts., owned by Rev. J. W. Bean and occupied by 
Herman Frost, Mrs. Moses Bean and James H. Moody. Cause 
kerosene stove in shed. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. pd. 


Building, $2,500.00 
Contents : 


$525.00 


$1,600.00 


$525.00 


Rev. J. W. Bean, 50.00 


50.00 


None. 


None. 


H. Frost, 500.00 


100.00 


None. 


None. 



324 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Mrs. Moses Bean, 450.00 50.00 None. None. 

J. H. Moody, 200.00 50.00 None. None. 

June 28th. Fire on roof of Chadvvick's block, Main St., 
owned by John Chadwick and occupied by J. F. Hastings, M. 
S. Peaslee and F. E. Bean. Caused by sparks from chimney. 
Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $4,000.00 $5.00 $2,000.00 $5.00 

Contents, 6,000.00 None. 1,100.00 None. 

Oct. 6th. Chimney fire in residence of John D. Fife at the 
Borough. No loss. 

Oct. 9th. Brush fire near Willow Hollow. No loss. 

Oct. 9th. Fire in store house owned by the Penacook Gun 
Club. Caused by boys playing with matches. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $15.00 $15.00 None. $15.00* 

(*) Paid by boys' parents. 

Oct. loth. Brush fire near Willow Hollow. No loss. 

Oct. II. Chimney fire in residence of Mary Jones, Cross St. 
No loss. 

Oct. 15th. Fire in residence on Merrimack St., owned by the 
Bean and Warren heirs and occupied by Felix Guyette and 
David La Duke. Cause unknown. 

Building, 
Contents : 
F. Guyette. 
D. La Duke, 

Dec. 2nd. Fire in residence of John H. Taylor, Charles St. 
Caused by over-heated chimney. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $2,000.00 $34-44 $1,550.00 $34-44 

WEST CONCORD. 

]Mar. 7th, 7:55 A. M. Fire in residence, Alain street, owned 
by Concord Manufacturing Co. and occupied by James Wil- 
liams. Cause unknown. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. pd. 


$1,500.00 


$125.00 


$800.00 


$125.00 


75.00 


75.00 


None. 


None. 


75.00 


None. 


None. 


None. 



FIRK DEPARTMENT. 325 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. 

Building, $2,000.00 $20.00 $2,000.00 $20.00 

Contents, 500.00 75-00 500.00 75-00 

May 22nd, 1 1 :20 A. M. Brush fire near Claremont crossing. 

See alarm from box 9, same date. 

EAST CONCORD. 

April 22nd, 4:00 P. M. Brush fire on land owned by O. W. 
Coon. 

April 22nd, 9:30 P. M. Brush fire on land owned by O. W. 
Coon. 

April 29th, 6:30 I*. M. Brush fire on land owned by J. T. 
Batchelder. 

May 9th, 8:00 P. j\i. Brush fire on land owned by J. T. 
Batchelder. 

Oct. nth, 8:00 P. M. Brush fire on land owned by E. C. 
Eastman. 

Oct. i8th, 4:00 P. M. Brush fire on land owned by John 
Potter. 

SUMMARY. 

Buildings. value. Loss. Ins. Ins. pd. Net loss. 

Precinct $120,460.00 §6,534.30 $74,400.00 $5,591.80 $942.50 

Penacook 20,415.00 1,303.44 12,700.00 1,153.44 150.00 

W.Concord 2,000.00 20.00 2,000.00 20.00 

Total $142,875.00 $7,857.74 $89,100.00 $6,765.24 $1,092.50 

Contents: 

Precinct $32,890.50 $3,482.00 $18,205.70 $1,656.22 $1,825.78 

Penacook 16,738.97 2,733.97 5,350.00 770.00 1,963.97 

W.Concord 500.00 75.00 500.00 75.00 

Total $50,129.47 $6,290.97 $24,055.70 $2,501.22 $3,789.75 

Buildings $142,875.00 $7,857.74 $89,100.00 $6,765.24 $1,092.50 

Total buildings and con- 
tents $193,004.47 $14,148.71 $113,155.70 $9,266.46 $4,882.25 

These figures are taken from the blanks returned by those 
who have suffered loss by fire, and, small as the net loss appar- 
ently is, it is far larger than the facts warrant. In justice to the 
insurance companies and the fire department, hereafter, no net 
loss will be recognized in cases where the amount of insurance 
carried is sufficient to cover the loss, unless notice is given at the 
time of adjustment that said adjustment is unsatisfactory. 



326 CITY OF CONCORD. 

APPARATUS AND FORCE. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows: 

Precinct, located at the Central fire station, one first-class 
Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," with modern hose wagon, attached 
to Eagle Steam Fire Engine company (13 men); one second- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Kearsarge," and modern hose wagon, 
attached to the Kearsarge Steam Fire Engine company (13 
men); one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Governor Hill," re- 
lief steamer, in charge of an engineer and fireman ; one double 
60-gallon Holloway chemical engine in charge of two permanent 
men; one ladder truck, "City of Concord," attached to hook and 
ladder company (21 men). There are ten horses owned by the 
city kept at this station. The precinct companies have swing 
harnesses upon all apparatus except steamers. There are six 
permanent men located at the Central station and one perma- 
nent man at each hose house within the precinct. 

The Alert Hose company (iimen), located on Washington 
street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent man and 
horse. 

The Good Will Hose company (iimen), located on the cor- 
ner of Concord and South State streets, has a modern hose 
wagon with permanent man and horse. 

Veterans' AuxiHar^- company (29 men). 

The "Pioneer" steamer, at Penacook (28 men), is a fourth- 
class Silsby, with hose wagon. 

The Cataract company (30 men), at West Concord, bas a 
Hunneman 6-inch cylinder hand-engine, and a second-class 4- 
wheel reel, Amoskeag make, drawn by one horse, and provided 
with swing harness. 

Old Fort company, at East Concord (30 men), has a 4 1-2- 
inch cylinder Hunneman hand-engine. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 327 

HOSE. 
Fabric : 

Precinct 8,450 feet. 

Penacook 2,200 " 

West Concord 750 



11,400 feet. 
Leather: 
East Concord 450 feet. 

PUBLIC RESERVOIRS. 

Capacity, 
cubic feet. 

1. Main street, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s 1,000 

2. Main street, middle front state house yard 1,500 

3. Main street, rear city hall 2,000 

4. State street, corner of Washington street * 2,000 

5. Rumford street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's 1,000 

6. Orchard street, corner of Pine street * 4,000 

7. School street, corner of Summit street '-^ 3»500 

* Brick, cemented. 

While the number of alarms has exceeded all previous records 
it has been the city's good fortune to enjoy comparative im- 
munity from fire loss. 

The apparatus is in good condition. The supply wagon has 
been retouched and varnished. 

Steamer Gov. Hill has been thoroughly repaired. 

Steamer Pioneer has been painted and varnished. 

This was done by B. J. Cate, permanent driver, and is a very 
creditable piece of work. 

The apparatus rooms at the Central Fire Station have been 
painted. A new set of flues has been placed in the stationary 
boiler at the Central Fire Station, and the chimney rebuilt from 
the roof to top. 

Two horses, five dozen aluminum fire hats and a chief's wagon 
have been purchased. 

All of the hose purchased prior to the year 1893 '"^^s been test- 
ed and eleven hundred feet have been relined. Sixteen hundred 
feet are being re-lined at present. 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The fire alarm telegraph system is in good condition. The 
storage battery is doing, in an excellent manner, all that is re- 
quired of it. 

Four fire alarm boxes and three direct action tappers have 
been added to the system and the main line has been extended 
about one mile. 

There are still large areas unprotected by fire alarm boxes and . 
I respectfully recommend that three boxes, at least, be added to 
the system during the coming year. 

In the interest of economy and safety new heating apparatus 
should be placed in the Good Will Hose house and the Old Fort 
Engine house, the former consuming fuel at a ratio dispropor- 
tionate with results obtained, and the latter being not only un- 
satisfactory but unsafe. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 
Chief Engineer, 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



329 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



ISO 



Permanent; Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, Office, Central fire station. 

.A.ssis1:a<n^1: Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 



John J. McNuLTT,lst Asst., Machinist, 
William E. Dow, 2d " Painter, 



7 Railroad square. 
13 Academy St. 



Abial W. Rolfe, 



John E. Frye, 



Geo. W. Kemp, 



John J. McNulty, Clerk of Board 

WARD 1. 
Manufacturer, 

WARD 2. 
Earmer, 

WARD 3. 
Overseer, 



Penacook St., Penacook. 



Penacook St., East Concord. 



Main St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE " 



STEAM FIRE ENGINE 
PANY No. 2. 



AND HOSE COM- 



OFFICERS. 

Sylvester T. Ford, Captain. A. H. Britton, LietU. and Clerk- 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 







MEMBERS. 




tadge 

Nos. 


Names . 


Occupations. 


Uesidences. 


11 


Sylvester T. Ford, 


Moulder, 


41 South Main si 


12 


A. H. Britton, 


Hardware dealer, 


12 Thompson st. 


13 


Charles 11. Swain, 


Carpenter, 


18 Holt St. 


15 


James H. Sanders, 


Carriage painter, 


45 Perley st. 


16 


Frank E. Heath, 


Snlesman, 


38 Perley st. 


18 


Charles H. Hurgum, 


Carpenter, 


5 Laurel st. 


84 


Tlioinas J. Morrison, 


Carriage painter, 


32 Downing st. 


19 


Charles Powell, 


Teamster, 


62 Rumford st. 


85 


Earle Bodwell, 


Carpenter, 


29 Warren st. 


20 


Elba F. Home, 


Carpenter, 


10 Liberty st. 


22 


Geo. B. Davis, 


Carriage painter, 


28 North Main si 


21 


J. E. Morrison, 


Janitor, 


8 Thorndike st. 


"14 


B. J. Cate, 


Permanent driver. 


Central station. 


87 


F. J. Young, 


Permanent driver. 


Central station. 



330 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE EN(iINE AND HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 



OFFICERS. 



W. J. Coffin, Captain. 



J. C. McGiLVRAY, Lietit. and Clei-k. 



MEMBERS. 



Badge 


Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


24 


Walter J. Coffin, 


Shipping-clerk, 


5 Rumford st. 


25 


John C. McGilvray, 


Jig-sawyer, 


26 Maple st. 


35 


L. W. Tozier, 


Barber, 


3 Prince st. 


30 


Thomas D. (iannon, 


Machinist, 


16| downing St. 


88 


Charles H Sanders, 


Machinist, 


112 Pleasant st. 


31 


John H. Spellmaii, 


Blacksmith, 


33 Concord st. 


36 


Orrin C. UoJgdon, 


Stationary engineer. 


31 Beacon st. 


32 


David J. Adams, 


Janitor, 


White's opera house 


34 


William W. Brown, 


Photographer, 


23i Pine st. 


38 


William A. Sewall, 


Expressman, 


90 Warren st. 


27 


Geo. H. Downing, 


Electrician, 


12 South St. 


29 


Oacar Pelkey, 


Harness-maker, 


12 Lyndon st. 


89 


William J. Bailey, 


Permanent driver. 


Central station. 



Badge 

Nos. 
17 
23 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, No. 4. 

RELIEF ENGINE. 

Names. Occupations. Residences. 

Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 78 South State st. 

Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 16 North Spring st. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 



Feed W. Scott, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

Geo. L. Osgood, Lieut, and Clerk; 
Geo. L. Osgood, Treasurer. 







MEMBERS. 




Badge 








Nos. 


Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


37 


Fred W. Scott, 


Builder, 


43 Lyndon st. 


38 


George L. Osgood, 


Book-keeper, 


45 Green st. 


39 


James Jepson, 


Carpenter, 


51 Franklin st. 


40 


James Crowley, 


Barber, 


115 Warren st. 


41 


J. H. Seavey, 


Stone-cutter, 


Alert Hose house. 


42 


C. H. Rowell, 


Carpenter, 


23 Concord st. 


43 


L. B. Putney, 


Carpenter, 


3 Abbott St. 


44 


Joseph Brunell, 


Blacksmith, 


60^ Washington st 


45 


C. J. French, 


Stone-cutter, 


5 Pel kins st. 


46 


Charles C. Chesley, 


Carpenter, 


11 Prince st. 


48 


Ira W. Sanborn, 


Permanent driver, 


Alert Hose house. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



331 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 

OFFICERS. 



John C. Mills, Captain. 



Hiram T. Dickerman, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Charles C. Ndtter, Treasurer. 
MEMBERS. 



Badge 
Nos. 


Names. 


Occujmtions. 


Residences. 


50 


John C. Mills, 


Blacksmith, 


34 Downing st. 


51 


Hiram T. Dickerman, 


Painter, 


18 Hall St. 


54 


George H. Sawyer, 


Blacksmith, 


45 South Main st. 


.55 


Charles C. Nutter, 


Painter, 


39 Laurel st. 


52 


Jolin E. Gove, 


Wood- worker. 


69 North State st. 


53 


Charles A. Richards, 


Wood-worker, 


45 South State st. 


57 


Jasper R. Mudgett, 


Wood- worker, 


98 South State st. 


60 


Frank S. Putnam, 


Packer, 


96 South State st. 


56 


H. H. Ash, 


Machinist, 


26 Pierce st. 


61 


E D. Clark, 


Spring-maker, 


8 Mills St. 


58 


Oscar H. Thomas, 


Permanent driver. 


Good Will Hose house. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1. 



Badge 

Nos. 


Names. 


91 


M. S. Wakefield, 


92 


J. A. Mills, 



Occiipations. 
Permanent engineer and driver, 
Permanent assistant engineer. 



Residences. 
Central station. 
Central station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 



Ed. E. Lane, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Badge 

Nos. 


Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


63 


Will A. King, 


Machinist, 


.38 Franklin st. 


64 


Edward E. Lane, 


Carriage-builder, 


5 Fremont st. 


65 


Benjamin Ouillette, 


Carpenter, 


10 Jefferson st. 


66 


Henry V. Tittemore, 


Teamster, 


6 Avon St. 


67 


John A. Sargent, 


Carpenter, 


6 Fremont st. 


68 


Daniel B. Dow, 


Teamster, 


54 Church st. 


69 


John M. Davis, 


Blacksmith, 


65 Pleasant st. 


70 


Will F. King, 


Builder, 


38 Tremont st. 


71 


Frank T. Bean, 


Carriage-builder, 


11 Elm St. 


72 


Lucius D. Caldon, 


Carriage-builder, 


13 West St. 


73 


George W. G rover. 


Carriage-builder, 


29Thorndikest. 


74 


Fred A. Dodge, 


Hackman, 


35 Fayette st. 


75 


J. L. Liberty, 


Carpenter, 


7 Harvard st. 


76 


Stephen P. Foster, 


Carriage builder, 


47 Perley st. 


77 


Harris Goodwin, 


Carpenter, 


5 North Spring st. 


78 


Milton S. Lull, 


Carpenter, 


5 Allison 9t. 


79 


John P. Kelley, 


Machinist, 


11 Pierce st. 


80 


S B. Morgan, 


Carriage builder, 


10 Avon St. 


- 81 


Daniel Crowley, 


Coachman, 


1 Hill's avenue. 


82 


B. W. Hall, 


Carpenter, 


78 South St. 


96 


Amos P. Turner, 


Permanent driver, 


Central station. 



332 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 

Penacook. 



OFFICERS. 



John H. Rolfe, Captain. 

Eddib C. Dukgin, Lieut, and Cleric. 

John B. Dodge, Treasurer. 



Henry Rolpe, Foreman of Hose. 
Walter H. Kolfe, Engineer. 
Leslie H. Ckowtheb, Steward. 



Names. 
John H. Rolfe, 
Eddie C. Durgin, 
John B. Dodge, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Walter H. Rolfe, 
George H. Sager, 
Enoch E. Rolfe, 
Leslie H. Crowther, 
William C. Ackerman, 
David S. Marsh, 
Samuel G. Sanborn, 
Edwin B. Prescott, 
George H. Tucker, 
Harper S. Allen, 
Frederic C. Ferrin, 
Lester W. Prescott, 
Ruel G. Morrill. 
Peter A. Keenan, 
Daniel Smith, 
Fred M. Dodge, 
Lawrin W. Rolfe, 
William Taylor, 
Clarence A. Davis, 
Harry G. Rolte, 
Albert E, Huff, 
Fred H. Morrill, 
John W. McNeil, 



MEMBERS. 



Occupations. 
Foreman of t^aw-mill, 
Carpenter, 
Asst postmaster. 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Plumber, 
Machinist, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Blacksmith, 
Butcher, 
Blacksmith, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Saw-maker, 
Farmer, 
Cabinet-maker, 
Butcher, 
Glazier, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Book-keeper, 
Baker, 
Sash-maker, 
Shipping clerk, 



Residences. 
Summer st. 
Main st. 
Merrimack st. 
Penacook st. 
Merrimack st. 
High St. 
Church St. 
Summer st. 
Washington st. 
Centre st. 
Union st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Merrimack st. 
High St. 
Main st. 
Washington st. 
High St. 
Summer st. 
Merrimack st. 
Summer st. 
Main st. 
Charles st. 
Penacook st. 
Washington st. 
High St. 
Union st. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



333 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 
East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



Elbridgk Emery, Captain. 

Geo. O. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



John C. Hdtchins, Treasurer. 
Charles P. White, Steward. 



Names. 
Elbridge Emery. 
George O. Robinson, 
John O. Hutching, 
Cyrus E. Robinson, 
Joseph E. Plumer, 
Shad. Gate. 
Daniel B. Sanborn, 
William L. Bachelder, 
William H. Smith, 
James L. Potter, 
Samuel G . Potter, 
Ross \\. Gate, 
Charles P. White, 
William E. Virgin, 
Arthur Swain, 
Chase Boynton, 
Daniel Pettingill, 
Albert H. C. Knowles, Jr., 
George (late, 
Reuben Gate, 
Jefferson Durgin, 
John Spaulding, 
Elvin Culver, 
Louis E. Radford, 
Fred S. Farnum, 
Arthur H. Tenney, 
John Gate, 
Bert Knowles, 
Edward Atwood, 
Wm. A. Cowley, 



MEMBERS. 

Occiipatimis. 
Butcher, 
Salesman, 
Entrineer, 
Clerk, 
Painter, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Carpenter, 
Moulder, 
Belt maker, 
Farmer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Carpenter, 
Milk-dealer, 
Moulder, 
Shoemaker, 
Painter, 
Carpenter, 
Milk-dealer, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Butcher, 
Merchant, 



Residences. 
Potter St. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Pembroke st. 
Shaker st. 
Potter St. 
Shaker st. 
Potter St. 
Appleton st. 
Shawmut st. 
Pembroke st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Mill St. 
Shawmut st. 
East Clinton st. 
Portsmouth st. 
Portsmouth st. 
Penacook st. 
Potter St. 
Mills St. 
Shawmut st. 
Potter St. 
Penacook st. 



334 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

West Concord. 

9 

OFFICERS. 
Jeremiah Cotter, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 

Hiram E. Quimby, Lieut, and Clerk. Patrick Conway, Steward. 

Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



Names. 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Patrick Conway, 
Patrick Ryan, 
James E. Fannon, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Thomas P. Hearn, 
Natlian Martin, 
James W. Welsh, 
Fred W. Peal)Ody, 
John Caldbeck, 
James W. Powers, 
Lawrence E. Hearn, 
John P. Benson, 
William N. Harrington, 
Lemuel O. Peabody, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Theodore Wilmot, 
Edward Lovering, 
James Abbott, 
John P. Harrington, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Engineer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Engineer, 
Mill operative, 
Expressman, 
Steam driller, 
Mill operative, 
Stone-cutter, 
Mill operative, 
Quarryman, 
Mill operative. 
Stone contractor, 
Stone-cutter, 
Mill operative, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 



Residences. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Hutching st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main et. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Lake st. 
Hutchins st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Hutchins st. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 

OFFICERS. 

D. B. Newhall, Captain. 

J. J. MoNtTLTY, J«« ijewt. Fred Leigh row, 2(i itew^. 

Fred Leighton, Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 
D. B. Newhall, 
J. J. McNulty, 
Fred Leighton, 
John M. Hill, 
James A. Johnson, 
Henry M. Gibney, 
Ira C. Evans, 
James A. Ward, 
William Badger, 
J. Ed. Morrison, 
Benjamin Bilsborougb, 
William M. Lever, 
David J. Rolfe, 
Henry Tucker. 
Charles C. Hill, 
Charles C. Moore, 



Names. 
Oliver Thompson, 
John Ahern, 
Frank E. Warren, 
James G. Leighton, 
Sydney S. Upham, 
Lewis C. Carter, 
George A. Mitchell, 
William F Carr, 
Will C. Wingate, 
Fred U. Lane, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Frank H. Silver, 
George A. Ordway, 
Thomas P. Sanborn. 



Report of the History Commission. 



The history commission is able to report gratifying progress 
the past year in both the preparation of the material for the 
city history and in the securing of subscriptions therefor. It is 
the expectation of the commission that the history will be com- 
pleted and in the hands of the printer before the close of the 
present year. There have been no more delays and disap- 
pointments in this work than are usual in undertakings of this 
kind. The commission has pursued the plan marked out by it 
in the beginning, and conducted the enterprise upon a business 
basis, believing that the work, undertaken under the auspices 
of the city government, could be made to pay for itself. In this 
plan they have received the cordial cooperation of our citizens 
in many ways. The members of the history commission and 
of the present city government headed the subscription lists, 
and several of those who were invited to assist in the prepara- 
tion of material have contributed their articles without expense 
to the city. The subscriptions have already exceeded the 
amount advanced by the city government, and there is now 
every reason to believe that whatever is advanced by the city 
to pay for the preparation and publication of the history will 
be returned to it immediately after the history is put on sale. 

JAMES O. LYFORD, 

Sec?-etaj'y. 
23 



The Auditor's Report. 



The ordinance creating the ofifice of auditor and defining his 
duties has been in force nearly two years, and a brief review of 
the work accomplished under it may not be amiss at this time. 
The retirement of the present occupant of the position at an 
early day permits him to speak with entire freedom of the 
duties of the office and of the system of conducting the city busi- 
ness, which has been the outgrowth of this ordinance. At the 
time the ordinance was passed, nearly all of the departments 
drew their appropriations in bulk and made their disburse- 
ments directly to their employe's, paying all bills or expenses 
incurred, and, at the end of the year, returning their vouchers 
to the city clerk. An annual examination was made of the 
accounts of the city treasurer and city clerk, but, until after the 
auditor ordinance, no general examination was made of the 
several departments. With the exception of the tax collector 
for the years 1891 to 1895, there is no reason to believe from 
subsequent examinations made that these departments were 
conducted otherwise than honestly and with due regard to the 
interests of the city. In changing the system from that of 
several treasurers to one, and requiring all disbursements to be 
made directly by the city treasurer upon orders of the city 
clerk, the auditor has met with the cooperation of every de- 
partment, and so satisfactorily has the system worked that not 
one of these departments would return to the old methods 
of paying the bills of the city. 

In accordance with the spirit of the auditor ordinance, there 
has been a radical change in the method of making appropria- 
tions for the several departments. Until 1897, these appropri- 
ations were made in lump sums for each department, without 
specifying how the money should be used. Each department 



auditor's report. 337 

was the sole judge of its purchases within the scope of its ap- 
propriation. The estimates made by them at the beginning of 
the year were general in their character, indicating little more 
than the gross sum that would be needed for the department 
during the fiscal year. A system of transfers prevailed by 
which, at the close of the year, the unexpended balances of one 
department could be used for another that had exceeded its ap- 
propriation. If the department kept within its appropriation, 
it was assumed that it had done well. The public, who knew 
nothing of the details, judged the several departments by the 
gross sums that were appropriated for their service. When it 
was first proposed to itemize the appropriation bills, it was 
urged by some of the departments that it would be difficult to 
estimate for. the entire year; but the record of the year shows 
that these estimates were made with an intelligent knowledge 
of the needs of the departments, for in very few instances did it 
become necessary, at the close of the year, to modify the appro- 
priations made at the beginning. There is another advantage 
to this method of making appropriations which is appreciated 
by all of the departments, and that is that the public thoroughly 
understands at the beginning of the year how it is proposed to 
expend the appropriations ; and that, while the aggregate in 
some instances may seem large, the departments are relieved of 
criticism when a scrutiny of the specific items shows that there 
is neither extravagance nor wastefulness. 

The method of keeping the accounts of the city has been 
made to correspond with this detailed system of appropriating 
the money, so that the books of the auditor show at any time 
the exact standing of each individual item of the appropriation 
bill. Each department has been furnished with a book that 
corresponds in form to that kept by the auditor, thus enabling 
it to have as complete knowledge as the auditor of the expendi- 
tures made under each item. 

Before the passage of the auditor ordinance, some of the de- 
partments were in receipt of funds popularly known as the 
" earnings " of those departments, which, though deposited in 
the treasury, were expended by them in connection with their 
appropriations. These funds are now no longer deposited to 



338 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the credit of these departments, but follow the course of other 
receipts of the city, and can only be used upon vote of the city 
government. The cost of each department is therefore entirely 
shown in the appropriations made therefor. 

The auditor being a salaried official, his services have been 
very properly called in requisition by the city government and 
its committees for work that was formerly done by these com- 
mittees. The members of the city government receive no pay 
for their services as such, and only a nominal compensation for 
committee work. Being for the most part busy men, they have 
felt that more time could be given and fuller investigations 
made by the auditor than if the work were peformed by them- 
selves. The principal work of the auditor in examining the 
accounts of the departments is necessarily in the tax collector's 
office. Here a new system of receipts has been instituted, with 
the approval of the city government and of the board of asses- 
sors. In brief, it comprises receipt books for each ward, in -the 
form of a check book, which are prepared by the auditor from 
the list book as submitted by the assessors. The stub contains 
the same information as the receipt, and the latter bears on the 
back thereof the official certification of the auditor. Before 
this method was introduced, no satisfactory examination of . the 
tax collector's books could be made until near the close of the 
year, except by making inquiries of all tax payers whose taxes 
appeared unpaid. This was not feasible until near the close of 
the fiscal year, because the greater number of the tax payers do 
not pay their taxes until after the time of discount has expired. 
The present system would be more perfect in its accountability 
if some change could be made in the method of collecting poll 
taxes. At present, the tax collector practically waits upon the 
convenience of the tax payer who pays simply a poll tax, and the 
small fee of twenty cents which he is authorized to collect of 
delinquents who do not pay by the first of September, is un- 
doubtedly the hardest earned of his compensation. It is prob- 
ably not feasible to make a change this year, but another year 
it may well be the subject of consideration. 

When the office of auditor was created, there was but a vague 
impression in regard to its duties. An examination, however, 



AUDITOR ORDINANCE. 339 

of the auditor ordinance, which is republished in this report, 
will, with this resume of what has been accomplished, give a 
pretty clear idea of the importance of the office and the time 
taken in the discharge of its duties. It is a position second to 
none in the city government, and it calls for the exercise of 
judgment and tact as well as a thorough knowledge of city 
affairs. The mere examination of bills and accounts as they 
are presented is but a small part of its labor, and it is an office 
that can be made valuable or valueless to the city accord- 
ing to the character of its occupant. The legislature of the 
state, several years ago, authorized cities to create the office, 
and, in the cities of this state and other states where such an 
officer has been employed, the conviction prevails that his 
salary is an economical expenditure of money in the results 
attained. Naturally, changes made by the auditor in the sys- 
tem of doing business in a municipality would be more marked 
the first year or two after the creation of the office ; yet any new 
incumbent of the position here should enter upon his duties 
with the expectation that still further improvements can be 
made, which will suggest themselves to him as he familiarizes 
himself with the work and which will meet the approval of the 
city government when they are thoroughly understood. 

In leaving the office, the present incumbent desires to ex- 
press his deep obligations to the mayor, the members of the 
city council, and the heads of all departments, for the kindly 
manner in which they have received his suggestions of changes- 
and for the cordial cooperation with which they have aided him 
in the discharge of his duties. 

JAMES O. LYFORD, 

City Auditor . 



Auditor Ordinance. 



CITY OF CONCOED. 

I7i the year of oxw Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and 

Ninety-Six. 

An Okdinance Establishing the Office of City Auditok, De- 
fining His Duties, Providing for His Appointment and Pay, 
AND Aiiso IN Amendment of Chapters 4 and 37 of the Re- 
vised Ordinances relating to Finances and Accountability 
in Expenditures and the Salary of the City Clerk, and 
Chapter 33 of said Eevised Ordinances relating to Print- 
ing OF the City Reports. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be aijpointed at the commencement of 
each municipal term a joint standing committee on accounts and 
claims, to consist of two members of the board of aldermen and 
two members of the common council. There shall also be ap- 
pointed by the mayor, with the approval of the board of alder- 
men, at the commencement of each municipal term, an auditor, 
who shall continue in office during said term and until his suc- 
cessor is appointed and qualified. 

He shall give bond satisfactory to the board of mayor and 
aldermen in the sum of two thousand dollars (."$2,000) for the 
faithful performance of his duties. 

In case of any vacancy by death, resignation, removal, or in- 
ability to perform his duties, a successor shall be apiioiuted to 
fill out the unexpired term. 

He shall receive in full for his services the sum of one thou- 
sand dollars -pev annum, jjayable monthly. 

He shall occupy an office in the city building, and have the 
use of a safe belonging to the city. 

Sec. 2. All accounts and claims against the city shall be laid 



AUDITOR ORDIlSrANCE. 341 

before said auditor, who shall carefully examine the same and 
see that they are correctly cast, and present the same, folded, 
filed, and numbered, with his approval endorsed thereon, to the 
committee on accounts and claims. No account or claim, except 
judgments of judicial courts, shall be received or acted upon by 
said auditor, or said committee, unless such account or claim 
shall be accompanied with the approval of the officer, committee, 
or agent authorized in behalf of the city to make the contract, 
or cause the expenditures to be made. In case there are bills or 
accounts which said auditor shall not approve, he shall present 
them to said committee on accounts and claims, with his reasons 
for refusing to approve the same The committee shall then 
consider them, and allow or reject them as they shall see fit. 

Said committee shall meet once, at least, in each month, and 
carefully examine and audit all accounts and claims so approved 
and laid before them, and shall allow and pass the same if found 
to be correct and justly due, and make report thereof to the city 
council. 

All claims which are not otherwise provided for shall be re- 
ferred to said committee, and their decision shall be laid before 
the city council for action. 

The auditor shall keep a book in such manner and form as the 
said committee shall direct, wherein he shall enter the date and 
amount of every account and claim against the city as finally 
corrected and allowed by said committee; and also the name of 
the person to whom the same has been allowed, designating the 
fund or appropriation from which the same shall be paid. He 
shall be under the general control and supervision of the com- 
mittee on finance and the committee on accounts ajid claims, in 
regard to the due and proper discharge of all his duties, and 
shall act as clerk of said committees and keep a proper record of 
their proceedings. 

Sec. 3. The auditor, under the direction of the committee on 
finance, shall keep a book or ledger, in which he shall enter the 
various appropriations made by the city council, each under its 
appropriate head, and charge to each the different jDayments and 
expenditures which from time to time shall be made therefrom. 

Whenever any appropriation has been expended, he shall im- 
mediately give notice thereof to the mayor, the city council, and 
to said committee on accounts and claims, and neither the audi- 
tor nor the committee shall pass or allow any claim or account 



342 CITY OF CONCORD. 

chargeable to such appropriation until tlie city council shall 
have i^rovided the means of paying the same. The auditor shall 
also open an account with the city treasurer, charging him with 
the amount of loans to the city and all sums of money paid to 
him on behalf of the city; and also with all bonds, notes, mort- 
gages, or other securities in the hands of the treasurer, or Avhich 
may pass into his hands, belonging to the city, to the end that 
the amount and value thereof may, at any time, be seen on his 
books. 

Sec. 4. No money shall be drawn out of the city treasury, ex- 
cept upon the written order of the mayor, addressed to the treas- 
urer and countersigned by the city clerk, and numbered so as to 
correspond with the account or claim it shall be drawn to pay; 
and no account or claim against the city, arising from any con- 
tract or agreement for labor or for the purchase or sale of any 
materials, goods, wares, or merchandise in which any mem- 
ber of the city council, or any officer or agent appointed by 
the city council, or either branch thereof, has been directly or 
indirectly interested in a private capacity, shall be approved 
by the auditor or said committee, nor shall any order therefor 
be drawn upon the city treasurer, unless such contract or agree- 
ment shall have been authorized or ratified by the city council; 
but such restrictions shall not be construed to prevent the pur- 
chase of ordinary supplies from members of the city council who 
may be engaged in trade, nor the employment of the members 
of the council in their ordinary vocations, by duly authorized 
heads of dejjartments. 

Sec. 5. In all bills against the city, which shall be presented 
for payment,, each item shall be specifically set forth; and no 
claim for medical services shall be allowed, unless such services 
were authorized by one or more of the overseers of the poor; 
and no claim shall be allowed and paid, unless approved by the 
city council. The mayor is hereby authorized to draw orders, 
countersigned by the city clerk, on the treasurer for the pay- 
ment of all accounts and claims allowed, as provided in this 
chapter; but he shall not draw an order in payment for any ser- 
vices rendered or any materials furnished for any department 
beyond the sum specifically appropriated therefor by the city 
council. 

Sec. 6. Any sum of money which shall have been specifically 
appropriated for the payment of principal or interest due on any 



AUDITOR ORDIKAKCE. 343 

uote or otlier security of the city, or for state or county taxes, 
may be drawn from the treasury, and paid by the order of the 
mayor, countersigned by the city clerk, for the purpose for 
which it was approjjriated, without any action on the part of 
the committee on accounts and claims; and whenever it shall be 
necessary to pay money in advance on contracts made, or for 
work begun but not completed, the mayor, upon being satisfied 
of such necessity, may draw his order, countersigned by the city 
clerk, on the treasurer for a sum not exceeding five hundred 
dollars at any one time, taking a i^roper voucher for the same. 
The mayor, immediately after drawing the orders provided for 
in this section, shall notify the auditor thereof. 

8ec. 7. Whenever any money shall be drawn from the treas- 
ury for the purposes specified in the jDreceding section, the audi- 
tor shall report the same and the amount thereof to the commit- 
tee on accounts and claims at their next meeting, and shall 
charge the same under the appropriate head of expenditures. 

Sec. 8. All city ofiicers, who shall in their official capacity re- 
ceive any money on behalf of the city from any soiirce, shall 
pay to the treasurer the amount in their hands once in thirty 
days, or oftener if required, except the collector of taxes, who 
shall make such payment daily whenever the sum in his hands 
shall amount to five hundred dollars. All other persons, who 
shall at any time have money in their hands belonging to the 
city, shall forthwith pay the same to the treasurer. No money 
received under the provisions of this section shall be used by 
any department unless the same has been specifically apjjropri- 
ated by the city council. 

Sec. 9. In all cases of the payment of money to the city treas- 
urer, he shall give his receipt for the amount to the person 
paying the same, and shall forthwith deliver to the auditor 
a ditplicate copy of stiid receipt, to be filed in his office. All 
city officers and agents receiving money in behalf of said city, 
shall deliver to the auditor, once in thirty days, a report in de- 
tail of the amount received, and what disposition has been made 
thereof, except in cases otherwise provided. 

Sec. 10. The city treasurer shall keep, in a book provided for 
the purpose, an accurate and true account of all receipts and 
payments on behalf of the city, making the same conform, in 
mode of entry, as nearly as may be, with the accounts kept by 
the city auditor. He shall not pay any money out of the treas- 



344 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ury, except upon orders of the mayor, drawn in the form pre- 
scribed in the fourth section of this ordinance. He shall, at the 
end of each six months, certify to the auditor all amounts by 
him paid for maturing bonds, interest, state or county taxes, or 
any other purpose; and the auditor shall enter each of said 
amounts in the ledger under its appropriate head, as provided 
in section three of this ordinance. He shall, at the close of 
each fiscal year and when required, lay before the city council 
a statement of the condition of the treasury, and of all moneys 
received and paid by him on city account. Whenever he is au- 
thorized by the city council to borroAV money on the credit of 
the city, all notes and certificates of indebtedness given therefor 
shall be signed by the mayor and city treasurer and counter- 
signed by the cily clerk, and all such notes and certificates shall 
be registered in books, kept for that purpose, in the offices of 
the city treasurer and the city auditor, respectively. Such reg- 
isters shall describe said notes and certificates by number, date, 
and amount, the name of person to whom payable, when pay- 
able, the rate of interest, and the date of the ordinance or reso- 
lution authorizing the same; and no such note or certificate 
shall be valid until such record shall be made, and the same, 
when paid, with the date of payment, shall be entered on each 
of said registers. 

Sec. 11. There shall be apjaointed at the commencement of 
each municipal term a joint committee on finance, consisting of 
the mayor, two members of the board of aldermen, and tAvo 
members of the common council, which committee shall negoti- 
ate all loans which shall be authorized by the city council, and 
shall report the amount to the city treasurer. 

Sec. 12. The auditor shall, at the beginning of each financial 
year, present to the committee on finance, in writing, an esti- 
mate of the amount of money necessary to be raised for the cur- 
rent year, under the respective heads of appropriations, and rec- 
ommending the ways and means for obtaining the same. The 
committee on finance, after considering the same and making 
such changes and recommendations as may seem to them desir- 
able, shall lay the same before the city council. All unexjDended 
balances of appropriations, at the close of each fiscal year, shall 
be covered into the treasury, and no transfer of any unexpended 
balance shall be made from one appropriation to another. The 
auditor, at the close of each financial year, shall prepare and 



CITY OF CONCORD. 345 

lay before the city council a statement of all the receipts and 
expenditures of the preceding financial year, giving in detail the 
amount of appropriation and expenditure for each department. 
He shall also, at each regular meeting of the city council, pre- 
sent a statement of all expended appropriations, both general 
and special, with the respective amounts expended and unex- 
pended in each of the same. 

He shall annually, in the month of January, make an inven- 
tory of the real estate and personal property belonging to the 
city in the hands of any and all of its officers, agents, or com- 
mittees, with an estimate of the value thereof in detail, and 
shall keep a record of all property bought during the year. 
Such inventory shall be recorded, and an abstract thereof printed 
in the city report. 

Every officer, committee, or agent who shall buy any property 
for the city, shall immediately notify the auditor in writing, 
stating what property has been purchased, the date of the pur- 
chase, and the price paid. 

Sec. 13. The auditor shall, at the close of each financial year, 
and as much oftener as he shall deem it expedient, examine and 
audit the accoiints of the city treasurer, city clerk, collector of 
taxes, city marshal, commissioner of highways, city engineer, 
and all other officers and departments of the city that receive or 
pay out any money belonging to the city, and for that purpose 
shall have access to all the books and vouchers in the possession 
of any of said officers, or of said departments. Said auditor 
shall not orfly compare said accounts with the vouchers thereof, 
but shall ascertain whether all moneys due the city have been 
collected and accounted for. He shall examine all bonds, notes, 
and securities in the treasurer's hands belonging to the city, 
and make report thereof to the city council. The printing of 
the annual city report shall be under his direction and supervi- 
sion. Said report shall be prepared and issued on or before 
March 1st in each year. 

Sec. 14. The financial year shall begin and end on the first 
day of January in each year, and the accounts of all officers of 
the city shall be made up accordingly. 

Sec. 15. Coupon bonds issued by the city of Concord may be 
registered on the books of the treasurer, and shall thereafter be 
payable, principal and interest, at the time provided by said 
bonds oaly to the registered owner or his order, on the signing. 



346 CITY OF COXCORD. 

of a receipt therefor, wliicli receijit sliall be a voucher for the 
•amount so paid by the treasurer. 

Sec. 16. The coupons of bonds registered shall be cut off and 
destroyed, and a certificate of such destruction shall be recorded 
on the bond register, and attested by the mayor, city clerk, and 
treasurer. On the face of the bond shall be printed, "This 

bond is payable only to or order and is transferable only 

by assignment on the back, and registration thereof in the reg- 
ister of bonds kept by the treasurer," which certificate shall be 
signed by the treasurer. Bonds so registered shall thereafter 
be transferable only by assignment in writing on the bond, and 
registration of such assignment in the bond register. The bond 
register shall be kept by the treasurer, and in it shall be re- 
corded the number and description of each bond so registered, 
the name of the owner, the certificate of the destruction of the 
coupons, blanks for transfers, and blanks in which shall be 
noted the date and amount of each payment of interest. When 
the bond is paid in full, the holder shall receipt therefor on the 
bond register. 

Sec. 17. After the close of the present municipal term, the 
■city clerk shall receive a salary of twelve hundred dollars per 
annum, payable monthly, in full for his services as city clerk, 
and in lieu of all fees which he shall receive or be entitled to 
from any source, by virtue of said office. He shall pay over to 
the city treasurer, in quarterly payments, all fees and perquis- 
ites by him received or to which he may be entitled on account 
of holding said office, and at the same time shall submit to the 
auditor a statement in detail of the amount so received, from 
whom, and on what account. 

Sec. 18. Immediately after the passage of this ordinance, an 
auditor shall be elected, who shall hold office until the com- 
mencement of the next municipal term and until his successor 
is chosen and qualified. He shall give bond and be subject to 
all the provisions of this ordinance, and shall receive, pro rata, 
the salary provided for in section one of this ordinance. 

Sec. 19. So much of the provisions of chapter four, chapter 
thirty-three, and chapter thirty-seven of the city ordinances as 
-are inconsistent with this ordinance, and all other ordinances 
.and parts of ordinances that are inconsistent with this ordi- 
Jiance, are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 20. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 12, 1896. 



Mayor's Address. 



Gentlemen of the City Council: 

We have closed the business of the year 1897, and it may 
be profitable to take a retrospective view of the past, in the 
hope that it may give definiteness to our knowledge of affairs 
and better fit us for our duties in the year to come. The fact 
that the different departments in their relations with each other, 
as well as with the chief executive, have been entirely harmo- 
nious, is a condition of things that cannot be too greatly appre- 
ciated by us all. It is but justice for me to say, as I can with 
all sincerity, that the more I become acquainted with the plans 
and purposes of the heads of departments, the more fully I 
recognize their honest endeavors to faithfully serve the city 
that has placed them in their positions of trust and responsi- 
bility. 

With two or three exceptions, all the departments have kept 
their expenditures within the appropriations, and these exceptions 
are in great part cases where the excess of expenditure could 
not have been anticipated. That of streets and highways, in 
spite of the unprecedented rains that worked so much havoc at 
three different times, has come to the end of the year with a 
small unexpended balance, December having proved to be a 
month requiring an exceptionally small outlay. I want to recom- 
mend with all urgency that the names of the streets be placed at 
all the corners, and that this duty be attended to at the earliest 
possible moment. In this connection, it may be mentioned that 
the commissioner of highways should be provided with a proper 
and convenient stable. It would, in my judgment, be better 
for the city to own and work more teams of its own. As I 
stated last month, more than a mile of macadamized road has 
been made the past year. 

The extraordinary repairs necessitated by bad breaks in the 



348 CITY OF CONCORD. 

sewers at the time of the heavy rains exhausted the regular 
appropriations in the sewer department and necessitated the 
using of sufficient funds from the precinct appropriation for 
street lighting, and there was no increase of indebtedness to 
the precinct on this account. 

The chief engineer's report shows that the losses by fire in 
the precinct aggregate $10,016.30, the net loss being but 
$2,768.28. Great saving from the damaging use of water has 
•been effected by the use of the chemical engine, and we can 
,but be thankful for the small loss sustained the past 3'ear. It 
is to be hoped that with such a showing the underwriters may 
see their way clear to make us a reduction in the rate of insur- 
ance. From thorough inspection, I can state that everything 
connected w^ith the fire department is kept in the very best 
order, the horses are well trained, and every appliance is kept 
in readiness for immediate response to a call. The amount 
that had to be expended over the appropriation for this depart- 
ment, and to be provided for, is accounted for almost wholly 
by three items which could not be foreseen when the estimates 
were made. A new set of flues was required in the Central Fire 
Station, which caused the expenditure of $56. An alarm box 
iit the new workshops at the railway was put in at a cost of 
$130, and the Governor Hill steamer, which was damaged at 
the Bradford fire, had to be repaired at an expense of $126. 
These three items alone aggregate $312, or nearly the entire 
amount of the additional appropriation of $350. 

Two small additional appropriations will need to be made, on 
account of salaries. In appropriating for the salary of auditor, 
the appropriation was made at the reduced salary, to take effect 
at the beginning of the fiscal year, but, as the auditor was paid 
at the old rate up to the 26th of January, the difference will 
have to be provided for by an appropriation at this time. This 
is, therefore, not an increase. The sum of $2,700 was appro- 
priated for the pay of the assessors, who i-eceive a per diem 
compensation. Their aggregate bills are $130 in excess of this 
appropriation. 

The appropriation for parks has been exceeded b}' about 
Had the original estimates of the park commissioners 



mayor's addkess. 349 

for Rollins park and parks and commons been granted by the 
finance committee and the city council, the expenditures in their 
department would have required no additional appropriation. 

In our sanitary! condition and in the public health we have 
been greatly favored. Nothing at all serious has interfered 
with our physical well-being, and we constantly reap the benefit 
of the " ouuce-of-prevention " policy, which is, to keep the cit}' 
clean and wholesome. Money used for this purpose is always 
well spent. 

Careful observation leads me to believe that the removal of 
the police department from the domain of politics has been a 
good thing for the efficiency of our service. I believe the pres- 
ent force is adequate to the protection of our city, and that 
there will have to be no increase of appropriations in this 
department. 

Contracts made with the Concord Gas company have made 
quite a saving in the cost of lighting our streets and public 
buildings. We are very well lighted now, and it is desirable 
that there should be but few calls for additional street lamps 
the coming year. 

The income from the water-works continues to be satisfac- 
tory, and in their improvements for the j^ear the}^ have com- 
pleted the core wall from the Hopkintou road to the south side 
of the pond, making it secure at the outlet, so that there need 
be no apprehension of danger from high water. During the 
great freshets of the past year, the management of affairs was 
fully equal to the demand for safety, and it may be of interest 
to know that water has fallen over the spill-way one hundred 
and seven days of the year. 

Repairs on the roof of the city library are an immediate 
necessity, and demands in this line will be cheerfully met be- 
cause of the ever-increasing excellence and efficiency with 
which all affairs connected with this admirable institution are 
carried on. 

The cemetery commission and the committee on cemeteries, 
having had a meeting to confer together on the purchase of the 
Bradley lot to enlarge Blossom Hill cemetery, reported in favor 
of that purchase, and the city council accepted the report. As 



350 mayor's address. 

this movement is a provision for the long future, it seems en- 
tirely proper that a twenty-year bond should be issued to pro- 
vide for its payment. This lot includes about thirty acres, and 
the sum paid is $5,000. In this connection, I would suggest 
that the note for $1,400, carried by the park commissioners for 
an addition to the White park, be included in the bond. 

Our city treasurer has demonstrated the fact that our credit 
stands high, by the sale of 3^ percent, bonds, to the amount of 
$25,000, for the South End sewer extension, at such a premium 
that it nets the city a 3^ per cent. rate. I wish to further sug- 
gest, that the city pay a fixed rate of interest for money left in 
trust for the cemeteries, from the time it is received. By the 
present arrangement, such funds are liable to lie idle till they 
can be safely invested, and, as the city will probably be always 
a borrower of money, it would seem to be well to use cemetery 
funds, and become directly responsible for them. 

The city engineer and his assistants have been kept very 
busy during the year, and largely in the work of sewers. For 
the immediate future, the work of defining and re-establishing 
street lines will be pressing. 

We began the new year with a floating indebtedness of 
$25,000. Before the taxes of 1897 became available, it was 
necessary to make an additional temporary loan of $15,000. 
These loaus, aggregating $40,000, have both been paid, and, 
except in anticipation of the taxes of 1898, it will not be neces- 
sary to borrow any money this year. The bonded indebtedness 
of the city has been reduced as follows: $10,000 of the Water 
Precinct bonds, maturing November 1, 1897; $15,000 of the 
Union vSchool District bonds, maturing July 1, 1897; $5,000 
of the Memorial Arch bonds, maturing July 1, 1897 ; and $500 
of School District No. 20 bonds, maturing July 1, 1897, have 
been paid, reducing the interest charges for the coming year by 
more than $1,200. 

An effort will be made by the finance committee in preparing 
the appropriations for the current fiscal year to secure a still 
further reduction in the tax rate of the city. In inviting the de- 
partments to make their estimates for this year, they have been 
reminded that this is the desire of the people of the city, and they 



mayor's address. 351 

have been requested to ask for no appropriation for improvements 
or new work where these undertakings can be postponed without 
detriment to the city. Since the beginning of the new year, 
there have been many inaugurations of new city governments in 
different New England cities, and the burden of the song, in 
nearly all cases, seems to be greater indebtedness and a con- 
stantly increasing tax rate. This condition of aft'airs in so 
many other places makes us especially appreciate the fact that 
both our indebtedness and our tax rate are on the descending 
scale. 

The report of the tax collector, that comes before us to-day, 
showing that bnt $356.4.5 of the 1896 tax remains uncollected, 
of which $285.57 is secured by real estate, is a most creditable 
one. The commissions of the tax collector paid for collections 
of 1896 and 1897 taxes, exceed the appropriation by $16.92; 
but the commissions on $8,000 of the taxes of 1896, collected 
in December, 1896, were paid from the appropriation for 1897. 
The commissions on collections made this year would come 
within the appropriation. 

AVhile we have no otlicial connection whatever with the vari- 
ous industries and business enterprises which engage our citi- 
zens, they are the concerns that make up the cit}^, for whose 
government we are at present responsible, and so they are of 
real concern to ns. Some of our business interests have not 
been as prosperous for the past year as we could wish. Con- 
cord has suffered more from business depression during the last 
two years than at any time since the panic of 1893, but no 
more than other localities in the state. 

While looking hopefully to the future for a revival of busi- 
ness, it is a cause of especial congratulation that we have been 
able to look upon the growth of a great industry in this city, 
which, when completed, is to add largely to the population and 
the material wealth of the capital. It is all the more gratifying 
that it has come at a time when other industries have been de- 
pressed by the financial situation of the past few years. It has 
come naturally and easily, and largely through the efforts of 
some of our citizens, who have long been identified with Con- 
cord. It is, therefore, with pleasure that I call attention to the 
24 



352 CITY OF CONCORD. 

growth of the railway interests here, which for two years past 
have gone on so quietly, in a vicinity just a little removed from 
daily public observation, that probably not many of our citizens 
realize their great importance. 

In order that this growth may be better understood, I have 
compiled certain facts in relation thereto. I am indebted to 
Hon. B. A. Kimball for the data. 

Concord is, as we all know, a convenient central station be- 
tween Boston and the termini of its three upper roads. It is 
likewise convenient to various branch lines which diverge from 
the main stems. For many trains it is the natural terminal of 
all these roads. It is a point for exchange of train crews, for 
the renewal of fuel and material, and for the repair of engines, 
cars, and all other equipments. 

These opportunities existed before the local roads were leased 
to the Boston & Maine company, but it was not until these 
roads were consolidated into one system between Boston and 
the Canada line on the north, and Boston and the Connecticut 
river on the west, that the public could secure the full benefits 
that the situation offered, and through reduction of operating 
expenses enjo}' the better service which came with the union of 
the roads. 

Everything favored the development of the railway interests 
at this point. Land contiguous to the existing railway tracks 
was vacant, and there was abundant space for growth. The 
removal of the railway buildings north of the passenger station, 
and the enlargement of the yard at the north end of the city, 
presented opportunity for new industries in that locality. 

This, then, was the situation when the Boston & Maine com- 
pany, in 189.5, took a lease of the Concord & Montreal Rail- 
road, and began a reorganization of its system between Boston, 
Worcester, Portsmouth, northern New Hampshire, Vermont, 
and Canada — a reorganization tending to public convenience 
and to economical management. This reorganization made 
Concord a clearing station for the traffic between Boston, Can- 
ada, northern New England, and many Western states. Out 
of this determination grew the construction, at a cost of about 
$150,000, of the great freight yard lying east of the passenger 



mayor's address. 353 

station, and occupying an area of fifty acres. This yard is 
operated by use of switching engines at either end. The ope- 
rating force of the yard is composed of eleven switching crews, 
and such service requires the labor of one hundred and ten men. 
A special independent telegraph station has been established in 
this yard, for the prompt and safe handling of the traflic of 
this valley. 

The total length of railway side-tracks within the city limits 
is forty and one-half miles, of which about one half has been 
built since the date of the lease to the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road . 

At the southern approach to the whole railway j'ard, a new 
signal and switching system is in process of installation, and 
another will shortly be put in at the northerly approach, and 
thus will be completed the most etticient railway freight yard in 
New England. The cars that are handled here daily number 
about 1,400, withoirt including those employed in the local 
Avork of Concord. So complete is this freight-train service, so 
widespread are the Boston & Maine connections, and so much 
available land borders on the railway tracks, that I cherish the 
hope that manufacturing plants of various kinds may seek loca- 
tions in so advantageous a place as Concord. 

The central situation which Concord holds in this great rail- 
way system has been more generousl}' recognized in the con- 
struction of the new and extensive repair shops. They occupy 
an area of five acres, and have six and one-tenth miles of side- 
track. The yard in which they stand encloses more than twenty- 
eight acres. In building the shops, large quantities of granite 
(mostly from Concord quarries) were used. These shops have 
more than twice the area under roof of all the former railway 
shops of the Concord and Northern railroads, and b}' the use 
of modern machinery and methods their capacity has been in- 
creased in still greater proportion. This capacity is three or 
four times as great as was that of the old shops, and the new 
buildings are so arranged that this capacity may be doubled 
whenever enlargement becomes desirable. 

■ The shops have been built with an outlook to the future. 
The best features of the most advanced plants in the country 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 

were incoporrated iu this plant, and they have had from their 
inception the intelligent personal care and critical monthly 
inspection of President Tattle, who manifests the deepest 
interest therein. 

Some details relating thereto may be permissible. The pres- 
ent boiler capacity is 600 horse- power. There are four steam 
engines of various patterns, and an electric-light plant which 
furnishes power for the shops, and light for the shops, yards, 
and stations from Langdon street to Penacook street. There 
are two electric cranes, capable of lifting the largest engine and 
carrying it as if it were a toy. There is an organized fire de- 
partment (a chief engineer, two assistants, and four hose com- 
panies of eight men each), with high-pressure city water service, 
and its own tire-alarm s^'stem will be provided. 

It takes one locomotive and a crew of men to wait upon the 
new shops. There are now employed about six hundred men, 
and when the shops are fully occupied, the number will be from 
eight hundred to one thousand men. It is expected that fully 
one half of the entire Boston & Maine equipment will be re- 
paired at these shops. When we consider those who are 
employed by the railroad in this city, and those who are directly 
and indirectly dependent upon them for their support, we shall 
see that Concoid's population who have a connection with this 
great railroad plant numbers from four thousand to five thou- 
sand people. 

In this connectron, attention should be called to the railroad 
department of the Young Men's Christian Association, to the 
establishment and support of which, in the two 3'ears just past, 
the Boston & Maine management has contributed nearh' S6,000. 
The annual cost of maintenance to the company is something 
more than $2,000. The association provides baths and dormi- 
tories, as well as evening classes in the English branches, me- 
chanical drawing, and lectures on practical subjects throughout 
the year. The membership of the association is 318; those 
enrolled in evening classes number about 100, and the average 
attendance on Sunday services is 42. The average daily visi- 
tors to the building are about 100. Opportunities are provided 
for physical, mental, and spiritual improvement, and evidences 



mayor's address. 355 

of moral gain might be cited here if it were desirable to 
do so. 

At the request of local granite interests, the railway engineers 
have nearly completed snrveys for a track to the quarries on 
Rattlesnake hill, vyhich, when constructed, will enable these 
quarries to successfully compete with tide- water ledges. 

To recapitulate, let me say that the sum expended in con- 
structing the great freight yard and the new shops exceeds half 
a million dollars. 

The monthly pay-roll of the Boston & Maine company at 
Concord is $59,515.19. The yearly pay-roll is $714,182.28. 

When the shops are full}' equipped with machinery' and tools, 
this amount will be greatly increased. 

I have expressed, in a previous paragi-aph, some doubt 
whether these expenditures and improvements have yet won a 
full measure of appreciation from our citizens, but 1 know that 
as time goes on their full advantages and helps to other growth 
and greater trade will be apparent to all. It would seem that 
they have come as a direct fruit of the lease and consolidation, 
and that without the consolidation they would not have come at 
all. They have come without struggle or rivalry with other 
towns. So we may congratulate ourselves that no enmities 
have been created, and that there will be no bitter harvests to 
be garnered hereafter. 

I am told, by one who has kept a record, that between eighty 
and ninety tenements liave been built the past year, and one 
of the finest of business blocks, with complete modern im- 
provements, has been recently finished. All these signs of 
progress are indications of a sound prosperity that may give us 
a well-grounded hope for the well-being of the city that is so 
much to us all. 



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IJSTDEX. 



Page 

Aid to dependent soldiers and families 108 

Aldermen for 1897-1898 44 

Appropriations, regular 96-101 

special 101 

precinct 102 

special precinct 102 

street sprinkling 102 

Union School District 102 

water precinct 102 

Penacook precinct 102 

West Concord precinct 102 

East Concord precinct 103 

School District No. 20 103 

Assessors 50 

Assistant engineers 51 

Available assets of city 90 

Blossom Hill cemetery, receipts and expenses 148-165 

Board of Education, Union School District 48 

Board of health 56 

expenses 136 

Cemetery committees 57 

appropriations 148-168 

Chief engineer 51 

City clerk 45 

council for 1897-1898 45 

engineer 47 

expenses 107-173 

collector 47 

• liquor agent 57 

marshal 53 

assistant marshal 53 

messenger 47 

ordinances and resolutions, 1897 18-43 

physician 56 

assistant physician 56 

poor, expenses 107-109 

treasurer 47 

Clerk of common council 45 

police court 53 

Collector of taxes 47 

Commissioner of highways 54 

Commissioners of cemeteries 58 

water-works 50 



402 INDEX. 

Commissioners of parks 57 

Committees, joint standing, of the city council 46 

Committee on accounts and claims 46 

cemeteries 46 

finance 46 

fire department 46 

lands and buildings 46 

lighting streets 46 

public instruction 46 

parljs and commons 46 

roads and bridges 46 

Committees, standing, in board of mayor and aldermen 46 

Committee on elections and returns 47 

engrossed ordinances 47 

bills, second reading 47 

police and license 46 

sewers and drains 46 

streets and sidewalks 46 

Committees in common council 47 

Committee service, expenses 138 

City statistics 80-82 

debt not funded 89 

Concerts, open air, expenses 170 

Concord water board 50 

Concrete, receipts 240-241 

Concrete bills remaining unpaid 241 

Cemetery committees 57 

County poor 290 

tax 107 

Cullers of staves 60 

Debts of city and precinct 89-96 

Dog licenses 172 

Drain-layers 55 

East Concord precinct debt 95 

sewer bonds 95 

Engineering department, expenses 147-148 

Executive department 44 

Fence viewers 59 

Fire department, expenses 109-115 

property 66-68 

roll of members 329-334 

Fire hydrants 211-215 

Fish and game wardens 59 

Health officers 56 

Highway department, expenses 119-133 

Hydrant expenses 141 

Hydrants, public, location 211-215 

private, location 215 

Incidentals and land damages, expenses 115-118 

Inspector of petroleu m 59 

Inspector of electric wires 52 

Interest 107 



INDEX. 403 

Inventory of city property 66-79 

flre department 66-68 

street department 68-69 

police department 69-70 

engineering department 70 

sewer department 70-71 

messenger's department 71-72 

auditor 71 

clerk's office 73 

health department 73 

liquor agency 73-74 

mayor's office 73 

tax collector's office 74 

sealer of weights and measures' office 73 

cemetery commissioners' office 74 

park commissioners' department 74 

real estate 75 

recapitulation 79 

water department 76-79 

Justice police court 52 

special 52 

Legal expenses 136 

Librarian public library 49 

assistants 50 

Lighting streets, expenses 140 

Penacook 170 

Liquor agency 173 

agent 57 

Mayor 44 

Mayors of Concord, list of 65 

Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital, expenses 147 

Memorial Day, expenses 147 

Millville cemetery, expenses 168 

Moderators 65 

Municipal regulations 2 

Old North cemetery, expenses 165 

Open air concerts, expenses 170 

Park commissioners 57 

Penacook park, expenses 144 

sewer bonds 93 

precinct expenses 169 

Penacook sewer precinct, sinking fund 93 

Police and watch, expenses. 133-135 

Police, regular ". 53 

special 54 

Polls, valuation and taxes, 18fi0 to 1897 81-82 

Poor, overseers of the , 55 

Population of the city 80 

Pound-keeper 59 

Precinct appropriations 102 

special 102 



404 INDEX. 

Precinct expenses 139-141 

funded debt 91 

debt not funded 92 

Printing and stationery, expenses 135-136 

Property of city, inventory 66-79 

water department, inventory 76-79 

Public library, expenses 145-147 

trustees 49 

Recapitulation of city debt 96 

city property 79 

property water department 79 

city expenses 171-172 

Registrar of vital statistics 56 

Report of auditor 336-339 

board of health 265-267 

city engineer 248-258 

city marshal 294-298 

city physician 288 

city solicitor 300 

city treasurer 104-106 

city liquor agent 302-303 

chief engineer 312-334 

cemetery commissioners 310 

clerk of police court 299 

committee on sewers and drains 243-244 

commissioner of highways 216-242 

collector of taxes 246-247 

engineer of pumping station 202 

inspector of electric wires 245 

health officer 268-280 

history commission 335 

librarian of city library 261-264 

mortality of city 281-287 

overseer of the poor 289-293 

park commissioners 304-309 

police commissioners 301 

superintendent of waterworks 187-197 

trustees of public library 259-260 

Millville cemetery 311 

water commissioners 185-186 

Rollins park, expenses 143-144 

Roll of the fire department 329-334 

Salaries, expenses 141-142 

Sanitary officer 56 

School boards, district No. 20 48 

town district 48 

School district No. 20 bonds 92 

Schools, expenses 139 

School house taxes 139 

Sealers of leather 60 

Sealer of weights and measures 60 

Selectmen 63 

Sewers, expense of 140-141 

State tax 107 



INDEX. 405 

stone quarries, receipts 173 

Schedule of pipe and gates 206-210 

Stewards, fire stations 51-52 

Superintendent of city clocks 52 

waterworks 51 

Supervisors of check-lists 63-64 

Surveyors of masonry 61 

painting 61 

stone 61 

wood, lumber, and bark 62 

Tables of vital statistics 357-400 

Truant officers 49 

Trust funds 83-88 

Abbott, William 85 

Adams, S. M. K 85 

Allison, Mary D 85 

Atherton, Alonzo 85 

Bailey, Abbie L. Sanborn 85 

Benson, Matilda , 85 

Bixby, Ellen C 85 

Blaisdell, James D 85 

Blaisdell, Timothy K 85 

Bouton, Nathaniel 85 

Bradford, James 85 

Bunton, Mary N. Preston 85 

Butters, Harriet W 85 

Caldwell, B. F 85 

Carter, Nathan F 85 

Cemetery, Blossom Hill 84 

East Concord 84 

Millville 84 

Old North 84 

West Concord 84 

Chaffln, John F 85 

Cheney, Lyman and Mary F 85 

Chesley, Samuel 85 

Clark, Caroline 85 

Clough, Frederick r 85 

Clough, Mrs. N. P 85 

Colburn, Amos L 85 

Cooper, Mrs. Josiah 85 

Crow, Mary 85 

Danforth, Cordelia 85 

Danforth, Chas. S 85 

Drown, Matilda 85 

Eastman, Seth 85 

Eaton, Stephen B 85 

Edgerly, Lydia F 85 

Ela, Georgiana P 85 

Farnum, Mary M 86 

Farley, Lydia A 86 

Fogg, George G 86 

Fowler, Asa 86 

French, Theodore 86 

Gale, Daniel E 86 



406 INDEX. 

Trust funds: 

Gale, John D 86 

Gear, John 86 

Gilbert, Harvey J 86 

Glover and Osgood 86 

Hadlej-, Betsey 86 

Harding, Geo. M 86 

Hart, Mary D 86 

Herbert, Mary 86 

Hoyt, Elisha and Mary C 86 

Hoyt, Jacob 86 

Hutchins, Mrs. Samuel 86 

Irish, Sarah E 86 

Kimball, John and B. A 86 

Kimball, Joseph S 86 

Knowlton, Edward L 86 

Lang, Abigail W 86 

Larkin, B. L 86 

Lincoln, J. L 86 

Little, J. W. and E. J 86 

Locke, William T 86 

Lyon, G. Parker 84 

McCauley, John 86 

McQuesten, Greenough and Evarts . 86 

McQuesten, James 86 

Matthews, H. W. and H. 87 

Merrill, J. B 87 

Morrill, S. F 87 

Morrill, Samuel and David L 87 

Moses, Mary J 87 

Newhall, Mrs. C. H 87 

Nutter, Eliphalet S 87 

Ordway, Eugene A 87 

Osgood , David 83 

Osgood, True 87 

Page, William 87 

Paige, Cyrus W 87 

Pecker, Mrs. E. A 87 

Phipps, Hannah E 87 

Pierce, Franklin 84 

Pitman, W. H 87 

Pixley, Mrs. S. Lizzie 87 

Reed, George L 87 

Richardson, Hiram 87 

Richard.son, Judith S 87 

Rollins, E. H 87 

Rumford, Countess of 83 

Russell, Moses W 87 

Sanborn, Jonathan 87 

Sargent, John B 87 

Shaw, Mary A 87 

Stickney, Nathan 87 

Southmaid, Hattie R 87 

Stuart, Thomas 87 

Sweetser, Abigail 87 

Tenney, Harriet N 87 



INDEX. 407 

Trust funds: 

Thorne, John C 87 

Tidd , Pliny 87 

Upham, Eliza W 87 

Valpey, Tliomas G 84 

Walker, Abigail 83 

Walker, Mary E 87 

Walker, Timothy and Abigail B 87 

Wentworth, Paul 88 

Whittredge, George F 88 

Williams, Mary 88 

Woodruff, Robert 88 

Woodward, E. W. .. 88 

Trustees of public library 49 

Undertakers 58 

Union school district bonds 92 

appropriations 102 

Valuation from 1860 to 1897 81-82 

Vital statistics, births 357-372 

deaths 388-400 

marriages 372-387 

Ward clerks 61 

Water commissioners 5q 

department 177 

expenses I81 and 187-198 

receipts 187 

report appendix 203-215 

Weighers of hay and coal 60 

West Concord sewer precinct bonds 94 

expenses I69 

sinking fund 94 

White park expenses 142 





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