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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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1899. 



KORTY-SEVENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



City of Concord 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECENIBER 31, 1899. 

Together with other Annual Reports and Papers Relating 
TO THE Affairs of the City. 




CONCORD, N. H. : 

Ira C. Evans, Printer, 12 School Street. 

1900. 



CIA- 
I&Q9 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 



FOR PAYMENT OF BILLS AGAINST THE CITY, 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, or 
aid to the city poor, should be particular to take thc^iame of 
the person ordering such service, material, or aid, and should 
know that the person is duly authorized to contract said 
liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city pauper account, except on the written order of 
the Overseer of the Poor, and for no longer time than until his 
successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by the 
city, furnished on county pauper account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the City Auditor on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by him and by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, they will be ready for payment on Thursday follow- 
ing the regular monthly meeting of the City Government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the City Government 
occur on the second Tuesday of each month. 

JAMES H. MORRIS, 

City Aiiditor. 



MAYOR MARTIN'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Cojincil : 

We stand at the beginning of a new administration. With 
a few exceptions we are new members, and inexperienced in 
municipal government. At the start, it is well for us to 
appreciate the fact that our responsibility is great, that the 
difficulties of municipal government are many. 

It is well for us to understand that an indifferent attention 
to the affairs of the cit}' will not produce good results, and 
that only by most careful attention to and consideration of, 
all matters relating to tlie welfare of our city that shall come 
within our province, can we attain even a fair degree of suc- 
cess. We are not responsible for present conditions, but we 
are responsible that through no mistakes of ours does the 
city suffer for the next two years. 

It is natural that we look back upon the administrations of 
former years for information that may be useful at this time, 
availing ourselves of every aid that may tend in any degree 
to fit us to perform the duties required of us. 

I shall not attempt a long review of the city's affairs, but 
shall call 3'our attention to the main features thereof, and to 
some of the responsibilities we are to meet — I trust faithfully 
and impartially — forgetting the differences in politics which 
made our election possible. 

In the last thirty years, great improvement has been made 
in our city. Within that period, the city water-works have 
been constructed, substantially all the sewer system of anv 
value has been laid ; many miles of streets have been opened, 
streets widened and improved and better lighted; many miles 
of concrete laid, forming substantial sidewalks; new bridges 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

built; handsome and substantial public buildings have been 
erected ; so that in these respects Concord is to-day one of 
the best cities in the United States. These improvements, 
however, have cost an enormous price. Attached to each is 
an annual expense, which reached in the year 1898 more 
than $350,000. 

Expenditures have steadily increased. Let me call your 
attention to a few figures, which, although uninteresting 
reading, state stubborn facts : 



In 1888 there was raised as county tax 
111 1898 the county tax was .... 

lu 1888 there was appropriated for fire department 
In 1898 the appropriation was .... 
Ill 1888 for highways, bridges, and sidewalks 
In 1898 appropriation for same .... 
In 1888 the appropriation for the police department 
In 1898 the appropriation for this department was 

In 1888 salaries were 

In 1898 salaries were ...... 

In 1888 water department collected . 
In 1898 this department collected 



$24,418.65 
42,200.69 
11,4.50.00 
20,000.00 
24,.500.00 
35,000.00 

6,000.00 
11,656.00 

7,.500.00 
10,852.00 
38,441.32 
59,147.54 



The list might be extended with the same result. If this 
policy continues, the outcome can be seen by the blind. I 
believe in being liberal, not extravagant. I believe the affairs 
of the city should be managed with the same care and thought 
that a good business man exercises in managing his private 
business. The tendency to increase expenses must stop. 
Taxes should not be increased. It is our plain duty to lessen 
the burden of public expense, and to see that the bonded debt 
of the city does not increase. 

DEBTS. 



The city lias a bonded debt of 
A floating debt of 

Total debt . 



$943,556.00 
. 13,400.00 



$956,956.00 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 5 

The practice of deducting "available assets " from the 
bonded debt is misleading. The available assets are not 
available for the payment of the bonded debt, but for the 
running expenses of the city. 

If the West End schoolhouse is constructed in accordance 
with the vote of the Union School District, the bonded 
indebtedness will be increased $34,000.00. 

CITY DEPOSIT. 

During the past year, there has been an average monthly 
balance to the credit of the city of $40,608.00. This balance 
should have been drawing interest, and at the rate offered to, 
and rejected by, the last city government, would have brought 
the city the sum of $81 3. 16, — an item which shoidd have 
been saved. 

TRUST FUNDS. 

The city holds the following trust funds: 

The Abial "Walker trust, for the benefit of the school 

fund S1,000.00 

(The income of this fund is paid to the city.) 

The David Osgood trust, for the purchase of school-books 

for poor children 200.00 

(Inasmuch as the city now purchases all school-books 
the object of this fund has lapsed.) 

The Countess of Rumford trust, for the benefit of the 

Female Charitable Society 2,000.00 

(The income of this fund is paid annually to said 
society.) 
• The G. Parker Lyon trust is 1,000.00 

The Franklin Pierce trust is 1,000.00 

The Thomas G. Valpey trust is 500.00 

These three funds are tor the benefit of the public librarv, 
the income being paid over to the city annually, which 
lessens the amount of money necessary to be raised by taxation 
for the support of the library. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



From the sale of lots, there is credited to Blossom Hill 
cemetery, Jan. i, 1S99, $17,025.37; the old cemetery, 
$715.00; West Concord cemetery, $275.00 ; East Concord, 
$202.50; Milville cemetery, $200.00, making a total of 
$18,417.67. 

There are at the present time 1 14 different trust funds, left 
by individuals for the care of their respective cemetery lots. 
The aggregate of these funds is $15,314.53, making a total 
cemetery fund of $33,732.20. 

The trusts which go to make up this aggregate are invested 
in various securities, the greater part being in city bonds, and 
in savings banks. Each fund, and the income thereof, is 
kept separately. 

It is reasonable to suppose that eventually more or less of 
these funds will be lost by poor investments. It would be 
much better if all these could be paid into the city treasiyy, and 
the city become the debtor, allowing a reasonable rate of in- 
terest annually upon the same, the income to be used in ac- 
cordance with the terms of the trusts. 

The city will always be in debt, and these funds could be 
more safely invested in the city than elsewhere ; therefore, I 
recommend that action be taken toward securing a public 
statute to be passed by the legislature, authorizing the change 
of the investment of these funds, so that the city can become 
the debtor, the act fixing a definite rate of interest to be paid 
by the city. 

A statute of this kind would inspire confidence in donors, 
prevent the loss of any of these funds, lessen the labor of 
caring for the same, and in every way be more desirable than 
the present manner of investment. 

DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

By section iS, chapter 60, of the public statutes, towns are 
authorized to direct a discount to be made to the persons who 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. i 

pay their taxes before certain dates, and persons who pay 
prior to such dates are entitled to such discount as the town 
directs. It has been customary for a number of years for the 
city to allow discounts on taxes paid before certain dates to 
an amount in some instances of 3 per cent., but usually 2^ 
per cent. 

This practice imposes an unequal and unjust burden upon 
all taxpayers who are unable to pay their taxes before the time 
for discount expires. 

The assessors each year raise a certain sum by taxation to 
meet these discounts. It is readily seen that taxpayers who 
are imable to secure the discount pay a portion of their more 
fortunate neighbors' taxes. The only reason that I am aware 
of which is urged for allowing a discount is to induce people 
to pay their taxes earlier; and thereby, in some instances, 
save the city from hiring money temporarily. This reason 
is not sound. The discount allowed always exceeds the amount 
of interest which the city would have to pay. 

There is no just or valid reason for such a discount, and I 
therefore recommend that no further discount be allowed. 

RENTS. 

The city at the present time is paying the following for 
rents : 



Water office .... 
Liquor agency office . 
City engineer's office . 
Commissioner of highways 
Board of health office 
Mayor's office .... 
Tax collector's office . 
Police office at Penacook . 
Shop at Penacook for water-works 
Cemetery commissioners' office . 
Land for sand shed . 

Making a total of 



$300.00 

28.3.00 

204.00 

108.00 

108.00 

180.00 

100.00 

108.00 

24.00 

25.00 

12.00 



$1,452.00 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The greater part of these rents can be saved b}' utilizing, at 
a small expense, Ward Five ward room, and the unused 
offices in the City Hall building. Ward Five ward room can 
be made into three good offices, which would be suitable for 
the city engineer, commissioner of highways, and the tax col- 
lector. The board of health and health officer can be fu)'- 
nished suitable offices in City Hall building. 

The cemetery commission, for such meetings as thev may 
require, could meet in the common council chamber. 

The mayor's office could probably be provided for in City 
hall. 

Perhaps the offices in City hall would not be considered as 
convenient in some respects as offices in the central part of 
the city ; but once established, I think tlie people would be 
practically as well accommodated. 

Certainly the proposed location of offices in Ward Five 
ward room would be an improvement on the present location 
of those offices. 

COMMISSIONS. 

The different commissions at the present time consist of the 
board of water commissioners, board of park commissioners, 
board of cemetery commissioners, and the board of police 
commissioners. The three first-named boards serve without 
compensation, and their services are im.portant and valuable 
to the city. They have the expenditure of over $65,000. 

A city ordinance passed March 19, 1897, provides that 
each member of the board of police commissioners shall re- 
ceive for his services the sum of $50 per annum. In view of 
the fact that all other commissioners serve the city without 
compensation, I recommend placing the board of police com- 
missioners on the same basis, and the repeal of the ordinance 
fixing their salaries. 

The board of police commissioners had four meetings in 
1S97, and two in 1S9S. In 189S, nothing was done except 
the appointment of a few special police officers. The ap- 
pointment of these cost the city $150. 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



By chapter 1S3, laws of 1S93, the power of the board of 
mayor and aldermen in relation to the appointment and 
removal of police officers was taken away and given to a 
board of police commissioners, who are appointed by the 
governor, with the advice and consent of the council. 

This law deprived the city of the right to choose its police 
officers. It is urged in support of this law, that it takes the 
police department Out of politics. If this result has been 
accbmplished, and is desirable, why not change the constitu- 
tion and law'S, and have a commission to choose aldermen, 
councilmen, city clerk, and all other city officers, and take 
those officers out of politics? 

There is no apparent reason why a city should not control 
the appointment and removal of its police to the same extent 
that it controls the election of other officials. The people are 
fully as competent to choose their police officers as to elect 
other officers. Thev should choose their police officers and 
remove them when occasion requires. There is no, doubt in 
my mind that the police department would be more efficient 
under the control of the citv than under a commission. 

The present police force consists of a city marshal, assistant 
marshal, captain of the night watch, and eight regular police 
and night watch. 

Two of these police are detailed for Penacook. I have 
made a careful investigation and have come to the conclusion 
that a day police is not needed in Penacook. I have also 
investigated with equal care the duties and work required of 
the police officers in the central wards ; in my judgment the 
central wards can be properly policed with two less officers. 

Nearly all the arrests made, except in Penacook, are made 
on Main street. There is seldom a disturbance away from 
the business part of the city. 

I find by talking with residents of the North, South, and 
West ends of the city that a general impression prevails that 
it is unnecessarv to patrol those sections during the entire 
night. 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

At the present time there are three regular night watch 
between Freight and Centre streets, which would seem to be 
ample protection for that section. The occasional passing of 
a policeman through back streets appears to be of little service. 
If a burglary were planned for such streets, it would be com- 
mitted after the policeman had passed. Fires are usually 
discovered by some occupant of the building on fire, or by 
some near resident, 

I think it would be well in making the appropriations for 
the coming year to provide for three less policemen. If this^ 
should prove to be a mistake, it is one which can be easily and 
quickly remedied. 

I see by the report of the city marshal that he recommends 
the building, by the city, of a stable for the accommodation 
of the police horse, wagon, and ambulance. I have given 
sufficient attention to this matter to find, and have found, that 
the care and feed of a horse, the care of the wagon, ambu- 
lance, and harness, and the pay of a man to take charge of 
the same, would cost at least three times the amount now 
expended for the same service, not including the interest on 
the investment, or the cost of the stable. 

There are stables convenient to the police station where 
the police team, ambulance, and harness can be cai-ed for by 
the owner of the stables, as for other patrons, and for the 
ordinary expense charged to private individuals. 

No sufficient reason appears why this additional expense 
should be incurred for this department. 

FIRE DEPARTMElSIT. 

The efficiency of the fire department is well known and 
universally acknowledged. The men are fully equal to the 
position, and to the duties required of them. Regarding the 
department, I have no criticism to make. 

After a careful investigation of current expenses I am 
unable to see where any considerable saving can be made. 
The opinion has been expressed that the appropriation, 
$20,000, for this department, is a large one. Of this sum,. 



mayor's address. 11 

$13,812.16 was paid to the officers and men in salaries. 
There is no way of reducing the expenses of this department 
except by reducing the pay of the members, and this I do not 
recommend. 

The department is in excellent condition, needing but few 
improvements, and no considerable outlay need be made. It 
is necessary to change one pair of horses. Two of the horses 
at present owned are unfit for the work required of them. It 
is also advisable to pvit in an alarm box on State street, near 
Downing, and one at the corner of Centre and Rumford or 
Essex streets, in order to properly cover the city. 

Outside of these matters there will be little additional 
expense, unless at some time, perhaps not immediately, it 
would be well to improve the service by the addition of a 
modern truck for the better equipment of the hook and ladder 
company. 

ASSESSORS. 

No more important office exists in the city than that of the 
board of assessors. The property assessed by them exceeds 
$11,000,000 in value. It is not expected that in all cases an 
absolutely equal valuation can be made, but it is expected that 
an equitable and fair estimation of valuation shall be reached. 
It is important so far as the state and county tax is concerned 
that valuation of like property should be the same in different 
towns in the county, and the different cities in the state. In 
that case Concord would not pay more than her share of the 
state and county tax, which, judging from the amount of the 
same, it appears to me that she now does. 

In order to attain this end the assessors should be familiar 
with the valuation in other towns and cities. 

So far as the city tax is concerned, it is of the utmost im- 
portance that valuations are fair. The full board of assessors 
should give more consideration to this matter than has been 
customary, not allowing the assessors of any ward to fix the 
valuation of that ward without a careful examination of his 
figures. 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

There are many pieces of valuable real estate which are 
not assessed over one half their actual valuation, while others 
are assessed two thirds to three fourths of their value. These 
discrepancies can be easily remedied by action of the full 
board, who should review the estimates of value fixed by the 
assessor of each ward. 

The law provides that a trader shall be assessed for the 
average amount of stock carried for the year. In manv cases 
stocks of goods are assessed for less than one half that amount, 
and some for not more than one third. 

By law, bonds (except certain classes), mortgages, and 
money at interest, and certain bank stocks, are taxable. Nearly 
all of this class of property escapes taxation, casting an undue 
burden on real and personal property which is in sight. 

To a great extent this can, and should, be remedied b}^ 
careful investigation on the part of the assessors. 

HIGHWAYS. 

It is perhaps not unfair to say that, to a certain extent, the 
condition of our country roads and the streets of our cities are 
a good gauge of the enterprise and public spirit of the people. 
It is a fact w^orthy of note tliat well-built roads have alvva^-s 
been a feature of the highest civilization, from early historic 
times down to the present. 

The question of good roads is being agitated throughout 
the state, and especially in the cities, and the conclusion has 
been reached that better roads are needed. 

The condition of the streets in our own city is not what it 
should be, considering the amount of money expended upon 
them. A portion of Main street is paved and macadamized; 
some portions of State street have been macadamized since 
the purchase of the steam roller, and some small pieces of 
concrete have been laid. Outside of these improvements, 
our streets are in no better condition than they were when 
only one half the amount now appropriated was expended. 

In considering the matter of the laying out of new streets, 
and of keeping those already built in repair, a few general 
principles should be kept in sight. In the first phice, the 



mayor's address. 13 

person in charge of the work should be competent to direct 
it intelligently, should have some practical knowledge of the 
art of making a good road or street, should possess some 
knowledge of the manner in which the work is done in other 
localities, and should have sufficient practical ability to apply 
what he has learned by observation and experience. 

An important feature in the laying out of a new street is 
the matter of grading. In a city like ours it is not necessary 
to make a true grade. 

In many cases it would be an injury to the adjoining land, 
lea\ing it inconveniently high in some places, and too low for 
good drainage in others, where fills are made. 

State street is a good example of a street well laid out on 
the surface. No house lots have been materially injured by 
the establishment of the grade. 

Various causes produce a bad condition of outlying roads. 
They are seldom constructed in a manner to give perfect, or 
even fairly good drainage. A poorly drained road remains 
always a poor road, not wearing well and a permanent annoy- 
ance to those who are obliged to travel on it. 

It is entirely practicable to maintain a good dirt road by 
looking at the drainage, avoiding the worse than useless cus- 
tom of scraping back upon the surface in the spring the sand 
and dirt which has accumulated at the sides during the rest 
of the year. This method is a positive injury, and is un- 
necessary, as good material for a dirt road can always be 
obtained. 

Another point not to be overlooked, is a wise provision for 
shade. Every one appreciates the comfort of a well-shaded 
road, which is always smoother, harder, and more free from 
dust in summer than an unshaded road, and this most desira- 
ble result is not difficult of attainment. It is merely a matter 
of leaving such trees, large or small, or sprouts if trees are 
\vanting, when the sides of the road are being cleared of 
brush. 

In a few vears there will be a growth which will give pro- 
tection to the road, and add greatly to the pleasure of passing 
over it. 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PARKS. 

Material improvements have been made in Rollins park. 
Good roads have been constructed through it, and the limber 
has not been cut off to any damaging extent. 

White park is being transformed into a public garden as 
fast as the appropriations will permit. Personally, I regret 
the extent to which the axe has been used therein. The 
growth that has been cut off was, to my mind, the great 
beauty of the land, and with its natural formation made it an 
ideal spot for a park. 

I think it would have been much more satisfactory if the 
growth on the flat at the northeast end of the park had been 
preserved, cutting out the underbrush and dead wood, grad- 
ing sufficiently to raise the surface above water level, and 
leaving the park open for the children to run and play in. 

Very likely the majorit}' of people are better pleased with 
its present condition— a garden rather than a park, into which 
it is unlawful to enter except on foot, and where moving about 
is limited to the well-kept gravel walks. 

WATER DEPARTRtENT. 

The water department, generally speaking, is in first-class 
condition. The receipts for the year 189S were $59,147.54, 
the largest for any year. Of this sum, the city paid 
$7,322.50 for water. I am informed by the superintendent 
of the department that it is necessary for the city to pay for the 
water it uses, in order to keep the water rate at the present 
figures; that if the city cut oft' this payment, rates would have 
to be advanced. 

This means that the department intends to raise from some 
source, and to spend about so much money each year, and 
that they do not consider it advisable to lessen the expendi- 
ture. The explanation of this is, that it is cohsidered neces- 
sary to replace the cement-lined pipe with cast-iron pipe, for 
the- reason that the cement-lined pipe is liable to burst. The 
department intend to relay the pipe through Main street, from 



mayor's address. - 15 

Centre to Freight streets, during the coming season, and also 
to relay 3,200 feet of the main pipe in the West Concord 
road. 

This work, with the payment of bonds which will become 
due, interest, and current expenses, will require as much 
money for the coming year as was expended in 1S9S. 

Notwithstanding these reasons, I think there should be a 
substantial saving in this department. Less new pipe will be 
used for new streets than was laid last year, and it should not 
be necessary to expend so large an amount for meters. Last 
year, the sum paid for meters was $2,473.46. This item 
could be saved, if consumers would not waste water. 

In a year \vhen water is plenty and runs over the dam, it 
should not run to waste through the pipes. It is for the inter- 
est of the consumer to make it unnecessary to meter the 
water, as by so doing the}- save themselves expense. The 
amount paid by the city for water is raised by taxation on the 
water precinct, and there is no practical difference, whether it 
is charged and collected by the water board, or paid as taxes. 

The only reason for the city paying for the water used by it 
is that it makes the water department appear, at first view, to 
be self-supporting. 

HEALTH DEPART>IENT. 

Since the establishment of this department on its present 
basis, the sanitary condition of the city has greatly improved. 
There is little danger of any contagious disease gaining a 
strong foothold here. 

One item in the report of the sanitary office deserves special 
notice. 

I refer to the remarkably low death-rate per 1,000 inhabi- 
tants for the year 1S9S. It was 12.13 in 189S, 13.95 in 
1897, 14.05 in 1896, and 15.33 in 1895. These four years 
show a gradual decrease. This fact is sufficient proof that 
Concord is a clean city. 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY REPORTS. 



Chapter 33 of the city ordinances provides for the printing" 
annually of 3,800 copies of the city reports. Investigation 
shou^s that this number is greatly in excess of the number re- 
quired for distribution. 

I recommend that the ordinance be amended, and the num- 
ber be reduced to 1,000. 

CITY MESSENGER. 

To the duties of the city messenger should be added the- 
care of the city clocks, without increased salary. Although 
the amount paid the superintendent of clocks is small, it is an 
unnecessary expenditure, the city messenger having ample 
time to perform this work. 

WIRES. 

At the present time, many streets, passageways, and alleys 
are filled with wires strung from and upon poles and build- 
ings, being the property of the New England Telegraph and 
Telephone Company, the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
panv, and the Concord Land and Water Power Company. 

In manv places, these companies have given very little at- 
tention or care to the manner of stringing these wires, cros- 
sing streets, passageways, allej's, and buildings with no uni- 
formity or system, obstructing the streets, and injuring private 
property. These manv wires and poles are a nuisance, and 
a menace to public safety. There are many places in the 
business part of the city where a ladder could not be erected 
in case of fire. I cannot conceive of a more dangerous and 
unsightly condition in this respect than now exists. 

Tlie companies that own these wires have paid nothing to 
the city for the franchises which they now hold. -They are 
all organized as dividend-paving corporations. Each has a 
large revenue, derived directly from the patronage of the 
public. 

It is olivious that, as a matter of public safety, these wires 
should be, and sooner or later must be, placed in conduits un- 
derground. The companies owning them will not of their 



mayor's addkess. 17 

own accord move in the matter, and I consider it to be the 
duty of the present administration to take action. I recom- 
mend that an ordinance be passed requiring each of said com- 
panies to place their wires in conduits underground, within 
certain boundaries which shall be designated therein, giving 
each company a reasonable time to comply therewith, and to 
remove their poles, causing them no unnecessary damage or 
expense. 

PROHIBITORV LAW, 

I find that it has been customar)- for former mayors to make 
particular mention of the prohibitory law. It has been 
referred to in difl'erent ways, but I tind no instance where an 
incoming mayor has recommended its enforcement. The 
subject seems to have been passed over lightly, and appar- 
ently with fear. 

I am at a loss to understand why officials, sworn to enforce 
the laws of the state and city, and whose duty it is to enforce 
the same, should permit the open and notorious violation of 
this law. Certainl}-, there is enough misery and poverty 
caused by the traffic in intoxicating liquor to warrant the 
suppression of its sale. Police officers, who are ready and 
willing to enforce all other criminal statutes, neglect the 
enforcement of this statute. 

The number of arrests for drunkenness has increased 
steadily for the last ten years. In the year just closed, the 
number of arrests for that cause exceeds the number for any 
previous year. 

More than two-thirds of all arrests are for drunkenness, 
for keeping for sale, and selling spirituous and intoxicating 
liquors. It is safe to say that two-thirds of all the expense of 
the police department is incurred b}- reason, directly or indi- 
rectly, of the sale of intoxicating liquors. 

I shall require the city marshal, and the police officers 
under him, to prosecute all violations of this law as ftiithfully 
and impartially as they prosecute the violations of any other 
criminal statute. 



18 CITY OF CONCOUD. 

There are many other subjects and conditions which we 
are to meet that might be spoken of in these suggestions, but 
I consider it unnecessary. 

I will refer briefly to the industrial situation. 

The material progress of the city has suffered in c(jmmon 
with all sections of the country for the last three \ears. 
While many industries haye lost in yolume, one, at least, has 
largely increased. 

It was thought by many that when the Boston & ]Maine 
Railroad finalh' secured control of all the roads centering in 
Concord, the change would be to the disadvantage of the city. 
The reverse is fully proven. 

Concord has become an important railroad centre for the 
distribution of traffic. The railroad has built one of the best 
freight-\-ards in all the east, and shops which make repairs 
for several hundred miles of road. 

I have not the exact figures, but it is safe to say that the 
Boston & Maine Railroad employ nearly one thousand men 
who resitle in the city oi" work here. We have assurances 
that the traffic, which has now reached 1,500 freight cars 
per day, will soon be increased, and more men will be 
employed in the shops. 

This great advance is not the result of accident, but has 
been accomplished by the untiring effort and energy of the 
head of the local management. It is greatly to be desired 
that the railroad undertake one other work — that of building 
a railroad into the stone quarries. This enterprise would 
undoubtedly pay a fair return on the investment, would be a 
great benefit to the cit}-, and would double the granite 
industry. 

In conclusion, I am confident that all will unite heartily in 
reducing expenses where it can be done without impairing 
the public service, and that we all have only the public good 
at heart. How well we shall succeed, the future alone can 
disclose. By taking good care of the present, the future is 
secure. 



Ordinances and Joint Resolutions 



PASSED DURING THE 



YEAE ENDING JANUARY 26, 1900. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance repealing an ordinance passed March 9, 
1897, fixing the salaries of the police commissioners. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That an ordinance passed March 9, 1897, entitled, 
" An Ordinance fixing the salary of the Police Commissioners, and 
in amendment of section 13, chapter 37, of the revised ordinances," 
is hereby repealed. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force upon its 
passage. 

Passed February U, 1899. 



An Ordinance repealing an ordinance allowing a discount 
of two and one-half per centum on taxes. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloios : 

Section 1. That an ordinance passed IMarch 29, 1895, entitled, 
" An ordinance allowing a discount of two and one-half per centum 
on taxes," is hereby repealed. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force upon its 
passage. 

Passed February 14. 1899. 



20 CITY Ot CONCORD. 

An Okdinance amending section 15, chapter 37, of the 
revised ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Citij Council of the City of Concord, as follows r 
That section 15, of said ordinance, be amended by striking out the 
words, "four hundred," in the second line of said section, and insert- 
ing instead therein the words, " four hundred and twenty-five," also 
by striking out the words, " twenty-five," in the last line of said sec- 
tion, and inserting instead thereof the word, " fifty," so that said 
section as amended shall read as follows : 

The several boards of education shall be paid for all services 
performed by them, the sum of four hundred and twenty-five dollars 
per annum, to be divided as follows : The town district school board, 
the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars ; the board of educa- 
tion of Union school district, the sum of two hundred and fifty 
dollars ; the school board of school district number twenty, the sum 
of fifty dollars. ' 

Passed March 14, 1899. 



An Ordinance amending an ordinance passed January 10, 
1899, relating to the printing of the city reports. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoics : 
That section 1, of said ordinance, be amended by striking out the 
words, "twenty-eight hundred." and inserting in place thereof the 
■words, " fifteen hundred," so that said section, as amended, shall 
read as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be printed annually, under the direction 
of the pity auditor, fifteen hundred copies of the financial report of 
the city, together with all the annual reports of the city officials and 
heads of departments required to be made to the city council, the 
reports of all the boards of education in the city, vital statistics, and 
such other mattei" as the city council may order, for general distribu- 
tion among the citizens of Concord. Said report shall be prepared 
and issued on or before April first in each year. 
Passed March 14, 1899. 



An Ordinance relating to removing curtains, blinds, and 
screens from the windows, doors, and floors of saloons, 
shops and restaurants. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That the city marshal may at any time order the 

owner, keeper, or occupant of any shop, restaurant or saloon, to 

remove forthwith all curtains and blinds from the windows and 



CITY ORDINANCES. 21 

doovs of such shop, restaurant or saloon, and all screens from the 
floors thereof, whenever in his opinion such removal will aid in the 
prevention of crime. 

Sect. 2. Any person being the owner, occupant, or keeper of such 
shop, restaurant, or saloon, who neglects to comply with the order of 
the city marshal, as provided for in section one of this ordinance, 
shall, upon conviction thereof, pay a fine of five dollars for each day 
such curtains, blinds, and screens, or either of them, remain unre- 
moved. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force upon its 
passage. 

Passed March 14, 1899. 



Ax Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of 

MONEY TO BE RAISED ON THE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE GAS AND SEWERAGE PRECINCT. FOR 
THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained h]) tlie City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the gas and sewer- 
age precinct of said city the sum of one thousand, six hundred 
fifty-eight dollars and seventy-nine cents (.$1,6.58.79), which, together 
with the unexpended balance of 1898, amounting to $1,841.21, making 
a total of S3,000.00, which sum shall be appropriated as follows : 
.For construction and repairs of sewers in said precinct. 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of ten 
thousand dollars (!?10,000). which, together with the unexpended bal- 
ance for the year 1898, amounting to .$326.90, making a total of' 
$10,326.90, which sura shall be appropriated as follows : For light- 
ing of streets in said precinct. 

Sect. 3. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of S2,54.o 
which shall be appropriated as follows : For the payment of interest 
on sewer bonds of said precinct. 

Passed March 30, 1899. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of 
money to be raised on the taxable property and inhab- 
itants within the limits of the Penacook sewerage pre- 
cinct, for the ensuing year. 

Jie it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloios : 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook sew- 
erage precinct the sum of one thousand seven hundred and sixty 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

dollars ($1,760), to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance with an 
ordinance establishing a sinking fund, one thousand dollars (■•i?l,000). 

For the payment of interest that may become due on precinct 
bonds, seven hundred and sixty dollars (S760). 

For repair of sewers, one hundred seventy-nine dollars twenty-one 
cents ($179.21), the unexpended balance for the year 1898. 

Passed March 30, 1899. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of 
money to be raised on the taxable property and inhab- 
ITANTS WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE WeST CoNCORD SEWERAGE 
PRECINCT, FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That there shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord 
sewerage precinct the sum of eleven hundred and eighty dollars 
($1,180), to defray the necessary expenses and charges for said pre- 
cinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance with an 
ordinance establishing a sinking fund, five hundred dollars ($500). 

For the payment of interest that may become due on precinct 
bonds, six hundred and eighty dollars ($080). 

Passed March 30, 1899. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of 
money to be raised on the taxable property and inhab- 
ITANTS within THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT, FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling 
precinct of said city the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000), to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of the street sprinkling 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which is made up as follows : 
$841.50, unexpended balance of the year 1898, and $1,158.50 by taxa- 
tion in the year 1899. 

Sect. 2. In addition to the foregoing appropriation, the labor done 
by the fire department for the year 1899, in sprinkling streets, shall 
be available for that purpose without compensation to said fire 
department. 

Passed March 30, 1899. 



city okdinances. 23 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of 
money to be raised on the taxable property and inhab- 
ITANTS WITHIN THE East Concord sewerage precinct, for 

THE ensuing financial YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on polls and ratable estates within the East Concord sew- 
erage precinct the sum of one hundred and seventy dollars (S170), to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct fur the 
ensuing financial year, whicli shall be appropriated as follows : 

For tlie payment of the sum becoming due in accordance with an 
ordinance establisliing a sinking fund, one hundred dollars (-$100). 

For the payment of interest that may become due on precinct 
bonds, seventy dollars ($70). 

Passed March 30, 1899. 



Ax Ordinance amending an ordinance passed March 14, 

1899, RELATING TO PRINTING THE CITY REPORTS. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That section 1 of said ordinance be amended by striking out the 
words, " the reports of all the boards of education in the city," so 
that said section as amended shall read as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be printed annually, under the direction 
of the city auditor, fifteen hundred copies of the financial report of 
the city, together with all the annual reports of the city officials, and 
heads of departments, required to be made to the city council, vital 
statistics, and such other matter as the city council may order, for 
general distribution among the citizens of Concord. Said I'eport 
shall be prepared and issued on or before April first in each year. 
Passed April 11, 1899. 



An Ordinance amending an ordinance fixing and deter 
mining the amount of money to be raised on the taxa- 
ble property' and inhabitants within the limits of the 

PeNACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT, FOR THE ENSUING YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. Substitute the words, "twelve hundred and sixty 
dollars," in place of " seventeen hundred and sixty dollars," so that 
said section, when amended, shall read as follows : 



•24 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



Section 1. There shall be raised, and thei'e is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook sewer- 
age precinct, the sum of twelve hundred and sixty dollars, to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance with an 
ordinance establishing a sinking fund, five hundred dollars by taxa- 
ion, and there shall be appropriated from the accumulation of interest 
belonging to said fund, five hundred dollars, making a total sinking 
fund for the present financial year of one thousand dollai-s. 

For the payment of interest that may become due on precinct 
bonds, seven hundred and sixty dollars. 

For repairs of sewers, one hundred and seventy-nine dollars and 
twenty-one cents, the unexpended balance for tlie year 1S98. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect and be in force upon its passage. 

Passed April 11, 1899. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of 

MONEY TO be RAISED FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR, FOR 
THE USE OF THE CITY. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum 
of forty-four thousand, four hundred and thirty-two dollars 
($44,432), to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the city 
for the ensuing financial year, which, together with the sums which 
may be raised by taxes on railroads and from other sources, shall be 
appropriated as follows : 



For payment of memorial arch bonds 
payment of interest on bonds 
payment of interest on temporary loans 
support of city poor .... 
incidental expenses and land damages 
committee services .... 
printing and stationery 
beds at the INIargaret Pillsbury hospital 
Decoration Day ..... 
dependent soldiers .... 
public school text books 



$.5,000.00 

3,207.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

1,410,00 

2,000.00 

2.000.00 

345.00 

300.00 

2,500.00 



CITY ORDINANCES. 



25 



For open air concerts . 

Blossom Ilill Cemeterv 
Old North Cemetery 
West Concord Cemeter 
Millville Cemetery 
Pine Grove Cemetery 
• Old Fort Cemetery 
Horse Hill Cemetery 
Bradley Park 
Rollins Park 
AVhite Park . 
Penacook Park 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Salary of health officer 
Salary of board of health 
J'or rent 

care of pest house 
bacteriological tests 
material fnmigation 
all other expenses 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, city marshal 
Salary, deputy marshal 
Salary, captain of watch 
Salary of seven (7) i^atrol men 
Pay of janitor 
Pay of special policemen 
Fuel, city proper 
Fuel, Penacook . 
Board of horse and shoeing 
Extra horse hire, city . 
Extra horse hire, Penacook 
Lights in city and Penacook 
Rent at Penacook 
Water .... 
Ice .... 
Helmets and buttons . 
Police telephone service 
Incidental expenses 



$300.00 

1,200.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

175.00 

2.5.00 

50.00 

25.00 

400.00 

1,500.00 

75.00 

127,312.00 

ssoo.oo 

75.00 
27.00 
15.00 

100.00 
25.00 

150.00 

$1,192.00 

$1,200.00 

900.00 

850.00 

5,600.00 

240.00 

150.00 

2.50.00 

3.5.00 

252.00 

15.00 

15.00 

180.00 

108.00 

28.00 

10.00 

50.00 

150.00 

1.50.00 



$10,183.00 



26 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SALARIES. 

Mayor 

City clerk . 

Overseer of the poor, Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 
Overseer of the poor, Ward 1 
Overseer of the poor, Ward 2 
City auditor 
City solicitor 
City treasurer 
City messenger . 
Care of city clocks 
Clerk of the common council 
Board of education. Union School District 
Board of education, district No. 20 
Town district school board 
Nine (9) assessors 
Nine (9) moderators . 
Nine (9) ward clerks . 
Twenty-seven (27) selectmen 
Judge of the police court . 
Clerk of the police court 
Collector of taxes, so much as may be necessary of the 
sum of 



$1,000.00 

1,200.00 

200.00 

30.00 

10.00 

1,000.00 

.500.00 

250.00 

600.00 

85.00 

50.00 

2.50.00 

50.00 

200.00 

1,500.00 

27.00 

90.00 

135.00 

800.00 

200.00 

1,500.00 

$9,677.00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Salaries 

For all other expenses 



.12,760.00 
1,940.00 

$4,700.00 



enginep:ring department. 




Salary of city engineer . . . . 


. $1,500.00 


Salary assistants 


800.00 


Supplies . . . ■ 


100.00 


Repairs 


30.00 


Rent 


51.00 


Incidentals 


200.00 


New furniture • 


20.00 



$2,701.00 



CITY ORDINANCES. 



27 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Salary of commissioner .... 

General maintenance and repairs for streets 
Permanent work ...... 

Macadam at Penacook .... 

Cleaning streets . . . . 

Catch basins and cleaning .... 

New sidewalks and crossings 

Repairing concrete ..... 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Pay roll of permanent men 
Semi-annnal pay roll ..... 
Rent, Veteran Firemen's Association 
Extra men for vacations .... 
For all other expenses .... 

For hose carriage at West Concord . 



$1,400.00 
18,000.00 
6,500.00 
1,000.00 
:3,.500.00 
1,500.00 
4,000.00 
500.00 

$36,400.00 

$6,518.00 

6,930.00 

150.00 

214.16 

6,187.84 
375.00 

$20,375.00 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of thirty- 
six thousand, one hundred and thirty-five dollars ($36, 135), for the sup- 
port of schools for the ensning.financial year, which, together with the 
income of the Abial AValker fund, shall be appropriated and divided 
among the several school districts according to the valuation thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing, there is appropriated for 
the cemeteries of the city one-half of the income from the sale of lots 
and the income derived from the care of lots and grading, which 
sum shall be deposited by the superintendents, or others receiving 
them, in the city treasury. The care pf lots for which the city holds 
trust funds shall be paid from the money appropriated for the 
care of cemeteries, and so mucli of the income from these trust funds 
as may be thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at 
the close of tiie year, and the remainder, in each instance, credited to 
the individual funds. 

Passed April 11, 1899. 



An Ordinance appropriating 

POLICE department. 



eight hundred dollars for 



Be it ordained b// the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 
Section 1. That eight hundred dollars ($800) be, and is hereby, 

appropriated to make up for deficiency in the police department. 
Passed ]May 9, 1899. 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Oudixance rklating to vacations of police officers. 

Be it ordained hij the. Citi/ Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. 'J'Jiat the city marshal, deputy marshal, captain of 
the night watch, and patrolmen, shall each be entitled to two weeks' 
vacation in every year, without deduction from their salaries. 

Sect. 2. The city marshal shall designate the time at which each 
member of the police force shall take his vacation. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force upon its 
passage. 

Passed June 13,1899. 



An Ordinance relating to the acceptance of assignments 

OF WAGES. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to accept 
assignments of wages, or orders, on behalf of the city, the same to be 
recorded by the city clerk in the usual form, and all assignments 
heretofore accepted by the mayor are hereby ratified. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall be in force upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1899. 



An Ordinance authorizing the transfer of funds of the 
Penacook sewerage precinct. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs : 

Section 1. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to trans- 
fer from the accumulated earnings of the sinking fund of Penacook 
sewerage precinct the sum of three hundred and eighty-nine dollars 
and eighty-eight cents, to the appropriation of maintenance of said 
precinct. 

Passed July 11, 1899. 



An Ordinance relating to the employment of laborers 
UPON the public works of the city. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That the heads of departments of the city of Con- 
cord be, and hereby are, instructed to employ upon the public works 
of the city, so far as possible, with a due regard to the public welfare, 
persons who are residents and taxpayers of said city of Concord. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 29 

The foregoing provision of this section shall not be construed 
to prevent the employment of any soldier or sailor who is exempt 
from taxation under the provisions of the public laws of the state, or 
any amendment thereof. 

Sect. 2. That the provisions of a joint resolution passed by the 
city council May 9, 1899, entitled, "A Resolution Relating to the 
-Employment of Native Born or Naturalized Citizens of North 
America upon the Public Works of the City," be, and the same is 
hereby, repealed. 

Sect. 3. That this ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed July 11, 1899. 



An Ordinance making nine hours a day's labor in city 
departments. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That nine hours shall constitute a day's labor, in all 
departments of the city, excepting the fire and police departments. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall be in force from and after the -Slst 
day of August, 1899. 

Passed Augusts, 1899. 



An Ordinance in amendment of Section 23, Chapter 37, of 

THE revised ordinances RELATING TO SALARIES OF OVERSEERS 
OF POOR. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That section 23, chapter 37, of the revised ordinances 
be amended by striking out tlie words, " two hundred," in the last 
line of said section, and inserting in place thereof the words, 
"three hundred and fifty," so that said section as amended shall 
read as follows : 

The overseers of poor shall receive for their services in Ward 1, 
thirty dollars ; in Ward 2, ten dollars ; in all other wards, three 
hundred and fifty dollars. 

Sect. 2. Tliis ordinance shall take effect from and after its pas- 
sage, and shall apply to the present municipal term. 

Passed October 10, 1899. 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ax Ordinance relating to salaries of the several boards 
OF education. 

Be it ordained hy the Cily Council of the City of Concord, m follows : 

Section 1. The several boards of education shall be paid for all 
services performed by thein, the sum of five hundred dollars per 
annum, to be divided as follows : The town district school board, 
the sum of two hundred dollars ; the board of education of Union 
school district, the sura of two hundred and fifty dollars ; the school 
board of school district number twenty, the sum of fifty dollars. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 14, 1S99. 



An Ordinance repealing Section 8, Chapter 7, of the ordi- 
nances OF THE city relating TO .lOB TEAMS. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That said Section 8, Chapter 7, of the city ordinances 
is hereby repealed. 

Sect. 2. That this ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed November 14, 1899. 



An Ordinance relating to the investment of cemetery 
trust funds. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. Whereas, by Chapter 40, Session Laws of this state 
for 1899, it was provided that (Section 1.) Any town or city which 
now holds, or hereafter may hold in trust, by bequest or otherwise, 
any fund for the care of any cemetery or any private lot therein, may 
pay the same into the town or city treasury, and so long as the same 
remains therein, said town or city sliall pay thereon an annual 
income at the rate of three and one-half per cent., which income 
shall be expended in accordance with the terms of the trust by which 
said fund or funds is held. (Sect. 2.) This act shall not be in force 
except in such towns and cities as by vote of the town or city council 
shall so elect. 

Sect. 2. That said act be, and hereby is, adopted and in force in 
this city, and the city council hereby so elects. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force upon its 
passage. 

Passed November 14, 1899. 



city ordinances. 31 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 2 of an ordinance 
PASSED March 12, 1895, relating to the salary of the 
chief engineer of the fire department. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That Section 2 of an ordinance passed March 12, 
1895, entitled, " An Ordinance in amendment of Chapters 18 and 22 
of the Revised Ordinances," relating respectively to the "Fire Depart- 
ment " and the " Water Works " be, and hereby is, amended by 
striking out the words, " nine hundred and fifty," and insei-ting the 
words, '• ten hundred and fifty," so that said section as amended 
shall read as follows : 

The chief engineer shall give his entire time to the duties of his 
office, and shall not engage in or be connected with any other busi- 
ness or occupation, and shall reside in a house to be furnished by 
the city free from rent. He shall receive in full for his services, in 
addition to the use of said house rent free, the sum of ten liundred 
and fifty dollars per annum. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall be in force and take effect on the 
first day of January, 1900. 

Passed December 30, 1899. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



A Joint Resolution changing ward five ward room into 

CITY OFFICES. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follouis : 

That the matter of changing the Ward Five ward room into offices 
for use by city officials, be, and hereby is, referred to the committee on 
lands and buildings with full power to act, the amount to be 
expended not to exceed $225. 

Passed January 26, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution inviting bids for printing and binding 

THE annual city REPORTS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city auditor is hereby instructed to invite bids for print- 
ing and binding the annual reports of the city of Concord, and 
submit the same to the finance committee, who shall report the same 
to the board of aldermen. 

Passed February 14, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution inviting bids for use of the average 
monthly balance of the city deposit. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the auditor is hereby instructed to invite bids from the 
several national banks in Concord for use of the monthly average 
balance of the city deposit, and submit the bids to the finance com- 
mittee, w'ho shall report the same to the city council. 

Passed February 14, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution inviting bids for shoeing the city 

HORSES BY the YEAR. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the auditor invite bids for shoeing the city horses by the 
year, and submit the same when received to the finance committee,, 
who shall report to the board of aldermen. 

Passed February 14, 1899. 



RESOLUTIONS. 33 

A Joint Resolution inviting offers, at what rate of 

INTEREST MONEY WILL I$E LOANED TO THE CITY. 

Resolced by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city auditor is hereby instructed to invite offers, at what 
rate of interest money will be let to the city of Concord for the year 
1899, on temporary loans, and submit the same to the finance com- 
mittee, who shall report the same to the board of aldermen. 

Passed February 14, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to paying salaries, pay- 
rolls, AND RENTS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his warrant 
on tlie city treasurer for. the payment of all salaries, pay-rolls and 
rents as the same shall become due, and be approved bv the city 
auditor during the present municipal term, and all bills so paid shall 
be laid before the committee on accounts and claims at their next 
meeting. 

Passed February U, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution relating to the leasing of city 
property. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloros : 

That the mayor and committee on lands and buildings shall have 
full power to act in all matters pertaining to the leasing of any of 
the city property, to fix the rental thereof and the other terms of the 
leases. 

Passed February 11, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution providing for a temporary loan, not 

exceeding in total fifty thousand DOI/LARS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city treasurer, under the advice and direction of the com- 
mittee on finance, is hereby authorized to borrow on the credit of the 
city, from time to time as the same shall be needed, a sum or sums 
of money not exceeding in total amount fifty thousand dollars, at the 
lowest practical per centum, the same to be used in meeting the 

3 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

usual and current expenses of the city during the present fiscal year, 
as they become due. The amount so borrowed to be paid as soon as 
the amount received from taxes will pay the same. 
Passed March 14, 1S99. 



A Resolution relating to the employment of native born 

OR NATURALIZED CITIZENS OF NoRTH AMERICA UPON THE PUB- 
LIC WORKS OF THE CIT\^ 

Resolred hy the City Council af the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the heads of all departments of the city of Concord be, and 
hereby are, instructed to engage only native born or naturalized 
citizens of the United States of North America, in and upon 
the public works of the city, and so far as possible, all public work 
shall be done by such citizens who are residents of the city of 
Concord. 

This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed Mav 9, 1899. 



A Resolution awarding the contract for printing the 

ANNUAL CITY REPORTS FOR 1898. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That E. T. McShane, of Concord, N. H., be, and hereby is, awarded 
the contract for printing the annual reports of the city for 1898, 
agreeably to his proposal dated May 9, 1899, and that he give a bond 
in the sum of ifoOO.OO, with sureties in proper form satisfactory to the 
city solicitor, for the faithful performance of his contract, and we 
require as part of said contract that the entire labor involved in 
printing and binding said reports be performed in the city of 
Concord. 

Passed May 9, 1899. 



A Resolution appropriating $278.30 balance duk for repairs 
on city offices. 

Resolred by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of two hundred and sevent3'-eight and thirty one- 
hundredths dollars be appropriated to pay the balance due for 
repairing city offices in the police station building, and the same is 
hereby appropriated out of any money not otherwise appropriated, 
and that the same be charged to incidentals and land danuige. 

Passed June 13, 1899. 



RESOLUTIONS. 35 

A Resolution appropriating the sum of four hundred 

DOLLARS FOR HEATING, LIGHTING AND PAINTING ENGINE AND 
WARD HOUSE IN WARD TWO. 

Resolred by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follov:s : 

Tliat the sum of four limidred dollars be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated for heating, lighting and painting the engine and ward house 
in ward two. and that the same be appropriated out of any funds not 
otherwise appropriated, and that the same be charged to incidentals 
and land damage. 

Passed June 13,1899. 



A KeSOLUTION relating to the TITLE OF THE CITY HALL 
REAL ESTATE. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city solicitor be, and hereby is, instructed to furnish to the 
city council an abstract of the title to the real estate and city hall, 
now occupied by the city in connection with Merrimack County, 
therein showing the respective rights of the city and county. 

Passed June 13, 1899. 



A Resolution authorizing a settlement of the taxes due 

FROM THE CONTOOCOOK jNIaNUFACTURIXG AND MECHANICS 

Company, for the years 1897 and 1898. 
Resolred by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloics : 

That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to receive from the 
Contoocook Manufacturing and Meciianics Company, ten hundred 
dollars, in full payment and discharge of the taxes due therefrom for 
the years 1897 and 1898. 

Passed July 11, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution relating to the city liquor agency. 
Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloics : 

Whereas, it is claimed that the appointment by the mayor of B. F. 
Tucker as city liquor agent is invalid because the present city 
government did not, prior to April 1, 1899, and prior to said appoint- 
ment, vote to establish a liquor agency for the ensuing year ; and 
whereas said Tucker is now assuming to carry on business as the 
legally appointed liquor agent for said city, notwithstanding the fact 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

that the comniittee on accounts and claims l^ave refused to approve 
his accounts, and notwithstanding an adverse opinion of the city 
solicitor ; and whereas, bills to a large amount incurred by said 
Tucker have already been presented against the city, and to further 
permit the said Tucker to hold himself out as such liquor agent may 
involve the city in expensive litigation with parties who may rely 
upon his apparent authority ; and the only practicable and speedy 
■ method of securing a determination by the court of the legal status 
of said liquor agency is by a complaint against said Tucker for the 
illegal sale of liquors ; and whereas, it is for the interest of said city, 
as well as said Tucker, that tliis question be determined before 
further legal complications arise. 

The board of police commissioners are hereby requested to instruct 
the city marshal to commence a proceeding against B. F. Tucker for 
the illegal sale of liquors, and prosecute the same to final decision. 

Passed Jul V 11, 1S99. 



A Joint Resolution making available funds for the use 
OF Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Resolced by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That in anticipation of receipts of income from the sale of lots 
and other sources of the Blossom Hill Cemetery, the auditor be, and 
hereby is, authorized to approve bills and accounts against said 
cemetery from this date to the end of the present financial year to an 
amount not exceeding ($2,500) twenty-five hundred dollars, and 
that the mayor is hereby authorized to draw his warrant for the pay- 
ment of the same. 

Passed Julv 11, 1S99. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing a loan of nineteen 

THOUSAND, FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS. 

Resoleeil by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city treasurer, under the direction and approval of the 
committee on finance, is hereby authorized to borrow temporarily on 
the credit of the city, nineteen thousand, five hundred dollars, in 
anticipation of the taxes for the present municipal year, and to issue 
the note of the city therefor, said note to be paid from the taxes of 
the present municipal year. 

Passed July 11, 1899. 



RESOLUTIONS. 37 

A Joint Resolution making available funds for the high- 
way DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of five hundred (500) dollars of the appropriation 
for permanent work of the highway department be, and the same 
hereby is, made available for the construction of bicycle paths around 
certain bad places in the highways leading into the city ; and the 
commissioner of highways is hereby authorized to expend the same 
at his discretion. 

Passed July 11, 1899. 



A Resolution authorizing a loan of fifty thousand 

DOLLARS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city treasurer, under the direction and approval of the 
committee on finance, is hereby authorized and empowered to borrow 
temporarily on the credit of the city, fifty thousand dollars, in 
anticipation of the taxes for the present municipal year, and to issue 
the notes of the city therefor, for such part thereof as may from 
time to time be borrowed, said notes to be paid from the taxes for 
the present municipal year. 
Passed July 11, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution to provide water for fire purposes in 

WARD ONE. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the board of water commissioners be requested by His 
Honor, the Mayor, to secure for Ward l,in the city of Concord, such 
a supply of water as in their judgment shall meet the imperative 
demands of said ward for fire purposes, either by a supply from the 
high pressure service or by a contract with the Penacook and Bos- 
cawen water precinct. 

That we ask for immediate action to be taken in the matter. 
Passed August 8, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the purchase of a tract 
of land for a gravel bank for use on the highway. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the commissioner of highways is hereby authorized to pur- 
chase of Elmer S. Ellsworth, one acre of land situated in Boscawen, 
N. H., for a gravel bank for use upon the highways, and to pay there- 
for three hundred dollars, which sum shall be charged to general 
maintenance of highways. 
Passed August 8, 1899. 



38 CITY OK CONCORD. 

A Joint Resolution establishing a liquor agency. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the mayor is hereby authorized to appoint, not exceeding 
three liquor agents, agreeably to an act of the legislature approved 
March 11, 1899, entitled, " An act to provide for the appointnient of 
state and town liquor agents, and to regulate their conduct." And 
that the committee on accounts and claims be, and hereby are, 
authorized to approve all outstanding bills against the city pertaining 
thereto. 

Passed August 8, 1S99. 



A Joint Resolution to pay for real estate sold to the city 
OF Concord for the years 1896, 1897 and 1898 taxes. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of ^3,714.. 52 be, and hereby is, appropriated out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay for the 
taxes of 1896, 1897 and 1898, on real estate sold for taxes unpaid 
and bid in by said city of Concord. 

Passed September 12, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution making appropriation for decorating 
city hall building. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That twelve dollars and fifty cents be appropriated to pay one-half 
the expense of decorating city hall building on the day of the cele- 
bration of Old Home week, and that the same be charged to inci- 
dentals. 

Passed September 12, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing a temporary loan of 

$2,000. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city treasurei- be, and hereby is, authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city the sum of $2,000 for the construction and 
maintenance of sewers in the city sewerage precinct. 

Passed September 12, 1899. 



KKSOLLTIONS. 39 

A Joint Resolution making available certain funds in 
ANY general appropriation. 

Resolved by the Citij Council of the Citij of Concord, ns follows : 
That the auditor be, and hereby is, authorized by transfer from the 

excess of any item in general appropriation to make up any iusuffi- 

ciences in any item or items in the same general appropriation. 

This resolution to be in foi-ce daring the present financial year. 
Passed September 12, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution exempting the new machinery and 
stock of the Xew Hampshire Spinning Mills from tax- 
ation. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the machinery, stock and improvements to be made on the 
plant formerly occupied by the Contoocook Manufacturing and 
Mechanics Company, in Penacook, Concord, N. H., and the capital to 
be used in operating the same, be exempted from taxation to the 
New Hampshire Spinning Mills for the term of ten years from the 
passage hereof, according to the provisions of Section 11, of Chapter 
55, of the Public Statutes of New Hampshire. 

Passed September V2, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the borrowing of the 
SUM of fifteen hundred dollars for the use of the 
street sprinkling precinct. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to borrow on the 
credit of the city the sum of fifteen hundred dollars, in anticipation 
of the taxes for the year 1900, for use in the street sprinkling pre- 
cinct, for sprinkling streets. 

Passed October 10, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution providing for a temporary loan of 
•fl,250, IN payment for a tract of land purchased by the 

city for an ADDITION TO ROLLINS PaRK. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city treasurer, under the advice and direction of the 
committee on finance be, and hereby is, authorized to procure by a 
temporary loan upon the credit of the city, the sum of iSl,250, at a 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

rate of interest not exceeding three and one-half per centum, to be 
used in payment of a tract of land purchased by the city for an 
addition to Rollins Park. Said note to become due on the first day 
of December, 1900. 

Passed November 14, 1899. 



A Joint Rksolution providing for a temporary loan of 
S5,000, in pay'ment of a note for that amount which 

BECAME DUE MARCH 7. 1899. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city treasurer, under the advice and direction of the com- 
mittee on finance be, and hereby is, authorized to procure a temporary 
loan upon the credit of the city for the sum of S5,000, at a rate of 
interest not exceeding three and one-half per centum, to be used in 
payment of a note given by the city for a temporary loan March 7, 
1898, which sum was used to pay for an addition to Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. Three thousand dollars of said loan to become due on 
the first day of December, 1900, and two thousand dollars of said 
loan to become due on the first day of December, 1901. 

Passed December 14, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating fifteen hundred dol- 
lars FOR salaries. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of fifteen hundred dollars be, and the same is, 
hereby appropriated for salaries, and that the same be paid out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated. 

Passed December 14, 1899. 



A Resolution in amendment of a resolution exempting 

FROM taxation CERTAIN PROPERTY OF WiLKINS, FoSTER & 

Clough, passed May' 14, 1895, and ix amendment of a res- 
olution EXTENDING SAID EXEMPTION TO THE NeW HAMPSHIRE 

Fruit Company, passed December 10, 1895. 

Whereas, certain property of Wilkins, Foster & Clough was 
exempted from taxation, by a resolution passed ]\Iay 14, 1895, and 
whereas that exemption was extended to the New Hampshire Fruit 
Company for the remaining portion of said ten years from the pas- 
sage of said original exemption, by a resolution passed December 10, 
1895, and whereas, said New Hampshire Fruit Company has con- 



RESOLUTIONS. 41 

veyed said property exempted to said Willvius, Foster & Clough to 
one William B. Wilson who, in turn, has conveyed the same to the 
Haines, Piper Company who are now the owners thereof, and are 
carrying on the business heretofore carried on by said Wilkins, 
Foster & Clouoh, and by said New Hampshire Fruit Company, upon 
and in connection with the premises so exempted by said resolutions 
of May 14, 1895, and December 10, 1895 ; 
Now, therefore, be it 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the exemption from taxation extended to Wil- 
kins, Foster & Clough, for the period of ten years, by virtue of said 
resolution of May 14, 1895, and to the said New Hampshire Fruit 
Company, for the unexpired portion of the said ten years, by said 
resolution of Decenjher 10, 1895, be, and the same is hereby, extended 
to said Haines, Piper Co., for and during the unexpired portion of 
the said ten years, commencing at and from the passing of said 
original resolution of May 14, 1895. 

Passed December 14, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the payment of interest. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to use such 
portion of the interest received from monthly balances of the city 
■deposit, as may be necessary to pay any deficiencies due for interest 
from the city on sums of money borrowed for the use of the city dur- 
ing the present financial year. 

Passed December ;30, 1899. 



A Joint Resolution relative to the discontinuance of a 
highway laid out by the original proprietors of Rum- 
ford. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloios : 

That the highway beginning at the southerly line of Ferry street 
on land of Joseph Stickney, thence running south 23 degi-ees east, 
1,600 feet ; thence south 49 degrees west, 510 feet ; thence south 29 
degrees west, 285 feet; thence south 49 degrees 30 minutes west, 
142 feet to the northerly line of P>ridge street at the westerly end of 
the Loudon bridge, be, and hereby is, discontinued. 

Passed December 30, 1899. 



42 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in 

THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 

Resolved hij the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of f 1,555.92 be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
to pay outstanding claim's as follows : 



City poor .... 

City liistory 

Engineering department 

Penacook Park . 

Police and watch 

Board of health . 

White Park 

Incidentals and land damage 

Bradley Park 

Penacook bridges 



i 18.90 

i5o.oa 

16.20 
2.66 

214.01 
56.35 

177.73 
57.98 
19.50 
17.61 



cemeteries. 



West Concord Cemetery 
Blossom Hill Cemetery 
Old North Cemetery . 



11.68 

775.62 

37.68 

1 ,.555.92 



Sect. 2. That there is transferred to the appropriation for the 
highway department for the year 1899 the sum of $1,208.05, the earn- 
ings of said department, which sum shall be credited to the appro- 
priation for said year. And the sum of fl,205.12 be, and hereby is, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, to pay outstanding claims against said department for the 
year 1899. 

Passed February 27, 1900. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 

CONCORD, N. H. 

Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, biennially. 



1899-1900. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 
Elected biennially in November by the people. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

NATHANIEL F.. MARTIN. 

Office : Martin & Luscomb's Block. 



ALDERMEN. 



Elected biennially in November by voters in each ward. No salary as such, 
but an allowance for committee service. 

Ward i— CHARLES E. FOOTE. 

HARRY G. ROLFE. 
Ward 2— JOHN W. SANBORN. 
■ Ward 5— HIRAM E. QUIMBY. 
Ward ^— HARRY H. DUDLEY. 

EBEN M. WILLIS. 

JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward o— HARLEY B. ROBY. 

JAMES E. RANDLETT. 
Ward 6— WILLIAM McC. LEAVER. 

EBENEZER B. HUTCHINSON. 
Ward 7— FRANK W. PAIGE. 

ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON. 
Ward <s"— GEORGE G. JENNESS. 
Ward 9— CHARLES J. FRENCH. 



44 CITY OK CONCORD. 

CITY CLERK. 

Elected bieimially in January by City Council. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

Office: City Hall Building. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elected biennially in November by voters of each ward. No salary as such, 
but an allowance for committee service. 

President— FRED H. GOULD. 

Ward i— WILLIAM TAYLOR. 

JOSEPH NEWSOME. 
Ward 2— RUFUS C. BOYNTON. 
Ward 5— JUSTUS O. CLARK. 
Ward 4— JAMES W. McMURPHY. 

JAMES E. TUCKER. 

JOHN W. PLUMMER. 
Ward .5— FRANCIS PL CORSER. 

FRED H. COULD. 
Ward 6'— HENRY B. COLBY. 

HENRY C. BROWN. 
Ward 7— DAVID A. WELCH. 

ARTHUR E. MAX AM. 
Ward c9— INIICHAEL MULCAHY. 
Ward .9— DAVID SULLIVAN, JR. 

CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 
Elected biennially in January by Common Council. Salary, $50 per annum. 

ANTONIO J. SOUZA. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 
On Finance — The Mayor; Aldermen Blackwood and French ; 

CouDcilnien Cors^er and Colby. 
On Accounta and ClainiK — Aldermen Rolfe and Roby ; Council- 
men Coll)y and McMurphy. 
Oil Lavds and Bnildiiif/s — Aldermen Paige and Randlett ; Coun- 
cilmen Taylor and Clark. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 45 

On Public Instrudlon — Aldermen "Willis and Rolfe ; Council- 
men Maxam and Brown. 

On Parks and Commons — Aldermen Hutchinson and Jenness ; 
Councilmen Brown and Tucker. 

On Roads and Bridges — Aldermen Sanborn and Johnson ; 
Councilmen Welch and Newsome. 

On Fire Department — Aldermen Quimby and Leaver ; Council- 
men Taylor and Sullivan. 

On Lighting Streets — Aldermen French and Dudley ; Council- 
men riummer and Mulcahy. 

On Ce)ueteries — Aldermen Q'^'ii^^^y '^""^^ AVillis ; Councilmen 
Clark and Boynton. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Elections and Returns — Aldermen Jenness and Roby. 

On Engrossed Ordinances — Aldermen Willis and Rolfe. 

On Bills, Second Reading — Aldermen Blackwood and Dudley. 

On Police and Licenses — Aldermen Blackwood and Roby. 

On Severs and Brains — The Mayor; Aldermen Dudley, Rolfe, 
Willis and Paige. 

On Streets and Sideivalks — The Mayor ; Aldermen Foote, Jen- 
ness and Hutchinson. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN COMMON COUNCIL. 
On Elections and Returns — Councilmen Welch and Newsome. 
On Bills, Second Reading — Councilmen McMurphy and Plum- 

mer. • 
On Engrossed Ordinances — Councilmen Tucker and Newsome. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Bond to the acceptance of 
the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $250 per annum. 

ALVIN B. CROSS. 

Office : National State Capital Bank. 



46 CITV OF CONCORD. 

CITY AUDITOR. 

Appointed bicMinially by the Mayor witli the approval of the Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

JAMES H. MORRIS.* 

Office: City Hall Building. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: Police Station Building. 



CITY MESSENGER. 
Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $600 per anuuni. 

EDWARD A. STEVENS. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Bond within 
six days to satisfaction of the board. Salary, live mills for each dollar of 
first $60,000; seven and one half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

WENDELL P. LADD. 

Office: Smith's Block. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

President, JOHN C. OR D WAY. 
Secretary, HENRY F. HOLLIS. 
Moderator, CHAS. C. DANFORTH. 
Clerk, LOUIS C. MERRILL. 
Auditors, JOSEPH C. A. HILL, 
WM. Y EATON. 

*JOHN B. ABBOTT till March 3. 1899. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 47 

Three elected annually in March by voters of Union School District. Sal- 
ary, 1250 per annum for the hoard. 



john c. ordway, 
susan j. woodward, 
hp:nry f. hollis, 
amos j. shurtleff, 
willis d. thompson, 
henry c. brown, 
john m. mitchell, 
susan c. bancroft, 
charles r. corning, 



Term expi 



•es March, 1900. 

" 1900. 

" 1900. 

" 1901. 

" 1901. 

" , 1901. 

" 1902. 
1902. 

" 1902. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

Appointed annually in July by Board of Education. Salary, $l,SOO per 

annum. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 

Office: High School Building, School Street. 

PENACOOK— District No. 20. 

One member of Board of Education elected annually in March by voters of 
district. Salary, $50 per annum for the board. 



IRA PHILLIPS, 
A. L. PARKER, 
OSCAR E. SMITH, 



Term expires Marcli, 1900. 
" " " 1901. 

" " " 1902. 



TOWN DISTRICT. 

Comprising all districts in the city except Union School District and No. 20. 
Elected annually in March by voters of district. Salary, $200 per annum 
for the board. 



FALES P. VIRGIN, 
ALBERT SALTMARSH, 
GEORGE T. ABBOTT, 



Term expires March, 1900. 
" " " 1901. 

" " " 1902. 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TRUANT OFFICERS. 

Appointed biennially in -January by Board of ^Nlayor and Aldermen. Salary 

as such, none. 

G. SCOTT LOCKE. 
JAMES E. RAND. 
DANIEL S. FLANDERS. 
FRED N. EATON. 
JAMES KELLEY. 
CHARLES W. HALL. 
W. D. BARRETT. 
JOHN E. GAY. 
CHARLES H. ROAVE. 
SAMUEL L. BATCHELDER. 
JOHN G. PUTNAM. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 
Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 
Ward 7— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 2— JOHN E. FRYE. 
Ward 5— PAUL K. HOLDEN. 
Ward ^— JOHN M. MITCHELL. 
Ward 5— AMOS J. SHURTLEFF. 
Ward 6— JAMES S. NORRIS. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward <?— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward 9— MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by Trustees of Library. Salary, 81000 )ier annum. 

GRACE BLAN CHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, .$450 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. 
MABEL P. BUNKER. 
WINNIE I. JAMES. 

Fowler Library Building. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



49 



ASSESSORS. 



Elected biennially by voters of each ward. Salary, $3 per day of actual 

service. 

Ward i— OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 
Ward 5— WILLIAM A. COWLEY. 
Ward 5— JOSEPH E. SHEPARD. 
Ward 4— BA^IEL C. WOODMAN. 
Ward 5— GEORGE F. UNDERHILL. 
Ward 6— GEORGE S. DENNETT. 
Ward 7— JONATHAN B. WEEKS. 
Ward 5— JOHN J. LEE. 
Ward .9— JAMES AHERN. 



CITY WATER-WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 



JOHN WHITAKER, 
HENRY E. CONANT, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
FRANK D. ABBOT, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
WILLIAM E. HOOD, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
TIMOTHY P. SULLIVAN, 



Terra exp 



)ires March 31, 


1900. 




1900. 




1901. 




1901. 




1902. 




1902. 




1903. 




1903. 



President — AVilliam P. Fiske. 
Clerk — Frank D. Abbot, 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Elected annually in April by Water Commissioners. Salary, $1,800 per 

annum. 

V. CHARLES HASTINGS. 

Office ; White's Block, Capitol Street. 



50 CITY OK CUNCOKD. 

.FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Term unlimited. Salary 
$950 per annum and rent of house. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Appointed by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Term nnlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $125 each per annvini. 

JOHN J. McNULTY. 
WILLIAM E. DOW. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $25 per annum. 

ABIAL W. ROLFE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $10 per annum. 

JOHN E. FRYE. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

LESLIE H. CROWTHER. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 
CHAS. P. WHITE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 
PATRICK CONWAY. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 51 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $S5 per annum. 

JOHN P. PAIGE. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $800 per annum, fixed by City 

Council. 

BENJAMIN E. BADGER. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $2 per day of actual service. 

AMOS J. SHURTLEFF. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $500 per annum. 

HARRY G. SARGENT. 

Office : 60 North Main Street. 



CLERK OP POLICE COURT. 

Appointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by the Legislature. 

HARRY R. HOOD. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Bond of $1,000 re- 
quired. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

GEORGE S. LOCKE. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Salary, $900 per 

annum. 

JAMES E. RAND. 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, .S800 each per annum. 

Daniel S. Flanders, Captain of Night Watch. 
Salary, $850 per annum. 
Fred M. Eaton, Charles W. Hall, 

Whitney D. Barrett, John G. Putnam, 

James Kelley, Charles H. Rowe, 

John E. Gay, Samuel L. Batehelder. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Geo. H. Silsby, Captain and Drill Master. 

John T. Batchelder, Alvin H. Urann, 

Wm. H. H. Patch, Thomas P. Davis, 

W. A. Little, Abiel C. Abbott, 

W. A. Fhmders, Harvey N. Oakes, 

O. H. Bean, * Geo. N. Fellows, 

Hoyt Robinson, Charles E. Kelley, 

Irving B. Robinson, Rufus C. Boynton, 

Geo. W. Chesley, James Jepson. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, S2 each per day for actual 

service. 

Robert Crowther, Alphonso Vene, 

Eli Hanson, Robert Hill, 

Clark D. Stevens, John T. Kimball, 

Moody S. Farnum, James F. Ward, 

Almah C. Leavitt, Horace Plummer, 

Oscar F. Richardson, Charles E. Palmer, 

Orlando I. Godfrey, • Henry C. Mace, 

Richard P. Sanborn, Justus O. Clark, 

pjdward H. Dixon, Charles H. Richardson, 

William J. Ahern, Ira C. Phillips', 

George W. Waters, Lewis C. Stevenson, 

Henry A. Rowell, W. H. Meserve, 

, Josepli C. Eaton, Moses T. Rowidl, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



53 



Napoleon B. Burleigh, 
Edward H. Haskell, 
John H. Carr, 
Edward M. Nason, 
James M. Jones, 
Albert F. Smith, 
Charles H. Dudley, 
Greorge E. Davis, 
Charles M. Norria, 
John J, Crowley, 



Charlie C. Plumer, 
Edward C. Hussey, 
Horace B. Annis, 
John Knowlton, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
Milton Colby, 
Ashbury F. Tandy, 
Henry J. Durrell, 
Patrick McGuire, 
Frank L. Hod"fdon. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 

COMMISSIONER OP HIGHWAYS. 

Elected aunually in January by City Council. Bond, $3,000. Salary, $1,400 

per annum. 

HENRY H. JOHNSON. 

Office : Police Station Building. 



LICENSED 

Appointed annually in January 

William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
George S. Milton, 
O. H. T. Richardson, 
Michael J. Lee, 
Daniel Mandigo, 
Edward H. Ramlall, 
Michael C. Casey, 
Timothy Kenna, 
James Cassidy, 
B. Frank Varney, 
Louis Auger, 
John Sweeney, 
Isaac Baty, 
W. Arthur Bean, 



DRAIN-LAYERS. 

by Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
salary. 

Henry H. Morrill, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
Miles F. Farmer, 
Charles L. Norris, 
Charles L. Fellows, 
Thomas Matthews, 
D. Warren Fox, 
Daniel Haslam, 
Michael Bateman, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Seth R. Hood, 
Rufus P^. Gale, 
John E. Frye. 



No 



54 CITY OF CONCORD, 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Ward i— CHARLES E. FOOTE, Penacook. 
Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 2— JOHN W. SANBORN, East Concord. 
Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 5, 4, 5, 6, 7, 6", ^—JOSEPH A. COCHRAN, 
City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to 

city poor. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 18 South State Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to 

city poor. 

DR. HENRY C. HOLBROOK. 

Office: Penacook. 



HEALTH OFFICERS. 

One elected annually in March, for three year.s, by City Council. Salary 
$25 per annum. 

DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, M. D., Term expires March, 1900. 
EDWARD N, PEARSON, " " " 1901. 

RUSSELL WILKINS, M. D., " " " 1902. 



SANITARY OFFICER. 

NomiTKited by Board of Health in April and confirmed by the City Council. 
Salary, $800 per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: Police Station Building. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 55 

REGISTRAR OP VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each 
birth, marriage, and death received, recorded and returned to the State 
Registrar. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 

Appointed annually in January by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Salary, $600 per annum. 

MOSES LADD.* 

Office: 168 North Main Street. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. No salary. 

BEN C. WHITE, 
WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
GEORGE A. YOUNG, 



Term 


expires January, 


1900 


i( 




1900 


'' 




1901 


t ( 




1901 


(i 




1902 


i (. 




1902 



CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7, consoli- 
dated) elected annually in January, for three years, by City Council. 
Salary, none. 

WARD 1. 

D. WARREN FOX, Term expires January, 1900. 

JOHN WHITAKER, " " " 1901. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, " " " 1902. 

WARD 2. 

SCOTT FRENCH, Term expires January, 1900. 

CYRUS R. ROBINSON, '^ " '^ 1901. 

JOHN C. HUTCHINS, " " " 1902. 

* BENJAMIN F. TUCKER, appointed April 15, 1899. 





n, a a 


1901 


ER, 

WA] 


(4 a 44 
RD 7. 


1902 




Term expires January, 


1900 




4 4 4 4 4 4 


1901 




44 44 4 4 


1902 



56 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD 3. 

WILLIAM A. LITTLP:, Term expires January, 1900. 

JAMES M. GROSSMAN, 
GEORGE R. PARMENTER, 



ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 
ALFRED CLARK, 
FRANK G. PROCTOR, 



COMMISSIONERS OP CEMETERIES. 

FOR WARDS 4, 5, 6. 8, 9, AND PART OF WARD 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, none. 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, Term expires March, 1900. 

1900. 
1901. 
1901. 
1902. 
1902. 



GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
FRANK P. ANDREWS, 
FRANK J. BATCHELDER, 
CHARLES G. REMICK, 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
FRANK A. DAME, 
AUSTIN W. JONES, 
LOUIS A. LANE, 
OLIVER IM. SHEPLEE. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 
J. FRANK HASTINGS, 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 
SCOTT FRENCH. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 57 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

ALVIN C. POWELL. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

WILLIAM H. CURRIER. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

GEORGE G. JENNESS. 



INSPECTOR OP PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Fees, 
one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

GEORGE H. ROLFE. 



FENCE-VIEWERS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, $2 each per day, paid by 
parties interested. 

GEORGE W. CHESLEY, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



POUND-KEEPER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, two cents each for 
impounding sheep, and five cents each for all other creatures, paid by 
owners. 

JOHN KNOWLTON. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid 
by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
CYRUS R. ROBINSON, 
DAVID E. EVERETT. 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEALER OP WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, for sealing each scale 
beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, and for each measure, 10 cents; 
live or more to one person, half price— paid by owners of scales or 
measures. 

EDWARD M. C0GSWP:LL. 

Office: City Hall. 



CULLER OP STAVES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; 
lihd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoops, 
50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M— paid by party for whom culling is 
done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OP HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Elected annually inv January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price per 
load, paid by party requiring service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, George B. Whittredge, 

I). Arthur Brown, Charles T. Page, 

John N. Hill, William F. Carr, 

Hiram O. Marsh, Frank E. Gale, 

Thomas Hill, Evarts McQuesten, 

John H. Mercer, Oscar p. Smith, 

A. H. Campbell, Amos Blanchard, 

O. F. Richardson, Mark M. Blanchard, 

Charles H. Day, Lurman R. Goodrich, 

PMward M. Proctor, James H. Harrington, 

Alvah L. Powell, Simeon Partridge, 

Seth R. Dole, Daniel Crowley, Jr., 

•Arthur N. Day, Fred A. Crocker, 

Lyman B. Foster, Alfred Beddow, 

William H. Meserve, Cliarles H. Cook, 

Hiram Brown, M. L. Partch. 



SURVEYORS OP PAINTING. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid 
by party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, Benjamin Bilsltorough, 

Edward A. Moulton, Alvin H. Urann, 

George Abbott, Jr., Fred Rollins. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



59 



SURVEYORS OP MASONRY. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 



Giles Wheeler, 
Peter W. Webster, 
William H. Kenney, 
Fred L. Pluminer, 
Charles L. Fellows, 



O. H. T. Ricliai-dson, 
Moses B. Smith, 
James E. Randlett, 
A\^illiam Rowell, 
Stephen H. Swain. 



SURVEYORS OP STONE. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 



Giles Wheeler, 



George F. Sanborn. 



SURVEYORS OP WOOD, LUMBER, AND BARK. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, for surveying shingles 
and clapboards, 4 cents per M ; boards and timber, 16 cents per M ; measur- 
ing cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty 
cords— paid by person employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
John Ballard, 
James F. Nelson, 
Jonathan B. Weeks, 
Charles Couch, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
Daniel K. Richardson, 
John H. Rolfe, 
William Ballard, 
John T. Batchelder, 
Thomas D. Avery, 
Timothy Carter, 
Weston Cofran, 
Augustine C. Carter, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Philip Flanders, 
Cyrus Runnells, 
David E. Everett, 
Silvester P. Dan forth, 
Alfred O. Preston, 



George Parti-idge, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Charles H. Day, 
Hiram O. Marsh, 
P^dward Runnels, 
Lowell Eastman, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
Curtis White, 
John N. Hill, 
Abner C. Holt, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Joseph E. Hutchinson, 
Tlionias Hill, 
Charles T. Page, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
John Potter, 
George C. Morgan, 



60 



Crxv OK CONCORD. 



William A. Chesley, 
Charles W. Hardy, 
Alfred Clark, 
John F. Scott, 
John Whitaker, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Peter W. Webster, 
George W. Abbott, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
John C. Farrand, 
FredW. Scott, 
G. A. Hinds, 



Harvey H. Hayward, 
Pjdward H. Dixon, 
Henry Eolfe, 
Horace F. Paul, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus 0. Clark, 
William Badger, 
Silas Wiggin, 
P2d\vard Stevens, 
P^dward L. Davis, 
Nath'l P. Richardson, 
John E. Berry, 
Arthur E. Maxam. 



WARD OFFICERS.' 

SELECTMEN. 

Ward i— FRED W. BURNHAM. 

ABIAL ROLFE. 

CHARLES H. DUGUID. 
Ward 2— JOHN C. FRYE. 

CASSIUS M. RADFORD. 

GEORGE McC. SANBORN. 
Ward 3— A. C. POWELL. 

SHERMAN P. COLBY. 

ALBERT W. HOBBS. 
Ward t^— ROY E. GEORGE. 

ALBERT H. DAGGETT. 

FREEMAN W. CROSBY. 
Ward 5— CURTIS WHITE. 

JAMES E. SEWALL. 

CHARLES E. SMITH.* 
Ward 6— HARLAN A. FLANDERS. 

J. EDWARD MORRISON. 

CHARLES H. CARROLL. 



* Resigned. Lewis J. Ca.ss appointed December 30. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 61 

Ward 7— EDWARD H. SHANNON. 

BENJAMIN F. KILBURN. 

ALFRED H. WALKER. 
Ward .9— RICHARD LYNA. 

DAVID J. ADAMS. 

WILLIAM E. GAY. 
Ward .9— DENNIS J. KENNEY. 

WILLIAM E. TRESIDDER. 

MIDAS M. CROTO. 



SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward i— WILLIAM H. MESSERVE. 

EDWIN B. PRESCOTT. 

WILLIAM C. ACKERMAN. 
Ward 2— FRANK P. CURTIS. 

JESSE G. STEVENS. 

GP:0RGE O. ROBINSON. 
Ward 5— CHARLES E. BALLARD. 

EMIL ENG STROM. 

JAMES F. ABBOTT. 
Ward -^—EDWARD H. DIXON. 

EVERETT H. RUNNELLS. 

WILLIAM P. DANFORTH. 
Ward .5— AVILLIAM M. MASON. 

ROBERT H. ROLP^E. 

JOSEPH P. sargp:nt. 

Ward 6— ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT. 

ARTHUR E. DOLE. 

LYSANDER H. CARROLL. 
Ward 7— DAVID M. SPLINE. 

DANA G. PRESCOTT. 

ART^HUR F. HEAD. 
Ward <9— MICHAEL J. LEE. 

CHARLES L. WORTHEN. 

WILLIAM E. STANDISH. 
Ward 9— WILLIAM K. SMITH. 

FRED C. COATES. 

BARTHOLOMEW J. COLLINS. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

'WARD CLERKS. 

Ward i— LESLIE H. GROWTH ER. 
Ward 2— SAMUEL L. FRENCH. 
Ward 5— THOMAS E. PENTLAND. 
Ward J— CHARLES C. SCHOOLCRAFT. 
Ward 5— GEORGE E. CHESLEY. 
Ward 6— ARTHUR H. BRITTON. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. AVHITTREDGE. 
Ward 5— MEDARD M. ISABEL. 
Ward 9— RICHARD J. DEE. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward i— SAMUEL N. BROWN. 
Ward 2— CHARLES H. SANBORN. 
Ward 5— CLARK D. STEVENS. 
Ward 4— BENJAMIN E. BADGER. 
Ward 5— CHARLES C. DAN FORTH. 
Ward 6— SOLON A. CARTER. 
Ward 7— GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT. 
Ward ^—HOWARD F. HILL. 
Ward .9— FRED N. MARDEN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



63 



MAYORS OF THE CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 
1853. and imtil 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor 
has been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. 



Hon. JOSEPH LOW 

RUFUS CLEMENT * 
JOHN ABBOTT . 
MOSES T. WILLARD 
MOSES HUMPHREY 
BENJAMIN F. GALE 
MOSES HUMPHREY 
JOHN ABBOTT . 
LYMAN D. STEVENS 
ABRAHAM G. JONES 
JOHN KIMBALL . 
GEORGE A. PILLSBURY 
HORACE A. BROWN f 
GEORGE A. CUMMINGS + 
EDGAR H. WOODMAN 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON 
STILLMAN HUMPHREY 
HENRY W. CLAPP . 
PARSONS B. COGSWELL 
HENRY ROBINSON . 
ALBERT B. WOODWORTH 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN 



1853-54 

'55 

1856-'57-'58 
1859-'60 
1861-'62 
1863-'64 

'65 

1866-'67 
1868-'69 
1870-71 
1872-'73-'74-'75 
1876-'77 
1878-'79-'80 
1880-'81-'82 
1883-'84-'85-'86 
1887-88 
1889-'90 
1891-'92 
1893-'94 
1895-'96 
1897-'98 
1899-1900 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 

t Term closed in November, 1880. 

t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



CITY PROPERTY 

Having Value but not considered Available Assets. 



The following is an abstract of the inventory of the property 
of the city made by the city auditor and the heads of the various 
departments : 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Central Fire Station. 



Building and 


lot 




. 


$35,000.00 


Miscellaneous 


propel 


■ty in main building 


1,29.8.50 


( i 




(( 


basement 


124.75 


u 




u 


■ shed 


536.50 


u 




u 


shop 


75.60 


(I 




i I 


stable 


162.50 


Ten horses 






. 


1,500.00 


New iron bedstea 


ds, 


increase 


40.00 



Kearsarg-e Steamer Company. 

1 steam fire engine .... $3,000.00 
Miscellaneous property . . . 646.60 



Eag-ie Steamer Company. 

1 steam fire engine .... $3,800.00 
Miscellaneous property . . . 618.50 



Governor Hill Steamer Company. 

1 steam fire engine .... $3,000.00 
Miscellaneous property . . . 35.90 



Hook and Ladder Company. 

1 ladder truck $400.00 

Ladders and miscellaneous property . 727.25 



737.85 



5,646.60 



t, 418. 50 



!,035.90 



L, 127.25 



66 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Chemical Eng-ine Company. 



1 chemical engine 
Miscellaneous property 



$1,550.00 
136.75 



Good Will Hose Company. 



Building . 
1 hose wagon 
1 horse 
Miscellaneous property 



$6,500.00 
300.00 
150.00 
336.90 



Alert Hose Company. 



Building . 

1 hose wagon 

1 horse 

Miscellaneous property 



$3,200.00 
300.00 
150.00 
394.25 



Pioneer Steamer Company. 



Building and lot 
New hose house 
Heating apparatus 
1 steam fire engine 
1 hose wagon 
Sampson wagon jack 
3 pony extinguishei'S 
Miscellaneous property 



$7,500.00 

100.00 

400.00 

2,000.00 

100.00 

5.75 

50.00 

147.00 



$1,686.75 



$7,286.90 



U 044. 25 



[0,302.75 



Old Fort Engine Company. 



Building and lot 


. $3,000.00 


1 Hunneman hand-engine . 


200.00 


3 pony extinguishers . 


75.00 


Miscellaneous property 


111.75 


Heating apparatus 


335.00 



53,721 .75 



CITY PKOPERTY. 

Cataract Engine Company. 



67 



Buiiilin<r lot 

1 Huiiiieman hand-engine 

1 hose reel 

Heating apparatus 

Miscellaneous property 

Hose wao'on 



Fire-alarm apparatus . . . . 

Fabric hose, 11,400 feet; leather hose, 

450 feet good, 550 feet poor 
Residence chief engineer 
Heating apparatus .... 



$8,500.00 
200.00 
50.00 
100.00 
117.75 
375.00 



^9,250.00 

fi,000.00 

3,000.00 

100.00 



>9,342.75 
57,351.25 



Pioneer Engine House. 

Ward room and liall furniture 



P'urniture 



Furniture 



Old Fort Engine House. 
Cataract Engine House. 



$18,350.00 



$70.50 



$(59.00 



171.25 



$105,912.00 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 
Central District. 



1 steam roller 

10 sprinklers and fixtures 

1 portable crusher plant 

1 stationary crusher plant 

8 horses 

1 sand house 



$2,000.00 

2,300.00 

1,200.00 

800.00 

600.00 

50.00 



68 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



3 sets double harness 

2 single harness . 
1 tip cart harness 

4 two-horse carts 
1 one-horse cart 
1 stake wagon 
1 stone wagon 

3 two-horse sleds 
1 two-horse dump sled 

1 one-horse sled 

2 snow rollers 
2 stone rollers , 
2 road machines 

4 wing snowplows 
7 common snowplows 
6 adjustable snowplows 

1 large improved snowplow 

1 street sweeper . 

2 hand carts 
1 boom derrick . 
1 garbage furnace 
1 one-horse express wagon 
1 Edson diaphragm pump 
24 feet hose and couplings 
1 diaphragm pump No. 3 
Hose and couplings 
Lumber 
Curbstone . 
Miscellaneous property 



$75.00 
15.00 
10.00 

300.00 
25.00 
50.00 
50.00 

200.00 
40.00 
15.00 

150.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 
25.00 

270.00 
65.00 

100.00 
40.00 
80.00 

300.00 

125.00 
17.00 
20.22 
10.00 
32.85 

150.00 
80.00 

800.00 



West Concord District. 
Miscellaneous property . . . . 

Penacook District. 
Miscellaneous property .... 



$10,295.07 



$18.00 



$22.00 



$10,335.07 



CITY PROPERTY. 



69 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Police station 






$25,000.00 




1 horse 






100.00 




1 harness . 






8.00 




1 two-seated wagon 






75.00 




1 pung sleigh 






15.00 




1 ambulance 






100.00 




1 safe 






50.00 




2 robes 






5.00 




1 roll-top desk , 






20.00 




1 roll-top desk . 






12.00 




Blankets .... 






2.00 




Desk and chair at Penacook 






15.00 




6 tables 






20.00 




11 settees . 






41.00 




37 chairs . 






20.00 




2 clocks 






12.00 




70 police badges 






70.00 




16 policemen's coats . 






100.00 




28 belts . 




' 


10.00 




28 night clubs . 






28.00 




14 short clubs 






14.00 




1 1 Colt's revolvers 






100.00 




15 pairs handcuffs 






60.00 




54 helmets 






10.00 




Miscellaneous property 






10.00 






iiOK Qnr 


00 


ENGINEERI 




LRTMENT. 


NG DEPi 




2 drawing tables .... $75.00 




1 desk 






15.00 




1 typewriter 






25.00 




1 safe 






25.00 




1 card index 






20.00 




1 Buff & Berger transit 






150.00 




1 Buff & Berger level . 






60.00 




1 steel bar 






1.00 





70 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



2 steel rods .... 


$1.00 


3 drawing boards 


3.00 


5 chairs ..... 


4.00 


2 stools ..... 


1.00 


1 planimeter . . ... 


20.00 


Drawing tools, triangles, etc. 


100.00 







$500.00 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



1 double drum hoisting-engine 


anc 




house $500.00 


3 No. 3 Edson pumps 






30.00 


20 feet suction hose 






10.00 


1 Deane steam pump . 






50.00 


2 wheelbarrows . 






2.00 


4 steel bars 






4.00 


15 lanterns 






5.00 


33 shovels, round point 






15.00 


6 long handled shovels 






3.00 


64 picks 






30.00 


5 mattocks 






2.00 


4 tampers, iron shod . 






3.Q0 


3 tool boxes 






10.00 


4 curbing mauls . 






8.00 


3 axes 






2.00 


2 striking hammers 






2.00 


2 five-gallon oil cans . 






1.00 


5 chains . 






5.00 


1 cross-cut saw . 






1.00 


1 set steel blocks and falls 






5.00 


Wooden blocks and falls 






10.00 


2 monkey wrenches 






1.50 


1 rake 






.25 


1 wood saw 






.25 


S\ dozen sewer braces 






30.00 


Sewer pipe on hand 






20.00 



$750.00 





CITY 


PROPERTY 




WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINC 


2 tool boxes $10.00 


21 lanterns 








2.50 


1 set steel blocks 








5.00 


1 derrick tripod . 








3.00 


1 No. 3 Edson pump 








15.00 


20 feet suction hose 








10.00 


3 pails 








.50 


1 paver's maul . 








1.00 


1 three-gallon oil can 








.25 


3 steel bars 








2.50 


3 tampers, iroa shod . 








2.00 


2 striking hammers 








2.00 


1 axe 








.25 


1 monkey wrench 








.75 


1 dozen poor shovels 








1.00 


1 dozen picks 








5.00 


1 dozen drills 








2.00 











71 



$62.75 



FURNITURE STORED AT CITY HALL. 
1 coal stove and pipe . . . . $5.00 

4 office chairs ..... 4.00 

Miscellaneous property . . . 1.00 



CITY CL 






?FICE. , 


ERK'S OI 


1 roll-top desk $25.00 


1 office desk 








15.00 


1 clock 








12.00 


1 v^^alnut book-case 








15.00 


1 pine book-case 








10.00 


1 map of Concord 








5.00 


1 carpet and mats 








5.00 


1 desk 








7.00 


3 chairs 








3.00 


135 copies old town records 




332.50 


Miscellaneous property 


T 






21.00 



$10.00 



$450.50 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



Pest house and lot 


$500.00 


Office furniture . . . . 


40.00 


Pest house furniture . 


25.00 


MAYOR'S ( 


DFPICE. 


1 oak roll-top desk 


$20.00 


1 carpet .... 


40.00 


1 oak revolving table . 


3.00 


6 chairs .... 


9.00 


1 mirror .... 


2.00 


1 small oak table 


1.00 


Miscellaneous property 


2.00 







$565.00 



$77.00 

SEALER OP WEIGHTS AND MEASURES' OFFICE. 
"Weights, measures, balances, etc. . . . |>225.00 



CITY LIQUOR AGENCY. 


Empty bottles $10.00 


7 empty casks 




5.25 


1 empty keg .... 




.50 


4 demijohns 




7.00 


6 two-gallon jugs 




3.00 


5 one-gallon jugs 




1.25 


9 bottles .... 




2.25 


5 brass lock faucets and key 




5.00 


3 H (( .4 4 4 4 




2.25 


9 measures and tunnels 




1.95 


3 racks of bari'cls 




7.35 


1 nail hammer . 




.50 


1 hatchet .... 




.50 


1 screw di'iver 




.25 


1 bit-stock 




.05 



CITY PROPERTY 



4 center bits 

1 wrench . 

2 water pails 
1 shovel 
Trucks 
Office desk and chair 
1 table 

Stove and funnel 
6 chairs and lounj 
Inkstand . 
1 mop-wringer 
1 duster '. 
1 ash barrel 
1 floor-brush 
1 cuspidor 
1 tin pail . 
1 graduate 
1 testor 

1 money drawer 
1 brush 

Wrapping-paper 
Corks 
Twine 



73 



$0.60 

.50 
1.00 

.50 
2.00 
40.00 
2.00 
8.00 
9.00 

.50 
1.50 
2.50 
2.25 
2.25 

.50 
1.88 
2.00 
2.50 
1.50 

.15 
7.00 
3.00 

.40 



CITY MESSENGER'S DEPARTMENT. 
City Council Rooms. 



L39.23 



3 office desks .... 


$30.00 


1 library table .... 


5.00 


29 members' desks, at $7.50 


217.50 


35 rotary chairs 


175.00 


1 cottage stove and pipe 


5.00 


2 carpets ..... 


20.00 


Miscellaneous property 


10.00 



- $462.50 



74 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY HALL 

42 nine-foot folding settees • 

20 seven-foot folding settees 

10 common chairs 

1 No. 36 Monitor stove and pipe . 

8 board tables .... 

Heating and lighting fixtures in city hall 

building .... 

Miscellaneous property 



$125.00 

60.00 

5.00 

5.00 

2.00 



250.00 
12.50 



$45!».50 



CITY AUDITOR'S OFFICE. 



1 desk 

1 filinjr case 



525.00 
13.00 



$38. 00 



PROPERTY IN AND ABOUT CITY HALL. 



1 eight-foot step ladder 






$0.50 


25 feet rubber hose 






1.50 


8 lawn settees 






8.00 


1 lawn mower, 20-inch 






8.00 


1 pair hedge shears 






.50 


1 Stillson wrench 






.75 


1 lantern ... 






.25 


1 wheelbarrow . 






2.75 


Miscellaneous property 






4.00 











826.25 



OLD POLICE COURT ROOM. 



1 table 

10 common cliairs 

1 No. 30 Monitor stove and pipe 

1 old desk .... 



$1 


50 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 



. $9.50 



CITY PROPERTY. 



75 



TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 



1 safe .... 


$150.00 


5 curtains . . . . . 


7.50 


1 desk chair 


4.50 


3 cane-seat arm chairs 


3.75 


1 ash office table 


3.50 


1 money drawer 


2.00 


Miscelhineous property 


11.20 







[80.45 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' DEPARTMENT. 



Property at White Park. 



1 dump cart 








$25.00 


1 hand cart 








6.00 


40 settees . 








50.00 


3 large snow shovels 








8.00 


2 iron rollers 








10.00 


2 gravel screens 








5.00 


225 feet garden hose 








6.00 


2 wheelbarrows . 








4.00 


4 lawn mowers . 








10.00 


1 lawn mower horse 








50.00 


1 scraper for ice 








10.00 


1 set horse boots 








7.00 


3 lawn sprinklers 








4.50 


Lot of tree stakes 








5.00 


Barb wire 








3.00 


2 Stillson wrenches 








2.00 


1 monkey wrench 








.25 


1 small basket . 








.25 


3 large baskets . 








.75 


4 water pails 








.75 


1 spirit level 








.25 


2 ladders . 








1.00 



7fi 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



1 step ladder 








$0.50 


1 rat trap . 








.50 


1 paij 








.35 


3 barrel covers . 








.75 


2 augers . 








1.00 


Nails, spikes, etc. 








.75 


Sledge and wedges 








1.00 


1 wire stretcher . 








.25 


1 wire pliers 








.25 


3 water kegs 








.75 


1 pole pruning shears . 








.25 


6 shovels . 








1.50 


5 iron rakes 








1.00 


4 wood rakes 








.50 


4 picks 








1.00 


3 grub axes 








1.00 


4 hoes 








.75 


3 edging knives . 








.50 


1 bill hook 








.25 


2 axes 








.50 


1 cant lever 








.25 


1 sheep shears 








.25 


1 tape measure . 








.25 


2 water pots 








.50 


1 grindstone 








1.00 


2 iron bars 








1.00 


5 snow shovels . 








.75 


4 drills, hammer and f 


)lugs 






.75 


2 hatchets . 








.25 


1 steel square 








.25 


2 cross-cut saws . 








1.00 


3 small saws 








.50 


1 clipping shears 








.50 


1 edging shears . 








2.00 


1 cart hanics 








3.00 


1 hames and traces 








2.00 



$236.35 



CITY PROPERTY. 77 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS' DEPARTMENT. 
Miscellaneous articles at Blossom Hill 



ko6.50 



Cemetery 
Furniture in commissioners' 


office 


$338.50 
18.00 






Books in public library 


• 


• 


CITY HISTO 

1 typewriter and table 
1 Bouton's History 


RY COM 


MISSION. 

$100.00 
10.00 







$9,000.00 



$110.00 



REAL ESTATE. 

REAL ESTATE BELONGING TO THE CITY NOT INCLUDED IN ANY 
OF THE FOREGOING INVENTORIES. 



City hall lot and half of building 

City farm pasture, and quarries 

City storehouse . 

Gravel banks 

"Ward house. West street 

Play-ground on intervale 

White Park 

Rollins Park 

Penacook Park . 

Market-place on Warren street 



$25,000.00 

3,000.00 

4,500.00 

400.00 

4,500.00 

1,500.00 

12,000.00 

7,250.00 

2,500.00 

10,000.00 



$70,650.00 



INVENTORY 



Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and All the Real 
Estate and Personal Propertv In Their Possession, 
January 1, 1900. 



WATER RIGHTS AND PLANT. 

Water rights from B. F. & D. Holden $60,000.00 
Water rights from Concord Manufactur- 
ing Company 83,000.00 

Flowage rights around Penacook lake . 4,375.61 

Dam, gate-liouse and appintenances . 30,756.17 

Conduit and gate-house . . . 29,484.05 

Main pipes 160,960.92 

Distribution pipes .... 283,431.38 
Service pipes . . . . . 42,489.95 
Reservoir and site .... 45,044.09 
Pumping station, shop, stable, store- 
house and site .... 27,000.00 
Pumping machinery .... 10,215.00 
Water and flowage rights in Long Pond, 

Webster .'.... 5,000.00 
Mill privilege and land of W . P. Cool- 
edge, West Concord, about 15 acres . 5,500.00 
Kit shop privilege from Humphrey & 

Farnimi, West Concord, about 2 acres 5,000.00 
Hutchins house and lot. West Concord, 

from W. P. Cooledge, about 6 acres . -2,250.00 
Land in West Concord, from Mary C. 

Rowcll, l.S acres .... 1,500.00 
Land in West Concord, from Alfred 

Roberts, 25 i acres .... 1,275.00 



CITY PROPERTY 

Land in West Concord, from O. F 
Richardson .... 

Land in West Concord, from Mary G 
Carter, 10 acres 

Land in West Concord, from Charles E 
Ballard, 6 acres 

Land in West Concord, from Charles E 
Ballard, 15 acres 

Land in West Concord, from Coffin & 
Little, 17^ acres . . . . 

Land in West Concord, which includes 
the Martin place, the Swan place, and 
a portion of the Carlton place, about 
1 1 0| acres ..... 

Land at south end of Penacook Lake, 
from Robert Crowlev, about 10 acres 



79 



^100.00 
1,250.00 

500.00 
1,200.00 

800.00 

6,364.50 



3,000.00 



-$810,496.67 



Water Office, 11 Capitol Street. 



2 roller-top desks 


S60.00 


1 counter and fixtures 


50.00 


1 typewriter and desk . 


30.00 


1 Howard eight-day clock 


25.00 


1 safe 


300.00 


1 record card case 


30.00 


Miscellaneous property 


. 75.00 







$570.00 



Water Commissioners' Room. 



1 long tal)le 
10 chairs . 
1 carpet 



1 case of water reports 



$5.00 


5.00 


3.00 


3.00 



$16.00 



80 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





Pumping- Station. 




1 roller- top desk 






Si, 5. 00 


1 eight-day dock 






10.00 


9 chairs 






0.00 


1 recording gauge 






10.00 


1 platform scales 






50.00 


Miscellaneous property, 


including sup- 




plies, stocks, etc. 


• 




506.00 







Shop at Pumping Station. 

Miscellaneous property, including fittings, pipe, 
tools, brass goods, etc. .... 



$600.00 



$400.00 



Stable and Basement at Pumping Station. 

$80.00 

100.00 

110.00 

50.00 



2 horses 

2 express wagons 
1 road wagon 
1 heavy sleigh 
1 pung sleigh 

3 harness . 
Miscellaneous property, including sup 

plies ..... 



15.00 
20.00 

80.00 



Storehouse. 
Miscellaneous property, including hydrants, water 
gates, curves, branches, etc. ... 



155.00 



$300.00 



Pipe Yard. 

Cast-iron pipe and supplies . 



Shop at Penacook. 
Miscellaneous property, including pipe, etc. 



. $2,100.00 



$50.00 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Shop at West Concord. 
Miscellaneous property, including pipe, etc. 



81 



$40.00 



RECAPITULATION OP WATER DEPARTMENT. 


Plant and real estate . . . $810,496.67 


Water office 




570.00 


Water commissioners' room 






16.00 


Pumping station . 






600.00 


Shop at pumping station 






400.00 


Stable and basement 






455.00 


Storehouse 






300.00 


Pipe yard and city shed 






2,100.00 


Shop at Penacook 






50.00 


Shop at West Concord 






40.00 
$815,027.67 



82 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 



Fire department . 

Street department 

Police department 

Engineering department 

Sewer department 

West Concord sewer 

City messenger department . 

City auditor's office 

City hall .... 

Property in and about city hall 

Furniture stored at city hall . 

Cit}' clerk's office 

Health department 

Mayor's office 

Sealer of weights and measures 

City liquor agency 

Tax collector's office 

Park commissioners 

Cemetery commissioners 

City history commission 

Books in public library 

Real estate 

Water department 



$105,912.00 

10,335.07 

25,897.00 

500.00 

750.00 

62.75 

462.50 

38.00 

459.50 

26.25 

10.00 

450.50 

565.00 

77.00 

225.00 

139.23 

180.45 

236.35 

356.50 

110.00 

9,000.00 

70,650.00 

815,027.67 



-$1,041,470.77 



1899. 

Papulation of the City (Census 1890) . . 17,004 

\>aluation of the City $11,218,886.00 

Tax assessed for the year .... $220,704.62 

Rate of taxation, $14 per $1,000. 

Rate for Union School District, $4.20 additional per $1,000. 

Rate for Precinct, $1.80 additional per $1,000. 

Total rate, $20 per $1,000. 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 



The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and per- 
sonal estate in the city of Concord since 18G0 : 



Year. 


Polls. 


1860 


2,577 


1861 


2,497 


1862 


2,350 


1863 


2,454 


1864 


2,539 


1865 


2,495 


1866 


2,762 


1867 


2,822 


1868 


3,120 


1869 


3,205 


1870 


3,187 


1871 


3,338 


1872 


3,767 


1873 


3,613 


1874 


3,784 


1875 


3,941 


1876 


3,911 


1877 


4,015 


1878 


3,869 


1879 


3,536 


1880 


3,672 


1881 


3,505 


1882 


3,661 


1883 


3,816 


1884 


3,734 


1885 


3,821 


1886 


3,773 


1887 


3,938 


1888 


3,959 


1889 


4,090 


1890 


4,190 


1891 


4,498 



Valuati 


$4 


307, 


4 


423, 


4 


,308, 


3 


,775, 


3 


,832, 


5 


549, 


4 


934, 


5 


006, 


5 


378, 


5 


581, 


5 


751, 


5 


891, 


5 


917, 


9 


012, 


9 


000, 


9 


216, 


9 


222, 


9 


405, 


9 


241, 


10 


604, 


10 


150, 


10 


062, 


10 


308, 


10 


023, 


9 


877, 


9 


774, 


9 


703, 


9 


852, 


9 


984, 


10 


048, 


10 


243, 


10 


923, 



on. 

192 

936 

568 

206 

800 

002 

082 

774 

365 

459 

928 

993 

054 

650 

526 

195 

625 

117 

485 

465 

585 

894 

052 

216 

874 

714 

458 

337 

120 

556 

857 

081 



^4V 
46 
50 
60 
89 
158 
116 
145 
126 
146 
133 
137 
141 
158 
171 
175 
163 
177 
162 
155 
172 
153 
151 
169 
148 
153 
158 
151 
165 
184 
176 
206 



Tax. 

,082.25 
,290.48 
,945.01 
,293.82 
,931.97 
,787.29 
,192.97 
,173.49 
,889.71 
,791.64 
,953.94 
,844.70 
,122.97 
,281.13 
,045.61 
,234.68 
,768.29 
,040.27 
,038.53 
,964.99 
,831.12 
,285.55 
,941.54 
,498.95 
,290.26 
,613.92 
,994.83 
,292.66 
,090.57 
,963.08 
,081.04 
,379.26 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES. 



85 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


1892 


4,288 


$10,786,498 


1893 


4,380 


10,890,960 


1894 


4,385 


11,189,294 


1895 


4,838 


11,566,083 


1896 


4,663 


11,228,515 


1897 


4,812 


11,200,363 


1898. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Ward 1 , 


416 


$787,551 


- 2, 


204 


293,880 


" 3, 


265 


398,430 


- 4, 


865 


2,443,228 


" 5, 


650 


3,081,417 


'' 6, 


810 


2,064,000 


" ", 


665 


912,633 


- 8, 


399 


862,135 


" 9, 


417 

4691 


305,385 




$11,148,659 


Non-resident 


. 


. 



1809. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Ward 1, 


473 


$787,818 




2, 


203 


306,407 




3, 


264 


402,155 




4, 


885 


2,424,213 




5, 


600 


3,120,792 




6, 


812 


2,064,400 




■J", 


726 


938,110 




8, 


397 


868,800 




9, 


400 


306,191 




4760 


$11,218,886 


Non- 


resident 


, 





Tax. 


$191 


733.45 


204 


585.27 


222 


110.35 


217 


399.83 


262 


254.99 


233 


761.58 


Tax. 


$16 


897.19 


4 


956.52 


7 


790.25 


48 


492.91 


61 


439.54 


41 


492.41 


16 


844.57 


16 


,293.89 


5 


718.57 


$219 


925.85 


. 1 


154.36 


$221 


080.21 


Tax. 


$15 


532.27 


5 


192.24 


8 


017.21 


48 


333.35 


61, 


199.49 


41 


300.82 


17, 


528.85 


16 


760.45 


5 


870.28 


$219 


734.96 




969.66 


$220 


704.62 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

S 

FOR THE YEAR 1S99. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: 

I herewith submit the annual report of the condition and 
transactions of the Treasury Department, consisting of a state- 
ment of the bonded and bills payable (indebtedness of the city and 
water precinct, with coupon statements of each, and statement of 
income and payments of the Water Works Department, a list of 
the trust and sinking funds of the city, including an account of 
the securities in which said trust and sinking funds are invested ; 
also, a statement of receipts of Blossom Hill and Old Cemetery ; a 
statement of the income of trust funds paid the treasurers of 
suburban cemetery associations ; and m addition to the forego- 
ing, a general statement of the receipts and expenditures for the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALVIN B. CROSS, 

City Treasurer. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP 


THE CITY. 




MUNICIPAL. 






Bonds. 




Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




Memorial Arch 


July 


^ 1 


U)00, 


4, 


$ 5,000 




Police Station . 


July 


■I ? 


1903, 


4, 


17,000 




Widening Pleasant 














street extension . 


June 


1 1 


l'J05, 


4, 


13,800 




Bridges . 


July 


-t 1 


1904, 


4, 


5,000 




( ( 


July 


^ 1 


1905, 


4, 


5,000 




a 


July 


^ 1 


1906, 


4, 


5,000 




a 


July 


^ 1 


lil07 


4, 


5,000 




Public Park . 


June 


^ 1 


1914, 


H, 


25,000 


$80,800 








PRECINCT 








Sewer 


July 




1904 


4, 


$12,000 




it 


June 




1914 


H, 


25,000 




a 


Dec, 




1914, 


3i, 


9,000 




a 


July 




1917, 


■3|. 


25,000 


$71,000 


Union School Di.^^t. 


. July 




1900 


4, 


$15,000 


a a 


• July 




1901 


4, 


15,000 




a a 


• Ji'iy 




1902 


4, 


15,000 


$45,000 


West Concord Sewei 


• Oct. 




1902 


4, 


$5,000 


a ( i 


Oct. 




1907 


4, 


5,000 




a a 


Oct. 




1912, 


4, 


7,000 


$17,000 


East Concord Sewei 


• July 




1900, 


34, 


$500 


(( (( 


July 




1905, 


H, 


500 




U (( 


July 




1910, 


3i, 


500 




u n 


July 




1915, 


3i, 


500 


$2,000 


Penacook Sewer 


Aug. 




1903 


4, 


$5,000 


a a 


Aug. 




1908 


4, 


6,000 




ii a 


May 




1913 


4, 


5,000 




a it 


July 




1914 


4, 


500 




( ( 11 


July 




1915 


4, 


500 




a a 


July 




1916 


4, 


500 




a a 


July 




1917 


4, 


500 




li a 


. July 




1918 


4, 


500 




u u 


• July 




1919 


4, 


500 


$19,000 







Total bonded iftdebtedness of the city exclusive of 
water department ...... 



$234,800 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



89 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 

COUPONS OVER-DUE JANUARY 1, 1899, AND NOT PRESENTED. 



Municipal 


S 61.25 


Precinct, sewer . 


105.00 


Union School District 


75.00 


School District No. 20 


10.00 


Penacook sewer 


140.00 


COUPONS DUE. 1899. 


Municipal 


. $3,307.00 


Precinct, sewer . 


. 2,545.00 


Union School District 


. 2,400.00 


School District No. 20 


20.00 


Penacook sewer . 


760,00 


West Concord sewer . 


680.00 


East Concord sewer 


70.00 



$10,173.25 



COUPONS PAID, 



Municipal . 
Precinct, sewer . 
Union School District 
Scliool District No. 20 
Penacook sewer 
West Concord sewer . 
East Concord sewer . 



^3,2.S7.00 

2,580.00 

2,400.00 

30.00 

840.00 

670.00 

70.00 



COUPONS DUE JANUARY 1, 1900, AND NOT PRESENTED. 
Municipal $81.25 



Precinct, sewer . 
Union School District 
West Concord sewer . 
Penacook sewer 



70.00 
75.00 
10.00 
60.00 



>10,173.25 



Bills payable indebtedness 



$17,650.00 



90 CITY OK CONCORD. 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE WATER 











PRECINCT. 










When c 


lue. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Whe 


n due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Nov. 




li>00. 


3i, 


S15,000 


Oct. 




1912, 


4, 


$45,000 


Jan. 




1901, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1913, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1902, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1914, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1903, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1915, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1904, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




191(5, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1905, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1917, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




19n(j, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1918, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1907, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1919, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




J 908, 


4, 


10,000 


Mar. 




1922, 


31, 


20,000 


Jan. 




1909, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1923, 


4, 


400,000 


Jan. 




1910, 


4, 


5,000 














Jan. 




1911, 


4, 


5,000 










8650,000 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1899, and not 

presented . . . . . . . S 42(3.00 

Coupons due 1899 2(5,225.00 



$26,651.00 



Cr. 

By coupons paid ..... . $26,315.00 

Coupons due January 1, 1900, and not pre.sented . ;>.")(). 00 



$26,651.00' 



TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WATER 
PRECINCT DEPARTMENT. 

Recf.ii'ts. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1899 . $12,098.06 

V. C. Hastinjis, superintendent . . 53,953.13 

$66,051.19 



Payments. 
Interest on water bonds . . . $26,315.00 

Bonds 10,000.00 

Maintenance and extension . . . 24,271.35 

Balance on hand January 1, 1900 . 5,464.84 



$66,051.19 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 91 

The city treasurer had in hid possession January 1, 1900, as 
treasurer and custodian the following trust and sinking funds, 
viz. : 

ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 

For the benefit of the School Fund. 

Capital .■ , . . $1,000.00 

Income received, 1899 . . . . . 35.00 

Paid into the city treasury . . . . . So.OO 

Invested in City of Concord 3^% bond. 



COUNTESS OF RUMPORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be 
applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital $2,000.00 

Income received, 1899 ..... 100.00 

Paid Fannie E. Miiiot, treasurer of tlie society . 100.00 

Invested in Eagle and Pheni.x Hotel Company 5% notes, 



MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually by 
the Superintendent of Cemeteries for the preservation, care, and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot Enclosure, under the direction 
of the duly appointed officials, or members of the Minot Cemetery Associa- 
tion. 

Capital $3,000.00 

Income received, 1899 ..... 40.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer .... 40.00 

Invested in City of Concord 3^^ note. 



92 CITY OK CONCORD. 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Capital $200.00 

BaUiuce fpom last year . . , $140. .")0 

Income received, 1899 . . . ll.r>0 

-^ $102.05 

Capital, $200, invested in City of Concord 4% bond, and $100 
of income invested in City of Concord 3^% bond. 

The purpose of the donor of this trust fiiinl was that the income should be 
used for the purchase of school books for poor children, but since the beqiiest 
was made, a state law has been enacted that requires the towns and cities to 
buy all the school books, consequently the beneficiary of the donor is provided 
for and tor the purpose of the trust no lohger exists. This fund, $200, has 
accumulated ($152.05) and will continue to accumulate forever without any 
benefit to any object unless some legal action can be taken to divert the income 
from the specified purpose of the donor. 

The i)roper remedy in this Case would seem to be for the city government to 
make application to the court to make a decree specifying the object to which 
the income of this trust shall be devoted. 



COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase 
of books of a Biographical, Geographical, Historical and Scientific char- 
acter, and the books relating to science shall be those that give the latest 
developments and discoveries by scientific persons, from year to year. 



Capital ...... 

Income received, 1899 
Paid into the city treasury . 

Invested in City of Concord oi% note 
Invested in Loan and Trust Savings Bank 



$2,145.00 
41.18 
41.18 



2000.00 
145.00 



G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital . . $1,000.00 

Income received, 1899 ..... 35.00 

Paid into the city treasury ..... 35.00 

Invested in City of Concord OtV^ bond. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



93 



FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 



Capital ...... 

Income received, 1899 

Paid into the city treasury . ... 

Invested in City of Concord 4 % bond . 
Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank 



$1,000.00 
37.50 
37.50 

500.00 
500.00 



THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 



Capital ..... 
Income received, 1899 
Paid into the city treasury . 

Invested in City of Concord 3i<^ bond. 



$500.00 
17.50 
17.50 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by tiie addition of one-lialf the amount 
"received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1899 . $17,009.17 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 1899 598.87 

Received from income of fund, 1899 . 653.33 

$18,261.37 



Credited Blossom Hill Cemetery ac- 
count ...... $653.33 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1900 . 17,608.04 



i, 261. 37 



Invested in City of Concord 4% bonds $12,400.00 
Invested in City of Concord 3|% bonds 2,000.00 
Invested in New Hampshire Savings 

Bank 2,658.04 

Invested in United States 4% bonds . 550.00 



7,608.04 



94 CITY OF CONCORD. 

OLD CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an 
increase of the fund. 

Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Old Cem- 
etery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1899 . S715.00 
Received from income of fund, 1899 . 28.48 



Credited Old Cemetery account 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1900 



Invested in City of Concord 4% bonds 
Invested in Merrimack County Savings 
Bank 



$28.48 
715.00 


S700.00 
15.00 



$743.48 



8743.48 



$715.00 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1899 . $275.00 
Unexpended income on hand, January 

1, 1899 . . . . . 75.26 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 1899 7.50 

Received from income of fund, 1899 . 11.20 

$368.96 



Unexpended income January 1, 1900 . $86.46 

Amount of capital January 1, 1900 . 282.50 

$368.96 

Capital and unexpended income invested in Merrimack 
County Savinjjs Bank. 



TREASURY DEPARTxMENT. 95 

MILLVILLB CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of in- 
terested parties. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation 
of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1899 . §200.00 
Unexpended income on hand, January 1, 

1899 18.50 

Received from income of fund, 1899 . 7.08 

$225.58 



Capital and unexpended income invested in Loan and Trust 
Savin2:s Bank. 



EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of East Concord cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1899 . $202.50 
Unexpended income on hand, January 1, 

1899 79.75 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 1899 15.00 

" income of fund, 1899 . 9.08 

8306.33 



Capital and unexpended income invested in New Hampshire 
Saving's Bank. 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING 

FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord Sewer Precinct, and 
aiithorizing loans on the credit of the city to constriict the system, also 
created a sinking fund which provided that the following amounts should be 
raised annually upon the taxable property of the precinct, for the purpose of 
paying the bonds as they mature, viz. : 

$500 annually for ten years from October 1, 1892. 
81,000 annually for five years from October 1, 1902. 
81,400 annually for five years from October 1, 1907. 



96 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Biiliince on luind, January 1, 1899 . $3,232.45 
Income received, 1899 . . . 99.23 

Received from city of Concord . . 500.00 



83,831.68 



Invested in City of Concord 3|% bonds $2,000.00 
Invested in Loan and Trust Savings 

Bank ...... 1,831.68 

$3,831.68 

PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establisliing tlie Penacook Sewer Precinct, and authoriz- 
ing loans on the credit of tlie city to construct the system, also created a sink- 
ing- fund which provided tliat the following amounts should be raised an- 
nually upon the taxable property of the precinct, for tlie purpose of paying 
the bonds as they mature, viz. : 

$1,000 annually for five years from August 1, 1898. 
$1,200 annually for five years from August 1, 1903. 
$1,000 aiuuially for five years from May 1, 1908. 
$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1899 . $889.88 

Income received, 1899 . . . 31.11 

Received from citv of Concord . . 1,000.00 

$1,920.99 



Paid city of Concord, per city ordinances $889.88 
Balance on hand, -January 1, 1900 . 1,031.11 



$1,920.99 



Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank. 



EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING 

FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord Sewer Precinct, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also 
created a sinking fund which provided that the sum of one hundred dollars 
($1001 should be raised annually for twenty years from July 1, 1895, upon 
the taxable property of the precinct, for the purpose of paying the bonds as 
they mature. 

Balance on hand, Janaury 1, 1899 . $309.92 

Income received, 189!) . . . 10.51 

Received from city of Concord . . 100,00 



$420.43 



Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Bank. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



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102 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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104 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



RECEIPTS OP BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 

One-half the amount received from the sale of lots is added annually to the 
permanent fund. The remaining half, with amount received for grading of 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections, 
income of permanent fund, and amount received from trust ^ funds, are 
added each year to the annual appropriation. 



Receipts. 



O. V. Pitman's estate, burial 

W. G. Carter, care 

Mary Pecker lot, care 

Dr. Quinby, cai-e 

Mrs. J, Batclielder, care 

Rollins and Young, " 

T. E. Currier, care 

Mrs.* G. L. Lovejoy, care . 

H. N. Sargent, care . 

Mrs. W. B. Stetson, care and rep 

Mrs. George K. Lawrence, care 

Charles H. Noyes, care 

Fred A. Carr, care 

Mrs. A. S. Sprague, care . 

Mrs. George Crockett, care 

Charles Hemphill, burial 

E. R. Wilkins, burial 

Mrs. H. E. Webster, care . 

City of Concord, burials 

Maurice Dearborn's estate, burial 

Joshua Lane, care 

Mrs. L. S. Morrill, care 

Mrs. S. Wardner, " 

C. P. Smith, 

Byron Moore, " 

John H. Teel, care and burial 

Samuel Scales, burial 

Kiiul)all Flanders, care 

Charles li. Shute, " 

Mrs. A. W. Gale, " 

Rev. A. C. Hardy, " 



^8.00 
2.00 
1.00. 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.50 
4.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
5.00 
.50 
3.00 
1.50 
0.00 
3.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
4.50 
3.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



105 



Mrs. Jos. Sargent, care 

Cliarles H. Locke, care and repair 

Miss Annah Kimball, care . 

Mrs. Lowell Brown, " 

John M. Mahany, lot 43, block U 

John M. Mahany, grading . 

Mrs. A. V. Merrill, care 

J. P. Kittredge, care and repairs 

Frank D. Abbot, care 

Miss S. Sargent, " 

Charles Lynam, " 

C. T. Summers, burial 
Mrs. J. Dodge, care . 
George A. Berry, burial 
Morey and Whiting, care 
H. F. Gerrish's estate, burial 
Mrs. L. F. Lund, care 
E. Young, burial 
Mrs. Charles Hayes' estate, burial 
Mrs. A. W. Kimball, care 
Mrs. D. A. Warde, '' 
George H. Heath, " 
L. W. Glysson, " 
Mrs. AY. H. Palmer, " 
Rev. E. W. Porter's estate, burial 
Mrs. Cyrus Hill's estate, care 
George L. Lincoln, removal 

D. C. Allen, care 
S. S. French, " 
W. E. Dow, " 
W. G. C. Kimball, - 
W. A. Russell, " 
C. L. Fellows, " 
Mrs. N. Mansur, " 
Mrs. J. Bartlett, " 
Mrs. A. J. Langley, " 
Mrs. F. A. Dodge, care and repairs 



$1.50 
1.75 
2.00 
2.00 
62.10 
49.67 
1.00 
3.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 
2.00 
7.00 
5.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
3.50 
4.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.00 
2.25 



106 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Frank H. Crapo, care 

G. H. Seavey's estate, burial 

J. C. Blake, care 

Charles Nichols, repairs 

Orrin Whidden, labor . 

Mrs. M. E. Walker's estate, burial 

W. W. Flint, l)urial and care 

E. C. Button, burial . 
L. K. Peacock's estate, care 
C. C. Danforth, care . 
Mrs. N. G. Mead, care 

F. J. Young, care 
W. E. Ray, " 
J. C. Lane, " 
Mrs. W. Clark, care . 
George L. Brown's estate, burial 
Mrs. J. M. Lauder, care 
Harry Dolotf", care 
Arthur Booth, " 
George D. Waldrou, burial 
George Q. Roy, care . 
Home for aged, burial 

G. J. Benedict, care . 
Collins and George, care 
E. A. Ordw ay, bulbs, etc. . 
Mrs. Nichols, grave and burial 
Mrs. S. A. S tan i els, care . 
Glanville Reynolds, burial . 
Mrs. I. W. Hammond, care 
Mrs. L. B. Chandler's estate, burial 
Charles G. Hlanchard, care . 
Howard A. Dodge, care 
J. O. Hall's estate, burial and ca 
Charles W. and Charles N. Hall, lot 53 

block P 

Charles W. and Charles N. Hall, grading 
Mrs. F. Booth, care . 



$3.00 
8.00 
2.00 
1.00 
G.OO 
8.00 
9.50 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.00 
1.25 
2.00 
2.00 
8.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
1.50 
3.00 
2.00 

, 1.50 
1.29 
8.00 
1.50 
4.00 
1.50 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 
(5.00 

32.40 

21.60 

1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMP:NT. 



107 



Mabel A. Southworth, lot 74, block V 
" " grading 

Laura Grant, lot 78, block V 
" " grading . 

David L. Neal, lot 86, block V 
" " grading 

T, O. Gardner, repairs 

David L. Neal, burial 

C. M. Murdock's estate, burial 
William Ladd, care 
Mrs. Hardy, plants 
E. F. Lake, burial 
Althea Hayes, burial . 
Clara F. Clarke, addition to lot 14 

block H. 
Mrs. Susan Grant's estate, burial 
J. Gove, burial . 
J. E. Gove, removal . 
Frank S. Streeter, lot 3, block U 

" " grading . 

James Harlow, use of tomb 

D. M. Spline, Div., foundations 
Mrs. S. M. Estes, grave and burial 
Moses H. Bradley, lot 58, block V 
H. W. Ranlet, burial and care 
Orrin Whidden, foundation . 

L. J. Goi'don, repairs . 
S. F. Patterson, care . 
George W. Wales and Ozro M. Allen 

lot 39, block V . 
George W. Wales and Ozro M. Allen 

grading ..... 
S. S. Kimball's estate, burial 
Labor and plants 
Walter H. and George H. Mills, lot 

3, block P 

AValterH. and George H. Mills, grading 



$24.00 

18.00 

24.00 

18.00 

33.00 

26.40 

5.00 

3.00 

8.00 

2.00 

1.00 

4.00 

3.00 

24.00 

3.00 

2.00 

.50 

109.80 

73.20 
1.00 
7.00 
8.00 
1.00 

10.00 
6.00 
1.00 
2.00 

85.50 



68.40 


10 


75 




75 


45 


00 


45 


.00 



1( 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Carl Vester, single grave 

J. D. Kelley lot, care 

J. F. Warde, care 

George G. Hatch, care 

Dr. H. E. Allison, care and repair 

Orrin Whidden, foundation 

D. D. Rowe, lot 133, block V 
" " grading . 

E. F. Lake, lot 131, block V 
" " grading . 

F. H. Kelsey, labor . . 
Miss Nelson, repairs . 

D. D. Rowe, burial . 

E. A. Moulton, labor 
Mrs. Waldron, care 
A. B. Carter, care 
Mrs. C. M. Murdock, labor 
John W. Rand, repairs 
A. B. Brown, care 
Miss E. Sturtevant, care 
I. Lewis Emerson's estate, burial 
Mary Hutchins, repairs 
Mrs. C. M. Murdock, labor 
Mrs. J. Johnson, burial 
John Allison, care 
O. H. T. Richardson, burial 
Henry Morrison, repairs 
Woman's Relief Corps, plants 
J. E. Wiiley, burial . 

lot 83, block V 
" " grading . 
New England Granite Co., foundation 
Irving Johnson, burial 
Lulu Dixon's estate, burial . 
John and W. P. Ballard, burial 
Mrs. Peck's estate, burial . 
Mrs. E. H. Greeley's estate, burial 



S5.00 

1..50 

1.50 

1..50 

2.. 50 

4.00 

24.00 

18.00 

24.00 

18.00 

4.00 

1.00 

3.00 

1.50 

1.00 

2.00 

.50 

1.00 

4.50 

1.00 

3.00 

2.50 

4.50 

.50 

1.50 

3.00 

.75 

2.00 

3.00 

30.00 

24.00 

16.00 

3.00 

8.00 

G.OO 

3.00 

3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



109 



A. W. Silsby's estate, burial 

Gordon and Edgerly, care . 

Mrs. W. L. Foster's estate, burial 

S. G. Mills, burial and repairs 

Paul Ladd's estate, burial . 

Mrs. Mary A. Stevens' estate, burial 

Mrs. I. S. R. Sanborn, care 

Sarah E. Tucker, lot 15, block D 

Mrs. L. D. Brown's estate, burial 

Sarah E. Tucker, removal . 

George R. Clark, grave and burial 

Mrs. C. Wasto, removal and repairs 

William Gordon, repairs 

Mrs. S. Butterfield, plants and care 

Mrs. R. S. Mitchell, care . 

Mrs. Burbank- Abbott, care 

William Tonkin, burial 

S. P. Foster, burial . 

W. H. Horner, repairs 

Mrs. E. A. Wason, burial . 

George A. Huntoon's estate, burial 

Clapp and Rolfe, care 

Stephen P. Foster, lot 132, block V 

" " grading 

Mrs. Eliza A. Wason, lot 15, block V 

" " grading 

Clara A. and Walter C. Huntoon 

lot 27, block V _ . 
Clara A. and Walter C. Huntoon 

grading .... 

Axey Mitchell, lot 82, block V . 

" *' grading 

C. M. Mitchell, burial 
Mrs. J. M. Jones' estate, burial am 

care . . . . • 

Charles Peaslee, burial 
Rev. C. L. Tappan, burial . 



$3.50 

2.50 

8.00 

10.00 

3.00 

3.00 

1.00 

15.00 

3.00 

3.00 

5.50 

6.00 

1.00 

2.25 

1.50 

2.00 

3.00 

1.50 

1.00 

3.00 

8.00 

1.50 

24.00 

18.00 

24.00 

18.00 

40.00 



30.00 


30.00 


15.00 


2.50 


4.50 


3.00 


3.00 



110 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Gustavus Bartlett, removal . 

Mrs. Burn side, care 

Frank P. Quimby, lot 2, block U 

" " grading . 

Mrs. C. A. Wasto, setting stone 
Mrs. Saville's estate, burial 
W. I. Peaslee, burial 
J. E. Thompson, repairs 
Mrs. James Minot, care 
Mrs. Burleigh's estate, care 
O. Smitli Aldrich's estate, repairs 
Mrs. John Straw, repairs 
Charles Ash, burial 
Frank Battles and Emmie E. Allin 

lot 66, block P . . • . 

Frank Battles and Emmie E. Allin 

grading ..... 
Mrs. T. W. Weston, lot 112, block V 
" " grading 

" " burial 

C. A. Kendall, repairs 

W. E. Gordon, trimming grave . 

O. Whidden, foundation 

M. Taylor Ladd's estate, burial . 

Charles A. Robinson's estate, burial 

Oland Blodgett, burial 

Fred Hoit's estate, burial . 

Mrs. Moses Sanborn, repairs 

J. M. Runals, labor . . . 

E. H. Haskell, repairs 

Mrs. F. P. (^uimby's estate, burial 

Mrs. P. H. Emerson's estate, burial 

Eugene A. Ordway, lot oG, block U 

" " grading 

Charles P. Virgin, care 
Henry Perkins, repairs 

D. D. Rowe, care 



$1.50 

2.00 

91.80 

61.20 

.,50 

3.00 

a. 00 

1.00 

2.00 

1.50 

5.00 

.75 

1.00 

32.40 

21.00 

30.00 

22.50 

8.00 

1.00 

5.00 

4.00 

3.00 

3.00 

.50 

8.00 

2.00 

.75 

1.25 

8.00 

3.00 

82.74 

55.16 

2.00 

1.25 

1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



Ill 



Home for Aged, burials . . 

Daniel Holden's estate, burial 

J. B. Fellows' estate, burial 

William Ladd's estate, burial and cai'e 

Mrs. Houston, burial 

W. W. Cloud, repairs 

Honora N. Houston, lot 137, block V 

" " grading 

George H. Folsom, labor 
C. W. Clarke, repairs 
Rev. D. J. Smith, burial 
Mrs. Lowell, single grave . 
Mrs. Lowell, burial 
C. N. Hall, burial 

Sturtevant Post, No. 2, G. A. R., burial 
Mrs. G. G. Spead, repairs . 
L. J. Perkins, repaii's 
George F. Page, care 
Lucy J. Perkins, lot 43i, block H 
A. R. Ayers, burial . 
A. G. Estabrook, care 
Labor ..... 
Bulbs sold .... 

W. K. Atwood's estate, burial 
George H. Russ, care 
Mrs. Esther Atwood, lot 136, block V 

" " grading 

Mrs. Mattie E. Barnard, lot 73, block P 

" " grading . 

Mrs. F. E. Bnrnhara, lot 38, block U 

" " grading 

Joseph T. Walker, sand 
Mr. Garmon, labor . ' . 
Rev. C. ¥j. Harrington, repairs 
J. P. Nutter, burial . 
S. S. French, burial . 
John G. Page's estate, burial 



S6.00 

10.00 

3.50 

5.00 

3.00 

6.00 

24.00 

18.00 

2.75 

8.00 

3.00 

5.00 

.50 

3.00 

3.00 

2.00 

5.00 

1.00 

20.00 

3.00 

4.50 

.25 

2.00 

3.00 

3.00 

24.00 

18.00 

32.40 

21.60 

56.70 

45.36 

5.00 

1.00 

1.00 

.50 

3.00 

3.00 



112 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. S. J. P^itts' estate, burial and'vepairs 

F. P^. Burnkain, burial 

J. PLdward Walker, burial . 

E. H. Lane, burial . 

Dr. Brainard, burial . 

S. ¥. Morrill, care 

George W. Waters, burials, etc, 

James G. Leightou, care 

Mrs. A. S. White, " 

J. W. Drew, " 

W. M. Chase, " 

E. O. Jameson, care and plants 

Mrs. J. H. Dearborn, care 

W. B. Durgin, " 

N. H. Shattuck, 

Mrs. A. V. Merrill, " 

Mrs. Charlotte Merrill, " 

Mary Martin, " 

George A. Berry, " 

C. J. Whitney, 

Mrs. George Vj. Jenks, " 

George H. Marston, " 

Mrs. George L. Nutter, care 

J. P. Nutter, care 

J. A. Cochran, " 

Mrs. A. Bunker, care 

Frank Mace, " 

A. P. Sherburne, " 

H. D. Hammond, " 

R. F. Robinson, " 

Fraidv Coffin, " 

A. T. Whittemore, care 

George L. Stratton, " 

H. E. Conant, " 

J. R. II. Davis, " 

Mrs. A. C. Heath, " 

Mrs. C. L. George, care and plants 

H. E. Jewell, care 



^7.00 
8.00 
3.00 
.50 
1.00 
2.00 

10.50 
1.00 

25.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.75 
2.00 
3.25 
1.50 
1.00 
2.00 
1.75 
1.50 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
G.50 
1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



113 



C. S. Mellen, care 

F. H. Clement, care . 
Jos. Palmer's estate, care 

G. D. B. Prescott, " 
W. E. Carpenter, " 
E. C. P^astman, " 
George C. Roy, care and plants 
W. P. Fiske, care 
J. P. Kittredge, " 
Mrs. J. Connell, " 
C. E. Palmer, " 
Mrs. H. C. Sturtevant, car 
Benjamin Conch's estate, 
E. N. Shepard's estate, 
W. F. Thayer, care . 
L. A. Smith, " 
G. F. Bnswell, " . 
G. B. Emmons, " 
J. T. Batchelder and brother, car 
W. E. Chandler, care and plants 
Miss L. M. Poore, cai'e 
Mrs. W. Bates, " 
Mrs. J. A. West, " 
C. A. Dole, " 
C. W. Lane, 
Mrs. Loran Clough, " 
J. Stevens Abbot's estate, care 
J. B. S. Fletcher, care 
H. W. Marcy, " 
J. W. Ward well, " 
O. S. Snell, " 
Rev. C. W. Bradlee, '' 
W. D. Thompson, " 
C. L. Gilmore, " 
J. Frank Webster, " 

E. E. Brown, " 

F. E. Brown, " 



$5.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.88 
5.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.25 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
4.00 
2.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.50 
6.00 
1.00 
4.00 
2.00 
2.50 
3.00 
1.50 

19.70 
4.50 
2.50 
2.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 



114 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



'Mrs. H. J. Crippen, care and plants 

P. S. Smith, care 

Clinton D. Shaw, lot 147, block V 

" " grading . 

N. H. Asylum, Kent lot, care 
Mrs. E. P. Schutz, care 
Mrs. W. B. Stetson, care 
Mrs. George H. Adams, care 
Philip Plummer's estate, burials 
Nahum Robinson's estate, care 
John C. French, care 
W. E. Hunt, care and plants 
C. C. Webster, care . 
A. P. Fitch, care 
S. Blaney's estate, care 
Byron Mooi-e, care 
J. E. Dwight, care . 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 

F. E. Colburn, care 
A. S. Trask, burial . 
C. O. Stearns, care 
C. P. Bancroft, " . 
H. C. Brown, " . 
J. C. Badger, " . 
W. Badger, " . 
Mary J. Stevenson's estate, bui'ial 
Sylvanus Smith, foundation 
E. B. Hutchinson, care and plants 
C. J. Smith, care 
N. H. Asylum for Insane, burial 
Benevolent Society, care 
W. H. Horner, burial 
W. H. Horner, care 
Mary Perley, care 
Mrs. W. Hooker, care and plants 
W. Green, care 
Martin Richardson, burial . 



$3.00 
1.50 

59.50 

47.60 
3.00 
9.00 
1.50 
2.00 

14.00 
2.00 
.75 
4.88 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
5.00 
3.00 
.50 
5.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 

16.50 
9.50 
2.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
1.25 
3.00 
2.27 
2.00 
3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 



115 



F. W. Boardman, care 

S. R. Dole, care 

Mrs. H. E. Perkins, care 

Mr. Hannigan, rent 

W. P. Ford, care 

Daniel Holden's estate, care 

M. B. Smith, repairs 

Albert A. Stewart, burial . 

Labor ..... 

Martin Rowell's estate, burial 

Grenville Bnzzell's estate, burial and car 

Miss P. Eaton, care . 

Warren Emerson, care 

Fred U. Lane, " 

Edson J. Hill, 

Charles Joy, -' 

Emma C. Rowell, lot 113, block V 

" " grading, 

S. N. Sargent's estate, burial 
Irving Pickering, care 
N. G. Carr, 
W. E. Dow, 
Maria Woods, " 

F. Moseley's estate, care and repairs 
Mrs. F. B. Underbill, care 
Miss A. Packard, care and plants 
Mrs. E. Adams, " 

Frank K. Jones, " 
Frank H. Locke, " 
Mr. Harvey, burial 
Amos Blanchard, care 
George L, Brown's estate, care 
T. W. Young's " " . 

J. B. Green, care 
F. Allison, repairs 
Dr. G. M. Kimball, repairs 
H. A. Brown, care 



$1.50 
1.00 
2.00 

12.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 
.50 
.50 
3.00 
4.00 
1.00 
2.50 
1.50 
8.00 
1.50 

30.00 

22.50 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
4.50 
2.00 
2.90 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 

36.05 
1.50 



116 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



George L. Lincoln, care 

Mrs. T. H. Ford, care and repairs 

Mrs. R. M. Morgan, care and shrubs 

Mr. Griffin, burial 

L. H. Carroll, care 

B. Bilsborough, care . 

C. Wall, foundation . 
Ara Morrill's estate, care 
W. I. Leightoii, " 
George Brooks, burial 
T. H. Dunstane, rent . 
J. E. Rand, care 
W. G. C. Kimball, care 
J. C. P^aton, care and burial 
Mrs. Donovan, care and plants 

F. S. Whiting, care 

G. H. Morey, " 
H. A. Kimball, " 
C. W. Clarke, " 
Mrs. J. B. Sanborn, care 
Alba Woods, care 
John C. Mills, lot 3, block 

" " grading 

Mrs. J. B. Coleman, care 
Dr. E. Morrill, 
D.Young, Jr., " 

Mrs. A. S. Marshall, " 
Rollins and Young, " 

C. A. Lockerby's estate, care 
Miss Morse, " 

Mrs. J. Y. Mugridge, " 

W. A. Chesley, " 

Miss M. A. Abbott, " 

Nelson Abbott, "• 

Mrs. R. R. Shaw, care and repairs 
Mrs. C. H. Rolfe, repairs 
Mrs. N. Mansur, care 
Gustavus Walker, repairs 



$1.00 
3.00 
2.75 
.50 
2.00 
1.00 
4.00 
2.00 
1.75 
3.00 

24.00 
1 .00 
2.00 
4.00 
2.50 
1.00 
1.00 
3.Q0 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 

30.00 

20.00 
1.00 
1.00 
8.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.00 
5.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



117 



F. Booth, care . 








SI. 00 


J. T. 


Sleeper, care 


. 






1.00 


c: G 


. Blanchard, 


care 






2.00 


B. F 


Virgin, 








1.50 


Mrs, 


J. Lauder 








1.50 


Mrs. 


E. Dow, 








1.50 


H. A 


. Rowell, 








2.00 


Mrs. 


S Edmands, 








1.00 


Mrs. 


A. J. Langley 








1.00 


Oliver Ballon, 








1.50 


Mrs. 


L. S. Morrill, 








1.50 


Mrs. 


N. G. Mead, 








1.50 


F. J. 


Young, 








1.00 


Mrs. 


S. Wardner, 








2.00 


Mrs. 


S. Webster, 








1.50 


B. G 


. Carter, 








1.50 


Mrs. 


C. H. Ordway 


5 






1.00 


Mrs. 


H. E. Chandler, care 




1.50 


H. B 


. Bartlett, 


U 




1.00 


D. C 


. Allen, 


( . 




1.50 


J. E 


Randlett, 


a 




1.50 


William Smith, 


i i 




1.50 


Mrs. 


C. L. Eastman, " 




2.00 


Mrs. 


E. G. Carter, 


I i 




1.50 


Mrs. 


A. S. Sprague 


i, i 




1.50 


Mrs. 


W. E. Morton 


's estate, burii 


il 


3.00 


Mrs. 


E. R. Carter, 


burial . 




3.00 


Lyman R. Fellows, 






3.00 


Miss 


Fogleburg, 






3.00 


C. A 


. Hutchins, 






,3.00 


Mrs. 


Grover, 






3.00 


Zeb Swain, 






1.00 


C. H 


. Noyes, 






3.50 


W. D. Kimball, 






3.00 


E. S 


outhworth's estate, burial 




3.00 


Mrs. 


F. A. Wells, 


)urial 




3.00 


G. J 


udkins, burial and grave 




8.00 


George W. Wales, 


burial 


, 




4.00 



118 



CITY OK CONCORD. 



B. L. Ring, burial 

C. T. Wason, " 
W. E. Hood, burial and care 
C. C. Danforth, cai-e . 
J. B. Hussey, " . 
Mrs. J. C. Ordway, Adams lot, care 
Mrs. T. A. Freemau, care . 
Mrs. George H. Smith, care 
Mrs. G. Bullock, " 
Mrs. J. J. Wyman, 
Charles Trenoweth, rent 
Mrs. C. H. Jones, care 
C. P. Smith, care 
George F. Sevvall, burial 
Henry McFarland, care 
G. H. Rolfe, care and plants 
R. H. Rolfe, burial . 
John H. Hill, repairs . 
George F. Sewall, lot 71, block P 

" " grading . 

Frank Adams, repairs 
J. M. Runals, repairs 
Mrs. Hevenor, care . 
Mrs. G. E. Todd, care and repairs 
Mrs. William Yeaton, repairs 
Income from invested funds . 
E. L. Knowlton, trust fund 

S. B. P]aton, 
Alonzo Atherton, 
Frederick Clouglj, 
Charles S. Danforth, 
John D. Gale, 
James D. Blaisdell, 
E. H. Rollins, 
Greenough and Evarts McQuesten, trust 

fund . . . . • 

E. W. Woodward, trust fund 

Abby L. Sanborn Bailey, " 



$3.00 
3.00 
12.00 
.2.00 
1..50 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 
1.50 
24.00 
1.00 
1.00 
.50 
3.00 
2.50 
1.00 
5.00 
32.40 
21.60 
4.00 
1.50 
1.50 
3.00 
1.00 
653.33 
15.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.25 
3.00 
2.00 
5.00 

3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



119 



Harriet W. Butters, 

Lydia F. Edgerly, 

B. F. Caldwell, 

Mary Crow, 

Emily P. Blanchard, 

George Clough, 

Silas Curtis, 

Alvah C. Ferriii, 

Hannah A. and Fanny ^ 

fund 
Lincoln and Forrester, 
Henry A. Maun, 
Charles Moody, 
Woodbridge Odlin, 
Jonathan E. Sargent, 
Mary W. Smith, 
Sarah M. K. Adams, 
Mary B. Allison, 
Matilda Benson, 
Ellen C. Bixby, 
Nathaniel Bouton, 
Mary N. Preston Buntin, 
Nathan F. Cai'ter, 
Samuel M. Chesley, 
Caroline Clark, 
Mrs. N. P. Clough, 
Amos L. Colburu, 
Mrs. Josiah Cooper, 
Cordelia A. Dan forth, 
Georgianna P. Ela, 
Lydia A. Farley, 
Mary M. Farnum, 
George G. Fogg, 
Asa Fowler, 
Mrs. A. W. Gale, 
John Gear, 
George A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, 

trust fund ..... 



trust fund 


$2.75 


( ( 


3.50 


(( 


7.00 


(( 


7.00 


(( 


3.00 


n 


10.00 


(( 


2.00 


( I 


2.28 


\.. Goss, trust 




. 


3.00 


trust fund 


2.00 


(( 


2.00 


(( 


2.00 


ii 


2.30 


" 


4.75 


a 


2.50 


a 


21.75 


i i 


1.50 


(( 


1.25 


(( 


3.00 


C( 


17.75 


a 


3.00 


u 


3.00 


(; 


3.00 


ii 


2.50 


i i 


2.00 


u 


1.25 


(( 


2.00 


(( 


2.50 


u 


; 3.00 


u 


2.50 


(( 


3.00 


(( 


3.00 


(( 


18.00 


(( 


.54 


(( 


1.50 



2.00 



120 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Betsey Hadley, 


trust fund 


$3.00 


George M. Harding, 


i t 


1.50 


Mary D. Hurt, 


a 


11.00 


J. P'rank Hoit, 


u 


3.00 


Sarah E. Ii'isli, 


i i 


3.00 


John and Benjamin A 


Kimball, trus 




fund 


. 


6.00 


J. L. Lincobi, 


trust fund 


1.50 


J. W. and E. .1. Little, 


1 1. 


4.00 


John McCauley, 


i i 


2.00 


James McQuesten, 


ik 


5.00 


H. W. and H. 0. Matthews, trust fund 


2.00 


J. B. Merrill, 


trust fund 


3.00 


8. E. Merrill, 




3.00 


Mary J. Moses, 




3.00 


Mrs. C. H. Newhall, 




3.00 


Eliphalet S. Nutter, 




3.00 


Eugene A. Oi'dway, 




1.75 


Cyrus W. Paige, 




3.00 


Hannah E. Phipps, 




2.00 


W. H. Pitman, 




3.00 


S. Lizzie Pixley, 




2.00 


George L. Reed, 




2.25 


Judith A. Richardson, 




3.00 


Moses W. Russell, 




3.00 


Jonathan Sanborn, 




3.00 


John B. Sargent, 




3.00 


Hattie R. Southmaid, 




1.50 


Thomas Stuart, 




2.50 


Hiram B. Tebbitts, 




• 3.00 


John C. Thorne, 




3.00 


Pliny Tidd, 




2.00 


Eliza W. Upham, 




4.50 


Mary E. Walker, 




4.75 


George F. Wliittredge, 




3.00 


Mary Williams, 




2.25 


Robert Woodrutf, 




4.00 



:,386.55 



treasury department. 

Credit. 

By N. H. Savings Bank, one-half sale 
lots for year, account of permanent 

fund $598.87 

Balance to city treasurer's account . 3,787.68 



121 



:,386.55 



RECEIPTS OF OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 

Amoiint received from sundry collections, permanent fund and trust funds, 
are added to the annual appropriation. 



Receipts. 

W. P. Silver, burial . 

C. E. Savory's estate, burial 

Samuel M. Gritfin, labor 

Mrs. D. A. Hill's estate, burial . 

J. L. Mason's " 

Cliarles Nutting's " " 

Mr.s. J. C. Clough's " " 

Mrs. Thomas Sanborn's estate, burial 

Mrs. J. Farrar, care . 

Mrs. C. H. Stearns' estate, burial 

Mrs. C. S. Johnson, Boynton lot, repair 

Mrs. M. G-. Thomas' estate, burial 

C. Ji^. Stevens' estate, burial and repair 

C. A. Hardy, care 

Mrs. Jos. Elkins' estate, burial 

C. C. Danforth, care . 

Mrs. Carrie Wright's estate, burial 

Wells Sargent, burial . 

W. W. Taylor's estate, burial 

Fred R. Roach, burial 

Frank E. Brown's estate, burial . 

Mrs. N. R. Brown, repairs . 

A. G. Mc Alpine, labor 

C. E. Ballard, burial . 



$3.00 
8.00 
5.00 
5.00 
8.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1 .00 
4.00 
7.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.50 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
4.00 
1.50 
2.50 



122 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. Elislia Morrill's estate, burial 
Mrs. Walter Abbott's "■ " 

Mrs. B. F. Gale's 
Mrs. A. A. Woodward, repairs 
Mrs. S. Evans' estate, burial 
M. F. F'armer, repairs 
George H. Colby, burial 
John G. Hook's estate, burial 
F*. J. Butclielder, repairs 
" '* burial 

Mrs. B. F. Gale's estate, repairs 
Charles Johnson, labor 
]\Irs. Stevens' estate, burial 
S. M. GritHn's estate, burial and r 
Charles Johnson, removal . 
Labor .... 

Mrs. Josiali Sanborn's estate, bur 
S. M. Morse, care and repairs 
G. W. Waters, removals 
J. F. Wilson, care 
Ida Hopkins' lot, care 
T. D. Merrill " " 
Mrs. N. Carter, " 
C. L. Gilmore, " 

J. Frank Webster, " 
Minot Cemetery Association, labor 
Mrs. Gustavus Walker, repairs 
Mrs. Worthen's estate, burial 
Mrs. Wiggin's '^ " 

Mrs. E. Smith's " " 

C. C. Danforth, care . 
Mrs. G. E. Todd, care 
Income from invested funds 
William Abbott, trust fund 
Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust fund 
John T. Chalfin, " " 

Seth Eastman, " " 



epairs 



al 



$3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
2.00 
1.00 
8.00 
2.00 

.50 
2.00 
1.00 
3.00 
6.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
2.00 
4.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
33.00 

.50 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 
28.48 
4.00 
4.00 
1.50 

.15 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



123 



Theodore French, trust fund, . . $3.50 

Harvey J. Gilbert, " " . . 1.50 

William T. Locke, " " . . 4.00 

Samuel and David L. Morrill, trust fund 4.00 

True Osgood, trust fund . . . 3.00 

Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust fund . . 5.50 

Hiram Richardson, " " . . 11.00 

Nathan Stickney, '' " . . 1.75 

Abigail Sweetser, 'if , . 5.00 

Susan P. Savory, etals., trust fund . .81 
Timothy and Abigail B. Walker, trust 

fund 7.00 

Paul Wentworth, trust fund . . 5.00 

Joseph Stickney, " " . . 10.00 

Credit. 

By balance to city treasurer's account . $282.19 



S282.19 



S282.19 



124 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid W. W. Allen, treasurer of Woodlawn cemetery, $13.00 
for care of lots in 1898 and 1899. provided for by the following 
cemetery trust funds : 



Matilda Drown . 

Elislia and Sarah C. Hoyt . 

Mary A. Shaw . 

Lyman and Mary F. Cheney 



$4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



$13.00 



Paid Scott Fkknch, treasurer of East Concord cemetery, 
$29.88 for care of lots provided for by the following cemetery 
trust funds : 



Joseph S. Kimball 


$6.50 


Daniel E. Gale .... 


3.00 


Jacob Hoyt .... 


4.50 


Abigail W. Lang 


5.50 


B. L. Larkin .... 


2.00 


William Page .... 


.88 


Harriet N. Tenney 


5.50 


Ruth K. Abbott 


2.00 







$29.88 



Paid Isaac N. Abbott, treasurer of Millville cemetery, $3.33 
for care of lots provided for by the following cemetery trust funds: 



Andrew S. Smith 
Charles H. Merrill 



^2.12 
1.21 



$3.33 



Report of City Treasurer. 



126 



CITl' OF CONCORD. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 131 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing accounts 
of Alvin B. Cross, City Treasurer, for the year 1899, and find 
all items of receipt and expenditure therein properly recorded 
and authenticated by appropriate vouchers, and the several items 
correctly cast, and the cash balance in the hands of the city treas- 
urer to be fourteen thousand, one hundred and four dollars and 
six cents ($14,104.06), and as treasurer of the City Water 
Department to be five thousand, four hundred and sixty-four 
dollars and eighty-four cents ($5,464.84). 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking funds 
of the city and find such trust and sinking funds invested and the 
income thereof, for the year 1899, accounted for, as shown by 
the book of the city treasurer, kept for that purpose. 

JAMES H. MORRIS, 

Auditor. 
March 7, 1900. 



132 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



MUNICIPAL FUNDED DEBT. 

POLICE STATION BONDS. 
When due. Rate of Interest. Payable. Amount. 

July 1, 1903, 4, semi-annually, $17,000.00 

WIDENING PLEASANT STREET EXTENSION. 



When due. Rate of Interest. Payable. 

June 1, 1905, 4, semi-annually, 

MEMORIAL ARCH BONDS. 
When due. Rate of Interest. Payable. 

July 1, 1900, 4, semi-annually, 

BRIDGE BONDS. 
When due. Rate of Interest. Payable. 



July 1, 1904, 

July 1, 1905, 

July 1, 1906, 

July 1, 1907, 



4, 
4, 
4, 

4, 



soi^i-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-aimually, 
semi-annually, 



PUBLIC PARK BONDS. 

When due. Rate of Interest. Payable. 

June 1, 1914, 3i, semi-annually, 

Funded city debt .... 



CITY DEBT NOT FUNDED. 

Orders outstanding .... 

Interest on bonds, accrued, not yet due . 

Coupons overdue, not presented 

Due school districts 

Dog licenses to school fund . 

Notes .... 

Interest accrued, not due 

Funded city debt 



Amount. 
$13,800.00 

Amount. 
$5,000.00 

Amount. 
$5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

$20,000.00 

Amount. 
$25,000.00 

$80,800.00 



$19.20 

958.91 

81.25 

16,492.40 

1,340.46 

14,150.00 

44.48 

$33,086.70 
. 80,800.00 

$113,886.70 



CITY BONDS. 



133 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



Cash in treasury, January 1, 1900 
Cash in hands of W. P. Ladd 
County poor .... 
County soldiers . . ... 

Electrical inspection . 
Highway department . 
Rent — quarries (collectable) 
Rent, armory .... 
Taxes bid in by city 1896, 1897. 1898 
Taxes, 1899 .... 
Liquor — stock on hand 
Due from D. B. Webber, wood cut 

Total available 



$14,104.06 

243.11 

6,352.52 

1,940.62 

77.20 

327.66 

250.00 

150.00 

983.24* 

40,733.47 

1,418.42 

6.25 



),586.55 



Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1900 . 
Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1899 . 

Inci-ease for the year ..... 



PRECINCT SEWER FUND. 

SEWER BONDS. 

When due. Rate of Interest. Payable. 

July 1, 1904, 4, semi-annually, 

June 1, 1914, 3^, semi-annually, 

Dec. 1, 1914, 3^, semi-annually, 

July 1, 1917, 3|^, semi-annually, 



WATER PRECINCT BONDS. 
Payable, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 

*Tax Contoocook Manufacturing- Co., 1897 and 1898, of $2,715.12 settled for 
$1,000 by joint resolution. 



When due. 


Rate of Inte 


Nov. 1, 1900, 


3i, 


Jan. 1, 1901, 


4, 


Jan. 1, 1902, 


4, 


Jan. 1, 1903, 


4, 


Jan. 1, 1904, 


4, 


Jan. 1, 1905, 


4, 



. $47,300.15 

. 45,637.54 

. $1,662.61 



Amount. 

$12,000.00 

25,000.00 

9,000-.00 

25,000.00 

$71,000.00 

Amount. 

$15,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 



134 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



When due. 


Rate of Interest. 


Payable. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1 


1906, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


$10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1907, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 


1908, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1909, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1910, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1911, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


5,000.00 


Oct.. 1 


1912, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


45,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1913, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


, 1914, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1915, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


, 1916, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1917, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


, 1918, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1919, 


4, 


semi-annually. 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1922, 


4, 


semi-annually, 


400,000.00 


Mar. 1 


, 1922, 


•3*, 


semi-annually, 


20,000.00 



$650,000.00 
$721,000.00 



PRECINCT DEBT NOT FUNDED. 

Coupons overdue, sewer bonds, not presented . $70.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, sewer bonds . . 776.67 

Interest accrued, not yet due, water bonds . . 12,170.83 

Note, sewer 2,000.00 

Note, sprinkling ..... . 1,500.00 



Precinct funded debt 



$16,517.50 
721,000.00 



Precinct debt $737,517.50 

Less available assets, cash on hand, water depart- 
ment . 5,464.84 



Net precinct debt, January 1, 1900 . 
Net precinct debt, January 1, 1899 . 



$732,052.66 
. 732,021.11 



Increase 



11.55 



CITY BONDS. 



135 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT BONDS. 



When due. Rate of Interest. 
July 1, 1900, 4, 

July 1, 1901, 4, 

July 1, 1902, 4, 



Payable, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 
semi-annually, 



Interest accrued, not yet due 



Amount. 

$15,000.00 

15,000.00 

15,000.00 

$45,000^00 
900'00 

$45,900.00 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT. 
SEWER BONDS, PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 



When due. Rate of Interest. 


Payable. 


Amount. 


Aug. 1, 1903, 




4, 




semi-annually. 


$5,000.00 


Aug. 1, 1908, 




4, 




semi-annually. 


6,000.00 


May 1, 1913, 




4, 




semi-annually, 


5,000.00 


July 1, 1914, 




4, 




semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1915, 




4, 




semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1916, 




4, 




semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1917, 




4, 




semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1918, 




4, 




semi-annually, 


500.00 


July 1, 1919, 




4, 




semi-annually. 


500.00 




$19,000.00 


Interest accrued. 


not ; 


yet di 


je . 


326.67 


Coupons due, 


, but not 


presented 


60.00 


Overdraft 








. 


55.43 



$19,442.10 
Amount of sinking fund accumulated, including 

interest 1,031.11 



Net indebtedness on account of Penacook sewer pre- 
cinct, January 1, 1900 ..... $18,410.99 

Net indebtedness on account of Penacook sewer pre- 
cinct, January 1, 1899 ..... 18,576.79 



Decrease for the year 



$155.80 



136 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The above bonds were issued under ordinances passed by the 
city council, establishing a sewer precinct in Peuacook, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city for the establishing of 
said system. The ordinances also provide that the yearly 
interest and a portion of the principal shall be raised each year, 
for the purpose of creating a sinking fund to pay said bonds as 
they mature, as follows : 

SoOO annually for ten years from August 1, 1888, 
Si, 000 annually for five years from August 1, 1898, 
$1,200 annually for five years from August 1, 1903, 
$1,000 annually for five years from May 1, 1908, 
SoOO annually for six years from July 1, 1914, 

by taxation upon the taxable property in Penacook sewer pre- 
cinct, said sums, as soon as received, to be placed at interest by 
the finance committee. 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 

SEWER BONDS, PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 

When due. Rate of Interest. Payable. Amount. 

Oct. 1, 1902, 4, semi-annually, $5,000.00 

Oct. 1, 1907, 4, semi-annually, 5,000.00 

Oct. 1, 1912, 4, semi-annually, 7,000.00 



$17,000.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due .... 170.00 

Coupons due, but not presented . . . 10.00 



$17,180.00 



Amount of sinking fund accumulated, including 

interest ....... . 3,831.68 



Net indebtedness on account of West Concord sewer 

precinct, January 1, 1900 .... $13,348.32 



CITY BONDS. 137 

The above bonds were issued under ordinances passed by the 
city council, establishing a sewer precinct in West Concord, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city for the establishing of 
said system. The ordinances also provide that the yearly inter- 
est and a portion of the principal shall be raised each year, for 
the purpose of creating a sinking fund to pay said bonds as they 
mature, as follows : 

SoOO annually for ten years from October 1, 1892, 
$1,000 annually for five years from October 1, 1902, 
$1,400 annually for five years from October 1, 1907, 

by taxation upon the taxable property in West Concord sewer 
precinct, said sums, as soon as received, to be placed at interest 
by the finance committee. 



EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 
SEWER BONDS PAYABLE AS FOLLOWS: 



When due. Rate of Interest. Payable. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1900, 3^, semi-annually. 


$500.00 


July 1, 1905, 3|^, semi-annually. 


500.00 


July 1, 1910, 3 J, semi-annually, 


500.00 


July 1, 1915, 3^, semi-annually, 


500.00 




$2,000.00 


Interest accrued, not yet due 


35.00 




$2,035.00 


Amount of sinking fund accumulated 


420.43 



Net debt East Concord sewer precinct, 1900 . . $1,614.57 

The above bonds were issued under an ordinance passed by the 
city council authorizing a loan on the credit of the city. The 
ordinance also provides that the yearly interest and a portion of 
the principal shall be raised each year, for the purpose of creating 
a sinking fund to pay said bonds as they mature, as follows : 

One hundred dollars annually for twenty years from July 1, 
1895, by taxation upon the taxable property in East Concord 
sewer precinct, said sums, as soon as received, to be placed at 
interest by the finance committee. 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Net regular municipal debt above assets 


§47,300.15 


Net precinct debt above assets . 


732,052.66 


Net school district debt .... 


45,900.00 


Net West Concord sewer debt . 


13,348.32 


Net Penacook sewer debt .... 


18,410.99 


Net P^ast Concord sewer debt 


1,614.57 


Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, Jan 




uary 1, 1900 


8858,626.69 


Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, Jan 




uary 1, 1899 


873,608.07 


Decrease during year .... 


$14,981.38 



REaULAR APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1899. 



For the payment of state tax 
the payment of county tax 
support of schools 
payment of Memorial Arch bonds 
payment of interest 
payment of interest on temporary 

loans ' . 
support of the city poor 
incidental and land damages . 
committee service 
jirinting and stationery 
beds at Margaret Pillsbury hospital 
Decoration Day . 
aid dependent soldiers . 
public school text-books 
open air concerts 
IJlos.som Hill cemetery . 
Old North cemetery 
West Concord cemetery 
' Millville cemetery 



^29,499.25 
42,062.48 
36,135.00 

5,000.00 
3,207.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

1,410.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 

345.00 

300.00 

2,500.00 

300.00 

1,200.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



139 



For Pine Grove cemetery . 


$175.00 


Old Fort cemetery 


25.00 


Horse Hill cemetery 


50.00 


White park 


. 1,500.00 


Rollins park 


400.00 


Penacook park 


. 75.00 


Bradley park 


25.00 




% 



[35,008.73 



For Salaries 



Mayor .... 




$1,000.00 


City clerk .... 




1,200.00 


Overseer of poor, Wards 3, 4 


, 0, 




6, 7, 8, and 9 . 




200.00 


Overseer of poor, Ward 1 




30.00 


Overseer of poor, Ward 2 




10.00 


City auditor 




1,000.00 


City solicitor 




500.00 


City treasurer 




250.00 


City messenger 




600.00 


care of city clocks 




85.00 


clerk of common council 




50.00 


Board of Education, Union Sc 


hool 




District . . . * . 




250.00 


Board of Education, District No 


. 20 


50.00 


Town district school board 




200.00 


nine assessors 




1,500.00 


nine moderators . 




27.00 


nine ward clerks . 




90.00 


twenty-seven selectmen . 




135.00 


judge of police court 




800.00 


clerk of police court 




200.00 


collector of taxes, so much as 


may 




be necessary of the sum of. 




1,500.00 



1,677.00 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

Public Library. 



For salaries 

all other expenses 



S2,760,00 
1,1)40.00 



Board of Health. 



For salary of health officer . 
salary of board of health 
rent . 

care of pest house 
bacteriological tests 
materials for fumigatioi 
all other expenses 



$800.00 
75.00 
27.00 
15.00 

100.00 
25.00 

150.00 



Police and Watch. 



For salary of city marshal . 
salary of deputy marshal 
salary, captain of night watch 
pay of seven patrolmen 
pay of janitor 
pay of special policemen 
fuel for city proper 
fuel, Penacook 
board of horse, and shoeing 
extra horse hire in city 
extra horse hire in Penacook 
lights 

rent at Penacook 
Avater 

ice .... 
incidental expenses 
helmets and buttons 
police telephone service 



$1,200.00 

900.00 

850.00 

5,600.00 

240.00 

150.00 

250.00 

35.00 

252.00 

15.00 

15.00 

180.00 

108.00 

28.00 

10.00 

150.00 

50.00 

150.00 



84.700.00 



$1,192.00 



$10,183.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



141 



Roads and Bridges. 

For salary of commissioner of highways $1,400.00 
general maintenance and repairs for 



streets .... 


. 18,000.00 


permanent work . 
cleaning streets . . 


6,500.00 
. 3,500.00 


new sidewalks and crossings . 


. 4,000.00 


repairing concrete 


500.00 


catch basins and cleaning 


. 1,500.00 


macadam at Penacook . 


. 1,000.00 

f'^fi '100 00 




*jP O U , T: w u . u u 


Engineering Department. 


For city engineer, salary 


. $1,500.00 


assistants' salary . 


800.00 


supplies .... 


100.00 


repairs .... 
rent ..... 


30.00 
51.00 


incidentals .... 


200.00 


new furniture 


20.00 

'R-' 701 00 




n?— , < U 1 . UU 


Fire Departi 


nent. 


For pay-rolls, permanent men 
semi-annual pay-roll 
rent. Veteran Firemen's Associa 


. $6,518.00 

. 6,930.00 

Lion 150.00 


extra men for vacation . 


214.16 


hose carriage for West Concord 


375.00 


all other expenses 


. 6,187.84 

"R-^O '^7^ 00 




<p<iU,o ( o .yj\j 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

For bridges, Ward 1 . . . . $17.61 

White park . . . . 177.73 

Penacook park . . . . 2.66 

Bradley park . . . . 19.50 

Old North cemetery . . . 37.68 



142 



CITV OF CONCORD. 



""or Blossom Hill cemetery . 


$775.(32 


history commission 


150.00 


salaries ..... 


1,500.00 


incidentals and land damages 


3,772.50 


board of health .... 


56.35 


police and watch .... 


1,014.01 


engineering department 


16.20 


city poor ..... 


18.90 


highway department (earnings ap- 




propriated) .... 


1,208.05 


highway department . 


1,205.12 


interest ..... 


408.79 




(111 n Q sin TO 


■ V J- '-' 5 <-' uvy . 1 u 



PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1899. 

For interest, sewer bonds . . . $2,545.00 

. 10,326.90 
$12,871.90 



lighting: streets 



SEWER PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1899. 
For sewers $5,000.00 



STREET SPRINKLING APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1899. 
For sprinkling streets ..... $3,500.00 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 
FOR 1899. 



For payment of bonds 
interest on bonds 



. $15,000.00 
. 2,100.00 



7,100.00 



PENACOOK PRECINCT APPROPRIATIONS FOR 

1899. 

For sinking fund .... $1,000.00 

interest, sewer bonds . . . 760.00 

repairs ..... 569.09 

$2,329.09 



APPROPRIATIONS. 143 

WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1899. 

For sinking fund . . . . $500.00 

interest on bonds .... 680.00 

$1,180.00 



EAST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1899. 

For sinking fund . . . . $100.00 

interest on bonds . . . 70.00 

$170.00 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 20 
FOR 1899. 

For payment of bond .... $500.00 

interest 20.00 

$520.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 

FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1899. 

Being an itemized account^ made up from fJie hooks of the City 

Auditor, of the payments made by the City Treasurer 

on account of 

RUNNING EXPENSES. 



The arrangement of the details of expenditure which follows is 
intended to furnish such information as is desired by the public, 
and is in accordance with suggestions received from various 
sources. Items of payment to the same individual at sundry 
times are included in the aggregate amount given, if paid for the 
same objects. Every effort has been made to ascertain and pay 
all the bills for the current year; and in all cases, so far as 
known, payments of rent, etc., have been made to December 31, 
1899, and salaries and committee service have been paid for the 
full municipal year. 



STATE AND COUNTY TAXES AND INTEREST. 

Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer . . .$29,499.25 

county treasurer ...... 42,062.48 

municipal coupons ..... 3,287.00 

interest on temporary loans .... 1,460.03 





CITY POOR 




Mrs. T. H. Clark 




S270.57 


Robert P. Blake 




49.55 


Charles W. Diedrich 




2.00 


Albert Shaw 




25.00 


Mrs. John B. Tyler 




43.50 


Alvertus Evans . 




24.00 


Patrick Hackett . 




104.28 



$518.90 



146 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Soldiers. 



Mrs. Henry M. Sanborn 
Stephen Lamprey 
Orrin Larkin 
Leonard W. Bean 



536.23 
96.00 
36.75 
1!).24 



$188.22 



INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

$222.25 



Pay-rolls ..... 

George Abbott, Jr., glass and setting 

Joseph N. Abbott, milk 

Chancey Adams, visiting schools . 

W. W. Allen, burial permits 

Charles H. Barnett, truant officer and 

enumerator .... 
Charles F. Batehelder, posting notices 
Geo. A. Berry & Co., medicine . 
M. F. Bickford, horse hire. . 
W. S. Blancbard, groceries . 
Frank C. Blodgett, numbering houses 
C. F. Boardraan, ringing bell 
N. B. Burleigh, repairs to lawn mower 

and sharpening 
Samuel N. Brown, recording deeds 
Wm. F. Carr, groceries 
John Chadwick, horse hire . 
B. S. Chase, repairing chairs 
Henry H. Chase, indemnity bonds 
Chase & Martin, insurance . 
John L. A. Chellis, boards . 
Cheshire County Mutual Fire Insurance 

Co., assessment 
E. A. Clark, professional services, con 

tagious diseases 
E. E. Clark, use of furniture 
H. M. Clough, provisions, scarlet fever 
case ....•• 



.58 

4.40 

4.00 

14.85 

18.00 

6.95 

5.30 

25.00 

15.43 

15.65 

2.00 

9.00 
2.70 

12.35 

1.00 

2.50 

102.00 

15.00 
3.68 

1.87 

6.00 
2.00 

4.78 



CITY EXPENSES. 



147 



M. E. Cliiford, repairs and heuting ap- 
paratus, police station building . . $173.76 
Fred C. Coates, election expenses, 1898 8.25 
J. A. Cochran, cash paid out . . 103.00 
" " fees, vital statistics (re- 
turned to treasurer) . . . 135.7.5 
Concord Coal Co., fuel for city hall . 6.50 
Concord Drug Store, medicine . . 1.20 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas, clock, 

city hall, and Ward 7 house . . 123.30 
Concord Water Works, water for foun- 
tains, arch, and city hall . . . 50.00 
Chas. H. Cook, .Jr., vaccinations . . 23.00 
Howard M. Cook, vacation, city clerk . 26.00 
Emily Cozzens, taking testimony and 

typewriting sewer cases . . . 43.80 

John B. Crosby & Co., horse hire . 2.50 

Cutler & Co., crackers . . • 3.36 
John H. Currier, provisions, scarlet 

fever case ..... 12.94 
A. K. Day, professional service, con- 
tagious disease .... 6.00 
E. L. Davis, ice, Penacook fountains . 33.75 
C. G. Davis, numbering houses . . 48.77 
W. M. Darrah, repairs, police station . 7.70 
Chas. H. Dudley, provisions, scarlet 

fever cases . . . . . 31.30 

H. H. Dudley, decorating city hall . 12.50 

Norris A. Dunklee, horse hire . . 3.00 
T. H. Dunstane & Son, wood, scarlet 

fever case . . . . . 3.76 
Execution, Lucia v. City, Truchon, 

trustee 20.18 

John Fanning, ringing bell . . . 2.00 
Fellows & Clark, horse hire . . 2.00 
Wm. H. Ford, vacation, city messenger 12.00 
Geo. A. Foster, rent, cemetery commis- 
sioners' office ..... 25.00 



$8.75 


4.00 


4.50 


.65 


1.75 


6.00 


16.00 


8.54 



148 CITY OF CONCORD. 

James L. Freeman, labor 

John E. Frye, removing furnace . 

Ralph E. Gallinger, professional ser- 
vice, contagious disease . 

Wm. Giles, trucking .... 

Globe horse-shoeing shop, picker . 

F. W. Grafton, professional service, 
contagious disease .... 

Chas. N. Hall, service and expense 

John R. Hill, tax refunded . . . 

W. B. Howe, expense, Toronto and re- 
turn 37.00 

Humphrey, Dodge Co., street numbers, 

etc 171.06 

E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., altera- 
tions and general repairs at police 

station building .... 343.52 

John Iba, trucking . . . . 2.10 

John M. Inman, ringing bell . . 2.00 

Jackman & Lang, insurance . . 12.50 

Geo. W. Johnson, truant officer . . 197.39 
Chas. E. Kelley, patroling scarlet fever 

district 14.00 

Arthur H. Knowlton, vaccine virus . 1.00 

F. W. Landon, electrical repairs, etc. . 47.00 
Wendell P. Ladd, rent, collector's office 100.00 

" " taxes bid off" by city . 3,714.52 
Lee Brothers, repairs and heating appa- 
ratus, East Concord . . . 336.00 

G. Scott Locke, cash paid out . . 156.82 
H. 0. Marsh, fuel .... 100.19 
Nellie A. Merrill, guardian, land dam- 
age, 1898 300.00 

Ruth A. Minot, work for city clerk on 

vital statistics . . . . 21.00 

Morrill & Dauforth, insurance . . 102.25 

Sibley Gage Morrill, professional ser- 
vice, contagious disease . . . 10.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 



149 



N. W. McMurphy, professional service, 

contagious disease . 
N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., tele 

phones ..... 
Chas. E. Palmer, cash paid out, scarlet 

fever case • , . . . 

Geo. H. Parker, professional service 

contagious disease . 
W. H. H. Patch, patroling scarlet fever 

district ..... 
Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice for fountains 

D. L. Perkins, tracking 

H. J. Rock, lettering doors . 

Roby & Knowles, insurance and indem 

nity bonds .... 
Receivers Concord Land & Water Power 

Co., lights at arch and fountains 
Savage & Corliss, provisions 

F. W. Scott & Co., repairs and labor 
city hall .... 

Amos J. ShurtletF, court fees 

E. M. Shannon, ringing bell 
John Sims, trucking . 

G. H. H. Silsby & Son, repairs . 
Wm. Silva, trucking . 
Sleeper & Putney, labor, city hall 
M. A. Spencer, work for city clerk on 

vital statistics .... 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs 
Stevens & Duncklee, hose, duster, etc 
Edward A. Stevens, extra labor and 

cash paid out .... 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, grass seed 
Joseph Stickney, laying drain 
D. E. Sullivan, professional service, con 

tagious diseases 
D. W. Sullivan, medicine, contagious 

diseases ..... 



S6.00 

524.95 

1.35 

4.50 

2.00 

209.09 

2.50 

4.25 

195.00 

276.00 
9.33 

2.80 

31.20 

2.00 

2.00 

.52 

.50 

.60 

12.00 

2.85 
16.96 

50.30 
1.91 

15.00 

78.50 
10.80 



150 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Harry G. Sargent, expense in sewerage 

cases ...... $44.14 

Geo. L. Theobald, trucking . . 1.00 
Thompson & Hoague, rakes . . 1.30 
Town school district, enumerating schol- 
ars 13.50 

A. W. Walker, ringing bell . . 2.00 

Geo. W. Waters, burial, scarlet fever . 12.00 
Russell Wilkins, professional service, 

contagious diseases . . . . 80.00 

Wm. S. Wilson, plants at memorial arch 18.00 



88,772.50 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



Pay-rolls .... 

Abbot, Downing Co., sprinkler 

C. H. Abbott, posts . 

J. S. Abbott, hay 

Ola Anderson, edgestone 

Isaac Baty, repairing fountain 

Batchelder & Co., salt 

C. G. Batchelder, poles 

John F. Batchelder, grade . 

Badger Bros., wood . 

Frank P. Bennett, grade 

A. B. Black, general repairs 

A. H. Britton & Co., roofing and 

ware .... 
Dennis Brodger, watering trough 
Frank Brown, harness oil, 1898 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight 
Fred Carter, lighting bridge lights 
Ross W. Cate, shoeing 
Alfred Clark, lumber . 
J. 0. Clark, posts 
Clark & White, hay and grain 



hard 



125,137.09 

300.00 

3.00 

12.62 

179.09 

.75 

.75 

1.50 

1.04 

2.50 

8.70 

171.92 

65.75 

3.00 

1,50 

23.21 

12.00 

58.35 

24.59 

1.10 

303.67 



CITY EXPENSES. 



151 



Climax Road Machine Co., repairs on 

crusher . , . . 

J. A. Cobiini, fuse and caps 
Frank Coffin & Co., forage . 
Coleman Sewer Trap Co., traps for catch 

basins 

Concord Foundry Co., grates and traps 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas 
Concord Land & Water Power Co., elec 

trie lights .... 

Concord Machine Company, repairs 
Concord Water Works, water troughs 

fountains and crushers 
James M. Crossman, general repairs 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs, roller 

and crusher .... 
Danforth, Forrest & Morgan, labor 
C. G. Davis, painting 
W. S. Davis & Son . 
Detroit Graphite Co., paint 
Dickerman & Co., cement 
J. S. Dutton, rent and labor 
Edson Mfg. Co., hose and couplings 
Elmer S. Ellsworth, gravel bank . 
J. C. Farrand, oil 
M. J. Ferrin, sand 
O. J. Fifield, sand 
Clarence F. Fipphen, masonry 
Foote, Brown & Co., cement and hard 

ware ..... 
Ford & Kimball, posts, grate and base 
Wm. P. Ford & Co., plow points 
N. S. Gale & Co., pipe and hardware 
Goodhue & Milton, fittings . 
Chas. C. Graham, water trough . 
J. Hadlock, repairs, road machine 
W. H. Hale, sand 



$69.30 

4.15 

379.35 

10.00 

220.97 

2.05 

108.19 
1.06 

227.00 
5.40 

10.96 

.90 

2.88 

49.61 

133.10 

24.78 

31.86 

70.07 

800.00 

.88 

1.30 

4.50 

88.17 

29.43 
13.91 

4.40 

11.26 

.50 

3.00 
10.00 

4.40 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Stephen Hammonrl, lumber and sand 

James Hart, veterinary services . 

C. A. Higgins, gravel . 

James R. Hill & Co., harness 

Hickory Broom Co., brooms 

Hobson & Harwood, labor and repairs 

Lewis B. Hoit, lumber 

R. W. Hoit, posts 

Samuel Holt, brick 

Holt Brothers, plank and w^agon pole 

E. H. Houston & Son, wagon and re 

pairs ..... 
J. Elizabeth Hoyt, gravel . 
Humplhrey, Dodge Co., shovels, saws 

hardware .... 

Geo. D. Huntley, blacksmithing . 
Huntley & Tenney, general repairs 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., repair 

and lumber .... 
Geo. G. Jenness, gravel 
Henry H. Johnson, cash paid out . 

" " salary . 

J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs, harness 
Johnson & Simpson, grout . 
John C. Kilburn, spikes and nails 
Henry Lamprey, filing saws 
John Lamprey, hay, $141.92; order 

of 1898, $20.00 
Lee Brothers, repairs, crusher and foun 

tains ..... 
John A. Lewis, lighting bridge . 
A. K. Lowell, general repairs 
H. O. Marsh, coal 

C. H. Martin & Co., brushes, oils, etc 
Robert J. Maguire, veterinary service 
Wm. McDonald, labor 
James pj. McShane, shoeing 



$51.20 

3.00 

10.00 

15.00 

6.50 

4.90 

65.23 

1.20 

81.00 

10.60 

137.15 
163.90 

66.15 
11.65 
38.60 

222.83 

8.80 

15.27 

1,400.00 

84.99 

92.42 

1.28 

1.40 

161.92 

75.41 
50.00 

7.00 
35.01 
28.91 
18.75 

6.03 
99.00 



CITY EXPENSES 

John G. McQuilkin, oibkin suits . 

A. G. Moore, lumber . 

Henry Morrill, sand . 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., toll 

Geo. Neller, labor 

Emma Osgood, sand . 

Page Belting Co., belting and tallow 

Simeon Partridge, drag planks 

S. F. Patterson, handles 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lighting 

bridges ..... 
George H. Perkins, gravel . 
Pi'octor & Burt, rubber boots 
Geo. Prescott, painting 
A. E. Putney, labor . 
Roby & Knowles, insurance 
C. R. Robinson, water trougli 
E. Rliodes, grade 
Joseph Rogers, stone . 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber and 

water trough .... 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete and re 

l^airs ..... 
Rowell & Plummer, masonry 
E. H. Runnells, teaming 
Francis Runnells, water trough 
A. C. Sanborn, dynamite and powder 
David Sanborn, plank 
S. G. Sanborn, blacksmithing 
Frank Sands, labor 
Sargent & Co., shovel 
Geo. J. Sargent, gravel 
Savage & Corliss, oil, etc. . 
Geo. W. Silver, poles, etc. . 
J. E. Simonds Table Co., repairs 
Wm. Simpson, grade 



153 



$10.00 

5.25 

13.20 

90.00 

.20 

1.50 

36.00 

66.16 

2.50 

13.15 

53.13 
«.90 
3.00 
4.65 
6.83 
18.00 
20.00 
1.00 
1.00 

181.90 

2,634.39 

9.55 

31.50 
3.00 

16.80 
7.86 

17.68 

6.28 

.45 

33.50 
4.40 
2.37 
1.80 
7.20 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



W. A. Sleeper, harness repairs 
Ai J. Smitli, water trough , 
Stevens & Duncklee, dippers, etc 
C. H. Stevens & Co., plank 
Joseph Stickney, rent of land 
St. Paul's School, blacksmithing 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, grain 
Mrs. Symonds, sand . 
Hugh Tallant, plank . 
Joseph Tandy, labor . 
Taylor, Durgin & Sebra, labor 
John T. Tenney, powder and fuse 
H. Thompson, brooms 
Thompson & Hoague, nails, etc 
Geo. L. Theobald, stone 
Frank Varney, labor . 
Fales P. Virgin, plank 
John Walker, plank . 
Geo. B. Whittredge, oil and wicks 
Woodworth & Co., cement . 
A. B. Young, oil, etc. 



$33.85 
3.00 
5.35 
4.83 

12.00 
9.08 

39.38 
•2.00 
7.55 
3.75 
3.83 
4.70 

17.59 

84.29 
4.00 
2.25 

29.47 

27.79 
4.57 

18.75 
2.82 



$34,744.61 



FINANCIAL REPORT OP THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 

Appropriations . 

For general maintenance . . . $18,000.00 

permanent work .... 6,500.00 
macadam at Penacook . . . . 1,000.00 

cleaning streets .... 3,500.00 
catch basins and cleaning . . 1,500.00 

new sidewalks and crossings . . 4,000.00 

repairing concrete . . . 500.00 

salary of commissioner . . . 1.400.00- 

$36,400.00 

Sum taken from permanent work for bicycle paths $500.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



155 



Paid as follows : 
Appropriation for general maintenance 

and repairs $18,000.00 

Transferred from macadam at Penacook 1,000.00 
<-<- " permanent work . 3,000.00 

" " bicycle paths . . 89.83 



CENTRA 






$22,089.83 
IICT. 


^L DISTI 


General Repairs. 


Labor pay-rolls . 
Lights 








$6,287.43 
106.52 


Rent . 








27.00 


Blacksmithing 








203.69 


Hay and grain . 

Supplies 

Water 








900.24 

242.90 

8.00 


Insurance . 








33.00 


Services veterinary sur 
Postage and express 


geon 






21.75 
15.27 


Wagon 








125.00 


Stone 








25.00 


Telephone . 
Gravel 








.20 
218.90 


Freight 








8.00 


Lumber 








115.63 


Gas . 








.30 


Harness and repairs 








126.74 


Plumbing . 








4.90 


Powder 








3.00 


Casting 








10.00 

458 4SS 17 











Watering- Troughs and Drinking- Fountains. 
Labor pay-rolls . . . . . $16.28 



Water 
Plumbing 



130.00 
72.56 



$218.84 



156 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

Painting- and Repairing Carts. 



Labor pay-rolls 
Oil and brushes 
Lumber 



Labor pay-rolls . 



. 


$17.50 

.58 

15.02 






Shade Trees. 


• 



Bridges. 



Labor pay-rolls 








$513.45 


Freight 








4.88 


Paint 








133.10 


Cement 








15.00 


Lumber 








103.14 


Oil . 








7.42 


Lights 








51.67 


Brushes 








5.18 


Stone 








8.00 











Fences. 



Labor pay-rolls 
Lumber 



Labor pay-rolls 
Stone 



Culverts. 



$23.53 
30.93 



$155.05 
37.62 



$33.10 



$76.22 



$841.84 



$54.46 



192.67 



Cobble Paving. 



Labor pay-rolls 



,149.09 





CITY EXPENSES. 




157 




Winter Expense 






Labor pay-rolls . 




$2,164.70 




Plows 


. 


110.00 




Freight 


. 


6.80 




Supplies 


. 


4.38 




Repairing plows . 


• 


21.49 


$2,307.37 








Sanding. 




Labor pay-rolls . 


. 


$398.45 




Sand 


. 


48.00 




Supplies 


. 


4.15 




Shingles 


. 


9.82 


$460.42 








Signs. 




Labor pay-rolls . 


. 


$8.08 




Signs 


. 


4.00 


$12.08 







.3,829.56 



WEST CONCORD DISTRICT. 

C. R. Faknum, Agent. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls ..... $684.88 
Concord Water Works, water . . 40.00 

J. M. Grossman, sharpening picks . 5.40 



Winter Expense. 



Labor pay-rolls 



Labor pay-rolls 



Bridges. 



$730.28 



$218.85 



158 

Labor pay-rolls . 

Labor pay-rolls . 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

Fences. 



Culverts. 



MILLVILLB DISTRICT 
G. W. Chesley, Aj^ent. 
General Repairs. 
Labor pay-rolls ..... 

E. Roades, grade .... 

A. H. BrittoD & Co., axe, scythe, and 
snap ...... 

St. Paul's School, sharpening picks 
A. C. Sanborn, dynamite, caps, etc. 
W. P. Ford & Co., No. 1 S. H. clevis 
complete ..... 



,331.21 
1.00 

2.10 
9.08 
2.25 



Culverts. 



Labor pay-rolls 



Labor pay-rolls . 



"Winter Expense. 



PENACOOK DISTRICT. 
Henry Morrill, Agent. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls $959.84 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, cover for fountain 2.80 

Foote, Brown & Co., bolts . . . 1.15 

S. G. Sanborn, pick, bar, and bolt . 13,78 

Concord Water Works, Avater . . 40.00 



^2.78 



$ .89 



»56.37 



$1,346.39 



.72 



$343.52 



,696.63 



CITY EXPENSES. 159 

C. G. Davis, repairs drinking fountain . $2.88 

Elmer S. Ellsworth, gravel pit . . 300.00 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, street signs . 7.20 

J. C. Farrand, oil . . . . .88 
Foote, Brovvn & Co., picks, handles, 

nails, etc 21.93 

N. S. Gale & Co., picks, handles, etc. .90 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, use of watering 

trough 3.00 

Isaac Baty, repairs water fountain . .7.5 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . . .50 

Sargent & Co., oil and shovel . . .45 

$1,356.06 







Winter Expense. 




Labor pay-rolls ..... 


$337.43 


S. G. Sanborn, repairs snow-plow 


1.25 


Sanding. 




Labor pay-rolls ..... 


$146.52 


0. J. Fifield, sand .... 


4.50 


Henry Morrill, sand .... 


13.20 


Culverts. 




Labor pay-rolls ..... 


. 


Bridges. 




Labor pay-rolls ..... 


$84.75 


Penacook Electric Light Co., lights 


53.13 


J. H. Rowell, concrete Main street 




bridge ...... 


152.71 


J. H. Rowell, concrete Twin bridge 


105.03 


C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . 


163.42 


Taylor, Durgin & Sebra, labor 


3.83 


Ford & Kimball, posts 


7.25 



$338.68 



$164.22 



$2.66 



^570.12 



160 



Labor pay-roll.- 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

Shade Trees. 



EAST CONCORD DISTRICT. 
Andrew S. Farncm, Agent. 
General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls . . . . . $282.70 

Fred Carter, lighting street lamp . . 12.00 

C. G. Bachelder, poles . . . 1.50 

George Prescott, signs ... .65 

C. R. Robinson, use of watering trough 20.00 

Mrs. A. B. Young, oil,*etc. . . 2.82 

Thompson & Hoague, nails ... .80 



Culverts. 



Labor pay-rolls . 



Labor pay-rolls . 



Fences. 



$16.92 



Labor pay-rolls . 


Paving. 


$52.75 


Ford & Kimball, posts 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, 


Fences, 
lumber 


$2.66 
3.58 








$2,507.65 



$320.47 



$26.40 



^o.oo 



Labor pay-rolls 



Winter Expense. 



$96.55 

$448.97 



CITY EXPENSES. 161 

NORTH CONCORD DISTRICT. 

John C. Kilbukn, Ageut. 

Winter Expense. 

Labor pay-rolls ...... . $99.27 



General Repairs. 
Labor pay-rolls ..... 
•John Kilburn, spikes .... 
William Simpson, railings . 
A. J. Moore, railings .... 
J. C. Kilburn, Avire nails 
Dennis Brodger, use of watering trough 



$372.23 


.68 


3.00 


5.25 


.60 


3.00 



Bridges and Culverts. 
Labor pay-rolls ..... $36.35 

Joseph Rogers, stone .... 1.00 

Hugli Tallant, chestnut plank . . 7.55 

Fales P. Virgin, chestnut plank . , 11.35 



SANBORN DISTRICT. 

David Sanborn, Agent. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls $214.60 

A. C. Sanborn, dynamite, fuse, and 

caps 11.55 

John A. Coburn, caps . . . 4.15 

David Sanborn, sharpening drills . . .95 

David Sanborn, plank . . . 6.91 



$384.76 



$56.25 
$540.28 



$238.16 



Winter Expense. 
Labor pay-rolls . . . . . . . $8.25 

$246.41 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



LONG POND NORTH DISTRICT. 
A. W. HoBBSi, Agent. 
General Repairs. 
Labor pay-rolls ..... $77.90 

Mrs. M. J. Ferrin, grade . . . 1.30 



Winter Expense. 



Labor pay-rolls 



HORSE HILL DISTRICT. 
R. W. HoiT, Agent. 
Winter Expense. 



Labor pay-rolls . 



Culverts. 
R. W. Hoit, posts 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . 



$1.20 
1.40 



POTTER STREET DISTRICT. 
John T. Tenney, Agent. 
General Repairs. 
Labor pay-rolls ..... 
John T. Tenney, fuse and powder 
John T. Tenney, use of watering trough 
John F. Bachekler, grade . 
John T. Tenney, spikes 
C. H. Stevens & Co., lumber 



$2, 


59.50 




1.25 




3.00 




1.04 




.45 




4.83 



Winter Expense. 



Labor pay-rolls 



$79.20 



^51.64 



$130.84 



$43.19 



$2.60 



t5.79 



$270.07 



(.51 



$303.58 



CITY EXPENSES. " 163 

NUMBER POUR DISTRICT. 
F. H. Currier, Agent. 
General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls $265.92 

J. O. Clark, posts . . . . 1.10 



VIRGIN DISTRICT. 
Fales p. Virgin, Agent 

General Repairs. 
Labor pay-rolls ..... 
Fales P. Virgin, chestnut plank . 
Fales P. Virgin, use of watering trough 
C. Higgins, grade .... 



$275, 


.87 


15, 


.12 


3, 


,00 


10.00 



$267.02 



"Winter Expense. 
Labor pay-rolls $97.97 

$364:99 



MOUNTAIN DISTRICT. 

W. D. Stevens, Agent. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls . . . . . . . $119.67 



Winter Expense. 
Labor pay-rolls $66.72 

$186.39 



$303.99 



Winter Expense. 
Labor pay-rolls ...... . $51.44 

$355.43 



164 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HOT HOLE POND DISTRICT. 

L. L. Locke, Agent. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls ..... S38.10 

C. H. Abbott, posts .... 3.00 



1.10 



Winter Expense. 
Labor pay-rolls ...... . $15.73 



$56.83 



EAST CONCORD INTERVALE DISTRICT. 

J. S. Locke, Agent. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls $40.29 

Charles C. Graham, use of watering 

trough 3.00 



$43.29 



Winter Expense. 

Labor pay-rolls . . . . . . . $15.95 



$59.24 





EGYPT DISTRICT. 




George G. Jenness, Agent. 




General Repairs. 


Labor pay-rolls . 


$142.65 


Geo. G. Jeuness. 


, gravel . . . 8.80 




Winter Expense. 


Labor pay-rolls . 






$151.45 

$48.76 
$200.21 



CITY EXPENSES. 165 

PENACOOK INTERVALE DISTRICT. 
George W. Silver, Agent. 

General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls $79.49 

Geo. W. Silver, posts . . . 2.37 

Ai J. Smith, use of watering trough . 3.00 

$84.86 



Winter Expense. 
Labor pay-rolls . . . . . . . $4.60 



General Repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls ..... $50.10 

Frank R. Bennett, gravel . . . 8.70 

Francis Runnells, use of watering trough 3.00 



.46 



MAST YARD DISTRICT. 
Frank R, Bennett, Agent. 

"Winter Expense. 
Labor pay-rolls . . . . . . . $9.40 



;i.80 



$71.20 
Amount expended in general maintenance . . $22,089.83 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 

Appropriation for repairing concrete . . . $500,00 

Appropriation for new sidewalks and crossings . 4,000.00 

$4,500.00 



166 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Central District. 

BUILDING SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 

Labor pay-rolls ..... S602.77 



Johnson & Simpson, grout 
Labor, building crossings 



12.00 
21.93 



SIDEWALK REPAIRS. 

Labor pay-rolls ..... 
Labor, raising wall .... 
Thompson & Hoague, twine 
Danforth, Forrest & Morgan, labor 
N. S. Gale & Co., twine 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., screws and chain 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., plank . 
J. S. Dutton, steps .... 



$158.79 

9.35 

.12 

.90 

.12 

.20 

7.27 

4.86 



NEW SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 

J. H. Rowell & Co., new concrete . $986.47 

Ola Anderson, edgestone . . . 162.45 

Labor, setting edgestone . . . 164.42 

Johnson & Simpson, corner stone . 9.80 



CONCRETE SIDEWALK REPAIRS. 

J. H. Rowell &Co., concrete 



NEW CONCRETE CROSSINGS. 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete 



CONCRETE CROSSINGS REPAIRS. 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete 



PATCHING CONCRETE. 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete 



636.70 



$181.61 



,323.14 



$533.35 



[08.47 



L3.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 167 

Penacook District. 

REPAIRING SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 

Labor pay-rolls . . . . . . . $167.01 



CONCRETE CROSSINGS. 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairs, concrete . $56.35 

J. H. Rowell & Co., new concrete 

crossinojs . . . . . 105.83 



NEW CONCRETE SIDEWALKS. 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete . . $261.14 

Ola Anderson, edgestone . . . 16.64 



$162.18 



1 1 .a 



CONCRETE SIDEWALK REPAIRS. 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete .... $252.97 



West Concord District. 

BUILDING SIDEWALKS. 

Labor pay-rolls . . . . . . , $51.10 



REPAIRING SIDEWALKS. 

Labor pay-rolls ....... $20.56 



Millville District. 
Labor pay-rolls ....... $28.82 



Bast Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls . . . . . . . $8.40 



Amount expended in full ..... $3,824.16 
Balance on hand ...... 675.84 

$4,500.00 



168 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

PERMANENT ^WORK. 



Appropriation 

Transferred to bicycle paths 



Macadamizing. 

Labor pay-rolls ..... 
Climax Road Machine Co., repairs, 

crusher .... 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight 
Page Belting Co., tallow 
Hiram O. Marsh, coal 
Thompson & Hoague, hose, bibb nails 

etc. .... 

Cushman Electric Co., nuts, etc. 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., lumber 
Page Belting Co., belt 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil 
Lee Bros., plumbing . 
Concord Water Works, water 
A. B. Black, links, boxes, etc. 
Goodhue «&; Milton, glasses . 
Geo. D. Huntley, glasses . 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., handles, etc 



Roller. 



Labor pay-rolls . . . . 

Thompson & Hoague, hooks, etc, 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs 



$406.59 

69.30 
2.18 
1.76 

28.41 

2.00 

1.55 

129.91 

64.40 

75.00 

1.10 

4.05 

9.00 

61.92 

.50 

.25 

.93 



$6,500.00 
500.00 



[6.30 

.25 

9.41 



Culvert, Bridge Street. 



»S.85 



Labor pay-rolls 



$25.96 



1.33 



CITY EXPENSES. 



169 



Millville District. 
Change of line, Pleasant street 

Abbot-Downing Co., sprinkler 
Edson Manufacturing Co., hose and 
coupling ..... 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 

Amount expended in full 
Transferred to cleaning streets 
Transferred to general maintenance 
Balance on hand .... 



$300.00 



sprni 



CLEANING STREETS 

Weekly cleanings 178 loads paper, 

547 loads ashes 
Fall cleanings, 1,175 loads, 

cleanings, 1,288 loads 
Hand carts 
Cleaning crossings 
Burning paper 
Leveling ashes . 
Tools and repairs 



$537.11 

2,501.82 
599.19 
608.67 
309.97 
271.79 
58.20 



$295.40 



32 


.85 
25 


$333.10 

$1,524.64 
1,385.58 
3,000.00 

89.78 


• 


• 



Amount expended in Penacook district . 

Amount expended in West Concord district 

Amount expended in East Concord district 

This amount has been expended, as shown above, in the 
weekly collection of ashes, paper and yard rakings, tree 
trimming-s, leaves, etc., in the spring and fall of the year; 
also for hand cart and cleaning crossings in the central part 
of the city. 

Appropriation for cleaning streets . . $3,500.00 

Transferred from permanent work ap- 
propriation ..... 1,385.58 
Transferred from catch basins appropria- 
tion . . . . , . 1.17 



),000.00 



1,886.75 

$502.53 
59.97 
21.75 



1,886.75 



170 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CATCH BASINS. 
Appropriation ..... 
Number of catch basius built, I'J. 
Number of catch basins repaired, 23. 
Number of catch basins re-built, 1 . 



$1,500.00 



ii.muuui, expeimcu lu iiiii 

Cleaning catch basins .... 


$444.40 


«pi ,UU i • I ^ 


Repairing catch basins 


115.39 




Building catch basins .... 


442.04 




Re-building catch basins 


5.29 


$1,007.12 






Labor ...... 


$503.79 




Brick 


74.25 




Cement ...... 


35.78 




Mason work ..... 


96.97 




Base, grate and trap .... 


281.24 




Dippers ...... 

Boots ...... 


2.15 
3.00 




Pipe ....... 


9.94 


$1,007.12 






Amount expended in Central district 


$892.61 




Amount expended in Penacook district . 


93.59 




Amount expended in West Concord dis- 
trict ...... 


15.48 




Amount expended in East Concord dis- 
trict ...... 


1.50 




Amount expended in Millville district . 


3.94 


$1,007.12 






Transferred to cleaning streets appropriation . 


1.17 


Balance on hand . . • . . 




491.71 




$1,500.00 


BICYCLE PATHS 




Appropriation ..... 




$500.00 


Labor pay-rolls ..... 


$12.11 




Transferred to general maintenance 


89.83 




Balance on hand .... 


398.06 





$500.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



171 



Appropriation for salary commissioner of highways $1,400.00 
Paid Henry H. Johnson, commissioner . . $1,400.00 



Appropriation 
Amount expended 

Amount left in treasury 



. $36,400.00 
. 34,744.61 

. $1,655.39 



SPRINKLING. 
Appropriation .... 


$2,000.00 




Special appropriation October 10, 1899 


1,500.00 


$3,500.00 


Paid as follows : 




Labor pay-rolls ..... 


$1,972.85 




Repairing sprinklers .... 


70.50 




Rings ...... 


9.00 




Water 

Hose ...... 


700.00 
46.00 




Sprinkling at state camp ground . 


18.1'.) 


$2,816.54 


Repairs standpipes : 




Labor pay-rolls ..... 


$103.63 




Plumbing ...... 


121.48 


$225.11 








$3,041.65 


Balance left in treasury 




458.35 



$3,500.00 



PLEASANT STREET MACADAM. 

Pay-rolls $9,363.76 

Frank Adams, grade . . . . 275.00 

Amos Blanchard, oil . . . . 36.04 

Charles H. Chandler, inspecting pipe . 2.00 

Concord Coal Co., coal . . . 42.50 
Concord Foundry Co., catch basins and 

repairs ...... 121.44 



172 



CITY OF CONCOUD. 



Concord Water Works, iron pipe . 
CushmcUi Electric Co., repairs on roller 
Dickerman & Co., cement . 
Clarence F. Fipphen, masonry 
Alfred Ford, repairing roller 
William P. Ford & Co., repairs 
Samuel Holt, brick 
Humphi'ey-Dodge Co., hardware and 

supplies 

E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., stakes 
Lee Brothers, repairs steam roller 
H. O. Marsh, coal 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil 
Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., trap 

rock and broken stone 
Page Belting Co., tallow 
Rowell & Plummer, mason labor 
A. C. Sanborn, powder, fuse, etc., 
George L. Theobald, boughs 
Thompson & Hoague, hardware, pipe 

etc. ..... 

Woodvvorth & Co.. cement . 



$101.94 

2.35 

34.22 

49.92 

7.56 

5.65 

101.25 

112.28 
4.00 
9.15 

236.59 

8.67 

1,023.68 

.65 

11.20 

2.00 

5.00 

495.46 
16.25 



$12,068.56 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Pay-rolls, A. B. Cross, treasurer . 

Pay-rolls, W. P. Ladd, paymaster 

Abbot-Downing Co., hose wagon and 
repairs ...... 

George Abbott, .jr., painting and sup- 
plies ...... 

L. E. Alexander, water 

Ame & Co., forage .... 

George A. Berry & Co., sponges and 
soap . . . . . • . 

M. F. Bickford, iiorse hire . 



$7,048.96 
6,810.00 

471.38 



30.33 


8.00 


3.25 


.75 


215.90 



CITY EXPENSES. 

Frank C. Blodgett, labor . . . $1.05 

A. H. Britton & Co., small hardware . 86.64 

Bnrt Brown, shoeing .... 2.00 

J. Hurd Brown, lubricator . . . 1.88 

Arthur Bruce, witch hazel . . . 3.75 

William F. Carr, pole and evener . 3.00 

Ross W. Gate, supplies . . . 4.50 
Carter & Griffin, painting engine house, 

Penacook 60.00 

J. H. Callahan, shoeing . . . 19.05 
Cornelius Callahan Co., hose and sup- 
plies for chemical engine . . . 148.75 
John Caldbeck, horse hire . . . 22.88 
W. Carpenter, paint and supplies . 8.46 
M. E. Clifford & Co., plumbing and 

repairs . . . . . . 8.00 

Combination Ladder Co., cellar pipe . 75.00 

Concord Water Works, water . . 108.50 

Fred E. Colburn, coffee and supplies . 7.51 

Concord Macliine Co., repairs . . 16.45 

Concord Coal Co., fuel . . . 559.53 
Concord Land & Water Power Co., 

current for fire alarm and repairs . 328.65 
H. E. Conant, laundry , . . 53.55 
Patrick Conway, steward . . . 30.00 
Coates Clipper Manufacturing Co., clip- 
per and plates .... 27.55 

C. W. Clarke, rent Veterans' Association 150.00 

Clark & White, forage . . . 200.85 

John B. Crosby & Co.> horse hire . 121.00 

Daniel Crowley, shoeing . . . 5.00 

Leslie H. Crowther, steward and labor . 76.25 

Cushman Electric Co., labor and brushes 1.60 
C. W. Dadmun, electrical supplies and 

repairs . . . . . . 21.94 

K. L. Davis, horse hire and fuel . . 122.12 
O. N. Davis, veterinary medicines and 

chemicals . • . . . 10.99 



173 



174 



5ITY OF CONCORD. 



Arthur N. Day, forage 

W. E. Decrow, plates, jars, etc 

J. H. Dodge & Co., forage . 

Dunklee & Crosby, horse hire 

Eddie C. Durgin, storage 

Lowell Eastman, glass and glazing 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., wire . 

Fred S. Farnum, labor and lumber 

A. Perley Fitch, supplies for chemical 

O. J. FiHeld, horse hire 

Fellows, Clarke & Co., horse hire 

Foote, Brown & Co., oil, etc. 

John ¥j. Frye, labor and stock 

Globe Horse-shoeing Shop, shoein 

horses ..... 
L. S. Gordon Co., plating badges 
Wm. C. Green, expense to convention, 

$30, and cash paid incidentals for the 

year 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Manufacturing 

Co., hose .... 
D. Hammond & Son, forage 
H. D. Hammond, spreads and cotton 
Catherine Haggerty, laundry 
James Hart, veterinary services . 
James R. Hill & Co., stable supplies 
Lewis B. Hoit, poles . 
Chas. T. HoUoway & Co., jars and 

clamps ..... 
Home & Hall, carpentering and stock 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., forks, brushes 

and hardware .... 
Geo. D. Huntley, repairs, apparatus 
Huntley & Tenney, repairs . 
J. D. Johnson & Son, harness supplies 

and repairs 
Mrs. Georjfe Jones, storage . 



$159.35 

10.50 

1,011.74 

31.50 

2.00 
11.38 
13.05 

8.72 

4.50 
26.25 
40.50 

6.24 
15.95 

120.00 
14.95 



102.98 

22.76 
2.00 
3.80 
8.55 
7.50 

59.70 
6.50 

30.50 
103.58 

64.67 
14.60 
38.48 

74.20 
12.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



175 



Walter E. Leavitt, labor . . . $2.00 

Lee Bros., plumbing and piping supplies 108.97 
Manchester Locomotive Works, repairs 

on steamer ..... 48.45 
C. H. Martin & Co., drugs and chemi- 
cals 10.60 

H. O. Marsh, fuel .... 93.94 
Robert J. Maguire, veterinary service 

and medicine . . . . . 95.65 
James E. McShane, shoeing . . 120.00 
Geo. E. Merrill, milk . . . 3.50 
David E. Murphy, ribbon . . . 6.36 
Office Toilet Supply Co., laundry . . 27.05 
Parmenter & Co., oil, wicks, etc. . 9.61 
Pelissier & Co., harness supplies and re- 
pairs 12.30 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights and 

lamps ...... 90.76 

Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice . . . 8.16 

E. H. Randall, repairs and plumbing . .90 
Receivers Concord Land & Water 

Power Co., lights .... 51.78 

Geo. O. Robinson, horse hire . . 21.50 
Abial W. Rolfe, cash paid out for in- 
cidentals . . . . . 15.92 

Roselle Bros., horse hire . . . 5.17 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing concrete 1.50 
Rowell & Pluinmer, masonry and ma- 
terials . . . . . . 19.32 

J. H. Sanders, lettering cross-arms . 9.15 

Frank Sargent . . . . . 1.75 

F. W. Scott & Co., labor and materials 120.80 
M. S. Sexton, shoeing . . . 19.05 
O. L. Shepard, glass and setting . . 2.24 

G. H. Silberg, supplies ... 6.00 
W. A. Sleeper, harness supplies and re- 
pairs 49.80 



176 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Chas. p. Smith, horse hire . 

Stevens & Duncklee, dusters, brushes, 
etc. ...... 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., mattresses 
and blankets, etc. .... 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil, etc. 

E. Sullivan & Co., drugs and supplies . 

Taylor. Durgin & Sebra, labor and ma- 
terial ...... 

Geo. L. Theobald, liorses purchased and 
horse hire ..... 

J. H. True, pole and wheels 

Amos P. Turner, soap 

P. C. White, steward .... 

J. A. Wilder, tire department collar 

G. M. Wooster, forage 

W. U. Telegraph Co., fire service 

Mrs. A. B. Young, oil, chimneys, etc. 



$1.00 

7.50 

19.52 

33.45 

6.50 

40.65 

31.S.56 
10.00 

2.00 
15.00 
16.00 

8.00 
15.25 

7.53 



$20,366.66 



POLICE AND WATCH. 

Pay-rolls $;),737. 

Batchelder & Co., supplies . . . 29, 

M. F. Bickford, horse hire and board of 

horse ...... 273, 

A. H. Britton & Co., lanterns, etc. . 8, 

John Chadwick, horse hire and tele- 
phone service ..... 

M. E. Clifford & Co., boiler grates and 
repairs ...... 

P. H. Coleman, puiuting wagon and 

l>i'"g 

Concord Coal Co., fuel . . . 97 

Concord Land & Water Power Co., 

lights 36 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas . 106 



85 
63 

06 
55 



29, 
19, 
•}■> 



00 

.00 
.50 

..SO 
.05 



CITY EXPENSES 

Concord Watei* Works, water 

Cutler & Co., supplies 

Chas. C. Danfbrth, salary police com- 
missioner, 10 months 

E. L. Davis, coal ... 

J. E. Dwight, salary police commis- 
sioner, one year 

D. Evans & Co., coat and vest buttons 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies 
James E. Gage, repairing locks . 

J. R. Hill & Co., horse furnishings 
Geo. D. Huntley, repairs on wagon 
Huntley & Tenney, " " 

E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., labor 
and material .... 

Knox the Hatter, seven helmets . 

F. W. Landon & Co., repaii'ing signals 
Lee Bros., repairs 
H. O. Marsh, fuel 
James E. McShane, slioeing horse 
John R. Miller, labor . 
New England Telephone & Telegrapl; 

Co., private line 
Penacook Electric Light Co., lights and 

repairs ..... 
Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice, 1899 
Chas. H. Sanders, rent 
Stevens & Duucklee, sundries 
Giles Wheeler, salary police commis 

sioner, one year 



177 



$28.00 
•2.33 

41.67 
14.00 

50.00 
15.00 
1.15 
.70 
6.75 
5.80 
6.80 

23.41 

17.50 

1.00 

.50 

269.95 

25.00 

3.25 

128.33 

29.05 

2.03 

108.00 

6.60 

50 00 



;il,197.01 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

John B. Abbott $3.25 

Frank J. Batchelder . . . . 14.00 

T. S. Buck 2.93 

J. G. Chase, Agent .... 1.85 



178 



CITV OF CONCORD. 



Concord Evening Monitor (Monitor and 


Statesman Co.) .... $121.17 


Edson C. Eastman 






2.50 


Ira C. Evans 






87.20 


T. Henry Jameson 






5.00 


G. Scott Locke . 






1.26 


James W. McMurpliy . 






162.56 


E. T. McShane . 






616.93 


N. H. Democratic Press Co 






87.32 


Rumford Printing Co. 






631.68 


Frank L. Sanders 






34.43 


Silsby & Son . 






131.37 











BOARD OP HEALTH. 

Edmund R. Angell, bacteria tests . SlO.85 
George A. Berry & Co., medicines and 

supplies . . . . . . 6.00 

C. W. Brown, burying dog. . . 1.00 
John Chadwick, horse hire . . . 1.50 
E. A. Clark, salary, boai'd of health . 25.00 
John H. Coburn, burying dog . . 1.50 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas . . 1.20 
J. A. Dadmun, fumigators . . . 5.00 
Danforth, Forrest & Morgan, pine, hard- 
ware, etc. ..... 3.32 

A. K. Day, M. D., diphtheria cultures 46.50 

Norris A. Dunklee, horse hire . . 10.00 

J. S. Dutton, rent .... 27.00 

W. J. Fernald, supplies . . . 4.35 

W. R. Heath, cotton cloth, pins, etc. . 5.12 

John A. Lewis, burying horse . . 3.00 
C. H. Martin & Co., peppermint, oils 

and chemicals .... 1.65 

Chas. E. Palmer, salary sanitary ofRcer 800.00 
Chas. E. Palmer, cash paid out and horse 

hire 90.38 



$1,903.45 



CITY EXPENSES. 179 

Edward N. Pearson, salary board of 

health $25.00 

D. E. Sullivan, M. D., salary board of 

health 25.00 

D. E. Sullivan, M. D., professional 

services . . . . . . 6.50 

D. W. Sullivan, formalin . . . 92.43 

George L. Theobald, trucking and bury- 
ing dogs and cats . . . . 5.50 

Russell Wilkins, vacation of sanitary 

officer and professional services . 38.05 

Woodworth & Co., sulphur . . . 12.50 

81,248.35 



OPEN AIR CONCERTS. 

Nevers' Third Regiment Band, ^Y. A. Chase, 

treasurer $300.00 



COMMITTEE SERVICE. 
City treasurer 81,410.00 



HISTORY COMMISSION. 
Charles R. Corning, preparing chapter on political 

history of Concord ..... . 8150.00 



DECORATION DAY. 
Frank Battles, E. E. Sturtevant Post, 

G. A. R 8220.00 

p. Arthur Brown, W. I. Brown Post, 

G. A. R 75.00 

Cyrus F. Fletcher, Davis Post, G. A. R. 50.00 

8345.00 



MARGARET PILLSBURY GENERAL HOSPITAL. 
William F. Thayer, treasurer, for free beds , . 82,000.00 



180 



CITY OF COKCORD. 



DOG LICENSE. 

Joseph A. Cochran, cash over paid . $2.30 

Gihiian H. Dimond, damage to sheep . 28.00 
John C. Kilbnrn, appraising damage to 

sheep 2.00 

Wyman T. Lincohi, sheep killed . . 6.00 
Albert J. Morrill, appraising damage to 

sheep 2.00 

Daniel Sanborn, damage to sheep . 11.00 

George McC. Sanborn, damage to sheep 100.00 

John B. Sanborn, damage to sheep . 34.00 



$185.30 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Pay-rolls ..... 
George Abbott, Jr., painting 

D. Appleton & Co., annuals 
Arena Co., subscription 
Balch Brothers, set Stoddard 
Batchelder & Co., supplies . 
Grace Blanchard, cash paid out . 
Boston Book Binding Co., bindings 
A. H. Britton & Co., hose . 
Concord Coal Co,, fuel 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas . 
Concord Water Works, water 
W. B. Cunningham, cartage 

E. C. Eastman, subscriptions and books 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance 
Ira C. Pjvans, catalogues and cards 
A. P. Fitch, sponges . 
James E. Gage, repairs lock 
N. S. Gale et Co., care of books . 
W. C. Gibson, periodicals, 1899 . 
Granite Monthly Co., subscriptions 
Humpln-ey-Dodge Co., 



^2,658.05 

9.16 

5.00 

2.50 

40.00 

1.70 

42.70 

180.95 

7.50 

203.49 

117.00 

10.00 

52.00 

173.39 

47.50 

202.50 

.50 

.75 

52.00 

85.39 

3.00 

1.75 



CITY EXPENSES. 181 

'Hunt & Emerson, books . . . $574.31 

Hurd & Evarts Co., book . . . 8.50 

Jackman & Lang, insurance . . 75.00 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., books . . 20.73 

H. A. Kendall, pictures and frames . 4.75 

F. W. Landon & Co., electrical repairs 2.00 
Library Bureau, cards, labels, etc. . 28.80 
Monitor & Statesman Co., subscription 6.00 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance . . 40.00 
New Hampshire Democratic Press Co., 

subscription . . . . . 6.00 

Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice, 1899 . 1.39 

Rowell & Plummer,. labor and repairs . 19.00 

Rumford Printing Co., binding . . 80.32 

A. C. Sanborn, lock and labor . . 2.00 

Frank L. Sanders, binding . . . 34.06 

G. Schirmer, subscription . . . 1.00 
Ira B. Shallies & Co., labor and repairs 20.80 
G. H. H. Silsby & Son, registers and 

mucilage . . . . . 3.50 

Leland A. Smith, drilling ... .70 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies and 

repairs ...... 20.53 

The Colliery Engineering Co., subscrip- 
tion 1.00 

The Helman Taylor Co., subscription 

index ...... 5.00 

Thompson & Hoague, supplies . . 5.05 

Union Publishing Co., subscription . 2.00 

$4,859.77 



LIQUOR AGENCY. 

Adams, Taylor & Co., ales, wines, and 

liquors ...... $5,702.87 

Concord Coal Co., fuel . . . 26.00 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas . 7.80 

Darling & Rhodes, bottles . . . 13.50 



182 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



C. H. Graves & Sons, liquors 

T>. T. Mills & Co., alcohol 

Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice, 1899 

Rumforcl Printing Co., price lists 

Frank L. Sanders, blank books 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., desk and 

chair ..... 
Joseph Stickney, rent and water . 
B. F. Tucker, cash paid out for supplies 
B. F. Tucker, salary . 
Moses Ladd, salary 
Moses Ladd, cash paid out for supplies 



SPRINKLING. 

Pay-rolls ...... 

Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 

City "Water Works, water, season 1899 

Goodhue *fe Milton, repairs". 

George D. Huntley, repairing sprinkler 

Huntley & Tenney, repairs . 

Lee Brothers, repairing stand pipes 

Revere Rubber Co., hose 

George W. Wales, rings and hose 



5768.42 

617.30 

1.13 

2.25 

29.15 

40.00 
283.00 
347.59 
423.33 
176.67 

15.83 



$2,094.67 

58.50 

700.00 

13.70 

5.75 

6.25 

107.78 

32.00 

23.00 



CEMETERIES AND PARKS. 
Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Pay-rolls $4,726.81 

Theo. H. Barker, plants . . . 11.20 

A. J. Benedict, sharpening lawn mower 4.65 

G. J. Benedict, plants . . . 5.40 

A. H. Britton & Co., wheelbarrow . 3.50 

George W. Bullock, dressing . . 16.50 

Henry M. Clough, dressing . . 20.00 

John H. Coburn, dressing and teaming . 29.37 



!,454.84 



$3,041.65 



CITY EXPENSES 

William H. Colby, plants and bulbs 
Concord Water Works, water, season 

1899 

Dan forth & Forrest, lumber and labor 
George O. Dickerman, secretary, 1898 

1899, and cash paid out . 
Henry A. Drew, plants and bulbs 
John A. Flanders, repairs on cart 
George H. Folsom, trees 
M. G. Gannon, dressing 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., seed, phosphate 

and hardware 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., chestnut 

boards ..... 
Lee Brothers, piping and labor 
Caleb P. Little, dressing and team hire 
Edward A. Moulton, cash paid out 
C. F. Swain & Co., grass seed 
William S. Wilson, plants and bulbs 



183 



$63.88 

80.00 
7.51 

57.60 
23.85 
4.38 
65.00 
10.00 

136.83 

4.12 

357.54 

37.50 

12.78 

5.50 
79.38 



.$5,763.30 



Old North Cemetery. 

Pay-rolls ...... | 

John H. Coburn, dressing and teaming 
Concord Water Woi'ks, water, season 

1899 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., fertilizer and 

baskets ...... 

E. H. Randall, pipe and labor 



575.22 
23.95 

10.00 

9.60 
1.10 



$419.87 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Shadrach M. Cate, labor and team 
Scott French, cai-e of cemetery 



$58.00 
117.00 



75.00 



184 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Old Fort Cemetery. 
Scott French, lubor uud materiul . 



Millville Cemetery. 
Isaac N. Abbott, treasurer . 



West Concord Cemetery. 



Pay-roll . 



White Park 
Pay-rolls ..... 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight 
Geo. W. Chesley, loam, clearing snow 

and teaming .... 
Clark & White, grain . 
F. Coffin & Co., grain 
Concord Water Works, water, season 

1899 

J. H. Cunningham & Co., pipe . 
Chandler Eastman & Sons, repairs 
Ellwanger & Barry, plants and bulbs 
Ira C. Evans, cards <- 
R. & J. Farquhar & Co., bulbs . 
James E. Gage, repairing and sharpen 

ing lawn mower ... 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., rakes, wedges 

etc. 
Geo. D. Huntley, repairing cart . 
William King, sharpening lawn mower 
Parmenter & Polsey Fertilizer Co., fer 

tilizer ..... 
J. H. Ramsay & Co., trees and shrubs 
W. H. Richardson, cash paid out 
W. L. Riford, freight and trucking 
A. C. Sanborn, sharpening lawn mower 
Thompson & Hoague, hose bibbs, bolts, 

etc. ...... 



;i,4:22.02 

.82 

61.75 
6.(30 
1.80 

15.00 
56.87 
13.65 
20.35 
1.50 
3.60 

1.00 



2.50 


2.00 


1.20 


7.50 


6.00 


3.80 


1.52 


1.10 



$25.00 



$100.00 



$111.68 



17.15 



,677.73 



CITY EXPENSES. 



185 



Rollins Park 

Pay-rolls ..... 
Geo. Abbott, Jr., asphalt . 
Edward W. Breed, plants . 
Concord Water Works, water, 1899 
G. H. Folsom, balsam firs . 
Hobson & Harwood, pipe, etc. 
Samuel Holt, gravel for 1896-'97-'98 
Wm. Hutchins, card signs . 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., lumbe 

and repairing swing 
E. McQuesten & Co., grain 
Parmenter & Polsey, fertilizer, 1898 
Fred Reed & Co. 
Thompson & Hoague, seeds, fertilizer 

etc. ..... 



5300.90 
4.53 
5.00 
G.OO 
5.00 
6.50 
16.05 
2.00 

7.07 

5.95 

7.50 

.60 

19.99 



$387.09 



Rollins Park Purchase. 
Lewis B. Hoit, agent, for land for extension of park $1,250.00 



Bradley Park 

Pay-rolls ..... 

Concord Water Works 

Parmenter & Polsey, fertilizer ($15 fo 

1898, $7.50 for 1899) . 
John C. Thorne, rubber boots 



Penacook Park. 

Pay-rolls ...... 

Parmenter & Co., rakes, lanterns, etc. . 
Thompson & Hoague, nails and pump . 
H. 0. Williams, lumber and labor 



$15.00 
4.00 

22.50 
3.00 



$61 


78 


5 


35 


6 


68 


3.85 



$44.50 



$77.66 



186 



CITY OF CONCORD." 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



Pay-rolls ...... 

C. L. Berger & Son, repairing level and 

transit ..... 
B. Bilsboroiigli, shellac 
A. H. Britton & Co., hatchet 
J. G. Chase, agent, ink, etc. 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas . 
E. A. dishing, trucking 
N. A. Dunklee, horse hire . 
J. S. Button, rent 
Globe Horse-shoeing shop, labor and 

repairs ..... 
W. B. Howe, cash paid out 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., stakes 
Frank L. Sanders, typewriter ribbon 
W. A. Sleeper, bag 
E. G. Soltmann, tracing paper and blue 

prints ..... 
Irving C. Swan, blue prints of maps 
Geo. L. Theobald, moving safe . 
Geo. W. Wilson, repairing tape . 



$2,367.50 

13.70 

.75 

.75 

2.65 

.30 

.35 

103.00 

51.00 

.75 

71.55 

24.00 

1.00 

2.00 

57.40 

10.00 

6.00 

4.50 



PRECINCT. 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas . . $1,387.15 
Concord Land & Water Power Co., elec- 
tric lights 8,864.73 



;2,717.20 



$10,251.88 



LIGHTING STREETS— WARD 1. 
Alfred E. Emery, treasurer .... $1,300.00 



SEWERS. 

Pay-rolls $3,378.99 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies . . 7.76 

Concord Foundry Co., lamp hole cover . 3.00 



CITY EXPENSES 

Dickerman & Co., cement . 

Arthur Dow, blacksmithing 

D. B. Dow, trucking . 

Ford & Kimball, manhole castings, etc 

Globe Horse-shoeing shop, blacksmithing 

Highway department, labor, bricks, etc 

Samuel Holt, brick and sand 

Hood & Robbins, sewer trap and labor 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., iron pipe, etc. 

B. A. Johnson, trucking 
Proctor & Burt, rubber boots 
W. L. Riford, trucking 
Rowell »fe Plummer, labor . 
Geo. F. Sewell, trucking 
Wm. Silva, trucking . 

C. H. Stevens & Co., plank 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil 
Geo. L. Theobald, trucking and team 

hire ..... 
W. A. Thompson, rubber boots . 
Thompson & Hoague, pipe, hardware 

and supplies .... 
Geo. W. Wales, hose . 
T. W. Weston, trucking 
Chas. A. Yeadon, trucking . 



187 



S66.08 

28.37 

3.. 50 

117.27 

44.85 

5.98 

138.70 

6.53 

354.93 

1.00 

16.50 

16.95 

6.00 

7.25 

3.00 

104.02 

7.30 

' 98.27 
3.50 

539.07 

20.00 

.50 

2.50 



t, 981. 82 



WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 

Pay-roll, flushing .... $9.88 

Interest ...... 

City treasurer, sinking fund 

$1,179.88 



670.00 
500.00 



EAST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 
John E. Frye, flushing . . . $14.50 



City treasurer, sinking fund 
Interest .... 



100.00 
70.00 



S184.50 



CITY OV CONCORD. 



PENACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 



Pay-rolls ..... 
John A. Coburn, caps and fuse 
W. Arthur Bean, unions and labor 
Ford & Kimball, manhole covers, grates 

etc. . . • . . 

Henry Haywood, blacksmithing . 
Henry Morrill, labor of mason and 

helper ..... 
John E. nines, brick . 
Thompson & Hoague, pipe, etc. . 
City treasurer, sinking fund . 
Interest ..... 



.17 
3.75 
3.01 



22.94 

8.75 

7.10 

27.50 

51.30 

1,000.00 

840.00 



$2,404.52 



SALARIES. 

John B. Abbott, auditor . . . $175.06 

James Ahern, assessor, Ward 9 . . 369.00 

Benj. E. Badger, judge police court . 800.00 

Joseph A. Cocln-an, city clerk . . 1,200.00 

" " overseer of poor, 

city proper . . . . . 337.50 

Wm. A. Cowley, assessor, Ward 2 . 288.00 

Alvin B. Cross, treasurer . . . 250.00 

Geo. S. Dennett, assessor, Ward 6 . 282.00 

O. J. Fifield, assessor. Ward 1 . . 261.00 

Chas, E. Foote, overseer poor. Ward 1 30.00 
Geo. A. Foster, for collection of taxes, 

1894 3.33 

Fred H. Gould, special justice police 

court 4.00 

Harry R. Hood, clerk of police court . 200.00 

Wendell P. Ladd, tax collector . . 1,399.07 

John J. Lee, assessor. Ward 8 . . 288.00 

Nathaniel E. Martin, mayor . . 1,000.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 

James H. Morris, auditor . . . $824.94 

Pay-roll, ward clerks and moderators . 117.00 

" selectmen . . . . 135.00 

John P. Paige, care of clocks, city . 85.00 
Thos. E. Pentland, return of meeting, 

1898 1.00 

Putnam, care of clocks, Penacook . 25.00 
Henry Rolfe, treasurer, salary, board of 

education. District No. 20 . . 25.00 
Albert Saltraarsh, salary, board of ed- 
ucation. Town district . . . 200.00 
John W. Sanborn, overseer poor. Ward 1 10.00 
Harry G. Sargent, solicitor . . 500.00 
Joseph E. Shepard, assessor and clerk, 

services ...... 400.50 

Amos J. ShurtlefF, special justice police 

• court 2.00 

Antonio J. Souza, clerk common council 50.00 

Edward A. Stevens, city messenger . 600.00 

Geo. F. Underbill, assessor, Ward 5 . 358.50 

Jonathan B. Weeks, " ' " 7 . 297.00 

Daniel C. Woodman, '' •' 4 . 273.00 
Mary P. Woodworth, salary, board of 

education, Union School District . 250.00 



189 



$10,140.90 



BRIDGES— PENACOOK. 



Pay-rolls ...... 


$28.16 


N. S. Gale & Co., lead . . . 


.12 


Henry HayAvood, repairs 


1.20 


C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . 


2.76 


Wrought Iron Bridge Co., (contract) . 


8,100.00 


" " " " maintaining 




foot-bridge ..... 


225.00 



5,357.24 



190 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOLS. 

L. J. Rundlett . . 

Isaac N. Abbott, treasurer . 
Henry Rolfe .... 
Abial Rolfe . . . 

Bonds, Union School District 
Interest, Union School District 
Bonds, District No. 20, 1898-1899 
Interest ..... 



$52,769.10 

3,391.50 

824.89 

2,675.00 

$15,000.00 

2,400.00 

1,000.00 

30.00 



$59,660.49 



West End School. 
William F. Thayer, treasurer 



$18,430.00 
$78,090.49 



$6,000.00 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Pay-rolls $6,541. 

Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 
George Abbott, Jr., paints, etc. . 
Ola Anderson, use of derrick 
Edmund R. Angell, analysis of water 
Batchelder & Co., oil, etc. . 
Benjamin Bilsborough, painting and 

supplies . . . . • 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight . 
Cavis Gr. Brown, teaming . 
Builders Iron Foundry, supplies . 
Ross W. Gate, shoeing 
Chadwick Lead Works, lead 
John Chambers, labor 
John H. Coburn, team hire . 
Alice G. Cochran, clerk hire 
Clark & White, feed and cement . 



23. 
30. 
7. 
18. 
23. 

52. 

1,658. 

11. 

10. 

8. 
36. 

6. 

6. 

605. 

40. 



10 
00 
12 
00 
30 
92 

30 
10 
75 
69 
25 
70 
00 
00 
00 
65 



CITY EXPENSES 

Concord Coal Co., coal 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas and 

lead ..... 
Concord Machine Co., labor and repair 
Concord Foundry Co., boxes 
G. P. Conn, professional service . 
James M. Crossman, blacksmithing 
H. H. Crowell, slabs . 
J. H. Cunningham Co., unions and pipi 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs 
W. S. Davis & Son, repairs 
Davis & Farnum Manufacturing Co. 

pipe 

J. H. Dodge & Co., straw and oats 

M. J. Drummond & Co., pipe 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance 

Engineering News, subscription . 

Ira C. Evans, envelopes and paper 

Fairbanks Co., die stock and weights 

O. H. Farnum, teaming 

Ford & Kimball, castings 

Globe Horse-shoeing shop, blacksmithing 

Goodhue & Milton, fitting . 

Fred W. Gow, water meter tester 

V. C. Hastings, salary 

V. C. Hastings, cash paid out 

Hayes Manufacturing Co., boxes . 

Highway department, labor 

James R. Hill & Co., collar and blanket 

A. H. Hoit, service Rhobidas case 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., hardware . 

Huntley & Tenney, repairs . 

E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., lumber 

and labor .... 
J. D. Johnson & Son, harness repairs 

and supplies .... 
Knowlton Packing Co., packing . 



191 



$376.54 

80.05 
5.00 
1.33 
5.00 
2.45 
101.25 

88.11 
1.40 
3.00 

111.64 

41.74 

5,609.80 

7.50 

5.00 

20.09 

105.20 

18.00 

47.86 

127.74 

7.89 

125.00 

1,800.00 

84.29 

42.19 

58.70 

10.50 

6.00 

62.17 

.75 

43.47 

16.10 
12.00 



192 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co., 

valves, etc. .... 
Lynn Electric Novelty Co., batteries 
H. O. Marsli, coal 
C. H. Martin & Co., oils, etc. 
Henry Morrill, teanaing and sand 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance 
National Meter Co., meters 
New England Telephone and Telegraph 

Co., service .... 
Payne Tapping Machine Co., tapping 

machine .... 

Peck Brothers Co., supplies . 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., packing 
Charles H. Putney, taxes (Webster) 
Calvin L. Randall, wrenches 
Richards & Co., pig lead 
O. F. Richardson & Son, labor and 

team ..... 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . 
Rowell & Plummer, labor and materials 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing concrete 
Rumford Printing Co., printing . 
Frank L. Sanders, office supplies . 
Percy R. Sanders, foreman . 
S. G. Sanborn, rent and repairs . 
Sewell & Day Cordage Co., bale rope . 
Silsby & wSon, otfice supplies 
Smith Premier Typewriter Co., repairs 
Smith & Anthony Co., repairing . 
Standard Paint Co., paint . 
Star Brass Manufacturing Co., repairs . 

C. H. Stevens & Co., lumber 
Stoughton Rubber Co., washers and hose 

D. A. Streeter, plug and bolts 

The Anderson Pipe Cutter Co., cutter 
wheels ...... 



$646.18 

1.80 

261.65 

10.3.5 

8.48 

25.00 

641.90 

126.00 

71.30 

6.84 

61.79 

50.00 

5.00 

401.72 

53.13 
2.34 

70.40 

69.75 

107.85 

10.30 

405.00 

25.10 

11.80 

24.41 

10.00 

5.50 

2.60 

11.85 

5.94 

8.00 

4.00 

6.60 



CITY EXPENSES 

George L. Theobald, teaming 

Thompson & Hoague, hardware . 

Thompson Meter Co., meters 

John C. Thorne, rubber boots 

John Walker, lead 

Walworth Manufacturing Co., pipe 

cocks, etc. .... 
Nathaniel White, Jr., rent . 
R. R. Wood & Co., hydrants 
Woodworth & Co., lime and cement 
Henry R. Worthington, brass meter 
Union Water Meter Co., meters . 
Vacuum Oil Co., oil . 



193 



5137.30 

60.04 
790.40 

16.25 
•289.34 

360.29 
350.00 
865.34 
29.72 
66.50 
24.00 
22.95 



,271.35 



AUDITOR'S FINAL MONTHLY STATEMENT, 1X99. 



To the Honorable Mayor and the Cll]] Council of the City of Concord: 

Gentlemei*? : In compliance with the last paragraph Section 12, 
of the Auditor's Ordinance, the undersigned herewith presents the 
statement required : 

1899. 
A'ppropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid city poor $.500.00 

Joint resolution 427 18.90 



Committee service $1,410.00 $1,410.00 

Cemeteries and parks : 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, appropria- 
tion $1,200.00 

Care of lots 1,390.22 

One half sale of lots 598.87 

Grading 836.39 

Income investment fund 653.33 

Income trust fund 308.87 

Joint resolution 427 775.62 

$5,763.30 $5,763.30 



$518.90 S518.90 

Aid dependent soldiers, city $300.00 $188.22 $111.78 

Aid county poor 6,355.27 

County poor received. 12.50 

Aid dependent soldiers, county 1,940.62 

Bridges, Ward 1 : 

Unexpended balance, January 1, 

1899 8,.340.63 

Joint resolution 427 17.61 



3,358.24 $8,357.24 $1.00 



auditor's report. 195 

Expended. Balance. 



Old North Cemetery 

Care of lots 


Appropriation, 

. . . . SIOO.OO 
182.00 


Income investment fund. . 

Income trust fund 

Joint resolution 427 


28.48 

71.71 

.... 37.(38 







S419.87 S419.87 



West Concord Cemetery $100.00 

Joint resolution 427 11. 6S 



Bradley Park 

Joint resolution 427. 



Rollins Park, addition (by issuing 

notes) Sl,2.50.00 

Decoration Day 

Dog license 

Engineering department : 

Salary engineer ... $1,.500.00 

Salary assistants 

Supplies 

Repairs 

Rent 

Contingent 

New furniture 

Joint resolution 427 



S77.()6 


.l!77.(36 


S25.00 




19..50 




$44.50 


#44.50 


Bl, 2.50.00 


SI, 250.00 


345.00 


345.00 




185.30 


n,500.00 


$1,500.00 


800.00 


867..50 


100.00 


98.-55 


30.00 


18.95 


51.00 


51.00 


200.00 


181.20 


20.0(» 




16.20 





$111.68 $111.68 

Pine Grove Cemetery $175.00 $175.00 

Old Fort Cemetery 25.00 2.5.00 

Millville Cemetery 100.00 100.00 

Horse Hill Cemetery 50.00 $50.00 

White Park 1,500.00 

Joint resolution 427 177.73 . . . . , 



$1,677.73 $1,677.73 

Rollins Park $400.00 $387.09 $12.91 

Penacook Park 75.00 

Joint resolution 427 2.66 



r2,7 17.20 $2,717.20 



196 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Fire department : 

Pay-rolls, permanent men .$6,518.00 $6,518.00 

Pay-rolls, extra men, vacation . . . 214.16 214.16 

Pay-rolls, semi-annual 6,930.00 6,980.00 

Rent veterans' association 1.50.00 1.50.00 

Appropriation hose carriage West 

Concord 375.00 375.00 

Appropriation for all other ex- 
penses 6,187.84 

Forage , 1,385.19 

Fuel 694.54 

Fire alarm 438.15 

Hose 104.76 

Plorses, purchase of . . . 260.00 

Horse hire 610.46 

Horse-shoeing 281.10 

Incidentals 1,703.30 

Lights • 446.00 

Washing 89.15 

Water 116..50 

Chemical supplies 50.35 . . . . 



$800.00 


-1800.00 


75.00 


75.00 


27.00 


27.00 




1.20 


15.00 




100.00 


63.85 


25.00 


109.93 


150.00 


171.37 


56.35 





•120,375.00 $20,366.66 $8.34 

Board of health : 

Salary health officer $800.00 

Salary board 

Rent 

Lights : . • . 

Care of pest house 

Bacteriological test 

Fumigation material 

Incidental expenses 

Joint resolution 427 

11,248.35 $1,248.35 

Highway department, appropriation $36,400.00 

Salary commissioner $1,400.00 

General maintenance and repairs 22,089.83 

Permanent work 1,524.64 

Cleaning streets 4,886.75 



auditor's report. 197 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Highway department : 

Sidewalks and crossings, new ) ^., g.-;,^ , g 

Repairing concrete ) 

Catch basins 1,007.12 

Bicycle paths 12.11 ...... 



$36,400.00 $34,744.61 $1,655.39 
Pleasant street macadam : 

Receipts $8,000.00 

Joint resolution 427, earnings 1,208.05 

Joint resolution 427 1,205.12 

Joint resolution 427 1,655.39 



$12,068.56 $12,068.56 

History commission $1.50.00 

Joint resolution 427 $150.00 

Incidentals and land damages $.5,000.00 

Joint resolution 412 3,714.52 

Joint resolution 427 ■ .57.98 



$8,772.50 $8,772.-50 

Interest $2,54.5-$3,207 $5,752.00 $5,867.00 

Interest on temporary loans 1,000.00 1,460.03 

Lighting precinct, Penacook 1,300.00 1.300.00 

Loans temporary - 100,000.00 

Public library $4,700.00 

Salaries $2,658.55 

Books and magazines 979.84 

Binding 249.31 

Fuel and lights 320.49 

Incidentals . . 451.58 

Printing catalogue 200.00 

Trust funds 131.18 

Library fines 194.75 ••••.. 



$5,025.93 $4,8.59.77 $166.16 
Police and watch : 

Contingent $150.00 $143.87 

Fuel, city 250.00 367.45 

Fuel, Penacook 35.00 14.00 

Helmets and buttons . 50.00 32.50 



198 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Police and watch : 

Horse, board of $252.00 S234.56 

Horse hire, city 1.5.00 38.50 

Horse hire, Penacook 15.00 24.75 

Horse-shoeing 25.00 

Ice 10.00 2.03 

Lights, city and Penacook 180.00 170.50 

Rent, Penacook 108.00 108.00 

Salaries, regular, marshal, de];>uty, 

captain, eight patrolmen 9,350.00 9,278.85 

Special 150.00 219.00 

Janitor 240.00 240.00 

Telephone, private line 150.00 128.33 

Water 28.00 28.00 

Salaries, police commissioners, 

April, 1898, to April, 1899 141.67 

Joint resolution 427 214.01 

Sll,197.01 $11,197.01 

Printing and stationery $2,000.00 

Assessors $85.18 

Auditor 134.89 

Clerk 166.02 

Engineering department 8.10 

Fire department 25.10 

Health " 35.05 

Highway department 105.40 

Library 27.70 

Miscellaneous 38.68 

Mayor's inaugural 18.00 

Ordinances 171.68 

Police and watch 82.32 

Reports, city 616.93 

Reports, school 111.00 

Tax collector 251.75 

Treasurer 25.65 

$2,000.00 $1,903.45 $96.55 

Memorial Arch Bonds $5,000.00 $5,000.00 

Margaret Pillsbnry hospital 2,000.00 2,000.00 

Open air concerts 300.00 300.00 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



199 



Precinct, street sprinkling : 

Unexpended balance, 1898 $841.50 

Appropriation 1,158.50 

Joint resolution i27 (note) .1,. 500.00 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



S3,.500.00 $3,011.65 

Precinct $10,326.90 

Gas 1,387.45 

Lights 8,864.43 



Auditor 

Clerk, city 

" common council. 

" police court 

Clocks, city 

" Penacook 

Education 

Judge, police 

Justice, special 

]\layor . . . . 

Messenger 

Overseer poor. Ward 1 . . 



" " city proper 

Pay-rolls, clerks and moderators. 

" selectmen 

Solicitor 

Tax collector, 1894 

1896, '97, '98, '99. . 
Treasurer 



$458.35 



$10,326.90 $10,251.88 $75.02 

Salaries , $9,677.00 

Joint resolution 420 1,. 500.00 

Assessors, Ward 1 289.50 ...... 

" " 2 288.00 

" " 3 372.00 ^ 

273.00 

358..50 

282.00 

297.00 

288.00 . . . . : 

369.00 

1,000.00 

1,200.00 

50.00 

200.00 

85.00 

25.00 

475.00 

800.00 

6.00 .... 

1,000.00 

600.00 

30.00 

10.00 

337..50 

118.00 

135.00 

500.00 

3.33 

1,399.07 

250.00 



$11,177.00 §11,041.90 $135.10 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Sewers : 

Balance, 1898 .$1,341.21 

Appropriation 1,(358.79 

Joint resolution 414 (note) 2,000.00 



>,349.09 $2,404.-52 



Sewer Precinct, East Concord : 

Interest on bonds 

Sinking fund 

Unexpended balance, 1898. 



$70.00 


$70.00 


100.00 


100.00 


146.90 


14.50 



Sewer Precinct, West Concord : 

Unxepended balance, 1898 $277.30 $9.88 

Sinking fund 500.00 500.00 

Interest on bonds 680.00 ^ 670.00 



Schools, Union School District $1,200.00 $1,200.00 

Voted to pay interest 2,100.00 1,200.00 

" " bond 15,000.00 15,000.00 

General fund, balance, 1898 14,769.10 14,769.10 

Appropriation 31,691.42 36,000.00 

Voted by Union School District. . 13,308.58 

Text-books 2,190.00 

Literary fund 1,577.60 

Dog license 1,237.64 

General repairs 2,000.00 2,000.00 

Repairs, Merrimack and Rumford 

schools 1,500.00 



$5,000.00 $4,981.82 $18.18 
Sewer Precinct, Penacook : 

Unexpended balance, 1898, repairs $179.21 ^564. .52 

Sinking fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Interest 760.00 840.00 

Order 294 389.88 

Interest 20.00 



$316.90 $184.50 $132.40 



1,457.30 $1,179.88 $277.42 



3,574.34 $70,169.10 $16,405.24 



AUDITOR S REPORT. 



201 



Appropriation. Expended. 
School.s, Town District : 

Appropriation S2,324.97 S2,324.97 

Voted by district 700.00 700.00 

Dog license 90.80 90.80 

Literary fund 115.73 115.73 

Text-books 160.00 160.00 



Balance. 



S3,391.50 $3,391.50 



District No. 20 : 



Appropriation $2,178.61 

Voted by district 1,140.00 

Unexpended balance, 1898 

Voted to pay bond, 1899 

" " 1898 

" " interest 

Dog license 

Literary fund 

Text-books 

Accrued interest, 1898 



824.89 

500.00 

500.00 

20.00 

85.10 

108.45 

150.00 

70.00 



?,675.00 

824.89 

500.00 

500.00 

20.00 



10.00 



S5,577.05 !S!4,529.89 $1,047.16 
West End School : 

Appropriation --^ejOOO-OO $6,000.00 



Liquor Agency : 
Receipts .... 
Rent 

Salary, agent. 

Liquors 

Lights 

Miscellaneous . 



^,701. 39 



County tax. 
State tax . . 



$276.00 
600.00 

7,088.59 

7.80 

482.35 



Cemetery Trusts 

Cemetery fund, West Concord. . . 
" " East Concord. . . 



Total expended as shown by city 
treasurer 



,701.39 $8,454.74 .$246.65 

$42,062.48 

29,499.25 



6,865.00 

7..50 

15.00 

$6,887.50 
.$447,358.78 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Orders outstanding, not presented : 

White park, account J. H. Ramsey 

& Co S6.00 

Roads and bridges, John Tenney, 

^QAo ; E. Rhodes, $1 ; M. Ferrin, 

' S2 3.45 

County poor, J. H. Gallinger, S8 ; 

John C. Farrand, S1.75 9 



Concord Water AVorks : 

Balance, 1898 .-^12,098.06 

Collections 53,953.13 

Salary, superintendent ... SI, 800. 00 

" clerk 605.00 

•' foreman 405.00 

Pay-rolls 6,-341.10 

Interest 26,315.00 

Freight 1,658.10 

Meters 1,511.80 

Miscellaneous 1,335.72 

Lights 19.05 

Printing 111.10 

Supplies 10,158.48 

Telephone 126.00 

Bonds 10,000.00 



S19 



10 



20 



$66,051.19 S60,586.35 S5,464.84 



Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES H. MORRIS, 

City Auditor. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



CITY OF CONCORD, N. H. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



1899. 



BOARD OF ^WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, Mayor, ex officio. 

EDSON J. HILL 
TIMOTHY P. SULLIVAN 
WILLIAM P. FISKE 
WILLIAM E. HOOD . 
SOLON A. CARTER . 
FRANK D. ABBOT . 
JOHN WHITAKER . 
HENRY E. CON ANT 



. to March 31, 


1903 


r . . to March 31, 


1903 


. to March 31, 


1902 


. to March 31, 


1902 


. to March 31, 


1901 


. to March 31, 


1901 


. to March 31, 


1900 


. to March 31, 


1900 



FRANK D. ABBOT, Clerh. 



OFFICERS. 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, President.- 
V. C. HASTINGS, Superintendent. 
ALICE G. COCHRAN, Clerk at Water Office. 
HENRY A. ROWELL, Engineer at Pumping Station. 



CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members. 



Abraham G. Jones, ex officio . 


1872 — three months. 




John M.Hill* . 


1872-1878. 




Benjamin A. Kimbfill . 


1872-1878. 




Josiah Minot * . 


1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 


1874 


David A. Warde * 


1872-1874. 




Edward L. Knowlton * . 


1872. Resigned Sept. 2.5, 


1875 


Benjamin S. Warren * . 


1872-1873. 




John Kimball, ex officio 


. 1872-1876. 




John Abbott * 


. 1873-1876. 




John S. Russ* 


. 1874-1877. 




Abel B. Holt * . 


1874-1877. 




Samuel S. Kimball * 


1875. Resigned July 1, 


1891 


Geo. A. Pillsbury, ex officio* 


. 1876-1878. 




Luther P. Durgin * 


. 1876-1885. 




John Kimball 


1877. * Resigned July 1, 


1891 


William M. Chase 


1877. Resigned July 1, 


1891 


Horace A. Brown, ex officio 


. 1878-1880. 




James L. Mason * 


. 1878-1893. 




James R. Hill* . 


. 1878. Died 1884. 




Geo. A. Cummings, ex ojjici 


3 1880-1883. 




Edgar H. Woodman, ex officio 


* 1883-1887. 




Joseph H. Abbot * 


. 1884-1893. 




George A. Young 


. 1885-1894. 




John E. Robertson, ex officio 


. 1887-1889. 




Stillman Humphrey, ex officio 


* 1889-1891. 




Henry W. Clapp, ex officio * 


. 1891-1893. 




Willis D. Thompson 


. 1891-1895. 




William P. Fiske . 


. 1891. Now in office. 




* 


Deceased. 





WATER DEPARTMENT. 



207 



James H. Chase * 


1891. 


Died 1893. 




John Whitaker 


1892. 


Now in office. 




Henry E. Conant . 


1892. 


Resigned Jan. 


8, 1895 


Parsons B. Cogswell, ex officio* 


1893- 


-1895. 




Solon A. Carter . 


1893. 


Now in office. 




Frank D. Abbot . 


1893. 


Now in office. 




William M. Mason 


1893- 


-1899. 




AVilliam E. Hood . 


1894. 


Now in office. 




Ebenezer B. Hutchinson 


1895. 


Resigned Jan. 


10, 1899 


Edson J. Hill . . 


1895. 


Now in office. 




Henry E. Conant . 


1899. 


Now in office. 




Timothy P. Sullivan 


1899. 


Now in office. 





PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD. 



Josiali Minot * 
Benjamin A. Kimball 
Edward L. Knowlton * 
John Kimball 
Benjamin A. Kimball 
John Kimball 
William P. Fiske 



1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

1874-1875. 

1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

1875-1876. 

1876-1878. 

1878. Resigned July 1 , 1891. 

1891. Now in office. 



* Deceased. 



SUMMARY STATISTICS. 



CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WATER WORKS. 



Population of the city by census of 1890 . . 17,004 

Population of that poilion of the city included witliin 

the water precinct, estimated .... 15,000 

Date of construction, 1872; additions since. 

Works are owned by tlie city. 

Source of supply, Penacook lake, a natural body of water 
containing 265 acres, situated about three miles and a half from 
the state house, and about 125 feet higher than Main street in 
front of the state house. 

Mode of supply, gravity and pumping to reservoir. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



209 



FINANCIAL. 



MAINTENANCE. 



Receipts. 

Fi'oni consumers, most- 
ly for domestic uses . 
From rents . 
From pipe sold, etc. . 



5,815.39 

83.32 

196.76 



Expenditures. 



For management and 




repairs 


S3,.578.37 


For new distribution 




pipes 


13,664.73 


For new service pipes . 


1,110.92 


For maintenance \ of 




pumping station 


2,347.33 


For inspection 


566.00 


For meter account 


2,198.00 


For work at Penacook 




lake .... 


33.25 


For relaying pipe near 




Mrs. Eddy's, on ac- 




count of change of 




grade 


578.14 


For incidentals . 


194.61 


For abatements . 


142.34 



$54,095.47 



S-'4,413.69 
Amount required to 

pay interest on 

bonded indebtedness 26,225.00 
Balance . . . 3,456.78 



$54,095.47 



CONSTRUCTION. 

• Cost of land damages, flowage, and water rights : 
Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights ..... $60,000.00 
Concord Manufacturing Co., for 

water rights .... 83,000.00 
W. P. Cooledge, for mill privilege 
and land 5,500.00 



210 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid Humphrey & Farnum, for kit- 
shop privilege .... $5,000.00 
Flowage rights around Penacook 

lake 4,375.61 

W. P. Cooledge, Hutchins house 

and lot 2,250.00 

Mary C. Ro well, for laud . 1,500.00 

Moses H. Bradley, " . . 5,000.00 

Joseph B. Walker " . . 2,214.00 

John G. Hook, " . . 370.00 

A. S. Ranney, " . . 1,350.00 

Alfred Roberts, " . . 1,275.00 

Charles E. Ballard, " . . 2,500.00 

Mary G. Carter, " . . 1,250.00 

Elizabetli Widraer, " . . 1,564.50 

A. L. Proctor, " , . 450.00 

Robert Crowley, " . . 3,000.00 

Miles Hodgdon, '' . . 2,200.00 

Coffin & Little, " . . 800.00 

O. F. Richardson, '^ . . 100.00 

C. H. Amsden, water and flowage 

rights 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Torrent 

Aqueduct Association . . 20,000.00 

dam, gate-house, and appurte- 
nances .... 30,756.17 
conduit and gate-houses . . 29,484.05 
mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam to 
Penacook street, force main 
from the pump to the reservoir, 
fire main through North and 
South Main and Turnpike 
streets, and supply main from 
near the dam to Stark street) 160,960.92 
distribution pipe . . . 283,431.38 
service pipe .... 42,489.95 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



;ii 



Cost of reservoir 



$42,460.09 



pumping station, shop, stable 

and storehouse . . .22,000.00 

pumping machinery . . . 10,215.00 

engineering and superintendence 14,913.12 

incidentals .... 6,531.19 

Cost of works, January 1, 1900 . $851,940.98 

Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said cost, 
of Avhich $10,000 have been paid each year for the past four 
om the earnings of the works, and of which the following 



years 


fi- 


lm the 


are still 


outstai 


When 


due. 


Nov. 




1900, 


Jan. 




1901, 


Jan. 




1902, 


Jan. 




1903, 


Jan. 




1904, 


Jan. 




1905, 


Jan. 




1906, 


Jan. 




1907, 


Jan. 




1908, 


Jan. 




1909, 


Jan. 




1910, 


Jan. 




1911, 


Oct. 




1912, 


Jan. 




1913, 


Jan. 




1914, 


Jan. 




1915, 


Jan. 




1916, 


Jan. 




1917, 


Jan. 




191-8, 


Jan. 




1919, 


Mar. 




1922, 


Jan. 




1923, 



Rate. 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

4, 

3i, 

4, 



Amount. 

$15,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
45,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
20,000.00 

400,000.00 



550,000.00 



212 CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council: 

The Board has the honor herewith to submit the report for the 
year 1899 : 

The detailed report of our superintendent herewith presented 
leaves little to be said by the commission. 

The work has been along usual lines of maintenance, also fol- 
lowing out plans heretofore presented, consisting mainly in laying 
a section of 3,259 feet of 20-inch cast iron pipe towards Pena- 
cook lake, also a section of 10-inch cast iron pipe between Centre 
and Freight streets, thus obviating the danger from leakage on 
the old pipe through a section of Main street, where much 
damage might occur. 

The strain on the old pipe is constantly manifesting itself by 
the serious breaks we have had. The board is considering a 
plan for re-laying certain sections of the city with cast iron pipe. 
The time is not far distant when the main line now running 
through State street must be replaced by a larger pipe in order 
to distribute water more freely to the southern part of the city. 

One matter of concern in new construction is the advance in 
the cost of material, being from 35% to 40% over prices paid in 
1899, but it would be unwise to be unprepared for certain 
emergencies which may arise at any time, and this work is im- 
perative. 

The commission have submitted a report during the year on the 
question of buying water from the Penacook and Boscawen water 
precinct. 

The number of meters has been increased by 139, making 
some 915 now in use. This fact may explain in some measure 
the gratifying condition of our water supply, while other localities 
have been alarmed by a shortage. The water stands about 11 
feet higher than at the lowest point in 1895, thus securing for the 
present, at least, a supply sufficient for the demand. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 213 

The amount heretofore received for hydrant rentals was cut off 
from the list of appropriations this year, and the bonds maturing 
November 1, 1899, $10,000, were met only in part from the 
earnings of the works. A larger amount mature in the coming 
year, which must be provided for: $15,000 of 3^% bonds 
mature November 1, 1900, and $10,000 4% bonds January 1, 
1901. These bonds should be paid as they become due, thus 
reducing the interest payments and allowing so much more to 
apply to the reduction of the debt. 

The pumping station has maintained its efficiency, more water 
being pumped than in the previous year. The good care of the 
grounds around the station has been continued, making it very 
attractive, and a delight to all. 

The work of the department was unnecessarily delayed, pend- 
ing the adjustment of the alien labor question. 

We desire to bear testimony to the careful and efficient manner 
in the care and work of the department by the superintendent and 
his assistants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON J. HILL, 
TIMOTHY P. SULLIVAN, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
WILLIAM E. HOOD, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
FRANK D. ABBOT, 
JOHN WHITAKER, 
HENRY E. CONANT, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, ex officio, 

Water Commissioners. 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I hei'ewith present to you the twenty-eighth annual report of 
the operations of this department, showing the receipts, expend- 
itures and abatements, together with a statement of extensions 
and improvements made during the year ending December 31, 
1899. 

RECEIPTS. 

For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates $26,215.81 

For Avater, from consumers by meter 

rates 27,448.18 

From delinquents . . . . 61.10 

For water used for building purposes . 90.30 

rents ...... 83.32 

pipe and stock sold, hay, etc. . 196.76 



S54, 095.47 
Deduct abatements . . .. . . . 142.34 

Net receipts for 1899 $53,953.13 

EXPENDITURES. 

General Expenses. 
Paid V. C. Hastings, salary as super- 
intendent . . . . $1,800.00 

pay-rolls, salaries and labor . 6,053.46 

Nath'l White, Jr., rent of office 

and heating .... 350.00 

S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop at 

Penacook and smith-work. . 25.10 

Rumford Printing Co., printing . 107.85 

F. L. Sanders, books, etc. . . 10.30 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



■215 



Paid Silsby & Son, stationery, etc. . $24.41 
Ira C. Evans, printing . . 20.09 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas 10.20 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., telephones . . 126.00 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., hardware . 49.52 
Thompson & Hoague, " . 60.04 
J. H. Dodge, grain . . . 41.74 
Clark & White, grain . . . 40.65 

C. H. Martin & Co., lead, oil, etc. 10.35 
Batchelder & Co., oil, etc. . . 21.58 
Woodworth & Co., cement . . 24.75 
Stoughton Rubber Co., washers . 2.00 
John C. Thorne, rubber boots . 16.25 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs . 23.00 
J. D. Johnson & Son, " . 16.10 
W. S. Davis tt Son, repairs . 3.00 
James R. Hill & Co., supplies . 10.50 
M. J. Driinimond & Co., cast-iron 

pipe 5,609.80 

Davis & Farnum Manufacturing 

Co., cast-iron pipe . . . 111.64 
R. D. Wood & Co., cast-iron pipe 

and hydrants .... 865.34 

Ford & Kimball, castings . . 47.86 

Builders Iron Foundry, castings . 10.69 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

castings. . . . , 6.33 

D. A. Streeter, castings . . 4.00 
Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co., 

gates .646.18 

Richards & Co., pig lead . . 401.72 

John W^alker, pig lead . . 289.34 
Concord Light & Power Co., pig 

lead 61.00 

Chadwick Lead Works, lead pipe, 

etc. ..... 36.70 



216 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid Walworth Manufacturing Co., 

pipe, tools, and fittings . . $360.29 
J. H. Cunningham Co., tools and 

fittings 88.11 

Goodhue & Milton, fittings . . 7.89 

Peck Brothers, corporation^ . 6.84 

Payne Tapping Machine Co., tools 71.30 

Anderson Pipe Cutter Co., tools . 6.60 

C. L. Randall, tools . . . 5.00 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., tools and 

packing . . . . . 61.79 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 

manilla rope .... 11.80 
Hayes Manufacturing Co., service 

boxes . . . . . 42.19 

Smith & Anthony, repair bands . 5.50 

The Fairbanks Co., scale and tools 105.20 

National Meter Co., meters . 641.90 

Thomson Meter Co., " . 790.40 

Henry R. Worthington, '■'■ . 66.50 

Union Meter Co., '' . 24.00 

E. B. Hanchay, smith work . 127.74 

RossW. Cate,j " . 8.25 

J. M. Crossman, '' . 2.45 

George L. Theobald, team-work 137.30 

O. F. Richardson & Son, " 38.63 

Charles H. Farnum, '' 18.00 

Cavis G. Brown, " 11.75 

Henry Morrill, " 8.48 

John H. Coburn, '' 6.00 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., 

lumber and labor . . . 43.47 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber and 

labor 2.34 

Rowell & Plummer, mason- work . 68.20 
James H. Rowell & Co., repairing 

concrete . . . • 69.75 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



217 



Paid Ola Anderson, use of derrick 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co., 

repairs .... 
Engineering News 
Highway department, paving Main 

street .... 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance 
E. R. Angell, water analyses 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freigh 

on pipe, etc. . 
town of Webster, taxes 
V. C. Hastings, cash paid out 
incidentals 



$7.00 

10.00 
5.00 

58.70 

25.00 

7.50 

18.30 

1,658.10 

50.00 

84.29 

224.97 



$21,924.02 



Pumping- Station Expenses. 



Paid pay-rolls, engineer and fireman 
Concord Coal Co., coal 
H. O. Marsh, 

C. H. Stevens & Co., coal . 
H. H. Crowell, slab wood . 
O. F. Richardson & Son, drawing 

wood .... 
Vacuum Oil Co., oil . 
Knowlton Packing Co., packing 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 
Batchelder & Co., " 

Stoughton Rubber Co., hose 
Star Brass Manufacturing Co. 

repairing counter 
Rowell & Plummer, mason-work 
"Woodworth & Co., soda ash 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas 



$1,503.64 

376.54 

261.65 

5.94 

101.25 

14.50 
22.95 
12.00 
12.65 
2.34 
6.00 

11.85 
2.20 

4.97 
8.85 



82,347.33 



Total expenditures for 1899 



524,271.35 



218 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



The expenses are divided as follows : 

General Expenses. 



Foi 


management and repairs 

new service pipes . 

new distribution pipes . 

inspection 

meter account 

work at Penacook lake . 






$3,578.37 

1,110.92 

13,664.73 

566.00 

2,198.00 

33.25 




relaying pipe neai" Mrs. 


Mary 






Eddy's, on account of change 


of 






grade 






578.14 




incidentals . 


• 


• 


194.61 




tp— 1 ^j ^'t ,\j £t 



Pumping Station Expenses. 

For salaries, engineer and tireman . $1,503.64 

fuel 759.88 

oil, packing and other supplies . 69.76 

repairs . . . . . 14.05 



$2,347.33 



EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Main and distribution pipes have been laid and hydrants set 
during the year, as follows : 

On main line, 

north from near tenement block of New Hampsliire state 
prison to Moses H. Farnum's, 3,259 feet 20-inch cast- 
iron pipe and four hydrants, in place of 14-inch cement- 
lined pipe, discontinued. 

In North Main Htreet, 

south from Centre street to opposite state house, 554 feet 10- 
incli cast-iron pipe, ,in place of 8-inch cement-lined pipe, 
discontinued. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 219 

In North Main street, 

south from Capitol street to Pleasant street, 1,017 feet 10- 
inch oast-iron pipe, in place of 8-inch cement-lined pipe, 
discontinued. 

In South Main street, 

south from Pleasant street, to south line of Freight street, 
284 feet 10-inch cast-iron pipe, in place of 6-inch cement- 
lined pipe, discontinued. 

In School street, 

west from Merrimack street to Tahanto street, 350 feet 10- 
inch cast-iron pipe, in place of 8-inch cement-lined pipe, 
discontinued. 

In Rumford street, 

south from Franklin street to Washington street, 1,450 feet 
8-inch cast-iron pipe, in place of 8-inch cement-lined pipe, 
discontinued. 

In Pleasant street, 

at crown of hill by Mrs. M. B. G. Eddy's, 513 feet 8-inch 
cast-iron pipe, in place of 8-inch cement-lined pipe, dis- 
continued. 

In Beacon street, 

west from Jackson street to Rumford street, 750 feet 6-inch 
cast-iron pipe, in place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe, dis- 
continued. 

In Merrimack street, 

south from Centre street to School street, 450 feet 6-inch 
cast-iron pipe, in place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe, dis- 
continued. 

In Rockingham street, 

west from Donovan street, 147 feet 6-inch cast-iron pipe. 

In Jefferson street, 

north from Concord street, 173 feet 4-inch cast-iron pipe, in 
place of I -inch pipe. 



220 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



On .connections in re-laying pipe, 

50 feet 10-inch, 19 feet 8-inch, 240 feet 6-inch cast-iron 
pipe, in place of cement-lined pipe, discontinued. 
On hydrant branches, 

471 feet 6-inch cast-iron pipe; 392 feet 6-inch cement-lined 
pipe discontinued. 
On blotu-offs, 

6 feet 4-inch pipe. 

Also 1,031 feet 1-inch and |-iuch pipe; 173 feet f-inch 
pipe discontinued. 



Summary of the Foregoing. 
New Pipes, Hydrants and Stop-Gates. 





Pipes. 


1-in. 


, 1,031 feet. 


4-in. 


, 179 " 


6-in. 


, 2,058 " 


8-in. 


, 1,982 " 


10-in. 


, 2,255 " 


20-in. 


, 3,259 " 




10,764 feet. 


equal 


to 2.03 miles 




Pipes a 


1-in. 


, 173 feet. 


4-in. 


, 1,339 " 


6-in. 


, . 823 " 


8-in. 


, 4,025 " 


14-in. 


, 3,259 " 




9,619 feet, 


equal to 1.82 miles 



Hydrants. 
W. Concord road, 4 



Stop- Gates. 

4-in., 

6-in., 

8-in., 
10-in., 
20-in., 



Pipes and Stop-Gates Discontinued. 

4-in., 
6-in., 
8-in., 



3 

23 
2 
7 

. 1 



36 



9 

Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
313,881 feet, equal to 59.44 miles. 

Total number of hydrant? now in use, 264. 
Total number of gates now in use, 747. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



221 



SERVICE PIPES. 



There have been laid during the year and connected with the 
main pipes, 56 service-pipes consisting of 



54 l^-inch, 

1 10-inch, 

1 6-inch, 

56 



1,243 feet. 
37 " 
27 " 



1,307 feet. 



There have been discontinued during the year, 8 ; whole 
nvimber in use at the present time, 3,288 ; total length of serv- 
ice-pipes, 77,118 feet, or 14.60 miles. 

We have set 139 meters during the year; 2 have been 
removed; making the total number now in use, 915. 

The following table shows the height of water in Penacook 
Lake on the first day of each month : 



January 


184.70 


July 


183.80 


February 


184.70 


August 


183.10 


March . 


184.80 


September 


182.20 


April . 


185.00 


October 


181.90 


May . 


184.90 


November 


181.40 


June 


184.40 


December . 


181.00 



The lowest point reached was December 1, being 181 ; the 
highest was March 14, 185.15; mean height, 183.49, which 
was .82 foot lower than the mean height for the year 1898. 

The water has been running over the overflow one hundred 
and twenty-three days during the year: in January, 31; in 
February, 16; in March, 31 ; in April, 30; in May, 15. At no 
time has the water been lower than forty-three inches below the 
overflow. 

The most important work of the year has been the continua- 
tion of the 20-inch cast-iron main in place of the 14-inch cement- 
lined and the relaying of the pipe in Main street. 

The new 20-inch main has been extended 3,259 feet to a 
little north of Moses H. Farnum's residence. It will now require 



222 CITV OF CONCORD. 

about 5.300 feet to complete the main from the pumping station 
to the gate house in West Concord, or about two years' work at 
the same rate as the last three years. 

In IMain street, a 10-inch cast-iron pipe was laid from Centre 
street to Freight street in place of 8 and 6-inch cement-lined. 
The work was done thoroughly ; all the service-pipes were put 
in good condition, in most instances new pipes were laid and in 
others the pipes were repaired ; service boxes at the curb were 
placed on nearly every supply ; all the hydrants which had been 
in use since the construction of the works, eight in number, wei'e 
replaced by new ones of the most improved design. 

Two other hydrants have been replaced by new ones in addi- 
tion to those on Main street and two new ones on West Concord 
road, a total of twelve hydrants, all of which are included in the 
distribution pipe account for this year. 

The expenses of the year were also increased by relaying the 
8-iuch pipe on Pleasant street, near Mrs. Eddy's, which was 
occasioned by cutting down the street grade in macadamizing the 
street. 

It has been well known from the first analyses, that Penacook 
Lake water will act on lead pipe to such an extent as to render 
it unfit for drinking purposes ; and as water that will act on lead 
will generally have a like efl^ect on zinc, I have believed that 
galvanized-iron pipe should not be used to carry Penacook Lake 
water for domestic use. I, therefore, corresponded Avith Prof. 
E. R. Angell, of Derry, and according to his directions placed 
a piece of galvanized-iron pipe in a sample of water, allowing it 
to remain there about twelve hours. The analysis is appended 
to this report showing the unusual and harmful quantity of zinc 
in the water. 

In closing this report, I wish to express my sincere apprecia- 
tion of the faithfulness of the employees of the depai'tment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

V. C. HASTINGS, 

Superintendent. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 223 



SANITARY ANALYSIS OF WATER. 



SAMPLE FROM OVER INTAKE, PENACOOK LAKE. 

Water is a mineral substance, composed of two elements. Hydrogen forms 
one-ninth of its weight, and oxygen, eight-ninths. This is water chemically 
pure, or pure water. As found in nature, it always contains other substances. 
Water sanitarily pure need not be chemically pure. Water sanitarily impure, 
designated as polluted, or contaminated, contains substances or organisms 
injurious to health ; animal matter, vegetable material, disease germs, poison- 
ous metals, as lead, zinc, copper, manganese, etc. 

The figures in the analysis represent parts per 100,000. To convert into parts 
per million, multiply by 10; into parts per United States gallon, by 0.583722; 
into parts per English gallon, by 0.7. 

Odor.— Some pond-like. 

Color.— Nearly colorless. 

Transparency.— Clear. . 

Pure water is odorless, colorless, clear, and tasteless. Water sanitarily pure 
may have one or all of these properties. Polluted water may be free from 
some or all of them. 

Behavior During Evaporation.— Nearly quiet. 

Appearance of Residue.— Nearly uniform ; few circles. 

Water containing vegetable juices is a thin syrup. Such water foams during 
evaporation. Circles and irregular figures are marked on the dish where the 
last bubbles break in drying away. Animal matter seldom causes water to 
behave in this manner. 

Total Solids.— 4.0. 

The amount of solids in water, sanitarily pure, varies greatly. Good well 
water in this state seldom contains more than 15 parts. Good pond water con- 
tains less than half of this quantity. 

Ignition of Residue.— It blackens some. 

The residue blackens in proportion to the amount of organic carbon present, 
provided there is no excess of nitrates. Nitrates are present excessively more 
often in animal polluted waters ; hence the residue of such waters blackens 
less than that of vegetable contaminated waters, both because animal matter 
contains less carbon as a rule, and because the nitrates supply oxygen to con- 
sume it quickly. Vegetable carbon often blackens intensely and the blacken- 
ing persists. 

Loss ON Ignition of Residue.— 2.0. 

This consists of the combustible and volatile portion of the organic matter, 
and volatile mineral substances — carbonic acid, nitric acid, water of crystal- 
lization, zinc, and other volatile metals. The proportion of mineral solids is 
larger in well water than in pond water, because well water settling through 
the earth has come in contact with more soluble minerals. On the other 
hand, pond water contains more organic solids, because the soluble organic 
matter received from the surface of the ground has not been removed by the 
filtering action of earthy strata. It is seldom that the character and quantity 
of natural, mineral solids condemn a water. Vegetable matter is less harmful 
than animal matter. Both are more harmful in well water than in pond 
water, because light and sunshine tend to destroy deadly germs. 

Hardness.— 1.0. 



224 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Alkalinity.— 1 .0. 

The liufurcs are given in terms of carbonate of lime, i. e., so many parts of 
carbonate of lime wonld give the same tignres. Hardness and alkalinity give 
considerable information abont the mineral constitution of water and often 
concerning its sanitary condition. Hardness is due chietly to the salts of lime 
and magnesia, most often, their carbonates and sulphates. Alkalinity is 
caused only by their carbonates, or by the carbonates of potash, soda, ammo- 
nia, or some other alkali. Water hard from the salts of lime and magnesia, 
other than their carbonates, shows no alkalinity, unless the substances last 
named above are present. The carbonates of lime, or magnesia, give nearly 
the same degree of hardness and alkalinity, lime especially. Sewage increases 
the alkalinity which then becomes an indication of pollution. 

Frke Ammonia.— 0.0017. 

Albuminoid Ammonia.— 0.0148. 

Ammonia results from the decomposition of organic matter ; the free is that 
which the natural process of decay has produced, and points to what extent 
decay has been going on in the water ; the albuminoid results from the artiti- 
ficial decomposition of organic matter during analysis and points to the quan- 
tity of organic matter actually present. In good well water the albuminoid 
ammonia should not exceed 0.009 part, and in good pond water 0.015 part. In 
neither should the free ammonia exceed 0.005 part. 

Chlorine.— 0.3. 

Chlorine is a constituent of common salt. Sewage is rich in salt, hence the 
value of chlorine as an indication of pollution. Good water should not con- 
tain more than 0.5 part of it, unless the locality is near the sea coast, or is 
naturally rich in salt. 

Nitric Acid.— Trace. 

This is a constituent of saltpetre which is produced by the fermentation of 
manures and sewage. Good well water should not contain more than 0.5 part 
of it, and pond water not more than 0.02. Excess of chlorine or nitric acid in 
water always indicates either actual contamination, or dangerous proximity 
to sources of filth. In this case, the water contains filtered sewage. Nitric 
acid of tenresults from the oxidation of ammonia, or vegetable matter. If the 
quantity of chlorine is norijial while the nitric acid is excessive, the water is 
probably contaminated with vegetable matter, unless other results deny it. 

Nitrous Acid.— None. 

This is a lower oxide of nitrogen than nitric acid. It is a transition product 
between ammonia, or organic matter, and nitric acid. Its presence shows that 
the source of pollution is so near that time enough has not elapsed for the 
complete oxidation of its nitrogen in its progress toward the water supply. 
Good water should contain none of it, or but a mere trace. 

Oxygen Consumed in Oxidation.— 0.198. 

Good well water should require less than O.l part of oxygen, and good pond 
water less tlian 0.2 for the oxidation of its dissolved organic matter. In no 
case should it exceed 0.4. Some bad waters may require less than 0.5 part. 
Vegetable material, comparatively richer in carbon than animal substances, 
requires more oxygen for oxidation ; while animal substances, being richer in 
nitrogen, yield more ammonia and other nitrogen compounds. 

Poisonous Metals.— None. 

Water should not contain more than 0.03 part of lead, or copper, or more than 
0.05 part zinc. 

Iron.— Trace. 

Good water ought not to contain more than 0.1 part iron. 

Sediment.— Little. 

Good water should deposit no sediment, or .scarcely any. '• 

Microscopic Examination and Biological Character of Sediment.— 
Diatoms, vegetable matter infusoria. 



watp:r department. 225 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood Tem- 
perature IN Alkaline Agar Medium.— 14. 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood Tem- 
perature IN Agar Medium Containing Parietti's Solution.— None. 

Disease germs grow at the temperature of the body. Many harmless bac- 
teria also riourish at this temperature. If a sample of water contains none 
which grow at this temperature, disease germs are evidently absent. The 
disease germ more usually found in waters of this latitude is the typhoid ba- 
cillus. The bacillus coli communis, whose original habitat is in the intestines, 
thougli not strictly a disease germ, is preeminently the sewage bacterium, and 
consequently all waters in which it is found should he condemned. The pres- 
ence of any other sewage bacterium should also condemn a water for drinking 
purposes. The typhoid bacillus, the coli communis, and a few others will grow 
in agar medium, containing Parietti's solution, but to distinguish and identify 
them, special cultures and examinations must be made. Bacteria multiply 
very rapidly after water is taken from its source and raised to summer tem- 
perature. Since the kind of bacteria is more important than their number, the 
delay necessarily caused by transportation of the sample, if not too long, is 
favorable instead of objectionable, because a very few disease germs in a 
large quantity of water might escape discovery, but detection of them would 
be much more certain after their multiplication. 

Disease Germs.— None. 

This is good water. 

EDMUND R. ANGELL. 

June 17, 1899. 



SAMPLE TAKEN FROM TAP IN WATER OFFICE, IN WHICH A 
PIECE OF GALVANIZED IRON PIPE WAS ALLOWED TO STAND 
ABOUT TWELVE HOURS. 

Water is a mineral substance, composed of two elements. Hydrogen forms 
one-ninth of its weight, and oxygen, eight-ninths. This is water chemically 
pure, or pure water. As found in nature, it always contains other substances. 
Water sanitarily pure need not be chemically pure. Water sanitarily impure, 
designated as ijolluted, or contaminated, contains substances or organisms 
injurious to health; animal matter, vegetable material, disease germs, 
poisonous metals, as lead, zinc, copper, manganese, etc. 

The figures in the analysis represent parts per 100,000. To convert into parts 
per million, multiply by 10; into parts per United States gallon, by 0.583722; 
into parts per English gallon, by 0.7. 

Odor.— Odorless. 

Color.— Slight tint. 

Transparency.— Clear. 

Pure water is ordorless, colorless, clear, and tasteless. Water sanitarily 
pure may have one or all of these properties. Polluted water may be free 
from some or all of them. 

Behavior During Evaporation.— Nearly quiet. 

Appearance of Residue.— Little yellowish ; nearly uniform. 

Water containing vegetable juices is a thin syrup. Such water foams during 
evaporation. Circles and irregular figures are marked on the dish where the 
last bubbles break in drying away. Animal matter seldom causes water to 
behave in this manner. 

Total Solids.— 5.6. 

15 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The amount of solids in water, sanitarily pure, varies greatly. Good well 
water in this state seldom contains more than 15 parts. Good pond water 
contains less than half of this quantity. 

Ignition of Residue.— It darkens little. 

The residue blackens in proportion to the amount of organic carbon present, 
provided there is no excess of nitrates. Nitrates are present excessively more 
often in animal polluted waters ; hence the residue of such waters blackens 
less than that of vegetable contaminated waters, both because animal matter 
contains less carbon as a rule, and because the nitrates supply oxygen to 
consume it quickly. Vegetable carbon often blackens intensely and the 
blackening persists. 

Loss ON Ignition of Residue.— 2.0. 

This consists of the combustible and volatile portion of the organic matter, 
and volatile mineral substances,— carbonic acid, nitric acid, water of crystalli- 
zation, zinc, and other volatile metals. The proportion of mineral solids is 
larger in well water than in pond water, because well water settling through 
the earth has come in contact with more soluble minerals. On the other hand, 
pond water contains more organic solids, because the soluble organic matter 
received from the surface of the ground has not been removed by the filtering 
action of earthy strata. It is seldom that the character and quantity of 
natural, mineral solids condemn a water. Vegetable matter is less harmful 
than animal matter. Both are more harmful in well water than in pond water, 
because light and sunshine tend to destroy deadly germs. 

Hardness.— 2.0. 

Alkalinity.— *2.9. 

The figures are given in terms of carbonate of lime, i. e., so many parts of 
carbonate of lime would give the same figures. Hardness and alkalinity give 
considerable information about the mineral constitution of water and often 
concerning its sanitary condition. Hardness is due chiefly to the salts of lime 
and magnesia, most often, their carbonates and sulphates. Alkalinity is 
caused only by their carbonates, or by the carbonates of potash, soda, ammo- 
nia, or .«ome other alkali. "Water hard from the salts of lime and magnesia, 
other than their carbonates, shows no alkalinity, unless the substances last 
named above are present. The carbonates of lime, or magnesia give nearly 
the same degree of hardness and alkalinity, lime especially. Sewage increases 
the alkalinity which then becomes an indication of pollution. 

Free Ammonia.— 0.0020. 

Albuminoid Ammonia.— O.OiOl. 

Ammonia resvilts from the decomposition of organic matter; the free is that 
which the natural process of decay has produced, and points to what extent 
decay has been going on in the water; the albuminoid results from the artifi- 
cial decomposition of organic matter during analysis and points to the quan- 
tity of organic matter actually present. In good well water the albuminoid 
ammonia should not exceed 0.009 part, and in good pond water 0.015 part. In 
neither should the free ammonia exceed 0.005 part. 

Chlorine.— 0.1. 

Chlorine is a constituent of common salt. Sewage is rich in salt, Jience the 
value of chlorine as an indication of pollution. Good water should not contain 
more than 0.5 part of it, unless the locality is near the sea coast, or is naturally 
rich in salt. 
Nitric Acid.— Mere trace. 

*This represents the amount of acid consumed rather than the amount of 
alkali-earth in solution. The presence of zinc causes this variation and also 
that in the hardness. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 227 

This is a constituent of saltpetre wliich is produced by the fermentation of 
manures and sewage. Good well water should not contain more than 0.5 part 
of it, and pond water not more than 0.02. Excess of chlorine, or nitric acid in 
water always indicates either actual contamination, or dangerous proximity 
to sources of filth. In this case, the water contains filtered sewage. Nitric 
acid often results from the oxidation of ammonia, or vegetable matter. If the 
quantity of chlorine is normal while the nitric acid is excessive, the water is 
probably contaminated with vegetable matter, unless other results deny it. 

Nitrous Acid.— None. 

This is a lower oxide of nitrogen than nitric acid. It is a transition product 
between ammonia, or organic matter, and nitric acid. Its presence shows 
that the source of pollution is so near that time enough has not elapsed for 
the complete oxidation of its nitrogen in its progress toward the water supply. 
Good water should contain none of it, or but a mere trace. 

Oxygen Consumed in Oxidation.— 0.184. 

Good well water should require less than O.l part of oxygen, and good pond 
water less than 0.2 for the oxidation of its dissolved organic matter. In no 
case should it exceed 0.4. Some bad waters may require less than 0.05 part. 
Vegetable material, comparatively richer in carbon than animal substances, 
requires more oxygen for oxidation ; while animal substances, being richer in 
nitrogen, yield more ammonia and other nitrogen compounds. 

Poisonous Metals.— None, except zinc 0.28. 

"Water should not contain more than 0.03 part of lead, or copper, or more than 
0.05 part zinc. 

Iron.— Trace. 

Good water ought not to contain more than 0.1 part iron. 

Sediment.— Very little. 

Good water should deposit no sediment, or scarcely any. 

Microscopic Examination and Biological Character of Sediment. 
— Nothing important. 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood 
Temperature in Alkaline Agar Medium.— 3. 

Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimetre Growing at Blood. 
Temperature in Agar Medium Containing Parietti's Solution.— None. 

Disease germs grow at the temperature of the body. Many harmless bacteria 
also flourish at this temperature. If a sample of water contains none which 
grow at this temperature, disease germs are evidently absent. The disease 
germ more usually found in waters of this latitude is the typhoid bacillus. 
The bacillus coli communis, whose original habitat is in the intestines, though 
not strictly a disease germ, is preeminently the sewage bacterium, and conse- 
quently all waters in which it is found should be condemned. The presence 
of any other sewage bacterium sliould also condemn a water for drinking pur- 
poses. The typhoid bacillus, the coli communis, and a few others will grow 
in agar medium, containing Parietti's solution, but to distinguish and iden- 
tify them, special cultures and examinations must be made. Bacteria multiply 
very rapidly after water is taken from its source and raised to summer tem- 
perature. Since the kind of bacteria is more important than their number, 
the delay necessarily caused by transportation of the sample, if not too long, is 
favorable instead of objectionable, because a very few disease germs in a 
large quantity of water might escape discovery, but detection of them would 
be much more certain after their multiplication. 

Disease Germs.— None. 

This is good water, without the zinc. 

EDMUND R. ANGELL. 

September 27, 1899. 



228 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF PUMPING STSTION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water-Works. 
V. C. Hastings, Sujjerintendent : 

Sir, — I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station is in very good working condition. 

Following will be found a statement of the coal and supplies 
used at the pumping station during the year, with a table showing 
the work for each month. 

Statement. 

7(5 tons, 790 lbs. Pocahontas coal. 
55 tons, 1345 lbs. Cumberland coal. 
47 cords of wood. 
60 gallons of oil. 
31 lbs. of waste. 



ENGINE RECORD. 



Date. 


Pumping 
time. 

h. TO. 


Gallons 

water 

pumped. 


Daily 
average 
pumped. 


Total 

coal 

burned. 


Daily 
average 

coal 
burned. 


* Gallons 
pvimped 

per 

pound of 

coal. 


January 

Febriiary 

March 

April 

M!ay 

June 


133:00 
133 :45 
133:00 
127:15 
133 :45 
188:30 
165:00 
129:00 
149 :30 
131 :30 
137:15 
129 :30 


11,371,435 
11,313,704 
11,327,236 
10,778,612 
11,279,534 
15,845,598 
13,734,334 
11,875,452 
12,453,350 
10,831,516 
11,347,058 
11,038,236 


366,820 
404,060 
365,394 
359,287 
363.855 
528,186 
443,043 
383,079 
415,111 
349,403 
378,235 
356,072 


23,510 
24,025 
24,497 
23,002 
23,428 
31,956 
' 28,069 
23,900 
25,232 
22,077 
23,184 
22,695 


759 
858 
790 
766 
755 
1,065 
905 
770 
841 
744 
722 
732 


483 
470 
460 
468 
481 
495 
489 


Aiigust 

September. .. 

October 

November — 
December 


496 
493 
490 
489 
486 


Total 


1,691 :00 


143,196,066 


392,317 


295,575 


809 


484 


Daily average 


4:37 


392,317 




809 













♦Amount of coal consumed includes that used for heating the building and 
banking fires. 

Amount of coal consumed per thousand gallons pumped, 2.06 

pounds. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



APPENDIX. 



230 



CITY OK CONCOKD. 



Receipts for Bach Year Since the Completion of the 

Works. 



For the year ending January 31, 1874 . 

For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875 

For the year ending April 1, 1876 

1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 

For nine months ending December 31, 1881 



For the year ending Decern 



Liber 31, 1882 
" 1883 

" 1884 

" 1885 

1886 
" 1887 
" 1888 
" 1889 
" 1890 
" 1891 
" 1892 
" 1893 
" 1894 
" 1895 
" 1896 
" 1897 

1898 
" 1899 



Total receipts for 27 years 



$ 4,431.10 
17,535.00 
16,921.24 
19,001.07 
20,763.03 
21,869.86 
22,451.53 
26,744.58 
25,534.01 
27,243.06 
28,255.48 
28,915.65 
30,222.54 
30,862.64 
34,047.52 
38,441.32 
40,237.53 
42,133.41 
46,075.16 
48,351.52 
52,299.66 
53,230.10 
55,343.19 
56,557.81 
55,156.42 
59,147.54 
53,953.13 

$925,725.10 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



J31 



B. 



1873 


iv±ea 


Lii rat 


175.86 


vv auci iz. 

1887 


ai^ii 


J. CCl/l 


179.04 


1874 






179.50 


1888 






181.96 


187o 






180.00 


1889 






180.91 


1876 






180.28 


1890 






181.90 


1877 






176.46 


1891 






180.00 


1878 






179.50 


1892 






174.32 


1879 






179.74 


1893 






173.38 


1880 






175.30 


1894 






172.81 


1881 






174.70 


1895 






171.15 


1882 






179.15 


1896 






178.96 


1883 






176.40 


1897 






. 183.33 


1884 






178.18 


1898 






. 184.31 


1885 






176.80 


1899 






. 183.49 


1886 






178.10 











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WATER DEPARTMENT. 



237 



O. 
FIRE-HYDRANTS. 



STREETS. 



No. Main. 



So. Main. 



Water. 

Hall. 

Hammond. 

Fiske. 

Summer. 

Durgin. 

No. State. 



LOCATIONS. 



South-west corner North Main and Penacook 

East side Xcn-th Main, near J. B. Walker's 

Jmiction Nortli Main and Fiske 

East side North Main, near Larkin's store 

North-west corner North Main and Franklin 

East side North Main . opposite Pearl 

North-west corner Noi'tli Main an<l Washington 

West side Xo. Main, oppusitc Historical Society rooms. 

East si<le North Main, upiMisite Chapid 

North-west corner North Main ami Court 

North-west corner Nortli Main aii<l Pitman 

North-west corner North Main and Montgomery 

East side North iMain, opposite ^MoiitLj-omery 

North-west corner Nortli Main and Centre 

Sonth-east corner N( irt li Main and P>ridge 

South-west corner North Main and Park 

East side North Main, opposite Park 

North-west corner North Main and Capitol 

North-west corner North Main and School 

West side North Main, at Centennial Block 

East side North Main, opposite Centennial Block 

East side North Main, in rear Ea^ile Hotel 

East side N(n-th ^Main, in rear AVoo<l\vard Block 

North-west i-orner North Main and Warren 

West side North ]\Iain, at Central Block 

North-east corner North Main and Depot 

North-west e< iruer North Main and Pleasant 

South-east corner Soiith IMain and Pleasant 

North-east corner South !Main and Freight 

East side South jMain, opposite Fayette 

East side South ^lani. opiiosite Thompson .-. 

Sonth-east corner South Main and Chandler 

North-west corner So. Main and Wentworth's avenue. 

North-west corner S( luth IMain and Thorndike 

East side South Main, opposite St. .John's church 

North-west corner South ]\lain and Perley 

West side South ^lain, near Ahhot-DowningCo.'s 

East side South M:iin, opposite Ahliot-Downing Co.'s. 

North-west corner South Main ami West 

East side South Main, near West 

West side South Main, opposite (Tas 

West side South .Main, opposite Holt Bros. M'f g Co. . . 

South-west corner Sout 1 1 .Main and Sottth State 

North-west corner South Main and Pillsbury 

East side South IMain, opposite Pillsbury 

West side Soutli IMain, at J. H. Lamprey's 

West side South IMain, at W. -J. Sawyer's 

West side A\'ater, near Capt .James Thompson's 

West side Hall, helow Rolt'e and Rttmford Asylum 

North side Hammond, near Bridge 

West side Fiske, near North State 

North-east corner Summer and Pitman 

West side Durgin, near Tool's laundry 

East side No. State, near cemetery gate 

North-east corner No. State and Foster 

West side No. State, at water-works storehouse 

Soutli-west corner North State and Penacook 

North-west corner North State and Walker 

North-west corner North State and Church 

North-west corner North State and Tremont 

North-east corner North State and Washington 

West side North State, opposite Court 

North-west corner North State and Maple 



27 



20 



238 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con«i«ite(i. 




No. State 



So. State. 



Mills. 

Dakin. 
Dunklee. 
Broadway. 

Green. 

South. 



Bradley. 



Union. 

Lyndon. 
No. Spring. 
So. Spring. 



Rum ford. 



Tall ante. 
Pine. 
High. 



Giles. 
Fruit. 



Minot. 
Penacook. 



Highland. 
Church. 



North-east corner North State and Centre 

East side North State, opposite government huilding 

South-west corner North State and School 

North-west corner North Stat<' and Warren 

North-west corner North Statraml Pleasant 

East side South State, opixisitc Wall 

North-west ciiriicr South Stati' and Thompson 

South-west curncr South State and Monroe 

East side South State, opposite Laurel 

South-east corner South State and r>i>wning 

North-east corner Soutli State ami West , 

Junction of South State and South Main 

South-east (^orner Mills and Downing 

West side Mills, near Levi Call's 

West side Dakin, near C. E. Harriman's 

North-west corner Dunklee and Pil Isbury 

Nortli-west corner Broadway and Allison 

West side Broadway, near precinct line 

North-west corner Green and Prince 

East side Green^opposite Prince 

West side South, opposite Wall 

North-west corner South and Thompson 

West side South, opposite Monroe 

West side South, opposite Laurel 

West side South, opposite Downing 

West side South, opposite Allison 

West side South, near Ahliott farm 

West side South, ojiposite Smith farm 

North west corner South and Kockingluim 

South-west corner Bradley and Penacook 

West side Bradlev, opposite Walker 

Eastside Bradley, opposite Ilif^diland 

North-west corner Union and Maple 

Soiitli-west corner T^yndon and Tremont 

South-west corner North Spring and Centre 

South-west corner Soutli Spring and Oak 

West side South Sprin;.;-. opiiosite Concord 

West side So. Siiring', opposite Perley proposed exten. 

West side Rumford, opjiosite Perkins 

North-east corner Rumford and Franklin 

West side Rumford, opuosite l^>eacon 

North-east corner Rumford and Ahhott 

North-east corner Uuniford and Cambridge 

North-east corner Rumford and School 

North-west corner Tahanto and School 

South-west corner Pine and Centre 

North- west corner High and Auburn 

East side llitfh, opposite Forest 

South-west corner lliiih and Franklin 

Soutli-ea~t eoriuT (Mies and S<'hool 

North -east corner Fruit and Clinton 

East side Fruit, opposite Wm. W. Critchett's 

Nortli-w.-st corner Fruit and Woodmaii 

West side Minot, near Odd Fellows' Home 

Soxrtli side Peiia(?(iok, east of P. B. Co., bark house 

South side Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s 

Soutli side Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s office 

South-east corner Penacook and North !Main 

South-west corner Penacook and Rumford 

Soutli-east corner Penaeookand Columbus avenue 

North-east corner Highland and Rumford 

North side Church, opposite Lyndon 

North-east corner Church and Rumford 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



239 



FIRE-HYDRANTS. 



Continued. 




Franklin. 



Beacon. 

Blancliard. 

Ferry. 

Washing'ton. 



Valley. 
Auburn. 
Centre. 



Bridge. 
Capitol. 
School. 



Depot. 
Warren. 



Pleasant. 



Mill Road. 
St. P. School 
OldHopkint'n 

road. 

Marshall. 
Freight. 

Hill's avenue 

Fayette. 

Chandler. 

Concord. 



North-west corner Franklin and Jackson 

South-west corner Franklin and Rumford 

South side Franklin, oiipcisite W.J. Ahern's 

North-east corner Franklin and Auburn 

North-west corner lica((iii and Jackson 

North-west corner ISIancbard and Essex 

North side ferry, east of ('. lK: M. Railroad 

South-west corner WasliiuLiton and Union 

North-west corner Wasliingtcm and Rumford 

North side Wasliin,L;toii, (>i)i)cisite Perry avenue 

North side Valley, (ipposite Forest 

North-west corner Aulmrn and Forest 

North-east corner Centre and North State 

South-west corner Centre and Green 

North-west corner Centre and Union 

North-west corner Centre and North Spring 

North-west corner Centre and Rumford 

South side Centre, opposite Essex 

Soiith-west corner Centre ami Summit avenue 

North-east corner Cent re and Ridge Road 

South side Bridge, near easterly barn 

North-east corner Capitol and North State 

North-west corner School and <4reen 

Nortii-west corner School and North Spring 

North-west corner Sehool and Merrimack 

North side School, near city storehouse 

North side School, opposite E. B. Woodworth's 

North-west corner Depot and Railroad square 

South side Depot, at end of train shed 

North-west corner Warren and Green 

North-west corner Warren and North Spring 

North-west corner Warren and Rumford 

South-west corner Warren and Merrimack 

North-west corner Warren and Tahanto 

North-east corner Warren and Liberty 

Junction Warren and Pleasant, near Fruit 

North-we.st corner Pleasant and Railroad square 

North-west corm-r Pleasant an<l Green 

South-west eorner Pleasant and Spring 

South side Pleasant, opposite RiimtV)rd 

South side Pleasant, opposite Merrimack 

Sorith side Pleasant, opposite Pine 

South side Pleasant, opposite Liberty^ 

North side Pleasant, opi)osite Mrs. Aiken's 

South side Pleasant, near Mrs. Eddy's 

North side Pleasant, near Mrs. Lane's 

North side Pleasant, near J. McC. Hammond's 

South side Pleasant, opjxisite Pond road 

South side Pleasant, near J. Mi I nor Colt's 

Nortli side Pleasant, opposite Infirmary 

South side Pleasant, near the mill 

East side Mill road, near Upper School cottage 

North side JNIill road, at Orphans' Home 

Junction Old and New Hopkinton roads 

North side Marsliall , opposite Fuller 

North side Freight, at soitthwest corner passenger 

station - 

North-east corner Hill's avenue and South Main 

South-west corner Hill's avenue and Railroad sqitare. 

North-west corner Fayette and Elm 

South side Chandler, opposite railroad 

South side Concord, opposite Jefferson 



240 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS. — Continued. 



STREETS. 



Thorinlike. 
Laurel. 
Pel-ley. 

West. 



Clinton. 

Avon. 

Harrison. 

Allison. 

Rockingham. 

Prospect. 

Curtice ave. 

North State. 

West Concord 

road. 



North State. 



Electric. 

Lake. 

Knight. 
Hutchins. 

Penacook rd. 



Main. 



West Main. 
Hi^h. 

Washington. 



LOCATIONS. 



North-east corner Thorndike and Grove 

North-east corner Laurel and Pierce 

North-west corner Perley and Grove 

South side Perley, near old hrook 

North side West, near Badger 

North side West, opposite Dukin 

North side West, at iiiti-rscctidii Broadway , 

North side Clinton, (ippnsitc Avon 

North-west corner Avon and Smith 

North-west corner Harrison and Morton 

North-west corner Allison and Mills 

North-east corner Rockingham and F! roadway , 

North-west corner Prospect and ( Granite avenue. .. 
North side Curtice avenue, near -lolin C. Kenney's 
East side North State, near W. H. Perry's 

West side North State, near Calvary Cemetery , 

East side North State, near A. L. Coburn's , 

West side Xortli State, at south line of prison wall. 
West side North State, at north lineof prison wall. 

East side North State, near Asa L. Gay's 

West side North State, near Amos Haynes Co.'s 

West side N( )rtli State, near C. H. Farnum's 

West side North State, near M. H. Farninn's 

East side North State, near stone cut 

WEST CONCORD. 

East side North State, near old city farm 

East side North State, neai- cnLjine house. 

East side North State, opposite 1). Holden's , 

West side North State, near north mill 

Eastsiih' North State, oppcjsite ( ieorge W. Brown's 

East side North State, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side North State, opposite A. Hollis's 

East side North State, neai- Sewall's Falls road 

Nortii-east corner of Kh'ciric and North State 

North side Electri<\ near power station 

East side Lake, near S. \V. Kelloni's 

East side Lake, near 3Irs. G. E. Holden's 

South side Kniglit, opposite railroad station 

North side Hutchins, near B. T. Putney's 

Nortli side Hutchins, near C. & C. Railroad 

West side Penacook road, near Warner road 

West side Penacook road, near Mr. Currier's 

PENACOOK. 

West side Main, at Woodlawn cemetery 

West side Main, opposite Stark 

West side Main, near Mr. Prescott's 

South-west corn<'r Main and Union 

Wasliington siiuare, opposite Washington 

North-west cornei- Main and Cliarles 

Nortli side Main, opposite East ('anal 

North side Main, near iron liridge 

^\■est side West Main, opposite cemetery 

East side Hit;li, opposite Summit 

North -\\('st corner iiit;li and Maple 

Nortli-west <'orncr Hij^ii and Spring 

Sou til -east corner \\'ashington and Union 

South side WasJiiiiLrton, opposite John Whitaker's. 
South side Washington, opposite Charles 



10 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



241 



FIRE-HYDRANTS. 



Continued. 



STREETS. 


LOCATIONS. 


u 
a> 

6 
14 
3 
6 
5 


'3 


Washington. 


South side Washington, near Contoocook bridge 

South-west corner Charles and Warren 


4 


West Canal 


North side Cliarles, near George W. Corey's 

South-east ('orner West Canal and Warren 


2 

T 


East Canal. 


North side East Canal, near Contoocook Mt'g. Co 


2 


Crescent. 
ISIerrimack. 


Nortli side Crescent, east of Canal 

South side Merrimack, opposite Merrimack avenue.. . 
Nortli side Merrimack, opposite D. W. Fox's 


1 


14 


South side Merrimack, opposite Rolfe's shop 




l> 








North-west corner Merrimack and Penacook 

North side Summer, opposite High 


6 






Q 


Spring. 


North-east corner Sju-ing and Church 

North-west corner Centre and Spring 


1 
1 






1 


Rolfe. 


North side Rolfe, near James Corbett's 






North-west corner Rolfe and Penacook 


2 




West side Penacook, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 


1 




Whole number public hydrants 


'>fi4 




PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard 












Aliliot Dow ning Co.'s yard 






Pai;'e Belting Co.'s yard 






W.' P. Ford !& Co.'s yard 






N. H. Asylum for Insane yard 

Concord Gas Light Co.'s yard •. 






St. Pattl's School 






Water-works pumping station grounds 


.39 






W 









16 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF Commissioner of Highways. 



To the City Coimcil : 

The greater part of the money expended this year has been 
used for general maintenance, that is, repair of roads, streets, 
courts, culverts and bridges. The out-lying districts, as 
will be shown in this report, have received more attention 
than in previous years. We have tried to harden as many 
sandy hills and grade as much as possible. In many places 
we have been obliged to draw the material such a distance 
that the cost of repairs are quite expensive. Horse Hill 
bridge and East Concord bi-idge have been repainted. 
Turkey river bridge, by the Moreland Farm, has had a new 
abutment, new stringers and new floor complete. The bridge 
on St. Paul's School old road has been replanked and two 
new stringers replaced. Sheep Davis bridge replanked on 
the Concord side. A small bridge across the canal at Pena- 
cook has been replanked, also the Main' street and Twin 
bridge floors have been concreted, and a number of culverts 
have been rebuilt and lengthened. 

The bridge on the Pembroke road, across the Soucook 
river, is in a bad condition and unsafe for heavy teaming. 
I recommend that an "Iron Cruder" be built next spring. 
The town of Pembroke, I am quite sure, will agree to this. 
Many of the small bridges about the city are in a l)ad con- 
dition, and will need repairing another year. 

All catch basins built this year have been 8-inch wall, 
large enough to keep the sand from running into the sewer. 
We have had considerabl'e complaint about sewer gas escaping 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 243 

through the basins which were either untrapped or traps 
broken. It is impossible to prevent this if the traps are 
perfect, as the slightest amount of sand or small sticks will 
hold the traps down and allow the gas to escape. The work 
of cleaning basins this year has been greatl\' reduced bv the 
use of Edson diaphragm pump, which pumps the water from 
the basins direct into the sewer, and this does away with 
allowing it to stand on the surface of the ground until the 
sand is removed and then allowed to run back into the basin. 

The work of cleaning the streets this year was done 
thoroughly. Owing to a late winter, this department had 
ample time to cover the entire cleaning precinct; the grass 
was cut from the gutters giving the streets a neat appearance. 

The public greatly accommodated this department in the 
fall by putting their garbage in boxes and barrels, and 
lessened the labor of the collectors greatly. 

In many sections of the city there are a number of accepted 
streets that shoidd be worked to grade. If these streets were 
properly graveled the road surface would be, as in many 
cases in the city proper, much higher than the sidewalk, and 
in the winter and spring would be covered with water, owing 
to the great amount of snow in this section. Some of the 
streets should be brought to grade every vear ; as the city 
enlarges, the demand for grading these streets will increase and 
the cost in many instances will be large. The appropriation 
for sidewalks this year was sufficient to build many that were 
much needed, and they, no doubt, will be appreciated. 

The shade trees about the city are in a bad condition, and 
as they have been trimmed only by linemen, many limbs die 
and blow down with every high wind. Many have died on ac- 
count of gas leaks and maple worms ; these are taken down and 
the cost amounts to more than has been expended on the street 
where they were taken down. 

Sprinkling. Owing to the extraordinary dry season this 
year, the sprinkling appropriation was soon expended. I 
would respectfully recommend that this be large enough next 
season to allow for new sprinklers, and have the precinct en- 
larged, or as many streets sprinkled as the people may ask. 



244 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Some of the sprinklers will be found in a bad condition, having 
been in service ever since the inauguration of sprinkling 
streets. 

The standpipes about the city have been changed to over- 
head standpipes, whenever a low one becomes out of repair. 
These, while perhaps not so ornamental, are much more in- 
expensive and will seldom, if ever, be found out of repair. 

I would recommend paving Freight street with l)lock 
paving taken from Main street, and replacing these with 
concrete. The large and increasing traffic, together with the 
steep grade of Freight street, combine to make it impossible 
to maintain gravel or macadam road. I also recommend 
the concreting of vState street directly opposite the Govern- 
ment building. This will only need a top coat, and will add 
much to the appearance and travel. We should like to 
macadam that portion of North State street that leads out 
from Penacook, and hope sometime that a macadam road 
may be complete from Penacook to Concord. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY H. JOHNSON, 
Coinmissio7ier of Highways. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



245 



INVENTORY OP CITY PROPERTY, FEB. 1, 1899. 



1 steam roller 








$2,000.00 




9 sprinklers and fixtm-es 






2,000.00 




1 portable crusher plant 






1,200.00 




1 stationary crusher plant 






800.00 




8 horses 






600.00 




1 sand house 








50.00 




3 sets double harness 








75.00 




2 single harness . 








15.00 




1 tip cart harness 








10.00 




4 two-horse carts 








300.00 




1 one-horse cart . 








25.00 




1 stake wagon 








50.00 




1 stone wagon 








50.00 




3 two-horse sleds 








200.00 




1 two-horse dump sled 








40.00 




1 one-horse sled . 








15.00 




2 snow rollers 








150.00 




2 stone rollers 








100.00 




2 road machines . 








100.00 




4 wing snowplows 








100.00 




7 common snowplows 








25.00 




1 street sweeper . 








100.00 




2 hand carts 








40.00 




1 boom derrick . 








80.00 




1 garbage furnace 








300.00 




Lumber 








150.00 




Curbstone . 








80.00 




Miscellaneous property 






260.00 








38,915.00 






West Concord miscellaneous property 




18.00 


Penacook miscellaneou 


s prop 


erty 




. 


22.00 



246 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



New Concrete Crossings. 

Location. Ward. Yds. Concrete. 



Street. 

South, Clinton and South, 7 

Rumford, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 9 

Rumford, Rumford and Short, 5 

Main, Main and Street Railway, 1 

Downing, Downing and Pierce, 6 

Morton, West and Morton, 7 

Summer, Summer and Square, 1 

Summer, Cross and Summer, 1 



29.4 

54.75 

18.91 

54.75 

29.1 

22.8 

57.45 

39 





Patching- Concrete, 




Street. 


Location. ^ 


Yai 


Pleasant, 


Fowler block. 


5 


Pleasant, 


Masonic Temple, 


5 


Blake, 


Drew's, 


5 


Pleasant, 


Knowlton, 


5 


Pleasant, 


Odd Fellows' building. 


5 


Main, 


Chase's block, 


5 


Main, 


Jones' block, 


5 


Main, 


Brown's block. 


5 


South, 






Pleasant, 


Knowlton, 


5 



RECORD OF LABOR ON STREETS. 
Ward One. 



Walnut Street. 
Repairing road 
Repairing fence 

Crescent Street. 
General repairs 

Charles Street. 
Repairs, concrete 
Trimming trees 
Repairing 



Cost. 
S20.58 
38.32 
13.24 
38.32 
20.37 
15.96 
40.21 
27.30 



Cost. 
10.60 

.50 
1.00 

.50 
1.00 

.50 

.50 
1.00 
1.50 

.50 



$1.61 
3.58 

3.67 

14.10 
4.33 
1.13 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



247 



Washington Street. 

General repairs ...... $11.53 

New concrete sidewalk south of Exchange block . 8.91 

Repairs, concrete in front of engine house . . 126.42 

Borough Road. 

General repairs ...... 1.93 

Raking stone . . . . . . . 4.56 

Merrimack Street. 

Paving gutter opposite F. Varney's . . . 7.00 

Union Street. 

General repairs ...... 2.00 

Spring Street. 

General repairs ...... 2.00 

Church Street. 

Repairing ....... .57 

Bog Road. 

Railing at Culvert by R. H. Hoit . . . 2.60 

Penacook Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 3.11 

Elm Street. 

Hardening and drawing grade . . . . 9.20 

Drawing and setting curbing .... 3.83 

Repairing culvert ...... .33 

Repairs, concrete crossing. . . . . .60 

Repairs, concrete sidewalk opposite No. 27 . . 1.50 

New concrete sidewalk and curbing . . . 124.59 

Main Street. 

General repairs . . . . . • 128.91 

Repairs, concrete . . .- . . . 95.23 
New concrete crossing, street railway and Main 

street 38.32 

Repairs, concrete crossings . . . . 55.75 

River Road. 

Removing tree ....... .80 

General repairs . . . . . . 3.16 



248 



CITY OF CONCOUU. 



Mkhrimaok Street. 

Trimming trees ...... $5.13 

Drawing gravel . . . . . . 10.74 

Cross Street. 

General repairs ...... 4.70 

New concrete . . . . . . . 75.16 

Repairing sidewalk ...... 66.80 

Grading side\valk . . . . . . 59.52 

Grading street . . . . . . . 6.00 

Repairs, Cross street extension .... 1.47 

East Canal Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 2.37 

Repairs, concrete sidewalk .... 2.58 

Centre Street. 

Repairing sidewalk . . . . . • 3.12 

RoLFE Street. 

Repairing Rolfe and Walnut streets . . . 9.20 

High Street. 

Removing trees ...... 2.70 

Repairing concrete sidewalk near Summit street . .72 

Summit Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 6.81 

SuMftiER Street. 

New concrete sidewalk, Summer and Main streets 93.24 

Putting in box . . . . . . . .57 

New concrete crossing. Summer and Main streets 40.21 

New concrete crossing, Cross and Summer streets 27.30 



Ward Two. 




\ST Penacook Street. 




General repairs ..... 


S62.56 


Repairing fence ..... 


5.55 


Grading ....... 


150.19 


Cutting bushes ...... 


3.56 


Repairing culvert ..... 


19.35 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



249 



Grading between River bridge and Wattanummon 

bridge 8196.02 

New concrete, J. E. Pecker . . . . 5.81 

Repairing sidewalk, C. E. Staniels' . . . 5.30 

East Clinton Street. 

Repairing . . . . . . . 8.10 

North Pembroke Street. 

Buildinof water course . . . . . 7.00 





Ward Three. 




Engel Street. 






Repairing 




$22.67 


K Street. 






General repairs 


. 


3.94 


West State Street. 






General repairs 


. 


268.57 


Repairing sidewalk . 




17.45 


Repairs concrete, Holden's mill . 


6.11 


Lake Street. 






General repairs 


. 


. ■ 24.31 


Putting in crossing . 


. 


3.11 


Repairs culvert 


. 


.89 


Quaker Street. 






General repairs 


. 


7.10 


DoLAN Street. 






Building street 


. 


46.17 


Sewalls Falls Road. 






Cutting bushes 


. 


31.75 


Building fence . 




2.78 


Building sidewalk 


. 


51.10 


Second Street. 






Building fence . 


. 


5.89 


Knight Street. 






General repairs 


. 


32.90 



250 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bog Road. 

Repairing 
Cutting bushes 
Penacook Road. 
Repairing 



Ward Four. 
Washington Street. 

Ti"imniing shade trees .... 

General repairs ..... 

Top coating sidewalk south side from State to 
Washington street .... 

Charles Street. 

General repairs ..... 

Top coating sidewalk east side . 

Repairing gutter ..... 
Tremont Street. 

General repairs ..... 

Resetting curbstone ..... 

Paving cobble gutter between Ruraford and 
Lyndon streets ..... 

Repairing sidewalk near Jackson street 

Setting cui'bstone and concrete sidewalk, A. F 
Fosgate ...... 

Paving gutter from Jackson street east 

Patching from Jackson street east 
Beacon Strep:t. 

Building drivebox ..... 

General repairs ..... 

Paving gutter ...... 

Setting curbing at J. S. Button's 

Repairs concrete ..... 

Trimming trees at J. S. Button's 

Rei)airing sidewalk near Rumford street 

Building crushed stone crossing, Beacon and Rum 
ford streets ...... 

Repairing steps ..... 



$5.28 
14.06 

1.56 



$3.81 
46.13 

3.96 

.80 
4.07 
1.47 

.40 

.83 

30.42 
2.83 

37.51 

9.53 

20.33 

3.53 
1.50 
17.26 
33.21 
6.66 
1.98 
1.70 

7.76 
4.86 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



251 



Essex Street. 

Patching ...... 

Chapel Street. 

Patching ...... 

Paving gutter south side .... 
Lyndon Street. 

New concrete walk ..... 
Chestnut Street. 

Building gravel walk east from Auburn street 
Cedar Street. 

Paving from State street west . 

Grading ...... 

Top coating gravel walk . 
Court Street. 

Repairing ..... 

Summer Street. 

Repairing sidewalk at Court street 

Repairing sidewalk .... 
Ridge Road. 

General repairs .... 

Building Ridge Park 

Turfing, banking corner, H. Groove's lot 

Cutting bushes Ridge Park 

Building sidewalk east side of Center street 
Montgomery Street. 

Repairing ..... 

Removing shade trees near State street 
Perry Avenue. 

Paving gutter ..... 

Grading ..... 

Maple Street. 

Repairing near Spring street 

Cambridge Street. 

Repairing ..... 

Union Street. 

Patching ..... 



S7.41 

2.57 

30.98 

56.01 

104.73 

16.48 

12.79 

2.06 

2.93 

2.40 
2.55 

7.41 

160.28 

1.11 

.67 

6.56 

6.08 
6.44 

53.25 

35.88 

.83 

9.26 

14.48 



252 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



West "Washington Street. 

Repairing ....... §3.23 

Repairing sidewalk ...... .40 

Jackson Street. 

Paving gutter between Highland and Church streets 71.91 

Paving gutter between Tremont and Beacon 

streets ....... 70.44 

Patching 10.87 

Building gravel sidewalk . . . . . 5.23 

Repairing sidewalk from Jackson to Franklin street 1.37 

Grading from Franklin to Tremont street . . 36.67 

Pitman Street. 

Patching 2.20 

White Street. 

Repairing . •. . . . . . 2.03 

Winter Street. < 

Paving gutter . . . . . . . 7.80 

Harrod Court. 

Patching .90 



Ward Five. 
Merrimack Street. 

Grading between School and Warren streets 

Repairing ..... 

Repairs, concrete opposite W. S. Baker's 
Pine Street. 

New concrete sidewalk at Benj. French's 

Repairing ..... 

Orchard Street. 

Repairs, concrete .... 

Repairs, cobble gutter 

Blake Street. 

Repairs, concrete .... 
Re-setting curbing at Green street 
Patching concrete .... 
Repairing sidewalk .... 



63.93 

4.03 

14.53 

26.68 
1.98 

43.00 
1.00 

9.75 

3.93 

1.00 

.29 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



253 



Liberty Street. 

Repairs, conci-ete . . . . . . S9.75 

Repairing cobble gutter near Pleasant street . .50 

Repairing sidewalk . . . . . • 1.80 

High Street. 

Repairing . . . . . . i 2.60 

Hanover Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 4.68 

School Street. 

General repairs . . . • . . . 27.63 

Paving gutter on north side for crossing . . 82.45 

Repairs, concrete crossing . . . . 5.98 

Putting in drive box at Davis', near Fruit street . .73 

Building gravel walk from High west, to concrete 28.26 

Repairing banking, corner of Merrimack street . 2.00 

Warren Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 42.56 

Cutting and filling gutter, corner Warren and High 

streets ........ 10.76 

Grading sidewalk for concrete, corner of High street 8.38 

Concrete sidewalk and edgestone . . . 146.14 

Repairs, concrete crossing at Fremont street . 6.12 

Building railing, city lot . . . . . 7.64 

Repairing concrete (roadway) . . . . 3.74 

Repairing sidewalk . . . . . . .90 

Repairs, concrete sidewalk opposite J. F. Mose- 

ley's 13.45 

Green Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 2.93 

Cutting tree, corner Warren street . . . 4.71 

Circle edgestone, corner of Pleasant street . . 18.14 

Park Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 1.60 

Short Street. 

Grading between Rumford and Huntington streets 13.03 
Re-laid gutter between Rumford and Huntington 

streets. ... ... 14.22 



254 city of concord. 

Odd Fellows' Avenue. 

Cutting gutter S3. 17 

Giles Street. 

Concrete ....... 6.14 

DuRGiN Avenue. 

Cutting gutters back of Hill's harness shop . . 4.88 



$1. 


.31 


34. 


,51 




.60 


1 


.41 


178.81 


164, 


.78 



Ward Six. 
Elm Street. 

Repairing iron fence at Willard's 

Repairing between Fayette, Wall and Tliompson 

streets ........ 

Monroe Street. 

Repairing between Monroe and Badger streets 

Repairing between Runiford and School streets 

Gradins' between South and Grove streets . 



Lincoln Street. 

Repairing . . . . . . . . 2.27 

Thorndike Street. 

Repairing with gravel ..... 

Grading between South and Pierce streets . 
Oak Street. 

Re-laying cobble gutter ..... 

Setting edgestone on south side .... 

New concrete walk ...... 

Fayette Street. 

Repairs, concrete north side west of State street . 
Thompson Street. 

Repairs, concrete opposite G. K. Mellen's . 
Concord Street. 

Paving gutter ....... 

Re-building culvert ...... 

Grading ........ 

Repairs, concrete ci-ossing Concord and Spring 

streets 3.09 



8.63 


93.38 


16.43 


128.10 


23.61 


11.20 


9.40 


51.11 


10.83 


66.84 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



255 



Repairs, concrete sidewalk 

General repairs ...... 

Wall Street. 

Patching between State and Elm streets 
Grove Street. 

Patchino; bet^veen Monroe and Downin"; streets 
Perley Street. 

General repairs ..... 

Grading east of Dunklee street . 
South Spring Street. 

Trimming shade trees .... 

Patching ...... 

Repairs, concrete opposite W. A. Stone's 

Repairing sidewalk near Clinton street 
Downing Street. 

Patching near South street, Ward 6 . 

Repairing driveway, DoAvning and Perley streets 

Paving gutter ...... 

Grading sidewalk for concrete . 

New concrete sidewalk .... 

Building and putting in drive box 

New concrete crossing between Downing and 
Pierce streets, Ward 6 . 

New concrete, J. M. Fletcher's . 



S6.37 
2.93 

23.54 

19.09 

26.64 
1.13 

5.56 

28.76 

6.21 

7.93 

2.03 

1.78 

46.38 

27.93 

181.49 

3.76 

20.37 
18.17 



Ward Seven. 

Morton Street. 

Grading sidewalk for concrete, east side . . $10.32 

New concrete sidewalk ..... 101.34 

Holly Street. 

Building gravel walk from Turnpike street west , 29.56 

Dakin Street. 

Grading sidewalk for concrete and new concrete . 58.86 

Setting corner stone at Dakin and Allison streets 1.78 

Repairing sidewalk . . . . . . 1.19 



256 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Birch Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . $4.51 

Fencing ........ .80 

Hall Street. 

General repairs ...... 1.30 

Clinton Street. 

General repairs near N. White's farm and Tur- 
key Pond 23.88 

Building sidewalk west from Harvard street . 64.69 

Putting in driveway at Eastman's ... .73 

Grading between Harvard and Fruit streets . 231.59 

Repairing culvert near Bow line . . . 1.50 

Repairing railing at Turkey Pond . . . 6.60 

Cutting bushes at Turkey Pond . . . . 7.93 

General repairs, Ward 7 . . . . . 122.14 

Kimball Street. 

Building sidewalk ...... 7.22 

Silk Farm Road. 

Repairing ....... 415.25 

Harrison Street. ^ 

Setting corner stone ...... .50 

Huntington Street. 

General repairs ...... 10.96 

Gas Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 1.70 

Rockingham Street. 

Repairing near Bow street .... 4.85 

General repairs ...... 4.78 

MiNOT Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 5.53 

" MosE Brown " Road. 

Repairing . . . . . . . 8.35 

PiLLSBURY Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 17.62 

Grading between Turnpike and proposed Dunklee 

street 346.30 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 257 

Repairing plank walk ..... $12.35 

Building gravel walk, north side, east of Dunklee 

street . . . . . . . . 4.16 

Top coating sidewalk . . . . . 1.70 

Grading . . . . . . . . 25.70 

Top coating north side, west from Turnpike street 12.16 

West Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 55.91 

Paving gutter east from Dakin street . . . 19.51 
New concrete walk, E. B. Hutchinson's . . 34.24 
Drawing and setting corner stone, corner of Mor- 
ton street . . . . • . . 6.70 

New concrete walk . . . . . . 21.96 

Repairing sidewalk near W. Brooks' . . . 1.70 

NoYES Strket. 

Filling 4.11 

Harvard Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 7.94 

Langdox Street. 

Grading 210.56 

Avon Street. 

Building gravel sidewalk between Clinton and 

South streets ...... 56.42 

Grading 124.07 

Repairing ....... 1.20 

Rolling ,80 

Water Street. 

Repairing ....... 20.03 

Work on lower bridge ..... 

Repairing railing, east side .... 

Raising wall and building sidewalk at junction of 
Hall street ....... 

St. Paul's School Road. 

General repairs ...... 

17 



1.0/ 


2.96 


124.66 


4.27 



258 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Fruit Street. 

Patching ....... 

Building sidewalk ...... 

Repairing South Fruit street . . . . 

Woodman Street. 

Repairing ....... 

South State Street. 

Repairing ....... 

Iron Works Road. 

General repairs ...... 

Grading and filling ...... 

Turnpike Street. 

General repairs ...... 

Setting post, Turnpike and Rockingham streets 

Grading ........ 

Building crossing off Langdon street . 

Putting in drivebox off gas works 

Building railing near Holly street 
Bog Road. 

Repairing . . . ... 

Mills Street. 

Top coating sidewalk, west side, between Allison 
and West streets ...... 

Broadway. 

General repairs ...... 

Repairing sidewalk, east side, between Humphrey 
and Allison streets .... 

Grading ....... 

Building gravel sidewalks, both sides . 
New concrete sidewalk .... 

Putting in pipe drain near Rollins Park 
Building crossing otF Rollins Park 

Dunklee Street. 

Setting stone bounds .... 

McKinley Street. 

Repairing ...... 



^17.21 

5.60 

.40 

1.13 

.40 

44.14 
26.01 

49.07 
.40 

15.21 
3.05 
2.27 
3.02 

4.49 



18.23 

8.41 

3.85 

298.44 

80.53 

54.11 

8.26 

3.40 

1.33 

20.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



259 



Allison Street. 

General repairs ..-,... 

Setting curbstone from Badger to Mills street 
Building gravel walk ..... 

Cutting gutter and shaping bank, corner of Kimball 
street ........ 



^25. 17 

133.44 

15.91 



New concrete sidewa 


Ik 


117.58 


Paving gutter between Badger and Mills streets . 


6.56 


Grading sidewalk 





5.66' 




Ward Eight. 




Sugar Ball Road. 






General repairs 




$10.83 


Loudon Road. 






Patching from Gully 


Hill to Break O'Day . 


7.28 


Pembroke Road. 






Grading with sod, top of Glover Hill to Plains 


57.97 


Repairing 


. 


10.00 


Cutting bushes 


. 


7.20 


Grading with gravel, 


top of Glover Hill 


88.77 


General repairs 


. 


11.99 


Depot Street. 






General repairs 


. 


1.57 


Clough's Avenue. 






Grading . 


. 


8.50 


Clough's Mill. 






Removing trees 


. 


1.86 


General repairs 


. 


11.99 


Bridge Street. 






Lights in gully 


. 


82.00 


Repairing paving 


. 


3.10 


Lengthening culvert 


. 


21.14 


General repairs 


. 


30.71 


Glover Hill. 






General repairs 


. 


41.07 



260 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Gully Hill. 

General repairs 
Cleaning gutters 
Putting in drive box 
Building plank culvert 
Patching at bridge . 
Patching Loudon road 

Freight Street. 

Repairing crossing at foot of Freight street 

Railroad Street. 

General repairs .... 

Garvin's Falls Road. 

Cutting bushes .... 

Wyatt's Road. 

Putting in plank culvert near lower bridge 



Ward Nine. 
Perkins Street. 

Paving gutter from Bradley street sidewalk . 
Grading ........ 

Building gravel walk, south side, between Rumford 
and Bradley streets ..... 

Wyman Street. 

Top coating sidewalk ..... 

Paving gutter, south side, west from Rumford street 

Little Pond Road. 

Repairing near club house 

General repairs 

Repairing between Auburn and head of Penacook 
Lake .... 

Repairing near John .Jordan's 
Penacook Street. 

Removing clay 

General repairs, Ward 9 . 

Repairing sidewalk, south side, near State street 

Removing fallen tree, Ward 9 . 



$2.40 
4.33 
3.00 
15.96 
25.11 
79.46 

13.27 
2.93 

11.40 
3.60 



$36.76 
76.95 

22.33 

1.60 

14.00 

9.53 

23.98 

23.96 
1.47 

30.34 
9.85 
2.83 
1.27 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



261 



North Main Street. 

General repairs, Ward 5 . 

Repairs, concrete crossing Main and Park streets 

Wards 

Repairs, concrete crossing Main and Centre streets 

Ward 5 ..... . 

Patching concrete, Chase, Brown and Jones 

blocks. Ward 5 . 
Repairing block paving west side of Depot street 
Repairing paving between Main and School streets 
G-eueral repairs. Ward 4 . 
Repairs, concrete. Ward 5 . . . 

Putting in flagging, Hall's Court, Ward 4 . 
Repairs, concrete crossing Hall's Court 
Re-laying block paving off Opera House, Ward 5 
Patching sidewalk. North Main street near Wm 

Fiske's ...... 

Repairing sidewalk at Pleasant street . 
Repairs, concrete sidewalk. Ward 4 . 
New concrete sidewalk, Ward 4 
RuMFORD Street. 

General repairs. Ward 9 .... 

Paving gutter between Highland and Church 

streets, Ward 9 . 
Banking sidewalk between Church and Wyman 

streets. Ward 9 . 
Grading from Washington to Abbott streets 

Ward 4 

Removing fallen tree off old crusher. Ward 9 
Paving gutter south of Centre street, Ward 5 
Paving gutter south of Short street, Ward 5 
Repairing sidewalk between Franklin and High 

land streets, Ward 9 . . . . 

New concrete crossing. Blossom Hill cemetery 

Ward 9 

New concrete crossing, Rumford and Short streets 

Ward 5 

Repairs, concrete sidewalk opposite No. 4 . 



$1.80 

3.90 

3.92 

2.00 

2.30 

.96 

2.00 

196.16 

6.32 

13.86 

.78 

.80 

.56 

47.63 

41.91 

14.74 

54.77 

12.46 

110.63 

.33 

19.26 

16.02 

2.83 

38.32 

13.24 
16.34 



262 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Biuldins gravel walk east side from Perkins street, 

Ward 9 S23.18 

Repairing driveway between Albin and Highland 

streets . . . . . . . 3.11 

General repairs, Ward 4 . . . . . 30.45 

General repairs ...... 59.95 

Church Street. 

General repairs, Ward 9 . . . . . .99 

Paving gutter from Bradley street east, Ward 9 . 26.15 

New concrete sidewalk, C. C. Schoolcraft . . 37.51 

Re-laying gutter at Bradley street . . . 4.43 

General repairs. Ward 4 . . . . . 8.85 

South Main Street. 

Repairing gutter, Acquilla building. Ward 6 . .90 

General repairs. Ward 6 . . . . . 8.64 

Repairing banking. Ward 6 . . . . 1.13 

Patching with gravel near West street, Ward 7 . 11.26 

Removing trees, Ward 7 . . . . . 10.57 

Setting edgestone, G. B. Whittredge's, Ward 7 . 14.42 
North State Street. 

General repairs. Ward 9 . . . . . 103.37 

Repairs, Ward 4, Walker street , . . .59 
Removing shade trees. Dr. Chesley's flat. Ward 4 11.16 
Repairs, concrete, Chesley's flat . . . 16.05 
Building sidewalk. No. 185 to junction of Rum- 
ford street and Blossom Hill, for concrete . 71.49 
New concrete, No. 185 to junction of Rumford 

street 130.50 

Building sidewalk off' prison .... 59.98 

Repairs, concrete, B. E. Badger . . . 3.19 
Repairing sidewalk, North State and Walker 

streets ....... 2.83 

Patching, Ward 4 28.28 

Patching, Ward 9 73.25 

Top coating side valk, Foster street to city water 

works . . . . . . . . 13.27 

Repairing sidewalk between Granite avenue and 

Oliver Racine's residence .... 35.57 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



263 



Highland Street. 

Paving gutter opposite Jackson street, Ward 9 
Repairing, corner of Jackson street 
Repairing banking, corner of Highland street 
Paving gutter, corner Jackson towards Rumfoi 
street ....... 

Walker Street. 

Repairing sidewalk .... 

General repairs. Ward 4 . 

General repairs. Ward 9 . 
Centre Street. 

General repairs. Wards 4 and 5 

Building gravel walk. Ward 4 . 

Removing shade trees, Centre and North Main 
streets ..... 

Removing shade trees between Green and State 
streets ..... 

Building drivebridge, Caledonia house 

Repairing sidewalk west of High street 
Bradley Street. 

General repairs. Ward 9 . 

Paving gutter, east side, opposite Highland street 
Ward 4 

Repairing sidewalk off Swedish church 
Ferry Street. 

Removing fallen tree, Ward 4 . 

Building sidewalk. Ward 8 

General repairs .... 

South Street. 

General repairs, Ward 7 . 

General repairs. Ward 7 . 

Patching from Thompson to Monroe streets 
Ward 6 

Patching at Thorndike street, Ward 6 

Putting in driveboxes, Nos. 72 and 60 

Repairing plank walk 



$10.63 
1.67 
3.88 

15.28 



1 


23 


12 


58 


5 


00 


72 


43 


14 


18 



9.49 

3.38 

.40 

1.80 

6.90 

31.55 
1.13 

4.49 
11.25 
20.31 

13.26 

48.07 

30.05 

22.38 

4.48 

2.38 



264 . 



CITY OV CONCORD. 



Repairing concrete, north from Tliorudike street on 

west side ...... 

Grading sidewalk for concrete, corner Clinton 

street ....... 

Drawing and setting corner stone, corner Monroe 

street ....... 

Grading south of Pillsbury street, Ward 7 . 
New concrete, corner of Clinton street 
New concrete crossings, corner of Clinton street 
Removing tree, south of Bushey's farm 
Re-building culvert ..... 

Re-laying gutter ..... 

Repairs, concrete crossing, Thompson and South 

streets, Ward 6 . 
Removing trees, south of Laurel street. Ward 6 
Trimming trees sovith of Laurel street. Ward 
Patching betw.een West and Bow streets 
Removing tree, Harriman's 
Repairing railing near Wheeler's Corner " . 
Patching conci-ete ..... 
Building driveway, corner of Thorndike street 
Building gravel crossing across Noyes street 
Filling oiF Bow street, and drawing stone for 

rubble. Ward 7 . 
Building crossing across Humphrey street. Ward 7 
Franklin Street. 

General repairs. Ward 9 . 
Grading between State and Bradley streets . 
Paving gutter. Ward 9 . . . . 

Paving gutter. Ward 4 . . . . 

Repairing sidewalk, west from Rumiord street 

Ward 9 

Repairs, concrete sidewalk, No. 42 
Banking sidewalk ..... 
Auburn Street. 

General repairs. Ward 9 . 

Re-laying cobble gutter, Waid 4 

Paving gutter, west side of Heath's, Ward 4 



$30.75 

.57 

3.85 

209.(31 

52. G5 

20.58 

3.31 

213.21 

3.83 

14.40 
5.71 
1.47 

10.20 
5.76 
3.67 
1.50 
4.19 

(;.47 

18.95 
2.30 

24.44 
136.86 

39.39 
143.20 

7.60' 

1.11 

3.60 

7.70 

7.55 

17.99 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMKNT. 



265 



South State Street. 

General repairs, AVards 5 and G . . . $7.93 

Repairs, macadam, AVard G . . . . 1.13 

Repairs, concrete. Ward G . . . . 26.20 
Top coating sidewalk, junction of Turnpike street. 

Ward 7 1.70 

Top coating sidewalk, from Harrison sti-eet, north 4.36 

Filling gutter, Ward 7 . . . . . 3.73 

General. repairs, AVard 7 . . . . 13.01 
North Spring Street. 

General repairs, Ward 4 . . . . . 7.70 
Re-laying cobble gutter between AVashington and 

Cambridge streets, AVard 4 . . . . .5.00 
Paving gutter between AA^ashington and Cambridge 

streets 30.60 

Building drive-bridge No. 87 . . . . 1.73 
Removing trees at Centre and Pleasant streets, at 

AA^ard's 9.18 

Pleasant Street. 

General repairs, AVard 6 . . . . . 21.93 

Re-laying cobble gutter near South street, AVard 6 4.15 
Trimming shade tree between Pine and Liberty 

streets, AVard 6 1.13 

Repairs, concrete sidewalk .... 55.46 
Repairs, concrete crossing, Pleasant and Main 

streets ....... 7.30 

Grading Pleasant street hill. Ward 5 . . . 2.83 

Patching concrete . . . . . . 3.00 

General repairs. Ward 7 .... 4.72 

Re-laying cobble gutter near Main street, AA'^ard 5 4.13 
Re-laying cobble gutter, corner Pleasant and Main 

streets. Ward 5 . . . . • . 10.00 

General repairs, AVard 5 . . . . . 20.17 



•266 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Concord, N. II., January 9, I'JOO. 

Below is a detailed statement of the cost of Pleasant street, in 
the city of Concord, state of New Hampsliire. 



Width of stone bed 

Depth of stone bed 

Length of stone bed 

6,933 square yards macadam 

Earth excavation 

Drains, 2,961 linear feet 

Cobble gutters, 782 square yards 

Sidewalks, 2,733 feet long, 6 feet wide 

Loaming slopes . 

Culverts 

Bank wall . 

Supplies 

Fences 

Blacksmithing 

Watchman . 

Total 

Sum paid by Mrs. Mary B. G. Eddy 



733 feet, or 



20 and 30 feet 
7 inches 
5176 miles 
$4,424.93 
4,170.91 
1,894.27 
341.01 
140.27 
443.49 
16.15 
21.20 
457.18 
1.50 
17.84 
139.86 



$12,068.61 
8,000.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



267 



Below is a list of the money paid to the city treasurer for 
crushed stone, concrete, paving, etc. 



Concrete. 








J. E. Hutchinson $17.14 


Benjamin French 








13.34 


E. B. Hutchinson 








52.53 


Peter Batchelder 








17.56 


Thomas Farrand 








37.58 


Maria Putnam . 








13.72 


Walter Jenkins . 








11.70 


Mrs. E. E. Chandler . 








53.76 


Mrs. S. H. Edmunds . 








51.21 


R. E. Kimball . 








6.38 


Mrs. G. H. Hammond 








6.70 


Mrs. Thompson . 








.88 


S. S. Kimball . 








6.43 


G. A. Foster . 








28.81 


Mrs. A. C. Ferrin 








20.35 


T. W. Williams 








5.09 


S. W. Emerson . 








9.19 


J. F. Mooney . 








10.15 


A. Clark .... 








73.07 


A. D. Fosgate . 








20.72 


H. W. Ranlet . 








9.95 


C. H. Sanders . 








66.46 


J. M. Fletcher . 








9.09 


Mrs. D. G. Foley 








6.66 


J. E. Pecker 








2.91 


Mrs. Godfrey . 








20.59 


J. C. Farrand and F. G. Chandle 


r 






25.18 


C. C. Schoolcraft 








16.88 


A. J. Thurston . 








23.15 


Crockett heirs 








17.56 


J. R. H. Davis . 








8.95 


C. T. Langley . 








9.14 



268 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



W. H. Reed . 
F. A. Abbott . 
J. E. Hutchinson 
D. "T. Twoomey 
F. A. Sanborn . 
J. S. Button 
Mrs. N. W. Burke 



$7.70 
11.30 

8.04 
11.03 

6.96 
11.63 

8.95 



Crushed Stone, Paving, etc 

E. G. Brown, crushed stone 
D. Morrison, leather hose . 
Labor .... 

City Water Works, paving . 
New Hampshire Asylum, crushed stone 
State camp ground, sprinkling 
James Rowell, crushed stone 
James Adams, crushed stone 
Samuel C. Eastman, gravel 
George L. Theobald, crushed stone 
Fellows & Sons, crushed stone 
Labor, sewer account . 
George Chesley, sand 
J. G. Mann, street cleanings 
N. P^. Telephone & Telegraph Co., paving 
N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co., crushed stone 
John Coburn, crushed stone 
Concord Foundry Co., scrap iron 
Concord Light & Power Co., crushed stone 
Joseph Stickuey, ashes 
.N. H. Spinning Co., gravel 



$738.44 



$1.00 
5.60 
2.62 

58.70 

40.50 

18.19 
6.00 
2.00 
8.60 
2.00 

45.00 
5.98 
3.00 

46.50 

3.00 

196.55 

10.00 
1.87 
7.00 
2.70 
2.80 



$469.61 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



269 



There remains unpaid the following amount for concrete and 
crushed stone for the year 1899 : 



Concrete .... 




$16.75 


Crushed stone 


8.00 


Unpaid bills for concrete previous 


to 1899 . . 302.91 


Appropriation 


. $36,400.00 


Amount expended 


. 34,744.61 


Paid as follows : 


• 


Blacksmithing . 


$214.43 


Brick, sand and cement 




202.73 


Carpentry and lumber 




631.85 


Coal .... 




35.01 


Curbing, crossings and concrete 




2,824.18 


Gas 




.30 


Grain .... 




497.08 


Stone, grout, etc. 




87.62 


Gravel .... 




541.34 


Hardware .... 




31.33 


Harness and repairs 




136.49 


Hay and straw . 




375.47 


Labor .... 




26,560.60 


Miscellaneous claims . 




248.39 


Plumbing .... 




80.31 


Powder, fuse and dynamite . 




22.20 


General repairs . 




1,689.97 


Castings .... 




211.93 


Water .... 




265.00 


Veterinary surgeon and medicine 




21.75 


Unpaid bills of 1898 . 




66.63 


Total. 




$34,744.61 



270 



CITY OF CUKCOKU, 



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HIGHWAY DEFAKTMENT. 



271 



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272 



CITY OK CONCOlil). 



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HIGHWAY DEPART3IENT. 



273 



REPAIRS ON CONCRETE CROSSINGS. 





LOCATIONS. 


Yards of Con- 
crete. 






STREET. 


40 cts. 


50 cts. 


70 cts. 


13 


Cost. 


School 

Warren 

South 


School and Warren 


14.94 

15.29 

36. 

30.6 

63.36 

27.5 

17.94 






5 
5 
6 

1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 


$5 98 


At Fremont 






6 12 


Thomnson and Sonth 






14 40 


Main Main and Charles 






12 24 


Main 






25 34 


Main West Can.al 






11 00 


Main 

Concord 

Elm 


Merrimack avenue 






7.17 


Concord and Spring 




4.42 


3 09 






1.2 


60 


Pleasant 


Pleasant and Main 


18.26 
9.75 
9 80 

34.65 


7 30 


Main 


Main and Park 






5 
5 

4 


3 90 


Main 


Between Main and Center. 
Hall's 






3 92 


North Main... 






13 86 













274 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



STREETS GRADED. 



STREET. 


LOCATIONS. 


is 

-2 


CD 

® 

.S'c 


4.3 
1 


'a 


o 


Perry avenue. 
Thorn dike . .. 
Clinton 


Betw'n Washington and Center 

Between South and Pierce 

Near Fruit 


Gravel 

Sod. 
Gravel 


4 
6 
7 
10 
8 
6 
6 
4 
3 
6 
4 
8 
8 
6 
6 
7 
8 
C 
4 


442x10 
300x17 
550x26 
050x18 
579x22 
300x26 
750x32 
215x24 
182X11 
177x14 
500x15 
400X23 
895x18 
607x22 
472x17 
465x28 
400x20 
100x12 
225X18 


4 
6 
6&7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
6 
5 
4 
9 
7 
2 

6 
4 

4 
8 
7 
8 


$35.88 

93.38 

231 59 




From Clinton to South 


147.07 


South 


From Bow street south 


269 61 






210.56 


Pillsbury 


From Turnpike west 

From South to Spring 


372.00 
66 84 


Short 

Jackson 

Perkins 

Broadway 

E Penacook.. 


From Rumford to Hunting-ton.. 

From Franklin to Ti-emont 

Between Rumford and Bradley. 
So. from Pillsbury, E. side track 


13.03 

36.67 

76.95 

298.44 

196.02 




From South to Grove 


178 81 


Rum ford 

Franklin 

Pembroke rd. 
Turnpike 


From Abbott to Washing-ton.. .. 

Between Bradley and State 

Top of Glover Hill to Plains. . . . 
0pp. brick yd., near Bow line. . . 
Top of Glover Hill 


110.63 
136. 86 
57.97 
15 21 

88.77 









HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



275 



COBBLE GUTTERS. 



STREET. 



LOCATIONS. 





« 








c3 










j5 


D" 


• fH 




1^ 




1-1 


< 



Wymau 

Concord 

Bradley 

Chiirch 

Highland 

Jackson 

Jackson 

Tremont 

Auburn 

Allison 

Perkins 

Chapel 

Ruml'ord 

Highland 

Franklin 

Rumford 

Beacon 

Rumford 

Tremont 

School 

Downing 

West 

Franklin 

Perry 

North Spring. 

Monroe 

Winter 



South side 

Soutli to Spring 

East sidr, opp. Highland, to Church 

From liradley east 

Opposite Jackson 

Between Highland and Church 

Between Tremont and Beacon 

From Jackson street east 

Opposite No. 5 

Badger to Mills 

From Bradley street sidewalk 



From Center street south 

Corner Jackson, towards Rumford. 

Between Rumford and Charles 

From Short street south 

Corner State street ; 

Between fliuiilaiid and Church ...-. 

Between Uuuit'nrd and Lyndon 

North side for crossing 

East from South 

East from Dakin 



Betw'n Washington and Cambridge 
North and south sides 



9 


126 


6 


, 450 


4 


304 


4 


252 


9 


150 


9 


520 


4 


564 


4- 


121 


4 


124 


7 


215 


9 


353 


4 


203 


5 


190 


9 


66 


9 


270 


5 


163 


4 


121 


9 


228 


4 


226 


.5 


541 


6 


267 


7 


124 


4 


1075 


4 


664 


4 


100 


6 


1250 


4 


56 



56 
200 
135^ 
112 

661 
23U 
250g 

53g 

551 

951 

1561 

905 

S4j 

29^ 

120 

811 

531 

lOlg 

lOOj 

2401 

1181 

55i 

477J 

221i 

44-1 

5551 

18| 



$ 14.90 
51.11 
31.55 
26.15 
10. 63 
71.91 
70.44 
9.53 
17.99 
24. 8G 
.36.76 
30.98 
19.26 
15.28 
39.39 
16 02 
17.26 
54.77 
30 42 
82.45 
46.38 
19.51 

143. 20 
53.25 
30.60 

164. 78 
7.80 



Cobble Gutters Relaid. 



Auburn 


West side 


4 
5 
4 
6 


50 
182 
100 
187 


221 
801 
44i 
62f 


$ 7.55 


Short 


North side 


14 22 


North Spring. 
Oak 


Betw'n Washington and Cambridge 
South side 


5 00 
16.43 









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Frye's Mill... 


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rr-. 00 



CITY ENGINEER. 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



Office of the City Engineer, 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1S99. 

To the City Coiincil : 

The undersigned herewith submits the annual report of the 
Engineering and Sewer Departments for the year ending 
December 31, 1899. 

Bridges. 

The Main street bridge and the Twin bridge, in Penacook, 
were completed, and a certificate issued February 3, 1S99, 
over four months hiter than the time specified for com- 
pletion in the contract. The amount paid for the entire work 
was $8, 100. The cost of each structure cannot be given, as 
the price paid covered the cost of all labor and materials for 
both bridges. The expenditures attending this work, outside 
the contract with the bridge company, will be found in the 
report of the Commissioner of Highways. Your engineer 
would recommend that any future bridge construction be 
taken from plans furnished by the city, and not from plans 
furnished by the contractors. 

An examination of the bridges built upon city plans and 
those built upon plans furnished by the contractors, will, in 
my opinion, sustain the recommendation. The Main street 



CITY ENGINEER. 279 

bridge was not, as has been stated by some parties, built to 
accommcjdate the street railway. The bridge was not designed 
to carrv the load that street railway service would bring upon 
it. No extras were allowed on this work, although the con- 
tractors claimed some $300 for a set of new pins furnished for 
the Twin bridge. Upon taking down the old bridge on the 
Main street site, examination revealed the fact that the old pins 
were not suitable to be used again, and new pins were 
ordered, which was in strict accordance with the terms of the 
agreement made with the contractors. By shortening the old 
bridge about 40 feet, the introduction of a new floor system, 
and a new overhead lateral system, a bridge suitable for the 
Twin site was made, which, barring accident, should do good 
service for manv vears. The work was done under contract 
with the Wrought Iron Bridge Co., of Canton, O., who 
were the original builders of the Main street bridge. 

Engineer's Office and Work. 

The general survey of the city has been advanced, so far as 
we were able to devote time to it, the past season. The ter- 
ritorv from Bow line on the south to the Horse Hill bridge on 
the north, and the Hopkinton line on the west, has been cov- 
ered, and with the exception of that portion lying north- 
westerly from the Horse Hill bridge, the entire westerly side 
of the citv has been surveved. 

The reduction of the appropriation for this department 
made it necessary for us to drop this work in the fall, at a 
season when we could have advanced more rapidly. We 
hope that the appropriation for this department, for the com- 
ing season, may be somewhat increased over the last one. 

It would be of advantage to the different departments to 
have a complete map of the city, but without a special ap- 
propriation for this work to enable us to put a partv in the 
field for this work alone, we cannot complete the remaining 
portions, on the easterly and westerly sides of the city, for 
some time. 



280 



CITY OF CONCOKI). 



The work for all departments has been attended to as rap- 
idly as possible,^ and so far as known no work requiring 
immediate attention has been left unfinished. 

The removal of the office of this department to. the city 
building has been of benefit to us in increased space, and the 
saving of nine months' rent to the cit}^ 

The assistants employed the past season were : Fi'ank VV. 
Brown, principal assistant; Fred W. Lang, transitman ; 
Charles H. Chandler, rodman ; who have cheerfully and 
thoroughly executed the work assigned to them. 

The expenses of this department have been as follows : 



Paid for salaries ..... 


• $2,367.50 


supplies ..... 


98-55 


repairs ...... 


1S.20 


livery bill ..... 


103.00 


car fares and incidentals 


78.95 


rent ...... 


51.00 


Total 


. $2,717.30 


Appropriation ...... 


2,701.00 


Overdrawn ...... 


$16.20 



I wish to express to the mayor and the city council my 
appreciation for their support and advice during the past 
season. 

Seweks. 

With the exception of a break in the twenty-inch outlet 
near Larkin's store no unusual expenses have attended the 
repairs and maintenance of the sewer system. A statement of 
the cost of new work and the amount expended for repairs 
and general maintenance will be found upon the following 
pages. 

There is no doubt, in my mind, that the adoption of the 
state law in regard to plumbing and regulations for the same, 
will result in direct benefits to the public as well as to the 
plumbers. With an inspector capable of making a thorough 



CITY ENGINEER. 281 

inspection of old and new work, we shall be relieved, in many 
cases, of complaints as to improper construction, open joints 
and generally bad systems of house plumbing, and the serious 
results arising therefrom. 

While your engineer recognizes the fact that there are 
differences in opinions among sanitary engineers and plumb- 
ers regarding the proper ventilation of sewers and their con- 
nections, we can only follow closely the best results of 
years of experience in cities where they are in search of, and 
adopt, the best methods and secure the best results. 

Your engineer would recommend the abolishment of the 
running-trap, generally found outside the building, in our 
house sewers. In my opinion an open pipe from the street 
sewer to a point above the roof, of undiminished size, with all 
connections trapped outside the line of this pipe, will give 
relief from back pressure of sewer gases, as when the sewers 
are suddenly filled from showers, and afibrd an unobstructed 
avenue of escape for any and all gases generated in the sewer 
system. It would also remove one of the common causes of 
stoppages in house drains. There are sometimes cases where 
a running-trap might be required, but they are largely in the 
minority. If the method of open connections was adopted in 
this city, it would ventilate the sewer system to a great extent. 

At present we have some complaints of foul odors and 
escaping gases from a few catch-basins. This must be 
expected, as very few open connections are found to exist, 
and these basins, if traps are not tight, are the only openings 
through which the accumulated gases can escape. 

Streets Laid Out. 

Dolan street. West Concord. 

Dunklee street. 

Robinson street, on the Plains. 

Changes In Street Lines. 
Pleasant street, near the home of Mrs. M. B. G. Eddy. 



282 city of concord. 

Grades Established. 

North sidewalk, Wanen street from High street, easterly, 

90.5 feet. 
East sidewalk, High street from Warren street, northerly, 

100 feet. 
East sidewalk, Pine street, opposite the premises of B. 

French. 
High street, from School street to Centre street. 
East sidewalk, High street from School street to Centre 

street. 
Centre street, from High street to Pine street. 
South sidewalk. Centre street from High street to Pine street. 
North sidewalk. School street from High street, easterly, 337 

feet. 
School street, from High street, easterly, 337 feet. 
Pleasant street, from Fruit street, westerly, 2,775 f'^^t. 
West and soutlierly sidewalk, Avon street from Clinton street 

to South street. 
South sidewalk, West street from Badger street, easterly, 

130.7 feet. 
South sidewalk, Tremont street, opposite the premises of A. 

D. Fosgate, 72 feet. 
West sidewalk. South street, southerh- from G. W. Brown's 

south line, 123 feet. 
East sidewalk. North Main street, opposite the residence of 

Mrs. Godfrey. 
West sidewalk, North State street from a point loS feet, 

northerly, from Waverly street to Rimiford street. 
North sidewalk, Allison street from Dakin street to Mills 

street. 
West sidewalk, Lyndon street from Charles Lynam's north- 
erly line, noith, 100.6 feet. 
South sidewalk. Church street from North State street, east- 
erly, 107 feet. 
North sidewalk, Centre street from Washington street, 

easterly. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



•283 



Both sidewalks, Chestnut court. 

South sidewalk, Perkins street. 

North sidewalk, School street from High street, westerly, 

391 feet. 
North sidewalk. Downing street from Pierce stieet to South 

street. 
South sidewalk. Chapel street, opposite the double tenement 

house of John H. Pearson. 
South sidewalk. Summer street (Penacook) from High street, 

westerly, 150 feet. 
North sidewalk, Elm street (Penacook) west from Webster 

place, 151.35 feet. 
West sidewalk, Webster place from Elm street, northerly, 

206.4 f*^^^- 
Clarke street (West Concord). 

Cost of Sewer Work, 1S99. 

BROADWAY, SOUTH PROM CARTER STREET. 

245 feet of 1 3-inch Akron pipe, 1S3 feet of lo-inch Akron 
pipe; total, 438 feet. 



Paid for labor 










$205.20 


pipe . 
brick 










109.33 

10.13 


cement 
castings 
wrought iron . 










5-90 

8.84 

.68 


trucking 
hardware 










11-35 
.40 


oil . . ' 
tools 










•50 
14.56 



Average cost per foot, $0,856. 
Material excavated, sand. 



$366.78 



J84 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



RUMFORD STREET, SOUTH FROM WALKER STREET. 

200 feet of ID-inch Akron pipe. 
Paid for labor $49-25 



pipe . 

brick 

cement 

trucking 

oil 

tools 



46.49 

6-75 

7-51 

14.00 

•45 
5-H 



$129.59 



Average cost per foot, $0,589. 
Material excavated, gravel. 

NORTH STATE STREET, BLO\A'-OFF AT PICKLE FACTORY. 



54 feet of 6-inch Akron pipe. 
Paid for labor 

pipe . 



Average cost per foot, $0,378. 



$15-57 
4.86 

$20.43 



CLINTON STREET, WEST FROM HARVARD STREET. 

470 feet of 1 8-inch Akron pipe. 



labor 










$1,168.43 


pipe . 










215-47 


brick . 










27.00 


cement 










17.70 


castings 










15-57 


wrought iron 










1-13 


trucking 










47.92 


oil . ■ . 










3.20 


tools 










62.05 


jute packing . 










7.28 



$1,565-75 



Average cost per foot, $3,331. 

Material excavated, running sand with water. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



285 



TURNPIKE STREET, SOUTH FROM 38-INCH OUTLET. 

Paid for labor ....... $6.45 

WARRENSTONE STREET, WEST FROM BROADWAY. 

306 feet of lo-inch Akron pipe. 



Paid for labor 
pipe 
cement 
tools 



$72.90 

56.33 

1. 18 

5-34 

$135.64 



Average cost per foot, $0,443. 
Material excavated, sand. 

PLEASANT STREET, WEST FROM MINOT STREET. 

1,714 feet of 8-inch Akron pipe, 540 feet of 6-inch Akron 
pipe; total, 3,254 feet. 



id for labor 










• $1 '335-49 


pipe . 










268.20 


brick 










74-25 


cement 










33-04 


castings 










71.07 


wrought iron 










3.01 


trucking 










36.95 


sand 










6.25 


hardware 










6.86 


blacksmithing 










53-38 


oil 










2.70 


tools 










78.54 



$1,969.74 

Average cost per foot, $0,873. 

Material excavated, hard pan and sand. 

The cost of this work was materially increased by the lay- 
ing of branches, for future house connections, to clear the 
macadam roadway, and the careful back-filling and ramming. 



286 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Repairs. 



Beacon street 
Bowery avenue . 
Bradley street 
Waverly street . 
Warren street 
North State street 
Tremont street . 
Outlet, third division 
Downing street . 
20-inch outlet 
North Spring street 
Granite avenue . 
Rollins court 
Academy street . 
East of Main street 
Flashing . 

Total repairs 



New Work. 



Broadway . 
Rumford street . 
North State street 
Clinton street 
Turnpike street . 
Warrenstone street 
Pleasant street . 

Repairs 

Total expenditure 

Less, pipe from city shed 

Total expenditure 

Appropriation 
Amoimt expended 



Unexpended balance, December 31, 1899 



$366.78 

129.59 

20.43 

1,565.75 

6.45 

135.64 

1,969.74 



$3.50 

.50 

3.84 

4.80 

10.82 

37.05 

7.00 

1.38 

.75 

411.89 

1.40 

5.12 

.70 

1.00 

23.68 

284.77 

$798.20 



$4,194.38 
798.20 

$4,992.58 
10.76 

$4,981.82 

$5,000.00 
4,981.82 

$118.28 



CITY ENGINEER. 



287 



Sewers Built, 1899. 



6-inch pipe, house branches and blow-off 


. 594 feet. 


8- " 


. 1,714 " 


10- " 


709 " 


12- - " 


245 " 


18- " 


470 " 


Total 


. 3,732 feet. 



Sewers built in City Precinct to December 31, 1899. 



8- 


inch pipe 




10- 


i i 


. 


12- 


a 




15- 


i i 




18- 


a 




20- 


I i 




24- 


i i 




30- 


i i 




Bri 


ck, 12-inc 


li X 14-inch 




' 16- " 


X 24- " 




' 14- " 


X 22- '' 




' 20- " 


X 32- " 




. 24- " 


X 36- " 




' 28- '' 


x48- " 




' 24- " 


circular 




' 30- " 


a 




' 38- " 


u 


24- 


inch cast-i 


ron pipe 


30- 


inch cast-i 


ron pipe 



Total 



22,949 


feet. 


45,023 




38,124 




10,627 




6,204 




3,434 




1,749 




969 




2,758 




1,848 




350 




2,527 




17,937 




883 




1,515.£ 


" 


402 




4,080 




1,576 




l,054.c 


) " 


164,010 feet 



Total miles in city precinct to date, 31.063. 

Above amount does not include house branches or blow-off. 



West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

The work in this precinct, during the past season, consisted 
in flushing the entire system at a cost of $9.88. 



288 city of concord. 

East Concord Sewer Precinct. . 

No extensions were buik in this precinct. The system was 
thoroughly flushed with the assistance of the hand engine at a 
cost ofSl4.50. 

There has been deposited, to the credit of the city, the sum of 
$29.50, for which amount I hold the receipts of the city 
treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the City Council: 

The trustees of the Public Library submit herewith the 
report of the Hbrarian, which describes at some length, and 
with interesting detail, the work of the past year and renders 
any extended statement by the board unnecessary. 

In the years 1 89 1-94 the annual appropriation for the 
library was $6,000; in 1895 it was $6,500; and in 1896, 
$6,000. The trustees in their annual reports, prepared by 
Judge Foster, the president of the board, who knew 
thoroughly the needs of the library and had the deserved 
confidence of the city council, alluded to these appropriations 
as liberal and earnestly recommended their continuance for 
" the maintenance and prosperity of an institution which has 
become indispensable to the welfare of our people," and 
characterized them as " investments which are sure to return 
large profits in the way of higher education of the people 
and their mental and moral development." Reports, 1894- 
1896. In 1897 the trustees of the library, in view of the 
increased burdens of public taxation, recommended through 
Mr. Charles H. Sanders, one of their number, then also a 
member of your honorable body, that the appropriation be 
reduced to $5,500, as an economical, not liberal, expenditure 
for the support of the library during the year, and that 
amount was granted. In 1898, the trustees recommended the 
same appropriation, but the city council, unwisely, as we 
thought, reduced still further the amount to $5,000, and in 
1899 the appropriation shrank to $4,700. Of this last sum 

19 



290 CITY OF CONCORD. 

only $676.83 has been available for the purchase of books. 
During the past year the circulation of our library was 
90,161 books. The circulation of the Dover Public Library 
during the same period was 71^269. Yet the Dover libraiy, 
in 189S (its statement for 1899 is not at hand), expended for 
books the sum of $881.75, or nearly twice the sum we have 
used for the same purpose when proportioned to the relative 
circulation. It is evident that a continuance of this extreme 
economy vvill result in the serious deterioration of our 
library, and this deterioration will soonest afiect its most 
useful departments, for scientific books, books of research, 
works of reference, and similar publications are expensive 
and if not well abreast the times are almost worthless. In 
view of this situation a committee of the trustees, consisting 
of Messrs. Sanders, Hill and Mitchell, has been appointed to 
confer with your finance committee touching the matter. 

In this connection we would say that the affairs of the 
library have been economically administered, and in other 
respects the management of the institution has our entire 
approval. The only merit we can claim in that regard is our 
uniform support of the librarian in her efforts to shape its 
policv as best to meet the varied wants of all the patrons. 
We also commend the faithfulness of the assistants, and we 
are confident that the public have found their helpfulness and 
tact unfailing. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, 
JOHN E. FRYE, 
PAUL R. HOLDEN, 
JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
AMOS J. SHURTLEFF, 
JAMES S. NORRIS, 
WILLIAM W. FLINT, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
MOSES H. BRADLEY, 

Trustees. 
Concord, February 3, 1900. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 

1899. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public 
Library : 

Gentlemen : — It is a pleasure to report a gain in both the 
quantity and the quality of our circulation the past year. 
We have given out more books and better books. Our per 
centage of fiction reading now compares favorably with tliat of 
the majority of libraries: for instance, our per centage is 7S ; 
in Salem, a cultivated old town, with an admirably equipped 
library, it is 82^ per cent. 

At the delivery desk alone, we gave out in 1S99 over 
90,000 books, more than are given out in cities the size of 
Manchester and Portland. Large as this figure is, it repre- 
sents but a small part of the library's usefulness, for as the 
Minneapolis city librarian says : 

"It is only the lighter and cheaper part of our books 
loaned at the desk. Great injustice is done when account is 
not taken of the books consulted within the library. One 
consultation by a teacher, a preacher, or an author, of a 
weighty work in science, history or philosophy — a consulta- 
tion the fruits of which are to be presently communicated to 
hundreds in the school-room, in the pulpit, or in the book, 
one such consultation is worth more than a score of novel 
readings." 

It is impossible to take statistics of every book consulted 
within the building, but it has been estimated by a Chicago 
librarian that the recorded use is such a small fraction of the 
whole use of a library that the ratio is as i 13. Thus the 
good work recorded by our statistics is in reality tripled. 

We can report that out of our great number of books 
loaned, only two have been lost during 1S99. 



292 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Our reference room is freely used, mainly, at present, by 
High School pupils who can run in, even at recess, from their 
building which is so conveniently near, to consult books 
which have been laid aside for them at the request of their 
teachers ; and by the members of the art and science depart- 
ments of the Woman's club. Many ladies, by having papers 
to prepare, are just realizing the resources of the library. 

The purchase of books has been chiefly of those which 
would best meet the popular demand for pleasure and instruc- 
tion. One important purchase was the two volume " His- 
toiy of the Catholic Church in New England," and another 
the ten volume set of John L. Stoddard's lectures. The 
latter were bought with the income from Mr. P. B. Cogs- 
well's bequest. Each book bought with this money will be 
marked with a special book-plate, and at any time it can thus 
be seen where this portion of our income has gone. 

A larger yearly appropriation would help our library in 
several ways. Obviously, we could buy more good new 
books. Furthermore, we could buy more copies of a book 
all are wanting at the same time. Thirdly, "we could get 
duplicates of standard works for school use, so that when a 
teacher in East Concord is using Fiske's " History of the 
United vStates," a teacher in West Concord could use it too ; 
or so that when the literature teacher in the High School 
requires fourteen pupils to read a dozen classics during the 
term, there might be more than one copy to go the rounds. 
Fourthly, we could replace worn-out books. Says the 
Providence librarian, " After a library has passed its 
twentieth year," and our Concord one has passed its fortieth, 
" this wear and tear makes itself manifest in an ever increas- 
ing ratio, and the money needed for replacing these books is 
a most unwelcome diminution of the book fund." Some 
books circulate longer than they should. Occasionally a 
borrower tucks in a note when she returns a book, saying, 
"This book is too dirty to go out again." We know it, 
but so long as it holds together, it has to do duty. As it 
is, we discard over two hundred utterly worthless books each 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 293 

year. Fifthly, although by no means lastly, we could, with 
more funds, bind more back years of magazines for reference. 

We do not see how some libraries report the number of 
books mended. We could not count the number of times we 
Ose the paste brush. All books are examined when returned 
and mended before being put on the shelves, and thousands 
need attention ever}' month. To instance one item of the 
repairing done, 6000 old labels have been scraped oft", and as 
many clean ones put on the backs of books, in six months. 

Onlv 500 new borrowers have been registered during 
the past year ; yet the building seems fuller of patrons than 
it did, and the rooms ai-e growing small. On a recent 
Sunday afternoon I carried six chairs from our stack- 
room to the reading-room to accommodate the adults. 
Then, accompanied by two small brothers, came a little 
girl, " a simple child that lightly draws its breath," 
who said, " ' We are seven,' and mother wanted to get 
rid of some of us;" the trio were shown to the boys' 
room in the basement. Later four lads arrived, who wanted 
to go down there, and they took the remaining space in 
that small room. Meanwhile the vestibule was occupied by 
people looking at tlie Scribner exhibit of pictures. I assure 
you, to hang out the sign, " Standing room only," would 
bring more jo}- to the librarian than it would to the 
public. 

Junior work is reaching the dignity of a department in 
modern libraries, and all librarians are asking for funds to 
equip rooms specially for children ; a reading room, where, as 
they whirl over the pages of "St. Nicholas," they may not 
disturb a quiet adult, trying to get a cosmopolitan point of 
view from a foreign quarterly. And another room where the 
best juvenile literature can be arranged on open shelves, for, 
as the Pittsburgli librarian says, " Children's books ought to 
be out for them to select from. If not, they get a grown-up 
book, are disgusted, return it, leave their card, and the 
parents criticise the books their children take from the library. 
It is not possible for the loan desk attendants, at busy times, 



294 i CITY OF CONCORD. 

to examine the books and question the children " ; though 
wlien we see a small boy walking oft" with Gail Hamilton's 
"Battle of the Books" (about her quarrel with her pub-' 
lishers), we hurry after him and save him from disap- 
pointment by giving him instead, " Twenty Decisive 
Battles of the War," or some book about a real fight. 

How much it would help children to have access to ina^iy 
open shelves is proved by their constant use of the meager 
supply of books suitable for them which we can place on 
the two little ledges called the Boys' Corner and the Girls' 
Corner. 

The prevalence of contagious diseases in Concord the past 
year leads us to acknowledge the good work done by our 
city health officer. At the outbreak of any infectious 
disease in a house, he takes into his keeping all the library 
books found there, and brings them back fumigated and 
guaranteed harmless. In extreme cases, he reports them 
burned. Concord's way is better than that taken in some 
towns, where the rule is that borrowers may return their 
books themselves after getting a permit from the board of 
health, but where the practice frequently is that they slip in 
their books without getting a permit. 

In September a New England library meeting was held 
here, which was fortunate in attendance and speakers, though 
not in weather. Whatever inspiration this large conference 
may have given, the library workers in the city do not mean 
to lose, as they have formed a library club to discuss prob- 
lems and methods. 

The joining of an art club has given this library the privi- 
lege of exhibiting, from time to time, collections of pictures 
which will be attractive at first sight and interesting and 
instructive upon examination. This Library Art Club, 
started in Massachusetts, in 1S97, has now at least thirty fine 
collections to send around to its members. The Concord 
public has been kind to give expression to its enjoyment of 
the exhibits already shown. 



PCBLIC LIBRARY. 295 

As the Baltimore librarian says, " People are coming to 
think that a public library is as legitimate a branch of public 
education as a public school, and of public recreation as a 
city park." 

The hearty and conscientious cooperation of the assistants 
in the work of the library is gratefully acknowledged. 

It is interesting to note that in the Portland Public Library, 
where the circulation is no larger than here, there are seven 
regular assistants where we have three, and the trustees 
report that to carry on their library properly they should 
have annually on hand at least $12,000. Last year we had 
$4,700. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Librarian, 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Ho7ior the Mayor and the City Council : 

The boaid of health have had a year of unusual activity, 
and offer the following as a summary of the work of the sani- 
tary department during the past twelve months : 

The Plumbing Qitestion. 

The board have felt for some time that an important step 
toward better sanitary conditions would be made when plumb- 
ing was done under such regulations as would guard the 
public against inferior work and the labor of incompetent 
men. Reference has been made to this subject many times 
in the annual reports of the board, and its members have 
taken advantage of such opportunities as have been afforded 
them to work for state legislation to this end. By the state 
law of 1899, the cities were given the protection which had 
been asked for by health boards and others interested in sani- 
tary matters. By the provisions of this law the business of 
plumbing is made subject to such restrictions as will prevent 
incompetent men from engaging in it, and will secure for 
both materials and workmanship careful inspection by a com- 
petent official. Similar provisions had already been made 
by local ordinances in several cities of the state, and the 
benefits of the system had been amply demonstrated before a 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 297 

state law had made such a course compulsory on the part of 
all cities. The board regret that thus far Concord, which 
was one of the first cities in the state to employ a health 
officer and has always kept abreast with other cities in efforts 
to protect the public health, has not enjoyed the benefits 
which we are confident will attend an honest enforcement of 
the act of 1899, "authorizing the examination of plumbers, 
and regulating the practice of plumbing and house drainage." 

Assistance in Quarantine. 

An act providing for assistance to persons while in quar- 
antine became a law early in the year, and is : 

" Section i. Whenever any person or family is placed in 
quarantine bv a board of health to protect the public against 
small-pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or other dangerous infec- 
tious or contagious disease, it shall be the duty of said board 
to assist such person or family while in quai'antine, in such 
manner as in the judgment of the board may be deemed wise 
or necessary. 

"■ Section 2. All expenses thus incurred, or such part 
thereof as the board may determine, shall be deemed a legiti- 
mate expenditure for the protection of the public health, shall 
be charged to the account of incidental expenses, but not to 
any indigent or pauper account; nor shall such expenditure 
be construed to mean public aid to the person or persons so 
quarantined and assisted unless such person or persons are 
already paupers as defined by the Public Statutes. 

"Section 3. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent with 
this act are hereby repealed, and this act shall take effect 
upon its passage." 

The above act received the signature of the governor 
March II, and in the brief time this law has been in opera- 
tion, its necessity has been made manifest through the good 
we were enabled to do in relieving the pressing wants of 
those who, under ordinary circumstances, were competent to 



298 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

provide for themselves, but, when embarrassed by quaran- 
tined iUness, found it impossible to keep even with the world 
without receiving aid from the city or county. When tlie 
main and, usually, the only wage-earner of the family was 
stricken down, or compelled to remain at home to assist the 
others, or, when feasible, permitted after proper precautions to 
leave home and board outside, the income of that family was 
altogether cut oft" or appi'eciably decreased while the expenses 
were at the same time largely increased. It is in this class of 
cases the wisdom of the law stands out in all its brightness 
and guarantees kindly assistance to those who are isolated, in 
order that the greatest good to the greatest number may be 
attained. 

Scarlet Fever. 

It is well-nigh impossible to estimate in dollars and cents 
the cost of the epidemic of scarlet fever from which we suf- 
fered during the year, but we can have some adequate idea of 
it when we recall that from August 3 to December 31 there 
were reported to this office ninety-nine cases ; seventy-five of 
these represented as many dilTerent families. The loss in 
wages and the increased cost of maintenance would foot up 
to a very high figure, while the anguish of mind, pain of 
body, the isolation depriving them of converse with others, 
and, in the case of children, the prolonged absence from 
school can not have their sad features figured out on any 
financial basis. Neither can tlie loss of a life be computed 
by any such system, though attempts are made to do so, and 
we ma}' well feel thankful that out of so many cases only one 
death occurred. One thing we deeply regret, — the absence 
of a hospital for these cases. Had we in our city an institu- 
tion for the proper care of contagious diseases, we fully 
believe manv of these cases would never have happened. 
Notwithstanding the strenuous eflbrts put forth by frequent 
visitations of the health officer, re-enforccd for some time by 
a police officer patrolling the infected district, it was not pos- 
sible at home to keep them isolated oreftectually quarantined. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. , 299 

In many instances the disease was so light in its course and 
the symptoms so poorly defined that undoubtedly there yvere 
not a few unrecognized until other cases in the family or 
playmates made a diagnosis certain. This fact aided greatly 
in its spread and for a while all of our best efforts seemed in 
vain. Everything deemed necessary to stay its progress was 
resorted to, and recognizing the dangers to the children 
attending the Walker and Franklin schools, we adopted at 
our regular meeting, September 2, and immediately forwarded 
to the board of education the following resolution : 

" It is the sense of the board of health, that on account of 
the prevalence of scarlet fever in the vicinity of the Walker 
and Franklin schools, those buildings should not be opened 
until the spread of the disease is passed." 

So the opening of the school 3'ear for those two schools yvas 
postponed for four weeks. The epidemic was confined to the 
territory north of Washington street until October 14, when a 
case was reported from the previously uninfected part of the 
city, and then followed cases from all directions. Much un- 
necessary alarm was caused by exaggerated reports and 
demands made on us to close all of the schools, but the ex- 
igency did not seem to us to exist. The situation was closely 
canvassed, and, at a special meeting, Sunday, November 5, 
it was voted to close one room at the Chandler school, and 
ask a conference with the board of education qt their regular 
meeting the next evening. As a result of the conference the 
board of education adopted the following resolution: 

" That the board of education express to the board of health 
its hearty approval of the suggestion for daily inspection of 
the schools in the central part of the districts, and grant per- 
mission to the board of health and its agents to institute such 
inspection as it deems wise." 

Immediately following the conference, we assigned the fol- 
lowing physicians to make the inspections : 



300 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Tahanto school . . Dr. Ralph E. Gallincrer. 

Walker " . . Dr. A. P. Chesley. 

Franklin " . . Dr. Russell Wilkins. 

Merrimack " . . Dr. F. W. Grafton. 

Kimball " . . Dr. N. W. McMurphy. 

Bow Brook " . . Dr. Geo. H. Parker. 
Chandler and Parochial schools Dr. D. E. Sullivan. 

Rumford school . . Dr. A. K. Day. 

Penacook " . . Dr. E. A. Clark. 

Cogswell " . . Dr. vS. G. Morrill. 

Subsequently, Dr. Chancey Adams assisted in the work ; 
and to these physicians who so faithfully aided us in limiting 
the progress of this and other contagious diseases, are we 
deeply indebted. 

On Tuesday, November 7' the inspections were com- 
menced ; the visits were made early in the morning session ; 
the teachers rendered hearty co-operation ; the pupils were 
examined separately; the routine of the school work was not 
appreciably disturbed, and we know much good was ac- 
complished. We believe it was the first time in the history 
of the schools of the state that a daily systematic inspection of 
the scholars was made, and from the results we are assured 
the innovation was most beneficial, and, regardless of out- 
breaks of disease, might, with much profit, be regularly re- 
peated. 

On December 1 1, the thorough fumigation of all tiie schools 
was connnenced, the health officer being assisted by the 
janitors of the different schools ; and from basement to attic 
was the cleansing process carried out. All floors, windows, 
furniture, and surfaces that could be scrubbed were sub- 
mitted to plentiful applications of soap and water with suffi- 
cient formalin added to destroy all germs. Formalin, sprinkled 
on suspeniled sheets, was the agent used in fumigation. 

The success which attended all these efforts was due in a 
large measure to the hearty co-operation extended and valu- 
able assistance rendered by the board of education, and by 
Mr. L. J. Rundlett, superintendent of the schools of Union 
School District. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 301 

SANITARY CONDITION OF THE SCHOpLS. 

April 31, the board of education were notified of the im- 
perative necessity of immediate Improvement in the West 
Concord school, and of a desire on our part to meet them or 
their agents at an early date to confer in regard to the sanitary 
condition of that and other schools under their jurisdiction. 
Agreeably to the above we met together May lo, and after a 
lengthy and exhaustive discussion the following resolution 
was unamiously adopted : 

'•''Resolved^ That it is the sense of this conference that 
before the beginning of the next school year, such changes 
and repairs should be made at the West Concord school 
building as will remedy the existing defects in the matters of 
ventilation, danger from fire, and sanitary arrangements." 

It was also the sense of the meeting that other specific 
changes should be made in other school buildings, and during 
the summer vacation, and since then, many improvements 
have been made. 

The Manual Training and Sewing schools have discon- 
tinued their outhouses and made connection with the public 
sewer, though some further change must be made in the flush- 
ing system at the Sewing school. Jacketed stoves have been 
placed in the Plains and East Concord schools, thus allowing 
some fresh air to be introduced — an improvement on the old 
method of depending on the windows and doors. Changes 
have been made in the ventilating systems at the Walker and 
Franklin schools, and recently a radical alteration in the heat- 
ing and ventilating of the Merrimack school has been agreed 
upon. All of the buildings have undergone a general clean- 
ing-up and an application of paint and whitewash so as to 
markedly improve their physical appearance. There yet re- 
main, however, many things to be done before the buildings 
can be said to be in first-class sanitary condition, and during 
the coming year it is hoped there will be a continuation of the 
good work so promisingly commenced this summer. 



302 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COLLECTION OF GARBAGE. 

The board are satisfied that an itnprovement m the manner 
of collecting garbage about the city is one of the needs of Con- 
cord's sanitary situation at the present time. The use of 
receptacles which will protect the public from the smell and 
sight of the contents of waste barrels, and a service sufiiciently 
frequent and regular to prevent the accumulation of filth and 
decaying animal matter, will remedy the most striking defects 
in the present haphazard system of house to house garbage 
collection. In many places these improvements are brought 
about by city ordinances fixing the kinds of carts and other 
receptacles to be used, and, in some instances, prohibiting all 
but licensed collectors from engaging in the business. In a 
city of the size of Concord perhaps all the collectors who 
make the rounds at present could not afford to go the expense 
of equipping themselves with closed carts and receptacles, but 
doubtless such a number as could cover the city at intervals 
sufficiently frequent to care for all the waste of houses and in- 
stitutions would be able to meet such requirements as your 
honorable body might establish. 

Ventilation Improvements. 

We are glad to state that the ventilation of the blacksniith- 
ing department of the railroad shops at the south end has 
been improved to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. 
That the smoke in their shop was not only a nuisance but 
dangerous to the health of the employees, there was no doubt, 
but how it could be satisfactorily remedied was apparentl}'^ a 
difficult problem. Similar shops were visited and a careful 
inspection of their ventilating systems was made. Mr. 
Charles H. Wiggin, master mechanic, cheerfully rendered 
every assistance in his power, and after several experiments 
perfected a system which seems to meet every requirement. 

It affords us pleasure to record that the work of Health 
Officer Charles E. Palmer has been fully up to the high stand- 
ard of previous years. Ever ready to carry out the instruc- 
tions of tlie board and cheerfully accepting added duties, he 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 303 

has labored faithfully and well to keep Concord abreast of the 
tinnes in sanitary matters. Reference to the accompanying 
detailed report of the work done by this officer will show that 
he has been far from idle. The health officer is daily 
brought in contact with all classes and conditions of people 
in the city, and is often called upon to exercise much firm- 
ness or tact, as the case may require. That he is uniformly 
successful in performing his duties with the least amount of 
friction is no small credit to his ability. 

During the past year Dr. E. A. Clark has retired from this 
board after a continuous service of twelve years. Dr. Clark 
was a faithful and efficient public official, and gave freely of 
his time and experience that the sanitary condition of the city 
might be brought to a satisfactory standard. For the impor- 
tant improvements which have been brought about diu-ing the 
past few years he is entitled to a full share of credit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. E. SULLIVAN, M. D., 
RUSSELL WILKINS, M. D., 
EDWARD N. PEARSON. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit the following 
report of the operations of this department for the year ending 
December 31, 1899. 

The statements presentetl comprise reports upon the sani- 
tary inspection, inspection of sewers, care of contagious 
diseases, and other sanitary matters, together with a mortuary 
report of the vital statistics for the year 1S99. 

The total number of deaths for the year was 365, an increase 
over the previous year of sixty-two. This includes all that 
died at hospitals and other institutions, a large number of 
whom came here for treatment, and are eliminated from the 
death rate. 

Contagious Diseases. 

The following table shows the number of cases of conta- 
gious diseases reported during each month of the year and the 
deaths resulting therefrom : 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


MONTHS. 




i 



1 

Q 










2 

Q 


03 




xi 

Q 




3 


2 










3 










1 


1 














3 

1 

22 

es 

42 
27 
23 
21 
47 
42 










































1 










July 


2 

1 














1 


15 
26 
20 
20 
17 


1 


3 
3 
5 

1 
1 












2 

1 


2 




November 


















9 


5 


99 


1 


14 


1 


299 









Number of cases of typhoid fever reported from hospitals, 4; died, 1. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



305 



RECORD OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Total. 


Diphtheria 




3 




2 

43 

2 
124 


3 
1 

17 


1 

6 

2 

20 


2 
5 

25 


2 
3 

1 
5 


1 
41 

2 
14 


9 


Scarlet fever 


1 


99 


Typhoid fever. . 


1 
3 


87 


14 


Measles 


4 


299 







COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom, for the 
years since and including 1S90: 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Totals. 


YEARS. 






1 














• 


73 

ei 



Q 


i 



03 





to 







to 


»3 




a 


1890 


6 


2 


9 




17 


5 


6 


38 


7 


1891 


12 


3 


7 




14 


6 


2 




35 


9 


1892 


13 

48 


3 


37 

41 


3 


7 
13 


1 


2 
300 




59 
402 


7 


1893 




1894 


17 


3 


113 


6 


13 


3 


21 




164 


12 


1895 


55 


8 


4 




15 


5 


452 




526 


13 


1896 


38 


8 


44 


8 


21 


3 


158 




261 


19 


1897 


13 

4 


1 


22 
8 


1 


17 
8 


2 
4 


138 
120 




190 
146 


4 


1898 


4 


1899 


9 


5 


99 


1 


14 


1 


299 




421 


7 





20 



306 city of concord. 

Scarlet Fever. 

The outbreak of this disease about Aug^ust i, has continued 
during the remainder of the year, and has been the cause of 
some uneasiness. There were ninety-nine cases reported, 
with one death. The type was a very mild one. In many 
instances medical aid would not be called until desquamation 
had commenced, or until the occurrence of secondary cases in 
the same family ; therefore these cases were not reported 
until a large number of children had been exposed. 

Qiiarantine and isolation of cases was enforced, school- 
houses were fumigated, and every possible effort v/as made 
to check the disease. In one instance, where it was found 
impossible to establish isolation, quarantine of the entire 
home was necessary, and as a result we had ten cases in one 
family. This experience has demonstrated more strongly 
than ever before the need of some suitable building for a 
contagious disease hospital, and I trust the matter will be 
given earnest consideration. 

Diphtheria. 

As will be seen by the above table, nine cases were re- 
ported during the year, five of which proved fatal. Anti- 
toxine was used in four cases where death resulted, but was 
used too late. 

Typhoid Fever. 

Fourteen cases were reported, one proving fiital, not 
including those brought to the hospital for treatment. 

Measles. 

Two hundred and ninety-nine cases of measles were re- 
ported, but no deaths are recorded from this cause. Four 
deaths are charged to pneumonia following measles, thus 
showing the importance of strictly guarding mild cases of 
measles. 



sanitary department. 307 

, Disinfection. 

By your direction I have adopted the process of formalde- 
hyde disinfection. The method is briefly as follows: the 
rooms to be disinfected are sealed and prepared as usual for 
sulphur disinfection; all surfaces are exposed as much as 
possible; closet doors are thrown open, and their contents, 
together with the contents of drawers, are removed and 
scattered about, and drawers left open ; mattresses and pil- 
lows are spread on chairs and other objects, so as to expose 
all sides ; books are opened and leaves spread — in short, the 
contents are so exposed as to admit the free access of the gas 
to all parts as fully as possible. Upon this prepai^ation 
largely depends the thoroughness of the disinfection. For 
every thousand cubic feet of space in a room, is suspended by 
one edge an oidinar\' bed sheet from a line stretched across 
the middle of the room ; properlv sprinkled, this will carry 
without dripping five ounces of formaline, the fortv per cent, 
solution of formaldehyde, which is sufficient to disinfect one 
thousand cubic feet of space. As many sheets as are 
necessary are hung at equal distances apart. The sprinkling 
is done by means of a spray producer. When all is ready 
the disinfector sprinkles each sheet rapidlv, being careful to 
spray as evenly as possible, and no space more than once. 
The evolution of gas is so rapid that the air becomes 
irrespirable in a very short time. The room is left closed 
from twelve to twenty-four hours, after which it is opened 
up as freely as possible to light and air, and the family are 
instructed to have all wood-work well scrubbed and the 
furniture wiped over with cloths dampened with diluted 
formaline, one part formaline to twenty parts water. 

So far as we have been able to make test of the above 
method bv our bacteriologist. Dr. A. K. Dav, the result has 
been satisfactory. 

Nuisances, Complaints, Inspections. 
The number and nature of requests for inspection, com- 
plaints of existing nuisances, and those found by house 
inspection, are given in the following table : 



308 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Accumulation of decayed fruit, and coal ashes 

Bad sink drainage 

Broken sewer traps 

Catch basins not trapped 

Dead animals 

Decayed meat and fish 

Defect in house sewer . 

Dumping rubbish 

Dropping manure in the streets 

Defective plumbing 

Filthy stables 

Filthy cellars 

Filthy swill barrels 

Filthy yards . 

Filthy alleyways . 

Foul and offensive cesspools 

Keeping hogs 

Keeping hens 

Offensive manure heaps 

Offensive privy vaults . 

Odor arising from water 

Offensive odor in house 

Offensive odor from stables 

Privy vaults full 

Private sewers obstructed 

Sinks found without traps 

Sewer gas in house 

Sewerage backed into cellars 

Stagnant water on vacant lots 

Street sewers obstructed 

Sewers not properly ventilated 

Slaughter houses . 

Surface sink drains 

Throwing swill in alleyways . 

Throwing ashes in street 

Throwing slops in street 

Water closets without w^ater suppl 



21 

iS 

4 
H 
36 

3 

10 
20 

2 

H 
3 



7 
6 

3 

10 
6 

9 
34 

5 

H 
4 
15 
5 
4 
3 
6 

3 

7 
3 
5 
5 
3 
5 
4 
3 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



309 



Water closets foul and offensive 
Water closets not ventilated . 
Water closets out of repair 
Water in cellars 

Total .... 



360 



Where nuisances have existed which have been a menace 
to the public health, they have been dealt with vigorously, 
considerately, and as speedily as possible. 

House Inspection. 
House inspection has been continued in the compact por- 
tion of the city, as time would permit. The following table 
will sfive the amount of work done in this direction : 



Dwelling houses inspected 
Tenement houses inspected . 
Stores inspected . 
Stables inspected . 
Meat and fish markets inspected 
School houses inspected 
Business blocks inspected 
Alleyways inspected 
Inspection of Penacook Lake 
Inspection of reservoir . 

Total .... 



89 

1 10 

3S 

3S 

6 

^9 

31 

34 
8 

10 

"383 



Sewer Inspection. 
In compliance with a provision of city ordinances I have 
inspected eighty-two private sewers, and made the usual 
records and reports of the same. The following table shows 
the various sizes and kinds of pipes used : 

316 feet of 6-inch Akron pipe, 
4,194 feet of 5-inch Akron pipe, 
30 feet of 3-inch Akron pipe, 
424 feet of 5-inch iron pipe, 
333 feet of 4-inch iron pipe. 
A total of 5,287 feet and an average of 64 feet to each lat- 
eral sewer. 



310 



CITY OF COXCOKD. 



This amount of drainage has been furnished to the follow- 
ing classes of buildings : 



Private dwellings . 

Tenement houses . 

Business block 

Public institution (school-house) 

Stables ..... 

Market .... 

Total .... 

Water closets put in 
Privies abolished . 
Cesspools abolished 
Surface drains abolished 



35 

40 

I 

I 

4 
I 



97 
44 
30 

17 



Disposal of Waste and Garbage 

A long delayed sanitary necessity remains unprovided for 
in the city, viz., a satisfactory gathering of house garbage. 
No city of this size can be considered well taken care of, 
which makes no provision for this purpose. The present 
method of removing garbage is for any one who desires to 
engage in the business, with filthy barrels and open carts, 
often leaky and unsuitable, making doubly oflensive the odors 
-which pollute the air through every street where such vehicle 
may be driven. Suitable persons should be licensed, the 
kind of vehicle to be used for the transportation of garbage 
specified, and regular collections made under the supervision 
of the board of health. 

Public Urinals. 

I desire to call your attention to the necessity of a public 
urinal, because not only strangers but our own people are 
compelled to use the alleys, or enter some store or other place 
of business. I regard this as a necessity and think they 
should be provided. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



311 



Summary. 



Houses placarded in cases of contagious diseases 
Placards removed ....... 

Visits made to contagious diseases .... 

Rooms fumigated ....... 

Pieces of bedding and clothes burned 

Pieces of clothing disinfected at pest house 

Library and school books fumigated . . . . 

Burial permits issued ...... 

Burial permits issued to non-residents 

Transfer permits issued ...... 

Peppermint tests of plumbing made .... 

Water tests made ....... 

Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to state 

board of health ....... 

Number of monthly mortuary reports sent in exchange 

to other cities ....... 

Number of certificates issued for children to retiwn 

to school ........ 



327 

310 

1,721 

397 

79 

54 
24 

365 

§7 
87 

19 
3 

47 
1,200 

264 



Expenses of the Health Department. 



Salary of sanitary officer 


$Soo.oo 


Salary of board of health 


75.00 


Rent of office .... 


27.00 


Lights ..... 


1.20 


Bacteriological tests . 


46.50 


Fumigator's supplies . 


115.05 


Incidentals .... 


1S3.60 



Total 



$1,248.35 



A table appended exhibits the mortuary statistics for the 
year 1S99. 



312 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my thanks to his honor 
the mayor, members of the city council, and the board of 
health for the aid and encouragement they have freely given, 
and many courtesies show^n me in the performance of my 
duties. 

Respectfull}' submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer, 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



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21 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the City Cojincil : 

I have the honor to make the following report tor the year 
ending December 31, 1899: 

Number of calls made, 23. 
Office consultations, 5. 
Insane persons examined, i. 
School children vaccinated, 40. 

I wish to endorse that portion of the report of my prede- 
cessor. Dr. Adams, which recommends placing a supply of 
medical and surgical appliances at the police station, and the 
setting apart and proper equipment of a suitable cell for the 
use of the sick who are detained at that institution. I think 
some action should be taken looking toward the carrying out 
of these suggestions. 

These ideas could be carried out at very small expense, and 
almost no trouble at all. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. COOK, 

City Physician . 

iS South State St., Concord, N. H. 
January 18, 1900. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF OVERSEER OF POOR, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1S99. 



To the City Council: 

Gentlemen : — The undersigned herewith submits the 
thirty-second annual report of expenditures for the poor, in- 
cluding Wards I and 3, For the year ending December 31, 
1S99, as follows : 

Families and individuals having a settlement in the city 
have been aided, in part or in full, during the time, to the 
amount set opposite their respective names. 



Mrs. T. H. Clark 


$270.57 


Robert P. Blake 


49.55 


Charles W. .Diedrich . 


2.00 


Albert Shaw 


25.00 


Mrs. John B. Tyler . 


43.50 


Alvertus Evans . 


24.00 


Patrick Hackett . 


104.28 


COUNI 


^Y POOR. 


Annie Rushlow . 


S120.00 


Bridget Collins . 


. « . 75.75 


James B. Fraser 


41.75 


Fred W. Story . 


47.75 


Robbins T. Orr . 


188.25 



5518.90 



324 



CITY OF CONCOKl). 



Mrs. Ella Friend 






$131.24 


Michael J. O'Couuell . 






146.48 


Mrs. Ethel Perry 






134.97 


Maxim Melauson 






130.00 


Isaac Leonard 






109.79 


Lydia S. Couch . 






105.00 


Mrs. J. Melanson 






81.00 


John Storin 






115.50 


Charles Truchon 






161.26 


Mrs. Charles Dennen . 






173.57 


William S. Paige 






42.00 


Mary Byrne 






84.00 


Chester F. Laird 






274.45 


John F. O'Neil . 






199.14 


Mrs. William Hunneman 






170.49 


Joseph Previe 






47.12 


Samuel Truett . 






127.72 


Mrs. Helen Ham 






136.00 


Mrs. Coleman Bray 






91.99 


James J. Veasey 






205.99 


Frederick Paradis 






184.67 


John B. Lemay . 






96.00 


John J. Greeley 






181.92 


Mrs. Peter Olson 






84.07 


Joseph Goodie . 






12.00 


C. L. Cook 






7.00 


Kate Donovan . 






48.00 


Mrs. C. E. Howe 






16.50 


George E. Hannaford . 






12.62 


George S. Drew 






157.83 


Herbert L. Cross 






14.79 


Lena Ayotte 






5.40 


Joseph Miner 






71.08 


Edward Osier 






91.15 


Edward Miner . 






78.54 


Charles Dennis . 






25.99 


James Dougan . 






30.50 


Albert Mason 






15.33 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



325 



Mrs. Clara Wiggin 








$10.59 


Mary Durgin 








91.45 


Fannie Groux . 








17.68 


Frank Houston . 








128.65 


Lewis Caron 








9.12 


William H. Ash 








31.00 


W. G. Tandy . 








99.00 


Joseph Stoneham 








18.50 


Charles L. Quimby 








21.38 


Mrs. James Clinton 








87.00 


Frank Bodeau , 








12.00 


Joseph Benoit . 








3.50 


Mrs. John Dupree 








107.58 


Myron H. Sessions 








36.25 


Mrs. M. Howe . 








24.00 


Ellen Cotter 








34.-10 


Minnie Forrest . 








72.75 


George N. Ash .. 








23.75 


Anna Jones 








70.62 


Peter Morris 








30.14 


Elmer S. Quimby 








14.12 


John Welcome . 








13.00 


Frank H. Ash . 








10.00 


Mrs. Polly Woodbury 








8.00 


George I. Estes . 








24.41 


Mrs. E. I. Davis 








18.00 


Thomas Mitchell 








48.09 


Felix Previe 








12.32 


Carter Sales 








30.24 


George W. Smith 








33.00 


Margaret Speed . 








3.12 


Mary Collins 








2.00 


Mary Carter 








20.00 


Mrs. James Jenness 








10.90 


William H. Knights 








3.00 


J. A. Elliott 








7.80 


Prudence A. Roberts 








58.81 



326 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Maiy McAvoy . 








S6.33 


Fred E. Berry . 








3.00 


Joseph Geddis . 








9.50 


Thomas Previe . 








33.80 


Mi"S. Eliza Cummings 








96.00 


Tyler Philbrick . 








2.00 


Frank Laundry . 








12.00 


Fred W. Nudd . 








30.45 


Melinda Howard 








19.25 


John J. Malony . 








5.00 


James H. Craigue 








30.75 


John H. Kelley . 








42.50 


George Tonkin . 








19.50 


W. H. Connelly 








36.63 


Mrs. Louis Rushlow 








22.03 


Edward C. Dow 








49.04 


Antoine Landry . 








13.50 


W. C. Wilmot . 








74.73 


Fred Fredette . 








17.54 


Wesley L. Ham 








13.00 


Tliomas O'Brien 








5.75 


Henry McLeod . 








3.00 


Michael Daley . 








6.00 


Paul Jerome 








2.00 


Mary Pratt 








25.00 


Mary Williams . 








3.50 


Fred Cyr . 








5.00 


Fred Charette . 








30.00 


Transients 








215.30 



Amount paid lor support of city poor 
Amount paid by the city for the support 
of county poor . . . . 

Total amount paid on account of poor . 

Respectfully submitted, 
JOSEPH A. 



$518.90 



6,352.52 



5,352.52 



6,871.42 



COCHRAN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



327 



Aid to Dependent Soldiers and their Families Ren- 
dered during- the Year 1899. 

Chargeable to City. 



Mrs. Henry M. Sanborn 
Stephen Lamprey 
Orrin Larkin 
Leonard W. Bean 



$36.23 
96.00 
36.75 
19.24 



Chargeable to Colnty. 



$188.22 



Michael Storin . 








$182.00 


E. N. Pinkham . 








256.23 


Honora Sullivan 








159.02 


William Wallace 








110.09 


N. W. Davis . 








175.98 


Lester Fletcher . 








56.00 


Mary J. Oakley 








133.25 


Otis H. Reister . 








123.25 


W. H. Sar":ent . 








164.50 


Emeline C. Drew 








46.00 


Harriet Ash 








49.50 


Lucretia A. Danforth 








28.00 


Helen L. Griswold 








23.20 


Mrs. Wm. D. Locke 








96.86 


George W. Johnson 








33.18 


Eliza B. Tandy . 








23.00 


Horace Page 








16.50 


Charles M. Davis 








30.00 


Mrs. John H. Heath 








50.00 


Charles Stevens . 








6.00 


Morris A. Lamprey 








18.50 


John F. Guild . 








6.37 



328 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



George B. Tilton 
John Walker 
Charles H. Norton 
Eli Sturgeon 
James English . 
John F. Townsend 
Charles T. Much 



S18.95 
8.24 
83.50 
7.00 
2.00 
3.50 
30.00 



SI, 940. 62 



Total amount 



$2,128.84 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1899. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The board of assessors respectfully submit for the benefit of the 
taxpayers of the city such information as seems to be of interest 
to all. 

Valuation of the City. 

Number of polls assessed : 

In 1898 4,691 

In 1899 4,760 



Increase of ...... . 69 

Improved and unimproved lands and buildings, 1898 $9,425,735 
" " " '' 1899 9,398,027 



Decrease of . ...... $27,708 

Horses : 

Number of horses in 1898 . . . 1,621 $77,398 

" " 1899 . . . 1,651 81,612 



Increase of 30 $4,214 

Oxen : 

Number of oxen in 1898 ... 44 $2,160 

1899 ... 34 1,700 



Decrease of . . . . . 10 $460 

Cows : 

Number of cows in 1898 . . . 1,239 $26,327 

" 1899 . .^ . 1,351 28,675 

Increase of 112 $2,348 



330 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Neat stock : 
Number of neat stock in 1898 
" " " 1899 

Increase of . 

Sheep : 
Number of sheep in 1898 
" " 1899 

Increase of . 

Hogs : 
Number of hogs in 1898 
" " 1899 

Increase of . 

Carriages : 
Number of carriages in 1898 
" 1899 

Decrease of . 



Stock in public funds, 1898 
" " 1899 

Increase of . 

Stock in banks, 1898 . 
" '^ 1899 . 

Decrease of . 



Corporations out of state, 1898 
" " '^ 1899 

Increase of . 
Money on hand or on deposit, 1898 

t; ii a a 1899 

Decrease of . 



141 
158 

17 

255 
279 

24 

29 
50 

21 

213 
213 



$1,120 
1,941 

8821 



S506 
560 



S240 
394 

Si 54 

$21,975 
21,701 

S274 

$26,400 
41,850 

$15,450 

$269,447 
242,626 

$26,821 

$ !),960 
16,960 



$7,000 

$215,464 
122,015 

$93,449 



ASSESSORS RErOKT 



Stocks in trade, 1898 . 
" " 1899 . 

Increase of . 

Mills and machinery, 1898 
" " 1899 

Increase of . 



331 

$553,037 
703,223 

$150,186 

$46,790 
81,602 

$34,812 



Valuation of Wards, 1899. 



Valuation of Wards, 1899. 
Ward 1 . . $787,818 

Ward 2 . . 306,407 



Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 
Ward 9 



402,155 

2,424,213 

3,120,792 

2,064,400 

938,110 

868,800 

306,191 



Assessors. 
Oliver J. Fifield. 
William A. Cowley. 
Joseph E. Shepard. 
Daniel C. Woodman. 
George F. Underhill. 
George S. Dennett. 
Jonathan B. Weeks. 
John J. Lee. 
James Aliern. 



Total 



.1,218,886 



332 



CITY 01" CONCORD, 



AppROritiATioxs, Tax Rate, and \'aia ation ok City and 

Precincts. 



GENERAL TAX. 



Appro- 
priations. 



Per cent, i Tax rate 
added, on $1,000. 



Valuation 
of City and 
Precincts. 



State 

County 

General school and city, 

School, Union 

School, Town 

School, District 20 

City gas and sewer 

Sprinkling 

Penacook sewer 

Penacook lig-hts 

East Concord sewer 

West Concord sewer 

Total 



$29,499.00 

42,062.00 

80,567.00 

39,600.00 

700.00 

1,660.00 

14,203.00 

2,000.00 

1,260.00 

1,300.00 

170.00 

1,180.05 



$7,600.40 



1,980.00 
35.00 
83.00 
710.15 
100.00 
63.00 
65.00 
8.50 
20.00 



$214,201.00 i $10,671.05 



$14.00 



4.20 
1.00 
2.60 
1.60 
.20 
2.00 
2.00 
5.30 
4.20 



$11,218,886 



9,823,007 

720,612 

675,267 

9,189,510 

8,432,395 

657.620 

674,856 

.33.000 

285,840 



Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE F. UNDERBILL, 

Chairman of Board of Assessors. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



To the Board of Mayor and' Alder ?nen : 

I herewith submit my annual report of the poHce depart- 
ment for the year 1S99 : 

1892. 189.3. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899. 

Whole number of arrests 

(including Penacook) . 699 697 720 649 870 876 958 467 
Whole number of arrests 

at Penacook . . . 72 50 44 65 83 73 98 47 
Brought before the court 487 560 628 617 720 698 752 375 
Discharged by the court . 2 17 4 8 2 20 2 

Discharged without being- 
brought before the court 140 110 93 85 1.57 178 186 74 
Total amount received for 

fines and costs : 1891, 

$3,306.92 ; 1892, $3,027- 

78; 1893, $.5,3.52.19; 

1894, $4,396.60; 1895, 

$6,418.92; 1896, $5,874- 

16; 1897, $7,078.72; 

1898, $7,174.82; 1899, 

$1,601.24 
Whole number of lodgers 

(including Penacook) . .584 9361,166 908 854 1,099 1,345 1,089 
W^hole number of lodgers 

at Penacook ... 94 170 251 201 158 316 460 356 
Number of doors found 

open and secured (in- 
cluding Penacook) . 103 68 184 290 252 233 200 164 



334 



CITY OF CO>'CORD. 



1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899. 



Number door.s found open 
and secured at Pena- 
cook . . . . 

Lost children returned to 
their parents 

Called to quell distur- 
bances . . . . 

Stray teams found . 

Stray horses found . 

Number times city ambu- 
lance required 

Number of duty calls rung 
in on police signal from 
Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 

Assault . 

Assault on officer 

Assault with intent to 
kill 

Aggravated assault 

Attempt to commit aboi 
tion 

Attempt to set fire . 

Breaking and entering 

Bastardy . 

Bigamy . 

Burning cotton 

Burning house 

Common seller 

Cruelty to animals . 

Defaulter 

Disturbing religious meet 
ing 

Drunkenness (includin 
Penacook) . 

Drunkenness at Penacook 

Entering Contoocook 
River Park without 
paying . . . . 

Evading railroad fare 

Escaped from House of 
Correction . 



11 6 9 22 

18 15 21 18 

44 61 80 72 

13 13 16 12 



18 26 26 10 

14 21 15 14 

81 90 95 56 

7 3 6 6 

3 3 3 



29 38 28 31 49 59 52 57 



31 18 19 16 



3 11 



1 14 14 18 
13 5 



399 340 365 378 
35 30 60 



5 113 



19,438 29,030 
17 19 15 21 

9 



2 
9 3 8 2 

2 13 2 

1 

1 
2 

5 
1 



488 425 507 244 
63 54 60 27 



13 1 

5 6 6 1 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 33o 

1892. 1893. 189-i. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899. 

False statement in hiring 

a horse .... 1 

Firing crackers . . 5 1 

For out of town otficers 2 111 8 6 

Fornication ... 4 

Fast driving . . . • 2 

Fugitive from justice . 1 

Hunting deer imlawfully 1 

Horse stealing ... 1 

Idle and disorderly per- 
sons .... 1 1 1 1 7 5 1.5 2 

Insane ....9684 11 68 4 

Injury to personal prop- 
erty .... 1 

Keeping dogs without a 

license .... 10 9 6 2 4 2 

Keeping malt liquor for 
sale ^ . . . . 1.3 64 5-3 77 54 69 63 20 

Keeping malt liquor for 

sale, second offence . 4 5 5 

Keeping spirituous liquor 

for sale . . . 7 47 33 57 49 60 51 21 

Keeping spirituous liquor 
for sale, second oifence 

Keeping disorderly house 

Larceny .... 

Larceny from the person 1 

Neglecting to support 

family .... 1 

Non-payment of fine 

Obtaining money under 

false pretences . . 12 

Obtaining goods under 

false pretences . . 1 

Over-driving horse . . 2 

Peddling without license 1 1 

Prostitute ... 1 

Rude and disorderly con- 
duct . . . . 18 14 13 6 7 29 10 20 

Rape .... 1 

Riding bicycle on side- 
walk .... 9534 





1 


32 


14 


1 




3 


3 


1 





336 



CITY OF COKCORD. 
1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 



3 



Riding bicycle in White 

Park . 
Safe keeping . 
Stealing . 

Selling spirituous liquor 
Selling malt liquor . 
Selling cider . 
Selling mortgaged prop 

erty 
Street walkers . 
Stubborn children . 
Subornation of perjury 
Throwing snowballs 
Threatening to do bodily 

harm 
Truants . 
Vagrants . 
Number arrests made by James E 

Rand ..... 
Number arrests made by Daniel S. 

Flanders .... 

Number arrests made by Fred M 

Eaton ..... 
Number arrests made by Whitney D 

Barrett ..... 
Number arrests made by James Kel 

ley 

Number arrests made by John E 

Gay 

Number arrests made by Charles W 

Hall 

Number arrests made by Charles H 

Rowe ..... 
Number arrests made by John G 

Putnam ..... 
Number arrests made by Samuel L 

Batchelder .... 



59 87 45 41 

25 28 28 5 



6 1 



896. 


1897. 


1898. 
1 


1899. 


89 


116 


105 


33 


19 


22 


10 


(5 


7 


10 


10 
3 








2 


2 






1 


1 


4 


1 


1 




3 


2 


1 


3 



88 144 

21 34 

69 49 

19 39 

11 25 

1 27 

1 20 

8 



13 

135 157 155 

66 70 54 

48 24 1 

47 43 56 

40 30 54 

85 78 138 

39 63 67 

82 105 115 

62 90 

6 69 



1 

5 
30 
35 
14 
27 
17 
63 
40 
48 
32 
39 



Assisting making arrests, James E. 

Rand ..... 
Assisting making arrests, Daniel S 

Flanders .... 

Assisting making arrests, Fred M 

Eaton ..... 
Assisting making arrests, John E 

Gay ..... 

Assisting making arrests, Charles W 

Hall 

Assisting making arrests, Whitney D 

Barrett ..... 
Assisting making arrests, James Kel 

ley 

Assisting making arrests, Charles H 

Rowe ..... 
Assisting making arrests, John G 

Putnam ..... 
Assisting making arrests, Samuel L 

Batchelder .... 
Arrests made by special officers 
Special officers assisted in making 

arrests ..... 
Number of liquor searches made 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 337 

1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899. 

16 

24 



65 33 37 19 11 
42 53 34 57 24 



3 29 21 19 31 

9 7 3 31 5 

7 5 4 9 2 

9 5 14 2 

2 24 45 31 

12 24 

6 

38 50 34 20 54 

48 32 7 6 26 



11 

30 

8 

5 

1 

28 

12 

23 
31 

12 

1,027 



The organization of the police department at the present 
time is as follows : 

Police Commissioners. 
Josiah E. Dwight, Giles Wheeler, Myron J. Pratt. 

(t. Scott Locke, city marshal Appointed eJune 30, 1888 

James E. Rand, assistant marshal " April 16, 1861 

Daniel S. Flanders, captain night watch " Jan. 26, 1889 



22 



338 CITr OF CONCORD. 

Regui.ar Police and Night Watchmen. 



Fred M. Eaton, 




Appointed 


Jan. 27, 1891 


AVhitney D. Barrett, Pen 


acook, 




Jan. 24, 1893 


James Kelley, Penacook, 






March 23, 1893 


John E. Gay, 






Aug. (j. 1894 


Charles W. Hall, 






April 3, 1894 


Charles H. Rowe, 






Dec. 10, 1895 


John G. Putnam, 






May 11, 1897 


Samuel L. Batchelder, 






Dec. 21, 1897 



Special Reserve Officers. 
George H. Silsby, captain. 

John T. Batchelder, Harvey H. Oakes, 

O. H. Bean, George N. Fellows, 

Willie A. Little, Thomas P. Davis, 

W. A. Flanders, Irving B. Robinson, 

George W. Chesley, Cliarles E. Kelley, 

W. H. H. Patch, Rufus C. Boynton, 

Hoyt Robinson, James Jepson. 
Alvin H. Urann, 

I will renew my recoininendation for a stable suitable for a 
horse, wagon and ambulance. It can be built after the same 
architectural design as the police station for $i,ooo. 

The police signal service has proved to be very useful and 
satisfactor}'. The number of duty calls that have been rung 
in by police officers during the past year is 29,030, besides a 
large number of emergency calls, and I would recommend that 
three (3) boxes be added at an expense of about $30, one to 
be located near the corner of Downing and South streets, one 
near the corner of Thompson and South streets, and one on 
Washington near Spring street. 

On account of the increased business at the south end 
there is a demand for an additional night officer, only one 
nio"ht officer being on duty south of Pleasant street at the 
present tiine. There is also a demand for an officer at the 
west end for night duty, and I would most respectfully 
recommend that provision be made for the appointment of 
two additional officers. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 339 

I would respectfully call the attention of the city govern- 
ment to the sanitary condition of the police station at Pena- 
cook, as I consider that it is detrimental to the health ot 
anyone who is unfortimate enough to be confined therein, and 
I would recommend that a new st.ition be built. 

It is customary in many cities to have one police officer for 
every thousand inhabitants, so it can be readily seen that we 
have a very small force for a city of this size. 

The receipts from fines and costs have been $1,601.24. 

In submitting mv report I desire to express my gratitude to 
the board of police commissioners and the city council tor 
their considerate treatment of this department. Thanks are 
due Harry G. Sargent, city solicitor, for valuable assistance 
rendered. To all who have contributed to our success we 
extend our thanks. To the members of the force my grateful 
acknowledgment and thanks are tendered for their efficiency 
and promptness in the discharge of their duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. SCOTT LOCKE, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT OF CLERK OF POLICE COURT. 



To the City Council: 

The clerk of the police court submits the following report 
for the year ending December 31, 1S99 : 

Number of civil cases entered, 1=59. 

Received entry fees in civil cases . . . $79.^0 

Received trial fees ...... 7.00 

Received continuances ..... 2. 85 



$89.35 
Paid city treasurer . . ... . . S9.35 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY R. HOOD, 

Clerk of Police Court. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Co7iiicil : 
I respectfully submit my annual report as solicitor: 

The case of Edward Rhobidas against the city of Concord, 
referred to in my last annual report, is still pending before the 
law term, no decision having been rendered. It will probably 
be decided in March. 

The suits in favor of Arthur Henry, Edward M. Proctor, 
Laura P. Clough, Honor M. Clough and John Callahan 
against the city, for damages caused by surface water on 
account of the alleged raising of the grade of Pine street, 
have been disposed of. In the suits in favor of Laura P. 
Clough and Honor M. Clough, the plaintiffs withdrew during 
the trial, and in the other suits a verdict was rendered in favor 
of the city by the referee, Hon. James W. Remick. 

The claims for damages in favor of Henry A. Cleaveland, 
John G. Hook and Nellie A. Merrill, guardian of Joshua B. 
Merrill, referred to in my last I'eport, have been disposed of, 
the city paying a small amount in the Cleaveland and Merrill 
cases, by my advice, and in the Hook case the plaintiff has 
neglected to press the claim. 

The suits of Bertha E, Braley, Edward E. Hodgdon and 
Mary J. Gay, William H. Gay and Walter C. Gay against 
the city are still pending. No trial has been had because the 
plaintiffs in the first case have taken no action to have a hear- 
ing, and in the other two cases the counsel for the plaintiff 
being his honor, the mayor, nothing could be done with them. 

The suit of Higgins against Concord, referred to in my last 
report, has been terminated, the plaintiff voluntarily with- 
drawing, and a judgment has been entered in favor of the city. 



342 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A suit in favor of Dvvight Hall, executor, against the 
city has been brought for damages alleged to have been 
caused by changing the grade of a highway. The suit is now 
pending in court, but the plaintiff lias notified the solicitor 
that the suit will not be pressed and judgment will be entered 
in favor of the city at the coming April term. 

A suit has been commenced against the city in favor of 
Elvira B. Lane for alleged damages to a tract of land, caused 
by dumping rubbish upon her lot. This will be in order for 
trial at the April term. 

The present year has been an unusually busy one in this 
department. At the commencement of the year written opin- 
ions were required of the solicitor by the city government in 
a great many matters, some of them being matters of import- 
ance and requiring a good deal of time and investigation, in 
order to answer the questions asked intelligent]}' and correctly. 

An unusually large amount of criminal complaints and 
warrants have been made in the office of the solicitor, mainly 
by order of the mayor in liquor cases ; the number in the last 
three months amounting to over two thousand. 

In addition, the solicitor has given advice and assistance to 
the different committees of the city council, and to the heads 
of departments. 

Respectfullv submitted, 

HARRY G. SARGENT, 

City Solicitor. 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1S99. 



REPORT OF COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



To the City Council : 

I herewith submit the report of collection of taxes to the close 
of business December 31, 1899 : 

Year 1896. 

Dr. Cr. 

Total amount submitted for collection, 

includinjr interest collected . . $264,376.26 

Cash paid treasurer . . . $253,909.59 
Amount of discounts allowed . . 3,611,31 
Abatements ordered by board of assess- 
ors 6,830.18 

Account adjusted .... 25.18 



$264,376.26 $264,376.26 

Year 1897. 

Total amount submitted for collection, 

including interest collected . .$236,016.51 

Cash paid treasurer . . . $227,705.64 
Amount of discounts allowed . . 3,404.02 
Abatements ordered by board of assess- 
ors 4,906.85 



$236,016.51 $236,016.51 



344 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Year 1898. 

Total amount submitted for collection, 

including interest collected . . $223,316.44 

Cash paid treasurer . , . $21.'J,(;".I3.32 

Amount of discounts allowed . . 2,87'J.84 

Abatements ordered by board of assess- 
ors 4,692.23 

Cash in otfice December 31, 1899, at 

closing ..... 12.06 

Uncollected December 31, 1899, at 

closing ..... 38.99 



S223,316.44 $223,310.44 

Year 1899. 

Total amount submitted for collection. 

including interest collected . . $221,699.28 

Cash paid treasurer . . . $177,500.00 

Abatements ordered by board of assess- 
ors to date 3,234.76 

Cash in office December 31, 1899, at 

closing ..... 231.05 

Uncollected December 31, 1899, at 

closing ..... 40,733.47 



$221,699.28 $221,699.28 

Respectfully submitted, 

WENDELL P. LADD, 

Tax Collector. 
Concord, Jaiuiary 1, 1900. 



REPORT OF CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 



To the City Council : 

I herewith submit my report of the City Liquor Agency from 
the date of my appointment, April 17, 1899, to the end of the 
financial year, December 31, 1899, inclusive. 

Goods on Hand April 17, 1899. 

Wines and liquors, 219|| gallons; bottled goods, 

82 bottles. Cost of both classes . . . SG.S1.()7 

Purchased from George W. Weeks, state agent, 
between April 17, 1899, and January 1, 1900: 
Wines and liquors, 1,985 gallons; bottled goods, 
6,915 bottles. Cost of both classes . . . 6,046.08 



Total cost of goods ..... $6,727.15 

Goods sold from April 17, 1899, to January 1, 1900. 

Wines and liquors, l,774|g gallons ; bot- 
tled goods, 6,350, Received for same $7,429.40 
Sale of barrels and kegs . . . 35.00 



Number of bottled goods on hand April 
17, 1899 .... 

Number of bottled goods purchased 
since April 17, 1899 

Sold since April 17, 1899 . 
Breakage ..... 
On hand January 1, 1900 . 



I 

82 
1 


$7,464.40 


6,915 


6 997 


6,350 




20 




627 


R QQT 



346 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Wines aod liquors on hand April 

17, 1899 .... 219{f gals. 

Purchased since April 17, 1899 . 1,98,5 " 

2,204|| gals. 

Wines and liquors sold since 

April 17, 1899 . . . 1, 774 j^ gals. 

Wines and liquors on hand Jan- 
uary 1, 1900 . . . . 430^^5^ " 

2,204|| gals. 

Expenses of Agency as per vouchers . . . 81,101.50 

Paid city treasurer, for which I hold his receipts . S7,464.40 

Respectfully submitted, 

BENJAMIN F. TUCKER, 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



The report of the park commissioners is herewith pre- 
sented : 

The appropriations made for the past year were as follows: 

White park .... $1,500.00 

Rollins park .... 400.00 

Penacook park .... 75-00 

Bradley park .... 25.00 

These limited appropriations have been used in mainten- 
ance, for no new work could be carried on, and some of the 
work already begun has been sadly neglected. At WHiite 
park the work has been looked after by the superintendent, 
with one man dvn-ing the season, and an extra man during the 
summer months. The usual custom has been to buy a horse 
for necessary work through the summer, but that has been 
dispensed with, and, if needed, one has been hired ; thus, 
much of the territory of grass plots has not been kept down 
by the mower. 

It would seem wise that this park should be bi'ought to 
completion as soon as possible, then only a fixed sum for 
maintenance would be required. A permanent fence is very 
much needed to properly inclose the park, and much planting 
should be done. 

The playground should be finished and trees planted. 

The expenditures have been: For labor, $1,433.02 ; re- 
pairs, $17.75 ; tools, $19.65 ; clearing ice, $11.35 ; shrub- 
bery and seed, $29.95 ; loam, fertilizer and teaming, $SS.oo ; 
grain, $8.40; water, $15.00 ; incidentals, $8.84 ; water pipe, 
$56.87; or a total of $1,677.73. 



348 CITY OF CONCORD. 

At Rollins park nothing has been done except keeping up 
the present condition, and that not satisfactorily. The under- 
growth, which has been such an attractive feature, is fast 
disappearing, and work done by those interested has been 
neglected. Plans are in hand to greatly improve this park, 
but thev cannot be carried out without a liberal appropria- 
tion. The general use of this park is such that more careful 
supervision is needed, so that it will not deteriorate. Police 
supervision should be inaugurated, especially to control large 
gatherings which may be held there. 

The city has the past year purchased a tract of land, con- 
sisting of between three and four acres, adjacent to the park, 
which can be adapted with it to great advantage. The price 
paid was $1,250. The expenditures have been as follows : 
Labor, $289.90; tools, $19.99; water, $6.00; incidentals, 
$41.58; grade, $16.05; I'ep'ii's, $i3'57; c"' ^ total of 
$387.09. 

Bradley park has been kept in good condition, and is a 
continued bit of satisfactory work. It was hoped that the ap- 
propriation would admit of the purchase of some* settees, but 
only enough was set apart to care for the same. There is an 
opportunity for some generous-minded citizen to place a 
monument to some military or naval hero, or to commemorate 
some historical event, in this enclosure. The expenditures 
have been: For labor, $15.00; fertilizer, $22.50; water, 
$4.00; incidentals, $3.00; or a total of $44.50. 

Penacook park has engaged the same attention as hereto- 
fore. Owing to the high water in the lake, it has, perhaps, 
been used more than of late, but the endeavor has been to 
keep it in a tidy condition. The expenditures have been : 
For labor, $65.63; hardware, $6.68; incidentals, $5.35; or 
a total of $77.66. 

A beginning has been made on the parcel of land given by 
residents at the West End, and with more money this can be 
made an attractive spot. The ground was leveled and seeded 
under the charge of the superintendent. 

Since ihe inauguration of the park work in our city, the 
last year has been the least satisfactory of any. Such a con- 



PUBLIC PARKS. 349 

dition, we feel, does not represent the wish or the desire of 
our citizens, who would like to see these matters carried to 
completion ; furthermore, it is not in accord with the best 
sentiment of the day. " Art is becoming not only a part of 
the educational scheme of our people, but its principles and 
the knowledge of its effects on their lives are becoming inter- 
woven in the daily affairs, and the recognition that '• a thing 
of beauty is a joy forever' is the influential factor in the vast 
improvements made in manv departments of applied art. 
This includes art in its broader application, as well as in 
peculiar lines." 

Somehow, our citizens do not come up to the measure of 
their privilege, for we have so few who are willing to con- 
tribute to the city's ornamentation. So much of attractive 
interest might be given by the construction of entrances to our 
parks, the gift of parcels of land for park purposes, the mark- 
ing of historical places, which abound among us, the gift of 
statuary, the planting of trees, and in numerous other ways to 
contribute to this end. One has but to look at many smaller 
places to see what has been done for the public good. 

One illustration we have of those who, in generations gone, 
planted our noble elms, which calls upon us to emulate their 
example. These things are not done wholly for to-day, but 
they go on and on to succeeding generations, and illustrate an 
unselfish desire to benefit others. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, CAa/rman, 
BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
GEORGE A. YOUNG, 
WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 

Park Commissioners. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., March i, 1900. 
To tJic City Cotincil of tJie City of Coiicord : 

Your commissioners of cemeteries have but Httle to 
report. 

We have endeavored to expend the appropriation placed at 
our disposal in a manner to merit your approval. 

As we informed you in a previous report, it will not lie 
necessary to make anv large appropriation the coming year 
for grading. 

We shall need quite a sum to complete the loaming and 
seeding of grounds already graded. We hope to plant a 
quantity of trees and shrubs the coming spring, the amount of 
which will of course depend on vour honorable body- 

Our cemeteries are gaining in beauty every year and under 
the immediate supervision of our efficient superintendent, 
Mr. E. A. Moulton, the grounds are well taken care of. 

We again call, your attention to the matter of a chapel and 
waiting-room at Blossom Hill Cemetery. We have an unex- 
pended appropriation of two hundred dollars ($200.00) for 
this object, and sincerely hope it mavbe increased sufficiently 
to warrant our commencing, at least, a building which will 
not only be useful but an added beauty to our already beauti- 
ful " City of the Dead." 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
FRANK P. ANDREWS, 
CHARLES G. REMICK, 
FRANK J. BATCHELDER, 
GEORGE A. FOSTER, 
GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, 

Commissioners of Cemetei'ies. 
GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, Secretary. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 351 

OLD PORT AND PINE GROVE CEMETERIES. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council : 

The appropriation of one Immlred and seventy- five dollars for 
the partial grading of the avenues and the painting of the iron 
rail in Pine Grove Cemetery has been expended during the past 
year, as has the twenty-five dollars appropriated for Old Fort 
Cemetery, making a decided improvement in both. 

As we stated last year this makes a fair beginning and we 
would i-ecommend an appropriation of two hundred dollars for 
the care of Pine Grove Cemetery and the grading of the avenues 
in the same, and twenty-five dollars for the care of Old Fort 
Cemetery, for the year 1900. 

Most respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. HUTCHINS, 
SCOTT FEENCH, 

Committee. 
Concord, February 26, 1900. 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

West Concord, N. H., January 1, 1900. 
To the City Council, Concord, N. H : 

Your committee on West Concord Cemetery report for the 
year 1899 as follows: 

Jan. 1, cash on hand .... S62.81 

sale of lots . . . . 24.00 

care of lots . . . . 4.00 



Bills Paid. 



Feb. 16, A. B. Cross 
June 17, Parmenter & Co. 
Oct. 4, City water bill 



$7.50 


13.00 


6.00 



S90.81 



$26.50 



Cash on hand January 1, 1900 . . . $64.31 

Approved by committee, 

J. M. CROSSMAN, 
GEO. R. PARMENTER, 
WILLIE A. LITTLE. 



352 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 
To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: 

The Millville Cemetery committee respectfully submit the fol- 
lowing report of the receipts and expenditures for the year 1899. 

The following named persons have given the sum of money 
opposite their names to be expended on private lots and for the 



improvement ot the cei 


netery generally : 




Mrs. Emerson .... 


$2.00 


I. H. Proctor . 








2.00 


Mrs. E. F. Kelley 








1.00 


L. A. Currier . , 








1.00 


F. W. Thompson 








1.00 


Amos Bhuicliard 








1.00 


Mark Smart 








2.00 


E. B. Rhodes . 








1.00 


P:. E. Griffin 








2.00 


Arthur Brown . 








2.50 


F. G. Pro(;ror . 








2.00 


Mrs. L. 8. ^''landers . 








7.00 


Mr. Gilmore 








1.00 


H. B. Currier 








2.00 


Amos Frye 








.50 


J. M. Abbott 








2.00 


Martha .Jones 








1.00 


Edward Gi'iffin . 








1.00 


Albert Sfiltnuirsh 








1.00 


Fred EatDii 








1.00 


Mrs. Rufus Smart 








1.00 


Mrs. Emerton 








1.00 


A. E. Griffin . 








1.00 


G. M. Tewksbui-y 








3.00 


Jessie Goodwin . 








10.00 


Charles J. Sennott 








.50 


Total from indivit 


uals . 









$50.50 



CExMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



353 



From A. S. Smith, trust fund 






$2.12 




Charles Merrill, trust fund 






1.21 




balance last year 






3.51 




city treasurer 






100.00 




cash to balance . 






2.14 








$108.98 




. , 


Total receipts . . . v 


$159.48 


Expenditures 








Paid C. H. Martin & Co., . 




$14.81 




W. Oscar Proctor 








16.00 




A. H. Britton & Co. 








20.10 




M. E. Clifford & Co. 








40.94 




V. C. Hastings . 








2.63 




E. B. Hanchay . 








.50 




Stevens & Duncklee 








1.50 




Water bill . 








6.00 




W. Oscar Proctor 








33.50 




H. B. Currier . 








2.00 




George W. Chesley 








12.00 




J. N. Abbott 








2.00 




F. K. Smith, Stickney Hill Cemetery 


8.00 




Total expended 


. 


, 


. 




$159.98 



ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 
ALFRED CLARK, 
F. G. PROCTOR, 

Committee. 



23 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the HonoraMe Mayor and City Council : 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the Fire 
Department for the year 1899 : 

The precinct department responded to twenty-nine (29) box 
alarms, and seventy-five (75) still alarms. 

In addition to these, five fires occurred for which no alarms 
were given, accounts of which are given in the order of their oc- 
currence. 

At Penacook seven (7) alarms were responded to, at East 
Concord five (5) and at West Concord one (1). 

Alarms. 

Still. January 1, 4.48 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. E. G. Wright, 56 Green street. Chemical company 
responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. January 1, 6.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
James Sullivan, 88 West street. No loss. 

Box 23. January 7, 6.24 a. m. Barn on Ferry street, 
owned by Gilbert H. Seavey and occupied by P. C. Whittier. 
Destroyed. Cause unknown. 2,200 feet hose wet. Recall, 
7.06 A. M. Twenty head of cattle and one horse perished. 
Department worked on ruins until 3.30 p. m. 

"Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $500.00 $500.00 

Contents, 2,800.00 1,954.25 2,300.00 1,954.25 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 355 

Still. January 7, 11.34 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
James Benson, 4 Perley street. No loss. 

Still. January 8, 6.30 p. m. Cliimney fire in residence of 
A. C. Sanborn, 62 North State street. Extinguished by members 
of Alert Hose company. No loss. 

Still. January 10, 4.07 p. m. Chimney fire in J. R. Hill 
& Co.'s harness manufactory, 67-69 North Main street. No loss. 

Still. January 10, 4.45 p. m.. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. I. W. Hammond, 151 North State street. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 4.42 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Edson C. Eastman, 21 North State street. No loss. 

Still. January 13, 5.43 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Elmer H. Farrar, 78 South State street. No loss. 

Still. January 13, 9.40 A. M. Chimney fire in residence of 
Fred Leigh ton, 98 North State street. No loss. 

Box 24. January 18, 8.25 A. m. Slight fire in residence at 
18 Centre street, owned by the Cyrus Hill estate and occupied by 
Mrs. N. C. Todd. Caused by an attempt to fill a kerosene 
stove while burning. Extinguished with pony extinguisher by 
members of Alert Hose company. Recall, 8.31 a. m. 





Value. 


Lo^. • 


Insurance. 


In.s. Pd. 


Building, 


$5,000.00 


$15.39 


$4,500.00 


$15.39 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


55.00 


1,200.00 


55.00 



January 25, 12.30 p. M. Fire in stable on Hopkinton road 
near St. Paul's School, owned and occupied by Joseph H. Coit, Jr. 
Caused by kerosene stove. No alarm given. Extinguished by 
employees. Loss confined to contents. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Contents, $800.00 $78.50 $500.00 $78.50 

Still. January 31, 4.30 p. m. Chimney fire in Rumford 
block. North Main street. Chemical company responded, but no 
assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. February 1, 12.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Julia Halpin, 20 Monroe street. No loss. 



356 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 5, 8.10 a. m. Fire in freight car loaded 
with potatoes, in B. & M. R. R. yard, opposite Hill's avenue. 
Caused by over-heated stove. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Car, $300.00 S3. 43 Blanket. $3.43 

Box 16. February 6, 3.15 a. m. Fire in buildings at 24 
Beacon street, owned by O. W. Coon and occupied by James 
P. Driscoll. Caused by ashes in wooden receptacles. 1,750 
feet hose wet. Recall, 3.44 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. Pd. 


Building, 


$1,800.00 


$350.00 


$1,200.00 


$350.00 


Contents, 


500.00 


450.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. February 7, 10.20 a. m. Slight fire in residence of 
E. J. Knuckey, 91 Franklin street. Caused by kettle of fat on 
stove taking fire. Chemical company responded, but no assistance 
was required. Loss confined to contents. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Contents, $1,000.00 $10.35 $300.00 $10.35 

Still. February 8, 8.34 a. m. Chimney fire in Stickney 
upper block. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 2.04 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Julia A. Stickney, 16 Prince street. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $1,200.00 $5.00 $1,000.00 $5.00 

Still. February 10, 9.40 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mary Robinson, 28 Union street. Extinguished by members 
of Alert Hose company. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 10.13 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. B. Lemay, 11 North State street. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 4.52 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Berryman, 32 Thoi'ndike street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 357 

Still. February 10, 5.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mary Robinson, 28 Union street. P^xtiuguislied by members 
of Alert Hose company. No loss. 

Still. February 11, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Berryman, 32 Thorndike street. No loss. 

Still. February 13, 1.57 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Grace E. Foster, 64 North State street. Chemical company 
responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

February 17, 4.00 a. m. Fire in residence at 31 Monroe 
street, owned by Ina Belle Howe and occupied by S. A. Dow. 
Caused by drying clothes over kitchen stove. No alarm given. 
Extinguished by occupants. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $2,000.00 $7.50 $1,400.00 $7.50 

Still. February 24, 4.08 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Timothy P. Sullivan, 49 Lyndon street. No loss. 

Box 12. February 24, 8.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Ryan, 10 Granite avenue. Needless alarm. Extin- 
guished by pony extinguishers, by Alert and Chemical com.panies. 
No loss. 

Still. February 28, 8.16 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Dennett, 7 Union street. No loss. 

Still. March 2, 11.18 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mary A. Bass, 33 Downing street. No loss. 

Box 25. March 4, 9.35 a. m. Fire in Exchange block, 
North Main street, owned by the A. J. Prescott heirs and occu- 
pied by W. J. Chadbourne, photographer. Cause unknown. 
Extinguished by Chemical company. Recall, 9.52 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. lus. Pd. 

Building, $10,000.00 $15.00 $7,000.00 $15.00 

Contents, 4,000.00 30.35 2,500.00 30.35 

Still. March 7, 10.48 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Dr. George Cook, 16 Centre street. No loss. 

Still. March 11, 11.29 a. m. Alarm occasioned by short 
circuiting of light wires in furniture establishment of J. M. Stew- 
art & Sons Co., 122 North Main street. Chemical company 
responded, bvit no assistance was required. 



358 CITY OF CONCOTRD. 

Still. March 13, <S.24 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Frank B. Merrill, 9 Franklin street. No loss. 

Still. March 13, 11.40 p, ji. Log cabin situated on the 
bhiiF north of the Loudon road, owned and occupied by the 
Wattanummon Club, destroyed. Cause, incendiary. No appa- 
ratus sent. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. Pd, 


Building, 


S-250.00 


S250.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


250.00 


250.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. March 23, 10.50 a. m. Chimney fire in p]xcliange 
block, North Main street. No loss. 

Box 37. March 25, 3.57 a. m. Fire in barn, owned and 
occupied by F. G. Harris, 169 Pleasant street. Cause unknown. 
700 feet hose wet. Recall, 4.19 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $350.00 S7.50 S250.00 $7.50 

Still. March 27, 6.2G p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. G. Johnson, 13 Centre street. No loss. 

Still. INIarch 28, 12.59 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. G. Johnson, 13 Centre street. No loss. 

Still. April 7, 7.57 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Stephen P. F'oster, 47 Perley street. No loss. 

April 12, 3.45 p. m. Slight fire in residence 9 Dakin 
street, owned by Mrs. H. C. Sturtevant and occupied by George 
A. Lyna. Caused by children playing with matches. No alarm 
given. Extinguished by occupants. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $3,500.00 $8.00 $2,500.00 $8.00 

Still. April 13, (5.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. R. Hosking, 8 Lyndon street. No loss. 

Still. April 19, 5.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Samuel Holt, 72 South State street. No loss. 

4.4.4, April 19, 2.59 p. m. Brush fire near Rollins Park. 
Extinguished by detail from the department. 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 359 

April 20, 3.40 p. m. Fire in residence of Gustavus Walker, 
11 Tahanto street. Caused by lace curtains coming in contact 
with flame of blow lamp which painters were using to remove 
paint. No alarm given. Extinguished by the painters. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. Pd. 


Building, 


$10,000.00 


834.32 


$7,000.00 


134.32 


Contents, 


3,500.00 


250.00 


2,500.00 


250.00 



4-4-4 April 22, 10.59 a. m. Brush fii-e on Pleasant street 

near residence of John F. Kent. Extinguished by detail from 
department. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 9.30 a. m. Chimney tire in residence of 

Charles DoloiF, 9 Concord street. Extinguished by members ot 
Good Will company. No loss. 

Still. April 27, 6,49 p. m. Fire in Chase block, owned 

by the estate of James H. Chase. Fire originated in dry goods 

store of W. R. Heath. Cause unknown. Extinguished by 
Chemical company. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. Pd. 


Building, 


S25,000.00 


$140.00 


$17,000.00 


$140.00 


Contents, 


10,000.00 


740.00 


7,400.00 


740.00 



Box 35, April 27, 6.53 p. m. Box pulled for preceding fire 
as a precautionary measure. Recall, 7.00 p. m. 

4-4-4. April 27, 9.05 p. m. Brush fire on Peuacook street 
near reservoir. Extinguished by detail from department. No 
loss. 

Still. April 28, 11.48 a. m. Chimney lire in residence of 
S. S. Kimball, 13 Montgomery street. No loss. 

Still. April 29, 1.07 p. m. Brush fire on School street, 
near residence of W. H. Kimball. Detail from department 
sent. 

Still. April 29, 1.50 p. m. Chemical engine sent to assist 
detail at preceding fire. Extitiguishod by Chemical company. 
No loss. 



360 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

4-4-4. April 29, 3.04 p. m. Brush fire on plains. Extin- 
guished by detail from department. Chemical engine also sent 
but not used. No loss. 

4-4-4. Ai)ril 29, 9.03 p. m. Brush fire near St. Paul's 
School. Detail from department sent, but services not required. 
Extinguished by employees of School. No loss. 

Still. April 30, 11.32 a. m. Grass fire near H. O. Marsh's 
coal sheds, Bridge street. No loss. 

Still. May 2, 11.31 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Thomas Dee, 85 Franklin street. No loss. 

Still. May 4, 2.47 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
S. L. Thompson, 64 Rumford street. 

Still. May 5, 9.23 p. ai. Fire on dump in rear ofthe shoe 
factory, Bridge street. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 7, 7.43 p. nr. Brush fire near Rollins Park. 
Extinguished by detail from department. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 8, 10.50 a. m. Grass fire on camp grounds. 
Detail from department sent, but services not required. 

Still. JMay 8, 6.47 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. J. Scully, 39 Franklin street. No loss. 

Still. May 10, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. Patrick Brosnan, 35 Downing street. Extinguished by 
members of Good AVill company. No loss. 

Still. May 19, 8.40 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
M. H. Donovan, 5 Grove street. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 31, 12.37 p. m. Brush fire on plains. Extin- 
guished by detail from department. No loss. 

Box 9. May 31, 1.21 p. m. Slight fire on roof of stone shed 
near prison, owned by Ola Anderson. Extinguished by 
employees before the arrival of the department. Recall, 1.32 
p. M. No loss. 

Still. June 1, 9.07 a. m. Slight fire in residence at 20 
Charles street, owned by Albin & Martin and occupied by Mrs. 
Jennie G. LaBonta. Caused by over-heated chimney. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $1,000.00 S2.70 $800.00 $2.70 



FIRE 'department. 361 

Still. June 6, 8.18 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Michael Gurley, 6 Lincoln street. No loss. 

4-4-4. June 14, 2.11 p. m. Brush lire on Pleasant street, 
near property of J. H. S. Wilcox. Extinguished by detail from 
department. No loss. 

Still. June 28, 10.22 a. m. Slight fire in Willard's block. 
Elm street. Caused by upsetting of soldering furnace. Ex- 
tinguished by occupants before the arrival of firemen. No loss. 

4-4-4. July 4, 12.20 p. m. Grass fire near Pettingili's 
crossing. Detail from the department sent, but services not 
required. Needless alarm. No loss. 

Still. July 15, 4.40 p. m. Alarm occasioned by the fumi- 
gating of rooms in Hill's block, North Main street, by liealth 
officers. No fire. 

Still. July 19, 4.37 p. m. Fire in rubbisli in rear of Con- 
cord Ice Company's stables, Fosterville. No loss. 

Still. August 6, 9.20 a.m. Slight fire on roof of barn in 
rear of 7 Railroad square, caused by electric light wire igniting 
tree overhead. Extinguished before arrival of firemen. No 
loss. 

11-11. August 12, 1.19 p. M. A call for assistance from 
Roby's Corner, N. H. O. P. & C. W. Redington's hub mill 
destroyed. Gov. Hill steamer, reserve hose reel and detail from 
department sent. Engine worked two hours. 

Box 19. August 12, 11.55 p. m. False alarm. Recall, 
12.01 A. M., August 13. 

Still, August 19, 8.28 p. m. Fii-e on dump on Rumford 
street, near stone crusher. No loss. 

Box 35. August 25, 2.17 a. m. Fire in tenemeut house 
at 7| South State street, owned by Mitchell & Flanders and 
occupied by Leslie Morrison. Caused by ashes in wooden 
receptacles, 2,500 feet hose wet. Recall, 2.36 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $5,000.00 SI 75.00 $3,000.00 $175.00 

Contents, 25.00 None. None. 

Still. August 25, 3.14 p. m. A call to investigate cause of 
smoke in J. E. McShane's block, Odd Fellows avenue. No fire. 



362 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. September 4, 8.47 p. m. Alarm occasioned by tenant in 
Diittoii's block, Nortli Main street, fumigating room. No fire. 

Box 4:.'). September 11, 2.20 p. m. Fire in residence at 11 
Water street, owned and occupied by Walter McMalion. Caused 
by children playing with matches. 2,500 feet hose wet. Re- 
call, 3.01 p. M. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $2,000.00 $807.00 $1,500.00 $807.00 

Contents, 1,100.00 394.55 500.00 394.55 

Still. September IG, 11.31 a. m. Fii-e in residence at 7^ 
South State street, owned by Mitchell & Flanders and occupied 
by Leslie Morrison. Caused by detective chimney. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $5,000.00 $22.73 $3,000.00 $22.73 

Still. September 30, G.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of I. F. Mooney, 11 Fremont street. Chemical company 
responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. October 2, 5.29 p. m. Slight fire in residence at 3 
South Spring street, owned by the Amos Wood estate and 
occupied by A. S. Terry. Caused by over-heated chimney. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $1,200.00 $3.65 $800.00 $3.65 

Still. Octobei' 14, 12.58 p. m. Brush fire on Hall street. 
Chemical company responded, but services not required. No 
loss. 

4-4-4. October 15, 3.59 p. m. Brush fire on Long Fond 
road, near residence of John Joi'dau. Extinguished by detail 
from department. No loss.. 

Still. October 24, 11.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Lewis Piper, 56 North State street. No loss. 

Still. October 25, 2.24 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in the Walker school. Church street. No fire. 

vStill. October 27, (;.03 p. Ji. Chimney \\m m residence of 
Mrs. L. A. Dyer, 105 Rumford street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 363 

Still. October 29, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. Calvin Smart, 10 Pearl street. p]xtinguished by members 
of Alert Hose company. No loss. 

Still. November 2, 11.07 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George F. Thompson, 19 Giles street. No loss. 

Box 12. Novembers, 9.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Tilda Hunneyman, 202 Riimford street. Extinguished with 
chemicals. No loss. 

Box 47. November 4, 1.23 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. P. Halloran, 6 Kimball street. Extinguished with pony 
extinguisher. Needless alarm. No loss. 

Still. November 11, 5.04 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J-olm H. Fagan, 11 Centre street. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 7.52 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. E. C. Rines, 106 AVai-ren street. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 7.05 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke at 130 North Main street. No fire. 

Box 413. November 17, 2.54 p. m. Fire in residence at 
103 South Main street, owned by Mrs. Ellen E. Haggerty and 
occupied by D. J. Ahearn and Arthur Leech. Caused by over- 
heated chimney. 1,250 feet hose wet. Recall, 3.15 p. M. 

Value. Loss. lusurauce. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $3,000.00 $100.00 $2,000.00 $100.00 

l]ox 45. November 22, 11.30 p. m. Fire in block at 1^ 
Turnpike street, owned by James F. Kelley and occupied by J. 
J. Fitzgerald as a bakery. Caused by kettle of fat taking fire. 
Extinguished by the owner without assistance. No loss. 

Still. November 29, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dr. E. A. Clark, 35 Pleasant street. No loss. 

, Still. December 4, 9.29 a. m. Chimney fire in sewing 
school, Union street. No loss. 

Still. December 9, 6.56 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
off]. Isabel, 175 North State street. No loss. 

11-11. December 10, 8.34 a. m. A call for assistance from 
Enfield, N. H. Fire in woolen mill. Gov. Hill steamer, 
reserve hose reel and detail from tlie department sent. P^ngine 
worked six hours. 



364 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. December 14, 2.49 p. m. Fire in residence at 2 Gove 
avenue, owned by the Tahanto Real Estate Association and 
occupied by Louis Carter. Caused by over-heated chimney. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $3,500.00 $22.61 $2,500.00 $22.61 

Still. December 24, 4.19 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John H. Couch, 8 Essex street. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 7.54 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of D. J. Murphy, 57 South Main street. ^Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Hose company. No loss. 

Still. December 28, 8.00 A. m. Chimney fii'e in residence 
of Mrs. William L. Foster, 60 North State street. No loss. 

December 29, 9.30 a. m. Slight fire in harness room of 
stable, 19 Pleasant street, owned and occupied by N. A. 
Dunklee. Caused by blouse coming in contact Avith over-heated 
funnel. Extinguished by owners and employees without assist- 
ance from the department. No alarm given. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $2,000.00 $1,000.00 

Contents, 3,500.00 25.00 2,500.00 25.00 

Still. December 31, 1.17 a. m. Slight fire in basement of 
building 187 North Main street, owned by Mrs. Lyman Merrill 
and occupied by M. L. Partch and A. C. Randall. Cause 
unknown. Extinguished by Chemical company assisted by the 
department. See alarm from box 23, same date. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $7,500.00 $275.00 $4,000.00 $275.00 
Contents : 

M. L. Partch, 2,000.00 75.00 1,200.00 75.00 

A. C. Randall, 1,200.00 25.00 500.00 25.00 

Box 23. December 31, 1.30 A. M. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire as a precautionary measure, l^ines run out but no hose 
wet. Recall 1.40 A. m. 

All of tlie above not otherwise credited were extinguished by 
the Chemical company. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 365 



Penacook. 



Still. January 28, 12.15 p. m. Fire in residence on Mer- 
rimack avenue, owned by Levi W. Everett and occupied by 
Horace D. Bean. Caused by defective chimney. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. Pd. 

Building, $1,500.00 $1.50 $1,000.00 $1.50 

Contents, 700.00 5.00 700.00 5.00 

Still. February 3, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Patrick Spearman, on Spring street. No loss. 

Bell Alarm. March 23, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in res- 
idence owned by W. W. Eastman on West Canal street. No 
loss. 

Still. April 27, 12.00 m. Brush fire at the Borough. 
Extinguished by detail from Pioneer company. 

Bell Alarm. May 8, 9.15 a. m. Fire in residence and 
barn on Washington street, owned by Ella A. Wadleigh and 
occupied by L. H. Crowther and J. C. & G. E. Farrand. 
Caused by children playing with matches. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. Pd. 


Building, $3,000.00 


$157.00 


$2,500.00 


$157.00 


Contents (barn), 90.00 


75.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. December 20, 8.00 p. m. Chimney fire in Cutler 
House, Main street. No loss. 

Still. December 31, 11.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence on Chai-les street, owned by the Methodist Society. No 
loss. 

East Concord. 

January 10, 12.00 m. Chimney fire in residence of James 
Riley on Penacook street. No loss. 

April 30, 2.00 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by Hugh 
Warren, Pembroke street. No loss. 

May 1, 1.30 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by Hugh War- 
ren, Pembroke street. No loss. 



366 



CITY OF COXCOKD. 



May 25, 11.00 p. m. Brush fire on lilufF, on land owned by 
J. E. Pecker. No loss. 

May 26, 2.30 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by Josiah 
Fernald and Scott French, Portsmouth street. No loss. 

West Concord. 

July 6, 2.00 p. M. Brush fire on Lake street. Extinguished 
by detail from Cataract company. No loss. 



Buildings. 

Precinct, 
Penacook, 

Total, 
Contents. 
Precinct, 
Penacook, 

Total, 
Buildings, 

Total, 
building's and 

contents. 



Value. 



Summary. 

Loss. Insvirance. 



Ins. Pd. 



Net Loss. 



90,600.00 !^3,2M.83 S61, 250.00 .1^2,494.83 §5750.00 
4,500.00 158..50 3,.500.00 1.58.50 



195,100.00 $3,403.33 $64,750.00 $2,653.33 $725.00 

^32,150.00 $4,363.00 S21, 400.00 $3,638.00 8725.00 
790.00 80.00 700.00 5.00 75.00 



$32,940.00 $4,443.00 $22,100.00 $3,643.00 $800.00 
95,100.00 3,403.33 64,750.00 2,653.33 7.50.00 



128,040.00 S7,846.33 $80,850.00 $6,296.33 $1,550.00 



A comparative table of gross and net losses for the past ten 
years. 

Gross. Net. 



1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 



$38,981.00 
22,854.00 

7,636.00 
52,682.00 
45,515'.00 

8,738.00 

68,439.00 

14,149.00 

17,945.00 

• 7,846.00 > 



514,421.00 
2,477.00 
2,842.00 

31,629.00 
3,758.00 
3,672.00 

32,012.00 
4,882.00 
7,428.00 
1,550.00 



fire department. 367 

Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows: 

Precinct, located at the Central fire station, one first-class 
Amoskeag engine, "' Eagle," with modern hose wagon, 
attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine company (13 men) ; 
one second-class Amoskeag engine, " Kearsarge," and mod- 
ern hose wagon, attached to the Kearsarge Steam Fire Engine 
company (13 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag engine, 
" Governor Hill," relief steamer, in charge of an engineer 
and fireman ; one double 60-gallon tank Hollowav chemical 
engine in charge of two permanent men ; one ladder truck, 
"City of Concord," attached to hook and ladder company 
(21 men). There are ten horses owned bv the city kept at 
this station. The precinct companies have swing harnesses 
upon all apparatus except steamers. There are six perma- 
nent men located at the Central station and one permanent 
man at each hose house within the precinct. 

The Alert Hose company (11 men), located on Washing- 
ton street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent man 
and horse. 

The Good Will Hose companv (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State streets, has a modern hose 
wagon with permanent man and horse. 

Veterans' Auxiliary company (30 men). 

The "Pioneer" steamer, at Penacook (2S men), is a 
fourth class Silsby, with hose wagon. 

The Cataract company (30 men), at West Concord, has a 
Hunneman 6-inch cylinder hand-engine and a modern hose 
wagon, and provided with swing harness. 

Old Fort, East Concord (30 men), has a 4^-inch cylinder 
Hunneman hand-engine. 

Hose. 
Fabric : 
Precinct ....... 8,300 feet. 

Penacook ....... 2,200 " 

W^est Concord ...... 900 "• 

1 1,400 feet. 



368 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Leather : 
East Concord 



Public Reservoirs. 



1. Main street, opposite Abbot-Downing Co. 's 

2. Main street, middle front state honse yard 

3. Main street, rear city hall 

4. State street, corner Washington street* 

5. Rumford street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's 

6. Orchard street, corner of Pine street* 

7. School street, corner of Summit street* 



450 feet. 

Capacity, 
cubic feet. 

1,000 

I ,500 

3,000 

2,000 

1,000 

4,000 

3^500 



The city has enjoyed another year of comparative immunity 
from fire loss. 

Although the number of alarms responded to was consider- 
ably in excess of the number for the preceding year, a large 
majority of them were minor affairs, and a glance at the com- 
parative table of losses will show the losses of the year to 
compare favorably with those of the preceding ten 3'ears. 

No extensive repairing of apparatus has been necessary. 

One modern hose wagon, two horses, one single harness, 
one set of double harness, one horse clipping machine, and 
one Baker cellar pipe have been purchased. 

The fire alarm telegraph system is in good condition. 
Fi\e direct action tappers have been added to the system 
and the main lines have been extended one-half mile. The 
addition of two signal boxes was desired, but heavy snow- 
storms with the attendant expense for extra horses, breaking 
out hvdrauts, and the rapid and constant increase in price of 
all articles of consumption precluded the possibility of 
accomplishing this without exceeding the appropriation. 

I can only renew my reconnnendations of last year 
concerning the needs of the department. Those needs are 
presumably well understood, and will, no doubt, be remedied 
as rapidly as possible. 

*Brick cemented. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 369 

During the month of August I had the honor to attend, as 
a delegate, the convention of the International Association 
of Fire Engineers, at Syracuse, N. Y. It was a most enter- 
taining and instructive convention, a report of which was 
rendered at that time. 

I wish to return my thanks to your honorable body for the 
compliment conveyed in the increase of salary, coupled 
with the assurance that it is fully appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engmeer. 



24 



370 



CITY OK CONCORD. 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



1899. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 
William C. Green, Office, Centni! Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. * 

PRECINCT. 

John J. McNulty, 1st Asst., M<acliinist, 7 Railroad square. 

William E. Dow, 2d Asst., Painter, 13 Academy street. 

John J. McNulty, Clerk of Board. 



Abial W. Rolfe, 



John E. Frye, 



George W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 
Maniifactvirer, 

WARD '2. 
Farmer, 

WARD 3. 
Overseer, 



Penacook St., Peuacook. 



Peuacook St., East Concord. 



Main St., West Concord. 



KEAESARGE STEAM P^IRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, No. 2. 



OFFICERS. 

Sylvester T. Ford, Captain. A. H. Britton, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 
Nos. Names. 

11 Sylvester T.Ford, 

12 A. H. Britton, 

13 Charles H. Swain, 

15 James H. Sanders, 

16 Frank E. Heath, 

84 Thomas J. Morrison, 

19 Charles Powell, 

20 Elba F. Home, 
22 George B. Davis, 

21 J. E. Morrison, 

85 H. M. Sanders, 
18 Frank N. Taylor, 

14 O. H. Thomas, 
87 F. J. Young, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Moulder, 

Hardware dealer. 
Carpenter, 
Carriage painter, 
Salesman, 
Carriage painter. 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage painter. 
Janitor, 
Gas titter. 
Painter, 

Permanent driver. 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
41 South Main st. 
12 Thompson St. 
18 Holt St. 
45 Perley st. 
38 Perley st. 
32 Downing st. 
62 Rum ford St. 
10 Liberty St. 
28 North Main st. 
8 Tliorndike st. 
112 Pleasant st. 
25 School St. 
Central Station. 
Central station. 



PIKE DEPAKTMENT. 



371 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, No. 1. 



W. J. Coffin, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

J. C. McGiLVEAY, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

MEMBERS. 



Badge 






Nos 


Naines. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


24 


Walter J. Coffin, 


Shipping clerk. 


5 Short St. 


25 


John C. McGilvray, 


Jig-sawyer, 


9 Pearl st. 


35 


L. W. Tozier, 


Barber, 


47 Thorn dike st. 


30 


Thomas D. Gannon, 


Machinist, 


109* Warren st. 


88 


Charles H. Sanders, 


Machinist, 


112 Pleasant st. 


31 


Orrin C. Hodgdon, 


Engineer, 


31 Beac(m st. 


36 


David .J. Adams, 


Janitor, 


107 North Main st. 


32 


William W. Brown, 


Photographer, 


9 Cummings ave. 


34 


William A. Sewell, 


Expressman, 


10 Smith block. 


38 


George H. Downing, 


Electrician, 


12 South St. 


27 


Oscar G. Pelkey, 


Harness-maker, 


3 South Main st. 


29 


John W. Inman, 


Carriage-painter, 


21 Perley st. 


89 


William J. Bailey, 


Permanent driver, 


Central station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, No. 4. 
RELIEF ENGINE. 



Badge 

Nos. 



Names. Occupations. Residences. 

17 Elmer H. Farrar, jE/igfJneer, Machinist, 78 South State st. 

23 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith. li Thompson st. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

Fred W. Scott, Captain. George L. Osgood, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

George L. Osgood, Treasurer. 







MEMBERS. 




Badge 






Nos. 


Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


37 


Fred W. Scott, 


Builder, 


43 Lyndon st. 


38 


George L. Osgood, 


Book-keeper, 


45 (xreen st. 


39 


James Crowley, 


Barber, 


115 Warren st. 


40 


John H. Seavey, 


Stone-cutter, 


Alert Hose house. 


41 


Charles H. Rowell, 


Carpenter, 


23 Concord st. 


42 


L. B. Putney, 


Carpenter, 


3 Abbott St. 


43 


C. C. Chesley, 


Carpenter, 


11 Prince st. 


44 


C. J. French, 


Stone-cutter, 


5 Perkins st. 


45 


Joseph H. Brunelle, 


Blacksmith, 


34 Washington st. 


46 


James Jepson, 


Carpenter, 


26 Beacon st. 


48 


John H. True, 


Permanent driver. 


Alert Hose house. 



372 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, No. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

John C. Mills, Captain. Hiram T. Dickerman, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Charles C. Nutter, Treasurer. 

MEMBERS. 



Badge 






Nos. 


Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


50 


John C. Mills, 


Blacksmith, 


34 Downing st. 


51 


Hiram T. Dickerman, 


Pahiter, 


94^ South State st. 


54 


George H. Sawyer, 


Blacksmith, 


5 Allison St. 


55 


Charles C. Nutter, 


Painter, 


39 Laurel st. 


52 


John E. Gove, 


Wood-worker, 


36 Beacon st. 


53 


Charles A. Richards, 


Wood-worker, 


45 South State st. 


57 


Jasper R. Mudgett, 


Wood-worker, 


98 South State st. 


60 


Frank S. Putnam, 


Packer, 


101 South State st. 


56 


H. H. Ash, 


Machinist, 


23j Perley st. 


61 


E. D. Clark, 


Springmaker, 


47 South State st. 


58 


M. J.Martin, 


Permanent driver. 


Good Will Hose house. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1 



Badge 
Nos. 



Names. Occupations. Residences. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, Permanent engineer and driver. Central stat'n. 

92 A. P. Turner, Permanent assistant engineer. Central stat'n. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, 

No. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 



Badge 
Nos. 



63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
70 
71 
72 
73 
75 
76 



Nantes. 
WillA. King, 
Ed. E. Lane, 
Benjamin Ouilette, 
Henry V. Tittemore, 
John A. Sargent, 
Daniel B. Dow, 
Will F. King, 
Frank T. Bean, 
Lucius D. Caldou, 
Geoi-gc W. Grover, 
James L. Liherty, 
Stephen P. Foster, 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Carriage builder, 
Carpenter, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Teamster, 
Builder, 

Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder. 
Carpenter, 
Carriage builder. 



Residences. 
38 Franklin st. 

5 Fremont st. 
10 Jefferson st. 

6 Avon St. 

6 Fremont st. 
54 Churcli St. 

15 Lyndon st. 

16 Avon St. 
13 West St. 

29 Thorndikc St. 

7 Harvard st. 
47 Perhiy st 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



373 



Nos 


Nmnes. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


79 


John P. Kelley, 


Machinist, 


11 Pierce st. 


80 


Sam B. Morgan, 


Carriage builder. 


10 Avon St. 


81 


Daniel Crowley, 


Coachman, 


1 Hill's ave. 


77 


Bion W.Hall, 


Carpenter, 


78 South St. 


82 


Edwin H. French, 


Carriage builder. 


29 Green st. 


78 


Harry T. Shaw, 


Clerk, 


63 School St. 


74 


Charles Parker, 


Blacksmith, 


63 South St. 


69 


Charles H. Pike, 


Carpenter, 


26 Elm St. 


96 


D. F. Crowley, 


Permanent driver. 


Central station, 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3, 

Fenacook. 



OFFICERS. 



John H. Rolfe, Captain. 

Eddie C. Durgin, Lieut, and Clerk. 

John B. Dodge, Treasurer. 



Henry Rolfe, Foreman of Hose. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 
Leslie H. Crowther, Steward. 



Naines. 

John H. Rolfe, 
Eddie C. Durgin, 
Jolm B. Dodge, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Walter H. Rolfe, 
George H. Sager, 
William C. Ackerman, 
Leslie H. Crowther, 
John W. McNeil, 
David S. Marsh, 
Fred H. Morrill, 
Edwin B. Prescott, 
George H. Tucker, 
Peter A. Keenan, 
Laurin W. Rolfe, 
Fred C. Ferrin, 
Lester W. Prescott, 
Harper S. Allen, 
Fred M. Dodge, 
Harry G. Rolfe, 
Clarence A. Davis, 
Ruel G. Morrill, 
William Taylor, 
George N. Robertson, 
Frank P. Robertson, 
Albert S. Andrews, 
Samuel G. Sanborn, 
Harry H. McNeil, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 

Foreman, 

Carpenter, 

Book-keeper, 

Carpenter, 

Machinist, 

Machinist, 

Macliinist, 



Residences. 

14 Centre St. 

46 Spring St. 

59 Merrimack st. 

26 Penacook st. 

49 Merrimack st. 

24 High St. 

7 Washington st. 



Maker plumbers'supplies, 23 Washington st. 



Mill operative, 
Door maker, 
Sash maker, 
Marketman, 
Axle maker, 
Table maker. 
Electrician, 
Band sawyer, 
Saw maker. 



1 Union st. 

19 Centre st. 
63 High St. 

88 South Main st. 
48 West Main st. 
93 High St. 
14 Centre st. 

20 High St. 

56 Summer st. 



Makerplumbers'supplies, 88 Merrimack st. 

Electrical inst. maker, 59 Merrimack st. 

Book-keeper, 21 Cross st. 

Miller, 40 Charles st. 

Farmer, 75 Washington st. 

Carpenter, ^ 120 South Main st. 

Axle maker, 17 Washington st. 

Axle maker, 6 Church st. 

Axle maker, 45 Charles st. 

Blacksmith, 15 Union st. 

Spinner, 16 Charles st. 



374 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

Eaat Concord. 

OFFICERS. 
Elbridge Emery. Captain. .John C. Hutchins, Treasurer. 

George O. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. Charles P. White, Steward. 



Names. 
Elbridge Emery, 
George O. Robinson, 
John C. Hutchins, 
C. E. Robinson, 
Daniel B. Sanborn, 
William L. Batchelder, 
William H. Smith, 
James L. Potter, 
Samuel G. Potter, 
Charles P. White, 
William E. Virgin, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
John Spanlding, 
Elvin Culver, 
Fred S. Farnum, 
Shad Cate, 
Ross W. Cate, 
George E. Cate, 
Jeiferson Durgin, 
Louis E. Radford, 
William E. Cowley, 
Bert Kiiowles, 
James Smith, 
James Cox. 
Daniel Lewis, 
Ahram Cushing, 
Robert Bell, 
Edward A. Newell, 
Thomas Spaulding, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Butcher, 
Water dealer, 
Engineer, 
Clerk, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Milk dealer. 
Milk dealer. 
Stone-cutter, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Moulder, 
Shoe-maker, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Horse-shoer, 
Blacksmith, 
Milk dealer, 
Painter. 
Store-keeper, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Section foreman, 
Driver, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Wood-worker, 
Farmer, 



Residences. 
Potter St. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook St. 
Shaker St. 
Potter St. 
Shaker st. 
Potter .St. 
Appleton St. 
Pembroke st. 
Penacook .st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Portsmouth st. 
Penacook st. 
Pembroke st. 
Shawmut st. 
Penacook st. 
Shawmut st. 
Shawmut st. 
Penacook st. 
Shawmut st. 
Penacook st. 
Fort sq. 
Shawmut st. 
Penacook st. 
Pembroke st. 
Shawmut st. 
Penacook st. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 

Went Concord. 
OFFICERS. 

Jeremiah Cotter, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 

Hiram E. Quimby, Lieut, and Clerk. Patrick Conway. Steward. 

Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Jlose. 



Names. 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 



Residences 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 



375 



Names. 

Patrick Conway, 
Patrick Ryan, 
AbialC. Abbott, 
Thomas F. Hearn, 
Tliomas Pentland, 
Jolin Harrison, 
Fred W. Peabody, 
John Caldbeck, 
James W. Powers, 
William D. Harrington, 
Roy Shepard, 
Lawrence Hearn, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Tlieodore Wihnot, 
Edward Loverin, 
James F. Abbott, 
John P. Harrington, 



Occupatioxs. 

Engineer, 

Stone-cutter, 

Street railway. 

Engineer, 

Blacksmith, 

Loom fixer, 

Motorman, 

Expressman, 

Stone-cutter, 

Blacksmith, 

Post-office clerk. 

Mill operative. 

Stone-cutter, 

Mill overseer. 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Quarry man. 



Residences. 

Main st. 
Hutchins St. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Lake st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Hutchins st. 
Hiitchins st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Main st. 
Hutchins st. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 

OFFICERS. 

D. B. Newhall, Captain. 

W. E. Dow, First Lieutenant. Henry Tucker, Second Lieutenant. 

Ira C. Evans, Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 
D. B. Newhall, 
W. E. Dow, 
J. J. McNulty, 
Fred Leighton, 
Henry M. Gibney, 
Ira C. Evans, 
James F. Ward, 
William Badger, 
Benjamin Bilsboroiigh, 
William M. Leaver, 
Henry Tucker, 
Charles C. Hill, 
Charles C. Moore, 
George H. Stickney, 
John H. Sargent, 
Fred S. Johnson, 



Naines. 
Oliver Thompson, 
John Ahern, 
Frank E. Warren, 
James G. Leighton, 
Sydney S. Upham, 
Lewis C. Carter, 
George A. Mitchell, 
William F. Carr, 
Will C. Wingate, 
Fred U. Lane, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Frank H. Silver. 
Frank T. Smith, 
H. W. Piper, 
D. L. Neal. 



376 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REGULATIONS OF CONCORD FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

In the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight 
Hundred and Ninety-Four. 

An Ordinance in amendment of all sections in Chapter i8 
of the revised ordinances relating to the fire department. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord 
as follozvs : 

Section i. The fire department will consist of a chief 
engineer, two assistants within the precinct, and one engineer 
each from Ward i, Ward 2, and Ward 3. Two steamer and 
hose companies, to consist of thirteen men, including driver; 
one relief steamer to consist of two men ; two hose companies 
to consist of eleven men, to include a driver; a chemical 
engine company to consist of two men ; and a hook and 
ladder company to consist of twenty-one men, to include a 
driver ; steamer Pioneer, not less than twenty noV more than 
forty men ; hand-engine companies. No. 2 and No. 3, not 
less than twent}' or more than thirty men each. The 
engineers shall exercise the powers of fire wards, and those 
within the precinct to constitute the board of engineers. 

Sect. 2. The chief engineer and assistant engineers, and 
all other members of the fire department shall hold their 
respective offices and places until they are removed, or their 
ofiices or places otherwise vacated. The mayor, for cause 
assigned by him, and after due hearing by him, may, with 
the approval of a majority of the board of aldermen, at any 
time remove from office or place the chief engineer, any 
assistant engineer, and officer or member of the department. 
In case of vacancies from any cause in the department, of 
officers or men connected in any manner with the fire service, 
such vacancies shall be immediately filled by the appointment 
and confirmation of the board of mayor and aldermen. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 377 

Sect. 3. The chief engineei" shall give his entire time to 
the duties of his office, and shall not engage in or be con- 
nected with any other business or occupation, and shall reside 
in a house to be furnished by the city free from rent. He 
shall receive in full for his services, in addition to the use of 
said house, rent free, the sum of ten hundred and fifty dollars 
per annum. 

Sect. 4. The chief engineer shall have the sole com- 
mand at fires over all persons, whether members of the 
fire department or not. He shall direct all proper measures 
for extinguishing fires, protecting property, preserving 
order, and enforcing the laws, ordinances, and' regulations 
respecting fires; and shall examine into the condition of the 
fire engines and all other fire apparatus, and of the fire 
engine houses, and other houses belonging to the citv and 
used for the department and by tlie companies thereto 
attached as often as once a week, and whenever directed to 
do so by the mayor. He shall certify all bills and submit the 
same for inspection monthly to the joint standing committee on 
fire department. He shall report to the city council annually 
in the month of December a statement of the receipts and 
expenditures of his department, the condition of the fire 
engines and all other fire apparatus, a detailed schedule of 
the property in his charge, the names of the officers and 
members, and all other facts in relation to the department. 
Whenever the fire engines or other fire apparatus require 
repairs he shall cause the same to be made under the direction 
of the committee on fire department, and as far as practicable 
shall examine into the location and condition of fire apparatus 
belonging to the corporations or private individuals within 
the limits of the city. He shall require permanent men, 
when not otherwise engaged, to perform such other duties 
and do such other work as in his judgment may be deemed 
proper. He shall keep fair and exact rolls of the respective 
companies, specifying the time of admission and discharge, 
and the age of each member, and shall report annually, or 
oftener if directed, all accidents by fire which may happen 
within the citv, with the cause thereof, the number and 



378 CITY OK CONCOHU. 

description of the buildings destroyed or injured, and the 
amount of loss and insiu'ance on the same, together with the 
names of owners or the occupants, and shall make returns as 
required by the Laws of 18S9, Chapter 84, and entitled "An 
act in relation to returns and statistics of fires." He shall 
visit each tlepartment house as often as ^ practicable, and 
inspect the men, the books of the house, and see that the 
quarters are properly conducted and in good order. He 
shall have the power to suspend any officer or member of the 
department for insubordination, disorderly conduct, or 
neglect of duty, said suspension to continue pending the 
action of the mayor and aldermen. The chief engineer shall 
examine all places where shavings and other combustible 
materials may be collected or deposited, and cause the same 
to be removed by the tenants or occupants of such places, or 
at their expense, whenever in his opinion such removal is 
necessary for the security of the city against fires. 

Sect. ^. In the absence of the chief engineer, the next 
assistant engineer in rank who may be present shall have the 
powers and perform the duties of the chief engineer, and the 
seniority in rank of the engineers shall be determined by the 
board of engineers at their first meeting. 

Sect. 6. The foreman of each engine, hose, and hook 
and ladder company, within one day after every fire at which 
said compan}^ may have attended, shall examine into the 
condition of the fire apparatus belonging to his respective 
company, and report any deficiency which may exist to the 
chief engineer. He shall keep, or cause to be kept by the 
clerk of his company, exact rolls, specifying the time of 
admission, discharge, and age of each member, and accounts 
of all city property entrusted to the care of the several mem- 
bers, and of all cases of absence and tardiness, in a book 
provided for that purpose by the city, which rolls of record 
books are always to be subject to the order of the chief 
engineer and mayor. They shall also make, or cause to be 
made, to the chief engineer, true and accurate returns of all 
members, with their ages, and of the apparatus entrusted to 
their care, whenever called upon to do so. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 379 

Sect. 7. The foreman of each company shall, under the 
direction of the chief ens^ineer, have charge and management 
of his company at fires; the assist;tnt foreman shall assist the 
foreman in discharge of his duties and act as clerk of the 
company, and in the absence of the foreman assume his 
authority. The foreman and assistant foreman shall be 
appointed by the chief engineer. 

Sect. S. The stewards of the Alert and Good Will Hose 
companies will act as dri\'ers of hose carriages, take charge 
of and properly care for and exercise the horses used by each 
company. They shall be permanently engaged and devote 
their whole time to the department, and sleep in their 
respective hose houses at night; and for the proper execution 
of all duties required of them shall be subject to the direction 
of the chief engineer. 

Sect. 9. It shall be the duty of every engine, hose, and 
hook and ladder company to have its engine, hose, and other 
apparatus cleaned, washed, oiled, reeled, and housed immedi- 
ately after its return from any fire or service, and at all times 
to maintain the same in good condition, and the members of 
the several companies shall perform any necessary duties 
which the chief engineer or their respective foremen may 
direct. 

Sect. 10. All members of the department when on duty 
shall wear some suitable badge, to be designated by the board 
of engineers. The chief and permanent members shall wear 
at all times when on tluty the regulation parade uniform 
worn by the fire department. 

Sect. ii. The pay-rolls for the board of engineers and 
the several fire companies shall be made up by the chief and 
clerk of the board of engineers semi-annually, on the first 
day of January and July. Foremen and clerks of companies 
will foryvard their paj'-rolls to the board of engineers for 
approval, and after the action of said engineers and the 
sanction of the mayor and aldermen, said pay-rolls shall be 
passed over to the city collector, under whose sole direction 
all sums for services of call firemen shall be disbursed. 



380 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. I3. No charge for extra services will be allowed 
any member of the department unless upon an order of a 
member of the board of engineers. 

Sect. 13. No engine, hose, or hook and ladder carriage 
shall be taken to a fire out of the cit}' without permission 
from the chief engineer, except steamer Pioneer, which may 
be taken to any fire in the village of Penacook, nor shall any 
apparatus of the fire department be taken from the city 
except in case of fire, without permission from the board of 
mayor and aldermen ; and in sending an}- apparatus to aid in 
extinguishing fires in neighboring localities, the chief in all 
cases will authorize his assistant next in rank available to 
take charge of the direction of such apparatus, and not allow 
any fireman, at such an emergency, to leave the city, except 
such a ninnber as is actuallv required to man the apparatus, 
and no member to leave without permission or direction from 
the chief engineer. 

Sect. 14. It shall be the duty of engineers and firemen, 
whenever there is an alarm of fire in the city, to repair im- 
mediately to the place of such fire, wearing a suitable badge, 
and the engineers to take proper measures that the several 
engines and other apparatus be arranged and duly worked for 
the speedy and effectual extinguishment of the fire. The 
engineers shall inspect and make themselves familiar with all 
shops, hotels, tenement blocks, and all public buildings, 
halls, churches, school houses, and asylums, once in each six 
months, and studv the location of all hydrants and reservoirs 
in the city, and generally inform themselves in all matters 
pertaining to their duties as engineers. No engineer shall 
interfere with or attempt to give orders relative to the location 
or use of a line of hose, when he has ascertained that another 
has command of it, unless by consent of the engineer in 
command of it, or by orders of the officer in command at the 
fire; and it shall be his duty to inquire if there is an ofiicer 
in charge. 

Sect. i^. For each absence from fire, or neglect of duty, 
the chief engineer, the assistant engineers, and engineers of 
steamers shall be fined three dollars, and each other member 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 381 

of the department one dollar; provided, however, that any 
fireman liable as above may in case of temporary absence or 
sickness have power of substitution by giving notice, each 
assistant engineer to the chief, eacn foreman to an engineer, 
and each member to the foreman of his company. Absence 
of more than twenty-four hours shall not be considered tem- 
porary, and he should get permission from the chief engineer 
to allow a substitute with pay from such absentee. 

Sect. i6. Any volunteer company using the apparatus 
of the city at any fire shall be under the control and com- 
mand of the chief engineer and his assistants, agreeably to 
the foregoing provisions of this chapter. 

Sect. 17. The department shall appear for public parade, 
drill and inspection at such times as the chief engineer and 
committee on fire department shall order, for which expense 
three hundred dollars can be expended annually. The com- 
panies in Wards i, 2, and 3 will attend by invitation and 
voluntarily. Each company in the department under the 
direction of the chief engineer or assistants shall take out 
their respective engines and apparatus for exercise and drill 
as often as he shall direct, such exercise and drill to take place 
in public, not oftener than once a month, and at least once in 
two months, between the first of April and November. 

Sect. iS. The engineers shall have control of all persons 
appointed to serve in any company of the fire department and 
power to direct and control the labor of all persons present at 
any fire. An engineer may and shall cause any fire deemed 
by him to be dangerous in any place to be extinguished or 
removed. 

Sect. 19. The engineers may establish such regulations 
respecting the kindling, guarding, and safe keeping of fires, 
and for the removal of shavings and other combustibles 
from any building or place, as they shall think expedient. 
Such regulations shall be signed by a majority of the 
engineers. Such regulations shall be approved by the mayor 
and aldermen, recorded by the city clerk, and copies attested 
by him posted up in two or more places in the city thirty 
days, when they shall take effect. Penalties not exceeding 



382 CITY OF CONCORD. 

twenty dollars for each offense may be prescribed by the 
engineers for the breach of such regulations, and such regu- 
lations shall remain in force until altered or annulled. 

Sect. 20. The board of engineers may from time to 
time make and enforce such regulations for the government 
of the department as may be deemed proper, and subject to 
the approval of the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 31. If any member of either of the several com- 
panies shall willfully neglect or refuse to discharge his duty 
or shall be guilty of disorderly conduct or disobedience to any 
officer or to any engineer, he shall for any such offence be 
forthwith dismissed from the department by direction of the 
chief engineer. No person shall be a member of, or serve 
in, the fire department, who is under the age of twenty years, 
and no person whose occupation is carried on outside the city 
shall be appointed a member of the fire department. 

Sect. 32. All applicants for membership shall be nom- 
inated by the chief engineer and shall receive pay and be 
considered members of the department from the date of their 
confirmation by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

No officer or member of the permanent, or officer of the 
call, force shall attend any political convention as a delegate, 
distribute tickets at any election, or take any part whatever in 
political matters other than to exercise the right of suffrage, 
and no political or religious discussion shall be permitted in 
any of the department houses. 

Sect. 23. The chief engineer shall have the care and 
management of the rooms, apparatus, machinery, wires, 
poles, and signal boxes connected with the fire-alarm tele- 
graph. He shall prepare rules and directions for giving 
alarms of fire through the telegraph. He shall have the 
superintendence, and under the direction of the joint standing 
committee on fire department, have control of the several 
stations, the apparatus, the furniture therein, and all other 
property appertaining to the department. 

vSect. 24. Permanent officers and men of the department 
shall be entitled to vacation without loss of pay, not exceed- 
ing fourteen days in each year, to be granted under direction 
of the chief ensfineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 383 

Sect. 2v The joint standing committee on fire depart- 
ment, subject to the board of ma3'or and aldermen, shall by 
themselves or agent piuxhase all supplies in connection with 
the fire department, and direct all repairs of houses and 
apparatus ; and all bills contracted for the department must 
receive their approval before being passed on by the com- 
mittee on accounts and claims. They shall hold stated 
meetings at least once each month at the Central fire station, 
and all communications to the cit}^ government from the fire 
department must come through said committee, and in the 
month of December in each year, in connection with the 
chief engineer, they shall make such recommendations as to 
the amount of appropriations the wants of the department 
will require for the coming year. 

Sect. 26. The city marshal and regular police officers 
shall have in charge all matters relating to the removal and 
protection of personal property endangered by fire, and any 
person entering a building or removing property contrary to 
the orders of the city marshal or such police officers shall be 
fined five dollars; and in the absence of firemen at fires from 
their respective department houses, the policemen in that 
vicinity will take charge of said houses. 

Sect. 27. The annual pay of the members of the fire 
department shall be as follows, and in full for all services: 
Chief, ten hundred and fifty dollars per annum and house rent ; 
permanent force at Central fire station, seven hundred and 
twenty-eight dollars each ; drivers at Good Will and Alert Hose 
houses, six hundred dollars each, per annum, paid monthly; 
assistant engineers, one hundred and twentj'-five dollars each 
within the precinct ; engineers of steamers, one hundred and 
fifteen dollars each ; members of steamer, hose, and hook 
and ladder companies, within the precinct, eighty dollars per 
annum, except foremen and assistant foremen, wdio shall 
receive ninety and eighty-five dollars respectively; outside 
the precinct, engine companies Nos. 3 and 3, two hundred 
and forty dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer company, No. 3, 
five hundred dollars, said sums to be divided among the 



384 CITY OF CONCORD. 

members as each company shall direct; assistant engineer at 
Penacook, twenty-five dollars ; assistant engineers at East and 
West Concord, ten dollars each. 

Sect. 28. The several engineers residing in Wards i, 2, 
and 3 shall have entire care and control, under the direction 
of the chief engineer, of the buildings and appurtenances 
occupied in part by the fire department situated in said wards,' 
respectively, to whom all applications for the use of the halls 
or any other part of such building shall be made. Said 
engineers may severally appoint janitors, who shall serve 
under the exclusive direction of the engineer having the 
care and control of the buildings where said janitor shall be 
appointed. Each of said engineers shall annuall}-, in the 
month of December, render a detailed statement, in writing, 
to the mayor and aldermen, of all receipts and expenditui'es 
for the preceding year on account of such buildings. 

Sect. 29. Stewards for the Pioneer Steamer company 
and engine companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be appointed by 
the mayor and aldermen, and shall receive for all services 
performed by them in that capacity the following sums: For 
Pioneer Steamer company, thirty dollars per annum, and, 
when performing the duties of janitor of the building, an 
additional sum of forty-five dollars per annum ; and for 
stewards of engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, each fifteen 
dollars per annum. No steward shall be allowed to pur- 
chase supplies for such building or for the department, unless 
by the authority and direction of the committee on fire 
department, and in no case shall he have any care or control of 
the building or its appurtenances occupied by the company of 
which he is a member, except in the immediate service of the 
company, unless he shall be appointed janitor thereof, when 
he shall be under the direction of the engineer, as provided 
in the foregoing section. 

Sect. 30. The drivers of hook and ladder truck, one 
hose wagon, and steamer shall at all times.be on duty at the 
Central fire station to attend to all fire-alarm calls, and shall 
do such other work in connection with the station and 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 385 

apparatus, as the chief engineer may direct. All permanent 
men shall lodge in their respective stations (except chief), 
and in all cases of absence a substitute luust be furnished ; 
and in all cases when any extra service is required, the chief, 
with the sanction of the committee on fire department, will 
have power to hire the same; the chief may also increase as 
far as possible the number of call men that wish to lodge at 
any fire station, subject to the regulations of the fire depart- 
ment. The chief engineer shall be furnished with a horse 
and wagon, to be maintained by the city, for his use at all 
times. 

Sect. 31. The chief engineer shall, under the direction 
of the committee on fire department, keep such other horses 
and men subject to labor under the commissioner of high- 
ways as are not by ordinance detailed for permanent duty at 
the Central fire station. 

Sect. 32. On or after the passage of the foregoing 
ordinance, at any meeting the board of mayor and aldermen 
can declare vacancies to suit the outlined changes in the 
department and make such appointments as will conform to 
the terms of this ordinance. 

Sect, 33. All ordinances and parts of ordinances incon- 
sistent with this ordinance are hereby repealed, but such 
repeal shall in no wise revive or put in force any ordinance 
heretofore repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect 
after action is taken as contemplated in section 32 of this 
ordinance. 

Passed November 13, 1S94. 



25 



386 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS 

Approved by Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
December 29, 1S94. 

Article i. Any engine or hose company running out a 
line of hose from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled to the 
pipe, although the hose of other companies may be attached, 
in order to reach the fire. And any compan}- coming to a 
fire, and finding an incomplete line of hose laid out from a 
hydrant or steamer, shall attach to and lengthen out such 
line, in lieu of laying a line of its own. 

Art. 2. When two or more engine companies are 
playing in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the 
company attaching to hydrant or steamer as provided in the 
foregoing article ; but any company furnishing the entire 
line, and receiving water from a steamer, the pipe shall 
belong to such company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Hose companies shall attach first lines to high 
pressure hydrants where accessible ; steamers attaching to 
those of low pressure, or reservoir. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant 
or reservoir unless their hose and apparatus for attaching to 
the same are at hand and ready for use. 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning from 
fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, and it is 
required of officers of companies to maintain perfect order 
and decorum in their respective commands during all such 
service. 

Art. 6. In case of fire the foreman first arriving shall be 
in command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 7. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding to a 
fire, to use the utmost care and caution consistent with 
promptness. Racing between companies is forbidden imder 
any circumstances. Any collision or casualty occurring to 
horses or apparatus will be considered a sufficient cause for 
the suspension of the driver in charge at the time. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 387 

Art, 8. Fire hats are furnished by the city for the 
protection and identification of firemen, and they must be 
worn at all fires except in the severest we-ather, when caps 
may be worn. 

Art. 9. While attending fires it shall be the duty of 
members of the department, when not performing active 
service, to concentrate about their respective pieces of 
apparatus. 

Art. 10. All engine and hose companies responding to 
second or general alarms will connect, but will not lay their 
lines until they have reported to the officer in command for 
orders. 

Art. II. The wearing of badges shall not be regarded 
by members of the department as conveying to them the 
privilege of free access to premises after fire has been 
extinguished. 

Art. 12. All members of the department shall address 
all officers by their respective titles while on dutv at fires. 

Art. 13. The roll of each company shall be called as 
soon as the apparatus is housed, and no member will be 
excused except in case of sickness. Rolls must be called 
after every alarm. No officer or member will be marked 
present on the company roll unless present at fires and returns 
to house with apparatus, unless excused by an engineer. 

Art. 14. Each company shall be allowed three substi- 
tutes, to be approved by the chief engineer. 

Art. 15. All orders issued by the chief or an assistant 
engineer shall be promptly obeyed. At all fires occurring in 
the night, the chief engineer shall be identified by a red light, 
assistant engineers by blue lights. 

Art. 16. Members of the department are expected to 
cheerfully comply with all rules and regulations which are 
adopted or which may be adopted. Foremen will be held 
responsible for all lack of promptness and efficiency in their 
commands. 



388 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 
Number and Location op^ Fire-Alarm Boxes. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire-alarm 
boxes, the city is divided into five districts, viz. : 

District i. Embraces that section of the city north and 
west of Washington street, box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 3. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
ton streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
streets. 

Districts 4 and 5. Embrace all south of Pleasant street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the district. 



21 

23 
34 

25 
26 

27 

28 



District No. i. 

New Hampshire state prison. 
Curtice avenue. 
Franklin and Rumford. 
Bradley and W^alker. 
Main and Church. 
Franklin and Jackson. 
Alert Hose house. 
C. S. Gale's store. 
Centre and Auburn. 

District No. 2. 

State, opposite Court. 
Main and Chapel. 
Main and Centre. 
Main and School. 
Centre and Union. 
Scliool and Merrimack. 
School and Spring. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



389 



32 

34 
35 
36 

37 
38 



41 

42 

43 
45 
46 

47 
48 

49 
412 

413 



51- 

52. 
53- 
54- 
56. 



District No. 3. 

Warren and Pine. 
Central fire station. 
Martin's Drug Store. 
Pleasant and Spring. 
Pleasant and North Fruit. 
Orchard and Merrimack. 

• District No. 4. 

South and Thompson. 

Good Will Hose house. 

Main and Fayette. 

Nelson & Durrell's store. 

Perley and Grove. 

South, opposite Downing. 

Thorndike and South. 

West and Mills. 

Wall and Elm. 

Main, opposite Thorndike. 

District No. 5. 

B. & M. R. R. new shops. 
South Main and Allison. 
Hall and Hammond. 
Broadway and Pillsbury. 
St. Paul's School. 



Private Boxes. 
5. Boston & Maine Railroad — north end passenger 



depot. 

6. The Abbot-Downing Company. 

7. New Hampshire Asylum for the Insane, 

8. Page Belting Company. 

31. Boston & Maine Railroad coal sheds. 
33. State house. 

55. Boston & Maine Railroad old repair shop. 
In addition to the above private boxes there are three 
located inside the state prison, all numbered 9. 



390 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

I. Alarms rung in from boxes 31, 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 
48,49, 412, 413, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, and 56 will not be 
responded to by tlie Alert Hose company until signaled. 
The signal to proceed to the tire will be a second alarm, 
except 56. 

Alarms rung in from boxes S, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, i6, 17, 
iS, 19, 21, 23, 26, 27, 32, 37, and 56 will not be responded 
to by the Good Will Hose company until signaled. It will 
be governed by the same signals governing Alert Hose com- 
pany. The Alert Hose and Good Will Hose companies will 
hitch up and remain in readiness twenty minutes after the 
first alarm, to all boxes not responded to on first alarm. 
Then, receiving no signal (all out or second alarm), the offi- 
cers in charge shall dismiss their companies. 

Kearsarge Hose company will respond to all calls. 

Kearsarge steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to boxes 5, 6 and 7, on first alarm ; to boxes 
23, 24, 25, 33, 34,35, 42, 43, 45, and 413 on second; to 
all others on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill steamer will respond to boxes S and 9 on 
first alarm; to boxes 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, iS, 19, 
21, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 48, 49, 412, 
52 and 54 on second ; to all others on third. 

Chemical engine will respond to all box alarms except 8, 
9, 56, and 51. 

Veterans' Auxiliary company will respond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating from 
same box or not. 

Two rounds of eleven strokes of the bells will signalize the 
requirement of assistance out of town, and will be responded 
to by a detail of four men from each company, appointed for 
the purpose, and by those alone. Such apparatus will be 
detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further aid is 
necessary, the box alarm 34 (Central station) will follow. 

All out signal, three strokes of the bells. 



firk department. 391 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on the 
bells. 

Military Signal. 

Two rounds of 3 — i — 2. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It, will be one 
single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells the 
number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose will 
vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be struck from the button of a box, alternating as before 
mentioned. 

School Signals For Closing. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause of 
fifteen seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will be given 
at S o'clock. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given 
at 1. 15 o'clock. 

The signals to close all schools for one session will be 
given at 1 1 .30 a. m. 

The Fire-Alarm Telegraph 

Is the " Gamewell " patent. It embraces 38 miles of wire. 
On the lines are 37 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the city, 
and 10 private boxes, — in all 47. There are three alarm 
bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell-metal), one of 3,740 pounds 
(bell-metal), and one of 2,000 pounds (American steel). 
There are also 15 mechanical tappers, 36 direct-action tap- 
pers, one four-circuit repeater, and four indicators. 



392 CITY OK CONCORD. 

The batteiy consists of 214 storage battery cells for the 
lines, and 34 open circuit battery cells for oth'cr electrical 
purposes. 

The alarm was put in, in iSSo, by Edwin Rogers, 657 
Washington street, Boston, Mass. 

Directions for giving an alarm : Open the box, pull down 
the hook once only, and let go. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. * 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, 



1899=1900. 



JOHN C. ORDW AY 
HENRY F. HOLLIS 
LOUIS J. RUNDLETT 



MEMBERS. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



1900. 

JOHN C. ORDWAY . 
SUSAN J. WOODWARD . 
HENRY F. HOLLIS 



President. 

Secretary. 

JPinaiicial Acrefit. 



113 North State St. 
1^4 South Main St, 
2 Park Ridgre. 



1901 , 

HENRY C. BROWN 
AMOS J. SHURTLEFF . 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON . 



[90^ 



JOHN M. MITCHELL 
SUSAN C. BANCROFT 



CHARLES R. CORNING 



28 South St. 
33 Green St. 
7 Pine St. 



57 Rumford St. 
State Asyluni for 

Insane. 
t^3 Pleasant St. 



394 CITY OF CONCORD. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

FINANCE. 

MR. ORDWAY, MR. MITCHELL, MR. SHURTLEFF. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

MR. HOLLIS, MRS. WOODWARD, MR. CORNING. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

MR. BROWN, MR. MITCHELL, MRS. BANCROFT. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

MRS. WOODWARD, MR. SHURTLEFF, 

MR. THOMPSON. 

PRIMARY. 

MRS. BANCROFT, MR. SHURTLEFF, MR. HOLLIS. 

INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 

MR. SHURTLEFF, MR. BROWN, 

MRS. WOODW^ARD. 

MUSIC AND ELOCUTION. 

MR. MITCHELL, MR. THOMPSON, 

MRS. BANCROFT. 

DRAWING. 

MR. THOMPSON, MR. CORNING, MRS. BANCROFT. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

MR. SHURTLEFF, MR. ORDWAY, 

MRS. BANCROFT. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

MR. CORNING, MR. ORDWAY, MRS. W^OODWARD. 



SCHOOL REPOKT. 395 

BUILDINGS AND REPAIRS. 

MR. ORDVVAY, MR. BROWN, MR. THOMPSON. 

SANITARY ADVISER. 

DR. S. C. MORRILL. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

CHARLES C. DANFORTH . . . Moderator. 
LOUIS C. MERRILL .... Clerk. 

J. C. A. HILL, WILLIAM YEATON . Auditors. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 
LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 

38 Merrimack St. Office, High School Building. 

Hours, S to 9 A. M., school days. Office generally open 
from 4 to 5 p. M. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 
GEORGE W. JOHNSON. 

21 Fayette Street. 

At the Superintendent's office, 8 to 9.30 a. m., i 1.30 to I3 m., 
I to 1.45, 5 to 6 p. M. 



Report of the Board of Education 

OP 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, 

CONCORD, N. H. 

For Year Ending March 31, 1900. 



Union School District comprises the territory in the central portion 
of the cit_v, together with the villages of East and West Concord, and 
the school on the plains. The property valuation of the district in 
1899 was $9,823,007 (an increase of $52,822 over the preceding 
year), being 87.55 P^"" cent, of that of the whole city, and it contains 
84.91 per cent, of the school population. The tax for school pur- 
poses last year was $4.20 on each $1,000 of assessed valuation, or 21 
per cent, of the general tax. 

District No. 20 (Penacook) has a property valuation of $675,267 
(an increase of $17,866 as compared with 189S), or 6.02 per cent, of 
the city, and 8.60 per cent, of the children of school age. School 
tax last year, $2.60. 

The Town district embraces the outlying or marginal territory, with 
a property valuation of $720,612 (a decrease of $30,046 as compared 
with 1898), or 6.42 per cent, of the whole city, and 6.49 per cent, of 
the whole number of pupils attending school. School tax, $1.00. 

The valuation of the city for 1899 was $11,218,886 by school dis- 
tricts, an increase over that of the j-ear before of $44,642, or a trifle 
more than a third of one per cent. 

The special school districts in the state, organized under the 
" Somersworth Act^" number 33. They are all contained in twenty- 
seven towns and two cities, the latter being Concord and Keene. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 397 

The board of education presents herewith its annual report, 
in accordance with a long established custom. Accompany- 
ing it are the reports of the financial agent, the superintend- 
ent of schools to the board ; the usual departmental reports ; 
and tables of school statistics, all of which are respectfully 
submitted to the citizens of the district. 

The year now closing is the fortieth since the organization 
of the board of education in September, 1859, ^'^^ forth-fourth 
since the union of the central districts in 1856, the ninety-third 
since the division of the town into school districts in 1807- 
1808, and the one hundred and sixty-ninth since the first 
school was opened in 1731. 

The past school year (March, 1899-March, 1900) has been 
in some respects a memorable one. In the order of time, it 
marks the waning of a century, in the beginning of which 
Concord was a little country village, unimportant perhaps, 
save in the character of its people, but during which time it 
has grown to be a city of substantial character, the first in 
rank in the state, as its capital, and the third largest in the 
number of its inhabitants. The relative value of this increase 
in growth is further improved by comparison with that of 
other places. In 1775, when the first national census was 
taken. Concord was the seventeenth town in the state, esti- 
mated by the number of its inhabitants. In iSoo it had 
grown to be the twelfth largest town, in iSio it had become 
the seventh, in 1820 the sixth, in 1830 the fourth, and in 
1890 it had passed every one of its earlv competitors and taken 
rank as the third city in the state, the manufacturing cities of 
Manchester and Nashua onlv, having a larger population, 
while the state itself in the latter } ear was but a little more 
than two and a half times greater in the number of its inhab- 
itants than a hundred years before. It is gratifying, also, to 
believe that tlie public schools, a cherished institution from 
the first, have more than kept pace with the material growth 
of the town. The closing century has been a period without 
a parallel for progress and expansion in every good cause, in 
which the system of free public schools has fully sustained its 



398 CITY OF CONCORD. 

part. The beginning was full of promise, and the closing is 
rich with the results of progress in every important direction. 
A very few of the more important changes which have taken 
place may be briefly summarized as follows : A ten-fold gain 
in the general population, from two to tw-enty thousand. An 
increase nearly as great in the number of pupils and teachers, 
though the families are considerably smaller in number now, 
than in the olden time, and the rural districts have lost in 
population. The number of school-houses has increased 
from nine to twenty-eight and the number of school-rooms 
from nine to nearly eighty, with a gain in the value of school 
property from three thousand to three hundred and twenty- 
five thousand dollars. In the earlier years, too, our school 
buildings provided but little more than shelter from the 
weather, and were almost destitute of anything in the way of 
comfort or convenience. To-day, they are furnished with all 
needful conveniences, are in every way adequate for the pur- 
poses for which they are intended and stand as monuments of 
progress and advancement. In the raising of money for the 
support of schools there has been an increase from four hun- 
dred to upwards of fifty thousand dollars annually, and in 
the cost per pupil, from less than one dollar per year in 1800, 
to more than twenty dollars at the present time. But the 
most important of all these changes is to be found in the 
greatly improved character of our schools and the value and 
thoroughness of instruction which they afford. Great 
improvement has been made in the systematic and thorough 
grading of schools, in the provision for physical as well as 
mental training, in text-books, and the introduction of many 
new and important branches of study, in the greater ability 
and culture of teachers and in the constant and skillful super- 
vision of daily work. The efforts constantly made to develop 
high moral character, and to cultivate a spirit of patriotism in 
children by the study of our country's history, the singing of 
patriotic songs and the use and salute of the national flag, 
have been productive of excellent results. It is safe to say 
that our schools at the present time are in every way vastly 



SCHOOL REPORT, 399 

and incomparably superior to those of a century ago. But, 
as we review the closing centurj^ with a feeling of gratitude 
for its achievements and its blessings, let no undue boasting of 
the past, or feeling of self-complacency with present condi- 
tions, mar our vision of the future. The spirit of the age 
demands constant progress. If the past has been fruitful of 
improvement and progress in the right direction, the future 
just as surely calls us to still nobler efforts. 

Some Events of the Year. 

The past year, like the one preceding, has been darkened 
by the shadows of continuous war, in which Concord boys 
fresh from school, and with military instincts, have been 
bravely risking health and life to uphold the valor of the 
nation in lands far remote and beyond the seas. We commend 
with generous pride this evidence of youthful patriotism and 
find comfort in the promising indications of an early restora- 
tion of national peace, believing, that, 

" If half the power that fills the world with terror, 
If half the wealth bestowed on camps and courts, 
Were given to redeem the human mind from error 
There were no need of arsenals and forts." 

The year has been saddened by death. Two widely known 
pupils, intellectually ambitious, and possessed of natural 
endowments of a high order, gifted in scholarship, genial 
with their teachers and companionable with associates, deeply 
beloved by all who shared their acquaintance for genuine 
character and refinement of mind, after an illness of brief 
duration were removed by death, leaving as a benediction a 
fragrant memory of all that is highest and noblest in young 
manhood and womanhood. These sad bereavements will 
make the coming days look darker for the brightness of the 
past. 

Two promising young pupils lost their lives by drowning 
in the river. Thomas McKenna, at West Concord, July 14, 
and Garfield S. Mitchell, August 8, 1S99, at a point just 



400 CITY OF CONCORD. 

below tlie Bridge street bridge. Rarely has a season passed 
within the memory of the living, in which the beantiful river 
which borders the city on the east, so charming and so tempt- 
ing to the yonng, has not been the source of death of one or 
more beloved school children ; and we renew and emphasize 
a suggestion made in the annual report of two years ago, that 
with the close of the spring term of school, and the advent of 
the summer season, that all teachers be requested to espe- 
cially warn their pupils of the great danger of bathing in the 
river except with the full permission of parents and under the 
care of adults experienced in swimming. 

It has been a memorable year, also, for the unusual num- 
ber of serious and distressing accidents to school children. 
A young lad in the Walker school sustained a fracture of the 
leg while playing foot-ball at recess. Another received 
severe injuries by falling within the building, while a little 
girl in the Chandler school sustained a painful fracture of the 
arm from the same cause. All fortunately recovered without 
permanent injury, but every possible precaution should be 
taken to prevent a repetition of these unfortunate occurrences. 

The year has been an exceptional one ni the prevalence of 
contagious diseases generally confined to children. In the 
last summer vacation, scarlet fever of a mild form becan.ie 
epidemic in the northwesterly portion of the city. With a 
desire to prevent any further spread of the infection, the 
board of health thought it best that the schools in that locality 
should remain closed until a measureable decline in the 
number of cases had taken place, and in compliance with 
such recommendation the Franklin and Walker schools were 
not opened until the fifth week of the term. Later in the 
season one room in the Chandler school, from which a pupil 
had been removetl with symptoms of the same complaint, 
was closed for two weeks, and the schools at West Concord 
and on the Plains suffered considerable interruption, more 
particularly from a diminished attendance, in consequence of 
the prevalence of measles and whooping cough in their 
respective localities during the fall and winter terms. For 



SCHOOL REPORT. 401 

the vear ending March i, 1900, there had been reported one 
hundred and fifteen cases of scarlet fever with one death, 
three hundred and forty-three cases of measles, and seven 
cases of diphtheria, one of which was fatal. The school of 
manual training was also closed early in March for the few 
weeks of the term remaining on account of the illness of Mr. 
Gordon, the instructor. 

School Census of Union District. 

A census of school children was taken by Mr. George W. 
Johnson, in compliance with a law of the state, and under 
the direction of the board, in the spring and early summer 
of last year. This includes. all children in the district 
between the ages of five and sixteen years. The whole 
number returned was 2,621, against 2,239 ^" ^^97' ^^^ 2,209 
in 1S95 ; a gain of 3S1, or 17.06 per cent., in the last two 
years. 

Arranged by wards and classified by sex, the results are 
as follows : 



^ard. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Tota 


1 


48 


49 


97 


3. 


94 


80 


174 


4. 


328 


317 


645 


'^, 


161 


163 


324 


6, 


1S5 


201 


386 


7' 


182 


223 


405 


8, 


93 


S5 


178 


9' 


212 


200 


412 



15303 1^318 2,621 



26 



402 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Nativity of parent or guardian. 

American 

French Canad 

Irish 

Swede . 

Scotch . 

EngHsh 

Italian 

Nova Scotian 

German 

Russian 

Swiss 

Armenian 

Dane 



3,621 

Number of children attending public schools 
Number of children attending parochial schools 
Number not having complied with the law 
Recent arrivals (since May, 1S98) 
Absentees from various causes .... 





Nativity of 




children. 


1,973 


2,543 


380 


42 


156 




56 


21 


43 


3 


42 


. i 


35 


6 


10 




7 




7 


2 


5 




4 


'3 


4 





!,62I 



2,241 

1S6 

24 

136 

34 
2,621 



An interesting comparison of names arranged in alpha- 
betical order : 



Names beginning with A, 73 G, 99 M, 341 S, 306 

" " B, 240 H, 334 N, 53 T, S6 

" " C, 380 I, 3 O, 43 U, 3 

" " D, 180 J, 43 P, 146 V. 33 

" " E, 31 K, 90 Q^, 10 W, 143 



F, X13 L, 155 R, 



Y, 



school report. 403 

Some Changes in School Laws. 

Relating to holidays. " Thanksgiving Day, and Fast 
Day, whenever appointed, Labor Day, the day on which the 
biennial elections are held, the twenty-second day of February, 
the thirtieth day of May, the fourth day of July, and Christ- 
mas day, shall be legal holidays, and when either of the last 
four days mentioned occurs on Sunday, the following day 
shall be observed as a holiday." (Approved February 15, 
1899.) 

Truant Officer. 

" School boards shall appoint truant officers for their 
districts, and fix their compensation at a reasonable rate, 
which compensation shall be paid by the towns. 

"Truant officers shall, if required by the school boards 
enforce the laws prohibiting the employment of children in 
manufacturing, mechanical or mercantile establishments, who 
have not attended school the prescribed time; and for this 
purpose they may, zvhen so attthorized and required bv 
vote of the school boards visit the manufacturing, mechani- 
cal and mercantile establishments in their respective citiesand 
towns, and ascertain whether any children under the age of 
sixteen are employed therein contrary to the provisions of 
law, and they shall report any cases of such illegal employ- 
ment to the school board ; and the truant officers, ivhen 
authorized as aforesaid, mav demand the names of all 
children under sixteen years of age employed in such manu- 
facturing, mechanical, and mercantile establishments, and 
may require that the certificates and lists of such children 
provided for by law shall be produced for their inspection. 
Truant officers shall inquire into the employment, otherwise 
than in such manufacturing, mechanical, and mercantile 
establishments, of children under the age of sixteen years, 
during the hours when the public schools are in session, and 
may require that the certificates of all children under sixteen 
shall be produced for their inspection ; and any such officer 
may bring a prosecution against a person or corporation 



404 CITY OF CONCORD. 

employing any such child, otherwise than as aforesaid, during 
the hours when the public schools are in session, contrary to 
the provisions of law. 

" A refusal or failure on the part of an employer of chil- 
dren under sixteen years of age to produce the certificate 
required by law, when requested by a truant officer, shall be 
prima facie evidence of the illegal employment of the child 
whose certificate is not produced. 

"Truant officers shall have authority without a warrant to 
take and place in school any children found employed con- 
trary to the laws relating to the employment of children, 
or violating the laws relating to the compulsory attendance at 
school of children between the ages of six and sixteen years." 

The effect of the amendment to the truant law is to render 
its enforcement, so far as the employment of children of 
school age in manufacturing, mechanical or mercantile estab- 
lishments is concerned, optional with the school boards of 
towns and cities. Without such authorization the law ceases 
to be mandatory. 

A law was passed at the last session of the legislature, '•'• To 
equalize the school privileges of the cities and towns of the 
state," the effect of which so far as we are concerned, is to 
require from, this city an annual contribution of $1,806.75, 
ostensibly to aid in the support of schools in the least popu- 
lous and less wealthy towns in the rural sections of the state. 
It was prompted, no doubt, by the best of motives, but it 
appears to have been a specimen of very crude legislation 
needing careful revision to carry out even the intentions of its 
progenitors, for its actual results have been to aid sixty-two 
different towns, twelve of which receive amounts in excess 
of their proportion of the state tax, twenty-five in which the 
tax rate is considerably less than that of the average of towns 
in the state, and sixteen towns have received aid which are 
entirely out of debt and have a surplus in their treasuries, 
while the city of Concord has a debt aggregating nearly a 
million of dollars and a tax rate which, in comparison with 
those pi'evailing in the former towns, would be considered 
excessive and burdensome. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



405 



Number of Schools. 

Our system now includes forty-eight regular and four 
special schools, one less grammar school than last year, and 
one additional kindergarten, making the whole number fifty- 
two, the same as in the previous year, classified as follows: 



Regidar schools. High 

Grammar 

Primary . 

Kindergarten . 

Mixed . 
Special schools. Manual Training 

Sewing . 

Cooking . 

Drawing 



I 

i6 

24 

6 



Total 



52 



Number of Teachers. 



The whole number of regular teachers employed full time, 
including the principal of the training school and the super- 
intendent, is sixty, with seven special teachers, making a 
total of sixty-seven. This number does not include the pupil 
teachers in the training school, all of whom serve without 
compensation except when substituting for regular teachers, 
when they receive $1.50 per da}-, or the instructor of military 
drill, who is engaged but a few hours weekly. 

Of the regular teachers, forty-two of the sixty, seventy per 
cent., are graduates of ovu^ own schools, nearly all of whom 
are natives of the city, and thirty-one of the forty-two, nearly 
seventy-four per cent., are graduates of our own local school 
for norrpal training. 

District No. 20 employs six teachers, and the Town district 
eleven, making a total of eighty-four teachers, or, adding the 
nine in the training school, a grand total of ninety-three 
teachers regularly emploved in the public schools of Concord. 



406 CITY OF CONCOKI). 

It may be of interest to know, also, that in addition to 
the above there are six teachers in the parochial school, at 
least five teachers or tutors of private schools, no less than 
seven teachers at St. Mary's school for girls, thirty-six at St. 
Paul's, two at the Rolfe and Rumford, and one at the 
Orphans' Home at Alillville, making a grand total of 150 
professional teachers in the whole city. 

Number op" Pupils. 

There has been a small increase in the number of pupils 
attending school over that of last year, a gain of eighty-one, 
or about 3. =^4 per cent. This increase may be accounted for 
in part by the opening of another kindergarten school at the 
south end, the latter being the sixth in this city, out of a total 
of thirteen in the state, supported by a public tax. 

26 schools show an increase in the number of pupils of £27 
I new school (kindergarten) adds to the number of 

last year ........ 24 

Total inc;'ease . . . . . .151 

15 schools show a decrease in attendance of . . 70 

6 report the same number as last year .... 

Net increase . . . . • • . Si 

The whole number in regular attendance on February 23, 
1900, was 2,347, classified as follows: 

Schools. Boys. Girls. Total. Increase. Decrease. 

Kindergarten, 117 102 219 24 22 

Primary, 603 571 1,174 70 40 

Grammar, 331 372 703 54 8 

Mixed school, 28 21 49 4 

High, Si 121 202 9 

Totals . 1,160 i,iS7 2,347 ^^^ 70 

The above numbers are not made up of pupils enrolled for 
short periods, but represent by name only such as actually 
belong to the school at the time specified. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



407 



School Population of the City. 

The numbei" of pupils and students under school instruction 
in the entire city, March, 1900, is as follows: 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Union School District, 


1,160 


1,187 


2,347 


Sisters of Mercy, 


119 


137 


256 


Miss Proctor's, 


ID 


3 


13 


Miss Bailey's, 








Rolfe and Rumford, 




19 


19 


Town District, 


135 


n6 


251 


Orphans' Home, Millville, 


19 


14 


33 


District No. 20, Penacook, 


H5 


109 


254 


St. Paul's, 


345 




345 


St. Mary's, 




7 


7 



Totals 



• I '933 
School Buildings. 



1,593 



3,525 



The number and general character of school buildings is 
the same as last year. All are in good or fair condition, and 
several comparatively new. The Merrimack and Rumford 
are already venerable in age and growing older every year, 
but are in much better condition now than for several years 
past. After the district has paid oft' its debt, and has had a 
breathing-spell perhaps, these buildings should be replaced 
by larger and better ones. The only vacant room at the pres- 
ent time is one on the second floor of the Kimball school, 
which is likely to come into use again the coming year. The 
usual revised inventory follows. 



408 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



INVENTORY OF SCHOOL DISTRICT PROPERTY, REAL ESTATE, 1900. 





Name of Build- 
ing. 


Location. 


'3 

cS 


Estimated value 
of land and 
buildings. 


6 
o 

i 


g 

o 

o 


1 

P, 

o 
CO 


1 

9 


High School 

Kimball 


School, State, and 
Green 

North Spring, near 
School 

Church, State, and 
Fiske 

Fayette and South.. 

West and State 

Franklin and Rum- 
ford 

Washington, near 
State 

Monroe and Thorn- 
dike 

Broadway and West 

East A'illage 

West Village 

Warren and Wash- 
ington 

No. State, near Cem- 
etery 

North Spring, near 
Warren 

Union, near Centre.. 

Off Loudon Road 

High Street 


1890 

1890 

1873 
1878 
1870 

1889 

1858 

1858 
1895 
1870 
1862 

1864 

188S 

1852 
18.52 
1873 
1900 


$100,000 

60,000 

35,000 
21,000 
21,000 

15,000 

8,000 

8,000 
8,000 
6,000 
G.OOO 

2,000 

4,000 

2,500 
2,000 
1,500 


$30,000 

20,000 

16,000 
10,000 
9,500 

10,000 

3,000 

3,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 

800 

2,000 

1,000 
800 
800 


9 

8 

6 

4 
4 

4 

4 

4 

2 
2 
4 

2 

2 

2 
2 
1 


200 


3 
4 


Walker 

Chandler 


400 

300 

200 


6 


Penacook 

Franklin 


200 


7 

R 


Merrimack, 

Rumford 


200 
200 


q 


Cogswell 


200 
100 


10 
11 
12 

IS 


Eastman 

West Concord 

Bow Brook 

Tahanto 


100 
200 

100 


14 

15 
Ifi 


Manual Training. 

Sewing' School... 
Plains 


100 

Chairs, 
50 


17 


AVest End School 






$300,000 


$118,900 


60 


2,550 



school report. 409 

Repairs of Buildings. 

Somewhat extensive repairs and betterments have been 
made to many of the school buildings during the last summer 
and fall. Three additional steam radiators were placed in 
the High school building, in recitation rooms Nos. 2, 5 and 7. 
Hitherto it has been found difficult to properly warm these 
rooms in the coldest weather, but it is believed no further 
trouble will be experienced. A more important change, 
however, has been the introduction of an electric motor of 
ten-horse powder in place of the upright engine hitherto em- 
ployed for driving the fan, by means of which the warm air 
is distributed throughout the building. The change in power 
has made possible a reduction of steam pressure in the boiler 
and radiators from seventy to thirtv-five pounds, thus remov- 
ing any apprehensions of possible danger, besides permitting 
the operation of the fan at a much higher and more uniform 
rate of speed, which has greatly improved the ventilation. 

The improvements at West Concord have been manv and 
expensive. A new gravel roof has been put on the building 
and the mansard sides newly shingled. The old water-closets 
have been taken out and a new and modern system of sani- 
taries put in, with new plumbing throughout. An entire 
change in the method of heating and ventilation has also been 
made. The interior walls have been thoroughly cleaned and 
freshly kalsomined. The cellar has been cemented and the 
stone steps re-set. 

The Eastman at East Concord and the Plains school have 
each been provided with new and enlarged ventilating shafts 
and jacketed stoves. The latter has also a new porch floor 
and steps, and the interior walls have been kalsomined and 
the wainscoting painted. 

The interior walls of the Franklin, Tahanto, Merrimack, 
Sewing-school and the Rumford have been kalsomined, and 
the ceilings whitewashed, and the wood-work in the Walker, 
Franklin and Kimball has been newly varnished. 

The Manual Training school-building has been painted on 
the outside and the Sewing-school outside and in, and both 



410 CITY OF CONCORD. 

equipped with new plumbing and modern sanitaries, toilet 
conveniences, etc. Minor repairs have also been made to 
nearlv all the buildings in the district. 

Changes in thp: Merrimack School. 

At the last annual meeting of the district the sum of $1,500 
was appropriated, to be expended subject to the approval of 
the board of education, for providing a new and improved 
system for warming the Merrimack and Rumford school- 
buiklings. At the first meeting of the board following that of 
the district meeting, a committee composed of the three new 
members was appointed to consider the matter and report its 
conclusions. At a later meeting this committee made a ver- 
bal leport to the effect that after visiting those buildings, 
inspecting the method of warming and the provisions for ven- 
tilation, and consultation with the teachers, they were of the 
opinion that it was not expedient to undertake the changes 
proposed with the limited funds provided. Later in the sea- 
son, at the urgent request of Dr. S. C. Morrill, the sanitary 
advisor of the board. Prof. Woodbridge, of Boston, a distin- 
guished authority in matters of this kind, was employed to 
make an examination of one of the buildings and submit a 
plan covering the changes proposed. Late in the fall plans 
were submitted, and Dr. Morrill was made the agent of the 
district to carry them into eflect. The report of the latter is 
herewith submitted. 

Dr. Morrill's Report. 

To the Board of Education of Union School District. 

Gentlemen : In accordance with your vote to improve 
the heating and ventilating of the Merrimack school-building, 
according to the plans of the S. H. Woodbridge Compan}-, 
Boston, heating and ventilating flues were put in during the 
winter vacation. Two ITvgeia furnaces, which were ordered 
in December, were not delivered until the ftwiX of January, 
and were in working order about the fifteenth of February. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 411 

The following tests of the quality of the air, according to 
Dr. Fitz's air tester, have been made : before the changes, the 
average from eighteen tests for all rooms was 73ro ^' ^- 5 
since the changes, the average for all rooms from forty tests 
was 13 Tj^ c. c, making an impi'ovement in the whole 
building of 57x^^ c. c. 

Before the changes were made, there was considerable 
difference in the ventilation of the rooms of the first and 
second floor, the second story being better than the first ; 
since the changes, the difference continues in favor of the 
second story. For example : Previous to the changes, the 
quality of air in the first floor was worse than "■very bad" 
(^^._9_ c. c), and in the second floor it was worse than 
" bad" {82^^ c. c.) ; since the changes, the quality of air in 
the first floor was slightly below "-fair" (112^^ c. c), and 
in the second floor, slightly below ''good" (150A '-• ^•)' 

Comparing the quality of ventilation of this building with 
all other buildings in Union School District, excepting the 
High school, it now stands third. 

Financial. 

The debt of the district, which was incurred for new build- 
ings in 18S9— 90, has been further reduced the past year by 
the payment of bonds maturing last July to the amount of 
$15,000, and now aggregates $45,000, all in 4 per cent, 
bonds, maturing as follows : 

$15,000, payable July i, 1900. 
$15,000, payable July i, 1901. 
$15,000, payable July i, 1903. 

To pay the amount becoming due the present year, it will 
be necessary to raise $15,000 of principal and $1,500 of 
interest, a total of $16,500, after pa} ment of which the funded 
debt will be $30,000, representing about ten per cent, ot the 
estimated value of our school property. 

In addition to the above, however, $24,000 more, being 
four fifths of the $30,000 voted for a new school-building at 



412 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the west end, must be borrowed the present year, in accord- 
ance with the vote of the district passed October 13, 1S9S. 
The district debt will thus be increased to $54,000, after the 
bonds maturing this year have been paid. 

The total amount of money to be raised by taxation this 
^ear for school purposes will be approximately as follows: 

For support of schools, about . . . $50,000 

payment of bonds maturing Julv i . 15,000 

interest on bonded debt . . . I1S00 



Total ...... $66,500 

The West End School Building. 

Of the $30,000 voted for a new building at the west end, 
in October, 189S, one fifth of the amount, $6,000, was raised 
by tax last year. The expenditures have been as follows : 

Paid City of Concord for lot . . . $2,500.00 
Geo. L. Theobald, for removal of 3,757 

cubic yards of earth (hard pan) . 1,953.64 

advertising for proposals for grading 6.00 



Total ...... $4,459.64 

Balance on hand, $1,540.36. 

Plans for the new building have been completed and provi- 
sion is being made for its early construction. It will be of 
red brick with granite trimmings, two stories high, with 
slated roof, and will contain four class rooms of standard 
size, and two teachers' rooms large enough to be used for 
recitation rooms should occasion require. The corridors will 
be wider than usual to permit of occasional use as assembly 
rooms when public exercises are held. The building will be 
provided with a modern svstem of heating and ventilation. 
It will probably be ready for occupanc\' with the beginning of 
the winter term of school. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 413 

One of the most pleasing features of progress in the schools 
in the last few years has been the marked improvement in the 
social life between teachers and pupils, more noticeable in 
the past year than ever before. The opportunities for social 
acquaintance and comradeship which the early schools pro- 
vided was an attraction from the beginning, but in the olden 
time there seemed to be a formidable barrier between teacher 
and pupil ; the former was too often looked upon as a task- 
master, and the pupils were inclined to fraternize to share and 
lighten each other's burdens and commiserate a general fate. 
Now, all this feeling has disappeared in many of the schools, 
and teachers find their usefulness greatly increased in striving 
to induce and foster a higher and better social life in the pupils 
under their guidance and instruction. There are many 
schools in the district to-day where dismissal at the close of 
the afternoon session is followed by a period of social enjoy- 
ment, in which the teacher is assisted by classmates helping 
each other to a better understanding and enjoyment of the 
work which they are pursuing. In this spirit of cooperation 
children become attached to their teacher and to each other, 
and results which could not be secured in any other vvav' 
are easily obtained. It is to be hoped that all teachers will 
see the worth of this principle and give it every encourage- 
ment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN C. ORDWAY, President, 
HENRY F. HOLLIS, 
SUSAN J. WOODWARD, 
HENRY C. BROWN, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
AMOS J. SHURTLEFF, 
JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 
CHARLES R. CORNING, 

^leiiibers Board of Education. 
CoMCORD, April I, 1900. 



414 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ESTIMATES FOR 1899-1900. 



Salaries of Teachers. 



High school .... 
First Grammar schools 
Second Grammar schools 
Kindergarten and sub-primary schools 
Primary schools .... 
Training teacher 



$8,425.00 
3,325.00 
6,075.00 
2,523.00 

11,825.00 
800.00 



Special Teachers. 

Music $1,075.00 

Drawing 800.00 

Superintendent 2,000.00 

Financial agent ..... 500.00 

Elocution and physical training . . 400.00 



Special Branches. 



Manual training 
Military drill 



83,700.00 
200.00 



Current Expenses. 



Fuel 

Supplies 

Miscellaneous 

Repairs 

Care of houses 

Insurance . 



$3,000.00 
1,500.00 

500.00 
2,000.00 
3,200.00 

841.00 



52,973.00 



54,775.00 



$3,900.00 
$8,675.00 



1,041.00 



$52,689.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



415 



Literary fund 
Dog license 
Balance last year 



Deduct. 



Prize Speaking. 



RECEIVED. 



Balance from last account . 
Interest on same to January 1, 1900 
Sale of 644 tickets at 35 cents 



$316.00 
1,600.00 
1,200.00 



$3,116.00 
$49,573.00 



,407.72 

48.53 

225.40 



.,681.65 



Phenix hall and piano 
Prizes, including pictures 
1,000 programs . 

F. P. Mace, selling tickets . 
Exchange tickets 
Expenses of judges 

G. W. Stewartson, orchestra 
A. F. Nevers, orchestra 
Miscellaneous expense 
Cash on hand as a guarantee for future 

contests ...... 



$35.00 
79.00 
4.75 
5.00 
2.00 
6.40 
1.50 
1.50 
4.75 

1,541.75 



.,681.65 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF AGENT 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Balance from last year 

Portion of school money for the year 

Extra money raised by the district 

Text-books (city regular appropriation) 

Text-books (city special appropriation) 

Repairs, special appropriation 

Repairs, special appropriation Rumford 

and Merrimack buildings . 
Literary fund .... 
Dog license .... 

Tuition receipts .... 
Miscellaneous receipts, books, ashes, 

glass, wood, etc. .... 

Expenses. 

Fuel 

Supplies ...... 

Miscellaneous ..... 

Repairs, regular appropriation 
Repairs, special appropriation 
Repairs, special appropriation Merri- 
mack and Rumford schools 
Care of houses ..... 

Insurance ...... 



$1,289.88 
31,691.42 
13,308.58 

2,190.00 
500.00 

2,000.00 

1,500.00 
1,577.60 
1,237.64 
1,031.50 

79.80 



$56,406.42 



^2,937.26 

1,772.17 

585.36 

1,055.78 

2,825.06 

581.52 

3,103.38 

998.20 



SCHOOL REPORT. 417 

Manual training . .... $2,620.83 

Salaries 35,828.33 

Military drill 109.30 

Text-books (city appropriation) . . 2,754.75 
Repairs, special appropriation Merri- 
mack and Rumford schools, unex- 
pended balance .... 918.48 
Cash on hand to balance . . . 316.00 

$56,406.42 



Concord, N. H., March, 1900. 

I certify that I have examined the foregoing account (except 
text-book account) of the financial agent and find the same 
correctly cast and a proper voucher for each item of expenditure 
therein mentioned. 

J. C. A. HILL, 

Auditor. 

Concord, N. H., March, 1900. 

I hereby certify that I have carefully examined the foregoing 
account of text-books, and find the same con'ectly cast and a 
proper voucher for each item of expenditure therein mentioned. 

JAMES H. MORRIS, 

City Auditor. 



27 



418 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Belle M. Locke . 


S 


ALARI 


ES. 


S75.00 


John F. Kent . 








2,500.00 


Newton H. Black 








1,268.44 


Elizabeth Averill 








825.00 


Mary A. Cogswell 








800.00 


Mary E. Whitten^ 








800.00 


Kate E. Wilson . 








52G.32 


Edith M. Walker 








784.21 


Mary W. Dean . 








410.51 


Philinda P. Rand 








157.89 


Kate P. Blodgett 








725.00 


Elizabeth M. McAfee 








550.00 


Jessie N. Stimson 








500.00 


Etha L. Sargent 








442.11 


A. Delia Shaw . 








550.00 


Lenora B. Caldwell 








484.21 


Emily M. Robinson 








150.00 


Jane D. Proctor 








94.73 


Sara R. Huse . 








363.95 


Fannie M. Stimson 








222.38 


Maude Weymouth 








78.00 


Luella A, Dickerman 








725.00 


Lillian Yeaton . 








434.21 


Minnie E. Ladd 








500.00 


Lottie E. Pearson 








425.00 


Alice H. Whitney 








228.94 


Mary G. Ahern 








317.11 


Louisa Prescott . 








542.13 


S. Josephine Messer 








367.17 


ElizaV)eth J. Talpey 








550.00 


Mary E. Sullivan 








492.11 


Grace A. Little . 








500.00 


Agnes L. Dickerman 








342.05 


Belle E. Shepard 








450.00 


Amy L. Coming . 








450.00 


Maud B. Binet . 








130.00 


Harriet C. Kimball 








550.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



419 



Nettie M. Bowen . . . . 


$342.05 


Martha E. Rolfe 


450.00 


Fannie B. Lothrop 


342.05 


Mary E. Melifant 


550.00 


Florence Bleu us . . . . 


134.21 


Annie J. Butterfield . . . . 


147.38 


Mary F. Osgood 


126.31 


Celia C. Standish 


342.05 


Gara E. McQuesten . . . . 


550.00 


Addie F. Straw 


800.00 


Alice M. Sargent 


600.00 


Enid H. Adams .... 


94.73 


Stella M. Britton 


376.34 


Susan M. Little .... 


542.13 


Helen L. Southgate 


450.00 


Mary A. 'Sanborn 


265.57 


Mary I. Powell .... 


66.00 


Etta M. Dodge .... 


650.00 


Grace L. Barnes 


. 484.21 


Annette Prescott 


484.21 


Mary A. Jones .... 


509.21 


Katberine L. Remick . 


342.05 


A. Viett-a Kimball 


434.21 


Edith Greene . . . . ' 


317.11 


Mary C. Caswell 


500.00 


Mildred I. Cilley 


367.17 


Mabelle A. Boutelle . 


484.21 


Sadie E. McClure 


367.17 


Edna M. Kennedy 


459.21 


Jane E. Sullivan 


384.28 


Charles S. Conant 


1,075.00 


Emily E. Harding 


800.00 


L. J. Rundlett, superintendent 


2,000.00 


L. J. Rundlett, agent . 


500.00 


Maude L. Wallace 


100.00 


Mary A. Cogswell, supervisor 


20.00 


Evelyn M. Cross 


60.00 



J5, 828.33 



420 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Supplies. 



Humphrey-Dodge Co., general supplies 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., physics supplies 
W. J. Fernald, chairs 
C. R. Schoolcraft, washing powder 
Philbrick Furniture Co., bureau . 
Thompson & Hoague, general supplies 
Sulpho Napthol Co., disinfectant . 
C W. Dadmun, cord and plugs 
George F. King & Co., clasped envel 

opes ..... 
John P. Lovell & Co., typewriter paper 
A. Perley Fitch, rubber gloves 

E. E. Babb & Co., blackboard liners 
A. H. Britton & Co., general supplies 

F. E. Nelson, basin, tacks, chair seat 
Mrs. "William Murdoch, water supply 

Bow Brook school ... 
Greenwood School Supply Co., dupli 

cator and ink . . . . 

T. F. Hannaford, brooms 
Edward T. McShaiie, Grammar school 

programs . . . 

Mrs. Joseph F. Merrill, water supply at 

Bow Brook school . 
William S. Wilson, plants for drawing 
New York Silicate Book Slate Co 

blackboard slating . 
H. A. Kendall, frames 
Denton Bros., iiatural history frames 
Mason M. Patrick, maps 
George W. Evans, maps 
Preston & Rounds, maps 
Irving S. Upson, atlas 
U. S. Geodetic Coast Survey Co., charts 



$85.04 

3.85 

21. .34 

2.84 

2.00 

190.67 

24.00 

2.00 

1.50 
6.00 
3.75 
9.00 
67.35 
3.45 

1.50 

2.65 
2.25 

14.00 

1.50 
.70 

8.00 
4.00 
3.80 
2.00 
1.60 
2.00 
1.00 
5.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



421 



U. S. Geological Survey, maps and 

charts ..... 
U. S. Hydrographic Office, charts 
AYard's Natural Science Establishment 
Diamond Paste Co., paste . 
H. A. Macdonald, chairs 
American Electrical Works, wire 
David Drinan, mat 
George B. Frazar, geology supplies 
C. J. Maynard, biology supplies . 
J. D. Johnson, chair cushion 
Ginn & Co., geographical models 
Frank P. Mace, general supplies . 
C. W. Tarleton, pails, tar, lard, etcl 
Neostyle Co., neostyle and supplies 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., mats, ren 

of chairs, brackets, curtains, etc. 
C. H. Martin & Co., brushes, tar, resin 

varnish, sponges, asphaltum, etc. 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas 
J. L. Hammett Co., pencil sharpeners 

blank books, maps . 
Rand, McNally & Co., maps and globes 
Batchelder & Co., washing powder 
Ira C. Evans, printing, cardboard, en 

velopes, pamphlets, etc. . 
Rumford Printing Co., examination 

papers, engravings, letter lieads, etc. 
Arthur H. Knowlton, chemical supplies 
Frank L. Sanders, note book, ink, 

paper, etc. . . . . . 

Whitman & Martin, ribbon, cloth, etc 
Concord Water Works, water supj^ly 
H. D. Hammond, ribbon 
R. F. Robinson, ribbon 
W. R. Heath, ribbon . 



$14.31 
2.00 
3.00 
1.75 
6.00 

17.32 
1.76 
7.05 
2.50 
2.50 

12.00 

10.35 
3.85 

74.65 

101.72 

22.45 
45.90 

19.40 

18.67 

6.99 

164.32 

302.08 
4.64 

8.93 
2.46 
358.50 
2.99 
1.15 
5.26 



422 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



L. J. Rundlett, agent, stamps, stamped 
envelopes, etc. .... 

Silsby & Son, carbon paper, thumb 
tacks ...... 

Mittag & Volger, carbon paper . 

Benjamin Bilsborough, paste 

Repairs. 

Frank Sargent, repairing chairs . 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight . 

Goodhue & Milton, plumbing 

James Galloway, repairing clocks 

Ira B. Shallies & Co., general repairs 

C. H. Stevens & Co., stock 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concreting . 

Fred Rollins, painting 

Wills Warming & Ventilating Co. 

grates and linings . 
Row^ell & Plummer, masonry 
Fuller, Warren Warming & Ventilatin 

Co., grate? and linings 
Lee Brothers, plumbing 
N. M. Kayes, repairing waste pipe 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., car 

pentry ..... 
Danforth & Forrest, carpentry 
Lowell Eastman, putty and glass . 
E. H. Randall & Co., plumbing . 
Frank H. George, soldering roof . 
George A. Dearborn, rubber cloth 
J. E. Symonds, tables 
A. C. Sanborn, repairing locks, keys, etc 
C. W. Dadmun, repairing physical ap' 

paratus ..... 
J. ¥j. Gage, repairing locks, keys, etc 
H. O. Williams, general repairs . 
Thomas Nolan, awnings repaired . 



;60.21 

1.10 

13.50 

.08 



$64.80 

3.92 

53.26 

7.75 

317.11 

2.76 

84.25 

7.05 

45.30 
98.23 

23.57 
22.22 

1.00 

1.50 
24.46 
40.22 
18.16 

1.00 

1.90 
32.75 

2.50 

1.75 

4.75 

1.80 

28.00 



.,772.17 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



423 



Hood & Robbins, grates and linings . $26,00 

Benjamin Bilsborough, painting . . 10.45 

J. E. Hobson 10.30 

Home & Hall, carpentry . . . 10.50 

Daniel Haslam, plumbing . . . 36.22 

George R. Pearce, drilling . . . 1.00 

George L. Theobald, moving partitions 5.00 

M. E. Clifford, repairing urinals . . 33.00 

E. H. Runnells, re-setting stone steps . 33.30 

Miscellaneous. 

Norris A. Dunklee, teams . . . $82.50 
George W. Johnson, extra census and 

badge , 12.03 

C. S. Conant, teams .... 76.35 

James H. Stone, care of books . . 8.75 

David Robinson, job team and sei'vices 143.54 

E. B. Morse, teams .... 14.50 

Morss & Whyte, wire guards . . 16.80 

L. J. Rundlett, 'engrossing diplomas . 15.25 

Harry P. Blake 4.00 

C. O. Partridge, drawing sand . . 3.00 

W. H. Btirtlett 1.00 

Emily E. Harding, car fare . . 2.70 

Prescott Piano Co., rent of pianos . 16.00 
Concord Land & Water Power Co., 

wiring . . . . . . 2.05 

John B. Crosby & Co., teams . . 9.50 

George R. Pearce, printing tickets . 2.00 

William Yeaton, auditor . . .. 2.00 

J. C. A. Hill, auditor . . . 2.00 
Silsby & Son, carbon paper, photo mount- 
ing paper, etc. . . . . 5.55 

Holland & Co., clock .... 1.50 

Clarence Clark, 'shoveling snow . . 2.20 

W. G. C. Kimball, negatives . . 17.25 

Frank A. Hill, oration . . . 29.25 



$1,055.78 



424 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Fred D. Drew, use of team 

H. J. Rock, tablet for frieze and gold 

leaf plate .... 

John F. Kent, envelopes, trip to Boston 

etc. ..... 

Frank W. Messe, tuning pianos . 
B. C. White, rent of Opera House 
Henry F. HoUis, telephone . 
Hampden, Corundum Wheel Co., sharp 

ener for mower 
Concord Land & Water Power Co. 

trucking motor 
Henry V. Tittembre, moving pianos 
John C. Ordway, expense , 
L. J. Rundlett, agent, telegrams, lele 

phone, car fare, job team, etc. . 
Frank Hill .... 

J. E. Morrison, man for shoveling, sup 

plies, etc. .... 
Clara E. Flanders, playing piano for 

kindero-arten .... 



Manual Training. 

Concord Land & Water Power Co., 
power ...... 

Spaulding Print Paper Co., tracing 
paper ...... 

Stevens & Duncklee, cooking utensils . 

Danforth & Forrest, lumber 

David E. Murphy, cloth for cooking 
school ...... 

Thompson & Hoague, supplies for wood- 
working ..... 

Batchelder & Co., cooking supplies 

C. H. Martin & Co., oil, tar, resin, 
shellac for wood-working . 

Lyster Brothers, cooking supplies 



$1.50 

5.15 

8.94 

39.00 

20.00 

.98 

2.00 

1.30 
5.50 
3.50 

20.22 
2.00 

2.30 

3.25 



$103.27 

2.95 

2.50 

92.53 

6.02 

83.02 
17.24 

14.25 
13.98 



$585.36 



SCHOOL REPORT 

Chandler & Farquhar, lathe tools 
Harry G. Emmons, sewing supplies 
J. C. Derby, spoons, forks, knives 
F. E. Nelson, cooking supplies 
F. E. Colburn, cooking supplies . 
E. F. Gordon, supplies for wood-work 

ing 

Central Market Co., cooking supplies 
Boston & Maine E. R., freight and 

trucking .... 

John A. White Co., lathe for iron 

working .... 

M. E. Elliott, sewing machine 
L. S. Bean, sewing supplies 
J. L. Hammett Co., drawing paper 

tluimb-tacks .... 
Ellen J. Jones, car fare 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., lumber 
Concord Machine Co., pulley 
Edward F. Gordon, salary . 
Mary J. Gannon, salary 
Ellen J. Jones, salary 
Leila A. Hill, salary . 
C. M. Smith & Co., cooking supplies 
Mary J. Gannon, cooking supplies 
The Century Co., books for cooking 

school ...... 



425 



$46.43 

8.70 

7.00 

10.38 

.nO 

5.11 

1.85 

S.GG 

151.00 

30.00 

3.70 

26.02 

3.50 

11.06 

1.50 

900.00 

385.90 

434.21 

231.04 

3.91 

3.60 

16.00 



Text-Books. 

Silver, Burdett & Co. ... $92.33 
J. Henry Ling, pitch pipes . . . 3.00 
Amy L. Comins, kindergarten supplies . .85 
Mary A. Sanborn, kindergarten sup- 
plies 8.25 

Helen L. Southgate, kindergarten sup- 
plies ...... 1.55 

J. H. Castor & Co. . . . 6.24 



$2,620.83 



420 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



Western Publishing House . 

Potter, Putniim & Co. 

George F. Dogeii, kimlergarteii nuiteritv 

Maynard, Merrill & Co. 

White, Smith Music Publishing Co. 

Frost & Adams, drawing material 

Houghton, Mitllin & Co. 

The Morse Co. .... 

Boston School Supply Co. . 

University Publishing Co. . 

Prang Educational Co., drawing Ixtok 

and supplies .... 
A. ,1. Wilkinson & Co. 
W. H. Wheeler & Co. 
J. C. Winter & Co., drawing supplies 
Wilmore, Aixlrcws Publishing Co. 
C. W. Dadmun, supplies for physics 
Bausch & Lomb, supplies tor physics 
J. L. Hamniett Co., paper, kindergar 

ten supplies, chai'ts, maps, etc. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Ginn & Co. .... 

Hurst & Co 

Thompson, Bi'own it Co. . 

George S. Perry & Co., paper, pencils 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., physics 

supplies .... 

American Book Co. . 
Boston & Maine R. R., treight . 
Werner School Book Co. 
Brown & Treacy 
Eagle Pencil Co., pens 
George F. King & Co., spelling blanks 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, 

weather niajts . . . . 

The Pratt Whitney Co., physics supplies 



S8.40 
17.28 
23.50 

8.98 
.98 

5.00 
75.77 
69.53 
80.50 
21.09 

126.33 

12.03 

113.24 

2.10 

1.06 

4.80 

71.41 

417.17 

21.67 

352.59 

8.40 

41.54 

5.77 

9.06 

107.51 

30.59 

5.44 

1.00 
15.00 
18.00 

3.99 

1.50 
11.45 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



427 



Whitall, Tatum & Co., physics supplies $6.70 

C. D. Hine, physiologies . . . o.40 
H. H. Cartes & Co., paper . . 4.00 
J. A. & W. Bird, chemical supplies . 23.46 
Luther H. Wightnian & Co., physics 

supplies . . . . . . 2.10 

Henry J. Green, thermometer . . 2.75 

Thomas R. Shewell & Co. . . . 127.02 

E. L. Kellogg & Co 14.00 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co., book 

covers ...... 8t).58 

Rand, McNally & Co., maps and globes 250.00 

Harper & Brothers . . . . 29.51 

D. C. Heath & Co 62.58 

P^. E. Babb & Co., i)ointers, ink, paper, 

crayon, penholders, etc. . . . 108.71 

Eimer & Amend, chemistry supplies . 75.29 

Allyn & Bacon 94.59 

L. J. Rundlett, express, etc. . . 51.00 

Meade, Dodge & Co., drawing supplies 2.56 

Harvard University, geometries . . 1.60 

Flel. 

Arthur N. Day, hard wood . . . $312.90 
Concord Land and Water Povver Co., 

electrical power . • . . . 61.26 

George G. Jenness, hard wood . . 33.00 
David Robinson, sawing ami piling 

wood . . . . . . 154.77 

Concord Coal Co., coal . . . 280.94 

Hiram O. JNIarsh, coal and soft wood , 1,675.82 

E. H. Runnells, hard wood . . . 353.51 
David Drinan, sawing wood . . 2.25 
R. P. Sanborn, hard wood . . . 62.81 



>2,754.75 



$2,937.26 



428 



city of concord. 
Military Drill. 



The Army and Navy Journal, drill 
books ...... 

Oscar Gr. Pelkey, repairing drums 
Charles L. Mason, services as instructor 

Care of Houses. 

Leon H. Milton, cleaning 

Harry P. Blake, carrying wood and 

lighting fires . 
Walter C. Lewis, carrying wood 
John Morrow, carrying wood 
Edmund Blauchette, carrying wood and 

shoveling .... 

Charles A. Baker, carrying wood 
Ralph A. Benjamin, janitor 
Leslie Cushman, carrying wood 
Herbert Smith, " " 

Willie Elkins, " " 

Henry D. Robinson, help for cleaning 
C. W. Tarletpn, help for cleaning 
Benjamin E. Berry, janitor 
Mrs. C. L. Quimby, cleaning 
Mrs. Robert Webster, cleaning. 
C. H. Ballard, janitor 
Guy C. Richards, janitor 
Mrs. C. W. Spaulding, cleaning 
B. T. Upham . 



O. M. Blodgett, 
J. E. Morrison, 
C. W. Tarleton, 
H. D. Robinson, 
Mabel N. Robinson, 
O. L. Jennings, 
Fred D. Drew, 



janitor 



§3.30 

6.00 

100.00 



S12.88 

8.40 
3.85 
2.55 

15.00 

10.00 

3.50 

1.20 

2.20 

.75 

6.00 

6.00 

6.00 

3.15 

1.25 

60.00 

8.50 

1.25 

.40 

572.00 

572.00 

624.00 

572.00 

76.00 

140.00 

152.00 



$109.30 



SCH.OOL REPORT. 



429 



Benjamin Bentley, 


janitor . 


$195.00 


William Rainie, 


tt _ 


30.00 


Earl Jennings, 


1 1 _ 


9.00 


John Woodward, 


a 


3.50 


James Kelley, 


Insurance. 


5.00 







Roby & Knowles 
Eastman & Merrill 
Morrill & Dan forth 



Repairs. 



$40.00 
328.20 
630.00 



i, 103. 38 



$998.20 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATION. 

Concord Land and Water Power Co., 

motor and setting .... $311.32 

George Abbott, Jr., painting . . 105.25 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., car- 
pentry . . . . . . 151.71 

Lee Brothers, plumbing and urinals . 314.63 

Hobson & Harwood, resetting furnaces 430.23 

Charles H. Kenney, kalsomining . . 220.00 
W. E. Darrah, roofing West Concord 

School building . . . . 189.00 

Fred Rollins, painting . . . 119.78 

Danforth & Forrest, carpentry . . 145.57 

C. L. Fellows & Co., masonry . . 25.10 
Hood & Robbins, new closets and smoke 

pipe ...... 101.52 

George W. Johnson, painting . . 61.71 

I. C. Bailey, painting . . . . 108.86 

Benjamin Bilsborough, painting . . 140.97 

Rowell & Plummer, masonry . . 164.58 
E. H. Randall, work on boiler and 

steam fittings . . . . . 234.83 



!,825.06 



430 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Special Repairs. 



MERRIMACK AND RUMFORD SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



Home & Hall, carpentry 
Rowell & Pluinmer, masonry 
Thompson & Hoague, supplies 
Danforth, Forrest & Co., carpentr 
Hood & Robbins, heaters 
W. Carpenter 



$58.01 
49.90 
22.18 
63.93 

386.00 
1.50 



S581.52 



Cost per Pupil Based on Whole Number Belonging. 

1900. 

For tuition ". $12.97 

Decrease from last year . . . . . .19 

For text-books in all schools . . . . 1.00 

Increase from last year ..... .06 

Entire cost, including all current expenses . . 19.98 

Increase from last year . . . . . .92 

Tuition Receipts in the Different Schools. 



High School 










$720.00 


Kimball . 










93.50 


Merrimack 










48.00 


West Concord 










6.00 


Eastman 










6.00 


Plains 










8.00 


Bow Brook 










24.00 


Walker . 










6.00 


Rumford . 










76.00 


Penacook . 










44.00 



,031.50 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



431 



Table Showing (1) the Whole Number of Different 
Pupils Attending and Drawing Literary Fund; (2) 
Average Daily Attendance; (3) Gross Expenditures; 
(4) Cost per Pupil, Based Upon the Whole Number of 
Different Pupils Attending; (5) Cost per Pupil, 
Based upon Average Daily Attendance. 



Year. 



(t) 



(2) 



(3) 



(4) 



(5) 



1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 



1,723 

1,614 

1,712 

1,654 

1,778 

1,837 

1,797 

1,842 

1,847" 

1,880 

1,961 

1,856 

1,753 

1,815 

2,073 

2,338 

2,338 

2,465 

2,489 

2,489 

2,487 

2.617 

2,762 



1,300 
1,262 
1,318 
1,219 
1,349 
1,402 
1,423 
1,439 
1,490 
1,463 
1,544 
1,404 
1,363 
1,428 
1,655 
1,669 
1,679 
1,835 
1,853 
1,847 
1,960 
2,024 
2,085 



^21,948.66 
21,674.16 
21,466.46 
21,767.48 
24,535.79 
23,953.81 
25,606.78 
27,974.88 
31,421.12 
31,376.80 
35,178.62 
34,173.24 
33,127.72 
39,547.70 
40,042.75 
44,727.76 
48,545.63 
48,922.04 
48,539.56 
48,400.02 
48,024.82 
49,904.92 
55,172.04 



$12.73 
13.42 
12.53 
13.16^ 
13.83 
13.04 
14.25 
15.18 
17.01 
16.69 
17.94 
18.41 
18.89 
21.79 
19.31 
19.13 
20.76 
19.84 
19.50 
19.44 
19.31 
19.06 
19.98 



17.17 

16.28 
17.85 
18.18 
17.08 
17.99 
19.44 
21.02 
21.44 
22.78 
24.34 
24.30 
27.69 
24.04 
26.70 
28.91 
26.66 
26.19 
26.20 
24.50 
24.65 
26.46 



432 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union ScJiool District : 

Following, please find the report of the schools of Union 
School District for the year 1899-1900, which is respectfully 
submitted : 

Comparative Table of Attendance. 





1898-1899. 




1899 


-1900. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Boys. Girls. Total. 


High school, 


78 


139 


217 


92 


128 220 


Grammar schools, 


315 


363 


678 


329 


379 708 


Primary schools, 


863 


803 1 


,666 


915 


862 1,777 


Mixed schools. 


33 


23 


56 


32 


25 57 



Total, 



1,289 1,328 2,617 1,368 1,394 2,762 



AVERAGE ATTENDANCE. 



High school 
Grammar schools 
Primary schools . 
Mixed schools 

Total 



185 


189 


618 


656 


1,188 


1,202 


33 


38 



2,024 



2,085 



PERCENTAGE OF ATTENDANCE. 



High school 
Grammar schools 
Primary schools 
Mixed schools 

Total 



93 


96 


91 


94 


89 


85 


73 


76 



90 



89 





SCHOOL REPOKT 


• 






TARDINESS. 






High scliool 




ISo 


221 


Grammar schools 




230 


302 


Primary schools 




692 


573 


Mixed schools 




15 


16 



Total 



1,122 



1,112 



433 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF TARDINESS 


TO 


EACH PUPIL. 


High school .... 


.66 


.79 


Grammar schools 


.26 


.28 


Primary schools 


.31 


.23 


Mixed schools .... 


.26 


.28 



Total 



.42 



.39 



PUPILS CLASSIFIED WITH RESPECT TO AGE 

Whole number of pupils under 6 years of age : 

Primary schools . . . 351 

Mixed schools 

Total 



Whole number of pupils ov 

High school 
Grammar schools 
Primary schools 
Mixed schools 

Total 



355 

er 1 6 years of age 

153 

56 

2 





416 
4 

420 



211 



159 

54 





213 



Whole number of pupils between 6 and 16 years of age 

High school 
Grammar schools 
Primary schools . 
Mixed schools 



64 


61 


622 


654 


1,313 


1,361 


52 


53 



Total 

28 



2,051 



2,129 



198 


19G 


679 


706 


L,334 


1,399 


45 


47 



434 CITY OF COXCOKD. 

k 
AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLLMENT. 

High school 
Grammar schools 
Primary schools . 
Mixeci schools 

Total .... 2,2.56 2,347 

NEW TEACHERS. 

Mary W. Dean, High school. 
Fannie M. Stimson, Kimball Tliinl Primary. 
Maude Weymoiitli, Kimball Kindergarten assistant. 
Maud B. Binet, Walker Kindergarten assistant. 
Annie J. Butterfield, Penacook Third Grammar. 
Mary F. Osgood, Penacook Third Grammar. 
Mary I. Powell, Franklin Kindergarten assistant. 
Maude L. Wallace, Elocution and Pliysical Training. 

SUBSTITUTES. 

Philinda P. Rand. 
Grace Monill. 
Regina J. Glennon. 
Alice R. Hood. 
Bertlia L. Holbrook. 
Phenie L. Jones. 
Addie V. Powers. 
Helen L. Baker. 
Elizabeth J. D<jnovan. 
Grace E. Dow. 
Mary Flavin. 
Mary W. Smith. 
Florence A. Stevens. 
Gerti'ude A. Dickerman. 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 435 



RESIGNATIONS. 



Enid H. Adams, Franklin Third Grammar. 
Florence Blenns, Penacook Third Grammar. 
Annie J. Butterfield, Penacook Third Grammar. 
Evelyn M. Cross, AValker Kindergarten assistant. 
Jane D. Proctor, Kimball Kindergarten. 
Alice H. Whitney, Chandler First Grammar. 
Emily M. Robinson, Kimball Third Primary. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 

Kate E. AVilson, winter term. 



436 CITY OF CONCORD . 



REPORT OF THE TRUANT OFFICER. 



L. J. RuNDLETT, Siipernitendcnt. 

Dear Sir, — I herewith submit the following as a report of 
my work from May 22, 1899, to March 33, 1900, exclusive of 
the enumeration of children of school age, in Union School 
District, for the year 1899, which will be found elsewhere in 
the report. 

I desire to return my sincere thanks to the board of educa- 
tion and the Superintendent of Schools for their cordial support 
in my efforts to perform the duties assigned to me ; also to the 
teachers for their valuable assistance and kindly cooperation, 
which I most highly appreciate. 

Very respectfully, 

GEORGE W. JOHNSON, 

Tritant Officer. 



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in 




MONTHS. 
June 


September 

October 

November 

December 

January 


S 


5 


c 





438 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades or sub-; t^u'^ 

C3 (D ^ 

jects taught. L 5^ >• 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



High. 

John F. Kent 

Newton H. Black . 

Elizabeth Averill 

Mary A. Cogswell. 
Kate E. Wilson . . . 



Mary E. Whitten . 

Edith M. Walker. 
Mary W. Dean 



Master Ci vics.classics 

niathem'tics. 

Sub-master Matlie matics, 

science 



Assistant.. 



Philinda P. Rand 



Kimball. 
Elizabeth M. McAfee 



Substitute for 
Mrs. Wilson 
during winter 
term 



French, Ger- 

I man, Eng... 

Classics 

Science, math- 
ematics 

^Mathematics 
English 

History, Latin 

English Com 
position 



Jessie N. Stimson 

EthaL. Sargent 

A. Delia Shaw 

Lenora B. Caldwell . 
Fannie M. Stimson . . 
Sara R. Huse 



Assistant 



Principalroom 5 Grades 7 and 8 

" 8 Grade 6 

TjGrade 5 

4iGrade 4 

" 2, Grades 2 and 3 

" " SiGrade 1 

" " llKindergarten 

and sub-pri- 

I mary 

Assistantroom 1 Kinderga rten 
Resigned at end 
of spring term 

Jane D. Proctor 'Resigned at end 

of spring term 
Merrimack. 

Luella A. Dickerman Principal Grade 9 

Lillian Yeaton ! Assistant Grades 7 and 8 

Minnie E. Ladd " i(Jrades 2 and 3 

Lottie E. Pearsim. . . . " Grades 1 and 2 



Maude Weymouth. . 
Emily M. Robinson. 



Chandler. 



Kate P. Blodgett 

Mabelle A. Boutelle. 

Louisa Prescot* 

S. Josephine Messer. 



M. Grace Ahern. 



Principal Grade 9 

Assistant Grades 3 and 4 

" |(irades 1 and2 

Kindergarten 
and sub-pri 



Alice H. Whitney. 
Walker. 



Transferred to 
I Tahanto First 

I Primary 

. .. Resigned at end 
of spring term 



Elizabeth J. Talpey.. 
Mary E. Sullivan .... 

Grace A. Little 

Agnes L. Dickerman 
Belle E. Shepard 



Principal . . 
Assistant . . 



mary . 



Grades 7 and 8 
(iriuli's 5 and G 
(irades 4 nnd 5 
Grades 2, 3, 4.. 
Grade 1. 



S2.500 230 Pleasant street. 

1,300 11 Liberty street. 

825 48 Church street. 

800 102 No. State street. (Lakeport.) 

51 Center street. (Worcestcr.Ms.) 

8OO1 105 No. State street. (Alfred, Me.) 
800 537 No. State street, W. Concord. 
(Somerville, INIass.) 
600 G Blake street. (Boston, Mass.) 



500 



550 8 Court street. (Bedford.) 
50O1 15 Summit street. 
450| 85 Pleasant street. 
550i72 Si'hool street. 
500126'- South street. 
325 15 Summit street. 



375 
104 



450 
500 
425 



725 
500 
550 



11 No. Spring street. 

12 Rumford street. (Laconia.) 



64 South street. 
66V2 No. State street. 
72 Washington street. 
52 Beacon street. 



95 School street. 
2Gyi> South street. 
25 Green street. 



43 So. Spring street. 



550 41 Warren street. 

500 411 Lvndon .street. 

5005 Harnxl street. 

350! Corner West and State streets. 

450I 71 No. State street. 



SCHOOL KEPOKT. 



439 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades or sab- 

jects taught. 






Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Walker.— Co?i<i«. 
Amy L. Comins 

Maud B. Bluet 

Evelyn M. Cross 

RUMFOUD. 

Harriet C. Kimball .. 

Nettie M. Bowen 

Martha E. Rolfe 

Fannie B. Lothrop. . . 

Penacook. 

Mary E. Melifant.... 

Mary F. Osgood 

Celia C. vStandish 

Gara E. McQuesteu . . 
Florence Blenus 

Annie J. Buttertield. 

Franklin. 



Addie F. Straw 

Alice M. Sargent 

Susan M. Little 

Stella :\l. Hritton 

Helen L. Southgate .. 



Assistant JKindergarten 

I and sub-pri- 
' niary 

Assistant Kindergarten 

Resigned at end; 
of spring term 



Principal 'Grades 7 and 8 

Assistant .Grades 5 and 6 

" [Grades 3, 4, 5.. 

Grades 1 and 2 



Principal j Grades 7 and 8 

Assistant jGrades 5 and 6 

Grades 3 and 4 

Grades 1 and 2 

Resigned at end 

of spring term 

Resigned at end 

of winter term 



Principal . 
Assistant. 



Mary I. Powell [Assistant 

Enid H. Adams Resigned at end 

I of spring term 
Mary A. Sanborn [Elected to Gogs- 
well kind'g'tn 



Grades 1 and 2 
(irades 4, 5, 6.. 
Grades 3 and 4 
Kindergarten 
and sub-pri- 
mary 

Kindergarten 



$450 8 No. State street. 
190 9 Pitman street. 



55o' Hopkinton road. 

350 31 South street. (Penacook.) 

450 Penacook. 

350 31 South street. (Strafford Corner) 



550 36 Downing street. 

400 19 Monroe street. (Franklin Falls) 

350 Garvin's Falls road. 

550 9 Wall street. 



800 4 Jackson street. 

600' 84 Pleasant street. 

550 90 School street. 

550 27 Washington street. (Newport.) 

450 2 So. Spring street. (Dedham, Ms.) 
104 57 Warren St. (Hillsboro'Bridge.) 



Pupil Teachers. 

Class of March, 1899. 

Fannie M. Stimson. Elected to Kimball, Third Primary, Fall term. 
Alice R. Laughlin. 
Lucie H. Chamberlain. 

Class of December, 1899. 

Regina J. Glennon 260 No. Main street 

Alice R. Hood 6 Lyndon street 

Bertha L. Holbrook 542 No. State street, West Concord 

Phenie L. Jones 51 Washington street. (Dunbarton) 

Addie V. Powers 45 So. Spring street 

Class of June, 1900. 
Helen L. Baker 5 Huntington street 

Class of December, 1900. 

Elizabeth J. Donovan , 5 Grove street 

Grace E. Dow 11 Pearl street 

Mary Flavin 3 Oak street 

Mary W. Smith 57 Merrimack street. (Penacook) 

Florence A. Stevens 52 Washington street. (East Pembroke) 



440 



CITV OF CONCOUD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades or sub- =- t, t-' 

rt jj cj 

jects taught. |c» >>i 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



West Concord. 

Etta M.Dodge 

(Trace L. Barnes 

Annette Prescott 

Mary A. Jones 

Katharine L. Remick 



Eastman. 



A. Vietta Kimball . 
Edith Greene 



Principal 
Assistant. 



Tahanto. 



M. Grace Ahern 

Sadie E. McClure 

Mabelle A. Boutelle. 



Cogswell. 

Edna M. Kennedy. 
Mary A. Sanborn . . 



Bow Brook. 

Mary C. Caswell.. 
Mildred I. Cilley. 



Plains. 

Jane E. Sullivan 

Special Teachers. 



Charles S. Conant.. 
Emily E. Harding. 
Edward F. Gordon. 



Ellen J. Jones 

Leila A. Hill 

Mary J. Gannon.. .. 
Charles L. Mason .. 
Maude L. Wallace. 



Grades 7, 8,9.. 

Grades 4, 5,6.. 

(irades 2 and 3 

Grade 1 

Kindergarten 
and sub-pri- 
mary 



Principal 

Assistant 

Principal 

Assistant 

Trans, to Chan- 
dler Fir.st Pri- 
mary, fall term 



Principal. 
Assistant . 



[7,8,0 
Grades 4, 5, 6, 
Grades l, 2, 3.. 



Grades 2 and 3 
Grade 1 . . . . 



Grades 1 and 2 
Kindergarten 
and sub-pri- 
mary 



Principal., 
Assistant . 



Grades 2 and 3 
Grade 1 



Principal . 



Principal . 
Assistant . 



Grades 1, 
4, 5, C, 7, 



Music 

Drawing.. . 
Wood and iron 

working 

Sewing 

Cooking 

Military drill. 

Elocution and 
physical 
training 



$G50 
500 
500 

525 



450 
325 



325 
375 



475 
325 



500 
375 



28 Hall Street. 

112 Centre street. 

25 Green street. 

152 No. Main street. (Penacook.) 



4 Fayette street. 



3 Lyndon street. 

113 South State street. 



64 Franklin street. 

30 Franklin street. (Boscawen.) 



10 Blancliard street. 
6 Blake street. 



121 Warren street. 

107 School street. (Dunl)arton.) 



4001 36 Jackson street. 



1,075' 

8001 

900 ! 
450 
250! 
450 
100 



400 



61 School street. 

19 Pearl street. (Cambridge, 

Mass., 

20 Auburn street. 
220 No. Main street. 
58 Green street. 

113 Warren sti-eet. 
27 Beacon street. 



school report. 441 
Rkgular Teachers. 

Whole number (male) . . . . . . 2 

Whole number (female) including Kindergarten assistants 57 

Special Teachers. 

Whole number (male) ...... 3 

Whole number (female) ...... 5 

Average Number of Pupils to a Teacher. 

High school ........ 28 

Grammar schools . . . . . . . 42 

Primary and Kindergarten schools . . . . 53 

Mixed schools . . . . . . . - 47 



TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 





°c «'®5'3 




















-5 a.^ S « 1 








S " a o 








" ~ > >^-M 


SCHOOLS. 


<c 2*0 - '' S? 














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cs H 
O 



High 

Grammar. 

Kimball, 1st.... 

Kiinhall,2(t 

Kimball, 3d 

Kimball, 4tli.... 
Merrimack, 1st 
Merrimack, 2cl.. 
Chamller, 1st... 

Walker, '2(1. 

Walker. 3d 

Ruinford, 2d.... 

Rumford, 3d 

Penacook, 2d... 
Peiiacdtds:, 3d... 
Franklin, 3d.... 
W. Coiicnrd, 1st 
W. Concord, 3d. 
Eastman, l.st 



Primary. 

Kimball, 1st.... 

Kimball, 2d 

Kimball, 3d 

Kimball, 4tli.. .. 
Merrimack, 1st 
Merrimack, 2d. . 
Chandler, 1st... 
Chandler, 2d.... 

Chandler, 3d 

Walker, 1st 

Walker, 2d 

Walker, 3d 

Walker, 4th 

Rumford, 1st 

Rumford, 2d 

Penacook, 1st... 
Penacook, 2d... 
Franklin, 1st... 
Franklin, 2d.... 
Franklin, 3d.... 
W. Concord, 1st 
W. Concord, 2d. 
W. Concord, 3d. 
Eastman, 1st... 

Tahanto, 1st 

Tall an to, 2d 

Bow Brook, 1st. 
Bow Brook, 2d.. 

Cogswell, 1st 

Cogswell, 2d 



Mixed. 



Plains. 



Totals. 



92 



128 220 196 189 



15 17 

211 29 

17 i 24 

28! 2G 



329 379 



32 
1368 



708 705 



25 
1394 



1777 



57 
2762 



1399 



1202 



47 38 
2347 i 2085 



96 221 



91 



4 
17 
911 

93 18 

94 22 
90 15 



94 302 



86 i 37 

821 20 



83 10 

88i 11 



85 



573 

16 
1112 



.79 



.12 
.22 
.081 
.18 
.32; 
.35 
.11 
.36 
.221 
.111 
.401 
.291 
.53 
23 
.33 
.18 
.671 



61 159 18 235 11 



.28! 



.19 65 
.161 

.47 17 

.is! 

.431 2 

.38 

.33 

.15 

.31 

.13 

.20 

.34 

.20 

.27 

.13 

.29 

.12 

.26 

.231 



45 


1 

69 


17 


22 



57 

4 
33 



.17j 19 
.06! 26 



.23 416 



654 



5 2 

7j 3 

l! 5 

5 

111 10 

3 7 



1361 



53 
2129 



54 90 



O!' 3 

4 

0: 

Oi 5 

O! 7 

0, 8 

o! 6 

3 

o; 



o; 




o! 



01 

o! 


0, 

Oi 









19 5 

114 11 

80 15 

50 23 



55 
39 
60 
29 
28 
97 1 
39 
116 



20; 20 

46 91 

24| 
1561 

14; 



986 208 



50 12 
73 10 



281 
112' 
24 
33 



451 12 
50: 9 



129 



40 
24' 

20 1 
44 
82 1 
49! 
65 



103 20 
121! 10 



50 

74 

54 

47 
. 52 

79 

17 

42 

30 

72 

61 
168 29 

46 6 



1755 301 



56 
3032 



33 



29 31 



51 23 



1 
114 



SCHOOL Rt:POKT. 



443 



Table Showing the Whole Number of Plpils, Average 
Attkndaxce, and Tardiness in all the Schools Since 
1889. 





Actual number of pupils 
attending. 


Average daily at- 
tendance. 


Tardine.ss. 




ai 

O 


3 


3 

o 


o 


d 

g 

o 
o 

Q 


6 


to 
eS 

o 

o 


Q 


■ i 


o 


t6 

u 
o 


1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 


833 
869 
995 
1146 
1117 
1210 
1251 
1246 
1235 
1289 
1368 


920 
946 
1078 
1192 
1221 
1255 
1238 
1243 
1255 
1328 
1394 


1753 
1815 
2073 
2338 
2338 
2465 
2489 
2489 
2487 
2617 
2762 


62 
258 
265 


103 


1363 
1428 
1655 
1669 
1679 
1835 
1853 
1847 
1960 
2024 
2085 


65 

227 
14 
10 

156 
18 

113 
64 
61 


41 
6 


1034 
1100 
1700 
1761 
1862 
1404 
1550 
1268 
1020 
1122 
1112 


66 
660 

1 
101 

146 

248 
102 


273 


1895 
1896 
1897 


127 
24 




478 


1898 
1899 
1900 


130 
145 


2 


10 



444 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



MANUAL TRAINING. 

TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 





Wood-working. 


Cooking. 


Sewing. 










_^ 


a> 






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CO 
















s 








c 








a 




p. 


• 






n 


M 






O 








SCHOOLS. 


a. 
o 


1 


a5 
o 

3 




n 

=4-1 

o 




6 
o 

S 


IS 


P. 

o 


0} 

1 


o 


!S 




!- 





'O 


o a> 


;-! 


§ 




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k( 


P 


a 


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o 






















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o c 


,a . 




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<D O 








<BO 




S5f 


> 


"S 


s S 


S ^ 


c3 


1 


a <D 


S^ 


S 
> 


4^ 






.— O 


o 




C:S 


^1 


1 


P 

^ 


^^ 








p.'S 




■gcS 


4^ 


> 


O P< 


"§03 


0) 


> 




e3 






«3 

oft 




H 


hJ 


■< 


H 


H 


1-5 


< 


H 


H 


h-! 


<! 


H 


High 


24 

IS 


5 
1 


21 
20 


29 
19 


11 
26 


21 
2 


4 
14 


32 
28 


10 

78 


11 

24 


11 
56 


21 


Kimball.. 


102 


Merrimack 


43 


2 


34 


45 


41 


5 


25 


46 


40 


15 


28 


55 


Chandler 


21 




15 


21 


37 


6 


21 


43 


23 


7 


16 


30 


Walker 


21 
15 




19 
14 


22 
15 


12 
15 




11 

14 


12 
15 


61 
56 


11 
15 


42 
41 


71 


Rum ford 


71 


Penacook 


22 




20 


22 


9 


1 


10 


10 


i 42 


20 


31 


62 


Franklin 










1 








26 
28 
16 


4 
7 

7 


25 
21 
15 


30 


West Concord . . 


10 


4 
3 


8 
2 


14 
5 










35 


Eastman 


7 


2 


7 


9 


23 


Tahanto 




Bow Brook 


























Cogswell 


























Plains 


2 
8 




2 

8 


3 

8 










6 


4 


4 


10 


Parochial 


3 


1 


4 


4 




Totals 


186 


17 


163 


203 


161 


38 


110 


199 


386 


125 


290 


510 







school report. 445 

Attendance. 

The increase in the whole number of different pupils 
belonging for the past ten years has been 26 per cent., 
and it is reasonable to suppose that, in view of the increase 
of last year, this will continue. During the past year the 
number of pupils has been larger than that of the year pre- 
ceding by 145. This increase has been pretty evenly distrib- 
uted, the gain south of Pleasant street being identical with 
that north of Center street. The average daily attendance 
has increased 64 and the per cent, of attendance has decreased 
one, due no doubt to the prevalence of children's diseases. 
The average number of tardinesses to each pupil has 
decreased 3 per cent. This increase in attendance has 
caused us to use all the extra seats available. It was reason- 
able to suppose that the recent change in the location of the 
railroad shops would cause congestion in attendance at the 
south part of the district. Although this has been realized, 
yet the attendance at the north part has also experienced a 
like increase. Residential lines prescribed by the board of 
education for attendance at the different buildings have been 
disregarded because conditions compelled it. Pupils resid- 
ing as far north as High and Auburn streets have been 
obliged to attend the Kimball school, and others as far south 
as Warren street have attended the Alerrimack school. 
Doubtless the new school building about to be erected at the 
west end will obviate this difficulty. 

The enrollment in certain portions of the district forcibly 
suggests the need of more room in the near future, but if the 
board sees fit to make the afternoon classes of the sub-prim- 
ary schools care for all the first year pupils this need of extra 
accommodations will be delayed for a considerable time. 
The plan has been on trial in the Franklin building and has 
met with such success that I recommend it as a feasible 
scheme. 

The record of perfect attendance has been remarkably good. 
Those pupils who have had a perfect attendance for more 
than one_ year are as follows : Perfect attendance for seven 



446 CITY OF CONCORD. 

years, Frances K. Saltmarsh, Roy .T. Brunei ; six years, 
Grace Walters ; five years, May A. Wardner, Wendell H. 
Piper, Harry Perry, Esther Carlson ; four years, Effie D. 
Weatliers, Reuben H. Boutvvell, William E. Morrison, Flor- 
ence Holbrook ; three years, Nellie J. Moore, Mabel G. San- 
born, Clarence Little, Edith P. Piper, Maude A. Burroughs; 
two years, Marion L. Smith, Mabel P. Home, George P. 
Leet, Julia A. Stickney, Alice J. Huntley, Llovd B. Dame, 
Mary Casey, Clara Heath, George E. Carter, Hazel Bar- 
nard, Raymond Taylor, Anna D. Liberty. 

Last spring the board elected Mr. George W. Johnson 
truant officer for the district. He has faithfully performed 
his duties and the attendance at school has been yery mate- 
rially increased by his work. An inspection of his report 
shows that yery many pupils who were clearly evading the 
law have been caused to attend school. 

High School. 

It gives me much pleasure to report an unusually success- 
ful year for the High school. The attendance has been large 
and regular, the corps of teachers efficient, and the results 
attained unsurpassed for many years. The courses are more 
comprehensive and well-balanced, and the equipment better 
than ever before. I hope that we may be able to retain the 
present corps of teachers for another year. 

The plan now in vogue in the ninth grade grammar schools 
has been on trial long enough to form an adequate idea of its 
effectiveness as a preparation for high school work. The fol- 
lowing comparisons show definitely in its favor: 

From 1S93 to 1896 the classes were fitted under the old 
plan; from 1S96 to 1899 under the new plan. Careful com- 
parisons of these two periods show that the average number 
graduating from the grammar schools has decreased i^ per 
cent. The average number entering the High school has 
decreased 3-j per cent. The number leaving the High school 
during the first term has decreased 2 per cent. The num- 
ber of the whole class enrolled upon the honor list during the 
first term has increased 13 per cent. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 447 

The items relating to graduations from the grammar 
schools and entering the High school are unfavorable to the 
present scheme, but those relating to scholarship are largely 
in its favor. 

The registration for the year has been 21S, two fifths 
being boys and three fifths girls. The freshman class enter- 
ing this year numbered S6 as compared with 76 of last year. 
The tuition receipts of the school amounted to $720. Of 
the twenty-five tuition pupils thirteen resided in the city of 
Concord, three in Dunbarton, three in Pembroke, two in 
Bristol and one each in Hooksett, Bow and Southern Pines, 
N. C. 

The graduating class last June numbered twenty-five, ten 
boys and fifteen girls. Nine were in the academic course, 
four in the classical, and twelve in the three years course. 
Seven entered college, two at Vassar, one each at Amherst, 
Dartmouth, Durham, Harvard and Wesleyan. Two are 
taking post-graduate courses, three studying at the Franklin 
Training school, two teaching outside of Concord, and one 
instructing private pupils. 

The teaching corps has been practically the same as for 
the previous year with the exception of Misses Mary W. 
Dean and Philinda P. Rand. Miss Dean, the instructor in 
English composition, is a graduate of Radcliffe college, 
thoroughly trained for her work, and her success as a 
teacher is evinced by the improvement in the literary work 
of the school. English composition under her teaching is 
rapidly approaching a standard never before attained here. 
The school paper, Z/^e Volunteer^ has been made a prac- 
tical part of her department. This appears once each term, 
and is the most creditable publication ever issued by the 
school. 

Mrs. Wilson has been granted leave of absence until next 
fall. Her work has been successfully carried on by Miss 
Rand. 

A course in miscellaneous reading was prepared by Misses 
Elizabeth Averill and Mary E. Whitten of the High school, 
and Judge Corning of the board. This has been printed 



448 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

and furnished the pupils in pamphlet form, the object being 
to induce them to select the choicest productions of the 
different authors, and thus cultivate a taste for first-cUiss liter- 
ature. 

The scientific course in the second year of its existence is 
successful and growing in favor. The pupils taking this 
course are classified as follows: juniors, four; sopliomores, 
seven, and freshmen twenty-five, making a total of thirty-six, 
or about one fifth of the whole number in school. Out of 
thirty-three in the freshman class who took this course ten 
were enrolled upon the honor list at the close of the fall term. 
The teaching antl the results are worthy of commendation. 
A liberal supply of apparatus has been furnished by the 
board and much more has been made by the instructor. 
There is urgent demand for a projecting lantern, which may 
be procured for a nominal sum, and a limited amount of 
apparatus is also needed for physiography. 

Primary and Grammar Schools. 

The two impeding factors of the year have been children's 
diseases and the overcrowding of rooms. The schools need 
more rooms and a smaller number of pupils in each room to 
realize what people desire as the best education for their 
children. 

A course in memory work has been prepared and practised 
throughout nine grades. This requires the memorizing of 
one short standard poem each month, especially suited to it. 
There are also appropriate opening and closing exercises. 

Much attention has been given to exercises in English com- 
position in the lower grades. Improvement has been sought 
not only in the quality of the subject matter, but also in the form 
in which it is presented. Since the introtluction of " Carpen- 
ter's Exercises in Rhetoric " better books have been published 
and the introduction of one into Grade Nine is deemed advis- 
able. 

The standard of arithmetic remains practically the same as 
for the past few years. If the mathematics of the first four 
years were reduced to mental work principally, and the time 



SCHOOL REPORT. 449 

thus gained applied to physical culture, reading, letter-writing 
and composition work, the results would show a gain for 
mathematics and the other studies as well. 

The results from our plan of teaching history have been 
satisfactory. The course in collateral reading has pi'oved to 
be more effective than I supposed it would be. More than 
2,000 books were read by the pupils last year, which can be 
traced directly to the influences of school work. Probably 
many more will be read next ^ear. The eflects of such 
extensive reading cannot be justly estimated, but we may 
conjecture that a taste for reading will be formed which will 
eventually relegate cheap literature to the place where it 
belongs. One room alone had a record of more than 400 
books read, and the greater part of these were taken from the 
public librai-y. 

The course in geography has been revised and topically 
arranged to suit the needs of the various grades. Aside 
from the regular subject matter of the books much attention 
has been paid to rapid map-sketching, location and finished 
map drawing. A new supply of maps and globes was fur- 
nished to nearly all of the schools, but a like supply is needed 
for next year to make the outfit complete. 

Manual Training. 

Wood and Iro7t Worki/ig- : This department has under- 
gone important changes during the past year. A new lathe 
for the iron work allowed an extension of the course to be 
made so that it now ofiers very instructive work to the 
advanced classes. To promote the best interests of the school 
an assistant should be employed to aid the regular instructor, 
aftbrd the pupils more individual attention and raise the 
standard of discipline. A class from the parochial school 
has attended this year. 

Sexving : Sewing has been graded so as to ensure steady 
progress. For various reasons quite a number have sought 
to be excused from this branch, perhaps more than in pre- 
vious years. On account of the time being divided with 
cooking in the upper classes, the fifth and sixth grades were 

29 



450 CITY OF CONCORD. 

enabled to take this work. I recommend that sewing be 
taught in the lowest grades of school and that the regular 
teacher give the instruction under the direction of the reg- 
ular sewing teacher. While the fifth and sixth grade girls 
have been at the sewing school the boys of these grades have 
been obliged to remain in the school rooms. Some manual 
work should be furnished them for next year. In the fall it 
became necessary to use the remaining room of the Cogs- 
well building for a kindergarten and the sewing classes were 
compelled to seek accommodation elsewhere. The city 
government generously allowed us the use of the Ward house 
on West street. While this is not an ideal place for the 
work, nevertheless it has been used to advantage. 

There is need of better equipment for the school. Cut- 
ting and making garments has been added, and if this work is 
to count with other studies in the matter of promotion, every 
necessary convenience should be placed at the disposal of the 
teachers and pupils and then they may be held responsible 
for careful examination. The exhibition at the close of the 
year showed commendable results. 

Cooking: Cooking and Household Economics divide the 
time with sewing in grades eight and nine of the grammar 
schools and the scientific course of the High school. Interest 
in this branch is evidenced by the fact that the West Concord 
class has attended and paid its own transportation charges. 
One girl is reported to have entire charge of the cereals for 
the home breakfast, and 1,253 dishes iiave been prepared at 
the difterent homes. Mothers are urged to allow the girls to 
experiment so as to apply knowledge for which the class time 
makes no provision. The room has been improved by white- 
washing the walls and the old unsightly pasteboard boxes have 
been replaced by new shelves and a cupboard. Instruction 
in domestic science, such as dusting, washing dishes and 
silver, sweeping, setting table for breakfast and luncheon, 
table etiquette, etc., has raised the standard to a point never 
before reached. It can be said confidently that the work has 
never been more popular with the pupils nor more satisfac- 
tory work accomplished than during the past year. 



school report. 451 

Drawing. 

Drawing has progressed as usual with the exception of the 
High school work. The time given to the subject here and 
the other limitations which the teacher is obliged to observe 
are such as to render the subject of little value and to set the 
standard lower than that required in ordinary high schools. 
The studio class has been larger than usual, the attendance 
more regular and the work of a higher order of excellence. 

Music. 

Music has been conducted upon essentially the same lines 
as heretofore. The books of the Educational Music Course 
have largely displaced those of the National Course. An 
etibrt has been made to render the High school work more 
varied and effective and it has been realized to a large extent. 
I suggest that consideration be given to the advisability of 
instituting a class of musical history. It is a subject worthy 
of any educational svstem and is in successful operation in 
other cities. The pupils sing in good tune and show unmis- 
takable improvement in sight reading. From year to year 
the different grades vary in the amount and the quality of the 
work done, but the average is one of progress, not retrogres- 
sion. 

Kindergartens. 

But one new kindergarten has been started this year. In 
the fall one was established in the Cogswell building. At 
present the attendance is small. A knowledge of the growth 
of the other kindergartens leads me to believe, however, that 
this one will assume larger proportions. 

Elocution and Physical Training. 

Miss Maude L. Wallace was elected as instructor of physi- 
cal training and elocution during the winter term. She has 
brought to her v^^ork a professional training and a capacity 
for teaching which ought to insure success. 



452 city of concokd. 

Military Drill. 

Military drill for both boys and girls has been carried on 
in the High school much as usual. Governor Rollins kindly 
allowed the use of the western part of the state house yard 
for purposes of drill during the spring term. This enabled 
the pupils to take up the more advanced work. There is 
much need of a hall for the companies during the winter. 
The pleasant days of the fall and spring terms permit out-of- 
door work, in which much more progress is made than dur- 
ing the winter term. The discipline has not been perfect and 
hardlv approaching it. The Cadets held a successful prize 
drill at which the girls gave a creditable exhibition. The 
boys were represented at the competitive drill in Boston, 
which was given under the auspices of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, and they carried off the honors at 
the recent drill of a local National Guard company. There 
is great need of some new rifles, belts, and also wooden 
dumb-bells for the girls. The Cadet colors are also in a 
dilapidated condition. 

Training School. 

The Training school still continues to do creditable work, 
and sends forth teachers who give good account of themselves 
wherever they are called upon to teach. The work of the 
school has been seriously impeded this year by the epidemic 
of the fall, but the zeal which has always characterized the 
corps of teachers has in nowise abated. 

Much discussion has been rife in this country during the 
last quarter of a century regarding the comparative values of 
did'erent courses of study. This discussion seems to be no 
nearer settlement than it was in the beginning. In the United 
States the people as a rule subordinate theory to practice. 
They have an innate desire to see a man act more than he 
talks. This question as related to our schools as well as 
others is — have our pupils the physical and mental ability to 
do something.'' Upon this will the success or failure of our 
American system of instruction depend. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 453 

The supreme effort of all educational systems should be 
towards the proper and full development of the mental faculties. 
It is not fatal to a child's prospects that courses which seek 
this have or have not a strong element of utilitarianism. It 
matters not whether a bov shows mental power as the result 
of a course in classics or a course in manual training. The 
result is what men desire. If we seek habits of accuracy we 
care not whether the power is gained through careful transla- 
tion of Greek or Latin, French or German, thorough work 
in English grammar, absolute work in arithmetic, algebra or 
geometry, planing to the line, the regular stitch, or using 
"just right measure" in cooking. The pupil who shows 
this development is the one who will be chosen for it. 

The professional man and man of affairs ask for a pupil 
with the ability to think, receive instruction, apply it and to 
increase in strength. That a pupil fresh from the public 
schools cannot add long columns of figures and keep books 
as well as a clerk of ten years' experience is not to be criti- 
cised as the results of an educational system. It is neither 
reasonable nor just. If the pupil through his studies has been 
able to gain the power of thought, accuracy, and application, 
this is all any man can reasonably expect and about all he 
will ever get from any course of study, either specific or 
general. There is not a course of instruction in connection 
with our public schools that tends to unfit a boy or girl for 
any calling in life. To say that any particular course, from 
kindergarten to the classics, is necessary is a misstatement. 
The records of many pupils from our public schools, who 
have entered the schools of other cities, are of such a high 
standard as to silence criticism. 

Our system of instruction is neither costly nor of a low 
standard, when justly compared with that of other cities of 
the same size. A statement to the contrary cannot be sub- 
stantiated. The people are charitable in regard to mistakes 
which any one is liable to make, the pupils are interested, 
the teachers verv hard workers, and those in charge of educa- 
tional affairs are careful and conscientious in their adminis- 
tration. 



454 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I am highly appreciative of aid in my professional work 
and it is without formality that I acknowledge obligations to 
the board of education, the teachers and the general public 
for unvaried courtesy during the past year. 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



455 



ROLL OK HONOR 



SCHOOLS OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, 

1899=1900. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Bertha A. Clark (i). 
Margaret A. Conway (i). 
Marion L. Smith (2). 
Nellie J. Moore (3). 
Mabel G. Sanborn (3). 
Maude E. Sanborn (i). 
Mabel M. Virgin (i). 
Effie D. Weathers (4). 
Helena M. Casey (i). 
Joseph J. Dearborn ( i ) . 
Helen A. Drake (i). 
Ashley G. Hazeltine (i). 
Mary A. Wardner (5). 



Andrew Broggini (i). 
Grace E. Chandler (i). 
Alice W. Clark (i). 
Carrie M. Foster (i). 
Clarence R. Fowler (i). 
James G. Frye (i). 
Ida A. Heath (i). 
Alice G. Henneberry (i), 
Mabel P. Home (2). 
George P. Leet (2). 
Wendell H. Piper (5). 
Henry Riley (i). 
Annie E. Sullivan (i). 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 



Bertha A. Gill (1). 



THIRD GRAMMAR. 



Edward A. Dame (i). Laurence F. Piper (i). 

Carl E. Millette (1). Lizzie M. Bullock (i), 



FOURTH GRAMMAR. 



Julia A. Stickney (2), 



456 CITY OF CONCOIU). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Alice J. Huntley (3). Philip O'Connell (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY, 

Lloyd B. Dame (2). Hazel L. Wingate (i). 

THIRD PRIMARY. 

J. Harold Dame (i). Harry O'Connell (i). 

KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

Reuben H. Boutwell (4). William E. Batchelder (i). 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Francis K. Saltmarsh (7). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Timoth}- P. Reardon (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Dennis Reardon (i). 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

Roy Tenneyson Brunei (7). Susie E. Dooning (i). 

FIRST PRIMARY'. 

Ruth M. Flanders (i). Nellie B. Derry (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 



Lora Brown ( i ) . 



KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 457 

WALKER SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Harry Perry (5). Clarence Little (3). 

Julia Casev (i). Mary Case}- (3). 

Eva Bartlett ( 1 ) . 

THIRD GRAMMAR. 

Evelyn E. Perry (i). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Albert Brown (i). Emma Henneberry (i). 

Bernice Chaplain (i). Grace Walters (6). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Ethel Mulligan (i). Esther Carlson (5). 

James Murray (i). Sadie Gallagher (i). 

Charles Walters (i). Elsie Taylor (i). 

THIRD PRIMARY. 

Paul Corrieau (i). Charles Taylor (i). 

William Murray (i). Mary Coughlin (i). 

KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Clara Heath (3). Ruth Buntin (i). 

Hattie Brooks (i). James Kelley (i). 

THIRD GRAMMAR. 

Ralph C. Morgan (i). Gladys N. Hammond (i) 

Ethel C. Dearborn (i). Evelyn F. Tozier (i). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

None. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

None. 



458 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

None. 

THIRD GRAMMAR. 

None. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

William E. Morrison (4). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Jasper E, Mudgett (i). Henrietta M. Rodd (i) 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

George E. Carter (2). Lilla M. Moore (i). 

Edna M. Batchelder (i). Edith R. Piper (3). 

Hazel Barnard (2). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Robert Ahern (i). Raymond Taylor (2), 

Ferdinand Phaneuf (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

None. 

KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



WEST CONCORD SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

None. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Florence Holbrook (4). 



SCHOOL REPORT. 459 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Bertha M. Nelson (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Roland T. Wilmot (i). 

KINDERGARTEN. 

Mildred Holbrook (i). Ruth Peterson (i). 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

None. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

None. 



TAHANTO SCHOOL. 



FIRST PRIMARY. 



Renie Belair (i). Elizabeth B. Comolli (i), 

J. Francis Kenney ( i ) . Mary E. Geary ( i ) . 

John G. Perry (i). Margaret A. Geary (i). 
William Reed (i). 



SECOND PRIMARY. 



Bessie M. Reed (i). Henry L. Larson (i). 

Cora M. Harrington ( i ) . 



BOW BROOK SCHOOL. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Dorothy F. Vannevar ( i ) . 

SECOND PRIMARY 

None. 



460 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COGSWELL SCHOOL. 



FIRST PRIMARY. 



Maude A. Burroughs (3). Cora E.Liberty (i), 
Anna D. Liberty (2). 



KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



PLAINS SCHOOL. 
Seth A. Clark (i). 



SCHOOL REPORT. 461 

GRADUATING EXP:RCISES OF THE CONCORD HIGH 
SCHOOL. 



Class of 1899. 



PROGRAMME. 

Recitation — Psalm XCJ, ' Viiinie M. Boutwell. 

Prayer, Rev. George H. Reed. 

Class Essay — " An Example of America's Gratitude to her Heroes," 

Florence M. Toof. 
Chorus — " Now the Music Soundeth," Hosmer. 

Class Oration — " The Disarmament of the Nations," 

Omar S. Swenson. 
Essay (First Honor) — " Tennyson as a Poet of the Sea," 

Ethel M. Paige. 
Chorus — " In Praise of the Waltz," McLaughlin. 



PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS, 

Henry F. Hollis, Esq. 

ADDRESS, 

Hon. Frank A. Hill. 



Choral Part-Song — " The Gallant Troubadour," Watson. 

Benediction. 

GRADUATING CLASS. 
A, Academic Course ; c, Classical Course ; 3, Three Yeai-s' Course. 

Nellie Angle Bailey, a. Harriet Belle George, a. 

James Herbert Baker, a. Willis (ioveCarleton Kimball, Jr., c. 

Clara Louise Ballard, 3. Mary Llewellyn Leaver. 3. 

Augustus Battles, a. Frank McGuire, 3. 

Elsie Lura Bean, a. Ethel Maude Paige, c. 

Fannie Maud Bodwell, 3. Thomas Walpole Pearson, 3. 

Vinnie Maud Boutwell, c. Paul Stephens Phalen, 3. 

Elizabeth Jane Donovan, a. Lurena May Ranney, c. 

Grace Emily Dow, a. Ralph Harvey Rollins, 3. 

Mabelle Lucy Farnum, 3. Omar Stephen Swenson, a. 

Ruth Winnifred Favor, 3. Florence May Toof, a. 

James Augustine Fitzgerald, 3. Fi'ank Ernest Woodbury, 3. 
Mary Flavin, 3. 



462 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 
June 22, 1899. 



Kimball Grammar School. 



PROGRAMME. 

Marcli — " Argyle Highlands, " 

Chorus — a. " Bright Summer Days." 
b. " Boat Song." 

Essay — " The Dress is Not the Man," 

Banjo Solo — "Louisiana Hoe Down," 

"The Bridge Keeper's Story," 

Lena M. Sargent. 

Piano Duet — "Waves of the Ocean," Misses 

Toussaint 1' Overture, 

Amos Dodge. 

Vocal Duet— " The Morning," 

Florence Wykes, 
Bessie Bateman, 
Lena Sargent, 

Essay — " Heroes of To-day," 

Bass Chorus — " The King's Champion." 

Essay— "Row, Not Drift," 

Solo— "Ye Merry Birds," 



Irma Berber. 



Chorus — "School March." 



" Eulogy Upon (Jeneral Grant," 

C. L. Roberts. 

Chorus — " A Little Dance." 

Presentation of Diplomas. 



Florence Newell. 



.Mabel Home. 

Cleon J. Chase. 

W. A. Eaton. 

Morton and Shallies. 
Chas. D. Blake. 



Emma Mooney, 
Mabel Home, 
Carrie Foster. 

Annie E. Palmer. 



Carrie Foster. 
Ferd. Gumbert. 



J. P. Neivuian. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



463 



GRADUATING CLASS. 



Bessie Bateman, 
Charles Walker Brown, 
Horace Everett Chase, 
Marion Stuart Clement, 
Fred Emerson Foster, 
Genevieve Downes Fifield, 
Alice Winifred Kendall, 
Emma May Mooney, 
Annie Eaton Palmer,f 
John Glenn Powers, 
Grace Frances Reed, 
Lena May Sargent, 
Eltha Achsah Shallies, 
Ethel Cilley Stone, 
Leslie Rix Trevett, 
Charles Parker Woodworth, 



Irma Berger,^ 
Cleon Joseph Chase, 
Morris Thayer Clement, 
Amos Dodge, 
Carrie May Foster,* 
Mabel Phylinda Horne,§ 
Nellie Morton, 
Clarence Samuel Marden, 
Harry Joseph Pelren, 
Emery Edwards Proctor, 
Margaret Dudley Sargent, 
Allie Mehitable Sprague, 
Harry Locke Smith, 
Charles Lester Roberts, 
Clinton Rand Thompson, || 
Florence Louisa Wykes. 



Merrimack Grammar School. 



PROGRAMME. 

Chorus — "Stand by the Flag," 
Declamation — " Paul Jones," 
Calisthenics — Boys, 
Piano Solo — "The Chapel by the Sea," 
Declamation — "A Happy Holiday," 
Duet— "The Morning," L. E. Robie, 

M. E. Robinson, 



Class. 

JW. J. Ahern. 

Leader, C. B. Sanborn. 

fA. G. Henneberry. 

, §G. L. Jones. 

A. H. Smith, 

M. R. A. Phaneuf. 



Calisthenics — Girls, Leader, M. E. Robinson. 

Oration — "How a State Makes Citizens," *Andrew Broggini. 

Chorus — " Boat Song." Class. 

Town Meeting, Class. 

Moderator, E. K. George, 

Clerk, M. E. Robiiison, 

Selectmen, C. B. Sanborn, §L. M. J. Phaneuf, C. O. 
Philbrick. 

Piano Solo— "Kathleen Mavourneen," H. M. Ackerman. 



*First honor. tSecond honor, t Third honor. § Fourth honor. II Fifth honor. 



464 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Essay — "Pleasant Hours," §L. M. J. Phaneuf. 

Quartette — "A Little Dance," M. M. Dee, E. K. George, 

A. H. Smith, W. H. Piper. 
Declamation — "The Reformation of Uncle Billy," L. E. Robie. 

Duet — " The Belle of the Cakewalk," *Andrew Broggini, 

William Haynes. 
Delsarte Poses, Class. 

Chorus— " School :\Iarch," Class. 

Award of Diplomas, Committee. 

Chorus — "Vacation Song." Class. 

GRADUATING CLASS. 

Helen Maria Ackerman, William Joseph Ahern,:}: 

Andrew Broggini,* ISIary Margaret Dee, 

Robert Emmett Donovan. Edward King George, 

William Haynes, Grace Louise Jones, || 

Leo Thomas Haynes. ]\Lary Gertrude Niles McPhersou, 

Alice Gertrude Henneberry,t ]Marie Pvose Alexandrine Phaneuf, 

Mary Agnes Keenan, Wendell Holton Piper, 
Louise Marie Josephine Phaneuf,§ Lillian Esther Robie, 

Clarence Orlando Philbrick, Claude Brown Sanborn, 

Edith Reynolds, Annie Elizabeth Sullivan, 

Myrtle Estelle Robinson, Hiram Oscar Taylor, 

Annie Hardy Smith, Eva Helena Tandy, 
Frank Walters. 



Chandler Grammar School. 

Ir 

PROGRAMME. 

]\Iotto : " Lest we Forget." 

March — "Favorite Regiment," Sarah J. Woodward. 

Butterfly chorus, Class. 

Recitation (First Honor)—" P^ducation," Ida A. Heath. 

Xi-io — " The Torrent," Misses ]\lclntire, Aldrich, Morrison. 

Recitation (Second Honor) — " Stavoren," (irace L. Aldrich. 

Duet—" The Morning," Neil O. Ralph, Mabel F. Morrison. 

Recitation (Third Honor) — "Small Beginnings," Laura M. Andrus. 
Violin solo, Edmund J. Fitzgerald. 

Fourth Honor Excused, Alice W. Clark. 

Recitation—" Success in Life," (ieo. Paul Leet. 

•First honor, t Second honor, i Third honor. §Fourtli honor. II Fiftli honor. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



465 



Song — " A Little Dance," 

Misses Currier, Aldricii, Morrison, Master Gushing. 
Class Oration — " A Soldier's Pardon," Neil O. Ralph. 

Class Essay—" Gifts," Marion A. Elkins. 

Presentation of Diplomas, By Committee. 

School March, Class. 



GRADUATING CLASS. 



Grace Leverett Aldrich,t 
Laura May Andrus4 
Edgar Melvin Royce, 
Ernest Ralph Blakely, 
Etta May Carter, 
Grace Earl Chandler, § 
Alice Westford Clark,§ 
Margaret Mary Clark, 
Alice Maud Currier, 
Samuel Erwin Cashing, 
Marion Allison P^lkin, 
Henry Elkin, 
Ednmnd Joseph Fitzgerald, 



Lena May Harrington, 
Ida Alberta Heath,* 
George Paul Leet, 
Margaret Everister Mclntire, 
Almira Ella Milton, 
Alice Lillian ^lorrill, 
Mabel Florence Morrison, 
Caroline Chandler Paul, 
William Leroy Persons, 
Neil Orlando Ralph, 
Margaret Frances Riley, 
]Marjorie Sawyer Robinson. 



Eastman Grammar School. 



PROGRAMME. 



Motto : " Persevere to the End." 



Chorus — " Welcome to Morning," 
Recitation — "The Drummer Boy," 
Chorus — " The Time to Walk," 
Essay — " A Little Common Sense," 
Piano Solo — " Une petite Fleur," 
Recitation — "Simon Grubb's Dream," 
Exercises, 

Double Trio — " Mayday Now is Sweetly 
Fairy L. Strickford, 
Mildred A. Jenkins, 
Scott E. Drew, 
Original Story — " A Girl's Trials," 
Delsartean Movements, 



Class. 

Mary E. Atwood. 

Class. 

Edith M. Holt. 

Annie M. Hodge. 

Mildi'ed A. Jenkins. 

Class. 

Smiling," 

Annie M. Hodge, 
Nellie J. Boynton, 
Henry H. Ring. 
Fairy L. Strickford. 
Class. 



* First honor, t Second honor. 
30 



t Third honor. § Fourth honor. 



466 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Piano Solo — " Rosalind Galop," Henry Riley. 

Chorus — " God and King," • Class. 

Recitation — " A Little Fireman," Nellie J. Boynton. 

Solo—" The Red Scarf," Henry Riley. 

Essay — " Persevere to the End," Annie M. Hodge. 

Solo — " The New Kingdom," Fairy L. Strickford. 

Chorus — " Wandering Song," Class. 

GRADUATING CLASS. 

Mary E. Atwood, Mildred A. Jenkins,J 

Nellie J. Boynton, Roy W. Maynard, 

Scott E. Drew,§ Sherman P. Radford, 

James G. Frye, Henry H. Ring.f 

Edith M. Holt, Fairy L. Strickford, || 

Annie M. Hodge,* Henry H. Riley. § 



Plains Grammar School. 



PROGRAMME. 

Chorus — " Welcome." 

Oration (First honor) — " I Sliall Be," Ralph A. Benjamin. 

Chorus—" Time to Walk." 

Essay (Second Honor) — " Mother," Loviua N. Emerson. 

Quartette — "Alphabet Song," 

Edith H. Sherburne, Ralph A. Benjamin, 
Lovina N. Emerson, George A.Champigny. 

Recitation (Third Honor) — " Marguerite," Edith H. Sherburne. 

Chorus — " Gaily Oar Boat Glides O'er the Sea." 

Oration (Fourth Honor) — " Andre and Hale," 

George A. Champigny. 

Recitation — " Mr. Week's Dinner," Glenina P. Blair. 

Solo — " Miss Liberty," B. Francis Clark. 

Recitation — " Caractacus," Eugene N. Champigny. 

Presentation of Diplomas, Committee. 

Chorus — "Farewell," Graduating Class. 

GRADUATING CLASS. 

Ralph Adams Benjamin,* George Arthur Champigny,^ 

Lovina Nelson Emerson, f Edith Holmes Sherburne. || 

*First honor. tSecond honor. +Third honor. § Fourth honor. II Fifth honor. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 467 

TENTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY CONTEST 

By the Pupils of the Public vSchools of Union School Dis- 
trict, AT Phenix Hall, Thursday Evening, March 23, 1900. 



PROGRAMME. 

Original Declamation, 

1. The American Newspaper, High School. 

Amos Dodge. 

2. The Future of the Anglo-Saxon Race, High School. 

James Hammond Stone. 

3. Patriotism, High School. 

William Wentworth Thayer. 

4. Music and Its Charms, High School. 

Irnia Berger. 

Music. Chorus — "Hail, Smiling Morn" (SiJofforth). 
. Aesthetic Drill—" The Revels of The Naiads," 
By Class selected from the Public Schools. 

Forensic Declamation. 

1. "Abraham Lincoln" (Melancthon Strykei"), Merrimack School. 

Charles Day Weathers. 

2. "The American Sailor and Soldier" (R. P. Hobson), 

Fred Albert Barker. Chandler School. 

3. " The Ship of State " (Rev. Wm. P. Lunt), West Concord School. 

Katharine Gertrude Quinn. 

4. "Eulogy on Lafayette " (Edward Everett), High School. 

]\Ioody Dole Holmes. 

Music. Part Song — " Rest Thee, My Little One " (Facer). 

Miscellaneous Declamation. 

1. " How Old Folks Won the Oaks " (J. J. Eakins), High School. 

Charles Lester Roberts. 

2. " Tim's Promise " (Josephine Marie), Chandler School. 

Ethel Ruby Welch. 



468 CITY OF CONCORD. 

3. " Apples Finkey, The Water Boy " (J. J. Rooney), 

Jennie Belle Blake. West Concord School. 

4. " How Burlington was Saved " (C. Mair), Merrimack School. 

Anna Margaret Gannon. 

5. " On the Railroad Crossing " (Hezekiah Strong), High School. 

Lillian Esther Robie. 

Music. Soli and Chorus — " The Old Guard " (Rodney). 
Aicard of Prizes. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Rev. Loren Webster, Holderness, N. H. 
Prof. Isaac Huse, Jr., Manchester, N. H. 
Supt. J. H. Fassett, Nashua, X. H. 

Original Declamation. 

First Prize, •§20, awarded to Amos Dodge. 

Second Prize, $6, awarded to William Wentworth Thayer. 

Forensic Declamation. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Moody Dole Holmes. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Charles Day Weathers. 

Miscellaneous Declamation. 

First Prize, |10, awarded to Charles Lester Roberts. 
Second Prize, S6, awarded to Lillian Esther Robie. 
Third Prize, $4, awarded to Jennie Belle Blake. 

Special Prize, SI, awarded to the best speaker of the school which 
took no prize, Fred Albert Barker. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



469 



THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Organized September 10, 1859. 

LIST OF MEMBERS AXU TERM OF SERVICE, 1859-1900. 



Name. 



From. 



To. 



Date ofDeath 



Henry E. Parker 

Asa Fowler 

Paltiali Brown 

Joseph B. Walker 

Caleb Parker 

Parsons B. Cogswell 

Jesse P. Bancroft 

Josiah P. Nutting 

David Patten 

Samuel C. Eastman 

Hazen Pickering 

Hazen Pickering, 2d time.. 

Lyman D. Stevens 

John V. Barron 

Abraham J. Prescott 

Amos Hadley 

Elisha Adams 

William M.Chase 

William M. Chase, 2d time 

Henrv J. Crippen 

Albert H. Crosby 

Oliver Pillsbury 

Samuel B. Page 

Charles P. Sanborn 

Charles P. Sanborn, 2d time 

Daniel C. Allen 

Warren Clark 

Warren Clark, 2d time 

Ai B. Thompson 

Ai B. Thompson, 2d time.. 

Joseph C. A. Hill 

Joseph C. A. Hill, 2d time.. 

Everett L. Conner 

Sargent C. Whitcher 

John H. George 

George W. Crockett 

Charles R. Corning 

Charles R. Corning, 2d time 
Charles R. Corning, 3d time 

Daniel B. Donovan 

John C. Thorne 

James L. Mason 

Charles H. Thorndike 

Cephas B. Crane 

Shadrach C. Morrill 

John C. Ord way ■. . . 

Harry P. Dewey 

Mary P. Wood worth 

William Yeaton 

Henry C. Brown 

Austin S. Ranney 

Eliphalet F. Philbrick 

Susan J. Woodward 

Amos J. Shurtleff 

Henry F. Hollis 

Willis D.Thompson 

John M. Mitchell 

Susan C. Bancroft 

Edward N. Pearson 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
March 15 
March 15, 
March 16 
March 30 
March 30, 
March 18 
March 21 
March 21 
March 20 
March 28 
Aug. 26 
March 22 
March 22, 
March 21 
March 21 
March 23 
March 23 
March 20 
March 27, 
March 18, 
March 28 
March 18 
Nov. 21 
March 24 
March 24, 
March 24. 
March 23 
July 13 
March, 
March 30 
March 25 
Feb. 3 
March 27 
March 26 
June 9 
March 31 
March 31 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
March 31 
March 31 
March 30 
Nov. 18, 
Oct. 5 
March 30 
April 2 
March 30 
March 30, 
April 5, 



1859 
1859! 
1859; 
1859 
1859 
18.59 
1859 1 
1859 1 
18.59 
1862 
1862 
1807' 
1864 
1864 
1865 
1868 
1868 
1869; 
1883 
1871 
18731 
1873 
1874 
18741 
1878: 
18741 
1875 
1886 
1876 
1883 
1876, 
1881: 
1877! 
18771 
1877 
1880 
1881 
1884! 
18991 
1882 
1883 
18861 
1887 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1890 
1890, 
1890: 
1892 1 
18921 
1893 
1895 
1896' 
18971 
1898; 
18991 
18991 
1900, 



1864! 
1868 
1861 
1872 
1862 
1895 
1869 
1864 
1867 
1874 
1865 
1871 
1867 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1880 
1875 
1896 



March 30, 
March 21, 
Nov. 20, 
March 22, 
ISIarch 15, 
Oct. 28, 
March 20, 
March 30, 
Aug. 21, 
]\Iarch 21, 
March 18, 
Aug. 26, 
March 16, 
March 22, 
March 21, 
March 21, 
Aug. 15, 
March 20, 
Aug. 3, 
March 31, 
March 18, 
Sept. 3, 
Sept. 1, 
March 24, 
March 28, 
August, 
August 7, 
Nov. 21, 
Feb. 3, 
March 27, 
March 24, 
March 27, 
March 23, 
March 23, 
March 28, 
March 27, 
March 25, 
March 26, 

MarcVi 27, 
March 31, 
March 31, 
June 9, 
March 27, 
March 30, 

March 30, 
March 30, 
March 30, 



Nov. 7, 1896. 
April 26, 1885. 
Nov. 20, 1861. 

Jan. 19, 1874. 
Oct. 28, 1895. 
April 30, 1891. 

17 March 26, 1879. 



Jan. 23, 1872. 

March 6, 1878 
July 4, 1891. 

August 15, 18 



1876 
1881 
1875! 
1877; 
1883' 
1876 
1883 
1891 
1883 
1886 
1877 i 
1890 
1880 
1878' 
1883 
1886 
1882 



Dec. 24, 1893. 
Sept. 5, 1886. 
Feb. 22, 1888. 



June 3, 1889. 

Nov. 21, 1891. 
Sept. 12, 1890. 



Dec. 19, 1882. 
Feb. 6, 1888. 
Jan. 9, 1888. 



1890 ! Nov. 29, 1898. 

18881 

1892 1 Dec. 18, 1898. 

1887 
1890 
1897 

1899 
1899 
1893 



April 2, 
March 30, 



1898, June 4, 1898. 
1899; 



April 5, 1900 



470 



CITY OK COXCOKD. 



OFFICERS OF THE HOARD AND TERMS OF 

SERVICE. 

PRESIDENTS. 



Name. 


From. 


To. 


* Henry E. Parker 

*Asa Fowler 

Joseph B. Walker 

* Hazen Pickering 


September 17,1859.... 

March 17, 1862 

Marcli 23, 1868 

March 24, 1S70 

March 27, 1871 

August 30, 1880 

Marcli 27,1882 

March 30, 1886 

April 2, 1888 

Ai)ril 8, 1895 

November 18, 1895. . . . 


March 17, 1862. 
March 23, 1868. 
Marcli 24, 1870. 
March 27, 1871. 




August 15, 1880. 


* Oliver Pillsbury 

* Parsons B. Cogswell 

* Henry J. Crippen 


September 3, 1881. 
March 30. 1886. 
April 2, 1888. 
April 8, 1895. 


* Parsons B. Cogswell 

John 0. Ordwav 


October 28, 1895. - 
March 29, 1900. 







SECRETARIES. 



Joseph B. Walker 

Paltiah Brown 

Joseph B. "Walker, 2d time. . . 
Samuel C Eastman 


September 17, 1859 

March 18, 1861 

November 20, 1861 

Marcli 17, 18C2 

April 2, 1864 

xMarch 22, 1865 

April 4, 1870 


March 18, 1861. 
November 4, 18G1. 
March 17. 1862. 
April 2, 1864. 
March 22, 1865. 




S. C. Eastman. 2d time 

William M. Chase 


April 4, 1870. 
March 24, 1873. 


Henry J. Crippen 

Warren Clark 

Daniel B. Donovan 

Mary P. Wood worth 

Henry F. Hollis 


j\Iarch 24, 1873 

March 20, 1876 

April 2, 1883 

April 7, 1890 

April 3, 1899 


March 20. 1876. 
April 2, 1883. 
April 7, 1890. 
March 30, 1899. 
April 5, 1900. 







SUPERlNTENDENTS.t 



Amos Hadley 

Daniel C. Allen.... 

* Warren Clark 

Louis J. Rundlett. 



July 10, 1873 

August 10, 1874. 
Marcli 4, 1882 . . . 
August 1. 1885.. 



July 1, 1874. 
December 1, 1881. 
July 6, 1885. 



* Deceased, 
t Henry E. Sawyer, principal ol the High School, performed the duties of 
superintendent of schools, in addition to those of instructor, in 1862-'63. 

OFFICERS OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, 1859-1900. 

Moderators: Asa Fowler, 1859, '63, '68, '69, '70, '72. Samuel Coffin, 1860. 
Dudley S. Palmer, 1861. Amos Blanchard, 1861. Henry E. Sawyer, 1862, '64. 
Thomas P. Treadwell, 1862. P.B.Cogswell, 1863. William E. Chandler, 1863, 
'64. Charles P. Sanborn, 1865, '73. Anson S. Marshall, 1866. John Kimball, 
1867, '76, "77, '79, 1880-1888 inclusive. Enoch Gerrisli, 1871. George A. Pillsbury, 
1873, '74. William M. Cha.se, 1875. Benjamin E. Badger, 1876. William H. 
Buntin, 1878. E. H. Woodman, 1889, '90, '91. Charles C. Danforth, 1892-1900 
inclusive. James O. Lyford, 1897. Samuel C.Eastman, 1898. 

Ch'vks: Jereniiiih S. N<)yes, 1859. Stillman Humphrey, 1860-1894 inclusive. 
AVillis D. Thompson, 1895, '96, '97. Louis (). Merrill, 1898-1900 inclusive. 

The following persons served as clerks pro tern.: Paltiah Brown, August 
17,1861. S. C. Eastman, April 8, 1865. William M. Chase, July 8, 1871. Thomas 
B. Little, March 24, 1877. Isaac W. Hammond, March 28, 1884. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 471 

ANNUAL SCHOOL iMEETING WARRANT. 



State of New Hampshire. 

To the inhabitants of Union School District qualified 
to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the city hall in said 
district on Thursday, the 29th day of March, 1900, at 7 
o'clock in the evening, to act upon the following subjects: 

I. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

3. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the board of educa- 
tion for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the board of education, to 
hold office for three years, to fill the vacancies arising from 
the expiration of the term of office of John C. Ordway, Susan 
J. Woodward, and Henry F. Hollis, and also to fill any other 
vacancies which may occur in said board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors, and all other necessary 
officers for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of the schools for the ensuing 
year, including industrial education, military drill, and 
calisthenics. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for repairs of school buildings during the ensuing 
year. 



472 CITY OF CONCORD. 

9. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 13th day of March, 1900. 

JOHN C. ORDWAY, 
CHARLES R. CORNING, 
SUSAN J. WOODWARD, 
A. J. SHURTLEFF, 
H. C. BROW^N, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
HENRY F. HOLLIS, 

Board of Education of Union School District. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 473 



ANNUAL MEETING OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



CoxcoRD, N. H., March 30, 1S99. 

Agreeably to the foregoing warrant, a meeting of the legal 
voters in Union School District was held at the city hall this 
thirtieth day of March, 1S99, at 7 o'clock in the evening, and 
was called to order by the moderator, Charles C. Danforth, 
who read the foregoing warrant. 

Article i. Mr. B. E. Badger moved to proceed to the 
election of a moderator and that one vote be cast for Charles 
C. Danforth ; motion carried, and the vote was cast by Mr. 
Badger. 

Charles C. Danforth having one and the only vote was 
declared .elected moderator. He was sworn in by Mr. A. J. 
Shurtlefl', justice of the peace. 

Art. 3. Mr. Badger moved to ballot for clerk and cast 
one vote for Louis C. Merrill. 

Louis C. Merrill having one and the only vote cast was 
declared duly elected clerk of the district for the ensuing year, 
and took the oath of office. 

Art. 3. Charles R. Corning moved that the report of the 
board of education as printed be accepted and placed on file ; 
motion declared adopted. 

Art. 4. Under this article A. J. Shurtleft" offered the 
following resolution : 

"That the three members of the board of education to be 
chosen for three years each, be voted for on one ballot. That 
the polls be opened at this time and remain open until 9 
o'clock this evening ; motion adopted, and the moderator 
declared the polls open." 



474 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Art. 5. On motion of Mr. H. C. Brown, it was voted 
that Mr. Joseph C. A. Hill and ]\Ir. William Yeaton, the 
auditors of last year, be and hereby are, appointed auditors for 
the ensuing year. 

Art. 6. John C. Ordway ottered the following resolution 
and moved its adoption : 

Resolved^ That there be raised by tax on the polls and 
ratable estates of Union School District, the sum of seventeen 
thousand, one hundred dollars ($17,100), of which sum fifteen 
thousand dollars ($15,000) shall be appropriated for the pay- 
ment of notes maturing July i, 1S99, and two thousand, one 
hundred dollars ($2,100) for the payment of the interest on 
its funded debt accruing during the year. 

A vote was taken and the moderator declared the resolution 
adopted. 

Art. 7. A.J. Shurtleft' offered the following resolution : 

Resolved., That there shall be raised, and is hereby ordered 
to be raised, by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District, for the support of schools for the 
ensuing year, such a sum as in addition to the sum assigned 
to the district by the city of Concord out of the appropriation 
for schools, will amount to the sum of forty-five thousand 
dollars ($45,000). 

Mr. Shurtleft' moved the adoption of the resolution. A vote 
being taken the moderator declared it a unanimous vote in 
the affirmative. 

Art. 8. H. C. Brown offered the following resolution : 

Resolved^ That the sum of two thousand dollars be raised 
by taxation upon the polls and estates of Union vSchool Dis- 
trict and appropriated for special repairs of school buildings, 
and that the expenditure of such a sum shall be under the 
direction of the board of education. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 475 

Mr. Brown moved the adoption of the resolution. A vote 
was taken and the moderator decUired it a unanimous vote in 
the affirmative, and the resolution passetl. 

The moderator appointed Howard A. Dodge and George 
M. Fletcher a committee to assist in sorting and counting the 
votes. 

Art. 9. William Yeaton moved that there shall be raised, 
and is hereby ordered to be raised, by tax on the polls and 
ratable estates within Union School District, and appropri- 
ated for the introduction of improved methods of heating and 
ventilation in the Merrimack and Rumford school buildings, 
the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500). 

Joseph Wentworth moved that the matter be referred to the 
board of education ; motion seconded and a vote taken, and 
the motion was declared lost. 

The motion of Mr. Yeaton was then seconded, a vote 
taken, and declared in the affirmative. 

John P. George moved to reconsider the vote on Mr. 
Yeaton's motion. Vote was taken, 64 voting in the affirm- 
ative and 63 in the negative ; the motion to reconsider was 
adopted. 

Mr. Yeaton's motion being before the meeting Mr. Howard 
F. Hill moved to amend the same by adding, " if in the opin- 
ion of the board of education such action, is advisable" ; 
motion was seconded, and the amendment was declared 
adopted. 

Mr. Yeaton's motion, as amended by Mr. Hill, was then 
voted on, and declared adopted. 

Nine o'clock having arrived the moderator declared the 
polls closed and proceeded to count the votes. 

The moderator declared the ballot as follows : 



476 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Total number of votes 






544 


Necessary for a choice 






273 


Benjamin E. Badger . 






69 


Chancer Adams 






169 


Ebenezer B. Hutchinson 






I 


John E. Frye 






3 


Frank L. Phalen 






217 


Charles R. Corning . 






323 


John M. Mitchell 






381 


Susan C. Bancroft 

/■I T-» r. T 1 A 


/r TV /r'i._i^ _i 


1 1 


431 

r-i\ I __ 



Susan C. Bancroft, John M. Mitchell and Charles R. 
Corning, having a majority of votes, were declared by the 
moderator as elected. 

On motion of Mr. Hill, voted to adjourn. 



A true record. Attest, 



LOUIS C. MERRILL, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 477 

REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION FOR 
DISTRICT NO. 20, FOR 1S99-1900. 



In the last report submitted by the school board of District 
No. 20 the attention of the citizens was called to some con- 
ditions then existing that had a tendency to retard general 
progress in the school. Their attention was also called to 
certain regulations that had recently been adopted and promul- 
gated for the purpose of remedying those baneful conditions. 

It is a source of gratification to your school board in sub- 
mitting their annual report, for the year ending March, 1900, 
to testify to the beneficial results accruing from the operation 
of these regulations. One of those regulations provided that 
no child who had not attended school before should be 
admitted to the school except at the opening of the fall term. 
Owing to strict adherence to this provision it has been 
possible to rearrange the gi-ading in the primary rooms so 
that each of the three teachers employed in that department 
have one grade only under their charge, thereby making it 
possible for them to do much more efficient work than under 
previous conditions, and at the same time dividing the num- 
ber of pupils more nearly equal among all the grades. 

Excepting in the second and third primary rooms the same 
corps of teachers has been employed for the past year that 
was employed for the previous year. Miss Florence A. 
Chandler, who previously taught with marked success in the 
second primary, was given the third primary, succeeding 
Miss Lizzie T. Elliot; and Mrs. Hannah R. Holden, a 
teacher of successful experience and well-deserved popular- 
ity, was placed in charge of the second primary. 

In all grades the work done by the several teachers has 
been eminently satisfactory, and such progress has been made 
as is possible only through the services of competent instruct- 
ors, and the harmonious cooperation of all parties concerned. 
We believe that the present system of supervision by the prin- 
cipal has been conducive to most beneficial results. 



478 city of concord. 

Attendance. 

The average attendance for the past year has been lowered 
somewhat on account of the prevalence of scarlet fever, 
whooping cough and measles, which epidemics have succes- 
sively visited the district during the last year. 

An enumeration of the children l^etween the ages of five 
and sixteen, residing in the district, was taken last April. It 
was found that there were in the district at that time 129 boys 
and 116 girls, making a total of 245 resident pupils of school 
age. Another enumeration of the school children will be 
made by Special Officer Barrett before the first of April, 1900. 

Course of Study. 

A new course of study was adopted at the beginning of the 
last fall term. It will not be possible the first year to meet 
with all the requirements of the course, especialls- in the 
higher grades. In the three primary grades they will, by the 
close of the next spring term, have completed the work 
prescribed, and we believe that by the close of another year 
all the grades will be working in strict conformity with the 
course. Those interested to examine the course of study can 
obtain a copy bv applying to the secretary of the school 
board, or to the principal of the grammar school. 

Promotion and Graduation. 

The matter of promotion in the several grades has been 
carefully supervised by the principal during the last year, and 
it is believed that only those v^'ho were able to do the work of 
the next higher grade satisfactorily were advanced. We 
believe that this is a matter that should be carefully attended 
to, as hasty promotion works an injury not only to the pupil 
thus advanced, but also a serious injury to the school in gen- 
eral. No pupil is to receive a certificate of graduation who 
has not successfully and satisfactorily completed the course 
laid down. 

We believe that graduation from this school should, and 
furthermore we believe that, it does, signify qualification to 
enter upon anv high school course in the state. Since we are 



SCHOOL REPORT. 479 

dependent upon institutions outside of our district for instruc- 
tion in high school branches, we consider it important 
that graduation from the Penacook grammar school signify 
some definite amount of work completed. And it is the 
policy of the school board, acting with the principal of the 
school, to graduate those only who have given satisfactory 
evidence of their ability to enter upon the work of any high 
school where they may apply for admission. 

Books, Etc. 

The only change in books for the year was the adoption of 
Southworth & Goddard's "First Lessons in English" to be 
used in place of " Tarbell's Lessons in Language," in the 
fourth and fifth grades. 

To meet with the requirements of the new course of study 
in the matter of reading and English the following books have 
been bought: "Stepping Stones to Literature," for third 
grade; "Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales," for fourth grade ; 
Hawthorne's " Tanglewood Tales," for fifth grade; " Miles 
Standish " and "Snow Bound," for sixth grade; Haw- 
thorne's " Tales of the White Hills," for seventh grade; and 
" Ivanhoe," "Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration," and 
" Selections from Whittier, Emerson, Holmes and Bryant," 
for the eighth grade. 

The teachers of the first and second primai'y and the first 
grammar and second grammar rooms, assisted by the pupils 
in those rooms, have been able, through the generous contri- 
butions of pai-ents and citizens of the district, to place three 
valuable libraries in the building without expense to the dis- 
trict, consisting each of thirty volumes of instructive and inter- 
esting reading matter adapted to the mental attainments of the 
pupils in the respective rooms. 

In closing we would thank the public for the interest and 
encouragement thev have given, and for their cooperation 
with us in what we have undertaken. 

IRA C. PHILLIPS, 
OSCAR E. SMITH, 

Board of Educatio?i. 



480 



CITV OF CONCOKI). 



TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 



GRADE. 



TERMS. 



TEACHERS. 



,^«i-i 
^o 






1st Primary... 
2d Primary. .. 
3cl Primary. . . 
3d Grammar.. 
2d Grammar .. 
1st Grammar. 



Spring.. 
Fall.... 
Winter 

Spring.. 
Fall.... 
Winter. 

Spring., 
Fall.... 
Winter, 

Spi'ing., 
Fall.... 
Winter, 

Spring.- 
Fall.... 
Winter 

Spring. 
Fall.... 
Winter 



Etta C. Pease 11 60 45 

Etta C. Pease 15 61 46 

Etta G. Pease 10 56 39 

Florence A. Chandler 11 44 38 

Hannah R. Holden 15 48 40 

Hannah R. Holden 10 51 39 

Lizzie T. Elliot 11 47 42 

Florence A. Chandler 15 i 46 42 

Florence A. Chandler 10 45 39 

Maria Carter 11 36 31 

Maria Carter 15 46 41 

Maria Carter 10 45 44 

Susan E. Pickard 11 39 35 

Susan E. Pickard 15 39 34 

Susan E. Pickard 10 33 29 

1 

W. E. Gushee 11 \ 27 23 

W. E. Gushee 15 ! 29 25 

W.E. Gushee 10 I 26 23 



SCHOOL REPORT. 481 

REPORT OF TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

The members of the school board are unanimous in the 
opinion that the past school year has been a prosperous one. 
The examination exercises in nearly every school indicated, 
at the least, a reasonable degree of advancement. Labor is 
valuable only as it produces valuable results. This is as 
true of work performed by teachers as it is of labor in any 
other calling. 

The faithful teacher who is thoroughly equipped for her 
duties is the one whose service is always in demand. 

We have been fortunate in obtaining good teachers, and it 
is hoped that nearly all of them will resume their work at the 
commencement of the spring term. 

With two hvmdred and twenty-two scholars who have 
attended school not less than two weeks during the year, we 
have supported eleven schools. Two of these schools have 
been maintained during the latter part of the year, for the 
benefit of four pupils in each school. 

Though the intent of the present school law was to centi-al- 
ize such schools, its application in every case is not as practi- 
cable as could be desired. The four scholars at Ashville 
could be conveyed to MilJville at much less expense, probably, 
than would be required to maintain a separate school and it 
is likely some sucii arrangement will be made. 

The location of the school at Turtletown with reference to 
other schools in the eastern section of the district, would 
render the task of conveying pupils expensive and unsatis- 
factory. 

The question, " Shall we employ a teacher of vocal music 
to teach singing in schools where there is enough musical 
talent to make the effort justifiable, and where the teacher 
is unable to teach music ?" is before the people of the dis- 
trict. 

We are in sympathy with any reasonable movement tending 
to develop a taste for music, believing a short daily exercise 

31 



482 CITY OF CONCORD. 

is beneficial, even to those who cannot participate in it. 
About half of our teachers can teach singing as usually 
taught in common schools. 

Whether or not the voters of the district will make an 
appropriation for the benefit of those schools not favored 
with such teachers, is a question to be decided at the annual 
meeting. 

Three or four of our school-houses will need repairs before 
the commencement of the spring term. It is probable that 
all necessary repairs will not require more than the average 
yearly outlay for this purpose. 

The amount expended for books and supplies during the 
past two years has been much above that of the average year, 
and above what we anticipate for the current school year. 
The average extra appropriation, together with the amount 
of money required to be raised by law, ought to meet all our 
requirements for the coming year. 

ALBERT SALTMARSH, 
GEORGE T. ABBOTT, 
PALES P. VIRGIN. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



483 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

The treasurer of the Town School District, respectfully 
submits the following statement of the receipts and expendi- 
tures for the year ending March, 1900 : 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance March, 1899 . 
Received from city treasurer 

'• " town of Loudon . 

" " Mr. Abbott, tuition 

Total receipts 



$240.51 

3'39i-5o 

8.65 
3.50 



$3'643-i6 



Paid orders drawn by the school board to the following 
amounts : 



Paid teachers, including board . 


$2 


,327.00 


for repairs .... 




219.87 


conveying scholars 




52-50 


fuel and incidentals 




260.02 


books and supplies 




411.S3 


treasurer .... 




35.00 


printing report 




7.00 


Union School District, tuition 




44.00 


Cash to balance account 




295.94 



$35643.16 

ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 

Treasurer. 



484 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



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I N D E :k. 



Appropriations, board of liealtli HO 

engineering- department 141 

fire department 141 

police and watch 140 

public library 140 

regular, for 1899 138-143 

roads and bridges 141 

salaries 139 

special 141-143 

Assessors, board of, report of 329-332 

Assets, city. See ^Municipal Assets. 

Aiiditor, report of 194-202 

verification by, of treasurer's report 131 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 104-121 

Board of health. See Sanitary Department. 

City engineer, report of 278-288 

Cemetery department, report of commissioners 350-353 

City expenses, itemized 145-193 

board of health 178-179 

bridges 189 

cemeteries and parks 182-185 

committee service 179 

Decoration Day 179 

dog license 180 

engineering department 186 

tire department 172-176 

highway department 150-172 

history commission 179 

incidentals and land damages 146-150 

liquor agency 181-182 

^Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital 179 

open air concerts 179 

police and watch 176-177 

poor 145 

printing and stationery 177-178 

public library 180-181 

salaries 188-189 

schools 190 

sewers 186-188 

soldiers 146 

sprinkling 182 

state and county taxes, with interest 145 

street lighting 186 

waterworks 190-193 



540 INDKX. 

City goveniiiient, departments of, personnel of 43-62 

Assessors 49 

Auditor 46 

Board of aldermen 43 

Board of education 46- 47 

Cemetery committees 55- 56 

Clerk, city 44 

Collector of taxes 46 

Common council, clerk of 44 

Commissioners of cemeteries 56 

Culler of staves 58 

Engineer, city 46 

Fence-viewers 57 

Fire department, otiticers of 50 

Health otiicers 54 

Inspector of petroleum 57 

Liquor agent 55 

Mayor 43 

Messenger 46 

Overseers of poor 54 

Park commissioners 55 

Physician, city, and assistant — 54 

Pound-keeper 57 

Police department, officers of court 51 

officers and members of police force 51- 53 

Public library, trustees of 48 

librarian and assistants 48 

Registrar of vital statistics 55 

Sanitary officer 54 

Sealers of leather 57 

Sealer of weights and measures 58 

Street department, commissioner of highways 53 

drain layers 53 

Surveyors of painting 58 

masonry 59 

stone 59 

wood, lumber, and bark 59-60 

Superintendent of clocks 51 

Superintendent of schools 47 

Treasurer 45 

Truant officers 48 

Undertakers 56- 57 

Ward officers 60-62 

Water works, city, commissioners 49 

superintendent 49 

Weighers of hay, coal, etc 58 

City officials, reports of. See Department Reports, 
salaries of. See Salaries. 

City pliysician, report of 322 

City, population of 83 

City solicitor, report of 341 -342 

City, valuation of 83 

Collector of taxes, report of 343-344 

Coupon account, statement of 89 

Debts, city. See Municipal Debts. 

Department reports 203-488 



INDEX. 541 

East Concord Cemetery, expenses of 124 

Expenses, total city. See City Expenses. 

Financial account of city treasurer 132-138 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 354-392 

roll of members 370-375 

regiilations of 376-387 

fire alarm system 388-392 

Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery 93 

East Concord Cemetery 95 

East Concord sewer 96 

Millville Cemetery 95 

Old Cemetery 94 

Penacook sewer 96 

West Concord Cemetery 94 

West Concord sewer 95- 96 

Higlnvay commissioner, financial statement of 154-172 

Highway department, report of commissioner 242-277 

Indebtedness, bonded ._ 88 

Liquor agent, report of 345-346 

Mayor, the, inaugural address of 3- 18 

Mayors of the city of Concord, list of 63 

Millville Cemetery, expenses of 124 

Municipal assets 133 

Municipal debt 132-139 

Municipal regulations. See Regulations. 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 121-123 

fund of. See Funds. 
Ordinances and joint resolutions, 1899 19-42 

Parks, public, report of couniiissioners 347-349 

Police court, report of clerk of 340 

Police department, report of city marshal 333-339 

Poor department, report of overseer 323-328 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1860 84-85 

Property, city, inventory of 65-77 

water department, inventory of 78-81 

Public library, report of trustees 289-290 

librarian 291-295 

Recapitiilation of city property 82 

Regulations, municipal 2 

Reservoirs, public 368 

Salaries 188-189 

Sanitary department, report of board of health 296-303 

sanitary otificer 304-312 

mortality report 313-321 

School report 393-484 

Annual school meeting warrant 471-472 

Annual school meeting 473-476 

Attendance, tables of 442-444 



542 INDEX. 

School re\»n-t— Contmuecl. 

Board of education, district, reports of 477-486 

recapitulation of members 469-470 

report of 396^13 

Elocutionary contest 467-468 

Estimates of expenses 414-415 

Financial agent, report of 416^30 

Graduating: exercises 461-466 

Honor, roll of 455-460 

Siaperintendent, report of 432-454 

Statistical table 431 

Teachers, list of 438^141 

Truant officer, report of 436-437 

Tax assessed, amount of 83 

rate f>f 83 

rate of apportionment 83 

Taxes, collector of. See collector of taxes. 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 126-130 

Treasiiry department, report of treasitrer 87-192 

Trust, Countess of Rumf ord 91 

Cogswell library 92 

G. Parker Lyon, library 92 

]Minot cemetery enclosure — 91 

David Osgood 92 

Franklin Pierce, library 93 

Abial Walker,the 91 

Trusts, indivitlual cemetery 97-103 

Vital statistics, tables of 489-537 

Births 489-503 

Marriages 504-523 

Deaths 524-533 

Deaths in public institutions 534-537 

Water department, report of 205-241 

Commissioners, report of 212-213 

Analyses of city water 223-227 

Engineer's report 228 

Financial statement 209-211 

Fire hydrants 237-241 

Mean yearly heights of water 231 

Recapitulation of yearly receipts 230 

Schedule of pipes and gates 232-236 

Summary of statistics 208 

Superintendent, report of 214-222 

Water precinct, bonded indebtedness of 90 

Coupon, accoitnt of 90 

Treasurer's report of 90 

Woodlawn cemetery, expenses of 124 



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