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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"




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Section 



Presented by 

^ JVo. 



4 






^M' 



1901. 



FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEIVIBER 31, 1901, 

Together with other Annlal Reports and Papers 
Relating to the Affairs of the City. 




CONCORD, N. H. : 

Ira C. Evans, Printer, 12 School Street. 

1902. 



N 
1501 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

FOK PAYMENT OF BILLS AGAINST THE CITY. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, or aid 
to the city poor, should be particular to take the name of the 
person ordering such service, material, or aid, and should Iniow 
that the person is duly authoi-ized to contract said liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or delivered 
on city pauper account, except on the written order of the Overseer 
of the Poor, and for no longer time than until his successor shall 
have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable l)y the 
city, furnished on county pauper account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action can be 
had upon the bill by the Committee on Accoimts and Claims, and 
no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the City Auditor on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by him and by the Committee on Accomits and 
Claims, they will be ready for payment on Thursday following 
the regular monthly meeting of the City Government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the City Government occur 
on the second Tuesday of each month. 

GEORGE K. HAZELTINE, 

City Auditor. 



MAYOR'S ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of tJie City Council : 

The opening of this municipal term occurs at the begin- 
ning of a new century. It is especiall}' desirable that our 
management of city aflairs shall compare favorably with those 
of preceding administrations and with those which will come 
hereafter. 

Next April will complete forty-eight years of municipal 
government in Concord. The change from town to city 
organization was accomplished only after strenuous opposi- 
tion, three trials at the polls being necessary to secure the 
adoption of a city charter. Since the adoption of the charter 
the aftairs of the city have progressed steadily. Our popula- 
tion has more than doubled, our voters trebled, and our val- 
uation quadrupled. The care and protection of the interests 
of the city bring serious responsibility. In the performance 
of ovu" duties it will be necessary to bear in mind that the peo- 
ple of Concord have a right to expect a high degree of effi- 
ciency in their public officials, and it will be only by persist- 
ent effort, with an eye single to the welfare of the city, that 
their expectation can be realized. 

At the outset, I desire to express my great appreciation of 
the honor which has been conferred upon me by my selection 
as chief magistrate of the city. 

I fully realize that the position to which I have been called, 
through no desire of my own, is one of the most difficult and 
troublesome which exists in the state. It would undoubtedlv 
be much more comfortable for me personally, if I could have 
seen my wav clear to avoid the responsibility which now 
devolves upon me. Not feeling it advisable to do this, I 



4 CITY OF CONCOHD. 

accept the situation with all the ditHculties and perplexities 
which are involved and will endeavor to emulate, so far as 
possible, the many worthy men who have preceded me in the 
office. 

There is nothing on earth so contemptible as a man who 
tries to go through life without incurring responsibility. The 
conduct of human affairs requires that some one must bear 
the burdens and be accountable for the results. This duty 
now devolves upon us. How well we shall be able to per- 
form it, the future must determine. 



FINANCE. 



It is not my purpose to go into details in regard to the 
figures which make up the statement of the financial condi- 
tion of the city. The report of the city treasurer, which will 
be laid before you, furnishes all these details in a compre- 
hensive manner. It appears that the 



Fvmded debt of the city, including Union vSchool 
District and City Sewerage Precinct, and 
excluding the Penacook, West Concord, and 
East Concord Sewerage debt, for which a 
sinking fund is provided, amounts to 

Debt not funded ...... 



Total 

Water-Works bonded indebtedness . 

The total expenditures of the city for all pur- 
poses during the last year, according to the 
figures of the city treasurer, were 

To the appropriation that must be made to meet 
the ordinary running expenses of the city we 
must add enough to provide for Union School 
District bonds due July i, 1901 . 

Union School District bonds due July i, 1902 . 



$186,800.00 
9,986.09 

$196,786.09 
$650,000.00 



$322,865.01 



$15,000.00 
$15,000.00 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. O 

The utmost care must be used to prevent an increase in 
expenses. The tax rate is ah'ead}' as high as is desirable, 
althougii less than in many other cities. The credit of the 
city stands very high, as is evidenced by the fact that during 
the last year three per cent, bonds of the city have been dis- 
posed of in the Boston market at a premivnn. The experi- 
ment of abolishing the discount on taxes and providing for 
the necessities of the city, before the current taxes are avail- 
able, by temporary loans, seems to have been a good one for 
the city. The difference between the amount paid for inter- 
est on temporary loans and the amount discounted upon the 
taxes paid, estimated upon the basis of the discount in 1S98, 
the last year when the discount ordinance was in force, shows 
a considerable balance in fevor of the city during the last two 
years. 

ASSESSMENT OF TAXES. 

The proper assessment of taxes is a matter of the greatest 
importance and has been frequently referred to, in vigorous 
language, in inaugural addresses of preceding mayors. Not- 
withstanding this fact, I have good reason to believe that 
great inequalities exist in the present assessment of property 
for taxation and that some radical measures will have to be 
adopted in order that all property shall bear its just and rea- 
sonable share of the public burden. It has been truly said 
that "no more important office exists in the city than that of 
the board of assessors." 

It is the duty of the full board under the law to fix the val- 
uations, and no member of the board can escape full responsi- 
bility for inequalities in valuation, even though made by the 
assessor of some other ward. If it is impracticable for the 
full board in the first instance to make up the valuations in 
each ward, they should carefully examine and revise all the 
estimates of value made bv the assessor of a particular ward. 
The boai'd of assessors should be composed of men who 
have accurate judgment of property values and who are fear- 
less and independent in the performance of their duties. 



b CITY OF CONCORD. 

It is a matter worthy of serious consideration whetlier the 
method of selection of assessors ought not to be changed. A 
board of nine assessors is unwieldy and too large for a satis- 
factory performance of their duties. The sense of responsi- 
bility resting upon each individual member of the board is 
far less where it is distributed among nine members than it 
would be if the responsibility were upon a smaller number. 
Speaking in a general way and without intending to refer to 
the present board of assessors, it seems doubtful whether the 
present method of selecting assessors by election from each 
ward is likely to secure as good results as if some other 
method were used. 

In considering this matter, I thought it might be useful to 
ascertain the method of selecting tax assessors in other cities, 
and accordingly I caused an investigation to be made as to 
the course pursued in several cities in Massachusetts. The 
result of this investigation leads me to believe that there is a 
chance for great improvement in our manner of selecting 
assessors as well as the number of members of which the 
board should consist. 

In the city of Chelsea, the taxes are assessed by a board of 
three assessors, one being elected by the board of aldermen 
each year. The chairman receives $850, and the other mem- 
bers of the board $550. 

In Fitchburg, the board consists of three assessors, one 
being elected each year by the city councils. 

In Waltham, the board consists of three assessors appointed 
by the mayor and confirmed by the board of aldermen. The 
annual salary of the chairman is six hundred dollars, and of 
the other two members of the board five hundred dollars. 

In addition to the board of assessors there are seven assist- 
ants appointed each year, one from each ward, to take the 
polls, who each receive three dollars per day for two weeks. 

In Maiden, the board consists of three assessors, one mem- 
ber being elected each year bv the city councils. The board 
elects its own chairman and the members have a salary of five 
hundred dollars each, the chairman receiving one hundred 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. / 

dollars extra. In addition, there is a clerk, not a member of 
the board, who receives $1,200 a year under the civil service 
law. 

In Somerville, the board consists of five members appointed 
by the mayor and confirmed by the board of aldermen, and 
their terms of office are so arranged that either one or two 
members of the board are appointed each year. 

In Holyoke, the board consists of three members, one 
member being elected by the city councils each year. 

While the population of some of the cities mentioned varies 
considerably from that of Concord, there seems to be no rea- 
son why they may not throw light upon the question under 
consideration. The selection of these particular cities in the 
investigation, which I caused to be made, was entirely at 
random and with no idea on my part as to what the result 
would be. It seems significant that in not one of these cities 
are members of the board elected from the different wards, 
and in all the cities mentioned, except one, the board consists 
of not over three members. 

It has been suggested that it might be advisable for this 
city to have a board of three assessors, one member to be 
appointed each year either by the mayor and confirmed by 
the aldermen, or directly by the board of mayor and alder- 
men ; or by the city councils ; or elected upon the general 
city ticket. 

As the legislature is now in session an opportunity is 
aftbrded to make any change which seems advisable in regard 
to the number of which the board shall hereafter consist and 
the method of selection. 

While a radical change in the city charter, in this respect, 
ought not to be made hastily or without due consideration, I 
suggest whether it would not be wise to obtain from the legis- 
lature authority to make such change provided the city coun- 
cils subsequently vote to accept such legislation. By doing 
this it will not be necessary to delay until the next session of 
the legislature, in case the change is desired, and it will give 
sufficient time for the city councils to thoroughly consider the 
whole question. 

I invite your immediate attention to this matter. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



lllGinVAYS. 



The matter of "■good roads" has received constantly 
increasing attention in the last few years. Among the many 
important and valuable ideas which our recent governor has 
developed and promoted with a thoroughness and abilitv 
which has made hiin prominent in his official position, there 
is none to which he has devoted more attention or which is 
of more practical value to the state than the matter of good 
highways, and there is nothing which is of more importance 
to the welfare of any city or town. 

I wish that it was possible for this city to make an attempt 
to embodv some of the ideas which he has so forciblv 
expressed by a practical application to the future construction 
and repair of our highways. Unfortunately the present rate 
of taxation of most cities and towns is so high that it is doubt- 
ful whether the scientific method of constructing and repair- 
ing highways can be adopted, for the present, at least, without 
a material and substantial contribution from the state towards 
this object. I should be glad if this administration could be 
made memorable by an attempt, even on a small scale, to 
furnish an object lesson in proper road construction and 
repair. But the financial condition of the city is such that it 
does not seem wise to attempt anything more than to expend 
as judiciously as possible the amount appropriated for high- 
ways on the same general lines as it has been in recent years. 

It is a matter of regret that many of our streets were origi- 
nally laid out with little or no plan. During the last few 
years many streets have been laid out at the suggestion of 
landowners who desired to make their lots more valuable for 
sale. These streets were laid cnit with no reference to exist- 
ing streets or highways, so that we have miles of streets 
which form no part of a direct line of travel from one point 
to another, and seem to be in detached portions with refer- 
ence to the main thoroughfares. This method of laying out 
results in a great number of unnecessary streets, which adds 
largely to the expense of keeping highways in repair, and 
serves no good purpose. 



mayor's address. 9 

I would suggest that, whenever applications are made for 
the laying out of a new street, the parties making such ap- 
plication should be required to file with the city engineer a 
plan of the land surrounding the proposed highway, which 
should show where said proposed highway is located with 
reference to existing streets. If this is done the matter of 
laying out proposed new streets could be considered not only 
with reference to the private property affected thereby, but 
also with reference to existing streets and some general plan. 
By this method, a good many unnecessarv streets can be saved 
and such as are laid out will be in accord with the general 
system of streets. 

The protection and care of shade trees is a matter of great 
importance. It adds greatly to our enioyment in the use of 
highways and to the natural beauty of the scenery to have the 
roads well shaded bv trees suitable for that purpose and which 
are well cared for. 

The commissioner of highwavs, in whose immediate charge 
this matter rests, should give constant attention to this fea- 
ture of the highway and should see that no shade tree is 
destroyed except when the destruction is absolutely necessary 
for tlie proper use of the highway. It is a fact not generally 
understood that if any owner of real estate desires to remove 
any shade or ornamental tree situated within the limits of a 
public street, he must first obtain leave of the proper author- 
ities. In many cases owners of real estate not having this 
provision of law in mind destroy trees in the street in front 
of their premises. In cases of this sort, the commissioner of 
highways should give his immediate attention to the matter, 
and see that the destruction or removal of such trees is pre- 
vented until the propriety of their destruction or removal is 
determined. 

In the absence of the detailed report of the commissioner 
of highways, I shall onlv allude in general terms to the pres- 
ent condition of the streets and highways and their future 
needs. 

I am informed that with one or two exceptions the coimtry 
roads are better than thev have been for some time. The 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

road leading from Concord to Loudon is in bad shape and a 
considerable sum will be required to put it in fair condition. 
Many of the old bridges have been replaced with new ones 
and only a few smaller ones remain to be rebuilt. Although 
many new streets have been laid out in the last few years, very 
few have been constructed and they remain in the same shape 
as they were when accepted by the city. 

One of the most satisfactory kinds of material that has been 
used in this city for the surface of streets seems to have been 
coal-tar concrete. In 1896 Warren street from State to Main 
street was paved with this concrete and it has proved far su- 
perior to that portion of Warren street between State and 
Spring streets which was macadamized. 

The portion of Main street, north of School street, which 
was paved with coal-tar concrete a number of years ago, so 
far as I am aware, has given good satisfaction. I am informed 
that the first cost of the concrete is much less than granite 
blocks although it is not as durable. It is certainly much 
more satisfactory for the ordinary purposes of light travel 
while it lasts. Of course a pavement of granite blocks is less 
expensive in the long run on account of its superior lasting 
qualities. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Our public schools maintain their high rank as a factor in 
the prosperitv of the city. 

As the little education which I possess was acquired in the 
public schools of this city, I have peculiar reasons for having 
their interests much at heart. 

I have reason to believe that the executive management, by 
the superintendent, by the board of education, and also by 
the departments of instruction, is very eflicient and that our 
schools are not second, either in the acquirements to be de- 
rived therefrom or in tlie method of furnishing means for 
such acquirements, to similar schools in other cities. The 
expense of maintaining our public schools is very large, and 
yet the result accomplished seems to warrant the expense in- 
volved. 



mayor's address. 11 

If I had any criticism to suggest as to the public schools or 
their management, it would be that too much is attempted to 
be accomplished. While a desire to accomplish everything 
possible and to excel all others in similar undertakings is a 
familiar feature of the modern competitive struggle in every 
department of life, I wish that it did not enter into the prac- 
tical conduct of our school aftairs. To me it would seem 
more satisfactory if our schools should furnish a reasonably 
substantial practical education without impairment of the 
health of the pupil, than that they should excel the schools of 
all other cities in the state in percentage of rank attained. 

It is but natural, perhaps, that teachers and managers of 
public schools desire that the schools under their charge shall 
excel all others, for such a result is very apt to be accepted by 
the public as conclusive evidence of the ability and efficiency 
of school management. It is a matter of common knowledge 
that quite a number of pupils who attend public schools here 
and elsewhere are unable to pursue the course of study pre- 
scribed without injuring to some extent their bodily or mental 
health. It is gratifying to know that our educational author 
ities are recognizing the importance of preserving the health 
of the pupil and are devoting more attention to physical cul- 
ture and exercise than was formerly the case. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

During the past year the public library has received the 
accumulations of the Seth K. Jones trust fund bequeathed for 
the purchase of new books, amounting to $875.43. This will 
be a welcome addition to the funds of the library and will add 
considerably to its usefulness. By the terms of Mr. Jones's 
will, the library will also receive each year for the purchase 
of books between $14 and $15, which is a portion of the in- 
come of a one thousand dollar bond. 

The library is well patronized and appreciated. The cir- 
culation during the present year has exceeded 88, 000. I am 
informed that the reading-room in connection with the library 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

has been very extensively used. It is a matter for congratu- 
lation that the facilities and equipments of the library are so 
satisfactory, and nothing but praise can be said in regard to 
the management. 

The usual appropriation should be cheerfully granted. 

NEW CITY BUILDING. 

The necessity of a new city building has been generally 
admitted for more than twenty years. One objection which 
has been urged is the city's ownership in the present citv hall 
building. 

In 1S85 Mayor Woodman in his inaugural address, speak- 
ing of the city hall building, used the following language : 
"The building is poorly arranged and entirely unsuited to 
our growing wants. Its location is objectionable and it fur- 
nishes very small return for the investment there made. The 
only room which it provides for office purposes is that of the 
city clerk ; all the other offices being scattered about the city 
as accommodations can l)e found. 

"The hall itself in which we are now gathered is but little 
used except at the biennial election and could easily be dis- 
pensed with. As the county officials are now being urged to 
provide better accommodations for the courts, it seems as if 
the time had arrived for us to negotiate a sale of the city's 
interest in the building and provide for all the city offices 
under one roof." 

The above language of Mayor Woodman states forcibly the 
situation as it existed in 1SS5. Since that time the situation 
has not changed for the better. It is true that some of the 
city officers are now provided with an office in the police sta- 
tion building instead of being scattered about the city as they 
were foruierly. But the accommodations for these officers in 
the police station are cramped and not well adapted for the 
purposes for which they are used. The situation in the city 
hall building has grown worse than it was in Mayor Wood- 
man's time. The recent increase in the number of members 
of the city government requires more space in which to hold 



mayor's address. 13 

city government meetings and there was hardly enough space 
before the increase of membership. It is evident that some- 
thing must be done immediately to provide proper quarters 
for the transaction of the city's business. The only practical 
plan seems to be the erection of a modern building which 
shall be designed for the purposes for which it is to be used. 
The location of such a building is an important and trouble- 
some question. It has been suggested that it might be erected 
upon the present city lot in the rear of the police station, thus 
saving a large amount of money which would be required for 
the purchase of a suitable lot. On the other hand, it has been 
suggested that the city lot is not suitable for such a building 
as should be erected and that a lot should be purchased in 
some convenient location. The problem is a difficult one and 
involves the expenditure of a large sum of money. As the 
benefit to be derived from the new building would be chiefly 
received in the years to come, it seems to me proper that the 
expense caused by the erection of such a building should be 
met by an issue of long time bonds. An addition to the in- 
terest-bearing debt of the city is not desirable, yet I see no 
other practicable way of providing for the expense of this ab- 
solutely essential public improvement. 

As is generallv known, the ownership of the lot on which 
the present city building stands is divided between the county 
and the city, the city owning about three fourths of the land 
and one half of the building and the county owning the balance. 
It is understood that a small portion of the land comprising 
the city lot was conveyed, subject to the restriction that it 
must be forever used for city purposes. Some arrangeinent 
may have to be devised by which this restriction can be re- 
moved, if it is thought advisable for the city and the count)^ 
to sell the lot as a whole. It may be that some arrangement 
can be made with the county by which the city shall either 
dispose of its interest to the county or the county dispose of 
its interest to the city. It seems desirable that a committee 
be appointed by the city government with power to confer 
with the county commissioners or some committee to be ap- 
pointed by the Merrimack County delegation in the present 



14 CITV OF CONCORD. 

legislature with a view to ascertain what arrangement can be 
made that will be satisfoctory to the county and the city. An 
arrangement of this sort is a prerequisite to taking any action 
witli reference to the erection of a new city building. 

I invite your attention to this matter and suggest that a 
resolution be passed as soon as possible providing for the ap- 
pointment of a committee to represent the city in this matter. 

INDUSTRIES. 

While some of the industries of our citv are in a fairly good 
condition, there are a few which have had a hard strugle for 
existence during the business depression of the last few years. 
It is to be hoped that this struggle is now over and that they 
will enter upon a period of long-continued prosperity. 

So far as the city government in any proper way can aid the 
industrial concerns of Concord and the worUingmen whom they 
employ, I am heartily in favor of such aid and support being 
furnished. The prosperity of this and all other cities and 
towns depends very largely upon the success, comfort, and 
prosperity of the workingmen. They have been its mainstay 
and dependence in the past and always will be and to them we 
must look more especially for the development of its indus- 
trial enterprises. 

In accordance with the recommendation of preceding may- 
ors, I desire to urge upon your attention the importance of 
the city government doing everything in its power toward 
procuring the building of a railroad into the stone quarries. 
If this can be brought about it will undoubtedly greatl}' 
enlarge the granite industrj' and thereby be a source of great 
benefit to the owners and workmen employed in these indus- 
tries as well as to the merchants of our city. 

The Commercial Club has been of great benefit to the city. 
It has been well managed. The members have given freely 
of their time and services to advance the interest of the city 
and have been reasonably successful in their eflbrts. I trust 
that its organization will be continued and that citizens gen- 
erally will interest themselves in perpetuating it. 



mayor's address. 15 

water department. 

The condition of tiie water department is in general excel- 
lent. The work of replacing the cement lined pipe with cast 
iron pipe is gradually going on and will probably increase as 
each year goes by. It is necessary to replace from year to 
year the insufficient supply and continually disintegrating 
cement lined pipe with cast iron pipe and accomplish by 
degrees what many cities have been forced to do at short 
notice. 

The city of Fitchburg replaced its entire system with cast 
iron pipe at great expense, not daring to run the risk involved 
in continuing to use the old cement lined pipe. 

Our pipe has been in constant use for twenty-eight years 
and each year serious breaks occur. The city has increased 
largely and the South and West ends are growing to such an 
extent that the old pipe is not sufficient to supply the water 
taken in those sections. The city is absolutely dependent on 
its water system and good judgment requires that it should 
be equipped in the best possible manner and that extensions 
should be made from year to year so that the present perma- 
nent indebtedness of the water department shall not be 
increased. 

Prior to the last two years the city has paid to the water 
department the sum of six thousand dollars for hydrant ser- 
vice. 

At the commencement of the last municipal term, the 
appropriation for this purpose was omitted and nothing has 
since been included in the taxes raised. It seems to me that 
the hydrant tax is a just tax and as legitimate as the tax for 
the fire department. It also seems clear that if this item is 
not included in the taxes raised an unjust burden is thrown 
upon the water takers, and that certain owners of property are 
relieved from the payment of their share of expense incurred 
for fire protection furnished to their property which thev 
ought justly to bear. 

The proposition, briefly stated, is this : The city has, at a 
large expenditure, laid miles of pipe, a portion being solely 
for fire protection, and unless it receives some compensation 
for its hydrants, it gets no return for this part of the system. 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The water takers pay for the water which they use for 
domestic purposes, but there are a large number of people 
within the limit of the fire precinct who, either for the whole 
or a portion of the time, do not take any water and so pay 
nothing at all to the city. 

Some of these people live in the outskirts of tlie city where 
they liave wells or springs and do not need the city water and 
some of them are within the thickly settled part of the city, 
but the buildings wiiich they own are vacant and so no water 
is used, yet all their buildings receive the benefit which the 
water affords for protection from fire. Merchants who own 
large stocks of goods also receive this protection, but not being 
water takers to any extent pay practically nothing tor the 
water furnished for this purpose. It seems just that their 
property should pay its fair proportion for the benefit so 
i-eceived instead of putting the burden upon the people who 
pay the water rates. The only way the property owned by 
these non-water-takers can be reached is by a hj'drant tax 
assessed upon all the property in the precinct. The assess- 
ment of a six-thousand-dollar tax for hydrants is an equal 
distribution over all the taxable property of the precinct. It 
should be borne in mind that the revenue derived from the 
hydrant tax also aids in paying a portion of the bonded in- 
debtedness each year. 

Since 1S89, when the hydrant tax was abated, the water 
bonds have been extended by new issues instead of being paid 
when they become due as heretofore. 

I recommend that the hydrant tax be restored. 

SEWERS. 

The general sewerage system has been substantially com- 
pleted, and there seems no reason to expect that extensions 
or additions will be needed in the near future. It appears, 
however, that the city engineer, on March S, 1900, commu- 
nicated to the committee on sewers and drains, in writing, his 
opinion that serious defects in the capacity of many sections 
of the present sewerage system have been found. This con- 
dition, according to the city engineer, is principally due to 



mayor's address. 17 

the general extension of the districts without providing 
enlarged outlets for the thickly settled territory to be drained. 
The communication of the city engineer sets forth in detail 
the diftevent sections which he regards as inadequate. They 
are located all over the city, and he estimates that to make 
the changes and repairs which he recommends would involve 
an expenditure of over $3i,ooo. While he is of the opinion 
that these changes and repairs should be made as soon as 
practicable, I do not understand that he regards it as abso- 
lutely essential that any must be made at once except the 
construction of a short section of twenty-four-inch pipe on 
North Main street from Warren to Depot street at an esti- 
mated cost of $600. 

The details of his report will be laid before you for consid- 
eration. 

STREET LIGHTING. 

The matter of street lights is one of much importance. 
While there are, doubtless, many places which are not now 
lighted where it would be desirable to have a street light, if 
it could be accomplished without too great an expense, we 
must make haste slowly in this direction. The expense for 
street lighting is already quite large, and the tax rate is so 
high that in many cases we may be unable to furnish additional 
street lights where they may seem to be needed. The 
expenses of the city are constantly increasing, and while there 
should be no disposition to be parsimonious or niggardly, our 
constituents have a right to require of us that we make every 
effort against any increase in the tax rate, and to attempt, if 
possible, a reduction thereof. 

In regard to the present street lighting, I have no reason to 
believe that the company which furnishes the light under the 
contract with the city do not honestly and fairlv try to carry 
out their contract according to its terms. But I am informed 
that there is some complaint that through irregularity of the 
power which furnishes the electric current, or defects in the 
apparatus by which it is furnished, the lights are frequently 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

out in diflerent parts of the city and remain out tor a consid- 
erable period of time, so that light is not furnished in those 
localities to the extent agreed upon. I trust that whatever 
the cause of this failure to furnish the lights continuously, 
whether mechanical or otherwise, it will soon be rectified, so 
that the lights will be furnished regularly to the full extent 
agreed upon in the contract. 

I would suggest that for the puipose of getting definite 
information on this subject all police officers be instructed to 
keep a record showing the period of time during which they 
find the lights extinguished in difierent parts of the city. 

A record of this sort will place the city council in a position 
to either demand that a proper reduction be made from the 
contract price for the failure to furnish the light agreed upon, 
or to take such other action in regard to the matter as may 
seem proper to protect the interests of the city. 

WIRES AND POLES. 

Considerable complaint has been made that a large number 
of dead wires and unused poles encumber the streets of the 
city. If such is the fact, measures ought to be taken to com- 
pel their removal. The many wires and poles in the streets 
which are now in actual use are an obstruction and a source 
of danger to the public. There are many places in the city 
where it would be difficult and dangerous for the fire depart- 
ment to properly perform its duties, in case of fire, on account 
of these obstructions. 

I recommend that as soon as practicable, action shall be 
taken to investigate and ascertain what poles and wires now 
erected are in disuse, and that measures be taken for their 
immediate removal. It is a matter for serious consideration, 
and to which I invite your attention, whether all the wires 
used for telegraph, telephone, and electric lighting purposes 
should not be required to be placed in conduits underground. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

An efficient police department is requisite in every city for 
the safety of individuals and the protection of property. 



mayor's address. 19 

It is self-evident that experienced men are much more effect- 
ive as police officers than new men can be. A fixed tenure 
of office, so that an officer is not liable to be removed to grat- 
ify political or personal spite of an individual or class, tends 
to make an officer fearless and energetic in the discharge of 
his duties. It is undoubtedly the fact that men on the present 
force, with the experience derived from years of service, can 
accomplish more than would be possible to new and untried 
men however zealous they might be. The duties of police 
officers at best are difficult and unpleasant. Ordinary com- 
mon-sense would suggest that all good citizens, who have the 
interest of the city at heart, ought to sustain and encourage the 
members of the police department rather than to indulge in 
indiscriminate criticism. An expression of distrust or loose 
talk as to the honesty arid efficienc}' of a police or other 
public official who is in fact honest, naturally makes such 
official much less sensitive to the demands of that healthful 
and enlightened public opinion which is an incentive to the 
faithful performance of public duties and one of the safeguards 
of our institutions. In my judgment, this citv from the 
beginning has been very fortunate in its police department, 
and I have heard no well-founded complaint as to the effi- 
cienc}' and trustworthiness of its members. If, in the admin- 
istration of afiairs, experience shall show that any official, 
whether in the police or any other department, is unfaithful or 
untrustworthy, so far as I have the power he will be held to a 
rigid accountability. 

The act establishing a board of police commissioners for 
the city of Concord was approved February 23, 1S93. The 
purpose of this and similar acts which have been passed, as 
generally understood, was to remove the control of the police 
force from politics and to create a tenure of office for the 
individual members which would not subject them at each 
election to the vicissitudes which frequently occur in city 
elections. In my judgment, some changes can be made in 
the police commission act which will be of advantage to the 
city. 



20 CITY OF COXCOKD. 

The present act provides that the members of the poHce 
force appointed by the commissioners shall serve during good 
behavior and while competent to discharge the duties of the 
office. This, in effect, makes it impossible for the police com- 
missioners to reduce the number of the force unless it can be 
shown that the member whose removal is desired, in order to 
make the reduction, has failed to discharge his duties properly 
or is incoiiTpetent by reason of physical or mental disability to 
perform his duties. I would suggest that an amendment to 
the act be procured, authorizing the police commissioners to 
remove members of the force whenever, in their judgment, the 
public good requires it. Under such a statute, police officers 
would still have a reasonable tenure of office, because the 
political success of one party or another in the city election 
W'ould not affect them. On the other hand it would afford a 
reasonable opportunity for the removal of members for the 
purpose of reducing the number, and also an opportunity to 
remove a member in cases where the board of police com- 
missioners, in their judgment, are satisfied that such member 
should be removed, even although no want of good behavior 
or physical or mental disability can be shown. 

The report of the city marshal, showing details relating to 
the management of the police department during the last year, 
will be laid before you. It contains several recommendations, 
to which I invite your attention. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

I can say nothing except in commendation of the fire de- 
partment. Under its present management, its affairs, in my 
judgment, have been administered with strict economy, and 
first-class ability and efficiency. The members of the depart- 
ment show a surprising interest in its affairs and attend to 
answering alarms and other duties with commendable prompt- 
ness and zeal. When the amount of difficult and dangerous 
work which they render to the cit}' each 3 ear is considered, it 
is to be regretted that the compensation of the " call men " is 
not larger than it is. If the tax rate was not so high, I should 
favor an increase in this particular. 



mayor's address. 21 

In i8S6 the expense of maintaining this department was 
about $12,000. It is now over $20,000. 

The increase in expense since 18S6 is quite large, but I 
think that the result fully justifies it. The department seems 
fully adequate to present needs and pro"bably for a good many 
years in the future. 

It appears from the report of the "chief" that there has 
been some unusual expense during the last year which will 
not be likely to arise during the present year. He suggests 
that the non-interference armatures in the fire-alarm boxes, 
just purchased by the city, are unreliable, and such boxes 
should be converted into Gardner boxes without delay. The 
estimated expense of this change is about $600. I recom- 
mend that this matter be given immediate consideration by 
the committee on fire department. 

There are various other recommendations made in his re- 
port to which I invite your careful attention. 

While I have not sufficient knowledge of the subject to 
express my opinion upon these recommendations, I have the 
utmost confidence in the purpose of the "chief" to perform 
his duties with economy and with an eye to the interests of 
the cit}^, and am therefore satisfied that his suggestions are of 
weight and should be given proper consideration. 

CITY HISTORY. 

From the report that has been made by the history commis- 
sion it is gratifying to learn that progress is being made with 
the work of writing the history and that it is nearing comple- 
tion. The city is to be congratulated that this important 
matter is in such excellent hands. There is nothing of greater 
interest or importance to the people of any city or town than 
an accurate and well-written history of its events. It is now 
expected that the history will be ready for delivery during the 
present fall, although in a work of this kind it is impossible 
to foresee many contingencies which may arise to delay its 
publication. 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

It goes without saying that the city is greatly indebted to 
the members of the commission who have generously given 
their time without compensation for this commendable object. 

SUSPENSION OF RULES. 

The rules of the board of mayor and aldermen and common 
council heretofore in force provide in substance that every 
ordinance, order, or joint resolution shall be read a first time 
for information, shall then be read a second time, if not 
rejected or otherwise disposed of; shall then be referred to a 
committee ; shall have a third reading when reported by the 
committee, and shall then be put upon its passage. These 
rules were manifestly designed to secure careful consideration 
of all matters on which action of the city councils was con- 
templated and to afford an opportunity for mature delibera- 
tion in regard to such matters. During the last few years a 
practice has grown up by which that portion of the rules 
which requires the reference to a committee is in most cases 
suspended and ordinances and resolutions are read three times 
in succession and put upon their passage. It seems to me 
that this is unwise. There may be cases where immediate 
action is so necessary that a suspension of the rules is advis- 
able, but it ought to be the rare exception instead of the 
regular practice as it substantially is now. There will prob- 
ably but few matters arise which will sutler from the delay 
caused by referring such matters to the proper committee and 
allowing them to lay over for a month. Such a course will 
give the members of the city government an opportunity to 
ascertain the feeling of the people upon public matters 
before them, as well as give the members themselves sufficient 
time for mature consideration. These remarks are not 
intended to apply to such changes in the ordinances or rules 
as are designed to facilitate the organization and procedure of 
the city councils, nor to matters which lequire action at the 
present session of the legislature. 



mayor's address. 23 

compe.vsation of members of city council. 

The public statutes provide that no member of either 
branch, except the mayor, shall receive any compensation for 
his services. This law has been on the statute book for 
many years, but in this city, and I presume in others, it has 
been evaded by voting to each member of the city govern- 
ment at the close of his term of service an amount for 
committee service so-called. These amounts have been in the 
case of members of the board of aldermen $60, and the 
members of the common council $30, the members of the 
committee on accounts and claims each receiving $15 extra, 
the aldermanic members thus receiving $75, and the common 
council members $45. It would seem that the sums paid for 
so-called committee service are in direct violation of the afore- 
said statute, yet it has been received and paid for many years 
without question or objection. There is no doubt in my mind 
that the members of the city council ought to receive at least 
this compensation for their services and probably ought to 
receive more. It seems to me that legislation should be 
obtained authorizing compensation to be made so that no 
question can hereafter arise as to its legality. 

PROHIBITORY LAW. 

While the practical details in connection with the enforce- 
ment of the prohibitory law must necessarily be performed 
by the police department, and while the practical results to be 
derived therefrom must largely depend upon the integrity 
and efficiency with which such duties are performed, I have 
no disposition or desire to shirk or evade any responsibility 
in this matter, which properly devolves upon the mayor. It 
must be conceded that there is considerable difl'erence of 
opinion among good citizens whether the present prohibitory 
law is the best and most judicious method of advancing the 
cause of temperance, but so long as it remains on the statute 
book it is the duty of all officials, sworn to enforce the laws 
of the state and city, to cause it to be enforced as faithfully 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and impartially as all other criminal statutes. Whether public 
sentiment is in favor of the enforcement of this law or not, is 
of no consequence. Public officials charged with the dut}' 
of enforcing laws have nothing to do with the question of 
advisability of such laws and have no right even to consider 
their own personal opinions on the subject. 

If rash expressions, engendered by the excitement of a 
strenuous municipal campaign, have led any one to believe 
that the advent of this administration is to result in a policy 
of non-enforcement or evasive enforcement of the prohibitory 
or any other law, the mistake will soon be realized. 

It would be idle to expect, however honest and earnest our 
efforts may be in dealing with this subject, that we can escape 
criticism and even censure. It is a fact generally conceded 
bv thoughtful and candid men that the prohibitory law cannot 
be as easily enforced as most of the other criminal laws. 
Evidence is not as cheerfully furnished, even by good citizens, 
in liquor prosecutions as in other criminal cases. It is the 
dutv of every citizen to assist in the enforcement of law, and 
when he fails to do so it makes- the problem of enforcement 
more difficult. It is not my purpose, in alluding to these 
difficulties, to unduly magnify tliem, or to seek for excuses 
to dodge the responsibility properly devolving upon me 
in the enforcement of this law. Whatever other faults may 
be laid at my door, I hope the charge of cowardice cannot be 
justly made. 

No city is entirely free from the evils of intemperance, but 
our own city has the proud distinction of being one of the 
most quiet and orderly cities in the United States. 

So far as lies in my power 1 shall make an honest and 
earnest effort for the enforcement of all laws. Whatever the 
result may be I shall have no excuses to make or apologies to 
offer. 

LIQ_UOR AGENCY. 

A liquor agency is the necessary adjunct of a prohibitory 
law. It is absolutely essential that there should be some place 
provided by law where legal sales of alcohol and other intoxi- 



mayor's address. 25 

eating liquors for medicinal, mechanical, and other proper 
uses can be made. To carry out the purposes of such an 
institution, it is necessary that the rules provided by law 
regulating the conditions under which such sales can be 
made, and the persons to whom made, shall be strictly 
followed. 

To conduct an institution of this kind upon lines similar to 
those used where the illegal sale of liquors in the past may 
have been carried on, would be an entire perversion of the 
purposes for which the agency is established. 

The liquor agency should be under constant supervision, 
and required to conform to the exact conditions of the h\w. 

CITY DEPOSIT. 

During the preceding administration a joint resolution was 
passed inviting bids from the national banks of the city for use 
of the monthh- average balance of the city deposit, and 
under this resolution bids were received and the deposit 
awarded to one of said banks. It appears from the report 
of the city treasurer that the city has received as interest on 
said daily balance during the last year the sum of $408.79' 

It seems to me that the plan of awarding the city deposit 
to the highest bidder is a wise one, and should be adhered to. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I ask for your earnest cooperation in an 
effort to administer wisely and honestly the affairs which have 
been committed to our charge. I recognize fully the fact 
that without your assistance and cooperation nothing sub- 
stantial can be achieved. I shall endeavor, so far as the 
performance of my duties is concerned, to act in entire con- 
cert and harmony with you. It will be necessary, as in all 
cases, where a number of individuals are engaged in a 
common undertaking, to exercise mutual forbearance and self- 
control. 



26 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

It is expected that the heads of departments will cheer- 
full\- cooperate to assist us by the skill and efficiency with 
which they perform their duties. It is important that they 
mana<^e the appropriations set aside for them with great 
economy and care. 

While it is their duty to properly provide for the reason- 
able needs of their respective departments, they will be 
entitled to public approval if they are able to save some- 
thing from the amount appropriated for their particular 
department. 

Whatever the future may have in store for us, we mav feel 
assured that honesty and integrity of purpose will be 
accepted by our fellow citizens as the guiding principles 
which should govern our conduct of municipal affairs, and if 
we adhere to these principles we shall, at least, have the 
approval of our own consciences. If, in addition, we obtain 
the approbation of our citizens, we shall accomplish all that 
we can reasonablv desire. 



Ordinances and Joint Resolutions 



PASSED DURING THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 14, 1902. 



CITV OK CONCORD. 

ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Sections 1 and 11 of Chapter 
4 OF THE Revised Ordinances of the city of Concord. 

Be it ordained by the Citij Council of the Citi/ of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. Sections 1 and 11 of Chapter 4 of Revised Ordinances 
of the city of Concord are hereby amended by inserting in place of 
the word •' two," wherever it occurs in said sections, the word 
" three." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 12, 1901. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised for the ensuing financial year for the use 
of the city. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum of 
fifty-three thousand dollars to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, together 
with the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads and from 
other sources, shall be appropriated as follows : 



28 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



For payment of interest on bonds . 

payment of intei'est on temporary loans 

support of city poor .... 

incidental expenses and land damages 

salaries of members of city council 

printing and stationery 

beds at the Margaret Pillsbury hospital 

Decoration Day . 

dependent soldiers 

public school text-books 

6pen air concerts . 

Blossom Hill cemetery 

Old North cemetery 

West Concord cemetery 

Millville cemetery 

Pine Grove cemetery . 

Old Fort cemetery 

Horse Hill cemetery 

Bradley park 

Rollins park . 

White park . 

Penacook park 

Ridge park . 

Fiske park . 

Penacook bridge note, paid January 20, 1901 

White park note, paid March 1, 1901 . 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salary city marshal 
Salary deputy marshal 
Salary captain of watch 
Salary of eight (S) patrol men 
Salary police commission . 



$3,073.25 

1,000.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 

2,150.00 

2,000.00 

2,000.00 

400.00 

200.00 

3,300.00 

300.00 

1.000.00 

100.00 

175.00 

50.00 

75.00 

2.5.00 

25.00 

40.00 

800.00 

2,500.00 

75.00 

25.00 

200.00 

3,500.00 

400.00 





$28,913.25 


HOARD OF HEALTH. 




Salai-y of sanitary officer 


$1,000.00 


Salary of board of health 


75.00 


For bacteriological tests ...... 


100.00 


fumigation supplies 


125.00 


all other expenses 


200.00 



$1,500.00 

11,200.00 

900.00 

850.00 

6,400.00 

150.00 



CITY ORDINANCES. 



29 



Pay of janitor 

Pay of special policemen . 

Fuel city proper . 

Fuel Penacook 

Board of horse and shoeing 

Extra horse hire, city . 

Extra horse hire, Penacook 

New harnesses 

Lights in city and Penacook 

Water 

Ice ..... 

Helmets and buttons . 
Police telephone service 
Incidental expenses 



$240.00 

600.00 

250.00 

75.00 

265.00 

40.00 

20.00 

50.00 

180.00 

28.00 

8.00 

50.00 

154.24 

185.00 





$11,645.24 


SALAKIES. 




Mayor 


$1,000.00 


City clerk .......... 


1,200.00 


Overseer of the poor, Ward 1 ..... . 


30.00 


Overseer of the poor. Ward 2 


10.00 


Overseer of the poor, W^ards 3, 4, 5, G, 7, 8, 9 


350.00 


City auditor ......... 


1,000.00 


City solicitor 


500.00 


City treasurer 


250.00 


City messenger 


600.00 


Care of city clocks ....... 


110.00 


Clerk of the common council 


50.00 


Board of education, Union School District 


250.00 


Board of education, District No. 20 . 


50.00 


Town district school board 


200.00 


Nine (9) assessors 


2,700.00 


Nine (9) moderators 


27.00 


Nine (9) ward clerks 


90.00 


Twenty-seven (27) selectmen ..... 


135.00 


Judge of the police court 


800.00 


Clerk of the police court 


200.00 


Collector of taxes, so much as may be necessary of the 




sum of .....••• • 


. 1,500.00 


Truant officer ........ 


400.00 



111,452.00 



30 



CITV OF CONCORD. 
PUHLIC LIHRAHY. 



Salaries 
For all 


ther 


expenses ..... 


. $2,760.00 
. 1,740.00 




$4,500.00 






ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 




Salary of city engineer 

Salary of assistants 

Supplies 

Repairs 

Incidentals . 






. $1,500.00 
. 1,200.00 

100.00 
50.00 

150.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Salary of commissioner .... 

General maintenance and repairs of streets 

Permanent work . 

Cleaning streets . 

Catch basins and cleaning 

New concrete 

Repairing concrete 



FIRE DEPARTMEN 

Pay-roll of permanent men 

Semi-annual pay-roll . 

Extra men for vacations 

Rent, Veteran Firemen's Association 

For forage ..... 

fuel 

lights ..... 

water ..... 

horse-shoeing 

purchase of horse 

horse hire .... 

washing .... 

fire alarm .... 

supplies for chemical engine 

hose ..... 

incidentals .... 



$y,ooo.oo 



$1,400.00 
1,800.00 

10,000.00 
5,500.00 
1,.500.00 
2,000.00 
2,000.00 

$41,000.00 



$6,618.00 

6,945.00 
214.00 
150.00 

1,4.50.00 
800.00 
465.00 
116.00 
300.00 
300.00 
600.00 
60.00 

1,2()().00 

50.00 

700.00 

2,000.00 



121,968.00 



CITY ORDINANCES. 31 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of thirty- 
six thousand, one hundred and thirty-five dollars ($36,135) for the 
support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, together 
■with the income of the Abial Walker Fund, shall be aj^propriated 
and <livided among the several school districts according to the valua- 
tion thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing, there is appropriated for 
the cemeteries of the city one-half of the income from the sale of 
lots and the income derived from the care of lots and grading, which 
sum shall be deposited by the superintendent or others receiving them 
in the city ti-easury. The care of lots, for which the city holds trust 
funds, shall be paid from the money appropriated for the care of the 
cemeteries and so much of the income of these trust funds as may 
be thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at the close 
of the year, and the remainder, in each instance, credited to the indi- 
vidual funds. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 26, 1901. 



An Ohdinaxce fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the gas and sewerage precinct for the ensuing 

FINANCIAL year. 

Be it ordained bi/ the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1 . There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the gas and sewerage 
precinct of said city, the sum of five thousand, six hundred and fifteen 
dollars (f 5,615) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows : 

For repairs and construction ...... $3,000.00 

interest on bonds ........ 2,.545.00 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of eleven 
thousand, five hundred dollars ($11,500) to defraj' the necessary 
expenses and charges of the precinct for the ensuing financial year, 
which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For lighting streets $11,500.00 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 26, 1901. 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance fixing and dkteumining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the street sprinkling precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follotvs : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates withing the street sprink- 
ling precinct of said city the sum of sixty-five hundred ninety-six and 
thirty-four one hundredths dollars (S6,59().;34) to defray the neces- 
sary expenses and charges of the street sprinkling precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : For 
sprinkling streets, $5,500.00; for the payment of note becoming due 
1901, $586.09 ; for the payment of interest that may become due on 
said note, $10.25; to repay amount expended in 1900, for which no 
appropriation was made, f ,500.00. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 26. 1901. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits of the city water precinct for the 
ensuin(; financial year. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the water precinct 
of the city, the sum of six thousand dollars ($6,000) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of the water precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : For water for 
hydrant service, $6,000.00. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. ' 

Passed ]\Iarch 26, 1901. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE PeNACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR 
THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloios : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Peiiacook sew- 
erage precinct the sum of twenty-four hundred fifty dollars (S2,450) 



CITY ORDINANCES. 33 

to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, whicli shall be appropriated as follows : For 
the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance with an ordi- 
nance creating a sinking fund, $1,000.00 ; for the payment of interest 
that may become due on precinct bonds, $850.00 ; for repairs and 
maintenance of sewers in said precinct, $600.00. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 26, 1901. 

Ax Oki>inan(e fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE RAISED ON THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
AVITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE WeST CoNCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained hij the Citij Council of the City of Concord, a.:^ follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the AVest Concord 
sewerage precinct the sum of eleven hundred eighty dollars ($1,180) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : For 
the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance with tlie ordi 
nance creating a sinking fund, $500.00 ; for the payment of interest 
that may become due on precinct bonds, $680.00. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 26, 1901. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of :money 

TO be raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
AVITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE EaST ConCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained bi/ the City 'Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby oi-dered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the p]ast Concord 
sewerage precinct the sum of one hundred fifty-two and fifty one 
hundredths dollars (!$1.52.50) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall 
be appropriated as follows: For the payment of the sum becoming- 
due in accordance wnth an ordinance creating a sinking fund, 
iflOG.OO ; for the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds, i$52..50. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed .March 26, 1901. 



34 CITY OK CONCOIU). 

Ax OllDINANCK IN AMENDMENT OF AN OKDINANCE ENTITLED "An 
ORDINANCE IN AMENDMENT OF ChAPTEK 18 OF THE CITY ORDI- 
NANCES RELATING TO THE FIRE DEPARTMENT," AND IN AMEND- 
MENT OF AN ORDINANCE PASSED MaRCH 12, 1895, ENTITLED "An 
ORDINANCE IN AMENDMENT OF CHAPTERS 18 AND 22 OF THE 
REVISED ORDINANCES RELATING RESPECTIVELY TO THE FIRE 
DEPARTMENT AND THE WATER-WOItKS," RELATING TO THE FIHE 
DEPARTMENT. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Section 8 of said ordinance is hereby amended so that 
it will read as follows : 

Sect. 3. That Section 7 of the aforesaid ordinance, passed 
March 12, 1895, is hereby amended by striking out the word "two" 
in the tenth line of said section, as printed, and inserting in place 
thereof the word "six," and also by inserting the word "at" 
between the words " steamer " and " Penacook " in the twenty-seventh 
line of said section, as printed, so that the said section, as amended, 
shall read as follows : 

"Section 7. That Section 29 of Chapter 18 of said revised ordi- 
nances is hereby amended so as to read as follows : 

"Section 29. The annual pay of the members of ihe fire depart- 
ment shall be as follows, and in full for all services : Chief, ten hun- 
dred and fifty dollars per annum and house rent; permanent force 
at central fire station, seven hundred and twenty-eight dollars each ; 
drivers at Good Will and Alert hose houses, seven hundred and 
twenty-eight dollars per annum, paid monthlj' ; assistant engineers 
within the precinct, one hundred and twenty-five dollars each ; 
engineers of steamers within the precinct, one hundred and fifteen 
dollars each ; foremen of companies within the precinct, each ninety 
dollars per annum ; assistant foremen of companies M'ithin the pre- 
cinct, eighty-five dollars per annum ; members of steamer, hose and 
hook and ladder companies within the precinct, eighty dollars per 
annum ; outside the precinct, engine companies Nos. 2 and 8, two 
hundred and forty dollars each ; and Pioneer steamer company No. 8, 
five liundred dollars. Said sums to be divided among the members 
as each company shall direct. Engineer of steamer at Penacook, 
seventy-five dollars per annum ; assistant engineer at Penacook, 
twenty-five dollars ; assistant engineer at P^ast Concord, fifteen dollars ; 
and assistant engineer at West Concord, twenty dollars." The ad- 
ditional sum re([uired to provide for the increase made in pay as 
hereinbefore provided shall be charged to the appropriation for fire 
department. 

Passed April 9, 1901. 



CITY OKOINAXCES. 35 

Ax ()lU>INANCK ENLARGING THK STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT AS 
PROVIDED FOR IN CHAPTER 21 OF THE REVISED ORDINANCES OF 
THE CITY OF CoNCORD AND IN AN ORDINANCE RELATING 
THERETO PASSED jNIaRCH 13. 1900. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. Said street sprinkling precinct shall embrace in addi- 
tion to the territory described in said Chapter 21 of the revised ordi- 
nances and in said ordinance passed March 13, 1900, the following 
territory, to wit : North State street, from the main entrance to the 
N. II. state prison, north to the tracks of the Boston & Maine K. R. 

Sect. 2. All lots, with their inhabitants, abutting on that part 
of North State street described in Section 1 shall be included in the 
street sprinkling precinct. 

Passed May 14, 1901. 



An Ordinance in amendment of Chapter 3-t of the revised 
ordinances relating to building and fire precinct. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follons : 

Section 1. That Chapter 34 of the revised ordinances, entitled 
building and fire precinct, is hereby amended by striking out the 
first section and inserting in place thereof the following : 

Section 1. No person shall hereafter erect or cause to be erected, 
move or cause to be moved, enlarge or cause to be enlarged, any 
wooden building, or set up or cause to be set up or use any steam 
engine in any building within the limits of the city mentioned in 
the second section of this chapter without written consent of the 
city engineer and the chief of the fire department, to be first had and 
obtained after a hearing of all j)arties in interest duly notified by 
public notice posted at the south-east outer door of the City Hall 
building at least seven days before the date of hearing, and by a 
further notice given to or left at the last and usual place of abode of 
the owners or occupants of land adjoining the premises where license 
is asked under this chapter. In all cases where said city engineer 
and the chief of the fire department shall give such written consent, 
they shall cause the petition and evidence of notice and of such 
written consent to be filed with the city clerk, who shall keep the 
same on file. In all cases where said city engineer and chief of the 
fire department shall refuse or neglect to give their written consent, 
any party interested in the matter may petition the board of mayor 
and aldermen for such consent and shall set forth in their petition 



36 CITY OF CONCOHl). 

that they have applied to the city engineer and chief of the fire 
departnient for sucli consent which has not been granted. The 
board of mayor and aldermen shall thereupon order a hearing giving 
not less than seven days' notice and upon such hearing or adjourn- 
ment thereof, shall grant or refuse such consent, as the\' may deem 
proper. 

Skct. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1901. 



An Ordinance establishing a sewerage precinct for the 

ACCOMMODATION OF THE INHABITANTS IN THE VICINITY OF St. 

Paul's School. 
Be it ordained hi/ the Citij Council of the City of Concord, ns foUoics : 

ITiat a sewerage j^recinct for the accouiiuodation of the inhabi- , 
tants of said city residing in the vicinity of St. Paul's School, to be 
known as the St. Paul's School Sewerage Precinct, is hereby fixed 
and established as follows : Said precinct shall embrace all the terri- 
tory together with its inhabitants within the following described 
limits, to wit : 

Commencing at the southeasterly corner of the property known as 
the Glennon place on the northerly side of Pleasant street ; thence 
northerly by the easterly line of said Glennon property to its north- 
easterly corner ; thence westerly by the northerly line of said prop- 
erty to its" northwesterly corner; thence southerly by the w-esterly 
line of said property to the northeasterly corner of land of J. W. and 
L. H. Lane ; thence westerly by the northerly line of said Lane 
property to land of G. W. Chesley ; thence northerly by the easterly 
line of said Chesley land to its northeasterly corner ; thence westerly 
by the northerly line of said Chesley land to land of J. H. S. Wilcox ; 
thence northerly by the easterly line of said Wilcox land to its 
northeasterly corner ; thence westerly by the northerly line of said 
Wilcox land to its northwesterly corner ; thence southerly by the 
westerly line of said Wilcox land to land of Mrs. G. F. Kelley ; 
thence westerly by the northerly line of said Kelley land to land of 
James Mercer; thence northerly by the easterly line of said Mercer 
land to its northeasterly corner; thence westerly by the northerly 
line of said Mercer land to its northwesterly corner; thence south- 
erly by the westerly line of said Mercer land to land of John McC. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 37 

Haniuiond ; thence westerly by the northerly line of said Ilaniinond 
land to the easterly line of land belonging to St. Paul's School ; 
thence northerly by the easterly line of said School property to its 
northeasterly corner ; thence westerly by the northerly line of said 
School property to the Fisk Road, so called ; thence southerly by the 
easterly line of said road to the northwesterly corner of land of Asa 
P. Chase ; thence southwesterly in a straight line to the corner of the 
walls next to, and westerly from the Flanders cottage, so called, now 
owned by Mrs. J. Milnor Coit ; thence southerly by the westerly 
wall to and across the Hopkinton Road, so called ; thence easterly 
on the southerly side of said road to the private way running south- 
erly from said road and easterly and adjacent to the Farm House, so 
called, on property of St. Paul's School ; thence southerly by said 
private way and said private way extended, through land of St. Paul's 
Scliool, to Turkey river ; thence down the centre line of said river to 
the southerly line of the Glennon property, so called ; thence easterly 
and northerly by the southerly and easterly lines of said Glennon 
property to Pleasant street ; thence northeasterly across said Pleasant 
street to the point of beginning. 
Passed June 11, 1901. 



An Ordinance in relation to the employment of teams. 

Be it ordained bij the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloios : 

Section 1. The commissioner of highways is hereby authorized 
to employ from time to time such teams for the use of the city as in 
his judgment may be needed for the work in his department, at 
such price as in the judgment of said commissioner is fair and just 
to the owners of the teams, and for the best interests of the city. 
Said price not to exceed forty (40) cents per hour for each two horse 
team with driver. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1901. 



An Ordinance in relation to the appointment of members 
of the fire department. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, asfoUotLis: 

Section 1. No person shall be hereaf-ter appointed to any position 
in the fire service unless and until the committee on fire department 
shall have certified in writing to the board of mayor and aldermen 



38 CITY OF COXCOKD, 

that 8uch person has been examined by them or nnder their super- 
vision and is in their opinion qualified to peii'onn tlie duties of the 
position to which he is nominated. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1901. 



Ax OltDINAXCE IX ItELATIOX TO THE CARE AXO TESTING OF 
IIYDRAXTS. 

Be it ordained by tlie City Council of the City of Concord, iisfo/loic.s: 

Section 1. The board of water commissioners shall have every 
hydrant within the limits of the city plainly numbered with red 
paint. 

Sect. 2. The superintendent of water works shall cause all 
hydrants in the city to be tested in such manner and at such times 
as in his judgment may be required, provided, however, that in the 
months of December, January, February and March of each year all 
hydrants within the business portion of the city and those located 
near manufacturing establishments shall be tested as often as once 
in each week, and all other hydrants as often as once in every two 
weeks. 

Sect. 3. There shall be kept in the office of the supei'intendent 
of water works, in a book prepared for that purpose, a record of all 
tests provided for in the preceding section, containing a statement of 
the number of each hydrant tested, the date of each test, the manner 
of testing, the condition of the hydrant at the time of each test and 
such other infoi'mation as may be prescribed by the board of water 
commissioners. 

This book shall be at all times open for public inspection. All 
complaints or suggestions from the fire department regarding the 
condition of hydrants shall be transmitted by the chief of the fire 
department to the president of the board of water connnissioners 
and turned over by him to the superintendent of the water works, 
who shall minute upon each of such complaints or suggestions the 
action taken by him in relation thereto and shall keep the same on 
file in his office, subject to public inspection. A co^jy of all such 
complaints or suggestions sliall also be kept on file in the office of 
the chief of the fire department. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance sliall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed June 11, 1901. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 31) 

Ax Ordinaxck to borrow money in aid of Union School 
District in Concord. 

Be it ordained hi/ the City Council of the City of Concord, as fol loirs : 

Sixtion 1. Tliat coupon bonds of the city of Concord amounting 
to tlie sum of twenty-four thousand dollars (!?24,00()) be issued and 
delivered to Union School District in Concord, in accordance with 
the request and upon the terms contained in resolutions adopted by 
its voters at the annual meeting of said district, held March "28, 1901. 
Said bonds shall be signed by the mayor and city treasurer and 
countersigned by the city clerk, and shall in all respects comply with 
the provisions of the municipal bonds act of 1895. Said bonds shall 
be dated xVpril 1, 1901, and numbered consecutively from one to 
twenty -four inclusive, and shall be for the sum of one thousand 
dollars each. Eight of said bonds in their order as numbered shall 
be due and payable on the first day of April, 1906. Eight of said 
bonds in their order, as numbered, commencing with number nine, 
shall be due and payable on the first day of April, 1907. Eight of 
said bonds in their order, as numbered, commencing with number 
seventeen, shall be due and payable on the first day of April, 1908. 
Said bonds shall be payable to the bearer with interest at a rate not 
exceeding 8^ per cent per annum, payable semi-annually on the first 
days of April and October in each year after 1901, upon the presen- 
tation of the coupons attached to said bonds respectively. The first 
interest coupons shall be due and payable on the first day of October, 
1901, upon the presentation of said coup>ons. 

Skct. 2. The treasurer is hereby authorized to procure jiroposals 
for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized and such bids as seem 
for the best interest of the city shall be accepted by him, provided 
the same are approved by the finance committee. 

Sect. 3. All of said bonds, while owned by citizens of said city of 
Concord, shall be exempt from taxation, as provided by law. 

Sect. 4. The mayor and treasurer are authorized to execute in 
the name and behalf of the city such agreements in writing between 
it and said district as they deem necessary and advisable to protect 
the rights of respective parties growing out of this transaction. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and 
after its passage. 

Pas,sed July 9, 1901. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinanck rklating to the iirk i>kpartjii:xt. 

Be it ordained by tlie City Council of the City of Concord, as folhnrs : 

Sfx'TION 1. 'J'he pennanent men and liorses at all of the fire 
stations in Concord shall at all times be on duty at their respective 
stations to attend to fire alarm calls ; and neither the permanent 
men nor the permanent horses connected with the fire department 
shall engage in any work for any other department of the city. 

Passed July f», 1001. 



An Ordinanck in amendmkxt'of an ordinance passed July 

10, 1900, ENTITLED, " An ORDINANCE DEFINING THE RULES 
AND REGULATIONS FOR THE MATERIALS, CONSTRUCTION, ALTER- 
ATION AND INSPECTION OF ALL PLUMBING, HOUSE DRAINAGE, 
AND SEWER CONNECTIONS." 

Be it .ordained hy the City Council f>f the City of Concord, ax foil ors : 

Section 1. That Section 2 of said ordinance be amended by 
striking out the words " one thousand " in the second line of said 
section, and inserting in place thereof the words, "twelve hundred," 
and further by adding the words, "said sum to include the expense 
of any team used by him personally in the performance of the duties 
of his office," so that said Section 2 shall read as follows : 

For services rendered, the sanitary officer shall receive the sum of 
twelve hundred dollars per annum, payable monthly, said sum to 
include the expense of any team used by him personall}' in the per- 
formance of the duties of his office. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take eifect and be in force on and 
after July 1, 1901. 

Passed August PJ, 1001. 

An Ordinance providing for the loan of six thousand 

DOLLARS FOR SEWERS IN THE St. PaUL's ScHOOL SEWERAGE 
PRECINCT. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concon/, as fol/ous : 

Section 1. That the treasurer of said city is hereby authori/ed to 
procure by loan on the credit of the city the sum of six thousand 
dollars for the purpose of defraying the cost of establisliing and con- 
structing a sewerage system in the St. Paul's School sewerage 
precinct. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 41 

Sfxt. 2. Bonds of said city &liall be issued for said loan, signed 
by the mayor and city treasurer and countersigned by the city clerk, 
and shall in all respects comply with the provisions of the " Munici- 
pal Bouds Act of 1S95." Said bonds shall be dated July 1, 1901, 
numbered consecutively from one to twelve inclusive, and shall be 
for the sum of five hundred dollars each. One of said bonds in 
their order, as numbered, shall be due and payable on the fii'st day 
of July in each year after their issue, the first one being due and 
payable on the first day of July, 1902. Said bonds shall have cou- 
pons attached for the semi-annual intei-est thereon, payable on the 
fii'st days of January and July in each year during the time the 
bonds run, at the rate of not exceeding 8|- per cent per annum. 
Said bonds shall be exempt from taxation when owned by residents 
of said city. 

Skct. o. All money paid on account of said bonds shall be 
charged to said St. Paul's School sewerage precinct. A sum suffi- 
cient to pay the interest accruing on said bonds shall be raised by 
an annual tax on the property and polls of said St. Paul's School sewer- 
age precinct as authorized by law. The sum of five hundred dollars 
($500) per year for the term of twelve years shall be raised by a tax 
on the property and polls of said St. Paul's School sewerage precinct 
for the purpose of creating a fund to pay said bouds as they mature. 
The treasurer is hereby authorized to procure proposals for the sale 
of the bonds hereby authorized and such bids as seem for the best 
interest of the city shall be accepted by him, provided the same are 
approved by the finance committee. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 13, 1901. 

An Ordinance adopting rules rei.atini; Tt) city lot on 
Warren street. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That rules are hereby adopted governing the occupa- 
tion of the city lot as follows : 

RULES TO HE OBSERVED BY OCCUPANTS OF CITY LOT ON WARREN 

STREET. 

No person while on the city lot, so called, shall use loud, profane or 
indecent language, but shall conduct himself in a quiet and orderly 
manner. 

No nuisance of any sort shall be committed ou said premises and 
no person shall stand or be upon the sidewalks surrounding said city 
lot except as he travels along the same. 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Any [lersou who shall viohite the provisions of tliis rnle shall be 
fined not exceeding ten dollars. 

The violation of the provisions of this I'ule by any person who is a 
job teamster, licensed by the city, shall, in addition to subjecting him 
to the payment of the above fine, be cause for the revocation of such 
license, and said job teamster shall not thereafter enter upon the city 
lot, until lie lias obtained another license. 

Skct. 2. Printed copies of the above rules sluxU be posted in con- 
spicuous places on and about said city lot. 

Sp:ct. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 10, 1901. 



An OliDIXANCE RKLATIXG TO THK IXSl'KCTIOX OK MILK. 

Be it iu'dained by lite Citi/ Cnuneil of the City of Concord, as folluas : 

Suction 1. That the provisions of an act passed by the legislature 
of the state of New Hampshire and approved March "22, 1901, enti- 
tled " .A.11 act in amendment of Chapter 127 of the public statutes, 
relating to the inspection of milk," be and hereby are adopted by the 
city of Concord. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance sliall take eifect upon its passage. 

Passed October 8, 1901. 

An Okoinance hepealixg Sectiox 17 ok Chapter 14 of the 

REVISED ordinances OF THE CITY OF CoNCORD, AXD IX SIB- 
STITUTION OF SAID SECTIOX. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the (/ity tf Concord, «s foUorcs : 

Section 1. No child shall attend any public, private or parochial 
school in the city of Concord unless he or she has been successfully 
vacciiuxted, or has had the smallpox. This section shall be enfoi'ced 
by the board of health for the city of Concord. 

Sect. 2. No child shall be permitted to attend any public, paro- 
chial or private school in the city of Concord until he has fiist fur- 
nished satisfactory evidence to the board of health that he lias been 
successfully vaccinated, or has had the smallpox. 

If practical a certificate of vaccination showing tiie date of such 
vaccination and the fact that it was successful, made by the party 
vaccinating, shall be presented to the board of health, and such cer- 
tificate shall be endorsed by the board of health. If it is not 
practical to get such a certificate, or if a child has had the smallpox, 
the board of health shall, upon satisfactory evidence of vaccination, 
or that the child has had the smallpox, issue to such a child a certifi- 
cate permitting him to attend school. 



CITY OKDIXANOKS. 43 

Sect. o. The board of health shall keep a card index record of all 
the vaccination cards indorsed l»y the board and of all the certifi- 
cates issued permitting scholars to attend school as above provided 
for. 

The city physician shall at all times be prepared to vaccinate, at 
the expense of the city, any scholar wiio is unable to pay therefor. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 8, 1901. 



Ax OrOIXAXCE EXTEXniXG THE WATER I'RECIXCT. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the water precinct be extended so as to embrace the follow- 
ing territory : Beginning at a point where the easterly line of the 
right of way of the Southern Division of the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road, formerly known as the Concord & Montreal Railroad, intersects 
the line between Concord and Bow ; thence easterly by said line to 
Merrimack river; thence northerly by said ^Merrimack river below 
the Perabroke bridge opposite to and on the northerly line of the 
land of the late F. C. Thompson, extended easterly. 

Passed December 10, 1901. 



RESOLUTIONS, 



A Joint Resolution in relation to paying salaries, pay- 
rolls AND RENTS. 

Eesolcctl. by the City Council of the City of Concord, (is follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his warrant 
on the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, payrolls and 
rents as the same shall become due, and be approved by the city 
auditor during the present municipal term, and all bills so paid shall 
be laid before the committee on accounts and claims at their next 
meeting. 

Passed January 22, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution changing the hour of meeting of the 

BOARD of aldermen AND COMMON COUNCIL. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloics : 

That, beginning at the next regular meeting of the City Council, 
and for all regular meetings thereafter, the board of mayor and 
aldermen shall assemble in their rooms for business at 7 o'clock p. m. 
and the common council at 8 o'clock i*. m. 

Passed January 22, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution establishing a liquor agency for the 
ensuing year. 

Resolced by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That a liquor agency be established for the ensuing year in accord- 
ance with the public statutes of the state of New Hampshire. 
Passed January 22, 1901. 



A floiNT Resolution providing for the appointment of a leg- 
islative COMMITTEE, ETC. 

Resolr/'d by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Tliat a special committee be ajipointed consisting of the mayor, 
three members of the board of aldermen to be named by the mayor, 
and tliree menibei-s of the common council to be named by the 



KESOLIXrONS. 45 

president of the comiuon comicil, to draft and secure the pre- 
sentation to the present session of the legislature of such acts in 
amendment of the city charter or otherwise, as to them may seem 
desirable, relating to the following subjects : 

1. The conferring upon the police comn)ission of power to reduce 
the number of the police force and to remove members of the force 
when the public good requires such reduction or removal. 

2. To secure whatever legislative authority as may be necessary to 
enable the city to make such arrangements as may seem best with 
the county of Merrimack with regard to the property owned jointly 
by the city and the county, and to secure suitable land and buildings 
for the various city offices. 

3. Such changes as may be deemed advisable in regard to the con- 
stitution of the board of assessors, their manner of election and 
powers and duties. 

4. Provision of reasonable compensation for the members of the 
board of mayor and aldermen and common council in place of the 
existing custom of allowances for committee service. 

Said committee shall incorporate in all proposed legislation relat- 
ing to the above subjects a provision that such legislation shall not 
take effect until adopted by the city council of the city of Concord. 

Passed January 22, 1901. 

A Joint Resolution inviting bids for printing and binding 

THE annual city RKPOKTS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloics : 

That the city auditor be, and hereby is, instructed to call for 
sealed proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 
1900, and submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have 
full power to act in the matter. 

Passed February 12, 1901. 

A Joint Resolution authorizing the finance committee to 

PROCURE A TEMPORARY LOAN OF FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

The finance committee are hereby authorized to procure by tempo- 
rary loan upon the credit of the city the sum of fifty thousand dollars, 
or so much thereof as may be necessary, to provide for current ex- 
penses upon such terms and conditions as they may deem advisable. 

Passed February 12, 1901. 



46 CITY OF CONCOKI). 

A Joint Kesolutiox inviting bids for the average monthly 

BALANCE OF THE CITY DEPOSIT. 

Resolced hy the Cily Couuc'd of the Citif nf Concord, cut foil own : 

That the city auditor is hereby instructed to invite bids from the 
several National banks in Concord for the use of the monthly average 
balance of the city deposit, and submit the bids to the finance com- 
mittee, who shall report the same to the city council. 

Passed February 12, 1901. 

A Joint Resolution to appoint a committee of three with 

AUTHORITY TO INVESTIGATE AND REPORT UPON THE SUB.JECT OF 
PUBLIC URINALS. 

Resolred hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That a committee of three, comprising the health officer, and one 
alderman and one councilman, to be appointed respectively by the 
mayor and the president of the common council, be authorized and 
instructed to make an investigation of the subject of public urinals 
together with their practicability, expense, and the advisability of 
the erection of one or more by the city of Concord. That said com- 
mittee be allowed sucli actual expense as may be necessary to investi- 
gate the subject reasonably. 

Said committee to report at the next regular meeting of the 
city council. 

Passed March 12, lUOl. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing and instructing the city 

CLERK to cancel DEED OF CEMETERY LOT TO LiVA C. HeATH 
AND TO MAKE NEW DEED TO EmILY P. HeATII. 

Resolved hy the City Coimril of the City of Concord, as follows : 

The city clerk is hereby authorized and instructed to cancel the 
deed for a cemetery lot issued to Liva C. Heath April 29th, 190vt, 
and in place thereof to make a new deed of the same lot from the 
city to Emily P. Heath, witliout payment oi any consideration, the 
sum of $93. .50 having been paid to said city at the time said deed 
to Liva C. Heath w.as issued. 

This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 12, 1901. 



RKSOLUTIOXS. 4 / 

A JoixT Resolution for special investigatix(; committee. 

Resiileefl h// the City Coimcil of the City of Concord, ax follows : 

Tliat a special committee of five, consisting of three meiubers of 
the board of aldermen to be nominated by the mayor, and two mem- 
bers of the common council to be nominated by the president of the 
common council, are hereby appointed to consider and investigate 
the facts in relation to the delay in obtaining vi^ater at the recent fire 
at the store of A. Perley Fitch, and any other facts in connection 
with said fire referred to in the communication of said A. Perley 
Fitch and the New Hampshire Board of Fire Underwriters. Said 
committee are authorized and instructed to employ a stenographer, 
give a public hearing, report the facts to the City Council, and make 
such recommendations in relation thereto as they may deem advisable. 

Passed March 12, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution discontinuing a portion of Pleasant 

STREET. 

Resolred by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That so much of the highway which was laid out May 25, 1899, 
known as Pleasant street, as is included between the lines formed by 
the following description, to wit : commencing at a stone bound on 
the southerly line of Pleasant street, as laid out May 25, 1899, said 
bound being at the westerly end of a curve to the left having a 
radius of 1637.28 feet ; thence on a tangent bearing south 53 degrees, 
59 minutes, 51 seconds west, 56.68 feet; thence curving to the 
right with a radius of 159.34 feet, a distance of 95.70 feet to a stone 
bound on the southerly line of Pleasant street ; the above described 
line being the Pleasant street line; the other line being described as 
follows, to wit: commencing at the first above mentioned stone 
bound and curving to the right with a radius of 465.46 feet, a dis- 
tance of 121.62 feet; thence compounding witli a curve having a 
radius of 85.99 feet, a distance of 29.27 feet to the second above 
mentioned stone bound, reference being made to the annexed plan 
for a more intelligible description, be and the same is hereby 
discontinued. 

Passed March 12, 1901. 



48 <'ITV OF CONCOUD. 

A Joint 1Ii:solution awahding city deposit. 

Resolved hif the Cilij Council of the Cltij of Concord, ax f)lloivs : 

That the city deposit be awarded to the National State Capital 
Bank of Concord, N. H., at their bid of 2 per cent per anniun for 
the average monthly balance of the city of Concord. 

Passed March 12, 1001. 

A JoixT Kesolution appuopiuatix(; tiip.ek hundued and sevex- 

TY-FIVE DOLLAKS FOR REPAIRS OX WARD 7 WARD HOUSE. 

Resolred hij the Citi/ Council of the Cit// of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred and seventy-five dollars be ap))ro- 
priated for repairs on \Vard 7 ward Iiouse, for plumbing, painting, 
etc.; that the saiil repairs be made under the direction of the com- 
mittee on lands and buildings ; and that the amount appropriated be 
charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed April !). 1901. 



A Joint Resolution to procure furniture for the i-oi,ice 

ST.-VTION at WAPvD ONE. 

Resolred hij the City Council of the Cit;/ of Concord, as follows : 

That the aldermen from ward one be and are hereby authorized 
to expend a sum not exceeding forty dollars for the purpose of pro' 
curing furniture for the new police station in ward one. 

Passed April 9, 1901. 

A Joint Kesoi.ution authorizing the purchase of a lot of 

LAND for the USE OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT AND PROVID- 
ING FOR A TEMPORARY LOAN TO PAY FOR THE SAME. 

Resolred h;/ the City Council of the City if Concord, as foUoirs : 

That a committee consisting of the mayor and the committee on 
roads and bridges is hereby authorized to purchase a lot of land 
located between Warren and Pleasant streets and west of Liberty 
street in said Concord for the use of the highway department, at an 
expense of six thousand dollars. Said lot is bounded and described 
as follows, to wit : 

Beginning on the north side of Pleasant street, at the south- 
west corner of land of S. (i. Lane, thence northerly on said 
Lane's land eight rods; thence easterly on said Lane's land one 



RESOLUTIONS. 49 

one hundred and twenty-five feet; thence north 16^ degrees, west 
three hundred and seventy-four feet, to land now or formerly of one 
Puffer ; thence westerly on land of said Puffer and one Driscoll one 
hundred and twenty-five feet ; thence northerly on said Driscoll land 
sixty-eight feet to Warren street ; thence westerly on Warren street 
three rods ; thence southerly on land now or formerly of one Gannon 
one hundred and thirty-two feet ; thence westerly on said Gannon 
land and land now or formerly of one Rooney one hundred and 
twenty-four feet ; thence southerly on land now or formerly of one 
Sargent eighty-six feet; thence westerly on said Sargent land one 
hundred and sixty-six feet to land formerly of one Smith ; thence 
southerly on said Smith land one hundred and fifty-eight feet to 
Pleasant street; thence by Pleasant street three hundred and thirty- 
nine and one-half feet to the hound begun at. 

The city treasurer is hereby authorized to procure by temporary 
loan upon the credit of the city a sum not exceeding six thousand 
dollars at the lowest practical per centum to pay for the above lot. 

Passed April 0, 1901. 



A JoixT Resolution relating to flowers for memorial arch. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs : 

The mayor is hereby authorized to provide suitable flowers to be 
planted at the base of the memorial arch, in accordance with the cus- 
tom in previous years. 

Passed April 9, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to the New Hampshire 

SCHOOL FOR THE FEEBLE MINDED CHILDREN. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the mayor is hereby requested to communicate with the 
trustees of the New Hampshire school for the feeble minded 
children aud call to their attention the desirability of this city on 
account of its central location, its excellent railroad facilities and 
other conveniences as a suitable site for the location of the school 
and home provided for by an act of the legislature approved INIarch 
22, 1901, and to extend to said trustees a formal invitation, that such 
location be made here. 

Passed April 9, 1901. 



50 CITY OF OONCOUD. 

A Joint Resolution appropriating the sum of thirty dollars 
FOR E. E. Sturtevant Post, No. 2. 

Resolved hrj the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoirs : 

That the sum of thirty dollars (S30) in addition to the money 
already appropriated, be appropriated for the use of E. E. Stur- 
tevant Post, No. 2, the same to be charged to the appropriation for 
incidentals and land damages. 

Passed April 9, 1901. 



A Joint Kesolution relating to the macadamizing of a 
portion of Warren street. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the commissioner of highways is hereby respectfully 
requested and instructed to macadamize during the present year the 
portion of Warren street which is located between Fruit street and 
Spring street. 

Passed May 14, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution providing for concreting a portion of 
Main street. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the commissioner of highways is hereby requested and 
instructed to concrete that portion of the west side of Main street 
between Centre street and Pitman street that is west of the ti-ack of 
the Concord Street Railway. 

Passed May 14, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the mayor to contract for 

BAND concerts FOR THE SEASON OF 1901. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That his honor the mayor is hereby authorized to contract with 
Arthur F. Nevers in the sum of $300 for the services of Nevers' Sec- 
ond Regiment Band for the band concerts during the coming summer 
season, said concerts to be distributed among different wards of the 
city in the same proportion as last year. 

Passed May 14, 1901. 



RESOLUTIONS. 51 

A JoixT Resolutiox appijopkiating thirty dollars additional 

FOR DECORATING SOLDIERS' GRAVES IN PeNACOOK AND VICINITY. 

Resolred hy the Cii>/ Council of the City of Concord, as folloirs : 

That the sum of thirty dollars ($30) is hereby appropriated out of 
any money iu the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose 
of defraying the expense of decorating soldiers' graves iu Penacook 
and vicinity, to be expended by William I. Brown Post, No. 31, 
G. A. R. 

Passed Mav U, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution relating to the purchase of coal and ice 

FOR THE various DEPARTMENTS OF THE CITY FOR THE ENSUING 
Y'EAR. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloirs : 

The city auditor is hereby authorized to invite bids for the fur- 
nishing of coal and ice necessary for the various departments for the 
ensuing year. 

Passed June 11, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating $51.5.06 to pay for the 

UNREDEEMED REAL ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY OF CONCORD FOi: 
THE YEAR 1900. 

Resolred by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of $515.06 be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay for the 
taxes of 1900 on real estate sold for the taxes unpaid and bid in by 
the city of Concord. And the said appropriation shall be credited to 
the account of incidentals and land damage. 
Passed June 11. 1901. 

A Joint Resolution relating to exemption from taxation 
OF city notes. 

Resolred by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That three notes of the city of Concord, all dated May 31, 1901, 
each for the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000), and numbered 
257, 258 and 259 respectively, and each payable to the order of W. F. 
Thayer, city treasurer, and being a part of a loan of six thousand 
dollars ($6,000) authorized by joint resolution of the city council 
passed April 9, 1901, shall be exeuipt from taxation while owned by 
citizens of Concord. 

Passed June 11, 1901. 



52 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

A Joint IIksoi.ution appropriating funds for rkpairs at 

WOODLAWN CKMKTERY, PeNACOOK. 

Resolved bij the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of three luuidred and fifty dollars ($350) be, and 
hereby is, appropriated for repairs and improvements at Woodlawn 
cemetery, Penacook, and that the same be appropriated out of any 
funds not otherwise appropriated and that the same be charged to 
incidentals and land damage. 

Passed June 11, 19U1. 



A Joint FtEsoi.uTioN appropriating two hundred and fifty 

DOLLARS FOR PUBLIC BATHS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a sum not exceeding two hundred and fifty dollars (6250) be, 
and is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the city treasury not 
otherwise appropriated. 

The same to be placed to the order of the committee on public 
instruction for defraying the expense of a public bathing place. 

Passed June 11, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution providing for repairs on the city- ambu- 
lance. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That tlie city marshal be instructed to take the ambulance now 
owned by the city of Concord to the Abbot-Downing Co., and 
authorize them to fit the wheels to modern hard rubber tires and 
•with a set of new springs suitable for such a carriage, at a cost not to 
exceed sixty-five dollars (S65), and if judged satisfactory to a com- 
.mittee of two selected by the mayor, the city marshal shall be 
authorized to have such other repairs made as shall be deemed satis- 
factory. 

The whole expense not to exceed one hundred and forty dollars 
($140), said sum to be taken from incidental and land damage funds. 

Passed June 11,1901. 



RESOLUTIONS. 53 

A Joint Resolution providing for the grading and construc- 
tion OF A CONCRETE SIDEWALK. 

Resnlred by the Citij Council of the Citij of Concord, as follows : 

Tliat the commissioner of highways is hereby instructed to grade 
and construct a concrete sidewalk in front of the premises on which 
the police station is located in ward one. The expense thereof to 
be defrayed from the appropriation made for concrete sidewalks in 
the highway department. 

Passed July 9, 1901. 

A Joint Resolution appropriating one hundred and twenty- 
five DOLLARS FOR REPAIRS ON POLICE STATION, WaRREN STREET. 

Resolred hij the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars ($125) be 
appropriated for repairs on police station, Warren street, for painting, 
kalsomining and varnishing. That the said repairs be made under 
the direction of the committee on lands and buildings. And that 
the amount appropriated be charged to the account of incidentals 
and land damage. 

Passed July 9, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution to establish line between land of Wil- 
liam P. FiSKE and the common south OF SAID LAND. 

Resolred hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as foil ore s : 

That a division line be run south of the land of William P. 
Fiske beginning at a point fifteen (1.5) feet south of the southeast 
corner of the land of said Fiske on North Main street, and running 
westerly by a line to a point five (5) feet sotith of an Elm tree stand- 
ing just north of the present path leading to the Walker school- 
house, and that the mayor be authorized to issue a quitclaim deed 
of said land to the said William P. Fiske, quitclaiming all right and 
title of said city to land north of said line, and to receive a deed from 
William P. Fiske, quitclaiming all the right and title of said Fiske to 
land south of said line, as per plan of the city engineer. 

Passed July 9, 1901. 



54 CITY OF COXCOHI). 

A Joint Uesolutiox providing foij a tempokahy loan to 

DEl'HAY' A portion OF TIIK EXPENSE OF THE CITY IHSTOKY'. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as: folloics: 

That the city treasurer, under the advice and direction of tlie com- 
mittee on finance, is hereby authorized to jjrocure for a period of one 
year by temporary loan upon the credit of the city tlie sum of fifteen 
hundred dollars (§1,500) at the lowest practical per centum, for the 
purpose of defraying necessary expenses arising in connection with 
the writing of the city history and to issue a city note therefor, pay- 
able one year from date, said note to be exempt from taxation when 
owned by residents of Concord. 

Passed July 9, 1901. 
A Joint Resolution providing for temporary loans not 

EXCEEDING IN TOTAL FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS TO MEET THE 
CURRENT EXPENSES OF THE PRESENT FISCAL YEAR AS THEY' MAY' 
BECOME DUE. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city treasurer, under the advice and direction of the com- 
mittee on finance, is hereby authorized to procure by temporary loan 
upon the credit of the city such sum as may be necessary, not exceeding 
in total fifty thousand dollars ($50,000), at the lowest practicable per 
centum to be used exclusively in meeting the usual and current 
expenses of the city during the present fiscal year, as they may 
become due. The notes or obligations given by the city for said loan 
shall be exempt from taxation when owned by residents of Concord. 

Passed July 9, 1901. 

A Joint Resolution appropriating three hundred and sixty- 
one AND twelve one-hundredth DOLLARS TO SETTLE THE 
SUIT OF iMaRY' J. GaY' and others AGAINST THE CITY' OF 

Concord. 

Resolved by the City Council of tlte ('ity of Concord, as folloics: 

That the city treasurer is hereby authorized and instructed to pay 
to Mary J. Gay and William II. Gay, both of Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, and Walter C. (Jay, of Lynn, in the county of flssex and state 
of Massachusetts, the sum of tln-ee hundred and sixty-one and 12-100 
dollars (S301.12) in full settlement, payment and discharge of all 



RESOLUTIONS. 00 

claims for damages to real estate now or formerly owned by them or 
either of them, which said parties or either of them have or can 
claim against said city on account of the laying out of the extension 
of Glen street from its former southern end south to Allison sti'eet 
through or over the land of said Gays, and in full discharge and pay- 
ment of the suit and the costs therein brought by said Gays against 
the city of Concord, now pending in the superior court for Merrimack 
county. Said amount thus expended shall be charged against the 
appropriation for incidentals and land damage. 

Passed July 9, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution appkopkiating the sum of one hundred 

DOLLARS to SETTLE THE SUIT OF EdWARD E. HoDGJIAN AGAINST 
THE CITY OF CoXCORI). 

Resolced hy tJie City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city treasurer is hereby authorized and instructed to pay 
Edward E. Hodgman, of Bow, New Hampshire, the sum of one hun- 
dred dollars (^100) in full settlement, payment and discharge of all 
claim for damages to real estate owned by him, which the said Hodg- 
man has or can claim against said city on account of a change in grade 
in State street in said Concord near the premises of said Hodgman, 
and in full discharge and payment of the suit and costs therein 
brought by said Hodgman against the said city of Concord, now pend- 
ing in the superior court for Merrimack county. Said sum thus 
expended shall be charged against the appropriation for incidentals 
and land damage. 



Passed July 9, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating money to meet current 

EXPENSES OF PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of one thousand dollars (SI, 000) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated to defray the expense of printing and stationery for the cur- 
rent year. 

Passed July 9, 1901. 



56 CITY OK CONCORD. 

A Joint Rksolution with kp:feri:ncp: to thk sp:ats in Hhadley 
Pa UK. 

Resolved hij the City Council of tJie Cily of Concord, as follows : 

That tlie board of park commissioners be, and hereby are, instructed 
to take such steps as may be necessarj- to cause the seats recently 
removed from Bradley Park, to be replaced therein. 

Passed Au"ust 13. 1901. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating one hundreo and iifty 

DOLLARS to SETTLE THE SUIT OF BeKTHA E. BrAILEY AGAINST 
THE CITY OF CoNCORD. 

Reaolced hjj the Cit>/ Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city treasurer is hereby authorized and instructed to pay 
to Charles F. Fletcher, Administratoi' of the estate of Bertha E. Brailey, 
late of Concord, N. H., the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars in full 
settlement, payment and discharge of all claims for damages to the 
real estate of said Brailey, situated on the corner of Church and 
Jackson streets, which the estate of said Brailey has or can claim 
against said city on account of the laying out of the extension of 
Jackson street, over and across a part of said land ; and in full dis- 
charge and payment of suit, and all costs therein, brought by said 
Bertha E. Brailey against the city of Concord at the October term, 
1897, of the supreme court and now pending in the superior court 
for ]\Ierrimack County. 

The ainount thus expended shall be charged against the appro- 
priation for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed August 13, 1901. 
A Joint Resolution appropriating one iuxdp.ed dollars to 

FINISH REPAIRING WARD SEVEN WARD HOUSE. 

Resolced hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of one hundred dollars be appropriated to finish re- 
pairing ward seven ward house. 

That the said repairs be made under the direction of the committee 
on lands and buildings and that the amount appropriated be charged 
to the account of incidentals and laud damages. 

Pa.ssed September 10, 1901. 



RESOLUTIONS. iJ I 

A Joint Resolution appropriating two hundred dollars for 
REPAIRS OF Old Fort engine house and to repair the 

concrete sidewalk AT SAID ENGINE HOUSE AND GOODWILL 
HOSE HOUSE. 

Resolred hjj the City Council of the Citi/ of Concord, as folloics : 

Tliat the sum of $200 be appropriated for the repairs on Old 
Fort engine house, also to rei^air the concrete sidewalks at said engine 
house and Goodwill hose house, and that the same be charged to the 
appropriation for incidentals and land damage, and that the repairs 
be done under the supervision of the committee on lands and 
buildings. 

Passed September 10, 11K)1. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the payment of one hundred 

DOLLARS to THE STATE TREASURER TO CORRECT ERROR. 

Resoli-ed bij the Cit/j Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to pay to the 
state treasurer the sum of one hundred dollars, the same being for 
fine paid city marshal by Sidney F. Smith, June 17, 1901, and de- 
posited by mistake in the city treasury, instead of being paid to the 
state, where it properly belonged. 

Passed September 10, 1901. 



A Joint Resolution relating to the attendance of the city 

ENGINEER AND COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS UPON THE SESSION 

OF American Society of Municipal Improvements. 

Resolred by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city engineer and commissioner of highways be instructed 
to attend the eighth annual session of Amei'ican Society of Muni- 
cipal Improvements at Niagara Falls, to be held October 1 to 4 inclu- 
sive, and that the reasonable expense thereof to the amount of not 
exceeding seventy dollars be paid out of the appropriation for inci- 
dentals and land damage. 

Passed September 10, 1901. 



58 f'lTY OF COXCOKD. 

A Joint Rksolution i-uovidixg for a sale of the city's interest 

IN THE CITY HALL HUILDING AND A PORTION OF THE LOT AND FOR 
THE PURCHASE OF A NEAV LOT AND ERECTION OF A NEW CITY 
HALL BUILDING. 

Rifnolced hji (he City Council of the C'iljj of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That the action and report of the special coinniittee 
appointed under the provisions of a joint resolution passed by the 
city councils in concurrence Janvxary 22, 1901, with reference to a 
separation of the interests of the city and county in the present 
city hall building and lot as set forth in their report this day 
submitted, are hereby accepted, ratified and approved, and that the 
mayor and president of the common council are hereby instructed 
to make and execute in the name and behalf of the city an 
agreement with the county commissioners of Merrimack county, 
providing for a sale by the city to the county of all the right, 
title and interest of said city in the present court house building 
and so much of the land comprised in the court house lot as 
lies east of the line coincident witli the western boundary line of 
lots conveyed by Susan Stickney to Merrimack county and 
Richard Bradley to Merrimack county, and extending from Court 
street on the north of said boundaiy to Pitman street on the 
south of said boundary, for the sum of twenty thousand dollars, to 
be paid by said county to said city ; said agreement to contain stipu- 
lations providing that the deed and possession of said projierty shall 
not be delivered to said county until said city is provided with a new 
city building completed for use and occupancy ; that the land belong- 
ing to the city and county lying west of the above described line in 
said court house lot shall forever be kept open as a public park ; that 
the county in remodeling the present court house building, or in the 
erection of a new court house building on the same lot, shall provide 
some suitable room in said building to be used for election purposes 
by the voters of vvard four in said city, upon a reasonable remunera- 
tion therefor to be paid by said city to said county. 

Sect. 2. That a committee consisting of his honor the mayor, 
the president of the common council, four members of the board of 
aldermen to be appointed by the mayor, and three members of the 
common council to be appointed by the president of the common 
council, are hereby appointed for the purpose of taking steps toward 
the selection and acquirement of a suitable site on which to erect a 
new city building, to be constructed of Concord granite, and also to 
procure plans and estimates of the expense for the erection of such 
buildin"'. 



HKSOIJ TIOXS. 59 

Sect. 3. Said conimittee are authorized to incur such reasonable 
expense as in their judgment n)ay be necessary in securing options on 
land secured as a site for such building, and in procuring prelimi- 
nary plans and estimates of the expense of such building, and the 
city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay all expense so incurred out 
of funds in the treasury not otherwise- appropriated, upon certificate 
in writing of a majority of said committee, with the approval of 
committee on accounts and claims endorsed thereon. 

Sect. 4. And said committee are further authorized and instructed 
to procure a suitable site for the erection of such building, and to 
make in the name of the city all necessary contracts for the securing 
of such site and to accept deed thereof in behalf of the city, and to 
take all such steps as may be necessary and convenient for the secur- 
ing of such site, whether by purchase or condemnation. If the com- 
mittee so desire, they may refer to the city council the question of 
the selection of a site, the price to be paid for it, and the manner in 
which it shall be secured. 

Sect. 5. And said committee are further authorized and instructed 
to employ by fair competition, architects to furnish plans and specifi- 
cations and supervise the construction of such building, and to make 
in the name of the city such conti'acts as in their judgment shall 
seem reasonable for the erection and furnishing of such building, 
and the grading and other preparation of the site thereof, all con- 
tracts to be let by con)petitive bidding to the lowest responsible 
bidder, .upon such terms and security as the said committee may 
deem advisable, all contracts signed by a majority of the committee 
and authorized by this resolution to be binding upon the city. Said 
committee shall place upon exhibition all plans and estimates 
thereon submitted to them in competition, and shall notify all mem- 
bers of the city council of the time and place at which such plans 
shall be on exhibition, and shall secure from the members of the 
city council not on said committee an expression of opinion regard- 
ing the merits of the several plans submitted, for the assistance of 
said committee in the selection of plans, and shall from time to tin)e 
inake reports to the city council, for the purpose of keeping said 
council informed as to the progress made by said committee. 

Sect. 6. And said committee are further authorized, if in their 
judgment it shall seem advisable, to eniploy some suitable person to 
supervise and superintend, in behalf of the city, the erection of such 
building, and to fix the compensation of the person so employed, 
such compensation to be paid out of the sums appropriated for the 
purchase and preparation of a site and the erection and furnishing 
of a city building. 



60 OITV OF CONOOltD. 

Sect. 7. Said committee are authorized to expend ia behalf of the 
city for the securing of such site, and the erection and furnishing of 
such building, and the grading and preparation of such site, such sums 
not exceeding one hundred and thirty thousand dollars (S18(),000), 
in addition to the sum of twenty thousand dollars (S20,0()0), to be 
received from the county of Merrimack in payment for the city's 
interest in the present city hall building and land connected there- 
with, as may be by them deemed necessary and advisable. And 
bonds of the city in the usual form as required by the city ordi- 
nances shall be issued by the finance committee of the city council 
for such sum not exceeding one hundred and thirty thousand dollars 
as shall be requested in writing by a majority of said building com- 
mittee, upon such time and at such rate of interest, not exceeding- 
three and one-half (-^ 1-2) per cent, per annum as may seem advisable 
to said finance committee; provided, however, that such bonds shall 
be of the par value of not exceeding one hundred dollars (•'SlOO) 
each, and shall be exempt from taxation while owned by residents of 
the city of Concord. And provided further that in the sale of such 
bonds the preference shall be given to residents of the city of Con- 
cord. 

Sect. 8. The finance committee of the city council are hereby 
authorized and instructed to issue from time to time, upon such time 
and at such rate of interest as to them may seem advisable, the notes 
of tlie city in the usual and legal form, when requested in writing by 
a majority of said building committee, the total amount of such 
notes not to exceed one hundred and thirty thousand dollars ($130,- 
000), said notes if issued, to be paid by the proceeds of the bonds to 
be issued under authority of this resolution, the finance committee to 
have full discretion as to the issuance of notes or bonids from time 
to time for the purpose of raising the funds required by said build- 
ing committee, within the limitations and upon the conditions here- 
inbefore prescribed by this resolution. 

Sect. 9. And the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay out of 
the proceeds of such notes and bonds and the funds to be received 
from tlie county of Merrinuick, all bills contracted by said building 
committee under tlie authority of this resolution upon the written 
approval of a majority of said building co.mmittee. 

Sect. 10. No bills in connection with the expenditures authorized 
by this resolution siiall be paid by the city treasurer until approved 
by the city auditoi'. 

Passed Novenibei- 12, 1901. 



RESOLUTIONS. 61 

A Joint Resolutiox appkopriatixg two hundred dollars 

TO SETTLE SUIT OF W. II. PeURY AGAINST THE CITY OF CoNCORD. 

Resolved hij the Cii/j Council of the Citi/ of Concord, as follows: 

That the city treasurer is hereby authorized and instructed to pay 
to Eastman & HoUis, attorneys for W. II. Perry, of Concord, New 
Hampshire, the sum of two hundred dollars (!i5200.00), in full settle- 
ment, payment and discharge of all claims for damages to real estate 
on North State street, owned by said W. H. Perry, on account of 
water thrown upon and over said real estate by the construction of 
roads in Blossom Hill cemetery, and in full discharge and payment 
of the siiit and all costs therein brought by said W. H. Perry 
against said city of Concord, and now pending in the superior court 
for Merrimack county. 

Said sum thus expended shall be charged against the appropria- 
tion for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed December 10. 1901. 



A eJoiNT Resolution in amendment of a .ioint resolution pro- 
viding FOR a sale of the CITY'S INTEREST IN THE CITY HALL 

building and a portion of the lot and for the purchase of 
a new lot and erection of ,\new city hall building, passed 
November 12, 1901. 

Resolved hy the Citij Council of the Citij of Concord, as folloivs : 

Section 1. That so much of Section 2, or any other section of a 
joint resolution passed November 1"2, 1901, entitled, " A Joint Reso- 
lution providing for a sale of the city's interest in the city hall 
building and a portion of the lot and for the purchase of a new 
lot and erection of a new city hall building," as requires the com- 
mittee to be appointed under the terms of said resolution for the 
erection of a new city building to construct the same of Concord 
granite, is hereby amended and modified to the extent that said com- 
mittee are hereby authorized to construct the same of Concord 
granite and brick. There shall be included within or connected with 
said new city building a city hall capable of seating from sixteen 
hundred to two thousand people, constructed on the ground floor. 

Passed December 31, 1901. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A .Joint Kesolutiox ix amkxdmknt of a joint • kesolutiox. 

I'ROVIDING FOR A SALE OF THE CITY'S INTEREST IN THE CITY 
HALL BUILDIXC- AXD A PORTION OF THE LOT, AND FOR THE PUR- 
CHASE OF A NEW LOT AXD ERECTION OF A NEW CITY HALL 

nriLDixG, PASSED November 12, 1001. 
Rennlred hi/ the City Council of the Cifij of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That to the committee provided for by Section 2 of a 
joint resolution entitled, " A Joint Resolution providing for a sale of 
the city's interest in the city hall building and a portion of the 
lot and for the purchase of a new lot and erection of a new city 
hall building," there shall be added five citizens of Concord who 
shall not be members of the city council. Said additional members 
of the committee shall be appointed by the mayor and confirmed b}' 
the city council in joint convention by a majority vote. 

The committee thus constituted, consisting of the committee whose 
appointment was provided for under the terms of the aforesaid origi- 
nal resolution and of the five additional members herein provided 
for, shall have and exercise all the powers and perform all the duties 
devolving upon the building committee under the terms of said origi- 
nal resolution. Said committee, as now constituted under the terms 
of this resolution, shall continue to exercise their powers and duties 
until the completion and acceptance of said new building, whether 
they continue to be members of the city government or not. No 
member of said committee shall receive any compensation for his 
services. Five members of said committee shall constitute a quorum 
for the ti'ansaction of all business, except the certification of bills 
and making requests for the issuance of notes or bonds. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1902. 



A Joint Resolution establishing a liquor agency for the 

ENSUING year. 

Resolred hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That a li(]uor agency be established for the ensuing year in accord- 
ance with the public statutes of the state of New Hampshire. 



Passed January 14, 1902. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



63 



A Joint Resolution empowering the committee on lands 

AND buildings TO SELL THE BIRCHES ON THE POOR FARM PASTURE 
LOT, SO CALLED. 

Re>iolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the committee on lands and buildings be hereby authorized 
and instructed to sell all the birch wood now standing on the poor 
farm pasture lot, so called. This wood to be sold by the committee 
to the highest bidder. 

Passed January 14, 1902. 



A Joint Resolution inviting bids for printing and binding 

THE annual city REPORT. 

Resolred hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the city auditor be, and hereby is, instructed to call for sealed 
proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1901, 
and submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full 
power to act in the matter. 

Passed January 14, 1902. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies 

IN THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, cis foUoios : 

Section 1. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
highway department for the year 1901, the sum of $756.90, amount 
received from abuttors on account of new concrete, which sum shall 
be credited to the appropriation for said year. 

Sect. 2. That the sum of $3,111.05 be, and hereby is, appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay 
outstandina: claims as follows. 



City poor 










$163.41 


City history commission 










7.75 


Engineering department 










53.37 


Health department 










55.89 


Incidentals and land damages 










1,. 598.05 


Police and watch 










624.68 


Purchase of land 










32.08 


Salaries ..... 










.575.82 



Passed January 14, 1902. 



$3,111.05 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 

CONCORD, N. H. 

Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, biennially. 



1901=1902. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Elected biennially in November by the people. Salary, ^i,ooo per annum. 

HARRr G. SARGENT. 

Office: Gov. Hill Block. 



ALDERMEN. 



Elected biennially in November by voters of each ward. Salary, ^71; per 
annum, with additional ^10 to Committee on Accounts and Claims. 

irard i— WILLIAINI W. ALLEN. 

HARRY G. ROLFE. 
Ward 5— ALBERT J. MORRILL. 
Ward 5— ANDREW T. SWENSON. 
Ward -^— EBEN M. WILLIS. 

JUSTIN E. ROBINSON. 

DANIEL C. WOODMAN. 
Ward 5— CHARLES B. CLARKE. 

GEORGE W. BUNKER. 
Ward 6— HENRY B. COLBY. 

FRANK CRESSEY. 

CHARLES A. RICHARDS. 
Ward 7— HIRAM T. DICKERMAN. 

DAVID A. WELCH. 

ALBERT P. DAVIS. 
Ward .9— MICHAEL H. MULCAHY. 
Ward y— CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

THOMAS NAWN. 
5 



66 CITY OK CONCOltl). 

CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, ^i,200 per annum. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

Office : City Hall Building. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elected biennially in November by voters in each ward. Salary, S40 per 
annum, with additional $10 to Committee on Accounts and Claims and 
$20 to President. 

President— J. WESLEY PLUMMER. 

Ward i— HENRY ROLFE. 

FRANK R. BENNETT. ■ 
Ward 5— RUFUS C. BOYNTON. 
Ward 5— JEREMIAH QUINN. 
Ward 4— J. WESLEY PLUMMER. 

FRED I. BLACKWOOD. 

JAMES W. McMURPHY. 
Ward 5— EDWARD C. NILES. 

CHARLES L. FELLOWS. 
Ward 6— FREDERICK E. WEBSTER. 

GEORGE H. ELLIOTT. 

NELSON W. McMURPHY. 
Ward 7— JAMES F. KELLEY. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY. 

ARTHUR E. MAX AM. 
Ward .9— ARTHUR COLFON. 
Ward .9— BARTHOLOMEW COLLINS. 

FRED C. COATES. 

CLERK OE COMMON (OINCIL. 

Elected biennially in January by Common Council. Salary, $50 per annum. 

ANTONIO J. SOUZA. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 67 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

On Finance — The Mayor ; Aldermen Willis, Colby and Rolfe ; 

Counoilineu Bennett, Blackwood and Niles. 
On Accounts and Glai^nn — Aldermen Colby, Bnnker and Miilcaliy ; 

Conncilmen Rolfe, Chesley and Webster. 
On Lands and Buildinf/s — Aldermen Woodman, Richards and 

Nawn ; Conncilmen F'ellows, Blackwood and Collins. 
On Public Instruction — Aldermen Robinson, Rolfe and Swenson ; 

Conncilmen N. W. McMurphy, Kelley and Coates. 
On Parks and Commons — Aldermen Davis, Woodman and Morrill ; 

Conncilmen Maxam, Qninn and Boynton. 
On Roach and Bridges — Aldermen Welch, Clarke and French ; 

Conncilmen Bennett, Chesley and Colton. 
On Fire Department — Ahlermen Allen, Dickerman and Richards; 

Conncilmen Rolfe, N. W. McMurpliy and Webster. 
On Lighting Streets — Aldermen Cressey,- Robinson and Davis ; 

Conncilmen J. W. McMnrphy, Niles and Elliott. 
On Cemeteries — Aldermen Swenson, Clarke and Morrill; Conn- 
cilmen Maxam, Kelley and Qninn. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Elections and Returns — Aldermen Bnnker and French. 

On Engrossed Ordinances — Aldermen Clarke and Mnlcahy. 

On Bills, Second Reading — Aldermen Cressey and Colby. 

On Police and Licenses — Aldermen Willis and Rolfe. 

On Sewers and Drains — The Mayor ; Aldermen Allen, Willis, 

Nawn and Welch. 
On Streets and Sidewalks~T\\e Mayor; Aldermen Dickerman, 

Bnnker and French. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Elections and Returns — Conncilmen Fellows and Quinn. 

On Bills, Second Reading — Conncilmen Niles and J. W. Mc- 
Mnrphy. 

On Engrossed, Ordinances — Comicilmen Elliott and N. W. Mc- 
Mnrphy. 



68 CITY OF COXCOUD. 

CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Bond to the acceptance of 
the Fioard of Mayor and Aldermen. .Salary, I5250 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

Office : First National IJank. 



CITY AUDITOR. 

.\ppointed biennially by the Mayor with the approval of the Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

GEORGE K. HAZELTINE. 

Office : City Mall Building. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, .$1,500 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office : Police Station Building. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, 56oo per annum. 

EDWARD A. STEVENS. 



COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Bond within 
six days to satisfaction of the Board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of 
first $60,000; seven and one half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

WENDELL P. LADD. 

Office : Smith's Block. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



69 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

President- CHARLES R. CORNING. 
Secretarv— SUSAN J. WOODWARD. 
Moderator— CHARLES C. DANFORTH. 
Clerk— LOUIS C. MERRILL. 
Auditors— WILLIAM YEATON. 
ADAM P. HOLDEN. 

Three elected annually in March by voters of Union School District. Salary, 
$250 per annum for the board. 

JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 
CHARLES R. CORNING, 
JOHN C. ORDWAY, 
SUSAN J. WOODWARD, 
EDWARD N. PEARSON, 
JOHN VANNEVAR, 
GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 
JOSEPH T. WALKER, 



Term expires 


Ma 


■cli. 


1902 








1902 








1902 








1903 
1903 
1903 
1904 








1904 


* H, il 






1904 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 
UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. * 

Appointed annually in July by Board of Education. Salary, $2,000 per 
annum as superintendent and $500 as agent. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 

Office : High School Kuilding, School Street. 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 



PENACOOK— District No. 20. 



One member of Jjoard of Education elected annually in March Ijy voters of 
district. Salary, $50 per annum for the board. 

OSCAR E. SMITH, Term expire.s Marcli, 1902. 

IRA PHILLIPS, " ^' " 1903. 

DR. H. C. HOLBROOK, " " - 1904. 

TOWN DISTRICT. 

Comprising all districts in the city except Union School District and No. 20. 
Elected annually in March by voters of district. Salary, ^200 per annum 
for the board. 

GEORGE T. ABBOTT, Term expires Marcli, 1902. 

FALES P. VIRGIN, " " '^ 1903. 

ALBERT SALTMARSH, " " " 1904. 



TRUANT OFFICERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary 

as such, none. 

G. sdOTT LOCKE. 
JAMES E. RAND. 
DANIEL S. FLANDERS. 
JAMES KELLEY. 
CHARLES W. HALL. 
W. D. BARRETT. 
JOHN E. GAY. 
CHARLES H. ROWE. 
SAMUEL L. BATCHELDER. 
JOHN G. PUTNAM. 
HOYT KOBINSON. 



CITY GOVKKNMENT. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 

Ward 1— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 2— CHABLES E. STANIELS. 
Wards— PAIL R. HOLDEN. 
Ward 4— .JOH'N M. MITCHELL. 
Ward 3— AMOii J. SHURTLEFF. 
Ward 6— REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— AYILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Wards— EDSO^ J. HILL. 
Ward .9— MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by Trustees of Library. Salary, $i,ooo per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

.Salary, $450 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. MABEL P. BUNKER. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Fowler Library Building. 



ASSESSORS. 

Elected biennially by voters of each ward. Salary, 33 per day of actual 

service. 

Ward i— OLn'ER J. FIFIELD. 
IVard 5— WILLIAM A. COWLEY. 

Ward 5— josi:ph E. SHEPARD. 

Ward ^—CHARLES A. HERBERT. 
Ward o— GEORGE F. UNDER HILL. 
Ward 6— GEORGE S. DENNETT. 
Ward 7— JOHN H. QUIMBY. 
Ward ,s^— JOHN J. LEE. 
Ward 5— JAMES AHERN. 



rl CITV OF CONCORD. 

CITY WATER-WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS-. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

HARRY G. SARGENT, Mayor, ex-o^cio. 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, Term expires Mareli 31, 1002. 

WILLIAM E. HOOD, '^ '^ '* 1902. 

EDSON J. HILL, " ^' " 1903. 

TIMOTHY P. SULLIVAN, " " " 1903. 

JOHN WHITAKER, '^ " " 1904. 

HENRY E. CONANT, '' " " 1904. 

SOLON A. CARTER, " " " 1905. 

OBADIAH MORRILL, ^' •' '-^ 1905. 

President — William P. P'iske. 
Cleisk — AV^iLLiAM E. Hood. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Elected annually in April by Water Commissioners. Salary, $i,Soo per 

annum. 

V. CHARLES HASTINGS. 

Office: White's Block, Capitol Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Term unlimite<i. Salary, 
$1,050 per annum and rent of house. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



CITY (;0\ EKNMENT. 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Appointed by the Board of Mayor and Alilermen. Term unlimited. 

FOR PKECINCT. 

Salary, $125 each per annum. 

JOHN J. McNULTY. 
WILLIAM E. DOW. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $25 per annum. 

ABIAL W. ROLFE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $10 per annum. 
JOHN E. FRYE. 

FOR WEST CONCORD, 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 
STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

LESLIE H. CROWTHER. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 
CHARLES P. WHITE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, ^WEST CONCORD. 
FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 
JOHN P. PAIGE. 



74: CITY OF rONCOUD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

POLICE JUSTICE. 

Ap])')inted by Governor and Council. Salary, ^800 per annum, fixed by City 

Council. 

BENJAMIN E. BADGER. 

Office : Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed l)y Governor and Council. Salary, $2 per day uf actual service. 

GEORGE M. FLpyrCHER. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $500 per annuni. 

EDMUND S. COOK. 

Office : 77 North Main Street. 

CLERK OP POLICE COURT. 

Appointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by the Legisla- 
ture. 

HARRY R. HOOD. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Bond of 31,000 
required. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

GEORGE S. LOCKE. 

Office : Police Station. 



ASSISTANT CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Salaryj $900 per 

annum. 

JAMES E. RAND. 



CITY (iOVEIINMENT. 



75 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, 38oo each per annum. 

Daxikl S.. F'landers, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $850 per annum. 



Whitney D. Barrett, 
James Kelley, 
John E. Gay, 
Charles H. Rowe, 



Samuel L. Batchelder, 
Hoyt Robinson, 
Christopher T. Wallace. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 
George II. Silshv, Captain anil Drill Master, 



O. H. Bean, 
W. A. Little, 
George W. Chesley, 
William H. H. Patch, 
Alvin H. Urann, 
Harvey N. Oakes, 
George N. Fellows, 
Thomas P. Davis, 
Irving B. Robinson, 



Charles E. Kelley, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
James Jepson, 
Fred C. Coates, 
Oliver J. Raymond, 
David J. O'Brien, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
David S. Rogers, 
Georo;e G. Allen. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, $2 each per day fur actual 

service. 



Clark D. Stevens, 
Almah C. Leavitt, 
Oscar F. Richardson, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
P>I\vard H. Dixon, 
William J. Ahern, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowel! , 
Joseph C. Eaton, 
Alphonso Vene, 



Robert Hill, 
John T. Kimball, 
James F. Ward, 
Charles E. Palnni-, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Justus O. Clark. 
Ira C. Phillips, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Moses T. Rowell, 
Napoleon B. Burleigh, 



76 



CITY OK CONCORD. 



Edward H. Haskell, 
Edward M. Nason, 
Charles M. Norris, 
John J. Crowley, 
William H. Richardson, 
Robert McKerley, 
Victor Engel, 
Win. S. Fisher, 
Ralph P. Farnuni, 
Frank W. Hobart, 
Wni. II. Garvin, 
Francis T. Ham, 
James Mercer, Jr., 
Win. H. Hammond, 
James W. Lane, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Philip St. Peter, 
Bert S. Manley, 
Geo. A. S. Kimball, 
Josepli T. Hurd, 



Geo. B. Russell, 
Frank W. Johnson, 
Oliver J. Raymond, 
Geo. W. Johnson, 
Wm. A. Pearsons, 
David J. O'Brien, 
Judson F. Hoit, 
Albert P. Davis, 
Josepli A. Flanders, 
David J. Roaers, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Geo. H. Downing, 
Alma L. Pease, 
Charlie C. Plainer, 
Edward C. Hussey, 
Horace B. Ann is, 
John Knowlton, 
Milton Colby, 
Ashbury F. Tandy, 
Henry J. Dnrrell, 
Patrick McGuire. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 

COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Bond, $3,000. Salary, $1,400 

per annum. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Ciffice : Police Station lluilding. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. No salary. 

William Rowell, Henry P. Cilley, 

Simeon Partridge, Richard H. Lyna, 

J. Henry Sanborn, G. Arthur Nichols, 

Zeb F. Swain, fklgar W. Sanborn, 



CITY (;OVERXMENT. 



77 



George S. Milton, 
O. H. T. Riclumlson, 
Micliiiel J. Lee, 
Edward H. Randall, 
Timothy Kenna, 
B. Frank Varney, 
Isaac Baty, 
John F. Clark, 
John E. Frye, 
R. N. Foster, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
Wm. S. Button, 
Willis H. Robbins, 
George N. Berry, 
Charles H. Berry, 
Wm. H. McGuire, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
Edward M. Batchelder, 
John Sweeney, 
Albert J. Long, 
M. E. Clifford, 
Frederick Booth, 
Fred M. Davis, 
Richard O'Brien, 
Benj. H. Orr, 



Michael J. Finn, 
Henry H. Morrill, 
Fred L. Plurnmer, 
Miles F. Farmer, 
Charles L. Norris, 
Charles L. Fellows, 
Thomas Matthews, 
D. Warren Fox, 
Daniel Haslam, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Seth R. Hood, 
Rufus E. Gale, 
Geo. A. Harwood, 
Albert S. Trask, 
Philip King, 
Wm. L. Regan, 
Patrick J. Calbret, 
Frederick T. Converse, 
Clias. M. Downes, 
Clarence A. Goodhue, 
Chas. W. Bateman, 
Joseph D. McLaughlin, 
John Vogel. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Ward 1— BARRY G. ROLFE, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 2— ALBERT J. MORRILL, East Concord. 
' Salary, ^10 per annum. 



78 CITY OF CONCOKI). 

Wards 3, 4, ,7, 6", 7, <9, .9— JOSEPH A. COCHRAN, 
City Hall. 
Salary, $350 per annum. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to 

city poor. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 18 South State Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, Si for each visit to 

city poor. 

DR. HENRY C. HOLBROOK. 

Office : Penacook. 



HEALTH OFFICERS.- 

One elected annually in March, for three years, by City Council. Salary, 
$25 per annum. 

RUSSELL WILKINS, M. D., Term expires March, 1902. 
L. A. SANDERS, M. D., " " " 1903. 

GEORGE A. BERRY, " " " 1904, 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Nominated by 15oard of Health in .\pril and confirmed by the City Council. 
Salary, $ 1,20c per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office : Police Station Building. 



CITY <^;OVEI!\MKNT. 79 

REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 1 5 cents for each 
birth, marriage, and death received, recorded, and returned to the State 
Registrar. 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN. 

Office : City Hall. 



CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 

Appointed annually in January by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 
Salary, $900 per annum. 

FRED S. JOHNSON. 

Office: 156 North Main Street. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. No salary. 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, Term exp 

GEORGE A. YoilNG, 
BEN C. WHITE, 
WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 



pires Jaiiuui 


■y^ 


1902 
1902 


a it 




1903 


a a 




1903 


( k a 




1904 


it a 




1904 



CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7, consoli- 
dated) elected annually in January, for three years, by City Council. 
Salary, none. 

WARD I. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, Term expire.s Jaiiuarv, 1902. 

D. WARREN FOX, " " " 1903. 

JOHN WHITAKER, " " '- 1904. 

WARD 2. 
JOHN C. HUTCHINS, Term expires January, 1902. 

SCOTT FRENCH, " " " 1903. 

CYRUS R. ROBINSON, . " " " 1904. 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD 3. 

GEORGE R. PARMENTER, Term expires Jaimarv, l'J02. 
WILLIAM A. LITTLE, '^ " " 1903. 

JAMES M. GROSSMAN, " " " 1904. 

WARD 7. 
FRANK G. PROCTOR, Term exjiires January, 1902. 

ISAAC N. ABBOTT, '' - " 1903. 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " " " 1904. 



COMMISSIONERS OP CEMETERIES. 

FOR WARDS 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, AND PART OF WARD 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FRANK J. BATCHELDER, Term expires March, 1902. 

CHARLES G. REMICK, " '^ " 1902. 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, " ' " - 1903. 

GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, " " '' 1903. 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, " " " 1904. 

FRANK P. ANDREWS, " " " 1904. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
FRANK A. DAME, 
LOUIS A. LANE, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS. 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 
SCOTT FRENCH. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 81 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 
ALVIN C. POWELL. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 
WILLIAM H. CURRIER. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 
JOHN E. CARTER. 



INSPECTOR OP PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Fees, 
one fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

gp:orge h. rolfe. 



PENCE-VIEWERS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, $2 each per day, paid by 
parties interested. 

GEORGE W. CHESLEY, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



POUND-KEEPER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, two cents each for 
impounding sheep, and five cents each for all other creatures, paid by 
owners. 

JOHN KNOWLTON. 



SEALERS OP LEATHER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
CYRUS R. ROBINSON, 
DAVID E. EVERETT, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



82 



CITY OK CONCOKI). 



SEALER OP WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, for sealing each scal^ 
beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, and for each measure, 10 cents; five or 
more to one person, half price — paid by owners of scales or measures. 

CHARLES E. BARTLETT. 

Office : Citv Hall. 



CULLER OP STAVES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; 
hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoops, 
50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M — paid by party for whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OP HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price per 
load, paid by party requiring service. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
D. Arthur Brown, 
John N. Hill, 
Hiram O, Marsh, 
Thomas Hill, 
John H. Mercer, 
A. H. Campbell, 
O. F. Richardson, 
Charles H. Day, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
Alvah L. Powell, 
Seth R. Dole, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Lyman B. Foster, 
William H. Meserve, 
Hiram Brown, 
George W. Chesley, 



George B. ^Yhittredge, 
Charles T. Page, 
William F. Carr, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Evarts McQuesten. 
Oscar E. Smith. 
Amos Blanchard, 
INIark M. Blanchard, 
Lurman R. Goodrich, 
James H. Harrington, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Daniel Crowley, Jr., 
Fred A. Crocker, 
Alfred Beddow, 
Charles H. Cook, 
Willis A. Cobnrn, 
Henry E. Chamberlin. 



CITY GOVEI5XMKNT. 83 

SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid 
by party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, Benjamin Bilsborougli, 

Edward A. Moulton, Alvin H. Urann, 

George Abbott, Jr., Fred Rollins. 



SURVEYORS OP MASONRY. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, O. H. T. Richardson, 

Peter W. Webster, Moses B. Smith, 

William H. Kemiey, James K. Randlett, 

Fred L. Plummer, William Rowell, 

Charles L. Fellows, Steplieii H. Swain. 



SURVEYORS OP STONE. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid 
by party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, George F. Sanborn. 



SURVEYORS OP WOOD, LUMBER, AND BAR^. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, for surveying shingles 
and clapboards, 4 cents per M; boards and timber, 16 cents per M; meas- 
uring cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over 
twenty cords — paid by person employing. 

Arthur G. Stevens, George Partridge, 

John Ballard, Oliver J. F'ifield, 

James F. Nelson, Fales P. Virgin, 

Jonathan B. Weeks, Charles H. Day, 

Charles Couch, Hiram O. Marsh. 

Wallace M. Howe, Edward Runnels, 

Daniel K. Richardson, Lowell P^astman, 

John H. Rolfe, Andrew S. Fanuim, 

William Ballard, Curtis White, 



84 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



John T. Batclielder, 
Thomas D. Avery, 
Timothy Carter, 
Weston Cofran, 
Augustine C. Carter, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Philip Flanders, 
>Cyrus Runnells, 
Silvester P. Danforth, 
Alfred O. Preston, 
Henry Knox, 
William A. Chesley, 
Charles W. Hardy, 
Alfred Clark, 
John F. Scott, 
John Whitaker, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Peter W. Webster, 
George W. Abbott, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
John C Far rand, 
Fred W. Scott, 
G. A. Hinds, 
Samuel E. Holt, 
George P. Clark, 



John X. Hill, 
Abner C. Holt, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Joseph E. Hutchinson, 
Thomas Hill, 
Charles T. Page, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
John Potter, 
George C. Morgan, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hay ward, 
Edward H. Dixon, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Horace F. Paul, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus O. Clark, 
William Badger, 
Silas AViggin, 
Edward Stevens, 
Edw^aid L. Davis, 
Nutli'l P. Richardson, 
John E. Berry, 
Arthur E. Maxam. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

SELECTMEN. 

Ward i— CHARLES S. WARD. 

WILLIAM G. GARLAND. 

FRANK J. MOHSE. 
Ward i?— GEORGE McC. SANBORN. 

HARRY B. SANBORN. 

JOHN E. FRYE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 85 

Ward 3— A. C. POWELL. 

SHERMAN P. COLBY. 

JOHN T. PARKINSON. 
Ward ^—FREEMAN W. CROSBY. 

ALBERT H. DAGGETT. 

FRED G. CROAVELL. 
Ward J— GEORGE D. WALDRON. 

CURTIS WHITE. 

MIC AH D. CROCKETT. 
Ward 6'— FRED C. DEMOND. 

JOSEPH A. GIRARDIN. 

JOHN M. INMAN. 
Ward 7— ELMER P. BROWN. 

JAMES MERCER, JR. 

CHRISTOPHER T. W^ALLACE. 
Ward 5— DAVID J. ADAMS. 

JOHN E. CARTER. 

JOSEPH L. CHAMPIGNEY. 
Ward f^— JAMES J. REEN. 

DANIEL B. DOW. 

WILLIAM E. TRESSIDER. • 



SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward i— HENRY F. LINEHAN. 

WILLIAM H. MESERVE. 

JOHN G. WARD. 
Ward 5— JOHN W. SANBORN. 

JESSE G. STEVENS. 

FADES P. VIRGIN. 
Ward 5— JAMES ABBOTT. 

JOHN ROSSELL. 

JOHN KNOWLTON. 
Ward ^—EVERETT II. RUNNELLS. 

JOSEPH T. WALKER. 

JOSEPH S. MATTHEWS. 



86 ' CITY Ol' COXCOIJl). 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT. 

FRANK II. DUSTIN. 

JAMES E. SEWELL. 
Ward <;— ARTHUR E. DOLE. 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT. 

JAMES F. FELLOWS. 
Ward 7— DANA G. PRESCOTT. 

WALTER WILLIAMSON. 

ANDREW RALPH MANDERSON. 
Ward 5— THOMAS H. HIGGINS. 

LEON B. SIMPSON. 

WILLIAM H. GAY. 
Ward 5— DENNIS J. KENNEY. 

RICHARD CARLSON. 

JAMES J. GANNON. 



WARD CLERKS. 

Ward i— LESLIE H. CROWTHER. 
Ward 5— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
Ward 5— THOMAS E. PENTLAND. 
Ward -:^— CHARLES C. SCHOOLCRAFT. 
Ward 5— GEORGE E. CHESLEY. 
Ward 6'— HOWARD M. COOK. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward ,?— FREDERICK J. SEXTON. 
Ward y— RICHARD J. DEE. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward i— SAMUEL N. BROWN. 
Ward 2— EDWARD J. LYLE. 
Ward 5— CLARK D. STEVENS. 
Ward ^—BENJAMIN E. BADGER. 
Ward .3— CHARLES C. DANFORTH. 
Ward 6— SOLON A. CARTER. 
Ward 7— GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 
Ward cV— HOWARD F. HILL. 
Ward .'/—FRED N. MARDEN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



87 



MAYORS OF THE CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March lO, 
(853, and until 1S80 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the 
Mayor has been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. 



Hon. JOSEPH LOW . 

RUFUS clp:ment* 

JOHN ABBOTT . 
MOSES T. WILLARD 
MOSES HUMPHREY 
BENJAMIN F. GALE 

MOSES HI mphrp:y 

JOHN ABBOTT ., 
LYMAN D. STEVENS 
ABRAHAM G. JONES 
JOHN KIMBALL 
GEORGE A. PILLSBURY 
HORACE A. BROWNt 
GEORGE A. CUMMINGSJ 
EDGAR H. WOODMAN 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON 
STILLMAN HUMPHREY 
HENRY W. CLAPP . 
PARSONS B. COGSWELL 
HENRY ROBINSON . 
ALBERT B. WOODWORTH 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN 
HARRY G. SARGENT 



18 



1883 



1853-'54 
'55 

1856-'o7-'58 
1859-'60 
1861-'62 
1863-64 

'65 

1866-'67 

1868-'69 

1870-'71 

72-'73-'74-'75 

1876-'77 

1878-'79-'80 

1880-81 -'82 

_'84-'85-'86 

1887-88 

1889-'90 

1891-92 

1893-94 

1895-'96 

1897-'98 

1899-1900 

1901- 



*Died in office, .January 13, 185G. 
t Term closed in November, 1880. 
t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS, 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



Report of commissioner of Highways 



To the City Council: 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the ordinance, I here- 
with submit the annual report of the work and expenditures 
of the highway department for the year of 1901. Alucii 
repairing in general, some permanent improvements and the 
usual work of the department has made the vear a particu- 
larly busy one. 

GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

The sum of $iS,6oo was appropriated for general main- 
tenance this year, but this amount does not seem sufficient to 
meet the numerous expenses which must be taken from the 
appropriation. The streets are in bad condition generally 
and need a good deal of repaii ing. Beside the trimming of 
shade trees, the care of ice and snow and sanding walks 
does not keep the roads in repair in any wav, and while the 
expense is considerable it does not show after the ice and 
snow are gone. Of course the month of December is very 
uncertain in regard to expense. This year we had a severe 
storm December 3 and 4, which was followed by a thaw, 
and the expense of this one storm was $631.13, which shows 
that if we have many storms in the year serious inroad is 
made on the appropriation for general maintenance. 

The shade trees of our city are dying fast and the depart- 
ment has been requested to remove a large number of dead 
trees the past season. Most of the shade trees need trim- 
ming badly and it will require quite a little expense. I think 
there should be a separate appropriation for removing and 
trimming trees, for the amount expended in that direction 
does not show in the street repairs. 



92 CITV OF CONCORD. 

Most of the liridges in tlie city are in good condition. Two 
new ones will have to he hiiilt across the Soucook ri\er, one 
on the Sheep Davis road, so called, and the Thompson lower 
hridge, which was washed away two years ago and has never 
been rebuilt. The town of Pembroke has not been ready to 
rebuild, but 1 understand that they will be ready to build 
both bridges next season. East Concord bridge has been 
replanked and the Sewall's Falls bridge repaired this year. 
The Loudon bridge will need painting next summer. 

Not many new streets have been granted this year. Stone 
street, at the south end, was granted and put into passable 
condition, and a small outlay another season will make it a 
good street. 

A change of grade on Pitman street was granted last year, 
but the work was not done imtil this. After the street was 
cut down it was found to be unsatisfactory, and a petition to 
have the grade reestablished was grantetl. The street is now 
in satisfactory condition. 

By the new layout of the Concord Street Railway, granted 
by the city government, a new track was laid to the Concord 
State Fair grounds, which added quite an expense to this 
department for putting the street back into good condition. 
Should the railroad broad gauge its line next season it will 
call for more street repairs. The work of putting in the new 
electric railway on Hall street was begun late in the fall and 
a large amount of grading done. When the railroad com- 
pletes the work in the spring I think the street will be in bet- 
ter condition than ever l^efore. 

The track of the street railway from West Washington 
street to Pine at the west end was moved into the center of 
the street, whicii n)ade it grade Centre street. The expense 
was $617.29, and we now have a street sixty-tive feet wide, 
which is a great improvement. 

The highway department has had eight horses at the city 
stable, which ha\e for the most part been taken from the 
fire department after they were beyond service there. On 
coming into office in February I found that two of the horses 
were useless, and we killed and buried them. Later on 



HIGHWAY DEPAHTMENT. 93 

another became useless and that was killed also. Two more 
will soon be beyond service, and it will then be necessary to 
purchase some new horses for use in the department. 

CLEANING STUEETS. 

The amount appropriated for cleaning streets was hardly 
sufficient this year, and although the changing from one 
method to another may have made some ditierence in the 
expense I would recommend that the appropriation be 
increased. The following ordinance relating to the removal 
of garbage was passed in April, 1901 : 

NOTICE. 
A Resolution Relating to the Removal of Garbage. 
Resoh>ed by ilie Board of Mayor and Aldermen : 

That for the improvement of the sanitary condition of the city and 
for the convenience of the people residing in the central portion 
thereof, the Commissioner of Highways is hereby authorized and 
instructed to cause the city teams to collect and remove all waste 
material and garbage at least once in three weeks, in all seasons of 
the year, when practicable, within the following limits : Commencing 
at the point where Penacook street intersects with the Boston & 
Maine Railroad, thence by said Penacook street to North State street; 
thence by North State street to intersection of North State street and 
Rumford street ; southerly through Rumford street to Beacon street ; 
westerly through Beacon street to White street ; southerly through 
White street to Washington street ; westerly through Washington 
street to Centre street, to Park Ridge, Park Ridge to Giles ; south- 
erly through Giles to Warren : westerly through Warren to intersec- 
tion ot Warren and Pleasant ; thence easterly through Pleasant street 
to South Spring street ; thence southerly by South Spring street and 
Avon street to South street ; thence southerly by South street to 
Pillsbury street ; thence easterly by said Pillsbury street and the line 
of said street extended to the Boston & Maine Railroad ; thence 
northerly by the Boston & Maine Railroad to the point begun at, 
including all streets that are within the territory herein bounded. 

All such work shall be done in accordance with such rules and reg- 
ulations as the Superintendent of Streets shall prescribe. 



94 CITV OF OONCOKL). 

We began the work by starting one garbage team at each 
of the two extreme limits, both teams working towards the 
center of the city each day excepting Wednesdays, when 
botli collect in the central portion, and going over the district 
once in tw'o weeks. The ordinance requires collection only 
once in three weeks, but the department finds it can cover 
the territory in two, and if residents would please be careful 
not to put the garbage out oftener than once in two weeks it 
would assist the department greatly. Of course the amount 
to be collected varies considerably each time, so that often 
we are not able to reach each street on exactly the same day 
of the week, but the time will vary but a little. The whole 
system of collecting garbage has been re-arranged, and in 
another season the department hopes to give better service. 

CATCH BASINS. 

An appropriation of $[,500 this year for catch basins was 
sufficient. The usual amount of repairing has been done, 
new basins built, and all thoroughly cleaned. 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 

Considerable repairing of concrete walks has been done 
the past year, and all new concrete walks granted by the city 
government have been laid excepting the one at the Dewey 
school, and the petition of G. H. Rolfe, which was granted 
too late to be constructed this season. In Penacook, a walk 
1,800 feet in length was constructed on Merrimack street. It 
makes a fine walk from the railroad station to the village, 
and is a great improvement over the gravel walk, which was 
in very bad condition in wet weather. 

PERMANETsT WORK. 

The amount appropriated for permanent improvements 
was $10,000. The demand for general repairs was such 
that it was found necessary to keep back a portion of this 
amount for use under general maintenance in case of severe 
storms, and therefore we were not able to do as much in the 
line of permanent work. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 95 

A petition for macadain on Warren street was presented to 
the city government and granted. About two thirds of a 
mile, twenty-four-foot roadway was built from Spring street 
to Fruit at an expense of $3,839.32, and we now have a good 
macadam road from Spring street to the ''Monument." 
This road is used a great deal for pleasure riding especially, 
and it should be extended from the "Monument" to St, 
Paul's School. 

Another piece of macadam, twenty-four-foot roadv^'ay 773 
feet in length, was put in on South State street from West to 
Main at an expense of $1,186.59. This class of macadam, 
such as Warren and South State street, can be built for about 
$7,000 a mile. 

The macadam on the Penacook road which was put in live 
years ago has stood the wear well, and nothing has been 
expended for repairs. On account of the large amount of 
travel over tliis road, I think it would be well to extend this 
both toward West Concord and Penacook from the piece 
now in. 

North Main street from Centre to Pitman has been in such 
bad condition for several years that the city government voted 
to concrete that portion west of the street railway track. 
The expense was $1,836.36, and we now have a very good 
street there. 

Qiiite a little grading has been done on North State street 
with stone chips from the stone sheds. This makes a very 
good road for the money expended, especially where there is 
considerable heavv teaming. 

The stationary crusher on Rumford street, which has been 
in use some twenty years, is in bad condition, and a new 
engine ought to be purchased before another season. The 
inspector's report of the condition of the boiler was unsatis- 
factory. He reports that it cannot be run with a pressure 
over sixty pounds, and we find that is not sufficient to run 
the plant. The matter of purchasing a new en'gine was con- 
sidered by the committee on roads and bridges, and they 
thought it advisable to purchase, but the season's work was 



96 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SO nearly done that the subject was given up. Qiiite a little 
will have to be expended in repairing both crushers and the 
steam roller next year. 

SPRINKLING. 

The street sprinkling precinct was extended the past sea- 
son and two sprinklers added. There is still a call to have 
the precinct enlarged another season, which if done will 
require more sprinklers. The department now has thirteen 
sprinklers, which have all been repaired and painted, and are 
now ready for use. 

IN GENERAL. 

Early in the year the city purchased a lot for the highway 
department which is proving a good investment, for the city 
needed the gravel and a place to dump ashes. It seems to 
me that it is an advantage for the city to purchase a gravel 
bank rather than to buy by the load. 

The call for macadam roads is increasing each year, and it 
seems it would be wise for the city to hold a portion of their 
quarries at West Concord, for there will be need of this class 
of material in a few years, as the present supply for macadam 
will soon be exhausted. 

The city government voted to send the commissioner of 
highwavs to the annual meeting of the American Society of 
Municipal Improvements held at Niagara Falls the first week 
in October. It was a very interesting meeting, and the sub- 
ject of good road building was quite freely discussed. The 
speakers taking the more active part in the discussion were 
from cities where good road building is clone on an extensive 
scale and large amounts expended in their construction ; but 
many useful ideas were advanced which would be a benefit 
to cities of our size. 

I would call the attention of the city government to the 
dangerous condition of the roofs of the Baptist church on 
State street, the Warren-street side of the Baker Memorial, 
corner State and Warren, and the Spring-street side of the 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 97 

brick tenement house, corner Spring and School. The accii- 
muhition of snow slides off these roofs during thaws, and 
there have been several narrow escapes from serious injury. 
The owners of these pieces of property should be requested 
to do something for the protection of the public. 

In closing, I would express my appreciation of the interest 
taken in this department by the mayor and the members of 
the city council, and the courtesy extended to it by all depart- 
ments of the city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Commissioner of Highzvays. 



98 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



RECORD OF LABOR ON STREETS. 



Ward One. 



East Canal Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalk 
West Canal Street. 

General repairs 
Chirch Street. 

General repairs 
Charles Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing 

Union Street. 

General repairs 
Penacook Street. 

General repairs 
Elm Street. 

General repairs 
Centre Street. 

General repairs 
Cross Street. 

General repairs 
Spring Street. 

General repairs 
River Road. 

General repairs 
Summit Street. 

General repairs 
Penacook Road. 

General repairs 
Maple Street. 

General repairs 
Winter Street. 

General repairs 



SI 1.52 


3.15 


6.95 


2.33 


1.50 


22.80 


4.33 


17.86 


37.35 


35.20 


7.15 


4.10 


132.95 


5.37 


7.14 


2.13 


3.21 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



99 



RoLFE Street. 




General repairs ..... 


$0.33 


Summer Street. 




General repairs ..... 


6.13 


Crescent Street. 




General repairs ..... 


23.22 


Borough Road. 




General repairs . . . . . 


88.58 


Washington Street. 




General repairs ..... 


69.92 


Moving watering trough in square 


36.48 


Main Street. 




General repairs ..... 


119.28 


Repairing sidewalks .... 


21.18 


Bye Street. 




General repairs . . . . . 


1.58 


Walnut Street. 




General repairs . . . . . 


18.55 


High Street 




General repairs . . . . . 


36.83 


Merrimack Avenue. 




General repairs ... 


6.13 


Changing grade ..... 


41.63 


Repairing sidewalks . . . . 


22.61 


Merrimack Street. 




General repairs . . . . . 


49.90 


Sidewalks ...... 


293.65 


Bank wall and railing .... 


161.79 


Pleasant Street. 




General repairs . . . . . 


11.30 



"Ward Two. 



Mills Street. 
General repairs 
Repairing sidewalks 



>15.78 
14.40 



100 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Clinton Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
Portsmouth Street. 

General repairs 
Pembroke Street. 

General repairs 
KEARSARtiE Street 

General repairs 
Shaker Road. 

Building culvert 
Graham Road. 

General repairs 

SCHOOLHOUSE ROAD. 

General repairs 
Penacook Road. 
General repairs 
Penacook Street. 
General repairs 
Repairing sidewalks 
Repairing culverts 



Ward Three. 



Knight Street. 
General repairs 
Repairing sidewalks 

Lake Street. 

Grading and widening 
Repairing sidewalks 
Repairing culvert 
General repairs 

K Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 

Electric Avenue. 
Repairing sidewalks 



S21.00 

6.60 

20.72 

6.60 

19.60 

30.88 

19.31 

112.83 

126.47 
14.70 
19.35 



$1.20 
6.22 

66.29 

26.30 

8.60 

23.64 

5.98 

1.24 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



101 



Bog Road. 

General repairs 
Sewall's Falls Road. 

General repairs 
Quaker Street. 

General repairs 
Second Street. 

General repairs 
Hutchins Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
Clark Street. 

General repairs 
Engel Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
Peabody Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
View Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
Fisher Street. 

General repairs 
Mullen Street. 

General repairs 
Saltmarsh Road. 

General repairs 
Beach Hill Road. 

General repairs 
Long Pond Road. 

General repairs 
New Road. 

General repairs 
Pine Hill Road. 

General repairs 
Number Four Road 

General repairs 



$101.07 

5.00 

2.36 

5.00 

23.13 

3.11 

13.73 

5.13 

5.80 

8.60 

30.71 

20.37 

107.43 

58.96 

40.36 

36.75 

2.69 



102 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Carter's Hill. 

General .repairs 
North State vStreet. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks . 



$19.11 

121.91 

56.82 



Ward Pour. 




Montgomery Street. 




General repairs ..... 


. . S4.92 


Cambridge Street. 




General repairs ..... 


13.03 


West Washington Street. 




General i-epairs ..... 


2.70 


Essex Street. 




General repairs ..... 


9.00 


Court Street. 




General repairs ..... 


12.50 


Valley Street. 




General repairs ..... 


8.09 


Repairing sidewalks ..... 


12.44 


Bradley Street. 




General repairs ..... 


11.08 


Maple Street. 




General repairs ..... 


17.40 


Church Street. 




General repairs ..... 


21.98 


Repairing sidewalks ..... 


14.30 


Union Street. 




General repairs ..... 


41.61 


Academy Street. 




General repairs ..... 


16.08 


White Street. 




General repairs ..... 


3.80 


Albin Street. 




General repairs ..... 


5.44 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



103 



Pitman Street. 

Cutting and grading . 

Re-modeling 

PuA'ing gutters 

General repairs 
Chapel Street. 

General repairs 
Franklin Street. 

General repairs, Ward 4 . 

General repairs, Ward 9 . 
Ferry Street. 

General repairs, Ward 4 . 

General repairs. Ward 8 . 

Repairing sidewalks. Ward 8 
Abbott Street. 

Repairing sidewalks . 
Forest Street. 

General repairs 
Vernon Street. 

General repairs 
Lyndon Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks . 
FiSKE Street. 

General repairs 
Rollins Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks . 
Tremont Street. 

General repairs 
Jackson Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks . 
Harrod Court. 

General repairs 



S84.23 

75.11 

22.20 

8.53 

5.50 

20.30 
36.31 

16.24 
37.60 
55.46 

4.58 

11.68 

7.17 

18.27 
19.29 

13.93 

4.25 
11.54 

20.60 

26.23 
37.72 

9.51 



104 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Beacon Street. 

General repairs 
Walker Street. 

Geueral repairs, Ward 4 . 

General repairs, Ward 9 . 

Repairing sidewalks. Ward 9 

Jackson West Court. 

General repairs 
North Spring Street. 

General repairs, Ward 4 . 

General repairs. Ward 5 . 
Park Ridge. 

General repairs 
Washington Street. 

General repairs 
Centre Street. 

General repairs, Ward 4 . 

General repairs, Ward 5 . 

Cutting and filling, Ward 4 

Repairing sidewalks. Ward 4 

Repairing sidewalks. Ward 5 

Paving gutter. Ward 4 . . 

North Main Street. 

Concreting west side. Centre to Pitnia 
General repairs. Ward 4 . 
General repairs, Ward 5 . 
Repairing paving. Ward 5 
Repairing paving. Ward 8 

Penacook Street. 

General repairs, AYard 4 . 
General repairs. Ward 9 . 
Grading with stone chips, Ward 4 
Grading with stone chips. Ward f) 
Repairing sidewalks. Ward 4 

High Street. 

General repairs, Ward 4 . 



$38.07 

4.43 
5.54 
3.70 

4.20 

27.15 
30.45 

1.52 

55.62 

39.16 
40.89 
617.29 
19.38 
7.26 
27.60 

1,836.36 

50.29 

9.82 

38.39 

18.67' 

39.46 
184.77 
226.54 
226.55 

14.16 

24.55 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMKNT . 



105 



High Street. 

General repairs, Ward 5 . 

Repairing sidewalks, Ward 4 

Repairing sidewalks, Ward 5 
RuMFORD Stre?:t. 

General repairs. Ward 4 . 

General repairs. Ward 5 . 

General repairs, Ward 9 . 

Repairing sidewalks, Ward 4 
North State Street. 

General repairs, Ward 4 . 

General repairs, Ward 5 . 

General repairs, Ward 9 , 

Grading with stone chips. Ward 

Repairing sidewalks. Ward 9 

Repairing macadam. Ward 9 



$11.74 

8.67 
104.30 

50.87 

G.15 

20.60 

25.12 

163.35 

110.65 

55.64 

274.14 

15.01 

29.86 



Ward Five. 



Orchard Street. 

General repairs 
Liberty Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
Hanover Street. 

General repairs 
Park Street. 

General repairs 
Tahanto Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
Blake Street. 

General repairs 
Green Street. 

General repairs 
Merrimack Street. 

General repaii'S 



$1.63 

3.09 

15.74 

31.15 

2.15 

5.38 

45.15 

26.26 



10(3 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Holt Street. 

General repairs 
Giles Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing culvert 
WooD-MAN Street. 

General repairs 
Pine Street. 

General repairs ... 

Kepairing sidewalks 
Warren Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks 

Repairing gutters 

Macadamizing from Spring to Fruit 

School Street. 

General repairs . . . . 

Repairing sidewalks 

Pleasant Street. 

General repairs, Ward 5 
General repairs, Ward 6 
General repairs, Ward 7 
Repairing sidewalks, Ward 5 
Repairing sidewalks, Ward 7 
Macadamizing 



Ward Six. 



Lincoln Street. 

General repairs 
Beaver Street. 

Repairing 
Tiiorndike Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks 
Laurel Street. 

General repairs 



§4.48 

20.89 
43.18 

1».51 

37.52 
21.22 

51.79 

23.35 

20.13 

3,839.32 

123.92 
151.29 

145.44 
128.44 
222.84 
31.92 
41.48 
220.71 



S17.39 

5.20 

13.33 
12.17 

11.0(5 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, 



107 



Perley Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidfewalks 
Monroe Street. 

General repairs 
Pierce Street. 

General repairs 
Thompson Street. 

General repairs 
Downing Street. 

General repairs, Ward 6 . 

General repairs, Ward 7 . 

Repairing sidewalks, Ward 7 
Marshall Street. 

General repairs 

Jefferson Street. 
General repairs 

Grove Street. 

General repairs 
Myrtle Street. 

General repairs 
South Street. 

General repairs, Ward (3 

General repairs, Ward 7 
SoLTH Spring Street. 

General repairs 
Concord Street. 

General repairs 



Ward Seven. 



HoPKiNTON Old Road. 

General repairs 
HopKiNTON New Road. 

General repairs 



$13.13 
9.76 

1.30 

10.47 

2.89 

23.37 

6.95 

60.17 

21.89 

10.20 

6.45 

5.68 

143.10 
55.70 

54.33 

18.33 



;i6.71 
74.68 



108 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Long Pond Road. 




General repairs 


S147.01 


AriuHN Road. 




General repairs 


17.52 


Dlnbarton Road. 




General repairs 


14.74 


MiNOT Street. 




General repairs 


5.24 


Rockingham Street. 




General repairs 


30.66 


Repairing sidewalks 


146.99 


South Main Street. 




General repairs, "Ward (i 


145.05 


General repairs, Ward 7 


. . . 133.74 


General repairs, Ward 8 


24.78 


Repairing sidewalks, Ward 6 


16.43 


Repairing sidewalks. Ward 7 


80.51 


South State Street. 




General repairs. Ward 6 . 


64.48 


General repairs, Ward 7 . 


25.78 


Macadamizing 


1,186.59 


Fruit Street. 




General repairs 


24.28 


Repairing sidewalks 


35.93 


Duncklee Street. 




General repairs 


5.76 


Repairing sidewalks 


. ' . . 24.99 


Iron Works Road. 




General repairs 


9.79 


Holly Street. 




General repairs 


19.40 


Morton Street. 




General repairs 


4.20 


'' TiiK Turnpike." 




Genc'i'al repairs 


4.48 



HIGHWAY DEPART.AIENT. 



109 



Silk Farm Road. 

General repairs 
Kimball Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
Saint Paul's School Road 

General repairs 
BiRCHDALE Road. 

General repairs 
HujiPHREY Street. 

Repairing sidewalks 
FiSKE Road. 

General repairs 
Gale Street. 

General repairs 
Noyes Street. 

General repairs 
South P^ruit Street. 

General repairs 
Eastjian Street. 

General repairs 
West Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks 
Water Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks 
Princeton Street. 

General repairs 
Hall Street. 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks 
Bog Road. 

General repairs 
Iron Works Road. 

General repairs 



$2.28 

16.00 

8.44 

9.58 

30.88 

86.24 

15.63 

11.48 

10.30 

7.32 

26.62 

43.87 

232.53 
4.76 

83.41 

45.75 
66.54 

75.38 

109.27 



no 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



HoPKixTON Road. 
General repairs 

Albin Road. 
General repairs 

Clinton Street. 
General repairs 
Repairinjr culvert 
Repairing sidewalks 

PiLLSiiriiv Street. 
General repairs 
Repaii'ing sidewalks 

Allison Street. 
General repairs 
Repairing sidewalks 

BoAV Street. 
General repairs 

Stone Street. 

Cutting and filling 
Repairing sidewalks 

Stickney Hill Road. 
General repairs 
Putting in drain 

Broadway. 

General repairs 

Badger Street. 
General repairs 
Repairing sidewalks , 

Birch Street. 
General repairs 

Harrison Street. 
General repairs 
Repairing sidewalks 



$20.15 


1 


20 


272 


68 


19 


53 


11 


31 


4 


.16 


60.0.5 


25 


.88 


128.35 



20.17 

145.64 
38.61 

120.75 
172.61 

35.83 

46.43 
11.63 

9.39 

13.10 
32.03 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, 



111 



Ward Eig-ht. 



Pleasant Street Extension. 




General repairs .... 


$4,30 


Bridge Street, 




General repairs .... 


519,38 


Repairing sidewalks 


8,35 


Loudon Road. 




General repairs .... 


231.70 


Sheep Dayis Road. 




General re])airs .... 


16.54 


Hill's Avenue. 




General repairs .... 


11,35 


Repairing sidewalks 


25,53 


Break 0' Day Road. 




General repairs .... 


5.20 


Chandler Street. 




General repairs .... 


43.41 


Depot Street, 




General repairs .... 


27,82 


Freight Street. 




General repairs .... 


23.34 


Railroad Street. 




General repairs .... 


12.31 


South Pembroke Road. 




General repairs .... 


10.99 


Clough's Mill Road. 




General repairs .... 


27.33 


Pembroke Road. 




General repairs .... 


77,50 


East Concord Road. 




General repairs .... 


12,54 


North Pembroke Road. 




General repairs . . , - 


32.74 



112 



CITY OF COXCORD. 



Ward Nine. 



Little Pond Road. 

General repairs 
Granite Avenue. 

General repairs 
Snow Shoe Cllb Road. 

General repairs 
Charles Street. 

General repairs 
Auburn Street. 

General repairs 
Highland Street. 

General repairs 



S53.99 
G.l!) 

18.74 
'J. 2 3 

61.31 
7.37 



The following amounts have been collected and deposited with 
the citv treasurer : 



Mf 



„_argaret Pillsbury General Hospital, concrete 

Mrs. Mary Sweeney, concrete 

Wonolancet Club, concrete . 

John Swenson, concrete 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, concrete . 

C. P. Haines, concrete 

H. S. Allen, concrete . 

Martin Corbett, concrete . ' . 

A. Planchet, concrete . 

Lyster Bros., concrete . 

Mary Lee, concrete 

A. L. Sanborn, concrete 

John W. Edgerly, concrete . 

Julia Halpine, concrete 

W. H. Hale, concrete .... 

Penacook Improvement Society, concrete 

L. H. Buntin, concrete . . 

M. T. Berry, concrete . 

H. U. King, concrete . 



$52.90 

8.84 

22.33 

13.38 

43.01 

8.45 

8.40 

9.10 

7.36 

11.86 

20.48 

21.47 

13.32 

9.57 

9.94 

218.60 

11.20 

11.00 

22.58 



HKiHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



113 



A. E. Brown, concrete 

Morrill Smith, concrete 

Mrs. Murdock, concrete 

George W. Chesley, crushed stone 

Addison Meri'ill, crushed stone 

N. H. State Hospital, crushed stone 

Mrs. Mary B. G. Eddy, crushed stone 

James H. Rowell & Co., crushed stone 

Mrs. Gustavus Walker, gravel 

Concord Axle Co., gravel 

A. D. Ayling, sprinkling to camp ground 

M. E. Prescott, use of pump 

Hood, Palmer & Bailey, use of pump 

Mark Upton, use of derrick . 

E. McQuesten, edgestone 

Town of Pembroke, repairs on bridge 

Penacook Improvement Society, bank wall 



The following amounts remain unpaid for 1901 



Concrete 

Crushed stone, etc. 



©b.ov 
9.30 

34.10 

5G.2.5 
2.50 
1.25 
4.50 

18.45 
.80 

10.10 

1(5.00 

.75 

1.00 

10.00 
5.52 
9.23 

SO. 89 

$791.00 



$37.07 
194.50 



Bridges Repaired During 1901. 

Pembi'oke bridge over Merrimack, new concrete floor 
Federal bridge over Merrimack, new floor 
Sewall's Falls bridge over Merrimack, repairing 
Borough bridge over " Outlet," i-epairing 
Davis bridge over Soucook, repairing (one half paid 

by town of Pembroke) .... 
Richardson's Mills bridge over Soucook, repairing 
Wliite Farm bridge over Turkey river, repairing 
St. Paul's School bridge over Turkey river, paint- 

i'lg 

Birchdale bridge, repairing .... 



1231.57 



$378.00 

478.94 

102.70 

14.01 

18.46 
13.92 
12.03 

11.25 

18.78 



114 



CITY OK CONCORD. 



NEW CATCH BASINS BUILT TJOL 



Street. 



Location. 



Size. 



Cost. 



Lake 

Nortli State 
Pillsbiiry . . . 
Peiiacook... 

Centre 

High 

Duiiklee .. .. 

Dunklee 

Pillsbury . . . 
South State. 

Soutli 

South 

Jackson 

High 

Nortli Main 
Penacook. .. 
Pillsbury... 
Pillsbury . .. 

Warren 

Chandler . . . 
Nortli Main. 



West Concord 

West Concord 

East of T. R. Parker's store. . . 

South side, corner Main 

North side, opposite Pine 

West side, near Valley 

West side, soutli of Pillsbury . 
West side, north of Pillsbury . 
North side, west of Dunklee . 
East side, at junction of Main 

East side, corner West 

West side, south of Avon 

Corner Treinont 

East side, corner Warren 

Opposite J. T. Walker's 

East of N. R. R. crossings 

North side, west of No. 28 

Soutli side, opposite No. 28 

Junction Giles 

Opposite railroad station 

At Streeter's 



•S 17.90 
28.24 
10.12 
23.30 
24.53 
34.69 
18.23 
18.24 
20.66 
20 43 
17.20 
25.09 
18. 02 
24 71 

18 77 

19 04 
39.17 
31.74 
13.46 
28. 80 
11.05 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



115 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF HIGH^WAY DEPART- 
MENT. 



GP:NERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Apj)ropriatioii ...... 

Transferred from catch bas^in.s 

Transferred from sideAvalks and crossings, new 

Transferred from permanent work 



Paid as follows : 



$18,600.00 

97.80 

4.5.79 

1,475.61 

620,219.20 



Central District. 



Pay-rolls ..... 

Crosby Knox, gravel . 

J. Elizabeth Hoyt, gravel . 

Geo. H. Perkins est., gravel 

Geo. H. Richardson, gravel 

Geo. J. Sargent, gravel 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 

A. B. Black, runners for road-machine 

Goodhue & Milton, repairs . 

W. H. Eastman, poles 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 

Alfred Clark, Commissioner, postage, etc 

C. H. Mai'tin ;t Co., paint, etc. . 

Concord Land & Water-Power Co. 

lights ..... 
Thompson & Hoagiie, supplies 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil 
J. P. W. Roacli, repairs 
AVm. P. Ford & Co., plow points and 

repairs ..... 
Edson Mfg. Co., hose 
Concord Water-Works, water 
Climax Road Machine Co., repairs 
Charles Noyes, gravel 



p5,923.58 

2.20 

4.50 

62.15 

3.10 

56.10 

36.75 

50.00 

1.10 

5.00 

2.24 

24.42 

17.09 

110.26 

25.50 

2.20 

4.00 

12.00 

26.63 

4.00 

8.50 

10.60 



116 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



E. B. Hutchinson Bklg. Co., lumber 

C. H. Stevens & Co., lumber 

H. P. Lamprey, filing saws 

St. Paul's School, repairs . 

W. A. Chamberlin, rubber stamps 

Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., sawing lumber 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 

Eyeless Tool Co., picks 

R. P. Sanborn, posts 

Police and Watch appropriation, heating 

Trees. 

Pay-rolls . . . ' . 

Hixmphrey-Dodge Co., supplies . 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 



Pay-roll.- 



Fences. 



Signs. 



Pay-rolls ..... 
E. B. Hutchinson Bklg. Co., board^ 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., tacks, etc. 
George Prescott, painting signs . 



Culverts. 



$'J.'J7 

ID.OO 

4.80 

1.80 

.50 

24.65 

67.28 

13.57 

11.50 

38.67 



[54.21 
2.05 
2.50 



n8.52 
.60 
.20 

40.10 



$6,583.66 



$158.76 



$10.1)3 



Pav-rolls 



559.42 



il.61 







Sidewalks. 




Pay-rolls. 


repairing 


. 


$423.48 


Pay-rolls, 


building 




251.40 






Crossings. 




Pay-rolls, 


repairing 


. 


$23.68 


Pay-rolls, 


building 


. 


14.36 



$674.88 



$38.04 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



117 



Watering Troughs and Drin 

Pay-rolls .... 
Concord Water-Works, water 
Goodhue & Milton, repairs . 
D. Waldo White, cement . 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 



KING Fountains. 



Pay-rolls 



Pav-rolls 



Repairing Macadam. 



Building Driveways. 



$2o 


16 


127 


50 


15 


84 


1 


.35 


1 


.95 



$171.80 



^55.73 



;35.08 



Gutters. 



Pay-i'olls, repairing 
Pay-rolls, pavin<r 



Pav-rolls 



Repairing Paving. 



Bridges. 



Pay-rolls ..... 
Fred H. Chase, lumber 
C. H. Stevens & Co., lumber 
E. B. Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber 
H. M. Warren, plank 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight 
Thompson & Hnague, nails, etc. . 
E. D. Clough, lumber 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete . 
Concord Land & Water Power Co., 
lights 



^8.13 
84.27 



U74.62 

225.00 

1.41 

6.79 

80.00 

29.00 

11.00 

27.40 

8.55 

378.00 

43.65 



$102.40 



$52.39 



$985.42 



118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



City Teams. 



Pay-rolls .... 
E. H. Ruunells, mowing . 
J. E. McSliane, blacksmithing 
Ross W. Gate, blacksmithing 
Savage & Corliss, hay 
Charles R. Farniim, hay 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs 
D. Waldo White, grain, etc. 
Robert J. Macquire, services 
Concord Water- Works, water 
W. A. Sleeper, repairs 
S. W. Barker, hay . 
George D. Huntley, repairs 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 
C. H. Martin & Co., suppHes 
Burton Oil Co., oil 
C. Pelissier, repairs . 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 



5925.00 

34.50 

82.50 

42.35 

49.92 

31.50 

33.19 

348.21 

19.80 

4.00 

23.30 

58.43 

96.95 

2.50 

9.15 

4.25 

.35 

1.75 



,767.65 



Winter Expense. 

Pay-rolls, breaking roads, etc. . . $477.36 

" rolling snow . . . 71.46 

*■' snowing bridges . . . 19.20 

" shoveling walks and crossings. 297.69 

" plowing walks . . . 196.88 

" leveling snow . . . 105.38 

" sanding . . . . 247.18 

" draining off water . . 325.75 

" repairs sleds, etc. . . . 36.58 

Concord Coal Co., slabs . . . 4.60 

Emma II. Osgood, sand . . . 11.00 

A. E. jMaxam, rent of sand-lionse . 12.00 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., bolts . . 1.02 



$1,806.10 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



119 



Millville District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls ..... 
Albert Saltmarsli, gravel used in 1900 
J. M. Coit, gravel used in 1900 . 
St. Paul's School, gravel 
James Mercer, gravel 
Dauiel G. Blake, gravel 
Mrs. E. D. Massison, gravel 
Chas. Noyes, gravel . 
Perley Badger, gravel 
Fred W. Griffin, labor 
Thompson & Hoagne, pipe, etc. . 
Amos Blanehard, oil . 



Pay-rolls 



Pay-rolls 



Bridges. 



Culverts. 



Fences. 



Pay-rolls .... 
C. H. Martin & Co., paint, etc. 



;i,221.44 

•25.90 

15.00 

17.15 

.90 

2.20 

2.(30 

3.00 

3.30 

8.90 

20.91 

.98 



SI, 3 



?5.05 
2.30 



^•i.9i 



S3. 90 



;144.87 



17.35 



Pay-rolls 



Winter Expense. 



$393.04 



Penacook District. 
General Repairs. 



Pay-rolls .... 

J. C. Farrand, oil 

S. G. Sanborn, repairing tools 

Miss Lucy Hoit, gravel 

G. A. Griffin, painting 



)57.19 

.90 

18.85 

6.30 

15.75 



120 



CITY OF OONCOUD. 



W. C. Spicer, paint, etc. 
Ola Ander.sou, stone steps . 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies 
Henry Hayward, sharpening drills 
Edward McShane, bars 

N. S. Gale & Co., supplies 
J. M. Crossman, repairs 
Isaac Baty, repairs 

D. AVarren Fox, shovels, etc. 

Bridges 

Pay-i'oUs ..... 
Penacook Electric Light Co.. lights 



6.00 

32.19 

5.32 

.60 

.58 

4.09 

1.20 

1.10 

.64 



82.60 
50.00 



81.084.51 



Signs. 
George Prescott, painting signs .... 

Repaiking Sidewalks. 
Pay-rolls 

Watering Troughs and Drinking Fountains. 



852.60 



87.15 



816.09 



Pay-i-olls ...... 


815.91 


Concord Water-Works, water 


42.50 


W. G. Buxton, ex'r, use of watering- 




trough ...... 


3.00 


N. S. Gale & Co., supplies 


1.19 


John E. Rines, brick .... 


6.00 


Isaac Baty, repairs .... 


19.45 


Winter Expense. 




Pay-rolls, breaking roads 


8434.72 


" sanding .... 


73.37 


"■ draining off" water 


10.75 



888.05 



8518.84 



HIGHWAY DEl'AKTMENT. 121 

West Concord District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls $496.71 

J. M. Crossmau, repairs . . . 20.25 

Simeon Partridge, drags . . . 13.00 

Huinphrey-Dodge Co., scythes . . 1.75 

S531.71 



Bridges. 

Pay-rolls $40.44 

J. L. A. Chellis, labor . . . 123.76 

S164.20 

Culverts. 

Pay-rolls $11.48 

Trees. 
Pay-rolls $5.60 

Signs. 
George Prescott, painting signs . . . . $5.85 

Sidewalks. 

Pay-rolls $133.11 

Watering Troughs and Drinking Fountains. 



Concord Water- Works, water . . $40.00 

Concord Light and Power Co., lights . 16.08 



$56.08 



Winter Expense. 



Pay-rolls, breaking roads, etc. 

" plowing walks 

" snowing bridges . 

' ' draining off water 

'•'• sanding 
Hnmplirey-Dodge Co., shovels 



L15.74 
27.49 
14.04 
19.03 
17.88 
1.00 



$195.18 



122 f'lTY OF CONCORD. 

East Concord District. 
Genekal Repaiks. 

Pay-roll^ $245.27 

Fred Carter, lij^hting street iHiiip.- . 12.00 

C. R. Robinson, use of watering-ti'ouuli 20.00 

C. H. Stevens & Co., Imnber . . 7.45 

Mrs. A. B. Young, oil, etc. . . 5.28 

$290.00 

Culverts. 

Pay-rolls $40.50 

Sidewalks. 

Pay-rolls S53.40 

Winter P^xpense. 

Pay-rolls $135.25 



East Concord Intervale District. 
General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls $40.78 

Winter PIxpense. 
Pay-rolls $21, 1)5 



North Concord District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls $105.42 

C. H. Stevens & Co., lumber . . 20.48 

J. C. Kilburn, nails, etc. . . . 1.12 



$127.02 



Winter Expense. 
Pay-rolls $105.(37 



IIKniWAY DErAHTMENT. 123 

Potter Street District. 
General Repairs. 

Pciy-rolls $120.61 

Hnmphrey-Dod<>e Co., sliovels . . 3.05 

Gilbert Hibbard, grade . . . .70 

J. T. Batehelder, grade . . 2.90 

John T. Tenney, powder, etc. . . 3.2.5 

$130.51 



Winter Expense. 

Pay-rolls . . . . . $51.50 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., sliovels . . 1.70 



Egypt District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls $235.07 

N. P. Richardson, use of watering-trough 3.00 

S. A. Taylor, labor . . . 6.36 

Frank Green, posts, etc. . . . 1.00 

R. E. Philbrick, lumber . . . 15.12 





Bridges. 




Pay-rolls 


. 


18.20 


N. P. Richardson, 


^\•alI plates 


5.72 



^53.20 



Long- Pond North District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls . . . . . . . $69.03 

Winter Expense. 
Pay-rolls $40.86 



$260.55 



$13.92 



Winter P^xpense. 
Pay-rolls . $106.37 



124 CITY OF CONCOUD. 

Virgin District. 

Gknkkal Repairs. 
Pay-rolls S21.85 

WiNTEK Expense. 
Pav-rolls ..... . . $65.55 



Number Four District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls $396.01 

F. H. Cun-ier, oravel . . . 2.90 

T. Harrington, urade . . . 4.40 

$403.31 

Winter Expense. 
Pav-rolls $118.99 



Hot Hole Pond District. 

General Repairs. 
Pay-rolls $10.00 

Winter ICxpense. 
Pav-rolls $21.13 



Mountain District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls . $87.73 

WiNTEi; Expense. 

Pay-rolls $80.54 

F. P. Muzzey, use of field . . 10.00 

$90.54 



IlIGIIWAV DEPARTMENT. 125 

Mast Yard District. 
General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls $91.45 

Francis Runnells, use of watering-trough 3.00 

$94.45 

Winter Expense. 
Pay-rolls $12.00 



Horse Hill District. 

General Repairs. 
Pay-rolls $93.77 

Winter Expense. 
Pay-rolls $24.60 



Penacook Intervale District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls . . . . . . $68.23 

L. R. Hinds, posts, etc. . . . 9.15 

A. J. Smith, use of watering-trough . 3.00 



Hoit District. 

General Repairs. 

Pay-rolls $177.67 

Humphrey-Dotlge Co.. supplies . . 12.73 



}.6l 



Winter Expense. 
Pay-rolls $11.95 



$190.40 



12G 



CITY OF CONCOKI). 

Sanborn District. 
General Repairs. 



Pay-rolls . 

J. M. Grossman, repairs 

Thompson & Hoague, pipe 



860.50 
2.50 
4.08 



17.08 



Winter Expense. 



Pay-rolls 



Sll.OO 
$20,219.20 



CLEANING STREETS. 

. $5,500.00 



Appropriation .... 
Transferred from sidewalks and cross 

ings, repairs .... 
Transferred from permanent work 



Paid as follows : 



Central District. 



Pay-rolls, spring and fall cleaning 

" cleaning ci'ossings 

" cleaning streets with patro 

4;arts 

" burning paper 

" leveling ashes 

" collecting garbage 

" collecting paper at night 

'•' collecting ashes at night 

George A. Foster, assignee, sleds 
George Prescott, painting signs 
Huhiphrey-Dodge Co., supplies . 



101.18 
205.88 



^2, 102.85 
550.64 

597.46 

310.80 

261.36 

1,065.78 

160.20 

123.30 

40.00 

4.50 

9.15 



$5,807.06 



$5,226.04 



Millville District. 



Pav-rolls 



17.39 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Penacook District. 



Pay-roll^ 



Pay-rolls 



Pay-rolls . 



West Concord District. 



East Concord District. 



CATCH BASINS. 
Appropriation ...... 

Paid as follows : 

Central District. 

Cleaning Catch Basins. 

Pay-rolls ${ 

C. W. Clarke & Son, rubber boots 
Edson Manufacturing Co., pump dome . 
Stevens & Duncklee, sewer ladle . 



42.54 

12.00 

2.16 

1.00 



Repairing Catch Basins. 
Pay-rolls ....... $20.32 

Concord Foundry Co., traps, etc. . 28.80 



Building Catch Basins. 

Pay-rolls .... 
AVoodworth & Co., cement • 
Powell & Plummer, mason-work 
Concord Foundry Co.. catcli basin outfits 
D. W. White, cement 
Thompson & Hoague, pipe . 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., pipe 
Samuel Holt, brick 
Zeb F. Swain, brick . 



132.11 

16.20 

88.23 

146.30 

4.05 

35.54 

12.06 

50.75 

6.00 



127 



126.37 



$78.61 



$28.65 
$5,807.06 



$1,500.00 



$657.70 



$49.12 



$491.24 



12.S 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Millville District. 
Building Catch Basins. 



Pay-roll^ 



East Concord District. 
Cleaning Catch Basins. 



Pay-rolls 



Penacook District. 
Cleaning Catch Basin; 



Pay-rolls 



Building Catch Basins. 



Pay-rolls .... 
Foote, Bi'owij & Co., cement, etc 
F. E. AVilliams, mason work 
N. S. Gale & Co., pipe 
John E. Rines, brick 



Repairing Catch Basins. 



Pay-rolls .... 
Concord Foundry Co., traps, etc 



$0.53 

13.39 

.0.70 

4.12 

6.00 



50.67 
4.20 



"West Concord District. 
Cleaning Catch Basins. 



$11.66 



82.55 



$76.49 



5.74 



$4.87 



Pay-rolls 



;il. 66 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



129 



Building Catch Basins. 

Pay-rolls ...... 

Woodworth & Co., cement 

Concord Foundry Co., catch basin outfits 

Thompson & Hoague, pipe 



Balance transferred to general maintenance 



36.40 




1.35 




19.65 




3.77 


$61.17 


ce 


$1,402.20 

97.80 




$1,500.00 



Appropriation 
Paid as follows : 



PERMANENT WORK. 



Warren Street Macadam. 



$10,000.00 



Pay-rolls, excavating . 
" macadamizing 

" paving gutters 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 
Thompson & Hoague, supplies 
Page Belting Co., tallow 
Robert Crowley, coal 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs 
Concord Coal Co., coal 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil 
Amos Blanchard, oil, etc. 
J. M. & T. W. Stewart, stone 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete 



$1,053.89 

2,254.26 

47.19 

6.90 

7.63 

1.41 

1.80 

174.00 

4.35 

45.36 

10.48 

10.68 

22.00 

199.37 



5,839.32 



Pleasant Street Macadam. 



Pay-rolls, excavating . 

" macadamizing 

C. H. Martin & Co., oil 
Robert Crowley, coal 



$77.84 

116.97 

1.90 

24.00 



$220.71 



130 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



South State Street Macadam. 



Pay-rolls, excavating . 
' ' macadainizing 

" setting edgestone . 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 

C. H. Martin & Co., oil . 

Robert Crowley, coal . 



296.23 

856.64 

4.34 

.lo 

2.23 

27.00 



North Main Street Concrete. 



Pay-rolls, macadamizing for concr 

" setting edgestone . 

W. F. Carr, oil 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil . 
Robert Crowley, coal 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete 



ete 



J850.31 

2.70 

2.26 

2.00 

75.00 

904.09 



Repairs, Rumford Street Crusher. 

Pay-rolls $32.30 

S. R. Hood & Co., repairs . . 33.97 

Goodhue & Milton, repairs . . 14.18 
Farrel F'oiuidry and Machine Co., jaAV 

plates, etc. . . . . . 55.50 

Boston & Maine R. R. , freight . . 2.38 

Concord Foundry Co., jaw plates . 34.13 

Concord Machine Co., labor on jawplates 7.10 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies . . 6.90 



Repairs, Portable Crusher. 



Pay-rolls ..... 

Page Belting Co., belting 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight . 

Concord Foundry Co., jaw plates 

Concord Machine Co., labor on jaw plates 

E. H. Randall, repairs 

Climax Road Machine Co., repairs 



140.09 

1.09 

1.91 

42.53 

6.80 

24.21 

43.00 



81,186.59 



$1,836.36 



$186.46 



$259.63 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



131 



Repairs, Steam Roller. 



Pav-rolls 



General Repairs and Supplies. 

Pay-rolls $47.94 

" grading with stone chips on 

No. State street . . 175.76 

" repairs on macadam, No. State 

street . . . . 29.86 

Concord Water- Works, water . . 12.00 

Robert Crowley, coal . . . 48.00 

C. H. Martin & Co., oil . . . 3.25 

Morrill & Dantorth, insurance . . 15.00 

Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., lumber . . 1.60 

Humplirey-Dodge Co., supplies . . 22.02 

George L. Tlieobald, horse . . . 150.00 

Ames Plow Co., plow . . . 17.35 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight . . 1.19 

Robert J. Macquire, services '. . 23.35 

A. H. Britton & Co., hose, etc. . . 15.23 



Transferred to cleaning streets 
Transferred to general maintenance 
Balance on deposit 



§26.82 



$562.55 

58,118.44 
205.88 

1,475.61 
200.07 



$10,000.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 



Appropriation 
Paid as follows 



Central District. 
Concrete Walks. 



Pay-rolls ..... 
M. H. & H. H. Johnson, edgestone 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete . 



S251.98 

50.35 

419.61 



$2,000.00 



M21.94 



132 city of coxcord. 

Concrete Crossings. 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete .... 

Penacook District. 

Concrete Walks. 

Pay-rolls $305.80 

R. G. Sargent, gravel . . . 21.10 

S. G. Sanborn, bolts . . . 5.60 

D. Warren Fox, bolts . . . 1.82 

John Swenson, stone .... 77.00 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . . 13.11 

M. H. & H. H. Johnson, edgestone . 24.15 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete . . 623.25 



!79.77 



Concrete Crossings. 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete . 

West Concord District. 
Concrete Walks. 



$1,071.83 



$30.76 



Pay-rolls 

J. 11. Rowell & Co., concrete . 


$23.15 

26.76 


$49.91 




• 


Less amount received from abutters 


$1,954.21 
756.90 


Transferred to general maintenance 
Balance on deposit .... 


$1,197.31 

45.79 

756.90 




$2,000.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIRS. 
Appropriation ....... $2,000.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



133 



Paid as follows : 

Central District. 

Repaiuing Sidewalks. 

Pay-rolls $69.25 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete repairs . 1,320.90 



Repairing Crossings, 
J. H. Rowell & Co., coiKTCte repairs 

Transferred to cleaninsr streets 



SPRINKLING. 



Appropriation 

Balance on deposit from 1900 

Paid as follows : 

Pay-rolls, repairs sprinklers 
" repairs stand-pipes 

" sprinkling streets . 

Concord Water-AVorks, water 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 
D. Waldo White, grain 
C. H. Martin & Co., paint, etc 
Joseph S. Merrill, repairs . 
George D. Huntley, repairs 
Goodhue & Milton, repairs 
Samuel Eastman & Co., hose. 

Balance on deposit 



$312.12 

63.61 

3,709.80 

700.00 

1.30 

82.80 

139.75 

86.47 

3.25 

18.05 

153.54 

44.50 



,390.15 



S508.67 

$1,898.82 
101.18 

$2,000.00 



$5,500.00 
78.13 

$5,578.13 



i, 315. 19 
262.94 



$5,578.13 



CITY ENGINEER. 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



Office OF the City Engineer, 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1901. 
To the City Cotiiicil : 

In accordance with the ordinance creating this department, 
the ninth annual report is herewith submitted for your con- 
sideration, together with a statement of the amounts expended 
on sewer construction and i"epairs. 

The accommodations in the office for the safe storage of 
plans, note books and records, are entirely inadequate, and it 
is ricspectfully suggested that a large vault be provided in the 
new city building for this purpose. Plans and records 
increase from year to year, and will probably continue to 
increase more rapidly as the city increases in population. 

The work of this department has materially increased since 
its organization, but we have been able to carry it on with a 
small force. 

Work on the general survey of the city has been carried on 
as in the past, that is, when v\'e could spare the time for it 
from work under way. We have now completed the held 
work to the Loudon line on the Loudon road, with the 
exception of the Soucook river from Richardson's mill to the 
Davis bridge; also the territory lying between the Loudon 
road and tlie Mountain road, north of East Concord village 
and east of the Merrimack river above Sewall's Falls road. 



CITY ENGINEER. 135 

SEWERS. 

Comparatively little work has been done in the city pre- 
cinct, the Penacook precinct and the West Concord precinct. 
In the East Concord precinct nothing has been done, either 
in the line of extensions or repairs. 

The question of enlarging some of the sewers in the city 
precinct must receive your attention at some time in the near 
future. Heavy showers have flooded many premises, and in 
some localities ordinary rains have overloaded the sewers. 

No extraordinary repairs have been made upon the sewer 
system. The principal changes have been made on account 
of the Street Railway locations granted in Clinton street and 
in Hall street, but the greater portion of said changes have 
been borne by the Street Railway. 

A pipe should be laid on the westerly side of North State 
street from Calvary cemetery to the brook, crossing North 
State street near the main entrance to Blossom Hill cemetery, 
to provide an outlet for the surface water coming from the 
cemeteries and adjacent property. This would avoid ovei'- 
loading the sewer in the easterly side of the street. It woidd 
be much cheaper than conveying the water to the Merrimack 
river, for that woidd necessitate the relaying of the entire line 
in North State street from Penacook street to Calvary ceme- 
tery. When the upper end of this line was laid it was 
assumed that the surface water would be carried, as it had been 
in years past, into the brook above mentioned. The sewer as 
constructed will carry the flow of surface water on the east- 
erly side of the street, but it is not large enough — and was not 
intended — to drain the cemeteries and contiguous land on the 
westerl}- side of the street. 

A relief sewer has been built the past season from a point 
in North Main street just north of the junction of North Main 
and Warren streets sewers, into Depot street. This should 
relieve the Main street sewer of a portion of its overload in 
time of showers and avoid the flooding of basements north 
of this point. 



136 CITY OF CONCORD. 

There has been added the past season one new sewer pre- 
cinct, known as the St. Paul's School Sewerage precinct. 

The system in process of construction in this precinct is 
what is known as the "• separate system," and provides for 
the removal of house sewage only. No street or surface 
drainage can be connected with this system. The surface 
water can be easily disposed of in the natural channels with- 
out material damage to landowners. 

The work is done under contract, and not until after the 
contract was let and operations commenced was there any 
objection raised to this system, or, at least, nothing was said 
to this department. A system to provide for all sewage and 
surface drainage could have been easil}' designed at the start, 
but the cost would have been materially increased and the 
burden of the taxpayers, in this precinct, would have been 
much heavier. The entire work should be completed early 
next season. 

NEAV STREETS. 

One new street has been laid out ; four streets have been 
extended ; one street relaid, and two streets have been 
extended upon the condition that the landowners grade 
them, and put them in shape acceptable to the commissioner 
of highways. 

In the opinion of your engineer, it would be to the mutual 
advantage of the city and owners of land to have all new 
divisions of land plotted upon the city plans, and have pro- 
posed streets plotted with some regard to grades and inter- 
sections with existing streets. 

The employees of this department, the past season, have 
been: Frank W. Brown, principal assistant; P. M. Corry, 
transitman ; Edwanl J. Murphy, Harry C. Hill and C. 
Walker Brown, rodmen, who have rendered valuable assist- 
ance in their respective positions. 



CITY ENGINEER 



137 



The expenses of this department huve been as follows : 



Paid for salaries ..... 


. $2,575.67 


supplies ..... 


125.15 


car fares and livery 


251..S2 


repairs ...... 


16.95 


postage, express and incidentals 


6.45 


coal ...... 


77.33 


Total 


. $3,053.37 


Appropriation ...... 


. 3,000.00 


Overdrawn ...... 


$53.37 



Streets Laid Out. 

Ridge road, from its nortlierly terminus to Forest street extension. 

Stone street, from its westerly terminus to Bow street. 

Carter street. 

Eastman street, from Pillsbury street to Carter street. 

Kimball street, from Pillsbury street to Carter street. 

Merrimack avenue, Penacook. 

conditionally. 

Ridge road extension, north from Forest street extension. 
Forest street, from Auburn street to Ridge road extension. 

Grades Established. 

Easterly sidewalk, Dunklee street, from Allison street northerly 
55 feet. 

Northerly sidewalk, Allison street, from Dunklee street to Glen 
street. 

Westerly sidewalk, Dunklee street, from Pillsbury street south- 
erly 200 feet. 

Easterly sidewalk. North State street, from Ola Anderson's south- 
erly line to Stone bound No. 10. 

Westerly sidewalk, South Spring street, opposite the premises of 
F. P. Kellom. 

Westerly sidewalk. South Spring street, opposite the premises of 
M. T. Berry. 

Stone street. 



138 



CITY OF CONCOIM). 



Easterly sidewalk, Rollins street, from Washington street south- 
erly 138 feet. 

Southerly sidewalk, Merrimack street, Penacook, from Cross 
street to Penacook street. 

Hall street. 

Water street, from West street to Hall street. 

Ridge road extension. 

Northerly sidewalk. Forest street, from Valley street westerly 
100 feet. 

Kimball street extension. 

Eastman street extension. 

Carter street. 

Westerly sidewalk. South Spi'ing street, opposite No. 40. 

Southerly sidewalk. Beacon street, from Rumford street to Lyn- 
don street. 

Northerly sidewalk, Tremont street, from Lyndon street westerly 
146 feet. 

Grades Amended. 

Northerly sidewalk, Pillsbury street, from Broadway to South 

street. 
Soutlierly sidewalk, Pillsbury street, from BroadAvay to South 

street. 
Westerly sidewalk, South Main street, from Pillsbury street 

southerly 546 feet. 
Easterly and westerly sidewalks, Eastman street, from Pillsbury 

street to South street. 
Khnball sti-eet, from Allison street to Pillsbury street. 



Cost ok Sewek Wokk, 1!)01. 

rumford street, south from wymax street. 

101 feet of 8-iiich Akron pipe. 
Paid for labor 
pipe 
I cement . 

trucking 
oil 
tools 



$23 


.12 


10 


.35 


•J 


70 


1 


00 




55 


1 


50 



$48.22 



CITY ENGINEER. 



139 



Average cost per foot, $0,477. 
Material excavated, sand. 

HIGH STREET, SOUTH FROM CENTRE STREET. 



165 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe. 




Paid for labor ..... 


$119.48 


pipe 


44.67 


cement ..... 


;3.90 


trucking .... 


4.50 


oil 


.55 


tools ..... 


4.14 



Average cost per foot, $1,074. 

Material excavated, gravel and hard-pan. 



7.24 



NORTH MAIN STREET, RELIEF SEVS^ER, WARREN STREET TO DEPOT 

STREET. 



181 feet of 24-incli Akron 


pipe. 










Paid for labor . $391.39 


pipe 
brick 












202.27 
42.05 


cement . 












17.15 


castings . 












27.36 


wrought iron . 












2.38 


trucking 












28.25 


hardware 












2.20 


oil 












1.65 


concrete 












18.70 


jute 












5.50 


diaphragms 
tools 












4.00 
18.04 



Average cost per foot, $4,204. 
Material excavated, sand. 



$760.94 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





DOW SEWER. 








703 feet of 10-incli Akron pipe. 


aid for labor 


S313.01 


pipe 












164.16 


brick 












32.38 


cement . 












10.40 


castings . 












45.34 


trucking 












5.00 


blacksmitliing 












.96 


liardAvare 












1.50 


tools 












18.90 



Average cost per foot, $0,834. 

Material excavated, sand, clay and boulders. 



$586.65 



Eepaib 


s. 








Beacon ........ $2.83 


Centre .... 








2.65 


Soutli . . • . 








19.06 


Between South and Spring streets 








14.71 


Bradley .... 








18.95 


South End sewer 








52.27 


South State 








10.51 


Runitbrd .... 








9.44 


Walker .... 








10.00 


Warren .... 








61.83 


Trenioiit .... 








3.11 


J'ei-ry .... 








1.56 


Hall 








17.66 


Third Division Outlet . 








12.10 


Prospect .... 








75.06 


Bi'ook sewer 








37.46 


Downing .... 








6.11 





CITY 


ENGINEER. 


141 


Prison outlet ....... $37.50 


Clinton 




. 


57.36 


Highland 






.25 


Twenty-inch outlet 






13.70 


Spring 






23.30 


Pleasant 






1.89 


Capitol 






4.72 


Academy 






3.90 


Flushing 






291.62 



Total expenditure 



$789.55 



New Work. 



Rumford street 
High street . 
North Main street 
Dow sewer . 



Repairs 

Total expenditure 

Appropriation 
Amount expended 



Unexpended balance, December 31, 1901 



$48.22 
177.24 
760.94 
586.65 

$1,573.05 

789.55 

$2,362.60 

$3,000.00 
2,362.60 

$637.40 



8-inch pipe 
10-inch " 
24-inch " 



Sewers Built, 1901. 



101 feet. 

868 " 
181 " 



Total 



1,150 feet. 



142 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Sewers Built in City Prkcinct to December 31, 11)01. 



8-iiicli pipe 

10-inch " 

12-iii('li " 

15-iiK*li " 

18-iuch " 

20-inch " 

24-incli " 

30-inch " 

Brick, 12-inch x 14-inc 
16-inch X 24-inc 
14-inch X 22-inc 
20-inch x 32-inch 
24-inch x 36-inc 
28-inch x 48-inc 
24-inch circular 
30.inch " 
3'8-inch '<■ 

24-inch cast-iron pipe 

30-inch " " 



23,545 

47,172 

38,559 

11,040 

6,204 

4,549 

1,930 

969 

2,758 

1,848 

350 

2,527 

17,937 

883 

1,515.5 

402 
4,080 
1,576 
1,054.5 



feet. 



Total '. . 168,899 feet. 

Total miles in city precinct to date, 31.9884. 

West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

The amounts expended .in this precinct during the season .iire 
as follaws : 

CLARKE STREET. 



210 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe 

Paid for labor 

pipe . 

brick 

eastinss 



$73.14 
55.00 
17.00 

9.84 



CITY ENGINEER. 143 

Paid for tracking . • $9.50 

wrought iron ..... .70 

oil .83 



Total • . . $166.01 

Average cost per foot, $0,790. 
Material excavated, sand. 

Repairs. 

Repairs ........ $13.65 

Flushing 15.80 

New work ........ 166.01 



Total expenditure $195.46 

Balance on hand January 1, 1901 . . . $213.53 

Expenditure in 1901 ...... 195.46 



Balance on hand, December 31, 1901 . . $18.07 

East Concord Sewer Precinct. 

No money has been expended in this precinct for repairs or 
extensions during the past season. 

St. Paul's School Sewerage Precinct. 

Paid C. L. Fellows & Co. on contract . . . $4,564.50 

inspector ....... 255.00 

typewriting contract . . . . . 5.72 



Amount expended ..... $4,825.22 

Appropriation $6,000.00 

Amount expended ...... 4,825.22 



Unexpended balance, December 31, 1901 . $1,174.78 



144 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Laml damage to the amount of Si 50 was awai'ded James W. 
and Lymau H. Lane, but up to date said award lias not been 
accepted . 

There has been deposited to tlie credit of the city, for rent of 
pumps and sale of material, the sum of S43.57, for which amount 
I hold receipts of the city treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS. 



To the City Council: 

The second annual report of the board of examiners, cover- 
ing its action for the year 1901, is herewith submitted for 
your examination and considei-ation. 

The board for the first three months of the year consisted 
of D. E. Sullivan, M. D., chairman; W. B. Howe, clerk, 
and Patrick A. Clitibrd. 

On March 29, the new board organized as follows: 
Timothy Kenna, chairman; VV. B. Howe, clerk; Russell 
Wilkins, M. D. 

Under the city ordinance Dr. Wilkins became a member 
of this board as chairman of the board of health, and Mr. 
Kenna, a journeyman plumber, an appointment by the 
mayor, for the term of one year. 

The board have held twelve regular and ten special meet- 
ings during the year. Seven men have successfully passed 
the examination and been granted licenses as journeymen 
plumbers ; two have passed and been granted licenses as 
master plumbers, and two have failed to pass as journeymen. 
Your examiners would renew their recommendation of one 
year ago and respectfully request that a room be fitted up in 
the city building where the practical work can be done; the 
city engineer's office has not the necessary accommodations 
for this work, and it interferes with the work of that depart- 
ment. 

The total receipts of the board are $31.50, which amount 
has been deposited with the city treasurer and his receipts 
for the same are in the hands of the clerk of the board. 
There has been expended for supplies used in examinations 
$18.24. 

10 



146 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The following is a list of all the registered plumbers, given 
in the order in which they appear on the register : 



MASTER PLUMBERS. 

W. Arthur Bean, certificate renewed. 

Seth R. Hood, " 

Willis H. Robbins, " 

William A. Lee, " 

Benjamin H. Orr, " 

Richard J. Lee, " 

George A. Harwood, " 

Michael J. Lee, " 

Albert S. Trask, 

Edward H. Randall, " 

Frederick Booth, " 

G. Arthur Nichols, license renewed. 

Charles W. Bateman, examined and license issued. 

Timothy J. Fitzpatrick, examined and license issued. 



EMPLOYING PLUMBERS. 



George S. Milton, certificate renewed. 
M. E. Cliftbrd, " " 

Isaac Baty, " " 

Charles M. Downes, " " 



JOURNEYMEN PLUMBERS. 

William S. Button, license renewed. 
George N. Berry, certificate renewed. 
Charles H. Berry, " " 

Henry P. Cilley, " " 

Timothy Kenna, license renewed. 
Thomas Matthews, " " 

Philip King, certificate renewed. 
William L. Reagan, certificate renewed. 
William H. McGuire, " " 

Harry H. Kennedy, " " 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 147 

P. Harrison D. Leary, certificate renewed. 
Edward M. Batchelder, " " 

Patrick A. Clifford, " " 

Richard O'Brien, license renewed. 
Patrick J. Colbert, " " 

Frederick T. Converse, license renewed. 
Richard H. Lyna, certificate renewed. 
Edgar VV. Sanborn, license renewed. 
Michael J. Finn, " " 

Clarence A. Goodhue, certificate renewed. 
Joseph D. McLaughlin, license renewed. 
John Vogel, " " 

Michael Tierney, examined and license issued. 
Charles F. Bascom, " " " 

George W. AlcConnell, " " " 

Charles W. Hanson, " " " 

Joseph W. Buckley, " " '^ 

James F. Cribbins,- " " " 

making a total of forty-six names on the register, holding 
licenses and certificates issued during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TIMOTHY KENNA, 
W. B. HOWE, 
RUSSELL WILKIN S, 

Board of Exauiiners of Phimbers. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



To the City Coiincil: 

I herewith submit my annual report of the police depart- 
ment for the year 1901. 

1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 
Whole number of arrests (in- 
cluding Penacook) . . 697 720 649 876 876 958 467 547 673 
Whole number of arrests at 

Penacook . . . . 50 44 65 83 73 98 47 68 85 
Brought before the court . 560 628 617 720 698 752 375 452 592 
Discharged by the court . 2 17 4 8 2 20 2 1 1 39 

Discharged without being 

brought before the court .110 93 85 157 178 186 74 78 86 
Total amount received for 

fines and costs: 1891, ^3,- 

306.92; 1892, ^3,027.78; 

1893. $5. 352-19; 1894, $4,- 

396.60; 1895, ^6,418.92; 

1896, $5,874.16; 1897, ^7'- 

078.72; 1898, $7,174.82; 

1899, $1,601.24; 1900, $2,- 

006.97; 19°!' $2,167.13 . 
Whole number of lodgers (in- 
cluding Penacook) . . 936 1,166 908 854 1,099 i'345 1.089 968 1,200 
Whole number Of lodgers at 

Penacook . . . .170 251 201 158 316 460 356 325 460 

Number of doors found open 

and secured (including 

Penacook) . . .68 1S4 290 252 233 200 164 208 375 

Number of doors found open 

and secured at Penacook . 6 9 22 18 26 26 10 23 18 
Lost children returned to their 

parents . . . . 15 21 18 14 21 15 14 18 24 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



149 



Called to quell disturbances 
Stray teams found . 
Stray horses found 
Number times city ambulance 

required 
Number of duty calls rung in 

on police signal from Jan 

I to Dec. 31 
Abducting minor child . 
Adultery 

Assault .... 
Assault on officer . 
Assault with intent to kill 
Aggravated assault 
Breaking and entering . 
Bastardy 

Bigamy .... 
Buggery 
Common seller 
Common drunkard 
Concealing mortgaged prop 

erty .... 
Concealing boat 
Conspiracy to murder 
Cruelty to animals . 
Disturbing religious meeting 
Drunkenness (including Pen 

acook) ... 
Drunkenness at Penacook 
Embezzlement 
Escaped from House of Cor 

rection 
Evading railroad fare 
For out of town officers . 
Fornication . 
Gambling 

Idle and disorderly persons 
Insane .... 
Injury to personal property 
Injury to real estate 
Indecent talk 
Insulting conduct . 
Keeping dogs without a license 
Keeping disorderly house 
Keeping cider for sale . 



1893. 
61 



18 



14 



340 
35 



1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 

80 72 81 90 95 56 63 80 

16 12 7 3 6 63 6 

3 3 3 64 

28 31 49 59 52 57 72 93 



19,438 29,030 29,300 35,472 
I 

2 2 
19 16 17 19 15 21 29 16 
2 
I 
I I I I I I 

14 18 9 3 8 27 8 
352 I 3 21 

I I 

I 

526 

2 I 



365 378 488 425 507 244 275 276 
30 60 63 54 60 27 48 59 

2 

566166 
I 3 I 3 I 2 

2 I II 8 61 4 

6 

10 I 

117 5 15 22 J 

8 4 II 6 8 4 5 II 

I 2 

5 

3 I 

I 

10 96 2 4 26 2 

I 
I 



loO 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



1893. 
64 



1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 
53 77 54 69 



Keeping malt liquor for sale 
Keeping malt liquor for sale, 

second offense ... 45 

Keeping spirituous liquor for 

sale 47 33 57 49 60 

Keeping spirituous liquor for 

sale, second offense 
Keeping open Sunday . 
Larceny 

Larceny from person 
Malicious injury 
Murder * . . . 
Neglecting minor child . 
Non-payment of fare 
Non-payment of fine 
Obstructing sidewalk 
Obtaining goods under false 

pretences . 
Obtaining money under false 

pretences . 
Overdriving horse . 
Pickpockets . 
Peddling without license 
Rape .... 
Riding bicycle on sidewalk 
Riding bicycle in White pari 
Rude and disorderly conduct 14 
Runaway children . 

Safe keeping . . . 87 45 

.Selling cigarettes • 
Selling cider . 
Selling spirituous liquor 
Selling malt liquor 
Selling soda, Sunday 
Setting brush fire . 
Shooting birds 

Stealing . . . . 28 28 

Stubborn children ... 3 6 I 3 2 
Threatening children with 

pistol ..... 
Threatening to do bodily harm 
Throwing stones in White 

park ..... 
Tramps ..... 

* Murder committed in Boscawen. 



19 



1898. 
63 



51 



1899. 1900. 
20 12 



9 


5 


3 


4 


6 


7 


29 


10 


11 


89 


116 


105 

2 


2 


7 


10 


10 
3 



10 
I 



14 i: 



1901. 
22 



32 



56 
4 
5 
4 



24 
6 



3 

5 

2 

3 
2 
I 

2 
I 

5 
84 

I 

5 
I 

3 

I 

21 

2 

I 
I 

I 

4 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



151 



Trespass . . . . 

Vagrants . . . . 
Violation of sanitary ordinance 
Number arrests made by 

James E. Rand 

Daniel S. Flanders 

Fred M. Eaton 

Whitney D. Barrett 

James Kelley . 

John E. Gay . 

Charles W. Hall . 

Charles H. Rowe . 

John G. Putnam 

Samuel L. Batchelder 

Hoyt Robinson 

George N. Fellows . 

Christopher T. Wallace 
Assisting making arrests 

James E. Rand 

Daniel S. Flanders . 

Fred M. Eaton 

John E. Gay . 

Charles W. Hall . 

Whitney D. Barrett 

James Kelley . 

Charles H. Rowe . 

John G. Putnam 

Samuel L. Batchelder 

Hoyt Robinson 

George N. Fellows . 

Christopher T. Wallace 
Arrests made by special officers 
Special officers assisted in 
making arrests . 



1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 

I 

5 7 50 



88 144 135 157 155 30 31 29 

21 34 66 70 54 35 38 26 

69 49 48 24 I 14 4 I 

19 39 47 43 56 27 39 38 

II 25 40 30 54 17 32 32 

I 27 85 78 138 63 14 53 

I 20 39 63 67 40 78 29 

8 82 105 115 48 55 49 

62 90 32 16 3 

6 69 39 40 52 

39 82 

37 4 

. 81 

65 33 37 19 " i6 15 31 

42 53 34 57 24 24 44 77 

1 1 I 

3 29 21 19 31 30 17 21 

9 7 3 31 5 8 18 14 

754 9 2 54 13 

951 4 2 I 2 14 

2 24 45 31 28 40 91 

12 24 12 22 2 

6 23 14 12 

6 33 

7 6 
38 

38 50 34 20 54 31 21 35 



48 32 7 



26 12 7 45 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The organization of the police department at the present 
time is as follows : 



Police Commissioners. 
Josiah E. Dwight, Giles Wheeler, Myron J. Pratt. 

G. Scott Locke, city marshal Appointed June 30, iSSS 

James E. Rand, assistant marshal " April 16, 1S61 

Daniel S. Flanders, capt'n night watch '' Jan. 26, 1SS9 

Regular Police and Night Watchmen. 

Whitney D. Barrett, Penacook, Appointed Jan. 24, 1S93 



James Kelley, Penacook, 
Charles W. Hall, 
Charles H. Rowe, 
Samuel L. Batchelder, 
Hoyt Robinson, 
John E. Gay, 
Christopher T. Wallace, 



March 23, 1S93 
April 3, 1S94 
Dec. 10, 1S95 
Dec. 21, 1S97 
March 2S, 1900 
April 24, 1901 



Nov 



190 1 



Special Reserve Officers. 



O. H. Bean, 
Willie A. Little, 
George W. Cheslev, 
W. H. H. Patch, ' 
Alvin H. Urann, 
Harvey H. Oakes, 
George N. Fellows, 
Thomas P. Davis, 
Irving B. Robinson, 



George H. Silsby, captain. 

Charles E. Kellev, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
James Jepson, 
Fred C. Coates, 
Oliver J. Raymond, 
David J. O'Brien, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
David S. Rogers, 
Georare G. Allen. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 153 

I will renew my recommendation for a stable suitable for a 
horse, wagon, and ambulance. It can be built after the 
same architectural design as the police station for $i,ooo. 

The police signal service has proved to be very useful and 
satisfactory. The number of duty calls that have been rung in 
by police officers during the past year is 35,473, besides a large 
number of emergency calls. 

On account of the increased business at the south end there 
is a demand for an additional night officer, only one night 
officer being on duty south of Pleasant street at the present 
time. There is also a demand for an officer at the west end 
and at Fosterville, and I would most respectfully recommend 
that provision be made for the appointment of these additional 
police officers. 

In submitting my report, I desire to express my gratitude 
to the board of police commissioners, His Honor Mayor 
Harry G. vSargent, and the city council, for their considerate 
treatment of this department. Thanks are due Edmund S. 
Cook', city solicitor, for valuable assistance rendered. To all 
who have contributed to our success we extend our thanks. 
To the members of the force ni}' grateful acknowledgment 
andthanks are tendered for their efficiency and promptness in 
the discharge of their duties. 

RespectfuUv submitted, 

G. SCOTT LOCKE, 

City AlarsJial. 



REPORT OF CLERK OF POLICE COURT. 



To the City Cottncil: 

I herewith respectfully submit my annual report as clerk of 
the police court for the year ending December 31, 1901 : 

Number of civil cases entered, 82. 
Received entry fees in civil cases . . . $41.00 

Paid city treasurer . . . . . . 41.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY R. HOOD, 

Clerk of Police Court. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Council : 

I respectfully submit the following report for the year 1901 : 

At the beginning of the year I90i,at which time I was 
elected city solicitor, there were pending against the city of 
Concord the following suits: Edward E. Hodgman v. Con- 
cord ; Bertha E. Braley v. Concord ; Mary J, Gay, William 
H. Gay, and Walter Gay v. Concord; Mary A. Bullock v. 
Concord ; Lavina Arlin v. Concord ; Concord Street Railway 
V. Concord; Elvira B. Lane z^. Concord, and Augustus B. 
Hall V. Concord. 

During the year the suits in tavor of Edward E. Hodg- 
man, Bertha E. Braley, and Mary J. Gay et als. have been 
settled on my recommendation; the city paying a small sum 
as damages in each case. 

The suit of Mary J. Gay ct als. was entered at the Octo- 
ber term, 1S93, of the supreme court. It appears from the 
reports of your former solicitor, Mr. Sargent, that the plain- 
tiffs in this case took no steps for a number of years to bring 
it to a settlement. During the years 1S99 ^"^ 1900 nothing 
could be done in this case, as Mr. Martin, counsel for the 
plaintiffs, was mayor of the city. The damage claimed in 
this suit was on account of laying out and building the exten- 
sion of Glen street over land belonging to the plaintiffs. The 
city was clearly liable, the only question to determine being 
the extent of the damage. The amount of the damage was 
finally settled upon as $361.12, and this amount was paid in 
full settlement of the case including all costs. 

The suit of Edward E. Hodgman was entered at the Octo- 
ber term of the supreme court in 1S95. The damage claimed 
in this suit was on account of a change in the grade of North 



156 CITY OF CONCORD. 

State street which resulted in throwing surface water onto 
the hind of the phiiiitift', undermining the foundations of his 
buiUHngs. The amount of damages churned was $150.00. 
At the time this suit was brought the pLaintifi' was not the 
owner of the damaged premises, although he owned them at 
the time of the damage. Mr. vSargent, the former solicitor, 
raised the question of law that on these facts the plaintiti' 
could not maintain his suit. This question was decided 
adversely to the city by the supreme court. This decision of 
the supreme court rendered the city liable to the plaintiff' for 
the actual damage sustained by him. This suit would 
undoubtedly have been settled by the former solicitor only for 
the fact that Mr. Martin, counsel for the plaintiti', was elected 
mayor, and nothing could properly be done with reference to 
this matter during his term of office. This suit was settled 
by the payment of $100.00 as damages. 

The suit of Bertha E. Braley was brought in October, 
1S97, and was for the recovery of damages on account of the 
laying out of Jackson street over land belonging to the plain- 
tirt". The plaintirt'in this case took no steps to press it to a 
settlement prior to this year. At the April, 1901, term of 
the supreme court, the plaintiff being dead, an administrator 
appeared in court to prosecute this suit. He was very 
anxious to get a settlement of this case in order to be able to 
settle the estate of the plaintiff'. The city was clearly liable, 
and on my recommendation paid $150.00 in full settlement 
of this suit including all costs. 

The suit of Elvira B. Lane referred to in the last report of 
your former solicitor as being before the law term, at the time 
of making his report, was decided in favor of the city at the 
March term, 1901. At the April term of the supreme court 
judgment was entered for the city of Concord for costs. This 
judgment has been collected by me and paid over to the city 
treasurer. 

The cases of Mary A. Bullock and Lavina Arlin and the 
Concord Street Railway are still unsettled. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 157 

The suits of Mary A. Bullock and Lavina Arlin are for 
damages for land taken in widening and straightening North 
State street. These cases will either be settled before the 
next term of court, or tried and disposed of at that time. 

The case of Augustus B. Hall is for personal injuries 
received by the plaintiff^ while driving on Pleasant street, 
which the city was engaged in repairing. The amount 
claimed is $5,000.00. The plaintiff claims that the city was 
guilty of negligence in the managemenc of its road-roller, 
thereby frightening his horses, causing them to run away and 
resulting in the injuries complained of. This case came up 
for trial at the April term, 1901, of the superior court. I 
took the position that, even if the facts claimed by the plain- 
tifl'were true, the city was not liable as a matter of law. The 
plaintiff was non-suited on this ground. He took exceptions 
and the case was transfeiTed to the supreme court. The case 
was argued before the supreme court at the December term, 
1901, by counsel for the plaintitf'and by the solicitor for the 
city. The solicitor has also filed two briefs in this case. If 
the decision of the supreme court sustains the ruling of the 
judge in the court below, judgment will be entered for the 
citv. If the supreme court decides that the non-suit was 
improperly granted, the case will go back to the superior 
court for a trial on its merits. 

During the year two suits have been brought against the 
city. One by W. H. Perry claiming $2,000 damage on 
account of surface water being thrown onto his land and 
undermining the foundations of his buildings by reason of 
the construction of roads in the northern part of Blossom 
Hill cemetery. On mv recommendation this suit was settled 
for $200 in full for all damages.and costs. The actual damage 
to the property was greatly in excess of this amount and I 
think this settlement was very favorable to the city. The 
other suit was brought by Joseph Stickne\^ for an abatement 
of taxes. His claim is that his property is valued for the pur- 
pose of taxation largelv in excess of any other property in the 



158 CITY OF CONCORD. 

city. Some depositions have been taken by the plaintiff in 
this action, and it will probably come up for trial at the April 
term, 1903, of the superior court. 

During the year a large number of criminal complaints 
and warrants have been made in this office, and the solicitor 
has tried many criminal cases for the police department 
before the police court. 

The solicitor has given advice and assistance to the various 
departments of the city government and to committees and 
members of the city council. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDMUND S. COOK, 

City Solicito?'. 
December 31, 1901. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To his Honor the Mayor and City Council: 

In presenting the annual report of the Health Department, 
the board wishes to record the faithful work done by Mr. 
Palmer, our efficient sanitary officer. 

During the year the personnel of the board has been some- 
what changed, as Dr. Clark's term expired in April, and he 
declined a re-election ; Mr. Berry was elected to till the va- 
cancy. Shortly afterward Dr. D. E. Sullivan resigned and Dr. 
L. A. Sanders was selected to fill the unexpired term. The 
board organized with Dr. Wilkins as president and Mr. 
Berry as secretary. 

During the year there has been very little sickness from con- 
tagious diseases, as will be seen by reference to the detailed re- 
port of the sanitary officer. The total number of cases of diph- 
theria (65) seems large, but the general mildness of the cases can 
best be realized when we note that there were only four deaths 
from this cause. Undoubtedly the very mildness of these 
cases served to spread the disease. 

The state Laboratory of Hygiene which has been opened 
since our last report has been of great value to the city, and 
promises to be of even more value in the future. Principally 
for the accommodation of the legal profession Dr. Watson has 
made arrangements to keep the laboratory open to receive cul- 
tures as late as nine o'clock in the evening. So far as we 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

know no otlier laboratoi-}- does this, and often in case of diph- 
theria it means a saving of tvventv-four hours, when time is 
of inestimable value. 

The boanl has thought it wise to lay in a small stock of 
antitoxine to be used upon patients who are too poor to pur- 
chase it, and would otherwise be deprived of its use. We 
consider this a legitimate expense for the protection of the 
public health. Application for antitoxine should be made 
through the sanitary officer. 

Several complaints have been made to the board regarding 
the outlets of the West Concord sewer which empty near the 
old kit factory. This sewer shoukl either be continued to the 
river as originally intended, or some other means found for 
disposing of the sewage. We also recommend that a sewer 
be laid in Penacook street from Bradley west for a distance 
sufficient to care for all the houses on that street. 

INSPECTION OF MILK. 

Agreeably to the recommendation made in the last report 
of this board, the city has adopted the law governing the sale 
and inspection of milk, skimmed milk and cream. This law 
was adopted October 8, 1901. 

As with all new laws, it has taken some little time to com- 
plete arrangements for its perfect operation. 

There have been issued up to January i, 1903, 155 licenses. 
These were granted for a nine months' term, no license being 
issued for a shorter term than three months. 

As the law has been in operation now over three months, 
and has been thoroughly discussed, there is no reasonable excuse 
for non-compliance with the law ; and any person found sell- 
ing without a license will be given a chance to test the law in 
its various phases. 

There have been 54 inspections made. Of the above num- 
ber nine samples were rejected as not being good average 
samples of the milk in question. The 45 samples gave the 
following: result : 



SAXITAKY DEPARTMENT. 161 

Out of 45 samples, 43 for cream tested standard or better. 
Out of 45 samples, 33 for total solids tested standard or better. 
Out of 45 samples, four for solids exclusive of fat tested 
standard or better. 

As will be seen, only a few were up to the standard on 
solids exclusive of fat, while quite a number were below on 
total solids. 

In order to determine what the true standard of a man's 
herd might be, the board has offered to make tests of milk 
that any dealer might bring in, providing it was done in a 
systematic and conscientious manner. In this way, we have 
no doubt shown to many the true value of each cow, and 
given them an opportunity to improve their heid with a view 
to getting better milk. The board felt that by this co-opera- 
tion the standard could be brought up quicker and with bet- 
ter feeling for all concerned. 

The inspection has been confined mostly to determining 
the percentage of fat, the total solids and the solids exclusive 
of fat. A few tests have been made for antiseptics, but with 
negative results. Some cream has been examined ; no pre- 
servatives have been found, and the cream was of good gen- 
eral quality, but occasionally showed careless handling. 

A volume could be written on the handling of milk. We 
find that careless handling leads to the use of antiseptics, be- 
cause milk that has been stored in unclean cans, exposed to 
the air, will not keep for any length of time, and other means 
have to be resorted to in order to market the milk. 

That antiseptics have been used by the milk trade of Con- 
cord there is no doubt, though we believe there are none be- 
ing used to-day. To feel that a food product so universally 
used as milk, should be embalmed with a chemical or chem- 
icals, which should only be used by the chemist and under- 
taker, cannot fail to impress even the most thoughtless and 
ignorant ; and they should pause before making unjust criti- 
cisms on the importance of the law. 

Milk is one of the most important food products that come 
under public inspection. It is the chief diet of invalids and 
11 



162 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

infants, while those in health are dependent on it to a greater 
or less extent. 

It must be borne in mind that milk furnishes the best of soil 
for certain kinds of bacteria, and that tliese bacteria increase 
verv rapidly under the influence of heat and exposure to the 
air. Milk then, as generally taken care of, should be deliv- 
ered to the consumer as soon as possible after being taken 
from the cow. Cleanliness should be observed in every de- 
tail, from the milking and the washing of the cans to the icing 
after proper cooling of the milk. 

While the time has been short to expect great results from 
the present law, we feel sure that it has had a good moral 
influence. It takes time to arrange methods and to deter- 
mine facts. 

A systematic course will be followed in determining the 
most common oftences, and it is the intention of the board 
that such oflences shall receive their just punishment. 

We are indebted to a number of milk dealers for their co- 
operation and support of the law, and we here extend our 
thanks to them in behalf of good government and citizenship. 

SMALL-POX. 

On Thursday, September 26, 1901, the board was notified 
that a case of small-pox existed in the city. Though this 
came somewhat as a surprise, as these cases must, still it did 
not find us totally unprepared, as we had been anticipating 
such an occurrence since the Manchester epidemic in 1900. 
The detention hospital had been opened up and thoroughly 
dried and aired a few days previously, so that it was in con- 
dition for immediate use and the patient was at once moved 
there. As soon as the state board was notified, they turned 
the entire control of the situation over to the local board. All 
exposed persons, so far as known, w^ere immediately vacci- 
nated and kept under observation ; rooms and clothing that 
might be a source of further contagion were thoroughly fumi- 
gated. The patient was found to be very sick with confluent 
small-pox, said by competent authority to have been the first 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 163 

case of this severe variety since the Claremont epidemic of 
six years ago. This patient died ten days after being removed 
to the detention hospital. 

The question is not infrequently asked whether small-pox 
is really such a terrible disease or not, and whether the pic- 
ture is not often overdrawn? To any such it is sufficient to 
say that if they had ever seen a case of true variola unmodified 
by vaccination and witnessed the sufterings of the patient, 
they never would have asked that question. It is one of the 
most repulsive and loathsome diseases which human tiesh is 
heir to, and the horrors of it can neither be imagined nor 
described; one must be brought face to face with the condi- 
tions to fully realize what it means. 

Another frequent source of inquiry is whether vaccination 
really has much influence in modifying the disease. It is at 
present the only known means of preventing or modifying 
small-pox. That it does this is evidenced bv the piesent low 
mortality from a disease formerly so fatal. 

Fortunately recent fearful epidemics are rare, and the few 
(7) deaths within our own state from upwards of four hun- 
dred cases which have occurred since the first outbreak in 
May, 1900, bears striking evidence to the efficiency of vacci- 
nation, and especially is this true when we consider that so 
far as it has been possible to ascertain the facts in regard to 
the fatal cases all have been among those not protected by 
vaccination. It may be interesting to quote one or two illus- 
trations, showing the efficiency of thorough vaccination in 
eradicating the disease. A recent report in hygiene shows 
that in Russia the average nimiber of deaths due to small-pox 
from 1846 to 1874 was 24.45 per 100,000 population, and 
one year the rate reached 263.4 P^' 100,000 population. In 
1874 compulsory vaccination laws were passed and the death- 
rate from this disease at once dropped wonderfully as shown 
in the next ten years, which gave a mortality of only 1.51 per 
100,000 population, and in iSS6itwas only 0.49 per 100,000. 
Many similar cases could be cited, as, for instance, the recent 
report of the superior board of health of Porto Rico, in 



164 CITY OF CONCORD. 

which the following statement is made : " The average annual 
number of deaths from small-pox for the past ten years was 
621, the greatest number, 2,362, occurring in 1890, and the 
least, II, in 1893 ; in 1899 there were about 50 per cent, less 
deaths than in any of the three years preceding. This 
decrease was due to the general vaccination of the island, 
which was concluded June 30 of that year; 860,000 vaccina- 
tions were performed under the directions of the chief sur- 
geon of the department during the four months preceding this 
date. All the deaths reported in 1899 ^^'om small-pox, except 
one, occurred prior to the day on which the work was con- 
cluded. At the rate of 242 for the first six months the annual 
deaths would have been practically the same as in the pre- 
ceding three years. During the seven months covered by 
these statistics but one death has occurred from this cause. 

" Since the completion of the general vaccination of the 
island, June 30, 1899, there have occurred down to the pres- 
ent time, November 23, 1901, but three deaths from small- 
pox in Porto Rico, the average annual death-rate has been 
reduced from 621 to less than 1.5." 

To decry a prophylactic measure which has been proved 
so productive of good results, not onl}^ to the individual but 
to the community at large, would seem absurd. 

It was generally supposed that the pupils of our public 
schools were well protected by vaccination, but a careful 
investigation revealed the fact that many had never been vac- 
cinated at all, while others had a physician's certificate that 
they had complied with the law, themselves admitting that 
" it didn't take." All such were requested to get vaccinated 
at once. Altogether, upwards of eight hundred pupils were 
ordered to be vaccinated, this besides those attending private 
and parochial schools, of whom the same requirements were 
made. Certificates have been issued to all those presenting 
satisfiictory evidence of having been successfully vaccinated. 
Such evidence may be either a satisfactory scar or a certifi- 
cate properly endorsed by a licensed physician. A duplicate 
of the same is kept on file and all pupils are required to 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 165 

present to the teacher before enroUment such certificate, which 
bears the seal of the health department. This uniformity in 
certificates will be of great assistance to teachers, besides 
relieving them of the responsibility of deciding whether cer- 
tain certificates are valid or not. All this has necessitated 
considerable expenditure of time and money at the outset, 
but we believe it will prove to be a wise investment. 

This board would earnestly recommend that the board of 
education require of our teachers what the law requires of 
our pupils. 

In conclusion, we desire to express to the mavor, members 
of the city government, and to the sanitary officer our 
appreciation of their courtesy and support during the past 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUSSELL WILKINS, M. D. 
L. A. SANDERS, M. D. 
GEO. A. BERRY. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit the following 
report relative to the operations of this branch of the depart- 
ment, and the condition of the public health during the year 
ending December 31, 1901. 

MORTALITY. 

The total number of deaths reported during the year was 
353, a decrease of 41 in the number as compared with last 
year, representing an annual death-rate of 13. n per thousand 
population, this does not include the non-resident mortality 
in the hospitals and public institutions of the city ; full infor- 
mation as to the number of deaths which occurred each 
month with reference to sex, disease, and age appears in the 
appendix. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

Happily the city has escaped all forms of epidemic during 
the year, the diseases that are more or less contagious having 
been broadly scattered and mild in character. Every possi- 
ble effort has been make to carry out the quarantine rules 
and regulations, and in no instance have I known of the 
disease being spread after having been reported and the 
house placarded, and isolation ordered. 

The following table contains the whole number of cases, 
and the deaths resultingr therefrom: 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



167 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


pox. Measles. 


MONTHS. 


CO 

a 
O 


CO 

Is 


to 

4) 

O 


52 


P 
o 




to 

O 


CO 


03 

a) 

CO 
C8 

O 


Q 


January 


3 




1 

2 
1 

1 












1 






1 




, 








5 

7 
7 
7 
6 
1 ' 


1 








1 




'April 

May 
















1 








« 






1 
















Jiilv 


















August 

September. . 




1 

1 


















2. 

2 

6 

1 


1 
2 


1 










5 

3 

21 


1 

1 


1 






November 


4 




8 
30 
















1 










Totals 


65 


4 


H 




13 


3 


1 


1 


40 





REPORT OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 



Wards. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Totals. 


Diphtheria 

Scarlet fever . . 


6 
6 
3 




2 


19 


2 
1 

1 
29 


25 
2 
2 


11 
1 

1 


2 




65 
11 


Typhoid fever . 






4 


1 


9 


21 


Small-pox 






1 


Measles 


2 




1 


5 


2 




• 1 




40 







168 



CITY OF CONCOUD. 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom, for the 
years since and including 1890: 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals. 


YEARS. 


CO 




■^ 
a 




CO 

CS 



cr. 

H 
Q 


03 



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a 

0; 

Q 


0) 




Q 


CO 




CO 


03 




00 


1890 


6 
12 
13 
48 
17 
55 
38 
13 
4 
9 
29 
65 


3 
3 

3 

8 

8 

1 

5 
5 
4 


9 

7 
37 
41 
113 

4 
44 
22 

8 
99 
39 
11 


3 

6 

8 
1 

1 


17 
14 

7 
13 
13 
15 
21 
17 

8 
14 
18 
13 


5 
6 

1 

3 
5 
3 

4 
1 
1 
3 


6 

2 
300 

21 
452 
158 
138 
120 
299 
476 

40 








38 
35 
59 
402 
164 
526 
261 
190 
146 
421 
562 
130 


7 


1891 

180'' 








9 










1893 

1894 
















n 


1895 








13 


1896 








19 


1897 








4 


1898 

1899 

1900 








4 

7 


1 


1 


1 


7 


1901 


8 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



169 



Disinfection. 

Formaldehyde lias been generally accepted as the most 
potent of disinfecting agents, and is used almost exclusively 
for this purpose by the department. 

An increased demand has been made upon the department 
for fumigation of houses in which cases of infectious diseases 
have existed. 

Other methods of disinfection are faulty, but our experi- 
ence with formaldehyde shows it to be a most effective agent, 
in that no case of infectious disease has followed where thor- 
ough fumisration with this gas has been instituted. 



Nuisances, Complaints, and Inspections. 

A statement of the number and character of the nuisances 
which have been abated by this department during the year 
appears below : 



Accumulation of decayed fruit and coal ashes 

Bad sink drainage 

Broken sewer traps 

Catch basins not trapped 

Dead animals 

Decayed meat and fish 

Defect in house sewer 

Dumping rubbish 

Dropping manure in the streets 

Defective plumbing 

Filthy stables 

Filthy cellars 

Filthy swill barrels 

Filthy yards 

Filthy alleyways 

Foul and offensive cesspools 

Keeping hogs 

Keeping hens 

Offensive manure heaps 



63 

30 

30 

41 

17 
II 

34 
26 

4 
19 

13 
23 

6 
18 

9 

5 
16 

1 3 

H 



170 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Offensive privy vaults 

Offensive odor in house 

Privy vaults full . 

Private sewers obstructed 

vSinks found without traps . 

Sewer gas in house 

Sewerage backed into cellars 

Street sewers obstructed 

Sewers not properly ventilated 

Surface sink drains 

Throwing swill in alleyways 

Throwing ashes in street 

Throwing slops in street 

Water closets without water supply 

Water closets foul and offensive 

Water closets not ventilated 

Total .... 



II 
31 
34 
18 

9 
6 

16 

8 

23 

4 

2 

13 
I 

12 

5 



590 



HOUSE INSPECTION. 



House inspection has been continuetl as time would permit. 
The following table will give the amount of work done in this 
dii'ection : 



Dwelling houses inspected . 
Tenement houses inspected 
Stores inspected 
Stables inspected 
Meat and fish markets inspected 
Schoolhouses inspected 
Business blocks inspected 
Alleyways inspected . 
Inspections of Penacook Lake 
Inspections of reservoir 



97 

513 

iS 

24 

3 

15 

9 

13 

12 

9 



Total 



413 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



171 



SEWER INSPECTION. 

In compliance with the city ordinance I have endeavored 
to perform my duty in regard to the enforcement of the rules 
and regulations relative to sewers and drains. In all cases, 
so far as known, I have personally inspected the connections 
made and work completed. 

A complete record has been made and filed of the fifty-one 
sewers, giving location of inlet, size and kind of pipe used, 
rate of fall per foot, total length, and name of drain-layer 
doing: the work. 



INSPECTION OF PLUMBING. 

The number of inspections made during the year will be 
found in the table below, and it gives me pleasure to state 
that with few exceptions, harmony exists all along the line. 
The plumbers, like all other craftsmen, come across condi- 
tions in their profession which no law seems to properly 
•cover, and often the plumber and myself have to reasonably 
agree how the work can best be done to keep the spirit of the 
the citv ordinance. I find the plumbers willing to assist in 
maintaining law, only once have I been called upon to 
prosecute a case. 



Plumbing permits granted 

Water closets put in 

Bath tubs put in . 

Urinals put in 

Wash trays put in 

Sinks put in 

Shower baths 

Wash-bowls put in 

Number sewers . 

Total number of inspections of plumb 



1 86 

237 
S8 

24 

139 

33 

114 

51 
433 



172 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SUMMARY. 

Houses placarded incases of contagious diseases . 117 

Placards removed ....... 108 

Visits made to contagious diseases .... 763 

Rooms fumigated ....... 470 

Pieces of bedding and clothing burned . . . 206 

Churches and schoolhouses fumigated ... 6 

Burial permits issued . . . . . . 352 

Burial permits issued to non-residents ... 59 

Transfer permits issued . . . . . . 124 

Garbage licenses issued '. . . . . . 52 

Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to state 

board of health ....... 48 

Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to 

U. S. Marine Hospital Service, Washington, D. C. 52 
Number of monthly mortuary reports sent in exchange 

to other cities ....... i,300 

Number of certificates issued for children to return 

to school ........ 76 



Thanking the members of the board for their uniform 
courtesv and consideration. 



I am very respectfully, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

SariUary Officer. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



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FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Hoitorable Mayoi' arid City Cojcncil : 

I herewith submit for your consideration the following 
report of the Fire Department for the year 1901 : 

The department responded to forty-six (46) bell alarms and 
one hundred and fifteen (115) still alarms. 

In addition, four (4) fires occurred for which no alarms were 
given. 

Still alarms. No alarms. 
105 I 

9 2 

I I 



Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 
East Concord, 



Bell alarms. 

I 
I 



Total. 
147 

H 
3 
I 



^65 



Buildiugs. 



Value. 



SUMMARY. 

Loss. Insurance. 



Ins. paid. Net Loss. 



Precinct, $166,770.00 $3,667.04 $92,190.00 

Penacook, 16,600.00 151..35 9,900.00 

E. Concord, 1,500.00 1,.500.00 1,000.00 

W. Concord, 1,600.00 3.5.00 1,300.00 



^3,627.04 
51.35 

1 ,000.00 
35.00 



$40.00 
100.00 
500.00 



$186,470.00 $5,3.53.39 $104,390.00 $4,713.39 $640.00 



Total, 

Contents. 
Precinct, $124,820.00 $27,084.06 
Penacook, 201,8.50.00 1,505.00 
E. Concord, 600.00 600.00 

W. Concord, 300.00 8.95 



$57,4.50.46 
168,400.00 

3.00,00 



15,270.88 $11,813.18 
914.25 590.75 
600.00 

8.95 



Total, $327,570.00 $29,198.01 $226,150.46 $16,194.08 $13,003.93 
Buildings, 186,470.00 5,353.39 104,390.00 4,713.39 640.00 

buildings and 

contents, $514,040.00 $34,551.40 $330,-540.46 $20,907.47 $13,643.93 



184 CITV OF CONCORD. 

Although the number of alarms exceeded all previous rec- 
ords, in but one instance did the fire assume threatening pro- 
portions. 

In view of the immense amount of propert}- destroved 
throughout the countiT during the year, the citv can be 
regarded in no other light than extremely fortunate at being 
called upon to contribute so little to the national ash heap. 

The apparatus is in good condition. Except in the case of 
" Kearsarge " steamer, which was provided with a set of new 
flues, repairs have been of a minor nature. 

The heating apparatus at the Old Fort station was removed 
during the year to the Good Will station, and new heating 
apparatus was installed at the former. 

This change yielded all the results sought for, and settled 
the heating problem as far as these two buildings are con- 
cerned for some time to conie. 

The heating apparatus at the Central fire station has been 
in use for a quarter of a century. 

Some of the boiler sheets are in an unsatisfactory condition, 
and I respectfully recommend that new heating apparatus be 
provided during the coming year for this building. Two 
thousand feet of hose were relined during the year. The 
abnormal advance in the price of grain and the excessive fall 
of snow during December, with the attendant expenditures 
for extra horses and breaking out hydrants, prevented the pur- 
chase of hose recommended in the last report. 

I would, therefore, respectfully renew the recommendation 
that five hundred feet of fire hose be purchased. No horses 
were purchased during the year. 

The}' are at present in good condition, but as two of them 
have grown old in the service, it would, in niy opinion, be 
wise to provide for the purchase of one pair. 

Nothing has occurredduring the year to weaken my belief, 
as expressed in former reports, that the horses should be 
behind the apparatus. On the contrary, horses have fallen 
in taking their placets, and every occurrence of that nature 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 185 

tends to strengthen the belief that the hazard run is out of 
comparison with the amount involved in the remedy. 

A glance in that direction will show that the south end of 
the city is rapidly growing away from the extreme southerly 
fire station. Undoubtedly at no distant day the problem of 
better fire protection for that locality will have to be solved. 

The department is in need of from four to five dozen canvas 
service coats, and I respectfully recommend the purchase of 
the same. 

I would also respectfully recommend the purchase of at 
least four Eastman perfection holders. 

The fire alarm telegraph system is in good condition. 

Twenty-one new movements of the latest and most 
improved pattern were placed in old boxes, and one new box 
was purchased during the year. New wire has replaced 
old wherever found necessary. 

The storage battery system was installed in December, 
1S96, and it was thought at that time that the life of the ele- 
ments would extend for two years. 

They have been in use for more than five years, and 
although they appear to be in good condition at -present, the 
time cannot be far distant when they will have to give way to 
new. It would be wise, therefore, in my opinion, to provide 
for the purchase of a new set. 

The change from the gravity to the storage battery system 
has resulted not only in obtaining better service than it is pos- 
sible to exact from the old S3'stem but in saving to the city 
double the cost of the change. 

A few sections of the city still exist which could be better 
protected by the installation of signal boxes, and I respect- 
fully recommend the purchase of two such boxes during the 
coming year. 

During the month of August I had the honor to attend as 
a delegate the convention of the International Association of 
Fire Engineers held at Indianapolis, Ind. It was a largely 
attended and instructive convention, a report of which was 
rendered at that time. 



186 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In conclusion, I wish to assure your honorable body that it 
has been the aim of the committee and the undersigned to 
confine the expenditures within the bounds of the appropria- 
tion. 

That success crowned the effort by a very narrow margin 
is made apparent by the table of disbursements appearing 
with other data in this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 187 

EXPP^NDITURES. 



Disbursements. 




Appropriation. 


Permanent men, 


$6,803.60 


$21,968.00 


Vacations, 


168.00 




Rent Veterans' Asso., 


150.00 




Call men, 


6,945.00 




Forage, 


1,375.94 




Fuel, 


724.04 




Lights, 


445.86 




Incidentals, 


2,892.22 




Horseshoeing, 


279.95 




Horse hire, 


551.39 




Washing, 


60.50 




Fire alarm, 


1,382.76 




Supplies chemical engine. 


30.87 




Hose, 


41.20 • 




Water, 


116.50 


$21,967.83 







Balance unexpended, $0.17 

ALARMS. 

Precinct. 

Still. January 2, 9.40 p. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
Charles A. Herbert, 103 North State street. Extinguished by 
Cliemical company. No loss. 

Box 5. January 3. 2.58 a. m. Fire in building owned by 
B. & M. R. R., and occupied by the general yard master. Cause 
unknown ; 2,250 feet hose wet. Recall, 3.43 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,000.00 


$110.80 


$1,200.00 


$110.80 


Contents, 


300.00 


58.58 


None. 


None. 



Still. January 3, 3.25 a. m. Chemical engine company 
which had been dismissed at preceding fire recalled. 

Still. January 3, 7.15 a. .m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Arthur Batchelder, 27 Franklin street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 



188 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 4, 6.42 r. m. Fire in rubbish in crema- 
tory on Bridge street. Extinguished by Chemical company. No 
loss. 

Still. January 5, 12.54 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of David Berryman, 17 West street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 4.50 p. M. Chimney fire in residence of 
D. J. Donovan, 105 South Main street. Extinguished by mem- 
bers of Good Will Hose company. No loss. 

Still. January 7, 9. IS a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Miss Emily P. Heath, 27 South Spring street, p^xtinguished by 
Cliemical company. 





Vahie. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


^2,500.00 


$6.32 


$1,700.00 


$6.32 


Contents, 


$1,000.00 


4.00 


400.00 


4.00 



Box 5. January 7, 7.37 p. m. Fire in freight car owned by 
Eastman Heater company in railroad yard. Caused by defective 
heater. 800 feet hose wet Recall, 7.44 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Car, $190.00 $190.00 $190.00 $190.00 

Still. January 8, 11.25 a. m. Fire in United Bank Build- 
ing. North Main street, in room occupied by Sanford's tailoring 
establishment. Caused by naptha which employee was using 
igniting. Extinguished by occupants before arrival of firemen. 
Chemical company responded. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 5.49 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
P. A. Murphy, 106 North State street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Still. January 15, 3.21 p. m. Chimney iire in residence of 
Lando J. Morrill, 78 Franklin street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Box 9. January 18, 5.42 p. u. Chimney fire in residence 
of Michael Ahern, 280 North State street. Needless alarm. 
Apparatus, with tlie exception of ladder truck, dismissed upon 
arrival, and still alarm sent in calling Chemical engine company. 
Extinguished by Hook and Ladder and Chemical companies. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 189 

Value. Loss. Iiisiirauce. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $10.00 $2,000.00 $10.00 

Still. January 18, 6.06 p. m. See preceding fire. 

Still. January 18, 6.37 p. m. Fire in residence of John 
M. Mitchell, 57 Rumford street. Chemical engine company 
being absent on still alarm, Kearsarge company responded. See 
'following fire. 

Box 18. January 18, 6.38 p. m. Alarm given for preceding 
fire. Caused by overheated furnace pipe. 1,450 feet hose wet. 
Recall, 7.45 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$10,000.00 


$483.00 


$4,000.00 


$483.00 


Contents, 


4,000.00 


413.50 


1,000.00 


413.50 



Still. January 19, 5.06 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. A. Strickland, 101 South Main street. Extinguished by 
Chemical company. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 8.44 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. Mary F. Drew, 12 Park street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 8.52 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
F. S. Ford, 25 Jackson street. Extinguished by members of 
Alert Hose company. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 8.54 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John Prouse, 56 High sti'eet. Extinguished by members of 
Eagle company. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 11.17 p. ii. Chimney fire in Exchange 
Block, North Main street. Extinguished by Chemical company. 
No loss. 

Still. January 30, 4.31 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Joseph F. Turgeon, 3 Major's court. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. January 31, 12.56 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dr. E. A. Clark, 35 Pleasant street. Extinguished by 
Chemical company. No loss. 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. Februarv 5, G.Ol p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. William Wri<;lit, 20 Clinton street. Extinjiuished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 5, 8.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
George H. Kenney, South Pembroke street. Extinguished by 
members of Eagle and Good Will companies. No loss. 

Box 14. February 7, 6.19 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Louis Twombly, 28 Walker street. Needless alarm. Extin- ■ 
guished by Chemical company. Recall, 6.28 A. m. No loss. 

Still. February 7, 5.19 p. m. Chimney fire 136 Stickney 
Block, North Main street. Extinguished by Chemical company. 
No loss. 

Still. February 11, 9.43 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George F. Underbill, 7 Merrimack street. Extinguished by 
Chemical company. No loss. 

Still. February 18, 7.18 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. O. A. Robertson, 45 West street. Extinguished by 
Chemical company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $12.00 $800.00 $12.00 

Still. February 20, 9.52 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. H. Packard, 53 South Spring street. Extinguished by 
Chemical company. No loss. 

Box 18. February 23, 9.35 A. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. C. Kerslake, 108 Ruraford street. Extinguished 
by Chemical company. Needless alarm. Recall, 9.50 a. m. 
No loss. 

Box 35. February 23, 10,16 a. m. Fire in Smith's block, 
North Main street, owned by Hon. John B, Smith and occupied 
by A, P, Fitch, drugs; J, C. Derby, silverware; F, E, Col- 
burn, restaurant; E. W. & E. A. Rowe, dental parlors; Roby 
& Knowles, bankers ; C. N. Hall, law ofiice ; F. E. Nelson, 
storage; E. L. Glick, school; and Ida McAfee, residence. 
Fire originated in basement of drug store. Cause miknown, 
4,200 feet hose Avet. Recall, 12.57 p. m. 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 191 





Value. 


Less. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


S65,000.00 


^1,901.32 


$30,000.00 


$1,901.32 


Contents : 










A. P. Fitch, 


35,000.00 


25,000.00 


13,500.00 


13,500.00 


J. C. Derby, 


15,000.00 


25.00 


5,500.00 


25.00 


C. N. Hall, 


1.000.00 


50.00 


500.00 


50.00 


Ida McAfee, 


1,000.00 


50.00 


500.00 


50.00 


E. A. Rowe, 


1,000.00 


25.00 


None. 


None. 


F. E. Nelson. 


200.00 


25.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. February 23, 11.46 a. m. A call for the Chemical 
engine company, which had been dismissed at the beginning of 
the preceding fire, to return. 

Still. February 27, 11.40 A. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. W. Colby, 71 Downing street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 11.49 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
George Prentiss, 21 Beacon street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 2.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. A. Lindsay, 62 South street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. March 8, 9.53 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John H. Couch, 8 Essex street. Chemical company responded, 
but no assistance Avas required. No loss. 

Still. March 11, 1.12 p. m. Fire in house in rear of 101 
South State street, owned by Walter Sargent. Caused by water 
running into cellar and coming in contact with lime stored 
therein. Building in course of construction. Chemical engine 
company responded. 

Still. March 11, 1.17 p. m. Same fire as one preceding. 
Chief's buggy with pony extinguisher responded. 

Box 52. March 11, 1.23 p. m. Same fire as one preceding. 
2,700 feet hose Avet. Recall, 1.39 p. M. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $600.00 $5.00 $500.00 $5.00 



192 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 52. March 12, 9.35 a. m. Cliimuey fire in residence 
9 Allison street, owned by E. B. Hutchinson and occupied by 
Otis T. Burnham. 500 feet hose wet, but no water used in the 
building. Extinguished by Chemical company. Recall, 9.39 
A. M. No loss. 

Still. March 18, 8.01 a. m. Fire in Holt Bros.' manufac- 
turing establishment 159-165 South Main street. Chemical 
engine company responded. See alarm from box 52 same date. 

Box 52. March 18, 8.10 A. m. Alarm given for preceding 
fire. Originated in engine-room. Cause unknown. 1,750 feet 
hose wet. Recall, 8.36 A. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $10,000.00 ^95.00 $5,000.00 $95.00 

Contents, 15,000.00 351.73 10,000.00 351.73 

Box 32. March 18, 8.33 v. m. Fire in residence 25 Pine 
street, owned by Mrs. Honor Clough and occupied by R. T. 
Emery. Caused by overheated stove. 1,300 feet hose wet. 
Recall, 9 r. m. Sixty-eight dollars in bank bills destroyed, 
which accounts for net loss on contents. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $116.20 $2,000.00 $116.20 

Contents, 700.00 255.37 500.00 187.37 

Still. March 20, 8.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. E. Pronk, 11 Elm street. Extinguished by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. March 22, 8.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. L. Gibbs, 5 Blake street. ^Extinguished by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. March 23, 1.54 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
P. H. Lakeman, 39 Fayette street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. March 23d, 2.27 v. m. Chimney fire in residence 
33 Laurel street, owned and occupied by Mrs. T. C. Clough. 
Extinguished by Chemical company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,200.00 $8.74 $900.00 $8.74 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 193 

Still. March 25, 6.03 p. m. Chimney tire in Nardini's 
restaurant, 7 Pleasant street extension. Extinguished by chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Box 12. March 27, 12.39 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Mary Ritchie, 201 North State street. Extinguished 
by occupants without assistance from the department. Recall, 
12.47 p. M. No loss. 

Still. April 1, 10.27 a. m. Grass tire in rear of 198 
North State street. Chemical company responded, but no assist- 
ance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 3, 7.13 p. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
George Oakley, 42 Bradley street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Box 5. April 4, 1.00 a. m. Fire in freight car hi B. & M. 
railroad yard. Cause unknown. 2,000 feet hose wet. Recall, 
1.16 A. M. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Car, $150.00 ' $150.00 $150.00 $150.00 

Still. April 10, 7.20 p. m. Chinmey fire in residence of 
Isaac Andrew Hill, 48 Pleasant street. Chemical company 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 13, 11.12 a. m. Brush fire in Bradley pasture, 
Penacook street. Extinguished by Chemical company. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 13, 12.11 p. m. Brush fire on Plains, near 
buildings of Fleming Mozee. Extinguished by neighbors before 
arrival of firemen. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 14, 1.12 p. m. Brush fire on Long Pond road. 
Extinguished by detail from the department. No loss. 

Still. April 14, 2.55 p. m. Brush fire on Penacook street, 
near the Perkins biiildings. Extinguished by Chemical company. 
No loss. 

Still. April 14, 6.07 p. m. Brush fire on Gully Hill. 
Chief's buggy with two men and pony extinguishers sent. No 
loss. 

4-4-4. April 14, 7.34 p. M. Brush fire on Rumford street, 
near stone crusher. Extinguished by detail from the department. 
No loss. 

13 



194 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Still, April 14, 8.01 p. m. Brush fire on Gully Hill, near 
the Cass blacksmith .shop. Extinguished by Chemical company. 
No loss. 

Still. April 18, 10.12 p. m. Brush tire on Auburn street, 
near head of Franklin. Extinguished by Chemical company. 
No loss. 

Still. April 19, 12.31 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
T. Clancey, 143 North State street. Chemical company 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

4--4-4. April 28, 4.12 p. m. Brush fire on Long Pond road, 
near property of .John Jordan. Extinguished by detail from the 
department. Five hours' labor. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 5.17 p.m. Brusli fire on Long Pond road. 
Chief's buggy, two men with pony extinguishers sent. No loss. 

Still. April 29, 1.32 p. m. Brush fire on Long Pond road. 
Chief's buggy, two men with pony extinguishei-s sent. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 29, 3.48 p. m. Brush fire on Long Pond road. 
Extinguished by detail from the department. Three hours' labor. 
No loss. 

Still. May 3, 8.37 a. m. Chimney fire in Stickney Block, 
13G North Main street. P^xtinguished by Chemical company. 
No loss. 

Still. May 4, 9.07 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. John C. Blake, 49 Thompson street. ^Extinguished by 
Chemical company. No loss. 

Still. May 16, 8.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Charles Quaid, Currier Block, 18 North Main street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical company. No loss. 

Still. May 18, 9.36 p. m. Fire in residence 236 North 
Main street, owned by the estate of Mrs. John B. Abbott, and 
occupied by heirs of said estate. Caused by defective fireplace. 
Alarm responded to by detail from Alert Hose company with pony 
extinguishers. See next alarm. 

Still. May 18, 9.48 p. m. A call for assistance from the 
detail operating at tlie scene of preceding fire. Chemical com- 
pany responded. 



FIRE DEPAKTMENT. 195 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, |2,000.00 $78.00 $1,000.00 ST'S.OO 

Still. May 19, 2.22 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. E. Garland, 22 Ferry street. ^Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. May 27, 10.37 a. m. Cliimney fire in residence of 
John Maguire, 1 Summer street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. June 11, 5.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. E. French, 25 Jackson street. Extinguished by members of 
Alert Hose company. No loss. 

Still. June 13, 11.42 a. ji. Chimney fire in residence ot 
Joseph Audet, 38 North Fruit street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. June 16, 1.00 p. si. Brush fire on blutf south of 
Free Bridge road. Buildings being in danger. Chemical company 
sent to the scene. 

4-4-4. June 16, 1.02 p. ii. Brush fire in same locality as 
preceding fire. Detail from the department sent. Small barn 
owned by H. C. Stevens & Co., destroyed, with a small quantity 
of hay, parts of harness, etc. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$30.00 


$30.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


20.00 


20.00 


a 


(( 



Still. June 16, 3.12 p. m. Brush fire near same locality 
as preceding fire. Chemical company responded. No loss. 

4—4-4. June 16, 3.15 p. m. Brush fire in same locality as 
preceding fire. Evidently incendiary, as the fire causing the first 
alarm was eflTectually extinguished by the detail and C^hemical 
company. Three hours' labor. 

Still. June 17, 12.34 p. m. Brush fire on Plains, near 
residence of Arthur Colton. Extinguished by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 

4-4-4. June 17, 12.35 p. 3i. Brush fire. Location same 
as preceding fire. Extinguished by Chemical company before 
arrival of bai'ge conveying firemen. No loss. 



196 CITY OF COXCORD. 

Box 49. June 21, 7.03 a. m. Fire in closet in residence 30 
Mills street, owned by J. D. Foley and occupied by James 
Cairns. Cause, probably pipe in pocket. G.'^O feet hose wet, 
but no w^ater used in the building. Recall, 7.14 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, 82, .500. 00 $.50.00 $2,000.00 $50.00 

Still. June 22, 4.47 p. m. Grass tire on vacant lot corner 
Centre and Tahanto streets. Extinguislied by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. July 1, 8.01 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of F. 
A. Garland, 17 Dakin street. Extinguished by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 

Box 24. July 12, 8.20 a. m. Fire in power station of Con- 
cord Electric Co., Bridge street. Caused by overheated stove. 
2,150 feet hose wet. Recall, 8.26 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


S12,000.00 


$10.00 


85,000.00 


^ No claim 


Contents, 


20,000.00 


30.00 


5,000.00 ■ 


^ made. 



Still. July 19, 11.04 a. m. Fire m residence 5 Eastman 
street, owned by Charles Blanchard and occupied by Frank Copp. 
Caused by explosion of kerosene stove. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, 83,000.00 820.00 82,000.00 $20.00 

Contents, 500.00 10.00 None. None. 

Still. August 20, 7.15 a. :m. A call to investigate cause 
of heat and smoke in residence of S. F. Hillsgrove, 2 Mont- 
gomery street. Probable cause, chimney burned out. No fire. 

Still. September 2, 2.48 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. L. Dyer, 112 Rumford street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. September 5, 5.40 p. m. Cliinuiey fire in residence of 
H. W. Cook, 53 South State street. Extinguished by Cliemical 
company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 197 

September 12, time not known. Fire in drawer in W. R. 
Heath's dry goods establishment, North Main street. Cause, 
mice and matches. Fact of fire having existed not discovered 
until loth inst. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $10,000.00 J49.54 $8,400.00 $49.54 

Box 12. September 15, 3.21 a. m. Fire in residence 179 
North State street, owned by Thomas Hannigan and occupied by 
Otto Johnson. Cause unknown. 650 feet hose wet. Recall, 
3.47 A. M. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $182.70 $1,800.00 $182.70 
Contents, 600.00 263.75 300.00 263.75 

Box 24. September 15, 3.38 p. m. Fire in residence 6 
Winter street, owned by John Bluto and occupied by J. E. Car- 
ter. Cause unknown. 1,650 feet hose wet. Recall, 3.54 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,500,00 


$20.00 


$1,000.00 


$20.00 


Contents, 


500.00 


15.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. September 19, 11.48 a. m. Chimney lire in resi- 
dence of F. H. Colby, 42 Thorndike street. Extinguished by 
Chemical company. No loss. 

Still. September 23, 11.02 a. m. Fire in room occupied 
by Emma Racine, Exchange block, North Main street. Caused 
by explosion of oil stove. Extinguished by Chemical company. 
No loss. 

Still. September 24, 11.59 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Walter Davis, 48 Centre street. Extinguished 
by Chemical company. No loss. 

Still. September 24, 12.13 p. m. Alarm caused by smok- 
ing of stove in residence of George H. Richardson, 10 Fayette 
street. Chemical company responded. No fire. 



198 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 35. September 24, 0,52 p. si. Fire iu W. R. Heath's 
dry goods establishment, Chase bh>ck, North Main street. Build- 
ing owned by estate of James H. Chase. Caused by mice and 
matches. 700 feet hose wet, but no water used in building. 
Recall, 9.59 p. m. 





Vahie. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$25,000.00 


$20.00 


$17,000.00 


S20.00 


Contents, 


10,000.00 


175.99 


8,350.46 


175.99 



Still. September 28, 4.40 p. m. Fire in closet in resi- 
dence of Dr. R. J. Macguire, 8 Hill's avenue. Extinguished 
by Chemical company. Cause unknown. 

Valne. Loss. Insiirance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $1,200.00 $10.00 None. None, 

Still. September 29, 10.30 a. m. Chimney lire in residence 
of H. W. Cook, 53 South State street. Extinguislied by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Still. September 29, 7.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Crosby, 64 North Spring street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

11-11. October 1, 8.40 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Loudon. Kearsarge steamer. Eagle wagon, and detail from the 
department sent under direction of Engineer W. E. Dow. En- 
gine worked two and one-half hours ; 950 feet hose wet. 

Still. October 2, 3.23 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Miss A. M. Fletcher, 65 Warren street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Box 42. October 5, 2.55 p. m. Fire in residence, 5 Grove 
street, owned by Mrs. Mary Donovan, and occupied by Peter 
McFadyen. Cause, child playing with matches. 400 feet hose 
wet. Recall, 3.13 p. M. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,300.00 $110.00 $1,700.00 $110.00 

Contents, 800.00 40.50 None. None. 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 199 

House adjoining owned and occupied by M. H. Donovan .said 
to have sustained damage to paint from Chemical engine stream. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $15.00 $2,500.00 $15.00 

Still. October 8, 8.35 p. m. Slight hre in Central Market, 
8 Pleasant street, F. E. Lynde, proprietor. Cause unknown. 
Elxtinguished by Chemical company. 

Value. Loss. • Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $2,000.00 $5.00 $1,500.00 No claim made. 

Still. October 23, 8.52 a.m. A call to investigate cause of 
smoke in State Block, North Main street. Cliemical company 
responded. No fire. 

Still. October 24, 1.42 p. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
O. C. Phillips, 16 Valley street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. October 25, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Edmund Boucher, 176 Rumford street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Still. October 25, 10.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Charles F. Adams, 49 Centre street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

4-4-4. October 28, 2.57 p. m. Brush fire on Long Pond 
road, near residence of John Jordan. Extinguished by detail 
from the department. Five hours' labor. No loss. 

Still. October 31, 4.05 p. m. Fire in residence 1 Water 
street, owned by C. A. McAlpine, and occupied by Fred Sears. 
Cause, children and matches. ^Extinguished by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 

Box 23. November 2, 8.10 a. m. Fire in rubbish in base- 
ment of tenement block, 185 North Main street, owned by Mrs. 
Nellie M. Merrill, Cause unknown. 500 feet hose wet, but no 
water used in building. Recall, 8.1'J a. m. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 7.13 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. S. Hall, 31 Pine street. Extinguished by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 



200 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Still. November 10, 10.21 a. m. Cliimuey fire in resi- 
dence of Peter Happy, 5 Foster street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Box 12. November 10, 2.39 p. m. Fire on root' of residence, 
7 Curtice avenue, owned by Chase & Martin, and occupied by 
Joseph Goodcliild. Caused by sparks from chimney. 800 feet 
hose Avet. Recall, 2.52 p.m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, S3, 000. 00 $1.50 $2,000.00 81.50 

Still. November 10, 11.36 p. m. Chimney fire in Stickney 
block, 136 North Main street. Extinguished by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. November 12, 2.40 p. Ji. Cliimney fire in residence 
of James Leahy, 36 Concord street. Extinguished by members 
of Good Will Hose company. No loss. 

11-11. November 16, S.54 a. m. A call for assistance from 
North Boscawen. Detail from the department. Governor Hill 
steamer, reserve reel and 1,200 feet of liose sent, under direction 
of Engineer J. J. McNulty. Engine worked three houi'S and 
forty minutes. 500 feet of hose wet. 

Box 42. November 17, 1.48 p. m. P'ire on roof of Lee's 
block. Chandler street. Caused Ijy sparks from Chimney. P2xtin- 
guished by occiipants. Needless alarm. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $10.00 $2,000.00 $10.00 

Still. Noveml>er 17, 6.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Edwin Lull, 68 South street. Extinguished by Chemical com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 7.28 p. m. False alarm. Responded 
to by meml)ers of Alert Hose company and Chemical engine com- 
pany. Jackson street. 

11-11. November 20, 6.53 A. m. A call for assistance from 
P>ast Andover. Detail from the department, Goveriu>r Hill 
steamer, reserve reel, and 1,200 feet hose sent under direction of 
Engineer W. E. Dow. Engine worked two hours and forty min- 
utes. 550 feet hose wet. 



KIRE DEPARTMENT. ^ 201 

Still. November 21, 9.14 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of Jeremiah Smith, 25 Fayette street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Still. November 22, 7.04 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of John E. Lamprey, 5 Gallinger court. Extinguislied by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

11-11. November 26, 10. 5G a. m. A call for assistance 
from Canterbury. Detail from the department, reserve engine, 
Eagle wagon, and 1,600 feet hose sent under direction of P^ngineer 
J. J. McNulty. Apparatus stopped by messenger before reach- 
ing the scene. 

Still. November 28, 8.17 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Brown, 88 Centre street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. November 28, 1.49 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of David Robinson, 11 Jackson street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical company. No loss. 

Box 19. November 29, 10.24 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Rocco Morano, 47 High street. All apparatus excepting 
Chemical engine dismissed immediately upon arrival. No loss. 

Still. November 30, 8.40 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Mason, 48 Washington street. Extinguished by mem- 
bers of Alert Hose Co. No loss. 

Still. November 30, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George H. Stickney, 16 Prince street. Extinguished 
by Chemical company. 

Value. Loss. lusuraiice. Ins. paid. 

Building, " $1,500.00 $2.12 $1,000.00 $2.12 

Box 26. December 2, 5.46 p. m. Fire in residence, 14 
Maple street, owned by Miss Carrie Evans and occupied by Rob- 
ert Powers. Cause unknown. 300 feet hose wet, but no water 
used in the building. Recall, 5.53 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,800.00 $25.23 $1,250.00 $25.23 



202 CITY OF CON'COKD. 

Box 12. December 4, 6.57 p. m. Cliimney fire in residence 
14 Perkins' Court, owned by Miss Susan Perkins and occupied 
by D. H. Lucia. ^Extinguished with chemicals. 

Valvie. Loss. Insiirance. Ins. paid. 

Buikling, $1,000.0.0 S4.ll $500.00 $4.11 

Still. December 5, 7.50 p. m. Cliimney fire in residence 
of J. H. S. Willcox, Pleasant street (Millville Road). Extin- 
guished by Chemical company. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 4.05 a. m. Fire in residence 50 North 
State street. Chemical company responded. See next alarm. 

Box 21. December 7th, 4,05 a. ji. Fire in residence 50 
North State street, owned and occupied by jMrs. Mary A. Mor- 
rill. Caused by brand from fireplace. 350 feet hose wet. Re- 
call, 4.34 A. M. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $6,000.00 $78.00 $4,000.00 $78.00 

Contents, 3,000.00 122.00 1,000.00 122.00 

Still. December 8, 5.37 p. m. Cliimney tire in residence 
of J. K. Martin, 7 Prince street. Cliief's sleigh responded with 
pony extinguishers. 

Still. December 7, 5.56 p. m. Chemical company called 
to assist at preceding fire. Extinguished by Chemical company. 
No loss. 

Box 23. December 11, 6.04 p. yi. Alarm occasioned by 
explosion of kerosene lamp in residence of Robert W. Shakes- 
peare, 11 Chapel street. Needless alarm. Lamp thrown out of 
doors by occupants. Recall, 6.11 p. m. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 9.31 p. m. Chimney fire in Hotel 
Nardini, 113-117 North Main street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal company. No loss. 

Still. December 16, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. Vj. Clifford, 3 Railroad Square. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal company. No loss. 

Still. December 17, 6.55 a. m. Cliimney fire in residence 
of R. A. Marshall, 246 North State street. Extinguished by 
Chemical company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 203 

Still. December 17, 10.07 a. m. Chimney tire in J. E. 
McShane's block, 3-5 Odd Fellow's avenue. Extinguished by- 
Chemical company. No loss. 

Still. December ]9, 1.32 p.m. Cliimey lire in residence 
of Mrs. A. L. Drew, 12 Park street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal company. No loss. 

Still. December 22, <S.25 A. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of N. F. Woodward, 19 Concord street. Extinguished by mem- 
bers of Good Will Hose Co. No loss. 

Box 47. Decendjer 2.5, 10.33 a. m. Slight fire in basement 
of blacksmith shop 17 Clinton street, owned by A. E. Savage. 
Cause unknown. Flxtinguislied before arrival of fireman. 500 
feet of hose wet. Recall, 10.41 a. m. No loss. 

Still. December 27, 12.06 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Unwin, 4 North State street. Extinguished by Chemical 
company. No loss. 

Still. December 31, 8.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Truchon, 8 Jackson street. p]xtinguisbed by meml)ers 
of Alert and Chemical companies. No loss. 

Pen A COOK. 

Still. January 10, 11.45 p. m. Fire in Washington House, 
19 Main street, owned and occupied by C. J. Coakley. Caused 
by overheated chimney. 

Building, 

Still. Febniary 10, 8.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mary Owens, 3 Park street. No loss. 

Still. February 14, 9.00 a. m. Chimney fire in boiler 
house of C. M. & A. W. Rolfe manufactory, Merrimack street. 
No loss. 

Bell. March 25, 11.50 a. m. Fire in residence corner 
Charles and Warren streets, owned and occupied by Mrs. Nellie 
A. Abbott. Caused by overheated chimney. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, S2,000.00 $5.00 $1,400.00 $5.00 



Vaiue. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


$10,000.00 


$6.35 


$6,000.00 


$6.35 



204 CITY OF CONCOKl). 

Still. April 11, 11.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. J. S. Fiske, Fowler street. No lofes. 

Still. April 15, 10.00 a. m. Chimney fii'e in residence of 
Mary Owens, 9 Park street. No loss. 

Bell. September 22, 5.00 p. m. Fire in residence 7 West 
Canal street, owned by Peter Gahagan and occupied by Felix. 
Guyotte. Cause unknown. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,000.00 


815.00 


$1,000.00 


815.00 


Contents, 


500.00 


25.00 


None. 


None. 



Bell. October 5, 3.50 a. m. Soap manufactory owned and 
occupied by Ruel G. Morrill, destroyed with contents. Cause 
unknown. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


8100.00 


8100.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


550.00 


550.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. November 9, 12.45 p. m. Brush fire near Wood- 
lawn cemetery. 300 feet hose wet. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 11.00 a. im. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Plankey, 1 Bye street. No loss. 

No Alakm. November 18, 4.30 p. m. Fire in mill owned 
and occupied by N. H. Spinning Mills Co. Caused by match in 
bale of cotton. 

Still. December 22, 10.45 A. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Herl)ert Cross, 9 Merrimack street. No loss. 

No Alahm. December 26, l.oO a. m. Fire in closet in 
Farrand & Chandler's block, AVashington square, occupied by F. 
H. Blanchard, marketman. Cause unknown. Extinguished by 
occupants. 

Still. December 31, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in Postofiice 
block, JNIain street. No loss. 



fire dp'.partment. 205 

West Concord. 

No Alarm. February 3, 7.30 a. m. Fire in residence 554 
North State street, owned by Fred A. & Edgar D. Eastman, 
and occupied by George Hamel. Caused by gas stove. Extin- 
guished by occupants. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,600.00 


S35.00 


$1,300.00 


$35.00 


Contents, 


300.00 


8.95 


300.00 


8.05 



Still. October 21, 8.20 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of Simeon Partridge, 499 North State street. No loss. 

Bell. October 28, 8.30 p. m. Brush fire near prison. 
Extinguished by detail from Cataract company. No loss. 

P^AST Concord. 

Bell. July 18, 8.15 p. m. Barn and contents totally 
destroyed. Building owned by John T. Tenney, and occupied 
by owner and C. W. Barnard. Caused by lightning. The 
scene of this fire was so remote from the fire station that it was 
impossible for the local company to render assistance in time to 
be effective. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $1,500.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 
Contents : 

J. T. Tenney, 345.00 345.00 None. None. 

C.W.Barnard, 255.00 255.00 None. None. 



206 city of concord. 

Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows: 

Precinct, located at the Central fire station, one first-class 
Ainoskeag engine, " Eagle," with modern hose wagon, 
attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine company (13 men) ; 
one second-class Amoskeag engine, " Kearsarge," and mod- 
ern hose wagon, attached to the Kearsarge Steam Fire Engine 
company (14 men); one second-class Amoskeag engine, 
" Governor Hill," relief steamer, in charge of an engineer 
and fireman ; one double 60-gallon tank Holloway chemical 
engine in charge of two permanent men ; one ladder truck, 
" Cit}- of Concord," attached to hook and ladder company 
(3[ men). There are ten horses owned bv the city kept at 
this station. The precinct companies have swing harnesses 
upon all apparatus except steamers. There are six perma- 
nent men located at the Central station and one permanent 
man at each hose house within the precinct. 

The Alert Hose company (11 men), located on Washing- 
ton street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent man 
and horse. 

The Good Will Hose company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State streets, has a modern hose 
wagon with permanent man and horse. 

Veterans' Auxiliary company (30 men). 

The "Pioneer" steamer, at Penacook (28 men), is a 
fourth-class Silsby, with hose wagon. 

The Cataract company (30 men), at West Concord, has a 
Hunneman 6-inch cylinder hand-engine and a modern hose 
wagon, and is provided with swing harness. 

Old Fort, East Concord (30 men), has a 4i-inch cylinder 
Hunneman hand-engine. 

Hose. 
Fabric : 
Precinct ........ 8,450 feet. 

Penacook ....... 2,200 " 

West Concord ...... 900 " 

ii.SSO " 



FIRE DEPAKTMENT. 



207 



Leather : 
East Concord 



good 
poor 



400 
500 



Public Reservoirs. 

1. Main street, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s 

2. Main street, middle front state house yard 

3. Main street, rear city hall 

4. State street, corner Washington street* 

^. Rumford street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's 

6. Orchard street, corner of Pine street* 

7. School street, corner of Summit street* 

*Brick cemented. 



900 " 

Capacity, 
cubic feet. 

1,000 
1,500 
3,000 
3,000 
1,000 
4,000 
3,500 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

'1901. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Greex, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

John J. McNulty, 1st Asst., j\Iacliinist, 35 West street. 

William E. Dow, 2d Asst., Painter, 13 Aca<lemy street. 

John J. McNulty, Clerk of Board. 



Abial W. Rolfe, 
John E. Frye, 
George W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 

^Manufacturer, Penacook St., Penacook. 

WARD 2. 
Farmer, Penacook St., East Concord. 

WARD 3. 

Overseer, 443 No. State St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, No. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

Sylvester T. Ford, Captain. A. H. Britton, Lieutenant and Clerk, 

James H. Sanders, Enyineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

11 Sylvester T. Ford, 

12 A. H. Britton, 

13 Charles H. Swain, 

15 James H. Sanders, 

16 Frank E. Heath, 

84 Thomas J. Morrison, 

19 Charles Powell, 

20 Elba F. Home, 
22 George B. Davis, 

21 J. E. Morrison, 

85 H. M. Sanders, 

18 Will D. Hutchinson, 

14 M. J. Martin, 
87 F. J. Young, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Moulder, 
Hardware dealer. 
Carpenter, 
Carriage painter, 
Salesman, 
Carriage painter. 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage painter, 
Janitor, 
Gas titter. 
Clerk, 

Permanent driver. 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
41 South Main street. 
12 Thompson street. 
IS Holt street. 
45 Perley street. 
38 Perley street. 
32 Downing street. 
62 Rum ford sti-eet. 
10 Liberty street. 
3 South Main street. 
8 Thorn dike street. 
112 Pleasant street. 
21 Union street. 
Central station. 
Central station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



209 



EAGLE STEAM 



W. J. Coffin, Captain. 

Badffe 

Jffos. Names. 

2i Walter J. Coffin, 
25 John C. MoGilvray, 

30 Thomas D. Gaunon, 

88 Charles H. Sanders, 

31 Orrin C. Hodgdon, 
36 David J. Adams, 

32 William W. Brown, 

34 William A. Sewell, 
38 George H. Downing, 
27 Oscar G. Pelkey, 

29 John W. Inman, 

35 Bert A. Tozier, 

89 John H. True, 



FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, No. 1. 

OFFICERS. 
J. C. INIcGiLVRAY, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Shipping clerk, 
Jig-sawyer, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Engineer, 
•Janitor, 
Photographer, 
Expressman, 
Electrician, 
Harness maker. 
Carriage painter. 
Barber, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
5 Short street. 
9 Pearl street. 
113 Warren street. 
112 Pleasant street. 
31 Beacon street. 
107 North Main street. 
9 Cummings avenue. 
100 Warren street. 
12 South street. 
161 North Main street. 
11 Wall street. 
19 South State street. 
Central station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, No. 4. 
RELIEF ENGINE. 



Badge 

JVos. Names. Occupations. 

17 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 
23 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 South State street. 
11 Thompson street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

Fred W. Scott, Captain. George L. Osgood, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

George L. Osgood, Treasurer. 



MEMBERS. 



Badge 




Nos. Names. 


- Occupations. 


37 Fred W. Scott, 


Builder, 


38 Geo. L. Osgood, 


Clerk, 


46 James Crowley, 


Barber, 


43 John H. Seavey, 


Clerk, 


39 Charles J. French, 


Stone-cutter, 


42 Charles H. Rowell, 


Builder, 


48 Lewis B. Putney. 


Builder, 


41 Charles C. Chesley, 


Builder, 


45 Joseph H. Brunelle, 


Blacksmitli, 


49 James Jepson, 


Car builder. 


47 Frank H. Silver, 


Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
43 Lyndon street. 
6 Insurance Block. 
115 Warren street. 
Alert Hose liouse. 
5 Perkins street. 
23 Concord street. 
12 Beacon street. 
11 Prince street. 
34 Washington street. 
21 Jackson street. 
Alert Hose house. 



210 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, No. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

John C. Mills, Captain. Hiram T. Dickerman, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
Charles C. Nutter, Treasurer. 



Badge 
Nos. Names. 

50 John C. Mills, 

51 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

54 George H. Sawyer, 

55 Charles C. Nutter, 

52 John E.Gove, 

53 Charles A. Richards, 

57 Jasper R. Madgett, 

60 Frank S. Putnam, 

56 H. H. Ash, 

61 E. D. Clark, 

58 AV. T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Packer, 
Machinist, 
Springmaker, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
3i Downing street. 
94 South State street. 
5 Allison street. 
39 Laurel street. 
45 Centre street. 
26 Grove street. 
98 South State street, 
lot South State street. 
14 Pierce street. 
52 West street. 
Good Will Hose house. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, 

No. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Badge 

Nos. 



Names. 



63 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

65 Benjamin Ouilette, 

66 Henry V. Tittemore, 

67 Jolin A. Sargent, 

68 Alfred B. Morgan, 

70 Will F. King, 

71 Frank T. Bean, 

72 Lucius D. Caldou, 

73 George W. Grover, 

75 James L. Liberty, 

76 Stephen P. Foster, 

80 Sam B. Morgan, 

81 Daniel Crowley, 

77 Bion W. Hall, 

82 Edwin H. French, 

78 Harry N. Lane, 

74 Charles Parker, 

69 William F. Paige, 

79 Fred I. Stevens, 
96 C. G. Pinkham, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Carriage builder, 
Carpenter, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Builder, 

Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder. 
Carpenter, 
Carriage builder, 
Carriage builder. 
Coachman, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage builder, 
Carriage builder, 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Gas-fitter, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
98 Franklin st. 
5 Fremont st. 
10 Jefferson st. 
Avon St. 
67 So. State St. 
35 Thonidike st. 
40 Lyndon st. 

16 Avon St. 
13 West St. 

29 Thorn dike St. 
7 Harvard st. 
47 Perley st. 
10 Avon St. 
130 Warren st. 
78 South St. 
29 Green st. 
2 Fremont st. 
63 South St. 

17 Laurel st. 
76 Rum ford st. 
Central station. 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 



211 



Badge 

Nos. 



CHEMICAL P:NGINP: COMPANV, No. 1. 



Names. 



91 M. S. Wakefield. 

92 A. P. Tamer. 



Occupations. 



Residences. 



Permanent engineer and driver, Central stat'u. 
Permanent assistant engineer, Central stat'u. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 

Penacook. 



OFFICERS. 



John H. Rolfe, Captain. 

Eddie C. Durgin, Lieut, and Clerk. 

John B. Dodge, Treasurer. 



Henry Rolfe, Foreman of Hose . 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 
Leslie H. Crowther, Stevjard. 



Names. 

John H. Rolfe, 
Eddie C. Durgin, 
John B. Dodge, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Walter H. Rolfe, 
George H. Sager, 
William C. Ackerman, 
Leslie H. Crowther, 
John W. McNeil, 
David S. March, 
FredH. Morrill, 
Edwin B. Prescott, 
Peter A. Keenan, 
Laurin W. Rolfe, 
Fred C. Ferrin, 
Lester W. Prescott, 
Fred M. Dodge, 
Harry G. Rolfe, 
Clarence A. Davis, 
Ruel G. Morrill, 
George N. Robertson, 
Frank P. Robertson, 
Albert S. Andrews, 
Samuel G. Sanborn, 
Harry H. McNeil, 
John P. Kelley, 
Frank Burke, 
Charles H. Barrett, 
Henry Rolfe, Jr., 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 

Foreman, 

Carpenter, 

Bookkeeper, 

Carpenter, 

Machinist, 

Machinist, 

Machinist, 

Maker plumbers' suppl 

Mill operative. 

Door maker, 

Sash-maker, 

Marketman, 

Table-maker, 

Electrician, 

Band-sawyer, 

Saw-maker, 

'Electrical Inst. -maker 

Bookkeeper, 

Miller, 

Farmer, 

Axle-maker, 

Axle-maker, 

Mill operative, 

Blacksmith, 

Clerk, 

Machinist, 

Overseer, 

Carpenter, 

Miller, 



Residences. 

14 Centre st. 
46 Spring st. 
59 Merrimack st. 
26 Penacook st. 
49 Merrimack st. 
24 High St. 

7 Washington st. 
ies, 23 Washington st. 

8 Union st. 

19 Centre st. 

8 Summer st. 

88 South Main st. 
93 High St. 

14 Centre st. 

20 High St. 

56 Summer st. 
61 Merrimack st. 

21 Cross St. 
40 Charles st. 

75 Washington st. 
17 Washington st. 
6 Church st. 
23 Washington st. 

15 Union st. 

16 Charles st. 

9 Church St. 
12 Centre St. 

6 Washington st. 
3 Elm St. 



212 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 

Elbridge Emery, Captain. 

George O. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



John C. Hutchins, Treasurer, 
Charles P. White, Steward. 



Xames. 

Elbridge Einery, 
George O. Robinson, 
John C. Hntcliins, 
C. E. Robinson, 
William L. Batclielder, 
William H. Smith, 
James L. Potter, 
Samiiel G. Potter, 
Charles P. White, 
William E. Virgin, 
Rnfus C. Boynton, 
Elvin Cnlver, 
Fred S. Farnnm, 
Shad Gate, 
Ross W. Gate, 
George E. Gate, 
William E. Cowley, 
Herbert Knowles. 
James Cox, 
Daniel Lewis, 
Abram Gushing, 
Edward A. Newell, 
Thomas Spaulding, 
Joseph Strickford, 
George At wood, 
Parker French, 
Albert Spaulding, 
Westley Field, 
Walter Carlton, 



MEMBERS. 

Occvpatlons. 

Butcher, 

Water-dealer, 

Engineer, 

Clerk, 

Farmer, 

Farmer, 

Milk-dealer, 

Milk-dealer, 

Stone-cutter, 

Carpenter, 

Belt-maker, 

Shoemaker, 

Carpenter, 

Farmer, 

Horseshoer, 

Blacksmith, 

Storekeeper, 

Carpenter, 

Section foreman, 

Driver, 

Stone-cutter, 

Wood-worker, 

Farmer, 

Painter, 

Machinist, 

Janitor, 

Moulder, 

Milkman, 

Harness-maker, 



Residences. 

Potter St. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Potter St. 
Shaker st. 
Potter St. 
Appleton St. 
Pembroke st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Portsmouth st. 
Penacook st. 
Pembroke st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Shawmut st. 
Fort sq. 
Shawmut st. 
Penacook st. 
Shawmut st. 
Penacook st. 
Fort sq. 
Mill St. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Penacook st. 
Mill St. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



•213 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

West Concord. 

OFFICERS. 

Jeremiah Cotter, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 

Hiram E. Quimby, Lieut, and Clerk. John Harrison, Steivard. 

Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



Names. 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Thomas P. Hearn, 
Thomas Pentland, 
John Harrison, 
Fred W. Peabody, 
James W. Powers, 
AVilliam D. Harrington, 
Roy Shepard, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Theodore Wihnot, 
Edward Loverin, 
James F. Abbott, 
John P. Harrington, 
Alfred Fraser, 
Fred L. Besse, 
Joseph Daley, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Street railway, 
Engineer, 
Blacksmith, 
Loom-fixer, 
Motor man, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Postoffice clerk. 
Stone-cutter, 
Mill-overseer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
5 Engel St. 
■190 No. State st. 
No. State st. 
50 Hutchins St. 
513 No. State st. 
5 Engel St. 
Lake st. 
462 No. State st. 
412 No. State st. 
3 Fisher st. 
50 Hutchins St. 
Hutchins St. 
436 No. State st. 
509 No. State st. 
1 Clark St. 
513 No. State st. 
50 Hutchins st. 
458 No. State st. 
15 Lake st. 
455 No. State st. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



D. B. Newhall, Captain. 

Names. 

D. B. Newhall, 
Henry Tucker, 
Fred. Leighton, , 
Ira C. Evans, 

J. E. Clifford, 
A. M. Sumner, 
C. A. Moulton, 

E. O. Wight. 
C. A. Herbert, 
James F. Ward, 
Martin V. B. Davis, 
Oliver Thompson, 
Frank E. Warren, 
Charles C. Hill, 
Fred. S. Johnson, 
Orlando I. Godfrey, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Henry Gibney, 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 



Henry Tucker, Lieut. 

Names. 
T. P. Davis, 
Joseph C. Eaton, 
William W. Hill, 
Lewis C. Carter, 
George A. Mitchell, 
Will C. Wing-ate, 
Fred. U. Lane, 
F. H. Corson, 

D. J. Rolfe, 

E. L. Peacock, 
Fred. K. Peacock, 
R. M. Patten. 
William Lynch, 
George H. Davis, 
James E. Holt, 
Robert Crowley, 
James A. Johnson, 
J. G. Leighton. 



214 



CITY OK CONCOKD. 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number and Location of F'ihe-Alarm Boxes. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering tlie fire-alarm 
boxes, the city is divided into five districts, viz. : 

District i. Embraces that section of the cit^• north and 
west of Washington street, box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 3. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
ton streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
streets. 

Districts 4 and 5. Embrace all south of Pleasant street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the district. 

District No. i. 



I 2 

14 
15 
16 

iS 
19 



21 
.23 
24 
25 
26 

-1 



New Hampshire state prison. 
Curtice avenue. 
Franklin and Rum ford. 
Bradley and Walker. 
Main and Church. 
Franklin and Jackson. 
Alert Hose house. 
C. S. Gale's store. 
Centre and Auburn. 

District No. 2. 

State, opposite Court. 
Main and Chapel. 
Main and Centre. 
Main and School. 
Centre and LTnion. 
School and Merrimack. 
School and Spring. 



FIRE DErAKTMENT. 



215 



5 
6 

7 
S 

31 
33 

55 



34 
35 
36 
37 

3S 



41 

4^ 

43 

45 
46 

47 
48 

49 
412 

413 
414 



51- 

52. 

53- 

54- 
56. 



District No. 3. 

Warren and Pine. 
Central fire station. 
Martin's drug store. 
Pleasant and Spring. 
Pleasant and North Fruit. 
Orcliard and Merrimack. 

District No. 4. 

South and Thompson. 

Good Will Hose house. 

Main and Fayette. 

Nelson & Durrell's store. 

Perley and Grove. 

South, opposite Downing. 

Thorndike and South. 

West and Mills. 

Wall and Elm. 

Main, opposite Thorndike. 

State and West. 

District No. 5. 
B. & M. R. R. new shops. 
South Main and Allison. 
Hall and Hammond. 
Broadway and Pillsbury. 
St. Paul's School. 



Private Boxes. 
Boston & Maine Railroad — north end passenger depot. 
The Abbot-Downing Company. 
New Hampshire Asylum for the Insane. 
Page Belting Company. 
Boston & Maine Railroad coal sheds. 
State house. 
Boston & Maine Railroad old repair shop. 

In addition to the above private boxes there are three 
located inside the state prison, all numbered 9. 



216 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

I. Alarms rung in from boxes 31, 41, 42, 43. 45, 46, 47, 
48, 49, 413, 413, 414, 51, 52, 53, 54, 5^, and >,6 will not be 
responded to by tbe Alert Hose company until signaled. 
The signal to proceed to the fire will be a second alarm, 
except 56. 

Alarms rung in from boxes S, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, iS, 
19, 31, 33, 26, 37, 32, 37, and 56 will not be responded to 
by the Good Will Hose company until signaled. It will be 
governed bv the same signals governing Alert Hose company. 
The Alert Hose and Good Will Hose companies will hitch 
up and remain in readiness twenty minutes after the first 
alarm, to all boxes not responded to on first alarm. Then, 
receiving no signal (all out or second alarm), the officers in 
charge shall dismiss their companies. 

Kearsarge Hose companv will respond to all calls except 
513. 

Kearsarge steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose company to all calls. 

Eagle steamer to boxes 5, 6, and 7, on first alarm ; to boxes 
23, 24, 35, 33, 34, 35, 43, 43, 45. and 413 on second; to all 
others on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill steamer will respond to boxes S and 9 on 
first alarm ; to boxes 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, k| , 15, 16, 17, iS, 19, 
21, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 48, 49, 413, 
414, 52, 54, and 55 on second; to all others on third. 

Chemical engine will respond to all box alarms except 8, 
9, ^i and 56. 

Veterans' Auxiliary company will resj)ond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating from 
same box or not. 

Two rounds of eleven strokes each will signalize the 
requirement of assistance out of town, anil will be responded 
to by a detail of three men from each company, appointed 
for the purpose, and by those alone. Such apparatus will be 
detailed as circumstances warrant. In case fuither aid is 
necessary, box 34 (Central station) will follow. 

All out signal, three strokes of the bells. 



fire depaktment. 217 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on the 
bells, and will be responded to by a detail of four men from 
each company, appointed for the purpose, and by those alone. 

Military Signal. 
Two rovnids of 3-1-2. 

Concord State Fair Grounds. 

Two rounds of 5-1-3. 

To be responded to by Good Will company and apparatus, 
Eagle company excepting engineers and stoker, Eagle wagon, 
Kearsarge engine, engineer and stokei", and Hook and 
Ladder company. 

All apparatus excepting Kearsarge engine to return 
immediately to quarters with detail sufficiently large to reload 
and work apparatus should occasion require. 

Companies not responding to remain in quarters until 
recall is sounded, in readiness to respond to summons by 
telephone. 

Signals For Closing .Schools. . 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause of 
fifteen seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will be giyen 
at S o'clock. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be giyen 
at 1. 15 o'clock. 

The signals to close all. schools for one session will be 
given at 1 1 .30 A. :m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in eyery 
^Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It will be one 
single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells the 
number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose will 
vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 



218 CITY OF CONXOKl). 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be struck from the button of a box, alternating as before 
mentioned. 

The Fire- Alarm Telegraph 

is the *•' Gamevvell " patent. It embraces 3S miles of wire. 

On the lines are 38 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the city, 
and 10 private boxes, — in all 4S. There are three alarm 
bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell-metal), one of 3,740 pounds 
(bell-metal), and one of 3,000 pounds (American steel). 
There are also 16 mechanical tappers, 40 direct-action tap- 
pers, one four-circuit repeater, and four indicators. 

The battery consists of 326 storage battery cells for the 
lines, and 34 open circuit battery cells for other electrical 
purposes. 

The alarm system was installed in iSSo by the Gamewell 
Fire-Alarm Telegraph Company. 

Directions for Giving an Alarm. 

Above all things, keep cool. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale," 
designed expi-essly for the purpose of informing you whether 
an alarm is being transmitted, the instant you open the door. 

Open the box, and, if this bell is not heard, pull down the 
hook once only and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled and it would be useless to 
attempt to pull another until the one already pulled had per- 
formed its mission. 

Wait until twenty seconds have elapsed after the "tell-tale" 
has stopped ringing, close the door, which will restore the 
armature to the position it left when the door was opened. 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go. 

Should there be no response, pull it again. 

Then, should there be no response, go to the next box. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 219 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the scene 
of the tire, remain at the box to direct the department. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm . 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



REGULATIONS OF CONCORD FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

In the Year of Our Lord One Thousand Nine 
Hundred and Two. 

An Ordinance relating to the fire department. 

Be it ordained by the City Coitncil of the City of Concord 
as foUoxvs : 

Section i. The fire department shall consist of a chief 
engineer, two assistants within the precinct, one engineer 
each from Ward i. Ward 2, and Ward 3; two steamer and 
hose companies, one company to consist of thirteen men, 
including dri\'er, and one company to consist of fourteen 
men, including drivers ; one relief steamer [company] to con- 
sist of two men ; two hose companies to consist of eleven 
men, including driver; a chemical engine company to consist 
of two men ; a hook and ladder company to consist of 
twenty-one men, including driver; steamer Pioneer, not less 
than twenty or more than forty men ; hand engine companies, 
No. 2 and No. 3, not less than twentv or more than thirty 
men each. The engineers shall exercise the powers of fire 
wards, and those within the precinct shall constitute the 
board of engineers. 

Sect. 3. The chief engineer and assistant engineers and 
all other members of the fire department shall hold their 
respective offices and places until they are removed, or their 
offices or places are otherwise vacated. The board of mayor 
and aldermen, for cause, and after a due hearing, may at any 
time remoye from office or place the chief engineer, any assis- 
tant engineer, or any officer or member of the department. 
In case of vacancies from any cause in the department, of 
officers or men connected in any manner with the fire service, 
such vacancies shall be filled by the board of mayor and 
aldermen. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 221 

Sect. 3. The chief engineer shall give his entire time to 
the duties of his office, and shall not engage in or be con- 
nected with any other business or occupation, and shall 
reside in a house to be furnished by the city free from rent. 
He shall receive in full for his services, in addition to the use 
of said house, rent free, the sum of ten hundred and fifty 
dollars per annum. 

Sect. 4. The chief engineer shall have the sole command 
at fires over all persons, whether members of the fire depart- 
ment or not. He shall direct all proper measures for extin- 
guishing fires, protecting property, preserving order, and 
enforcing the laws, ordinances, and regulations respecting 
fires; and shall examine into the condition of the fire 
engines and all other fire apparatus, and of the fire engine 
houses, and other houses belonging to the city and used by 
the department, and by the companies thereto attached, as 
often as once a week, and whenever directed to do so by the 
mayor, or the committee on fire department through its 
chairman. He shall certify all bills and submit the same for 
inspection monthly to the joint standing committee on fire 
department. He shall report to the city council annually a 
statement of the receipts and expenditures of the fire depart- 
ment, the condition of the fire engines and all other fire appa- 
ratus, a detailed schedule of the property in his charge, the 
names of the officers and members, and all other facts in 
relation to the department. Whenever the fire engines or 
other fire apparatus require repairs he shall, under the direc- 
tion of the committee on fire department, cause the same to 
be made, and as fir as practicable he shall examine into the 
location and condition of fire apparatus belonging to corpora- 
tions or private individuals within the limits of the city. He 
shall require permanent men, when not otherwise engaged, 
to perform such other duties and do such other work as 
in his judgment may be deeined proper. He shall be 
responsible for the proper care of all propertv connected with 
the fire department. He shall keep fair and exact rolls of 
the respective companies specifying the time of admission 



222 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and discharge, and the age of each member, and shall report 
annually, or oftener if directed, all accidents by fire which 
may happen within the city, with the causes thereof, the 
number and description of the buildings destroyed or injured, 
and the amount of loss and insurance on the same, together 
with the names of owners or the occupants, and shall make 
returns as required by the laws of 1SS9, Chapter S4, and 
entitled: "An act in relation to returns and statistics of 
fires." He shall visit each department house as often as 
practicable, and inspect the men, the books of the house, and 
see that the quarters are properly conducted and in good 
order. He shall have the power to suspend any officer or 
member of the department for insubordination, disorderh' 
conduct, or neglect of duty, said suspension to continue 
pending the action of the mayor and aldermen. The chief 
engineer shall examine all places where shavings and other 
combustible materials may be collected or deposited, and 
cause the same to be remo\ed by the tenants or occupants of 
such places, or at their expense, whenever in his opinion 
such remo\al is necessary for the security of the city against 
fires. 

Sect. =;. In the absence of the chief engineer, the next 
assistant engineer in rank, who may be present, shall have 
the powers and perform the duties of the chief engineer and 
the seniority in rank of the engineers shall be determined by 
the board of engineers at their first meeting. 

Sect. 6. The foreman of each engine, hose, and hook 
and ladder company, immediately after every fire at which 
said company may have attended, shall examine into the con- 
dition of the fire apparatus belonging to his respective 
company, and report any deficiency which may exist to the 
chief engineer. He shall keep, or cause to be kept by the 
clerk of his company, exact rolls, specifying the time of 
admission, discharge, and age of each member, and accounts 
of all city property entrusted to the care of the several mem- 
bers, and of all cases of absence and tardiness, in a book 
provided for that purpose by the city, which rolls and record 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

books are always to be subject to the order of the chief engi- 
neer and mayor. They shall also make, or cause to be made, 
to the chief engineer, true and accurate returns of all mem- 
bers, with their ages, and of the apparatus entrusted to their 
care, whenever called upon so to do. 

Sect. 7. The foreman of each company shall, under the 
direction of the chief engineer, have charge and management 
of his company at fires; the assistant foreman shall assist the 
foreman in the discharge of his duties, and act as clerk of the 
company, and in the absence of the foreman assume his 
authority. The foreman and assistant foreman shall be 
appointed by the chief engineer. 

Sect. 8. The stewards of the Alert and Good Will Hose 
companies shall act as drivers of hose carriages, take charge 
of and properly care for and exercise the horses used by each 
company. They shall be permanently engaged and devote 
their whole time to the department, and sleep in their respec- 
tive hose houses at night; and for the proper execution of all 
duties required of them shall be subject to the direction of the 
chief engineer. 

Sect. 9. It shall be the duty of every engine, hose, and 
hook and ladder company to have its engine, hose and other 
apparatus, cleaned, washed, oiled, reeled and housed imme- 
diately after its return from any fire or service, and at all 
times to maintain the same in good condition, and the mem- 
bers of the several companies shall perform any necessary 
duties which the chief engineer or their respective foreman 
may direct. 

Sect. 10. All members of the department when on duty 
shall wear some suitable badge, to be designated by the 
board of engineers. The chief and permanent members 
shall wear at all times when on duty the regulation parade 
uniform worn by the fire department. 

Sect. ii. The pay rolls for the board of engineers and 
the several fire companies shall be made up by the chief and 
clerk of the board of engineers semi-annually, on the first 
day of January and July. Foremen and clerks of companies 



224 CITY OF COXCORD. 

will forward their pay-rolls to the board of engineers for 
approval and after the action of said engineers and the 
approval of the city auditor and tlie committee on accounts 
and claims, said pay-rolls shall be passed over to the city tax 
collector, under whose sole direction all sums tor services of 
call firemen shall be disbursed. 

Sect. 12. No charge for extra services will be allowed 
anv member of the department unless upon an order of a 
member of the board of engineers. 

Sect. 13. No engine, hose or hook and ladder carriage 
shall be taken to a fire out of the city without permission 
from the chief engineer, except steamer Pioneer, which may 
be taken to any fire in the village of Penacook, nor shall any 
apparatus of the fire department be taken from the city 
except in case of fire, without permission from the board of 
mayor and aldermen; and in sending any apparatus to aid in 
extinguishing fires in neighboring localities, the chief in all 
cases will authorize his assistant next in rank available to 
take charge of the direction of such apparatus, and not allow 
anv fireman, at such an emergencv, to leave the city, except 
such a number as is actually required to man the apparatus, 
and no member to leave without permission or direction from 
the chief engineer. 

Sect. 14. It shall be the duty of engineers and firemen, 
whenever there is an alarm of fire in the city, to repair imme- 
diately to the place of such fire, wearing a suitable badge, 
and the engineers shall take proper measures tliat the several 
engines and other apparatus be arranged and duly worked for 
the speedy and effectual extinguishment of the fire. The 
engineers shall inspect and make themselves fomiliar with all 
shops, hotels, tenement blocks, and all public buildings, halls, 
churches, schoolhouses, and asylums once in each six months, 
and study the location of all hydrants and reservoirs in the 
city, and generally inform themselves in all matters pertain- 
ing to their duties as engineers. No engineer shall interfere 
with or attempt to give orders relative to the location or use 
of a line of hose, when he has ascertained that another has 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

command of it, unless by consent of the engineer in com- 
mand of it, or by orders of the officer in command of the 
fire; and it shall be his duty to inquire if there is an officer 
in charge. 

Sect. 15. For each absence from fire, or neglect of duty, 
the chief engineer, the assistant engineers, and engineers of 
steamers shall be fined three dollars, and each other member 
of the department one dollar; provided, however, that any 
fireman liable as above may in case of sickness have power of 
substitution by giving notice, each assistant engineer to the 
chief, each foreman to an engineer, and each other member 
to the foreman of his company. All fines shall be paid to 
the clerks of respective companies at the first I'egular meeting 
after they are incurred. The clerks of companies shall dis- 
burse the fines to substitutes answering for absent members 
in cases where there were substitutes. In cases where there 
were no substitutes the fines shall be paid to the city. 

Sect. 16. Any volunteer company using the apparatus of 
the city at any fire shall be under the control and command of 
the chief engineer and his assistants, agreeably to the forego- 
ing provisions of this chapter. 

Sect, 17. The department shall appear for public parade, 
drill and inspection at such times as the chief engineer and 
committee on fire department shall order, for which purpose 
three hundred dollars can be expended annually. The com- 
panies in Wards i, 3, and 3 will attend by invitation and vol- 
untarily. Each companv in the department under the direc- 
tion of the chief engineer" or assistants shall take out their 
respective engines and apparatus for exercise and drill as 
often as he shall direct, such exercise and drill to take place 
in public, not oftener than once a month, and at least once in 
two months, between the first of April and November. 

Sect. iS. The engineers shall have control of all persons 
appointed to serve in any company of the fire department and 
power to direct and control the labor of all persons present at 
any fire. An engineer may and shall cause any fire deemed 
by him to be dangerous in any place to be extinguished or 
removed. 

15 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 19. The engineers may estajjlish such regulations 
respecting the kindling, guarding, and safe-keeping of fires, 
and for the removal of shavings and other combustibles from 
any building or place, as thev shall think expedient. Such 
regulations shall be signed by a majorit}' of the engineers. 
Such regulations shall be approved by the mayor and alder- 
men, recorded by the citv clerk, and copies attested by him 
posted up in two or more places in the city thirty days, when 
they shall take etiect. Penalties not exceeding twenty dollars 
for each offense may be prescribed by the engineers for the 
breach of such regulations, and such regulations shall remain 
in force until altered or annulled. 

Sect. 20. The board of engineers may from time to time 
make and enforce such regulations for the government of the 
department as may be deemed proper, subject to the approval 
of the board of mayor and aldermen. 

vSect. 21. If any member of anv of the several companies 
shall willfully neglect or refuse to discharge his duty, or shall 
be guilty of disorderly conduct or disobedience to any officer 
or to any engineer he shall for any such offense be forthwith 
dismissed from the department by direction of the chief engi- 
neer. No person shall be a member of, or serve in, the fire 
department, who is under the age of twenty years, and no 
person whose occupation is carried on outside the city shall be 
appointed a member of the fire department. 

Sect. 32. All applicants for membership shall be nomi- 
nated by the chief engineer, and shall receive pay and be con- 
sidered members of the department from the date of their 
confirmation by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

No person shall hereafter be appointed to any position in 
the fire department unless and until the committee on fire 
department shall have certified in writing to the board of 
mayor and aldermen that such person has been examined by 
them, or under their supervision, and is in their opinion qual- 
ified to perform the duties of the position to which he is nom- 
inated. 

No officer or member of the permanent, or officer of the 
call, force shall attend any political convention as a delegate, 



FIUE DEPARTMENT. 227 

distribute tickets at any election, or take any part whatever in 
political matters other than to exercise the right of sutlrage, 
and no political or religious discussion shall be permitted in 
any of the department houses. 

Sect. 23. The chief engineer shall have the care and 
management of the rooms, apparatus, machiner}-, wires, 
poles, and signal boxes connected with the fire-alarm tele- 
graph.- He shall prepare rules and directions for giving 
alarms of fire through the telegraph. He shall ha\'e the 
superintendence, and under the direction of the joint standing 
committee on the fire department have control of the several 
stations, the apparatus, the furniture therein, and all other 
property appertaining to the department. He shall, with the 
assistance of the permanent men at the Central station, make 
the necessary repairs and take care of the fire-alarm system, 
including the batteries, all alarm boxes, and everything per- 
taining to the fire-alarm system. He shall personallv be able 
to master the fire-alarm in every particular, and everv perma- 
nent man at the Central station shall be obliged to understand 
the fire-alarm system, in order that the chief engineer mav 
call upon any of them to attend to and repair any part of the 
same. This provision shall not be construed to prevent the 
chief engineer from employing extra linemen when necessary, 
or from acting promptly in any emergency. 

Sect. 24. Permanent officers and men of the department 
shall be entitled to a vacation, without loss of pay, of four- 
teen days in each year, to be granted under tlie direction of 
the chief engineer. 

Sect. 25. The joint standing committee on fire depart- 
ment, subject to the board of mayor and aldermen, shall by 
themselves or agent purchase all supplies in connection with 
the fire department, and direct all repairs of houses and appa- 
ratus ; and all bills contracted for the department must receive 
their approval before being passed on by the committee on 
accounts and claims. They shall hokl stated meetings at 
least once each month at the Central fire station, and all com- 
munications to the city government from the fire department 



228 CITY OK CONCOKD. 

must come through said committee, and annually at the call 
of the finance committee, in connection with the chief engi- 
neer, they shall make recommendations as to the amount of 
appropriations the wants of the department will require for 
the coming year. 

Sect. 26. The city marshal and regular police officers shall 
have in charge all matters relating to the removal and protec- 
tion of personal property endangered by fire, and any person 
entering a building or removing property contrary to the 
orders of the city marshal or such police ofticers, shall be 
fined five dollars; and in the absence of firemen at fires from 
their respective department houses, the policemen in that 
vicinity will take charge of said houses. 

Sect. 27. It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to 
cause all snow and ice or other obstructions to be removed 
from and around all fire hydrants owned by the city, so that 
at all times the fire department can make immediate connec- 
tion of the hose to the hydrants. 

Sect. 28. The annual pay of the members of the fire 
department shall be as follows, and in full for all services : 

Chief, ten hundred and fifty dollars per annum and house- 
rent ; permanent force at Central fire station, seven hundred 
and twenty-eight dollars each ; drivers at Good Will and 
Alert hose houses, seven hundred and tvs^enty-eight dollars 
each per annum, paid monthly ; assistant engineers, within 
the precinct, one hundred and twenty-five dollars each ; engi- 
neers of steamers, within the precinct, one hundred and 
fifteen dollars each ; foremen of companies, within the pre- 
cinct, each ninety dollars per annum; assistant foremen of 
companies, within the precinct, eighty-five dollars per annum ; 
members of steamer, hose, and hook and ladder companies, 
within the precinct, eighty dollars per annum ; outside the 
precinct, engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, two hundred and 
forty dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer company. No. 3, five 
hundred dollars; said sums to be divided among the mem- 
bers as each company shall direct; engineer of steamer at 
Penacook, seventy-five dollars per annum ; assistant engineer 



FIKE DETARTMENT. 229 

at Penacook, twenty-five dollars; assistant engineer at East 
Concord, fifteen dollars; and assistant engineer at West Con- 
cord, twenty dollars. 

Sect. 29. The several engineers residing in Wards 1,2, 
and 3 shall have the entire care and control, under the direc- 
tion of the chief engineer, of the buildings and appurtenances 
occupied in part by the fire department situated in said wards, 
respectively, to whom all applications for the use of the halls, 
or any other part of such building, shall be made. Said engi- 
neers may severally appoint janitors, who shall serve under 
the exclusive direction of the engineer having the care and 
control of the buildings where said janitor shall be appointed. 
Each of said engineers shall annually, in the month of 
December, render a detailed statement, in writing, to the 
mayor and aldermen, of all receipts and expenditures for the 
preceding year on account of such buildings. 

Sect. 30. Stewards for the Pioneer Steamer company 
and engine companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be appointed by 
the mayor and aldermen, and shall receive for all services 
performed by them in that capacity the following sums : For 
Pioneer Steamer company, thirty dollars per annum, and 
when performing the duties of janitor of the building an addi- 
tional sum of forty-five dollars per annum ; and for stewai'ds 
of engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, each fifteen dollars per 
annum. No steward shall be allowed to purchase supplies 
for such building, or for the department, unless by the 
authority and direction of the committee on fire department; 
and in no case shall he have any care or control of the build- 
ing or its appurtenances occupied by the company of which 
he is a member, except in the immediate service of the com- 
pany, unless he shall be appointed janitor thereof, when he 
shall be under the direction of the engineer, as provided in 
the foregoing section. 

Sect. 31. The permanent men and horses at all of the fire 
stations in Concord shall at all times be on duty at their 
respective stations to attend to fire-alarm calls; and neither 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the permanent men nor the permanent horses connected with 
the fire department shall engage in any work for any other 
department of the city. 

The men at the difl'erent fire stations shall do such work in 
connection with the station and apparatus as the chief engi- 
neer or his assistants may direct. All permanent men shall 
lodge in their respective stations (except chief), and in all 
cases of absence a substitute must be furnished ; and in all 
cases when any extra service is required, the chief, with the 
sanction of the committee on fire department, shall have 
power to hire the same; the chief may also increase as far as 
possible the number of call men that wish to lodge at any fire 
station, subject to the regulations of the fire department. 
The chief engineer shall be furnished with a horse and 
wagon, to be maintained by the city, for his use at all times. 

Sect. 33. All alarms for brush or forest fires shall be 
responded to by members of the fire department under such 
rules and regulations as shall be prescribed by the chief engi- 
neer. 

Sect. 33. All ordinances and parts of ordinances incon- 
sistent with this ordinance are hereby repealed ; but such 
repeal shall in no wise revive or put in force any ordinance 
heretofore repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect upon 
its passage. 

Passed February 11, 1902. 



FIRE DEPAKTMENT. 2ol 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS. 

Article i. Any engine or hose company running out a 
line of liose from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled to the 
pipe, although the hose of other companies may be attached, 
in order to reach the fire. And any company coming to a 
fire, and finding an incomplete line of hose laid out from a 
hydrant or steamer, shall attach to and lengthen out such 
line, in lieu of laying a line of its own. 

Art. 2. When two or more engine companies are play- 
ing in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the company 
attaching to hydrant or steamer as provided in the foregoing 
ai'ticle ; but any company furnishing the entire line, and 
receiving water from a steamer, the pipe shall belong to such 
company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Hose companies shall attach first lines to high 
pressure hvdrants where accessible ; steamers attaching to 
those of low pressure, or reservoir. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant 
or reservoir unless their hose and apparatus for attaching to 
the same are at hand and ready for use. 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning from 
fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, and it is 
required of officers of companies to maintain perfect order 
and decorum in their respective commands during all such 
service. 

Art. 6. In case of fire the foreman first arriving shall be 
in command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 7. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding to a 
fire, to use the utmost care and caution consistent with 
promptness. Racing between companies is forbidden under 
.any circumstances. Any collision or casualtv occurring to 
horses or apparatus will be considered a sufficient cause for 
the suspension of the driver in charge at the time. 

Art. S. Fire hats are furnished by the city for the pro- 
tection and identification of firemen, and they must be worn 
at all fires except in the severest weather, when caps may be 
worn. 



232 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Art. 9. While attending fires it sliall be the duty of 
members of the department, when not performing active 
service, to concentrate about their respective pieces of appa- 
ratus. 

Art. 10. All engine and hose companies responding to 
second or general alarms will connect, but will not lay their' 
lines until they have reported to the officer in command for 
orders. 

Art. II. The wearing of badges shall not be regarded 
by members of the department as conveving to them the 
privilege of free access to premises after tire has been extin- 
guished. 

Art. 13. All members of the department shall address 
all officers by their respective titles while on duty at fires. 

Art. 13. Tlie roll of each company shall be called as 
soon as the apparatus is housed, and no member will be 
excused except in case of sickness. Rolls must be called 
after every alarm. No officer or member will be marked 
present on the company roll unless present at fires and returns 
to house with apparatus, unless excused bv an engineer. 

Art. 14. Each company shall be allowed three substi- 
tutes, to be approved by the chief engineer. 

Art. 1:5. All orders issued by the chief or an assistant 
engineer shall be promptly obeyed. At all fires occurring in 
the night, the chief engineer shall be identified by a red light, 
assistant engineers by blue lights. 

Art. 16. Members of the department are expected to 
cheerfully comply with all rules and legulations which are 
adopted or which may be adopted. Foremen will be held 
responsible for all lack of promptness and efficiency in their 
commands. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



233 



FIRE-HYDRANTS. 




North Main. 



South Mam. 



Water. 
Hall. 

Hammond. 

Fiske. 

Summer. 

North State. 



Southwest corner North Main and Penacook 

East side Nortli Main, near J. B. Walker's 

Junction Niiitli ^lain and Fiske 

East side Nuitli ^luin, near Larkin's store 

Nortlnvest coiikt North Main and Franklin 

East side North Main, opposite Pearl 

Nortliwest corner North iMain and Washington. .. . 
West side No. Main, opposite Historical Society rooms 

East side North ]\Iaiii, opposite ('hapel 

Northwest corner Ncjrth Main ami Court 

Northwest corner North Main and Pitman 

Northwest corner North .Main and Montgomery 

East side North Main, opiiositc Montgomery 

Northwest corner North Main and Centre 

Southeast corner North Main and Bridge.,, 

Southwest corner North Main and Park 

East side North .Main, opjiosite Park 

Northwest corner North .Main and Capitol — 

Nortliwest corner North Main ami School 

West side Nortli Main, at Centennial Block 

East side .Xorth .^hlin, opposite ('entennial Block 

East side Nortli .Main, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side North .Alain, in rear Woodw ard Block 

Northwest corner North Main and Warren 

West side Nortli Main, at ('eiit;al lUock 

Northeast corner Nortli Mam and Depot 

Northwest corner North Main ami Pleasant 

Southeast corner South .Main and Pleasant 

Northeast corner South .Main and Freight 

East side South .Main, opposite Fayette 

East side Sout ii Main, oi)posite Thompson 

Southeast corner South Main and Chandler 

Northwest corner So. Main and \Vent\vorth's avenue. 

Northwest (^iruer South Main and Thorndike 

East side South .Main, opposite St. John's church 

Northwest corner South .Main and Perley.... 

West side South Main, near Ahliot-Downing Co.'s 

East side South Main, opposite .\bbot-Downing Go's.. 

Northwest corner South .Main and West 

East side South .Main, near West 

West side South Main, oi)|iosite (i-as 

West side South .Main, opi)osiie Holt Bros. M'f'gCo... 

Southwest corniM-'South .Main and South State 

Northwest corner South Main ami Pillsbury 

East side South .Main, opposite Pillsbury 

West side South .Main, at J 11. Lamprey's 

West side South Main, at W.J. Sawyer's 

West side Water, near ('apt. James Thompson's 

West side Hall, below Kolfe and Kumford Asylum 

East side Hall, opjiosite W, H. Page's 

North side Haniniond, neai' iiridge 

West side Fiske, near North State 

Northeast corner Summer and Pitman 

East side North State, near cemetery gate 

Northeast corner North State and F^oster 

West side Nortli State, at water-works storeliou.se 

Southwest corner North State and Penacook 

Nortliwest corner Nortli State and Walker 

Northwest corner North State and Church 

Northwest corner North State and Tremont 

Northeast corner North State and Washington 

West side North State, opjiosite Court 

Northwest corner North State and Maple 



234 



CITY OF CONCOKU. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— CouimuefL 




Nortli State. 



Soutli State. 



MiUs. 

Daldn. 

Di^iiklee. 

Broadway. 

Green. 

South. 



Bradley. 



Union. 

Lyndon. 
Nortli Spring. 
Soutli Spring. 



Rum ford. 



Talianto. 
Pine. 
High. 



Giles. 



Princeton. 
Fruit. 



Minot. 
Penacook. 



Highland. 
Churcli. 



Northeast corner North State and Centre 

East side Nortli State, opposite government building. 

Southwest ciirner North State and School , 

Northwest corner North State and Warren 

Northwest c(irner North State and Pleasant 

East side South State. <ii)iu,siti' Wall , 

Northwest ciiiiiei- South State ami Thompson , 

Southwest edi-ner South State and Monroe , 

East side South State, opposite Laurel 

Soutl least cornel- South State and Downiiig , 

Northeast eorner South State and West 

Junction ot South State and South Main 

Southeast corner Mills and I)owning 

West side :\[i]ls, near Levi Call's , 

West side Dakiii. near C. K. Ha iri man's 

Northwest corner Dunklee and Pillshury 

Northwest corner ih-oadway and Allis(.)ii 

West side Broadway, near precinct line 

Northwest corner (Ti-een and Prince 

East side Gi-eeii, opposite Prince 

West side S(mth, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner South and Thompson 

West side South, opiiosite ^Monroe 

West side South. op!>osite Laurel 

West side South, opposite Downing 

West side South, opposite Allison 

West side South, near Ahhott farm 

W^.'st side South, opixisite Smith farm 

Northwest corner South and Itockingham 

Southwest corner Bradley and Penacook 

West side Bradley, opposite Walker 

East side Bradley, ojipositc Iliuliland 

Northwest corner IT n ion and Maple 

Soiithw est Corner Lyndon and Tremont 

Southwest corner North Spring and Centre 

South \vest corner .South Spi'ing and Oak 

'A'est side South SpriiiL;-, oiniosite Concord 

West si<ie So. Spring, oi>p. Pcrley proposed extension. 

West side Rum ford, oiiposite Perkins , 

Noi-t Invest corner Rum ford and Beacon , 

Northeast cornel' Rumford and Franklin 

Northeast corner Rum ford and Abbott 

Northeast corner Rumford and Cambridge 

Northeast corner Rumford ami School 

Northwest corner Tahanto and School 

Southwest cornel- Pine and Centre 

Northwest conic r Hiyli and Auhuru 

East side Hitih, opixisite Forest 

Southwest corner High a ml Franklin 

Southeast (-orner ( Jiles am! S(-hool 

Northeast (-orner (iiles ami Warren. 

Southwest corner Piincetou and Clinton 

East side Fruit, opiiosite Wm. W. Critchett's 

Northwest corner Fruit ami Woodman 

West side Minot, near Odd Fellows' Home 

South si<le Penacook. east of P. B. Co 's hark house — 

South side Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s 

South sid(^ Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s otHce 

Southeast (-orner Pemn-ook and North Main 

Southwest corner Penacook and Rumford 

Southeast corner I'enacook and Columbus avenue 

Nortlieast corner Highland and Rumford 

North side Church, opi)osite Lyndon 

Northeast corner Church and Rumford 



KIKH DEl'AHTMEXT. 



235 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— C'o?/^(»»e(i. 





• 


ti 








<D 




STREETS. 


LOCATIONS. 


,0 

s 

IS 


"3 







'A 


H 



Franklin. 



Beacon. 

Blanchard. 

Ferry. 

Washington. 



Valley. 
Aubnrn. 
Centre. 



Bridge. 
Capitol. 
School. 



Durgin. 
Depot. 

Warren. 



Pleasant. 



Mill road. 
St. P. School. 
Old Hopkin- 

toii road. 

^Marshall. 

Freight. 

Hill's avenue. 
Fayette. 



Northwest corner Franklin and Jackson 

Sou til west corner Fruiikliu and Rum ford 

Soutli side Frnnklin. (ippnsitc W. .1. Ahern's 

Northeast roruer Franklin and Auburn 

Nortliwi'st rcirncr 1 )(■:',( '(in and Jackson 

Northwest cdrncr 1 '> hi n chard and Essex 

North side Fcri'v, cast of C. & M. railroad 

Southwest corner Washini^ton and Union 

Northwest corner Washumton and Rumford 

North side Washington, opposite Perry avenue.. .. 

North si(h' A'alle.v, opposite Forest 

Northwest corner Aulmru and Forest , 

Northeast corner (.'entre and North State 

Soutliwest corner t'entre ami (Treen 

Northwest corner Ciiitre and Union — 

Northwest corner t'entre and North Spring 

Northwest corner Centre and Rumford 

South side (Jentrc, opposite Essex .. 

Southwest coi'iier (.'entre and Summit avenue — 

Noi-thi'ast corner ( 'entre and Ridge road 

South side r>rid^e, ne:n- easterly harn 

Northeast corner Caiiitol and N(.)rth State 

Northwest corner Scliool ami Green 

Northwest corner School and North Spring 

Northwest corner Scliool and Merrimack 

North side S(diool, near city storeliotise 

Nortli side School, opposite E. B. Wood worth's... 

East side l)ur«in, opijosite Toof's Laundry 

Northwest corner Depot and Railroad square 

South side !)ei)ot, at end id' train-slied 

Northwest corner \Vai'ren and (xreen 

Northwest corner Warren and North Spring 

Northwest corner Warren and Rtimford 

Southwest corner Warren and Merrimack 

Northwest corner Warren and Tahanto 

Northeast corner Warren and Liberty 

Junction of Warren and Pleasant, near Fruit 

Northwest corner Pleasant and Railroad square. 

Southeast corner Pleasant and South 

Northeast corner Pleasant and Fremont 

Southwest corner Pleasant and Sprint;- 

South siile Pleasant, opiiosite Kitmford 

South side Pleasant, oiiposite Merrimack 

South siiie Pleasani, ojiposite Pine 

South side Pleasant, opi'osife Liberty 

North side Pleasant, o)>iiosite Mrs Aiken's 

South side Pleasant, near Mm. Eddy's 

North side Pleasant, near Mrs. Lane's 

North side Pleasant. near.T. McC- Hammond's. . . 

South side Pleasani, opposite Pond road 

Soutli side Pleasant, near .1. iMilnor Coit's 

North si<le Pleasant, opposite Inhnuary 

South side Pleasant, near the mill 

East side .'Niill road, near Upper School cottage... 
North side Mill road, at Orphans' Home 



Junction Old and New Hopkinton roads 

North side Marshall, opposite Fuller 

North side Freight, at southwest corner passengerj 

station 

Northeast corner Hill's avenue and South Mam ■ 

Southwest corner Hill's avenue and Railroad square. . 
Northwest corner Fayette and Elm I 



236 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS. — Co/*^i»z<er/. 




Thompson. 

Chandler. 

Concord. 

Thorudike. 

Laurel. 

Perley. 

West. 



Clinton. 



Avon. 

Harrison. 

Allison. 

Rf)ckingham 

Prospect. 

Curtice ave. 

North State. 

West Concord 

road. 



North State. 



Electric. 

Lake. 

Knig-ht. 
Hutchins. 

Penac'k road. 



Main. 



North side Thompson, opposite Jefferson 

South side ClKniiUcr, (ippnsite railroad 

South side Cniicdrd, upixisitc Jef¥erson 

Northeast corner riioriidikf and Grove 

Northeast corner Laurel and Pierce 

Northwest corner Perley and Grove 

South side Perley, near old brook 

North side West, near Ixulycr 

North side West, opposite bakin 

North side West, at intersection Broadway 

North side Clinton, at Concord State Fair Grounds. 

North side Clinton, near Snell's 

Northeast corner Clinton and Fruit 

North side Clinton, opposite Avon 

Northwest corner Avon and South 

Northwest corner Harrison and Morton 

Northwest corner Allison and Mills 

Northeast corner Rockingham and Broadway 

Northwest corner Prospect and Granite avenue 

North side Curtice avenue, near John C. Kenney's. . 
East side North State, near W. H. Perry's 

West side North State 
East side North State, 
West side North State 
West side North State 
East side North State 
West side North State 
East side Nortli State, 
East side Nortli State, 
East side North State, 
West side North State, 



, near Calvary cemetery 

near A. L. Cohurn's 

at south line of prison wall. 

at north line of prison wall. 

near Asa L. Gay's 

near Amos Haynes Co.'s 

near C. H. Farnum's 

near M. H. Farnum's 

near stone cut 

opposite S. Abbott's 



WEST CONCORD. 

East side North State, near old city farm 

East side North State, near engine house 

East side North State, opposite D. Holden'.>j 

West side North State, near north mill 

East side North State, opposite (ieorge W. Brown's. 

East side North State, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side Nortli State, oi)posite A. Ilollis's 

East side North State, near Sewiill's Falls road 

Northeast eorner of Electric and North State 

North side Electric, neari)ower station 

East side Lake, near S. W. Kellonrs 

East side Lake, near Mrs. G. E. Holden's 

South siile Knight, opposite railroad station 

North side Hutchins, near B. T. Putney's 

North side Hutchins, near C. & C. railroad 

West side Penacook road, near Warner road 

PENACOOK. 

West si<le Main, near Mr. Currier's 

West side Main, at \Voodlawii cemetery 

West side Main, (>pi>osite Stark 

West side Main, near Mr. Pres(!ott's 

Southwest corner Main and Union 

Washington s(iu;ire. opposite Washington 

Northwest corner Main and (.'liarles 

North side Main, opposite East Canal 

North side Main, near iron bridge 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



237 



FIRE-H Y DRAWrS.— Concluded. 











STREETS. 


LOCATIONS. 


a 





West Main. 
High. 



Washington. 



Charles. 



West Canal. 
East Canal. 



'Crescent. 
Merrimack. 



Summer. 

Spring. 
Centre. 

Cross. 

Rolfe. 

Penacook. 



West side West Main, opposite cemetery 

East side High, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner Hi^li and Maple 

Northwest corner Hi!j;h and Spring .' 

Southeast ooriicr Washin!J:ti)ii and Union 

Soutli side \Vasliint;t(>n, (ipposiic -lohii Whitaker's. 

Sou til side Wasl ling-ton, opposile Cliarles 

Sontli sid(> Wasliington, near Contoocook bridge... 

Sout Invest cdrner Cliarles and Warren 

Nortli side (_'liarl(\s, near George W. Corey's 

Sout lieast ((irner West Canal and Warren 

Nortli side East Canal, near Contoocook Mfg. Co... 

Nortli side East Canal, near Crescent 

North side Cri'seeiit, east <>t Canal 

South side Mi'i riiua<k, opposite Merrimack avenue 

North side Merrimack, opposite D. W. Fox's 

North side Merrimaek. opposite Cross 

South side Merrimaek, opposite Rolfe's shop 

North side Merrimaek, near road to Island 

Northwest corner Merrimaek and Penacook . . 

North side Sunrmer, ojiposite HiLrli 

Nortlieast corner Summer and Centre 

Northeast corner Spring an<l Chnreh 

Northwest corner Centre and Spring 

Southwest corner Cross and Summer 

North side Rolfe, uear .lames Corhett's 

Northwest corner R(dt'e ami Penacook 

West side Penacook, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 

Whole number public hydrants 

PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard 

Boston ,v Maine Railroad, new shops 

New state jirison 

Abhotd)o\vning Co.'s yard 

Page Belting Co. 's yard , 

W. P. Ford & Co.'s yard 

N. H. State HospitaJ. yard 

Concord Gas Light Co.'s yard 

St. Paul's School 

Water-works pumping station grounds 

Whole number private hydrants 



272 



CITY OF CONCORD. X.. H. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1901. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

HARRY G. SARGENT, Mayoi-. ex officio. 

SOLON A. CARTER . 
OBADIAH MORRILL 
JOHN WHITAKER . 
HENRY E CON A NT . 
EDSON J. HILL 
GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT 
WILLIAM P. FISKE . 
WILLIAM E. HOOD . 

AYILLIAM P. FISKE, President. 
WILLIAM E. HOOD, Clerk of Board. 



. to March 31, 


1905 


. to March 31, 


1905 


. to March 31, 


1904 


. to March 31, 


1904 


. to March 31, 


1903 


. to March 31, 


1903 


. to March 31, 


1902 


. to March 31, 


1902 



Superintendent. 
y. C. HASTINGS. 



Clerk. 
ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

Foreman. 
PERCY R. SANDERS. 



Inspector. 
HARRY E. STEVENS. 

Eng-ineer. 
HENRY A. ROWELL. 



CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and lenjrth of .service of members. 



Abraham G. Jones, ex officio 


1872 — thi-ee months. 




John M. Hill * . 


1872-1878. 




Benjamin A, Kimball . 


1872-1878. 




Josiah Minot* 


1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 


1874 


David A. Warde * 


1872-1874. 




Edward L. Knowlton * . 


1872. Resigned Sept. 25 


1875 


Benjamin S. Warren * . 


1872-1873. 




John Kimball, ex officio 


1872-1876. 




John Abbott * 


1873-1876. 




John S. Russ * 


. 1874-1877. 




Abel B. Holt* . 


. 1874-1877. 




Samuel S. Kimball * 


1875. Resigned July 1, 


1891. 


Geo. A Pillsbiiry, ex officio * 


1876-1878. 




Luther P. Durgin * 


1876-1885. 




John Kimball 


1877. Resigned July 1, 


1891 


William M. Chase 


1877. Resigned July 1 


1891 


Horace A. Brown, ex officio 


. 1878-1880. 




James L. Mason * 


1878-1893. 




James R. Hill * . 


1878. Died 1884. 




Geo. A. Cummings, ex ojficic 


) 1880-1883. 




Edgar H. Woodman, e.r o(ficio * 


- 1883-1887. 




Joseph H. Abbot* 


1884-1893. 




George A. Young 


. 1885-1894. 




John E. Robertson, exofficio 


. 1887-1889. 




Stillman Humphrey, ea- officio ^ 


' 1889-1891. 




Henry W. Clapp, ex officio * 


. 1891-1893. 




Willis D. Thompson 


. 1891-1895. 




William P. Fiske 


1891. Now in office. 




*] 


deceased. 





240 



CITY OF CONCOHD. 



James H. Chase* 

John Whitaker 

Heuiy E. Coiiant . 

Parsons B. Cogswell, ex q[)i(io 

Solon A. Carter . 

Frank D. Abbot . 

William M. Mason 

William E. Hood . 

Henry Roljinson, ex officio 

Ebenezer B. Hutchinson 

Edson J. Hill 

Albert B. Woodworth, exojficio 

Nathaniel E. Martin, ex officio 

Henry E. Conant . 

Timothy P. Sullivan 

Harry G. Sargent, ex officio 

Obadiah Morrill . 

George D. B. Presoott . 



18;) 1. Died in 1893. 
1892. Now in oflfice. 

1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 
1893-1895. 

1893. Now in office. 
1893-1901. 
1893-1899. 

1894. Now in office. 
1895-1897. 

1895. Resigned Jan. 10,1899. 
1895. Now in office. 
1897-1899. 

1899-1901. 

1899. Now in office. 

1899. Resigned May 14, 1901, 

1901 . Now in office. 

1901. Now in office. 

1901. Now in office. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD. 



Josiah Minot * 
Benjamin A. Kimball 
Edward L. Knowlton * 
John Kimball 
Benjamin A. Kimball 
John Kimball 
William P. Fiske . 



1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

1874-1875. 

1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

1875-1876. 

1876-1878. 

1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

1891. Now in office. 



'Deceased. 



SUMMARY STATISTICS. 



CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WATER-WORKS. 



Population of the city by census of 1900 . . 19,632 

Population of that portion of the city included within 

the water precinct, estimated .... 17,000 

Date of construction, 1872; additions since. 

Works are owned by the city. 

Source of supply, Penacook lake, a natural body of water con- 
taining 265 acres, situated about three miles and a half from the 
state house, and about 125 feet higher than Main street in front 
of the state house. 

Mode of supply, gravity and pumping to reservoir. 



FINANCIAL. 



MAINTENANCE. 



Receipts. 



Expenditures. 



From consumers, mostly For care and niainte- 

for domestic uses f 62,172.56 nance . . .$3,676.88 



From rents . 
From pipe sold, etc. 



91.641 For repairs on cement- 

63.78 lined j)ipe . . . , 485.41 
For new distribution 

pipes .... 21,228.53 

For new service-pipes . 1,563.23 
For maintenance of 

pumping-station . 2,597.68 

For inspection . . 660.00 

For meter account . 1,972.08 
For land at Penacook 

lake .... 2,782.55 

For incidental expenses 253.98 

For abatements . . 74.37 

$35,294.71 



52,327.98 



Amount required to pay 
interest on bonded 
indebtedness 

Balance 



25,700.00 
1,333.27 

562,327.98 



CONSTRUCTION. 

Cost of land damages, Howage, and water rights : 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water rights $60,000.00 
Concord Manufacturing Co., for 

water rights . . . .83,000.00 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill i)rivilege 

and land . . . . 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for kit-shop 

privilege . . . . 5,000.00 



"VVATEi; DEPARTMENT. 



243 



Paid Flowage rights around Peiiacook 

lake . . . . , 

W. P. Cooledge, Hiitchins house 

and lot .... 
Mary C. Rowell, for land 
Moses H. Bradley, " 

Joseph B. Walker, <■' 

John G. Hook, " 

A. S. Ranney, "■ 

Alfred Roberts, " 

Charles E. Ballard, " 

Mary G. Carter, " 

Elizabeth AVidmer, " 

A. L. Proctor, " 

Robert Crowley, " 

Miles Hodgdon, " 

Heirs of Lowell Brown, " 
Coffin & Little, " 

O. F. Richardson, " 

Cook cSi Hood, " 

C. H. Amsden, water and flowage 
rights .... 
Cost of property and rights of Torrent 
Aqueduct Association 
dam, gate-house and appurte 

nances .... 
conduit and gate-houses 
mains (low service main and pump 
main from the dam to Penacook 
street, force main from the pump 
to the reservoir, fire main 
through North and South Main 
streets, and supply main from 
near the dam to Stark street) . 
distribution pipe 

service-pipe . . . . 

reservoir . . . . . 



$4,375.61 

2,2oO.OU 
1,500.00 
5,000.00 
2,214.00 

370.00 
1,350.00 
1,275.00 
2,500.00 
1,250.00 
1,564.50 

450.00 
3,000.00 
2,200.00 
1,032.55 

800.00 

100.00 
1,750.00 

5,000.00 

20,000.00 

30,756.17 

29,484.05 



160,960.92 

300,341.38 

44,053.18 

42,460.09 



244 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cost of pumping-station, shop, stable and 

storehouse .... $22,000.00 
pumpinir machinery . . . 10,215.00 

engineering and superintendence . 14,913.12 
incidentals .... 6,531.19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1902 . 



$873,196.76 



Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said cost, 
of which the followina: are still outstandina: : 



When 


due. 


Jan . 1 


, 1902, 


Jan. 1 


, 1903, 


Jan. 1 


, 1904, 


Jan. 1 


, 1905, 


Jan. 1 


, 1906, 


Jan. 1 


, 1907, 


Jan. 1 


, 1908, 


Jan. 1 


, 1909, 


Jan . 1 


, 1910, 


Jan, 1 


, 1911, 


Jan. 1 


, 1911, 


Oct. 1 


, 1912, 


Jan. 1 


, 1913, 


Jan. 1 


, 1914, 


Jan. 1 


, 1915, 


Jan. 1 


, 1916, 


Jan. 1 


, 1917, 


Jan. 1 


, 1918, 


Jan. 1 


, 1919, 


Nov. 1 


, 1920, 


Nov. 1 


, 1921, 


Mar. 1 


, 1922, 


Jan. 1 


, 1923, 



Rate. 

4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
3, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
3, 
3, 

4, 



Amount. 
$10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 

5,000.00 

5,000.00 
10,000.00 
45,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 

5,000.00 

20,000.00 

400,000.00 



550,000.00 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council : 

The Board of Water Commissioners submit herewith their 
report for the year 1901. The report of the superintendent, 
which is a part of this report, exhibits in detail the work of the 
department. 

Mr. Frank D. Abbot, who was elected a commissioner in 
1893, and who occupied the office of secretary of the board, 
resigned, and Mr. Obadiah Morrill was chosen to fill the vacancy ; 
and Mr. Timothy P. Sullivan, who was elected in 1899, also 
resigned, and Mr. Geo. D. B. Prescott was elected to fill the 
vacancy. These gentlemen have served faithfully and ably, and 
it is a regret that their business relations have called them from 
the city. 

The year has marked the completion of the 20-inch main to 
Penacook lake to take the place of the cement-lined main laid at 
the beginning of the works ; thus a serious menace has been 
overcome. 

More pipe has been relayed than in many previous years, so 
that if in the coming five years we can continue this important 
work, the city will practically be relaid with cast-iron pipe, and 
in a way that shall not call for a large expenditure in any one 
year. The weakness of the old pipe is evident by the frequent 
leaks, but each year makes it easier to control them. A feature 
of the relaying with new pipe is the necessity of much expense in 
changing over the service-pipe and setting of gates, also, con- 
necting with the hydrants. 

The payment of the hydrant rental by the city has enabled the 
board to push the work, and the expectation is that the plans sug- 
gested by the superintendent in his report will be carried out. 



24fi CITY OF CONCORD. 

The good results of the pumping station have been maintained 
during the year ; the pump having been in commission constantly 
for ten years shows the careful management of the engineer. 

It may be wise, to guard against any mishap in the future, to 
look at the matter of an auxiliary pump. 

The continued use of meters, while it will have the effect of 
lessening the income, prevents a waste of water. The number 
now in use is 1,142. 

The building of cottages on the eastern shoi'es of Lake Pena- 
cook has been prosecuted to an alarming extent, so that the 
Board have made purchases of the shores now unoccupied, to 
prevent encroachment. The purity of our drinking water is vital, 
and the Board will endeavor to nse such methods as seem to 
them to best reach that end. 

The height of the water is gratifying, but on account of it 
some needed repairs have not been made on the face of the dam. 

The Board desire to express their appreciation of the satisfac- 
tory manner in which the superintendent and his assistants have 
carried on their individual work during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SOLON A. CARTER, 
OBADIAH MORRILL, 
JOHN WHITAKER, 
HENRY E. CONANT, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 
WILLIAM E. HOOD, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
HARRY G. SARGENT, ex officio, 

Water Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the thirtieth annual report of the 
operations of this department, showing the receipts, expenditures, 
and abatements, together with a statement of extensions and 
improvements made during the year ending December 31, 1901. 

RECEIPTS. 

For water, from consumers by hxed 

rates $30,240.1)9 

For water, from consumers by meter 

rates ...... 31,762.73 

From delinquents . . . . 58.70 

For water used for building purposes . 110.14 

For rents . . . . . . #91.64 

For water-wheel sold .... 40.00 

For pipe sold, etc. . . . . 23.78 

$62,327.98 

Deduct abatements . . . . . . 74.37 

Net receipts for 1901 $62,253.61 

EXPENDITURES. 
General Expenses. 

Paid pay-rolls, salaries, and labor . $10,894.74 
Nathaniel White, .Jr., rent of office 

and heating . . . . 350.00 

S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop in 

Penacook and smith-work . 24.80 

Rumford Printing Co., printing . 89.45 

Ira C. Evans, printing . . 84.40 



248 CITV OF CONCORD. 

Paid Frank L. Sanders, books, etc. . $28.15 

E. C. Eastman, office supplies . 2.13 
Library Bureau, card cases and 

supplies .... 4G.50 

Concord Light & Power Co, gas . 11.70 
N. E. Teleplione & Telegraph Co., 

telephones .... 129.00 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., office 

supplies, etc. .... 29.43 

Humphrey Dodge Co., hardware . 51.64 

Thompson & Hoague, hardware . 73.05 

D. Waldo White, grain . . 137.29 

H. H. Crowell, slab wood . . 15.00 

C. H. Martin & Co., lard oil, etc. 10.45 

Batchelder & Co., oil, etc. . . 28.94 

Woodworth & Co., cement, etc. . 35.70 

Dickerman & Co., cement . . 14.80 
A. C. Sanborn, dynamite and care 

of horses . . . . 7.25 

C. W. Dadmun, electrical supplies 5.40 

Samuel Holt, brick . . . 4.00 

Z. F. Swain, brick . . . 3.60 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., jute 

packing . . . . . 40.35 

Page Belting Co., leather valves . 14.40 

Smith & Anthony, repair bands . 4.20 
U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry 

Co., cast-iron pipe . . . 10,295.78 

Builders Iron Foundry, castings • 35.63 

Ford & Kimball, castings . . 31.27 

Concord Foundry Co., castings . 27.70 
Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co., 

gates and hydrants . . . 1,423.80 
K. D. Wood & Co., hydrant sup- 
plies ..... 76.50 
Richards & Co., pig lead . . 908.66 
Boston Lead Mfg. Co., lead pipe . 86.94 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



249 



Paid J. H. Cunningham Co., pipe and 

fittings $197.34 

Walworth Mfg. Co., gate boxes 

and tools . . . . 203.02 
Sumner-Goodwin Co., tools and 

fittings 138.23 

The George Woodman Co., fittings 5.10 
Goodhue & Milton, fittings . . 9.69 
Hays Mfg. Co., service boxes . 173.28 
National Meter Co., meters . . 727.00 
Thomson Meter Co., meters . 702.24 
E. B. Hanchay, smith-work . 180.85 
Ross W. Cate, smith-work . . 22.05 
J. M. Crossman, smitli-work . 56.95 
Concord Axle Co., steel and ma- 
chine work .... 5.75 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs . 11 60 
George D. Huntley, repairs . . 10.85 
George L. Theobald, team work . 252.90 
O. F. Richardson & Son, team 

work . . . . . 75.64 

J. H. Coburn, team work . . 4.20 

Fellows & Clark, use of horse . 10.50 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., 

lumber and labor . . . 26.31 

Rowell & Flummer, mason-work 39.62 

James Cookson, whitewashing . 4.60 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing 

concrete . . . . 43.00 

J. H. Flood, use of derrick . . 4.00 

M. J. Duffy, use of derrick . . 3.50 

J.. L. Qninn, use of derrick . . 2.00 

^Engineering News . . . 5.00 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance . 114.46 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance . 32.50 

Chase & Martin, insurance . . 25.00 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freiglit 

and repairing siding . . 1,332.49 



250 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid Concord Street Railway, car tickets 
town of" Webster, taxes 
iieirs of Lowell Brown, land at 

Penacook lake 
Cook & Hood, land at Penacook 

lake 

Ya. B. Morse, horse 

A. G. Cochran, clei'k, cash paid 

out ..... 

incidentals .... 



850.00 
56.00 

1,032.55 

1,750.00 
125.00 

113.98 
52.81 



132,622.66 



Pumping-Station Expenses. 



Paid pay-rolls, engineer and fireman 
C. H. Stevens & Co., coal . 
H. H. Crowell, slab wood . 
Vacuum Oil Co., oil . 
A. W. Chesterton & Co., packing 
Knowlton Packing Co., packing 
N. E. Roller Grate Co., grate 
Henry R. VVorthington, valv 

spring .... 
Rowell & Plummer, mason-work 
J. H. Sanborn, mason-work 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies ' 
Thompson & Hoague, supplies 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas 
New England Telephone & Tele 

graph Co., telephones 



$1,510.00 
822.89 
69.00 
55.69 
16.14 
10.24 
56.00 

6.30 
9.14 
4.00 
7.75 
2.50 
2.50 
6.15 

1!).3<S 



$2,597.68 



Total ex))enditures ftn* 1901 



55,220.34 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



.251 



The expenditures are divided as follows : 
General Expenses. 



For 


care and maintenance . 


$3,676.88 




repairs on cement-lined pipe . 


485.41 




new service-pipes 


1,563.23 




new distribution pipes . 


21,228.53 




inspection .... 


660.00 




meter account 


. 1,972.08 




land at Penacook lake . 


2,782.55 




incidentals .... 


253.98 

$32,622.66 




Pumping-Station Es 


cpenses. 


For 


salaries, engineer and fireman 


81,510.00 




fuel 


891.89 




oil, packing and other supplies 


92.32 




repairs .... 


77.94 




gas and telephone 


25.53 




— ' '^jLtmOOt *\J^J 



EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron main and distribution pipes have been laid and 
hydrants set during the year, as follows : 

On main line, 

north from Lake street in West Concord to a little below the 
brick gate-house, 2,615 feet 20-iuch pipe. 

In South State street, 

south from Pleasant to Thompson street, 978 feet 14-inch 
pipe, in place of 10-incli cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Sordh street, 

south fi'om Pleasant to Thompson street, 1,102 feet 12-inch 
pipe, in place of 6-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In Pleasant street, 

west from State to South street, 600 feet 12-inch pipe, iu 
place of 8-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

/;; Pleasant street, 

east from State to Main street, and Avest from South to Rum- 
ford street, 1,331 feet 10-inch pipe, in place of 8-inch and 
6-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued, and 1 hydrant. 

In North Main street, 

north from Centre to Chapel street, 997 feet 10-inch pipe, in 
place of 6-incli cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Thompson street, 

on connection at South State street, 38 feet 10-inch pipe. 

In Warren street, 

west from North Spring to Tahanto street, 1,082 feet 8-inch 
pipe, in place of 6-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Warren street, 

west from near Giles to North Fruit street, 685 feet 8-inch 
pipe, in place of 4-inch cement-lined and iron pipe dis- 
continued. 

In SouUi Spring street, 

south from Pleasant street, 83 feet 8-inch pipe, in place of 
4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Thompson street, 

west from South State to South street, 1,020 feet 6-inch 
pipe, in place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued, 
and 1 hydrant. 

In Fayette street, 

west from South State to South street, 915 feet 6-inch pipe, 
in place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 253 

In Wall street,, 

west from South State to South street, 754 feet 6-inch pipe, 
in place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Stone street,, 

west from near Broadway, 555 feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Court street, 

west from North Main street, 58 feet 6-inch pipe, in place 
of 4-inch cement-hned pipe discontinued. 

In Montgomery street, 

west from North Main street, 43 feet 6-inch pipe, in place 
of 4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Giles street, 

north from Warren street, 82 feet 6-inch pipe, in place of 
4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued, and 1 hydrant. 

In Green street, 

north from Pleasant street, 61 feet 6-inch pipe, in place of 
4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

hi North Spring street, 

north from Warren street, 41 feet 6-inch pipe, and north 
from Pleasant street, 22 feet 6-inch pipe, in place of 6-inch 
cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In North Fruit street, 

on connection at Warren street, 13 feet 6-incli pipe. 

In Hall street, 

extended south, 790 feet 4-inch pipe and 1 hydrant. 

In Hammond street, 

extended east, 252 feet 4-inch pipe. 

In Elm street, 

south from Pleasant street, 131 feet 4-inch pipe. 



254 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



In Elm street^ 

south from Wall street, 108 feet 4-incli pipe. 

In Durgin fitreet, 

near Toof's laundry, 1 hydrant. 

On hydrant hranc/tes, 

297 teet 6-inch pipe and 22 feet 4-inch pipe ; 260 feet 6-inch 
and 18 feet 4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

Also 670 feet 1-inch pipe. 

There have been set 50 gates ; discontinued, 24. 



Summary of the Foregoing-. 
New Pipes, Hydrants and Stop-Gates. 





Pipes. 




Hydrants. 




Stop-G 


ates. 


1-in. 


, 670 


feet. 


Durgin street. 




4-in., 


3 


4-in. 


, 1,303 




Pleasant street. 




6-in., 


31 


6 -in. 


,3,861 




Thompson sti'eet, 




8-in., 


3 


8-in. 


, 1,850 




Giles street, 




10-in., 


5 


10-in. 


, 2,366 




Hall street, 




12-in., 


5 


12-in. 


, 1,702 








14-in., 


3 


14-in. 


, 978 












20-in. 


, 2,615 


feet. 












15,345 





equal 


to 2.90 


)niles. 




5 




50 



Pipes and Stop-Gates Discontinued. 







Pipes. 




4- 


in. 


, 3,632 feet. 


6- 


in. 


, 3,863 


(4 


8- 


in. 


, 1,551 


(( 


10- 


in. 


, 978 


!.(. 


14- 


in. 


23 


a 




10,047 


feet. 


equal to 1.90 


miles. 



Stop- Gates. 




4-in., 


12 


6-in., 


6 


10-in., 


1 


14-in., 


3 


18-m., ■ 


2 



24 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



255 



Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 

323,158 feet, equal to 61.20 miles. 

Total number of hydrants now in use, 272. 

Total number of gates now in use, 783. 

• 

Service-Pipes. 

There have been laid during the year and connected with the 
main pipes, 57 service-pipes consisting of 

56 l^-inch, 1,572 feet. 

1 2-inch, 24 " 



57 



1,596 feet. 



There have been discontinued, 6 ; whole number in use at the 
present time, 3,278 ; total length of service-pipes, 76,968 feet, or 
14.57 miles. We have placed 167 service-boxes at the curb on 
old services. 

"We have set 1 34 meters during the year ; 2 have been removed, 
making the total number now in use, 1,142. 

The following table shows the height of water in Penacook 
lake on the first day of each montli : 



January 


182.90 


July 


184.75 


February 


182.70 


August . 


184.00 


March . 


182.30 


September 


184.35 


April . 


184.00 


October . 


183.90 


May 


184.85 


November 


183.75 


June 


185.00 


December 


183.80 



The lowest point reached during the year was on March 8, 
being 182.15 ; the highest was on April 7, 185.40 ; mean height, 
183.86, which was .77 foot higher than the mean height for the 
year 1900. 

The water has been running over tlie overflow one hundred and 
two days during the year : in April, 26 ; in May, 31 ; in June, 
25; in July, 16; in August, 3; in December, 1. At no time 
has the water been lower than thirty-two inches below^ the over- 
flow. 



256 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

The work of rcluyinsr the original 14-incii ceinent-liued miiiii 
was completed, and tliere is now a continuous line of 20-inch 
cast-iron pipe from Penacook lake to tlie piimping-station. Good 
progress was made toward relaying the cement-lined pipe in the 
city, and I would recommend that the following streets be relaid 
the coming season : South Main street from Freight to Thorn- 
dike ; South State and South streets from Thompson to Thorn- 
dike ; South Spring from Pleasant to Concord; Fayette and 
Thompson from South Main to South State ; Thompson from 
South to South Spring; and Concord, Monroe and Thorndike 
streets, thus making the entire area between Pleasant and Thorn- 
dike and South Main and South Spring streets supplied by cast- 
iron distribution pipe. 

In conclusion, I desire to thank all the members of the board 
for their hearty support and many courtesies extended through 
the year, and also wish to express my appreciation of the faithful 
service of the employees of the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

V. C. HASTINGS, 

Stiperintendent. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER OF THE PUMPING-STRTION. 



Pumping-Station, Concord Water- Works » 
V. C. Hastings, Superintendent : 

Sir, — 1 would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping-station is in very fair working condition, but it will be 
necessary to make some repairs the coming year. 

Following will be found a statement of the coal and supplies 
used at the pumping-station during the year ; also a table showing 
the work for each month. 

Statement. 

134 tons 1,556 lbs. Pocahontas coal. 

24 cords of wood. 
52 gallons of oil. 

25 lbs. of waste. 

ENGINE RECORD. 



Date. 


Pumping 
time. 

h. m. 


Gallons 

water 

pumped. 


Daily 
average 
pumped. 


Total 

coal 

burned. 


Daily 
average 

coal 
burned. 


♦Gallons 
pumped 

per 
povind of 

coal. 


January 

February 

March 

April 

Mav 


131:00 
143:30 
146 :30 
122 :45 
139:00 
143:15 
164:15 
132:00 
139:00 
146:00 
156:30 
149:15 


11,035,893 
12,348,765 
12,711.666 
10,492.944 
12,093,114 
12,508,749 
14,324,937 
11,764,104 
12,570,591 
12,885,708 
13,496,406 
13,138,158 


355,996 
441,027 
410,053 
349,764 
390,100 
416,958 
462,094 
379,487 
419,019 
415,668 
449,880 
423,811 


22,580 
24,981 
25,614 
21,384 
25,263 
25,254 
29,309 
23,678 
25,225 
25,560 
26,745 
26,123 


726 
892 
826 
712 
814 
841 
945 
763 
840 
824 
891 
842 


488 
494 
496 
490 

478 


June . . 

July 

August 

September.... 

October 

November 

December 


495 
488 
499 
498 
504 
504 
502 


Total 


1,713:00 


149,371,035 


409,235 


301,716 


826 


495 


Daily average 


4:41 


409,235 




826 















* Amount of coal consumed includes that used for heating the building and 
banking fires. 

Amount of coal consumed per thousand gallons pumped, 2.01 
pounds. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 

17 



APPENDIX. 



A 

Receipts for Each Year Since the Completion of the 

Works. 

For the year ending January 31, 1874 
For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875 
For the year ending April 1, 1876 
" " " 1877 

" " " 1878 

" " " 1879 

" " " 1880 

" " " 1881 

For nine months ending December 31, 1881 
For the year ending December 31, 1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

Total receipts for 29 years 



S4, 


431 


10 


17 


535 


00 


16 


921.24 


19 


001.07 


20 


763.03 


21 


869 


86 


22 


451 


53 


26 


744 


58 


25 


534.01 


27 


243.06 


28 


255 


48 


28 


915 


65 


30 


222 


54 


30 


862.64 


34 


047 


52 


38 


441.32 


40 


237 


53 


42 


133.41 


46 


075 


16 


48 


351 


52 


52 


299.66 


53 


230.10 


55 


343 


.19 


56 


557 


.81 


55 


156.42 


59 


,147 


.54 


53 


953 


.13 


57 


003 


.71 


62 


253.61 


$1,074 


982 


42 



WATER DEPAHTMENT. 



259 



B 



1873 . 


xfat/c 




1 75.80 


VV CLUOX JLL 

1888 . 


COOJ^ 




181.96 


1874 






179.50 


1889 






180.91 


1875 






180.00 


1890 






181.90 


1876 






180.28 


1891 






180.00 


1877 






176.46 


1892 






174.32 


1878 






179.50 


1893 






173.38 


1879 






179.74 


1894 






172.81 


1880 






175.30 


1895 






171.15 


1881 






174.70 


1896 






178.96 


1882 






179.15 


1897 






183.33 


1883 






. 176.40 


1898 






. 184.31 


1884 






. 178.18 


1899 






183.49 


1885 






. 176.80 


1900 






. 183.09 


1886 






. 178.10 


1901 






. 183.86 


1887 






. 179.04 















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8-iii. 6-in. 4-iii. 






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i 



WATER DEPAUTMENT. 



265 



F1RE-HYDRANT8. 




North Main. 



South Main. 



Water. 
Hall. 

Hammond. 

Fiske. 

Summer. 

Nortli State. 



Southwest corner North Main and Penacook 

East side Nortli Main, near J. B. Walker's 

.Iiuiction N<irtli ^Nfain and Fiske 

East side Xnrtii ]\lain, near Larkiii's store 

Xorthwt'st corner Xnrtli Main and Franklin 

East siile Xui-th ^laiii, opiKisitc Pearl 

Nortliwest corner X<irtli .Main and Washington 

West side Xd. Main, njiposite Historical Society rooms 

East side Xortli ^Nlain, (imxisitc riiapel 

Northwest corner Xortli ^lain and (_'ourt 

Xortliwest corner Xoi'tli Main and l^itnnin 

Xortliwest (■orner Xortli .Main and Montgdniery 

East side Xortli Main, opliositc Monigduiery 

Xortliwest corner Xortli Main and Centre 

Southeast corner Xortli ^lain an<l liridge 

Southwest cin'iier Xortli Main and Park 

East side Xortli .Main, opposite Pari-; 

Xortliwest corner Xortli .Main and Capitol 

Xortli \\est corner Xorth ^lain and School 

West side Xortli .Main, at Centennial lilocdv 

East side Xortli Main, opjiosite Centennial Block 

East side Xortli -M:iin, in rear Eai;lc Plotel 

East side Xorth .Main, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner Xdrtli .Main and Warren 

West side Xorth Main, at Central Block 

Northeast corner Xortli .Main and Depot 

Northwest corner Xorth Main and Pleasant 

Southeast corner South ?ilain and Pleasant 

Northeast corner South ^lain and Freight 

East side South ^lain, opposite Fayette 

East side South Main, opposite Tlioinpson 

Southeast corner South Main and Cliamller 

Northwest corner So. Main and Wentw drth's avenue. 

Northwest corner Soitth Main and Thorndike 

East side S<mth Main, opposite St. John's church 

Northwest corner South .Main and Perley 

^\estside South Main, near Abbot-Downing' Co. 's 

East side South Main, opposite Abbot-Downing Go's. . 

Xortliwest corner South .Main and We.st 

East side South .Main, near ^\'est 

West side South Main, opposite ({as 

West side South Main, opposite Holt Bros. M'f'g- Co... 

Soitthwest corner South Main and South State 

Xortliwest corner South Main and Pillsbury 

East side South Main, opposite Pillsbury 

West side South .Main, at J. H. Lamprey's 

West side South Main, at W. .1. Sawyer's 

West side Water, near (.apt. .lames Thompson's 

West side Hall, Ixdow Kolle and Kumford Asylum 

East si<le Hall, opi.osite W H. Page's 

Xorth side Hauiniond, near Bridg'e 

^yest side Fiske, near Xorth State 

Northeast corner Siiinmer and Pitman 

East side North State, near cemetery gate 

Northeast corner Xorth State and Foster 

West side Xorth State, at water-works storehouse 

Southwest corner Xorth State and Penacook 

Nortliwest corner Xorth State and Walker 

Northwest corner Xortli State and (Jhurch 

Northwest corner Xortli State and Tit;mont 

Northeast corner Xorth State and Washington 

West side North State, opposite Court 

Northwest corner North State and Maple 



26G 



CITY OF CONCOKU. 



F1RP:-HYDKANTS. — Coyj^u^Merf. 




North State. 



South State. 



Mills. 

Dakin. 

Dunklee. 
Broadway. 

Green. 

South. 



Bradley. 



Union. 

Lyndon. 
North Spring. 
South Spring. 



Rumford. 



Tall an to. 
Pine. 
Hi^h. 

Giles. 

Princeton. 
Fruit. 

Minot. 
Penacook. 



Highland. 
Church. 



Northeast corner North State and Centre ._ . . . 

East side North State, opposite government huilding 

Southwest corner North State and School 

Niirlliwcst corner North State and Warren 

Northwest corner North State and Pleasant 

East side South Stati', opposite Wall 

Northwest coniiM- South State and Thompson 

Soutliwest conicr South State and INIonroe 

East si(h' South State, opposite Laurel.. 

Southeast corner South State anil Downing 

Northeast corner South State and West , 

.1 unction of South State and Soutli Main 

Southeast cornel' Mills and 1 )o\viiing 

West side .Mills, near Levi Call's 

^Vest side Dakin, near ('. E. Hairiinan's 

Northwest corner Dunklee and Pillsliury , 

Nort Invest corner iJniadway and Allison 

West side I5roadway, near precinct line , 

Northwest cc>rner ( ireeu and Prince , 

East side (ireeii, opposite Prince 

West side South, op|)osite Wall 

Northwest corner South and Thompson 

West side South, opposite Monroe , 

West side South, oi)posite Laurel 

West side South, opposite Dow iiing 

West side South, opposite Allison 

West side South, near A hi m it I farm 

West side Soutli, oiiposite Sin it h farm 

Nor til west corner South and liockingham 

Southwest coriu'r I Bradley and Penacook 

AVest side liradley, opposite Walker 

East side Prailley, ojiposite HiL;iilaiid 

Northwest corner Union ami ^laple 

Southwest corner [,,ynih)ii and Trenioiit , 

Southwest corner North Siirinj^- and Centre 

Southwest corner South Sprini^ and Oak 

West side South Siirini^-, opposite (Joiicord 

West side So. SpiiiiL;, opp. Perley proposed extension. 

West siile Km u ford, oiiposite Perkins 

Northwest corner Kiunford and lieacon 

Northeast corner Ku in ford and Franklin 

Northeast corner Kuni ford and Aliliott 

NortI least corner Kninford and ('amhridge 

Northeast corner Kiunford and Sciiool 

Noitli west corner Taliaiit<i and School 

Southwest corner Pine ami Centre 

Noil 1 1 west corner Hi^h and Auburn 

East side Ilis^li, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner Ili[;li and Franklin 

Southeast corner ( Jiles and School 

Northeast corner (iiles and Warren 

Southwest corner Princeton and Clinton 

East side Fruit, oiiiiosite Win. W, Critchett's 

Northwest corner Fiiiit and Woodman 

West sid(^ i\limit, near Odd F(d low's' Home 

South side Penacook, cast (d' P. B. Co 's liark house.. . . 

South side Penacook, near P. 1'.. Co."s 

South side Penacook, near P. 1'. Oo.'s ottice 

Southeast cornel' Penacook and North Main 

Southwest corner Penacook ami Kiunford 

Southeast corner Penacook ami Coluinhus avenue 

Northeast corner Higlihuid and Kuniford 

Nortli side Clnirch, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner Cliurcli and Rumford 



i 15 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



267 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co??im?te(^. 



STREETS. 



LOCATIONS. 



Franklin. 



Beacon. 

Blanchard. 

Ferry. 

Washington. 



Valley. 
Auburn. 
Centre. 



Bridge. 
Capitol. 
School. 



Durgin. 
Depot. 

Warren. 



Pleasant. 



Mill road. 
St. P. School. 
Old Hopkin- 

ton road. 

^Marshall. 
Freight. 

Hill's avenue. 

Fayette. 



Northwest corner Franklin and Jackson 

Southwest corner Franklin and Rumford 

South si<le Fi-ankliii, opposite W. J. Ahern's 

Northeast corner Franklin and Auburn 

Nortliwest ('orner ISearon and .Tackson 

Northwest I'orner lilancliard and Essex 

North side Ferry, fast of C. ^: :M. railroad 

Southwest corner Wasliin^ton and Union 

Nortliwest corner Wasliinuton and Rumford 

Nortli side Wasliinj^ton. opposite Perry avenue.. . 

North side ValU'v, oi)posite Forest 

Northwest corner Auburn and Forest.. 

Northeast corner Centre and North State 

Southwest corner Centre and (Treen 

Nortliwest corner Centre and Union 

Northwest corner Centre and North Spring 

Northwest corner Centre and Rumford 

South side Centre, opposite Essex 

Sotithwest corner Centre and Summit avenue 

Northeast corner Centre and Ridge road 

South side Bridge, near easterly barn 

Northeast corner Capitol ;ind North State 

Nortliwest corner School and (h-eeii 

Northwest corner Scliool and North Spring 

Northwest corner School and Merrimack 

North side School, near citv storeliouse 

North side School, opposite' E. H. Wood worth's. . . 

East side Durgin, opposite Toof's Laundry 

Northwest corner Depot and Railroad square 

South side Depot, at end of train-shed 

Northwest corner ^^'arren and (ireen 

Northwest corner Warren and North Spring 

Northwest corner Warren and Rumford 

Southwest corner Warren and Merrimack 

Northwest corner Warren and Tahanto 

Northeast corner Warren and Liberty 

Junction of ^^'arren and Pleasant, near Fruit 

Nortliwe.st corner Pleasant anil Railroad square. 

Southeast corner Pleasant and South 

Northeast corner Pleasant and Fremont 

Southwest corner Pleasant and Spring 

South side Pleasant, opimsite Rumford 

South side Pleasant, opposite .Merriniack 

South side Pleasant, oi>posite Pine 

South side Pleasant, opposite Libertj^ 

North side Pleasant, opiiosite j\Irs. Aiken's 

South side Pleasant, near Mrs. Eddy's 

North side Pleasant, neai- Mrs. Lane's 

North siile Pleasant, near J. McC. Hammond's... 

South side Pleasant, opposite Pond road 

South side Pleasant, near .1. Miliior Colt's 

North side Pleasant, opposite Infirmary 

South side Pleasant, near the mill 

East side Mill i-oad, near Upper School cottage... 
North side iNIil I road, at Orphans' Home 



Junction Old and New Hopkinton roads 

North side Marshall, opposite Fuller 

North side Freight, at southwest corner passenger 

station 

Northeast corner Hill's avenue and South Main 

Southwest corner Hill's avenue and Railroad square. . 
Northwest corner Fayette and Elm 



268 



CITY OK CONCOUD. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co »<inMef?. 




Thompson. 

Chandler. 

Concord. 

Thorndike. 

Laurel. 

Perley. 

West. 



Clinton. 



Avon. 

Harrison. 

Allison. 

Rockingham. 

Pi-ospect. 

Curtice ave. 

North State. 

West Concord 

road. 



North State. 



Electric. 

Lake. 

Kniglit. 
Hutchins. 

Penac'k road. 



Main. 



North side Thompson, opposite JetTerson 

South side Chandler, opposite railroad 

South side Concord, oppusitc .IrllVrson 

Northeast corner riiorudikf and (irove 

Northeast cm-ner Laurel and Pierce 

Nort 1 1 west corner Perley and Grove 

South side Perley, near old brook 

North side West, near Bad:4er 

Nort 1 1 side West, ui)i)(isite 1 »akin 

North side West, at inl(.Tsection Broadway 

North sitle Clinton, at Concord State Fair Grounds 

North side Clinton, near Snell's 

Northeast corner Clinton and Fruit 

Nortli side Clinton, opposite Avon 

Northwest corner Avon and South 

Northwest corner Harrison and Morton 

Northwest corner Allison and Mills 

Northeast corner Roekiiiy;liiiin and Broadway 

Northwest corner Prospect and Granite avenue — 
North side Curtice avenue, near John C. Kenney's. 
East side North State, near W. H. Perry's 

West side North State, near Calvary cemetery 

East side Nnitli State, near A. L. Coburn's 

West side Xortli State, at south line of prison wall 
West side North State, at north line of prison wall 

East side North State, near Asa L. Gay's 

West side North State, near Amos Haynes Co.'s. . . . 

East side North State, near 0. H. Fariiuin's 

East side Xnrfli State, near M. H. Farnum's 

East side North State, near stone cut 

West siile North State, opposite S. Abbott's 

WEST CONCORD. 

East side North State, near old city farm 

East side North State, near engine house 

East side North State, opposite D. Holden's 

West side North State, near north mill 

East side N<n'th State, opposite George W. Brown's 

Eastsidi- North Statr. near Mr. Harrington's 

East side Xortii State, opposite A. Hollis's 

East side Xortli State, iioar SewalTs Falls road 

Nortlicast corner of Electric and North State 

North side Electric, near power station 

East side Lake, near S. W. Kellom's 

East side Laixe, near Mrs. G. E. Holden's 

Soutli side Kiiiglit, opposite railroad station 

North side Hutchins, near B. T. Putney's 

North side Hutchins, near C. & C. railroad 

West siile Penacook road, near Warner road 

PENACOOK. 

West side Main, near Mr. Currier's 

West side Main, at Wood lawn cemetery 

West side iNIaiii, opposite Stark 

West side Main, near Mr. Prcscott's 

Soutli west corner Main and Union 

Wasiiiiiii'ton s(iuare. opposite Washington 

Nortli west corner Main and Charles 

Norlli side Main, opposite East Canal 

Nortli side Main, near iron bridge 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



269 



FIUi:-nYDRA'!^TS.— Concluded. 











STREETS. 


LOCATIONS. 


1 


Is 



West Main. 


West side West Main, opposite cemetery 


6 
14 
3 
6 
5 


1 


High. 


East side High, opposite Sniniiiit 










•« 


Northwest conirr Miu'li and Spring 


8 


"Washington. 


Souti least corner Washington and Union 




S<.mth side Wasliington. opposite John Whitaker's 




Charles. 


Sontli side SVashington, near Contoocook hridge 

Southwest corner Charles and Warren 

Nortli side Charles, near George W. Corey's 


4 

2 
1 


East Canal. 

Crescent. 
Merrimack. 


Nortli side East f^anal. near Contoocook Mfg. Co 

Nortli side East Canal, near ('rescent 

North side ("reseeiit, east of Canal 

South side .Merrimack, opposite Merrimack avenue. .. 
North siile Mei'riinack, opposite U. W. Fox's 


2 
1 


„ 


North side ^lenimack, opposite Cross 

South side ^lerrimack, opposite Rolt'e's shop 




'• 






" 


Northwest corner Merriniaek and Penacook 


6 


Slimmer. 


North side Sum 111 er, oi)p(isite High 




Spring. 


Northeast corner Summer and Centre 

Northeast corner Spring and Church 


2 
1 


Centre. 


Northwest corner Centre and Spring 


1 


Cross. 


Southwest corner Cross and Summer 


1 


Rolfe. 


North side Rolfe, near .Tames Corbett's 




Penacook. 


Nortliwest eoriier Rolfe and Penacook 

West sitle Penacook, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 


2 

1 




Whole number public hydrants 


^7? 




PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 
Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard 






Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops 






New state prison 






Abbot-Downing Co.'s vard 












W . P. Ford & Co. 's vard 

N. H. State Hospital vard 






Coneord (ias Light Co.'s yard 






St. Paul's School 






Water-works pumping station grounds 


S<) 




Whole number private hydrants 


39 









PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the City Council : 

The accompanying report of the librarian presents at 
length the methods of library management during the past 
year, their development, and the condition and prospects of 
the institution, and it is respectfully commended to \our 
thoughtful consideration. We will add a few words only 
with reference to the expense of maintenance and a recommen- 
dation as to the appropriation. 

Last year, in view of the accumulated interest on the Seth 
K. Jones fund, $875-431 then first available, the appropriation 
to the library was reduced from $5,000 to $4,500. Of the 
interest on the Jones fund there has been expended $646.36; 
interest on other funds and on Jones fund for current year, 
$169.21. The total expenditure, $5,315.47, has been used 
for the following purposes: purchase of books, $1,174.62; 
subscription to newspapers, $45.95; to periodicals, $181.85 ; 
and the remainder, $3,913.05, has been required for expenses 
of administration, supplies, etc. A detailed statement of 
these disbursements is included in the report of the city 
auditor. There have been received from fines $194.75 and 
from the sale of catalogues $11.00, which amounts have been 
paid to the city treasurer. 

As only $229.17 of the interest on the Jones fund remains 
unexpended, the trustees respectfully recommend an appro- 
priation of $5,000 additional for the support of the library 
during the coming year. 



PUBLIC LIBKARY. 271 

We take this occasion to express our appreciation of tiie 
faithful services of the librarian and the assistants and of the 
unvarying courtesy and assiduity with v^diich the patrons of 
the library have been served. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, 
CHARLES E. STANIELS, 
PAUL R. HOLDEN, 
JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
AMOS J. SHURTLEFF, 
REUBEN E. WALKER, 
WILLIAM W. FLINT, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
MOSES H. BRADLEY, 

Trtistees. 
Concord, February i, 1902. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 

1901. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library : 

Gentlemen, — During 1901 our library has quietly con- 
tinued its work of dispensing pleasure with one hand and 
instruction with the other. More than the usual number of 
books have been bought, a liberal supply of the most recent 
literature has been promptly placed before the public, the 
library building has been kept in repair, and some improve- 
ments made. 

We have not been able to think of any new privileges to 
offer our patrons, and no event has specially stimulated read- 
ing, vet we have given out more books than in 1900. This 
is gratifying, particularly as the increase in circulation has 
been accompanied by ahother slight reduction in the reading 
of fiction; this is now down to 76 per cent., a rate not 
discreditable when compared with other libraries' statistics, 
but one which we hope to see lowered as time goes on; 
only four years ago our fiction was read to the extent of 85 
per cent. Magazines have been taken out even more freely 
than heretofore ; and it may interest the members of the 
science department of the Woman's Club to know that there 
has been a perceptible increase in the circulation of scientific 
works. 

What we at the library have known as the "Saturday 
night rush," when hundreds of persons came to get a good 
story for over Sunday, has been less noticeable of late months, 
and we feared to add up our figures, lest we should find a 
deficit in our desk work for the year. But the footing was 
many hundreds in advance of 1900, and we exulted that the 
steady, sane use of better books all through the week had 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



27a 



given lis an excess to the credit of non-fiction. If, some day,. 
we can offer, by access to shelves, as free an examination of 
books and magazines as can be enjoyed in a private library, 
many valuable but comparatively unknown volumes will be 
selected, and the character of our circulation raised still 
higher. 

Concord has a population of 19,632. Exactly 89,000 books 
were handed over the delivery desk in 1901. We wish these 
statistics meant that each citizen had read over four books 
thoroughly. Instead, some child has skimmed dozens of books 
and another has read none at all ; one adult has known the 
library to be the place where he can find out things ; another 
adult has had the general idea that a public library contains 
poetry, essays, biograph}' and history, and has not imagined 
our abundance of technical and industrial works. 

A public library is, nowadays, a great department store, 
and should be managed with the same push and enterprise 
and desire to supply all customers, i. e., all taxpayers. At 
Field's, in Chicago, one can buy lettuce on the top floor 
and steam-engines in the basement. So, at a library, a 
borrower ought to be able to get perishable green goods in 
latest novels, or works of originality and force which will 
move the world. 

We despair of a right understanding of our institution, 
however, so long as our budding clientele says, "Please may 
I take out 'libr'ies'?" We ask the small applicant if he 
wants the building, or us, or books? And when his face 
lights up at the word books, we hope he begins to see a 
difference in words, which may lead to his knowing some time 
a dift'erence in books, and end by his realizing that truth is 
stranger than fiction, that " Up from Slavery" and " The 
Making of an American " are as fascinating as any fictitious 
tale of a poor boy's rise to fame and fortune. Titles that 
take boys' ffinc}' read, "Luck and Pluck," "Strive and 
Succeed," " Try and Trust." Surely no Horatio Alger urchin 
ever so strove and so succeeded as Mr. Washington and 
Mr. Riis. 

18 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 

If people only knew that a library Ukes to be put upon its 
mettle as a provider of information, they would not hesitate 
to come in and, if necessary, expose, by inquiry, the weak 
places in our departments. As soon as a lack on any given 
subject becomes known, it is made good immediateh. For 
instance, a leading civil engineer came in to get something 
on the laying of electric railroads. We had nothing recent 
in that line, but in three days the two most helpful books on 
that topic which could be bought in Boston were on our 
shelf. Again, the school instructor in domestic science had 
only to find us short on that subject, to lead us to buy at 
once. 

It is the bright spot in a weary day when an intelligent 
adult comes in for assistance ; when, for example, a mother 
says: " My children are beginning to read 'The Outlook' 
editorials, and to ask me questions concerning our govein- 
ment which I cannot answer. Have you any book wliich 
will post me?" When, to illustrate further, a young man 
calls for books on Germany before going to Mr. Streeter's 
address on the union of that empire, and afterwards takes 
pains to tell us that he got more out of the address and could 
talk more understandingly with the speaker because of his 
preliminary running through of our material. Mr. Streeter's 
address is the first thing we shall hand to future inquirers 
on this subject. 

One hour a borrower wants to know what stain will make 
new wood look old; the next, a committee- woman must 
have a play to enact at a Christmas festival. A business man 
drops in to consult a city directory of 'G"]^ and as he goes 
out meets coming in a newspaper reporter after biographical 
matter for the obituary of a former Concord resident. From 
our Concord collection came the only picture of Moses Wool- 
son procurable for the article on the Concord High School. 
Hardly a day passes without a satisfactory happening of this 
kind, in which the library has sufficed the investigator. 

The tendency is markedly toward a more serious use of the 
library for purposes other than recreation. The use of the 
reference room by children is rapidly growing. Pupils are 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 275 

finding out that there is a relation between their ordinary 
text-books and literatui"e. To foster this, we sent out postal- 
cards at the beginning of the school year, reminding our 
teachers of what the library accords them in the way of priv- 
ileges and of what more it might easily be persuaded to 
accord. We wish more teachers would bring in their classes 
to learn the use of indexes, encvclopredias, etc. To derive 
the greatest benefit from a library it is essential to know how 
to use page-headings, tables of contents, a card catalogue, 
etc. ; and this knowledge should be gained in school davs, 
and no pupil be allowed to graduate with the idea that the 
dictionary is the only book of reference. As Sam Waiter 
Foss, genial poet and fine librarian of Somerville, says, 
desirous that each resident shall be a borrower at his library: 
"If our books are good for half the pupils, thev are also 
good for the other half." 

Manvof our teachers occasionally take a dozen or so of our 
library books to their schoolrooms, thus making the books 
seek the readers, and creating a brisk little circulation of 
them, which, if counted, _would add sensiblv to our total 
stated in this report. One little girl advised her teacher to 
have library books there for leisure minutes, "for," she said, 
" I think we will have better ' conduct' if you do." 

Turning from tlie consideration of circulation and borrow- 
ers to the subject of purchases, we have first to acknowledge 
gratefully our use of the accumulated interest on the bequest 
left in 187S by Mr. Seth K. Jones for the buying of books for 
the Public Library. We have conservativelv reserved a frac- 
tion of this interest to spend next vear, but have nevertheless 
been able to add more volumes than in any year of which the 
present librarian has record. 

Of the 1,350 volumes bought, many fill vacancies caused 
by the wearing out of old favorites. It will surprise you to 
hear that in the last twelve months we had to discard, as 
utterly disreputable, 393 volumes. 

Some one has said, " New books are the vitality of the 
library, the old, its strength." Replenishing, therefore, goes 
hand in hand with purchasing new material. 



276 CITY OF COXCORD. 

Some of our notable additions have been : 

The Warner Librar\' of the World's Best Literature 30 vols. 

The Harriman Alaska Expedition . . . . 2 vols. 

Tissot's Life of Christ . . . . . '4 vols. 

Dictionary of Building and Architecture . . 3 vols. 

Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology . . 3 vols. 

The Abridged Poole's Index. 

Various books of design. 

A new edition of Lippincott's Biographical Dictionary. 

A set of juvenile French periodicals, and a set of 

Heath's Home and vSchool Classics . . .33 vols. 

These last we keep on an open shelf by the desk, and thei"e 
they win hundreds of readers among the little folks who oth- 
erwise might never know these best of youthful stories. Sev- 
eral adults have smilingly renewed their " Robinson Crusoe" 
in the neat little brown volume. 

Another noteworthy purchase has been that of stereoscopic 
views of different countries, which we let out on borrowers' 
cards judiciously, as we do valuable books. These pictures 
and accoiiipanving lenses are so fine that onlv praise has 
come from those who have already seen them ; and we fore- 
see a long life of usefulness for the stereographs among inva- 
lids and travel clubs. 

In purchasing books, we aim to get all those which will 
enable people to identify treasures they possess in their homes ; 
for instance, illustrated books on rare laces, Indian baskets, 
oriental rugs, old china, glassware, and antique furniture. 

During 1901 we tried the system of adding new books 
every month, instead of putting out a larger number every 
two months. We are convinced that the monthly additions 
are better, and that a library's tendency should be toward 
placing a few new books often before the public. A feast or 
a famine in mental food is no more salutary than in other 
kinds of nourishment. 

We shall bind up most of the magazines taken during the 
year, and thus continue the files which are becoming recog- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. '1 1 i 

nized by investigators as invaluable, by reason of the modern 
means of tracing articles through the "Cumulative Index to 
Periodicals," 

" We are confident," says one librarian, "that the appe- 
tite for fiction has a solid foundation in nature and will 
endure. We think that under due limitations it ought not to 
be considered an evil." We feel like adding, — Let him who 
is not accustomed to relax or divert himself with fiction cast 
the stone at story-writers, and incidentallv hit George Eliot, 
Victor Hugo, Thackeray, and Hawthorne. Your librarian 
pleads guilty, on an exhausting day, to reaching up to the 
new books over her desk for "Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage 
Patch," rather tliiin for the " Studies in Fossil Botany." Mis- 
sions to the sick are deservedly much commended and are 
carried on by many agencies. But there is a mission to the 
tired which is worthy to be done, and a public library wants 
a share in it. 

We try, however, to buy fiction of such a character that no 
permanent injurv can come from reading it. Occasionally 
the excusable curiosity of manv very intelligent readers clam- 
ors for a book of dubious value. We compass this difficulty 
by buying one copy of the book and entering it in our card 
catalogue only. By the time the book has worn out the 
demand for it has ceased, the cards are removed from the 
catalogue, and future librarians will not be obliged, much 
against their will, to keep it in the library. 

Clever and persistent advertising stimulates a call for cer- 
tain new novels, producing a run on a library which affects 
its staff about as pleasantly as a run on a bank afi'ects its offi- 
cials. I presume there is usually about as good cause for the 
one as for the other. For the "six best-selling books" are 
not the six best books. Dr. Van Dvke says, "Although the 
fact that a book has reached its 200,000 mark cannot possibly 
prove that the book is bad, such a figure is unfortunately no 
sure sign of its real literary value." " When the public shall 
have learned that much of that which appears owes its suc- 
cess to the business methods of its publishers, there will be a 
rebound to the older standards and more worthy books." 



278 CITY OF COXCOKD. 

The Booklovers Library seems to have been created to 
satisfy this ahnost universal desire to read the new books. 
It may soon perceptiblv reheve the pressure upon pubHc 
libraries to furnish manifold copies of a nine days wonder in 
literature. We are often asked politely, in roundabout ways 
so as not to hurt our feelings, if tlie Booklovers Librarv con- 
flicts with ours. 

No, a hundred times no ! It may keep us from seeing in 
our building some delightful people who have become 
enrolled among its members; but the giving out of fresh nov- 
els is only a small item in our work and opportunities. We 
are not on a single track, and there will be no collision. 

We have one protest to make, however, in connection with 
the Booklovers Library. If townspeople studied our monthly 
lists, kindly printed by our two daily papers, as assiduously as 
they study the beautiful catalogues of the Booklovers Library, 
they would find that we possess most of the books (in the 
English language) offered by the latter. We do not care 
how many copies of "The Crisis" come from Boston, but 
we do feel it when a citizen thinks she must send there for 
" The Progress of Invention in the 19th Centurv," or when a 
teacher says she is enjoying a Booklovers' copy of Green- 
ough's "Words and Their Ways," and asks if we have heard 
of it, while there is the book in front of her on our open 
shelf, trying to allure some one into taking it. Let no one 
import " The Improvement of Towns and Cities," for we 
bought that admirable book as soon as it was published last 
spring, and have been disappointed that no one has cared 
enough for the civic beauty of Concord to read it. 

It is entertaining to observe how a new successful work 
sets the public to reading all the old writings of the same 
author. " The Cavalier " revives an interest in Cable. We 
are always reminded that dealers say they buy a new stock of 
goods to make the old stock sell. 

Comparing our institution with other liliraries, we find we 
have very little " red tape" ; even reference books and works 
of art are given out when at all practicable, for they arc for 
the use of the present generation as much as for posterity. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 279 

We have shown from the source of the Library Art Club 
many exhibits of pictures which have been greatly enjoyed. 

About the same number of new borrowers register annu- 
ally, 639 being the number of applicants the past year. 

Almost 500 children have frequented the little box we dig- 
nify by the name of Boys' Room. May the day be not far 
distant when a big, sunny Children's Room will be an adjunct 
of our library ! It is a valued feature in progressive libraries 
of any size. 

We are indebted for gifts of books, periodicals, plants, and 
picture exhibits to the following: Mrs. Armenia White, Miss 
M. A. Downing, Mr. Samuel C. Eastman, Mr. Henry A. 
Kimball, Mrs. Sarah J. Adams, Dr. J. E. Hoyt, Mrs. Eddy, 
to the government press at Washington, to the Salvation 
Army, and to temperance and philanthropic societies for their 
publications, to state and city institutions for their yearly 
reports, to the publishers of several newspapers, and to the 
different colleges for their annual catalogues. Through the 
warm weather we are fortunate in being remembered very 
frequently with flowers for the desk. 

It has been said that the first requisite of means to bring 
the treasures of a library to the notice of the people is attend- 
ants ready, eager, and willing. My assistants are that. 

It is an honor and a privilege to give the foregoing account 
of the growth and work of the library. 

Respectfull}' submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1901. 



To the Taxpayers of the G'dij of Concord: 

Tlie board of assessors respectfully sul^mit for your perusal 
information regarding the valuation of the city for 1901 as com- 
pared with the previous year. 

Valuation of the City by AVards. 



1900. 



1901. 



Ward 1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



$11,227,885 
Increase over 1900, $105,809. 



$781,677 


Ward 1 


297,722 


2 


398,340 


3 


2,413,614 


4 


3,095,200 


5 


2,063,000 


6 


990,490 


7 


875,070 


8 


312,772 


9 



$822,973 

295,009 

394,721 

2,443,603 

3,125,761 

2,050,150 

1,053,762 

882,400 

325,315 

$11,393,694 



Lands and buildings improved and unimproved, 1900 $9,460,065 
" " " " 1901 9,596,979 



Increase over 1900 

Number of polls assessed : 
In 1900 
In 1901 



$136,914 



4,809 
5,378 



Increase 



569 



BOAKD OF assessors' REPORT. 281 



Horses 



Number of horses in 1900 . . . 1,561 $75,080 

'' " 1901 . . . 1,510 74,355 



Decrease 



Neat stock 



Increase 



Sheep : 



Decrease ....... $725 

Oxen : 

Number of oxen in 1900 ... 29 $1,105 

1901 ... 24 1,235 



Increase . . ... . . . $130 

Cows : 

Number of cows in 1900 . . . 1,316 $27,-930 

1901 . . . ' 1,329 27,495 



Number of neat stock in 1900 . . 215 $2,707 

" " 1901 . . 254 3,192 



Number of sheep in 1900 ... 250 $483 

" " 1901 ... 254 579 



Increase ....... $96 

Hogs : 

Number of hogs in 1900 ... 22 $200 

" " 1901 ... 3 15 



Decrease . . . . . . . $185 

Fowls in 1901 . . . . . $15 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Carriages : 

Ninnl)er of cai'riages in 1900 

" 1901 

Increase 

Stock in public funds in 1900 
1901 

Decrease 



297 S24,205 
394 25,635 

• . 81,480 

$38,700 
13,700 

$25,000 



Stock in banks : 

In 1900 

In 1901 

Increase .... 

Stocks out of the state, 1900 
'' 1901 

Increase . . . . 

Money on hand or on deposit, 1900 
" '' 1901 

Decrease 

Stocks in trade in 1900 
1901 

Decrease 

Mills and machinery, 1900 . 
'' 1901 . 

Increase 



U47,950 
230,949 

$82,999 

$15,240 
16,595 

$1,355 

n54,222 
150,710 

$3,512 

^656,731 
644,750 

$12,181 

$45,977 
69,690 

$23,713 



BOARD OF assessors' REPORT. 



283 



Appropriations, Tax Rate, axd Valuation of the City 
AND Precincts in 1901. 



Name of tax. Items of 
general tax. 


Appro- 5 per cent, 
priations. added. 


Tax on 

$1,000 as 

voted 

by board. 


Valuation 

of city 

and 

precincts. 


State 


f30,714 
44,147 
53,000 
36.135 

35,212 

800 

2,000 

6,000 
17,115 
6,596 
2,450 
1,300 
1,180 
152 








County 








City 


$8,190.60 


$14.80 


$11,393,694 


School tax required by law 


Special scIkxjI : 
Union district 


1,760.60 
40.00 
100.00 

300.00 
855.75 
328.80 
12250 
65.00 
59.00 
8.12 


3.60 
1.00 
3.00 

.50 
1.80 

.80 
4.10 
2.20 
4.40 
4.80 


9,996,393 
723,173 
674,128 

10,516,362 

9,372,013 

8,529.045 

006,630 

605,825 

281,805 

33,400 


Town district 


District No. 20 

Precincts : 
Water 


City gas and sewer 


City sprinkling 

Penacook sewer 


Penacook lights 


West Concord sewer 



Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE F. UNDERBILL, 

Chairman of Board of Assessors. 



CHARLES A. HERBERT, 

Clerk. 



284 CITY OK CONCOIU). 

MEMBERS OE THE BOARD OE ASSESSORS. 

Harr/ 7— OLIVER J. EIEIELD. 
Ward 2— WILLI AIM A. COWLEY. 
Ward S—JOSEFli E. SHEPARD. 
If arf? 4— CHARLES A. HERBERT. 
Ward o—GEORGV. ¥. UNDERHILL. 
Ward 6— GEORGE S. DENNP:TT. 
Ward 7— JOHN H. QUIMBY. 
irarc? <9— .JOHN J. LEE. 
Ward .9— JAMES AHERN. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the City Council : 

I herewith submit the report of collection of taxes to the close 
of business, December 31, 1901 : 

Year 1899. 

Dr. Cr. 

Total amount submitted for collection, $2"21,824.00 
Interest collected . , . . 1,040.24 
Gash paid treasurer . . . . $218,101.23 
Abatements ordered by board of assess- 
ors 4,763.01 



$222,864.24 $222,864.24 

Year 1900. 

Total amount submitted for collection, $233,988.65 
Interest collected .... 1,155.12 
Cash paid treasurer . . . . $229,735.00 
Abatements ordered by board of assess- 
ors 5,331.01 

Cash in office December 31, 1901, at 

closing ..... 15.60 

Uncollected December 31, 1901, at 

closing: . . . . . .62.16 



$235,143.77 $235,143.77 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Year 1901. 

Total amount submitted for collection, $243,143.48 
Interest collected . . . . 41.01 

Cash paid treasurer . . . $192,100.00 

Abatements ordered by board of assess- 
ors ...... 3,541.07 

Casli in office December 31, 1901, at 

closing 166.38 

Uncollected December 31, 1901, at 

closino; ..... 47,377.04 



$243,184.49 $243,184.49 

Respectfully submitted, 

WENDELL P. LADD, 

Tax Collector, 
Concord, N. H., January 1, 1902. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council of the City of Concord: 

The park commissioners respectfully submit the following- 
report : 

Appropriations and expenditures for the past year were 
as follows : 





Appropriations . 


Expenditures. 


White park 


. $3,500.00 


$3 


,434.60 


Rollins park . 


Soo.OO 




764.S7 


Penacook park 


75.00 




88. oS 


Bradley park . 


40.00 




34-72 


Ridge Avenue park 


35.00 




43.28 


Fiske park 


200.00 




199.61 



$3,640.00 $3,554.16 

It will be noticed that in the aggregate the commissioners 
have kept within the appropriations ; but work which is abso- 
lutely necessary must be put ofl' from year to year on account 
of lack of funds. 

White Park. 

The work at White park has been carried on by the usual 
force, which with the large area to cover and the necessary 
work demanded has been well done. Over eight hundred 
loads of Riling have been put on the north end of the park, 
covering up the low ground, and making- it ready for a top 
covering which will be needed in the spring. 



288 CITY OF CONCORD. 

On account of badly-washed walks the superintendent has 
laid over 750 square feet of gutters to prevent in the future 
damage which is occasioned by heavy showers. The walks 
have been newly gravelled with material which we have had 
on the grounds, but which now is exhausted and will necessi- 
tate our finding it in other localities. 

It was hoped that we could build a much-needed tool house 
this last year, but could not do so, although the stone founda- 
tion for one was laid, and we shall hope to erect a building 
this coming year. A fence will also have to be constructed, 
as the temporary one erected some years ago is giving way. 

Owing to the widening of Centre street between Pine and 
Auburn streets, the park has become exposed and changed 
so much that quite a sum must be expended to fix it. 

With each year the development of this park is gratifying, 
and when all the plans are carried out it will accommodate 
all with facilities for rest and pleasure. 

The expenditures have been : For labor, $2,023.06 ; grade, 
$88.65; shrubs and seed, $84.20; hardware and tools, 
$48.34; lumber, $14.90; fertilizer, $21; water, $15; inci- 
dentals, $129.45 ; a total of $2,424.60. 

RoLLixs Park. 

The larger part of the work has been done on the clearing. 
The ground was smoothed and leveled thoroughly with plow 
and harrow, then seeded, and one ton of fertilizer put on. 
New water service was laid, using one thousand feet of iron 
pipe, with eight hydrants at various points with which to 
supply water for the grass and shrubs. 

This park is enjoyed by many people, and services have 
been held on Sunday during the summer months. On the 
whole, better order has prevailed. 

The expenditures have been : For labor, $533.96 ; seed and 
trees, $29.50; fertilizer, $28; hardware and tools, $22.52; 
iron pipe and fitting, $111.36; incidentals, $39.53; a total 
of $764.87. 



PUBLIC PAKKS. 289 



Pexacook Park. 



Tills park has been a very popular resort for picnickers, 
and the work is wholly one of care and keeping the pavilion 
in repair. 

There has been expended: For labor, $77,10; lumber, 
$8.18; incidentals, $3 .So; a total of $88.08. 

Bradley Park. 

For the maintenance of this park the following has been 
expended: Labor, $24.03; fertilizer, $4.20; water, $4.00; 
incidentals, $2.50; a total of $34.72. 

Ridge Avenue Park. 

On account of the dry weather after seeding, also for pre- 
serving the trees and shrubs already planted on this plot of 
ground, it was found necessar}' to put in pipes for citv 
watc!', making an extra expense, and a consequent over-run- 
ning of the appropriation. 

The expenditures have been as follows: Labor, $20.01 ; 
iron pipe and fittings, $13.72 ; water, $3.00; fertilizer, $2.80. 

Fiske Park. 

The sum of $200 was appropriated to grade the triangle 
between North Main street and Fiske street, at the earnest 
solicitation of the citizens at the North End. The amount 
was carefully expended bv the superintendent, but the uneven 
grade of the original ground and the high grade given by the 
city engineer necessitated more filling than was at first antici- 
pated. Over 380 loads of gravel were placed on this plot ; 
the loam was moved, and then replaced after the filling. In 
order to make a path over the embankment, granite steps 
were put in at a cost of $35. 

To fix the title to this piece of ground, an arrangement was 
made b}' a joint resolution of the city government, authorizing 
the mayor to accept a deed from William P. Fiske, quitclaim- 
ing all his right and title to land lying south of stone bounds 

19 



290 CITY OK CONCORD. 

placed by the city engineer. The superintendent estimates 
that it will require the additional sum of $350 to complete 
this park. 

The expenditures have been: For labor, $163.65 ; stone 
steps, $35; incidentals, $0.96; a total of $199.61. 

The park system has grown since the first board of park 
commissioners who were chosen in 1SS5, and who consisted 
of Josiah Minot, Benjamin C White, John M. Hill, Joseph 
R. Walker, and William P. Fiske. Since 1SS7 the commis- 
sioners have received from regular appropriations $40,000, 
or an average of $2,666.67 per year. They have also received 
in gifts from Mrs. N. White $1,700, Mrs. C. H. Newhall 
$500, and Mr. C. H. Newhall for the bridge, $50; from 
other sources $1,215, making a total of funds passing through 
their hands of $43,465. The city has also paid $5,350 for 
land which has been added to White and Rollins parks. 

The gentlemen composing the West End syndicate in 1898 
made a gift of land to the city, and it has been named Ridge 
Avenue park. 

The commissioners have also improved other tracts of land 
owned by the city, together with the maintenance of Penacook 
park, which came under their control in 1S95. Appended 
are tables giving the yearly appropriations and expenditures 
for construction and maintenance since a park board was 
established. 

Respectfidly submitted, 

HARRY G. SARGENT, Chairman, 
BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
GEORGE A. YOUNG, 
WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 

Pa rk Co jii 1)1 iss io 7icrs. 









.11,700.00 
.000.00 

50.00 


ition to 
therefor 

3ity has 
nal gift. 


nacook park on tlie shore 
eiiacook lake came under 
rol of park commissioners 
395. City had cliarge be- 
and has spent from com- 
cement of work in 1883 
dditional sum of 14,444.13. 








a; 


s-bt 


N. White . 
C. H. JSewhall . 
C. H. Newhall 
ir bridge 


e city made add 
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REPORT OF HISTORY COMMISSION. 



To the City Council: 

The completed manuscript of the History of Concord is 
now in the possession of the Histor}* Commission. An edi- 
torial committee, consisting of James O. Lvford, Henry 
McFarland, and Charles R. Corning, is revising and arrang- 
ing this manuscript for the printer. The contract for printing 
will be made when this work is completed. As nearly as 
can be now estimated the history will be a volume of 
upwards of one thousand pages of five hundred words to the 
page, including the illustrations. After the contract is made 
the subscribers will have the option of having the book 
bound in \.\\o volumes or one, those who elect to have two 
vohu-nes paying for the additional cost of binding, which in 
the cloth binding will probably not exceed one dollar. This 
is merely a question of convenience to the subscribers in the 
use they make of the book. If it is to be referred to often it 
will be easier to handle if bound in two volumes. It is 
probable that the copies bound for the trade, after the sub- 
scribers have been supplied, will be in two volumes, and 
the price to purchasers will be in excess of that to subscrib- 
ers. For a limited period subscriptions can be made to the 
Secretary. 

When the contract is made with the printer it can be 
definitely stated what month this year the history will be 
ready for delivery. 

JAMES O. LYFORD, 

Secreta/-y History Co/iinu'ssio//. 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the City Cotoicil : 

I have the honor to present the following report of the work 
clone in my departnient for the year ending December 31, 
1 90 1. 

Number of calls ..... 92 

Office consultations .... 27 

Vaccinations . . . . .271 

Examinations for insanity ... 4 

It will be noticed that there was an unusually large num- 
ber of vaccinations. This is a consequence of the wholesome 
fear engendered by the epidemic of small-pox now sweeping 
over the country, together with the activity of our board of 
health in the matter of compulsory vaccination of school 
children. Through the efforts of this board probably nearly, 
if not quite, all of our school children now satisfy the law in 
this respect. 

I think it worthv your notice, as tending to controvert the 
increasing fear of untoward etlects following vaccination, that 
of this large number of cases, only one was sick enough to 
call me in consultation. This one was all right the day fol- 
lowing my attendance. They are perfectly free from trouble 
to-day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. COOK, JR., 

City Physician. 
Concord, N. H., January i, 1902. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES 



Concord, N. H., March 1, 1902. 

To the Citij Councils of the Cifij of Concord: 

In making our annual report the commissioners of cemeteries 
beg leave to say that the work of the past year has consisted 
mainly in repairing and beautifying lots and avenues. 

Dui-ing the year we have laid out and pi'ovided a new block of 
lots in the northeast section of Blossom Hill Cemetery, and lots 
are being rapidly taken. 

No great expense incident to grading will be incurred the com- 
ing year. 

We intend to plant trees and shrubs, and in a general way 
beautify our already beautiful cemetery. 

The burials during the past year have not been as many as 
some previous years. The burials in Blossom Hill Cemetery 
have been one hundred and twenty-six (126), and in the Old 
North, twenty-two (22). 

We have completed the iron fence the entire length of the north 
line of Blossom Hill Cemetery, and consider it a great benefit to 
the grounds. 

We have constantly called yoiu" attention to the great need of 
a chapel, hoping that some generous citizen would place such a 
memorial in Blossom Hill Cemetery. After years of wniting it 
seems that a realization of our hopes is near. We are reliahly 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 297 

informed that such a chapel will be built the coniiug year, by a 
wealthy and generous lover of Concord. Concord cannot boast 
of a more beautiful memorial to the dead than this will be; and 
your commissioners feel greatly rejoiced in being able to report 
the prospect of this much needed improvement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
FRANK P. ANDREWS, 
CHARLES G. REMICK, 
GEORGE A. FOSTER, 
FRANK J. BATCHELDER, 
GEORGE O. DICKERMAN, 

Commissioners of Cemeteries. 

GEORGE 0. DICKERMAN, 

Secretary of Board. 



298 



CITY OF CONCOUD. 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

To His Honor the Mayor and Cifi/ Council: 

The Millville Cemetery committee respect fully submit 
lowing i-eport of the receipts and expenditures for the year 



the Ibl- 
1901 : 



Receipts. 

Balance from last year 
From city treasurer . 

A. S. Smith, trust fund 

C. H. Merrill, trust fund 

M. R. Jones, trust fund 

J. McC. Hammond, trust fund 

George W. Abbott . 

A. J. Kelley . 

J. H. Sanders . 

N. M. Stetson . 

I. F. Currier . 

L. S. Flanders . 

E. E. Griffin . 
Total . 



Expenditures 



Paid George W. Abbott 
Irving Currier . 
George W. Chesley 

C. H. Martin & Co. 
A. H. Britton & Co. 
M. E. Clifford & Co. 
Otis W. Whittier 

D. B. Smith . 
V. C. Hastings . 

Cash to balance accounts 
Total . 



$9.69 
aO.OO 
.T.67 
2.02 
1.75 
1.75 
5.00 
3.00 
3.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
l.dO 



SO. 75 
4(3.40 
G.OO 
4.65 
14.50 
3.22 
3.50 
1.50 
6.00 
2.86 



889.38 



$89.38 



FRANK G. PROCTOR, 
ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 
ALBERT S. TRASK, 

Committi-e. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



299 



^WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

West Concord, N. H., Januavv 1, 1902. 
To tJie Citij CninicU^ Concord^ N. H.: 

Your committee on West Concord Cemetery report tor tlie year 
1901 as follows: 



Jan. 1. 


Cash on hand 
From sale of lots 
For care of lots . 


$3!). 91 

22.00 

2.00 








Appropriation . 


175.00 


>N •-*•->, S 


91 




Expenses. 




O — ' ' '- 


Feb. 20. 


C. H. Martin & Co. . 


S4..S7 






July 27. 


1 lawn mower . 


4.00 






Dec. 1. 


Watei- bill 

G. R. Parmeiiter 

J. M. Crossman 


G.OO 
5.00 
5.00 






31. 


W. F. Thayer . 
Pay-rolls .... 
Thompson & Iloague . 
C. H. Martin & Co. . 


14.50 
99.59 
15.00 
39.64 


8193 
24. 


60 
54 


Balance in 


hands of commissioners 


, , 


Balance of 


appropriation 


• 


20 


t 1 



$238.91 

Approved by committee, 

J. M. CROSSMAN, 
W. A. LTITLK. 



300 CITY OF CONXORD. 

OLD FORT CEMETERY. 

Appropriation ,.,.... $25.00 

Expenses . . . . . . . • 8.25 



Halaiice ....... $16.75 

SC'OIT FRENCH, 

Secretary. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Appropriation ....... $75.00 

Received from one half sale of lots . . . . 7.50 



$82.50 
P^xpenses . . . . . . . . 24.12 



Balance $58.38 

SCOTT FRENCH, 

Secretary. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF OVERSEER OF POOR 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1901 



To the Gitij Coannl : 

Gentlemen, — The undersij2iie<l herewith submits tlie thirty- 
fonrtli annual re})ort of expenditures tor tlie poor, including 
Wards 1 and '2, lor the year ending December 31. 1901, as fol- 
loAvs : 

Families and individuals having a settlement in the city have 
been aided, in part or in full, during the time, to the amount set 
opposite their respective names. 



T. H. Clark children . . . . 


8115.50 


Patrick Hackett '. . . . 


104.29 


jMrs. Octave Morin 


187.30 


John Tyler .... 


80.00 


Nellie Tyler .... 


60.00 


Mitchel Fournier 


24.0.S 


Mrs. A. A. Moore 


14.00 


Celestine Delarge 


49.(30 


Kate Elliott .... 


26. (54 



8661.41 



302 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



COUNTY POOR. 



Annie Ruslilow . 






$100.00 


Bridget Collins . 






56.39 


James B. Fraser 






48.25 


Bobbins T. On- . 






198.63 


Mrs. Ella Friend 






134.25 


Maxim Melansoii 






48.00 


Isaac Leonard 






115.75 


Lydia S. Couch . 






110.31 


John Storin 






106.00 


Charles Truchon 






191.63 


Chester F. Laird 






287.07 


Mrs. John F. O'Neil . 






146.63 


Mrs. William Hunneman 






131.65 


Mrs. Coleman Bray 






78.75 


Mrs. James J. Veasey 






193.59 


Frederick Faradis 






188.11 


James B. Lemay 






111.50 


Mrs. John J. Gurley . 






210.12 


Mrs. Peter Olson 






96.00 


Margaret Trainor 






204.94 


Henry A. Ward . 






121.84 


Stephen A. Marstin . 






214.09 


Mrs. Ethel Perry 






189.79 


M. J. O'Connell 






80.88 


Mrs. John H. Kelley . 






215.80 


George Tonkin . 






283.25 


Thomas J. Moran 






210.75 


Fred Charrette . 






.S7.00 


Edward Osier 






181.39 


Mrs. James Jenness . 






98.03 


Joseph Benoit 






169.50 


W. G. Tandy . 






164.25 


John E. Beckett 






141.51 


Mary Durgin 






68.05 


Mrs. George Clews 






76.81 



POOR DKl'AIiTMENT. 



303 



Mrs. Charles Deiuieii 

Jane Clinton 

Mrs. Carl Hill . 

Kate Donovan . 

Mrs. Georjje K. Hannatbrd 

Albert Mason 

William H. Ash 

Frank Bodeaii 

Elmer S. Quimby 

John Welcome . 

Frank H. Ash . 

Thomas Mitchell 

Charles F. Hillsgrove 

Michael Daly 

Mrs. Oscar E. Quiet 

Polly Z. Knight 

Mrs. A. Cleveland 

Sarah Abbott 

Octave LeBlanc . 

Godfrey Anderson 

Peter Truchon 

Peter Kelley 

Thomas Knuckey 

Sarah McConnell 

A. Lapiere 

Peter Greenwood 

Mary Carter 

Mrs. Stephen Currier 

Mrs. H. D. Woodward 

John Champigney 

Domino Le Clair 

Mrs. Elizabeth Aldri 

William Cooney 

Mrs. William Beede 

George D. Hanson 

Louis Marshall . 

Oscar H. Thomas 



$122.11 

74.25 

151.37 

36.00 

3.50 

33.43 

14.23 

12.00 

3^.75 

6.00 

6.00 

54.00 

5.00 

6.00 

24.00 

60.00 

5.75 

51.89 

32.00 

30.00 

98.25 

18.00 

24.50 

18.00 

12.50 

26.37 

72.00 

65.62 

22.63 

7.00 

33.75 

35.00 

17.00 

9.00 

6.50 

60.54 

40.00 



304 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. Felix Guyette 








612.50 




A. ^y. Galbraith 








40.00 




John Griffin 








6.00 




Louis Delarge . 








38.25 




Mary Collins 








73.51 




Mrs. J. W. P:iliott 








16.11 




Mrs. Mary Williams 








87.86 




Nancy Murphy . 








46.00 




"William Chennette 








3.00 




Maria AVooster . 








63.00 




Mrs. Agnes Sullivan . 








32.00 




David Cadret, Jr. 








18.00 




George B. Baker 








6.00 




Mattie J. AVheeler 








16.00 




Mrs. John Taylor 








27.92 




Mrs. J. Melanson 








3.23 




Fred Cyr . 








6.00 




Patrick McGowan 








28.00 




Levi Chennette . 








5.25 




George M. Lamprey 








41.50 




Mrs. M. A. Robertson 








10.00 




Walter E. Chase 








20.38 




Charles A, Tracy 






■ 


3.75 




William H. Knights 








6.23 




AVilliam A. P^dmunds 








7.75 




Transients 








190.75 


87.195.54 



Amount paid for sujjport of city poor . §661.41 
Amount paid by the city for the support 

of county poor .... 7,195.54 

Total amount paid on account of poor $7,856.95 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH A. COCHRAN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



305 



Aid to Dependent Soldiers and their Families Rendered 
during" the Year 1901. 



Chargeable to City. 



Mrs. Henry M. Sanborn 
Stephen Lamprey 
Orrin Larkin 



Chargeable to County. 



^27.50 

96.00 

4.00 



$127.50 



John E. P'arrell . 


. 






$35.49 


Nathaniel W. Davis 


. 






122.25 


Harriet Ash 


. 






62.04 


Mrs. William Stevens 








2.50 


William H. Sargent 








80.00 


Charles M. Davis 








81.56 


Robert Crowther 








142.00 


Lester Fletcher . 








103.87 


Mrs. John IT. Heath 








70.00 


William Jameson 








87.71 


John Walker 








6.00 


Mrs. F. 0. Rollins 








45.38 


Lucretia A. Danforth 








40.50 


Otis H. Reister . 








130.91 


Eliza B. Tandy . 








24.50 


William Wallace 








116. G7 


Helen L. Griswokl 








38.62 


Albert I. Lawrence 








21.40 


Mrs. W. D. Locke 








74.80 


Charles H. Norton 








82.88 


George Kelley . 








65.00 


William D. Perkins 








9.50 


Emeline C. Drew 








50.00 


Michael Storin . 




. 




182.00 


Charles T. Much 








72.00 



20 



306 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Honora Sullivan 








$147.52 


Mary J. Oakley 








158.00 


Nathaniel S. Chase 








12.50 


Morris A. Lamprey 








33.94 


Mi's. Abial Stevens 








17.75 


Mary A. Huntress 








69.00 


Peter Bergeron . 








29.22 


P^li Sturgeon 








14.75 


Total amount 











§2,230.26 



82,357.76 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 



OF 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, 

1901=1902. 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 
1902. 



JOHN M. MITCHELL, SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 

CHARLES R. CORNING. 

1903. 

JOHN C. ORDWAY, SUSAN J. WOODWARD, 

' EDWARD N. PEARSON. 

1904. 

JOSEPH T. WALKER, GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 

JOHN VANNEVAR. 

CHARLES R. CORNING .... President. 

SUSAN J. WOODWARD .... Secretary. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT, Superintendent and Financial Agent. 



308 CITY OF CONCORD. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

FINANCE. 

MR. CORNING, MR. MITCHP:LL, MR. KIMBALL. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

MR. CORNING, MRS. WOODWARD, MR. VANNEVAR. 

MANUAL TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

MR. ORDWAY, MRS. WOODWARD, MR. WALKER. 

MUSIC AND ELOCUTION. 

MR. MITCHELL, MRS. BANCROFT, MR. VANNEVAR. 

DRAWING. 

MRS. BANCROFT, MR. PEARSON, MR. KIMBALL. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

MR. ORDWAY, MR. MITCHELL, MR. PEARSON. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

MR. PEARSON, MR. ORDWAY, MRS. BANCROFT. 

BUILDINGS AND REPAIRS. 

MR. WALKER, MR. ORDWAY, MR. KIMBALL. 

PENACOOK. 

MRS. WOODWARD, MR. VANNEVAR, MR. PEARSON. 

COGSWELL. 

MR. ORDWAY, MR. PEARSON, MR. CORNING. 

RUMFORD. 

MR. PEARSON, MRS. BANCROFT, MR. MITCHELL. 

CHANDLER. 

MR. VANNEVAR, MRS. BANCROFT, jMR. WALKER. 

KIMBALL. 

MR. MITCHELL, MR. PEARSON, MR. VANNEVAR. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 309 

FRANKLIN. 

MRS. BANCROFT, MR. KIMBALL, MR. CORNING. 

MERRIMACK. 

MR. ORDWAY, MR. MITCHELL, MRS. WOODWARD, 

WALKER. 

MR. KIMBALL, MR. ORDWAY, MRS. BANCROFT. 

TAHANTO. 

MR. MITCHELL, MR. PEARSON, MR. CORNING. 

WEST CONCORD. 

MR. WALKER, MR. PEARSON, MR. CORNING. 

EASTMAN. 

MR. MITCHELL, MR. ORDWAY, MR. VANNEVAR. 

PLAINS. 

MRS. WOODWARD, MR. WALKER, MR. PEARSON. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

* CHARLES C. DANFORTH .... Moderator. 

LOUIS C. MERRILL Glerh. 

WILLIAM YEATON, ADAM HOLDEN . Auditors. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 

3 Pine St. Office, High School Building. 
Hours, 8 to 9 A. M., school days. Office generally open from 4 to 5 p. m. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 
GEORGE W. JOHNSON. 

61 School St. 
At the Superintendent's office, 8 to 9.30 A, m., 11.30 to 12 m., 1 to 1.45, 5 to 6 p. m. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

OF 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, 

COiMCORD, N. H., 
FOR YEAR ENDING 31 ARCH 31, 1902. 



The Board of Education herewith presents to the people 
of Union School district its forty-second annual report, em- 
bracing the financial year from March, 1901, to March, 1902. 

The organization of the board remains practically the same 
as last year, the only changes being those in the membership 
of certain sub-committees made necessary by the election of 
tliree new members at the last annual meeting. 

The distribution of the pupils attending the Rumford school 
w"as accomplished by the superintendent in such a manner as 
to entail the least possible detriment to scholars and incon- 
venience to teachers. In the past few months a large and 
hanilsome structure has risen over the site of the old Rum- 
ford, and so rapidly is tlie work carried on that there seems 
to be no doubt as to the new Rumford being ready for occu- 
pancy at the beginning of the fall term. Tliis building, mod- 
ern in every feature, is a splendid addition to Concord's 
collection of schoolhouses. 

During the year the Training scliool has been transferred 
to the Dewey building from the Franklin, its first home. 
The singularly attractive location of the Dewey building, 
together with its convenient accessibility ami internal arrange- 
ments, convinced the committee to whom the question had 
been referred that the present and future welfare of the school 



SCHOOL REPORT. 311 

would be promoted by making the change. This opinion 
met witb the entire concurrence of the board ; consequently 
the change was made and the best of results have followed. 
In some respects the Training school is the most critically 
observed school in the district; its work is constantly on 
trial, and its methods attract constantly a large number of 
visitors. 

Since the school has moved to the Dewey building the 
number of strangers visiting the classes has been surprisingly 
increased. Connected with the Training school is a Kinder- 
garten training department inaugurated during the year just 
passed. Experience had shown the necessity of this branch 
of teaching and the results derived from its trial have met the 
approval of the board. Respecting this subject, we call 
attention to what Mr. Rundlett has to say in his report. 

Another change suggested by experience has been the add- 
ing of a third room in the Eastman building (East Concord). 
In order to do class work properly, so that teachers and pupils 
should find it in the highest degree beneficial and satisf^ictory, 
another room became imperative. When the Eastman school 
was built two rooms on the ground floor wei'e finished, 
leaving the upper story unfinished and open to the ridge- 
pole. In this space was made a light and commodious school- 
room for pupils of the Jiigher grades, including the ninth. 

It will be remembered that in our report for last year we 
called attention to the subject of ventilation and improved 
sanitary conditions, according to the tentative plans of Professor 
Woodbridge and the suggestions of health-ofiicer Palmer. 
An appropriation of two thousand dollars was voted for 
beginning work of this kind, part of which has been expended 
in installing new methods of ventilation, and part in substi- 
tuting a modern system of sanitation for the old. 

From the report of the Committee on Buildings and Repairs, 
made to the Board of Education, will be seen the nature and 
extent of the work accomplished, while reference to the finan- 
cial report will show the expenditures incurred in carrying 
out the plans of Professor Woodbridge and the recommenda- 
tions of the board of health. 



312 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 
AND REPAIRS. 

October 7, 1901. 
The Committee on Buildings and Repairs beg to submit 
the following report of work done on school buildings during 
the summer vacation of 1901 : 

Eastman School. 

1. South half of second floor partitioned off and one 
schoolroom with hall and stairs finished. 

2. Ventilation flue for the three rooms carried to attic floor. 

3. Fresh-air flue from south wall brought to stove. 

4. Roof-plate on west wall straightened and fastened. 

5. Gutter on west roof repaired. 

Ventilating flue for three rooms ends at attic floor and 
should be carried out through roof. 

Two lower rooms and halls should be renovated. 

Walker School. 

I. All plumbing taken out. 

3. Entire new plumbing put in. 

3. Furnaces in this building do not warm the basement, 
consequently water in latrines, pipes, etc., has to be drawn 
off" every night during cold weather. Pipes are so arranged 
that they can be emptied, except traps which are enclosed in 
boxes filled with dry saw-dust. Water-pipes are hung from 
basement ceiling, then wrapped with paper, asbestos and 
felting. 

4. Basement whitewashed. 

5. Floor of basement recemented where necessary. 

6. Roof where covered with tin repaired and painted. 

7. Basement windows to air-box repaired. 

8. Iron grating and stonework put back, concrete repaired 
around stonework. 

9. Window sashes drawn where necessary. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 313 

10. Four front doors painted. 

11, Railing for additional protection to small children put 
on original hand-railing on stairs. 

This building should be painted outside another year, 
also fire-escape painted. 

Brickwork under some of the stone-trimmings should be 
pointed-up. 

Would strongly suggest that a door be cut in partition wall 
between lower halls, in order that the door between the 
girls' and boys' basements can be kept locked. 

Merrimack School. 

I. Size of ventilating shaft in hall reduced. 
3. Smoke-stack painted on outside. 

3. Enlarged the outlet to foul-air shaft of lower west room. 

4. Sheet-zinc put in to reduce right angles to curves, to 
facilitate better flow of air. 

5. New foul-air shaft put in lower east room, 

6. Hot-air pipe run from hall furnace to same, to ensure 
draft. 

7. Extra register in east room removed. 

8. Outlet of same in furnace capped. 

9. Ventilator on roof enlarged at outlet to twice its former 
capacity. 

10. New smoke-flue for hall furnace. 

Plumbing should be changed as soon as possible. 
Plastering wants repairing in some of the rooms. 
Slate on roof in poor condition. 

High School. 

I. New service-pipes to wash-basins. 

3. Traps to wash-bowls cleaned. 

3, New water-pipes through building below first floor, 

4, New tubes in steam-boiler. 

5. New urinal. 

6. Building painted outside. 



314 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Janitor complains basement flooded at times of heavy 
rains. Building sliould have back-pressure valve to pre- 
vent this. 

Chandler School. 

1. Platform removed, and wainscoting repaired and 
painted. 

2. Brick post put under the iron pipe that ventilates the 
sewer traps. 

3. Window sashes repaired. 

Penacook School. 

1. Old plumbing taken out. 

2. New plumbing put in. 

3. Concrete in basement mended. 

4. New furnace pipe. 

V Opening in furnace chimney closed to get improved 
draft. 

6. Furnaces front removed in order to clean furnaces. 

7. Furnaces covered with sheet iron to confine hot air and 
deliver more directly to the rooms. 

8. Cold air chamber enlarged. 

9. Exhaust fan and motor installed at outlet of foul-air 
shaft to insure circulation. 

10. Window sashes repaired and painted. 

11. Basement whitewashed. 

12. Main wall front building near underpinning repainted 
and bricks relaid. 

Hall furnace flue should run to chimney on west side of 
building. 

Present chimney used for flue of hall furnace should be 
used for ventilating flue for rooms containing latrines. 

Basement, west half, should be concreteil. 

Cogswell School. 

1. Porch floor and steps repaired. 

2. W^indows set in screens in front of latrines to get more 
lieht. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 315 

3. Brick box put around water shut-oft'. 

4. Cement floor repaired. 

5. Desks renovated. 

This building should be painted another year. 
The floors should also be done over. 

KiMBAi,!. School. 

One water-closet fitted with door and lock for teachers. 

Building painted. 

Building should be partly replumbed. 

Some pipes re-covered. 

Dewey School. 

Steps should be leaded. 

Fraxklix School. 

1. Building painted outside. 

2. Woodwork where rotten repaired. 

3. Bulkhead doors repaired. 

4. New name and date put on building. 

5. Furnaces repaired. 

Fence and flag-pole should be painted. ^ 
Should have new coal furnaces. 
Old ones burnt out. 

JOSEPH T. WALKER, 
GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 
JOHN C. ORDWAY, 

Committee. 

At the beginning of the fall term an unlooked-for and per- 
plexing situation was presented by the High school. Owing 
to its suddenness and novelty no measures had been taken to 
meet it, and some inconvenience was experienced in adjust- 
ing the extraordinary conditions. Instead of finding the 
usual number of Concord pupils, the principal found await- 
ing him not onlv that niunber but more than fifty additional 



316 CITY OF CONX'ORD. 

pupils hailing from Penacook, the tovyn district, and from 
towns near and far. The explanation of all this is found in 
an act passed by the legislature of 1901, the first section of 
which is as follows : 

"Any town not maintaining a high school or school of 
corresponding grade, shall pay for the tuition of any child 
who with parents or guardian resides in said town, and who 
attends a high school or academy in the same or another town 
or city in this state, and the parent or guardian of such child 
shall notify the school board of the district in which he resides 
of the high school or academy which he has determined to 
attend." 

The immediate result of this legislation brought to our 
High school about thirty boys and girls living without the 
city limits. Complimentary as this was to the reputation of 
our school, it has nevertheless caused an overcrowding that 
is anything but desirable. Strange as it may seem to those 
unacquainted with the condition of the High school building, 
the tact is that the room space and facilities for carrying on 
the work of teachers and scholars are not only inadequate at 
the present time, but have been inadequate for several years. 
The scholars from Union School district alone have so out- 
grown the space provided for them, that the question of an 
enlarged building has become paramount. 

One of the exigencies by which the board is confronted is 
the crowded condition of the High school building, and the 
immediate need of increased facilities for the accommodation 
of those pupils who come from adjacent districts, both within 
and without the city limits. Not only is the large hall over- 
crowded, thus necessitating the use of all the a\ailable space 
for desk room, thereby blocking several aisles which should 
always remain open, but the recitation rooms are altogether 
inadequate. Not only are these all used, but the room occu- 
pied b}' the board of education has to be utilized by classes 
for recitation, as well as the large hall during study hours. 
These cramped facilities not only greatly interfere with the 
proper work of the school, but also with the maintenance of 



SCHOOL REPORT. ' 317 

the highest discipline, without which no school can produce 
the best results. If the present influx of pupils is to con- 
tinue, — and there seems to be no reason for anticipating any 
reduction of the present number, — the present building should 
be enlarged so as to increase the capacity of the hall, as well 
as provide more i-ecitation rooms. 

We feel that the time has come when the district should 
take action respecting the school on the Plains. That sec- 
tion of our city, constantly increasing in population, has cer- 
tainly the right to ask for larger and more modern school 
facilities for its children. The present building, containing 
but a single room, is utterly inadequate for the number of 
children attending the school. It seems to the board of edu- 
cation that a two-story building should be provided for this 
district, with two lower rooms made ready for present occu- 
pancy, leaving the upper story unfinished, but available for 
future use. 

The addition of a few feet to the Manual Training School, 
thereby gaining much-desired space, seems called for. At 
present the schoolroom is hardly large enough for the work 
carried on, and some addition ought at once to be made, 
relieving the overcrowding and affording more storage space. 
A few hundred dollars would probably be sufficient for this 
purpose. 

With the completion of the Rumford building the district 
will own seventeen schoolhouses, valued at nearly four hun- 
dred thousand dollars, four of these houses having been built 
within the past twelve years, namely : The High, Kimball, 
Dewev, and Rumford. It will be readily seen, therefore, 
that the district has been rapidly acquiring a vei'y valuable set 
of school buildings which, added to the older houses, makes 
a school plant of large valuation. The board have given 
much thought to this matter, and have come to the conclu- 
sion that the present system of supervision of our buildings 
ought to be changed. For several years, or since iS86, the 
general oversight and care of buildings has been performed 
by a siib-committee of three, designated the committee on 



318 ' CITY OF CON'COHD. 

buildings and repairs. For a time this committee did very 
well, but with changes in membership and the increase in the 
number and size of the new structures, the deficiencies of this 
arrangement became noticeable. In otiier words, the largeh' 
increased school plant renders the old-fashioned method of 
supervision impracticable. The buildings not only need con- 
stant attention if they are to be kept in good condition, but 
repairs should be made seasonably. Moreover, the buildings 
should be frequently inspected, and a watchful, intelligent 
supervision exercised over them. Tlie making of contracts 
and the overseeing of repairs has now become no small part 
of the duties connected with the board of education. 

The extent and importance of the work performed under 
the supervision of the committee on buildings and repairs 
during the summer vacation of 1901, may be in a measure 
comprehended bv reading the report of the committee on a 
foregoing page. This is likely to be repeated year by year 
until the buildings are put in better sanitary condition. Even 
at the end of that period, further need of repairs will be found 
urgent, for the larger the imildings the greater the necessity 
of care and watchfulness. It is plain that the time has arrived 
when a change should be made in tlie present method of 
effecting repairs and supervising contracts. We feel that 
some arrangement whereby the office of financial agent could 
be so enlarged as to include the regular and intelligent over- 
sight of our schoolhouses and the supervision of repairs, 
painting, and alterations, would be for the positive good of 
the district. We should then have an officer whose duty it 
would be not onlv to purchase the supplies and act as dis- 
bursing agent, but to do the work now entrusted to a sub- 
committee of the board. It is hardly to be expected that the 
members of the committee, usually active men of business, 
can give as constant and thorough attention to these matters 
as a permanent supervisor could give. For the best inter- 
ests of the district, and for economical reasons as well, we 
are of the unanimous opinion tliat a change in this method 
should be made. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 319 

With the payment this year of fifteen thousand doUars is 
closed the account incurred by the building of the High and 
the Kimball schools, one hundred and twenty odd thousand 
dollars in all paid by the people of this district since 1889. 
The bonds of the Dewey are payable eight thousand a year 
beginning in 1906, and three years will cancel them ; and 
then comes the indebtedness represented by the new Rum- 
ford, which, let it be hoped, will be funded for yearly pay- 
ments at an amount not exceeding five or six thousand dollars. 
While freedom from debt is most commendable,. the method 
of paying the debt by raising so large a sum as fifteen thou- 
sand dollars annually on the property of Union District, has 
raised the tax rate appreciably, and caused taxes to bear 
heavily on our people. 

The board of education ask the taxpayers for only such 
appropriations as experience seems to demand, consistent with 
the proper conduct of the schools and the inevitable progress 
of educational subjects. The people of Concord are splen- 
didly generous toward their schools, being determined that 
no schools shall surpass those of Union District ; and the 
members of the board, mindful of the trust imposed upon 
them, strive strenuously to maintain the high character of our 
common schools. 

In conclusion, we ask a careful perusal of the superintend- 
ent's report, and of those accompanying it. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, President, 
JOHN C. ORDWAY, 
SUSAN J. WOODW^ARD, 
SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 
JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
EDWARD N. PEARSON, 
JOSEPH T. W^ALKER, 
GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 
JOHN VANNEVAR, 

Board of Edjication. 



320 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF TREASURP:R OF BUILDING COMMITTEE 
OF THE DEWEY SCHOOL. 

Receipts. 

City of Concord . . . . S 6, 000.00 

Money borrowed .... 24,000.00 
E. H. Rollins & Sons, City of Concord 

31% sclioolhouse bonds . . . 24,000.00 

Premium oii bonds .... 4.53.60 

Interest on bonds . . . . 375.67 

Rebate on insurance .... 21.33 

854,850.60 



Expenditures. 

Lot and grading .... S5,582.42 

Plans, services of architect, etc. . . 906.50 

School building 20,148.02 

Heating and ventilating . . . 1,711.77 

Notes paid 24,000.00 

Incidentals 603.06 

Furniture . . . . . . 764.13 

Interest 868.34 

Boston Bank Note Co., engraving bonds 65.00 

Insurance . . . . . . 50.00 

Cash on hand 151.36 



$54,850.60 

AV. F. THAYER, 

Treasurer. 



Concord, N. H., March 18, 1902. 

I have examined the above account of receipts and expendi- 
tures, and find the same correctly cast, together with receipted 
vouchers for same. 

GEO. K. HAZELTINE, 

Citii Auditor. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



321 



$5,582.42 



$906.50 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures on Account of 
Dewey School. 

Lot and <rrading : 

City of Concord, for lot . . . $2,500.00 

George L. Theobald .... 1,953.64 

George W. Chesley .... 1,128.78 

Plans, services of architect, etc. : 
J. E. Randlett, architect . . . $900.00 
H. J. Rock, designs for tablet . . 2.00 
Emily Cozzens, two copies of specifica- 
tions ...... 4.50 

School building : 

J. L. A. Chellis, contractor . . $19,889.89 

Rowell & Plummer .... 79.21 

A. G. McAlpine, tablet, lettering, etc. . 86.00 

M. E. Clifford & Co 81.69 

Fred Rollins, work on floors . . 11.23 

Heating and ventilating : 

The Fuller & Warren Heating and Ven- 
tilating Co $1,672.17 

George W. Brown, services on furnace 39.60 

Incidentals : 

Monitor d: Statesman, advertising . $6.00 

People & Patriot, advertising . . 5.70 

C. H. Stevens & Co., coal . . . 155.82 

Concord Water- Works, water-pipe . 12.00 

H. J. Lawson, copper finials . . 30.00 

C. W. Dadmun, electric call buttons . 12.64 

W. D. Thompson, bill paid . . . .35 

Expenses of committee to Boston . . 8.40 

21 



$20,148.02 



$1,711.77 



322 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Expenses of committee to Dover, Bos 

ton, etc. .... 

George Prescott, numbering doors 
J. F. Healey, freight, and carting tablet 
Thompson & Hoague, pipe and hooks 
Thompson & Hoague, grass seed . 
Samuel N. Brown, recording deed 
J. H. Rowell «fe Co., concrete 
Elwanger & Barry, shrubs . 
George W. Chesley, lumber and labor 
George W. Chesley, work on sewer 



$16.80 

.85 

.85 

29.95 

33.25 

1.00 

219.67 

17.60 

8.43 

43.75 



Furniture : 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., desks and chairs . 

Interest ....... 

Boston Bank Note Co., engraving bonds 

Insurance ....... 



Notes paid 

Cash balance on hand . 



$24,000.00 
151.36 



S603.06 



$764.13 

$868.34 
$65.00 
$50.00 



,699.24 



$24,151.36 



$54,850.60 



ESTIMATES FOR 1902-1903. 



Salaries of Teachers. 



High school .... 
First grammai- schools 
Second grammar schools 
Primary schools .... 
Kindergarten and sub-pi"imary schools 
Training teachers 



$8,675.00 
3,250.00 
6,600.00 

12,350.00 
3,650.00 
1,600.00 



836,125.00 



Special Teachers. 



Music SI, 125. 00 

Drawing 900,00 

Superintendent and financial agent . 2,500.00 



84,525.00 



Special Branches. 



Manual training 
Military drill 



Fuel . 

Miscellaneous 
Supplies 

Repairs (regular) 
Insurance . 
Care of houses . 



83,400.00 
200.00 



53,600.00 



Current Expenses 



$4,300.00 

900.00 

2,000.00 

2,500.00 

300.00 

4,000.00 



$14,000.00 



$58,250.00 



324 city of conx'ord. 

Deduct. 

Balance from last year . . . $1,871.81 

Literary fund ..... 1,466.00 

Dog license ..... 1,126.00 

Tuition 1,000.00 



S5,463.81 



$52,786.19 



Prize Speaking, 
received. 

Balance from last account . . . $1,655.45 

Interest on same to Januaiy 1, 1902 . 49.17 

Sale of 622 tickets at 35 cents . . 217.70 





PAID. 




Phenix hall and piano 


. 


$35.00 


Prizes, including books 


. 


68.00 


Programmes 


. 


4.50 


F. P. Mace, selling 


and furnishing 




tickets . 


. 


5.00 


Exchange tickets 


. 


2.00 


Expense of judges 


. 


4.40 


Expended for school decorations . 


48.85 


Miscellaneous expense . 


. 


5.25 


Cash on hand as a guaranty fund for 




future contests 


• 


1,749.32 



$1,922.32 



11,922.32 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF AGENT 



OF 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



RECAPITULATION, 

Eeceipts. 



Unexpended balance of last year . 

Portion of school money for the year 

Extra money raised by the district 

Text-books (city a})propriation) 

Literary fund 

Dog license 

Extraordinary repairs 

Tuition receipts . 

Miscellaneous receipts from sale of ashes, 
old iron, books, insurance rebate, pre- 
miums at State Fair, etc . 



Ex PEN 

Fuel .... 

Miscellaneous 

Supplies .... 

Repairs, regular 

Repairs, extraordinary 

Repairs, Merrimack and Rumford 

priation .... 
Insurance .... 
Manual training 
Care of houses . 
Military drill 

Salaries .... 
Text-books (city) 
Unexpended balance for the year 



SES. 



ippro 



82,230.25 
31,743.01 
18,909.99 
2,894.10 
1,466.59 
1,126.08 
2,000.00 
1,742.00 



121.31 



$3,478.53 
1,177.72 
2,184.73 

2,664.77 
1,807.77 

50.69 
1,152.00 
3,330.44 
3,555.61 
196.80 
37,557.35 
3,205.11 
1,871.81 



)2, 233.33 



$62,233.33 



326 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CoN'CORD, N. H., March, 1902. 

We hereby certify tliat we have examined the foregoing ac- 
connt (except text-book account) of tlie financial agent, and find 
the same correctly cast, and a proper voucher for each item of 
expenditure therein mentioned. 

WILLIAM YEATON, 
ADAM P. HOLDEN, 

Auditoj's. 

Concord, N. H., March, 1902. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing account of 
text-books and find the same correctly cast, and a proper voucher 
for each item of expenditure therein mentioned. 

GEO. K. HAZELTINE, 

City Auditor. 



Text-Books. 



White-Smith Music Publishing Co., 

music . . . . . . $3.60 

Werner Scliool Book Co. . . . 97.65 

William Ware & Co 36.00 

Wadsworth-Howland & Co. . . 120.86 

Thompson, Brown & Co. . . . 32.00 

Mary A. Sanborn, kindergarten supplies 3.15 

T. R. Shewell & Co 24.-10 

Silver, Burdctt & Co. . . . 47.81 

Katharine L. Remick, kindergarten sup- 
plies ...... 1.03 

Rand, McNally & Co. . . . 21.60 

Prang Educational Co., draAving books 

and material . . . . . 158.25 

Potter, Putnam & Co. ... 18.00 

George S. Perry & Co. . . . 38.64 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



o2 i 



The Morse Co 

Frank P. Mace .... 

Milton-Bradley Go. 

Mayuartl, Merrill & Co. 

Longmans, Green & Co. 

J. B. Lippincott & Co. 

Lee & Shepard .... 

S. S. Kimball .... 

George F. King & Co. 

Holden Patent Book Cover Co. 

W. R, Heath & Co., kindergarten ma 

terial ..... 
Henry Holt & Co. 

Hurst & Co 

Hoxightou, Mifliin & Co. 
Hammett School Supply Co. 

D. C. Heath & Co. . 
J. L. Hammett Co. 

Ginn & Co. .... 

Ira C. Evans Co. 
Eagle Pencil Co. 
Educational Publishing Co. . 
Duel Chemical Co., ink 
Oliver Ditson & Co., music 
Amy L. Comins, kindergarten material 
T. H. Castor & Co. . 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight o 
books ..... 

E. E. Babb & Co. . 
The Baker Taylor Co. 
A. W. Baker & Co. . 
American Book Co. 
D. Appleton & Co. 

R. F. Robinson, kindergarten material 
L. J. Rundlett, agent, express and 
freijrht charg-es . . . . 



$4.17 

.45 

24.91 

37.50 

29.71 

26.40 

1.12 

1.24 

64.91 

105.91 

.46 

7.69 

12.00 

56.27 

10.36 

146.75 

173.76 

243.73 

57.14 

15.00 

80.47 

12.00 

29.63 

1.00 

.53 

9.71 

1,116.83 

3.78 

30.69 

246.07 

5.84 

1.08 

45.01 



;,205.11 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Expended, i;i01-1902 . . . $3,205.11 

Balance of expense from last year . 277.10 



Received, city appropriation . . $2,894.10 

" from sale of books . . 87.81 



3,482.27 



2,981.91 



Balance of expense carried to next ac- 
count $500.36 

Manual Training. 

Holt Bros., lumber .... $0.75 

Harry G. P^mmons, sewing supplies . 14.60 

W. R. Heath, towels .... 3.00 

C. W. Dadmun, repairing switcli . . 3.50 

Page Belting Co., pulley . . . 1.22 

Hammacher-Sclilemmer Co., carving 

tools 12.24 

F. E. Nelson, cooking utensils . . 1.90 

Chandler & Far<iuhar, counter-shaft, 

gasoline torch .... 10.20 

J. L. Hamme^tCo., thumb-tacks, draw- 
ing paper, etc. .... 
ILdward F. Gordon, supplies 
Concord Light and Power Co., plate for 

cooking, irons for sewing . 
J. E. Randlett, blue print, tracing cloth 
Concord Foundry Co., balance wheels 

and castings . . . • • 12.55 

Concord Land and Water Power Co., 

power . . . . • • 27.74 

Wesana Dairy, milk .... 3.96 

Pike Manufacturing Co., tools , . 2.70 

The Century Co., books, cooking . . 3.38 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co., counter-shaft . 10.25 

Brickett & Booth, cooking supplies . 22.96 

Batchelder & Co., " '' . .69 



23, 


.25 


o 

o, 


,00 


1, 


.75 


2, 


.20 



C. R. Dame, cooking 


supplies 


r.ftjKi. 


$11.82 


Ellen J. Jones, car fare and supplies 


3.88 


E. B. Hutchinson Buildinij Co., lumber 


55.81 


Philbrick Fish Market 


, fish . 


2.55 


Lyster Bros., cooking 


supplies 


10.81 


Danforth & Forrest, li 


mber 


135.09 


C. H. Martin & Co., ( 


Dil, brush, turpen 




tine, lamp-black, etc 




13.06 


Concord Electric Co., 


DOwer 


44.71 


Thompson & Hoague, 


tools, etc. . 


54.06 


Concord Machine Co., 


shaft and labor 


9.00 


Ford & Kimball, castings and lathe 


2.56 


A. H. Britton & Co., 


cooking utensils 


.90 


Edward F. Gordon, salary . 


900.00 


Charles E. Stewart, 






460.53 


Ellen J. Jones, 






516.45 


Lou.ise C. Howe, 






291.45 


Harriet C. Gilmore, 






416.45 


Charles 'F. Moore, 






239.47 




Carb 


OF House 


s. 


J. Edward Morrison 




. 


$523.29 


C. AV. Tarleton . 








624.00 


0. M. Blodgett . 








572.00 


E. H. Dixon 








590.00 


Frank L. Dudley 








70.00 


Mary Robinson . 








8.00 


Lee S. Whidden 








18.50 


John Casey 








76.00 


Archie S. Matheson 








253.00 


Park French 








202.00 


Henry D. Robinson 








572.00 


Peter King 








5.50 


Chester H. Sherburne 








3.12 


John K. Woodward 








7.50 


Harvey H. Gritfin 








1.60 



329 



1,330.44 



;;30 



CITY OF CONXORU. 



John G. Powers 
C. W. Tarleton . 
E. H. Dixon 
Henry D. Robinson 
Clarence Clark . 



Supplies. 

Thompson & Hoague, general supplies 

Hammett Scl)ool Supply Co. 

R. F. Robinson, ribbon 

George F. King & Co., rubber bands 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 

Frank L, Sanders, ink, record books, etc 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., general supplies 

Rand, McNally & Co., maps 

Edward E. Babb & Co., blackboard 
slating ...... 

Thompson, Brown & Co., numeral cards 

Clifton W. Drake, glass, putty, etc. 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., general sup- 
plies ...... 

Arthur H. Knowlton, sodium, iodine, etc. 

Stevens & Duncklee, dippers, pans, etc. 

Rumford Printing Co., ex. papers, cer- 
tificates, letter heads, etc. 

The Morse Co., outline maps 

Hunt & Emerson, paper 

Department of the Interior . 

N. C. Nelson, clocks . . . . 

National School Supply Co., ink . 

A. Storrs & Bement Co., board . 

Continental Brush Co., brushes 

Edith A, Gritfin, model stands 

Philbrick Furniture Co., cocoa matting 

Chandler Adjustable Desk Co., desks 
for high school . . . . 

Harvard Co-operative Society, paper 



55. .50 
6.00 
6.10 
6.00 
5.50 



S119.40 

.62 

10.66 

1.50 

.41 

17.00 

111.28 

96.10 

10.00 

1.92 

29.13 

134.94 
.35 

6.00 

182.30 
19.80 

1.80 

2.00 
14.25 

1.50 
15.00 

6.00 
12.00 
22.89 

178.00 
2.00 



53,555.61 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



331 



Bausch & Lomb Optical Co,, micro 

scopes, etc. .... 
Brown University, science supplies 
P. P. Caproni & Brother, clay for mod 

eling ..... 
H. H. & C. A. Brimley, crayfish 
Rolf'e Art Store, picture and frame 
Marine Biological Laboratory, science 

supplies .... 

Red Cross Chemical Co., disinfectant 
A. H. Britton & Co., general supplies 
Concord Water- Works 
Harry G. Emmons, ribbon, denim, oil 

cloth '..... 
J. L. Hammett Co., tables, blackboards 

rulers, etc. .... 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil, brushes, shel 

lac, stain .... 

Frank P. Mace, fasteners, rubber-stamps 

letter- scales, etc. 
David E. Murphy, denim, ribbon 
Concord Light and Power Co., gas 
Edson C. Eastman, paste, book support; 
Concord Electric Co., incandescent light 
George S. Perry, supplies . 
George L. Lincoln & Co., castors, tables, 

rent chairs, curtains, etc. 
Ira C. Evans, general svipplies 
F. E. Nelson, general supplies 
Concord Land and Water Power Co 

incandescent light 
George E. Carter, typewriter supplies 
Diamond Paste Co., paste . 
C. G. Coffin & Co., oil 
Batchelder & Co. 

Benjamin Bilsborough, shellac, brush 
Safety Bottle & Ink Co., ink 



$53.69 
2..00 

4 00 
2.63 
4.00 

4.25 
12.50 

82.99 
401.00 

13.28 

95.52 

9.58 

26.35 
6.55 

58.06 
1.75 
7.00 
3.69 

120.15 

251.91 

7.80 

2.95 
5.05 
2.91 
1.80 
.42 
4.45 
1.10 



.2,184.73 



332 city of concord. 

Repairs. 

GENERAL. 

Concord Miichine Co., pulleys, oil oups, 

etc $2.30 

The Fuller & Wurreii Heatinjr and Venti- 
lating Co., linings to furnace . . 4.98 
Clarence F. Fipplien, masonry . . 5.50 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concreting . . 11.50 
C. W. Dadnum, repairing lamp, and wire 3.10 
W. E. Darrah, repairing roof . . 7.71 
J. E. Gage, repairing locks . . 5.50 
W. Carpenter, painting . , . 2.21 
Harwood & Nichols, phimbing . . 7.13 
Edward E. Babb & Co., blackboard 

slating . . . . . . 5.00 

J. E. Randlett, measuring for fire-escape 5.00 

S. R. Hood, work on furnace . . 4.55 

A. JL. Lowell & Co., painting fence . 13.00 

Henry O. Williams .... .50 

Scannell & Wholley, repairing high 

school boiler ..... 265.00 

S. Homer Woodbridge Co., making and 

preparing estimates of repairs . . 200.36 
W. R. Wenzel, work on floors and chairs 6.83 
W. S. Davis & Son, repairs on Chand- 
ler scliool 40.00 

Danfortli & Forrest, work on Eastman 

school and lumber .... 534.19 

Frank Sargent, repairing chairs . . 56.00 
Fred Rollins, painting . . . 21.99 
E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., miscel- 
laneous repairs .... 292.81 

J. L. A. Cliellis, luml)er, work on black- 
boards, etc. ..... 47.42 

Lee Brothers, general plumbing . . 162.87 
George Abbott, Jr., general painting of 

school buildin-rs .... 389.67 



jChool report. 



333 



Rowell & Plummer, general plumbing . $21.87 

J. E. Hpbsoii, tin work . . . 73.67 
C. L. Fellows & Co., general repairs, 

masonry, etc. . . . . 7.65 

George W. Johnson, painting . . 46.80 

Goodhue & Milton, general plumbing . 104.96 

Benjamin Bilsborough, paint, oil, etc. . 12.15 

Ira B. Shallies & Co., general repair work 264.95 

E. H. Randall, repairs on boilers . 37.60 

EXTRAORDINARY. 

J. E. Hobson, work on Penacook school S25.95 

C. L. Fellows & Co., work at Penacook 

and Walker schools . . . 169.33 

E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., work at 

Penacook school .... 193.96 

D. P. Gosline, blower for Penacook 

school 58.80 

W. Carpenter, sliellac, paint, stain, etc. 19.46 

George W. Jolmson, painting at Pena- 
cook, AYalker, P2astman schools . 24.98 
Lee Brothers, work at Penacook school 326.66 
J. H. Coburn, teaming . . . 4.00 
Concord Machine Co., pulleys, oil cups, 

etc 21.78 

S. Homer Woodbridge Co., professional 

services ...... 125.27 

Rowell & Plummer, mason work at Pen- 
acook school . . . . . 42.13 

Charles H. Eastwick, plaster, etc. . 3.12 

J. L. A. Chellis, carpentry at Walker 

school 213.23 

Concord Fllectric Co., motor at Penacook 

school 158.29 

M. E. Cliftord, plumbing at AValker 

school ...... 417.56 

C. W. Dadmun, work on motor at Pen- 
acook school . . . . . 3.25 



;2,664.77 



SI, 807. 77 



334 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MEHKIMACK AND RUMFOHD APPROPKIATION. 

C. L. Fellows & Co., work at Merri- 
mack school $10.98 

J. E. Hobson, work at Merrimack school 8.80 

E. B. Hutchinson Building Co., work at 

Merrimack school .... 30.it 1 



Miscellaneous. 

E. B. Morse, teams .... $27.25 

N. A. Dunklee, teams . . . 80.. 50 

Dodd, Mead & Co. .... .75 

Comstock Publishing Co., reference 

books ...... 4.05 

Charles S. Conant, teams . . . 52.86 

A. S. Matheson, car fare . . . 5.35 

Prescott Piano Co., pianos . . . 211.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight . . 30.93 

Hunt & Emerson, paper, frames, etc. . 13.07 
David Robinson, hauling ashes, settees, 

rubbish, etc. ..... 96.55 

N. B. Burleigh, repairing clocks . . 10.25 
Benjamin F. Robinson, drawing ashes, 

shoveling, rubbish, etc. . . . 40.30 

Longmans, Green & Co., reference books 6.55 
Ginn & Co., " " 3.83 
Allyn & Bacon, " " .41 
American Book Co., " " 8.48 
Arthur N. Day, repair of piano . . 5.00 
Henry V. Tittemore, moving piano . 2.50 
D. C. Heath & Co., reference books . .50 
William Ware & Co., '• " . 1.35 
Edward K. Woodworth, assignee, bind- 
ing books, etc. . . . . 8.55 

Charles Scribner's Sons Co., reference 

books 3.94 

Grace L. Bell, car fare . . . 4.05 



$50.69 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



335 



G. F. Sewall, job team, 

F. S. Webster Co., repairing typewriter 

Charles E. Lauriat Co., encyclopedia 

W. Gr. C. Kimball, negatives 

C. H. Sanborn, trees 

Frank L. Sanders, binding books 

Ruth H. Buntin, playing piano 

Edson C. Eastman, encyclopedia 

George R. Pearce, printing tickets 

People & Patriot Co., notices 

L. J. Rundlett, engrossing diplomas 

Samuel A. Eliot, oration 

Scott French, clearing up yard . 

Frank W. Messe, tuning pianos . 

C. B. Mills, job team . 

Concord Evening Monitor, notices 

Daniel L. Perkins 

Grace L. Aldrich, labor 

C. B. Walker, rent of hall . 

Fred S. Farnum, carpentry 

Maynard, Merrill & Co., reference books 

Harper & Brothers, " " 

N. E. Telephone & Telegrapli Co., rent 
of telephone . . . . . 

J. Edward Morrison, miscellaneous sup- 
plies ...... 

L. J. Rundlett, agent, stamps, envelopes, 
ink, postals, telegrams, etc. 

Rumford Printing Co., printing pam- 
phlets ...... 



$1.25 

12.45 

35.00 

(i.OO 

11.00 

5.85 

8.00 

20.00 

1.50 

11.55 

20.00 

28.00 

5.00 

39.00 

4.00 

9.20 

1.00 

5.67 

20.00 

1.80 

.75 

1.09 

29.62 

.75 

103.31 

177.91 



;i,177.7 



Military Drill. 

William Read & Sons, equipments • $94.05 

George M. Belyea., repairing drum . 2.50 

Charles L. Mason, instructor . . 100.00 

James R. Hill & Co., . . . .25 



$196.80 



336 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Insiranck. 



Chae^e & Martin 
Roby & Knowles 
J. H. Ballard . 

Eastman & Merrill 
Jackm;ui & Lanii' 
Morrill & Daiifoi'tl 



Fuel. 



Badger Brothers, coal 
David Robinson, sawing and piling wood 
David Drinan, sawing wood 
Concord Coal Co., coal 
Concord Electric Co., electricity . 
Concord Light and Power Co., gas 
Arthur N. Day, hard wood 
George W. Chesley, coal 
Caleb P. Little, hard wood . 
C. H. Stevens & Co., hard wood 
Lewis B. Hoit, hard wood . 
Benjamin F. Robinson, sawing and pil 
injr hard antl soft wood . 



Salaries. 



Belle M. Locke . 
A. Delia Shaw, . 
Mary A. Sanborn 
Millie K. Bray . 
Walter H. Fletcher 
E. Gertrude Dickerman 
Mary I. Powell . 
John F. Kent 
Elizabeth Averill 
Mary E. Whitten 
Cora J. Russell . 
Alice W. C(dlins 



$126.00 

36.00 

36.00 

LSD. 00 

558.00 

216.00 



$267.60 

74.40 

7.00 

1,833.02 

124.23 

65.08 

49.00 

82.21 

361.38 

5.50 

515.51 

93.60 



$75.00 

50.00 

166.44 

10.00 

20.00 

2.00 

54.66 

2,500.00 

.S25.00 

800.00 

374.42 

311.06 



81,152.00 



$•3,478.53 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



337 



Carrie 31. True . 








$394.73 


Mary W. Dean . 




682.89 


Emma Hindley . 








460.53 


Grace Morrill 








328.95 


Mary A. Cogswell 








800.00 


Elizabeth M. McAfee 








600.00 


Louisa Prescott . 








550.00 


Jessie N. Stimson 








550.00 


Mabelle A. Boutelle 








500.00 


A. Delia Shaw . 








550.00 


Lenora B. Caldwell 








500.00 


Fannie M. Stimson 








366.45 


Edith M. Ray . 








330.99 


Sara R. Huse 








145.39 


Dorothy D. Reynold? 








131.58 


Lillian Yeaton . 








632.91 


Harriet C. Kimball 








550.00 


Amy C. Wood . 








136.84 


Minnie E. Ladd 








500.00 


Lottie E. Pearson 








507.90 


Luella A. Dickerman . 








757.89 


Jessie D. Alexander 








197.37 


Fannie B. Lothrop 








407.89 


A<rnes L. Dickerman . 








407.89 


Evelyna D. Boulay 








75.00 


Elizabeth .J. Talpey 








550.00 


Mary E. Sullivan 








342.10 


Mary G. Hall . 








94.74 


Mary G. Ahem . 








366.45 


Mary Flavin 








316.45 


Belle E. Shepard 








532.90 


Amy L. Comins 








450.00 


Maud B. Binet . 








200.00 


Mary E. Melifant 








550.00 


Delia L. Ingalls . 








432.90 


Martha E. Rolfe 








500.00 


Gara E. McQuesten 








361.85 



338 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mary F. Osgood 
Celia C. Standish 






$532.90 
407.89 




Edna M. Kennedy 






541.45 




Helen C. Cooper 






181.49 




Elizabeth J. Stevens 






67.50 




Addie F. Straw . 






865.76 




Helen L. Southgate 






614.47 




Alice M. Sargent 






600.00 




Susan M. Little . 






550.00 




Stella M. Brit ton 






550.00 




Augusta M. Judkins 






311.32 




Jane E. Sullivan 






482.89 




Grace L. Barnes 






500.00 




Annette Prescott 






500.00 




Mary A. Jones . 






550.00 




Katharine L. Remick 






407.89 




Mary B. McLam 






582.88 




Mary T. O'Connor 






246.72 




Regina J. Glennon 






230.27 




Bertha L. Holbrook 






341.45 




Sadie E. McClure 






457.89 




Mary C Caswell 






500.00 




Mildred I. Cilley 






457.89 




A. Vietta Kimball 






482.89 




Grace L. Bell, drawing 




865.76 




Charles S. Conant, music 




. 1,107.97 




L. J. Rundlett, superintendent 




. 2,000.00 




L. J. Rundlett, agent . 




500.00 




W. I. Hyatt 




376.31 




Edith M. Walker 




273.65 




Mary A. Cogswell, supervisor 




30.00 




Helen M. Ayers 




24.75 




Phenie L. Jones 




111.18 




Elizabeth J. Donovan . 




97.50 




Helen M. Baker 




119.73 




Nettie M. Bowen 


• 


. - 


128.28 

$37, 


557.35 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



339 



Cost per Capita. 



Cost per pupil including all current expenses . 

'• " for tuition including music, drawing, 

supt, ........ 

Cost per pupil for tuition exclusive music, drawing, 
supt. in all schools below the high school 

Cost per pupil for tuition exclusive music, drawing, 
supt. in the high school . . . . . 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all schools 
" " " " " in high school 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all schools 
below the high school .... 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material 

" ''• " " " and tuition 

Cost per pupil for paper .... 

" " " pens .... 

" " " pencils .... 

" " " wood- and iron- working inclusive 

of instruction ...... 

Cost per pupil for wood- and iron-working exclusive 
of instruction ...... 

Cost per pupil for cooking inclusive of instruction 
'' " " " exclusive of " 

'' " " sewing inclusive of " 

" " " " exclusive of " 

" " " drawing inclusive of " 

" " " " exchisive of " 

" " " music inclusive of " 

" " " " exclusive of " 

" " " military drill inclusive of " 

" " " " " exclusive of" 



822.14 
13.77 

10.36 

33.70 
1.17 
3.74 

1.18 
.38 

0.13 
.063 
.013 
.007 

7.95 

1.45 

1.55 

.19 

1.37 

.52 

.529 

.36 

.54 

.079 

5.14 

2.01 



340 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



i UITION 


Kece 


IPTS ] 


N THE Dn 


FEKENT SCIIC 


High school .... 


$1,197.00 


Kimball 










84.50 


Mei-rimack 










54.00 


Plains 










20.00 


Walker . 










12.00 


Rumfortl . 










18.00 


Dewey 










20.00 


Chandler . 










133.50 


West Concord 










8.00 


Training school 










195.00 



,742.00 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union ScJwol District: 

With respect I submit to your honorable body my sixteenth 
annual report of the condition of the schools in Union School 
District, being the forty-second of its series. I have made the 
usual tabulated statistics a part of the report, but will com- 
ment upon them no further than to say that the total enroll- 
ment for the year ending June 37, 1901, showed an increase 
of ninety pupils over that of the preceding year. Statistics 
are necessary and interesting, but the decisive test of our s^'S- 
tem of instruction lies in the character of the work done by 
the pupils. The number of children of foreign birth in Con- 
cord is so sinall that the energv of the teachers is not con- 
sumed in trying to carry them along with the more readily 
instructed portion. The public school, speaking as it does 
for the republic and for personal liberty, has alwa3'S been 
considered the safeguard of our form of government, and our. 
greatest solicitude is that all classes of children, both foreign 
and native born, rich and poor, should receive the benefit of 
its teachings. 



TABLE OF ATTP:NDANCE 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 28, 1901. 



SCHOOLS. 





M 


>. 


'j! 






M 


b 



«.S'U 









. o 






S U 



-2 o 



Oe3 












-.: .^x SS Soj^S 



PLi-^hs ,< 1^ I?: i^ \'^ 



■r. \ 

:do d.2 
125 z; 



High 

Grammar. 

Kimball, 1st.... 
Kimball. 2cl .... 

Kimball, 3d 

Kimball, 4th ... 
Merrimack, 1st. 
Merriinaok, 2d . 
Chandler, 1st... 

Walker. 2d 

"Walker. 3d 

Rmiiford, 2d 

Rnmford, 3d. .i. 
Penacook, 2d... 
Penacook, 3d... 

Franklin, 3d 

W. Concord, 1st. 
W. Concord, 2d. 
Eastman. 1st .. 



,36 
.36 
.36 

36 
.'36 
. !36 

35.8 
. 36 
.36 
. 36.1 
.35.8 
. 36 
. 35.9 
. 36 
. 36 
.35.9 
.36 



Primary. 

Kimball, 1st 

Kimball, 2d 

Kimball, 3d 

Kimball, 4th .... 
Mei'riiiiack, 1st. . 
]Merriiiiack, 2d .. 

Chandler. 1st 

Chandler, 2d .... 
Chandler, 3d .... 

"Walker, 1st 

"Walker. I'd 



"Wal 

Walk( 

Ruml 

Runrl 

Penaf 

Pen a I 



:A . 

■r, 4tli .... 

)rd, 1st .... 

)rd.2d 

<iok, 1st . .. 

..ok, 2d.... 
Franklin, l.st.... 

Franklin, 2d 

Franklin, 3d 

Dewey, 1st* 

Dewey, 2d 

Dewey, 3d 

Dewey, 4th* 

"W. Concord, 1st.. 
W. Concord, 2d.. 
W. Concord, 3d.. 

Eastman 

Tahanto, l.st 

Tahanto. 2d 

Cogswell, 1st 

Cogswell, 2d 

Plains 



35.4! 
35.4 
35.4 
34.8: 
35.4 
35.41 
32.9 
32. 7 1 
32.7 
35.41 
35.4 
35.4 
35 3 
35.2 
35.2 
35.41 
35.4 
.35.4 
35.4: 
35.3 
18.5 
35.7 
35.3! 

35.5! 

35 5] 

34.9 

.35. 5: 

.•55.4 

35.4' 

3.5.4! 

136 

35.41 



222 



208 206 



32: 31 

48' 48 

45 44 

40 47 

32 33 

48, 48 

42: 41 

45 45 
50 50 
44 50 
50! 52 

46 46 
52' 53 
43! 44 
24: 24 
36! 36 
40 40 



795 723, 732 



35 40 

43: 45 

47! 49 

76 76 

49! 50 

51! 52 

35. 36 

38 39 
30! -9 
49; 50 
46; 46 

53 53 
81. 83 

47 
48 

44 44 

54 54 
48 , 49 
46 47 

55 56 
441 43 

39 41 
50! 48 
32 1 32 
42 42 
33 32 

45 45 
49' 50 



39 40 

45 47 



95 358 



670 



909! SOf) 170i) 1535 1.5C0 1393 



Totals 34.7jl383 1343 2720 24GG 2498 2260 



93 



337 



16 



.53 
.03 
.24 
.39 
1.06 
.63 
.61 
.46 
.29 
.39 
22 



.21 
.23 
.23 
.35 
.38 
.86 
.09 
.44 
.89 
.29 

1.00 
.86 
.48 
.39 
.31 
.25 
.32 
.15 
.53 
.23 
.08 
.44 
.44 
.22 
.46 
.42 
.20 
.80 
.75 

1.43 
.19 
.32 
.52 



16 



52 



190! 32 



41 32 

2| 47 

. . . ! 47 

. . . 51 

15 19 



50 747 



47 



21 
62 
29 
13 
50 
34 
104 
28 
10 
35 
21 
79 



55 224 



.. 1345 79 



240!2122 139 



18 
13 
10 
10 
9 
7 
10 
11 
7 

10 
10 
9 
5 
14 
11 
14 
9 
10 
9 
5 
8 
14 
10 
5 
13 
7 
4 
13 
9 



612 



64 
36 

151 

143 
25 
41 
20 
41 
42 
62 

104 
34 
57 
29 
51 
46 

110 
42 
78 
50 
34 
46 
50 
7 
21 



.32 
22 
43 
202 
42 



7 
20 



308 



530 



1609 
26.53 



92 
157 



'Made up in middle of year from other schools. 



CO 
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< 

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-ijd pug^i'B oj pasuBO -o^i 


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-H t-l ?5 Oi 


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•s^uoo 
am eaojaq ji[,8uo.iq 'o^ 














- i 




- 


•UOUBJS 80l[0d %'B 

pauytioo xii.xB.iodih9j -o^ 








- 


— ■ CO rt 


CO 


•pajisiA sijuM-Bd -ojsj 


2 


mc^t<)ooo-rt<coi^cs 

-t< C-1 CO C) — C-l ^ " 


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•s.inoii [ooips ui sjaaajs 
uo punoj 9Sb xooqos -o^ 


to 


10 C5 


I> 00 «5 -^ 


00 

1 


op 


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■* 


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•siooqos A^IQ 


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00 


CO ?J (M M ■ C 


CO 


•SJ99.I1S uo 

puuoj panojua !jou s?uuujx 














W 
H 

!z; 
•< 


•pnnoj lou -o^ 








■* 


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■paaiB^ap 
jS^q^piOAieun asiMjaq^o 'ox 


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aiq'Bim puB jjois punoj -o^ 


- 


coooc-iooco-^t^i^ 


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•^110 JO !>no paAoui "o^ 




LO '. 








■M (M <- 





1' 


•pitaj^B oj aiq^Bufi 


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rt -M [- 


l» 


1 ^ 


•pua^jB 0^ pasu'Bo 


C 


C<1 1-1 


CO CO m LO c 


1 


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d 
12; 


•S[0oqos i^iqooj'Bj 






- 


CO c-i 


- ^1 


1 ^l 


•siooqos A.%10 


t- 


LO -1 -H -t< ^ CO t- gl Ci 


i CO 


No. volunta- 
rily returned. 


■siooqos I'Giqooj'Bj 








-f 










•* 


•spoqos AjiQ 


ir 


5 C-1 CO -H 


LO 


CO -i 


1 


<o u 


•spoqos (Biqooj'Bj 




: ^ ^ 


: IN CO 


rH <M 


: S 


•spoqos A%i(y 


IT 


J^g-^t^g^ss^ 


: 
1 ^' 






z6 
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c 
c 


J 

J "c 
2 C 


: © - 
I 3 ; 




5 1^ 




<s 


^ ^ 


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/ 



344 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, CENSUS, 1901, 



SUMMARY. 

Number clnldren enumerated, 1899 . 

" " " 1900 . 

'' " 1901 . 

Boys ...... 

Girls 

Number attending school. 

" " public school 

" " parochial school . 

" " private school 

" " Rolfe and Rumford asy 

Not attended since September, 1900 . 

Number between 6 and 16 never attended 
" " 5 and 6 " " 

Moved to city shice April 1, 1900 . 

Not complied with law 

NATIVITY OF PARENT 



2,621 

2,766 
2,856 

1,440 
1,416 

2,688 

2,303 

336 

36 

13 

26 

43 

99 

133 

4 



American born 
Foreign born 
Dane . 
Armenian . 
Swiss 
Russian 
German 
French 



American born 
Foreign born 
Irish . 
English 
French 
Russian 



,904 


Italian 


952 


Nova Scotian 


1 


Scotch 


3 


English 


6 


Swede 


7 


Irish 


10 


French Canadian 


10 





ATIVITY OF CHILD. 



27 

41 
41 

76 

77 

243 

410 



2, 


766 


Italian 


2 




90 


Armenian . 


3 




1 


Scotch 


5 




1 


Nova Scotian 


11 




1 


Swede 


25 




1 


French Canadian 


40 



SCHOOL KETORT. 



345 



SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and 
room. 


Grades or subjects 
taught. 


C3 (D w 


Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 


High. 
John F. Kent 


Master 


Civics, classics, 
mathematics 

French. German... 

Latin and Greek... . 

Mathematics a n d 
English Litera- 
ture 

Physics and Chem- 
istry 

English Composi- 
tion 


$2,500 
825 
800 

800 

800 

700 

700 
600 

500 

600 
550 
550 
500 
550 
500 

375 

325 
200 

650 
550 
500 
525 

775 
300 
425 




Elizabeth Averill 

Mary A.Cogswell 

Mary E. Whitten 

Cora J. Russell 

Mary W. Dean 


Assistant 


230 Pleasant St. 
3 Hanover St. 
102 No. State St. (Lakeport, 
N. H.) 




3 Hanover St. (Alfred, Me.) 

50 Pleafsant St. 

3 Elm St. (Boston, Mass.) 


EnimaHindley 


Biology and Physi- 


[Falls. R. I.) 
20 No. Spring St. (Valley 


Carrie M. True 


Algebra and Latin.. 
History, Latin 

G, room 6, grade 8. . 

<T, room 5, grade 7.. 

(i, room 8, grade 6.. 

(i, room 7, grade 5. . 

P. room 4, grade 4. . 

P, room 2, grade 3.. 

P, room 3, grades la 
and 2 

Kindergarten and 
su b-p r i mar y, 
room 1 


20 No. Spring St. (Water- 


Grace Morrill 




ville, Me.) 
8 So. State St. 


Edith M. Walker 

Willard I.Hyatt 

Alice W. Collins 

Kimball. 

Elizabeth M. McAfee 

Louisa Prescott 

Jessie N. Stinison .... 


Leave of absence 
for the year 

Resigned at end of 
spring- term 

Substitute for Miss 
Rus.sellduring the 
winter term 

Principal 

Assistant 


8 Court St. 
25 Green St. 
15 Summit St. 


Mabelle A. Boutelle.. 


" 


20'.. South St. 


A. Delia Shaw 

Leonora B. Caldwell. 
Fannie M. Stimson... 

Edith M. Ray 


'' :::: :::::: 


72Sclio(il St. 
26^2 South St. 

15 Summit St. 




.. 


[ougli,U. Y. N. H.) 
11 No. Spring St. (HilLsbor- 


Dorothy D. Reynolds. 
Sara R. Huse 


Kindergarten 

G, grade 9 


74 Warren St. (Concord, 


Leave of absence 
for one year 

Transferred toEast- 
man First Gram- 
mar at end of 
spring term 

Transferred from 
Kimball First Pri- 
mary to Walker 
Second Primary 
at end of spring 
term 


Mass.) 


May B. McLani 

Mary Flavin 

Merrimack. 








66V2 No. State St. 


Harriet C. Kimball.. . 


Assistant 


G, grades 7 and 8. .. 
P, grades 2 and 3.... 
P, grades l and la.. 

G grade 9 


Hmikinton road. 
72 Washington St. 
52 Beacon St. 

64 South St, [N. H.) 


Minnie E. Ladd 

Lottie E. Pearson .... 
Amy C. Wood 

Chandler. 


Resigned at end of 
spring term 


Jessie D. Alexander. . 
Fannie D. Lothrop. . . 


Assistant 


(i, grades 5 and 6. .. 
P, grades 3 and 4. . . 


62 So. State St. (Bristol, 
36 So. Spring St. (Contoo- 
cook. N. H.) 



346 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades or subjects 
taught. 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Chandler.— C'o«<irt. 

Agnes L. Dickernian, 
Evelyna I). Boulay.. . 
Mabelle A. lioutelle.. 



S. Josepiiine Messer 

Walker. 

Elizabeth J. Talpey 

Mary G. Hall 

Mary G. Aliern 

Mary Flavin 

Belk' E. Shepard. .. 
Amy L. Comins — 

Maud B. Binet 

Mary E. Sullivan.. . 

Phenie L. Jones 

RUJIFORD. 

(Discontinued at end 
of spring term.) 

Harriet C. Kimball. 



Nettie M. Bowen. 
Martha E.Rolfe.. 



Transferred toKim- 
ball Fovirth Gram- 
mar at end of 
spring term 

Leave of absence 
for the year 



Assistant., 



Principal . 
Assistant , 



Fannie B. Lothrop. 

Penacook. 

Marv E. Meliiant... 

Delia L. lug-alls 

Martha E. ftolfe.. .. 

Gara E. McQuesten 
Mary F. Osgood — 

Celia C. Standish... 

Evelyna D. Bo\ilay. 



Resigned at end of 
fall term 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 



P, grades 1. la, and 2 
P, half sessions 



G, grades 7 and 8. . 

G, grades 5 and 6. . 

P, grade 4 

P, grade 3 

P. grades la, 2 

Kindergarten and 

Sub-Primary . ... 

Kindergarten 



Transferred to Mer- 
rimack Second 
Grammar 

Resigned. 

Tninsferred to Pen- 
acook First Pri- 
mary 

Transferred to 
Chandler First 
Primary 



Principal . 
Assistant . 



T r a n s f e r r e d to 
Frankhu Third 
Grammar at end 
of spring term. .. 

T r a n s f e r r e d to 
Franklin First 
Primary at end of 
spring term 

Assistant for half 
S(;ssions in Second 
Primary for last 
half year 



G, grades 7,8... 
G, grades 5, G. . 
P,griides3. 4... 

P, grades 1, la, 



.$425 
285 



550 

300 

375 
325 
550 

450 
200 



94 So. State St. 
2 Highland St. 



41 Warren St. (York Beach, 

Me.) 
59 Rum ford St. (Franklin 

Falls, N. H.) 
64 Franklin St. 
5 Rum ford St. 
58 School St. 

[N. J.) 
58 School St. (Glen Ridge, 
9 Pitman St. 



550 
450 
500 



36 Downing St. 
Clinton St. 

36 So. Spring St. (Pena- 
cook, N.H.) 
9 Wall St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



347 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 


Position and 


Grades or subjects 




Residence. 


and teachers. 


room. 


taught. 


02 ^■ 


( ) Oiit of town. 


Dewey. 








Addie F. Straw 


Principal — Trainer 
for Primary and 














900 


4 Jackson St. 


Helen L. Southgate.. 


Assistant — Trainer 








for Kindei'garten. 




700 


3 So. Spring St. (Dedham, 




Assistant 


P, grades la, 2 


600 
550 


Mass.) 
84 Pleasant St. 


Susan jM. Little 




G, grades 5, 6 


SO School St. 


Stella M. Britton 


" i P, grades 3, 4 


550 


27 Washington St. (New- 
port, N. H. )| 


Augusta M. Judkins.. 


Kindergarten and 








! Sub-Primary 


325 


27 Fayette St. 


Mary C. Caswell 


Transferred to 
Cogswell First 
Primary at end of 
spring term 








Mildred I. Cilley 


Transferred to 
Cogswell Second 
Primary at end of 
spring term 








A. Delia Shaw 


Transferred to Kim- 
ball First Primary 
at end of spring 
term .... 








Edith M.Ray 


T r a n s f e r r e d to 






Kimball, Kinder- 










garten and Sub- 
Primary at end of 


















spring term 









Pupil Teachers. 

Class of December, 1901. 

Evelyna Delia Boulay 2 Highland St. 

Class of Juxe, 1902. 

Maude Garland, left school at end of .June term. 

Class of December, 1902. 

Ina Harriet Gove, 59 Rumford St. (Henniker). Left at end of fall term. 

Marv Grace Hall 59 Rumford St. (Franklin Falls) 

Esther Hodge 86 Franklin St. 

Class of March, 1903. 
Florence Alice Chandler (Penacook) 

Kindergarten. 

Class of June, 1903. 

lyla Chamberlin 2 View St. (West Concord) 

Grace Mae Chase 78 Broadway. (Franklin Falls) 

Marv Fernald 9 Tahanto St. 

EveivH Tilton Foster 26 No. Spring St. 

Beulah Blanche Goodale 90 No. State St. (Franklin Falls) 

Emma Lillian Hastings 155 No. State St. 

Martha Belle Marden (Manchester) 

Anna Bradlev Peck 48 School St. (Manchester) 

Agnes Veronica Sullivan » 49 Lyndon St. 

Alice Louise Sullivan 59 Rumford St. (Manchester) 

Cora Ada Webb (Manchester) 



348 



CITV OK CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Cordmued. 



Names of building's 
and teachers. 



Position and 
teachers. 




Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



^Principal G, grades 5, 6. 



Franklin. 

Mary F. Osgood. 

Celia C. Standish Assistant JP, grades 3, 4. . . 

Edna M. Kennedy. . 
Hehni GUira Cooper. 



(Franklin 



Elizabeth C. Stevens.; " 

Mary A. Sanborn , Leave of absence 

for winter and 

spring terms 

Training School 
transferred to 
Dewey building 
at end of spring 
term 



550.0031 South St. 

I Falls.) 
425.00 6 Beacon St. 

P, grades la, 2 550.00!io Blanchard St. 

Kindergarten and I 

Sub-Primary 300.00 74 Warren St. (Wreutham, 



Kindergarten 



West Concord. 



Jane E. Sullivan 

Grace L. Barnes 

Annette Prescott 

Mary A. Jones 

Katliarine L. Remick 



Eastman. 

May Belle McLam... 
MaryTracy O'Connor 
Regina J. Glennon 
Delia L. Ingalls .. . 



Principal G, grades 7, 8, 9 

Assistant iG, grades 4, 5, G 

" |P, grades 3, 4 

" P, grades la, 2 

'■ Kindergarten and 

Sub-Primary 



Principal . 
Assistant 



T ]• a n s f e r r e d to 
Penacook Third 
Grammar at end 
of spring term.... 

Edith Greene Kesigned at end of 

i spring term 

Helen M. Baker ISubstitute for Miss 

Greene for spring 
term 



G, grades 6, 7, 8, 9... 
G, P, grades 3, 4, 5. , 
P, grades 1,1a, 2 



Tahanto. 



Bertha L. Holbrook. 
Sadie £. McClure... 



Cogswell. 



Mary C. Caswell... 
Mildred I. Cilley. . . 
Edna M. Kennedy. 



JM.ary A. Sanborn. 

Plains. 
A. Vietta Kimball. 
Bow Bhook. 



Principal . 
Assistant . 



P, grades 2, 3.. , 
P, grades 1, la. 



Principal P, grades 2, 3. . 

Assistant P, grades l, la. 

T r a n s f e r r e d to 
Franklin Second 
Primary at end of 
spring term 

Transferred to 
Franklin Kinder- 
garten at end of 
spring term 



Principal . . . 
Not in use. 



Grades 1, la, 2, 3, 4, 

5,6,7,8.9 



142.50 



Mass.) 
3 Church St. 



500.00 
500.00 
500.00 
550.00 



36 Jackson St. 
112 Centre St. 
25 Green St. 
(Penacook.) 



425.00:4 Fayette St. 



600.00,35 Perlev St. 
375.00|206 No. Main St. 
350.00 12 So. Spring St. 



350.00 ("West Concord.) 
475.00 139 No. State St. 
caweii.) 



(Bos- 



500.00 121 Warren St. 
475.00 72 Dunklee St. 
ton.) 



(Dunl.ar- 



500.00,3 Lyndon St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



34D 



SCHOOL TABLE. — Co?ichidecL 



Special teachers 
and janitors. 


Position and 
buildings. 


Subjects taught. 


as P.S 


Residence. 
( ) Out of to\\n. 


Special. 
Charles S. Conant.... 


Music 


$1,125 


fii School St. 


Grace L. Bell 


Drawina- 


900I99 No. State St. (Darien 


Edward F.Gordon... 
Charles E. Stewart... 
Ellen J. Jones 


Principal 

Assistant 

Principal 

Assistant 


Industrial 

Industrial 

Sewing 


1 Conn.) 
900"20 Auburn St. 
700'12 (ir:niitr St. 
r,-2o K',' X<(. :\l:nn St. 


Louise C. Howe 


Sewing 


300 
425 
100 

624 

572 
520 

572 

624 

266 

228 

76 


12 AV'ashington St. 


Harriet C. Gilmore.. . 




172 No. Main St. 


Charles L. Mason .... 




Military drill 


48 Washington St. 


Janitors. 
C. W. Tarleton 


High 




44 Lyndon St. 


Olin M. Blodgett 


Kimball and Chan- 
dler 




48 Monroe St. 


Frank L. Dudley 


Penacook and Cogs- 
well 






Henry D. Robinson.. 


Walker and Frank- 
lin 




Plains. 


Edward H. Dixon. . . . 


Dewey and Merri- 
mack 




11 Pearl St. 


Archie S. Matheson.. 


West Concord 




West Concord. 


Park French 


Eastman 




East Concord. 


John Casey 


Tahanto 




Fosterville. 











350 



CITY OF CONCOIU). 



HIGH SCHOOL TABLE 

SllOWIXd NlMBEK OF STUDENTS TAKIXG EACH StLDY, 

Fall Term, 1901. 



Class. 



Number in Class. 



English Composition 

English Literature 

History of English Literature 

Frencli 

German 

Latin 

Greek 

Algebra 

Plane Geometry 

Solid Geometry 

Trigonometry 

Physiography 

Biology 

Physics 

Chemistry 

History 

Political Economy and Civil Government 
Manual Training 



Grad. 



Total. 



Sen. 



9 

29 
9 
23 
6 
21 
9 
4 
4 
6 
1 



Jun. 



58 



Soph. Fresh. !Total. 



10 



297 



108 



108 
1 



1 

108 

1 



35 



105 



35 



256 



231 

96 

9 



146 
40 

153 
92 



38 
43 

4G 

151 

27 
02 

1.276 



SCHOOL UEPOKT. 



351 



TABLE SHOWING NUMBER OF STUDENTS TAKING 
EACH COURSE OF STUDY. 



Class. 


Grad, 


Senior. 


Junior. 


Sopli. 


Fresh. 


Total. 






20 
9 
1 


28 
15 
14 


20 
13 
17 


24 
10 
38 


98 






47 







70 


Post-graduate — .... 
Special 


4 


4 




2 




2 
35 


4 


Undecided* 






35 














Total 


4 


30 


59 


56 


109 


258 







*As the Academic and Classical cour.ses are identical during Freshman 
year, the Freshmen are not required to decide between them until the 
beginning of Sophomore year. 



352 



CITV OF CONCOKI). 



Table SIiowino (1) tiik Wiiulk Number of DiFFKitKNT 
Pri'iL.s Attending and Dhawing Literary Fund; (2) 
Average Daily Attendance; (o) G-ros.s Expenditures; 
(4) Cost per Pupil, Based upon the Whole Number 
OF Different Pupils Attending; (5) Cost per Pupil, 
Based Upon Average Daily Attendance, for the Last 
Ten Years. 



Year. 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


1892 


2,073 
2,338 
2,338 
2,465 
2,489 
2,489 
2,487 
2,617 
2,762 
2,636 
2,726 


1,6.55 
1,669 
1,679 
1,835 
1,853 
1,847 
1,960 
2,024 
2,085 
2,0W 
2,260 


.?40,042.75 
44.727.76 
48,545.63 
48,922.04 
48,539.56 
48,400.02 
48,024.82 
49,904.92 
55,172.04 
54,925.61 
60,361.52 


$19.31 
19.13 
20.76 
19.84 
19.50 
19.44 
19.31 
19.06 
19.98 
20.84 
22.14 


$24.04 


1893 


26.70 


1894 


28.91 


1895 


26.66 


1896 


26.19 


1897 


26.20 


1898 


24.50 


1899 


24.65 


1900 


26.46 


1901 


26.80 


1902 


26.72 







Table Showing the Whole Number of Pupils, Average 
Attendance, and Tardiness in all the Schools Since 
1892. 



1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



Actual number of pupils at- 
tending. 



995 
1146 
1117 
1210 
1251 
1246 
1235 
1289 
1368 
1317 
1383 



Average daily at- 
tendance. 



1078 
1192 
1221 

1238 
1243 
12.55 
1328 
1394 
1319 
1343 



2073 
2338 
2338 
2465 
2489 
2489 
2487 
2C17 
2762 
2636 
2726 



258 
265 



127 
24 



130 
145 



90 



126 



1655 
1669 
1679 
1835 
1853 
1847 
1960 
2024 
2085 
2049 
2260 



Tardiness. 



227 < 1760 

14 1761 

10 ' 1862 

156 ' 1404 

18 1550 

I 6 1268 

113 ' 1020 

04 1 1122 

61 1 1112 

i 36 1125 

211 1467 



660 

1 

101 



146 



248 
102 



13 

342 



478 

282 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



353 



MANUAL TRAINING. 

TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 





Wood and Iron. 


Cooking. 


Sewing. 




no 






qlti 


«! 


CO 




gbi 


OS 






gbi 




P, 


p: 


© 


^s.-d 


ft 




<s 


*=.s 


ft 

ft 


3 


0) 


^S 




a 







^"2 


ft 







^T 



















eM 








4-* 






*M 03 


SCHOOLS. 


o 





s 







3 



a 


4) « 





3 



1 

33 


0*i 




,0 




"^ 


■2-^ 




cS 


"§ 


'2-2 




> 


"S 


Sft 
Sft 






=2 




- ft 




b 
« 


03 






=2 


33 
33 




C Oi 


a;> 




a^ 


OJ 


0? 




<» 


o* 


33 


> 


s 




H 


h-i 


«1 


H 


H 


hJ 


<!l 


H 


H 


hJ 


< 


H 


High 


48 


4 


36 


44 


31 


4 


27 


1 
27 


24 


8 


22 


16 


Kimball 


53 


5 


43 


48 


51 


4 


44 


47 


129 


42 


126 


87 


Merrimack.... 


36 




32 


36 


80 


3 


71 


77 


87 


22 


59 


65 


Chandler 


26 


1 


17 


25 


47 


4 


41 


43 


72 


31 


69 


41 


Walker 


19 


2 


17 


17 


23 




21 


23 


79 


22 


54 


57 


Rumford 










7 
27 


".5 


5 
23 


7 
22 










Penacook 


24 


2 


23 


22 


80 


18 


57 


62 


Franklin 


















31 
31 
36 


12 
5 
10 


17 
22 
28 


19 


Dewev 


















26 


West "Concord 


16 


6 


9 


16 


13 


2 


10 


11 


26 


Tahanto 


























Cogswell 


























Plains 


8 
8 


2 
2 


6 
4 


6 
6 


4 
8 


4 














Eastman 


7 


8 


21 


3 


18 


18 


Parochial 


17 


2 


12 j 15 


21 


1 


18 


20 


11 


1 


10 


10 


Totals 


255 


20 


199 235 


312 


27 


267 


285 


601 


174 


482 


427 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 



NEW TEACHERS. 



Jessie D. Alexander, Chandler Third Grammar. 

Evelyna D. Boulay, assistant Chandler Second Primary. 

Dorothy D. Reynolds, assistant Kimball Kindergarten. 

Helen C. Cooper, Franklin Kindergarten. 

Elizabeth C. Stevens, assistant Franklin Kindergarten. 

Mary G. Hall, Walker Third Grammar. 

Mary T. O'Connor, Eastman First Primary. 

Regina J. Glennon, Eastman Second Primary. 

Carrie M. True, High school. 

Alice W. Collins, " " 

Emma Hindley, " " 

Grace Morrill, " " 

SUBSTITUTES. 

Mary G. Hall. 
Evelyna D. Boulay. 
Walter H. Fletcher. 
E. Gertrude Dickerman. 
Florence A. Chandler. 
Esther Hodge. 
Maude Garland. 
Elizabeth J. Donovan. 

RESIGNATIONS. 

Amy C. Wood, Merrimack Second Grammar. 

Mary E. Sullivan, Walker Third Grammar. 

Willard I. Hyatt, High school. 

Nettie M. Bowen, Rumford Third Grammar. 

Charles F. Moore, Manual Training. 

Edith Green, Eastman Primary. 

Phenie L. Jones, Walker Second Primary. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 

Sara R. Huse, Kimball Kindergarten, one year. 
Edith M. Walker, High school, one year. 
Gara E. McQuesten, Penacook Second Primary, one term. 
Cora J. Russell, High school, one term. 



school report. 355 

Regular Teachers. 

Whole number (male) ...... 1 

Whole number (female) including Kindergarten assistants 60 

Number of Regular Teachers Graduates of City Thain- 

iNG School. 
High school . . . . . . . .0 

Grammar ......... 8 

Primary ......... 19 

Kinderoarten ........ 



Number Graduate of College 



High school 
Grammar 
Primary 
Kinderjrarten 



High school 
Grammar 
Primary . . 

Kinders;arten 



Graduates of Noi 



MAL School 



Graduates of High School. 

High school ........ 9 

Grammar . . . . . . . . .17 

Primary ......... 20 

Kindergarten ........ 4 

Average Number of Pupils to a Teacher. 

High school . . . . . . . .28 

Grammar schools ....... 47 

Primary and Kindergarten schools . . . . .52 

Mixed schools ........ 45 

Special Teachers. 
Whole number (male) ....... 4 

Whole number (female) ...... 4 



356 city of concord. 

Attendance and School Accommodations. 

The school attendance has held its own vemarkablv well in 
spite oi' so many hindrances. The giving up of the old Rum- 
ford building forced us to make provision for four extra 
schools with four less rooms than last year. To do this, the 
Cogswell and Chandler kindergartens and the ninth grade of 
the Kimball school were discontinued. No fourth room 
being available, the pupils were housed by sending them 
where they were most easily accommodated, school lines 
heretofore existing being disregarded. Alany were asked to 
walk long distances, and were put to other inconveniences; 
but the parents generally showed forbearance, so that the 
ai'rangement has been maintained with comparatively little 
friction. Many rooms were so crowded as to render excellent 
work next to impossible. Pressure was so great in the 
Chandler and Penacook primaries that it was thought best to 
employ an assistant teacher for them during the last half of 
the year. Even this unusual condition, and the taking out of 
pupils by the new French parochial school, did not cause the 
attendance to fall below that of last year. The schools in the 
northern part of the district still continue crowded, particu- 
larly in the lowest primaries, — tlie Tahanto suffering the 
most. Unless a steady increase is shown in this section, 
however, I see no immediate need of constructing more 
school buildings. The southern part of the city will be well 
accommodated when the new Rumford building is completed, 
with the exception of that section near the southern boundary 
in the vicinity of Rockingham, Donovan, and South Main 
streets. I think the board will soon see the necessity of mov- 
ing the Bow Brook building to this vicinity for the accom- 
modation of kindergarten and primary pupils who cannot walk 
to the Penacook and Cogswell schools. There are between 
forty and fifty pupils here who would be benefitted thereby. 
The attendance at the Plains school has been large, and satis- 
factory work has not been done. The large number of classes 
renders it impossible for the teacher to give as much drill as 
is required. Some pupils have become discouraged and left 
school because of a lack of attention. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 357 

In the Eastman building one new room was finished in the 
second story and occupied in the fall, and as a consequence 
these schools have been prosperous, and are now in the best 
condition since this part of the city joined Union district. 

The attendance in the high school shows an increase due 
to the influx of tuition pupils for whom the new high school 
law makes provision. Should this law continue in force for 
an extended period of time, it will compel the district to fur- 
nish more room for high school purposes. The new law in 
regard to compulsory attendance at school has been carefulh' 
observed, and Mr. Johnson has been kept busy in its execu- 
tion. Already thirty-nine labor certificates have been issued 
since last September. The truant officer's report to be found 
elsewhere is worthy of careful study. 

Training School. 

At the beginning of the }ear in September the training 
school was transferred from the Franklin to the Dewey 
building. This was caused by an urgent demand for more 
commodious quarters, consequent upon the institution of a 
normal kindergarten class which was enrolled during the 
summer after the board had decided to make a trial of a 
scheme submitted by the superintendent. Our system of 
instruction requires the kindergarten teacher to be well 
versed in primarv methods for sub-primary work. Few 
kindergartners are thus qualified. The question resolved 
itself into this, either give up the kindergartens or provide 
some means for the efficient training of such teachers. The 
scheme was arranged so as to be practically self-supporting, 
and next year will prove to be the means of saving expense to 
the district. This class which numbers five resident and six 
non-resident pvipils is in charge of Miss Helen L. Southgate, 
normal kindergartner, with Miss Augusta M. Judkins as her 
working assistant. From the beginning, in spite of the 
difficulties which usually attend such worthy enterprises, the 
class has prospered, both instructors and pupils evincing 
much zeal in makins: this initial movement a success. There 



3o8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

is little doubt but tbat the scheme will prove its value to our 
system of instruction and to our city, enhancing its already 
acquired reputation for the conception, adoption, and practice 
of advanced educational ideas. The pupils and regular 
kindergarten teachers of the district have had the advantage 
of lectures by Miss Ellen Gray, of Boston, who lectured on 
" Kindergarten Games and Plays," on January 25 and March 
8; and by Miss Laura Fisher, February 15, supervisor of 
kindergartens in Boston on -'What education is best for 
young children?" The training classes for primary work 
have been unusually small and I find it easy to account for 
this only upon the theory that it happened so. The school 
has now only two pupil teachers but the prospect for a much 
larger class next year is good. 

The accommodations for successful work here were never 
better, and it speaks well for those interested in the welfare 
of our schools that they forego petty criticisms and credit the 
school for what it has done and is likely to do in the future. 

Supervision. 

The schools have been supervised as faithfully as conditions 
would permit, and results attained commensurate with the 
amount of attention bestowed upon them ; yet it has not been 
close enough to realize the best results. Choosing sound 
methods and insuring their careful execution, securing 
uniformity of work, detecting irregularities, and correcting 
mistakes will not admit of hasty action. Time drawn from 
school duties by work that is essentially clerical is really 
misapplied and will not yield the returns which it ought. 
The usual number of visits to the schools have been made by 
the superintendent, and the teachers have been called in 
meeting whenever occasion demanded. 

Kindergartens. 

The kindergartens have been materially improved by the 
skilled supervision of Miss Southgate. Weekly meetings of 
the teachers have been held, a uniform programme mapped 
out and carried into execution. The pupil teachers of the 



SCHOOL REPORT. 359 

normal class have been assigned observation duty at stated 
periods in the regular schools. Besides supplementing their 
theoretical knowledge by practical work, they have lent 
material aid to the regular teachers in various ways. The 
attendance i?i the kindergartens has been good and the worth 
of the instruction generally acknowledged. Parents will do 
well to give their children a full kindergarten course before 
placing them in the regular primary schools. 

Military Drill. 

Two periods weekly of about thirty five minutes each have 
been allowed for military drill and calisthenics in the high 
school. The boys have been instructed in " School of a 
company in close order," " School of a soldier with and w'ith- 
out arms," while some attention has been paid to " Extended 
order " and "• Battalion drill." The girls have been given calis- 
thenic exercises designed to correct the carriage, improve the 
circulation and respiration, and increase the phvsical strength. 
In addition to the annual competitive drill the company had a 
field day in the spring. This was held on the intervale and 
the afternoon was spent in drill and athletic games, closing 
with a dress parade and a salute to the colors. The numbers 
being large, a battalion of boys of two companies and a 
four-company battalion of girls was organized. Some new 
equipments have been provided and more ought to be. The 
instructor has attended to his duties faithfully, taught 
intelligently, makes a generally favorable report of the 
condition of the company, and advises that more time be 
given to the study of military science in order to broaden the 
field of instruction and allow the lower classes more time 
for drill. 

The High School. 

The high school has recorded the largest attendance in its 
history. The maximum enrollment, has been 258, the mini- 
mum 251, only seven having dropped out for various causes. 
This is a fine record. There are at present fiftv tuition 
pupils, thirty coming from without the limits of Concord. 



360 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The building was originall\' constructed to accommodate iSo 
pupils. Without the tuition pupils there would be an 
attendance of 3oi, so that the question of more room with or 
without tuition pupils is one which cannot long be put off. 
The revenue from tuition pupils is $2,350 and the extra 
expense incurred by their attendance cannot be over $Soo, so 
that the net proceeds of tuition would be $1,4^0. This is 
the interest on quite a large sum of money and it is desirable 
that the district should have it to lighten the general expense. 
The hall alone now contains 230 desks crowded together by 
narrowing the aisles far below the minimum required for safe 
hygienic conditions, some having no aisle space at all. The 
remainder of the pupils are seated in one of the recitation 
rooms. There is no indication of a decrease in attendance. 
The principal says "It is absolutely imperative that additional 
accommodations for the school be provided at once." There 
were not enough recitation rooms for the pupils so the board 
room was utilized as w^ell as the laboratories. The principal 
reports a prosperous year and generally commends the work 
of the subordinate teachers. 

Miss Walker was granted a leave of absence for the vear, 
her place being taken by jVIiss Grace Morrill. Miss Emma 
Hindley w^as chosen to fill the vacancy caused by the retire- 
ment of Mr. Hyatt. The increased attendance made it 
necessary to hire another teacher and Miss Carrie ISI. True 
was chosen to fill the position. 

The high school in a measure sets the standard of scholar- 
ship and discipline for the lower schools, and any lapses in 
either of these particulars is exceedingly injurious to the 
whole system. 

Primary axd Grammar Schooi.s. 

The grading of the schools between the kindergarten and 
the high school remains much the same as in previous vears. 
Each succeeding year brings up the question of a better 
adjustment of the requirements to the taste and ability of the 
pupils. No more conscientious work is done in the district 



SCHOOL REPORT. 361 

than that of these schools and none more important. The 
character of the work in the various branches is strengthened 
each year by more judicious handling and a power of mind 
ensues which is highly favorable when compared with that 
produced by methods in use when I was a boy. The teachers 
still have to combat prejudices caused bv a departure from old 
ways and b\- many tilings which distract the attention of the 
child from school work. It may be interesting to know that 
almost all the criticism of school work comes from homes 
where the pupil is not required to do any considerable 
amount of manual labor. The school must always demand 
careful application, and when it becomes subser\ient to the 
demands of pleasure it cannot do that which is of service to 
the child and for which taxes are annuallv assessed. Arith- 
metic shows to advantage in the increased ability of the pupil 
to think and reason, and I do not hesitate to say that for 
knowledge of mathematics in this respect the schools were 
never better equipped than they are to-day. The new 
geographies are sound in theory and practical work and 
are sure to prove their worth when the full series has been 
on trial for a reasonable length of time. The reading course 
should be revised and enriched by the introduction of 
new material possessing literary merit, at least through 
the first six grades. The results in map drawing and 
coloring shown at the exhibition last June elicited much 
favorable comment. A new spelling list has been pro- 
vided for the eighth grade. This has three objects in 
view, correct spelling, correct pronunciation, and correct 
definition. The mother tongue in grades three, four, and 
five should be followed bv the second book in grade six to 
make the series complete. The Latin book introduced last 
June is not satisfactory and not having proved successful 
should be replaced by a more teachable one. The results of 
the course in vertical penmanship are commendable. It is 
legible, decidedly helpful to the eyesight, and recent tests 
among school children developed the fact that it is faster 
than the slant bv from ten to fifteen letters a minute. 



3fi-2 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Commercial houses vieing with each other for trade frequently 
discover errors which do not exist, and are to be credited 
with much of the agitation upon this subject. 

As a whole the work of these grades is creditable and has 
not been subject to as much criticism as in former years. 

Wood and Iron Work. 

The school has enjoyed its full measure of prosperity from 
increased attendance and a continuation of the interest shown 
in previous years. The classes are all lai'ge, some not 
having adequate accommodations for carrying on the work. 
The working outfit has been increased through the generosity 
of public spirited citizens. Mr. Chailes P. Virgin presented 
the school with a case of wood-working tools, Dr. George 
M. Kimball a fine emery-wheel grinding machine, and the 
instructors have constructed a power jig-sawing machine. 
These are all desirable for the working outfit, aid in the 
execution of the work, and furnish extra educational features. 
The school is badly cramped for storage room. This may 
be had by raising the shed another story or by moving the 
school to new quarters. The principal compliments the 
work of the new assistant, Mr. Stewart. 

Sewing. 

The instructor reports added interest and increased attend- 
ance over former years. The pupils from the high school 
deserve commendation for their faithful intlustry and excellent 
deportment, the junior class being exceptional in this 
respect. The number of pieces of finished work exceed those 
of last year. The. classes have been so large that the time 
for work usually given to machine sewing has been shortened. 
It may be well to suggest more attention to that kind of work 
which is properly classed under industrial art. While having 
had some attention here it has not been given the attention 
that it ought, but it is rapidly growing in favor, and in 



SCHOOL REPOKT. 363 

some cities the instructor has been sent abroad to become 
more fully informed of its value and to be better able to 
facilitate its introduction. 

The instructor desires n)ore visitors that the work may be 
better understood and appreciated. 

Cooking. 

Nearly the same course and line of work in cooking has 
been in practice this year as last. It has been more carefully 
arranged, thvis giving something new to each succeeding grade. 
Individual cooking has been tried with signal success, and has 
resulted in an increased interest as well as a more complete 
knowledge of the preparation of the different dishes. It 
involves a reasonable amount of home work, the pupil prac- 
ticing from recipes given at tlie school and bringing in the 
samples for inspection. At the close of the spring term the 
eighth and ninth grade pupils prepared, cooked, and served 
a dinner to their teachers. The cooking room has been 
improved in various ways so that it is now in a quite satisfac- 
tory condition. There have been thirty-five visitors to the 
school this year and the instructor would be pleased to have 
the number doubled next year. 

Drawing. 

The supervision of drawing has been exercised by Miss 
Bell, the proficient instructor of last year. The same general 
plan has been in use and the progress marked. Water-color 
work has shown a decided improvement and if other condi- 
tions would permit, more time would be allotted this branch. 
In the high school, time had to be saved and as usual the 
scientific course drawing had to sufl'er. Only half the time 
of last year has been available. I agree with the instructor 
that this course is seriously injured by this arrangement and 
the pupils will be poorly prepared in this line of work if the 
time is not fully restored. There are thirty-six pupils in the 
studio class this year, attending in two divisions. The attend- 
ance is larger, more regular, and the pupils more enthusiastic 



364 CITY OF CONCORD. 

than before. They are obliged to work in poorly heated, 
ventilated, and lighted quarters, and there is urgent need of 
more suitable accommodations. The primary and kinder- 
garten normal classes combined have received instruction one 
hour each week in free-hand drawing, composition, color and 
harmony. Something has been done in the way of decora- 
ting buildings. A beginning was made by purchasing and 
placing in the halls of the Dewey school, a reproduction 
in ivory-tinted plaster by Lucca Delia Robbia, a Bambino 
by Andrea Delia Robbia, a Madonna by Michael Angelo, a 
large photograph of The Children of Charles I. by Van 
Dyck, and a statue of Diana of Versailles. The effect of 
mural decorations would be better if the walls were tinted 
for an appropriate background. This new departure in 
decoration will surely exert a refining influence upon the 
pupils by bringing them in contact with the truly good and 
beautiful in art. The exhibition of last June, poorly attended 
on account of the intense heat, was the best ever held here. 
The work reflected great credit upon the instructor and the 
pupils. 

Music. 

No radical changes have taken place either in method or 
matter of musical instruction. Supplementary rote songs 
have been added to the regular work of the first two grades. 
Sight reading has increased in power and this was ably 
demonstrated by the supervisor with a class from the West 
Concord school at the February meeting of the Merrimack 
Valley Teachers' Association. The high school has a 
chorus of well-trained voices which was shown to excel- 
lent eflect in the midwinter concert, which was held with 
assisting talent at Phenix Hall, on the evening of February 
14. About forty dollars was realized from this concert and 
has been placed on deposit as a guaranty fund for future con- 
certs. The instructor justly asks for more than forty minutes 
a week for his work in the high school in order to accomplish 
satisfactory results. The teaching has been efficient and the 
supervisor generously gives the greater part of the credit to 
the re<»-ular teachers. 



school report. 365 

The Morale of School Work. 

In casting a critical eye toward the scholastic phase of 
school work, we should not be unmindful of the moral 
element which forms the basal principle of all true educa- 
tion. Those who have given but little thought to child 
nature, and have never actually engaged in school work are 
too often inclined to think that the very necessary element of 
school instruction is teaching the pupil how to obtain a live- 
lihood, or rather something that bears directly upon wage 
earning. On the contrary, those who have studied the educa- 
tional problem believe the primary principle to be, teaching 
the child how to live, not merely how to obtain a living but 
how to enjoy his provision as well. 

To attain the highest measure of excellence, to stand as 
something desirable for the children of all, to act as a lever 
which constantly lifts society from a lower to a higher plane, 
a school system must be founded upon morality, justice, and 
intelligence. The one indispensable element is truth — 
truth in manner, truth in matter, and truth in method. The 
nearer the pupil gets to truth in heart and action, the nearer 
he is perfected as a responsible, moral and intellectual 
being. 

Conducive to the aesthetic education of the child is the 
improvement in the construction and decoration of school 
buildings. If the building is commodious, well-heated and 
ventilated, perfect in its sanitary conditions, of sound archi- 
tectural design, and embellished with works of art, a child 
naturally dresses better, acts better, talks in better language 
and thinks purer thoughts. Frequently this healthful influ- 
ence extends to the immediate neighborhood and its social 
status is perceptibly improved. 

Methods of instruction should be founded upon reasonable 
hypotheses, for after youth has been passed and manhood 
reached, reflection often causes keen regrets at the amount oi 
time wasted upon work called for by methods which had 
their false conception in the brains of aspirants for educa- 
tional fame through introducing somethingf new. The same 



366 CITY OF CONCORD. 

is true of old methods, practiced because they were thou^^ht to 
be good when I was a i:)ov. Usually those engaged in active 
teaching are good judges of what methods are suited to pro- 
mote the moral and intellectual welfare of the child. 

So it is with the matter which is taught within and without 
the text-book, matter illogical in statement and arrangement 
which fails to fortify the pupil against futuie contingencies. 
Error in thought, spelling, grammatical construction, mathe- 
matical accuracy, geographical and historical statement — 
all work havoc with results we expect from time and effort 
spent in school. 

Nature alone stands forth as the most persistent of truth- 
tellers. Her laws are still immutable. The nearer we bring a 
child to nature the nearer we bring him to truth in thought 
and act. This being an indisputable fact, it ill becomes any- 
bodv to belittle the study of nature through minimizing its 
helpful influence. Its work is sure and sooner or later will be 
made manifest in various and unexpected ways. 

All recreations identified in any way with school life or 
indorsed by those in charge of school children should be of 
such a character as to elevate, not lower, the moral tone. 
There are enougii diversions combining the recreative and 
the educative to lighten the monotony of school routine with- 
out descending to cheap and degrading amusements. 

Underlying all these things and transcendent in importance 
is the nature and attitude of the teacher. To become a power 
for the upbuilding of the school morale, of society in general, 
and a credit to the profession, the teacher must be free from 
boorishness, refined in nature, just to all, pure in speech, 
thought and action, and must set an example of manhood and 
womanhood which the pupils may safely emulate. The sub- 
ject of school morale is one which is being brought forward 
to-day more forcibly than ever before, and the best educa- 
tional minds are giving it due thought. This thought is 
necessarv in order that the educational superstructure, reared 
by years of patient toil and anxiety, may not be ruthlessly 
torn down. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 367 

I am again made mindful of the sympathy and encourage- 
ment given me by the board of education and teachers, and 
the trust reposed in me by the general public. 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent . 



ROLL OK HONOR 



SCHOOLS OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 28, 1901. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Edith A. Freeman (i). 
Florence G. Fellows (i), 
Andrew Broggini (3). 
Annie E. Sullivan (2). 
Faye Dudley (i). 
Florence P. Newell (i). 
Effie D. Weathers (5). 
Ashley G. Hazeltine (i) 
George P. Leet (i). 



Reuben H. Boutwell (i), 
Stella M. French (i). 
Georgia M. Stevens (i). 
Joseph J. Dearborn (2). 
William H. Hutchin (i), 
Wendell H. Piper (6). 
Roy T. Brunei (9) . 
Ashley B. Morrill (i). 
James W. Tucker (i). 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

Mary Rochelle (i). Henry D. Johnson (3), 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 



Bertha B. Gill (2). 
Edward A. Dame (2), 
Helen O. Monier (i). 



Lawrence F. Piper (2). 
Benjamin K. Avers (2). 



THIRD GRAMMAR. 



Ernest R. Taylor (i), 



SCHOOL REPORT. 3 69 

FOURTH GRAMMAR. 

Nellie B. Derry (2). Eddie J. Young (i). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Hazel M. Davis (i). Lloyd B. Dame (3). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

John R. Neville (i). Elizabeth Crowley (i). 

Harold J. Clay ( i ) . 

THIRD PRIMARY. 

J. Harold Dame (3). Evelyn M. Landry (3). 

Bernice C. Hutchinson (i). R. Harold Gilmore (i). 

SUB-PRIMARY. 

Mary Crowley ( i ) . 

KINDERGARTEN. 

Edgar A. Landry ( i ) . 



MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

George J. Sargent ( i ) . 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Frances K. Saltmarsh (9). Charles F. McGuire (i). 
Carrie R. Goodrich (i). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Robert L. Saltmarsh (i). Gladys V. Ray (r). 

Anne Dunn (i). Thoinas S. Pillsbury (i), 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Jeremiah Reardon (3). Walter K. Winter (i). 

Ellsworth Runnells (i). 

24 



370 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CHANDLER SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

Clara M. Heath (4). Clara A. Walker (i). 

Alice M. Morrison (i). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

W. Dwight Chandler (i). Robert E. West (i). 

Grace E. Parker (i). Flora A. Edmunds (i), 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Harold Millette (i). 

KINDERGARTEN AND SUB-PRIMARY. 

Harold Crowell (i). 



WALKER SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Gardner Harrington (i). Laura Eraser (1). 

Eva Bartlett (i). Clarence Little (i). 

Grace French ( i ) . 

THIRD GRAMMAR. 

Esther S. Carlson (6). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Edna C. Dimond (i). James Murray (i). 

Charles Walters (2). Margaret A. Young (i), 

Mary E. French (i). Mary E. Geary (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Edward Galfetti (i). John G. Perry (3). 

John T. Knuckey (i). William H. Reed (i). 

THIRD PRIMARY. 

Frank Abbiatti (i). Carl Poore (i). 

Marion Stevens (i). Mary Coughlin (2). 

Joseph Lucier ( i ) . 



SCHOOL REPORT. 371 

SUB-PRIMARY. 

Ruth Keane (i). Bertha Tippet (i). 

KINDERGARTEN. 

Robert Keane, Jr. (i). Rosaline Beckett (i). 

Ruth Shugrue (i). 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 

\ SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Arthur Libert_y (i). Ora Liberty (i). 

Edna Davis (i). 

THIRD GRAMMAR. 

Ralph Berry (i). Martina Jensen (i). 

Everett Darrah ( i ) . Eva Liberty ( i ) . 

George Ash (i). Ralph Morgan (i). 

Jennie Blanchette (i). Gladys Hanimond (i), 
Grace Clark (i ). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Willie Morrison (i). Mabel Webster (i ) . 

Eric Swenson (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Grover S. Colby (i). Helen A. Grover (i). 



PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Addie M. Lyna (i). 

THIRD GRAMMAR. 

None. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Earl Hitchcock (2). Howard Taylor (i), 

Earle Mudgett (3). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Albert F. Hall ( i ) . Neil A. Sargent ( i ) . 

Arthur E. Hall (i). 



372 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

THIRD GRAMMAR. 

Albert M. Barrett (i). Beatrice L. Grant (i). 

Mary A. Reed (i). Samuel H. Barrett (i). 

John D. Steele (i). Grace M. Walters (i). 

Evelyn K. Perry (i). Eva S. Little (i). 
Ferdinand J. Phaneuf (i). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Harry J. Carter (i). Mabel W. Simpson (i) 

Annie E. Saltmarsh (2). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Thomas M. Harrison (i). Clara F. Watkins (i). 

George H. vSimpson (i). 

KINDERGARTEN. 

James M. Beggs (i). 



DEWEY SCHOOL. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 



Robert C. Brown (i). J. Walker Monier (i), 

Mary Watkins (i). Thomas Twomey ( 1 ). 

Maude C. Nason (i). 



SECOND PRIMARY. 

None. 

THIRD PRIMARY. 

None. 

SUB-PRIMARY. 

None. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 373 



WEST CONCORD SCHOOL. 



FIRST GRAMMAR. 



Frank E. Gay (i). Jennie B. Blake (i), 

Mai-y A. Ballard (i). 



THIRD GRAMMAR. 



B. Sigurd Larson (i). Florence Holbrook (5). 

Lera E. Cheney (i). Florence J. Ballard (2). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Hugh T. Coflan (i). Frank H. Williams (i). 

Roscoe E. Gay (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Ruth A. Peterson (i). 

SUB-PRIMARY. 

Edith M. Dolloff (i). Agnes E. Engstrom (i). 

KINDERGARTEN. 

Rowena M. Holbrook (i). 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

Grover Lyle ( i ) . Clarence Lyle ( i ) . 

PRIMARY. 

Lawrence C. Farnum (i). George Robinson (i). 



TAHANTO SCHOOL. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Ella F. Marston (2). Cora E. Jennings (i). 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Mark D. Casey (i). Joseph J. Hallaghan (i) 



374 CITY OV CONCORD. 

COGSWELL SCHOOL. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Anna D. Liberty (i). Cora E. Liberty (2) 

Aphia C. Webster ( i ). Ruby H. Maxam ( i 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

None. 

KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



PLALNS SCHOOL. 
None. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES. 



CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL. 
Class of 1901. 



" Ov SoKeiv aW' eivat " 



PROGRAMME. 

Prayer, Rev. Loui.s H. Buckshorn. 

Vocal March — •• Over the Meadows Fair," Geibel. 

Class Oration — "Universal Education," 

Fred S. Putney. 
Chorus — "Six o'clock in the Bay," Adams. 

Oration (Second Honor) — "Some Problems of the Day," 
John H. Dunlap. 

Essay (First Honor) — "Wit and Humor," | 

Florence E. George. 

Chorus (with Bass Obligato) — 'The Red Scarf." Theo. Bonheur. 



PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS, 
Hon. Charles R. Corning. 

ADDRESS, 

Rev. Samuel A. Eliot. 



Unison Chorus — " The Lost Chord," Siillivan. 

Benediction. 



376 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



HONORS. 

First, 
Florence Elvira George. 

Secotid, 
John Hoft'man Uunlap. 

Third, 

Sarah Jones Woodward. 

Fourth, 

Helen Lucretia Brown. 

GRADUATING CLASS. 
A, Academic Course; c, Classical Course; 3, Three Years' Coarse. 



Arthur Greenleaf Adams, c. 
Mabel Mary Benjamin, 3. 
May Abbie Bresnahan, a. 
Helen Lucretia Brown, c. 
Harry Chester Brunei, A. 
Helena Marie Casey, 3. 
lyla Chamberlin, c. 
Lizzie Maude Cloudman, c 
Florence Ada Clough, a. 
Ethel Marie Crockett, 3. 
Mervin James Curl, c. 
Ethel May Day, C. 
John Hoffman Dunlap, C. 
Edith Fernald, c. 
Mary Fernald, A. 
Edith Shepard Freeman, c. 
Florence Elvira George, c. 
Mary Anne Hallinan, 3. 
Nellie Theresa Halloran, A. 
Emma Lillian Hastings, A. 



Hugh Horatio Henry, c. 
Esther Hodge, A. 
Royal Daniel Holden, A. 
William Harry Hutchin, 3. 
Bessie Kelly, 3. 
Wyman Forrester Lincoln, C. 
Idella Maude Maxfield, c. 
Theresa Josephine Murphy, A. 
Mary Barbara Murray, 3. 
Edith Louise Muzzey, 3. 
Mary Alice Nawn. A. 
Ethel Mabel Ordway, 3. 
Ethel May Paige, c. 
Fred Silver Putney, C. 
Margaret Reed, 3. 
Harold Robert Shurtleff, A. 
Edward James Stott, 3. 
Agnes Veronica Sullivan, C. 
Effie Dell Weathers, A. 
Sarah Jones Woodward, c. 



KIMBALL GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Thursday, June 27, 1901, at 2.30 p. m. 

. programme. 

Orchestra. 



Song — " Butterfly Waltz," 
Recitation — " Commencement," 



Class. 
Lena Woodman.*** 



SCHOOL REPORT. 377 

Piano Solo — "Whirling Dervisa," Benjamin Henry Rolfe. 

Essay — "The Reading Habit," Raymond Henry Fellows. 

Duet — " Star of Evening," Esther Abbott Clark, Mary Rochelle, 
Alice Josephine IVIercer, Sara Frances Scannell. 
Violin Solo — " Sarabande," Jerome Hall Stewartson. 

Song — " The Song of the Oak," Class. 

Orchestra. 
Recitation — " The Traitor's Death-Bed," 

Margaret Frances Blanchard.** 
Double Trio — " The Bees," 

Margaret Frances Blanchard, Nellie Mae Crosby, 

Bessie Estella Foster, Jerome Hall Stewartson, 

Sara Frances Scannell, Herbert Ray Tucker. 

Oration — "Opportunities of the Scholar," Herbert Ray Tucker. 

Song.:—" The Berry Pickers," Class. 

Duet — " Blow, Soft Winds," 

Esther Abbott Clark, Mary Rochelle, 

Alice Josephine Mercer, Sara Frances Scannell. 

Essay — "Joan of Arc," Irad Edmunds Willis.* 

Song — " Call to Arms," Class. 

Presentation of Diplomas, Committee. 

GRADUATING CLASS. 

Margaret Frances Blanchard.** Katharine McFarland. 

John Andrew Bresnahan. Alice Josephine Mercer. 

Esther Abbott Clark. Samuel Sidney Radley. 

Aimee Louise Cloudman. John Michie Rainie. 

Nellie Mae Crosby. Mary Zoe Richardson. 

Ira Leon Evans. Mary Rochelle. 

Raymond Henry Fellows. Benjamin Henry Rolfe. 

Bessie Estella Foster. Beatrice Loleta Sargent. 

Maurice John Graney. Sara Frances Scannell. 

Blanche May Hodgdon. Jerome Hall Stewartson. 

Emalyn Maude Holland. Hattie Clara Trask. 

Wesley Elba Home. Herbert Albert Trask. 

George Monroe Jewett. Herbert Ray Tucker. 

Henry Dinsmore Johnson. Irad Edmunds Willis.* 

Harry Cleveland King. Lena Woodman.*** 
William Bruce Macguire. 

* First Honor. ** Second Honor. *** Third Honor. 



378 CITY OF COXCORD. 

MERRLMACK SCHOOL. 

Thursday, June 27, 1901, at 2.30 p. m. 

programme. 

March, Margaret Elizabeth CoUins. 

Chorus — " The Song of the Oak," H. Marschner. 

Recitation — " Mr. Bush and the Kindling-garter Teacher," 

Grace Olivia Anderson.*** 
Chorus — "The Roamer," D. H. Engel. 

Piano Solo, Marion Bell Crowell.**** 

Essay — " My Camping Trip," Edward Z. Wilcox. 

Piano Duet — " Light of Heart," E. Ferrati. 

Mary Louise Phillips, Eva Lillian Rand. 
Essay — " A Chapter from the Life of Basil Bourque," 

Alice M. M. Phaneuf.** 
Chorus — " The Berry Pickers." 

Song — " The Bees," G. A. Veazie. 

Ila D. Knowles, Annie E. Dennen, Edward Z. Wilcox, 
Arthur D. Taylor, Robert W. Brown, Ralza M. Cummings. 
Recitation — " Deacon Pettigrew's Unfortunate Prayer," 

Sam IValter Eoss. 
Carl Duncan Kennedy. 

Duet — " Spring," E. Lasson. 

Ila D. Knowles, Annie E. Dennen, 
Ida Belle Dean, Julia E. Casey. 

Essay — " The American Woman," Helen Frances Huntoon.* 

Chorus—" The Hay-Ride." H.Sattler. 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Chorus — " Oueen June." 

GRADUATING CLASS. 

Grace Olivia Anderson.*** Ward Jay Nutting. 

Albert Athenas Boulay. Eva May Pelren. 

William Charles Cahill. Harriet Ellen Perry. 

Julia Elizabeth Casey. Harry James Perry. 

Marion Bell Crowell.**** Alice Marie Melvina Phaneuf.** 

Ralza Milon Cummings. Mary Louise Phillips. 

Ida Bell Dean. Alice Celina Racine. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 379 

Annie Elizabeth Dennen. Eva Mary Racine. 

George Willis Goddard. Eva Lillian Rand. 

Frank Hoit Godfrey. Ida May Riford. 

Helen Frances Huntoon."' Andrew Edward Saltmarsh. 

Carl Duncan Kennedy. Frank Henry Saltmarsh. 

Wallace Lewis Kennedy. George Jackman Sargent. 

Ada May Kenney. Ralph Henry Tucker. 

James William Kenney. Edward Zelotes Wilcox. 
Ila Derinda Knowles. 

* First Honor. ** Second Honor. *** Third Honor. **** Fourth Honor. 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 
" Thursd.w, June 27, 190 i, at 2.30 p. m. 

PROGRAMME. 

Chorus — " Vacation Song," Class. 

Essay — •' An Abandoned Farm," Pearl L. V. Hodgdon.** 

Wand Drill, Class. 

Quartette — "The Bugle Song," 

Hattie M. Brooks, Edith M. Aldrich,*** Martha L. James,**** 
Nellie J. James, Ruth H. Buntin.***** 

Declamation — " Robert Sallette,'' George W. Hanlon. 

Chorus — (a) "The Berry Pickers," 

(/;) "The Hay-Ride," Class. 

Declamation — "Susan Boudinot," Bessie A. Clough. 

Delsarte Exercise; — " The American Hymn," Chorus. 

Julia M. Emerson, Mabel A. Foster, Lora E. Putnam, 

Flora M. Sanborn, Anna E. Stevens, 

Clara A. Walker, Edna R. Sawyer. 

Chorus — "The Oak," Class. 

Essay — "How the Black Prince Won His Spurs," 

Evelyn A. Piper.* 

Trio — "The Bees," 

Edith M. Aldrich, Hattie I\L Brooks, Martha L. James, 
Ruth H. Buntin, Nellie J. James, Leslie W. Cushman. 

Presentation of Diplomas, Committee. 

Chorus— "Call to Arms," Class. 

Piano Solo — "Dance of the Fairies," Hattie M. Brooks. 



380 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CHANDLERVILLE PRIZE SPEAKING. 



CHARACTERS. 

Teacher, 

Judges — Hon. Ebenezer Seer, 
Judge A. B. Slow, 
Adolphus B. Heavy, Esq., 

Mehitable Snow, 

Huldah Short, 

Elnathan Strong, 

Susannah Hope, 

Hosea Week, 

Rosalinda Dale, 

Leander Good, 

Araminta Gault, 

Johnnie Littleboy, 

Sallie Wrinkles, 

Betsey Acres, 

Sissy Long, 

Liza Rock, 

Melissa Grass, 

Hannah Cherry, 

Nanny Wykes, 

Mrs. Good, 

Visitors, 



Edna R. Sawyer. 

Clarence S. McCauley. 

Ernest C. Dudley. 

Eugene J. Millette. 

Edith M. Aldrich. 

Alice M. Morrison. 

George W. Hanlon. 

Ethel M. Woodbury. 

Nute B. Flanders. 

Martha L. James. 

Leslie W. Cushman. 

Ruth H. Buntin. 

Irving D. Dudley. 

Eva M. Badger. 

Hattie M. Brooks. 

Mary G. Colbert. 

Clara M. Heath. 

Gertrude M. Leavitt. 

Margaret Wright. 

Mabel A. Foster. 

Julia M. Emerson. 

Class. 



GRADUATING CLASS. 



Edith Marion Aldrich.*** 
Edith May Badger. 
Ruth Harriet Buntin.***** 
Hattie May Brooks. 
Bessie Azubia Clough. 
Mary Geraldine Colbert. 
Leslie Wardner Cusiiman. 
Ernest Ciiarles Dudley. 



Nellie Josephine James. 
Gertrude Muriel Leavitt. 
Clarence Stephen McCauley. 
Eugene Joseph Millette. 
Alice May Morrison. 
Nathaniel Martin Mudgett. 
Evelyn Arthur Piper.* 
Grace Marion Prince. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



381 



Irving Dean Dudley. 

Julia May Emerson. 

Mabel Alma Foster. 

Nute Boyce Flanders. 

Bessie lona Hager. 

Anastasia Hagarty. 

George Wilfred Hanlon. 

Roger Hasey Haselton. 

Clara Maria Heath. 

Lillian Vida Pearl Hodgdon.** 

Martha Lila James.**** 

* First Honor. ** Second Honor. 



Lora Ella Putnam. 
Harley Arthur Robie. 
Vertie May Robinson. 
Flora May Sanborn. 
Edna Rosezella Sawyer. 
Anna Everett Stevens. 
Arthur Lee Stone. 
Clara Amy Walker. 
Ethel Mae Woodbury. 
Margaret Wright. 



*** Third Honor. 
Fifth Honor. 



**** Fourth Honor. 



WEST CONCORD GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 
Thursday, June 27, igoi, at 2.30 p. m. 

PROGRAMME. 



March. 

Class Oration — " Toussaint L'Ouverture," 

J. Arthur Svvenson. 
Chorus — " Song of the Oak," 
Recitation — "Commencement," 

Jennie B. Blake. 
Violin Solo— "Le Bal," 

George Farnum. 
Chorus — "The Hay-Ride," 
Recitation — "Mr. Meek's Dinner," 
" The Star-Spangled Banner," 

(With Delsarte movements and attitudes.) 

Class. 

Class Essay — " Work and Win," Catherine T. Hughes 

Chorus — "The Berry Pickers." 

Oration — " The Dignity of Labor," New/nan Hall 

Sherman H. Murray. 
Double Trio — "The iiees," G. A. Veazie 

Jennie B. Blake, Myrtie Farnum, Lottie T. Peabody, 
Frank E. Gay, Harry N. Kemp, J. Arthur Swenson. 



Wendell Phillips 

H. Marschner 
Atina Kellogg 

Charles Bohin 

H. Saltier 

Henrietta K. Elliott 

Samuel Arnold 



382 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Recitation — " Mona's Waters," 
Violin Solo — " Reverie," 

J. Arthur Svvenson. 
Recitation — " Aunt Saphronia at the Opera,'" 
Chorus — " Call to Arms." 
Essay—" What the Mirror Told," 
Presentation of Diplomas. ^ 



Katherine G. Ouinn 
Anton Gilis 

Lottie I. Peabody 

G. A. Veazie 

Mary A. Ballard 



GRADUATING CLASS. 

Mary Alice Ballard.*** Catherine Teresa Hughes.* 

Jennie Belle Blake. •"* Katherine Gertrude Ouinn.****" 

Henrietta Ketchum Elliott. John Arthur Swenson.**** 

♦First Honor. ** Second Honor. *** Third Honor. **** Fourth Honor. 
***** Fifth Honor. 



PLAINS SCHOOL. 
Thursday, June 27, 1901, at 2.30 

programme. 

Song — "The Singer's Invitation," 

Recitation — "The Charcoal Man," 

Recitation — " Bruce and the Spider," 

Reading, 

Recitation — " The Little Fireman," 

Song — "Echo Chorus," 

Recitation, 

Recitation — " My Neighbor's Call," 

Song — " I Guess You'd Better Hush," 

Recitation — ' The Milk-Maid," 

Song — " Awake the Song," 

Exercises, 

-"The Little Bootblack," 
— " Curfew Must Not Ring To-night," 
Eugene N. Champigny. 
The Fireman's Prize,'' 



Recitation 
Recitation 



Recitation- 
Song- 



The Violets," 



School 

Seth Clark 

Chester Gay 

Class 

Mary Carlson 

School 

Class 

Annie Charrier 

Nell Ashcroft 

Addie Hayes 

School 

School 

Lena Blanchette 



Nell Ashcroft 
Schoo 



graduating class. 
Eugene M. Champigney. 



SCHOOL REI'OKT. 383 

FOURTEENTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY CONTEST 

By the Pupils of the Public Schools of Union School Dis- 
trict, AT Phenix Hall, Thursday Evening, March 20, 1902. 

PROGRAMME. 

Music — " Fairyland Waltz.", J^easie. Chorus. 
Original Declaiiiatiou . 

1. "The Progress of the Nineteenth Century," High School. 

Julia Frances Foley. 

2. "In Defense of Athletics," High School. 

Augustine Haines Ayers. 

3. "The American Girl," High School.* 

Harriette May Bingham. 

4. "A Saturday's Fishing Excursion," High School. 

Moody Dole Holmes. 

5. " Rosa Bonheur," High School. 

Clara Elizabeth Flanders. 

Music — "Come. Gentle Spring." From " The Seasons." Haydn. 
Chorus. 

forensic Declamation . 

1. " Spartacus to the Gladiators" (Kellogg), Merrimack School. 

George Francis Nowell. 

2. "The Bell of Liberty" (Headley), Eastman School. 

Clarence Albert Lyle. 

3. " HannibaPs Address to his Army," Chandler School. 

Samuel Victor Carl Holt. 

4. " The Black Horse and His Rider" (Shepard), 

West Concord School. 
Harry Nelson Kemp. 

5. " The Unknown Speaker" (Anon.), High School. 

Amos Dodge. 

Class Exercise in Calisthenics {Nissen) by the pupils of 
Merrimack First Grammar School, Lillian Yeaton, 
teacher. 



384 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Miscellaneous Declamation . 

1. "Experience with a Family Paper" (Rankin), High School. 

Lillian Esther Robie. 

2. " The Light on Dead Man's Bar" (Rexford), Chandler School. 

Grace Marion Prince. 

3. " The Curse of Regulus," High School. 

Merritt Chase Hiise. 

4. " His Own Obituary " (Harbour), West Concord School. 

Charlotte Inez Peabody. 

5. " The Ride of Grandmother Lee " (Rexford), 

Merrimack School. 
Bertha Bradbury Gill. 

• Music — («) Vocal Gavotte, from "Erminie." E. Jacobowski. 

Chorus. 
(;5) Vocal March, "Onward." Male voices. 
Semi-Chorus. 

Award of Prizes. 
Original Declamation. 

First Prize, $20, awarded to Moody Dole Holmes. 
Second Prize, $6, awarded to Julia Frances Foley. 

Forensic Declamation. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Amos Dodge. 

Second Prize, $4, awarded to Harry Nelson Kemp. 

Miscellaneous Declamation. 

First Prize, $10, awarded to Charlotte Inez Peabody. 
Second Prize, $6, awarded to Merritt Chase Huse. 
Third Prize, $4, awarded to Grace Marion Prince. 

Special prize awarded to the best speaker of the school which took 
no prize. 
$1 awarded to Bertha Bradbury Gill, Merrimack School. 
$1 awarded to Clarence Albert Lyle, Eastman School. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Hon. John P. Bartlett, Manchester, N. H. 

VV. P. Fellows, Tilton, N. H. 

Dr. A. C. Alexander, Penacook, N. H. 



.SCHOOL HEPORT. 



385 



THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Organized September 10, 1S59. 
LIST OF MEMBERS AND TERM OF SERVICE, 1859-1902. 



Name. 



From 



To 



JDate of Death 



Henry E. Parker 

Asa Fowler 

Paltiah Brown 

JosepI) B. AValker 

Caleb Parker 

Parsons B. Cogswell 

Jesse P. Bancroft 

Josiah P. Nutting 

David Patten 

Samuel C. Eastman 

Hazen Pickering , 

Hazen Pickering, 2d time. . 

Lyman D. Stevens 

John V. Barron 

Abraham J. Prescott 

Amos Hadley 

Elisha A(l;ims 

William M.Chase 

William M. Chase, 2d time 

Henry J. Crippen 

Albert H. Crosby 

Oliver Pill.sbury 

Samuel B. Page 

Charles P Sanborn 

Charles P. Sanborn, 2d time 

Daniel C. Allen 

Warren Clark 

Warren Clark, 2d time 

Ai B. Thompson 

Ai B. Tliompson. 2d time 

Joseph C. A. HiJl 

Joseph C. A. Hill, 2d time. . . 

Everett L. Conger 

Sargent C. Whitcher 

•Tohn H. (Teorge 

George W. Crockett 

Charles R. Corning 

Charles R. Corning, 2d time 
Cliarles R. Corning, 3d time 

Daniel B. Donovan 

John C. Thorne 

James L. ]Mason 

Charles H. Thorndike. . . . 

Cephas B. Crane 

Shadrach C. Morrill 

Joliu C. Ordway 

Harry P. Dewey 

Mary P. Wood worth 

William Yeaton 

Henry C. Brown 

Austin S. Ranney 

Eliphalet F. Philbrick... 

Susan J. Woodward 

Amos J. Shurtleff 

Henry F. Hollis 

Willis D. Thompson 

John .M. INIitchell 

Susan C. Bancroft 

Edward N. Pearson 

Joseph T. Walker 

(ieorge M. Kimball 

John Vannevar 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
March 15, 
March 15, 
March 16, 
March 30, 
March 30, 
March 18, 
March 21, 
March 21, 
March 20, 
March 28, 
Aug. 2G, 
March 22. 
March 22, 
March 21, 
March 21, 
March 23, 
March 23, 
March 20, 
March 27, 
March IS, 
Marcli 28, 
March 18, 
Nov. 21, 
March 24, 
March 24, 
March 24, 
March 23, 
July 13, 
March, 
March 30, 
March 25, 
Feb. 3, 
March 27, 
Marcli 2G, 
June 9, 
March 31, 
March 31, 
April 1. 
April 1, 
April 1, 
ISIarch 31, 
March 31, 
March .30, 
Nov. 18, 

Oct. 5, 

March .30, 
I April 2, 
] March 30. 
March 30, 
April 5, 
' March 28, 
' March 28, 
1 March 28, 



1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
1859 
18.59 
1859 
1802 
1862 
1867 
1864 
1864 
1865 
18C8 
1868 
1869 
1883 
1871 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1878 
1874 
1875 
1886 
1876 
1883 
1876 
1881 
1877 
1877 
1877 
1880 
1881 
1884 
1899 
1882 
1883 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1890 
1890 
1S9II 
1892 
1892 
1893 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1901 



March 30, 
March 21, 
Nov. 20, 
March 22, 
March 15, 
Oct. 28, 
March 20, 
March 30, 
Aug. 21, 
March 21, 
March 18, 
Aug. 26, 
March 16, 
March 22, 
March 21, 
ISIarch 21, 
Aug. 15, 
March 20, 
Aug. 3, 
March 31, 
March 18, 
Sept. 3, 
.Sept. 1, 
Marcli 24, 
March 28, 
August, 
August 7, 
Nov. 21, 
Feb. 3, 
March 27, 
March 24, 
iMarch 27, 
March 23, 
March 23, 
March 28, 
March 27, 
March 25, 
March 26, 



1864 
1868 
1861 
1872 
1862 
1895 
1869 
1864 
1867 
1874 
1865 
1871 
1867 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1880 
1875 
1896 
1888 
1876 
1881 
1875 
1877 
1883 
1876 
1883 
1891 
1883 
1886 
1877 
1890 
1880 
1878 
1883 
1886 
1882 
1887 



March 27, 
March 31, 
March 31, 
June 9, 
March 27, 
iMarch 30, 



1890 
1888 
1892 
1887 
1890 
1897 



March 30, 
March 30, 
Marrli 30, 
March 28, 
April 2, 
March 30, 



1899 
1899 
1893 
1901 
1898 
1899 



March 28, 
April 5, 
March 28, 



1901 
1900 
1901 



Nov. 7, 1896. 
April 26, 1885. 
Nov. 20, 1861. 

Jan. 19, 1874. 
Oct. 28, 1895. 
April 30, 1891. 

March 26, 1879. 



Jan. 23, 1872. 

jMarch 6, 1878. 
July 4, 1891. 

August 15, 188! 



Dec. 24, 1893. 
Sept. 5, 1886. 
Feb. 22, 1888. 



June 3, 1889. 

Nov. 21, 1891. 

Sept. 12, 1890. 

March 14, 1901. 

Dec. 19, 1882. 
Feb. 6, 1888. 
Jan. 9, 1888. 

Nov. 29, 1898. 
Dec. 18, 1898. 



June 4, 1898. 



386 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD AND TERMS OF SERVICE. 

PRESIDENTS. 



Name. 


From 


To 


*Henry E. Parker 

*Asa Fowler 


September 17, 1859 

March 17, 1862 

March 23, 1868 


March 17, 1862. 
March 23, 1868. 


Joseph B. Walker 


March 24, 1870. 


Marcli 24, 1870 


March 27, 1871. 




March 27. 1871 


August 15, 1880. 


*01iver Pillsbury. 


August 30, 1880 


September 3, 1881. 


*Parsons B. Cogswell 


March 27, 1882 


March 30, 1886. 


Marcli 30, 1886 


April 2, 1888. 


William M Chase 


April 2, 1888 


April 8, 1895. 


*Par.sons B. Cogswell 

John C. Ordway 

Charles R. Corning. . 


April 8, 1895 


October 28, 1895. 


November 18, 1895 

April 9, 1900 


March 29, 1900. 







SECRETARIES. 



Joseph B. Walker 


September 15, 
March 18, 1861 
November 20, 
March 17, 1862 
April 2, 1864 . . . 
March 22, 1865 
April 4, 1870 . . . 
March 24, 1873 
March 20, 1876 
April 2, 1883 


1859 

m,. .... 




March 18, 1861. 


*Paltiali Brown 

Joseph B. Walker, 2d time 

Samuel C. Eastman 


November 4, 1861. 
March 17, 1862. 
April 2, 1864. 
March 22, 1865. 


Lyman D. Stevens 


Samuel C. Eastman, 2d 
William M.Chase 

*Henry J. Crippen 

*Warren Clark 


time.. 


April 4, 1870. 
March 24, 1873. 
March 20, 1876. 
April 2, 1883. 




April 7, 1890. 




April 7, 1890. . . 
April 3, 1899... 
April 9, 1900... 




March 30, 1899. 


Henry F. Mollis 


April 5, 1900. 


Susan J. Woodward 











SUPERINTENDENTS.t 



Amos Hadley July 10, 1873 July 1, 1874. 

Daniel C. Allen August 10, 1874 December 1, 1881. 

*Warren Clark March 4. 1882 July 6, 1885. 

Louis J. Rundlett August 1, 1885 — 



* Deceased. 

IHenry E. Sawyer, principal of the High School, performed the duties of 
superintendent of schools, in addition to those of instructor, in 1862-'63. 

OFFICERS OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, 1859-1901. 

Moderators— Asa, Fowler, 1859. '63, '68, '69, '70, '72. Samuel Coffin, 1860. Dud- 
ley S. Palmer, 1861. Amos Blanchard, 1861. Henry E. Sawyer, 1862, '64. 
Thomas P. Treadwell, 1862. P. B. Cogswell, 1863. William E. Chandler, 1863, 
'64. Charles P. Sanborn, 1865, '73. Anson S. Marshall, 1866. John Kimball, 
1867, '76, '77. '79, 1880-1888 inclusive. Enoch Gerrish, 1871. George A. Pillsbury, 
1873, '74. 'William M. Chase, 1875. Benjamin E. Badger, 1876. William H. 
Buntin, 1878. E. H. Woodman, 1880, '90, '91. Charles C. Dauforth, 1892-1901 
inclusive. James O. Lyford, 1897. Samuel C. Eastman, 1898. 

CTe/'Aii.— Jeremiah S. Noyes, 1850. Stillman Humphrey, 18C0-1S94 inclusive. 
Willis D. Thompson, 1895, '90, '97. Louis C. Merrill, 1898-1901 inclusive. 

The following persons served as clerks pro tern.: Paltiah Brown, Aug. 17. 
1861. S. C. Eastman, April 8, 1865. William M. Chase, July 8, 1871. Thomas 
B. Little, March 24, 1877. Isaac W. Hammond, March 28, 1884. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 387 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



State of New Hampshire. 

To the inhabitants of Unioft School District qualijied to 
vote in district affairs : 

You are hereby notified to meet at the city hall in said dis- 
trict, on Thursday, the twenty-seventh da}- of March, 1902, 
at 7 o'clock in the evening to act upon the following subjects : 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the board of educa- 
tion for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the board of education to 
hold office for three years, to fill vacancies arising from the 
expiration of the term of office of John M. Mitchell, Susan C. 
Bancroft, and Charles R. Corning, and also fill any other 
vacancies which may occur in said board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors and all other necessary 
officers for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year, 
including industrial education, military drill, and calisthenics. 

S. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for repairs of school buildings during the ensuing 
year. 



388 CITY OF CONCORD. 

9. To see what sum of. money the district will raise and 
appropriate for extraordinary repairs of school buildings 
during the ensuing year. 

10. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the completion and furnishing of the new 
Rumford school building, for the grading of the Rumford 
school lot, and building of walks thereon. 

11. To see what action the district will take with reference 
to funding the indebtedness arising from the building and fui*- 
nishing of the new Rumford school building and grading of 
the lot of said school, and with reference to providing pay- 
ment of said indebtedness as it becomes due, and what ar- 
rangements, if any, the district will make with the City of 
Concord for its aid in funding said indebtedness, under the act 
of the legislature passed in the session of 1SS9, entitled "An 
Act to Authorize the City of Concord to borrow money in 
aid of its vSchool Districts," and to appoint all necessary agents 
to carry into etiect such vote as the district may pass. 

12. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 12th day of March, 1902. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, 
JOHN C. ORDWAY, 
JOHN VANNEVAR, 
GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 
SUSAN J. WOODWARD, 
EDWARD N. PEARSON, 
JOSEPH T. WALKER, 
SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 

Board of Education of Union ScJiool District. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 389 

I certify that on the eleventh day of March, 1902, I posted 
a copy of the written warrant attested by the board of edu- 
cation of said district at the place of meeting within named, 
and a like attested copy at the police station in the City of 
Concord, N. H., being a public place in said district. 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 

Merrimack ss. 

Concord, March 12, 1902. 

Personally appeared the said L. J. Rundlett, and made oath 
that the above certificate by him signed is true. 

Before me : 

GEORGE W. JOHNSON, 

Justice of the Peace. 



390 CITY OF CONCORD. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



Concord, N. H., March 2S, 1901. 

Agreeably to the foregoing warrant, a meeting of the legal 
voters in Union School District was held in city hall, this 
twenty-eighth day of March, 1901, at 7 o'clock in the evening, 
and was called to order by the moderator, Charles C. Danforth, 
who read the warrant. 

Article i. John M. Mitchell moved that the clerk cast 
one vote for Charles C. Danforth for moderator ; motion car- 
ried, the clerk cast one vote for Charles C. Danforth for mod- 
erator, and having all the votes cast, he was declared elected, 
and the oath of office was administered by John M. Mitchell. 

Art. 2. Edward N. Pearson moved that the moderator 
cast one vote for Louis C. Merrill for clerk, and he was de- 
clared elected unanimously, and the oath of office was ad- 
ministered by John M. Mitchell. 

Art. 3. H. H. Metcalf moved that the printed report of 
the board of education be accepted. Motion adopted. 

Art. 4. John M. Mitchell otiered the following resolu- 
tion : 

Resolved^ That the three members of the board of educa- 
tion to be chosen for three years each, be voted for on one 
ballot. That the polls be opened at this time, and remain 
open until 8 o'clock this evening. Motion seconded, vote 
taken, resolution declared adopted, and the polls declared 
open. 

At 8 o'clock the moderator declared the polls closed, and 
appointed E. N. Spencer and James M. Killeen to assist in 
sorting and counting the votes. 



SCHOOL KEFORT. 



391 



The moderator declared the ballot as follows 



Total number of votes cast 






199 


Necessary for a choice . 






95 


May Martin . 






1 


James M. Killeen . 






6 


Henry C. Brown . 






S7 


Eben B. Hutchinson 






91 


John Vannevar 






99 


George M. Kimball 






105 


Joseph T. Walker 






• 163 



The moderator declared John Vannevar, George M. Kim- 
ball, and Joseph T. Walker elected members 6f the board of 
education for three years. 

Art. V ^^'- D. Th.ompson nicAed that the clerk cast one 
ballot for William Yeaton and Adam P. Holden as auditors 
for the ensuing year. Motion carried, and moderator de- 
clared William Yeaton and Adam P. Holden elected as 
auditors. 

Art. 6. John P. George oflered the following resolution 
and moved its adoption : 

/Resolved, That there be raised by tax on the polls and 
ratable estates within Union School District, the sum of 
fifteen thousand nine himdred dollars (15,900), of which 
sum fifteen thousand dollars shall be appropriated tor the pay- 
ment of notes maturing July i, 1901, and nine hundred dol- 
lars ($900) for the payment of the interest on its funded debt 
during the year. Motion adopted and appropriations made. 

Art. 7. John M. Mitchell offered the following resolution 
and moved its adoption : 

Resolved^ That there shall be raised, and is hereby ordered 
to be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District, for the support of schools for the en- 
suing year such a sum as in addition to the sum assigned to 



392 CITY OF CONCOHD. 

the district by the city of Concf)rcI out of the appropriation for 
schools, will amount to the sum of fifty thousand six hundred 
and fifty-three dollars ($50,653). Resolution declared 
adopted, a vote being taken. 

Art. S. John M. Mitchell moved the article be passed 
over, and so declared by the moderator. 

AuT. 9. Hem-y C. Brown oflered the following resolution 
and moved its adoption : 

Resolved^ That the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) 
be raised by taxation upon the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District, and appropriated for extraordinar}- 
repairs on the school buildings, and that the expenditure of 
such a sum shall be under the direction of the board of educa- 
tion. 

A vote was taken and resolution declared adopted. 

Art. 10. W. D. Thompson ofiered the following resolu- 
tions : 

Resolved^ That a new schoolhouse of not less than eight 
rooms be erected on the lot now occupied by the Rumford 
building, between Monroe and Thorndike streets, at an ex- 
pense not exceeding thirty thousand dollars ($30,000) ; that 
Henr}' C. Brown, Eben B. Hutchinson, and Louis C. Mer- 
rill be a building committee to erect and furnish said school- 
house ; to employ architects, agents, and such other assistants 
as they mav require, and to do in the name and in behalf of 
the Union School District such other acts as may be necessary 
to carry this resolution into efiect. 

Resolved^ That one fifth of the sum mentioned in the last 
resolution be raised by taxation upon the polls and estates 
within the district when the money is raised for the regular 
appropriation for the vear nineteen hundred and two, and 
that the remaining four-fiftlis of said sum be borrowed upon 
the credit of the district, as authorized by law. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 393 

Resolved^ That the building' committee aforesaid be and 
hereby is authorized to receive the money arising from taxa- 
tion, and to borrow the balance of the money appropriated as 
aforesaid in the name and in behalf of the district, and to sign 
the name of the district to notes or other evidences of debt 
therefor, and to receive the proceeds. 

Resolved^ That the building committee aforesaid be and 
hereby is authorized to appoint a treasurer from its number 
or otherwise, to hold and disburse upon its order the money 
coming into its hands. 

Mr. Thompson moved the adoption of the resolution. Dr. 
S. C. Morrill moved to amend by substituting $16,000 for 
$30,000. 

Sylvester Dana mo\ed that the whole matter be referred to 
the board of education, to report at some subsequent meeting. 
Motion seconded, a vote taken, and motion declared lost. 

Dr. S. C. Morrill withdrew his amendment, and moved to 
amend the resolution by substituting $35,000 for $30,000. 

Amendment seconded, vote taken, and amendment declared 
lost. 

Mr. Thompson's motion was seconded, a vote taken, and 
declared adopted. 

Art. II. Mr. W. D. Thompson then read the following 
report of the treasurer of the building committee for the Dewey 
school : 



394 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Report of Treasurer of Building Committee. 
Union School District, March 28, 1901. 

RECEIPTS. 



From City of Concord 
From money borrowed 

EXPENDITURES 

Lot and grading 

Plan and services of architect, etc. 

School building 

Heating and ventilating 

Furniture . 

Interest 

Insurance 

Total cost to date 
*Cash balance on hand 



$6,000.00 
24,000.00 



$30,000.00 



$4,904.87 

941-75 

20,174.00 

1,867.59 

764-13 

271.67 

^o.oo 



$28,974.01 

1.025.99 



$30,000.00 



W. F. THAYER, 

Treasurer. 

Concord, N. II., March 28, 1901. 

I have examined the above account of receipts and expend- 
itures, and tind the same correctly cast, together with re- 
ceipted vouchers for the same. 

GEORGE K. HAZELTINE. 

City Auditor. 

On motion, voted to accept the report. 



* Cash in hands of treasurer for expense of grading, concrete walks to be 
laid, etc., $1,025.99. 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 395 

John C. Ordway then oflered the following resolution : 

I. Resolved^ That the present indebtedness of the district 
arising from building and furnishing the Dewey schoolhouse, 
twenty-four thousand dollars ($34,000), be funded at a rate of 
interest not exceeding three and one-half percent. (31%), 
the principal to be paid as follows: 

$S,ooo JliIv I, 1906. 
$S, 000 July 1, 1907. 
$S, 000 July I, 190S. 

And that a sufficient sum of money be assessed upon the polls 
and estates in said district on the first day of April in each 
year hereafter to meet the payments of interest and of the 
principal tailing due in the years as aforesaid, and that the 
money obtained by said assessment be and the same is appro- 
priated to the making of said payments. 

II. Resolved^ That the district request the City of Con- 
cord to aid in funding the indebtedness as the city is author- 
ized to do by the act of the legislature of New Hampshire, 
approved August 14, 1889, entitled "An act to authorize the 
City of Concord to borrow money in aid of its school dis- 
tricts," provided said district will raise the money necessary 
for the purpose upon the terms set forth in the last resolution, 
and will allow the district to have the use of the money so 
borrowed; and further, that if this request is complied with, 
the district will seasonably pay to the city sufficient sums of 
money to enable it to meet the payments of interest and prin- 
cipal upon its indebtedness so created as the same fall due, 
and all incidental expenses, and will apply the money to be 
raised under the last resolution to the payment aforesaid. 

III. Resolved, That John C. Ordway, Willis D. Thomp- 
son, and William F. Thayer, the building committee of said 
district, be the agents of the district to negotiate and agree 
with the city for its aid, as set forth in the last resolution, and 
to sign, seal, and deliver all writings and papers that may be 



396 CITY OF CONCORD. 

deemed necessary or advisable relating to said negotiations 
and agreement, and if the city does not aid the district as re- 
quested, said persons are authorized to borrow money for the 
use of the district upon the terms set forth in the first resolu- 
tion ; and to give the district notes or other obligations for the 
money so borrowed, and full authority is hereby given to said 
persons to do all the acts aforesaid, and it shall be their duty 
to make a full report in writing of their doing under the au- 
thority herein granted at the next general meeting of the dis- 
trict. 

Mr. Ordway moved the adoption of the resolutions. Motion 
seconded, a vote taken, and declared unanimously adopted. 

Art. 12. Mr. John P. George ottered the following reso- 
lution and moved its adoption : 

Resolved^ That the board of education are hereby author- 
ized to make such disposition of the Bow Brook schoolhouse 
and lot as thev may deem for the best interests of the dis- 
trict. 

A vote was taken, and the resolution declared adopted. 

No other business being presented, it was voted to adjourn. 

A true record. Attest : 

LOUIS C. MERRILL, 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 39 7 



APPENDIX. 



Opinion of the Supreme Court in Regard to 
Tuition Pupils of Penacook. 

No. loi. ^slerrimack. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT -.'.9. DISTRICT NO. 30. 

Assu:\ipsit, for tuitions of children who, with their par- 
ents or guardians, reside in the defendant district, and who 
attend the high school of the plaintiff district. 

The defendant district does not maintain a high school, or 
one of a grade corresponding to the plaintiff's high school. 

The respective parents or guardians of the children attend- 
ing said high school notified the defendant school board of 
the purpose of said children to attend said school. 

The defendants declined to pay said tuitions, or any of 
them, claiming that the same should be paid by the city of 
Concord. 

There are three school districts in Concord, namely : 
Union vSchool district, District No. 20, and the tow'u district. 

Transferred from the superior court by Stone, J. 

Mitchell S Foster^ for the plaintiff. 
David F. Dudley^ for the defendant. 

Blodgett, C. J. The sole contention of the defendant 
district is that the tuitions of the children resident therein, 
who attend the high school of the plaintiff district, should be 
paid by the city of Concord, in which both districts are 
situate. 

We are unable to find any tenable basis for this contention. 
So far as appears, and as we take the fact to be, each district 
has "a special, independent, and complete organization, and 
officers of its own having exclusive authority for the superin- 
tendence and government of its schools, and the administra- 
tion of all its school affairs," and is a distinct and separate 



398 CITY OF CONCORD. 

organization and corporation, not mcrelv as to each other, 
but as to the city of Concord. Sarg-efit \s. District^ 63 
N. H. 52S, 530, ^33? S34; Wheeler vs. Altoit, 68 N. H. 

47S. 

With these rehitions and conditions existing, it would not 
only be obviously imjust to subject the city to the pavment of 
tuition at the plaintiff's high school, for children resident in 
the defendant district, which has authoritv to establish and 
inaintain a high school of its own (Public Statutes, chapter 
89, section 9), but we think the parties fairly come within the 
meaning of "town" as used in chapter 96, Laws of 1901, 
indicating that "any tosvn not maintaining a high school or 
school of corresponding grade, shall pay for the tuition of 
an}' child who with parent or guardian resides in said town, 
and who attends a high school or academy in the same or 
another town or city in this state, and the parent or guardian 
of such child shall notify the school board of the district in 
which lie resides, of the high school or academy which he 
has determined to attend." 

This construction not onl\' accords with the requirements 
of justice and the well-recognized independent corporate 
powers of school districts, and the historical evidence, but it 
is also authorized bv Sargeut vs. District and Wheeler vs. 
Alton^ siipra^ and by section 5, chapter 2, of the Public Stat- 
utes, which provides : "The word 'town' shall extend and 
be applied to any place incorporated, or whose inhabitants 
are required to pay anv tax, and shall mean that city, town, 
ward, or place in which the subject matter referred to is situ- 
ate, or in which the persons referred to are resident, unless 
from the context a different intention is manifest." But, 
apart from these considerations, towns, as such, not being 
authorized to maintain high schools, and having no boards of 
education, it is manifest from the act of 1901, itself, that the 
construction adopted is the correct one. 

The plaintiff's action is maintainable. Case discharged. 
All concurred. 



SCHOOL REPORT. . 399 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF 
DISTRICT No. 3o, PENACOOK. 



The Board of Education presents herewith its annual 
report, accompanied by the report of the superintendent of 
schools and of the treasurer to the board, and respectfully 
submits them to the citizens of the district. For the first 
time in the history of this district we have a superintendent 
of schools, this district uniting with the city of Franklin for 
this purpose, in accordance with a vote passed at an adjourned 
school meeting held April 27, 1903. 

The value of the work of a superintendent of schools can- 
not be demonstrated in one year. Especially is this true 
when teachers and members of the Board of Education are 
unused to such supervision. For this reason, and because a 
superintendent is considered a necessity in most districts and 
by all competent educators, we recommend that the district 
appropriate money for the purpose of employing a superin- 
tendent another year. A pressing need in education in this 
district is skilled supervision by a man of broad and liberal 
training, who is familiar with educational methods in other 
and larger localities, and who shall have power and oppor- 
tunity to administer school affairs according to such methods. 
The time has come when we must either adopt this plan with 
consequent skilled work and improvement in our schools, or 
grow more accustomed to low standards, in consequence of 
which children waste time and opportunity and society suffers 
sorely. With the administration of school affairs by a super- 
intendent who is given authority and held responsible, goes 
out the personal element which has sometimes caused friction 
and unpleasantness. 

The Board of Education should centralize responsibility on 
the same principle as large business interests are managed, 
and the superintendent should understand that he is to be 
judged by his record and held responsible for results. It is 
because the Union District believes in skilled supervision and 



400 CITY OF CONCORD. 

has confitlcnce in Air. Sanborn, that they are wilHng to admit 
the graduates of our grammar school to their high school 
without examination, and the continuance of such supervi- 
sion means that eveiy graduate of our grammar school will 
be cjualified to commence work in the high school without 
the extra effort and expense of tutoring, or the dread of exam- 
ination bv teachers with whom they are unacquainted. 

No parent can afford to send his child to a teacher who is 
not qualified by education, training, culture and nobility of 
character, to develop the child into the noblest possible type of 
manhood or womtuihood. There is no place where high 
ideals should be so constantly proclaimed both by precept 
and example as in the school, and a high standard of qualifi- 
cations of teachers, both educational and moral, should be 
maintained. 

During the past year sanitary improvements have been 
made in the basements of the school building. .Sinks with 
automatic faucets have been substituted for the unsightly and 
unsanitarv pails for drinking purposes, and a new urinal with 
automatic flush has been substituted for the old wooden 
trough. These improvements are, however, only a begin- 
ning of what ought to be done. The schoolhouse is unsani- 
tarv, and will continue to be a menace to the h.ealth of every 
child in the school until a thorough system of ventilation is 
put in the building. 

We commend the untiring zeal with which Mr. Merriam 
and Mr. Sanborn have worked for the uplifting of the whole 
school, the improvement of the school building, and the 
establishment of high moral and physical ideals. 

IRA C. PHILLIPS, 
OSCAR E. SMITH, 
H. C. HOLBROOK, 

Board of Edttcatioii. 



school report. 401 

Report of Superintendent, 

I herewith respectfull}- submit to the School Board of Dis- 
trict No. 20, Penacook, N. H., my first annual report. 

The labors of a school superintendetit in a new field must 
in part be that of the student. He must find out and become 
conversant with those conditions of school and commvniity 
which have a bearing upon the educational problem which he 
is to solve. When this is done he can wisely formulate a 
plan along which he can work for the best interests and 
greatest improvement of the schools. In the following report 
I shall endeavor to set forth some of the items of such a plan, 
and on careful consideration you will agree with me that 
these items are of vital importance to the welfare of the 
schools. 

The superintendent's work in Penacook has been difficult, 
and not altogether as pleasant as it should have been. This 
was in part due to the fact that in the fall the idea of a school 
superintendency was entirely new to both schools and com- 
munity. However, many thanks are due to those teachers 
and members of the district who have heartily cooperated in 
working for the good of the school. Some of the difficulties 
have already been removed, and those which remain to 
threaten the interests of the school must soon disappear under 
the united efforts of an efficient school board, an interested 
community and able teachers. 

The results of working among children can be wrought 
out only by the slow process of time. New plans and 
methods must be pursued with care for a long period before 
decision can be passed upon their success. Education and its 
development are necessarily slow, and in passing judgment 
upon the work of those who have the schools in charge this 
fact must be kept constantly in mind. 

ATTENDANCE. 

A glance at the table of attendance for 1900-1901, will 
convince any one that in this line there is chance for great im- 
provement. Only one school has a per cent, of attendance 
over ninety and the total tardiness is 686. Here is where the 

26 



402 CITY OP COKCORD. 

parents can greatly assist the teachers. Place the school in 
its true relation of importance to the child, teach the child 
the first lessons of punctuality and regularity in school attend- 
ance, then you will have done a great deal to secure the pres- 
ent success of the schools and the future success of the child. 
The teachers are doing much to make attendance what it 
should be ; but their eftbrts cannot be fruitful of the best results 
without the hearty cooperation of the parents. 

TRUANT LAW, 

Under the recent law of 1901, twenty-one employment cer- 
tificates have been granted to children between the ages of 
fourteen and sixteen years. By the provisions of the law, all 
children between the ages of eight and fourteen must attend 
school, and the school districts may make by-iaws, not repug- 
nant to law concerning the attendance of children between 
the ages of six and sixteen. As the average child is sufficiently 
well developed to attend school when six years of age, the 
district ought to make a by-law concerning the attendance of 
children between the ages of six and eight. Most towns of 
the state have already made such regulations, and compel the 
children to attend at six years of age. The Union District of 
Concord compels all children to attend at five years of age. 
It might not be advisable in Penacook to fix attendance at 
such an early period, but something ought to be done at once. 
The majority of children between the ages of six and eight 
are far better oft' in school than they are outside of the school- 
room. A great deal might be said showing how great the 
advantage to be obtained for both children and school by such 
a regulation. It is hoped that the district will see fit to take 
prompt action in regard to the matter. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

There ought to be an addition to our primarv schools, in 
order to accommodate the large number of small children. 
At present tlie first grade is very much overcrowded. This 
addition might take the form of a sub-primary or kindergar- 
ten. 



SCHOOL kp:port. 403 

Under present conditions the children come into the first 
grade with little or no training, and several weeks of valuable 
time must be spent in teaching them how to use their hands 
and to become familiar with school customs. In this place 
let me quote from the Hon. A. E. Winship, who savs in a 
recent issue of the Journal of Ediication : 

"• The right kind of a kindergarten aftects for great good 
the child's whole school life. The primary school work in 
any town is decidedly improved when it follows the kinder- 
garten. Primary school work is in a better spirit, and the 
child is in a vastly better mental attitude. No primary school 
teacher can do reputable work with newcomers if she has 
more than twenty-five children. All statistics demonstrate 
that in towns and cities with no public kindergarten, about 
forty per cent, of the primary children are required to do the 
work of the first or second grade over, so that forty per cent, 
of the primary schools must be charged up to the absence of 
the kindergarten." 

This shows that the establishment of a kindergarten would 
not incur an appreciable extra expense to the district. It 
seems to me that the time is ripe for the establishment of such 
a school for the children, and that District No. 20 could only 
be placed in the objectionable rank of those who are indifferent 
to the progress of modern education should it longer delay 
action in this direction. 

IMPROVEMENT. 

During the last summer vacation over two hundred dollars 
were expended on improvements in the basement of the school 
building. A new and improved svstem of sanitary water- 
closets has taken the place of the old objectionable system. 
New porcelain sinks have been placed in the basements, and 
further improvements in piping have been made. In order 
to drain the water from the steam pipes in the two north 
rooms and facilitate the heating of those rooms, escape pipes 



404 CITY OF CONCORD. 

have been put in. These carry oft' the water and allow the 
pipes to fill more rapidly with steam, thereby making it much 
easier to gain the required temperature. Nodusto has been 
applied to the floors of some of the rooms. This seems to 
have made a great improvement in the air of the rooms, and 
its use can, I believe, be continued to good advantage. 

TEACHERS. 

Unless the teaching force of a school acts as one harmo- 
nious whole, the best results cannot be obtained. The work 
of each teacher must supplement that of every other one. In 
the modern educational s\stem no teacher is independent of 
all others. They must work together, hand to hand, and it 
is much better if they work in full sympathy for the fulfillment 
of a noble purpose — that of making the world better by teach- 
ing the children to become good citizens. 

Thei-e have been several changes in the teaching force this 
year. While it is always a misfortune to lose an experienced 
teacher if his work is satisfactory, a new teacher often brings 
new life, new methods, and new vigor into the school, and 
sets in motion the thoughts of the other teachers. 

Miss Bessie Kelley began work in the first grade at the 
opening of the fall term. Miss Mary W. Smith took up the 
work of the sixth and seventh grades early in the fall. At the 
beginning of the winter term, ]Miss Bessie Rolfe entered upon 
the work of the second grade in the place of Mrs. Hannah 
Holden who was transferred to the third grade to take the 
place of Miss Florence Chandler who resigned. Early in 
the fall Miss Annie Chandler entered upon the duties of 
music instructor. Miss Maria Carter and Miss Susan Pickard 
are doing faithful work in the fourth and fifth grades 
respectively. 

Near the end of the fall term a\Ir. Gushce resigned and 
Mr. B. J. Merriam was chosen to fill his place. Under Mr. 
Merriam the school has shown marked improvement in 
spirit and order. All belonging to the district should give 



SCHOOL REPORT. 405 

sympathy and as far as possible material aid to Mr. Merriam 
in his earnest eflbrt to place the school on a higher 
educational plane. 

Great care should be used in the selection of teachers. 
This is an age of trained labor. No untrained, unskilled 
person can hope to take a front rank in his profession. The 
skill which will assure success to the teacher may be obtained 
through years of experience, the training school or normal 
instruction. It may not be wise to make radical changes in 
our present teaching force ; but as vacancies from time to 
time occur, I would strongly recommend that candidates be 
required to present a state certificate, or in place of that proof 
of professional training or successful experience in other 
schools. 

The majority of our teachers have their homes in Penacook. 
This is wise. All due consideration should be given to the 
employment of home teachers when the working capacity of 
the schools is not impaired thereby. No school can afford, 
however, to have on its teaching force, simply because they 
are home teachers, those who through lack of education, 
training, or a sufficiently strong pei'sonality are emuiently 
unfit to hold positions in the public schools. 

When other conditions are equal it is right that preference 
should be given to teachers who reside in town. Yet the 
conditions can not be considered equal when the home 
candidate does not present a certificate of qualification, while 
candidates from elsewhere present certificates from training 
schools and sometimes in addition the proof of successful 
experience. Those who are looking forward to teaching in 
the future should plan to train themselves for their work by 
reading and study. 

MUSIC AND DRAWING. 

Early in the year the school district was very fortunate in 
securing the services of Miss Annie Chandler as music 
teacher. Under her supervision several new and progressive 
features have been added to the music course. The third 
and fifth books of the educational music series have been 



406 CITY or COXCOKD. 

introduced with success. The amount of money expended 
on the department of music is by far inadequate to the 
amount of work required and also to the amoimt of work 
actually done. 

The condition of the drawing in the schools is far from 
what it should be. Perhaps the work might be somewhat 
improved by the introduction of a series of books on the 
subject. Such a course, however, seldom proves satisfactory. 
Free-hand drawing is an art and only an artist can success- 
fully teach it. In fact it is almost, if not quite, impossible for 
a grade teacher to do sufficient work along this line. She 
has not the time to spare and often lacks the talent required. 
The best remedy for the present unsatisfactory condition of 
the drawing in our schools is to employ a supervisor. This 
can be done at very small expense and would add greatly to 
the improvement of the schools. 

TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPI.IES. 

At present all supplies are, according to law, furnished by 
the school district. This especiallv in the[case of paper is a 
matter of neatness and economy. In the fall the children 
were buying their own tablets, wasting the paper and 
throwing it about the schoolroom. Under the present 
system the paper is furnished to the pupils at a much less 
cost than they can possibly buv it, and the teachers oblige 
them to he much more careful in the use of it. 

A few new text-books have been introduced this vear. 
Great care has been used to get only the best. Early in the 
year VVentworth's Algebra was adopted in the ninth grade, 
and later the fourth book of the Stepping Stone series of 
readers was placed in the fifth grade and the Arnold primer 
in the first grade. Mention has already been made of the 
third and fifth book of the educational music series. Recently 
the Lockwood and Emerson lessons in English have been, 
placed in the ninth grade. The subject of arithmetic is now 
inider consideration, and it is hoped that at the beginning of 
another year a new arithmetic on the spiral plan may be 
placed in the hands of the pupils of the lower grades at least. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 407 



SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 



The overcrowded condition of the schoolhonse is a well- 
known fact to all members of the school district. When 
school opened in the f;ill Mr. Gnshee had four grades in his 
room. This was a very unsatisfactory, overcrowded condi- 
tion, and a remedy was immediately sought. It was thought 
wise to establish a school in some outside building, but as it 
was impossible to secure a suitable room, the plan failed. 
Finally, at the suggestion of Mr. Oscar vSmith, the present 
arrangement was decided upon. Seats were placed in the 
hallway, and a part of the scholars removed from Mr. Gush- 
ee's room. This arrangement, though the best that. could be 
made, has been very unsatisfactory, and will be impossible 
another year on account of the large in-coming sixth grade. 
There are now eighteen in the sixth grade, six in the seventh 
grade, fourteen in the eighth grade, and thirteen in the ninth 
grade. This makes a total of fifty-one pupils in lour grades, 
with two teachers, and very poor seating accommodations. 
The estimate on the size of tlie same grades for next vear is 
as follows: Forty-one in the sixth grade, fifteen in the sev- 
enth grade, ten in the eighth grade, and fourteen in the ninth 
grade. This makes a total of eighty pupils to be accommo- 
dated where it has been very difficult to accommodate fifty- 
one pupils. 

The question arises, What can be done? The only answer 
is, More room must be furnished. All the grades below the 
sixth will have over fortv pupils, which is fully as large a 
number as any room in the building ought to accommodate. 

Great care should be used in planning for new accommoda- 
tions. To build a new building that in a few years would 
become inadequate in the matter of room accommodation, 
would in the end cause much inconvenience, and certainly 
pecuniary loss. The number of pupils is yearly increasing. 
At present we have a sufficientlv large number of pupils to 
fill two new rooms, and in a few years the number will 
greatly increase. A building of four rooms would not in any 



408 CITY OF CONCORD. 

respect be an overestimate of the accommodation needed in 
the near future. Moreover, I beHeve tliat such a building 
should be so constructed as to admit of a large addition. 

Great care should be used in the construction of new build- 
ings. The arrangement of rooms, their general equipment, 
heating, lighting, and ventilation, should be left in the hands 
of those who are thoroughly familiar with the e\ervdav 
requirements of the modern school. 

Heating and ventilation are matters of great importance. 
The best methods of heating and ventilation are none too 
good for the schoolroom. To do the most effective work 
children must be surrounded with the most favorable condi- 
tions. In a crowded, overheated, poorlv ventilated room, 
children become restless, their minds dull, and their work 
unsatisfactory. Furthermore, poor ventilation is a constant 
menace to the bodily health of the pupils. A perfect sani- 

tary condition demands that each pupil shall be furnished 
with two thousand cubic feet of pure air per hour. At pres- 
ent the aveiage schoolroom in Fenacook has an air capacity 
of about two hundred and ten cubic feet per pupil. This 
would necessitate a change of air five times each hour. The 
present methods are altogether ineftectual. In fact, as far as 
can be ascertained, our schoolrooms have no ventilation what- 
ever except by means of the doors and windows, which is a 
most dangerous system. The children are constantly sufter- 
ing from impure air, or are in danger of taking cold from 
draughts of cold air. This matter should be attended to at 
once, and prompt action should be taken bv the members of 
the district, in whose charge the children reallv are. 

IX CONCLUSION. 

The aim of an educational system is not to simply fill the 
mind of the pupil with a long list of dry, uninteresting facts, 
but rather to develop in the pupil a power of mind which he 
can use in his after life. Very few children remember what 
they have learned from their books in the schoolroom, and 
yet they have grown mentally, have formed habits of study 



SCHOOL REPORT. 409 

and thought, and have acquired force of character. Educa- 
tors have been and still are studying to find and foster the nat- 
ural development of the child's mind. It is with this end in 
view that the old method of learning rules by number, and 
wasting time and energy on the solution of problems far too 
difficult for the capacity of the child's mind, has given place 
to the brighter one of teaching nature, music, and drawing. 
The same idea has led to the introduction of the kindergarten, 
where the child's play is regulated and skillfully guided, so 
that it may form a part of the training for the life-work. The 
present methods of educational training tend to give the chil- 
dren a bright and cheerful disposition, broad mental develop- 
ment, and strength of character. To be sure, the present 
system cannot be approved in full until it has stood the test 
of time; yet it can be readily seen that the schools of to-day 
show a conservation of school time, scientific methods of 
teaching, and cultivation of the fine sensibilities of the child's 
mind which have not been shown by any previous system. 
Then it should be the object of our school systems to develop 
in the children those qualities which will make them good 
citizens. This I consider the ultimate aim of my work in 
Penacook, and I seek from all interested in the schools hearty 
cooperation. 

H. C. SANBORN, 

Super in te?zde fit. 



410 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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SCHOOL KKl'ORT. 



411 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Receipts. 

Received from Abiiil Rolfe, district treas- 
urer . . . . . . $7.19 

Received from city treasurer . , 4,504.64 

" " sale of book and supplies 2.60 

" " tuition .... 16.00 



- 


EXPENDITIRES. 


Teachers' salaries 


. $3,152.73 


School supplies . 


114.78 


Care and cleaning; 


263.59 


Fuel 


223.00 


Repairs 


230.62 


Books 


283.12 


Incidentals 


220.48 



t, 530. 43 



Balance in treasury ..... 

Respectfully submitted, 

OSCAR E. SMITH, 



,488.32 
S42.ll 



Treasurer. 



Teachers' Salaries. 



H. C. Sanborn 
B. J. Merriam 
W. E. Gushee . 
Mrs. W. E. Gushee 
Mary W. Smith . 
Susan E. Pickard 
Maria Carter 
Florence A. Chandler 
Hannah R. Holden 



$208.33 
266.64 
666.66 
110.00 
198.00 
360.00 
360.00 
234.00 
324.00 



412 



CITY OF OONCOKl). 



Etta C. Pease 

Bessie Rolfe 

Bessie Kelley 

Sadie Parker (music) , 



School Supplies. 



1901. 
Sept. 27, 



1901. 
May S. 
July 19. 
Nov. 21. 

1902. 
Feb. 21. 



Care and Cleaning. 

L. C. Gage, janitor 
Henry Morrill, janitor . 
E. B. Runnels, " 

Lester Perley, watering plants 

E. B. Runnels, cleaning schoolhouse 



P\el. 

E. L. Davis, coal 

John C. Farrand, coal and wood 

E. L. Davis, slabs 

E. L. Davis 



$99 


.00 


90.00 


225 


.00 


11 


.10 



;, 152.73 



1901. 






May 25. 


J. L. Hammett & Co. . 


$35.97 


Oct. 15. 


A. J. Noyes & Co. 


4.70 


Nov. 2. 


J. E. Symonds Table Co. 


4.75 


Nov. 21. 


J. L. Hammett & Co. . 


9. 64 


Dec. 23. 


Edward Babb & Co. . 


25.43 


1902. 






Feb. 21. 


J. L. Hammett & Co. . 


19.13 




Edward E. Babb & Co. 


5.25 


Mar. 17. 


H. C. Sanborn, supplies 


9.91 



14.78 



$56.00 

18.00 

171.45 

.84 
17.30 

$263.59 



$24.08 

168.77 

15.00 

15.15 



$223.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



413 



Repairs. 



1901. 






May 8. 


W. Arthur Bean . 


$3.40 


June 26. 


Seth R. Hood . 


200.00 


Oct. 15. 


Geo. A. Griffin . 


20.75 


21. 


Ed. C. Durgin . 


2.25 


Nov. 25. 


George Neller 


4.22 



1901. 
Apr. 25. 

May 8. 



Books. 



Abial Rolfe, water 

Henry Morrill, work on .sewer 

Abial Rolfe., services as treasurer 

Foote & Brown, sundries 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber 



$230.62 



1901. 












May 8. 


American Book Co. . . . . $19.25 




Ginn & Co. (music) 








9.38 




Thomas Shewell . 








2.17 


24. 


Silver, Burdett & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 








.58 
7.00 


25. 


American Book Co. 








48.72 


June 26. 


Edward E. Babb 
Oliver Ditson 








17.73 
.63 


Nov. 21. 


D. C. Heath 

Thomas Shewell . 
AUyn & Bacon 
Silver, Biirdett & Co. 








3.50 
13.00 
11.25 

6.00 


Dec. 10. 


Ginn & Co. 








34.46 


23. 


American Book Co. 








24.91 


1902. 












Feb. 21. 


Ginn & Co. 

Silver, Burdett & Co. 








40.41 
24.92 


Mar. 19. 


American Book Co. 








19.21 






$283.12 




Incident 


ALS. 









$15.00 
3.50 
2.00 
2.25 
4.93 



414 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





23 
•2.") 


Nov. 


•) 




21 


Dec. 


23 


190 


2. 


Jan. 


31 



May 8. Ira C. Phillips, labor . 
June 20. E. L. Davis, teaming . 

14. W. P]. Gushee, express and sundries 
July 19. John C. Farrand, broom 

Maria Carter, clerical services 
Oct. 15. C. M. & W. Rolfe, lumber and labor 

Concord Axle Co., brick and mortar 

H. C. Sanborn, mileage and journal 

V. C. Hastings, water 

Chas. H. Baruett, labor 

Ira C. Phillips, labor . 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber and labor 

Foote & Brown, sundries 

J. H. Jackman, express 

John Farrand .... 

Hood, Palmer & Bailey, slate slab . 

Chas. G. Davis, painting blackboards 

Ira Phillips, labor 

Isaac Batey, sundries . 
Feb. 21. Foote & Brown, sundries 

Masury, Young & Co., Nodusto 
Feb. 21. C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber 

R. E. Gale, sundries . 
27. Isaac Batey, siuidries . 

Ira Phillips, labor 
Mar. 17. Sargent & Co., sundries 

H. C. Holbrook, melodeon 

Concord Axle Co., material 

J. H. Jackman, express 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber 

D. "Warren Fox, door springs 
William B. Quimby, labor . 
C. H. Fowler, paint, etc. 



$5.10 
2.50 

10.49 
.35 
1.50 
1.10 
2.06 
5.60 

15.00 
1.25 
5.50 
1.33 
1.13 
5.30' 
3.00 

6.50 
3.75 
1.07 

35.49 
2.81 

13.00 
2.59 

15.04 

12.65 
2.25 
3.25 
7.00 
1.00 
6.07 
3.11 

12.00 

.65 

3.36 



$220.48 



SCHOOL KEPOKT. 



415 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT. 

School District No. 20. 



Balance of appropriation, 1900 


8889.90 


Appropriation, 1901 . 


. 2,135.51 


Voted by District No. 20, 1901 . 


. 2,000.00 


Text-books ..... 


194.70 


Literary fund .... 


98.67 


Dog licenses .... 


75.76 




$5,394.54 


Cash paid treasurer : 




Cash balance, 1900 . 


§889.90 


Cash account, 1901 


. 3,400.00 


Cash paid since January 1, 1902 . 


400.00 




$4,689.90 


Balance due of 1901 . . . . 


704.64 




$5,394.54 


Note.— The balance due of 1901 has been paid 


since tliis account was ren- 



dered. 



416 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT 
For the Year Ending March, 1903. 



Another school year with its successes and disappointments 
is in the past. Success has been general. Our selection of 
teachers has been eminently fortunate, and their work has 
been thorough without exception. The teachers and school 
board have been almost unanimously supported by parents 
and residents of the district, though now and then we encoun- 
ter one of those people whom nobody seems to please. For- 
tunately such persons' influence is seldom felt beyond the 
disadvantages they bring to their own families. Having 
some acquaintance with schools in adjacent towns, we may 
be pardoned for saying that ours compare favorably with 
other rural schools in this section of the county. We give 
below a concise report of each school in the district. 

MiELviLLE School. 

The spring and fall terms of the advanced grades were 
taught by Miss Luella Marden, of Epsom, who gave perfect 
satisfaction, and it was with many regrets that we accepted 
her resignation. The winter term was taught by Mrs. Sarah 
E. H. Clark, who is a lady of large experience. The excel- 
lence of the school was fully maintained under her manage- 
ment. 

A. 
MiLE\iLLE Primary. 

The spring term was taught by Mrs. Sarah E. H. Clark. 
Her work was fully appreciated, and was attended with 
marked results. The fall and winter terms were taught by 
Ethel M. Paige. This was Miss Paige's first school, but we 
fail to see how her work could have been better done ; the 
district should retain her. 

A. 



school report. 417 

Iron Works School. 

Miss Jennie C. Brown has taught this school for several 
years. Fine scholarship is positive proof of Miss Brown's 
ability and faithfulness as a teacher. Keep her in some of 
our schools. 

A. 
Standish School. 

This school was organized for the benefit of scholars near 
Pembroke line, with Miss Lora L. Tarbell as teacher. This 
was Miss Tarbell's first school, and the room in which she 
taught was unsuitable. She succeeded just the same, and 
won the respect of parents and the love of her scholars. 

A. 

Horse Hill School. 

The spring and fall terms were taught by Miss Carrie E. 
Foss, whose faithful service in the past has brought this 
school to its present excellent standing in scholarship. Miss 
Georgiana Webster, of Kingston, N. H., was employed for 
the winter term, during which the school maintained its usual 
high rank. The closing examination was notable for the 
exhibition of some excellent spellers, among whom two young 
girls showed remarkable proficiency for their years. 

s. 

Number Four School. 

This school was in charge of Miss Mary F. Barnes for the 
entire school year. Miss Barnes is a graduate of the Maine 
State Normal School, and well equipped for the duties of her 
position. Good progress was made in all branches taught, 
and thoroughness was a prominent feature of her work. The 
teacher, however, did not have the unanimous support of the 
parents, which mav account in part for a very low per cent, 
of attendance. 

S. 

27 



418 citv ok concokd. 

Little Pond. 

The three terms of the past year were taught by ISIiss 
Georgia A. Foster. Though a difficult school in some 
respects, the year's work has been successful. Miss Foster is 
a teacher of experience whose faithfulness is seen in every 
detail of school management. 

S. 

Borough School. 

This is one of our larger schools, over thirty names appear- 
ing on the register for the winter term. One of the obstacles 
in the way of best results here, as in most of our schools, is 
irregularity in attendance. Miss Hannah M. Stanyan has 
taught this school during the past year. She is a successful 
teacher, and has gained the respect of both parents and 
scholars. 

S. 
Virgin School. 

This is a very pleasant school, and has been under the care 
of Miss Ida B. Sleeper, a teacher of experience, who is per- 
fectly at liome iii the schoolroom. Good advancement was 
made, and the school was one of profit. Great interest was 
manifested at the closing examination, there being twenty- 
five visitors present. 

V. 

TURTLETOWN vSCHOOL. 

The summer term was taught by Miss Mabel Virgin ; the 
fall and winter terms bv Miss Bessie E. Virgin. This is a 
small school, there being but seven pupils enrolled. Good 
interest was manifested. ' 

V. 

Plains School. 

This school has been under the instruction of Miss Mae E. 
Morrill, of Amesbury, Mass., who has been a kind and useful 
teacher, giving good satisfaction to both parents and pupils. 
The names of ten scholars were enrolled. 

V. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 419 

MouNTAix School. 

Mr. S. L. French, a teacher of man} years' experience, has 
had charge of this school for several successive terms. Good 
discipline, tlioroughness, and attention to duties, were the 
elements of success in this school. This is a school of twen- 
ty-five scholars, but has been much broken up the past term 
on account of sickness. There were over twentv visitors 
pi^esent at the close, and much interest was manifested. 

V. 

ALBERT SALTMARSH, 
GEORGE T. ABBOTT, 
FALES P. VIRGIN. 

■Sc/iool Board. 



420 



CITY OF COXCORD. 



Treasurer's Report. 

The treasurer of the Town School District of Concord, 
respectfully submits the following report of the receipts and 
expenditures for the year ending March, 1902. 



Received as follows : 

Balance March, 1901 

Town of Loudon 

Appropriated by city 

" " for text-books 

" by district . 

Literary fund .... 

Dog licenses .... 

Town of Loudon, Maynard tax . 

Total receipts 
Paid as follows : 



$15-39 

S.io 

2,316.48 

21 1.20 

800.00 

107.03 

82.18 

13-05 

$3 '553 -43 



Teachers' salaries 

Books 

vSupplies . 

Fuel .... 










$2,707.65 

129.38 

16.93 

217.00 


Repairs 

Conveying scholars 
Incidentals 










141.52 

60.00 

186.21 


Hopkinton school district 
Truant officer 










15-32 
3.00 


District treasurer 










25.00 


Printing 










6.00 


Cash to balance account 










45.42 


Total expenditures 


$3v553-43 



ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 



Treasurer. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1901, 



TRUST FUNDS. 

City Teea.slrer's Accounts as Custodian of Trust Funds. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the School Fund. 

Capital §1,000.00 

Income received, 1901 ..... 32.50 

Paid into the city treasury . . . . . 32.. 50 

Invested in Merrimack Countv Savings Bank. 



COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be 
applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital ........ $2,000.00 

Income received, 1901 . . . . . 120.00 

Paid Fannie E. Minot, treasurer of the society . 120.00 

Invested in Eagle and Phenix Hotel Company 4% notes, se- 
cured by mortgage. 



422 CITY OF coNConi). 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually 
by the Siiperintendent of Cemeteries for the preservation, care, and embel- 
lishment of the burial lots known as the Minot Enclosure, under the direction 
of the duly appointed officials, or members of the INlinot Cemetery Association. 

Capital S3, 000. 00 

Income received, 1901 ..... 108.33 

Paid H. H. Dudley, trea.surer .... 108.33 

Invested in City of Concord 3% bonds . . . 2,000.00 

Merrimack County Savings Bank. . . . 1,000.00 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Capital $200.00 

Balance from last year . . . $163.55 

Income received, 1901 . . . 11.50 

8175.05 



Capital, $200, invested in City of Concord 4% bond, and $100 
of income invested in City of Concord ^h% bond. 

The purpose of the donor of this trust fund was that the income should be 
used for the purchase of school-books for poor children ; bvit since the bequest 
was made, a state law has been enacted that requires the towns and cities to 
buy all the school-books, consequently the beneficiary of the donor is provided 
for and for the purpose of the trust no longer exists. This fund, $200, and ac- 
cumulations, amount to $375.05, and same will continue to accumulate foi'ever 
without any benefit to any object unless some legal action can be taken to 
divert the income from the specified pixrpose of the donor. 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, tJie income to be spent annually for the purchase 
of books of a Biographical, Geographical, Historical, and Scientific character, 
and the books relating to science shall he those that give the latest develop- 
ments and discoveries by scientific persons, from year to year. 

Capital . $2,145.00 

Income received, 1901 ..... 74.74 

Paid into the city treasury ..... 74.74 

Invested in City of Concord 3% bonds . . . 2,000.00 

Invested in Loan and Trust Savings Bank . . 145.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 423 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capit'il $1,000.00 

Income received, 1901 ..... 35.00 

Paid into the city treasniy ..... 35.00 

Invested in City of Concord 3.V% bond. 



FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 



Capital . . 

Income received, 1901 
Paid into tbe city treasnry 

Invested in City of Concord 4% bond 
Invested in Union Guaranty Savings Ba 



$1,000.00 
35.00 
35.00 



500.00 
500.00 



THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital $500.00 

Income received, 1901 . . . . • 17.50 

Paid into the city treasury ..... 17.50 

Invested in City of Concord 3^% bond. 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection, and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1901 . $18,228.49 
Received from one half sale of lots, 1901 803.63 

Received from income of fund, 1901 . 700.92 

$19,733.04 



Credited Blossom Hill Cemetery ac- 
count $700.92 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1902 . 19,032.12 



$19,733.04 



424 • CITY OF CONCORD. 

Invested in City of Concord 4% bonds . $12,400.00 

Invested in City of Concord 3^% bonds 2,000.00 

Invested in New Hampshire Savings 

Bank 4,082.12 

Invested in United States 4% bonds . 550.00 

$19,032.12 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots iu this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an increase 
of the fund. 

Income devoted to the care, protection, and ornamentation of Old North 
Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1901 . $715.00 
Received from income of fund, 1901 . 28.49 

$743.49 



Credited Old North Cemetery account . $28.49 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1902 . 715.00 



Invested in City of Concord 4% bonds . $700.00 
Invested in Merrimack County Savings 

Bank 15.00 



$743.49 



$715.00 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection, 
and ornamentation of West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1901 . $282.50 
Received from one half sale of lots, 1901 14.50 

Unexpended income on hand, January 

1, 1901 101.42 

Received from income of fund, 1901 . 12.44 

$410. 8G 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1902 . $113.8G 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1902 . ■_'97.00 

$410.86 

Capital and unexpended income invested in Merrimack County 
Savings Bank. 



TREASURY DPU'ARTMENT. 425 

MILLVILLB CEMETERY FUND. 

Tliis fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of 
interested parties. Income devoted to tbe care, protection, and ornamenta- 
tion of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capitul, January 1, 1901 . $200.00 
Unexpended income on hand, January 

1, 1901 32.89 

Received from income of fund, 1901 . 7.54 

8240.43 

Capital and unexpended income invested in Loan and Trust 
Savinars Bank. 



BAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased eacli year by tlie addition of one half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to tlie care, protection, and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1901 . §232.50 

Unexpended income on hand, January 

1, 1901 99.49 

Received from one half sale of lots, 1901 15.00 

Received from income of fund, 1901 . 11.54 

8358.53 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1902 . $111.03 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1902 . 247.50 



8358.53 



Capital and unexpended income invested in New Hampshire 
Savino;s Bank. 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING 

FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord Sewer Precinct, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also cre- 
ated a sinking- fund which provided that the following amounts should be 
raised annually upon the taxable property of the precinct, for the purpose of 
paying the bonds as they matui-e, viz. : 

8500 annually for ten years from October 1, 1892. 
$1,000 annually for five years from October 1, 1902. 
81,400 annually for five years from October 1, 1907. 



426 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1001 . §4,450.57 

Income received, 1001 . . . 138.81 

Received t'rom city of Concord . . 500.00 



Invested in City of Concord oi% bonds 82,000.00 
Invested in Loan and Trust Savings 

Bank 3,080.38 



§5, 080. 38 



$5,080.38 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook Sewer Precinct, and autlior- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fnnd which provided that the following amounts should be raised 
annually upon the taxable property of the precinct, for the purpose of paying 
the bonds as they mature, viz. : 

81,000 annually for Hve years from August 1, 1808. 
8100 annually for fifteen years from October 1, 1000. 
$1,200 annually for five years from August 1, 1003. 
$1,000 annually for five years from May 1, 1008. 
$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1014. 
8500 annually for three years from October 1, 1015. 

Balance on hand, .lanuary 1, I'OOl . $2,064.28 

Income received, 1001 . . . 61.02 

Received from city of Concord . . 1,000 00 

$3,126.20 



Invested in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank 82,126.20 

Invested m City oi' Concord 3% bond . 1.000.00 

83,126.20 

EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING 

FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord Sewer Precinct, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also cre- 
ated a sinking fluid which provided that the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) 
should be raised annually for twenty years from July 1, 1895, upon the taxable 
property of the precinct, for the purpose of paying the bonds as they mature. 



TKEASIRY DKl'AKT.MKNT. 427 

Balance on hand, Jainiary 1, lilOl . $25.08 

Income received, 1901 ... .75 

Received from city of Concord . . 100.00 

$125.83 

Inve.sted in Union Guaranty Savings Bank. 



SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested iu some safe New England 
city bond, the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year in 
keeping lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in a neat and orderly condition; six 
dollars each year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a 
monument fund ; and the balance of tlie income to be expended each year in 
purchasing books for the Concord Public Library. 

Income received, 1901 $17.97 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 

mem fund . . . . . $6.00 

Transferred to city general account, for 

Public Library . . . . 6.97 

Paid E. A. Moulton, Supt., care of lot 5.00 

$17.97 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones Trust. 
The entire accumulations to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1902 . . . $218.52 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



428 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TREA6LRV DEPAKTiMENT. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 437 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



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442 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 



Bonds. 
Police Station 
Widening Pleasant 

street extension 
Bridofes 



Public Park 



Municipal. 

Due. Rate. Amount. 

July 1, 1903, 4, $17,000 



June 1, 1905, 
Jnly 1, 1904, 
July 1, 1905, 
July 1, 1906, 
July 1, 1907, 
June 1, 1914, 



4, 

4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
3i, 



13,800 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

25,000 





Precinct. 






Sewer . 


July 1, 


1904, 


4, 


812,000 


a 


June 1, 


1914, 


3i, 


25,000 


u 


. Dec. 1, 


1914, 


H, 


9,000 


n ^ 


• July 1, 
. July 1, 


1917, 
1902, 


4, 


25,000 


Union School Dist. 


$15,000 


U 11 


. Apr. 1, 


1906, 


H^ 


8,000 


I ( a 


Apr. 1, 


1907, 


H, 


8,000 


(I a 


. Apr. 1, 
July 1, 


1908, 
1902, 


3, 


8,000 


S. p. S. Sewerage 


8500 




July 1, 


1903, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1904, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1905, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1906, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1907, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1908, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1909, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1910, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1911, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1912, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1913, 


3, 


500 



875,800 



871,000 



839,000 



86,000 



TREASURY r)p;PARTMENT. 



443 



West Concord Sewer Oct. 1, 1902, 4, $5,000 
" " . Oct. 1, 1907, 4, 5,000 

" " . Oct. 1, 1912, 4, 7,000 



Penacook Sewer 



• July 1, 


1905, 


H, 


8500 


. July 1, 


1910, 


3i, 


500 


. July 1, 


1915, 
1903 


oh 
4, 


500 


Aug. 1 


$5,000 


. Oct. 1 


1905 


3, 


500 


Aug. 1 


1908 


4, 


6,000 


. Oct. 1 


1910, 


3, 


500 


. May 1, 


1913, 


4, 


5,000 


. July 1 


1914, 


4, 


500 


. July 1 , 


1915, 


4, 


500 


. Oct. 1 


, 1915 


3, 


500 


. July 1 


191(5 


4, 


500 


. Oct. 1 


1916 


» o, 


500 


. July 1 


1917 


4, 


500 


. Oct. 1 


, 1917 


, 3, 


500 


. July 1 


1918 


4, 


500 


. Oct. 1 


, 1918 


, 3, 


500 


. July 1 


, 1919 


, 4, 


500 



$17,000 



$1,500 



$22,000 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city exclusive of 
water department ..... 



$232,300 



STATEMENT OP COUPON ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 



Municipal overdue 
Precinct overdue 
Penacook sewer overdue 



$141.25 

145.00 

70.00 



444 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



DUE 1901, 



Municipal 
Precinct, sewer . 
Union School District 
Penacook sewer 
West Concord sewer 
East Concord sewer 



Cr 



Municipal paid . 

Precinct, sewer . 

Union School District 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord sewer . 

East Concord 

Municipal due, not presented 

Precinct, sewer, due, not presented 

Penacook sewer, due, not presented 



02,907.00 

2,545.00 

1,620.00 

850.00 

680.00 

52.50 



§2,995.75 

2,527.50 

1,620.00 

900.00 

680.00 

52.50 

52.50 

162.50 

20.00 



$9,010.75 



S9,010.75 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER- WORKS ACCOUNT. 

W. F. Thayer, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water- 
Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1901 . $9,548.09 

V. C. Hastings, superintendent . . 62,253.61 
People's Fire Ins. Co., fire insurance 

premium returned .... 9.33 

Refunding bonds .... 10,000.00 

Refunding bonds premiums . . . 40.00 



Expenditures 
Interest on bonds 
Bonds paid .... 

Maintenance and extension . 
Casli on hand, January 1, 1902 . 



$25 


691 


00 


10,000.00 


35 


357 


93 


10 


802 


10 



$81,851.03 



$81,851.03 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



445 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP THE WATER 
PRECINCT. 



When 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 



due. 
, 1902 
, 1903 
, 1904 
, 1905 
, 1906 
, 1907 
, 1908 
, 1909 
, 1910 
, 1910 
, 1911 
, 1911 



^ate. 


Amoiiut. 


When 


due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


4, 


$10,000 


Oct. 




1912, 


4, 


$45,000 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1913, 


4, 


10,000 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1914, 


4, 


10,000 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1915, 


4, 


10,000 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1916, 


4, 


10,000 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1917, 


4, 


10,000 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1918, 


4, 


10,000 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1919, 


4, 


10,000 


4, 


5,000 


Jan. 




1920, 


3, 


10,000 


3, 


5,000 


Jan. 




1921, 


3, 


5,000 


3, 


5,000 


Mar. 




1922, 


3i, 


20,000 


4, 


5,000 


Jan. 




1923, 


4, 


400,000 



$650,000 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1901, and not 

presented . , $411.00 

Coupons due 1901 25,700.00 



Cr. 



By coupons paid 1901 
Coupons due and not presented 



^26,111.00 

^25,691.00 
420.00 



$26,111.00 



446 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



RECEIPTS OF BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 
Receipts. 

One-half of the receipts from the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. Tlie remaining- half, with the amount received for grading of 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections, and 
income of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropri- 
ation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order 
from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the city 
for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
specified in each triist. i 



Albiu and W. ¥.. Hunt, lot 112. north 

addition .... 

Albin and W. E. Hunt, grading . 
C. E. Kellev, lot 11, block V 
C. Fj. Kelley, grading 
A. D. Locke, repairs . 
Thomas B. Hall, burial 
Mrs. George F. Page, care . 
Mrs. George E. Todd, care . 
C. P. Bancroft, care . 
Mrs. Loran Clough, care 
Mrs. J. M. Stewart, plants and care 
Dr. W. G. Carter, repairs and care 
Dr. Quimby, care 
W. B. Durgin, care . 
J. F. Webster, care . 
E. E. Brown, care 
C. L. Gilmore, care . 
Fred A. Carr, care 
J. C. Badger, care 
R. F. Robinson, care . 
C. E. Palmer, care 
Mrs. H. C. Sturtevant, cai-e 
W. E. Green, care 
Mrs. G. E. .Tenks, care 
Mrs. C. J. AVhitney, care 
C. T. Morrill, burial . 
James Galloway's estate, burial 



^72.00 
48.00 
25.00 
20.00 
1.00 
8.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
5.50 
12.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.25 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.50 
3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



u: 



Frank Doyen's estate, burial 

O. Bovver's estate, burial 

Mrs. Asel Burnham . 

Solomon Sleeper's estate, burial 

C. E. Plummer, burial 

Mrs. Angell's estate, burial . 

Mrs. Hoag's estate, burial . 

Mrs. Sarah Cooper's estate, burial 

Rev. R. D. Grant, burial . 

Ernest Roberts, burial 

George C. Roy, care 

W. P. Fiske, care 

Warren Emerson, care 

George L. Stratton, care 

W. H. Horner, care . 

Mrs. H. E. Perkins, repairs and 

W. D. Thompson, care 

L. A. Smith, care 

B. W. Couch, care 
W. F. Thayer, care . 
W. E. Hunt, care 

C. C. Webster, care . 
Mrs. S. Webster's estate, care 
C. P. Smith, care 
Mrs. E. G. Carter's estate, care 
Harry DoUoff, care 
Mr. Harrigan, rent 
Chas. Trenovveth, foundation and rent 
Edson J. Hill, care 
Charles Joy, care 
Mrs. J. H. Chase, plants and care 
S. F. Patterson, care . 
W. I. Leightou, care . 
F. E. Colburn, care . 
Trenoweth and Fogg, rent . 
Mary N. Perley, care 
P. S. Smith, care 



$3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
.50 
1.75 
2.50 
2.50 
3.00 
1.25 

17.20 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
4.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
1.00 
1.50 
1.00 

12.00 

18.00 
8.00 
1.50 
5.00 
2.00 
1.75 
1.50 
9.00 
2.00 
1.50 



448 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



State of New Hampshire, burial 

J. G. Leighton, care . 

F. A. Johnson, care . 

L. H. Carroll, care 

Mrs. A. C. Heath, care 

A. P. Sherburne, care 

Dr. Irving A. Watson, lot 8, block U 

Dr. Irving A. Watson, grading 

F. P. Mace, care 
Lucy M. Poore, care . 
Mrs. C. L. George, plants and c 
Joseph Palmer, care . 
Alba Woods, care 
Mrs. A. V. Merrill, care . 
I. E. Currier, care 
E. C. Eastman, care . 
Miss Mary Martin, care 
E. N. Shepard's estate, care 
J. T. Sleeper, care 
Mrs. E. H. Schultz, care . 
Mrs. Lowell Brown, care 
Mrs. Nathan Mansur, care . 
Amos Blanchard, care 
Mrs. E. Dow, care 
Mrs. F. B. Underbill, care 
Mrs. H. E. Chandler, care 
Mrs. S. Heath's estate, burial 
Dr. E. Morrill, care . 
Mrs. Cady Clark's estate, burial 
Miss A. Packard, repairs . 
W. E. Dow, care 
H. E. Jewell, care 

G. B. Emmons, care . 
Mrs. C. Noyes' estate, burial 
Mrs. S. J. Crippen, plants and ca 
Fred Powell, care 
Mrs. M. A. Abbott, care . 



$3.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
53.20 
39,90 
2.00 
1.75 
6.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
9.00 
3.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
6.00 
1.00 
8.00 
6.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 



TREASURY DKFARTJIEKT. 



449 



Mrs. A. W. Hevanor, care 

Mrs. G. D. Huntley, care 

Mrs. R. M. Morgan, care 

Mrs. G. W. Crockett, care 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 

Frank Coffin, care 

Geo. L. Batchelder's estate, burial 

S. R. Dole, care 

Fred U. Lane, care 

Irving Pickering, care 

E. B. Hutchinson, plants and car 
Jonathan Brown lot, care 

Benj. Bilsborougli, care 
Mabel Ordway, care . 
Mrs. A. A. Currier, care 
Nelson Abbott, care . 
Miss M. Woods, care 

F. Moseley, care 

Mrs. E. Adams, Sanborn lot, can 

William Smith, care . 

J. C. Eaton, care 

J. A. Cochran, care . 

Mrs. Jos. Sargent, care 

H. E. Conant, care 

Mrs. F. S. Dodge, care. 

Dr. G. P. Titcomb, burial . 

D. B. Corser, care 

Mrs. G. H. Seavey, repairs 

Mrs. M. A. Southworth, care 

C. W. Lane, care 

N. H. Shattuck, care 

C. L. Jackman, care 

C. N. Hall, care 

J. E. D wight, care 

Perry Kittredge, care 

J. A. Moore, care 

W. M. Chase, care 



SI. 50 
1.50 
2.00 
4.00 
5.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
6.82 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
3.50 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 



450 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I. A. Watson, burial 

F. P2. Qiiimby, care . 

F. E. Brown, care 

Streeter and Carpenter, care 

Ordway and Sedgley, cai'e . 

Mrs. J. C. Ordway, Adams lot, care 

Mrs. J. M. Lauder, care 

Mrs. S. Edmunds, care 

Frank H. Locke, care 

B. G. Carter, care 
Frank P. Andrews, lot 78, block M 
Milton Colby, Admr. Est. B. B. Davis 

lot 18i, block H . 
Daniel Cutting, lot 33, block W 
Daniel Cutting, grading 
Mrs. A. S. Sprague, care 
Mrs. C. H. Jones, care 
W. A. Chesley, care . 
Mrs. H. A. Church, care 
Mrs. J. J. Wyman, care 
Mrs. A. Bunker, care 

C. C. Danforth, care . 
George Sewell, care . 
Fred J. Young, care . 
Mrs. G. Bullock's estate, care 
Thomas Young's estate, care 
W. C. White, burial . 
C. W. Lynam, care . 
John P^. Carter, single grave and burial 
E. D. Clough, care 
Rollins and Young, care 
Mrs. L. F. Lund, care 
H. A. Rowell, care 
C. H. Shute, care 
Kimball Flanders, care 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care . 
Mrs. I. S. R. Sanborn, care 



S4.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 

14.40 

15.00 
20.00 
15.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
6.00 
1.50 
1.00 
5.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 



tup:aslry depautiment. 



451 



William Badger, care . 

Miss S. Sargent, care . 

Byron Moore, care 

Austin G. Sanger's estate, burial 

John Leary's estate, burial . 

C. P. Virgin, burial and care 
John H. Lamprey's estate, buri 

care .... 
Mac D. Aldrich, burial 
Mrs. Blanche Blaisdell, burial 
W. I. Brown's estate, burial 
Mrs. W. H. Allison's estate, buri 
Mr. Hodgeman, burial 
Mrs. Emily Rolfe's estate, burial 
Mrs. T. H. Ford's estate, burial 
G. D. B. Prescott, care 

D. C. Allen, care 
Mrs. G. N. Mead, care 
H. B. Bartlett, care . 
Mrs. A. S. Marshall, care . 
A. B. Brown, care 
Bartlett and Morrison, care 
Mrs. A. J. Langley, care 

Mrs. John Rollins's estate, burial 

J. H. & G. L. Brown, repairs 

C. H. Martin, burial . 

T. H. Dunstane, rent . 

James Minot, care 

Mrs. Burleigh, care 

Mrs. S. Wardner, care 

A. Brown's estate, burial 

Miss Morse, care 

C. A. Lockbery lot, care 

W. F. Carr, burial 

Miss A. Kimball, care 

J. H. Gallinger, care . 

H. K. Leaver's estate, burial 



al and 



il 



$2.00 
l.oO 
2.00 
7.00 
8.00 

10.00 

10.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 

10.00 
1.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.50 
5.00 
4.00 

24.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
3.00 
1.50 
1.50 
4.00 
2.00 
2.00 
4.00 



452 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. C. L. P^astman, care 

D. W. Hobbs, care . 

S. Smith & Son, foundation 

W. W. Hill, care 

Miss P. Eaton, care . 

Mrs. G. Buzzell, care 

W. W. Flint, care 

H. A. Dod<ie, care 

Mrs. E. Hayes's estate, burial 

Miss Julia Stark's estate, burial . 

Miss Mary F. Lcavitt's estate, burial 

Isaac A. Hill, care 

J, Stephen Abbott's lot, plants and car 

Mrs. Ella M. Leavitt, lot 38, block V 

Mrs. Ella M. Leavitt, grading 

Daniel D. Dow, lot 28, block W. 

Daniel D. Dow, grading 

Roland D. Grant, lot 46, block U 

Roland D. Grant, grading . 

Mrs. W. M. Paul, lot 124, block P 

I. W. Hill and Jas. O. Lyford, lot .58 

block U ..... 
I. W. Hill and Jas. O. Lyford, gradin; 

N. H. Odd Fellows' Home Association 
lot 58, block U . . . 

W. G. C. Kimball, care 

diaries Barker, care . 

John H. Teal, care 

Margaret C. Brooks's estate, burial 

Mrs. McFeir, single grave and burial 

John Erickson, single grave 

Collins and George, care 

S. R. Chandler, care . 

Fred Nyquist, burial . 

L. W. Glysson, care . 

Peter Clark, burial 

Mrs. James Dodge, care 



$2.00 

1.50 

4.00 

2.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.50 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

4.00 

2.00 

16.10 

49.50 

39.60 

20.00 

15.00 

90.00 

60.00 

16.00 

95.28 
63.52 

50.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
4.00 
8.00 
8.00 
1.50 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 
3.00 
2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



453 



Charles Peaslee, care . 

Mrs. W. Wright 

Charles I. Johnson's estate, burial 

William Gordon, burial 

Philip D. Mclnnis, single grave an 

burial ..... 
Mrs. H. B. Hardy, care 
Mrs. L. G. Parker, burial . 
Benevolent Society, care 
Mrs. Asa McFarland's estate, burial 
Horace Merrill, lot 137, block W 
Horace Merrill, grading 
Mrs. Dana Allen, care 
Jeremiah Murphy's estate, burial . 
J. G. Wells's estate, burial . 
John Rollins's estate, burial 
Mrs. Susan F. Cilley's estate, burial 
Mrs. Batchelder, burial 
J. P. Durrell's estate, burial 
Mrs. J. Connell's estate, burial 
H. O. Packard, burial 
E. A. Moulton, labor 
Mrs. Allen, Bliss lot, I'epairs 
Mrs. Bartlett's estate, burial 
Orrin Whidden, tbundation . 
David Young, Jr., care and burial 
Mrs. A. J. Hooker, care and plants 
Algernon' Willis, labor 
Geo. N. Greeley's estate, plants, etc. 
Cummings Bros., foundation 
John Erickson, burial 
W. M. Paul's estate, burial 
Mrs. Booth, care 
A. B. Carter, care 
Mrs. L. S. Morrill, care 
Mrs. .J. E. Hutchins, care . 
Geo. H. Heatli, care . 



SI. 50 
1.00 
3.00 
3.00 

8.00 

2.00 

3.00 

2.00- 

11.00 

20.00 

15.00 

4.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

4.00 

8.00 

3.00 

1.00 

5.00 

3.00 

4.00 

1.75 

2.25 

.50 

4.00 

3.50 

.50 

3.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.50 

2.00 

1.00 



454 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



Mrs. James Hill, plants anrl care . 
Mrs. Mary C. Hubbard, lot 150, 

block W . . . . 

Mrs. Mary C. Hubbard, grading . 
I. W. Hill and Jas. O. Lyford, remov 

als, etc. ..... 

S. S. French, care 

Mrs. E. Earle, burial 

Geo. W. Emerton's estate, burial 

Charles Wall, foundations 

Walter H. Leavitt's estate, burial 

George Carter, labor . 

Francis Kelley's estate, use of tomb 

Miss E. Sturtevant, care 

W. H. Gilson, burial . 

A. W. Gale, burial . 

W. J. McMuUen, grading . 

Woman's Relief Corps, plants 

Mrs. L. J. Trask's estate, burial . 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., car 

and repairs .... 
Charles H. Abbott's estate, burials 
Mrs. Dale's estate, burial 
John H. Hill's estate, burial 
S. A. Smith & Son, foundation . 
Wm. H. Gilson, lot 2, block P . 
Wm. H. Gilson, grading 
Mrs. G. A. Potter and Mrs. Amy 

Batchelder, lot 109, block V . 
Mrs. G. A. Potter and Mrs. Amy 

Batchelder, grading 
Mrs. Charles Root, grave and burial 
Edgerly and Gordon, care . 
C. H. .Johnson, grave and burial . 
Odd Fellows' Home Association, buriii 
Daniel F. Moses's estate, burials . 
E. B. Wood worth's estate, burial, etc. 



$3.00 

20.00 
15.00 

15 00 
1.00 
4.00 
• 3.00 
10.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
5.00 
3.00 
4.00 

6.00 
<S.OO 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 
36.00 
36.00 

75.37 

50.25 
8.00 
2.00 
5.50 
3.00 
8.00 
8.75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



455 



B. B. Davis's estate, foundation . 
Odd Fellows' Home Association, burial 
Miss H. P. Dame's estate, burial . 
Mrs. Geo. K. Lang, care 

Delia A. Little's estate, burial 

Charles Lyon's estate, burial, etc. 

Joseph Wentworth's estate, burial, etc 

J. E. Rand, care, etc. 

A. McDonald, burial . 

J. F. Gordon, care 

Mrs. Chas. Lihbey, lot 116, block V 

Mrs. Chas. Libbey, grading 

Felix McShane, lot 131, block W 

Felix McShane, grading 

Henry A. Sti-ickland, single grave and 

burial 
Lull and Paige, repairs 

E. A. Ordway, burial 
Mrs. Leary, care 

C. C. Peaslee, care 
J. R. Hosking, labor . 
Rev. C. A. Cook, dressing 

D. D. Rowe, care 

C. W. Hall, burial . 
Mr. Rowland, burial . 
Mrs. J. Burgum, labor 
H. A. Kimball, care . 
Tree sold . 

Mrs. F. A. Burnham, care 
Mrs. S. A. Holt, care 

D. G. Lowell, care 
Mrs. Geo. H. Smith, care 
John Ellis, care . 
Moses Ladd's estate, burial 
S. Smith & Son, foundation 

F. A. Morgan, repairs 

Mrs. Hannah V. Bell, lot 43, block V 



$3.00 

3.00 

10.00 

1.00 

3.00 

5.00 

5.00 

4.00 

3.00 

5.00 

70.00 

56.00 

20.00 

15. -00 

8.00 
4.00 

.50 
1.00 
2.00 

.50 

.50 
1.25 
8.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.50 

.50 
1.00 
8.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
3.00 
8.00 
1.00 
28.80 



456 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. Hannah V. Bell, ^irrading 

Mrs. Cora K. Tozier, lot 148, block V 

Mrs. Cora E. Tozier, grading 

Mrs. Jane Davis, lot 148, block W 

Mrs. Jane Davis, grading 

Mrs. Olivia Lundin, lot 147, block W 

Mrs. Olivia Lundin, grading 

Mrs. Elizabetii Romine, lot 34, block Vn 

Mrs. Elizabetii Romine, grading . 

Mrs. AValter Bates, care 

James Mobbs, burial . 

Mrs. Charles Libbey, removal 

Otis Young, burial 

J. H. Sargent, burial . 

James Ilosking, setting tablet 

Orrin Whidden, labor 

Mrs. Robert Bell, removal . 

Mrs. Carter, Young lot, repairs . 

L. M. Tozier's estate, burial 

Mrs. Abbie A. Harris's estate, single 

grave and burial 
J. P. Durrell's estate, burial 
Miss E. J. Chase's estate, burial 
W. G. C. Kimball, burial 
Mrs. Harrietta Fletcher, single grav 

and burial .... 
Geo. J. Sargent's estate, burial . 
C. R. Dame, burial . 
Mrs. John Davis, removal . 
H. Bickford, care and repairs 
Mrs. H. Day, care . 
Victor Liuidin's estate, burial 
Leigh Romine's estate, burial 
Mrs. Winn's estate, burial . 
John Svvenson, foxindation and care 
Josepli H. Pearce, burial 
William Williamson, repairs 



^21.60 

55.00 

44.00 

20.00 

15.00 

20.00 

15.00 

20.00 

15.00 

4.00 

.50 

6.00 

.50 

3.00 

1.00 

5.00 

5.00 

.50 

3.00 

8.00 
4.00 
3.00 
8.00 

8.00 
8.00 
1.50 
5.00 
3.00 
1.50 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
4.50 
4.00 
1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



45' 



E. O. Jameson, plants and care 
Miss Lucy Poore, care 
John Lugg, removal . 
Mrs. A. S. White, care 
Charles A. Dole, care 
Henry Robinson, care 
S. Blaney, care . 
Colby and Fitch, care 
Henry McFarland, care 

F. J. Batchelder, labor 
Mrs. Gilbert Bullock's estate, car( 
Henry E. Conant, care 

G. B. Emmons . 
Mrs. A. C. Heath, care 
Fred Powell, care 
D. B. Corser, care 
Mrs. Charlotte Merrill, care 
Mrs. H. C. Sturtevant, care 
W. W. Flint, care 
Mrs. J. H. Chase, care and plants 
Maria Woods, care . 
Mrs. W. Emerson, care 
Mrs. R. P. Morgan, care 
Mrs. E. Adams, Sanborn lot, car( 
Mrs. Geo. E. Todd, care 
George Angwin, burial 
James G. Leighton, care 
George H. Russ, care 
George H. Moifett's estate, burial 
J. B. Hussey, care . 
AY. H. Horner, care . 
S. C. Eastman, care . 
H. M. Cavis, care 
J. E. Dvvight, care 
Horace Merrill, burial 
George M. Kimball, care and repairs 
Mrs. C. L. George, care and plants 



$2.00 
1.00 
•3.00 

25.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
.75 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
5.00 
2.00 
2.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
.50 
1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.50 
1.25 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
3.00 
7.60 
6.00 



45« 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



John W. Drew, care . 

Baker and Biiruside, care . 

C. P. Tucker, care 

Mrs. J. A. West, care 

"W. P. Ford's estate, care and burial 

John P. Nutter, care 

Mrs. G. L. Nutter's estate, care . 

Mrs. Jos. Sargent, care 

Mrs. George E. Jenks, care 

Mrs. C. J. AVhitney, care . 

Benevolent Society, care 

S. F. Morrill, care 

Charles P. Virgin, care 

Mrs. John Connell's estate, care . 

Charles E. Palmer, care 

W. H. Marcey .... 

Mrs. Roxanna Adams 

Mrs. Lauren Clough, care . 

Mrs. E. p. Schultz, care 

Fred W. Boardman, cai'e 

E. C. Eastman, care . 

W. B. Durgin, care . 

Charles S. Mellen, care 

C. W. Clarke, care 

H. D. Hammond, care 

Mac D. Aldrich, labor 

W. D. Thompson, care 

George L. Stratton, care 

W. E. Kincaid, foundation . 

J. C. French, care 

J. F. Webster, care . 

E. E. Brown, care 

F. E. Brown, care 

Mrs. H. E. Perkins, care and plants 
F. P. Mace, care 
George F. Buswell, care 
F. K. Colburn, care . 



S.3.00 
2.50 
1.50 
2.00 

11.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.25 
2.50 
2.00 
1.50 
9.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
5.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.50 
1.50 
3.00 
5.00 
.75 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 

10.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 



TREASL'RY DEPARTMENT. 



459 



George J A. Berry, care 

Batchelder Brotliers, care 

W. E. Hunt, plants and care 

J. Stephens Abbot estate, plants and car 

Mrs. Geo. H. Adams, care 

John H. Carr's estate, burial 

George C. Roy, care . 

W. P.TFiske, care . 

C. C. Danforth, care 

Rev. C. W. Bradlee, care . 

Mrs. G. H. MotTett, lot 46, block W 

Mrs. G. H. MotFett, grading 

Mrs. Jean N. Hyde, lot 57, block V 

Mrs. Jean N. Hyde, grading 

Eben J. Blodgett, lot 37, block V 

Eben J. Blodgett, grading . 

David D. Taylor, lot 50, block X 

David D. Taylor, grading . 

Helen W. Woodworth, i lot 40, block X 

Helen W. Woodworth, grading . 

A. B. Woodworth, | lot 40, block X 

A. B. Woodworth, grading 

H. W. Stevens, lot 39, block X . 

H. W. Stevens, grading 

Joseph Palmer, care . 

J. M. Runnels, care . 

Thomas Hannigan, rent 

Mr. Trenoweth, rent . 

David L. Neal, care . 

Charles H. Noyes, care 

S. R. Dole, care 

J. C. Eaton, care 

George Raymond, burial 

Eben .J. Blodgett, burial 

Nelson Abbott, care . 

Mrs. N. G. Mead, care 

H. B. Bartlett, care . 



$1.50 

2.50 

5.90 

15.00 

2.00 

4.00 

1.50 

2.50 

2.00 

1.50 

24.00 

18.00 

40.00 

30.00 

49.50 

39.60 

180.00 

120.00 

112.50 

75.00 

112.50 

75.00 

210.00 

140.00 

2.00 

1.00 

12.00 

12.00 

1.00 

1.50 

1.00 

2.00 

3.00 

3.00 

1.00 

1.50 

1.00 



460 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Thomas Young, care . 
INIiss M. A. Abbott, care 
Mrs. G. D. Huntley, care 
Mrs. A. M. Havener, care 
David D. Taylor, burial 
Alba Woods, care 
Joshua Lane, care 
W. E. Dow, care 
Mrs. Chapman, repairs 
Thomas Nawn, foundation 
A. T. Whittemore, care 
C. C. Webster . 

C. G. Blancluird 
John Couch 
R. F. Robinson 
Miss H. Robinson 

D. Young, Jr. 
Mrs. H. E. Chandler 
S. F. Morse 
Dr. C. A. Locker by . 

F. & C. Moseley, care 
F'. H. Locke, care 
C. L. Jackman, care 
C. N. Hall, care 
Jones and Mason, care 
C. H. Martin, care 
Carpenter and Streeter, care 
W. G. Carter, cai'e . 
Byron Moore, care 
James Moore's estate, burial 
Fred Hyde's estate, burial . 
Mrs. Helen M. Robinson's estate, 
R. H. Ayer's estate, burial 

L. J. Durrell's estate, burial 

G. E. Merrill's estate, burial 
Mrs. 1. Estes's estate, burial 
H. S. Leavitt's estate, burial 



buria 



$1.50 
1.00 
1.50 
1.00 
6.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 
5.00 
1.00 
2.00 
4.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1,50 
1.50 
2.50 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
4.00 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



461 



C. H. Puffer's estate, burial 
C. W. Lynam, care 
C. T. Morrill, labor . 
P. S. Smith, care 
Edson J. Hill, care 
Charles Joy, care 
Sarah M. K. Adams, trust fund 
Mary B. Allison, trust fund 
Alonzo Atherton, trust fund 
Abby L. Sanborn Bailey, trust fund 
Oliver Ballou, trust fund 
Matilda Benson, trust fund 
Ellen C. Bixby, trust fund . 
James D. Blaisdell, trust fund 
Emily P. Blanchard, trust fund . 
Nathaniel Bouton, trust fund 
Mary N. Preston Buntin, trust fund 
Harriet W. Butters, trust fund 
Benj. F. Caldwell, trust fund 
Nathan F. Carter, trust fund 
Samuel M. Chesley, trust fund 
Caroline Clark, trust fund . 
Rufus Clement, trust fund . 
Frederick Clough, trust fund 
George Clough, trust fund . 
Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust fund 
Amos L. Colburn, trust fimd 
Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust fund 
Mary Crow, trust fund 
Silas Curtis, trust fund 
Coi'delia A. Danforth, trust fund 
Charles S. Danforth^ trust fund . 
Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust fund . 
Stephen B. Eaton, trust fund 
Elizabeth G. Emerson, trust fund 
Lydia F. Edgerly, trust fund 
Georgianna P. Ela, trust fund 



$3.00 
1.00 
3.50 
1.50 
8.00 
1.50 

23.00 
2.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.25 
2.94 
8.00 
3.00 
8.00 
3.00 
2.75 
7.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.50 
2.50 
2.00 
5.00 
1.50 
1.25 
2.00 
7.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.75 
1.25 
1.50 
3.00 
2.50 
3.00 



462 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



, trust 



trust 



Lydia A. Farley, trust fund 
Mary M. Farnum, trust fund 
Alvah C. Ferrin, trust fund 
George Gr. Fogg, trust fund 
Asa Fowler, trust fund 
John D. Gale, trust fund 
John Gear, trust fund 
Enoch Gerrish, trust fund . 
Geo. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood 

fund .... 
Hannah- A. and Fannie A. Goss 

fund .... 
William E. Greene, trust fund 
Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust fund 
George N. Greeley, trust fund 
Betsey Hadley, trust fund . 
George M. Harding, trust fund 
Mary U. Hart, trust fund . 
John M. Hill, trust fund 
J. Frank Hoyt, trust fund . 
Timothy Haynes, trust fund 
Charles F. Hildreth, trust fund 
Sarah Irish, trust fund 
Seth K. Jones, trust fund . 
John and Benj. A. Kimball, trust fund 
Pklward L. Knowlton, trust fund 
Lincoln and Forrester, trust fund 
J. L. Lincoln, trust fund 
J. W. and E. J. Little, trust fund 
William Ladd, trust fund 
John McCauley, ti-ust fund 
Greenough and Evarts McQuesten, trust 

fund .... 
James McQuesten, trust fund 
Henry A. Mann, trust fund 
H. W. and H. O. Matthews, trust fund 
J. B. Men-ill, trust fund 



$2.00 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 

20.00 
3.00 
1.50 
2.00 

1.50 

3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
7.50 
3.00 
1.50 

11.00 
5.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
5.00 
6.00 

15.50 
2.00 
1.50 
4.00 
2.00 
2.00 

3.00 
5.00 

2.00 
3.00 
3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



463 



S. F. Merrill, trust fund 

Charles Moody, trust fund . 

Mary J. Moses, trust fund , 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust fund 

E. S. Nutter, trust fund . 

Woodbrido'e Odlin, trust fund 

Eugene A. Ordway, trust fund 

Cyrus W. Page, trust fund 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust fund 

W. H. Pitman, trust fund . 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust fund 

Lucy J. Perkins, trust fund 

George L. Reed, trust fund 

Judith A. Richardson, trust fund 

E. H. Rollins, trust fund . 

Moses W. Russell, trust fund 

Jonathan Sanborn, trust fund 

John B. Sargent, trust fund 

Jonathan E. Sargent, trust fund 

Mary W. Smith, trust fund . 

Hattie R. Southmaid, trust fund 

Onslow Stearns, trust fund . 

Thomas Stuart, trust fund . 

Hiram B. Tebbits, trust fund 

John C. Thorne, trust finid . 

Pliny Tidd, trust fund 

Charles L. Tappan, trust fund 

Eliza W. Upham, trust fund 

Mary E. Walker, trust fund 

George F. Whittredge, trust fund 

Mary Williams, trust fund . 

Robert WoodruflP, trust fund 

E. W. Woodward, trust fund 

William Yeaton, trust fund . 

Loren W. Glysson, trust fund 

J. L. Tilton and A. D. Locke, trust fund 



$3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.50 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 
2.00 
.75 
2.25 
3.00 
5.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
5.00 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 
4.50 
4.00 
3.50 
1.50 
4.00 
3.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.00 



r, 509. 58 



464 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Credit. 

Paid Mrs, Charles Libbey, for lot 43, 

block V $50.40 

One-lialf sale of lots for 1901 added to 

permanent fund .... 803.63 

Paid E. A. Moulton, superintendent, in- 
come from sundry trust funds, as 
ciiarged to this account . . . 344.19 

Transferred to City of Concord jreneral 

account . . . . . . 3,311.36 



$4,509.58 



RECEIPTS OF OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 

Amount received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund are 
added to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds 
are paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual 
deposits made with the city for that pi;rpose, said iucome being used exclu- 
sively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 



Receipts. 

Mrs. George E. Todd, care 

J. F. Webster, care . 

A. C. Sanborn, care . 

First Congregational Society, care 

J. AVarren Gordon, burial . 

R. L. Ela, care .... 

Mrs. M. .J. Roby's estate, burial . 

C. C. Danforth, care . 

Charles H. Sanborn's estate, burial 

Mrs. Susan Morris's estate, burial 

Mrs. S. H. Dumas's estate, burial 

C. A. Hardy, care 

Mrs. Farrah, care 

George H. Sluite's estate, burial . 

Levi Lamprey, labor . 

E. C. Currier, lot, repairs . 

Mrs. E. B. Whitnev, Ijurial 



SI. 00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.00 
4.00 
1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
8.00 
2.00 
1.00 
4.00 
.50 
1.00 
3.00 



tr?:asurv department. 



4()5 



N. A. Willis, burial . 

Mrs. James Tucker's estate, burial 

J. C. A. Hill's estate, burial 

Royal Norton, burial . 

Mrs. Eliza P. Lamprey's estate, burial 

Henry K. Hall, burial 

Ann A. Hall's estate, burial 

Mrs. C. E. Seavey, repairs 

Mrs. Pease's estate, burial . 

Lewis Downing's estate, burial 

Curamings Bros., labor 

Home for Aged (Mrs. Blake), burial 

Joseph T. Walker, burial 

John F. Wilson, care . 

J. F. Webster, care . 

A. C. Sanborn, care . 

First Congregational Society, care 

C. C. Danforth, care . 

Mrs. Charles Nutting, repairs 

Mrs. S. F. Cushing, care 

Mrs. George E. Todd, care . 

L. P. Fuller's estate, burial 

W. G. Mason's estate, burials 

F. W. Rollins, repairs 

Lucy M. Page's estate 

Charles H. Foster 

Minot Cemetery Association 

William Abbott, trust fund . 

Samuel Alexander, trust fund 

Timothy Blaisdell, trust fund 

John F. Chaffin, trust fund . 

Samuel Evans, trust fund 

Theodore French, trust fund 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust fund 

Mitchell Gilmore, trust fund 

William T. Locke, trust fund 

S. and D. L. Merrill, trust fund 

True Osgood, trust fund 



$2.00 
3.00 
9.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
4.00 
3.00 
8.00 
4.00 
3.00 

10.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
7.00 
2.00 
1.00 
3.00 

20.77 
5.00 
3.00 
8.00 

82.9.5 
5.00 
2.00 
4.00 
1.50 
2.50 
3.50 
2.50 
2.50 
3.00 
5.00 
3.00 



30 



4G6 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



W. B. Palmer ami H. H. and S. P 

Savory, trust fund . 
Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust fund 
Hiram Richardson, trust fund 
Nathan Stickney, trust fund 
Abigail Sweetser, trust fund 
Joseph Stickney, trust fund . 
Sarah A. Stevens, trust fund 
Albert AVebster, trust fund . 
T. and A. B. Walker, trust fund 
Paul Went worth, trust fund 
Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust fund 

Crkdit. 

Paid E. A. Moulton, superintendent, in- 
come from sundry trust funds, as 
charged to this account 

Transferred to city of Concord, general 
account ...... 



$2.00 
5.50 

12.00 
1.75 
5.00 

10.00 
1.00 
2.00 
7.00 
7.00 
1.00 



S322.97 



$88.75 
234.22 



$322.97 



I hereby certify that I have examined tlie foregoing accounts 
of Wm. F. Thayer, City Treasurer, for the year 1901, and find 
ail items of receipt and expenditure therein properly recorded and 
authenticated by appropriate vouchers, and the several items cor- 
rectly cast, and the cash balance due the city treasurer to be 
two thousand one hundred and twenty dollars ($2,120.00), 
and as treasurer of the City Water Department, cash balance to 
be ten thousand eight hundred and two dollars and ten cents 
($10,802.10). 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking funds 
of the city, and find such trust and sinking funds invested and the 
income thereof, for the year 1901, accounted for, as shown by 
the book of the city treasurer, kept for that purpose. 



January 31, 1902. 



GEO. K. HAZELTINE, 

City Audit 01 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 



ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1901. 



To the Honorable Mayor and City Council of the City of Concord : 

Gentlemen, — In compliance with the last paragraph of section 12, 
of the Auditor's Ordinance, the undersigned herewith presents the 
statement required : 







1901. 






Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Aid city poor 


$500.00 


$661.41 




Joint resolution Xo. 510 . 


163.41 


8661.41 






S663.41 


$2.00 


Aid dependent soldiers, city 


i!!200.00 


$127.50 


S72.50 


Aid county poor . 




7,197.04 




Aid dependent soldiers, county 


. 


2,230.26 





Bridges, Penacook, note 

Cemeteries and parks : 

Blossom Hill cemetery, appro 
priation .... 
Care of lots . 
One half sale of lots 
Grading 

Income investment fund 
Income trust fund 
E. L. Knowlton, trust fund 

acct. fence . 
M. K. Adams, trust fund, acct 

fence .... 



3,500.00 3,500.00 



$1,000.00 

1,409.26 

753.23 

1,096.47 

700.92 

344.19 

526.51 

96.87 
$5,927.45 



$6,234.41 



,234.41 



468. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





Appropriation. 


Expended 


Old North cemetery 


$100.00 


^$424.41 


Care of lots . 


234.22 




Income investment fund 


28.49 




Income trnst fund 


88.75 





Balance. 



Woodlawn cemetery : 
Joint resolution No. 486 

West Concord cemetery 

Pine Grove cemetery 

Old Fort cemetery 

Millville cemetery 

Horse Hill cemetery 

White park 
Note 

Rollins park 

Peuacook park . 

Fiske park 

Bradley pai'k 

Ridge Avenue park 



Decoration day 

Joint resolution No 
Joint resolution No 



478 
482 



Engineering department : 
Salary engineer 
Salary assistants 
Contingent 
Joint resolution No. .510 



Fire department : 

Pay-rolls, permanent men . 
Pay-rolls, extra men, vacation 
Pay-rolls, semi-annual 
Rent Veterans' association 
Forage .... 

Fuel 

Fire alarm 

Hose ..... 



S451.46 



S424.41 



S460.00 $460.00 



$1,500.00 


$1,500.00 


1,200.00 


1,075.67 


300.00 


477.70 


53.37 





3,053.37 $3,053.37 



. $6,618.00 


$6,803.60 


214.00 


168.00 


6,945.00 


6,945.00 


150.00 


150.00 


1,450.00 


1,375.94 


800.00 


724.04 


1,200.00 


1,382.76 


700.00 


41.20 



527.05 



$350.00 


$350.00 




175.00 


1.54.23 


20.77 


75.00 


24.12 


50.88 


25.00 


8.25 


16.75 


50.00 


50.00 




25.00 


24.97 


.03 


2,500.00 


2,424.60 


7.5.40 


400.00 


400.00 




800.00 


764.87 


35.13 


75.00 


88.08 




200.00 


199.61 


.39 


40.00 


34.72 


5.28 


25.00 


42.28 




$400.00 


$460.00 




30.00 






30.00 







AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 



469 





Appropriation 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Fire department : 








Horse hire 


^600.00 


$551.39 




Horseshoeing 


300.00 


279.95 




Incidentals 


2,000.00 


2,892.22 




Lights 


465.00 


445.86 




Washing . 


60.00 


60.50 




Chemical supplies 


50.00 


30.87 




Water 


116.00 


116..50 




New horses 


300.00 








121,968.00 


$21,967.83 


$0.17 


Board of Health : 








Salary sanitary officei 


. $1,000.00 


$1,100.00 




Salary board of healt 


h . . 75.00 


75.00 




Fumigation supplies 


125.00 


107.45 




Bacteriological test 


200.00 


135.80 




Incidental expenses 


100.00 


137.64 




Joint resolution No. 


510 . . 55.89 








11,555.89 


$1,555.89 




Highway department : 








Salary commissioner 


. Sl,400.00 


$1,400.00 




General maintenance 


and re- 






pairs 


. 18,600.00 


20,219.20 




Permanent work 


. 10,000.00 


8,118.44 


$2,031.56 


Cleaning streets 


5,.500.00 


5,807.06 




Sidewalks and crossii 


igs, new . 2,000.00 


1,197.31 


802.69 


Repairing concrete 


2,000.00 


1,898.82 


101.18 


Catch-basins 


1,500.00 
$41,000.00 


1,402.20 


97.80 




$40,043.03 


$956.97 


Purchase of land : 








Joint resolution No. '- 


175 . . $6,000.00 


$6,032.08 




Joint resolution No. I 


)10 . . 32.08 
$6,032.08 








$6,032.08 




History commission 


. $1,500.00 


$1,507.75 




Joint resolution No. t 


10 . . 7.75 







L,507.75 $1,507.75 



470 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Incidentals and land damages 


."$5,000.00 


$7,918.25 


Joint resolution No. 484 ' . 


515.06 




Joint resolution Xo. 510 . 


1,.598.05 






f 7,1 13.11 


$7,918.25 


Interest 


$3,073.25 


$3,473.37 


Interest, sewer bonds 


2,545.00 


2,527.50 


Interest on temporary loans . 


1,000.00 


1,266.13 


Lighting precinct, Penacook 


1,300.00 


1,700.00 


Lighting precinct, Penacook, bal- 






ance 1900 


400.00 




Loans, temporar3' .... 


86,000.00 


86,000.00 


Public library : 






Salaries 


$2,760.00 


$2,785.15 


Books and magazines . . 




1,408.42 


Binding ..... 




341.93 


Fuel and lights .... 




377.93 


Incidentals ..... 




402.04 


Miscellaneous .... 


1,740.00 




Trust funds 


169.21 




Interest on S. K. Jones bequest 


875.43 






S5,544.64 


$5,315.47 



Balance. 



Public baths : 
Joint resolution No. 487 . 

Police and watch : 

Contingent .... 
Fuel, city .... 
Fuel, Penacook . 
Helmets and buttons . 
Horse, boarding and shoeing 
Horse hire, city . 
Horse hire, Penacook 
Ice ..... 
New Harness 

Lights, city and Penacook . 

Salarie.s, regular, marshal, dep 

uty, captain, eight patrolmen , 



$250.00 



$243.75 



$185.00 


$277.76 


250.00 


515.33 


75.00 


204..50 


,50.00 


45.00 


265.00 


263.08 


40.00 


42.00 


20.00 


41.00 


8.00 


4.08 


.50.00 


50.00 


180.00 


222.23 



.'S17.50 



$229.17 



3.75 



9,350.00 9,494.50 



Police and watch : 
Special 
Janitor 

Telephone, private line 
Water .... 
Police commission 
Special, 1900 
Joint resolution No. 510 



IRTMENT. 




471 


•opriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


$600.00 


$650.00 




240.00 ■ 


240.00 




154.24 


154.24 




28.00 


46.00 




150.00 







394.00 



624.68 





112,219.92 


$12,643.72 


'rinting and stationery 


$2,000.00 




Joint resolution No. 496 


1,000.00 




Assessors .... 




$105.00 


Auditor .... 




186.25 


'Clerk 




208.73 


Engineering department 




32.94 


Fire department . 




46.47 


Health department 




60.55 


Highway department 




99.33 


Liquor agent 




37.95 


Miscellaneous 




143.20 


Mayor .... 




87.54 


Ordinances 




239.35 


Police and watch 




42.20 


Reports, city and departments 




1,159.40 


Tax collector 




275.90 


Treasurer and solicitor 




35.85 


Committee city government 




26.20 



5,000.00 $2,786.86 $213.14 



^largaret Pillsbury hospital 
Open air concerts . 



f2,000.00 $2,000.00 
300.00 300.00 



Precinct street sprinkling : 
Unexpended balance, 1900. 
Appropriation 
Note and interest 



$78.13 
5,500.00 $5,315.19 
596.34 596.34 



3,174.47 15,911.53 $262.94 



472 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Precinct street lighting : 
Unexpended balance, 1900 
Appropriation . . 
Electric lights 
Gas 



Precinct water for hydrants 

Salaries .... 

Joint resolution No. 510 

Assessors, Ward 1 

Assessors, Ward 2 

Assessors, AVard 3 

Assessors, Ward 4 

Assessors, Ward 4, accoun 

Assessors, Ward 5 

Assessors, Ward 6 

Assessors, Ward 7 

Assessors, Ward 8 

Assessors, Ward 9 

Clerk board of assessors 

Auditor 

Clerk, city . 
• Clerk, common council 

Clerk, police court 

Clocks, city 

Clocks, Penacook 

Education . 

Judge, police 

Justice, special . 

Truant officer 

INIayor 

Messenger . 

Overseer pooi-. Ward 1 

Overseer poor, Ward 2 

Overseer poor, city proper 

Pay-rolls, clerks, moder 
and selectmen 

Solicitor 

Tax collector, 1900 and 1901 

Treasurer .... 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



1900 



ator; 



140.81 






11,500.00 


$9,565.00 
1,473.00 




SI 1,540.81 


ifil 1,038.00 


$.502.81 


S6,000.00 


$6,000.00 




$11,452.00 






575.82 


$288.00 
291.00 
243.00 




2,700.00 


288.00 
9.00 
346.00 
300.00 
300.00 
384.00 
297.00 
344.25 




1,000.00 


] ,000.00 




1,200.00 


1,200.00 




50.00 


50.00 




200.00 


200.00 




85.00 


85.00 




25.00 


25.00 




500.00 


500.00 




800.00 


800.00 
22.00 




400.00 


400.00 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 




600.00 


600.00 




30.00 


30.00 




10.00 


10.00 




350.00 


350.00 




252.00 


252.00 




500.00 


500.00 




1,500.00 


1,663.57 




250.00 


250.00 




$12,027.82 


$12,027.82 





AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 473 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Salaries City Council . . . $2,150.00 S2,106.00 S44.00 



S637.40 



Sewers : 






Appropriation 


. $3,000.00 


$2,.362.60 


Sewer Precinct, Penacook : 






Unexpended balance, 1900 


$.i9.60 




Sinking fund 


. 1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


Interest .... 


850.00 


900.00 


Repairs .... 


600.00 


659.34 



$2,509.60 $2,559.34 



Sewer Precinct, East Concord : 






Unexpended balance, 1900 


$132.40 




Interest on bonds 


52.50 


852.50 


Sinking fund 


100.00 


100.00 



$284.90 I152..50 $132.40 



Sewer Precinct, West Concord : 

Unexpended balance, 1900 . $213.-53 $195.46 

Sinking fund .... 500.00 500.00 

Interest on bonds . . . 680.00 680.00 



$1,393.53 $1,375.46 $18.07 

Sewer Precinct, St. Paul's School . $6,000.00 $4,825.22 $1,174.78 

Schools, Union School District : 

Voted to pay interest . . . $900.00 $1,620.00 

A^oted to pay bonds . . . 15,000.00 15,000.00 

General fund, balance, 1900 . 12,714.69 12,514.69 

Appropriation .... 31,743.01 46,800.00 

Voted by Union School District 18,909.99 

Repairs 2,000.00 

Text-books 2,894.10 

Literary fund .... 1,466.59 
Dog license .... 1,120.08 



$86,754.46 $76,134.69 $11,539.77 



474 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Schools, Town District : 
Appropriation 
Voted by district 
Dog license 
Literary fund 
Text- books . 



District No. 20 : 

Unexpended balance, 1900 

Appropriation 

Voted by district 

Dog license 

Literary fund 

Text-books . 



Liquor Agency : 
Receipts deposited 
Rent . 
•Salary, agent 
Liquors 
Lights . 
Miscellaneous 



County tax 
State tax 

S. K. Jones monument fund 



Appropriation. 


Expended. Balance. 


.12,316.48 


!$3,305.69 


800.00 




82.18 




107.03 




211.20 


211.20 


!$3,516.89 


$3,516.89 


SS89.90 


•1889.90 


2,135.51 


3,205.30 


2,000.00 




75.76 




98.67 




194.70 


194.70 



.'S5,394..54 ^14,289.90 $1,10-4.64 

S7,256.30 

S205.75 

900.00 

.5,158.92 

9.30 

438.31 

$7,256.30 ig6,712.28 $544.02 

$47,147.20 
30,714.75 

$204.84 



Outstanding orders, not presented for payment : 

No. 1232, Incidentals and land damages, Dunn Bros. 
2807, Printing and stationery, F. P. ]Mace . 
1150, County poor, New American House . 
2625, County poor, J. H. Gallinger . 
2627, County poor, Annie F. Lewis 
2804, Incidentals and land damages, N. S. Gale & Co 

account 1900 

Soucook cemetery, Dickerman & Co., account 
1900 



$1.60 
7.95 
1.50 
8.00 

31.00 

1.75 

5.00 



$56.80 





AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 


475 


Total charge to expense account during year 


$336,114.60 


Total bonds, notes, and transfer paid. 


$101,690.93 


Total paid by city treasurer during yeg,r 


S438,777.82 


Appropriation. 


Expended. Balance. 


Concord Water-Works: 




Balance $9,548.09 




Collections . 




62,253.61 




Insurance premiums return 


ed 


9.3:3 




Refunding bonds 




10,000.00 




Premiums on bonds . 




40.00 




Salary, superintendent 






$1,800.00 


*' clerk 






742.00 


" foreman 








810.00 


Pay-rolls 








9,018.41 


Interest 








25,691.00 


Freight 








1,333.51 


Meters 








1,429.24 


Miscellaneous 








4,654.21 


Lights 








17.85 


Printing 








175.83 


Supplies 








15,090.91 


Telephone . 








148.38 


Bonds . 








10,000.00 


Abatements 








137..59 




$81,851.03 


$71,048.93 $10,802.10 



CITY EXPENSES. 

FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1901. 

Being an itemized account, made up from the books of the City 

Auditor, of the payments made by the City Treasurer 

on account of 

RUNNING EXPENSES. 



The arrangement of the details of expenditure wliich follows is 
intended to furnish such information as is desired by the public, 
and is in accordance with suggestions received from various 
sources. Items of payment to the same individual at sundry 
times are included in the aggregate amount given, if paid for the 
same objects. Every effort has been made to ascertain and pay 
all the bills for the current year ; and in all cases, so far as 
known, payments of rent, etc., have been made to December 31, 
1901, and salaries and committee service have been paid for the 
full municipal year. 



STATE AND COUNTY TAXES AND INTEREST. 



Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasuri 
county treasurer . 
municipal coupons 
interest on temporary loans 

" " sewer bonds 

" " Penacook sewer bonds . 

" " West Concord sewer bonds 

" " East Concord sewer bonds 



544,147.20 

30,014.75 

3,473.37 

1,266.13 

2,527.50 

900.00 

680.00 

52.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 477 

MARGARET PILLSBURY HOSPITAL. 
W. F. Tbaver, treasurer $2,000.00 



DECORATION DAY. 

Frank Battles, Q. M., E. E. S. Post . $305.00 
Jas. M. Grossman, Q. M., Davis Post . 50.00 

D. A. Brown, Q. M., W. I. Brown Post 105.00 



CITY HISTORY COMMISSION. 

Rumfoi-d Printing Co., illustrations . $859.00 
Folsom & Sunergren, electrotypes and 

maps ...... 33.25 

Amos Hadley, services . . . 500.00 

H. P. Barnes, services . . . 75.00 

W. W. Flint, chapter . . . . 25.00 

jNIrs. Clara B. Harriman, typewriting . 15.50 



$460.00 



OPEN AIR CONCERTS. 
Nevers' 2d Regt. Band $300.00 



CITY POOR. 

Details in poor account .... . $661.41 



CITY SOLDIERS. 
Details in poor account .... . $127.50 



$1,507.75 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

C. E. Palmer, salary .... $1,100.00 

C. E. Palmer, cash paid out . . 37.17 
Concord Coal Co., coal . . . 38.67 

D. E. Sullivan, salary . . . 25.00 

E. A. Clark, salary .... 25.00 



478 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Russell Wilkins, salary 

Russell Wilkins, services 

Dr. A. K. Day, diphtlieria cultures 

Alvarado Howard, diplitlieria cultures 

Edmiuid R. Angell, analysis of water 

A. H. Knowlton, antitoxine 

C. H. Martin & Co., formaldehyde 

George A. Berry & Co., supplies 

Thompson & Hoague, supplies 

F. L. Sanders, supplies 

State Board of Health, cloth 

Charles H. Swain & Co., lumber and 

labor ..... 
George Prescott, signs 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., furnitur 

and card index 
Goodhue & Milton, repairing sprayer 
George L. Theobald, burying horse and 

dojj ...... 



$25.00 

3.00 

126.00 

5.00 

3.00 

6.75 

23.10 

85.55 

.15 

.20 

2.52 

8.48 
1.50 

32.00 
.50 

7.00 



$1,555.59 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 



Pay-rolls ..... 

Whittemore Bros», trees 

E. S. Davis, agent, trees and shrubs 

Wilson Floral Co., plants 

W. M. Colby, plants . 

G. J. Benedict, plants and bulbs . 

A. J. Farquhar, tulips 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies, tools 

fertilizer .... 

A. H. Britton, supplies 
E. H. Randall, supplies 
Parmenter & Polsey Co., fertilizer 
Dickerman & Co., cement . 
James Flynn, fence 



1,759.54 
50.00 
92.00 
98.78 
90.20 
27.42 
23.91 

68.18 
6.59 
6.20 

28.00 

2.50 

600.00 



CITV EXPENSES 

C. C. Webster, seed . 

Lee Bros., piping 

Royal Newton, posts . 

E. B. Hutchinson Co., shingles and 

labor ..... 
A. E. Lowell & Co., painting pavilion 
W. R. Wenzel, painting 
G. O. Dickerman, services and ex 

penses, 1900 .... 
Dan forth & Forrest, repairs 
Ola Anderson .... 
J. Coburn, teaming 
Concord Water-AVorks, water 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer 
E. A. Moult on, cash paid out 



479 



63.00 

9.24 

19.25 

7.25 

41.61 

5.35 

57.80 
19.82 
15.00 
45.65 
80.00 
25.00 
52.12 



$6,234.41 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 

Pay-rolls $406.41 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., fertilizer . . 8.00 

Concord Water- Works, water . . 10.00 



$424.41 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

Pay-rolls $99.59 

Thompson & Hoague, phosphate . . 15.00 

C. H. Martin & Co., paint . . . 39.64 



L54.23 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 
Scott French, labor ..... 



OLD PORT CEMETERY. 



Scott French 



524.12 



$8.25 



480 



CITY OF CONCOrtD. 



MILLVILLB CEMETERY. 



I. N. Abl)ott 



SoO.OO 



HORSE HILL CEMETERY. 



Pay-rolls .... 
C. H. Martin & Co., brimstone 



1.20 



WOODLA\VN CEMETERY. 



W. W. Allen 



$24.97 



550.00 



WHITE PARK. 



Pay-rolls .... 
EUwanirer & Barry, shrubs, etc. 
R. & J. Farquliar Co., seeds*, etc 
Hun)phrey-Dodge Co., rakes 
A. C. Sanborn, dynamite 
C. G. Remick, trustee, gravel 
Parmenter & Polsey Co., fertilizer 
J. C. Thorne, rubber boots . 
I). W. AVliite, grain . 
Geo. Prescott, signs . 
Geo. Abbott, Jr., painting . 
Danforth & Forrest, lumber 
Thompson & Hoague, supplies 
J. D. Johnson & Son, supplies 
Ross Cate, repairs, tools 
Rowell & Plummer, repairs 
Geo. D. Huntley, repairs 
Concord Machine CIo., repairs, 

mowers . . . 

Geo. W. Chesley, teaming . 
W. L. Riford, teaming 



law I 



11,529.79 

77.20 

7.00 

1.30 

1.21 

88.65 

21.00 

3.75 

18.06 

8.15 

3.29 

14.90 

47.04 

11.75 

5.70 

2.80 

.75 

3.80 
493.02 

5.78 



CITY EXPENSES 



M. E. Clifford, piping 

F. C. Coates, labor 

R. J. Haight, subscription . 

J. W. Bowditch, services 

Concord Water- Works, water 

W. H. Richardson, cash paid out 



481 



$o.G2 


27.00 


1.00 


28.20 


15.00 


2.84 



ROLLINS PARK. 

Pay-rolls ..... 
G. H. Folsom, trees . 
R. & J. Farquhar Co., seed 
Parmenter & Polsey Co., fertilizer 
Geo. Wood Co., pipe . 

D. W. White, grain . 
Geo. W. Chesley, loam and teaniitjg 

E. B. Hutchinson Co., lumber 
Danforth & Forrest, lumber 
Thompson & Hoagiie, supplies 
Geo. Abbott, Jr., painting . 
M. E. Clifford & Co., repairs 
Ira B. Sliallies, repairs 
Goodhue (fc Milton, repairs, fountain, etc. 
Charles Fellows, labor 
W. L. Riford, trucking 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 
Concoi'd Water- Works, water 
W. H. Richardson, cash paid out 
A. P. Davis, cash paid out . 



PBNACOOK PARK. 

Pay-rolls $77.10 

C. H. Stevens & Co., lumber . . 8.18 

Geo. R. Parmenter, labor . . . 2.80 



S2,424.60 



# 



$764.87 



$88.08 



31 



482 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BRADLEY PARK. 



Pay-rolls .... 
Parmenter & Polsey Co., fertilizer 
Thompson & Hoague, rakes 
George Prescott, painting 
Concord Water- Works, water 



$24.02 
4.20 
1.00 
1..50 
4.00 



RIDGE AVENUE PARK. 



Pay-rolls 

Parmenter «& Polsey Co., fertilizer 

Braman, Dow & Co., pipe . 

M. E. Clifford, piping 

Geo. W. Chesley, trucking . 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

Concord Water- Works, water 



FISKE PARK. 



Pay-rolls ... 
Frank Merrill, steps . 
Danfbrth & Forrest, lumber 
Geo. W. Chesley, teaming 



S20.01 
2.80 
8.55 
5.17 
2.50 
.25 
3.00 



$13.75 

35.00 

.96 

149.00 



$34.72 



$42.28 



$199.61 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



Pay-rolls ..... 
W. B. Howe, cash paid out 
N. A. Dunklee, horse hire . 
Frost & Adams, supplies 
F. P. Mace, supplies . 
E. G. Soltman, tracing cloth, paper 
Keuffel & Esser Co., paper . 
Chas. E. Moss, B. P. paper 



52,575.67 

66.27 

192.00 

9.00 

2.50 

36.24 

39.10 

3.00 



CITY EXPENSES 

J. E. Gage, tapes 

Thompson & Hoague, duster, etc. 

E. B. Hutchinson Co., stakes 

C. L. Berger & Sons, repairs, transit 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., spring 

Concord Coal Co., coal 



$5.35 


1 


.76 


33 


20 


11 


.60 




.35 


77 


33 



483 



1,053.37 



SEWERS. 

Pay-rolls ...... $1,236.95 

Thompson & Hoague, pipe, wire, tools, 

etc 424.08 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., pipe and drum . 28.78 

Concord Foundry Co., castings . ' . 37.00 

Ford & Kimball, castings . . . 136.29 

Dickerman & Co., cement . . . 32.20 

Woodworth & Co., cement . , . 16.20 

Samuel Eastman & Co., fittings . . 6.00 

Samuel Holt, brick . . . . 116.19 

Lee Brothers, valve . . . . 5.50' 

W. A. Thompson, rubber boots . . 14.50 

A. H. Britton, pails .... 1.00 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil . . 4.94 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing concrete 18.70 

Rowell & Plummer, repairs . . 86.76 

George D. Huntley, " . . 2.00 

William B. Taylor, " . . 10.00 

Globe Horseshoeing Co., repairing tools 9.21 

George L. Theobald, horse hire . . 27.00 

George L. Theobald, trucking . . 104.65 

C. B. Mills, " . . 8.00 

William Giles, •' . . 4.75 

H. C. Hall, " . . 3.25 

G. F. Sewall, " . . 9.00 

G. F. Sewall, Jr., " . . 8.75 

William Silva, " . . 3.75 



484 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Thomas Robinson, trucking, 


SI. 25 


L. J. Morrill, " 


.60 


T. F. Darcy, " 


.60 


E. C. Page, 


.50 


J. F. Ward, " 


.85 


Daniel B. Dow, " 


1.35 


W. A. Sewall, 


.50 


W. H. Ahern, 


.50 


C. A. Yeadon, " 


1.00 







S2,362.60 



PRECINCT SPRINKLING. 



Pay-rolls . 

Concord Water-Works, Avater for stand 
pipes ..... 

C. H. Martin & Co., paint and oil 
Samuel Eastman & Co., liose, etc. 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., waste 

D. W. White, grain . 
Abbot-Downing Co., two sprinklers 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 
Goodhue & Milton, " 
George D. Huntley, " 

J. S. Merrill, '' 



1,485.53 

700.00 

86.47 

44.50 

1.30 

139.75 

600.00 

82.80 

153.54 

' 18.05 

3.25 



PRECINCT LIGHTING STREETS. 

Concord Light and Power Co. . . $1,473.00 

Concord Land and Water Power Co. . 9,565.00 



^5,315.19 



$11,038.00 



PRECINCT LIGHTING STREETS, PENACOOK. 
Abial Rolfe, Tr . . $1,700.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



485 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT. 

Pay-rolls $358.81 

Ford & Kimball, eastings . . . 99.04 

John Rines, brick . . . . 108.00 

C. M. & A. W. Rolte, lumber . . 26.05 

Henry Morrill, plank .... 12.29 

Thompson & Hoague, pipe . . . 18.00 

Penacook Electric Light Co., tape . ,25 

W. H. Bell, powder, etc. . . . 4.70 

George Nellar, labor . . . . 12.25 

J. H. Jackman, telephone tolls . . 1.95 

Guy Hubbard, rubber boots . . 10.00 

Sinking fund 1,000.00 



,657.34 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 

Pay-rolls $98.54 

Ford & Kimball, castings . . . 9.84 

Samuel Holt, brick . . . . 17.00 

Wood worth & Co., cement . . 4.05 

Thompson & Hoague, pipe . . 55.00 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies . . .70 

R. P. Shepard, oil . , . . .83 

George L. Theobald, trucking . . 3.50 

George F. Sewall, Jr., trucking . . .6.00 

Sinking fund 500.00 



)5.46 



EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 
Sinking fund $100.00 



ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL SEWER PRECINCT. 
Pay-rolls . . . . . . $255.00 

C. L. Fellows & Co., contract . , 4,564.50 

Josephine C. Larkiu, specifications . 5.72 



t,825.22 



486 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Pay-rolls .... 

Concord Coal Co., coal and slab 

E. L. Davis, coal and slabs 

E. L. Davis, horse hire 

M. F. Bickford, horse hire 

Geo. L. Theobald, " 

Charles P. Smith, " 

Fellows & Clark, " 

E. B. Morse, " 

CO. Partridge, " 

O. J. Fitield, 

J. E. McShane, horseshoeing 

M. S. Sexton, " 

Globe Horseshoeing Co., ' ' 

.J. H. Callahan & Co., " 

Arthur I. Coulter, " 

R. J. Macguire, veterinary service 

James Hart, " " 

D. W. White, hay and grain 

E. W. Brooks, grain 
• G. N. Bartemus & Co., grain 

A. N. Day, oats 

Crockett Brothers, hay 

Joseph T. Walker, hay 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 

Humphrey-Dodge Co., " 

Stevens & Duncklee, " 

Mitchell, Wing & Co., " 

Foote, Brown & Co., " 

A. C. Sanborn, " 

Goodhue & Milton, supplies and labo 

A. P. Fitch, supplies 

O. N. Davis, '' 

Eugene Sullivan & Co., supplies 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, oil, etc 



$7,470.65 

577.16 

146.63 

75.00 

214.75 

34.14 

35.00 

62.00 

70.50 

25.00 

35.00 

122.00 

18.25 

120.00 

12.75 

7.80 

100.93 

2.00 

249.23 

74.40 

882.32 

36.00 

90.90 

41.44 

119.40 

77.28 

3.25 

2.56 

1.00 

1.63 

27.79 

9.59 

9.29 

4.85 

15.80 



CITY EXPENSES. 



487 



J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies and 

repairs .... 
George D. Huntley, repairs 
W. E. Tenney, " 

Abbot-Downing Co., " 
C. Pelissier & Co., " 
J. R. Hill & Co., 
J. D. Johnson & Son, " 
C. AY. Dadmun, 
J. A. Dadmun, " 

M. E. Clifford & Co., " 
Rowell & Plummer, " 
W. E. Darrah, " 

Ross Cate, " 

J. H. Rowell & Co., '' 
H. H. Carpenter, " 

Chas. H. Swain & Co., " 
Scrannage Brothers, " 
F. W. Scott, 

Sleeper & Putney, repairs to floor 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs 
Joseph S. Merrill, repairs 
Concord Machine Co., repairs 
Manchester Locomotive Works, repairs 

engines .... 
Mrs. A. P. Turner, repairs 
H. C. Sturtevant, oil, etc. . 
Burton Oil Co., oil 
Mrs. A. B. Young, oil 
R. P. Shepard & Co., oil, etc. 
New Jersey Car Spring and Rubber Co 

relining hose . 
Boston Woven Hose Co., relining hose 
Mrs. George Jones, storage 
Ed. C. Durgin, storage 
R. E. Gale, storage 
George Abbot, Jr., labor, glass, paint 

ins 



$5.70 

84.35 

11.10 

141.54 

24.40 

18.20 

44.00 

44.28 

1.55 

10.46 

33.45 

13.61 

1.50 

3.00 

2.00 

13.26 

2.00 

46.15 

49.50 

10.00 

5.25 

26.75 

271.50 
2.25 

46.45 
2.75 
1.60 

11.93 

247.00 
270.00 

12.00 
3.00 

12.60 

55.50 



488 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Home & Hall, lahov, etc. . . . 8134.22 
Fred S. Fanium, labor . . . 6.25 
William L. Huntress, labor . . 1.05 
Orrin Whidden, labor . . . . 1.25 
E. B. Hutchinson Co., labor . . 2.56 
W. A. Sewall, trucking . . . 4.75 
J. Hurd Brown, lubricant . . . 1.88 
J. H. Harrington, wood . . . 1.00 
C. W. Drake, glass .... .60 
The Sulpho-Napthol Co., disinfectant . 6.00 
Nardini Bros., lunch . . . . 3.60 
C. W. Wilcox, paper, etc. ... .60 
John Silberg, whips, etc. . . . 8.25 
H. D. Hammond, cloth, etc. . . 20.77 
J. H. Toof& Co., laundry . . . 60.50 
Cornelius Callahan, extinguisher bot- 
tles, etc 44.82 

C. W. Clarke, rent .... 150.00 
Concord Light and Power Co., gas . 312.00 
Philbrick Furniture Co., furniture . 18.00 
Arthur Bruce, trustee, witch hazel . 3.75 
Western Union Telegraph Co., time ser- 
vice 15.00 

Concord Land and Water Power Co., 

lights and power .... 58.57 
Electric Gas Light Co., wire, etc. . 35.65 
Concord Water- Works, water . . 108.50 
Charles T. Halloway & Co., pony ex- 
tinguisher 45.00 

George H. Downing, steel trip . . 3.00 
W. E. Decrow, one new fire-alarm box, 

and repairs on alarm signals . . 723.39 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights . 86.60 
E. H. Randall, heating apparatus engine 
house East Concord, and Good Will 

hose house 596.00 

E. H. Randall, repairs . . . 4.07 



CITV EXPENSES. 



489 



Gutta Percha Rubber Mfg. Co., suctioi 
hose .... 

A. J. Morse & Son, hose 
Concord Foundry Co., castings 
Concord Axle Co., castings 
William W. Robertson, filter 
L. B. Hoit, poles 
Alden Speares Sons Co., soda 
Flynn & Kirby, hames-hanger 
J. C. Carlton, leather . 
Arae & Co., standard food . 
L. E. Alexander, water 
Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice 
Danforth & Forrest, lumber 
J. H. Sanders, painting 
W. P. Ford.& Co., stove, etc. 

B. &M. R. R., freight 
A. L. Walker, pasturing horses 
D. Hammond & Son, carrots 
Thomas Degnan, carrots 
W. C. Green, expenses to Indianapolis 
W. C. Green, cash paid out 
Abial W. Rolfe, cash paid out 
W. P. Ladd, semi-annual pay-roll 
John Harrison, steward. West Concord 
P. C. White, steward. East Concord 
Leslie H. Crowther, steward, Penacook 



$13.50 

41.20 

2.90 

14.21 

1.00 

4.25 

4.48 

8.00 

2.50 

3.25 

8.00 

13.84 

1.12 

5.25 

10.05 

12.00 

3.50 

2.40 

2.00 

60.00 

36.88 

3.95 

6,825.00 

30.00 

15.00 

75.00 



$21,967.83 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Pay-rolls $30,116.75 

H. H. Johnson, salax'y . . . 116.67 

Alfred Clark, salary .... 1,283.33 
Concord Land and Water Power Co., 

lights 166.35 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights . 50.00 



490 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Robert Crowley, steain'coal 
Concord Coal Co., coal and slabs . 
Concord Water-Works, water, trough 

stables ..... 
Concord Foundry Co., castings, etc. 
W. P. Ford & Co., castings, etc. 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies . 
Thompson & Hoague, supplies., pipe, etc 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies 
N. S. Gale & Co., supplies 
Isaac Baty, supplies 
J. D. Johnson & Son, supplies and re 

pairs ..... 
Goodhue & Milton, supphes, repairs 

and labor .... 

Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., repairs, lumber 

and sawing .... 
George D. Huntley, repairs 
Climax Road Macdiine Co., repairs 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs 
J. M. Grossman, repairs 
Rowell & Plummer, repairs 
E. H. Randall, repairs 
S. R. Hood & Co., repairs . 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 
J. P. W. Roach, repairs 
Henry Hayward, repairs, tools 
John T. Tenney, repairs, tools, posts 

etc. ..... 

C. Pelissier & Co., repairs . 
Concord INIachine Co., repairs 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairs concrete 
" " new concrete 

" " concrete bridges 

" " concrete streets 

.Tohn Swenson, capstone 
Ola Anderson, steps 
M. H. and H. H. Johnson, curbing 



S348.00 
49.96 

230.00 
278.96 

12.00 
111.26 
102.21 

48.40 
9.40 

20.55 

33.19 

31.12 

26.25 

96.95 

51.50 

4.35 

23.95 

88.23 

24.21 

33.97 

2.50 

4.00 

.60 

3.25 

.35 

13.90 

1,829.57 

1,180.15 

378.00 

1,103.46 

77.00 

6.00 

74.50 



CITY EXPENSES 

John E. Riiies, brick . 

Zeb. F. Swain, brick . 

Samuel Holt, brick 

T. W. & J. H. Stewart, stone 

E. B. Hutcliinson Co., lumber 

C. H. Stevens & Co., lumber 

N. P. Richardson, lumber and trough 

J. L. A. Chellis, lumber and labo 

C. M. and A. W. Rolfe, lumber 

H. M. Warren, plank 

Fred H. Chase, plank . 

R. E. Philbrick, plank 

Simeon Partridge, plank 

E. D. Clough, plank . 
Charles Noyes, gravel 
Mrs. E. D. Massison, gravel 
Fraok Griffin, gravel . 
Miss Lucy Hoit, gravel 
Dr. J. M. Coit, gravel 
A. Saltmarsh, gravel . 

F. H. Currier, gravel . 
George J. Sargent, gravel . 
James Mercer, " 
Daniel G. Blake, " 
Perley S. Badger, " 
Crosby Knox, " 
J. Elizabeth Hoyt, " 
Geo. H. Perkins's estate, gravel 

G. H. Richardson, gravel . 
R. G. Sargent, gi-avel and sand 
Emma H. Osgood, sand 
Gilbert Hibbard, grade 
J. T. Batchelder, " 
T. Harrington, " 
St. Paul's School, grade, tools, and 

pairs .... 
Woodworth & Co., cement . 
Foote, Brown & Co., cement, etc 



491 



$12.00 

6.00 

50.75 

22.00 

17.36 

48.34 

8.72 

123.76 

45.30 

80.00 

225.00 

15.12 

13.00 

27.40 

13.60 

2.60 

1.00 

6.30 

15.00 

25.90 

2.90 

56.10 

.90 

2.00 

3.30 

2.20 

4.50 

62.15 

3.10 

21.10 

11.00 

.70 

2.90 

4.40 

18.95 
17.55 
18.71 



492 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



W. F. CaiT, oil, etc. . 

J. C. Farraud, oil 

Amos Blanchard, oil . 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil 

Mrs. A. B. Young, oil 

Burton Oil Co., harness oil, etc 

D. W. White, grain . 
S. W. Barker, hay 
Savage & Corliss, hay 
Charles R. Farnum, hay 
George Prescott, signs 
Stevens & Duncklee, ladle . 
A. E. Maxam, rent sand-house 

E. H. Runnells, teaming 
C. W. Clarke & Son, rubber boots 
Geo. A. Foster, assignee, sleds 
H. Thompson, brooms 
R. P. Sanborn, posts . 
Frank Green, posts and rail 
L. R. Hines, posts and poles 
Ames Plow Co., {)low 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance, crusher 

and bridge 
Farrell Foundry and Machine Co., jaw 

plates, etc. 
The Eyeless Tool Co., picks 
John C. Kilburn, nails 
W. A. Chamberlain, rubber stamp 
Frank P. INIuzzey, use of field 
H. P. Lamprey, filing saws 
Edson Manufacturing Co., hose, pump 

and dome 
A. B. Black, rims, road-machine 
W. A. Sleeper, blankets, etc. 
W. H. Eastman, removing pole 
Geo. L. Theobald, horse, and repair 

of snow-plow . 
Page Belting Co., belt and tallow 



$2.26 

.90_ 

11.66 

9.10 

5.28 

4.25 

522.16 

58.43 

49.92 

81.50 

57.60 

1.00 

12.00 

34.50 

12.00 

40.00 

8.78 

11.50 

1.00 

9.15 

17.35 

15.00 

55.50 
13.57 

1.12 

.50 

10.00 

4.80 

28.79 

50.00 

23.30 

5.00 

150.50 

2.89 



CITY EXPENSES 



W. C. Spieer, paint . 

G. A. Griffin, painting 

S. G. Sanborn, bolt.s, repairs, etc 

D. Warren Fox, bolts and tools 

A. H. Britton & Co., tools and si 

Edward McShane, tools 

J. E. McSliane, shoeing 

Ross W. Gate, shoeing, repairs 

Robert Macguire, services . 

Fred Carter, lighting . 

S. A. Taylor, labor 

F. E. AVilliams, labor 

Fred Griffin, labor 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

Alfred Clark, cash paid out . 

N. P. Richardson, trough . 

A. J. Smith, " 

Fred Mayo, '' 

Willis G. Buxton, executor, troug 

Francis Runnells, trough 

Cyrus Robinson, water for trough 

Concord Coal Co., coal 



Credit. 



pplies 



493 



S33.80 

15.75 

24.45 

2.46 

104.16 

.58 

82.50 

42.35 

43.15 

12.00 

6.36 

5.70 

7.90 

36.72 

24.42 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

3.00 

20.00 

38.67 



840,799.93 



By amount received from abuttors for new concrete 756.90 



$40,043.03 



LIQUOR AGENCY. 

B. F. Tucker, salary . . . $225.00 

B. F. Tucker, cash paid out . . 80.78 

F. S. Johnson, salary . . . 675.00 

F. S. Johnson, rent and cash paid out 383.65 

J. Stickney, rent and water . . 70.75 

Concord Light and Power Co. . . 1.80 

H. O. Marsh, coal .... 7.50 

Arthur N. Day, service . . . 33.88 



494 



CITY OK CONCORD. 



Adams, Taylor & Co., liquors 

D. T. Mills & Co., 

John P. Sheelian Co., " 

Otis S. Neale Co., ales 

F. E. Peckham, special stamp tax 

F. E. Peckham, penalty of tax 



1,559.71 
501.20 
26.01 
72.00 
50.00 
25.00 



),712.28 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Pay-rolls 

Concord Coal Co., coal and slabs 

E. L. Davis, '^ " 
H. O. Marsh, " " 
Concord Light and Power Co., gas 
Concord Land and Water Power Co. 

lights ..... 
Penacook Electric Light Co., lights and 
repairs ..... 

F. W. Landon, repairs, signals 
George D. Huntley, repairs 
Lee Brothers, repairs, 1900 
Albert S. Trask, repairs, heater , 
W. E^. Darrah, repairs 
J. E. Gage, repairs . 
N. C. Nelson, repairs, clock 
W. PL Hood, repairs, coat . 
Concord Dye-Hou.^e, repairs 
M. E. Clifford, repairs 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, Penacook 
D. Warren Fox, " " 
Isaac Baty, " " 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 

Batchelder & Co., " 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., furniture, etc. 

J. R. Hill & Co., harness, blankets, bells 

Knox tlie Hatter, helmets 

D. Evans & Co., buttons . 



;iO,778.50 
321.83 
205.00 
193.50 
113.85 

30.30 

78.08 

11.90 

16.40 

34.98 

12.40 

5.22 

4.55 

1.50 

20.50 

.75 

6.39 

8.92 

1.75 

12.15 

4.10 

35.91 

31.14 

64.00 

30.00 

15.00 



CITY EXPENSES 

W. W. Allen, shades 

D. E. Murphy, erepe 

W. G. C. Kimball, pictures of pick 
pockets ..... 

P. H. Coleman, painting wagon 

Fred F. Carr, cleaning Fenacook station 

Concord Water- Works, water 

Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice 

New England Telephone & Telegraph 
Co., rental private line 

E. B. Hutchinson Co., bulletin board 
Kendall & Dame, use of" ambulance 
James E. McShane, hoi'seshoeing 
N. A. Dunklee, horse hire 
M. F. Bickford, 
Samuel Batchelder, " 
John Chadwick, " 
N. A. Dunklee, board of horse 
M. F. Bickford, " 



495 



$9.00 
2.00 

8.00 
10.00 

1.70 
4G.00 

4.08 

154.24 

3.00 

16.00 

25.00 

40.50 

1.50 

5.00 

41.00 

169.32 

68.76 



PRINTING J' 






TIONERY. 


lND STA 


Statesman, tax-list .... $4.50 


Monitor 








208.49 


Patriot 








168.41 


Rumford Printing Co 








2,002.90 


F. J. Batchelder 








35.75 


Ira C. Evans 








167.00 


F. L. Sanders . 








90.19 


E. C. Eastman . 








26.64 


T. H. Jameson . 








31.50 


F. P. Mace 








16.68 


J. ^Y. McMurphy 








25.65 


Hunt & Emerson 








6.40 


George E. Carter 








2.50 


Sargent, Niles & Mo 


•rill , 






3.25 



2,643.72 



52,789.86 



496 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Pay-rolls .... 

Hunt & Emerson, books 

E. C. Eastman, " 

Damrell & Upliam, " 

Charles E. Lauriat Co., " 

N. J. Bartlett & Co., ." 

Boston Book Co., " 

J. B. Lippincott Co., " 

Clara R. Davis, " 

John Lane, " 

TownofMilford, N. H., " 

D. C. Heath & Co., 

The C. A. Nichols Co., " 

Baleh Brothers, " 

T. H. Castor & Co., " 

D. Appleton & Co., " 

Eniile Pingault, " 

S. F. McLean & Co., " 

Educational Pub. Co., " 

Office of Publishers' Weekly, boo! 

W. C'. Gibson, magazines . 

Granite Monthly, subscription 

International Monthly, subscription 

Cumulative Index Co., subscription 

People and Patriot, subscription and 

books ..... 
Rumf'ord Printing Co., binding, print 

ing, etc. .... 

Boston Book-Binding Co., binding 
Frank L. Sanders, binding 
Ira C. F)vans, printing 
W. B. Cunningham, carrying books 
N. S. Gale, care of books . 
R. E. Gale, care of books . 
Library Art Club, assessment 



S2,G8l.L-) 

533.04 

400.01 

108.10 

65.76 

53.74 

32.35 

17.00 

13.50 

5.00* 

3.00 

6.59 

6.00 

4.00 

9.30 

5.00 

3.00 

3.00 

2.34 

2.50 

101.59 

3.00 

6.00 

5.00 

8.60 

122.18 
154.77 
82.48 
47.95 
52.00 
26.00 
26.00 
5.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 

George Abbott, Jr., painting . . $2.90 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., furniture 

and repairs ..... 28.07 
Ira B. Shallies, bookcase and repairs . 26.44 
Lee Bros., repairs . . . . 7.82 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies . . " 6.00 
M. S. SafFord, stereograph . . . 100.00 
C. G. Coffin & Co., seed ... 1.58 
Manchester Slaughtering and Render- 
ing Co., ashes .... 2.00 
Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice . . 3.32 
Concord Coal Co., coal . . . 236.18 
Concord Light and Power Co., lights . 141.75 
Grace Blanchard, cash paid out . . 66.96 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance . . 62.50 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance . . 25.00 
Concord Water- Works, water . . 10.00 



PUBLIC BATHS. 

Pay-rolls $169.00 

Y. M. C. Association, boat, etc. . . 74.75 



497 



$5,315.47 



$243.75 



INCIDENTALS. 

Concord Coal Co., coal at city hall . $154.76 

H. O. Marsh, wood, city hall and Ward 

6 ward-room ..... 8.00 

N. E. Telephone and Telegraph Co., 

rent and tolls, etc. .... 597.04 

Concord Light and Power Co., gas city 

hall, etc 142.95 

Concord Land and Water Power Co., 

lights at arch and fountain . . 216.00 

Concord Water- Works, water city hall 

and ward-rooms .... 45.00 



498 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Penacook Lake Ice Co., ice city hall and 

fountains . . . . . 

State of New Hampshire, engrossing 

bills 

Town of Boscawen, taxes lOOO-'Ol 
C B. Perry & Son, tax collector's bond 
Boston Bank Note Co., bonds 
W. F. Thayer, cash paid for bond 
W. F. Thayer, pay-roll births, deaths 

and marriages 
Albert Saltmarsh, enumerating Town 

School District 
Town of Epsom, dog fees . 
Giles Wheeler, account of police com 

mission ..... 
Geo. A. Foster, appraiser of ' city's in 

terest in city hall and lot . 
H. P. Bennett, inspection of wires and 

poles . . . 

Chas. H. Barnett, truant officer District 

No. 20 

W. P. Ladd, taxes bid in by city 
W. P. Ladd, rent tax collector's office 
J. A. Cochran, return of births 

" " fees vital statistics 

" " cash paid out 

G. K. Hazeltine, cash paid out . 
H. G. Sargent, cash paid out and car 

fares ..... 
Sargent, Niles & Morrill, expenses sun 

dry cases, 1900 . . . 

Howard M. Cook, substitute daring vaca 

tion city clerk 
Joseph Johnson, substitute during vaca 

tion messenger 
Alice L. Dana, assisting city clerk 
M. A. Spencer, assisting city clerk 



;127.52 

7.50 

9.37 

75.00 

30.00 

75.00 

228.00 

16.50 
34.50 

4.50 

10.00 

14.00 

37.20 
515.06 
108.33 
279.50 
145.20 
82.21 
16.22 

5.65 

31.73 

35.00 

12.00 
11.00 
38.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 



499 



W. B. Howe, expenses at Niagara, 

board of assessors and examination 

plumbers .... 

Alfred Clark, expenses at Niagara 
Cressy and Colby, expenses accoun 

ambulance .... 
H. B. Colby, expenses aceomit roads 
Lena M. Minot, stenographer, investi 

gation of fire department . 
Cook & Hood, fees, sale of property tor 

taxes ..... 
Geo. F. Buswell, refund of poll-tax 
Sylvester Dana,, agent, over-payment of 

tax of B. Alexander 
Chas. J. French, expenses account pub- 
lic urinals .... 
G. A. Foster, agent, rent cemetery com. 

mittee ..... 
David E. Murphy, decorating city build 

ings ..... 
Chas. F. Batchelder, posting notices 
George Prescott, signs 
W. A. Chamberlain, rubber stamps 
W. S. Gale & Co., nails 
E. A. Stevens, cash paid out 
E. A. Stevens, account armories . 
G. S. Locke, Avitness fees, car fares 

and cash paid out 
Emile St. Hilaire, return of births 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete at hose 

house ..... 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., grass-seed an 

rakes . . . . . 

Thompson & Hoague, pipe, twine, fur 

nace for examiners of plurabei's . 
A. H. Britton, tax collector's supplies 
Horace B. Parker, book 



$38.45 
35.00 

9.75 
9.13 

55.56 

17.20 
2.10 

.54 

25.60 

25.00 

180.00 

4.00 

1.50 

4.55 

.34 

35.12 

50.00 

303.97 
1.75 

38.36 

2.75 

7.01 
2.50 
3.00 



500 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



W. S. Wilson Floral Co., plants at arch 
J. H. Jackman, telephone service and 

tolls 

Goodhue & Milton, supplies, exaniina 

tion of plumbers 
Underhill & Kittredge, assessors' sup 

plies ..... 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies 
T. H. Madigan, services as magistrate 
Ashelj G. Hazeltine, services 
John M. Inman, ringing bell 
W. F. Page, " 

John Fanning, " 

E. M. Shannon, " 

Stevens & Duncklee, supplies and re 

pairs ..... 
American Express Co. 
Geo. W. Johnson, cash paid out . 

E. B. Morse, horse hire 
John Chadwick, horse hire . 
Fellows & Clark, " 

N. A. Dunklee, " 

Estate of J. B. Sanborn, damage to 

sheep ..... 
Willis Hoit, damage to sheep 
Sarah T. Lull, land damage 
Bertha E. Braley, land damage 
Edward E. Hodgman, land damage 
Mary J. Gay and others, land damage 
W. H. Perry, land damage . 
A. C. Sanborn, repairs, city hall . 

F. W. Scott, " " 
Chas. L. Fellows, '' " 
Rowell & Plummer, repairs, city hall 
Lee Bros., repairs, city hall and foun 

tain ..... 

W. E. Darrah, repairs, city hall . 



$18.00 

7.85 

11.08 

5.82 
1.00 
13.28 
15.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

34.46 
3.13 
1.85 

45.50 
6.00 

12.00 

23.00 

11.50 
6.00 

y.oo 

150.00 

100.00 

361.12 

200.00 

3.00 

4.00 

9.80 

3.91 

16.95 
5.85 



CITY EXPENSES. 501 

Globe Horseshoeing Co., repairs, city 

hall $2.25 

Geo. F. Sewall, trucking . . . 3.00 

William Giles, trucking . . . 2.00 

Ethelyn Dutcher, nursing, McFadgen 

diphtheria case . . . . 13.00 

Ethelyn Dutcher, nursing, J. McCann 

diphtheria case .... 20.00 

Ethelyn Dutcher, nursing, Michael 

Dower diphtheria case . . . 43.00 

Peter McFadgen, on account of quaran- 
tine 20.00 

Dunn Bros., milk, McFadgen diphtheria 

case . . . . . . 1.6jO 

Chas. H. Dudley, groceries, McFadgen 

diphtheria case .... 27.67 

H. 0. Marsh, wood, McFadgen diph- 
theria case . . . . . 1 .88 

Mary Rankin, nursing, Ethelyn Dutcher 

diphtheria case . . . . 15.00 

John P. Kelley, rent, Ethelyn Dutcher 

diphtheria case . . . . 10.00 

Caroline D. Standish, nursing, Ruth Sul- 
livan diphtheria case . . . 15.00 

Mrs. J. H. Buswell, nursing, Standish 

and Sullivan diphtheria cases . . 4.00 

Eugene Sullivan & Co., supplies, Mc- 
Fadgen, Dutcher, Sullivan, and Dower 
cases ...... 37.05 

Concord Drug Store, supplies, McCann 

and E. Greer diphtheria cases . . 9.80 

Badger Bros., wood, Simonds diphtheria 

case 2.00 

Chas. H. Dudley, groceries, Simonds 

diphtheria case . . . . 6.30 

Harold Blake, milk, Simonds diphtheria 

case ...... .96 



502 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dr. Russell AVilkiiis, services in Simonds 

diphtheria case .... $15.00 

Dr. E. A. Cook, services in A.B. Hall 

case . . . . . . • 14.79 

Dr. L. A. Sanders, services in Williams 

diphtheria case and Perry child . 13.50 

John Chad wick, rent, Louis Carroii 

scarlet fever case . . . . 7.00 

Dr. Russell Wilkins, services in Louis • 

Carron scarlet fever case . . . 33.00 

Geo. A. Berry, supplies in Louis Carron 

scarlet fever case . . . . .85 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies in Louis 

Carron scarlet fever case , . . 5.40 

G. W. Vinica & Co., supplies in Louis 

Carron scarlet fever case . , . 18.67 

Richard Lessard, supplies in Louis 

Carron scarlet fever case . . . 27.82 

Geo. A. Berry & Co., supplies in Dower, 
McCann, Simonds, Snllivan, Jas. Four- 
nier diphtheria cases, antitoxine and 
vaccine lymph .... 54.73 

J. F. Scott, six desks, council . . 90.00 

J. F. Scott, repairs . . . . 15.21 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., chairs, coun- 
cil, carpet for vault, repairs . . 55.35 
M. E. Clifford, repairs . . . 1.60 
N. B. Burleigh, repairs, lawn-mower . 7.75 
Bert S. Chase, repairs, chairs . . 2.50 
J. E. Gage, repairs, locks . . . 1.60 
George Abbott, Jr., painting, city hall 2.26 
A. E. Lowell & Co., painting. Ward 7 

wardhouse . . . . 35.50 

Clifton W. Drake, repairs. Ward 7 ward- 
house . . . . . . 4.21 

Charles L. Fellows & Co., repairs, Ward 

7 wardhouse ..... 40.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 503 

E. B. Flutchiuson Bldg. Co., repairs, 

Ward 7 wardhoiise . . . . $20.89 

C. H. Martin & Co., repairs. Ward 7 

wardhoiise ..... 46.66 

A. S. Trask, repairs. Ward 7 wardhoiise 187.29 

R. B. Frost, " " " 80.00 

W. E. Darrah, " " " 6.80 

C. F. Miidgett, painting, police station . 124.23 

George Abbott, Jr., painting, city build- 
ing, East Concord .... 40.00 

Hiram Gardner, cleaning city building. 

East Concord . . . . 15.00 

Fred M. Morse, furniture, Penacook 

police station . . . . 19.45 

J. E. Syraonds, furniture, Penacook 

police station . . . . 10.00 

M. E. Bell, clock, Penacook police sta- 
tion ...... 5.50 

George Griffin, repairs, desk, Penacook 

police station . . .• . . 3.00 

Taylor & Sebra, repairs, Penacook 

police station .... 14.46 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, repairs, Pena- 
cook police station .... 15.53 

E. L. Davis, ice at Penacook fountains . 39.25 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, stone- 
crusher, storehouse, lower bridge, city 
hall 112.25 

Roby & Knowles, insurance, storehouse 18.00 

Jackman & Lang, insurance, engine 

house, Penacook . . . . 36.00 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance, engine 
house. East Concord, and premium on 
bonds ...... 37.50 

Chase & Martin, insurance, pest-house 

and lower bridge .... 26.25 

William Silva, trucking . ... 1.00 



504 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Dr. D. E. Sullivan, services, J. Greer 

diphtheria case .... §24. 00 

Herman S. George, nursing Alvertus 

Evans 4.00 

Charles Derry, attendance at detention 

hospital . . . . . . 17.00 

Dr. Russell Wilkins, services, small-pox 

case 360.00 

Elizabeth T. Miirphy, nursing,- small- 
pox case ..... 105.00 

DoUie Dickson, nursing, small-pox case 20.00 

Geo. Cook, M. D., consultation, small- 
pox case . . . . . 10.00 

F. K. Nelson, supplies, small-pox case 4.64 

Charles H. Dudley, supplies, small-pox 

case ...... 8.83 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies, 

small-pox case . . . . 19.05 

George A. Berry &Co., supplies, small- 
pox case . . . . . 12.07 

Savage & Coi-liss, supplies, small-pox 

case . . . • . . 5.17 

F. E. Colburn, supplies, small-pox case 1.73 

Philbrick Furniture Co., supplies, small- 
pox case ..... 4.75 

Martin & Yeates, supplies, small-pox 

case . . . . . . 13.61 

Margaret Pillsbury hospital, supplies, 

small-pox case . . . . 23.00 

Nardini & Co., lunches, small-pox case 5.05 

Charles H. Swain & Co., repairs, deten- 
tion hospital . . . . . 101.38 

Zeb. F. Swain, repairs, detention hospital 9 .25 

B. Bilsborough, painting, " " 10.52 

H. 0. Marsh, wood, " " 1.75 

Dr. L. A. Sanders, vaccinating school 

children 118.40 



CITY EXPENSES. 



505 



Dr. C. H. Cook, vaccinations 
Arthur H. Knowlton, vaccine points 
Eugene A. Rix, vaccination certificates 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., cards for 

index, inspection of milk . 
George A. Berry, salary, rent and cash 

paid out, inspection of milk 
George A. Berry & Co., supplies for 

inspection of milk .... 
F. L. Sanders, supplies for inspection of 

milk ...... 

Ira C. Evans, supplies for inspection of 

milk ...... 

D. Van Nostrand & Co., supplies 

O. F. Carter, collecting samples of milk 

Eugene A. Rix, shipping tags 

J. R. Hill & Co., bag 

Harwood & Nichols, repairs 



SALARIES 

O. J. Fifield, assessor AVard 1 
W. A. Cowley, " "2 

Joseph A. Shepard, " "3 

Charles A. Herbert, " " 4 

Daniel C. Woodman, account of 1900, 

assessor Ward 4 . . . . 

George F. Undeihill, assessor Ward 5 
George S. Dennett, " "6 

John H. Quimby, " "7 

John J. Lee, " "8 

James Ahern, " "9 

Charles A. Herbert, clerk of board of 

assessors ..... 

George K. Hazekiue, city auditor 
James H. Morris, " "• 

Joseph A. Cochran, city clerk 



S136.50 
25.90 
13.25 

37.00 

119.06 

76.78 
6.50 

1.75 

2.25 
12.18 

3.50 
10.50 

2.05 



$288.00 
291.00 
243.00 
288.00 

9.00 
346.00 
300.00 
300.00 
384.00 
297.00 

344.25 

916.67 

83.33 

1,200.00 



$7,918.25 



506 



CITV OF CONCORD. 



A. J. Sousa, clerk common council 
Harry R. Hood, clerk police court 
J. P. Paige, care city clocks 
William Putnam, care city clocks. Pen 

acook ..... 
Susan J. Woodward, secretary boar 

education. Union School District 
Ira C. Phillips, board of education, Dis 

trict No. 20 . 
Albert Saltmarsh, board of education. 

Town District 

B. E. Badger, judge police court . 
George M. Fletcher, special justice 
Fred H. Gould, " " 
George W. Johnson, truant officer 
Harry G. Sargent, mayor . 
Edward A. Stevens, messenger . 

J. A. Cochran, overseer of poor, city 
Harry G. Rolfe, " . " Ward 1 

Albert J. Morrill, " " "2 

Pay-roll of clerks, moderators and select- 
men ...... 

Edmund S. Cook, solicitor . 
Wendell P. Ladd, tax-collector . 
William F. Thayer, treasurer 



d of 



$50.00 

200.00 

85.00 

25.00 

250.00 

50.00 



200.00 

800.00 

18.00 

4.00 

400.00 

1,000.00 

600.00 

350.00 

30.00 

10.00 

252.00 

500.00 

1,663.57 

250.00 



$12,027.82 



SCHOOLS. 

L. J. Rundlett, agent Union School Dis- 
trict S50,514.G9 

Abial Rolfe, treasurer District No. 20 . 889.90 
Oscar E. Smith, treasurer District No. 

20 3,400.00 

Isaac N. Abl)ott, treasurer Town Dis- 
trict 3,51 0.S9 

Bonds, Union School District . . 15,000.00 

Interest 1,620.00 

SALARIES CITY COUNCIL. 

W. F. Tliayer, treasurer, pay-roll 



$2,106.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



507 



WATER-WORKS. 



Pay-rolls .... 

V. C. Hastings, salary 

Lulu Hastings, salary 

Percy R. Sanders, salary 

Alice Cochran, salary 

Alice Cochran, cash paid out 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas 

New England Telephone and Telegrapl 

Co 

Rumford Printing Co., stationery 
Ira C. Evans, stationery 
Edson C. p]astman, stationery 
Frank L. Sanders, stationery 
Engineering News Publishing Co., sub 

scription 
Library Bureau, card index tray 

and cards 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance 
Jackman & Lang, insurance 
Chase & Martin, insurance . 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance 
Cook »&; Hood, land and buildings 
George W. Brown and others, land 
Samuel N. Brown, recording deeds 
C. H. Stevens & Co., coke, coal . 
N. White, Jr., rent and heat 
Concord Street Railway Co., car fares 
Town of Webster, taxes 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., carpet and 

supplies .... 
David E. Murphy, decorating 
James Cookson, repairing cottage 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing concrete 
Thompson & Hoague, supplies 



^9,018.41 

1,800.00 

22.00 

810.00 

720.00 

113.98 

17.85 

148.38 

89.45 

84.40 

2.13 

28.15 

5.00 

46.50 

89.46 

25.00 

25.00 

32.50 

1,750.00 

1,032.55 

1.24 

822.89 

350.00 

50.00 

56.00 

1,333.51 

29.43 

5.00 

4.60 

43.00 

75.55 



508 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Batchelder & Co., supplies . 

George Abbott, Jr., paint . 

Benj. Bilsborougli, paint 

Sewall & Day Cordage Co., packing 

Knowles Packing Co., packing rings 

E. B. Hutchinson Co., lumber 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil . 

John C. Thorne, rubber boots 

W. A. Thompson, rubber boots 

S. Gr. Sanborn, rent of shop 

C. W. Dadmun, batteries . 
H. H. Crowell, slabs . 

D. W. White, straw, hay, and gi 
James L. Quinn, use of derrick 
John H. Flood, use of derrick 
M. J. Duffee, use of derrick 
J. H. Sanborn, repairing boiler 
W. S. Davis & Son, repairs 
Smith & Anthony Co., repairs 
Boston & Maine Railroad, repairs, track 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 
George D. Huntley, repairs 
Rowell & Plummer, repairs 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs 
J. M. Crossman, repairs, tools 
Michael Murphy, labor 
Alex Boisvert, labor . 
New England Roller Grate Co., grate 
National Meter Co., meters 
Thompson Meter Co., meters 
Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., valves 
R. D. Wood & Co., valyes 
Page Belting Co., leather valves 
Henry K. Worthington, valve-springs 
U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co. 

cast iron pipe 
Boston Lead Mfg. Co., tin-lined pipe 



$28.94 

4.59. 

2.23 

40.35 

10.24 

26.31 

55.09 

3.50 

7.50 

24.80 

5.40 

84.00 

137.29 

2.00 

4.00 

3.50 

4.00 

1.50 

4.20 

1.48 

4.00 

10.85 

48.76 

11.60 

56.95 

18.00 

12.00 

56.00 

727.00 

702.24 

1,423.80 

76.50 

14.40 

6.30 

10,295.78 
86.94 



CITY EXPENSES. 



509 



J. H. Cunningliam & Co., brass pipe, 

bushing gaskets, etc. 
W. B. Cunningham, pipe 
Ford & Kimball, castings, etc. 
Concord Foundry Co., castings 
Builders' Iron Foundry, castings and 

supplies ..... 
The Sumner & Goodwin Co., fittingi 

and drills .... 

The George Woodman Co., fittings 
A. W. Chesterton, fittings . 
Hays Mfg. Co., service and curb boxes 
Walworth Mfg. Co., gate boxes, etc. 
Concord Axle Co., steel and labor 
Richards & Co., pig lead 
Z. F. Swain, brick 
Samuel Holt, brick 
Woodworth & Co., cement and soap 
Dickerman & Co., cement . 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies 
Goodhue & Milton, supplies 
Humphrey-Dodge Co., supplies 
Alphonse Tarantino, labor . 
H. M. Richardson, labor, dressing, and 

trucking .... 

J. H. Coburn, trucking 
George L. Theobald, trucking 
O. F. Richardson & Son, trucking 
A. C. Sanborn, dynamite and board of 

horse ..... 
E. B. Morse, exchange of horses . 
Fellows & Clark, horse hire 
Ross W. Cate, horseshoeing 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, horseshoeing 

and repairs . . . 



1197.34 

1.25 

31.27 

27.70 

35.63 

138.23 

5.10 

16.14 

173.28 

203.02 

5.75 

908.66 

3.60 

4.00 

35.70 

14.80 

10.45 

9.69 

59.39 

26.33 

48.14 

4.20 

252.90 

27.50 

7.25 

125.00 

10.50 

22.05 

180.85 



55,220.34 



510 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



1900 BILLS PAID DURING 1901. 
Roads and Bridges : 

Pay-roll S20.85 

H. P. Lamprey, tiling saws . . 1.25 

Incidentals and Land Damages : 

G. A. Foster, rent . . . 25.00 

C. H. Barnett, truant officer, Dis- 
trict No. 20 . . . . 37.20 

N. E. Telephone and Telegraph Co. , 

rents and tolls . . . . 67.78 

Sargent, Niles & Morrill, sundry 

cases ..... 31.73 

Liquor Agency : 

F. E. Peckham, stamp tax 1900 . 25.00 

F. E. Peckham, penalty on tax . 25.00 

Police and "Watch : 

H. O. Marsh, coal . . . 188.50 

Lee Bros., repairs . . . 25.58 

E. L. Davis, coal, Penacook . 72.50 

Special police pay-roll . . . 394.00 



PRECINCT DEBT NOT FUNDED. 
Coupons overdue, sewer bonds not presented . 
Interest accrued, sewer bonds not due 
" water bonds not due 

Precinct funded debt ...... 



Less available assets, cash on hand, water depart- 
ment ........ 



Net precinct debt, 1902 
" 1901 



(( u 



$914.39 

$182.50 

767.07 

12,258.33 

$13,208.50 
721,000.00 

5734,208.50 

10,802.10 

5723,406.40 
726,606.91 



Decrease 



$3,200.51 



CITY EXPENSES. 



511 



CITY DEBT NOT FUNDED. 
Outstanding orders 

Interest accrued on bonds not yet due 
Coupons overdue, not presented 
Due school districts 
Notes .... 

Interest accrued not yet due . 
Land damage claims, Lane brother: 
Dog licenses to school districts 
Balance due city treasurer 

P\inded city debt .... 

Available Assets. 

Cash in hands of tax-collector 

" " liquor agent 

Merrimack county, county poor 

" " dependent soldiers 

Rents 

Taxes bid in by city 
Taxes, 1901 

" 1900 
Liquors on hand . 
Amount due account concrete and sales by highway 

department ....... 



Indebtedness above assets, .Jan. 1, 1902 
" " Jan. 1, 1901 



So 6. 80 

858.91 

52.50 

12,644.41 

9,500.00 

41.25 

150.00 

1,701.80 

2,120.00 

^27,125.67 
75,800.00 

102,925.67 

$181.98 

61.15 

7,197.04 

2,230.26 

430.00 

977.72 

47,377.04 

62.16 

1,155.50 

610.72 

?60,283.57 

H2,642.10 
39,632.90 

$3,009.20 



Increase ...... 

Increase is on account of purchase of gravel-bank lot. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE K. HAZELTINE, 

City Auditor 



CITY PROPERTY 

Having Value but not Considered Available Assets. 



The following is an abstract of the inventory of the property 
of the city made by the city auditor and tlie heads of the various 
departments : 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Central Fire Station. 

Building and lot .... $35,000.00 

Miscellaneous property in main building 1,298.50 



u ;( 


basement . 124.75 




a a 


shed . . 536.50 




(I ' ( c 


shop . . 75.60 




u u 


stable . . 162.50 




Ten horses 


. 1,500.00 




New iron bedsteads 


40.00 


$38,737.85 


Kearsarge Steamer Company. 


1 steam fire engine 


. $3,000.00 




Miscellaneous property 


646.60 


$3,646.60 






Eag-le 


Steamer Company. 




1 steam hre engine 


. $3,800.00 




Miscellaneous property 


618.50 


$4,418.50 



Governor Hill Steamer Company. 

1 steam fire engine .... $3,000.00 
Miscellaneous property . . . 35.90 



5,035.90 



CITY PROPERTY. 



513 



Hook and Ladder Company. 

1 ladder truck $400.00 

Ladders and miscellaneous property . 727.25 



Chemical Engine Company. 



1 chemical engine 
Miscellaneous property 



$1,550.00 
136.75 



Good Will Hose Company. 

Building $6,500.00 

1 hose wagon ..... 300.00 

1 iiorse 150.00 

Heating apparatus .... 300.00 

Miscellaneous property . . , 336.90 



Alert Hose Company. 



Building 

1 hose wagon 

1 horse . . 

Miscellaneous property 



^3,200.00 
300.00 
150.00 
394.25 



Pioneer Steamer Company. 



,127.25 



$1,686.75 



$7,586.90 



c, 044. 25 



Building and lot 






$7,500.00 




New hose house 






100.00 




Heating apparatus 






400.00 




1 steam fire engine 






2,000.00 




1 hose wagon 






100.00 




Sampson wagon jack 






5.75 




3 pony extinguishers . 






50.00 




Miscellaneous property 






147.00 
$10,302 


75 



514 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Old Fort Engine Company. 



Building and lot 


. $3,000.00 


1 Hunneman hand-engine . 


200.00 


3 pony extinguishers . 


75.00 


Miscellaneous property 


111.75 


Heating apparatus 


500.00 



Cataract Engine Company. 



Building and lot 


. $8,500.00 


1 Hunneman hand-engine 


200.00 


1 hose-reel 


50.00 


Heating apparatus 


100.00 


Miscellaneous property 


117.75 


Hose wagon 


375.00 



1,886.75 



1,342.75 



57,351.25 



Fire-alarm apparatus .... $9,400.00 
Fabric hose, 11,550 feet; leather hose, 

400 feet good, 500 feet poor . . 6,450.00 

Residence chief engineer . . . 3,000.00 

Heating apparatus . . . . 100.00 



Pioneer Engine House. 
Ward-room and hall furniture 

Old Port Engine House. 
Furniture ...••• 

Cataract Engine House. 
Furniture ....•• 



$18,950.00 



$70.50 



$69.00 



1.25 



$106,977.00 



CITY PROPERTY. 



515 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 
Central District. 



1 steam roller •. 






$2,000.00 


10 sprinkler.^ and fixtures 






3,000.00 


1 portable cruslier plant 






. 1,200.00 


1 stationary crusher plant 






800.00 


8 horses 






600.00 


1 sand-house 






50.00 


4 sets double harness . 






100.00 


2 sHjgle harness . 






15.00 


1 tip cart harness 






10.00 


4 two-horse carts 






300.00 


1 one-horse cart . 






25.00 


1 stake wajjon 






50.00 


1 stone wagon 






50.00 


3 two-horse sleds 






200.00 


1 two-horse dump sled 






40.00 


3 one-horse sleds 






50.00 


2 snow rollers 






150.00 


2 stone rollers 






100.00 


3 road-machines 






300.00 


6 wing snow-plows 






150.00 


7 common snow-plows 






25.00 


6 adjustable snow-plows 






270.00 


1 large impro\ed snow-plow 






65.00 


1 street sweeper . 






100.00 


2 hand carts 






40.00 


1 boom derrick . 






80.00 


1 garbage furnace 






300.00 


1 one-horse express wagon . 






125.00 


2 Edson diaphragm pumps . 






38.00 


48 feet hose and couplings . 






40.00 


1 diaphragm pump, No. 3 . 






10.00 


Hose and couplings 






32.85 


Lumber . . . . 






200.00 



516 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Miscellaneous property 


$800.00 


1 roll-top desk 


20.00 


4 chairs .... 


o.OO 


1 letter-press 


3.00 


1 table . . 


4,00 


1 typewriter 


50.00 


1 cabinet .... 


10.00 


1 cupboard 


8.00 




Sll,415.85 



West Concord District. 
Miscellaneous property .... 

Penacook District. 
Miscellaneous property ..... 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 


Police station $25,000.00 


1 horse .... 




75.00 


1 harness .... 




50.00 


1 two- seated wagon 




30.00 


1 pung sleigh 




15.00 


1 ambulance 




75.00 


1 safe .... 




50.00 


2 robes .... 




5.00 


1 roll-top desk . 




20.00 


1 roll-top desk . 




12.00 


Blankets .... 




3.50 


Desk and chair at Penacook 




10.00 


6 tables .... 




18.00 


11 settees .... 




35.00 


37 chairs .... 




20.00 


1 clock .... 




6.00 


70 police badges 




15.00 



$18.00 



$22.00 



.1,455.85 



CITY PROPERTY 




16 policemen's coats . 


$100.00 


28 belts . 






10.00 


28 night clubs . 






28.00 


14 short clubs 






14.00 


11 Colt's revolvers 






88.00 


12 pairs handcuffs 






48.00 


54 helmets 






10.00 


Miscellaneous property 






10.00 


Penacook. 




Building and lot ... 


S6,000.00 


Furniture ..... 


35.00 


ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 


2 drawing-tables 


$75.00 


1 desk 






15.00 


1 typewriter 






10.00 


1 safe 






25.00 


1 card index 






20.00 


1 Buff & Berger transit 






150.00 


1 Buff & Berger level . 






40.00 


1 steel bar 






1.00 


2 steel rods 






1.00 


3 drawing-boards 






3.00 


5 chairs .... 






4.00 


2 stools 






1.00 


1 planimeter 






20.00 


Drawing tools, triangles, etc. 




100.00 











517 



1 double 

house 
3 No. 3 Edson pumps 
20 feet suction hose 
1 Deane steam pump 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

drum hoistino;-ens:ine and 



$500.00 
30.00 
10.00 
50.00 



i, 747. 50 



;,035.00 



$465.00 



518 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



2 wheelbarrows . 






$2.00 


4 steel bars 






4.00 


15 lanterns 






5.00 


6 long handled shovels 






3.00 


64 picks 






30.00 


5 mattocks 






2.00 


4 tampers, iron shod . 




' 


3.00 


3 tool-boxes 






5.00 


3 axes 






2.00 


2 striking hammers 






2.00 


1 five-gallon oil-can 






.50 


5 chains 






5.00 


1 cross-cut saw . 






1.00 


1 set steel blocks and falls 






5.00 


Wooden blocks and [tails 






10.00 


2 monkey wrenches 






1.50 


1 rake 






.25 


S^ dozen sewer braces 






30.00 


PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT. 


1 sewer [pump . . . . . Si 5. 00 


1 derrick . 






15.00 


1 tool-box . 






4.00 


2 pulley-blocks . 






1.00 


8 shovels . 






2.40 


11 picks 






5.50 


1 bar 






.50 


1 striking-hammer 






.75 


4 drills . . •. 






2.00 


500 feet plank . 






5.00 











$701.25 



.1.15 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT. 

2 tool-boxes $10.00 

21 lanterns ..... 2.50 

1 set steel blocks . . . . 5.00 

1 derrick tripod . . . . . 3.00 



CITY PROPERTY 



1 No. 3 Edson pump 
20 feet suction hose 
3 'pails 
1 paver's maul . 

1 three-gallon oil-can 
3 steel bars 

3 tampers, iron-shod 

2 striking hammers 
1 dozen picks 

1 dozen drills 



519 



$15.00 
10.00 

.50 
1.00 

.25 
2.50 
2.00 
2.00 
5.00 
2.00 



$60.75 



FURNITURE STORED AT CITY HALL. 



1 coal stove and pipe . 
3 office chairs . 
Miscellaneous property 



$5.00 
3.00 
1.00 



$9.00 



1 roll-top desk . 

1 office desk 

1 clock 

1 walnut bookcase 

1 pine bookcase . 

1 map of Concord 

1 desk 

2 chairs 
135 copies old town records 
Miscellaneous property 



CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. 

$25.00 
15.00 



12.00 

15.00 

10.00 

5.00 

7.00 

2.00 

332.50 

10.00 



$433.50 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 
Pest-house and lot . . . . $500.00 

Office furniture 40.00 

Pest-house furniture . . . . 25.00 



$565.00 



520 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 



1 oak roll-top desk 

1 carpet 

6 chairs 

1 small oak table 



$20.00 

25.00 

9.00 

1.00 



$55.00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES' OFFICE. 
Weights, measures, balances, etc. .... S225.00 





CITY LIQUOR AGENCY. 


Empty bottles $7.00 


1 empty cask 








1.00 


5 empty kegs 








2.50 


4 demijohns 








7.00 


6 two-gallon jugs 








3.00 


8 one-gallon jugs 








2.00 


9 bottles . 








2.25 


5 brass lock faucets and key 




5.00 


Q n a ii. 




4.50 


5 u a a 




5.00 


9 measures and tunnels 




1.95 


1 measure and tunnel 






.45 


3 racks of barrels 






7.35 


1 nail hammer 










.50 


1 hatchet . 










.50 


1 screwdriver 










.25 


1 bitstock . 










1.00 


4 center-bits 










.60 


1 wrench . 










.50 


2 water pails 










1.00 


1 shovel . 










.50 


Trucks 










2.00 


Office desk and c 


hair 








40.00 


1 table 










2.00 


Stove and funnel 










25.00 





CIT\ 


PKOPEUTY 




6 chairs ..... 


$.4.00 


Inkstand 








.50 


1 mop-wringer . 








1.50 


1 cluster . 








2.50 


1 floor-brush 








2.25 


1 cuspidor 








.50 


1 tin pail . 








1.88 


1 graduate 








2.00 


1 tester 








2.50 


1 money-drawer 








1.50 


1 brush 








.15 


Corks 








3.00 


Twine 








.GO 


Copper boiler 








6.00 


Directory . 








8.00 











521 



CITY MESSENGER'S DEPARTMENT. 



City Council Rooms. 



3 ottice desks 

1 library table . 

86 members' desks 

36 rotary chairs 

1 cottage stove and pipe 

Miscellaneous property 



CITY HALL. 

42 nine-foot folding settees . 
20 seven-foot folding settees 
10 common chairs .... 
1 No. 36 Monitor stove and pipe 
8 board tables ..... 
Heating and lighting fixtures in city hall 
building ..... 

Miscellaneous property 



$30.00 

5.00 

307.50 

175.00 

5.00 

10.00 



5125.00 

60.00 

5.00 

5.00 

2.00 

250.00 
10.00 



;154.73 



$532.50 



$457.00 



522 



1 desk 

1 filing case 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY AUDITOR'S OFFICE. 



$25.00 
13.00 



$38.00 



PROPERTY IN AND ABOUT CITY UJ 


1 eiglit-foot step-ladder . . . $0.50 


25 feet rubber hose 






1.50 


4 lawn settees . 






4.00 


1 lawn-mower, 20-incli 






8.00 


1 pair hedge shears 






.50 


1 Stillson wrench 






.75 


1 lantern . 






.25 


1 wheelbarrow . 






2.75 


Miscellaneous property 






4.00 



m.25 



TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 



1 safe .... 


. . $150.00 


5 curtains . . . . 


, . 7.50 


1 desk chair 


4.50 


3 cane-seat armchairs . 


3.75 


1 ash office table 


3.50 


1 money-drawer 


2.00 


Miscellaneous property 


9.20 







$180.45 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' DEPARTMENT. 
Property at White Park. 



1 dump cart 


$25.00 


1 hand cart 


G.OO 


Settees .... 


100.00 


3 large snow shovels . 


8.00 


2 iron rollers 


10.00 


2 gravel screens 


5.00 



225 feet garden hose . 


VJl 1 X 


fKUt 


t/Kl 1 . 


$6.00 


2 wheelbarrows . 








4.00 


4 lawn-mowers . 








10.00 


1 lawn-mower, horse . 








40.00 


1 scraper for ice 








10.00 


1 set horse boots 








4.00 


3 lawn sprinklers 








4.50 


Lot of tree stakes 








5.00 


Barb wire . 








3.00 


2 Stillson wrenches 








2.00 


1 monkey wrench 








.25 


1 small basket . 








.25 


3 large baskets . 








.75 


4 water pails 








. .75 


1 spirit level 








.25 


2 ladders . 








1.00 


1 step-ladder 








.50 


1 rat trap . 








.50 


1 pan 








.35 


3 barrel covers . 








.75 


2 angers 








1.00 


Nails, spikes, etc. 








.75 


Sledge and wedges 








1.00 


1 wire stretcher . 








.25 


1 wire pliers 








.25 


3 water-kegs 








.75 


1 pole pruning shear 








.25 


6 shovels . 








1.50 


5 iron rakes 








1.00 


4 wood rakes 








.50 


4 picks 








1.00 


3 grub axes 








1.00 


4 hoes 








.75 


3 edging knives . 








.50 


1 bill hook 








.25 


2 axes 








.50 


1 cant lever 








.25 



523 



524 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



1 sheep shears 






$0.25 


1 tape measure . 






.25 


2 water-pots 






.50 


1 grindstone 






1.00 


2 iron bars 




. 


1.00 


5 snow sliovels . 






.75 


4 drills, hammer and plugs 






.75 


2 hatchets . 






.25 


1 steel sfjuare 






.25 


2 cross-cut saws 






1.00 


3 small saws 






.50 


1 clipping shears 






.50 


1 edging shears . 






2.00 


1 cart hames 






3.00 


1 hames and traces 






2.00 


Rollins Park 





$273.35 



Shovels, rakes, hoes 



$25.00 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS' DEPARTMENT. 



Miscellaneous articles at Blossom Hill 



Ceraete 
Furniture 


in commi 

public libr 

CITY 

:er and ta 
s History 


ssioners' office 


$300.00 
16.00 






Books in 
Furniture 


PUBLIC L] 

ary 


[BRARY. 

. $9,000.00 
500.00 






1 typewri 
1 Bouton' 


HISTORY 

jle 


COMMISSION. 

$100.00 
10.00 



$316.00 



$9,500.00 



$110.00 



CITY PROPERTY. 



525 



REAL ESTATE. 

REAL ESTATE BELONGING TO THE CITY NOT INCLUDED IN ANY OF 
THE FOREGOING INVENTORIES. 



City hall lot and half of building 

City farm pasture, and quarries 

City storehouse . 

Gravel banks 

Ward house, West street 

Play-ground on intervale 

White park 

Rollins park 

Penacook park . 

Market-place on Warren street 



$20,000.00 
5,000.00 
6,000.00 
6,250.00 
4,500.00 
1,500.00 
14,000.00 
7,500.00 
2,500.00 
15,000.00 



;, 250.00 



MILK INSPECTOR. 



Table and cupboard 


$13.66 


1 double boiler .... 


.68 


Nippers ..... 


.35 


Milk bottles .... 


2.00 


1 retort stand .... 


.75 


1 retort ..... 


2.00 


1 eight-bottle milk tester 


8.45 


6 acid measures). 


.98 


6 cream bottles .... 


1.86 


Milk pipette .... 


.75 


Rubber tubing . . . . . 


1.00 


1 steel tripod . . . . . 


.50 


3 glass funnels . . . . . 


.35 


1 flask 


.15 


18 five-inch test tubes 


.35 


1 gas mantle, shade and chimney . 


1.00 


1 chemical thermometer 


1.25 


1 dipper . ... 


.30 



526 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



1 set scales 


$2.00 


Glass tubing 


.25 


3 pinch cocks - . 


.75 


1 test tiibe holder 


.65 


1 filter stand 


1.25 


1 graduate 


.50 


1 pair dividers . 


.35 



S42.13 



INVENTORY 



Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and All the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1902. 



'WATER RIGHTS AND PLANT. 

Water rights from B. F. & D. Holden $60,000.00 
Water rights from Concord Manufac- 
turing Company .... 83,000.00 
Flowage rights around Penacook lake . 4,375.61 
Dam, gate-house and appurtenances . 30,756.17 
Conduit and gate-house . . . 29,484.05, 

Main pipes 160,960.92 

Distribution pipes . . . .288,931.38 

Service pipes ..... '42,489.95 
Reservoir and site .... 45,044.09 
Pumping station, shop, stable, store- 
house and site .... 27,000.00 
Pumping machinery . ... . 10,215.00 
Water and flowage rights in Long Pond, 

Webster 5,000.00 

Mill privilege and land of W. P. Cool- 
edge, West Concord, about fifteen 

acres 5,500.00 

Kit shop privilege, from Humphrey «fe 
Farnum, West Concord, about two 

acres • 5,000.00 

Hutchins house and lot. West Concord, 

from W. P. Cooledge, about six acres 2,250.00 



528 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Land ill West Concord, from Mary C. 

Rowell, eighteen acre.s 
Land ill West Concord, from Alfred 

Roberts, twenty-five and one half acres 
Land in West Concord, from O. F. 

Richardson ..... 
Land in West Concord, from Mary G. 

Carter, ten acres .... 
Land in West Concord, from Cliarles 

E. Ballard, six acres 
Land in West Concord, from Charles 

E. Ballard, fifteen acres . 
Land in West Concord, from CotHii & 

Little, seventeen and one half acres . 
Land in AVest Concord, ^wliich includes 

tlie Martin place, the Swan place, and 

a portion of the Caidton place, about 

one hundred and ten and one fourth 

acres ...... 

Land at south end of Penacook Lake, 

from Robert Crowley, about ten acres 
Land in West Concord, from heirs of 

Lowell Brown, about three acres 
Land in West Concord, from Cook & 

Hood 



$1,500.00 
1,275.00 

100.00 
1,250.00 

500.00 
1,200.00 

800.00 



6,364.50 
3,000.00 
1,032.55 



1,750.00 



-6818,779.22 



Water Office, 11 Capitol Street. 



2 roller-top desks 


$60.00 


1 counter and fixtures 


40.00 


1 typewriter and desk . 


30.00 


1 Howard eight-day clock . 


20.00 


2 safes .... 


400.00 


Miscellaneous property 


50.00 



$600.00 



CITY PKOPEKTY. 




Water Commissioners' 


Room. 


1 long table ..... 


$5.00 


10 chairs ...... 


5.00 


1 carpet ...... 


3.00 


1 case of water reports 


3.00 


Pumping Station 




1 roller-top desk .... 


$15.00 


1 eight-day clock .... 


10.00 


9 chairs . . ■ . 


9.00 


1 recording gauge .... 


10.00 


1 platform scales .... 


50.00 


Miscellaneous property, including sup- 




plies, stock, etc. .... 


500.00 







529 



$16.00 



$594.00 



Shop at Pumping Station. 

Miscellaneous property, including meter 
testing machine, fittings, pipe, tools, 
brass goods, etc. ..... 



$475.00 



Stable and Basement at Pumping Station. 



2 horses 

2 express wagons 
1 road wagon 
1 heavy sleigh 
1 pung sleigh 

3 harness . 
Miscellaneous property 

plies 



including sup- 



$150.00 
90.00 
90.00 
50.00 
15.00 
15.00 

40.00 



Storehouse. 

Miscellaneous property, including hydrants, water 
gates, curves, branches, etc. 

34 



$450.00 



$425.00 



530 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Pipe Yard. 



Cast-iron pipe and supplies 



Shop at Penacook. 

Miscellaneous property, including pipe, etc. 



Shop at West Concord. 
Miscellaneous property, including pipe, etc. 



$1,600.00 



S40.00 



525.00 



RECAPITULATION OF "WATER DEPARTMENT. 



Plant and real estate 


$818,779.22 


Water office 


600.00 


"Water commissioners' room . 


16.00 


Pumping station . 


594.00 


Shop at pumping station 


475.00 


Stable and basement 


450.00 


Storehouse .... 


425.00 


Pipe yard and city shed 


1,600.00 


Shop at Penacook 


40.00 


Shop at West Concord . 


25.00 



i23,004.22 



CITY TROPERTY. 



531 



GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 



Fire department . 


. $106,977.00 




Street department 


. 11,415.85 




Police department 


•25,747.50 




Police department, Penacook 


6,035.00 




Engineering department 


465.00 




Sewer department 


701.25 




Penacook sewer . 


51.15 




West Concord sewer 


60.75 




City messenger department . 


532.50 




City auditor's office 


38.00 




City hall .... 


457.00 




Property in and about city hall 


22.25 




Furniture stored at city hall . 


9.00 




City clerk's office 


433.50 




Health department 


565.00 




Milk inspector's office . 


42.13 




Mayor's office . . . , 


55.00 




Sealer of weights and measures 


225.00 




City liquor agency 


154.73 




Tax collector's office 


180.45 




Park commissioners 


298.35 




Cemetery commissioners 


316.00 




City history commission 


110.00 




Books in public library and furniture 


9,500.00 




Real estate . . . . . 


82,250.00 




Water department 


833,004.22 






$1 


,079,646.63 



REPORT OF CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 



To the Mayor and City Council of Concord^ N. H. : 

I herewith submit my rei)ort of the City Liquor Agency for 
eleven months ending March 1, 1901. 

Goods on Hand April 1, 11)01.. 

Wines and liquors, 324Jfr gals. ; bottled goods, 518. 

Cost of both SI, 502. 97 

Purchased of George W. Weeks, state liquor agent, 

l,707y% gals.; bottled, 5,172. Cost of both . So, 369. 94 



$6,872.91 
Goods Sold. 

l,784lf gals. ; 4,517 bottled. Received 

for both S7,060.65 

Received for barrels and kegs . . 38.50 

S7,099.15 

On Hand, March 1, 1902. 

Wines and liquors, 243i^ gals. ; bottled goods, 

1,166. Cost of both SI, 403. 07 

Bottled goods on hand, April 1, 1901 . . 518 

Purchased eleven months, to March 1, 

1902 5,172 

5,690 



Bottled goods sold . . . . 4,517 

Breakage ...... 7 

On hand Marcli 1, 1902 . . . 1,166 



5,690 



REPORT OF CITY LIQUOR AGENT. 533 

Wines and liquors on hand April 1, 

1901 . . . . _._ . 324 J^ gals. 
Purchased eleven months, to March 1, 

1902 . ... . . . 1,707^^ " 



2,031t-V 



Wines and liquors sold . . . 1,784|-^ gals. 

On hand March 1, 1902 . . . 243-f4 " 

^ lb 



Shrinkage ...... 3^^ 



Balance Sheet March 1, 1902. 

Stock on hand April 1, 1901 , . $1,502.97 

Stock purchased . . . . 5,369.94 

Expense of agency .... 1,516.41 

Bills payable, bottles, printing, etc. . 122.45 



Cash deposited $6,950.00 

Cash on hand March 1, 1902 . . 149.15 

Stock on hand 1,403.07 

Evaporation . . . . . 9.55 



2,031 



i, 511. 77 



!,511.' 



1901. 

Population of city (census of 1900) . . 19,632 

Valuation of city $11,393,694.00 

Tax -assessed for the year .... $241,588.57 
Rate of taxation, $14.80 per $1,000. 
Rate for Union School District, $3.60. 
Rate for precinct, $3.10. 
Total rate, $21.50 per $1,000. 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 535 

POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and 
personal estate in the city of Concord since 1860 : 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1860 


2,577 


$4,307,192 


$47,082.25 


1861 


2,497 


4,423,936 


46,290.48 


1862 


2,350 


4,308,568 


50,945.01 


1863 


2,454 


3,775,206 


60,293.82 


1864 


2,539 


3,832,800 


89,931.97 


1865 


2,495 


5,549,002 


158,787.29 


1866 


2,762 


4,934,082 


116,192.97 


1867 


2,822 


5,006,774 


145,173.49 


1868 


3,120 


5,378,365 


126,889.71 


1869 


3,205 


5,581,459 


146,791.64 


1870 


3,187 


5,751,928 


133,953.94 


1871 


3,338 


5,891,993 


137,844.70 


1872 


3,767 


5,917,054 


141,122.97 


1873 


3,613 


9,012,650 


158,281.13 


1874 


3,784 


9,000,526 


171,045.61 


1875 


3,941 


9,216,195 


175,234.68 


1876 


3,911 


9,222,625 


163,768.29 


1877 


4,015 


9,405,117 


177,040.27 


1878 


3,869 


9,241,485 


162,038.53 


1879 


3,536 


10,604,465 


155,964.99 


1880 


3,672 


10,150,585 


172,831.12 


1881 


3,505 


10,062,894 


153,285.55 


1882 


3,661 


10,308,052 


151,941.54 


1883 


3,8'16 


10,023,216 


169,498.95 


1884 


3,734 


9,877,874 


148,290.26 


1885 


3,821 


9,774,714 


153,613.92 


1886 


3,773 


9,703,458 


158,994.83 


1887 


3,938 


9,852,337 


151,292.66 


1888 


3,959 


9,984,120 


165,090.57 


1889 


4,090 


10,048,556 


184,963.08 


1890 


4,190 


10,243,857 


176,081.04 


1891 


4,498 


10,923,081 


206,379.26 


1892 


4,288 


10,786,498 


191,733.45 



536 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Year. 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 

1900. 

Ward 1, 

^' 2, 

" 3, 

" 4, 

" o, 

" 6, 

'' 7, 

" 8, 

" 9, 



Polls. 
4,380 
4,385 
4,838 
4,663 
4,812 
4,691 
4,760 

Polls. 
5.00 
185 
281 
895 
602 
808 
757 
380 
401 



Valuation. 
$10,890,960 
11,189,294 
11,566,083 
11,228,515 
11,200,363 
11,148,659 
11,218,886 

Valuation . 

$773,077 

297,722 

398,340 

2,413,614 

3,095,200 

2,063,000 

990,490 

875,000 

313,772 



Tax. 

?204,585.27 
222,110.35 
217,399.83 
262,254.99 
233,761.58 
221,080.21 
220,704.62 

Tax. 

$17,383.82 

5,159.11 

8,308.21 

50,191.08 

64,689.16 

43,078.54 

19,022.46 

17,666.20 

6,276.53 









4,809 


$11,220,215 


$231,775.11 


Non- 


resi'i 


dent , 


• • 




997.99 




$232,773.10 


1901. 






Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 




556 


$822,973 


$18,817.77 




2, 




185 


295,009 


5,211.34 




3, 




293 


394,721 


8,397.61 




4, 




1,059 


2,443,603 


53,638.68 




5, 




730 


3,125,761 


65,792.35 




6, 




811 


2,050,150 


43,584.62 




7, 




866 


1,053,762 


20,265.82 




8, 




427 


882,400 


18,367.25 




y, 


- 


451 


325,315 


6,583.50 




5,378 


$11,393,694 


$240,658.94 


Non- 


■resi 


dent 


• 


• 


929.63 



$241,588.57 



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Betsey Morin. 
Elizabeth J. Cleary. 
Mary Reagan. 
Sarah Evans. 
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Hannah Sargent. 
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INDEX. 



Page 

Address, Mayor's 3 

Appropi'iations, see aiiditor's account 467-475 

Assessors, board of, report of 280-284 

Assets, city. See Municipal Assets. 

Auditor, report of 467-511 

Blossom Hill cemetery, receipts of 447-464 

Board of health. See Sanitary Department. 

City engineer, report of 134-144 

Cemetery department, report of commissioners 296-300 

City expenses, itemized 476-509 

hoard of health 477 

cemeteries and parks 478-482 

Decoration Day 477 

engineering department 482-483 

fire department 486-489 

highway department 489-493 

history commission 477 

incidentals and land damages 497-505 

liquor agency 493-494 

■ Margaret Pillsbviry General Hospital 477 

open air concerts 477 

police and watch 494-495 

poor 477 

printing and stationery 495-496 

public library 496-497 

public baths 497 

salaries 505-506 

city council 506 

schools 506 

sewers 483^85 

soldiers 477 

sprinkling ' 484 

state and county taxes, with interest 476 

street lighting 484 

water-works 507-510 

City government, departments, personnel of 65-68 

assessors 71 

auditor 68 

board of aldermen 65 

board of ediication 69-70 

cemetery committees 79-80 

clerk, city 66 

collector of taxes 68 



590 CITY OF CONCORD. 

City government : 

common council 66 

commissioners of cemeteries 80 

culler of staves 82 

engineer, city 68 

fence-viewers 81 

fire department, officers of 72-73 

health officers 78 

inspector of petroleum 81 

liquor agent 79 

mayor 65 

messenger 68 

overseers of poor 77 

park commissioners 79 

physician, city, and assistant 78 

pound-keeper 81 

police department, officers of court 74 

officers and members of police force 74-76 

public library, trustees of 71 

librarian and assistants 71 

registrar of vital statistics 79 

sanitary officer 78 

sealers of leather 81 

sealer of weights and measures 32 

street department, commissioner of highways 76 

drain-layers 76-77 

surveyors of painting 83 

masonry 83 

stone 83 

wood, lumber and bark 83-84 

superintendent of clocks 73 

superintendent of schools 69 

treasurer 68 

truant officers 70 

undertakers 80-81 

ward officers 84-86 

water-works, city, commissioners 72 

superintendent 72 

weighers of liay, coal, etc 82 

City physician, i-epoi't of 295 

City, population of 534 

City solicitor, report of 155-158 

City, valuation of 280 

Collector of taxes, report of 285-286 

Coupon account, statement of 443-445 

Commission, history, report of 294 

Debts, city. See Municipal Debts. 

Department reports 89-536 

East Concord cemetery, expenses of 300 

Fire Department, chief engineer, report of 183-207 

roll of members 208-213 

regulations of 220-232 

lire-alarm system ' 214-219 

location of hydrants 233-237 



INDEX. 591 

Fund, Blossom Hill cemetery 423-424 

East Concord cemetery 425 

East Concord sewer 426-427 

Millville cemetery 425 

Old cemetery 424 

Penacook sewer 426 

West Concord cemetery 424 

West Concord sewer 425-426 

S. K. Jones monument 427 

Highway commissioner, financial statement of 115-133 

Highway department, report of commissioner 91-133 

Indebtedness, bonded 442-445 

Liquor agent, report of 532-533 

Mayors of the city of Concord, list of 87 

Millville cemetery, expenses of 298 

Municipal assets 511 

Municipal debt 511 

Old North cemetery, receipts of 464-466 

fund of. See Funds. 

Ordinances and joint resolutions, 1901 27-63 

Opinion of supreme court in regard to tuition ' 397-398 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 287-293 

Police court, report of clerk of ^54 

Police department, report of city marshal 148-153 

Poor department, report of overseer 301-306 ' 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1860 535-536 

Property, city, inventory of 512-526 

water department, inventory of 527-530 

Public library, report of trustees 270-271 

librarian 272-279 

Plumbers' report of board of examiners 145-147 

Recapitulation of city property 531 

Regulations, municipal 2 

Reservoirs, public 207 

Salaries 505-506 

Sanitary department, report of board of health 159-165 

report of sanitary officer 166-172 

mortality report 173-182 

School report 307-420 

annual school meeting warrant 387-389 

annual school meeting 390-396 

attendance, tables of 344 

board of education, recapitulation of members 385-386 

report of 310-319 

elocutionary contest 383-384 

estimates of expenses 323-324 

financial agent, report of 325-340 

graduating exercises 375-382 

honor, roll of 368-374 



592 CITY OF CONCORD. 

School report : 

superintendent, report of 341-367 

teachers, list of 345-349 

truant officer, report of 343 

buildiny committee, report of 312-315 

treasurer of committee on Dewey school, report of 320-322 

treasurer of Union School district, report of 394 

District Xo. 20, report of 399-400 

superintendent, report of 401-409 

I treasurer, report of 411-415 

town ilistrict, report of 416-419 

treasurer, report of 420 

Tax assessed, amount of 534 

rate of 534 

rate of apportionment 534 

Taxes, collector of. See Collector of Taxes. 

Treasui-er, balance sheet of 436-441 

Treasury department, report of treasurer 421 

Trust, Counteiss of Rumford 421 

Cogswell library 422 

G. Parker Lyon , library 423 

Minot cemetery enclosure 422 

David Osgood 422 

Franklin Pierce, library 423 

Abial Walker, the 421 

Thomas (t. Yalpey, library 423 

Trusts, individual cemetery 428^35 

Seth K. Jones 427 

Vital statistics, tables of 537-587 

Water department, report of 238-269 

commissioners, report of 245-246 

engineer's report 257 

financial statement 242-244 

fire hydrants 265-269 

mean yearly heights of water 259 

recapitulation of yearly receipts 258 

schedule of pipes and gates 260-264 

summary of statistics 241 

superinteiulent, report of 247-256 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 445 

coupon, account of — 445 

treasurer's report of 444 

West Concord cemetery, expenses of 299 



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