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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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1905 
FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1905 



TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCORD, N. H. 

RUMFORD Printing Co. 
1906 



H 

13(35 
MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

FoK Payment of Bills Against the City 



All ])ersons furnishing materials or service for the city, or 
aid to the city poor, should be i)articular to take the name of 
the person ordering such service, material, or aid, and should 
knoiv that the person is duly authorized to contract said liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deUv- 
ered on city pauper account, except on the written order of 
the Overseer of the Poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be requh-ed of all bills payal)le by the 
city, furnished on county pauper account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action can 
be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the City Government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the City Government 
occur on the second ]\Ionday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Citi/ Clerk. 



MAYOR CORNING'S INAUGURAL 
ADDRESS. 



Called to a second term as mayor by a most gratifying 
•expression of public confidence, I cannot but feel encouraged 
and rewarded. 

To re})eat what I said two years ago at this time respecting 
the honor of the office and my profound thanks to my fellow 
citizens for their trustful partiality, is altogether appropriate 
on this occasion. I do most sincerely thank the citizens of 
Concord for what they have done personal to myself, and I 
acknowledge the great obligation I owe them. 

Two years ago I had no policy other than the determination 
to serve the city faithfully, nor have I any policy other than 
that now. Two years' experience in the office of may'or has 
given me a more intelligent insight into municipal affairs, and 
has enlightened me in respect to certain municipal needs and 
administrative methods. I do not intend, however, to convey 
the impression that I have in mind any radical changes and 
reforms, for such is not ray meaning. I wish merely to say 
that thei'e are some matters pertaining to the city's welfare 
which I desire you to consider. As to the conduct of the dif- 
ferent departments, I feel that T can speak with a knowledge 
derived from frequent observation and association, and it 
affords me infinite pleasure to commend them all. I include 
not only the heads of the regular departments, but the boards 
of commissioners and of trustees as well. I have found devo- 
tion to duty and prudence in expenditure to be the rule. If 
all this w^ere private business, I question very much if the 
results could be much improved. This conclusion on my part 
may seem somewhat unusual, but if it does so seem then so 
much the better for Concord. That I have heard criticisms 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

concerning this or that department is very true; all mayors 
have heard them, but this does not detract in the least from 
the opinion I entertain. Again, I say that Concord is fortuilate 
in her public servants. 1 firmly believe that we have no mu- 
nicipal leaks, as they are called, and that every dollar spent is 
honestly spent. In my first inaugural address I spoke of Con- 
cord's importance as the capital of the state, and as the pos- 
sessor of many public and quasi-public edifices, all of which 
greatly contribute to the fame and to the attractions of the city. 
It is natural, therefore, that Concord should be sensitive to 
the influences of progress and adornment. These character- 
istics have been conspicuously shown since the close of the 
Rebellion, and Concord, largely because of this, has become 
another city. Our administrative duty is, therefore, plain. 
We should conduct affairs intelligently. We should be jiro- 
gressive, yet not hasty, and, above all else, we should do those 
things only which are for the good of all our people. 

Assessors. 

Now that Concord has passed half a century of municipal 
life, and has grown more than a hundred times larger in popu- 
lation, and richer in wealth since the days of Mayor Low, I 
submit to you, gentlemen of the city council, whether it is not 
incumbent on us all to put aside the old town custom of assess- 
ing values and to adopt a system consistent with our changed 
conditions. This is not a personal matter, it is wholly a matter 
of public concern. As respects this particular department of 
our government, we are compelled to acknowledge that Con- 
cord is behind the times. I have given much thought and 
examination to the subject of assessors. I have compared 
Concord with other cities similar to our city in population and 
wealth, and I have come to the conclusion that our present 
method of choosing an assessor from each ward is careless, 
hurtful and unprogressive. As a consequence of the present 
method. Concord is practically separated into nine different 
towns for the purpose of valuation. 

To a great extent this is inevitable. The unsatisfactory 
results obtained are due to the methods rather than to the 



MAYOIl's ADDRESS. 5 

<issessors. Under the present system there always has been 
and there always will be a constantly recurring change of 
membership, which is far from desirable in a board of assessors. 
Inclusive of 1858, when the first board was chosen, there have 
l)een 40 city elections, at two of which only was no change 
made in the membership of the board. At 88 of these elec- 
tions, changes of from one member to five members have taken 
place. Since 1853, Concord has had 114 different assessors. 
This indicates an average change of almost three assessors at 
every election. Yet, during all this ])eriod, Concord has had 
but 22 different mayors. 

Now, I submit that this continual changing of assessors indi- 
cates that the voters, or a certain set of voters in each ward, 
are not satisfied with their assessors, or that the assessors 
themselves, finding their work irksome and unsatisfactory, 
have declined reelection. 

In any way we look at it, the fact must be obvious that the 
|»resent system is uncertain, erratic and experimental. We all 
agree that the duties imposed on the assessors are difiicult and 
perplexing, and call for good judgment, impartial performance 
and firmness, but, even assuming that these qualifications are 
inherent in the board, pray tell me what value they possess in 
the face of so many changes. I feel that the time has come, 
so far as the assessors are concerned, when ward lines should 
be effaced and definiteness of procedure and reasonable tenure 
of office should be sought in a smaller board chosen for a 
longer term than two years. 

I3riefiy, I ask you to consider whether it would not be of 
infinite advantage to the city if a board consisting of three 
assessors, each chosen for six years, were to take the place of 
our present system. I am opposed to the nominating of 
assessors by the mayor, or the choosing of them by the city 
council, because I have grave doubts of its wisdom ; there- 
fore, I should recommend choosing them at our l;)iennial 
elections. This change involves legislative action and the 
arranging of details, but it is a municipal reform certain to 
<-ome some day, and why not at this time? Gentlemen, Con- 
cord is no longer a sli|)-shod little town living from hand to 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



mouth, therefore, to us, the city's administrators, this fact 
should be a constant incentive to meet changed conditions, 
with changed methods. 

Bo>^DED DeI!T. 

At the present time, this is the bonded indebtedness of 
Concord, exclusive of water-works debt : 

C%hall 1130,000 

Police station 17,000 

Widening Pleasant Street . . 13,800 

Bridges 15,000 

State Library land .... 25,000 

|200,80a 



Added to this is the precinct debt : 




Sewer precinct bonds 


. 159,000 


Union School District 


59,000 


School District Xo. 20 


13,800 


St. Paul's School sewer 


4,500 


West Concord sewer 


15,300 


East Concord sewer 


1,500 


Penacook sewer 


17,000 



Sewer precmct notes 



1170,100 

$370,900 
9,000 

1379,900 



Cemeteuies. 



While I have no recommendation to offer respecting the 
care and management of our cemeteries, I bespeak for them a 
kindly attention. Blossom Hill has now become a beautiful 
city of the dead, and it will grow more beautiful with advanc- 
ing years. The land recently added, which is now in its nat- 
ural state, is susceptible of infinite adornment. It is, I am 
sure, the policy of the commissioners so to treat this wild and 
broken land as to enhance in every i*espect the beauty of the 
cemetery. 

For many years the need of a cha])el at Blossom Hill has 
become more and more manifest, vet owing to urgent reasons. 



MAYOR S ADDliESS. 7 

no appropriation for this purpose had ever been voted. But 
that which tlie city had failed to do has been done by a phil- 
antliro])ic lady. As mayor of Concord I should l)e utterly 
lacking in appreciation on an occasion hke this if I did not 
here convey to ]Miss Perkins the thanks and gratitude of her 
fellow citizens for her gift of the Memorial Chapel at Blossom 
Hill. 

There is connected with the subject of cemeteries a matter 
to which I ask your favorable consideration. The action 
which I recommend was earnestly urged by Mayor ^Martin, who 
secured from the Legislature of 1899 an act in accordance with 
his views. Other raaj^ors of this city, I understand, have also 
considered this matter favorably, while in several towns and 
cities the legislative act has been formally adopted. 

This is the act approved by the governor March 8, 1899: 

" Seotiox 1. Any town or city which now holds or here- 
after may hold in trust, l)y bequest or otherwise, any fund for 
the care of any cemetery or any private lot therein may pay 
the same into the town or city treasury, and so long as the 
same remains therein said town or city shall pay thereon an 
annual income at the rate of three and one half per cent. ; 
which income shall be expended in accordance with the terms 
of the trust by which said fund or funds is held. 

" Sect. 2. This act shall not be in force except in such 
towns and cities as by vote of the town or city councils shall 
so elect." 

The city council on November 14, 1899, passed an ordi- 
nance, which, reciting the act in full, provided under section 2, 
" That said act be, and hereby is, adopted and in full force in 
this city, and the city council so elects." 

This ordinance took effect upon its passage. 

For some unexplained reason the city has never taken any 
further measures toward carrying out this safe and prudent 
policy. 

There are now two large trust funds pertaining almost 
wholly to Blossom Hill, amounting to about $50,000. One 
fund, called the cemetery fund, amounts to $25,573.21; the 



« CITY OF CONCORD. 

Other, called the cemetery trust fund, amounts to $24,o4'2.55. 
The cemetery fund is derived from half the income arising 
from the sale of lots, and is increasing yearly at the rate of 
about $600. This fund is invested in Concord savings banks, 
in Concord city bonds and in United States bonds., As this 
fund is derived from the sale of lots in Blossom Hill, and is 
wholly a city matter, I advise that we leave it just as it is. 
But the other fund, called the cemetery trust fund, presents a 
different question. This fund is made up of bequests and gifts 
to the city on condition that the city invest the money and 
expend so much of the income as may be necessary for the 
care of the specified lots. This fund, increasing yearly at the 
rate of 11,200 to 11,500, is now invested as follows: $13,242.55 
in Concord savings banks ; $8,560 in Concord city bonds ; 
$400 in United States bonds, and $1,600 in railway stock. 
This fund was increased during the year 1904 by $1,440, 
which is not yet invested. 

Now, the doctrine of averages in the matter of investing 
money is bovmd, sooner or later, to show a certain percentage 
of loss, and 1 beg to i)oint out to you the indisputable fact that 
if this deposit in savings banks had been made in many sav- 
ings banks in New Hampshire within the last 30 years a large 
part of these sacred trusts would have been irrevocably lost. 
Assume for a moment that we have suffered a loss and so crip- 
pled the income as to have rendered it impossible to care for 
the lots as they should be cared for, what then would have 
been our duty? Does any one doubt that such a calamity 
would have imposed on our citizens a direct tax in order to 
maintain those cemetery lots in accordance with the sentiments 
of an enlightened and Christian community? 

It is solely for the purpose of making these bequests and 
gifts absolutely safe that I urge this change in investment. 
There are at this time 200 cemetery trust funds, varying in 
amounts from $1,000 to $40, and averaging about $125 each, 
and it is to this fund that I address my recommendations. 

As the most sanguine optimist well knows, the City of Con- 
cord will never be out of debt; therefore the assumption of 
the fund can in no wise affect future ]iolicy. IMy plan is this. 



.AIAYOi; S ADDRESS. V' 

Let us collect these various funds and turn them into the city 
treas.ury to be applied to such municipal debts or purposes as 
the city council may determine. We shall then credit each 
separate bequest or gift at its original amount and pay thereon 
a yearly rate of interest at 3.J per centum. Any surplus, how- 
ever, belonging to any bequest or gift now accrued or to accrue 
hereafter shall be kept intact to be used only in accordance 
with the condition expressed in such bequest or gift. By this 
method the city will have the immediate use of the fund while 
the benefaction is assured for all time of a fixed and certain 
income. The objection that 3.^ per centum may be somewhat 
excessive 50 or 75 years hence is met with this answer: It all 
depends "on the future cost of labor and material. Judging 
from the past, we shall find that the suggested rate of interest 
will be likely to produce less labor and material in the future 
than at the present time, and furthermore, the legislative act 
provides that any city or town shall pay 3^ per centum only 
so long as said city or town shall keep the funds. Therefore 
if we take the funds and some future administration should 
see fit to relinquish the trust, the law points to a simple method 
by which it can be effected. 

Fire Dei'art:\[ext. 

This department, the most important in any city, is, I confi- 
dently believe, entitled to your favor and confidence. Singu- 
larly fortunate as Concord has been in recent immunity from 
destructive fires, the organization and equipment of the depart- 
ment has been constantly maintained. Two years ago I sug- 
gested changes at the Central Station, whereby the horses 
should be placed close to the engines and the hose wagons. It 
had been represented to me that such a change had once been 
planned and that it was wholly practicable. Subsequent exam- 
ination soon showed me that it was purely a case of desire 
resting upon misinformation. Owing to the construction of 
the interior of the station it is necessary to place the apparatus 
in certain unchangeable positions which must, for the present, 
make any plan of moving the stalls utterly impracticable. 

A department like this requires constant attention and a cer- 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tain degree of familiarity on your part, a watchfulness, in fact^ 
in order that you may become acquainted with its system, its 
officers and its members. 

You should understand its needs and requisites, for in this 
department every citizen must feel the deepest interest, but to 
no one is that interest more vital than to you, gentlemen of 
the city council. 

There is but one matter connected with the lire department 
to which I call your attention, and it is a matter that has been 
often considered V)y my predecessors, as well as by myself. I 
have reference to a modern and quickly manoeuvred hook and 
ladder truck. I do believe that for the more complete efficiency 
of the department there is great need of this addition. 

Parks. 

The beginnings of our park system are of comparatively 
recent date. To those among us who can look back a quarter 
of a century the parks are a revelation. Few persons, I fancy,, 
can indulge in this retrospection without mingled sensations of 
surprise and delight. In the early eighties the idea of a public 
park in Concord would have suggested the optimism of incip- 
ient insanity. Today our parks enhance the charms of Con- 
cord many fold. AVhite Park and Rollins Park have paid for 
themselves many times over in the pleasure and pride they 
have given to the young and old of our city. ISTo expenditure 
of public money yields a surer return than do the appropria- 
tions for these exquisite recreation grounds. Public sentiment 
is overwhelmingly in favor of liberality toward our parks. To 
cripple their yearly improvements or to interrupt their accus- 
tomed care would be to chill the love of the beautiful and to 
dull the zest of healthful sports at the very source of their 
inspiration. Let us then conserve these parks, and add to 
their attractive features whenever we can. 

The last administration certainly took a step in this direc- 
tion by adding an inclosure for deer at Rollins Park. 

The act of the commissioners in making a spacious play- 
ground at White Park has met a long desired want and given 
satisfaction to a large number of persons. These playgrounds 



mayor's address. 11 

are now essential features in every city, and should be estab- 
lished whenever practicable. It would, I am sure, afford infi- 
nite pleasure to the residents of the south section of the city if 
a suitable recreation ground could be made somewhere in the 
vicinity of Rollins Park. The question of cost respecting a 
provision like this is of slight moment in comparison to the 
deUght and usefulness such a purchase would afford. 

If narrowness and blindness had prevailed on the part of 
former administrations concerning our parks, and the land had 
been allowed to go into houselots, would not the people of 
Concord now regret such a neglect of official opportunity ? Look 
forward five and twenty years and the question of investment 
answers itself. Bythe sale of the city's interest in the old county- 
city building nearly all the land west of the courthouse still 
remains in the possession of the city, and is reserved for public 
use. It is most desirable that this land should come under the 
control of the park commissioners with a view to its improve- 
ment and care. Perhaps not much work needs to be done, yet 
there are a i&w obvious changes that ought to be made. First 
of all that hideous and useless hedge should be removed, the 
paths might be enlarged, additional paths opened and seats 
installed. My plan would be to do those things and very httle 
more, for it seems to be understood that band concerts will be 
held there as in the past. 

Police. 

This department is now well organized and well equipped 
to perform its important and exacting part in city affairs. 

The number of patrolmen has been increased until the num- 
ber is adequate to the duties incumbent on the police in a city 
of Concord's mileage and population. 

In my opinion the last administration took a comprehensive 
and common-sense view of the relations of this department to 
the needs of the whole community. 

At last a suitable patrol wagon, so much needed for many 
years, has been provided, and its usefulness abundantly demon- 
strated. The present city marshal follows the recommenda- 
tion of his predecessor respecting a police stable. As to this 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

matter, I now express no opinion, but I do submit that for us 
to build a police stable before we build a city stable would be 
censurable and hard to explain. A comparison of the relative 
needs of the two departments will, I am sure, bring you to 
this conclusion. 

Public Libuauy. 

I have words only of praise respecting the public library. 

The policy of the librarian, I am sure, meets with public 
approval, and considering the physical limitations of the insti- 
tution the policy accomplishes all that the public can reasona- 
bly demand. Personally I hold the library and its progressive 
management in the highest esteem, and I rejoice at the condi- 
tions now prevailing as compared to the censurable neglect 
and indifference of former years. But, improved as the situa- 
tion now is, I entertain the belief that the library is only mark- 
ing time, and that in the near future philanthropy %vill mani- 
fest its munificence by erecting a public library, beautiful and 
commodious, and thoughtfully adapted to the needs of this 
intelligent community. 

Concord has been blessed with many generous friends who 
have given freely of their wealth toward the erection of public 
edifices and works of art, and judging the future by the past, 
may we not indulge in hope respecting a new library V 

Schools. 

Interest in our public schools, always dear to the hearts of 
the American people, is and ever has been a sterling charac- 
teristic of the citizens of Concord. There are at this time 
attending our schools almost 2,600 {nipils, and the number in- 
creases yearlj'. 

Want of convenient accommodation is already evident in 
some of our schoolrooms, and for this condition tliere is but 
one remedy. 

The day is near at hand when larger schoolhouses must be 
built at the north end and at the south end. During the i)ast 
year a new building has been built and opened in that part of 
the city so called the Plains. With exceeding ap))ro})riateness 



mayor's addkess, is 

this house lias been named the Harriet P. Dame School. This 
is a well constructed and admirably lighted, four-room build- 
ing, with three rooms now in use ; yet a few years ago the 
children in that part of Concord were all accommodated in an 
old-fashioned house having but a single room. This increase 
in attendance is an illustration of what is taking place else- 
where in the district. 

Seweiis. 

To the subject of sewers I must invite your especial atten- 
tion. Two years ago I addressed myself to this subject, and 
suggested that we engage the services of a well-accredited 
civil engineer to study the situation and to submit plans and 
recommendations concerning the improvement and enlarge- 
ment of our entire system. I urge now what I urged then ; 
but owing to knowledge since derived, I have become more 
confirmed in niy views. Personal cognizance of individual 
cases arising from inadequate sewers compels me to repeat my 
former suggestion. My suggestion, and I trust that it will 
meet your approval, is this : Secure an expert engineer, and 
let us see what he may recommend us to do in order to make 
our system of sewers sufficiently large to perform their proper 
work, not only for the present but for years to come. Our 
sewers were begun under municipal conditions very dissimilar 
to those now existing, and while improvements and extensions 
have since been made to the original system, there confronts 
us today an urgent demand for radical reconstruction. Later, 
gentlemen, I shall ask for the authority to secure the services 
of an engineer such as I have mentioned. 

Streets. 

In no department have I taken deeper interest during my 
term of office than in the highway department. Our citizens 
demand good roads and good streets. And yet, no municipal 
subject is surrounded with more perplexities and real diffi- 
culties. On the one side we have to overcome the narrow 
economies and prejudices of the past ; on the other side we 
must face the cost and burden of the present and the future. 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I have given diligent study to this subject, and I have rehic- 
tantly reached the conchision that I do not consider it advis- 
able at this time to depart from our custom of yearl}^ appropri- 
ations and expenditures. To undertake and carry out a plan 
of permanent street construction such as I should like to see 
throughout this city, would involve an issue of bonds too large 
in amount to be favored by this administration. We must, 
therefore, hold to our accustomed course, and do the best we 
can with the money we have. I earnestly recommend an 
appropriation for the continuation of the Penacook road, and 
such other construction as may be decided upon. Pleasant 
Street, at least from Main to Green, should be concreted the 
coming season. And in relation to Pleasant Street, I believe 
the time has come to begin a bank wall, and to raise the grade 
opposite the State Hospital pond. On the north side the city 
land is rapidly becoming adapted to house building, and we 
should see to it that other conditions a!re attended to. Pleas- 
ant Street, rather than Warren, is the natural sti'eet to St. 
Paul's School and Hopkinton, but its unsuitable condition for 
many years has turned travel elsewhere. 

Another ])art of the city calls for permanent work, that part 
of North State Street from Penacook Street to Blossom Hill 
gateway. Here the conditions will involve an unusual outlay 
of money in order to construct the street as it should be. 

The Loudon road, greatly improved during the year, must 
not be forgotten in our appropriations. Regretfully as I dis- 
miss the subject of thorough and comprehensive street con- 
struction, I feel that prudence and matured judgment admit of 
no choice on my part. But there is another very important 
matter connected with the highway department to which I 
desire to direct your favorable consideration. It is the build- 
ing of a new city stable. This question was thoroughly inves- 
tigated by the last city council, and is completely understood 
by many members of this council. To prolong the ill advised 
conditions existing at the stable would be unjustified in every 
point of view. It is also the opinion of the committee ap- 
pointed to examine this matter that the present stable and 
sheds should be abandoned, the site sold for house lots, and a 



mayor's address. 15 

new stable witli coinmodious sheds be built on the city land 
between Pleasant and Warren streets. The report of the 
committee was unanimously adopted in joint convention. 

I believe that the money derived from the sale of the pres- 
ent site will meet largely the cost of the new buildings. This 
is tlie one subject of an original nature involving anj' unusual 
outlay that I earnestly recommend. Humaneness to brutes, 
considerations of public health and security to property, as 
well as sound biisiness principles, urge this subject to your 
favorable and earliest consideration. 

In my first inaugural address 1 spoke about the cleanliness 
and attractiveness of our streets. This will be better under- 
stood -by those that visit other cities and compare their condi- 
tion with our own. My pride in Concord, as well as yours, 
has often been stimulated by the favorable comments offered 
by visitors and strangers. I doubt very much if in the future 
Concord will be materially changed from what she has been in 
the past. A progressive, sane and attractive city seems to be 
her manifest destiny. Her development will be along the 
lines of contented home-making and diversified industries. 
Our streets, therefore, will be taken as indicating to a certain 
extent the public spirit of our citizens. Cleanliness of the 
streets above all else should be our purpose, not alone the 
cleanliness imposed on the highway department, but that other 
cleanliness which ought to be the duty of the citizen himself. 
The indiscriminate tossing into our streets of newspapers, 
handbills and wrapping papers, to be whirled al)Out by every 
wind, is altogether too common. Such a habit scares horses, 
liesides marring the natural beauty of our streets. 

Then there are signs stretching across the sidewalks. These 
detract not only from the fine appearance of our principal 
business streets, but they are obstructions to the firemen. 
I l:)elieve that our merchants, when they think over this matter, 
will cheerfully do their part toward removing these defects. 
As to tossing papers into the streets, let us hope that we have 
seen the worst of that ill-becoming and reprehensible habit. 

These, then, gentlemen of the city council, are some of the 
ideas and suggestions that seem to me appropriate to call to 



16 CITY OF CONCOliD. 

your attention at this time. As the administration advances 
other questions will undoubtedly come before you, some of 
them new and never before considered, questions involving 
important interests and establishing grave precedents. Your 
rule of action will depend entirely upon yourselves. Your 
sole guide should always be to reconcile what you do with the 
benefit and welfare of the whole city. Ijc cautious lest private 
measures masquerade as public good ; do not offset one ques- 
tion for another, judge each measure by itself, be unprejudiced,, 
firm and fair, and allow no man to have authority without 
responsibility, or influence without restraint. 



Ordinances and Joint Resolutions 

PASSED DURING THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 8. 1906. 



CITY OP CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

Ax Okdinance in amendment op an ordinance entitled "An: 
Okdinance kei^ating to the building and fire precinct." 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That an ordinance entitled "An Ordinance relating to' 
the building and fire precinct," passed December 30, 1904, be and 
hereby is amended by adding to the end of Section 1 of said ordi- 
nance the following: Any person erecting or causing to be erected, 
moving or causing to be moved, enlarging or causing to be enlarged, 
any wooden building or setting up or causing to be set up, or using 
any steam, gas, naphtha, gasolinej or other engine in any building, 
contrary to the foregoing provisions, shall be fined twenty dollars for 
each offense. 

Passed February 13, 1005. 



An Ordinance in relation to cemetery trust funds being in 
accordance with chapter 40, LAvrs OF 1899, and with an 

ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL PASSED NOVEMBER 14, 1899. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, asfdlows : 

Section 1. The city treasurer shall convert into cash ail cemetery 
trust funds and place the amount thereof in the city treasury, said 
amount to be subject to the payment of such city debts or to such 
city purposes as the city council shall determine. 

Sect. 2. The city treasurer shall open an account with each ceme- 
tery trust fund, so taken, and credit each fund with the amount of 
principal received therefor and on all such amounts the City of Con- 
cord shall pay a yearly interest of 3+ per centum, but any surplus 
income belonging to any fund, now earned or hereafter to be earned, 
shall be credited to such fund and be expended in accordance with 
the conditions, if any, attached to such fund. 

Sect. 3. Any money or security now paid to the city or hereafter 
to be paid, for cemetery trust fund purposes shall be placed in the 
city treasury and be subject to such use, credit and yearly interest as 
provided in this ordinance. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect as the finance committee 
shall direct. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 
2 



18 CITY OF CONCORD, 

An Ordixance in amendment of an ordinance entitled "An 
Ordinance amending chapter xi of city ordinance relat- 
ing TO CITY MESSENGER," PASSED SEPTEMBER 12, 1904. 

Be it ordained by the Ctt[i Council of the Clfj/ of Concord, un follows .- 

Section 1. That an ordinance entitled "An Ordinance amending 
chapter xi of City Ordinances relating to city messenger," passed Sep- 
tember 12, 1904, be and hereby is amended as follows: by adding to 
the first paragraph of said ordinance the following: "and shall be 
present at the City Hall on such evenings as the water-works office or 
the tax collector's office are open, and at all times when the City Hall 
is ojjen for any purpose": — and that said ordinance be further 
amended by striking out the word "six" in the second paragraph 
thereof and inserting in place thereof the word "eight," and by add- 
ing to the end of said paragraph the following: "in full for all ser- 
vices," so that said ordinance as amended will read — 

That chapter xi of City Ordinance be amended by striking out in 
section 2 all after the words "when so lequested" in the fourth line 
and substituting the following — He shall be in attendance at all meet- 
ings of the city council, the board of mayor and aldermen and meet- 
ings of committees, held in City Hall and shall be present at the City 
Hall on such evenings as the water-works office or the tax collector's 
office are open, and at all times when the City Hall is open for any 
purpose. 

He shall have custody and care of City Hall and Auditorium and 
the grounds and sidewalks pertaining thereto. He shall have the 
care and be responsible for the cleanliness of offices, rooms and cor- 
ridors of City Hall and of the Auditorium dressing rooms, stage, 
entrances and all appurtenances belonging thereto. He shall have 
charge of the heating and lighting of City Hall and the Auditorium 
and shall give the necessary time and attention thereto. The com- 
pensation for the city messenger shall be $800 a year, payable each 
month, in full for all services. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed March i:^, 1905. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 21 of the revised 
ordinances extending the street sprinkling precinct. 

lie it ordained b;/ (he City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. The street sprinkling precinct shall include, in addi- 
tion to the territory described in chapter 21 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances and amendments thereto, the following territory: Beginning 
at the junction of South Main and Water streets thence southerly on 
Water Street to the intersection of Water and Hall streets: thence 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 19 

southerly on Hall Street to a point opposite the southerly line of the 
buildings of the IJolfe and Rumford Asylum. All lands, with the 
inhabitants thereof, abutting on the parts of Water and Hall streets 
above described are hereby included in the street sprinkling pre- 
cinct. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 10, 1905. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to 15e raised for the ensuing financial year for the use 
of the ^city. 

Be it orduuied by the CUij Council of the Cittj of Concord, nsfolhjws: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within said city, the sum of 
$54,000 to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the city for 
the ensuing financial year, which, together with the sums which may 
be raised by taxes on railroads and from other sources shall be appro- 
priated as follows : 

For payment of interest on bonds $6,896.00 

payment of interest on temporary loans .... 1,. 500.00 

support of city poor 800.00 

incidentals and land damages 4,000.00 

salaries of members of city council 2,150.00 

printing and stationery .;, 000.00 

aid to Margaret Pillsbury Hospital o, 000.00 

decorating the graves of soldiers and sailors . . . 460.00 

dependent soldiers, city 150.00 

public school text-books 3, .500.00 

open air concerts 300.00 

public baths 2.50.00 

Blossom Hill Cemetery 1,000.00 

Old North Cemetery 100.00 

West Concord Cemetery 75.00 

Millville Cemetery ,50.00 

Pine Grove Cemetery 150.00 

Old Fort Cemetery . . 15.00 

Horse Hill Cemetery 25.00 

Woodlawn Cemetery 25.00 

Soucook Cemetery 20.00 

parks 3,500.00 

Penacook Park 125.00 

Washington Square 25.00 

repairs buildings 2,000.00 

$32,116.00 



20 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Salary of sanitary officei 
Salary of board . 
Fumigation supplies . 
Miscellaneous 



!!;l,200.0a 
.75.00 
12.5.00 
600.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries, regular force 

Salaries special . 

Salary janitor 

Salary police commissioners 

Telephone, private line 

Water 

Lights .... 

Ice 

Board and shoeing horse . 
Horse hire .... 
Helmets and buttons 

Fuel 

Incidentals 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Salaries 

Books and incidentals 



■¥2,000.00 

.$12,02.5.00 
400.00 
270.00 
1.50.00 
164..32 

43. oa 

160.00 
5.00 

325.00 
30.00 
50.00 

525.00 

600.00 

$14,747.32 

. $2,760.00 
. 2,240.00 

$5,000.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



Salary city engineer 

Salary assistants 

Supplies 

Repairs 

Incidentals 



$1,500.00 

1,100.00 

1.50.00 

50.00 

200.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Salary commissioner 
General maintenance 

Catch basins 

New concrete sidewalks . 
llepairs, concrete sidewalks 

Trees 

Permanent work, Penacook Road . 

Bog Road 

Loudon Road .... 

South Pembroke Road 

North State Street, Walker Street to cem 



etery 



$3,000.00 

$1,400.00 

22,000.00 

1,. 500. 00 

2,000.00 

1,. 500. 00 

500.00 

2,500.00 

600.00 

500.00 

500.00 

5,000.00 



$38,000.00 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 21 

FIKE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries, permanent men !t>7,074.00 

Salaries, semi-annual G,960.00 

Salai-ies, vacations 624.50 

Rent, Veterans' Association 150.00 

Forage 1,000.00 

Fuel 900.00 

Lights 600.00 

Horseshoeing 325.00 

Horse hire 800.00 

Laundry 52.00 

Fire alarm 1,000.00 

Water 119.50 

Supplies chemical 50.00 

House man 80.00 

Incidentals 1,665.00 

A22,000.00 

SALARIES. 

Mayor $1,000.00 

City clerk • 1,200.00 

Overseer of poor, Ward 1 30.00 

Overseer of poor, Ward 2 10.00 

Overseer of pool-. Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 . . . . .350.00 

City solicitor 500.00 

City treasurer 250.00 

City messenger 759.68 

•Care of city clocks 110.00 

Clerk common council 50.00 

Board of education. Union School District .... 250.00 

Board of education. District No. 20 50.00 

Board of education. Town School District .... 200.00 

Nine assessors 2,700.00 

Nine moderators 63.00 

Nine ward clerks 90.00 

Twenty-seven selectmen 189.00 

Thirty-six inspectors of election 180.00 

Twenty-seven supervisors ....... 216.00 

Judge police court . 1,000.00 

Clerk police court 200 00 

Collector of taxes, so much as may be necessary of the sum of 1,500.00 

Truant officer .500.00 

$11,397.68 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of fifty-one 
thousand one hundred ninety-five dollars ($51,195.00) for the support 

of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, together with the 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be appropriated and divided 
among the several school districts according to the valuation thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the- 
cemeteries of the city one half of the income from the sale of lots 
and the income derived from the care of lots and grading, which sum 
shall be deposited by the superintendent, or others receiving them, 
in the city treasury. The care of lots for which the city holds trust 
funds shall be paid from the money appropriated for the care of 
cemeteries and so much of the income of these trust funds as may be 
thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at the close of 
the year and the remainder, in each instance, credited to the indi- 
vidual funds. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
use of the Public Library in the purchase of books the amount col- 
lected for fines. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 10, 1905. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants- 
within the street sprinkling precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling 
precinct of said city, the sum of five thousand six hundred dollars 
($5,000) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the street 
sprinkling precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be 
appropriated as follows : 

For sprinkling streets $5,60O' 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
W^ITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE CITY WATER PRECINCT FOR THE ENSU- 
ING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City (f Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the water precinct 
of the city, the sum of six thousand dollars ($6,000) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of the water precinct for the ensiling 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 23 

For water for hydrant service $6,000 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 

An Okdinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits of the garbage precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be It ordained by the C'dij Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to ' 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the garbagje precinct 
of the city, the sum of five thousand seven hundred dollars ($5,700) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the garbage precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as fol- 
lows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said pre- 
cinct $5,700 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE LIMITS 
OF THE GAS AND SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINAN- 
CIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follow s: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the gas and sewerage 
precinct of said city, the sum of three thousand four hundred dollars 
($3,400) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be api)ropriated as fol- 
lows: 

For repairs and construction $1,000 

For interest on notes and bonds ...... 2,400 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of fifteen 
thousand dollars ($15,000) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of the precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be 
appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets $15,000 

Sect. 3. This oi-dinance shall take effect on its pas.sage. 
Passed Apvil 10, 1905. 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinaxce fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits of the west concord sewerage precinct 
for the ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There sball be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord 
sewerage precinct the sum of sixteen hundred seventy-six and thirty- 
five one-hundredth dollars ($1,676.35) to defray the necessary expenses 
and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which 
shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with the ordinance creating a sinking fund . . . $1,000.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 676.35 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect on its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE EAST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoios: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord 
sewerage precinct, the sum of one hundred fifty-two and fifty one 
hundredths dollars (§1.52.50) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of said pi-ecinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be 
appropriated as follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . . . $100.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 52..50 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
within THE LIMITS OF ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the St. Paul's School 



ORDINANCKS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. io 

sewerage precinct, the sum of seven hundred eighty-five dollars ($785) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . . . $500 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 135 

For payment of expense of construction above amount 

raised by issue of bonds 150 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
TO be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

WITHIN the limits OF THE PENACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR 
THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordainfd by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook sewer- 
age precinct, the sum of twenty-four hundred and fifty dollars ($2,450) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . . . $1,300 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 740 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said precinct . 410 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 



An Ordinance establishing a lighting precinct for the ac- 
commodation OF THE inhabitants OF THE VILLAGE OF EAST 

concord in said concord. 

Be it ordohied by Ihe City Counril of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

Section 1. A lighting precinct for the accommodation of the inhab- 
itants of the village of East Concord, in said city, is hereby fixed and 
established, as follows: Said precinct shall be known as the East 
Concord Lighting precinct and shall embrace all the territory in Ward 
Two which is included in the Union School District together with the 
inhabitants thereof. 

Passed April 24, 1905. 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance in amendment of an okdinance entitled "An 
Ordinance establishing a precinct for the collection of 
garbage," passed April 13, 1903. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, asfolloio.s: 

Section 1. The precinct for the collection of garbage shall 
include, in addition to the territory described in an ordinance entitled 
" an ordinance establishing a precinct for the collection of garbage," 
passed April 13, 1903, and amendments thereto, the following territory : 
Beginning at the corner of Pillsbury and Broadway streets, thence 
south on Broadway Street to Stone Street; thence westerly on Stone 
Street to Bow Street; thence northerly on Bow Street and South 
Street to Pillsbury Street, said precinct shall include in addition to 
the territory within the above-described limits, all lots, with their 
inhabitants, abutting on the streets hereinbefore named. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 24, 1905. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 21 of the revised or- 
dinances, extending the street sprinkling precinct. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, ax follows: 

Section 1. The street-sprinkling precinct shall include, in addi- 
tion to the territory described in chapter 21 of the revised ordinances 
and amendments thereto, the following territory: Broadway Street 
from Pillsbury Street to the entrance of Rollins Park. All lands, with 
the inhabitants thereof, abutting on that part of Broadway Street 
above described are hereby included in the street-sprinkling precinct. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 24, 1905. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
within THE LIMITS OF THE EAST CONCORD LIGHTING PRECINCT FOR 
THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord light- 
ing precinct tiie sum of four hundred twenty-four dollars ($424) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year which shall be appropriated as follows: 
For the lighting of streets $424.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 8, 1905. 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 27 

An Ordinance adopting the pkovisions of chaptkk 12-1 of the 

PUBLIC statutes AS AMENDED BY CHAPTER 76 OF THE SESSION 
LAWS OF 1905, RELATING TO DEALERS IN OLD METALS. 

Be if ordained b>/ the Cil>/ Coiniril of the City of Concord, ax fuUow-s: 

Section 1. Tlie provisions of chapter 124 of the Public Statutes. 
as amended by chapter 70 of the session laws of 1905, entitled " An 
act in amendment of chapter 124 of the Public Statutes relating to 
dealers in old metals," are hereby adopted to be in force in the City 
of Concord. 

Passed August 14, 1905. 



An Ordinance establishing a board of hydrant commissioners 

AND prescribing ITS DUTIES. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, a.-^ follows : 

Section 1. For the more effectual securing of proper hydrant 
service for protection against fire, there is hereby established aboard, 
to consist of three persons, which shall be known as the board of 
hydrant commissioners. The city engineer, the chief engineer of the 
fire department and the superintendent of the water-works shall, 
ex officio, constitute said board. The city engineer shall be chairman 
of said board, and may, and at the request of either of the other mem- 
bers shall, call meetings of the board at such times and places as he 
may direct. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of said board to consider and pass 
upon all recommendations submitted by any of its members, and all 
requests or complaints made to any of its members by other persons^ 
relative to the city's hydrant service; to direct the installation of new 
hydrants wherever needed, and to prescribe their character and loca- 
tion; to direct such changes in the character or location of 
existing hydrants as may be necessary or advisable; to recommend 
such changes in the pipe lines and laterals connecting with 
hydrants now existing or hereafter installed as may be necessary for 
furnishing the same with an adequate supply of water; and, gener- 
ally, to recommend such changes in the water and hydrant service as 
in the judgment of said board may be necessary and practicable for 
the securing of proper fire protection within the city. The decision 
of a majority of the members of said board upon any of the foregoing 
matters shall be treated for all purposes as the decision of the board. 

Sect. 3. All directions and recommendations of said board rela- 
tive to any of the matters enumerated in section two of this ordinance 
shall be transmitted by it in writing to the president of the board of 
water commissioners, and the board of water commissioners shall 
cause all such directions and recommendations to be complied with 
and carried into effect forthwith, unless in its judgment such compli- 
ance will involve unwarrantable expense or be otherwise inexpedient. 



28 . CITY OF CONCOKL). 

in which event said board of water commissioners shall, within thirty 
days from the transmission to its president of the directions or rec- 
ommendations which it regards as inexpedient, file with the city -clerk 
a statement in writing of said directions or recommendations and of 
its objections to complying therewith. The city clerk shall thereupon 
transmit a copy of said statement to the chairman of the board of 
hydrant commissioners, and shall lay said statement before the city 
council at its next regular meeting; and the city council shall examine 
the questions so presented, hear the respective boards with reference 
thereto, and make such orders in the premises as the public good 
requires. Said orders shall be final and conclusive, and copies of the 
joint resolution or ordinance containing the same shall be transmitted 
to the president of the board of water commissioners and to the chair- 
man of the board of hydrant commissioners by the city clerk. 

Sect. 4. Nothing herein contained shall be construed to prevent 
The board of water commissioners from making extensions and im- 
provements of the water service without direction from the board of 
hydrant commissioners; but the location and character of all pro- 
posed new hydrants shall be fixed by said board of hydrant commis- 
sioners before the same are installed, and no hydrant shall be discon- 
tinued or its location changed, nor the size of any pipe on which a 
hydrant is dependent for its supply decreased, without the apjiroval 
In writing of said last-named board. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed December 11, 1905. 



An Ordinance in amendment of an ordinance passed march 
13, 1905, entitled " An Ordinance in relation to cemetery 
trust funds," beino in accordance with chapter 40, laws of 
1899, and with an ordinance of the city council passed no- 
VEMBER 14, 1899. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. When directed by the city council, the city treasurer 
shall convert into cash all existing cemetery trust funds, and place 
the proceeds thereof, together with income tlierefrom, in the city 
treasury, to be used for such purposes as the city council may deter- 
mine. Such trust funds as hereafter may be received by the city shall 
be converted into cash by the city treasurer and the proceeds there- 
from paid into the city treasury forthwith. 

Sect. 2. The city treasurer shall open an account with each ceme- 
tery trust fund, so taken, and credit each fund with the amount of 
principal received therefor and on all such amounts the City of Con- 
■cord shall pay a yearly interest of three and a half per centum, but 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 29 

any surplus income belonging to any fund, now earned or hereafter to 
be earned, shall be credited to such fund and be expended in accord- 
ance with the conditions, if any, attached to such fund. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances, or parts of ordinances, inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed Januarys, 190G. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

A Joint Resolution in relation to paying salaries, pay 

BOLLS AND RENTS. 

Resolved by the City Cuuncil of the City of Concord, us follows: 

That the mayor be, and hereby is authorized to draw his warrant 
on the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, pay rolls and 
rents as the same sliall become due during the present municipal 
terra, and all bills so paid shall be laid before the committee on 
accounts and claims at their next meeting. 

Passed January 24, 190.5. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the city*- clerk to have 
printed two hundred copies of the mayor's inaugural 

ADDRESS. ' 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city clerk be authorized and instructed to have printed 
200 copies of the mayor's inaugural address, the expense of same to 
be charged to the account of printing and stationery. 

Passed January 24, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution providing for the printing of rosters 
OF the city government. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, os follows: 

That the city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the present 
city government and cause 200 copies thereof to be printed for the 
use of the members; and that the expense of printing the same be 
charged to the account of printing and stationery. 

Passed January 24, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating fifteen hundred dollars 

FOR furniture AND FURNISHINGS AT CITY HALL. 

Resolved by the City Conncil of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sura of fifteen hundred dollars be and the 
same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 



30 CITV OF CONCORD. 

otherwise appropi-iated for providing furniture and furnishings at 
City Hall, said sum to be ci-edited to City Hall furniture appropria- 
tion and expended under direction of the mayor and the committee 
on lands and building. 

Sect. 2. This shall take effect on its passage. 

Passed February 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution asking fok sealed proposals fok print- 
ing AND binding the ANNUAL CITY REPORTS. 

Eesoh-ed by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 
proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1904, 
and submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full 
power to act in the matter. 

Passed February 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to clerk hire. 

ResnkeiJ by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor be and is hereby authorized to employ 
such assistance as may be necessary to audit the accounts of the city 
•during the year 1904, and to prepare the annual report for jirinting, 
the cost of such assistance to be charged to the account of incidental 
and land damages. 

Sect. 2. This shall take effect on its passage. 

Passed February 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution to erect a public urinal. 
Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a special committee consisting of the health officer and one 
alderman and one councilman, to be appointed by the mayor and the 
president of the common council respectively, is hereby authorized 
and directed to inquire into the expediency and cost of building a 
public urinal. 

Passed February 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating two hundred and forty- 
three dollars and twenty-four cents for text-books used 

IN UNION school DISTRICT. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of two hundred and forty-three dollars 
and twenty-four cents be and the same is hereby appropriated out of 



OKDIXANCKS AND -lOINT RESOLUTIONS. 31 

any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the pur- 
chase of text-books used in Union School District. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect on its passage. 

Passed February 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution account repairs at central fire sta- 
tion, ALERT HOSE HOUSE, GOOD WILL HOSE HOUSE AND WARD 
SEVEN WARD HOUSE. 

Resolved by the City Council of tin- City of Concord, <is follows: 

That the sum of two hundred sixteen dollars and fifty-five cents 
<$216.55) be and hereby is appropriated for repairs as follows: 

At Central Fire Station, repairs to floor and roof, building new 
stall, new radiator and piping, and connecting new stall with sewer. 

At Alert and Good Will Hose Houses, repairs to floors. 

At Ward Seven Wa-rd House, new lock on door. 

Same to be charged to account of repairs to buildings. 

Passed February 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution for appropriation, account repairs at 

CITY BUILDING. 

Reanhed by the City Council of the City (f Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred four dollars ($104) or such a part 
thereof as may be necessary, be and is hereby appropriated for the 
following repairs at City Building: 

Adding 64 feet of two-column radiation to that already installed in 
drafting room of city engineer. 

Installing a circuit run in basement connecting all drip pipes, to 
carry them to tank and thence to sewer. 

To provide attachment to boilers, for purpose of cleaning flues by 
steam. 

2. These repairs shall be made under the direction of the commit- 
tee on lands and buildings and shall be charged to account of repairs 
to buildings. 

Passed February 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the issuance of bonds to 

THE AMOUNT OF FORTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($45,000) TO 
RAISE MONEY FOR THE PURPOSE OF REDEEMING WATER BONDS 
TO THE AMOUNT OF FORTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($45,000) 
ISSUED OCTOBER 2, 1882. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, asfollotos: 

Section 1. That the treasurer of the City of Concord is hereby 
authorized to procure by loan on the credit of the city the sum of 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

forty-five thousand dollars ($45,000) for the purpose of redeeming 
four per cent, water bonds to the amount of forty-five thousand dol- 
lars ($45,000) issued October 2, 1882. Said bonds were issued. under 
an ordinance passed March 25, 1882, and were made payable October 
1, 1912, with the provision that they were redeemable after twenty 
yeai'S if the city elected to redeem. The said treasurer is hereby 
instructed to use the money secured by the loan hereby authorized 
to redeem said bonds. The interest on said bonds shall cease on 
May 1, 1905, and the city treasurer is hereby instructed to give notice 
of this to the holders of such bonds by personal notice where practi- 
cable, and by publication in the Concord Ece)un(jlMo)iitor and the 
Daily Patriot. 

Sect. 2. Bonds of said city shall be issued for said loan, signed by 
the mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer and sealed with, 
the seal of the city, and said bonds shall in all respects comply with 
the provisions of the " Municipal Bonds Act, 1895." Said bonds shall 
be payable to bearer and shall be dated April 1, 1905, and be num- 
bered from one to forty-five inclusive and shall be for the sum of one 
thousand dollars (§1,000) each, and shall be due and payable as folr 
lows: Ten of said bonds, from number one to number ten inclusive, 
on the 1st day of April, 1912, five of said bonds, from number eleven 
to number fifteen inclusive, on the 1st day of April, 1921, thirty of 
said bonds from number sixteen to number forty-five inclusive, on 
April 1, 1922. 

Said bonds shall have coupons attached for the semi-annual interest 
thereon, payable on the fir.-t days of April and October in each year 
during the term said bonds run, at a rate of not exceeding three and 
one-half per cent, per annum. Said coupons shall be signed by the 
treasurer of the city either in the original or facsimile. 

The interest on said bonds shall be paid at the office of the treas- 
urer of the City of Concord, or at the First National Bank of Boston, 
Boston, Massachusetts, on the first days of April and October in each 
year during the terms of said bonds upon presentation of the interest 
coupons, and the bonds shall be paid at the oflice of the treasurer of 
the City of Concord or at the First National Bank of Boston, Boston, 
Massachusetts, upon presentation at maturity. 

Sect. 3. The city treasurer is hereby authorized to procure pro- 
posals for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized, and such bids as 
seem for the best interest of the city shall be accepted by him, pro- 
vided the same are approved by the finance committee. 

Sect. 4. All of said bonds owned by citizens of said Concord shall 
be exempt from taxation. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 33 

A Joint Resoi-ution kescinding joint kesolution passed De- 
cember 30, 1904, relative to erection of a carriage shed 

AT good will hose HOUSE. 

liesohflbi/ the City Council of tin- City of Cuitconl, as follows: 

That the erection of a carriage shed in connection with Good Will 
Hose House, authorized by joint resolution passed December 30, 
1904, not having been completed at the close of fiscal year 1904, the 
joint resolution is hereby rescinded. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution for the erection of a carriage shed in 

CONNECTION WITH THE GOOD WILL HOSE HOUSE. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, ((s follovjs : 

That the sum of two hundred thirty dollars and forty-four cents 
($230.44) is hereby alppropriated from money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, for the erection and painting of a carriage 
shed on the easterly side of Good Will Hose House, according to 
specifications already furnished by the Hutchinson Building Co., 
this appropriation to be chapged to the account of repairs to 
buildings. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution account repairs to b'iildings. 

Eesoh-ed by the City Coiindl of th<' City of Concord, us follows: 

Thatihe sum of eighty dollars ($80) or such a part thereof as may 
be necessary, be and hereby is appropriated from money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of following 
repairs to buildings: 

Erection of voting booth Ward One (1904). 

Shoring up barn fioor at Central Fire Station. 

Pointing up and repairing foundation wall at Central Fire Station. 

Minor repairs at Central Fire Station, including 500 feet of birch. 

Glass and setting at Good Will Hose House. 

This appropriation to be charged to account of repairs to buildings. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution to reimburse the pioneer steam fire en- 
gine COMPANY no. 3, OF PENACOOK FOR MONEY EXPENDED FOR 
TWO HARNESSES FOR THE USE OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

licsoh-ed by thr City Council of th<' City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of ninety-three dollars and five cents ($93.05) be and 
hereby is appropriated to reimburse the Pioneer Steam Fire Engine 



34 CITV OF CONCOKD. 

Corapany No. 3 of Penacook, for two harnesses bought by said com- 
pany for the use of the lire department. The amount hereby appro- 
priated shall be charged to the account of the incidentals and land 
damages. 
Passed March 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution in favor of iiokace a. brown of ward 

FOUR. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of two dollars and twenty cents, the same being the 
poll tax assessed and collected in 1904, and jjaid by Horace A. Brown 
of Ward Four be paid back to Mr. Brown, who having reached the 
age of seventy was by law relieved from said poll tax. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and 

BUILDINGS to MAKE CURRENT REPAIRS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, a^ follows: 

That the committee on lands and buildings be authorized to expend 
such sums as may be necessary for current repairs, not exceeding 
$300 in any one month, the same to be charged to the appropriation 
for repairs to buildings. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to a temporary loan of 
seventy-five thousand dollars. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the committee on finance are hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not exceeding seventy-five thousand dol- 
lars for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the year 1905, 
upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall 
determine. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to the building of a stable 

FOR THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, us follows: 

That the land and buildings committee together with the commis- 
sioner of highways be authorized to procure a plan and specifications 
of a stable suitable for the highway department and to make report 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 35 

tbereon as soon as possible to the city council. The said stable shall 
be built on city land located between Pleasant and Warren streets. 

This resolution shall take effect ujion its passage. 

Passed March i:J, 1905. 



A Joint Kesolution in reference to the communication of 

PRENTISS M. KENT, RESPECTING THE GIFT OF A lililNKING FOUN- 
TAIN. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, asfollowf^ : 

That the board of mayor and aldermen and the common council 
accept with much gratitude the gift of a drinking fountain to be given 
by Prentiss M. Kent to be placed in front of the Court House on Main 
Street, and that the city engineer be directed to confer with Mr. Kent 
or his agents in regard to the foundation and water supply. 

Passed March 13, 100.5. 



A Joint Resolution relating to the board of health. 
Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That two members of the board of aldermen to be named by the 
mayor and two, members of the common council to be named by the 
president shall with the mayor be appointed a committee to examine 
into the powers and duties of the board of health, to consider the 
claims of Drs. Chancey Adams and Russell Wilkins now pending be- 
fore the committee on accounts and claims, and to examine the oi^in- 
ion of the city solicitor heretofore rendered to said committee as to 
the duties of board of health and city physician, and to report to the 
city council at the next regular meeting. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



A Concurrent Resolution of thanks to Austin coruin. 

Whereas Austin Corbin, president of the Blue Mountain Forest 
Association has by his present of deer done much to promote the 
pleasure of the people of Concord by adding to the attractions at 
Rollins Park, be it resolved by the city council of the City of Con- 
cord, as follows : 

That the board of mayor and aldermen and the common council of 
the City of Concord hereby express to Mr. Corbin their deep appre- 
ciation and thanks for his kindly interest and generosity in present- 
ing to the city the herd of four deer now at Rollins Park. 

Passed March 13, 1905. 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Joint Kesolution for improvement of city lot on avarren 

STREET AND ODD FELLOWS' AVENUE, 

Uesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, us follows : ' 

1. That the sum of one hundred and fifteen dollars ($115.00) or such 
part thereof as may be required, be and hereby is appropriated for 
the improvement of the city lot on Warren Street and Odd Fellows* 
Avenue. 

2. This money to be expended under the direction of the commit- 
tee on lands and buildings and charged to the account of incidentals 
and land damage. 

3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution providing for an investigation of the 
city's system of fire protection. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

Section 1. That the mayor, three members of the board of alder- 
men to be forthwith named by the mayor, the president of the com- 
mon council, and two other members of the common council to be 
forthwith named by the president, be and hereby are constituted a 
committee to examine into the condition of the city water supply and 
hydrant service on the evening of April 7, 1905, and the action of the 
fire department at the fire which occurred in the shoe factory build- 
ing on Bridge Street on that date, for the purpose of determining 
whether deficiencies exist in the city's system of fire protection and 
whether any department or employee of the city was at fault for the 
failure seasonably to extinguish said fire. 

Sect. 2. Said committee are hereby empowered and directed to ap- 
point a hearing or hearings, to summon before them and examine 
officers and employees of the city or of any of its departments, to take 
such further measures as they deem expedient for the determination 
of the questions aforesaid, and to report their conclusions and recom- 
mendations to the city council as soon as practicable. 

Sect. 3. Said committee may in their discretion employ a stenogra- 
pher, the expense of such stenographer to be charged to the account 
of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed April 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution in reference to providing a playground 

NEAR ROLLINS PARK. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City <f Concord, us fdloivs : 

That the committee on lands and buildings be instructed to inquire 
into the desirability of providing a public playground at the South 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 37 

End somewhere in the vicinity of Rollins Park, and if in the opinion 
of the committee it appears to be desirable said committee is further 
instructed to ascertain if land suitable for the purpose can be had in 
said locality together with the cost and terms of acquiring the same 
and to report to the city council as soon as practicable. 
Passed April 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution to provide for the installation of a 

DRINKING FOUNTAIN IN THE CITY BUILDING. 

Besohed by the Cllij Coiitiril of tlw City of Concord, os f<>ltoiof< : 

Section 1. That a sum not exceeding forty-eight dollars be and is 
hereby appro^jriated to install a drinking fountain in the city build- 
ing, the same to be charged to the account of "furniture and fixtures 
for the city building." 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect ujion its passage. 

Passed April 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution for extending water pipe in west con- 
cord cemetery for sprinkling purposes. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows. • 

That a sum not exceeding twenty-five dollars (!>25) be and the same 
hereby is appropriated for the purpose of extending the water pipes 
in West Concord Cemetery for sprinkling purposes, said sum to be 
expended under the direction of the cemetery committee and shall be 
charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed April 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the committee on sewers 

AND DRAINS TO EMPLOY A CONSULTING ENGINEER. 

Resohed by the City Covnril <f the City of Concord, as folloios : 

That committee on sewers and drains is hereby authorized to 
employ a consulting engineer to examine and report on our sewer- 
age system with recommendations for improvements and greater 
efficiency. 

Passed April 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating $900 for the purchase of 

HOSE for the fire DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of §900 is hereby appropriated for the purchase of 
,000 feet of Paragon hose for the use of the fire department, the 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

same to be paid for out of any moneys not otherwise appropriated, 
and charged to appropriation for hose, fire department. 
Passed April 24, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution in relation to coal, wood and ice. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, aft folloios: 

That the committee on finance be and hereby are directed to ask 
for bids for supplying the city witli coal, wood and ice for the ensu- 
ing year, and that the said committee have full power to accept or 
reject any bids offered. 

Passed April 24, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution in relation to flowers around memorial 

ARCH. 

Revolted by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That in accordance with custom the mayor is authorized to procure 
the setting out of flowers in front of the memorial arch. 
Passed April 24, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and- 

BUILDINGS to PROCURE SPECIFICATIONS AND BIDS FOR A STABLE 
FOR THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That the committee on lands and buildings be author- 
ized to procure specifications in accordance with plans of Randlett & 
Griffin and call for bids for construction of a stable for the highway 
department, to be located on the city lot between Warren and Pleas- 
ant streets. 

Sect. 2. That this resolution sliall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 24, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution authorizing the purchase of the lamprey 

ESTATE, NEAR ROLLINS PARK, FOR A PUBLIC PLAYGROUND. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That a sum not exceeding twenty-one hundred dollars- 
($2,100) be and hereby is appropriated from any money in the treas- 
ury not otlierwise appropriated, for tlie purchase of all that portion 
of the Lampi-ey estate lying south of Rollins Park and west of Broad- 
way, which has not already been sold, for the purpose of establishing 
a public playground, the same to be expended under the direction of 
the committee on lands and buildings. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 24, 1905. 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT IlESOLUTIONS. 39 

A Joint Resolution for furnishings in city iiali. buii.dinc;. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, a.<< follows : 

1. That the sura of forty-one dollars ($41) or such a part thereof as 
may be necessary, is hereby appropriated for the purchase of mat- 
ting for hall floors on second story of City Hall Building, the same to 
be expended under the direction of the committee on lands and 
buildings and charged to the appropriation for furnishings of city 
building. 

2. This resolution shall take effect on its passage. 
Passed May 8, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution authorizing the board of water commis- 
sioners TO EXCHANGE LANDS IN THE VILLAGE OF WEST CONCORD 
WITH UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs : 

That the board of water commissioners of said City of Concord be 
and hereby are authorized and empowered to sell to Union School 
District in said Concord a certain tract of land situated in the village 
of West Concord, bounded easterly by Quaker Street, northerly by 
Hutchins Street, of sufficient dimensions to erect a schoolhouse there- 
on, and sufficiept yard room therefor, and the president of said board 
of water commissioners is hereby authorized to sign a deed to said 
Union School District of said tract of land fixing definite boun- 
daries therein; that said board of water commissioners sliall reserve 
to said City of Concord and the successors forever the right for the 
water pipes now laying in and on said tract of land to remain therein, 
to enter upon, relay and repair the same, and to lay additional pipes 
hereafter if for any reason the laying of the same may be deemed 
necessary by said board of water commissioners or said City of Con- 
cord. Said board of water commissioners are hereby authorized to 
receive in payment for said tract of land a certain other tract of land 
with the buildings thereon situated in said village of West Concord, 
lying between the Concord & Claremont Railroad and the said Quaker 
Street, now used for school purposes by said district, allowing said 
district the use of the schoolhouse and said lot until such time as 
said Union School District shall have completed and occupied a new 
schoolhouse which is to be built on the land first above described. 

Passed May 8, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution in relation to band concerts for the sea- 
son OF 1905. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That in accordance with custom the mayor is authorized and 
directed to contract with Arthur F. Nevers for band concerts during 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the season of 1905, the concerts to be given in different wards, three 
concerts in old City Hall Park, two in Ward One, one in Ward Two, 
two in Ward Three, two at Rollins Park and two at White Park. 
Passed May 22, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution approphiating money for the erection of 

A STABLE FOR THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Resohcd by Ike City Connril (if the City of Coitcord, as folloios: 

That the sum of eight thousand five hundred dollars ($8,500) be and 
liereby is appropriated from any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for the erection of a stable for the highway department, 
the same to be expended under the direction of the committee on 
lands and buildings. 

Passed May 22, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution in relation to a collection of portraits 

OF MAYORS FOR CITY HALL. 

liesoh-ed by the City C(>U)icil of the City of Conrord, as follows: 

That the mayor be authorized to solicit from each mayor or his 
family a portrait of said mayor, either a large photograph or crayon, 
for the purpose of making a complete collection of portraits for City 
Hall. Such inevitable and necessary expenses as may be incurred 
in procuring said collection shall be charged to the appropriation for 
furniture and furnishings for City Hall. 

Passed June 12, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution to exempt the concord shoe factory 

COMPANY FROM TAXATION. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, asf(dluws: 

That the Concord Shoe Factory Company be exempted from taxa- 
tion for the period of 10 years upon a building which that corpora- 
tion proposes to erect to replace the building recently destroyed by 
fire. 

Passed June 12, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the expenditure of seventy- 
five DOLLARS for PENACOOK PARK. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City (f Concord, as follows: 

That a sum not exceeding seventy-five dollars ($75) be appropriated 
for the purchase of three new swings, six new park lights and new 
plank seats for Penacook Park, the same to be charged to the account 
of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed June 12, 1905. 



OKDI^"A^X'ES AND JOINT 1! KSOLUTIONS. 41 

A Joint Resolution account fowls killed uy doos. 
licsoJrvd hi/ the Citij Council of I he Cilij of Concord, (isfnlhu-s: 

Tliat the sum of seven dollars be and hereby is appropriated to 
pay the chiim of J. A. Coburn for live hens and one cockerel killed 
by dogs. 

Passed June 12, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution appropriating p:ight hundred sixteen 

DOLLARS AND 38-100 DOLLARS (.'pS16.3S) TO PAY FOR THE REAL 
ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR UNPAID TAXES FOR 
THE YEAR 1904. 

Bemked by the City Council of tltc City of Concoi-d, as follows; 

That the sum of eight hundred sixteen and 38-100 dollars (.$816.38) 
be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay the amount due from the 
City of Concord for real estate purchased at the tax collector's sale 
of real estate for the unpaid taxes for the year 1904. 

Passed June 12, 1905. 



A Joint Resoj^ution providing for enlarging rollins park 
BY the addition of certain land. 

lic.solved by the City Council of the City of Coyicord, asfidlowa: 

Section 1. That Rollins Park be enlarged by the addition of the 
following described parcels of land, to wit: 

(1) Lots numbered 15, 16 and 17 upon a plan of lots of the trust 
■estate of John H. Lamprey recorded in Merrimack County Registry 
•of Deeds as plan Xo. 137 and bounded beginning at the northeasterly 
■corner of the tract hereby described at the intersection of the west- 
erly line of Broadway with the southerly line of the street just south 
■of Rollins Park, thence by the southerly line of said street in a west- 
erly direction 182.32 feet to lot No. 14 on said plan, thence southerly 
Toy said lot 14 110 feet to the northerly line of a proposed street as 
shown on said plan, thence easterly 169.47 feet by the north line of 
said proposed street to said line of Broadway, thence northerly by 
said line of Broadway 110.7G feet to the point begun at. The above 
described belongs to Adolf Hammar of said Concord. 

(2) Lot No. 25 on a plan of lots of the trust estate of John H. Lam- 
prey recorded in Merrimack County Registry of Deeds as plan No. 
137, bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the northeast 
corner of the lot hereby described in the southerly line of a proposed 
street adjoining lot No. 26 on said plan thence westerly by the south- 
erly line of said proposed street 50 feet to the northeasterly corner of 
lot No. 24, thence southerly by said lot No. 24 106 34-100 feet, thence 



42 CITY OF CONGO IID. 

easterly 50 1-100 feet to the southwest corner of lot No. 27, thence 
northerly by lots 27 and 26 10(3 67-100 feet to the point begun at on 
said proposed street. The last described lot belonos to Ethel C. 
Fraser of said Concord. 

(3) Lot No. 26 on plan of lots of the trust estate of John H. Lam- 
prey recorded in Merrimack County Registry of Deeds as plan No. 
137, bounded as follows: Easterly by Broadway; northerly by a pro- 
posed street as shown on said plan; westerly by lot No. 2.5 on said 
plan, and southerly by lot No. 27 on said plan. The last described 
lot belongs to D. S. Rogers of said Concord. 

Sect. 2. The committee on lands and buildings is hereby author- 
ized to obtain said land by contract with the owners thereof if the 
same can be obtained for a reasonable price. 

Passed June 12, 1905. 

A Joint Resolution appropkiating two hundred dollars 
($200), or such a part thereof as may be necessary, for. 

SUPPLIES for city CLERK's OFFICE. 

Resolved by the Cltu Council of the City of Concord, asfolloii's: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200), or such a part thereof 
as may be necessary, be and hereby is, appropriated for the purchase 
of a typewriter, card cabinet and 10,000 cards for indexing vital 
statistics, and one vault truck for card index cabinet for use in the 
city clerk's office, the same to be charged to incidentals and land 
damages. 

Passed July 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution .making additional appropriation to the 

ACCOUNT of printing AND STATIONERY. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City rf Concord, as follows: 

That one thousand dollars be, and the same is, hereby appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, and 
credited to the account of printing and stationery. 

Passed July 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating money for furnishings at 

ALERT HOSE STATION. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City ef Concord, ds follows: 

That the sum of ten dollars ($10) is hereby appropriated for the 
purchase of marble shelf and two lambrequins in sleeping room at 
Alert Hose station, the same to be charged to account of incidentals 
and land damage. 

Passed July 10, 1905. 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 43^ 

A Joint Resolution ratifying the action of the city treas- 
urer IN PAYING out of THE CEMETERY TRUST FUNDS THE FOL- 
LOWING SUMS, TO wit: THIRTEEN THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED 
DOLLARS ($13,800) PLEASANT STREET EXTENSION BONDS, DUE 
JUNE 1, 1905, AND FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($5,000) BRIDGE 
BONDS, DUE JULY 1, 1905. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Conrord, (infolkno.s: 

That the payment by the city treasurer out of the cemetery trust 
funds of the following sums, to wit: Thirteen thuusand eight hun- 
dred dollars ($13,800) Pleasant Street Extension bonds, due June 1, 
1905, and five thousand dollars ($5,000) bridge bonds, due July 1, 1905, 
be and the same is hereby ratified and approved. 

Passed July 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating seventeen hundred dol- 
lars ($1,700) FOR THE CONCRETING OF PLEASANT STIiEET FROM 
MAIN TO STATE STREET. 

Resokedby the City Council of the City of Concord, asfdlows: 

That the sum of seventeen hundred dollars ($1,700) be and the 
same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, for the purjiose of concreting that part of 
Pleasant Street extending from Main to State Street. 

Passed July 10, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating the sum of fifty-five 

DOLLARS ($55) FOR THE SERVICES RENDERED BY THE AGENT OF 
THE FOREST FIRE WARDEN. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of fifty-five dollars ($55) be and the same is hereby 
appropriated to pay David J. Adams, agent of the forest fire warden 
of Concord, in accordance with Chapter 97, Laws of 1905, said sum ta 
be in full payment for services during May and June of the current 
year, the appropriation to be charged to the standing appropriation 
for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed August 14, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to the use of the alder- 
man AND the council CHAMBER BY THE SUPERIOR COURT. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, (is follows: 

That the use of the aklerman and the council chambers be granted 
to the County of Merrimack for the purpose of holding the October 
term of the Superior Court. That the county be charged the sum of 



44 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

$5 per day for each clay or fraction of a day used, and for any extra 
janitor service found necessary, the city reserving the right to the 
apartments for meetings of the city government. 
Passed August 14, 1905. 



A Joint Eesolution exempting fijom taxation the capitai. 

AND PliOPEKTY OF TIM & COMPANY, FOB A TERM OF TEN YEARS. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Whereas, it is represented that Tim & Company, a corporation 
duly established by lavF, engaged in the business of manufacturing 
shirts, collars and cuffs, and having its principal place of business at 
Troy, New York, is intending to invest nevr capital, enlarge its busi- 
ness, and establish a branch of said business in this city and continue 
the same here as a permanent business, provided it can obtain an 
exemption from taxation of the capital invested therein; and 

Whereas, it is expected that such new enterprise will be of special 
benefit to this city and the citizens thereof; now, therefore. 

Voted, that the manufacturing establishment or establishments to 
be owned by said Tim & Company in this city, or put in operation 
therein, and the capital invested by said Tim & Company in such 
establishment or establishments, and the capital and property used 
by it in operating the same, be and hereby are exempted from taxa- 
tion for the term of ten years from the date of tlie passage of this 
resolution, according to the provisions of the Public Statutes of New 
Hampshire. 

Passed August 14, 1905. 



A Concurrent Resolution of thanks to prentiss m. kent. 
Eesolxed by the City Council of the City uf Concord, asfolloivs: 

That the thanks of the City of Concord be given to Prentiss M. 
Kent for his generous gift to the city of his birth of the Kent memorial 
fountain. 

Passed September 11, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating the sum of four thousand 

DOLLARS ($4,000) FOR INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Besolvedby the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That the sum of four thousand dollars ($4,000) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed September 11, 1905. 



ORDIXANCKS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 45 

A Joint Resolution api'kopkiating money to pay damages 

ASSESSED FOU LAND TAKEN FOR AN ENLARGEMENT OF ROLLINS 
PARK. 

Ersoked by the Cltij CoiinrH (,/ the CiUj of Coiirord, as follows : 

That the sum of twelve hundred and seven dollars and fifty cents 
(§1,207.50) be, and hereby is, appropriated from money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated, to pay the dama<;es assessed to 
owners of land taken for an addition to Rollins Park, under condem- 
nation proceedings of September 6, 1905. 

Passed September 11, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating one hundred and seventy- 
nine DOLLARS AND FIFTY-EIGHT CENTS FOR EXPENSES INCURRED 
IN CONNECTION WITH KENT FOUNTAIN. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, os follows: 

That the sum of one hundred and seventy-nine dollars and fifty- 
eight cents be, and the same is hereby, appi'opriated out of the 
account of incidentals and land damages, to pay for labor and ma- 
terials in connection with the Kent fountain. 

Passed September 11, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to the buying of gravel. 

Resolved by the City Council (flltc City of Concord, us follows: 

That the committee on lands and buildings be requested to exam- 
ine the matter of gravel supply for city needs, and report on the 
expediency of buying such supply. 

Passed September 11, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to extension of stickney ave- 
nue, THE moving of FEDERAL BRIDGE AND THE BUILDING OF A 
BRIDGE OVER WATTANUMMON BROOK. 

Resolved by the City Council (f the City of Concord, as fnlloivs: 

Whereas, the Boston & Maine Railroad, or its lessor, the Concord 
& Montreal Railroad, having submitted a plan for avoiding grade 
crossings and improving highways, in this city, which plan embodies 
the following changes in highways: 

First, change the location of the highway bridge, known as Federal 
Bridge, to the site now occupied by the railroad bridge, and build the 
new railroad bridge upon the site now occupied by the highway 
bridge : 

Second, lay out and build a new highway from a jjoiut on East Pen- 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 

acook Street north of said bridges to a point at or near the northerly 
terminus of Stickney Avenue: 

Third, build a new and wider bridge over the railroad on Bridge 
Street: 

Fourth, discontinue a portion of East I'enacook Street, from the 
northerly terminus of the new highway above described to a point 
near Wattanummon Brook. 

Fifth, discontinue that portion of the North Fan road between East 
Penacook Street and said new highway. 

Sixth, change the location of the South Fan road so that it will 
pass under the bridge known as bridge number one, White Mountains 
Division, Boston & Maine Railroad, substantially as said road is now 
traveled. 

Seventh, discontinue Ferry Street between the easterly line of the 
Tight of way of the Concord i% Montreal "Railroad and the westerly 
line of the right of way of the Concord & Claremont Railroad; sub- 
stituting for tlie portions of highways so discontinued the new high- 
way above described, therefore, — 

Besolred, That in the event the Board of Railroad Commissioners 
authorize the Boston & Maine Railroad, or its lessor, the Concord & 
Montreal Railroad, to make the above changes, that the City of Con- 
cord will, for its part of the construction of said new highway, and to 
secure the above changes, build a suitable bridge with the masonry 
therefor over Wattanummon Brook, do all surfacing or hardening 
required on the new highway, and remove the highway bridge to its 
new position after the masonry has been prepared by the railroad. 

Said railroad to remove the present railroad bridge, and prepai-e 
the masonry ready to receive the highway bridge, and move its tracks 
and do all the grading, masonry, bridging and other work necessary 
therefor; and said railroad shall secure the laying out of the new 
highway and pay for the land necessary therefor, and shall grade the 
roadway 25 feet wide, ready for the surfacing material; and said rail- 
road shall build a new bridge over its tracks on Bridge Street and the 
approaches thereto, of a width of 50 feet. 

Resolved, That the mayor, city engineer and commissioner of high- 
ways be and hereby are authorized and directed to enter into a con- 
tract with the Concord it Montreal Railroad, or its lessee or others, 
on the part of the City of Concord, for the performance of its, said 
city's, part of said work, provided 

"Said contract to be submitted to the city council for ratification 
before it shall become binding upon the city." 

"Provided, however, that the City of Concord does not by these 
resolutions express its assent to the discontinuance of any part of 
Ferry Street or pledge its cooperation in any proceedings taken with 
a view to procure such discontinuance." 

Passed September 14, 1905. 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 47 

A Joint Resolution autiiokizing a loan of $5,000 fou city sew- 

EHAGE I'KECINCT. 

Eesulccd by the C'dij Council of t/ie City of Concord, as J'olloios: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city, for a term not exceeding twelve months, the 
sum of tive thousand dollars for the construction and improvement of 
the sewerage system in the city sewerage jjrecinct. 

Passed October 9, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution relative to lease of city auditorium. 
Eesolved by the, City Council of the City of Concord, ax follows: 

That the committee on lands and buildings, with the city solicitor, 
be and hereby are authorized to enter into a contract in behalf of the 
city, with Mr. F. W. Hartford of Portsmouth, N. H., for the lease of 
the City Auditorium upon the basis of the proposition submitted by 
Mr. Hartford, with such modifications as they may deem advisable. 

Passed October 9, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution making additional appropriation to the 
account of health department. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoics: 

That five hundred dollars be, and the same is hereby appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, and 
credited to the incidental account of the health department. 

Passed November 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating the sum of six hundred 

DOLLARS ($600) for THE SUPPORT OF CITY POOR. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred dollars ($600) be, and the same is here- 
by appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for the support of city poor. 

Passed November 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution for the moving of city shed. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Coticord, as follows : 

1. That a sum not exceeding seven hundred dollars be and hereby is 
appropriated from money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for the purpose of moving the present city shed from the School 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Street lot to the Pleasant Street lot, and replacing building in good 
condition. 

2. This money to be exj^ended under the direction of the committee 
on lands and buildings. 

Passed November 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating money for the purchase 
OF a gravel bank. 

Eesolved by the City Council of tlic City of Conrord, a.s follows : 

That the sum of eight hundred dollars ($800) be and hereby is 
appropriated for the purchase of real estate situated in the rear of 
Franklin Street from William J. and John Ahern, to be used for a 
gravel bank. 

Same to be appropriated from any money in the treasury not other- 
VFJse appropriated. 

Passed November 13, 190.5. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating a sum not exceeding 

TWELVE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($1,200) FOR THE PURCHASE OF A 
MODERN HOOK AND LADDER TRUCK AND APPURTENANCES. 

Eesohed by the City Council of the City of Concord, n.sfolloios : 

That a sum not exceeding twelve hundred dollars ($1,200) be and 
hereby is appropriated, out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for the jjurchase of a new hook and ladder truck 
of modern design, together with a set of attachable steel sleigh run- 
ners for the same and a track for the same to run on when equipped 
with runners, to replace the truck now in use at the Central Fire Sta- 
tion. 

The money hereby appropriated shall be expended under the direc- 
tion of the mayor and the chief engineer of the fire department, who 
are hereby constituted a committee with full power to purchase said 
new hook and ladder truck and appurtenances and to make such dis 
position of the old truck as they shall deem best. 

Passed November 13, 1905. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating four dollars and thirty 

CENTS ($1..S0) to reimburse HOLLIS M. CHASE FOR TAXES PAID 
BY MISTAKE. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of four dollars and thirty cents ($4.30) be and hereby 
is appropriated to re-imburse HoUis M. Chase of Contoocook for poll 
taxes paid by him to the City of Concord for the years 1903 and 1904 



OllDlNAXCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 49 

by mistake. The amount hereby appropriated shall be charged to 
the account of incidentals and land damages. 
Passed December 30, 1905. 



A Joint Rksolution appropriating the sum of two thousand 

TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY DOLLARS {•■5;2,250) FOR THE PURCHASE 
OF HOSE FOR THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, usfolloivfi: 

Section 1. That the sum of two thousand two hundred and fifty- 
dollars ($2,250), or as much thereof as may be necessary, be and is- 
hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise^ 
appropriated for the purchase of hose for the fire department, sucli 
purchase to be made by the committee on fire department together 
with the chief engineer. This sum shall be charged to the expenses 
of the fire department. 

Passed January 8, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating 8369.25 for interest accrued 
ON cemetery trust funds. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum»f three hundred sixty-nine and twenty-five one hun- 
dredths dollars ($369.25) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the interest 
accrued to January 1, 1906, on $18,800 cemetery trust funds, received 
by the city treasurer. 

Passed January 8, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in 

THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 

liesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of one thousand two and forty one hun- 
dredths dollars ($1,002.40) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay outstanding 
claims as follows: 

Salaries $441.43 

Furniture and fixtures. City Hall 558.72 

West Concord Cemetery 1.25 

Pine Grove Cemetery 1.00 

$1,002.40 

Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sewers 

for the year 1905 the sum of one hundred forty-eight and fifty one 



50 CITY OF CONCOHD. 

hundredths dollars ($148.50), the same being the earnings of this 
department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for gar- 
bage for the year 190.5 the sum of two hundred one and eighty-seven 
one hundredths dollars ($2^1.87), the same being the earnings of this 
department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for parks 
for the year 1905 the svim of two hundred dollars ($200), tlie same 
having been deposited in the city treasury on account of Pecker 
Park. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 8, 1906. 



A Joint Resoi>ution autiiokizing the finance committee to 

PROCURE A TEMPORARY LOAN UPON THE CREDIT OF THE CITY 
OF A SUM NOT TO EXCEED SEVENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS TO 
PROVIDE FOR CURRENT EXPENSES. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord., a.s follows: 

Section 1. That the finance committee is hereby authorized to 
procure by temporary loan upon the credit of the city the sum of 
seventy-live thousand dollars ($75,000), or so much thereof as may be 
necessary to provide for current expenses. 

Passed January 8, 19CG. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1905-1906. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in Januarj', biennially. 



EXECUTIYE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Elected biennially in November by the people. Salary $1,000 per annum. 

CHARLES R. CORNING. 

: City Hall. 



ALDERMEN. 

Elected biennially in November by the voter.s of each ward. Salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to Committee on Accounts and Claims. 

Ward 7— WILLIAM W. ALLEN. 

FRED H. BLANCHARD. 
Ward 1^— JOHN. T. CATE. 
T^an? 6'— JOSEPH F. PALY. 
Ward 4— JOSEPH S. MATTHEWS. 

CHARLES H. SWASEY. 

WILLIAM P. DANFORTH. 
Ward y— GEORGE D. WALDRON. 

GEORGE H. ROLFE. 
Ward 6— SETH R. DOLE. 

FRED C. DEMOND. 

GEORGE II. ELLIOTT. 
Ward 7— FORREST L. WELLMAN. 

JAMES F. KELLEY. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY. 
Ward .9— MICHAEL H. MULCAHY. 
Ward .9— JAMES J. GANNON. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMMON" COUNCIL. 

Elected biennially in November by voters of each ward. Salary, $40 per 
annum, with additional $10 to Committee on Accounts and Claims, and $20 
to President. 

PRESIDENT— BENJAMIN W. COUCH. 

Ward i— EVERETT L. DAVIS. 

WALTER 11. ROLFE. 
Ward 5— WESLEY O. FIELD. 
Ward o^— JOHN T. PARKINSON. 
Ward ./—JOHN L. PRESCOTT. 

FRED G. CROWELL. 

CHARLES C. SCHOOLCRAFT. 
Ward .5— BENJAMIN W. COUCH. 

HARRY J. BROWN. 
Ward ^;— HERBERT M. DANFORTH. 

ELMER H. FARRAR. 

HARRY R. CRESS Y. 
Ward 7— LOREN A. SANDERS. 

ALFRED H. WALKER. 

FRANK S. PUTNAJ^I. 
Ward ,9— THOMAS H. HIGGINS. 
Ward ,9— JAMES J. REEN. 

JAMES SCULLY. 

(I.ERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 
Elected biennially in January by Common Council. Salary, $50 per annum. 

JAMES W. McMURPHY. 



CITY COVlCUN.ArENT. 53 

JOINT STAXI)IN(; COM.Mll TKES OF THE CITY COrXCII,. 

On Accounts and Claims — Aldermen George H. llolt'e, William 
P. Danfortb, French ; Councilmen Schoolcraft, 
Cressy, Brown. 

On Finance — The Mayor; Aldermen Matthews, Demond, Wal- 
dron ; President of the Common Council ; Coun- 
cilmen Brown, Keen, Walter TI. Kolfe. 

On Fire Department — Aldermen Dole, Allen, Daly; Council- 
men Walter. II. Rolfe, Farrar, Prescott. 

On. Lands and Buildings — Aldermen Waldron, Matthews, Kel- 
ley; Councilmen Walker, Herbert M. Danforth, 
Davis. 

0)t Lighting Streets — Aldermen Wellman, Elliott, William 
P. Danfortli ; Councilmen Crowell, Putnam, 
Walker. 

On Public Listruction — Aldermen Kelley, Chesley, Cate ; Coun- 
cilmen Farrar, Sanders, Higgins. 

On Roads and Bridges — Aldermen Blanchard, Chesley, Gan- 
non ; Councilmen Davis, Parkinson, Field. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN 150 AKJ) OF MAVOK AND AI.DEKMEN. 

On Bills, Second Beading — Aldermen Swasey, Chesley. 

On Elections and Returns — Aldermen Allen, Mulcaby. 

On Engrossed Ordinances — Aldermen Mulcahy, Blanchard. 

On Police and License — Aldermen Elliott, French. 

Oil Sewers and Drains — The Mayor; Aldermen Dole, Allen, 

George H. Rolfe, Mulcahy. 
On Streets and Sidewalks — The Mayor; ^Vldermen Elliott, 

Swasey, Wellman. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IX COMJION COUNCIL. 

On Bills, Second Reading — The President ; Councilmen 

Crowell, Cressy. 
On Elections and Returns — Councilmen Prescott, Scully. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — Councilmen Herbert ]\I. Danforth, 

Schoolcraft. 



54 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in Januarj' by City Council. Bond to the acceptance of 
the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $250 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $800 per annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Bond within 
six days to satisfaction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of 
first $60,000; seven and one half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

WENDELL P. LADD. 

Office: City Hall. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

BOARD OP EDUCATION. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

President— CHARLES R. CORNING. 
Secretary— ALICE M. NIMS. 
Moderator— S. C. EASTMAN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



55 



Clerk— LOUIS C. MERRILL. 
AuDiToiis— JOHN GEORGE. 
J. A. FERXALD. 

Three elected annually in March by voters of Union School District. Salary, 
$250 per annum for the board. 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
ELLA H. J. HILL, 
EDWARD N. PEARSON, 
10 HN VANNEVAR, 
GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 
ALICE M. NIMS, 
JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 
CHARLES R. CORNING, 



Term expires 


.March 


190G 


u 




" 


190(3 


u 






190G 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1908 


" " 






1908 
1908 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 
Appointed annually in July by Board of Education. Salary, $2,000 per annum. 

LOLTIS J. RI^NDLETT. 

Office: Chandler School Building, South Street. 



FINANCIAL AGENT. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 
Salary, $500 per annum. 

JOSEPH T. WxVLKER. 

Office : Chandler School Building. 



PENACOOK— District No. 20. 

One member of Board of Education elected annually in March by voters of 
di.strict. Salary, $50 per aanum for the board. 



HENRY A. BROWN, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
LEANDER C. PRESCOTT, 



Term expires March, 1906. 
1907. 
1908. 



56 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TOWN DISTRICT. 

Comprising all districts in the city except Union School District and No. 20. 
Elected annually in March by voter.s of district. Salary, $200 per annum 
for the board. 

ALBERT SALTMARSH, Term ex])iies March, 1906. 

JUDSOX F. IIOIT, " " " 1907. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, - " " 1908. 



TRUANT OmCER. 

Salary, $500 per annum. 

GEORGE W. JOHNSON. 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
TFard 2 -CHARLES E. STANIELS. 
Ward 5— PAUL R. HOLDEN. 
Ward 4— JOHN M. MITCHELL. 
Ward y— FRANK W. ROLLINS. 
Ward 6— REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward <9— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward .9— MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS 

Salary, $450 per annum. 

CLARA F. 15R0WN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

I^LVRY W. DENNETT. 

Fowler Library Building. 



CITV GOVERNMENT. 57 

ASSESSOES. 

Elected biennially by voters of each ward. Salary, $3 per day of actual 
service. 

Ward i— OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 
Ward 5— WILLIAM A. COWLEY. 
Ward i'— GEORGE R. PARMER TER. 
T7arc? ^-GEORGE \V. PARSONS. 
T7(i,.fj; 5_GE0RGE F. I^NDERIIILL. 
Ward 6— OSRO JM. ALLEN. 
Ward 7— JOHN II. QUIMBY. 
Ward 5— WILLIAIVI A. LEE. 
Ward .9— JAMES AIIERN.* 

DAVID SULLIVAN, JR.f t 

THOMAS NAWN.-t 



CITY WATER -WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four year.s, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES R. C^ORNING, Mayok, ex officio. 

N. E. MARTIN, Terra expires March 81, 1906. 

H. H. DUDLEY, " " " 1906. 

EDSON J. HILL, " " " 1907. 

G. D. E. PRESCOTT, " " " 1907. 

HENRY E. CONANT, " " " 1908. 

H. C. HOLBROOK, " " " 1908. 

SOLON A. CARTER, " " " 1909. 

HARLEY B. ROBY, " " " 1909. 

Prksident — Soi.ox A. Cartei;. 
Clekk — Edsox .1. Hill. 

* Died March 16, 1905. 

t Elected to fill vacancy, t Died October 27, 1905. 

t Elected to fill vacancy. 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Elected annually in April by Water Commissioners. Salary, $1,800 per 
annum. 

V. CHARLES HASTINGS. 

Office : City Hall. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Term unlimited. Salary 
$1,250 per annum and rent of house. 



WILLIAM C. GREEX. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Term unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $125 each per annum. 

.lOHX J. McXFLTY. 
WILLIAM E. DOW. 

FOR PENACOOK. 
Salary, $25 per annum. 

AlUAL W. ROLFE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salarj-, $10 per annum. 

JOHN E. FRYE. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $10 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 59 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Appointed l).y Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

LESLIE IL CROTHER. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 
CHARLES r. WHITE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 
FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

GEORGE W. BROWX. 
POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,000 per annum, fixed by 
City Council. 

GEORGE M. FLETCHER. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $2 per day of actual service. 

BENJAMIN W. COUCH. 



CITY SOLICITOR, 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $500 per annum. 

EDMUND S. COOK. 

Office: 77 North Main Street. 



60 CITY OF COXCORD. 



CLERK OF POLICE COURT. 

Appointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by the LegislE 
ture. 



RUFUS 11. BAKER. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Bond of 
required. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

JAMES E. RAXI). 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Salary, $900 per 
annum. 

JOIIX E. GAY. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, $825 each per annum. 

Daniel S. Fl.\nders, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $850 per annum. 

Whitney D. Barrett, Hoyt Robinson, 

Charles H. Rowe, Christopher T. Wallace, 

Samuel L. Batchelder, Samuel Rodd, 

Victor I. Moore, George E. Drury, 

Irvin B. Robinson, George X. Fellows. 
Elbridge F. Akeley, 



CITY (;OVER]SiMENT. 



61 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 



Geoik 



II. 



O. H. Bean, 
W. A. Little, 
William n. II. Patch, 
Alvin 11. Urann, 
Thomas P. Davis, 
Fred H. Clifford, 
George G. Allen, 



SiLSHv, Captain and Drill Master. 

Charles E. Kelley, 
James JejDSon, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
Fred S. Pendleton, 
Fred 8. liagley, 
Clark D. Stevens, 
Harry F. Jones. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, $2.25 each per day of actual 



Almali C. Leavitt, 
Oscar F. Richardson, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
Edward H. Dixon, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Row^ell, 
Joseph C. Eaton, 
Alphonso Venne, 
Edward M. Nason, 
Charles M. Norris, 
John J. Crowley, 
William H. Richardson, 
James ]Mercer, Jr., 
William II. Hammond, 
James W. Lane, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Charles Ada, 
George W. Brown, 
George L. Danforth, 
John A. Flanders, 
Arthur J. Taylor, 
Geoi'ge B. Wright, 
Alfred II. Walker, 



George A. S. Kimball, 
James F. Ward, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Henry C. IMace, 
Justus O. Clark, 
Ira C. Phillips, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Moses T. Rowell, 
Frank W. Johnson, 
George W. Johnson, 
Judson F. Iloit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Milton Colby, 
Asbury F. Tandy, 
Henry J. Durrell, 
(xeorge W, Chesley, 
Harry E. Stevens, 
Lewis B. Iloit, 
Albert H. C. Knowles, 
Fred N. Marden, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor, 
John G. Solchow. 



62 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS. 



Elected annually in January by City Council. Bond, $3,000. Salary, $1,400 
per annum. 



ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. No 
salary. 



William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
George S. Milton, 
O. H. T. Richardson, 
Michael J. Lee, 
Edward H. Randall, 
Timothy Kenna, 
B. Frank Yarney, 
Isaac Baty, 
John H. Clark, 
John E. Frye, 
R. N. Foster, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
William S. Dutton, 
Willis IL Robbins, 
George X. Berry, 
Charles II. Berry, 
William II. McGuire, 
P. Henry T>. Leary, 
John Sweeney, 
Richard O'J^rien, 
M. J. Finn, 
Charles L. Fellows, 



John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe, 
James V. Kelley, 
Henry P. Cilley, 
G. Arthm- Nichols. 
Henry II. Morrill, 
Fred L. Pluramer, 
Miles F. Farmer, 
Charles L. N orris, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Seth R. Hood, 
Rufus E. Gale, 
George A. Ilarwood, 
Albert S. Trask, 
Philip King, 
William L. Regan, 
Frederick T. Convers 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Frederick Booth, 
Benjamin II. Orr, 
Louis Browning, 
Elmer E. Babb, 



CITY GOVERXMENT. 



George W. Chesley, F. F. Converse, 

Henry H. Kennedy, Harris S. Parmenter, 

Arthur W. Buntin, P. W. Orr, 

Jolin C. Smith, Alex Ralph. 



OVERSEEKS OF THE POOR. 

Elected bienniallj' in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Ward 7— FRED H. BLANCHARD, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 1^— JOHN T. CATE, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

9— HEXR 

City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to 
city poor. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 18 South State Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to 
city poor. 

DR. E. F. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 



HEALTH OFFICERS. 

One elected annually in March, for three years, by City Council. Salary, $25' 
per annum. 

CHANCEY ADAIMS, M. D., Term expires 3Jaicb, 1906. 

GEORGE A. BERRY, " '' " 1907. 

RUSSELL WILKIXS,M. D., " " " 1908. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Nominated by Board of Health in April and confirmed by the City CounciK 
Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar bj' General Laws. Fees, 1.5 cents for each 
birth, marriage and death received, recorded and returned to the State 
Registrar. 

HENRY E. CHAMRERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 

No salary. 

WILL B. HOWE City Engineer 

WILLIAM C. GREEN . Chief of the Fire Department. 
V. C. HASTINGS . Superintendent of the Water-Works. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 65 

PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES K. C'ORNIXG, .Alayor, e.v, officio. 

1>EX C. WHITE, Term ex])ires .Tanuarv, 1905. 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, " " " " 190G. 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, " - •' 1907. 

(GARDNER B. E^LMONS, " •' " 1907. 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, ^^ " '' 1908. 

*JOHX F. JONES, " - " 1908. 

tCHARLES P. BANCROFT, " " - 1908. 



CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7, con- 
solidated) elected annually in January, for three j'ears, by City Council. 
Salary, none. 

WARD 1. 

D. WARREN, FOX, Term ex])ires .January, 190(5. 

OLIVER -J. FIFIELD, " " " ' 1907. 

CHARLES 11. SANDERS, " " " 1908. 



SCOTT FRENCH, Term expires, .Tanuary, 190G. 

W.A.COWLEY, " " " ' 1907. 

EDWARD .T. LYLE, " " " 1908. 

WARD 3. 

WILLIAM A. LITTLE, Term expires .January 1906. 

.JAMES M. CROSS:\IAN, " " " ' 1907- 

GEORGE R. PARMEXTER, " " " 1908. 

WARD 7. 

ISAAC X. ABBOTT, Term exi)ires .January, 1906. 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " " " ' 1907. 

FRAXK H. PROCTOR, " " " 1908. 

* Died March 28, 1905. 

t Appointed to fill vacancy. 



66 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

FOR WARDS 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, AND PART OF WARD 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, none. 



CHARLES R. CORXIXG, Mavor, 



'#' 



(4E()RGE A. FOSTER, 
(iEORGE \V. AliUOTT, 
JOITX E. ROBERTSOX, 
FRAXK P. AXDREWS, 
CTIARLES (4. RE.AIICK, 
FRAXK .T. liATC IIELDEK', 



T. 



erin exjiires 



Ma 



1!»0C) 
1907 
1!>07 
IDOS 
liXIS 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

EDWARD A. .AIOl'ETOX. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 
FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

(GEORGE W. WATERS, 
*FRAXIv A. T)A:ME, 
LOUIS A. LAXE, 
ILVMILTOX A. KEXDALL, 
LEOXARD Ml^DGETT. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRAXK irASTIX(4S, 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FREXCIL 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

ALVIX' C. POWELL. 



Died April 20, 190.^). 



CITV COVKKX.MENT. 
FOR MILLVILLE CEMETEKY. 

FRANK G. PKOCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAIirM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Fees, one 
fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

p:dward :\r. cogswell. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, .f2 per day, paid 
parties interested. 

GEORGE W. CHESLEV, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
MOSES H. JiRADLEY. 



POUND-KEEPER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, two cents each for 
impoundiiig' sheep, and five cents each for all other creatures, paid by 
ow^ner.'. 

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, pai( 
by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
CYRrS R. ROI5INS0N, 
DAVID E. E^'ERETT, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. (;ALE. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

INSPECTOR OF ELECTRIC WIRES. 
ALFRED W. WALKER. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fee.s, for sealing each scale 
beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, and for each measure, 10 cents; five or 
more to one person, half price— paid by owners of scales or measures. 

EDWARD K. GO YE. 

OfHee: Rear of Police Station. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; 
hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoops, 50 
cents; heading, 33 cents per M— paid by party for whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price per 
load, paid by party requiring service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, Frank E. Gale, 

John X. Hill, Evarts McQuesten, 

Ilh'am O. jAIarsh, Amos Blanehard, 

Thomas Hill, ]Mark M. Blanehard, 

.John H. Mercer, Liirman R. Goodrich, 

A. H. Campbell, James IT. Harrington, 

O. F. Richardson, Simeon Partridge, 

Charles H. Day, Daniel Crowley, Jr. 

Alvah L. Powell, Charles H. Cook, 

Seth R. Dole, John C. Farrand, 

Arthur N. Day, John E. Rossell, 

William H. Meserve, .Vsher E. Ormsbee, 



OITY (iOVEItXMENT. 



69 



Hiram Brown, 
George W. C'hesley, 
Everett L. Davis, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Harry Knapp, 
Howard Perley, 
L. C. Prescott, 



S. D. Walker, 
George L. Danforth 
A. C. Fisher, 
William J. Mullen, 
Elmer E. Young, 
Henry -V. Brown, 
JMilo (4. Davis. 



CITY WEIGHER. 
EDWARD K. GOVE. 

Office: Rear Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 



Elected annually in Januarj- by Citj' Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid l)y 
party employing. 



Giles Wheeler, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
George Abbott, Jr., 
George Griffin, , 



Benjamin Bilsl)orough, 
Fred Rollin.s, 
IMoses E. Haines. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 



Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 



Giles W^heeler, 
Peter W. Webster, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 
Charies L. Fellows, 



O. H. T. Richardson, 
James E. Randlett, 
William Rowell, 
Henrv Morrill. 



SURVEYORS OF STONE. 



Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 



Giles ^Vheeler, 



Henry Mori 



70 



CITV OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Elected bienniallv in January by City Council. Fees, for surveying shingles 
andclapboards: 4 cents per M; boards and timber. 16 cents per M; meas- 
uring cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for oxer 
twenty cords-paid by person employing. 



Arthur (t. Stevens, 
.lames F. Nelson, 
.Jonathan H. Weeks, 
Charles Couch, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
'Piniothy Carter, 
Weston Coftran, 
.lohn A. Ulackwoo.!, 
Philip Flanders, 
( ' vrus Runnells, 
Silvester V. Danforth, 
Albert O. Preston, 
WiUiam A. Chesley, 
Alfred Clark, 
.Tohn F. Scott, 
.T. Frank Hastings, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Peter W. Webster, 
George W. Abbott, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Sinith, 
Clinton O. Partridge, 
.John (J. W^oods, 
Frank E. Diraond, 
.Vraos L. Coburn, 
(4ilman II. Diraond, 
.Tohn C. Farrand, 
Arthur E. Maxam, 
^Martin E. Kenna, 
Phili)) C. Eastman, 



(ieorge Partridge, 
Oliver .1. Fitield, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Charles II. Day, 
Hiram O. ^larsh, 
Edward Runnels, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
.Tohn X. Hill, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
.Toseph E. Hutchinson, 
Thomas Hill, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
F^red G. Chandler, 
Frank I.. Swetl, 
Harvey H. I lay ward, 
Edward H. Dixon, 
William V. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
.lustus O. Clark, 
Silas Wiggin, ^ 
Edward Stevens, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Charles L. Worthen, 
Clark D. Stevens, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 
(ieorge 1>. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells. 



CITY COVEKNMENT. 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SELECTMEN. 

]r,„v/ /—WILLIAM S. HOLLAND. 
ERNEST L. MESEKVE. 
HARRY (4REV. 

ii-,,rr/ i>_cLnrris a cuA.Mr.EULAix. 

.TOSEPir C. STRICKFOLM). 
EDCAR A. NEWELL. 

n^^n-d .;— HENRY farnl.m. 

RORERT HENRW 
HARRIS PARMENTEL*. 

Ij-,,,.,/ ./_K()r>ERT V. KEAXE. 
FRED X. HAM.AIONI). 
AMOS O. MAXSTR. 

ir,„.,? .^;— C TRTIS WHITE. 

CARLTOX L. (HUBS. 
EDWARD .^L ('()(;SWELL. 

1I7(;-,/ 0'_EDWARD ('. DFTTOX. 
WILFRED ROURKE. 
ALRERT H. DALRV.AH'LE. 

]\',,r,l r— CHARLES II. OSCiOOD. 

CHARLES P. DAYIDS()X. 
CHARLES P>. BENSON.' 

]Vur<l S— 1 1 A R UY MO R R I LL . 

SYLYESTER T. FORD. 
JOHN A. FA(4AN. 

ir,//7/ .'y— PHILIP P>ABINEAU. 
J A:\IES J. NICHOLS. 
MAPRICE (iE.VRY. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
SUPERVISOR OF CHECK-LISTS. 

mij-a 7_F1IK]) J. (4UILD. 

WILLIAM II. MESERA'E. 

JOHN B. PLANKEY. 
Ward 1^— ROSS W. CATE. 

ELWIX F. CULVER. 

PIIILEAS P. BELANGER. 
Ward o'— JOIIX N()RDSTRO:\r. 

ALVIN C. I^OWELL, JR. 

OMAR SWENSON. 
Ward ^— HARRY II. KENNEDY. 

ALLEN IIOLLIS. 

J. WESLEY PLITMxMER. 
Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT. 

WILLIAM A. FOSTER. 

ARTHUR P. MORRILL. 
Ward 6— ARTHl'R E. DOLE. 

WILL Vy. HOWE. 

HENRY B. COLBY. 
Ward 7— CHARLES W. FOWLER. 

WALTER C. HUNTOON. 

ARISTIDE L. PELISSIER. 
Ward ,s'— WILLIAM II. REC^AN. 

LEON B. SIMPSON. 

xMOSES PELREN. 
Ward .9— MICHAEL IMURPHY. 

CHARLES L. WALDROX. 

HARRY CRAIGUE. 



WARD CLERKS. 

Ward i— HOWARD N. PERLEY. 
T7(0(? 1>— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
Ward o'— HERBERT S. FARNUjNI. 
Ward ^—ERNEST P. ROBERTS. 
Ward J— GEORGE E. CHESLEY. 



CITY (lOVKIlNMKNT. 

Ilo.v/ ^—TIIO.MAS J. DVEll. 

Ward 7— ge()K(;p: p.. WIIITTREDGE. 

Word S'—KlKiAU M. (,)I'TXT. 

wnni !)—mnnyicK iikni:v (iAxxox 

MODERATORS. 
H7,,v/ y— ED.MIXD II. IVROWX. 
Ward 1?— WILLIAM E. VIRGIN. 
irarr?o'— CLARK D. STEVEXS. 
Ward 4— ,JOny B. ARROTT. 
TFctrrf ;5— EDWARD K. WOODWORTII. 
Ward 6— JOHN II. BROWN.* 
TFan? 7— ALBERT W. THC-SIPSOX. 
Ward 8— now AlU) F. HILL. 
Ward .9— FRED X. ."\IARDEX. 



MAYORS OF THE CITY OF COjS^COKD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March lO, 1853. 
and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annuallj'. Since 1880 the Mayor has 
been elected for two 3'ears at each biennial election in November. 



Hex. JOSEPH LOW 

" RUFUS CL&MEXTt . 

" JOHN ABBOTT . 

" MOSES T. WILLARD . 

" MOSES HrMPIIREY . 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE . 

" MOSES HUMPHREY . 

" JOHN ABBOTT . 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS . 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES . 

" JOHX^ KIMBALL . 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBFRY 

" HORACE A. BROWNt . 

" (tEORGE a. CUMMfNGSi? 



1872 



lS5(>-'57-'58 
1859-'(;() 
1H61-'(j2 
1863-^64 

'6o 

1866-'67 
1868-'69 
1870-71 
3-74-'7r) 
1876-'77 
1878-'79-'80 
1880-81-8-2 



*Resigned. 

t Died in offlce. January 13, 1856. 

t Term closed in November, 1880. 

§Term commenced in November, 1880. 



74 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EDGAll ir. WOODMAX 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON 
STILIAIAX IirMl^HREY 
IIEXRY W. (LAPP 
PARSOXS R. COGSWELR 
IIEXRY RO BIX SOX . 
ALIiERT B. ^Y00DWORTII 
XATIIAXIEL E. MARTIX 
ITARRY G. SARGEXT . 
GTTARLES i;. (ORXTXG 



1S8J 



UK) 



'84-'85-'8t) 
1887-'88 
1 88 9-'90 
1891-92 
1893-94 
1895-9G 
1897-'98 

1899-1900 
1901-'02 

*04-0:)-^0(3 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION OF UNION 
SCHOOL DISTRICT, 1905-1900. 



MEMBERS. 

TEi;>r KXl'IKKS. 

1900. 



IIox. Edward N. Peaksox, IIun. .Toux E. Robkutsox'^, 
Mns. Ei.LA IT. .T. Hill. 

1907. 

Dk. Geou<;k M. Kimuall, Rev. .Tohx \\\xxevai:, 

Mrs. Alice M. Xims. 

1908. 

Hon. John 31. Mitchell, Mks. 8l:sax C. Haxcroft, 

IIox. Charles R. CoRXixci. 



OFFICERS. 

Hox. Charles R. Coiixixci .... President. 
Mrs. x\lice M. Nnrs Secretary. 



i» CITY' OF ('()XC()i;i). 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

FI.NAXCK. 

Mi;. ('(H;xin(;, 3Ii;. Mir( iiki.i., 1)i;. Kimiia i.r.. 

lIKill SI llool.. 

]\[i;. A'axnkvai;, Mm. Pi:ai;>(.n, Mi;s. ]5ax<i;(.ft. 

MAXi'Ai. ti;aixix(; axd ixdi siui a i, i:iir< a tiox. 
l)i;. KiMi'.Ai.i,. Mn. KoBKKTsox, Mks. Ilii.r.. 

MisK AXD i:i.o(rri()X. 
Mi:. :\rn. iikii.. .Mks. IIii.i,, Mi;. Vaxxkyai;. 

DKAW IXd. 

Mi;s. 1)AX( KOFT, .Mi;. Pi:ai:s(»x, Di;. Kimi'.ai.i.. 

TKAIXIXi; S( IKMH,. 

:\ri;. :Mit< iiFi.L, .Afi;. l*FAi:s<.x, .A[i;s. Xims. 

TFX r-l!()OKS. 

Mi;. C'(ii;xiX(;, AIi;s. J5an( koft, Afi;. I^ohki: rsox. 

iini.i>iX(;s axi> i;i;i'aii;s. 
l)i;. KiMKAi.i., .Mi;. ]^.:ai;s(>x, Mk. IJoukktsox. 

im;x A< OOK. 
Mi;. N'axxkvai;. Mi;. Pkai;s<.x, Mi;s. \ims. 



Mi;. Pkakscx, Mi;. C.kxix.;, A1i;s. IIim.. 



:mk. rKAi;s..N. 



■^ciiooi. itEi'oir 
iM\ii'<>i;i>. 

.Mi:s. l; AN. KOFI 

(MAN 1)1, i:i;. 



.Mk. \'anm:vai;, .Mi;>. Hi 



.Mi;. Mikiiki. 



Mk. K(.kki:st<.x. 



Mm. yivn 



Mi;s. XiMs, Mil. N'annkvak. 



Mks. Han.koft. 



I'KANKr.IX. 

I)i;. KiMiiAi.i., 



Mu. ('..liMN... 



MKKKIM A< 



Mk. ];(.nKKTs..>, .Mi;. .All 



.Mi;>. XiMs: 



Dk. KlMCAI.L. -Mus. I! 



.Ali;s. llll.l, 



.Mi;. 3IrK iiKi.i., .All;. Pkaks..n, ^Ik. C.kmn... 



Mi:s. XiMs. 



3ri;. lIc.HKKTSOX, 



.Mus. UlLL. 



WKST coN.OKh 

Mi;. Pkakson, 

KASTM.VX. 

.Mi;. \'a\m;\ai 

lAKUIKT I'. DAM 

.Mu. Pi.;ai;s,.n. 



3Ii;. 1{oi:ki;ts,.x. 



:\[i:s. IJ. 



.All;. ((.K-xix. 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SUPERINTENDENT OE SCHOOLS. 

Louis Juiix IIumjlett. 

3 Pine St. Oftice, Chandler Building, corner Fayette and 
South Sts. 

Hours, 8 to 9 a. ni., school days. Office generally found open 
from 4 to 5 p. ra. 



FINANCIAL AGENT. 

JOSKI'II TniOTHY Walkkr. 

274 Xo. ^lain St. At Su})erintendent's office, 9 to 10 a. m. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

Geoikje Washin(;tox .Jonxsox. 

Oli School St. At the Superintendent's office, 8 to 9.o0 a. m. 
11.80 to 12 ni., 1 to 1.45, 5 to G p. m. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

IIox. Samuel C. East.max .... Moderator. 

Louis C Meiuiill . . • . . Clerk. 

Joiix P. (tkok<;e, Josiaii E. Feiixald . Auditors. 



KEPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCA- 

tio:n" of uNiOTsr school district, 

FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1900. 



To the Inliahitiints of Union School DIslrid: 

The Board of Education submits its forty-sixth annual report 
comprising the school year April, 1905, to .Vpril, 1900. 

A year ago we made reference to the crowded condition of 
certain school rooms and the congestion existing in certain 
parts of the district laying particular stress on the High School 
and on the schools north of Centre Street. 

In June last a special meeting was called to take action on 
the report of a committee provided for at the annual meeting in 
March. This comijiittee set out com})rehensively the facts 
found and the recommendations looking to relief. In brief the 
committee advised the building of a new High School and an 
eight-room school at West Concord. The meeting unani- 
mously adopted the report and voted to raise money to carry 
out the reconmiendations presented by the committee. As 
a result the district linds itself confronted with the pecuniary 
obligations singularly like the obligations of sixteen years ago 
when the present High, the Kimball and the FrankUn schools 
constituted a debt of almost 1130,000. In addition to this 
there remains the funded debt created on account of the Dewey 
and the Rumford schools, which amounts in all to $59,000. 
These bonds are payable at the rate of i^8,000 and $7,000, 
beginning this year and ending in 191o. Whoever will take 
the pains to separate the annual tax levy into its component parts 
will find that a fourth of all the money raised by taxation is 
6 



82 CITY OF CONCOED. 

spent on our public schools. Moreover, they that consider the 
appropriation for education somewhat excessive will quickly 
learn their error by examining the constantly-changing ' condi- 
tions personal and material throughout Union District, together 
with the educational demands and requirements common to the 
public schools of the Avhole country. Concord cannot be 
singled out as an exception to the prevailing conditions. 

The increase of Concord children of school age is at once 
interesting and remarkable. In 1895 a census taken Ijy the 
board of education showed the number of children in the dis- 
trict to be 2,209, and ten years later tli^ census of 1905 made 
the number 3,226. During that period three new schoolhouses 
were built, the Dewey, Rumford and Plarriet P. Dame, and 
three houses were discontinued, Bow Brook, the Old Rum- 
ford and the one-room house on the Plains. The yearly in- 
crease of children for 1902-'03-'05 has been from 2*20 to 240, 
thus producing a congestion which additional buildings only 
could relieve. As is undoubtedly understood by the district it 
is the purpose of the board to use the present High School as 
a central ninth grade to embrace all tlie children of that 
grade throughout the district with the possible exception of 
East and West Concord where ninth grades are now firmly 
established. We believe this purpose will svirely result in im- 
proving and strengthening this very important and indispensable 
grade. The new house at West Concord is fast approaching 
completion and gives satisfaction to all. Deeming the perpet- 
uation of locally historic names and localities altogether 
advisable both as a duty and an educational step the board has 
named this building " Garrison School," in commemoration of 
the garrisoned dwelling house of Henry Lovejoy during the 
Indian incursions of 1746-'47. 

The foundations of the High School on Spring Street were 
put in during the autumn and further work postponed until 
the spring of this year when the building will go on to 
completion. The two-room schoolhouse occupying the site of 
the High School on Spring Street has been the Manual Train- 
ing School of tlie district ever since that branch of education 
has been a part of our system. 



SCHOOL IJETORT. 83 

It was necessary to move this building to the extreme south 
line of the new lot until such time as the district might vote 
on the question of a new building for the accommodation of 
this popular and important subject. It is clear to the members 
of the board that if this branch is to continue there should be 
an immediate expression of opinion respecting a modern build- 
ing especially adapted to manual pursuits. The present 
building has served too long a time as a temporary expedient, 
its usefulness has reached the limit of reasonable excuse and 
there remains no alternative other than a larger and better 
equipped building for this school. 

It will be remembered that the special meeting that voted to 
build the Dewe}^ School voted also to build a manual training 
building, appropriating therefor $10,000. But, owing to causes 
more or less personal in their nature a subsequent meeting 
voted to rescind the vote relating to the manual training build- 
ing. The time has now come when the citizens of this district 
must again face this question and declare definitely their desires 
and opinions. 

As members of the board of education we are not overlook- 
ing the school debt involved in the carrying out of all this con- 
struction, we regret the necessity which compels it. In Con- 
cord we are confronted with precisely the same conditions that 
obtain elsewhere ; it is the same story of increasing attendance 
and the providing of adequate buildings. We desire to call 
your attention to the detailed reports of the superintendent and 
of the financial agent. 

Very respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES R. CORNING, President, 

JOHN M. MITCHELL, 

SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 

EDWARD N. PEARSON, 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 

ELLA II. J. HILL, 

GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 

JOHN VANNEVAR, 

ALICE M. NIMS, 
Board of Education of Union /School District. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE O]^ 
BUILDINGS AND REPAIRS. 



We, tlie Building and Repairs Committee of Union Scliool 
District, submit this, our annual report: 

During the year we have expended !So,992.oO. 
Work has been done in all the buildings belonging to the 
district, as follows : 

11. P. Damk School. 

Furnace, smoke i»ipe, etc., overhauled, cost *40.03 

Water pii)e run from street to building, 
connected with l^laiivs Water Co., cost 
for pipe and labor . . 12.41 

Miscellaneous repairs to desks and building 23.19 

Total . ' t;75.Go 



Furnaces cleaned ....... $5.92 

Varnish ......... 1.9S 

Total $7.90 

Pkna.ook S( IIOOI.. 

Furnaces in this building were in poor condition 
and it was necessary to put in new grates, new 
linings, and one new end, cost . . . $(55. 8S 

Owing to the fire in the building last spring, it was 
necessary to put in one new ceiling, repair floor 
timber, floor and lathing, and rekalsomine, cost . 132.87 

One room was supj)lied with adjustable irons for 

desks and chairs, cost ..... SS.80 



IJasement was receinente<l 
Paint .... 



i|;50.00 
1.9S 



Total 



Kr.Mi 



Two new Aeoli])yIe dampers ])ut on to furnaces 
Furnaces, of which there are six, overhauled, cleaned 

and repaired, and Mdiere necessary, new grate 
Kepairs to telejthone system .... 

Carpenter work ...... 

Slate on roof ...... 

Paint and \arnish ...... 



Total 



CllANDLEU SCHOOI 



Much trouble was experienced last year in heatintr 
this building. During last summer larger risers 
were put in from boiler, and dampers rearranged, 
with the result that 2.^ pounds of steam gi^es 
better result than 10 })ounds last year, cost 

Repairs to plumbing ...... 

Two upper rooms furnished for Ninth grade scliools, 
desks, chairs, etc. .... . . 

Carpenter work . . . . . . .' . 

Electrician . . . . . . 

Alason ......... 

Paint 



*889.58 



*90.00 

79.97 
()4.05 

•21.89 
3.80 

■1'282.01 



*l:](j.78 

8.G2 

47:).04 

07.69 

10.30 

8.54 

1.98 



Total 



15. .w r,i; <. 



This building is used for storage room. The roof 
was in such bad condition that it was necessar\ 
to repair and reshingle, cost 

( himney repaired ...... 

Total 



*708.90 



*122.89 
19.30 

-S;142.19 



»t> CITY (.)F CONCOKD. 

Kimball School. 

The return })ipes in this building are underground. 
During last winter some became rusted through 
and they were repaired as best they could be, 
but we felt that during the coming summer all 
returns shoTild be repaired and so arranged that 
they would be accessible. This was done at a 

cost of ... ' $99.85 

For steam titters and for mason work of the brick 

conduits . 120.28 

Repair steam pijje ...... (3.48 

Two stack rooms built for storage of books and 
supplies, which also includes carpentry work on 
conduits and other work about the l)uilding, cost 90.71 

Paint and varnish work ..... 17.72 

Electric door bells from both sides of building . 25.75 



Total 



$360.79 



Dkwey School. 

Furnaces cleaned and repaired, cost . . . |>12.41 

Plumbing repaired, cost ..... 6.61 

Two lower rooms new ceiling .... 103.54 

Rooms kalsomined and finish retouched . . 38.91 
One room arranged, and south end of hall, first fioor, 

curtains, desks, shelves, screens, etc. . . . 62.94 

New awnings ....... 24.00 

Repairs to bells and telephones .... 9.20 



Total 



1257.61 



F'liANKLix Scnooi 



Furnaces, two Aeolipyle dampers 
Gleaning and repairs of furnaces 
Plumbing .... 
Tin work .... 
Carpenter work 
Mason .... 



145.00 

35.45 

22.57 

7.20 

5.91 

5.40 



SCHOOL IlKrOKT. 



Xew awning> 
Painting- 
Total 



-t:-{2.r)0 
3.23 

•1?15T.2() 



Union Stkkkt S( iiool. 

Stove repaii'ed ....... 

Plastering repaired and wall and ceiling kalsoniined 
Carpenter work and hardware .... 



Total 



^MeKRIMACK St'HOOL. 



Cleaning and repairing furnaces 
Painting and rejDairing blackboards 
Carpentering on building and seats 
Mason work on building and furnaces 



*2.:)7 

4G.()9 

;").S7 

*55.13 



4.10 
12.13 
10.32 



Total 



W.vLKEit School 



.^38.05 



Cleaning and rej^airing furnaces 


16.10 


Plumbing • ., 


22.01 


Lining flower boxes 


4.55 


Carpenter work on building, seats, etc. . 


24.53 


Mason 


• . 8.75 


Paint and varnish ...... 


2.23 


Total 


-1^68.77 



T.viiAXTo School. 

This building was in poor condition, and it was de- 
cided to renovate thoroughly the interior. The 
entire building was painted on the inside and 
walls kalsomined, ceilings repapered, the old 
desks taken out and new desks made from old 
double ones, new adjustal)le irons liought for 
desks and seats. 



88 



CITY OF CONCOni). 



Painting ........ !ii^l67.4:5 

Seats and carpenter work ..... 159.24 

Seat and desk irons ...... 144.00 

P\irnaces rejtaired a\ itli new door, grates, etc. . 55.94 

Total 1526.61 



East Cox com 

New floor two lower rooms and lialls, w 

paired, doors, locks, etc., cost 
Painting ..... 

Stoves repaired .... 

Total 



indows re- 



$283.57 

11.33 

7.45 

*302.85 



West CoxcoiiD. 

Furnaces cleaned, plumbing repaired, cost 
Carpentering, seats and 1)uilding 
Mason . . . . . - . 



5.12 

8.18 



Total 



134.76 



High Sciiooi.. 

New grates for l)oiler ...... 

Repairs to steam plant and plumbing 

Carpenter work and linnber to arrange room for 
Commercial course room . . . . , 

Painting and kalsomining room, cleaning front 
doors and finishing same, miscellaneous work in 
building ....... 

Mason, lining boilers, tire V)0x, tiling in halls, etc. 

Labor oil electric nujtor for ventilating . 

Total . . . . 



■i^eo.oo 

37.85 
102.0S 



60.98 
18.70 
24.93 

*304.54 



SCHOOL UKi'oirr. 89 

.AIam'ai, 'I'i;aimn(; Sciiooi.. 

Labor on stove ■t4.3.") 

Carpenter and stock for changing benches, cutting 

new entrance door and closing old door . . 8S.02 

Electric work made necessary In' fhnnge of location '2(J.G.") 

'Fotal *G9.0'2 

iMlS('KI.I.AXEOlS. 

(ilass bought for different buildings . . . -1;25.00 

Repairs to clocks ....... 4.2.") 

Paint, varnish and j)olish ..... 20.01 

Desk and chair, irons, miscellaneous repairs on same tll.4S 

Hardware . . . . . . . . 20. S;") 

Miscellaneous ex})enses ...... oO.lO 

Miscellaneous exjtenses, carpenter work . . 45.10 

Miscellaneous expenses, plumbing .... 4.40 



Total ^^201.2.") 

GEORGE M. KLMRAI.L, 
EDWARD N. PEARSON, 
JOHN E. RORERTSOK, 

BiiildiiKi mid liejioirs Coimatftee. 



REPORT OP THE FIN^ANCIAL AGENT, 
UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



AiMUL 1, 1905, TO March 31, 1906. 




Balance froni last year 


^58.19 


Amount appropriated by Union School District 


22,956.88 


Amount appropriated by law .... 


44,439.36 


Additional appropriated for repairs 


2,500.00 


Literary fund ....... 


1,530.10 


Dog tax 


1,713.77 


Text-books 


3,038.14 


Income Abial Walker fund, two years . 


60.76 


Tuition, High School .... *2,G94.48 




Tuition, Training School . ... 15.00 




Tuition, Grammar School . . . '229.00 




Tuition, Primary School . . . 40.00 






2,978.43 


Insurance, fire loss, Penacook School 


125.05 


Sale text-books 


246.43 


Sale stock Manual Training School 


26.52 


Miscellaneous sales 


64.31 


Returned premiums, insurance on coal . 


2.70 


Cash for tuition paid in advance, terra ]\rarch 27 to 




June 15, 1906 


82.16 




$79,822.80 


Expended. 




Fuel 


.t9,961.16 


Miscellaneous . . . . . . . 


1,271.43 


Supplies 


4,069.74 


Repairs 


3,992.30 


Insurance ...... 


352.20 



SCHOOL IMCI'OKT. 



91 



JVIanual training, maintenance 

Manual training, salary .... 

Care of houses, janitors' salary 

Militar}^ drill, maintenance 

Military drill, salary .... 

Salary, superintendent, teachers, and agent 
Text-books ...... 

Tuition paid in advance, term Marcli 27 t( 
15, 1906 ...... 

Balance cash on hand .... 



June 



-t727.21 

2,908.55 

4,770.00 

81.80 

100.00 

47,925.95 

;-},480.26 

82. IG 
100.04 

$79,822.80 



CoxcoKi), N. H., March 6, 190G. 
We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing- 
accounts (except text-book account) of the financial agent and 
find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper voucher for 
each item. 

JOHX P. geor(;e, 

JOSIAII E. FERNALD, 

^iiidUors. 



C\>N((>i:i), N. II., :\Iarch 5, 1900. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing account 
of text-books and find same correctly cast and proper voucher 
for each item of expenditure mentioned. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



92 



CITY OF CONCOIM) 



Cost Pki; CAriTA. 

Cost per pu})il, inc-ludino- all cm-rent expenses 
Cost per pupil for tuition, including nuisic, drawing, 
superintendent, etc. ...... 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive music, drawing, 
sui)erintendent, in all schools below the High 

School 

C(jst per pupil for tuition, exclusive music, drawing, 

superintendent, in the High School 
Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 
schools ........ 

Cost per pu]dl for text-l)ooks and supplies in High 
School ........ 

Cost per pupil for text-books and sujiplies in all 

schools below the High School . 
Cost per pupil for kindergarten material 
Cost per pupil for kindergarten material and tuitioi 
Cost i)er ])upil for |)ai)er .... 

Cost per pupil for pens .... 

Cost per pupil for pencils .... 

Cost per pupil for wood and iron working, inclu- 
sive of instruction ...... 

Cost per pupil for wood and iron working, exclu- 
sive of instruction ...... 

Cost per pupil for cooking, inclusive of instruction 
Cost per pupil for cooking, exclusive of instruction 
Cost ])er ])upil for sewing, inclusive of instruction 
Cost per pupil for se\\ing, exclusive of instructit)n 
Cost per pupil for drawing, inclusive of instruction 
Cost per pupil for drawing, exclusive of instruction 
C'Ost ])er pupil for music, inclusive of instruction 
Cost per pupil for music, exclusive of instruction . 
Cost ])er itu])il for militarv drill, inclusive of instruc- 
tion ......... 

Cost i)er pupil for militarv <lrill, exclusi\e of instruc- 
tion ......... 



16, 
V2. 

1. 



15 



95 
33 

,80 
.094 
.0-27 
.01-2 

(;.90 

1.70 
3.3') 

M 
2.17 

.10 

.47 

.11 

.44 

.03 

1.35 
.GO 



S('H(')OL REI'OIIT. 



93 



'lllTK.N 


lli:< 


KII'T 


■<. 






Dewey School 




*1.S.00 


Dewey Training School 










15.00 


High School 










•J,()9-t.43 


Kimball School 










:)0.00 


^Merrimack School . 










18.00 


Penacook School . 










32.00 


Harriet P. Dame School 










6.00 


Rumford School 










52.00 


West Concord School 










12.00 


Cogswell School 










4.00 


Eastman School 










47.00 


Chandler School . . 










30.00 



*2,978.43 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

The i^ast year has shown marked progress in the educational 
world. Questions of vital importance to the public schools 
have arisen and engaged the best minds of the country. 
Remarkable evidences of the desire of the people to eradicate 
political control and sectional influence from school affairs 
have been shown in a representative New England city, while 
the leading city of the Middle Atlantic states, with a progres- 
sive corps of educational leaders and an intelligent public, has 
resolutely refused to take a step backward in the administra- 
tion of school affairs. These are reassuring signs to those who 
have an intimate knowledge of the workings, requirements, 
and attainments of the modern school, which is superior to 
that of any previous period. 

Of our own elementary schools I am able to say that they 
were never in better condition. The deyotion to duty of the 
teachers in charge has been shown conspicviously in results 
which are creditable to the schools and to those in whose trust 
the educational welfare of our children is reposed. The course 
of study never before has been so w^ell suited to the needs and 
capacities of the pupils who evince a keen interest in their 
school duties. 

With confidence in continued progress and with hope that a 
unity of jsurpose may be made manifest in all our school work, 
I submit this report, the forty-sixth of its series. 

Attexdaxck axi> School A<<ommo])Atioxs. 

The table of attendance for June, 1905, shows that there 
were 2,846 pupils enrolled during the year that ended at that 
time. In addition to this, there were 553 in parochial schools 



SCHOOL ItEPORT. 95 

and 37 in pri\ate schooLs who were residents of the district. 
This makes a total of 3,436 different piipils of scliool age who 
were in attendance during tliat year. 

School attendance trends toward the south. ^Vith the room 
afforded by the Chandler Scliool, and the possibility of a 
decrease in the enrolment on account of new parochial schools, 
no immediate provisions for additional accommodations may 
be necessary. 1 wish to call the attentioii of the Board, how- 
ever, to the following table, to ac(iuaint them with the fact that 
the growth in the southern part of the district is quite rapid : 



Class A, 
Class B, 
Class C, 
Class D, 
Class E, 
Class F, 
Class G, 
Class H, 
Class I, 
Class J, 
Class K, 
Class L, 
Class j\r, 

215 ' 12S 

A 'new room was provided in the Dewey building by parti- 
tioning off the south end of the lower hall with a large curtain 
extending from the floor to the ceiling. The arrangement has 
its inconveniences, but there are regular schoolrooms in the 
district which are not so desirable. About thirty puj)ils in the 
first three primary classes have received instruction in this 
room, and there are 180 pupils in the building. The floor 
space will warrant the accommodation of a much larger num- 
ber of pupils. The only reason they cannot be accommodated 
is because the grading will not permit of all the rooms being 
ecjually filled. It does not appear to be in the line of economy 



No. pupils livino- 
below West St. 

18 


No. pupils living 
below Allison St. 

12 


18 






12 


15 






7 


22 






8 


11 






6 


18 






8 


22 






14 


18 






9 


13 






12 


28 






11 


10 






8 


17 






16 


10 






5 



96 (ITV OF CONCOKD. 

to make an enlargement of the building at the present time 
witli such an attendance. 1 believe some way can be devised 
by which the floor space can be more fully occupied- than it is 
now, and I urge a consideration of this matter by the Board. 

The plan of consolidating two of the ninth grades in the 
Chandler building has been carried out successfully, and sug- 
gests a careful consideration of a general consolidation of these 
grades at some convenient central point. 

Tf the old High School building should be used for manual 
training purposes, it will prove to l)e an expensive experiment. 
Unless this building can be used for relieving pressure from 
the north, the district will have to face another heavy expense 
for additional construction there at no distant day. 

No decided increase in attendance has been discovered either 
in East Concord or West Concord. Upon the completion of 
the Garrison School building, West Concord will be accommo- 
dated for some years to come. The labor and inconvenience 
with which the work is carried on at the Eastman School 
forcibly suggests more room, but the number of pupils is not 
large enough to warrant an addition to the building. 

I desire to call the attention of the liJoard to the danger of 
non-adjustable desks, especially combination furniture. The 
injury likely to be done to growing pujnls by desks not fitted 
to them may not be readily calculated. I offer it as a hygienic 
necessity that adjustable furniture be intro<luced in place of the 
fixed furniture as rapidly as the finances will permit. 

In the Kimball School building some steps should be taken 
to give better regulation to the heat of the rooms. If the 
steam pipes could be altered so that each pipe could be shut off 
independently of the others, a ])artial remedy for the trouble 
coidd be had. 

The ventilation of the Chandler Ituilding is faulty. Efforts 
should 1)6 made to render it more satisfactory than it is now, 
as the building will eventually be given over to x-egular school 
work. 

The attendance at the High School has remained about the 
same as last year. It is probable that it will increase some- 
what for a few years to come. A change in the high school 



SrHOOL IlEINIRT. 97 

acconiniodatioiis throughout the state will probably keej) the 
number of tuition pupils smaller than heretofore. This fact, 
coupled with the departure of manufacturing interests from the 
city, and other things, may work to keep the attendance below 
what it was prophesied it would be. 

Complaint has been made by people living at the extreme 
south end of the district about the long distances their children 
have to go in attending the Penacook and Rumford schools. 
Request has been made for furnishing transportation for these 
pupils. The matter is respectfully referred to the Board for 
consideration. 

Elementary School Work. 

The work of one year means a great deal in the school life 
of the child. The gradual development of brain and muscle 
may be materially strengthened or permanently injured through 
a lack of application by the child or by a lack of efficient teach- 
ing. As a whole I can say that the work has been one of 
strong continuous development. Our school system retains 
the essentials which have characterized it for a generation, but 
the plan of working and applying them has changed from year 
to year and will continue to change as times and conditions 
demand. 

Our course of study seems to be quite well balanced, and 
the attainments of the pupils are not inferior to those of any 
other city. Probably no more conscientious body of teachers 
exists than that which governs the work of these schools. In 
some cases, however, teachers do not seem to have a proper 
regard for their physical condition. I believe every teacher 
should take a leave of absence for a year once in every five 
years, whether she appears to need it or not. 

The unusually strong course in literature and language has 
been strengthened still more by connecting the work of class 
M wnth the public library. Every pupil in this class is required 
to read at least one book each term and make a definite 
abstract of the work on a folder ])repared for this jnirpose. 
On the last page of the folder is given a list of books selected 
for their literary merit and a wide range of authorship. This 



98 CITY OF COXCOUD. 

■excellent list was made up liy ]Miss Blancbard of the Public 
Library and Miss Dickerman of the Chandler School. Tn this 
class much attention, also, has been paid to pronunciation and 
8})elling-. Ashmore's Manual of Pronunciation was adopteil, 
and the children have daily exercises in the correct pronun- 
ciation of a wide vocabulary of words. Out of these they are 
asked to spell and apply a selected list of two hundred words. 

The time for the study of arithmetic was lengthened seven 
weeks and the study of algebra confined to the spring term. 
The coiirses in language, history and geography have been 
more reasonably adjusted for all the grades. Vertical pen- 
manship was discontinued and slant penmanship again resumed. 
The result of this has been that penmanship is at present in a 
chaotic state and it will take a long time to bring it up to the 
standard of former years. I am convinced that vertical pen- 
manship should have been retained during the first six years, 
and that the matter of satisfying the commercial world with 
slant writing should have been introduced after that. 

The advantages of a semi-annual promotioa have been 
amply demonstrated. The only really bad feature about it is 
the tendency to give some teachers too many classes. Steps 
ought to be taken to obviate this difficulty. I see no other 
way to do it than by making two rooms of some of the regular 
rooms and furnishing an extra teacher. The result of this 
would be that more than two classes to a teacher would be 
eliminated ; the floor space and seating capacity of each build- 
ing fully occupied; and the necessity of extraordinary transfers 
of pupils obviated. The difficulty of such an arrangement 
would be the solving of the problem of heating and lighting. I 
am confident, however, that careful thought given to the subject 
would reveal some way of accomplishing it satisfactorily, and 
I suggest that a trial of this scheme be made in some building. 

Some of the readers now used in the schools are out of date 
so much as to be a bore to both teacher and pupil, besides 
offering such literature as is not fitted for modern schools. 
These ought to be changed at once for books that conform 
more closelv to modern ideas in regard to good literature, and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 99 

freetlom from grammatical errors. Some series have been in 
use fifteen years. 

The regulation, which allows but forty minutes for examina- 
tion, subjects the }>u})ils to much unnecessary nervous strain 
and works to their disadvantage in many ways. This should 
be changed without delay, and in classes K, L, M the time 
ought to be extended to at least ninety minutes. 

TuAiNixG School. 

The training school has done its usual good work, there 
being enrolled at the present time five students in the primary 
department and three in the kindergarten normal class. In 
December, 1905, five yoimg ladies were graduated from the 
regular primary course. Under the present conditions for 
entering the school and graduating from it, much confusion 
ensiles. This arises from allowing students to enter at the dif- 
ferent periods during the year, in that it affects, seriously, the 
arrangement of studies and classes and the logical sequence of 
the training course. The labor of the instructor is also greatly 
increased thereby, and thoroughness so essential to such 
normal work is not easily realized. For the best interests of 
the school I recommend to the Board the following changes : 

1. Allow but one time for entering the normal classes, that 
being at the beginning of the fall terra. 

2. ]Make the course seventy-six weeks instead of fifty-three 
as it is at present. 

I am sure the standard of training work would be raised and 
the pupil teachers would be much better prepared to take up 
the duties of their profession as far as age and equipment are 
concerned. 

This year's graduating kindergarten normal class will prob- 
ably be the last. This department was instituted in order that 
the district might be furnished reliable teachers at a reasonable 
salary. The amount of money the school has saved the dis- 
trict is far and away above the expense it has ever incurred, a 
fact which ,will be more evident when we are obliged to seek 
kindergartners from other sources. 

The school was established in Se})tember, 1901, with eleven 



100 ('[TY OF CONCORD. 

pupils, live resident and six non-resident. Miss Helen L. South- 
gate was chosen training teacher and Miss Augusta M. -Judkins, 
assistant. The school flourished and the first class was grad- 
uated in June, 1903. In 1902 the entering class numbered 
six. Two left and but four graduated in June, 1904. In 1903 
there was no entering class. In 1904 three entered and these 
Avill be graduated in June, 1906. The classes had the benefit 
of lecturers and instructors from abroad — specialists in their line 
of work. The strength of the training gained as time went on 
and from an educational viewpoint the school flourished in 
spite of many obstacles from within and without. Its influence 
has been felt in all grades of school work, very many of the 
teachers of the grammar and primary classes being helped by 
attending the lectures. Giving up the afternoon classes no 
longer required kindergartners to do both primary and kinder- 
garten service, and it was not deemed wise to continue it 
longer. In its retirement the schools have sustained the loss 
of one of their distinctive educational forces. 

Music. 
The report of the instructor i-e veals an unusual amount of 
hard work that has been done during the past year. Much 
attention has been given to sight singing and the results ac- 
complished by the Independent Sight Singing Societies are 
accorded great praise. Tone production has been carefully 
looked after, but it is desirable that this should be largely 
confined to the more advanced grades and the mechanics of 
music taught and mastered before the higher grades are reached. 
One hundred sixty High School pupils have elected singing 
which consists largely of chorus drill. Through the courtesy 
of Mr. George A. Place they have been enabled to hear selec- 
tions, which they have studied, reproduced on the Victor talk- 
ing machine. The required work at the training school has 
been faithfully performed and the general work is satisfactory. 

The course in drawing has been changed only in the direc- 
tion of establishing a closer relation between drawing, construe- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

tion and design ; and in connecting more closely this subject 
with the school and home intei'ests of the child. The director 
asks for better grade of colored crayons — a reasonable request — 
and gratefully acknowledges the generosity of the Board in 
granting an additional allowance for Japanese pottery. She 
also urges immediate attention to the subject of school-room 
decoration. Good reproductions of fine art may be had more 
reasonably than ever before. The matter of decorating school 
rooms has become a highly-systematized process and commonly 
recognized as an advisable adjunct to successful schools. The 
instructor deplores her inability to do justice to both basketry 
and the legitimate work of dra\^'ing. No better work than 
basketry exists for promoting ambition, perseverance, patience 
and industry. I suggest that the Board give thought to the 
better regulation of these two subjects. 

The status of drawing in our schools was never better. I 
doubt if there is another study that enters more forcibly into 
all other branches of school work. Its beneficial results are 
seen in board illustration, in arithmetical drawing, in ph^'siol- 
ogy, in geography, in history, in literature, in composition, and 
in manual training. Although it may be counted costly, I 
believe no money is more economically used and no money 
spent whose evidence is so plainly marked as value given for 
value. 

Military Drill. 

The instructor reports a keen interest on the part of the boys. 
The battalion is the largest and best equipped that has ever 
represented the school. The usual Competitive Drill and Field 
Day were held. The cadets attended the service of Military 
Sunday, participated in Memorial Day exercises, and were 
creditably represented in the Interscholastic Championship 
Drill held at Boston under the auspices of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 

There is need of more fully arming and equipping the 
cadets and also need of a copy of Infantry Drill Regulations 
for each member. 



102 ("ITY OF COXCOIID. 

MANUAL TRAINING. 

Wood and Irox Work. 

Twenty years ago manual training in wood-work was intro- 
duced into our schools. During that time it has been one 
continued success from nearly every point of view. It began 
with a yearly enj-ollment of eighty-two pupils and continued 
increase has brought the number up to three hundred 
seventy-one in 1906. The gain per cent, in school attendance 
of boys during these years has been one hundred eighty. 
The gain per cent, in manual training attendance has been four 
hundred forty. Of the educational value of this work no one 
need seriously doubt. It is firmly established in the minds of 
all unprejudiced people. The remarkable growth of scientific 
schools, the incorporation of this work into the public school 
curriculum by very many cities of educational prominence, ita 
effect of pronounced value upon the ordinary school work, the 
enthusiasm shown by the pupils who take it, and its unquestioned 
influence for good upon the moral condition of the schools — 
all these things forbid thoughts of discontinuing it. The 
course for this school gradually expanded from plain carpen- 
try to the use of working drawings, lathe work, and finally 
machine work in iron. During the greater part of its exis- 
tence it has been located in the old Spring Street School 
building, an addition having been made on the south side of 
the building to make room for iron work. For two or more 
years this school has not offered the pupils those accommoda- 
tions which are justly their due. Pupils entering class K in 
midwinter have been largely excluded from the school for half 
a year because there Avas no room for them. This year class 
M of the Merrimack School works Saturday forenoons, taking^ 
Wednesday afternoon instead. Classes K in the Kimball and 
Rumford Schools receive instruction only every other week. 
Such arrangements are verj^ undesiral)le. The time has come 
for building a structure which shall meet the requirements of 
this class of work. Such a building should provide a large 
room for wood and lathe work with storage rooms for lumber 
and for finished work of pupils, a machine shop, a sewing 



sunooi. i;i:i'()HT. 103 

room, a cooking room, a draughting room, a principal's office, a 
soft metal moulding and forge room, suitable lavatories, closets 
and other conveniences. The draughting room might easily 
accommodate all the High School mechanical drawing pu])ils if 
the building should be located within easy access of those pupils. 
Such a building need not have any elaborations of any sort. 
It should be built first for the best of interior accommodations 
and, secondly, for good, solid, substantial architecture without 
unnecessary ornamentation. It shoiild have such construction 
as will be durable but admit of extension or enlargement if 
future occasion should demand it. 

CooKIXC. 

Dm-ing the fall term jMiss Penniman, for a number of years 
an efficient teacher of cooking and household economics in our 
schools, resigned to accept a much more responsible and lucra- 
tive position in a neighboring state. The work of Miss Penni- 
man will not soon be forgotten by us. Thoroughly educated 
and equipped for her work, she brought to her pupils, besides, 
an immaculate neatness of person and room, fine scholastic 
attainments and the best of womanly instincts. We wish her 
success in her future work. She was succeeded here by Mrs. 
Mary II. Ring, a resident of this city. Mrs. Ring inclines 
toward the practical side of her work and seeks to make the 
pupils home-keej)ers, not merely housekeepers. The school 
prepared the lunch for the recent Parents' Day at the Chandler 
School in a creditable manner. A few boys from the High 
School still take cooking and are getting benefit from the 
course. The class started with great flourish but th& number 
soon dwindled to small proportions when it was found that 
such work did not mean play. 

Sewin(;. 

The number of pupils who take sewing increases each year, 
there l)eing now enrolled five hundred seventy-five. The usual 
excellence in all kinds of this work has been realized. The 
increase in numl)ers naturally requires more facilities for storing 



104 CITY OF CONCORD. 

material and finished work. The instructors desire additional 
accommodations of this sort and they should be furnished. 

KlXDERGAKTENS. 

The kindergartens have been strengthened by more experi- 
enced and careful supervision. No new kindergartens have 
been started this year, but the number of pupils constantly 
increases, there having been a gain of sixteen during the past 
year. Miss Comins of the Walker kindergarten was granted 
a leave of absence and Miss Hastings of the Dewey School was 
given her place for the year. Miss Fernald took Miss Hastings' 
place for one year. There seems to be no abatement of public 
interest in this work. 

The Stamf Savixgs System. 

Last spring the Board voted to try the Stamp Savings Sys- 
tem in the public schools. Owing to the approach of the close 
of the year it was thought best not to try it until the beginning 
of the fall term. At this time nearly all the teachers showed 
commendable spirit in promoting the welfare of the movement 
and from the beginning the scheme was a success. The idea 
originated with the members of the Concord Woman's Club, 
who rendered efficient aid in carrying on the work. The entire 
amount saved up to March 1, 1916, and other interesting facts 
may be learned from the following table : 



SCHOOL IlEPORT. 



105 



Name of School. 


ssa 


a 

3 
O 

■ a 


o ** 
a t^-: 

lis 


No. Of grammar : 
pupils. 


1 

P. 

1- 




185 
120 
96 
78 
32 
26 
43 
53 


$396.00 
214.11 
125.21 
67.21 
55.16 
33.19 
68.89 
41.52 


$20.00 
20.14 
12.00 
6.00 
3.85 
10.00 
6.75 
6.50 


85 
67 
54 
30 
14 

19 

21 


100 
53 
42 
48 
18 
26 
34 
32 


Kimball School 

Walker School 




Dewej' School 


Tahanto School 

Franklin School 






Total 


643 


$1,001.29 


$20.14 


290 


353 





8ome statements bv the teachers 



FAVOKABI.E. 



" The money saved to a great extent is money that would 

have gone for candy — mostly cheap candy." 
" Children are intensely interested in it." 
" It is looked upon with favor l)y most of the parents." 
" It shows the pupils that every jjenny has its value." 
" It makes a much needed bond of sympathy between the 

teacher and the pupil." 

" I see nothing unfavorable to the ])lan in my l)uilding. We 

all favor it." 

" Fewer l)ags of candy are brought to school." 

" It is an advantage to be taught to save and form the habit 

of saving money for right uses." 



rXFAVOIJAULE. 



"Not always time to take the money before school and 
children lose it if told to wait." 

" The teacher has made up the money in a few instances 
because of the grief of the child." 



10<3 CITY OF CONCOUl). 

" Loss of money in consequence of loss of stam])s by a child 
who is naturally very careful al)Out such matters." 

As a proposition it is a success and the favorable reitorts 
greatly outnumber the unfavorable. 

High School. 

The report of the ja-incipal shows material progress for the 
past year. The commercial course flourishes and has a bene- 
ficial effect upon the entire school. A new room was impro- 
vised from the boys' dressing room, twelve new typewriting 
machines being purchased and installed therein. Miss Grace 
V. Knowles, the instructor in stenography and English, was 
granted a leave of absence on account of illness. Miss Welthie 
P. Nichols taking the stenography classes and Miss Marion L. 
Bean her classes in English. 

The school is on the approved list of the New England Col- 
lege Entrance Certificate Board and similarly accredited at 
Cornell and the University of Michigan. Spelling matches 
have been held. Extempore speaking has received some atten- 
tion as well as commercial arithmetic and commercial geogra- 
phy. I'upils have made visits to industrial plants to aid future 
technical study and train them in good citizenshi]». 

The spirit of the school is commended, the teaching corps 
approved by the principal, and he looks hopefully forward to 
more ample accommodations. 

Teachers. 

The teacher is practically the school. All teachers are not 
leaders, but the most desirable teachers have this qualification. 
Some teachers are fitted to teach by nature, but this is no 
surety that they can teach profitably until time and experience 
have had a chance to mould them into teaching form. An 
untrained teacher will at some time take hei- training at the 
expense of pupils. In the case of a trained teacher, training at 
the expense of pupils is more nearly reduced to a minimum. 
In this respect it is possible for the East to learn something 
from tlie West. From a California city comes this regulation : 



SCHOOL KEI'OIIT. 107 

" Xo university graduate can be certificated for secondar}- 
school teaching without first having a year of strictly profes- 
sional study, and no normal graduate can teach in a secondary 
school without at least a year of university study." Such 
things as these reassure one that reason in educational matters 
still survives, and that some sections of our country are alive 
to the real ])roblems confronting us in regard to the common 
school. 

The fitness of the teacher from every standpoint is the first 
thing to be considered for a successful school. The strongest 
element in every teacher shovild he governing j^o/rer. Strong, 
wholesome governing power makes strong pupils, strong citi- 
zens, and strong fathers and mothers. It makes the school a 
ruling factor in the equation of public good. Anything that 
benefits the community belongs to the work of the teacher and 
the school. I do not care whether it be of an intellectual, 
moral, spiritual or physical nature, if it stands for raising the 
standard of citizenship to a higher plane, it belongs to every- 
body, school board, teacher, pupil, parent and superintendent 
to strive to bring it about at all times, and it belongs unques- 
tionably to the public school as a whole. The best, most suc- 
cessful and consequently the most valuable teachers do this to 
their everlasting credit. They do it by a strong personality, 
by an evidence of public spirit, by an inherent regard for the 
truth at all times, by having a standard which they maintain in 
life and deed, by sincerity of purpose, by fi'ank and open ser- 
vice, by " hewing to the line and letting chips fall wdiere they 
may," by giving actual service for every dollar paid them, by 
treating the poor man's child with the same consideration that 
they do the rich man's child, and in many other ways that 
spring spontaneously from a strong, generous and truthful 
nature. I have nfever known a low, lax standard of school 
government to result eventually in anything but a low, lax 
standard of school work and school morals. We may then 
conclude safely that the selection of teachers for governing- 
power first and equipment second will seldom fail of giving us. 
excellent schools. 



108 ClTr OF CONCORD. 



Ar(;usTA Maud Judkins. 
Died March 25, 1905. 



3Iiss Judkins taught in the kindergartens and primary schools 
of our Union School Disti'ict, iirst at the Chandler kindergar- 
ten and finally at the Dewey School as assistant in the kinder- 
garten normal training department. Miss Judkins was a shin- 
ing light in her profession. Indeed, I have seldom found in 
all my experience such an energetic, bright, brainy, capable 
teacher. The soul of honor, she brought to her work a lovable 
nature that left its impress upon all with whom she became 
associated. These few words pay but scant tribute to her val- 
uable services and memory. 



With the hope that all departments of our school work may 
sustain and improve upon the standards of former years this 
report is respectfully submitted. 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



110 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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112 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 





Wood and Iron. 


Sewing. 


Cooking. 


SCHOOLS. 


ft 

3 
P. 

O 
1 

ii 

|2 


i 

i 

o 
'ti 

o 


I.S 

35 


i^ a 

a= 

P 


1 

3 
O 

> 

o 

3 


k 

Is 
P 


ft 
ft 

"3 
1 

■si 


I 
O 

> 
o 


1^ 
o a 

II 

o ft 


High 

Kimball 


56 
43 
49 
54 
27 
32 


6 
7 
4 
4 
2 
5 


50 
36 
45 
50 
25 
27 


11 

79 
101 
46 
70 
41 
22 
24 
37 
29 
14 
32 


4 
3 


7 
79 

46 
70 
41 

00 


9 
28 
35 
36 
16 
18 


5 

1 
3 
2 

1 
4 


4 
27 




34 




















....1 24 
....j 37 
.... 29 
....j 14 
.... 32 

7 i 499 








West Concord 


13 
12 
5 
18 


3 
3 
1 

1 


10 
9 

4 
17 


13 1 

7 1 2 
2 2 

195 22 


12 


Harriet P. Dame 

Parochial • • . - 


30 






Totals 309 


36 


273 


506 


173 



.SCmooL REPORT, 



113 



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114 



CITY OF COXCORI). 



UNIOX SCHOOL DISTRICT, U)0:.. 

SuMMARV. 

Number children enumerated in 1899 . 

1900 . 

1901 . 

1902 . 

1903 . 

1904 . 

1905 . 

1905. 
AVhole number of l)oys ..... 

Whole number of girls ..... 

Number attending school since Seiiteinl)er 1, 1904 

" " public schools 

" " parochial schools 

■" "• private schools 

" Rolfe and Rumford .Vsyluni 

Number between G and 16 never attended 
Number between 5 and 6 never attended 
Moved to city since September 1, 1904 
Not complied with law 



2,(321 
2,766 
2,856 
2,970 
3,128 
3,162 
3,226 



1,580 

1,646 

3,086 

2,513 

523 

5 

13 

5 

34 

93 

9 





Nativity 


OF Pa RENT. 


American born 




2,145 


Nova Scotian . 


Foreign born 




1,081 


Scotch 


Finn . 




2 


Italian 


Pole . 




•2 


English ■. 


German 




4 


Swede 


Swiss 




5 


Irish 


Armenian . 




5 


French Canadian 


Russian 




27 






N 


ATIVIT^ 


OF ClIlI.I.. 


American born 




3,166 


Russian . 


Foreign l)orn 




60 


Italian 


Scotch 




2 


Swede 


Nova Scotian 




.> 


French Canadian 



28 
43 
50 
106 
121 
226 
462 



SCHOOL IlKPOET. 



Hi 



HIGH SCHOOL TABLE 

SiiuwiNii XuMiJEU OF Students Takixg Each Study, 11)0."), 



Class. 


Grad. 


-- 


Jun. 


Soph. 


Fresh. 


Total. 


English 


1 61 


80 
67 
18 
30 
8 


79 
62 


117 


338 

166 








20 
14 
5 






41 
4 


71 
115 


156 


Greek 




Algebra 




115 
65 
28 
10 




1 




65 
28 


Commercial Arithmetic . . . 








10 
































7 
55 


14 




23 
55 


Physio 










History \ 


46 
29 


21 


80 


108 


255 




5 


13 


46 
52 


^4 
52 
52 




Bookkeeping . 




23 
10 
32 
30 


29 




Trigonometry 








25 
24 




57 
54 


Typewriting 


















3 360 


369 


386 


509 


1,627 





116 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades or subjects 
taught. 




Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 


High. 
Frederick W Doring. PHnpinni 


History 


$2,400 
950 

800 
900 
8C0 

800 
800 

800 

600 

750 

700 

700 
750 

650 








Mathem'ics, Vergil 

Physics, Chemistry 
French, German.... 
English 


53 School St. (Goffstown, 

N. H.) 
2 So State St 


Vaughn E. Standish. 




,, 




Mary W. Dean 


,1 


3 Elm St (53 Hemenwav 




Latin, Greek 

Latin, Greek 

Book'eeping, Type- 


St., Boston, Mass.) 


Louise A. Ordway.... 
Mildred K. Bentley... 


4. 


113 No State St 


,, 






23 Rumford St. (Wallace, 

N. S.) 
6 Blake St. (65 Martin St., 

Cambridge, Mass.) 
35 Perley St. 


Edith W Lawrence 




May Belle Mc Lam.... 
Grace V. Knowles.... 




Media?val History, 
English History . 

English, Ancient 
History, Stenog- 






23 Rumford St. (23 Lancas- 
ter St., Cambridge, Mass.) 

99 No. State St. (Epping. 

N.H.) 
66i-> North State St 


MaryB.Bartlett...... 


g, 


Biology, Physiol- 
ogy, Geometry, 
Comm'cial Geog- 




Lillian Yeaton 


Algebra, English . . 
Class I 


William H. Bunt 

Emma Hindley 

Carrie M. True 

KlMB.^LL. 

Elizabeth m'. McAfee. 
Jessie N. Stimson.... 
Lenora B. Caldwell.. 
Mabel A. Boutelle.... 
Anna Delia Shaw 


Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 


S OrinT-t «f 


Assistant 




55o!9 Holt St. 
550128 Beacon St. 
550,21 South St. 


Classes K, J 

J.I 




,, 


D, E, F.... 

C.B.A.... 

Kindergarten 

Class L 


550 22 So. Spring St. 
550'42 No. Spring St. 
475 11 No. Spring St. 

200 'il I'- Rnmfnrri St 


Belle B. Shepar4 

Edith M. Ray 

Alice L. Sullivan 

Mabel I. Durivage ... 

RUMFORD. 

Harriet S.Emmons.. 
Cora T. Fletcher 

Florence A. Chandler 




t. 




Transferred to 
Chandler First 
Grammar at the 
beginning of the 
fall term.. 

Principal 

Assistant 


550 


« Sfi at-jtc st 


" K 




Classes H I 


St., Lawrence, Mass.) 
425 36 So. Spring St. (20 Win- 

j terSt., Penacook, N.H.) 
500'25 Green St. 




Agnes R. Masson.. .. 

Fannie B. Lothrop.... 

Gara E. McQuesten.. 
Katharine L. Remick 
Nellie T. Halloran.... 
Luella A. Dickerman 

Delia I. Lewis 


,, 


F,G 

D,E 

A,B.C 

Kindergarten 


350|36 So. Spring St. (23 Elm 

1 St., Peiiacook, N. H.) 
550136 So. Spring St. (Bristol, 

N.H.) 


" 


,1 




Transferred to 
Chandler First 
Grammar at the 
beginning of the 
fall term. 

Substituted for 
Mi.ss Masson dur- 
ing winter term. 


200 


30 Perley St. 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 



117 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Contimied. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room, ^'"'"'^''faugh^.^^"®''^^ 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Chandler. 

Luella A. Dickerman 
Mabel I. Durivage . . . 
Office of superintend - 
ent, financial agent, 
truant officer, cook- 
ing school, board of 
education. 



Merrimack. 

Elizabeth J. Talpey 

Harriet C. Kimball. 

Minnie E. Ladd 

Lottie E. Pierson... 
Lillian Yeaton 



Walker. 

Grace L. Barnes... 

Mary Flavin 

Viola J. Brock 

Esther Hodge 

Regina J. Glennon 
Emma L. Hastings 
Florence C. Willis. 
M. Grace Ahern... 

Nellie Davis 

Belle E. Shepard .. 

Amy L. Comins — 



Penacook. 

Mary E. Melifant 

Annie M. Branon 

Bertha M. Brett 

Laura M. Andrus 

<3ara E. McQuesten.. 



Franklin. 

M. Grace Ahern 

Abbie A. Donovan 

Edna M. Kennedy 

Bessie M. Edson 

Bernice Ella Hoyt.. . 
■Celia C. Standish 



Principal 
Assistant , 



Principal 

Assistant 

Transferred to 
High School at 
beginning of fall 
term. 



Principal 

Assistant 

Transferred to 
Franklin School 
at beginning of 
fall term. 

Resigned at end of 
year. 

Transferred toKim- 
ball Lower Pri- 
mary at begin- 
ning of fall term. 

Leave of absence 
for year. 



Principal 

Assistant 

Transf'red to Rum- 
ford Primary at 
beginning of fall 
term. 



Principal 

Assistant 

Transf'red to West 
Concord First 
Grammar at be- 
ginning of fall 
term. 



Class M 

Classes K, L... 
F,G... 
B, C, D 



Classes K, L 

I, J 

H.I 

F,G 

C. D, E 

A, B, Kind 
Kindergarten 



Classes K, L... 
H,J... 
F,G.... 
A, B. D 



Class J 

Cla.sses H, I 

D,F,G.... 
" A, B, Kind 

A, B, Kind 



$800 
525 



64 South St. 

22 South St. (Lowell, Vt.) 



41 Warren St. (Cape Ned- 
dick, Me.) 
Hopkinton Road. 
72 Washington St. 
52 Beacon St. 



112 Centre St. 

69 Warren St. 

47 Wa.shington St. (Clin- 
ton, Mass.) 

86 Franklin St. 

12 Perlev St. 

155 No. State St. 

29 Merrimack St. (Warner, 
N. H.) 



38 Perley St. 
49 South St. 
22 So. State St. 
11 Fayette St. 



550 64 Franklin St. 
500!264 No. Main St. 
550 10 Blanchard St. 
47575 Centre St. 
200 (Penacook, N. H.) 



118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.—Continuecl 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades or subjects 
taught. 


'S4 


Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 


Franklin.— Con. 
Viola J. Brock 

Agnes V. Sullivan 

Dewey. 
\ddie F Straw . 


Trans'ed to Walker 
Fir.st Primary at 
beginning of fall 
term. 

Trans'ed to Dewey 
Kind, at begin'g 
of fall term. 

Principal 


Trainer for Prim'ry 
Trainer for Kind... 


$1,000 
700 
600 
600 
600 
400 
300 
200 


101 No State St 


Helen L. Southgate.. 




2 So. Spring St. 




Stella M Britton 


,, 


G,H 

D, E, F 

A,B,C 

Clas.ses, Kind 

Classes, Kind 


27 Washington St. 


Alice M. Sargent 


,, 


,, 




Mary Fernald 

Agnes V. Sullivan.... 
Abbie A. Donovan ... 

Emma L. Hastings.. 




9 Tahanto St 


Transfer re d to 
Franklin Primary 
at beginning of 
fall term. 

Trans'ed to Walker 
Kind, at beginn'g 
of fall term. 


49 Lyndon St. 



TRAINING CLASSES. 



Primary and Grammar. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Graduates December, 190(1. 

Jennie Belle Blake (422 No. State St., We.st Concord.) 

Bessie Venelia Burnham (34 High St., Penaeook. N. H.) 

Alice Melvina Marie Phaneuf 90 Rumford St. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Graduates March, 1907. 

Julia Frances Foley 100 So. State St. 

Carrie Chandler Paul 114 South St. 

Kindergarten, 
senior class. 



Graduates June, 1900. 

Frances Gwimm Amee 8 Tahanto St. 

Ruth Wardwell Amee 8 Tahanto St. 

Myrta Baxter Lowe 90 School St- 



SCHOOL llEPORT. 



119 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades or subjects 
taught. 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



West Concoed. 



Celia C. Standish. 
Ellen B. Dixon.... 



Bertha L. Holbrook. 
Mary Alice Jones . . . 
lyla Chamberlain... 



Grace L. Aldrich — 
Elizabeth J. Talpey 



Bernice E. Hoyt. 



Principal 

Assistant 

Transferred to 
Merrimack First 
Grammar at be- 
ginning of fall 
term. 

Transferred to 
Franklin Kinder- 
garten at begin- 
ning of fall term. 



Classes K, L, M 
K,J.... 



G.H.I 

D, B,F.... 
" A, B, C and 

Kindergarten 

Classes A, B, C and 
Kindergarten 



Eastman. 

Ada Myra Mann 

Florence E. George.- 1 Assistant 

Su.sie F. Goddard [ 

Mary A. McGuire 
May B. McLam.. 



Principal •. Classes K, L, M 



H, J.... 
D, F, G. 
A.B, C. 



Transf erred toHigh 
School at begin- 
ning of fall term. 

Transferred to 
Walker Second 
Primary at begin- 
ning of" fall term. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



Principal 

Assistant 

Transferred to 
; Eastman First 
I Grammar at be- 
1 ginning of fall 
I term. 



Tahanto. 

Cecilia P. Jones | Principal 

Sara E. McClure 'Assistant 

Esther Hodge Transferred to 

1 Walker Second 
i Primary at begin- 
ning of fall term. 



Regina J. Glennon , 



Mary T. O'Connor. 



Harriet P. Dame. 

Vinnie M. Boutwell . 
Evelyna D. Boulay.. 

Louisa Herbert 

Ada M Mann 



Cogswell. 



Mary C. Caswell 

Mildred lona Cilley. 



Manual Training, 
Spring Street. 



Principal . 
Assistant . 



iWood and Iron. 



Classes D, E,F. 
A, B.C. 



Clas-ses C, D, E. 
A. B, C 



1 Cummings Ave. 

West Concord. (Maple- 
wood Ave. .Glo'ster. Mass.) 
542 No. State St., W Concord. 
(152 No. Main St., Penacook„ 
N. H.) 

2 View St., West Concord. 

19 Monroe St. 



8 Court St. (Wcolsville, 

N. H.) 
66 Franklin St. 
E. Concord. (Norwich, Vt.) 
102 So. State St. 



19 Merrimack St. 
2 Highland St. 
103 No. State St. 



300|24 Thorndike St. 

550 153 No. State St. (Boscawen, 

N. H.) 



121 Warren St. 
36 So. Spring St. 



120 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



Name of buildings 
and teachers. 



Union Street. 

Bow Brook. 

Special. 



Position and 
room. 



Sewing School. 
Not in use. 



Charles S. Conant — 

Grace Louise Bell 

Edward Fox Gordon. 
Herbert R. Tucker .. . 
Ellen Juliette Jones.. 
Louise Carter Howe . 

Mary H. Ring 

Annie B. Penniman... 

Edward A. Gordon... 



Major C. L. Mason. 



JANITORS. 

Albert W. Thompson. 
Arthur James Taylor 
Benjamin F.Robinson 

Oland M. Blodgett.... 

Frank Leroy Dudley. 

Charles Ada 

George R. Parmenter 
Philander C.White... 
Park French 

Margaret Casey 

Byron K. Woodward. 
George W. Johnson.. 



Principal . 
Assistant . 
Principal . 
Assistant . 



Cooking; resigned 
during fall term. 

Wood and iron; 
resigned during 
winter term. 



High School 

Kimball 

Walker and Merri- 
mack 

Dewev and Frank- 
lin.. 

Penacookand Cogs- 
well 

Rumford 

West Concord 

Eastman 

Resigned at end of 
year. 

Tahanto 

Harriet P. Dame 

Chandler 



Grades or subjects 
taught. 



Music 

Drawing 

Wood and iron. 



Sewing... 
Cooking , 



Military drill. 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



,175 61 School St. 
,00099 No. State St. 
900 20 Auburn St. 
380 

625; 18 School St. 
425 12 Washington St. 
425 



48 Washington St. 

114 So. State St. 
47V2 No. Spring St. 

15 Bradley St. 

61 Franklin St. 



572 

572 

572 

572 87 South St. 
57215 Chapel St. 

" ' i Highland Rd.,W. Concord. 
East Concord. 



Fosterville. 
Plains, Route No. 6. 
61 V2 School St. 



SCHOOL KKPOKT. 121 

New Tkachkks. 
Laura Ma}' .Vndrus — Penacook Primary. 
Cecilia Poore Jones — Tahanto First Primary. 
Mnnie Maud Boutwell — Harriet P. Dame Grammar. 
Mary Agnes McGuire — Eastman Second Primary. 
Grace Leverett Aldrich — ^West Concord Kindergarten ^Vssistant. 
Lillian Jackman Chase — Dewey Second Primary. 
]\Lary JJlaisdell Partlett — High School. 
Grace Vincent Knowles — High School. 
Mary H. Ring — Cooking. 
Herbert R. Tucker — ^Manual Training. 

SrnsTiTrTKs. 
Grace Belle Knowlton. 
Clara Elizabeth Flanders. 

Delia Ingalls Lewis — Rumford First Primary. 
Stella May French. 
Julia M. Mellifant. 
Gertrude A. Dickerman. 
Abbie Theresa McDonald. 

Eva Helena Tandy — West Concord First and Second Primary. 
Mary Louise Ryan. 
Jennie Belle Blake. 
Alice ^Nlaud Phaneuf. 
Bessie Venelia Burnham. 
Welthie P. Nichols— High School. 
Marion L. Bean — High School. 
Georgia M. Stevens. 

Resigxatioxs. 
Mary T. O'Connor — Eastman School. 
Emma Hindley — High School. 
Carrie 3Iabel True — High School. 
William H. Burtt — High School. 
Nellie Davis — Walker School. 
Edward A. Gordon — Manual Training. 

Leave of Absexce. 
Grace Vincent Knowles— Winter term. 



122 CITY OF ('()N('Oi;i). 



KEciiKAi; Tka(1iki:s. 



Whole miuiber (male) ....... ,8 

Whole number (female) inehiding kindergarten assistants 75 

Xr.MiiKi; OF KK(;rL.vi; Tka( iikus Gilvdiates of City 
Ti:aimx(; S( iioor.. 

High School 1 

(Grammar ......... 10 

Primary ......... 20 

Kindergarten . . . . . * 11 

Nr>rBKi; (ilHADrATKS of C(H,LE(iK. 

High School 11 

(Grammar .....'.... 

Primary ......... 1 

Kindei-garten ........ 

(iRADUATKS OF XoUMAL SciIOOr.. 

High School ........ 1 

Grammar ......... 4 

Primary ......... 2 

Kindergarten . . . . . . . . 1 

(t];aj)L'atks OF ]Ii«;ii School. 

High School 10 

Grammar ......... 23 

Primary ......... 23 

Kindergarten . . . . .11 



AvKKAdK XlMIIKI: of PlI'Il.S TO A Te 



ACUEU. 



High School ........ 27 

(Grammar ......... 43 

Primary ......... 42 

Kindergarten . . . . 21 



Sl>E< lAI. T 



A ( 1 1 



Whole number (male) ....... 4 

Whole number (female) ...... 4 



ROLL OF HONOR OF THE SCHOOLS OF 
UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING JUNE K), 1905. 



(irace Anderson, 
Winifred Ackennan, 
^laud IJroggini, 
Mary Chase, 
Rachel Courser, 
Daniel Donovan, 
JJernice Gile, 
(Gladys Little, 
.\lan Leighton, 
Frederick JMann, 
.\nnie McGuire, 



IIKUI SCHOOL. 

Carl Nason, 
Robert C. Perkins, 
Alice M. Phaneuf, 
Carrie M. Pineo, 
Eva Rand, 
Elmer S. Randall, 
Timothy IL Lull, 
liessie V. Burnham, 
Charlotte M. Peahody. 
"^Frueworthy Dudley, 
Katherine C. Smith, 
Margaret D. Tavlor. 



KIIVIBALL SCHOOL. 



Margaret Challis, 
ILazel :\r. Davis (5), 



C'larence ]3ell, 
William Gale, 
Harry Jewell, 
Mason Kendall, 
Clarence Kenneston, 
Edward King, 



) (tka.mmai;. 

Esther V. Libby, 
John P. Stohrer (2; 

Grammar. 

May Bell, 
:\rildred Libby, 
Carl Merryman, 
Marguerite Calvert, 
.Alildred Dearborn, 
(41adys Ray, 



Edna Turner. 



124 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Fourth Grammau. 
Ernest W. Robinson. 

Fifth GRAM^rAi:. 
Harold E. Wakeiiekl. 

First PRniAitY. 

P. Frank O'Connell. Esther E. Green. 

Pauline Lawrence. 

Second Primary. 

Jane W. Matthews, Hester G. Hamilton, 

Marjorie I. Lawrence, Stark L. Huntley, 

Helen I. Shaw, Merrill B. Perrigo. 

Tiinn) Primary. 

Flora P. Davis, William Chester Ilaggett, 

Horace E. Hammond. 

Fourth Primary. 
Philip H. Hutchinson (3). 

KlXDERGARTEXr 

Martha V. Scully, Grafton O. Quiet. 



RmiFORD SCHOOL. 

First Grammar. 

Floi-a C. Edmunds, Leslie W. Hammond, 

Myrna S. Howe, Waldo S. Roundy, 

Maude C. Nason (5), Robert West. 

Secoxd Grammar. 

Harry K. Adams, Campbell Wright, 

jNIary L. Keniston, Charles D. Wardner, 

Amos I). Morrison, Mabel A. Webster. 



SCHOOL llEPORT. 



12^ 



Leona Eastman, 
Reginald Crosby, 
Harold Darrah, 



TiiiiM) Grammar. 

Ruth Hagerty, 
George Lee, 
Marjorie Perkins. 
Marion Silsby. 

FoUinil (iRAMMAR. 



Annie M. Benson, 
Harry E. Hutchinson, 
Flora Jones, 



Harold Eastman, 



Margaret Calef (2), 
Mona Dimond, 



Daisy E. E. Lewis, 
3Iargaret E. Morrison, 
Aphia C. Webster. 



First Primary. 

Helen Emmons, 
Karl West. 

Sk( ONI) Primary. 

Etta Edmunds, 
Lillian Foote, 
Henry R^^an (2), 

Third Primary. 
(Gladys V. Clark. 

Fourth Primary. 
Frank Keniston. 

KlXI)ER(iARTEX. 

Xone. 



.^lERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

First Grammar. 

.Margaret E. Durgin, E:irland B. Cooke, 

Flossie L. Saltmarsh, Ferdinand J. Phaneuf, 

Walter R. Runnells. 



126 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sp:(:x)XI) GiiAM^rAi;. 

Harry Foote (4), William Watkiiis (4), 

Chaplain Louine. 

Fli;sT PuiMAltY. 

Earl P. Pendleton, Elmer F. Ilutcliinson. 

Se( oxi) PiiniAiiv. 
Harold A. Arlin. 



WALKER SCHOOL. 

Se( i»xi) (4i;a.m:\iai;. 

Artluir \y. Brown, Helen K. Harrington, 

Joseph 31. Doherty, Annie E. Saltmarsh (5), 

TJussell E. Perry (2), Elsie Taylor (2). 

TmiM) (tkammak. 
Jose})li Lucier. 

FOUKTII GltAM-MAi;. 

Leila :\Iartin, Harold Philip (3). 

First Pi;niAi;Y. 
Alphonse Lucier. 

Skcoxi) PjajiAKv. 

Ai T. Ritchie, Ernest Taylor, 

Frederic Saltmarsli, ^fargaret Saltmarsh. 

TiiiKi) PunrAKv. 
William I'arsons, Clarion Keane. 

KiM)KK«;Ai;ri:\. 
Xone. 



FRANKLIN SCflOOL. 

Third Grammar. 

Dennis Reardon (8), Clarence Lyon, 

Ruth Hammond, Robert Saltraarsh (4). 

First Primary. 

Ralph S. Steele, Eliott Stanley, 

Francis A. Collins (^8). 

Se<onj) Primary. 
Edward A. Pichette. 

Third Primary. 
Rol)ert Coates, Clara LaFlamnie. 

KlNDER(iARTKX. 

Raymond Collins, Ralph Mcliain. 



WEST CONCORD SCHOOL. 

First (trammar. 
Bessie P. Roberts. 

Second Grammar. 
None. 

First Primary. 
Matthew E. Bedders. 

Second Primary. 
(xerda H. Eckstrom, Ethel G. Noonan. 

Third Primary. 

None. 

Kindergarten. 
William G. Lynch. 



EASTMAX SCHOOL. 
First Grammar. 

Xone. 

Second Grammar. 

None. 

First Primary. 

None. 

SEfOM) Primary. 

None. 



HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 

First CtRammar. 

None. 
First Primary. 

None. 
SE(o>fu' Primary. 
Grace Reister (3). 



TAHANTO SCHOOL. 
First Primary. 
Mary Henneberry, Mary Farnianian, 

Edith Larson. 

S EooxD Pri m a i: y . 
None. 



tXlGSWELL SCUIOOL. 
First Primary. 
Claire W. liracey, Louis L. Lull (2), 

Mary !>. Callahan, Charles J. White. 

Skcond Primary. 
Willie Hamni, Arthur LyfonL 



SCHOOL UKl'ORT. 127 

1*ENACX)()K SCiroOL. 

Si:( OM) (iUAMMAK. 

Harold J. Clay, Anna (ihidys (iuiiuhy, 

<ieorge W. lUirke. Horace Sanders, 

Edward T.rooks. 

TllIUI) GUAM.MAU. 

Harold Harvey, Pearl Mottitt (2), 

INfay Thomi)son. 

FlKSr I'lM.MAUA. 

Harry White, .Alary Clay (2). 

Second Pki.mauv. 
Harold C. Hay ward ('2). 

DEWE\' SCHOOL. 

TiiiKi) (ii;A:\i>iAi;. 

Ralph S. Carr, Earl J 5. Frost, 

Edward A. Chase, Robert J. Hart. 

First Pi;i.mai;v. 
Clara V. Sewall. 

Se< (»XI) Pki-mauv. 

James AI. Reggs, William R. Crowley, 

Ruth S. Campbell, Nellie M. King. 

TlIIi;i> PlMMAUV. 

None. 

KlNDKlMJAUTKN. 

None. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES. 



CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL. 



Honor before Honors. 



Program. 
Prayer. Rev. Sylvanus E. Frohock. 

Vocal Waltz— New Life. Geihel. 

Essay — Songs that are Not Sung. 

Mary Bertha Swett. 

Essay — "So Run that ye May Obtain." 

Helen P'rauces Huntoon. 

Part Song— Ballad of the Weaver. Ihitiort. 

Class Oration— New Hampshire's Place in History. 

Carl Duncan Kennedy. 
March of the Guard. Geibel. 

C. H, S. Boys' Quartet. 

Address— The Responsibilities of Freedom. 

Samuel M. Crothers, D. D., Cambridge, Mass. 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

Hon. Charles R. Corning, 
President of the Board of Education. 

" Oh, Italia, Italia, Beloved." Donnlzetf.i. 

Chorus. 

Benediction. 

HONORS. 

First. 
Helen Frances Huntoon. 

Secmd. 
Mary Bertha Swett. 



SCHOOL liEPORT. 



129 



GKADUATING 



Editli Marion Aldricli. 
Marion Goodwin Alexander. 
Grace Olivia Anderson. 
Jennie Belle Blake. 
Margaret Frances Blanchard. 
Hattie Mary Brooks. 
Bertram Lawrence Brown. 
Ruth Harriett Buntin. 
Bessie Venelia Burnhani. 
William Charles Cahill. 
Minnie Maria Carter. 
Aimee Louise Cloudman. 
Nellie Mae Crosby. 
Marion Bell Crowell. 
Catherine Cecilia Crowell. 
Leslie Warduer Cushman. 
Annie Elizabeth Denuen. 
Ernest Charles Dudley. 
Florence Belle Emery. 
Ira Leon Evans. 
Raymond Henry Fellows. 
Nute Boyce Flanders. 
Julia Frances Foley. 
Blanche Victoria Gagnon. 
Raymond Bryant Gates. 
Frank Hoyt Godfrey. 
Leonora Hackett. 
Ellie Margaret Hoben. 
Blanche May Hodgdon. 
Lillian Vida Pearl Hodgdon. 
Helen Frances Huntoon. 
Martha Lvla James. 



Nellie Josephine James. 
Waldo Blossom Jones. 
Carl Duncan Kennedy. 
Wallace Lewis Kennedy, 
Ila Derinda Knowles. 
William Bruce Macguire. 
Margaret Amelia Masson. 
Bernice Olive McCollom. 
Katharine McFarland. 
Mary Elizabeth McNulty. 
Alice Josephine Mercer. 
Howard Brown Moore. 
Nathaniel Martin Mudgett, 
Bertha Annie Munsey. 
Mary Agnes Naughton. 
Alice Marie Melvina Phaneuf. 
Mary Louise Phillips. 
Evelyn Arthur Piper. 
Harold Milton Prescott. 
Alice Celina Racine. 
Eva Lillian Rand. 
Benjamin Henry Rolfe. 
George Jackman Sargent. 
Sarah Frances Scannell. 
John Arthur Swenson. 
Mary Bertha Swett. 
Herbert Ray Tucker. 
Rose Elizabeth Warren. 
Charles Day Weathers. 
Robert Ernest Wiggin. 
Irad Edmunds Willis. 



RUMFORD GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 
Thursday, June". 15, 1905, at 2.30 p. m. 

CLASS OFFICERS. 

President — Francis Dominic Nardini. 
Vice-President — Henry Wadleigh Merrill. 
Secretary — Lina Marie Meehau. 



Class Motto — ^^ Labor Conquers all llungsJ' 



130 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PiiOGRAM. 

"Old-fashioned poetry but choicely good." — Wallon. 

Chorus — Landing of the Pilgrims. 

Class. 

Recitation— Xew England's Chevy Chase. 

Eric Manfrid Swensou. 



llemdiis 



Piano Solo — Robin Adair. 

Alice Jane Pearl. 

Recitation— The Legend Beautiful. 

Edith Pvay Jevvett. 

•Chorus— O, Vales with Sunlight Smiling. 
Class. 

iRecitation — The Height of the Ridiculous. 

William Dwight Chandler, Jr. 

Essay— Old Songs. 

Maude Carroll Nason. 

Violin Solo — Swiss Air — Gentle Zitella. 

Earl Fremont Russell. 

Recitation— To a Waterfowl. 

Alice Marion Clay. 

Chorus — Who is Sylvia ? 

Class. 

Recitation — Seven Times Two. 

Florence Belle Ilodgdon. 

Piano Duet — Juanita. 

Elizabeth Shurtleff, Myrna Selina Howe. 

Recitation — The American Flag. 

Henry Wadleigh Merrill. 

Chorus — Annie Laurie. 

Class. 

Recitation — Horatius at the Bridge. 

Ray Andrews Brown. 

Recitation— Richelieu's Appeal. 

George Heaton Frohock. 



Brier Rose. 

Elizabeth Bancroft, 

Misses Blanchard, Clark, Clay, Clough, Derry, Edmunds, 
Gibbs, Hodgdon, Howe, Jewett, Liberty, Marsh, Meehan, 
Pearl, Pearson, Swedmark, Thompson, Wiggin. 



Fox 

Lonijfelhno 

Mendelssohn 

Holmes 

Farmer 

Bri/unt 

Shakespeare 

Ingeloio 

Rimbaull 

Drake 

Scott 

Mucunh'ii 

Bulwer 

Boysen 



S(^HOOL IIET(1RT. 



Recitation— The Elf-Child. 

Alice Fiances Brown. 



Chorus — Swanee River. 



Recitation — The Courtin'. 



Class. 



Mildred Pearson. 

Chorus— Seeing Xellie Home. 

Eva Augusta Marsh 
Class. 



Presentation of Diplomas. 
Chorus — Lullaby. 



Committee. 
Class. 



131 

li !!<■!/ 

Foster 
Lowell 

Paine 



i:rahu,> 



GRADUATING CI.Af 



Dale Addie Banger. 
Elizabeth Bancroft. 
Mildred Adelaide Blanchard. 
Harry Fiske Blossom. 
Alice Frances Brown. 
Loring Pearson Brown. 
Ray Andrews Brown (4). 
William Dwight Chandler, Jr. 
Mabel Clark. 
Alice Marion Clay (2). 
Margaret Walter Clough. 
Nellie Beatrice Derry. 
John Hewson Dickson, Jr. 
Maurice James Dwyer. 
Flora Clark Edmunds. 
<Teorge Heaton Frohock. 
Helen Lynwood Gibbs. 
Leslie William Hammond. 
Florence Belle Hodgdon. 
Myrna Selina Howe. 
Edith Ray Jewett (3). 
Eva Georgiana Liberty. 

(1) First Honor. 

(2) Second Honor. 



Frank Ignatius Manning. 
Eva Augusta Marsh. 
Una Marie Median. 
Henry Wadleigh Merrill. 
William Emerson McCreedy. 
Francis Dominic Nardini. 
Maude Carroll Nason (1). 
Phillip John O'Connell. 
Alice Jane Pearl. 
Mildred Pearson. 
Waldo Sidney Roundy. 
Earl Fremont Russell, 
Elizabeth Shurtleff. 
Hilda Elsie Swedmark. 
Eric Maufrid Swenson. 
Grace Eleanor Thompson. 
Robert West. 
Ernest Clarence Whittier. 
Catherine Arabelle Wiggin. 
Fred Carl Young. 
John Edward Young. 

(3) Third Honor. 

(4) Fourth Honor. 



HONOR LIST. 



Elizabeth Bancroft. 
Mildred Adelaide Blanchard. 
Ray Andrews Brown. 



William Dwight Chandler, Jr. 
Mabel Clark. 
Alice Marion Clay. 



132 CITY OF CONCOUD. 

John Hewson Dickson, Jr. Hanry Wadleigli Merrill. 

Leslie William Hammond. Maude Carroll Nason. 

Florence Belle Hodgdon. Alice Jane Pearl. 

Myrna Selina Howe. Mildred Pearson. 

Edith Ray Jewett. Elizabeth Shurtleff. 

Eva Augusta Marsh. Eric Manfrid Swenson. 

Lina Marie Meehan. Hilda Elsie Swedmark. 



MERRIMACK GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Thursday, June 15, 190."), at 2.30 p. m. 

Motto — E'dlun- nrver attempt or due accomplish. 

Program. 

PART I. 

Chorus — Boat Song. Gilchrist 

Margaret E. Durgin, Accompanist. 

Piano Solo — Valse Caprice. Newland 

Alice J. Huntley. 

Girls' Chorus — With the Stream. 1?. Reece 

Alice J. Huntley, Accompanist. 

Piano Duet — Postillion d' Amour. Fr. Beki. 

Dorris Ladd, Alice M. Swain. 

Banjo Solo— Merrimack Two Step. Lcavitt 

Marjorie C. Leavitt. 

Violin Solo. 

James L. Casey. 
Bernard McK. Clinton, Accompanist. 

Piano Duet— On the Race Course. Blake 

Ada M. Berry, Marjorie C. Leavitt. 

Boys' Chorus — Out on the Deep. Lohr 

Bernard McK. Clinton, Accompanist. 

Dumb Bell Drill. 

Robert L. Ahern, Accompanist. 

Boys' Chorus — The Old Guard. Veuzie 

Robert L. Ahern, Accompanist. 



The Historical Basis of Marmion. Original 

Thomas James Twomey (1). 



SCHOOL REPOrvT. 



133 



A Synopsis of the Poem, Marmion. Or/;/. 

Ferdinand Joseph Phaneuf (3). 

Marmion's Approach at Xoiham (told by the Warder). 
Kathleen Mary Hickey. 

Marmion's Visit at Norham (told by the Palmer). 
Charlotte White. 

The Voyage from Lindisfarne (told by one of the Xuns). 

Mary Ayers Moore. 
The Trial of Constance (told by the Abbess). 
Margaret Ethel Durgin. 

The Trial of Constance (told by the Abbot). 

Robert Leo Ahern (4). 

The Night at GifCord's Inn (told by the Palmer). 
William John Bishop. 

The Night at Gilford's Inn (told by one of the train). 
Marion Mitchell. 

The Fight with the Elfin Knight (told by one of the train). 
Hilda Adelaide Fletcher. 

Marmion's Departure from Douglas Castle (told by Fitz-Eustace). 
Harry Cogswell Ballard. 

Marmion's Death (told by Lady Clare). 

Thomas Francis Deuuen. 

Marmion's Death (told by one of the soldiers). 
Emerson Davis (2). 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Chorus — Sweet and Low. 



GRADUATING CLASS. 



Ernest Henry Abbott. 
Robert Leo Ahern (4). 
Rhoda Jane Angwin. 
Harry Cogswell Ballard. 
Albert Arthur Barrett. 
Samuel Henry Barrett. 
Ada Mahalah Berry. 
William John Bishop. 
Albert James Brown. 
James Lawrence Casey. 
Bernard McKenna Clinton. 
Earland Bickford Cooke. 
Emerson Davis (2). 



Thomas Francis Dennen. 
Margaret Abbie Donovan. 
Margaret Ethel Durgin. 
Annie Margaret Edmunds. 
Irville Walter Flanders. 
Hilda Adelaide Fletcher. 
Lena May French. 
Philroy Clifton Gale. 
Raymond Galfetti. 
Fred Michael Gannon. 
Kathleen Mary Hickey. 
Herbert Howard Hood. 
Alice Jane Huntley, 



134 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Dorris Ladd. 

Beatrice Corinne Lapierie. 

Marjorie Constance Leavitt. 

Samuel Levingston. 

Dora Levingston. 

Annie Helen McDavid. 

Marion Mitchell. 

Mary Ayers Moore. 

Jessie McDonald Murdock. 

May Watson Murdock. 

John Robinson Neville. 

Ferdinand Joseph Phaneuf (3). 



Rupert West Robinson. 
Walter Rentou Runnells. 
Martin Louis Rushlow. 
Flossie Lucinda Saltmarsh. 
John Duguid Steele. 
Alice Morse Swain. 
Rena Hodge Trask. 
Howard Garfield Trenoweth 
Thomas James Twomey (1). 
John Michael Welsh. 
Earle Leslie Whidden. 
Charlotte White. 



HONOR LIST. 



Robert Leo A hern (4), 
Rhoda Jane Angwin. 
Harry Cogswell Ballard. 
Ada Mahalah Berry. 
William John Bishop. 
Albert James Brown. 
Bernard McKenna Clinton. 
Earland Bickford Cooke. 
Emerson Davis (2). 
Thomas Francis Dennen. 
Margaret Abbie Donovan. 
Margaret Ethel Durgin. 
Hilda Adelaide Fletcher. 
Philroy Clifton Gale. 
Raymond Galfetti. 
Fred Michael Gannon. 



Kathleen Mary Hickey. 
Alice Jane Huntley. 
Dorris Ladd. 

Beatrice Corinne Lapien-e. 
Marion Mitchell. 
Mary Ayers Moore. 
May Watson Murdock. 
John Robinson Neville. 
Ferdinand Joseph Phaneuf (3). 
Rupert West Robinson. 
Walter Renton Runnells. 
Flossie Lucinda Saltraarsh. 
Alice Morse Swain. 
Rena Hodge Trask. 
Thomas James Twomey (1). 
Charlotte White. 



(1) First Honor. 

(2) Second Honor. 



(3) Third Honor. 

(4) Fourth Honor. 



WEST CONCORD SCHOOL. 
Thursday, June 15, 1905, at 2.30 p. m. 



Class Motto — " Honor and shame from no condition rise ; 

Act well your part: there all the honor lies.''' 



March. 

Chorus— Boat Song. 

Declamation — The Greatness of Obedience. 

Lawrence Wendell Knight. 



Gilchrist 
Farrar 



SCHOOL REPORT. 185 

Kecitation— The Indian Deacon. Wh'dUer 

Bessie Priscilla Roberts. 

Solo— Little Boy Blue. Uaydclof 

Florence Lucy Ilolbrook. 

Class Recitation— The High Tide. IrKjelow 

Chorus— rt. Lo! The Morn in Splendor. Schmicr 

h. The Berry Tickers. Dole 

Recitation— The Swan Song. Brook-^ 

Goldie Kathryn Kemp. 

Chorus— Cycle Song. Zollner 

Recitation— The Little Quaker Sinner. 

Mary Rose Turcotte. 

Piano Solo— The Ocean Pearl. Blake 

Mary Agnes Welsh. 

Recitation— The Witch's Daughter. ]Vhitt!er 

Edna Cornelia Dimond. 

Solo— Upon the Shoogy-Shoo. Parkard 

Gladys Anna Blake. 

Recitation — The Schoolmaster's Guests. Carletou 

Susie West Carter. 

Duet— The Falling of the Leaf. 

Misses Flanders, Holbrook, Kemp, Blake. 

Essay— Honor. 

Florence Jeanette Ballard. 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Chorus— School March. Wrede 



EASTMAN GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Thursday, June 15, 1905, at 2, -SO p. m. 

Class Motto — "■ Thp lal rut of success is nothing more than (Joing ivhaf 
yon can do well, loithonl a thought of fame.'''' 

PlIOGRAM. 

Song— Bright Summer Days. Arinauif 

School. 

Essay— The Evolution of English Liberty. 

George A. Merrick. 



136 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Piano Solo — Meadow Brook. Lnycn UnKjdon 

Elizabeth T. Nash. 

Recitation— The One-Legged Goose. F. Ifojiklnftou Smith 

Clovis V. Gushing. 

Song— Anchored. 31. Watsou 

Mixed voices. 

Concert llecitatlon — The Rising in '76. T. B. lUade 

Piano Duet— Mermaid's Song of Oberon. Kinkc 

Gertrude E. Prescott, Elizabeth T. Nash. 

Essay — Leaves from Concord's History. 

Mary L. Rollins. 

Song— Boat Song. W. W. GUrhrixi 

School. 

The Stately Minuet. 

Lillian M. Drew, Solon W. Gate, 

Ruth B. Knowles, Lawrence E. Gushing. 

Duet— Star of Evening. J. L. Uoeckd 

Elizabeth T. Nash, Amelia Garter. 

Piano Solo— Silvery Waves. A. P. Wijmdn 

Gertrude E. Prescott. 

Oration — The Present Age, W. E. CJianniixj 

Arthur E. Noyes. 

Song — Cycle Song. Karl Zolliier 

School. 

Recitation — Brier Rose. 

Elizabeth T. Nash, assisted by 

Charlotte E. Frye, Caroline L. Gardner, 

Bertha A. Peaslee, Gladys E. Morrison, 

Ruth B. Curtis, Ruth B. Knowles, 

Amy G. Rollins, Verna C. Hardy, 

Lillian M. Drew, Pansy I. Tucker, 

Bernice L. Prescott, Esther L. Fairfield. 

Song— The Berry Pickers. N. If. Dole 

School. 

Recitation— The Bogie Man. 

Esther L. Fairfield. » 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Committee. 

Song — Six o'clock in the Bay. Stephen Adanifi 

School. 



SCHOOL KEl'Oirr. 



13: 



(iRADUATING CLASS. 

<?lovis Vincent Cashing, Arthur Edwin Noj-es, 

George Alexander Merrick (3), Gertrude Esther Prescott (1), 
Elizabeth Thomas Nash (4), Mary Livy Rollins (2), 

Lloyd Richardson Virgin. 



HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 

Thursday, June 15, 190.5, at 2.80 p. m. 

Class Motto — " Excdsior.'^ 

Program. 



Song— The Deserted Garden. 
Brier Rose. 



Gettysburg Speech. 



Annie Newton. 

William J. Grant. 

Song — Harm Not the Nests. 

The Deacon's Masterjjiece. 

Grace E. Reister. 

Essay — Harriet P. Dame. 

Nellie Giddis. 

Choi'us — Star of Evening. 

Annie Newton, Fred Rochelle, 

Nellie Giddis, Beatrice Grant, 

Mary Mahoney. 
The Fire King. 

Ella Sherburne. 

Essay— School Experiences. 
Handkerchief Drill. 
Essay— School History 



Beatrice Grant. 
Eighteen Girls. 
Fred Rochelle. 



Presentation of Diplomas. 
Song — Ancient Archer. 



GRADUATING CLASS. 

William John Grant, Beatrice Laura Grant. 

Mattie Pai'ker Leavitt. 



Koschaf 

Lincoln 

Join 
Holmes 

Eoekel 
Cooper 



Kucken 



Class Colors— Green and White. 



138 CITY OF CONCORD. 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY CONTEST. 

By THE Pupils of the Public Schools of Union School Dis- 
trict, AT THE Auditorium, Thursday Evening, March 15, 1906. 

PROGRAM. 

Original Dechimathni — U'Kjh School. 

1. A Man or a Dos? 

Lydia Caller Frost. 

2. Aunt Hepsy's Views of Boys, 

Marjorie Caldwell Barnard. 

3. When Josiah Jenkins Changed His Mind, 

Clarice Mae Elliot. 

4. A Grocery Store Episode, 

Thomas Francis Dennen. 

Chorus — " Columbia Beloved," Donlzetft 

Mlsrellancoiis Declamation — IIi(jJi ScJiool. 

1. " The Advocate's First Plea," George Barr McCutcheou 

Carrie Montgomery Straw. 

2. " The Picnic on Labor Day," from " Lovey Mary," 

Alice Hegan Rice 
Evelyn Fi-ances Tozier. 

Trio — "Angel's Serenade," Tiraga 

Editha Maxham, Gertrude Berry, Marjorie Barnard. 

(Violin obligato by Leon Stewartson.) 

Forensic BechimaiUm — Grammar Schools. 

1. " Spartacus to the Gladiators of Capua," E. Kellogg 

George Warren Morrill, Merrimack School. 

2. " Citizenship," Hon. W. P. Frye 

Charles Davis Wardner, Chandler School. 

:'.. " Extract from the Last Speech of Robert Emmet," 

Richard Adams Knight, West Concord School. 

Exhibition Drill— By Squad of High School Cadets, commanded by 
Capt. J. Mitchell Ahern. 

Miscellaneous Declamation— Grammar Schools. 

1. " Mis' Deborah Has a Visitor," (monologue) Flske 

Elizabeth Fowler, Chandler School. 



SCHOOL UKPOUT. 189 

2. " Brier Rooe,"' Iljalmar Iljorth Boycson 

Crystal Ivy Parsons, Merrimack School. 

3. "Busy," EdmiindJ. JiuH- 

Bessie Alice Clark, West Concord School. 

Chorus—" Union and Liberty," IVurjner 

Award of Prizcu. 

Original Declamation — High School. 

First Prize, $20, awarded to Marjorie Caldwell Barnard. 
Second Prize, $6, awarded to Lydia Caller Frost. 

Forensic Declamation — Grammar Schools. 

First Prize, .$6, awarded to George Warren Morrill. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Charles Davis Warduer. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — High School. 

First Prize, $6, Jiwarded to Evelyn Frances' Tozier. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Carrie Montgomery Straw. 

Miscellaneous Declamation— Grammar Schools. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Elizabeth Fowler. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Crystal Ivy Parsons. 

Special Prize, $1, awarded to the better of the contestants of the 
school which won no prize, Richard Adams Knight. 

BOARD OF .JUDGES. 

Hon. Eosecrans W. Pillsbury, Derry. 
Hon. Edmund H. Brown, Penacook. 
Prof. George H. Libby, Manchester. 



Prize Speaking, 
keceivei). 

l>alance from last ^'ear's account . . $2,011.05 
Interest on same to January 1, 190G . 64.37 

Sale of 710 tickets at 35 cents . . 25.0.60 

EXPE^^DEI). 

Rent of Auditorium .... $25.00 

Prizes, including prize books . . 73.00 



.1;2,326.02 



140 (UTY OF CONCORD. 

Programs $4.50 

George R. Pearce, }>rinting and selling- 
tickets , 7.50 

Expenses of judges .... 4.00 

English Composition prizes, High School 30.00 

Ardelle Noiirse, professional services . 50.00 
E. M. Proctor, moving piano, selling 

tickets, etc. . . . • . 5.00 

Leon Stewartson, services playing violin 2.00 

Miscellaneous expenses . . . 3.85 
Balance on hand for a guaranty fund 

for future contests . . . . 2,121.17 



$2,32(5.02 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the iuJiabitanfs of Union School Disfrict in (JonconJ (/ualijied 

to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium, on Prince 
Street in said district, on the 29th day of March, 1906, at 7.30 
o'clock in the evening, to act upon the following subjects : 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Board of Ed\i- 
cation for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education to 
hold office for three years to fill vacancies arising from the ex- 
piration of the term of office of Edward N. Pearson, John E. 
Robertson, and Ella H. J. Hill, and to fill any other vacancies 
that may occur in said board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors, and all other necessary 
officers for the ensuing year. 

G. To see what sum of money the district will raise and ap- 
propriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and ap- 
propriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year, in- 
cluding industrial education, military drill, and calisthenics. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will raise and ap- 
propriate for occasional and extraordinary repairs of school 
buildings during the ensuing year. 

9. To see if the district will vote to erect and equip a new 
Manual Training School Building, appoint a committee with 



142 CITY OF CONCORD. 

authority to decide upon its location, and authorize such com- 
mittee to purchase or acquire by condemnation, such land as 
may be necessary and suitable for a lot for such new jNIanual 
Training School Building, as the same may be located by the 
committee ; and raise and appropriate money and authorize a 
contract with the Cit}^ of Concord for its credit as contemplated 
by Chapter 261 of the Session Laws of 1889, and take such 
other, or further, action as may l)e necessary to provide for the 
location and erection of a new ^Manual Training Scoool 
Building. 

10. To see if the district will ratify and confirm the sale 
and conveyance to the City of Concord, of the old schoolhouse 
lot and building at West Concord, made by the special build- 
ing committee, appointed to erect the new West Concord 
school buildmg ; said sale and conveyance having been made 
in payment for the lot purchased of said city by said committee 
for the new West Concord school building. 

11. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the completion of the erection and furnishing 
of the West Concord school building. 

12. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 



CoxcoKi), X. II., March 30, 1905. 
Agreeably to the foregoing warrant, a meeting of the legal 
voters in Union School District was held at the Auditorium in 
the City of Concord, X. II., this 30th day of March, 1905, at 
7.30 o'clock in the evening, and was called to order by the 
moderator, Samuel C. Eastman, who read the warrant. 

Article 1. The moderator called for votes for moderator, 
and when all had voted who wished, the ballot was declared 
closed, and Samuel C. Eastman having three votes, all that were 
cast, was declared elected moderator and took the oath of office 
before Louis C. Merrill, Justice of the Peace. 

Art. 2. The moderator called for votes for clerk, and 
when all had voted the ballot was declared closed, and Louis 



SCHOOL llEPOUT. 143 

C Merrill having two votes, all that were cast, was declared 
elected clerk and took the oath of office before Samuel C. East- 
man, Justice of the Peace. 

AiiT. o. .Air. diaries R. Corning moved that the reports as 
])rinted be accepted, and it was so voted. 

Art. 4. On motion of Charles R. Corning, it was voted to 
fill vacancies in the Board of Education by having three candi- 
dates on each vote. The moderator declared the ]>olls open for 
three members of the Board of Education. 

When all had voted \\'ho wished, on motion of John M. 
Mitchell, it was voted to close the polls, and moderator de- 
clared the polls closed and counted the votes, which resulted as 
follows : 

Whole number of votes cast . . . .110 

Xecessary for a choice . . . . .59 
William Yeaton had . . . . 1 

Edward K. Woodworth had .... 1 

Charles E. Staniels had ..... 1 

Annie McFarland had ..... '2 

Susan C. Bancroft had 110 

John M. Mitchell had 115 

Charles R. Corning had 110 

— and Susan C. Bancroft, John M. Mitchell and Charles R. 
Corning were declared elected members of the Board of Edu- 
cation for three years, and after adjournment of the meeting- 
took the oath of office before Louis C. Merrill, Justice of the 
Peace. 

Art. 5. The moderator called for votes for auditors, and 
when all had voted who desu-ed to vote, the ballot was declared 
closed and Josiah E. Fernald and John P. George having 
received two votes, Avere declared elected as auditors. 

Art. G. Mr. John M. Mitchell offered the following resolu- 
tion and moved its adoption : 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to l)e 
raised on the polls and ratable estates wnthin Union School 
District the sura of two thousand and sixty-five dollars ($2,065), 



144 CITV OF CONCORD. 

and the same be appropriated for the payment of one year's 
interest on the bonds issued for the building of the Dewey and 
Rumford school buildings. The resolution was unanhnously 
adopted. 

Art. 7. Mr. George ^I. Kimball offered the following reso- 
lution : 

Resolved, That there be raised by tax on the polls and ratable 
estates within Union School District for the support of schools 
for the ensuing year, such a sura as in addition to the sum as- 
signed to the district by the City of Concord out of the sum 
appropriated for schools will amount to the sum of sixty-seven 
thousand three hundred ninety-six and twenty-four one hun- 
dredth dollars (167,396.24). Mr. Kimball moved the adoption 
of the resolution, and it was so voted. 

Art. 8. Mr. John E. Robertson offered the following reso- 
lution and moved its adoption : 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School Dis- 
trict, and appropriated for special repairs of school buildings of 
the district the sum of two thousand five hundred dollars 
($2,500). A vote was taken and the resolution adopted. 

Art. 9. Mr. H. H. Metcalf offered the following resolution : 

Resolved, That a special committee of three be appointed by 
the moderator, three to be selected from the Board of Educa- 
tion, who shall ascertain the wants of the district with respect 
to the erection of new school buildings or the enlargement of 
existing buildings, and report the result of their investigation 
at a special meeting of the district to be held not later than 
June 1, such a committee being hereby authorized and directed 
to present with their report recommendations and general plans 
for such new buildings, and changes in existing buildings, as 
they may find necessary for the school accommodations of the 
district, including an estimate of the cost of such new biiildings 
or alterations of existing ones. 

Mr. Metcalf moved the adoption of the resolution. 

Mr. John P. George offered this amendment: 



SCHOOL REPORT. 145 

That said committee report to the district" through the news- 
])apers at least two days before said meeting. 

Mr. Metcalf accepted the amendment. 

.\ vote was taken on resohition as amended by Mr. George. 
The amendment and resolution was declared adopted. 

Art. 10. No business was presented. 

On motion of ]Mr. H. 11. Metcalf it was \()te<l to adjourn. 

A true record, attest: 

LOUIS C. :\IERRILL, Cle,-k. 



SPECIAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 

State of Neav Hampshire. 

To the Inhahitants of Union School District, qualified to rote in 
district affairs. 
You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium in said 
district on Thursday, the first day of June, 1905, at 7.30 o'clock 
in the evening, to act upon the following subjects : 

1. To hear and act upon the report of the Special Commit- 
tee authorized by a vote of the district, at its annual meeting 
on March 30, 1905, to ascertain and report the wants of the 
district with respect to additional school accommodations. 

2. To see if the district will vote to erect and equip a new 
high school building, appoint a committee with authority to 
decide upon its location and authorize such committee to pur- 
chase or acquire by condemnation such land or such land addi- 
tional to the land already owned by the district, as may be 
necessary and suitable, for a lot for such new high school 
building, as the same may be located by the committee ; and 
raise and appropriate money and authorize a contract with the 
city of Concord for its credit as contemplated by Chapter 261 
of the Session Laws of 1889, and take such other or further 
action as may be necessary to provide for the location and 
erection of a new high school building. 

10 



146 CITY OF CONCOKl). 

3. To see if the district will vote to erect and equij) a new- 
school building at West Concord, appoint a committee with 
authority to decide upon its location, and authorize such com- 
mittee to purchase or acquire by condemnation, or the exchange 
of the existing lot and building, land necessary and suitable for 
a lot for such new school building in accordance with the loca- 
tion decided upon by the committee, and raise and appropriate 
money and authorize a contract with the city of Concord for 
its credit as contemplated by Chapter 261 of the Session Laws 
of 1889, and take such other or further action as maybe neces- 
sary to provide for the location and erection of such new 
building. 

4. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

CoxcoEi), X. H., June 1, 1905. 

Agreeable to the foregoing warrant, a meeting of the legal 
voters in Union School District was held at the Auditorium in 
the city of Concord, N. H., on June 1, 1905, at 7.80 o'clock in 
the evening, and was called to order l)y the moderator, Samuel 
C. Eastman, who read the warrant. 

Akticle 1. The Special Committee submitted the report 
attached hereto and made a part of the records, the report 
being read by the moderator. 

To Union School District : 

The Special Committee, appointed under the following res- 
olution passed by Union School District, having performed the 
duties required of it herewith submits its report : 

KESOLUTIOX. 

'-.''Resolved, That a special committee of seven be appointed 
by the moderator, three of whom to be selected from the 
Hoard of Education, who shall ascertain the wants of the dis- 
trict, with respect to the erection of new school buildings, or 
the enlargement of existing buildings, and report the result of 
their investigation at a special meeting of the district, to be 



SCHOOL IlEPORT. 147 

held not later than June 1 ; such committee being hereby 
authorized and directed to present, with their re])ort, recom- 
mendations and general plans for such new buildings, and 
changes in existing buildings as they may find necessary for 
the school accommodations of the district, including an esti- 
mate of the cost of such new buildings, or alterations of exist- 
ing ones. That said committee re])ort to the district through 
the newspapers at least two days before said meeting." 

UEl'ORT. 

In investigating and considering the matter assigned to us, 
we have recognized the fact that ideal school facilities cannot 
be provided at an expense which would be warranted by the 
general condition of the district; and we have therefore elimi- 
nated all cases of inadequate school accommodations which are 
not such as to imperatively demand present attention. 

The school accommodations at the Walker School and the 
Tahanto School, particularly the former, are inadequate, but 
we think the changes and additional buildings hereinafter rec- 
ommended, together with a parochial school at the north end, 
which our investigation leads us to consider a probability of 
the near future, will rectify those difficulties. 

High School. — We find that inadequate school accommoda- 
tion exists in the high school. The remedies for this inad- 
equacy, suggested to us in two public hearings which we have 
given, as well as through the press, are (1) refusing to take 
tuition pupils ; (2) dividing the school by putting a part of it 
into the Chandler Building; (3) building one or more addi- 
tions to the present high school building ; (4) building a new 
high school building and using the present building for other 
school purposes. 

After considering the several remedies suggested we have 
concluded that (1) would not affoi'd adequate relief; that (2) 
is impracticable for several reasons, one being that the Chand- 
ler building will soon (probably this fall) be needed for a 
schoolhouse ; that (3) is inadvisable because it will cost about 
^60,000 to ])uild and furnish the additions required and when 
that is done two wants will remain unsatisfied, namely, a suit- 



148 CITY OF CONCORD. 

able assembly hall and class rooms of suitable size. It should 
also be stated as a reason against the adoption of (3) that it 
will not relieve the congestion in other schools — a result which 
we hope to attain by the plan hereinafter suggested. 

Having been constrained to dismiss remedies 1, 2 and 3, we 
were brought to a consideration of 4, — the biiilding of a new 
High School building, the present building to be used for other 
school purposes — and have found that the present High School 
building can be advantageously used for a central ninth grade 
school, thereby relieving the congestion at several schools, 
especially the Walker. 

We find that a new High School building, in all resjDects 
adequate to accommodate five hundred (500) pupils, can be 
erected on the lot hereinafter specified, and furnished, at a 
total expense not exceeding 190,000 ; and we recommend the 
erection of such a building, the same to be built upon the gen- 
eral plan of the new Nashua and Dover High Schools, said 
plans to be modified and changed to suit our requirements. 

A consideration of the available sites for such a building has 
led us to the conclusion that the North Spring Street lot, 
belonging to the district, where the Manual Training School 
now stands, together with two additional lots, is the most desir- 
able site, everything considered, for the new High School, the 
erection of which we recommend. We therefore recommend 
that the district acquire the necessary land on North Spring 
Street and erect said new High School building on said North 
Spring Street lot. 

West Concord /School. — We find that inade(iuate school 
accommodations exist at West Concord, and we recommend 
an exchange of the present lot and building with the water 
department (Concord Water Works) for a lot of suitable size 
fronting on Quaker Street and running northerly to Ilutchins 
Street, out of the Ilutchins property, so called, in accordance 
with authority given water commissioners by the city, and 
the erection on said new lot of an eight-room brick school 
building, at a cost, with furniture, not to exceed $28,000, to be 
built according to the general plan of the new Bethel, Vt., 
school, but enlarged so as to give class rooms suitable for forty- 



SCHOOL rp:poet. 149 

five or fifty pupils, and otherwise modified to meet our require- 
ments. 

We transmit lierewith general plans of the scliool buildings, 
the plans of which we have herein referred to, namely, the 
new Nashua High School, the new DoAer High School and 
the Bethel, Vt., school. 

Respectful ly subm itted, 

CHARLES R. CORNING, 
Chairman., for the Committee. 

Mr. Arthur Sturtevant moved to accept the report of the 
special committee, and it was so voted. 

Mr. Edward C. Niles offered the following resolution and 
moved its adoption : 

Voted, That the recoramendatiorfs of the special committee 
authorized by the district at its annual meeting on March 30, 
1905, to ascertain and report the wants of the district with 
respect to additional school accommodations, be and are 
hereby approved as to the erection of a new High School 
building and a new eight-room building at West Concord. 

Motion seconded, a vote taken and declared by the modera- 
tor unanimously adopted. 

Art. 2. Mr. William J. Ahern offered the following reso- 
lution : 

Voted, (1) That a new High School building be erected and 
equipped. (2) That Charles R. Corning, George jM. Kimball, 
John M. Mitchell, Henry H. Metcalf, Edson J. Hill, DeWitt C. 
Howe and Charles R. Walker be and hereby are appointed a 
committee with authority to decide upon the location of said 
new High School building, and said committee is hereby author- 
ized to purchase, or acquire by condemnation, in the name and 
on behalf of the district, such land or such land additional to 
that already owned by the district, as may be necessary and 
suitable for a lot for such new High School building, to be 
erected upon the location selected and decided upon by said 
committee ; and said committee is authorized to do all other 
acts and things in the name and on behalf of the district nee- 



150 CITY OF CONCORD. 

essary to secure the location of such lot and purchase and 
acquire it. (3) That said Charles R. Corning, George M. Kim- 
ball, John M. Mitchell, Henry M. Metcalf, Edson J. IlilL 
DeWitt C. Howe and Charles R. Walker be and hereby are 
appointed a building committee to erect and furnish said High 
School building, to employ architects, agents and such other 
assistants as they may require, and to do in the name and on 
behalf of the Union SchoorDistrict such- other acts as may be 
necessary to carry this vote mto effect. (4) That the sum of 
ninety thousand dollars ($90,000) be and the same is hereby 
appropriated to purchase or acquire the land necessary for the 
location of said High School building. (5) That the indebt- 
edness of the district arising from the construction and fur- 
nishing of said new High School building be funded at a rate 
of interest not exceeding 3^ per cent, per annum, and that a 
sufficient sum of money be assessed upon the polls and ratable 
estates within Union School District on the 1st day of April 
in each year hereafter to meet the payments of the interest 
and the principal of said indebtedness at the date, or dates, of 
the maturity of the principal and interest, as the same may be 
fixed, as hereinafter provided ; and that the money obtained 
by said assessments lie and hereby is appropriated to make 
said payments. (6) That the district request the City of Con- 
cord to aid in funding the indebtedness of the district arising 
from the construction and furnishing of the said Higli School 
building, as the city is authorized to do by chapter 261 of the 
Session Laws of 1889, entitled "An act to authorize the City 
of Concord to borrow money in aid of its school district," pro- 
vided said city will borrow the money necessary for the pur- 
poses set forth in this vote and will allow the district to have 
the use of the money so borrowed ; and further, that if this 
request is complied with, the district will seasonably pay the 
city sufficient sums of money to enable the city to meet the 
payments of the principal and interest upon this indebted- 
ness so created, as the same may fall due, and all incidental 
expenses, and will apply the money to be raised, as herein pro- 
vided, to the payments aforesaid ; and said building committee 
is hereby' further authorized to make said request of the city, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 151 

and determine with the city the date or dates when the prin- 
cipal of said indebtedness and interest thereon shall mature, 
and do all other acts and tilings necessary to carry this vote 
into effect. 

Mr. William J. Ahern moved the adoption of the resolution, 
motion seconded, vote taken, and the moderator declared the 
resolution adopted. 

Art. 3. Mr. Joseph E. Shepard offered the following reso- 
lution which was read by the moderator : 

Voted (1), That a new eight-room building be erected and 
equipped at West Concord; (2) That Charles R. Corning, 
(George M. Kimball, John M. Mitchell, Henry H. Metcalf, Ed- 
son J. Hill, DeWitt C. Howe, and Charles R. Walker, be and 
are hereby appointed a committee, with authority to decide 
upon the location of said new school building, and said com- 
mittee is hereby authorized to purchase, or acquire by condem- 
nation, in the name and on behalf of the district, such land as 
may be necessary and suitable for a lot for such new school 
building to be erected upon the location selected and decided 
upon by said committee, and said committee is. authorized to do 
all other acts and things in the name and on behalf of the dis- 
trict necessary to secure the location of such lot and purchase 
or acquire it; (3) That said Charles R. Corning, George M. 
Kimball, John M. Mitchell, Henry H. Metcalf, Edson J. Hill, 
DeWitt C. Howe, and Charles R. Walker, be and are hereby 
appointed a building committee to erect and furnish said new 
school building at West Concord, to employ architects, agents 
and such other assistants as they may require and to do in the 
name and on behalf of the Union School District such other 
acts as may be necessary to carry this vote into effect ; (4) That 
the sum of twenty-eight thousand dollars (128,000) be and the 
same is hereby appropriated to purchase or acquire the land 
necessary for the location of said new school building and erect 
and equip said new school building ; (5) That the indebtedness 
of the district arising from the construction and furnishing of 
said new school building at West Concord be funded at a rate 
of interest not exceeding three and one half per cent, per annum, 



152 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and that a sufficient sura of money be assessed upon the polls 
and estates of I'nion School District on the first day of April 
in each year hereafter to meet the payments of the interest of 
said indebtedness at the date or dates of the maturity of the 
principal and interest, as the same may be fixed, as hereinafter 
provided ; and that the money be obtained by said assessments 
be and hereby is appropriated to make said payments ; (6) That 
the district request the City of Concord to aid in funding the 
indebtedness of the district arising from the construction and 
furnishing of said new school building at West Concord as the 
city is authorized to do by Chapter 261 of the Session Laws of 
1889 entitled "An Act to authorize the City of Concord to 
l)orrow money in aid of its school districts," provided said city 
will borrow the money necessary for the purposes set forth in 
this vote and will allow the district to have the use of the money 
so borrowed ; and further, that if this request is complied with, 
the district will seasonably pay the city sufficient sums of money 
to enable the city to meet the payments of the principal and 
interest upon this indebtedness, so created, as the same may fall 
due, and all incidental expenses, and will apply the money to 
be raised as herein provided to the payments aforesaid ; and 
said building committee is hereby further authorized to make 
said request of the city and determine with the city the date or 
dates when the principal of said indebtedness and the interest 
thereon shall mature, and do all other acts and things necessary 
to carry this vote into effect. 

Mr. Shepard moved the adoption of the resolution, motion 
seconded, a vote taken and declared adopted. 

Art. 4. Mr. ITenry H. Metcalf mo^•ed to adjourn, and it 
was so voted. 

A true record, attest : 

LOUIS C. .MERRILL, Cleric. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATIOX, 
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 20. 



In making our report for the year ending in March, 1906, 
we feel that the question of changes in our school system is of 
great importance. During the past five years the number of 
pupils in the grades above the fourth has increased from 54 to 
1.50 and the number of pupils in the high school has doubled 
during the two years of its existence. 

The addition of one year of high school work to our course 
of study has been one of the chief causes of this increased 
attendance and has helped to arouse the ambition of each pupil 
to complete the course. A careful and conscientious study of 
past and present conditions leads us to believe that we should 
add more high school work to our course of study. 

Our ninth grade is of sufficiently high standard to rank with 
the first year of most of the high schools of the state, and it 
would be a practical and progressive step to somewhat alter 
the course of study in the ninth and tenth grades and add 
another year, or an eleventh grade, to our school system, and 
ask the state superintendent to approve the last three grades 
as a high school course. 

With such a system our grammar school work would end 
with the eighth grade and the graduation would be at the end 
of the high school course. Such a step would mean the em- 
ployment of one more college trained teacher and would cer- 
tainly increase the efficiency as well as enlarge the facilities of 
our educational work. It would also be a step toward unify- 
ing the school systems of this community to our mutual 
advantage, and would result in a great educational and moral 
uplift to the whole community. 

During the year extensive improvements have been made in 
the grounds surrounding the Chai'les Street School, and the 



154 CITY OF CONCORU. 

interior of the building has been made more attractive and 
educational by the purchase of works of art in accordance Avitb 
the plan outlined in our last annual report. 

Our school buildings are now in good sanitary condition and 
extraordinary repairs and alterations Avill not l>e needed this 
year. 

We invite the most careful scrutiny of the quality and quan- 
tity of the work the schools are doing. We believe that the 
results accomplished are all and even more than could fairly 
be expected, and we urge every j)arent and taxpayer to insti- 
tute the most thorough personal investigation of every school. 
Especially is it urged that every parent should come into closer 
personal touch with the schools and teachers, giving the inspi- 
ration of their sympathy and interest. 

It is not enough that taxes should be paid cheerfully. Every 
parent should visit the school often and be on friendly and 
sympathetic terms with the teacher, and every lover of his 
kind should seek to cooperate with the teachers in the sublimest 
mission ever given to man, the making of honest, intelligent, 
God-fearing men and women. 

There is nothing so blighting to educational enthusiasm and 
educational progress as serene satisfaction with what is or what 
has been ; there is nothing so stimulating to educational effort 
as a realizing sense of present imperfections and limitations 
and of higher possibilities. Our duty by no means ends with 
what is easy of accomplishment. We owe to the children in 
this community an educational training which shall prepare 
them to live in the fullest sense possible in their own environ- 
ment, a training which shall teach them to study and to think 
and furnish them Avith tools with which they can further edu- 
cate themselves if they so desire. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. BROWN, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
LEANDER C. PRESCOTT, 
Board of Education. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Education : 

I herewith respectfully submit my tii'th annual report, which 
is the fifth in the series of reports of the superintendent of 
schools in District No. 20, Penacook. 

Review of Fouu Yeaks. 

Four years ago, when the superintendent began his work in 
the district, all the schools were crowded into one building, 
which Avas far too small for the purpose. There were nine 
grades and seven teachers. The four highest grades were 
seated in one room and a small hall. The change since that 
time has been so wonderful as to seem almost incredible. The 
same four classes, with the addition of the high school class 
of 14, now number 164 p\i})ils and occupy the whole of one 
building and a part of another. A new" building has been 
erected and occupied. One year of approved high school work 
has become a part of the course. One new teacher has been 
added and the quality of the teaching has been improved. 
New courses of study, adapted to varying conditions and new 
demands, have from time to time been made. The old text- 
books have been almost entirely replaced by the best modern 
woi-ks. A truly pedagogical phonetic system of reading has 
been introduced, and many other methods of teaching have 
been altered. Moreover, improvements in sanitation and ven- 
tilation have been made. 

The above is but an outline of what has been actually done, 
yet it seems to indicate that the schools are changing, and that 
school officials and teachers are alive to the active development 
of the great educational interests of the times. Every change 
is not an improvement. Many so-called improvements are 



156 CITY OF CONCORD. 

simply strenuous efforts to keep to an acknowledged standard. 
Such efforts, however, are not to be despised, as they often 
require the deepest thought and hardest work. " Keeping up 
to the times " is a common expression and means the maintain- 
ing of a certain uniform standard in the quality of production. 

There are changes, however, that relatively raise the stand- 
ard of the schools — that is, not only keep them in the usual 
running order but make it possible for them to do more work 
in a given time or better work than they have ever before 
done. Whenever this takes place there is genuine improve- 
ment. In review of the four years then it may be seen that 
much has been done to maintain the even high standard of the 
schools. Changes in courses of study, the replacing of old 
books, and the repair of buildings, all may not raise the stand- 
ard in the least yet they are necessary and a part of the work 
of school officials. On the other hand, the erection of a new 
building, improving the quality of the teaching force, and any 
change that may increase the amount of work done adds to the 
proficiency of school work, and hence raises the standard. 

Each of the four years has seen something accomplished 
which was lasting and fully worth the effort expended. Every 
effort has either been the outcome of some demand depending 
upon existing conditions, or has resulted from some sound 
educational principle. 

High School. 

The high school has now been in existence nearly two years 
and has proved its value by the large number of pupils in 
attendance. There have been 14 in the first year of the high 
school and 16 in the ninth grade. The ninth grade, as has 
been stated in previous reports, is doing much the same work 
as is being done in the first year of man}' approved high schools 
throughout the state. It is also true that next fall another 
yeai-'s work might be added to the high school course. This 
would practically give a three-year high school. In fact, as 
conditions now are, the superintendent recommends that the 
present course of study in the high school and ninth grade be 
somewhat changed, another year's work added, and the state 



SCHOOL REPORT. 157 

superintendent be asked to a]>j)roye the whole for a three years' 
high school course. 

This will not be such a radical change as at first might ap- 
pear. While more work will be added, the present would 
remain about the same, with perhaps a slight cliange in the 
ninth grade. One more teacher would be required, but even 
Avithout the addition of the extra year there should be another 
teacher added to the force at the beginning of another school 
year The only difference then would be in the (qualifications 
of the teacher employed. A teacher for tlie ninth grade, which 
will be the first year of the three-year high school, must, of 
course, be a graduate of some school for higher education or of 
a college. It would be well that she should also be a normal 
graduate. Such a teacher would work under the guidance of 
the principal as a regular high school assistant, and would do 
work among all the high school classes. 

The accommodation of the high school might be a matter of 
interest. It could be accommodated in the two upper rooms 
of the Charles Street building. In this location the only ex- 
pense and change necessary would be the refurnishing of one 
room with larger desks. As many of the desks in the high 
school room are now too small for the older children, this 
change ought anyway to be made another year. The best 
location, however, it seems to me, would be in the double room 
at the old schoolhouse. Here the whole school would be 
together in one large room which could be easily separated 
into two for recitation purposes. While for many reasons 
this double room would furnish excellent accommodations for 
the school and would in many ways be better than any other 
that could be furnished, the change from the Charles Street to 
the old building might not be wise, at least next fall, on account 
of the necessity it would involve of moving so many schools 
and so much furniture. Now all the higher grades are, as they 
should be, in the building with the principal. So the change 
in the location of the high school would mean a change in the 
location of neai'ly'all the other schools. This, as I have said 
above, might not be wise. 

An approved high school with a three years' course would 



158 CITY OF CONCORD. 

certainly be a progressive step for the district. Children wish- 
ing to carry their education farther could, as they do now, con- 
tinue at the expense of the district to graduation in the Con- 
cord High School or any other approved school in the state. 
It might ultimately be best to make the last year of the high 
school the graduating point rather than the ninth grade, thus 
setting the standard higher than at present. Such a plan is not 
recommended at present but simply suggested for consideration 
and possible future action. 

Teachers' Salaiues. 

In connection with this subject I shall use freely another 
article which I have already written. 

Perhaps no subject in the educational world has been more 
thoroughly investigated within the last four years than that of 
teachers' salaries. The discussion has covered all branches of 
educational work and the conclusions have invariably been the 
same. Teachers are, as a class, underpaid. 

A consensus of public opinion demands that the standard of 
living for teachers shall be high. They must have the very 
best accommodations which the place where they ar.e affords. 
They must attend certain social functions ; show an interest in 
much in which their pupils are engaged — whether it be in 
school or out — attend institutes, visit schools, and answer innu- 
merable demands upon their time and money. In fact, as far 
as I know, no other class of laborers is obliged, from the very 
nature of the work, to respond to so many appeals of one kind 
or another which i-equire an expenditure of money, time and 
energy. 

13ut previous to these demands, incumbent upon teachers 
already engaged in their profession, is a long, expensive period 
of preparation. Every year the jn-ofessional requirements are 
advanced. The young teacher is expected to know the history 
of education, the psychology of the young mind, the theory of 
l>edagogy, the rules governing school management, and many 
other subjects, of which the knowledge adds professional pro- 
iiciency. This preparatory training is generally followed by a 
struggle for two or three years to get experience. 



SCHOOL ItEF^OET. 159 

Thus, after several years of unremitting strife, the teacher is 
equipped for Ufe work and is at a point where, it might be ex- 
jjected, trained labor should receive for its service true financial 
recompense. 

Almost every school district in the state of New Hampshire 
has given the matter of salaries a reasonable consideration, and 
has fixed a salary schedule by which teachei's are paid. Such 
a well arranged schedule would bring into the school system 
better teachers and would show approval of efficient work. All 
teachers, irrespective of qualifications, experience, time of ser- 
vice and efficiency should not be asked to serve for the same 
recompense. Everj^ business or profession considers as good 
that policy which provides for the recognition of merit on the 
])art of its employees. 

In order to secure and retain good teachers. District Xo. 20 
must soon enter upon some arrangement which shall render to 
the teachers some material recompense for long and faithful 
service. In places where such action has been taken, the bene- 
ficial results have been almost immediate. Better teachers 
have been employed, teachers who have ah'eady been in service 
have shown a spirit of gratitude and increased activit}^, and the 
whole teaching force has been elevated. 

GltAlUXC. 

As far as possible during the year each grade has I)een under 
a separate teacher. The only exceptions to this are the fifth 
grade, which was divided between the teachers of the seventh 
and fourth grades, and the first grade, which was far too large 
for one teacher. 

Grading is, at best, a mechanical device to assist in liandling 
a large number of children, and is generally based on the 
amount of work done in certain subjects. Little, in fact almost 
no, account can be taken of the ability of the individual pupil. 
F'ailure to be promoted and double promotions are the only 
exceptions to this. 'J'he latter does not often occur except in 
the upper grades. It takes place in one of two ways. Either 
the child must do double work, or omit one year altogether. 
Neither of these is entirely satisfactoi-y. The first is apt to 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

unduly tax the strength of the child, while the second omits a 
definite part of a logically arranged outhne of work. Hence 
parents and teachers should be very careful in i;rging double 
promotions, and should always consider the physical as well as 
the mental vigor of the child. 

Failures to be promoted occur most frequently in the lower 
grades, disappearing almost entirely at the sixth. This would 
seem to indicate that a system of mid-year promotions would 
be advisable. Such a system would render the grading far 
more flexible, and in case of failures would necessitate the 
repeating of only one-half year instead of a whole year as is 
now the case. 

A great deal of troulile that arises in our first and second 
grades in regard to classification and promotion could be done 
away with by the establishment of a kindergarten, which would 
relieve the pressure on the primary department. Now these 
rooms have far too many pupils for teachers to obtain the best 
results. Thirty-five pupils to the room is considered by good 
authority to be a reasonable number. At present all but two 
of the schools number more than that, and one, the first room, 
is nearly double it. In the distribution of pupils and the grad- 
ing of the schools an effort has been made to divide the pupils 
as nearly as possible, equally among the different teachers. It 
should always be considered, however, that if two teachers have 
the same number of pupils, but one has two grades, the one 
having the two grades has the more difficult position. 

In connection with the grading and classification it might 
be well to call the reader's attention to an obstacle with which 
teachers in a mill town have to contend. It is the change in 
pupils which is going on in every class. This change is due 
to three causes — double promotions, failures to be promoted, 
and the so-called floating population of the district. To many 
it may be a surprise to learn that only about 25 per cent, of 
the children now registered above the third grade have been 
in the class in which they now are, for four years. This gives 
some idea of the stupendous task which the teachers have to 
perform in classifying the 75 per cent, of changing enrollment. 
It would seem that almost too much was required of our teach- 



SCHOOL KKPOUT. 161 

ers to assimilate these children into their schools and keep 
them up to a fixed standard. 

Ix Gknkuai.. 

During the year only two vacancies have occurred. Mrs. 
Lillian J. Chase resigned to accept a more remunerative posi- 
tion nearer home, and Miss Annie M. Chandler of the music 
department also resigned. jMiss Nettie M. Bowen was elected 
to the position vacated by Mrs. Chase, and Mrs. Martha' Gale 
to that vacated b}^ JMiss Chandler. Teachers have maintained 
the high average standard and their usual good spirit of active 
cooperation. The spirit of teachei's towards their children, 
each other, and officials has a great influence upon the schools. 
As long as it is pleasant, all labor is performed in harmony and 
results are excellent. 

During the year the music department has been somewhat 
disturbed by the change in teachers. Mrs. Gale, who now has 
the department in good working order, has introduced the 
Weaver Individual Sight-singing method. This should, on 
account of the individual effort made with each pupil, be very 
beneficial in its results. The method also furnishes a good 
system by which children may be ranked as in any other sub- 
ject. While music should be marked in a very different man- 
ner from ordinary studies, some consideration should be given 
in case of promotion to the efforts of pupils to master music. 

The great change in the personnel of the classes, elsewhere 
mentioned at some length in this report, affects the results in 
music as Avell as in any other subject. To accomplish much, 
pupils in music must have long and excellent drill of the most 
systematic character. Under the changeable enrollment, this 
is wellnigh impossible for the majority of the public school 
pupils of the district. 

The attention of the Board of Education and citizens of the 
district should be directed towards the needs of the drawing 
department. Drawing is fully as common and quite as impor- 
tant a method of expression as music, and should receive an 
equal amount of time and the service of a special teacher. 
Money expended in this direction would bring in rich returns 
11 



162 CITY OF CONCOIJD. 

and directly accrue to the benefit of eacli pui>il in our schools. 
Many of the towns nearby are considering this matter, and 
would gladly enter into a combination for the employment of 
a good special teacher of the subject. In fact, the superin- 
tendent has been approached in regard to the matter from two 
different sources during the past few months, and now recom- 
mends that the district take some early action in view to secur- 
ing special instruction in this department. 

Text-Books. 

In accordance with the law, text-books and other school 
supplies are furnished the pupils. At best, this method as 
applied to books cannot Jie perfectly sanitary, and in many 
ways might be improved. Many children who would naturally 
be very cleanly and careful in whatever they do are obliged to 
use soiled and torn books which another pupil has previously 
abused. Books as they pass from child to child and are taken 
to many different homes are subjected to many possible 
chances of infection. Whenever such a case is known to 
school ofHcials, the books in question are destroyed, bvit while 
the known cases are few and easy to handle, there probably 
exist many unknown cases which cannot be dealt with. There 
is no way to completely do away with this danger except to 
furnish each child with whatever books are needed. At pres- 
ent this cannot be done. In the near future, however, I think 
there will be some law by which each pupil will have exclusive 
use of his own books. Massachusetts has already passed a law 
permitting school committees, whenever they so vote, to allow 
the children under certain conditions to come into possession 
of their books, and as far as possible to allow each child to 
have the same books from year to year until he has completed 
their study. Such legislation is in the right direction. Every 
child that possesses his own books, in addition to the sanitary 
phase of the question, has a small reference library which may 
at any time be of great service to him. If District No. 20 
would make some regulation by which, at least, those gradu- 
ating from the Granunar School could come into possession of 
two or three books which tliev have \ised durinti; their course, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 163 

or if the school comniittee would make rules by which books 
must be kept by the same pupil until their study is completed, 
or the pupil leaves town, there would be some incentive for the 
children to make better use of books. By some such arrange- 
ment there might be some saving in text-book expense, as 
increased care would lengthen the life of the books used. 

Conclusion. ' 

This report has, in brief, covered the conditions and needs 
of the schools. It now remains to thank those who have 
shown a hearty, wholesome interest in the educational work. 
Every important change in every public work must, in order 
to be successful, receive the support of the citizens of the com- 
munity. Such support has been freely given in the past and 
has been the cause of much progress and advance in the edu- 
cational interests of the community. I also take this opportu- 
nity to thank the Board of Education for their interest in the 
schools, for their suggestions, and for their support of such 
policies as I have from time to time entered upon. 
Respectfully submitted, 

■ ' H. C. SANl^ORN. 



164 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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REPORT OF TREASURER, SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT NO. 20. 





Receipts. 




Balance in hand of treasurer for the 




year ending March 14, 1905 


.$97.20 


Received from city treasurer . 


6,621.75 


tuition 


104-.25 


Sarah Ilolden, one half o: 




fencing 


8.00 


sale of stovepipe 


1.66 


sale of stove 


6.00 


treasurer of building fund 


5.09 


EXPEXDITUKES. 




Salaries 


$3,673.08 


Sinking fund . 




500.00 


Tuition . 




586.30 


Fuel 




368.50 


Text-books 




241.42 


School supplies 




104.73 


Repairs . 




117.34 


Grading, fencing an 


1 lowering sewer 


429.24 


Care of schoolhouse 


422.67 


General supphes .... 


35.88 


Miscellaneous ..... 


284.07 


Balance in hands of treasurer . 


80.72 


Respectfullv sulmiit 


ted, 



*6,843. 



$6,843.95 
emitted, 
DAVID T. TWOMEY, 

Treasurer. 



166 



CITY OF CONCOKI). 



Salaries. 




H. C. Sanborn, superintendent 


$300.08 


W. B. Atwell, 2)rinci})al . 


800.00 


Elizabeth Saunders .... 


360.00 


Nettie Bowen 


250.00 


Hannah Holden . . . . 


360.00 


Maria Carter 


360.00 


Susan Pickard .... 


360.00 


Gertrude Stevens .... 


349.00 


Henrietta Otterson .... 


324.00 


LiUian Chase ..... 


110.00 


Annie M. Chandler, music 


25.00 


Martha S. Gale, music 


50.00 


David T. Twoiiiey, treasurer . 


25.00 



SiXKIXG FUXD. 

1905. 
May 5. Deposited in N. H. Savings 
Bank . . . . . 

Fuel. 

May 10. E. L. Davis, wood and slabs . 18.50 

June 12. J. C. Farrand, coal and wood . 329.50 

Oct. 6. J. C. Farrand, slabs . . 3.50 
Dec. 1. C. M. and A. W. Rolfe, 6 cords 

wood 27.00 

TuiTiox. 
l^nion School District, Concord High 

Text-Books. 

April 14. Edward E. Babb & Co. . . f 17.20 

Atkinson, Mentzer & Grover . 6.67 
William Welch, diplomas and * 

ledger 15.88 

Oct. 6. Houghton, Mifflin & Co. . . 13.77 

Edward E. Babb & Co. 144.75 



$3,673.08 



1500.00 



1368.50 



1586.30 



SCHOOL REPORT. Uh 



Dec. 1. 


Edward PI Babb & Co. 


■ts.eo 




Ginii & Co. 


1.68 


190G. 






March 15. 


Little, Brown & Co. 


4.00 




Hinds, Xoble & Eldredge 


20.00 




Edward E. Babb & Co.^ . 


13.87 



School .Siti'LIKs. 

1905. 
April 17. Annie M. Chandler, music . -tll.95 
Aug. 14. Annie M. Chandler, music . 5.50 
Oct. 6. Milton liradley Co., kinder- 
garten 9.48 

J. L. Ilammett & Co., blotters, 
erasers and rulers . . 18.78 
Dec. 1. Milton Bradley Co., kinder- 
garten ..... 2.30 
Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, pa- 
per 30.09 

J. L. Hammett & C'o., writing 

fluid 1.00 

15. Oliver Ditson Co., music paper 4.00 

Edward E. Babb & Co., cray- 
ons and express . . . 5.20 
Ginn & Co., music chart and 
easel ..... 5.83 
1906. 
March 14. Atkinson, 3Ientzer ct (Trover, 

paper . . . . . 6.00 

Esterbrook Steel Pen Co., pens 3.60 

Ginn & Co., 50 coda . . 1.00 



Repaiks. 
1905. 
.\pril 7. X. W. Miner, repairing cjiim- 

ney •1^5.00 

17. Charles Ilaines, repairing clocks 1.00 



nUA2 



.tl04.73 



168 



CITY or CONCOIID. 



June 2. Russell & Erwin, keys . . *0.72 
Aug. 14. Penacook Electric Light Co., 

ropes on Hag pole . . 1.50 

Oct. 6. F. II. Smart, painting . 1.79 

Orr & Rolfe, labor ." . . 11.00 
Dec. 1. Concord Axle Co., repairing 

gong .... 1.93 
15. W. E. Farrand, bricking up 

boiler ..... 3.50 
1906. 
Jan. 29. Concord Axle Co., repairing 

boiler ..... 7.72 

Geo. Xeller, labor and material <i80 

E. C. Durgin, labor . . 1.50 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, glazing 

and glass . . . . 2.84 

Orr & Eolfe, labor and stock . 58.38 

March 14. Orr & Rolfe, labor . . . 1.45 
American Furniture Co., desk 

slides 4.00 

Concord Axle Co., labor . , . 1.86 

' E. C. Durgin, labor and stock . 3.60 

Laurin Rolfe, dry batteries . 2.75 



8117.34 



Gr.ADiXG, Fencing, and Lown-:rnN(i Seavek. 

1905. 
Aug. 3. Henry Morrill, . . . 8354.00 
Aug. 7. W. C. Spicer, paint and fenc- 
ing 8.70 

14. J. C. Farrand, labor and gravel 5.24 
Oct. 14. Henry Morrill, building fence 

and labor on lawn . . 21.30 

Kov. 14. Ilenrv IMorrill, labor . . 40.00 



CauE of St'IIOOLHorSE. 



William Farrand 



1429.24 

$422.67 



SCHOOL JlKl'OKT. 169 

(iKXKKAl. Si riM.IKS. 



$1.82 


5.G3 


9.02 


•i.m 


I.IG 


7.00 


! .86 


6.44 



1905. 
April 17. D. Warren Fox, mops, brooms 

and hardware 
June 12. Foote, Brown & Co., oil rope 

and fasteners 
Aug. 14. G. E. Farrand, oil brooms, gold 
dust, grass seed . 
Foote, Brown & Co., toilet 
paper and staples 
Oct. 14. G. E. Farrand, brooms, oil, am- 
monia and gold dust . 
Foote, Brown & Co., Hoor oil 
and hardware 
1906. 
Jan. 29. D. Warren Fo.v, thermometers, 
globes and hardware . 
Foote, Brown & Co., cement, 
floor oil and hardware 



Miscellaneous. 
1905. 
April 17. V. C. Hastings, 6 months' 

water rent .... i$30.00 
Penacook Electric Light Co., 

3 months' power . . 7.50 

E. L. Davis, freight . . .65 
IMay 12. L. C. Prescott, ladder . . 1.60 

Isaac Baty, mirror and brackets 1.85 

F. E. Bean, printing . . 5.50 
John McGirr, express . . 1.20 
Geo. H. Folsom, shade trees . 13.50 
John F. Hayward, labor . 6.60 

June 2. C. G. Davis, gilding and clean- 
ing pictures . . . 4.50 

June 12. E. L. Davis, teaming . . 2.10 

W. B. Ranney, printing . . 1.25 

IT. A. Brown, flag and fixtures 5.95 



^35.88 



170 



("ITY OF CONCORD. 



June 12. John ]Mc(4iiT, express 

(Tertrude Stevens, teaching 

elocution .... 

June 20. Lhoyd & ]Mann, lettering 

diplomas .... 

II. C. McDougall, services at 

graduation .... 

Aug. 14. Penacook Electric Light Co., 

3 months' power 
Aug. 18. Prescott Piano Co., rent of 
piano ..... 
Oct. 6. V. C. Hastings, 6 months' 
water rent .... 
Mary E. Bell, rent of hall 
II. Chadwick, ribbon 
.Fohn McGirr, express 
W. B. Ranney, printing . 
Thompson & Hoague, land tile 
Nov. 4. Penacook Electric Light Co., 
* batteries and 3 months' 

power .... 

Nov. 23. John McNeil, insurance . 
Dec. 1. Buxton & Sherburne, insurance 
E. L. Davis, freight and cartage 
Grace Allen, ribbon, cambric 
and tacks .... 
H. C. Sanborn, postage, mile- 
age and telephoning . 



1906. 
Jan 



.Mar. 



29. Towne & Rol)ie, printing 
John iMcGirr, express 

14. O. J. Fifield, teaming 
John ]McGirr, express 



^0.45 
18.00 

4.00 
10.50 

7.50 
10.00 



30.00 


7.00 


.52 


2.90 


6.75 


3.30 


9.00 


32.50 


32.50 


1.72 



1.18 
7.90 

1.75 
.95 

5.85 
.60 



*284.07 



A])pro})riations 
Voted by the district 
Literary fund . 



$3,026.16 
. 2,600.00 
. 193.60 



SCHOOL llEPORT. 



171 



Dog licenses . 




1110.70 


Text-books 




206.89 


Abial Walker trust fund . 




4.14 


Tuition returned by the state 




473.76 


Due from previous year . 




.50 


SlXKIX 


(; P'uNi). 





.Alay 2, 1904. Deposited in Loan ifc Trust Savings 

Iiank . 
July 1, 1905. Dividend on same 
May 5, 1905. Deposited in New nam])shire Sa\ 

ings Bank 
Jan. 1, 1906. Dividend on same 



Total 



.1;6,621.75 



1500.00 
20.41 

500.00 
11.66 



•11,032.01 
Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID T. TWOMEY, 

Treasurer. 



SCHOOL REPORT OF THE T0W:N^ DIS- 
TRICT OF CONCORD. 



We are pleased to report a successful school year of 34 
weeks ; an increase of two weeks over any previous year. 

We realize that one of the important duties of the school 
board is to secure the best teachers consistent with our means. 
How far we have been successful is best proved by their work. 
We believe general improvement in the quality of the work 
done was noticeable in a majority of the 12 schools of the 
district. 

During the past two years a complete change has been made 
in our text-books, with possibly one or two exceptions. The 
new books were heartily welcomed, and have contributed mate- 
rially to the success of the past year's work. 

Music has been taught in the Iron Works and Millville 
schools by Mrs. J. E. Gove, who has served us so successfully 
in that capacity for several years. Since we were no longer 
able to retain Miss Annie Chandler as teacher of music, the 
schools in the north section of the district have been without 
instruction in music except such as the teachers were able to 
give. It is probable that these schools will be in chai-ge of a 
competent music teacher at the opening of the spring term. 

Our registers show but little, if any, improvement over the 
previous year in attendance. Aside from all cases of necessary 
absence we have ample evidence that frequently children are 
allowed to stay away from school with no reasonable excuse. 
A remedy for this evil is in the hands of the voters of the dis- 
trict. The question of expert supervision is one to which our 
attention has often been called. Though no action has yet 
been taken in that direction, the plan seems to be heartily 
endorsed where it has been adopted. We commend it to the 
consideration of all who are interested in good schools. 

We suggest that our annual appropriation be made a little 
in excess of that for 1905, that our school year may not fall 
short of 34 weeks. 



SCHOOL IIEPOJIT. 173 

]Mii,i.viLLK School. 

The fall and winter terms were taught by Miss Marjorie 
Robinson, who has given us faithful, conscientious work. She 
has kept u|) the good standing of the school. i. t. c. 

MiLLVILLK PKi:MAnY. 

This school has been taught by Miss Ethel Paige in the 
same successful manner that has characterized her work for 
several years past. i. t. c 

InoN WorjvS School. 

Miss Edna F. ^Yatson has taught this school during the past 
year. Miss Watson is a successful teacher, of much experi- 
ence. The district was fortunate in securing her services. 

i.^ T. c. 

ASHVILLE. 

This school has been taught since its recent opening by 
Miss Myra Milton, whose work has been reasonably successful. 
The schoolhouse has been thoroughly repaired, making it one 
of the best in the district. \. t. c. 

Standisii School. 

The fall term was commenced by Miss Carrie C. Paul, who 
was obliged to give up the work on account of illness. Her 
place was taken by Miss Carrie E. Foss. Both teachers gave 
good satisfaction in their work i. t. c. 

SxAPTOwx School, 

Miss Isabel Adams taught this school during the three terms 
of the year. Miss Adams continued the successful work of 
the pi'evious year. j. f. h. 

TuRTLETOWX ScHOOL. 

Miss Bessie Virgin taught this school during the first term, 
and Miss Flora Hook the two last terms of the year. The 
school has increased in numbers, making it possible for a bet- 
ter showing than formerly. Miss Hook, though a young 
teacher, was very successful. j. f. h. 



174 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Plains School. 

The first terra was taught by Miss Laura Andrews. Scarlet 
fever nearly broke up the school, making it impossible to judge 
fairly the merits of the work. Mrs. Maude G. Thompson 
taught the last two terms, and gave her usual hard work. 

J. F. H. 

Mountain School. 

The three terms of the year were taught by Miss Grace 
Morrill. The school has decreased in numbers, but under 
Miss Morrill's rule is doing excellent work. ,t. v. h. 

BoKOUGH School. 

Thirty-two scholars were registered for the fall term. 
Rarely has this school been more pros])erous than under 
its pi'esent instructor, Mrs. Belle C. I^all. The closing exam- 
ination was creditable to the school, and gave evidence of 
much patient work on the part of the teacher. a. s. 

Horse Hill School. 

During the entire year the school has been under the instruc- 
tion of Miss Ruth W. Favor. A steady progress in all branches 
taught has been noticeable. During the fall and winter terms 
one class completed the second book of the Werner Arithmetic 
series, and their blackboard exercises showed that the work, 
has been thorough. a. s. 

Number Four School. 

At the close of the spring terra JNliss Edith Bal:)cock resigned 
her position as teacher, after two years of faithful service. 
Miss Hannah M. Stanyan took up the work for the remainder 
of the year. The work throughout the year has been attended 
with good results. Though smaller in numbers than formerly, 
the school stands well in point of scholarship. a. s. 

ALIiERT SALTMARSH, 
mVING T. CHESLEY, 
JUDSON F. HOIT, 

iSchool Board. 



SCHOOL KHI'OlfT. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

The treasurer of the Town School District respectfully sub- 
mits the following rei)ort of the receipts and expenditures for 
the vear endino- JMarch, 190G: 



Re< EIFTS. 




Ralance from last year .... 


,$588.98 


Regular appropriation .... 


.- '3,729.4s 


Extra appro] >riation .... 


500.00 


Literary fund . . . . ; 


140.80 


Dog licenses. 


143.83 


Text-books 


254.97 


Abial Walker trust fun<l 


5.10 


Tuitions returned by state 


110.08 


Other tuitions 


51.15 


Town of Loudon, Maynard tax 


. . 44.54 


Total receipts .... 


*5,568.88 


ExPKXDITriiKS. 




Teachers' salaries 


. -$3,029.75 


Books ....... 


332.69 


Supplies 


03.33 


Fuel ........ 


231.17 


Repairs 


402.63 


Conveying scholars .... 


21.00 


Music ....... 


88.18 


Tuitions 


393.57 


Enumerating children .... 


3.00 


Water 


12.00 


Incidentals 


129.54 


Printing ...... 


9.40 


Truant oflicers 


9.45 


Rent 


36.00 


District treasurer ..... 


25.00 


Balance in city treasury 


384.25 


Balance in district treasury . 


397.92 




$5,568.88 


ISAAC J 


s\ ABBOTT, 




Treasurer. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



Concord, jST. H., December 31, 1905. 
GejSttlemex : — I have the honor herewith to siilnnit the 
report of the police department for the year ending December 
31, 1905. 

The Foik'e. 

The only change on the force this year was the resignation of 
Ofti<jer Cordon A. Lowell, who resigned May 10, 1905. His 
place was filled by Special Officer Elbridge F. Akley, June 3, 
1905, he being appointed regular officer at the meeting of the 
police commissioners December 30, 1905, to take effect January 
1, 190G. 

The organization of the police department at the present 
time is as follows : 

Police Commissioners. 

Josiah E. D wight, Giles Wheeler, (t. Scott Locke. 

Marshal, James E. Rand, appointed patrolman, April 16, 
1861; captain, Apiil 16, 1891; assistant marshal, April 16, 
1894; city marshal, January 27, 1902; took oath of office, July 

1, 1905. 

Assistant John E. Gay, appointed special officer, April 

2, 1894; patrolman, August 6, 1894; resigned as patrolman, 
March 28, 1900; appointed special officer June 15, 1900; 
pati-olman, April 24, 1901 ; assistant marshal, July 1, 1902. 

Captain night watch, Daniel S. Flanders; appointed special 
officer, June 26,1886; patrolman, January 26, 1889; captain, 
January 1, 1895. 



I'OI.ICIO DKl- 


'AirniENT. 




177 




Special. 


Res, 


ilar. 


t, Feb. 


'20, 1SS»1 


.Ian. 


24, 189;{ 


Nov. 


S, 1887 


Dee. 


10, 1895 


er, Dec. 


:>, 189G 


Dec. 


21, 1897 


July 


'21, 1891 


March 


28, 1900 


llace, .May 


28, 1900 


Xov. 


26, 1901 


Nov. 


12, 1902 


.May 


12, 1903 


Jan. 


17, 1903 


Aug. 


20, 1903 


.Iiine 


<;, 1908 


May 


7, 1904 


Aug. 


2, 1S97 


July 


23, 1904 


April 


:]0, 1S97 


Dee. 


12, 1904 


( )ct. 


;;o, ii»0;-5 


Dec. 


30, 1905 



Patrolmen appointed 

Whitney D. l>arrett 
Charles If. Rowe, 
Samuel 8. Batchelilei 
Iloyt Kobinson, 
Christopher T. Wa 
Samuel llodd, 
Victor I. ]Moore, 
(George E. Drury, 
Irving B. Robinson 
(Teorge X. Fellows, 
Elbridge F. Akley, 

Out of fourteen officers which constitute the force at the 
j)resent time, two are stationed at Penacook, leaving twelve in 
the city proper for day and night duty. 

At no time during the twenty-four hours are there less than 
two officers on duty in the city proper. 

SpKciAl. 1Jkski;\'1': Offk i:i;s. 

(leorge II. Silsby, captain, Apj)ointe<l ^larch 18, 1879 

Orrin II. Bean, " Jan. 26, 1889 

Willie A. Little,* ^ " Jan. 27, 1885 

W. 11. H. Patch, ' " Jan. 27, 1891 

Alvin 11. I^ran, " :\Iarch 17, 1891 

Fred II. Clifford, '^ :\Iay 28, 1904 

Thomas P. Davis,* " May 29, 1893 

Fred S. Bagley, " Oct. 26, 1903 

Charles E. Kelley,* " Jan. 27, 1891 

James Jepson, " Aug. 30, 1899 

(Teorge G. Allen, " Aug. 15, 1901 

Joseph A. Flanders, " May 17, 1901 

Clark I). Stevens,* '^ March 7, 1893 

Fred S. Pendleton, " May 12, 1903 

Harry F. Jones, '• April 7, 1905 

*Have been regular officers. 



178 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The statistical portion of iny i-e[»ovt, which is hereto attached, 
gives you a complete account of the work done by the depart- 
ment during the year ending Deceml)er 31, 1905. 

Arrests. 

Males . . . . . . . . . . 736 

Females ......... 32 

Married .......... 193 

Single .......... .")75 

Juveniles ......... 14 

Residents ......... 371 

Non-residents ........ 397 

Residents arrested for drunkenness .... 213 

Non-residents arrested for drunkenness . . . .215 



N.\TIONALITIES, SOCIAL CONDITION AND NUMBER OF PERSONS 
ARRESTED EACH MONTH FOR 1905. 

















i 


























o5 












































MONTH. 


1 


13 

a 


i 


6 
"3; 
a 


1 


a 
■a 
% 


1 

a 
o 


C3 




a 


>> 
a 


I 


•6 

a! 


■3 


1 

n 


.3 




1 


a 


a 
a 


i 




S 


fc 


% 


5C 


- 


« 


15 


o 


Q 


W 


o 







- 


(X 


K 02 


m 


l^ 


!= 




















.i 








? 


i!i 






February 


54 


1 


10 


45 




28 


27 


6 




■■ 


! 
il 11 


7 








3 


1 


25 


March 


48 


1 


12 


37 




23 


26 


6 




..|.. 


1 


16 










3 


2 


21 


April 


64 


3 


21 


46 




33 


34 


10 








18 


1 






1 


1 


•• 


34 


Mav 


61 


1 


19 


43 




?9 


33 


9 


1 








25 






1 




2' 1 


23 




68 

97 


5 


13 

17 


60 

8?, 


1 
8 


36 
61 


37 
38 


14 








5 

? 


20 

?,7 


5 

4 






2 


1 


4 


27 


Julv 


40 




' 




























? 






? 




3? 


September 


67 


5 


27 


45 


3 




39 


7 






5 




18 






1 




3 .. 


33 


October 


70 
52 


4 
3 


20 
18 


54 
37 


■■ 


35 
16 


39 
39 


10 
8 


1 








27 
18 


2 




2 


3 
2 


2'.. 
2 2 


28 


November 


21 


December 


44 


1 


10 


35 


1 


17 


28 


5 


.. 


.. 


1 


1 


15 










1 .. 


22 


Totals 


736 


32 


193 


575 


14 


371 


397 


110 


2 


17 


' 


10 


232 


21 


2 


« 


9 


2110 


320 



I'OLICK DKI'ARTMENT 



179 



)K Peksoxs Aian:sr 



United States, 


820 


Scotland, 


9 


Canada, 


110 


Sweden, 


21 


England, 


17 


Italy, 


21 


Germany, 


8 


Russia, 


G 


Ireland, 


332 


P'inland, 


10 


Greece, 


10 


Poland, 


2 


Denmark, 


2 






O.cri'ATKl 


>X ..K Pi 


•;ks(>xs Akuestki). 




Agent, 


1 


Blacksmiths, 


s 


Stonecutter, 


25 


Plumbers, 


<s 


]Mill operative, 


147 


Bookbinders, 


2 


Laborers, 


340 


Meat cutters. 


•> 


Machinists, 


G 


School boys. 


17 


Quarrjanen, 


7 


Firemen, 


2 


r>ell-boy. 


1 


Housework, 


30 


Upholsterer, 


1 


Seamstress, 


1 


JJrick masons, 


G 


Printers, 


(•) 


Farmers, 


10 


Junk dealers. 


3 


Gigar makers, 


3 


Shoemakers, 


17 


Carpenters, 


12 


JMarble cutter, 


1 


]Monlders, 


5 


Prison guard. 


1 


Linemen, 


3 


Saloon keepers, 


2 


Harnessmakers, 


6 


Stone masons, 


10 


Hostlers, 


3 


Railroad men. 


i 


Barbers, 


G 


Doctor, 


1 


Traveling man, 


1 


Store keepers. 


7 


Paper hanger, 


1 


Cooks, 


4 


Clerks, 


18 


Bill maker. 


1 


Peddlers, 


4 


Keeper of jtool-room 


1, 1 


Painters, 


15 


Bartenders, 


2 


Polisher, 


1 


Salesmen, 


4 


Teamster, 


1 


Sailor, 


1 


Telegraph operator. 


1 






Steamfitters, 


6 


Total, 


7G8 



180 



CITY OF CONCOllD. 



AgKS of PkKSONS AltHESTK 

Number between the ages of 10 and 20 



Each month in 

Januaiy, 

February, 

]\[arcli, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

Total, 



" 


20 


" 30 


" 


30 


" 40 


" 


40 


" oO 


" 


:)0 


" till 


" 


00 


'• 7(1 


" 


70 


'' so 




80 


'^ 90 


DliU.NKKXXKSS. 


1902. 




1903. 


19 




21 


•20 




40 


23 




44 


27 




43 


43 




33 


33 




00 


38 




68 


73 




09 


20 




02 


45 




■)b 


40 




' 27 


29 




20 



466 



548 



55 
44 
50 
30 
46 
33 
44 
54 
51 
32 
38 

514 



60 
193 
264 
152 

67 

27 

4 

1 



30 
35 
24 
44 
39 
33 
32 
47 
43 
47 
26 
28 

428 



NrMi'.i 



AMt CaISK 



>\'hole niiiuber of arrests including Penat'o< 
Whole number of arrests at Penacook 

]Jrought before the court 

Discharged by the court . 

Discharged without being brought before 

Aggravated assault .... 

.\ssault with intent to rape 

Adultery 



1902. 1903 


1904. 1905 


()64 782 


809 768 


81 132 


111 149 




. 601 




. 13 


^ courl 


. 167 




. 4 




1 




2 



I'OLICK DKI'AIITMEN" 



181 



Ac-cessory aftt-r tlie fact of l)iir<ilary 
Assault upon an otlicer 
Assault ..... 
.M)usino; woman i-liild under sixteen 
nur<;-larv ..... 
Doing junk business witliout license 
Driving an automobile on sidewalk 
Deserter ..... 
Drunkenness, including I'enaeook 
Drunkenness at Penacook 
Doing illegal junk l)usiness 
Discharging fire arms in compact pa 
Discharging cane on street (fire arnr 
Escaped from house of correctioi^ 
Evading railroad fare 
Embezzlement . 
For out-of-town ofiicers 
Fornication .... 
Firing revolver on street . 
(Tambling ... 

Insane ..... 
Keeping malt li([iu)r for sale 
Keeping store oj^en Sun<lay 
Larceny ..... 
Xon-support of chihl 
Over driving horse . 
On suspicion .... 
Obtaining goods under false pretensi 
Playing cards on Sunday 
Running gasoline engine within fire 
Rude and disorderly conduct . 
Riding bicycle on sidewalk 
Runaway boys 

Selling cider .... 
Selling malt li((uor . 
Spitting in car 

Safe keeping .... 
Selling adulterated milk . 



t of t 
) • 



age 



11 

;^ 

1 

1 

428 

1)9 

1 



1 

140 

1 



182 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Selling cigai'^^ aiid c-onfeetioiievy on Sunday 
Vagrants ..... 

Throwing snow balls 
Appealed to high court 
liound over to high court 
Committed tt) jail .... 
Committed to house of correction 
Committed to asylum 
Number paid fines or costs 
Xol-prossed ..... 
Mittimus not to issue until called for 
Sentence susi)ended 



Hi 

January . 
Fe))ruary 
I\Iarch . 
April 

:\ray 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



190: 
U20. 
121. 
144. 
148, 
278. 
232. 
225. 
510. 
225. 
274. 
410. 
i]29 



i; Fi 

2. 

18 

37 

92 

,23 

35 

64 

,24 

40 

96 

07 

,31 

.42 



)K Costs ."Mon i ii 



1903. 
*124.59 
256.54 
504.20 
286.41 
227.90 
368.06 
443.38 
575.25 
354.49 
375.28 
1 93.25 
272.27 



1904. 
-^59.10 
254.44 
190.99 
210.90 
233.34 
330.09 
260.44 
460.83 
278.79 
847.66 
805.78 
189.80 



3 
1 
1 

85 

32 

173 

2 

336 

5 

89 

1 



1905. 

SI 69. 16 
153.90 
261.65 
237.45 
266.14 
817.58 

• 513.82 
253.19 
229.44 
386.28 
128.64 
88.98 



•^8,821.09 >!^3,9S1.57 

Exi'KNDrriKKS. 

Regular ap])ropriation .... 
Expended ...... 

IJalance une.xj^ended 

DisnrusK.MK.vis. 
Fuel, city and l^enacook 
Tlehnets and buttons .... 



,241.66 -158,006.23 



. $14,747.82 
. 14,578.49 



$168.88 



$427.61 
29.0(1 



POL1C1-: DIOI'AKTMENT. 



183 



Horse hire, i-ity and l^enacook 
I^oard and shoeing of liorse 
Incidentals .... 
Lights, city and Penacook . 
Salaries, regular, marsh 

patrolmen 
Special otHcers 
Janitor 

Telephone, pi'ivate line 
Water 
Police co]tniiissioiiei-s 

Total . 



1, de|>uty, captain, eleven 



*48, 
825 
('47 
144 

1,UU4 
4-24. 
•270, 
104, 
43 
150 



>?«14.57S.49 



.All 



KI.L.WKOUS DUTIE 



The following tal)le exhil)its an abstract of the miscel 
duties performed l)y the ])olice in adilition to tlie nui 
arrests : 
Xund)er of <luty calls rung in on police signal, from 

January 1, 1905, to December ol, 1905 
Called to (juell disturbances 
Stray teams found and cared for 
Stray horses found and cared for 
Xuniber of times city ambulance re(pnred 
Xuraber of breaks reporte<l 
Xumber of breaks in water jiipe reported 
Bicycles found on street .... 
Xumber of callers received at station 
Complaints received and investigated 
Xumber of officers made liquor searches 
X'uiul)er of officers atten<led tires 
Xumber of times horse used 
Xumber of prisoners taken to jail 
Xumber of street lights reported out 
Xuraber of obstructions reported 
Xumber of lost children returned to ])arents 
X^'umber of officers assisting in taking |)ersons to State 
ITos])ital ........ 



laneous 
nber of 



t7,S23 

81 

(> 

5 

79 

4 

(5 

59 

7,000 

424 

•17 

188 

1,020 

10 

809 



11 



184 



CITY OF COMCOKI) 



Number of telephone calls in city answered . . 7,S*.).") 

Number of telephone calls out of city answered . , oTIl 

Number of doors tried, including Penacook . . (;iis,-J(;i» 
Number of doors found open and secured, incliidino- 

Penacook ........ 29S 

Number of doors found open at Penaco'ok . . "iO 

By reference to the foregoing table it will be seen that there 
were a large number of doors found open and secured. This 
shows the thorough work done l>y the [)atrolnien and undoubt- 
edly prevented larcenies that might otherwise have occurred. 

Number of dogs killed ...... S 

Number of runs made by patrol wagon . . . 02 

Number of miles covered l)y ])ati"ol wagon . . 08 

L()i)(;i:i;s. 

The number of [)ersons furnished lodgings at the police sta- 
tion in 1905 was (38(i against 1,'289 in 1904, showing a decrease 
of 603 for the year. T attribute the cause of this decrease to a 
large demand for common laborers in the past year. 



NrMi-.Ki; AM) A(;ks ok Pkksons Ai'im.vinc von Lod 

190:]. 1904. 
NVhole number of lodgers, including Pen- 
acook 1,100 1,289 

Number at l^enacook ...... 

]\Iales 

Females ......... 

Married 

Single ......... 

Number between the ages of 10 and 20 

" " 20 and oO . 

80 and 40 . 

" " 40 and 50 . 

" " 50 and GO . 

60 and 70 . 

70 and 80 . 

" " 80 and 90 . 



190." 



686 

Ml 

685 

1 

29 
657 

17 
189 
245 
14H 

67 

17 



TOLK'E DEI'A ItTMENT. 



185 



NATIONALITIES, SOCIAL CONDITION AND NUMBER OF LODGERS 
EACH MONTH FOR 1905. 





























1 






MONTH. 




1 

a 


1 
1 


"3) 
a 


a 
o 


aj 

be 
a 
W 


a 

Li 


O 


a 




a 
o 




CD 

1 

'3 



a 


i 


January 


72 




5 


67 


7 


2 


2 




31 


.... 


1 


5 


23 


1 




February 


61 




4 


57 


6 








oo 


9 


2 




9S 






87 
100 




1 
2 


86 


11 
11 


' 






40 
58 




1 




34 
31 






April 

May 

June 

July 

August 








31 
13 

12 






























I 




13 
10 


2 








fi 








5 








"> 




I 






4 








Y 






13 






13 


1 


1 






3 


















September 


31 




1 


30 


5 








10 








15 
















October 

November 

December 


62 
94 
109 






59 


7 

10 
8 


4 
3 
4 






19 
36 
43 










1 




5 




,, , 








44 








3 


106 








2 


1 


49 




1 


Totals 


685 


1 


29 


657 


68 


17 




1 


288 


4 


7 


7 


284 


1 


1 



() 


(•(■ri'ATION < 


F Lodgers. 




I^aborers, 


421 


Stonecutters, 


4 


Railroad men, 


2 


Brick mason. 


1 


^rill operatives, 


119 


Quarrymen, 


2 


^Machinists, 


f) 


Blacksmiths, 


6 


l>arbers. 


3 


Clerk, 


1 


Painters, 


24 


Teamsters, 


11 


Shoemakers. 


83 


Stone masons, 


2 


Cooks, 


6 


Bookkeeper, 


1 


Tailors, 


2 


Moulders, 


9 


bookbinder. 


1 


Farmers, 


2 


Roofers, 


2 


Broommaker, 


1 


Plumber, 


1 


Combmaker, 


1 


Steamfitters, 


4 


Telegraph operator. 


1 


Meat-cutter, 


1 


Papermakers, 


2 


Engineers, 


() 


Firemen, 


4 


Waiter, 


1 


Carpenters, 


4 


Printers, 


2 


Housework, 


1 



186 CITV OF CONCOIM). 



Finland, 






1 


(Tei-many 


Belgium, 






1 


Greece, 


Russia, 






4 


Ireland, 


Canada, 






(58 


Sweden, 


England, 






17 


Scotland, 


United States, 




284 




Lo. 


ATION (1 


F Pol 


.!( K 8l. 


;xAi. Skj; 



8 

1 

•288 



. K BoXKS. 

I)0\' 1. South Main and State Streets. 

" 'I. South ]Main and West Streets. 

" :>. South INfain and Concord Streets. 

" 4. South Main and Pleasant Streets. 

" ;'). North Main and School Streets. 

" ('). North Main and Park Streets. 

" 7. North ^lain and Washington Streets. 

" 8. North Main and Church Streets. 

" 9. North State and Penacook Streets. 

" 10. North State opposite cemetery. 

" 11. West Concord. 

" 12. Penacook. 

" 13. Washington and Tnion Streets. 

" 14. South and Thompson Streets. 

" lo. South and Downing Streets. 

" 10. White Park. 

Conclusion. 

1 am pleased to commend to your attention the good work 
of the otKcers and members of the present force. 

They have been vigilant and attentive to their duties, and 
have cheerfully responded to all calls made ui)on them for 
extra service, and I sincerely extend my thanks to them for the 
cordial support they have given me. 

In concluding this repoi't i)ermit me to return thanks to the 
honorable mayor and city council for the su])port they have 
given me ; also to the board of police commissioners, judge of 



I'OMCK I)KI'Ai;tmhnt. 187 

police court and City Solicitor Ediuund S. Cook, all of whom 
have been very kind, considerate and accommodating at any 
and all times; and to all others wlio have contributed to oui- 
success we extend our thanks. 

Res])ectfully submitted, 

.lA.MKS E. RANI), 

Cifil Mar^hoL 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



CiTV ExGIXEEK'S OlKICE, 

CoxcoKP, N. II., December .".0. l'.M)5. 
To the Cit;i Coiniril: 

The thirteenth aumial report of the eDgineeriug (lei)artmeiit, 
for the 3'ear ending December 31, 1905, is herewith submitted. 

The recommendation of 3'our engineer, that a consulting 
engineer be employed to make a study of our present sewerage 
system, and to make plans and i-ecommendations for its im- 
provement, were approved by a joint resolution passed at tiie 
April meeting of the city council, authorizing the mayor and 
the committee on sewers and drains to employ such an 
engineer. 

Following the passage of the joint resolution, the mayor and 
the sewer committee employed Mv. Freeman C. CoHin, the well- 
known hydraulic engineer of Boston, INIass., whose report is 
printed with this report and is worthy of the careful study of 
every member of the city council and of all citizens w-ho are 
interested in the sanitary condition of the city sewer precinct. 

Considerable work was required of this department to suppl}' 
Mr. Coffin with the necessary data for his studies, but the time 
so spent, was, in the opinion of your engineer, for the material 
good of the sewer precinct, and the work of improving the 
system should be carried forward as rapidly as funds can be 
secured for its prosecution. It is not expected that this work 
can all be undertaken immediately, but liberal appropriations 
should be made to relieve the worst sections and all future work 
done in this precinct should l^e along the lines indicated in Mr. 
Coffin's report. 

A start was made on this woi'k late in the fall, on North 
State Street, where a surface drain, designed to run from 



ciTV i:n(;inki:i;"s UKi'oirr. 189 

AVoods Brook, iieai- tbe eutrance to Blossom Hill Cemetery, to 
a poiut near the entrance to Calvary Cemetery, was laid, a dis- 
tance of 711 feet. Tliis is about one half the length it will be 
when completed. 

This drain is not intended to carry any sewage, as a sanitary 
sewer is already laid in this street, but it will relieve the 
Hooded conditions in this locality in the time of excessive rains 
and in the spring and fall. Work on this drain was suspended 
owing to the expense of breaking frost, but it should be com- 
menced as early in the spring as possible, and the drain 
completed. 

Some small sewers were constructed in different portions of 
the city as shown on the following pages. 

Plans for the foundation of the Kent fountain, located oppo- 
site the court house, were prepared and the fountain installed 
under the direction of this department. 

Several plans and sketches of proposed locations for the new 
High School were made for the committee having this matter 
in charge. 

The petitions for building permits in the building and lire 
precinct grow more numerous each year. In company with the 
chief engineer of the tire department I have attended 21) hear- 
ings, issued 28 permits and denied one. 

The preparation of plans for such work as was being carried 
on, locating poles and underground conduits for electrical con- 
struction, the perambulation of a portion of the town lines, 
the preparation of plans and examinations for the examination 
of plumbers,' and the usual routine work of this department 
has given us a busy season. The addition of the hydrant com- 
mission will give additional work in studying the conditions 
pertaining to this matter. 

We have had a suitable Ijlue-print room added to our e(iuip- 
nieut, for which our thanks are due his honor the mayor. 
No extra appropriation was needed for this work, and the bal- 
ance on hand from our appropriation shows the economical basis 
upon which we have worked during the past year. 

The employes of this department have been : 



190 



ciTv OF co^'cour). 



Edward H. Henderson and Fred W. Lang, principal assist- 
ants ; Carl D. Kennedy and William B. McGuire, rodnien, who 
bave rendered good service to the city in their respective posi- 
tions. 



1 ue expeuses ui tins uepiuLiueui iJii\ 
Paid engineer and assistants 


e uee 


u as 1 


oiiows : 
*2,314.75 


supplies .... 


74. 2<) 


car fares and livery 






107.90 


postage .... 






3.00 


repairs .... 






2.55 


express .... 






1.55 


incidentals 






2.33 


blue-print iiouse 






94.71 


Total .... 






§2, GO 1. OS 


Appropriation .... 






83,000.00 


Expended ..... 






2,601.08 


luexpended balance 






$31)8.92 



To the mayor and the city council I desire to express my ap- 
preciation for their counsel and support during the past season, 
also to the heads of other departments with whom I have been 
associated. 



CITY PRECINCT, NKW SEWERS. 

South Spring Street, South ok Lincoln Street. 



3(; feet of fi-inch Akron pipe laid. 




Paid for labor 


.$23.33 


pipe 


5.40 


castings .... 


.58 


trucking .... 


2.25 


hardware .... 


.30 


tools 


1.59 



$33.45 



Average cost per foot, $0,929 + . 
JNIaterial excavated, gravel and marl. 



CITV KN(iIXEKU S KErOllT. 



191 



McKixLKY Street 


, Extension oi' 


Sew I 


K. 


(!8 feet of l.")-ineli Akron pipe laid. 


Paid for labor $24G.42 


pipe . 








39.44 


brick . 








8.00 


cement 








10.00 


castings 








11.3:5 


wrought iron 








.62 


rubber boots 








17.75 


oil 








.90 


trucking 








.s.7o 


tools . 








17.16 



Average cost per foot, .$•">. 299. 

Material excavated, loam and wet sand. 

There is on the ground 224 feet of 15-iuch pipe 
.$129.12, which will complete this sewer to the easterly' 
Broadway. 

Holly Street, Extension of Sewer. 

76 feet of 10-iuch Akron pipe laid. 



!360.37 



costing 
line of 



labor 


S81.23 


pipe . . 


27.74 


cement .... 


2.00 


trucking .... 


4.25 


tools 


5,76 




$120.98 



Average cost per foot. Si. 591. 
Material excavated, loam and sand. 

Dunklee Street, Southerly from West Strep:t 



236 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe laid. 




Paid for labor 


$93.62 


pipe 


79.12 


brick ..... 


9.60 


cement .... 


6.00 


castings .... 


13.00 



192 



ITV OF (^ONCOIJD. 



Pai<l fov oil 

trucking 
tools 



Average cost per foot, -SO/.tiJo-j- . 
^Material excavated, loam, sand and ela}-. 

(tiles Strekt Extknsiox. 

27.') feet of (j-incb Akron i)i[)e laid. 
Paid for labor .... 

pipe 

cement 

castings 

hardware 

trucking 

tools .... 



Average cost per foot. SO.oO'.). 
Material excavated, loam and hard[tan. 

North P^ssex Street, Extexsiox of Seweij 

42 feet of 8-inch Akron pipe laid. 
Paid for labor ....... 

pipe 

trucking ...... 

tools ....... 



Average cost per foot, SO.(j;v")-|-- 
INIaterial excavated, gravel. 

XouTn State Street 1)i:aix. 

71 1 feet of 24-iuch Akron pipe laid. 

20 feet of G-inch Akron pipe laid. 

1 6-inch Akron curve laid. 

1 8-inch Akron curve laid. 

Used in connecting eatch-l)asins. 



.ii;0.70 

7.7o 

10.48 

$220.27 



^91.78 


36.00 


2.00 


.90 


1.15 


1.50 


G.66 


$139.!) 9 



$14 


00 


9 


69 


1 


75 


1 


27 



;2().71 



Paid for 



i Li\ \\:sui 


.N 1<J^;K « Kl 


I'OKl 


• 


1 ITO 


laboi' .... 


S732.56 


pipe . 








.SSI..")!) 


brick 








40.00 


cement 








34.00 


castings 








21.81 


wrought iron 








.45 


sand . 








3.75 


blacksmith . 








5.48 


lumber 
oil 








31.58 
4.20 


liardwai'c 








l.'JG 


salt 








1.40 


trucking 








17.10 


tools 








.S!).24 



$1,805.12 
Average cost per foot, $2,497 + . 
Material excavated, gravel, sand and hardpan. 
There is on the ground 701 feet of 24-inc!i and 200 feet of 
18-inch Akron pipe, costing $0'.»5.13. 





Kp:rAiK.s. 








Beacon Street $17.29 


South End sewer 






302.94 


South State Street, ^near Perley Street 






16.22 


South State Street, near :Main Street 






4.72 


Rumford Street .... 






22.73 


North State Street 






2.58 


Fremont Street .... 






2.44 


Abbott Street 








(3.85 


'J'remont Street 








3.05 


Summit Street 








.70 


Curtice Avenue 








G.88 


Prospect Street 








3.17 


Downing Street 








6.00 


Prison outlet 








15.45 


Twenty-inch outlet 






5.50 


Pleasant Street .... 






7.19 


13 











194 



CITY OF CONCOr.D. 



Green Street 
Prince Street 
Miuot Street 



Expense of spring and fall tliisbings 

Paid for hose 

Paid for new work 

Paid for repairs . 

Paid for pipe on hand . 

Paid for repaiis on hoister 

Paid F. C. Coffin, C. H 



Precinct funds available 1905 
Expended, 1005 ..... 

Balance on hand .... 

Seaveks Built in 190;' 

6- inch pipe 

8-iuch pipe 
10-inch pipe 
15-inch pipe 
24-iuch pipe 



Total 

Sewers Built ix City Pr 

G-inch pipe 

8-inch pipe 
10-iuch pipe 
12-inch pipe 
15 -inch pipe 
18-inch pipe 
20-inch pipe 
24-inch pipe 



^1.43 

1.00 

.70 



M26.84 

S249.81 

325.00 

2,766.89 

426.84 

1,124.25 

3.24 

656.54 

$5,552.57 

87,177.04 
5,552.57 

81,624.47 



311 feet. 
42 '' 

312 •' 
68 " 

711 '' 



1,444 



T TO Decemuec 31, 1905 



1,084 

25,003 

49,089 

39,222 

11,108 

6,204 

4,549 

2,641 



feet. 



(MTV KNCINEKItS REPORT. 



195 



:]0-iii 
I5ric-1< 



ell pi 
:, 12- 
16. 
14 
20 
24 
28 
24 
.•50 

;;8 

24 

30 



ipt' 

-inch x 14-inch 
-inch X 24-iuch 
-inch X 22-inch 
-inch X 32-inch 
-inch X 36-iuch 
-inch X 48-iuch 
-inch circular 
-inch circular 
-inch circular 
-inch cast iron pipe 
-inch east iron pipe 



2,758 


1,848 


350 


2,527 


17,937 


883 


1,515.5 


402 


4,080 


1,576 


1,054.5 


174,800 



feet. 



Total miles in city precinct to date, 33.106-(- 

West Concord Sewer Precixct. 

No additional sewers were laid in this precinct and no exten- 
sions were made. 

The brook into which the southern outlet empties was some- 
what clogged and the channel was cleaned out. Spring and 
fall flushing was done as usual. 

The expense attending this work is as follows : 

Spring and fall flushing 
Cleaning brook channel 

Total expenditure 

Unexpended balance January 1, 1905 
lilxpeuded 1905 .... 

Balance January 1, 1906 

East Concord Sewer Precix 

No work was done in this precinct during the past season. 
The funds available January 1, 1906, are S132.40. 



S17.83 
8.66 


826.49 

$98.05 
26.49 


671.56 



196 CITY OF CONCORD. 

8t. Taul's School Seweka(;e Phecixct. 

The animal charge for water service in the flush tanks, and 
slight repairs at the outlet, cover the expense in this precinct. 

Paid water department ..... 145.00 

labor repairs at outlet ..... 2.72 



$47, 


.72 


$73.56 


47, 


.72 



li»05 appropriatioi] available 

Expended rJOT) ...... 

Balance January 1, I'JOC .... $25.64 

There has been deposited with the city treasurer, to the 
credit of the city sewer precinct, the following sums : 

Pent of pumps ....... $13.50 

Rent of hoister 135.00 



$148.50 
New Streets. 

No new streets have been laid out, but two streets have 
been extended, viz. : jMaitlaud Street, 50 feet wide, 288.3 feet 
westerly; Giles Street, 50 feet wide, 606.61 feet northerly 
from Centre Street. 

(Grades Established. 

Easterly sidewalk, Broadway from Pillsbury Street southerl}' 
503 feet. 

AVesterly sidewalk reestablished on Green Street, from School 
Street northerly 60.2 feet. 

Southerly sidewalk, Pillsbur}' Street, from Broadway to 
Dunklee Street. 

Westerly sidewalk, Kumford Street, from Wyman Street to 
Penaeook Street. 

Southerly sidewalk, Beacon Street, from Kumford Street to 
White Street. 

Easterly sidewalk, South Main Street, from tlie northerly 
line of Pillsbury Street ;>98 feet northerly. 



(MTV kncjineer's report. 197 

Westerly sidewalk, South Street, from Thompson Street 
southerly 218 feet. 

Westerly sidewalk, White Street, rei'stablished from Wasli- 
iugton Street to Beacon Street. 

White Street, from Washington Street ooO feet northerly. 
Northerly sidewalk, Elm Street, Ward One, from Dr. E. E. 
Graves' easterly line 418 feet westerly. 

P^asterly sidewalk. South Spring Street, from Tliorndike 
Street southerly 296 feet. 

Southerly sidewalk, Centre Street, easterly from Tahauto 
Street G4.5 feet. 

Respectfully submitted, 

\V. B. HOWE, 
City Enqiiieer. 



EEPORT ON SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 



Boston, September 16, 1905. 

Hon. Charles R. Corning, Mr. Seth R. iJoIr, Mr. Winiani W. 

Allen, Mr. George H. Rolfe, Mr. Mirhw^l H. Mnlcalnj, 

Committee on Sewers cmcl Drains. 

Gentlemen : I submit the following report upon the sew- 
erage and drainage of the City of Concord. The city is to a 
large extent provided with sewers which have been laid from 
time to time as the occasion seemed to demand. These sewers 
are mainly laid on the combined system, or to carry both house 
sewage and surface water. They are in Sections Nos. 1 and 
2.* One section, however, that which drains into the valley of 
Bow Brook, or Section No. 3, is sewered upon the separate 
system as far as it is sewered at all. The separate system is 
one in which the house sewage flows in one set of sewers or 
drains and the surface water flows in another. 

Wherever sewage can be disposed of without objection b}' 
discharge with the surface drainage into a body of water with- 
out treatment or pumping, a combined system is satisfactory. 
If, however, the ti'me comes when the sewage must be disposed 
of in some way that requires treatment or pumping, then the 
separate system is preferable, except for those streets where the 
street wash is nearly or quite as badly polluted as the sewage. 

It is very difficult to handle surface water in any system in 
which it must be either pumped or treated on account of the 
great variation in the flow. In a combined system the dry- 
weather flow is little, if any, greater than the volume of the 
house sewage and sucli ground water as finds its way into the 

* For convenience I have divided the territory of the cltj' which Is under 
consideration into four separate districts and called them respectively Sec- 
tions Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4, and shall so refer to them in this report. 



REPORT ON SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 199 

sewers, while during a severe storm the flow of surface water 
aloue may be oue or two hundred times as great. The flow in 
the sewers is varying all of the time between these limits. 

When it is considered that, if properly handled and kept 
separate from house sewage, the surface water cun be turned 
into the nearest and most convenient water courses or rivers, 
thus avoiding large sewers as well as pumping and treatment, 
it is seen how important it is that the two classes of flow be 
kept separate, especially when it is necessary that the sewage 
should be treated, either at present or in the future. 

At the present time there is, I understand, little or no com- 
plaint on account of the discharge of the sewage of Concord 
into the Merrimack River in a crude state. The public standard 
of what is tolerable in sanitary conditions is, however, continu- 
ally becoming more exacting, and it is not safe to assume 
that, because certain conditions are permitted today, they will 
be allowed to exist in the future. 

It is in my opinion quite possible that the time will come 
when the City of Concord will be required to purify its sewage 
before discharging it into the Merrimack. The building of a 
dam at Garvin's Falls and maintaining what is in effect a pond 
or a body of water with a current of low velocity has already 
changed the conditions along the river front of the city. The 
present conditions are a closer approximation to those which 
have involved the City of Fitchburg, Mass., in a suit from a 
mill owner on the Nashua River, in which he claims damages 
for injuries alleged to be received by the pollution and filling 
up of his pond by the sewage that the city turns into the 
river. 

I speak of the above to indicate the'reason for the considera- 
tion which I am giving in this report to the question of the 
combined system of sewers. As already stated, the City of 
Concord is largely sewered upon the combined system.* I 
consider this unfortunate and advise that all new or additional 
territory be sewered upon the separate system. 

'* A certain territory in the westerly part of the city which drains into Bow 
Brook, in so far as it has sewers, is sewered upon the separate system. This 
section I have called Section No. 3 in my reference to it in this report. 



200 CITY or coxcor.D. 

With regard to the existiug combiDed sewer system, aud the 
improvements which it will be necessary to make to it in order 
to increase its capacity to meet the requirements, there are two 
ways in which it can be adapted to a possible future need for 
artificial treatment of the sewage. 

One is by a complete separation of the system by construct- 
ing a new set of sewers or drains, in some streets new sewers 
for the house sewage, diverting all of the latter from the exist- 
ing drains, in other streets new drains for the surface water, 
diverting all of the latter from the existiug sewers, and build- 
ing all of the supplementary drains needed for increasing the 
capacity of the system in accordance with such a plan. 

The other method is to maintain and improve the existing 
combined system, and, when it becomes necessary to purify the 
sewage, connect it at each of the outlets with an intercepting 
sewer of a sufficient size to carry the dry-weather flow^ ; arrange 
the connections in such a manner that the dry-weather flow 
will be discharged into the intercepting sewer ; provide storm 
overflows at these connections so that during storms the excess 
over a certain determined amount will flow to the old outlets 
and be discharged into the river. This method is based upon 
the assumption that at the times of such discharge the sewage 
will be so greatly diluted and the water will be so high in the 
river that there will be little objection to its discharge for the 
comparatively short time in which it occurs. 

It will be evident that the second method is not so desirable 
as the first, for the following reasons : The flow which goes to 
the intercepting sewer to be eventually treated and perhaps 
pumped is and must be considerably greater than the amount 
of the house sewage and ground water that would flow in a 
strictly-separate system. This, of course, renders the treat- 
ment and pumping more expensive than for a separate system. 

Then there is, of course, some objection to the discharge of 
dilute sewage into the river during storms. 

There are also liable to be more objectionable deposits in the 
combined than in the separate sewers. 

I recommend, however, that the existing combined system of 
sewers in Concord be improved and developed in accordance 



liKl'OKT OX SKWHHAGE SYSTEM. 201 

Avith the second iiiethod, or that of an intercepting sewer witli 
storm overflows. 

I do this maiuU' because it will, no doubt, be quite a number 
of 3^ears before it wall be necessary to discontinue the discharge 
of the crude sewage into the river, and if all of the changes 
which will be rendered necessar}' (in connection with the 
increase in the capacit}^ of the existing system) to separate 
the system are made now or soon, the interest on their cost 
will be considerable, and probably more than offset any future 
saving which can be made in operation by the entire separation 
of sewage and surface water. 

My recommendations in regard to the future policy, then, 
are that the existing system of combined sewers be maintained 
and their capacity be increased where necessary, having in 
view a future connection with an intercepting sewer, laid along 
the river front, of all of the outlet sewers and the provision of 
storm overflows at the connections. This intercepting sewer 
-will run to a point near Hall Street, about 700 feet from Ham- 
mond Street, substantially as shown on the accompanying 
plans. 

From this point the sewage will be pumped to any location 
where it is to be treated, unless such location should be at 
some point below Garvin's Falls, where it could flow by gravity 
and the pumping be avoided. It is, of course, unnecessary 
to anticipate the future by attempting to determine where or 
how the sewage will be treated. 

The intercepting sewer must, from the conditions of the 
case, run substantially as shown, and the discharging point 
can be anywhere between Hall Street and the river and 
Hammond Street and Bow line. The location which I have 
indicated is chosen because it is also a good collecting point 
for the sewage from the territory south of Hammond Street, 
McKinley Street and Park Avenue. 

I recommend that the sewerage system for Section No. 3 be 
carried out as it is started, namely, as an entirely separate 
system. 

I recommend that Section No. 4 be sewered upon a strictly 
separate system, whenever any sewer construction is under- 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 

taken iu this district. Tliis section comprises all of the terri- 
tory south of Hammond and McKinley streets and Park 
Avenue, and between the river and the summit or divide 
l)etween South and Birch streets. That part of this district 
west of and including South Main Street is to be provided 
with main sewers in South, Bow, Rockingham and South Main 
streets, so arranged as to connect with sewers in new streets 
not yet existing, which may be built in this section in the 
future for the discharge of house sewage.* For as long as the 
sewage is discharged in a crude state into the Merrimack 
River, that from this section will be turned through South 
Main Street from Rockingham to McKinley Street through a 
sewer yet to be built, thence through an existing sewer to the 
present 38-inch outlet sewer. 

Whenever treatment of the sewage is undertaken, it would 
be intercepted at the junction of South Main and Rockingham 
streets, at an elevation of about 43, and possibly How to the 
place of treatment by gravity. 

The sewage from the lower portions of the section, or that 
part east of South Main Street, will flow to the point chosen 
for the discharge of the main intercepting sewer for Sections 
1 and 2, where being delivered below the level of the water in 
the river, it must be pumped even for discharge into the river ; 
that is to say, no system can be operated in this low-lying dis- 
trict without pumping. When, however, a pumping plant is 
installed to pump the sewage discharged by the intercepting 
sewer to the disposal plant, this sewage can be handled by 
that plant. 

The storm water of this section is to be discharged by drains 
into the natural water courses of the district, wliich are to be 
kept open and free from obstruction for this purpose. 

It is also recommended that when treatment of the sewage 
is resorted to, if the disposal plant is favorably situated, a 
storm overflow connection be made between the head of the 
38-inch main sewer at the junction of Glen and Allison streets 
and the 24 x 36-inch sewer in Allison Street, to allow the dry 

* There is a part of this territory that this plan does not provide for, namely, 
the valley immediately bordering upon Bow Brook south of Noyes Street. 



REPORT ON si;wi-:iia(;k system. 203 

weather How, oi' tlie sewage proper, to flow in the latter and 
the storm water to overflow to the former. The sewage will 
then flow to the 24 x oG-inch sewer which crosses South Maiu 
Street about oOO feet north of Allison Street, where it should 
be intercepted, together with the flow coming south in the 
South Maiu Street sewer, at about elevation of) and taken by 
gravity, if possible, to the disposal plant. 

This arrangement will intercept all of the sewage of Section 
Xo. 3 and nearly all of that of Section No. 2 south of Warren 
Street, and, if the disposal plant is situated where it can be 
reached by gravity, will avoid the pumping of a large amount 
of sewage. 

Changes and Improvements to Existing System. 

We now come to the required improvements to the existing 
system, whicli consist mainly in I'eplacing some of the present 
sewers with larger ones, or supplementing them with a second 
sewer or drain, in order to increase the capacity of the system 
sufficiently to carry awa}' the surface water in times of severe 
storms. 

Section No. 1. 

In this section there are two available methods of relieving 
the congestion : First, by laying new or supplementary sewers 
along the lines of the present main sewers to the Merrimack 
River ; second, by intercepting the surface flow from the ter- 
ritory above Rumford Street and taking it by a main line 
through Rumford Street to the brook which crosses North State 
Street near its intersection with Rumford Street. This method 
would require the separation of the sewage from the surface 
water in that part of the district west of Rumford Street, 
because sewage could not be discharged into this small brook 
without causing a nuisance. This separation would not be a 
serious matter, as there are at present but few sewers in this 
territojy. 

I have made estimates of the cost of treating the S3'stem in 
both ways, and find that tlie cost of the first method, taking 
the district as a whole, is Jess than that of the second, and, 



20-i CITY OF CONfJOKD. 

therefore, I recommeud that the first method be adopted. I 
have estimated the maximum flow coming to each of the 
sewers, and also estimated the capacity of each of the sewers, 
and in this way determined which of them have snflicieut 
capacity for the demand upon them, not alone for the present, 
but for the future when the district becomes completely built 
over. 

For those sewers in which the capacity is insufficient, I have 
determined the size of a sewer with ample capacity to replace 
them, and also of a supplementary surface drain to be laid 
parallel to them, and to provide capacity for the discharge of 
the excess of surface water which cannot be carried in the 
present sewers in severe storms. 

Which of these alternative propositions (whether a new 
sewer or a supplementary drain) will be adopted in any par- 
ticular case can only be determined by a careful examination 
of local conditions, and is, generally speaking, dependent upon 
the comparative cost. I presume that a new sewer to replace 
the existing one will be cheaper or better in some streets, while 
in others a supplementary drain will be more advantageous. 
I, of course, am not possessed of the detailed information nec- 
essary to decide this question, and it can better be determined 
at the time it is proposed to do the work in an}' particular 
place. 

The plan of Section No. 1, accompanying this report, shows 
the sewers and parts of sewers which are required to provide 
sufficient capacity in the system. Table No. 1 also gives a 
list of these sewers and their sizes, both for sewers for replac- 
ing existing ones, and for a sewer or drain supplementary to 
them. 

There are two lines recommended which are to be used solely 
for surface water. One is to be laid in Rumford Street from 
Albin Street, northerly, to the stream crossing North State 
Street ; the other in North State Street from the entrance to 
Calvary Cemetery southerly to the same stream. As these 
drains discharge into this' small brook, all sewage must be kept 
out of them. North State Street, along this line, is already 
provided with a sewer, which is, however, too small to provide 



IIE]'()11T OX SKWKRAGK SVSTE:\r. 205 

for the surface drainage. A separate sewer must be laid iu 
Rumford Street at the above loeatiou whenever the necessity 
for the disposal of house sewage at this place arises. 

There is little more to be said in regard to the changes and 
additions, except to i-efer briefly to the additions to the main 
outlets. 

There are now three main outlet sewers from Section No. 1 
discharging into the Merrimack River, Neither one of these 
is large enough. Although the most northerly one, the 24 x 
o6-inch sewer from Penacook Street, gives little trouble now, 
it will be too small when the territory it serves is wholly built 
over, and completely sewered. As will be seen from an exami- 
nation of the plan, it is proposed to lay a new sewer from 
Main Street at Montgomery Street to the present outlet of the 
20-iuch main sewer. The sewer will, practically, supersede 
the present main sewer which discharges just south of Bridge 
Street. It is also proposed to supplement the 20-inch and the 
24 X 3 6-inch sewer by laying one alongside the latter, into 
which both will discharge, as shown on the plan. 

Section No. 2. 

In Section No. 2 there are (|uite a number of improvements 
which it will be necessary to make at some time iu order to 
render the system effective. Their nature is much the same 
as that of those in Section No. 1 , and does not require further 
special mention. All of the new sewers required are showni on 
the plan of Section No. 2, and given iu Table No, 2. 

There are some changes in the main outlet sewers of this 
section. The outlet sewer whicii runs through Depot Street 
to the river is of sufHcient capacity east of Railroad Square, 
but will have to be enlarged, as shown from Main Street to 
Railroad Square. 

The 24 X 36-inch outlet sewer, which runs from State and 
Main streets across the railroad to Water Street, and through 
Water Street to the river, must be supplemented, as shown on 
the plan. The same is true of the 38-inch main sewer, which 
discharges into the river al)out .lOO feet south of Hammond 
Street. 



206 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Plans of Sectious o aud 4 accompany this report, showing 
what is recommended in these sections. 

Suggestions of Improvements to i-.e Made in the Near 
Future. 

The foregoing recommendations contemplate additions and 
improvements that will be needed in the future, and it is, per- 
haps, nnnecessary to state that it is not expected that all of 
them will be undertaken now. Some of them may not be 
required for years. They are suggested and shown on the 
plans with the intention of providing a comprehensive plan of 
the improvements of the existing system of sewers, and for 
the future development of territory not now sewered. 

There are, Ijowever, a number of places wdiere present con- 
ditions require that the improvements be made in the near 
future. The following is a list of these, covering some points 
that have already given trouble through insufficient capacity in 
times of severe storms. 

Section No. 1. 

Pei'haps the most important improvements to be made in this 
section are those for increasing the capacity of the sewers on 
the field line from the corner of Valley and High streets to 
Washiugton Street, in Washington Street from Centre to 
Main Street, in Franklin Street from Rumford about 150 feet 
west, in Kamford from Franklin to Beacon, in Beacon from 
Rumford to near State ; on field line. Beacon to Washington 
Street, in North Main Street from Washington to Montgomery, 
and the main outlet sewer from North Main to the river, as 
shown on the plan of Section No. 1. 

A connecting sewer should also be laid from the 20-inch 
outlet sewer at or near the point where it crosses the railroad 
to the 24 X 36-inch outlet sewer. This is only a part of the 
contemplated improvement to the 20-iuch line, which consists 
in laying this same connecting sew^er from the 20-iucli to a 
new sewer parallel with the 24 x oG-inch sewer, as shown on 
the plan. It is believed, however, that the above connections 
to the 24 X 36-inch Avill relieve the overcharged condition of 



i:i:roi:T on sewkkage system. 207 

the 20-inch, somewhiit, and that the construction of the above- 
named parallel sewer can be postponed for awhile, as the 24 x 
36-inch sewer has not caused any serious trouble under the 
present development of the section which it drains. 

In Centre Street, a sewer will be required from Green 
Street to about 200 feet east of State Street. A new sewer 
will be necessary in Bradley Street from Walker to Penacook 
Street, and in Penacook from Bradley to North State Street, 
and an additional drain for surface water onJji in North State 
Street from the stream crossing near Rumford Street to the 
entrance to Calvary Cemetery. The estimated cost of these 
improvements is given for each street on Table No. 1. 

Section No. 2. 

In Section No. 2 the following changes or additions are 
Urgently needed : 

In Main Street from Warren to Depot Street and in Depot 
Street from Main to 225 feet east. 

In Warren Street from Rumford to Pine Street and from 
State to Qreen Street, 

In Pine Street from Warren Street about 300 feet nortJjerly. 

The main sewer, called the "Brook Sewer," from North 
Spring Street to Allison Street, is of insufficient capacit}' and 
requires an additional or supplementary drain laid parallel 
Avith it. 

In South State Street an increase in capacit}' is required 
from Downing to Harrison Street. 

These are all shown on the plan of Section No. 2. Their 
cost is estimated and given by streets on Table No. 2. 

Section No. 3. 

In Section No. :! new sewers will be necessary in Ridge 
Road, Park Ridge, Giles and School streets. 

These sewers are shown on the plan of Section No. 3. 
Their cost is estimated and given on Table No. 3. 

AYhile there is present need of all of the improvements sug- 
gested above, it is probable that all of them will not be under- 
taken at once and a choice must be made of those which will 



208 



riTV OF CONCORD. 



*Col. 1. 


*Col.2. 


8836 


S666 


844 


6i;) 


1,956 


1,645 



7,986 


6,844 


4,960 


11,481 


2,382 


2,040 


1,149 


994 


6,257 


6,001 


2,382 





do the most good aud upon which to make a begiunino-. With 
this in mind, I suggest the following order : 

Main Street, Warren Street to Depot Street, 
Depot Street, Main Street to 48-inch line, 
Centre Street, Green to 200 feet east of State, 
Line from Merrimack River to Main, corner 

Montgomery, 18,142 

North Main Street, JMontgomery to Wasliing- 

ton, 
Washington, Main to Centre, 
Field line, Washington to corner Valley and 

High, 
Field line, Washington to Beacon, 
Beacon, field line to Rumford, 
Rumford, Franklin to Beacon, 

Surface Drainage. 

North State Street, Calvary Cemetery to cor- 
ner Rumford, • $4,042 
School Street, Brook to Giles Street, 542 
Giles Street, School to Park Ridge, 451 
Park Ridge, Giles to Ridge Road, 590 

Type ok Sewers and Drains Recommended. 

It is suggested that for present purposes at least all sewers 
and drains less than 24 inches in diameter be laid of vitrified 
clay pipe with closely packed cement joints ; that all above 
20 inches 'be built of Portland cement concrete or with con- 
crete in the lower two thirds of the section and brick in the 
upper third. Drawings of cross sections for the different 
sizes accompany this report. 

Use of Egg-Shaped Sewers. 

All of the dimensions of sewers given on the plans and in 
the tables are those of the diameter of a circular sewer. In 

*Col. 1 gives cost of sewers as laid to replace existing sewers, and Col. 2 
gives cost if they are laid supplementarj' to them. 



itKPor.T ON SEWERAGE syste:\[. 200 

those Hues where the flow of sewage is extremely variable and 
the dry weather How very small the so-called "egg-shaped" 
section may be more desirable than the circular shape. I have 
given ou the plans the sizes of egg-shaped sewers which have 
substantially an equivalent capacity of certain sizes of circular 
ones. In my opinion it is not necessary or desirable to use 
egg-shaped instead of circular sections where the diameter of 
the latter is 20 inches or less, or much exceeds three feet. 

Appended to this report is a schedule giving estimates of 
tiie cost of the work which is proposed for present construc- 
tion. It is difficult to make an estimate which will be a close 
approximation to the actual cost of this work on account of 
the fact that it must be done under entirely different condi- 
tions to those obtaining in new work. There are many con- 
nections to make with existing pipe, and, when an existing 
sewer is to be replaced, it must he removed and the flow of 
the sewage maintaiued, all of which introduces very uncertain 
factors. 

In making these estimates I have used new work as a basis, 
and made a general estimate of the increase due to the special 
difficulties. I do not consider the estimate of any particular 
sewer of much value in predicting closely what that particular 
sewer will cost, but the entire estimate may be an approximate 
guide to the general cost of doing the work. These estimates 
are based upon contract prices at the present time. 
Respectfully submitted, 

FREEMAN C. COFFIN. 

14 



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Pillsbury 

225 ft. East 

Merrimack River 

Water 

South and Thompson 

Thorndike 

Laurel 

Downing 

West 

Allison 

Railroad 

Hall 

Merrimack River 

Dunklee 


Field Line 

Warren 

Field Line 

North State 

Main 

Monroe 

Warren 

Depot 

Fayette 

Perley 

We.st 

Field Line 

We.st 

Field Line 

Ruraford 




• 

: 
\ 1 

: 


3 

o 


South Main 

Hammond 

Railroad 

Pleasant 

Monroe 

Thorndike 

Laurel 

Downing 

West 

325 ft. E. of Main 

Railroad 

Hall 

Broadway 


Dunklee 

1/2 way fr. Warren to 
No. Spring... [School 

Green 

North State 

Thompson 

School 

Warren 

Thompsim 

Thorndike 

Perley 

West 

Downing 

We.st 

Pine 


a '• 

li 

3B 




<1^ 

1 


Broad waj' 

Depot 

Field Line 

Field Line 

Fiehl Line 

Field Line 

Field Line 

J'^ield Line 

Field Line 

Field Line 

Field Line 

Field Line 

Field Line 

Pillsburv 


Pillsbury 

Pine 

Pleasant 

School 

School.. 

South 

North Main 

North Main 

South Main 

South Main ... 

South Main 

South Main 

South State 

South State 

Warren 


■A rt 


3 
e 



21^ 



CITY or CONCORD. 



TABLE No. 3. 

LIST OF DRAINS RECOMMENDED TO INCREASE 
THE CAPACITY OF PRESENT DRAINAGE SYS- 
TEM. 



Name. 



From. 



To. 



Giles 

Park Ridge. 
Ridge Road 



Park Ridge School 

Ridge Road Gile.s 

Forest i-j fr. Forest to Park Ridge 



Ridge Roadi 1/2 way fr. Forest to Park Park Ridge. 

[Ridge 
School Gile.s Brook 



300 |S 451 
350 590 
... 497 
325! 527 
350 542 
1325.... 



TABLE No. 4. 

LIST OF PROPOSED SEWERS REC0M:\IENDED FOR 
FUTURE SEPARATE SYSTEM. 



Name. 



From. 



Birch Iron Works Road 

Bow South 

Clinton Birch 

Field Line South Main 



Bow Line. 

South 

South 

Summit... 



Hall 

Ironworks Road..; 

Rockingham. 

South 

1 
South [Summit... 

South Bow Line. 

South Main McKinley. 

South Main Summit... 

Total ■ 



To. 



900 



Clinton 

Rockingham 

Summit 

Hall 400 

Pump. Station..' 

Birch |.... 

South Main ....].... 

Rockingham ... ' 

Bow — 

Rockingham . . . ; — — 

Near Bow Line. ! 

Bow Line 65o!.... 

1050 900 



1400 
1450 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
HIGHWAYS. 



To the Cit[i Contiril : 

Gentlejeex : lu submitting tliis aunual report I am glad to 
state that the year 1905 has seen the erection and completion 
of a new stable for the highway department which has been 
needed for a number of years. The new stable is a modern 
structure and very convenient in every way, and the greatly 
improved conditions are certainly appreciated. The city de- 
cided to move the old sheds from the lot on School Street to 
the new for storage purposes and a work shop, and a bank wall 
was built uuder the sheds. When these are fully repaired and 
painted they will be convenient and well suited to the needs of 
the department. Considerable grading was necessary around 
the buildings, and a large part of this was done with the ashes 
collected by the garbage teams. Much more grading should 
be done on the lot another year. 

The amounts appropriated in 1905 for the various kinds of 
work of the department were about the same as in other years. 
From the amount for general maintenance beside the usual 
necessary repairs, two new bank walls were built. One at East 
Concord on Penacook Street at an expense of $368.93, and the 
other at Penacook on Main Street which cost S684.83. Con- 
siderable grading was done with stone chips through West Con- 
cord village which has put that part of North State Street in 
very good condition. Quite extensive work was done on Rum- 
ford Street in cutting and grading, and the same kind of work 



214 CITY OF CONCURI). 

was done on White Street. A piece of hardening was put in on 
the river road at Penacook. When the new Kent fountain was 
put in the old watering trough was removed and placed at the 
junction of North Main and Penacook streets. A plot of land 
around it has been graded and it greatly improves the appear- 
ance of that section. A new trough was also put in at the 
junction of North State and Fiske streets. 

A number of culverts on the outlying roads had to be re- 
built and repaired, and several bridges also were repaired. 
The following list shows the repairs on bridges. 

Loudon bridge over Merrimack River, repairing . .$23.70 
Loudon bridge over Merrimack River, repairing road- 
way ......... 451.44 

Pembroke bridge over Merrimack River, repairing . 20. (i9 
Crescent Street bridge over canal, Penacook, re- 

plauking . . . . . . . . ;U.22 

Borough bridge, Penacook, repairing . . . 2.10 
Main Street bridge over Coutoocook, Penacook, re- 
pairing . . . . . . . . r.l.Ol) 

Main Street bridge over Coutoocook, Penacook, re- 
pairing roadway . . . . . . ll.'i.lT 

Twin bridge over Coutoocook, Penacook, repairing . ('(7.34 
Twin bridge over Coutoocook, Penacook, repairing 

stone work ....... 41.03 

Twin bridge over Contoocook, Penacook, repairing 

roadway . . . . . . . .1)6.00 

Ash brook bridge on Hopkinton new road, repairing . 8.53 
" Mose Brown" bridge over Turkey River, repairing G.33 
Bridge over Turkey River on Clinton Street, repairing 5.18 
Bridge over Turkey River on Iron Works road, re- 
pairing ........ 8.41 

Bridge over Turkey River on Stiekney Hill road, re- 
pairing . . . . . . . . 18.71 

Clough's Mill bridge over Soucook River, repairing . 32.44 
New bridge over Hackett Brook, Penacook Intervale 

District . . . . . . . .170.77 

Bridge on Penacook Street, East Concord, repairing 4. GO 



HKfHWAY OKPAIITMEXT. 



215 



Uridge on Pembroke Street, East Coucord, repaiiiug $25. G8 
Bridge on Mills Street, East Coucord, repairing . 23. 34 
Bridge on Penacook road, Hoit District, replanking . 9.47 

Tbe usual amount of work has been done on trees, a number 
having been removed and many trimmed. While we have not 
had au}' great trouble thus far with the brown-tail moth, other 
cities around here have had rather serious results from them. 
If the property owners will l)e careful to keep their trees free 
of the moths, and with careful watch of the trees in the high- 
ways, Concord may possibly be free of the pest to any great 
extent. 

A large number of catch basins were constructed the past 
season and many rebuilt. The list given below shows the 
location, size, etc., of the new ones. 



street. 



White, west side 

Wliite, east side 

Rumford 

Pillsburj- 

Allison 

Holly, north side 

Holly, south side 

White 

Broadway, east side. 

North State 

Penacook Road 

Water, east side.. . . 
North State 



At Washington. 
At Washington. 

At Garden 

At Broadway... 
At Broadway... 



At Blanchard 

At Carter 

At Pumping Station 

Between Spring and Pleasant 

Junction Hall 

Junction Fiske 



Electric Avenue iWest Concord. 

Clark West Concord. 

Lake West Concord. 



$22.15 
33.21 



18 


23.18 


18 


26.84 


18 


45.73 


18 


26.29 


18 


17.68 


5-18 


216.13 


18 


28.23 


15 


9.03 


2-16 


50.77 


16 


25.38 


18 


26.43 



All the concrete walks granted have been laid and the usual 
number of walks recoated. 

Along the line of permanent work, SoOD was appropriated 
for continuing the work of graveling the Loudon Road. On 



210 CITV OF COXt'OKI). 

the liog Road, 8600 for repairiug, and $500 for the South 
Pembroke Road. About 1,600 feet of macadam was put in 
on the Penacook Road, continuiug the work of last year. 
This brings the macadam well up toward the village, and 
another year's work would complete it to the square. The ■ 
amount expended was $2,503.77. The macadamizing of 
North State Street from Walker Street to Blossom Hill Ceme- 
tery entrance was begun this year, and although it was not 
carried as far as intended, it is a great improvement as far as 
put in, and the work should be continued another year. On 
the section from Penacook Street north, it was necessary to 
do considerable excavating on account of the clay, and the 
street railway track had to be moved. At the request of the 
street railway, the-work on that section was not begun until 
after the close of their summer travel, so that with the delay 
and the amount of excavating necessary it was impossible to 
complete the work as far as the cemetery, and therefore there 
was a balance of $1,120.14 left on this appropriation. 

A special appropriation was made for concreting Pleasant 
Street from Main to State. This is a great improvement on 
that street. The total cost of the work was $1,523.80. 

The amount of garbage collected in 1905 was about the 
same as other years. Most of the ashes collected have been 
used to good advantage in grading and filling on the city lot 
between Pleasant and Warren streets. 

The sprinkling precinct was enlarged the past season, which 
made it necessary to purchase a new sprinkler. The city now 
has 14 sprinklers, all of which are in fair condition. 

For the interest taken in the department, and the many 
courtesies toward it, I wish to thank his honor the mayor and 
the city council. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 
Commissioner of Highways. 



H If; H WAY DKPARTMENT. 



217 



Deposited with tlie city treasurer as follows 

New Hampshire State Hospital, crashed stone 

New Hampshire State Hospital, street sweep 

Boston & Maine Railroad, labor, etc 

Union School District, labor 

W. W. Critchett, dressing . 

Park French, crushed stone . 

N. E. T. & T. Co., labor, concrete, etc 

E. U. Sargent, concrete 

James H. Rowell & Co., crushed stone, 

P. H. Gendrou, crushed stone 

Mrs. G. H. Berry, concrete 

Committee on Land and Buildings, labor, etc 

J. ¥^. Symonds, grade 

G. S. Milton & Co., use of pump 

C. L. Fellows, crushed stoue 

A. C. Sanborn, concrete 

J. Phaueuf, concrete . 

Joseph Moses, concrete 

Wesley Johnson, concrete 

C. W. Follansbee, concrete . 
Mrs. J. Lewis, concrete 

D. Warren Fox, concrete 
J. H. Albin, concrete 
Welch & Sullivan, crushed stoue 
J. E. Ryan, concrete 
W. G. Elliott, concrete 
C. P. Little, use of pump 
Fred Sargent, edgestone 

E. E. Graves, concrete 
Henry A. Brown, concrete . ~ 
David O'Brien, concrete 
Frank Morrill, concrete 
M. E. Clifford & Co., repairs 
J. S. Norris, crushed stone . 
Concord Water- Works, labor. et( 
J. A. Clouo-h, concrete 



SI .-5.7.-, 

125. 00 

•28.17 

7(1. .S7 

;;o.()() 

1.00 
lO'.t.-llI 

1 (•..;;. s 

:U.:]0 

l.oO 

D.SO 

371.70 

10.00 

1.00 

52.37 

11. G3 

5.88 

i).7t» 

7.55 

22.70 



99 



ID 



23.38 

24.34 

1.50 

C..24 

23.16 

1.00 

14.08 

36.58 

19.39 

8.55 

10.79 

4.50 

2.00 

49.44 

14.32 



218 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



II. E. Fisher, old junk 

R. W. Hoit, old plank 

P. J. Donovan, concrete 

E. F. Home, concrete 

G. M. Kimball, concrete 

Mary E. Lund, concrete 

Mary Jackman, concrete 

Mary Merrill, concrete 

Mary Goodhue, concrete 

J. E. Durgin, crushed stone 

.7. H. Cobnru, second-hand wheels 

New Hampshire State Prison, gravel 

M. E. Clifford, concrete 

Harry E. Dolloff, concrete 

J. P. Kelly, concrete . 

C H. Johnson, concrete 

B. F. Adams, concrete 

Wellington Carpenter, concrete 

Mrs. F. W. Dudley, concrete 

J. Conn, concrete 

George F. Thompson, drawing wood 

City Sewer Department, labor 



So2.30 

a. 00 

12.73 

10.18 

28.35 

36.68 

33.75 

14.07 

14.07 

1.00 

10.00 

.50 

9.35 

6.30 

12.80 

i).19 

11.32 

15.85 

14.25 

12.32 

1.00 

1.43 



$1,511.04 



FINANCrAL KEPOKT OF THE HIGH- 

AVAY departme:n^t. 



gp:neral maintexance. 

Appropriatiou $22,000.00 

Transferred from permanent work. South Pembroke 

Road 464.115 

Transferred from permanent work. Bog Road . 5. OR 
Transferred from permanent work. North State 

Street 792.82 

Transferred from sidewalks and crossings, new . 184,87 

Transferred from sidewalks and crossings, repair . 64.78 

Transferred from trees . . . . . 19.58 

Transferred from catch basins . . . . 111.18 



$2;3,644.14 



Expenditures 



Central District. 
General Repaius. 



Labor pay rolls . . . .87,343.03 

Eyeless Tool Co., picks and handles . 22.65 

Hugh Tallant, plank for drag . . 6.75 

E. C. Eastman, office supplies . . 3.65 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing, etc. . 72.25 

C. F. Nichols, supplies ... .75 

Geo. E. Carter, office supplies . . 3.85 

Rumford Printing Co., book . . 18.50 

N. E. T. & T. Co., use of telephone . 43.95 
Alfred Clark, commissioner, postage, 

express, etc. ..... 17.40 



220 



CITY OF CONCUKD. 



J. E. McShane, shoeiug horses . 

W. A. Cbambeilin, rubber stamps 

L. A. Sanders, bay . 

R. J. Macquire, veteriuaiy servi( 

II. H. Blake, hay 

E. H. Ruunells, moAviug 

Mark Upton, sawdust 

Geo. D. Huntley, repairs . 

Thompson-Hoague Co., supplies 

D. AValdo White, grain, etc. 
Joseph T. Walker, hay 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs and su) 

plies .... 
J. R. Hill Co., harnesses . 
A. B. Black, repairs 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs 
Marl Chase, gravel 
Concord Water- Works, water 
Town of Hopkinton, marl . 
Morrill & Danforth, premium on i)ol 

cies .... 
R. S. Emery, plank . 
C. H. Martin & Co., paint, etc 
Geo. W. Cilley, marl 
Parley Badger, gravel 

E. A, Boutwell & Sou, lumber 
Geo. F. Clark, capping stone 
Concord Fouudry & Machine Co., cast 

ing . . . . 

Samuel Holt, labor 
N. B. Cloutman, gravel 
J. P^lizabeth Hoit, gravel . 
St. Paul's School, gravel . 
Robert Crowley, coal 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 
Wood worth & Co., cement 
E. S. Tenney Co.. coal 



S 11 0.00 

1.0;-) 

G4.7;;5 

21.1)0 

65. .■)4 

21».00 

5. 05 

161.63 

42.86 

568.27 

300.84 

128.41 

60.00 

12.90 

1.10 

2.20 

23.00 

2.00 

112.50 

77.78 

7.80 

7.80 

6.80 

141.39 
4.40 

2.24 
25.25 
10.80 
91.10 

8.60 
15.50 

1.80 
70.54 

3.75 
11.00 



H 1 G n WAY 1 )i:r A UT.M KN r. 



221 



.1. yi. Stewart c^ Sons C)o., I'liDiil 

for city stable 
Harry G. P^mmoiis, blunkets 
H. C. Sturtevaut & Sou, oil 
Orr & Rolfe, labor aud supplies . 
Chas. H. Dudley, oil 
J. E. McShaue, repairing tools . 
P. Crowley, grout 
James Mercer, grade 
Ritchie & Elliott, labor 
New England Granite Works, grout 
liurt Brown, sled 
l>urt Brown, shoeing horses, repai 

etc. ..... 

J. Milnor Coit, gravel 
Hutchinson Building Co., luniljer 
Concord Electric Co., lights 
W. L. .Tenks & Co., supplies 



Culverts. 



Labor pay rolls 

Mark M. Blanchard, oil 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe 



>522.71 

H.DO 

7.00 

3. Go 

.75 

2.50 

!».00 

8.20 

."^4.00 

28.50 

75.00 

1 45.41) 
12.80 
1'.>.79 

204.23 
94.05 



$10,408.8,S 



S2G3.20 

.56 

58.28 



$322.04 



Sidewalks and Crossings. 

Labor pa}' rolls, repairingsidewalks . $178.43 

" ^ building sidewalks . 182.58 

" " repairing crossings . 1.00 

•' "■ building crossings . 8.00 



$.•'.70.01 



La])or pay rolls 



Si(;\^ 



$5.r 



Labor pay rolls 



$43.88 



I'lrl CITY OF CONCOIID. 

WATKruNG Troigiis and DinxKix<; Focxtaixs. 

Laboi- pay rolls .... .$109.82 
Concord Water- Works, water . . 150.00 
Woodwortb «& Co., cement . . 4.20 
Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe . . 2.80 
Geo. B. Quimby, use of watering trough 3.00 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., foun- 
tain 100.00 

Ritchie & Elliott, labor . . . 4.00 

E. H. Randall, repairs . . . 26.50 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies . 16.27 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies . . .45 

GlTTEUS. 

Labor pay rolls, repairing . . . $75.56 

" " cleaning . . . .'578.72 

" " paving . . . 51.41 

People & Patriot Co., advertising . 1.20 



Bridges. 

Labor pay rolls . . . . $87.12 

Concord Electric -Co., lights . . 39.98 

Hutchinson Building Co., lumber . 17.97 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing concrete 

roadway ..... 451.44 

E. A. Boutwell & Son, lumber . . 16.32 



$417.04 



$506.89 



$612.83 



Macadam. 



Labor pay rolls, repairing 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil 
Robei't Crowley, coal 



?343.65 

.65 

14.00 



$358.30 



WAY DEPAKTiMENT. 



223 







\V INTER P.XrENSE. 






Labor iJJiy i 


■oils, breakiDg roads . 




*503.77 




" 




plowiDg walks . 




146.00 




.. 




slioveliDg u-alks 


and 










crossings 




r)30.89 




.. 




sanding walks . 




492.42 




c; 




leveling snow . 




330.55 




'' 




rolling snow 




9G.54 




ii 




snowing bridges 




17. G4 




- 




draining gutters 




1,020.33 




Miss Kuima 


H. 


Osgood, sand 




13.00 




A. E. iMaxani, 


rent of land 




12.00 














$3,109.14 



Penacook Distinct. 



(Jenei!ai. Kei'air- 

Labor pay rolls 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, etc. 

George A. Carter, use of plow 

D. F. Dudley, gravel 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies 

Strattou & Co., sand, etc. 

J. E. Brown, repairing tools 

C. H. Barnett, labor 

Sanborn Bros., powder 

R. E. Gale, supplies 

Thomas H. Murray, grade 

Thompson-Hoague Co., plow points 



Culverts. 



Labor pa}' rolls 



$053.45 

3.40 

1.50 

17.50 

12.25 

7.24 

7.90 

15^30 

.75 

1.90 

2.50 

11.20 

.85 



Sidewalks and Crossings. 
Labor pay rolls, repairing .... 



1735.74 



$42.63 



$09.81 



CITY OF CONCOi; 


:d. 




Fences. 




S15.23 


posts 

5 . . . 




1.90 
.24 



224 



Labor pay rolls 

E. D. Clough & Co., posts 

D. Warren Fox, nail 



Waterinc; Troughs and Drixkixo Folxtaixs 

Labor pay rolls .... .$4.06 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, use of watering 
trough ...... 

T. S. Holland, use of watering trougl: 

Concord Water- Works, water 

Isaac Baty, repairs .... 



(tUTTERS. 

Labor pay rolls, repairing . . . S35.01 

Labor pay rolls, cleaning . . . 37o..">7 



*17, 



3.00 


3.00 


40.00 


4.10 



Bridges. 

Labor pay rolls . . . . $77.67 

J. E. Brown, sharpening tools . . 1.75 

Foote, Brown & Co., cement . . 6.58 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights . 50.00 

8. G. Sanborn, plank . . . 23.04 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing concrete 

roadwa}' . . . . . 227.17 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber . . r.».OS 



Bank Wall. 






$457.9D 


. 


30.00 



$54.16 



$410.58 



$405.29 



Macadam. 
Labor pay rolls, repairing ..'... S53.13 



Labor pay rolls 
P. Crowley, grout 



IllCHWAV DETAllTJrHXT. 



"\V. I). Ciuniinglumi, express 
.1. K. lirowu, sharpeniug tools 

C. M. .^ A. W. Rolfe, Inmbei- 

D. Warreu Fox, supplies . 
P'oote, Brown &, Co., cemeut 
Ford & Kimball, fence posts 
P. Crowley, capping stone 
F. M. Morse & Co., oil 
Isaac Baty, labor and supplies 



$1.55 

6.74 

16.13 

5.55 

64.35 

24.54 

76.40 

.70 

.88 



$684.83 



AViNTER Expense. 



breaking roads . 




$64.12 




leveling snow . 




135.25 




l)lowiug walks . 




59.94 




draiuiug gutters 
sanding walks . 




202.17 
136.63 




snowing bridges 




7.11 




sboveling walks 


and 






crossings 




8.21 


$613.43 







West Concord District. 



Gexehai. Bepairs 



Labor pay rolls . ■ . 

Mrs. Jennie P. Rowe, gravel 
J. H. Harrington, grade 
P. Crowley, repairing tools 
J. M. Crossman, repairing tools 
AV. L. .lenks & Co., pipe . 



'22.86 

.80 

1.00 

1.98 

3.85 

10.43 





Cllvekts. 




Labor pay lolls 




$5.60 


'rhom[)S(>n-Hoague Co. 


pipe 


7.20 



$740.92 



,S0 



226 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Sidewalks and Crossings. 
Labor pa}' rolls, repairing sidewalks . 

Watering Troughs and Drinking vFountain; 



812. '13 



Labor pa}' rolls 
Concord Water-Works, Avater 
W. L. Jenks & Co., pipe . 
Concord Electric Co., lights 



Gutters. 
Labor pay rolls, cleaning 

Winter Expense. 



$23.33 

40.00 

3.84 

15.9i» 



^aboi 


p^y 


rolls 


breaking roads 
plowing walks 
sanding walks 
snowing bridges . 
draining gutters . 


. $208.20 
75.17 
31.53 
16.00 
62.48 







S83.1G 



806.59 



$393.38 



East Concord District. 



Labor 



pay 



oils, breaking roads . 


^73.90 


plowing walks 


28.00 


sanding walks 


20.67 


shoveling walks and 




crossings . 


12.00 


draining gutters . 


6.17 


general repairs 


407.87 


repairing fences . 


3.33 


cleaning gutters . 


21.00 


repairing culverts 


C>J){\ 


repairing sidewalks 


93.39 


repairing bridges . 


12.81t 


building bank wall 


293.78 



HIGHWAY DEPAl^TMENT. 



22' 



P. Crowley, grout for wall 

New Euglaud Granite AVorks, grout for 

wall . . 

Wood worth & Co., cement for wall 
Tiiompson-Hoague Co., pipe for wall 
Ford & Kimball, fence posts 
Fred Carter, lighting street lamp . 
C. R. Robinson, water for trough . 
Orr & Rolfe, repairs on trough 
J. M. Lacroix, sharpening tools . 
Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe 
Shad M. Gate, sharpening tools 
W. L, Jenks & Co., pipe 
•loiin T. Gate, lumber . 



S17.()() 

4.00 
25.00 

(5.40 
18.38 

7.50 
20.00 

G.53 

1.95 

r,.20 

2.42 
5.10 

a(;.42 



Sl,l;'.3.46 



Penacook Intervale District. 



Labor pay rolls, breaking roads 
'^ " general repairs 

" " building bridge 

Ai .]. Smith, use watering trough 
Robinson & Sanborn, lumber 



S14.'.)3 




17.04 




77.13 




3.00 




1)8.65 






$210.75 






$23,644.14 



East Concord Intervale District. 



Labor pay rolls, breaking roads 


$45.00 


;, 


general repairs 


66.53 


.. 


repairing bridges . 


7.11 


" 


building culverts . 


28.84 


Scott French, 


breaking road 


4.00 


Frank Fanny, 


gravel . 


3.70 


Frank Fanny, 


use watering trough 


3.00 



$158. 1{ 



228 



CITY OF CONCOllD. 



Mountain District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads . . $94.39 

" '^ general repairs . . 1G1.48 

" '' repairing culverts . 20.13 

F, P. Virgin, use watering trough . 3.00 



•$279.00 



Holt District. 



Labor pay rolls, breaking roads 
'' '' general repairs 

"■ " repairing bridges 

C. H. Abbott, bridge plank . 

Fred Mayo, use watering trough 



-1555.42 
123.82 

9.44 
11.14 

3.00 



^202. 82 



Virgin District. 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs 



$86.11 



Sanborn District. 



Labor pay rolls, breaking roads 
" " general repairs 

F. AV. Sanborn, dynamite 
David Sanborn, plank . 



$28.44 

126.32 

4.00 

8.00 



$166.76 



Potter Street District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads . . $43.85 

" '■' general repairs . . 135.93 

John T. Tenney, gravel, etc. . . 1.50 

.lohn T. Tenney, use watering trough . 3.00 

,Iohn T. Batchelder, grade . . . 2.96 

W. L. Jenks & Co., pipe . . . 13.68 



$200.92 



HIGHWAY DKPAKTMKNT. 229 



Hot Hole Pond District. 



Labor pay rolls, breaking roads . . $11.87 

" " general repairs . . 10.66 



Egypt District. 

Lal)or pa}- rolls, breaking roads . . ■ ■S.J6.S7 

'' '• general repairs . . .".o.T.'! 

(Jeo. (t. Jenness. use watering trough . 1.5.00 



Horse Hill District. 

Labor pa}- rolls, breaking roads . . $48.47 

" •' general repairs . . 68.40 

K. W. Hoit, o-ravel . . . . l.OO 



$22.5; 



$107.60 



$117.96 



Mast Yard District. 

Francis Runnells, use watering trough . . $3.00 



Number Four District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads . . $118.44 

" '' general repairs . . 105.68 

1314.12 



SALARY CXJMMISSIOXER. 

Appropriation $1,400.00 

Expenditures : 

Alfred Clark, salary . . . . . '^l 400.00 



230 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



TREES. 
Appropriation ....... 

Expenditures : 

Central District. 

Labor pay rolls .... S442.0S 

W. L. Jenks & Co., rope . . . 12. 6i) 

Western Cofrau, liliuof saws . . 1.5.") 



Penacook District. 



Labor pay rolls 



Transferred to general maintenance 



Appropriation 
Expenditures : 



CATCH-BASINS. 



Central District. 



$.jOO.OO 



$45G.;V> 



$24.10 

,$480.42 
19.58 

S500.00 



; 1,500. 00 



Labor pay rolls, cleaning . 


S47G.08 






" " repairing . 


22. (;5 






" " building 


14G.89 






" " rebuilding 


39.82 






Edsou jAIanufacturing Co., hose, etc. 


84.44 






Boston & Maine R. R., freight . 


.75 






Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe 


43.45 






AVoodworth & Co., cement 


28.75 






Concord Foundry & Machine Co. 








catch-basin outfits 


132.85 






Rowell & Plummer, labor 


32.92 






Samuel Holt, brick 


123.20 






A. H. Brittou & Co., hose 


G.OO 






Concord Coal Co., slabs 


1.38 










$1 


139.18 



HIGHWAY DEI'AIIT-MEXT. 



231 



Panacook 


District. 




Labor pay rolls, cleaniug . 




$g;).29 


" '• repairing . 




1.17 


^' building . 




40.12 


(xeorge Neller, mason work 




19.00 


K. E. Gale, pipe 




5.90 


Thompsou-Hoague Co., pipe 




15.20 



$144.68 



West Concord District. 

Labor pay rolls, cleaning . . . $10.62 

building . . . 53.22 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

catch-basin outfits . . . 24.45 

Dickerman ifc Co., cement . . 3.80 

W. L. Jenks & Co., pipe . . . 8.89 

Woodworth & Co., cement . . 1.25 



East Concord District. 

Labor pay rolls, cleaning 

Transferred to general maintenance 



$102.23 



$2.73 

$1,388.82 
111.18 

$1,500.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 

Appropriation •t2,000.00 

Expenditures : 

Central District. 

Labor pay rolls, grading for concrete 

walks 173.61 

Labor pay rolls, setting edgestoue . 58.07 



2o2 CITY OF CONCORD. 

J. H. Rowell & Co.. coDCiete walks . 8860.54 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete cross- 

iDgs ...... 300.53 

Whidden Gianite Co., curbing . . 21.00 

P. Crowlev, curbing . • . . 180. i)0 

-si, 509.05 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay rolls, setting edgestone . $40.19 

P. Crowley, curbing . . . . 40.77 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete walks . 192.78 
J. H. Rowell ct Co., concrete cross- 

ino's ...... 25.74 



i?;305.48 



$1,815.13 
Transferred to general maintenance . . . 184.87 

82.000.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, RLPAIR. 

Appropriation $1,500.00 

Expenditures : 



Central District. 

Labor pay rolls, resetting edgestone 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing walks 
J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing cross 

ings ..... 
J. H. Rowell t<: Co., repairing roadway 



810.71 
1,159.35 

110.51 
10.57 
81,303.14 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay rolls, repairing walks for 

concrete . . . . . ^05.71 

J. H. Rowell tt Co., repairing walks . 00.57 



HKillWAV Dl-:i"Ain\^II-:NT. 



233 



J. 11. Kowell (X: Co.. iv[).airiim' eross- 
ino's ...... 



Transferred to oeueral niainteiuuice 



sr>.S(t 



*1?;2.08 

$1,435.22 
64.78 

fKoOO.OO 



PERMANENT WORK. 



Penacook Road. 



Appropriation ..... 
Transferred from permanent work, 
North State Street 

Expenditures : 

Labor pay rolls 

D. AVarren Fox, supplies . 
Robert Crowley, coal 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freiglit 
Alfred Clark, commissioner, express 
etc. ...... 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, stakes . 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil . 
F. INI. Morse & Co., oil 
J. E. lirown, sharpening tools 

E. E. Davis, coal 

C. G. Davis, painting sign 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies 

R. E. Gale, pipe 

George Neller, mason work 

Concord Foundry & INIaebine Co., catcl 

basin outfits . . . 

Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co., re 

pairs ..... 



•S 2,0 00. on 



$2, 258. in 

10.18 

77.00 

.50 

10.50 
3.00 

15.12 
2.22 
1.70 

32.70 

.75 

5.06 

29.45 

28.1»0 

24.00 
4.50 



,503. 



)03.7' 



234 



CITY' OF CONCORD. 



South Pembroke Road. 



Appropriation 



Expenditures : 

Labor pay rolls, piitting in culvert 
Tbompson-Hoague Co., pipe 
Transferred to general maintenance 





$500.00 


820.05 




15.00 




404.95 






8500.00 



Loudon Road. 
Appropriation ..... S5(H).()0 
Transferred from permanent work, 

North State Street . . . i;).82 



Expenditures : 




Labor pay rolls .... 


>>VX)A2 


J. Elizabeth Hoit, gravel . 


20.70 


Bog Road. 




Appropriation ..... 


• 


Expenditures : 




Labor pay rolls .... 


8513.52 


Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe 


42.32 


N, B. Cloutman, gravel 


38.20 


Transferred to general maintenance 


5.96 



8513.82 



8513.82 



8600.00 



8600.00 



North State Street. 



Appropriation 



85,(iOU.(»0 



Expenditures : 

^abor pay rolls, excavating . . 8789.77 

backfilling . . 242.30 

'' " macadamizing . . 2,199.74 



HKiHWAY 1)i:i'Ai:t.mi:n' 



235 



Labor pay rolls, building catcii l)asiii 

'* '' putting in drain 

Nutting & Ilayden, hammers 
Jioston & Maine Railroad, freight 
A. B. Black, repairs 
Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co., iv 

pairs ..... 
Hutchinson Building Co., stakes 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co. 

grates, etc. .... 
W. L. Jenks t^- Co., supplies 
A. H. Brittou & Co., supplies 
Acme Road Machinery Co., grease, etc 
'Robert Crowley, coal 
Page Belting Co., tallow, etc. 
C. H. Martin & Co., oil . 
Cxeorge J. Sargent Estate, gravel and 

cobble .... 

J. Elizabeth Hoit. gravel . 
K. H. Larkin, agent, oil 
Thompson-Hoague Co., supplies 
Susan G. Perkins, gravel . 
Transferred to permanent work, Pena 

cook Road 
Transferred to permanent work, Lou 

don Road .... 
Transferred to general maintenance 
Balance on deposit 



825.12 

10.82 

!l.00 

2.80 

12G.21 

17.00 
12.45 

23.80 
20.38 
33.47 

8.50 

244.59 

14.25 

1.30 

7.30 
30.50 
15.40 
35.76 

9.40 

3.77 

13.82 
792.82 
309.73 



$5,000.00 



Concreting Pleasant Street. 

Appropriation, as per Joint Resolution No. 730 . 

Expenditures : 

Labor pay rolls, excavating . . $107.22 

" " macadamizing . . 402.83 

" " ' resetting edgestone . 2.54 

" rebuildino; catch basins 11. OC, 



81,523.80 



236 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Labor pay rolls, paviug gutters . . >;42.rj;) 
Plonio Specialty Maiiufacturiug Co., 

belt dressiDg .... $20.00 

Page Belting Co., repairs . . . 1.3.93 

Ford & Kimball, man-hole cover . 2.93 

D. Waldo White, cement ... 2.60 

Robert Crowley, coal . . . 13.50 

C. H. Martin & Co., oil . . . .65 

Woodworth & Co., cement . . 2.50 
Concord Foundr}' & Machine Co., catch 

basins outfit . . . . . 4.80 
J. H. Rowell & Co.. concreting road- 
way .S9(J.71 



$1,523.80 



GARBAGE. 

Appropriation S5, 700.00 

Deposited from collections . . 201.87 

Expenditures : 

Deficiency, 1904 account . . . 842.57 

Labor pay-rolls, collecting garbage . 1,901.96 

" *■' collecting paper . 219.73 

" " burning paper . . 82.42 

*■' " leveling ashes . . 559.07 

'' '' cleaning crossings . 536.85 
" "■ cleaning streets with > 

patrol carts . . 958.59 

"• " sweeping pavements . 50.75 

" " cleaning gutters . 1,350.70 

D. Waldo White, grain, etc. . . 88.60 

A. H. Britton & Co., iron and labor . 9.33 

A. B. Black, street cleaner . . 20.50 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight . .42 

Abbot-Downing Co., refilling broom . 20.00 

H. Thompson, refilling broom . . 20.00 

H. Thompson, brooms . . . 14*51 

Balance carried to 1906 account . 25.87 



85,901.87 



901.8; 



H KiH WAY DErARTMENT. 



237 



SPKIXKLIXC. 

Appropriation S-"), 000.00 

l^>alance from lltoi .... 083.88 

Expenditures : 

Labor pay rolls, re})airino; and i)aintin<2; 

carts S80.(51 

Labor pay rolls, repairiug staudpipes . 163.41 

Labor pay rolls, sprinkling . . ;'), 714.23 

C. H. Martin & Co., paint, etc. . 32,(30 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairing carts . 79. "jO 
Samuel Eastman & Co., couplings, etc. 18.2.") 
Chandler Eastman & Sons, new sprink- 
ler and repairs .... .■>i)8.00 

J. T. Walker, bay .... 8.5.46 

George D. Huntley, repairing carts . 4.7.5 

The Fairbanks Co., valves . . 7-5.02 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight . . 1.76 

J. B. Cunningham Co., valve boxes . 16.08 

Orr & Rolfe, labor on standpipes . 17.27 

G.S. Milton & Co., labor and supplies ;57.43 

D. Waldo AVhite, grain, etc. . . 133.7.5 
Ross W. Cate, shoeing horses . . 36.00 
Concord Water-AV^orks, water for stand- 
pipes 700.00 

Balance on deposit . . " . 



*6,283.88 



•So, 



505.02 
687.06 



$6,283.88 



RECORD OF LABOR ON STREETS. 
Ward One. 



Si'RiXii .Street. 
General repairs 
Building sidewalks 

Simmer Street. 
General repairs 



*6.36 
4.73 



3.83 



238 CITY OF CO^^COED. 

High Street. 

General repairs $16. IG 

Borough Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 18.57 

Walnut Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . .S.02 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 10.20 

Union Street. 

General repairs . . . . ... ;').40 

Charles Street. 

General repairs , . . . . . 3.42 

Centre Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 2.31 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 15.71) 

East Canal Street. 

General repairs ...... 8.38 

Summit Street. 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 5.16 

RoLFE Street. 

General Repairs . . . . . . 42.9() 

Winter Street. 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 6.44 

West Canal Street. 

General repairs ...... 7.69 

Crescent Street. 

General repairs ...... 11.53 

Elm Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 41.98 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 118.9;') 

Pleasant Street. 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 2.49 



7, 


.9(5 


7, 


.38 


4.57 


6 


.55 


1 


.71 



IIICnWAV DKl'AKTMENT. 239 

FOAVLEK StREKI. 

General repairs . . . . . . $1;},15 

Penacook Street. 

General repairs ...... 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 

Merrimack Strep:t. 

General repairs ...... 

Repairing sidewalks . . . 

Repairing macadam ..... 

Warren Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . •.)..')(> 

Merrimack Avem e. 

General repairs . . . . . . 10.1)7 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 116.19 

Paving gutters . . . . . . 17.17 

AVashingtox Street. 

General repairs ...... 26.53 

Grading .....".. 58.04 

Back Road. 

General repairs ...... 2.22 

River Road. 

General repairs ...... 72.52 

Hardening . . . . . . . 145.97 

Horse Hill Road. 

General repairs ...... 61.36 

Penacook Road. 

Repairing macadam ..... 26.56 

Macadamizing ...... 2,503.77 

West Main Street. 

General repairs ...... 29.84 

Scales Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 3.82 



240 CITY OF COXCOItD. 

Main Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . $19.15 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 21.08 

Building sidewalks ...... 64.66 

Building bank wall 684.83 

South Main Street. 

General repairs ...... 8.09 

Ward Two. 

Shaker Road. 

General repairs ...... S98.30 

Locke Road. 

General repairs ...... 10.86 

Repairing culverts ...... 37.78 

Canterbury Road. 

General repairs ...... 8.78 

Pond Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 7.02 

Sewall's Falls Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 7.68 

Sanhorn Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 18.83 

Penacook Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . I.'jI.IO 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 73.81 

Building bank wall ;w;8.93 

Pembroke Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 57.69 

Curtis Road. 

General repairs ...... 8.75 

Eastman Street. 

General repairs ...... 4.94 



HIGHWAY DEl'AltTMKXT. 241 

Kear,<akge Street. 

General repairs ...... $10.98 

Portsmouth Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . ;)0.67 

SCHOOLHOUSE ROAI). 

(ieneral repairs ...... 8.18 

Penacook Road. 

Grading (Hoit District) (30.12 

General repairs (Mountain District) . . 25.40 

General repairs (Sanborn District) . . . 87.05 

(iRAiiA.Ai Road. 

Grading SIMS 

Mountain Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 34.16 

3Ieadow Hill Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 18.22 

Turtletown Road. 

Building culvert 21.82 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 19.31 

Ward Three. 
Highland Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . $2.71 

Bog Road. 

General repairs ...... 1G.42 

(.Quaker Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 1.51 

Second Street. 

General repairs . , . . . . 11.56 

West Parish Road. 

General repairs . . . . , . 5.60 

16 



24f 



CMTV OF CONCOini 



Lake Street. 

Geoeral repairs 
HuTCHiNs Street. 

General repairs 
KxKiHT Street. 

General repairs 
Ceark Street. 

General repairs 
Electric Aaenue. 

General repairs 
Beech Hill Egad. 

General repairs 
Carter Hill Road, 

General repairs 
Saltmarsh Road. 

General repairs 
River Road. 

General repairs. 
Sewall's Falls Roa 

General repairs 
Sand Bank Road. 

General repairs 
Palm Street. 

General repairs 

Grading 

Long Pond Road. 

General repairs 
Nljiber Five Road. 

General repairs 
Number Four Road, 

General repairs 



si:j.04 

7.4:5 

.71 

.62 

.4r, 

4r..;u 

;].oo 

:V2J>1 

27.4r. 

20.2:) 

8. 30 

3.11 
43.10 

r)i.48 

30.05 



llKlilWAV DKI'AirniENT. 248 

Penacook Road. 

General repairs ...... 81.09 

XoKTH State Stkkkt. 

General repairs ...... 45.46 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 8.70 

Grading witli stone chips .... 484.40 

Fairi!axks Street. 

Grading 18.74 

Ward Four. 
Rollins Street. 

General repairs ...... S0..")7 

Ridge Roai>. 

General repairs . . . . . . (;.44 

I'nion Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 1.73 

Church Street. 

General repairs ...... ;U.ll 

Building sidewallvs ..... 320.41 

Franklin Street. 

Grading 32.15 

White Street. 

Grading 408.88 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 10.38 

Harrod Court. 

General repairs . . . . . . 9.85 

North Spring Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 31.67 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 250.24 

Walker Street. 

General repairs ...... 4.G8 

^Montgomery Street. 

General repairs ...... 6.88 



244 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Court Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . $6.81 

Pearl Street. 

General repairs ...... 4.44 

Lyndon Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . G.91 

Tremont Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . .'>2.()6 

Academy Street. 

General repairs .....'. 41.84 

Vernon Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 2.27 

Fiske Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 18.13 

Jackson Street. 

General repairs ...... 34.50 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 4().97 

Bradeey Street. 

General repairs ...... 4.12 

Pitman Street. 

General repairs ...... .52 

P^SSEX Street. 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 34.05 

Beacon Street. 

General repairs ...... 

Grading ....... 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 

North Maix Street. 

Repairing macadam ..... 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 



27.06 


20.40 


87.26 


127.43 


D.Ol 



HKiHWAY DEPARTMENT. 245 



"Washington Strkkt. 
General repairs 
Grading 
Repairing sidewalks 

RuMFORD Street. 
General repairs 
Building sidewalks 

North State Street. 
General repairs 
Repairing sidewalks 
Building sidewalks 
Macadamizing 

Ferry Street. 
General repairs 



Ward Five. 



Sio.y 


,(;.") 


HI, 


,.")i 


rtCu 


*>3 


23. 


,94 


11.3, 


,68 


31, 


.71 


74. 


,53 


132. 


2;') 


1,440.94 



Park Street. 

Repairing macadam ..... $5.90 

Liberty Street. 

€4eneral repairs ...... 2.79 

Building sidewalks ...... 36.09 

Fremont Street. 

Grading 22.90 

Tahanto Street. , 

General repairs . . . . . . 4.83 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 10.28 

Merrimack Street. 

General repairs ...... 1.61 

Duroin Avenue. 

General repairs . . . . . . 3.56 

Orchard Street. 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . 47.75 



246 CITY OF (JONCOIIT). 

Pine Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . ' $2.02 

Repairing sidewalks * . . . . . 88. G 7 

Grading 41.22 

Giles Street. 

General repairs ...... 40. 8;") 

Summit Street. 

Building sidewalks . . . . . (lo.ST 
Holt Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . ' J)7 

AVarren Street. 

General repairs ...... 11. .")7 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 14.(1 7 

Hanover Street. 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 7.66 

West Washington Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 2.43 

School Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . . 8.71 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 22.26 

North Spring Street. 

General repairs ...... 2.06 

North Main Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 17.72 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 42. .■i2 

Green Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 11.26 

Building sidewalks . . . . . 87.27 

Macadamizing ...... 196.38 

Rlmford Street. 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 29.88 

Paving gutters ...... 32.56 



HKiMWAV DEl'Airr.MKNT. 247 

Noinii Staik Stkekt. 

Geueral repairs ...... $25.35 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 24.51 

Pr.EAS.vxT Street. 

Geueral repairs . . • • • • 44,1)0 

Repairiug sidewalks ..... 1).G6 

Cextre Street. 

Geueral repairs . . . • • . 48.50 

Building sidewalks 65.61 

Ward Six. 
J.ixcOEX Street. 

General repairs . . . . . • $0.40 

^loNROE Street. 

General repairs ...... 1.3.82 

Pierce Street. 

Geueral repairs . . . . • • 27.30 

Wall Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . •1.15 

TiiORXDiKE Street. 

Geueral repairs ...... 

Repairiug sidewalks ..... 

Gr.ovE Street. 

Geueral repairs ...... 

Repairiug sidewalks ..... 

Perlev Street. 

(leueral repairs . ' . 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 

Laurel Street. 

(ieneral repairs ...... 

Repairiug sidewalks ..... 

Fayette Street. 

General repairs ...... 

Repairiug sidewalks ' . 



15.97 


13.26 


1.53 


13.68 


10.22 


46.36 


16.82 


47.25 


9.41 


8.01 



248 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Thompson Stuekt. 

Geueral repairs . . . ' . . . Sl.oH 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . 2.2(t 

Elm Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . -s-l..').") 

CoNCOKi) Street. 

General repairs ...... 17.68 

Repairing sidewalks ..... IM.20 

Downing Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 8.93 

South Main Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 19.82 

South Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 146.34 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 155.75 

South Spring Street. 

General repairs ...... 1. '.»'.• 

Building sidewalks . . . . . 34.08 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . 22.80 

South State Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 3.20 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 76.25 

Repairing niacadani ..... 31.65 

Pleasant Street. 

General repairs ...... 19.29 

Repairing sidewalks . . . ■ . . 54.28 

Ward Seven. 
McKiNLEv Street. 

Grading $50.86 

Maitla^ti) Street. 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . . 3.40 

FiSKE Road. 

General repairs ....'.. 26. .'lO 



4 


.77 


87 


.42 


43 


.32 


64.09 



ll[(;iI\VAV ItKI'AKTMKNT. 249 

.Sll.K F.VUM R0AI>. 

General repaii's ...... '$4o.o7 

Woodman Stkekt. 

General repairs ...... 12.1'.) 

"West Stkep:t. 

General repairs . . . . . . ll.fw 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 77.1.'> 

Harvard Street. 

Gradino; . . . . . . . ;)2.12 

Birch Street. 

General repairs ...... 

Grading ....... 

Iron Works Road. 

General repairs ...... 

Grading ....... 

Albin Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 10.60 

Holly Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 1.7G 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 13.04 

Mills Street. 

General repairs ...... 11.02 

South Fruit Street. 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 8.47 

Turnpike Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 17.95 

Stickney Hill Road. 

General repairs ...... 06.40 

Rebuilding culvert . . . . . . 82.08 

Dakin Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 2.06 



2r)0 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Rockingham Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . S4.00 

Carter Street. 

Building sidewalks ..... (")<». 82 

Hammond Street. 

General repairs ...... O.G'i 

DuNKEEE Street. 

Building sidewalks ..... 24.92 

Kimball Street. 

Grading ....... 6.5.14 

Building sidewalks . . . . . 33.14 

DiMOND Hill Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 106.1.') 

HoPKiNTON Road. 

General repairs ...... 40.60 

HoPKiNTON New Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . r)3.60 

Repairing culverts ...... .■>.5.95 

HoPKiNTON Old Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 35.90 

Repairing culverts . . . . . . 8.87 

Pillsbury Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 19.. 02 

Building sidewalks 20.08 

BiRCHDALE Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 7.25 

Allison Street. 

General repairs ...... 25.25 

IJuilding sidewalks ..... ;>3.09 

Broadway. 

General repairs ...... 2;]. 72 

Building sidewalks . . . . . 35.67 



HIGH WAV i)i:i'Ai: rMKXT. 251 

Watkk Stkekt. 

(ieneral repairs ...... 82.83 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . i».64 

l)owxix(; Sthekt. 

Geueral repaiis . . . . . . S.94 

Lox(; Pond Koad. 

General repairs . . ... 44.54 

South State Stuket. 

Repairing niacailani ..... 5.16 

South Street. 

Geueral repairs . . . . . . 77.H7 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 12.52 

SoiTn Main' Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 42.70 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 30.70 

Uuilding sidewalks . . . . . 99.44 

Pleasant Street. 

( General repairs . . . . . . 28.79 

liJnilding culverts ...... 83.49 

Clinton Street. 

Geueral repairs . . . . . . 210.16 

Graveling ....... 594.04 

Repairing culverts . . . . . . 25.71 

Ward Eight. 
North INIain Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . SI 1.83 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 15.98 

East Penacook Street. 

General repairs ...... 72.30 

Grading 193.24 

South Main Street. 

General repairs ...... 11.22 



*16.21 


44.45 


39.14 


G.35 


14.76 


5.27 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Pleasant Stk^-iet Extension. 

General repairs ...... 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 

Chandler Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 

CLOu<iH's Mill Road. 

General repairs ...... 

Depot Street. 

General repairs ...... 

Freight Street. 

General repaiis ...... 

Stickney Avenue. 

General repairs ...... 3.75 

Bridge Street. 

General repairs ...... 

Hill's Avenue. 

General repairs ... . . '. 

Loudon Road. 

Graveling ....... 

General .repairs ...... 

Suncook Road. 

General repairs ...... 

Sugar Bowl Road. 

General repairs ...... 

South Pembroke Road. 

Putting in culvert ...... 

Wai'd Nine. 
Wyman Street. 

Repairing sidewalks . . . . . Si. 3 7 

Auburn Street. 

General repairs ...... 23.42 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 75.50 

Highland Street. 

General repairs ...... 7.00 



209.86 


12.27 


513.82 


46.24 


104.96 


4.40 


35.05 



HIGHWAY DEl'Airr.MENT. 253 

Sxow Shoe Club Road. 

General repairs . . . . . . 816.45 

Perkins Street. 

General repairs ...... 4.98 

Albin Street. 

General repairs ...... 35.90 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 15.93 

Chestnut Street. 

General repairs ...... .59 

Bradley Street. 

General repairs ...... 5.93 

Grading 42.67 

Franklin Street. 

General repairs ...... 67.87 

Charles Street. 

Building sidewalks ...... 43.00 

Little Pond Road. 

General repairs ....... 7.64 

Long Pond Road. 

General repairs ...... 130.02 

Repairing culverts 33.28 

Walker Street. 

General repairs . . . . . . 5.72 

Penacook Street. 

General repairs ...... 10.51 

Building sidewalks ...... 53.55 

Rumford Street. 

General repairs ...... 53.49 

Cutting and grading ..... 642.70 

Repairing sidewalks ..... 8.00 

North State Street. 

General repairs ...... 31.42 

Building sidewalks ...... 53.39 

Macadamizing ...... 2,438.92 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1905. 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

CrixUILES 1{. COIIXIXG, Mayor, rv o^V/o. 
SOLON A. CARTER ... to March 31, 1901). 

HARLEY B. R013Y . . . to March 31, 190i). 

HENRY C. HOLBROOIv . to March 31, 1908. 

HENRY E. CONANT ... to March 31, 1908. 
EDSON J. HILL .... to March 31, 1907. 
GEORGE D. r>. PRESCOTT . to March 31, 1907. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY . . . to March 31, 1900. 
NATHANIEL E. :\L\RTIN . . to .ALnrcli 31, 190(;. 

SOLON A. CARTE1^^ President. 

EDSON .T. HILL, Clerl- of Bonnh 



Superintendent. 
Y. C. HASTIN(iS. 



Clerk. 
A] JOE G. COCHRAN. 



Foreman. 
PEHC V R. SANDERS. 



Inspector. 
HAUUV E. STE\'ENS. 



Engineer. 
IIKNUV A. ROWELi.. 



CONCORD AVATER BOARD. 



Date of election and len 


gth of service of members. 


Altraham (t. Jones, ex <>_r}irio, 


IST'i— three months. 




John .M. ITill* 


1 872-1 87S. 




l>enjaniin A. l\iinl)a!l 


187-2-1S7S. 




Josiab IMinot* 


1S72. Resigned Jan. K 


, 1874 


David A. Ward* 


1872-1874. ^ 




Edward L. Knowlton* 


1872. Resigned Sept. 2^ 


, 1875 


J>enjaniin 8. Warren* . 


1872-1878. 




John Kimball, (\r offirio 


1872-187G. 




Jolm Al)bott* 


1873-187(;. 




Jolin S. Russ* 


1874-1877. 




Abel ]'.. Holt* . 


1874-1877. 




Samuel 8. Kimball* 


187."). Resigned July 1 


1891 


Geo. A. Pillsbury,* ex otfirin . 


187G-1878. 




Luther P. Durgin* 


187(;-1885. 




John Kimball 


1S77. Resigned July 1, 


1891. 


William M. Chase 


1877. Resigned July 1, 


1891. 


Horace A. Brown, r.r ojficio . 


1878-1880. ^ 




James L. ]Mason* 


1878-1893. 




James K. Hill* . 


1878. Died 1884. 




Geo. xV. Cumming-s,* (\r officio, 


1880-1883. 




Edgar H. Woodman,* e.r officio, 


1883-1887. 




Joseph H. Abbot* 


1884-1893. 




(xeorge A. Young*' 


1885-1894. 




John E. Robertson, ex officio. 


1887-1889. 




Stillman Humphrey,* ex officio. 


1889-1891. 




Henry W. Clapp,* ex officio . 


1891-1893. 




Willis T>. Thompson 


1891-1895. 




AVilliam P. Fiske 


1891-1902. 




James IT. Chase* 


1891. Died in 1893. 




* Deceased. 





256 



I'lTY OF CO>X'Oi:i). 



John Whitaker* . 

Henry E. C'onant . 

Parsons B. Cogswell,* px officio, 

Solon A. Carter . 

Frank D. Abbot . 

AVilliara M. Mason 

William E. Hood 

Henry Robinson, ex officio 

Ebenezer li. Hutchinson 

Ed son J. Hill 

Albert JJ. Wood worth, ex officio, 

Xathaniel E. Martin, ex officio, 

Henry E. Conant . 

Timothy P. Sullivan 

Harry G. Sargent, ex (ffido . 

Obadiah Morrill . 

(George T>. B. Prescott . 

Harry H.Dudley . 

Xathaniel E. Martin 

Charles R. Corning, ex officio, 

Henry C. Holbrook 

Harlev B. Roby . 



189-2. Died in 190H. 




1892. Resigned Jan. 


8, 1895. 


1893-1895. 




1893. Xow in office. 




1893-1901. 




1893-1899. 




1894-1902. 




1895-1897. 




1895. Resigned Jan. 


10, 1899 


1895. Xow in office. 




1897-1899. 




1899-1901. 




1899. Xow in office. 




1899. Resigned .May 


14,1901 


1901-1903. 




1901-1905. 




1901. Xow in office. 




1902. Xow in office. 




1902. Xow in office. 




1903. Xow in office. 




1903. Xow in office. 




1905. Now in office. 





PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD. 



Josiah 3lin()t* . . 
]5enjamin A. Kimball 
Edward L. Knowlton* 
John Kimball 
lienjarain A. Kimliall 
John lvinil)all 
William P. Fiske . 
Solon A. Carter . 



1S72. Resigned .Ian. 10, 1S74. 

1874-1875. 

1875. Resigned Se]>t. 25, 1875. 

1875-1876. 

1870-1878. 

1878. Resigned July 1, 18!H. 

1891-1902. 

1902. Xow in office. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WATER-WORKS. 



Population of the city by census of 1900 . . 19,632 

Population of that portion of the city includetl 

within the water precinct, estimated . . 17,000 

Date of construction, 1872. 

Works are owned by the city. 

Source of supply, Penacook Lake, a natural l>ody of water 
containing 265 acres, situated about three miles and a half from 
the state house, and about 125 feet higher than Main Street in 
front of the state house. 

Mode of supply, gravity and jtumping to reservoir. 



CONSTRUCTIONS^. 



Cost of land damages, tlowage and water rights : 
Paid ]]. F. & D. Holden, for water rights, -$60,000.00 
Concord ]\Ianufacturing Co., for 



water rights .... 


88,000.00 


W. P. Cooledge, for mill privilege 




and land 


5,500.00 


LlumphreyX' Farnnm, for kit-shoj) 




privilege ..... 


5,000.00 


Ho wage rights around Penacook 




lake . ^ 


4,875.01 


W. P. Cooledge, Ihitchins house 




and lot 


•2,250.00 


jMary C. liowell, for land 


1,500.00 


Moses II. Bradley, 


5,000.00 


Joseph B. Walker, 


2,214.00 


John G. Hook, " 


370.00 


A. S. Ranney, "• 


1,850.00 


Alfred Roberts, 


1,275.00 


Charles E. Ballard, 


2,500.00 


Mary (t. Carter, " 


1,250.00 


Elizabeth Widraer, " 


1,564.50 


A. L. Proctor, 


450.00 


Robert Crowley, " 


8,000.00 


Miles Ilodgdon, " 


2,200.00 


heirs of Lowell Brown, " 


1,032.55 


Coffin & Little, '^ 


800.00 


<). F. Richardson, " 


100.00 


M. H. & C. R. Farnum, " 


4,500.00 


Cook & Hood, " 


1,750.00 


Charles II. Farnum, '' 


1,410.86 


Fred N. Ladd, 


800.00 


C. II. Amsden, water and Howage 




riohts 


5,000.00 



WATER DETAIITMENT. 259 

<"ust of property ami riglits of 'l^orrent 

Aqueduct Association . . S'20,000.()() 
dam, gate-house ami appurtenances oO,?;")*).!" 
conduit and gate-houses . . ■J1>,4S4.0.'') 
mains (low service main and 
pumj) main from the dam to 
Penacook Street, force main 
from the pump to the reser- 
voir, tire main through North 
and South Main sti-eets, and 
high service main from Pena- 
cook Street to Stark Street, 
Penacook) .... 182,241.70 
distribution pipe ... 835,225. 8S 

service pipe .... 49,653. IS 

reservoir 42,460.09 

pumping station, shop, staV)le 

and storehouse . . . 22,000.00 

l)um])ing machinery . . . 17,000.42 

engineering and superintendence 14,913.12 
incidentals .... 6,531.19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1906 . . !5;947,957.82 

Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a }iart of said cost 

of which the following are still outstanding : 

When due. Rate. Amount. 

dan. 1, 1906. 4, !3?10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1907, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 190S. 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1909, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1910, 4, 5,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1910, 3, 5,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1911, 4, 5,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1911. 3, 5,000.00 

April 1, 191-J, 3.i, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1913, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1914, 4, 10,000.00 



260 CITY OF CONCOrvD. 

When due. , Rate. Amount. 

Jan. 1, 1915, 4, -^10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1916, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1917, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1918, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1919, 4, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 19-20, 3, 10,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1921, 3, 5,000.00 

April 1,1921, 3^, 5,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1922, 4,' 400,000.00 

March 1, 1922, 3.J, 20,000.00 

April 1, 1922, 3^, 30,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1923, 3^, 15,000.00 

Jan. 1, 1924, 3^, 15,000.00 

-t640,000.00 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Office of tiik Board of Water Co.^imissioxehs, 

CoxcoRD, N. n., January 31, 190G. 

To His Honor the Maijor and City Council: 

The Board of Water Commissioners resi)ectfully sul)raits the 
following report of the operations of this department for the 
year 1905, accompanied by the detailed reports of the superin- 
tendent and engineer of the pumping station, which are made 
a part of this report. 

Vour attention is particularly invited to that portion of the 
superintendent's report exhibiting in detail the work of substi- 
tuting cast-iron distributing pipes for the original cement-lined 
pipes, and the largely increased capacity of the former. 

In view of the work accomplished in this direction, the Board 
is unable to discover the necessity of that pai't of the ordinance 
establishing a Board of Hydrant Commissioners and defining 
their duties, which provides that the size of an}^ pipe on which 
a hydrant is dependent for its supply shall not be decreased 
without the approval, in writing, of said last named Board. 

The thing prohibited is something that has never been done, 
never contemplated, and never would have been done in the 
absence of the ordinance. 

Upon the recommendation of the newly created Board of 
Hydrant Commissioners, we. have placed orders for twenty new 
hydrants which will be installed the coming season. 

In this connection, we would respectfully request the Coun- 
cil to carefully consider the question of hydrant service and the 
extension of that service and compensation for same in all its 
bearings. In a former communication to the Council we pointed 
out the largely increased number of hydrants in service, and 
their increased efficiency without any increase of revenue to 
the system. 



•262 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The cost of installation of oiir si)lendi(l hy<lrant service, and 
the supervision and frequent inspection of the same, is no incon- 
siderable item. The condition of the entire system is such as. 
to warrant the expectation that it will meet all reasonable de- 
mands upon it. 

The Board commends the faithful services of its employees, 
in all departments. 

Kes)>ectfully submitted, 

SOLOX A. CARTER, 
HARLEY B. ROBY, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
HENRY E. CON A XT, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE D. B. PRE8C0TT, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. :\L\RTIN, 
CHARLES R. CORNLXG, ex officio. 
Water Comnussioners\ 



KEPOHT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Wafer Conmiissioners- : 

I herewith present to you the thirty-fourth annual rej)ort of 
the operations of this department, showing tlie receipts, expen- 
ilitures and abatements, together with a statement of extensions 
and improvements made during tlie year ending December ol, 
1905. 

RECEIPTS. 
For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates ..... 

For water, from consumers by meter 

rates ..... 

From deUn(iuents 

For water used for building pur])oses 
For rents ..... 
For hay and apples 
For horse, pipe and stock sold 
For old brass and iron sold . 
For insurance returned 



Deduct abatements 



i$<29,109.08 



41,317.07 

77.91 

83.30 

43.29 

50.00 

155.04 

330.29 

1.70 



Xet receipts for 1905 . . ' . 

EXPENDITURES. 

General Expenses. 
Paid pay rolls, salaries and lal»or . . if^l 1,603.37 
S. G. Sanborn, rent of shoj) in Pen- 

acook 24.00 

Ira 0. Evans Co., printing . . 82.05 

Kumford Printing Co., books and 

printing ..... 91.25 

Frank P. .Mace, office supplies . 2.35 



*71,1G;.68 
91.24 

*71,076.44 



^1.75 


1.65 


9.60 


12.39 



264 CITY OF CONCOr.D. 

Paid George E. Carter, office supplies 
Library Bureau, office supplies 
People & Patriot Co., advertising 
bonds ..... 
Concord Electric Co., lighting- 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., telephones . . 128.70 
Smith Premier Typewriter Co., 

typewriter .... 60.00 
John C. Thorne, rubber boots . 9.00 
W. A. Thompson, rubber boots . 6.50 
Thompson & Iloague Co., hard- 
ware ..... 78.59 
W. L. Jenks & Co., hardware . 23.31 
A. H. Britton & Co., hardware . 15.12 
Joseph T. Walker, hay . . 62.32 

C. Pelissier & Co., harness . . 40.00 
F. W. Sanborn, dynamite . . 36.99 
John Swenson, dynamite . . 6.00 
H. H. Crowell, slab wood . . 15.00 
Concord Lumber Co., wood . . 12.00 

D. Waldo White, grain and straw 115.48 
Batchelder & Co., oil, etc. . . 43.44 
C. H. Martin & Co., naphtha, etc. . 16.95 
Solshine Mfg. Co., harness oil, etc. 2.75 
Woodworth & Co., cement . . 16.00 
Dickerman & Co., cement . . 8.05 
M. J. Drummond & Co., cast-iron 

pipe 12,120.63 

R. D. Wood & Co., cast-iron pipe 

and hydrants . . . . 1,969.86 
Ludlow Valve Mfg. C^o., gates and 

hydrants 1,485.55 

Builders Iron Foundry, castings . 124.82 

Ford & Kimball, castings . . 41.12 

Davis & Farnum Mfg. Co., castings 37.18 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

castings ..... 4.21 



WATER DKPAUTMENT. 



Paid Rensselaer Mfg. Co., hydrant 

Coffin Valve Co., hydrant sujjplies 
Chadwick-Boston Lead Co., pig- 
lead and lead pipe 
Richards & Co., pig lead 
J. II. Cunningham Co., wrought- 
irou pipe, valves and valve boxes 
Hays Mfg. Co., service boxes 
The Sumner-Goodwin Co., brass 
goods ..... 

Harold L. Bond & Co., tools and 

jiite 

AValdo Bros., tools 

Walworth Mfg. Co., tools 

Orr & Rolfe, fittings 

<T. S. Milton & Co., fittings . 

National Meter Co., meters and 

i-epairs .... 
Thomson Meter Co., meters . 
Hersey Mfg. Co., meters 
Henry R. Worthington, meters 
Bailey & Merryman, roofing 
C. L. Fellows & Co., mason work 
€. W. Dadmun, electrical work 
E. B. Hanchay, smith work . 
J. M. Crossman, smith work . 
Xutting & Hayden, smith work 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs . 
<ieorge D. Huntley, repairs . 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs 
W. E. Darrah, repairs . 
George L. Theobald, team work 
O. F. Richardson, team work 
Cyrus R. Farnum, team work 
PI L. Davis, team work 
E. II. Runnells, labor 
Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber and 
labor ..... 



$27.50 
4.50 

771.04 
428.13 

370.29 
200.94 

169.31 

52.52 
3.70 
1.53 
8.14 
3.89 

356.34 

327 20 

201.60 

84.00 

50.78 

19.70 

8.05 

154.63 

13.40 

9.52 

57.25 

9.50 

4.95 

4.00 

355.75 

31.30 

10.80 

4.20 

3.00 

89.74 



266 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



Paid George Abbott, Jr., painting . 
lienjamin l>ilsborough, painting 
J. II. Rowell & Co., i-epairing con 

Crete .... 

City Highway Department, repair 

ing streets 
Engineering Neics . 
Morrill <fe Danforth, insurance 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance 
Boston Bank Note Co., bond plate 
13oston &, Maine Railroad, freight 

and repairing siding . 
Fred N. Ladd, land 
Town of Webster, taxes 
A. (i. Cochran, cash paid out 
incidentals .... 



•y27.30 
4.7-2 



49.44 

5.00 

277.18 

9.40 

ey.oo 

1,585.68 

300.00 

54.00 

58.21 

178.21 



*34,935.00 



Pumping Station Expenses. 
* 1,592. 



Paid pay rolls, engineer and tireinan 
labor on fuel 
Marsh Coal Co., coal 
J. A. & A. W. Walker, coal . 
II. 11. Crowell, slab wood 
Vacuum Oil Co., oil 
Henry R. Worthington, }»acking 
I^oston & Maine Railroad, freight 

on coal .... 
Reversible Tube Cleaner Co., tube 

cleaner . . ... 

Morse Twist Drill & Machine Co. 

tools .... 

]McLeod & Henry Co., tire brick 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co.. 

brass castings 
E. II. Randall, tittings . 
W. L. Jenks & Co., su})])lies . 
Thomj)son &: Iloague Co., su])[)Hc^ 



42 

464 

353 

45 

34 



191.32 

3.00 

2.72 
(i.70 



WATfCK DEPAUTMEX' 



■2i]T 



Paid Batchelder & Co., sn])])lies . . 11.54 

Kowell ct Plurainer, work on boiler 45.75 
IJoston & ]\Iaine Railroad, repairing 

siding and freight . 30.12 
Concord Light & Power Co., light- 
ing 7. SO 

Xew England Telephone it Tele- 

gra})h Co., telephone . . 42.00 

Total expenditures for 1905 
The expenditures are divided as follows : 



-^2,891.25 



S37,82(j.25 



General Expenses. 



For care and maintenance . 




$2,355.47 


office expenses 




1,228.00 


repairs on cement-lined ])ipe 




237.41 


work at Penacook Lake 




327.21 


inspection 




660.00 


new service pipes . 




2,905.96 


new distribution pipes . 




25,009.22 


meter account 




1,222.91 


incidentals 




988.07 




$34,935.00 


Pumping Statior 


1 Expenses. 


For salaries, engineer and fireman 


. -<^1,592.00 


fuel . ^ . 




1,097.16 


oil and packing 




42.00 


repairs .... 




65.61 


repairs on siding . 




28.82 


supjdies 




15.86 


lighting and telephone . 




49.80 



91.2;) 



268 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron main and distribution pipes have been laid and 
bj'drants set during the year as follows : 

In North State Street, 

south from Penacook to near Chapel Street, 2,727 feet 20- 
inch pipe in place of 14-inch cement-lined pipe discon- 
tinued. 

Ill South State Street, 

south from West to junction with South Main Street, 809 
feet 12-inch pipe in j^lace of 8-inch cement-lined pipe 
discontinued. 

In South Main Street, 

south from junction with South State to Allison Street, 
180 feet 12-inch pipe in i»lace of 6-inch cement-lined 
pipe discontinued. 

In South Main Street, 

south from Thorndike to junction with South State Street, 
2,429 feet 10-inch pipe in place of 6-rnch cement-lined 
pi})e discontinued. 

In South Main Street, 

south from Allison to Pillsbury Street, 449 feet 10-inch 
pipe in place of 6-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Gas Street, 

east from South Main to Water Street, 550 feet 10-inch 
pi])e in place of 4-inch cement-lined })ii)e discontinued. 

In Water Street, 

south from near bridge to ITall Street, 310 feet 10-inch 
pijjc in place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Hall Street, 

south from Water to Hammond Street, 1,621 feet of 10- 
inch pipe in place of 4-inch cement-lined and iron pipe 
discontinued. 



WATER DEl'ARTMENT. 269 

Ti, JIaU's Court, 

east from North ^lain Street to Stickney AAenue, 905 feet 
10-inch pii)e. 

Ill Sticl-)ie>/ Avenue, 

south from Ilall's Court, 250 feet 10-incli pipe. 

In Bridge Street, 

east and west from Stickney Avenue, 327 feet 10-inch pipe. 

In Palm Street, West Concord, 

west from North State Street, 596 feet 6-inch pipe. 

/// Fairbanks Street, West Concord, 

north from Palm Street, 74 feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Minot Street, 

north from Pleasant Street to Odil Fellows' Home, 505 
feet 6-inch pipe in place of 4-inch cement-lined pij^e 
discontinued. 

//( Beacon Street, 

east from Jackson Street to rear Merrimack School, 428 
feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Washington Street, 

east from Rumford to Lyndon Street, 389 feet 6-inch pipe. 

1)1 Union Street, 

north from Centre to Mai)le Street, 364 feet 6-inch pipe in 
l)lace of 4-inch cement- lined pipe discontinued. 

Ill Princeton Street, 

extended south 318 feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Perlejj Street, 

west from South Main Street, 313 feet 6-inch i)ii)e in j)lace 
of 4-inch pij)e discontinued. 



270 (;ITY OF CON COED. 

In Giles Street, 

extended north from Centre Street, 300 feet G-inch pipe. 

/// Maitlihxl Street, 

extended west '290 feet 6-incli })ii)e. 

Ii> HurrlsoH Street, 

west from South State to IMorton Street, 240 feet G-incli 
j.ipe. 

1,1 North Essex Street, 

extended north to liowell Street, 44 feet G-incli pipe. 

In Boivell Street, 

west from North Essex to Kumford Street, 142 feet G-inch 
pipe. 

/// Mliiter Street, Penacooli, 

extended west 50 feet G-inch i)ii)e. 

On connectiuiis, 

257 feet 10-inch pipe; 93 feet S-inchpipe; 2G9 feet G- 
inch pipe; 28 feet 4-incli pipe; in place vi 20 G feet 
G-inch and 420 feet 4-incl\ cement-lined pii)e discon- 
tinued. 

On hydrant branches, 

442 feet G-inch i»ii>e; 123 feet G-inch and 41 feet 4-inch 
cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

On f>lon--ofs, 

S feet G-inch and 59 feet 4-inch pipe ; 5 feet G-inch dis- 
continued. 

Also, 2X8 feet of 1-inch pipe. 



WATKi; i>ki'Ai:tment. -211 

Tweuty-seven new hydrants ha\e Iteen set as follows: 

On Walker Street at JNIartin. 
On North State Street near Franklin. 
On Beacon Street rear Merrimack School. 
On Washmgton Street at Lyndon. 
On Rowell Street at White. 
On Union Street at Ma])le. 
On Pine Street at Warren. 
On JMinot Street at Odd Fellows' Home. 
On 3Iinot Street at Pleasant. 
On ]'leasant Street at Gale. 
On Pleasant Street at city sheds. 
On School Street at Rumford. 
On Bridge Street at Concord Shoe Factory. 
On Bridge Street at Concord Coal Co. 
On Monroe Street opposite Grove. 
On Perley Street at Pierce. 
On Perley Street at South State. 
On Pillsbury Street opposite Foster \\'ard. 
On Pillsbury Street at Broadway. 
On Princeton Street at Xoyes. 
On Hall Street at Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 
On Hall Street at E. W. Robinson's. 
On Flail Street near F. H. George's. 
On Hall Street at Hammond. 
On Palm Street, West Concord! 
On Winter Street near Pleasant, Penacook. 
On Merrimack Street o})posite Syraonds' factory, Pena- 
cook. 

Three hydrants have been discontinued : 
On Union Street ai JMaple. 
On Minot Street at Odd Fellows' Home. 
On Hall Street near E. W. Robinson's. 

There have been set 55 gates; discontinued, "24. 



272 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Summary of the Foregoing^. 
New Pipes, Hvduants and Stop-gates.. 



Pipes. 

l-iuch, 288 feet. 

4-inch, 87 " 

6-inch, 4,772 " 

8-inch, 93 " 

10-inch, 7,098 " 

12-iuch, 989 " 

20-inch, 2,727 " 



ITi/drants. 

In city 

In Penacook 



Stop- Gates 



25 



16,054 feet, 
equal to 3.04 miles. 



27 



4-inch 


. 2 


6-inch 


. 40 


8-inch 


. 2 


10-inch 


. 8 


18-inch 


1 


20-inch 


. 2 



Pipes, Hydrants and Stop-gates Discontinued. 

Pipes. Hydrants. . Stop-Gates. 

4-inch, 4,489 feet. Discontinued 
6-inch, 3,392 " 
8- inch, 809 " 
14-inch, 2,727 " [ 



4-inch 


. 12 


6-inch 


9 


8-iuch 


1 


4-inch 


. 2 



11,417 feet, 
equal to 2.16 miles. 



24 



Total length of main and distribution pi})es now in use, 
345,471 feet, equal to 65.48 miles. 

Total number of hydrants how in use, 310. 
Total number of gates now in use, 871. 

Service Pipes. 
There have been laid during the year' and connected with 
the main pij)es, 53 service-pipes consisting of 

45 f|-inch, 1,117 feet. 



1 1-inch, 

4 '2-incb, 

•2 4-inch, 

1 8-inch, 



59 



12 



53 



1,302 feet. 



AVATEK DEPARTMENT. 273 

There have been discontinued, 2 ; whole number in use at 
the present time, 3,509 ; total length of service pipes, 81,360 
feet, or 15.40 miles. We have also relaid 8 services as we have 
relaid the street mains, and ha^■e placed 126 service boxes at 
the curb of old services. 

We have set 65 meters during the year ; 7 have been re- 
moved, making the total number now in use, 1,397. 

The following table shows the height of water in Penacook 
Lake on the first dav of each month : 



January 


182.40 


July . 


184.60 


February 


182.50 


August 


183.70 


March . 


182.10 


September 


182.90 


April . 


184.20 


October 


183.00 


.Alay . 


185.00 


November . 


182.50 


June 


184.70 


December 


182.70 



The lowest point reached during the year was on March 15, 
being 181.80; the highest was on April 13 and was 185.10 ; 
mean height, 183.37, which was 1.03 feet lower than the mean 
height for the year 1904. 

The service-pipe and the distribution-pipe accounts are some- 
what larger in proportion to the length of pipe laid than in 
jirevious years. The woi-k of laying the 20-inch main from the 
pumping station to near Chapel Street was expensive owing to 
the large number of hoiise and street connections on North State 
Street and the ledge work between Church and Chapel streets. 
We also found considerable rock on Hall Street, and on Palm 
Street in West Concord nearly the entire trench had to be 
blasted. The service-pipe account was increased because of 
repairs to old services which we found necessary as we relaid 
some streets. 

I would suggest that the work of relaying cement-lined pipe 
with cast-iron be continued next year as follows : 

20-inch main in North State Street from near Chapel to 

Pleasant; 10-inch pipes in Clinton Street from South Spring 

to South Fruit ; in Bradley Street from Perkins to Franklin ; 

and in Walker Street from North State to Bradley ; 8-inch high- 

IS 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 

service pipe in Ferry Street from North jNlain to near Stickney 
Avenue ; 8-incb pipe in Wasliington Street from Rumford to 
White. 

When these streets are relaicl, we shall have a system of 
large-sized distribution pipes through the greater part of our 
city, well arranged to feed the smaller ones in the cross streets. 

The large main will, as in the original plan of the works, be 
through State Street; in place of the 14- and 12-inch pipe, 
we will then have a continuous line of 20-inch pipe from Pena- 
cook Lake to Pleasant Street; from there 14-inch to West 
Street, and from West to the junction with South ]Main and 
thence to Allison, 12-inch pipe. 

In Main Street where we originally had a G-inch pipe, w^e 
now have from its northern limit at Penacook Street to its 
junction with South State, a 10-inch pipe, fed from the 20-inch 
main by a 10-inch pipe through Penacook Street and also 
through ever}' cross street by 4, 6, 8 or 10-inch pipes, the 4-inch 
to be eventually replaced by larger sizes ; there is also in South 
Main Street from Allison to Pillsbury, a 10-inch pipe to be 
continued later. 

The 18-inch main extends from Penacook Lake to the pump- 
ing station with a 12-inch branch at the cemetery gate from 
which a 12-inch pipe runs through Rumford Sti-eet as far as 
School, thence a 10-inch to Pleasant Street. 

In South Street in place of the original 6-inch we now have 
a 12-inch pipe from Pleasant to Clinton Street and continuing 
through Broadway to West, fed from the State Street main by 
a 12-inch through Pleasant Street as well as the connections 
•with the cross streets. 

From the reservoir a 14-inch pi})e is laid through Auburn 
Street, reducing to a 12-inch through Liberty to the connection 
at Pleasant. 

South Spring Street is now supplied by an 8-inch pipe; 
Bradley Street will then have a 10-inch and Hall Street now has 
a 10-inch as far as Hammond to be continued in the near future, 
all of which took the place of 4-inch pipes. 

Thus the distribution pipes in nearly all of the principal 
streets running north and south will be of sufficient size to give 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 275 

excellent service and so located as to feed the other streets 
Avell. 

The continuation of a larger })ijte farther south through one 
of the streets at the south end to supply the section developed 
in the last few years is a work which I know has already 
received ^^our consideration and should be done as soon as 
l)racticable. 

On the streets running east and west a complete relaying of 
the street has been done to a greater extent below Pleasant 
Street than at the north end, all the streets between Pleasant 
and West now having been relaid. In place of the original 
4-inch we now have O-inch pipes in Wall, Fayette, Thompson, 
Concord, Monroe, Laurel and Downing, and Perley as far 
west as Pierce Street; Thorndike Street has a 10-inch pipe 
replacing a 6-inch. It is planned to have a 12-inch pipe on 
West Street when that pipe is relaid, but as there has been 
very little trouble with leaks there, that street has been post- 
poned for more urgent sections. 

Clinton Street will have a 10-inch pipe from South to Fruit, 
and Pleasant Street is supplied by a 10-inch pipe except be- 
tween State and South Streets, as mentioned before. 

North of Pleasant Street the relaying of an entire street has 
not been as general. Warren Street has been relaid and with 
the exception of between North State and North Main, an 
8-inch has taken the place of the 6- and 4-inch. School Street 
now has 10-inch in place of 8- and 4-inch pipes from North 
Main to Hanover Street; west of Hanover, it has been par- 
tially relaid with 10-inch. 

In Centre Street, a 10-inch high-service pipe extends from 
High to North Main; east of Rumford, a part of the G-inch 
low-service pipe has been replaced with 8-inch. 

Very little work has yet been done in Washington Street, to 
be relaid with 8- and 10-inch, the original pipes being 4- and 
O-inch. In Franklin Street we now have a 12-inch pipe in the 
high-service section from Auburn to Rumford Street, the low- 
service section east of Rumford having not yet been relaid but 
eventually to be 10-inch in place of 4- and 6-inch. In Walker 
Street we shall have 10-inch pii)e from North State to IJradley 



2(b CITY OF CONCORD. 

replacing 4-inch, and to be continued later. Treniont and 
Church streets are still supplied through the original 4-inch 
pipes but will })e relaid with 8- and (>-inch according to present 
plans. 

We have also the 20-inch high-service main in Penacook 
Street from the reservoir, with connection at Rumford Street, 
with 14-inch high-service main for Penacook which also allows 
additional high-service hydrants through Rumford and North 
State streets. This 20-inch main extends througli Penacook, 
Fiske and North and South Main streets to Hill's Avenue ; 
thence a 16-inch to "West Street; thence a 14-inch to junction 
Avith South State;' thence a 12-inch to Langdon Street, for fire 
service only. 

In closing, I desire to commend the conscientious and efficient 
work of the employes of the department. 
Respectfully sulnuitted, 

V. C. HASTINGS, 

Superintendent. 



WATER DErARTMKNT. 2( ( 

REPORT OF THE ENGINEER OP THE 
PUMPING STATION. 

Pumping Station, Concord Watkr- Works. 
Y. C. Hastings, Superintendent : 

Sir: I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station is in good working condition. 

Following will he found a statement of coal and other sup- 
plies used at the pumping station during the year, with a table 
showing the work for eacli month : 

Statement. 

159 tons 260 pounds Pocahontas coal. 
34 tons 76!) pounds Cumberland coal. 
68 gallons of oil. 
48 pounds of waste. 
10 cords of slab wood. 
10 pounds of grease. 

ENGINE RECORD. 



r, q\ 



65 65 






January ... 
February.. 
March 



10 i 16 
12! 16 

11 15 
April I 12I 12 



13 



May 
June 

July 11 

August 13 

September.. 13 

October 12 

November . . 9 

December... 18 

Total 137 

Dailj' av'ge. 



7:13 
9:5 
7:6 
6:8 
7:14 
7:33 
8:8 
7:28 
6:26 
6:29 
6:18 



I i 

19.631,304 633,364 38,035 
22,025,226 786,615i 41,642 
19,514,090 650,469 

32.163 
36,821 



16,777,399 559,246 
19,550, 122|630,613 
19,387,892!646,263 
22,102,0201712,968 
20,064,317647,236 
16,013,2541583,775 
16,863,618 543,987 
15,872,784 529,092 
17,381,015!560,677 



225,186,041 616,9 
616,948 



37,58' 
42,359 
38,348 
31,949 
32,561 
30,362 
34,715 



433,349 
1,187 



1,220 
1,487 
1,187 
1,072 
1,187 
1,252 
1,366 
1,237 
1,064 
1,050 
1,012 
1,119 



1>1 



Oft 



1,118 
1,927 
1,899 
1,413 
1,616 
1,490 
1,441 
1,286 
1,439 
1,473 



♦Amount of coal consumed includes that used for starting fires, banking 
fires and heating the buildings. 

Amount of coal consumed per thousand gallons pumped, 
1.92 pounds. HENRY A. ROWELL, 

EiK/ineer. 



APPENDIX. 



Receipts for Each Yeax' Since the Completion of the 
Works. 



For the year ending January 31, 1874 

For fifteen months endmg April 1, 1875 

For the year ending April 1, 187G 

1877 

" ' " 1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

For nine months ending December 31, 1881 
For the 3'ear ending December 31, 1882 

1883 

1884 

" " " 1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

" " 1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

« « " 1890 

1897 

« " " 1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

« " 1903 

1904 

1905 

Total recei))ts for 33 years . 



$4,431.10 
17,535.00 
16,921.24 
19,001.07 
20,763.03 
21,869.86 
22,451.53 
26,74.4.58 
25,534:01 
27,243.06 
28,255.48 
28,915.65 
30,222.54 
30,862.64 
34,047.52 
38,441.32 
40,237.53 
42,133.41 
46,075.16 
48,351.52 
52,299.66 
53,230.10 
55,343.19 
56,557.81 
55,156.42 
59,147.54 
53,953.18 
57,003.71 
62,253.61 
63,430.85 
65,088.45 
68,570.48 
71,076.41 

$1,343,148.64 



WATi:U DEPART.MK.N r, 



281 



B 





Mean 


Height of Water Each 


Yeai 






1878 . . . 175.80 1890 . . 181.90 


1874 






179.50 1891 




. 180.00 


1875 






180.00 1892 






174.32 


1870 






180.28 1893 






173.38 


1877 






170.40 1894 






172.81 


1878 






179.50 1895 






171.15 


1879 






179.74 1896 






178.90 


1880 






175.30 1897 






183.33 


1881 






174.70 1898 






184.31 


1882 






179.15 1899 






183.49 


1883 






170.40 1900 






183.09 


1884 






178.18 1901 






183.80 


1885 






170.80 1902 






184.98 


1886 






178.10 1903 






184.75 


1887 






179.04 1904 






184.40 


1888 






181.90 1905 






183.37 


1889 






180.91 









282 



CITY OF CONCOUD. 



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284 



CITY OF CONCOi;i). 



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286 



CITY OF CONCOED. 





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WATER DEPARTMENT. 



287 



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288 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE-IIYDRANTS. 




South Main. 



Water. 
Hall. 



Hammond. 

Fi.ske. 

Summer. 

Durgin. 

North State. 



Southwest corner North Main and Penacooli 

East side North Main, near J. B. Wallier's 

Junction North Main and Fislie 

East side North Main, near Larkin'.s store 

Northwest corner North Main and Franklin 

East side North Main, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner North Main and Washington 

West side No. Main, opp. Historical Society rooms . . . 

East side North Main, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner North Main and Court 

Northwest corner North Main and Pitman 

Northwest corner North Main and Montgomery 

East side North Main, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner North Main and Centre 

Southeast corner North Main and Bridge 

Southwest corner North Main and Park 

East side North Main, opposite Park 

Northwest corner North Ma in and Capitol 

Northwest corner North Main and School 

West side North Main at Centennial Block 

East side North Main, opposite Centennial Block 

East side North Main, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side North Main, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner North Main and Warren 

West side North Main, at Central Block 

Northeast corner North Main and Depot 

Northwest corner North Main and Pleasant 

Southeast corner South Main and Pleasant 

Northeast corner South Main and Freight 

East side South Main, opposite Fayette 

East side South Main, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner South Main and Chandler 

Northwest corner So. Main and Wentworth Avenue... 

Northwest corner South Main and Thorndike 

East side South Main, opposite St. John's Church 

Northwest corner South Main and Perley 

West side South Main, near Abbot-Downing Co.'s 

East side South Main, opposite Abbot- Downing Co.'s. 

East side South Main, near West 

Northeast corner South Main and Gas 

West side South Main, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co... 

Southwest corner South Main and South State 

Northwest corner South Main and Pillsbury 

East side South Main, opposite Pillsbury 

West side South Main, opposite Langdon 

West side South Main, at J. H. Lamprey's 

West side South Main, at W. J. Sawyer's 

West side Water, near Capt. James Thompson's . . 

West side Hail, opposite Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 

West side Hall, opposite E. W. Robinson's 

West side Hall, near F. H. George's 

West side Hall, opposite Hammond 

East side Hall, opposite W. H. Page's 

East side Hall, near Rumfor<l Field 

North side Hammond, near Bridge 

West side Fiske, near North State 

Northeast corner Summer and Pitman 

East side Durgin, opposite Toof 's laundry 

Southwest corner North State and Penacook 

Northwest corner North State and Walker 

Northwest corner North State and Church 



WATER depaht:\ient. 
FIRE-IIYDKAXTS.— Co»^//n«^f?. 



289 




North State. 



South State. 



Mills. 

Dakin. 

Dunklee. 

Broadwa3'. 

Green. 



Klley. 



Union. 

Lyndon.' 

North Spring, 

South Spring 



Tahanto. 
Pine. 



High. 



Giles. 
Princeton. 



Fruit. 
Minot. 



Northeast corner North State and Franklin 

Northwest corner North State and Tremont 

Northeast corner North State and Washington 

West side North State, opposite Court 

I Northwest corner North State and Maple 

Northeast corner North State and Centre 

East side North State, opposite government building. 

I Southwest corner North State and School 

I Northwest corner North State and Warren 

[ Northwest corner North State and Pleasant 

East side South State, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner South State and Thompson 

Southwest corner South State and" Monroe 

East side South State, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner South State and Downing 

Northeast corner South State and West 

Southwest corner South State and Harrison 

West side Mills, near Levi Call's 

West side Dakin, near C. E. Harriman's 

Northwest corner Dunklee and Pillsbury 

Northwest corner Broadway and Allison 

Northwest corner Broadway and Stone 

Northwest corner Green and Prince 

East side Green, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner Green and Warren 

West s-ide South, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner South and Thompson 

West side South, opposite Monroe 

West side South, opposite Laurel 

West side South, opposite Downing 

West side South, opposite Allison 

West side South, near Abbot Farm 

West side South, opposite Smith farm 

Northwest corner South and Rockingham 

East side South, at Quint's 

West side South, near Bow line 

Southwe.-t corner Bradley and Penacook 

Northwest corner Bradley and Walker 

East side Bradley, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner Union and Maple 

Southwest corner Lyndon and Tremont 

Southwest corner North Spring and Centre 

Southwest corner South Spring and Oak 

West side South Spring, opposite Cor cord 

West side So. Spring, opp. Perley proposed extension 

West side Rumford, south of cemetery gate 

I West side Rumford, opposite Perkins 

I Northeast corner Rumford and Franklin 

{ Northwest corner Rumford and Beacon 

j Northeast corner Rumford and Abbott 

! Northeast corner Rumford and Cambridge 

Northeast corner Rumford and School 

Northwest corner Tahanto and School 

Southwest corner Pine and Centre 

Southwest corner Pine and Warren 

Northwest corner High and Auburn 

East side High, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner High and Franklin 

Southeast corner Giles and School 

I Southwest corner Princeton and Clinton 

Northwest corner Princeton and Noyes 

Northeast corner Fruit and Woodman 

East side Fruit, opposite W. W. Critchett's 

West side Minot, near Odd Fellows' Home 

Northwest corner Minot and Pleasant 



19 



290 



CITV OF CONCOIJI). 

FIRE-IIYDRANTS.— Coui/MuecZ. 



Locations. 



Walker. 

Highland. 

Church. 



Rowel 1. 
Blanchard. 

Ferr3'. 
Wa.shlngton. 



Valley. 
Auburn. 
Centre. 



Bridge. 



Capitol. 
School. 



Depot. 
Pleasant. 



South side of Penacook, east of P. B. Co.'s bark house 

South side Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s 

South side Penacook, near P. B. Co's office 

Southeast corner Penacook and North Main 

Southwest corner Penacook and Rumford 

Southeast corner Penacook and Columbus Avenue 

Southwest corner Walker and Martin ." 

Northeast corner Highland and Rumford 

North side Church, opposite L.vndon 

Northeast corner Church and Rumford 

Northwest corner Franklin and Jackson 

Southwest corner Franklin and Rumford 

South side Franklin, opposite W. J. Ahern's 

Northeast corner Franklin and Auburn 

North side Beacon, opposite Merrimack School 

Northwest corner Beacon and Jackson 

South side Beacon, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner Rowell and White 

Northwest corner Blanchard and Essex 

North side Ferry, Eastof C. & M. R. R 

Southwest corner Washington and Union 

Northeast corner Washington and Lyndon 

Northwest corner Washington and Rumford 

North side Washington, opposite Perry Avenue 

Northeast corner Valley and Forest...*. 

Northeast corner Auburn and Forest 

Northeast corner Centre and North State 

Southwest corner Centre and Green 

Northwest corner Centre and Union 

Northwest corner Centre and North Spring 

Northwest corner Centre and Rumford 

South side Centre, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner Centre and Summit Avenue 

Northeast corner Centre and Ridge Road 

South side Bridge, near easterly barn 

North side Bridge, opposite Concord Coal Co.'s 

North side Bridge, opposite Concord Shoe Factory... 

Northeast corner Capitol and North State 

Northwest corner School and Green 

Northwest corner School and North Spring 

Northwest corner School and Rumford 

Northwest corner School and Merrimack 

North side School, opposite Holt 

North side School, opposite E. B. Woodworth's 

Southeast corner Warren and Fremont 

Northwest corner Warren and North Spring 

Northwest corner Warren and Rumford 

Southwest corner Warren and Merrimack 

Northwest corner Warren and Tahanto 

Northeast corner Warren and Liberty 

Northeast corner Warren and Giles 

Junction of Warren and Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side of Depot, at north end of train shed 

Morth west corner Depot and Railroad Square 

Northwest corner Pleasant and Railroad Square 

Southeast corner Pleasant and South 

Northeast corner Pleasant and Fremont 

Southwest corner Pleasant and Spring 

South side Pleasant, opposite Rumford ■ 

South side Pleasant, opposite Merrimack 

South ^side Pleasant, opposite Pine 

South side Pleasant, opposite Liberty 

North side Pleasant, opposite city stable 

South side Pleasant, near Gale 

South side Pleasant, opposite Mrs. Aiken's 

South side Pleasant, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage 

North side Pleasant, near James Lane's 



WATEi: DKl'AUTMENT. 

FI RE-H V DR AN Ti^.— Continued. 



291 




Mill Road. 

St. P. School. 

Old Hopkint'D 

road. 

Marshall. 

Freight. 

Hill's Avenue. 

Fayette. 
Thompson. 
Chandler. 

Concord. 

Monroe. 
Thorndike. 



Downing. 
Clinton. 



Avon. 

Harrison. 

Allison. 

Pillsbury. 

Carter. 

Holly. 

Rockingham. 

Prospect. 
Curtice Ave. 
North State. 



North side Pleasant, near J. McC. Hammond's I 

South side Pleasant, opposite Fiske Road j 

Southwest corner Pleasant and School Avenue 

North side Pleasant, opposite infirmary 

South side Pleasant, in field near gasometer 

South side Pleasant, near new Upper School 

East side Mill Road, near laboratory 

North side Mil! Road, at Orphan's Home 

Junction old and New Hopkinton roads 

North side Marshall, opposite Fuller 

North side Freight, at southwest cor. passenger sta'n 
Southwest corner Hill's Avenue and Railroad Square. 

Northeast corner Hill's Avenue and South Main 

Northwest corner Fayette and Elm 

North side Thompson, opposite Jefferson 

South side Chandler, opposite Railroad 

South side Concord, opposite Jefferson 

North side Monroe, opposite Grove 

Northeast corner Thorndike and Grove 

North side Thorndike, opposite Pierce j 

Northeast corner Thorndike and South Spring ' 

Northwest corner Laurel and Pierce 

Southwest corner Perley and South State 

Northwest corner Perley and Grove 

Northeast corner Perley and Pierce 

South side Perley, near old brook 

Southeast corner Downing and Mills 

North side Clinton, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner Clinton and Fruit 

North side Clinton, near Snell's 

North side Clinton, at State Fair grounds 

North side West, near South Main 

North side West, near Badger 

North side West, opposite Dakin 

North side West, intersection Broadway 

Northwest corner Avon and South .' 

Northwest corner Harrison and Morton 

Northwest corner Allison and Mills 

North side Pillsbury, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner Pillsbury and Broadwaj' 

Northeast corner Carter and Eastman 

North side Holly, opposite W. D. Thompson's house.. 

Northeast corneV Rockingham and Broadway 

Northwest corner Prospect and Granite Avenue 

North side Curtice Avenue, near John C. Kenney's 

West side North State, at Water-Works storehouse.. 

Northeast corner North State and Foster 

Northeast corner North State and Curtice Avenue 

East side North State, near W. H. Perry's 

Ea.st side North State, near north entrance Blossom 

Hill Cemetery 

West side North State, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side North State, near A. L. Colburn's 

East side North State, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side North State, at south line of prison wall 

West side North State, at north line of prison wall — 

East side North State, near Asa L. Gay's 

Northeast corner North State and Palm 

West side North State, near Concord Woodw'king Co. 

East side North State, near C. H. Farnum's 

East side North State, near Cyrus R. Farnum's 

East side North State, near M. H. Farnum's 

East side North State, opposite Dolan 

East side North State, opposite John H. Flood's 

West side North State, opposite S. Abbott's 

North side of Palm, west of Fairbanks 



192 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con?;H»ed. 




North State. 



Clarke. 
Lake. 



Knight. 
Hutchin.s 



Penacook Rd. 



West Main. 
High. 



Washington. 



Charles. 



West Canal. 
East Canal. 



Crescent. 
Merrimack. 



Summer. 

Spring. 
Winter. 
Centre. 

Cross. 

Rolfe. 

Penacook. 



WEST CONCORD. 

Southeast corner North State and K 

Northeast corner North State and Peabodj- 

East side North State, at George Partridge's 

East side North State, near engine house 

East side North State, opposite D. Holden's 

West side North State, near west mill 

East side North State, opposite Simeon Partridge's. 

East side North State, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side North State, opposite A. Hollis's 

East side North State, near Se wall's Falls Road 

Northeast corner of Electric and North State 

North side Electric, near power station 

Northeast corner Clarke and Fisher 

East side Lake, near S. W. Kellom's 

East side Lake, near Mrs. G. E. Holden's 

South side Knight, opposite railroad station. . .' 

North side Hutchins, near B. T. Putney's 

North side Hutchins, near C. & C. Railroad 

West side Penacook Road, near Warner Road 

PENACOOK. 

West side Main, near Mr. Currier's 

West side Main, at Woodlawn Cemeterj- 

West side Main, opposite Stark.. 

West side Main, near Mr. Prescott's 

Southwest corner Main and Union 

Washington Square, opposite Washington 

Northwest corner Main and Charles 

North side Main, opposite East Canal 

North side Main, near iron bridge 

West side West Main, opposite cemetery 

East side High, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner High and Maple 

Northwest corner High and Spring 

Southeast corner Washington and Union 

South side Washington, opposite John Whitaker's.. 

South side Washington, opposite Charles 

South side Washington, near Contoocook bridge — 

Southwest corner Charles and Warren 

North side Charles, near George W. Corey's 

Southeast corner West Canal and Warren 

North side East Canal, near Contoocook Mfg. Co 

North side East Cana), near Crescent 

North side Crescent, east of Canal 

South side Merrimack, opposite Merrimack Avenue 

North side Merrimack, opposite D. W. Fox's 

North side Merrimack, opposite Cross 

South side Merrimack, opposite Rolfe's shop 

South side Merrimack, opposite Symonds' factorj'.. 

North side Merrimack, near road to Island .'. .. 

Northwest corner Merrimack and Penacook 

North side Summer, opposite High 

Northeast corner Summer and Centre 

Northeast corner Spring and Church 

North side Winter, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner Centre and Spring 

Southwest corner Cross and Summer 

North side Rolfe, near James Corbet t's 

Northwest corner Rolfe and Penacook 

West side Penacook, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 

Whole number public hydrants 



WATER DEI'A IITMENT. 



293 



FlRE-llYDUA-^TS.— Concluded. 




Concord Shoe Factory 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard ' 6 

Boston & Maine Railroad, new sliops j 14 

State prison i 7 

Abbot -Do wninff Co. 's yard 6 

Page Belting Co.'s yard 5 

W. P. Ford & Co.'s yard j i 

N. H. State Hospital yard ' 5 

Concord Gas Light Co.'s vard [ 1 

St. Paul's School ; i 

Water-works pumping station grounds : i 

Whole nuifaber private hydrants 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Honorahle Maiior ((ml City CoKucit : 

1 herewith submit for your consideration the following rejiort 
of the Fire Department for the year 1905 : 

The department responded to sixty-three (do) bell alarms 
and one hundred and seventy-five (17.")) still alarms. 





Bell. 


still. 


Total. 


l^reeinct, 


44 


148 


187 


Penacook, 


18 


'lb 


3S 


East Concord, 


3 


4 


7 


^yest Concord, 


n 


8 


(5 



(18 175 238 

The number of working fires, the value of j)roperty destroyed,, 
the hazardous districts in which some of the fires occurred, 
with the attendant possibilities, the quantity of hose used and 
the hard labor ])erfoniied will tend to make the year 1905 a 
memorable one to the members of the department. 

The apparatus is in good condition. All of the engine boil- 
ers were tested and the machinery t)f engines No. 1, No. 2 and 
No. 4 repaired at an expenditure of three hundred and forty- 
five dollars. 

One thousand feet of new hose [turchased and the relining 
of nine hundred feet of old liose entailed an expenditure of 
twelve hundred an(1 fifteen dollars. Cataract P^ngine Com})any 



FiiiK DKrArrr.MKN'i'. 295 

was provided with a double liydrant gate and two Eastman 
perfection liolders at a cost of one hundred and thirty-five dol- 
lars. The tire-alarni telegraph is in good condition. 

One indicator was adde<l to the system at an expenditure of 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars ami necessary repairing 
was conducte<l in a thorough manner. 

All alarms were transmitted propei'Iy. IJelative to recom- 
mendations pertaining to the improvement of the system 1 can 
liut refer your honorable body to rejtorls of foi-mer years. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. i'. (ilJEEX, 



Appropriation, •i<'i2,000.(H> 

.Joint resolution, 900.00 

*22,900.0() 
I)isi:ri;si:.MK.\Ts. 

Permanent men, -^7,074.00 

Vacations, <i20..3(> 

Rent Veterans' Association, 150.00 

Call men, 0,900.00 

Forage, 1,433.91 

Fuel, . 912.48 

Lights, 665.20 

Incidentals, 2,365,50 

Horseshoeing, 310.00 

Horse hire, 602.00 

Laundry, 52.00 

Fire-alarm, 630.59 

Sui)i)lies chemical engine, 30.72 

Hose, 900.00 

Water, 119.50 

House man, 73.33 

is22,S99.6S 

1 balance unexpended, •1^0.32 



296 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ALARMS. 

PKEf'IXCT. 

Still. January o, 1.88 ]). in. Chimne}' fire in residence of 
O. J. Dennerly, 4 Cottage Court. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. January 5, 9.08 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. J. Trenoweth, 19 Charles Street. Extinguished l»y Chemi- 
cal Company. Xo loss. 

Still. January 6, 6.52 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Rev. Thos. H. Stacy, 41 South Sin-ing Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. Xo loss. 

Still. January 7, 9.56 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Michael Ahern, 2S0 North State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 7, 6.29 p. m. Chimney fire in ^[cShane's 
Block, Odd Fellows' Avenue. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. Januarj^ 9, 9.41 a. m. Chimney fire in Thompson's 
Block, 15 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. January 10, 3.54 ]>. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Eben Fellows, 7 Ford Avenue. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. January 14, 10.12 }). m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. M. H. Freeman, 42 North Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 14, 10.58 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Don. Aldrich, 19 JNIonroe Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Hose Company. No loss. 

Box 42. Januar}^ 15, 9.49 a. m. Fire in residence 67 
South State Street, owned by Sarah A liarnard and occupied 
by John Sargent and J. C. Holt. Caused by overheated chim- 
ney. 350 feet hose wet. Recall, 10.02 a. m. 





Value. 


Los.s. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


$250.00 


$2,000.00 


$250 00 


Contents : 










J. Sargent, 


1,000.0(1 


] 5.00 


300.00 


15.00 


J. C. Holt, 


1,000.00 


21.00 


200.00 


21.00 



riKE DEI'AIITMENT. 297 

Stu.i.. January 19, 12.34 a. in. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at 38 Auburn Street. Cliemical Company resj)onde(l. 
No tire. 

Stii.i.. .lanuai'v '22, G.41 ]». in. Cliimney tire in Excliange 
Blocli:, 98 North Main Street. Kxtinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. January '20, 1.02 ]>. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of Mrs. E. E. Fury, 48 School Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Com])any. No loss. 

Still. January 28, 8.20 a. m. Fire in White's IJlock, Cap- 
itol Street, owned l)y the Nathaniel White estate. Fire origi- 
nated in closet in suite <), occupied by Mrs. S. J. Benjamin. 
Cause, i^robably s])ontaneous combustion. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. . 

Value. Los.s. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, 115,000.00 $130.00 $10,000.00 $136.00 

Still. February 1, 7.57 a. in. Chimney tire in residence 
of Thomas Reed, East Penacook Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 1,9.43 a. ul Chimney tire in Thompson's 
Block, 15 Pleasant Street. Extinguished b}' Chemical Com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. February 2, 3.45 ]>. m. Slight tire on roof of Con- 
cord Coal Co. plant, Bridge Street. Caused by sj)ark from 
smoke stack of stationary boiler. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Loss trilling. 

Still. February 3, 9.24 a. m. Chimney tii-e in residence 
of B. R. Jewell, 15 Essex Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. February 3, 6.30 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of George Lyna, 9 Dakin Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Box 53. February 4, 7.49 a. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of William Lynch, 31 Hall Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Needless alarm. Recall 7.56 a. m. No loss. 

Still. February 4, 5.26 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of Augustine Provost, 45 Thorndike Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 





Value. 


Loss. 


lUiilJing, 


$2,500.00 


§8.00 


Still. 


February 6, 2.04 ; 


[1. m. < 



298 CITY OF CONCOKI). 

Still. February 4, o.40 p. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
Miss A. M. Moulton, 33 Washington Street. ]les|)oa(le(l to by 
niemljers of Alert Hose Comj^any. See next alaruL 

Still. February 4, 5.53 p. ni. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding tire. Chemical Company l)eing in service, 
Ivearsarge A\agon and detail from Central Station sent. No 
loss. 

Box 10. Feb. 5, 12.59 a. in. Slight tire in closet in resi- 
dence 35 Tremont Street, owned V>y John C. French and occu- 
|)ied by Isaac Leonard. Caused by overheated chimney. Xo 
hose wet. Kecall 1.13 a. m. 

Insurance. Ins. paid. 

§1,700.00 #8.00 

Chimney tire in residence 
of John Currier, 46 South State Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 12.10 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of X. M. Kayes, Jr., 30 Grove Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. Xo loss. 

Still. February 11, 5.44 p. iil Chimney tire in residence 
of E. A. Royce, 42 South Street. Extinguisheil l)y Chemical 
Company. Xo loss. 

Still. February 10, 8.34 a. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of J. S. French, 25 Fayette Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Conipany. Xo loss. 

Still. February 18,12.52 ]>. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of Frank Reille, 147 Xorth State Street. Extinguished l)y 
Chemical Company. Xo loss. 

Still. February 18, 3.30 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of John Currier, 46 South State Street Extinguished by mem- 
bers of Good Will Hose Company. Xo loss. 

Still. February 18, 5.05 ]>. m. Clnmney tire in residence 
of J. W. Moulton, 44 l^illsbury Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. Xo loss. 

S'itll. February 2(1, 1.08 ]>. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Board of Trade Uuilding, S5 Xortli .Afain Street. 
Chemical Compam- resitondcd. \o tire. 



FUIK DEPAIiTMHNT. 299 

Srii.i.. February '27, 10. '29 a. m. Cliiinney tire in residence 
of (George \V.. Carter, A.') School Street. Extinguished hy 
Chemical Conipany. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

r.uiiding, *i,200.oo *5.oo ^<s(io.o(» *r).oa 

Stii.l. February 27, 11.04 a. ni. Chimney tire in residence 
of Miss ^lary Pierce, 19 North State Street. Extinguished l)y 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Stilr. ^ February. 27, O.SG |». m. Chimney tire in residence 
of J. S. Hall, ol Pine Street. Elxtinguished by Chemical Com- 
})any. No loss. 

Still. February 28, 6.00 a. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of Cornelius Doherty, 47 Soutli State Street. Extinguished by 
members of (Tood Will Hose Company. No loss. 

Box 42. March 2, 5.10 p. m. Fire in tenement house 5o-;")7 
South State Street, owned byAlphonse Belleveau and Herbert 
Tsabelle, and occupied by .Vlphonse Pellevean, Harry Colby, 
Peter Carpenter and Joseph Normandeau. Caused by over- 
heated chimney. 1,500 feet of hose wet. Pecall 5.59 p. m. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


l>uilding, -^8,500.00 


*1, 500.00 


i!;2,500.0O 


1,500.00 


Contents : 








A. Belleveau, 1,000.00 


200.00 


None. 


None. 


H. Colby, 1,000.00 


50.00 


- 


^• 


P. Carpenter, 1,000.00 


75.00 


'' 


" 


J. Normandeau,l,000.00 


200.00 


" 


" 



Box 28. ' March 3, 1.88 p. m. Fire in Foundry, Ferry 
Street,. owned and occupied by W. P. Ford it Co. Cause un- 
known. 1,050 feet hose wet. Recall 1.58 ]). m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

lUiilding, ^15,000.00 -$40.00 .1;10,000.00 #40.00 

Still. March 4, 8.37 a. m. Fire in building connected 
with Holt Bros, carriage plant, 159 South Main Street. In this 
building the bending operations of the firm was conducted. It 
was also used as a storehouse. Fire caused by hot clutch. 
Chemical Company was on the road when the box alarm was 
sent in. See next alarm. 



300 CITY. OF CONCORD. 

Box 45. JMarcli 3, 8.38 j). m. Box pulled for ])i-ecedino; 
fire. 2,600 feet hose wet. Recall 9.28 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,400.00 $1,200.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Contents, 6,098.00 2,450.95 2,000.00 2,000.00 

Still. Mai'ch 4, 7.51 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Polidor Lapierre, 9 Foster Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 1.58 p. ra. Chimney fire in residence of 
Daniel Shine, 63 Penacook Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 6.16 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
James Callahan, 13 Bradley Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

•Still. March 6, 11.39 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. L. Gage, 8 North Spring Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 7.44 p. in. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. D. Cutting, 76 Franklin Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Box 23. March 7, 9.28 p. m. Box foolishly })ulled for a 
fire in East Concord. Recall 9.38 ]>. m. See East Concord 
report. 

])OX 18. March 10, 12.46 a. m. Fire in residence 39 Bea- 
con Street, owned and occupied by Mrs. AVm. King. Cause, 
overheated chimney. The fire had assumed such proportions 
at the time of its discovery, and spread so rapidly, that Mrs. 
Mahala King, mother of Mr. King, perished, while the other 
members of the family escaped with difiiculty, Mr. King being 
badly burned. His wife and son escai)ed by jumping from the 
l)iazza roof. 2,150 feet hose wet Recall 2.26 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $2,000.00 $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

CVmtent!-', 1,500.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Still. March 11, 10.34 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Hannah Ilerlihy, 85 Washington Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIRE' DEIWUTMENT. 301 

Still. March 14, 10. 12 a. in. Chimney tire in resilience of 
Henry Ivobinson, 21 Ueacon Street. Responded to by mem- 
bers of the Alert Hose Company. 

Still. March 14, 10.20 a. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Chemical Company responded. Xo 
loss. 

Still. 3farch 15, 12.11 }t. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Henry Robinson, 21 Beacon Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. Loss trifling. 

Still. March 16, 10.24 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Miss Mary Robinson, 28 Union Street. Extinguished l)y 
Chemical Company. Xo loss. 

Box 12. March 17, 8.01 a. m. Eir.e in residence 12 Per- 
kins Court, owned by Miss Susan Perkins and occupied by 
Israel Ouilette. Cause unknown. 2,450 feet hose wet. Re- 
call 8.25 a. 111. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 .$150.00 $500.00 $150.00 

Contents, 1,000.00 20.00 X^one. X'one. 

Still. March 17, 4.25 p. m. Slight fire on roof of Con- 
cord Coal Company plant, Bridge Street. Chemical Company 
responded, but no assistance was required. Extinguished by 
employees. Loss trifling. 

Still. March 23, 2.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Isaac Ploude, 158 Xorth State Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. X^o loss. 

Still. March 31, 4.33 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
James Hughes, 63 Xorth State Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. Xo loss. 

Still. April 1, 10.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Charles H. Farnum, 312 North State Street. Extinguished by 
detail from Central Station. Xo loss. 

Still. April 1, 10.23 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. (t. L. Green, 32 Maple Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. X"o loss. 

Still. April 1, 2.07 p. m. Slight fire on roof of Concord 
Coal Company plant, Bridge Street. Caused by spark from 



o02 CITY OF CONCOIID. 

smoke stack of stationary boiler. Chemical Com])any re- 
sponded, but no assistance was required. Extinguished by 
employees. Loss trifling. 

Still. April 2, 8.1'2 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Charles S. Currier, 11 JNIerrimack Street. Exthiguished by 
Chemical Company. Xo loss. 

Still. April 2, 9.44 a. m. Chimney fire in lower Stickney 
lilock, 154 North IMain Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. April 3, 5.28 p. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
Thomas Nolan, 89 North Spring Street. Extinguished by 
jneml)ers of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Box 28. April 3, 7.29 p. m. J3ox jaulled for fire of no im- 
])ortance in East Concord. Recall 7.34 p. m. 

Box 24. April 7, 9.09 p. m. Fu-e in building 22 JJridge 
Street, owned by Concord Shoe Factory, and occupied by the 
Peerless JNIanufacturing Co., and the Morrison Shoe Co. 
Cause unknown. Recall 3.15 a. m., April 8. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Ibiilding, ^23,000.00 $18,000.00 113,000.00 *13,000.00 

Contents : 

Peerless Mfg. Co., 41,022.07 22.030.75 17,500.00 17,500.00 

Morrison Co., 50,000.00 50,000.00 31,000.00 31,000.00 

Con. Shoe Factory, 5,000.00 250.00 1,000.00 250.00 

Still. April 8, 7.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
I'atrick Jordan, 138 South jMain Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 14, 4.55 p. m. ]>rush fire on Woodman 
Sti-eet. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 15, 1.43 p. m. Grass fire corner of Bradley 
and Church streets. Chemical Company responded, but no 
assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 17, 7.32 ]>. m. Grass fire on Water Street. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. A))ril IS, 11.21 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
\V. E. I'errigo, 37 Hunnpson Street. Extinguished l>y Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 



VlllE DKl'ARTiMENT. 803 

Si'ii.i.. .Vjiril IX. 11..")::) a. iii. Chimney tire in residence 22 
Allison Street, owned by Ciet). A. Foster and occupied by C. II. 
Mrgin. Extingiiislied by Chemical Company. 

Value. Less. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

ihiil.lino-, ^2,400.00 ^2.25 .tl,r)00.00 *2.2r) 

Stii.i.. April IS, 2.40 ]>. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
A. E. Callahan, Gl Perley Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Xo loss. 

4-4-4. April 20, 8.54 a. m. (irass tire on South Street, near 
J>ow line. Immediately after the alarm was given, infonnation 
was received that the tire was under control. Detail therefore 
was not sent. No loss. 

Stilt.. Aju-il 20, 9.25 a. ul (irass tire on Hall Street, near 
llumford Field. Extinguished i>y Chemical Company. Xo 
loss. 

4-4-4. April 20, 10.05 a. hl I'.rush tire on Gladstone Street. 
Extinguished l)y detail from the dei»artment under command 
of Engineer AV. E. ])o\v. Labored two and one half hours. 
Xo loss. 

Still. A[)ril 22, ().2o a. ul Chimney tire in residence of 
James Jepson, 40.^ Franklin Street. Extinguished by mem- 
bers of Alert Hose Company. Xo loss. 

Still. April 22, 3.44 ]>. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
11. II. Morrison, 01 Rumford Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. Xo loss. 

4-4-4. April 24, 9.40 a. m. Ihush tire on IMack Hill. Ex- 
tinguished by detail from the <le|»artment under command of 
Engineer J. .1. AlcXulty. Labored one and one lialf hours. 
Xo loss. 

Box 414. .\.pril 25, 2.47 p. ul Fire in flooring second 
story of Fenacook School, corner of South State and West 
streets. Caused by rats and matches. 2,<i50 feet hose wet. 
llecall, 3.09 p. UL ^_ 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

r.uilding, ^lo.OOd.OO $125.00 |9,000.0<» $125.00 

4- 4-4. .\pril 20, 3.30 p. m. Urush tire on Gully Hill, south 
of Loudon road. Extinguished by detail from the department 



304 CITY OF COXCORD. 

under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. Labored four and 
one half hom's. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 30, <S.OO ]>. in. IJriish tire south of Penacook 
Street, near reservoir. Extinguished by detail from the depart- 
ment under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. Labored two 
hours. 

Still. ^L^}^ 1, 5.54 p. m. Chimney lire in residence of 
J. S. Randlett, 29 Beacon Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Xo. loss. 

4-4-4. May 5, 7.07 p. m. Brush lire on Berry Ilill, near 
Penacook Lake. Extinguished by detail from the department 
imder command of Engineer J. J. McXulty. Labored three 
hours. Xo loss. 

Still. May 7, 11.52 a. m. Fire in dump, corner of Allison 
and Glen streets. Extinguished by detail from Central Station. 
300 feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. May 9, 8.30 a. m. Fire in dump, corner Allison and 
Glen streets. Extinguished by detail from Central Station. 
300 feet of hose wet. No loss. 

11-11. May 10, 12.25 p. m. A call for help from Mast 
Yard to extinguish brush fire which endangered buildings. 
Extinguished by detail from the department under command of 
Engineer W. E. Dow. Labored two and one half hours. No 

loss. 

Still. May 10, 7.47 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. M. Ferrin, 54 Beacon Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. ]May 11, 7.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
A. F. Sturtevant, 60 South State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. May 14, 9.00 a. m. Fire in dump, corner of AUison 
and Glen streets. Extinguished l)y detail from Central Station, 
300 feet hose wet. No loss. 

Still. May 20, 10.48 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Frank Patro, 4 Downing Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. May 27, 2.47 p. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
Jose})h Seymour, 8 Jefferson Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 



FIKE DKrAUTMKNT. 305 

I>(ix 9. ]\Iay 29, 7.48 a. in. Slight fire on roof of stone shed 
north of tlie })ri>ion, North State Street. Extinguished by em- 
ployes before arrival of the dei)artnient. Recall, 7.58 a. m. Loss 
trifling. 

Box 521. May 29, 10.21 a. m. Dangerous brush tire cor- 
ner of Broadway and Rockingham Streets. Engine 4 worked 
three and one half hours. 850 feet hose wet. Recall, 10.82 
a. m. No loss. 

Still. May 29, 8.25 p. m. Acting upon information 
received by telephone that the })receding lire had rekindled and 
crossed the road, Engine 4, Eagle wagon and detail sent. 
Although the fire was found to have rekindled it had not 
crossed the road, and the near-by residents had it under 
control. Xo assistance required. Xo loss. 

11-11. June 1, 9.84 a. m. A call for assistance from ^Yest 
Concord. Engine 2, Eagle wagon and detail from the depart- 
ment sent under command of Engineer J. J. McXulty. Upon 
the arrival of the Concord contingent the fire was found to l)e 
under control. See West Concord report. 

4-4-4. June 4, 12.43 p. m. Brush fire on South Pembroke 
Street. Extinguished by detail from the department under 
command of Engineer J. J. McXulty. Labored three hours 
and fifteen minutes. Xo loss. 

Still. June 5, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Benjamin Davis, 187 School Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. Xo loss. 

Still. June 7, 10.18 a. m. C'himney fire in residence of 
R. Manion, 15 Washington Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Xo loss. 

Still. June 7, 1.41 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
F. R. Parsons, 8 Perkins Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Xo loss. 

Still. June 9. 4.42 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. T. Jameson, 18 Short Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Xo loss. 

Still. June 15, 3.56 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Xils Peterson, 25 Jackson Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Xo loss. 



306 CITV OF CONCOllD. 

Still. July 4, 9.56 p. m. Slight fire in roof of residence 
40 Soiith Street. Caused by the alighting of hot-air balloon. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. Xo loss. 

Still. July 6, 11.28 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Timothy Lassard, 21^ West Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. July 13, 11.50 a. m. A call to investigate cause of 
smoke in residence of H. W. Piper, 7 Washington Street. 
Chemical Company responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. July 25, 4.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
P. II. Gendron, 115 South State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. August 14, 6.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Peter Seymour, 6 Jefferson Street. Extinguished by members 
of Good Will Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. August 20, 9.22 a. m. Shght fire in residence 114 
South State Street, owned by A. S. Pelissier and occupied bj^ 
A. W. Thompson. Caused by crossed electric wires. Chemi- 
cal Company responded but no assistance was required. Extin- 
guished by neighbors. 

Value. LO.S.S. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $3.50 i!2,500.00 $3.50 

Still. August 20, 1.50 p. m. Slight fire in ash barrel in 
barn, rear of residence 11 Green Street. Extinguished by 
members of Hook and Ladder Company. No loss. 

Still. August 24, 9.46 a. m. Slight fire on roof of the 
William P. Ford & Co. foundry'. Ferry Street. Caused by 
.spark from locomotive. Chemical Company responded but no 
assistance Avas required. Extinguished by employe's. No 
loss. 

Box 12. September 3, 6.52 p. m. Fire in bed in residence 
of I). J. Kenney, 172 North State Street. Cause unknown. 
Extinguished before the arrival of the department. Recall, 
7 p. ra." Loss trifling. 

Still. September 16, S.17 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. G. Bartlett, 4 Jackson Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 307 

Still. September 18, 1.35 ]>. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of J. E. Morrison, 10 Laurel Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. Xo loss. 

11-11. September 20, 11.10 ]>. m. A call from Robey for 
assistance. IJartlett lirothers' excelsior mill destroyed and rail- 
road bridge damaged. Engine 4, reserve reel and detail from 
the department sent under command of Engineer J. J. 
McXulty. 500 feet hose wet. Engine worked four hours. 
Detail returned at 11.00 a. m., 21st inst. 

Still. September 25, 12.52 j3. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of yi. E. Prince, 59 North S^n-ing Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. September 25, 5.29 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of G. M. Whalen. 10 Downing Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 57. Septeml)er 27, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. F. Kent, 230 Pleasant Street. No assistance 
required. Recall, 7.29 p. m. No loss. 

11-11. September 27, 9.15 p. m. A call for assistance from 
East Concord. Engine 2, Eagle wagon and detail from the 
department sent under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. 
Engine worked three hours and forty minutes. 750 feet hose 
wet. Detail returned at 2.15 a. m., 28th inst. See East Con- 
cord report. 

Still. September 28, 6.28 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Walters, 18 Prospect Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Comj)any. No loss. 

Still. September 25, 1.24 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. C. Hawkins, 15 Perley Street. Extinguished l)y Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. October 2, 8.09 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. W. Tarleton, 44 Lyndon Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. October 3, 11.17 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
George Yarret, 5 Foster Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. October 4, 8.39 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 



308 CITV OF CONCORD. 

H. A. Kimball, 69 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Box 412. October 4, 3.33 ]». m. Slight tire in residence 7 
South Street, owned and occupied by Mrs. John F. Jones. 
Caused by lace curtains coming in contact with gas stove or 
match after lighting. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall,. 
3.38 p. m. 

Value. Less. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, ' $7,000.00 $31.00 $5,000.00 $31.00 

Contents, 3,000.00 54.50 2,000.00 54.50 

Still. October 5, 12.16 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of W. A. Drew, 5 Scott Avenue. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Xo loss. 

Box 23. October 6, 1.02 a. m. Fire in Steam 31111 Court 
in building owned by John T. Mclveen and occupied by owner, 
carriage builder, John E. Ryan, upholsterer, and John B. 
Cadret, carriage painter. The tire had attained great headway 
before the alarm was given and upon the arrival of the depart- 
ment it was readily seen that the building in which the tire 
originated was doomed and that surrounding property was in 
great danger. 

All efforts were, therefore, directed towards confining the 
spread of the flames to as small an area as possible. 

Second alarm given at 1.10 a. m. 

On the east stood the New ITamjishire State Hospital coal 
pocket, which was destroyed. 

On the north was the foundry and storehouse of William P. 
Ford & Co. The latter with its contents was badly damaged, 
while the former escaped loss. 

Residences on North Main Street west of the McKeen build- 
ing were badly scorched and somewhat damaged by water. 

In addition to the losses sustained by the occupants of the 
McKeen building owners of vehicles undergoing repairs suffered 
to a greater or less extent, and carpets and furniture at the 
Ryan establishment in course of cleaning and repair were lost 
to the owners. 

Flying brands also set tire to l)uildings on Bridge Street, 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



309 



necessitating the pulling of Box 24 after the second alarm had 
been given for the main blaze. 

Cause unknown. 4,150 feet hose wet. Recall, 4.5.") a. m. 

IVIcKeen Ijuilding : 





Value. 


Lo.ss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


S3,500.00 


1^.3,500.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents : 










J. T. McKeen, 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


Xone. 


None. 


J. E. Ryan, 


500.00 


500.00 


None. 


None. 


J. 11 Cadret, 


260.00 


260.00 


None. 


None. 


Others, 


646.00 


646.00 


None. 


None. 


State Hos])ital Building : 










Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$8,000.00 


$8,000.00 


$3,500.00 


$3,500.00 


Contents, 


2,000.00 


500.00 


2,000.00 


500.00 


William P. F( 


ord & Co. building : 








Value. 


Lo.ss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid 


Building, 


i3;2,500.00 


11,000.00 


$700.00 


$700.00 


Contents : 










Machinery, etc., 


1,800.00 


1,206.05 


500.00 


500.00 


Stock, 


2,400.00 


1,790.96 


3,000.00 


1,790.96 



Residence 202 North Main Street, owned and occupied I)y 
John F. IVIorrill : 



Building, 
Contents, 



Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

$4,000.00 $175.00 $2,500.00 $175.00 
2,000.00 17.50 1,250.00 17.50 



Residence 204 North Main Street, owned by C. R. Dame 
and occupied by owner and George P. Wilder : 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


$718.00 


$1,500.00 


$718.00 


Contents : 










C. R. Dame, 


1,500.00 


46.25 


800.00 


46.25 


G. P. Wilder, 


1,200.00 


300.45 


500.00 


300.45 



Residence 206 North Main Street, owned by ]\Irs. C. R. 
Dame and occupied by Charles W. Young and D. A. Heath : 



)10 CITY OF CONCOKD. 





Value. 


LO.S.S. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


.l!2,500.0() 


.'«;142.00 


.tl,o00.00 


*142.00 


Contents : 










C. W. Young, 


600.00 


3.60 


oOO.OO 


■ 3.60 


D. A. Heath, 


500.00 


30.00 


None. 


None. 



Residence 208 Xorth Main Street, owned by Charles A. and 
George JM. Fowler : 

Value. Los.s. In.surance. In.s. paid. 

Building, $2,600.00 $35.00 $2,000.00 135.00 

Box 23. October 6, 1.10 a. m. Second alarm for preceding 
fire. 

Box 24. October 6, 1.25 a. m. Fire on roof of residence 
corner Bridge Street and Stickney Avenue, owned by Carolyn 
F. Stickney. Caused by brand from Steani Mill Court fire- 
Extinguished with chemicals. Recall, 4.55 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,300.00 $4.96 $2,000.00 4.9G 

Still. October 6, 2.04 a. m. Fire on roof of Concord Coal 
Company plant. Bridge Street. Caused by brand from Steam 
Mill Court fire. Extinguished by Chemical Company. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. October 8, 10.25 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
George L. Theobald, 2 South Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. October 9, 1.54 p. m. RekindHng of fire in coal in 
pocket, Steam Mill Court. Chemical Companj' responded. 

Still. October 9, 2.09 j). ra. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Kearsarge wagon sent. 400 feet 
hose wet. No loss. 

Still. October 10, 7.03 a. m. RekindHng of fire in coal 
in pocket, Steam Mill Court. Exercise wagon sent. 400 feet 
hose wet. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 11.49 a. m. Chimney fire in American 
House, 125 North Main Street. Chemical Company responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. October 15, 4.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 



FIRE DEl'AItTMENT. 



311 



of John George, 205 Xortli ]\[ain Street. Extinguished hy 
Chemical Compan^^ Xo loss. 

Still. October 16, 11.87 a.m. Chimney tire in tailor shop 
of T. W. Williams, 21 North :Main Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 35. October 17,12.28 a.m. Fire in Batchelder Block, 
14-20 Warren Street, owned by Mrs. Frank J.Batchelder and 
occupied by M. H. Bragg, upholsterer, J. A, Dadmun, tinsmith, 
C. W. Dadmun, electrical supplies, W. D. Nutting, jeweler, 
Rowell & Plummer, office, and E. B. Morse, storage of car- 
riages. This blaze, hke the one in Steam Mill Court, had 
attained great headway when discovered, and as surrounding 
l)roperty was endangered a second alarm was given. 

Adjoining this building on the east, 10-12 Warren Street, 
was the brick block owned and occupied by the Pickering 
Furniture Company, wliich was damaged by hre, smoke and 
water. 

North of the Pickering Block and also adjoining the Batch- 
elder Block, 3-5-7 Durgin Lane, was the brick block owned 
by Welch and Sullivan and occupied by owners as a wholesale 
and retail liquor store. Moose Club, club room, Companies C 
and E, N. 11. N. G. armory, and Orren Couch, residence. 

This building was also damaged by fire, smoke and water. 

Cause of tire unknown. 4,700 feet hose wet. Recall, 2.56 
a. m. 

Batchelder Block : 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


liuilding. 


$4,000.00 


|!2,000.00 


-t 1,000.00 


-ti,ooo.oo 


Contents : 










E. B. Morse, 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


None. 


Fleischman Co., 


410.00 


125.00 


410.00 


125.00 


No. Prov. Co., 


380.00 


380.00 


* 1,500.00 


320.00 


M. IT. Bragg, 


200.00 


200.00 


None. 


None. 


C. W. Dadmun, 


1,500.00 


650.00 


500.00 


450.00 


W. D. Nutting, 


500.00 


25.00 


None. 


None. 


J. D. Maguire, 


70.00 


35.00 


None. 


None. 


11. G. Sargent, 


75.00 


75.00 


None. 


None. 



Includes property in main stable. 



312 



CITY OF CONCOED. 



Pickerino; Block 



Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 17,000.00 


.1?1,-20G.00 


$4,000 00 


.$1,206.00 


Contents, 6,000.00 


1,500.00 


3,000.00 


1,500.00 


Welch & Sullivan Block : 








Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, ^10,000.00 


i«?2,023.00 


16,000.00 


$2,023.00 


Contents : 








\Yelcli & Sullivan, 4,000.00 


1,077.44 


4,000.00 


1,077.44 


O. Couch, 200.00 


GO.OO 


Xone. 


Xone. 



Box 35. October 17, 12.35 a. m. Second alarm for pre- 
ceding fire. 

Still. October 17, 9.11 a. m. Rekindling of fire in mat- 
tresses in Pickering Block, 10-12 Warren Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 17, 10.45 a. m. Fire in bed in residence of 
Frank Garland, 16 Montgomery Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. Loss trifling. 

Still. October 17, 7.35 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Smith Block, North Main Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded. Fire discovered under stairway on first floor 
in room connected with the jewelry establishment of J. C. 
Derby, and box alarm sent in. 

Box 35. October 17, 7.42 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Fire originated in the J. C. Derby jewelry establishment, 
20 North INfain Street. Building owned by Hon. John B. 
Smith. Cause of fire unknown. 250 feet hose wet. Kecall 
7.52 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $65,000.00 $225.00 $30,000.00 $225.00 

Contents, 25,000.00 125.00 6,000.00 125.00 

Still. October 21, 1.51 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George F. Silsby, 51 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 22, 11.45 a. m. Brush fire on Auburn 
Street, near Franklin Street. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany. No loss. 



fii;k i)i:i'Ai;r.MKNT. 313 

Still. October 'io, 11.5(1 a. iii. Chimney tire in residence 
of Charles Ordway, 22 Monroe Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 23, 8.44 p. m. Fire in New England 
Gi'anite Co. stone plant, east of IJ. & M. R. R. tracks (old 
Northern line), and opposite Franklin Street. Fire originated 
in the motor house, a small wooden structure, which, with the 
contents was destroyed. One of the immense sheds was also 
slightly damaged. 

Rolling stock standing near the Vuiilding, and freight con- 
sisting of cut granite, was also damaged. 

Cause unknown. 

Upon the arrival of the Chemical Company it was apjtarent 
that fm-ther aid was necessary, and a messenger was sent to 
pull a box which, owing to the distance, consumed consider- 
able time. 

Box 23. Octol)er 23, 8.58 p. m. See preceding alarm. 
1,800 feet hose wet. Recall 9.2G p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Buildings, 


13,075.00 


$335.00 $2,750.00 


$335.00 


Contents, 


4,000.00 


592.74 2,700.00 


592.74 




*1,790.00 


1,440.00 None. 


None. 


SjILL. 


October 27, 3.42 p. 


m. Chimney tire in 


residence 



of Mrs. John Robinson, 48 Concord Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss 

Still. October 29, 5.45 p. m. Chimney lire in residence 
of Rev. Wm. Ilimes, 116 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 3.34 p. nL Fire in residence 11 Water 
Street, owned and occupied by Walter J\Ic]Mahon. Chemical 
Company responded, but almost immediately box 45 was pulled 
for the same fire. See next alarm. 

Box 45. November 3, 3.35 ]>. m. See preceding alarm. 
Cause of fire unknown. 300 feet hose wet. Recall 3.53 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,200.0(1 $225.00 $1,500.00 $225.00 

Contents, 1,200.00 225.00 700.00 225.00 

* Cut granite on cars. 



314 CITY OF CONCOBD. 

Still. November 4, 12.40 p. ni. Chimney tire in residence 
of Charles Cogswell, 5 Garden Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. Xo loss. 

Box 23. November 4, 9.55 p. m. IJarn on Ferry Street, 
east of railroad tracks, owned and occupied by Daniel Iliggins, 
destroyed with contents. Cause incendiary. Recall 10.43 
p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, .15200.00 1200.00 sJ^lOO.OO 1100.00 

Contents, 300.00 300.00 None. None. 

Box 23. November 4, 11.29 p. m. While a detail of lire- 
men were playing upon the ruins of the Higgins i)r6perty, 
another barn upon the opposite side of Ferry Street, and sev- 
eral hundred feet farther east, burst into tlames. This build- 
ing was owned and occupied by II. II. Blake. 

Upon the arrival of the department the line of hose then in 
use was spliced enabling the firemen to play upoi>-the fire from 
the only available hydrant. With the exception of a few vehi- 
cles saved by the detail of firemen on duty at the scene Of the 
preceding fire the loss was total. 

Cause incendiary. 4,000 feet of hose wet at both fires. 
Recall 4.49 a. m., November 5. 

Value. Loss.. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, i^GOO.OO -l^eOO.OO $500.00 $500.00 

Contents, 300.00 300.00 None. None. 

Box 25. November 7, 5.35 p. m. Shght fire in shop of C. W. 
Drake, glazier, Durgin Street. Caused by breaking of kero- 
sene lamp hanger. Extinguished without assistance from the 
department. Recall 5.40 }>. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $1,000.00 $15.00 $800.00 $15.00 

Still. November 12, 1.02 p.m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Cleary, 14 Walker Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. November 14, 2.37 ]). in. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. B. Watts, 24 ]\ra))le Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPAIiTMENT. ol5 

Still. Xovembev IG, 4.50 p. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of Thomas Pelkey, 11 Waverly Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 17, 11.05 a. m. Chinmey fire in resi- 
dence of David BerrjTiian, 17 W'est Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company'. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 12.14 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. J. Reille, 147 North State Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 12.29 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mary J. Oakley, 3 Foster Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 19, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Alfred Ford, 10 Tuttle Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 19, 12.27 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of N. G. Can-, 24 Thompson Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 20, 12.56 }). ni. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. J. Morgan, 11 Washington Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 17. November 20, 6.10 p. m. Fire in double-tenement 
house, 31-33 Union Street, owned and occupied by E. IF. and 



L. B. Runnells. 


Caused by 


overheated 


chimney. 


2,050 feet 


hose wet. Recall, 7.05 p. m. 










Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building : 










E. II. Runnells, 


$3,500.00 


*361.05 


12,700.00 


1361.05 


L. B. Runnells, 


1,800.00 


250.00 


1,000.00 


250.00 


Contents : 










E. H. Runnells, 


1,000.00 


75.00 


600.00 


75.00 


L B. Runnells, 


1,000.00 


65.00 


500.00 


65.00 



Still. November 21, 9.29 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. L. A. Dyer, 112 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 21, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Octave Dennis, 28 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



.316 CITY OF CONX'OED. 

Still. November 21, 7.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of N. F. Carter, 51 Rumford Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No. loss. 

Still. November 24, 1.21 p. m. (xrass fire in rear of llU 
South State Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
No loss. 

4—4-4. November 25, 11.56 a. m. Brush fire on Plains 
near the Perkins place. Chemical Company and detail from 
the department sent under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. 
Labored three hours. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 6.22 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles E. Gray, 6 Lewis Com-t. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. November 30, 7.41 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Champagne, 15 Perkins Court. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 17. December 2, 6.40 p. m. Fire in residence, 3 Gor- 
don Court, owned by the Bartlett heirs and occupied by F. IL 
Matheson. Caused by overheated chimney. 800 feet hose 
wet. Recall, 7.31 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, 11,000.00 $600.00 $800.00 $600.00 

Contents, 400.00 400.00 400.00 350.00 

Still. December 4, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of I. S. Livingston, 57 Warren Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 4.52 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. A. C. Morse, 35 South Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 6.29 p. m. Fire in Central Block, 27 
North Main Street, owned by Mrs. Jennie D. Roby and occu- 
pied by N. C. Nelson & Co., jewelers, and W. H. Campbell, 
tailor. Caused by rats and matches. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, $11,500.00 


$250.00 


$6,000.00 


$250.00 


Contents : 








N. C. Nelson & Co., 7,000.00 


19.00 


4,500.00 


19.00 


W. IL Campbell, 1,000.00 


52.70 


600.00 


52.70 



FIIIE DEPARTMENT. 317 

Still. December 9, 1.50 p. ra. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles A. Sanquist, 14 Pierce Street. Chemical Company 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. December 12, 4.o4 p. m. Chimney lire in residence 
of Frank H. Fifield, 19 Green Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 14, 9.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Jion. B. A. Kimball, 44 South ]Main Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 16, 10.16 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of T. Kristo, 4 Foster Street. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. December 16, 10.49 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Eugene Callahan, I'd Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 17, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Thomas Reed, East Penacook Street, near Wattanummon 
Bridge. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 21, 9.08 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. E. Lewis, 17^ South State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 21, 4.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of G. D. Meader, 10 Marshall Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

11-11. December 26, 6.35 a. m. A call for assistance from 
Penacook. Engine 2, Eagle wagon, 1,450 feet of hose and 
detail from the department sent under command of Engineer 
J. J. McNulty. 

Later extension ladders were called for and sent l)y electric 
car. 

Engine worked one and one half hours. 1,350 feet hose wet 
by Concord contingent. 

See Penacook report. 

Still. December 26, 10.36 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in basement 8 Pleasant Street. Chemical 
Company I'esponded but no assistance was requu-ed. No fire. 

Still. December 29, 8.16 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Lizzie Mclntire, 77 School Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



-318 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Still. December 30, 5.04 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. A. F. Holt, 56 South Main Street. Chemical Company 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Box 24. December 31, 1.43 a. m. Fire in Commercial 
House, 143 North Main Street, owned by S. J. & P. J. 
Matson and occupied by owners. Cause unknown. 2,1 00 feet 
hose wet. Recall, 3.1'2 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Biulding, 18,000 00 14,000.00 18,000.00 $4,000.00 

Contents, 5,000.00 2,736.70 5,000.00 2,736.70 

Pena(ook. 

Bkll. January 13, 3.14 ]>. m. Fire in Bonney's Hotel, 
Boscawen side of river. 

Still. January 15, 8.45 p. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of Frank Monroe, 4 Charles Street. No loss. 

Still. January 24, 7.00 a. m. Chimney tire in Eagle 
Ijlock, Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. Januar}' 26, 7.40 ]>. m. Chimney lire in residence 
of Walter Dowd, 18 East Canal Street. No loss. 

Still. February 12, 8.40 p.m. Chimney fire at 12 Walnut 
Street. No loss. 

Bell. March 2, 9.30 a. m. Alarm caused b}' smoke from 
wood in oven in residence of Charles H. Emmons, 8 jVlerri- 
mack Street. No loss. 

Still. March 3, 7.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Richard Lessard, 18 INIerrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. April 15, 4.20 p. m. Brush fire near Washington 
Street. Labored one half hour. No loss. 

Bell. April 20, 2.40 p. m. Brush fire neai; residence of 
S. S. Hanson, South ^Nlain Street. 1,150 feet hose wet. No 
loss. 

Still. April 29, 3.25 p. m. Chimney fire at 12 Walnut 
Street. No loss. 

Bell. May 11, 11 a. m. Brush fire in rear of Cross Street 
extension. Labored one and one half hours. No loss. 

SiTLL. May 11, 7.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Charles H. Barrett, 4 AVashington Street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 319 

Bell. May 26, (j.30 j>. m. Fire in residence 47 Washing- 
ton Street, owned by O. J. Fifield and occupied by Dr. A. II. 
Ilovt. Cause unknown. 1,000 feet hose wet. 





Value. 


Los.s. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


!5?2,00O.0O 


*188.00 


*l,r)O0,00 


*1 88.00 


Contents, 


4,000.00 


1,200.00 


3,000.00 


856.00 



Still. June 22, 4.15 p. m. Chimney tire in residence of 
John C. Linehan, 11 Charles Street. Xo loss. 

Bell. July 7, 11.38 a. m. Chimney fire in Eagle I31ock, 
Washington Square. Xo loss. 

Bs:ll. July 22, 6.12 p. m. Fire on Boscawen side of river. 

Bell. July 20, 8.20 p. m. Brush fire west of main road 
near Willow Hollow. Labored one hour. Xo loss. 

Bell. Juh' 27, 11.15 a. m. I3rush fire west of main road 
near Willow Hollow. Lal>ored one and three fourths hours. 
Xo loss. 

Still. July 30, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John Chadwick, 13 JVIerrimack Street. Xo loss. 

Bell. August 29, 12.50 p. m. Slight fire in residence of 
S. L. Hanson, 159 South Main Street. Caused by kerosene 
stove. Xo loss. 

Still. September 11, 12.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Miner, Elm Street. Xo loss. 

Still. October 18, 8.30 p. m. Grass fire in lumber yard 
near Penacook depot. Xo loss. 

Still. Octoljer 27, 11.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Florence, 76 Merrimack Street. Xo loss. 

Bell. Xovember 2, 6.40 p. n\. Fii-e in picker room of 
woolen factory, Washington Street, owned and occu2)ied by 
Concord Manufacturing Company. Caused by spark from 
picker. Loss on contents 1322, covered by insurance. 

Still. Xovember 3, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Monroe, 4 Charles Street. Xo loss. 

Still. Xovember 4, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of G. H. Streeter, 22 Spring Street. Xo loss. 

Still. Xovember 15, 8.45 p.iiL Chimney fire in residence 
of Moses Xoe, 52 South Main Street. Xo loss. 



320 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Stit.i,. Xovember 16, 10.00 a. m. Grass tire near Charles- 
Street. Xo loss. 

Still. November 17, 11.45 a. m. Chimney tire in resi- 
dence of George W. Blake, S Maple Street. No loss. 

Still. November 17, 6.30 p.m. Chimney tire in residence 
of L. H. Crowthei-, 23 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. November 21, 10.15 a. m. Brush tire on land owned 
by S. G. Sanborn, near Horse Hill. Labored three hours. No 
loss. 

Still. December 10, 9.15 a. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of J. F. Sessions, 75 High Street. No loss. 

Bell. December 10, 8.57 p. m. Fire in Eagle Block, 
Washington Square, owned by Farrand and Chandler and 
occupied by George E. Farrand, Lena Fournier, and Albert 
Charron. Caused l)v overheated chimney. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


|;3,500.00 


•1?25.00 


*2,500.00 


$25.00 


Contents : 










G. E. Farrand, 


4,000.00 


12.15 


1,500.00 


12.15 


L. Fournier, 


500.00 


21.00 


350.00 


21.00 


A. Charron, 


500.00 


10.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. December 11, 12.40 p. m. Chimney tire in resi- 
dence of Charles E. Duchaine, 17 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 9.50 a. m. Chimney tire in Eagle 
Block, Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. December 24, 9.00 a. m. Chimney tire in residence 
of David Carney, 7 Park Street. No loss. 

Bell. December 26, 6.07 a. m. Fire in Exchange Block, 
owned by heirs of John A. Holmes, heirs of Joshua Sawyer, 
and Mary E. Bell. Occupied by Masons and Odd Fellows' 
lodge rooms, and by Various parties for mercantile purposes,, 
offices, rooms, etc. Cause unknown. Aid summoned from 
city proper. 

Building. Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

J. A. Holmes' heirs, $11,250.00 $4,689.77 $4,200.00 $2,770.30 
Mary E.Bell, 8,035.70 5,100.00 4,500.00 3,784.77 

J. Sawyer heirs, 3,214.30 402.08 1,700.00 402.08 



FIRE DEPAKTMENT. 321 



Contents : 


( 








C'ontoocook Lodge, No. 










26, I. 0. 0. F., $1,500.00 


$915.00 


$800.00 


$800.00 


Hannah Dustin Lodge, 










No. 49, L 0. 0. F., 


816.00 


500.00 


400.00 


400.00 


Winniperket Encamp- 










ment, No. 37, 1.O.O.F 


., 300.00 


150.00 


150.00 


150.00 


Horace Chase Lodge, 










No. 72, F. & A. M., 


750.00 


500.00 


300.00 


300.00 


Henry C. Holbrook, 


650.00 


181.75 


200.00 


181.75 


F. C. Rowe, 


300.00 


25.00 


None. 


None. 


Charles Rowe, 


200.00 


25.00 


None. 


None. 


R. C. Gale, 


3,500.00 


300.00 


None. 


None. 


G. H. Hubl)ard, 


4,500.00 


450.00 


2,000.00 


450.00 


Fitield & Hubbard, 


400.00 


175.00 


200.00 


175.00 


C. H. Fowler, 


7,200.00 


2,229.39 


3,500.00 


2,229.39 


B. M. Weeks, 


375.00 


67.00 


300.00 


67.00 


:Mary E. Bell, 


400.00 


400.00 


200.00 


200.00 


Still. December 28, 11.15 


a. m. CI 


limney fire 


1 in resi- 



dence of Mary Linehan, 11 Washington Street. No loss. 

East Concord. 

Still. February 11, 10.00 a. ra. Chimney fire in residence 
of Samuel Batchelder, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. February 27, 10.00 a. m. SUght fire in blacksmith 
shop, Penacook Street, owned by W. A. Cowley. No loss. 

Bell. March 7, 9.10 p. m. Fire in portable sawmill on 
Plains, near Sugar Ball, owned and occupied by Herbert L. 
Knowles. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $100.00 $100.00 None. None. 

Contents, 1,800.00 1,200.00 600.00 600.00 

Still. April 26, 12.00 m. Brush fire on land owned by 
James Riley and Alside Lemay, near Pecker Street. Labored 
one hour. No loss. 

Bell. April 26, 1.00 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
W. A. Cowley and others, near Penacook Street. Labored 
five hours. No los.s. 
21 



322 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. September 20, 2.00 p. m. Slight lire in residence 
of E. B. Carleton, Penacook Street. Caused by explosion of 
kerosene stove. Loss trifling. 

Bell. September 27, 9.10 p. m. Fire in set of biiildings, 
dwelling and barn, owned and occupied by W. D. Merrick, 
Penacook Street. Caused by defective chimney. Aid sum- 
moned from city proper. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 13,100.00 $3,.500.00 $3,100.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 455.05 1,100.00 455.05 

West Concord. 

Bell. April 30, 1.40 p. m. Brush lire on lot south of Pena- 
cook Park, owned by the city. Labored one hour and fifty 
minutes. Xo loss. 

Still. April 30, 3.20 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Concord Electricr Company, near Sewall's Falls. Labored two 
hours and ten minutes. No loss. 

Bell. May 3, 8.30 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
A. H. Engel, east of Main Street. Labored one hour and 
twenty minutes. Xo loss. 

Still. May 25, 7.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Jeremiah Harrington, 50 Ilutchins Street. No loss. 

Bell. June 1, 9.30 a.m. Fire in car barn between Electric 
Avenue and K Street, owned and occupied by Concord and 
Montreal Railroad. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

l^uilding, $1,300.00 $77.50 $1,300.00 $77.50 

Contents, 6,000.00 1,000.00 6,000.00 1,000.00 

Still. November 12, 8.00 p. m. Brush fire in rear of Old 
Mill, North State Street. Labored one hour. No loss. 



FIRE depart:\ient. 

SUMJIARY. 



323 



Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. Net loss 



Buildings: 


$239,775.00 
28,000.00 
4,100.00 
1,300.00 






$34,100.76 

7,170.15 

3,100.00 

77.50 


$15,200.00 
3,234.70 


Penacook 


I0,404.85i 14.'400.00 




West Concord 


77.50 


1.300.00 








Total . 


$273,175.00 

$193,851.67 
29,891.00 
3,800.00 
6,000.00 


$62,983.11 

$95,541.59 
7 483 29 


$158,250.00 

$95,160.00 
io ann (\r\ 


$44,448.41 

$62,727.84 
6,164.89 
1,055.05 
1,000.00 


$18,534.70 

$32,813.75 
1,318.40 


Contents: 
Precinct 






1 [655.05 T.m.m 

1,000.00 6,000.00 


West Concord 







$233,542.67 
273,175.00 


$105,679.93 $115,76000 
62,983.111 158.250.00 


$70,947,781 $34,732.15 
44,448.411 18,-534.70 


Buildings 




Buildings and 


$506 717 67 


ftiRS «K5 n,i: *97d nin nn 


$115,396.19j$53,266.85 







Comparative Table of Losses, 1895-1905. 



Year. 


Gross loss. 


Net loss. 


Year. 


Gross loss. 


Net loss. 


1895 . . . 


$8,737.86 
68,439.05 
14,148.71 
17,945.46 
7,846.33 
54,430.36 


$3,672.39 
32,012.42 
4,882.25 
7,428.00 
1,550.00 
6,792.57 


1901 


$34,551.40 
20,379.25 
70,320.41 
26,301.70 

168,663.04 


$13,643.93 










38,119.40 
6,380.00 
53,266.85 


1898 


1904 




1905 


1900 







Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows : 
Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first-class 
Araoskeag engine, " Eagle," with modern hose wagon, attached to 
Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men) ; one second-class 
Amoskeag engine, " Keai'sarge," and modern hose wagon, 
attached to the Kearsarge Steam Fire Engine Company (14 
men) ; one second-class Amoskeag engine, " Governor Hill," 
relief steamer, in charge of an engineer and fireman ; one 
double 60-gallon tank Holloway chemical engine in charge of 
two permanent men, one ladder truck, "City of Concord," 
attached to Hook and Ladder Company (21 men) ; one house 
man at Central Fire Station. There are eleven horses kept at 
this station. There are six permanent men located at the Cen- 



324 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



tral Fire Station and one permanent man at each hose house 
within the precinct. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Washington 
Street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent man and 
horse. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State streets, has a modern hose 
wagon with permanent man and horse. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

The "Pioneer" Steamer Company (28 men), at Penacook, is 
a fourth-class Silsby, with two hose wagons. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has a 
Hunneman 6-inch cylinder hand engine and a modern hose 
Avagon. 

Old Fort (30 men). East Concord, has a 4i-inch cylinder 
Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck. 



Hose. 



Fabric : 
Precinct . 
Penacook 
West Concord . 

Leather : 
East Concord — good 
" " — poor 



Pu] 



.ESEHVOIRS. 



1. Main Street, opposite Abbot-Downing Co. 

2. Main Street, middle front state-house yard 

3. Main Street, rear court house 

4. State Street, corner Washington Street* 

5. Ruraford Street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's 

6. Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street* 

7. School Street, corner of Summit Street* 





S,500 feet. 


2,000 » 


900 " 


11,400 feet. 


400 feet. 


.500 " 


900 feet. 


Capacity, 


cubic feet. 


1,000 




1,500 




2,000 




2,000 




1,000 




4,000 




3,500 



'Brick cemented. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 325 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPPI 

Number, Locatiox, Etc. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire-alarm 
boxes, the city is divided into five districts, viz. : 

District 1. Embraces that section of the city north and 
west of Washington Street, box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washington 
streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
streets. 

Districts 4 and 5. Embrace all south of Pleasant Street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the district. 

District No. 1. 

9. New Hampshire state prison. 

12. Curtice Avenue. 
13.' Franklin and Rumford. 

14. Bradley and Walker. 

15. Main and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. C. S. Gale's store. 

19. Centi-e and Auburn. 

District No. 2. 

m. State, opposite Court. 

23. Main and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 

25. Main and School. 

26. Centre and Union. 

27. School and Merrimack. 

28. School and Spring. 

29. Centre and Essex. 



326 CITY OF CONCORD. 

District No. 3. 

32. Warren and Pine. 

34. Central Fire Station. 

35. Martin's drug store. 

36. Pleasant and Spring. 

37. Pleasant and North Fruit. 

38. Orchard and Merrimack. 

District No. 4. 

41. South and Thompson. 

42. Good Will Hose House. 

43. Main and Fayette. 

45. Nelson & Durrell's store. 

46. Perley and Grove. 

47. South, opposite Downing. 

48. Thorndike and South. 

49. West and Mills. 

412. Wall and Elm. 

413. Main, opposite Thorndike. 

414. State and West. 

District No. 5. 

51. Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. 

52. South Main and Allison. 

53. Hall and Hammond. 

54. Broadway and Pillsbui-y. 

56. St. Paul's School. 

57. Pleasant View. 

521. Broadway and Rockingham. 

Private Boxes. 

5. Boston & Maine Railroad — north end passenger depot. 

6. The Abbot-Downing Company. 

7. New Hampshire State Plospital. 

8. Page Belting Company. 

9. Three boxes inside New Hampshire state prison. 
33. State house. 

55. Boston & Maine Railroad old repair shops. 



FIRE DEl'ARTMENT. 327 

FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

Alarms rung in fi-om boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 413, 414, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57 and 521 will not be 
responded to by the Alert Hose Company until signaled. The 
signal to proceed to the lire will be four blows or second alarm, 
excepting alarms rung in from box 56. 

Alarms rung in from boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 
19, 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 32, 37, 56 and 57 will not be responded 
to by the Good Will Hose Company until signaled. It will be 
governed by the same signals governing Alert Hose Company- 
The Alert Hose and Good Will Hose companies will hitch up 
and remain in readiness 20 minutes after the first alarm, to 
all boxes not responded to on first alarm. Then, receiving no 
signal, the officers in charge shall dismiss their companies. 

Alarms rung in from boxes 12, 37, 53, 54, 57 and 521 will 
not be responded to by Kearsarge Company on first alarm. 

The signal to proceed to the fire will be two blows, four 
blows, or second alarm, as circumstances may warrant. 

Kearsarge Steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose Company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to boxes 6 and 7, on first alarm : to boxes 23, 
24, 25, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43, 45 and 413, on second; to all others 
on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill Steamer will respond to boxes 8 and 9 on first 
alarm; to boxes 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 26, 
27, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 48, 49, 412, 414, 52, 54, 
55, 57 and 521 on second; to all others on third. 

Chemical Engine will respond to all box alarms except 8, 9, 
51, 56, 57 and 521. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company will respond to all third alarms 
occurring before the recall, whether emanating from same box 
or not. 

Two rounds of 11 strokes each will signalize the requu-e- 
ment of assistance out of town, and will be responded to by a 
detail of three men fi'om each company, appointed for the pur- 
pose, and by those alone. 

Two additional blows will indicate that the call for assist- 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ance emanates from East Concord. Such apparatus will be 
detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further aid is nec- 
essary, box 34 (Central Station) will follow. 
All out signal, three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Sigjjal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on the 
bells, and will be responded to by a detail of four men from 
each company, appointed for the purpose, and by those alone. 

Military Signal. 
Two rounds of 8-1-2. 

Concord State Fair Grounds. 

Two rounds of 5-1-2. 

To be responded to by Good Will Company and apparatus, 
Eagle Company excepting engineer and stoker, Eagle wagon, 
Kearsarge Engine, engineer and stoker, and Hook and Ladder 
Company. 

All apparatus excepting Kearsarge Engine to return imme- 
diately to quarters with detail sufficiently large to reload and 
work apparatus should occasion require. 

Companies not responding to remain in. quarters until recall 
is sounded, in readiness to respond to summons by telephone. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause of 
15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will be given at 
8 o'clock a m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given at 
1 o'clock p. m. 

The signal to close all schools for one session will be given 
at 11.30 a. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of the 
fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every Monday 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 329 

afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It will be one single round 
only, indicating by the strokes on the l)ells the number of the 
box. The boxes used for this purpose will vary each week, 
alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week day a single blow upon the bells will 
be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Fire-Alakm Teleguapii 

is the " Garaewell " patent. It embraces 39 miles of wire. 

On the lines are 41 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the city, 
and nine private boxes — in all, 50. There are three alarm 
bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell metal), one of 3,740 pounds 
(bell metal), and one of 2,000 pounds (American steel). There 
are also 16 mechanical tappers, 40 direct-action tappers, one 
four-circuit repeater, and five indicators. 

The battery consists of 234 storage battery cells for the 
lines, and 34 open-circuit battery cells for other electrical pur- 
poses. 

The alarm system was installed in 1880 by the Gamewell 
Fire- Alarm Telegraph Company. 

DiKECTIOXS FOR GlVlNG AN AlaRM. 

Above all things, keep cool. 

To obtain the key to the box, break the glass in the key box 
located beneath the alarm box. 

In each box there is a small bell called a " tell-tale," designed 
expressly for the purpose of informing you whether an alarm 
is being transmitted the instant you open the door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull down the 
hook once only and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to 
attempt to pull another until the one already pulled had per- 
formed its mission. 

Wait until 20 seconds have elapsed after the "tell-tale" has 
stopped ringing, close the door, which will restore the arma- 
ture to the position it left when the door w^as opened. 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go. 



330 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Should there be no response, pull it again. 

Then should there be no response, go to the next box. 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the scene 
of the lire, remain at the box to direct the department. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it except 
in case of tire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is immi- 
nent danger of the building catching. 



REGULATIONS OF C0:N^C0RD FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 



Sectiox 1. The lire department shall consist of a chief 
engineer, two assistants within the precinct, one engineer each 
from Ward 1, Ward 2 and Ward o ; two steamer and hose 
companies, one company to consist of thirteen men, including 
driver, and one company to consist of fom-teen men, including 
drivers; one relief steamer [company] to consist of two men ; 
two hose companies to consist of eleven men, including driver ; 
a chemical engine company to consist of two men ; a hook and 
ladder company to consist of twenty-one men, including driver ; 
a house man at Central Fire Station ; steamer Pioneer, not less 
than twenty or more than forty men ; hand engine companies 
No. 2 and No. 3, not less than twenty or more than thirty men 
each. The engineers shall exercise the powers of fire wards, 
and those within the precinct shall constitute the board of 
engineers. 

Sect. 2. The chief engineer and assistant engineers and all 
other members of the fire depai'tment shall hold then- respec- 
tive oftices and places until they are removed, or theii- offices or 
places are otherwise vacated. The board of mayor and alder- 
men, for cause, and after a due hearing, may at any time re- 
move from office or place the chief engineer, any assistant en- 
gineer, or any officer or member of the department. In case of 
vacancies fi-om any cause in the department, of officers or men 
connected in any manner with the fire service, such vacancies 
shall be filled by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 3. The chief engineer shall give his entire time t» 
the duties of his office, and shall not engage in or be connected 
with any other business or occupation, and shall reside in a 
house to be furnished by the city free from rent. He shall 
receive in full for his services, in addition to the use of said 
house, rent free, the sum of twelve hundred and fifty dollars 
per annum. 



332 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 4. The chief engineer shall have the sole command 
at fires over all persons, whether members of the fire depart- 
ment or not. He shall direct all proper measures for extin- 
guishing fires, protecting property, preserving order and en- 
forcing the laws, ordinances, and regulations respecting fires ; 
and shall examine into the condition of the fire engines and all 
other fire apparatus, and of the fire engine houses, and other 
houses belonging to the city and used by the department, and 
by the companies thereto attached, as often as once a week, and 
whenever directed to do so by the mayor, or the committee on 
fire department through its chairman. He shall certify all bills 
and submit the same for inspection monthly to the joint stand- 
ing committee on fire department. He shall report to the city 
council annually a statement of the receipts and expenditures 
of the fire department, the condition of the fire engines and all 
other fire apparatus, a detailed schedule of the property in his 
charge, the names of the ofticers and members, and all other 
facts in relation to the department. Whenever the fire engines 
or other fire apparatus require repairs he shall, under the direc- 
tion of the committee on fire department, cause the same to be 
made, and as far as practicable he shall examine into the loca- 
tion and condition of fire apparatus belonging to corporations 
or private individuals within the limits of the city. He shall 
require permanent men, when not otherwise engaged, to per- 
form such other duties and do such other work as in his judg- 
ment may be deemed proper. He shall be responsible for the 
proper care of all property connected with the fii'e department. 
He shall keep fair and exact rolls of the respective companies 
specifying the time of admission and discharge, and the age of 
€ach member, and shall report annually, or oftener if directed, 
all accidents by fire which may happen within the city, with 
the causes thereof, the number and description of the buildings 
destroyed or injured, and the amount of loss and insurance on 
the same, together with the names of owners or the occupants, 
and shall make returns as required by the Laws of 1889, chap- 
ter 84, and entitled : " An act in relation to returns and statis- 
tics of fires." He shall visit each department house as often as 
practicable, and inspect the men, the books of the house, and 



FIRE . DEPARTMENT. 33S 

see that the quarters are properly conducted and in good order. 
He shall have the power to suspend any officer or member of 
the department for insubordination, disorderly conduct or neg- 
lect of duty, said suspension to continue pending the action of 
the mayor and aldermen. The chief engineer shall examine 
all places where shavings and other combustible materials may 
be collected or deposited, and cause the same to be removed by 
the tenants or occupants of such places, or at their expense,, 
whenever in his opinion such removal is necessary for the secu- 
rity of the city against lires. 

Sect. 5. In the absence of the chief engineer, the next as- 
sistant engineer in rank, who may be present, shall have the 
powers and perform the duties of the chief engineer and the 
seniority in rank of the engineers shall be determined by the 
board of engineers at their first meeting. 

Sect. G. The foreman of each engine, hose, and hook and 
ladder company, immediately after every fire at which said com- 
pany may have attended, shall examine into the condition of 
the fire apparatus belonging to his respective company, and re- 
port any deficiency which may exist to the chief engineer. Pie 
shall keep, or cause to be kept by the clerk of his company, 
exact rolls, specifying the time of admission, discharge, and age 
of each member, and accounts of all city property entrusted to 
the care of the several members, and of all cases of absence and 
tardiness, in a book provided for that purpose by the city, which 
rolls and record books are always to be subject to the order of 
the chief engineer and mayor. They shall also make, or cause 
to be made, to the chief engineer, true and accurate returns of 
all members, with their ages, and of the ajiparatus entrusted to 
their care, whenever called upon so to do. 

Sect. 7. The foreman of each company shall, under the 
direction of the chief engineer, have chai'ge and management 
of his company at fires ; the assistant foreman shall assist the 
foreman in the discharge of his duties, and act as clerk of the 
company, and in the absence of the foreman assume his author- 
ity. The foreman and assistant foreman shall be appointed by 
the chief engineer. 



334 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 8. The stewards of the Alert and Good Will Hose 
companies shall act as drivers of hose carriages, take charge of 
and properly care for and exercise the horses Used by each com- 
pany. They shall be permanently engaged and devote their 
whole time to the department, and sleep in their respective hose 
houses at night ; and for the proper execution of all duties re- 
quired of them shall be subject to the direction of the chief 
engineer. 

Skct. 9. It shall be the duty of every engine, hose, and 
hook and ladder company, to have its engine, hose and other 
apparatus cleaned, washed, oiled, reeled and housed immediately 
after its return from any fire or service, and at all times to main- 
tain the same in good condition, and the members of the several 
companies shall perform any necessary duties which the chief 
engineer or their respective foreman may direct. 

Sect. 10. All members of the department when on duty 
shall wear some suitable badge, to be designated by the board 
of engineers. The chief and permanent members shall wear 
at all times when on duty the regulation parade uniform worn 
by the fire department. 

Sect. 11. The pay rolls for the board of engineers and the 
several lire companies shall be made up by the chief and clerk 
of the board of engineers semi-annually, on the first day of 
January and July. Foremen and clerks of companies Mnll for- 
ward their pay rolls to the board of engineers for approval and 
after the action of said engineers and the approval of the city 
auditor and the committee on accounts and claims, said pay rolls 
shall be passed over to the city tax collector, under whose sole 
direction all sums for services of call firemen shall be dis- 
bursed. 

Sect. 12. No charge for extra services will be allowed any 
member of the department unless upon an order of a member 
of the board of engineers. 

Sect. 13. No engine, hose, or hook and ladder carriage 
shall be taken to a fire out of the city without permission from 
the chief engineer, except steamer Pioneer, which may be taken 
to any fire in the village of Penacook, nor shall any apparatus 
of the fire dei)artment be taken from the city except in case of 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 335 

fire, witboiit permission from the board of mayor and aldermen ; 
and in sending any apparatus to aid in extinguishing fires in 
neighboring localities, the chief in all cases will authorize his 
assistant next in rank available to take charge of the direction 
of such apparatus, and not allow any fii-eman, at such an emer- 
gency, to leave the city, except such a number as is actually 
requu-ed to man the apparatus, and no member to leave without 
permission or direction from the chief engineer. 

Sect. 14. It shall be the duty of engineers and firemen, 
whenever there is an alarm of fire in the city, to repair imme- 
diately to the place of such fire, wearing a suitable badge, and 
the engineers shall take proper measures that the several engines 
and other apparatus be arranged and duly worked for the 
speedy and effectual extinguishment of the fire. The engineers 
shall inspect and make themselves familiar with all shops, 
hotels, tenement blocks, and all public buildings, halls, churches, 
schoolhouses, and asylums once in each six months and study 
the location of all hydrants and reservoirs in the city, and gen- 
erally inform themselves in all matters pertaining to their 
duties as engineers. No engineer shall interfere with or 
attempt to give orders relative to the location or use of a line 
of hose, when he has ascertained that another has command of 
it, unless by consent of the engineer in command of it, or by 
orders of the officer in command of the fire ; and it shall be his 
duty to inquire if there is an officer in charge. 

Sect. 15. For each absence from fire, or neglect of duty, 
the chief engineer, the assistant engineers, and engineers of 
steamers shall be fined three dollars, and each other member of 
the department one dollar ; provided, however, that any fire- 
man liable as above may in case of sickness have power of 
substitution by giving notice, each assistant engineer to the 
chief, each foreman to an engineer, and each other member to 
the foreman of his company. All fines shall be paid to the 
clerks of respective companies at the first regular meeting after 
they are incurred. The clerks of companies shall disburse the 
fines to substitutes answering for absent members in cases 
where there were substitutes. In cases where there were no 
substitutes the fines shall be paid to the city. 



336 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 16. Any volimteei- company using the apparatus of 
the city at any fire shall be under the control and command of 
the chief engineer and his assistants, agreeably to the foregoing 
provisions of this chapter. 

Sect. 17. The department shall appear for public parade, 
drill and inspection at such times as the chief engineer and 
committee on fire department shall order, for which purpose 
three hundred dollars can be expended annually. The compa- 
nies in Wards 1, 2, and 3 will attend by invitation and volun- 
tarily. Each company in the department under the direction 
of the chief engineer or assistants shall take out their respective 
engines and apparatus for exercise and drill as often as he shall 
direct, such exercise and drill to take place in public, not often er 
than once a month, and at least once in two months, between 
the first of April and November. 

Sect. 18. The engineers shall have control of all persons 
appointed to serve in any company of the fire department and 
power to direct and control the labor of all persons present at 
any fire. An engineer may and shall cause any fire deemed 
by him to be dangerous in any ])lace to be extinguished or 
removed. 

Sect. 19. The engineers may establish such regulations 
respecting the kindling, guarding and safe-keeping of fires, and 
for the removal of shavings and other combustibles from any 
building or place, as they shall think expedient. Such regula- 
tions shall be signed by a majority of the engineers. Such 
regulations shall be approved by the mayor and aldermen, 
recorded by the city clerk, and copies attested by him 2:)0sted 
up in two or more places in the city thirty days, when they 
shall take effect. Penalties not exceeding twenty dollars for 
each offense may be prescribed by the engineers for the breach 
of such regulations, and such regulations shall remain in force 
until altered or annulled. 

Sect. 20. The board of engineers may from time to time 
make and enforce such regulations for the government of the 
department as may be deemed proper, subject to the approval 
of the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 21. If any member of any of the several companies 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 337 

shall wilfully neglect or refuse to discharge his duty, or shall 
be guilty of disorderly conduct or disobedience to any officer 
or to any engineer, he shall for any such offense be forthwith 
dismissed from the department by direction of the chief engi- 
neer. No i^erson shall be a member of, or serve in, the fire 
department, who is under the age of twenty years, and no per- 
son whose occupation is carried on outside the city shall be 
appointed a member of the fire department. 

Sect. 22. All applicants for membership shall be nominated 
by the chief engineer, and shall receive pay and be considered 
memV)ers of the department from the date of their confirmation 
by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

No person shall hereafter be appointed to any position in the 
fire department unless and until the committee on fire depart- 
ment shall have certified in writing to the board of mayor and 
aldermen that such person has been examined by them, or 
under their supervision, and is in their opinion qualified to per- 
form the duties of the position to which he is nominated. 

No officer or member of the 2)ermanent, or officer of the call, 
force shall attend any political convention as a delegate, dis- 
tribute tickets at any election, or take any part whatever in 
political matters other than to exercise the right of suffrage, 
and no political or religious discussion shall be permitted in 
any of the department hov^ses. 

Sect. 23. The chief engineer shall have the care and man- 
agement of the rooms, apparatus, machinery, wires, poles and 
signal boxes connected with the fire-alarm telegraph. He shall 
prej^are rules and directions for giving alarms of fire through 
the telegraph. He shall have the superintendence, and under 
the direction of the joint standing committee on the fire depart- 
ment have control of the several stations, the apparatus, the 
fm-niture therein, and all other property appertaining to the 
department. He shall, with the assistance of the permanent 
men at the Central Station, make the necessary repairs and 
take care of the fire-alarm system, including the batteries, all 
alarm boxes, and everything pertaining to the fire-alarm sys- 
tem. He shall personally be able to master the fire-alarm in 

every j^articular, and every permanent man at the Central Sta- 

22 



338 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tion~shall be obliged to understand the fire-alarm system, in 
order that the chief engineer may call upon any of them to 
attend [to and repair any part of the same. This provision 
shall not be construed to prevent the chief engineer from 
employing extra linemen when necessary, or from acting 
promptly in any emergency. 

Sect. 24. Permanent officers and men of the department 
shall be'entitled to a vacation, without loss of pay, of fourteen 
days in each year, one day per month, also one night per week 
in addition to said day, to be granted under the direction of 
the chief engineer. 

Sect. 25. The joint standing committee on fire department, 
subject to the board of mayor and aldermen, shall by them- 
selves or agent purchase all supplies in connection with the 
fire department, and direct all repairs of houses and apparatus ; 
and all bills contracted for the department must receive their 
approval before being passed on by the committee on accounts 
and claims. They shall hold stated meetings at least once each 
month at the Central Fire Station, and all communications to 
the city government from the fire department must come 
through said committee, and annually at the call of the finance 
committee, in connection with the chief engineer, they shall 
make recommendations as to the amount of appropriations the 
wants of the department will require for the coming year. 

Sect. 26. The city marshal and regular police officers shall 
have in charge all matters relating to the removal and protec- 
tion of personal property endangered by fire, and any person 
entering a building or removing property contrary to the orders 
of the city marshal or such police officers, shall be fined five 
dollars ; and in the absence of firemen at fires, from their 
respective de|)artment houses, the policemen in that vicinity 
will take charge of said houses. 

Sect. 27. It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to 
•cause all snow and ice or other obstructions to be removed 
from and around all fire hydrants owned by the city, so that 
at all times the fire department can make immediate connec- 
tion of the hose to the hydrants. 

.Sect. 28. The annual pay of the members of the fire dei)art- 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 339 

inent shall be as follows, and in full for all services: Chief, 
twelve hundred and fifty dollars per annum and house rent; 
permanent force at Central Fire Station, seven hundred and 
twenty-eight dollars each ; drivers at Good Will and Alert Hose 
houses, seven hundred and twenty-eight dollars each per annum, 
paid monthly; assistant engineers, within the precinct, one hun- 
dred and twenty-five dollars each ; engineers of steamers, within 
the precinct, one hundred and fifteen dollars each ; foremen of 
companies, within the precinct, each ninety dollars per annum ; 
assistant foremen of companies, within the precinct, eighty-five 
dollars ])er annum ; members of steamer, hose, and hook and 
ladder companies, within the precinct, and house man at Central 
Fire Station, eighty dollars per annum ; outside the precinct, 
engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, two hundred and forty dol- 
lars each, and Pioneer Steamer Company, No. 3, five hundred 
dollars, said sums to be divided among the members as each 
company shall direct; engineer of steamer at Pen acook, seventy- 
five dollars per annum; assistant engineer at Penacook, twenty- 
five dollars ; assistant engineer at East Concord, fifteen dollai-s ; 
and assistant engineer at West Concord, twenty dollars. 

Sect. 29. The several engineers residing in Wards 1, 2, and 
3 shall have the entire care and control, under the direction of 
the chief engineer, of the buildings and appurtenances occupied 
in part by the fire department situated in said wards, respec- 
tively, to whom all applications for the use of the halls, or any 
other part of such building, shall be made. Said engineers 
may severally appoint janitors, who shall serve under the exclu- 
sive direction of the engineer having the care and control of 
the buildings where said janitor shall be appointed. Each of 
said engineers shall annually, in the month of December, ren- 
der a detailed statement, in writing, to the mayor and alder- 
men, of all receipts and expenditures for the preceding year on 
account of such buildings. 

Sect. 30. Stewards for the Pioneer Steamer Company and 
engine companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be appointed by the mayor 
and aldermen, and shall receive for all services performed by 
them in that capacity the following sums : For Pioneer Steamer 
Company, thirty dollars per annum, and when performing the 



340 CITY OF CONCORD. 

duties of janitor of the building an additional sum of forty-five 
dollars per annum ; and for steward of Engine Company Xo. 2, 
fifteen dollars per annum; and for steward of Engine Company 
No. 3, thirty dollars per annum. No steward shall be allowed 
to purchase supplies for such building, or for the department, 
unless by the authority and direction of the committee on fire 
department ; and in no case shall he have any care or control 
of the building or its appurtenances occupied by the company 
of which he is a member, except in the immediate service of 
the company, unless he shall be appointed janitor thereof, 
when he shall be under the direction of the engineer, as i^ro-, 
vided in the foregoing section. 

Sect. 31. The permanent men and horses at all of the fire 
stations in Concord shall at all times be on duty at their re- 
spective stations to attend to fire-alarm calls ; and neither the 
permanent men nor the permanent horses connected with the 
fire department shall engage in any work for any other depart- 
ment of the city. 

The men at the different fire stations shall do such work in 
connection with the station and apparatus as the chief engineer 
or his assistants may direct. All permanent men shall lodge in 
their respective stations (except chief), and in all cases of ab- 
sence a substitute must be furnished ; and in all cases when any 
extra service is required, the chief, with the sanction of the 
committee on fire department, shall have power to hire the 
same ; the chief may also increase as far as possible the num- 
ber of call men that wish to lodge at any fire station, subject to 
the regulations of the fire department. The chief engineer 
shall be furnished Avith a horse and wagon, to be maintained by 
the city, for his use at all times. 

Sect. 32. All alarms for brush or forest fii'es shall be re- 
sponded to by members of the fire department under such rules 
and regulations as shall be prescribed by the chief engineer. 

Sect. 33. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsis- 
tent with this ordinance are hereby repealed ; but such repeal 
shall in no wise revive or put in force any ordinance heretofore 
repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 



FIRE depaiitmp:nt. 341 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS. 

Article 1. Any engine or hose company running ont a 
line of hose from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled to the 
pipe, although the hose of other companies may be attached, in 
order to reach the fire. And any company coming to a fire, 
and finding an incomplete line of hose laid out from a hydrant 
or steamer, shall attach to and lengthen out such line, in lieu of 
laying a line of its own. 

Art. 2. When two or more engine companies are playing 
in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the company at- 
taching to hydrant or steamer as provided in the foregoing 
ai'ticle ; but any company furnishing the entire line, and receiv- 
ing water from a steamer, the pipe shall belong to such com- 
pany so receiving. 

Art. 3. Hose companies shall attach first lines to high pres- 
sure hydrants where accessible ; steamers attaching to those of 
low pressure, or reservoir. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant or 
reservoir unless their hose and apparatus for attaching to the 
same are at hand and ready for use. 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning from 
fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, and it is re- 
quired of officers of companies to maintain perfect order and 
decorum in their respective commands during all such service. 

Art. 6. In case of fire the foreman first arriving shall be in 
command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 7. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding to a 
fire, to use the utmost care and cau^tion consistant with prompt- 
ness. Racing between companies is forbidden under any cir- 
cumstances. Any collision or casualty occurring to horses or 
apparatus will be considered a sufficient cause for the suspen- 
sion of the driver in charge at the time. 

Art. 8. Fire hats are furnished by the city for the protec- 
tion and identification of firemen, and they must be worn at all 
fires except in the severest weather, when caps may be worn. 

Art. 9. While attending fires it shall be the duty of mem- 
bers of the department, when not performing active service, to 
concentrate about their respective pieces of ai)paratus. 



342 CITY OF CONCOPvD. 

Art. 10. All engine and hose companies responding to 
second or general alarms will connect, but will not lay their 
lines until they have i-eported to the officer in command for 
orders. 

Art. 11. The wearing of badges shall not be regarded by 
members of the department as conveying to them the privilege 
of free access to premises after fire has been extinguished. 

Art. 12. All members of the department shall address all 
officers by their respective titles while on duty at fires. 

Art. 13. The roll of each company shall be called as soon 
as the apparatus is housed, and no member will be excused ex- 
cept in case of sickness. Rolls must be called after every 
alarm. No officer or member will be marked present on the 
company roll unless present at fires and returns to house with 
apparatus, ixnless excused by an engineer. 

Art. 14. Each company shall be allowed three substitutes, 
except Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, which shall have 
five, to be approved by the chief engineer. 

Art. 15. All orders issued by the chief or an assistant engi- 
neer shall be promptly obeyed. At all fires occurring in the 
night, the chief engineer shall be identified by a red light, 
assistant engineers by blue lights. 

Art. 16. Members of the department are expected to cheer- 
fully comply with all rules and regulations which are adopted 
or which may be adopted. Foremen will be held responsible 
for all lack of promptness and efficiency in their commands. 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1905. 

Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

John J. McNdlty, 1st Asst., Machinist, 35 West Street. 

William E. Dow, 2d Asst., Painter, 13 Academy Street. 

John J. McNulty, Clerk of the Board. 



Abial W. Rolfe, 



John E. Frye, 



George W. Kemi 



WARD 1. 

Manufacturer, Penacook St., Penacook. 

WARD 2. 

Farmer, Penacook St , East Concord. 

WARD 3. 

Overseer, 443 No. State St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, No. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

Sylvester T. Ford, Captain. J. Edward Morrison, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 
J^os. 



Names. 
Sylvester T. Ford, 
J. Edward Morrison, 
James H. Sanders, 
Thomas J. Morrison, 
Charles Powell, 
Elba F. Home, 
George B. Davis, 
Herbert M. Sanders, 
W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 
Harry P. Blake, 
Frank D. Hurd, 
Harry L. Messer, 
Fred J. Young, 



14 Charles G. Pinkham, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Moulder, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter. 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage painter. 
Collector, 
Trimmer, 
Machinist, 
Moulder, 
Machinist, 
Permanent driver, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
41 South Main Street. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 
75 Centre Street. 

10 Liberty Street. 

3 South Main Street. 

11 Chapel Street. 
65 Downing Street. 

8 Thorndike Street. 

9 Jackson Street. 
27 Downing Street. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



344 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, No. 1. 



W. J. Coffin, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

J. C. McQiLVRAY, Lieutenant and Clerk. 





MEMBERS. 




Badge 






Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


24 Walter J. Coffin, 


Shipping clerk. 


5 Short Street. 


25 John C. McGilvray, 


Jig-sawyer, 


9 Pearl Street. 


30 Thomas D. Gannon, 


Machinist, 


113 Warren Street. 


88 Charles H. Sanders, 


Machinist, 


11 Chapel Street. 


31 Orrin C. Hodgdon, 


Engineer, 


31 Beacon Street. 


36 David J. Adams, 


Janitor, 


107 North Main Street. 


38 George H. Downing, 


Electrician. 


12 South Street. 


29 John M. Inman, 


Carriage painter. 


11 Wall Street. 


35 Bert W. Leavitt. 


Gas-fitter. 


62i North Spring Street. 


32 O. F. Plummer. 


Mason, 


26 Albin Street. 


27 W.J.Sawyer, 


Machinist, 


16 Church Street. 


34 J. B. McLeod, 


Electrician, 


2 North State Street. 


89 M.S. Wakefield. 


Permanent driver, 


Central Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, No. 4. 



RELIEF ENGINE. 



Badge 

Nos. 



Vames. Occupations. Residences. 

17 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 78 South State Street. 

23 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 11 Thompson Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 



Fred W. Scott. Captain. George L. Osgood. Lieutenant and Clerk. 

George L. Osgood, Treasurer. 







MEMBERS. 




Bad 
Nos 


;. Names. 


Occupations. 


-Residences. 


37 


Fred W. Scott, 


Builder, 


43 Lyndon Street. 


38 


George L. Osgood, 


Clerk, 


9 Thompson Street. 


46 


James Crowley, 


Barber, 


115 Warren Street. 


43 


John H. Seavey, 


Clerk, 


5 Odd Fellows' Avenue. 


39 


Charles J. French, 


Stonecutter, 


5 Perkins Street. 


42 


Charles H. Rowell, 


Builder, 


Ins. Block, School St. 


48 


Lewi.s B. Putney, 


Builder, 


12 Beacon Street. . 


41 


Charles C. Chesley, 


Builder, 


11 Prince Street. 


45 


Joseph H. Brunelle, 


Blacksmith, 


34 Washington Street. 


49 


James Jepson, 


Car-builder, 


49.^ Franklin Street. 


47 


Frank H. Silver, 


Permanent driver. 


Alert Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



345 



GOOD WILL II08E COMPANY, No. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

John C. Mills, Captain. Hiram T. Dickerman, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

George H. Sawyer, Treasurer. 



MEMBERS. 



ZVoa 


1. ^ Names. 


Occupations. 


50 


John C. Mills. 


Blacksmith, 


51 


Hiram T. Dlckerman, 


Painter, 


54 


George H. Sawyer, 


Blacksmith, 


52 


John E. Gove, 


Wood-worker, 


53 


Charles A. Richards, 


Wood-worker, 


57 


Jasper R. Mudgett, 


Wood-worker, 


60 


Frank S. Putnam, 


Packer, 


55 


H. H. Ash, 


Machinist, 


61 


E.D.Clark, 


Spring-maker, 


56 


A. W. Thompson, 


Janitor, 


58 


W. T. Happny, 


Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
34 Downing Street. 
36 Broadway. 
5 Allison Street. 
40 Mills Street. 
74 West Street. 
98 South State Street. 
101 South State Street. 
234 Perley Street. 
109 South State Street. 
114 South State Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY 
No. L 



Will A. King, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Badge 
Nos. Names. 

63 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E.Lane, 

65 Benjamin OuUette, 

66 Henry V. Tittemore, 

67 Ned E. Herrin, 

70 Will F. King, 

71 Frank T. Bean, 

72 Lucius D. Caldon, 

73 George W. Grover, 

75 James F. Libertj-, 

76 Stephen P. Foster. 

80 Sam B. Morgan, 

81 Daniel Crowley, 

77 Bion W. Hall, 

82 Edwin H. French, 

78 Harry N. Lane, 

74 Charles Parker, 
69 William F. Paige, 

79 Albert W. Nearhood, 

68 Edward C. Simpson, 
99 M. J. Martin, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Carriage builder. 
Carpenter, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Builder. 

Carriage builder, 
Carriage builder, 
Carriage builder. 
Carpenter, 
Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder, 
Coachman, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder, 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Machinist, 
Gas-fitter, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 
5 Fremont Street. 
10 Jeflferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 
Ins. Block, School St. 
23 Union Street. 
Odd Fellows' Home. 
13 West Street. 
29 Thorndike Street. 
7 Harvard Street. 
37 Perley Street. 
10 Avon Street. 
130 Warren Street. 
15 Humphrey Street. 
29 Green Street. 
2 Fremont Street. 
63 South Street. 
87 South State Street. 
26 Monroe Street. 
4 High-Street Avenue. 
Central Station. 



346 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1. 



Badge 

JVos. 



91 A. P. Turner, 

92 A. L. Dickerman, 



Occupations. 

Permanent engineer and driver, 
Permanent assistant engineer, 



Central Station. 
Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 



PenacooK: 



OFFICERS. 



John H. Bolfe, Captain. 

Eddie C. Durgin, Lieut, and Clerk. 

John B. Dodge, Treasurer. 



Henry Rolfe, Foreman of Hose. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 
Leslie H. Crowther, Steward. 



Names. 

John H. Rolfe, 
Eddie C. Durgin, 
John B. Dodge, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Walter H. Rolfe, 
George H. Sager, 
Leslie H. Crowther, 
Fred H. Morrill, 
Edwin B. Prescott, 
Peter A. Keenan, 
Fred C. Ferrin, 
Fred M. Dodge, 
Ruel G. Morrill, 
Frank P. Robertson, 
Albert S. Andrews, 
John P. Kelley, 
Harlow F. Rolfe, 
George A. Griffin, 
Harry F. Jones, 
Henry E. Templeton, 
Fred Migneault, 
John P. Lucas, 
Frank A. Faneuf, 
Fred J. Guild, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Bert Bucklin, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 

Foreman, 

Carpenter, 

Bookkeeper, 

Carpenter, 

Machinist, 

Machinist, 

Maker plumbers' supplies, 

Sash-maker, 

Marketman, 

Table-maker, 

Band-sawyer, 

Electrical inst. maker, 

Farmer, 

Axle-maker, 

Mill operative. 

Machinist, 

Clerk, 

Painter, 

Teamster, 

Electrical inst. maker. 

Teamster, 

Machinist, 

Axle-maker, 

Electrician, 

Carpenter, 

Machinist, 



Residences. 

14 Centre Street. 

46 Spring Street. 

59 Merrimack Street. 

26 Penacook Street. 

37 Centre Street. 

28 High Street. 

23 Washingt<in Street. 

8 Summer Street. 

88 South Main Street. 
93 High Street. 
46 South Main Street. 
61 Merrimack Street. 
75 Washington Street. 

6 Church Street. 

23 Washington Street. 

9 Church Street. 

63 Merrimack Street. 
1 South Main Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
41 Washington Street. 
19J Washington Street. 
71 Washington Street. 

10 Summer Street. 
46 Summer Street. 
70 High Street. 

43 Washington Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



347 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

East Concord. 



Elbridge Emery, Captain. 

George O. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



John C. Hutchins, Treasurer. 
Charles P. White, Steward. 



Names. 

Elbridge Emery, 
George O. Robinson, 
John C. Hutchins, 
C. E. Robinson, 
William L. Batehelder, 
William H. Smith, 
James L. Potter, 
Samuel G. Potter, 
Charles P. White, 
William E. Virgin, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
Elvin Culver, 
Fred S. Farnum, 
Shad Cate, 
Ross W. Cate, 
George E. Cate, 
William A. Cowley, 
Herbert Knowles, 
James Cox, 
Daniel Lewis, 
Abram Cushing, 
Edward A. Newell, 
Thomas Spaulding, 
Joseph Strickford, 
Parker French, 
Westley Field, 
Amos Peaslee, 
John W. Sanborn, 
Edward H. Hardy, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 

Butcher, 

Water-dealer, 

Engineer, 

Clerk, 

Farmer, 

Farmer, 

Milk-dealer, 

Milk-dealer, 

Stonecutt*ir, 

Carpenter, 

Belt-maker, 

Shoemaker, 

Carpenter, 

Farmer, 

Horseshoer, 

Blacksmith, 

Storekeeper, 

Carpenter, 

Section foreman, 

Driver, 

Stonecutter, 

Wood-worker, 

Farmer, 

Painter, 

Janitor, 

Milkman, 

Storekeeper, 

Farmer, 

Clerk, 



Residences. 

Potter Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Potter Street. 
Eastman Street. 
Potter Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Fort Square. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 



348 



CITY OF CONCOHD. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 
West Concord. 

OFFICERS. 

Hiram E. Quimby. Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 

Alfred J. Fraser, Lieut, and Clerk. Frank C. Blodgett, Steward. 
Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



■ Names. 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Alfred J, Fraser, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Frank G. Peterson, 
James W. Powers, 
William D. Harrington, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Edward Lovering, 
James F. Abbott, 
Thomas Pentland, 
Abram D. Cushing, 
Joseph Daley, 
Luther E. Rowe, 
Herbert Farnum, 
Robert Henry, 
Benjamin Kemp, 
John Harrison, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stonecutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Mill operative. 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Blacksmith, 
Blacksmith, 
Quarryman, 
Mill operative. 
Silversmith, 
Laborer, 
Loom repairer, 



Residences. 

490 North State Street. 
458 North State Street. 
382 North State Street. 
5 Engel Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Street. 
346 North State Street. 
3 Fisher Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
436 North State Street. 

I Clark Street. 

513 North State Street. 
Sewall's Falls Road. 
5 Lake Street. 
455 North State Street. 

II Lake Street. 
5 Lake Street. 

513 North State Street. 
461 North State Street. 
519 North State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



D. B. Nbwhall, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

Henry Tucker, Lieutenant. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 

D. B. Newhall, 
Henry Tucker, 
Fred Leighton, 
J. E. Clifford, 

E. O. Wight, 
C. A. Herbert, 
James F. Ward, 
Martin V. B. Davis, 
Oliver Thompson, 
Frank E. Warren, 
Charles C. Hill, 
Fred S. Johnson, 
Olando I. Godfrey, 



Names. 
T. P. Davis, 
George A. Mitchell, 
WillC. Wingate, 
Fred U. Lane, 
E. L. Peacock, 
Fred K. Peacock, 
R. M. Patten, 
George H.Davis, 
Robert Crowley, 
James A. Johnson, 
James M. Colbert, 
E. A. Saltmarsh, 
Charles H.Smith, 



Henry Gibney. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the City Council : 

The trustees of the PubHc Library herewith transmit the 
annual report of the hbrarian, and bespeak for it that thought- 
ful consideration which the evident care and labor involved in 
its preparation amply merit. When it is remembered that the 
circulation of books during the past year aggregates more than 
88,000 volumes — a circulation exceeding that of the libraries of 
many larger cities — the immense educational influence thus 
exerted in the community demonstrates the fact, that our library 
is a civilizing agent of the first importance. It is an institution 
that ought to be fostered and supported upon a broad basis of 
public utility and policy. In no other department does the 
money appropriated result in more substantial or useful returns. 

The citizens of Concord may well take pride in the work 
that the able librarian and her competent assistants are accom- 
plishing under a hraitation of essential conveniences in library 
work which the present inadequate and ill-adapted building 
necessarily imposes. 

R. E. WALKER, 
President of Board of Trustees. 

Concord, N. H., February 17, 1906. 



REPORT OF LIBRARIA:N^ FOR 1905. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gextlemen.^ — By means of library meetings, library jour- 
nals, and reports from other libraries, the knowledge of each 
librarian becomes the possession of all. My management is 
only a comjjosite of others' ideas which strike me as good and 
new — they furnishing the bricks to which I add but the straw 
of interest in ray work. 

It is the exceptional library, however, which is not hampered 
by lack of money, lack of space, lack of time and lack of help 
from grafting on itself all the improvements of which it hears. 
We have been hampered ; but w^hat we have been able to bring 
to pass in 1905 is herewith reported. 

The desk circulation was 88,369 volumes, over 1,100 more 
than in the preceding year. Four books were lost : usually, we 
lose none, while other cities with a home circulation as large as 
Concord's lose from 40 to 100 books annually. 

Estimating the quality of reading by percentages, we find it 
about as usual, except that magazines have circulated more and 
story-books less than heretofore. But if the per cent, of fiction 
reading had not thus decreased, worry would not have fastened 
upon us, for it is agreed that a library should furnish milk as 
well as meat. In their literary tastes we find many customers 
are vegetarians, preferring fresh, green things, which the "six 
best-sellers " certainly are. 

I wish this were the time and place to quote John Morley's 
article on "The Great Commonplaces of Reading," in the 
February Critic, in which he justifies the claim of poetry and 
fiction to be classed among the books called useful, as rousing 
and stirring the imagination. He adds, "If fiction takes a 
large place in a library, I do not care so far as it promotes 
cheerfulness and good humor, for that is w^anted." 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 351 

Tlie popularity of a library depends chiefly upon its circu- 
lating department, that being the part of the institution known 
to the majority, and the large figures of our circulation are a 
tribute to our desk attendants. Their waiting on people alter- 
nates with an amount of book-mending which is incalculable ; 
a libi'ary whose books have seen wear and tear only one twelfth 
as many years as ours says they repair at least 10,000 volumes 
annually. 

Concord might be said to furnish a reading public, a-s 703 
new patrons registered during 1905, whereas in a manufactur- 
ing city twice this size only 552 new customers were reported 
in 1904. 

We have added 1,025 new volumes, (577 being new works. 
We have, as usual, spent more money on non-fiction than 
fiction, and our lists of monthly additions show consideration 
for the student and the artisan ; yet we are liberal toward our 
novel readers compared with the Boston Public Library which 
purchased but 112 out of 702 new novels examined, and with 
Scranton, Pa., which bought only 126 works of new fiction. 
We bought 275 stories adult and juvenile. We have felt par- 
ticularly solicitous to serve well the returned prodigals who had 
been feeding on the Booklovers and Tabard Inn libraries. 

One hiindred and forty of the year's acquisitions came from 
the bindery and were volumes of magazines, now become our 
best reference material by means of three indexes to periodi- 
cals. One hundred and fifty-one books were bought as dupli- 
cates of old favorites or of new novels. One hundred and 
thirty have been discarded as worn out, and 74 have been 
replacements. The net gain to our shelves during the year was 
895 volumes, making the number now in the library 27,830. 
We received 68 gifts from state and city institutions, from gov- 
ernment, religious and college societies and from private indi- 
viduals, those known to Concord people being Mrs. A. S. 
White, Mrs. Edson C. Eastman, Joseph B. Walker, John Kim- 
ball, Allen Folger, Elwin C. Page and Dr. Jane Greeley. Mrs. 
Frank Blanchard of West Concord annually gives a book to 
the library, saying, " I 've always done it and my mother did it 
before me." Mr. Samuel C. Eastman took abroad a memoran- 



352 CITY OF CONCORD. 

dum of the llemie des Deux Mondes he gave in 1903 and 
secured the missing vohimes to the number of about fifty — a 
characteristically thorough and scholarly and generous pro- 
ceeding. Xow when we have secured the index to this file of 
the Revue, we shall have at one's call the best French literature 
of the last half century. 

The New Hampshire Bible Society has generously given us 
Bibles in nine different tongues. Perhaps some of our foreign 
population will take pattern by Macaulay and learn English 
from our polyglot collection as he learned foreign languages 
from reading their renderings of the Bible. 

Fewer volumes were bought in 1905 than usual because i!400 
were diverted from book buying to printing. Our catalogues, 
issued in 1897, seemed antiquated to many who called for sup- 
plements ; consequently spring brought me the job of prepar- 
ing copy for entries of the fiction and non-fiction books added 
in the past eight years, and summer the task of reading proof. 
Almost any library would have asked an extra appropriation 
for this unusual bill and it has required planning to pay that, 
buy enough new books to have it seem a normal year to the 
public, and also to add a few works of value, such as the Histo- 
rians' History of the World, Garnett & Gosse's Illustrated Eng- 
lish Literature, a set of Shakespeare and art books for the art 
department of the Woman's Club. 

For several months M'e have tried the postal-card reserve, by 
which a borrower leaves a cent for notification when a desired 
book is in. The system seems gratifying to patrons. 

The summer branch was maintained this year in the district 
known as Fosterville. During July and August a central room 
supplied with books, seats, tables and pictures was open two 
afternoons a week, and was filled wuth Swedish, Irish, Arme- 
nian, American, Greek, Italian and Norwegian children. Each 
afternoon I read aloud a story, and Miss Alcott was soon a favor- 
ite. Adults and toddlers freely took books home. The children, 
though not the cleanest possible, were far from being the 
naughtiest imaginable ; and now I am never more pleased than 
when a little FostervilHan, recalling the joys of the vacation 
branch, gets down to this main library for a book. 



PUBLIC LII'.UAPA'. 353 

Your librarian now takes fresli lots of books monthly instead 
of weekh^ to West Concord, but these books are exchanged 
there every Tuesday by Mrs. Sai*ah Quiraby, whose capable 
oversight is a labor of love for the cause. A box is sent simi- 
larily to East Concord, where Mrs. Grace Farnum kindly gives 
it hall-roora, and at hours convenient and inconvenient for her- 
self changes and charges the books. The distribution of books 
at Penacook was interrupted for three weeks by the fire in 
Exchange Block. Mr. R. E. Gale, who has been our reliable 
agent for about fifteen years, removed the books from his smok- 
ing store -in season to prevent serious damage. I hope to be 
able to run our vacation branch this summer in Penacook. 
Perhaps by fall the delivery agency of the past years can 
become the next thing in library development — a permanent 
deposit station. Residents of Ward 1 would doubtless agree 
with the librarian who wrote : " When a book is taken from 
the shelves in an agency, the chooser has only a few hundred 
books from which to select. But if he takes books on his card, 
the resources of the whole central library are at his disposal. 
But yet the freedom of selecting one's own book by coming in 
direct contact with it is appreciated so highly that readers much 
prefer to select their books personally from a very meagre col- 
lection, rather than to draw them by card from a very large 
collection." 

This sending out of boxfuls of books is a practical good in 
that it relieves our congested shelves. But agencies have far- 
reaching immaterial benefits which alone offset their slight 
expense. At a national library meeting it was said : " People 
will not go so far as a mile for books. If their own gratifica- 
tion only were concerned, they might be left to suffer, but for 
the good of the municipality they should be provided with 
library agencies where they will use them ; being made to real- 
ize, however, that a branch is a local representative of a great 
system ; never a mere substitute for it. There are thousands 
.of citizens who either do not know or do not care for the 
library. A deposit station quietly advertises the library and 
helps solve the great problem of library management, which, 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 

is to get its books generally read. Such deliveries are the only 
way to bring the benefits of the library to outlying wards." 
But to get such stations taken care of competently by local 
residents is necessary. The recurrent summer branch, devolv- 
ing in plan and execution wholly upon your librarian, makes all 
the demand upon her time and strength which she can meet in 
the fierce heat of our summers, when the staft" is depleted by 
vacations. 

Reports from cit}' libraries have stated that manufacturing 
establishments feel interested to secure the benefits of the 
library for their employes. Therefore, in September, jve offered 
to send boxes of books to the Boston & Maine shops, but the 
offer has not been accepted. We may have a proposal from 
some Sunday-school to take its old library and in return send 
it weekly books to deliver to its pupils. We shall be able, we 
hope, to offer to send lots to the Odd Fellows' Home and the 
Home for the Aged. The St. Louis librarian says books should 
be carried to people as groceries and other necessities of life. 
But if our efforts in this direction are not taken up with, we 
shall conclude, with Woburn, Mass., that methods in use in 
larger places are not yet needed in Concord because the major- 
ity of citizens can reach the library. 

We continue to send supplementary reading to schoolrooms ; 
at present, Penacook, East Concord and West Concord teach- 
ers have books in charge ; they are not burdened with a request 
to keep account of the circulation, but each volume is counted 
as circulated once in every two weeks. The North Adams 
library report says : " We constantly hear teachers say, they can 
pick out ' library boys and girls ' by their brightness in their 
studies." An ex-teacher recently told me that she used to quietly 
place a certain attractive red-covered library book on the desk 
of the bad boy in her schoolroom when she saw an unruly 
mood coming on, and in ten minutes he was diverted, and 
engrossed in reading. 

The principals of St. Mary's School and of the Chandler 
Grammar School have given your librarian opportunity to talk 
to |)upils in a }>ractical wa}^ either about books or the way to 
use them. Mr. Doring and others of the High School facultv 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 355 

are good users of the library. We fear that adult students and 
members of women's clubs are somewhat deterred by its 
crowded condition from using the reference room, which it is 
impossible to ventilate. 

The semi-centennial of the library's establishment occun-ed 
on August 25. I thought it should be observed and undertook 
a celebration, the chief features of which you will recall were 
as follows: The staff wore the dress of 1855. The books 
displayed on the open shelf were the favorites of fifty years 
ago. The writings of Concord authors were shown by them- 
selves. An art exhibit consisted of the original sketches from 
whicli were made the illustrations for the recent two-volume 
History of Concord ; there was also a large exhibit of pictures 
of old-time furniture. An interesting souvenir bookmark was 
given each caller. Instead of closing at six, as visual in August, 
we kept open till nine o'clock, and hundreds of our best citi- 
zens honored us by dropping in. Mr. L. D. Stevens and Mr. 
Amos Hadley of the first board of trustees were two of our 
visitors. We of the staff enjoyed the occasion greatly, and as 
Old Home Day was omitted in Concord this year, people were 
pleased to say that our anniversary celebration, being of a remi- 
niscent nature, came at just the right time. 

What was said by the president of this board in his report 
last year to the city council was so clear and forcible that it 
needs only to be repeated with emphasis. If Concord people 
who have supplanted their stoves Avith furnaces, then- lamps 
with gas, would only realize thattheirpubhc library needs mod- 
ern improvements ! A Massachusetts library reports : " Good 
work was done in the old building ; but the new building with 
its modern accommodations has enabled better work to be ac- 
complished in all directions." 

Every movement for civic improvement requires two things 
— the hour and the man. Mayor Corning certainly is the man. 
For years a trustee of this institution, and a])preciative of the 
value of books and of the reading habit, he would be inter- 
ested in any movement to better the library. This may 
not be the hour. Yet is not the ditticult problem, What to do 
for the puUic Uhrarij, the next one for the city fathers to solve ? 



356 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Does any trustee doubt that citizens would vote in an 
enlightened and liberal way on this subject? Why fear on 
this point for a library which has been in such active use for 
lifty years, since St. Louis statistics show that " those who are 
best acquainted with a library and have received most benefit 
from it, are most willing to vote appropriations for its main- 
tenance and enlargement." 

That we have not as yet been a drain upon Concord may be 
seen by comparison. Our circulation is over 88,000 ; our cost 
of maintenance, 15,423. Recently, Manchester circulated 
67,670 and had an appropriation of over 17,000. Portland, 
Me., with a circulation of 94,912, spent over $12,000. Law- 
rence, Mass., circulating 102,000 volumes, cost $17,120. 

Many other reports might be quoted to prove how economi- 
cally we have got on, but one more comparison must suffice. 
A Vermont city has recatalogued its public library. At the end 
of six and one half months an expert with two assistants had 
done 6,380 volumes, at an expense of $1,000 for salaries and 
$400 for supplies. When this library was made over we hired 
an expert cataloguer but he had only the help of our regular 
staff. In eleven months we had done 18,157 volumes, spent 
only $500 for cataloguer and $265 for supplies. 

At your last annual meeting you kindly granted me a long 
vacation that I might take a trip to California. Li the cities 
visited, I sought out the libraries and librarians with profitable 
and pleasant results. At one place, where a trustee fills the 
library with orchids of his raising, the librarian, in March, had 
ready for us to take away literally more rare garden flowers 
than we could can-y. 

Our public library has a very small staff for the amount of 
Avork annually turned off ; the large results accomplished by 
the few assistants are due partly to the personnel of the staff 
remaining unchanged, but chiefl}^ to the fact that each gives 
the best service of which she is capable. I am off and on 
more as the library's interests expand and multiply, and cares 
have increased for my three assistants, who have met them 
with both patience and energy. 



PUIJLLC Lir.UAltY. 357 

jMv report is respectfully suljinitted, as jMr. E. II. Anderson 
submitted one of his, with the closing remark : " It is imprac- 
ticable to make any very great proportion of the public under- 
stand this; it would be unfortunate if it were not fully 
understood by the members of the I>oard of Trustees." 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Librarian. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. II., December 30, 1905. 
To the City Council: 

The sixth annual report of tlie Board of Examiners of 
Plumbers is herewith submitted for your consideration. 

The members of the board are Russell Wilkins, M. D., Henry 
P. Cilley, a practical journej'man })lumber, and Will B. Howe, 
city engineer. 

The board retained its former organization, viz., Henry P. 
Cilley, chairman, and Will B. Howe, clerk. 

There has been 12 regular and four special meetings, a total 
of 16, to complete the work of the board. We have examined 
and issued licenses to four journeyman plumbers, and have 
examined two applicants for master's license and issued a 
license to one, the other failing to meet the requirements of 
the board ; making a total of six applicants examined. The 
receipts of the board were $26.50, for which amount the clerk 
of the board holds the receipts of the city treasurer. 

The expenses of the board were 18.52. 

The following is a list of all the registered plumbers, given 
in the order in which they appear on the register : 

Master Plumbers. 

W. Arthur Bean, certificate renewed. 

Seth R. Hood, " " 
Willis H. Robbins, 

William A, Lee, " " 

Benjamin H. Orr, " " 

Richard J. Lee, " " 

George A. Harwood, " " 

Michael J. Lee, " " 



EXAMINERS OF I'LUMBEltS. 359 

Albert S. Tvask, certificate renewed. 

E. H. Kamlall, 

Frederick Booth, " " 

(t. Arthur Nichols, license renewed. 

Charles W. Bateman, " " 

Burton A. Curtis, " " 

W. M. Trottier, 

Albert L. Worthen, " " 

John C. Smith, " " 

P. Wallace Orr, license issued July 27, 190;'). 

Employixc Plumbers. 

George S. Milton, certificate renewed. 

M. E^ Clifford & Co., " 

Isaac Baty, " " 

JOURXE Y MA X P LUM HERS. 

Charles 11. Berry, certificate renewed. 

Henry P. Cilley, 

Philip King, " " 

William L. Reagan, " " 

William H. McGuire, " " 

Harry H. Kennedy, " " 

P. Harrison D. Leary, " " 

Patrick A. Clifford, » " 

George N. Berry, " " 

Richard O'Brien, license renewed. 

Frederick F. Converse, license renewed. 

Charles F. Bascora, " " 

Arthur W. Buntin, " " 

Louis Browning, " ' " 

Michael J. Finn, " " 

Elmer E. Babb, " " 

Thomas Mathews, " " 

Thomas F. Foley, license issued August 28, 1905. 

William F. O'Neil, license issued Sej^tember 13, 1905. 

Harris S. Parmenter, license issued April 7, 1905. 

William J. Tierney, license issued Xovember 3, 1905. 



860 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Master plumbers' certificates issued 
Master plumbers' licenses issued . 
Employing plumbers' certificates issued 
Journeyman plumbers' certificates issued 
Journeyman plumbers' licenses issued . 

Total number on register to date . 



11 

9 
1-2 

42 



Kespectfully submitted, 

II. P. CILLEY, 
RUSSELL WILKIXS, 
W. B. H(3WE, 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor th" Mai/or and the City Council : 

The work of the Board of Ilealtli for the i»ast year has been 
of the regular routine character, there having been no large 
epidemics and nothing of unusual interest to record. The 
general health of the city has been good, and the death rate 
(12.7) extremely low as will be seen by the detailed report of 
the sanitary officer. The membership of the board and its 
organization remain the same as last year, and Mr. Palmer has 
performed his duties in the same capable and efficient manner 
as in the past. The work has been greatly facilitated and 
much assistance rendered to the board by Miss Helen Monier 
as office clerk, and we wish to express our appreciation of her 
careful and painstaking services. 

During the past year there have been twenty-three cases 
typhoid fever with three deaths. Several of these cases came 
from out of town to be treated at our hospitals, and are not 
directly chargeable to local conditions of water or food supply. 
As usual measles formed the largest jsart of the contagious dis- 
eases reported. There were only lifteen cases of diphtheria 
with one death. 

Since the records of vaccination of school children has been 
transferred to this board considerable time and work have been 
given to this and we now consider the records full and com- 
plete. Much assistance in this work has been rendered by the 
superintendent of schools, the teachers and the truant officer. 

The department of milk inspection has been conducted as 
formerly without hardship to any, and with good results to the 



362 CITY OF CONCORD. 

general public. The number of samples examined during the 
past year was 396, of which 11 or less than three per cent, were 
below standard. There has been but one prosecution by this 
department during the past year. Lack of care and cleanliness 
in the storage and handling of this product is the principal 
cause of complaint. 

RUSSELL WILKINS, M. D., 
GEO. A. BERRY, 
CHANCEY ADAMS, M. D., 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health of the City of Concord, N. II.: 

(4extlemex : Herewith is submitted my annual report as 
Sanitary Officer, giving in detail the general work of the Health 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1905. 

Comparison of the death rates show that the rate for 1905, 
12.7, is the lowest on record for the past 13 years in onr city, 
except in 1898, when it was 12.13. There were during the 
year 402 deaths, eight less than in 1904. 131 bodies were sent 
to other places for interment, and 89 were brought here to be 
interred. 

The expenditures of this department for the year 1905 were 
much less than usual, owing to the fact that less aid was re- 
quired by persons placed in quarantine, as will be seen by the 
financial statement. 

The inspection of dwelling houses and blocks has been made 
as thoroughl}' as time would permit. This work has been made 
where the inspections were most needed, and also of all prem- 
ises complained of. 

The demand for fumigation is constantly increasing. After 
a death from tuberculosis, or the removal of a patient suffering 
from that disease, the rooms are fumigated in compliance with 
the Session Laws of 1905. Also, w^e are constantly called upon 
to fumigate after deaths from cancer, bronchitis, erysipelas, 
pneumonia, and various other causes aside from contagious 
diseases. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

There were 299 cases of contagious diseases reported to this 
department during the year 1905, with five deaths, compared 
with 116 cases and four deaths in 1904. 



364 CITY OF CONCORD. 

There were SO cases of scarlet fever witli no deaths resulting 
therefrom. During the past six years, 193 cases have been re- 
ported with no fatalities. This is a record that is encouraging 
and of interest to man3\ 

Diphtheria did not prevail to any extent during the year, 
there being only 15 cases with one death. 

There were 23 cases of typhoid fever with three deaths. 
Several of the cases at the hospital were brought here for 
treatment from other places. 

An epidemic of measles in Ward 1, the first of the year, 
made the total of 181 cases with one death. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Expenditures of the Health Department of the City of Con- 
cord, N. IT., for the year ending December 31, 1905 : 

Charles E. Palmer, health officer, salary . . . $1,200.00 
Russell Wilkins, M. D., George A. Berry, Chancey 

Adams, M. D., board of health, salary . . 75.00 

Helen O. Monier, clerk, services .... 257.58 

Russell Wilkins, acting for health officer . . 50.00 

Charles E. Palmer, postage 21.13 

Rumford Printing Co., mortuary reports . . 18.00 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing ..... 19.75 

Edson C. Eastman, office supplies .... 1.00 

W. A. Chamberlin, seal press .... 2.50 

George A. Berry, antitoxin, etc. . . . 15.73 

George A. Berry, fumigation supplies . . . 87.80 
A. Perley Fitch, fumigation supplies . . . 16.80 
A. H. Britton & Co., fumigation su])plies . . 2.05 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, care of James H. Jor- 
dan, scarlet fever ...... 78.28 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, care of Minnie Comier, 

measles ........ 11.43 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, care of Josephine Co- 
burn, measles . . . . . . . 17.29 

C H. Dudley, su])plies furnished (ieorge Malanson, 

scarlet fever case ...... 10.11 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



365 



Concord Coal Co., fuel furnished George ^Nlelanson, 

scarlet fever case ..... 

A. P. Baker, supplies furnished ]Mr. .Mahoney, scarlet 

fever case 

W. A. Cowley & Co., supplies furnished 3Irs. IMan 

chard, scarlet fever case .... 
Mrs. E. J. Lyle, milk furnished Mrs. lUanchard 

scarlet fever case ..... 

C. PI. Cook, M. D., professional services 
George W. Waters, moving patients 
J. H. Coburn, use of team burying animals 
George L. Theobald, burying animals 
CD. Marsh, burying horses .... 
John Prentiss, burying horse .... 
K E. Tel. & Tel. Co., rental and tolls . 
Russell Wilkins, milk inspection 
Charles Seavey, collecting milk 
E. H. Calvert, collecting milk 
George A. Berry, supplies for milk inspection 

Total 



$G.13 

1-2.52 

10.91 

1.26 

23.00 

4.00 

5.00 

8.00 

2.00 

1.00 

23.88 

201.77 

14.26 

25.78 

1.30 

12,225.21 



366 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



The following table shows the number of contagious dis- 
eases reported during each month of the year and the deaths 
resulting therefrom : 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Smallpox. 


Measles. 


Months. 


i 


1 

a 


i 
6 


1 


o 


% 


i 

CO 

O 


A 

% 
Q 


i 

O 


1 
Q 


Januar 


4 
2 


i ,« 




3 

1 

1 


1 
1 






2 
3 
16 
55 
49 




February 




10 

11 

4 
15 
1" 














April .... 
















2 
4 
2 


1 




1 
3 




















July . . 




A 












i 




1 














* 

1 














1 
24 
23 

1 








1 

3 
3 

80 




8 
4 

1 
















1 


































Totals 


15 


1 




23 


3 




181 


\ 







RECORD OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 



Wards. 


1 


2 


3 


4 1 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Totals. 


Diphtheria 1 

Scarlet fever 8 

Typhoid fever... 1 


1 
1 
4 


23 
1 


2 
5 

2 


4 
4 
5 


9 

4 


7 
14 
6 






15 


13 


3 


80 








Measles ' 82 

1 


2 


1 


35 


23 


6 


20 


12 




181 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



361 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The follo\Aing table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom, for the 
years since and including 1890 : 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


SmaU- 
pox. 


Totals. 


Years. 


i 


Deaths. 
Cases. 


fl 


1 


J3 


1 


1 


o 


i 
1 

Q 


i 


Q 


1830 


6 
12 
13 
48 
17 
55 
38 
13 
4 
9 
29 
65 
29 
42 
55 
15 


2 
3 
3 

3 

8 
8 




9 

37 
41 
113 

4 
44 
22 

8 
99 
39 
11 

6 
39 
18 
80 


3 
6 
8 


17 
14 
7 
13 
13 
15 
21 
17 


5 
6 

3 
5 
3 

2 
4 

1 
1 
3 
3 
3 


6 
2 
2 
300 
21 
452 
158 
138 
120 
299 
476 
40 
27 








35 
59 
402 
164 
526 


7 
9 

7 






























1895 








1Q 










" 






















146 


4 




1 






421 
562 
130 
87 
682 
116 
299 








18 
13 
23 

12 
23 


■ 








1901 


1 


1 


g 




' 2 

4 2 




1903 


11 

4 


1904 


1 SI 




3 


181 


1 

















Nuisances, Complaints and Inspections. 

A statement of the number and character of the nuisances 
which have been abated by this de2:)artment during the year 
appears below : 

Accumulation of decayed fruit and coal ashes . 6 
Catch-basins not trapped ..... 5 
Collecting swill unlawfully .... 1 
Collecting swill without license .... 1 
Dead animals . . . . . . .51 



368 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Decayed meat and fish 

Defect in house sewers 

Defective i?himbing . 

Dropping maniire in street 

Dumping rubbish 

Filthy alleyways 

Filthy cellars 

Filthy premises . 

Filthy stables . 

Filthy swill barrels 

Filthy yards 

Keeping hens 

Keeping hogs 

Odor from gas in houses 

Offensive manui-e heaps 

Offensive odor from stables 

Offensive odor in houses 

Offensive privy vaults 

Pediculosis 

Private sewers obstructed . 

Sewerage backed into cellars 

Sewerage backed on to land 

Sewer traps broken . 

Sink drain obstructed 

Sinks found without trai)s . 

Sinks with imperfect drainage 

Stagnant water . 

Suspected contagious disease 

Throwing ashes in street . 

Throwing out slops . 

Throwing swill in yards and alleyvva\ 

Washing ice at watering trough 

Water-closets foul and offensive 

Water-closets out of repair 

Water-closets without water supply 

Water in cellars 

Total 



3 

2 
6 
1 

22 
2 
6 

11 
1 
4 



10 

2 

5 

10 

10 

21 

3 

11 

2 

1 

4 

1 

2 

t> 

2 
1 
1 
7 
4 
1 
G 
4 
4 
5 

257 



I 



SANITARY DEPART:MENT. , 



369 



Inspection of Plumbing. 

The number of inspections made will be found in the table 
herewith annexed : 



Plumbing permits granted 








. 150 


Water-closets put in . 






. 231 


Sinks' put in 








. 13B 


Bath-tubs put in 








. 108 


Wash-bowls put in 








. 160 


Wash-trays put in 








. 24 


Urinals put in 








. 13 


Ranges put in 








. 7 


Shower baths put in . 








. 8 


Xuraber sewers 








. 54 


Total number inspection 


. of , 


lurab 


mg 


. 250 



SUMMARV. 

Houses placarded in cases of contagious diseases . . 200 

Placards removed . . . . . . . . 200 

Visits made to contagious diseases . . . . .631 

Rooms fumigated 576 

Schoolhouses fumigated ...... 5 

Cellars fumigated ........ 3 

Wards at hospitals fumigated ..... 7 

Hacks fumigated ........ 2 

Books and pieces of clothing fumigated .... 132 

Pieces of bedding and clothing burned .... 423 

Burial permits issued ....... 402 

Burial permits issued to non-residents . . . .89 

Transfer permits issued ....... 131 

Garbage licenses issued ....... 48 

Xumber of reports of contagious diseases sent to State 

Board of Health 52 

Xumber of mortuary reports sent in exchange to other 

cities 1,032 

Number of vaccination certificates issued for children to 

attend school 940 

24 



370 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Number of })erniits issued for children to return to school 10() 
Number of collections of food for analysis at the labora- 
tory 7 

Water sent for analysis . . . . . . .10 

In closing this report I wish to express my thanks to His 
Honor the Mayor, members of the City Government and the 
Board of Health for the courteous treatment shown this de- 
partment during the year. 

CHAS. E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



SANITARY DEPART]VrEXT. 



371 



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MORTALITY REPORT. 



374 



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380 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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381 













































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CITY OF CONCORD. 



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SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



383 





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REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the City Council: 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the work 
done in my department during the year ending December 31^ 
1905 : 

Xumber of calls . . . . . . 18 

Office consultations ..... 8 

Children examined for school ... 5 

Vaccinations and certificates . . . 146 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES }I. COOK, JR., 

City Physician. 
Concord, N. H., March 5, 1906. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 

REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



The park commissioners present herewith their report for 
the year ending December ol, 190o : 

General appropriation for parks . . -^0,500. 00 
Appropriation for Penacook Park . 125.00 

Appropriation for extra . . . 75.00 

$3,700.00 

Gift of J. P:astman Pecker ...'.. 200.00 

$3,900.00 

The amount of money available for park work was 13,900.00 
for the past year and has been spent as follows : 



White P 



VRK 



For labor (including superintendent's salary) . $1,909.39 

grade 112.05 

grain 17.15 

fertilizer . . . . . . . 17.60 

plants and shrubs 42.25 

tools, etc. . • 56.88 

incidentals 119.63 

12,274.95 

Rollins Park. 

For labor $559.35 

grain 27.70 

plants and shrubs 180.58 

fertilizer 27.50 

25 



386 CITY OF CONCORD. 



For lumber . 
tools, etc. 
incidentals 


BUADLEY PaUK. 


141.17 

89.88 

78.75 

11,004.93 


For labor . 
fertilizer 
incidentals 




165.00 
10.95 
13.10 




189.05 




FisKE Paijk. 




For labor 

incidentals 




136.50 

8.25 




$44.75 




Ridge Road. 




For labor 

incidentals 




126.50 
11.20 




137.70 




Court House. 




For labor 
labor 




122.00 
21.75 




143.75 




Penacook Park. 




For labor 

lumber . 
repairs . 
incidentals 





1117.80 

9.03 

43.00 

15.22 



1185.05 

The expense of imj^rovinfr Pecker I*ark, in East Concord, 
was borne by Col. J. Eastman Pecker, who gave -t200. This 
money was expended as follows : 



I'URLIC PARKS. 387 

For labor $53.50 

grade 103.50 

shrubs and trees . . . . . . 30.16 

incidentals . . . 1*2.12 



fl99.28 
The total expenditures on account of parks was ^3,S79.4(). 

The work at White Park has been almost wholly in keeping 
the grounds in good order. The pond has been improved by 
edging it with stones and 600 loads of grade have been drawn 
on to tlie playground. 

The commissioners did not have sufficient funds to begin 
the fence, as they liad hoped to do, but it is a matter which 
will require immediate attention. We hope, also, that the 
grounds ma}' be policed, especially after the hour when the 
men quit work. 

An addition of 4^ acres to Rollins Park has been made, for 
a playground, at an expense of 13,307.50. This will be 
improved as the funds will warrant. The deer park has been 
an attraction to many, and it is hoped to have an enlarged 
enclosure by the purchase of the run below the present loca- 
tion. The Angora goats were sold at the time of the state 
fair, as the enclosure was not large enough for the deer and 
goats together. 

Penacook Park has been used very extensively as a picnic 
ground, and should be more closely supervised. New lamps 
were put up and needed repairs made. It will be necessary to 
cut some of the trees, which are dead or soon will be. The 
shores should be improved by the erection of a rustic house 
and benches, and restrictions as to the erection of wharves 
should be made. All who intend to locate should ask permis- 
sion of the commissioners. 

The other parks have been maintained as usual, and have 
been objects of much satisfaction and pleasure for all. 

The plot of groiind in the rear of the Cou.rt House has had 
some work done on it, but owing to the building operations 
going on nothing permanent could be accomplished. 



388 CITY OF COXCORD. 

Owing to the increase of the area and the many needed 
improvements, the commissioners should be allowed a larger 
sum to expend upon the parks. It is possible that other 
lots of land will be donated to the city for its care and main- 
tenance. 

Mr. John F. Jones, a valued member af the board, died early 
in the year, and Dr. Charles P. Bancroft was chosen to fill his 
place. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES R. CORNING, Chairman. 
WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 
BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 
AVILLIAM P. FISKE, 

Commissioners. 



PUP.LIC PARKS. 



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CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS OF CEM- 
ETERIES. 



To the City Council of the Citu of Concord : 

Your commissioners of cemeteries have but little to report. 
The expenditures during the year have been small, as the ap- 
propriations placed at our disposal have prevented any perma- 
nent improvements. The burials in the past year have been 
one hundre<l and forty-seven (147) in Blossom Hill Cemetery, 
and twenty-one (21) in the Old North. 

For the financial standing of the cemeteries we would refer 
you to the report of the city treasurer. 

We would again recommend that a small appropriation be 
made for the employment of a competent landscape architect 
to lay out the new section at Blossom Hill which was purchased 
a few years ago of Mr. Bradley, so that when needed for new 
lots it may be ready for use. 

We would also recommend that an appropriation be made 
for the erection of a waiting room and toilet rooms near the 
entrance to Blossom Hill, which has long been needed, and we 
have had plans made for a suitable building, which can be built 
at an estimated cost of not exceeding three thousand dollars. 

Whatever sum you may place at our disposal will be ex- 
pended, we trust, in a manner that will merit your approval. 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
FRANK P. ANDREWS, 
CHARLES G. REMICK, 
FRANK J. BATCHELDER, 
GEORGE A. FOSTER, 
GEORGE W. ABBOTT, 

Commissioners. 
Geokgk a. Fostek, Secretary. 



( ' EM ETE K Y I )EPAI;TMENT, 



393 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

To His Honor the Mayor and City Council: 

The Millville Cemetery Committee respectfully submit the 
following rejiort of the receii)ts and expenditm-es for the year 
1905 : 

Receipts. 

From city treasurer, appropriation . . Si50.00 

From city treasurer, interest on trust funds 15.75 

From sale of lots (one half) . . . 32.50 

From interested individuals . . . 35.75 



$134.00 



Total receipts 






Expenditures. 




Paid C. H. Martin & Co. . 




$9.85 


W. L. Jenks & Co. . 




16.13 


George \V. Chesley 




3.00 


F. W. Sanborn 




4.50 


F. G. Proctor . 




80.50 


V. C. Hastings 




6.00 


I. N. Abbott, cash paid 


for flowers 




and loam 




•2.75 


Cash to balance account . 




11.27 



Total expenditures 



1134.00 

ALBERT S. TRASK, 
FRANK G. PROCTOR, 
ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 

Committee. 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

To His Honor the Mayor and City Council: 

Your committee on "West Concord Cemetery submit the fol- 
lowing re[)ort of the receipts and expenditures for the year 
1905: 



394 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Jan. 1, 1905. C\asli on hand . . . 130.09 

Sale of lots . . . 41.00 

Care of lots . . . 1.50 



*72.59 



1905. Paid out : 

June G. Simeon Partridge . . . 114.50 

Aug. 9. A. C. Powell .... 20.00 

Xov. 20. Water bill .... (i.OO 
Dec. 6. W. F. Thayer, one half sale of 

lots 20.50 

Dec. 29. J. M. Grossman . . . 5.00 

G. R. Parmenter . . . 5.00 



171.00 
Jan. 1, 1906. C-ash on hand 1.59 



*72.59 



J. M. GROSSMAN, 
GEO. R. PARMENTER, 

Committee. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

To His Honor the Mayor and City Council: 

Your committee on cemeteries in East Concord submit the 
following report for the year 1905 : 

Receipts. 

Appropriation !^150.00 

Joint resolution ..... 1.00 

One half sale of lots . . . . 12.50 



-I1G3.50 



Expenses. 

Jeremiah Carter, mowing . . . '117.00 

Samuel Cunningham, mowing . . . 17.00 

C. M. Radford, labor . \ . . 14.85 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



395 



L. J. Fairfield, labor 


$89.60 


J. T. Batchelder, grade . 


4.80 


S. Lowell French, labor . 


12.15 


Scott French, labor . 


45.00 


Balance with coraraitttee 


12.50 



$163.50 





OLD FORT CEMETERY. 








RK( EIPTS. 






Appropriation 




Expenses. 




. 115.00 


Scott French, 


labor . 






$8.85 


Balance of ap] 


n-opriation 






6.15 




$15.00 








W. A. 


COWLEY, 


' 






SCOTT 


FRENCH, 

Committee. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the C'dii Council: 

I respectfully submit the following report for the year 1905 : 

At the time I made my last report, December 31, 1904, the 
following suits against the City of Concord were pending in the 
Superior Court: Concord Street Raihvay v. Concord, an appeal 
taten by the Concord Street Railway from an award of dam- 
ages to it by the board of mayor and aldermen upon laying out 
a highway in Penacook ; Joseph Stickney v. Concord, a petition 
for an abatement of taxes for the year 1900; Joseph Stickney 
V. Concord, a petition for an abatement of taxes for the year 
1901 ; Jennie E. Martin v. Concord, a suit to recover damages 
for injury to her property on the corner of South State and 
Downing streets, alleged to have been caused by the backing 
up of w'ater and sewage by reason of an insufficient and defec- 
tive sewer; H. Cohen v. Concord, a petition for a writ of man- 
damus to. compel the board of mayor and aldermen of Concord 
to issue to him a license to deal in old junk. 

The cases of the Concord Street Railway, Joseph Stickney, 
and Jennie E. Martin have not been pressed by the plaintiffs 
and ai'e still on the docket. I have been told by counsel for 
Jennie E. Martin that if the conditions causing the damage are 
remedied by the city she will not ask for large damages. I 
have called this matter to the attention of the city engineer 
and I think it would be well for the city government to inves- 
tigate the sewer conditions and facilities in the vicinity of Mrs. 
Martin's property with a view to ascertaining if there is some 
practical w^ay of preventing future damage to property in that 
neighborhood. 

The petition of IT. Cohen for a writ of mandamus to compel 
the board of mayor and aldermen of Concord to issue to him a 



CITY solicitor's REPORT. 397 

license to deal in old junk was, at the time of ray last re})ort, 
before the Supreme Court on an exception of the plaintiff to 
the ruling of the Superior Court sustaining a demurrer to the 
petition. At the last session of the Legislature the law relating 
to dealers in old metals, old junk, etc., was amended in such a 
way that the determination of the questions raised by the peti- 
tion of II. Cohen would be of little or no value. Counsel for 
H. Cohen have not pressed the matter of their exception to the 
ruling of the Superior Court and no decision has l)een rendered 
by the Supreme Court. 

After the amendment of the law relating to junk dealers I 
instituted proceedings in the Police Court against II. Cohen for 
being a dealer in and keeper of a shop for the purchase, sale 
and barter of old junk, old metals, etc.^ without a license. 
Upon trial in the Police Court Mr. Cohen was found guilty and 
ordered to pay a fine. He appealed from this finding and order 
of the Police Court to the Superior Court. lie was found 
guilty by the Superior Court and ap2:)ealed to the Supreme 
Court, claiming that the law relating to dealers in old metals, 
etc. (chaj)ter 124 of the Public Statutes), was unconstitutional 
and that his business, as shown by the facts, was not within the 
meaning of the law. This case is in order for argument in the 
Supreme Court at the February term. This is a very impor- 
tant case to the City of Concord, as well as to all other cities 
and towns in the state which have adopted the provisions of 
chapter 124 of the Public Statutes, because it will settle the 
law as to the power boards of mayor and aldermen and boards 
of selectmen have with reference to regulating the junk busi- 
ness. I hope that the constitutionality of the law will be sus- 
tained, as my experience as city solicitor has shown me that 
this business is one that requires supervision and regulation by 
reason of the character of the men who usually engage in it 
and of the opportunity the business affords for the disposition 
and concealment of stolen property and by reason of the dan- 
ger to public health and safety if such business is conducted 
without any restrictions or regulations. 

I have during the year prosecuted many criminal cases for 
the police department before the Police Court. I have also 



398 CITY OF CONCORD. 

given advice and assistance when required to the various de- 
partments of the city government and to committees and mem- 
bers of the city council. Some of these matters have been of 
importance and have required considerable time on my part to 
be able to properly advise in regard to them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDMUND S. COOK, 

City Solicitor. 
December 31, 1905. 



REPORT OF CLERK OF POLICE 
COURT. 



CoxcoRD, N. H., March 9, 1906. 
To the City Coiincil : 

The clerk of the Police Court submits the following report : 
Xumber of civil cases entered ]\Iavch to December, 1905, in- 
clusive, was eighty-five. Received entry fees on same, forty- 
two dollars and fifty cents ($42.50). Paid city treasurer forty- 
two dollars and fifty cents (-$42.50). 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUFUS H. BAKER, 

Clerk of Police Court. ' 



Note.— Mr. H. R. Hood resigned as clerk of the Police Court April 15, 1905. 
I was appointed and took the oath of oiHce on the 20th day of April, 1905. Ac- 
cordingly I have not reported for the full year, but have reported the entrie.s 
for March, the month previous to my appointment, a.s the entry fees for the 
March term of the court were turned over to me and the entries on the docket 
for that term were made by me. 

R. H. BAKER, Clerk. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the City Council: 

I liei-ewith submit the report of collection of taxes to the 
close of business, December 30, 1905. 

Year 1902. 

Total amount submitted for collection, §24o,'220.46 
Interest collected .... 1,223.29 
Unadjusted account . . . . 19.53 





^244,463.28 




Paid treasurer 




$237,899.52 


•Discounts allowed . . . . 




471.26 


Abatements allowed . . . . 




6,073.07 


Account adjusted, William Hodge . 




19.43 




1244,463.28 


Year 1903. 






Total amount sul>mitted for collection. 


$243,225.25 




Interest collected . . . . 


1,148 83 






-$244,374.08 




Paid treasurer . . . . . 




1235,456.00 


Abatements allowed . . . . 




8,918.08 




$244,374.08 


Year 1904. 






Total amount submitted for collection. 


.1^252,205.55 




Interest collected . . . . 


1,271.89 





1253,477.44 



TAX COLLECTOR S KEPOKT. 



401 



Paid treasurer ..... 






1247,351.83 


Abatements allowed .... 






6,028.30 


Unadjusted account .... 






6.20 


Cash in office Dec. 80, 1904, at close 








of business . . . . . 






16.02 


Uncollected Dec. 30, 1904, at close of 








business . . . . . 






75.09 




!i;253,477.44 


Year 1905. 








Resident list as committed 


n 


-)7,143.09 




Errors and omissions added 




1,551 20 




Resident list as corrected . 


n 


j8,694.29 




Xon-resident list .... 




900.77 




Interest collected to date . 




40.88 






8259,635.94 




Cash paid treasurer, as per report. 








Dec. 1, 1905 . . . . 






-1^118.325.00 


Cash paid treasurer during month of 








December, 1905 . 






89,950.00 


Abatements to date .... 






4,200.51 


Cash in office Dec. 30, 1905, at closing 






261.20 


Uncollected Dec. 30, 1905, at closing 






46,899.23 



1259.635.94 
WENDELL P. LADD, 



Concord, N. II., January 1, 1906. 



Tax CoUedo) 



26 



ASSESSORS* REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord : 

The Board of Assessors respectfully submit, for the benefit 
of the taxpayers of the city, such information as seems to be 
of interest to all. 

Valuation of the City. 
Number of polls assessed: 

In 1904 5,188 $518,800 

In 1905 5,400 540,000 

Increase 212 $21,200 

Improved and unimi)roved land and buildings, 

1904 19,660,795 

Improved and unimproved land and buildings, 

1905 9,704,465 

Increase $43,670 

Horses : 
Number of horses in 1904 . . . 1,590 190,870 

Number of horses in 1905 . . . 1,539 85,910 

Decrease 51 $4,960 

Oxen: 

Number of oxen in 1904 ... 43 $1,810 

Number of oxen in 1905 ... 45 2,275 

Increase 2 $465 



ASSESSOR S REPORT. 



403 



14 



Cows : 
Number of cows in 1904 , 
Number of cows in 1905 . 

Increase . . . . 
Neat Stock : 
Number of other neat stock in 1904 . 
Number of other neat stock in 1905 . 

Increase ..... 
Sheep : 
Number of sheep in 1904 . 
Number of sheep in 1905 . 

Decrease 

Hogs: 
Number of hogs in 1904 . 
Number of hogs in 1905 . 

Decrease ..... 
Carnages : 
Number of carriages in 1904 
Number of carriages in 1905 

Decrease 

Stocks : 
Stocks in public funds in 1904 .... 
Stocks in public funds in 1905 .... 

Decrease . 

Stock in banks and other corporations in this 
state, 1904 

Stock in banks and other corporations in this 
state, 1905 

Decrease ....... 



1,419 


180,830 


1,444 


30,728 


25 


t$102 


192 


$2,335 


194 


2,475 


2 


$140 


230 


$500 


222 


510 



49 



*$10 



27 


$277 


11 


90 


16 


$187 


346 


$24,310 


297 


25,000 



*$690 

$27,098 
11,450 

$15,648 

$266,450 

233,532 

$32,918 



404 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Stock in corporations out of this state in 1904 
Stock in corporations out of this state in 1905 

Increase .... 



Money on hand or on deposit, 1904 
Money on hand or on deposit, 1905 



Stock in trade in 1904 
Stock in trade in 1905 

Increase 

Mills and machinery in 1904 
Mills and machinery in 1905 

Increase 



$15,835 
19,577 

$3,742 

196,370 
103,497 

$7,127 

$747,102 
770,351 

$23,249 

$76,100 
84,151 

$8,051 



Valuation by Wards ix 1904 axd 1905. 





1904. 


1905. 


Ward 1, 


$844,127 


$867,927 


Ward 2, 


296,424 


302,428 


Ward 3, 


385,170 


433,370 


Ward 4, 


2,554,820 


2,632,399 


Ward 5, 


3,094,884 


2,943,949 


Ward 6, 


1,955,727 


1,954,820 


Ward 7, 


1,190,055 


1,228,165 


Ward 8, 


882,175 


875,193 


Ward 9, 


356,100 


375,760 




$11,559,482 


$11,614,011 



Assessors. 

Oliver J. Fifield. 
William A. Cowley. 
Joseph E. Shepard. 
George W. Parsons. 
George F. Underhill. 
Osro M. Allen. 
John H. Quimby. 
William A. Lee. 
David Sullivan. 



ASSESSOR .S REPORT. 



405 



Appropkiations, Tax Kate and Valuation of City ani 
Pkecixcts. 



General Tax. 


Appropria- 
tions. 


Per cent, 
added. 


Tax rate 

on 

$1,000. 


Valuation of 
citv and 
precinct.s. 


f State tax 


$29,010,501 


2V2 percent. 








42,930.34 1 

> 

51,195.00 1 


$4,428.40 


$15.60 






$11,614,011 


City tax 


1 
54,000.00 J 








Special school appro- 
priations: 








Union School District... 


27,502.00 


68755 


$2.80 


10,081,437 


Town District 


500 00 


12 50 


.70 


846 064 


District No. 20 


3,583.00 


89.57 


5.40 


686,510 


Precincts: 










Sprinkling 


5,600.00 


140.00 


.70 


8,524,973 












Water 


6,000.00 


150.00 


.60 


10,594,706 










9,370,156 

9,576,941 

682,900 




15,000.00 
1,250.00 
2,450.00 








31 25 


1 90 


Penacook sewer 


61.25 


3.70 


684,000 


West Concord sewer — 


1,676.35 


41.90 


6.70 


257,950 


East Concord lights .... 


424.00 


10 60 


2.20 


198,266 


East Concord sewer .... 


152.50 


3.83 


4.80 


32,250 


St. Paul's School sewer. 


785.00 


19.62 


9.30 


87,100 



Respectfully submitted, 

OSRO M. ALLEN, 
Chairman of Board of Assessors. 



GEORGE W 



PARSONS, 

Clerl: 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



THIRTY-EIGHTH AN:N'UAL REPOKT OF 
OYEKSEER OF POOR 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1905. 



To the City Council: 

Gentlemen. — The undersigned herewith submits the 
thirty-eighth annual report of expenditures for the poor, includ- 
ing Wards 1 and 2, for the year ending December 31, 1905, 
as follows : 

Families and individuals having a settlement in the city have 
been aided, in part or in full, during the time, to the amount 
set opposite their respective names : 



Mrs. W. J. Dunn . 








1131.01 


Mrs. F. U. Abbott 








180.25 


Mrs. John Casey . 








75.00 


George B. Farley . 








103.84 


Daniel Murphy 








78.00 


Ada Sanborn 








64.13 


Fred Duchame 








304.00 


W. Florent . 








12.75 


Frank R. Elliott . 








62.15 


Martha Moore 








15.50 


Nancy Batchelder 








198.17 


George Lapierre . 








14.00 


Mary Ann Driscoll 








37.07 


Nathan Lucier 








9.00 


Mrs. Fred Sawyer 








32.00 


Mrs. Annie Manley 








3.50 

11.320.37 



POOR DE1»ARTMENT. 



40( 



COUNTY POOK. 


J. E. Beckett $13.63 


James Bingham 








7.40 


Peter Bolay . 








39.10 


Frank Bordeau . 








19.40 


Mrs. C. Bray 








74.00 


Mrs. T. II. Brown 








62.00 


Martha Burke 








160.09 


Mary Carter . 








69.38 


Mrs. Thomas Carron 








115.43 


Fred Charrette . 








161.00 


Clark Family 








100.00 


Jane Clinton 








60.00 


Mary Collins 








102.52 


Mrs. L. Clifford . 








36.20 


Fred Cyr 








23.29 


M. Daly 








30.00 


L. A. Davis . 








35.00 


Mrs. L. A. Deering 








5.63 


Mrs. J. W. Elliott 








40.29 


J. B. Frazier 








16.15 


Mrs. J. J. Gm-ley . 








149.19 


Mrs. Hannaford . 








106.81 


Mrs. Hunneman . 








27.95 


George E. Ingalls 








187.34 


Mrs. J. H. Kelley 








21.20 


Mrs. Henry Knox 








258.09 


Mrs. C. F. Laird . 








262.36 


Mrs. J. B. Lemay . 








113.64 


Mary Lucie . 








12.00 


Mrs. P. McGowan 








92.00 


Mrs. Thomas Mitchell 




*■ 




51.35 


Lillian Monroe 








3.95 


Marion Morley 








100.03 


Nancy Murphy 








82.00 


Mrs. Peter Olson . 








59.75 


Mrs. O'Neil . 








96.00 


R. T. Orr . 








112.42 



408 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Elmer Quiiiil)y 










$7.95 


Rudner Children 










165.00 


Annie Rushlow . 










96.00 


Carter Sayles 










70.06 


John Storin . 










106.00 


W. G. Tandy 










210.89 


Mrs. Oscar Thoma 


s 








96.00 


George Tonkin 










257.29 


Margaret Trainor 










206.68 


Mrs. C. Truehon 










• 111.09 


Mrs. P. Truehon 










108.76 


B. G. Tucker 










11.40 


Mrs. James Vease 










205.92 


H. A. Ward . 










124.84 


Mrs. C. P. Watts 










96.00 


W. C. Wilmot 










24.00 


Mary Williams 










121.11 


C. Belaire . 










29.35 


Isaac Leonard 










72.00 


Mrs. Magnuson 










1.98 


M. J. O'Connell 










5.95 


Daniel Virgin 










29.00 


Mrs. David Lucia 










12.00 


Mrs. Mae Haskins 










50.00 


W.G.Lee . 










50.09 


Sarah Nichols 










39.00 


Napoleon Panquin 








L98 


George A. Rollins 








35.00 


George Baker 








4.00 


Mrs. John Baker . 








4.02 


Sarah McConnell . 








32.00 


M. Smith . 








2.01 


Charles Gray 








4.00 


Mrs. Mary McComeau 








21.00 


John Wilson 








102.01 


George Lapierre . 








35.00 


Helen Smith 








66.12 


IVIrs. Alalia . 










51.63 



rOOi; DErAHTMENT. 



409 



Martha J. Pollard 










$81.89 


Joseph W. Edgerly 
Mrs. A. F. Lindsey 








27.50 
12.00 


John Murphy 








108.57 


Mrs. F. D. Brown 








44.03 


Addie Webster . 








3.81 


Frank M. Piper 










2.00 


John L. Anderson 










18.00 


W. L. Huntress 










24.00 


Joe Lapierre 

Mrs. N. E. Foss 










15.00 
6.00 


A. E. Wasgatt 
Mrs. Sarah S. Ellis 










7.63 
8.44 


Miss Sarah Hoyt 
Tim Lane 










10.00 
10.00 


Nathan Tidofsky 
Rhoda T. Carter 










13.00 
3.63 


Mrs. N. Arnile 










41.45 


Adolph Beauchane 
Louis Carrow 










12.68 
33.20 


Mrs. Chase . 










72.50 


Levi Chennette 










90.60 


M. Fournier . 










16.01 


C. Gerald . 










16.75 


Felix Guyotte 
Mrs. C. Hill . 










6.50 
150.93 


Mrs. Osier . 










148.97 


Mrs. Papineau 
Tom Preva . 










12.21 
149.20 


Francis Runnells 










13.29 


Mrs. James Shea 










6.78 


Lena Ayotte 










4.45 


Ernest Aville 










4.00 


Mrs. Davis . 










4.35 


Clara Lapointe 
Sarah Abbott 










7.00 
14.00 


Annie Labrick 










3.58 


Mrs. Fred Blanchr 


rd 








27.50 



410 



CITY OF COMCOllD. 



Edmund Previe . 






12.50 


Mrs. Rosa Gagnon 






133.99 


William Chenette 






7.06 


M. Stone, Jr. 






*17.00 


Fred Raynoe 






1.75 


F. Vincent 






13.17 


Philip Simoneau . 






14.50 


Joe A. Boyce 






5.25 


Transient account 






26.84 



$7,027.23 

Amount paid for support of city poor . 11,320.37 
Amount paid by the city for the sup- 
port of county poor .... 7,027.23 
Total amount paid on account of 

poor $8,347.60 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



Aid to Dependent Soldiers and Their Families Rendered 
During the Year 1905. 



Chargeable to City, 



Alvah Atwood 
P. C. White . 
Archibald Marston 



$64.13 

27.08 
28.26 



$119.47 



Chargeable to County. 



J. E. Farrell 
Helen- L. Griswold 
Ann Hackett 
Mrs. John Heath 
George Kelley 
Morris Lamprey 
Mary J. Oakley 



Returned to city treasurer, 



$96.00 
61.22 
59.26 
29.32 

135.00 
82.30 

193.85 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



411 



Jolin McKenna 
Charles T. Much 
C. II. Norton 
Otis Reister . 
J. M. Prentiss 
Mrs. Michael Storia 
Eli Sturgeon 
Honora Sullivan 
Eliza B. Tandy 
William Wallace 
Nathaniel Chase 
Mrs. R. L. Chase 
Harriet Ash . 
Lucretia Danforth 
Mary Huntress 
Robert Crowther 
Mrs. C. M. Davis 
W. H. Libby 
Asa Demick . 
Lester Fletcher 



$84.00 
96.00 
78.00 

143.15 

3.70 

89.25 

5.95 

168.88 
32.50 

141.74 
6.90 
28.84 
72.00 
16.50 
20.00 
20.00 
56.95 
10.94 
16.91 

102.55 



11,851.71 



Total amount 



$1,971.18 



REPORT OF CITY CLERK 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1905. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the amount 
received from fees, licenses and other sources for year ending 
December 31, 1905 : 



From Merrimack County, aid to county poor 

Merrimack County, aid to dependent soldiers 

fees of all kinds . 

licenses, pool and billiard tables 

licenses, hack and job teams 

licenses, junk dealers 

licenses, dogs 

quarry rents 

use of steam bolster 

rent of auditorium 

account Pecker Park 

account aid to county poor, refunded 



1^7,010.28 

1,851.71 

683.14 

370.00 

110.50 

210.00 

2,018.30 

150.00 

135.00 

465.00 

213.88 

17.00 



|?13,234.76 
The foregoing amount has been paid into the city treasury. 
Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1905. 



TRUST fu:nds. 

City Treasureh's Accounts as Custodian of Trust Funds. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 

For the benefit of the School fund. 

Capital -S1,000.00 

Income received, 1905 35.00 

Paid into the city treasui-y ..... 35.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

COUNTESS OP RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be 
applied to the charitable uses and purpose.s of said societj-, and under its 
direction. 

Capital $2,000.00 

Income received, 1905 80.00 

Paid Grace E. Foster, treasurer of the society . 80.00 

Invested in Eagle and Phenix Hotel Company 4 per cent, 
notes, secured by mortgage. 



MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embel- 
lishment of the burial lots known as the Minot Enclosure, under the direc- 
tion of the duly appointed officials, or members of the Minot Cemetery Asso- 
ciation. 

Capital 13,000.00 

Income received, 1905 ...... 98.12 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer .... 98.12 



414 CITY OF CONCORD. 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

The purpose of the donor of this trust fund was that the income should be 
used for the purchase of school books for poor children; but since the bequest 
was made, a state law has been enacted that requires the towns and cities to 
buy all the school books; consequently the beneficiary of the donor is pro- 
vided for and the purpose of the trust no longer exists. This fund, $200, and 
accumulations, amount to $423.30, and same will continue to accumulate for- 
ever without any benefit to any object unless some legal action can be taken 
to divert the income from the specified purpose of the donor. 

Capital 1200.00 

Balance from last year .... 209.55 
Income received, 1905 . . . 13.75 

$223.30 

Capital $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank. 
$100 of income invested in City of Concord 3^^ bond, bal- 
ance of income deposited in the Union Guaranty Savings Bank. 



COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase 
of books of a Biographical, Geographical, Historical and Scientific character, 
and the books relating to science shall be those that give the latest develop- 
ments and discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital $2,145.00 

Income received, 1905 . . . 65.15 

Paid into the city treasmy . . . 65.15 

Invested in City of Concord 3 % bonds . . 2,000.00 

Dejiosited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank . . 145.00 



G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital $1,000.00 

Income received, 1905 35.00 

Paid into the city treasury ..... 35.00 

Invested in City of Concord oh% bond. 



FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital $1,000.00 

Income received, 1905 . . . 36.25 



TREASURY DEPARTiMENT. 415 

Paid into the city treasury . . . I3G.25 

Invested in City of Concord 4% bond . . $500.00 

De])Osited in Union Guaranty Savings Bank . 500.00 



THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital $500.00 

Income received, 1905 . . . 17.50 

Paid into the city treasury . . . 17.50 
Invested in City of Concord 3.^% bond. 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one half the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1905 . $21,256.08 
Received from one half sale of lots, 1905 583.88 

Received from income of fund, 1905 . 856.54 



Credited City of Concord general acct. $856.54 

Amount of capital January 1, 1906 . 21,839.46 

Invested in City of Concord 4% bonds $8,500.00 

Invested in City of Concord 3i% bonds 2,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav. Bk. 7,375.11 

Invested in United States 4% bonds . 550.00 

Deposited in Union Guai'anty Sav. Bk. 3,414.35 



$22,696.00 



$22,696.00 



$21,839.46 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an increase 
of the fund. 

Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Old North 
Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1905 . $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 1905 . 28.89 

$843.89 



416 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Credited City of Concord genei-al acct. !?28.89 

Amount of capital January 1, 1906 . 815.00 

Invested in City of Concord S^/^ bonds $500.00 
Deposited in Merrimack County Savings 

Bank . . . / . . 315.00 



$843.89 



$815.00 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased eacti year by the addition of one half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of West Concord Cemeter3'. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1905 . $366.00 
Unexpended income on hand January 

1, 1905 158.27 

Received from income of fund, 1905 . 18.32 

Received from one half sale of lots . 20.50 



Unexpended income January 1, 1906 . $176.59 
Amount of capital January 1, 1906 . 386.50 



$563.09 



$563.09 



Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
Coimty Savings Bank. 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by the voluntary contributions of 
interested parties. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1905 . $252.50 
Unexpended income on hand January 

1, 1905 46.53 

Received from one half sale of lots, 

1905 32.50 

Received from income of fund, 1905 . 20.25 

Received from estate Moses Hall . 500.00 

. $851.78 



TREASURY DEPARTMEMT. 417 

Unexpended income January 1, 1906 . $66.78 

Amount of capital January 1, 1906 . 785.00 

$851.78 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Loan and Trust 
Savings Bank. 



EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1905 . $247.50 
Unexpended income on hand January 

1, 1905 151.81 

Received from income of fund, 1905 . 15.96 

$415.27 

Unexpended income January 1, 1906 . $167.77 
Amount of capital January 1, 1906 . 247.50 

$415.27 

Capital and unexpended income dej^osited in Xew Hamp- 
shire Savings Bank. 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord Sewer Precinct, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the citj' to construct the system, also cre- 
ated a sinking fund which provided that the following amounts should be 
raised annually upon the taxable property of the precinct, for the purpose of 
paying the bonds as they mature, viz. : 

$500 annually for 10 years from October 1, 1892. 
$1,000 annually for five years from October 1, 1902. 
$1,400 annually for five years from October 1, 1907. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1905 . $2,936.72 
Income received, 1905 . . . 82.68 

Received from City of Concord . . 1,000.00 



Deposited in Union Guaranty Savings 

Bank . . . ."^ . . $2,066.04 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings 

Bank 1,953.36 



27 



$4,019.40 



$4,019.40 



418 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook Sewer Precinct, and author- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund which provided that the following amounts should be raised 
annually upon the taxable property of the precinct for the purpose of paying 
the bonds as they mature, viz.: 

11,000 annually for five years from August 1, 1898. 
$100 annually for 15 years from October 1, 1900. 
$1,200 annually for five years from August 1, 1903. 
11,000 annually for five years from May 1, 1908. 
1500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 
$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1905 . $2,115.25 

Income received, 1905 . . , 68.74 

Received from City of Concord . . 1,300.00 



$3,483.99 



Bond paid . . . . . . $500.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1906 . 2,983.99 

__ $3,483.99 

Capital and unexpended income de})0sited in Union Guar- 
anty Savings Bank. 

EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord Sewer Precinct, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also cre- 
ated a sinking fund which provided that the sum of one hundred dollars 
($100) should be raised annually for 20 years from July 1, 18 5, upon the tax- 
able property of the precinct, tor the purpose of paying the bonds as they 
mature. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1905 . $446.56 
Income received, 1905 ... 14.49 

Received from City of Concord . . 100.00 

$561 05 

Bond paid $500.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1906 . 61.05 

$561.05 

Capital and unexpended income de])osited in Union Guar- 
anty Savings Bank. 



TEEASURY DEPARTMENT. 419 



SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the City of Concord to be invested in some safe New England 
city bond, the income to be applied as follows : Twelve dollars each year in 
keeping lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in a neat and orderly condition ; six 
dollars each year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a 
monument fund ; and the balance of the income to be expended each year in 
purchasing books for the Concord Public Library. 

Capital *i,000.00 

Invested in City of Concord 3 ^ bond. 
Unexpended income for the care of lot, 

January 1, 1905 .... ^2.50 

Income received, 1905 . . . 80.00 

$32.50 



Transferred to SetliK. Jones monument 

fund m.OO 

Transferred to city general account for 

Public Library .... 12.00 

Paid for care of lot .... 12.00 

Unexpended income for care of lot . 2.50 



132.50 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones Trust. 
The entire accumulations to be expended every 50 years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1905 . 1254.99 
From S. K. Jones trust . . . 6.00 

Income received, 1905 . . . 8.76 



$269.75 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



CEMETERY TRUSTS. 



422 



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82 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



431 



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CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TEEAStJRY DEFAETMENT. 



433 



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434 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



435 



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436 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



437 



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CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TREASURY DEPART.MEMT. 



439 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 



Bonds. 

City Hall Buildiai 



Police Station, 



Bi 



State Library, 



Sewer. 



Union School District, 



MUNICH'AL. 
Due. 

Sept. 1, 1912, 
Sept. 1, 1913, 
Sept. 1, 1915, 
Sept. 1, 1916, 
Sept. 1, 1918, 
Sept. 1, 1919, 
Sept. 1, 1920, 
Sept. 1, 1921, 
Sept. 1,1922, 
Sept. 1, 1923, 
July 1, 1924, 
July 1, 1925, 
July 1, 1926, 
July 1, 1927, 
July 1, 1928, 
July 1, 1929, 
July 1, 1908, 
July 1, 1909, 
July 1, 1910, 
July 1, 1911, 
July 1, 1906, 
July 1, 1907, 
Junel, 1914, 

Precinct. 



Rate. 
3i, 

H, 

3i, 
3i, 

3A, 
3i, 
3^ 
3^, 

H, 
34, 
34, 
H, 
34, 
3^, 
3^, 
34, 
34, 

si 

4, 



Amount. 

88,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

7,000 

7,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

4,000 

3,000 

5,000 

5,000 

25,000 



June 1, 1914, 34, $25,000 



Dec. 1, 


1914, 


3^, 


9,000 


July 1, 


1917, 


3^, 


25,000 


April 1 


1906, 


34, 


$8,000 


April 1, 


1907, 


34, 


8,000 


April 1, 


1908, 


34, 


8,000 


Oct. 1, 


1909, 


34, 


7,000 



S182,000 



^59,000 



440 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





Bonds. 






Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


Union School District, 


Oct. 1, 1910, 3^, 


$7,000 


u 




" 


Oct. 1, 1911, 3i, 


7,000 


(( 




" 


Oct. 1, 1912, 3h, 


7,000 


ii 


istrict. 


No. 20 


Oct. 1, 1913, 3i, 


7,000 


School E 


, Sept. 1, 1913, 3i, 


$5,000 


'' 








Sept. 1, 1914, 3*, 


500 


a 








Sept. 1, 1915, 3i, 


500 










Sept. 1, 1916, 3i, 
Sept. 1, 1917, 3i, 


500 
500 


a 








Sept. 1, 1918, 3J, 


500 


a 








Sept. 1, 1919, 3i, 


500 


" 








Sept. 1, 1920, 3^, 


500 


*' 








Sept. 1, 1921, 3i, 


500 


a 








Sept. 1, 1922, 3i, 


500 


(( 








Sept. 1, 1924, 3^, 


4,300 


s. p. s. 


Sewer 

4( 


age, 


July 1, 1906, 3, 
July 1, 1907, 3, 


$500 
500 


a 


ik 




July 1, 1908, 3, 


500 


it 


" 




July 1, 1909, 3, 


500 


i. 


4( 




July 1, 1910, 3, 


500 


'' 


^' 




July 1, 1911, 3, 


500 


" 


(( 




July 1, 1912, 3, 


500 


" 


" 




July 1, 1913, 3, 


500 


West C 


Dneord Sewer, 


Oct. 1, 1907, 4, 


$5,000 


(( 


" 




Oct. 1, 1912, 4, 


7,000 


" 


" 




Oct. 1, 1913, 3i, 


500 


a 


'i 




Oct. 1, 1914, 3.J, 


500 


,u 


" 




Oct. 1, 1915, 3^, 


500 


.;c 


i 




Oct. 1, 1916, 3A, 


500 


X' 


C( 




Oct. 1, 1917, U, 


500 


*' 


' 




Oct. 1, 1918, sl 


500 


" 


( 






Oct. 1, 1919, 3i 


300 



^59,000 



$13,800 



$4,000 



$15,300 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



441 



East Concord Sewer, 



Peuacook Sewer, 



Due. Rate. 


Amount. 




July 1, 


1910, 


3i, 


$500 




July 1, 


1915, 


3.}, 


500 


$1,000 








Aug. 1, 


1908, 


4, 


$6,000 




Oct. 1, 


1910, 


3, 


500 




May 1, 


1913, 


4, 


5,000 




July 1, 


1914, 


4, 


500 




July 1, 


1915, 


4, 


500 




Oct. 1, 


1915, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1916, 


4, 


500 




Oct. 1, 


1916, 


3, 


500 




July 1, 


1917, 


4, 


500 




Oct. 1, 


1917, 


3, 


500 




July 1 


1918, 


4, 


500 




Oct. 1, 


1918, 


3, 


500 




July 1 


1919, 


4, 


500 


$16,500 









Total bonded indebtedness of the city, exclusive of 
water department ...... 



$350,600 



STATEMENT 


OP COUPON ACCOUNT. 






Dr. 




Municipal overdue January 1 


, 1905 


$283.00 


Precinct . 






232.50 




Due 


IN 1905 




Municipal 






$6,896.00 


Precinct, sewei- 






2,065.00 


Union School District 






2,065.00 


Penacook sewer 






650.00 


West Concord sewer . 






595.50 


East Concord sewer . 






52.50 


St. Paul's School sewer 






142.50 


School District No. 20 






483.00 
$13,465.00 



442 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cr. 



Municipal paid 


. 






$6,939.25 


Precinct, sewer 


. 






2,030.00 


Union Scliool District 


. 






2,047.50 


St. Paul's School sewer 








135.00 


Penacook sewer 


. 






650.00 


West Concord sewer . 








595.50 


East Concord sewer . 








52.50 


School District No. 20 


. 






483.00 


Municipal due, not presented 






239.75 


Precinct due, not preser 


ted 






267.50 


Union School District, 


due. 


not 


pre 




sented . 








17.50 


St. Paul's School sewei 


, due, 


not 


pre 




sented . 




• 




7.50 
_ $13,465.00 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OP 
WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

W. F. Thayer, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water- 
Works : 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1905 . $24,454.78 
V. C. Hastings, superintendent . 71,076.44 

Bonds 45,000.00 

Bonds, premium . , . . . 1,042.20 
Bonds, interest .... 134.17 

$141,707.59 



Expenditures. 

Coupons and interest . . . $25,176.94 

Bonds paid 52,800.00 

Maintenance and extension . . 37,826.25 

Cash on hand January 1, 1906 . 25,904.40 



$141,707.59 



TREASURY DErAETMENT. 



443 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 


When 


due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jau. 1, 


1906, 


4, 


110,000 


Jan. 1 


1917, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 


1907, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1 


1918, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 


1908, 


4, 


10,000 


Jau. 1 


1919, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 


1909, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1 


1920, 


3, 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 


1910, 


4, 


5,000 


Jau. 1 


1921, 


3, 


5,000 


Jan. 1, 


1910, 


3, 


5,000 


April 1 


1921, 


3.i, 


5,000 


Jan. 1, 


1911, 


3, 


5,000 


Jau. 1 


1922, 


4, 


400,000 


Jan. 1, 


1911, 


4, 


5,000 


April 1 


1922, 


3i, 


30,000 


April 1, 


1912, 


3*, 


10,000 


Mar. 1 


1922, 


3*, 


20,000 


Jan. 1, 


1913, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1 


1923, 


U, 


15,000 


Jan. 1, 


1914, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1 


1924, 


3i, 


15,000 


Jan. 1, 


1915, 


4, 


10,000 










Jan. 1, 


1916, 


4, 


10,000 








1640,000 


Bonds 


> due and not 


presented 


. 


. 


. 


$2,200 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OP THE WATER 
PRECINCT. 



Dr. 
To coupons overdue January 1, 1905, and not 
presented ....... 

Coupons due 1905 ...... 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1905 . 
Coupons due and not presented 



$581.00 
25,187.50 

$25,768.50 

$25,046.00 
722.50 



$25,768.50 



444 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts from the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining- half, with the amount received for grading of 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and 
income of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropria- 
tion. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order 
from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the city 
for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
specified in each trust. 



Receipts 
Charles W. Lane, care 
Mrs. G. H. Adams, care . 
Mrs. G. B. Buzzell, care . 
Miss P. Eaton . 
Mrs. Judith Eaton's estate, burial 
Miss Lucy Poore, care 
John H. Albin, care . 
W. H. Horner, care . 
Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care . 
Joseph T. Sleeper, care 
Amos Blauchard, care 
T. E. Currier, care 
Mrs. J. J. Wynian, care 
Henry A. Rowell, care 
Gordon & Edgerly, care 
W. G. Mead lot, care . 
Mrs. J. O. Lyford, care 
Mrs. M. R. Bunker's estate, burial 
J. S. Kidder's estate, use of tomb 
M. Devoreaux, use of tomb 
Kendall & Dame — W. Hardee, burial 
Mrs. Mary J. Webster's estate, labor 
Mrs. Mary G. Philbrick, burial . 
Odd Fellows' Home Association, burial 
Frank A. Fowler's estate, burial 
Mrs. H. A. Church, care . 
Mrs. George F^. Todd, care . 
Lyman Jackman, grading . 
John Mosee's estate, burial 



$1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.25 
1.00 
1.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
4.00 
2.50 
4.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1 00 
4.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
2.00 

26.00 
8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



445 



C. H. Noyes, care 

C, G. Remick, burial . 

J. B. Colby, care 

C. H. Morrison, burial 
Rollins & Young, care 

D. D. Brainerd's estate, use of touib 
Mrs. W. G. Carter, care . 
Miss Annah Kimball, care . 
Alba AVoods, care 

C. P. Tucker, care , 
J. W. Rankin's estate, burial 
Mrs. Sprague, care 
F. A. Stilliugs, care . 
George M. Kimball, care 

E. H. Osgood, burial . 
George A. Cummiugs' estate, burial 

D. Young, Jr., care . 
Mrs. James Minot, care 
Mrs. Burleigh's estate, care 
Kendall & Dame, use of tomb 
T. H. Dunstane, rent . 
S. C. Eastman, care . 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care . 
Mrs. J. W. Brown's estate, burial 
Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care . 
W. W. Cochran's estate, burial 
Mrs. Hevenor, care . 
Mrs. E. P. Plummer, care . 
Mr. Hanson, use of tomb . 
George L. Lincoln, care 
W. J. Green, care 
Dr. Lockerby's lot, care 
Miss Morse, care 
John Yeadon, lot and burial 
J. G. Leighton, care . 
W. E. Dow, care 
Harry Phillips, foundation . 
Hutchins & Abbott, care . 



12.00 
4.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 
3.00 
1.00 
4.00 
2.50 
3.00 
8.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 

24.00 
1.50 
1.00 

10.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.00 
6.00 
1.00 
1.00 
4.00 
2.00 



446 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



George W. Carter, care 

J. H. & Gr. L. Brown, care 

Arthur Cross' estate, use of tomb 

Otis Nudd's estate, burial . 

Rev. R. D. Grant, care 

N. H. Shattuck, care . 

George Buswell's estate, care 

Mac D. Aldrich, care . 

Cuniniings Bros., foundation 

J. B. Green, care 

Kendall & Dame, burial 

D. S. Flanders, burial 
M. H. Chapman, plants 

E. A. Moulton, labor . 
A. & A. S. Smith, foundation 
D. G. Lowell, care 
J. H. Toof estate, lot 48, block N 
J. H. Toof estate, lot 48, block N, 

grading ..... 
Lillian F. Downing, lot 92, block W 
Lillian F. Downing, lot 92, block W, 

grading .... 
James Fraser, lot 182, block Q 
Mrs. MarjS. Leland, lot 104, block VJ 
Mrs. Mary S. Leland, lot 104, block W. 

grading .... 
Lando Morrill's estate, burial 
Luther Sherburn, burial 
Mrs. S. A. Perry's estate, burial 
Perry Leland's estate, burial 
Mrs. Carlson, use of tomb . 
Samuel Blood's estate, burial 
W. Fj. Colton's estate, burial 
Mr. Schipper, grave and burial 
N. P. Fallansbee's estate, burial 
Felix Stone, burial 
J. H. Toof 's estate, burial . 
Mrs. Hadley's estate, grave and burial 



11.50 
2.00 
1.00 
3.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
1.00 

10.00 

2.00 

.50 

3.00 

.50 

15.00 

38.50 
1.00 

85.75 

68.60 
20.00 

15.00 
10.50 
20.00 

15.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.00 

■3.00 
8.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



447 



O. H. T. Richardson's estate, burial . 

Mrs. Friend's estate, grave and burial, 

Mr. Gray, burial 

Mrs. George Davis, repairs 

F. H. Lock's estate, burials 

Mrs. Mary Shackford's estate, burial 

S. K. Laporte, grave and burial . 

James Sargent's estate, burial 

Mrs. M. M. Butterfield's estate, burial 

Mr. Harkins, burial . 

Miss Rose Bennett, burial . 

J. T. Gordon, care 

Mrs. C. H. Alexander, plants 

George W. Downing's estate, burial 

W. H. Pitman's estate, burial 

Miss S. Grant, foundation . 

Charles S. Parker, lot 19, block X 

Mrs. ^¥. P. Follausbee, lot 114, bloci, 

V, east half .... 
Mrs. W. P. Follansbee, lot 114, bloc! 

V, east half, grading 
J. N. Maynard, lot 21, block P . 
J. N. Maynard, lot 21, block P, grad 

ing 

A. S. Morgan and John S. Berry, lot 

13, block X . . . . 

A. S. Morgan and John S. Berry, lot 

13, block X, grading 
Arthur Colton, lot 108, block W . 
Arthur Colton, lot 108, block W 

grading ..... 
Charlotte S. Giles, lot 64, block M 
Charlotte S. Giles, burial . 

C. C. Peaslee, plants . 

W. B. Durgin's estate, burial 
George Raymond's estate, burial . 

D. W. Hobbs, care . 
Harry Ivy, foundation 



13.00 
8.00 
3.00 
2.00 
7.00 
3.00 
6.00 
3.00 

10.00 
3.00 
.50 
5.00 
1.50 
3.00 
3.00 
4.00 

64.04 

20.00 

15.00 
15.10 

15.10 

40.00 

40.00 
40.00 

32.00 
35.00 
1.00 
2.00 
12.00 
3.00 
1.00 
5.00 



448 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



J. E. Thompson, removal . 
J. G. Craig, care 
A. J. Souza, care 
W. D. Garvin's estate, burial 
James Price's estate, burial 
Mrs. Driscoll, use of tomb . 
John F. Jones' estate, burial 
W. W. Lowell, burial . 

D. H. Corser, burial . 
W. D. Hodgdon, burial 
M. Donley, care 
AVoman's Relief Corps, plants 
Cummings Bros., foundation 
M. H. Johnson's estate, labor 
James T. Brown's estate, burial 
George H. Hobson, burial . 
Mrs. Darius Merrill, care . 
Mrs. Fred Sawyer, burial . 
Mrs. H. T. Randall's estate, burial 
Mary A. Hodgdon, lot 14, block X 
Mary A. Hodgdon, lot 14, block X 

grading ..... 
Fred M. Kuowles, lot 60, block X 
Fred M. Knowles, lot 60, block X, 

grading ...... 

Mrs. Ada L. Sawyer, lot 43, block W, 
Mrs. Ada L. Sawyer, lot 43, block W, 

grading ..... 
S. Smith & Son, foundation 
W. W. Young, burial . 

E. P. Comins, burial . 
Levi S. Heath, burial . 

Charles E. Thompson's estate, burial 
Mrs. Joshua Lane's estate, burial 
Mrs. Andrew L. Lane's estate, burial 
Matthew H. Johnson's estate, burial 
Nathaniel E. Elkins, burial . 
C. H. Morrison's estate, burial . 



.$5.00 
2.00 
2.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 
3.0O 

.50 
4.00 
3.00 

.50 
4 0a 
4.00 

i.oa 

3.00 
1.00 
1.50 
4.00 
3.00 
40.00 

40.00 
180.00 

120.00 
24.00 

18.00 
16.50 
3.00 
8.00- 
3.00 
5.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 

3.oa 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



449 



State of New Hampshire, burial . 
Sewall F. Youug, lot 91, block W 
Sewall F. Youug, lot 91, block W 

gi-ading 

Solou A. Carter aud E. P. Comius, lot 

18, block X . . . . 

Solou A. Carter aud E. P. Comius, lot 

18, block X, grading 
Levi L. Heath, lot 23, block X . 
Levi L. Heath, lot 23, block X, grad 

iug ..... 

Mrs. Martha H. Johnsou, lot 24 

block X 

Mrs, INLartha H. Johusou, lot 24, block 

X, grading .... 
Nathaniel E. Elkius, lot 54, block X 
Nathaniel E. Elkins, lot 54, block X 

grading .... 
A. B. Sargeut, repairs 
Mrs. W. P. Ford's estate, burial 
Thomas Sargent's estate, burial . 
Mrs. W. W. Cochran's estate, burial 
F. T. Bean, foundation 
Henneberry & Halligau, labor 
Home for the Aged — M. Houston 

burial ..... 
Charles E. Jones' estate, burial . 
J. W. McMurphy, burial . 
W. H. Horner, burial 
Hyam Hyams, burial , 
Joseph Tonkin, burial 
Mr. Mood}^ burial 
^y. F. Burnham — E. A. Moultou, lot 

13, block W . . . . . . 

W. F. Burnham— PL A. Moulton, lot 

13, block W, grading 
J. W. McMurphy, lot 38, block W 
29 



$3.00 
20.00 

15.00 

51.36 

51.36 

40.00 

40.00 

40.00 

40.00 
45.00 

45.00 
5.00 
8.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 

10.00 

3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
8.0O 
8.0O 
2.0O 
.50 

24.00 

18.00 
24.00 



450 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



J. W. McMiirpby, lot 38, block W 

grading .... 
John C. Oixlway's estate, burial 
Gleason & Farns worth, care 
Mrs. Wasto, burial 
Mrs. A. F. Holt, care 
Ella Sturtevaut, care . 
Mrs. Charlotte Merrill, care 
Mr. Carlton, repairs . 
Oriu Whiddeu, foundation . 
J. S. Merrill's estate, burial 
J. F. Moseley's estate, burial 
Frank A. Sanborn's estate, burial 
Geo. W. Waters — McMichael, burial 
J. F. Webster, trnstee, repairs . 
N. H. Asylum— P. White, burial 
Wood sold and labor . 
William J. Dyer's estate, burial 
Bessie M. Hodgman, burial 
E. H. Randall, care . 
Richard Casey, burial . 
Mrs. Charles Dennett's estate, burial 
Milton Colby, shrubs . 
Mrs. Sarah A. Ordvvay, lot 4, block X, 
Mrs. Sarah A. Ordway, lot 4, block X, 

grading ..... 
Irene L. Merrill, lot 89, block W 
Irene L. Merrill, lot 89, block W, grad 

iug ..... 

Mrs. Frank A. Sanborn, lot 25, block 

X 

Mrs. Frank A. Sanborn, lot 25, blocls 

X, grading .... 
N. P. Stevens, burial . 
W. F. Buruham, burial 
Mrs. Catherine Chandler's estate, burial 
Frank E. Wright, burial 
Mrs. Annie P. Pitman's estate, burial 



618.00 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 
6.00 
1.00 
2.00 
.50 
8.00 
3.00 
10.00 
3.00 
3.00 
6.00 
3.00 
10.00 
8.00 
3.00 
4.10 
3.00 
3.00 
1.00 

120.00 

80.00 
20.00 

15.00 

40.00 

40.00 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
.50 
3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



451 



Sarah F. Wootlmau's estate, burial 

Mrs. Mary Page's estate, burial . 

Mrs. J. N. Lauder, repaii's . 

J. W. Barton's estate, burial 

W. H. Graham's estate, burial 

Euruside & Baker, care 

W. S. Page's estate, burial . 

Heirs of Hattie W. Aldeu, lot 97, block 

W 

Heirs of Hattie W. Aldeu, lot 97, bloc! 

W, gradiug .... 
Mrs. B. T. Bickford, lot 55, block X 
Mrs. B. T. Bickford, lot 55, block X, 

grading ..... 
Mrs. Charlotte L. Goodwin, lot 58, 

block X . 

Mrs. Charlotte L. Goodwin, lot 58, 

block X, grading 
H. A. P2atou, foundation 
J. K. Ayer's estate, burial . 
Mrs. L. H. Clough, care 
I. \V. Bushey, burial . 
Hattie W. Aldeu's estate, burial . 
George W. Waters, removal 
O. C. Cole's estate, burial . 
Mrs. F. A. Burnham, care . 
B. T. Bickford's estate, burial 
Ira J. Hutchinson's estate, burial 
Mrs. George Barnes, care . 
Merrimack County — M. Faverstrom. 

burial ..... 
Daniel Weathers, foundation and burial 
Mrs. Patience Eaton's estate, burial 
Mr. p:iliott, burial 
W. M. Leete's estate, burial 
Mrs. P. F. Stevens, care 
Mrs. I. S. Ring's estate, burial . 
Mr. Van Cor, removals 



So. 00 
3.00 
5.00 
8.00 
3.00 
2.50 
3.00 

40.00 

32.00 
63.00 

63.00 

45.00 

45.00 
5.00 

10.00 
7.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 
.1.00 
3.00 
3.00 
1.50 

3.00 
11.00 
4.00 
2.00 
3.50 
1.00 
8.00 
8.00 



452 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



C. C. Goodwin's estate, burial . 


13.00 


Kendall & Dame— T. Richardson, 




burial 


3.00 


J. H. Gallinger, repairs 


17.00 


Mrs. Wallace-Russell, repairs 


29.70 


F. H. Clement, care . . . . 


2.00 


Mrs. J. A. West, care 


2.00 


Mrs. Nathaniel White, care 


25.00 


Mrs. E. B. Wood worth, plants . 


3.00 


Miss A. L. Merrill, care and plants 


5.00 


P. S. Smith, care 


1.50 


C. W. Bradlee, care . 


1.50 


John Swenson, labor . 


3.60 


Mrs. Jeremiah Smith's estate, burial 


3.00 


Mrs. C. C. Lund, care 


5.00 


P. F. Stevens' estate, burial 


4.00 


Fred Boardman, care . 


1.50 


Lucy Poore, care 


1.50 


Mrs. R. M. Day, care 


3.00 


C. W. Lane, care 


1.50 


Mrs. Irvan Clough, care 


1.50 


C. A. Dole, care 


2.00 


Mrs. C. L. George, care 


6.00 


Mrs. George K. Lang, care 


1.00 


C. W. Lyman, care 


1.00 


AV. E. Chandler, care 


5.00 


Howe & Barker, care . 


1.50 


H. C. Brown, care 


1.50 


I. A. Hill, care .... 


1.50 


C. R. Dame, care 


1.50 


J. P. Nutter, care 


1.00 


Mrs. George Nutter, care . 


1.00 


Mrs. J. P. Sargent, care 


1.00 


Streeter & Carpenter, care . 


5.00 


John Ford, care 


1.00 


George H. Marston, care . 


2.00 


Henry McFarlaud, care 


2.50 


D. G. Lowell, care 


1.00 



F. A. Johnson, care . 


$1.50 


W. P. Fiske, care 


2.50 


W. L. Jenks, care 


2.00 


]\frs. C. J, Whitney, care . 


1.00 


"VV. M. Chase, care 


2.00 


E. J. Hill, care .... 


8.00 


Mrs. J. H. Chase, care 


5.00 


L. H. Carroll, care 


2.00 


€. H. Marlin, care 


1.50 


J. C. French, care 


.75 


Batchelder Bros., care 


2.50 


Oeorge A. Berry, care 


1.50 


Fred Powell, care 


1.00 


€. H. linruham's estate, burial . 


3.00 


David Neal, care 


1. 00 


John H. Teel, care . 


2.00 


H. W. Marcy, care . 


2.50 


Leverett Freeman, burial . 


1.00 


Roxanna Adams, care 


2.00 


Mrs. A. S. Marshall, care . 


3.00 


€. S. Kelley's estate, burial 


3.00 


Mr. F. S. Copp, move and burial 


6.00 


Otis Hammond, burial 


.50 


W, F. Thayer, care . 


4.00 


F. E. Colburn, care . 


1.50 


D. B. Corser's estate, care . 


2.00 


Oeorge Connell, care . 


2.00 


H. C. Sturtevant, care 


1.50 


J. F. Webster, care . 


1.50 


E. E. Brown, care 


1.50 


Oeorge M. Kimball, care . 


2.50 


C. W. Clarke, care 


1.00 


C. P. Bancroft, care . 


2.00 


Mrs. C. N. Hastings, repairs 


2.00 


W. C, Green, care 


1.75 


W. B. Durgin's estate, care 


5.50 


J. 0. Lyford, care 


4.00 


C. S. Fellows, care 


1.50 



453 



454 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. T. Wbittemore, care 


$1.00 


R. F. Robinsou, care 


2.00 


S. C. P^astman, care . . . . 


1.50 


H. M. Cavis, care . . . . 


1.00 


Harry DoUofif, care . . . . 


l.oO 


Joseph Palmer, care . . . . 


■2.00 


George C. Roy, care . 


1.50 


C. L. Jackman, care . 


1.00 


Mrs. T. H. Brown's estate, burial 


3.00 


Lymau Jackman, care 


2.00 


W. H. Horner, care . 


1.25 


W. W. Flint, care . 


1.50 


A. and E. M. Willis, care . 


1.50 


C. T. Batcbelder, care 


i.oa 


Charles Barker, care . 


1.50 


Hay sold ..... 


8.80 


Franklin Moseley's heirs, care 


2.50 


W. E. Carpenter, care 


1.00 


B. Bilsborough, care . 


1.00 


W. J. Tonkin's estate, burial 


3.00 


Mrs. Stearns-Wolcott's estate, burial 


3.00 


Mr. Hannagau, rent . 


12.00 


H. A. Rowell, care . 


1.50 


Miss M. Woods, care 


5.00 


George L. Stratton, care 


3.00 


Sarah M. K. Adams trust . 


20.00 


Mary B. Allison trust 


1.75 


Lavinia Arlin trust 


1.50 


Alonzo Atherton trust 


2.00 


A. L. S. Bailey trust 


4.00 


Oliver Ballon trust 


1.50 


Mary A. Bass trust . 


1.00 


Robert Bell trust 


1.50 


Matilda Benson trust . 


1.25 


E. C. Bixby trust 


3.50 


J. D. Blaisdell trust . 


5.00 


W. J. Blakely trust . 


2.00 


E. P. Blanchard trust 


5.00 



TREASURY DEPAIITMENT. 



455 



Nathaniel Bonton trust 






$7.00 


M. N. P. Bmitin trust 






5.00 


W. P. Burbaiik trust . 






1.00 


H. ^V. Butters trust . 






4.00 


B. F. Caldwell trust . 






7.00 


N. F. Carter trust 






4.00 


Lizzie Cate trust 






1.50 


S. M. Chesley trust . 






3.00 


Caroline Clark trust . 






3.00 


Rufns Clement. trust . 






2.50 


W. W. Cloud trust . 






2.50 


Frederick Clough trust 






2.50 


George Clough trust . 






3.00 


Mrs. N. P. Clough trust 






1.50 


A. L. Colburu trust . 






1.50 


Sarah T. Colby trust . 






3.00 


Mrs. J. Cooper trust . 






2.00 


Mary Crow trust 






7.00 


Silas Curtis trust 






2.00 


C. A. Danforth trust . 






1.75 


Charles S. Danforth trust 






1.50 


B. B. Davis trust 






1.50 


E. Dow trust 






2.75 


Mrs. C. Dudley trust . 






1.50 


Mrs. E. J. Eastman trust . 






3.50 


S. B. Eaton trust 






2.50 


L. F. Edgerly trust . 






3.00 


G. P. Ela trust . 






4.00 


E. G. Emerson trust . 






3.00 


L. A. Farley trust 






4.00 


M. M. Farnum trust . 






4.00 


A. C. Ferriu trust 






3.00 


Ferrin and French trust 






1.50 


George G. Fogg trust 






5.00 


Jerome Ford trust 






2.00 


Asa Fowler trust 






25.00 


Mrs. A. W. Gale trust 






1.50 


John D. Gale trust . 






10.00 



456 



CITF OF CONCORD. 



Johu Gear trust . . . . 


$2.00 


Enoch Gerrish trust . . . . 


4.00 


S. K. Gill trust . . . . 


2.00 


Glover and Osgood trust 


2.00 


L. W. Glysson trust . 


1.50 


H. A. and F. A. Goss trust 


4.00 


G. N. Greeley trust . 


12.00 


W. E. Green trust 


3.00 


Betsey Hadley trust . 


3.00 


George M. Harding trust . 


1.50 


Mary D. Hart trust . 


12.00 


Timotliy Haynes trust 


3.00 


C. F. Hildreth trust . 


3.00 


Emma J. Hill trust . 


1.50 


J. M. Hill trust 


6.00 


J. Frank Hoit trust . 


5.00 


H. F. Holman trust . 


2.50 


S. E. Irish trust 


3.00 


E. 0. Jameson trust . 


2.50 


Julia A. Jones trust . 


2.00 


Seth K. Jones trust . 


12.00 


J. and B. A. Kimball trust . 


7.00 


E, L. Knowlton trust . 


20.00 


William Ladd trust 


2.00 


William C. Libby trust 


3.00 


Lincoln and Forrester trust 


4.50 


J. L. Lincoln trust 


2.00 


J. W. and E. J. Little trust 


14.00 


J. McCauIey trust 


3.00 


G. and E. McQuesteu trust 


3.00 


J. McQuesten trust 


G.OO 


H. A. Mann trust 


3.00 


H. W. and H. 0. Matthews trust 


3.00 


J. B. Merrill trust 


3.00 


S. F. Merrill trust 


3.00 


S. G. Mills trust 


4.00 


Charles Moody trust . 


3.00 


Mary J. Moses trust . 


4.00 



TIMOASUKY UlDi'AKTi 


VI EM'. 


C. S. Mellen trust 


So. 00 


C. H. Newhall trust . 


6.00 


E. S. Nutter trust 


3.50 


W. Odlin trust 


3.00 


E. A. Ordway trust . 


2.50 


George F. Page trust . 


1.50 


C^'rus W. Paige trust . 


3.00 


M. W. aud M. A. Page trust 


1.50 


L. J. Perkins trust 


.75 


H. E. Pbipps trust 


3.00 


I. L. Pickeriug trust . 


3.00 


W. H. Pitman trust . 


4.00 


S. L. Pixley trust 


2.00 


J. E. Rand trust 


1.50 


George L. Reed trust . 


4.00 


J. A. Richardson trust 


3.50 


E. H. Rollins trust . 


6.00 


D. W. Rowe trust 


1.50 


M. W. Russell trust . 


5.00 


H. W. Ranlet trust . 


1.00 


Jonathan Sanborn trust 


6.00 


F. A. Sargent trust . 


2.00 


J. B. Sargent trust 


3.00 


J. E. Sargent trust 


5.00 


M. ^y. Smith trust 


3.00 


H. R. Soutkmaid trust 


2.00 


J. F. Stark trust 


3.00 


0. Stearns trust 


5.00 


T. Stuart trust 


3.00 


C. L. Tappan trust 


2.00 


H. B. Tebbitts trust . 


5.00 


J. S. Thompson trust 


3.00 


J. C. Thorne trust 


3.00 


Pliny Tidd trust 


1.50 


Tilton aud Locke trust 


1.50 


E. W. Upham trust . 


5.00 


C. P. Virgin trust 


1.25 


Gustavus Walker trust 


2.00 



457 



458 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mary E. Walker trust 
G. F. Wbittredge trust 
Mary Williams trust . 
R. Woodruff trust 
P:. W. Woodward trust 
William Yeaton trust . 



CuEDrr. 



One half of sale of lots for 1905 added 
to permanent fund .... 

Income from sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account, transferred 
to City of Concord General Account 

Transferred to City of Concord General 
Account ..... 



$5.00 
5.00 
1.50 
5.00 
3.00 
3.00 



^583.38 



509.00 



2,559.13 



63,651.5] 



$3,651.5] 



RECEIPTS OF OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 

Amount received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund are 
added to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds 
are paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual 
deposits made with the city for tha.t purpose, said income being used exclu- 
sively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 



Receipts. 

A. C. Sanborn, care . 

T. AV. Merrill estate, care 

J. F. AVebster, care . 

Mrs. S. F. Cushing, care 

Mrs. G. E. Todd, care 

Mrs. N. Carter, care . 

Mrs. L. S. AVoodward's estate, burial 

Mrs. C. B. Bartlett's estate, burial 

Mrs. J. Barnes' estate, burial 

Orrin T. Carter, burial 

Horace Beal, burial 

Iron sold ..... 

AV. H. Ford, burial . 



$1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
2.00 
1.00 
1.00 
4.00 

10.00 
7.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.60 
1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTiMENT. 



459 



Mrs. N. P. BrowD, care 


SI. 00 


Mrs. James Morrill, burial . 


2.53 


Mrs. J. F. Jarvis, plants . 


2.00 


R. L. Ela's estate, burial 


3.00 


A. H. Wiggin's estate, burial 


3.00 


S. W. Emerson's estate, burial . 


3.00 


T. H. Dunstane, foundation 


4.00 


John H. Ballard's estate, burial . 


3.00 


Iron sold 


3.00 


J. Henry Sanborn, E. Fellows, burial 


3.00 


Mrs. J. C.A. Hill, Mrs. Grover, buria 


8.00 


Charles P. Moore's estate, burial 


3.00 


Mrs. John Farrar, care 


1.00 


Old iron sold . 


4.75 


Mrs. J. B. Cournmet's estate, burial 


3.00 


Mrs. Elias Horner's estate, burial 


3.00 


Gumb Brothers, foundation 


•J.OO 


M. F. Farmer, grading 


3.00 


Merrimack County, Mrs. J. C. Pills 




bury, burial .... 


3.00 


Mrs. B. T. Bickford, burial 


1.00 


Mr. Marden, burial 


8.00 


Mrs. C. J:. Mead, labor 


2.00 


John F. AVilson, care 


1.00 


Miuot Cemetery Association 


104.75 


William Abbott, trust 


13.00 


Samuel Alexander, " 


3.00 


L. Bell, Jr., 


3.00 


T. K. Blaisdell, 


10.00 


J. F. Chaffin, . 


2.00 


Samuel Evans, " . 


4.00 


Theodore French, " 


5.50 


Harry J. Gilbert, •' 


1.50 


Mitchell Gilmore " 


4.00 


AVilliam T. Locke, 


3.00 


Mary A. Morrill, " 


1.50 


S. and D. L. Morrill, 


6.00 


True Osgood, " 


3.00 



460 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Palmer & Savory, trust 


13.00 


Mrs. E. A. Pecker, 


5.00 


Hiram Richardson, " 


23.00 


Sarah A. Stevens, " 


1.50 


Joseph Stickney, " 


20.00 


Nathan Stickney, " 


1.75 


A Swatzer, " 


8.00 


T. and A. B.Walker, 


6.00 


Albert Webster, " 


2.00 


Paul Wentworth, " 


7.00 


S. A. Wolcott, " 


2.00 


L. L. Hoit, " 


3.00 



S361. 



Credit. 

Income from sundry trust fuads, as 
charged to this account, transferred 
to City of Concord General Account $141.75 

Transferred to City of Concord General 

Account 219.63 



e$361.38 



I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing accounts 
of William F. Thayer, city treasurer, for the year 1905, and 
find all items of receipt and expenditure therein properly 
recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouchers, and the 
several items correctly cast and the cash balance to be twenty- 
five thousand five hundred twenty-three dollars and eighty-four 
cents ($25,523.84), and as treasurer of the city water depart- 
ment, cash balance to be twenty-five thousand nine hundred 
four dollars and forty cents ($25,904.40). 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking 
funds of the city, and find such trust and sinking funds in- 
vested and the income thereof, for the year 1905, accounted 
for, as shown by the book of the city treasurer, kept for that 
purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Cily Clerk. 



CITY EXPENSES 



FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1905. 



CITY POOR. 

Itemized iu report of overseer of poor 



. $1,320.37 



DEPENDENT SOLDIERS, CITY. 

Itemized in report of overseer of poor 



$119.47 



CITY BUILDING AND LOAN. 

E. B. Hutchiuson Bldg. Co., contract S2,610.98 

.John Abbott, arbitrator . . . 100.00 

Arthur G. P^verett, services . . 37.50 

Seth W. Fuller Co., contract . . 192.48 

Warren, Smith & Biscoe, contract . 92.77 



13,033. 7a 



CITY STABLE 

W. H. Sargent, material and labor 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe 

Orr & Rolfe, lights in cellar and in 

stalling hot water . 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll 
Raudlett & Griftiu, plans and superin 

tendence .... 

AYoodworth & Co., cement . 



$7,905.00 
37.08 

38.03 
44.51 

400.00 
73.00 



$8,497.62 



462 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY. 



W. F. Tbaycr, treasurer, pay rol 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, salary 

New Euglaud Tel. & Tel. Co., rental 

and tolls 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 
Concord Water- Works, water 
AV". L. Jeuks & Co., supplies 
George D. Huntley, repairs 

D. Waldo White, burnt wood ash 
M. S. & R. Co., ashes 

E, A. Moultou, cash paid out 
A. P. Home & Co., shrubs, etc 
Charles R. Fish & Co., shrubs, e 
E. B. Hutchinson Bldg. Co., labor and 

supplies 
Donald McLeod, plants 
G. J. Benedict, plants 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete 
George W. Brown, four lots sold city 
Thonipson-Hoague Co., pipe, etc 
Charles C. Hill, dressing 
George A. Foster, secretary, salary 



,80.5.77 
25.00 

23.34 
18.20 
85.00 
84.97 
57.25 
27.00 
15.00 
75.12 
93.20 
50.00 

82.05 

275.70 

33.07 

16.75 

10.00 

100.00 

8.80 

12.50 

25.00 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay rolls . $444.80 

W. L. Jenks & Co., fertilizer . . 21.00 

G. J. Benedict, plants . . . 4.50 

Concord Water- Works, water . . 10.00 



$5,013.72 



$480.30 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll . 134.12 

Simeon Partridge, labor and supplies . 67.13 



SlOl.2,^ 



CITY EXrENSES. 



468 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



J. Cartel', Jr., mowing 

S. Cnnninghani, niowing- 

John T. Batcbelder, grade 

S. L. French, labor . 

Scott French, labor, etc. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pa}- rol 



$17.00 

17.00 

4.80 

12.15 

45.60 
54.45 



HORSE HILL CEMETERY. 

Jerome S. Ruuuells, labor, etc. . 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

Isaac N. Abbott, treasurer, appropriation . 



SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

Nahum Prescott, repairs, etc. 



OLD FORT CEMETERY. 

Scott French, care, etc. . 



DOG LICENSES. 

Uavid Sanborn, lambs killed by dogs . 
J. A. Coburn, hens killed by dogs 
J. H. Rolfe, hens killed by dogs 
George McC. Sanborn, sheep killed by 

dogs ...... 

Edward E. Clark, chickens killed by 

dogs ...... 

James W. Jordan, sheep killed by dogs 



58.00 
7.00 
8.00.. 

8.00 

5.00 
8.00 



$151.00 



825.00 



$50.00 



$20.00 



$8.85 



$44.00 



464 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



W. F. Thayer, pay rolls 

Charles E. Moss, supplies . 

W. B. Howe, cash paid out 

Frank P. Mace, supplies 

Ira C. Evans Co., stationery 

N. A, Dunklee, horse hire . 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., tolls 

S. P. Dan forth, stakes and repairs 

George E. Carter, office supplies 

W. L. Jenks & Co., hardware 

G. G. Ledder, supplies 

J. E. Gage, repairing tapes 



,314.75 
7.10 

86.03 
5.40 

14.80 

28.00 

1.50 

107.21 

4.27 

1.50 

28.22 
2.30 



EXTENSION ROLLINS PARK. 



Adolph Hammer, land damage 
P^thel C. Frasier, land damage 
D. S. Rogers, land damage 



$747.50 
172.50 

287.50 



62,601.08 



$1,207.50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay rolls 
W. P. Ladd, semi-annual pay roll 
L. Pickering, hay 
G. N. Bartemus & Co., forage 

D. Waldo White, forage . 
Fellows & Clark, horse hire 

E. B. Morse, horse hire 
M. F. Bickford, horse hire . 
J. R. Hill & Co., repairs and supplies 
Cornelius Callahan Co., supplies 
¥j. S. Tenney Co., coal and wood 
New England Tel. & Tel Co., rentals 

and tolls 
Burt Brown, horseshoeing . 



$8,396.67 

6,825.00 

256.29 

448.63 

249.32 

17.50 

38.00 

223.50 

91.10 

213.06 

840.93 

85.47 
12.75 



CITY EXPENSES. 



46/ 



G. L. Theobald, horse hiie 

H. T. Corser^ horse hire 

Stuart Howhxncl Co., supplies 

J. E. McShane, horseshoeing 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas 

Concord Electric Co., electricity 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies 

F. W. Sanborn, repairs 

E. F. Home, labor and supplies . 

Morrill Bros., clock oil 

C. W. Clarke, rent Veterans' Asso. 

Harry G. Emmons, blankets 

Aid-Ant Remedy Co., Aid-Ant . 

Rowel 1 & Plummer, labor and supplies 

Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 

George 1). Huntley, repairs 

Globe Horseshoeing Shop, horseshoeing 

Thompson-Hoague Co., supplies . 

David E. Murphy, supplies 

C. Pelissier & Co., supplies 

Arthur Bruce, trustee, witch hazel 

Robert J. Macquire, services and med 

icine ..... 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., furniture 
O. N. Davis, supplies 
W. U. Telegraph Co., time service 
Salem Chemical Supply Co., supplies 
American Steel & Wire Co., wire 
N. A. Duuklee, sponges 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., re 

pairs ..... 
Ross W. Cate, repairs, etc. 
J. H. Brown, lubricant 

C. W. Batemau, labor and supplies 
Coates Clipper Mfg. Co., repairs 
Concord Water- Works, water 

D. Hammond & Son, forage 
M. S. Sexton, horseshoeing 



$20. 50 

60.00 

27.96 

138.00 

27.45 

594.08 

46.94 

1.00 

13.24 

1.00 

100.00 

9.50 

10.25 

12.27 

128.10 

53.57 

131.95 

45.19 

5.00 

28.98 

3.75 

113.95 
9.00 
17.98 
15.00 
10.17 
21.25 
14.26 

1.72 

8.00 

3.75 

34.07 

5.15 

111.50 

2.47 

21.75 



466 



C[TY OF CONCORD. 



G. O. Robinson, horse hire 

J. H. Toof & Co., laundry 

W. E. Decrow, electrical supplies 

W. E. Lynch, wood . 

Concord Coal Co., wood 

Albert Weatherbee, horse hire 

C. W. Dadmun, electrical supplies 

C. H. Swain & Co, labor and supplies 
Charles H. Barnet, hardware 

D. Warren Fox, supplies . 
American Soap & Washoline Co., wash 

oliue ..... 

F. E. Colburn, lunch . 
W. A. Currier, hay . 

Robert J. Crowley, horseshoeing . 
Penacook p:iectric Light Co., electricity 
Sulpho-Napthol Co., napthol 

G. S. Milton & Co., supplies 
Leslie H. Crowther, semi-annual pay 

roll 

Frank C. Blodgett and P. C. White 
semi-annual pay roll 

F. E. Gilford, wood . 
CO. Partridge, horse hire . 

G. W. Heath, horse hire 

E. L. Davis, horse hire 
Combination Ladder Co., supplies 
H. V. Tittemore, trucking . 
Solshine Mfg. Co., supplies 
James M. Baker, spanners . 
American Locomotive Co., testing boil 

ers and repairs 
Eureka Fire Hose Co., hose and relining 
John Beck, hay 
John R. Emerson, hay 
Concord Lumber Co., teaming 
Fred S. Farnum, labor and supplies 
L. E. Alexander, water 



$15.00 

52.00 

131.26 

13.00 

11.00 

1.50 

16.76 

6.60 

.39 

10.40 

5.50 
8.00 
143.!)1 
1.00 
73.80 
3.00 
2.91 

75.00 

60.00 

47.50 

25.00 

1.00 

200.00 

9.00 

6.65 

2.75 

6.00 

346.41 

1,215.00 

90.18 

21.33 

2.75 

14.50 

8.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



467 



J. H. Callaluiu, horseshoeing 

¥.. B. Iliitehinsoii Bldg. Co., repairs 

and supplies .... 
W. D. Nutting, clock oil . 
Peter Milou, painting 
J. E. Clinton, lunch . 
George Abbott, Jr., painting 
Reversible Tube Cleaner Co., cleaner 
Mrs. Annie Hook, soap 
W. B. Cunningham, teaming 
Ford & Kimball, supplies . 
Concord Ice Co., ice . 
Mrs. George Jones, storage 
American La France Fire Engine Co 

springs .... 

W. A. Cowley & Co., supplies 
West Disinfectant Co., disinfectant 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies 
Electric Gas Lighting Co., supplies 
James H. Sanders, painting signs 
G. F. Sewall, Jr., trucking 
W. A. Sleeper, harness 
E. F. Chisholm & Co., supplies 
R. F. Robinson, rent, Veterans' Asso 

ciation 
W. W. Critchett, hay 
Carter Cate, hay 
E. L. Glick, supplies . 
C. E. Berry, hanger for harness 
C. L. Leonard, leather dressing 
W. C. Green, cash paid out 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 
J. D. Johnson & Son, supplies 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies 
Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies 
J. A. Dadmuu, repairs, etc. 
Samuel Eastman & Co., supplies 



SG.OO 

22.10 
1.00 
2.50 
2.00 

15.02 
3.00 
1.00 
3.30 
1.10 

18.04 

12.00 

2.40 
2.95 

15.00 
1.65 
2.80 
G.OO 
1.75 

40.00 
1.75 

50.00 

35.37 

186.41 

1.75 

6.30 

1.25 

22.32 

25.40 

40.37 

19.60 

20.70 

35.39 

3.25 

103.50 



468 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A. W. Rolfe, cash paid out . . $6.89 

Putney & Sanborn, labor and lumber . 2.75 

Ed. C. Duro;in, storage . . . 3.00 



$22,899. 



FURNITURE AND FIXTURES, CITY HALL. 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies . . $84.90 

Bradley & Hubbard Mfg. Co., electric 

lamps 289.81 

C. E. Bartlett, trucking . . . 1.50 

Benjamin Bilsborough, labor and sup- 
plies ...... 2.59 

J. M, Stewart & Sons Co., furniture 

and supplies ..... 234.09 

Orr & Rolfe, installing hot water heater 56.44 

Cummiugs Bros., marble and labor . 9.00 

S. P. Dauforth, labor and lumber, ice 

box 24.95 

G. L. Lincoln & Co., cabinet and grass 

matting 35.20 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies . . .15 

Orr & Rolfe, drinking fountain . . 56.70 

Hutchinson Building Co., labor and 

supplies ..... 798.72 

S. J. Steinmetz, door holders . . 11.46 

S. P. Danforth, labor and supplies . 2.02 

S. P. Danforth, incline floor . . 265.97 

S. P. Danforth, balcony incline . . 19.44 

S. P. Danforth, doors in gallery . . 24.00 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., labor 

and supplies ..... 3.48 

W. G. C. Kimball, framing portraits of 

mayors ...... 68.50 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas fix- 
tures 22.30 

Wonolancet Club, matting . . . 22.50 

Thompsou-Hoague Co., fire extinguisher 25.00 



$2,058.72 



CITY EXPENSES. 



469 



GRAVEL BANK. 

John aud William J. Abei'u, land for 
oiavel bauk ..... 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Palmer, salary, sanitary 



Cbarles E 

ofllcer ...... 

Helen O. Monier, services health office 
Russell Wilkins, salary 
Russell Wilkins, milk inspection . 
Russell Wilkins, substituting for sani 

tary officer .... 
George A. Berry, salary 
George A. Berry, antitoxin, etc. . 
C. H. Dudley, supplies, George Melan 

son ..... 

George W. AYaters, moving patient 
Concord Coal Co., supplies, George 

Melanson 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 
Rumford Printing Co., mortuary reports 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals 

and tolls . . . . . 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, board and 

nursing, James H. Jordan 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, board and 

nursing, Minnie Comier . 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, board and 

nursing, Josephine Coburn 
Charlie Seavey, milk inspection . 
Chancey Adams, salary 
Charles E. Palmer, cash paid out 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing, etc. . 
John Prentiss, burying horse 
C. D. Marsh, burying horses 
Mrs. E. J. Lyle, milk, Mrs. F. Blanch- 

ard ...... 



$1,200. 
257. 

25, 
201, 

50, 

25. 

103. 

10. 
4. 

6, 

9 



23.88 



78.28 



11.43 



$800.00 



1.26 



470 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

W. A. Cbambeilin, seal press . . S2.50 
Edson C. Eastman, oflice supplies . 1.00 
Geo. L. Theobald, buvying animals . 8.00 
A. P. Baker, supplies, M. Maboney . 12. .52 
Charles H. Cook, Jr., professional ser- 
vices 23.00 

a: Perley Fitch, formaldehyde . . 16.80 
E. H. Calvert, milk inspection . . 25.78 
George A. Berry, supplies, milk inspec- 
tion 1.30 

J. H. Coburn, burying animals . . .5.00 
W. A. Cowley & Co., groceries, Mrs. 

Blanchard 10.91 



t;2,22,5.2] 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Itemized in report of highway department . . $39,214.07 



INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Alex McMartin, shoveling walks, city 
hall 

James Grafton, salary janitor 

M. A. Spencer, services city clerk's 
office ...... 

Alice Dana, indexing records 

W. F.Thayer, treasurer, pay rolls, births 
and deaths ..... 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, payrolls, mar- 
riages ...... 

Henry E. Chamberlin, fees, vital statis- 
tics ...... 

Henry E. Chamberlin, completing birth 
records ...... 

Henry E. Chamberliu, cash paid out . 

Concord Ice Co., ice, fountains . 

Concord Ice Co., ice, city ball . 



11.50 


600.00 


468.00 


333.68 


211.25 


39.50 


153.90 


70.75 


51.67 


292.87 


35.67 



CITY EXPENSES. 471 

Chas. H. Cook, Jr., vaccinations and 

examinations ..... $1G(3.00 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals 

and tolls 32.39 

Henry H. Chase, bond, tax collector . 75.00 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, city 

hall and clock . . . . 1G1.40 

Penacook P^lectric Light Co., lighting 

ward room, Ward 1 . . . 13.00 

Concord Electric Co., lamps, city hall . 9.36 

Concord Electric Co., electricity, city 

hall • 733.80 

J. E. Gage, repairs safe, tax ofHce . 2.50 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, city hall 20.87 

E. S. Tenney Co., coal, city hall . 1,129.97 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance, city hall 150.00 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance, police 

station 30.00 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance, engine 

house. Ward 2 . . . . 12.75 

Eastman & Merrill, city officers bonds 19.50 

Capital Fire Insurance Co., insurance, 

city hall 150.00 

IVIorrill & Danforth, bond, city treas- 
urer . . . . . . 75.00 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, lower 

bridge 20.00 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, deten- 
tion hospital . . . . . 6.25 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, city hall 255.00 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, police 

station 60.00 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, crusher 

building and lower bridge . . 57.50 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, store 

house 35.00 

George L. Lincoln & Co., desk and 

chair, city clerk's office . . . 25.00 



472 CITY OF CONCORD. 

C. W. Uadmuu, temporal^ lights, band 
coucert. Ward 2 . . . . 

C. W. Dadmun, repairs and supplies, 
city hall ..... 

E. L. Davis, moving band stand, Pen- 
acook ...... 

Edmund S. Cook, cash paid out . 

B. E. Badger's estate, desk, police court 
Nevers' Second Regiment Band, ex- 
pense account band concert 

Leonora B. Gould, services account fire 
investigation ..... 

Lena M. Minot, services account fire 
investigation ..... 

H. T. Corser, damages to horse . 

George H. Whitman, flag, city hall 

W. L. Jenks & Co., house numbers 

L Eugene Keeler, insurance, city hall . 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs and 
supplies, city hall .... 

The E. Howard Clock Co., repairs 
tower clock ..... 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll, ac- 
count Penacook Park 

Jackman & Lang, insurance, police 
station ...... 

W. B. Cunningham, trucking City Re- 
ports to Penacook .... 

C. A. Yeadou, trucking, city hall 
A. H. Knowltou & Co., vaccine points 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, city hall 
Harry G. Emmons, supplies, city hall 
Seth W. Fuller Co., electrical supplies 
Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, city 

hall 51.54 

Edward M. Proctor, extra services and 

cash paid out . . . . 18.75 

Charles R. Corning, typewriting . . 3.70 



15.00 


17.27 


11.50 


19.68 


12.00 


7.00 


GO. 20 


67.45 


35.00 


7.00 


3.00 


125.00 


12.67 


9.85 


14.75 


15.00 


1.00 


4.00 


18.65 


61.68 


3.46 


11.40 



CITY EXPENSES. 



473 



C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, city ball $8.1') 

F. W. Sanborp, repairs autl supplies, 
city hall .... 

C. F. Nichols, supplies, city hall 
Reed Laundry Co., laundry, city hall 
Concord Highway Department, labo: 

and loam, city lot . 
Smith & Thayer Co., fence, city lot 
Patrick Crowley, posts, city lot . 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight, ac 

count city lot ... 

Town of Boscawen, taxes, 1905 . 
N. A. Dunklee, horse hire, committees 

etc. ...... 

H. Thomi)son, brooms, city hall . 
P^astman & Merrill, insurance furniture 

Central Fire Station 
Eastman & JMerrill, insurance, city hall 

D. Waldo White, fertilizer, city hall 
Frank G. Brown, services janitor 
Ford & Kimball, grate and base, Kent 

fountain 3.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., iron, Kent 

fountain ...... 1.24 

G. J. Johnston, trucking, Kent fountain .25 
William Giles, trucking, Kent fountain .50 
W. L. Riford, trucking, Kent fountain 1.50 
W. H. Ahern, trucking, Kent fountain 1.75 
F. Green, trucking, Kent fountain . .75 
W. L. Jeuks & Co., pipe and trap, Kent 

fountain ...... 4.83 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., man- 
hole cover, etc., Kent fountain . 12.00 
Dickerman & Co., cement, Kent fountain 14.00 
Orr & Rolfe, lal)or and supplies, Kent 

fountain ...... 34.88 

New P^ngland Granite Works, stone, 

Kent fountain ..... 27.00 



4.45 


1.00 


7.G1 


71.70 


27.70 


21.00 


3.09 


7.13 


51.00 


2.25 


6.00 


120.00 


2.65 


20.96 



474 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Samuel Holt, brick and sand, Kent 
fountain ...... 

Orr & Rolfe, supplies, account inspection 
of plumbers . . . . . 

E. L. Davis, ice, drinking fountains, 
Penacook . . . . . 

G. P. Conn, M. D., services, account 
Fred Duchanie . . . . 

Yawraan & Erbe Mfg. Co., truck, cabi- 
net and cards . . . . . 

M. E. Clifford &Co., damage to wagon, 
etc. ....... 

Henry E. Chamberliu, return of vital 

statistics, chap. 21, Laws 1905 
Leslie H. Crowther, ringing bell, July 4 
George A. Sleeper, ringing bell, July 4 
C. A. Hagar, ringing bell, July 4 
S. R. Dole, ringing bell, July 4 
John T. Knuckey, ringing bell, July 4 
William Ramsden, ringing bell, July 4 
S. H. Vernal, ringing bell, July 4 
Waldo S. Field, ringing bell, July 4 
W. H. Putnam, ringing bell, July 4 
Leon Weatherbee, ringing bell, July 4 
Timothy McCarthy, ringing bell, July 4 
William Farrand, truant officer, Pena- 
cook ...... 

William I-'"'arrand, enumeration school 

children, Penacook . 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete, police sta 
tion lot .... . 

G. L. Lincoln & Co., repairing chairs 
tax office ..... 

F. E. Gilford, wood . 

H. T. Corser, horse hire, committees 
C. B. Mills, trucking ... 
Donald McLeod, flowers, memorial arcl 
Jefferson Banks, labor in coal cellar 
Oliver Typewriter Co., typewriter 



$18.50 

2.50 

37.25 

5.00 

86.20 

13.00 

176.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

• 2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

25 00 

10.00 

15.78 

1.95 

6.50 
12.00 

1.50 
25.50 

4.00 
85.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 475 

Charles J. French, mantel shelf and 

lambrequin, Alert Hose House . . $10.00 

Oak Hall Clothing Co., badges . . 2.25 
W. L. Jenks & Co., swings, Penacook 

Park . . . ^ . . . 36.75 

H. T. Corser, teams, forest fires . . 6.00 
H. T. Corser, serving notices account 

land sold for taxes .... 5.50 

J. E. Willey, team, forest fire . . 12.50 
Roby & Knowles, insurance, storehouse, 

city shed 21.00 

Roby & Knowles, insurance, City Hall 75.00 
Roby & Knowles, insurance, police sta- 
tion 60.00 

E. A. Stevens, labor, etc., band concert 1.75 
David J. Adams, patrolling forests and 

posting 80.00 

Concord Electric Co., electricity, Rollins 

Park, account band concerts . . 11.63 

G. F. Sewall, Jr., trucking . . . .35 
C. R. Schoolcraft & Son, supplies. City 

Hall 9.00 

Elmer E. Buzzee, closet cleaner . . 5.00 

J. E. Post, brushes . . . . 1.75 

S. P. Danforth, labor, band concert . 9.37 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll, Kent 

fountain 59.38 

Horace A. Brown, return of poll tax . 2.20 
Charles J. French, expenses special 

committee 21.00 

Pioneer Engine Co., harness, J. R. 698 93.05 

W. B. Howe, postage .... 1.00 

A. Booth, supplies. City Hall . . 1.00 

J. D. Bartley, book rest . . . 1.65 

E. U. Sargent, vaccinations . . . 12.60 

Samuel N. Brown, recording deeds . 5.51 
Concord Water-Works, water, drinking 

fountains and ward houses . . 34.00 



476 CITY OF CONCORD. 

G. L. Theobald, setting cannon on me- 
morial arch S20.00 

J. R. Holcomb Mfg. Co., supplies, City 

Hall '. 3.00 

George D. Waldron, express on wire . .60 

Talbot Company, one gallon tabo, City 

Hall \ ' . . . . \ 3.00 

Ciishman P^lectric Co., labor on fence, 

city lot .60 

New England Granite Works, bound 

marks . . . , . . 5.00 

Waldo Quimby, care lawn. Ward 7 

ward house . . . . . 6.25 

HoUis M. Chase, taxes paid by mistake 4.30 

G. J. Benedict, plants. Central Fire 

Station 2.25 

M. Chamberlin, work on auditor's ac- 
counts, 1904 25.00 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, Penacook 

Park 9.03 



17,758.47 



LAND FOR PLAYGROUND. 
Henry W. Stevens, trustee $2,100.00 

LAND SOLD FOR TAXES. 
W. P. Ladd, tax collector $816.38 



MEMORIAL DAY. 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, No. 2 . . . . $305.00 

William I. Brown Post, No. 31 . . . . 105.00 

Davis Post, No. 44 50.00 



$460.00 



MARGARET PILLSBURY HOSPITAL. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer $3,000.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



477 



MOVING CITY SHED. 

Davis & Morrill, moving city shed 
Highway DepaitmeiU, labor . 



S400.00 
300.00 



S700.00 



OPEN AIR CONCERTS. 

Nevers' Sccoud Rcgimeut Band . 



$300.00 



PARKS. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurei', pay roll 

George Abbott, Jr., painting 

J. A. Flanders, cash paid out 

W. H. Richardson, cash paid out 

D. Waldo White, grain 

Hutchinson Building Co., lumber 

Thompson-Hoague Co., supplies 

A. H. Britten & Co., supplies 

Harwood & Nichols, labor . 

W. B. Durgin Co., grade 

R. and J. Farquhar & Co., seeds, etc. 

Ira C. Evans Co , printing . 

John C. Thorne, rubber boots 

George Prescott, lettering 

W. L. Riford, freight and trucking 

Concord Lumber Co., posts . 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies 

Tom Robinson, dressing 

J. F. Ward, labor 

S. P. Danforth, lumber 

C. H. Morgan, lumber 

Concord Water- Works, water 

Mrs. A. S. Ranney, desk and chai 

Orr & Rolfe, labor 

O. M. Blodgett, use of team 

G. J. Benedict, plants . 

Arthur Cowee, bulbs . 



$2,365.8.5 

15.00 

13.43 

43.18 

44.85 

2.22 

115.35 

38.05 

3.88 

96.95 

68.89 

4.00 

8.00 

2.75 

6.50 

8.32 

11.50 

15.00 

1.00 

57.72 

4.00 

33.00 

10.00 

3.00 

7.50 

49.65 

10.00 



478 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



"Walter L. Jenks & Co., repairs 

W. W. Critchett, fertilizer . 

Edward Gillett, ferns, etc. . 

J. W. Mowatt, filling . 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., repairs 

M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and supplies 

George W. Cbesley, loam and teaming 

L. W. French, azaleas . 

Charles R. Fish & Co., plants, etc. 

Henry A. Dreer, plants 

S. S. French, turf, etc. 

E. C. Woods, dressing 

Ross W. Cate, repairs . 

First National Bank, interest on note 

Penacook Park 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies 
Shepard Brothers & Co., supplies 
J. M. Crossman, bolts . 
W, F. Thayer, treasurer, pay rolls 



Washington Square. 
Edmund H. Brown, treasurer, appro- 
priation ...... 



$21 57 

32.00 

4.25 

16.20 

7.70 

4.40 

361.35 

10.00 

117.75 

2.40 

25.50 

12.50 

12.70 

27.00 



$12.45 

8.42 

.60 

103.05 



$3,694.41 



$124.52 



$25.00 



POLICE AND WATCH. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay rolls . $12,598.87 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies . . 14.78 
Concord Electric Co., electricity . . 105.55 
Penacook Electric Light Co., electricity 28.08 
M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and supplies 24.88 
N. A. Dunklee, board of horse . . 300.00 
N. A. Dunklee, horse hire, etc. . . 23.45 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., cocoa mat- 
ting 1.80 

A. Perley Fitch, supplies . . . .90 

O. J. Fifield, horse hire . . . 22.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



479 



C. H. Fowler, supplies . 

C. W. Dadmun, labor and supplies 

N. C. Nelson & Co., repairing clocks 

James E. Rand, cash paid out 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals an 

tolls 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., private 

line ...... 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas . 

C. A. Lowell, one half telephone ex 

pense ..... 
Hoyt Robinson, one half telephone ex 

pense ..... 
M. J. Pratt, salars', commissioner 
Josiah E. Dwight, salar}', commissioner 
Giles Wheeler, salary, commissioner 
Concord Water- AYorks, water 
Batchelder & Co., supplies . 
C. T. Wallace, one half telephone ex 

pense ..... 
R. E. Gale, supplies 
Abbot-Downing Co., supplies 
Charles H. Cook, M. D., professiona 

services ..... 
Mrs. Joseph Broggini, lodgings . 

E. F'. Akeley, one half telephone ex 
pense ...... 

I. B. Robinson, one half telephone ex 

pense ..... 
V. I. Moore, one half telephone expense 
C. Pelissier & Co., supplies and repairs 
Fred L. Johnson, auto service to Warner 

F. E. Gilford, wood . 
E. L. Davis, wood 
E. L. Davis, drawing ashes 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing . 
Kendall & Dame, ambulance service 
George D. Huntley, repairs . 



$4.32 
4.61 
2.7.5 

203.80 

154.30 

1G4.32 
10.85 
1G.25 

3.12 

9.87 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
43.00 
14.00 

7.33 

.25 

1.25 

5.50 
1.50 

5.25 

4.50 
4.50 
4.75 
5.00 
8.50 
5.00 
1.10 

60.25 
3.00 

40.75 



480 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Oak Hall Clothing Co., caps, etc. 
Concord Evening Monitor^ notices 

E. S. Tenney Co., coal 
Frank P. Mace, supplies 
Uniform Hat and Cap Co., helmets 
PeojyJe and Patriot^ notices . 
George Prescott, signs . 
Brown & Bragg, covering screens 

F. W. Landon & Co., labor and supplies 
Orr & Rolfe, labor 
Samuel L. Batchelder, use of teams 
Reversible Tube Cleaner Co., cleaner 
Monitor and Statesman Co., advertising 
Leon Saidel & Bro., supplies 

C. L. Fellows & Co., labor and supplies 
F. H. Sweet, team .... 
J. E. McSliane, shoeing horse 

D. Evans & Co., buttons 

E. U. Sargent, M, D., professional ser 
vices ..... 

J. E. Gage, repairs 



$9.00 

2.25 

414.11 

12.20 

10.00 

4.00 

1.50 

2.50 

8.50 

.60 

3.00 

3.00 

2.25 

.90 

4.85 

1.00 

25.00 

10.00 

1.00 
2.90 



$14,578.49 



PRECINCT, GARBAGE. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll . $5,660.07 

Abbot- Downing Co., refilling broom 

A. H. Britton & Co., labor and supplies 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

H. Thompson, brooms . 

A. B. Black, street cleaner . 

H. Thompson, refilling broom 

D. Waldo White, grain, etc. 



20.00 




s 9.33 




.42 




14.51 




20.50 




20.00 




88.60 






$5,833.43 



PRECINCT, LIGHTING STREETS. 



Concord Light & Power Co., gas 
Concord Electric Co., electricitv 



$3,627.22 
11,695.36 



$15,322.58 



CITY EXPENSES. 



481 



PRECINCT, LIGHTING STREETS, EAST CONCORD. 

Concord Electric Co., electricity .... $162.99 



PRECINCT, LIGHTING STREETS, PENACOOK. 
Abial W. Rolfe, treasurer S900.00 



PRECINCT, SEWERS, CITY. 



W. A. Thompson, rubber boots 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay rolls 
G. J. Johnston, trucking 
Chas. A. Yeadon, trucking- 
Walter L. Riford, trucking 
S. W. Emerson, trucking 

E. B. Hanchay, sharpening picks 
W. H. Ash, trucking . 
J. F. Ward, trucking . 
G. L. Theobald, teaming 

F. Green, trucking 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies 
E. C. Page, trucking 
William Giles, trucking 
Frank P. Mace, supplies 
William H. Ahern, labor 
Dickerman & Co., cement 
C. B. Mills, trucking . 
Ford & Kimball, supplies 
Concord Foundry &. Machine Co., sup 

plies . . . , 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe 
E. S. Quimby, trucking 

G. F. Sewall, trucking 
N. H. State Hospital, one half water 

bill, account repairs to sewer 
Joseph E. Mayo, one half expense low 
ering sewer, account changing grade 
31 



S6.00 

1,660.38 

.75 

2.50 

16.00 

1.50 

17.15 

2.50 

4.70 

78.35 

5.25 

1,031.00 

2.00 

1.50 

.67 

6.25 

55.40 

3.25 

47.62 

3.50 

1,186.00 

1.00 

2.75 

201.13 

5.00 



482 



CITY OF COXCOED. 



Hutchinson Building Co., plank, etc. 

Edson Mfg. Co., supplies 

W. B. Howe, cash paid out . 

F. C. Coffin, consulting engineer 

Harold L. Bond Co., hose 

Globe Rubber Works, hose . 

John C. Thorne, rubber boots 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies 

C. H. Martin & Co., oil 

SanQuel Holt, brick and sand 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil . 

Highway Department, raising manhole 



^81.58 

1.08 

.76 

656.54 

40.50 

325.00 

17.75 

17.2.3 

.20 

61.35 

7.00 

1.43 



$5,552.57 



PRECINCT, EAST CONCORD SEWER. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund . . . $100.00 



PRECINCT, PENACOOK SEWER. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund 

George Neller, labor . 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll 

Henry Rolfe, labor 

J. E. Brown, repairs 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., sup 

plies .... 

R. E. Gale, supplies 
Isaac Baty, labor and cement 
Harold L. Bond Co., hose, etc. 
C. M. & A. W Rolfe, packing 



$1,300.00 

4.60 

133.20 

9.00 

3.60 

6.42 

.26 

2.70 

28.50 

1.13 



$1,489.41 



PRECINCT, ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL SEWER. 



Concord Water- Works, water 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll 



$45.00 
2.72 



$47.7: 



CITY EXPENSES. 



483 



PRECINCT, WEST CONCORD SEWER. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund 
W. F. Tiiayer, treasurer, pay roll . 
Georse L. Theobald, teaai . 



$1,000.00 

24.99 

1.50 



$1,026.49 



PRECINCT, SPRINKLING STREETS. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay rolls 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs 

C. H. Martin & Co., paint, etc. . 
Boston & IMaine Railroad, freight 
Fairbanks Co., valves, etc . 

D. Waldo White, grain, etc., 
G. S. Milton & Co., repairs . 
Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies . 
Samuel Eastman & Co., couplings, etc 
J. H. Cunningham Co., valve boxes 
Joseph T. Walker, hay 
Concord Water- Works, water 
Chandler Eastman & Sons, sprinkle 

and repairs ... 
George D. Huntley, repairs . 
Ross W. Cate, shoeing horses 



. $3,958.25 


79.50 


32.60 


1.76 


75.92 


133.75 


37.43 


17.27 


18.25 


16.98 


85.46 


700.00 


398.00 


4.75 


36.00 


$5,595.92 



PRECINCT, WATER FOR HYDRANTS. 

Concord Water- Works $6,000.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Rumford Printing Co., printing . 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing . 
Concord Evening Monitor, printing 
People & Patriot Co., printing 
W. A. Chamberlin, stamps and pads 
Charles F. Nichols, stationery 
George E. Carter, stationery 



$467.46 

1,757.95 

181.55 

160.31 

9.55 

8.60 

12.28 



484 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Charles R. Corning, cash paid for post 
age, etc. ..... 

Treworgy Ink Mfg. Co., ink and pens 

E. L. Glick, stationery • 

Edson C. Eastman, stationery 

John H. Brown, postmaster, stamped 
envelopes .... 

O. N. French, pens 

Frank J. Batchelder, printing 

Independent Statesman 

Yawman & Erbe Mfg. Co 
cards .... 



$3.50 


3.50 


.90 


29.18 


214.00 


.75 


8.50 


5.25 



index 



PUBLIC BATHS. 
J. F. Kelley, chains, etc. 
Y. M. C. A., services superintendent, 
etc. ....... 

A. C. Sanborn, agent, right of way 
Hutchinson Building Co., paint . 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay roll . 
Edson C. Eastman, books 
Charles F. Nichols, books . 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas . 
Grace Blanchard, cash paid out . 
New Hampshire Historical Library 

books ..... 
Monitor and Statesman, subscription 
R. R. Bowker, periodical 
H. W. Wilson Co., periodical 
Edward D. Griswold, books . 
Jackman & Lang, insurance 
Concord Water-Works, water 
E. S. Tenney Co., coal and wood . 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance 
Rumford Printing Co., binding 



24.70 



$11.25 

206.03 

15.00 

2.50 



52,747.26 

218.78 

264.75 

168.60 

94.95 

22.00 
7.50 
5.00 
6.00 
6.00 

75.00 

10.00 
215.41 

47.50 
208.64 



$2,887.98 



S234.7f 



CITY EXPENSES 

Roy M. G rover, book . 
W.B. Clark Co., books 
Outlook Co., books 
Edwin A. Barber, book 

E. P. Thurston, subscription 
Boston Bookbinding Co., binding 
Geo. Prescott, repairs bicycle stand 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing . 
R. E. Gale, care of books, Penacool' 
W. B. Cunningham, trucking books 
Bates & Guild Co., books 

F. P^. Gilford, wood 
W. C. Gibson, subscriptions 
Directors Old South Work, books 
Old Corner Book Store, books 
C. E. Lauriat Co., books 
John R. Anderson Co., books 
Library Bureau, rubber dates 
The Bradford Co., books 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs, etc, 
William Noonan, trucking . 
Philadelphia Bookstore Co., books 
Puhlisliers Weekly, subscriptions 
The Tabard Inn Library, books 
A. L. A. Publishing Board, cards 
Mrs. Grace E. Foster, rent . 
N. E. H. G. Co., index 
Charles H. Swain & Co., labor and sup 

plies .... 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance 
J. G. Cupples, books . 
People & Patriot Co., subscription 
Mrs. Ida F. Moore, agent, subscriptions 
Eastern Subscription Co., books . 
Union Library Association, books 
Boston Book Co., books 
Northfield Town History Committee 

book .... 

The Guidon, book 



485 



$10.00 
84.60 
72.00 

2.25 

5.00 
120.00 

4.00 

424.14 

52.00 

52.00 

7.50 

18.50 

116.40 

7.50 

19.76 

69.84 

37.91 

.71 

4.00 
21.85 

3.00 
37.55 

1.00 
14.29 
11.84 
12.00 
15.00 

5.58 
40.00 
1.50 
6.75 
6.35 
22.35 
8.38 
5.15 

4.00 
1.00 



S5,423.09 



486 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and supplies, 

Central Fire Station .... S26.97 

E. F. Home, labor and supplies. Cen- 
tral Fire Station .... 186.05 

A. G. McAlpine Co., granite. Central 

Fire Station 1.00 

Ford & Kimball, columns and plates, 

Central Fire Station .... 44.40 

W. E. Darrah, labor and supplies. Cen- 
tral Fire Station .... 23.26 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies. Central 

Fire Station 63.72 

Putney & Sanborn, labor and supplies. 

Alert Fire Station .... 22.70 

Hutchinson Building Co., labor and sup- 
plies, ward room, Ward 7 . . . 2.25 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies. City 

Engineer's Office .... 34.27 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies. City 

Hall 109.52 

George Abbott, Jr., repairs. Good Will 

Fire Station 10.04 

Hutchinson Building Co., shed. Good 

Will Fire Station .... 225.00 

Chas. H. Baruett, labor and supplies, 

voting booth and fire station. Ward 1 7.82 

C. W. Drake, labor and supplies. Good 

Will Fire Station .... 2.80 

C. H. Martin & Co., shellac, etc.. City 

Hall 26.00 

E. L. Davis, turning cells, etc., Pena- 

cook Station . . . . . 6.70 

M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and supplies, 

Penacook Station .... 22.99 

E. F. Home, repairs and supplies, City 

Hall 4.85 



CITY EXPENSES. 487 

S. P. Danforth, repairing B. A. Kim- 
ball's fence $1.39 

S. P. Danforth, labor and sui)plies, City 

Hall 120.15 

B. Bilsborough, painting, etc., City Hall 14.10 

S. P. Danforth, labor and supplies. Cen- 
tral Fire Station ..... 23.93 

S. P. Danforth, repairs and supplies. 

Good Will Fire Station . . . 99.64 

Isaac Baty, repairs, fire station, Ward 1 30.75 

E. C. Durgin, repairs, fire station, Ward 1 55.72 

Manchester & Concord Express, express .25 

OrieutManufacturingCo., atomizer, etc., 

City Hall 13.00 

J. C. Stricltford, labor and supplies, fire 

station. Ward 2 . . . . 75.00 

W. Carpenter, painting. Central Fire 

Station 100.00 

George Abbott, Jr., painting fence, etc., 

Police Station ..... 4.72 

George Abbott, Jr., painting fence and 

floor, residence chief engineer . . 11.70 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairs concrete, 

Alert and Central fire stations . . 25.18 

Orr & Rolfe, installing steam. Alert Fire 

Station 175.00 

Bailey & Merrymau, repairing roof. City 

Hah 5.35 

B. Bilsborough, painting. West Concord 

Fire Station 14.02 

B. Bilsborough, staining storm door. 

Police Station 2.87 

Charles Haines, repairs, police station, 

Ward 1 7.35 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, repairs, West 
Concord Fire Station . . . 10.80 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, repairs, police 

station. Ward 1 . . . . 9.00 



488 CITY OF CONCOED. 

S. P. Dauforth, storm door, police sta- 
tion ....... S15.35 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs, Good 

Will Fire Station . . . . 14.11 

Hntcbinson Building Co., repairs, West 

Concord Fire Station . . . 3.85 

C. L. Fellows & Co., labor and supplies. 

Central Fire Station . . . . 10.15 

C. M, & A. W. Rolfe, repairs, fire sta- 
tion. Ward 1 3.85 

Orr & Rolfe, installing steam boiler. 

Good Will Fire Station . . . 140.00 

C. W. Bateman, supplies, Central Fire 

Station ...... .30 

Louis J. Sebra, repairs, police station. 

Ward 1 1.00 

George D. Huutle3s supplies, Central 

Fire Station 1.00 

Tliompson-Hoague Co., supplies, Cen- 
tral Fire Station .... 6.92 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and repairs. 

City Hall 47.49 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and repairs. 

Alert Fire Station .... 1.40 



SI, 865. 68 



SALARIES. 

Charles R. Corning, mayor . . . $1,000.00 

Henry E. Charaberliu, city clerk . . 1,200.00 
Henry E. Charaberliu, overseer of the 

poor. Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 . 350.00 
F. H. Blanchard, overseer of the poor. 

Ward 1 30.00 

John T. Cate, overseer of the poor, 

Ward 2 10.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer . . . 250.00 

Edward M. Proctor, city messenger . 759.68 

Edmund S. Cook, city solicitor . . 500.00 



i 

i 



CITY EXPENSES. 



489 



Geo. M. Fletcher, judge police couit 

Harry R. Hood, clerk police court 

Rufus H. Baker, clerk police court 

J. W. McMurphy, clerk common council 

John P. Paige, care city clock 

Geo. W. Brown, care city clock . 

W. H. Putnam, care city clock 

G. W. Johnson, truant officer 

Alice M. Nims, secretary board of edu 

cation, Union School District . 
Albert Saltmarsh, chairman board of 

education. Town School District 
H. C. Holbrook, chairman board of edu 

cation. District No. 20 
O. J. Fifield, assessor, Ward 1 
W. A. Cowley, assessor. Ward 2 . 
Joseph E. Shepard, assessor, Ward 3 
G. W. Parsons, assessor. Ward 4 
Geo. F. Uuderhill, assessor, Ward 5 
Osro M. Allen, assessor, AVard 6 . 
J. H. Quimby, assessor, Ward 7 . 
W. A. Lee, assessor, Ward 8 
James Ahern, assessor, Ward 9 . 
David Sullivan, Jr., assessor. Ward 9 
Pay roll, moderators, ward clerks and 

selectmen ..... 
Pay roll, supervisors 
Pay roll, inspectors of election 
W. P. Ladd, tax collector 
Fred H. Gould, special justice police 

court ..... 

Benjamin W. Couch, special justice 

police court .... 



SI, 000. 00 

50.00 

142.30 

50.00 

5.31 

79.69 

25.00 

500.00 

250.00 

200.00 

50.00 
315.00 
297.00 
207.00 
498.00 
573.00 
279.00 
306.00 
303.00 

21.00 
210.00 

342.00 

216.00 

165.00 

1,033.13 

4.00 

18.00 



$11,839.1; 



SALARIES CITY COUNCIL. 

W. F. Tiiayer, treasurer, pay roll . . . S2,112.00 



490 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOLS. 

J. T. Walker, agent, Union School Dis- 
trict S77,556.68 

D. T. Tworaey, treasurer, District No. 20 6,81 1.2;^ 
I. N. Abbott, treasurer, town district . 4,989.10 

$89,357.01 



I 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE CITY OF COIVCORD FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1905. 



Aid city poor .... 

Joint resolution No. 743 

Aid dependent soldiers, city- 
Aid dependent soldiers, county . 
Aid county poor . . . . 
Cemeteries: 

Blossom Hill .... 
Income cemetery fund 
Income trust fund 
Transferred from cemetery ac- 
count 

Old North 

Income cemetery fund 
Income trust fund 
Transferred from cemetery ac- 
count 

West Concord .... 
Joint resolution No. 709 
Joint resolution No. 749 . 

Pine Grove 

Joint resolution No. 749 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

1800.00 ) 



600.00 


S $1,320.37 


$79.63 


$150.00 


$119.47 
$1,851,71 
$7,027.23 


$30.53 


11,000.00 


$5,013.72 




856.54 






509.00 






2,559.13 






14,924.67 


$5,013.72 




$100.00 


$480.30 




28.89 






141.75 






219.63 






$490.27 


$480.30 


$9.97 


$75.00 


$101.25 




25.00 






1.25 






$101.25 


$101.25 




$150.00 


$151.00 




1.00 







$151.00 $151.00 



492 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



$6.15 



Millville 


$50.00 


$50.00 


Old Fort 


15.00 


8.85 


Horse Hill 


25.00 


25.00 


Woodlawn .... 


25.00 




Soiicook .... 


20.00 


20.00 


City stable: 






Joint resolution No. 719 . 


$8,500.0a 


$8,497.62 


City shed, moving of: 






Joint resolution No. 743 . 


$700.00 


$700.00 


Dog licenses .... 




$44.00 


Engineering department: 






Salary engineer . 


$1,500.00 


$1,500.00 


Salary assistants 


1,100.00 


814.75 


Supplies .... 


150.00 


73.79 


Repairs .... 


50.00 


2.30 


Incidentals .... 


200.00 


210.24 




$3,000.00 


$2,601.08 


Fire department: 






Pay rolls, permanent men 


$7,074.00 


$7,074.00 


Pay rolls, extra men vacations 


624.50 


620.50 


Pay rolls, semi-annual 


6,960.00 


6,960.00 


Rent Veterans' Association 


150.00 


150.00 


Forage .... 


1,600.00 


1,433.91 


Fuel 


900.00 


912.43 


Fire alarm .... 


1,000.00 


630.59 


Horse hire .... 


800.00 


602.00 


Horse shoeing . 


325.00 


310.00 


House man .... 


80.00 


73.33 


Lights 


600.00 


665.20 


Washing .... 


52.00 


52.00 


Chemical supplies 


50.00 


30.72 


Water 


119.50 


119.50 


Incidentals .... 


1,665.00 


2,365.50 


Hose, joint resolution No. 711 


900.00 


900.00 




$22,900.00 $22,899.68 


Furniture and fixtures, City Hall 






Joint resolution No. 687 


$1,500.00 


$2,058.72 


Joint resolution No. 749 


558.72 





25.00 



$2.38 



$398.92 



$0.32 



$2,058.72 $2,058.72 



Gravel bank: 
Joint resolution No. 744 

Health, Board of. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 493 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
1800.00 $800.00 



Salary health officer . 


11,200.00 


$1,200.00 




Salary board 


75.00 


75.00 




Fumigation supplies . 


125.00 


106.65 


$18.35 


Incidental expense 


600.00 






Joint resolution No. 741 


500.00 


843.56 


256.44 



Highway department: 

Salary commissioner . 

General maintenance and repair 

Permanent work, Penacook Road 

" " Bog Road 

" " Loudon Road . 

" "So. Pembroke 

Road 

Permanent work, No. State 
Street, Walker Street to Cem- 
etery 

Sidewalks and crossings, new . 
" " repair 

Catch basins .... 
Care of trees .... 
Concreting Pleasant Street, 
joint resolution No. 730 . 



Incidentals and land damages 
Joint Resolution No. 734 . 

Interest on notes and bonds . 

Interest on temporary loan . 

Interest on cemetery trust funds: 
Joint resolution No. 748 

Land for playground: 
Joint resolution No. 715 

Land sold for unpaid taxes: 
Joint resolution No. 724 



$2,500.00 $2,225.21 $274.79 

$1,400.00 $1,400.00 

22,000.00 23,644.14 

2,.500.00 2,503.77 

600.00 594.04 

500.00 513.82 



500.00 



35.05 



5,000.00 3,879.86 

2,000.00 1,815.13 

1,500.00 1,435.22 

1,500.00 1,388.82 

500.00 480.42 

1,700.00 1,523.80 



^39,700.00 $39,214.07 


$485.93 


$4,000.00 ; 
4,000.00 ] $7,758.47 


$241.53 


$6,896.00 $6,939.25 




$1,500.00 $1,473.99 


$26.01 



.25 



).25 



$2,100.00 $2,100.00 



$816. 



$816. 



494 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 
Memorial Day 
Opeu-air concerts . 



Parks .... 
Joint resolution No. 749 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
$3,000.00 13,000.00 



$460.00 1460.00 
$300.00 $300.00 



$3,500.00 

200.00 $3,694.41 





$3,700.00 


$3,694.41 $5.59 


Penacook Park 


$125.00 


$124.52 $0.48 


Washington Square 


$25.00 


$25.00 


Pleasant Street extension bonds: 






Joint resolution No. 729 . 


$13,800.00 $13,800.00 


Payment bridge bonds: 






Joint resolution No. 729 


$5,000.00 


$5,000.00 


Police and watch: 






Salaries regular force 


$12,025.00 $11,904.53 


Salaries special . 


400.00 


424.34 


Salary janitor 


270.00 


270.00 


Fuel 


535.00 


427.61 


Helmets and buttons . 


50.00 


29.00 


Horse hire .... 


30.00 


48.00 


Horse, board of . 


325.00 


325.00 


Ice 


5.00 




Incidentals .... 


600.00 


647.81 


Lights 


160.00 


144.88 


Telephone, private line 


164.32 


164.32 


Water 


43.00 


43.00 


Police commission 


150.00 


150.00 




$14,747.32 $14,578.49 $168.83 


Precinct, garbage: 






Overdrawn balance, 1904 . 




$42.57 


Appropriation 


$5,700.00 


5,833.43 


Joint resolution No. 749 


201.87 





Precinct, lighting streets, city 
Balance from 1904 



$5,901.87 $5,876.00 $25.87 

$15,000.00 $15,322.58 
849.28 



$15,849.28 $15,322.58 $526.70 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



495 



Precinct, liglitiug streets, East 

Concord . . 
Precinct, lighting streets, Pena- 

cook 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
1424.00 $163.99 $261.01 
350.00 



Precinct, sewer, city: 


i,/40U.UU 


yuu.uu 


Construction and repair . 


11,000.00 




Balance from 1904 


1,028.54 




Joint resolution No. 749 . 


148.50 




Note No. 308 


5,000.00 


15,552.57 


Note No. 286 .. . 




2,000.00 


Interest on notes and bonds 






Overdrawn balance, 1904 . 




27.63 


Appropriation 


2,400.00 


2,477.50 




$9,577.04 $10,057.70 


Precinct, sewer, East Concord: 






Construction and repair 






Balance from 1904 . 


$132.40 




Interest on bonds 


52.50 


$52.50 


Sinking fund 


100.00 


100.00 


From sinking fund 


500.00 




Bond paid .... 




500.00 



Precinct, sewer, Peuacook: 

Overdrawn balance, 1904 
Construction and repair 
Interest on bonds 
Overdrawn balance, 1904 
Appropriation 
Sinking fund 
From sinking fund 
Bond .... 



Precinct, sewer, St. Paul's School 

Overdrawn balance, 1904 . 
Construction and repair 
Interest on bonds 
Sinking fund 



$132.40 



$784.90 $652.50 $132.40 



$256.21 
$410.00 189.41 

90.00 
740.00 650.00 
1,300.00 1,300.00 
500.00 

500.00 



^2,950.00 $2,985.62 



$76.64 

$150.00 47.72 

135.00 135.00 

500.00 500.00 



$785.00 $759.36 $25.64 



496 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance 



Precinct, sewer. West Concord: 

Construction and repair 

Balance from 1904 

Interest on bonds, overdrawn 

Balance, 1904 

Appropriation 

Sinking fund ... 



.05 



$26.49 



80.85 

676.35 595.50 

1,000.00 1,000.00 





$1,774.40 


$1,702.84 


$71.56 


Precinct, sprinkling streets . 
Balance from 1904 


$5,600.00 

■ 683.88 


$5,595.92 






$6,283.88 


$5,595.92 


$687.96 


Precinct, water, hydrant service . $6,000.00 


$6,000.00 




Printing and stationery 
Joint resolution No. 727 . 


$2,000.00 
1,000.00 


$2,887.98 






$3,000.00 


.f;2,887.98 


$112.02 


Public baths .... 


$250.00 


$284.78 


.$15.22 


Public Library: 








Salaries . . . 
Incidentals .... 
Balance from 1904 . 
Trust funds 
Library fines 


$2,760.00 

2,240.00 

5.75 

165.90 

262.50 


$2,747.26 
2,675.83 





Repairs of buildings 

Rollins Park extension: 
Joint resolution No. 735 

Salaries: 



$5,434.15 $5,423.09 $11.06 
$2,000.00 $1,865.68 $134.32 

$1,207.50 $1,207.50 



Mayor 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


City clerk, .... 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


Overseers poor . 


390.00 


390.00 


Solicitor . ' . 


500.00 


500.00 


Treasurer .... 


250.00 


250.00 


Messenger .... 


759.68 


759.68 


Clerk common council 


50.00 


50.00 


Care city clocks . 


110.00 


110.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



497 



Boards of edticatiou 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



Moderators, ward clerks, aud 
selectmen .... 

Supervisors and inspectors of 
election 

Judge police court 

Collector of taxes 

Truant officer .... 

Clerk Police Court 

Joint resolution No. 749 



Salaries, city council 

Schools, Union School District: 

Interest .... 

General fund — balance, 1904 

Appropriation 

Voted by district 

Literary fund 

Dog licenses 

Text-books . 

Special repairs . 

Abial Walker trust fund 

Text-books, joint resolution No, 



Town District: 
General fund — balance, 1904 



$500.00 
2,700.00 



$500.00 
3,009.00 



342.00 342.00 



396.00 


3S1.00 


1,000.00 


1,022.00 


1,500.00 


1,633.13 


500.00 


500.00 


200.00 


192.30 


441.43 





$11,839.11 $11,839.11 
$2,150.00 $2,112.00 $38.00 



$2,065.00 $2,047.50 
15,513.44 77,556.68 
44,439.36 
22,956.88 

1,530.10 

1,713.77 

3,038.14 

2,500.00 
60.76 

243.24 



$94,060.69 $79,604. 18 $14,456.51 



Appropriation . 
Voted by district 
Literary fund 
Dog licenses 

Text-books .... 
Tuition returned by state . 
Abial Walker trust fund . 


3,729.48 
500.00 
140.80 
143.83 
254.97 
110.08 
5.10 


$4,989.10 


District No, 20: 

General fund— balance, 1904 
Appropriation 
Voted by district 
32 


$5,873.36 

$1,111.73 
3,026.16 
2,600.00 


14,989.10 
$6,811.23 



$884.26 



498 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





Appropriation. Expended. Balance 


Literary fund 


$193.60 


Dog licenses 


116.70 


Text-books .... 


206.89 


Tuition returned by state . 


473.76 


Abial Walker trust fund . 


4.14 


Bonds and interest 


983.00 1483.00 




$8,715.98 $7,294.23 $1,421.75 


Temporary loan: 




Joint resolution No. 701 . 


$75,000.00 $75,000.00 


County tax .... 


42,938.34 


State tax .... 


29,010.50 




$71,948.84 



City Hall account, 1905: 
Construction 



$3,033.73 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1905 .... 

Taxes, 1903 

Taxes, 1904 

Taxes, 1905 

Fines and costs, city marshal .... 

Library fines 

Highway department 

Fees, city clerk 

Hack and job team licenses 

Billiard and pool table licenses .... 

Junk dealers' licenses 

Dog licenses 

Dog license fees ■ . ' . 

County paupers off farm 

County dependent soldiers 

Milk inspection 

Temporary loan 

Sewer note 

Garbage 

Income Blossom Hill Cemetery fund 
Income Old North Cemetery fund .... 
Transferred from Blossom Hill Cemetery account 
Transferred from Old North Cemetery account . 
Blossom Hill Cemetery trust fund .... 
Old North Cemetery trust fund .... 
Abial Walker trust fund for schools 



$2L 

48, 
208. 



759.48 
107.70 
101.83 
275.00 

,006.23 
262.50 

,309.17 
347.44 
110.50 
370.00 
210.00 

,018.30 
181.80 

,010.23 

,851.71 
140.00 

,000.00 

,000.00 

201.87 

856.54 

28.89 

,559.13 
219.63 
509.00 
141.75 
35.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 499 

Thomas G. Valpey trust fund, library .... |17.o0 

G. Parker Lyou trust fuud, library .... 35.00 

P. B. Cogswell trust fund, library Go. 15 

Fraukliu Pierce trust fuud, library . . . . 36.25 

Seth K. Joues trust fund, library 12.00 

State of New Hampshire, iusurauce tax . . . 1,110.60 

State of New Hampshire, railroad tax .... 48,649.49 

State of New Hampshire, savings bank tax . . . 34,026.74 

State of New Hampshire, literary fuud . . . . 1,864.50 
State of New Hampshire, high school tuition, town 

district 110.08 

State of New Hampshire, high school tuitiou, Pena- 

cook 473.76 

Building and Loan Association tax .... 50.78 
Sinking fund. East Concord sewer precinct . . . 500.00 
Sinking fund, Penacook sewer precinct ... 500.00 
Cemetery trust funds, transferred to general city ac- 
count 18,800.00 

Rent of auditorium 465.00 

State Board of License Commis.sioners, balance, 1904, 776.78 

Account, 1905 9,507.39 

Miscellaneous 1,403.09 

Total 1498,017.81 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

City departments 1143,317.91 

City poor and soldiers 1,439.84 

County poor and soldiers 8,878.94 

City notes ■ 75,000.00 

City bonds 18,800.00 

City interest on notes and bonds 8,413.24 

Interest, cemetery trust funds 369.25 

Schools 89,357.01 

Schools, interest on bonds 2,530.50 

Precinct, sprinkling streets 5,595.92 

Precinct, lighting streets, city 15,322.58 

Precinct, lighting streets, Penacook .... 900.00 

Precinct, lighting streets. East Concord . . . 162.99 

Precinct, garbage • . 5,833.43 

Precinct, water 6,000.00 

Precinct, sewers, bonds 1,000.00 

Precinct, sewers, notes 2,000.00 

Precinct, sewers, interest on bonds and notes . . 3,910.50 

Precinct, sewers, repairs and extensions . . . 5,816.19 

Precinct, sewers, sinking funds 2,900.00 



500 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



State tax .... 
County tax 

City hall, construction . 
Treasury balance January 1, 



1906 



Less outstanding orders unpaid January 1, 
Total 



1906 



Concord Water- Works : 

Cash balance January 1, 1905 . 
Receipts deposited with treasurer 

Bonds 

Premium and interest 
Expended per orders . 

Bonds paid 

Interest 

Cash balance January 1, 1906 . 



Receipts. 

124,454.78 

71,076.44 

45,000.00 

1,176.37 



$141,707 



$29,010.50 

42,938.34 

3,033.78 

25,523.84 

$498,054.71 
36.90 



$498,017.81 



Expenditures. 



$37,826.25 
52,800.00 
35,176.94 
25,904.40 

$141,707.59 



Police Station bonds 
Bridge bonds 
State Library bonds 
New City Hall bonds 

Total funded citv debt 



MUNICIPAL DEBT. 
Funded Debt. 

. $17,000.00 



10,000.00 

25,000.00 

130,000.00 



Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding Jan. 1, 1906 . $41.90 

Interest accrued, not yet due, mu- 
nicipal bonds .... 2,453.92 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds . . . 239.75 

Due school districts . . . 16,762.52 

Cemetery trust funds . . . 18,800.00 

Total debt not funded .... 
Total city indebtedness .... 



$182,000.00 



$38,298.09 
$220,298.09 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



501 



Available Assets. 






Tieasinei's cash balance, Jan. 1, 






1906 $25,523.84 






Taxes of 1904, uncollected . . 75.09 






Taxes of 1905 .... 46,899.23 






Cash in hands of tax collector, Jan. 






1,1906 277.22 






Due for rents, quarries . . . 111,52 






Due highway department, repairs of 






concrete 258.44 








$73,145 


34 


Indebtedness above assets, Jan. 1, 1906 . 


$147,152 


75 


Indebtedness above assets, Jan. 1, 1905 . 


150,863 


79 


Decrease for the year .... 


83,711 


04 



PRECINCT DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 
Water- Works bonds . . . 8640,000.00 



Sewer bonds . 



59,000.00 



$699,000.00 



Debt Not Funded. 
Sewer precinct notes . . . $12,000.00 
Interest accrued on same, not yet 

due 
Coupons overdue, sewer 

presented . 
Coupons overdue, water 

presented . 



Interest accrued, sewer 

yet due 
Interest accrued, water 

yet due 
Water bonds due, not presented 

Total precinct debt . 



bonds, not 
bonds, not 
bonds, not 
bonds, not 



122.50 
267.50 
722.50 
536.67 



11,758.33 
2,200.00 



$27,607.50 



$726,607.50 



50: 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Available Assets. 
Cash on hand, water department, 

Jan. 1, 1906 .... $25,904.10 
Due highway department, garbage 

precinct ..... 98.69 

Due sewer department, use of hoister 105.00 



Net precinct debt, Jan. 1, 1906 
Net precinct debt, Jan. 1, 1905 

Decrease for the year . 



$26,107.79 

$700,499.71 
707,228.98 

$6,729.27 



OTHER PRECINCT LIABILITIES. 

Union School District bonds . . $59,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due . . 516.25 

Coupons due, not presented . . 17.50 

School District No. 20, bonds . $13,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due . 161.00 

Net liability of school districts 

West Concord sewer bonds . . $15,300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due . . 148.88 



Penacook sewer bonds . . . $16,500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due . . 212.08 

East Concord sewer bonds . . $1,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due . . 17.52 

St. Paul's School sewer bonds . $4,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due . . 60.00 

Coupons due, not presented . . 7.50 



$59,533.75 



$13,961.00 
$73,494.75 



$15,448. 



$16,712.08 



$1,017.52 



$4,067.50 



FINANCIAL STATE]NrENT. 



503 



RECAPITULATION. 



Net regulai- municipal debt 
pi'ecinct debt . 
school district 
West Concord sewer debt 
Peuacook sewer debt 
East Concord sewer debt 
St. Paul's School sewer debt 



Aggregate indebtedness over available assets 
Jan. 1, 1906 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets 
Jan. 1, 1905 



Decrease for the year 



$147,152.75 

700,499.71 

73,494.75 

15,448.88 

16,712.08 

1,017.52 

4,067 50 



S958,393.19 

970,328.51 
$11,935.32 



REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS, 1905. 

For payment of interest on notes and bonds . $8,396.00 

support of city poor and soldiers . . . 950.00 

incidentals and land damages •. . . 4,000.00 

salaries, city council ..... 2,150.00 

printing and stationery .... 2,000.00 

aid to Margaret Pillsbury Hospital . . 3,000.00 

decorating the graves of soldiers and sailors . 460.00 

public school text-books .... 3,500.00 

open-air concerts ...... 300.00 

public baths 250.00 

cemeteries ....... 1,460.00 

parks 3,650.00 

repairs buildings ...... 2, 000. CO 

board of health 2,000.00 

police department ..... 14,747.32 

Public Library 5,000.00 

engineering department .... 3,000.00 

highway department 38,000.00 

fire department 22,000.00 

salaries 11,397.68 



504 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



For state tax 

county tax . 

schools 

Penacook lighting precinct 

sewers, city . 

lighting streets, city 

Penacook sewer precinct 

water for hydrants 

garbage precinct . 

sprinkling streets 

St. Paul's School sewer precinct 

West Concord sewer precinct 

East Concord sewer precinct 

P^ast Concord lighting precinct 



$29,010.50 

42,938.34 

82,799.88 

1,250.00 

3,400.00 

15,000.00 

2,450.00 

6,000.00 

5,700.00 

5,600.00 

785.00 

1,676.35 

152.50 

424.00 

S325,447.57 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS BY JOINT RESOLU- 
TIONS, 1905. 



687 Furniture and fixtures, City Hall . 

691 Text-books, Union School District 

711 Hose, fire department . 

715 Public playground 

719 City Stable .... 

7^4 Real estate sold for unpaid taxes 

727 Printing and stationery 

730 Concreting of Pleasant Street 

734 Incidentals and land damages 

735 Enlargement of Rollins Park 
739 City sewerage precinct 

741 Health department 

742 City poor 

743 Moving city shed . 

744 Gravel bank 

745 Hook and ladder truck and appurtenances 

748 Interest, cemetery trust funds 

749 Salaries .... 
749 Furniture and fixtures, City Hall 
749 West Concord Cemetery 



$1,500.00 

243.24 

900.00 

2,100.00 

8,500.00 

816.38 

1,000.00 

1,700.00 

4,000.00 

1,207.50 

5,000.00 

500.00 

600.00 

700.00 

800.00 

1,200.00 

369.25 

441.43 

558.72 

1.25 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 505 

749 Pine Grove CeraeteiT Si. 00 

749 Sewer department . . . . . 148.50 

749 Garbage ....... 201.87 

749 Parks 200.00 

832,689.14 



INVENTORY 

Op the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1906. 



Water rights— land, etc. . . $906,565.76 

Water office — furniture, etc. . 635.00 

Pumping station — furniture, sup- 
plies, etc 1,391.00 

Shop at pumpiug statiou — machin- 
ery, tools, etc. . . . 500.00 

Stable and basement at pumping 

station — horse, wagons, etc. . 515.00 

Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, 
etc. ..... 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc. 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc. 



500.00 




1,300.00 




15.00 




30.00 






S911.451.76 



I 



CITY PROPERTY 



Haying Value but not Considered Available Assets. 



The following is a summary of the inventory of the property 
belonging to the city January 1, 1906, made by the heads of 
the various departments having the same in charge. Itemized 
statements are on file in the city clerk's office. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Central fire station . 
Kearsarge steamer company 
Eagle steamer . 
Governor Hill steamer . 
Hook and ladder company 
Chemical engine company 
Good Will hose company 
Alert hose companj' 
Pioneer steamer company 
Old Fort engine company 
Cataract engine company 
Fire alarm apparatus 
Hose .... 
Residence chief engineer . 
Heating apparatus . 
Pioneer engine house furniture 
Old Fort engine house furniture 
Cataract engine house furniture 



^39,960.60 

3,745.35 

4,529.75 

3,035.90 

1,164.75 

1,906.00 

7,841.90 

4,256.75 

11,967.75 

4,041.75 

9,427.75 

9,990.00 

6,600.00 

3,000.00 

100.00 

70.50 

69.00 

71.25 



$111,779.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 
Central District. 

New city stable, sheds, lot, tools, etc. $27,339.00 



508 



Tools, etc. 



Tools, etc. 



Tools, etc. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
Penacook District. 



; 186. 75 



West Concord District. 



24.00 



East Concord District. 



7.50 



$27,557.25 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Furniture, tools and supplies .... $082.50 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Precinct, sewer, tools and supplies 

Precinct, Penacook Sewer. 
Tools and supplies ..... 

Precinct, West Concord Sewer. 
Tools and supplies ..... 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



Isolation hospital and furniture 
Office furniture and supplies . 



$740.00 
150.50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police station, citj .... $25,000.00 



Police station, Penacook . 
Equipment, furniture, etc. 



6,000.00 
1,678.65 



$628.75 



$40.15 



$50.75 



$890.50 



$32,678.65 



CITY PROPEflTY. 509 

CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, etc. S866.00 



COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE. 
Furniture SlOO.17 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 
Furniture $107.45 



ASSESSORS' ROOM. 

Furniture, etc S86.60 



TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, etc !$20o.20 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES' OFFICE. 

Weights, measures, balances, etc. . . . $200.00 



CITY MESSENGER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Committee room .... $73.70 

City Council rooms .... 774.50 

Property in and about city ball . 1,403.09 

$2,251.29 



PARK COMMISSIONER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Tools, etc.. White park . . . $200.00 

Tools, etc., Rollins park . . . 25.00 

$225.00 



510 



CITY OF CONCOED. 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Tools, etc., Blossom Hill cemetery . . • $250.00 



Books 
Furniture 



Tools, etc. . 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



$9,500.00 
500.00 



MILK INSPECTOR. 



$10,000.00 



$43.77 



CITY HISTORY COMMISSION. 
1 Bouton's History SIO.OO 



REAL ESTATE. 



REAL ESTATE BELONGING TO THE CITY NOT INCLUDED IN ANY OF 
THE FOREGOING INVENTORIES. 

City hall lot aud building . . . $150,000.00 

City farm, pasture and quarries . 5,000.00 

Old city sheds 5,000.00 

Gravel banks 1,050.00 

Ward house. West Street . . . 4,500.00 

Playground on intervale . . . 1,500.00 

White park 14,000.00 

Rollins park 10,807.50 

Penacook park 2,500.00 

Market place on Warren Street . . 15,000.00 

Cemeteries 20,000.00 

Bradley, Fiske (so called), Ridge 

Road and Packer parks . . . 2,200.00 

$231,557.50 



CITY PROPERTY. 



511 



GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 



Water department 


$911,451.76 




Fire department . 


111,779.00 




Highway department . 


27,557.25 




Engineering department 


682.50 




Sewer department 


628.75 




Penacook sewer . 


40.15 




West Concord sewer 


50.75 




Healtii department 


890.50 




Police department 


32,678.65 




City clerk's office . 


866.00 




Commissioner's office . 


100.17 




Mayor's office 


107.45 




Assessors' room , 


86.60 




Tax collector's office . 


205.20 




Sealer of weights and measures 


200.00 




City messenger's department 


2,251.29 




Park commissioners 


225.00 




Cemetery commissioners 


250.00 




Public library 


10,000.00 




Milk inspector 


43.77 




City History commission 


10.00 




Real estate .... 


. 231,557.50 






a 1 Q q 1 c r: o 


29 







POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 



The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real 
personal estate of Concord since 1895 : 



and 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1895 


4,838 


$11,566,083 


$217,399.83 


1896 


4,663 


11,228,515 


262,254.99 


1897 


4,812 


11,200,363 


233,761 58 


1898 


4,691 


11,148,659 


221,080.21 


1899 


4,760 


11,218,886 


220,704.62 


1900 


4,809 


11,220,215 


232,773.10 


1901 


5,378 


11,393,694 


241,588.57 


1902 


5,249 


11,394,218 


241,216.83 


1903 


5,407 


11,643,466 


240,025.79 



512 CITY OF CONCORD. 

1904. Polls. Valuation. Tax. 

Ward 1, 382 §844,127 $20,928.32 

2, 218 296,424 4,916.07 

3, 301 385,170 8,645.76 

4, 999 2,554,820 55,946.31 

5, 654 3,094,884 65,733.82 

6, 857 1,955,727 43,013.41 

7, 925 1,190,055 24,302.34 

8, 400 882,175 18,467.25 

9, 452 356,100 7,418.87 





5,188 


$11,559,482 


$249,372.15 


Non-resident 


■ 


. 


850.14 




$250,222.29 


1905. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


558 


$867,927 


$21,442.36 


2, 


206 


302,428 


5,584.32 


3, 


312 


433,370 


9,541.54 


4, 


1,026 


2,632,399 


58,358.62 


5, 


707 


2,943,949 


65,557.37 


6, 


812 


1,954,820 


43,707.51 


7, 


948 


1,228,165 


26,382.08 


8, 


367 


875,193 


18,488.83 


9, 


464 


375,760 


8,080.46 



5,400 $11,614,011 $257,143.09 

Non-resident 900.77 



$258,043.86 



1005. 

Population of city (census 1900) . . 19,632 

Valuation of city . . $11,614,011.00 

Tax assessed for the yeur .... 258,043.86 

Rate of taxation, $15.60 per $1,000. 
Rate for Union School District, 12.80. 
Rate for precinct, $4.10. 
Total rate, $22.50 per $1,000. 
34 



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INDEX. 



Page 

Appropriations, regular 503 

special 504 

Assessors, board of, report of 402 

Assets, city. See Municipal Assets. 



Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 
Bonded indebtedness 



Cemetery department, reports of 392 

City clerk, report of 412 

City expenses, itemized 461 

City government, departments, personnel of 51 

assessors 57 

board of aldermen 51 

boards of education 54 

cemetery committees 65 

clerk 51 

collector of taxes 54 

common council .52 

commissioners of cemeteries es 

committees of city council 53 

culler of staves 68 

engineer 54 

fence- viewers 67 

fire department, officers of 58 

financial agent Union School District 55 

health officers 64 

hydrant commissioners 64 

inspector of electric wires 68 

inspector of petroleum 67 

inspector of plumbing 64 

mayor 51 

messenger 54 

overseers of poor 63 

park commissioners 65 

physician, city and assistant 63 

pound-keeper 67 

police department, officers of court .59 

oflacers and members of police force 60 

public library, trustees of 56 

librarian and assistants 56 

registrar of vital statistics 64 

sanitary officer 64 

sealers of leather 67 

sealer of weights and measures 68 



570 INDEX. 

City, street department, commissioner of highways 62 

drain-layers 62 

surveyors of painting 69 

masonry 69 

stone 69 

wood, lumber and bark 70 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 66 

superintendent of clocks 59 

superintendent of schools 55 

treasurer 54 

truant offlcer 56 

undertakers 66 

ward officers 71 

water-works, city, commissioners 57 

superintendent 58 

weigher 69 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 68 

City physician, report of 384 

City, population of 513 

City solicitor, report of 396 

Clerk of police court, report of 399 

Collector of taxes, report of 400 

Coupon account, statement of 441 

Debts, recapitulation 503 

Engineer, city, report of 188 

Financial statement . 491 

Fire Department, chief engineer, report of 294 

flre alarm 325 

regulations of 331 

roll of members 343 

Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery 415 

East Concord Cemetery 417 

East Concord sewer 418 

Millville Cemetery 416 

Old North Cemetery 415 

Penacook sewer 418 

Seth K. Jones monument 419 

trust 419 

West Concord Cemetery 416 

sewer 417 

Highway commissioner, financial statement of 219 

department, report of commissioner 213 

Mayor's address 3 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 73 

Municipal assets 501 

debt 500 

regulations 2 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 458 

Ordinances and joint resolutions 17 



INDEX. 571 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 385 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 358 

Police department, report of city marshal 176 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1895 511 

Poor department, report of overseer 406 

Precincts, debts of 501 

Property, city, inventory of 506 

Public library, report of trustees 349 

librarian 350 

Recapitulation of city property 511 

Sanitary Department, Board of Health report of 361 

sanitary ofllcer, report of 363 

mortality report 373 

School reports 77 

Union School District, annual school meeting warrant 141 

annual school meeting 142 

attendance, tables of 110 

board of education, report of 81 

census, 1905 114 

committee on buildings and repairs, re- 
port of 84 

elocutionary contest, financial report of. 139 

financial agent, report of 90 

graduating exercises 128 

honor, roll of 123 

members, officers and standing commit- 
tees 77 

special school meeting 145 

superintendent, report of 94 

teachers, list of 121 

truant officer, report of 113 

District No. 20, report of 153 

town district, report of 172 

Sewerage system, report of 198 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 434 

Treasury, report of 413 

Trust Funds 413 

Trusts, individual cemetery..- 421 

Vital Statistics, tables of 516 

Water department, report of 254 

commissioners, report of 261 

coupon, account of 443 

engineer's report 277 

Are hydrants 288 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 443 

schedule of pipes and gates 282 

superintendent, report of 263 

treasurer's report 442 




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