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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

ANNUAL REPORT 

gf tffe 

ClTYfif CONCORD 




1906 



1906 
FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OV THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1906. 



TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCORD, N. H. : 

Ira C. Evans Co., Printers. 

1907. 



552. Ol 
C74 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnisliing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract said liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or de- 
livered on city pauper account, except on the written order 
of the Overseer of the Poor, and for no longer time than 
until his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county pauper account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the City Government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the City Government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 
' , . City Clerk. 



MAYOR CORNING'S INAUGURAL 
ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen and of the Common 
Council and My Fellow Citizens: 

This occasion, unprecedented in the annals of Concord, 
cannot but impress me. Chosen by the voters of this city 
to a third term as mayor is an honor which I shall always 
hold dear. As it was at my first election and at my second, 
so it has been in my third election, an honor all the more 
prized because it came without price or solicitation. To be 
called to a public service in this manner is in nw opinion 
to enhance the trust and to dignify the office. Surely the 
debt of gratitude which I owe to my fellow citizens be- 
cause of their reiterated partiality toward me, is such 
that I cannot hope to lighten it except by constant dili- 
gence, unAvearied effort and honest and courageous dis- 
charge of duty. 

Whatever may have been accomplished during the last 
four 3'ears is due not alone to me, but to those who with me 
comprised the city government. During this time my 
constant thought has been centered in the work pertaining 
to my office of mayor, and what I have done has been dic- 
tated by motives absolutely unselfish and unpartisan. Pol- 
itics in a city government are out of place, Avhile influence 
and " pulls," calculated always to promote measures that 
ought not to be promoted, are next to crime. 

So far as I know there have been but few and in- 
significant attempts to thrust personal politics into the 
sphere of city government and those attempts met with 
no favor. As I have said on another occasion like this so 
I again say, that I believe our departments are well man- 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

aged and prudently conducted and that our officials are 
honest and capal)le. I am aware that those who hold pub- 
lic positions are subject to criticisms of various kinds, 
and are sometimes accused of shortcomings which, upon 
investigation, turn into thin air. The demagogue's cry of 
graft may or may not be an exigency of campaign ambi- 
tions and deserves to be condemned unless clearly proved. 

We are now entering upon Concord's forty-first consecu- 
tive city government, and looking backward over the 
years of administration, we shall see among our prede- 
cessors many of Concord's best and foremost citizens. They 
administered municipal afifairs with intelligence and hon- 
esty and they had many vexing undertakings. during their 
terms of office. 

City affairs are constantlv- increasing, progress is writ- 
ten everywhere, and despite all cavilling and fault-finding, 
our citizens, men and women alike, rejoice in our efforts 
to maintain a modern city, healthful, clean and sound. 
This, then, should be our present endeavor. Neither nig- 
gardliness nor extravagance should be shown, but a careful 
course between the two and thereby win the good esteem 
of those who have sent us here. 

Assessors. 

While in no wise changing my opinion respecting a board 
of assessors representing the whole city, I am willing to 
await the forming of public sentiment which, in due time, 
wdll be expressed on this subject regardless of partisan- 
ship and ward prejudices. The board of assessors sent 
a request to the late city council asking for a map of the 
city. The estimated expense incident to preparing such 
a map would be upward of $2,000. I am convinced that 
a map showing the size, shape and situation of every parcel 
of land, and buildings thereon, within the city would be of 
service to the assessors and of infinite benefit to the tax- 
payers. I am in favor of beginning this work and I recom- 



mayor's address. 5 

mend making an appropriation wherewith to make a start. 
Naturally the details and structure of the map should be 
under the supervision and charge of. the city engineer. 

Bonded Debt. 

On the first day of this year the indebtedness of Con- 
cord was as follows : 

City ; $177 000 

Sewer precincts 95.300 

School districts 213,800 

Total $486,100 

Water-works 630.000 

Total debt $1,116,100 

Of the $177,000 city bonds, $130,000 represent the cost 
of the city hall and auditorium, and $5,000 are bridge 
bonds, $17,000 are police station bonds, and $25,000 rep- 
resent Concord's contribution to the state library by pur- 
chase of land. 

Of the $95,300 sewer bonds, $59,000 belong to the city 
precinct, $16,500 to the Penacook precinct, $15,300 to the 
West Concord precinct, $1,000 to the East Concord pre- 
cinct, and $3,500 to St. Paul's School precinct. 

Of the $213,800 school district bonds, $51,000 are on ac- 
count of the Dewey school and the Rumford school ; $119,- 
000 are for the High school and the Garrison school, and 
$30,000, not yet bonded, represent the cost of the JNIanual 
Training school. In this school indebtedness is seen a 
superb illustration of Concord's generosity in providing a 
common school education for the city's children. Here, 
too, is found the largest liability, except the water-works 
which are not a burden on the taxpayers. No person may 
honestly charge extravagance because of this debt incurred 
by new schoolhouses. Personally I know how imperative 
the need was for larger school accommodations, yet even 



6 CITY OF CONCORD. 

now I realize, after all that- has been done, that there is a 
further need, especially south of West street. 

While the city government has no voice respecting school 
affairs, we are bound to recognize the large cost of our 
schools and to try to adjust our municipal expenditures 
accordingly. 

With this debt staring us in the face, our policy respect- 
ing new subjects of expenditure is too plainly demonstrated 
to require another word from me. This is a period of 
debt when all personal ambitions to do something for this 
or that section of the city, involving more bond issues, 
should be absolutely repressed. 

Fire Department. 

Two years ago I recommended a modern and quickly 
handled hook and ladder truck to replace a sturdy but 
antiquated truck built in the seventies. AVithout a dis- 
senting opinion or a negative vote, the late administration 
appropriated $1,200 to pay for such a truck, including 
runners, and it is exceedingly gratifying to say that this 
new piece of apparatus is in commission and gives entire 
satisfaction to the department and to the public. As this 
truck weighs much more than the old one an additional 
horse has been added in order to make what is called a 
three-horse hitch. Another improvement has been made 
in this department by replacing the old hose wagon of the 
Alert Company with a larger and more convenient wagon, 
built, as was the new truck, at the Abbot- Downing Com- 
pany. The old hook and ladder truck is housed on North 
State street, and is kept equipped and ready to respond to 
emergency alarms. 

Parks. 

Our parks are now as nnich a subject of pride as our 
good streets and modern schoolhouses. But the manage- 
ment of the parks is peculiarly intensive and therein dif- 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 7 

fers from certain other departments. Not only is the 
routine work to be carried forward but there comes yearly 
the problem of permanent beautification. Two years ago I 
spoke of the plaj^ground at White park as meeting the 
desires of a large number of persons and T advanced the 
hope that a similar recreation ground might be added to 
Rollins park. A year had not passed when the city council 
voted a generous appropriation to buy additional land 
adjoining that park for the purpose of making a play- 
ground. 

During the two years last passed Pecker park, in Ward 
Two, has been added to our park system. This small but at- 
tractive spot, at the junction of the highway leading to 
Shaker Village and to Sewall's Falls bridge, is due wholly 
to the generosity of Jonathan Eastman Pecker, a native 
and life-long citizen of Concord. Whatever has been done 
there demonstrates the practical work that can be done 
elsewhere in reclaiming waste and unsightly places and 
changing them into simple, inexpensive, j'et pleasing plots 
of permanent beauty and utility. 

Public Library. 

Here is an institution as important as any in the city 
and very close to the hearts of our people. I regret that 
the necessities of our schools compelled the district to ap- 
propriate money for new school buildings, thereby de- 
priving the city government of its desire to give the library 
a much needed enlargement. I regret further that I cannot 
consistently at this time, considering the state of our ex- 
penditures and debt, recommend an adequate appropria- 
tion for library enlargements. If, however, during our 
term of office, circumstances change for the better, I shall 
not hesitate to call your attention to this subject. The 
librarian accomplishes much and evinces a pride to keep 
ovir library in the front rank of similar institutions. Con- 
cord has always had a population given to good reading. 



8 CITY OP^ CONCORD. 

and never more so than at tlie present time. Whatever 
we can do to promote the usefulness of our public library 
I am sure we ought to do promptly and cheerfully. 

Revision of Ordinances. 

In February, 1894, the revision of the city ordinances 
was authorized by vote of the city council. Since that 
date there have been changes, amendments, repeals and 
substitutions to an extent scarcely conceivable, until the 
precise meaning and extent of our nuinicipal laws are mat- 
ters of more or less uncertainty. To accomplish this work 
thoroughly is of great importance, and much time and 
consideration will be necessary to enable those who may 
have the work in charge to produce a satisfactory result. 
At some later time I shall, with your consent, submit my 
views on this subject more definitely and clearh'. 

Sewers. 

Here is a subject of supreme importance and urgency. 
Following my recommendation of two years ago the city 
council authorized the services of an expert sanitary engi- 
neer, Mr. Freeman S. Coffin, whose recent death is a dis- 
tinct loss to his profession. Mr. Coffin made a compre- 
hensive study of our system of sewers and in due time 
presented his results in a clear and exhaustive report, in 
which he not only dealt with conditions as they now are 
but looked far into the future and provided for that period. 
To carry out in full the engineer's plans and recommenda- 
tions at this time would be impracticable, if not impossible, 
and nobody has ever given a thought to such a measure. 
but to begin the work in accordance with the report had 
been my hope and expectation. \\Tiat we had planned to 
do was to construct a large sewer, starting on Main street 
at the corner of Montgomery and extending to Hall's 
court, thence across the railroad yard and tlie intervale to 
the Merrimack river. 



mayor's address. 9 

A main sewer of the size we proposed would relieve in 
a great measure the frequent congestion and overflowing 
into cellars which is now, and for several years has been, 
a source of well-founded complaints. 

I had confidently hoped at this time to congratulate you 
on the completion of this much needed work, and I con- 
fess my regret at not being able to do so. Owing to ap- 
propriations for new sclioolhouses,;more particularly for 
the jManual Training building, I did not feel justified in 
asking the city council to increase our municipal debt by 
an appropriation of $20,000 with which to begin an en- 
largement of our sewer system. But I feel that this work 
must he begun before long, and unless monetary objections 
again interpose it will be ni}^ purpose to ask for an appro- 
priation during the present term. 

While concerned with this subject I desire to say that 
unless we make larger annual appropriations for sewers, 
and to this I am opposed, it is manifest that some house- 
holders must wait their turn for sewer connections. It 
has too often been the case that a costly sewer has been 
laid merely to accommodate one house. In this as in 
many other matters that come before us we need courage 
and common sense, courage being preferable, whereby we 
may resist the irate taxpayer and vote-getter and expend 
the limited appropriation only in places where it will do 
the greatest public good. 

Streets. 

Whether some of our citizens agree or not respecting the 
care of streets and our considerable increase in permanent 
street construction during the four years last passed, the 
fact is that never since the first administration in 1853 
has Concord had better streets and sidewalks. To look 
backward a decade and see what we had then and com- 
pare it all with what we have now is to confirm my state- 
ment. I cannot but believe that good and permanent 
streets have become the desire and expectation of our peo- 



10 CITY OP CONCORD. 

pie. ]\[ain street from School street to Warren street 
should receive our immediate attention, in fact it is our 
duty to carry out the vote of the preceding administration 
relative to this work. 

We must be convinced, by this time, that the highways 
leading into the city should be so constructed as to make 
them attractive to those who dwell in surrounding towns 
and who naturally prefer to come here to trade than to go 
elsewhere. The road to Loudon is an example of the trade 
and travel magnet of a good highway. 

]\Iost emphatically do I ask your favorable considera- 
tion toward the highway extending from the lower bridge 
to the State-Aid highway ending at the boundary be- 
tween Pembroke and Concord. A section of gravel road, 
measuring a thousand feet, has already been completed 
on the Concord side of the boundary at the Soucook 
river, and it is our duty, as I regard it, to keep adding to 
the good road on our side until we have a well constructed 
highway from the Pembroke line extending over the sandy 
plains and down Black hill to the lower bridge. 

North State street is now a macadam road to Blossom 
Hill cemetery and this year this desirable work should be 
extended northward to Calvary cemetery. 

Strange as it is when we consider the gravel banks of 
earlier years that to-day Concord is face to face with a 
positive want of gravel for street uses. Nowhere other 
than in Ward Nine are gravel banks apparent, and from 
this point we nnist carry gravel to remote parts of the 
city. To carry a load measuring a cubic yard from 
North Rumford street to distant points beyond the ]\Ierri- 
mack river is costly and slow, for the greater the distance 
from the supply to the unloading point the greater the cost 
and the smaller the amount deposited dail3\ To this 
want of convenient gravel and crushed stone must be 
added the increased cost of construction, in as much as 
there is no method of conveyance other than by teaming. 
It had been thought practicable to make an arrangement 



mayor's address. 11 

with the street railroad whereby crushed stone might be 
conveyed through the city, but an investigation proved that 
this plan would be impracticable. 

Trees. 

Here is a matter that at once challenges our attention 
and invokes our solicitude. Owing to the invasion of 
insect pests the denudation and ultimate destruction of 
our splendid foliage is threatened. Whoever has visited 
the Massachusetts towns where the ravages of the gypsy 
moth and the broAvn-tail moth may be seen will, I am sure, 
approve heartily of our utmost endeavors to stay and to ex- 
terminate this baneful enemy. 

For a year past the commissioner of highways has 
worked diligently to remove the nests. I am troubled con- 
cerning this subject, and yet, owing to the difficulties of 
the case, I am not prepared to suggest any unusual reme- 
dial measures. Unlike disease the moths defy sequestration 
and render of slight avail the repressive attempts on our 
part to deal with the peril. To protect Concord, while all 
the towns around do nothing, is impossible. The state is 
interested in preserving our forests and the state should 
show its interest in protecting the wayside trees which are 
among New Hampshire's greatest charms. Let us trust 
in the wisdom of the legislature to adopt effective meas- 
ures so that the work may be systematic throughout the 
infested districts, and Concord, I am sure, will do all and 
more than has been done in the past to protect our ex- 
quisite foliage. 

Conclusion. 

The present tax rate in the central wards is $22.50 on a 
thousand dollars. Naturally this appears to be a somewhat 
high rate, yet this rate is equalled or exceeded by many 
towns in the state and by several cities. If the present rate 
can be maintained, and I regret to acknowledge that I 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

entertain grave doubts on the subject, Concord taxpayers 
would have but little to complain about, but the increase 
in school expenditures, together with the calls for lights, 
sewers and sidewalks in the newly occupied section of the 
city, are suggestive of increased expenses. The valua- 
tion and population gain gradually, but not enough to 
meet the increasing cost of carrying on the city. 

Exemption from taxation on the part of new industries 
ma.y be of positive benefit to this city, but I doubt 
whether Concord will ever become a manufacturing com- 
munity. It is the home owner, the man or woman attracted 
here because of school facilities or who comes here because 
of Concord's situation and surroundings, that must be a 
source of civic strength now and hereafter. 

Whoever finds interest in an analysis of the Concord tax 
rate is commended to study for a moment this tabulation. 

The rate of $22.50 is made up in this way : 

State tax $2.90 

County tax 3.80 

School tax 4.40 

City tax 4.10 

Union School District tax 3.50 

Street lighting tax 1.50 

Street sprinkling tax 60 

Hydrant tax 60 

Garbage tax 60 

Sewer tax 50 

$22.50 

The first three items amount to $11.10. yet the city 
government has nothing whatever to do with the assess- 
ment; yet subtracting this from $22.50 leaves $11.40 for 
city, precinct and Union School District expenses. 

There are other departments to which reference could 
be made, such as water-works, cemeteries, schools and 
police, l)ut I have nothing to say respecting them except 



mayor's address. 13 

to commend them, for I believe their affairs are carefully 
and efficiently conducted. 

The water-works are in better condition than ever before. 
New and larger iron pipes are fast replacing smaller pipes, 
greater mains are laid, and, to safeguard the purity of Lake 
Penacook, the commissioners have bought several parcels 
of land with dwelling-houses thereon. 

An appropriation of $3,000 has enabled the cemetery 
commissioners to build a granite waiting-house near the 
gateway at Blossom Hill. This is a much desired addition 
and will be appreciated by all. 

The reports of the departments contain in detail an 
account of what has been done and I trust you will give 
them your diligent attention. 

Our revenue, owing to the no-license vote will be con- 
siderably lessened for several years, a fact which you will 
later on understand. It is easy to talk about economy in our 
affairs, yet that means curtailment of appropriations. I 
am sure you will appreciate this. However, we are pledged 
to do the best we can after taking all things into con- 
sideration, bearing always in mind what Concord is, what 
Concord stands for, "and what Concord demands and ex- 
pects. 



Ordinances and Joint Resolutions 

PASSED DURING THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 8, 190r. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
ro be ratsed for the ensuing financial year for the use of 

THE CITY. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum of 
forty-seven thousand dollars ($47,000) to defray the necessary 
expenses and charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which 
together with the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads 
and from other sources shall be appropriated as follows: 



For payment of interest on bonds 

payment of interest on temporary 
interest Cemetery Trust funds 


loan 






$6,420.00 

1,500.00 

658.00 


support of city poor . 
incidentals and land damages 






800.00 
4,000.00 


salaries of members of city council 






2,150.00 


printing and stationery 

aid to Margaret Pillsbury hospital 

decorating the graves of soldiers and 


sailors 




2,000.00 

3,000.00 

460.00 


dependent soldiers, city 
public school text-books 










150.00 
3,500.00 


open air concerts . 

public baths 

Blossom Hill cemetery . 










300.00 

250.00 

1,000.00 


Old North cemetery . 
West Concord cemetery 
Millvillc cemeteiy 
Pine Grove cemetery . 










100.00 
75.00 
75.00 

150.00 


Old Fort cemetery . 










15.00 


Horse Hill cemetery 
Woodlawn cemetery 
Soucook cemetery 
parks .... 
Penacook park 










25.00 

25.00 

20.00 

3,500.00 

125.00 



ORDINANCES. 



15 



Washington square 
repairs buildings . 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Salary of sanitary officer 
Salary of board . 
Fumigation supplies 
Miscellaneous 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



$25.00 
2,000.00 

$32,323.00 



$1,200.00 

75.00 

125.00 

600.00 



.$2,000.00 



Salaries, regular force 












$12,025.00 


Salaries, special .... 












400.00 


Salary, janitor .... 












300.00 


Salary, police commissioners 












150.00 


Telephone, private line 












164.32 


Water 












43.00 


Lights .... 












160.00 


Ice ..... 












5.00 


Board and shoeing horse 












325.00 


Horse hire .... 












30.00 


Helmets and buttons . 












50.00 


Fuel 












525.00 


Incidentals .... 












600.00 




$14,777.32 


PUBLIC LIBRARY. 


Salaries $2,760.00 


Books and incidentals . 












. 2,240.00 



$5,000.00 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, city engineer $1,500.00 

Salary, assistants 1,100.00 

Supplies :150.00 

Eepairs 50.00 

Incidentals 200.00 

$3,000.00 



16 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



General maintenance . 
Salary, commissioner . 
Trees ..... 
Catch basins .... 
Sidewalks and crossings, new 
Sidewalks and crossings, repair 
Permanent work: 

North State street . 

Penacook road 

South Pembroke road . 

South Spring street 



$23,000.00 
1,400.00 
800.00 
1,500.00 
2,000.00 
1,500.00 

1,500.00 

2,500.00 

500.00 

1,000.00 

















$35,700.00 


FIRE DEPARTMENT. 




Salaries, permanent men 


. $7,074.00 


Salaries, semi-annual . 












6,960.00 


Salaries, vacations 














624.50 


Eent, Veterans ' Association 














150.00 


Forage 














1,500.00 


Fuel .... 














900.00 


Lights 














700.00 


Horseshoeing 














325.00 


Horse hire . 














800.00 


Laundry 














52.00 


Fire alarm 














1,000.00 


Water .... 














119.50 


Supplies, chemical 














50.00 


House man . 














80.00 


Incidentals .... 














1,665.00 



$22,000.00 



Mayor ........ 

City clerk ... ..... 

Overseer of poor. Ward 1 . 

Overseer of poor. Ward 2 .... . 

Overseer of poor. Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 
City solicitor ....... 

City treasurer ....... 

City messenger ....... 

Care of city clocks 

Clerk of common council ..... 



$1,000.00 

1,200.00 

30.00 

10.00 

350.00 

500.00 

250.00 

800.00 

110.00 

50.00 



ORDINANCES. 



17 



Board of Education, Union School District . 

Board of Education, District No. 20 . 

Board of Education, Town School District . 

Nine assessors 

Nine moderators . 

Nine ward clerks . 

Twenty-seven selectmen 

Thirty-six inspectors of election 

Twenty-seven supervisors 

Judge police court 

Clerk police court 

Collector of taxes, so much as may be necessary of the 

sum of ... . 
Truant officer 



$250.00 

50.00 

200.00 

2,700.00 

63.00 

90.00 

189.00 

180.00 

216.00 

1,000.00 

200.00 

1,500.00 
500.00 

$11,438.00 



Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of fifty- 
one thousand one hundred ninety-five dollars ($51,195) for the 
support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, together 
with the income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be appropriated and 
divided among the several school districts according to the valuation 
thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 
the cemeteries of the city, one half of the income from the sale of 
lots and the income derived from the care of lots and grading, which 
sum shall be dejjosited by the superintendent or others receiving them 
in the city treasury. The care of lots for which the city holds trust 
funds shall be paid from the money appropriated for care of ceme- 
teries and so much of the income of these trust funds as may be 
thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at the close of 
the year and the remainder, in each instance, credited to the in- 
dividual funds. 

Sect. -1. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 
the use of the public library in the purchase of books, the amount 
collected for fines. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 12, 190G. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants avithin 
the limits of the street sprinkling precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoios: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling 
precinct of said city the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) to 
2 



18 CITY' OF CONCORD. 

defray the necessary expenses and charges of the street sprinkling 
precinct for the ensuing year, which shall be appropriated as fol- 
lows : 

For sprinkling streets ........ $5,000 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE GARBAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the garbage pre- 
cinct of the city, the sum of six thousand dollars ($6,000) to de- 
fray the necessary expenses and charges of the garbage precinct for 
the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said 

precinct $6,000 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 

An Ordinance fixikg and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the city water precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be it ordained by tlie City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoics: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the i)o]ls and ratable estates within the water precinct 
of the city the sum of six thousand dollars ($6,000) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of the water i)recinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For water hydrant service ....... $6,000 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take efl'ect upon its passage. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
Y'EAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 

be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the sewerage pre- 



ORDINANCES. 19 

cinct of said city, tl\e sum of four thousand eiglit hundred sixty 
dollars ($4,860) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows: 

For repairs and construction ...... $1,000 

For interest on notes and bonds ...... 2,360 

For payment of note No. 295 ...... 1,500 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take eft'ect upon its passage. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount op money to 

BE RAISED on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS AVITHIN 
THE LIMITS OP THE PENACCOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSU- 
ING YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Citi/ Council of the City of Concord, as foUows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penaeook sew- 
erage precinct the sum of twenty-two hundred and thirty-five dol- 
lars ($2,235) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . . . $1,300 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds ........ 635 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said precinct . 300 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE RAISED on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY' AND INHABITANTS AVITHIN 
the LIMITS OF ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foiloirs: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the St. Paul's 
School sewerage precinct the sum of six hundi^d sixty-five dollars 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

($665) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as fol- 
lows ; 

Tor the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . . . $500 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds ......... 120 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said precinct . 45 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the east concord sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained hy the Citij Council of the City of Concord, as foUoios: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord 
sewerage precinct the sum of one hundred thirty-five dollars ($135) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . . . $100 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds ......... 35 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall t^ke eft'cct upon its passage.. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the avest concord sewerage precinct for 
the ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of ihc City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Tliere shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord 
sewerage precinct the sum of fifteen hundred ninety-five and fifty 
one-hundredths dollars ($1,595.50) to defray the necessary expenses 



ORDINANCES. 21 

and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which 
shall be appropriated as follows: 

Tor the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund . . $1,000.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 595.50 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the tajcable property and inhabitants ayithin 
the limits of the lighting precinct for the ensuing year. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section ]. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the lighting pre- 
cinct of said city, the sum of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of the precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets $15,000 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

be RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS AVITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE EAST CONCORD LIGHTING PRECINCT FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord 
lighting precinct the sum of tAvo hundred dollars ($200) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting of streets within said precinct . . . $200 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 9, 1906. 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance to borrow money in aid of union school district 
IN concord. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the Cit>i of Concord, as follows' 

Section 1. That coupon bonds of the City of Concord, amount- 
ing to the sum of one hundred and nineteen thousand dollars ($119,- 
000), be issued and delivered to Union School District, in Concord, 
in accordance with the request and upon the terms contained in 
resolutions adopted by its voters at a special meeting of said district 
held on June 1, 1905, and the vote of the district passed at its annual 
meeting held on March 29, 1906, providing an additional appropria- 
tion for the West Concord school building. 

Said bonds shall be signed by the mayor and city treasurer and 
countersigned by the city clerk. 

Said bonds shall be dated July 2, 1906, of the denomination of 
one thousand dollars ($1,000) each, and be payable as follows: 

$8,000 thereof July 1, 1915. 
$8,000 thereof July 1, 1916. 
$8,000 thereof July 1, 1918. 
$8,000 thereof July 1, 1919. 
$8,000 thereof July 1, 1920. 
$8,000 thereof July 1, 1921. 
$8,000 thereof July 1, 1922. 
$10,000 thereof July 1, 1923.- 
$5,000 thereof July 1, 1924. 
$5,000 thereof July 1, 1925. 
$5,000 thereof July 1, 1926. 
$5,000 thereof July 1, 1927. 
$•4,000 thereof July 1, 1928. 
$10,000 thereof July 1, 1929. 
$10,000 thereof July 1, 1930. 
$9,000 thereof July 1, 1931. 

The interest on said bonds shall be at the rate of three and one- 
half per cent. (3i/> per cent.) per annum, payable semi-annually on 
the first days of January and July in each year, at the First 
National bank, in Boston, Mass., and the office of the city treasurer, 
in the said city of Concord, upon presentation of said coupons. 

Sect. 2. The treasurer is hereby authorized to procure proposals 
for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized, and such bids as seem 
for the best interest of the city shall be accepted by him, provided 
the same are approved by the finance committee. 

Sect. 3. All of said bonds, while owned by citizens of said 



ORDINANCES. , 23 

City of Concord, shall be exemj^t from taxation, as provided by law. 

Sect. 4. The mayor and treasurer are authorized to execute in 
the name and behalf of the city, such agreements, in writing, be- 
tween it and said district as they may deem necessary and advisable 
to protect the rights of the respective parties, growing out of this 
transaction. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

Passed May 14, 1906. 



An Ordixaxce relating to junk dealers. 

Whereas, In previous years, junk dealers' licenses have been 
granted in some instances to be exercised at points within the com- 
pact 2)art of the city, and sundry applications have been made to 
the board of mayor and aldermen for such licenses for the current 
year to be exercised at points within the compact i:)art of the city, 
and 

Whereas, In the opinion of the city council, the accumulation and 
storage of old junk and worn-out and discarded materials within the 
compact part of the city is unnecessary, and so enhances the risks 
of fire and contagious disease and is otherwise so incompatible with 
the safety and welfare of the city that no licenses ought hereafter to 
be granted permitting such accumulation and storage Avithin the 
compact part of the city, now therefore 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. No person shall keep or maintain a shop or other 
place for the purchase, sale or barter of old junk, old metals, old or 
second-hand bottles or other such second-hand articles, refuse, or 
waste, within the limits of the city hereinafter described, nor shall 
any dealer in such articles accumulate or store any of the same at 
any place within such limits. 

The limits of the city above referred to are hereby fixed as fol- 
lows: Beginning at the intersection of the center lines of Pleas- 
ant and Tuttle streets; thence in a straight line to a point in the 
easterly line of Aubvirn street two hundred feet northerly from the 
north line of Franklin street; thence easterly on a line two hundred 
feet north of and parallel with the northerly line of Franklin street 
to a point two hundred feet west of the westerly line of Eumford 
street ; thence northerly on a line two hundred feet west of and 
parallel with the westerly line of Eumford street to the center line 
of Penacook street; thence easterly by the center line of Pena- 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

cook street to the main track of the Boston & Maine railroad, 
Concord division; thence southerly by the easterly main tracks of 
the Concord and Southern divisions of said Boston & Maine railroad 
to a point two hundred feet easterly of the highway near the junction 
of South Main and Water streets ; thence southerly on a line two 
hundred feet easterly of and parallel with the easterly line of Water 
street to the center line of Hammond street; thence westerly by the 
center line of Hammond street to Hall street; thence in a straight 
line to the intersection of the center lines of South Main and 
Eockinghani streets; thence westerly by the center line of Eocking- 
ham street to a point two hundred feet west of the westerly line of 
Bow street ; thence in a straight line to a point in the northerly 
line of Clinton street two hundred feet west of the westerly line of 
South Fruit street ; thence, northerly on a line two hundred feet west 
of and parallel with the westerly line of South Fruit street to a 
point eight hundred feet south of the southerly line of Pleasant 
street ; thence westerly on a line eight hundred feet south of and 
parallel with the southerly line of Pleasant street to the center line 
of Tuttle street; thence northerly by the center line of Tuttle street 
to the point of beginning. 

Sect. 2. Any person violating the provisions of section 1 of this 
ordinance shall be fined not exceeding ten dollars, and each day's 
continuance of such violation shall be deemed a separate offense. 

Sect. 3. Nothing herein contained shall be construed to affect 
the powers or duties of the board of mayor and aldermen under 
chapter 124 of the Public Statutes as adopted by chapter 9 of the 
Eevised Ordinances and by an ordinance passed August 14, 1905, ex- 
cept that no license shall be issued thereunder permitting the ac- 
cumulation or storage of any of the articles above specified at a 
place within the limits of the city above set out. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Provided, hoicever, that persons holding and exercising junk 
dealers' licenses at points within the limits of the city above de- 
scribed for the year ending March 31, 1906, shall have sixty days 
from the passage hereof in which to remove their materials from 
said limits before they shall become subject to the penalty herein 
prescribed. 

Passed June 11, 1906. 



An Ordinance relative to the public health. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of tJic City of Concord, as foUoios: 

Section 1. All matters relating to the public health of the city 
shall be under the control of a board of health, consisting of the 



ORDINANCES. 25 

mayor, who shall be chairman, the city physician and a third mem- 
ber who shall forthwith be appointed by the mayor with the ap- 
proval of the city council in joint convention for the remainder of 
the present municipal term. At the commencement of each suc- 
ceeding municipal term and whenever a vacancy shall exist, a third 
member of such board shall be appointed in like manner, who shall 
hold oflfiee until the end of the municipal term during which he is 
appointed and until his successor is appointed. Such board shall 
consider all matters relative to the public health which in their 
judgment call for action on the part of the city council, or which 
may be referred to them by the city council, the sanitary officer or 
the city physician, and make recommendation with reference thereto, 
and shall perform such other duties as may be imposed upon them 
by this ordinance or by the laws of the state, and such as are im- 
posed upon the present board of health by any ordinance not hereby 
repealed. 

Sect. 2. The city council shall, at the commencement of each 
municipal term, elect a sanitary officer, who shall hold his office for 
two years and until his successor is chosen and qualified, subject, 
however, to removal at any time by vote of the city council. Vacan- 
cies in said office shall be filled for the remainder of the municipal 
term by new elections, and an election shall be held forthwith to fill 
the existing vacancy for the remainder of the present term. 

Sect. 3. The sanitary officer shall devote his entire time to the 
performance of the duties imposed upon him by virtue of his office, 
and shall serve all orders and notices, and enforce all rules and 
regulations issued by the city council or the board of health, and 
enforce all ordinances and rules relating to nuisances or other con- 
ditions affecting the health and comfort of the public. 

Sect. 4. The sanitary officer shall, under the direction of the 
board of health, in the first week of May, commence a systematic 
house-to-house sanitary inspection, which shall continue vmtil- the 
inspection of the, city is completed. The sanitary officer shall re- 
quire the abatement within a reasonable time of all nuisances 
found; and shall give such advice and make such recommendations 
to householders and others as he may deem necessary to secure good 
sanitary conditions. 

Sect. 5. The board of health shall prescribe a blank form upon 
which a complete record of the inspections made by the sanitary 
officer shall be entered; a record shall also be kept by the sanitary 
officer of all complaints made to him, or to the board ; of all orders 
issued, of all notices served, and of all nuisances abated. All the 
records kept by the sanitary officer shall be submitted to the board of 
health, or the city council whenever called for, and shall at the 
end of each fiscal year be placed in the hands of the city clerk. 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 6. The sanitary officer shall see that all the provisious of 
the ordiuanee regulating or relating to sewers or drains are enforced. 
He shall inspect all private drains laid by any licensed drain layer 
before the same are covered, and shall report monthly to the board of 
health and to the committee on sewers and drains the result of 
said inspection, giving the name of the owner and of the occupant 
of the premises, the street and number, the position of the inlet em- 
ployed, the size of the drain, inclination of the same and the manner 
in which it enters the main sewer, and shall perform such other 
duties in the enforcement of the provisions of said ordinance as may 
be authorized by the board of health, or the committee on sewers; 
he shall also enforce the provisions of the city ordinances relating to 
the pollution of the water of Penacook lake. In case any licensed 
drain layer shall have completed his excavating, and on account of an 
approaching storm or other urgent cause, there is necessity that the 
work should be immediately connected and back filled, any member 
of the committee on sewers and drains may be required to act in 
place of the sanitary officer, if, from any cause, said sanitary officer 
is unable to be present. 

Sect. 7. No person shall place or leave, or cause to be placed or 
left, in or near any highway, street, alley, or public place, or in any 
pond or other body of water where the current will not remove the 
same, any rubbish, dirt, soot, ashes, hay, shreds, oyster, clam, or 
lobster shells, manure, swill, tin cans, decaying fruit or vegetables, 
waste water, or any refuse animal or vegetable matter whatsoever, 
nor keep in or about any vacant lot, dwelling-house, barn, shed, store, 
shop or cellar, any of the aforesaid substances after the same have 
become putrid or offensive, or a menace to the public health. 

Sect. 8. No person or persons shall suffer or permit any cellar, 
vault, private drain, pool, sink, privy, sewer, or other place upon any 
premises or grounds belonging to or occupied by him or them, to 
become offensive or injurious to the public health. 

Sect. 9. No person or occupant, or any person having control 
or charge of any lot, tenement, premises, building, or other place, 
shall cause or permit any nuisance to be or remain in or upon said 
lot, tenement building, or other place, or between the same and the 
center of the street, lane or alley adjoining. 

Sect. 10. No person or persons shall erect, maintain or use within 
the compact part of any ward in the city, any swill-house, or building 
for rendering any offal, tainted or damaged lard, tallow, or any 
putrid animal substance, or for the deposit of green pelts or skins. 

Sect. 11. No person or persons shall keep or use any hog-pen, 
goat-pen, chicken-coop, or barn-yard so near to any highway, park, 
or other public place, as to be offensive or a menace to the public 



ORDINANCES. 27 

health, or adjoining or abutting any lot upon which any other person 
resides, if so near tlieni as to be offensive, or in such manner that 
the contents of such hog-pen, goat-pen, chicken-coop, or barn-yard are 
discharged upon said lot or upon any street, lane or alley in the city. 

Sect. 12. The owner, agent, occupant, or other person having 
the care of any tenement used as a dwelling-house, or any other 
building, shall furnish the same with a sufficient drain, under ground, 
to carry off the waste water; antl also ^vith a suitable privy, which, 
if not properly connected with the public sewer, shall have a vault 
which shall be sunk underground, and built in the manner herein- 
after prescribed, and of capacity proportionate to the number of in- 
habitants of such tenement, or of those having occasion to use such 
privy; and no person shall suffer any waste or stagnant water to re- 
main in any cellar or upon any land by him owned or occupied, in 
the compact part of any ward of the cit}'. 

Sect. 13. All vaults, privies, and cesspools shall be so constructed 
that the inside of the same shall be at least two feet distant from 
the line of every adjoining lot, unless the owner of said adjoining lot 
shall otherwise agree and consent; and a like distance from any 
street, lane, alley, court, square, public jjlace, public or private pas- 
sageway. Every vault and cesspool shall be made tight, so that the 
contents cannot escape therefrom, and shall be securely covered; and 
no person shall open a vault, privy, or cesspool, or remove the con- 
tents thereof, or haul such contents through any street in the city, 
between the first day of May and the first day of November inclu- 
sive, except between the hours of nine o'clock in the evening and six 
o'clock in the morning. 

Sect. 14. Any person or persons intending to construct a privy, 
vault or cesspool shall first obtain a written permit to do so, signed 
by the sanitary officer. Each permit shall designate the location on « 
the lot, the distance from any house, well or spring, the kind of 
vault or cesspool and the depth thereof, and shall contain a printed 
abstract of the state law and city ordinances relating to the con- 
struction of pri-^-y vaults and cesspools; but no cesspool for the re- 
ception of sink or other waste water shall be constructed within one 
hundred feet of a public sewer; and no abandoned Avell shall be used 
as a privy vault, cesspool, or sink. 

Sect. 15. When any vault, privy, cesspool, or drain shall become 
offensive or obstructed, the same shall be cleansed and made free; 
and the owner, agent, occupant, or other person having charge of 
the premises in which any vault, privy, cesspool, or drain may be 
situated, the state or condition of which shall be a violation of the 
provisions of this ordinance, shall remove, cleanse, alter, amend, or 
repair the same within such reasonable time after notice in writ- 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ing to that effect from the sanitary officer, as shall be expressed in 
such notice. In case of neglect or refusal so to do, the sanitary 
officer may cause the same to be removed, altered, amended or re- 
paired, as he may deem expedient, at the expense of the owner, agent, 
occupant or other person as aforesaid. 

Sect. 16. The owner, agent, occupant, or other person having 
the care of any stable, barn, premises, or any other place where 
manure, swill, garbage, or any other animal or vegetable substances 
accumulate, shall cause the same to be removed at such stated 
periods as the sanitary officer may designate. 

Sect. 17. The prudential committee, or boards of education, shall 
not admit any scholar into the public schools without satisfactory 
evidence that such scholar has been vaccinated; and the city phy- 
sician shall at all times be prepared to vaccinate, at the expense of 
the city, any scholar who is unable to pay therefor. 

Sect. 18. It shall be and is hereby made the duty of every 
physician, surgeon, or other person attending upon a case of small- 
pox, epidemic cholera, epidemic dysentery, diphtheria, scarlet fever, 
typhoid fever, measles, yellow fever, or other dangerous, contagious, 
infectious, or pestilential disease, and of every householder, attendant, 
or agent, in whose house a case of any such disease occurs, to re- 
port every such case to the sanitary officer, within twenty-four 
hours after first having knowledge of the same, giving the number 
of the house, the street, avenue, or lane upon which it is situated, 
and the name of the occupant or occupants, with the name and age 
of the diseased person, if known. The board of health shall pre- 
scribe a course of action which shall be followed by the sanitary 
officer in all ordinary cases to prevent the spread of such disease; 
all cases of smallpox, and diphtheria, and others, not covered by the 
general instructions shall be at once reported by the sanitary officer 
to said board, who shall take such further or different action as they 
may deem expedient, and who may in cases of emergency, with the 
approval of the finance committee of the city council, employ, at the 
expense of the city, such medical advice and assistance, in addition 
to the services of the city physician, as in their judgment may be 
necessary. 

Sect. 19. All petitions for the cleansing, removing, or abate- 
ment of any nuisance shall be made to the sanitary officer, verbally or 
in writing, stating distinctly the character of such nuisance, the 
premises where situated, and the reason for its removal or abate- 
ment, but if it becomes necessary to institute legal proceedings 
against the party or parties complained of, the complainants shall, 
before such proceedings are instituted, file a complaint in writing 
with the city council. 



ORDINANCES. 29 

Sect. 20. A notice served on an owner, agent, or occupant of any 
property, or left at the private residence of the owner, or agent, 
or occupant, or, if after due search neither can be found, posted on 
the front door or wall or fence of such property, and a like notice 
sent to his last known post-office address, shall be considered sufficient 
and ample notice. 

Sect. 21. The sanitary officer shall have the same power to make 
arrests as is by ordinance and law conferred upon the regular police 
of the city, in all cases where any person or persons shall violate the 
laws of the state, city ordinances, rules, or regulations relating to the 
health of the city; and shall wear a uniform or badge to be pre- 
scribed by the city council. 

Sect. 22. The board of health shall provide themselves and the 
sanitary officer with such blanks and record books at the expense of 
the city as are necessary, and shall, at the close of each financial 
year, make a report to the city council of all complaints made to 
them or to the sanitary officer, and the cause for the same, with such 
suggestions pertaining to the health of the city as they may deem 
expedient to present, so much of the vital statistics as is necessary, 
the causes of death so far as possible, and such other sanitary in- 
formation as may be called for by the city council. 

Sect. 23. The board of health may make such rules and regula- 
tions for the prevention and removal of nuisances, for the control 
and restriction of infectious and contagious diseases, and such other 
relations relating to the public health as in their judgment the health 
and safety of the people may require. Copies thereof shall be 
printed and circulated among the citizens, and published in one or 
more of the daily papers of the city. 

Sect. 24. The board of health shall meet at such times and 
places as it may deem necessary, for the consideration of matters 
relating to the public health or whenever requested by the sanitary 
officer; they shall investigate, inquire into, and advise in all cases 
referred to them for such purpose by the sanitary officer or the city 
physician and shall direct them in such eases. In case the sani- 
tary officer is unable to attend to the duties of his office, through 
sickness or other good cause, the board may select a suitable person 
to act temporarily in his stead, and said person shall, while so acting 
possess all the authority, with the same compensation given the 
sanitary officer under the provisions of the city ordinances. 

Sect. 25. Any person or persons, company or corporation, who 
shall violate or cause to be violated, by agent or otherwise, any 
provision of this ordinance, or any order, rule or regulation made by 
the sanitary officer or the board of health, under the authority of 
this ordinance, shall upon conviction thereof, before the police or 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

other court of competent jurisdiction, be fined not less than three 
dollars and not more than twenty dollars, with the costs of prosecu- 
tion, for each offense, except in cases where the punishment is 
provided for by the laws of the state, in which cases the penalty so 
prescribed shall be imposed. 

Sect. 26. Chapter 14 and section 22 of chapter 30, Eevised 
Ordinances, are hereby repealed. This ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage, and upon such passage the powers and duties of 
the present board of health shall cease. 

Passed January 14, 1907. 



An Ordinance relative to the city physicians. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. The city council shall, biennially, at the commence- 
ment of each municipal term, elect a city physician and one assistant 
city physician, who shall hold their offices until their successors are 
chosen unless sooner removed by the city council. Vacancies in said 
offices shall be filled by new elections. The assistant city physician 
shall discharge the duties imposed upon said physicians by this 
ordinance within the limits of Ward One. In all other parts of the 
city, said duties shall be discharged by the city physician. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of said physicians to attend upon 
sick paupers and all patients under the care of the city authorities, 
including those in quarantine, when called to act by the overseers of 
the poor, or by the sanitary officer of the city or the board of health, 
and to vaccinate all persons required by the city ordinances to be 
vaccinated at the expense of tlie city, and to perform such other 
professional services as may reasonably be required of them by the 
board of health, the board of mayor and aldermen or the city 
council. 

Sect. 3. The city physicians, in aildition to the amount received 
from the county for attendance on county paupers, shall receive in 
full for all services such salary as the city (founcil may from time to 
time fix and determine. 

Sect. 4. Unless otherwise directed by the board of health with 
the approval of the finance committee of the city council, no physi- 
cians other than the city physicians shall be employed. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect on January 21, 1907. 

Passed January 14, 1907. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 31 

An Ordinance fixing the salaries of the city physicians. 

Be it ordained hij tlie City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. The city physicians, in addition to the amount re- 
ceived from the county for attendance on county paupers, shall re- 
ceive in full for their services the following sums: city physician, 
four hundre.d and fifty dollars per annum; assistant city physician, 
fifty dollars per annum. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect on January 21, 1907. 

Passed January 14, 1907. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

A Joint Eesolution appropriating twenty-one and eighty-six 
one-hundredths dollars to reimburse JOHN flynn for taxes 
paid by mistake. 

Besolved by the City Council of th.c City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of tweuty-one and eighty-six hundredths dollars be, 
and the same hereby is, appropriated to reimburse John Flynn of 
Concord, N. H., for taxes paid to the City of Concord for the year 
1905 by mistake. The sum hereby appropriated shall be charged to 
the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed February ]2, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and 
seventy-five dollars ($175) for the purchase of one seagrave 
trussed ladder for use of fire department, avard one. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred and seventy-five dollars ($175) be, 
and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated for the purchase of one Seagrave 
trussed ladder, fifty-four feet in length, for the use of the fire de- 
partment. Ward One, such purchase to be made by the committee on 
fire department, together with the chief engineer. This sum shall be 
charged to the expenses of the fire department. 

Passed February 12, 1906. 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Joint Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing 

ft.ND BINDING THE ANNUAL CITY REPORTS. 

Besolvecl by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUows: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to advertise for 
sealed proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the 
year 1905, and submit the same to the finance committee, who shall 
have full power to act in the matter. Proposals to be confined to 
citizens of Concord doing business in this city. 

Passed February 12, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and 

BUILDINGS TO REPORT ON THE CONDITIONS AT CENTRAL FIRE STATION 
AND TO RECOMMEND CHANGES AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Besolvecl by the City Council of the City of Concord, a^ follows: 

That the committee on lands and buildings are hereby authorized 
and requested to examine into the conditions relating to the placing 
of the horses at Central fire station and to report such changes as in 
the opinion of the committee will conduce to more modern and 
satisfactory condition. 

Passed February 12, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing the appropriation of an 

AMOUNT not to EXCEED THREE THOUSAND DOLLARS FROM THE CEME- 
TERY FUND FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A WAITING HOUSE AT BLOS- 
SOM HILL. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUows: 

That an amount not to exceed three thousand dollars be, and the 
same is, hereby appropriated out of the money known as the Cemetery 
Fund for the purpose of constructing a waiting house at Blossom 
Hill, the said amount, or so much thereof as shall be required, to be 
expended by the commissioners of cemeteries. 

Passed March 12, 1900. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to the sale of land formerly 

OCCUPIED FOR city STABLES. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the mayor and the committee on lands and buildings are 
hereby authorized to sell by auction or by private sale the land for- 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 33 

merly occupied for city stables situated between School and Center 
streets and containing about forty thousand square feet, and the 
mayor is hereby authorized to execute in the name of the city, 
proper deeds therefor. 
Passed March 12, 1906. 



A Joint Eesolutiox in aid of local military companies. 
Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoivs: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200) is hereby appropriated 
from money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the 
assistance of Companies C and E, Second Infantry, N. H. N. G. 
This money shall be paid one hundred dollars ($100) to each com- 
pany. 

Passed March 12, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to the use of the aldermen and 

THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS BY THE SUPERIOR COURT. 

Resolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Should it become necessary for Merrimack county to procure a 
place for holding the April term of court, that the use of the alder- 
men and council chambers be granted to the County of Merrimack for 
the purpose of holding the April term of the superior court. 

That the county be charged the sum of five dollars per day for 
each day or fraction of a day used and for any extra janitor ser- 
vice found necessary, the city reserving the right to the apartments 
for meetings of the city government. 

Passed March 12, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution rescinding joint resolution passed Novem- 
ber 13, 1905, relative to purchase of a modern hook and lad- 
der TRUCK AND APPURTENANCES FOR USE AT CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 

Eesolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the purchase of a modern hook and ladder truck and ap- 
purtenances for use at Central fire station, authorized by joint 
resolution passed November 13, 1905, not having been made at the 
close of the fiscal year 1905, the joint resolution is hereby rescinded. 

Passed April 9, 1906. 
3 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Joint Resolution appropriating a sum not exceeding twelve 

HUNDRED DOLLARS ($1,200) FOR THE PURCHASE OF A MODERN HOOK 
AND LADDER TRUCK AND APPURTENANCES. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That a sum not exceeding twelve hundred dollars ($1,200) be, and 
hereby is, appropriated, out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for the pui'chase of a- new hook and ladder truck 
of modern design, together with a set of attachable steel sleigh 
runners for the same and a track for the same to run on when 
equipped with runners, to replace the truck now in use at the 
Central fire station. 

The money hereby appropriated shall be expended under the 
direction of the mayor and the chief engineer of tho fire department, 
who are hereby constituted a committee with full power to purchase 
said new hook and ladder truck and appurtenances and to make such 
disposition of the old truck as they shall deem best. 

This sum shall be charged to the expense of the fire department. 

Passed April 9, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating a sum not to exceed four hun- 
dred DOLLARS TO PAY FOR A NEW BOILER AT CITY LIBRARY. 

Eesolvcd by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a sum not to exceed four hundred dollars be, and the same is, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the payment of a new boiler in city library. 

Passed April 9, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating four dollars and twenty- 
eight CENTS ($4.28) TO reimburse ARTHUR J. CURTIS FOR TAXES 
PAID BY MISTAKE. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of four dollars and twenty-eight cents ($-1.28) be, 
and hereby is, appropriated to reimburse Arthur J. Curtis, of Con- 
cord, for taxes paid by him to the City of Concord for the year 1904, 
the same having been erroneously assessed. The amount hereby ap- 
propriated shall be charged to the account of incidentals and land 
damages. 

Passed Aj.ril 9, 1906. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 35 

A Joint Resolution account repairs at fire station, avard one. 
Besolfcd by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of seven hundred dollars ($700) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated from money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for the purpose of raising the roof of stable at fire station, Ward 
One, one story, and providing a suitable loft for hay, grain, etc., the 
money to be expended by and under the direction of the committee on 
lands and buildings. 

Passed May 14, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing alfred clark, street commis- 
sioner, TO RELEASE AND DISCHARGE THE BOSTON & MAINE RAILROAD 
FROM ALL LIABILITY FOR INJURIES TO A HORSE BELONGING TO THE 
CITY OP CONCORD ON DECEMBER 30, 1905. 

Eesolied by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoivs: 

That Alfred Clark, street commissioner, is hereby authorized to re- 
lease and discharge the Boston & Maine railroad from all liability 
on account of injuries sustained by a horse, named Dick, belonging 
to the city, on December 30, 1905, by reason of being run into by 
an electric car belonging to the Boston & Maine railroad, upon pay- 
ment by the Boston & Maine railroad to the City of Concord of 
thirty-eight dollars and fifty cents ($38.50). 

Passed May 14, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution exempting from taxation the capital and 

PROPERTY of THE CRESCENT AVORSTED COMPANY FOR A TERM OF TEN 
YEARS. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Whereas, It is represented that the Crescent Worsted Com- 
pany, a corporation duly established by law, engaged in the busi- 
ness of manufacturing worsted yarns and other fabrics, and having 
its principal place of business at Lawrence, Mass., is intending to 
invest new capital, enlarge its business, and establish a branch of 
said business in this city and continue the same here as a permanent 
business, provided it can obtain an exemption from taxation of the 
capital invested therein; and 

Whereas, It is expected that such new enterprise will be of special 
benefit to this city and the citizens thereof; now, therefore. 



36 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Voted, That the manufacturing establishment to be owned or put 
in operation by said Crescent Worsted Company in Ward Three in 
this city, and the capital invested by said company therein, and the 
capital used by said company in operating the same, be and hereby 
are exempted from taxation for the term of ten years from the date 
of the passage of this resolution, according to the provisions of the 
Public Statutes of New Hampshire. 

Passed May 14, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating twenty-nine hundred thirty- 
four AND thirty-eight ONE-HUNDREDTHS DOLLARS ($2,934.38) TO 
PAY" FOR the real ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY OP CONCORD FOR UNPAID 
TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1905. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloios: 

That the sum of twenty-nine hundred thirty-four and thirty-eight 
one-hundredths dollars ($2,934.38) be, and the same hereby is, ap- 
propriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise ap- 
propriated, to pay the amount due from the City of Concord for real 
estate purchased at the tax collector's sale of real estate for the 
unpaid taxes for the year 1905. 

Passed June 11, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to coal, wood and ice. 
Resolved l}y the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the committee on finance be, and hereby are, directed to ask 
for bids for supplying the city with coal, wood and ice for the ensu- 
ing year, and that said committee have full power to acccjit or reject 
any bids offered. 

Passed June 11, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to band concerts for the season 
OF 1906. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That in accordance with custom the mayor is authorized and 
directed to contract with Artluir F. Nevers for band concerts during 
the season of 1906, the concerts to be given in the different wards. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 37 

three concerts in Old City Hall park, two in Ward One, one in Ward 
Two, two in Ward Three, two at Eollins park, and two at White 
park. 

Passed Jnne 11, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution in relation to flowers around memorial 

ARCH. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That in accordance with custom the mayor is authorized to procure 
the setting out of flowers in front of the Memorial Arch. 
Passed June 11, 1906. 



A Joint Eesolution authorizing and instructing the city treas- 
urer to pay out of the cemetery trust funds, the following 
SUM, TO wit: five thousand dollars ($5,000) bridge bonds, due 
JULY 1, 1906. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUotvs: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized and instructed 
to pay out of cemetery trust funds the following sum, to wit: Five 
thousand dollars ($5,000) to pay bridge bonds, due July 1, 1906. 

Passed June 11, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating the sum op four hundred and 

NINETY' dollars ($490) FOR THE PURCHASE OF A HOSE AVAGON FOR 
ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs : 

That the sum of four hundred and ninety dollars ($490) be, and 
the same is, hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for the purchase of a hose wagon for 
Alert Hose Company, No. 2, and the committee on fire department is 
hereby authorized to contract for the building of the same. 

Passed Juno 11, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution to reimburse the cataract engine company^, 
NO. 3, west concord, for money' expended for one swing har- 
ness FOR the use of said COMPANY'. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of thirty dollars ($30) be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated to reimburse the Cataract Engine Company, No. 3, of West 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Concord, for one swing harness bought by said company for use with 
the hose wagon. The amount hereby appropriated sliall be charged 
to the account of incidentals and land damages. 
Passed July 9, 1906. 



A Joint Eesolution in relation to loan of settees to the con- 
cord Y. M. C. A. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city messenger be, and hereby is, authorized to deliver 
to the secretary of the Concord Y. M. C. A. a reasonable number of 
settees now in city hall not to exceed thirty for use at the open air 
meetings held by the Y. M. C. A. at Eollins park, the settees to be 
returned to the city messenger at the close of said meetings. 

Passed July 9, 1906. 



A Joint Eesolution making additional appropriation to the 

ACCOUNT OF PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That eight hundred dollars ($800) be, and the same is, hereby ap- 
propriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise ap- 
propriated and credited to the account of printing and stationery. 

Passed July 9, 1906. 



A Joint Eesolution authorizing the mayor to execute and 

DELIVER to the PENACOOK PARK GRANGE HALL ASSOCIATION A DEED 
OF CERTAIN LAND IN WEST CONCORD. 

Besolved, by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Tliat the mayor, Charles E. Corning, is hereby authorized and 
directed to execute and deliver to the Penacook Park Grange Hall 
association a deed from the City of Concord of the following 
land with the buildings thereon, to wit: Beginning on the north 
side of the road leading from West Concord to Hopkinton at the in- 
tersection of the Boston & Main^ railroad, Concord division, there- 
with; thence running westerly along said highway two hundred and 
forty-one and one-tenth feet to a stone bound; thence running 
north seventy-two degrees east one hundred seventeen and seven- 
tenths feet to a stone bound; thence running south seventy 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 39 

degrees east eighty-one feet to a stone bound; thence south- 
erly by the land of said Boston & Maine railroad, Concord 
division, one hundred forty-four feet to a stone bound at the 
point of beginning. Meaning and intending to convey hereby the 
same premises conveyed to the City of Concord by the Union School 
District by deed dated June 30, 1905. The consideration for said 
land and building being $1,200. Said deed shall contain a reserva- 
tion of the school seats and heating apparatus in said building with 
the right for the Union School District to remove the same there- 
from. 

Passed July 9, 1906. 



A Joint Eesolution authorizing the mayor to execute and de- 
liver TO IONE B. CLARK A DEED OF THE KIT FACTORY PROPERTY, SO 
CALLED, CONTAINING FIVE AND SIXTY-EIGHT ONE-HUNDREDTH S ACRES. 

Besolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the mayor, Charles R. Corning, is hereby authorized and 
directed to execute and deliver to lone B. Clark a deed from the City 
of Concord of the Kit Factory property, so called, in West Concord, 
containing five and sixty-eight one-hundredths acres. Said deed to 
contain a reservation of the Kit Factory road and of the right for 
the City of Concord to maintain the sewers already on said land and 
to enter said land at any time for the purpose of relaying or repair- 
ing said sewers. 

Passed July 9, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating money'' for permanent improve- 
ments ON STATE AND MAIN STREETS. 

Eesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of eight thousand dollars, or such part 
thereof as may be necessary, be and is hereby appropriated, from 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the fol- 
lowing purposes, viz. : A sum not exceeding five thousand dollars to 
be added to an equal sum to be furnished by Irving C. Tomlinson and 
others for permanent improvements upon State street from Pleasant 
street northerly, and south of Franklin street; a sum not exceeding 
three thousand dollars for permanent improvements on Main street 
between School and Warren streets ; the same to be expended under 
direction of the commissioner of highways. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its jiassage. 

Passed August 7, 1906. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Joint Eesolution relating to the discontinuance of certain 

PRACTICE BY FIRE DEPARTMENT COMPANIES. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the practice by the various fire department companies of pre- 
senting to the city council petitions for reimbursement for various 
articles purchased by them for use in the fire department shall be 
discontinued ; 

That the chief of the fire department notify the captains of the 
various companies of the passage of this resolution ; 

That this resolution take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 13, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution providing for the printing of a report 

THIS DAY submitted BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as foUoics: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to cause two 
hundred (200) copies of the report this day submitted by the com- 
mittee on finance upon a ' ' Joint Eesolution providing for a state- 
ment of the city debt " to be printed for the use of the city council 
and other officials, all persons who may be interested therein, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the account of printing and 
stationery. 

Passed August 13, 1906. 



A ,ToiNT Resolution in amendment of a joint resolution passed 

august 7, appropriating money for PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS 
ON STATE AND MAIN STREETS. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a joint resolution passed August 7, appropriating money for 
permanent improvements on State and ]\Iain streets be amended as 
follows: Strike out in section 1 all after the words " "Warren 
streets" and substitute therefor the following: The same to be 
expended under the direction of the committee on finance who shall 
call for bids for the work of construction, said committee to have 
the power to accept or reject any bids. 

Passed August 13, 1906. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 41 

A Joint Eesolution appropriating the sum of four thousand 

DOLLARS ($4,000) FOR INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Sesolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of four thousand dollars ($4,000) be, and the same 
is, hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed September 10, .1906. 



A Joint Eesolution providing for a temporary loan of two hun- 
dred AND fifty dollars ($2.50) FOR THE USE OF THE WEST CON- 
CORD sewer precinct. 

Besolved by tlie City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

Section 1. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized and 
directed to procure by loan, on the credit of the city, the sum of two 
hundred fifty dollars ($250) for the use of the West Concord sewer 
precinct. 

Sect. 2. The amount thus raised shall be charged to said West 
Concord sewer precinct and said precinct shall raise by taxation a 
sum sufficient to pay said amount and the interest thereon. 

Passed October 8, 1906. 



A Joint Eesolution making additional appropriation to the 
account of health department. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That five hundred dollars ($500) be, and the same is, hereby ap- 
propriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise ap- 
propriated, and credited to the incidental account of health depart- 
ment. 

Passed November 12, 1906. 



A Joint Eesolution appropriating two thousand three hun- 
dred dollars ($2,300) FOR the use of the fire department. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the sum of two thousand three hundred dollars ($2,300) be, 
and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, for the repairing of Governor Hill steamer, 
No. 4, and the purchase of a horse for the hook and ladder truck. 

Passed November 12, 1906. 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Joint Eesolution authorizing the conversion into cash of a 

PORTION OF THE BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY PERMANENT FUND, TO 
REIMBURSE THE TREASURY FOR MONEY PAID OUT ON ACCOUNT OF 
THE NEW WAITING ROOM AT SAID CEMETERY. 

Resolved hi/ the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloics: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized and directed 
to convert into cash an amount not exceeding three thousand dollars 
of the Blossom Hill Cemetery permanent fund, and to turn said sum 
when so realized into the treasury on general account, for the i)ur- 
pose of reimbursing the treasury for a like sum heretofore drawn 
therefrom and charged against said fund, in accordance with a joint 
resolution passed March 12, 1906, to pay for the new waiting room at 
said Blossom Hill cemetery. 

Passed December 10, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating eighteen and seventy one- 

HUNDREDTHS DOLLARS ($18.70) TO REIMBURSE THE CHARLES MAIN 
ESTATE FOR TAXES PAID BY MISTAKE. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of eighteen and seventy one-hundredths dollars 
($18.70) be, and hereby is, appropriated to reimburse the Charles 
Main estate, of Concord, for taxes paid by it to the City of Con- 
cord for the years 1904 and 1905, the same having been erroneously 
assessed. The amount hereby appropriated shall l)e charged to the 
account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed December 10, 1906. 



A Joint Resolution appropriating three and thirteen one-hun- 

DREDTHS DOLLARS ($3.18) TO REIMBURSE W. P. LADD, COLLECTOR OF 

TAXES. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloics: 

That the sum of three and thirteen one-hundredths dollars ($3.13) 
be, and hereby is, appropriated to reimburse W. P. Ladd, collector of 
taxes for the City of Concord, it being for money received for taxes 
in excess of the assessment, and refunded from his own funds. 

Passed December 10, 1906. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 



43 



A Joint Eesolution appropriating moxky for deficiencies in the 

SEVERAL departments. 

Besolvcd by the City Council of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

Section 1. That the sum of two thousaud four hundred sixty- 
eight and sixty-two one-huudredths dollars ($2,468.62) be, and hereby 



is, appropriated out 


of any 


money in 


the treasury not 


otherwise ap- 


propriated, to pay outstand 


ing claims as follows: 




City poor 






. $368.18 


Old Fort cemetery 














.75 


Fire department . 














496.18 


Parks . 














139.81 


Penacook park 














19.62 


Board of health . 














261.73 


Salaries 














816.89 


Highway department . 












116.07 


Interest, temporary 


loan 












249.39 



$2,468.62 

Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
sewers for the year 1906 the sum of two hundred sixty-two and 
thirty-four one-hundredths dollars ($262.34), the same being the 
earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for gar- 
bage for the year 1906 the sum of one hundred fifty-three and three 
one-hundredths dollars ($153.03), the same being the earnings of 
this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for parks 
for the year 1906 the sum of one hundred thirty-one and eight one- 
hundredths dollars ($131.08), the same having been deposited in 
the city treasury on account of Pecker park. 

Sect. 5. That there be transferred to the appropriation for high- 
way department for the year 1906 the sum of five hundred eighty- 
three and three one-hundredths dollars ($583.03), the same being the 
earnings of this department. 

Sect. 6. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 19"07. 



A Joint Eesolution appropriating money for permanent im- 
provements on main street. 

Besolvcd by the City Coimcil of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000), 
or such part thereof as may be necessary, be, and hereby is, appro- 



44 CITY OP CONCORD. 

priated from any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for the purpose of making permanent improvements on Main street 
between School and Warren streets; the same to be expended under 
the direction of the committee on finance who shall call for bids for 
the work of construction, said committee to liave the power to accept 
or reject any bids. 

The above appropriation is to take the place of an apjiropriation 
of three thousand dollars ($3,000) for permanent improvements on 
Main street between School and Warren streets made by a resolu- 
tion passed August 7, 190G, and that part of the resolution passed 
August 7, 1906, appropriating three thousand dollars ($3,000) for 
permanent improvements on Main street between School and Warren 
streets is hereby rescinded and repealed. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1907. 



A Joint Resolution authorizing and directing the city clerk 

TO ISSUE NEW city ORDERS TO TAKE THE PLACE OF CITY ORDERS LOST 
BY S. P. DANFORTH. 

Whereas, On December 14, 1906, City Order No. 3,218 for 
$71.97 and City Order No. 3,142 for $2.04 were delivered to S. P. 
Danforth in payment of certain bills of said Danforth against the 
city, and whereas said orders have been lost by said Danforth, 

Besolved hy the City Council of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the city clerk be, and hereby is, authorized and 
directed to deliver to S. P. Danforth new city orders to take the 
place of City Orders Nos. 3,218 and 3,142 upon the execution and 
delivery by the said Danforth to the city of a bond to save the 
city harmless from all loss, costs, damage or expense on account of 
said first orders. 

Passed January 14, 1907. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1905-1906. 



Inaugurated fourtli Tuesday in January, biennially. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 
MAYOR. 

Elected biennially in November by the people. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

CHARLES R. CORNING. 

Office: City Hall. 



ALDERMEN. 

Elected biennially in November by the voters of each ward. Salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to Committee on Accounts and Claims. 

Ward i— WILLIAI\I W. ALLEN. 

FRED 11. BLANCHARD. 
Ward 5— JOHN T. CATE. 
Ward 5— JOSEPH F. DALY. 
Ward 4— JOSEPH S. MATTHEWS. 

CHARLES H. SWASEY. 

WILLIAM P. DANFORTH. 
Ward J— GEORGE D. WALDRON. 

GEORGE H. ROLFE. 
Ward ^— SETH R. DOLE. 

FRED C. DEMOND. 

GEORGE H. ELLIOTT. 
Ward 7— FORREST L. WELLMAN. 

JAMES F. KELLEY. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY. 
Ward 8— I\1ICHAEL H. I\IULCAHY. 
Ward P— JAMES J. GANNON. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elected biennially in November by voters of each ward. Salary, $40 per 
annum, with additional $10 to Committee on Accounts and Claims, and 
$20 to President. 

President— BENJAMIN W. COUCH. 

Ward i— EVERETT L. DAVIS. 

WALTER H. ROLFE. 
Ward 5— WESLEY 0. FIELD. 
Ward 5— JOHN T. PARKINSON. 
Ward i— JOHN L. PRESCOTT. 

FRED 0. CROWELL. 

CHARLES C. SCHOOLCRAFT. 
Ward 5— BENJAMIN W. COUCH. 

HARRY J. BROWN. 
Ward ^—HERBERT M. DANFORTH. 

EL1\IER H. FARRAR. 

HARRY R. CRESSY. 
Ward 7— LOREN A. SANDERS. 

ALFRED H. WALKER. 

FRANK S. PUTNA:\I. 
Ward S— THOMAS H. HIGOINS. 
Ward P— JAI\IES J. REEN. 

JAMES SCULLY. 

CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL.. 
Elected biennially in January by Common Council. Salary, $50 per annum. 

JAMES W. McMURPHY. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 47 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OP THE CITY COUNCIL. 

On Accounts and Claims — Aldermen George H. Rolfe, Wil- 
liam P. Danforth, French; Councilmen 
Schoolcraft, Cressy, Brown. 

On Finance — The ]\[ayor; Aldermen Llatthews, Demond, 
Waldron ; President of the Common Council ; 
Councilmen Brown, Reen, Walter H. Rolfe. 

On Fire Department — Aldermen Dole, Allen, Daly ; Coun- 
cilmen Walter H. Rolfe, Farrar, Prescott. 

On Lands and Buildings — ^Aldermen Waldron, Matthews, 
Kelley ; Councilmen Walker, Herbert j\I. Dan- 
forth, Davis. 

On Lighting Streets — Aldermen Wellman, Elliott, William 
P. Danforth ; Councilmen Crowell, Putnam, 
Walker. 

On Fuhlic Instruction — Aldermen Kelley, Chesley, Cate; 
Councilmen Farrar, Sanders, Higgins'. 

On Eoads and Bridges — Aldermen Blanchard, Chesley, 
Gannon ; Councilmen Davis, Parkinson, Field. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Bills, Second Beading — Aldermen Swasey, Chesley. 
On Elections and Returns — Aldermen Allen, IMulcahy. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — Aldermen Mulcahy, Blanchard. 
On Police and License — Aldermen Elliott, French. 
On Sewers and Drains — The Mayor; Aldermen Dole, Allen, 

George H. Rolfe, Mulcahy. 
On Streets and Sidewalks — The Mayor; Aldermen Elliott, 

Swasey, Wellman. 

STANDING COMMITTEES IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Bills, Second Reading — The President; Councilmen 
Crowell, Cressy. 

On Elections and Returns — Councilmen Prescott, Scully. 

On Engrossed Ordinances — Councilmen Herbert M. Dan- 
forth. Schoolcraft. 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Bond to the acceptance of the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $250 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $800 per annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Bond within 
six days to satisfaction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of 
first $60,000; seven and one-half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

WENDELL P. LADD. 

Office: Citv Hall. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 
BOARD OP EDUCATION. 

UNION SCIIOOTj DISTRICT. 

President— CHARLES R. CORNING. 
Secretary— ALICE M. NIMS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 49 

Moderator— S. C. EASTMAN. 
Clerk— LOUIS C. MERRILL. 
Auditors— JOHN GEORGE. 
H. H. METCALF. 

Three elected annually in March by voters of Union School District. Salary, 
$250 per annum for the board. 



JOHN VANNEVAR, 
GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 
ALICE M. NIMS, 
JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 
CHARLES R. CORNING, 
GEORGE H. MOSES, 
ELLA H. J. HILL, 
EDWARD N. PEARSON, 



Term expires IMarch, 1907. 





i 


1907 






' 1907 




c 


1908 






' 1908 






1908 






' 1909 






1909 






' 1909 



SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



Appointed annually in July by Boaid of Education. Salary, $2,000 per 

annum. 



LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



Office : Chandler School Building, South Street. 



FINANCIAL AGENT. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 
Salary, $500 per annum. 

JOSEPH T. WALKER. 

Office: Chandler School Building. 



50 CITY OP CONCORD. 

PENACOOK — District No. 20. 

One member of Board of Education elected annually in March by voters of 
district. Salary, $50 per annum for the board. 

HENRY C. HOLBROOK. Term expires March, 1907. 

LEANDER C. PRESCOTT, " " " 1908. 

HENRY A. BROWN, " " " 1909. 

TOWN DISTRICT. 

Comprising all districts in the city except Union School District and No. 20. 
Elected annually in March by voters of district. Salary, $200 per 
annum for the board. 

ALBERT SALTMARSH, Term expires :\Iarcli, 1907. 

JUDSON F. HOIT, " " " 1908. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, '' " " 1909. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

Salary, $500 per annum. 

GEORGE AV. JOHNSON. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 5— CHARLES E. STANIELS. 
Ward 5— PAUL R. HOLDEN. 
Ward 4— FRANK W. ROLLINS. 
Ward 5— AMOS J. SIIURTLEFF. 
Ward ^—REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward S— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward 5— I\IOSES H. BRADLEY. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 51 

LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $450 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Fowler* Library Building. 



ASSESSORS. 

Elected biennially by voters of each ward. Salary, $3 per day of actual 

service. 

Ward i— OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 
Ward 5— WILLIAM A. COWLEY. 
Ward 5— GEORGE R. PARMENTER. 
Ward 4— GEORGE W. PARSONS. 
Ward 5— GEORGE F. UNDERIIILL.* 

GEORGE A. FOSTER.** 
Ward 5— OSRO I\I. ALLEN. 
Ward 7— JOHN H. QUIMBY. 
Ward S— WILLIAM A. LEE. 
Ward i*— THOMAS NAWN. 



CITY WATER-WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, I\Iayor, ex-officio. 

EDSON J. HILL, Term expires March 31, 1907. 

G. D. B. PRESCOTT, " " " 1907. 

* Died May 30, 1906. 
** Elected to fill vacancv. 



52 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



HENRY E. CONANT, 
H. C. HOLBROOK, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
HARLEY B. ROBY, 
N. E. MARTIN, 
H. H. DUDLEY, 



Term expires 


March 31, 1908 




1908 




1909 




1909 




1910 




1910 



President — Solon A. Carter. 
Clerk — Edson J. Hill. 



SUPERINTENDENT OP WATER-WORKS. 

Elected annually iu April by Water Commissioners. Salary, $1,800 per 

annum. 

V. CHARLES HASTINGS. 

Office: City Hall. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Term unlimited. Salary, $1,250 
per annum and rent of house. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldei'men. Term unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 
Salary, $12,5 each per annum. 

JOHN J. ]\IcNULTY. 
WILLIAM E. DOW. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 53 

FOR PENACOOK. 
Salary, $25 per annum. 

ABIAL W. EOLFE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $10 per annum. 

JOHN E. FRYE. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $10 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

LESLIE H. CROWTHER. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 
CHARLES P. WHITE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 
FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

GEORGE W. BROWN. 



54 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,000 per annum, fixed by 

City Council. 

GEORGE M. FLETCHER. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $2 per day of actual service. 

BENJAMIN W. COUCH. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $500 per annum. 

EDMUND S. COOK. 

Office: 77 North Main Street. 



CLERK OP POLICE COURT. 

Appointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by the 

Legislature. 

RUFUS H. BAKER. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Bond of $1,000 re- 
quired. Salary, $1,200 per annum; 

JAMES E. RAND. 

Office: Police Station. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 55 

ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Term unlimited. Salary, $900 per 

annum. 

JOHN E. GAY. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, $825 each per annum. 

Daniel S. Flanders, Captain of Night Watch, 



Salary, $850 per annum. 



Charles H. Rowe, 
Samuel L. Batehelder, 
Victor I. j\Ioore, 
Irvin B. Robinson, 
Hoyt Robinson, 



Christopher T. Wallace, 
Samuel Rodd, 
George E. Drury, 
George N. Fellows. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 
George H. Silsby, Captain and Drill Master. 



0. H. Bean, 
W. A. Little, 
William H. H. Patch, 
Alvin H. Urann, 
Thomas P. Davis. 
Fred H. Clifford, 
George G. Allen, 



Charles E. Kelley, 
James Jepson, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
Fred S. Pendleton, 
Harry F. Jones, 
Clark D. Stevens. 



56 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, $2.25 each per day of actual 

service. 



Almah C. Leavitt, 
Oscar F. Richardson, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowell, 
Joseph C. Eaton, 
Alphonso Venne, 
Edward M. Nason, 
Charles M. Norris, 
John J. Crowley, 
William H. Richardson, 
William H. Hammond, 
James W. Lane, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Charles Ada, 
George W. Brown, 
George L. Danforth, 
John A. Flanders, 
Arthur J. Taylor. 
George B. Wright, 
Alfred H. Walker, 
George A. S. Kimball, 



James F. Ward, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Justus 0. Clark, 
Ira C. Phillips, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Moses T. Rowell, 
Frank W. Johnson. 
George W. Johnson, 
Judson F. Hoit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Milton Colby, 
Asbury F. Tandy, 
Henry J. Durrell. 
George W. Chesley. 
Harry E. Stevens, 
Lewis B. Hoit, 
Albert H. C. Knowles, 
Fred N. Marden. 
Edw^ard M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor. 
John G. Solchow, 
Clarence W. Brown. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 
COMMISSIONER OF HIGHWAYS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Bond, $3,000. Salary, $1,400 

per annum. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
George S. Milton, 
Michael J. Lee, 
Edward H. Randall, 
B. Frank Varney. 
Isaac Baty, 
John H. Clark, 
John E. Frye, 
R. N. Foster, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Robbing, 
George N. Berry, 
Charles H. Berry, 
William H. jMcGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
John Sweeney, 
M. J. Finn, 
Charles L. Fellows, 
John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe. 
Henry P. Cilley, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Henry H. Morrill, 
Fred L. Plummer, 



INIiles F. Farmer, 
Charles L. Norris, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Seth R. Hood, 
Rufus E. Gale, 
Albert S. Trask, 
Philip King, 
William L. Regan, 
Frederick T. Converse, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Frederick Booth, 
Benjamin H. Orr, 
Louis Browning, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
George W. Chesley, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
John C. Smith, 
Alfred Ford. 
F. F. Converse, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
P. W. Orr, 
Alex Ralph. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Ward J— FRED H. BLANCHARD, Penacook. 



Salary, $30 per annum. 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward 5— JOHN T. GATE, East Concord. 

Salai-y, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 5— HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 
City Hall. 

, Salary, $350 per annum. 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to 

city poor. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 18 South State Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, $1 for each visit to 

city poor. 

DR. E. IT. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



HEALTH OFFICERS. 

One elected annually in March, for three years, by City Council. Salary, $25 

per annum. 

GEORGE A. BERRY, Term expires March, 1907. 

RUSSELL WILKINS, M. D., " " " 1908. 

CHANCE Y ADAMS, M. D., " " " 1909. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



59 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Nominated by Board of Health in April and confirmed by the City Council. 
Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 

REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each 
birth, marriage and death received, recorded and returned to the State 
Registrar. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 

No salary. 



WILL B. HOWE, 
WILLIA]\r C. GREEN, 
V. C. HASTINGS, 



City Engineer. 

Chief of the Fire Department. 

Snpt. of the Water-works. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, Mayor, ex-officio. 



WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 
BEN C. WHITE, 
WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 



Term expires January, 1907. 
1907. 
1908. 
1908. 
1909. 
1909. 



60 ' CITY OF CONCORD. 

CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except "Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7, con- 
solidated) elected annually in January, for three years, by City Council. 
Salary, none. 

WARD 1. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, Term expires January, 1907. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS. " " " 1908. 

1909. 



D. WARREN FOX, 



WARD 2. 



W. A. COWLEY, 
EDWARD J. LYLE. 
HENRY A. COLBY. 



Term expires January, 1907. 
1908. 
1909. 



WARD 3. 



JAMES M. CROSSIMAN, Term expires January, 1907. 
GEORGE R. PARMENTER, " " '' 1908. 

WILLIAM A. LITTLE, " " " 1909. 



WARD 7. 



ALBERT S. TRASK, 
FRANK H. PROCTOR, 
ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 



Term expires January, 1907. 

1908. 
1909. 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

FOR WARDS 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, AND PART OP WARD 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Board of 

Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, Mayor, ex-officio. 



JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
FRANK P. ANDREWS. 
CHARLES G. REMICK. 
FRANK J. BATCHELDER. 
GEORGE A. FOSTER, 
GEORGE W. ABBOTT, 



Term expires March, 1907. 
1907. 
1908. 
1908. 
1909. 
1909. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 61 

SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

EDWARD A. MOULTON. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Salary, none. 
FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE A¥. WATERS, 
LOUIS A. LANE, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
LEONARD MUDGETT, 
CARL H. FOSTER. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS, 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

ALVIN C. POWELL. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OP PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Fees, one- 
fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

EDWARD M. COGSWELL. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PENCE VIEWERS. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, $2 per day, paid by 
parties interested. 

GEORGE W. CHESLEY, 
■ CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
MOSES H. BRADLEY. 



POUND-KEEPER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, two cents each for im- 
pounding sheep, and five cents each for all other creatures, paid by 
owners. 

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. 



SEALERS OP LEATHER. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid 
by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
CYRUS R. ROBINSON, 
DAVID E. EVERETT, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OP WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, for sealing each scale 
beam, steelyard, or soale, 25 cents, and for each measure, 10 cents; five 
or more to one person, half price — paid by owners of scales or measures. 

EDWARD K. GOVE. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



63 



CULLER OP STAVES. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; 
hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoops, 
50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M — -paid by party for whom culling is 
done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OP HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Tees, reasonable price per 
load, paid by party requiring service. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
John N. Hill, 
Hiram 0. Marsh, 
Thomas Hill, 
John H. Mercer, 
A. H. Campbell, 
0. F. Richardson, 
Charles H. Day. 
Alvah L. Powell, 
Seth R. Dole, 
Arthur N. Day. 
William H. ]\Ieserve, 
Hiram Brown, 
George W. Chesley, 
Everett L. Davis, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Harry Knapp, 
Howard Perley, 
L. C. Prescott, 
Ernest F. Carr, 
C. W. Flanders, 
James F. Fitzgerald, 
Edward W. Brockway, 
John H. Flanders, 



John J. Kelley, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Amos Blanchard, 
Mark M. Blanchard, 
Lurman R. Goodrich, 
James H. Harrington, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Daniel Crowley, Jr., 
Charles H. Cook, 
John C. Farrand, 
John E. Rossell, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 
S. D. Walker, 
George L. Danforth, 
A. C. Fisher, 
William J. Mullen, 
Elmer E. Young, 
Henry A. Brown, 
Milo G. Davis, 
Fred F. Tucker, 
F. H. Smith, 
Fred A. Barker, 
Hamilton C. Morgan, 
James B. Riley. 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY WEIGHER. 
EDWARD K. GOVE. 

( Office: Rear Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OP PAINTING. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, Benjamin Bilsborough, 

Edward A. Moulton, ' Fred Rollins, 
George Abbott, Jr., Moses E. Haines. 

George Griffin, 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, Charles L. Fello^YS, 

Peter W. Webster, James E. Randlett, 

Fred L. Plummer, William Rowell, 

Stephen H. Swain, Henry IMorrill. 



SURVEYORS OP STONE. 

Elected annually in January by City Council. Fees, reasonable price, paid by 
party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, Henry IMorrill. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



65 



SURVEYORS OP WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Elected biennially in January by City Council. Fees, for surveying shingles 

and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; boards and timber, 16 cents per M. ; 

measuring cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for 
over twenty cords — paid by person employing. 



Arthur Gr. Stevens, 
James F. Nelson, 
Jonathan B. Weeks, 
Charles Couch, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
.Timothy Carter, 
Weston Coffran, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Philip Flanders, 
Cyrus Runnells, 
Silvester P. Danforth, 
Albert 0. Preston, 
William A. Chesley, 
Alfred Clark, 
John F. Scott, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Peter W. Webster, 
George W. Abbott, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Smith, 
Clinton O. Partridge, 
John Q. Woods, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Amos L. Coburn, 
Oilman H. Dimond, 
John C. Farrand, 
Arthur E. Maxam, 
Martin E. Kenna, 
E. A. Cole, 
George Partridge, 



Oliver J. Fifield, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Charles H. Day, 
Hiram 0. Marsh, 
Edward Runnels, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
John N. Hill, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Joseph E. Hutchinson, 
Thomas Hill, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hayward, 
Edward H. Dixon, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus 0. Clark, 
Silas Wiggin, 
Edward Stevens, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Charles L. Worthen, 
Clark D. Stevens, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
Crosby A. Sanborn. 



66 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SELECTMEN. 

Ward i— WILLIAM S. HOLLAND. 
ERNEST L. MESERVE. 
HARRY GREY. 

Ward 5— CURTIS A. CHAMBERLAIN. 
JOSEPH C. STRICKFORD. 
EDGAR A. NEWELL. 

Ward 5— HENRY FARNUM. 
ROBERT HENRY. 
HARRIS PARMENTER. 

Ward 4— ROBERT F. KEANE. 
FRED N. HAMMOND. 

AMOS 0. MANSUR. 

Ward 5— CURTIS WHITE. 

CARLTON L. GIBBS. 
EDW^ARD M. COGSWELL. 

Ward ^—EDWARD C. DUTTON. 
W^ILFRED BOURKE. 
ALBERT H. DALRYMPLE. 

Ward 7— CHARLES H. OSGOOD. 

CHARLES P. DAVIDSON. 
CHARLES B. BENSON. 

Ward S-^HARRY MORRILL. 

SYLVESTER T. FORD. 
JOHN A. FAGAN. 

Ward 5— PHILIP BABINEAU. 
JAMES J. NICHOLS. 
IVrAURICE GEARY. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 67 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward i— FRED J. GUILD. 

WILLIAM H. MESERVE. 
JOHN G. WARD. 

Ward 5— ROSS W. GATE. 

ELAVIN F. CULVER. 
PHILEAS P. BELANGER. 

Ward 5— JOHN NORDSTROM. 

ALVIN C. POWELL, JR. 
OMAR SWENSON. 

Ward 4— HARRY H. KENNEDY. 
ALLEN HOLLIS. 
J. WESLEY PLUMMER. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT. 
WILLIAM A. FOSTER. 
ARTHUR P. MORRILL. 

Ward ^—FREDERIC T. WOODMAN. 
W^ILL B. HOWE. 
HENRY B. COLBY. 

Ward 7— CHARLES W. FOWLER. 
WALTER C. HUNTOON. 
ARISTIDE L. PBLISSIER. 

Ward S— WILLIAM H. REGAN. 
LEON B. SIMPSON. 
MOSES PELREN. 

Ward 5— MICHAEL MURPHY. 

CHARLES L. WALDRON. 
HARRY CRAIGUE. 



WARD CLERKS. 

Ward :Z— HOWARD N. PERLEY. 
Ward 5— FRANK P. CURTIS. 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward 5— HERBERT S. FARNUM. 

Ward 4— ERNEST P. ROBERTS. 

Ward 5— GEORGE E. CHESLEY. 

Ward 5— THOMAS J. DYER. 

Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 

Ward S— EDGAR M. QUINT. 

Ward P— DOMINICK HENRY GANNON. 

MODERATORS. 

Ward i— EDMUND H. BROWN. 
Ward 5— WILLIAM E. VIRGIN. 
Ward 5— CLARK D. STEVENS. 
Ward 4— JOHN B. ABBOTT. 
Ward 5— EDWARD K. WOODWORTH. 
Ward ^—ARTHUR E. DOLE. 
Ward ;— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward <§— HOWARD F. HILL. 
Ward 5— FRED N. MARDEN. 



MAYORS OF CITY OP CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 

1853, and until 1880 the Mayor was eleoted annually. Since 1880 tlie 

Mayor has been elected for two years at each biennial election in No- 
vember. 

Hon. 



JOSEPH LOW, 


1853- 


'54 


RUFUS CLEMENT,* 




'55 


JOHN ABBOTT, 


1856- '57- 


'58 


MOSES T. WILLARD, 


1859- 


'60 


I\IOSES HUMPHREY, 


1861- 


'62 


BENJAMIN F. GALE, 


1863- 


'64 


MOSES HUMPHREY, 




'65 


JOHN ABBOTT, 


1866- 


'67 


LYMAN D. STEVENS, 


1868- 


'69. 


ABRAHAM G. JONES, 


1870- 


71 


JOHN KIMBALL, 


1872-73-74- 


75 



Died in office, January 13, 1856. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 69 

Hon. GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, ^ 1876-77. 

" HORACE A. BROWN,** ' 1878- '79- '80. 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,*** 1880- '81- '82. 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883- '84- '85- '86. 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887- '88. 

" STHjLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889- '90. 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891- '92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893- '94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895- '96. 

" ALBERT B. WOOD WORTH, 1897- '98. 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901- '02. 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903 . 



** Term closed in November, 1880. 
*** Term commenced in November, 1880. 



VOTE FOR CITY OFFICERS. 

NOVEMBER 6, 1906. 



WARD ONE. 



Mayor. 
Corning, r., 
French, d.. 

Aldermen. 
Davis, r., 
Rolfe, r., 
McGirr, d., 
Keenan, d., 

Councilmen. 
Burnham, r., 
Bean, r., 
Roy, d., 
Driseoll, d., 



Assessor. 



FifieUl, r., 
Farrand, d., 

Clark, r., 
Vaughn, r.. 



Selectmen. 



Routhier, r., 
231 Holland, d., 
241 Mulligan, d., 

McGirr, d.. 



207 

264 

194 Perley, r., 

p-r, Gahagan, d 



Ward Clerk. 



Supervisors. 



Sargent, r., 
252 ,,, 

Meserve, r., 
202 ^ .,, 

Guild, r., 

187 -j^ ■ 

Ferrin, d., 

Ladeiu, d., 

270 O'Brien, d., 

189 



Moderator. 



258 Brown, r., 
257 Rolfe, d.. 



WARD TWO. 



Mayor. 



Corning, r., 
French, d., 



Alderman. 



Peaslee, r.. 
Field, r., 
Robinson, d., 



Councilman. 
100 Farnuni, r., 
109 Muzzey, d., 



Assessor. 



105 Cate, r., 
105 Cowley, d.. 



VOTE FOR CITY OFFICERS. 



71 





Seleci 


\men. 




Supervisors. 




Culver, r., 






104 


Gate, r., 


107 


Smith, r., 






105 


Armstrong, r., 


102 


Webber, r., 






110 


Belanger, r.. 


107 


Cooden, d., 






102 


Potter, d.. 


104 


Drew, d., 






103 


Stevens, d., 


103 


Potter, d.. 






99 


Sanborn, d., 


105 




Ward 


Clerk. 




Moderator. 




Chamberlin 


, r.. 




94 


Strickford, r., 


103 


Curtis, d.. 






113 


Richardson, d., 


105 



WARD THREE. 



Mayor. 
Corning, r., 
French, d., 


132 
134 


Piper, d., 
Clark, d., 
Lynch, d.. 


95 

92 
93 


Alderman. 




Ward Clerk. 




Danforth, r., 


107 


St. Pierre, r., 


153 


Swenson, d., 


159 


Dolan, d.. 


100 


Councilman. 
Farnum, r.. 
Tucker, d., 


129 

128 


Supervisors. 
Nordstrom, r., 
Richardson, r., 


160 
157 


Assessor. 
Shepard, r., 
Phillips, d., 


168 
95 


Hoyt, r., 
Spead, d., 
Murchie, d., 
Fuller, d.. 


149 
97 
99 

108 


Selectmen. 
Henry, r., 
Parmenter, r.. 


160 
162 


Moderator. 
Stevens, r., 


160 


Peterson, r., 


166 


Harrington, d., 


97 



WARD FOUR. 



Mayor. 




Davis, d., 


310 


Corning, r., 


509 


Sanborn, d., 


332 


French, d., 


334 


Councilmen. 








Crowell, r.. 


539 


Aldermen. 




Hill, r., 


464 


Danforth, r., 


527 


Evans, r.. 


473 


Prescott, r.. 


473 


Cahill, d., 


276 


Blackwood, r.. 


514 


Putney, d., 


325 


Callahan, d., 


270 


Flanders, d., 


348 



72 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Assessor. 




Mason, d., 


Parsons, r., 
Davis, d., 




513 

287 


Supervisors 
Plumraer, r., 


Selectmen. 




Kennedy, r.. 


Keane, r.. 




501 


Fletcher, r.. 


Hammond, r., 




512 


Clough, d.. 


Mansur, r., 




499 


Smith, d., 


Larkin, d., 




298 


Hutchinson, d., 


King, d., 
Nolan, d.. 




287 
273 


Moderator. 
Watson, r.. 


Ward 


Clerk. 




Norris, d.. 


Robeits, r., 




501 





WARD FIVE. 



Mayor. 




Hodgman, 


r.. 


418 


Corning, r., 
French, d., 


436' 
147 


Hobbs, r., 
Bolger, d., 
Kerley, d.. 




410 
129 
120 


Aldermen. 




Follett, d.. 




128 


Couch, r.. 


424 








Waldron, r.. 


419 




Ward Clerk. 




Bartomus, d.. 


139 


Chesley, r.. 




435 


Sullivan, d.. 


128 


Meehan, d. 


> 


118 


Councihnen. 






Supervisors. 




Cogswell, r., 
Woodworth, r., 
Hodgman, d.. 
Chandler, d.. 


436 
434 
121 
119 


Sargent, r. 
Foster, r., 
Morrill, r., 
Adams, d.. 


y 


413 
406 
408 
129 


Assessor. 




Fifield, d., 




129 


Foster, r., 


422 


Badger, d., 




131 


Craft, d., ■ 


122 




Moderator. 




Selectmen. 




Niles, r.. 




410 


White, r.. 


■ 422 


Mace, d., 




137 



'WARD SIX. 



Mayor. 



Corning, r., 
French, d., 





Aldermen. 




421 Betton, r., 




415 


308 Farrar, r., 




417 



VOTE FOR CITY OFFICERS. 



73 



Cressy, r., 
Brown, d., 
Holt, d.. 


420 

272 
275 


Chamberlin, r., 
Lang, d., 
Ouilette, d., 


404 
285 
266 


Gannon, d., 


270 


Leahy, d.. 


269 


Councilmen. 




Ward Clerk. 




Danforth, r., 


343 


Dole, r.. 


409 


Powell, r., 


404 


Halloran, d.. 


276 


Dyer, r., 
Crockett, d., 
Kiley, d., 
Stevens, d.. 

Assessor. 


396 
342 
262 
296 


Supervisors 
Howe, r., 
Emerson, r., 
Manderson, r., 
Colbert, d.. 


423 
425 
411 
271 


Allen, r., 


399 


Kenna, d., 


263 


Donovan, d.. 


300 


Parker, d.. 


263 


Selectmen. 




Moderator. 




Knowlton, r., 


416 


Woodman, r.. 


412 


Bourke, r., 


395 


Nelson, d., 


279 



WARD SEVEN. 



Mayor. 




Selectmen. 




Corning, r.. 


401 


Davison, r., 


400 


French, d., 


365 


Marsh, r.. 


403 


Aldermen. 




Carpenter, r., 
Elkins, d.. 


394 
349 


Chesley, r., 


393 


Sweatt, d.. 


348 


Sanders, r.. 


398 


Putney, d., 


339 


Walker, r.. 


390 






Bodwell, d.. 


345 


Ward Clerk. 




Morgan, d., 
Sanborn, d., 


330 
325 


Whittredge, r.. 


765 


Councilmen. 
Putnam, r., 
Wooster, r., 
Pelissier, r.. 


.401 

*399 

388 


Supervisors. 

Brunei, r., 
Clement, r., 
Jenkins, r., 
Lyna, d., 
Smith, d., 
Eogers, d.. 


410 
397 
398 
338 
342 
341 


Jackson, d., 
Eichardson, d., 
Hntton, d.. 


351 
358 
355 


Assessor. 




Moderator. 




Quimby, r., 


412 


Thompson, r., 


419 


Proctor, d., 


357 


Lamprey, d.. 


334 



74 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



WARD EIGHT. 





Mayor. 




Prescott, r.. 


87 


C!orning, r. 


J 


75 


Ford, d., 


220 


French, d., 




237 


Fagan, d., 


220 


Parsons, r. 
Higgins, d. 


Alderman. 

> 
Councilman. 


85 
220 


Taylor, d., 

Ward Cleric. 
Atherton, r., 
Quint, d.. 

Supervisors. 


222 

73 
235 


Hall, r.. 




79 


Robinson, r.. 


85 


Hill, d., 




228 


Lavigne, r., 


83 


Baker, r., 
Lee, d.. 


Assessor. 
Selectmen. 


72 
234 


Elliott, r., 
Regan, d., 
Pelren, d., 
McCormick, d., 

Moderator. 


82 
222 
224 
222 


Welch, r., 




87 


Sullivan, r.. 


85 


Bartlett, r. 


» 


85 


Mulcahy, d., 


224 



WARD NINE. 





Mayor. 




Johnson, r.. 


no 


Corning, r., 




88 


Venne, r.. 


114 


French, d., 




300 


Gerry, d., 
Halligan, d.. 


243 
237 




Aldermen. 




Hannigan, d., 


235 


Evans, r., 
Moody, r.. 




■ 125 

107 


Ward Cleric. 




Jordan, d., 




247 


Waite, r., 


106 


Reen, d.. 


Councilmen. 


246 


Casey, d., 

Supervisors. 


244 


Boulay, Jr. 


, r., 


111 


Bichette, r.. 


112 


Page, r., 




107 


Angwin, r.. 


114 


Scully, d., 




246 


O'Connor, r.. 


98 


Fitzgerald, 


d.. 


241 


Saltmarsh, d., 


234 




Assessor. 




Craigue, d., 


235 


Reed, r.. 




101 


Donovan, d., 


244 


Nawn, d., 




267 


Moderator. 






Selectmen. 




Brown, r.. 


122 


Burbeck, r. 


J 


112 


Marden, d.. 


241 



VOTE FOR CITY OFFICERS. 



75 







LICENSE. 








Yes. 


No. 


Yes. 


No. 


Ward 1, 


189 


285 Ward 7, 


286 


442 


Ward 2, 


81 


95 Ward 8, 


298 


31 


Ward 3, 


•95 


140 Ward 9, 


219 


126 


Ward 4, 
Ward 5, 


340 
224 


459 
322 






2,024 


2,271 


Ward 6, 


292 


371 







DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION OF UNION SCHOOL 
DISTRICT, 1906-1907. 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 
1907. 



Dr. George M. Kimball, Rev. John Vannevar, D. D., 
Mrs. Alice M. Nims. 

1908. 

Hon. John M. Mitchell, Mrs. Susan C. Bancroft, 

Hon. Charles R. Corning. 

1909. 

Hon. Edward N. Pearson, Mrs. Ella H. J. Hill, 

Mr. George H. Moses. 



OFFICERS. 

Hon. Charles R. Corning .... President. 
Mrs. Alice M. Nims Secretary. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

finance. 

]Mr. Corning, Mr. Mitchell, Dr. Kimball. 



80 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



high school. 
Dr. Vannevar, Mr. Pearson, 



Mrs. Bancroft 



manual training and industrial education. 
Dr. Kimball, Mr. Pearson, Mrs. Hill. 

MUSIC AND elocution. 

Mr. Mitchell, Mrs. Hill, Dr. Vannevar. 



DRAWING. 

Mrs. Bancroft, ]\Ir. Pearson, 

training scpiool ( dewey ) . 
Mr. Mitchell, Mr. IMoses, 

text-books. 
Mr. Corning, Mrs. Bancroft, 

buildings and repairs. 
Dr. Kimball, Mr. Pearson, 

PEN A cook. 

Dr. Vannevar, Mr. Pearson, 



Mr. Pearson, 



Mr. Pearson, 



cogswell. 
Mr. Corning, 

rumpord. 
Mrs. Bancroft, 



chandler. 
Dr. Vannevar, Mrs. Hill, 



Dr. Kimball. 



Mrs. Nims. 



Mr. Moses. 



Mr. Corning. 



Mrs. Nims. 



Mrs. Hill. 



Mr. Mitchell. 



Mr. Corning. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 



81 



Mr. Mitchell, 
Mrs. Bancroft, 
Mr. Moses, 
Dr. Kimball, 
Mr. Mitchell, 
Mrs. Nims, 
Mr. Mitchell, 
Mrs. Hill, 



KIMBALL. 

Mrs. Nims, 

franklin, 
Dr. Kimball, 
merrimack. 
Mr. Mitchell, 

WALKER. 

Mrs. Bancroft, 

tahanto. 
Mr. Pearson, 

garrison 
Mr. Pearson, 

EASTMAN. 

Dr. Vannevar, 
harriet p. dame. 
Mr. Pearson, 



Dr. Vannevar. 



Mr. Corning. 



Mrs. Nims. 



Mrs. Hill. 



Mr. Corning. 



Mr. Moses. 



Mrs. Bancroft. 



Mr. Corning 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 
Louis John Rundlett. 

3 Pine St. Office : Chandler School Building, Room 1. 

Hours : 8 to 9 a. m., sohool days. Office generally open 
from 4 to 5 p. m. 



FINANCIAL AGENT. 

Joseph Timothy Walker. 

274 No. Main St. Office : Chandler School Building, Room 1. 

6 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

George Washington Johnson. 

6I14 School St. Chandler School Building, Room 1. Office 
hours : 8 to 9.30 a. m., 1 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 
Hon. Samuel C. Eastman .... Moderator. 

Louis C. Merrill Clerk. 

John P. George, Henry H. I\Ietcalp . Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, FOR YEAR 

ENDING MARCH 31, 1907. 



To the Inhabitants of Union School District: 

The Board of Education begs to submit its forty-seventh 
annual report comprising the last school year. 

Two years ago the board called your attention to the 
crowded condition of certain schoolhouses and recom- 
mended that measures be taken looking toward the erec- 
tion of larger buildings. With a generosity and desire 
such as has always characterized the people of Concord 
whenever the improvement of their schools was concerned, 
an appropriation of $118,000 was voted for an eight-room 
building at West Concord and for a new and much larger 
High school. The appropriation was $28,000 and $90,000. 
Last year the manifest need of a Manual Training school 
building came before the annual meeting and an appro- 
priation of $30,000 was at once voted for a modern and 
commodious building wholly adapted to wood- and iron- 
working, mechanical drawing, cooking and sewing. Of 
these three buildings one only is open, the G-arrison at West 
Concord. The High and the Manual Training schools will 
be ready for occupation at the beginning of the fall term 
in September. 

The cost imposed on the district is very large, yet the 
contracts were reasonable and within the hopes and ex- 
pectations of the committee. The bond issue consequent to 
these new buildings is at a rate of three and one half per 
cent., and the bonds have been sold at a price far above 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the prevailing market quotations for similar indebtedness 
offered by cities of unquestionable financial integrity and 
standing. The $30,000 represented by the Manual Train- 
ing school has not yet been funded, but will be very soon. 
The Dewey school bonds, $24,000, will be reduced $16,000 
by the first of April. The total indebtedness of the dis- 
trict will at that date amount to $192,000. If by any rea- 
soning a debt may be useful in urging economy in further 
expenditures it would seem that the illustration as well as 
the precept is before us. The past decade has been a period 
of permanent construction which, let us hope, will not re- 
peat itself for many years. For the details concerning the 
management and conduct of the schools as well as for par- 
ticular information respecting supplies, repairs and inci- 
dental expenses, reference should be had to the respective 
reports of the superintendent and of the financial agent. 
The board, while earnest in support of our schools and in 
encouragement of teachers, cannot bring about the best re- 
sults without parental co-operation. 

The present management of the Higli school is all that 
could be desired and there is an atmosphere of loyalty to 
requirements noticeable among the pupils. But there is 
one important matter which is beyond the direct control of 
the Board of Education and the teachers, and we wish to 
bring it to the attention of parents, who have the exclusive 
right and authority in the premises. 

The interest and attention of the pupils in their studies 
are diverted by a too frequent participation in outside mat- 
ters of a social nature. These seem to be increasing to 
such an extent as seriously to interfere with the best work 
of the school, and to antagonize the efforts of the teachers. 
If the best results are to be obtained and the scholarship of 
the school kept up to the required standard, these social 
temptations should be stoutly resisted. In this matter the 
parents and the guardians have full authority and the 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

Board of Eaucation earnestly request their moral co-oper- 
ation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES R. CORNING, 
JOHN M. MITCHELL, 
SUSAN C. BANCROFT, 
GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 
EDWARD N. PEARSON, 
ELLA H. J. HILL, 
JOHN VANNEVAR, 
ALICE M. NIMS, 
GEORGE H. MOSES, 
Board of Education of Union ScJiool District. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 
AND REPAIRS. 



To the Board of Education of Union ScJiool District: 

We, the Building and Repairs Committee, make the fol- 
lowing report : 

During this year the work has been confined to the neces- 
sary repairs of buildings and equipment as could be done 
without a large expenditure, the work having been mis- 
cellaneous carpenter work, plumbing and repairs to heating 
plants. No large amount of work was undertaken in any 
one building. 

With seventeen schoolhouses to keep in order on five thou- 
sand dollars a year the question is one of not so much what 
shall we do as what can we do. In looking over the build- 
ings, we would make the following suggestions as to work 
to be done this coming summer, outside of the things that 
must be done each year : 

The Tahanto school should be repainted outside. 

The Walker school painted outside and in, walls cleaned 
and tinted. Some additional light should be given the west 
room, third floor, should the room continue in use. The 
committee have considered this for several seasons, but 
owing to the condition of the ]\Ierrimack school have hesi- 
tated about any large out])iit on the Walker school, as a 
new building to replace the IMerrimaek miglit make the 
expense unnecessary. 

The Merrimack should have new ceilings, a new chimney 
for smoke flue to furnaces, and a very thorough over- 
hauling. 

The Franklin school is in good condition, but could be 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

much improved by varnishing the wood-Avork and coloring 
the walls. 

We hope to refurnish two rooms this year with adjusta- 
ble desks and chairs made from old desks. This will make 
one more building with adjustable furniture. 

Dewey school: The ceiling in the two upper rooms 
should be removed and replaced with new ones, as was done 
Avith the two lower rooms two years ago. The wood-work 
should be varnished and walls colored. New smoke pipe 
put in for all furnaces. 

Kimball school : This is in good order and we think will 
require only the general repairs made each year. 

High school (School St.) : This building should have 
the Avails cleaned and colored before it is put in use for 
ninth grade, and all outside stone-work repointed. 

Chandler school: Repainting outside. Considerable 
work has been done on the steam plant in this building 
during the year with good results. 

Rumford school: Repainting outside, revarnishing in- 
side, and AA'e would suggest that the interior AA^alls be 
painted and ceilings Avhitened. This AA^ould put the build- 
ing in better shape than when new. 

Penacook school: This building should have ncAV floors, 
and all the Avood-work and plastering in the entire build- 
ing should be done over. The committee has considered 
this for sometime, but have delayed on account of the fact 
that at the same time the building should be raised to get 
a better basement and better drainage for the yard. 

The CogsAvell school is in good condition, with the usual 
summer renovation. 

Eastman school: The old AA^ood stoves are in use here, 
and we would suggest that the furnaces taken from the old 
West Concord school be put into this building, Avhich 
would necessitate a stack for ventilation and would give 
opportunity for cremating closets in place of the outbuild- 
ings noAA^ in use. We also recommend that a suitable 
well for drinking purposes be dug. 



OO CITY OF CONCORD. 

The expenditures in the Garrison school are for flag- 
pole, book-eases, double windows, and such items not in 
contract. 

GEORGE M. KIMBALL, 
EDWARD N. PEARSON, 
CHARLES R. CORNING. 



REPORT OF FINANCIAL AGENT OF UNION 
SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



April 1, 1906, to March 31, 1907, 



RECEIVED. 



Balance from last year 
Amount appropriated l)y Union 
Amount apropriated by law 
Amount appropriated additional 
Literary fund 
Dog tax .... 
Text-book, city appropriation 
Income Abial Walker fund 
Tuition, High school . 
Tuition, Primary school 
Tuition, Grammar school . 
Tuition. Training school 



School District 
repairs 



$2,074.99 

63.00 

255.20 

30.00 



Cash for insurance cancelled 
Cash sale of text-books 
Cash sale of text-books night school . 
Cash sale of stock, manual training 
Cash sale old iron, seats, etc. 
Cash tuition paid in advance for term March 25 
1907, to June 14, 1907 .... 



$100.04 

15,880.09 

51,195.00 

2,500.00 

1,722.64 

1.613.94 

3,044.66 

30.45 



2,423.19 
47.70 
70.73 
65.62 
44.70 
90.30 

63.20 



$78,892.26 



EXPENDED. 



Fuel 

Miscellaneous 

Supplies 



^2,434.56 
1,248.44 
2.572.24 



90 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



Repairs, .... 

Insurance .... 

]\Ianiial training, maintenance 

Manual training, salaries 

Janitors 

Military drill, maintenance 

IMilitary drill, salary 

Teachers' salaries 

Superintendent's salary 

Financial agent's salary 

Text-books 

Transportation 

Replacing worn-out equipment, moving and fit- 
ting up new manual training school 

Tuition paid in advance for term March 25, 
1907. to June 14, 1907 .... 

Balance ....... 



, $2,632.28 

1,537.10 

639.66 

3,256.75 

4,906.70 

78.75 

100.00 

46,491.42 

2,000.00 

839.87 

3,253.94 

534.25 

963.77 

63.20 
5,339.33 

$78,892.26 



Evening School. 



Appropriation . 

Expenditures 

Balance March 22, 1907 



. $1,000.00 

$801 ,61 
198.39 



$1,000.00 $1,000.00 



Concord, N. H., March 11, 1907. 
We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts (except text-book account) of the financial agent, 
and find the exjjenditures correctly cast and a proper 
voucher for each item. 

HENRY II. METCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 91 

Concord, N. H., March 11, 1907. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing ac- 
count of the text-book account, and find the same correctly 
cast and proper vouchers for each item of expenditure. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Auditor. 



Concord, N. H., March 11, 1907. 
We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
account of the Night school and find same correctly east and 
proper vouchers for each item of expenditure. 

HENRY H. METCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 

Cost Per Capita. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses . $25.12 

Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, draw- 
ing, superintendent, etc. .... 16.80 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing, and superintendent .... 15.35 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive music, draw- 
ing, superintendent, in all schools below the 
High school ....... 11.36 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive music, draw- 
ing, superintendent, in the High school . . 33.89 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools ........ 1.07 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in 
High school 1.40 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in 

all schools below the High school ... .90 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material . .56 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material and 
tuition . . . . . - . . . 18.71 



92 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cost per pupil for paper, . . . . , 

Cost per pupil for pens ..... 

Cost per pupil for pencils ..... 

Cost per pupil for manual training, entire 
Cost per pupil for manual training, salaries 
Cost per pupil for manual training, material 
Cost per pupil for wood- and iron-working, in- 
clusive of instruction ..... 

Cost per pupil for wood- and iron-working, ex- 
clusive of instruction . , . 
Cost per pupil for cooking, inclusive of instruc- 
tion ......... 

Cost per pupil for cooking, exclusive of instruc- 
tion ....... 

Cost per pupil for sewing, inclusive of instruction 
Cost per pupil for sewing, exclusive of instruction 
Cost per pupil for drawing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion 

Cost per pupil for drawing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion ........ 

Cost per pupil for music, inclusive of instruction . 
Cost per pupil for music, exculsive of instruction 
Cost per pupil for military drill, inclusive of in- 
struction ....... 

Cost per pupil for military drill, exclusive of in- 
struction ........ 



$0,077 

.015 

.016 

3.23 

2.70 

.53 

5.60 

1.37 

2.54 

.42 
1.81 
.028 

.42 

.08 
.45 
.05 

.84 

.13 



Tuition Receipts. 



Walker school .... 


$8.00 


Dewey school .... 


27.00 


Dewey Training school 


30.00 


High school .... 


. 2,074.99 


Kimball school . . . . 


. . 71.00 


Penacook school 


36.20 


Rumford school 


38.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 93 

Cogswell school $4.00 

Eastman school 22.00 

Chandler school 112.00 

$2,423.19 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

Ladies and Gentlemen : I am privileged to submit to 
you my annual report, being the forty-seventh of its series. 

ATTENDANCE. 

1905. 1906. Increase. Decrease. 

Number of pupils in public schools 2,486 2,886 40 

" " parochial scliools 553 519 .. 34 

" " private schools 37 29 8 

3,436 3,434 40 42 

Net decrease — 2 

PUBLIC DAY SCHOOLS. 

1905. 1906. Increase. Decrease. 

Number of pupils in the high schools 322 340 18 

" " grammar schools 940 843 .. 97 

" " primary schools. 1,336 1,4.50 114 

kindergarten. ^.. 248 253 5 

2,486 2,886 137 97 

Net increase 40 

(For other data see Table of Attendance.) 

Attendance. 

From the above enumeration we find that the net loss 
in all schools has been just two for the year ending June 
15, 1906, due to a falling off in the attendance in private 
and parochial schools. The net gain in the public schools 
has been forty. Since the time of this enumeration addi- 
tional parochial schools have been established, causing the 
withdrawal of a large number of public school pupils ; 
nevertheless, the attendance has held well up to that of the 
preceding year. 

The enrollment in the southern part of the district 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

increases steadily, and if continued, will call for additional 
room. The institution of a central grammar school in the 
old High school building seems to reduce to a necessity 
for the avoidance of further building construction south 
of Pleasant street. This arrangement would give us one 
extra room in the Merrimack building and four in the 
Chandler building, additional accommodations which can 
be used in reducing the number of grades to a room and 
in allowing the pupils of the forenoon classes to attend 
school all day. The attendance at the High school reached 
a maximum of 353 this year. About 190 pupils will gradu- 
ate from the grammar schools next June, and it is fair to 
assume that 150 of these pupils will enter the High school 
in the fall and that the attendance will be somewhat above 
400. Only two forenoon classes have been maintained this 
year, one each in the Franklin and Dewey school buildings. 
Although these schools have done good work and we have 
made the best of the situation, nevertheless, pupils of these 
ages should have the benefit of two daily sessions. The 
attendance at the Eastman, Garrison and Harriet P. 
Dame schools has varied little except in the latter, which 
was largely increased by the' transfer of the Black hill 
pupils. 

In view of the heavy rate of school tax in this . district, 
additional construction of school buildings should be the 
result of only absolute necessity and the plant which the 
district now has ought to be utilized to its fullest extent. 
No room should remain idle for even a half day if reason- 
able adjustment and consolidation can render it unneces- 
sary. 

Transportation of Pupils. 

Under the state law. the school board is permitted to use 
a portion of the school money, not exceeding twenty-five 
per cent., for conveying pupils to school. Upon petition 
of the parents residing at Black hill, asking for the trans- 
portation of school children living in that district, the 



96 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Board of Education authorized such provision to be made. 
During the spring term pupils were conveyed by the 
Eagle stable teams to the Penacook and Rumford schools, 
but in the fall, these being overcrowded, it was thought best 
to send the children to the Harriet P. Dame school at the 
Plains. The transportation since last fall has been in charge 
of William H. Gay. 

School Sessions. 

During the spring term a new arrangement of school ses- 
sions was given a trial as follows: 

Forenoon session, 8.30 to 12. 

Afternoon session, 1.30 to 3. 

This was done to facilitate the accomplishment of the 
course of study and thus minimize school fatigue through a 
more logical arrangement of the studies. At the end of the 
term an expression of opinion from the parents, pupils and 
teachers as to the feasibility of the scheme was taken and 
submitted to the Board of Education. 

The opinions received were largely in favor of continuing 
the plan. In consequence, the board voted it a permanent 
arrangement for all the lower schools. 

1. Number of parents expressing an opinion . 1,910 

2. Number of parents reporting in favor of the 

scheme ........ 1.629 

3. Number of parents reporting not in favor of it . 221 

4. Number of parents indifferent as to the scheme 50 

5. Number of pupils expressing an opinion . . 2,041 

6. Number of pupils reporting in favor of the 

scheme ........ 1,852 

7. Number of pupils reporting not in favor of the 

scheme ........ 185 

8. Number of pupils indifferent as to the scheme . 4 

9. Number of teachers expressing an opinion . 51 

10. Number of teachers in favor of the scheme . 45 

11. Number of teachers not in favor of the scheme . 3 

12. Number of teachers indifferent as to the scheme 3 



school report. 97 

Non-Resident Pupils. 

There are a large number of non-resident pupils in the 
schools. They are to be found in all the grades, which 
seems to show that the school privileges afforded here are 
held in esteem by outsiders. The tuition list in the High 
school has shown a decided decrease owing to the fact that 
many towns have met the requirements of the state in 
regard to " approved High schools," thus keeping their 
children in home institutions. 

The specific requirements of the state superintendent of 
public instruction concerning examination for admission to 
high schools has a deterrent effect upon outsiders from ap- 
pearing for such examination. The number of those pre- 
senting themselves last year was seven. One received 
special permission to enter our High school from the state 
superintendent, one failed of passing and five were 
admitted, having attained the required average. Of these 
five, three were obliged to take a second examination after 
having passed the summer vacation in extra preparation. 

Night School. 

At the annual meeting held March 29, 1906, a resolution 
was offered that the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) 
be raised and appropriated for maintaining a night school 
during the winter months, and it was so voted. In accord- 
ance with this vote the Board of Education authorized the 
superintendent to start such a school. It began Tuesday 
night, January 1, 1907. The four roouLS on the lower floor 
of the High school building on School street were properly 
fitted up for this work, supplies purchased, teachers hired 
and everything done to make the project a success. Adver- 
tisements which were inserted in the daily papers, asking 
for the registration of the names of those who purposed to 
attend such a school, brought forth a preliminary enroll- 
ment of eighty. A definite report of the attendance cannot 
be given here because the school is in session at the time of 

7 



98 CITY OF CONCORD. 

this writing. About one hundred and ninety different peo- 
ple have been in attendance, one hundred and thirty-seven 
being the largest number present on any one night. 

The following teachers were chosen and they have done 
efficient work. Princii)al, Kenneth L. Morse; assistants, 
Mildred K. Bentley, Grace L. Aldrich, Delia I. Lewis and 
Bernice E. Hoyt. 

The school is composed largely of people born in foreign 
countries, nearly all of Avhom come with a strong desire to 
learn our language so that they may conform more easily 
to our laws and customs, thus rendering their citizenship 
effective and desirable. Many come through the observance 
of the school laws which have been carefully enforced. 
These people, earnest, industrious, and well-disposed, will do 
credit to our country and its institutions. 

The studies pursued are elementary reading, writing, 
arithmetic, spelling, history, and one class each in English 
grammar and algebra. I believe this money to have been 
expended wisely and well. All people who have not been 
offered the advantages of day schools should be granted 
extensive privileges in this direction. When we consider 
that many men and women do not get home from work until 
6.30 p. m., have their supper and appear regularly for 
instruction for three months three nights a week, we may 
then readily understand what the school means to many 
who have a strong desire to improve their education. I 
recommend that it be continued next winter. 



Penmanship. 

The results in penmanship do not show up to advantage 
because of the recent change from the vertical system to the 
slant. The best penmanship I have ever seen produced by 
the schools was done in the vertical script. It was the most 
natural, the most artistic, the easiest taught, and the easiest 
learned. A gradual falling away from the vertical script 



SCHOOL REPORT. 99 

has been noticeable in the entire country, due to commercial 
criticism almast wholly. From my own observations I find 
that many pupils write the vertical hand naturally and 
others write the slant. What is hard for the one may be 
easy for another. Some cities have solved the problem by 
allowing the pupil to choose between the two and without 
close investigation it appears to me to possess many advan- 
tages. 

Pupil Government. 

Pupil government has been tried in the Pumford school 
during the .year. There is a marked difference of opinion 
among educators regarding the educational value of this 
scheme, valid arguments being adduced l)oth for and 
against it. In this building, however, it has proved its 
efficiency in many ways. Noticeable among other things is 
the entire absence of corporal punishment. It is hoped that 
the general effect of this scheme may be good and lasting. 
The rules which have been strictly enforced follow. 

RULES. 

1. No loud talking to each other in the lines. 

2. No disorder in the lines. 

3. No loud talking in the basement. 

4. No disorderly conduct in the halls. 

5. No snow-balling in the yards. 

6. No disorderly conduct in the yard. 

7. No damage to the property of Union School District. 

8. To conduct oneself as befitting a pupil of the Rum- 
ford school. 

FIRST CORPS OF OFFICERS. 

Chief, Robert McMullen ; assistants, Edna Wright, Wales 
Allen. 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SUBORDINATES. 

William Bennett, Ruth Merrill, Russell Fraser, Alice 
Drury, Edward Whitaker, Ethel Dyer, Chandler White, 
Jeanette Crowell, Henry Donovan, Rose Tardiff. 

Training School. 

The thing most worthy of note in connection with this 
school for the past year has been the alteration in the 
requirements of the training course. The former plan of 
admitting trainers three times a year was changed so as to 
admit them but once a year at the beginning of the fall 
term, and the length of the course was made seventy-six 
weeks instead of fifty-six as previously, arrangements which 
will work advantageously in many ways. Three young 
ladies graduated in December last and two will graduate at 
the end of this winter term. 

The San Francisco Fire. 

A sympathetic spirit for the suffering caused by the 
catastrophe at San Francisco last spring was shown by our 
public schools in contributing $147.94 to the general relief 
fund raised by the citizens of Concord. 

High School. 

The High school has had a year of progress. At the end 
of the spring term Mr. Doring, Mr. Moore and IMr. Stan- 
dish, master, sub-master and teacher of science respectively, 
resigned their positions to go elsewhere. The committee 
chose for their successors Mr. C. F. Cook, master; INIr. Ken- 
neth L. ]\Iorse, sub-master ; and I\Iiss Edith Fernald, teacher 
of science. The work has been going on with as little fric- 
tion as could be expected and steady advancement is notice- 
able. In view of the fact that next year tlie attendance will 
be largely increased, the new High school building Avill be 
ready none too soon. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

The course of study has been changed by taking away 
alternative commercial arithmetic and concrete geometry, 
making geometry required and commercial arithmetic elec- 
tive. Mediaeval and modern history was also made an 
elective for the sophomore class. In the senior class Ameri- 
can history and civics was made a required study. Sopho- 
more English was given four recitations a week instead of 
three and senior stenography five instead of four. These 
changes hold only for the present year, but next year a 
complete revision of the course of study should be made to 
meet the requirements of the state department of public 
instruction. 

A new system of keeping the records was installed to 
enable the principal to make more frequent reports to the 
parents. Hereafter these reports Avill be sent out at the 
end of the fifth, tenth, jEifteenth and nineteenth weeks, and 
the regular examinations will be held at the end of each 
semester, thus making a more convenient unit for determin- 
ing ranks. 

The principal shows a praiseworthy interest in making 
the following recommendations : 

1. The expansion of the commercial course to a compre- 

hensive four years' course. 

2. The institution of a mechanic arts course, to which I 

have alluded in another place. 

3. Provision for yearly additions to the school library. 

4. Provision for schoolroom decoration, because, as he 

says, "attractive schoolrooms have an educational 
value which, though unconscious, is none the less 
powerful. ' ' 
I commend the efforts of Mr. Cook in his earnest en- 
deavor to bring the school up to a standard as high as it has 
ever attained in previous years. 

Manual Training. 

The accomplishments in the different departments of 
manual training were quite forcibly demonstrated in the 



102 CITY OF CONCORD. 

annual exhibition of the work held last June, when a large 
number of people viewed with expressed satisfaction the 
results of a year's work. 

Wood- and iron-work: It was decided to hire Mr. 
George W. Cunningham to take charge of the drawing of 
this department, in order that the regular classes might be 
more wieldy and more individual attention be given to the 
work. The east room of the Union Street school building 
was fitted up for temporary usage, crudely, but well 
enough to carry on the work until the new building is 
ready for occupancy. The results in both departments 
have been commensurate with the degree of application 
shown by the pupils and the conditions prevailing here. 
The new High school building has obstructed the light 
somcAvhat and caused inconvenience. The principal asks 
for longer periods of work for the high school classes. 

Cooking: The attendance at the cooking school in- 
creases steadily each year and the pupils are reported to 
evince a keen interest in the exercises given. This is true 
especially of the younger pupils who seem to grasp more 
easily than the older ones the essential features of the 
work. For this reason the instructor asks for the enroll- 
ment of class K in cooking. 

Sewing: The instructor suggests the following things as 
necessary for the room in the new manual training build- 
ing: 

1. Plenty of fioor space. 

2. Suitable light. 

3. Blackboards. 

4. Cupboards for books. 

5. Closets and drawers for work and supplies. 

6. A cutting table. 

7. An ironing table. 

8. Chairs and small tables for each girl. 

9. Toilet room with hot and cold water, good soap and 

towels. 

10. A room to store model books. 

11. A room for " trying on " garments. 



school report. 103 

Drawing. 

The instructor in drawing has devoted her time solely to 
drawing, having had nothing to do with baslcetry as here- 
tofore. In consequence of this, basketry has not had the 
services of one who is competent to handle this work as it 
ought to be. The exhibition in June showed remarkable 
advancement in drawing during the past year, which was 
further emphasized by the prizes which some of the pupils 
took at the monthly contest instituted by the School Arts 
Book Company, at Worcester, ]\Iass. The following pupils 
appeared as winners of prizes. 

Second prize : Ethel Parker, Merrimack school. 
Third prize : Ada L. Huntley, Kimball school. 

Caroline Pearson, Rumforcl school. 
Fourth prize : Hugo Erickson, West Concord school. 

Ruth Chase, Helena H. Haggett, Phoebe 
M. Jenks, Bessie McDuffie, Kimball 
school. 
Alice J. Lindgren, Tahanto school. 

The teacher summarizes as follows: " As far as draw- 
ing is concerned, I feel that the Concord schools need an 
additional teacher, more time for the subject and a well- 
supervised course in manual work for the primary 
grades. ' ' 

A beginning has been made in schoolroom decoration 
through an appropriation of fifty dollars from the prize 
speaking fund, voted by the Board of Education for this 
purpose. The lowest primary rooms in the Tahanto 
and Penacook schools have been fitted up with appropriate 
pictures selected by a special committee consisting of Mrs. 
Hill, of the Board of Education; Miss Bell, drawing in- 
structor; and the superintendent of schools. The cost of 
these pictures framed, slightly exceeded the amount appro- 
priated and was met by taking the premium money given 
by the Concord State Fair Association. 



104 city of concord, 

Music. 

Much attention has been paid this year to sight-singing 
in the regular grades and to the production of soft tones in 
the kindergartens. Mr. Conant makes the statement that 
with the exception of a single school, the standard of musi- 
cal attainment in the schools is higher than ever before. 

The High school chorus numbers about one hundred and 
fifty voices. While the annual concert of last year was not 
a financial success, it is hoped that the one to be held this 
spring will be much more remunerative and that the gen- 
eral public will respond in such numbers as to make up for 
the deficiency of last year. In addition to this chorus, a 
boys' glee club and a girls' glee club have been formed 
with about twenty voices in each. The usual course in the 
training school has been well sustained and the routine 
work of the other schools faithfully performed. 

Kindergartens. 

In the fall the Walker kindergarten was discontinued 
and a primary school established in its place. This allowed 
two sessions a day for all primary pupils in this building. 
A new kindergarten was started in the Tahanto building, 
the highest primary room being given up. This kinder- 
garten started with but few pupils but it has grown 
steadily until now it has over twenty. This will steadily 
increase and eventually become a large kindergarten, doing 
as effective work as any other in the city. Of the work in 
general I can say only words of praise due to close super- 
vision, better conditions and hearty co-operation. 

Frequent mothers' meetings have been held to acquaint 
the parents more fully with the nature of this feature of 
the public school system. 

I am pleased to report that a movement has been made 
to free the kindergartens from the burden of the musical 
instruments which have for years labored hard to lay 
claim to the name pianoforte but miserably failed. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 105 

The afternoon kindergartens have accomplished good 
results despite the fact that this is not the ideal time of day 
for such work. 

Military Drill. 

The report of the instructor shows that drills have been 
held regularly twice a week. The competitive drill of last 
spring was highly praised by Lieutenant Hunt of the 
United States Army. The cadets had a Field Day in June 
and were also represented in the Interscholastic Competi- 
tive drill at the Institute of Technology. Colonel Mason 
makes an earnest plea for compulsory uniforming of the 
company, for weekly inspection of the equipment, and the 
addition of more arms and accoutrements, there not being 
enough to equip the present company. 

Mechanic Arts Course. 

The trend of educational thought is toward arranging 
courses that work for the development of the whole man. 
The old courses which sprang largely from clerical sources 
have proved inadequate for the masses of the people. For 
years the classics have been hurled over the heads of many 
pupils who have taken such worlv as a matter of course 
without that careful thought and intelligent guidance 
which such a choice calls for. This has resulted in many 
cases of arrested mental development, discouragement over 
school work, and withdrawal from school at an age when 
proper counsel in the selection of studies would have meant 
two and three j^ears more of valuable school life. We note 
with satisfaction that reason is coming to its own in recog- 
nizing the fact that the making of a man is not confined to 
any stereotyped course of study, also that that which trains 
the hand often employs the student's best faculties and 
arouses thought even better than a strictly mental course 
can do. This trend of thought is shown conclusively by the 
constantly increasing number of scientific courses incor- 



106 CITY OF CONCORD. 

porated into the regular school curricula each successive 
year; the vast sums of money expended in equipping such 
courses properly ; the attitude of the highest educational 
authorities 'regarding them and the curtailment of the 
" old school " requirements for admission to college. All 
of these things tend to show the policy of the future in 
matters educational. 

The scientific courses of the past have not shown a unity 
of purpose, or a logical correlation that ought to be mani- 
fest if the greatest good is to be gained from them. Such 
correlation can be gained best by instituting a course which 
shall be so comprehensive in its scope as to begin with the 
lowest grades of school and extend in logical order through 
the high school, culminating in a thorough theoretical and 
practical fit for any ordinary technical school in the coun- 
try and at the same time giving an educational equipment 
sufficient to enable one to enter upon life's work with an 
assurance of proper mental development. Pupils will be 
attracted to such a course because its ultimate design will 
appeal to them, because it is natural, and because in appeal- 
ing to all the faculties it enables them to get something 
from it which mere book-learning cannot supply. Scholars 
graduate from high schools too little appreciative of the 
equality of rights, and knowing less of what real life 
means. IMany courses lead to such high ideals that pupils 
are discouraged at the start in a futile attempt to reach 
them. There should be at least one course that holds fast to 
the surface of the earth, having for its exemplification prac- 
ticability and power. The Avork should be so arranged that 
it cannot be used as makeshift for the shirk and the lazy 
pupil. Intensiveness should be one of its strong fea- 
tures, and a graduation from it should count as much 
as that from any other. It should include all common 
branches of the old courses centred around the subject of 
manual training in its comprehensiveness. No city in the 
state at the present time has better facilities for carrying 
on such a course. The additional expense entailed would be 



SCHOOL REPORT, 107 

but little, we having at this time a new building nearly 
ready for use and four of the necessary departments now 
quite well equipped. It is the purpose of this report to 
bring the matter to the attention of the board and I recom- 
mend that a trial be given it. The results, I am sure, will 
show it to be both profitable and popular. 

School Work and Its Hindrances. 

The results accomplished by the schools have been such 
as to inspire one with confidence in their efficiency. The 
teachers generally have shown their usual energy in striv- 
ing to raise the standard and more harmony has pre- 
vailed in all the departments. Teachers' meetings have 
been called at intervals to aid in the execution of the 
course of stud}'. The Concord Teachers' Association has 
had the most prosperous season in its history. As an ad- 
junct to this association in giving it a mark for actual 
work, the grammar teachers have met frequently to dis- 
cuss matters tending to broaden their educational horizon. 
To me this is a very significant and hopeful departure for 
our schools. Nothing is so detrimental to the teacher and 
to the school as a feeling on her part that things are just 
about right and further educational effort is useless. When 
a teacher, a superintendent, or any one else connected 
with educational affairs lapses into such a condition the 
" educational rust " has begun to form and should be 
removed at once. The best results are brought about by 
the " live " teacher and every parent should insist upon 
having his child taught by one. The various subjects of 
arithmetic, history, geography, spelling and language are 
taught as well as at any other time during my incum- 
bency. The question' of reaching a high standard of school 
work is not so perplexing a problem as maintaining such a 
standard after it has once been realized. To maintain a 
standard requires constant renewal of those forces by 
which it has been raised — of teachers of character and 



108 CITY OP CONCORD, 

power — of material which is up-to-date, and of pupil 
character which tends to purity and not to the frivolities 
of the present time. It has been my privilege in former 
reports to write about the morale of the schools and, in 
view of conditions prevailing in the country at large, I see 
no reason why I should not continue to do so. If five hours 
a day cannot be given to the education of child pure and 
simple without the distractions which many forms of social 
life and the unhealthful craze of modern athletics is wont 
to force upon the formative period of manhood and 
womanhood; if moral force in a community is not strong 
enough to make up for the woful lack of responsibility on 
the part of parents; if the general pul)lic alloM's the 
questionaljle customs of college life to create in the public 
school pupil a spirit of insubordination, of lawlessness, of 
contempt for parental authority, of constant breaches of 
even the commonest forms of politeness on the street, in 
the home, at church and at school, will some well-informed 
person tell me what a common school education is going to 
stand for in the future? The worst of the matter is that 
such lack of parental government is not confined to any 
particular stratum of society. In some of its worst forms 
it is found in homes where the very opposite would be 
naturally expected. Pupils from such homes can work 
more harm to a school in one hour than a less prominent 
pupil can in a year. If education is to stand for anything 
it must have the hearty co-operation of all in stamp- 
ing out all forms of social evil in every home and in every 
school. The idea that the highest good of education can be 
realized without insistence upon strict moral conduct and 
the upholding of a teacher's authority is, to me, one that 
is too absurd to admit of argument. The trouble with 
schools is not that the essentials are not well taught; not 
that the teachers lack conscientiousnessMu their work; not 
that too little time is set apart for school use ; nor that 
enough money is not spent for popular education. The 



SCHOOL REPORT. 109 

trouble lies in the fact that some teachers do not set a 
standard of character high enough ; that the noxious cus- 
toms of private institutions are fastening themselves on 
our public schools, and that the standard of parental 
authority bears no comparison to that of years gone by. 
It is time for people to understand that school is a public 
institution, to be supported by public taxes, to be kept in 
the interests of the children, to be recognized as a distinct 
factor in the preservation of our traditional rights, and 
that the unwholesome customs "of private institutions 
should be frowned upon when an attempt is made to fasten 
them upon the public school. Conditions in Concord are 
not so bad as they are in many other cities and there is no 
good reason Avhy they should be. The time to stop any- 
thing of a contagious nature is at the beginning. I believe 
I represent the public temper when I say that all parents 
wish the schools to be kept for the moral, physical, and 
mental well-being of the children and that not one of these 
things should be neglected. 

With feelings of gratitude for the support given me 
during the past year by the Board of Education, the 
teachers, and the general public, I respectfully submit this 
report. 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 
Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



112 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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1 1 4 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 





Wood and Iron. 


Sewing. 


Cooking. 


SCHOOLS. 


a: 

■ft 

ft 

o 
t-l 


S 


it 

Oil 


a) . 

**-( o 


to 
» 
to 
S! 
c« 


!« 




53^ 


05 
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ft 


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0) 
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11 


> 



11 

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4J C 






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(C 


0® 


0* 


Ol 






H 


^J 


H 


H 


h-1 


H 


H 


hJ 


H 


High 


51 


9 


42 


25 


6 


19 


4 


2 


2 


Kimball 


59 
45 


4 
5 


55 
40 


90 
112 


13 
9 


77 
103 


24 
21 


1 
2 


23 


Rumford 


19 


Merrimack 


4-1 


4 


40 


50 


6 


44 


36 


2 


34 


Walker 


39 


4 


35 


71 


11 


60 


17 




16 




38 


G 


32 


32 
38 
28 


7 
4 
1 


25 
34 
27 


3 




3 






















35 
19 
2 
33 
30 


10 
3 


25 
19 
2 

30 
30 


45 
30 
15 
25 
49 

610 


4 
3 
3 
1 
10 

78 


41 

27 
12 
24 
39 

532 


13 
8 
3 

23 

46 


3 
3 

I 
6 


13 




5 






Parochial 


22 


Chandler 


40 






Tolisills 


395 


45 


350 


198 


21 


177 







SCHOOL REPORT. 



115 



CO 
H 

< 


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caused to 

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03 




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3 







116 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1906. 
Summary. 



ber children enumerated in 1899 . 






2,621 




1900 . 






2,766 




" 1901 . 






2,856 




1902 . 






2,970 




1903 . 






8,128 




" 1904 . 






3,162 




1905 . 




' 


3,226 




" 1906 . 






3,241 



1905. 

Whole number of boys 

Whole number of girls 

Number attending school since September 1, 
" " public schools 

" " parochial schools . 

"■ " private schools 

" " Rolfe and Rumford Asy 

" between 6 and 16 never attended 

" between 5 and 6 never attended 

Moved to district since Septend^er 1, 1905 

Not complied with law 



1905 



Nativity of Pakent. 



American born 

Foreign boi 

Dane 

Dutcli 

Swiss 

German 

Armenian 

Finn 



1,563 

1,678 

3,210 

2,618 

574 

3 

15 



31 

152 

5 



2,164 


Russian 




26 


1,077 


Scotch 


. 


41 


2 


Nova Scotian 


48 


2 


Italian 


. 


57 


3 


English 




104 


6 


Swede 


, 


105 


6 


Irish 




223 


11 


French C 


inadian 


443 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



117 



American born 
Foreign born 
Armenian . 
Scotch 
Russian 



Nativity of Child. 

3,122 Nova Scotian 

119 English 

1 Italian 

6 Swede 

lU French Canadian 



11 
12 
13 
14 
52 



HIGH SCHOOL TABLE 

Showing Number op Students Taking Each Study, 1906. 



Class. 


Grad. 


Sen. 


Jun. 


Soph. 


Fresh. 


Total. 


English 




61 

27 


70 
49 

9 
20 

3 


102 
89 
18 
61 
C 


134 

60 
121 


367 


Frencli 


1 


166 


German 


27 


Latin 

Greek 


1 


14 
5 


156 
14 


Algebra 




121 


Plane Geometry 






11 


95 
12 


106 


Commercial Arithmetic 

Solid Geometrv 


2 


12 
27 


12 
12 


Review Mathematics 








29 


Physiography 










Biology 




4 

1 

22 

58 

36 

3 


3 
32 

1 
21 

1 

7 


6 




13 


Physics 


3 

4 
3 


36 


Chemistry 






26 


History 


35 

1 
29 
5 


113 

50 
64 


231 


Civil Government 


41 


Manual Training 


89 




69 


Bookkeeping 


1 


47 
12 
24 
21 


28 


76 


Trigonometry 






12 


Stenography 


4 
5 


27 
30 






55 


Typewriting 







56 


Totals 


■ 27 


374 


312 


459 


542 


1,714 







118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings 
and teacliers. 


Positiou and 


1 Grades or subjects 
room. taught. 




Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 


High. 
Charles F. Cook 


Principal 


Mathematics, Amer- 
ican History,Civil 
Government 

Math'm'ics, History 

French, German.. . 
English 


$1,800 
900 


5'' Pleas.ant St 


Kennetli L Morse.... 




n ■Rnmfoivl .^t CPnnnv 


Elizabeth Averill.. .. 




N. H.) 
900 '^3 Rumford St 




" 


800 3 Ehn St 




" 


Latin, Greek 

Greek, Latin .. . 


800 16 South St. 


Louise A. Ordway.. . 


,, 


800 113 No. State St. 

650 G Blake St. (Cambrid 

INIass.) 
800 39 Washington St. (W 

1 lace, N. S.) 
800 s.t; Pprlfiv Sf, 


Mildred K. Bentley.. 


.. 


English, Bookkeep- 
ing, Typewriting. 

Ancient, Mediicval 
and JNlodern Euro- 
pean History 

Biology, Comm'cial 
Geography, Plane 


May B. McLam 


„ 


MaryB. Bartlett 





750 

750 

700 

800 

650 


99 No. State St. (Eppi 
N. H.) 


Grace V. Knowles. . . 


Stenography, Type- 
writing, English, 
Chemistry, Physics 
Algebra, English... 

Class L 


23 Rumford St. (Cambrid 


Edith Fernald 


.. 


Mass.) 
9 Tahanto St. 


Lillian Yeaton 


" 


665 No State St. 


Kimball. 

Elizabeth M. McAfee. 


Principal, room 6.. 
Assistant " 5.. 

" 8.. 

" 7.. 

" 4.. 
1.. 

'• 3.. 

" " 2.. 

" " 2.. 

Principal, room 8.. 
Assistant " 7.. 

" 6.. 
" 4.. 
" 3.. 
" 2.. 

1.. 
" 5.. 
" 5.. 

Principal, room 3. . 

Assistant " 4.. 
" '' 2.. 


sTniirt St 


Jessie N. Stimson.. .. 


Class K 


550 9 Holt St. 


Lenora B. Caldwell.. 


Class K 


550.'ifi ("entre St. 


Mabelle A. Boutelle. 
Anna D. Shaw 


Classes 1, J 

•' G, H 


550 
550 
550 

550 
475 

200 
600 


21 South St. 
72 School St. 


LucieH. Chamberlain 

Belle E. Shepard 

Edith M.Ray 

Myrta B. Lowe 

RUMFORD. 

Harriet S. Emmons.. 


" D, E, F 

" A,B,C 

Kindergarten 

Kindergarten 

Class L 


22 So. Spring St. (NewiD 
hain.N.H.) 

10 South State St. 

11 No. Spring St. (Hi 
boroiigh,U. V.,N. H) 

13 Holt St. (New Ipswi 
N. H.) 

fi South State St. 


Cora T. Fletcher 




500 41 School St. (Lawren 


Florence A. Chandler 
Annette Frescott 


Classes J, K 

•' H, 1 


475 
500 
375 
550 

550 
475 
225 

800 

575 
450 


Mass.) 
(Penacook, N. H.) 
25 Green St. 


Agnes K. Ma.sson 


" F, G 


( Penacook, N. H.) 


Fannie B. Lotlirop. . . 

Gara E. McQuesten. . 
Katharine L. Remick 
Nellie T. Halloran .. 

Chandler. 

Luella A. Dickerman 


" D,E 

" A,B. C 

Kindergarten 

Kindergarten 

Class M, Latin, Lit- 
erature, American 
History, Engli s h 
History, Concrete 


36 So. Spring St. (Bris' 

N.H.) 
9 Wall St. 
4 Fayette St. 
30 Perley St. 

64 South Street. 


Mabel L Durivage... 
Ada M. Mann 


Class M, Math'm'ics, 
Spelling, English, 
Co m p o s i t i n. 
Bookkeeping 

Cla.ss M, Arithmetic, 
Latin, English 
C om pos i tio n. 
Spelling, History. 


7 Fremont St. (Isle : 
Motte, Vt. 

63 School St. (Woodsvi 
N.H.) 



SCHOOL REPORT. 
SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



119 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Chandler.— Con. 

ulia M. Melifant.... 
•ttices of Union 
School District: 
Superintendent, fi- 
nancial agent, tru- 
ant officer, cooking 
school. 

Merrimack. 

ulia E. Talpey 



[arriet C. Kimball .. 

linnie E. Ladd 

lOttie E. Pearson 

Walker. 

rrace L. Barnes 

''iola J. Brock 

'lorence E George.. 

Istlier Hodge 

legina J. Glennon... 
Iva H. Tandy 

Penacook. 

lary E. Melifant.... 
innie M. Branon ... 
nizabeth J. Donovan 
-aura M. Andrus 

Franklin. 



lary G. Ahern 

ibbie A. Donovan. 
Cdna M. Kennedy . 
tella M. French .. 
Lgnes V. Sullivan . 
.eila A. Hill 



Assistant, clerical 
work 



Principal, room 1 

Assistant, " 2 
" 3 
" 4 



Principal, room 3 
Assistant, " 4 

" 2 

" 6 

" 5 

" 1 



Principal, room 4 

Assistant, " 3 

" 2 

" 1 



Assistant, 



Principal, room 3 
'■ 4 
2 
1 
1 
1 



Dewey. 

iddie F. Straw j Principal, room 6 

lelen L. Southgate.. Assistant, 
lusan M. Little ... 
Itella M. Britton ., 
Llice M. Sargent . , 
jillian J. Chase..., 

lary Fernald 

Jernice E. Hoyt . . 



Grades or subjects 
taught. 



«* m cj 



Class M 

Classes K, L... 
" E,G... 
" A, C, D 

Class L 

•'K 

Classes I, J 

" G,H... 
" D, E, F 
" A, B, 

Classes K, L... 
" H, I, J. 
" E, F, G 
" A, B, C 

Classes I, J 

" F, G, H 
" C, D, E 
" A, B... 

Kindergarten . 



Trainer forPrim'ry 

and Grammar 

Supervisor of Kind. 
Classes L -J 

" F, G, H 

" C, D, E 

a. m., Cla.sses A, B . 
p. M., Kindergarten 



$225 



750 

550 
500 
550 



6.50 
500 

375 
425 
5.50 
300 



600 
500 
400 
325 



600 
500 
55(1 
200 
300 
200 



1,000 
700 
600 
600 
600 
450 
325 
225 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



ssPerley St. 



41 Warren St. (Cape ISied- 

dick. Me.) 
Hopkinton Road. 
72 Washington St. 
52 Beacon St. 



112 Centre St. 

47 Washington St. (Clin- 
ton, Me.) 
23 Union St. 
86 Franklin St. 
12 Perley St. 
66 High St. 



38 Perley St. 
49 South St. 
28 Thorndike St. 
11 Fayette St. 



64 Franklin St. 

264 No. Main St. 

lOBlanchard St. 

East Concord, Route No. 5. 

49 Lyndon St. 

51 Lyndon St. 



101 No. State St. 
2 South Spring St. 
90 School St. 
27 Washington St. 
52 No. State St. 
26 Church St. 
9 Tahanto St. 
(Penacook, N. H.) 



120 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



TRAINING CLASSES. 
Primary and Grammar. 

senior class. 

Graduates December, 1906. 

Jennie Belle Blake (422 No. State St.. West Concord 

Bessie Veuelia Burnham (34 High St., Penacook, N. H 

Alice Melvina Marie Plianeuf 90 Ruinford S 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Graduates March, 1007. 

Julia Frances Foley 100 So. State S 

Caroline Chandler Paul 114 South S 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Graduates June, 1908. 

Winifreil (^liristabel Ackerman (7 Washington St., Penacook, N. P 

Julia (Jnirr (Mark 32 Church S 

Marion Eleanor Haynes 29 Bradley S 

SCHOOL TK^hY.. — Continued. 



Names of l)uildings ti •■.• i 

and teachers. Position and room. 



Grades or subjects 
taught. 



S ft? 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Garrison. 

Celia C. Standish.... 
Ellen B.Dixon 

Bertha L. Holbrook.. 

Mary A. Jones 

Susie F. Goddard .... 
Mary A. McGuire. .. 

lyla Chamberlin 

Grace L. Aldrich 

Ea.stman. 

Mary Flavin 

Grace B. Knnwlton.. 
Abbie T. McDonald.. 
Cecilia P. Jones 

Harriet P. Dame. 

Elizab'th E.Roberts'n 
Evelyini D. Boulay. .. 
Louisa Herbert 

Tahanto. 

SaraE. McClure 

Emma L. Hastings 
Frances (J. Amee 

Cogswell. 

Mary C. Caswell 

Mildred T. Cilley .... 



Principal, 
Assistant, 


room 6 . . 

" 5 .. 


Classes L, M 

" J, K 




" 7 .. 


" H,I 




" 4 .. 


" F, G 




;; 3 .. 

" 1 '.'. 
" 1 .. 


" C,E 

" A,B 

Kindergarten 


Principal, 
Assistant, 


room 1 .. 

" 3 '.'. 
" 4 .. 


Classes L. M 

" H,I.K 

" E, F, H.... 
" A, B,D 


Principal 

Assistant, 

Priiu'ipal, 


room 3 . . 
" 1 '.'. 

room 2 . . 


Classes 5,7, M 

2,3,4 

Class 1 


Classes A, B, C 


Assistant, 


" 1 .. 
1 .. 


Kindergarten 


Principal, 
Assistant, 


room 1 .. 
" 2 . . 


Cla.ssesC, D 

" A,B 



$700(1 Cummings Ave. 
5001532 No. State St., W. Cc 

I cord. (Gloucester. Mas 
500 542 No. State St., W. Cc 

! cord. 
550,(152 No. Main St., Penacoc 

I N. H.) 
500 12 Perley St. (Norwich.V 
450 102 So. State St. 
350 2 ^'iew St., West Concorc 
225|19 Monroe St. 



.550 39 Wari'en St. 
300 38 So. Spring St. 
;J00 79 Rum ford St. 
325 24 Thorndike St. 



350 107 No. State St. 
475 2 Highland St. 
350 103 No. State St. 



(B. 



550 153 No. State St. 

cawen, N. H.) 
400 155 No. State St. 
200 13 Holt St. (Watham,Mas 



500 121 Warren St. 
550 36 So. Spring St. (Duiib 
ton.N.H.) 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



121 



Names of buildiugs 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades or subjects S g S 

taught. r^^S, 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Night School. 

Kenneth L. Morse . . . 

Mildred K. Bentiey.. 

Grace L. Aldrich 

Delia I. Lewis 

Bernice E. Hoyt 

Manual Training, 
Spring Street. 

Union Street. 

Chandler School. 

Bow Brook. 

Special. 

Charles S. Conant . . . 

Grace L. Bell 

Edward F.Gordon... 
Herbert R. Tucker. . . 
Geo. W.Uuuningham 

Ellen J. Jones 

Louise G. Howe 

Mary P. Ring 

Lieut. -Col. Charles L. 
Mason 



Principal, rooms 1 

and 11 

Assistant, rooms 1 

and U 

Assistant, room 2 .. 
" 4.. 
" 3.. 



Not in use. 



Director . . 
Director . 
Principal . 
Assistant 



Janitors. 

Albert W. Thompson 

Arthur J. Taylor 

Ben jaminF. Robinson 

Gland M.Blodgett.. 

Frank L.Dudley 



Charles Ada 

George R. Parmenter 
Philander C. White.. 

Margaret Casey 

Byron K. Woodward. 
George AV. Johnson.. 



Principal . 
Assistant . 
Principal . , 

Instructor 



High School 

Kimball -.. 

Walker and Merri- 
mack 

Dewey and Frank- 
lin 

Penacook and Cogs- 
well 

Rumford 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Tahanto 

Harriet P. Dame. .. 

Chandler 



Wood and iron. 



Drawing 
Sewing. 



Cooking. 



Music 

Drawing 

Wood and iron 



Drawing. 
Sewing . . 



Cooking 

Military drill. 



$144 

72 
72 
72 



13 Rumford St. 

39 Washington St. 
19 Monroe St. 
116 Clinton St. 
(Penacook, N. H.) 



1,175 61 School St. [Conn.) 

1,000 99 No. State St. (Darieu, 

900]20 Auburn St. 

600 17 Hanover St. 

450 25 Favette St. 

650|l.54 No. Main St. 

450,12 Washington St. 

400,34 Pine St. 

100 48 Washington St. 



624 
572 



572 

572 



114 So. State St. 
61 Washington St. 

13 Bradley St. 

61 Franklin St. 



572 87 South St. 

5725 Chapel St. 

572I4 Highland Rd., W.Concord. 

228 1 East Concord. 

120 9 Granite Ave. 

150, Plains, Route 6. 

300 61* School St. 



122 city of concord, 

New TexVchers. 

Leila A. Hill — Assistant Franklin Kindergarten. 

Eva H. Tandy — Walker Third Primary. 

Frances G. Amee — Assistant Tahanto Kindergarten. 

Lurena Ranney — West Concord Second Grammar. 

Abbie T. MacDonald — Eastman First Primary. 

Grace B. Knowlton — Eastman Second Grammar. 

Elizabeth E. Robertson — Harriet P. Dame, principal. 

Charles F. Cook — High school, master. 

Kenneth L. IMorse — High school, sub-master. 

Edith Fernald — High school, physics and chemistry. 

George W. Cunningham — Manual Training, drawing. 

Mary L. Ryan — Penacook First Primary. 

Bessie V. Burnham — Walker Third Grammar, winter term. 

Stella M. French — Franklin Primary. 

Alice M. ;i\T. Phaneuf, Penacook Second Grammar, assistant. 

Substitutes. 
Grace L. Putnam. 
Delia I. Lewis. 
Jennie B. Blake. 
Alice M. M. Phaneuf. 
Bessie V. Burnham. 
Julia F. Foley. 
Caroline C. Paul. 
Winifred C. Ackerman. 
Julia G. Clark. 
Marion E. Haynes. 
Cora J. Russell. 
Mrs. H. Lake. 

Resignations. 

Frederick W. Doring — High school. 

Frank C. Moore — High school. 

Vinnie M. Boutwell — Harriet P. Dame. 

Ellen B. Dixon — Garrison. 

Bertha M. Brett — Penacook First Primary. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 123 

Lucie H. Chamberlain — Kimball Second Primary. 

Vaughn E. Standish — High school. 

Grace L. Aldrich, Garrison Kindergarten, assistant. 

Leave of Absence. 
Florence E. George — AVinter term. 

Kegular Teachers. 

Whole number (male) ...... 2 

Whole number (female) including kindergarten as- 
sistants ........ 78 



Number of 


' Regular Teachers Graduates op 
Training School. 


City 


High school 
Grammar 
Primary 
Kindergarten 





14 
22 

4 


Number Graduates of College. 




High school 
Grammar 
Primary 
Kindergarten 




12 
2 




Graduates op Normal School. 




High school 
Grammar 
Primary 
Kindergarten 


Graduates of High School. 


1 
2 
3 
2 


High school 
Grammar 
Primary 
Kindergarten 





12 

20 

27 

9 



124 city of concord, 

Average Number of Pupils to a Teacher. 

High school 27 

Grammar ........ 40 

Primary ......... 42 

Kindergarten ........ 21 

Special Teachers. 

Whole number (male) ...... 5 

Whole number (female) ...... 4 



ENGLISH PRIZE COI\[POSITION. 

High Schooi;. 

The annual contest for English Prize Compositions in 
the High school was instituted in 1903. The scheme was 
submitted to the Board of Education by the superintendent 
of schools and, on his recommendation, an amount of 
money was appropriated each year from the prize speaking 
fund sufficient to defray the cost of the prizes and other 
expenses of the contest. One month in advance of the con- 
test the pupils are notified of the books from which the sub- 
jects are to be chosen (see No. 1). 

At the time of the contest each pupil is given a slip 
explaining the conditions under which the essay is to be 
written. A number of subjects are submitted from which 
they can make a choice, all taken from the books pre- 
viously mentioned, with the exception of two which are 
*' current events " topics. These subjects are chosen by 
the judge of the contest. 

At the expiration of the time allotted for the writing of 
the essays, the papers, which have been numbered, are 
collected, the numbers changed to other distinguishing 
characters to avoid the identification of the writer by the 
judge. The judge makes his decision with such accom- 
panying remarks as he thinks advisable and the contestants 



SCHOOL REPORT, 125 

are notified of the decision, which, with the two prize 
essays, are printed in full in the daily papers. Appended 
are the preliminary announcement (No. 1), the slip of 
instructions (No. 2), and a summary of the prize winners 
from the beginning of the contests (No. 3). 
High School Prize Contest for English Composition. 
The fourth contest for English Composition prizes in the 
High school will occur at the Chandler school building 

on The award will be 

determined by excellence in the following particulars: 

1. Excellence of thought . . . .40 per cent. 

2. Excellence of composition . . .30 per cent. 

3. Excellence of form including paragraph- 

ing, punctuation and capitalization . 30 per cent. 

Subjects will be taken from the following books: 

The Idylls of the King. 

Macbeth. 

Julius Ca?sar. 

The P^ssay on Burns. 

The DeCoverley Papers. 

Macaulay's Essay on Johnson. 

Irving 's Life of Goldsmith. 

Silas Marner. 

The INIerchant of Venice. 

Scottish Chiefs. 

Topics on Current Events. 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 

Prize Essays. 

]\[ay 5. 1906. 

Five minutes for material. 

Thirty minutes for choosing and thinking about the 
subject. 

Sixty minutes for writing the essay. 
Five minutes for mistakes. 



126 CITY OF CONCORD, 



SUBJECTS. 



1. The Chivalry of Then and Now. Idylls of the King. 

2. The Quest of the Holy Grail. Idylls of the King. 

3. Ghosts that will not Down. ]\Iaebeth. 

4. The Influence of Lady Macbeth upon Her Hus- 

band. Macbeth. 

5. The Power of Oratory. Julius Caesar. 

6. The Rome of Ceesar's Day. Julius Cffisar. 

7. A Poet of the People. The Essay on Burns. 

8. Was the Life of Burns a Failure ? 

The Essay on Burns. 

9. The Spectator. The DeCoverley Papers. 

10. Christmas at Coverley Hall. The DeCoverley Papers. 

11. The Men of Grub Street. 

Essay on Johnson — IMacaulay. 

12. The First Great Lexicographer. 

Essay on Johnson — ^lacaulay. 

13. Poverty as a Spur to Genius. 

Life of Goldsmith — Irving. 
11. Goldsmith and Irving — ^A Contrast. 

Life of Goldsmith — Irving. 

15. Why have Famous Women Written under 

Men 's Names ? Silas Marner. 

16. The Life Problem of Silas Marner. Silas Marner. 

17. Was Shylock a Tragic Character in Shake- 

speare's Mind? , Merchant of Venice. 

18. The Choice of Caskets. Merchant of Venice. 

19. The Scotch Character. Scottish Chiefs. 

20. Why is Scottish Chiefs a Classic? Scottish Chiefs. 

21. Government Ownership, Municipal and Na- 

tional. Current Events. 

22. The Forestry Problem. Current Events. 

MARKING. 

Thought 40 per cent. 

Composition . . . . . .30 per cent. 

Form (capitalization, punctuation, para- 
graphing, etc.) 30 per cent. 

Be careful in your work. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 127 

SUMMARY. 

First Contest— 1903. 

First prize, $15, Alice Winifred Kendall, '' What Eppie 

Did for Silas Marner." 
Second prize, $10, Grace Leverett Aldrich, " The Madness 

of Malvolio." 

Judge, Frances M. Abbott. 

Second Contest— *1904. 

First prize, $15, Roy Marcy Grover. '' Why Doth the Jew 

Pause?" 
Second prize, $10, Mary Louise Phillips, " The Story of 

Uncas. " , 

Judge, Frances M. Abbott. 

Third Contest— 1905. 

First prize, $15, Mary Louise Phillips, " The Ploughboy 

Poet." 
Second prize, $10, Harriet Rose Blodgett, " Sunday at 

Sir Roger's." 

Judge, Rev. Edwin W. Bishop. 

Fourth Contest— 1906. 

First prize, $15, Martha Grace Burroughs, " The Specta- 
tor." 

Second prize, $10, Harriet Rose Blodgett, " The Chivalry 
of Then and Now. ' ' 

Judge, Harlan C. Pearson. 



128 CITY OF CONCORD. 

STAMP SAVING SYSTEM. 

TOTAL AMOUNT SAVED, 





1905-6. 


1906-7. 


Total to date. 


Rumford Scliool, 


S396.00 


$492.08 


$888.08 


Kimball Scliool, 


214.11 


138.50 


352.61 


Walker School, 


125.21 


117.76 


242.97 


Penacook School, 


67.21 


82.53 


149.74 


Dewey School, 


55.16 


95.24 


150.40 


Tahanto School, 


33. ly 


.... 


33.19 


Franklin School, 


• 68.89 


82.84 


151.73 


Garrison School, 


41.52 


70.63 


112.15 


Eastman School, 


.... 


16.37 


16.37 




$1,001.29 


$1,095.95 


$2,097.24 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY CONTEST. 

By the Pupils of the Public Schools of Union School Dis- 
trict, AT Phenix Hall, Thursday Evening, March 14, 
1907. 

programme. 
Original Declamation — High School. 

1. The Value of Manual Training. 

Ralph Clifford Morgan — High School. 

2. Forestry. 

Russell Elvin Perry— High School. 

3. An Exponent of the Farmer. 

Benjamin Kimball Ayers — High School. 

4. The Harmony of Nature. 

Dorris Ladd— High School. 

• Chorus — " To Our Flag." Vocal March. M. James 

Mildred Tenney, Accompanist. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 129 

Miscellaneous Declamation— High School. 

1. " Her Clothes as seen by Him. " Ellis Parker Butler 

Edith Bennett. 

2. "A Lady in a Shoe Store." (Monologue.) Isabelle Fiske 

Elizabeth Fowler. 

Forensic Declamation — Grammar Schools. 

1. "The Death of Garfield." James G. Blaine 

Charles Rumford Walker — Chandler School. 

2. " Spartacus to the Roman Envoys." Anonymous 

Florence Dooning— Harriet P. Dame School, 

3. " The Progress of Freedom. " Daniel Webster 

William John Drinan— Garrison School. 

4. " Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address." 

Walter Edward Maynard— Merrimack School. 

5. "Antony's Address at the Funeral of Caesar. " Shakespeare 

Locke Bullock — Eastman School. 

(a) Quartet— " Mrs. Mulligatawney. " G. W. Conant 
Edna Wright, Elizabeth Bishop, Gertrude Berry 

and Marjorie Barnard. 

(b) Chorus— "All Good Angels." Flotoiv 

Solos and Duet by Gertrude Berry and 
Marjorie Barnard. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — Grammar Schools. 

1. " Robert Sallette. " Laura E. Richards 

Marion Nesmith Hammond — Chandler School. 

2. "The Polish Boy." Ann Stephens 

Grace Ellen Reister— Harriet P. Dame School. 

3. " His Majesty the King." Rudyard Kipling 

Eleanor Frances Radford— Eastman School. 

4. "Mr. Caudle and His Second Wife." Douglass Gerould 

Harriet Magdalin Leighton — Merrimack School. 

5. " For Tommy. " Laura E. Richards 

Elizabeth Mae Williams— Garrison School. 
Chorus — "Fairyland" Waltz. Veazie 



130 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Award of Prizes. 
Original Declamation— High School. 

First Prize, $20, awarded to Dorris Ladd. 
Second Prize, $6, awarded to Russell Elvin Perry. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — High School. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Edith Bennett. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Elizabeth Fowler. 

Forensic Declamation — Grammar Schools. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Charles Rumford Walker, 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Walter Edward Maynard. 

Miscellaneous Declamation— Grammar Schools. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Elizabeth Mae Williams. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Marion Nesmith Hammond. 

Special Prize, $1, awarded to the better of the contestants of the 
schools which won no prize, Grace Ellen Reister, Carrie 
Eleanor Radford. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Hon. John Scammon, Exeter. 
Prof. John R. Eastman, Andover. 
Supt. Henry C. Sanborn, Franklin. 

Prize Speaking Account, 
received. 

Balance from last year's account . . $2,121.17 

Interest on same to January 1, 1907 . 73.39 

Sale of 728 tickets at 35 cents . . 254.80 

$2,449.36 



EXPENDED. 

Rent of Phenix Hall .... $20.00 

Prizes, including books . . . 73.75 

Programs . . . • • 4.50 
George R. Pearce, printing and selling 

tickets 7.50 



SCHOOL REPORT, 131 

Expenses of judges .... $5.00 

English Composition prizes, High school 33.50 

Ardelle Nourse, professional services . 50.00 

Amount voted for school-room decoration 50.00 
E. M. Proctor, putting up and taking 

down chorus seats . . . 2.00 

Miscellaneous expenses . . . 3.00 
Balance on hand as a guaranty fund 

for future contests . . . 2,200.11 

$2,449.36 



ROLL 0¥^ HONOR 



SCHOOLS OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 15, 1906. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Winifred Ackerman, 
Samuel Barrett, 
Leland Baker, 
Cora W. Blodgett, 
Albert J. Brown, 
Agues Collins, 
Trueworthy Dudley, 
William Fitzgerald, 
Mary E. Foley, 
Philroy Gale, 
Dorris Ladd, 
Beatrice Lapierre, 
Helen Morrison, 
Leonard Morrison, 
Annie F. McGuire, 



Maude Nason, 
Elizabeth T. Nash, 
Poorest F. Owen, 
Marion Rolfe (2), 
Katharine Smith, 
Robert Smith, 
Timothy Snell, 
Robert West, 
Charles Chesley, 
Henry McGirr, 
Ralph Morgan, 
Robert Fletcher, 
Guy Swenson, 
Robert Perkins, 
Elizabeth Silva. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

SECOND (;i;ammai{. 



Mildred A. Dearborn (3), 
Mildred A. Lil)by (3), 
Beatrice Sanborn, 
John S. Chandler, 



Richard F. Fletcher, 
Carl P. Merryman, 
George A. Stickney, 
Clayton T. Waits, 



J. Harold Dame. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 
THIRD GRAMMAR. 

Ralph S. Carr (2), Clarence H. Green, 

Ada L. Huntley. 

FOURTH GRAMMAR. 

Dorothy N. Unwin, Ernest W. Zambs {'2). 

FIFTH GRAMMAR. 

Karl F. Kenniston. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Clayton B. Aiken, Lew W. Gilmore, 

Harold M. Dearborn, Stark L. Huntley (2), 

Hester G. Hamilton (2). 



133 



SECOND PRIMARY. 



Helen Currier, 



CecilJ. Unwin (2), 
Flora P. Davis (2). 



THIRD PRIMARY. 

Clarence Hammond, Allen Wilmot. 

KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 



SECOND GRAMMAR. 



G. Wales Allen, 
William A. Bennett, 
Lora M. Brown, 
James P. Bowers, 
Edwin B. Biirgum, 
Howard B. Clifford, 
Paul E. Corriveau, 



Russell M. Frasier, 
Clarence G. Howser, 
George G. Lee (2), 
Marjorie Perkins (2), 
Marion Silsby (2), 
Mabel A. Webster (2), 
Edward M. Whitaker. 



134 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



THIRD GRAMMAR. 



Dorothea Lyford, 
Vivien Morgan, 
Margaret Morrison (2), 
Lila Nelson, 



Mildred E. Libbey, 
Anna D. Liberty, 
Cora A. Liberty, 



Ruth M. Dennis, 
Alfred F. Diversi, 
Harold L. Eastman, 



Walter Clark, 

J. Henry Ryan (3), 



Gladys V. Clark, 
Leslie W. Gross, 
Eva M. Lapiante, 



Leroy E. Brown, 
Earl E. Fipphen, 
Howard T. Moore, 
Earl M. Sawyer, 
Ernest H. West, 



Ethel Wason, 
Aphia Webster (2), 
Ruth Whitcomb, 
Arthur Corbit, 



Clarence Fipphen. 



FOURTH GRAMMAR. 



Marie Nelson, 
George E. Ryan, 
Una G. White. 



FIRST PRIMARY. 



Helen F. Edmunds, 
Mabel M. Jewett, 
Doris M. Williamson. 



SECOND PRIMARY. 



Mona Dimond (2), 
Inez Batchelder, 
Mjra Bowers. 



THIRD PRIMARY. 



Charlie Nelson, 
Foster E. Sturtevant, 
Irene E. Williamson. 



FOURTH PRIMARY, 



Lucy B. Donovan, 
Ethel G. Green, 
Dorothy M. Hook, 
Ida L. Nelson, 
Helen F. Stevens. 



kinder(;arten. 

None. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 135 

CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



FIRST GRAMMAR. 



Mary L. Cragg, P^dward S. Sullivan, 

Richard S. Hevenor, Dorothy F. Vannevar, 

Francis Ouelette, Charles D. Wardner (2) 

John P. Stohrer (3), Campbell Wright (-2). 



TAHANTO SCHOOL. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Vera M. Webster. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

None. 



MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 



FIRST GRAMMAR. 



Helen Harrington (2), Russell Perry (3), 

Annie Saltmarsh (6). 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

James Francis Byrne. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Beryle G. Arlin, Harold A. Arlin, 

Beatrice M. Ayer, Stanley S. Lee, 

Irving G. Douglass. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

None. 



136 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

WALKER SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 



Leon W. Batchelder, 
Guy A. Batchelder, 
Arthur W. Brown (2), 
Edward A. Galfetti, 



A. Raymond Lavid, 
Walter E. Maynard, 
Mary A. Coughlin, 
Mabel L. Parsons, 



Edward C. Kelley, 



M. Doris Clark, 



Willis S. Dyment, 
Ai T. Ritchie, 



Aunie O. Standquist, 

THIRD GRAMMAR. 

Ethel G. Edmunds. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Earl Pendleton. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Leonard Doherty, 
Howard Reed. 

THIRD PRIMARY. 

Edith L. LeBlanc, 
Margaret L. Saltmarsh, 
Clara Evans. 



FOURTH PRIMARY, 

Ray A. Dyment. 

KINDERGARTEN. 

Marjorie J. Newl)old. 



George W. Burke, 
Edward H. Brooks, 



PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Everette Bunker, 
Harrv Hutchinson. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



137 



Eva M. Converse, 



THIRD GRAMMAR. 



Nellie D. Foley, 
Nicholas E. Fisher. 



George Converse, 



FIRST PRIMARY. 

Thelma Rowland. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

None. 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 



THIRD GRAMMAR. 



Nelson R. Brown, 
Stanlev O. Elliot, 



Marjorie C. Hill, 
O. Hilda Larson, 



Frederick H. A. Hill, 
George A. Stohrer, 
Emma G. Perry. 



FIRST PRIMARY. 



Raymond Tonkin, 
Howard F. Tebeau. 



SECOND PRIMARY. 



Doris Baxter, 
Isabel Baxter, 
Robert N. Coates (2), 



Nellie Tippett, 



Lily Edmunds, 
Bertha Stohrer, 
Albert Tonkin. 

THIRD PRIMARY. 

Raymond Collins. 

KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



138 CITY OP CONCORD. 

dp:wey school. 



THIRD GRAMMAR. 



Frank W, Home, Annie B. Parker, 

Neil M. Cheney, Clara W. Sewall (2) 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Pvdward A. Freeman, Bertha P. McBain, 

Nellie M. King (2), Chauncey M. Sewall. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Esther Crowley. 

THIRD PRIMARY. 

Lloyd H. Berry, William J. Connors, 

Henry K. Bugbee, Gladys E. Harris, 

Henry Dee, Joseph Mayo, 

Katherine M. Gannon, Ernest J. Morin, 

Adeline M. M. Audet, A. Rose Tousignant, 

Dorothy E. Brown, Howard C. Yeadon, 
Forest Proctor. 

KINDERGARTEN. 

None. 



COGSWELL SCHOOL. 

FIRST PRIMARY. • 

None. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

Everett Biirney, Bertha Burroughs, 

Norman Ordway. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

WEST CONCORD SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

William J. Drinan, L. Paul Johnson, 

M. Josephine Noonan. 



Agnes Engstrom, 
Annie Pollard, 



SECOND GRAMMAR. 



Ethel Ekstrom, 
Harry Gustafson, 
Glenn McFall. 



139 



Walter Engstrom, 
Ernest W. Noonan, 



FIRST PRIMARY, 



Judith H. Farnum, 
Gertrude Pollard, 
Doris H. Roberts. 



Frank H. Blodgett, 
Carl R. Carlson, 



SECOND PRIMARY. 



Gerda H. Eckstrom (2), 
Ethel G. Noonan (2), 
Evelyn R. Noonan. 



THIRD PRIMARY. 

Redfiel Anderson. 

KINDERGARTEN. 

Elsie Carlson. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



John Davison, 



FIRST GRAMMAR. 

Freda Morrison. 

SECOND GRAMMAR. 

Verna C. Hardy. 



140 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

James Stevens. 

SECOND PRIMARY. 

None. 



HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 

FIRST GRAMMAR. 

Grace E. E. Reister (4). 

FIRST PRIMARY. 

Maud K. Robinson. 

SECOND PRIMARY, 

Edwin D. Robinson. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES. 



CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL. 

Class of 1906. 
At the Auditorium, Friday afternoon, June 15, at 3 o'clock. 



PROGRAMME. 

Prayer. 

Rev. William Ramsden. 

Music — ' ' The Wandering Students. ' ' Rogues 

Essay — ' ' The Lyceum. ' ' First Honor 

Bridget Rochelle. 

Essay— " Nature Always the Color of the Spirit." Second Honor 
Katherine Caroline Smith. 

Music — " King of the Forest Am L" Parker 

Class Oration — "Conquest Brings Responsibility." 
Jesse Scott Wilson. 

Prophecy. 

Gladys Lloyd Morgan. 

Music— " The Storm-fiend." Arr. from Roeckel 

Address — "The Value of a Man. " 

Professor Charles D. Adams, Dartmouth College. 

Music— ' ' Holy Art Thou. ' ' Handel 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

Hon. Charles R. Corning, 
President of the Board of Education. 

Class Song— Words by Reuben Rixford Copp. 

Benediction. 



142 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Class of 1906. 



Eva Julia Abbott. 
Winifred Christajjel Ackerman. 
John Mitchell Ahern. 
Edith Pearl Batchelder. 
Harriet Rose Blodgett. 
Alice Margaret Brown. 
Dora Louise Brown. 
Grace Currier Brown. 
Mary Josephine Casey. 
Julia Grace Clark. 
Marjorie Clement. 
Marion Cook Clough. 
Annie Frances Colby. 
Reuben Rixford Copp. 
Frances Howard Dodge. 
Jessie Elizabeth Dunlap. 
Ralph Willard Evans. 
Florence May Farrar. 
Ruth Fernald. 
Stuart Guy Fifield. 
Lucy Nettie Fletcher. 
Ethel Mae Foster. 
George Arthur Foster. 
Everett Percy Frohock. 
Lydia Caller Frost. 
Bertha Bradbury Gill. 
James Michael Greeley. 
Alice Maude Hale. 
Frank Fitzgerald Hart. 
Marion Eleanor Haynes. 
Ethel LiUis Healy. 



Mary Harriett Head. 
Francis Michael Hoben. 
Peter Joseph King. 
Gertrude Muriel Leavitt. 
Clarence Arthur Little. 
Clarence Albert Lyle. 
Annie Masson. 
Katherine Agnes McDonald. 
Albert Grover Meehan. 
Gladys Lloyd Morgan. 
Margaret Morrill. 
Leonard Samuel Morrison. 
Alexander Murchie. 
Robert Charles Murchie. 
Charlotte Inez Peabody. 
Lester Grant Perley. 
Harold Charles I'laisted. 
Grace Marion Prince. 
William Gladstone Ramsden. 
Ella Locke Richardson. 
Bridget Rochelle. 
Marion Simpson Rolfe. 
Genella Smith Sanborn. 
Katherine Caroline Smith. 
Ried Herrick Stone. 
Carrie Montgomery Straw. 
Margaret Dorothy Taylor. 
Edward Baker Towne. 
Ruth Vinton. 
Jesse Scott Wilson. 



CHANDLER GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Thursday, June 14, 1906, at 2.30 p. m. 

Class Motto — " The secret of success is constancy to purpose." 

—Disraeli. 



CLASS OFFICERS. 



President— CampheU Wright. 
Vice-President— heigh Spaulding Hall. 
Secretary — Esther Velona Libby. 



SCHOOL REPORT. ' 143 

PROGRAMME. 

Music — " The Voyagers." Facer 

Class. 

Declamation— " The Maid and the King. " Cloud 

****Marjorie Prescott Rowell. 

Music — "Vanity." An Intermezzo. Matthews 

Class Orchestra— Masters Stewartson, Hall, Sullivan, 
Carpenter, Haseltine, Kerslake, Stohrer. 

Declamation— ' ' Education. ' ' Ruskin 

***Edward Joseph King. 

Music — ' * The Daffodils. ' ' King 

Double Trio — Misses Vannevar, Nardini, MacKay, Brown, 
Libby, Fowler. Miss Davis, Accompanist. 

Essay — "A Modern Sir Launfal." 

Helen Maria Whittier. 

Dumb-bell Drill. 

Masters Adams, Brown, Carpenter, Colby, Dame, Fellows, 
Gillmore, Guptill, Hagerty, Hall, Hevenor, Kerslake, 
Morrison, Ouelette, F., Rogers, Sullivan, Wallace, Ward- 
ner, Wright. Bridge, Leader. Stohrer, Pianist. 

Declamation— "A Fool's Prayer." Sill 

Florence Lucinda Carroll. 

Music — ' ' Night. ' ' Ergmann 

Class. 

Declamation—" High Tide on the Coast of Lincolnshire." Ingelow 
Bernice Clyde Flanders. 
Misses Chapman, Clement, Danforth, Davis, G. E., Davis, 
H. M., Hall, Heilburn, Jewett, Keniston, Morrison, 
Quimby, Richardson, West. 

Declamation — ' ' The Battle of Durley . ' ' Cloud 

**Laura Cheney Conant. 

Music—" Faithful and True." Bridal Chorus from Lohengrin. 

Class. R. Wagner 

Declamation— "An Enviable Errand." Cloud 

Charles Davis Wardner. ^ 

Music— ' ' Serenade. ' ' Schubert 

Violin Solo— Leigh Spaulding Hall. 
Accompanists— Leon Cousens Stewartson, John Philip Stohrer. 



144 * CITY OP CONCORD. 

Oration — " Monroe Doctrine." 

Albert Mentzer Guptill. 

Music — Unison Chorus— "The Lobster. ' ' Brown 

Masters Adams, Brown, Carpenter, Colby, Davis, Hagar, 
Hall, Haseltine, Hevenor, McCauley, Kerslake, Ouelette, 
J., Rogers, Sanders, Stewartson, Wallace, Wright, Young, 
Stohrer, Accompanist. 

The Nations' Drill. 

England — Esther Velona Libby. 
Scotland— Edyth Florence MacKay. 
Ireland— Henrietta Ayer Powell. 
France— Hilda Ellison Brown. 
Austria — Signe Victoria Swedmark. 
Germany— Dorothy Frances Vannevar. 
Italy — Beatrice Teresa Nardini. 
Spain— Gladys Remick. 
U. S. Navy— Elizabeth Fowler. 
U. S. Army— Mary Louise Cragg. 

Sailors. Soldiers. 

Dorothy Wright. Marie Tholander. 

Margaret Challis. Dorothy Reed. 

Ada Beatrice Martin. Marjorie Ruth Sanderson. 

Amy Verona Robie. Hazel Lillian Wingate. 

Esther Alberta Winslow. Etta May Rowell. 

Ethel Harriott Blake, Accompanist. 

Music — " Benita." A Mexican Intermezzo. Hoffman 

Class Orchestra. 

Essay — "A Summer Camp for Girls." 

* Marjorie Fisk Chase. 

Declamation— "A Providential Discovery." Foley 

Elizabeth Fowler. 

Music — "Bright Star of Eve, Arise." Wrighton 

Soprano Solo— Dorothy Frances Vannevar. 
Violin Obligate — Leon Cousens Stewartson. 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

, Committee. 

Music — "A Prayer." 

Class. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



145 



GRADUATING CLASS. 



Frank Leon Adams. 
Ethel Harriott Blake. 
Harold Watson Bridge. 
Charles Irving Brown. 
Hilda EUison Brown. 
Earl Atkins Carpenter. 
Florence Lucinda Carroll. 
Margaret ChaUis. 
Janet Angieline Chapman. 
Marjorie Fisk Chase.* 
Grace Marion Clement. 
Frank Edgar Colby, Jr. 
Laura Cheney Conant.** 
Mary Louise Cragg. 
Lloyd Benton Dame. 
Maude Louise Danforth. 
Gladys Ester Davis. 
Hazel Marion Davis. 
Henry Kimball Davis. 
Sydney Carl Fellows. 
Bernice Clyde Flanders. 
EHzabeth Fowler. 
Roy Winfred Gilmore. 
Albert Mentzer Guptill. 
Lewis Garret Hagar. 
Edward Francis Hagerty. 
Elizabeth Hope Hall. 
Leigh Spaulding Hall. 
Emery Haseltine. 
Inez Adelaide Heilburn. 
Richard Stillings Hevenor. 
Jennie Peaslee Jewett. 
Lyle Polly Keniston. 
Victor George Kerslake. 
Edward Joseph King.*** 

* First Honor. 
** Second Honor. 



Esther Velona Libby. 
Edyth Florence MacKay. 
Ada Beatrice Martin. 
Arthur McCauley. 
Nancy Maude Morrison. 
William Edward Morrison. 
Beatrice Teresa Nardini. 
Francis Ouelette. 
Joseph Ouelette. 
Henrietta Ayer Powell. 
Anna Gladys Quimby. 
Dorothy Reed. 
Gladys Remick. 
Ahce Sara Richardson. 
Amy Verona Robie. 
Harold Raymond Rogers. 
Etta May Rowell. 
Marjorie Prescott Rowell.**'* 
Horace Woodward Sanders. 
Marjorie Ruth Sanderson. 
Leon Cousens Stewartson. 
John Phihp Stohrer. 
Edward Scanlan Sullivan. 
Signe Victoria Swedmark. 
Marie Tholander. 
Dorothy Frances Vannevar. 
Herbert Christopher Wallace. 
Charles Davis Wardner. 
Stella May West. 
Helen Maria Whittier. 
Hazel Lillian Wingate. 
Esther Alberta Winslow. 
Campbell Wright. 
Dorothy Wright. 
Wilham Dow Young. 

*** Third Honor. 
**** Fourth Honor. 



HONOR LIST. 



Hilda Ellison Brown. 
Marjorie Fisk Chase. 
Grace Marion Clement. 

10 



Laura Cheney Conant. 
Sydney Carl Fellows. 
Bernice Clyde Flanders. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Albert Mentzer Guptill. 
Inez Adelaide Heilbrun. 
Richard Stillings Hevenor. 
Edward Joseph King. 
Esther Velona Libby. 
Edyth Florence MacKay. 



Etta May Rowell. 
Marjorie Prescott Rowell. 
Edward Scanlan Sullivan. 
Charles Davis Wardner. 
Helen Maria Whittier. 



MERRIMACK GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 
Thursday, June 14, 1906, at 2.30 p. m. 
Class Motto — ''Honor before Honors.'" 

PROGRAMME. 

Chorus — "Bright Summer Days." Arnaud 

Original Declamation— " Charlie's First Race." 
George Warren Morrill.** 

Concert Recitation — ' ' The High Tide. ' ' Ingelow 

Misses Ballard, Boyd, Clough, Crabbe, Crowell, Culbertson, 
Geary, Harrington, Hurd, Little, Mulligan, Nevers, Nichols, 
Phillips, Quimby, Saltmarsh, Silva, Tippet. 

Violin Solo— "Coeurs et Fleurs." Tobani 

Russell Elvin Perry. 

Chorus— a " Oh! Where Do Fairies Hide their Heads? " Parker 
b "The Berry Pickers." Dole 

Recitation— ' ' Mr. Burton's Car Ride. ' ' Original 

Marion Scott Nevers.* 

Recitation — "Kentucky Belle." Woolson 

Katherine Helen Mulligan.**** 

Piano Duet — " Les Sylphes, " Bachman 

Misses Clough and Nevers. 

Bar Bell Drill. 

Masters Favor, Foote, Gardner, Gove, Hastings, Higgins, 
Larson, Lugg, Morrill, Morrison, Murray, Nawn, Perry, 
Reed, Rushlow, Steele, Wilmot, Whidden. 

Recitation — " The Princess' Holiday." Perry 

Annie Elizabeth Saltmarsh. 



Chorus— ' ' Madeleine. ' ' 



Roeckel 



SCHOOL REPORT. 147 

Recitation — "Briar Rose." 

Crystal I. Parsons, assisted by 
Misses Ballard, Boyd, Clough, Crabbe, Crowell, Geary, 
Harrington, Mulligan, E. Mulligan, Nevers, Nichols, 
Phillips, Quimby, Saltmarsh, Silva, Tippet. 

Recitation— ' ' Mice at Play. ' ' 

Marion Louise Ballard. 
Piano Trio — " Bewitching Fairy." Keller 

Misses Crabbe, Little, Tippet. 

Bass Chorus — ' ' The Lobster. ' ' Brown 

Masters Foote, Gardner, Gove, Higgins, Larson, Lugg, 

Morrill, Morrison, Reed, Rushlow, Trenoweth. 

Declamation—" Herve Riel. " Broivning 

Joseph Lewis Reed. 
Chorus— " The Little Tin Soldier." Molloy 

Misses Hurd, Chambers, Crowell, Geary, Boyd, Harrington, 
Tippet, Crabbe, Mulligan, Phillips, Nichols. 
Masters Lugg, Gove, Foote, Morrison, Perry, Murray, 
Steele, Nawn. 

PRESENTATION OP DIPLOMAS. 

Class Song. Abt 

GRADUATING CLASS. 

Marion Louise Ballard. George Warren Morrill. 

Nellie Mae Boyd. Howard Morrison. 

Agnes Rose Chambers. Katherine Helen Mulligan . 

Ethel Mae Clough. Mary Ethel Mulligan. 

Mabel Gertrude Crabbe. James Murray. 

Ruth Lydia Crowell. Emmett Augustine Nawn. 

Lera Farr Culbertson. Marion Scott Nevers. 

Joseph Michael Doherty. Margaret Helena Nichols. 

Daniel Bartlett Favor. Crystal Ivadell Parsons. 

Charles Harvey Foote. Russell Elvin Perry. 

Arthur Edward Gardner. Marion Pretoria Phillips. 

Margaret Anne Geary. Jettie Mae Quimby. 

Mary Elizabeth Geary. Joseph Lewis Reed. 

Lewis William Gove. Frederick Edward Rushlow. 

Helen Rena Harrington. Annie Elizabeth Saltmarsh. 

Carroll Ashley Hastings. Susan Elizabeth Silva. 

John Higgins. George Alexander Steele. 

Marion Agnes Hurd. Beatrice Mary Tippet. 

Bernard Sigurd Larson. Herbert Clarence Trenoweth. 

Eva Susan Little. Willard Harold Wilmot. 
John James Lugg. 



148 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



HONOR LIST. 



Marion Louise Ballard. 
Ruth Lydia Crowell. 
George Warren Morrill.** 
Howard Morrison.*** 
Katherine Helen Mulligan.**** 
James Murray. 



Marion Scott Nevers.* 
Crystal Ivadell Parsons. 
Russell Elvin Perry. 
Marion Pretoria Phillips. 
Annie Elizabeth Saltmarsh. 
Jettie Mae Quimby. 



WEST CONCORD SCHOOL. 
Thursday, June 14, 1906, at 2.30 p. m. 
Class Motto— " Ne tentes, aut perfice." 

PROGRAMME. 

March. 

Chorus — " Oh! Where Do Fairies Hide their Heads? " 

Recitation— "A Boy's Story." 

Howard Porter Blanchard. 



Parker 
Anon. 



Duet- "Lily of the Valley." 

Florence A. Flanders, Mary K. Martin. 

Recitation—" The Song of the Camp." 

Emma Christine Stevens. 



Quartet—" The Letter." 

Swenson, Murchie, St. Pierre, Blodgett. 



Pinsuti 

Bayard Taylor 

Hatton 



Anon. 



Recitation — " Catching the Train." 

Elizabeth Alice Clark. 

Unison Song— " The Lobster. " Brown 

Harrison, Lovely, St. Pierre, Blodgett. 

Recitation— ' ' Herve Riel. ' ' Robert Browning 

Richard Adams Knight. 

Piano Solo— ' ' The Rose Chain. ' ' Bailey 

Margaret R. Eastman. 

Recitation— "Tom Sawyer." Mark Twain 

Elsie Mabel Carter. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 149 

Double Quartet — " Flower of Liberty. " Neidlinger 

Misses Flanders, Parmenter, Martin, Anderson, Swenson, 
Drinan, St. Pierre, Blodgett. 

Essay- "The Old School and the New." 

Roscoe Cleveland Gay. 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

Chorus— ' ' The Call to Arms. ' ' Veazie 

GRADUATING CLASS. 

Howard Porter Blanchard. Roscoe Cleveland Gay. 

Elsie Mabel Carter. Richard Adams Knight. 

Elizabeth Alice Clark. Emma Christine Stevens. 

HONOR LIST. 

Elizabeth Alice Clark.** Roscoe Cleveland Gay.* 

* First Honor. ** Second Honor. 



EASTMAN GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 
Thursday, June 14, 1906, at 2.30 p. m. 

PROGRAMME. 

Piano Duet— ' ' Class Day March. ' ' Macy 

Bertha Peaslee, Charlotte Frye. 

Recitation — ' ' Edelweiss. ' ' Dickinson 

Lilly Carter. 

Song — "There 's Music in the Air." 

Ruth Curtis, Caroline Gardner, Lawrence Gushing, Amos 
Lewis, Bernice Prescott, Lawrence Farnum, Eugene 
Beaupre, Locke Bullock. 

Recitation— ' ' Selling the Baby. ' ' Carleton 

Fanny Hamilton. 

Violin Solo — ' ' Slumber Song. ' ' Schill 

Hiram Gardner. Freda Morrison, Accompanist. 

Recitation— " How He Saved St. Michael's." Stansbury 

Howard Stevens. 



150 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Song—" Football Day." 



School. 



Recitation — "One, Two, Three." 

Esther Fairfield. 

Piano Solo — "La Fi Lience." 

Freda Morrison. 

Recitation— " How Uncle Podger Hung a Picture." 
Grace Noyes. 

Song—" Where Do Fairies Hide Their Heads? " 

School. 

Recitation — "The Cow and the Bishop." 
Charlotte Frye. 

Piano Solo — " Sparkling Eyes." 

Grace Noyes. 

"Looking Backward." 



Anon. 

Horbath 

Jerome 

Townsend 

Original 



Lawrence Farnum. 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

Wand Drill. 

Charlotte Frye, Lillian Drew, Bertha Peaslee, Bernice 
Prescott, Fanny Hamilton, Margaret Bachelder, Edith 
Hardy, Verna Hardy, Ruth Curtis, Lilly Carter, Eva 
Gushing, Helen Merrick, Caroline Gardner, Hazel Rich- 
ardson, Freda Morrison, Esther Fairfield. 



GRADUATING CLASS. 



Grace Estella Noyes. 
Lilly Amanda Carter. 



Howard Eastman Stevens. 
Charlotte Eastman Frye. 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inliahitauts of Unio)i School District in Concord 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium, on 
Prince street in said district, on the 29th day of Llarch, 
1906, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the follow- 
ing subjects : 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the reports of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years to fill vacancies arising from 
the expiration of the term of office of Edward N. Pearson, 
John E. Robertson, and Ella H. J. Hill, and to fill any 
other vacancies that may occur in said board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors, and all other neces- 
sary officers for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing 
year, including industrial education, military drill, and 
calisthenics. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for occasional and extraordinary repairs of 
school buildings during the ensuing year. 



lo2 CITY OF CONCORD. 

9. To see if the district will vote to erect and equip a 
new iNIanual Traiiiino- school linilding, appoint a committee 
with authority to decide upon its location, and authorize 
such committee to purchase or acquire by condemnation, 
such land as may be necessary and suitable for a lot for 
such new Manual Training school building, as the same 
may be located by the committee ; and raise and appro- 
priate money and authorize a contract with the City of 
Concord for its credit as contemplated by chapter 261 of 
the Session Laws of 1889, and take such other, or further, 
action as may be necessary to provide for the location and 
erection of a new Manual Training school building. 

10. To see if the district will ratify and confirm the 
sale and conveyance to the City of Concord, of the old 
school house lot and building at West Concord, made by the 
special building committee, appointed to erect the new 
West Concord school building; said sale and conveyance 
having been made in payment for the lot purchased of said 
city by said committee for the new West Concord school 
building. 

11. To see what sum of money the district will raise 
and api)r()priate for the completion of the erection and 
furnishing of the West Concord school building. 

12. To transact any other business that may legallj^ 
come before said meeting. 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING. 

Concord, N. IL, March 29, 1906. 

Agreeal)le to the foregoing warrant, a meeting of the 
legal voters in Union School District was held at the Audi- 
torium, in the City of Concord, N. H., on IMarch 29, 1906, 
at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, and was called to order by 
the moderatoi", Samuel C. Eastman, who read the war- 
rant. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



153 



Article 1. The moderator called for votes for modera- 
tor and when all had voted who wished, declared the ballot 
closed, and Samuel C. pjastnian having four votes, all that 
were cast, was declared elected moderator and took the 
oath of office before Louis C. Merrill, justice of the peace. 

Art. 2. The moderator called for votes for clerk and 
when all had voted who wished, the ballot was declared 
closed, and Louis C. INIerrill having received all the votes 
cast, was declared elected clerk and the oath of office was 
administered by Samuel C. Eastman, justice of the peace. 

Art. 3. On motion it was voted to dispense with the 
reading of the reports, and that the reports, as printed, be 
adopted and placed on file. 

Art. 4. Mr. H. H. jMetcalf moved to proceed to ballot 
for three members of the Board of Education, the names 
to be on ticket, and it was so voted and the moderator 
called for votes. 

On motion of ]Mr. H. II. Metcalf it was voted that the 
polls be closed at 8.15 o'clock. 

The moderator appointed Arthur Sturtevant and Edson 
J. Hill to assist in sorting and counting the votes. 

The moderator declared the vote as follows : 



Number of votes cast . 






443 


Necessary for a choice . 






222 


John P. George had . 






54 


Charles L. Fellows had 






107 


Ella H. J. Hill had . 






334 


George H. ]\Ioses had . 






360 


Edward N. Pearson had 






422 



—and Ella H. J. Hill. George H. Moses and Edward N. 
Pearson were declared by the moderator as elected mem- 
bers of the Board of Education for three years. The mem- 
bers elect then appeared and were sworn by Samuel C. 
Eastman, justice of the peace. 



154 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Art. 5. ^Iv. John M. Mitchell moved that John P. 
George and Henry H. Metcalf be chosen auditors, and it 
was so voted. 

Art. 6. Hon. Charles R.' Corning presented the follow- 
ing resolution and moved its adoption : 

Besolved, That there be raised by tax on the polls and 
ratable estates of Union School District the sum of nine 
thousand seven hundred eighty-five dollars ($9,785) of 
which sum eight thousand dollars ($8,000) shall be appro- 
priated for the payment of bonds maturing April 1, 1906, 
and one thousand seven hundred eighty-five dollars 
($1,785) for the payment of the interest on its funded debt 
accruing during the year. 

jMotion seconded, a vote taken, and the resolution de- 
clared adopted. 

Art. 7. I\Ir. John ]M. iMitchell offered the following 
resolution and moved its adoption : 

Besolved, That there shall be raised, and is hereby or- 
dered to be raised, by tax on the polls and ratable estates 
within Union School District, for the support of schools 
for the ensuing year such a sum as in addition to the sum 
assigned to the district by the City of Concord out of the 
appropriation for schools will amount to the sum of sixty- 
seven thousand seventy-five dollars and nine cents ($67,- 
075.09). 

Motion was seconded, a vote taken, and the moderator 
declared the resolution adopted. 

Art. 8. !Mr. John P. George presented the following : 

Resolved, That the sum of two thousand five hundred 
dollars ($2,500) be raised by taxation upon the polls and 
ratable estates of Union School District and appropriated 
for occasional and extraordinary repairs of school build- 
ings and that the expenditure of such a sum shall be under 
the direction of the Board of Education. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 155 

]Mr. George moved the adoption of the resolution and 
the motion being seconded, and a vote taken, the moderator 
declared the resolution adopted. 

Art. 9. ^Ir. George INI. Kimball ottered the following 
resolution which was read by the moderator : 

Voted, (1) That a ucav manual training school building 
be erected and equipped; (2) That Charles R. Corning, 
George I\I. Kimball, John :\L IVIitchell, Henry H. Metcalf, 
Edson J. Hill, DeWitt C. Howe and Charles R. Walker be, 
and hereby are, appointed a committee with authority to 
decide upon a location for said new manual training 
school building, and said committee is hereby authorized to 
purchase or acquire by condemnation, in the name of, and 
on behalf of, the Union School District, such land as may 
be necessary and suitable for a lot for such new manual 
training school building to be erected upon, as selected and 
decided upon by said committee, and said committee is 
authorized to do all other acts and things in the name of, 
and on behalf of, the Union School District necessary to 
secure the location of such lot and to purchase or acquire 
it; (3) That Charles R. Corning, George IM. Kimball, John 
M. Mitchell, Henry H. Metcalf, Edson J. Hill, DeWitt C. 
Howe and Charles R. Walker be, and hereby are, appointed 
a building committee to erect and furnish said new manual 
training school building and to employ architects, agents 
and such other assistants as they may require, and to do 
in the name and on behalf of the Union School District 
such other acts as may be necessary to carry this vote into 
effect; (4) That the sum of $30,000 be, and the same is, 
hereby appropriated to purchase or acquire the land 
necessary for the location of said new manual training 
school building and to erect and furnish said new manual 
training school building; (5) That the indebtedness of the 
Union School District arising from the purchase of land, 
construction and furnishing of said new manual training 



156 CITY OF CONCORD. 

school building be funded at a rate of interest not exceed- 
ing three and one half per cent, per annum, that a suffi- 
cient sum of money be assessed upon the polls and estates 
of Union School District on the first day of April in each 
year hereafter to meet the payments of the interest and 
principal of the said indebtedness at the date or dates of 
the maturity of the principal and interest as the same 
may be fixed, as hereinafter provided, and that the money 
obtained by said assessments be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated to make said payments; (6) That the Uni(m School 
District requests the City of Concord to aid in funding the 
indebtedness of the Union School District arising from the 
purchase of land, construction and furnishing of said new 
manual training school building, as the City of Concord is 
authorized to do by chapter 261 of the Session Laws of 
1889, entitled " An act to authorize the City of Concord 
to borrow money in aid of its school districts " provided 
said City of Concord will borrow the money necessary for 
the purposes set forth in this vote, and will allow the 
Union School District to have the use of the money so bor- 
rowed, and further that if this request is complied with, 
the Union School District will seasonably pay the City of 
Concord sufficient sums of money to enable the City of 
Concord to meet the payments of principal and interest 
upon the indebtedness so created as the same falls due, and 
all incidental expenses, and will apply the money to be 
raised as herein provided, to the payments aforesaid ; and 
said building committee is hereby further authorized to 
make said request of the City of Concord and determine 
with the City of Concord the date or dates when the princi- 
pal and interest thereon shall mature, and* do all other acts 
and things necessary to carry this vote into effect. 

Mr. Kimball moved a yea and nay vote on each para- 
graph and it was so voted, and the vote was then taken 
on each paragraph with the following result as stated by 
the moderator: 



SCHOOL REPORT, 157 

1. The ayes appear to have it, the ayes do have it and 
the paragraph is adopted. 

2. The ayes have it and the paragraph is adopted. 

3. » The ayes have it and the paragraph is adopted. 

4. The ayes appear to have it, the ayes do have it and 
the paragraph is adopted. 

5. The ayes have it and the paragraph is adopted. 

6. The ayes have it and the paragraph is adopted. 

. Art. 10. ]Mr. Edward N. Pearson offered the following 
resolution and moved its adoption : 

Voted, That the sale and conveyance to the City of Con- 
cord, of the old schoolhoiise lot and building, at West Con- 
cord, made by the special committee appointed to erect the 
new West Concord school building, said sale and convey- 
ance having been made in payment for the lot purchased of 
said city by said committee for the new West Concord 
school building, be ratified and confirmed. 

Motion seconded and a vote taken on the motion which 
the moderator declared adopted. 

Art. 11. jNlr. John ]\I. ^litehell offered the following 
resolution and moved its adoption : 

Resolved, That the smn of one thousand dollars ($1,000) 
in addition to the sum of twenty-eight thousand dollars 
($28,000) appropriated by the district by vote at its 
special meeting holden on June 1, 1905, to secure land and 
erect and equip the new West Concord school building 
be, and hereby is, appropriated for the completion and fur- 
nishing of said new West Concord school building and for 
grading the lot upon which it is erected ; and that said one 
thousand dollars ($1,000) or such part thereof as may be 
needed for the purposes specified be funded at a rate of 
interest not exceeding three and one half per cent, in the 



158 CITY OF CONCORD. 

manner and by the authority ])rescribed for the funding of 
said twenty-eight thousand dollars ($28,000) as provided 
in the vote of the district passed as aforesaid, on June 1, 
1905. 

c 

A vote being taken, the moderator declared the resolu- 
tion adopted. 

Mr. Charles J. French moved to return to the considera- 
tion of article 7 of the warrant and it was so voted. 

Art. 7. Mr. Charles J. French offered the following 
resolution and moved its adoption : 

Resolved, That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) 
l:»e raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District and hereby is appropriated for the 
purpose of establishing and maintaining a night school in 
said Union School District during the winter months of 
1906 and 1907, and that the expenditure of the amount of 
money be under the supervision of the Board of Education. 

A vote was taken and the resolution declared adopted. 

Art. 12. Mr. H. H. ]\Ietcalf moved to adjourn and it 
was so voted. 

A true copy, attest : 

LOUIS C. LIERRILL, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION, 
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 20. 



Tho Board of Education submits the following report 
of educational conditions in School District No. 20 for the 
financial year of 1906-1907. 

For a detailed statement of school management, attend- 
ance and expenses reference is made to the accompanying 
reports of the superintendent and treasurer which are 
made a part of this report. 

The school buildings are in good repair and, while sani- 
tary conditions are not perfect at the Summer Street 
building owing to insufficient ventilation in some of the 
rooms, no extra appropriation will be required as all neces- 
sary repairs and some improvements are made each year. 

Two years have been added to the high school course in 
accordance with the unanimous vote of the district at its 
last annual meeting. The year began with an enrollment 
of sixt}' pupils in this department, which abundantly justi- 
fies the new venture. Sufficient tuition has been received 
to nearly pay the salary of the extra teacher required, and 
if a full course of four years should be organized, the in- 
come from tuitions would be materially increased. 

It is now three years since any high school work was 
attempted in this village and sufficient time has elapsed to 
judge, if not of its efficiency, at least of its influence on the 
rest of our school system and on the community. 

Under the present management the high and elementary 
schools form practically one iftibroken course wdth only 
one graduation point. As a result of this policy and the 
increased opportunities there has been a large increase in 
the number of pupils in the higher grades. This year we 
have sixty pupils from our own district enjoying high 



160 CITY OP CONCORD. 

school privileges, while previous to the organization of our 
own school, twenty-one was the largest number and the 
average was below seventeen. 

These facts show in an unmistakable manner how the 
children themselves -react to the increased opportunities, 
and they are a sufficient answer to any question as to their 
stimulating and helpful infiuenca on the lower grades. 
They also prove the truth of the assertion so often made by 
those who have studied our educational conditions most 
carefully that a very large proportion of our people pre- 
fer to educate their children as far as possible in the com- 
munity where they live. The cost of transportation, the 
long day away from home privileges, home influences and 
home restraints are, with many of our people, serious 
obstacles to sending their children away from home to 
complete their public school education. 

Nor is this all. The high school is a most potent factor 
in raising the ideals of the community. It fosters educa- 
tional progress and contributes in no small measure to the 
culture and moral ]:)etterment of the people. 

^Inch has been said concerning the rate of taxation in 
our district. It is fair to state the fact that the principal 
cause of the increased rate is the new school building, 
which was a necessity before the high school was organized. 

It may also be interesting to those concerned to know 
that our school tax is h\ss than our precinct tax and that 
the rate will prol^ably decrease as large proi)erty interests 
now exempt become taxable. 

Is there any good and sufficient reason why we should 
not pay as much for the education and training of our 
children as we pay for sewer and light privileges? Of 
what avail are modern conveniences and even hygiene 
when schools are neglected and the vast majority of 
children, finding the larger educational opportunities 
practically denied them, seek work in the factories at four- 
teen years of age, and are fit only for work demanding 
lilllc skill or intelligence, and when the education and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 161 

training of the secondary schools can only be the special 
privilege of the favored few who can afford to seek such 
privileges away from home. 

The efficient administration of your school system means 
equal public school opportunities for rich and poor alike, 
it means the contact of all children with American ideals 
and the spirit of American institutions, it means an oppor- 
tunity for every Penacook boy and girl to prepare for col- 
lege if they have the natural ability and ambition, it means 
an increase in the working efficiency and intelligence of the 
whole village which it is impossible to estimate. 

We believe that no public moneys are more judiciously 
expended or bring a larger return in the things which 
really increase human wealth and human success than those 
expended for school purposes. The average current expen- 
diture per pupil is twenty dollars and sixty-seven cents. 
Does any intelligent person believe that it should be less 
than this ? 

There is some honest criticism of the practical value of 
the work done in the public schools. Such criticism is 
always welcome, especially from those who have studied 
the problem sufficiently to be able to offer practical 
methods for improvement. 

No school system, however perfect, will ever be able to 
compensate for lack of home training and discipline, and it 
should always he remembered that the sympathy and co- 
operation of the parents are quite as essential as wise 
methods on the part of those who administer school affairs. 

Growth toward ideal conditions may be slow but it will 
be sure when the responsibility of each citizen for the con- 
ditions which exist is recognized. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
LP]ANDER C. PRESCOTT, 
HENRY A. BROWN, 

Board of Education. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Education: 

I herewith respectfully submit my sixth annual report, 
which is the sixth in the series of reports of the superin- 
tendent of schools in District No. 20, Penacook. It gives 
me pleasure to again thank the members of the Board of 
Education and the citizens of the district for their \oysl 
support and their kindly interest in the schools. 

I Attendance. 

In another part of this report there will l^e found a list 
of the names of those children who Avere perfect in attend- 
ance and a table of attendance for the school year 1905- 
1906. The ten children whose names are on the list are 
certainly deserving of praise. As they did not know that 
their names were to appear in this report, they must have 
been prompted by some other motive than notoriety. They 
have shown an interest and faithfulness in school work 
which is surely worthy of emulation, and it is hoped that 
next year the list may be greatly increased. 

A careful study of the table of attendance brings out sev- 
eral interesting facts. The average membership of the 
schools is gradually increasing from j^ear to year. This is 
due to the increased membership in the upper grades. The 
per cent, of attendance is exceptionally good. The highest 
per cent, is 97, while the lowest is only 91, and the average 
per cent, is 94. 

In one respect the table is disappointing. There are far 
too many cases of tardiness. Only two schools show eveir 
reasonable figures in that respect. At present there is quite 
an effort being made to improve this condition of affairs, 
and it is h()i)ed that the parents will heartily co-operate 



SCHOOL REPORT. 163 

with the teachers in their efforts. There are also a large 
number of excuses granted by teachers. I believe many of 
these to be unnecessary. Parents are too willing to grant 
the request of children and write excuses when it would be 
far better not to do so. Children should be taught that 
their attendance at school and their school work is of first 
importance. Poor attendance, as indicated by absence, 
tardiness, and excuses, often accounts for many cases of 
poor scholarship. Every time that a child misses a school 
exercise for one of tliese causes, there has occurred a ma- 
terial loss which it is almost impossible to regain. Pupils, 
teachers, parents and members of the Board of Education 
are urged to do everything in their power to decrease in 
the future the number of cases of tardiness and excuse. 
Until something is accomplished in this direction our 
schools will not be all that we desire. 

Programme op Studies. 

The programme of studies is now so arranged that the 
grammar school work is completed at the end of the eighth 
year of school. That is,' if a child enters at the age of six 
years and continues without interruption, he is ready to 
enter the High school at the age of fourteen. As very few 
children have such uninterrupted progress, the average age 
for entering the High school is generally a little over fif- 
teen. Thus with the present programme of studies the 
children will graduate from the High school at the average 
age of nineteen years. 

The majority of children lose a year in school life during 
the first four years. For one reason or another the average 
child does not develop with the same regularity during 
this early period as later. This failure of young children 
to proceed uniformly from grade to grade would be greatly 
alleviated by the extension of the programme of studies to 
include the work of the kindergarten. The advantage of 
the kindergarten and its bearing upon school work in gen- 



164 CITY OP CONCORD. 

eral, has been fully treated in previous reports and need 
not be touched upon at length in this connection. 

The course in music is still under the direction of ]\Irs. 
Martha Gale, who has made some changes in the work dur- 
ing the past year. New books from the Modern IMusic 
Series have been placed in some rooms. As the other old 
books now in use become unserviceable through wear, they 
will be replaced by more new ones. The Weaver System 
of Individual Sight-Reading has been successfully used; 
some new charts have been furnished, and some sheet music 
has been placed in the hands of the older pupils. From 
time to time it has been the custom to give school enter- 
tainments with musical programmes to illustrate what is 
being done in this course. At present such a programme is 
under preparation and will probabl}^ be publicly given in 
the near future. 

The course in physiology has l^een revised and much ex- 
tended. A new text-book. Conn's Physiology and Hygiene, 
has been introduced. This course now fully complies with 
the requirements of the laAV and gives the children a good 
knowledge of the human body and much valuable informa- 
tion in regard to its care. 

At present the Werner Arithmetic is being used in most 
of the rooms. This is extremely spiral in its method of 
treating the subject-matter. The method is one that has been 
much in vogue during the past few years. Theoretically, 
the system is pedagogically sound. The child should take 
up the discussion of arithmetical facts in their elementary 
forms as early as the mind is ;ible to grasp them, and these 
facts should l)e constantly added to as tlie mind develops. 
On the other hand, it is equally true thtit too m;iny ideas 
should not be ])resented in a short period of time, and all 
facts that are closely allied should l)e grouped so that com- 
parisons could be made and thiMr relations be definitely 
shown. In addition the ex])lanation of processes, as they 
come up for consideration, should be accompanied by sev- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 165 

eral examples and problems for the purpose of illustration 
and drill. This does not mean a return to the old method 
of presenting fractions in one school year, percentage in 
the next, and so on, but to simply bring together all the 
material pertaining to any arithmetical fact which is to 
be taken up during a definite period of the child's develop- 
ment. In this way there would be less confusion of facts 
and the child would be able, through comparison and drill, 
to form more definite arithmetical conceptions. Further- 
more, text-books should be so arranged that the pupil may 
easily refer through the index to any definition or process. 
This is an important consideration in view of the fact that 
it is generally conceded to be one of the prominent features 
in school work to train children how to use books and find 
out things for themselves. Any book with its subject-mat- 
ter in confusion, loses its value and is soon discarded. So 
a text-book, to be of value to pupils, must be well arranged 
and easy of reference. 

It is my privilege to again call the attention of the Board 
of Education and members of the district, to the condition 
of the course in drawing. This is being carried out as well 
as possible, each teacher independently doing her own 
work. Often many excellent results are o])tained, but on 
the whole the work lacks uniformity in logical arrange- 
ment and development. The difficulties encountered in car- 
rying out this course can best be overcome by the employ- 
ment of a special teacher in the subject. As a method of 
expression it is fully as worthy of study as music, and de- 
serves an equal expenditure. 

At the beginning of the last fall term the State Pro- 
gramme of Studies, with a few slight modifications, was 
adopted for the first four grades. This programme was 
worked out by some of the best educators of the state. It 
serves to establish a uniformity among the schools of the 
state, so that children moving from one school district to 
another may do so without loss of time in their studies. It 
furnishes uniform directions in regard to the amount of 



166 CITY OF CONCORD. 

work covered, and the results that should be obtained in 
each year of school work. It does not definitely determine 
the text-books to be used, but its recommendations in this 
direction are good and worthy of consideration. It also 
contains excellent lists of reference books for teachers on 
the various subjects. Any thoughtful teacher will find it a 
great assistance, whatever the programme of studies in 
use. 

GrRADING. 

As during previous years, the first grade, on account of 
its size, has been divided and a part placed in the room 
with the second grade. Besides the first, the fifth grade is 
the only one that has been divided. A part of this has been 
with the sixth and a part with the eighth grade. The plan 
of having a part of the fifth combined with the eighth is by 
no means satisfactory on account of the difference in the 
age of the pupils and the methods of teaching the different 
subjects presented to the two classes. The combination, 
however, for the past year seemed unavoidable. xYnother 
J' ear it will not l)e necessary, as the lower grades can be 
accommodated by themselves. 

During the year several pupils have been advanced a 
grade as they have shown their ability to do harder work. 
This is always done with the consent of the parents, and 
where the physical condition of the child is good. Double 
promotion more frequently occurs in the lower grades, as 
there advancement depends upon the maturity and natural 
development of the child rather than on the individual 
effort. 

]\Iore children should each year fail of i)r()motioii. It is 
the tendency of teachers, and especially of parents, to 
crowd children whose mental activities are not rapid 
enough to do required work. Such crowding is, in the long 
run. injurious, and these children \v()ul(l develop better 
and get more from school if they were doing work within 



SCHOOL REPORT. 167 

their iindei'standing. C'liildren thus struggling to keep up 
with their class, as they sny, are \ery apt to become dis- 
couraged and generally leave school at the earliest oppor- 
tunity. If such children and their parents could be 
I)rought to realize the importance of considering mental 
development in relation to grading, a great many unhappy 
and discouraging hours would be saved the children as w^ell 
as a great many cases of absolute failure. Only eight years 
are required to enter the high school, so if a child loses a 
year only nine years are required, and formerly nine years 
were required for all children. The superintendent wishes 
that more parents would consult him in regard to the 
matter. 

Teachers. 

During the past year there have been far too many 
changes in the teaching force. Since the resignation of 
Miss Lillian G. Stevens, there have been two teachers, Miss 
Grace B. Knowlton and Miss Eva ^l. Cheney, in the second 
grade. ]Miss Stevens resigned on account of her health, 
and Miss Knowlton, to accept a position in Concord. The 
same change has occurred in the eighth grade. Miss Eliza- 
beth G. Saunders resigned at the end of the last spring 
term, and ]\Iiss M. Jennie Doyle was elected to fill the posi- 
tion. After a few weeks. Miss Doyle resigned to accept a 
better position in jMassachusetts, and ]Miss Edna Crowell 
was elected to fill the position. INIiss Nettie INI. Bowen 
resigned and her place was filled by the election of ]Miss 
Ella M. Shaw. 

During the summer Mr. Willard B. Atwell resigned as 
principal of the High school. Mr. Atw^ell was principal 
for three years and did good work in the establishing and 
building up of the High school. Mr. George H. Harmon, 
a graduate of Bates, was elected to the position. The 
growth of the school and the addition of another year's 
work necessitated the employment of another High school 



168 CITY OF CONCORD. 

teacher. Miss Susan Annie May, a graduate of Brown, fills 
this position. There were, then, no less than five teachers 
who resigned during the year. In only one case, that of 
Miss Stevens, was poor health the cause. The others came 
about directly or indirectly through the lack of sufficient 
salary inducements. The district, in order to maintain 
permanency and the standard of its teaching force, must 
at an early date make a more generous salary schedule. 
The present teaching force, including the new members, is 
composed of well-educated, well-trained teachers, who will 
soon become candidates for better positions. Due recogni- 
tion must be granted the facts that the expense of living is 
greater for teachers, and that it takes more time and more 
money to secure the training required of them now than 
ever before. In the long run, it is a good financial as well 
as educational policy to continue the services of good 
teachers as long as possible. 

High School. 

In the last annual report the superintendent recom- 
mended that the programme of studies for the High school 
and ninth grade at that time be somewhat changed, another 
year's work added and the state superintendent be asked 
to approve the whole for a three-year High school. The 
reconnnendation has been carried out in full, and to-day 
Penacook has a successful, approved three-year High school 
with an average enrollment of about fifty-five pupils. Con- 
sidering the size of the village, this is certainly all that 
could be expected as far as numbers are concerned. Should 
another year be added, the number enrolled next year 
would probably be about seventy-five, and the year follow- 
ing nearly one hundred. 

Arguments are no longer necessary to justify the exist- 
ence of the High school as it now is. Its programme of 
studies, approved by the state superintendent of public 
instruction, its teachers, graduates of well-known institu- 



SCHOOL REPORT. • 169 

tions, and its large enrollment are most emphatic evidences 
that a long deep-felt need has been successfully met. The 
question now before the district is, shall the fourth year 
be added? Should the addition be made, three rooms must 
be devoted to the High school, one more teacher, a college 
graduate, must he employed and some new books and appa- 
ratus must be purchased. One room at the Summer Street 
school is still unused, so there need be no anxiety or expense 
incurred in securing the needed accommodations. The ad- 
ditional teacher, although she must he a college graduate, 
can, in all probability, be secured at a normal figure which 
will not exceed by much, if at all, the average salary already 
paid by the district. Books and the apparatus for a chem- 
ical and physical laboratory Avill probably cost somewhat 
over one hundred dollars, at the beginning of the next 
school year. The physical laboratory, however, which is 
the most expensive part of the equipment, even under the 
present conditions of a three-year High school, must be 
established. Thus the extra expense of the fourth year will 
be largely for the salary of the extra teacher, and this to a 
large extent will be met l)y the increased number of tuitions 
paid by those attending school from outside of the district. 
There have been, during the fall and winter terms, enrolled 
eleven pupils for whom tuition has been paid at the rate of 
thirty dollars per j'ear. Most of these will remain another 
j'Car while quite a few others will enter. 

Whenever a district adds another year's work to its 
school system, it increases by just so much the educational 
standard of the schools and community. This is especially 
true when it affords opportunity for a large number of 
pupils, who for financial or other reasons can not con- 
tinue their education outside of the district. »For exam- 
ple, out of the fifty-one now enrolled in the High school, it 
is not probable that even fifty per cent, would have gone to 
a High school out of the district. The opportunities, then, 
offered these children, who would have been otherwise de- 
prived of a High school education, have been eagerly ac- 



170 CITY OF CONCORD. 

eepted and these same children will be better fitted to take 
the positions of responsibility which will devolve upon 
them as they continue to live in the community. A fourth 
High school year would add more to the educational stan- 
dard of the schools than any previous year of the child's 
school life. With this year children could fit for college or 
other higher educational institutions without leaving home, 
and the reduced expense in the secondary school would ena- 
ble many, where there are now but few, to look forward to 
a college or high technical education. From an educa- 
tional point of vieAv, the Pligh school should have a full 
four years' course. Then, and then only, will the school 
system of the district be complete, and the pupils have 
something definite to look forward to. namely, the High 
school diploma. The superintendent recommends this to 
the careful consideration of the School Board and residents 
of the district. 

As has been before mentioned, an additional year in the 
High school would require another room. One of the 
grades in the Charles Street building could be transferred to 
Summer Street and the room thus vacated be used. However, 
as a matter of fact, the Summer Street building would be 
far more economical for High school purposes than the 
present situation, where the High school must soon occupy 
the whole building, crowding out all the grades. On the 
other hand, the second fioor of the Summer Street building, 
by using the double room as an assembly room, could be 
made to accommodate the school for some time to come. 

Thus far the High school has been conducted with the 
hope and, I may say, ex})ectation that the fourth year 
would fituilly be added. The progrannne of studies is 
simply the first three years of a four-year course. Records 
are being kept of all the work of the ])upils. Definite per 
cents, have been decided upon for promotion and certif- 
icate privilege. In order to be promoted and finally grad- 
uate, a child must acquire an average per cent, of seventy. 
While those wishing to obtain certificates of scholarship, in 



SCHOOL REPORT. 171 

order to attend more advanced institutions, must attain 
eighty-five per cent, for the last two years of the course. 
In these respects the whole plan has been in accordance 
with the idea of a complete four-year High school. 

In Conclusion. 

In closing this report, it may be well to call your atten- 
tion briefly to the purpose of the public schools. During 
the last ten years the educational affairs of the state have 
progressed by leaps and bounds. New and extremely bene- 
ficial attendance laws have been enacted, opportunity is 
now furnished every child of the state to attend a High 
school at public expense, supervisory laws have been passed, 
several laws of equalization have become successfully appli- 
cable to a large number of poorer districts of the state, and 
much other equally advantageous legislation has taken 
place. Furthermore, at the time of writing, the General 
Court is considering the establishment of another Normal 
school, the further extension of the equalization laws, and 
the certification of teachers. Through these numerous legis- 
lative acts, the state shows an interest in its public schools 
and indicates that they are really a department of the state 
rather than the property of local municipalities. In short, 
the state recognizes that the political safety of a republic 
depends directly upon the intelligence of its citizens. It 
is then for the protection of the state that the vast sj^stem 
of public schools exists. Bearing this in mind, it is readily 
seen that the public schools must educate children for citi- 
zenship. They must, as far as possible, train children so 
that they may be able to perform intelligently the ordinary 
duties, social, moral, and political, devolving upon them. 
The schools of the district are, as far as possible, endeavor- 
ing through the conscientious efforts of the teachers and 
school officials, to attain this object. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. C. SANBORN, 
Superintendent . 



DIRECTORY. 



BOARD OP EDUCATION. 

Dr. H. C. HOLBROOK, chairman. 
LEANDER C. PRESCOTT, secretary 
HARRY A. BROWN. 



SUPERINTENDENT OP SCHOOLS. 

H. C. SANBORN. 

Office at the Summer Street building. 
Hours, from 12 m. to 1 p. m., Wednesdays. 



TEACHERS. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal— GEORGE H. HARIMON. 
Assistant— ^VSA'^ ANNIE MAY. 



GRADES. 

EDNA CROWELL . 
HANNAH R. HOLDEN 
MARIA CARTER 
ELLA M. SHAW 
SUSAN E. PICKARD 
EVA CHENEY 
HENRIETTA L. OTTERSON 
MARTHA GALE 



Grades VIII and V. 
Grade VII. 
Grades VI and V. 
Grade IV. 
Grade III. 
Grades II and I. 
Grade I. 
Music. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 173 

TRUANT OFFICER. 
WILLIAM FARRAND. 



ROLL OF ATTENDANCE. 

Mildred Raymond, High school; Walter Gregg, Grade 
VIII; Gladys Quimby. John Rodd, William O'Keefe, Wil- 
liam Fortin, Grade VI; Frank Nareomb, Grade V; Lena 
Jemery, Grade IV ; Mildred RunnelLs, Grade III ; Albert 
Simoneau, Grade II. 



174 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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REPORT OF TREASURER OF SCHOOL DIS- 
TRICT NO. 20. 





Receipts 


. 




Balance on hand for the year ending 


1905-1906. 


. $80.72 


Received from city treasurer. . . 7,383.15 


Received from children 


, breaking glass .50 


Received from H. C. Holbrook, sale of 


books 


8.92 


Received from sale of g 


rass . . . 5.00 


Received from tuition 




232.74 


Total 




Expenditures. 


Salaries 


$3,999.72 


Books 




; 


. 494.31 


Supplies 








102.40 


Sinking fund 








500.00 


Tuitions 








361.04 


Fuel . 








535.00 


Care of schoolhouse 








438.87 


Furnishings 








311.16 


Repairs 








135.85 


General supplies . 








32.36 


Miscellaneous 








254.58 


Balance on hand . 








545.74 



$7,711.03 



$7,711.03 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID T. TWOMEY, 

Treasurer. 



176 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Salaries. 

H. C. Sanborn, superintendent 

W. B. Atwell 

George H. Harmon 

Elizabeth Saunders 

Nettie Bowen 

Hannah Holden . 

Maria Carter 

Susan Pickard 

Grace B. Knowlton 

Henrietta Otterson 

Susan May . 

M. Jennie Doyle 

Ella M. Shaw 

Eva 31. Cheney 

Edna Crowell 

Martha S. Gale (music) 

David T. Twomey, treasurer 



$299.30 
244.42 
555.50 
110.00 
110.00 
360.00 
372.50 
360.00 
99.00 
324.00 
300.00 
140.00 
250.00 
225.00 
110.00 
115.00 
25.00 



Text-Books. 




Ginn & Co 


$193.18 


Edward E. Babb & Co. 






168.93 


Silver-Burdette Co. 






73.18 


Isaac Walker (register) 






4.00 


J. D. Pearsons 






9.00 


D. C. Heath & Co. 






14.00 


American Book Co. 






18.77 


Educational Publishing Co. 




12.00 


Gault & Spaulding 






1.25 



$3,999.72 



$494.31 



School Supplies. 

Oliver Ditson Co., music . . . $2.99 
J. L. Hammett & Co., ink, crayons, 

cards, paper, etc. .... 32.44 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



177 



C. H. Fowler Drug Store, paper and 

ink syringe 
George B. Jennings Co., music 
The Scarborough Co., rollers 
Edward E. Babb Co., paper 
Eagle Pencil Co., pencils 
F. E. Bean, stationery and clock 
Milton Bradley Co., kindergarten 



Sinking Fund. 



1906. 



$2.24 
2.97 

12.90 

15.20 
7.32 
4.65 

21.69 



May 28. Deposited in N. H. Savings 
Bank .... 

Tuition. 

Union School District, High school- . $341.04 
Lebanon School District, Mildred 

Ward 20.00 



Fuel. 



J. C. Farrand, 72 tons coal 
H. H. Hay ward & Co., wood 



$530.00 
5.00 



$102.40 



$500.00 



$361.04 



$535.00 



Care of Schoolhouse. 
William E. Farrand .... 

Furnishings. 

American Seating Co., desks and 

chairs $201.60 

Isaac Baty, chair . . . " . 1.65 

Mary Bean, piano .... 56.00 
C. H. Barnett. slate blackboards . / 51.91 



$438.87 



$311.16 



178 city op concord. 

Repairs. 

1906. 
May 1. Orr & Rolfe, labor and car 

fare $2.20 

F. P. Amiis, painting hlack- 

boarcls .... .75 

C. H. Barnett, labor and 

supplies . . . .25.13 

26. Isaac Baty, labor and stock 2.05 

Oct. 3. F. P. Annis, paint and labor 6.25 

Dec. 5. Louis J. Sebra, labor and 

material building fence . 46.32 
14. W. J. Corbett, paint and 

labor .... 2.40 

Henry Rolfe, crushed sfone 

and labor, one man . . 5.50 

F. E. Williams, labor and 

stock .... 6.80 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lum- 
ber, glass and labor . . 13.82 
1907. 
Feb. 1. Concord Axle Co., repairs on 

boiler .... 13.85 

John B. Varick Co., gong . 6.25 

March 7. E. E. Babb, labor and sup- 
plies . . . t . 4.53 



General Supplies. 

G. E. Farrand, oil, pails, brooms, gold 

dust, etc $7.04 

D. W. Fox, dippers, locks and keys, 

thermometer, lantern globes, etc. . 5.19 

Foote, Brown & Co., waste-baskets, 

cloth, oil, ink, mops, etc. . . . 20.13 



$135.85 



$32.36 



school report. 179 

Miscellaneous. 
1906. 
April 6. V. C. Hastings, 6 months' 

water rent . . . $30.00 
May 1. E. L. Davis, trucking . . 1.60 

American Express Co., ex- 
press .... .95 
Penacook Electric Light Co.; 

3 months' power . . 7.50 

26. American Exjjress Co., ex- 
press .... 1.30 
June 18. J. Willey, team hire . . 3.00 
July 9. Bertha I. Stevens, elocution 

lessons, graduating class . 15.24 
Sept. 12. J. C. Farrand, team and 

labor .... 2.22 

Lloyd & ]Mann, printing di- 
plomas .... 4.00 
George H. Whitman, ribbon, 

cambric and pins . . 1.24 

Penacook Electric Light Co., 

3 months' power . . 7.50 

H. A. Brown, traveling ex- 
penses hiring teacher . 4.93 
E. L. Davis, freight and 

cartage .... 10.80 
W. B. Ranney, printing . 15.75 

Morrill & Danforth, in- 
surance .... 25.00 
Oct. 19. V. C. Hastings, 6 months' 

water rent . . . 30.00 
Nov. 2. American Express Co., ex- 
press .... 8.05 
Penacook Electric Light Co., 
3 months' power, and re- 
pairing motor . . . 8.40 
Dec. 16. American Express (^o., ex- 
press .... .90 



L80 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



1907. 

Jan. 29. E. L. Davis, freight and 

cartage .... $37.88 

Nelson Case, sawing wood . 3.00 

Feb. 1. American Express Co., ex- 
press .... 1.35 

Penacook Electric Light Co., 

3 months' power . . 7.50 

First Baptist Church, grad- 
uating exercises . . 5.00 
H. C. Sanborn, mileage, post- 
age, paper, telephoning, 
etc. ..... 6.77 

March 7. American Express Co., ex- 
press .... .95 

F. Carl J\Ierrill, repairing 

and tuning piano . . 11.00 
18. W. B. Kanney, printing . 2.75 



$254.58 



School Funds and How Obtained. 



Appropriations 






$3.0-13.70 




Amount voted by district . . . 2,825.00 




Literary fund 






225.70 




Dog licenses 






110.30 




Text-books . 






208.09 




Abial Walker trust fund 






2.08 




Sinking fund 






500.00 




Tuitions returned by state 






468.28 




Total .... 




$7,383.15 


Total amount of sinking fund .... 


$1,500.00 


Interest on the same ...... 


82.37 




$1,582.37 


Total bonded indebtedness . 




, 


. 


$13,800.00 



SCHOOL REPORT OF THE TOWN SCHOOL 
DISTRICT OF CONCORD, 1906-1907. 



Once again your attention is called to the close of an- 
other school year. Looking back over the year's work, we 
are able to report progress and improvement in many 
directions. We have had a school year of about thirty-five 
weeks; the longest in our history. It may be desirable to 
extend the school year to thirty-six weeks or even more 
than that the coming year. However, it is the opinion of 
many who are well qualified to judge, and the opinion is 
indorsed by your school board, that thirty-six weeks of 
schooling in the year is enough for the best interests of 
the average child. 

The financial affairs of the district have been ably man- 
aged by our town treasurer, ]Mr. Isaac N. Abbott, who has 
served the district faithfully in various positions over an 
uninterrupted period of forty-nine years. 

The close of the year finds all bills paid, schoolhouses in 
good serviceable condition, and a substantial sum in the 
treasury. 

Our schools are in charge of teachers who have taught 
from six to forty terms and they are doing uniformly good 
work. 

We earnestly hope the district will vote to authorize the 
school board to unite with others in forming a supervisory 
district for the purpose of employing expert supervision. 
This will, at least, be worth the trial and will not, we trust, 
make our expenses burdensome. This would be a help to 
the teachers as a course of study would be planned for 
them and the work throughout the district would be more 
uniform. 

A short course in agriculture in our schools, we believe, 



182 CITY OP CONCORD. 

would awaken an interest in that most essential of occupa- 
tions and would be especially helpful to any who may 
wish to enter the agricultural college. 

We recommend to parents that their visits at the school- 
room be more frequent. Encourage and support the 
teacher in every possible way, and if any injustice pre- 
vails, come directly and in a fair manner to the committee 
for adjustment. 

ALBERT SALTMAESH, 
IRVING T. CHESLEY, 
JUDSON F. HOIT, 

School Board. 



MiLLViLLE Grammar. 

This school has been taught for two years by Miss Mar- 
jorie Robinson, a teacher of experience, who has worked 
faithfully with her pupils. c. 

MiLLViLLE Primary. 

This school has been taught for a number of years by 
Miss Ethel Paige, whose efficient worlc has won for her the 
esteem of all, and it is with regret that we accept her 
resignation. c. 

AsHviLLE School. 

This school has been taught by Mrs. Maude G. Thomp- 
son, a graduate of Tilton Seminary, a teacher of seven 
years' experience in the graded schools of Belmont and the 
Town District of Concord. Mrs. Thompson's scholars show 
great progress during the past year and we hope she will 
return in the spring. c. 

Iron Works School. 

Tliis school of thirty scholars has been taught during 
the past year by IMiss Edna AVatson, a teacher of experi- 



SCHOOL REPORT, 183 

ence, whose excellent work is satisfactory to all parents 
and scholars in the district. c. 

Horse Hill and No. 4 Schools. 

During the spring and fall terms the scholars at No. 4 
were conveyed to Horse Hill school. ]\Iiss Ruth W. Favor 
was in charge of the spring term and both schools seemed 
to maintain their standing as well as under separate 
teachers. 

After the close of the spring term IMiss Favor resigned 
the position she had filled acceptably for two years and 
Miss Grace E. Wallace, of Centre Sandwich, succeeded 
her in the work. Miss Wallace, though a young teacher, 
gave to the school excellent service which was highly 
appreciated. A winter school of twelve weeks was main- 
tained at No. 4 with Miss Tina B. Hurd, of Lisbon, as 
teacher. The closing examination proved to a good num- 
ber of parents and friends that the school had been in 
every way a success. S. 

BuRROUGH School. 

This school, for three years under the instruction of 
]Mrs. Belle C. Ball, of Concord, has made good improve- 
ment during her entire term of service. An average of 
a])out thirty pupils of ages ranging from five to nearly 
fifteen years is certainly a field requiring busy and faith- 
ful work. The present instructor has filled her position 
most acceptably to all interested in the welfare of this 
school, and her services should be retained for the coming 
year. s. 

Snaptown School. ^ 

]Miss Fannie Kendall taught the spring term. Miss Mary 
Shaw, a graduate of Pittsfield high school, taught the 
fall and winter terms doing good work. h. 



184 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
TURTLETOWN SCHOOL. 



Miss Flora Hook, who has so successfully taught this 
school iu the past, resumed charge again during the past 
year. The improved condition of the sehoolhouse, together 
with good teaching service, has made the school a success. 

H. 

Mountain School. 

The spring term was commenced by ]\liss Hannah ^I. 
Stanyan. Owing to sickness in her home she was obliged 
to leave and Miss Delia Corser finished the term in a very 
satisfactory manner. The fall and winter terms were 
taught by Miss Bridgett Rochelle, a graduate of Concord 
high school, who gave entire satisfaction to scholars and 
parents. h. 

Plains School. 

Miss Isabel Adams was in charge of this school during 
the three terms. She gave her usually faithful service, 
which resulted in good advancement of the pupils in all 
branches taught. h. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



The treasurer of the Town School District respectfully 
submits the following report of the receipts and expendi- 
tures for the year ending IMarch, 1907 : 



Receipts. 




Balance from last year 


• . $397.92 


Balance from city treasurer 


384.25 


Regular a])propriation 


3,616.62 


Extra appropriation 


500.00 


Literary fund ..... 


140.30 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



185 



Dog licenses 

Text-books 

Abial "Walker trust fund . 

Tuitions returned by state 

Other tuitions . 

Cash .... 



Total receipts 



Expenditures 



Teachers' salaries 

Books 

Supplies 

Fuel 

Repairs 

Conveying- scholars . 

]\Iusic 

Tuitions 

Enumerating children 

Water 

Incidentals 

Truant officer . 

Printing 

Treasurer 

Balance undrawn 

Cash to balance account 



$131.07 

247.25 

2.47 

118.19 

75.20 

1.00 

$5,614.27 



$2,917.25 

114.61 

89.45 

148.96 

272.57 

130.00 

34.00 

408.46 

15.45 

12.00 

132.77 

1.00 

1.25 

25.00 

1,255.90 

55.60 



Total expenditures 



$5,614.27 

ISAAC N. ABBOTT. 

Treasurer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Honorahle Mayor and City Council: 

I herewith submit for your consideratiou the following 
report of the Fire Departmeiit for the year 1906 : 

The department responded to fort^'-six (46) bell alarms 
and one hundred and sixty-one (161) still alarms. 





Bell. 


Still. 


Total. 


Precinct, 


27 


140 


167 


Penacook, 


12 


18 


30 


East Concord, 


3 




3 


West Concord, 


4 


3 


7 












46 161 207 

In the line of fires the year, when compared with the 
preceding one, has been uneventful. The loss was not large 
and a considerable portion of this was entailed by the de- 
struction of buildings far removed from the city proper, 
without fire protection, the only surprising feature being 
the total lack of insurance in some instances. 

In the line of expenditures, th(^ year has been extraor- 
dinary. Valuable additions and improvements have been 
made to the apparatus and equipment, among the most no- 
table of which may be mentioned the purchase of a ladder 
truck, hose wagon, twenty-five hundred feet of hose, ex- 
tension ladder, life-net, and the relmilding of Engine four. 

The apparatus is in good condition but the fact must be 
borne in mind that the boilers of some of the engines have 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 187 

attained such age that the rephieement of same will he sub- 
jects for consideration in the near future. 

The fire-alarm telegraph system is in good condition. One 
box was added to the system and the circuits kept in thorough 
repair. I would respectfully recommend the installing of 
a fire-alarm station on Auburn Street, between High and 
Franklin Streets, during the coming year. Relative to rec- 
ommendations pertaining to the improvement of the system, 
I can but refer your honora])le body to reports of former 
years. 

The annual test of hose resulted in the relining of seven- 
teen hundred and fifty feet and the discarding of eight 
hundred and fifty feet. 

EespectfuUy submitted; 



' W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 

Appropriations. 

Appropriation, $22,000.00 

Joint resolution, hose, 2,250.00 

rebuilding Engine 4, 2.000.00 

ladder truck, 1,200.00 

hose W'agon, 490.00 

horse, 300.00 

extension ladder, 175.00 

outstanding claims, 496.18 



$28,911.18 



Disbursements. 

Permanent men, $7,074.00 

Vacations, 624.50 

Rent, A^eterans' Association, 150.00 

Call men, 6,960.00 

Forage, 1,399.53 

Fuel, 1,407.07 



188 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Lights, 




$761.54 


Incidentals, 




2,299.43 


Horseshoeing, 




327.00 


Horses purchased. 




260.00 


Horse hire, 




597.85 


Laundry, 




52.00 


Fire alarm, 




683.52 


Supplies, chemical engi 


ine, 


40.24 


Hose, 




2,250.00 


Water, 




119.50 


House man. 




80.00 


Extension ladder. 




175.00 


Ladder truck. 




1,160.00 


Rebuilding Engine 4, 




2,000.00 


Hose wagon. 




490.00 


• 


ALARMS. 






Precinct. 





$28,911.18 



Still. January 2, 6.47 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Lizzie Mclntire, 77 School Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 5, 4.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Mary Robinson, 28 Union Street. Extinguished by 
members of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. January 7, 12.25 p. m. Chinniey fire in resi- 
dence of Robert Barry, 20 Green Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 9, 4.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of R. A. Marshall, 246 North State Street. Extingviished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 35. January 10, 8.28 p. m. Chinmc^- fire in Central 
Block, North Main Street. Extinguished with chemicals. 
Recall 8.41 p. m. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 189 

Still. January 13, 1.49 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. J. Lynch, 31 'Hall Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 15, 4.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. H. Hanson, 111 North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 16, 6.03 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of D. C. Lynch. 97 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 17, 7.32 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of D. II. Leavitt, 47 Green Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of ]\Irs. F. P. Hallett, 117 School Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 24, 6.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. F. Ray. 9 Auburn Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. 2>Jo loss. 

Still. January 25, 10.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. G. Fletcher, 2 North Spring Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Compan^y. No loss. 

Still. January 26. 7.11 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. L. A. Dyer, 112 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 12.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. E. Plummer, 34 Washington Street. ]Members 
of Alert Hose Company responded. See next alarm. 

Still. January 29. 1.06 p. m. A call for assistance 
from scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. February 1, 8.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Robinson, 77 Washington Street. Chemical 
Company responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. February 2, 8.44 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of 0. A. Robertson, 45 West Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Compan3\ No loss. 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. Feln-uary 2. 3.26 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. J. Donovan, 18 Badger Street. Extinguished 
hy Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. Fe])ruary 2, 8.15 p. in. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles ]\Iasse, 7 Tavern Place. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 3. 10.14 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Dr. Elizabeth Hoyt, 85 
North State Street. Chemical Company responded but no 
assistance was reqviired. No fire. 

Still. February 3, 7.22 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 122 Warren Street, owned by John Bolger and occu- 
pied by A. P. Thompson. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building. $1,200.00 $7.00 $700.00 $7.00 

Still. Feljruary 6, 9.47 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. F. Clark. 119 Kumford Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 6. 8.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Samuel Holt, 72 South State Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 7.24 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. T. Bailey, 5 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 8.52 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. T. Bailey, 5 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 15, 5.29 p. in. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Potter, 171 North ^Faiii Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Co. No loss. 

Still. February 16, 9.12 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of I\Irs. 11. M. Griffin, 22 I\Iills Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Co. No loss. 

Still. February ]7, 10.04 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 49 Washington Street, owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Ellen Callahan. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

^'nluo. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $5.00 $2,000.00 $5.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 191 

Still. February 19, 8.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of "Sirs. Catherine Cashine, 75 South Main Street. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 22, 9.19 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Oliver Shepard, 24 Ferry Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 22, 10.48 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. C. Wilmot, 27 Franklin Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 23, 8.10 a. m. Fire in closet in build- 
ing 72 North Main Street, owned by ]\Irs. William Drew 
and occupied by R. F. Keane, tailor. Cause unknown. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $10.00 $10.00 None. , None. 

Still. February' 28. 2.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Sylvester. 37 Stone Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 28. 2.56 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. A. Perrigo, 37 Thompson Street. Chemical 
Company being in service Kearsarge wagon sent, which re- 
turned to quarters upon meeting said company. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Co. No loss. 

Still. February 28, 6.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. H. Colby, 9 Dakin Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 28. 7.23 p. m. Grass fire corner of 
Harrison and Badger Streets. Chemical Company being 
in service Kearsarge w^agon sent. No assistance required. 
Extinguished by neighbors. No loss. 

Still. ]\Iarch 1, 10.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. R. Burroughs, 27 Fayette Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 2, 8.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. L. ]\rarshall. 97 South Main Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 



192 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. ]\Iarch 4, 8.59 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. F. Chellis, 77 North State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. ]\Iarch 4, 5.47 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. E. Hobson, 47 Tremont Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 8.28 p. m. Chimne}- fire in residence 
of ^Irs. V. F. Silver, 25 Maple Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 6. 8.44 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss C. A. Sewall, 90 Warren Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 7, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. J. Reille, 147 North State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 12, 11.28 a. m. Set of buildings on Gar- 
vin's Falls road, owned by Mrs. William Standish and oc- 
cupied by S. A. Richardson, destroyed. Chemical Com- 
pany responded but could do little beside assisting in the 
removal of contents. One horse perished. Cause unknown. 

Buildings, 
Contents, 

Still. March 12, 5.22 p. m. Chimney fire in Rumford 
Block, 80 North Main Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. ]\Iarch 15, 8.51 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of G. D. ]\Ieader, 10 Marshall St. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Stilij. March 17, 8.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
22 North Spring Street, owned by George A. Foster and 
occupied by David A. Gage. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. 

Vahio. Loss. Tnsiiranee. Ins. paid. 

Building. ^^2.000.00 $10.00 $1,500.00 $10.00 

Still. ]\Iareh 20, 7.20 a. m. Chinnioy fire in residence 
of Miss IMary Pierce, 19 North State Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


$1,200.00 


$1,200.00 


$900.00 


$900.00 


1,000.00 


600.00 


None. 


None. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 193 

Still. March 29, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James 0. Lyford, 11 Pitman Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 31, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Bartlett. 4 Jackson Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. Xo loss. 

StilIj. April 3. 9.06 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. C. iMessier. 10 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 7. 6.29 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Lemer, 55 South State Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 5.40 a. m. Fire on roof of ell of resi- 
dence 279 Pleasant Street, owned by John Lane and occu- 
pied by George JMiller. Caused by overheated chimney. 
Extinguished by occupants before the arrival of Chemical 
Company. / 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $25.00 None. None. 

Box 56. April 10, 4.-1:5 a. m. Residence on Duubarton 
road, near Orphans' Home, owned by St. Paul's School and 
occupied by Thomas Hill, destroyed. Fire originated in 
carriage-house attached to rear of building. Cause un- 
known. Seven hundred feet hose wet. Recall 6.42 a. m. 

Value. Losi?. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $3,500.00 $2,300.00 $2,300.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 1,900.00 None. None. 

Still. Aj)ril 14. 2.52 p. m. Grass fire on Giles Street, 
near residence of H. C. Morrison. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 14. 5.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. M. Woodbury, 57 South Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 16, 4.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. S. C. iMorrill, 123 North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 



194 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. April 19, 7.48 a. m. Cliimue}' fire in residence 
of Frank Mayo, 87 Rnmford Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 19, 8.30 a. m. Fire in hollow tree in 
"White Park. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No 
loss. 

Still. April 19, 11.30 a. m. Brush fire on Gladstone 
Street. Chemical Company responded. See next alarm. 

4-4-4. April 19, 12.06 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Eagle wagon and detail from the 
department sent under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. 
Labored three and one-half hours. No loss. 

Still. April 20, 11.04 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. L. Demerritt, 10 Downing Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

11-11. April 21, 5.35 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Loudon. Engine 2, Eagle wagon and detail from the de- 
partment sent under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. 
Engine worked three hours. One thousand and fifty feet 
of hose wet. Detail returned at midnight. 

Still. April 22, 3.02 p. m. Fire on roof of residence 
3 Liberty Street, owned and occupied by C. L. Gibbs. 
Caused by spark from chimney. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $5,000.00 $61.00 $3,400.00 $61.00 

Still. April 24, 7.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. C. Silver, 69 Franklin Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 24, 12.09 p. m. Brush fire on Lightning 
Hill, near head of Centre Street. Detail from the depart- 
ment sent under command of Engineer J. J. IMcNulty. 
Extinguished by near-by residents before arrival of fire- 
men. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire in Low Court 
in paint shop occupied by George Abbott, Jr. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. Loss trifling. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 195 

Box 25. April 27, 11.26 p. m. Slight fire in packing 
case in glazier shop occupied by C. W. Drake, Durgin 
Street. Cause unknown. Recall 11.32 p. m. Loss trifling. 

4-4-4. April 29, 3.29 p. m. Brush fire on Auburn 
Street, near head of Franklin Street. Detail from the de- 
partment sent under command of Engineer AV. E. Dow. 
Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. April 29, 3.32 p. m. Information received from 
the scene of preceding fire that a building was in imminent 
danger. As the barge had not arrived at the Central Sta- 
tion to convey the detail of firemen, the Chemical Company 
was immediately sent and the aid rendered was most timely. 

Still. jMay 4, 9.01 a. m. Chimney fire in Exchange 
Block, 98 North Main Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. May 6, 8.17 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Edgar Howe, South Street, near Wheeler's Corner. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. INIay 8. 6.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. K. Tenney. 52 South Main Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. ]\Iay 11, 11.31 a. m. Chimne}" fir(* in residence 
of William jMcIsaac, 15 Monroe St. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. ^lay 12. 10.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. L. Dudley, 3 Broadway-. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. ]May 14, 11.35 a. m. Brush fire west of prison. 
Detail from the department sent under command of En- 
gineer J. J. ^McNulty. Labored seven hours. At 3.07 
p. m., houses being in danger, Chemical Company was sent 
to assist. An unoccupied building formerly used as a 
blacksmith shop and engine house, owned by A. M. John- 
son, destroyed. Loss trifling. 

Still. May 14, 1.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Felix Bean, 82 South State Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 



196 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. ]\lay 14. 3.07 p. m. Brush fire west of prison. 
Chemical Company responded. See alarm same date, 
11.85 a. m. 

4-4-1:. ]May 15. 9.30 a. m. Brush fire on Long Pond 
road near residence of ^lichael Daly. Detail from the de- 
partment sent under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. 
Labored two hours. No loss. 

Still. ]May 15. 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. Oscar Thomas, 21 Concord Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Hose Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 19, 11.48 a. m. Brush fire on east side of 
river near the Passaconaw^ay Club property. Chemical 
Company and detail from the department sent vinder com- 
mand of Engineer J. J. ]\IcNulty. Labored three hours. 
Cause alleged to have been spark from locomotive. Claims 
filed against B. & M. R. R. aggregating $512 for loss of 
wood as follows : 

George P. Thompson. $400.00 

S. A. Richardson. 100.00 

T. J. Byrne. 12.00 

Still. ]May 20, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Herbert, 103 North State Street. Extinguished 
by members of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. ]May 20, 12.11 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Blanehard Block. 3 South ]\I-ain Street. Chem- 
ical Company responded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

StilI;. May 20, 8.40 p. ni. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. W. Lowry. 49 Green Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Comi)any. No loss. 

Still. May 21, 6.22 a. m. Chimn(\v fire in residence 
of D. McLeod, 4 Wentworth Avenue. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. ^lay 23, 6.50 p. m. Chinuiey fire in residence 
of R. E. Walker, 22 South Spring Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 197 

Still. ]May 26, 8.30 a. m. Fire in hen-house in rear of 
5 Harvard Street, owned and occupied by D. B. Webster. 
Caused by kerosene lamp. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building. $200.00 $20.00 None. None. 

Still. June 4, 7.44 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Miss Lizzie Mclntire, 77 School Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. June 9, 6.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. Palmer, 27 Perley Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. June 11, 8.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Thomas Cilley. 26 Essex Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. June 21, 2.25 p. m. Fire in flooring in kitchen 
in St. Mary's School, 32 South Main Street. Caused by 
lack of protection under range. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building. $10,000.00 $5.00 $6,000.00 $5.00 

Still. June 23, 12.27 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of Joseph Gingran, 1 ]\Iarshall Street. 
Stovepipe failed of entering chimney. Chemical Company 
responded. No loss. 

Box 17. June 28. 3.35 p. m. Slight fire in barn in rear 
of 13 Washington Street, owned by Charles S. Bordman 
and occupied by Rev. V. ]M. Morse. Caused by children 
playing with matches. Three hundred feet hose wet. 
Recall 3.47 p. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. July 18, 11.26 a. m. Slight fire in oven of gas 
stove in residence of T. W. Craigue, 4 South State Street. 
Chemical Company responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. No loss. 

Still. August 1, 9.33 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. C. Rhines, 106 Warren Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Companv. Xo loss. 



198 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. August 7, 12.31 p. m. Fire in pile of old lumber 
in B. & ]M. R. R. yard south of Marsh coal plant. Caused 
by spark from locomotive. Extinguished by C'hemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. August 11. 12.21 p. m. See next alarm. 

Box 26. August 11, 12.22 p. m. Fire in residence 5 
Ford Avenue, owned by ]\Irs. H. ]\I. Hartshorn and occu- 
pied by George A. Sleeper. Cause unknown. Recall 
12.30 p. m. Extinguished with chemicals. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$2,500.00 


$40.00 


$1,500.00 


$40.00 


Contents, 


600.00 


19.06 


400.00 


19.06 



Still. August 25, 10.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of ]Mrs. Addie Butterfield, 44 South State Street. 
Extinguished by members of Good Will Hose Company. 
No loss. 

Still. September 1, 3.31 p. m. Fire in bridge over 
railroad tracks. Bridge Street. Caused by spark from loco- 
motive. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 42. September 1, 10.50 p. m. Fire in residence 10 
Myrtle Street, OMmed by Mrs. John L. Jordan and occupied 
by Henr.y Libby. Cause unknown. Five hundred and 
fifty feet hose wet but no water used in building. Ex- 
tinguished with chemicals. Recall 11.11 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,200.00 


$34.50 


$800.00 


$34.50 


Contents, 


1,000.00 


90.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. Septeml)er 2. 6.42 ]>. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. E. Tucker, 21 Franklin Street. Extinguished 
by members of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Stiltj. Se])tember 5. 8.59 a. m. Slight fire on roof oF 
building connected with E. S. Tenney coal plant. Ferry 
Street. Caused by spark from smolvcstack. Chemical 
Company responded but no assistance was required. Ex- 
tinguished by employees. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 199 

Still. September 6, 2.12 p. m. Slight tire on roof of 
Concord Coal Co. plant, Bridge Street. Caused by spark 
from smokestack. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
No loss. 

4-4-4. September 11, 3.22 p. m. Brush fire on Plains 
near property of John Prentiss. Detail from department 
sent under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. Labored 
one hour. No loss. 

Still. September 13, 5.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. N. Harvey, 5 Wentworth Avenue. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. September 17, 4.12 p. m. Brush fire on Plains 
near property of John Prentiss. Detail from the depart- 
ment sent under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. 
Labored two and one-half hours. No loss. 

Still. September 23, 11.12 a. m. Chimnej^ fire in resi- 
dence of James ]\rcBain, 95 Franklin Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 9, 8.45 p. m. Fire in temporary shed 
used for the storage of lime and cement, in front of Manual 
Training school, in course of erection, Rumford Street, 
owned by J. II. Mendell & Co. Caused by water coming 
in contact with lime during heavy shower. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company and employees of owner. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $450.00 $25.00 None. None. 

Still. October 14, 2.40 p. m. Alarm caused by smoke 
issuing from basement windows of Sacred Heart School, 
Thorndike Street. Chemical Company responded but no 
assistance was required. Janitor building fire in furnace. 

Still. October 15, 7.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Robert Clark. 7 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 19, 11.53 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. N. Plartshorn, 56 High Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 22. 3.42 p. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. II. Bean. 121 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 23, 5.35 p. m. Chimney tire in resi- 
dence of M. D. King. 26 Beacon Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 24. 7.17 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. H. Tandy. 10 Valley Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 48. October 26, 2.16 p. m. Fire in residence 20 
Pierce Street, owned by ^Irs. Edith Lovering and occu- 
pied by Leon H. Emerson. Cause unknown. One thou- 
sand feet hose wet. Recall 2.35 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


$322.01 


$2,000.00 


$322.01 


Contents, 


1.500.00 


110.32 


500.00 


110.32 



Still. October 28, 2.01 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Hannigan, 177 No^-th State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 29, 7.42 a. m. Alarm caused by ignit- 
ing of wood in oven in residence of Nicholas Theodoss, 4 
Lewis Court. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No 
loss. 

Still. October 30. 2.36 a. m. Fire in buikling 34 War- 
ren Street, owned by Home Realty Company and occu- 
pied by Philbriek market. Caused by overheated stove- 
pipe. Extinguished l)y Chemical Company. 

A'nluc. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Buihling, $20,000.00 $35.00 $8,000.00 $35.00 

Still. Oct()l)er 31, 12.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Broolvs, 42 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical (^ompany. No loss. 

Still. Novenil)er 1. 4.22 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. J. Leary, 21 Fayette Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 201 

Still. November 2, 3.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Ordway, 22 Monroe Street. Extingnished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. C. Batty, 40 West Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 21. November 3, 10.11 p. m. Fire in residence 81 
North State Street, owned by IMrs. Fred W. Cheney and 
occupied by W. A. Kelley. Caused by lace curtain coming 
in contact witli gas jet. Extinguished with chemicals. 
Recall 10.19 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building. 


$7,000.00 


$40.15 


$5,500.00 


$40.15 


Contents. 


1.200.00 


34.50 


700.00 


34.50 



4-4-4. November 6, 11.01 a. m. Brush fire on Albin 
road. Detail from the department sent under command of 
Engineer J. J. ^IcNulty. Labored two and one-half hours. 
No loss. 

Still. November 7, 6.25 p. m. Fire in rubbish in 
court-house yard. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
No loss. 

Still. November 7. 6.32 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. E. Clarke. 33 Harvard Street. Chemical Com- 
pany being in service. Chief's buggy and detail sent. See 
next alarm. 

Still. November 7. 6.49 p. m. A call for assistance 
from scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. November 7. 7.37 p. m. Fire in residence 10 
Sa\^yer Street. Chemical Company responded. See next 
alarm. 

Box 9. November 7. 7.39 p. m. Residence 10 Sawyer 
Street, owned and occupied by James C. Smith, destroyed 
with contents. Caused by upsetting of kerosene lamp. 
Residence ad.joining, south, slightly damaged, owned by 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Joseph Smith and occupied by Eli Sturgeon. Sixteen 
hundred feet hose wet. Recall 9.11 p. m. 



James Smith : 












Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$800.00 


$800.00 


$400,00 


$400.00 


Contents, 


800.00 


800.00 


400.00 


400.00 


Joseph Smith: 












Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 



Building, $600.00 $13.50 $200.00 $13.50 

Still. November 17, 9.10 a. m. Fire in Stevens Lumber 
Company plant, East Penacook Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded. See next alarm. 

Box 8. November 17, 9.13 a. m. Fire in building East 
Penacook Street, owned by Stevens Lumber Company and 
occupied by owners and Standard Oil Co. as blacksmith 
shop and store-house. Cause unknown. Upon the arrival 
of the department two streams were being worked upon 
the fire, manned by employes. Two more streams were im- 
mediately brought to bear, wetting 950 feet of hose. One 
stream from the chemical engine was also used. Recall 
9.26 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid 


Building. 


$200.00 


$200.00 


None. 


None, 


Contents : 










Stevens Co., 


300.00 


300.00 


None. 


None, 


Stan. Oil Co. 


, 300.00 


100.00 


None. 


None, 



Still. November 23, 4.02 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. H. Ken worthy, 5 ]\Ionroe Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 24, 4.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. i\I. Norton, 14 Concord Street. Extinguished 
by members of Good Will Hose Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. November 26, 2.07 a. m. Brush fire on Plains 
north of Pembroke road, near the Fleming Mozee place. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 203 

Caused by burning of building owned and occupied by 
Fred Duplace for the storage of hay and the herding of 
swine. Cause of building fire unknown. Building and 
contents, consisting of forty-seven pigs and five tons of 
meadow hay, a total loss. Detail from the department 
sent under command of Engineer W. E. Dow. Upon the 
arrival of the firemen the brush fire had been extinguished 
by neighbors while the building was level with the ground. 
No loss from brush fire. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insui-ance. 


Ins. paid 


Building, 


$800.00 


$800.00 


None. 


None 


Contents : 










Swine, 


700.00 


700.00 


None. 


None, 


Hay, 


43.86 


43.86 


None. 


None, 



Still. November 26, 1.56 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in resi- 
dence of T. C. Cilley, 26 Essex Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Compan3^ No loss. 

Box 18. November 30, 10.36 a. m. Fire in residence 3 
Lyndon Street, owned and occupied by John T. Kimball. 
Caused by overheated chimney. Three hundred feet hose 
wet. Recall 10.46 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insui-ance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,500.00 


$25.00 


$1,000.00 


$25.00 


Contents, 


700.00 


8.25 


500.00 


8.25 



Still. December 2, 1.04 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Thomas Pelkey, 12 Prospect Street. Extinguished hy 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 1.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. G. C. Kimball, 102 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 3, 4.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. R. Davidson, 1 Marshall Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 4, 3.58 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. S. Tucker, 34 Jackson Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 



204 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. December 5. 11.41 a. in. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. P. Brown, 32 Stone Street. Extinguished b,y 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 5, 6. •4-4 p. m. Chimnc\v fire in resi- 
dence of H. W. Knee, 6 Walker St. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 6. 8.03 a. m. Chimney fire reported 
at 39 South Spring Street. Chemical Company responded. 
No fire. 

Still. December 6, 8.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. W. B. H. Moore. 5 South Spring Street. 
Chemical Company being in service, Kearsarge wagon sent 
with detail, which, on meeting Chemical Company, returned 
to quarters. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No 
loss. 

Still. December 7, 12.59 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles A. Kendall, 38 Centre Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 6.19 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Louis Centin, 9 Freight Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 6.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. L. Maher, 106 South State Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 7.38 a. m. C*himney fire in resi- 
dence of James Coleman, 5 Redwood Avenue. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 4.47 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. Melanson, 87 South Main Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 52. DecemlK^r 9. 6.18 p. m. Fire in residence 116 
South State Street, owned l)y A. L. Pelissier and occupied 
by Charles E. IMorrill. Caused l)y upsetting of kerosene 
lamp. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 6.25 p. m. 

\'!ilui>. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $58.00 $1,000.00 $58.00 

Contents. 1,000.00 80.00 500.00 80.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 205 

Still. December 9, 11.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of ^Irs. Oscar Thomas, 21 Concord Street. Extin- 
guished by members of Good Will Hose Company. No loss. 

Box 14. December 10, 7.06 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John B. Baker, 38 Walker Street. Needless 
alarm. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 7.25 p. m. 
No. loss. 

Still. December 12, 10.08 a. m. Fire in Holt Bros, 
manufacturing plant, 159 South ]\Iain Street. The fire 
originated and was confined to a wooden building in rear 
of main plant. The building was used for operations of the 
bending department of the carriage plant, also as a store- 
house. Chemical Company responded. See next alarm. 

Boxes 45-52. December 12, 10.12 a. m. Both boxes 
pidled simultaneously for preceding fire.- Non-interference 
armatures failed to work properly, resulting in a mixup, in- 
dicators in stations showing 48. Apparatus was not de- 
layed, however, as drivers had received information by 
telephone regarding the fire and were hitching up when 
alarm came in. As box 43 was passed it was readily seen 
that it had not been opened and the apparatus kept on. 
Fire caused by hot shafting bearing. Eighteen hundred 
feet of hose wet. Recall 11.14 a. m. Detail and one line 
of hose left until 1.30 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $1,200.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Contents : 

Stock, 7.500.00 2.981.77 3,500.00 2.981.77 

Machinery, 1,200.00 473.30 500.00 473.30 

Still. December 14. 8.27 a. u\. Fire in basement of 
residence 25 Clinton Street, owned and occupied by J. E. 
Gage. Caused by attempt to thaw out gas meter with oil 
stove. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building. $2,000.00 $25.00 $1,300.00 $25.00 

Contents : 

Gas meter, 10.00 10.00 None None. 



206 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. December 14, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George L. Williams, 58 School Street. Extin- 
guished b}' Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 19. 7.59 p. m. A call to investigate 
canse of smoke in Phenix Hall block. Chemical Company 
responded but no assistance was required. 

Still. December 19, 10.14 p. m. Fire in wooden cus- 
pidor in Ward House, West Street. Chemical Company 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. December 20, 11.38 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Rev. J. H. Robbins, 58 North Spring Street. Chem- 
ical Company responded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

StilIj. December 21, 11.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. H. H. Blake, 29 Thompson Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 14. December 24, 5.56 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William Abbott, 169 Rumford Street. Needless 
alarm. No assistance required. Recall 6.07 a. m. 

Still. December 25, 12.27 p. m. Slight fire in base- 
ment of residence 50 School Street, owned by Mrs. Blanche 
Hill and occupied by Mrs. E. L. Johnson. Caused by crude 
attempt to thaw water pipe. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Stilij. December 25, 4.53 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Samuel St. Cyr, 3 Railroad Square. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 25, 7.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 48 South Fruit Street, owned and occupied by PI. T. 
Oilman. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Lof?s. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $800.00 $17.50 $400.00 $17.50 

Still. Decem1)er 26, 1.40 a. m. Fire in building 7 
Depot Street, owned by Mrs. John J. Griffin and occupied 
by L. E. Currier. Caused by spontaneous combustion 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 207 

among greasy rags thrown in closet. Door forced to gain 
entrance. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building. $10,000.00 $20.00 $4,000.00 $20.00 

Box 19. December 31, 1A8 p. m. Fire in residence 92 
Centre Street, owned and occupied by Fred J. Collins. 
Caused by overheated chimney. Eleven hundred feet of 
hose wet. Recall 2.30 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $450.00 $1,500.00 $450.00 

Contents, 1,100.00 225.00 500.00 225.00 



Penacook. 

Still. January 11, 5.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William W. Allen, 36 Summer Street. No loss. 

Still. January 24. 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in Farrand 
& Chandler building. Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. February 2, 3.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John E. Tucker. 36 Centre Street. No loss. 

Still. February 3, 9.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Asher Ormsbee, 62 South Main Street. No loss. 

Bell. February 3, 6.18 p. m. Alarm for Boscawen side. 

Still. February 6, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Herbert Cross, 5 Spring Street. No loss. 

Bell. INIarch 26, 11.45 p. m. Alarm given for lost child. 

Still. April 12. 7.35 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Coveny, 7 Bye Street. No loss. 

Bell. I\Iay 4. 1.35 p. m. Brush fire on Penacook road. 
Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. May 14, 4.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dr. E. U. Sargent, 22 ^Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Bell. May 15, 4.50 p. m. Brush fire on Penacook road. 
It was found that this lire was being cared for by Cataract 
Company of West Concord, it being located in Ward 3. 
Company out one hour. 



208 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. July 15, 4.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dr. E. U. Sargent, 22 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. August 11, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Alice P. Ketchum, 15 Washington Street. No 
loss. 

Still. August 26, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. John C. Linehan, 11 Charles Street. No loss. 

Still. September 9, 2.45 p. m. Brash fire on land of 
F. G. Chandler, George S. IMorrill. AV. A. Bean and others, 
between South Main and Penacook Streets. 

Bell. September 10, 1.45 p. m. Brush fire at above 
locality. Company on duty three hours. 

Bell. September 1], 1.30 p. m. Brush fire as above. 
Company on duty one and one-half hours. 

Still. September 16, 2.45 p. m. Brush fire as above. 
Company on duty one hour. 

StilIj. September 20, 8.10 p. m. Brush fire as above. 
Company on duty one hour. 

Bell. September 21, 2.30 p. m. Brush fire as above. 
Company on duty three and three-quarters hours. Eleven 
hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Loss on these several fires 
unknown. 

Bell. October 9, 5.45 a. m. Fire in Chadwick Block, 
24 South Main Street. Fire originated in wooden cuspidor 
in store occupied by Walter Bedee. Caused probably by 
cigar stub. Building owned by John Chadwick. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$5,000.00 


$30.00 


$3,000.00 


$30.00 


Contents, 


400.00 


30.00 


100.00 


30.00 



Bell. November 2, 5.30 p. m. Chinnicy fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Decato, 10 South Alain Street. No loss. 

Bell. November 3, 10.35 a. m. Fire in gas house of 
New Hampshire Spinning Mills plant. East Canal Street. 
Caused by spark or match. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $500.00 $50.00 Blanket policy. $50.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 209 

Bell. November 3, 4.10 p. m. Fire in bed in residence 
16 West i\Iain Street, owned by Isaac Tetrault. Caused by 
smoking in Iied. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents. $500.00 $10.00 None. None. 

Bell. November 6, 12.30 p. m. Brush fire on land 
owned by R. G. Sargent between Rolfe and Cross Streets. 
Company on duty forty-five minutes. 

Still. November 17, 6.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Alice P. Ketchum, 15 Washington Street. No 
loss. 

Still. December 8, 11.30 a. m. Chimney fire in 
tenement house owned by George P. Hay ward, 18 East 
Canal Street. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 8.10 p. m. Chimney fire at above 
location. No loss. 

Still. December 9, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house owned by Susie A. Hall, 62 South Main Street. 
No loss. 

Still. December 12, 8.15 a. m. Fire in building owned 
by James Kelley, 5 West Canal Street. Caused by thawing 
water pipe 

A'alue. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Buildings, $3,000.00 $10,00 $2,000.00 $10.00 

East Concord. 

Bell. March 28, 11.00 p. m. Residence on Mountain 
road owned and occupied by Harley H. Sanborn, destroyed 
with contents. Cause unknown. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$2,000.00 


$2,000.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents. 


800.00 


800.00 


None. 


None. 



Bell. April 28, 12.02 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by James Riley and Alcide Lemay, west of railroad track 
near the Samuel Eastman & Co. factory. Labored two 
hours. No loss. 

14 



210 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Bell. April 29, 12.05 p. m. Fire in lumber yard on 
Mountain road, owned by Robert S. Emery. Caused by 
spark from boiler. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $1,000.00 $45.00 None. None. 



"West Concord. 

Bell. February 28, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Spofford, Hopkinton road. No lows. 

Bell. April 16, 12.20 p. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by William E. Chandler on Sewalls Falls road. Labored 
one hour. No loss. 

Stilij. April 19, 10.15 a. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by William Clark, Hopkinton road. Labored two hours. 
No loss. 

Bell. April 21, 11.40 a. m. Brush fire on land o^^^led 
by the city on Lake Street. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. May 4, 9.20 p. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
house 4 Knight Street, owned by Mrs. Simeon Partridge. 
No loss. 

Bell. May 15, 4.00 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Theodore Lovely on Penacook road. Labored two hours. 
No loss. 

Stilij. October 26, 7.45 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by John Swenson on Rattlesnake Hill. Labored one hour. 
No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



211 



SUMMARY 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Insurance 
paid. 


Net loss. 


BUILDINGS. 

Precinct 


$53,200.00 
8,500.00 
2,000.00 


$8,841.16 

90.00 

2,000.00 


$33,000.00 
5,000.00 


$5,696.16 
90.00 


$3,145.00 






East Concord 


2,000.00 










Total 


1 
$63,700.00 ,«10.9.'?1.1fi 


$38,000.00 

$7,900.00 
100.00 


$5,786.16 

$4,349.70 
30.00 


$5,145.00 


CONTENTS. 

Precinct 


$22,933.86 

900.00 

1,800.00 


$9,040.56 
40.00 
845.00 


$4,690 86 


Peuacook 


10.00 


East Concord 


845.00 










Total 

Buildings 


$25,633.86 , $9,925.50 
63,700.00 lO.fl.'il.lfi 


$8,000.00 
38,000.00 


$4,379.70 
5,786.16 


$5,545.86 
5,145.00 










Total buildings 
and contents. 


$89,333.86 


$20,856.72 


$46,000.00 


$10,165.86 


$10,690.86 



212 city of concord. 

Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows : 

Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," with modern hose wagon, 
attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men) ; 
one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kearsarge," and 
modern hose wagon, attached to the Kearsarge Steam Fire 
Engine Company (14 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag 
engine, "Governor Hill," relief steamer, in charge of an 
engineer and fireman; one double 60-gallon tank Holloway 
chemical engine in charge of two permanent men ; one ladder 
truck, "City of Concord," attached to Hook and Ladder 
Company (21 men) ; one house man at Central Fire Station. 
There are twelve horses kept at this station. There are 
six permanent men located at the Central Fire Station and 
one permanent man at each fire station within the precinct. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Washing- 
ton Street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent man 
and horse. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State streets, has a modern 
hose wagon with permanent man and horse. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hook and ladder truck and one hose carriage in re- 
serve. 

The "Pioneer" Steamer Company (28 men), at Pena- 
cook, has a fourth-class Silsby, with two hose wagons. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
a Hunneman 6-inch cylinder hand engine and a modern 
hose wagon. 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4i/2-inch cyl- 
inder Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck. 



fire department. 
Hose. 



Fabric: 
Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 



Leather : 
East Concord — good. 
East Concord — poor, 



213 



8,650 feet. 
3,000 feet. 
1,400 feet. 



13,050 feet. 

400 feet. 

500 feet. 

900 feet. 



Public Reservoirs. 



1. Main Street, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s, 

2. Main Street, middle front state-house yard, 

3. Main street, rear court house, 

4. State Street, corner Washington Street,* 

5. Rumford Street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's, 

6. Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street,* 

7. School Street, corner of Summit Street,* 



Capacity, 
cubic feet. 

1,000 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
4,000 
3,500 



* Brick cemented. 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire- 
alarm boxes, the city is divided into five districts, viz. : 

District 1. Embraces that section of the city north and 
west of Washington Street, box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
ton streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
streets. 

Districts 4 and 5. Embrace all south of Pleasant 
Street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the 
district. 

District No. 1. 

9. New Hampshire state prison. 

12. Curtice Avenue. 

13. Franklin and Rumford. 

14. Bradley and Walker. 

15. Main and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. C. S. Gale's store. 

19. Centre and Auburn. 

District No. 2. 

21. State, opposite Court. 

23. Main and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 

25. Main and School. 

26. Centre and Union. 

27. School and Merrimack. 

28. School and Spring. 

29. Centre and Essex. 



fire department. 215 

District No. 3. 

32. Warren and Pine. 

34. Central Fire Station. 

35. ]\rartin's drug store. 

36. Pleasant and Spring. 

37. Pleasant and North Fruit. 

38. Orchard and Merrimack. 

District No. 4. 

41. South and Thompson. 

42. Good Will Hose House. 

43. Main and Fayette. 

45. Nelson & Durrell's store. 

46. Perley and Grove. 

47. South, opposite Downing. 

48. Thorndike and South. 

49. West and Mills. 

412. Wall and Elm. 

413. Main, opposite Thorndike. 

414. State and West. 

District No. 5. 

51. Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. 

52. South Main and Allison. 

53. Hall and Hammond. 

54. Broadway and Pillsbury. 

56. St. Paul's School. 

57. Pleasant View. 

521. Broadway and Rockingham. 

522. South Main and Holly. 

Private Boxes. 

5. Boston & ]\Iaine Railroad — north end passenger depot. 

6. The Abbot-Downing Company. 

7. New Hampshire State Hospital. 

8. Page Belting Compan3\ 

9. Three boxes inside New Hampshire state prison. 
33. State house. 

55. Boston & ]Maine Railroad old repair shops. 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

fire-alar:\i signals. 

Alarms rung in from boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 413, 414, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 521 and 522 will 
not be responded to by the Alert Hose Company until sig- 
naled. The signal to proceed to the fire will be four blows 
or second alarm, excepting alarms rung in from box 56. 

Alarms rung in from boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 
19, 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 32, 37, 56 and 57 will not be responded 
to by the Good AVill Hose Company until signaled. It will 
be governed by the same signals governing Alert Hose Com- 
pany. The Alert Hose and Good Will Hose companies will 
hitch up and remain in readiness 20 minutes after the first 
alarm, to all boxes not responded to on first alarm. Then, 
receiving no signal, the officers in charge shall dismiss their 
companies. 

Alarms rung in from boxes 12, 37, 53, 54, 57 and 521 will 
not be responded to by Kearsarge Company on first alarm. 

The signal to proceed to the fire will be two blows, four 
blows, or second alarm, as circumstances may warrant. 

Kearsarge Steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose Company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to boxes 6 and 7, on first alarm; to boxes 
23, 24, 25, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43, 45 and 413, on second ; to all 
others on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill Steamer will respond to boxes 8 and 9 on 
first alarm; to boxes 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 
21, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 48, 49, 412, 
414, 52, 54, 55, 57, 521 and 522, on second; to all others on 
third. 

Chemical Engine will respond to all box alarms except 
8, 9, 51, 56, 57 and 521. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company will respond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating from 
same box or not. 

Two rounds of 11 strokes each will signalize the require- 
ment of assistance out of town, and will be resi)onded to by 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 217 

a detail of three men from each company, appointed for 
the purpose, and by those alone. 

Two additional blows will indicate that the call for as- 
sistance emanates from East Concord. Such apparatus will 
be detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further aid 
is necessary, box 34 (Central Station) will follow. 

All out signal, three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on the 
bells, and will be responded to by a detail of four men 
from each company, appointed for the purpose, and by 
those alone. 

Military Signal. 
Two rounds of 3-1-2. 

Concord State Fair Grounds. 

Two rounds of 5-1-2. 

To be responded to by Good Will Company and appa- 
ratus. Eagle Company excepting engineer and stoker. Eagle 
wagon, Kearsarge Engine, engineer and stoker, and Hook 
and Ladder Company. 

All apparatus excepting Kearsarge Engine to return im- 
mediately to quarters with detail sufficiently large to reload 
and work apparatus should occasion require. 

Companies not responding to remain in quarters until 
recall is sounded, in readiness to respond to summons by 
telephone. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause of 
15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will be given 
at 8 o'clock a. m. 



218 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given 
at 1 o'clock p. m. 

The signal to close all schools for one session will be given 
at 11.30 a. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It w^ill be one 
single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells the 
number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose will 
vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other w'eek-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Fire- Alarm Telegraph 

is the "Gamewell" patent. It embraces 40 miles of wire. 

On the lines are 42 tire-alarm boxes belonging to the city, 
and nine private boxes— in all, 51. There are three alarm 
bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell metal), one of 3,740 pounds 
(bell metal), and one of 2,000 pounds (American steel). 
There are also 16 mechanical tappers, 40 direct-action tap- 
pers, one four-circuit repeater, and five indicators. 

The battery consists of 236 storage battery cells for the 
lines, and 46 open-circuit battery cells for other electrical 
purposes. 

The alarm system was installed in 1880 by the Gamewell 
Fire- Alarm Telegraph Company. 

Directions for Giving an Alarm. 

Above all things, keep cool. 

To obtain the key to the box, break the glass in the key 
box located beneath the alarm box. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale," de- 
signed expressly for the purpose of informing j'ou whether 
an alarm is being transmitted the instant you open the door. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 219 

Open the box, aud if this bell is not heard, pull down the 
hook once only and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to 
attempt to pull another until the one already pulled had 
performed its mission. 

Wait until 20 seconds have elapsed after the " tell-tale " 
has stopped ringing, close the door, which will restore the 
armature to the position it left when the door was opened. 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go. 

Should there be no response, in\U. it again. 

Then should there be no response, go to the next box. 

Unless" your presence is most urgently required at the 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the depart- 
ment. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



REGULATIONS OF CONCORD FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 



Section 1. The fire department shall consist of a chief 
engineer, two assistants within the precinct, one engineer 
each from Ward 1. Ward 2 and Ward 3 ; two steamer and 
hose companies, one company to consist of thirteen men, 
in chiding driver, and one company to consist of fourteen 
men, including drivers; one relief steamer [company] to 
consist of two men ; two hose companies to consist of eleven 
men, including driver; a chemical engine company to con- 
sist of two men ; a hook and ladder company to consist of 
twenty-one men, including driver; a house man at Central 
Fire Station ; steamer Pioneer, not less than twenty or more 
than forty men; hand engine companies No. 2 and No. 3, 
not less than twenty or more than thirty men each. The 
engineers shall exercise the powers of fire wards, and those 
within the precinct shall constitute the board of engineers. 

Sect. 2. The chief engineer and assistant engineers and 
all other members of the fire department shall hold their 
respective offices and places until they are removed, or their 
offices or places are otherwise vacated. The board of mayor 
and aldermen, for cause, and after a due hearing, ma}^ at 
any time remove from office or place the chief engineer, any 
assistant engineer, or any officer or member of the depart- 
ment. In case of vacancies from an^^ cause in the depart- 
ment, of officers or men connected in any manner with the 
fire service, such vacancies shall be filled by the board of 
mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 3. The chief engineer shall give his entire time 
to the duties of his office, and shall not engage in or be con- 
nected with any other business or occupation, and shall 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 221 

reside in a house to l)e furnished by the city free from rent. 
Pie shall receive in full for his services, in addition to the 
use of said house, rent free, the sum of twelve hundred and 
fifty dollars per annum. 

Sect. 4. The chief engineer shall have the sole command 
at fires over all persons, whether members of the fire de- 
partment or not. He shall direct all proper measures for 
extinguishing fires, protecting property, preserving order 
and enforcing the laws, ordinances, and regulations respect- 
ing fires; and shall examine into the condition of the fire 
engines and all other fire apparatus, and of the fire engine 
houses, and other houses belonging to the city and used by 
the department, and by the companies thereto attached, as 
often as once a week, and whenever directed to do so by 
the mayor, or the committee on fire department through its 
chairman. He shall certify all bills and submit the same 
for inspection monthly to the joint standing committee on 
fire department. He shall report to the city council annu- 
ally a statement of the receipts and expenditures of the 
fire department, the condition of the fire engines and all 
other fire apparatus, a detailed schedule of the property in 
his charge, the names of the officers and members, and all 
other facts in relation to the department. "Whenever the 
fire engines or other fire apparatus require repairs he shall, 
under the direction of the committee on fire department, 
cause the same to be made, and as far as practicable he 
shall examine into the location and condition of fire ap- 
paratus belonging to corporations or private individuals 
within the limits of the city. He shall require permanent 
men, when not otherwise engaged, to perform such other 
duties and do such other work as in his judgment may be 
deemed proper. He shall be responsible for the proper 
care of all property connected with the fire department. 
He shall keep fair and exact rolls of the respective com- 
panies specifying the time of admission and discharge, and 
the age of each member, and shall report annually, or 
oftener if directed, all accidents by fire which may happen 



222 CITY OF CONCORD. 

within the city, with the causes thereof, the number and 
description of the buildings destroyed or injured, and the 
amount of loss and insurance on the same, tog(^ther with 
the names of owners or the occupants, and shall make 
returns as required by the Laws of 1889, chapter 84. and 
entitled: "An act in relation to returns and statistics of 
fires." He shall visit each department house as often as 
practicable, and inspect the men, the books of the house, 
and see that the quarters are properly conducted and in 
good order. He shall have the power to suspend any 
officer or member of the department for insubordination, 
disorderly conduct or neglect of duty, said suspension to 
continue pending the action of the mayor and aldermen. 
The chief engineer shall examine all places Avhere shavings 
and other combustible materials may be collected or de- 
posited, and cause the same to be removed by the tenants 
or occupants of such places, or at their expense, whenever 
in his opinion such removal is necessary for the security of 
the city against fires. 

Sect. 5. In the absence of the chief engineer, the next 
assistant engineer in rank, who may be present, shall have 
the powers and perform the duties of the chief engineer 
and the seniority in rank of the engineers shall be deter- 
mined by the board of engineers at their first meeting. 

Sect. 6. The foreman of each engine, hose, and hook 
and ladder company, immediately after every fire at which 
said company may have attended, shall examine into the 
condition of the fire apparatus belonging to his respective 
company, and report any deficiency which may exist to the 
chief engineer. He shall keep, or cause to be kept by the 
clerk of his company, exact rolls, specifying the time of 
admission, discharge, and age of each member, and accounts 
of all city property entrusted to the care of the several 
members, and of all cases of absence and tardiness, in a 
book provided for that purpose l)y the city, which rolls and 
record books are always to be subject to the order of the 
chief engineer and mayor. They shall also make, or cause 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

to be made, to the chief engineer, true and accurate returns 
of all members, with their ages, and of the apparatus en- 
trusted to their care, whenever called upon so to do. 

Sect. 7. The foreman of each company shall, under the 
direction of the chief engineer, have charge and manage- 
ment of his company at fires ; the assistant foreman shall 
assist the foreman in the discharge of his duties, and act 
as clerk of the company, and in the absence of the foreman 
assvime his authority. The foreman and assistant foreman 
shall be appointed by the chief engineer. 

Sect. 8. The stewards of the Alert and Good Will Hose 
companies shall act as drivers of hose carriages, take charge 
of and properlj^ care for and exercise the horses used by 
each company. They shall be permanently engaged and 
devote their whole time to the department, and sleep in 
their respective hose houses at night; and for the proper 
execution of all duties required of them shall be subject 
to the direction of the chief engineer. 

Sect. 9. It shall be the duty of every engine, hose, and 
hook and ladder company, to have its engine, hose and other 
apparatus cleaned, washed, oiled, reeled and housed imme- 
diately after its return from any fire or service, and at all 
times to maintain the same in good condition, and the 
members of the several companies shall perform any neces- 
sary duties which the chief engineer or their respective 
foreman may direct. 

Sect. 10. All members of the department when on duty 
shall wear some suitable badge, to be designated by the 
board of engineers. The chief and permanent members 
shall wear at all times when on duty the regidation parade 
uniform worn by the fire department. 

Sect. 11. The pay rolls for the board of engineers and 
the several fire companies shall be made up by the chief 
and clerk of the board of engineers semi-annually, on the 
first day of January and July. Foremen and clerks of 
companies will forward their pay rolls to the board of 
engineers for approval and after the action of said engi- 



224 CITY OF CONCORD. 

neers and the approval of the city auditor and the com- 
mittee on accounts and claims, said pay rolls shall be passed 
over to the city tax collector, under whose sole direction all 
sums for services of call firemen shall be disbursed. 

Sect. 12. No charge for extra services will be allowed 
any member of the department unless upon an order of a 
member of the board of engineers. 

Sect. 13. No engine, hose, or hook and ladder carriage 
shall be taken to a fire out of the city without permission 
from the chief engineer, except steamer Pioneer, which 
may be taken to any fire in the village of Penacook, nor 
shall any apparatus of the fire department be taken from 
the city except in case of fire, without permisvsion from the 
board of mayor and aldermen ; and in sending any ap- 
paratus to aid in extinguishing fires in neighboring locali- 
ties, the chief in all cases will authorize his assistant next 
in rank available to take charge of the direction of such 
apparatus, and not allow any fireman, at such an emer- 
gency, to leave the city, except such a numl^er as is actu- 
ally required to man the apparatus, and nO member to leave 
without permission or direction from the chief engineer. 

Sect. 14. It shall be the duty of engineers and firemen, 
whenever there is an alarm of fire in the city, to repair 
immediately to the place of such fire, wearing a suitable 
badge, and the engineers shall take proper measures that 
the several engines and other apparatus l)e arranged and 
duly Avorked for the speedy and effectual extinguishment 
of the fire. The engineers shall inspect and make them- 
selves familiar with all shops, hotels, tenement blocks, and 
all public buildings, halls, churches, sehoolhouses, and asy- 
lums once in each six months and study the location of all 
hydrants aiul reservoirs in the city, and generally inform 
themselves in all matters pertaining to their duties as en- 
gineers. No engineer sball interfere Avith or attempt to 
give orders relative to the location or use of a line of hose, 
when he has ascertained that another has command of it, 
unless by consent of the engineer in command of it, or by 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

orders of the officer in commaud of the fire ; and it shall be 
his duty to inquire if there is an officer in charge. 

Sect. 15. For each absence from fire, or neglect of duty, 
the chief engineer, the assistant engineers, and engineers of 
steamers shall be fined three dollars, and each other mem- 
ber of the department one dollar; provided, however, that 
any fireman liable as above may in case of sickness have 
power of substitution by giving notice, each assistant en- 
gineer to the chief, each foreman to an engineer, and each 
other member to the foreman of his company. All fines 
shall be paid to the clerks of respective companies at the 
first regular meeting after they are incurred. The clerks 
of companies shall disburse the fines to substitutes answer- 
ing for absent members in cases where there were substi- 
tutes. In cases where there were no substitutes the fines 
shall be paid to the city. 

Sect. 16. Any volunteer company using the apparatus 
of the city at any fire shall be under the control and com- 
mand of the chief engineer and his assistants, agreeably to 
the foregoing provisions of this chapter. 

Sect. 17. The department shall appear for public 
parade, drill and inspection at such times as the chief en- 
gineer and committee on fire department shall order, for 
Avhicli purpose three hundred dollars can be expended an- 
nually. The companies in Wards 1, 2, and 3 will attend by 
invitation and voluntarily. Each company in the depart- 
ment under the direction of the chief engineer or assistants 
shall take out their respective engines and apparatus for 
exercise and drill as often as he shall direct, such exercise 
and drill to take place in public, not oftener than once a 
month, and at least once in two months, between the first 
of April and November. 

Sect. 18. The engineers shall have control of all persons 
appointed to serve in any company of the fire department 
and power to direct and control the labor of all persons 
present at any fire. An engineer may and shall cause any 
fire deemed by him to be dangerous in any place to be ex- 
tinguished or removed. 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 19. The engineers may establish such regulations 
respecting the kindling, guarding and safe-keeping of fires, 
and for the removal of shavings and other combustibles 
fi'om any building or place, as they shall think expedient. 
Such regulations shall be signed by a majority of the en- 
gineers. Such regulations shall be approved by the mayor 
and aldermen, recorded by the city clerk, and copies at- 
tested by him posted up in two or more places in the city 
thirty days, when they shall take effect. Penalties not 
exceeding twenty dollars for each offense may be prescribed 
by the engineers for the breach of such regulations, and 
such regulations shall remain in force until altered or 
annulled. 

Sect. 20. The board of engineers may from time to 
time make and enforce such regulations for the government 
of the department as may be deemed proper, subject to 
the approval of the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 21. If any member of any of the several com- 
panies shall wilfully neglect or refuse to discharge his duty, 
or shall be guilty of disorderly conduct or disobedience to 
any officer or to any engineer, he shall for any such offense 
be forthwith dismissed from the department by direction 
of the chief engineer. No person shall be a member of, or 
serve in, the fire department, who is under the age of 
twenty years, and no person whose occupation is carried on 
outside the city shall be appointed a member of the fire de- 
partment. 

Sect. 22. All applicants for membership shall be nom- 
inated by the chief engineer, and shall receive pay and be 
considered members of the department from the date of 
their confirmation by the board of maj^or and aldermen. 

No person shall hereafter be appointed to any position in 
the fire department unless and until the committee on fire 
department shall have certified in writing to the board of 
mayor and aldermen that such person has been examined 
by them, or under their supervision, and is in their opinion 
qualified to perform the duties of the position to which he 
is nominated. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 227 

No officer or member of the permanent, or officer of the 
call, force shall attend any political convention as a dele- 
gate, distribute tickets at any election, or take any part 
whatever in political matters other than to exercise the 
right of suffrage, and no political or religious discussion 
shall be permitted in any of the department houses. 

Sect. 23. The chief engineer shall have the care and 
management of the rooms, apparatus, machinery, wires, 
poles and signal boxes connected with the fire-alarm tele- 
graph. He shall prepare rules and directions for giving 
alarms of fire through the telegraph. He shall have the 
superintendence, and under the direction of the joint stand- 
ing committee on the fire department have control of the 
several stations, the apparatus, the furniture therein, and 
all other property appertaining to the department. He 
shall, with the assistance of the permanent men at the 
Central Station, make the necessary repairs and take care 
of the fire-alarm system, including the batteries, all alarm 
boxes, and everything pertaining to the fire-alarm system. 
He shall personally be able to master the fire-alarm in every 
particular, and ever}^ permanent man at the Central Station 
shall be obliged to understand the fire-alarm system, in 
order that the chief engineer may call upon any of them to 
attend to and repair any part of the same. This provision 
shall not be construed to prevent the chief engineer from 
employing extra linemen when necessary, or from acting 
promptly in any emergency. 

Sect. 24. Permanent officers and men of the department 
shall be entitled to a vacation, without loss of pay, of four- 
teen days in each year, one day per month, also one night 
per week in addition to said day, to be granted under the di- 
rection of the chief engineer. 

Sect. 25. The joint standing committee on fire depart- 
ment, subject to the board of mayor and aldermen, shall 
by themselves or agent purchase all supplies in connection 
with the fire department, and direct all repairs of houses 
and apparatus ; and all bills contracted for the department 



228 CITY OF CONCORD. 

miist receive their approval before being passed on by the 
committee on accounts and claims. They shall hold stated 
meetings at least once each month at the Central Fire 
Station, and all communications to the citj^ government 
from the fire department must come through said commit- 
tee, and annually at the call of the finance commit- 
tee, in connection with the chief engineer, they shall make 
recommendations as to the amount of appropriations the 
wants of the department will require for the coming year. 

Sect. 26. The city marshal and regular police officers 
shall have in charge all matters relating to the removal and 
protection of personal property endangered by fire, and any 
person entering a building or removing property contrary 
to the orders of the city marshal or such police officers, shall 
be fined five dollars ; and in the absence of firemen at fires, 
from their respective department houses, the policemen in 
that vicinity will take charge of said houses. 

Sect. 27. It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to 
cause all snow and ice or other obstructions to be removed 
from and around all fire hydrants owned by the city, so 
that at all times the fire department can make immediate 
connection of the hose to the hydrants. 

Sect. 28. The annual pay of the members of the fire 
department shall be as follows, and in full for all services : 
Chief, twelve hundred and fifty dollars per annum and 
house rent ; permanent force at Central Fire Station, seven 
hundred and twenty-eight dollars each; drivers at Good 
Will and Alert Hose houses, seven hundred and twenty- 
eight dollars each per annum, paid monthly; assistant en- 
gineers, within the precinct, one hundred and twenty -five 
dollars each ; engineers of steamers, within the precinct, one 
hundred and fifteen dollars each; foremen of companies, 
within the precinct, each ninety dollars per annum; as- 
sistant foremen of companies, within the precinct, eighty- 
five dollars per annum ; members of steamer, hose, and hook 
and ladder com])anies, within the precinct, and house man 
at Central Fire Station, eighty dollars per annum; outside 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 229 

the precinct, engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, two hundred 
and forty dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer Company, No. 
3, five hundred dollars, said sums to be divided among the 
members as each company shall direct ; engineer of steamer 
at Penacook, seventy -five dollars per annum; assistant en- 
gineer at Penacook, twenty -five dollars ; assistant en- 
gineer at East Concord, fifteen dollars ; and assistant en- 
gineer at West Concord, twenty dollars. 

Sect. 29. The several engineers residing in Wards 1, 2, 
and 3 shall have the entire care and control, under the di- 
rection of the chief engineer, of the buildings and appurte- 
nances occupied in part by the fire department situated in 
said wards, respectively, to whom all applications for the 
use of the halls, or any other part of such building, shall 
be made. Said engineers may severally appoint janitors, 
who shall serve under the exclusive direction of the engi- 
neer having the care and control of the buildings where said 
janitor shall be appointed. Each of said engineers shall 
annually, in the month of December, render a detailed 
statement, in writing, to the mayor and aldermen, of all 
receipts and expenditures for the preceding year on account 
of such buildings. 

Sect. 30. Stewards for the Pioneer Steamer Company 
and engine companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be appointed by 
the mayor and aldermen, and shall receive for all services 
performed by them in that capacity the following sums: 
For Pioneer Steamer Company, thirty dollars per annum, 
and when performing the duties of janitor of the build- 
ing an additional sum of forty -five dollars per annum ; and 
for steward of Engine Company No. 2, fifteen dollars per 
annum; and for steward of Engine Company No. 3, thirty 
dollars per annum. No steward shall be allowed to pur- 
chase supplies for such building, or for the department, 
unless by the authority and direction of the committee on 
fire department ; and in no case shall he have any care or 
control of the building or its appurtenances occupied by the 
company of which he is a member, except in the immediate 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

service of the company, unless he shall be appointed janitor 
thereof, when he shall be under the direction of the engi- 
neer, as provided in the foregoing section. 

Sect. 31. The permanent men and horses at all of the 
fire stations in Concord shall at all tiines be on dut}^ at 
their respective stations to attend to fire-alarm calls ; and 
neither the permanent men nor the permanent horses con- 
nected with the fire department shall engage in any work 
for any other department of the city. 

The men at the different fire stations shall do such work 
in connection with the station and apparatus as the chief 
engineer or his assistants may direct. All permanent men 
shall lodge in their respective stations (except chief), and 
in all cases of absence a substitute must be furnished; and 
in all cases when any extra service is required, the chief, 
with the sanction of the committee on fire department, shall 
have power to hire the same ; the chief may also increase as 
far as possible the number of call men that wish to lodge 
at any fire station, subject to the regulations of the fire de- 
partment. The chief engineer shall be furnished with a 
horse and wagon, to be maintained by the city, for his use 
at all times. 

Sect. 32. All alarms for brush or forest fires shall be 
responded to by members of the fire department under such 
rules and regulations as shall be prescribed by the chief 
engineer. 

Sect. 33. All ordinances and parts of ordinances incon- 
sistent with this ordinance are hereby repealed; but such 
repeal shall in no wise revive or put in force any ordinance 
heretofore repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 231 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS. 

Article 1. Any engine or hose company running out a 
line of hose from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled to 
the pipe, although the hose of other companies may be at- 
tached, in order to reach the fire. And any company 
coming to a fire, and finding an incompleted line of hose 
laid out from a hydrant or steamer, shall attach to and 
lengthen out such line, in lieu of laying a line of its own. 

Art. 2. When two or more engine companies are playing 
in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the company 
attaching to hydrant or steamer as provided in the fore- 
going article ; but any company furnishing the entire line, 
and receiving water from a steamer, the pipe shall belong 
to such company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Hose companies shall attach first lines to high 
pressure hydrants where accessible : steamers attaching to 
those of low pressure, or reservoir. 

Art, 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant 
or reservoir unless their hose and apparatus for attaching 
to the same are at hand and ready for use. 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning from 
fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, and it is 
required of officers of companies to maintain perfect order 
and decorum in their respective commands during all such 
service. 

Art. 6. In case of fire the foreman first arriving shall 
be in command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 7. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding to a 
fire, to use the utmost care and caution consistent with 
promptness. Racing between companies is forbidden under 
any circumstances. Any collision or casualty occurring to 
horses or apparatus will be considered a sufficient cause for 
the suspension of the driver in charge at the time. 

Art. 8. Fire hats are furnished by the city for the pro- 
tection and indentification of firemen, and they must be 
worn at all fires except in the severest weather, when caps 
may be worn. 



232 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Art. 9. While attending fires it shall be the duty of 
members of the department, when not i)erforming active 
service, to concentrate about their respective pieces of 
apparatus. 

Art. 10. All engine and hose companies responding to 
second or general alarms will connect, but will not lay their 
lines until they have reported to the officer in command for 
orders. 

Art. 11. The wearing of badges shall not be regarded by 
members of the department as conveying to them the priv- 
ilege of free access to premises after fire has been ex- 
tinguished. 

Art. 12. All members of the department shall address 
all officers by their respective titles while on duty at fires. 

Art. 13. The roll of each company shall be called as 
soon as the apparatus is housed, and no member will be ex- 
cused except in case of sickness. Rolls must be called after 
every alarm. No officer or member will be marked present 
on the company roll unless present at fires and returns to 
house with apparatus, unless excused by an engineer. 

Art. 14. Each company shall be allowed three substi- 
tutes, except Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, which shall 
have five, to be approved by the chief engineer. 

Art. 15. All orders issued by the chief or an assistant 
engineer shall be promptly o1)eyed. At all fires occurring 
in the night, the chief engineer shall be identified by a red 
light, assistant engineers by blue lights. 

Art. 16. Members of the department are expected to 
cheerfully comply with all rules and regulations which are 
adopted or which may be adopted. Foremen Mill be held 
responsible for all lack of promptness and efficiency" in their 
commands. 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1906. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, Oiifice, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

John J. McNulty, 1st Asst., Machinist, 35 West Street. 

William E. Dow, 2d Asst., Painter, 13 Academy Street. 

John J. McNulty, Clerk of the Board. 



Abial W. Rolfe, 



John E. Frye, 



George W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 
Manufacturer, Penacook St., Penacook. 

WARD 2. 
Farmer, Penacook St., East Concord. 

WARD 3. 
Overseer, 443 No. State St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, No. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

Sylvester T. Ford, Captain. J. Edward Morrison, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 
Nos. Names. 

11 Sylvester T. Ford, 

12 J. Edward Morrison, 

15 James H. Sanders, 

84 Thomas J. Morrison, 

19 Charles Powell, 
22 George B. Davis, 

16 Herbert M. Sanders, 
21 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

86 Harry P. Blake, 
18 Frank D. Hurd, 

85 Harry L. Messer, 

20 F. M. Ingalls, 

87 Fred J. Young, 

14 Charles G. Pinkham, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Moulder, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter. 
Clerk, 

Carriage painter. 
Collector, 
Trimmer, 
Machinist, 
Moulder, 
Machinist, 
Painter, 

Permanent driver, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
41 South Main Street. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 

75 Centre Street. 

3 South Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 

76 Downing Street. 

8 Thorndike Street. 

9 Jaskson Street. 
27 Downing Street. 
45 Franklin Street. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



234 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 

PANY, No. 1. 



W. J. Coffin, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

J. C. McGiLVRAY, Lieutenanl and Clerk. 



Badge 
Nos. 



Names. 



24 Walter J. Coffin, 

25 John C. McGilvray, 

88 Charles H. Sanders, 

31 Orrin C. Hodgdon, 
36 David J. Adams, 

38 George H. Downing, 

29 John M. Inman, 
35 Bert W. Leavitt, 
27 W. J. Sawyer, 
34 J. B. McLeod, 

30 Homer Taylor, 

32 K. C. Brunt, 

89 M. S. Wakefield, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Shipping clerk, 
Jig-sawyer, 
Machinist, 
Engineer, 
Janitor, 
Electrician, 
Carriage painter. 
Gas-fitter, 
Machinist, 
Electrician, 
Teamster, 
Electrician, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
5 Short Street. 
9 Pearl Street. 

11 Chapel Street. 
31 Beacon Street. 

107 North Main Street. 

12 South Street. 
9 Wall Street. 

621/2 No. Spring Street. 
Albin Road. 
2 North State Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 
20 Green Street. 
Central Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, No. 4. 



Badge 
Nos. 



RELIEF ENGINE. 
Occupations. 



Names. 

17 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 
23 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Residei^ces. 
78 South State Street. 
11 Thompson Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 2. 



OFFICERS. 

Fred W. Scott, Captain. George L. Osgood, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

George L. Osgood, Treasurer. 



Badge 
Nos. 



Names. 



37 Fred W. Scott, 

38 George L. Osgood, 
43 John H. Seavey, 

39 Charles J. French, 
42 Charles H. Rowell, 

48 Lewis B. Putney, 
41 Charles C. Chesley, 

45 Joseph H. Brunelle, 

49 James Jepson, 

46 Fred Sargent, 

47 Frank H. Silver, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Builder, 
Clerk, 
Clerk, 

Stonecutter, 
Builder, 
Builder, 
Builder, 
Blacksmith, 
Car-builder, 
Mail carrier. 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
43 Lyndon Street. 
9 Thompson Street. 
5 Odd Fellows' Avenue. 
5 Perkins Street. 
18 Centre Street. 
12 Beacon Street. 
11 Prince Street. 
34 Washington Street. 
491/1! Franklin Street. 
86 North State Street. 
Alert Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



235 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, No. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

John C. Mills, Captain. Hiram T. Dickerman, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

George H. Sawyer, Treasurer. 



Bndpe 
Nos. Names. 

50 John C. Mills, 

51 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

54 George H. Sawyer, 

52 John E. Gove, 

53 Charles A. Richards, 

57 Jasper R. Mudgett, 

60 Frank S. Putnam, 

55 H. H. Ash, 

61 E. D. Clark, 

56 A. W. Thompson, 

58 W. T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Blacksmith, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Packer, 
Machinist, 
Spring maker, 
Janitor, 
Permanent driver. 



Resid'yaces. 
34 Downing Street. 
36 Broadway. 
5 Allison Street. 
40 Mills Street. 
74 West Street. 
98 South State Street. 
101 South State Street. 
231/2 Perley Street. 
109 South State Street. 
114 South State Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, No. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Badge 
Nos. Names. 

63 Will A. King, 
65 Ed. E. Lane, 

65 Benjamin Ouilette, 

66 Henry V. Tittemore, 

67 Ned E. Herrin, 

70 Will F. King, 

71 Frank T. Bean, 

72 Lucius D. Caldou, 

73 George W. Grover, 

75 James F. Liberty, 

76 Stephen P. Foster, 

80 Sam B. Morgan, 

81 Daniel Crowley, 

77 Bion W. Hall, 

82 Edwin H. French. 

78 Harry N. Lane, 

74 Charles Parker, 
69 William F. Paige, 

79 Albert W. Nearhood, 

68 Edward C. Simpson, 
99 M. J. Martin, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Carriage builder, 
Carpenter, 
Teamster, 
Carpenter, 
Builder, 

Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder, 
Carriage builder. 
Carpenter, 
Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder, 
Coachman, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage builder. 
Carriage builder. 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Machinist, 
Gas-fitter, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 
5 Fremont Street. 
10 Jefferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 
Ins. Block, School Street. 
23 Union Street. 
Odd Fellows' Home. 
13 West Street. 
29 Thorndike Street. 
7 Harvard Street. 
37 Perley Street. 
10 Avon Street. 
130 Warren Street. 
15 Humphrey Street. 
29 Green Street. 
2 Fremont Street. 
63 South Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
26 Monroe Street. 
4 High- Street Avenue. 
Central Station. 



236 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Badge 
Nos. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1. 



Navies. 

91 A. P. Turner, 

92 A. L. Dickerman, 



Occupations. Residences. 

Permanent engineer and driver, Central Station. 
Permanent assistant engineer, Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3. 

PenacooJc. 



OFFICERS. 

Fred M. Dodge, Captain. Henry Rolfe, Foreman of Hose, 

Prank P. Robertson, Lieut, and Clerk. Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 
Leslie H. Crowther, Steward. 



Names. 
Fred M. Dodge, 
Frank P. Robertson, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Walter H. Rolfe, 
Fred H. Morrill, 
Charles E. Piper, 
Albert S. Andrews, 
Harlow F. Rolfe, 
Leslie H. Crowther, 
Edwin B. Prescott, 
Fred C. Ferrin, 
Peter A. Keenan, 
Henry E. Templeton, 
John P. Lucus, 
Frank A. Faneuf, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
George A. Griffin, 
Harry F. Jones, 
Ruel G. Morrill, 
Fred Migneault, 
Fred J. Guild, 
Bert Bucklin, 
Ralph G. Morse, 
Cornelius W. O'Brien, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Electrical Inst, maker. 
Axle-maker, 
Highway agent. 
Machinist, 
Sash-maker, 
Machinist, 
Axle-maker, 
Clerk, 

Maker plumbers' supplies, 
Marketman, 
Band-sawyer, 
Table-maker, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Axle-maker, 
Carpenter, 
Painter, 
Teamster, 
Farmer, 
Teamster, 
Electrician, 
Machinist, 
Clerk, 
Axle-maker, 



Residences. 
61 Merrimack Street. 

6 Church Street. 

26 Penacook Street. 
37 Centre Street. 

45 Summer Street. 

4 Washington Street. 
23 Washington Street. 
63 Merrimack Street. 
23 Washington Street. 
88 South Main Street. 

46 South Main Street. 
93 High Street. 

41 Washington Street. 
67 Washington Street. 
10 Summer Street. 
70 High Street. 
15 Washington Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
75 Washington Street. 
19 '/^ Washington Street. 
46 Summer Street. 

43 Washington Street. 

37 High Street. 

9 West Canal Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



237 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 
East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



Elbeidge Emery, Captain. 

George O. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



John C. Hutchins, Treasurer. 
Charles P. White, Steward. 



Names. 
Elbridge Emery, 
George O. Robinson, 
John C. Hutchins, 
C. E. Robinson, 
William L. Batchelder, 
William H. Smith, 
James L. Potter, 
Samuel G. Potter, 
Charles P. Wliite, 
William E. Virgin, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
Elvin Culver, 
Fred S. Farnum, 
Shad Gate, 
Ross W. Cate, 
George E. Cate, 
William A. Cowley, 
Herbert Knowles, 
James Cox, 
Daniel Lewis, 
Abram Gushing, 
Thomas Spaulding, 
Joseph Strickford, 
Parker French, 
Westley Field, 
Amos Peaslee, 
John W. Sanborn, 
Walter C. Sanborn, 
Arthur P. Swain, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Butcher, 
Water-dealer, 
Engineer, 
Clerk, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Stonecutter, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Shoemaker, 
Cariicnter, 
Farmer, 
Horseshoer, 
Blacksmith, 
Storekeeper, 
Carpenter, 
Section foreman. 
Driver, 
Stonecutter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Storekeeper, 
Farmer, 
Wood-worker, 
Moulder, 



Re.sidences. 
Potter Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Peuacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Potter Street. 
Eastman Street. 
Potter Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shavnnut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Fort Square. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 

Hiram E. Quimby, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 

Alfred J. Frasee, Lieut, and Cleric. Frank G. Blodgett, Steward. 

Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



238 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Natnes. 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Frank G. Peterson, 
James W. Powers, 
William D. Harrington, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Edward Levering, 
James F. Abbott, 
Abram D. Gushing, 
Joseph Daley, 
Luther E. Rowe, 
Herbert Farnum, 
Robert Henry, 
Benjamin Kemp, 
John Harrison, 
Clarence J. Spead, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stonecutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Mill operative, 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Blacksmith, 
Quarryman, 
Mill operative, 
" Silversmith, 
Laborer, 
Loom repairer. 
Plumber, 



Residences. 
490 North State Street. 
458 North State Street. 
382 North State Street. 
5 Engel Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Street. 
346 North State Street. 
3 Fisher Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
436 North State Street. 

I Clark Street. 

513 North State Street. 

5 Lake Street. 

455 North State Street. 

II Lake Street. 
5 Lake Street. 

513 North State Street. 
461 North State Street. 
519 North State Street. 
439 North State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



D. B. Ne\vh.\ll, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 



Hexry Tucker, Lieutenant. 



Names. 
D. B. Newhall, 
Henry Tucker, 
Fred Leighton, 
J. E. Clifford, 
A. Taylor, 
C. A. Herbert, 
James F. Ward, 
Martirt V. B. Davis, 
Oliver Thompson, 
Frank E. Warren, 
Charles C. Hill, 
Fred S. Johnson, 
Olando I. Godfrey, 



MEMBERS. 

Names. 
T. P. Davis, 
George A. Mitchell, 
Will C. Wlngate, 
C. L. Mason, 
E. L. Peacock, 
Fred K. Peacock, 
R. M. Patten, 
George H. Davis, 
Robert Crowley, 
James A. Johnson, 
James M. Colbert, 
E. A. Saltmarsh, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Henry Gibney. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
HIGHWAYS. 



To the City Council: 

Gentlemen : The commissioner of highways herewith 
submits the annual report of the highway department for 
the year ending December 31, 1906. The usual amount of 
work was necessary along the line of general repairs. The 
winter was not a very severe one and no heavy expense was 
incurred by reason of storms or freshets. 

Considerable was done in the way of permanent improve- 
ments. The macadam on North State Street was extended 
north to the south entrance of Blossom Hill cemetery and I 
would recommend that the work be carried farther north as 
the street beyond the macdam now is in very bad condition. 
About ten hundred ffeet of graveling was done on the South 
Pembroke road and I think a continuation of this same 
work would be advisable another year. Graveling was 
also done on South Spring Street from Pleasant Street 
south. A drain was put in which I think will greatly im- 
prove the condition of the roadway there. A small section 
of macadam has been put in each season for several years 
past on the Penacook road. The section put in this year 
brought the macadam into "Washington Square at Penacook. 
With a little repair, which is necessary, this road will be in 
good condition for some distance. Pleasant Street from 
State to Green was concreted, continuing the work begun 
in 1905. Main Street from Freight Street south on the 
west side of the street railway track is in bad shape and 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 

should be repaired. The friends of Christian Science 
throughout the country, taking pride in the home of their 
leader, Rev. Mary Baker Eddy, very kindly offered the city 
a sum of money equal that appropriated by the city for 
permanently improving North State Street from Pleasant 
Street north. The city council voted to accept the offer 
and appropriated $5,000. The street was concreted from 
Pleasant to Court Street at an expense of $10,855.97, of 
which $5,855.97 was paid into the city treasury by Mr. 
J. Wesley Plummer, trustee of the fund. 

On account of the new heating plant put in at St. Paul's 
School, it was necessary to do considerable grading and the 
bridge will have to be widened. 

During the year the Pembroke bridge was re-planked and 
the Borough bridge at Penacook thoroughly repaired. The 
Borough bridge was raised about three feet, new timbers 
put in where needed and re-planked. The Pembroke and 
Sewall's Falls bridges should both be re-shingled the coming 
summer. The following table shows the repairs on bridges : 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

LABOR ON BRIDGES. 



241 



STREET. 



Name of 
bridge. 



Over. 



Work. 



Ex- 
pense. 



Sawmill 



Bridge Loudon 

Canterbury road .. ..[ 

Clinton 

Clinton 

Crescent(P). ... 

Hall Pembroke. 

Hall Pembroke , 

Hopkinton old road. Asb brook. 

Hor.se Hill road i . 

Hot Hole Pond road. ! 

Loudon road 



Sewair.s Falls road.. 
Washington (P.) 



Sewall's Falls. 
Borough 



Washington Outlet. 



Merrimack 

Hackett's bro'k 
Turkey river . . 
Turkey river . . 

Canal 

Merrimack 

Merrimack 

Ash brook 

Hardy brook. .. 
Pond brook ... 

Brook 

Merrimack 

OvUlet 



General repairs 
Replanking.. .. 
General repairs 



Replanking. 



Outlet. 



General repairs 

Raising and re 
planking. . .. 



General repairs 



$6.26 

89.83 

1.46 

1.70 

.44 

15.50 

821.21 

6.89 

1.84 

33.26 

10.61 

1.20 

602.53 
4.43 



The past year brought the brown-tail moth to Concord 
in much larger numbers than before. The department made 
a thorough inspection of the trees in the streets during 
January and February and cleaned them of the nests, which 
helped to check the spread of the pest. During the summer 
months when the moths had developed and were depositing 
the eggs, the trees where infested were sprayed with a 
solution of ar.senate of lead. The department also sprayed 
trees for private parties, charging for the labor and actual 
cost of materials used. Quite a number had the work done, 
while others seemed less interested to help in destroying 
the pest. The spraying was sufficient to destroy the moths 
as far as it went, but when the trees of property owners 
near by Avere filled with the moths, it can be seen that the 
work done might be almost useless. I would urge property 
owners to carefully examine their trees during the winter 
months and free them of the nests. The department is 

16 



242 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



again cleaning the trees in the streets and hopes for the 
co-operation of the residents in the work. Several bills re- 
lating to the extermination of the brown-tail moth are 
before the present session of the legislature, anj- of which, if 
passed, will probably offer help in the work. Beside the 
work on the trees on account of the moths, a number of 
dead ones were removed and considerable trimming done. 

Not man}^ petitions for new concrete walks were granted 
during the year, but a large number of old concrete walks 
were repaired. 

The table below shows the work done on catch basins. 

CATCH BASINS. 



STREET. 



Location. 



Work. 



Size. 



Ex- 
pense. 





City lot 


Building ..1 is 


$21.92 


Essex 


At Washington St 

At railroad crossing 

West Concord 


Rebuilding. 


2-18 

18 

16 

2-18 

9-16 

1 18 

18 

2-18 

2-24 

16 

16 

18 

1 18 

18 

1 18 


42.00 


Ferry 


34.41 


Hiilchins 


25.10 


North Essex 


At Washington St 


39.40 


North Pembroke road 

Noyes 

North State 


East of camp-ground 

On culvert 

At Blake St 


110.79 
5.39 
12.02 


North State 


At Chapel St. . 


35.57 


Penacook road 

Portsmouth 


On macadam . 

East Concord 


68.25 
68.81 


South Main 




35.75 


South Spring 


At Dr. Leete's 


14.32 


Soutli Spring 


At Marshall's 

At Cress v's 


16.50 


Tliompson 


25 30 


West 


East of DunkleeSt 

Corner Beacon St 

Penacook , 


31.23 


Charles 

High 


21.80 
30.93 


Hill's avenue 


At Wood worth & Co 

Corner Pierce St 


13.38 


Latirel 


8.16 


Main 


Penacook 

At State St 

Between American and 
Lpud.x House 


21.18 




7.66 


North Main 


7.51 


North State 


At Pheasant St 


30.52 


North State 

Pleasant 


At Warren St 

Corner State St 

Near West St 

Near Dr. Morrill's 


31.43 
16.24 


South Main 


22.53 




8.25 


Soutli State 


South side, cor. Perley St. 
South of Beacon 


12.02 


Rumford 


20.76 


West 


Corner South State St 

At Mills St 


13.95 


West 


32.39 









The question of a convenient supply of gravel is a mat- 
ter of importance. The ])ank on the Ahern lot on Frank- 
lin Street, purchased last year, has been opened and over 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 243 

1,500 loads of good gravel and cobble were taken from it 
in 1906. 

The convenience of having garbage regularly collected 
seems to be appreciated by the citizens. Three thousand 
nine hundred and twenty-five loads of garbage and three 
hundred and eighteen of paper were collected during the 
year. It will be necessary before long to secure some other 
place for dumping garbage as the stable lot is nearly filled. 

The city stable completed last year is proving a great 
convenience to the department. More shed room is needed 
for storage and a fence should be built around the lot, 
which I hope will be completed next year. 

Two or three of the sprinklers in use are nearly worn out 
and it will be necessary to replace them with new ones the 
coming season. With the present precinct, the number of 
sprinklers is sufficient. 

For the interest taken in the department by his honor 
the mayor and the city council, I would acknowledge my 
appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 
Co}Hmissio)ier of Highways. 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $23,000.00 
Transferred from permanent work. North State 

Street, 2.20 

Transferred from trees, 151.87 

Transferred from sidewalks and crossings, new, 1,098.28 

Deposited from collections, 583.03 

Deficiency raised by joint resolution No. 788, 116.07 



$24,951.45 



Expenditures 



Central District. 



GENERAL REPAIRS. 

Labor pay-rolls. 

Eyeless Tool Co., picks and handles, 

E. C. Eastman, office supplies, 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing, etc., 

George E. Carter, office supplies, 

Rumford Printing Co., book, 

N. ^E. T. & T. Co., use telephone, 

Alfred Clark, commissioner, postage 

express, etc., 
Clifton W. Drake, glass, 
Harold L. Bond Co., supplies, 
J. H. Row(>ll & Co., cobble and gravel, 
Western Cofran, filing saws. 
Ford & Kimball, iron, etc., 



$6 



,927.98 
22.65 
8.13 
51.20 
17.65 
12.00 
35.51 

29.19 

2.62 

13.00 

187.50 

1.65 

11.75 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 245 

F. W. Sanborn, powder. $2.00 
Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co., 

repairs, 111.00 

Benjamin Bilsborough, paint, etc.. 36.00 

Virgin & Forrest, filing saws, 1.60 

Page Belting Co., supplies, 5.90 
Acme Road IMachinery Co.. elevator, 

etc., 233.96 
E. H. Randall, labor, 2.25 
R. W. Cate, shoeing horses, 36.00 
W. A. Chamberlin, rubber stamps, .75 
R. J. Macguire, veterinary services, 10.50 
E. H. Runnells, mowing, 30.50 
E. H. Larkin, agent, oil, 3.50 
George D. Huntley, repairs. 129.50 
Thompson-Hoague Co., supplies, 33.80 
D. Waldo White, grain, etc., 869.65 
Joseph T. Walker, hay, 455.56 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs and sup- 
plies, 203.92 
J. R. Hill Co., collars, 10.00 
A. B. Black, repairs, 9.00 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs, 29.42 
Frank Griffin, gravel, 1.10 
Concord Water- Works, water, 24.00 
Concord Water- Works, pipe, 26.69 
Page Taylor Mfg. Co., supplies, 22.50 
Mrs. Crosby Knox, gravel, .70 
C. H. Martin & Co., paint, etc., 25.98 
Samuel Holt, brick, 24.00 
Perley Badger, gravel, 1.20 
Florence M. Hall, laundry work for 

city stable, 1.60 
Mrs. George Baker, laundry work for 

city stable, 3.60 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., re- 
pairs, 3.56 



246 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Oilman H. Baker, gravel, $1.80 
N. B. Cloutman, gravel, 9.30 
J. Elizabeth Hoit, gravel and cobble, 55.70 
Susan G. Perkins, gravel, 11.10 
Robert Crowley, coal, 25.00 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight and re- 
pairs, 71.78 
A. H. Britton & Co.. supplies, 149.97 
Woodworth & Co., cement, 10.05 
S. P. Danforth & Co., clapboards, etc., 12.97 
Rev. Mary B. Eddy, hay, 82.25 
C. Pelissier & Co., repairs, 2.05 
Chandler Eastman & Sons, cart, 160.00 
Concord Evening Monitor, advertising, 1.40 
People and Patriot Co., advertising, 1.40 
Holt Brothers Mfg. Co., labor, 5.74 
Plomo Specialty INIfg. Co., belt dressing, 20.00 
Massachusetts Broken Stone Co., 

crushed stone, 97.05 
E. F. Home, screens, 5.50 
L. B. Simpson, lighting lanterns, 2.00 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs, .25 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil, etc., 17.23 
John Hadlock, road machine and re- 
pairs, 234.60 
Ames Plow Co., plow, 19.79 
Concord Fire Department, sled, 40.00 
Burt Brown, shoeing horses and re- 
pairs, 51.75 
Hutchinson Building Co., lumber, 15.90 
Concord Electric Co.. lights, 210.77 
W. L. Jeiiks & Co.. supplies, , 118.70 
George L. Theobald, horses, 500.00 



$11,604.62 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 247 



CULVERTS. 



Labor pay rolls, $67.95 

Thompson-IIoague Co., pipe, 16.00 

D. Waldo White, cement, 



9 9r^ 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 



$127.91 


192.56 


4.59 


5.60 



Labor pay rolls, repairing sidewalks. 
Labor pay rolls, building sidewalks, 
Labor pay rolls, building crossings, 
Woodbury E. Hunt, grade, 



SIGNS. 

Labor pay rolls, $4.55 

George Prescott, lettering sign, 1.90 

FENCES. 

Labor pay rolls, $95.50 

C. H. Martin & Co., paint, .95 

Holt Brothers Mfg. Co., sawing pine, 71.12 

Ford & Kimball, fence posts, 9.63 

George B. Little, posts, .75 



$86.20 



$630.66 



$6.45 



$177.95 



WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Labor pay rolls, $95.13 

Concord Water- Works, water, 180.00 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 11.50 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, .48 

George B. Quimby, use watering trough, 3.00 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., re- 



pairs, 



8.53 



Ritchie & Elliott, labor, 5.00 



248 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Hutchinson Building Co., lumber, $1.88 

Orr & Eolfe, labor and supplies, 53.93 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, .25 



GUTTERS. 



MACADAM. 



Labor pay rolls, repairing, $1.66 

Labor pay rolls, cleaning, 723.58 



BRIDGES. 

Labor pay rolls, $199.42 

Concord Electric Co., lights, 40.00 

W. L. Jenks & Co.. supplies, 6.85 

E. D. Clough & Co., lumber, 406.91 

C. P. Little, lumber. 320.00 



$359.70 



$725.24 



$973.18 



Labor pay rolls. $977.63 

Labor pay rolls, repairing, $236.72 

Robert Crowley, coal, 76.30 

Hutchinson Building Co., stakes, 6.00 

J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete, 1,056.58 

$2,116.51 

WINTER EXPENSE. 



Labor pay rolls, 


breaking roads. 




•$108.16 


a i c 


plowing walks. 




106.00 


( < li 


shoveling walks 


and 






crossings, 




381.88 


C C ( c 


sanding walks. 




382.96 


li (I 


leveling snow. 




75.00 


(I (( 


rolling snow. 




18.00 



snowing bridges, 34.53 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



249 



Labor pay rolls, draining gutters, $245.88 

Miss Emma H. Osgood, sand, 3.40 

A. E. Maxam, rent of land, 12.00 

C. H. Herbert Estate, sand, 11.20 

George W. Chesley, labor breaking road, 6.27 



$1,385.28 



Penacook District. 



GENERAL REPAIRS. 



Labor pay rolls. 
Concord Water-Works, pipe, 
D. Warren Fox, supplies, 
Mrs. Clara Hanson, gravel, 

D. F. Dudley, gravel, 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 
Stratton & Co., sand, 
J. E. Brown, repairing tools. 
C. H. Barnett, snow roller, 

E. E. Babb, repairs, 
R. E. Gale, supplies, 
Henry Hardy, gravel, 

F. A. Abbott, sand, 

W. B. Cunningham, trucking, 
F. M. Morse & Co., oil, etc., 



$1,002.74 

32.23 
3.26 
8.50 
3.30 

19.88 
8.10 
1.00 
6.65 

95.00 

.50 

1.64 

10.00 
4.40 
4.15 
3.33 



CULVERTS. 




Labor pay rolls. 


$22.55 


C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber. 


3.59 


SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 


Labor pay rolls, repairing, 


$155.52 


Labor pay rolls, building. 


91.58 



$1,204.68 



$26.14 



$247.10 



250 CITY OF CONCORD, 

WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Labor pay rolls, $46.43 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, use watering 

trough, 3.00 

T. S. Holland, use watering trough. 3.00 

Concord Water- Works, water, 40.00 

E. E. Babb, repairs, 6.25 



GUTTERS. 



Labor pay rolls, repairing, $9.86 

Labor pay rolls, cleaning, 234.54 



BRIDGES. 

Labor pay rolls, $10.38 

Labor pay rolls, account Borough 

bridge, 302.62 

P. Crowley, grout account Borough 

bridge, 6.00 

Foote, Browai & Co., supplies Borough 

bridge, 5.42 

F. A. Abbott, sand Borough bridge, 8.50 

E. C. Durgin. lumber Borough bridge, 3.20 
C. ]\I. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber Borough 

bridge, 188.95 
C. G. Davis, lettering sign Borough 

bridge, .75 

S. F. Patterson, labor Borough bridge, 41.75 

John Swenson, stone Borough bridge, 20.00 

F. ]\r. IMorse & Co., oil, etc.. Borough 
bridge, 1 .05 

W. B. Cunningham, trucking Borough 

bridge, .80 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights, 37.50 



$98.68 



$244.40 



$626.92 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



251 



MACADAM. 

Labor pay rolls, repairing. 



WINTER EXPENSE. 



Labor pay 



T rolls, breaking roads, 
" leveling snow, 

" plowing walks, 

" draining gutters, 

" sanding walks, 

" snowing bridges, 

' ' shoveling walks 

crossings, 
'' rolling snow. 



and 



$22.43 

31.43 

42.17 

115.27 

148.96 

17.77 

43.62 
24.45 



West Concord District, 
general repairs. 



Labor pay rolls, 

J. ]M. Grossman, repairing tools, 

Thorapson-Hoague Co., pipe. 



$400.80 

4.95 

17.00 



CULVERTS. 



Labor pay rolls, 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 



Labor pay rolls, repairing sidewalks, $32.36 

Labor pay rolls, building sidewalks, 110.25 



$61.92 



$446.10 



$422.75 
$1.87 



$142.59 



WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 



Labor pay rolls, 
Concord Water-Works, water. 
A. H. Britton & Co., cups. 
Concord Electric Co., light, 



$10.04 

40.00 

1.02 

16.00 



$67.06 



252 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GUTTERS. 



Labor pay rolls, cleaning, 



$101.2^ 



WINTER EXPENSE. 



breaking roads, 


$20.07 


plowing walks, 


50.00 


sanding walks, 


22.91 


snowing bridges, 


21.82 


draining gutters. 


17.38 


shoveling wallis and 




crossings. 


6.54 


leveling snow, 


3.72 





$142.44 



East Concord District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, $2.83 

" " plowing walks, 10.00 

** *' sanding walks, 18.41 
" " shoveling walks and 

crossings, 15.19 

" *' draining gutters, 2.61 

" " general repairs, 300.50 

" " cleaning gutters, 43.66 

" " repairing culverts, 12.93 

" '' repairing sidewalks, 90.17 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 8.40 

C. R. Robinson, water for trough, 20.00 

M. J. Lacroix, repairing tools, 2.50 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies. .90 

George Prescott, lettering guide boards, 2.75 



$530.85 



highway department. 
Penacook Intervale District. 



Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, 
Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 
Ai J. Smith, use watering trough, 
L. R. Hinds, posts, 



$0.80 

64.54 

3.00 

3.85 



253 



$72.19 



East Concord Intervale District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, $12.58 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 23.39 

Frank Fanny, use watering trough, 3.00 



Mountain District. 

Labor ipay rolls, breaking roads, $12.93 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 295.06 

C. P. Little, lumber, 84.00 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 91.12 

John AV. Sanborn, posts, etc., 7.90 



HoiT District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, $4.73 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 131.70 

Joseph Matott, sand, 2.40 

Fred Mayo, use watering trough, 3.00 



$38.97 



$491.01 



$141.83 



Virgin District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, $7.54 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 166.62 



254 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

Labor pay rolls, repairing culverts, 

Hutchinson Building Co., signs, 

F. P. Virgin, guide-posts, 

F. P. Virgin, use watering trough 1905-6, 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 

George Preseott, lettering signs. 



$16.82 


3.00 


2.00 


-6, 6.00 


40.60 


6.25 



Sanborn District. 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, $81.47 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 7.20 



Potter Street District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, $1.20 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 178.23 

John Durgin, sawdust, 1.75 

John T. Tenney, use watering trough, 3.00 

John T. Batchelder, grade, 2.40 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 1.75 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 12.05 



Hot Hole Pond District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, 
Lal)or pay rolls, general repairs, 
La])()r pay rolls, repairing bridges, 
W. L. Jenks & Co., nails, 
Robinson & Sanborn, plank. 



$4.50 


22.91 


7.83 


.53 


24.90 



$248.83 



$88.67 



$200.38 



$60.67 



highway department. 255 

Egypt District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads. $7.93 

Labor pay "rolls, general repairs, 332.27 

Cyrus Jenness. gravel, 19.80 

$360.00 



Horse Hill District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, $7.45 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 190.21 

R. W. Hoit, gravel, 2.10 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe. 7.20 



]\Iast Yard District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, $3.00 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 4.50 

Hutchinson Building Co., signs, 1.50 



Number Four District. 

Labor pay rolls, breaking roads, $17.60 

Labor pay rolls, general repairs, 344.55 

George A. Carter, gravel, 3.50 



$206.96 



$9.00 



$365.65 
$24,951.45 



256 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SALARY COMMISSIONER. 

Appropriation, $1,400.00 

Expenditures : 

Alfred Clark, salary, ■ $1,400.00 



TREES. 

Appropriation, $800.00 



Expenditures : 



Central District. 



Labor pay rolls, trimming and remov- 
ing trees, $222.89 
Labor Ytay rolls, account brown-tail 

moth, ' 291.19 

Joseph Breck & Son, pruners, 2.50 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 42.02 

Concord Evening Monitor, advertising, 2.40 

People and Patriot Co., advertising, 2.20 
Alfred Clark, commissioner, express. 

etc., 5.55 

George D. Huntley, repairs, 2.00 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, , 11.70 

Virgin & Forrest, filing saws, 3.68 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay rolls, trimming and remov- 
ing trees, $28.76 
O. J. Fifield, use of team, 1.25 



$586.13 



$30.01 



highway department. 257 

West Concord District. 

Labor pay rolls, trimming and remov- 
ing trees, $5.74 

Labor pay rolls, account brown-tail 

moth, 11.17 

-^ $16.91 



East Concord District. 

Labor pay rolls, account brown-tail 

moth, $15.08 



$648.13 
Transferred to general maintenance, 151.87 



CATCH BASINS. 



Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and cross- 
ings, new, 189.54 



$800.00 



$1,689.54 



PJxpenditures : 

Central District. 

Labor pay rolls, relaying pipe at St. 

Paul's School $34.94 

Jjabor pay rolls, cleaning, 668.15 

" " repairing, 13.72 

building. 123.68 

re-building, 52.26 

thawing, 14.91 

17 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Edson IManufacturing Co., hose, etc., $14.33 
Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 68.20 
Woodworth & Co., cement, 40.70 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., out- 
fits, ' 125.22 
Ritchie & Elliott, labor, 105.00 
Samuel Holt, brick, 102.00 

C. F. Thompson, rubber boots, 18.75 

D. Waldo White, cement, 14.05 



Penacook District. 



Labor pay rolls, cleaning. 


$84.12 


' ' " repairing. 


35.37 


re-building. 


32.86 


George Neller, mason work, 


16.60 


R. E. Gale, pipe. 


6.50 


Foote, Brown & Co., cement. 


7.00 







West Concord District. 



Labor pay rolls, cleaning, i 


$16.84 


" " repairing. 


2.09 


building. 


11.99 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., out- 




fits. 


4.20 


Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe. 


5.04 


East Concord District. 




Labor pay rolls, cleaning. 


$5.97 


" " repairing. 


3.50 



$1,395.91 



$182.45 



$40.16 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 259 



Labor pay rolls, building. $32.93 

Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 28.62 



$71.02 



$1,689.54 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. NEW. 
Appropriation, $2,000.00 

Expenditures : 

Central District. 

Labor pay rolls, grading for concrete 

walks, $60.18 

Labor pay rolls, setting edgestone, 22.53 

Labor pay rolls, resetting edgestone. 15.56 

J. H. Rowell &. Co., concrete walks, 240.78 

J. H. Rowell & Co.. concrete crossings. 124.23 
P. Crowley, curbing, 50.10 

$513.38 

Transferred to permanent work. South 

Spring Street, 21.49 

Transferred to permanent work. South 

Pembroke Road, 20.40 

Transferred to permanent work. Pena- 

cook Road, 64.55 

Transferred to sidewalks and crossings. 

repair, 92.36 

Transferred to catch basins, 189.54 

Transferred to general maintenance, 1,098.28 

$2,000.00 



260 CITY OP CONCORD. 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and cross- 
ings, new, 92.36 



Expenditures : 

Central District. 

Labor pay rolls, re-setting edgestone, $27.42 

Labor pay rolls, repairing sidewalks, 19.70 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing walks, 1,385.12 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing crossings, 88.71 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing roadway, 71.41 



PERMANENT WORK. 



Penacook Road. 




Appropriation, 


$2,500.00 


Transferred from sidewalks and cross- 




ings, new. 


64.55 


Expenditures : 




Labor pay rolls, setting up crusher. 


$101.29 


" " crushing. 


737.29 


" '' excavating. 


662.05 


' ^ " macadamizing, 


783.73 


" " building catch basins, 


23.27 


D. Warren Fox, supplies, 


1.23 


J. E. Rossell, coal, 


56.57 


Boston & I\Iaine R. R., freight, 


.79 


Alfred Clark, commissioner, car fares 




for men, etc., 


1.45 


C. I\I. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber. 


6.85 


Page Belting Co., oil, 


8.70 



$1,592.36 



$1,592.36 



$2,564.55 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 261 



F. M. Morse & Co., oil, 
J. E. Brown, sharpening tools, 
E. L. Davis, coal, 
C. G. Davis, painting sign, 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 
R. E. Gale, pipe, 
George Neller, mason work. 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., out- 
fits, 
A. B. Black, repairs, 
Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 
Boscawen Mills, waste. 
Concord Water- Works, water. 



$3.77 


9.65 


35.23 


.50 


1.73 


8.16 


18.93 


36.00 


57.40 


3.60 


.36 


6.00 



South Pembroke Road. 

Appropriation, $500.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and cross- 
ings, new, 20.40 



Expenditures : 


' 


Labor pay rolls, grading, 
Jerry Colby, gravel, 
A. Chandler Manning, gravel, 
Jabez Chickering, marl, 


$476.50 
16.30 
15.80 
11.80 


North State Street 




Appropriation, 




Expenditures : 




Labor pay roll, excavating," 
Labor pay roll, macadamizing, 


$353.64 
1,068.19 



$2,564.55 



$520.40 



$520.40 



$1,500.00 



262 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Boston & Maine R. R., repairs, $4.85 

Farrel Foundry & ^Machine Co., repairs, 38.00 

Robert Crowley, coal, 7.00 

Page Belting Co., tallow, etc., 26.12 



$1,497.80 

Transferred to general maintenance, 2.20 



$1,500.00 



South Spring Street. 

Appropriation, $1,000.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and cross- 
ings, new, 21.49 



Expenditures : 




Labor pay rolls, grading, • 


$301.87 


" " putting in drain. 


554.58 


" " putting in catch basin, 


24.21 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., out- 




fit. 


4.80 


Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe. 


121.28 


Robert Crowley, coal, 


14.00 


C. H. Martin & Co., oil, etc.. 


.75 





$1,021.49 



$1,021.49 



Concreting North State Street. 



Appropriation, $5,000.00 

Deposited by J. Wesley Plummer, 

treasurer, 5,855.97 

$10,855.97 

Expenditures : 

Labor pay rolls, excavating, $2,418.17 

macadamizing, " 2,089.43 

" '' setting edgestone, 54.48 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 263 

Labor pay rolls, catch basins, $28.07 

P. Crowley, edgestone, 105.82 

Robert Crowley, coal, 150.50 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., labor, 

castings, etc., 32.73 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 2.50 
Page Belting Co., repairs, etc., 83.92 
Hutchinson Building Co., stakes, 12.00 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete, 5,787.77 
Charles Trenoweth, curbing, 8.00 
Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co., re- 
pairs, 6.75 
Parrel Foundry & Machine Co., cast- 



ings, 


21.50 




Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 


2.08 




Alfred Clark, commissioner, postage. 


1.50 




Thompson-Hoague Co., pipe, 


23.94 




A. B. Black, repairs. 


1.26 




Ritchie & Elliott, labor. 


7.00 




Woodworth & Co., cement. 


2.65 




J. Elizabeth Hoit, cobble. 


10.80 




Susan G. Perkins, cobble, 


5.10 


$10,855.97 






GARBAGE. 






Appropriation, 


$6,000.00 




Balance from 1905, 


25.87 




Deposited from collections. 


153.03 


$6,178.96 






Expenditures : 






Labor pay rolls, collecting garbage. 


$1,923.80 




" " collecting paper, 


501.06 




" " burning paper. 


80.49 




' ' " leveling ashes, 


691.16 





264 CITY OF CONCORD, 



Labor pay rolls, cleaning crossings, 


$548.24 




'' " cleaning streets with 


L 




patrol carts, 


888.13 




" " sweeping pavements, 


47.81 




" " cleaning gutters. 


1,254.44 




Ames Plow Co., supplies. 


21.00 




A. B. Black, street cleaner, 


15.00 




Alfred Clark, commissioner, freight. 


.75 




H. Thompson, re-filling broom, 


18.00 




H. Thompson, brooms, 


13.38 


$6,003.26 






Balance carried to 1907 account, 


- 


175.64 




$6,178.90 


SPRINKLING. 






Appropriation, 


$5,000.00 




Balance from 1905, 


687.96 


$5,687.96 



Expenditures : 

Labor pay rolls, repairing and paint- 
ing carts, $287.10 
Labor pay rolls, repairing standpipes, 53.18 
Labor pay rolls, sprinkling, 4.303.23 
C. H. Martin & Co., paint, 26.65 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairing carts, 17.20 
Samuel Eastman & Co., couplings, etc., 4.50 
A. H. Britton & Co., repairs, 7.84 
J. T. Walker, hay, 84.78 
George D. Huntle^^, repairs, 32.55 
A. C. Sanborn, hay, 52.90 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 1.47 
R. J. Macguire, veterinary services, 12.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 265 

G. S. Milton & Co., labor and supplies. $11.39 
(.'oncord Water- Works, water for stand- 
pipes. 700.00 



^ $5,594.79 

Balance carried to 1907 account, 93.17 



$5,687.96 



Deposited with the city treasurer as follows: 
New Hampshire State Hospital, crushed 

stone, $9.00 
New Hampshire State Hospital, street 

sweepings, 75.00 

Walter H. Sargent, labor, 7.28 

W. P. Ballard, use pump, 1.00 

L. C. Merrill, crushed stone, 6.00 

Union School District, labor, 78.03 

John T. Cate, use pump, 1.00 

John IMcIntire. street sign, 1.50 

I. 0. 0. F. Home, crushed stone, 3.50 

B. W. Couch, labor spraying trees, .98 
V. C. Hastings, labor spraying trees, 1.00 
V. J. Nay, labor spraying trees, 2.00 
A. D. Ayling, adjutant, labor, -1.40 
J. B. Walker, edgestone, 50.00 

C. P. Little, use pump, 1.00 
Walter Blanchard, labor spraying trees, .50 
St. Mary's School, labor spraying 

trees, 2.98 

Mrs. L. W. Allen, labor spraying trees, 1.96 

F. A. Stillings, labor spraying trees, .98 

Allen Hollis, labor spraying trees, 1.96 

H. E. Parker, concrete, 9.13 

Lewis F. Emery, labor spraying trees, .98 

E. N. Pearson, labor spraying trees, .50 



266 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. A. Grover, concrete. $9.13 
Adam P. Holden, crushed stone, 3.00 
H. M. Cavis. labor spraying trees, 1.00 
W. W. Critchett, dressing, 40.00 

F. P. Virgin, labor spraying trees, 1.00 
Roy George, labor spraying trees, 1.00 
W. G. Roach, labor spraying trees, 1.00 
C. L. Fellows, labor spraying trees, 1.50 
J. L. Cass, labor spraying trees, 1.00 
Mrs. Helen Cogswell, labor spraying trees, .75 
Julia W. Russell Estate, labor spraying 

trees. .98 

P. A. Clifford, labor spraying trees, 1.00 

Mrs. Perry Kittredge, labor spraying 

trees, 1.50 

Mary E. Sherburne, labor spraying trees, .98 
Mrs. Hattie E. Sanborn, labor spraying 

trees, 1.50 

Mrs. J. C. Ordway, labor spraying 

trees, 
William LaMonte, tlag stone, 
F. J. Pillsbury, labor spraying trees, 
H. M. Cavis, concrete and edgestone. 
Kate F. Clark, concrete, 
Mrs. N. F. Blaisdell, labor spraying 

trees, 
J. E. Randlett, labor spraying trees, 
John Roach, use pump, 
Owen Sullivan Estate, concrete, 
Walter Putney, use pump, 
J. C. French, labor spraying trees, 
Rowell & Plunnner, (crushed stone, 
Perley Badger, use pump, 
Mrs. J. C. Ordway, concrete. 
Mrs. Richard Ayer, lalK)r spraying 

trees, 
Centeiniial Home for Aged, edgestone. 



1.00 


2.00 


.50 


47.95 


13.21 


1.00 


1.00 


1.00 


14.37 


1.00 


2.00 


2.00 


.50 


10.66 


2.25 


28.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



267 



G. S. Milton & Co., use pump, $2.00 

Park Department, crushed stone, 15.00 
Committee on Lands and Buildings, 

labor, 6.50 

Concord Water- Works, labor, 14.45 

J. H. Rowell & Co., crushed stone, 202.00 

Daniel Crowley, concrete, 8.85 

Alfred Clark, concrete, 7.80 

C. P. Little, dressing, 25.00 



$736.06 



268 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD ONE. 




Borough road 

Centre 

Charles 

Church 

Crescent 

Cross 

East Canal 

Elm 

Fowler 

High 

Horse Hill road 

Main road (Horse Hill) 
Main 

Merrimack avenue . .. 

Merrimack 

Penacook road 

Penacook 

Pleasant 

River road 

Kolfe 

Runnclls road 

Scales road 

Spring 

Summer 

Summit 

Svveatt's Hill road 

Terry road 

Union 

"Walnut 

Warner road 

Washington 

Webster road 

West Canal 

West Main 



General repairs 

Road machine , . 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks. 

(General repairs 

Grading 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks. 
Repairing sidewalks. 
General repairs 



Gravel 



Gravel 

Crushed stone 

Gravel 

Gravel 



Grading 

General repairs 



Road machine 

General repairs 

General repairs 

Repair! n.i; sidewalks. 

General repairs 

General repairs 

Repairing macadam . 

Macadamizing 

(xeneral repairs 

Building sidewalk... 

(General repairs 

Road machine 

(jreneral repairs 

Repairing sidewalks. 
General repairs 



Building sidewalk ... 
General repairs 



Repairing sidewalks. 

Grading 

General repairs 



Gravel, crushed stone, 
(xravel, crushed stone. 
Gravel 



Gravel, crushed stone. 



Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 
Crushed stone 



Gravel 
Gravel 



Gravel 

Crushed stone 

Gravel 

Gravel and ashes 

Gravel, crushed stone. 
Gravel, crushed stone. 

Crushed stone 

Gravel 



Gravel 



Crushed stone . 

Gravel 

Gravel 



Gravel 



WARD TWO. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


Ex- 
pense. 


Appleton 




$11.61 

7 69 


Canterbury road 


Road nnichine 




(Jeneral repairs \ 


2.83 


Curtis road 




5.40 


Cushingroad 




10.50 


East Pemicook 


Road machine 




17. W 


Graham road 


Roail machine 




13.96 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

WARD TWO. — Continued. 



269 





STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


Ex- 
pense. 


Graham road 


General repairs 




$38.44 


Havward road 






3 00 


Hot Hole Pond road.. 


i> 1. 




9.45 








13 45 


Kilburn road 


(ieneral repairs .... 
(reneral repairs 




48.90 


Loudon road 




16.44 








14.13 


Mill 


(trading 


Gravel 


14.82 




Repairing sidewalks.. 


Gravel, crushed stone. 


8.79 
3.34 








10.12 


Mountain road. 


General repairs .. .. 




1.67 


Pecker 






7 69 






Gravel 

Stone chips 

(iravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 

Gravel 


7.04 




68.96 


Penacook 


(leneral repairs; 

Repairing sidewalks. . 


72.16 


Penacook road (Moun- 
tain District) . . . 


78.57 
107.19 




Road machine 


26.47 




Putting in drain 




133.75 


Penacook road (Hoit 
District) 


General repairs 


Gravel 


39.73 
37.54 


Penacook r'd(Penac'k 
Intervale District) .. 






20.00 


Penacook road (San- 
born District) .... 


>i .. 




21.14 




General repairs 

Road machine .. 




30.16 


Portsmouth 




21.92 


Potter 


Gravel .. 


109.37 




78.81 


Sanborn road 






11.19 


Sewall's Falls road . . 


>> >> 




8.GS 




General repairs 




2.80 




General repairs .. 




22.41 




Road machine 




32.09 


Shaker road (Virgin 
District) 


Road machine 




49.97 




(-leneral repairs 




57.98 


Sluiwmut 


Repairing culvert 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks.. 
General repairs 


Gravel, crushed .stone. 
Crushed stone 


42 12 
133.65 


Snow's Pond road 


19.62 
21.28 


TurtletOM'n road .... 






1.56 




.1 11 




3.86 


Virgin road 


11 11 




6.51 


Wintlirop 


.. 1. 




1.11 











270 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD THREE. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Materials used. 



Beech Hill road 

Bog road 

Carter Hill road . . . 

Dolan 

"Dugway " 

Electric avenue 

Ferrin road 

Hutchins 

Knight 

Lake 

Little road 

Long Pond road 

North State 

Number Four road. 
Number Five road. 

Palm 

Pine Hill road 

Quaker 

River road 

Saltmarsh road 

Second 

Sewair.s Falls road 

West Parish road . . 



General repairs 
Road machine. . 

Grading 

(leneral repairs 
Road machine. . 
Road machine.. 
General repairs 



Building sidewalk ... 

Grading 

General repairs 

Building sidewalk ... 

General rei)airs 

General repairs 

Road machine 

Road machine 

General repairs 

General repairs *. 

Repairing sidewalks. 

General repairs 

General repairs 

Grading 

General repairs 

General repairs 

(trading 

General repairs 

Road machine 

General repairs 

(leneral repairs 

Road machine . .. . 

Road machine 



Gravel 



Gravel 
Gravel 



(iravel 

(iravel, crushed stone. 
Gravel, crushed stone. 



Stone chips , 



Gravel 
(iravel 



WARD FOUR. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


Ex- 
pense. 


Abbott 

Beacon 


General repairs 

(xeneral repairs 

Building concrete 
walks 


Gravel, crushed stone, 
(iravel, crushed stone. 


$5.12 
24.71 

22.20 




Repairing concrete 
walks 




15 00 


Centre 


Repairing concrete 
walks 








161.49 




General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel 


27.42 


Chapel 




11 73 


Chestnut 


.50 


Church 


" 


3 92 


Court 




2.97 


Fiske . . 


(leneral repairs 

Repairing sidewalks.. 




23 24 


Franklin 


(iravel 


15.31 


Jackson 


(iravel 


19.43 




Gravel, crushed stone. 


10.51 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 
WARD FOUR. — Continued. 



271 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


Ex- 
pense. 


Lyndon 


General repairs 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete 


Gravel 


$13.98 
1.73 




Gravel 






31.20 




Repairing sidewalks. . 

General repairs 

Grading 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete 


Crushed stone 


2.70 


North Essex 


Gravel 


7.01 


North Main 


Gravel, crushed stone. 
Crushed stone 


33.71 
12.63 






27.57 


North Spring 


Pointing up bank wall 
Repairing concrete 




43.91 




17.64 


North State 


General repairs 

Repairing macadam.. 
Repairing concrete 
walks 


Crushed stone 

Crushed stone 


30.54 
44.51 






21.84 


Ridge road 

Rowell 

Rumford 


Repairing sidewalks . . 

General repairs 

Building sidewalks. . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete 


Crushed stone. 

Gravel 

Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 


20.35 

5.33 

20.96 

31.99 




62.23 




General repairs 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 




2.30 




Gravel 


9.90 






3.96 


Valley 


General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 




1.90 


Walker 


Crushed stone, gravel. 
Gravel 


11.68 


Washington 


55.95 






42.71 


White 


General repairs 


Gravel 


6.65 



WARD FIVE. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


Ex- 
pense, 


Centre 

Fremont 


General repairs 

Building sidewalks . .. 
Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 


$6.68 
48.44 




9.52 


Giles 


General repairs 




.83 


Green 


General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Crushed stone 


29.38 




2.82 




Repairing concrete 
roadway 




28.87 


Hanover 


General repairs 

Grading 

Building concrete 
crossings. 


Gravel 


7.36 


Huntington 

Liberty 


1.47 


Gravel, crushed stone. 
Gravel 


10.55 
27.20 

14 62 


Merrimack 


General repairs 

Repairing conci'ete 
walks 


Crushed stone 


17.93 






14.25 



272 



CITY OP CONCORD. 
WARD FIVE.—Cojdiniied. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


Ex- 
pense. 




Repairing concrete 
walks 








$151.00 




Repairing concrete 




29.56 




(■feneral repairs 




11.96 


North Spring 

North State 


General repairs 




.67 


Repairing concrete 
walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Crushed stone 


25.79 
7.28 






60.33 




Repairing concrete 




7.66 


Park 


Repairing concrete 








9.37 




General repairs 

Repairing concrete 


Crushed stone 


2.70 


Pine 

Pleasant 


Crushed stone, gravel. 
Crushed stone, gravel. 


8.70 
17.12 




102.93 




Repairing sidewalks.. 


Crushed stone 


13.59 






1,058.25 


School 


<Tcn('i:il repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks ... 


Crushed stone, gravel. 


79.18 
10.27 




Building concrete 

walks 

General repairs 

Repairing macadam .. 
Repairing sidewalks. . 
Repairing concrete 




138.77 


Short 


Gravel 


2..35 


Tahanto 


Crushed stone 

Crushed stone, gravel. 


5.27 


Warren 


7.01 
197.08 




Gravel 


14.59 
18.16 




Building concrete 
walks 




115.00 




Repairing concrete 

walks 

General repairs 




69.49 


Washington 


Gravel 


7.00 


West Wa.shi)igton 

Woodman 


Gravel 


27.74 
5.27 









WARD SIX. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials lased. 


Ex- 
pense. 


Clinton 


General repairs 


Crushed stone, gravel. 
Gravel 


$5.49 


Concord 


39.72 


Downing 






2.23 




Repairing concrete 




30.32 


Elm 


Repairing concrete 
walks 








17.65 


Fayette 


Repairing concrete 




3.67 




General repairs 

(ieneral repairs 

Grading 


Gravel 


14.02 


Grove 




39.03 







69.62 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

WARD Sl^. — Continued. 



273 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


Ex- 
pense. 


Grove 


Building concrete 
crossing 








$29.47 
9 19 


Laurel 


General repairs 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel 


Monroe 


Gravel 


9.99 






16.92 


Orchard 


General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel 


3 98 


t 




.59 


Perley 


General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel 


29 84 




3.46 


Pierce 


General repairs 

Geiieral repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel 


5.71 


Pleasant 


Gravel . 


24 12 






26 25 




Concreting 




1,058 2G 


South 


General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel, crushed stone. 


9 55 




45.59 


South Main 


Repairing concrete 
walks 








35 66 


South State 


General repairs 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel, crushed stone. 
Crushed stone. 


197.97 
30 37 






168 22 


South Spring... 


Repairing concrete 
walks 




29.59 


Thompson 


General repairs 

General repairs 


Gravel, crushed stone. 


29.01 
3 22 




Repairing concrete 
walks 

Repairing concrete 
walks 




58.79 


Thorndike 








12.51 




General repairs 


Gravel 


56.23 









WARD SEVEN. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


• 

Ex- 
pense. 


Albin road 


Road machine 


' 


$23.45 


Allison 


General repairs 

Road machine 


Gravel, crushed stone. 


18 04 


Avon 


2 70 


Badger 


Gravel 


8 09 


Birch 


Gravel 




Birchdale road 


11 05 


Bog road 


Road machine 




36 80 




General repairs 

Grading 


Gravel 


9.79 
C8 ''O 


Bow 


(General repairs 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks.. 
Building concrete 
walks 


" 


'> 51 


Broadway 


!• 


9 69 




Crushed stone 


15.82 






98 92 


Carter 


Building sidewalks... 

(irading 

Grading 




9 70' 


Clinton 


Gravel 


101.24 
56 02 




General repairs 


" 


40.53 



18 



274 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD SEVEN .—Continued. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Materials used. 



Clinton 
Dakin . 



Dakin extension.. 
Diniond Hill road. 
Downing 



Dunbarton road 

Dunklee 

Fiske road 



Glen 



Hall. 



Hammond. 

Harrison 

Harvard 

Holly 

Hopkinton Main road. 
Hopkinton New road. 

Hopkinton Old road.. 
Iron Works road 



Kimball 

Long Pond road. 



Repairing sidewalks. 
Building sidewalks. . 

General repairs 

Grading 

Setting bounds 

Grading 

(xeneral repairs 

Repairing sidewalks. 
Repairing sidewalks. 

General I'epairs 

(Trading 

Building sidewalk... 
Rejiairiiig sidewalk. . 

Road luachiue 

(leneral repairs 

Rei)airing sidewalks. 
Building concrete 

walks 

Building sidewalks. . 
General repairs 



Grading 

Rei>:nring sidewalks. 

( rcncral rt'paii's 

Gema-al repairs 

Road machine 



Gravel, crushed stone 
Gravel, crushed stone 

Gravel 

Gravel 



Gravel 

Gravel 

Crushed stone 

Crushed .stone, gravel 
Crushed stone, gravel 

Gravel 

Gravel 

Crushed stone 



Crushed stone, gravel 
Crushed stone 



Crushed stone, gravel. 
Crushed stone, gravel 



Crushed stone, gravel 

Gravel 

Crushed stone. 

Gravel 

Gravel 



Maitland . 
McKinley 
Mills 



Minot.. 
Morton 



Nor^li Fruit.. 

Noyes 

Pillsbury 

Pleasant 



Princeton 

Rockingham .. . 

School 

Silk Farm road 

South 



South Fruit 
South Main 



South State 

Stickney Hill road. . . 



General repairs 

Grading 

General repairs 

Road machine 

Building sidewalks.. 
Building sidewalks.. 

(Tcneral repairs 

I;epairin^;■ sidewalks.. 
Repairing sidewalks. 
Building concrete 

crossing 

General repairs , 

Grading 

General repairs 

General repairs 

Building fence 

Rejiairing sidewalks.. 
Repairingside walks.. 

General repairs 

(Tcnerai repairs 

Road machine 

Putting in drain 

General repairs 

Road machine 

R(M>airing sidewalks.. 

General repairs 

General repairs 

R(!pairing concrete 

walks 

Building concrete 

crossings 

Repairing concrete 

walks 

(■renciral repairs 

Road machine 



Gravel , 
Gravel , 



Gravel, crushed stone. 

Gravel 

Crushed stone 

Gravel, crushed stone. 



Gravel 

Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone, 
Gravel, crushed stone. 



Crushed stone. 
Crushed stone. 
Gravel 



Gravel . 



Crushed stone 

Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 



Gravel 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 
WARD SEVE^.— Continued. 



275 



STREET. 



Work. 



Materials used. 



Ex- 
pense. 



Stickney Hill road. 

Water 

West 

Whitredge avenue 
Wiggin 



Raising street . . 
General repairs 
General repairs . 



Building concrete 

crossings 

General repairs . .. 
General repairs . . . 



Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 

Gravel, crushed stone, 

stone chips 



Crushed stone. 



$304.17 
48.02 

51.64 

32.49 
2.40 
12.30 



WARD EIGHT. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Materials used. 


Ex- 
pense. 


Break-O-Day road 

Bridge 


General repairs 

General repairs 

Grading at Gully Hill. 
Lights in (iully 




$2.92 


Gravel 


98.13 




Gravel, crushed stone. 


3C2.95 
156.00 


Chandler 


Building 754 feet 

gravel walks 

General repairs 

Grading 


Gravel 

Crushed stone 


56.23 
2.30 


Clough's Mill road 

Depot 


Gravel 


11.22 
1.83 


East Concord road 


I' 


15.54 


Ferry 


Stone chips 

Gravel 

Gravel 


103.35 


Loudon road 

North Main 


Grading 

(xcneral repairs 

Repairing concrete 

walks 

Repairing concrete 

roadway 


414.04 
82.40 

59.34 

4.55 


North Pembroke road 


General repairs 

Grading 


Gravel, crushed stone 
Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 


23.10 
263.12 




Building 2,935 feet 
gravel walk 


325.85 


Sheep Davis road 


General repairs . ... 


2.83 


South Main. 


General repairs 

Repairing concrete 
walks 


Gravel, crushed stone. 


79.57 
113.02 


South Pembroke road 


General repairs 


Gravel 


2.83 






520.40 


Stickney aven ue 


General repairs 




43.24 


Sugar Bowl road 

Suncook road 


Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 


42.67 
126.67 







276 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

WARD NINE. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Materials used. 



Ex- 
pense. 



Auburn 

Bradley 
Charles 



Curtice avenue . 
East Penacook.. 

Fiske road 

Frauklin 

Granite avenue . 

High 

Little Fond road 

Long Pond road. 

North State 

Park Ridge 

Penacook 

Perkins 

Rum ford 

Walker 

Waverly 

Wyman 



Road niacjiine. . 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete 
walks 

Building concrete 
walks 

General repairs 



Grading 

General repairs 

General rerjairs 

Road machine 

Road machine 

Grading 

General repairs 

General repairs 

Repairing sidewalks. 

Macadamizing 

General repairs 



Crushed stone, gravel. 

Gravel 

Gravel 



Crushed stone 

Gravel , stond chips . 
Gravel 



Gravel 



Crushed stone, gravel, 
Crushed stone 



Crushed stone 

Crushed stone, gravel. 

Gravel 

Gravel, crushed stone. 
Gravel 



Gravel 



17.02 
1.10 



.G7 

22.60 

5.37 
.51.75 
23.85 
46.99 
47.48 

1.58 
26.40 
36.40 
23.45 
90.90 
17.68 
41.54 
47.43 
1,497.80 

1.35 
25.42 

1.G3 
34.66 
11.86 

6.75 
.50 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1906. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 
CHARLES R. CORNING, I\Iayor, ex officio. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, to IMarch 31, 1910. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, to March 31, 1910. 

SOLON A. CARTER. to March 31, 1909. 

HARLEY B. ROBY. to March 31, 1909. 

HENRY C. HOLBROOK, to March 31, 1908. 

HENRY E. CONANT. to March 31, 1908. 

EDSON J. HILL. to March 31, 1907. 

GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, to March 31, 1907. 

SOLON A. CARTER, President. 
EDSON J. HILL, Clerk of Board. 



SUPERINTENDENT. 

V. C. HASTINGS. 



CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 



FOREMAN. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 



INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 



ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL 



CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members. 

Abraham G. Jones, ex officio, 1872 — three months. 

John M. Hill,* 1872-1878. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1872-1878. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

David A. Ward,* 1872-1874. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1872. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

Benjamin S. Warren,* 1872-1873. 

John Kimball, ex officio, 1872-1876. 

John Abbott,* 1873-1876. 

John S. Russ,* 1874-1877. 

Abel B. Holt,* 1874-1877. 

Samuel S. Kimball,* 1875. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Geo. A. Pillsbury,* ex officio, 1876-1878. 

Luther P. Durgin,* 1876-1885. 

John Kimball, 3877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William M. Chase, 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Horace A. Brown, ex officio, 1878-1880. 

James L. Mason,* 1878-1893. 

James R. Hill,* 1878. Died 1884. 

Geo. A. Cummings,* ex officio, 1880-1883. 

Edgar H. Woodman, *ejc'oj^Ci'o, 1883-1887. 

Joseph H. Abbot,* 1884-1893. 

George A. Young,* 1885-1894. 

John E. Robertson, ex officio, 1887-1889. 

Stillman Humphrey,* ex officio, 

1889-1891. 
Henry W. Clapp,* e,r o;^fio, 1891-1893. 
Willis D. Thompson, 1891-1895. 

William P. Fiske, 1891-1902. 

James H. Chase,* 1891. Died in 1893. 

♦Deceased. 



WATER D"EPARTMENT. 279 

John Whitaker,* 1892. Died in 1903. 

Henry E. Conant, 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

Parsons B. Cogswell,* ex officio, 

1893-1895. 
Solon A. Carter, 1893. Now in office. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William i\I. ]\lason, 1893-1899. 

William E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Robinson, ex officio, 1895-1897. 
Ebenezer B. Hutchinson, 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 
Edson J. Hill, 1895. Now in office. 

Albert B. Wood worth, ex officio, 

1897-1899. 
Nathaniel E. ^Martin, ex officio, 

1899-1901. 
Henry E. Conant, 1899. Now in office. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 

Harry G. Sargent, ex officio, 1901-1903. 
Obadiah Morrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott, 1901. Now in office. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 

Charles R. Corning, ex officio, 

1903. Now in office. 
Henry C. Holbrook, 1903. Now in office. 

Harlev B. Robv, 1905. Now in office. 



Presidents of the Board. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1874-1875. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

John Kimball, 1875-1876. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1876-1878. 

John Kimball, 1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William P. Fiske, 1891-1902. 

Solon A. Carter, 1902. Now in office. 

* Deceased. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



CO^X^ORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE, WATER-WORKS. 



Population of the city by census of 1900, 19,632 

Population of that portion of the city included 

within the water precinct, estimated, 17,000 

Date of construction, 1872. 

Works are owned by the city. 

Source of supply, Penacook Lake, a natural body of 
water containing 265 acres, situated about three and one- 
half miles from the state house, and about 125 feet higher 
than !Main Street in front of the state house. 

Mode of supply, gravity and pumping to reservoir. 



CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights: 
Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights. $60,000.00 

Concord ^Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights. 83,000.00 
W. P. Cooledge, for mill privi- 
lege and land, 5,500.00 
Humphrey & Farnum, for kit- 
shop privilege, -1.900.00* 
tlowage rights around Penacook 

Lake. -4.375.61 

W. P. Cooledge, Hutchins lot, l,050.00t 

Mary C. Rowell, for land, 1,500.00 

Moses H. Bradley, for land, 5,000.00 

Joseph B. AValker, for land, 2,211.00 

John G. Hook, for land, 370.00 

A. S. Ranney, for land, 1,350.00 

Alfred Roberts, for land, 1,275.00 

Charles E. Ballard, for land, 2,500.00 

Mary G. Carter, for land, 1,250.00 

Elizabeth Widmer, for land, 1,564.50 

A. L. Proctor, for land. 450.00 

Robert Crowley, for land. 3,000.00 

Miles Hodgdon, for land, 2,200.00 
heirs of Lowell Brown, for 

land. 1,032.55 

Coffin & Little, for land. 800.00 

0. F. Richardson, for land. 100.00 
M. H. & C. R. Farnum. for 

land, 4.500.00 

•Original cost, $5,000; land sold for $100. 

t Original cost house and lot, $2,250 ; portion of lot sold for $1,200. 



282 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Paid Cook & Hood, for land, $1,750.00 

Charles II. Farnum, for land. 1,410.36 

Fred N. Ladd, for land, 300.00 

A. W. Hill, for land, 6,500.00 

Helen G. Evans and others, for 

land, 2,000.00 

Frank B. Kilburn, for land, 2,500.00 

C. H. Amsden, water and floAv- 

age rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Association, 20.000.00 
dam, gate-house and appur- 
tenances, 30,756.17 
conduit and gate-houses, 29,484.05 
mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam to 
Penacook Street, force main 
from the pump to the reser- 
voir, fire main through North 
and South Main Streets, and 
high service main from Pen- 
acook Street to Stark Street, 
Penacook), 182,241.70 
distribution pipe, 347,113.88 
service pipe, 50,553.18 
reservoir, 42,460.09 
pumping station, shop, stable 

and storehouse, 22,000.00 

pumping machinery, 17,000.42 

engineering and superinten- 
dence, 14,913.12 
incidentals, 6,531.19 



Cost of works January 1, 1907. $970,445.82 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 283 

Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of 
said cost, of which the following are still outstanding: 



When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1, 1907, 


4, 


$10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1908, 


4, 


10.000.00 


Jan. 1, 1909, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1910, 


4,. 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1910, 


3, 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1911, 


4, 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1911, 


3, 


5,000.00 


April 1, 1912, 


31/2, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1913, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1914, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1915, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1916, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1917, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1918, ' 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1919, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1920, 


3, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1921, 


3, 


5,000.00 


April 1, 1921, 


31/2, 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1922, 


4, 


400,000.00 


March 1, 1922, 


31/2, 


20,000.00 


April 1, 1922, 


31/2, 


30,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1923, 


31/2, 


15,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1924, 


31/2, 


15,000.00 




$630,000.00 



REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Office of the Board, of Water Commissioners. 
Concord, N. H., January 31, 1907. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: 

The Board of Water Commissioners respectfully sub- 
mits the following report of the operations of this depart- 
ment for the year 1906, accompanied by the reports of the 
superintendent and the engineer of the pumping station, 
which are made a part of this report. 

The report of the superintendent exhibits in detail the 
amount of work done in substituting cast-iron pipe for 
the original cement-lined pipe. 

The work for the coming year is practically decided 
upon, and the necessary new^ material has been contracted 
for at satisfactory prices. 

We expect that within a comparatively short period 
the work of substitution of cast-iron for cement-lined pipe 
will be completed, relieving the department of so large 
an annual expenditure for new construction. 

The matter of protecting our source of supply, Penacook 
Lake, from contamination has received the careful considera- 
tion of the Board, and during the year we have secured 
several properties on the shores of the lake with this end 
in view. The report of the superintendent will exhibit 
the details of our work in this direction. 



J 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 285 

In our judgment the time is not far distant when public 
sentiment will demand more vigorous measures than the 
Board has heretofore felt justified in adopting. 
Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
HARLEY B. ROBY, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
HENRY E. CONANT, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 
CHARLES R. CORNING, ex officio, 
Water Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the thirty-tifth annual report 
of the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement 
of extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1906. 

Receipts. 

For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates, $29,111.38 
For water, from consumers by me- 
ter rates, 42,150.85 
From delinquents, 79.24 
For water used for building pur- 
poses, 83.00 
For land and buildings sold, 1,350.00 
For hay and apples sold, 50.00 
For pipe and stock sold, 88.14 
For old brass and iron sold, 246.88 

. $73,159.49 

Deduct abatements, 96.04 

Net receipts for 1906, $73,063.45 

Expenditures. 

general expenses. 

Paid pay rolls, salaries and labor, $10,989.61 
S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop in 

Penacook, 24.00 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing and 

postage, 176.48 



$66.75 


4.00 


10.00 


8.44 


4.15 


14.65 


112.83 


9.25 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 287 

Paid Rumford Printing Co., books, 
Henry E. Conant, books. 
People & Patriot Co., printing, 
Concord Evening Monitor, 

printing. 
Frank P. I\Iace, office supplies. 
Concord Electric Co., lighting, 
N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., telephones, 
John C. Tliorne, rubber boots, 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., wall 

paper, 3.80 

Thompson & Hoague Co., hard- 
ware, 83.78 
W. L. Jenks & Co., hardware, 23.57 
A. H. Britton & Co., hardware, 6.17 
Joseph T. Walker, hay, 91.70 
Wm. P. Ford & Co., stove, 12.00 
H. H. Crowell, slab wood, 11.75 
D. Waldo White, grain and 

straw, 77.94 

G. N. Bartemus & Co., grain, 21.50 

T. L. Davis & Co., manila rope, 15.34 

Tragle Cordage Co., jute pack- 
ing, 47.25 
Walter Macleod & Co., heater, 95.00 
Alfred Clark, horse, • 100.00 
George W. Wales, hose, 15.00 
Stoughton Rubber Co., hose, 3.33 
Jos. Dixon Crucible Co., grease, 3.50 
Batchelder & Co., oil, etc., 37.37 
C. H. Martin & Co., naphtha, 

etc., 18.28 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 12.90 

M. J. Drummond & Co., cast- 
iron pipe, 13,202.67 



288 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid Bniklers Iron Foundry, east- 
ings. $63.90 
Ford & Kimball, castings and 

coke, 83.33 

Concord Foundry & INIachine 

Co., castings. 2.26 

Page Belting Co., pipe, lead, 

etc., 70.41 

Coffin Valve Co., hydrants, 560.00 

R. D. Wood & Co., hydrants, 291.52 

Rensselaer Mfg. Co., hydrants, 210.00 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., gates, 987.75 

Richards & Co., pig lead, 1,329.42 

Chadwick-Boston Lead Co., 

lead pipe, 34.56 

J. H. Cunningham Co., wrought- 

iron pipe and valve boxes, 348.15 

Hays Mfg. Co., valve box 

covers, 3.00 

Sumner-Gerald Co., pipe. 34.81 

H. ^lueller Mfg. Co., brass 

goods, 81.79 

Walworth Mfg. Co., brass goods, 

valve boxes and tools, 50.68 

Harold L. Bond & Co., tools and 

jute, 25.71 

Waldo Bros., tools, 6.00 

Crane Co., tools, 4.10 

Orr & Rolfe, pipe and labor, 23.09 

Lee Bros., pipe and labor, 10.98 

Concord Pipe Co., pipe and fit- 
tings, 8.06 
G. S. JMilton & Co., ])ipe and 

fittings, 13.39 

Thomson jMeter Co., meters and 

repairs, 414.45 

Hersey Mfg. Co., meters, 119.58 



14.60 


4.50 


157.55 


6.20 


4.00 


34.78 


71.46 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 289 

Paid Henry R. Worthington, meters, $71.20 

Union Water IMeter Co., meters, 31.00 

National Meter Co., repairs, 53.77 

E. B. Hanehay, smith-work, 133.70 

Ross W. Cate, smith-work, 13.25 

Rowell & Plummer, mason- work, 16.31 

George D. Huntley, repairs, 32.70 

Chandler Eastman & Sons, re- 
pairs, 27.00 
J. D. Johnson & Son, repairs 

and supplies, 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs, 
George L. Theobald, team-work, 
0. F. Richardson, team-work, 
E. H. Runnells, labor, 
Hutchinson Building Co., lum- 
ber and labor, 
Geo. Abbott, Jr., painting, 
Benj. Bilsborough, painting and 

papering. 13.58 

J. H. Rowell & Co., repairing 

concrete, 54.33 

city highway department, re- 
pairing streets, 14.45 
Engineering News, 5.00 
iMorrill & Dan forth, insurance, 266.51 
Eastman & ^Merrill, insurance, 9.00 
Boston & ]\Iaine Railroad, 

freight, 1,352.58 

A. W. Hill, land, 6,500.00 

Helen G. Evans and others, land 

and buildings, 2,000.00 

Frank B. Kilburn, land, 2,500.00 

town of Webster, taxes, 55.20 

A. G. Cochran, clerk, cash paid 

out, 54.33 

incidentals, 27.45 

— $43,603.40 



290 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 

Paid pay rolls, engineer and fireman, $1,600.00 



labor on fuel, 


18.00 


B. P. Burton & Co., coal, 


389.57 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight on coal. 


95.21 


H. H. Crowell, slab wood, 


40.00 


Vacuum Oil Co., oil. 


68.84 


Garlock Packing Co., packing. 


45.13 


Henry R. Worthington, pack- 




ing, 


18.00 


Walworth Mfg. Co., pacldng 




and glasses. 


3.72 


Harold L. Bond & Co., waste, 


12.04 


Stoughton Rubber Co., hose. 


13.00 


Orr & Rolfe, pipe and labor, 


9.78 


Thompson & Hoague Co., sup- 




plies. 


11.10 


J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., sup- 




plies. 


9.60 


Rumford Printing Co., book. 


11.00 


Morrill & Danforth, insurance, 


75.00 


Concord Light & Power Co., 




lighting. 


8.17 


N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 




Co., telephone. 


35.25 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight. 


1.34 


incidentals. 


3.40 



Total expenditures for 1906, $46,071.55 

The expenditures are divided as follows: 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 291 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 



For care and maintenance. 


$2,282.61 


office expenses, 


1,012.85 


inspection, 


660.00 


care and repair of hydrants. 


759.64 


repairs on cement-lined pipe. 


260.09 


raising road and work at Pena- 




cook Lake, 


84.25 


new service pipes. 


1,632.44 


new distribution pipes. 


22,949.14 


new hydrants. 


1,413.46 


meter account, 


928.17 


land at Penacook Lake, 


11,000.00 


incidentals. 


620.75 


_ 


$43,603.40 



PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 

For salaries, engineer and fireman, $1,600.00 



fuel. 


542.78 


oil, packing and waste. 


148.32 


repairs, 


9.78 


supplies. 


48.85 


lighting and telephone. 


43.42 


insurance, 


75.00 







$2,468.15 



EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron main and distribution pipes have been laid and 
hydrants set during the year as follows : 

In North State Street, 

south from near Chapel to Pleasant Street, 2,733 feet 
20-inch pipe in place of 14-inch and 12-inch cement- 
lined pipe discontinued. 



292 • CITY OP CONCORD. 

In Clinton Street, 

west from South Spring to South Fruit Street, 1,615 
feet 10-indi pipe in place of 4-inch cement-lined 
pipe discontinued. 

In Bradley Street, 

south from Perkins to Franklin Street, 1,514 feet 
10-inch pipe in place of 4-inch cement-lined and 
iron pipe discontinued. 

In Walker Street, 

west from North State to Bradley Street, 610 feet 
10-inch pipe in place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe 
discontinued. 

In Alhin Street, 

west from Bradley to Rumford Street, 785 feet 10- 
ineh pipe in place of 4-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Franklin Street, 

west from Jackson to Rumford Street, 650 feet 10- 
inch pipe in place of 6-inch cement-lined pipe dis- 
continued. 

In Fenacook Street, 

east from near North Main Street to Page Belting 
Co.'s, 672 feet 10-inch pipe in place of 8-inch and 
6-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Ferry Street, 

east from North JNIain Street to Huntoon Avenue, 
1,000 feet 8-inch pipe. 

In Washinglon Street, 

west from North Main to North State Street, 545 feet 
8-inch pipe in place of 4-ineh cement-lined pipe 
discontinued. 



I 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 293 

In Washington Street, 

west from Rumford Street to Perry Avenue, 498 feet 
8-inch pipe. 

In South Fruit Street, 

north from Clinton Street, 1,447 feet 6-inch pipe in 
place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Jackson Street, 

north from Franklin to Church Street, 505 feet 6-inch 
pipe in place of 4-inch cement-lined pipe discon- 
tinued. 

In Penacook Street, 

extended east from Page Belting Co.'s, 406 feet 6-inch 
pipe. 

In Eastman Street, 

south from Pillsbury to Carter Street, 400 feet 6-inch 
pipe. 

In Chapel Street, 

east from North State Street, 222 feet 6-inch pipe 
in place of 4-incli cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Hnmphreij Street, 

extended west from Kimball Street, 64 feet 6-inch 
pipe. 

On connections, 

59 feet 10-inch pipe, 136 feet 8-inch pipe, 378 feet 
6-inch pipe ; in place of 74 feet 8-inch, 94 feet 
6-inch and 324 feet 4-inch cement-lined pipe dis- 
continued. 

On hydrant branches, 

414 feet 6-inch pipe; 174 feet 6-inch and 28 feet 4-inch 
cement-lined pipe discontinued. 



k 



294 CITY OF CONCORD. 

On Now-off's, 

4 feet 6-inch pipe. 

Also, 315 feet of 1-inch pipe ; 253 feet 1-inch pipe dis- 
continued. 

Twenty-three new hydrants have been set as follows: 

On Penacook Street at Concord Lumber Co. 's planing 

mill. 
On Albin Street near D. Weathers'. 
On Rumford Street at Albin. 
On Bradley Street at Franklin. 
On Franklin Street at Lyndon. 
On Jackson Street at Church. 
On Chapel Street near First Methodist Church. 
On Ferry Street at Northern Railroad. 
On Ferry Street at New England Granite Works. 
On Ferry Street at Huntoon Avenue. 
On Washington Street at Rollins. 
On Washington Street at Essex. 
On Holt Street at E. M. Nason's. 
On Orchard Street opposite A. P. Sherburne's. 
On INIinot Street at Odd Fellows' Home. 
On North Spring Street at High School. 
On Concord Street at South State. 
On Downing Street opposite Grove. 
On Downing Street at Redwood Avenue. 
On Pillslniry Street at Kimball. 
On Clinton Street opposite Harvard. 
On South Fruit Street at J. C. Kilburn's. 
On Humphrey Street near Kimball. 

Two hydrants have been replaced by larger ones: 

On Bradley Street at Highland. 

On South Fruit Street at Critchett's. 

There have been set 55 gates; discontinued, 33. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



295 



Summary of the Foregoing, 
new pipes, hydrants and stop-gates. 



Pipes. 



1-in, , 
6-in., 

8-in., 
10-in., 
20-in., 



315 feet. 
3,840 '• 
2,179 " 
5,905 " 
2,733 " 



14,972 feet, 
equal to 2.835 miles. 



Hydrants. 
In city, 27 



Stop-Gates. 



27 



4-in., 

6-in., 

8-in., 

10-in., 

12-ln., 

20-in., 



PIPES, HYDRANTS AND STOP-GATES DISCONTINUED. 



Pipes. 



l-'in. , 
4-in . , 
6-in., 
8-in., 
12-in., 
14-in., 



253 feet. 

7,259 " 

1,033 " 

631 " 

1,622 " 

977 " 



11,775 feet, 
equal to 2.23 miles. 



Hydrants. 
In city. 



4 
37 
5 
6 
2 



55 



Stop-Gates. 




4-in., 


19 


6-in., 


9 


8-in. , 


2 


12-in., 


2 


14-in., 


1 



33 



Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
348,668 feet, equal to 66.03 miles. 

Total number of hydrants now in use, 339. 

Total number of gates now in use, 893. 

. Service Pipes. 

There have been laid during the year and connected 

with the main pipes, 58 service pipes consisting of 

54 s^-inch, 1,335 feet. 

2 2-inch. 55 feet. 

1 4-inch, 47 feet. 

1 10-inch. 10 feet. 



58 



1,447 feet. 



296 CITY OP CONCORD. 

There have been discontinued, 8 ; whole number in use 
at the present time, 3,559 ; total length of service pipes. 
82,563 feet, or 15.63 miles. We have placed 106 service 
boxes at the curb on old services. 

We have set 47 meters during the year ; 5 have been 
removed, making the total number now in use, 1,439. 

The following table shows the height of water in Peua- 
cook Lake on the first dav of each month : 



January, 


183.00 


July, 


185.10 


February, 


183.50 


August, 


184.50 


March, 


183.70 


September, 


183.90 


April, 


184.65 


October, 


183.00 


May, 


185.05 


November, 


182.75 


June, 


185.50 


December, 


182.40 



The lowest point reached during the year was on Decem- 
ber 26, being 182 ; the highest was on June 1 and was 
185.50; mean height for the year was 183.94, which was 
.57 foot higher than the mean height for the year 1905. 

All the buildings owned hy the works are in good 
condition, the woodwork of the pumping station, coal shed, 
shop and stable having been painted the past summer. 

The work of the year has been mainly in relaying the 
distribution pipes. On all the streets relaid, we have 
cleaned out the service pipes, renewing them when neces- 
sary, and set service boxes when practicable; we also 
replaced the hydrants on these streets with new ones, most 
of the old ones having been in use for thirty-four years. 

There now remains of the original cement-lined pipe, 
18,085 feet, and pipe has already been contracted for to 
be used next season in relaying 9,349 feet of this amount, 
thus leaving only 8,736 feet of the original pipe, which, 
according to the work done in the past few seasons, would 
be replaced in another year. 

It is planned to relay the following streets in 1907 : 
Broadway, South, Centre, Church, Railroad, Hill's Avenue, 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 297 

Lyndon. IMaple, Montgomery, Park, North Spring, Union, 
Washington and West. 

I would also recommend that a pipe be extended down 
Dnnklee Street from West to Pillsbnry. 

Respectfully submitted, 

V. C. HASTINGS, 

Superintendent. 



298 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER OF THE 
PUMPING STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water- Works. 
V. C. Hastings, Superintendent : 

Sir: I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station is in good working condition. 

Following will be found a statement of coal and other 
supplies used at the pumping station during the year, with 
a table showing the work for each month : 

Statement. 
168 tons 1.933 pounds Cumberland coal. 
40 tons 1515 pounds Pocahontas coal. 
70 gallons of oil. ' 
49 pounds of waste. 
101/2 cords of slab wood. 
81/4 pounds of grease. 

p:ngine rp:cord. 



Months. 



January 

February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 
October... . 
November .. 
December. .. 



Total . . 
Daily aver'ge 



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27 


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22 


201:.. 




26 

16 


26 
26 


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10 


10 


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25 


230:.. 


8 


20 


28 


260 :30 


11 


14 


25 


278:.. 


12 


15 


27 


25i: . 


14 


12 


26 


235:30 


11 


15 


26 


253:30 


125 


184 


309 


2,821 :30 











H. M. 

6:59 
7:24 
7:11 
0:42 
7:09 
7:42 
7:44 
8 :24 
9:16 
8:08 
7:51 
8:05 



7:21 



16,813 
17,578 
17,785 
16,234 
18,201 
19,851) 
19.655 
22,024 
23.845 
21.:{7:» 
19,919 
21.580 



539 542,372 
697 627,810 
0:J4 ,573.710 
847 5*1,161 

,05S -.,S7.1,50 
,:!8'_' 66 1,979 
,570 6:U,050 
,S1:$ 710.477 
<7 7'.U,8(;2 
l."i (;,SI).67() 
,212 (i:!G.l)73 
482 696,144 



33.351 1,072 
34,e'21 1,236 
34,578 1,115 
32,472 1.0S2 
33,9.36 1.094 
,36.2.'')6 1,208 
:«i,022 1,162 
39,997 1,290 
44. .548 1,481 
40,650 1,311 
3S.073 1.269 
42,464 1,369 



c a 
c s 
:=; o 

ci Q. 



1,438, 504 
1.099' 507 
1,396: 514 
1,930 499 
1,775 ,536 
1.1.55 .547 
1.099 545 
1,231, 550 
1,482 535 
1,8521 525 
1,716 502 
2,234 1 508 



234,878,916 643,503,446,908 l,224jl9,007j 525 
643.503 1.224 | .... 



♦Amount of coal consumed includes that used for starting fires, banking 
fires and heating the buildings. 

Amount of coal consuined per tliou.«aiKl jrallon.s pumped, 1.90 

pounds. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Ei)gineer. 



APPENDIX. 



300 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. 

Receipts for Each Year Since the Completion of the 

Works. 

For the year ending January 31, 187-4. 
For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875, 
For the year ending April 1, 1876, 

1877, 

1878, 

1879. 

1880, 

1881. 
For nine months ending December 31, 1881, 
For the year ending December 31, 1*882, 

1883, 



Total receipts for 3-4 years, 



1884, 


28,915.65 


1885, 


30,222.54 


1886, 


30,862.64 


1887, 


34,047.52 


1888, 


38,441.32 


1889, 


40,237.53 


1890, 


42,133.41 


1891, 


46,075.16 


1892, 


48,351.52 


1893, 


52,299.66 


1894, 


53,230.10 


1895, 


55,343.19 


1896, 


56,557.81 


1897, 


55,156.42 


1898, 


59,147.54 


1899, 


53,953.13 


1900, 


57,003.71 


1901, 


62,253.61 


1902, 


63,430.85 


1903, 


65,088.45 


1904, 


68,570.48 


1905. 


71,076.44 


1906, 


73,063.45 




$1,416,212.09 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



301 



B. 





Mean Height of 


Water Each Year, 




1873, 


175.86 


1890, 


181.90 


1874, 


179.50 


1891, 


180.00 


1875, 


180.00 


1892, 


174.32 


1876, 


180.28 


1893, 


173.38 


1877, 


176.46 


1894, 


172.81 


1878, 


179.50 


1895, 


171.15 


1879, 


179.74 


1896, 


178.96 


1880, 


175.30 


1897, 


183.33 


1881, 


174.70 


1898, 


184.31 


1882, 


179.15 


1899, 


183.49 


1883, 


176.40 


1900, 


183.09 


1884, 


178.18 


1901, 


183.86 


1885, 


176.80 


1902, 


184.98 


1886, 


178.10 


1903, 


184.75 


1887, 


179.04 


1904, 


184.40 


1888, 


181.96 


1905, 


183.37 


1889, 


180.91 


1906, 


183.94 



302 



CITY OF CONCORD. 







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304 



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WATER DEPARTMENT. 



305 



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306 



CITY OF CONCORD. 






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Canal, East 

Canal, West 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



307 











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308 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

D. 

FIRE- HYDRANTS. 




North Main. 



South Main. 



Water. 
Hall. 



Hannnonfl. 
Fiske. 

Summer. 

Durgin. 
Nortli State. 



South west corner North Main and Penacook 

Fa.st .side IS'orth Main, iieai- J. B. Walker'.s 

Junction North Main iind Fi.ske 

Ea.st side North Main, 7icnr Larkin'.s store 

Northwest corner North IMiiiu ;iik1 F'ranklin 

East side North Main,<ii)i>iisiie Pearl 

Northwest corner Nortli Main and Wa.shington 

West side No. Main, opi>. Historical Society rooms... 

East side North Main, opixxsite Chapel 

Northwest corner North Main and ('ourt 

Northwest corner North Main mid Pitman 

Northwest corner North Main and Montgomery 

East side North Main, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner JSdrth Main and Centre 

Soutliea.st corner North Main and Bridge 

Southwest corner North ]Maiii and I'ark 

East side North Main, opposite Park 

Northwest corner North Main ami Capitol 

Northwest Corner North ^lain and School 

West side North Main at Centennial Block 

East side North Main, opposite Centennial Block 

East side North Main, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side North Main, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner North Main and Warren 

West side North Main, at Central Block 

Northeast corner North Main and Depot 

Northwest corner North .Main and Pleasant 

Southeast corner South IVIain and I'leasant 

Northeast comer South Main and Freight 

East side South ^hun, oiii)osite Fayette 

East side .Suuth !Maiii, oiijiosite 'JMioinpsoti , 

Southeast corner South Main and Chandler 

Northwest corner So. Main and Went worth Avenue. 

Northwest cfirner South .Main and Thorndike 

East side South Main, oppo.site St. .John's Church. . . . 

Nortli west corner South Main and Perley 

West side Siuith Main, near .\hhot-Dowuing Cd.'s... 
East side South .Main, opposite Ahhot-Downing Co.'s 

East side South Main, near West 

Northeast corner South Main .and (ias 

West side South Main, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co. , 

Southwest corner South Main and South State 

Northwest corner South .Main and Pil'shury 

East side South .Main, opposite Pillshury 

Westside South Main, oiiposite Langdon 

West side South .Main, at .1. H. I, am prey's 

West side South .Main, at W. .(. Sawyer's 

W^est side Water, near Cant, .lames Thorn pson'.s 

West side Hall, opposite IJolie and Rnmford Asylum 

West side Hall, near lO. \\ . Kohinsoii 's 

West side Hall, near F. II. (George's 

West side Hall, op)iosiie Hammond 

East side Hall,opiiosit(> W. H. Page's 

East side Hall, near Jiumford Field 

North side Hammond, near Bridg(> 

West side Fiske, near Noilh State 

North 'ast corner .Summer and Pitman 

East side Durgin, opposite 'I'lxd's laundry 

Southwest corner North State and I'eiiacook 

Northwest corner North State and Walker 

Northwest corner North Slate and Church 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS— C'o»^;»«e^. 



309 




North State. 



South State. 



Mills. 

Dakia. 

Duiiklee. 

Broadway. 

Green. 



South. 



Bradley. 

Union. 

Jackson. 

Lyndon. 

North Sprin?. 

South Spring. 
Rumford. 



Tab an to. 
Pine. 



Holt. 
High. 



Northeast corner Ninth Stnte and Franklin 

Northwest corner North State and Treniont 

Northeast corner North State and Wasliington 

West side North State, oi>p(isite Conrt 

Southwest corner Nortli State and Maple 

Southeast corner North State and Centre 

Southeast corner North State and Park 

Southwest corner North State and School 

Southeast corner North States and Warren 

Northwest corner Nortli State and Pleasant 

East side Soutli State, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner South State and Thompson 

Southwest corner Sontli State and Monroe 

East side South State, (■inxtsite Laurel 

Northeast corner South State and Downing 

Northeast, corner Soutli State and West 

Southwest corner South State and Harrison 

West side Mills, near Levi Call's , 

West siiU' Dakin, near C. E. Hairinian's 

Nortliwest corner Dunklee and I'illshnry 

Northwest corner Broadway and Allison 

Northwest corner Broadway and Stone 

Northwest corner (ireen and Prince 

East side Green, opi)osite Prince 

Northwest corner (ireen atid Warren 

West side South, o|)posite Wall 

Northwest corner South and Tlioinpson 

West side Soutli, oiiposite Monroe 

AVest side South, opposite Latuud 

^^'^'st side South, opiiosite Downing 

West si lie South, oiiposite Allison 

West side South, near Abbot farm 

West side South, opposite Smith farm 

Northwest corner South and Rockingham 

East side South, at Quint's 

West side South, near Bow line 

Southwest corner Bradley and Penacook 

Northwest corner Bradley and Walker 

East side Bradley, opposite Higliland 

Northwest corner Bradley and Franklin 

Northwest corner Union and Maple 

Northeast corner Jackson and Church 

Southwest corner Lyndon and Tremout 

Southwest corner North .Spring and Centre 

East side North Spring, opposite High School 

Southwest corner South Spring and Oak 

West side South Spring, opposite Concord _. ... 

West side So. Spring, opp. Perley proposed extension. 

West side Rumford, south of cemetery gate 

West side Rumford, opposite Perkins 

Northeast corner Rumford and Albin 

Northeast corner Rumford and Franklin 

Nortliwest corner Rumford and Beacon 

Northeast corner Rumford and Abbott 

Northeast corner Rumford and Cambridge 

Northeast corner Rumford and School 

Northwest corner Tahanto and School 

Southwest corner Pine and Centre 

Southwest corner Pine and Warren 

East side Holt, at Nason's 

Northwest corner High and Auburn 

East side High, opposite Forest 



310 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FlRE-B.YD'RAKrS— Continued. 




High. Southwest comer Higli and Franklin 

Giles. Southeast corner Giles and iScliool 

Princeton. , Southwest corner Princeton imd ('liiiton 

" Northwest corner Princeton ami Xoyes 

Fruit. Northeast corner Fruit and Woodman 

" East side Fruit, opposite W. W. Critchett's 

" East side Fruit, opposite Kil burn's 

Minot. West side Miiiot, neai- Odd Fellows' Home , 

West side Minot. near Odd Fellows' Home 

" ' Northwest corm-r .Minot and Pleasant 

Penacook, South side Penacook, near Concord Lumber Co.. . . 
" ' South side Penacook, east of P. B. Co.'s bark house 

Soutli side Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s 

South side Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s office 

Southeast corner Penacook and North Main 

Southwest corner Pouicook and Kumford 

Southeast corner Penacook and Columbus avenue . 

Walker. Southwest corner Walker and Martin 

Albin. ! North side Albin, near D. Weathers' 

Highland. \ Northeast corner Highland and Rumford 

Churcli. North side Church,- opposite Lyndon 

! Northeast corner Church and Rumford 

Franklin, i Northwest corner Franklin and Jackson 

j Noitlieast corner Franklin and Lyndon 

" I Southwest corner Franklin and Rumford 

Soutli side Franklin, opposite W. J. Ahern's 

Nortlieast corner Franklin and Auburn 

Beacon. North side Beacon, opposite Merrimack School 

Northwest corner Beacon and Jackson 

] South side Beacon, opposite Charles 

Rowell. Northeast corner Rowell and White 

Blanchard. Northwest corner Blanchard and Essex 

Ferry. North side Ferry, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side Ferry, near N. E. Granite Works 

" North side Ferry, east of C. & M. R. R 

" Northwest corner Ferry and Huntoon avenue 

Washington. North side Washiniiton, opposite Rollins court 

" ■ Southwest corner Washington and Union 

" i Northeast corner Washington and Lyndon 

" ! NortliAvi'st corner Washington and Rumford 

" ; Northwest corner Washington and North Essex. ... 

" ' North side Washington, opposite Perry avenue 

Chapel. I Soiilh side Chapel, near Methodist church 

Valley. Northi-ast corner Valley and Forest 

Auburn. i Northeast corner Auburn and Forest 

Centre. ' Northeast corner Centre and North State 

Southwest corner Centre and (rrecMi 

Northwest coi'iier Centre and Union 

Northwest eoriKU' Centre and North Spring 

Northwest corner Centre and Run i ford 

South side Centi'e, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner Center and Summit avenue 

Northeast corner Centre and Ridge road 

Bridge. South side Bridge, near easterly barn 

North sid(^ Bridge, ojiposite Concord Coal Co.'s 

" I North siile Bridge, oiiposite Concord Shoe Factory. . 

Capitol. Northeast coriitr (Jaiiitol and North Stale 

School. Northwest corner School and (Jreen 

Northwest cornel- School and Nortli Spring 

Noitli west corner School and Rumford 

North westcoriier S<'hool and Merrimack 

North side School, opposite Holt 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 

FIRE-HYDRANTS— Co«/mHe(7. 



311 




School 
Warren 



Depot. 

Orchard. 
Pleasant. 



Mill Road. 
St. P. School. 
OldHopkint'n 

road . 

Marshall. 

Freight. 

Hill's A venue. 

Fayette. 

Thompson. 

Chandler. 

Concord. 

Monroe. 
Thorndike. 



Laurel. 
Perley. 



DowniDg-. 
Clinton. 

West. 



North side School, opposite E. B. Woodworth's... 

Southeast corner Warren and Fremont 

Northwest corner Warren and Nortli Spring 

Northwest corner Warren and Kumford 

Southwest corner Warren and Meirimack 

Northwest corner Warren and Tahanto 

Northeast corner Warren and Liberty 

Northeast corner Warren and Giles 

Junction of Warren and Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side Depot, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner Depot and Railroad Square 

South side Orchard, opposite Sherburne's 

Northwest corner Pleasant and Railroad Square. 

Southeast corner Pleasant and South 

Northeast corner Pleasant and Fremont 

j Southwest corner Pleasant and Spring 

; South side Pleasant, oiipositt* Humford 

Soutli side Pleasant, opposite Merrimack 

I South side Pleasant, opposite Pine 

j South side Pleasant, opposite Liberty 

I Nortli side Pleasant, near city stable 

! South side Pleasant, near Gale 

South side Pleasant, opposite INIrs. Aiken's 

South side Pleasant, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage... 

North side Pleasant, near James Lane's «. ... 

North side Pleasant, near J. McC. Hammond's... 

South side Pleasant, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner Pleasant and School Avenue... 

North side Pleasant, oi>posite infirmary 

South side Pleasant, in held near gasometer 

.Siiutli side Pleasant, near new Upper School 

East side ;Mill Knad, near laboratory 

North side Mill Koad, at Orphans' Home 



Junction old and new Hopkinton roads 

North side Marsliall, opposite Fuller. 

North side Freight, at southwest cor. pas.senger sta'n 
Southwest corner Hill's Avenue and Raih-oad Square, 

Northeast corner Hill's Avenue and South Main 

Northwest corner Fayette and Elm 

North side Thompson, opposite .Iclferson 

Sotith side Chandler, opixisite Railroad 

Southwest corner Concord and S(juth State 

Northwest corner Concord and Jefferson 

North side Monroe, opposite Grove 

Northeast corner Thorndike and Grove 

North side Thorndike, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner Thorndike and South Spring 

Northwest corner J^aurel anrl Pierce 

Southwest corner Perley and South State 

Northwest corner Perley and Grove 

Northeast corner Perley and Pierce 

Soitth side Perley, near old brook 

South side Downing, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner Downing and Mills 

Southwest corner Downing and Redwood Aventte 

North side Clinton, opposite Harvard 

North side Clinton, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner Clinton and Fruit 

North side Clinton, near Snell's 

North side Clinton, at State Fair grotmds '.. 

North side West, near South Main 



312 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS— (7o«^m«e(i. 




West. 



Avon. 

Harrison. 

Humphrey. 

Allison. 

Pillsbury. 



Carter. 

Holly. 

Rockingliam. 

Prosiiect. 
Curtice Ave. 
North State. 



Palm. 



North State. 



North side West, near Badger 

North side West, opposite Dakin 

North side West, intersection Broadway 

Northwest corner Avon and South 

Northwest corner Harrison and ^lorton 

North side Humplirey, nrar Kiinhall 

Northwest corner Allison and Mills 

North side Pillsbury, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner Pillsbury and Broadway 

Northwest corner Pillsbury and Kimball 

Northeast corner Carter and Eastman 

North side Holly, opix^ite W. D. Thompson's house.. 

Northeast corner R()ekinj;iiam and Broadway 

Northwest corner Prospect and Granite Avenue 

North side Curtice Avenue, near John C. Kenney's 

West side North State, at Water-Works storehouse.. . 

Northeast corner North State and Foster 

Nortlieast corner North State and Curtice Avenue 

East side North State, near W. H. Perry's 

East side North State, near north entrance Blossom 

Hill Cemetery 

West side North State, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side Noitli State, near A. L. Colburn's 

East side .\nith State, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side North State, at south line of prison wall.. . 

West side North State, at north line of prison wall 

East side North State, near Asa L. Gay's 

Northeast corner North State and Palm 

West side North State, near Concord Woodw'king Co. 

East side Xortli State, near (J. H. Farnum's 

East side North State, near Cyrus R. Farnum's 

Eastside North State, near M.H. Farnum's 

Eastside North State, opposite Dolan 

East side North State, opposite John H. Flood's 

West side North State, opposi le S. Abbott's 

North side of Palm, west of Fairbanks 

WEST CONCORD. 

Southeast corner North State and K 

Northeast corner North State and Peal 
East side North State, at (U 
East side Nortli State, 
East side NorMi States < 
West side North State, 



Electric. 



.dy 

Partridg-ci's 

lear eiiLrine lionse 

ipiMisite I). Hold en's 

near west mill 

Eastside Nortli State, opposite Sinu^on Partridge's... 

Eastside Nortli State, near ]Mr. Ilarrini^ton's 

East side North State, (i))p(isiie A. Ibillis'.. 

Eastside North State, iiearSewall's Falls Road 



Clarke. 
Lake. 

Kni«-ht. 
Hutchins. 



Nortlieast corner of Electric and North State. 

North side Electric, near power station 

Northeast corner Clarke and Fisher 

East side Lake, near S. W. Keliom's 

Eastside Lake, lear Mrs. G. E. Holden's 

South sid(! Kiii:4'lit, opposite railro.ad station. .. 

North side, Hutchins, near H. T. Putney's 

North side Hutchins, near C. & C. Railroad 

Penacook Rd. West side Pcnacook Road, near Warner Road. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS— Con c?M(?erf. 



313 



Streets. 


Locations. 




o 
H 


Main. 












,1 






.1 






1. 






" 


Wasliing-tdii S(ni;irc, iiiMxisitc Washington 




West Main. 
High. 


North side M.nu. (ipt'ositc Enst Canal 

North side Main, niMir imn bridge . 

West side West Main, ojipusite cemetery 


9 

1 


Northwest corner High and Maple 


3 


Wasliiugton. 






South side Washington, opposite John Whitaker's.... 




Charles.' 
West Canal 


South side Wasliington, near Contoocook bridge 

Southwest corner Charles and Warren 

North side Charles, near George W. Corey's 

vSoutheast corner West Canal and Warren 


4 

2 
1 


East Canal. 

Crescent. 
Merrimack. 


North side East Canal, near Contoocook Mfg. Co 

North side East Canal, near Crescent 

North side Crescent, east of Canal 

Soutli side Merrimack, opposite Merrimack Avenue.. 
Nortli side Merrimack, opposite D. W. Fox's 


2 
1 


>• 








Soutli siile Meriiuiack, oppositi' Symonds' factory 






Northwest corner i\Ierrimack and Penacook 

North side Summer, opposite High 




7 


Spriner. 


Northeast corner Summer and Centre 

Northeast corner Spring and Church 

North side Winter, near Pleasant 


1 

14 

7 
fi 
10 

1 
9 
1 
1 

1 
1 
4 


2 

1 
1 




Northwest corner Cen-tre and Spring 


1 






1 


Rolfe. 


North side Rolfe, near James Corbett's 




Penacook. 


Nortliwest corner Rolfe and Penacook 

West side Penacook, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 

Whole number public hydrants 


2 

1 




PRIVATE HYDRANTS. ■ 

Concord Slioe Factory 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard 

Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops 






Abbot-Downing Co.'s yard 

Page Belting Co.'s yard 

W. P. Ford & Co.'s yard 

N. H. State Hospital yard 

Concord Gas Light Co.'s yard 






Water- works pumping station grounds 






Wm. B. Durgin Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 


03 




Whole number private hydrants 


G3 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1906. 
To the City Council: 

In compliance with the ordinance creating this depart- 
ment, the following report of the expenses and operations 
of the Engineering Department for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1906, is respectfully submitted : 

Paid for engineer and assistants, 
supplies, 

car fares and livery, 
postage, 
repairs, 
express. 



$2,530.50 


91.16 


97.50 


2.75 


6.80 


2.05 


$2,730.76 


$3,000.00 


2,730.76 



Appropriation, 
Expended, 

Unexpended balance, $269.24 

Seweks. 

The conditions existing in several sections of the city 
call for attention from the city council, and an appro- 
priation for beginning the work of enlarging the mains 
is sadly needed. It is hoped that some action will be 
taken the coming season, to enal)le this much-needed work 
to be properly started. 

The many comphiints from owners of flooded premises 
makes the necessity of radical changes more apparent each 
year. 



CITY engineer's REPORT. 315 

The surface drain in North State Street is completed, 
and if catch-basins of sufficient capacity are constructed 
and connected with this drain, all troubles from surface 
water will be overcome. 

One sewer granted by the board of mayor and aldermen 
was not laid, owing to a lack of funds. 

The amounts spent on new worlv and repairs, the location 
of the Avork and the cost of flushing the sewers will be 
found on the accompanying pages. 

Streets. 

Dakin Street Avas extended from Allison Street to Pills- 
bury Street. 

The surfacing of a portion of North State Street with 
coal-tar concrete, called for an expenditure of sewer funds 
to the amount of $83.63. 

This amount was expended for raising and adjusting 
man-holes and lamp-holes to tlie new surface. * 

There was laid on this street, in the roadway, 9,318 
square yards of coal-tar concrete. 

Lines and grades for street and sidewalk work have been 
given when requested by other departments and by private 
parties. 

Water- Works. 

A survey of Penacoolc Lake and the property fronting 
on the lake has been made, and a plan showing the same 
will be made during the winter, for the board of water 
commissioners. 

Building Permits. 

The petitions for new buildings and for alterations to 
old ones, in the building and fire precinct, become more 
numerous each year. In company with the chief engineer 
of the fire department, I have attended forty-three hear- 
ings. We have granted forty-one petitions and denied 

tAVO. 



316 city of concord. 

Miscellaneous. 

The work of the hydrant commissioners is shown in 
their report to the city council. 

The location of poles, attendance upon various hearings, 
committee meetings, examinations of plumbers, surveys 
and plans in connection with the High School and the ]\Ian- 
ual Training School, the West Concord School, the old city 
shed lot and the cemeteries, together with the numerous 
demands for information from other departments and 
private citizens, have fully occupied our time and recpiired 
many days' work outside of regular hours. 

The employes during the past season have been : Fred 
W. Lang, principal assistant; Carl D. Kennedy and Clar- 
ence A. Little, rodmen, who have rendered efficient services 
in their respective positions. 

To his honor the mayor and the members of the city 
council, I wish to express my appreciation for their sup- 
port and co-operation, and to the heads of other depart- 
ments, for many courtesies extended to this department. 

City Precinct, New Sewers, 
carter street, extension of sewer. 



148 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe laid. 




Paid for labor, 


$71.32 


pipe. 


48.04 


cement. 


2.25 


trucking. 


4.75 


tools, 


5.68 



$132.04 



Average cost per foot, $0,892 plus. 
Material excavated, sand. 



CITY engineer's REPORT. 31' 

MCKINLEY STREET, EXTENSION OF SEWER. 



202 feet of 15-inch Akron 


pipe 


laid. 




Paid for labor, 






$1,084.80 


pipe, 






37.08 


cement, 






13.50 


trucking, 






8.60 


hardware, 






.20 


oil. 






2.10 


tools. 






51.06 




$1,197.34 


Pipe on hand, 






109.08 



$1,306.42 
Average cost per foot, $6,467 plus. 
Material excavated, loam, wet sand and clay. 



NORTH STATE STREET DRAIN. 



729 feet of 24-inch Akron 


pipe 


laid. 




200 feet of 18-inch Akron 


pipe 


laid. 




Paid for labor. 








$795.58 


pipe, 








26.48 


brick. 








34.00 


cement, 








44.40 


castings, 








37.93 


wrought iron. 








1.18 


sand, 








1.25 


blacksmith. 








5.30 


oil. 








3.75 


trucking, 








12.50 


tools. 








43.00 




$1,005.37 


Pipe on hand, paid for in 


1905, 


• 


995.13 



$2,000.50 
Average cost per foot, $2,153 plus. 
Material excavated, gravel, sand and hardpan. 



318 CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPAIRS. 



North State Street, 


$2.89 


Frankliu Street, 


6.15 


Abbott Street, 


6.00 


Summit Street, 


.61 


Jackson Street, 


1.50 


Ferry Street, 


3.60 


Downing Street, 


.50 


Stiekney Field, 


108.66 


Academy Street, 


8.40 


Giles Street Extension, 


1.00 


Bowery Avenue, 


3.05 


South State Street, 


.50 


Rumford Street, 


9.50 


"Warren Street, 


7.33 


North State Street, account of concreting, 


83.63 


Holly Street, 


1.50 




$244.82 


Expense of spring and fall flushings, 


$299.29 


Paid for new work. 


2,334.75 


I*aid for repairs. 


244.82 


Paid for repairs on hoister, 


.76 


Moving to new shed. 


6.00 




$2,885.62 


Precinct funds available, 1906, 


$2,886.81 


Expended, 1906, 


2,885.62 



Balance on hand, $1.19 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1906. 

10-inch pipe, 148 feet. 

15-inch pipe, • 202 feet. 

18-inch pipe, 200 feet. 

24-inch pipe, 729 feet. 

Total, 1,279 feet. 



CITY engineer's REPORT. 319 

SEWERS BUILT IN CITY PRECINCT TO DECEMBER 31, 1906. 

6-ineli pipe, 
8-incli pipe, 
10-inch pipe, 
12-inch pipe, 
15-inch pipe, 
18-inch pipe, 
20-inch pipe, 
24-inch pipe, 
30-inch pipe. 
Brick, 12-inch x 14-inch, 

16-inch X 24-inch, 

14-inch X 22-inch, 

20-inch x 32-inch, 

24-inch x 36-inch, 

28-inch x 48-inch, 

24-inch circular, 

30-inch circular, 

38-inch circular, 

24-inch cast-iron pipe, 

30-inch cast-iron pipe, 

176,079 feet. 
Total miles in city precinct to elate, 33.348 plus. 
West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

No additional sewers were laid in this precinct, and no 
extensions were made. Spring and fall flushing was done 
as usual. 

The expense attending this work is as follows : 

Spring and fall flushing, $17.66 

Repairs, 43.55 



1,084 


feet. 


25,003 


feet. 


49,237 


feet. 


39,222 


feet. 


11,310 


feet. 


6,404 


feet. 


4,549 


feet. 


3,370 


feet. 


969 


feet. 


2,758 


feet. 


1,848 


feet. 


350 


feet. 


2,527 


feet. 


17,937 


feet. 


883 


feet. 


1,515.5 


feet. 


402 


feet. 


4,080 


feet. 


1,576 


feet. 


1,054.5 


feet. 



Total expenditure, $61.21 

I 

Unexpended balance January 1, 1906, $71.56 

Expended 1906, 61.21 



Balance January 1, 1907, $10.35 



320 city of concord. 

East Concord Sewer Precinct. 

No work was done in this precinct during the past 
season. 

The funds available January 1. 1907, are $132.40. 

St. Paul's School Sewerage Precinct. 

The annual charge for water service in the flush tanks 
cover the expense of this precinct. 

Paid water department. $45.00 

Funds available January 1. 1906, $70.64 

Expended 1906, 45.00 



Balance January 1, 1907. $25.64 

There has been deposited with the city treasurer, to the 
credit of the city sewer precinct, the following sums: 

Rent of pumps, $7.34 

Rent of hoister, 255.00 



$262.34 

Sidewalk Grades Established. ' 

Northerly side of School Street, from High Street 300 
feet westerly. 

Easterly side of Auburn Street, from High Street north- 
erly to Saint John Street (so called). 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1906. 
To the City Council: 

The seventh annual report of the Board of Examiners 
of Plumbers is herewith submitted for your consideration. 

The membership of the board is made up as follows : 
Henry P. Cilley, a practical plumber, Russell Wilkins, M. 
D., and Will B. Howe, city engineer. 

The board organized with Henry P. Cilley, chairman, 
and Will B. Howe, clerk. 

Twelve regular meetings and five special meetings were 
held during the year. We have examined two candidates 
for master plumbers' licenses, and issued a license to 
them. We have examined three for journeyman's licenses, 
and issued licenses to two of them, the third failing to 
meet the requirements of the board ; making a total of five 
applicants examined. The receipts of the board were $24, 
for which amount the clerk holds receipts of the city 
treasurer. 

The expenses of the board for materials purchased for 
the practical w^ork were $7.62. 

The following is a list of all the registered plumbers, 
whose licenses or certificates were renewed in 1906, in the 
order in which they appear on the register. 

IMaster Plumbers. 

W. Arthur Bean, certificate renewed. * 

Seth R. Hood, certificate renewed. 
Willis H. Robbins, certificate renewed. 



322 CITY OP CONCORD. 

William A. Lee, certificate renewed. 

Benjamin H. Orr, certificate renewed. 

Richard J. Lee, certificate renewed. 

George A. Harwood, certificate renewed. 

Michael J. Lee, certificate renewed. 

Albert S. Trask, certificate renewed. 

Frederick Booth, certificate renewed. 

G. Arthur Nichols, license renewed. 

Charles W. Bateman, license renewed. 

Burton A. Curtis, license renewed. 

W. M. Trottier, license renewed. 

Albert L. Worthen, license renewed. 

John C. Smith, license renewed. 

P. "Wallace Orr, license renewed. 

Elmer E. Babb, license issued March 2. 1906. 

Timothy Kenna, license renewed. 

Joseph A. Ralph, license issued ^lay 22, 1906. 

Employing Plumbers. 

George S, Milton, certificate renew^ed. 
M. E. Clifford & Co., certificate renewed. 

Journeyman Plumbers. 

Charles H. Berry, certificate renewed. 
Henry P. Cilley, certificate renewed. 
Philip King, certificate renewed. 
William L. Reagan, certificate renewed. 
William H. McGuire, certificate renewed. 
Harry H. Kennedy, certificate renewed. 
P. Harrison D. Leary, certificate renewed. 
Patrick A. Clifford, certificate renewed. 
George N. Berry, certificate renewed. 
Frederick F. Converse, license renewed. 
Arthur W. Buntin, license renewed. 
Michael J. Finn, license renewed. 
Thomas Mathews, license renewed. 



EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 323 

Thomas F. Foley, license renewed. 

Harris S. Parmenter, license renewed. 

Frank D. Brown, license renewed. 

Timothy W. Quinn, license renewed. 

Jonas Denby, license issued August 15, 1906. 

Manley W. INIorgan, license issued October 9, 1906. 

Master plumbers' certificates issued, 10 

jMaster plumbers' licenses issued, 10 

Employing plumbers' certificates issued, 2 

Journeyman plumbers' certificates issued, 9 

Journeyman plumbers' licenses issued, 10 

Total number on register to date, 41 

Respectfully submitted, 
H. P. CILLEY, 
RUSSELL WILKINS, M. D.. 
WILL B. HOWE, 
Board of Examiners of Plumhers. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMIS- 
SIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1906. 
To the City Council: 

An ordinance creating a Board of Hydrant Commis- 
sioners was passed on December 11, 1905, and on January 
1, 1906, the first meeting was held. 

At this meeting it was unanimously voted to recommend 
setting hydrants in locations specified herein, and a letter 
embodying these locations was sent to the Hon. Solon A. 
Carter, President of the Water Board. 

1. Chapel Street, near North State Street. 

2. Concord Street, near South State Street. 

3. North Spring Street, opposite jNlaple Street. 

4. Downing Street, opposite Grove Street. 

5. Downing Street, west of and near Redwood Avenue. 

6. Concord Street, 100 feet east of South Street. 

7. Rumford Street, near Walker Street. 

8. Bradley Street, at Franklin Street. 

9. Jackson Street, just north of Church Street. 

10. Holt Street, midway between AVarren and School 
Streets. 

11. Clinton Street, 100 feet east of Harvard Street. 

12. Humphrey Street, 50 feet east of South Street. 

13. South Street, l)etween Pillsbury and Carter Streets. 

14. Stone Street, 300 feet east from Bow Street. 

15. Rockingham Street, west of and near Donovan 
Street, for a blow-off. 

16. Pillsbury Street, 50 feet west of Kimball Street. 

17. Ferry Street, 3 hydrants, when liigh service mains 
should be extended into Ferry Street. During the summer 
this pipe was laid and the hydrants were located and set. 



HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 325 

The hydrants above mentioned were installed, excepting, 
the one on North Spring Street opposite Maple Street, 
which will be set during the coming season, when the 
Spring Street main will be relaid with larger pipe ; Con- 
cord Street, 100 feet east of South Street; South Street, 
between Pillsbury and Carter Streets, which location was 
abandoned later in the season; Stone Street, 300 feet east 
of Bow Street ; Rockingham Street, west of and near 
Donovan Street. 

On May 5, 1906, a meeting was held to consider the 
request of Wm. Parkinson for fire protection on the Fisher- 
ville road near the West Concord Cemetery. No recom- 
mendations were made at that time, but the location of 
branches was to be looked up and investigations made 
as to the methods that could be devised and expense in- 
curred, to furnish Penacook with suitable protection, during 
the time required for any proposed installation of hydrants 
on that line. Some investigations along this line have been 
made, and during the coming season the board will com- 
municate with the Water Commissioners on this subject. 

The location of the hydrant which was set on the easterly 
side of North State Street, in the rear of the state house, 
was changed to a point nearer Park Street. 

A new hydrant was set in Washington Street near 
Rollins Street. 

The hydrant at the junction of North State and Warren 
Streets was changed from the north-westerly to the south- 
easterly corner. 

A new hydrant was set in Penacook Street near the sheds 
of the Concord Lumber Co. 

A new hydrant was set on Fruit Street near the Blan- 
chard place ; one on Franklin Street at Lyndon" Street 
and one at Rumford and Albin Streets, instead of one at 
Walker and Rumford. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. B. HOWE, 
W. C. GREEN, 
Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the City Council of the City of Concord: 

The trustees of the Public Library submit herewith the 
report of the librarian for the past year. In eonneetion 
with her former reports it shows clearly the work that 
is being done in this department, which for obvious reasons 
does not materially differ from what has been accomplished 
for several years. But notwithstanding the restricted quar- 
ters of the library and its inadequate facilities for the work 
it is intended to do, it is a remarkable as well as gratifjang 
fact that each year finds it extending its influence of use- 
fulness in the community. It is more than "holding its 
own. "It is not standing still, though seriously hampered. 
It is not merely "beating time." 

Little more than a generation ago, a i)ublic library was 
deemed to be principally useful as a place for the storage 
of books, which upon rare occasions might be consulted. 
A few^ hundred volumes of standard works, inconveniently 
catalogued, in the care of a custodian called a librarian, 
whose duties were not unlike those of a watchman, seemed 
to fulfil the mission of a public library. Comparatively 
few people ventured within its walls, while many were 
ignorant of its existence. It was not an intellectual force 
of much vigor and ^vas principally useful to the scholar 
and the confirmed bookworm. To the great majority, it 
was of little, if any, importance. Subsequently, it received 
the additional credit of affording amusement and some 
instruction to children and novel-readers, and its use was 
thereby enlarged. It acquired a larger class of patrons 



I 



PUBLIC LIBRARY, 327 

than before. But its true mission, as well as the essential 
function of the librarian, has not been adequately appre- 
ciated by the public, and probably it will not be until 
people in all fields of activity resort to it, not for recrea- 
tion merely, but for information in matters relating to 
their various vocations. The scope of its true usefulness will 
then be immensely enlarged. It requires no argument to show 
that all engaged in industrial pursuits may learn much of 
practical utility to them individually, by regarding the 
books in the library as most useful tools to be used under 
the direction of the librarian, whose most important func- 
tion it is to guide and direct readers to the books they 
specially need. The old idea that the reader must tell the 
librarian what book he wants has been largely modified by 
the more rational idea that the librarian must be qualified 
to tell the reader what book he needs. Co-operation in 
this respect is essential to the best results. 

The fact that the library and the lil^rarian and her 
assistants furnish the means for the acquisition of useful 
information upon most subjects affecting the daily life of 
the people, ought to draw to the library hundreds of our 
citizens, who are not now its patrons. It is believed that 
this delinquency is due principally to an erroneous and 
antiquated view of the purpose of a library, or to a lack 
of information as to the method of using it. Let it be 
generally known that the library is for practical uses by 
practical people, as well as for recreation and amusement 
or theoretical information by school children and students, 
and its true importance will ])e more fully appreciated, and 
a niggardly policy of raising money for its support will 
become less popular. The demands of the library will 
receive more adequate recognition, when the inhabitants of 
the city become better acquainted with the work which 
it is attempting to do, and which, with proper facilities, 
it can successfully accomplish. It is, therefore, the desire 
of the trustees, as well as of the librarian, that that large 
class of our citizens who do not now use the library should 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

become acquainted with the advantages it affords for prac- 
tical information upon almost every subject, believing that 
they Avould soon become its most ardent patrons. It Avould 
then be recognized as a most useful aid, not merely to a 
small minority, but to the great majority, and be in fact, as 
well as in name, a public library. 

REUBEN E. WALKER, 
President, Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN FOR 1906. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen : 1906, at our library, has been much, too 
much, like its predecessors in opportunities and results. 
."^Marking time," which ]\Iayor Corning two years ago said 
in his inaugural was all this library could do in its present 
quarters, is not enjoyable in the doing or thrilling in the 
relation. In previous reports, I have detailed the library's 
work and aims, and urged its needs. I will, therefore, now 
occupy less time than usual at this annual meeting, in 
order to leave more time for your inspection and dis- 
cussion. 

The circulation of books has increased in the past twelve 
months; 90,939 volumes were given out at the desk. That 
is a proud record for a city of not quite 20,000 inhabitants. 
It is only the third time the library has touched this high- 
water mark in a dozen years. This increase in the number 
of books given out for home reading comes*, we think, from 
our work at deposit and delivery stations, particularly that 
done at Penacook, of which further mention will be made 
later on. 

It may be of interest to you to compare the force earing 
for this library's business with the staff of another library. 
Here, there are, besides the librarian, three regular assist- 
ants ; also two boys and one girl, each of whom works 
several hours a week. In a middle state library, where 
the circulation was 106,000, the staff consists of a librarian, 
assistant librarian, seven assistants on full time, three 
assistants on half-time, tw^o substitutes and one story-teller. 

It ma\' be well to make another illuminating comparison, 
bearing in mind the figures of our circulation, 90.939, and 



330 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the sum at our disposal, $5,427. The public library in a 
New York city did a desk business of 92,369 volumes. It 
sent in an itemized estimate for the next year's work, which 
called for $9,900. 

Our approi)riation would not have been sufficient the 
past year had it not been that the trustees secured the 
favor from the city government of an extra $400, to cover 
the cost of the new and larger boiler rendered necessary 
by the burning out of the old one in our furnace. 

Though we handled during the year so many thousand 
volumes, and though they went by every method of trans- 
portation to every conceivable kind of a home, out of 
91.000 volumes circulated only five were lost. xVnother 
librar3''s report says they are indebted to the local police 
for assistance in securing the return of books overdue. 
Here the librarian hunts them up herself, knowing she will 
upturn the very last stone to find one. It is a comfort, 
however, to feel that back of her lies the police force, 
whose help she can invoke when necessary. Indebtedness 
is felt toward the teamsters and janitors, who kindl.y bring 
in books left by children on their sleds or in the buildings 
under their care. It is entertaining to note that in 1869, 
when this library loaned out only 20.000 volumes, 58 were 
lost, and in the report of that year the loss is considered 
"very small, considering the circulation." 

The Concord public has read during 1906, for recreation 
and for instruction, in about the same proportion as for- 
merly. Fiction leads by a hopeless majority, and always 
will ; and our 70 or more per cent, annually charged to 
stories is not caused altogether by that serious study of 
fiction advocated by Professor Phelps of Yale. We try, how- 
ever, to purchase fiction worth reading for one reason or 
another, /. c, for plot, style or timeliness, as we agree 
with the Somerville librarian, who says, "The most con- 
firmed novel readers will read good novels when they can 
not get bad ones ; and here is the opportunity of the public 
library." We l)uy fiction to a degree which would be 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 331 

thought reprehensible by some library boards; to such let 
]\lrs. jMargaret Deland give the paper she gave here on 
^'The Value of the Novel." 

Turning from the subject of the quantity and quality 
of our circulation to that of acquisitions, the}" are to be 
stated as follows : 

Volumes added, 1,100 

New works, 678 

From bindery, chiefly magazines, ' 132 

Duplicates. 66 

Replacements of discarded volumes, 224 

Worn out, 302 

(]\Iany of these volumes are given to the 
asylum and tlie jail.) 

Net gain to our shelves, 798 
Total number of volumes now in library. 28.628 

Anyone inspecting the accession book, in which are listed 
all our purchases, should bear two things in mind. Fir>st, 
books are 20 per cent, higher than formerly ; hence we must 
buy fewer. Secondly, the State Library and the New 
Hampshire Historical Society in town buy along certain 
lines, with which we conflict least if we confine ourselves 
to acquiring the more popular and generally educational 
works that wdll extend the use of the library to greater 
numl^ers of people and particularly to the younger per- 
sons. 

We have received gifts from Grovernment, from state 
and city organizations, from committees of publication, from 
manufacturing houses and from jMrs. Armenia S. White, 
Mrs. Frank H. Blanehard, Mrs. Edwin W. Plummer, Joseph 

B. Walker. Henry JMcFarland, William M. Chase, Samuel 

C. Eastman, Frank W. Rollins, Dr. A. F. Sumner, Eastman 
& I\Ierrill. all of Concord; Miss Mary Eaton, Albert E. 
Pillsbury, Roy M. Grover. Boston ; Rossiter Johnson, New 
York ; Nathan Goold, Portland ; ]\Irs. Alice Peloubet Norton, 



332 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Chicago. We wish to acknowledge the kindness of those 
local societies, hospitals, churches, etc., which place their 
periodicals on our reading talile or bring us their year- 
books to put on file. 

Fewer new borrowers were registered in 1906 than in 
1905, l)ut that does not mean that we had fewer new custom- 
ers. We made out application blanks for 675 persons, but we 
also charged by name and street address scores of books 
to newcomers, who wanted only one special work and 
would have heartily agreed with us that the registration 
process was, in their case, unnecessary red tape. 

We must expect, however, that as we send more and 
more books to school-rooms, fewer boys and girls will have 
sufficient leisure or book-hunger to come to the library for 
enrollment among its borrowers. 

As usual, the lectures in the free Walker courses have 
stimulated reading on certain subjects. A run on our Shake- 
sperian material was caused by Professor Griggs' course 
on the immortal plays. Every year these Walker lectures 
are ''roads to books." Art and science departments, cur- 
rent events clubs, etc., annually give us winter work. The 
supplementary reading required of pupils gives us another 
valued clientele. ]\Ir. L. J. Rundlett, school superintendent, 
is desirous of making this public library increasingly use- 
ful, and through him there might be arranged a systematic 
way of sending reading to school-rooms or of giving talks 
to pupils on books and the use of the library. At present 
we are not so much aggressive as responsive in this line 
of our work. Indeed, we feel there is truth in the statement 
that school deposits encourage the reading habit, but are 
injurious in that they make it easy for the pupils to avoid 
going to a library. 

Our summer l)ranch has now passed in successive years 
from Wcvst Concord, to East Concord, to Foster ville, to 
Penacook. After tending each of these four stations, the 
librarian realizes tlu^ truth of the saving that no two chil- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 333 

dren are alike; for each branch has had distinct charac- 
teristics. 

Each summer arrangement has resolved itself into a 
permanent delivery station. 

At East Concord, ]\Irs. Grace Farnum still cares at her 
house for the boxes of books we send over from time to 
time. She never fails to enclose an acknowledgment when 
returning a box. such as : " We shall be very glad of 
another lot. One young lady remarked, 'I don't know 
what I shall do without those books for even a few days.' 
I think we all feel that wa3^" 

The West Concord delivery station is still in the good 
care of Mrs. Sara Quimby. 

The summer liraneh, Avhicli is always my immediate 
charge, was located this year in Penacook, from June to 
December. Half a plumber's store was rented, and about 
500 volumes taken up, together with our summer room 
paraphernalia, consisting of chairs, tables, pictures, etc. 
We were in attendance to give out books on Tuesday and 
Friday afternoons, but borrowers could return books at any 
time. 

Penacook people were cordial and appreciative after they 
learned that the sole object of the six-months' scheme was 
their own enjoyment. Between 60 and 80 books were 
charged out each afternoon. The branch prevented some 
juvenile street loafing, and afforded opportunity to ladies 
to secure, in good season, material for coming papers at 
their clubs. When it was time for this summer branch 
to be discontinued, an arrangement was made so that now 
twice a weelc books are sent to Penacook, those books going 
up which have been selected from call-numbers on bor- 
rowers' cards that have come down to us the preceding 
week from this ward. At present ]Mr. George H. Whitman 
has, at his store, the care of handling the books and of 
repacking the boxes, which then are transported by Cun- 
ningham's express. If found desirable, an increasing re- 
serve supply of library books Avill be kept at Mr. Whitman 's. 



334 CITY OF CONCORD. 

to be charged out l)y him to any resident who has not 
had a book come up in our box. 

In our humble way. we have taken to heart and are 
trying to put into practice what a Missouri librarian said: 
"Branches are necessary to realize the possibilities of a 
public li])rary system. It should be, not the St. Louis 
Public Libary, but the St. Louis Public Lihraries, just as 
it is the St. Louis Public Schools." 

All cities find that at delivery stations the main feature 
is circulation of general reading matter, especially for 
women and children ; men fail to get the pleasure or profit 
they might easily derive hy merely sending in requests 
for books by a favorite author, or for works which would 
help them in their vocations. 

This regrettable state of things is true at a main library, 
to a lesser degree. Every year I read thoughtfully about 
75 reports from other libraries, and it is curious to note 
how the same problem seems to arise at the same time 
all over the country. Apparently, just now the unsolved 
problem of public lil)rary administration is how to interest 
masses of adults, to place one book in every home, to ascer- 
tain why there are lapsed cards, to draw men to the 
library. It is evident the public library has a campaign 
to wage. 

One gets some light on such problems by attendance at 
national library meetings, and I went to the 1906 Conference 
of the American Library Association, held at Narragansett 
Pier, where the 1,000 librarians convened were stinuilated 
by salt air, as well as by fresh ideas. 

The fad-and-hobby stage in library development seems 
to be over ; for instance, a large circulation is no longer 
considered the test of a library 's usefulness ; work with 
children is not dwelt upon as more vital than work for 
adults ; exhibits and other extension work have become a 
matter of course and regarded as entirely legitimate within 
limits. Also when extensive work cannot be taken up by 
a library because of hampering conditions, intensive work 



PUBIJC LIBRARY. 335 

is considered a praiseworthy alternative. In short, a mod- 
ern librarian, steadied by professional reading, comparisons 
and experience, takes her stand not upon the plea that 
her library shall be ahead of the times, but that it shall 
not be behind the times. 

It would seem as if this library had reached the point 
of urging- only unquestioned benefits. When a gentle- 
spoken and studious lady says to us, "It was dreadfully 
crowded upstairs ; I had to take the book home to read, 
as there was not a chair left in the reference room," 
it would seem as if enlarged quarters were wanted by the 
public as well as by the library staff. 

"When a book is received, as it was, bearing this inscrip- 
tion, "For the Children's Room of the Public Library of 
Concord, N. H., with the Christmas good wishes of the 
author," it would seem that a literary person takes it 
for granted that the city library in a place of Concord's 
size and reputation has modern adjuncts. 

When the former cataloguer at our State Library, now 
himself a Massachusetts librarian, writes in acknowledg- 
ment of our last annual report, "You certainly need a 
larger building. We have twice the reading room you do, 
and yet we think we are crowded and are talking of an 
addition," it would seem as if this Concord library was 
claiming only its dues. 

During the year, a carpenter has made bookcases for 
every place where he saw room to put one, and they 
are all occupied. We have culled and can still further cull 
old or duplicate books and put them in the basement, until 
the small space remaining there shall become filled. But 
when the 800 volumes we shall add in 1907 are under this 
roof, many of them will go on shelves so high above our 
reach that the customer must wait while the assistant drags 
a chair and steps up on it to secure the lofty literature. 

A minor note has inevitably crept into this report, be- 
cause I have just listened to our cultivated Mayor's third 
inaugural, in which he discountenanced any outlay at pres- 



336 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ent for libary enlargements. IMv faithful assistants also 
would rejoice in additional opportunities for the library, 
even if such entailed more work. Perhaps the major kej' 
can be regained by saying that library work, no matter 
under what limitations it is done, or with what physical 
weariness, is always interesting. 

To this Board, who cannot feel indifference for the insti- 
tution under their charge, I respectfully sulimit this report, 
with the hope that soon they and the other powers that 
be will be putting through measures for the relief of the 
congestion of this city department, and that the proposi- 
tion, as taken up, will not read. "What is the least thing 
we can do for the public library?" 

Thanking all my Trustees for their constant considera- 
tion and courtesy, and many of them for help readily 
given the past year in regard to improvements at the 
library or to needs at the branches, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Librarian. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF SANITARY OFFICER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, the City Government and the 
Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : The Sanitary Officer herewith submits the 
annual report of the Health Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1906. 

The city maintained its usual good sanitary condition 
throughout the year. Inspections were made of all prem- 
ises complained of. and the stables and alleyways in the 
business portion of the city. 

]\IORTALITY. 

The total number of deaths from all cSuses during the 
year was 42-1, 22 more than in 1905. Based upon an 
estimated population of 20,000, this gives a death rate of 
15, compared with 12.7 in 1905. Heart disease in various 
forms caused the greatest number of deaths, 44 being the 
recorded number. Dementia occupied second place, with 
40 deaths; nearly all these deaths were at the New Hamp- 
shire State Hospital. Tuberculosis and pneumonia fol- 
lowed, with 25 deaths each. The vital statistics for the 
year are tabulated and made a part of this report. 

Transfer permits to the number of 143 were granted 
for the removal of dead bodies to other towns and cities 
for interment ; 95 bodies were brought to this city from 
other places, to be interred. 

Contagious Diseases. 

During the year there were 175 cases of contagious dis- 
eases reported to this department, with six deaths, compared 
with 299 eases with five deaths, in 1905. 

22 



338 CITY OF CONCORD, 

There were 27 eases of searlet fever, with no deaths. 
A number of the cases were very mild, and others more 
severe. During the last three months of the year, there 
were several cases whose origin could not be determined. 
It is probable that children having a mild type of the 
disease, and not knowing its true nature, were allowed to 
attend school and other public places, thereby transmitting 
it to others. 

There were 14 .cases of diphtheria, with two deaths. Nine 
of these cases were in Ward 1, and as there were a number 
of cases in Boscawen the latter part of the year, we were 
fortunate in not having more. 

There were 32 cases of typhoid fever, with three deaths. 
This is the largest number of cases ever reported to this 
office in one year, and they were widely scattered over 
the city. Several of the cases trace their origin to sources 
outside the city. 

A slight epidemic of measles in Ward 8 made the total 
of 101 cases, with one death. 

One case of smallpox occurred in June. The patient 
was a non-resident who had been exposed to the disease 
in Canada. As soon as the disease was recognized, he 
was removed to the Detention Hospital, where he remained 
21 days, when he was pronounced entirely recovered, and 
was discharged. The expense*^ of handling this case was 
$206.60. 

Fumigation. 

Formaldehyde was used as a disinfectant through the 
year, with good results. The total cost for fumigation 
supplies was $66.83. Your attention is called to the amount 
of fumigating done, in the table. Summary. 

Plumbing. 

There were not as many plumbing permits issued as in 
former years, though nearly as many new fixtures were 
installed. A number of peppermint tests were made of 



i 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 339 

the plumbing in old buildings to ascertain if it was in 
good sanitary condition. There were 60 sewers constructed. 

Expenditures. 

The expenditures of this department for the year 1906 
were more than for the year 1905, owing to the fact that 
more aid was required by persons having contagious dis- 
eases, and a case of smallpox also added to the expenses. 
The total expense for milk inspection was $383.39, which 
was paid out of the appropriation for the Health Depart- 
ment. 

Expenditures of the Health Department of the City of 
Concord, N. H., for the year ending December 31, 1906 : 

salaries. 

Charles E. Palmer, health officer. $1,200.00 

George A. Berry, member board of health, 25.00 

Russell Wilkins, M. D., member board of health, 25.00 

Chancey Adams. INI. D.. member board of health. 25.00 

FUMIGATION SUPPLIES. 

George A. Berry & Co., formaldehyde, perman- 
ganate, etc., 63.08 
C. Pelissier & Co., satchel, 3.75 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Helen 0. Monier, clerk, services, 278.68 
Kussell Wilkins, jM. D., supplying for health 

officer, 50.00 

Russell Wilkins, M. D., professional services, 7.50 

Chancey Adams, M. D., professional services, 82.50 

Charles H. Cook, M. D.. professional services, 196.75 

Charles E. Palmer, postage, 15.75 

Rumford Printing Co., mortuary reports, 19.50 

Rumford Printing Co., contagious disease book, 7.50 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing, 28.75 

Edson C. Eastman, office supplies, 1.82 

C. F. Nichols, medical dictionary, 2.50 



340 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Ijibrary Bureau, vaccination cards, $6.63 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rental and tolls, 24.80 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 1.00 

George A. Berry & Co., antitoxin, 26.50 
Margaret PillsLury Hospital, care of Ethel 

Beer, diphtheria, 15.00 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, care of Abbie Wil- 
cox, scarlet fever, 87.86 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, care of Thomas 

Fagan, scarlet fever, 19.29 

Fred Cherette. attendance on smallpox patient, 36.00 
Charles E. Palmer, cash paid out, smallpox 

ease, 10.00 
A. P. Baker, supplies, smallpox case, 22.29 
C. H. Dudley, supplies, smallpox ease, 2.89 
George A. Berry & Co., supplies, smallpox case, 6.75 
A. H. Knowlton & Co., supplies, smallpox case, 5.42 
M. E. Prescott, labor on pump. Detention Hos- 
pital, 7.50 
E. J. Ormsbee, boarding Gilpatrick family, • 10.00 
Mrs. Mabel Rolfe, care of Mrs. Foley, diph- 
theria, 26.00 
Mrs. Mabel Rolfe, care of ]\Irs. C. G. Davis, 

diphtheria, 18.00 
Mrs. Bell Bean, care of W. J. IMcMullen, diph- 
theria, 15.70 
W. W. Allen Co., supplies furnished Foley 

family, 2.63 

E. L. Davis, burying dog, 1.00 

MILK INSPECTION. 



Russian Wilkins, ]\I. D., milk inspector, 
Edgar H. Calvert, collecting milk, 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing tags, etc., 
George A. Berry & Co., supplies, 
Eimer & Amend, supplies. 



268.40 

101.84 

7.75 

3.80 

1.60 



Total, 



$2,761.73 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



341 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during each month of the year and the 
deaths resulting therefrom : 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
lever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Small- 
pox. 


Measles. 


MONTHS. 


to 

o 

O 




to 

O 


Q 


o 


Q 


X 

O 


tn 

■a 


i 


Q 




1 
1 


1 


2 
5 
1 
5 
1 
1 




3 1 1 






5 
10 
31 
16 
25 
12 
















March . 














April 

May 


1 

1 






1 
























1 




1 


Julv 


1 






5 

8 
5 
5 
2 

3 














1 

1 






1 




September 


3 




2 
2 
6 
2 














1 




November. .. 


4 
2 


1 

2 










December 
























Totals 


14 


27 




32 


3 


1 




101 


1 



RECORD OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 



Wards 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Totals. 


Diphtheria 


9 








1 

1 
5 


1 
3 
5 


2 
5 
7 
1 
26 


1 
3 


5 

2 


14 


Scarlet fever 


1 


1 


10 


27 


Typhoid fever . . 
Smallpox 


2 


7 


32 
1 


Measles 


1 




1 12 


9 


10 


39 


3 


101 











342 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of 
contagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom, 
for the years since and including 1890: 





Diph- 


Scarlet 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 


Totals. 




theria. 


fever. 






pox. 






YEARS. 








cc 








03 








CO 










rC 






t/ 






^ 




.C 
























« 








cS 




•S 




c3 




C!i 


rr 


ea 




cS 




cS 


S 


eS 


s 


cS 


S 


cS 




a 




eS 


<u 




O 


w 


O 


Q 


.o 


Q 


O 


P 


U 


u 


O 


M 


1890 


6 


2 


9 




17 


5 


6 








38 


7 


1891 


12 
13 
48 
17 
55 
38 
13 
4 
9 
29 


3 
3 

3 

8 
8 

1 

5 
5 


7 
37 
41 
113 

4 
44 
22 

8 
99 
39 


3 

6 

8 
1 

1 


14 
7 
13 
13 
15 
21 
17 
8 
14 
18 


6 

1 

3 

5 
3 

2 
4 

1 
1 


2 
2 
300 
21 
452 
158 
138 
120 
299 
476 








35 
59 
402 
164 
526 
261 
190 
146 
421 
562 


9 


1892 








7 


1893 










1894 








1> 


1895 








13 


1896 








19 


1897. . . 








4 


1898 








4 


1899 








7 


1900 


1 








1901 


65 


4 


11 




13 


3 


40 




1 




130 


8 


1902 


29 


2 


6 




23 


3 


27 




2 




8? 


5 


1903 


42 


4 


39 




17 


3 


582 


4 


2 




682 


11 


1904 


55 
15 


3 

1 


18 
80 




12 
23 


1 
3 


31 
181 








116 
299 


4 


1905 


1 






5 


1906 


14 


2 


27 




32 


3 


101 


1 


1 




175 


6 



Nuisances, Complaints and Inspections. 

A statement of the number and character of the nuisances 
which have been abated by this department during the 
year ai)pears below : 



Catch-basins not trapped, 
Dead animals, 



8 
47 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



343 



Decayed fruit. 


1 


Decayed meat and fish. 


4 


Defect in house sewers. 


3 


Defective plumbing, 


11 


Dropping manure in street, 


2 


Dumping rul)bish, 


16 


Filthy alleyways. 


1 


Filthy cellars, 


2 


Filthy premises. 


6 


Filthy swill-barrels. 


7 


Filthy watering-troughs, 


1 


Filthy yards, 


10 


Keeping hens. 


8 


Keeping hogs, 


9 


Odor from gas in houses, 


2 


Offensive manure heaps, 


2 


Offensive odor from stables. 


5 


Offensive odor in houses, 


16 


Offensive privy vaults. 


13 


Offensive sewage. 


2 


Pediculosis, 


1 


Plumbers doing work without license, 


2 


Scabies, 


1 


Sewage backed into cellars, 


5 


Sewer-traps broken. 


1 


Sink-drains obstructed, 


2 


Sinks found without traps. 


2 


Sinks with imperfect drainage. 


3 


Spitting in halls. 


2 


Stagnant water. 


1 


Suspected contagious diseases, 


7 


Throwing ashes in street. 


1 


Throwing out slops. 


4 


Throwing swill in yards and alleyways, 


5 


Water-closets foul and offensive. 


7 


Water-closets not ventilated. 


2 


Water-closets out of repair, 


10 



344 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Water-closets without water supply, 2 

Water in cellars, 4 

Well water questionable, 2 



Total, 240 

Inspection of Plumbing. 

The number of inspections will be found in the table 
herewith annexed: 

Plumbing permits granted, 124 

Water-closets put in, 251 

Sinks put in, 106 

Bath-tubs put in, 88 

AA^ash-bowls put in, 117 

Wash-trays put in, 35 

Urinals put in, 17 

Drinking fountains put in. 3 

Ranges put in, 2 

Shower baths put in, 5 . 

Slop sinks put in, 3 

Number sewers, 60 



Total number inspections of plumbing. 275 

Summary. 

Houses placarded in cases of contagious diseases, 94 

Placards removed, 94 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 436 

Rooms fumigated, 361 

School-rooms fumigated, 6 

Wards at hospitals fumigated, 11 

Staliles fumigated, 4 

Cars fumigated, 2 

Hacks fumigated, 2 

Fire towers fumigated, 1 

Watering-troughs fumigated, 1 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 345 

Books and pieces of clothing- fumigated, 279 

Pieces of bedding and clothing burned, 28 

Burial permits issued. 424 

Burial permits issued to non-residents, 95 

Transfer permits issued, 143 

Garbage licenses issued, 46 

Number of reports of contagious diseases sent 

to state board of health. 52 

Number of mortuary i-eports sent in exchange to 

other cities, 1,044 

Number of vaccination certificates issued for 

children to attend school. 772 

Number of permits issued for children to return 

to school, 58 

Number of samples of water collected for analy- 
sis, 12 
In closing this report, I wish to acknowledge the cour- 
tesies extended this department during the year by his 
honor the mayor, the members of the city government, 
the board of health, and the various city officials. 
Respectfulh^ submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



346 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



DEATHS DURING 1906, BY SEX. CONDITION AND 
NATIVITY, BY MONTHS. 





c3 
S 
S 

1-5 


>> 

c3 

3 








a 
a 

1-5 




s 

3 


a 

a 


1 

o 
O 


S 

> 
o 


1 

3 

aj 
Q 


to 

Is 

1 


SEX. 




























Males 


15 


8 


20 


J9 


16 


12 


16 


29 


24 


23 


19 


27 


228 


Females 


21 


20 


22 


11 


20 


12 


13 


14 


18 


12 


15 


18 


196 


CONDITION. 




























Married 


11 


9 


14 


11 


10 


7 


6 


17 


14 


15 


15 


16 


145 


Single 


16 


10 


14 


14 


14 


9 


^'i 


17 


"0 


11 


14 


15 


169 


Widowed 


9 


8 

1 


13 

1 


4 

1 


12 


7 
1 


6 

2 


7 


7 


9 


4 

1 


14 


100 


Divorced 


6 


Not stated 




2 


1 




4 


NATIVITY. 




















Concord 


12 


11 


12 


14 


8 


9 


12 


18 


17 


12 


12 


13 


150 


New Hampshire 


16 


8 


12 


9 


10 


6 


8 


10 


14 


9 


9 


12 


123 


Other states 


2 


6 


6 


3 


7 


3 


3 


5 


7 


5 


6 


8 


61 


Foreign 


6 


2 


8 


3 





4 


6 


6 


4 


6 


3 


11 


68 


Not stated 




1 


4 


1 


2 


2 




4 




3 


4 


1 


22 









HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



347 



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350 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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352 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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CAUSES OF DEATH. 


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POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CITY MARSHAL. 



Concord, X. H., December 31, 1906. 

Gentlemen: I have the honor herewith to submit the 
report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1906. 

Financial Statement. 
Total receipts from fines and costs, $3,257.15 

Expenditures, 1906. 



Regular appropriation. 


$14,777.32 


Expended, 


14,627.22 


Balance unexpended, 


$150.10 


Disbursements. 




Fuel, city and Penacook, 


$273.17 


Helmets and buttons. 


59.05 


Horse hire, city and Penacook, 


69.75 


Board and shoeing of horse, 


325.00 


Ice. 


2.11 


Incidentals, 


734.27 


Lights, city and Penacook. 


144.53 


Salaries, regular marshal, deputy, 


captain, 


eleven patrolmen. 


11,959.49 


Special officers. 


402.53 


Janitor, 


300.00 



364 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



Telephone, private line. 




$ 


164.32 


Water, 






43.00 


Police commissioners. 


- 




150.00 


Total, 


$14,627.22 






1905. 


1906. 


Whole number of arrests, including Penacook, 


768 


760 


Whole number of arrests at Penacook, 


149 


124 


Males, 






727 


Females, 






•33 


Married, 






196 


Single, 






564 


Juveniles, 






11 


Residents, 






356 


Non-residents, 






404 


Nationality of 


Persons Arrested. 






United States, 326 


Scotland, 




10 


Canada, 110 


Sweden, 




11 


England, , 14 


Italy, 




18 


Germany, 4 


Russia, 




7 


Ireland, 243 


Finland, 




4 


Greece, 8 


Armenia, 




3 


Ages of Persons Arrested. 






Number between the ages 


of 10 and 20, 




45 


( i ( i (1 


20 and 30, 




187 


a ( c ( ( 


30 and 40, 




248 


i i ( i i ( 


40 and 50, 




165 


a ( c a 


50 and 60, 




80 


I i a i i 


60 and 70, 




31 


i i i i i ( 


70 and 80, 




4 


Occupations of 


Persons Arrested. 






Brick mason, 1 


Bell boys. 




4 


Barbers, 13 


Belt maker. 




1 


Blacksmiths, 14 


Carpenters, 




21 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



365 



Clerks, 


13 


Peddlers, 


5 


Cigar makers, 


2 


Printer, 


1 


Cooks, 


9 


Quarrymen, 


12 


Canvasser, 


1 


Steam fitters. 


4 


Doctor, 


1 


Storekeeper, 


1 


Electrician, 


1 


Salesmen, 


3 


Engraver, 


1 


Sailor, 


1 


Engineer, 


1 


Automobile drivers. 


2 


Farmers, 


7 


Schoolgirl, 


1 


Firemen, 


4 


Schoolboys, 


9 


Harness makers, 


8 


Stone cutters. 


44 


Housework, 


24 


Shoemakers, 


14 


Junk dealers. 


6 


Stone masons. 


13 


Laborers, 


330 


Silversmiths, 


5 


Linemen, 


3 


Teamsters, 


4 


Mill operatives. 


118 


Tinker, 


1 


Machinists, 


4 


Waiters, 


2 


Molders, 


5 


Druggists, 


3 


Music teacher, 


1 


Merchants, 


2 


Nurse, 


1 


Broom maker. 


1 


Painters, 


23 


Heel cutter. 


1 


Polishers, 


2 


Watchman, 


1 


Plumbers, 


7 


Shop lifters. 


4 



Brought before the court, 630 

Discharged by the court, 8 

Discharged without being brought before court, 130 

Arson, 1 

Adultery, 4 

Aggravated assault, 2 

Assault on officer, 2 

Assault, 22 

Attempt burglary, 1 

Bastardy, 1 

Burglary, 1 

Breaking and entering, 4 

Beating board bill, 2 



366 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Being present at cock fight, 10 

Contempt of court, 1 

Cruelty to animals. 1 

Cruelty to horse, 1 

1905. 1906. 

Drunkennes's, including Penacook, 428 478 

Drunkenness at Penacook, 99 124 

Doing junk business without license, 3 

Escaped from house of correction, 11 

Evading car fare, 4 

Forgery, 1 

Furnishing liquor to minors, 1 

Fornication, 5 

Firing revolver on street, 3 

For out-of-town officers, 12 

Furnishing liquor to blacklisted men, 1 

Plorse stealing, 1 

Insane, 2 

Keeping unlicensed dog, 2 

Keeping spirituous liquor for sale, 1 

Larceny, 41 

Malicious injury to United States mail box, 1 

Non-support, 3 

Over-driving horse, 1 

Over-speeding automobile, 1 

Playing cards on Sunday, 4 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk, 9 

Rude and disorderly conduct. 6 

Running steam engine within fire precinct, 2 

Repeating false cry of fire, 3 
Street walking. 

Spitting in car, 1 

Safe keeping, 97 

Selling spirituous liquor, 1 

Threatening to do bodily harm, 1 

Vagrants, 16 



9 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 367 

Bound over to high court, 26 

Committed to jail, 19 

Committed to house of correction, 206 

Committed to state hospital, 2 

Number paid fines or costs, 361 

Mittimus not to issue until called for, 38 

Appealed to high court, 3 

Nol-prossed, 8 

Miscellaneous Duties Performed by Police. 

Number of duty calls rung in on police signal, 

from January 1, 1906, to January 1, 1907, 45,131 

Called to quell disturbances, 29 

Stray teams found and cared for, 9 

Stray horses found and cared for, 7 

Number of times city ambulance required, 108 

Number of breaks reported, 2 

Number of breaks in water pipe reported, \ 2 

Bicycles found on street, 35 

Number of callers received at station, 6,709 

Complaints received and investigated, 406 

Number of officers made liquor searches, 12 

Number of officers attended fires, 55 

Number of times horse used, 912 

Number of prisoners taken to jail, 11 

Number of street lights reported out, 269 

Number of lost children returned to parents, 4 
Number of officers assisting in taking persons 

to state hospital, 7 
Number of telephone calls in city answered, 7,803 
Number of telephone calls out of city answered, 454 
Number of doors tried, including Penacook, 601,780 
Number of doors found open and secured, in- 
cluding Penacook, 222 
Number of doors found open at Penacook, 17 
Number of dogs killed, 3 
Number of runs made by patrol wagon, 111 
Number of miles covered by patrol wagon, 116 



368 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Lodgers. 



Whole number of lodgers, including Penacook, 


700 


Whole number of lodgers at Penacook, 


287 


Males, 


698 


Females, 


2 


Married, 


15 


Single, 


685 


Number between the ages of 10 and 20, 


29 


20 and 30, 


174 


30 and 40, 


239 


40 and 50, 


151 


50 and 60, 


60 


60 and 70, 


25 


70 and 80, 


16 


80 and 90, 


6 



Nationality of Lodgers. 



United States, 


282 


Scotland, 


Ireland, 


328 


Sweden, 


Canada. 


46 


Russia, 


England, 


13 


Poland, 


Germany, 


2 


Finland, 




Indian, 


1 




Occupation 


OF Lodgers. 


Boiler maker, 


1 


^lachinists. 


Blacksmiths, 


11 


^lolders, 


Barbers, 


4 


Peddlers, 


Cooks, 


8 


Polisher, 


Carpenters, 


3 


Plumbers, 


Currier, 


1 


Painters, 


Cigar makers, 


6 


Pa])er maker 


Farmers, 


3 


Qunrrymen, 


Firemen, 


5 


Roofers, 


Laborers, 


420 


Shoemakers, 


]\Iill operatives. 


149 


Stone mason. 



15 
5 
1 
5 
2 



4 
6 
2 
1 
3 

12 
1 
5 
3 

25 
1 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



369 



4 

2 
3 
3 

The organization of the Police Department at the present 
time is as follows : 



Stone cutters, 


7 


Printers, 


Steam fitters, 


2 


Bushers, 


Schoolboys, 


3 


Sailors, 


Teamsters, 


2 


Dyers, 



Police Commissioners. 
Josiah E. D wight, Giles Wheeler, 

City ^Marshal. 
James E. Rand. 

Assistant Marshal. 
John E. Gay. 

Captain of Night Watch. 
Daniel S. Flanders. 



G. Scott Locke. 



Charles H. Rowe, 
Samuel L. Batchelder, 
Hoyt Robinson, 
Christopher T. Wallace, 
Samuel Rodd, 



Patrolmen. 

Victor I. ]\Ioore, 



George E. Drury, 
Irving B. Robinson, 

George N. Fellows, 
Clark D. Stevens. 



Special Reserve Officers, 
captain. 
George H. Silsby. 



Orrin H. Bean, 
W. H. H. Patch, 
Fred H. Clifford, 
Charles E. Kelley, 
Harry J. Jones, 
George G. Allen, 

24 



Willie A. Little, 
Alvin H. Uran, 
Thomas P. Davis, 
James Jepson, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
Fred S. Pendleton. 



370 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In concluding this report, permit me to return thanks 
to the honorable mayor and city council for the support 
you have given me; also to the board of police commis- 
sioners, judge of police court, and City Solicitor Edmund 
S. Cook, all of whom have been very kind, considerate and 
accommodating at any and all times ; and to all others 
who have contributed to our success, we extend our thanks. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES E. RAND, 

City Marshal. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



REPORT OF THE PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council: 

The Park Commissioners present herewith their report 
for the year ending December 31, 1906 : 

Receipts. 

G-eneral appropriation for parks, $3,500.00 

Appropriation for Penacoolc Park, 125.00 

Appropriation for Pecker Park, 131.08 

Appropriation to cover deficit, 159.43 

$3,915.51 



$1,080.00 



Expenditures. 




Salary of superintendent, 




WHITE PARK. 




Paid for labor, 


$765.71 


shrubs, seed, etc.. 


170.55 


repairs. 


31.39 


grain. 


8.30 


tools, etc.. 


68.94 


grade, 


215.00 


swans. 


40.00 


fence. 


280.00 


incidentals, 


137.97 



$1,717.86 



372 CITY OF CONCORD. 
ROLLINS PARK. 

Paid for labor, $388.62 

shrubs, seed, etc., 130.70 

grade, 28.90 

repairs, 10.64 

tools, etc., 8.39 

grain, 12.95 

incidentals, 70.65 





BRADLEY PARK. 




Paid for labor. 




$38.60 


incidentals, 




18.84 




FISKE PARK. 




Paid for labor. 




$32.38 


incidentals. 




14.00 


RIDGE AVENUE PARK. 




Paid for lal)or, 




$16.00 


incidentals, 




4.80 



PECKER PARK. 



Paid for labor, $34.25 

sun-dial, etc., ^ 96.08 

incidentals, 26.10 



PENACOOK PARK. 



Paid for labor, $103.00 

repairs, 38.77 

incidentals, 2.85 



$650.85 



$57.44 



$46.38 



$20.80 



$156.43 



$144.62 



PrTBLIC PARKS. 373 



COURT HOUSE PARK. 



Paid for labor. $39.13 

incidentals. 2.00 



$41.13 



$3,915.51 



The work at White Park has contiinKMl during the .year 
as usual, the only exception being the erection of a section 
of a permanent fence, which the commissioners will hope 
to continue from year to year until the park is well fenced. 
The Park has reached a place which demands permanent 
work, such as entrances and interior embellishnient, to give 
added dignity and character. At present the work has 
developed so slowly that many years will go by before the 
plan can be completed. How much better it would be 
to complete the park, for the maintenance of it would ])e 
no more than in its incompleteness. 

A cage of grey squirrels was placed in the grounds during 
the summer and has created much interest, and it is hoped 
that later on we can let them loose in the park, for there 
are many nut-bearing trees, which will sustain a large 
colony. If those who frequent the park will co-operate 
with the caretakers in the maintenance and good order, 
tht^se added attractions will bring much pleasure to all. 
A new i)aii' of swans have been added this last year. The 
walks have been recoated with crushed stone, and one 
hundred and fifty loads of grade have been put on the 
playground, which will need many loads more to make it 
available, for the lack of drainage causes the water to 
stand thereon during the rainy part of the season, so that 
the ground settles continually. 

Rollins Park has been very attractive during the season. 
The new ball-grounds have been in constant use. The 
superintendent has regraded a part, and will by degrees 
complete the whole surface. 



374 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The shrubs and herbaeeuiis [> hints at the entrance from 
Broadway have been very effective, as they stand in con- 
trast to the noble forest beyond. 

The herd of deer, which has increased by two, still 
continues to be of much interest. This park is well adapted 
for picnics and is often used by family parties, while 
during the summer large numbers of peoi)le gather at the 
servi(!es which are held on Sundays. The time is not far 
away when some scientific forestry can be applied with 
advantage. 

Penacook Park is still enjoyed, as in years past, as a 
picnic ground. The appropriation should be increased, 
that much -needed improvements nuiy l)e made. A more 
rigid enforcement of rules would result in keeping the 
shores more sightly. Everything which in any way will 
cause pollution to the water or unsightliness should be 
removed. 

The enclosure in the rear of the County Building should 
])e improved and arranged, so that the large crowds which 
attend the band concerts can be better accommodated. 

The smaller parks and enclosures have been increased by 
the addition of Pecker Park in East Concord, and one at 
the north end of Main Street, and placed under the super- 
vision of the park department. There are others which 
coidd be develo])ed if given to tlie city. The increasing 
demands on this department bring an imperative iK^ed of 
an increased approj^riation. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, I\lay()i-, cx-nfficio, 

WILLIS 1). THOMPSON, 

GARDNER B. EMI\IONS, 

WILLIAM P. EISKE, 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 

BEN C. WHITE, 

WILLIS G. C. KBIBALL, 

(\)int)iiHf<i()ncrs. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



375 



J5 




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o 
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$47,686.76 

9,502.12 

1,550.96 
1,253.71 

273.45 

366.68 
355.71 

84.88 


o 

CO 


$2,100.00 

2,000.00 
1,250.00 
3,307.50 














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$1,022.50 
192.50 














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CITY OF CONCORD. 



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$1,717.86 
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144.62 
57.44 
20.80 
40.38 
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41.13 


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REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the City Council: 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
work done in my department for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1906: 

Vaccinations and examinations for same, with 

certificate, 143 

Office calls, 23 

Operation, 1 

Calls, 145 

At the request of the sanitary officer, I have taken 
professional care of three cases of scarlet fever and one 
of smallpox. From time to time during the year, he 
also called upon me to inspect schools for contagious dis- 
eases among the pupils, and again to look up suspicious 
cases in their homes and report on the nature of the case. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CHAELES H. COOK, 

City Physician. 
Concord, N. H., January 23, 1907. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF 
COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 



To the City Council of the City of Concord: 

In making our annual report, the commissioners can 
only say that your appropriation of the last year has been 
expended in the planting of trees and shrubs, and in 
the general care and improvement of both cemeteries com- 
mitted to our care. For the financial standing of the 
cemeteries we would refer you to the report of the city 
treasurer. 

The burials for the past year have been one hundred and 
seventy-eight (178) in Blossom Hill Cemetery, and twenty- 
five (25) in Old North. 

The new chapel has been used but eight times the past 
year, and the commissioners think it strange that the 
public continues to have funeral services held in the under- 
takers' rooms, when this beautiful chapel can be had free 
of expense. 

A new waiting room l)uilt of stone, with toilet rooms, 
has been erected near the entrance at Blossom Hill, which 
we think will be fully appreciated by the public, when 
waiting for the cars or in stormy weather. We would 
recommend that the iron fence be extended on the west 
line of Blossom Hill as soon as the necessary funds can 
be appropriated. We would again recommend that a 
small appropriation be 'made for the employment of a 
competent landscape architect to lay out the new section 
at Blossom Hill, which was purchased a few years ago of 



380 CITY OF CONCORD. 

]Mr. Bradley, so that when needed for new lots it would 
be ready for use. 

Whatever sum you may place at our disposal will be 
expended, we trust, in a manner that will merit your 
approval. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, ex officio, 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 

FRANK P. ANDREWS, 

CHARLES G. REMICK. 

FRANK J. BATCHELDER, 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, 

GEORGE W. ABBOTT, 

Commissioners. 
George A. Foster, Secretary. 



MiLLViLLE Cemetery. 

To His Honor tJie Mayor and the City Council: 

The ^Nlillville Cemetery Committee respectfully submit 
the following report of the receipts and expenditures for 
the year 1906 : 

receipts. 



Balance as per last report. 


$11.27 


From city treasurer, appropriation. 


75.00 


city treasurer, interest on 




trust funds. 


28.37 


sale of lots (one-half), 


10.00 


interested individuals. 


19.50 


T'ntnl i"pppii~»t>i 




J.V'L<IL 1 ITVjCi l-/ lo. 




EXPENDITURES. 




Paid A. IT. Britton & Co., 


$1.20 


W. Hardy, 


2.80 


I. N. Abbott, 


2.35 



$144.14 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 



381 



Paid Alfred Clark. 


$12.00 


F. W. Sanborn, 


3.00 


F. G. Proctor, 


79.00 


V. C. Hastings, 


6.00 


A. S. Trask, 


14.55 


George W. Chesley, 


8.00 


Cash to balance account, 


15.24 


Total expenditures, 





$144.14 



ALBERT S. TRASK, 
FRANK G. PROCTOR, 
ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 

Committee. 



West Concord Cemetery. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: 

The West Concord Cemetery Committee submit the fol- 
lowing report for 1906 : 



Jan. 1, 1906. Cash on hand. 
Sale of lots. 



$1.59 
25.00 



$26.59 



PAID OUT. 

Oct., 1906. Water bill, 
Dec. 28, J. jNI. Crossman, 

G. R. Parmenter, 



Jan. 1, 1907. Cash on hand, 



$6.00 
5.00 
5.00 



$16.00 
10.59 



$26.59 

J. M. CROSSMi?N, 
G. R. PARMENTER, 

Committee. 



382 



city of concord. 
Pine Grove Cemetery. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council: 

Your Committee on Cemeteries in East Concord submit 
the following report for the year 1906 : 



RECEIPTS. 




Appropriation, 




EXPENSES. 




Henry A. Colby, care and labor, 


$52.25 


Thomas H. Smith, care and labor. 


10.00 


Sidney F. Smith, labor, 


10.00 


Chester P. Colby, labor, 


37.25 


E. F. Colby, labor, 


10.25 


Walter L. Jenks, hardware, 


.98 


Page Belting Co., paint. 


25.86 


Old Fort Cemetery. 




RECEIPTS. 




Appropriation, 




EXPENSE. 




Henry A. Colby, 


$10.00 


Chester P. Colby, 


5.75 



$150.00 



$146.59 



$15.00 



$15.75 



THOMAS H. SMITH, 
HENRY A. COLBY, 
W. A. COWLEY, 

Committee. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The Board of Assessors respectfully submit, for the bene- 
fit of the taxpayers of the city, such information as seems 
to be of interest to all. 

Valuation of the City. 

Number of polls assessed: 
In 1905, 
In 1906, 

Increase, 

Improved and unimproved land and buildings, 

1905. 
Improved and unimproved land and buildings, 

1906, 

Increase, 

Number of horses in 1905. 
Number of horses in 1906, 

Increase, 

Number of oxen in 1905, 
Number of oxen in 1906, 

Decrease, 

Number of cows in 1905, 
Number of cows in 1906, 

Decrease, $663 



5,400 


$540,000 


5,474 


547,400 


74 


$7,400 


[ildings. 






$9,704,465 


lildings, 






9,817,805 




$113,340 


1,539 


$85,910 


1.537 


92,235 




$6,325 


45 


$2,275 


41 


2,095 




$180 


1,444 


$30,728 


1,300 


30,065 



384 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



222 


$510 


52 


112 




$398 


11 


$90 


1 


10 




$80 


297 


$25,000 


310 


31,870 



Number of other neat stock in 1905. 194 $2,475 

Number of other neat stock in 1906, 244 2.874 

Increase, $399 

Number of sheep in 1905, 
Number of sheep in 1906, 

Decrease, 

Number of hogs in 1905, 
Number of hogs in 1906, 

Decrease, 

Number of carriages in 1905, 
Number of carriages in 1906, 

Increase, 

Stocks : 

Stocks in public funds in 1905, 
Stocks in public funds in 1906, 

Increase, $29,550. 

Stocks in banks and other corporations in this 

state in 1905, $233,532 

Stocks in banks and other corporations in this 

state in 1906, 230,731 

Decrease, $2,801 

Stocks in corporations out of this state 

in 1905, $19,577 

Stocks in corporations out of this state 

in 1906, 16,425 



$6,870 



$11,450 
41.000 



Decrease, 



$3,152 



assessors' report. 



385 



Money on hand or on deposit in 1905, 
Money on hand or on deposit in 1906, 

Increase, 

Stock in trade in 1905, 
Stock in trade in 1906, 

Increase, 

Mills and machinery in 1905, 
Mills and machinery in 1906, 



$103,497 
122,976 

$19,479 

$770,351 
801,799 

$31,448 



141 

31,500 



Decrease, 



$52,651 



Valuation by Wards in 1905 and 1906. 

Assessors. 

Oliver J. Fifield. 
William A. Cowley. 
Joseph E. Shepard. 
George W. Parsons. 
George A. Foster. 
Osro ]\I. Allen. 
John H. Quimby. 
William A. Lee. 
Thomas Nawn. 

$11,614,011 $11,768,897 





1905. 


1906. 


Ward 1, 


$867,927 


$885,104 


Ward 2, 


302,428 


300,342 


Ward 3, 


433,370 


428,215 


Ward 4. 


2,632,399 


2,796,832 


Ward 5, 


2,943,949 


2,846,219 


Ward 6, 


1,954,820 


1,937,082 


Ward 7, 


1,228,165 


1,306,800 


Ward 8, 


875,193 


879,893 


AVard 9; 


~ 375,760 


388,410 



25 



b 



386 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriations, Tax Rate and Valuation of City and 

Precincts. 



GENERAL TAX. 



Appropri- 
ations. 



2 per cent, 
added. 



Tax 

rate on 
$1,000. 



Valuation 

of city 

and 

precincts. 



State , 

County 

Scliool 

City 

Special school appropriations : 

Union School District 

For repairs, interest, etc 

Town District 

District No. 20 

Precinct appropriations : 

Sprinkling 

Garbage . . 

Water 

Sewer 

Lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord sewer 

East Concord lights 

East Concord sewer 

St. Paul's School sewer 



$34,130.00 1 
43,398.00 I 
51,195.00 
47.000.00 J 

22,543.30 

13,285.00 

500.00 

3,808.00 

5,000,00 

6,000.00 

6,000.00 

4,860.00 

15,000.00 

1.250.00 

2,235.00 

1,595.50 

200.00 

135.00 

665.00 



3,514.46 



716.56 

10.00 
76.16 

100.00 

120.00 

120.00 

97.20 

300.00 

25.00 

44.70 

31.91 

4.00 

2.70 

13.30 



3.50 

.60 
5.50 

.60 

.60 

.60 

.50 

"1.50 

1.80 

3 30 

6.30 

1.00 

4.20 

7.80 



15.20 $11,768,897 



10,232,490 

830,969 
609.334 

8,524,610 

9,014,075 

10,751,336 

9,480,981 

9,756,.521 

703,015 

091,815 

258,250 

201,530 

32,300 

80,415 



Respectfully submitted, 

OSRO M. ALLEN, 

Chairman of Board of Assessors. 

GEORGE W. PARSONS, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the City Council: 

I herewith submit the report of collections of taxes to 
the close of business, December 31, 1906 : 

Tax Levy for 1904. 

Resident list as committed, $249,372.15 

Errors and omissions to date added, 1,988.65 

Resident list as corrected to date, $251,360.80 

Non-resident list, 850.14 

Interest collected to date, 1,271.89 



$253,482.83 



Cash paid treasurer, as per report, $247,351.83 
Abatements to date. 6,069.52 

Unadjusted accounts, 1.20 

Cash in office December 31, 1906, at 

closing, 56.29 

Uncollected December 31, 1906, at 

closing, 3.99 

$253,482.83 

Tax Levy for 1905. 

Resident list as committed, $257,143.09 

Errors and omissions to date added, 2,094.91 

^$259,238.00 

Non-resident list, 900.00 

Interest collected to date, 1,274.01 



$261,412.01 



V 



388 , CITY OP CONCORD. 

Cash paid treasurer, as per report, $254,689.68 
Abatements to date, 6,583.36 

Cash in office December 31, 1906, at 

closing, 14.00 

Uncollected December 31, 1906, at 

closing, 124.97 

$261,412.01 

Tax Levy for 1906. 

Resident list as committed, $259,651.06 

Errors and omissions to date added, 1,066.89 

$260,717.95 

Non-resident list, 1,325.61 

Interest collected to date, 47.20 



$262,090.76 

Cash paid treasurer as per report 

December 1, 1906, $130,475.00 

Cash paid treasurer during month of 

December, 1906, 80,850.00 

Abatements to date, 3,325.05 

Cash in office December 31, 1906, at 

closing, 343.36 

Uncollected December 31, 1906, at 

closing, ^ 47.097.35 

$262,090.76 

WENDELL P. LADD, 

Collector. 
Concord. N. H., January 1, 1907. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF 
OVERSEER OF POOR. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1906. 



To the City Council: 

Gentlemen: The undersigned herewith submits the 
thirtj^-ninth annual report of expenditures for the poor, 
including Wards 1 and 2, for the year ending December 
31, 1906, as follows : 

Families and individuals having a settlement in the city 
have been aided, in part or in full, during the time, to the 
amount set opposite their respective names : 

Daniel Bresnahan, $63.25 

Mrs. John Casey, 31.25 

Mary A. DriscoU, 78.00 

George B. Farley, 104.12 

W. Florent, 3.63 

Frank Lepolit, 30.00 

Annie Manley, 24.50 

Daniel Murphy, 72.00 

Ada Sanborn, 15.00 

Mrs. Fred Sawyer, 96.00 

Charles Wentworth, 90.00 

Bateista Abbiati, 257.10 

Mrs. Fred Fellows, 64.00 

G. J. Johnston, 145.75 

Mrs. Amos Bichette, 7.50 



390 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Wm. Drew, 


$1.00 


John Sawyer, 


43.33 


Mrs. Joseph Pratt, 


27.19 


Mrs. Albert Knowles, 


10.00 


Charles H. Tandy, 


3.56 


David Robertson, 


1.00 




d>1 Ififi 1Q 




iP-t,XUO.±0 


County Poor. 




Mrs. F. U. Abbott, 


$164.89 


Henry Ash, 


40.00 


Morrison S. Batehelder, 


191.86 


Hattie Bean, 


5.00 


C. Belaire, 


19.25 


Peter Boley, 


4.00 


Mrs. C. Bray, 


13.00 


Martha Burke, 


148.90 


Herman Buzzell, 


11.56 


Mrs. Thomas Carron, 


70.08 


Mary Carter, 


85.19 


Rhoda Carter, 


9.30 


Fred Charrette, 


106.00 


Clark family. 


8.00 


Jane Clinton, 


60.00 


Mary Collins, 


28.36 


Fred Cyr, 


36.50 


Mrs. W. J. Dunn, 


135.02 


J. W. Edgerly, 


60.00 


Mrs. J. W. Elliott, 


56.25 


Sarah S. Ellis, 


80.29 


J. B. Eraser, 


10.89 


Charles Gray, 


12.50 


Mrs. J. J. Gurley, 


149.27 


Mrs. Mae Haskins, 


60.00 


Mrs. A. V. Hannaford, 


104.99 


Miss Sarah Hoyt, 


15.00 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 391 

George E. Ingalls, $165.51 

W. L. Huntress, 96.00 
Emma Jesseman, . 48.01 

Mrs. Henry Knox, 84.15 

Mrs. C. F. Laird, 257.68 

W. G. Lee, 60.78 

Arthur Lefazzue, 2.00 

Isaac Leonard, 75.70 

Joe Lapierre, 60.00 

Mrs. J. B. Lemay, 98.38 

Mrs. Andrew F. Lindsey, 21.00 

Sarah McConnell, 48.00 

Mrs. P. McGowan, 103.26 

I\Irs. Thomas Mitchell, 63.26 

Marion :\rorley, 68.02 

Nancy Murphy, 85.85 

Edward Neff. 14.77 

Mrs. O'Xeil. 96.00 

Martha J. Pollard, 158.95 

E. S. Quimby, 56.00 

George A. Rollins, 65.00 

Mrs. Frank Rowe, 174.91 

Rudner children, 180.00 

Annie Rushlow, 96.00 

Carter Sayles, 94.69 

Helen Smith, 78.39 

John Storin, 104.00 

W. G. Tandy, 64.44 

Mrs. Oscar Thomas, 40.00 

George Tonkin, 241.26 

Mrs. P. Truchon, 15.26 

Margaret Trainor, 210.54 
Mrs. C. Truchon, ' 104.82 

Mrs. J. Vallier, 108.00 

Mrs. J. J. Veasey, 215.62 

Daniel Virgin, 111.42 

Mrs. H. A. AVard, 109.07 



392 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. C. p. Watts, $99.70 

Mary Williams, 74.18 

John Wilson, 193.21 

Arthur Brunette, 6.00 

I. M. Cole, ' 20.00 

M. Daley, 30.00 

Mrs. B. L. Davis, 16.19 

James Keegan, 11.26 

John ]\Iurphy, 24.00 

Frank M. Piper, 10.70 

Frank Potter, 88.77 

Charles Tueker, 5.46 

W. C. Wilmot, 8.00 

Sarah Nichols, 47.50 

Mrs. Mary Buekner, 5.83 

J. E. Beckett. 44.89 

Fred A. Chase, 17.80 

George H. Cox, 2.00 

David Lucia, 4.00 

Fred Dow, 18.00 

R. T. Orr, 3.00 

J. A. Poupore, 35.63 

Ada Sanborn, 48.63 

Herbert Chase, 13.00 

Albert F. Baxter, 40.00 

D. W. Fraser, 7.00 

Bert Drew. 8.00 

Mary Quinn, 32.00 

Mary McDonald, 59.32 

Mrs. Mary Cochran, 26.93 

Mrs. Larosch, 30.00 

Mrs. Cassie Quiet, 25.00 

Oliver Shepard, 78.37 

George Baker, 29.38 

Mrs. Foss, 17.50 

Kuth Hoit, 51.20 

Henry Heard, 8.93 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 393 

Dolph Mitchell $7.99 

M. Horwitz. 10.00 

Charles Wells. ' 5.56 

Mary T. Kelley. • 19.49 

Mrs. Patrick Maloy, 11.43 

0. W. Couch. 6.00 

John Carlin. 1.96 

Frank Bodeau, 2.00 

Mrs. Edward Knox, 13.86 

Arthur Gray, 7.26 

Luke Gouthier, 7.45 

Thomas J. Foote, 6.00 

Louis Lapplant, 2.00 

Mrs. Call 4.98 

Lewis C arrow. 97.91 

Levi Chennette, 66.00 . 

Eosa Gagnon. 91.46 

Mrs. Hill. 151.01 

Mrs. E. Osier. 131.05 

Mrs. N. Preva. 76.58 

A. Boyce, v 83.29 

Mrs. Charles Davis. 3.25 

Felix Guyotte, 2.00 

Mrs. Peter Gangnier, 8.84 

Charlie Leblanc, 6.33 

C. Gerald. 15.00 

Miss Duchame, 46.50 

Mrs. Tom Prevey, 7.44 

Edd Narcomb. 57.56 

Mrs. Fred York, 2.75 

Edmund Prevey, 1.50 

C. White. 8.10 

Joseph Closs. 20.40 

Mrs. Fred Blanchard, 118.39 

Ira Cutting. 18.00 

George Cummings. 4.00 

Mrs. Henry Blanchard, 16.42 



394 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Willie Shalloo, $19.50 

Sam Carregnan, 3.40 

John Sullivan, ' 1.77 

Transient account, • 52.22 



$7,820.87 



Amount paid for support of city 

poor, $1,168.18 

Amount paid by the city for the sup- 
port of county poor, 7,820.87 



Total amount paid on account of poor, $8,989.05 



Aid to Dependent Soldiers and Their Families Ren- 
dered During the Year 1906. 

chargeable to city. 

Alvah Atwood, $27.14 

Archibald Marston, 84.39 

$111.53 



CHARGEABLE TO COUNTY. 

Harriet Ash, $72.00 

Rosie L. Chase, 19.90 

Lueretia Danforth, • 45.75 

Helen L. Griswold, 57.72 

Mrs. Ann Hackett, 69.57 

George Kelley, 131.75 

Morris Lamprey, 37.25 

John McKenna, 84.00 

Charles T. Much, 96.00 

C. H. Norton, 78.00 

Mary J. Oakley, 191.37 

Otis Reister, 142.90 

Mrs. Michael Storin, 91.00 



POOR DEPAfeTMENT. 395 



Honora Sullivan, 




$118.27 




Eliza B. Tandy, 




28.60 




William Wallace, 




130.83 




Nathaniel Chase, 




19.40 




J. E. Farrell, 




96.00 




Eli Sturgeon, 




1.75 




Eliza J. Currier, 




13.07 




Jane Wright, 




3.81 




Mrs. S. S. Ford, 




11.04 




Mrs. C. M. Davis, 




65.95 




AV. H. Libby, 




79.01 




Asa Demick, 




24.39 




Lester Fletcher, 




114.80 




Alvah Atwood, 


- 


42.03 


$1,866.16 






Total amount. 


$1,977.69 




Respectfully subm 


itted, 






HENRY E. 


CHAMBERLIN, 







verseer of the Poor. 



REPORT OF CITY CLERK. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1906. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1906 : 

From Merrimack County, aid to county poor, $4,287.94 
Merrimack County, aid to dependent 

soldiers, 987.83 

fees of all kinds, 650.83 

licenses, pool and billiard tables, 430.00 

licenses, hack and job teams, 112.50 

licenses, junk dealers, 210.00 

licenses, dogs, 2,038.31 

account Pecker Park, 131.08 
account land damages, Asa Emery, not 

accepted, 75.00 

account grass sold to D. Brown, 4.00 

account rent Ward 7 ward house, 7.50 

rent of auditorium, 1,290.00 

use of council rooms for court, 530.00 

quarry rent, Ola Anderson, 75.00 

quarry rent, F. R. Clark, 50.00 

quarry rent, P. Crowley, 50.00 

use of steam hoister, 165.00 

sale of stall-pan, .70 

sale of safe, 20.00 

pay-roll, moderator Ward 6, resigned, 7.00 



$11,122.69 



The foregoing amount has been paid into the city 
treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



REPORT OF CLERK OF POLICE 
COURT. 



Concord, N. H., April 4. 1907. 

To the City Council: 

The clerk of the police court submits the following 
report : 

Number of civil cases entered in court January to De- 
cember, 1906, inclusive, was seventy-three. Received entry 
fees for same at fifty cent^ each, thirty-six dollars and fifty 
cents ($36.50). Paid to city treasurer thirty-six dollars 
and fifty cents ($36.50). 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUFUS H. BAKER, 
Clerk of Police Court. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Council: 

I respectfully submit the following report for the year 
1906 : 

On December 31. 1905, the following suits against the 
city of Concord were pending in court : Concord Street 
Railway v. Concord, an appeal taken by the Concord Street 
Railway from an award of damages to it by the board of 
mayor and aldermen upon laying out a highway in Pena- 
cook; Joseph Stickney v. Concord, a petition for an abate- 
ment of taxes for the year 1900; Joseph Stickney v. 
Concord, a petition for an abatement of taxes for the year 
1901 ; Jennie E. Martin v. Concord, a suit to recover damages 
for injury to the plaintiff's real estate, on the corner of 
South State and Downing Streets, which she claims has 
been caused by the backing up of water and sewage by 
reason of an insufficient and defective sewer; H. Cohen v. 
Concord, a petition for a writ of mandamus to compel the 
board of mayor and aldermen of Concord to issue to him 
a license to deal in old junk. The city was also interested 
in the case of State v. Cohen, a criminal prosecution charg- 
ing the defendant with being a dealer in old junk, old 
metals, etc., in the City of Concord, without a license, which 
was, at the time of my last report, before the supreme court 
on an appeal by the defendant claiming that the law relat- 
ing to dealers in old metals, etc. (chapter 121 of the Public 
Statutes), was unconstitutional, and that his business, as 
shown by the facts, was not within the meaning of the 
law. I made two briefs for the state in this case and 
argued the case orally before the supreme court. The 
court decided that the junk business is subject to police 



REPORT OP CITY SOLICITOR. 399 

regulation, that chapter 124 of the Public Statutes, giving 
boards of mayor and aldermen in cities and selectmen in 
towns power to say who are suitable persons to engage 
in such business, and to determine where such business 
shall be carried on under a license, is constitutional, and 
that the business of the defendant was such as to require 
a license. This decision makes it clear that the city has 
the power to prohibit all unsuitable persons from dealing 
in old junk, old metals, etc., within its limits, and to 
determine where the business of such persons as may be 
licensed shall be carried on. Since this decision certain 
men, who previously did a local junk business, claim to 
do no buying or selling of junk in Concord, but do go 
into the surrounding towns and buy junk which they 
ship into Concord, sort, arrange, handle, and store here, 
and ship away from here for sale in other places. This 
kind of a business, because it results in the accumulation 
of large quantities of rags, paper, and other inflammable 
matter, gathered from all sorts of places, creates the very 
dangers at which the junk law is aimed, to wit: the 
danger to the public by reason of fire, and the danger to 
public health by reason of the spread of contagious dis- 
eases. I do not think that the present junk law gives the 
city the power to regulate such a business, because the 
owner thereof cannot be said to be a dealer in junk in 
the city. I therefore recommend that the incoming legis- 
lature be asked to pass a law which will give cities and 
towns power to regulate such a business. 

The cases of the Concord Street Railway, Joseph Stick- 
ney, and Jennie E. Martin have not been pressed by the 
plaintiffs, and no progress has been made in them since 
my last report. I have been told a number of times since 
my last report by counsel for Jennie E. INIartin that the 
plaintiff in this case cares more to have the conditions 
causing the damage remedied than to get damages from 
the city. I renew the recommendation, made in my last 
report, that the city government investigate the sewer con- 



400 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ditions and facilities in the vicinity of Mrs. Martin's 
property "with a view of ascertaining if there is some practi- 
cal way of preventing future damage to property in that 
neighborhood on account of defective or insufficient sewers. 
The petition of H. Cohen for a writ of mandamus to 
compel the board of mayor and aldermen to issue to him 
a license to deal in old junk, which at the time of my 
last report was in the supreme court on exceptions taken 
by the petitioner to the denial of his petition by the superior 
court, has been abandoned by the petitioner and has been 
dismissed by the court. 

In the early part of the year a number of citizens, living 
at the south end of the city, complained that their property 
was being endangered by the use of a steam engine, in a 
building on Broadway, by E. A. Morgan. I took this 
matter up and found that Mr. Morgan was using a steam 
engine in a shed on Broadway in connection with a wood 
business he was carrying on there. I prosecuted him in 
the police court for using a steam engine in a building 
within the fire precinct without a license. He was found 
guilty and fined. He then appealed to the superior court. 
At the April term, 1906, of the superior court, I filed a 
petition asking that Mr. Morgan be enjoined from using a 
steam engine at his place on Broadway without a license. 
Mr. Morgan claimed that the structure in which he was 
using a steam engine was not a building within the mean- 
ing of the law, and the petition for an injunction was 
transferred to the supreme court for a decision of the 
question. The supreme court decided that the structure 
was a building, and the superior court at the October 
term, 1906, issued an injunction, which was served on 
Mr. Morgan, ordering and directing him not to use a 
steam engine in the building referred to in the case, or 
in any other building in the fire precinct in the city of 
Concord, without a license. 

At the Ajiril term, 1906, of the superior court, Asa Emery 
brought suit against the city, claiming damages on account 



CITY solicitor's REPORT. 401 

of a change in grade on North State Street, at Willow 
Hollow, which he alleges throws sand and water onto his 
land and obstructs his driveway thereto. At the October 
term of court this matter was referred to the county com- 
missioners. I expect that they will hear this case in time 
to file their report at the April term, 1907, of the superior 
court. 

At the October term, 1906. of the superior court, James 
Y. Gatcomb and George L. Theobald brought suit against 
the city, claiming $30,000 damages for injuries to a pacing 
mare, called Phalla, owned by them, which they allege 
she received on May 10, 1906, on Fruit Sreet, by reason 
of a defective culvert in said street. The plaintiffs gave 
notice to the city to be ready for trial at the October 
term of court, but, after a hearing, I obtained a continu- 
ance. This case is in order for trial at the term of court 
to be held next April. 

In addition to the claim of Gatcomb & Theobald, there 
are pending against the city the claim of N. E. Martin 
and his wife for injuries which they claim to have received 
while traveling on one of our highways by reason of a 
defective culvert, and one or two small claims for injuries 
which are claimed to have been received by r6ason of 
defective culverts. During the last year I settled one 
small claim against the city for injuries to a horse caused 
by stepping into a culvert which was out of repair. 

Under the law, as it stands now, the liability of cities and 
towns for accidents happening to travelers on highways 
is limited to such as are caused by bridges, culverts and 
sluiceways which are defective or out of repair, and by 
dangerous embankments defectively railed. With this lim- 
ited liability, it behooves the city to take especial care 
of these parts of its highways. I think it would be true 
economy for the city government to authorize the street 
commissioner to employ a capable man, whose especial duty 
it should be to make, periodically, a thorough examination 
of all bridges, culverts and sluiceways to see that they 



402 CITY OF CONCORD. 

are in i)roper repair, and to inspect all embankments which 
are dangerous to travelers to see that they are properly 
railed. In addition to the money such an inspection may 
save the city, it is a duty owed to the traveling public 
to see that these particular places, at which very serious 
accidents are liable to occur, are kept in a safe and suitable 
condition. 

I have, during the year, prosecuted many criminal cases 
for the police department before the police court. I have 
also given advice and assistance when required to the vari- 
ous departments of the city government and to committees 
and members of the city council. Some of these matters 
have been of importance and have required considerable 
time on my part to be able properly to advise in regard 
to them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDMUND S. COOK. 

Cit)j Solicitor. 
, December 31, 1906. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1906. 



TRUST FUNDS. 

City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Trust 

Funds. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the school fund. 



Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1906, 35.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 35.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



countess of RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be 

applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1906, 80.00 

Paid Grace E-. Foster, treasurer of the society, 80.00 

Invested in Eagle and Phenix Hbtel Company 4 per 
cent, notes, secured b}^ mortgage. 



404 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot Enclosure, under the direction 
of the duly appointed officials, or members of the Minot Cemetery Asso- 
ciation. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Deposited (at 3i/o per cent.) with city of Concord, in 
general acconnt. 

Income received, 1906, $105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

The purpose of the donor of this trust fund was that the income should 
be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children; but since the 
bequest was made, a state law has been enacted that requires the towns 
and cities to buy all the school-books; consequently the beneficiary of the 
donor is provided for and the purjiose of the trust no longer exists. This 
fund, |200, and accumulations, amount to $438.91, and same will 
continue to accumulate forever without any benefit to any object, unless 
some legal action can be taken to divert the income from the specified 
purpose of the donor. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance from last year, $223.30 

Income received, 1906. 15.61 



■ $238.91 

Capital $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank ; 
income deposited in the Union Guaranty Savings Bank. 



COGSWELL COLLECTION OP THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the 

purchase of books of a biographical, geographical, historical and scientific 

character, and the books relating to science shall be those that give the 

latest developments and discoveries by scientific persons from year to 
year. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 405 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received 1906, 65.16 

Paid into the city treasuiy, 65.16 

Invested in City of Concord 3% bonds, $2,000.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 11:5.00 



G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1906, 35.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 35.00 



Invested in City of Concord 3i/2% bond. 



FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, ^ $1,000.00 

Income received, 1906, 36.25 

Paid into the city treasury. 36.25 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 500.00 



THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1906, 17.50 

Paid into the city treasury, 17.50 

Invested in City of Concord 31/0% bond. 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the 
care, protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 



406 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Amount of capital January 1. 1906. $21,839.-1:6 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1906. 690.85 

Received from income of fund, 1906, 848.95 

Credited City of Concord general 

account, $848.95 

Credited City of Concord for wait- 
ing room at cemetery, 3.000.00 

Amount of capital January 1, 1907, 19,530.31 



$23,379.26 



>3,379.26 



Invested in City of Concord 4% 

bonds, $8,500.00 

Invested in City of Concord Sy2% 

bonds, 2,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 4,925.11 

Deposited in Union Guaranty Sav- 
ings Bank, 4,105.20 



$19,530.31 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an 
increase of the fund. 

Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Old North 
Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1906, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 1906, 28.53 

$843.53 

Credited City of Concord general ac- 
count, $28.53 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1907, 815.00 



$843.53 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 407 

Invested in City of Concord 3i/^% 

bonds. $500.00 

Deposited in ]\Ierrimaek Connty Sav- 
ings Bank, 315.00 

$815.00 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1906, $386.50 
Unexpended income on hand Janu- 
ary 1, 1906, 176.59 
Received from income of fund, 1906, 19.67 

$582.76 



Unexpended income January 1, 1907, $196.26 
Amount of capital January 1, 1907, 386.50 

$582.76 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in IMerrimack 
Countv Savings Bank. 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by the voluntary contributions 
of interested parties. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamen- 
tation of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1906, $785.00 

Unexpended income on hand Janu- 
ary 1, 1906, 66.78 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1906, 10.00 

Received from income of fund, 1906, 20.26 

$882.04 



Unexpended income January 1, 1907, $87.04 

Amount of capital January 1, 1907, 795.00 

. $882.04 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Loan and 
Tru.st Savings Bank. 



408 CITY OP CONCORD, 

EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the cure, jn'otection and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1906, $2^:7.50 
Unexpended income on hand Janu- 
ary 1, 1906, 167.77 
Received from income of fund. 1906, 16.60 

$431.87 



Unexpended income January 1, 1907, $184.37 
Amount of capital January 1, 1907, 247.50 

• $431.87 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in New Hamp- 
shire Saving's Bank. 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord Sewer Precinct, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also 
created a sinking fund which provided that the following amounts should 
be raised annually upon the taxable property of the precinct, for the 
purpose of paying the bonds as they mature, viz.: 

$500 annually for 10 years from October 1, 1892. 
$1,000 annually for five years from October 1, 1902.. 
$1,400 annually for five years from October 1, 1907. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1906, $4,019.40 
Income received, 1906, 135.49 

Received from City of Concord, 1,000.00 

$5,154.89 



Deposited in Union Guaranty Sav- 
ings Bank, $3,133.18 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings 

Bank, 2,021.71 

■ $5,154.89 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 409 

PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook Sewer Precinct, and authoriz- 
ing loans on the credit of the city to construct tlie system, also created a 
sinking fund, which provided that the following amounts should be raised 
annually upon the taxable property of the precinct for the purpose of paying 
the bonds as they mature, viz. : 

$1,000 annually for five years from August 1. 1898. 
$100 annually for 15 years from October 1. 1900. 
$1,200 annually for five years from August 1, 1903. 
$1,000 annually for five years from I\Iay 1, 1908. 
$500 annually for six years from July 1. 1914. 
$500 annually for three years from October 1. 1915. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1906. $2,983.99 
Income received, 1906, 96.94 

Received from City of Concord, 1,300 

$4,380.93 



Balance on hand January 1, 1907, $4,380.93 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Union 
Guarantv Savings Bank. 



EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord Sewer Precinct, and 
authorizing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also 
created a sinking fund, which provided that the sum of one hundred dollars 
($100) should be raised annually for 20 years from July 1, 1895, upon 
the taxable property of the precinct, for the purpose of paying the bonds 
as they mature. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1906, $61.05 

Income received, 1906, 1.95 

Received from Citv of Concord, 100.00 



$163.00 

Balance on hand January 1. 1907, $163.00 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Union 
Guarantv Savings Bank. , 



410 CITY OP CONCORD. 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the City of Concord to be invested in some safe New England 
city bond, the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year 
in keeping lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in a neat and orderly condition ; six 
dollars each year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a 
monument fund; and the balance of the income to be expended each year 
in purchasing books for the Concord Publi; Library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Invested in City of Concord 3% bond. 
Unexpended income for the care of 

lot, January 1, 190G, $2.50 

Income received, 1906, 30.00 

$32.50 



Transferred to Setli K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 

Transferred to city general account 

for public library, 12.00 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

Unexpended income for care of lot. 2.50 



$32.50 



SETH K. .JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones 
Trust. The entire accumulation to be expended every 50 years in erecting 
a new monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1906, $269.75 

From S. K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1906, 9.29 

$285.04 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



CEMETERY TRUSTS. 



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426 CITY OF CONCORD. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETEKY KECEIPTS. 



One-half of the receipts from the Scale of lots is added annually to the 

permanent fund. The remaining lialf, with the amount received for 
grading of lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry 
collections and income of permanent fund, are added each year to the 
annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid 
on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits 
made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively 
for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

Byron ]\Ioore, care, $2.00 

Mrs. George E. Todd, care, 3.00 

C. P. Tucker, care, 1.50 

C. J. Smith, care, 2.00 

Mrs. J. M. Stewart, care, 3.00 

C. S. Fenner, repairs, 6.00 

Alba Woods, care, 2.00 

J. H. Lane's estate, care, 1.50 

Mrs. W. G. Carter, care, 2.00 

F. E. Currier, care, 2.00 

C. E. Palmer, care, 1.25 
Ola Anderson, labor, 1.00 

G. A. R. Post 2, care, 5.00 
Mrs. F. S. Dodge, care, 1.00 
Mrs. H. A. Church, care, • 2.00 
W. Williamson, repairs, 5.00 
F. A. Carr, care, 1.50 
E. C. Eastman, care, 2.00 
Charles Peaslee, care, 2.00 
J. A. Cochran, care, 1.50 
Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care, 1.00 
Miss H. Robinson, care, 2.50 
Miss Morse, care, 1.00 

D. Lockerly lot, care, 1.50 
Mrs. N. A. Dunklee, care, 1.00 
Moray & Whiting, care, 2.00 
W. A. Chesley, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 427 

Mrs. C. I. Johnson, $1.00 

Mrs. G. Hnntle.y, care, . 1.50 

H. E. Conant, care, 1.50 

Mrs. H. E. Chandler, care, 1.50 

Henneberry & Halligan, foundation, 4.00 

F. A. Stillings, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 1.00 

Miss Young, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Fifield, grave and burial, 6.00 

Miss M. A. Abbott, care, 1.00 

Mrs. R. M. IMorgan, care, 2.00 

Norman G. Cavis' estate, burial, 3.00 

Ball & Morrison, use of tomb, 2.00 

Amos Blanchard, care, 1.50 

S. R. Dole, care, 1.00 

J. C. Eaton, care, 1.00 

Mrs. E. Adams, Sanborn lot, care, 2.00 

Mrs. J. J. Wyman, care. 1.50 

E. B. Hutchinson, 7.00 

John Brown lot, care, 2.00 

T. H. Dunstane, rent, 24.00 

W. E. Dow, care, 1.00 

John Craig, labor and care, 15.00 

C. H. Noyes, care, 2.00 

Mrs. A. Atherton's estate, burial, • 4.00 

"Warren Emerson, care, 2.50 

Mrs. James ]\Iinot, Pickering lot, care, 1.50 

Mrs. James ]Minot, Burleigh lot, care, 1.50 

H. H. Chapman, care, 1.50 

Mary E. Goss. lot 41, block W. 24.00 
Mary E. Goss, lot 41, block W, 

grading, 18.00 

Frederick E. Cilley, lot 19, block W, 24.00 
Frederick E. Cilley, lot 19, block W, 

grading, 18.00 

]\Irs. Fred Eaton's estate, labor, 2.00 

George Carter, care, 1.50 



428 CITY OF CONCORD. 

H. M. F. Goss' estate, burial, $3.00 
Mrs. Olive Butterfield 's estate, 

burial, 3.00 

D. L. Sander's estate, burial, 3.00 
F. E. Cilley, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Flora K. Wilson's estate, burial. 3.00 
Mrs. J. C. Ordway, care, 3.00 
F. E. Brown, care, 1.00 

E. McQuesten's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Gilbert Foster, care, 2.00 
Mrs. A. J. Tilton's estate, burial. 5.00 
A. D. Farnum's estate, burial. 3.00 
Mrs. Frank A. Dame, lot 21, block 20, 48.00 
Mrs. Frank A. Dame, lot 21, block 20, 

grading. 36.00 

Adin C. Robinson, lot 96, block W. 24.00 
Adin C. Robinson, lot 96, block W, 

grading. 18.00 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. Batclielder, 

lot 39, block W, 24.00 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Edwin F. Batchelder, 

lot 39, block W, grading, 18.00 

Wm. A. Thompson, lot 43, block X, 60.00 
Wm. A. Thompson, lot 43, block X, 

grading, * 60.00 
Francis W. Tewksbury, lot 44, 

block X, 60.00 
Francis W. Tewksbury, lot 44. 

block X, grading, 60.00 

Ellen I\I. Lewis, lot 25, block W, 24.00 
Ellen M. Lewis, lot 25, block W, 

grading, 18.00 

James IMorrison, lot 105, block W, 20.00 
James ^Morrison, lot 105, block W. 

grading. 15.00 

George E. Kibby, lot 74, block W, 28.80 
George E. Kibl)y. lot 74. block W, 

grading, 21.60 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 429 

John W. Leighton's estate, burial, $3.00 

Mrs. W. B. Stetson, care, 1.50 

F. A. Dame's estate, burial, 3.00 

G. D. B. Prescott, care, 1.00 
Mrs. A. J. Langley's estate, burial, 4.00 
Dr. Cumming.s, burial, .50 
J. H. Brown's estate, burial, 4.00 
W. D. Hutchinson, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. R. R. Shaw, care, 2.00 
George W. Blair's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. George H. Adams, care, 2.00 
Francis W. Tewksbury, burial, 3.00 
Miss Annah Kimball, care, 1.50 
Oliver Racine, labor, 1.00 
Adin Robinson, burial, 3.00 
C. A. Lewis' estate, burial, 3.00 
Thomas Riley, burial, .50 
George E. Kibby. 1.00 
Austin L. Howe, lot 88, block W, 24.00 
Austin L. Howe, lot 88, block W, 

grading, 18.00 
Charles H. Swain and C. L. Roberts, 

lot 12, block X, 84.00 
Charles H. Swain and C. L. Roberts, 

lot 12, block X. grading, 56.00 

Charles L. Ash, lot 77, block Q, 10.50 

Edwin Pinkham, lot 73, block Q, 10.50 
Estate of Maria L. Gove, lot 61, 

block X, 175.50 
Estate of Maria L. Gove, lot 61, 

block X, grading, 117.00 
George A. Dow, single grave and 

burial, 8.00 

Lenna Orclway, care, 1.00 

Austin L. Howe, burial, 3.00 

George W. Dow, care, 5.00 

J. H. and G. L. Brown, care, 2.00 



;3.00 


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1.50 


1.50 


4.00 


8.00 


8.00 


5.50 


3.00 


8.00 


9.00 


1.00 


3.00 


3.00 



430 CITY OF CONCORD. 

]\Ir. Persons, burial, 

W. E. Hunt, care, 

C. H. Swain, burial, 

G. S. Buswell, care, 

N. H. Shattuck, care, 

Colored Association, care, 

George Hawes, single grave and 

burial, 
Harry Ivey, single grave and burial, 
M. E. Banks, single grave and burial, 
Mrs. S. H. Stewart's estate, burial, 
i\Irs. J. S. Russ' estate, burial, 
Mrs. ^Nlaria L. Gove's estate, burial, 
J. G. Leighton, care, 
]\Irs. Anna L. IMorton's estate, burial, 
Frank Norton's estate, burial, 
Hiram Brown and Ada D. Hines, 

lot 36, block W, 36.00 

Hiram Brown and Ada D. Hines, 

lot 36, block W, grading, 28.80 

Ella ]\I. Elliott, lot 16, block W, 40.00 

Ella M. Elliott, lot 16, block W, 

grading, 40.00 

Cash for shrubs, 1.00 

Mrs. M. H. Calvert's estate, burial, 3.00 

James G. Chesley's estate, burial, 3.00 

Lucy Ann Young's estate, burial. 4.00 

]\Irs. J\Iary II. Brown, use of tomb, 1.00 

George H. Davis, labor, 5.25 

David Young, Jr., care, 3.00 

John C. Lane's estate, burial, 3.00 

George F. Underbill 's estate, burial, 8.00 

B. W. Couch, burial, 3.00 

Flint Granite Co., foundation. 38.00 

Woman's Relief Corps, flowers, 5.00 

Frank Dustin, burial, 3.00 

Fred Jones' estate, burial, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 431 

Mrs. Martha Gay's estate, burial, $3.00 

Mrs. N. F. Clark, repairs, 5.00 
]\Ir. Hines' estate, burial, • 3.00 

Mrs. R. Adams' estate, burial, 3.00 

E. A. IMoulton, labor, 4.00 

Fred U. Lane, care, 3.00 
Robert D. W. McKay, lot 81, 

block W, 24.00 
Robert D. W. I\IcKay, lot 81, 

block W, grading. 18.00 

Charles H. Elliott's estate, burial, 3.00 

Charles G. Danforth's estate, burial, 3.00 
Merrimack County, W. L. Chase, 

. burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Lizzie Robinson's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. M. Donald, removal, 2.00 

Mrs. Minnie Bartlett's estate, burial, 3.00 

Jonathan Weeks, burial, 3.00 

R. D. W. McKay, burial, 3.00 

Calvin C. AVebster's estate, burial, 4.00 

George K. Mellen, labor, 1.00 

Mrs. J. Follansbee, burial, 3.00 

Miss H. Stewart, labor, 1.50 

Felicite Pingault, lot 86, block M, 20.00 
Mrs. Henry L. Persons, lot 106, 

block W, " 20.00 
Mrs. Henry L. Persons, lot 106, 

block W, grading. 15.00 
Eliza A. Cole, lot 3, block W, 35.00 
Eliza A. Cole, lot 3, block W, grad- 
ing, 28.00 
Mrs. George H. INIoore, lot 57, 

block X, 45.00 
Mrs. George 11. IMoore. lot 57, 

block X, grading, 45.00 

Jessie M. Robinson, lot 73, block W, 28.80 
Jessie M. Robinson, lot 73, block W, 

grading, 21.60 



432 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. R. Prouse's estate, burial, $3.00 

George Clark, foundation, 5.00 
Mrs. Julia W. Russell's estate, 

burial, 10.00 

U. W. Hobb's estate, burial, 3.00 

D. AV. Hobb's estate, care, 1.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, , 5.00 

Hobert Goodwin, burial, 1.25 

Fred Fellows, burial, 3.00 

John Tebeau, removal, 4.00 

J. R. Hasking, foundation, 5.75 

Archie Carr, burial, 2.00 

Phillips & Sanders, foundation, 9.00 

Emile Pingault's estate, burial, 3.00 

Eilza A. Cole, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Alma Dunklee and Mrs. Hattie 

Belrose, lot 18, block W, 36.00 
Mrs. Alma Dunklee and Mrs. Hattie 

Belrose, lot 18, block W, grading, 28.80 

Charles H. Shattuck, lot 28, block X, 48.00 
Charles H. Shattuck, lot 28, block X, 

grading, 48.00 

Caroline L. George's estate, burial, 8.00 

George H. Moore's estate, burial, 3.00 

Ella Sturtevant, care, 1.00 

Mrs. F. A. Burnham, care, 1.00 

Percy Sanders, burial, 1.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 5.00 

Mrs. C. Dyer's estate, burial, 3.00 

W. G. Elliott, burial, 5.00 

Hillsboro County, burial, 3.00 

A. W. Johnson, removal, .50 

Mrs. Hevenor, burial and care, 2.00 

F. H. Clement, care, 1.00 

Mrs. D. Merrill, plants, 1.50 

Sarah B. Richardson, burial, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 433 

]\Iiss Rea, plants, $1.00 

George H. IMarston, burial, 10.00 

Cumming's Brothers, foundation, 5.00 

W. E. Keniston, lot 85, block W, 28.80 
W. E. Keniston, lot 85, block W, 

grading, 21.60 
F. R. Bailey, lot 24, block W, 24.00 
F. R. Bailey, lot 24, block W, grad- 
ing, 18.00 
Charles Barker's estate, burial, • 8.00 
Mrs. A. A. Young's estate, burial, 3.00 
Coos County (Arthur Morriss), 

burial, 3.00 

Harry G. Sander's estate, burial, 3.00 

George F. Durgin's estate, burial, 12.00 

E. B. Emerson, repairs, 3.00 
I\rrs. L. H. Clough, care, 2.00 
Palmer & Garmon, foundation, 2.25 
IMartha G. Hill's estate, burial, 3.00 
Perry Kittredge's estate, burial, 3.00 

F. R. Bailey, burial, 3.00 
Cummings Brothers, foundation, 5.00 
Mrs. Elisha Adams' estate, burial, 3.00 
Warren S. Rowell, burial, 1.00 
George H. Emery's estate,. burial, 10.00 
E. H. Randall's estate, care, 3.00 
William D. I.add's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. D. A. Warde's estate, burial 

and repairs, 5.25 

Mrs. C. H. Ordway, care, 2.00 

Mrs. George Barnes, care, 1.50 

J. E. Robertson, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. G. K. Lang, care, 1.00 

Mr. Devereaux, burial, 2.00 

L. H. Carroll, burial, 7.00 

W. I. Lovely, burial, 3.00 



28 



434 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Miss S. ]M. Geimarson, grave and 

burial, $8.00 
Mr. Carr, grave and burial, 6.00 
Miss A. Ericson, grave and burial, 8.00 
Mrs. Ida Sanborn 's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Batehelder Putney, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. A. E. Cote, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Annie Booth, burial, 3.00 
E. H. Randall, burial, 3.00 
M. B. Richardson, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Cramm, use of tomb, 1.00 
C. E. Burnside, care, 2.50 
L. H. Carroll, care, 2.00 
Orrin Whidden's estate, foundation, 9.00 
Cummings Brothers, foundation, 9.00 
P. S. Smith, care, 1.50 
Mrs. E. P. Shutz, care, 8.00 
Mrs. Rosella Day, care, 3.00 
A. S. Temple, burial, 1.00 
W. H. Clark's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mary Hurd, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Dumpley, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Eva M. Paul, burial, 3.00 
Henry Ivey, burial, 3.00 
Mr. Hastings, removal, 3.00 
Charles W. Lane, care, 1.50 
Mrs. B. E. Badger's estate, burial, 3.00 
William E. Badger, repairs, 2.00 
Daniel Blake's estate, burial, 3.00 
A. S. Temple, lot 79, block W, 24.00 
A. S. Temple, lot 79, block W, grad- 
ing, 18.00 
Mark N. Holt, lot 60, block W, 72.00 
Mark N. Holt, lot 60, block W, grad- 
ing, 48.00 
Henry Ivey, lot 22, block W, 24.00 
Henry Ivey, lot 22, block W, grading, 18.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



43f 



W. I. Lovely, lot 61i/>, block M, $25.00 

Edward A. Moulton, lot 55, block V, 72.00 
John F. Scott and Marion S. Nevers, 

lot 82, block W, 24.00 
John F. Scott and Marion S. Nevers, 

lot 82, block W, grading, 18.00 

William Bishop, lot 72, block W, 28.80 
William Bishop, lot 72, block W, 

grading, 21.60 

John M. Davis, lot 61, block M, 40.00 
Frank 0. Cox's estate, lot 82, 

block M, 25.00 
Mrs. Joseph H. Smart, lot 102, 

block W, 20.00 
Mrs. Joseph H. Smart, lot 102, 

block W, grading, 15.00 

Mrs. J. C. Lane, repairs, 4.50 

Mrs. Mansfield's estate, burial, 3.00 

Joseph B. Palmer, care, 2.00 

Fred Smith, burial, 3.00 

A. N. Alquist. burial, 1.00 

Mrs. Sarah Ash's estate, burial, 3.00 

Charles Ash's estate, burial, 3.00 

John Swenson, labor, 4.00 

Carpenter and Streeter, care, 5.00 

Nellie S. Nevers' estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. A. S. White, care, 25.00 

Mrs. E. B. Woodworth, plants, 3.00 

J. H. Gallinger, care, 2.00 

J. P. Nutter, care, 1.00 

Mrs. George Nutter, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Joseph Sargent, care, 1.00 

D. G. Lowell, care, 1.00 

W. E. Carpenter, 1.00 

C. R. Dame, care, 1.50 

George Rolfe, repairs, 2.50 

A. T. Whittemore, care, 1.00 



436 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



George L. Stratton, care, $3.00 

Batchelder Brothers, care, 2.50 

Fred Lane's estate, burial, 3.00 

Day Brothers, repairs, 5.00 

E. B. Hutchinson, care, 8.00 

Mrs. H. C. Sturtevant, care, 1.50 

H. A. Rowell, care, 1.50 

George H. Marston, care, 2.00 

John Ford, care, 1.50 

W. P. Fiske, c^re, 2.50 

Mrs. J. II. Chase, 5.00 

Mrs. J. Hannigan, rent, 12.00 

E. C. Eastman, care, 2.00 
H. M. Cavis, care, 1.00 
S. C. Eastman, care, 1.50 
R. F. Robinson, care, 2.00 
H. C. Brown, care, 1.50 
David Neal, care, 1.00 
William Bishop, burial, 2.00 
Mrs. Loran Clough, care, 1.50 
Mrs. Ansel Burnham's estate, burial, 8.00 
W. F. Thayer, care, 4.00 
Joseph Wentworth's estate, repairs, 1.50 
W. E. Chandler, care, 5.00 
Mr. Robey, burial, 1.00 
W. L. Jenks, care, 1.50 
T\Irs. George E. Todd, care, 2.00 
Barker & Howe, care, 1.50 
Henry Corser, care, 1.50 
Fred Powell, care, 1.00 

F. A. Colburn, care, 1.50 
I. A. Hill, care, 1.50 
i\Irs. R. R. Shaw, care, 2.00 
Edson J. Hill, care, 8.00 
C. E. Palmer, care, 1.25 
C. P. Tucker, care, 1.50 
C. F. Batchelder, care, 1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



437 



Warren Emervson, care, $2.50 

F. 0. Cox's estate, burial, 3.00 

Harry Dolloff, care, 1.50 

A. and E. M. Willis, care, 1.50 

Annah Kimball, care, 1.50 

George Carter, care, 1.50 

George C. Roy, care, 1.50 

Adam P. Holden, care, 2.00 

Mrs. J. M. Stewart, care, 2.00 

Lucy Poore, care, 1.50 

C. F. Osgood, burial, 3.00 

J. C. French, care, .75 

Mrs. H. E. Chandler, care, 1.50 

W. H. Horner, care, 1.25 

S. F. Morrill, care, 2.00 
Mrs. E. Adams' estate, Sanborn lot, 

care, ' 2.00 

George Connell, care, 2.00 

John F. Jones' estate, care, 2.00 

C. H. Martin, care, 1.50 

Charles Jackman, care, 1.00 

Lyman Jackman, care, 2.00 

J. F. Webtser, care, 2.50 

E. E. Brown, care, 1.50 

F. E. Brown, care, 1.00 
Mrs. W. H. Palmer's estate, burial, 4.00 
Orrin Whidden's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. W. T. Butter's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Charles Brown's estate, burial, 4.00 

G. M. Kimball, care, 2.50 
W. E. Dow, care, 1.00 
H. N. Farley, repairs, 2.00 
W. M. Chase, care, 2.00 
Mrs. C. C. Lund, care, 5.00 
Mrs. A. S. Marshall, care, 1.50 
Sarah M. K. Adams trust, 20.00 
Smith and Dimond Allen trust, 3.00 



438 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary B. Allison trust, $1.75 

Lavinia Arline trust, 1.50 

Alonzo Atherton trust, 3.00 

Abby L. S. Bailey trust, 4.00 

Oliver Ballou trust, 1^50 

Charles Barker trust, .50 

James "W. Barton trust, 2.50 

Mary A. Bass trust, 1.00 

Robert Bell trust, 1.50 

Matilda Benson trust, 1.25 

Ellen C. Bixby trust, 3.00 

J. D. Blaisdell trust, 5.00 

William J. Blakely trust, 2.00 

Emily P. Blancliard trust, 5.00 

Nathaniel Bouton trust, 7.00 

Mary N. P. Buntin trust, 5.00 

W. P. Burbank trust, * 1.50 

Harriet W. Butters trust, 4.00 

Benjamin F. Caldwell trust, 7.00 

Nathan F. Carter trust. 5.00 

Lizzie Cate trust, 1.50 

Samuel M. Chesley trust, 3.00 

Caroline Clark trust, 3.00 

Rufus Clement trust, 2.50 

William W. Cloud trust, 2.50 

Frederick Clough trust, 2.50 

George Clough trust, 3.00 

Mrs. N. P. Clough trust, 1.50 

Amos L. Colburn trust, 1.25 

Sarah F. Colby trust, ■ 3.00 

Mrs. Josiah Cooper trust, 3.00 

Mary Crow trust, 7.00 

Silas Curtis trust, 3.00 

Charles S. Danforth trust, 1.50 

Charles C. Danforth trust. 1.00 

Cordelia A. Danforth trust, 1.75 

Benjamin B. Davis trust, 1.50 



I 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 439 



Edward Dow trust, 


$3.00 


Mrs. Charles Dudley trust, 


1.50 


William B. Durgin trust, 


3.00 


J. B. Dyer trust, 


1.00 


Mrs. E. J. Eastman trust, 


3.00 


Stephen B. Eaton trust, 


1.50 


Lydia F. Edgerly trust. 


3.00 


Georgianna P. Ela trust. 


4.00 


Ella M. Elliott trust. 


.88 


Elizabeth F. Emerson trust. 


3.00 


Lydia F. Farley trust. 


5.00 


Mary ]M. Farnum trust, 


4.00 


Alva C. Ferrin trust. 


3.00 


Ferrin and French trust, 


1.50 


George G. Fogg trust. 


5.00 


Jerome Ford trust. 


3.00 


Asa Fowler trust. 


25.00 


Mrs. A. W. Gale trust. 


1.50 


John D. Gale trust. 


10.00 


John Gear trust. 


2.00 


Caroline L. George trust, 


2.00 


Enoch Gerrish trust, 


4.00 


Samuel K. Gill trust, 


2.00 


Glover and Osgood trust. 


2.00 


L. W. Glysson trust. 


1.50 


H. A. and F. A. Goss trust. 


5.00 


George N. Greeley trust, 


12.00 


William E. Greene trust. 


3.00 


Betsey Hadley trust, 


6.00 


George ]\I. Harding trust. 


1.50 


Mary D. Hart trust, 


12.00 


Timothy Haynes trust. 


3.00 


Charles F. Hildreth trust. 


3.00 


Emma J. Hill trust. 


1.50 


John :\r. Hill trust. 


6.00 


J. Frank Hoit trust, 


5.00 


Harriet F. Holman trust. 


2.50 



440 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sarah E. Irish trust. $3.00 

E. D. Jameson trust, 2.50 

Julia A. Jones trust, 2.00 

Seth K. Jones trust, 12.00 

J. and B. A. Kimball trust, 7.00 

E. L. Knowlton trust, 20.00 

William Ladd trust. 2.00 

Mrs. Charles Libby trust, 3.00 

Lincoln and Forrester trust, 3.00 

J. L. Lincoln trust, 2.00 

J. W. and E. J. Little trust, 6.00 

John McCauley trust, 3.00 

James McQuesten trust, 6.00 

G. and E. McQuesten trust, 3.00 

Henry A. Mann trust, 3.00 

H. W. and H. 0. Matthews trust, 3.00 

C. S. Mellen trust. 5.00 

J. B. Merrill trust, 3.00 

S. F. Merrill trust, 3.00 

Sullivan J. IMills trust, 4.00 

Charles Moody trust, 3.00 

Mary J. Moses trust, 4.00 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall trust, 10.00 

E. S. Nutter trust, 3.00 

Woodbridge Odlin trust, 3.00 

Eugene A. Ordway trust, 2.50 

Ordway and Sedgley trust, 3.00 

George F. Page trust, 1.50 

M. W. and M. A. Page trust, 1.50 

Cyrus W. Paige trust, 3.00 

J. B. Palmer trust, , .85 

Lucy J. Perkins trust, .75 

Mary N. Perley trust, 5.00 

Isabelle Perry tru>st,* - 1.50 

Hannah E. Phipps trust, 4.00 

Irving L. Pickering trust, 3.00 

W. 11. Pitman trust, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 441 

G. Lizzie Pixley trust, $2.00 

Edwin F. Plummer trust, 1.50 

James E. Rand trust. 1.50 

Henry W. Ranlet trust. 2.00 

George L. Reed trust, 3.00 

Judith A. Richardson trust, 3.50 

E. H. Rollins trust, 9.00 

David D. Rowe trust, 1.50 

Moses W. Russell trust. 5.00 

Jonathan Sanborn trust, 4.00 

Frank A. Sargent trust, 2.00 

John B. Sargent trust. 3.00 

Jonathan E. Sargent trust, 4.00 

Mary W. Smith trust. 3.00 

I\Ioses B. Smith trust, 1.50 

H. R. Southmaid trust. 1.50 

Julia F. Stark trust, 3.00 

Onslow Stearns trust. 5.00 

John W. Straw trust, 1.50 . 

Mary J. Streeter trust, 3.00 

Thomas Stuart trust, 3.00 

C. L. Tappan trust, 2.00 

Hiram B. Tebbitts trust, 5.00 

John S. Thompson trust, 3.00 

John C. Thome trust, 3.00 

Pliny Tidd trust, 1.50 

Tilton and Locke trust. 1.50 

John H. Toof trust, 2.50 

Jane R. Twombly trust, 3.00 

Eliza W. Upham trust, 5.00 

Charles P. Virgin trust. 1.25 

Gustavus Walker trust. 2.00 

Mary E. Walker trust, 5.00 

Mara J. Wardwell trust, 2.00 

George F. Whittridge trust, 5.00 

Sarah A. Williams trust, 3.00 

Mar3^ Williams trust, 1.50 



442 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Robert Woodruff trust, 
E. W. Woodward trust, 
Sarah F. Woodworth trust, 
William Yeaton trust, 



$5.00 
3.00 
2.00 
3.00 



Credit. 

One-half sale of lots for 1906, added 

to permanent fund, $690.85 

Income from sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account, trans- 
ferred to city of Concord, general 
account. 555.23 

Transferred to city of Concord, gen- 
eral account, 2,637.60 



$3,883.68 



$3,883.68 



RECEIPTS OF OLD NORTH CEMETERY. 

Amounts re?eived from sundry collections and income of permanent funds 
are added to the annual appropriation. The amounts e.xpended on trust 
funds are paid on a special order from the mayor, from the income of 
individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being 
used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

A. C. Sanborn, care, $1.00 

J. F. Webster, care, 1.00 

R. L. Ela's estate, care, 1.00 

Mrs. S. F. Cushing, care, 2.00 

Hosea Fessenden lot, repairs and care, 6.50 

Henry Minot's estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. J. M. Blake, repairs, 4.50 

Mrs. J. S. Norris' estate, burial, 8.00 

Mrs. George Morris' estate, burial, 3.00 

Oliver Racine, foundation, 4.00 

Nellie G. Fagan's estate, burial, 3.00 - 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 443 

"William Abbott, burial, $0.50 

Mrs. N. R. Brown, care, 1.00 
Mrs. Mary J. C. Eaton's estate, 

burial, 3.00 

Mrs. J. Farrar, care, 1.00 
Franklin W. Burnham's estate, 

burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Mary A. Houston, burial, 3.00 

Charles ]M. Ferrin's estate, burial, 4.00 

Frances Nichols, repairs, 3.00 

William Ballard, repairs, 4.00 

William R. Carter, burial, 3.00 

William Ballard, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Elvira Hoyt's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Saphrina Page's estate, burial, 3.00 

Old iron sold, 2.33 

Mrs. Sarah K. Merrill, burial, 3.00 

John F. AVilson, care, 1.00 

F. J. Constantine, burial, 3.00 

C. W. Dadmun, repairs, 3.00 

C. A. Hardy, care, 3.00 

Minot Cemetery Association, care, 81.34 

Mrs. J. E. Lang's estate, burial, 3.00 

T. D. Merrill lot, care, 1.00 
Mrs. E. J. Richardson's estate, 

burial, 4.00 

A. C. Sanborn, care, 1.00 

William Abbott trust, 8.00 

Samuel Alexander trust, 5.00 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, 3.00 

F. K. Blaisdell trust, 5.00 

John T. Chafan trust, 2.00 

Samuel Evans trust, 3.00 

Theodore French trust, 4.00 

Hosea Fessenden trust, 2.00 

Harvey J. Gilbert trust, 1.50 

Mitchell Gilmore trust, 4.00 



444 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Frank S. Harraden trust, 
L. Louise Hoit trust. 
Wm. F. Locke trust, 
Mary Ann INIorrill trust, 
S. and D. L. Morrill trust, 
True Osgood trust, 
Palmer and Savory trust, 
Alice W. Parker trust, 
Mrs. E. A. Pecker trust, 
Hiram Richardson trust, 
Sarah A. Stevens trust. 
Joseph Stickney trust. 
Nathan Stickney trust, 
Abigail Sweetser trust, 
T. and A. B. Walker trust, 
Albert Webster trust, 
Paul Wentworth trust, 
Sylvia Wolcott trust, 



$2.00 
3.00 
2.50 
1.50 
5.00 
3.00 
3.00 
2.00 
5.00 

10.00 
1.50 

15.00 
1.75 
5.00 
6.00 
2.00 
7.00 
2.00 



$292.92 



Credit. 

Income from sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account, trans- 
ferred to city of Concord, general 
account. 

Transferred to city of Concord, 
general account, 



$114.75 
178.17 



$292.92 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



445 



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450 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 







IMUNICIPAL. 






Bonds. 


Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


City Hall Building. 


Sept. 1,1912, 31/2, 


$8,000 




i I 


Sept. 1, 1913, 31/2, 


8,000 




I i 


Sept. 1, 1915, 31/2, 


8,000 




IC 


Sept. 1, 1916, 31/2, 


8,000 




1 1 


Sept. 1, 1918, 31/2, 


8.000 




i i 


Sept. 1,1919, 31/2, 


8,000 




I c 


Sept. 1,1920, 31/2, 


8,000 




i i 


Sept. 1, 1921, 31/2, 


7,000 




c c 


Sept. 1, 1922, 31/2, 


7,000 




C I 


Sept. 1, 1923, 31/2, 


5,000 




C i 


July 1, 1924, 31/2, 


10.000 




i ( 


July 1, 1925, 31/2, 


10,000 




< ( 


July 1, 1926, 31/2, 


10,000 




I i 


July 1, 1927, 31/2, 


10,000 




( I 


July 1,1928, 31/2, 


10,000 




i i 


July 1, 1929, 31/2. 


5,000 


Police Station, 


July 1, 1908, 31/2, 


5,000 


<< 


il 


July 1, 1909, 31/2, 


5,000 


< ( 


( i 


July 1, 1910, 31/2, 


4.000 


i I 


(( 


July 1, 1911, 314, 


3,000 


Bridges, 




July 1, 1907, 4. 


5,000 


State Li 


orary, 


June 1, 1914, 31/2, 


25,000 

4 




Precinct. 


s 



Sewer, 



$177,000 



June 1, 1914, 31/2, $25,000 
Dee. 1,1914, 31/2, 9,000 
July 1,1917, 31/2, 25,000 



$59,000 



Union School District, April 1, 1907, 31/2, $8,000 
Aprill, 1908, 31/2, 8,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



451 



Bonds. 

Union School District, 



Due. 

1. 1909, 
1, 1910, 
1, 1911, 
1. 1912, 
1. 1913, 
1. 1915, 
1, 1916, 
1, 1918, 
1, 1919, 
1, 1920, 
1, 1921, 
1, 1922, 
1. 1923, 
1, 1924, 
July 1, 1925, 
July 1,1926, 
July 1, 1927, 
July 1, 1928, 
July 1, 1929, 
July 1.1930, 
July 1, 1931, 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
Julv 



Rate. 

31/2, 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/^, 

31/2. 

31/2, 
31/,, 

31/2, 
31/2, 

31/2, 
31/2, 

31^, 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/0, 

31/2, 
31/2, 
31/0. 



Amount. 

$7,000 
7,000 
7,000 
7,000 
7,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 
8,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
4,000 

10,000 

10,000 
9,000 



$170,000 



School District No. 20, Sept. 1, 1913, 3i/o, $5,000 

Sept. 1,1914, 31/0, 500 

Sept. 1,1915, 31/2, 500 

Sept. 1,1916, 31/0, 500 

Sept. 1,1917, 31/2, 500 

Sept. 1,1918, 31/2, 500 

■ " Sept. 1,1919, 31/2, 500 

Sept. 1.1920, 31/2, 500 

Sept. 1,1921, 31/2, 500 

Sept. 1,1922, 31/2, 500 

Sept. 1.1924, 31/2, 4,300 



$13,800 



S. P. S. Sewerage, 



July 1, 1907, 3, 
July 1, 1908, 3, 



$500 
500 



452 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. 


] 


Due. 


Rate. 


Amount 


S. P. S. Sewerage, 


July 1, 1909, 


3, 


$500 


H I i 


July 


1, 1910, 


3, 


500 


a a 


July 


1, 1911, 


3, 


500 


11 I ( 


July 


1, 1912, 


3, 


500 


ti I i 


July 

Oct. 


1, 1913, 
1, 1907, 


3, 
4, 


500 


West Concord Sewer, 


$5,000 




Oct. 


1, 1912, 


4, 


7,000 




Oct. 


1. 1913, 


31/2, 


500 




Oct. 


1,1914, 


31/2, 


500 




Oct. 


1, 1915, 


31/2, 


500 




Oct. 


1, 1916, 


31/2, 


500 




Oct. 


1, 1917, 


31/2, 


500 




Oct. 


1, 1918, 


31/2, 


500 




Oct. 


1, 1919, 


31/2, 


300 



East Concord Sewer, July 1, 1910 
July 1,1915 



Penacook Sewer, 



31/2, 
31/2, 



$500 
500 



Aug. 


1, 1908, 


4, 


$6,000 


Oct. 


1, 1910, 


3, 


500 


May 


1, 1913, 


4, 


5,000 


July 


1. 1914, 


4, 


500 


July 


1, 1915, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 


1,1915, 


3, 


500 


July 


1. 1916, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 


1, 1916, 


3, 


500 


July 


1, 1917, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 


1, 1917, 


3, 


500 


July 


1.1918, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 


1. 1918, 


3, 


500 


Jul>' 


1,1919, 


4, 


500 



$3,500 



$15,300 



$1,000 



$16,500 

Total bonded indebtedness of the city, exclusive 

of water department, $456,100 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 453 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 



Municipal overdue January 


1, 1906, 


$239.75 


Precinct, 




267.50 


Union School District, 




17.50 


Due 


1906. 




Municipal, 




$6,420.00 


Precinct, sewer. 




2,065.00 


Union School District, 




1,925.00 


Penacook sewer, 




635.00 


West Concord sewer, 




595.50 


East Concord sewer, 




35.00 


St. Paul's School sewer. 




120.00 


School District No. 20, 




483.00 

$12,803.25 



Cr. 

Municipal paid, $6,353.50 

Precinct, sewer, 2,047.50 



Union School District, 


1,890.00 


St. Paul's School sewer. 


120.00 


Penacook sewer. 


635.00 


West Concord sewer, 


595.50 


East Concord sewer. 


35.00 


School District No. 20, 


483.00 


Municipal due. not presented, 


306.25 


Precinct due, not presented, 


285.00 


Union School District, due, not pre- 




sented, . 


52.50 



$12,803.25 



454 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASUEER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER- WORKS ACCOUNT. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, in account with Concord water- 
works : 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1906, $25,904.40 
V. C. Hastings, superintendent. 73.063.45 

$98,967.85 



Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $24,620.83 

Bonds paid, 11,000.00 

Orders paid, 46,071.55 

Cash on hand January 1, 1906, 17,275.47 



$98,967.85 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 

When due. Rate. Amount. \Vlien due. Rate. Amount. 

Jan. 1, 1907, 4, $10,000 Jan. 1, 1917, 4, $10,000 



Jan. 


1, 


1908, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1918, 


4, 


10.000 


Jan. 


1, 


1909, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1919, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1910, 


3, 


5,000 


Jan. 




1920, 


3, 


10.000 


Jan. 


1, 


1910, 


4, 


5,000 


Jan. 




1921, 


3, 


5,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1911, 


3, 


5,000 


Jan. 




1922, 


4, 


400,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1911, 


4, 


5,000 


Apr. 




1921, 


31/2, 


5,000 


Apr. 


1, 


1912, 


31/2, 


10.000 


Apr. 




1922, 


3Mi, 


30,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1913, 


4, 


10,000 


i\Iar. 




1922, 


31/2, 


20,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1914, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1923, 


3y2, 


15,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1915, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 




1924, 


31/2, 


15,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1916, 


4, 


10,000 
































$630,000.00 



Bonds due and not presented. $1,200.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 455 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1906, 

and not presented, $722.50 

Coupons due 1906, 24,675.00 

$25,397.50 

Cr. 

By coupons paid 1906, $24,617.50 

Coupons due and not presented, 780.00 

■ $25,397.50 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
accounts of William F. Thayer, city treasurer, for the year 
1906, and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein 
properly recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouch- 
ers, and the several items correctly cast, and cash balance 
to be thirty-nine thousand nine hundred sixty-eight dollars 
and twenty-four cents ($39,968.24), and as treasurer of the 
city water department, cash balance to be seventeen thou- 
sand two hundred seventy-five dollars and forty-seven cents 
($17,275.47). 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking 
funds of the city, and find such trust and sinking funds 
invested, and the income thereof, for the year 1906, ac- 
counted for, as shown by the book of the city treasurer, kept 
for that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



CITY EXPENSES. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1906. 



Boiler Public Library. 
Lee Brothers Co., $399.93 



City Poor. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, $1,168.18 



Dependent Soldiers, City. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, $111.53 



City Building and Loan. 

Robert D. Judkins, compiling and auditing 

accounts. $100.00 



Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $4,209.34 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, salary, 25.00 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals, 

etc., 24.68 

Concord Water- Works, water, 82.50 

Walter L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 73.88 



CITY EXPENSES. 457 

D. Waldo White, phosphate, $34.00 
Donald McLeod, plants, 175.23 
C. C. Hill, dressing, 17.50 
A. P. Home & Co., plants, etc., 113.86 
Whitmore Bros., plants, etc., 43.75 
Charles E. Fish & Co., shrubs, 35.00 
G. J. Benedict, plants, 47.46 

E. A. Moulton, cash paid out, 90.68 
George A. Foster, secretary, salary, 25.00 
Manchester S. & R. Co., wood ashes, 17.00 
Lee Brothers Co., repairs, 7.03 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 17.50 
Hutchinson Building Co., lumber, 

and extra account waiting station, 104.80 

$5,144.21 



Old North Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $411.94 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 15.00 

Concord Water- Works, water, 10.00 

E. A. Moulton, cash paid out, 3.15 



$440.09 



West Concord Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $42.12 

Simeon Partridge, phosphate, 12.50 



$54.62 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

E. F. Colby, labor, etc., $10.25 

Page Belting Co., supplies, 25.86 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, .98 

C. P. Colby, labor, 37.25 



458 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Henry A. Colby, labor, $52.25 

Sidney F. Smith, mowing, 10.00 

Thomas IT. Smith, labor, 10.00 

$146.59 

MiLLViLLE Cemetery. 
Isaac N. Abbott, treasurer, $75.00 



Horse Hill Cemetery. 
J. S. Runnells, treasurer, $25.00 

Old Fort Cemetery. 

C. P. Colby, labor, $5.75 

Henry A. Colby, labor, 10.00 

$15.75 

WooDLAWN Cemetery. 
E. H. Brown, treasurer, $25.00 



SoucooK Cemetery. 
Nahum Preseott, care, ' $20.00 



Dog Licenses. 

David Sanborn, sheep killed by dogs, $4.00 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing, 8.50 

F. J. Batehelder, printing, 8.50 
George McC. Sanborn, sheep killed 

by dogs, 5.00 

John Jordan, sheep killed by dogs, 10.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 459 

John N. Lane, hens killed by dogs, $2.00 
George H. Nichols, hens killed by 

dogs, 3.00 
James E. Dodge, sheep killed by 

dogs, 140.00 

C. A. Eastman, services, 2.00 

$183.00 



Engineering Department. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,530.50 

Frank P. Mace, supplies, 11.15 

C. E. Moss, supplies, 12.21 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 1.52 

W. B. Howe, cash paid out, 76.60 

B. Bilsborough, labor, etc., .67 
W. C. Gibson, supplies, 4.00 
George E. Carter, supplies, 1.80 
E. Dietzgen Co., supplies, 17.01 
Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 2.15 
S. P. Danforth, stakes, 25.25 
N. A. Dunklee, horse hire. 30.50 

C. L. Berger & Sons, tripod head, ■4.50 
Frost & Adams Co.. books, * 10.00 
J. E. Gage, repairs, 2.30 
E. B. Hanchay, sharpening bars, .60 



Fire Department. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $8,285.08 

Concord Electric Co., electricity, 686.17 

Concord Light and Power Co., gas, 44.64 

G. N. Bartemus & Co., forage, 471.05 

C. E. Burchsted, services, 18.00 



$2,730.76 



460 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Robert J. Macguire, services, $130.65 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 43.26 

E. S. Tenney Co., coal, etc., 1,324.17 

F. E. Gilford, wood, etc., 36.50 
A. W. Rolfe, cash paid out, 24.43 
R. F. Robinson, rent Veterans' Asso- 
ciation, 150.00 

Stuart Howland Co., supplies, 27.07 
Charles B. Mills, trucking, 2.00 
American Steel & Wire Co., wire, 48.07 
M. S. Sexton, horseshoeing, 14.70 
J. H. Callahan, horseshoeing, 24.00 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, horseshoe- 
ing, etc., 154.00 
J. E. McShane, horseshoeing, 120.00 
A. E. Savage, hay, 283.31 

D. Waldo White, forage, 59.05 
Mrs. George Jones, storage, 15.00 
George L. Theobald, horse hire, 24.50 
W. C. Green, cash paid out, 56.81 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals 

and tolls, 91.21 
S. P. Danforth, labor and supplies, 17.08 
George F. Sewall, Jr., trucking, 19.14 
George D. Huntley, repairs, 9.85 
Abbot-Downing Co., repairs and sup- 
plies, 203.25 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 57.52 
0. N. Davis, supplies, 14.95 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing, 16.84 
James R. Hill Co., repairs, 84.90 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 32.13 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 20.54 
G. H Farrand, supplies, .90 
J. D. Johnson & Son, supplies, 17.00 
Fred S. Farnum, repairs, etc., 1.50 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 2.87 



CITY EXPENSES. 461 

John E. Clinton, lunch, $2.00 

Hope Manufacturing Co., supplies, 1.25 

Rumford Printing Co., books, 7.75 

Cornelius Callahan Co., supplies, 229.86 

Combination Ladder Co., supplies, 33.50 

Eureka Fire Hose Co., hose, 2,250.00 

Marsh Coal Co., forage, 247.12 

D. Hammond & Son, forage, 3.67 
H. T. Corser, horse, 260.00 
H. T. Corser, horse hire, 56.00 

E. B. Morse, horse hire, 79.00 
M. F. Bickford, horse hire, 202.50 
Western Union Telegraph Co., time 

service, 15.00 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, 18.65 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies, 39.00 
Solshine Manufacturing Co., sup- 
plies, 4.00 
Salem Chemical & Supply Co., sup- 
plies, 10.64 
New Jersey Car Spring & Rubber 

Co., relining hose, 614.30 
Mrs. Jerome Turner, labor and sup- 
plies, 18.95 
L. Pickering, forage, 67.68 
International Power Co., repairing 

steamer, 2,000.00 

J. H. Toof & Co., laundry, 52.00 

Concord Water-Works, water, 111.50 

A. D. Wheeler, repairs, 187.41 

C. W. Dadmun, supplies, 10.55 

C. Pelissier & Co., repairs, 23.05 

Harry G. Emmons, supplies, 15.00 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 4.00 

0. J. Fifield, horse hire, 6.50 

J. H. Mercer, horse hire, 1.50 

W. A. Currier, hay, 33.93 



462 CITY OF CONCORD. 

L. F. Spofford. hay, $124.86 
E. F. Home, labor and supplies, 16.38 
James H. Sanders, lettering cross- 
arms, 4.50 
C. H. Swain & Co., labor and sup- 
plies. 4.24 
G. Silberg, whips, 12.00 
Winchester's Tar Disinfectant Co., 

supplies. 11.25 
Hutchinson Building Co., labor, etc., 7.25 
V. F. Atkins, lunches, 14.05 
Mitchell AVing & Co., supplies. 2.50 
George W. Chesley, horse hire, 2.00 
W. L. Riford, trucking, 1.50 
Penacook Electric Light Co., elec- 
tricity, 71.80 
Abbot-Downing Co., hook and lad- 
der truck, 1.000.00 
Abbot-Downing Co., extension lad- 
der, 175.00 
Abbot-Downing Co., set hub runners, 160.00 
Abbot-Downing Co., hose wagon, 490.00 
A. Perley Fitch, supplies, 1.80 
West Disinfectant Co., supplies, 15.00 
C. W. Bateman, labor and supplies, 13.46 
John A. Beck, hay, 58.50 
H. H. Hayward & Co.. slabs, 20.00 
J. C. McLaughlin, horseshoeing, 14.55 
C. O. Partridge, horse hire, 25.00 

E. L. Davis, horse hire, 208.10 
G. 0. Robinson, horse hire, 10.00 
W. E. Lynch, horse hire, 8.25 
Elmer Twombly, clamp, 1.75 
P. C. White, semi-annual pay-roll, 15.00 

F, E. Blodgett, semi-annual i)ay-roll, 45.00 
1j. H. Crowther, semi-annual pay- 
roll, 75.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 463 

W. p. Lacld, semi-annual pay-roll, $6,825.00 

Concord Coal Co., wood, 6.00 

J. E. Batchelder, hay, 24.16 

W. D. Nutting, clock oil, 1.00 

Island Pipe Wrench Co., wrench, 1.50 

A. C. Sanborn, keeping horse, 8.00 

C. N. Perkins Co., soda, 21.09 
F. L. Seavey, hay, 27.72 
Norris A. Dunklee, sponges, 7.90 
Mark M. Blanchard, supplies, 1.50 
John H. True, wood, 5.00 
Gamewell Fire Alarm Co., magnets, 9.00 
Ford & Kimball, supplies, 4.73 

F. W. Scott, use of wagon. 15.00 
L. E. Alexander, water, 8.00 
Concord Axle Co., hub, 2.22 

G. S. Milton & Co., supplies, 3.33 
Coates Clipper Manufacturing Co.. 

sharpening plates. 2.25 
J. B. McLeod. motor. 10.00 
George Abbott. Jr.. labor and sup- 
plies, 28.70 
Park & Russell Co.. supplies. .63 
Concord Ice Co., ice, 36.05 
W. B. Cunningham, trucking, 2.75 
A. B. Smart, blanket. 3.00 
W. A. Cowley & Co.. supplies. 2.44 
Shepard Brothers & Co., supplies, .50 
G. L. Lincoln & Co.. shades, 3.00 

D. W. Fox. supplies, 3.52 

— $28,911.18 



Health Department. 
Itemized in report of sanitary officer, $2,761.73 



464 city op concord. 

Highway Department. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $36,399.10 



Interest Cemetery Trust Funds. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, $777.49 



Incidentals and Land Damages. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll. 

marriages, $44.25 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 

births and deaths, 200.75 

James Grafton, services, janitor, 200.00 

M. A. Spencer, services city clerk's 

office, 469.50 

Alice Dana, services, indexing rec- 
ords, 128.83 

Henry E. Chamberlin, fees, vital sta- 
tistics, 151.35 

Henry E. Chamberlin, completing 

birth records, 69.00 

Henry E. Chamberlin, cash paid 

out, 45.19 

Eastman & Merrill, city officers' 

bonds, 18.00 

Eastman & Llerrill, insurance, city 

property, 308.25 

Morrill & Danforth, bond, city treas- 
urer, 75.00 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, city 

property, 338.75 

H. H. Chase, bond, tax collector, 75.00 

Capital Fire Insurance Co., insur- 
ance, city property, 324.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 465 

Chase & ^Martin, insurance, city prop- 
erty, $60.00 

Roby & Knowles, insurance, city 

property, 99.00 

Charles H. Cook, Jr., vaccinations, 

etc.. 145.00 

E. U. Sargent, vaccinations, etc., 1.20 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 

city hall, clock, etc., 152.61 

Concord Light & Power Co., water 

heater. Alert hose house, 30.00 

Concord Electric Co., electricity, city 

hall, 721.46 

Concord Electric Co., supplies, 5.76 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, city 

hall, 31.38 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, city 
hall, 

C. F. Batchelder, posting notices, 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., tele- 
phone, city solicitor, 

John Flynn, taxes refunded, 

W. P. Ladd, tax collector, taxes re- 
funded. 

Charles Main's estate, taxes re- 
funded, 

R. J. Graves, M. D., consultation 
case, Emma Hammer, 

Bailey & Merryman, repairs, city 
hall, 

Arthur Booth, supplies, city hall, 

Charles C. Schoolcraft, supplies, 
city hall, 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs 
and supplies, city hall, 

G. L. Lincoln & Co., matting, etc., 
city hall, 

30 



47.36 


13.50 


22.95 


21.86 


3.13 


18.70 


1.50 


10.02 


3.90 


2.00 


73.15 


63.19 



466 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Concord Water- Works, water, ward- 
rooms and fountains, $34.00 

The Reed Laundr}^ Co., laundry, 

city hall, 10.08 

E. S. Tenney Co., coal, city hall, 753.74 

Norris A. Dunklee, horse hire, com- 
mittees, etc., 29.00 

George E. Wood & Son, supplies, 

city hall, 1.25 

H. I. Dallman & Co., supplies, city 

hall, 5.75 

A. H. Knowlton & Co., vaccine 

points, etc., 20.15 

Foster & Hoit, commission, sale of 

city lots, 162.50 

E. C. Beckett, services account pac- 
ing mare Phalla, 20.00 

Frank G. Brown, services, janitor, 400.00 
Lewis B. Hoit, commission, sale of 

city lot, 82.50 
James F. Kelley, cleaning Ward 7 

ward-house, 2,00 

George L. Fogg, repairs, city hall, 3.00 
M. F. Bickford, barge, etc., street 

hearings, 20.00 
American Express Co., express, 

city reports, 8.18 

F. E. Gilford, wood, city hall, 9.00 
Town of Boscawen, taxes, 1906, 7.05 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, city 

hall, .30 
AVest Disinfectant Co., disinfectant, 

city hall, 17.50 
Pioneer Bundle Wood Co., wood, 

Ward 9 ward-house, 9.35 

D. J. Adams, forest fire warden, 140.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 467 

J. E. Willey, team hire account 

forest fires, $10.00 

William Farrancl, truant officer. 

District No. 20, 25.00 

William Farrancl, school census, Dis- 
trict No. 20, 10.00 
Henry E. Chamberlin, return of 

vital statistics per chapter 21, laws 

1905, 211.10 

Henry E. Chamberlin, land damage, 

Asa Emery, 75.00 

Donald IMcLeod, plants. INIemorial 

Arch, 25.00 

Donald McLeod, plants, central fire 

station, 18.50 

H. T. Corser, barge, street hearings, 19.00 

Prank C. Blodgett, numbering 

houses, Ward 3, 3.50 

E. M. Proctor, cash paid out, 3.10 

L. H. Crowther, ringing bell July 4, 2.00 

T. McCarthy, ringing bell July 4, 2.00 

D. C. Wingate, ringing bell July 4, 2.00 

W. H. Putnam, ringing bell July 4, 2.00 

H. H. Virgin, ringing bell July 4, 2.00 

L. Wetherbee, ringing bell July 4, 2.00 

J. M. Inman, ringing bell July 4, 2.00 

J. Stanley, ringing bell July 4, 2.00 

Cataract Engine Co., No. 3, swing 

harness, 30.00 

W. G. C. Kimball, frame and plate, 

mayor's portrait, 4.00 

George F. Sewall, Jr., trucking, 4.50 

Gibson Soap Co., soap polish, 7.50 

Rufus H. Baker, insurance, city 

property, 24.00 

John Fagan, repairs, ward-room 

Ward 8, 3.00 



468 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. C. Dutton, repairs, ward-room 

Ward 6, $7.00 
E. A. Stevens, services account ward- 
room Ward 4, 12.70 
George Belisle, box, Ward 4, 1.00 
John B. Abbott, expense account 

election Ward 4, 5.82 
H. V. Tittemore, trucking, 1.50 
Nevers' Band, extra expense ac- 
count concerts, 11.00 
E. L. Davis, moving band stand, 5.25 
E. L. Davis, ice, fountain Ward 1, 37.00 

E. L. Davis, trucking, 1.00 
Union Publishing Co., 12 directories, 36.00 
Robert Crowley, coal, city hall, 7.12 
W. H. Richardson, tulip bulbs, fire 

department, 3.75 

W. H. Richardson, tulip bulbs, police 

department, 5.60 

D. D. Taylor, land account Dakin 

Street, 600.00 
W. C. Gay, land account Dakin 

Street, 480.35 

George W. Kemp, land damage, 80.00 

Anne Garvey, land damage, 300.00 
Hutchinson Building Co., repairs 

Ward 7 ward-room, 6.50 
C. L. Morgan, sharpening lawn 

mower, .50 
J. C. Strickford, labor, Ward 2 

ward-room, 4.75 
M. Casey, cleaning Ward 9 ward- 
room, 4.00 
H. N. Perley, records returned, 1.00 

F. P. Curtis, records returned, • 1.00 
H. S. Farnum, records returned, 1.00 

E. P. Roberts, records returned, 1.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 469 

G. E. Chesley, records returned, $1.00 

T. J. Dyer, records returned, 1.00 

G. B. Whittredge, records returned. 1.00 

E. M. Quint, records returned, 1.00 
D. H. Gannon, records returned, 1.00 
Concord Ice Co., ice, city hall. 34.-19 
G. W. Johnson, balance salary tru- 
ant officer, 29.63 

F. W. Sanborn, supplies, city hall. 10.00 
W. B. Cunningham, trucking, city 

reports, 1.00 

S. N. Brown, recording deeds, 1.86 
R. W. Cate labor, ward-room 

Ward 2, 4.00 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, city 

hall, . ' 1.63 
Penacook Electric Light Co., labor 

ward-room Ward 1, 2.00 
Merrimack County, use of building, 

election, 75.00 
AV. H. Quimby, care lawn. Ward 7 

ward-house, 6.25 

$7,985.79 



Land Sold for Taxes. 
W. P. Ladd, tax collector. $2,934.38 



Memorial Day. 

J. E. Minot, Q. M., Sturtevant Post, $305.00 

S. N. Brown, Q. M., Brown Post, 105.00 

J. M. Grossman, Q. M., Davis Post. 50.00 



$460.00 



470 city of concord. 

]\Iargaret Pillsbury Hospital. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, $3,000.00 



IMiLiTARY Companies, Aid of. 

Company C, 2d Regiment, N. H. 

N. G., $100.00 

Company E, 2d Regiment, N. H. 

N. G. ' 100.00 



North State Street. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $4,590.15 
Page Belting Co., repairs, steam- 
roller, • 83.92 
W. L. Jenks & Co., belt lacing, 2.50 
Concord Foundry and Machine Co., 

labor, etc., 32.73 

Robert Crowley, coal, 150.50 

P. Crowle3% edgestone, 105.82 
J. H. Rowell & Co., concrete road- 
way, 5,787.77 

Hutchinson Building Co., stakes, 12.00 

C. Trenoweth, curbing, 8.00 
Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Co., 

steam gauge, 6.75 
Farrell Foundry and JMachine Co., 

screen, etc., 21.50 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 2.08 
Alfred Clark, commissioner, cash 

paid out, 1.50 

Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 23.94 

A. B. Black, sprocket, 1.26 

Ritchie & Elliott, mason work, 7.00 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 2.65 

J. Elizabeth Hoyt, cobble, 10.80 

Miss S. G. Perkins, cobble, 5.10 



$200.00 



$10,855.97 



city expenses. 
Open Air Concerts. 
Nevers' Second Regiment Baud, 



471 



$300.00 



Parks. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,211.97 

W. Carpenter, windows, etc., 5.95 

D. Waldo White, corn, 21.25 

G. D. Huntley, repairs, 1-4.75 

C. G. Blanchard. hay, 15.00 

W. H. Richardson, cash paid out, 26.65 

Edward Gillette, azalias, 10.00 
R. and J. Farquhar & Co., plants, 

etc., 65.40 

Samuel Holt, grade and loam, 28.90 
Cape Cod Squab Poultry and Game 

Farm, pair swans, 40.00 
Ellwanger & Berry, shrubs, 14.95 
C. R. Fish & Co., shrubs, 65.90 
H. P. Kelsey, shrubs, 10.00 
W. W. Critchett, fertilizer, 64.00 
Mrs. E. Tandy, ashes, 1.50 
Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 8.59 
J. T. Prowse, teams, 19.50 
Woodworth & Co., cement, 7.05 
G. W. Brown, squirrel house, 15.00 
M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, 3.20 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 27.00 
George Abbott, Jr., paint, 22.39 
George W. Chesley, loam and team- 
ing. 208.29 
George Richardson, plants, 24.00 
W. L. Riford, trucking, etc., ' 23.69 
James H.. Bowditch, plants, etc., 42.40 



472 CITY OF CONCORD. 

First National Bank, interest on 
note, 

First National Bank, note, 

John Lugg, labor, 

J. C. Thorne, rubber boots, 

Donald IMcLeod, plants, 

F. W. Sanborn, repairs, etc., 

W. G. C. Kimball, trees, etc., 

Cummings Brothers, labor, etc., sun 
dial, 

C. G. Blake & Co., sun dial, etc., 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing. 

Concord Water- Works, water, 

Thompson & Hoague Co., iron fence, 
etc., 

Scott French, team, etc.. 

City of Concord, highway depart- 
ment, crushed stone, 15.00 



Penacook Park. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 
W. H. Richardson, cash paid out, 
Shepard Brothers & Co., supplies. 
Concord Lumber Co., plank, 



$27.00 


200.00 


18.00 


3.00 


19.95 


3.25 


9.95 


28.08 


83.00 


2.25 


29.00 


331.58 


3.50 



$103.00 


23.53 


9.00 


2.85 


6.24 



$3,770.89 



$144.62 



Washington Square. 
E. H. Brown, treasurer, appropriation, $25.00 



Police and Watch. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $12,662.02 
James E. Rand, cash paid out, 269.29 



CITY EXPENSES. 473 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals 

and tolls, $143.18 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., pri- 
vate line. 164.32 

Concord Electric Co.. electricity, 115.20 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights, 28.63 

Norris A. Dunklee, board of horse 

and hire. 353.25 

C. H. Swain & Co.. labor and sup- 
plies. 3.80 

0. J. Fifield, teams, 12.50 
A. Perley Fitch, supplies, 3.90 
Rumford Printing Co., printing, 10.75 

F. W. Landon & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, 12.05 

George E. Carter, supplies. .25 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 2.55 

J. E. Dwight. salary. 50.00 

Giles Wheeler, salary. 50.00 

G. Scott Locke, salary. 50.00 
John MeGirr. teams, .50 
Concord "Water- Works, water, 43.00 
Ira C. Evans Co.. printing, 37.75 
G. L. Lincoln & Co., supplies, 16.00 
G. D. Huntley, repairs. 55.75 
Batchelder & Co.. supplies, 13.22 
E. F. Akerly, one-half telephone ex- 
pense. 9.00 

Hoyt Robinson, one-half telephone 
expense, 

1. B. Robinson, one-half telephone ex- 
pense, 

C. T. Wallace, one-half telephone ex- 
pense, ■ 9.00 

V. I. INloore, one-half telephone ex- 
pense, 9.00 



9.00 
9.00 



474 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



C. H. RoAve, one-half telephone ex- 
pense, $6.75 

D. S. Flanders, one-half telephone 
expense, 1.50 

W. D. Barrett, one-half telephone 

expense, 3.52 

R. J. Macgnire, services, 6.35 

A. Sweet, horse hire, .50 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 12.25 
Thomas J. Dyer, printing, 1.50 
A. B. Morrill, M. D., services, 1.50 
C. Pelissier & Co., supplies, 2.35 
C. L. Howe & Co., supplies, 3.00 
Concord Light and Power Co., gas, .70 
Concord Evening Monitor, adver- 
tising, 3.20 

People and Patriot, supplies, 4.50 
E. C. Atwood, supplies, 1.20 
Raphael Masstrangialo, helmets, etc., 59.05 
E. S. Tenney Co., coal, 270.92 
C. H. Cook, Jr., services, 10.00 
George Prescott, signs, 15.75 
C. H. Fowler, supplies, 5.02 
M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, 10.59 
Frank P. Mace, supplies, 10.60 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 15.25 
E. L. Davis, trucking, 4.25 
George W. Brown, supplies, 1.00 
S. L. Batchelder, team hire, 3.00 
J. E. McShane, shoeing horse, 25.00 
J. E. Gage, repairs, 2.95 
Concord Ice Co., ice, 2.11 



$14,627.22 



Precinct Garbage. 
Itemized in report of highway department. 



$6,003.26 



city expenses. 475 

Precinct Lighting Streets, City. 

Concord Light and Power Co., gas, $3,765.16 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, 12,087.58 

$15,852.74 



Precinct Lighting Streets, East Concord. 
Concord Electric Co., electricity^ $447,14 



Precinct Lighting Streets, Penacook. 

A. W. Rolfe, treasurer. $350.00 

C. H. Barnett, treasurer, 1,000.00 



Precinct Sewers, City. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls. $2,326.30 

C. B. Mills, trucking, 11.00 

H. V. Tittemore, trucking, 4.00 

Frank P. Mace, supplies, 1.00 

Dickerman & Co., cement, 64.65 

W. L. Riford, trucking, 17.75 

C. A. Yeadon, trucking, 1.25 

Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 10.00 

George L. Theobald, team hire, 61.10 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 25.70 

E. B. Hanchay, repairs, 5.30 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 114.27 

W. H. Ash, trucking. .75 

J. F. Ward, trucking, 4.85 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 62.74 

G. W. Heath, trucking, .50 

C. L. Fellows & Co., labor, etc., 11.25 



$1,350.00 



476 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Concord Foundry and Machine Co., 

supplies, 
E. C. Paige, trucking, 
Samuel Holt, brick, etc., 
Hutchinson Building Co., lumber 
William H. Ahern, trucking, 
William Noonan, trucking, 
G. F. Sewall, trucking, 
G. C. Robinson, trucking. 
Ford & Kimball, man-hole and 

covers, 
Page Belting Co., labor. 
Gale & Brown, supplies, 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies 



$3.85 


3.60 


71.50 


.95 


.50 


.75 


1.00 


.35 


71.81 


1.65 


■ 1.40 


5.85 



$2,885.62 



Precinct, East Concord Sewer. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund, $100.00 



Precinct, Penacook Sewer. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls 
George Neller, labor, etc., 
H. L. Bond & Co., supplies, 
W. W. Allen, cash paid out, 
Foote, Brown & Co., cement, 
Orr & Rolfe, pipe, 
S. Eastman & Co., supplies, 
C. IVr. and A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 
Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking 
fund. 



$124.8-1 


11.05 


35.65 


.60 


2.85 


13.30 


2.25 


1.53 


3.20 


1,300.00 



$1,495.27 



city expenses. 477 

Precinct, St. Paul's School Sewer. 
Concord Water-Works, water, $45.00 



Precinct, West Concord Sewer. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $29.71 
George L. Theobald, team, 1.50 
Simeon Partridge, filling on Inter- 
vale, 30.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking 

fund, * 1,000.00 



$1,061.21 



Precinct, Sprinkling Streets. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $5,594.79 



Precinct Water for Hydrants. 
Concord Water-Works, $6,000.00 



Printing and Stationery. 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing, $174.33 

D. L. Guernsey, supplies, 1.00 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 22.77 
Concord Evening Monitor, publish- 
ing ordinances, 122.26 

Rumford Printing Co., printing, 

etc., 2,053.32 

W. A. Chamberlin, stamps and pads, 2.00 

E. L. Glick, supplies, 3.50 

F. J. Batchelder, printing, 14.00 
George E. Carter, supplies, 4.28 



478 CITY OP CONCORD. 

People and. Patriot, publishing ordi- 
nances, $136.84 
Yawnian & Erbe ]\Ianufacturing Co., 

supplies, 7,50 

Treworgy Ink and. Pen !!\Ianufactur- 

ing Co., supplies, 2.60 

C. F. Nichols, supplies, 9.45 

John H. Brown, postmaster, stamped. 

envelopes, 214.00 

Monitor and Statesman Co., print- 
ing, 10.00 
George H. Richardson & Co., pens, 2.00 
Independent Statesman, printing, 5.25 
J. Phaneuf & Son, printing, 12.55 



Public Baths. 

Y. M. C. A., services swimming pool, $206.92 

J. F. Kelly, chain, 2.00 

Carolyn F. Stickney, right of way. 15.00 



Public Libr.\ry. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,755.29 

W. B. Clarke Co., books, ' 41.22 

Smith & MeCance, books, 12.60 

G. H. Policy & Co., books, 28.00 

C. F. Nichols, books, etc., 195.80 

Old Corner Bookstore, books, 15.55 

W. A. Keating, books, 14.17 

E. C. Eastman, books, 199.85 

Balch Brothers, books, 4.00 

N. F. Carter, books, 6.00 

New England H. G. Society, books, 30.00 



$2,797.65 



$223.92 



CITY EXPENSES. 479 

H. W. Wilson Co.. periodicals. $6.00 

Publisher's Weekly, periodicals, 7.00 

Concord lee Co., ice, 11.44 

Grace Blanchard. cash paid out. 99.57 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing, 41.55 

E. S. Tenney Co., coal, 306.13 
Concord Light and Power Co., gas, 155.97 
Boston Book Co., books, 3.00 
American Magazine Exchange, books, 2.25 
W. S. Houghton, books, 2.00 
Library Bureau, periodicals, etc., 23.75 

F. J. Barnard & Co.. binding, 268.10 
Rumford Printing Co.. printing, etc., 10.75 
Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 3.90 
Orr & Rolfe, rent of room, 24.00 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co.. supplies, 11.33 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 4.90 
H. W. Rogers, books, 5.00 
C. E. Lauriat Co.. books. 486.61 
H. R. Huntting & Co.. books, 3.00 
Dow, Jones & Co., periodicals, 10.00 
Concord Water- Works, water, 11.00 
Goodspeed's Book Shop, books, 26.00 
E. P. Thurston, periodical, 5.00 
Boston Bookbinding Co., binding, 111.50 
Cedric Chivers, books, 11.80 
W. B. Cunningham, trucking, 26.00 
R. E. Gale, care of books, 26.00 
W. E. Darrah, labor and supplies, 6.45 

B. Bilsborough, labor and supplies, 3.92 
Virgin & Forest, labor and supplies, .50 

C. G. Coffin & Co., grass seed, 1.50 
W. L.' Riford, trucking. 2.50 
T. E. Schulte, books. 30.23 
W. C. Gibson, periodicals, 60.00 
Hutchinson Building Co., labor and 

supplies, 2.50 



480 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Lee Brothers Co., labor and supplies, $29.84 
McChire, Phillips & Co., books, 36.10 
Dennison Manufacturing Co., sup- 
plies, 2.00 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 1.80 
C. G. Remiek, rubber bands, 3.00 
E. F. Home, labor and supplies, 15.63 
Robert Crowley, wood, 2.50 
R. W. Eldridge, periodicals, 173.20 
Granite Monthly, periodicals, 3.00 
People & Patriot, subscription, 6.00 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 1.40 
Monitor and Statesman Co., sub- 
scription, 6.00 
University Press, subscription, 3.00 
Literary Art Club, assessment, 1.00 



Repairs op Buildings. 

Bailey & Merryman, supplies, city 

hall, ' $21.83 

S. P. Danforth, footlights, etc., audi- 
torium, 56.79 

S. P. Danforth, labor and supplies, 

central fire station, 84.65 

S. P. Danforth. labor and supplies, 

city hall, 5.69 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, city 

hall, ' 35.97 

W. E. Darrah, labor and supplies, 

police station, 8.00 

S. P. Danforth, labor and supplies, 

Good Will hose-house, 158.29 

C. W. Dadmun, labor and supplies, 

auditorium, 46.57 

E. F. Home, stall traps, 24.50 



$5,398.10 



CITY EXPENSES. 481 

Whitney Electrical Instrument Co., 

repairs, fire station. Ward 1. $1.90 

E. C. Durgin, repairs, engine house, 

Ward 1. 33.38 

C. W. Drake, repairs, central fire 

station. 33.10 

E. E. Babb, repairs, engine house, 

Ward 1, 17.70 

S. P. Danforth, repairs. Alert hose- 
house, 139.62 
Orr & Rolfe, repairs, Good Will 

hose-house, 69.40 

Orr & Rolfe, labor. Ward 9 ward- 
house. 2.55 
B. Bilsborough, repairs, auditorium, 5.18 
Rowell & Plummer, repairs. Alert 

hose-house, 15.00 

W. Carpenter, painting. Alert hose- 
house, 59.20 
S. P. Danforth, labor and supplies, 

engine-house. Ward 1, 19.97 

S. P. Danforth, labor and supplies, 

engine-house. Ward 3, 18.15 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 

ward-house. Ward 7, 1.00 • 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 

Alert hose-house, 10.70 

L. J. Sebra, repairs, engine-house. 

Ward 1, 9.75 

E. E. Babb, repairs, police station, 

Ward 1, 1.50 

Haines Brothers, painting, engine- 
house. Ward 1, 70.00 
Ford & Kimball, track, Alert hose- 
house, 11.10 
Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 

engine-house, Ward 2, 63.25 

31 



482 CITY OF CONCORD, 

S. P. Danforth, steel ceiling, etc., en- 
gine-house. Ward 2, $68.81 

"W. W. Allen, shades, engine-house. 

Ward 1, 5.00 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 

auditorium, 100.00 

Concord Light and Power Co., pip- 
ing, auditorium, 14.10 

C. A. Davis, labor, engine-house. 

Ward 1, 18.05 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies. Alert 

hose-house, 4.21 

J. E. McShane, iron fence, city lot, 32.00 

E. L. Davis, labor, police station. 

Ward 1, 39.80 

Henry Rolfe, labor, police station, 

Wafd 1, 14.58 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 

police station. Ward 1, 5.15 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, city 

hall, 34.00 

11. E. Clifford & Co., labor and sup- 
plies. Alert hose-house, 80.50 

C. N. Perkins Co., track, hook and 

ladder truck, 92.50 

G. S. Milton & Co., labor, central 

fire station, 11.85 

Highway department, labor, police 

station, Ward 1, 6.50 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, police 

station. Ward 1, 2.67 

Foote, Brown & Co., lawn seed, po- 
lice station, Ward 1, 1.25 

C. M. and A. W. Rolfe, fence posts, 

police station, Ward 1, 6.67 

C. M. and A. W. Rolfe, labor and 

supplies, engine-house. Ward 1, 2.89 



CITY EXPENSES. 483 

P. Crowley, curbing, police station, 

Ward 1, $26.43 

Penacook Electric Light Co., wiring 

engine-house, Ward 1, 7.66 

W. Carpenter, painting, engine- 
house, Ward 2, 15.75 

W. Carpenter, painting, auditorium, 1.80 

George Abbott, Jr., painting, audi- 
torium, 3.94 

George Abbott, Jr., labor. Good Will 

hose-house, 2.22 

G. A. Mitchell, painting, Good Will 

hose-house, 45.00 

C. P. Haines, labor, fence, police 
station. Ward 1, 1.74 . 

W. H. Sargent, labor, shed, city lot, 9.00 

G. S. Milton & Co., iron fence, 17.32 

Ford & Kimball, fence guards, 6.24 

Cushman Electric Co., labor on 

fence, 8.40 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., matting, 

Alert hose-house, 11.33 

$1,722.10 



Kepairs, Fire Station Stable, Ward 1. 
Louis J. Sebra, $694.77 



Salaries. 



Charles R. Corning, mayor, $1,000.00 

Henry E. Chamberlin, city clerk, 1,200.00 

Henry E. Chamberlin. overseer of 
the poor, Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 
and 9, 350.00 

F. H. Blanchard, overseer of the 

poor, Ward 1, 30.00 



484 CITY OF CONCORD. 

John T. Gate, overseer of the poor, 

Ward 2, $10.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, 250.00 

Edward M. Proctor, city messenger, 800.00 

E. S. Cook, city solicitor. 500.00 

George W. Brown, care city clocks, 85.00 

W. H. Putnam, care city clock, 25.00 

George W. Johnson, truant officer, 500.00 
J. W. MclNIurphy, clerk common 

council, 50.00 
George M. Fletcher, judge, police 

court, 1,000.00 

Eufus H. Baker, clerk, police court. 200.00 
Alice M. Nims, secretary board of 

education, Union School District. 250.00 
Albert Saltmarsh. chairman board 
of education. Town School Dis- 
trict, 200.00 
H. C. Holbrook chairman, board of 

education. District No. 20, 50.00 
0. J. Fifield, assessor, Ward 1, 288.00 
W. A. Cowley, assessor. Ward 2, 297.00 
J. E. Shepard, assessor. Ward 3, 267.00 
George W. Parsons, assessor. Ward 4, 510.00 
Estate of G. F. Underbill, Ward 5, 40.00 
G. A. Foster, assessor. Ward 5, 336.00 
0. M. Allen, assessor. Ward 6. 501.00 
J. H. Quimby, assessor, Ward 7, 306.00 
W. A. Lee, assessor, Ward 8. 303.00 
Thomas Nawn, assessor. Ward 9, 287.00 
W. P. Ladd. collector of taxes, 1,849.89 
Moderators, ward clerks and select- 
men, 342.00 
Inspectors and supervisors, 396.00 
Benjamin W. Couch, special justice 

police court, 26.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 485 

Cornelius E. Clifford, special justice 

police court, $2.00 

Fred H. Gould, special justice police 

court. 4.00 

$12,254.89 



Salaries, City Council. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,046.00 



Schools. 



J. T. Walker, agent. Union School 

District, $73,239.01 

D. T. Twomey, treasurer. School 

District No. 20, 6,321.75 

I. N. Abbott, treasurer. Town School 

District, 3.884.26 

— $83,445.02 



Waiting Station, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 
Hutchinson Building Co., $3,000.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid city poor, $800.00 ) ^^ -j^gg ^g 

Joint resolution Xo. 788, 368.18 ) 

Aid dependent soldiers, city, 150.00 111.53 $38.47 

Aid dependent soldiers, county, 1,866.16 

Aid county poor, 7,820.87 
Aid local military companies: 

Joint resolution No. 757, 200.00 200.00 
Bridge bonds, payment of: 

Joint resolution No. 770, 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Cemeteries : 



Blossom Hill, 


$1,000.00 


$5,144.21 


Income cemetery fund, 


848.95 




Income trust funds, 


555.23 




Transferred from cemetery acc't, 


2,637.60 






$5,041.78 


$5,144.21 


Old North, 


$100.00 


$440.09 


Income cemetery fund. 


28.53 




Income trust fund. 


114.75 




Transferred from cemetery acc't. 


178.17 





$421.45 $440.09 

West Concord, $75.00 $54.62 $20.38 

Millville, 

Pine Grove, 150.00 146.59 3.41 

Woodlawn, 

Soucook, 

Horse Hill, 

Old Fort, 

Joint resolution No. 788, 
Dog licenses, 



75.00 


75.00* 


150.00 


146.59 


25.00 


25.00 


20.00 


20.00 


25.00 


25.00 


15.00 ) 
.75 J 


15.75 




183.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



487 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



Engineering department : 








Salary engineer, 


$1,500.00 


$1,500.00 




Salary assistants, 


1,100.00 


1,030.50 


$69.50 


Supplies, 


150.00 


89.59 


60.41 


Repairs, 


50.00 




50.00 


Incidentals, 


200.00 


110.67 


89.33 



$3,000.00 $2,730.76 $269.24 



Fire department : 



Pay-rolls, permanent men. 


$7,074.00 


$7,074.00 


Pay-rolls, extra men vacations. 


624.50 


624.50 


Pay-rolls, semi-annual, 


6,960.00 


6,960.00 


Rent Veterans ' Association, 


150.00 


150.00 


Forage, 


1,500.00 


1,399.53 


Fuel, 


900.00 


1,407.07 


Fire alarm, 


1,000.00 


683.52 


Horse hire. 


800.00 


597.85 


Horseshoeing, 


325.00 


327.00 


House man, 


80.00 


80.00 


Lights, 


700.00 


761.54 


Washing, 


52.00 


52.00 


Chemical supplies. 


50.00 


40.24 


Water, 


119.50 


119.50 


Incidentals, 


1,665.00 


2,299.43 


Hose, joint resolution No. 747, 


2,250.00 


2,250.00 


Ladder, joint resolution No. 752, 


175.00 


175.00 


Hook and ladder truck, joint reso- 






lution No. 760, 


1,200.00 


1,160.00 


Hose wagon, joint resolution No. 






771, 


490.00 


490.00 


Repairing steamer and purchase of 






horse, joint resolution No. 784, 


2,300.00 


2,260.00 


Joint resolution No. 788, 


496.18 





Health, board of: 

Salary health officer. 
Salary board, 
Fumigation supplies, 
Incidental expense, 
Joint resolution No. 



783, 



Joint resolution No. 788, 



^28,911.18 $28,911.18 

$1,200.00 $1,200.00 
75.00 75.00 

125.00 66.83 

600.00 1 

500.00 \ 1,419.90 
261.73 J 



$2,761.73 $2,761.73 



488 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Highway department: 

Salary commissioner, $1,400.00 $1,400.00 

General maintenance and repair, 23,000.00 22,834.94 

General maintenance, Pleasant St., 2,116.51 

Permanent work, North State St., 1,500.00 1,497.80 

Permanent work, Penacook road, 2,500.00 2,564.55 
Permanent work, South Pembroke 

road, 500.00 520.40 

Permanent work. South Spring St., 1,000.00 1,021.49 

Sidewalks and crossings, new, 2,000.00 513.38 

Sidewalks and crossings, repair, 1,500.00 1,592.36 

Catch basins, 1,500.00 1,689.54 

Care of trees, 800.00 648.13 

Joint resolution No. 788, 699.10 



$36,399.10 $36,399.10 



North State Street: 

Joint resolution No. 777, 

Fund for improvement of State 
Street, 
Incidentals anil land damages. 

Joint resolution No. 781, 
Interest, cemetery trust funds, 
Interest on notes and bonds, 
Interest on temporary loan, 

Joint resolution No. 788, 
Land sold for unpaid taxes, 1905: 

Joint resolution No. 766, 
New boiler, public library: 

Joint resolution No. 761, 
Margaret Pillsbury hospital, 
Memorial Day, 
Open-air concerts, 
Parks, 

Joint resolution No. 788, 
Penacook Park, 

Joint resolution No. 788, 
Washington Square, 

Police and watch : 

Salaries, regular force, 
Salaries, special. 



$5,000.00 ■ 

5,855.97 
4,000.00' 
4,000.00 

658.00 
6,420.00 
1,500.00 

249.39 



2,934.38 2,934.38 



|.$10, 855.97 

7,985.79 

777.49 

6,353.50 

1,749.39 



400.00 


399.93 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


460.00 


460.00 


300.00 


300.00 


3,500.00 ) 
270.89 j 


3,770.89 


125.00 ) 
19.62 )■ 


144.62 


25.00 


25.00 



$14.21 



66.50 



.07 



$12,025.00 $11,959.49 
400.00 402.53 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



489 





Appropriation. 


Expended. Balance. 


Salary, janitor, 


$300.00 


$300.00 


Fuel, 


525.00 


273.17 


Helmets and buttons, 


.50.00 


59.05 


Horse hire, 


30.00 


69.75 


Horse, board of, 


325.00 


325.00 


Ice, 


5.00 


2.11 


Incidentals, 


600.00 


734.27 


Lights, 


160.00 


144.53 


Telephone, private line, 


164.32 


164.32 


Water, 


43.00 


43.00 


Police commission. 


150.00 


150.00 



Precinct, garbage: 

Balance from 1905, 

Appropriation, 

Joint resolution No. 788, 



Precinct, lighting streets, city, 
Balance from 1905, 



Precinct, lighting streets, E. Concord, 
Balance from 1905, 



$14,777.32 $14,627.22 $150.10 

$25.87 
6,000.00 $6,003.26 
153.03 



$6,178.90 $6,003.26 $175.64 

$15,000.00 $15,852.74 
526.70 



15,526.70 $15,852.74 

$200.00 .$447.14 
261.01 



$461.01 $447.14 $13.87 
Precinct, lighting streets, Penacook, $1,250.00 $1,350.00 



Balance from 1905, 



Precinct, sewer, city 



350.00 



$1,600.00 $1,350.00 $250.00 



Construction and repair. 




$1,000.00"] 




Balance from 1905, 




1,624.47 [ 


$2,88.5.62 


Joint resolution No. 788, 




262.34 j 




Note No. 295, 




1,-500.00 


1,-500.00 


Note No. 308, 






5,000.00 


Interest on notes and 


bonds, 






overdrawn balance, 1905, 






105.13 


Appropriation, 




2,360.00 


2,397.50 



5,746.81 $11,888.25 



490 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Precinct, sewer, East Concord; 

Balance from 1905, 
Interest on bonds. 
Sinking fund, 



Precinct, sewer, Penacook: 

Overdrawn balance, 1905, 
Construction and repair. 
Interest on bonds. 
Sinking fund, 

Precinct, sewer, St. Paul's School: 

Construction and repair. 
Balance from 1905, 
Interest on bonds, 
Sinking fund, 



Precinct, sewer. West Concord: 

Balance from 1905, 
Interest on bonds. 
Sinking fund, 



Precinct, sprinkling streets, 
Balance from 1905, 

Precinct, water, hydrant service. 

Printing and stationery. 
Joint resolution No. 774, 

Public baths, 

Public library: 

Salaries, 

Balance from 1905, 

Incidentals, 

Trust funds, 

Pines, 

Sale of catalogues. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

$132.40 

35.00 $35.00 
100.00 100.00 



$267.40 $135.00 $132.40 

$35.62 

$300.00 195.27 

635.00 635.00 

1,300.00 1,300.00 



$2,235.00 $2,165.89 $69.11 

$45.00 

25.64 $45.00 
120.00 120.00 
500.00 500.00 



$690.64 $665.00 $25.64 

$71.56 $61.21 

595.50 595.50 

1,000.00 1,000.00 



$1,667.06 $1,656.71 

$5,000.00) g 
687.96 ) 

$6,000.00 $6,000.00 

$2,000.00) , 
800.00) 

$250.00 $223.92 



$2,760.00 

11.06 $2,755.29 
2,240.00 2,642.81 
165.91 
242.50 
8.35 



$10.35 
$93.17 

$2.35 
$26.08 



$5,427.82 $5,398.10 $29.72 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



491 



Eepairs of buildings, 

Eepairs, fire station stable, Ward 1 

Joint resolution No. 763, 
Salaries : 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

$2,000.00 $1,722.10 $277.90 



$700.00 $694.77 



Mayor, 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


City clerk, 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


Overseers poor. 


390.00 


390.00 


Solicitor, 


500.00 


500.00 


Treasurer, 


250.00 


250.00 


Messenger, 


800.00 


800.00 


Clerk common council, 


50.00 


50.00 


Care city clocks. 


110.00 


110.00 


Boards of education. 


500.00 


500.00 


Assessors, 


2,700.00 


3,135.00 


Moderators, ward clerks and select- 






men. 


342.00 


342.00 


Supervisors and inspectors of elec- 






tion. 


396.00 


396.00 


Judge police court. 


1,000.00 


1,032.00 


Collector of taxes. 


1,500.00 


1,849.89 


Truant officer. 


500.00 


500.00 


Clerk police court. 


200.00 


200.00 


Joint resolution No. 788, 


816.89 





Salaries, city council, 

Schools : 

Union School District : 

Interest, 
Bond, 

General fund — balance 1905, 
Appropriation, 
Voted by district, 
Literary fund, 
Dog licenses. 
Text books, 
^Abial Walker trust fund, 
Eepairs, 
Night school, 



$12,254.89 $12,254.89 
$2,150.00 $2,046.00 



$1,785.00 

8,000.00 

14,439.01 

44,534.68 

22,540.41 

1,722.64 

1,613.94 

3,044.66 

30.45 

2,500.00 

1,000.00 



$1,890.00 

8,000.00 

73,239.01 



$5.23 



$104.00 



$101,210.79 $83,129.01$18,081.78 



492 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Town District : 

General fund — balance 1905, 

Appropriation, 

Voted by district, 

Literary fund, 

Dog licenses, 

Text books, 

Abial Walker trust fund, 

Tuition returned by state, 



District No. 20: 



.Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



$884.26 
3,616.62 
500.00 
140.30 
131.07 
247.25 
2.47 
118.19 



$3,884.26 



$5,640.16 $3,884.26 $1,755.90 



General fund — balance 1905, 


$1,421.75 




Appropriation, 






3,043.70 


$6,321.75 


Voted by district 






2,825.00 




Literary fund, 






225.70 




Dog licenses. 






110.30 




Text books. 






208.09 




Abial Walker trust 


fund. 


2.08 




Sinking fund, 






500.00 




Tuition returned 


by 


state. 


468.28 




Interest, 






483.00 


483.00 



$9,287.90 $6,804.75 $2,483.15 

Waiting room, Blossom Hill Ceme- 
tery, joint resolution No. 755, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 
Temporary Loan: 

Joint resolution No. 750, 65,000.00 65,000.00 

County tax, 43,398.06 

State tax, 34,130.00 

City hall account, 100.00 

KECEIPTS. 

Keceipts of the city for year ending December 31, 1906: 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1906, $25,523.84 

Taxes, 1905, 46,414.68 

Taxes, 1906, 211,325.00 

Fines and costs, city marshal, 3,2^7.15 

Library fines, 250.85 

Highway department, 583.03 

Fees, city clerk, 318.28 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



493 



Hack and job team licenses, $112.50 

Billiard and pool table licenses, 430.00 

Junk dealers' licenses, 210.00 

Dog licenses, 2,038.31 

Dog license fees, 181.20 

Temporary loan, 65,000.00 

Garbage, 153.03 

Auditorium, 1,290.00 

City lots, 4,900.00 

Rent of bolster, 255.00 

Milk licenses, 196.50 

County paupers off farm, 4,287.94 

County, dependent soldiers, 987.83 
State board license commissioners: 

Balance 1905, 412.97 
Account 1906, , 10,118.12 

Cemetery trust funds, transferred, 5,000.00 

Fund for improvement of State Street, 5,855.97 

Taxes sold city and redeemed, 1904 and 1905, 2,538.33 

State of New Hampshire, insurance tax, 1,277.10 

railroad tax, 57,320.61 

savings bank tax, 37,953.43 

literary fund, 2,088.64 
high school tuition, town 

district, 118.19 
high school tuition, Pena- 

eook, 468.28 

Building and loan association tax, 91.51 

Income Old North Cemetery fund, 28.53 

Income Blossom Hill Cemetery fund, 848.95 

Franklin Pierce trust fund, library, 36.25 

Seth K. Jones trust fund, library, ' 12.00 

Thomas J. Valpey trust fund, library, 17.50 

G. Parker Lyon trust fund, library, 35.00 

P. B. Cogswell trust fund, library, 65.16 

Abial Walker trust fund for schools, 35.00 

Blossom Hill Cemetery trust fund, 555.23 

Old North Cemetery trust fund, 114.75 

Transferred from Blossom Hill Cemetery account, 2,637.60 

Transferred from Old North Cemetery account, 178.17 

Blossom Hill Cemetery fund, 3,000.00 

Miscellaneous, 3,961.60 



$502,514.03 



494 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements of the city for year ending December 
City departments, 
City poor and soldiers, 
County poor and soldiers. 
City notes, 
City bonds. 

City interest on notes and bonds, 
Interest cemetery trust funds. 
Schools, 

Schools, interest on bonds. 
Precinct, sprinkling streets, 
Precinct, lighting streets, city, 
Precinct, lighting streets, Penacook, 
Precinct, lighting streets, East Concord, 
Precinct, garbage. 
Precinct, water, 
Precinct, sewer, notes. 

Precinct, sewers, interest on bonds and notes, 
Precinct, sewers, repairs and extensions. 
Precinct, sewers, sinking funds, 
City hall, 
County tax. 
State tax. 

Paid outstanding orders previous years. 
Treasury balance, January 1, 1907, 



Less outstanding orders unpaid January 1, 1907, 



31, 



1906: 

$149,773.26 

1,279.71 

9,687.03 

65,000.00 

5,000.00 

8,102.89 

777.49 

91,445.02 

2,373.00 

5,594.79 

15,852.74 

1,350.00 

447.14 

6,003.26 

6,000.00 

6,500.00 

3,783.00 

3,187.10 

2,900.00 

100.00 

43,398.06 

34,130.00 

27.00 

39,968.24 

$502,679.73 
165.70 

$502,514.03 



CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 



Cash balance, January 1, 1906, 

Receipts deposited with treasurer, 

Expended per orders. 

Bonds paid. 

Interest, 

Cash balance, ' January 1, 1907, 



$25,904.40 
73,063.45 



$46,071.55 
11,000.00 
24,620.83 
17,275.47 



5,967.85 $98,967.85 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 495 

MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 
Police station bonds, $17,000.00 

Bridge bonds. 5,000.00 

State library bonds, 25,000.00 

New citv hall bonds, 130,000.00 



Total funded city debt, $177,000.00 
Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1907, $165.70 

Interest accrued, not yet due, munici- 
pal bonds, 2,353.92 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 306.25 

Due school districts, 22,320.83 

Cemetery trust funds, 23,800.00 



Total debt not funded, $48,946.70 



Total city indebtedness, $225,946.70 

Available Assets. 

Treasurer's cash balance, January 

1, 1907, $39,968.24 

Taxes of 1904, uncollected. 

Taxes of 1905, uncollected, 

Taxes of 1906, 

Cash in hands of tax collector, 
January 1, 1907, 

Due for rents, quarries. 

Due high^vay department, repairs of 
concrete. 



3.99 

124.97 

47,097.35 




343.36 

86.52 




102.19 


$87,726.62 



Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1907, $138,220.08 
Indebtedness above assets Januarv 1, 1906, 147,152.75 



Decrease for the year, $8,932.67 



496 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PRECINCT DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

Water- Works bonds, $630,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 59,000.00 

$689,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Sewer precinct notes, $5,500.00 

Interest accrued on same, not yet 

due, 96.25 

Coupons overdue, sewer bonds, not 

presented, 285.00 

Coupons overdue, water bonds, not 

presented, 780.00 

Interest accrued, seM'er bonds, not 

yet due, 536.67 

Interest accrued, water bonds, not 

yet due, 11,558.33 

Water bonds due, not presented, 1,200.00 

$19,956.25 



Total precinct debt, $708,956.25 

Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1907, $17,275.47 

Due highway department, garbage 

precinct, 75.00 

. $17,350.47 



Net precinct debt January 1, 1907. $691,605.78 

Net precinct debt January 1, 1906, 700,499.71 



Decrease for the year, $8,893.93 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 497 

OTHER PRECINCT LIABILITIES. 

Union School District bonds, $170,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,505.42 

Coupons due, not presented, 52.50 

$172,557.92 



School District No. 20, bonds, $13,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 161.00 



$13,961.00 

Net liability of school districts, $186,518.92 

West Concord sewer bonds. $15,300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 148.88 

■ ^ $15,448.88 



Penacook sewer bonds, $16,500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 212.08 



East Concord sewer bonds. $1,000.00 

Interest accrued, not vet due, 17.50 



St. Paul's School sewer bonds, $3,500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 52.50 

Coupons due, not presented, 7.50 



$16,712.08 



$1,017.50 



$3,560.00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $138,220.08 

precinct debt, 691,605.78 

school district, 186,518.92 

West Concord sewer debt, 15,448.88 

Penacook sewer debt, 16,712.08 

32 



498 CITY OF CONCORD. 

East Concord sewer debt, $1,017.50 

St. Paul's School sewer debt, 3,560.00 



Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1907, $1,053,083.2-1 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1906, 958,393.19 



. Increase for the year. 



$94,690.05 



REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS, 1906. 

For payment of interest on bonds, $6,420.00 

payment of interest on temporary loans. 1.500.00 

interest cemetery trust funds, 658.00 

support of city poor, 800.00 

incidentals and land damages, 4.000.00 

salaries of members of city council, 2,150.00 

printing and stationery, 2,000.00 

aid to Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 3,000.00 

decorating the graves of soldiers and sailors, 460.00 

dependent soldiers, city, 150.00 

public school text-books, 3,500.00 

open-air concerts, 300.00 

public baths, 250.00 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,000.00 

Old North Cemetery, 100.00 

West Concord Cemetery, 75.00 

Millville Cemetery, 75.00 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 150.00 

Old Fort Cemetery, 15.00 

Horse Hill Cemetery, 25.00 

Woodlawn Cemetery, 25.00 

Soucook Cemetery, 20.00 

parks, 3,500.00 

Penacook Park, 125.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



499 



Washington Square. 


$25.00 


repairs buildings. 


2,000.00 


board of health. 


2,000.00 


police department. 


14,777.32 


public library, 


5,000.00 


engineering department, 


3,000.00 


highway department. 


35,700.00 


fire department. 


22,000.00 


salaries, 


11,438.00 


state tax, 


34,130.00 


county tax. 


43,398.06 


schools, 


90,828.41 


Penacook lighting precinct. 


1,250.00 


sewers, city, 


4,860.00 


lighting streets, city, 


15,000.00 


Penacook sewer precinct, 


2,235.00 


water for hj^drants, 


6,000.00 


garbage precinct. 


6,000.00 


sprinkling streets. 


5,000.00 


St. Paul's School sewer precinct, 


665.00 


"West Concord sewer precinct, 


1.595.50 


East Concord sewer precinct, 


135.00 


East Concord lighting precinct. 


200.00 




$337,435.29 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS BY JOINT RESOLU- 
TIONS, 1906. 

747 Hose, fire department, $2,250.00 

752 Ladder, fire department. Ward 1, 175.00 

757 Aid military companies, 200.00 

760 Hook and ladder truck, fire department, 1,200.00 

761 New boiler, public library, 400.00 
763 Repairs, fire station, Ward 1, 700.00 



500 CITY OF CONCORD. 

766 Real estate sold for unpaid taxes, $2,934.38 

771 Hose wagon. Alert hose company, 490.00 

774 Printing and stationery, 800.00 

777 North State and Main Streets, 8,000.00 

781 Incidentals and land damages, 4,000.00 

783 Health department, 500.00 

784 Fire department, 2,300.00 
788 City poor, 368.18 
788 Old Fort Cemetery, .75 
788 Fire department, 496.18 
788 Parks, 139.81 
788 Penacook Park, 19.62 
788 Board of health, 261.73 
788 Salaries, 816.89 
788 Highway department, 116.07 
788 Interest temporary loan, 249.39 

$26,418.00 



INVENTORY. 

Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in Their Possession, 
January 1, 1907. 



Water rights— land, etc., $924,153.76 
Water office— furniture, etc., 625.00 
Pumping station — furniture, sup- 
plies, etc., 841.00 
Shop at pumping station — machin- 
ery, tools, etc., 800.00 
Stable and basement at pumping 

station — ^horse, wagons, etc., 570.00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water 

gates, etc., 550.00 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 1,400.00 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 20.00 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00 



$928,999.76 



CITY PROPERTY. 

• Having Value but not Considered Available Assets. 



The following is a summary of the inventory of the prop- 
erty belonging to the city January 1, 1907, made by the 
heads of the various departments having the same in charge. 
Itemized statements are on file in the city clerk's office. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Central fire station, $40,345.60 

Kearsarge steamer company, 3,745.35 

Eagle steamer, 4,529.75 

Governor Hill steamer, 3,035.90 

Hook and ladder company, 2,424.75 

Chemical engine company, 1,920.00 

Good Will hose company, 7,841.90 

Alert hose company, 4,496.75 

Pioneer steamer company, 12,142.75 

Old Fort engine company, 4,041.75 

Cataract engine company, 9,427.75 

Fire alarm apparatus, 10,115.00 

Hose, 8,391.00 

Residence chief engineer, 3,000.00 

Heating apparatus, 100.00 

Pioneer engine house furniture, 70.50 

Old Fort engine house furniture, 69.00 

Cataract engine house furniture, 71.25 

$115,769.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Central District. 

New city stable, sheds, lot, tools, 

etc., $27,339.00 



city property. 503 

Penacook District. 
Tools, etc.. $186.75 

West Concord District. 
Tools, etc., 24.00 

East Concord District. 

Tools, etc., 7.50 

$27,557.25 



ENGINEERING DEPART:\IENT. 

Furniture, tools aud supplies, $657.50 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Precinct, sewer, tools aud supplies, $628.75 

Precinct, Penacook Sewer. 
Tools and supplies, $40.15 

Precinct, West Concord Sewer. 
Tools and supplies, $50.75 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Isolation hospital and furniture, $740.00 

Office furniture and supplies. 150.50 

$890.50 



504 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police station, city, $25,000.00 

Police station, Penacook, 6,000.00 

Equipment, furniture, etc., 1,953.65 

$32,953.65 

CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, etc., $866.00 



COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, $100.17 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, $107.45 



ASSESSORS' ROOM. 
Furniture, etc., $86.60 



TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, etc., $205.20 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES' OFFICE. 

Weights, measures, balances, etc., $200.00 



I 

J 



CITY PROPERTY. 505 

CITY MESSENGER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Committee room, $73.70 

City council rooms, 774.50 

Property in and about city hall. 1,403.09 

$2,251.29 



PARK COMMISSIONER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Tools, etc.. White Park. $200.00 

Tools, etc.. Rollins Park. 25.00 

■ $225.00 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Tools, etc.. Blossom Hill Cemetery, $250.00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Books. $9,500.00 

Furniture, 500.00 

$10,000.00 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

Tools, etc., $43.77 



CITY HISTORY COMMISSION. 
1 Bouton's History, $10.00 



506 CITY OP CONCORD. 

REAL ESTATE. 

Real Estate Belonging to the City Not Included in 
Any of the Foregoing Inventories. 

City hall lot and building, $150,000.00 

City farm, pasture and quarries, 5,000.00 

Gravel banks, 1,050.00 

Ward-house, West Street, 4,500.00 

Playground on Intervale, 1,500.00 

AVhite Park. 14,000.00 

Rollins Park, 10,807.50 

Penacook Park, 2,500.00 

Market place on Warren Street, 15,000.00 

Cemeteries, 20,000.00 
Bradley, Fiske (so called). Ridge 

Road and Pecker Parks, 2.200.00 

— $226,557.50 



GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 



Water department. 

Fire department. 

Highway department. 

Engineering department. 

Sewer department, 

Penacook sewer, 

West Concord sewer. 

Health department, 

Police department, 

City clerk's office. 

Commissioner's office. 

Mayor's office, 

Assessors' room. 

Tax collector's office. 

Sealer of weights and measures. 

City messenger's department, 

Park commissioners. 

Cemetery commissioners. 



$928,999.76 


115,769.00 


27,557.25 


657.50 


628.75 


40.15 


50.75 


890.50 


32,953.65 


866.00 


100.17 


107.45 


86.60 


205.20 


200.00 


2,251.29 


225.00 


250.00 



CITY PROPERTY. 



507 



Public library, 

Milk inspector, 

City history commission, 

Real estate, 



$10,000.00 
43.77 
10.00 

226,557.50 



$1,348,450.29 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 



The number of polls, and 
personal estate of Concord 



the tax assessed on the real and 
since 1896 : 



Year. 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1896 




4,663 


$11,228,515 


$262,254.99 


1897 




4,812 


11,200,363 


233,761.58 


1898 




4,691 


11,148,659 


221,080.21 


1899 




4,760 


11,218,886 


220,704.62 


1900 




4,809 


11,220,215 


232,773.10 


1901 




5,378 


11,393,694 


241,588.57 


1902 




5,249 


11,394,218 


241,216.83 


1903 




5,407 


11,643,466 


240,025.79 


1904 




5,188 


11,559,482 


250,222.29 


1905. 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 


1, 


558 


$867,927 


$21,442.36 




2, 


206 


302,428 


5,584.32 




3, 


312 


433,370 


9,541.54 




4, 


1,026 


2,632,399 


58,358.62 




5, 


707 


2,943.949 


65,557.37 




6, 


812 


1,954,820 


43,707.51 




7, 


948 


1,228,165 


26,382.08 




8, 


367 


875,193 


18,488.83 




9, 


464 
5,400 


375,760 


8,080.46 




$11,614,011 


$257,143.09 


Non-r 


esideni 


") 




900.77 




$258,043.86 



508 CITY OF CONCORD, 



1906. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


566 


$885,104 


$21,210.90 


2, 


212 


300,342 


5.343.85 


3, 


306 


428,215 


9,472.97 


4, 


965 


2,796,832 


61,868.64 


5, 


762 


2,846,219 


64.124.48 


6, 


780 


1,937,082 


43,460.03 


7, 


965 


1,306,800 


27,875.64 


8, 


402 


879,893 


18,002.25 


9, 


516 
5,474 


388.410 


8.292.30 




$11,768,897 


$259,651.06 


Non-resident 






1,325.61 




$260,976.67 



1006. 

Population of city (census 1900), 19,632 

Valuation of city, $11,768,897.00 

Tax assessed for the year, 260,976.67 

Rate of taxation, $15.20 per $1,000. 
Rate for Union School District, $3.50. 
Rate for precinct, $3.80. 
Total rate, $22.50 per $1,000. 



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INDEX. 



Page 

Appropriations, regular 498 

special 499 

Assessors, board of, report of 383 

Assets, city. See Municipal Assets. 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 426 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 450 

Cemetery department, reports of 379 

City clerk, report of 396 

expenses, itemized 456 

government, departments, personnel of 45 

assessors 51 

board of aldermen 45 

boards of education 48 

cemetery committees 60 

clerk 45 

collector of taxes 48 

common council 46 

commissioners of cemeteries 60 

committees of city council 47 

culler of staves 63 

engineer 48 

fence-viewers 62 

fire department, officers of 52 

financial agent Union School District 49 

health officers 58 

hydrant commissioners 59 

inspector of petroleum 61 

inspector of plumbing 59 

mayor 45 

messenger 48 

overseers of poor 57 

park commissioners 59 

physician, city and assistant 58 

pound-keeper 62 

police department, officers of court 54 

officers and members of police force 54 

public library, trustees of 50 

librarian and assistants 51 

registrar of vital statistics 59 

sanitary officer 59 

sealers of leather 62 

sealer of weights and measures 62 



566 



CITY OF CONCOKD. 



City, street department, commissioner of highways 56 

drain-layers 57 

surveyors of painting 64 

masonry 64 

^ stone 64 

wood, lumber and bark 65 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 61 

superintendent of clocks 53 

superintendent of schools 49 

treasurer 48 

truant officer 50 

undertakers 61 

ward officers 66 

water- works, city, commissioners 51 

superintendent 52 

weigher 64 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 63 

physician, report of 378 

population of 509 

solicitor, report of 398 

Clerk of police court, report of 397 

Collector of taxes, report of 387 

Coupon account, statement of 453 

Debts, recapitulation 497 

Engineer, city, report of 314 

Financial statement 486 

Fire Department, chief engineer, report of 186 

fire alarm 214 

regulations of 220 

roll of members 233 

Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery 405 

East Concord Cemetery 408 

East Concord sewer 409 

Millville Cemetery 407 

Old North Cemetery 406 

Penacook sewer 409 

Seth K. Jones monument 410 

trust 410 

West Concord Cemetery 407 

sewer 408 

Highway commissioner, financial statement of 244 

department, report of commissioner 239 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 324 

Licen se, vote for 75 

Mayor's address 3 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 68 

Municipal debt 495 

regulations 2 



INDEX. 567 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 442 

Ordinances and joint resolutions 14 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 371 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 321 

Police department, report of city marshal 363 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1896 507 

Poor department, report of overseer 389 

Precincts, debts of 496 

Property, city, inventory of 501 

Public library, report of trustees 326 

librarian 329 

Recapitulation of city property 506 

Sanitary Department, sanitary officer, report of 337 

mortality report 350 

School reports 79 

Union School District, annual school meeting warrant 151 

annual school meeting 152 

attendance, tables of 112 

board of education, report of 83 

census, 1906 • 116 

committee on buildings and repairs, re- 
port of 86 

elocutionary contest, financial report of 128 

English prize composition 124 

financial agent, report of . 89 

graduating exercises 141 

honor, roll of 132 

members, officers and standing commit- 
tees 79 

stamp saving system 128 

superintendent, report of 94 

teachers, list of 118 

truant officer, report of 115 

District No. 20, report of 159 

town district, report of 181 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 445 

Treasury, report of 403 

Trust funds 403 

Trusts, individual cemetery 412 

Vital statistics, tables of 514 

Vote for city officers 70 

Water department, report of 277 

commissioners, report of 284 

coupon, account of 455 

engineer's report 298 

fire hydrants 308 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 454 

schedule of pipes and gates 302 

superintendent, report of 286 

treasurer's report 454 



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