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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

CITY OF CONCORD 

ANNUAL REPORT, 1911 




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1911 

FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 



FOR THE 



Year Ending December 31,1911 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND 

PAPERS RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS 

OF THE CITY 




CONCORD, N. H. 

Ira C. Evans Co., Printers 

]912 



552, 07 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

For Payment op Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should knoiv that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract said liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or de- 
livered on city poor account, except on the written order 
of the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than 
until his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



MAYOR FRENCH'S THIRD INAUGURAL 
ADDRESS. 



January 23, 1912. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: 

We have met here to-day to inaugurate a second admin- 
istration under the new city charter, and I am liappy to 
say, the third under which I am to be the chief magistrate 
of our city. At the outset, I desire to express my deep 
appreciation of the honor conferred upon me by my 
selection for a third time as such chief magistrate. Dur- 
ing my past administrations, economy in the expenditures 
of the city funds has always been my watchword, to the 
end that the taxpayers of the city should be relieved as 
much as possible from the burdens necessarily placed 
upon them. I feel that I have been fair and impartial 
to all in my conduct of city affairs, striving always to do 
that which is for the best interest of all. I have been 
independent, all will admit, but my recommendations 
have been made in that spirit which tends best to promote 
good municipal government. The fact that my recom- 
mendations have not generally been adopted and that I 
have been returned for the third time, bears me out when 
I say that the people of this city approve of the principles 
for which I have stood and still desire my recommenda- 
tions carried into effect. 

One year ago we inaugurated an important and radical 
change in our system of city administration, and at that 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

time had strong hopes of an improvement under it. Con- 
trary to our expectations the results have not been what 
they should have been. In no measure has this been due 
to the charter, but rather to the way in which the last 
board acted under it. This course of conduct has met, 
not alone with my disapproval, but with that of the cit- 
izens of the city generally. It did not seem to me that 
the last board acted wisely at times ; nor did it administer 
city affairs as Avas expected of it. I think the charter has 
not had a fair trial ; it has not been tried out as it should 
have been ; it has not received the proper test. Deception 
to a certain extent has been practiced upon the taxpayers. 
Politics, I am sorry to say, has entered into the affairs of 
city administration during the past year. There was a 
tendency on the part of one member, at least, to sacrifice 
the citj^'s interest to the end that he might advance his 
own chance for future political preferment. It is need- 
less for me to say that I strongly deprecate such conduct 
and hope we shall not encounter it during the present 
administration. 

Many cities have adopted forms of government similar 
to ours since our charter was granted by the legislature 
and adopted by the people. From all reports these cities 
have been meeting with a marked degree of success with 
their new charters, due undoubtedly to the fact that 
in those cities all parties have worked together for the 
interest of the taxpayers, putting aside all political bias 
and doing business on non-partisan lines. It is a well- 
known fact that the people of this municipality intended 
to bring about exactly this condition when they adopted 
the present charter in 1910. 

The two principal objects sought by this new plan of 
city government were the elimination of partisan politics 
and the concentration of responsibility upon a compara- 
tively few officials. The first object, I am sorry to say, 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 5 

was not attained, except in one instance which I shall 
mention hereafter. As to the second it is a well known 
fact, and I but wish to recall it to your minds, that when- 
ever the doing of an act promised little credit and threat- 
ened to cause some ill-feeling, members have invariably 
been ready and willing to cast the burden of responsibility 
upon the mayor. 

HaAdng thus called yonv attention to those things of a 
general nature concerning which I think we are justified 
in finding some fault, and which I hope to see remedied 
in the future, I shall now pass on to a consideration in 
detail of the various departments of the city, making 
such recommendations as seem to me especially applicable. 

BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 

Under our new city charter the highway department 
was practically abolished as such, and the work placed 
under the immediate charge of the Board of Public 
"Works. I desire to call your attention to the provisions 
of the charter which effected this and which plainly show 
what the intent of the people was when they adopted 
them. You will see that the Board of Public Works was 
designed to take over the control of all matters pertain- 
ing to highways and give them personal attention, and 
this in no narrow sense. 

First, I draw your attention to the difference in salary 
between that of the ward aldermen, which is seventy-five 
dollars per year, and that of the members of the Board 
of Public Works, which is two hundred dollars per year. 
This has a meaning of its own. Now look at the express 
words of the charter. Section 31 reads as follows: "The 
Board of Public Works hereby established shall have full 
charge, direction and control of the construction, recon- 
struction, maintenance, repair and improvement of public 



6 CITY OF CONCORD, 

streets, highways, bridges, sidewalks, sewers and drains, 
of the sprinkling of streets, and of the collection and 
disposal of garbage." It is further provided by section 
32 that the board "shall have charge of all horses, vehi- 
cles, machinery, etc.," "shall have the expenditure of 
all appropriations voted by the Board of Aldermen," and 
"may, in its discretion, procure the performance of any 
work under its charge by contract." And by section 33 
it is provided that the board "shall, as early as prac- 
ticable in each year, submit to the Board of Aldermen or 
its Committee on Finance a detailed estimate in writing 
of the appropriations required for that year for the pur- 
poses referred to" in sections 31 and 32. 

Having these provisions of the charter in mind let me 
point out to you the way in which they have been ob- 
served during the past j^ear. In the first place the board 
has in no sense undertaken personal supervision of the 
work on our highways. During the entire year but one 
inspection of road work has been made. A resolution 
was passed early in the year by the board, delegating all 
the powers conferred by section 32 to the superintendent 
of streets. As a result of this act all purchases and sales 
have been made by said superintendent. Every employee 
on the streets has been hired by him, including the dis- 
trict foremen. To my knowledge not a single bid has 
been called for for city supplies by the Board of Public 
Works. 

These things I think call for condemnation from me. 
B.y snch conduct the new charter has not been given a 
fair trial, and all I ask is, that a fair trial be given it by 
this incoming board, that the order of things be changed 
so that the business of the department will be done on 
the new lines laid down by the charter, and not in the 
same old way, as has been the case during the past year. 

While discussing these particular sections I wish to 



mayor's address. 7 

call your attentiou, especiall}', to that part of section 32 
which says that the Board of Public Works "shall employ 
a superintendent of streets and such other agents and 
emploj^ees as it may deem necessary." To me this sec- 
tion appears mandatory, leaving no power to delegate 
the duty of hiring such agents and employees. But the 
board thought otherwise and permitted the superintendent 
of streets appointed by it to hire every one who did work 
on the streets, including the district foremen. A specific 
case having arisen by the resignation of the foreman of 
the West Concord district, I called for an opinion from 
the city solicitor as to the meaning of that part of the 
above section which I have quoted to you. In a care- 
fully considered opinion, subsequently rendered, he held 
that the duty of hiring mere day laborers, who were with- 
out direct responsibility, could be delegated, but that as 
to district foremen "It was plainly intended that they 
should be hired directly by the Board of Public Works." 
While this was a construction of the charter that I had 
not given it myself, it was the opinion of one who is paid 
by the city for just that purpose and would probably 
have resulted in facilitating the work of the department 
better than if a strictly literal construction had been 
given. I was willing to abide by it, but in direct opposi- 
tion to the solicitor's opinion a majority of the Board of 
Public Works still persisted in delegating the duty, and 
the foreman of the West Concord district was employed 
by the superintendent of streets. I hope the present 
board will reverse the action of the last board and abide 
by the charter. 

In regard to the subject of highways generally, I am 
sorry to say that the present condition of our streets is 
no better than it was at the beginning of the last admin- 
istration. In a large measure this is due to the fact that 
so much money has been appropriated for permanent 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

work and so little for general maintenance. The present 
tendency elsewhere is away from this course, and it is 
only by such action that we can save enormous expend- 
itures in the future. 

I feel that an added reason for the condition just men- 
tioned was the failure of the last board to adopt a recom- 
mendation made by me one year ago, which was this, — 
the superintendent of streets should be a civil engineer. 
Again I make the same recommendation and this time I 
am able to state that the same thing was recommended 
by every speaker at the good roads convention recently 
held in this city. Place this work under the direction of 
the city engineer. By such action you will center respon- 
sibility, avoid conflict as to grades, save money and im- 
prove the streets. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

No city the size of Concord has a better fire depart- 
ment. The personnel of the department cannot be easily 
improved. From the chief down the men are steady, 
honest, competent and faithful and are very efficient in 
the discharge of their duties. In this department I con- 
sider the city gets the worth of its money. For several 
years it has been advocated that the Central fire station 
should be more modern, that the horses should be placed 
behind the apparatus, an act of which I would heartily 
approve. I recommend that the necessary steps be taken 
to remodel this station so that this may be accomplished. 

Much has been said about automobile fire apparatus. 
I strongly believe that such apparatus, after it has left 
its experimental stage, which it is now in, will be very 
efficient, but I do not recommend its purchase wdtli our 
present $2.43 tax-rate and our apparatus in first-class 
condition. I am strongly of the opinion that something 



mayor's address. 9 

should be done to relieve the existing conditions at the 
Alert hose house on Washington Street. The piece of 
apparatus there carries eight hundred feet of hose, a 
burden too great for one horse to enable it to make a 
quick response to fires. I recommend the purchase of 
another horse for this station to remedy this condition 
of affairs. 

I do not deem it advisable to contemplate the build- 
ing of any new fire stations. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

It is necessary, for the safety of individuals and the 
protection of property, that the city should have an 
efficient police department. In this department experi- 
enced men are much more efficient than new men can be, 
and so far as possible the present members of the force 
who are experienced and efficient should be retained and 
promoted strictly according to their merit. New officers 
should be recruited from the ranks of the reserve. If in 
the administration of city affairs experience shall show 
that any official, whether in this or any other department, 
is unfaithful or untrustworthy, so far as I have the power 
he will be held to a rigid accountability. 

During the past year the police department has been 
directly under the control of the city, the old police com- 
mission having been abolished by the new city charter. 
As a result I think there has been a distinct change in 
the attitude of the members of the force toward other 
eity officials and the public generally. I always opposed 
the idea of a police commission appointed by the governor 
of the state. It tended to make police officers less amen- 
able to authority and inculcated in them a certain degree 
of indifference that worked against a spirit of respect on 
the part of the people. This department is now directly 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

responsible to the city government and is under the con- 
trol of the mayor, who is its chief. 

While there has been considerable improvement in the 
department during the past year there is still ground for 
criticism. The outgoing board raised the salaries of all 
the regular watchmen to approximately one thousand 
dollars per year. For this amount I think the city is en- 
titled to the services of able-bodied men and to their en- 
tire attention to the duties of the work. But we are not 
getting what we are paying for, in the first instance, in 
the case of some members of the force. As for the sec- 
ond, I draw your attention to section 46 of the present 
city charter, which says: "No member of said force, 
except reserve members, shall engage in any other occu- 
pation, or hold any other state, county or municipal 
office. ' ' 

This provision of the charter must mean something, 
and I feel it my duty 'to call your attention to the fact 
that it is not being lived up to at the present time by 
several members of the department, one of whom has 
but recently received an appointment from the secretary 
of state which must of necessity take a large share of 
his time and interfere to a marked degree with his duties 
to the city. I trust that this condition of affairs may be 
speedily remedied so that this board Avill not find it nec- 
essary to exercise the powers conferred upon it by sec- 
tions 4G and 48 of the city charter. 

PARKS. 

Our parks are in a very good condition and are being 
well managed by our new superintendent, for which he 
is deserving of credit. Public playgrounds are much in 
demand these days, and I wish in this connection to call 
your attention to the Kimball playground at the north 



mayor's address. 11 

end of the city. I must confess that this ground is not 
in the condition it should be in, not having had the care 
necessary to make it so, and I recommend that a sum of 
money be appropriated sufficient for the purpose. Seats 
should be more freely distributed in the parks for the 
accommodation of the public. I regret that the com- 
mittee on State House park of the last legislature has 
not seen fit to install seats in that park, as previously 
recommended by me, an act which would be appreciated 
by the many people who visit the state's capitol every 
year. 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

Well-lighted streets are a necessity for the safety and 
convenience of the public, and it is unfortunate that the 
city is dependent on one company for its electric lights. 
I welcome any other company which may apply for a 
license to enter the city, to the end that in competition 
we may get as good service at lower prices than now 
prevail. 

I also solicit the co-operation of the board in devising 
means to bring about a reduction in the cost of gas. This 
may look like a difficult problem, but it really is not. In 
other cities it has been solved, so why not in Concord? 
From good authority I understand that it costs but forty 
cents to manufacture one thousand feet of gas. Why 
should the consumer be obliged to pay $1.25 per thousand 
feet for it? Just consider this proposition for a moment. 
Second only to a water plant, a gas plant is the greatest 
necessity in the line of public utilities. Innumerable 
cities in this country and abroad own their gas plants, 
and the cost to the consumers has been cut in half. It 
would not be so difficult a matter for the city of Concord 
to build a gas plant of its own, or perhaps the present 



12 CITY OP CONCORD. 

plant here situated might be taken over at a fair physical 
valuation, all consideration of the value of the franchise, 
which, of course, is the property of the city in the first 
instance, being eliminated. 

LABOR. 

During the last administration an ordinance was passed 
giving able-bodied laborers employed by the city a $2 
maximum and a $1.75 minimum rate per day. It also 
provided that all work should be done, so far as prac- 
ticable, by native-born or naturalized citizens. I am 
sorry at this time to be obliged to call your attention to 
a violation of this ordinance by one of our departments. 
American citizens who have worked for this department 
during the summer months have been allowed to remain 
idle since cold weather set in, while men who cannot 
qualify under the above ordinance have been given steady 
employment. 

BAND CONCERTS. 

My attention has been called to that provision of the 
new charter which repeals all laws previously enacted 
except sueli as relate to ward boundaries, school dis- 
tricts, sewer, lighting, and other special precincts, water- 
works, police court, overseers of the poor, borrowing- 
money in aid of school districts, and the appropriation 
of money for the observance of Memorial Day. This 
means that the last appropriation for band concerts was 
illegal, as the right to so expend city money had been 
given by legislative act. No appropriation can be made 
for this purpose the coming year, but I shall be pleased 
to contribute personally for such an object and hope 
popular subscription will be large enough to secure the 
concerts. 



mayor's address. 13 

HEALTH. 

We all recognize the importance of this branch of the 
city government and its efficient management. This 
board should be especially commended for its efforts to 
see that the inhabitants of the city are furnished with 
milk produced and delivered under sanitary conditions. 

LEGAL DEPARTMENT. 

Early in this address I called attention to an act done 
by the last board which was on strictly non-partisan 
lines. This occurred in July when the present city solic- 
itor was elected. That act gave this city the benefit of 
legal resources such as they have not had for many 
3^ears. It also gave the city constant and speedy service 
in the determination of legal questions, which call for 
such service. Few of you realize how important it is to 
have a solicitor who responds promptly, for the matters 
demanding legal attention are continually arising. Those 
who sat in the last board know something of the service 
rendered, of the attention given, and especially of the 
favorable outcome to the sewer controversy. 

In this connection, as the city solicitor is one of a com- 
mittee of three on the revision of the city ordinances, I 
desire to state that the revision of the ordinances has been 
delayed on account of the press of business due to the 
sad event of last summer, with which you are no doubt 
familiar. The revision, however, is now well under way, 
and in a reasonable time we shall have the completed 
revision in our hands to aid us in our work. 

HOSPITALS. 

It has been customary for years to make an annual 
appropriation of $3,000 for the Margaret Pillsbury Gen- 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

eral Hospital. This sum was a gift until 1909, but com- 
mencing with that year a restriction was placed upon it 
which has proved a great saving to the taxpayers of our 
municipality. The amount of such saving for the years 
1909-1910 and 1911 has been approximately $2,203.16. 
On South Street is located the Memorial Hospital for 
Women and Children, organized some years later than 
the Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. Both hospitals are 
doing excellent work among our worthy poor and deserve 
financial consideration from the taxpayers. The Memo- 
rial Hospital received financial aid last year to the amount 
of $500. I recommend that both appropriations be con- 
tinued for the present year. 

TAXATION. 

No more important office exists in the city than that of 
the Board of Assessors. The property assessed by them 
amounts to over $12,500,000 in value. Equalization of 
taxation is all the people demand and that is what they 
are entitled to have. Every citizen should bear his just 
proportion of the public tax. Whether or not this is 
efl'ected depends greatly on the courage and efficiency of 
the Board of Assessors. Our new charter provides that 
the assessors give more time to the valuation of our prop- 
erties. Much real estate is not taxed in proportion to 
its value with other real estate. Money, bank stock, 
bonds, mortgages and other securities escape from taxa- 
tion almost wholly,creating an unequal and unjust burden 
upon other property which is in sight. This is partly 
brought about by the borrowing of money just before 
the first day of April for the purpose of avoiding being 
taxed, partly by false inventories, and greatly assisted 
by the lack of courage on the part of the Board of As- 
sessors and by favoritism. 



mayor's address. 15 

I think our Board of Assessors are men with accurate 
judgment on property values. I recommend that they 
fearlessly perform their important duties and they will 
receive that credit which is their due. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The education of the youth of the city is one of the 
most important functions of city administration. By leg- 
islative act, concurred in by the people, this branch of 
city administration was taken away from the city coun- 
cil, perhaps wisely, as the subject is so large, so compli- 
cated, that it calls for careful attention and demands 
specially trained individuals to care for it successfully. 
Although more than one hundred thousand dollars is 
appropriated annually for schools, we have no voice in 
its expenditure. This fact makes our duties less onerous, 
and as long as these funds are used in as efficient and 
honest a manner as at present w^e can have no possible 
ground for complaint. 

The schools are well managed; the teaching staff is 
well chosen. Liberal views are taught and various sub- 
jects are open to the pupil's choice. This is as it should 
be in a country as free as ours. Contrarj^ to previous 
ideas I have had on the subject, I am now convinced that 
the combination of high school and business course is 
proving a great benefit to students, and also to those who 
have occasion to employ office help. Appreciating these 
facts let us co-operate at all times to further the interests 
of our young people by lending our support to those who 
direct their education. 



16 CITY OP CONCORD. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 

1911, $60,030.72 

Receipts, 1911, 461,573.16 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

City departments, $149,746.83 

City poor and soldiers, 2,203.03 

County poor and soldiers, 9,422.64 

City notes, 25,000.00 

City bonds (police station), 3,000.00 
City interest on notes and 

bonds, 5,693.64 

Interest, cemetery trust funds, 1,465.50 

Schools, ' 106,854.52 

Schools, interest on bonds, 6,468.00 

School bonds, 7,000.00 

Precinct, sprinkling streets, 7,022.62 
Precinct, sprinkling streets, 

Penaeook, 468.48 
Precinct, lighting streets, city, 19,146.30 
Precinct, lighting streets, Pena- 
eook, 1,300.00 
Precinct, lighting streets. East 

Concord, 514.00 

Precinct, garbage, 7,095.69 
Precinct, sewer, interest on 

bonds, 3,865.50 

Precinct, sewer, repairs, etc., 3,546.73 

Precinct, sewer, sinking funds, 3,100.00 

County lax, 39,973.07 

State tax,- 46,389.00 



$521,603.88 



$449,275.55 



Approximate balance, January 16, 1912, $72,328.33 



mayor's address. 17 

municipal debt. 

Funded debt : 

City Hall bonds, $130,000.00 

State Library bonds, 25,000.00 



Total funded city debt, $155,000.00 

Debt not funded : 



Interest accrued, not yet due. 






municipal bond. 


$1,910.42 




Due school districts. 


28,592.86 




Due precinct, lighting streets. 






East Concord, 


9.87 




Due precinct, sewer. East Con- 






cord, 


127.53 




Due precinct, sewer. West Con- 






cord, 


52.52 




Due precinct, sewer, St. Paul's 






School, 


17.55 




Due precinct, sprinkling streets, 






city. 


562.33 




Due precinct, sprinkling streets, 






Penacook, 


31.52 




Due precinct, sewer, city. 


6,886.68 




Cemetery trust funds. 


43,176.43 




Total debt not funded, 


5S, 


81,367.71 


Approximate city indebtednes 


$236,367.71 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



Approximate cash balance, Jan- 
uary 17, 1912, $72,328.33 
Taxes, 1907, uncollected, 11.32 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Taxes, 1908, uncollected, 
Taxes, 1909, uncollected, 
Taxes, 1910, uncollected. 
Taxes, 1911, uncollected. 
Cash in hands of tax collector, 

January 17, 1912, 
Taxes bid in by city, 
Due for quarry rents, 
Due highway department, 
Due state of New Hampshire, 

grasshoppers killed, 
Overdraft, precinct, sewer, city, 
Overdraft, precinct, lighting 

streets, city. 
Overdraft, precinct, garbage, 
Overdraft, precinct, sewer, Pen- 

acook, 



Approximate indebtedness above 

assets, January 17, 1912, $108,943.10 

Indebtedness above assets, Janu- 
ary 1, 1911, 115,222.87 



$187.88 


345.55 


717.58 


47,342.74 


1,049.55 


3,429.02 


122.92 


171.14 


238.00 


1,125.81 


53.18 


220.81 


80.78 


$127,424.61 



Approximate decrease for the year, $6,279.77 



PRECINCT DEBT. 



Funded debt: 
Water-works bonds, $553,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 84,000.00 



$637,000.00 



mayor's address. 19 

Debt not funded: 

Interest accrued, sewer bonds, 

not yet due, $682.50 

Interest accrued, water bonds, 

not yet due, 10,030.42 

$10,712.92 



$647,712.92 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Cash on hand, water depart- 
ment, January 1, 1912, $28,700.00 

Due highway department, gar- 
bage precinct, 71.00 

28,771.00 



Net precinct debt, January 1, 1912, $618,941.92 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1911, $642,968.08 

Approximate decrease for the year, $24,026.16 

OTHER PRECINCT LIABILITIES. 

Union School District bonds, $163,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,729.00 

$165,729.00 



Penacook School District bonds, $13,800.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 161.00 

13,961.00 

Net liability of school districts (approxi- 
mate), $179,690.00 



20 CITY OP CONCORD. 

West Concord sewer bonds, $10,300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 98.88 



East Concord sewer bonds, $500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 8.75 



Penacook sewer bonds, $10,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 108.34 



St. Paul's School sewer bonds, $1,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 15.00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $108,943.10 

precinct debt, 618,941.92 

school districts, 179,690.00 

West Concord sewer debt, 10,398.88 

East Concord sewer debt, 508.75 

Penacook sewer debt, 10,108.34 

St. Paul's School sewer debt, 1,015.00 



$10,398.88 



$508.75 



$10,108.34 



$1,015.00 



Approximate indebtedness over available 

assets, January 17, 1912, $929,605.99 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1911, $967,516.67 

Approximate decrease for year 1911, $37,910.68 

1910, 37,500.00 

1909, 27,227.90 

Total decrease in city debt for years, 

1909, 1910, 1911, $102,638.58 



mayor's address. 21 

conclusion. 

The task before us should cause you all to stop and con- 
sider carefully what your attitude will be during the next 
two years. You are the directors of a large corporation, 
with assets worth more than twelve millions. The taxpay- 
ers are the stockholders who have selected you to represent 
them. They look for co-operation on the part of all to the 
end that their affairs may be wisely handled, their money 
carefully spent. In this way alone shall we do our duty 
and perform the service expected of us. 



ORDINANCES AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS 
Passed During the Year Ending January 15, 1912. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance prescribing the time for choosing and appointing 

CITY officers and FIXING THEIR COMPENSATION AND TERMS OF 
OFFICE. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. The board of aldermen shall, on the fourth Tuesday 
in January, ]9]1, choose by a viva voce vote a city clerk, a city 
treasurer, a city engineer, a city messenger, a collector of taxes, a 
city solicitor, three overseers of the poor (one for Penacook, one for 
East Concord and one for Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9), a city 
physician and assistant city physician, a sanitary officer and inspector 
of plumbing, and a superintendent of city clocks, who shall perform 
the duties now imposed upon such officers by law, ordinance and 
custom and who shall receive the compensation and hold office for 
the terms now provided by law or ordinance; subject, however, to be 
removed by the board of aldermen at pleasure by majority vote. 

Sect. 2. The mayor shall, on the fourth Tuesday in January, 
1911, appoint, subject to confirmation by the board of aldermen, 
nine library trustees, drain-layers, health officers, a board of hydrant 
commissioners, consisting of three members, two park commissioners, 
members of cemetery committees (one from Ward 1, one from Waxd 
2, one from Ward 3, and one from Ward 7), undertakers, an inspec- 
tor of petroleum, fence viewers, a pound-keeper, sealers of leather, 
a sealer of weights and measures, a culler of staves, weighers of 
hay, coal, etc., a city weigher, surveyors of painting, surveyors of 
masonry, surveyors of stone and surveyors of wood, lumber and 
bark. The officers thus appointed shall perform the duties now im- 
posed upon such officers by law, ordinance and custom, and shall 
enjoy all the privileges heretofore enjoyed by such officers. They 
shall receive no compensation payable from the city treasury, but 
shall be entitled to such fees as are now provided by law or ordinance 



ORDINANCES. 23 

for such officers. They shall hold office for the terms now provided 
by law or ordinance; subject, however, to be removed at any time 
by the mayor, by written order. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 24, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing the time for regular meetings of the board 
of aldermen. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That regular meetings of the board of aldermen for 
the transaction of business shall be held in the council chamber in 
the city hall on the second Monday of each month at seven o'clock 
p. m. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 24, 1911. 



An Ordinance relating to committees of the board of aldermen. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. At the commencement of each municipal term, there 
shall be appointed by the mayor, subject to the approval of the board 
of aldermen, the following standing committees of the board of alder- 
men : A committee on finance, consisting of the mayor and four 
members of the board of aldermen, of which the mayor shall be chair- 
man, and a conmiittee on accounts and claims, a committee on fire 
department, a committee on lands and buildings, a committee on 
bills, second reading, a committee on elections and returns, a com- 
mittee on engrossed ordinances, a committee on police and license, 
and a committee on public instruction, each to consist of three mem- 
bers of the board of aldermen. The first named member of each 
committee shall be the chairman of such committee. Said commit- 
tees shall perform the duties heretofore performed by similar com- 
mittees of the city council and board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 24, ]911. . 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance authorizing the board op assessors to employ 
assistants in making lists of ratable polls. 

Be it ordained iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the board of assessors is hereby authorized to employ assist- 
ants not exceeding one in each ward to aid in making the lists of 
ratable polls, such assistants to be employed not exceeding two weeks, 
in each year, at a compensation of two and one-half dollars a day, 
to be charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed February 13, 1911. 



An Ordinance relating to the salaries op the officers and 
members op the police department. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follovjs : 

Section 1. The city marshal shall receive in full for his services 
the sum of fifteen himdred dollars per annum. The assistant city 
marshal shall receive in full for his services the sum of twelve hun- 
dred dollars per annum. The captain of the night watch shall re- 
ceive in full for his services the sum of ten hundred and fifty dollars 
per annum. The sergeant shall receive in full for his services the 
sum of two dollars and seventy-five cents per day. Each regular 
policeman during the first year of service shall receive the sum of 
two dollars and fifty cents per day and for service thereafter the sum 
of two dollars and seventy cents per day, which shall be in full for 
all services rendered by him as watchman and day police. 

Sect. 2. Each officer and member of the regular force shall be 
entitled to two weeks' vacation in each year without deduction from 
their salary or pay. The city marshal shall designate the time at 
which each member of the police force shall take his vacation. Ex- 
cept during such vacation and when temporarily excused by the city 
marshal on account of sickness or for other good and sufficient rea- 
sons, the sergeant and regular policemen shall not receive pay when 
absent from duty. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent 
with this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall 
take effect April 1, 1911. 

Passed March 13, 1911. 



ORDINANCES. 25 

An Ordinanck fixing and detkrmining the amount op money to 
be raised for the ensuing financial year for the use of 

THE CITY. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the Citij of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum 
of forty-seven thousand dollars ($47,000) to defray the necessary 
expenses and charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, 
which, together with the sums which may be raised by taxes on rail- 
roads and from other sources, shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds $5,477.50 

For payment of interest on temporary loans 200.00 

For payment of interest on cemetery trust funds 1,400.00 

For support of city poor 800.00 

For dependent soldiers, city 200.00 

For incidentals and land damages 4,000.00 

For salaries, board of aldermen 1,905.00 

For printing and stationery 2,000.00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000.00 

For aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital for Women 

and Children 500.00 

For Memorial Day 460.00 

For public school text^books 3,500.00 

For open air concerts 325.00 

For pubUc baths 225.00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery 1,000.00 

For Old North Cemetery 100.00 

For West Concord Cemetery 90.00 

For Millville Cemetery 65.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 150.00 

For Old Fort Cemetery 25.00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery 15.00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25.00 

For Soucook Cemetery 20.00 

For parks 3,500.00 

For Penacook Park 125.00 

For Washington Square 25.00 

For repair buildings 2,000.00 

For police station bonds 3,000.00 

$34,132.50 



26 CITY OP CONCORD. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Salary, sanitary officer $1,400.00 

Milk inspection 300.00 

Fumigation supplies 125.00 

Antitoxin and medical supplies 200.00 

Incidentals 600.00 



$2,625.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $14,150.00 

Police commissioners 137.49 

Fuel 400.00 

Horse hire, board and shoeing 435.00 

Helmets and buttons 25.00 

Ice and water 48.00 

Lights 150.00 

Telephone, private line 164.32 

Incidentals 800.00 



$16,309.81 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Salaries $2,760.00 

Books and incidentals 2,540.00 



$5,300.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, engineer $1,600.00 

Salary, assistant 1,300.00 

Supplies 100.00 

Repairs 25.00 

Incidentals 150.00 

Assessors ' map 1 ,000.00 

$4,175.00 



ORDINANCES. 27 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, superintendent $1,600.00 

General maintenance 27,000.00 

Catch basins 1 ,400.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, new 1,000.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, repair 2,2.50.00 

Trees 3,000.00 

Permanent Work : 

Gravel, Loudon Koad 1,500.00 

Gravel, South Street 1,500.00 

Macadam, Ilopkinton Eoad 2,000.00 

Macadam, Main Street, Fiske to Pearl 3,000.00 

Macadam, Pleasant Street 1,500.00 



$45,750.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $8,028.00 

Salaries, semi-annual 7,280.00 

Rent, Veterans ' Association 150.00 

Forage 1,800.00 

Fuel and lights 1,700.00 

Fire alarm 800.00 

Horse hire and shoeing 1,200.00 

Washing 52.00 

Water 119.50 

Chemical supplies 50.00 

Penacook fire alarm 130.00 

Incidentals 2,000.00 

New hose 800.00 



$24,109.50 



Mayor $1,500.00 

City clerk 1,200.00 

Overseers of the poor 390.00 

City solicitor 500.00 

City treasurer 250.00 

City messenger 800.00 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

City physicians $500.00 

Care of city clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,000.00 

Moderators and ward clerks 360.00 

Supervisors and inspectors of elections 960.00 

Judge, police court 1,000.00 

Clerk, police court 200.00 

Collector of taxes, so much as may be necessary of the 

sum of 1,500.00 



$12,270.00 



Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of forty- 
nine thousand seven hundred two and fifty-hundredths dollars 
($49,702.50) for the support of schools for the ensuing financial 
year, which, together with the income of the Abial Walker fund, 
shall be appropriated and divided among the several school districts 
according to the valuation thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 
the cemeteries of the city one half of the income from the sale 
of lots, and the income derived from the care of lots and grad- 
ing, which sum shall be deposited by the superintendent, or 
others receiving them, in the city treasury. The care of 
lots for which the city holds trust funds shall be paid from the 
money appropriated for the care of cemeteries and so much of the 
income of these trust funds as may be thus expended shall be depos- 
ited in the city treasury at the close of the year and the remainder, 
in each instance, credited to the individual funds. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 
the use of the public library in the purchase of books the amount 
collected for fines. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be kaised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits op the garbage precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 



ORDINANCES, 29 

be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the garbage pre- 
cinct of said city, the sum of sixty-five hundred dollars ($6,500) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said 

precinct $6,500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
TO be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits of the lighting precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the lighting pre- 
cinct of said city, the sum of nineteen thousand dollars ($19,000) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for 
the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets $19,000.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance sliall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 

to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

within the limits of the street sprinkling precinct for 

the ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling 
precinct of said city, the sum of seventy-five hundred dollars ($7,500) 



30 CITY OF CONCORD, 

to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for 
the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $7,500.00 

8ect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits op the sewerage precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and rataJble estates within the sewerage pre- 
cinct of said city, the sum of five thousand ninety-seven and fifty- 
hundredths dollars ($5,097. .50) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall 
be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs and construction $2,000.00 

For interest on bonds 3,097.50 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

within the limits of ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordairied by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratalble estates within St. Paul 's School 
sewerage precinct, the sum of five hundred ninety dollars ($590) to 
defray the nece.ssary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 



ORDINANCES. 31 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $500.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on 

precinct bonds 45.00 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said preinet . . . 45.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 191L 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount op money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
within THE LIMITS OP THE PENACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR 
THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook sew- 
erage precinct, the sum of fourteen hundred eighty dollars ($1,480) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for 
the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $1,100.00 

For the payment of the interest that may become due 

on precinct bonds 380.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount op money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

WITHIN THE limits OP THE WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord 
sewerage precinct, the sum of thirteen hundred ninety-five and fifty- 
hundredths dollars ($1,395.50) to defray the necessary expenses and 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall 
be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $1,000.00 

For payment of interest that may become due on precinct 

bonds 395.50 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE EAST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by ihe Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord 
sewerage precinct, the sum of one hundred seventeen and fifty-hun- 
dredths dollars ($117.50) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall 
be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $100.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on 

precinct bonds 17.50 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
WITHIN the limits of the east concord lighting precinct for 

THE ensuing financial YEAR. 

Be it ordained iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 



ORDINANCES. 33 

be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord 
lighting precinct, the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets within said precinct $500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance relating to the employment and payment of 
laborers. 

Be it ordained hy ilie Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follotvs : 

Section 1. That the heads of departments of the city of Con- 
cord, in employing men for city work, shall, so far as possible, with 
due regard for the public welfare, give preference to native born 
or naturalized American citizens. 

Sect. 2. That the rate of wages to able-bodied city employees 
w^orking by the day shall be two dollars jier day and that the mini- 
nuim rate shall be one dollar and seventy-five cents per day of nine 
hours. City employees working by the day or week shall be paid 
for overtime on week da.ys at the per diem rate, and for overtime 
on Sundays at one and one-half times the per diem rate. 

Sect. 3. That after April 1, 1911, the wages earned each week 
b}^ employees of the city who work by the day or week shall be paid 
within eight days after the expiration of the week in which such 
wages are earned, or upon demand after that time. 

Sect. 4. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance providing for the payment of one hundred dollars 
per year to the city clerk for his services as clerk of the 

board OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloics : 

Section 1. That the city clerk shall receive for his services as 
3 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

clerk of the board of public works the sum of one hundred dollars 
per year, payaible in equal monthly payments. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 27, 191]. 



An Ordinance fixing the compensation of the city messenger. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follows : 

Section 1. The city messenger shall receive the sum of nine hun- 
dred dollars ($900) a year, payable in equal monthly payments, in 
full for all services. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances, inconsistent 
with this ordinance, are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect on April 1, 1911. 

Passed March 27, 1911. 



An Ordinance extending the street sprinkling precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section L The street sprinkling precinct shall include, in addi- 
tion to the territory described in chapter 21 of the Eevised Or- 
dinances, as amended, the following territory: Franklin Street from 
Charles Street to High Street; High Street from Franklin to 
Chestnut Street. All lands, with the inhabitants thereof, abutting 
on the above described parts of Franklin and High Streets, are 
hereby included in the street sprinkling precinct. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 10, 1911. 



An Ordinance relating to the salaries of the permanent men 
of the fire department. 

Be it ordained l))i the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. The permanent force of the Central fire station, the 



ORDINANCES. 35 

drivers at the Good Will and Alert hose houses, shall each receive in 
full for their services the sum of eight hundred and forty dollars 
per annum, to be paid in monthly installments; the members of the 
Chemical Company shall each receive in full for their services the 
sum of nine hundred and twelve dollars, to be paid in monthly in- 
stallments. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect April 1, ]91]. 

Passed April 10, 1911. 



An Ordinance fixing and establishing a street sprinkling pke- 
cinct in "ward one. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the Citii of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. A street sprinkling precinct is hereby fixed and es- 
tablished in Ward One, bounded as follows: Said street sprinkling 
precinct shall embrace all the territory, together with its inhabitants, 
situated within the following described limits, to wit: 

Beginning on Main Street at a point opposite the southerly end of 
Grimes' garage, thence northerly on said Main Street to Union 
Street, thence westerly and northerly on said Union Street to Wash- 
ington Street, thence westerly on said Washington Street to Charles 
Street, thence northerly and easterly on said Charles Street to West 
Canal Street, thence northerly and easterly on said West Canal 
Street to Main Street, thence northerly on said Main Street to East 
Canal Street, thence easterly on said East Canal Street to Center 
Street, thence southerly on said Center Street to Merrimack Street, 
thence easterly on said Merrimack Street to Cross Street, thence 
southerly on said Cross Street to Spring Street, thence westerly on 
said Spring Street to the junction of Main Street and Pleasant 
Street, thence southerly on said Pleasant Street to Maple Street; 
also Maple Street from Pleasant Street to High Street, High Street 
from Maple Street to Spring Street, Washington Street from 
Charles Street to the westerly line of land of the Concord Manu- 
facturing Company, Main Street from East Canal Street northerly 
to the Boscawen town line, Elm Street from Main Street westerly 
to the Avesterly line of land of Mr. Ainsworth, Webster Street from 
Elm Street northerlv to the Boscawen town line, East Canal Street 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

from Center Street to Cross Street, Merrimack Street from Cross 
Street to Penaeook Street, Summer Street from Cross Street to the 
end of said street. 

Said precinct shall include in addition to the territory within the 
aforesaid limit all lots, with their inhabitants, abutting on the streets 
hereinbefore named, so far as the lines hereinbefore described extend 
on said streets. 

Passed May 8, 191L 



An Ordinance tixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the street sprinkling precinct in ward one. 

Be it ordained hy ihe Board of Aldermen of the Citii of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. Tliere shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling 
precinct in Ward One the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of the precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets five hundi'ed dollars $500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed May 8, 1911. 



An Ordinance extending the lighting precinct. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. The lighting precinct shall include, in addition to the 
territory described in chapter 20 of the Eevised Ordinances, as 
amended by ordinance of June 13, 1904, the following territory: 
South Pembroke Road from the Lower River bridge to the top of 
Black Hill, so called. All lands, with the inhabitants thereof, abut- 
ting on said above described part of South Pembroke Road, are 
hereby included in the lighting jjrecinct. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 11, 1911. 



ORDINANCES, 37 

An Ordinance to regulate motor traffic. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follou's : 

Section 1. On and after the first day of January, 1912, operators 
and chauffeurs of motor vehicles shall not use the cut-out or other- 
wise disengage the muffler, except for the purpose of making a short 
signal, while operating any motor vehicle within the compact part 
of the city of Concord. 

Sect. 2. Any person found guilty of a violation of this ordinance 
shall be fined not exceeding twenty dollars for each offence. 

Passed November 13, 1911. 



An Ordinance to prohibit false fire alarms and tampering with 

FIRE alarm box APPURTENANCES. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. Any person who shall pull a false fire alarm, break a 
fire alarm key-box glass or key chain, or otherwise tamper with any 
fire alarm appurtenance or disfigure a fire alarm pole, shall be fined 
not more than twenty nor less than ten dollars for each offence. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 13, 1911. 



An Ordinance appointing a building inspector and authorizing 

A BUILDING code AND FIRE ORDINANCE. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. The chief of the fire department is hereby appointed 
building inspector at an annual compensation, in addition to his 
present salary, of two hundred dollars. 

Sect. 2. The duties of said building inspector shall be as here- 
after defined by the board of aldermen. 

Sect. 3. The mayor, Alderman Brown, the city solicitor and said 
building inspector are hereby constituted a committee to draft a 
building code and fire ordinance, subject to the approval of the board 
of aldermen. 

Passed January 15, 1912. 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

A Eesolution providing for the printing of rosters of the city 

GOVERNMENT. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the pres- 
ent eity government and cause copies thereof to be printed, and that 
the expense of printing the same be charged to the account of print- 
ing and stationery. 

Passed January 24, 1911. 



A Resolution in relation to paying salaries^ pay-rolls and 

RENTS. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his warrant 
on the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, pay-rolls and 
rents as the same shall become due during the present municipal 
term, and all bills so paid shall be laid before the committee on 
accounts and claims at their next meeting. 

Passed January 24, 1911. 



A Resolution providing for the printing of the mayor's in- 
augural address. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the city clerk be authorized and instructed to have printed 
copies of the mayor's inaugural address, the expense of the same to 
be charged to the account of printing and stationery. 

Passed .January 24, 1911. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 39 

A Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and buildings 

TO MAKE CURRENT REPAIRS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the committee on lands and buildings be authorized to expend 
such sums as may be necessary for current repairs, not exceeding 
three hundred dollars in any one month, the same to be charged to 
the appropriation for repairs to buildings. 

Passed January 24, 1911. 



A Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and 

BINDING the annual CITY REPORTS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 
proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1910, 
and submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full 
power to act in the matter. 

Passed January 24, 1911. 



A Resolution providing for the revision of the city ordinances. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to appoint a special 
committee consisting of three members, one of whom shall be the 
city solicitor, and none of whom shall be a member of the board of 
aldermen, to revise the ordinances of the city of Concord so that 
they shall conform with the new charter and said committee is au- 
thorized to employ such clerical assistance as may be necessary to 
properly perform this work and the members of said committee shall 
receive reasonable compensation for their work. 

Passed January 24, 1911. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution appropriating three hundred dollars for supplies 

OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Resolved bjj the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

That the sum of three hundred dolhirs is hereby appropriated for 
the purchase of furniture, cards and ofhce supplies for the use of the 
board of assessors, be charged to the account of incidentals and land 
damages. 

Passed February 13, 1911. 



A EESOLUTION APPROPRIATING NINE AND SIXTY-FIVE ONE-HUNDREDTHS 
DOLLARS ($9.65) TO REIMBURSE CHARLES E. JONES FOR TAXES 
ERRONEOUSLY ASSESSED. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of nine and sixty -five one hundredths dollars ($9.65) 
be, and the same hereby is, appropriated to reimburse Charles E. 
Jones of Loudon, N. II., for taxes paid by him to the city of Concord 
for the years 1903 to 1908, inclusive, the same having been errone- 
ously assessed. The amount hereby appropriated shall be charged to 
the account of incidentals and land daiuages. 

Passed March 13, 1911. 



A Resolution relating to a joint resolution passed march 28, 
1910, exempting the property OF John Swenson from tax- 
ation. 

licsolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Whereas on the twenty-eighth day of March, 1910, a joint resolu- 
tion was passed exempting certain property of John Swenson from 
taxation and whereas said John Swenson since said date has taken 
into partnership one Omar S. Swenson, now therefore be it resolved 
that the said resolution of March 28, 1910, shall be. continued in 
force and apply to said property exempted from taxation now owned 
by said partnership, during the remainder of the jieriod of ten years. 

Passed March 13, 1911. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 41 

A Eesolution providing for a special committee on the 

AUDITORIUM. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That a special committee, to consist of the mayor, Alderman Far- 
rar, Alderman Eoby and AMerman Keene be, and hereby is, ap- 
pointed to take charge of and have full powers in regard to all mat- 
ters pertaining to moving picture shows, dances, etc., to be held or 
given in said Auditorium, also as to the determining and regulating 
of all matters which may arise through any lease of said Auditorium 
given or proposed. They shall act in respect to the above matters 
during the j^resent municipal term unless sooner removed by this 
board. 

Passed March 13, 1913. 



A Resolution appropriating eleven hundred ten and seventy- 
four hundredths dollars for text-books used in union 
school district. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of eleven hundred ten and seventy-four 
hundredths dollars ($1,110.74) be, and hereby is, appropriated out 
of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated for the 
purchase of text-books used in Union School District. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 13, 1911. 



A Resolution authorizing the transfer of funds of the west 
concord sewerage precinct. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldcr7ne7i of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to transfer 
the sum of four hundred dollars ($400) from the West Concord 
sewerage precinct sinking fund account to the city treasury, said 
fund to constitute a part of the amount to be raised for the sinking 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

fund for 1911, which, together with one thousand dollars ($1,000) 
raised by taxation, amounts to one thousand four hundred dollars 
($1,400), the sum required by ordinance. 
Passed March 27, 1911. 



A Resolution appropriating thirty and seventy-nine hundredths 

DOLLARS FOR TEXT-BOOKS USED IN TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of thirty and seventy-nine hundredths 
dollars ($30.79) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated for the purchase of text- 
books used in Town School District. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 27, 1911. 



A Resolution appropriating money for the use of the mayor. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200) be, and hereby is, ap- 
propriated for the necessary expenses and supplies for the mayor's 
office. The same to be expended under the direction of the mayor 
and charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed March 27, 1911. 



A Resolution exempting from taxation the property of the dux 

TOY company for A TERM OF TEN YEARS. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

Whereas, It is represented that the Dux Toy Company, now located 
in Warner, N. H., has leased the premises known as Hill building 
on Durgin Avenue and proposes to move its business from Warner 
to said premises and establish in the city of Concord an important 
industry; and 

Whereas, It is expected that the estaJblishment of this industry 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 43 

will be of special benefit to this city and the citizens thereof; it is 
Besolved, That the manufacturing equipment, including machines, 
shafting and tools, goods in process of manufacture and the finished 
product of the Dux Toy Company be, and hereby are, exempted from 
taxation for the term of ten years from March 27, 1911, according 
to the provisions of the Public Statutes of New Hampshire. 
Passed April 10, 1911. 



A Eesolution providing for a discount of taxes. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That a discount of two per cent, sliall be allowed on all taxes as- 
sessed for the year 1911, paid on or before the fifteenth day of July 
1911. 

Passed April 10, 1911. 



A Eesolution in relation to the location op saloons. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

"Whereas, Pleasant Street Extension is the main thoroughfare to 
the railroad station and as such is used during the day and evening 
by unattended women and children: 

It is the sense of this board that no saloons should be located on 
said street, and the state board of license commissioners are hereby 
respectfully requested not to locate any saloons on said street. 

The city clerk is hereby directed to send a certified copy of this 
resolution to the State Board of License Commissioners. 

Passed April 10, 1911. 



A Eesolution appropriating four hundred eighty and sixty-three 

HUNDREDTHS DOLLARS FOR TEXT-BOOKS USED IN PENACOOK SCHOOL 

district. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of four hundred eighty and sixty-three 
hundredths dollars ($480.63) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the pur- 
chase of text-books used in Penacook School District. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 10, 1911. 



A Eesolution relating to a lease of the auditorium. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Whereas, A committee of the last city government consisting of 
the mayor and the committee on lands and buildings, voted to lease 
the Auditorium for the term of three years from February 1, 1911, 
to Marcus & Cohen; and 

Whereas, The term of office of said committee expired before the 
said lease was executed and signed on behalf of the city, it is hereby 

Besolved, That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to sign 
said lease on behalf of the city. 

Passed April 10, 1911. 



A Eesolution in relation to coal, wood and ice. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the committee on finance be, and hereby are, directed to ask 
for bids for supplying the city with coal, wood and ice for the en- 
suing year, and that said committee have full power to accept or 
reject any bids offered. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



A Eesolution in relation to band concerts for 1911. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloics : 

That the mayor is hereby authorized to contract with Arthur F. 
Nevers in the sum of three hundred twenty-five dollars ($325) for 
band concerts during the summer of 1911. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 45 

A Eesolution appropriating money towards defraying the ex- 
penses OF a playground in ward two. 

Besolved hit ihc Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follotcs : 

Tluit the sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated for the use of defraying the expenses of a play- 
ground in Ward 2. 

Said sum to be expended under the direction of Alderman Harry 
B. Sanborn and to be charged to the account of incidentals and 
land damages. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



A Eesolution relating to city pay-rolls. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follotcs : 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized and directed 
to turn over all of the city pay-rolls for the period prior to Janiiary 
1, 1908, now in his possession, to the city clerk, and to carry all 
money set apart for the payment of such pay-rolls which is unex- 
pended, to the general account. In the event of demand being made 
by the proper person of the amount due on said pay-rolls, the mayor 
and city clerk are hereby authorized to draw orders on the city treas- 
urer for the payment thereof. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



A Eesolution appropriating money for the purchasing op horses 
for the fire department. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of six hundred dollars ($600) be, and is hereby, ap- 
propriated out of anj' money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the purchase of a pair of horses for the fire department; 
this sum shall be charged to the expenses of the fire department. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Eesolution constituting a committee to investigate the 

MATTER OF MOTOR APPARATUS FOR THE CONCORD FIRE DEPART- 
MENT. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the committee on fire department, with the mayor added, is 
hereby directed to make an investigation of the adaptability of motor 
fire apparatus for service in Concord, and for such purpose may visit 
such places as have installed such apparatus, the expenses incurred 
to be paid from the appropriation for incidentals and land damages 
on bills approved by the committee on accounts and claims. 

Said committee is directed to report on the following subjects in 
connection with the investigation above outlined: 

The cost to the city of a combination chemical (two tank) and 
hose wagon and a gasolene pumping engine. 

The number of pieces of horse-drawn apparatus now in service in 
the Concord fire department that would be replaced by the installa- 
tion of the two pieces of motor apparatus indicated and the saving 
that would accrue through the retirement of the horses now employed 
on such apparatus from the service of the city. 

The estimated cost of maintenance of the motor apparatus per 
year, exclusive of pay of firemen, in comparison with the cost of 
maintaining the present apparatus, the figures to include the cost 
per year for keep per horse now employed. 

The estimated cost to the city of the proposed remodeling of the 
Central fire station. 

The cost to the city of the proposed new stations at the South 
and West ends should it become necessary to erect those structures 
and distribute the apparatus in accordance with the report on the 
subject by a committee of the former city government, and the cost 
of maintenance of such stations per year. 

The amount of money that the installation of such motor appara- 
tus would save the city should it be found that the installation of 
the new apparatus would do away with the necessity of erecting 
additional stations for fire department purposes. 

And to investigate and report upon all matters in connection with 
the above sulajects as will bear on the questions presented, said 
report to be made at the earliest possible day consistent with a full 
and proper consideration of the entire subject-matters contained in 
this resolution. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 47 

A Resolution appropriating $23 to reimburse Rev. T. J. E. Devoy 

FOR taxes erroneously ASSESSED. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of $23 be, and the same is hereby, appropriated to 
reimburse Rev. T. J. E. Devoy of Concord, N. H., for taxes paid by 
him for the year 1907, the same having been erroneously assessed. 
The amount hereby appropriated shall be charged to the account of 
incidentals and land damages. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



A Resolution in regard to the lease of a clock for city hall 

BUILDING. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, instructed and authorized to 
make a lease with the Western Union Telegraph Company for the 
installation of an electric clock in City Hall building at a yearly 
rental of $15. 

The same to be charged to account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



A Resolution relative to the locations of saloons. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloios : 

At the April meeting of the board of aldermen it v?as voted that 
it was the sense of the board of aldermen that licenses to deal in 
liquor should not be granted on Pleasant Street Extension. Since 
this vote was passed the state board of license commissioners has 
included Main Street from Pleasant Street to Center Street in the 
territory in which licenses to deal in liquor will be granted. If 
licenses to deal in liquor are to be granted on Main Street no good 
reason appears why such licenses should not be granted on Pleasant 
Street Extension; and it is therefore 

Eesolved, That in view of the fact that Main Street from Pleasant 
Street to Center Street has been included in the territory in which 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

licenses to deal in liquor will be granted, it is the sense of this board 
that licenses to deal in liquor should be granted in proper locations 
on Pleasant Street Extension and that the vote passed by this board 
at its April meeting be, and hereby is, rescinded; and it is further 

Hcsolved, That it is the opinion of this board that licenses of the 
third class can properly be granted to be exercised in the locations 
where such licenses were exercised when the city of Concord was be- 
fore under the license law. 

The city clerk is directed to transmit a certified copy of this vote 
to the state board of license commissioners. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



A Resolution approprtating money in aid of military organiza- 
tions. 

Besolved hy tlie Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of one hundred dollars be hereby appropriated for 
the use of Company C, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G., the sum of one 
hundred dollars for the use of Company E, of the same regiment, and 
tlie sum of fifty dollars for the use of the Hospital Corps attached 
to the same regiment, they being the military organizations now 
having their headquarters in the state armory in the city of Con- 
cord, and that these several sums be paid to the commanding officers 
of the said organizations, respectively, out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated. 

Passed May 8, 1911. 



A Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000). 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the Cily of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the committee on finance are hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed twenty-five thousand dollars 
($25,000) for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the year 
1911 upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall 
determine. 

Passed June 12, 1911. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 49 

A Eesolution appropriating thirty-six hundred fifty-three and 

NINETY-SEVEN HUNDREDTHS DOLLARS ($3,653.97) TO PAY FOR THE 
REAL ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR UNPAID TAXES 
FOR THE YEAR 1910. 

Besolved hy ihe Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of thirty-six hundred fifty-three and ninety-seven 
hundredths dollars ($3,653.97) be, and the same hereby is, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated 
to pay the amount due the city of Concord for real estate purchased 
at the tax collector's sale of real estate for the unpaid taxes 
for the year 1910. 

Passed June 12, 1911. 



A EESOLUTION appropriating MONEY FOR A SEWER IN NOYES STREET. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of fourteen hundred dollars ($1,400) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise ap- 
propriated for the purpose of constructing a sewer in Noyes Street 
between Dartmouth and South Streets. 

Passed June 12, 1911. 



A Resolution appropriating money for the John Kimball play- 
ground. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

That the sum of three hundred seventy-five dollars ($375) be, and 
the same hereby is^ appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for the John Kimball playground during 
the season of 1911. Said sum shall be expended under the direction 
of the following committee: Alderman Fraser, chairman; Alderman 
Brown and Alderman Anderson. 

Passed June 12, 1911. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of a hand 

ENGINE FOR WEST CONCORD FIRE STATION. 

Eesolvcd by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for the purchase of a hand fire engine belonging 
to the Veteran Firemen's Association, to be placed in the engine 
house at West Concord. 

Passed June 12, 1911. 



A RESOLUTION AMENDING A RESOLUTION PASSED MARCH 13, 1911, EN- 
TITLED "RESOLUTION PROVIDING FOR A SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON 
THE AUDITORIUM. ' ' 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follovjs : 

That a resolution passed March 13, 1911, entitled "Resolution 
providing for a special committee on the Auditorium," be amended 
by striking out the whole of said resolution and insert in the place 
thereof the following: That a special committee to consist of the 
mayor. Alderman Farrar, Alderman Roby and Alderman Norris be, 
and hereby is, appointed to take charge of and have full powers in 
regard to all matters pertaining to moving picture shows, dances, 
balls, etc., to be held or given in said Auditorium, and to the rent- 
ing of said Auditorium to any organi?ations, societies or conven- 
tions, as provided in any lease of said Auditorium. They shall act 
in respect to the above matters during the present municipal term 
unless sooner removed by this board, and any two members of said 
committee may call a meeting of the same at any time. 

Passed June 12, 1911. 



A Resolution amending a resolution passed may 8, 1911, en- 
titled "resolution appropriating money in aid of military 
organizations. ' ' 

Benclvcd by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

fi.lJoirs : 

That a resolution, entitled "Resolution appropriating money in 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 51 

aid of military organizations," passed May 8, 1911, be, and hereby 
is, amended by striking out the words * ' attached to the same regi- 
ment" so that the resolution as amended will read: That the sum 
of one hundred dollars, be hereby appropriated for the use of Com- 
pany C, First Eegiment, N. H. N. G., the sum of one hundred dollars 
for the use of Company E of the same regiment, and the sum of fifty 
dollars for the ufe of the Hospital Corps, they being the military 
organizations now having their headquarters in the state armory 
in the city of Concord, and that these several sums be paid to the 
commanding officers of the said organizations, respectively, out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated. 
Passed July 10, 1911. 



A Resolution appropriating the sum of two thousand dollars 
($2,000) FOR incidentals and land damages. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follotvs: 

That the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise api^ropriated, for incidentals and laud damages. 

Passed July 10, 1911. 



A Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars 

($1,000) FOR PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

JResolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for printing and stationery. 

Passed July 10, 1911. 



A Resolution appropriating the sum of eight hundred dollars 
($800) FOR the support of city poor. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs: 

That the sum of eight hundred dollars ($800) be, and the same 



52 CITY OF CONCORD, 

is hereby, ai-)propriated out of any nioney in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for the support of city poor. 
Passed July 10, 1911. 



A Eesolutiox authorizing the city solicitor to institute pro- 
ceedings NECESSARY TO PROTECT THE CITY SEWERS. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the city solicitor be, and hereby is, instructed to take the 
steps necessary to prevent the flooding of the sewers of the city by 
the Manchester Traction, Light & Power Company or by any other 
corporation or by any individual, and, 

Eesolved, That the city solicitor is hereby authorized to incur the 
necessary expense incident thereto, by and with the approval of the 
mayor. 

Passed August 14, 1911. 



A Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of land 

FOR THE extension OF SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

Eesolved 'by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and the same 
hereby is, ajjpropriated for the purchase of land for the extension 
of Soucook Cemeteiy. The amount hereiby appropriated shall be 
charged to the account of incidentals <ind land damages and expended 
under the direction of the mayor. 

Passed August 14, 1911. 



A Resolution appropriating eleven dollars and thirty cents 
($11.30) to reimburse Jedediah Carter for taxes errone- 
ously assessed. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of eleven and thirty one-hundredths dollars ($11.30) 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 53 

be, and the same hereby is, appropriated to reimburse Jedediah Car- 
ter of Concord, for taxes paid by him to the city of Concord, the 
same having been erroneously assessed for the year 1911. The 
amount hereby appropriated shall be charged to the account of inci- 
dentals and land damages. 
Passed September 11, 1911. 



A Eesolution appropriating $509 for the use of the fire depart- 
ment. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of five hundred and nine dollars ($509) be, and the 
same is, hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated for the purpose of relining thirteen hundred 
(1,300) feet of fire hose, the same to be expended under the direction 
of the chief engineer. 

Passed November 13, 1911. 



A Resolution authorizing the settlement op the sewer con- 
troversy. 

Besolved by tlic Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloios : 

That the city solicitor be, and hereby is, authorized to settle the 
case of the City versus the Manchester Traction, Light & Power Com- 
pany, instituted for the protection of the sewers of the city, for the 
sum of seven thousand six hundred dollars; and, 

Resolved, That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized, on pay- 
ment of said sum to the city, to execute and deliver in the name and 
under the seal of the city, a joint contract with said Manchester 
Traction, Light & Power Company, permitting the maintenance by 
said company upon its dam at Garvin 's Falls of flash-boards to the 
height of three feet above the main crest of the present dam, or to 
a height of 3.17 feet on city datum, or a deed to said company of 
the perpetual right to maintain flash-boards on said dam to that 
height and to hold back the water of the Merrimack River thereby as 
against the city, such contract or deed to be in such form as the 



54 CITY OF CONCORD. 

city solicitor may approve, and said flash-boards to be' maintained 
at the pleasure of said company, provided, however, that the support- 
ing pins of said flash-boards are to be constructed to release said flash- 
boards when the water flowing over said dam rises to the height of 
eight inches above tiie top of three-foot flash-boards, or 3.84 feet 
on city datum, and 

Eesolved, That after deducting expenses, the proceeds of this set- 
tlement be paid into the city sewer precinct fund. 

Passed December 20, 1911. 



A Resolution APPRorRiATixG four hundred dollars ($400) to 

REIMBURSE THE JOSEPH STICKNEY ESTATE FOR TAXES ERRONE- 
OUSLY ASSESSED. 

Meftalved hy the Board of Aldermen of the Ciiij of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of four hundred dollars ($400) be, and the same is, 
hereby appropriated to reimburse the Joseph Stickney estate for 
taxes paid by Joseph Stickney to the city of Concord for the years 
1900 and 1901, the same having been erroneously assessed. The 
amount hereby appropriated shall be charged to the account of in- 
cidentals and land damages. 

Passed December 20, 1911. 



A Resolution authorizing the settlement of the lyster land 

DAMAGE CLAIM. 

Ecsolvcd by the Board of Aldermen of ihe City of Concord, as 
folloirs: 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to contract in behalf 
of the city with Lyster Brothers for the permanent settlement of the 
claim of said Lyster Brothers for damage to their land by reason of 
the alleged obstruction of a certain culvert under North Main 
Street between Montgomery and Pitman Streets, and 

Hesolved, That said contract be drawn subject to the approval of 
the city solicitor, and shall provide that pipes be laid by the city to 
relieve the present situation, which pipes, after being laid, shall be 
jnaintained forever by said Lyster Brothers and their successors 
and assigns, and 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS, 55 

Resolved, That said contract shall contain a release by said Lyster 
Brothers of all claim by them or their successors and assigns, against 
the city on account of the obstruction of said culvert. 

Passed January 15, 1912. 



A Resolution relating to the abatement of interest on taxes 
ON the estate op the late George II. Downing. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follovs : 

That all the interest charges above and over the rate of 6 per 
cent., which have accrued and will accrue to February 1, 1912, on 
all the unpaid taxes assessed against the estate of the late George 
II. Downing, deceased, or his estate thereof, be, and hereby are, 
abated. 

Passed January 15, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the sev- 
eral departments. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloics : 

Section 1. That the sum of six thousand eight hundred seventy- 
four and ninety-nine one-hundredths dollars ($6,874.99) be, and 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, to pay outstanding claims as follows: 

Board of Health $5.58 

City poor 499.03 

Engineering department 74.74 

Fire department 1,672.99 

Incidentals and land damages 2,729.47 

Interest, cemetery trust funds 65.50 

Police and watch 989.50 

Salaries 838.18 



$6,874.99 
Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sewers 



56 CITY OP CONCORD, 

for the year 1911, the sum of five aud ten one-hundredths dollars 
($5.10) the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
garbage for the year 1911, the sum of two hundred sixty-nine and 
twenty-six one-hundredths dollars ($269.26), the same being the 
earnings of this department. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 15, 1912. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 191 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

HON. CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

Office: City Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims. 

Aldermen-at-Large. 

FOR THREE YEARS. 

OLA ANDERSON, 
ELMER H. FARRAR, 
RICHARD A. BROWN. 

FOR ONE YEAR. 

JOHN E. CLINTON, 
THOMAS G. NORRIS, 
HARLEY B. ROBY. 

Ward Aldermen. 

Ward l—WIhhlAM H. McGIRR. 
Ward 5— HARRY B. SANBORN. 
Ward 5— MATHEW H. PEABODY. 
Ward 4— ROBERT F. KEANE. 
Ward 5— NATHANIEL W. HOBBS. 
Ward ^— HENRY 0. POWELL. 
Ward 7— GEORGE A. WOOSTER. 
Ward S— MICHAEL J. LEE. 
Ward P— ROY W. ERASER. 



58 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY CLERK. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per 

annum. 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 



Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



CHARLES J. FRENCH, ]\Lvyor, ex-officio. 



Term expires January. 1914 



OLA ANDERSON, 
ELMER H. FARRAR, 
RICHARD A. BROWN, 
JOHN E. CLINTON, 
THOMAS G. NORRIS, 
HARLEY B. ROBY, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Clerk. 

Salary, $100 per annum. 





1914 




1914 




1912 




1912 




1912 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — Aldermen Norris, Keane, Eraser. 

On Bills, Second Beading — Aldermen Hobbs, Peabody, Lee. 

On Elections and Beturns — Aldermen Brown, Powell, 
Wooster. 

On Engrossed Ordinances — Aldermen Keane, Roby, Eraser. 

On Finance — The Llayor; Aldermen Roby, Peabody, 
Hobbs, Wooster. 

On Fire Department — Aldermen Farrar, McGirr, Powell. 

On Lands and Buildings — Aldermen Lee, Brown, Sanborn. 

On Police and License — Aldermen Anderson, Clinton, 
Norris. 

On Puhlic Instruction — Aldermen IMcGirr, Farrar, San- 
born. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 59 

CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance 
of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $250 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,600 per 

annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $900 per annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days 
to satisfaction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of first 
$60,000; seven and one-half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

WENDELL P. LADD. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $750 per annum. Clerk, $1,500 per annum. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1916 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1914 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " '' " 1912 



60 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salary, $1,600. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,400 per 

annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $450 per annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $50 per annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $500 per annum. 

EDMUND S. COOK.* 
ALEXANDER MURCHIE.** 

* Died July 14, 1911. 
** Elected to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 61 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward i— WILLIAM H. McGIRR, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 5— HARRY B. SANBORN, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, .9— HENRY E. CHAIMBERLIN, 
City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,000 per annum, fixed by 
Board of Aldermen. 

GEORGE M. FLETCHER. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $3 per day of actual service. 

BENJAIMIN W. COUCH. 



CLERK OF POLICE COURT. 

-Appointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by the Legislature. 

RUFUS H. BAKER. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, $1,500 per aunum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

CHARLES H. ROWE. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 
Term, unlimited. Salary, $2.50 per day for first year, and $2.70 per day 
thereafter. 

Charles S. Flanders,* Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $1,050 per annum. 

Victor I. Moore.** 
Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $2.75 per day. 

Samuel L. Batehelder, P]hner J. Brown, 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

Albert W. Braley, p]dward J. McGirr, 

George II. Silsby, Josepli E. Silva, 

Harry L. Woodward, Hoyt Robinson,t 

Fred N. IMarden. 



* Died January 18, 1911. 
** Elected to fill vacancy, 
t Died May 13, 1911. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 



63 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captaiu and Drill blaster. 



0. H. Bean, 
W. A. Little, 
William H. H. Patch, 
Alvin H. Urann, 
Fred H. Clifford, 
Charles W. Hall, 
George G. Allen, 



Charles E. Kelley, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
Fred S. Pendleton, 
Harry F. Jones, 
George E. Drury, 
Harper B. Giles, 
Walter H. Beane. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 



Appointed by Police Commissioners. 

se 

Almali C. Leavitt, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Justus 0. Clark, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Powell, 
Joseph C. Eaton, 
Alphonso Venne, 
Edward M. Nason, 
Charles M. Norris, 
William H. Richardson, 
William H. Hammond, 
James W. Lane, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Charles Ada, 
George L. Danforth, 
Arthur J. Taylor, 
Alfred H. Walker, 
Walter H. Beane, 
Harper P. Giles, 



Salary, $2.25 each per day of actual 
rvije. 

Elmer Twombly, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Ira C. Phillips, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Moses T. Rowell, 
Frank W. Johnson, 
Judson F. Hoit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
]\Iilton Colb}^ 
Asbury F. Tandy, ^ 
Henry J. Durrell, 
George W. Chesley, 
Harry E. Stevens, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor, 
John G. Solchow, 
Clarence W. Brown, 
Nelson Forrest, 
John McGirr, 
Leeson 0. Tarleton, 
Edward H. Smart. 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Klected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

JOHN p. PAIGE. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in .January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 5— CHARLES E. STANIELS. 
Ward J— PAUL R. IIOLDEN. 
Ward 4— FRANK W. ROLLINS. 
Ward 5— AMOS J. SHURTLEFF. 
Ward ^—REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward (S— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward 5— GEORGE V. HILL. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by tru.stees of library. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $500 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Fowler Library BuiUliiif/. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 65 

CITY WATER WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

HENRY E. CONANT,* Terra expires March 31, 1912 

FRANK P. QUIMBY.** 

H. C. HOLBROOK, " '' " 1912 

SOLON A. CARTER, " '' " 1913 

HARLEY B. ROBY,*** '' " " 1913 

BURNS P. HODGMAN.**** 

N. E. MARTIN, " " " 1914 

H. H. DUDLEY, " " " 1914 

EDSON J. HILL, " '' '' 1915 

G. D. B. PRESCOTT, " " " 1915 

President — Solon A. Carter. 
Clerk — Edson J. Hill. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary $1,600 per annum. 
Term unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



* Died July 27, 1911. 
** Appointed to fill vacancy. 
*** Resigned January 24, 1911. 
**** Appointed to fill vacancy. 



66 CITY OF CONCORD, 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,250 per annum 
and rent of house. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $125 each per annum. 

JOHN J. McNULTY. 
WALTER J. COFFIN. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $25 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $75 per annum. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 67 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

CHARLES P. WHITE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subjest to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, ISIayor, ex-officio. 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio. 
DR. FRED A. SPRAGUE. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Pees, 15 cents for each 
birth, marriage and death received, recorded and returned to the State 
Registrar. 

HENRY E. CHA:MBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 

Xo sahii'v. 

WILL B. HOWE, City Engineer 

WILLIMI C. GREEN, Chief of the Fire Department 
PERCY R. SANDERS, Supt. of the Water- Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

BEN C. WHITE, Term expires January, 1912 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, " " '' 1912 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, " " " 1913 

GARDNER B. EMIMONS, " " " 1913 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, " " " 1914 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, '' " " 1914 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 

One from each ward (except "Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7, con- 
solidated) appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, 
subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

D. WARREN FOX, Term expires January. 1912 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, " " " 1913 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, " " " 1914 

Ward 2. 

HENRY A. COLBY, Term expires January, 1012 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, '' " " 1913 

SCOTT FRENCH, " " " 1914 



city government. 69 

Ward 3. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, Term expires January, 1912 
JAMES M. GROSSMAN, " '' " 1913 

GEORGE R. PARMENTER, " " " 1914 

Ward 7. 

ISAAC N. ABBOTT, Term expires January, 1912 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " " " 1913 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, " " " 1914 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, 
subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, IMayor, cx-officio. 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, Term expires March, 1912 

GEORGE W. ABBOTT,* " '' '' 1912 
JAMES C. NORRIS.** 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, " '' " 1913 

FRANK P. ANDREWS, " " '' 1913 

CHARLES G. REMICK, '' '' " 1914 

FRANK J. BATCHELDER, " " " 1914 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

EDWARD A. MOULTON. 



* Died August 4, 1911. 

** Appointed to fill vacancy. 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subJL'ct to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. "WATERS, 
LOUIS A. LANE, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HIRAI\I G. KILKENNY, 
WILLIAM H. HOYT, 
MILO II. SNELL. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS, 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERA\ 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner 
of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TEBBETTS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 71 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 



GEORGE W. CHESLEY,* 
IRVING T. CHESLEY,** 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
GILES WHEELER. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents each 
for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, for sealing each scale beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, 
and for each measure, 10 cents ; five or more to one person, half price — 
paid by owners of scales or measures. 

EDWARD K. GOVE. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



* Died August 27, 1911. 

** Appointed to fill vacancy. 



72 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 
40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — 
paid by party for whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring service. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Thomas Hill, 
John H. Mercer, 
Charles H. Day, 
Everett L. Davis, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 
C. W. Flanders, 
James F. Fitzgerald, 
Edward W. Brockway, 
John H. Flanders, 
C. W. Hazelton, 
Hiram Brown, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Fred H. Perley, 
Amos J. Peaslee, 
William Goodwin, 
Mark M. Blanchard, 
Lurman R. Goodrich, 
James H. Harrington, 
Simeon Partridge, 
E. F. Miller, 

V. 



Waldo A. Holmes, 
Seth R. Dole, 
Arthur N. Day, 
William H. Meserve, 
George W. Chesley, 
John (1 Farrand, 
John E. Rossell, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 
William J. Mullen, 
Elmer E. Young, 
Henry A. Brown, 
Milo G. Davis, 
Fred F. Tucker, 

F. H. Smith, 
Fred A. Barker, 
Hamilton C. ^Morgan, 
James B. Riley, 

G. N. Hills, 
Charles E. Cook, 
S. D. Walker, 
Ernest F. Carr, 
Charles Peaslee, 

J. Bennett. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 73 

CITY WEIGHER. 

EDWARD K. GOVE. 

Office : Rear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Pees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, George Griffin, 

Edward A. Moiilton, Fred Rollins, 

George Abbott, Jr., ]\[oses E. Haines, 

Charles F. Mudgett. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 

Giles Wheeler, Charles L. Fellows, 

Fred L. Plummer, William Rowell, 

Stephen H. Swain, Fred Cilley. 



SURVEYORS OF STONE. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 

(liles Wheeler, Timothy Sullivan. 



74 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, suljjojt to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M; 
boards and timber, 16 cents per M; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per 
cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person 
employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
James F. Nelson, 
Jonathan B. Weeks, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Philip Flanders, 
Silvester P. Danforth, 
Albert 0. Preston, 
William A. Chesley, 
Alfred Clark, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
George W. Abbott, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Smith, 
Clinton 0. Partridge, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hayward, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus 0. Clark, 
Silas Wiggin, 
Edward Stevens, 
Daniel Griffiths, 
W. F. Hayward, 



Amos L. Colburu, 
Gilman H. Dimond, 
John C. Farrand, 
Arthur E. Maxam, 
Henry Kolfe, 
Martin E. Kenna, 
E. A. Cole, 
George Partridge, 
William E. Virgin, 
William H. Gay, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Charles H. Day, 
Edward Runnels, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Charles L. Worthen, 
Clark D. Stevens, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
Frederick H. Chase, 
Crosby A. Sanborn, 
Herbert M. Danforth, 
Hiram W. Drouiu, 
Frank J. Moreau, 
W. F. Frost, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



75 



Irving' T. Chesley, 
John Q. Woods, 
Frank E. Dimond, 



E. F. Miller, 
George Oakley, 
W. J. Mullen. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Miles F. Farmer, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
George S. Milton, 
Michael J. Lee, 
B. Frank Varney, 
John E. Frye, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Robbins, 
George N. Berry, 
William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
John Sweeney, 
Charles L. Fellows, 
John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Henry P. Cilley, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Edward H. Donovan, 
Ned J. Morrill, 



William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Seth R. Hood, 
Albert S. Trask, 
William L. Regan, 
Frederick T. Converse, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Frederick Booth, 
Benjamin H. Orr, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
George W. Chesley, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
Alfred Ford, 
F. F. Converse, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Alex Ralph, 
]\Ianley W. Morgan, 
Philip King, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Henry Morrill. 



76 CITY OF CONCORD. 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 

THOIMAS F. FOLEY,* 
CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio, 
WILL B. HOWE, ex-officio, 
HARRIS S. PARMENTER.** 



WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK LISTS. 

Ward i— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
BERNARD J. FERRIN, 
WILLIAM S. HOLLAND. 

Ward 5— FREEMAN F. POTTER, 
C. E. ROBINSON, 
WALTER C. SANBORN. 

Ward 5— JOHN M. HILAND, 

EDWARD P. ROBINSON, 
J. ARTHUR SWENSON. 

Ward 4— HARRY H. KENNEDY, 
J. WESLEY PLUMMER, 
EBEN M. WILLIS. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
ARTHUR P. MORRILL, 
JOHN W. WOODWORTH. 

Ward (>— WARREN E. EMERSON, 
WALTER WILLI AI\r SON, 
J. EDWARD MORRISON. 

* Died August 27, 1911. 
** Elected to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 77 

Ward 7— HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
WALTER H. BEANE, 
FRED P. CLEMENT. 

Ward S— "WILLIA]\I L. REAGAN, 

CORNELIUS Mccormick, 

THOMAS p. HIGGINS. 

Ward 5?— ANDREW E. SALTMARSH, 
MARCUS V. BOURNE, 
JAMES J. REEN. 



WARD CLERKS. 

Ward i— JAiMES W. GAHAGAN. 
Ward 5^RALPH L. STEARNS. 
Ward 5— ERVIN E. WEBBER. 
Ward 4— LOUIS P. ELKINS. 
Ward 5— GEORGE E. CHESLEY. 
Ward ff— EDWARD J. LEARY. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward S— TIMOTHY W. DONOHOE. 
Ward 5— JAMES W. KENNEY. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward i— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward 5— HERBERT L. KNOWLES. 
Ward 5— CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
Ward 4— ALLEN HOLLIS. 
Ward 5— EDWARD C. NILES. 
Ward ff— CHARLES DUNCAN. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOIMPSON. 
Ward <§— ]\IICHAEL MULCAHY. 
Ward 5— BARTHOLO]\IEW COLLINS. 



78 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 
1853, and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the 
Mayor has been elected for two years at each biennial elestion in November. 
Under the City Charter, adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in 
December, 1910, for one year, and biennially thereafter in November, be- 
ginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853- '54. 

" RUFUS CLEMENT,* '55. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856- '57- '58. 

" MOSES T. WILLARD, 1859- '60. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861- '62. 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863- '64. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1866- '67. 

'' LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868- '69. 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870- '71. 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 1872- '73- '74- '75. 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876- '77. 

" HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878- '79- '80. 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,$ 1880- '81- '82. 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883- '84- '85- '86. 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887- '88. 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889- '90. 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, • 1891- '92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893- '94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895- '96. 

'' ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897- '98. 

" NATHANIEL E. IMARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901- '02. 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903- '08. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 

t Term closed in November, 1880. 

t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1911-1912. 



OFFICERS. 
Rev. John Vannevar, D. D, 
Mrs. Alice M. Nims 



President. 
Secretary. 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 



1912. 

William H. Sawyer, Esq., 
Miss Carrie E. Evans, 
Edward C. Niles, Esq., 

1913. 
Rev. John Vannevar, D. D,, 
Mrs. Alice M. Nims, 
Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 



1914. 



Dr. Dennis E. Sullivan, 
Mrs. Fanny E. Minot, 
i\lR. Omar S. Swenson, 



105 North State Street 

14 Maple Street 

119 School Street 

4 Merrimack Street 

5 Blake Street 

89 North State Street 

7 North State Street 

23 South State Street 

15 Pearl Street 



Mr. Dudley. 
Dr. Vannevar. 
Dr. Sullivan. 

6 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 
FINANCE. 

Dr. Sullivan. 

high school. 
Mrs. Minot. 

grammar schools. 
Dr. Vannevar, 



Mr. Niles. 
Mr. Niles. 
Mrs. Nims. 



82 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



Mrs. Nims. 



primary schools. 
Mrs. Minot. 

kindergartens. 
Miss Evans. 



Mr. Niles. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Dudley. 

discipline. 
Miss Evans. 

hygiene. 
Miss Evans. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Dudley, 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Niles. 



MANUAL TRAINING. 

Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Dudley. 

Seiving and Cooking. 
Miss Evans. 

music. 
Miss Evans. 

drawing. 
Mr. Sawyer. 

text-books. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Dr. Vannevar. 



Mrs. Nims. 



Dr. Vannevar. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



Mrs. Nims. 



TRAINING school. 

Mr. Niles. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



night school. 

Miss Evans. 



Mr. Dudley. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett. 

3 Pine Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours : 8 to 9 a. m., school days. Office open 8 to 12 a. m., 

1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

George Natt Feli^ows. 

8 Warren Street. Parker School. 
Office hours : 8.30 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. 



CLERK. 

Gyrene Sargent Farrar. 

4 Rockingham Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 
Office hours; 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Elizabeth Maria Murphy. 

442 North State Street, West Concord, N. H. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

John B. Abbott Moderator. 

Louis C. Merrill Clerk. 

Henry H. Metcalp, John P. George . . Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1912. 



To the Citizens of Union School District: 

The Board of Education of Union School District hereby 
presents its fifty-second annual report. 

We are pleased to again record our conviction based upon 
a knowledge of conditions, that the schools of this district 
are worthy of your deepest confidence. 

We are more deeply impressed every year with the neces- 
sity of keeping in close touch with the increasing demands 
of the times in educational matters, which requires no small 
amount of attention and expenditure of money; but in 
no direction can money be expended to better advantage 
than in the equipment of our boys and girls for life's 
responsibilities. We feel that our educational facilities 
are admirably adapted to that end, not only in material 
equipment, but in an efficient teaching force. 

Interest in manual training has increased far beyond our 
expectations. The Morrill School under its present man- 
agement, is attracting the attention of educators from- all 
over New England. The report of Principal French merits 
your careful perusal. 

The new system of grading instituted last year has justi- 
fied our anticipations in ways emphasized in the report of 
Superintendent Rundlett. 

While mindful of the constant needs of the schools in 
making them more and more efficient, we are not unmind- 
ful of the fact that increased expenditures make a propor- 
tionate rise in taxation, and yet it is our constant aim to 
so utilize ways and means as to conserve the best interests 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

of the pupils and teachers, and avoid extra burdens to the 
taxpayers. 

To this end we ask for a somewhat larger appropriation 
to meet the demands occasioned by a general increase of 
salaries of the elementary grade teachers, as an immediate 
result of the increased cost of living. A living wage must 
be paid if we are to receive the best returns in service 
rendered. 

To the detailed report of the superintendent we invite 
your careful attention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN VANNEVAR, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
WILLIAM H. SAWYER, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
EDWARD C. NILES, 
ALICE M. NIMS, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 

Board of Education. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 
AND REPAIRS. 



Concord, N. H., March 4, 1912. 
To ike Board of Education of Union ScJiool District: 

In addition to the following detailed report of what has 
been done with the money appropriated for repairs during 
the past year, we also submit a statement of what ought to 
be done during the following year to keep the school plant 
from deteriorating and to insure an economical handling 
of the same. The addition to the heating arrangement of 
the Parker School is saving the district much money for 
fuel. The neAv motor is working satisfactorily and will soon 
pay for itself in saving expense for power. It is expected 
that the change in the Eastman School, made by equipping 
the building with metal weather strips, will result in a great 
saving of fuel. 

The appropriation for extraordinary repairs should be 
large enough to meet the expense of making the following 
changes next year : 

1. A new^ tubular boiler for tlie Chandler School. 

2. Retubing and resetting the boiler in the Parker 
School. 

3. New heating apparatus for the Merrimack building. 

4. New heating apparatus for the Penacook School. 

5. Painting the interior walls of the High School Iniild- 
ing. 

6. Varnishing the interior woodwork, painting the walls, 
kalsomining the ceilings, laying new floors, and repairing 
the outside of the Walker School. 

It will be the policy of the committee hereafter to put 
one or more ])nildings in first-class repair each year, as ocea- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

sion demands, thus keeping the plant in economical working 
order. 

New adjustable furniture should be made to replace the 
old combination furniture wherever it is in use. 

The Union Street schoolhouse and lot were sold at public 
auction on August 1, 1911, for the sum of $1,350. We feel 
that the district was fortunate in this transaction. The sale 
of the Bow Brook building is to take place March 16, 1912. 
An account of this will be made in next year's report. 

The school buildings of the district are in good repair, as 
a general thing, and the money expended has been used to 
good purpose. 

Detailed Report op Repairs Made. 
Cogswell School. 
Platform and steps repaired. Blackboards slated. 

Fenacook School. 

Two new umbrella racks. All the desks, tables and chairs 
cleaned and varnished. Door to basement repaired. Closet 
seats fastened. Set bowl and sanitary fountain for teach- 
ers' room. Furnaces repaired. New pit and trap to drain 
basement. Desks, chairs, teachers' desks, tables, all in- 
side woodwork cleaned, scraped, shellacked and varnished. 
Window sashes painted and varnished. New door cut into 
teachers' room. 

Rumford School. 

Doors to cabinets repaired. New glass in windows. 
Basement floors covered with concrete dressing. 

Parker School. 

Briek-work and fire-box to boiler repaired. Blackboards 
slated. New shades for some windows. Four large radi- 



88 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ators for hall. New radiator for sewing room. Radiator 
in board room exchanged for the one in the superin- 
tendent's office. New manhole plate. Basement floors cov- 
ered with concrete dressing. Walls painted. All wood- 
work except large hall and board room varnished. All in- 
side window sashes painted. New electric motor. 

Chandler School. 

Wood-work in basement painted. Outside doors painted. 
Desks polished. 

Kimball School. 

New closet for paper. New curtains for some windows. 
New sanitary drinking fountains for upper and lower halls. 
Flush tank repaired, also boys' latrine. Two new radiators 
in lower hall. Roof painted. Furnaces repaired. Floor 
of teachers' room scraped and varnished. 

Merrimack School. 
Front steps, platform and furnaces repaired. 

Franklin School. 

Flag-pole painted and new cable for same. Pole taken 
down and reset. Porch floors and bulkhead painted. 
Chairs varnished. 

Tahanto School. 

Building shingled. New gutters. Furnaces repaired 
and cleaned. Water pipes over urinal repaired. Drain 
pipes dug up and put in order. Outside of building 
painted. 

Harriet P. Dame School. 
Puttying and repainting flag-pole. New sanitary foun- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 89 

tains for basements. "Walls of all rooms cleaned, sized and 
painted. Ceilings of three rooms kalsomined. Floors of 
porches and steps painted. All interior wood-work var- 
nished. Glass reset. All pupils' desks, teachers' desks and 
tables varnished. 

Morrill School. 

Changing over south entrance into a lumber room. Water 
pipes to toilet room painted. Windows tightened with 
oakum and cement. 

Garrison School. 

Flashing to ventilators repaired. Two teachers' desks 
and tin roof painted. 

High School. 

Bicycle room made over into manual training room. New 
damper for northeast ventilating shaft to prevent freezing. 
Fire-box repaired. New draining board for biology room. 
Boilers repaired. Basement floors covered with dressing. 
New steam valves for new room. 

Walker School. 
Furnace and pipes repaired. Flush tank repaired. 

Dewey School. 

Furnaces and ventilating shafts repaired. Rings on kin- 
dergarten floor renewed. 



Report of Financial Agent, Union School District. 



April 1, 1911, to March 31, 1912. 
Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 

RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand April 1, 1911, $3,116.67 

Received from city, appropriated by law, 42,955.88 

" " " appropriated by Union School 

District, 42,870.84 

" text-books, 4,044.96 

" literary fund, 1,875.52 

" " dog tax, 1,380.86 

" Abial Walker fund, .34.57 

" rent of Union Street school, 25.98 

" miscellaneous cash sales, 38.89 

" cash sales for text-books, 203.82 

" cash sales for manual training, 39.04 

" tuition, high school, $2,241.27 

" " elementary schools, 412.90 
training school, 42.00 

year 1910-1911, 60.04 



sale of Union Street school, 



- 2,756.21 
1,350.00 

$100,693.24 



EXPENDED. 



Fuel, 

Miscellaneous, 

Supplies, 

Repairs, 

Trucking, 



^6,882.11 

1,112.89 

2,285.91 

2,950.70 

180.28 



SCHOOL REPOBJ. 


91 


Transportation, 


$765.28 


Care of houses (maintenance), 


130.65 


Care of houses (salaries), 


6,800.33 


Insurance, 


1,447.10 


Manual training (maintenance). 


2,350.43 


Manual training (salaries). 


6,826.08 


Military drill (maintenance), 


25.55 


Military drill (salaries), 


100.00 


Salaries, 


60,269.00 


Text-books, 


4,242.18 


Night school (maintenance). 


16.38 


Night school (salaries). 


282.25 


Union Street school account, 


67.50 


Balance Union Street school account. 


1,282.50 


Balance, 


2,676.12 




$100,693.24 



Concord, N. H., March 21, 1912. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts (except text-book account) of the financial agent, 
and find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper 
voucher for each item. 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 
H. H. METCALF, 

Auditors. 



Concord, N. H., March 21, 1912. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing ac- 
count of the text-book account, and find the same correctly 
cast and proper vouchers for each item of expenditure. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Auditor. 



92 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COST PER CAPITA. 



Cost per pupil, including all current expenses . 
Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, 

drawing, superintendent, etc. 
Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing and superintendent . . . . 
Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing, superintendent, in all schools below 

the high school ..... 
Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music 

drawing, superintendent, in the high school 
Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools ....... 

Coi-t per ])upil for text-books and supplies in 

high school ...... 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools below high school 
Cost per pupil for kindergarten material 
Cost per pupil for kindergarten material and 

tuition ....... 

Cost ])er pupil for paper .... 

Cost per pupil for pens .... 

Cost per pupil for pencils .... 

Cost per pupil for manual training, entire 
Cost per pupil for manual training, salaries 
Cost per pupil for manual training, material 
Cost per pupil for wood and iron- working, in 

elusive of instruction .... 
Cost per pupil for wood and iron-working, ex 

elusive of instruction .... 
Cost per pupil for cooking, inclusive of instruc 

tion ........ 

Cost per pupil for cooking, exclusive of instruc- 
tion 

Cost per pupil for sewing, inclusive of instruc 

tion ........ 



$34.01 
20.38 
18.52 

14.09 
26.47 

1.49 

2.52 

.506 
.318 

17.52 
.199 
.0105 
.013 

7.53 

5.50 

1.89 

17.94 
5.24 
2.449 
.593 
2.18 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



93 



Cost per pupil for sewing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion $0,084 

Cost per pupil for drawing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion 417 

Cost per pupil for drawing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion 099 

Cost per pupil for music, inclusive of instruction .507 

Cost per pupil for music, exclusive of instruction .048 

Cost per pupil for military drill, inclusive of in- 
struction .916 

Cost per pupil for military drill, exclusive of in- 
struction .186 

TUITION RECEIPTS. 



High School . 
Dewey School 
Training School 
Kimball School 
Merrimack School 
Penacook School 
Rumford School 
Eastman School 
jMorrill School 



$2,301.31 
53.27 
42.00 
63.61 
2.00 
22.00 
108.97 
91.05 
72.00 



$2,756,21 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 



To the Board of Education of Unio7i School District: 

I have the lionor to submit for your consideration my 
twenty-seventh annual report, the fifty-second of its series. 
As usual this not only accounts for what has been done, 
but also has suggestions calculated to make school work 
more efficient. 

If we are to profit by experience, that experience will have 
been in vain if it does not result in our increased ability 
and desire to adapt methods to prevailing conditions, if it 
furnishes no power of initiation or construction but is con- 
tent to feed upon itself until its vital exhaustion is con- 
summated. 

So many and such different factors enter into maintain- 
ing a proper standard of school work that we cannot afford 
to disregard any if we are conscientious in the economical 
expenditure of school revenue. 

Methods which have become ineffective should give place 
to those which are better adapted to the needs of to-day. 
The teaching corps should be allowed to lose none of its life 
and vigor either through the ravages of time or through in- 
attention to modern methods. 

School equipment should be kept up to date by constant 
renewals and additions. The promotion of health in the 
teaching corps and in the student body is of the utmost 
importance. 

In these days when the commercial by force of circum- 
stances dominates public attention, let us not forget that the 
cultural in the past has produced proofs of its superiority, 
and that it is our duty to shape and direct school energies 
so that, in the future, children shall not be robbed of that 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

richer training which undue attention to any one line of 
educational activity can never furnish. 

Attendance. 

The enrollment in the schools is a little smaller than that 
of last year. This difference is manifest in the kindergar- 
tens and in the elementary group. The high school attend- 
ance shows much larger on account of the addition of the 
fifth year, which has destroyed the old lines of grade 
demarcation. The following tabulation is given for com- 
parison and the more complete statement may be found in 
Appendix II of this report. 



ATTENDANCE. 

ALL SCHOOLS. 

1910. 1911. Increase. Decrease. 

Number of pupils in the public schools '^,892 2,844 48 

" " parochial scliools 686 711 25 

" " private scliools 66 63 .. 3 

night school 121 109 .. 12 

" " Industrial school 10 10 

Totals 3,765 3.737 35 63 

Net decrease 28 

PUBLIC DAY SCHOOLS. 

Number of pupils in the high school 496 829 333 

" " elementary schools .. 2,162 1,727 .. 435 

" " kindergartens 234 278 44 

". " Industrial school 10 10 

Totals 2,892 2,844 387 435 

Net decrease 48 

NIGHT SCHOOL. 

Number of pupils enrolled (male) 100 94 .. 6 

" (female) 21 15 .. 6 

Totals 121 109 .. 12 

Net decrease 12 



96 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The laws g-overning child labor, revised hy the last legis- 
lature, are being carefully enforced in the district. Up to 
the present time, under the revision, there have been issued 
from this office one hundred thirty-nine employment certifi- 
cates, divided as follows : 

Eegular certificates, 87 

Vacation certificates, 43 

For age only certificates, 9 

Many who secured these, did so at the earliest possible 
moment allowed by law. Nearly all would much better 
have attended school for a longer period. Some, desirous 
of remaining in school, were forced to go to work by their 
parents, who, seemingly, cared much more for the small 
wages than for the child 's welfare. 

Attention is called to the tabulated reports of the truant 
officer and the school census. The cost of taking the census 
M^as materially lessened and will meet with further reduc- 
tion next year. 

Many children are kept from school for lack of proper 
clothing. All such cases are carefully looked after and 
the aid of the city invoked. The assistance of the truant 
officer and the probation officer has been most valuable in 
the final disposition* of troublesome cases of truancy. 

High School. 

The work accomplished in both groups is acceptable and 
much of it superior. Through legislation by the Board of 
Education, extraordinary efforts by the teachers, and in- 
creased interest by the pupils, a great deal of energy has 
been diverted from athletic and social channels and di- 
rected toward accomplishing the work laid out in the curric- 
ulum, the results showing clearly the value of this policy. 
A report of one year's trial of the reorganization scheme 
w^as submitted to the Board of Education in the fall of 



SCHOOL REPORT. 97 

1911, giving definitely the results attained. The report 
printed elsewhere in this volume was afterward sent out by 
the state superintendent of public instruction as an official 
document. A similar report of the second year's trial will 
be submitted next summer. That this scheme is one of 
importance is shown by the fact that inquiries concerning 
it are coming in from points near and remote. 

Group I. 

The feature of this group has been the subordination of 
the distractions of modern high school life to the require- 
ments of the course. The results show a gain in school 
work and social conditions. The principal approves the 
semi-annual promotion plan and asks for improvements to 
the building. The attendance, which has been larger this 
year than last, is divided as follows : 



Class Y, 


Total 
Enrollment. 

2 


Half Year 
Enrollment 

2 


- U, 


77 


73 


" T, 


13 


13 


- s, 


74 


74 


- R, 


26 


25 


" Q, 


138 


130 


" .^' 


18 


15 


Special, 
Post-graduate, 


4 
5 


3 
4 



357 338 

Pupils now graduate from this school in February and 
in June. Seventy-six graduated last June and of this 
number thirteen entered college, several others planning to 
enter next fall. One pupil graduated January 26, 1912, 
the first one to do so in mid-year under the present plan. 

Miss Burns, for a number of years instructor in the com- 



98 CITY OF CONCORD. 

mercial department, resigned in August to accept a similar 
position in Brockton, Mass. Mr. A. H. Adams was selected 
to fill the vacancy and served until November, when he re- 
signed to take a like position in Revere, Mass. Mr. A. R. 
Tarr, of Newburyport, was elected to succeed him. The 
school library has been enlarged by the addition of many 
new volumes. 

The following changes have been made in military drill: 
The ownership and accounting for property has been sys- 
tematized. The attainment of higher ranking for officers 
now depends upon merit, eighty-five per cent, being the 
average examination mark to be gained before promotion. 
The prize drill has been changed to an exhibition drill. 
The annual field day, shorn of its social features, is devoted 
almost wholly to work in sham battle. The uniformed bat- 
talion has increased in numbers twenty per cent. The in- 
structor asks that the old guns, which are nearly worn out, 
be replaced by modern Krag-Jorgenson rifles and that new 
equipment be furnished. 

Group II. 

The activities of this group have been governed by 
modern ideas. The planning of the work has been done 
always with reference to the age and the capacity of the 
pupil, discipline maintained firmly but judiciously, the 
health of the student body carefully conserved and the co- 
operation of the home sought in regulating the social ques- 
tions that always present themselves. The wholesome 
school spirit which was apparent in this group last year 
has continued to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

Parker School. 

The reading requirements in English for boys in classes 
and P have been changed to furnish something better 
suited to their natural tastes and inclinations. The school 



SCHOOL REPORT. 99 

lunch has been repeated and the following menu served 
each week: 

Parker ScJiool Luncheon. 
1911-1912. 

MENU, 

Soup with Buttered Rolls, 5c. 

Chicken Pie with Mashed Potato, 10c. 

Escalloped Oysters with Rolls, 10c. 

Boiled Fowl, Cream Sauce, Mashed Potato, 10c. 

Beefsteak Pie with Mashed Potato, 10c. 

Chowder with Rolls or Crackers, 5c. 

Oyster Stew with Crackers, 10c. 

Lamb Pie with ]\Iashed Potato, 10c. 

Roast Beef with Mashed Potato, 10c. 

Roast Lamb with Mashed Potato, 10c. 

Cocoa, 5c. 

Bottle of Milk, 5c. 

The success of the feature is the subject of investigation 
by other cities. 

During the last semester commercial history and com- 
mercial geography are being taught as one subject after a 
syllabus prepared by INIiss Ryan and Miss Dickerman, ap- 
proved by the state superintendent of public instruction 
and by ]\Ir. Cook. The change allowed more time for Eng- 
lish in the commercial classes. 

The new system of teaching mathematics in the second- 
ary schools is receiving its trial here for the first time in the 
city. The development of mathematical power, even in the 
dullest pupils, is distinctly noticeable. This work must be 
taught strictly in accordance with the plan outlined in the 
Teachers' ]\Ianual to gain the best results. While the 
teacher is not required to sink his individuality entirely in 



100 CITY OF CONCORD, 

that of the author, nevertheless he cannot safely substitute 
his own ideas to the detriment of either the general or the 
specific directions laid out. 

This year it was necessary to put class N into this build- 
ing and class P, composed entirely of retarded pupils, w^as 
sent to the high school building. The arrangement of 
classes for next year is problematical. The work done by 
the school is of high class and the administration of its 
affairs is in capable hands. 

Chandler School. 

The scheduled work for these grades has been faithfully 
carried out. For the first semester all the students were in 
class M. The last semester about thirty w^ere in class ]\I and 
the remainder in class N, The pupils who are obliged to 
stay at the building during the noon recess have had warm 
cocoa served in the cooking room. The work done here 
shows improvement over last year and the general tone of 
the school is admirable and a credit to the city. 

Walker, Garrison, Eastman, Kimball and Rumford 

Schools. 

The high school classes enrolled in these schools seem to 
be doing the required work with success, employing' meth- 
ods used in the succeeding grades. During the last semes- 
ter the class N pupils of the Garrison School, who elected 
Latin, were transferred to the Chandler School. 

Elementary Schools. 

Group III. 

The chief concern of this group has been the working 
out of the course of study as far as adjusted. New courses 
in geography have been formulated for classes E, F, G, H, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

I, J, K. The teachers of these grades were helpful in 
determining not only the amount, but also the character of 
work to be done, and as a body they have spared no pains 
to maintain the standard of former years. 

In promoting pupils much care has been exercised re- 
garding their ages ; and parents, frequently consulted, were 
glad to accept the judgment of the teacher in many in- 
stances. Your attention is called to the results attained 
last year by these schools as tabulated in the mid-year 
report. The burden of the superintendent's duties has 
been in adapting methods of work so as to insure the 
greatest economy of school time. This I find to be the one 
thing which occupies the attention of the best educational 
thinkers. 

It has been found that the pre-adoleseent pupil is capable 
of much more advanced work than was formerly supposed 
to be the case. By appealing to the positive side of 
child nature much more and much better results can be 
gained and with less strain than could be realized under 
the old way of endless criticism. The observance of par- 
ents' days, festivals, issuing of school papers, and the usual 
number of visits to other schools by the teachers have oc- 
curred. Extended athletic exercises in the form of games 
and folk-dancing are practiced, particularly in the Dewey, 
Kimball and Rumford buildings. The John Stark Club of 
the Rumford School is strong in maintaining a fine school 
spirit and in promoting wholesome discipline. 

The attention of the board is called to the decided im- 
provement shown in all the branches of elementary school 
work, much of which can be demonstrated by tabulated 
results and specimens of work at the office of the superin- 
tendent. Also permit me to direct your attention to the 
practice of approved modern pedagogical methods that are 
being tried out with success in these classes and those of 
group two. The standing of these schools is satisfactory 
and in no way is any great amount of weakness displayed, 



102 CITY OF CONCORD. 

other than that which must always result from the first 
ex])erienee of new teachers and a few other apparently un- 
avoidable conditions. 

Kindergartens. 

The attendance in the kindergartens for the year 1910- 
1911 was larger by forty-four than in the year preceding. 
At present the enrollment is considerably less. One reason 
for this is that parents are not sufficiently informed of their 
value as a part of the public school system. Some means 
should be taken to bring this about at the beginning of next 
fall term. 

The first training of children ought to be as largely in- 
dividual as conditions will allow\ This naturally belongs 
to the kindergarten age, can be accomplished better then 
than at any other time in the school life of the child, and 
is in full accord with the whole trend of modern education. 
The question of kindergarten training does not reduce to 
the mental development of the child so much as it does to 
his social standing and that of his home. School teachers, 
truant officers, school nurses and superintendents know that 
if school children need anything they need good homes. 
Kindergarten training is broader than it seems to be. It 
gradually overcomes the child's natural fear and supersti- 
tion, substituting in place thereof a free, frank expression — 
one of the distinguishing qualities between brutes and ra- 
tional beings. Indirectly it transforms home conditions, 
so that both child and parent value the school for what is 
done in their behalf. Kindergartens should be encouraged 
and be made to show a healthy growth, but never beyond 
the limits of reason as to the expense of maintaining them. 
The question everybody should ask is, "Are children of 
kindergarten training better children than they would have 
been if they had not received it?" My observation for 
twenty years tells me that they are. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 103 

In the summer the board passed a rule that a kinder- 
garten in the future should show an average of at least 
thirty pupils to warrant the employment of an assistant. 
This was found to be necessary in the interests of financial 
economy. At present it affects only the kindergartens at 
the Garrison and the Tahanto buildings. Instead of regu- 
lar assistants two young women have been hired for nom- 
inal sums to play the piano during the games, Miss East- 
man at the Garrison and I\Iiss Bishop at the Tahanto. 

The usual Christmas festivals were held, were very 
largely attended, and the work throughout the district has 
been carried out quietly but effectively. 

Drawing. 

The display of the pupils' handiwork in drawing at the 
annual exhibition last June and at the State Teachers' 
Convention in October spoke more strongly of its worth 
than I can write. The drawings were shown under the 
following heads: Illustrative drawing, original design, 
water-color washes, pose drawings, still life and design. 

Last spring the Board of Trade offered the high school 
pupils a prize of five dollars for the best design for an en- 
velope corner. The successful competitor was Miss Har- 
riet Crapo. 

In the contest for the 1911 report cover designs those of 
]\Iiss Lila Nelson and Miss Marion Winch were accepted. 

Through the increase in the number of pupils taking the 
mechanic arts course, the time of the supervisor is com- 
pletely occupied and is in excess of that required of other 
regular teachers. 

Considering the amount of time allotted this branch the 
results accomplished by the instructor are entirely satis- 
factory. 



104 city of concord. 

Music. 

The features of the work of the past year in music have 
been more attention to note-singing in classes A and B and 
additional practice in sight-singing melodies. 

An examination of the individual sight-singing records 
revealed to the instructor a lack of rhythmic sense in a 
large number of pupils. This he is trying to develop and 
thus strengthen the work of the higher grades. He speaks 
of the creditable singing in the Chandler, the Parker and 
the High schools. In the latter the chorus numbers one 
hundred sixty voices and is the best working chorus ever 
in the school. The annual concert given by the high school 
chorus last April was successful musically, but not finan- 
cially. The prize for excellence in sight-singing, a picture 
of Beethoven, was won by the pupils of classes J and K 
of the Merrimack School, Miss Brock teacher. Mr. Con- 
ant's work in the schools is invaluable. 

School Hygiene. 

The protection of the pupils' health under the direction 
of the committee on hygiene, is well eared for. The rules 
pertaining to contagious diseases, those governing room 
conditions and general sanitation have been faithfully en- 
forced. 

Miss Murphy is devoted to the duties of her office, and 
the co-operation of the teachers is worthy of special men- 
tion. Health Day was observed in all the grades of 
schools. Through the efforts of the chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Hygiene w^e were enabled to secure the services 
of several experts on that day, and we ^dsh to record here 
our appreciation of their kindly help. 

Dr. Charles Duncan lectured to the High School pupils; 
Dr. Kobert B. Kerr lectured to the Parker School pupils; 
Mr. "Wallace F. Purrington lectured to the Chandler 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 105 

School pupils; and Miss Murphy gave talks at the Pena- 
cook, Walker and Merrimack buildings. 

The report of the school nurse may be found in Ap- 
pendix I. 

Manual Training — The Morrill School. 
Wood and Iron Work. 

The report of Mr. French to me is so full in detail, re- 
plete with information and so valuable to the general pub- 
lic, that I am incorporating it in full, in Appendix I, as a 
part of this report. The classes are steadily growing, the 
teaching coips efficient, and the results attained are a credit 
to all concerned. 

Sewing. 

The duties which this department requires have been 
faithfully performed. There have been no breaches of dis- 
cipline and increased interest is being shown by the pupils. 
The number enrolled in the different classes is now five 
hundred fifty-four. They receive one lesson each two weeks. 
Some classes have the privilege of coming more frequently, 
so that the number of individual lessons given is six hun- 
dred eighty. This increase of work called for an extra 
teacher and Miss Marion L. Stevens, a resident of the city 
and a student of Lasell Seminary, was chosen for the 
place. The exhibition last June showed that the standard 
of former years is being maintained. The outline of work 
was changed to suit the requirements of the mechanic arts 
course and noAv a complete logical arrangement is followed 
throughout the five years. 

Cooking and Domestic Science. 

There are now enrolled in this department two hundred 
fifty-five girls, an increase of twenty-five over last year. 



106 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The classes, in many cases, are too large and not easily 
workable. One numbers thirty, the smallest ten, six less 
than fifteen and five over twenty-five in each. 

Last May each of the two high school classes gave a 
luncheon to which were invited the members of the Board 
of Education, Mr. Cook and Miss Dickerman of the high 
school corps of teachers and the superintendent. 

During the fall term over forty quarts of preserves, 
pickles and jelly were put up by the advanced classes for 
different people who furnished their own material. This 
was such a success that already a number of orders have 
been placed for next year. 

During the winter term the cooking room has been used 
for preparing cocoa for tw^enty-five pupils of the Chandler 
School who are obliged to bring lunches. Every noon two 
girls, under supervision, make sufficient cocoa to supply 
each pupil at the nominal price of two cents a cup. Three 
cans of cocoa, five cups of sugar and fifteen quarts of milk 
are used every week. 

Six dining-room chairs and a gas range have been added 
to the equipment this year. 

Dewey Training School. 

The efficiency of this school is ever on the increase. The 
model schools are expositions of common sense and ap- 
proved methods in teaching. 

The training classes are large enough but do not vary 
much from year to year. Last June eight graduated, five 
of whom secured positions in the schools of this district, 
one in Massachusetts, one in Hill, N. li., and one in the 
Concord Town District. Six are now enrolled in the junior 
class and five in the senior class. During the present 
semester we are able to have the services of the seniors in 
aiding the regular schools of the Walker and the Merrimack 
buildings. This is done for the purpose of fitting the 



SCHOOL REPORT. 107 

trainers better for the regular schools by accustoming them 
to varying conditions, to make them more familiar with 
the different personalities of children and to observe how 
different teachers manage to accomplish desired results. 
The variety of work which they are supposed to do is as 
follows : Render individual help, to take classes while the 
regular teacher visits other rooms and schools, to supervise 
seat work, planning and assignment of seat work, correction 
of written work under the direction of the teacher, and 
general help on special lines. The good results which are 
possible from this may be limitless. 

Supervision. 

The schools have been supervised as closely as conditions 
would permit. Frequent teachers' meetings have been held 
to secure uniformity in carrying out the requirements and 
to increase general efficiency. The superintendent has 
made 637 official visits to the various schools, a majority of 
which were recorded in writing with suggestions for the 
teachers. 

The usual number of meetings have been held in the 
several buildings by the teachers, nearly all of which were 
devoted to the study of problems of the teaching art. The 
following tabulation has been compiled from the yearly 
records : 



High School — Group I, 
Parker and Chandler Schools 

Group II, 
Walker School, 
Garrison School, 
Eastman School, 
Rumford School, 
Kimball School, 
Merrimack School, 



Number of 
teachers' meetings. 

15 


Number of these 

meetings devoted 

to pedagogy. 




50 


34 


20 


14 


19 


19 


18 


18 


20 


20 


47 


30 


10 


10 



108 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Penacook School, 


Number of 
teachers' meetings. 

18 


Number of these 

meetings devoted 

to pedagogy. 

15 


Franklin School, 


15 


12 


Dewey School, 


15 


15 


Harriet P. Dame School, 


12 


12 


Tahanto School, 


11 


11 


Cogswell School, 


10 


10 



280 



220 



Number of educational works used by the teachers pri- 
vately : 





Read. 


studied 


Pligh School — Group I, 


3 


3 


Parker School — Group II, 


4 


4 


Walker School, 


10 


2 


Garrison School, 


10 


4 


Eastman School, 


10 


4 


Rumford School, 


11 


7 


Kimball School, 


19 


11 


J\Ierriniack School, 


6 


2 


Penaeook School, 


5 


4 


Franklin School, 


9 


3 


Dewey School, 


9 


8 


Harriet P. Dame School, 


6 


3 


Tahanto School, 


4 





Cogswell School, 


2 


1 



106 



56 



Different authors whose works were studied : 

Bloomfield, Cutting, Eliot, McMurry, Swift, Thorndike, 
Spalding, James, Hill, Hyde, Bagley, O'Shea, Henderson, 
Klemm, Baldwin, Froebel, Seeley, Rowe, Dewey, Com- 
paraye, Ruyer, Jones, Betts, Cabot, Palmer, Scudder, Har- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 109 

rison, Howe, Aimer, Scliaefer, Hamilton, Wilson, Tyler, 
Taylor, Wiggin, Howland, Dexter. 

Publications taken by teachers : 

History Teacher's Magazine, Popular Educator^ Educa- 
tional Review, ScJiool Review, Journal of Education, Nor- 
mal Instructor, Primary Educator, School Arts ' Book, 
American Primary Teacher, Kindergarten Review, Educa- 
tional Foundations, Primary Plans, The Elementary 
Teacher. 

The experiment of employing the kindergartners ' after- 
noon time for assisting in the lower grades of the element- 
ary schools has proved to be most helpful. These teachers 
entered upon their tasks with a fine spirit and early mani- 
fested a desire to make themselves proficient in the details. 
Such a spirit is worth more to the schools than can well be 
expressed on the printed page. They have accomplished 
more during the first semester than I had reason to expect. 
A fair estimate of the work done during this time by these 
assistants may be gained from this table : 



!- s "5 g g =e 

Number of different pupils uu- I I w « iS I 
der instruction, 72 76 56 42 35 281 

Number of different backward 

pupils under instruction, 58 30 26 21 35 170 

Number of different backward 
pupils showing decided im- 
provement, 58 24 16 21 35 154 

The matter of helping backward children is not the only 
strong feature of this scheme. It enables the kindergart- 
ners to have an ever-growing conception of the elementary 
school requirements so that they can shape their prepara- 
tory kindergarten work accordingly. In assigning the 
teachers to the various buildings heed was given to their 
places of residence so that long walks were not imposed. 



110 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In the Rumford and Kimball buildings the policy of having 
an extra teacher has been carried out, but at a reduced 
expense. 

Rumford. Kimball. Total. 

Number of different pupils instructed 

by these teachers, 105 140 245 

Number of different backward pupils 

instructed by these teachers, 59 76 135 

Number of different backward pupils 

showing decided improvement, 42 44 86 

Number of different substitutes in 

regular rooms, 85 78 163 

The movement to discover causes for pupils leaving 
school and to remove the causes of pupil retardation has not 
been neglected. While it has not been possible to find a 
standard by which retardation may be uniformly and ra- 
tionally judged, nevertheless, the moral effects of such re- 
search are asserting themselves and doing a great deal of 
good. Tabulations of the movement of pupils through the 
grades appear in this pamphlet and ought to be valuable 
not only now, but as a means for making comparisons here- 
after. 

During the first semester forty- three pupils left school 
for good, as follows : 

Higli Scliool, Group I. — Class V, 0; class U, 5; class T, 
1 ; class S, ; class R, 3 ; class Q, 8 ; class P, 3 ; special, 2 ; 
post-graduate, 1. 

Parker School, Group II. — Class 0, 6 ; class N, 4. 
; Chandler School, Group II. — Class M, 1. 

Garrison School, Group II. — Class M, 1; class N, 1. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Class K, 2, 
Garrison School. — Class J, 1; class I, 1. 
Dewey School. — Class J, 1. 
Franklin ScJiool. — Class J, 1. 



SCHOOL REPORT. Ill 

REASONS GIVEN FOR LEAVING. 



Sickness at home, 


2 


PL, 
1 


Illness, 


6 




Death, 

Went to work, 

Loss of interest. 


1 
5 
5 


4 
2 


To attend fitting school, 
Not able to study with- 
out interruption, 
Moved out of town. 
Home complications, 
Could not keep up, 


2 

1 

1 


3 



23 10 1 2 4 1 2 

In a majority of these cases no extraordinary means had 
been taken by the teachers to hold them in school. This 
would seem to be good ground for improvement in the 
future, as in many places it is considered one of the para- 
mount duties of the teacher to make every possible effort to 
retain such pupils. 

Night Schootj. 

The three months' session of the night school shows a 
slightly reduced enrollment and the usual low rate of at- 
tendance. At the beginning two rooms were in use, both 
for instruction in the elementary branches. One of them 
was discontinued at the end of the eighth week. A room 
for advanced classes was opened at the beginning of the 
third week after much effort had been made to secure a suf- 
ficiently large membership. The result was that fourteen 
were enrolled with an average attendance of eight. Those 
who could attend regularly made unusual progress and 
appreciated the privileges afforded them. 



112 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Whole number of different pupils 

attending. 
Average membership. 
Average daily absence. 
Average daily attendance. 
Per cent, of daily attendance, 
Age of youngest pupil. 
Age of oldest pupil. 


Males. 

94 


Females. Total. 

15 109 

55.942 

19.677 

36.265 

.64+ 

14 

50 


Average age, 


21 


years, 8 months. 


ROLL OF HONOR. 




None. 






NATIONALITIES. 






1911. 


1912. 


Swedes, 


23 


13 


Armenians, 


2 


3 


Danish, 


1 





Canadians, 


11 


19 


Russians, 


2 


2 


Americans, 


14 


19 


English, 





1 


Italians, 


13 


10 


Albanians, 


7 


11 


Irish, 


4 


1 


Turks, 


15 


3 


Greeks, 


22 


15 


Prince Edward Island, 


2 





Polish, 


1 


2 


Finns, 


3 


6 


German, 


1 


1 


IMacedonians, 





1 


Portuguese, 

Japanese, 

Austrian, 


1 






■ 1 

1 



•xaodaa ^ooHOS 113 

Suggestions. 

I respectfully call the attention of the board to the fol- 
lowing suggestions : That systematic physical exercise be in- 
stituted for the girls in Group I. That the modern lan- 
guage course be made logically continuous through the five 
years of high school work, and that the course in English 
be revised, both as to content and methods of teaching. 

That the entering age for pupils of the elementary 
grades be fixed at six years. 

The industrial class for girls was not started because no 
available room could be found for it. We hope this may be 
brought about eventually. 

The value of any system of education is determined not 
alone by what has been done, but as much by what it prom- 
ises for the future. We have no good reason for not be- 
lieving that just as vital changes are to come as have been 
brought forward during the last twenty-five years. The 
law school, the medical school and other provisions for spe- 
cial activities have their real origin in public demand. 

The department store had its inception in public desire 
for economy in time and expense. These were unmistak- 
able manifestations of life's forces. Old methods have proved 
themselves inadequate for prevailing conditions. We have 
had concrete illustrations of this right here in Concord's 
business life. Therefore, we may expect to be confronted in 
our educational problem of the future with schools for back- 
ward children, special schools for the gifted child, open- 
air schools for the tuberculous and a:inemic pupils, the 
parental school, the vocational school, provision for the 
wdder public use of the school plant, medical inspection, 
supervised playgrounds, more flexible gradation and pro- 
motion, and many others. A rather formidable array, but 
they must be met and answ^ered somewhere at some time. 
These specific forms are discussed at educational meetings, 
tried out in school by those best fitted to do so, and the re- 
sulting system will be the one which realizes most fully 

8 



114 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the hopes and aspirations of the community. Thus the 
school of to-day, as the school of the past has been, and as 
the school of the future will be, is the embodiment of the 
community idea from which is derived its energy and, as 
civilization increases the complexities of life, the dynamic 
force of education will depend upon methods adapted for 
and adjusted to those complexities. The teacher or the 
superintendent who gives no heed to the solution of such 
problems as these faces swift and certain failure. 

Within the last few years only, has there been any work 
published on the problem of how to study. Mental equip- 
ment alone seems to have been the one standard by which 
the ability of the teacher was judged. 

To date few colleges have regular departments of peda- 
gogy as they have for law and medicine, although there are 
signs pointing to an adoption of such a policy. The out- 
come of this neglect is that mere children have been taught 
by the same methods as the teachers themselves were taught 
in college. Even the assignment of the studies and the 
prescribed amount to be done show the lack of judgment 
that could be supplied by professional training or even by 
professional study alone. To this defect and the inherit- 
ance of college customs can be traced much of the educa- 
tional mortality commonly known as pupil elimination 
from school. Just such problems as these are the ones with 
which the educator must concern himself if energy' and 
power in the public school are to increase. Many of our 
schools have shown remarkable progress in these things, 
and I hope this policy will prevail until all are convinced 
that method is equally as important as mental equipment 
and that each is necessary to the other. 

It is my privilege again to record my cordial apprecia- 
tion of the help I have received from the Board of Educa- 
tion, teachers, pupils, and citizens in general. 
Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX I. 



Concord, N. H., September 25, 1911. 
To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

I had planned to submit a brief statement of tlie first 
year's trial of the regrading scheme before this, but collect- 
ing details was a much slower process than I had thought. 
However, I believe the results have been positive and grati- 
fying enough to warrant presenting it even at this late date. 

The plan, thus far, has been successful. This is in evi- 
dence by the keen interest and activity of both teachers and 
pupils, by a show of but little friction, and by a high stand- 
ard of scholarship. 

The methods of teaching in the elementarj^ grades and 
through the first two years of the high school have been 
on modern pedagogical lines and the results shown in the 
tables that follow may be ascribed to this, in connection with 
the banishment of athletic and social distractions. 

In about two years more the plan will have been reason- 
ably tested and 1 am confident that with the hearty support 
of all concerned it will prove its value both educationally 
and financially. 

Elementary Schools. 

The chief work in these grades was the adjustment of the 
course of study to the new conditions. It is being done 
slowly and eifeetively and will be completed in about two 
years. 

The number of pupils registered at the end of the year 
in classes E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L was 1,026. 

The number of these who attained an average of B — or 
better in their studies was 408. 



116 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



"The per cent, of these who attained an average of B- 
better in their studies was 39.81. 



or 



High School. 

(Classes M, N, 0, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V.) 

The success of the plan in this group has been marked. 

The whole number of pupils in all departments at the 
end of the year was 760. 

The whole number of pupils in all departments who at- 
tained an average of A — or better, 81. 

The per cent, of pupils in all departments who attained 
an average of A — or better, 10.65. 

The whole number of pupils in all departments who at- 
tained an average of B — or better, 323. 

The per cent, of pupils in all departments who attained 
an average of B — or better, 42.5. 

By Groups. 









CO 






CO 










































p, 




^j 


a 


^ 








s 


U. 


a 


ss 


S 








p. 




<D 


p. 


« 








T 


a 




T 


u 








< 


o 


A® 


M 




High School (group 1) classes Q, R, S 


T 


U, V. 


299 


6 


2.0 


80 


26.75 


Parker School (group 2) classes 0, P. . 






163 


31 


19.0 


99 


60.70 


Chandler, Walker, Eastman, Garrison. 


Merri: 












mack, Rumford, Kimhall schools 


(group 2> 












classes M, N 






298 


44 


14.7 


144 


48.13 



High School. 

Group 1. 

As far as my observation goes this school has shown im- 
provement in discipline and in attention to work. The 
following tabulation was taken from the annual reports sent 
me in June by the principal. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



117 



From this it seems that, as far as marks go, the school 
does not show up as well as it did last year. The great re- 
duction in the reported number of failures and in the num- 
ber leaving school during the year would indicate a better 
average scholarship. This is encouraging. 



1910. 


1911. 


CO 

O 


'S. 

p. 

d 
5?; 


? 


? 

CQ 




1 

CO 


CO 

a! 


? 


r 

CQ 


'6 
fa 


1 

.a 


'p. 

a 
6 


u,v 

S,T 

Q,R 


66 
96 
143 


6 

5 
3 


20 
25 
33 



6 
12 


2 
7 
19 


u,v.... 

S, T . . . . 
Q.R 


81 
99 
119 


3 
3 



28 
28 
24 





1 






4 




305 


14 


78 


18 


28 


299 


6 


80 


1 


4 



1910. 

Per cent, gaining A— or better 5.0+ 

Per cent, gaining B— or better 33.2-1- 
Percent, failing 6.4-1- 
Percent, leaving school 9.1-f- 

HiGH School. 



1911. 

2.000-F 

29.100-r 

.003-)- 

1.300+ 



Group 2. 
Parker School. 

The segregation of the freshman class in the Parker 
School was attended by remarkable results. Comparing 
the work of this year's class with that of last year, we find 
the following : 

Algebra. 

The per cent, of failure was 9 per cent, less than last 
year. Not only was the same amount of work covered but, 
in addition, one division finished the entire book and an- 
other division of girls not naturally fitted for mathematical 
studies finished Slaught & Lenne's algebra. 



118 CITY OF CONCORD. 

History. 

The number of failures was three-fifths of one per cent, 
larger than last year, about the same amount of work being 
covered. 

English. 

The number of failures was three-fifths of one per cent, 
less than last year, about the same amount of work being 
covered. 

Latin, 

The accomplishment of the class in Latin has surpassed 
anything of the kind I have ever known before. In fifty- 
seven weeks they have covered the work comprised in: 
Ritchie's First and Second Latin Books; Ingiis & Pretty- 
man's Second Book; form work in the first 117 pages of 
Allen & Greenough's Latin Grammar; Mellick's Prose 
Composition. 

They have read at sight : Fabulffi Faciles ; Cresar 's Gallic 
War, Books I, II, III, IV; Eutropius, Books I, II, III, IV; 
much additional outside reading. 

Last year's class after a study of Latin for the same 
period of time were able to accomplish only the following: 
Collar & Daniell's "First Year in Latin"; Mellick's Latin 
Prose Composition; Fabulee Faciles, one division; Viri 
Romte, one division. 

Of this year's class fifty-two passed and none failed. 

Of last year's class sixty- two passed and five failed. 

This year's class passed the two-year Latin entrance 
(1910) examinations to both Dartmouth and Amherst Col- 
leges, averaging eighty-seven per cent, as a class. These 
papers were marked severely, even misspelled English words 
being counted mistakes. The work was conducted accord- 
ing to the plan suggested by the state superintendent, and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



119 



the instructors were not college graduates, but very efficient 
teachers nevertheless. It is really unfortunate that this 
method is not to be continued in the high school proper. 

Commercial History. 

Tlie number of failures was two and one-eighth per cent, 
larger than last year. The amount of work covered was 
about the same. 

Commercial Geography. 

The number of failures this year was five and one-tenth 

per cent, less than last year. 

The amount of work covered was about the same. 
From the following table intelligent comparisons may be 

made between the work of the 1910 freshman class under 

the old plan, and the work of the 1911 class under the new 

scheme : 



1910. 


1911. 




































o 




aj 








o 












o 




^ 








o 


■J) 

(0 


a, 






^ 


HI 


aj 


a 






nd 




'S 


a 








to 


a 






CD 


























5 


o 


< 


1 


fa 






o 


1 

< 


1 


fa 


^ 


o,p 


143 




39 


17 


28 


O, P.... 


185 


31 


68 


13 


22 



1910. 1911. 

Per cent, gaining A— or better 2.60 19.01 

Per cent, gaining B— or better 36.52 60.72 

Per cent, failing 14.78 7.97 

Per cent, leaving scliool during tlie year 19.58 11.89 

The foregoing tabulations show conclusively that, from 
the viewpoint of attainment, as far as school work goes, this 
year's class was far and away superior to last year's class, 
which worked under the old plan, even if we allow for the 
possible variation in the natural ability of classes. This 
year 's class was the best one of its grade I have ever known. 
Its strength will continue to be shown if held by strong disci- 
pline, if shown the same amount of individual attention, and 
if similar methods of teaching are employed. 



120 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Group 2. 

Eastman, Garrison, Walker, Merrimack, Kimball, 
Chandler and Rumpord Schools. 

The accomplishment of school work in these grades is 
hardly less marked than that of those immediately preced- 
ing. This being the first year of these grades, no comparison 
can be made with previous classes. Pupils who finished the 
work of class M were given certificates of graduation. No 
cases of discipline were reported and the work has gone 
smoothly and effectively. 

What the pupils have accomplished in Latin, instructed 
by Misses Flavin, Standish, Talpey and Fletcher, may be 
better understood when I say that they accomplished under 
the new method in nineteen weeks more than previous fresh- 
man classes Avere able to accomplish in twenty-eight. The 
studies were prosecuted under the "working school" plan, 
which allowed merging of the study and recitation periods, 
thus permitting the teachers to give much more individual 
help. The standing of these schools may be found in the 
accompanying school table. 

Athletics and Social Features. 

The athletics of the classes below class Q have been con- 
fined to each of the various schools. Games which could 
be played in the yard have taken the place of those which 
have the tendency to interfere with legitimate school work. 
This has not been accomplished without great effort on the 
part of the teachers. 

No social features have been allowed which tend to have 
a bad effect upon the regular work and upon student health. 
The result is that school discipline and school work have 
been maintained at a high standard and it is for pu])lic 
benefit that it remain so in the future. 

By consulting the school table one can readily trace the 
effect of functions and of general athletics upon school 
work. Classes M, N, 0, P have been relieved of it, and 
classes Q, R, S, T, U, V have not. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



121 



SCHOOL TABLE— ]911. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Walker 



36 









*« 




OJ^ 
























ftX! 




P.^ 


















SCHOOL. 




a 


o 


s 


o 


a 




E/3 


p. 


■ 1 t^ 


O 


• 1 t: 


o 




C« 


6 


C<J^ 


u 


"=mS 


u 




o 


^ 


Iz; 


(S 


'i^ 


04 


High 


V 


77 


3 


3.96 


27 


35.0C 




u 


4 





0.00 


1 


25.00 




T 


83 


3 


3.61 


28 


33.73 




S 


16 





0.00 





0.00 




R 


71 





0.00 


21 


29.57 




Q 


48 





0.00 


3 


6.25 


Parker 


P 


150 


31 


20.66 


99 


66.00 




O 


13 





000 





0.00 


Chandler 


N 


94 


7 


7.44 


43 


45.74 






Grarrison 


N 
M 


19 
14 


10 

2 


52.620 
14.285 


16 

8 


84.22 




57.24 




N 
M 


3 
12 






0,000 
0.000 



3 


0.00 




25.00 


Merrimack 


M 


38 


10 


26.315 


22 


57.89 






Kimball 


M 


36 


6 


13.888 


16 


44.44 






Rumford 


M 


46 


2 


4.347 


18 


39.13 







50.00 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


183 




84 


45.880 




K 


81 




30 


37.000 




J 


155 




66 


42.580 




I 


88 




41 


46.590 




H 


162 




49 


30.246 




G 


79 




38 


48.100 




F 


171 




60 


35.089 




E 


107 




41 


38.317 



No. Elementary pupils attaining B— or better = 409 : 
■KT„ tj:„t. — 1 — 1 ;i_ _4.i_:_: — g — Or better = 

A— or better = 81 = 10.65%. 



JNO. Jiiementary pupils attaining iJ— or better = 409 = 39.86%. 
No. High school pupils attaining B— or better = 323 = 42.5%. 

A— or better = 81 = 10.6 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE. 



Supt. L. J. Bundlett: 

Dear Sir, — I beg leave to submit for your approval my 
second annual report. While I feel that some progress has 
been made during the year in the work for good health in 
our schools, there is still much to be desired. With only one 
nurse it has been impossible to cover in a satisfactory manner 
the entire Union School District, for while much has been 
done there still remains more that is undone. It is earnestly 
hoped that before the end of another year the city will see 
the need of a medical inspector. 

Parents frequently wonder why their children do not 
make better progress in school work. Many times it is 
because of neglect to send their children to an oculist, 
a dentist or to call in the family physician for his ad- 
vice. Many cases of retardation are due to defects of eye, 
ear, throat and nose. These are conditions we hope in time 
to remedy by school inspection. 

Children whose parents or guardians were unable to at- 
tend to examinations or treatments, have been taken to pri- 
vate physicians and hospitals and their after treatment 
supervised. 

It is most gratifying to note the increased interest on the 
part of parents, and their willingness to co-operate for the 
good of their children. 

Attention is called to the statistical account which fol- 
lows. It may not seem large in number, but it rep- 
resents a considerable expenditure of time and thought. 
There is a limit to every person's ability and endurance and 
I have learned from personal experience that quantity does 
not mean quality, so mere figures do not and never can tell 
the story of this kind of service. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



123 



It is with a deep sense of gratitude that acknowledgment 
is made to all who have materially aided or in any way 
helped in this work. 





Home Calls. 




Defective vision, 


72 


Retardation, 


10 


Adenoids and tonsils, 


34 


Tubercular suspect, 


3 


Congenital cataract. 


1 


Defective teeth. 


2 


Conjunctivitis, 


8 


Eingworm, 


1 


Strabismus, 


23 


Defective hearing. 


7 


Eczema, 


5 


Anaemia, 


1 


Scabies, 


6 


Frost-bite, 


1 


Malnutrition, 


13 


Pink eye, 


1 


Enuresis, 


3 


Undiagnosed, 


5 


Vaccination, 


3 


Whooping cough. 


3 


Orthopedic, 


22 


Chicken-pox, 


2 


Pediculosis, 


31 


Scalp disease, 


2 


Enlarged glands. 


2 


Nervous condition, 


2 


Otitis, 


2 


Herpes, 


1 


Septic finger, 


1 






Infected ear. 


11 


Total, 


278 



Totals. 



Number of visits made at schools, 144 

Number home calls recorded, 281 

Number home calls unrecorded, 40 
Number visits to physicians and hospitals with children 

for examination, treatment or operation, 60 

Consultation mth officials, 45 

Number free glasses provided, 12 pairs. 

Number dressings done, 16 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH M. MURPHY, R. N., 

School Nurse. 



REPORT OF MORRILL MANUAL TRAINING 
SCHOOL. 



Afr. L. J. Rundlett, Supt.: 

Dear Sir, — In reply to your request I submit the fol- 
lowing report : 

The past year has been one of remarkable growth in the 
JVIanual Training School as the following table will show. 

Freshmen. Soph. Junior. Senior. Totid. Gross. Gross all. 



1908-1909, 


4 


4 


1 


1 


10 


60 


380 


1909-1910, 


13 


6 


7 


1 


27 


162 


550 


1910-1911, 


36 


10 


5 


5 


56 


336 


850 


Sept., 1911, 


33 


22 


11 


5 


71 


426 


1,100 


Feb., 1912, 


58 


23 


10 


5 


96 


576 


1,200 



Gross represents the number of periods of one and one- 
half hours each w^eek of the high school only, while the 
gross all represents the gross number of periods in all 
schools taking manual training, including the grammar 
school classes and the industrial class. 

Last spring a printing plant was added to the equip- 
ment and since then nearly all the work that came within 
the capacity of the press has been done here for the district 
at a great saving of expense. Over 45,000 impressions have 
been made on the press. 

During the spring term two new lathes were added to 
the machine shop and the building was equipped with fire 
extinguishers. In the summer the back stairs, formerly 
used for the girls' entrance, were taken out and the space 
floored over making a fine storeroom on the second floor, a 
tool-room on the first floor with a dry-room for lumber un- 
derneath and on a level with the driveway. With this im- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 125 

provement every foot of the building was put to use. A 
tool-room was built in the machine shop, the work all being 
done by the boys of the industrial class. Here all the small 
tools are eared for and the room is kept in order by a boy 
from the industrial class. A brass-check system has been in- 
troduced by which all tools are charged up to the boys, tlms 
saving much time and annoyance from misplaced and lost 
tools. 

In September an additional teacher was employed and 
again in January it became necessary to add to the staff, 
making seven teachers in all. The ]\Iorrill building, being 
taxed to its limit, a new room had to be opened in the 
north basement of the high school. This room was equipped 
with sixteen benches and the necessary tools. 

In the grammar schools the work is now begun in the 
K class, which corresponds to the sixth grade in other cities, 
and the classes are doing the same grade of work as is done 
elsewhere in the eighth and ninth grades. 

The growth in the mechanic arts course has been steady 
until at the present time there are nearly one hundred 
boys taking the full course of nine hours a week. In order 
to carry out the course of study in full another year it will 
be necessary to add to the equipment of forges, wood- 
turning lathes and iron-working machinery. This year the 
sophomore class has had only thirty-six hours of forging, 
which is less than one third of the intended course. In 
the machine shop the equipment is being taxed to its limit. 
It now accommodates ten boys, but next year the classes will 
range from fifteen to twenty each, and in order to carry 
the work on in an efficient manner more machines will be 
needed. The work in this department ranks high, consider- 
ing the limited equipment. At present there are five two- 
cylinder, twelve horse-power gasoline engines in process of 
construction, the patterns for which were all made in the 
school. This work is done at no cost to the district for 
stock, as the boys pay for all their supplies. As no boy is 



126 CITY OF CONCORD. 

allowed to build an engine until after completing the ele- 
mentary course of exercises and proving his ability as a 
mechanic, some fine work is being done. 

Last year one half the sophomore class did their junior 
year work by coming back four afternoons a week extra, 
and this year several sophomores are doing the same. This 
certainly shows great interest when a boy keeps up in all 
his studies, for no boy is allowed to come extra time who 
is behind in his academic work, and gives up all his after- 
noons to do the work of the next year. 

The work in the machine shop has been somewhat handi- 
capped during the cold weather by the room being too 
cold to work in. In the month of January there were ten 
mornings that the room did not reach a temperature of 
over 50 degrees when it was time for the classes to come in. 
On all such days the boys were sent back to the high school 
to study. There were a good many days when the tempera- 
ture averaged betwen 50 and 55, and the boys were given 
the liberty of returning to the high school if they felt it 
too cold to work. There is very little exercise to machine 
work and, as the pupils have to handle cast-iron, it is with 
difficulty that they can keep comfortable in a room that is 
much below 60. I am having the boys in the industrial 
class calk the joints around the windows with oakum and 
cement. This will help some but I would also advise hav- 
ing aiiother coil of steam pipes added to the room, as there 
is need of more radiating surface. 

The questions have been asked several times, "Of what 
value is the education received in the mechanic arts 
course?" and "What becomes of the boys after leaving 
school?" In answer to the first question, it nmst be re- 
membered that it is not the function of the public school 
to teach a trade, therefore these boys are not journeymen 
when they graduate. The object of the mechanic arts 
course is to give the pupils a definite and working Imowl- 
edge of several (as many as possible) mechanical trades, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 127 

showing the relation of each to the others, and giving as 
much of the details of each as the time will allow. The 
trades touched upon are joinery, cabinet-making, wood- 
turning, pattern-making, moulding, blacksmithing and 
forging, elementary machine shop practice and machine 
construction. With this is given a progressive course in 
freehand and mechanical drawing which is closely corre- 
lated with the shop practice. During the four years a gen- 
eral dexterity is developed that is useful in all vocations 
and the knowledge gained offers vocational guidance, so 
that the pupils have no difficulty in choosing their future 
employment. If they desire further education the work 
done will admit them to New Hampshire State College. 

In answer to the second question of what becomes of the 
graduates, in 1910 the one graduate went to work in a local 
shop as a pattern-maker. In 1911 five graduated. One of 
these went to work to finish learning the machinist trade, 
another the pattern-maker's trade, the third received a 
position as draftsman in a Cambridge shop, the fourth is 
working for his father, who owns and runs a saw and grist- 
mill, and the fifth one would have entered State College if 
his health had not given out. It is also a very noticeable 
fact that almost all the boys who left school during the 
course went to AA'ork at some mechanical trade. 

In September the industrial class was increased to 
twenty boys, the average age being over 16. These boys 
were chosen from the grades because of their advanced age 
or because they had no intention of going to high school 
and because of their aptitude for mechanical work, as 
shown in the manual training classes. 

As there seems to be a general demand for information 
about the work of this department, and as there has been 
much misunderstanding as to its character, it may not be 
out of place to give a brief description of the work at this 
time. 

Every year there appear in the manual training classes 



128 CITY OP CONCORD. 

boys who are older than the remainder of the class. Many 
of these boys can continue their education but a few years 
and cannot go to high school. They show exceptional tal- 
ents for mechanical work, but if allowed to leave school 
with only the elementary education enter the ranks of the 
unskilled labor and take up some "blind alley" occupation 
having no chance for advancement. The world is crowded 
with just this class and a great deal of the poverty and 
suffering is caused by heads of families not being able to 
earn a wage large enough to supply even the necessities of 
life. The conditions in this class are steadily groAving 
worse as the cost of living increases, and it was with a 
desire to steer boys into the ranks of skilled labor that the 
industrial class w^as started. 

The boys in this department go to the Morrill School six 
hours a day for five days a w^eek. One half of the time is 
spent on academic work and the other half on shop practice. 
The academic work consists of English ; the writing of com- 
positions on things learned in the shops, on lectures and 
shop talks, business letters and reports. Mathematics is 
taught by first reviewing arithmetic and then taking up 
shop problems such as figuring cost of stock for certain 
jobs, speeds and sizes of pulleys to run the machines in the 
shops. In commercial geography the industries, trans- 
portation, social and labor conditions are studied in order 
that the boys may gain a practical knowledge of the con- 
ditions in the world at large. In civics the city, state and 
national governments are studied and once a week a class 
meeting is conducted by the boys at which debates and 
discussions are held. Current events are studied from 
newspapers and magazines. In all these subjects an effort 
is made to correlate the w^ork very closely to the shop prac- 
tice and the future life of the pupils. The academic work 
is all taught by the same men who teach the mechanical 
branches. This work could not be taught in the other 
schools for several reasons, the principal one being that 



SCHOOL REPORT. 129 

these boys need male teachers, who are familiar with shop 
conditions and discipline and know just what problems the 
boys will meet on going to work. 

In the shop work the pupils are first placed in what is 
called the pre-voeational division and given instruction in 
several kinds of work in order to find out for what each is 
best fitted. Just as soon as a boy shows a talent for one 
kind of work more than another he is given as much of it 
as possible, not with the idea of teaching him a trade but 
of preparing him for it so that when he leaves school he 
will at once apply for an apprenticeship in the work. This 
differs from the work in the mechanic arts course in that 
it has a commercial value and has to be up to a commercial 
standard. For example, the drawing-room of the school is 
very poorly equipped for its work; common school desks 
and a few old laboratory tables being used. Instead of 
buying regulation tables at a cost of about $300 the boys are 
making them, and the total costs will be much less than 
$100. Each department is doing something for the other 
departments and for other schools of the district. Great 
encouragement has been given by all business men and 
parents to whom the work has been explained. Several 
manufacturers have taken the opportunity of calling on 
the school to supply boys to fill positions. Thus the school 
has become like a sieve, through wliich the boys are sifted 
and sorted in such a way that each may find his place in 
the world's work, and employers may here find just the 
right boy for the right job without going through the costly 
process of trying Tom, Dick and Harry and discharging 
them and trying again until the right boy comes along. 
The manual training department has become one of the 
strongest links in the educational chain, which would be far 
from complete without it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR W. FRENCH. 



130 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Work Done in the Printing Department of the Morrill 
School hy the Industrial Class. 

FOR THE superintendent's OFFICE. 

1,000 Covers for vouchers. 

1,000 Character slips. 

2,000 Invitations to annual exhibition of manual training, 

2,000 Registration slips. 

1,200 Delivery slips. 

500 Postal cards, 

1,500 Envelopes for high school report cards. 

2,000 Envelopes for elementary school report cards. 

5,000 Absence reports (blocked and perforated). 

2,000 Book reviews. 

1,000 Parasite slips. 

500 Manual training report blanks. 

1,000 Returns on envelopes. 

1,000 Notices. ("Kindly return this bill.") 

1,000 Tickets for Concord Teachers' Association. 

1,000 Covers for vouchers (second lot). 

FOR the high SCHOOL. 

700 Election cards. 

500 Book labels. 

1,500 Letterheads. 

300 Official ballots for Athletic Association. 

1,000 Recitation slips. 

1,000 Library book slips. 

5,000 Library slips. 

FOR the MORRILL SCHOOL. 

1,000 Notices to the annual exhibition. 

500 Program cards. 

100 Wood-working course. 

1,000 Work slips. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 131 

1,000 Printing time slips. 

1,000 Applications to industrial class. 

500 Library cards. 

500 Lists of classes. 

500 Temperature report blanks. 

1,000 Letterheads. 

500 Covers for technical sketches. 

1,000 Cards (invitations to visit Morrill School). 

Work Done 'by the Industrial Class of the Morrill School 
Since the Last Report. 

February 15, 1912. 

One note-book case to hold one hundred books for high 
school. 

One note-book case to hold seventy-five books for high 
school. 

Four two-drawer card filing cabinets for superintendent's 
office. 

Two blackboard shelves for Dewey school. 

Coat and hat racks for the Dewey school. 

Four old laboratory cupboards repaired. 

Twelve galleys for the printing department. 

Ten strips for maps for high school. 

One chair repaired for Chandler school. 

Three doors repaired for the cooking school. 

Twenty window boards for the Penacook school. 

Two cleats for galley rack. 

One handle for net, high school. 

Eight window boards for Chandler school. 

Seven blocking boards for Morrill school. 

Awnings taken off the Dewey school. 

Awnings taken off the Franklin schoel. 

Storm doors put on the Dewey school. 

Two coat and hat racks for the drawing room. 

Two plant shelves for the Chandler school. 



132 CITY OF CONCORD. 

One desk repaired for the high school. 

Four lights of glass set in H. P. Dame school. 

Thirteen double windows put on Tahanto school. 

Shelves for IMorrill school. 

Six blackboard rulers for high school. 

Double windows put on H. P. Dame school. 

Two wire screens for Tahanto school. 

Three lights glass set Tahanto school. 

Twenty-four drawers refinished for drawing room. 

Eight door wedges for H. P. Dame school. 

Five chairs repaired for high school. 

One office chair repaired for high school. 

Back-boards for machine shop. 

Pencil sharpener repaired for superintendent's office. 

Sixteen rolling-pins for cooking school. 

Twenty-four back-boards for benches Morrill school. 

Painted benches and lockers Morrill school. 

Repaired lockers for machine shop. 

Made one dozen mallets for manual training department. 

Repaired piazza floor Tahanto school. 

Repaired fence Tahanto school. 

Took off double windows Tahanto school. (Last spring.) 

Took off double windows H. P. Dame school. (Last 
spring.) 

Repaired desk for Chandler school. 

Built tool room in machine shop. 

Took down partition in room two, Morrill school. 

Made fourteen key cupboards for grammar schools. (Last 
spring.) 

Three blackboard rulers for high school. 

Made sleeve board for sewing school. 

Door repaired for Morrill school. 

Three drawing tables repaired for high school. 

Bulkhead repaired for Tahanto school. 

Two coat and hat racks for high school. 

One steam radiator put in Morrill school. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 133 

Two locks set in book-case doors for high school. 

Work under way but not completed : 

Removing two platforms and laying floor at Kimball 
school. 

Twenty-four drawing tables being built for the Morrill 
School. 



APPENDIX II. 



p 

o 

12; 
I— I 

P5 

w 

en 

p^ 
o 

Q 

12; 
Q 

O 
PQ 



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a9(jinn,v 






cc^orot-o-co- 


13 
1 




-H CO-1 « 


•uiooj jmoK 
m ODBjjns pjBoqJiotJiq 
JO ^83j aaunbs jo jaqtun^j 


1.990 
2,233 

350 
125 
249 
234 
280 
172 






CO'* CSI:- 


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OOOOOOOr-lO 


^ 




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eoooeo o»r^ eo-n 


1 




SSS2 


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ar\% Xq sjisia jo aaqmn^ 


T)<coeo(M"OOi-ico 


1 ^ 

1 




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§ 




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CO 




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O 




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liiajgjjip joa9qamu9[oq^ 




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00 lO 00 CO (N --1 CO "* -il C^ 

1 




coOf-iio 

(NTt<T(<CO 


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1 




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-ipjBj JO jaqiunu 9aBa9Av 






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jiC5C:C50c:02aiCi 


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00 C2 00C5 






■diqsj9qui9iu 9Sbj9Av 


305.000 
179.550 
04.240 
37.000 
29.160 
19310 
37.089 
38.720 
47.090 


i 




25.060 
37.510 
41.340 
31.910 


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2.550 
3.510 
0.840 
2.090 


•8DaBpn9!H'B A[lBp 9SBJ9AV 




292.180 
171.380 
90.980 
34.620 
27.420 
18.050 
34.054 
36.660 
45.450 

75).790 




22.510 
34.000 
34.500 
29.820 


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Chandler School 

Walker School 

Garrison School 

Eastman School 

Merrimack School.... 

Kimball School 

Rum ford School.... 


o 
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>< 


Harriet p. Dame, 1 .. 
Harriet P. Dame, 2 ... 
Harriet P. Dame, 3 ... 
Eastman School, l.... 



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§ 


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1 1 


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CO CO OOOOOO 


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1 »-«.-. T-« CO c-i 


00 1 05 

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1 


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-ipjBj JO jaquimi aSejaAy 


4.900 
4.900 

..529 
.280 
.589 
1.250 
.3G0 
.259 


S IE: 

lO ■* 

1 


■ssan 
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51 § S2?5j§s;2is g 
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^ 1 »-. CO CO o »o m lo 
oiioj t-t-t-r-ooco 

■ 1 


o 1 o 

1 


•dtqsaaqinain aS^aaAy 




9.480 

30.650 
35.000 
49.360 
34.500 
39.500 
39.420 

228.430 


i 

00 

in 
e4" 


•aouasqu ^irep aS^JQAV 


O 
00 


.810 

7.120 
8.000 
11.550 
8.290 
5.680 
3.700 

44.340 


la 


•aoaTjpuajjB ^lli^p aScjaAv 


i 

00 


8.670 

23..530 
27.000 
37.810 
26.210 
33.820 
35.720 


o 

CT5 
O 

00 


o 

00 


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0|0 00t-0(N0 

1 


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s 


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jo' jaqumu aio'qAV 


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CO 


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SCHOOLS. 




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SCHOOL REPORT. 



139 



o 

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P 

W 
Z 

w 

Q 

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Solid Geometry 

Chemistry 

Physics 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



O 



pq 
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O 
O 

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03 




03 . 




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C-l C^ <N -1 « C<» CO .(M 



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t- 05 05 to 



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SCHOOL REPORT. 



141 



MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 
June 15, 1911. 





Wood AND 


Iron. 


Cooking. 


Sewing. 








iin 






i-an 


tU 




(^ 








<B n 


0) 


Od 


oj n 


<D 


CD 


<r 




*^ 




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CO 


^^ 






^ 


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— 


■S 5^ 


t; CO 


3 


-^ QJ 




"©"o 


o 


oS u 


"o o 


o 




"So 




"©"p 


SCHOOLS. 




m 

O 


t, «3 cs 


n tl) 


o 


u tS cS 


^5 


O 










s'a£ 


S_2 


OS 




S:S 




S^ 




^§ 


> 


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^ 


"as 


C 3 


> 


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o-S £ 


ot^ 


~ 


"o-ti 




i" 




|5^ 


5" 


» 
^ 


^s- 


^" 




^" 


High School 


41 


7 


34 


.4 


1 


13 


15 

19 
97 
59 
70 


1 

2 

8 
2 

4 


14 




17 




51 
37 
34 


6 
4 

4 


45 
33 
30 


25 
59 
24 


3 
1 
6 


22 
58 
18 


89 




57 


Kimball " 


72 
















26 


1 


25 


Franklin " 






















48 


2 


46 


17 


2 


15 


15 
40 




15 






Walker " 


15 


1 


14 


23 


4 


19 


53 


2 


38 








27 


6 


21 


20 


1 


25 


54 


12 


41 








19 


7 


12 








23 


4 


50 












Harriet P Dame School 


11 
45 


1 
9 


10 
36 


4 

14 


4 


4 
10 


12 
14 


1 


22 




12 






Parochial, St. John's 


22 




22 


14 




14 




4 


10 
















24 






" St. Mary's 


18 




18 


19 


1 


18 


27 




24 






" Sacred Heart 


28 


3 


25 


22 


1 


21 


20 




27 








10 


3 


7 










2 


18 














Totals 


406 


53 


353 


261 


24 


237 


574 


43 


521 







■paiuuiS 



am ajojaq :)ii3noiq '0^ 



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uo puuoj a3« lo'oqos 'o^j 



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punoj panoiua ^ou sjumux 



OOO<NCCOC0e0<£)C^as 



•punoj 30U •()>! 



0(MCO«)r-iOOOOi-<ii 



• pauiT!jap 
jtiq'BpioABun asiAvjaqjo -o^j 



C^QOrJ^t^lOOOOfMOOOI 



aiqKtin puB jfDis puuoj •ojj 



1-1 -J< CC 01 o o o 
CO (M i-^ CM CJ -T -p 



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1-1 o ir c) -r 



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t^ l^ O i^ o ?o 



5. s 



■Sjooqas [niqaojCBd 



ClCOCMiOCOi-^Oi^D-T- 



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S S E s S 3 ^ • 
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SCHOOL REPORT. 



143 



STAMP SAVING SYSTEM. 



Eumford School, 
Kimball School, 
Penacook School, 
Walker School, 
Dewey School, 
Franklin School, 
Garrison School, 
Harriet P. Dame School, 
Chandler School, 
Eastman School, 
Merrimack School, 
Tahanto School, 



Saved from 
March 1, 1911 

to 
March 1, 1912. 


Total aiiioimt 

saved since the 

inaugviration ot 

the system. 


$87.01 


$2,121.67 


42.12 


782.06 


106.95 


649.00 


17.34 


430.29 


106.50 


517 50 


47.11 


404.05 


19.10 


247.99 


10.33 


146.11 




106.02 


7.69 


109.20 


17.55 


77.41 




33.19 



$461.70 



$5,630.49 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1911. 

SUMMARY. 



ioys. 



Girls. Total. 



Number of children enumerated 

Decrease since 1910 

Number attending school since 1910 

Number attending public schools 

Number attending parochial schools 

Number attending private sciioois 

Number 5 to 16 not attending school regularly. . . 
Number 5 to 8 not attending school regularly — 
Number 8 to 14 not attending school regularly — 
Number 14 to 16 not attending school regularly... 
Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write the 

English language correctly 

Moved into the district since 1910 



1,500 



1,467 

1,089 

376 

2 

31 

25 

7 

5 





1,694 



1,652 

1,280 

331 

41 

38 

31 



3,194 

51 

3,119 

2,369 

707 

43 

69 

56 

15 

13 

2 
90 



144 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1911. 
Continued. 

NATIVITY OF PARENT. 




American born 

Foreign born 

Russia 

West Indies 

Italy 

New Brunswick 

England 

Poland 

Sweden 

Roiiniania 

Ireland 

Armenia 

French Canadian 

Denmark 

Turkey 

(lermany 

Norway 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 

Finland 

Scotland 

Albania 

Syria 

Brazil 



NATIVITY OF CHILD. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Total. 



American horn 

Foreign born 

Russia 

Italy 

England 

Sweden 

Ireland 

Armenia . . .. 

French Canadian 

Turkey 

Norway 

Prince Edward Island 

Sciilhind 

Albania 

Brazil 

Africa 



1,415 
75 
9 
9 
12 
8 

1 
30 

1 
3 

3 

1 



1,615 

79 

18 

3 



3,035 
154 
27 
12 
20 
16 
1 

54 
1 
1 
6 
1 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



145 



SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
roou!. 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



High School. 

Group I.— Classes 
P, Q. R, S,T. U, V. 



iharles F. Cook., 
iharles E. Moors 



Salter L. Barnum . . 

[ai'old C. Bales 

Jphouso R. Tarr 



Uisabetb Averill 

;dith W. Lawrence.. 

rrace V. Knowles 

lay B. McLani 

.illian Yeatoii 

llizabetli S. Sargent 



[elen L. Brown... 
label L. Warner. 

arris E. Baker... 



Principal 

Sub-master, room 1 

Assistant, lecture 

room 

Assistant, room 2.. 



arrie A. Hood 

delbert H. Adams. 



label L. Seavey... 
[argaret L. Burns. 



Jroup IL— Parker 
School. 

Classes N, O, P. 

(Uella A. Dickerman. 

[abel I. Duri vage 

[elen O. Stephenson. 

[ay L. Ryan 

[ary K.Taylor 

tarion Wood worth.. 

Idna L. Hanson 

rertrude N. Rideout. 



ulia M. Melifant. 
arrie M. Hill 



U.S. History, Civics 

Mathem'tics, Chem- 
istry 

Physics, Mathemat- 
ics 

Economics, Mathe- 
matics 

Com. Arith., Book- 
keeping 

French, German. .. 

French 



Stenography, Type- 
writing, English. 

6.. History 

4.. English 

rooms 12, 13 Mathematics, Biol- 

j ogy 

room 11.. Latin, English 

lu.. Latin, English 



3.. 



Clerk. 



French, History.. . 



Resigned during 
I fall term. 

Clerk Resigned at end of 

spring term. 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 



Principal, room 5.. 
Assistant, room 7. 



Clerk. 



Mathematics, Latin 
English 

Mathematics, Eng- 
lish 

Mathematics, Eng- 
lish 

Com. Hist., Geogra- 
piiy. Penmanship 

English, Ancient 
History 

English, Hygiene, 
History 

French, Mathemat- 
ics 

English, American 
History 



)handler School. 

—Classes M, N. 

[arriet S. Emmons... 

ora T. Fletcher 

lary Flavin 

.da M. Mann 



Resigned at end of 
spring term 



Principal, room 1.. Mathem'tics, Gram- 

I mar, Hygiene 

.\ssistant, " 2..jLit., (Tram,, Latin, 

j Mathematics 

" " 3.. Literature, Latin, 

History, Drawing 

Leave of absence 

' for year. 



?2,300 
1,.300 

1,200 

1,100 

1,000 

900 
800 



800 
800 
800 



10 Pine St. 

13 Rumford St. 

82 School St. (Jericho Cen- 
ter, vt.; 

16 Essex St. (Wilton, N.H.) 

38 Rumford St. (34 Purchase 
St., Newburyport, Mass.) 

6 Liberty St. 

82 School St. (65 Martin St,, 
Cambridge, Mass.) 

90 School St. 

35 Perley St. 

66V2 Nortlf State St. 

101 Center St. 



800 (27 Elm St., Penacook.N.H.) 

75O1I3 Summit Ave. (56 Pros- 

I pect St.,Waltham, Mass.) 

800,111 School St. (Lancaster, 

N. H.) 
350 140 Rumford St. 



1,200 64 South St. 



La. 



700,7 Perry Ave. (Isle 
Motte. Vt.) 

550 7 Perry Ave. (Lowell, Vt.) 
I 

550 16 Holly St. 
I 

550 35^ Liberty St. (No. Cam- 
bridge, Mass.) 

550 93 Warren St. (Weston, 
Mass.) 

650 33 Green St. (Center Har- 
bor. N.H.) 

500 61 Warren St. (Concord 
I Junction, Mass.) 

350 3 Elm St. 



■12.50 6 South State St. 



65041 School St 

I Mass. ) 
650 58 School St. 



(Lawrence, 



10 



146 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Con^mned. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and 
room. 


Grades and sub- 
jects tauglit. 


en ^ 


Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 


Walker School. 










Elizabeth J. Talpey.. 
Garrison School. 


Principal 


Glass N 


$650 


41 Warren St. 








Celia Standish 


Principal 


Classes M, N 


650 


8 Rumford St. 


Eastman School. 










Florence E. George. . . 


Principal 


Classes M. N 

Transfer'd to Chan- 
dler School at end 
of spring term. 


650 


62 Beacon St. 













ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 
Elizabeth J. Talpey . 



Julia G. Clark 

Eva H.Tandy 

Louisa Herbert 

EvelynaD. Boulay. 



Garrison School. 

Celia Standish , 

Margaret T. Kelley. . , 
Bertha L. Holbrook . . 
Mary A. Jones 



Agnes R. Kelley 

Margaret T. Lynch . . . 

Tyla Chaniberlin 

Margaret R. Eastman 

Alice M. M. Phaneuf. 

Eastman School. 
Florence E. George... 

Emma G. Nickerson.. 



Stella M. Frencli.... 
Grace B. Knowltou. 



Principal, room 3. 

Assistant, " 4. 

" " 2. 

" 1. 

Principal, room 5. 
Assistant, " 7. 

" 6. 

" 4. 

" 3. 

" 2. 



Principal, room 1. 



Assistant, 



See High School, 
Group IL 

Classes G, H 

" E,F 

" A, B 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 



See High School, 

(jroup n. 
Classes K, L 



L J. 



E, F, G... 

C, D, E... 
A, B.C.. 



Kindergarten and 

Primary sub 

Piano 



Transferred to Mer- 
riniack Prim, at 
end spring ter)n. 



Classes L, M, N 

See Higii School, 

Group IL 
Classes 3, 4, 5 



2, 3 

Transfer'd to Kim- 
ball School at end 
of spring term 



i;450 32 Church St. 
.500166 High St. 
500 3 Rollins St. 



550 

550 

550 

400 
350 

525 

95 



400 



11 North Spring St. (Wil- 
ton, N. H.) 

542 North State St., Garri- 
son, N. H. 

(152 North Main St., Pena- 
cook, N. H.) 

Harrod St. 

446 North State St., Garri- 
son, N. H. 

2 View St., Garrison, N. H. 

504 North State St., Garri- 
son, N. H. 



Eastside, N. H. (Glouces- 
ter, Mass.) 
Eastside, N. H. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



147 



SCHOOL T KV,\.Y..—Ccmtiimed. 



Names of buildings 
aud teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Kimball School. 

Mary E. Melifant 

Jessie N. Stimson 

Grace B. Knowlton... 
EdnaM. Kennedy ... 

Mary A. Mc(Tuire 

Lottie E. Pearson 

Margaret A. Donovan 

Alice J. Pearl 

Mary Fernald 



Principal, room 6. 
Assistant, " 5. 



Myrta B. Lowe 

Bernice M. i^tearus. 

Florence E. George. 



Laura M. Andrus 



RuMFOKD School 
Elizab'th E.Robertson 
Anna M. Keenan. . 



Elizabeth J. Donovan 

Annette Prescott 

AbbieT. McDonald... 

Fannie B. Lothrop 

Gara E. McQuesteii .. 
Elizabeth M. McAfee. 
Katharine L. Remick 

Maud B. Binet.... 
Florence A. Chandler 
Maud Bethune 



Principal 
Assistant. 



rooms.. 

" 2.. 

" 1.. 
Special, 
room 5 . 

" 5.. 



Merkimack School. 

Harriet C. Kimball. .. 

Viola J. Brock 

Alice M. M. Phaneuf.. 
Agnes V. Sullivan 

Margaret Morrill 

Lottie E. Pearson 



Penacook School. 

Annie M. Brannon 

Clara E. Flanders 

Harriet L. Megrath... 
Cecilia P. Jones 



Franklin School. 

Abbie A. Donovan . . . 

Minnie E. Ladd 

Mary G. Doherty . . . 
Marion E. Haines. ... 



Principal, rooms. 
Assistant, " 4. 



Principal, room 4. 
Assistant, " S. 

" 2. 

" 1. 



Principal, room S. . 
Assistant, room 4. 

" 2. 

•' 1. 



Classes M 

" K, L 

" LJ 

" G, H 

" E,F 

A,B 

" CD........ 

General 

Kindergarten and 

Primary sub 

Kindergarten 

Resigned at end of 

spring term 

Transfer'd to East- 
man School at end 

of spring term 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 



Class L. -Arithme- 
tic, History.. . . 
Class K . — Geogra- 

pliy. History. 
Class J.— Language. 

Classes G,H 

E,F 

" CD 

" A,B 



Kindergarten and 
Primary sub 

Kindergarten 

Leave of absence. . . 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 



Classes K, L 

•' J,K 

A., C 

Kindergarten and 

Primary sub 

Kindergarten 

Transferr'd to Kim- 
ball school at end 
of spring term... 



Class I 

Classes G.H... 

E,F.... 

A, B.C. 



Classes H, I 

" F, G.... 
" D,E.... 
" A, B.C. 



$550 3 Elm St. 
550,9 Holt St. 
500 38 South Spring St. 



550 
550 
550 
300 
300 
500 

375 



lOBlanchard St. 
77 .South State St. 
52 Beacon St. 
•261 North Main St. 
71 Broadway, 
9 Talianto St. 

60 North Spring. 



450 

550 
550 
500 
550 
550 
350 
525 



550 
550 
500 
475 

350 



151 K North State St. 

f93 High St., Penacook, 

N. H.) 
28Thorndike St. 
25 Green St. 
17 Essex St. 
22 North Spring St. 
9 Wall St. 
95 School St. 
4 Fayette St. 

246 North Main St. 



Hopkinton Road. 
99 North State St. 
ftO Rum ford St. 
49 Lyndon St. 

123 North State St. 



550,55 Thorndike St. 
.^00:l2Dunklee St. 
500(H(.oksett, N. H.) 
550 75 South St. 



550 
5.50 
400 
450 



264 North Main St. 
72 Washington St. 
145 No. State St. 
29 Bradley St. 



148 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Contmucd. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 



Grades and sub- 
jects taiiglit. 



^ ^ S 
CO >•' 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Dewey School. 

Addie F. Straw 

Helen L. Southgate... 

Susan M. Little 

Anna D. Shaw 

Alice M. Sargent 

Belle E. Shepard 

Margaret Reed 



Principal, room 6. 
Assistant, " 1. 

" 5. 

" 4. 



Training teacher. . , 
Supervis'r and Kin 

dergarten 

Classes I, J , 

" G,H 

" G 

" A, B 

Kindergarten 



$1,000 
700 

600 
600 
600 
600 



101 North State St. 
2 South Spring St. 

90 School St. 
72 School St. 
78 Warren St. 
6 Liberty St. 



375 9 Pine St. 



TRAINING CLASSES. 

Elementary Grades to K. 

senior class. 

(Graduates June, 1912.) 

Mary Teresa Gannon 7 South Spring St. 

Helen Katherine Hallinan 281 Pleasant St. 

Ada Beatrice Martin 27 Warren St. 

Grace Estella Noyes R. F. D. 5. East Concord. 

Annie Elizabeth Saltmarsh 7 Albin St 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Graduates June, 1913. • 

Ethel Brockway 25 Oak St., Penacook, N. H. 

Mary Agnes Coughlin.. 22 Albin St. 

Mary Margaret Doherty 11 Thorndike St. 

Alice Elizabeth Jackson 80 Allison St. 

Mary Lodema Keniston 4 Railroad Sq. 

Marie Anastasia Scully Little Poud Road. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



149 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Contiwced. 



Names of buildings 
aud teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 



"5 p.^ 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Harriet P. Da.me 
School. 



Nettie M. Bowen. 



Elizabeth T. Nash.. 

Alice M. Swain 

Margaret T. Lynch. 



Tahanto School. 



Sara E. McClure.. . 
Nellie T. Halloran. 
Annie U. Bishop .. 
Frances G. Amee. . 



Cogswell School. 



Mildred I. Cilley 

Eleanor B. Kelley... 
Mary C. Caswell 



Morrill School. 

(Manual Training.) 

Arthur W. French . . . . 

Edward F. Gordon.... 

Raymond P. Gilman.. 

Joseph H. Barber 

Charles P. Nash 

Harry R. L. Chellman, 

Henry F. Oesting 

Arthur L Brock 

Sewing. 

(Parker School.) 

Louise C. Howe 

Martha H. Berry 

Marion L. Stevens 

Cooking. 

(Chandler School.) 

Helen A. Harrington. 

Music. 

Charles S. Coiiant... 



Principal, room 3. 



Classes J, K, L . 



Assistant, 



Principal, room 2.. 

Assistant, " l. 

" 1. 



3, 4 

1, 2 

Transfer'd to Garri- 
son School at end 
of spring term. 



Classes A, C... 
Kindergarten 



Principal, room 1.. 
Assistant, " 2.. 



Resigned at end of 
spring term 



Classes A, B 

" CD 

Resigned at end of 
I spring term. 



Principal, rooms2, 6 

A.ssistant, room 1.. 
" 2, 5 
" 4.. 
" 3.. 
" 3.. 
" 2, A 



Principal 
Assistant . 



Principal. 



Director 



Printing, mouldi'g, 
wood carving, su- 
pervis'n, lectures. 

Machine-shop prac- 
tice. 

Pattern -m aki n g, 
academic work. 

Drawing. 

Elementary wood- 
work. 



Wood-work, forg- 
ing. 

Leave of absence 
for the year. 



High school class. 



High school classes 



$500 (29 Center St.. 'Penacook, 
i N. H.) 
300 R. F. D. 5, Eastside, N. H. 
300 32 Pine St. 



550 

425 
95 



11 Cummings Ave. 
30 Perley St. 
11 Bradley St. 



.550 13 Blake St. 

400 137 South Main St. 



1,600 



12 South Spring St. 



1,000 20 Auburn St. 



800 111 School 
Mass.) 
Ill School 

Mass.) 



700 



St. (Roxbury, 
St. 



(Roxbury, 

800 498 North State St., Garri- 

I son, N. H. 
800 111 School St. (100 Kittredge 

I St., Roslindale, Mass.) 
475'l2V^ South Spring St. (Cam- 
bridge, Mass.) 



650 167 North Main St. 
40032 South Spring St. 
250I3 Church St. 



500 



1,175 



33 Green St. (Toledo, O.) 



61 School St. 



150 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



SCHOOL i:ABL.^.—CoJtclnded. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 



'5 »? 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Drawing. 

Faith C. Stalker 

Military Drill. 
George W. Morrill — 

Janitors. 

Albert W. Thompson. 
Jeremiah S. French .. 

Charles Ada 

Arthur J.Taylor 

Gland M.Blodgett... 
Harry K. Sturm 

Henry D. Robinson. .. 

Frank L. Dudley 

George R. Parmenter. 
Philander C. White.. 
George N. Fellows — 
Mrs. H. P. Robinson.. 
Mrs. Margaret Casey- 



Director 



Instructor 



High and Morrill. 



Parker 

Kimball 

Rumford 

Walker and Merri- 
mack 

Dewey and Frank- 
lin 

Penacook and Cogs- 
well 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Chandler 

Harriet P. Dame. .. 

Tahanto 



I 4 Rumford St. (Worcester, 

I Mass.) 



100 78 Franklin St. 



780 114 South State St. 
546 114 South State St. 
780 5 Chapel St. 
624 6 Avon St. 
624 58 Perley St. 
624 7 Maple St. 



624 
624 



624 



Route 6. 
18 South St. 



4 Highland Road, Garrison. 
3001 Route 5. 
300 8 Warren St. 
■J28 Route6. 
150 11 Waverly St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



151 



a 2 

O 2 






-^ tH 






o t;§ < 






y ■rf'^'u'— ' cO i*? oj'i c.? 



cs oj i s 




^. i,'^ t. s ^ = 

C c a: O^ OJ 



; : : ; ; s- 



i-scoOcc&h'-jEh 



• S .• S , S 

c- <D s oj a aj 

Oj 1< ^ 1. d t« 



o " o 2 o 2 
^ a; 0) 



•T; O-rCTTO 






(P m 0) 

pis:— ^-^ji; 






cs o 
be? 

^ s > 



Jih-ltCQ 



o ? — — oj 
, t. IS ^ m i. 



tj^>^ i;— jjri ".z..---.— .- « — " or_Qf ^ 
« i:«>; 5 * 2--- -<.;:: r::i^t;j;5^*i^® 



bfl O 






152 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





Kind'n. 


ELEMENTARY 


YEAR. 




I 


2 


Class. 


1 and 2. 




A. 




B. 


c. 


D. 




P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


p. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


High 






















Parkor 






















Cogswell 






9 
5 
8 


11 
5 
4 


22 
9 
14 


3 
3 

2 


13 

I) 
12 


4 


4 


11 
12 
11 


. . . 
2 













41 


1 


4 








30 
43 


3 


2 
9 
9 

4 
8 
3 




3 

2 
5 

4 
3 
2 




14 
15 

7 
17 

9 
15 
13 

9 
12 


10 

3 

2 

3 


2 
13 


12 
3 
6 
6 

8 







1 
3 
1 

1 





13 

7 

10 
12 

7 

13 
10 
14 
15 


7 


Dewey 



5 


Merrimack 

Walker 


48 






3 




32 
36 


""6" 


2 


Taliaiito 

Eascniaii 



3 




1 




230 






Total 


4 


57 


39 


156 
~7 


41 
).18 


60 


14 


135 


27 


Per cent, promoted 


98 29 


59.37 


81.08 


83.33 



AVERAGE AGE 



High 












Parker 
















6 yr. 9 in. 

7 1 
6 11 


7 yr 

7 
7 


Cm. 
3 
1 


8yr. im. 


8 vr 

8 

9 




Peiiacook 






Run) ford 


5 yr. 7 m. 


8 2 





Kimball 


4 11 
.'i 2 


7 
7 3 

6 7 

c .5'" 

7 4 

8 3 


7 
6 

7 
7 
7 

C 

7 


3 
10 


1 

2 
6 
4 
9 


9 1 
8 
8 

7 8 


8 
7 
9 
7 
8 
9 
8 
8 
9 


1 
10 






Merrimack 


5 3 


9 




1 


Garrison 


5 5 

5 7 


8 5 


1 






6 











11 








Average 


5 yr. 3 m. 


7yr. m. 


7yr 


1 m. 


8yr. 2 m. 


8 yr 


Gm. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



153 



THE GRADES— JUNE, 1911. 



SCHOOLS. 



3 


4 


5 


6 


E. 


F. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


p. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


































































































13 


6 


15 

18 


6 

7 


15 
12 


7 
3 


16 
16 


7 
2 



22 



3 


31 



6 












15 


19 


3 


48 


9 


11 
5 


4 


2 


26 
17 
17 


5 


2 


13 

11 


1 




18 
21 
10 


4 
5 



17 


28 


2 


2 


26 
21 


3 
1 


10 
12 


4 
2 


36 


3 


14 
















42 


5 


15 


6 


12 
10 



1 


12 



5 



14 
13 


10 
1 




11 



3 


24 
13 


2 

1 


12 
9 


2 
3 




8 


11 


2 










10 

15 


2 

8 










6 
15 

129 


2 
1 






6 




10 
9 


6 




5 






7 
10 


7 



81 


27 


140 


31 


63 


16 


32 


78 


10 


134 


19 


67 


14 


154 


26 


75.00 


81.87 


79.74 


80.12 


88.63 


87.58 


82.71 


85.55 



PER CLASS. 



















































9 yr. 6 m. 


10 y. 9 m. 
10 1 


I0y.l2m. 
11 3 


11 y. 2 m. 
9 10 




12 y. 8 m. 


i4"y. 3 in. 




9 8 


11 y 


8 m. 


9 y. 10m. 








9 1 
9 5 


io 5 
9 
9 6 


io i 


if) 4 

10 10 
10 


11 
li" 


4 


11 6 

12 2 


13 3 

14 


13 5 


8 6 


10 3 










13 3 


9 10 


9 5 
9 6 


10 10 


11 2 
10 10 


.■.■■.:.■■": 


12 5 
11 4 


13 2 
13 




9 6 


11 


9 


12 8 










9 12 
10 10 




11 1 

12 5 





11 10 
13 11 


is "io "' 


13 6 








14 4 








9 yr. 4 m. 


lOy.Om. 


10 y. 8 m. 


lOy.llm. 


11 y. 


7 m. 


12 y. 3 m. 


13 y. 7 m. 


12y.l0m- 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





HIGH 


YEAR. 


7 


8 


Class. 


M. 1 J^. 


O. 


p. 




P. 


N. P. P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. p. 


High 


















Parker 










13 





146 


4 


Cogswell 
































37 


6 
















78 


15 










Kimball 


26 


11 










Dewey 














Franklin 




















35 


3 














Walker 


31 
16 


5 
3 












8 


6 




















Eastman 


6 


7 


2 


1 






















112 


.^■? 














Total 


127 


24 


13 





146 


4 












Per cent, promoted 


77.24 


84.10 


100 


97..^1 





















AVERAGE AGE 



High 










Parker 






15 y. 11m. 


15 y. 10 m. 


Cogswell 








Peiiacook 












11 y. 8 m. 










Uy.lOm. 






Kimball 


14 5 






Dewey 








Franklin 












14 9 








Walker 


14 8 
14 7 






Garrison 


13 11 






Tahanto 






Eastman 


14 


13 11 






Harriet P. Dame 










14 y. 6 m. 






Average 


I3y.})m. 


15y.llm. 


16 y. 10 m 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



155 



THE GRADES— JUNE, 1911. 



SCHOOL. 


9 


10 


11 


Q. 


R. 


s. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


P. 


N. P. P. 


N. P. 


p. 


N.P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. N. P. 




8 


27 


4 


73 


2 


11 


4 


78 





4 



















































































































































































































































































1 


































































8 


27 


4 


73 


2 


11 


4 


78 





4 







87.0P 


97.33 


73.33 


100 


100 

























PER CLASS. 



17 yr. 10 m. 


17 yr. 3 m. 


17 yr. 10 m. 


17 yr. 9 m. 


17 yr. 10 m. 


18 yr. 8 m. 




































































































































































17 yr. 10 m. 


17 yr. 3 m. 


17 yr. 10 m. 


17 yr. 9 m. 


17 yr. 10 m. 


18 yr. 8 m. 



156 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 



YEAR. 


Kindergarten. 


1 


Class. 


1 and 2. 


A. 


B. 




P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


High 


































19 

7 

23 


14 
14 
8 


9 
4 
12 











2 








1 










Kimball 






13 
15 
10 
14 
8 
10 
11 
13 
15 


17 
6 
9 
5 

13 

10 
7 


12 


13 
3 
11 


1 









Franklin 






1 










Walker 






■ "io" 













2 








2 





























Total 






168 


105 


63 


9 














60.07 


87 


50 













AVERAGE AGE 



High 




















6 yr. m. 
6 7 
6 9 


7 yr. 6 m. 






8 3 


Rum ford 




7 10 








Kimball 




6 6 

6 7 
6 4 
6 9 
6 6 
6 7 
6 7 

6 3 

7 6 


8 7 






7 4 


Franklin. 




7 








Walker 






Garri.son 




7 7 






8 4 








Harriet P. Dame 












Average 




6 yr. 7 m. 


7 yr. 9 m. 









SCHOOL REPORT. 



157 



THE GRADES— FEBRUARY, 1912. 



2 


3 


4 


c. 


D. 


E. 


F. 


G. 


H. 


p. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. N.P. 


















































20 


3 
6 
5 


17 

14 


1 




















3 
18 


16 

22 


8 

1 


11 
16 


7 
2 


15 
18 


7 

1 


17 
16 


5 
2 


12 
17 
8 
11 


2 

§ 

1 
1 

1 





14 

10 


5 

10 


21 
13 
18 


5 
1 
3 


14 

14 


2 


1 



22 
22 
14 


2 

3 


15 
8 
6 


2 

2 


12 






13 
18 


3 
1 


isi i 


11 
9 


5 
3 


14 



6 


14 
12 


7 


4 


9 








12 






14 
24 












13 
14 












13 






















152 


226 


62 


20 


59 


22 


77 


13 


138 


21 


76 


17 


87.; 


J5 


75 


60 


87 


84 


85 


55 


86.79 


81.72 



PER YEAR. 



























7 yr. 5 m. 
7 11 


7 yr. 7 m. 










9 yr. 9 m. 
9 10 


9 yr. 10 m. 
10 1 


11 yr. 1 m. 

9 7 


11 yr. 4in. 
11 7 


7 11 


9 


7 9 
7 8 


9 


9 8 

8 4 

9 7 


11 3 


10 9 
10 2 
10 6 


10 4 

11 8 


7 5 
7 5 


9 4 


10 8 


11 4 


7 5 




8 11 

9 10 


9 8 
9 4 


9 8 
10 9 


10 7 


8 5 

8 8 
7 9 

9 4 


9 1 








9 
10 7 




10 6 

11 9 














7 yr. 11 m. 


8 yr. 9 m. 


9 yr. 6 m. 


10 yr. 1 m. 


10 yr. 6 m. 


11 yr. 6 m. 



158 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 



YEAR. 


5 


6 


7 


Class. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


M. 


N. 




P. 


P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N.P 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 


























Parker 






















102 


5 


Cogswell 
























Peiiacook 


27 



5 























Rumford 


30 


4 


33 


3 


33 


6 










Chandler 


70 


30 






Kimball 


17 
26 

17 


4 

12 


20 


4 


42 





24 









Dewev 










Franklin 






















Merrimack.. 


28 





33 




22 













Walker 






45 
12 


1 
4 






Garrison 


13 





11 


3 


12 


5 


6 


4 


7 


1 


Tahanto 




Eastman. 


13 
14 










10 

7 

137 




1 

11 


8 
3 

96 




1 


8 


5 






Harriet P. Dame 






















Total 


127 


21 


89 


11 


n 


135' 40 


109 


6 












Percent, promoted 


85.81 


89.00 


92.56 


95.04 


77.14 


94.78 



AVERAGE AGE 



Hig-h . . 














Parker 












15 y. 2 m. 


















11 y. 5 m. 












Rumford 


12 y. 8 m. 


12 y. 9 m. 


13 y. 8 m. 






Chandler . 




14y. 3in. 




Kimball 


10 9 

11 11 
11 10 


12 1 


12 8 


13 6 










Franklin 












Merrimack 


12 8 


13 3 


13 8 






Walker . 




14 8 
14 1 




Oarrison 


11 7 


12 3 


12 7 


13 4 


13 6 


Tahanto 






11 10 

12 4 




12 7 

13 10 


13 U 

14 7 


13 11 
















Average 


11 y.8m. 


12 y. 5 m. 


12y.llm. 


13 y. 9 m. 


14 y. 2in. 


I4y. 4 m. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



159 



THE GRADES— FEBRUARY, 1912. 



8 


9 


10 


11 


o. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


s. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


p. 


N. P. 


P- 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


p. 


N. p. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 






9 


6 


116 


14 


23 


2 


72 


2 


11 


2 


70 


3 


1 


1 


130 


2 






























































































































































































































































































































































































































__ 


































130 


2 


9 


6 


116 


14 


23 


2 


72 


2 


11 


2 


70 


3 


1 


1 


98.48 


60.00 


89.23 


92.00 


97.29 


84.61 


95.89 


50.00 



PER YEAR. 





16 y. 6 m. 


15y.llm. 


17y.llm. 


16 y. 5 m. 


18 y. 4 m. 


18 y. Om. 


19 y. 2 m. 


15 y 4 m. 






{ : 

















?.::::::: 
















































- 

































5 
















J 
































•i 










































































I8y.0m. 




15 y. 4 m. 


16 y. 6 m. 


ISy.llm. 


17y.llm. 


16 y. 5 m. 


18 y. 4 m. 


19 y. 2 m. 



160 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE DEILLS, 1910-1911. 



High School. 

Sept. 30, ']0. 9.20 a. m., 66 seconds. All doors open. 

Nov. 9, '10. 9.50 a. m., 90 seconds. East door closed. 

stairs closed. 

Jan. 13, '11. 8.45 a. m., 70 seconds. All doors open. 

March 9, '11. 9.00 a. m., 73 seconds. North door closed. 

April 13, '11. 9.22 a. ni., 63 seconds. All doors open. 

May 11, '11. 10.45 a. m., 80 seconds. All doors open. 

Garrison School. 



North 



Oct. 


12. 


60 seconds. 


March 


2 


58 seconds. 


Oct. 


17. 


64 seconds. 


April 


7. 


64 seconds. 


Dec. 


5. 


60 seconds. 


June 


9. 


55 seconds. 



Cogswell School. 



Oct. 3. 25 seconds. 
Nov. 23. 21 seconds. 
Feb. 27. 24 seconds. 



March 13. 20 seconds. 
May 15. 18 seconds. 
June 7. 19 seconds. 



Penacook School. 



Oct. 4. 29 seconds. 
Nov. 1. 30 seconds. 
Jan. 25. 32 seconds. 



March 17. 29 seconds. 
May 11. 31 seconds. 
June 8. 32 seconds. 



Harriet P. Dame School. 



Sept. 29. 30 seconds. 
Dec. 14. 32 seconds. 
March 13. 30 seconds. 



March 17. 30 seconds. 
June 2. 30 seconds. 
June 9. 20 seconds. 



Eastman School. 



Sept. 26. 50 seconds. 
Jan. 25. 32 seconds. 
March 9. 30 seconds. 



April 21. 30 seconds. 
June 13. 32 seconds. 



Tahanto School. 



Oct. 11. 30 seconds. 
Dec. 7. 30 seconds. 
Jan. 24. 30 seconds. 



March 


9. 


20 seconds. 


May 


9. 


20 seconds. 


June 


8. 


30 seconds. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



161 



Franklin School. 



Sept. 20. 40 seconds. 
Nov. 1. 35 seconds. 
Feb. 27. 42 seconds. 



March 24. 39 seconds. 
May 31. 45 seconds. 
June 15. 35 seconds. 



Walker School. 



Sept. 


14. 


85 


seconds. 


March 


13. 


62 seconds. 


Oct. 


4. 


105 


seconds. 


April 


26. 


58 seconds. 


Nov. 


9. 


80 


seconds. 


June 


15. 


65 seconds. 


Jan. 


17. 


70 


seconds. 














Dewey School. 






Oct. 


5. 


55 


seconds. 


March 


3. 


53 seconds. 


Oct. 


6. 


55 


seconds. 


April 


25. 


55 seconds. 


Nov. 


8. 


55 


seconds. 


May 


3. 


55 seconds. 


Feb. 


24. 


55 


seconds. 














Merrimack School. 






Sept. 


16. 


50 


seconds. 


March 


9. 


45 seconds. 


Oct. 


4. 


58 


seconds. 


April 


11. 


42 seconds. 


Nov. 


11. 


40 


seconds. 


June 


15. 


38 seconds. 


Jan. 


25. 


40 


seconds. 

EUMFORD 


School. 






Oct. 


24. 


75 


seconds. 


April 


3. 


82 seconds. 


Nov. 


7. 


80 


seconds. 


May 


23. 


80 seconds. 



Kimball School. 



Oct. 


5. 


70 seconds. 


April 


12. 


60 seconds. 


Oct. 


19. 


70 seconds. 


May 


16. 


65 seconds. 


Nov. 


2. 


75 seconds. 


June 


7. 


70 seconds. 


Nov. 


17. 


70 seconds. 

Chandler 


School. 






Oct. 


18. 


38 seconds. 


Fdb. 


27. 


39 seconds. 


Oct. 


26. 


35 seconds. 


April 


4. 


38 seconds. 


Nov. 


15. 


40 seconds. 


May 


5. 


30 seconds. 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL. 



Graduating Class, 1911. 



Julia Elizabeth Anderson, 
George Wales Allen, 
Leon Will Batchelder, 
Philip Haseltine Blodgett, 
Edward Hale Brooks, 
Lora Merle Brown, 
Kuth Hoit Bugbee, 
Edwin Berry Burgiim, 
George Wilbur Burke, 
Bessie Burroughs, 
Margaret Challis, 
Harley Hammond Chamberlin, 
Janet Angieline Chapman, 
Paul Edward Corriveau, 
Mary Agnes Coughlin, 
Jeannette -Stuart Crowell, 
Eay Edward Crowell, 
Marian Ella Currier, 
Jessica Teresa Danforth, 
Charles Wesley Davis, 
Mildred Ardena Dearborn, 
Carl S. Dimond, 
Mary Margaret Doherty, 
Hannah M. Ducey, 
Walter Edward Dunlap, 
Alfred Henry Dunn, 
Eussell Luther Durgin, 
Margaret Eobertson Eastman, 
Albert Fanny, 
Gladys Helen Farnum, 
Harold Merrill Farrar, 
Francis Burwell Fish, 
Earl Seavey Flanders, 
George Curtis Foster, 
Emily Beatrice Freslmey, 



Theresa Eva Gagnon, 
William Morrill Gale, 
Sara Alice Gannon, 
Ernest Jesse Goodwin, 
Ella Maria Greene, 
Ida Locke Hale, 
Marion Nesmith Hammond, 
Carroll Ashle}' Hastings, 
Inez Adelaide Heilbrun, 
Alice Elizabeth Jackson, 
Dorothy Nowell James, 
Clarence Brooks Keniston, 
Mary Lodema Keniston, 
Robert Norris Kennedy, 
Thomas Joseph King, 
Katherine Louise Leary, 
Mildred Almena Libby, 
Fannie Esther Lincoln, 
Howard Walter Lincoln, 
Walter Edward Maynard, 
Euth Alma Merrill, 
Nell Cumniings Milton, 
Euth Putnam Morse, 
James Murray, 
William Edmund Nash, 
Eleanor Margaret Nolan, 
Josephine Mary Noonan, 
Marjorie Perkins, 
Eleanor Frances Radford, 
Gladys Vera Ray, 
Mary Eliza.beth Reardon, 
Margaret Reed, 
Mildred Eunice Rowe, 
Kathleen Evangeline Rushlow, 
Howard Pierce Sawyer, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



163 



Ella Una Sherburne, 
Eussell Alexander Sims, 
Annie Olga Strandquist, 



Clayton Taylor Waite, 
Edward Marshall Whitaker, 
Bernice Monroe Young. 



Graduating Class, January 26, 1912. 
Amy Gladys Rollins. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Graduating Class, June 15, 1911. 
CHANDLEE SCHOOL. 



James Armstrong, 
Joseph Audet, 
Perla Ball, 
Esther Bennett, 
Cecille Blackstone, 
Myra Bowers, 
Mildred Brown, 
Claire Bracey, 
Ruth Brown, 
Shirlie Burroughs, 
Robert Campbell, 
Porter Chickering, 
Chandler Cavis, 
Leon Cilley, 
Roy Cilley, 
Lucile Cogswell, 
Albert Corriveau, 
Alice Currier, 
Hazel Currier, 
Helen Currier, 
Freida Davis, 
Mary Davis, 
Alfred Diversi, 
Gladys Dole, 
Hazel Emerson, 
Arthur Feltault, 



William Foy, 
Samuel Freshney, 
Lena Frost, 
Evelyn Fulford, 
Joseph Gale, 
Madeline Gibbs, 
Harold Gibson, 
Madeline Gilman, 
Lew Gilmore, 
Rebekah Goldberg, 
Alta Green, 
Woodbury Hagan, 
Lelia Hall, 
Muriel Hall, 
Bertha Halloran, 
Hester Hamilton, 
Mary Harriman, 
Bernard Haynes, 
Proctor Hayward, 
Marion Healey, 
Louise Hook, 
Stark Huntley, 
Elmer Hutchinson, 
Willis Hutchinson, 
Mabel Jewett, 
Helen Jones, 



164 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Alice King, 
Walter Lang, 
Mildred Libby, 
Alphonse Lucier, 
Thomas Mahen, 
Hazel Marston, 
Lottie Marston, 
Azro Maxham, 
Ruth McCaig, 
Lena Ordway, 
Margaret Owen, 
Clarke Pettengill, 
Chase Phelps, 
Eoland Powell, 
Karl Proctor, 
Ella Quinn, 
Mary Eegan, 
Murray Eowe, 
Doris Sanborn, 
Knowlton Sanborn, 
Alice Savage, 



Dora Sherr, 
Ruth Sinclair, 
Edward Smith, 
Wesley Spain, 
Welda Sproat, 
Marion Stuart, 
Alargaret Sweeney, 
Olive Tabor, 
Yvonne Theriault, 
Blanche Thurber, 
Clifford Titcomb, 
Lottie Tittemore, 
Esther Tuttle, 
Cecil Unwin, 
Mary Walker, 
Blanche Whiteher, 
Harry White, 
Harold Wilson, 
Pauline Wright, 
Charlotte Young, 
Electa Young. 



WALKER SCHOOL. 



Joseph Arthur Abbott, 

Elizabeth Babineau, 

Gladys Batchelder, 

Delia Carter, 

Florence Doherty, 

Lida Dunn, 

Edith Ericson, 

Irene Hart, 

Arthur Hardy, 

William Penn Haselton, 

Arthur Harris, 

Alice Hanson, 

Samuel Theodore Holmgren, 

Ralph Kenney, 

Hilda Larson, 

Lena Leavitt, 

Alden Moody, 

John Milne Murray, 



Claire Ardelle Martin, 
Bertha McBain, 
Stella May Marshall, 
Bertha Millette, 
Douglas Newbold, 
Edward Bichette, 
Ragnar Peterson, 
Alice Prescott, 
John Reed, 
Marion Robinson, 
Rupert Robinson, 
Caroline Saben, 
Gladys Saltmarsh, 
Dorothy Sims, 
Marion Smith, 
James Steele, 
Vera Wester, 
Catherine Woods. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



165 



GAEEISON 
Frank IT. Blodgett, 
Walter II. G. Engstrom, 
Hugo E. Ericson, 
Arthur E. Peterson, 
Hugh D. Colby, 
Ellen II. S. Anderson, 
Maud E. Anderson, 
Gerda H. Ekstrom, 
Hulda Ericson, 

Blanche F. 



SCHOOL. 

Eowena M. Holbrook, 
Esther C. Johnson, 
Ijaura Knight, 
Vesta Knight, 
Alice J. Lindgren, 
Helen A. Murphy, 
Ethel G. Noonan, 
Martha Shepard, 
Elizabeth G. Silva, 

Dimond. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



Gertrude A. Haselton, 
Ethelyn M. Sargent, 
Alice M. Spaulding, 



Harold W. Riley, 
Albert M. Sargent, 
Everett J. Spaulding. 



Edith M. Bartlett, 
Inice B. Batchelder, 
Mabel E. Bracey, 
Gladys V. Clark, 
Luna Cushman, 
Hazel A. Deane, 
Hattie M. Dudley, 
Helga E. M. Erickson, 
Leota M. Fenton, 
Vera L. Hall, 
Thelma E. Howland, 
Blanche E. Mills, 
Eva M. Norris, 
Gladys M. Nute, 
Sadie Rabinovit?, 
Esther Reynolds, 
Nellie A. Trail, 
Irene White, 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 

Roger E. Ashley, 
William H. Bailey, 
Frank T. Bean, 
John S. Beane, 
Arthur J. Coyle, 
Leslie W. Gross, 
A. Victor Hudson, 
Joseph Isabelle,* 
Ralph B. Knox, 
Fred J. Laplante, 
Fred W. Lifebey, 
Joseph B. Manning, 
Charles Nelson, 
Gustaf A. Nylen, 
Norman R. Ordway, 
Willard E. Spinney, 
Charles J. White, 
Ralph W. Wilson, 
Irene Williamson, 



Received diploma but not certified. 



166 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 



John Page Amsden, 
Walter Arthur Bagnal, 
Madeline Frances Barry, 
Dorothy Arlena Bateman, 
Dorothy Bourlet, 
Beatrice Elvira Diversi, 
Nella Pia Diversi, 
Thomas Minot Dudley, 
Elcy Mabel Fletcher, 
Margaret Ellen Gannon, 
Esther Louise Garland, 
Charles Andrew Gordon, 
Doris Green, 

Barbara Marseilles 



Eodney William Hill, 
Leslie Henry Jones, 
Dorothy Pierce Kendall, 
Florence Elizabeth Kilburn, 
Joseph Hilliard Lane, 
Chester Linwood Lane, 
Morris Levingston, 
Mario Nicolai, 
Helen Matthews, 
Vincent Currier Newton, 
Frank Ea;ymond Potter, 
Elsie Amy Walker, 
Afton Belle White, 
Robinson. 



MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 



Marian Elizabeth Cass, 

Louise Cileski, 

Ethel Cora Carr, 

Margaret Catherine Drew, 

Golden Elizalbeth Farmanian, 

Clara Annie Hanson, 

Annie Heartz, 

Hazel IsaJbel Howard, 

01 ga Laird, 

Ruth Pike, 



Harriette Quackenbush, 

Eva Quackenbush, 

Bernice Emeline Riford, 

Nellie Tippet, 

Alice Aurora Tremblay, 

Elsie Pearl Waterhouse, 

Roland Dean Crosby, 

Peter Fanny, 

Harley William McCauley, 

Thomas Tippet. 



Graduating Class, January 26, 1912. 
CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



John C. Ahearn, 
Helen J. Barker, 
Leola M. Beers, 
C. Arthur Bergstrom, 
Clare L. Berry, 
G. Marion Brown, 
Eva M. Campbell, 
Ruth L. Campbell, 



Georgia L. Cate, 
Agnes M. M. Cheney, 
Walter J. Clark, 
Jannie Cling, 
Ruth B. Cling, 
William H. Colby, 
Francis B. Cronan, 
John R. W. Crosby, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



167 



Helen H. Davis, 
Euth Day, 
George I. Deshaist, 
Clarence A. Drown, 
Earl E. Fipphen, 
Bernard M. Keniston, 
Ursula F. Kimball, 
Ernest King, 
Florence B. King, 
Eabert G. Knowlton, 
Roger P. Leavitt, 
Euth I. Lemmon, 
Oscar Levingston, 
Eobin U. Macquire, 
John C. Marston, 
Julia E. McFall, 
Euth G. Morgan, 
Ethel M. Moulton, 
Edwin N. Olson, 
Karl E. Flanders, 
Paul B. Flanders, 
Daniel Flint, 
Doris E. Fowler, 
Laura I. Foote, 
George E. Gilpatrick, 
Euth H. Gonyer, 
Gladys Goodrich, 



C. Eoss Gourley, 
Edith E. Hall, 
Gladys M. Haskell, 
Maurice E. Hatch, 
Francis X. Henry, 
George K. Harvey, 
Emma B. Hill, 
Stuart B. Holbrook, 
Edith M. Holmes, 
Nellie M. Houston, 
Philip H. Hutchinson, 
Margaret B. Jackson, 
Hazel E. Jones, 
Harold H. Owen, 
Eichard M. Pearson, 
Doris A. Eamsay, 
Mae M. Eogers, 
Rosalind W. Eolfe, 
Bernice C. Silver, 
Lawrence M. Smith, 
William A. Stevens, 
Flora M. Stevens, 
Foster E. Sturtevant, 
Olive B. Sweatt, 
Henry O. Swenson, 
Sylvia F. Waldman, 
Euth H. Wilcox. 



WALKEE SCHOOL. 



Evelyn Cate Atwood, 
Doris Aurelia Baxter, 
Clara Anna Barrett, 
Eachel Eice Bugbee, 
John Edward Blair, 
Harriet Elizabeth Callahan, 
Charles Alfred Crutehfield, 
Walter Bryant Dame, 
Martha Sugden Dolloff, 
Alida Olivia Dufresne, 
Dolphice Wilfred Dufraine, 
Lillian Edmunds, 



Clara Caroline Evans, 
Eichard John Evans, 
Mary Veronica Farmanian, 
Eobert Arthur George, 
Kenneth Badger Hurd, 
Elsa Eosella Johnson, 
Edith Victoria Larson, 
pjdith Lora LeBlanc, 
Joseph Mederiek LeBlanc, 
Euth Isabel Lamprey, 
Walter Chester Osgood, 
Winfield John Phillips, 



168 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Margaret Louise Saltmarsh, 
Alfred Henderson Sawyer, 
Charlotte Mary Sawyer, 
Robert Cushman Sawyer, 
Leonise Velma Scott, 
Elmer James Smith, 
Evelyn Esther Smith, 
Lester Hutchins Smith, 
Julius Cecil Sturm, 

Euth 



Arthur Albert Tremblay, 
Milton Re^niolds Vose, 
Herbert Walker, 
Alice Marguerite Warren, 
Alice Frances Waterhouse, 
Winifred Josephine Welch, 
Edna Alice White, 
Gladys May Wilcox, 
Mary Elizabeth Willis, 
Potter Wirrell. 



Harry C. Anderson, 
Bernhard C. Ericson, 
Harry E. Woodman, 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 

Judith R. Lawson, 
Hildur S. Nordstrom, 
Eva D. Rossell, 
Mildred E. Ryan. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



Francis E. Chase, 
Lloyd W. Fairfield, 
Guy E. Griffin, 
Louise M. Charaberlin, 



Emeline P. Gage, 
Elizabeth I. Gardner, 
Annie M. Latouche, 
Edna E. Murray. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



169 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



William A. Blanchette, 
Lora M. Brown (2), 
Edwin B. Burgum, 
George W. Burke, 
Eeginald W. Crosby, 
Leland W. Davis, 
Mildred A. Dearborn, 
Florence E. Durgin, 
Charlotte C. Hammoud (2), 
Shirley W. Harvey, 
Kachel P. Harwood, 
Percy E. Holbrook (2), 
Frank W. Home, 
Mary L. Keniston (2), 



Rudolph A. Larson, 
Mildred E. Libbey, 
Fannie E. Lincoln (2), 
Euth A. Merrill (3), 
Pearl L. Moffitt (2), 
Vivien E. Morgan (3), 
Margaret E. Morrison (2), 
Josephine M. Noonan, 
Lillian M. Phaueuf (2), 
Eleanor F. Eadford (4), 
Copley M. Eundlett, 
James S. Stevens, 
Marion A. Winch, 
Margaret M. Worthington. 



Edmund Adams, 
Leon Doherty, 
Paul Donovan, 
Harold Eastman, 
Eene Feltault, 
Leslie Frost, 
Marjorie Hill, 
Edith Marden, 
Mildred Morgan, 



PARKER SCHOOL. 

Nina Nash, 
Frances O'Brien, 
Hannah Reardon, 
Edna Robinson, 
Wendall Scott, 
Clara Sewall, 
Maud Sims, 
Harry Strandquist, 
Edward Tebeau, 
Mark Yea don. 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



Joseph Audet, 
Myra E. Bowers, 
Mildred E. Brown, 
Shirlie A. Burroughs, 
Robert R. Campbell, 
Hazel H. Emerson, 
Evelyn D. Fulford, 
Alta G. Green, 
Lelia M. Hall, 
Mary E. Harriman, 



Bernard D. Haynes, 
Louise G. Hook, 
Alice I. King, 
Walter E. Lang, 
Mildred E. Libby, 
Roland A. Powell, 
Alice M. Savage, 
Edward H. Smith, 
Harold Wilson, 
Charlotte Young. 



170 



Irene Hart, 
Kalph Kenney, 
Douglas Newbold, 
Emanus Brusa (2), 
Ida Larson (2), 
Bertha Roach, 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
WALKER SCHOOL. 



Axel Anderson, 
Carl Johnson, 
Peter Pralgio, 
Ivy Eobbins, 
Ernest Levesque, 
Mary L. Hall. 



HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 



Harold G. Arlin, 
Dorothy Robinson, 



Edwin Robinson, 
Margaret G. Robinson, 
Oscar Parenteau. 



TAHANTO SCHOOL. 

Antonio Pralgio, Ralph W. Walters, 

William King. 



COGSWELL SCHOOL. 

A'^ivien Heath, Marion Wason, 

Joseph Brooks, 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 



Ellen H. S. Anderson, 
Harry C. Anderson (2), 
Frank H. Blodgett, 
Gerda H. Ekstrom, 
Walter H. G. Engstrom, 



Hugo E. Ericson, 
Ethel G. Noonan, 
Arthur F. Henry, 
Arthur Nordstrom, 
Carl A. Anderson. 



Nathaniel Gardner, 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

Dorothy W. Morrison, 
Dana S. Morrison. 



Edith M. Bartlett, 
Gladys V. Clark, 
T.eota Fenton, 
Thelma Howland, 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 



Nellie M. Trail, 
Irene E. Williamson, 
Frank T. Bean, 
Leslie Gross, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



171 



Ealph B. Knox, 
Fred W. Libbey, 
Dorothy A. Gross, 
Glenda E. Merrill, 
Katharine M. Cronan, 
Robert P. Button (2), 
Lloyd D. Nutting, 
Gustaf Nylen, 
Leola M. Beers, 



Ruth G. Converse, 
Lucy B. Donovan, 
Maud F. Green, 
Estelle E. Plummer, 
Doris P. Bartlett, 
Anna M. Drouin, 
Ralph W. Hearson, 
Grace B. Lull, 
Ruth G. Morgan, 
George E. Wooster. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 



James H. Hill, 
Vincent C. Newton, 
F. Raymond Potter, 
Madeline F. Barry, 
Dorothy Bourlet, 
Margaret E. Gannon, 



Roger E. Garland, 
Louise Home (2), 
John H. B. Mills, 
Raymond L. Piper, 
Lillian A. Haggett, 
Elvira B. Dillon. 



MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

Evelyn Brunell, Garfield Reed, 

Kathryn Cheney, Ai Ritchie, 

Agnes Moberg, Harold Whitcomb, 

Harry Cochran, Rachel E. Bugbee, 

Stanley Clark, Alfred C. Crutchfield, 

Harold Kenney, John E. Branswell, 

Charles Moberg, Philip E. Stohrer, 

Earl Pendleton, D. Harland Cass, 

Dorothy Moberg. 



Hugh Cruikshank, 
Helen Bunker, 
George Bergstrom, 



PENACOOK SCHOOL. 



Irene Lord, 

Harry Levin, 

H. Horton Cameron (3). 



Altha E. Walker, 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

Rhoda F. Reilly, 
Anne J. Dixon. 



172 



Marion E. Cass (2), 
Marion Vose, 
Harriett I. Albee (2), 
Vema I. Corser, 
Paul O. Davis, 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

DEWEY SCHOOL. 

Euth E. Dearborn, 
Cornelia H. Kimball, 
Forrest Proctor, 
Edward Twomey (2), 
Elizabeth Twomey (5), 
H. Giflford Wood. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 173 

HONOR LISTS. 

Fob the Year 1910-1911. 

Names of pupils in Union School District who attained a mark of 
(A — ) or better during the year. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

CLASS V. 

Edwin B. Burgum, Marian E. Currier, Gladys Eay. 

CLASS T. 

Charles H. Dudley, Neil A. Sargent, Marion A, Winch. 
PAEKER SCHOOL. 



Edmund Adams, Ethel Andrews, Clarence Batchelder, Horton 
Chandler, Willougbby Colby, Mira Crowell, Leon Doherty, Paul Dono- 
van, Eva Eastman, Louise Fletcher, Heman Fogg, Leslie Frost, Frieda 
Goldberg, Marjorie Hill, Marion Hodges, Katharine Hurd, Abraham 
Kaufman, Elsie Kendall, Richard Kimball, Shirlie Macguire, Jane 
Mathews, Osmond McLeod, Mildred Morgan, Agnes Murphy, Naomi 
Quinn, Marion Sawyer, Wendell Scott, Harry Strandquist, Edward 
Tebeau, Leland Wildes, Doris Williamson. 

CPIANDLER SCHOOL. 

CLASS N. 

Myra Bowers, Gladys Dole, Madeline Gilman, Rebekah Goldberg, 
Mabel Huckins, Margaret Owens, Charlotte Young. 

GARRISON SCHOOL. 

CLASS N. 

Frank H. Blodgett, Blanche F. Dimond, Walter H. G. Engstrom, 
Gerda H. Engstrom, Hugo E. Ericson, Rowena M. Holbrook, Alice J. 
Lindgren, Helen A. Murphy, Elizabeth G. Silva, Hulda Ericson. 

CLASS M. 

Judith R. Larson, Eva D. Rossell. 



174 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WALKER SCHOOL. 

CLASS N. 

J. Arthur Abbott, Edith Ericson, Arthur Harris, Irene Hart, Ralph 
Kenney, Lena Leavitt, Claire Martin, Catherine Woods. 

KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

CLASS M. 

John P. Amsden, Thomas M. Dudley, Joseph II. Lane, Margaret E. 
Gannon, Dorothy P. Kendall. 

RUMFORD SCHOOL. 

CLASS M. 

Willard Spinney, Nellie Trail. 

MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

CLASS M. 

Perley Baker, Harry Cochran, Kathryn Cheney, Harold Hood, 
Harold Kenney, Frederick Marden, Earl Pendleton, Bertha Stevens, 
Winifred Phillips, Harold Whiteomb. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Names of i)upils who have attained a rank of (B — ) or better intheir 
studies for the past school year. 



WALKER SCHOOL. 

CLASS K. 

Annie Heartz, Hazel Howard, TIarley McCauley, Emma Piehette, 
Nellie Tippet, Thomas Tippet. 



Eleanor Bailey, Emma Brunelle, Emmanus Brusa, Harold Fraser, 
Esther Holmgren, Ida Larson, Esquirien Najarian, Ross Lovejoy, 
Oliver Reno, Helen Tebeau, Rupert LaBelle, Earl Preseott. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 175 



CLASS H. 



Mildred C. Byers, Jeannine L. Bourke, Alice Carlson, Melvin P. 
Crowell, Bertha M. Fraser, Lydia M. King, Sating A. Najarian, 
Charles F. Shepard, Everett White. 



William C. Goldsmith, Florence M. Hunt, Florence M. Lueier, 
Lillian M. Morley. 



Alice Boley, Edward T. Grant, Hige Najarian, Mary A. Otis, Mil- 
dred Patterson, Doris E. Sturm, Krekor Shaterian, Mary Trnchon. 



Blanch Austin, Ida Fortunato, Charles Guy, Edith Heartz, Agnes 
Johnson, Dorilla Levesque, Harry Morley, Charles Bobbins, Nathaniel 
Sawyer. 

DEWEY SCHOOL. 

CLASS K. 

Bradley L. Baker, Dorothy E. Brown, Marion F. Cheney, Paulina 
B. Davies, Margaret W. Teague, F. Everett Moberg. 



William J. Angwin, Miriam Batehelder, Harry N. Kinlball, Eliza- 
beth S. McBain, Anna Murphy, Euth Peckham, Eowland P. Rhodes, 
Marion Vose, Elsie Waterhouse. 



Grace Patch, Annie Morono, Gladys Phillips, George R. Walker, 
E. Follis Wall, Mary A. Shannon, Helen Rhodes, Cornelia H. Kim- 
ball, Parker Huntington, Abbie V. Hall, Francis Crowley. 



Margaret Wall, Leslie Dixon, Madeline Vose, Eric Sandquist, Nellie 
M. Riford, Dorothy H. Clark, M. Phyllis Carpenter, Aubrey Brown, 
Harriett I. Albee, Chester T. Adams. 



176 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FEANKLIN SCHOOL. 

CLASS I. 

Helen Bailey, Ellen Lamprey, Gladys S. Evans, Angeline Olgiati, 
Winnie I. Ramsay, Marjorie M. Newbold, Marjorie M. Carter, Eldon 
W. Heartz, Frank E. Stohrer, Marion Cochran. 



Louise H. Guyol, Altha E. Walker, Ethel Felton, Herbert J. 
Stevens, Marion E. Whitcomb, Laura D. Phillips. 

CLASS G. 

Dorothy Lauder, Theresa M. Guiena, Gladys M. Leighton, Ethel M. 
Nudd, George L. Boulay, Theodore Morrison. 



Helen K. Morrison, Louise M. Guiena, Edith L. Ford, Katharine E. 
Crabbe, Elizabeth C. Houser, Jennie P. Kemp, Euth A. Leavitt, 
Arthur G. Ledward. 



Carol Angwin, Earl Brunell, Ansel Dixon, Elizabeth Dyment, Helen 
Hartshorn, Antonio Rossi, Rhoda Reilly, Edna Smith. 

GARRISON SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

Mildred Anderson, Carl Carlson, Maxwell Clarke, Errol Da\ds, 
Beatrice Persons, Ruth Swanson, Hilia Silva. 



Lila Clarke, Chandler Eastman, Hilma Jlokenson, Marjorie Knight, 
Clary Lindgren, Ada iTatthcws, Raymond Manning. 



Nannie Dahlgren, Dorothy Chase, Cora Clarke, Elmer Anderson, 
Redfield Anderson, Amelia Pollard, Roger Eastman, Arthur Henry, 
Nora Cotter, Ralph Weldon, Florence Prescott. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 177 



Frederick Eossell, Ida Carlson, Mary Murphy, George Johnson, 
Harold Ericson, Carl Eckstrom. 

CLASS H. 

Fritz H. Gustafson, Robert A. Clarke. 

MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

Charlotte Sawyer, Mary Willis, Ruth I. Wirrell, Gladys M. Will- 
cox, Margaret A. Warren, Herbert Walker, Arthur Frembley, Julius 
C. Sturm, Elmer R. Smith, EveljTi E. Smith, Ruth I. Lamprey, Edith 
li. LeBlanc, Medie J. LeBlanc, Mary Farmanian, Clara E. Evans, 
Dolphice W. Dufresne, Abbie R. Carter, Alfred C. Crutchfield, John 
E. Blair, Rachel R. Bugbee, Clara A. Barrett, Evelyn C. Atwood. 

KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

George K. Harvey, Francis H. Henry, Bernard M. Keniston, Robert 
G. Knowlton, Oscar Levingston, Harold H. Owen, Wells E. Tenney, 
Arthur R. Cole, Mildred A. Cheney, Dorothy A. Hall, Edith E. Hall, 
Dorothy M. Hook, Helen H. Davis, Ursula F. Kimball, Helen J. 
Barker, Aurora E. Langlois, Hazel M.Martin, Robin U.Macguire. Julia 
R. McFall, Rebecca M. Merrill, Ruth H. Gonyer, Mary E. Robinson, 
Ruth H. Yandemark, Alice F. Waterhouse. 

CLASS K. 

Edna B. Chandler, Ethel C. Sullivan. 

CLASS J. 

Robert W. Cook, William E. Gordon, Lawrence Kimball, Harry A. 
Morrison, Kathleen Bateman, Helen E. Dow, Evelyn Fowler, Eva M. 
Haines, Frances Heath, Maud M. Parkhurst, Gertrude Robinson, Lois 
Rundlett, Florence Thurston. 

CLASS I. 

Elizabeth B. Adams, Rachael S. Barker, Dorothy W. Daggett, Hilda 
Hall, Ruby W. Lawrence, Annabell Walker. 

12 



178 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Rachel G. Andrews, Marion Colby, Gladys L. Currier, Ruth H. 
Kil>by, Pauline M. Lane, M. Charlene L. Pettengill, Doris G. White. 

CLASS G. 

Elizabeth Benton, George F. Clark, Gwendoline B. Goodwin, Philip 
B. Gove, Shirley W. Jones, Raymond D. Moore, Charles J. Silverman. 



Paul H. Burroughs, Dean R. Colton, Croghan G. Gault, Clayton C. 
Gordon, Harold E. Lovejoy, Nattie F. Silverman, Charles D. Waldron, 
Blanche E. Walker. 



Elvira P. Dillon, Humphrey J. Emery, Mary G. Hillsgrove, Gwen- 
dolyn Jones, Wendall Kimball, Edmund Laport, Milton Shapiro. 

HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

William Colby, Clarence Drown, Laura Foote, George Gilpatrick, 
Rassio Parenteau, Albert Tonkin, Sylvia Waldman. 

CLASS K. 

Harland Baker, William Giddis, Doris Merrill. 

GRADE V. 

Edward Blanchette, Franklin Goodsell, Ida King, John Richardson, 
Jane Tonkin. 



Mary Champigny, George Colby, Edith Giddis, Robert Hillsgrove, 
AA'^alter Plummer, Lily Roland, Arthur Stickney, Bessie Waldman, 
Harold Welch. 



Ernest Ash, Ellen Blanchette, Ethel Blanchette, Lillian Blanchette, 
Emma Boulay, Harry Anderson, Ellen Grant, Nathalie McDonnell, 
Dorothy Robinson, Ruth Robinson, Elizabeth Tonkin. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 179 

PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

CLASS J. 

Grace Beaulac, Everett Burney, Elmer Brown, Leroy Brown, Emer- 
son Ellis, George Houston, Arthur Lyford, Rita Preble, Earl Sawyer. 

CLASS H. 

Irene Lord, Frances Wason. 

CLASS G. 
Irene Dudley, Emma Jones, Dorothy Kendall, Gertrude Ravitch. 

CLASS F. 

Arlene Booth, Webster Bridges, Edgar Jewett, Ruth Lyford, Carl 
Magnuson, Lillian Hearson, Catherine Hoyt, Leona McCaffrey, Annie 
Wilson, Frank Wright. 



Sally Clement, Carl Harris, Eugene Maxam, Iva Floyd, Stewart 
Lyford, William Tucker. 

EUMFORD SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

Rosalind Rolfe, Bernice Silver, Eva Campbell, Leola Beers, Olive 
Sweat, Maud Green, Doris Fowler, Hazel Mansfield, John Ahearn, 
Clare Berry, Arthur Bergstrom, Maurice Hatch, Paul Flanders, Henry 
Swenson, Walter J. Baker, Hiram F. Battey, Ruth Day, Earl E. 
Fipphen, Nellie M. Houston, Frank S. Merrill, Richard Pearson, Doris 
A. Ramsay, Foster E. Sturtevant. 

CLASS K. 

Ralph E. Blake, Dorothy F. Booth, Anna M. Drouin, Ernest Ham- 
mar, Harry F. Koehler, Goldie V. E. Morrieon. 



Ernest H. West, Mildred D. Maxham, George E. Young, Benjamin 
S. Cohen, Louise A. Durrell, Judith E. Hammar, Guy E. Tabor, Ernest 
I. Heath, Myrtle A. Hartford, Arleen B. Crossley. 



180 CITY OP CONCORD. 



CLASS H. 



C. Fred Moulton, Ernest S. Beck, Lloyd M. Chamberlin, Arthur E. 
Kumberger, Helen A. Morgan, Nina Eamsay, Eachel E. George. 



Dorothy A. Gross, Arthur L. Copp, A. Leslie Ellis, Daniel W. Howe, 
J. Stafford Connors, Harold W. Winslow. 



Otto K. Knopp, Louise Struthers, Sadie G. Ash, Field C. Perry, 
Ethel J. Eobinson, Margaret L. Osgood, Winnifred Curran, Pearl 
Goldman, J. Emile Cote, Priscilla Wood. 

CLASS E. 

Helen G. Miller, Annie Voneski, Katharine M. Cronan, Edith M. 
Unwin, Willis J. Sawyer, Eddie N. Cohen, Oliver E. Bennott, Lloyd 
D. Nutting, Euth E. Johnson, Henry M. Clay, Myer G. Baer. 

EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

Albena L. Gebo, Guy E. Griffin. 

CLASS J. 

Eaymond Chamberlin, Nyrum C. Chesley, Parker Little, Frank E. 
Muzzey, Eobert Spaulding, Kathleen M. Sargent, Euth E. Sargent. 



Amelia F. Fanny, Esther S. Haselton, Mildred S. Haselton, Euth C. 
Staniels. 

GRADE III. 

Doris H. Chamberlin, Elizabeth E. Gushing, George V. Lacroix, 
Dorothy E. Maynard, Evelyn McAlpine, Dorothy W. Morrison. 



MEMORIAL DAY OFFERING, MAY. 191 



Rumford School $11.77 

Kimball School 10.69 

High School 6.50 

Chandler School 5.64 

Garrison School ......... 5.14 

Walker School 4.72 

Penacook School ......... 4.72 

Dewey School ......... 4.68 

Franklin School 4.42 

St. John's School (Bradley Street) 4,19 

Merrimack School . . 4.11 

Sacred Heart School (South Main Street) . . . , 3.78 

Cogswell School 3.46 

Parker School 3.42 

Eastman School ......... 2.30 

Harriet P. Dame School 1.63 

Tahanto School 1.02 

$82.19 



TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, AT PHENIX HALL, 

Thursday Evening, March 14, 1912, 

AT EIGHT o'clock. 



PROGRAM 

ORIGINAL DECLAMATION— High School— Groups 1 and 2 

1. Something Old and Something New 

ELSIE FRANCES KENDALL '14 

2. A Belated Conscience 

JOHN MILNE MURRAY — '15 

3. The Problem of a Wayward Boy 

RUTH MILDRED GARLAND '13 

4. The Cultural and the Practical Values of Manual Training 

HOLLAND RICH GOVE — '12 

Chorus— " Clickety-Click March" Fred T. Baker 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION— High School— Group 2 

1. "The American Flag" Henry Ward Beecher 

EMELINE PAGE GAGE, EASTMAN SCHOOL 

2. ' ' Gustavus, King of Sweden, to his Soldiers ' ' 

Pierre Francois Lefevre 

LOUIS ROGERS MARTIN, GARRISON SCHOOL 

3. "Elements of Eoosevelt 's Greatness" Anorii/moris 

ELMER JAMES SMITH, WALKER SCHOOL 

4. "Paul Revere 's Ride" William Curtis 

HAROLD HOLMES OWEN, CHANDLER SCHOOL 
Folk Songs: 

a — ' ' My Mammy 's Voice ' ' Loomis 

&— "Old Black Joe" Foster 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION -High School-Group 2 

1. "Mary Elizabeth" Elizabeth Stuart Phelps 

HELEN JEANETTE BARKER, CHANDLER SCHOOL 

2. "An Object of Love" Mary E. Wilkins 

EDNA ALICE WHITE, WALKER SCHOOL 

3 "Kentucky Philosophy" Aiwiiymotis 

JUDITH RUTH LAWSON, GARRISON SCHOOL 

4. "Papa and the Boy" Anonymous 

ATJJENA LYDIA GEBO, EASTMAN SCHOOL 

Chorus — ' ' Forget-me-not ' ' — Gavotte Th. Giese 

Extra musical number: 
Chorus — ' ' Blue Danube Waltzes ' ' J. Strauss 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



183 



AWARD OF PRIZES 

Original Declamation — High School, groups 1 and 2. 

First prize, $15, awarded to Ruth Mildred Garland, '13. 
Second prize, $10, awarded to Elsie Frances Kendall, '14. 

Forensic Declamation — High School, group 2. 

First prize, $6, awarded to Louis Rogers Martin, '16. 
Second prize, $4, awarded to Harold Holmes Owen, '16. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — High School, group 2. 

First prize, $6, awarded to Helen Jeanette Barker, '16. 
Second prize, $4, awarded to Edna Alice White, '16. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Prof. Thomas W. D. Worthen, Hanover, N. H. 
Prof. William W. Flint, Concord, N. H. 
Prof. George H. Harmon, Penacook, N. H. 



PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 

RECEIVED. 



Balance from last year 's account, 
Interest on same to January 1, 1912, 
Sale of 544 tickets at 35 cents. 



$2,536.56 

99.64 

190.40 

$2,826.60 



EXPENDED. 

Rent of Phenix Hall and piano, $20.00 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services, 50.00 

Programs, 4.25 

Prizes, including books, 51.75 

George R. Pearce, printing and selling tickets, 8.75 

Phiglish Composition prices and expense. High School, 39.75 
E. M. Proctor, transporting, putting up and taking down 

seats, 10.00 

Schoolroom decoration, 10.00 

Miscellaneous expense, moving chairs, 1.50 

Balance on hand as a guarantee for future contests, 2,630.60 



$2,826.60 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inliahitants of Union School District in Concord, N. 
TI., qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium, on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the thirtieth day of March, 
1911, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the fol- 
lowing subjects: 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years, to fill vacancies arising from 
the expiration of the term of office of Dennis E. Sullivan, 
Fanny E. Minot, and Omar S. Swenson, and to fill any 
other vacancies that may occur in said board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors and all other neces- 
sary officers for the ensuing year. 

G. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year, 
including industrial education, military drill, night school 
and medical inspection. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for occasional and extraordinary repairs of the 
school buildings during the ensuing year. 

9. To see if the district will authorize the Board of Edu- 
cation to sell the Union Street schoolhouse and lot on Union 



SCHOOL REPORT. 185 

Street, and the Bow Brook schoolhouse and lot on Warren 
Street, either by public action or by private sale. 

10, To transact any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this eleventh day of March, 1911. 

JOHN VANNEVAR, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OIVIAR S. SWENSON, 
WILLIAI\I H. SAWYER, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
EDWARD C. NILES, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 

1 certify that on the fifteenth day of March, 1911, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant, attested by the Board 
of Education of said district, at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copy at the police station in the 
city of Concord, N. H., being a public place in said district. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 

Personally appeared before me, on this date, the said 
Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certificate 
by him signed is true. 

GEORGE N. FELLOWS, 

Justice of the Peace. 

A true copy of the warrant, return of service, and cer- 
tificate of the oath. 

Attest: LOUIS C. MERRILL, 

Clerk. 



186 CITY OP CONCORD. 

ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING. 

Concord, N. H., March 30, 1911. 

Agreeable to the foregoing warrant, a meeting of the 
legal voters of Union School District was held at the 
Auditorium, in the city of Concord, N. H., on March 30, 
1911, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening. 

The meeting was called to order by the moderator, John 
B. Abbott, who read the foregoing warrant. 

ARTiciiE 1. The moderator called for votes for mod- 
erator and H. II. Dudley moved the clerk cast one vote for 
John B. Abbott for moderator for the ensuing year, and it 
was so voted. The clerk cast the vote as directed and John 
B. Abbott having the only vote cast, was declared elected 
moderator, and was duly sworn by Louis C. Merrill, jus- 
tice of the peace. 

Art. 2. H. H. Metcalf moved the moderator cast one 
vote for Louis C. Merrill for clerk, and it was so voted. 

The moderator cast the vote and declared Louis C. Mer- 
rill elected clerk for the ensuing year, and was duly sworn 
by William li. Sawyer, justice of the peace. 

Art. 3. Henry C. Morrison moved to dispense with the 
reading of the report of the Board of Education, and the 
report, as printed, be accepted. Motion carried. 

Art. 4. William H. Sawyer moved to proceed to ballot 
for three members of the Board of Education for three years, 
all the names to be on one ticket and that the polls be 
kept open until 7.50 o'clock, and it was so voted. Mod- 
erator declaring the polls open. 

Edward C. Niles moved to take up the other articles 
of the warrant. Motion carried. 

Art. 5. Harry H. Dudley moved the clerk cast one vote 
for John P. George and Henry H. Metcalf as auditors for 
the ensuing year; motion carried; the clerk cast the vote 



SCHOOL REPORT. 187 

as directed and John P. George and Henry H. Metcalf 
were declared elected as auditors. 

Art. 6. W. D. Thompson offered the following resolu- 
tion and moved its adoption : 

Resolved, That there be raised by tax on the polls and 
ratable estates within Union School District the sum of 
twelve thousand nine hundred fifty dollars ($12,950), of 
which sum seven thousand dollars ($7,000) shall be appro- 
priated for the payment of bonds maturing October 1, 
1911, and five thousand nine hundred fifty dollars ($5,950) 
for the payment of the interest on its funded debt accruing 
during the year. 

Art. 7. Thomas G. Norris submitted the following reso- 
lution and moved its adoption : 

Resolved, That there shall be raised by tax on the polls 
and ratable estates within Union School District, for the 
support of schools for the ensuing year, such a sum as in 
addition to the sum assigned to the district by the city of 
Concord out of the appropriation for schools will amount 
to the sum of eighty-five thousand eight hundred twenty- 
six and seventy-two hundredths dollars ($85,826.72). 

Mr. Norris' motion was seconded, a vote taken and reso- 
lution declared adopted. 

Art. 8. H. H. Metcalf moved to pass over this article, 
and it was so voted. 

Art. 9. H. H. Metcalf moved that the Board of Edu- 
cation be authorized to sell the Union Street schoolhouse 
and lot on Union Street and the Bow Brook schoolhouse and 
lot on Warren Street either by public auction or by pri- 
vate sale. 

A vote was taken and the motion prevailed. 

The moderator declared the polls closed at 7.50 o'clock 
and appointed Henry H. Chase to assist in sorting and 
counting the votes. 



188 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Moderator declared the ballot as follows: 

Whole number of votes cast, 59 

Necessary for choice, 30 

Dennis E. Sullivan had 55 

Omar S. Swenson had 57 

Fanny E. Minot had 59 

and Dennis E. Sullivan, Omar S. Swenson and Fanny E. 
Minot were declared elected members of the Board of Edu- 
cation for three years. 

Art. 10. No business being presented, the article was 
passed. 

Mr. Dennis E. Sullivan appeared and was duly, sworn 
as a member of the Board of Education before Louis C. 
Merrill, justice of the peace. 

On motion of Mayor Charles J. French it was voted to 
adjourn. 

A true record. Attest: 

LOUIS C. MERRILL, 

Clerk. 



Town School District Treasurer's Report. 



The treasurer of the Town School District of the city of 
Concord respectfully submits the following report of the 
receipts and expenditures for the year ending March, 1912 : 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand March 7, 1911, $244.99 

Amount required by law, 2,804.70 

Additional voted by the district, 2,000.00 

Books and scholars' supplies, 197.50 

Books and scholars' supplies, overdraft from 

city, 30.79 

Literary fund, 122.46 

Amount received for support of schools from 

dog licenses, 90.16 
Amount received from Walker fund, 2.26 
Kebate on tuition from Union District, 10.08 
Error in order from school board, 5.00 
Amount from state treasury towards superin- 
tendent's salary, 266.66 



Total receipts, $5,774.60 

EXPENDITURES. 

Teachers' salaries, $2,932.00 

Text-books and supplies, 192.91 

Fuel, 165.91 

Tuition, Union District, high school, 760.17 

Tuition, Penacook, high school, 10.70 

Tuition, Union District, Dewey school, 12.00 



190 CITY OP 


CONCORD. 




Tuition, School District of Bow, 


$31.00 


Kepairs, 




94.56 


Conveying scholars. 




103.00 


Enumerating children, 




9.00 


Incidentals, 




81.49 


Janitors, 




69.25 


Water, 




12.00 


District superintendent, 




670.00 


Salary of School Board (two years), 


400.00 


Flag-pole and rope. 




3.55 


Auditor, 




2.00 


Treasurer, 




25.00 


Balance on hand March 19, 


1912, 


200.06 



$5,774.60 

FRANK E. DIMOND, 

Treasurer. 



Having examined the treasurer's accounts I find them 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH N. ABBOTT, 
Auditor, Concord School District. 



Concord, N. H., March 19, 1912. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Concord: 

The comprehensive report of the librarian of the Public 
Library, which is herewith submitted, renders it unneces- 
sary for the trustees to attempt to supplement it by ex- 
tended remarks. All friends of the library will find it 
an interesting document. 

R. E. WALKER, 
President Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN FOR 1911. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen, — At the dedication of the New Hampshire 
Historical Society's beautiful building, which now queens 
it over our civic square, there was a good deal said con- 
cerning the desirability of iveeding libraries : that which 
President Eliot remarked years ago about dead books and 
which was repeated in emphasized form recently by Lord 
Rosebery at Glasgow, was reiterated by the speakers here 
in Concord on November 23. 

All these eminent authorities would feel that this Pub- 
lic Library could not be excelled as a weeder, for our 
crowded quarters oblige us to discard old books with one 
hand while we accession new ones with the other. Statis- 
tics for 1911 verify this statement, we having made a net 
gain of less than 400 volumes although we bought 724. 

At this rate the library will make progress slowly 
toward an imposing total figure, but it will contain an 
exceptionally small amount of out-grown material, and I 
shall be envied by those librarians whose trustees have 
not your enlightened views and who therefore are re- 
quired to keep in their stackrooms everything which was 
ever there, even if it be a twenty-year-old work on elec- 
tricity, a treatise on agriculture as practiced in the '50's, 
or a theological pamphlet combatting tenets no longer 
held. 

It seems to me false modesty never to presume to dis- 
card a book ; some dusty tomes may be made to circulate 
if they are placed in front of the delivery desk where 
they will catch the borrower's eye, but surely there are 
scores of novels and out-of-date technical books which 
are not worth this attempt to galvanize them into life. 



PUBLIC LIBRAKY. 193 

I feel strongly that residents of a city or state should 
not be taxed to pay for the housing and care of much of 
the stutf that is now in libraries ; before these edifices beg 
for enlargement let them gain space by discarding ; and 
also let inter-library loans prevent the present duplication 
of material. I must say that when a great Chicago library 
sent for our 1910 report which I purposely had not un- 
loaded upon it, I did not feel gratified, but rather exas- 
perated in behalf of those Chicagoans who, if their 
library does not alter its policy, may be called upon to 
add a wing, and who would prefer to send here for our 
report, if it were wanted — which it never would be. 

Yet in spite of our culling, from both necessity and con- 
viction, it became necessary the past year to create new 
accommodations for our monthly purchases, and in July 
the gallery voted at your last annual meeting was con- 
structed around our catalogue room ; many think the in- 
terior of the library has gained in looks as well as in 
convenience by its introduction. This gallery enabled us 
to fill with shelving what had hitherto been unavailable 
wall space, and thither we have moved our sets of bound 
magazines; their transference has left the balcony free 
to catch the overflow of reference work, or rather to add 
stimulus to it, for Miss Brown, in charge thereof, says 
that old and young showed instant appreciation of the 
pleasant new study place and increased their research to 
such a degree that she waited on 1,746 inquirers from the 
third week in September to December 31. During the 
month just passed, 570 have had recourse to the reference 
room. 

This enjoyment of our one slightly enlarged facility 
indicates that a twentieth century library, with modern 
improvements — like a juyenile department, special library 
alcoves, access to shelves, and cases for models, collec- 
tions, curios and gifts — would meet with approval and 

13 



194 CITY OP CONCORD. 

use. It is no unusual thing now for a resident to bring 
to our desk an illustrated account of the opening of a line 
library in some other town and say, "This is what we 
ought to have here." 

Will not somebody do for Concord what Mr. Frank 
P. Carpenter is doing for Manchester? Picture to your- 
selves how a suitable city library, situated on Green, 
Street at the head of Park, would complete our handsome 
square and make the capital more noteworthy for its 
group of public buildings. Ought it not to strike a rich 
man as a good investment — this putting his money into 
what will add to his own and his town's reputation and 
serve as a "continuation school" for everybody? 

But to consider, not what is Croesus's duty, but the 
library's, I think its present resources should be more 
widely known, and that it would be well to spend a small 
sum in bringing this about. Hereafter we shall advertise. 
We may even boast ! We want to reduce the number of 
those who say, "Why, I did not suppose you had anything 
on this subject." 

In an institution of our unpretentious and popular 
character it is not undignified but sensible to call atten- 
tion to the helpful material it contains. If we purchase 
the Loose-leaf Encyclopaedia we shall want the fact 
known to every man who is alive enough to desire latest 
information. If we put in the International Library of 
Technology, the volumes should be made to reach not 
only the Manual Training School boys but all artisans 
and mechanics. If we buy the books listed in Grange 
reading courses, all our farmers must be made aware of 
it. We ought to ask the daily papers to publish more news 
about the library, and when their space is exhausted, to 
have lists printed in other ways and to mail them broad- 
cast. 



riJBLIC LIBRARY. 195 

My answer to agents frequently is, "Buy? Yes, if your 
books would get read." 

And the agents reply that they hear of a wide-spread 
decrease in the patronage of reading-rooms. The fact 
that our evening customers have fallen off more than our 
day ones seems significant ; the youth of the city who 
used to flock to the library after supper now prefer other 
forms of recreation, and choose a nickel show instead of 
a free book. 

In our agencies and deposit stations also, there is notice- 
able this crowding out of the literary habit. I believe in 
organizing branches to a library because they are always 
keenly enjoyed and their advantages thoroughly realized 
by a few, and because they afford possibilities for the 
personal touch; but our latest essay in this direction, 
namely, the vacation branch maintained last summer in 
East Concord, was a disappointment. On one afternoon, 
seeing a half-dozen lads idling over part of a newspaper 
on the store steps with no intention of crossing the street 
to where our Branch was located, I selected six of the 
most alluring books for boys and took them to the group. 
They turned the pages but in fifteen minutes brought 
them back to our case, not enough interested to ask if 
they might take the stories home. And this incident 
might have happened in any ward besides No. 2. 

A writer on our national psychology says : — 

"The American people wants literature reduced to 
snappy paragraphs — culture in the form of capsules. 
There is a feeling that somehow we ought to have these 
things and we want to get through with them in as short 
order as possible. The American's pleasure is not in 
reading but in having read." 

Certain it is that when one of our valued customers 
dies who has regularly taken out the Nineteenth Century, 
The Forum, the Popular Science Monthly, etc., etc., no 



196 CITY OF CONCORD. 

other borrower steps into his place to call for the 
weightier periodicals. 

Even the Shakespeare Eoom is no longer used by 
eight clubs, and the girls of the present will hardly meet 
there as women to read the author whom one young per- 
son of to-day dismissed with, "Yes, I've glanced through 
Shakespeare but I don't like the way it ends." 

There seems a pictorial presentation of modern tenden- 
cies in a recent Woman's Home Companion. The full- 
page illustration is entitled, "If Bobby got everything 
he wanted for Christmas," and depicts a youngster open- 
ing his eyes on December 25th to tind his dreams come 
true, and himself surrounded by everything he has longed 
for. All toys and engines, all pets and sporting goods, 
everything that can divert him on earth below or in the 
heavens above — for there is an airship in the collection, — • 
is banked up beside his cot. But there is no book ; and 
that its omission was probably unconscious on the artist's 
part makes it more striking. The little fellow has no 
hunger for a fairy story, a hero legend, or a tale of ad- 
venture. He wants to be doing something himself! 

Perhaps it is such boys, — the Bobbys growing up with- 
out benefit of books, — who form the ungrateful and dis- 
orderly groups that weekly come to our reading room 
not to read but wilfully to strain the attendant's patience 
till it breaks and a policeman is sent for. This matter of 
bad conduct, Sunday afternoons, is our most annoying 
and immediate problem. 

On the other hand, none are more welcome within the 
Library than another set of boys who have gained an ad- 
mirable facility in consulting indexes and works of refer- 
ence. "What a bright class can do when directed by an 
excellent teacher who himself knows how" to use a library, 
has been shown by the High School boys and girls now 
studying political economy. Doubtless many pupils in 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 197 

Concord have already learned the truth of George Mae- 
donald's saying, ''As you grow ready for it, somewhere 
or other you will find what is needful for you in a book." 

With the increasing interest felt by adults in social 
service, in questions of labor and capital, in practical sub- 
jects and vocational education, it would seem to be a 
city library's obligation to put within the public's reach 
the sanest works giving both sides of these issues of the 
day. If people are growing deaf to the Swan of Avon 
and are listening either in faith or curiosity to Steiner, 
Steffens, Dr. Grenfell, ''Scientific" Taylor or Jane 
Addams, then this Library better not waste its energies 
in trying to create a literary renaissance by buying hand- 
some editions of the classics, but rather provide that 
mental food which the civic body is in condition to assim- 
ilate. 

It must not be inferred that the growth of indifference 
to library privileges is not offset by features which en- 
courage us in our work: take the matter of circulation, 
for instance ; we gave out only 326 fewer volumes than in 
1910; probably 326 persons went last year, for best- 
sellers, to Gibson's subscription library. Further, instead 
of regretting the cessation of our Saturday night rushes, 
we might be glad that our work is more evenly distributed 
throughout the week. It is a fine record that with 91,338 
books taken out in 1911, only two have been lost and not 
settled for. The long-time charge for books to be carried 
away during the summer vacation is a privilege in greater 
demand each year. Our worn-out stories have been 
wanted by local W. C. T. U. workers for the boxes being 
packed for lumbermen. 

By means of continued membership in the Library Art 
Club our School Street hall is seldom without a display 
of photographs, and the cultivating influence of pictures 
is thus secured. I lately directed the attention of an in- 



198 CITY OF CONCORD. 

telligent patron to an array of especially line views, and 
his answer was a reproachful, "I never missed one ex- 
hibit." 

It may be permissible to bring out the fact that in a 
Library doing our amount of business it is exceptional 
for the librarian to be the cataloguing department; for 
seventeen years I have prepared every card for our 
drawers, latterly aided by buying for new non-fiction 
works the cards printed by the Library of Congress 
which require only slight preparation to make them ready 
for insertion in our catalogue. 

The construction of our gallery was followed by the 
painting of all the inside walls in harmonious shades of 
brown, and by the purchase of a vacuum cleaner; when 
this has been thoroughly used, we shall take an inventory, 
a task long contemplated but rendered formidable by the 
accumulation of dirt on books and shelves. 

Through the year there come many kind proofs that 
townspeople appreciate the faithful labors of the library 
assistants, but the extent of their duties I claim I alone 
can understand. 

In conclusion, grateful acknowledgment is made to 
Concord's religious, municipal and philanthropic institu- 
tions which furnish their reports and publications, and to 
the citizens who have during 1911 given books or maga- 
zines ; the list should be headed by the one who has for 
a quarter of a century turned over to the Library periodi- 
cals which she thinks ought to do the world good. To this 
name of Mrs. Armenia S. White are subjoined those of 
E. J. Aiken, D. E. Miller, P. R. Holden, Mrs. Barton P. 
Jenks, Mrs. Sophia Sanborn, Dr. Hoyt-Stevens, ]\Irs. H. 
H. "Wright, Mrs. F. M. Reed of Penacook. 

Respectfully submitted, ' 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Lihrarian. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

We respectfully submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1911. 

At the first regular meeting in January the board, con- 
sisting of ]\Iayor Charles J, French, ex-officio, chairman, 
City Physician Charles H. Cook and Dr. Fred A. Sprague, 
organized, and Dr. Cook was re-elected secretary. 

Our city was remarkably free from contagious diseases 
during the year. Antitoxin was used in diphtheria cases, 
and we feel that it was a valuable help in checking the 
spread of this disease. We purchasd our supply of diph- 
theria antitoxin from Schieffelin & Co., New York, and it 
was furnished free to those unable to pay for it. 

The rules and regulations concerning contagious dis- 
eases were changed to meet requirements and were ap- 
proved by you on May 8. The school authorities were 
notified at the opening of schools in September that no 
child is entitled to attend school in Concord without a cer- 
tificate of vaccination bearing the seal of this board, and 
we feel that this ordinance was generally complied with. 

The petition of citizens living in the vicinity of the dump 
on Dunklee Street was referred to this board by the Board 
of Public Works, and we voted to notify the owner to have 
the rubbish covered over with clean dirt or sand. Our 
notice was not complied with, and the case was referred to 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the city solicitor for prosecution, which resulted in the 
abatement of the nuisance. 

We approved a list of medical and surgical supplies for 
an emergency case to be used in shops and other places 
where power machinery is used, and in compliance with the 
state law the proprietors of all such places were notified to 
provide cases at once. 

Owing to illness. Dr. Cook was necessarily absent from 
the meetings during the fall months, and his presence was 
greatly missed. 

For a detailed account of the work of this department 
your attention is called to the report of the sanitary officer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, 
F. A. SPRAGUE, 

Board of Health. 



i 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen, — The examinations made by the milk in- 
spector appear in another part of the health department 
report: these examinations show that there has been little 
cause for complaint. Since the adoption of the cotton filtra- 
tion method for dirt by the inspector, the examinations 
show progressive improvement in cleanliness, but as stated 
last year this test offers no assurance that dirt does not get 
in the milk, but rather that it is well strained before it 
comes to the consumer. 

From time to time the supplies have been investigated 
for tuberculosis by the guinea-pig test and one was found 
to be tubercular. It is my intention to continue this test, 
though the test is hardly ideal but is important when 
positive. 

The so-called ''tuberculin test" for tuberculosis in cattle 
is of the greatest diagnostic value. The city should en- 
courage the producers to use it, and such farms as do 
should receive the hearty support of the consumer. Many 
of the farms do now use the test, and no milk should be 
fed to children in a Concord home unless it comes from one 
of these farms with the tuberculin tested herd. 

I consider the above statement important because all re- 
cent investigations of the various types of tubercle bacilli 
in man and animals seem to tend nearer the proof that they 
have a common origin. 

During the year, as reports in the office show, many men 
without sufficient capital have started in to sell milk in 
our city, consequently their places have not come up to the 
standard of our regulations and a quick failure to remain 



202 CITY OF CONCORD, 

in business has been the result. If the department should 
in the future investigate all places of persons desiring to 
sell milk before a license is granted, these men could be 
headed off from entering a business for which they are not 
sufificiently prepared, with a saving of money for them and 
bother to the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of HealiJi: 

Gentlemen, — Herewith is su)3mitted the annual report 
of the sanitary officer for the year ending December 31, 
1911. Your attention is respectfully called to the tables 
attached, which show in detail the work of the department. 

Our city maintained its usual sanitary condition through- 
out the year, and we were remarkably free from contagious 
diseases. Complaints were investigated and necessary 
action was taken to abate all nuisances. Other inspections 
were made as time would allow, and on numerous occasions 
the alleyways in the rear of the business blocks were visited. 
As a rule it required only a word of suggestion to the 
proprietors of our stores and markets and to the janitors 
of the different blocks to have the rubbish and objection- 
able matter removed at once. 

Inspections w-ere made of all the barber shops and con- 
ditions were found to be good. The barbers of the city 
are generally complying with all the provisions of the 
state law, and the shops are kept in a cleanly conditien. 

The conditions of Long Pond and the reservoir were 
noted from time to time, and samples of water were 
analyzed at the state laboratory with satisfactory results. 
In the fall, complaints were received that the water had 
a fishy taste and odor, but the analyses at that time 
showed nothing injurious. 

An act to provide for the keeping of medical and surgi- 
cal appliances in factories, to be enforced by the local 
board of healtli, was passed at the last session of the legis- 
lature. This law is one of importance; accidents are lia- 
ble to occur at any time, and with such appliances in our 



204 CITY OP CONCORD. 

worksliops aid can be given immediately to relieve the 
injured. Copies of the law and a list of the articles re- 
quired by the board were placed in the hands of the 
proprietors and managers of all places where power 
machinery was used in which three or more persons were 
employed, and they were notified to procure the supplies 
at once. Seventy-six factories, shops, foundries and 
stone sheds were notified and in several instances it was 
found that medical and surgical supplies were already on 
hand for use in emergencies. I feel that this law was 
generally complied with. 

There were 459 deaths reported to this department for 
the year 1911, 24 less than in 1910. The death-rate was 
13.34, compared with 15.45 in 1910. The deaths of non- 
residents and still births are not included in reckoning 
our death-rate. Concord has always had an exceedingly 
large number of deaths of non-residents, owing to the 
fact that a great many of the patients and inmates of our 
public institutions are brought here from other places in 
the state. The total number of deaths in the hospitals 
and institutions was 219, divided as follows : New Hamp- 
shire State Hospital, 136 ; Margaret Pillsbury General 
Hospital, 58 ; New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 16 ; 
Nefv^ Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, 7; New Hampshire 
Centennial Home for the Aged, 2. 

We received reports of 95 cases of contagious diseases, 
6 of which proved fatal. There were 51 cases of diph- 
theria, with 2 deaths ; 8 cases of scarlet fever, w4th 1 
death ; 10 cases of typhoid fever, with 3 deaths, and 26 
cases of measles Avith no fatalities. This record shows a 
decrease in the number of cases, but the death-rate was 
higher than for a number of years. In each case of scar- 
let fever, diphtheria and measles the house was placarded 
or the patient moved to the contagious disease hospital, 
and at the termination of all cases of diphtheria and scar- 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 205 

let fever the rooms occupied by the patient were thor- 
oughly disinfected. Rooms were also fumigated after 
deaths and removals of tubercular patients. "The total 
number of deaths from tuberculosis was 29, and of this 
number over one-third were out-of-town inmates of our 
public institutions. 

The formaldehyde-potassium permanganate method of 
fumigation was used as in former j^ears. All the school 
books in Union School District and the entire Lower 
School building at St. Paul's School were fumigated at 
the end of the school year. The material for this work 
was furnished by the schools. In several other instances 
rooms were fumigated upon request for various sick- 
nesses not of a contagious nature, and the material used 
in these cases was paid for by the owner. 

Plumbing inspections were made as usual, water tests 
being applied to the new work, and peppermint tests 
made of old work on request. 

The appropriation for our department for the year was 
$2,625, and the expenses were $2,630.58, making a deficit 
of $5.58. Diphtheria antitoxin was furnished at cost to a 
number of families who were unable to pay the retail 
price, and we received $43.70 from this source, and $6.23 
was received from the sale of fumigation supplies. These 
sums were deposited with the city treasurer and in con- 
sidering this fact the deficit was not unreasonable. 

I wish to express my thanks to His Honor the Mayor, 
the members of the Board of Health, the members of the 
city government and the city solicitor for their assistance 
during the year, which has been appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



206 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Expenditures of the Board of Health of the City of 
Concord for the Year Ending December 31, 1911. 

salaries. 

Charles E. Palmer, sanitary officer, salary, $1,400.00 

Charles Duncan, M. D., milk inspector, salary, 300.00 

fumigation supplies. 

A. H. Knowlton & Co., formaldehyde, 15.00 

A. Perley Fitch, formaldehyde and permanganate, 35.62 

Jewell Drug Store, formaldehyde, 16.64 

Milton & Co., hose bibb, ,75 

antitoxin and medical supplies. 



Schieffelin & Co., diphtheria antitoxin, 
W. C. Spicer, lotion, account pediculosis, 



206.25 
6.75 



incidental expenses. 

Helen 0. IMonier, services, 475.00 
Rumford Printing Co., mortuary reports, 24.00 
New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., rental, 25.00 
Charles E. Palmer, postage, car fare, etc., 21.27 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing, 57.55 
Edson C. Eastman, office supplies, • 4.60 
BroAvn & Saltmarsh, new roll and cleaning type- 
writer, 3.50 
Treworgy Ink and Pen Mfg. Co., writing fluid, .75 
Prown & Burpee, cutting board, .60 
Star Stamp Co., five rubber stamps, .75 
A. R. Andrews, typewriter ribbon, 1.75 
The Gift Shop, vaccination cards and guides, 8.25 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 207 

"Whitcomb & Barrows, Gould's Medical dictionary, $1.00 

IMorrill Bros., office clock, 5.00 

Monitor and Statesman, advertising, 1,60 

New Hampshire Patriot Co., advertising, 2.10 

Home & Hall, boards for signs, 5.11 

Fletcher Prescott, painting signs, 2.50 

John Dooning, burying dog, 2.00 
Shepard Bros. Co., provisions, Wilson family, 

diphtheria, 2.45 
C. 0. Partridge, provisions, Anderson family, 

diphtheria, 4.79 



Total, $2,630.58 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1911. 

Milk license fees, $191.70 

Sale of diphtheria antitoxin, 43.70 

Sale of fumigation supplies, 6.23 

Total, $241.63 



208 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during each month of the year and the 
deaths resulting therefrom : 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Smallpox. 


Measles. 


Months. 


CO 

CO 

«« 
o 




to 

<v 

O 




to 

ei 
O 


to 

Q 


CO 

CO 

C3 
O 


P 




CO 

Is 




14 
19 
2 

1 
4 
2 


1 
1 






1 


1 






2 
15 
3 

2 

2 






1 














2 
1 


1 
1 








April 




4 

1 










May .^ 








June.. 




1 










July 




1 












August 




















September 


3 
5 
1 








1 
2 
2 












October 


















November 




1 


1 












December 


































Totals 


51 


2 


8 


I 


10 


3 






26 













REPORT OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 



Wards. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 Totals. 


Diphtheria 


1 


1 


19 

2 


6 


1 
1 


9 
3 


10 
5 
3 




4 


51 
8 


Typhoid fever. 


1 


1 




2 


10 


Smallpox 










Measles 


1 






1 


2 




22 






26 















I 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



209 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of 
contagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom 
for the years since and including 1890 : 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals, 


Years. 


























i 

CS 

O 




90 


Q 


O 


03 






Cases. 
Deaths. 


6 

CO 

O 


CD 


1890 


6 

12 
13 
48 
17 
35 


2 
3 
3 

7 
3 
8 


9 

7 
37 
41 
113 
44 


3 

6 

8 


17 
14 
7 
13 
13 
21 


5 
6 
1 
2 
3 
3 


6 
2 
2 

300 
21 

158 








38 

35 

59 

402 

164 

258 


7 


1891 











1892 








7 


1893 








9 


1894 .... 


T* 


1895 








1<» 


1896 


55 


8 


4 




15 


r 


452 








526 


n 


1897 


13 
4 
9 

29 


1 

5 
5 


22 

8 

99 

39 


1 



1 



17 
8 
14 
18 


2 
4 
1 

1 


138 
126 
299 
476 








190 
146 
421 

562 


4 


1898 








4 


1899 








7 


1900 


1 






7 


1001 


65 


5 


11 




13 


3 


40 




1 


1 


130 


9 


1902 


29 


2 


6 




23 


3 


27 




2 




87 


5 


1903 


42 


4 


39 




17 3 


582 


4 


2 




682 


11 


1904 


55 
15 


3 

1 


18 
80 




12 
23 


1 
3 


31 
181 








116 
299 


4 


1905 


1 






5 


1906 


14 


2 


27 




32 


3 


101 


1 


1 




175 


6 


1907 


63 





''6 


1 


11 




118 
100 
1,168 
143 
26 








218 

157 

1,350 

199 

95 


3 
5 


1908 


44 
131 


4 
6 


7 
23 




6 

28 


1 
4 








1909 


1 






11 


1910 


30 
51 


1 

2 


10 

8 


1 
1 


16 
10 


3 








9 


1911 








6 













210 city of concord. 

Nuisances, Complaints and Inspections. 

A statement of the number and character of the nui- 
sances for the year 1911 appears below : 

Accumulation of ashes and other rubbish, 8 

Broken sewers, 2 

Catch basin traps broken, 8 

(.Collecting garbage without license, 2 

Complaints made without cause, 10 

Conditions in grocery stores and markets, 3 

Dead animals, 21 

Drains out of repair, 1 

Dumping rubbish and odor from dumps, 15 

Filthy barns, 2 

Filthy premises, 2 

Garbage cans uncovered on teams, 1 

Keeping hens, 7 

Keeping hogs, 14 

Odor from garbage cans, 4 

Odor from horse sheds, 1 

Odor from manure, 5 

Odor from premises, 2 

Odor from privy vaults, 9 

Odor from sink drains, 2 

Odor from stables, 3 

Odor in blocks, 4 

Odor in houses, 8 

Open sewers, 1 

Other complaints and inspections, 38 

Pediculosis, 1 

Plumbing done in violation of ordinance, 1 

Scabies, 1 

Sewers obstructed, 1 

Sinks out of repair, 4 

Sinks without traps, 1 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 211 

Stagnant water, 2 

Stone drains obstructed, 2 

Throwing out slops and swill, 2 
Water-closets out of repair and in uncleanly 

condition, 11 

Total, 199 
Inspection of Plumbing. 

Plumbing permits granted, 113 

Number of inspections made, 226 

Water-closets put in, 177 

Sinks put in, . 83 

Bath-tubs put in, 118 

Wash-bowls put in, 129 

Wash-traj's put in, 35 

Urinals put in, 2 

Foot baths put in, 2 

Soda fountains put in, 1 

Bar fixtures put in, 1 

Number of sewers inspected, 54 

Fumigation. 

Rooms fumigated, 447 

Schoolrooms fumigated, 24 

School buildings fumigated, 2 

Wards at hospitals fumigated, 12 

Cellars fumigated, 15 

Closets fumigated, 12 

Attics fumigated, 2 

Hallways fumigated, 4 

Barns fumigated, 1 

Privy vaults fumigated, 1 

Books and pieces of clothing fumigated, 14 



212 city of concord. 

Report of Milk Examinations and Inspection of 
Milk Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 176 

Number of examinations above standard, 173 

Number of samples dirty, 2 
Number of samples for tuberculosis found 

positive, 1 

Number of teams inspected, 14 

Number of milk farms inspected, 19 

Conditions good, 14 

Conditions fair, 4 

Conditions poor, 1 

Notices and recommendations sent, 7 

Summary. 

Houses placarded in cases of contagious diseases, 28 

Placards removed, 28 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 239 

Burial permits issued, 459 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies 

brought here, 108 

Transit permits issued, 188 
Number of persons to whom milk licenses were 

issued, 181 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses 

were issued, 59 
Number of reports of contagious diseases sent 

to the state board of health, 49 
Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, 

public health and marine-hospital service, 52 

Number of mortuary reports issued, 912 
Number of A^accination certifieates issued to 

school children, 1,167 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 213 

Number of permits issued for children to re- 
turn to school after recovery from con- 
tagious diseases, 87 

Number of samples of water collected for 

analysis, 2 

Number of inspections of barber shops, 18 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



214 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



DEATHS DURING 1911, BY SEX, CONDITION AND 
NATIVITY, BY MONTHS. 



















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SEX. 

Males 

Females 

CONDITION. 

Married 

Single 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Not stated 

NATIVITY. 

Concord 

New Hampshire.. 

Other states 

Foreign 

Not stated 



20 


17 


22 


14 


23 


20 


25 


28 


16 


17 


18 


22 


20 


14 


19 


11 


18 


13 


19 


21 


20 


21 


18 


23 


11 


12 


12 


7 


16 


14 


23 


14 


19 


13 


15 


21 


12 


12 


14 


13 


17 


9 


11 


20 


7 


19 


14 


11 


11 


7 


12 


5 


7 


9 


8 


15 


9 


5 


5 


11 


1 
2 




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2 
















1 

1 


2 




1 


1 


2 




1 


1 


5 


13 


9 


11 


14 


8 


7 


15 


7 


11 


12 


14 


17 


8 


18 


10 


14 


9 


11 


17 


15 


10 


12 


14 


8 


5 


7 


1 


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7 


11 


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6 


4 


4 


3 


7 


5 


5 


2 


4 


7 


12 


8 


8 


11 


7 


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2 


1 


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4 




2 


1 


6 



180 

159 

104 

3 

13 

126 
155 
69 

84 
25 



health department. 215 

Deaths by Age. 



62 

12 

6 



Under 1 year, 

From 1 to 5 years, 

From 5 to 10 years. 

From 10 to 15 years, 2 

From 15 to 20 years, 5 

From 20 to 30 years, 26 

From 30 to 40 years, 31 

From 40 to 50 years, 46 

From 50 to 60 years. 

From 60 to 70 years, 

From 70 to 80 years, 

From 80 to 90 years. 

From 90 to 100 years, 10 

Over 100 years, 1 

Not stated, 2 

Total number of deaths, 459 



62 

72 
82 
40 



216 



CITY OP CONCORD. 





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218 



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222 



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224 



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15 



226 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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PUBLIC PARKS. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council: 

The park commissioners present herewith their report 
for the year ending December 31, 1911 : 



Receipts. 






General appropriation, 


$3,500.00 




For Penacook Park, 


125.00 


$3,625.00 






Unexpended, 




44.70 




$3,580.30 


Expenditures. 






Salary of superintendent, 




$1,080.00 


WHITE PARK. 






Paid for labor, 


$890.12 




labor on ice, 


43.75 




labor removing moths, 


95.50 




shrubs. 


19.75 




repairs, 


57.63 




tools and fertilizers. 


119.08 




iron fence, 


362.50 




city water, 


15.00 




miscellaneous, 


80.97 


4:1 fiSJ. ^n 



PUBLIC PARKS. 




235 


ROLLINS PARK. 






Paid for labor, 


$495.75 




trees and shrubs, 


29.75 




repairs, 


8.52 




tools, etc., 


8.76 




city water, 


10.00 




miscellaneous. 


45.05 


$597.83 






PENACOOK PARK. 






Paid for labor. 




90.17 


BRADLEY PARK. 






Paid for labor. 


$30.00 




city water, 


4.00 


34.00 


FISKE PARK. 




Paid for labor, 




29.00 


RIDGE AVENUE PARK. 






Paid for labor, 




14.00 


PECKER PARK. 






Paid for labor, 




11.00 



COURT HOUSE PARK. 

Paid for labor, 40.00 

$3,580.30 



236 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mr. Richardson, who had served as superintendent for 
nearly eighteen years, was compelled to give up his work 
on account of ill health, and in J\lay the board accepted 
his resignation. Under his hands the park system of the 
city had developed in a large measure, and it was with 
regret that the services of so faithful a man were relin- 
quished. 

]\lr. Frank Atkinson, who came to us highly recom- 
mended and who has had many 3'ears of experience in 
Park work, has taken up the work in a commendable way, 
so that there has been no break in the progress. 

The same conditions obtain as in former years. The 
very dry weather was disastrous to many of the shrubs 
and trees, and tlie extra expense of caring for the trees 
has been large. It is planned to extend the iron fence 
along Center Street at White Park and install a drinking 
fountain. The springs, having been condemned by the 
Board of Health, were closed so that no place was avail- 
able to the public for cold drinking water. Plans have 
been suggested and the lack will be remedied as soon as 
possible. The necessary work of renewal of lawns, the 
care of paths and shrubbery is constantly being attended 
to, which care and maintenance preclude any great 
amount of new work with the funds appropriated. The 
superintendent has been carefully trimming the trees 
along the lines of up-to-date forestration, and it is the 
desire of the commissioners to keep the number of trees 
intact by planting from year to year. 

The grounds at White Park which are devoted to sports 
have been used as last year with games of baseball, which 
have attracted large crowds. 

At Rollins Park some renewal of laAvns and trimming 
of trees will be considered the coming year. The live 
stock seems to be in a prosperous condition. The care of 



PUBLIC PARKS. 237 

the parks has been maintained and the commissioners 
hope in the near future that more constructive work can 
be prosecuted. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex officio, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
WILLIS 0. C. KIMBALL, 
BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 

Commissioners. 



238 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





03 

O 


White Park has received the 
following gifts: 

Mrs. N. White, $1,700.00 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, 500.00 

Mr. C.H. Newhall. 
for bridge, 50.00 

The city m-ade addition to 
original gift, paying therefor 
$2,100. 

Rollins Park. The city has 
made addition to original gift, 
paying .«!6,557.50 therefor. 

Penacook Park, on the shore 
of Penacook Lake, came un- 
der control of the park com- 
missioners in 1805. City'Jhad 
charge before, and has spent 
from commencement of work 
in 1883, an additional sum of 
$4,444.13. 


A small piece of land in East 
Concord was developed and 
was paid for by a gift of $'200 
from J. Eastman Pecker, and 
named Pecker Park, to wliich 
he has added $160.96 for sun- 
dial and other improvements. 


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750.00 
100.00 
45.00 
25.00 
30.00 












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25.00 












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75.00 

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400.00 
100.00 
40.00 
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FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Ilonorahle Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city or- 
dinance, I herewith submit for your consideration the 
report of the Fire Department for the year 1911. The 
department responded to 95 bell alarms and 219 still 
alarms. In addition one fire occurred in West Concord 
for which no alarm was given. 





Bell. 


still. 


No alarm. 


Total. 


Precinct, 


62 


183 




245 


Penacook, 


13 


11 




24 


East Concord, 


7 


14 




21 


West Concord, 


13 


11 


1 


25 



95 219 1 315 

This report will be found to contain statements in de- 
tail embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete 
roll of the department with residence and occupation of 
each member, a record of all fires and alarms which have 
occurred during the year and the causes thereof as nearly 
as could be ascertained, with the names of the owners or 
occupants and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance 
recovered in each case. 

The department responded to more alarms than ever 
before in a single year. There was but one particularly 
dangerous fire, that of December 7, and as conditions 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 

were favorable, the outcome was fortunate. The forest 
fires of the year taxed the resources of the department 
to the limit, besides costing more than one thousand dol- 
lars in efforts to extinguish. 

The apparatus is in good condition and no extensive 
repairs were required during the year. 

Tile fire-alarm telegraph systems of the city proper and 
Penacook are in good condition. 

It was found necessary to renew the battery elements 
of the latter in December. The department purchased 
800 feet of 214-inch hose and relined 1,300 feet. 

Two horses were purchased for use at the Central Sta- 
tion and one hand engine was purchased for use at West 
Concord. Two horses were sold to the highway depart- 
ment. I can but repeat the recommendations of last j^ear 
relative to motor-driven apparatus. The opinion ex- 
pressed by the fire department officials of the country 
warrants the belief that the automobile is to take the 
place of the horse as surely as the steam fire engine dis- 
placed the hand engine. 

I respectfully recommend the purchase of 1,000 feet of 
21/2-inch hose and the installation of two fire-alarm boxes 
in the northwest section of the city. 

These boxes were recommended in the report of last 
year, but the abnormal expense attending the subduing of 
forest fires prevented their installation. 

There are but two one-horse hose wagons in the city 
proper at present, and I respectfully recommend the con- 
version of both into two-horse wagons. 

To accomplish this at the Central Station the purchase 
of one horse would answer all requirements. 

At the Alert Station some not ver^'- expensive changes 
would have to be made in the stall arrangement in addi- 
tion to the purchase of one horse. But in the latter case 
the investment would be a paying one, as in bad Aveather 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 243 

the hiring of extra man and liorse, compulsory at present, 
would be obviated. 

The complement of hose in these wagons would then 
be 1,000 feet instead of 800 feet, as at present, and the 
runs would be made faster. 

During the month of September I had the pleasure of 
attending the convention of the International Association 
of Fire Engineers held at Milwaukee, "Wis., a report of 
which I rendered at that time. 

It was a rare opportunity to learn something relative 
to motor-driven apparatus, which was availed of to the 
letter, and I was sincerely grateful for the privilege af- 
forded. 

Respectfvilly submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 

Appropriations. 



Appropriation, 


$24,109.50 


Joint resolution, horses. 


600.00 


hand engine. 


200.00 


relining hose, 


509.00 


outstanding claims 


;, 1,672.99 



$27,091.49 



Disbursements. 



Permanent men. 


$7,890.00 


Vacations, 


821.15 


Rent, Veterans' Association, 


150.00 


Call men, 


7,280.00 


Forage, 


1,731.99 


Fuel, 


886.57 


Lights, 


704.57 



244 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Incidontals, 




$2,998.10 


Horse shoeing, 




325.90 


Horses purchased, 




600.00 


Horse hire, 




970.25 


Laundry, 




52.00 


Fire alarm, 




753.92 


Supplies, chemical er 


igine, 


52.07 


Hose, 




800.00 


A¥ater, 




119.50 


House man, 




80.00 


Penacook fire alarm. 




166.47 


Hand engine, 




200.00 


Relining hose. 




509.00 




ALARMS. 






Precinct. 





$27,091.49 



11-11-2. January 5, 10.10 p. m. A call for assistance 
from East Concord. Detail from the department, Kear- 
sarge engine and Eagle wagon sent under command of 
Engineer W. J. Coffin. Engine worked three hours. For 
details see East Concord report. Twelve hundred and fifty 
feet of hose wet. 

Still. January 9, 9.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Turcotte, 8 Bowery Avenue. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 10, 8.16 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. H. Johnson, 141 Dunklee Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 15, 6.02 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Broucher, 80 Broadway. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

11-11. January 16, 4.04 a. m. A call for assistance 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 245 

from Plymouth. Governor Hill engine, reserve reel and 
detail from the department sent under command of Engi- 
neer John J. McNulty. Apparatus was not unloaded, but 
the detail relieved the Plymouth men on the hose lines, 
giving them a much needed rest. Detail arrived home at 
11.00 a. m. 

Still. January 16, 7.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. G. H. Stickney, 16 Prince Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

StilTj. January 16, 8.27 a. m. Chimney fire in unoc- 
cupied residence, 7 Pearl Street. Painters employed there 
had built a fire in stove. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. January 16, 12.56 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. J. H. Pendergast, 481/2 School Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 17, 10.38 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Edward Blake, 17 Dakin Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 18, 6.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Patrick "Welch, rear 37 Thorndike Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 6.17 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Baker, 3 Marshall Street. Extinguished 
b}^ Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 20, 10.44 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. Pickering, Iron Works Road. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $15.00 $2,300.00 $15.00 

Still. January 20, 6.00 p. m. Slight fire in office 
building owned and occupied by B. & M. R. R. Ijocated 
in railroad yard southeast of passenger station. Cause 



246 CITY OF CONCORD. 

unknown. Extinguished by railroad employees and 
Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $15.00 $1,500.00 None. 

Still. January 25, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of U. C. Rowen, 105 School Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 9.07 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. N. F. Blaisdell, 9 Harrod Street. Extin- 
guished by members of Alert Company. No loss. 

Still. January 27, 11.48 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of B. L. Blackwood, 29 Lyndon Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insui'ance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $4,500.00 $12.50 $3,500.00 $12.50 

Still. January 28, 7.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Touisagnant, 13 Perkins Court. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 28, 12.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank Ash, 22 Stone Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 28, 8.26 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of R. W. Marshall, 246 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 30, 6.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George H. Abbott, 63 School Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 1, 5.49 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of B. R. Edelstern, 20 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

2-2-2. February 2, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. February 3, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 247 

dence of Miss Annie Galligan, 9 Prince Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 4, 3.54 a. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
stable, rear 110 North Main Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 6, 8.39 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Guy Jewett, 65 Perley Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 6, 8.42 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. J. Bean, 84 South State Street. Chemical Com- 
pany being in service, detail from Central Station sent 
Avith Chief's sleigh. No loss. 

Still. February 6, 10.42 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. F. Cook, 10 Pine Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 48. February 7, 10.45 a. m. Fire in residence, 31 
Laurel Street, owned and occupied by Eugene Sullivan. 
Caused by child setting couch afire with matches. Ex- 
tinguished with pony extinguishers. Recall, 10.53 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$2,000.00 


$28.50 


$1,200.00 


$28.50 


Contents, 


800.00 


30.00 


None. 


None. 



2-2-2. February 7, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. February 8, 1.07 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. L. Potter, 194 North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 12, 7.38 a. m. Fire in residence 53-55 
Warren Street, owned by Mrs. Hattie Cushing and occu- 
pied by owner and Charles E. Tenney. Fire originated 
on the second floor of the Tenney residence. Caused by 
roomer swinging lighted gas burner against the wall. 
Chemical Company responded but as the fire had worked 
into the partitions, an alarm Avas sent in from Box 34. 
See next alarm. 



248 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box. 34. February 12, 7.44 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire; 1,300 feet of hose wet. Recall, 8.40 a. m. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, $6,000.00 


$323.96 


$4,500.00 


$323.96 


Contents : 








Mrs. H. Gushing, 2,500.00 


53.50 


1,700.00 


53.50 


C. E. Tenney, 1,000.00 


90.00 


650.00 


90.00 


C. J. Sawyer. 225.00 


125.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. February 15, 6.04 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. L. Gillette, 11 Wall Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 18, 7.55 a. m. Fire in basement of 
residence 38 North Fruit Street, owned and occupied by 
Joseph Audette. Caused by children and matches. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $6.07 $1,000.00 $6.07 

Still. February 27, 7.04 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. John O'Neil, 8 Waverly Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 1, 3.35 p. m. Fire on roof of Concord 
Coal Company plant, Bridge Street. Caused by sparks 
from smoke stack. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
Loss trifling. No claim filed. 

Still. March 1, 4.13 p. m. Fire in unoccupied build- 
ing east of Water Street, owned by Capt. J. AV. Sulli- 
van. Bill board attached to building damaged. Owned 
by Charles F. Batchelder. Cause unknown. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


None. 


None. 


None. 


None. 


Bill board. 


$56.00 


$14.00 


None. 


None. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 249 

Still. March 2, 8.59 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dominican Pastole, 37 Tremont Street. Extinguislied 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 16. March 2, 9.00 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Needless alarm. Recall, 9.07 a. m. 

Still. March 3, 6.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of David Lucia, 7 Prospect Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 7, 12.21 p. m. Fire in wooden block 
33-39 Pine Street, owned by the William Mason estate. 
Fire originated on second floor of 37, occupied by Roy 
Craft and M. J. Reagan. Caused by overheated chimney. 
Chemical Company responded, but had hardly left quar- 
ters when an alarm from Box 19 was received. 

Box 19. March 7, 12.22 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Six hundred feet hose wet. Recall, 12.57 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


$85.00 


$2,000.00 


$85.00 


Contents : 










R. Craft, 


250.00 


25.00 


None. 


None. 


j\r. J. Reagan, 


500.00 


40.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. March 7, 2.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. W. Barnard, 50 West Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 8, 7.10 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of J. E. Chadbourne, 3 Hanover 
Street. Chemical Company responded. No fire. 

Still. March 17, 9.14 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. C. Chapman, 300 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 19, 6.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. G. Quinn, 39 Fayette Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 24, ]\farch 20, 5.27 a. m. Fire in rear of building, 



250 CITY OF CONCORD. 

131 North ]\rain Street, owned by Hon. N. E. Martin and 
occupied by George H. Reed as a lunch room, the Aetna 
Bottling Company, and others. Cause unknown. Twenty- 
one hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 6.16 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$4,500.00 


$715.00 


$2,000.00 


$715.00 


Contents : 










G. H. Reed, 


400.00 


300.00 


None. 


None. 


Bottling Co., 


2,000.00 


98.23 


1,000.00 


98.23 



Barn and store north of the Martin building owned by 
the Ellen O'Brien estate slightly damaged. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $100.00 $1,000.00 $100.00 

Still. March 20, 7.50 a. m. Rekindling of tire in cov- 
ing of barn at scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 21, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Cote, 142 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 21, 3.31 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Marcier, 3 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. March 23, 9.11 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James J. Nolan, 110 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 24, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Giddis, 5 Montgomery Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. Marcli 28, 3.50 p. m. Alarm occasioned by pan 
of fat taking fire in residence of W. T. Ferns, 204 North 
State Street. Chemical Company responded but no as- 
sistance was required. No loss. 

Still. March 29, 5.46 a. m. Fire in basement of 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 251 

church, corner of Pleasant and Elm Streets. Owned and 
occupied by the Pleasant Street Baptist Church. Caused 
probably by overheated furnace. Chemical Company re- 
sponded, but the fire soon assumed such proportions that 
a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 412. March 29, 5.55 a. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Two thousand feet of hose wet. Recall, 6.46 
a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$22,000.00 


$1,438.95 


$5,500.00 


$1,438.95 


Contents, 


500.00 


250.00 


None. 


None. 


Organ, 


3,000.00 


420.00 


3,000.00 


420.00 



Still. April 8, 1.50 p. m. Grass fire in White Park 
near Auburn and High Streets. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. April 8, 7.19 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Rev. A. D. Leavitt, 104 School Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Moran, 137 School Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 2.11 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
G. H. Hobson, 35 Church Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 12.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Henry McParland, 10 Ridge Road. Detail sent with 
Chief's buggy. No loss. 

Still. April 11, 11.13 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. H. Young, 230 North Main Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 12, 11.22 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Maurice Gerry, 4 Waverly Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 12, 1.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of A. E. Clark, 297 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 52. April 13, 4.28 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
burning of papers in stove in residence 114 South State 
Street, causing considerable smoke, which led some to be- 
lieve tliat the house was afire. Box pulled by a boy. 
Needless alarm. Recall, 4.34 p. m. 

Still. April 14, 7.48 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. P. H. Kelley, 11 Morton Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 413. April 15, 1.50 a. m. Fire in stable, rear of 
101 South Main Street, owned and occupied by Robert 
Crowley. Cause unknown. Horses and harness removed 
by railroad employees before arrival of the department. 
Nineteen hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 2.28 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,000.00 


$500.00 


$900.00 


$500.00 


Contents, 


1,750.00 


66.00 


100.00 


66.00 



Still. April 15, 8.29 a. m. Fire in hollow tree which 
stood close to building damaged by preceding fire. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 16, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in Curtis 
Memorial Church, corner South and Fayette Streets. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 18, 5.35 p. m. Brush fire on the Plains 
near residence of John Prentiss. Detail from the depart- 
ment sent under command of Engineer J. J. McNulty. 
Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 7.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. II. M. Newell, 301/2 South State Street. Extin- 
guished by members of Good Will Hose Company. No 
loss. 

Still. April 19, 6.14 p. m. Slight fire on floor of lower 
bridge. Caused probably by cigar or cigarette stub. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 253 

Chemical Company responded, but no assistance required. 
No loss. 

Still. April 21, 4.54 p. m. Grass fire on Bradley 
Street, between Franklin and Church. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 10.34 a. m. Grass fire in yard of resi- 
dence of G. Scott Locke, 26 South Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 24, 8.21 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Lyman Downs, 6 Mills Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. April 24, 3.07 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 107 
Rumford Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
No loss. 

Still. April 25, 2.28 p. m. Grass fire on Mooreland 
Farm, Iron Works Road. Chemical Company responded. 

4-4-4. April 25, 2.30 p. m. Alarm given for preceding 
fire. Detail from the department sent under command of 
Engineer John J. McNulty. Fire was practically extin- 
guished upon arrival. No loss. 

Still. April 25, 3.43 p. m. Brush fire in rear of Cal- 
vary Cemetery. Detail happening home from preceding 
fire just in time sent. Labored seven hours. 

Still. April 25, 4.55 p. m. At this time the fire had 
reached to rear of prison buildings. Alarm ordered given 
at West Concord. Seven hundred and fifty feet of hose 
wet. Loss, trifling. 

Still. April 25, 5.14 p. m. As a precautionary meas- 
ure, and on account of information received regarding 
fire, reserve reel sent. No hose used. 

Still. April 26, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Edward Libby, 13 Thompson Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Hose Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 26, 10.52 a. m. Brush fire on the Abbott 
farm, Albin Road. Detail from the department sent un- 



254 CITY OF CONCORD. 

cler command of Engineer J. J. McNulty. Labored one 
hour. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 26, 1.17 p. m. Continuation of the brush 
fire of the twenty-fifth instant. At this time the fire had 
covered an immense area and was working south and west 
toward Penacook and Au])urn Streets. Detail from the 
department sent under command of Engineer J. J. ]\rc- 
Nulty. Main detail labored six hours. Detail of four men 
left to watch through the night. Labored eighteen hours. 

Still. April 26, 1.40 p. m. Fire in shed connected with 
residence of Mrs. Flemming Mozee, on the Plains. Chemi- 
cal Company responded, but no assistance was required. 
Extinguished by occupants. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 27, 7.02 a. m. Continuation of brush fire 
of the twenty-fifth. Detail from the department sent to 
Auburn and Penacook Streets, under command of Engi- 
neer W. J. Coffin. Labored twelve hours. 

Still. April 27, 10.16 a. ra. A call for the Chemical 
Company from the detail at Penacook Street. 

4-4-4. April 27, 12.19 p. m. Brush fire on the Plains, 
near South Pembroke Street. Detail from the department 
sent under command of Engineer J. J. McNulty. Labored 
six hours. Loss, trifling. 

Still. April 27, 12.22 p. m. Continuation of the brush 
fire of the twenty-fifth instant. Residence on Auburn 
Street threatened. A call for hose wagon. Eagle wagon 
sent. One thousand feet of hose laid. Wagon immediately 
returned to quarters. At this time the fire had reached the 
hydrant zone, still the situation was a serious one. During 
the afternoon buildings on Auburn, Franklin, Gladstone, 
Rumford, Penacook, High Street Extension and Ridge 
Road were in danger and frequent calls were received at 
the Central Station for assistance. During the afternoon 
the detail had two thousand feet of hose at its disposal. 
Tliis was moved from one hydrant to another as needed un- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 255 

til the aggregate number of feet used reached fifty-six 
hundred. 

Still. April 27, 1.24 p. m. A call for hose wagon from 
Ridge Road. Eagle wagon again sent. One thousand 
feet of hose laid, Avhen wagon was again returned to 
quarters. 

Still. April 27, 2.18 p. m. A call for Chemical Com- 
pany from Franklin and Gladstone Streets. 

Still. April 27, 2.21 p. m. A call for hose wagon from 
Franklin and Gladstone Streets. No hose was used from 
this wagon, as upon arrival the detail had a line already 
laid. 

Still. April 27, 3.56 p. m. A call for steamer from 
Rumford Street. Kearsarge engine sent. Engine worked 
one and one-half hours. 

Still. April 27, 8.00 p. m. A call for Chemical Com- 
pany from Penacook Street, west of the Perkins build- 
ings. This was the end of this fire. Loss unknown. No 
buildings burned, although the engine-houses of the New 
England Granite Company on Rattlesnake Hill were at 
one time in danger, besides the residences before men- 
tioned. 

Still. April 28, 1.37 p, m. A call to investigate chim- 
ney condition in residence of Mrs. G. L. Green, 32 Maple 
Street. Detail sent with Chief's buggy. Had evidently 
recently burned out. One pony used. 

Still. April 29, 10.17 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Donahue, 10 Jefferson Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. May 1, 6.30 a. m. Set of buildings consisting of 
house, barn, etc., on the Pittsfield road destroyed. Build- 
ings owned by Stickney Hanson and occupied by owner, 
Moses Edmunds, and a family consisting of Mr. and Mrs. 
Merl Bills and two children aged five and two years, vis- 
itors. The youngest child, Elmer Bills, who was up stairs, 



256 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



perished in the flames. Fire probably caused by tipping 
over of himp which had been left burning up stairs. 
Chemical ('ompany responded, but could do little but pre- 
vent the fire from spreading in the woods. Detail sent 
over later in automobiles to recover the body, which was 
accomplished. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid 


Buildings, 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents : 










S. Hanson, 


400.00 


300.00 


None. 


None. 


]\I. Edmunds, 


200.00 


150.00 


None. 


None. 


M. Bills, 


70.00 


50.00 


None. 


None, 



Still. ]\Iay 2, 4.07 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mary F. Smith, 17 Valley Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. 



Building, 



Value. 

$1,800.00 



Loss. 



Insurance. 



$5.00 $1,000.00 



Ins. paid. 

$5.00 



4-4-4. ^lay 6, 1.37 p. m. Brush fire on Garvin's Falls 
road, near the Passaconaway Club buildings. Detail from 
the department sent under command of Engineer W. J. 
Coffin. Labored seven hours. .Loss unknown. 

4-4-4. May 6, 2.12 p. m. Brush fire in Bow, near Weeta- 
moo Club property. Alarm rung in answer to call for 
help from Bow authorities. Detail from the department 
sent under command of Capt. J. C. Mills. As it was im- 
possible to secure a barge, automobiles were used. Labored 
six hours. 

Still. May 6, 3.50 p. m. A call for help from Pem- 
broke road, to whicli the Garvin's Falls road fire had 
spread. Detail sent in automobile. Labored one hour. 

Box 24. May 6, 4.43 p. m. Fire in caboose car in B. & 
M. R. R. yard, near Bridge Street. Caused by explosion 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



257 



of oil stove, over which one of the train crew was prepar- 
ing supper. Nineteen hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall, 4.59 p. m. Two other cars slightly scorched. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Car No. 4087, 


$1,000.00 


$250.00 


$1,000.00 


$250.00 


Other cars, 


2,000.00 


55.00 


2,000.00 


55.00 


Contents : 










B. & M. R. R., 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


John Wood, 


35.00 


35.00 


None. 


None. 


J. A. Downing, 


25.00 


25.00 


None. 


None. 


C. P. Avery, 


15.00 


15.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. May 6, 6.16 p. m. Second call for help from 
Pembroke road on account of brush fire. Chemical Com- 
pany responded. Residence of James Fleming slightly 
damaged. Extinguished with pony extinguisher by de- 
tail already there before the arrival of the engine. 



Loss. 



Insurance. 



Ins. paid. 



Building, 



$700.00 $16.00 $500.00 $16.00 



Still. May 6, 8.58 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
R. H. Kimball, 122 School Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 7, 10.23 a. m. Brush fire on Garvin's Falls 
road. Detail from the department sent in barge under 
command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. Labored three hours. 
Loss unknown. 

4-4-4. May 7, 12.57 p. m. Alarm rung in answer to an 
appeal for help from Bow. Dangerous brush fire. Detail 
from the department sent in barge under command of 
Engineer J. J. McNulty. Labored nine hours. 

4-4-4. May 7, 2.55 p. m. Alarm occasioned by another 
call for help. Detail from department sent with four- 
seater, with orders to report to Engineer J. J. McNulty. 
Labored five hours. 

17 



258 CITY OP CONCORD. 

4-4-4. May 7, 7.00 p. m. Brush fire on Plains, north of 
Gully Hill. Detail sent with barge under command of 
Engineer W. J. Coffin, while another small detail was sent 
in advance with automobile offered by owner. Labored 
one hour. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 8, 2.52 p. m. Brush fire on Garvin's Falls 
road. Barge and detail from the department sent under 
command of Engineer "W. J. Coffin. Labored tliree hours. 

4-4-4. May 8, 7.57 p. m. Brush fire on Garvin's Falls 
road. Barge and detail from the department sent under 
command of Engineer J. J. McNulty. Unnecessary call. 
Three hours' labor. 

Still. May 9, 6.20 p. m. Alarm occasioned by fumi- 
gating of room at 65 North Main Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded but no assistance was required. 

Still. May 10, 1.40 p. m. Brush fire on Garvin's Falls 
road, near Pembroke line. Forest fire-warden and detail 
from the department sent in automobile. Upon arrival it 
was found that the railroad employees had been sum- 
moned and had the fire well in hand. Three hours ' labor. 

4-4-4. May 11, 2.28 p. m. Brush fire on shore of Pena- 
cook Lake, near summer cottages of George B. Lauder, 
J. C. Derby and others. Automobile and detail sent un- 
der command of Forest Fire-warden D. J. Adams, which 
was followed as soon as possible by barge and another 
detail under command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. Cottage 
and ice-house owned by George B. Lauder burned to the 
ground. Hard and persistent labor alone saved other 
buildings. St. Paul's School students, who were boating 
upon the lake rendered invaluable service. Fire caused 
by careless burning of brush near buildings. Detail 
labored three hours. Small detail left to watch through 
the night. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Buildings, $1,875.00 $1,875.00 $1,200.00 $1,200.00 

Contents, 915.00 915.00 500.00 500.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 259 

Still. May 12, 4.37 p. m. Fire in residence, 111 War- 
ren Street, owned and occupied by Bridget Driscoll. 
Caused by piece of lighted newspaper with which a fire 
in stove was to be started dropping on floor and blowing 
under couch. Extinguished by Chemical Company. Loss, 
trifling. 

Still. May 12, 7.53 p. m. Fire reported started in 
upper portion of Rumford Printing Company plant, De- 
pot Street. Chemical Company responded, but no assist- 
ance was required. No fire. 

Box 24. May 13, 2.57 p. m. Slight fire on second floor 
of residence 174 North Main Street, owned by Ira E. Gray 
and occupied by Mrs. Andrew Loven. Caused by cigarette 
and draperies. Extinguished with pony extinguisher. 
Recall, 3.03 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$4,000.00 


$31.50 


$3,000.00 


$31.50 


Contents, 


1,000.00 


55.00 


500.00 


55.00 



Still. May 14, 11.49 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of R. F. Walker, 103 North State Street. Extinguished 
by members of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Box 14. ]\Iay 16, 3.58 p. m. Fire in shed attached to 
residence 173 Rumford Street, owned by Mrs. Lucy M. 
Sargent. Cause unknown. Three hundred feet of hose 
wet. Recall, 4.13 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $700.00 $15.00 $500.00 $15.00 

Still. May 22, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in McShane 
Block, corner Warren Street and Odd Fellows' Avenue. 
Extinguished by detail from Central Station. No loss. 

Still. May 24, 3.39 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 



260 CITY OF CONCORD. 

R. P. Sanborn, 54 Washington Street. Chemical re- 
sponded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Box 33. May 25, 4.44 p. m. Fire in southeast corner 
of basement of State House. Caused by lightning. 
Twenty-two hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 
5.12 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $750,000.00 $25.00 None. None. 

Contents, 25,000.00 Trifling. None. None. 

11-11. May 28, 1.50 p. m. A call for assistance from 
West Concord. Kearsarge engine. Eagle wagon, barge 
and detail from the department sent under command of 
Engineer W. J. Coffin. No assistance required. See West 
Concord report. 

Still. May 29, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. S. Chandler, 10 South Spring Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. June 2, 12.02 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
the N. H. State Hospital, west of Penacook Lake. Barge 
and detail from the department sent under command of 
Capt. S. T. Ford. Labored two hours. No loss. 

Box 14. June 4, 3.13 p. m. Fire in unoccupied resi- 
dence, 173 Rumford Street, owned by Mrs. Lucy M. Sar- 
gent. Cause probably incendiary. Twelve hundred feet 
of hose wet. Recall, 3.45 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $700.00 $335.00 $485.00 $335.00 

Still. June 4, 7.30 p. m. Brush fire in rear of 135 
Rumford Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
No loss. 

Still. June 6, 8.49 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. E. W. Sanborn, 53 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



261 



Still. June 6, 10.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John Coleman, 9 Bowery Avenue. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 34. June 6, 6.21 p. m. Fire in block 26-30 Warren 
Street, owned by Cyrus F. Dustin and occupied by John 
Gaudreau, residence and meat market. Martin J. Haynes, 
shoe repairing ; F. P. Fellows & Son, cigar manufacturers ; 
P. F. Fellows, residence. Mr. Dustin also had furnished 
rooms in the building. Cause of fire unknown. Recall, 
8.04 p. m. Four thousand and fifty feet of hose wet. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$8,000.00 


$1,000.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents : 










J. Gaudreau, 


1,500.00 


125.10 


$1,000.00 


$125.10 


M. J. Haynes, 


200.00 


50.00 


150.00 


50.00 


F. P. Fellows & 










Son, 


600.00 


265.45 


300.00 


265.45 


I'. F. Fellows, 


900.00 


650.00 


300.00 


300.00 


C. Dustin, 


100.00 


80.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. June 7, 3.38 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. L. Gage, 129 "Warren Street, owned by George T. 
Whittemore. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Box 37. June 7, 3.46 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire as a precautionary measure. Three hundred and fifty 
feet of hose wet, but no water used in building. Recall, 
4.01 p. m. 



Value. 



Loss. 



Insurance. 



Ins. paid. 



Building, 



$1,100.00 $40.00 $800.00 $40.00 



Still. June 16, 9.47 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John Opie, 20 Tahanto Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. June 19, 10.33 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 



262 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of Joseph Matthews, 53 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. June 21, 3.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. F. Edgeworth, 10 Elm Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 46. June 22, 7.30 a. m. Fire in automobile on 
premises of owner, W. E. Darrah, 42 Perley Street. Ex- 
tinguished by owner without assistance from the depart- 
ment. Recall, 7.35 a. m. Loss, trifling. 

Still. June 27, 6.03 a. m. Fire in closet in Hotel 
Lenox, 117 North Main Street, owned by the L. D. Brown 
estate and occupied by P. Descoteau. Cause, unknown. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $15,000.00 $25.00 $10,000.00 $25.00 

Still. June 29, 8.03 a. m. Fire in closet in residence 
7 Lee Avenue, owned by Kate G. Lee and occupied by 
Anthony Koziomuchik. Cause unknown. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $47.00 $2,000.00 $47.00 

Box 48. July 2, 6.46 p. m. Alarm occasioned by auto- 
mobile owned by the Batchelder & Snyder Co., of Boston, 
taking fire in j^ard of N. A. Dunklee, 46 South Street. 
Cause unknown. One hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 
6.50 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Automobile, $1,350.00 $624.21 $1,200.00 $624.21 

Still. July 3, 1.25 p. m. Grass fire on east side of 
Rumford Street, north of Penacook Street. Extinguished 
by detail from the department with pony extinguishers 
sent in Chief's buggy. Loss, trifling. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 263 

Still. July 3, 8.30 p. m. Fire in sawdust on former 
site of an ice house at scene of preceding fire. Caused 
probably by the fire of the afternoon. Detail sent with 
pony extinguishers in Chief's buggy. 

Still. July 3, 9.30 p. m. Reserve hose wagon sent to scene 
of preceding fire when the whole area was soaked with 
water. Four hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Box 413. July 4, 1.15 a. m. False alarm. Seven hun- 
dred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 1.29 a. m. 

Box 35. July 4, 3.10 a. m. Fire in debris of abandoned 
building in process of demolition on south side of Pleas- 
ant Street Extension. Caused probably by fire crackers. 
Four hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 3.25 
a. m. No loss. 

Box 45. July 4, 9.19 a. m. Fire on roof of abandoned 
building on South Main Street opposite West Street. 
Caused probably by fire crackers. Six hundred and fifty 
feet of hose wet. Recall, 9.21 a. m. No loss. 

Still. July 4, 4.43 p. m. Slight fire on roof of resi- 
dence of Daniel F. Giles, 9 Montgomery Street. Caused 
probably by fire crackers. Extinguished by Chemical 
Compan3^ No loss. 

Still. July 4, 9.14 p. ra. Fire in dump north of Frank- 
lin Street near Ahern Court. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. July 5, 10.12 p. m. Alarm occasioned by flaring 
of kerosene brown-tail moth destroying apparatus which 
was being used at South and Fayette Streets. Chemical 
Company responded, but no assistance was required. No 
fire. 

Still. July 8, 11.06 a. m. Grass fire on Giles Street 
near School Street, set by boys. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Box 42. July 10, 4.22 p. m. Fire in building used as 
storehouse, owned and occupied by John Gienty, in rear 



264 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of 26 Concord Street. Caused by boys and matches. 
Eleven hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 4.42 
p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $500.00 $150.00 $300.00 $150.00 

4-4-4. July 11, 12.00 noon. Alarm sounded in response 
to an appeal for help from Bow in extinguishing brush 
fire. Barge and detail from the department sent under 
command of Capt. J. C. Mills. Labored four hours. 

Still. July 12, 12.13 p. m. Fire in dump on Bridge 
Street, east of river bridge. Chemical Company responded 
and extinguished the fire which was rapidly running 
across the field to the woods, but could do nothing with 
the main fire, it having burrowed far underneath. 

Still. July 12, 1.13 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Reserve reel, reserve hose wagon 
and Kearsarge wagon sent with detail. Nineteen hun- 
dred feet of hose wet. No loss. 

4-4-4. July 12, 3.41 p. m. Alarm given in response to a 
call for help from "West Concord in extinguishing brush 
fire. Detail from the department sent by railroad train 
under command of Engineer J. J. McNulty. Labored four 
hours. This was the beginning of a fire which was not 
officially declared out until the twenty-fourth instant, 
when rain came as a relief. It sorely taxed the resources 
of the railroad and fire department officials and caused no 
end of worry among property owners in the village. 

Still. July 13, 11.25 a. m. Another call for help from 
West Concord. Kearsarge engine, reserve reel and detail 
sent. Engine worked four hours protecting buildings. 
Seventeen hundred feet of hose wet. 

Still. July 13, 3.30 p. m. A call for help in fighting 
brush fire from West Parish. Details sent in automobile 
with pony extinguishers. Labored fifteen hours. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 265 

Still. July 13, 4.27 p. in. Another call for help from 
West Parish. Six-horse barge and man sent with orders 
to pick up all men who could be spared at West Concord 
and convey them to the scene. Labored fifteen hours. 

11-11. July 13, 4.46 p. m. Alarm given in response to 
call for help in fighting brush fire from Hopkinton. Barge 
and detail from the department sent under command of 
Engineer W. J. Coffin. Labored six hours. 

Still. July 21, 5.28 p. m. Slight fire on roof of w^hole- 
sale grocery store, 12 Hill Avenue, owned and occupied 
by Woodworth & Co. Caused probably by spark from 
foundry stack. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
Loss, trifling. 

Still. July 22, 10.15 a. m. Fire in residence 7 North 
State Street, owned and occupied by Dr. D. E. Sullivan. 
Caused hy painter stepping on snap match while using 
adelite. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$5,000.00 


$245.85 


$3,800.00 


$245.85 


Contents, 


2,500.00 


39.45 


1,200.00 


39.45 



Still. July 28, 9.57 a. m. Slight fire in residence 1 
Washington Court, owned by Charles Byrne and occupied 
by Patrick McGoff. Cause unknown. Chemical Com- 
pany responded but no assistance was required. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,200.00 $20.00 $800.00 $20.00 

Still. August 5, 11.41 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Miss S. M. Lee, 8 Park 
Street. Chemical Company responded but no assistance 
was required. No fire. 

Still. August 8, 3.43 p. m. Alarm occasioned by the 
burning of rubbish on the State Hospital grounds. 



266 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Chemical Company responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. Needless alarm. 

Still. August 9, 8.27 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Smith, rear 114 South Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. August 14, 12.26 p. m. Alarm given in response 
to a call for assistance in extinguishing brush fire in Bog 
at Penacook. Detail from the department sent under 
command of Engineer J. J. McNulty. As Engine 3 and 
hose wagon were engaged at this fire, Engine 4 and re- 
serve reel were sent to Penacook to cover. 

Still. August 14, 2.20 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in the George H. Reed restaurant, 168 
North Llain Street. Chemical Company responded but 
no assistance was required. No fire. 

StilIj. August 15, 11.40 a. m. Fire in dump on Broad- 
way, near Rockingham Street. Chemical Company re- 
sponded but could do little except extinguish it on the 
surface as it had worked far underneath. 

Still. August 15, 12.45 p. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Reserve wagon and detail sent. Worked two lines of hose 
one hour. Four hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 

Still. August 17, 8.15 a. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Reserve wagon and detail sent. Two hundred feet of 
hose wet. No loss. 

Box 45. August 19, 9.39 p. m. Fire in car loaded with 
hay in B. & M. R. R. yard opposite Sexton's Aveinue. Car 
owned by N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Cause of fire 
unknown. Nineteen hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall, 31.15 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Car, 


$806.00 


$193.43 


$600.00 


$193.43 


Contents, 


200.00 


200.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. August 26, 12.46 p. in. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 267 

dence of J. S. Chandler, 10 South Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. September 5, 9.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. E. Brown, 12 South Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. September 7, 3.45 p. m. Chimney tire in resi- 
dence of Grant Parkhurst, 47 Thompson Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 12. September 11, 6.54 a. m. Fire in residence 
193 North State Street, owned by Z. Farmanian and occu- 
pied by M. A. Spencer. Caused by children playing 
with matches in bed. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
j)any. Recall, 7.09 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,200.00 $10.00 $1,000.00 $10.00 

Contents, Trifling. 

Box 35. September 13, 7.53 p. m. Fire in building 25 
South Main Street, owned by Mrs. James F. Kelley ana 
occupied by S. B. Mitchell as residence and shoe store. 
Cause unknown. Sixteen hundred and fifty feet of hose 
wet. Recall, 8.40 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$400.00 


$111.49 


$300.00 


$111.49 


Contents, 


1,200.00 


125.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. September 15, 7.47 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. H. Staniels, 781/2 South Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 24. September 17, 6.31 a. m. Alarm occasioned 
by smoke in residence 12 Montgomery Street. Needless 
alarm. Recall, 6.43 a. m. No fire. 

Still. September 27, 7.35 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
heating of car load of refuse in railroad yard at foot of 



268 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Hill's Avenue. Kearsarge wagon and detail responded. 
One hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. September 27, 9.01 p. ra. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. G. Bartlett, 4 Jackson Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. October 6, 3.28 a. m. Trestle on B. & M. R. R. 
east of Page Belting Company plant damaged by fire. 
Caused by spark from locomotive. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Trestle, $1,500.00 $100.00 $1,500.00 $100.00 

Box 24. October 6, 3.33 a. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Needless alarm. Recall, 3.43 a. m. 

Box 48. October 6, 11.32 a. m. Fire in residence 43 
Thorndike Street, owned by L. W. Sargent and occupied 
by W. J. Sawyer. Caused by child and matches. Two 
hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 11.47 a. m. 





Vaiue. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$2,000.00 


$54.85 


$1,500.00 


$54.85 


Contents, 


1,200.00 


119.00 


700.00 


119 00 



Still. October 6, 11.34 a. m. Fire in residence 68 
Warren Street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Theresa 
Henry. Caused by child and matches. Chemical Com- 
pany being in service, ATert wagon sent. Extinguished 
with pony extinguisher. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$4,500.00 


$3.00 


$3,000.00 


$3.00 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


30.50 


1,000.00 


30.50 



Still. October 6, 11.37 a. m. A call for Chemical Com- 
pany from the scene of preceding fire. Company sent 
from Thorndike Street fire, but services not required. 

Still. October 7, 10.17 a. m. Fire in automobile truck 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 269 

owned by Boston Fruit Company, in Odd Fellows' Ave- 
nue. Caused by short circuiting of wires. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. Loss, trifling. 

Still. October 12, 12.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Jolm Ahern, 12 Granite Avenue. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

. Still. October 12, 4.18 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Rudolph Jeannotte, 43 Franklin Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 33. October 13, 11.25 a. m. Fire in basement of 
State House. Cause unknown. Twelve hundred feet of 
hose wet. Recall, 12.20 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$750,000.00 


$350.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


25,000.00 


Trifling. 







Still. October 13, 1.42 p. m. Rekindling of fire in de- 
bris at State House. Chemical Company responded but 
no assistance was required. Extinguished by occupants. 
Detail left to watch during remainder of day and night. 

Still. October 17, 12.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of James Reed, 40 Church Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 18, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Ash, 11 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 51. October 21, 6.40 p. m. Slight fire in erecting 
shop B. & M. R. R. plant. Cause unknown. Extin- 
guished by employees. Recall, 6.47 p. m. Loss, trifling. 

Still. October 26, 8.34 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Woodbury Hunt, 10 Court Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Stii-l. October 28, 6.47 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Hattie Gordon, 37 Fayette Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



270 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Box 49. October 31, 11.53 p. in. False alarm. Recall, 
11.59 p. in. 

Still. November 2, 7.23 p. ni. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Samuel Frost, 51 "West Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 8.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Herman Schaffer, 117 South Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 1.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Burton Crane, 16 "West Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 4, 9.46 p. m. Fire in box car owned 
by N. Y., N. H. & H R. R. and occupied by Eli Brunei. 
Loaded with empty boxes. Car located on spur track in 
R. R. Square, foot of Hill's Avenue. Cause unknown. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid 


Car, 


$806.00 


$21.69 


$600.00 


None 


Contents, 


2.50 


2.50 


None. 


None 



Box 55. November 4, 9.47 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Needless alarm. Recall, 10.07 p. m. 

Still. November 6, 11.55 a. m. Fire in block, 12 
Pleasant Street, owned by C. N. Towle and others and 
occupied by Lee Bros. Co., plumbers. Caused by drop- 
ping of match in oakum. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $4,000.00 $14.25 $3,000.00 $14.25 

Still. November 6, 6.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Rerai Belaire, 34 Jackson Street. Extinguished 
by Cliemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 6.55 p. m. A call to examine chim- 
ney in residence of B. C. White, 8 Pine Street. Chemical 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 271 

Company being in service, detail from Central Station 
sent. No fire. 

Box 45. November 7, 2.23 p. m. Fire in residence 13 
Sexton Avenue, ovsmed by David Lynch and occupied by 
Robert T. Morrow. Caused by overheated chimney. 
Seventeen hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 
3.04 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,200.00 


$487.00 


$700.00 


$487.00 


(Contents, 


600.00 


239.10 


500.00 


239.10 



Still. November 8, 6.24 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fortunat Draouin, 6 Downing Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 8, 7.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. W. Westman, 27 Jackson Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 34. November 9, 2.55 p. m. Slight fire in block, 3 
Odd Fellows' Avenue, owned by the James E. McShane 
estate and occupied by various parties. Fire originated 
on third floor, in residence of H. L. Bean. Caused by 
dropping of match in rubbish receptacle, which contained 
among other things some kodak films. Thrown out of 
doors before arrival of department. Recall, 2.59 p. m. 
Loss, trifling. 

Still. November 12, 3.03 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. C. Sanborn, 7 Wiggin Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 10.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Fanning, 801^ South State Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 12.23 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. E. Senter, 9 Marshall Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



272 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. November 15, 8.39 p. m. Chemical Company 
called to B. & M. R. R. round-house. No fire. 

Still. November 17, 6.30 p. m. Slight fire under fire- 
place in residence of H. 0. Martin, 45 Center Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. Loss, trifling. 

Still. November 22, 2.56 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. Godreau, 3 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 22, 5.33 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. Godreau, 3 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 28, 12.21 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E, Abbott, 9 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 28, 2.01 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Parker BroAvn, 75 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 29, 4.10 p. uj. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank Rushlow, 17 Highland Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 29, 11.17 p. m. Fire in pile of boards 
in rear of the W. S. Dole grain store, south of Phenix 
Stable. Caused probably by spark from locomotive. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. Loss, trifling. 

Box 5, November 29, 11.21 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Recall, 11.41 p. m. 

Still. November 30, 6.28 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of B. G. Tucker, 165 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 12.45 a. m. Club house west of 
Rumford Street, opposite Walker Street. Boys' resort. 
Owned and occupied by Walker Street Boys' Club. Caused 
probably by cigarette or cigar stub. Chemical Company 
responded but could do but little, the building being 
practically destroyed upon arrival. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 273 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$50.00 


$50.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


10.00 


10.00 


None. 


None, 



Still. December 3, 7.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. E. Bacon, 19 Prince Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 4, 10.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. W. Deering, 47 Green Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 25. December 7, 4.59 p. m. Fire in brick build- 
ings on south side of School Street between Durgin Street 
and Durgin Lane. The northerly building was owned by 
the AVilliam B. Durgin Company and occupied by the 
Globe Theatre, Williamson & Patch, proprietors. The 
southerly building was owned by Charles C. Schoolcraft 
and occupied by the Dux Toy Company as a manufactory 
and C. C. Martin as a blacksmith shop. These buildings 
comprised \drtually one block, as the wall between them 
contained fourteen apertures, formerly windows, thinly 
boarded, thus affording no protection from fire for either 
building, should one originate in the other. The weight 
of evidence would indicate that the fire originated in the 
theatre building, but this will never be definitely known, 
as when the alarm was given the flames had secured a 
firm hold on both buildings. The first work in hand, of 
course, was the removal of employees from the buildings, 
which was successfully accomplished. The Insurance 
Block, brick, on the north side of School Street, owned 
by the Capital Fire Insurance Company and occupied by 
various parties for mercantile and residential purposes, 
was damaged by the heat to considerable extent, numer- 
ous panes of both plate and common glass being broken 
and paint scorched from roof to sidewalk. State Block, 
brick, mercantile, located on the east side of Durgin Lane 
and extending to Main Street, owned by the Hill Asso- 



274 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



eiates, was slightly damaged. Frame residence on the 
"vvest side of Durgin Street, owned by Mrs. Mary E. 
Boinay, also scorched. Stock of F. W. Woolworth & Co., 
in the James R. Hill building, slightly damaged by flood- 
ing of basement. Four firemen injured. Fifty-five hun- 
dred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 9.26 p. m. Detail 
on duty through the night. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Durgin Bldg., 


$10,000.00 $10,000.00 


$7,500.00 


$7,500.00 


Contents : 










Williamson & 










Patch, 


3,500.00 


2,700.00 


3,000.00 


2,700.00 


George Perkins, 400.00 


400.00 


None. 


None. 


0. W. Bacon, 


20.00 


20.00 


None. 


None. 


Schoolcraft 










Building, 


5,000.00 


3,248.00 


3,500.00 


3,248.00 


Contents : 










Dux Toy Co., 


13,998.49 


12,172.72 


13,500.00 


12,172.72 


C. C. Martin, 


800.00 


50.00 


None. 


None. 


Insurance Blk., 


, 50,000.00 


775.48 


35,000.00 


755.48 


Contents : 










Mrs.C.C.Morey 


, 1,000.00 


9.75 


300.00 


9.75 


N. A. "Willis, 


1,000.00 


20.00 


500.00 


20.00 


State Block, 


40,000.00 


70.00 


30,000.00 


70.00 


M. E. Boinay, 


4,500.00 


150.00 


3,500.00 


150.00 


Woolworth 's. 




50.00 




50.00 



Box 25. December 7, 5.14 p. m. Second alarm for pre- 
ceding fire. 

Still. December 9, 1.26 a. m. Couch destroyed in resi- 
dence of Charles Horner, 4 Cedar Street. Caused by 
smoking, probably. Extinguished by Chemical Company, 
lioss, trifling. 

Still. December 9, 7.56 a. m. Fire in blacksmith 
forge mistaken for rekindling of fire in Schoolcraft 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 275 

Building, Durgin Street. Kearsarge wagon and detail 
sent. Needless alarm. 

Still. December 10, 9.58 a. m. Rekindling of fire in 
Schoolcraft Building, Durgin Street, among paper bags. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 12, 8.58 p. m. Fire in building in 
B. & M. R. R. yard, northeast of passenger station, used 
as a storehouse for lumber, oil, paint, etc. Cause un- 
known. Chemical Company responded, but had hardly 
left the station when a bell alarm was given. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid 


Building, 


$5,000.00 


$75.00 


$4,500.00 


None, 


Contents, 


8,000.00 


100.00 


7,500.00 


None, 


Freight car. 


800.00 


25.00 


500.00 


None, 



Box 5. December 12, 8.59 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Sixteen hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall, 10.01 p. m. 

Still. December 12, 10.28 p. m. Rekindling of fire in 
debris of preceding fire. Kearsarge wagon and detail 
sent. Four hundred feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. December 17, 7.43 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. J. C. Ordway, 13 Centre Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 19, 10.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. E. Clark, 297 Pleasant Street. Extinguished 
by detail sent in Chief's buggy. No loss. 

Still. December 20, 2.37 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Gen. J. N. Patterson, 35 Penacook Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 21, 7.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. M. Cotter, 3 Washington Court. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 21, 12.57 p. m. Chimney fire in the 



276 CITY OF CONCORD. 

William Thompson pool parlor, 123 North Main Street. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 21, 6.01 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. W. Service, 76 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 6.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John jMurphy, 23 Concord Street. Extinguished 
by members of Good Will Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. December 23, 9.03 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. S. Carleano, 20 Walker Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 24, 9.26 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. T. Snell, 31 Union Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 55. December 25, 10.14 p. m. Fire in freight car 
loaded with refuse from freight station. Car was stand- 
ing at freight train shed near foot of Chandler Street. 
Cause unknown. Two hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Kecall, 10.56 p. m. Loss, trifling. 

Still. December 27, 1.42 p. m. Fire in R. R. Y. M. 
C. A. building, owned by R. R. Y. M. C. A. and occupied 
by the above named Association for social, religious and 
lodging purposes. Building located on lot in Railroad 
Square extending from Pleasant Street Extension to 
Freight Street. Fire originated in basement, but it was 
soon apparent that the department was needed and box 
was pulled. 

Box 5. December 27, 1.49 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Thirty-two hundred feet of hose wet. Re- 
call, 2.49 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, .$25,000.00 $724.00 .$15,000.00 $724.00 

Contents, 1,800.00 77.16 1,800.00 77.00 

Still. December 27, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 277 

dence of Mrs. Charles Davis, 12 Monroe Street. Extin- 
guished by members of Good Will Hose Company. No 
loss. 

Still. December 28, 3.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Miss Mary Robinson, 28 Union Street. Extin- 
guished by detail from Central Station, sent in Chief's 
buggy. No loss. 

Still. December 28, 3.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Hazen Griffin, 22 Mills Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 28, 10.10 p. m. Chimney fire in James 
R. Hill Block, 61 North Main Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 1.09 p. m. Chimney fire in Ameri- 
can House Stable, rear of 125 North Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 2.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Timothy P. Sullivan, 49 Lyndon Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Penacook. 

Still. January 9, 8.25 p. m. Chimney fire, 18 West 
Canal Street, Hayward Block. No loss. 

Still. January 13, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire Contoo- 
cook Manufacturing Company Block, 6 Walnut Street. 
No loss. 

Box 35-2. January 28, 3.04 p. m. Chimney fire Bos- 
cawen side. Recall, 3.30 p. m. 

Still. February 5, 4.30 a. m. Slight fire in house 109 
]\Ierrimack Street, owned by the J. E. Symonds Table 
Company and occupied by Charles Emmons. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $800.00 $11.00 $500.00 $11.00 



278 CITY OF CONCORD. 

11-11. April 8, 2.30 p. m. Telephone call for help 
at River Hill. Old Runnel's homestead, owned by H. H. 
Chase. Assistant Engineer Dodge and a detail from the 
Company responded, but owing to the lateness of the 
call and the state of the roads, the main house and out 
buildings, with the exception of the barn were completely 
destroyed by the time the detail arrived. House unoc- 
cupied. Recall, 5.10 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $2,500.00 $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

Still. April 9, 7.50 p. m. Residence of J. Irving Hoyt, 
5 High Street. Fire in ash heap in cellar. Extinguished 
by members of the company. Small loss. Caused by 
smoke and dust. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $500.00 $15.00 $500.00 $15.00 

Still. April 16, 9.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George W. Vinica, 50 High Street. No loss. 

4-4-1. May 9, 1.35 p. m. Brush fire Elm Street. 
Meserve and Farrand lots. Labored two hours. Recall, 
3.40 p. m. No loss. 

4-4-4. July 11, 2.05 p. m. Grass fire on Intervale on 
land owned by E. L. Davis. Loss unknown. Recall, 3.10 
p. m. 

4-4-4. July 13, 12.25 p. m. Brush fire Bog Road. West 
Concord District. 

Box 35. July 13, 3.12 p. m. Brush fire River Hill, West 
Concord District. Recall, 6.00 p. m. 

Still. July 13, 9.15 p. m. Brush fire on Bog Road, 
West Concord District. 

4-4-4. July 14, 1.34 p. m. Call from IMast Yard. Rail- 
road bridge in danger from brush fire. Fire under con- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 279 

trol and order countermanded before apparatus left en- 
gine house. Recall, 1.52 p. m. 

4-4-4. August 13, 12.05 p. m. Brush fire Bog Road. 
Fire started on Jones lot; about two hundred cords of 
wood burnt. Cause not known. Thirty-one hundred feet 
of hose wet. Recall, 6.25 p. m. 

4-4-4. August 14, 10.40 a. m. Brush fire, same locality, 
Annis lot. Loss unknown. Twenty-five hundred feet of 
hose wet. Recall, 7.00 p. m. 

4-4-4. August 15, 1.45 p. m. Brush fire, same locality, 
Quimby lot. Loss unknown. Recall, 4.30 p. m. 

Box 47. September 19, 9.40 p. m. Table Shop, Sy- 
monds Court, owned by J. E. Symonds Table Company. 
Slight fire in boiler-house. Cause unknown. No loss. 
AVet one thousand feet of hose. Recall, 10.45 p. m. 

Box 47. September 20, 12.50 a. m. Same place. No 
loss. Recall, 2.20 a. m. 

Box 38. October 5, 5.12 p. m. No. 98 West IMain Street. 
Chimney fire in residence of George Provost. No loss. 
Recall, 5.50 p. m. 

STiLii. November 5, 9.45 p. m. Chimney fire 14 Sum- 
mer Street. House owned by C. G. Davis. No loss. 

Still. November 22, 12.00 noon. Chimney fire in house 
OAvned by Daniel Coakley, 19 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. November 23, 6.35 a. m. 106 Merrimack Street. 
Chimney fire in house owned by Miss Lizzie Rolfe. No 
loss. 

Still. November 25, 1.40 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block, 52 South Main Street, owned by Miss Susie 
Hall. No loss. 

Still. December 28, 8.15 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block owned by Mrs. Jennie Hay ward, 18 East 
Canal Street. No loss. 



280 city op concord. 

East Concord. 

Bell. January 5, 10.00 p. m. Buildings of Willis C. 
Prescott, Penacook Street, destroj^ed. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Buildings, $2,000.00 $2,000.00 $1,200.00 $1,200.00 

Contents, 1,000.00 591.00 700.00 591.00 

House adjoining, owned and occupied by John C. 
Hutchins, scorched. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $150.00 $2,100.00 $150.00 

Still. Januarj^ 11, 3.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. J. Lyle, Pembroke Street. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $20.00 $1,500.00 $20.00 

Still. January 22, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred S. Farnum, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. February 9, 8.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William DreAV, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. February 15, 6.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas E. Chase, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. March 11, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Sophia Fernald, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. April 25, 12.30 p. m. Brush fire on land of Mr. 
Gage, Penacook Street. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Bell. April 26, 10.30 a. m. Brush fire on land of John 
Potter on Potter Street. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Bell. April 29, 12.45 p. m. Brush fire near Sewall's 
Falls, on railroad land. No loss. Two hours' labor. 

Bell. April 30, 12.00 noon. Brush fire on land of 
llarley Sanborn, on the mountain. Three hours' labor. 
Loss, $500. Paid by railroad. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 281 

Still. May 1, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Fred S. Farnum, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. June 11, 8.15 p. m. Fire on Plains, residence of 
John Diiprey totally destroyed. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $600.00 $600.00 $450.00 $450.00 

Bell. July 12, 12.40 p. m. Fire in pile of ties on land 
of Boston & Maine R. R., near property of Mary F. Robin- 
son, which threatened to be serious on account of the 
high wind and the dry conditions. Large chemical used 
twice to good advantage. Labored one and one-half 
hours. No loss claimed. 

Still. July 12, 5.15 p. m. Call for volunteers to go to 
Canterbury to fight brush fire. Seventeen responded. 
Services paid for by Boston & Maine R. R. 

Still. July 19, 2.15 p. m. Grass fire on land owned by 
Miss Sophia Fernald, which threatened several buildings. 
Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. November 8, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred S. Farnum, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. November 17, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in house 
owned by Shad Cate, Pembroke Street, and occupied by 
PVank Terrell. No loss. 

Still. December 1, 12.50 a. m. Grass fire on railroad 
land, near property of Mrs. Mary F. Robinson, caused by 
spark from locomotive. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 5.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William D. Merrick, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. December 13, 2.15 p. m. Chimney fire in house 
of Mrs. Perkins, occupied by William Drew, Penacook 
and Shawmut Streets. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 1.45 p. m. Grass fire on land 
owned by Mary F. Robinson, Eastman Street. Labored 
thirty minutes. No loss. 



282 city of concord. 

West Concord. 

Still. January 16, 11.30 a. ni. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Irving Graham, 342 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. January 16, 4.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of David Piper, 11 Peabody Street. No loss. 

Still. January 23, 6.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Bernard Donahue, 514 North State Street. No 
loss. 

Still. January 28, 2.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur Davis, 522 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Stanley Granson, 486 North State Street. No 
loss. 

Bell. April 23, 1.15 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by Concord Electric Company. No assistance required. 

Still. April 24, 10.30 a. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by William A. Clark, Hopkinton Road. Labored one and 
one-half hours. No loss. 

Still. April 25, 4.50 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by the New England Granite Company, near the prison. 
Labored two hours. Wet seven hundred and fifty feet of 
hose. 

Still. April 25, 7.40 p. m. Second call for preceding 
fire. Labored two hours. See precinct report. 

Bell. May 17, 2.15 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
George R. Parmenter, North State Street. No loss. . 

Bell. May 28, 1.45 p. m. Fire in set of buildings 469 
North State Street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Charles 
E. Ballard. Fire originated in barn from some unknown 
cause. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Buildings, 


$2,500.00 


$288.00 


$1,100.00 


$288.00 


Contents, 


600.00 


403.00 


500.00 


403.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 283 

Bell. July 12, 2.30 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Alexander Boisvert, near the junction of the Penacook 
and Bog Roads. Caused by spark from locomotive. This 
was the beginning of a brush fire which burned until the 
twenty-fourth instant. Help was repeatedly sent to West 
Concord and once to Hopkinton from the precinct. It 
burned over an area in West Concord' of about four 
square miles of forest land, owned by various parties, 
crossed the Hopkinton line and raged for miles beyond. 
The figures given here pertain solely to losses sustained 
on the Concord side of the line. Loss, including set of 
farm buildings owned by Mrs. Esther Sanborn, valued at 
$4,888.00, and small buildings owned by Andrew J.Abbott, 
$150.00, $16,700.00. Paid by B. & M. R. R. 

Bell. July 12, 3.15 p. m. Second alarm for preceding 
fire. See precinct report. 

Bell. July 13, 4.00 a. m. Continuation of brush fire 
of the twelfth instant. 

Bell. July 13, 7.30 a. m. Continuation of brush fire 
of the twelfth instant, then burning on land owned by 
Charles H. Farnum. Houses on Hutchins Street in immi- 
nent danger. Help summoned from precinct. Engine 2, 
reserve reel and detail sent. Engine worked four hours. 
Seventeen hundred feet of hose wet. No houses lost. 

Bell. July 13, 9.15 a. m. Grass fire near the residence 
of James H. Harrington, 533 North State Street. No loss. 

Bell. July 14, 9.00 a. m. Continuation of brush fire of 
the twelfth instant. 

Bell. July 14, 1.45 p. m. Continuation of brush fire of 
the twelfth instant. 

Bell. July 15, 12.45 a. m. Continuation of brush fire of 
the twelfth instant. 

StilI;. August 13, 12.30 p. m. Brush fire on land 
owned by George S. Morrill, Bog Road. Cause unknown. 
Loss, $100.00. No insurance. 



284 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Bell. October 5, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in the resi- 
dence of Fred A. Eastman, 504 North State Street. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


$10.00 


$2,800.00 


$10.00 


Contents, 


500.00 


5.00 


400.00 


5.00 



Still. October 10, 6.15 p. m. Fire in old carpets in 
barn cellar, 3 Knight Street. Caused presumably by boys 
and matches. No loss. 

Bell. October 24, 3.30 p. m. Slight fire in residence 
of Henry Peterson, 451 North State Street. Cause, chil- 
dren and matches. No loss. 

Still. November 22, 9.30. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Grand, 552 North State Street. No loss. 

No Alarm. November 27, 4.30 p. m. Small frame 
building in the woods, owned by C. M. and A. W. Rolfe 
and occupied by wood-choppers as a camp, destroyed. 
Defective chimney. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $100.00 $100.00 None. None. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

SUMMARY. 



285 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Insurance 
paid. 


Net loss. 


BUILDINGS. 

Precinct 


$1,753,723.00 

3,300.00 

8,600.00 

22,400.00 


$25,442.48 

2,511.00 

2.770. CO 

17,198.00 


$162,685.00 

2,000.00 

5,250.00 

20,600.00 


$19,691.79 

1,511.00 

1,820.00 

16,998.00 


$5,750. 6'.t 
1,000 00 


Penacook 


East Concord 

West Concord. ... 


950.00 
200.00 


Total 


$1,788,023.00 

$109,665.99 

800.00 

1,500.00 

1,100.00 


$47,921.48 

$20,552.71 

30.00 

1,091.00 

408.00 


$190,535.00 

$42,250.00 

500.00 

1,200.00 

900.00 


$40,020.79 

$17,545.05 

15.00 

1,091.00 

408.00 


$7,900.69 

.$3,007.66 
15 00 


CONTENTS. 

Precinct 

Penacook 


East Concord . ... 
West Concord 




Total 


$113,065.99 
1,788,023.00 


$22,081.71 
47,921.48 


$44,850.00 
190,535.00 


$19,059.05 
40,020.79 


$3 022 66 


Buildings 


7,900.69 


Buildings and 
contents 


$1,901,088.99 


$70,003.19 


$235,385.00 


$59,079.84 


$10,923.35 



Figures relative to buildings include forest fire losses. 



Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as 
follows : 

Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one tirst- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," with modern hose 
wagon, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company 
(]3 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kear- 
sarge," and modern hose wagon, attached to the Kear- 
sarge Steam Fire Engine Company (14 men) ; one second- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, 
in charge of an engineer and fireman ; one double 60- 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 

gallon-tank Hollo way chemical engine, in charge of two 
permanent men; one ladder truck, ''City of Concord," 
attached to Hook and Ladder Company (21 men) ; one 
house man at Central Fire Station. There are twelve 
horses kept at this station. There are six permanent men 
located at the Central Fire Station and one permanent 
man at each fire station within the precinct. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent 
man and horse. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has a modern 
hose wagon with permanent man and two horses. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hook and ladder truck, one hose reel and one 
wagon in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, 
has a Hunneman 6-inch cylinder hand engine and a 
modern hose wagon. 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4i/2-iiich cylin- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank. 



Hose. 



Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 
East Concord, 



8,600 


feet, 


3,000 


( ( 


1,400 


< ( 


500 


( ( 


13,500 


feet 



fire department. 287 

Public Reservoirs. 

Capacity 
cubic feet. 

1. Main Street, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s, 1,000 

2. Main Street, middle front State House yard, 1,500 

3. Main Street, rear Court House, 2,000 
4 State Street, corner Washington Street,* 2,000 

5. Rumford Street, near Mrs. Josiali Minot's, 1,000 

6. Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street,* 4,000 

7. School Street, corner of Summit Street,* 3,500 



* Brick cemented. 



288 CITY OP CONCORD, 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire- 
alarm boxes, the city is divided into six districts, viz. : 

District 1. Embraces that section of the city north and 
west of Washington Street, Box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
ton Streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
Streets. 

Districts 4, 5 and 6. Embrace all south of Pleasant 
Street. 

The first figure of the box number wall indicate the 
district. 

District No. 1. 

9. New Hampshire State Prison. 

12. Curtice Avenue. 

13. Franklin and Rumford. 

14. Bradley and Walker. 

15. Main and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. C. S. Gale's Store. 

19. Centre and Liberty. 

District No. 2. 

21. State, opposite Court. 

23. IVIain and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 

25. Main and School. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 289 

26. Centre and Union. 

27. School and Merrimack. 

28. School and Spring. 

29. Centre and Essex. 

District No. 3. 

32. "Warren and Pine. 

34. Central Fire Station. 

35. Martin's Drug Store. 

36. Pleasant and Spring. 

37. Pleasant and North Fruit. 

38. Orchard and Merrimack. 

District No. 4. 

41. South and Thompson. 

42. Good Will Hose House. 

43. Main and Fayette. 

45. Nelson & Durrell's Store. 

46. Perley and Grove. 

47. South, opposite Downing. 

48. Thorndike and South. 

49. West and Mills. 

412. Wall and Elm. 

413. Main, opposite Thorndike. 

414. State and West. 

471. Clinton and South Fruit. 

District No. 5. 

51. Boston & ]\Iaine Railroad, new shops. 

52. South Main and Allison. 

53. Hall and Hammond. 

54. Broadway and Pillsbury. 
56. St. Paul's School. 



19 



290 CITY OF CONCORD. 

57. Pleasant View. 

521. Broadway and Rockingham. 

522. South Main and Holly. 

District No. 6. 
62. South Main, opposite Holt Bros. 

Private Boxes. 

5. Boston & Maine Railroad, north end passenger depot. 

6. The Abbot-Downing Company. 

7. New Hampshire State Hospital. 
S. Page Belting Company. 

9. Three boxes inside New Hampshire State Prison. 

33. State House. 

39. Odd Fellows' Home. 

55. Boston & Maine Railroad, old repair shops. 



FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 413, 414, 471, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 62, 521 and 
522, will not be responded to by the Alert Hose Company 
until signaled. The signal to proceed to the tire will be 
four blows or second alarm, excepting alarms rung m 
from Box 56. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 32, 37, 39 and 56 will not be 
responded to by the Good Will Hose Company until sig- 
naled. It will be governed by the same signals govern- 
ing Alert Hose Company. The Alert Hose and Good "Will 
Hose Companies will hitch up and remain in readiness 20 
minutes after the first alarm, to all boxes not responded 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 291 

to on first alarm. Then, receiving no signal, the officers 
in charge shall dismiss their companies. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 12, 37, 53, 54, 57, 471 ana 
521 will not be responded to by the Kearsarge Company 
on first alarm. 

The signal to proceed to the fire will be two blows, four 
bloAvs, or second alarm, as circumstances may warrant. 

Kearsarge Steamer to all calls excej>t 51. 

Eagle Hose Company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to Box 6, on first alarm ; to Boxes 23, 24, 
25, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43, 45 and 413, on second ; to all others 
on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill Steamer will respond to Boxes 7, 8, 9 
and 39 on first alarm ; to Boxes 5, 6, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 21, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 414, 471, 52, 54, 55, 57, 62, 521 and 522, on second; 
to all others on third. 

Chemical Engine will respond to all box alarms except 
8, 9, 51, 56, 57 and 521. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company will respond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating 
from same box or not. 

Two rounds of 11 strokes each will signalize the re- 
quirement of assistance out of town, and will be re- 
sponded to by a detail of three men from each company, 
appointed for the purpose, and by those alone. 

Two additional blows will indicate that the call for 
assistance emanates from East Concord. Such apparatus 
will be detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further 
aid is necessary. Box 34 (Central Station) will follow. 

All-out signal, three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on 
the bells and will be responded to by a detail of four men 



292 CITY OP CONCORD. 

from each company, appointed for the purpose, and by 
those alone. 

IMiLiTARY Signal. 
Two rounds of 3-1-2. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause 
of 15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will ])e given 
at 8 o'clock a. m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given 
at 1 o'clock p. m. 

The signal to close all schools for one session will be given 
at 11.30 a. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It will be one 
single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Fire-alarm Telegraph 

is the "Gamewell" patent. It embraces 41 miles of wire. 
On the lines are 44 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the city, 
and 10 private boxes— in all, 54. There are three alarm 
bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell metal), one of 3,740 pounds 
(bell metal), and one of 2,000 pounds (American steel). 
There are also 16 mechanical tappers, 40 direct action tap- 
pers, one four-circuit repeater, and six indicators. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 293 

The battery consists of 252 storage battery cells. 
The alarm system was installed in 1880 by the Gamewell 
Fire-alarm Telegraph Company. 

Directions for Giving an Alarm. 

Above all things, keep cool. 

To obtain the key to the box, break the glass in the key 
box located beneath the alarm box. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale," 
designed expressly for the purpose of informing you 
whether an alarm is being transmitted the instant you open 
the door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull doMTi 
the hook once only and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to at- 
tempt to pull another until the one already pulled had per- 
formed its mission. 

Wait until 20 seconds have elapsed after the "tell-tale" 
has stopped ringing, close the door, which will restore the 
armature to the position it left when the door was opened. 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go. 

Should there be no response, pull it again. 

Then should there be no response, go to the next box. 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the depart- 
ment. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



294 CITY OP CONCORD. 

PENACOOK FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 
Number, Location, Etc. 

W. C. Green, Chief Engineer: 

I lieremth submit for your consideration the following 
report of the Penacook fire-alarm telegraph system. The 
system is the Gamewell patent, and consists of four ana 
one half miles of No. 9 iron wire. On the lines are ten 
boxes owned by the city, two private boxes, one 1,500-pound 
bell, one indicator, three mechanical gongs and three direct- 
action tappers. The battery consists of thirty-six storage 
battery cells. The battery plates have been renewed this 
year. No new boxes were added the past year. I would 
respectfully recommend the addition to the system of two 
new boxes the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED M. DODGE, 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm. 

Location op Boxes. 

31. Elm Street, near S. N. Brown's house. 

35. Washington Square. 

37. "Washington Street, near outlet. 

38. Junction of West Main and South Main Streets. 

39. South ]\Iain Street, near cemetery. 

41. Comer of Center and East Canal Streets. 

42. High Street, opposite Maple Street. 
45. Summer Street, opposite Church Street. 

47. Merrimack Street, opposite Hose House. 

48. Corner Penacook and Rolfe Streets. 



fiee department. 295 

Private Boxes. 

25. Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works. 
62. Concord Axle Works. 

All-out Signal. 
Three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 
Three rounds of four strokes each. 

Out of Town Signal. 
Two rounds of eleven strokes each. 

For Fire on Boscawen Side. 
Box 35, mth two additional strokes. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, ^vith a pause 
of 15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close all schools for the forenoon session 
will be given at 7.30 a. m. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session at the Charles 
Street building will be given at 8.00 a. m. 

The signal to close all schools for the afternoon session 
will be given at 12.15 p. m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session at the Charles 
Street building will be given at 12.45 p. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Saturday afternoon at 12.50 o'clock precisely. It will be 



296 CITY OF CONCORD. 

one single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

Directions for Giving an Alarm. 

To open the box, break the glass and turn the key. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale," 
designed expressly for the purpose of informing you 
Avhether an alarm is being transmitted the instant you open 
the door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull down the 
hook the whole length of the slot, once only, and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to 
attempt to pull another until the one already pulled had 
performed its mission. 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the depart- 
ment. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 

The Penacook fire-alarm system was installed in June, 
1908, under direction of the chief engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 297 

REGULATIONS OF CONCORD FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Section 1. The fire department shall consist of a chief 
engineer, two assistants within the precinct, one engineer 
each from Ward 1, Ward 2 and Ward 3 ; two steamer and 
hose companies, one company to consist of thirteen men, in- 
cluding driver, and one company to consist of fourteen 
men, including drivers; one relief steamer (company) to 
consist of two men; two hose companies to consist of eleven 
men, including driver; a chemical engine company to con- 
sist of two men ; a hook and ladder company to consist of 
twenty-one men, including driver; a house man at Central 
Fire Station ; steamer Pioneer, not less than twenty or more 
than forty men; hand engine companies No. 2 and No. 3, 
not less than twenty or more than thirty men each. The 
engineers shall exercise the powers of fire-wards, and 
those within the precinct shall constitute the board of 
engineers. 

Sect. 2. The chief engineer and assistant engineers and 
all other members of the fire department shall hold their 
respective offices and places until they are removed, or their 
offices or places are otherwise vacated. The board of mayor 
and aldermen, for cause, and after a due hearing, may at 
any time remove from office or place the chief engineer, or 
any assistant engineer, or any officer or member of the de- 
partment. In case of vacancies from any cause in the de-- 
partment, of officers or men connected in any manner with 
the fire service, such vacancies shall be filled by the board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 3. The chief engineer shall give his entire time 
to the duties of his office, and shall not engage in or be 
connected with any other business or occupation, and shall 
reside in a house to be furnished by the city free from rent. 



298 CITY OF CONCORD. 

He shall receive in full for his services, in addition to the 
use of said house, rent free, the sum of twelve hundred and 
fifty dollars per annum. 

Sect. 4. The chief engineer shall have the sole command 
at fires over all persons, whether members of the fire de- 
partment or not. He shall direct all proper measures for 
extinguishing fires, protecting property, preserving order 
and enforcing the laws, ordinances, and regulations re- 
specting fires; and shall examine into the condition of the 
fire engines and all other fire apparatus, and of the fire en- 
gine houses and other houses belonging to the city and used 
by the department, and by the companies thereto attached, 
as often as once a week, and whenever directed to do so by 
the mayor, or the committee on fire department through its 
chairman. He shall certify all bills and submit the same 
for inspection monthly to the joint standing committee on 
fire department. He shall report to the city council an- 
nually a statement of the receipts and expenditures of the 
fire department, the condition of the fire engines and all 
other fire apparatus, a detailed schedule of the property 
in his charge, the names of the officers and members, and 
all other facts in relation to the department. Whenever 
the fire engines or other fire apparatus require repairs he 
shall, under the direction of the connnittee on fire depart- 
ment, cause the same to be made, and as far as practicable 
he shall examine into the location and condition of fire ap- 
paratus belonging to corporations or private individuals 
within the limits of the city. He shall require permanent 
men, when not otherwise engaged, to perform snch otlier 
duties and do such other work as in his judgment may be 
deemed proper. He shall be responsil)le for the proper 
care of all property connected with the fire department. 
He shall keep fair and exact rolls of the respective com- 
panies, specifying the time of admission and discharge, and 
tlie age of each member, and shall report annually, or 



FIRE DEPABTMENT. 299 

oftener if directed, all accidents by fire which may happen 
within the city, with the causes thereof, the number and 
description of the buildings destroyed or injured, and the 
amount of loss and insurance on the same, together with the 
names of owners or the occupants, and shall make returns 
as required by the Laws of 1889, chapter 84, and entitled: 
"An act in relation to returns and statistics of fires." He 
shall visit each department house as often as practicable, 
and inspect the men, the books of the house, and see that 
the quarters are properly conducted and in good order. 
He shall have the power to suspend any officer or member 
of the department for insubordination, disorderly conduct 
or neglect of duty, said suspension to continue pending the 
action of the mayor and aldermen. The chief engineer shall 
examine all places where shavings and other combustible 
materials may be collected or deposited, and cause the same 
to be removed by the tenants or occupants of such places, or 
at their expense, whenever in his opinion such removal is 
necessary for the security of the city against fires. 

Sect. 5. In the absence of the chief engineer, the next 
assistant engineer in rank, who may be present, shall have 
the powders and perform the duties of the chief engineer 
and the seniority in rank of the engineers shall be deter- 
mined by the board of engineers at their first meeting. 

Sect. 6. The foreman of each engine, hose, and hook 
and ladder company, immediately after every fire at which 
said company may have attended, shall examine into the 
condition of the fire apparatus belonging to his respective 
company, and report any deficiency which may exist to the 
chief engineer. He shall keep, or cause to be kept by the 
clerk of his company, exact rolls, specifying the time of ad- 
mission, discharge, and age of each member, and accounts 
of all city property entrusted to the care of the several 
members, and of all cases of absence and tardiness, in a 
book provided for that purpose by the city, which rolls and 



300 CITY OF CONCORD. 

record books are always to be subject to the order of the 
chief engineer and mayor. They shall also make, or cause 
to be made, to the chief engineer, true and accurate returns 
of all members, with their ages, and of the apparatus en- 
trusted to their care, wlienever called upon so to do. 

Sect. 7. The foreman of each company shall, under the 
direction of the chief engineer, have charge and manage- 
ment of his company at fires; the assistant foreman shall 
assist the foreman in the discharge of his duties, and act 
as clerk of the company, and in the absence of the foreman 
assume his authority. The foreman and assistant foreman 
shall be appointed by the chief engineer. 

Sect. 8. The stewards of the Alert and Good Will Hose 
Companies shall act as drivers of hose carriages, take charge 
of and properly care for and exercise the horses used by 
each company. They shall be permanently engaged and 
devote their whole time to the department, and sleep in 
their respective hose houses at night ; and for the proper 
execution of all duties required of them shall be subject to 
the direction of the chief engineer. 

Sect. 9. It shall be the duty of every engine, hose, and 
hook and ladder company, to have its engine, hose and other 
apparatus cleaned, washed, oiled, reeled and housed imme- 
diately after its return from any fire or service, and at all 
times to maintain the same in good condition, and the mem- 
bers of the several companies shall perform any necessary 
duties which the chief engineer or their respective foreman 
may direct. 

Sect. 10. All members of the department when on duty 
shall wear some suitable badge, to be designated by the 
board of engineers. The chief and permanent members 
shall wear at all times when on duty the regulation parade 
uniform worn by the fire department. 

Sect. 11. The pay-rolls for the board of engineers and 
the several fire companies shall be made up by the chief 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 301 

and clerk of the board of engineers semi-annually, on the 
lirst day of January and July. Foremen and clerks of 
companies will forward their pay-rolls to the board of en- 
gineers for approval and after the action of said engineers 
and the approval of the city auditor and the committee on 
accounts and claims, said pay-rolls shall be passed over to 
the city tax collector, under whose sole direction all sums 
for services of call firemen shall be disbursed. 

Sect. 12. No charge for extra services will be allowed 
any member of the department unless upon an order of a 
member of the board of engineers. 

Sect. 13. No engine, hose, or hook and ladder carriage 
shall be taken to a fire out of the city Anthout permission 
from the chief engineer, except steamer Pioneer, which may 
be taken to any fire in the village of Penacook, nor shall any 
apparatus of the fire department be taken from the city 
except in case of fire, without permission from the board 
of mayor and aldermen; and in sending any apparatus to 
aid in extinguishing fires in neighboring localities, the chief 
in all cases will authorize his assistant next in rank avail- 
able to take charge of the direction of such apparatus, and 
not allow any fireman, at such an emergency, to leave the 
city, except such a number as is actually required to man 
the apparatus, and no member to leave without permission 
or direction from the chief engineer. 

Sect. 14. It shall be the duty of engineers and firemen, 
whenever there is an alarm of fire in the city, to repair im- 
mediately to the place of such fire, wearing a suitable badge, 
and the engineers shall take proper measures that the sev- 
eral engines and other apparatus be arranged and duly 
worked for the speedy and effectual extinguishment of the 
fire. The engineers shall inspect and make themselves 
familiar with all shops, hotels, tenement blocks, and all pub- 
lic buildings, halls, churches, schoolhouses and asylums once 
in each six months and study the location of all hydrants 



302 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and reservoirs in the city, and generally inform themselves 
in all matters pertaining to their duties as engineers. No 
engineer shall interfere with or attempt to give orders rela- 
tive to the location or use of a line of hose, when he has 
ascertained that another has command of it, unless by con- 
sent of the engineer in command of it, or by orders of the 
officer in command of the fire ; and it shall be his duty to 
inquire if there is an officer in charge. 

Sect. 15. For each absence from fire, or neglect of duty, 
the chief engineer, the assistant engineers, and engineers of 
steamers shall be fined three dollars, and each other mem- 
ber of the department one dollar; provided, however, that 
any fireman liable as above may in case of sickness have 
power of substitution by giving notice, each assistant en- 
gineer to the chief, each foreman to an engineer, and each 
other member to the foreman of liis company. All fines 
shall be paid to the clerks of respective companies at the 
first regular meeting after they are incurred. The clerks 
of companies shall disburse the fines to substitutes answer- 
ing for absent members in cases where there were sub- 
stitutes. In cases where there were no substitutes the fines 
shall be paid to the city. 

Sect. 16. Any volunteer company using the apparatus 
of the city at any fire shall be under the control and com- 
mand of the chief engineer and his assistants, agreeably to 
the foregoing provisions of this chapter. 

Sect. 17. The department shall appear for public pa- 
rade, drill and inspection at such times as the chief engineer 
and committee on fire department shall order, for which 
purpose three hundred dollars can be expended annually. 
The companies in Wards 1, 2 and 3 will attend by invita- 
tion and voluntarily. Each company in the department 
under the direction of the chief engineer or assistants shall 
take out their respective engines and apparatus for exercise 
and drill as often as he shall direct, such exercise and drill 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 303 

to take place in public, not oftener than once a month, and 
at least once in two months, between the first of April and 
November. 

Sect. 18. The engineers shall have control of all per- 
sons appointed to serve in any company of the fire depart- 
ment and power to direct and control the labor of all per- 
sons present at any fire. An engineer may and shall cause 
any fire deemed by him to be dangerous in any place to be 
extinguished or removed. 

Sect. 19. The engineers may establish such regulations 
respecting the kindling, guarding and safe-keeping of fires 
and for the removal of shavings and other combustibles 
from any building or place, as they shall think expedient. 
Such regulations shall be signed by a majority of the en- 
gineers. Such regulations shall be approved by the mayor 
and aldermen, recorded by the city clerk, and copies 
attested by him posted up in two or more places in the city 
thirty days, when they shall take effect. Penalties not ex- 
ceeding twenty dollars for each offense may be prescribed 
by the engineers for the breach of such regulations, and 
such regulations shall remain in force until altered or an- 
nulled. 

Sect. 20. The board of engineers may from time to time 
make and enforce such regulations for the government of 
the department as may be deemed proper, subject to the 
approval of the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 21. If any member of any of the several com- 
panies shall wilfully neglect or refuse to discharge his duty, 
or shall be guilty of disorderly conduct or disobedience to 
any officer or to any engineer, he shall for any such offense 
be forthwith dismissed from the department by direction 
of the chief engineer. No person shall be a member of, or 
serve in, the fire department, who is under the age of 
twenty years, and no person whose occupation is carried on 



304 CITY OF CONCORD. 

outside the city shall be appointed a member of the fire 
department. 

Sect. 22. All applicants for membership shall be nom- 
inated by the chief engineer, and shall receive pay and be 
considered members of the department from the date of 
their confirmation by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

No person shall hereafter be appointed to any position in 
the fire department unless and until the committee on fire 
department shall have certified in writing to the board of 
mayor and aldermen that such person has been examined 
by them, or under their supervision, and is in their ojnnion 
qualified to perform the duties of the position to which he 
ia nominated. 

No officer or member of the permanent,, or officer of the 
call, force shall attend any political convention as a dele- 
gate, distribute tickets at any election, or take any part 
whatever in political matters other than to exercise the right 
of sufi^rage, and no political or religious discussion shall ])e 
permitted in any of the department houses. 

Sect. 23. The chief engineer shall have the care and 
management of the rooms, apparatus, machinery, wires, 
poles and signal boxes connected with the fire-alarm tele- 
graph. He shall prepare rules and directions for giving 
alarms of fire through the telegraph. He shall have the 
superintendence, and under the direction of the joint stand- 
ing committee on fire department have control of the several 
stations, the apparatus, the furniture therein, and all other 
property appertaining to the department. He shall, with 
the assistance of the permanent men at the Central Station, 
make the necessary repairs and take care of the fire-alarm 
system, including the batteries, all alarm boxes, and every- 
thing pertaining to the fire-alarm system. He shall per- 
sonally be able to master the fire-alarm in every particular, 
and every permanent man at the Central Station shall be 
obliged to understand the fire-alarm system, in order that 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 305 

the chief engineer may call upon any of them to attend to 
and repair any part of the same. This provision shall not 
be construed to prevent the chief engineer from employing 
extra linemen when necessary, or from acting promptly in 
any emergency. 

Sect. 24. Permanent officers and men of the depart- 
ment shall be entitled to a vacation without loss of pay of 
fourteen days in each year. In addition they shall be en- 
titled to be off duty without loss of pay two days in each 
month, such two days not to be taken in the same week. 
On the weeks that they are not off duty for a day, under 
the above provision, they shall be entitled to be off' duty for 
one night without loss of pay. All vacations and absences 
from duty under the above to be under the direction of 
the chief engineer. 

Sect. 25. The joint standing committee on fire depart- 
ment, subject to the board of mayor and aldermen, shall 
by themselves or agent purchase all supplies in connection 
with the fire department, and direct all repairs of houses 
and apparatus ; and all bills contracted for the department 
must receive their approval before being passed on by the 
committee on accounts and claims. They shall hold stated 
meetings at least once each month at the Central Fire Sta- 
tion, and all communications to the city government from 
the fire department must come through said committee, and 
annually at the call of the finance committee, in connection 
vv'ith the chief engineer, they shall make recommendations 
as to the amount of appropriations the wants of the depart- 
ment will require for the coming year. 

Sect. 26. The city marshal and regular police officers 
shall have in charge all matters relating to the removal and 
protection of personal property endangered by fire, and any 
person entering a building or removing property contrary 
to the orders of the city marshal or such police officers, shall 
be fined five dollars ; and in the absence of firemen at fires, 



306 CITY OF CONCORD. 

from their respective department houses, the policemen in 
that vicinity will take charge of said houses. 

Sect. 27. It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to 
cause all snow and ice or other obstructions to be removed 
from and around all fire hydrants owned by the city, so that 
at all times the fire department can make immediate con- 
nection of the hose to the hydrants. 

Sect. 28. The annual pay of the members of the fire 
department shall be as follows, and in full for all services : 
Chief, twelve hundred and fifty dollars per annum and 
house rent; permanent force at Central Fire Station, seven 
hundred and twenty-eight dollars each; drivers at Good 
"Will and Alert Hose houses, seven hundred and twenty- 
eight dollars each per annum, paid monthly; assistant en- 
gineers, within the precinct, one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars each; engineers of steamers, within the precinct, one 
hundred and fifteen dollars each; foremen of companies, 
within the precinct, each ninety dollars per annum; assist- 
ant foremen of companies, witliin the precinct, eighty-five 
dollars per annum ; members of steamer, hose and hook and 
ladder companies, within the precinct, and house man at 
Central Fire Station, eighty dollars per annum ; outside 
the Precinct, engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, two hundred 
and forty dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer Company, No. 
3, five hundred dollars, said sums to be divided among the 
members as each company shall direct ; engineer of steamer 
at Penacook, seventy-five dollars per annum ; assistant en- 
gineer at Penacook, twenty-five dollars; assistant engineer 
at East Concord, fifteen dollars; and assistant engineer at 
West Concord, twenty dollars. 

Section 28 amciidcd. Pay of members of Chemical Company advanced to 
eight hundred dollars. August 15, 1907. 

Section 28 amended. Pay of outside the precinct companies advanced as 
follows: Pioneer Steamer Company, to six hundred dollars per annum; En- 
gine Company, No. 3, to three hundred and forty dollars per annum. June 
13, 1910. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 307 

Pay of the East Concord branch of the service advanced by ordinance as 
follows: Assistant engineer, to twenty dollars per annum; Old Fort Engine 
Company, No. 2, to three hundred and forty dollars per annum; steward of 
Old Port Engine Company, to thirty dollars per annum. September 14, 1910. 

Pay of Chemical Company advanced by ordinance to nine hundred and 
twelve dollars. Pay of other permanent men advanced to eight hundred and 
forty dollars. April 10, 1911. 

Sect. 29. The several engineers residing in Wards 1, 
2 and 3 shall have the entire care and control, under the 
direction of the chief engineer, of the buildings and ap- 
purtenances occupied in part by the fire department 
situated in said wards, respectively, to whom all applica- 
tions for the use of the halls, or any other part of such 
building, shall be made. Said engineers may severally 
appoint janitors, who shall serve under the exclusive 
direction of the engineer having the care and control of 
tlie buildings where said janitor shall be appointed. Each 
of said engineers shall annually, in the month of Decem- 
ber, render a detailed statement, in writing, to the mayor 
and aldermen, of all receipts and expenditures for the 
preceding year on account of such buildings. 

Sect. 30. Stewards for the Pioneer Steamer Company 
and Engine Companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be appointed 
by the mayor and aldermen, and shall receive for all 
services performed by them in that capacity the follow- 
ing sums : For Pioneer Steamer Company, thirty dollars 
per annum, and when performing the duties of janitor 
of the building an additional sum of forty-five dollars per 
annum; and for steward of Engine Company No. 2, thirty 
dollars per annum ; and for steward of Engine Companj' 
No. 3, thirty dollars j^er annum. No steward shall be al- 
lowed to purchase supplies for such building, or for the 
department, unless by the authority and direction of the 
committee on fire department ; and in no case shall he 
have any care or control of the building or its appur- 
tenances occupied by the company of which he is a mem- 



308 CITY OP CONCORD. 

ber, except in the immediate service of the company, un- 
less he shall be appointed janitor thereof, when he shall 
be under the direction of the engineer, as provided in the 
foregoing section. 

Sect. 31. The permanent men and horses at all of the 
fire stations in ('oncord shall at all times be on duty at 
their respective stations to attend to fire-alarm calls; and 
neither the permanent men nor the permanent horses con- 
nected with the fire department shall engage in any work 
for any other department of the city. 

The men at the different fire stations shall do such work 
in connection with the station and apparatus as the chief 
engineer or his assistants may direct. All permanent men 
shall lodge in their respective stations (except chief), and 
in all cases of absence a substitute must be furnished ; and 
in all cases when any extra service is required, the chief, 
with the sanction of the committee on fire department, 
shall have power to hire the same ; the chief may also in- 
crease as far as possible the number of call men that wish 
to lodge at any fire station, subject to the regulations of 
the fire department. The chief engineer shall be fur- 
nished with a horse and wagon, to be maintained by the 
city, for his use at all times. 

Sect. 32. All alarms for brush or forest fires shall be 
responded to by members of the fire department under 
such rules and regulations as shall be prescribed by the 
chief engineer. 

Sect. 33. All ordinances and parts of ordinances in- 
consistent with this ordinance are hereby repealed; but 
such repeal shall in no wise revive or put in force any 
ordinance heretofore repealed, and this ordinance shall 
take effect upon its passage. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. • 309 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS. 

Article 1. Any engine or hose company running out a 
line of hose from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled 
to the pipe, although the hose of other companies may be 
attached, in order to reach the fire. And any company 
coming to a fire, and finding an incompleted line of hose 
laid out from a hydrant or steamer, shall attach to and 
lengthen out such line, in lieu of laying a line of its own. 

Art. 2. When two or more engine companies are play- 
ing in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the com- 
pany attaching to hydrant or steamer as provided in the 
foregoing article ; but any company furnishing the entire 
line, and receiving water from a steamer, the pipe shall 
belong to such company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Hose companies shall attach first lines to high 
pressure hydrants where accessible ; steamers attaching 
to those of low pressure, or reservoir. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant 
or reservoir unless their hose and apparatus for attaching 
to the same are at hand and ready for use. 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning 
from fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, 
and it is required of officers of companies to maintain per- 
fect order and decorum in their respective commands dur- 
ing all such service. 

Art. 6. In case of fire the foreman first arriving shall 
be in command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 7. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding to 
a fire, to use the utmost care and caution consistent with 
promptness. Racing between companies is forbidden un- 
der any circumstances. Any collision or casualty occur- 
ring to horses or apparatus will be considered a sufficient 
cause for the suspension of the driver in charge at the 
time. 

Art. 8. Fire hats are furnished by the city for the pro- 



310 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tection and identification of the firemen, and they must be 
worn at all fires except in the severest weather, when 
caps may be worn. 

Art. 9. While attending fires it shall be the duty of 
members of the department, when not performing active 
service, to concentrate about their respective pieces of 
apparatus. 

Art. 10. All engine and hose companies responding to 
second or general alarms will connect, but will not lay 
their lines until they have reported to the officer in com- 
mand for orders. 

Art. 11. The wearing of badges shall not be regarded 
b}^ members of the department as conveying to them the 
privilege of free access to premises after fire has been 
extinguished. 

Art. 12. All members of the department shall address 
all officers by their respective titles while on duty at fires. 

Art. 13. The roll of each company shall be called as 
soon as the apparatus is housed, and no member will be 
excused except in case of sickness. Rolls must be called 
after every alarm. No officer or member will be marked 
present on the company roll unless present at fires and 
returns to house with apparatus, unless excused by an 
engineer. 

Art. 14. Each company shall be allowed three sub- 
stitutes, except Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, which 
shall have five, to be approved by the chief engineer.' 

Art. 15. All orders issued by the chief or an assistant 
engineer shall lie promptly obeyed. At all fires occurring 
in the night, the chief engineer shall be identified by a 
red light, assistant engineers by blue lights. 

Art. 16. Members of the department are expected to 
cheerfully comply with all rules and regulations which 
are adopted or which may be adopted. Captains will be 
held responsible for all lack of promptness and efficiency 
in their commands. 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1910. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Geeen, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

John J. McNtjlty, 1st Asst., Machinist, 35 West Street. 

Walter J. Coffin, 2d Asst., Shipping clerk, 63 Pleasant Street. 

John J. McNulty, Clerk of the Board. 

WARD 1. 
Fred M. Dodge, Electrical Inst, maker, 61 Merrimack Street. 

WARD 2. 
Elbeidge Emery, Butcher, Potter St., East Concord. 

WARD 3. 
George W. Kemp, Overseer, 443 No. State St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

Sylvestee T. Foed, Captain. J. Edwaed Moreison, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Noa. Names. 

1 Sylvester T. Ford, 

2 J. Edward Morrison, 

3 James H. Sanders, 

4 Thomas J. Morrison, 

5 Charles Powell, 

6 George B. Davis, 

7 Hei-bert M. Sanders, 

8 Harry P. Blake, 

9 Harry L. Messer, 

10 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

11 H. C. Taylor, 

12 George L. Livingston, 

13 G. C. Robinson, 

14 E. C. Simpson, 



MEMBERS. 

Occuputio7js. 
Moulder, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter, 
Carriage painter. 
Clerk, 

Carriage painter, 
Collector, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Trimmer, 
Machinist, 
Gas inspector. 
Substitute driver, 
Substitute driver. 



Residences. 
41 South Main Street. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
45 Parley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
3 South Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
3 Broadway. 
5 Leighton Avenue. 
81 South State Street. 
38 Jackson Street. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



312 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



J. C. McGiLVKAY, Captain. 

Badge 

No8. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 Charles H. Sanders, 

21 Orrin C. Hodgdon, 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 

23 John M. Inman, 

24 John B. McLeod, 

22 Eli Langlois, Jr., 

26 Charles W. Bateman, 

27 W. W. Brown, 

28 F. H. Fowler, 

29 Daniel J. Brennan, 

30 A. B. Smart, 



OFFICERS. 

D. J. 

MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Jig-sawyer, 
Janitor, 
Machinist, 
Engineer, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter, 
Electrician, 
Painter, 
Plumber, 
Clerk, 
Electrician, 
Electrician, 
Permanent driver. 



Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Residences. 
9 Pearl Street. 
107 Korth Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 
31 Beacon Street. 
43 Thorndike Street. 
16 Wall Street. 
Colonial Block. 
5 Perry Avenue. 
60 Centre Street. 
5 Union Street. 
34 North Spring Street. 
26 North Main Street. 
Central Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



„ ^ RELIEF ENGINE. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. Occupations. 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Reside7ices. 
78 South State Street. 
11 Thompson Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 



George L. Osgood, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

E. E. Saben, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Badge 






MEMBERS. 




Nos. 




Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


36 G. 


L. 


Osgood, 


Clerk, 


9 Thompson Street. 


37 E. 


E. 


Saben, 


Car-builder, 


88 North State Street. 


38 C. 


C. 


Chesley, 


Builder, 


11 Prince Street. 


39 C. 


J. 


French, 


Mayor. 


5 Perkins Street. 


40 C. 


H. 


Rowell, 


Builder, 


145 North Main Street. 


41 J. 


H. 


Brunelle, 


Blacksmith, 


43 Tremont Street. 


42 F. 


P. 


McKenna, 


Clerk, 


13 Franklin Street. 


43 J. 


M. 


Davis, 


Blacksmith, 


4 Tahanto Street. 


44 J. 


W 


innistrom, 


Lineman, 


145 North Main Street. 


45 M. 


G. 


Davis, 


Builder, 


6 Beacon Street. 


46 F. 


H. 


Silver, 


Permanent driver. 


Alert Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



313 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

John C. Mills, Captain. Hiram T. Dickerman, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

George H. Sawyer, Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

50 John C. Mills, 

51 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

52 George H. Sawj'er, 

53 Frank S. Putnam, 

54 Jasper R. Mudgett, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

56 Edgar D. Clark, 

57 Albert "W. Thompson, 

58 Harry L. Peacock, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Blacksmith, 
Packer, 
Wood-worker, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Janitor, 
Painter, 
Electrician, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
34 Downing Street. 
36 Broadway. 
5 Allison Street. 

113 South State Street. 
98 South State Street. 
231/i Perley Street. 

125 South State Street. 

114 South State Street 
36 Warren Street. 

104 South State Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

66 Frank T. Bean, 

67 Benjamin Ouillette, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Foster, 

73 Sam B. Morgan, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

76 D. Charles Parker, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

78 Carmi L. King, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 

82 James F. Liberty, 

83 Guy C. Richards, 

84 F. C. Young, 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
MEMBERS. 



Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Wood- worker, 
Wood- worker. 
Wood- worker. 
Teamster, 
Wood- worker. 
Wood-worker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood- worker. 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Renovater, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Wood- worker, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Substitute driver, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 
5 Fremont Street. 
Odd Fellows' Home. 
10 Jefferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 

13 West Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 
10 Avon Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 
100 Warren Street. 
63 South Street. 

Ins. Blk., School Street. 
28 North Main Street. 
68 South Spring Street. 
71 South Street. 
92 West Street. 
9 Harvard Street. 
52 Beacon Street. 
Central Station. 



314 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 1. 



Badge 

No8. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 C. G. Pinkham, 



Occupations. Residences. 

Permanent engineer and driver, Central Station. 
Permanent assistant engineer, Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 

OFFICERS. 
Henry Rolfe, Captain. Frank P. Robertson, Lievt., Clerk and Treas. 

Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. John B. Dodge, Steward. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Walter H. Rolfe, 

106 Fred H. MorriU, 

109 Alfred Beddow, 

111 William H. McGirr, 

107 Joseph A. York, 

110 John B. Dodge, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

117 Fred J. Guild, 

118 George A. Griffin, 

103 Harry F. Jones, 

123 William Corbett, 

108 Albert S. Andrews, 

104 Frank E. Goodwin, 

120 Frank D. O'Brien, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

114 Henry E. Templeton, 

125 Frank C. Rocheleau, 

112 Ambrose Sweet, 

121 Clayton S. Ogden, 

119 William H. Holbrook, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Highway agent. 
Machinist, 
Foreman, 
Sash-maker, 
Stationary engineer. 
Second hand, 
Moulder, 
Janitor, 
Table-maker, 
Electrician, 
Painter, 
Teamster, 
Axle-maker, 
Wine clerk. 
Teamster, 
Expressman, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Machinist, 
Wine clerk, 

Proprietor bowling alley. 
Laborer, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 
37 Centre Street. 

45 Summer Street. 
44 Elm Street. 

36 Charles Street. 
20 Main Street. 
59 Merrimack Street. 
92 High Street. 

46 Summer Street. 

15 Washington Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
44 Centre Street. 

14 Summer Street. 
19 Washington Street. 
19 Church Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 
41 Washington Street. 
19 Merrimack Avenue. 
07 Washington Street. 
17 South Main Sti-eet. 
9 Webster Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



315 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 
George O. Robinson, Captain. 
0. E. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Names. 
George O. Robinson, 
C. E. Robinson, 
John C. Hutchins, 
"William L. Batchelder, 
Samuel G. Potter, 
Charles P. White, 
William E. Virgin, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
Fred S. Farnum, 
Shad Cate, 
Ross W. Cate, 
Herbert Knowles, 
James Cox, 
Daniel Lewis, 
Parker French, 
Westley Field, 
John W. Sanborn, 
Walter C. Sanborn, 
Arthur P. Swain, 
Michael Lacroix, 
Clarence Tibbetts, 
Reuben L. Cate, 
John T. Cate, 
C. A. Chamberlin, 
William F. Paige, 
Lloyd Virgin, 
Henry A. Newton, 
Daniel W. Sanborn, 
Solon W. Cate, 
Thomas E. Chase, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Clerk, 
Engineer, 
Farmer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Janitor, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Horseshoer, 
Carpenter, 
Section foreman. 
Driver, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Wood-worker, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 
Machinist, 
Brakeman, 
Blacksmith, 



John C. Hutchins, Treasurer. 
Charles P. White, Steward. 



Residences. 
Penaeook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penaeook Street. 
Potter Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Eastman Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 



316 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

West Concord. 

OFFICERS. 

Hiram E. Quimby, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 

Alfred J. Fraser, Lieut, and Clerk. Frank C. Blodgett, Steward. 

Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



Names. 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Jeremiah. Cotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Frank G. Peterson, 
William D. Harrington, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Edward Levering, 
Abram D. Gushing, 
Joseph Daley, 
Luther E. Bowe, 
Robert Henry, 
Benjamin Kemp, 
Clarence J. Spead, 
Arthur Spead, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Ekstrom, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarrj-man, 
Stone-cutter, 
Mill operative, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Blacksmith, 
Quarryman, 
Silversmith, 
Laborer, 
Plumber, 

Stationary engineer, 
Stationary engineer. 
Stationary engineer, 
Stone-cutter, 



Residences. 
490 North State Street. 
458 North State Street. 
382 North State Street. 
5 Engel Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Streei. 
346 North State Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
436 North State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
517 North State Street. 
455 North State Street. 
453 North State Street. 
513 North State Street. 
461 North State Street. 
439 North State Street. 
439 North State Street. 
14 View Street. 
458 North State Street. 
16 Gladstone Avenue. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



William E. Dow, Captain. 



W. E. Dow, 
J. E. Howard, 
E. F. Home, 
P. D. Hurd, 
G. H. Davis, 
J. M. Colbert, 
D. Holloran, 
C. E. Palmer, 
C. C. Hill, 
C. L. Mason, 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 
W. M. Chase, 

C. F. Thompson, 

D. L. Neal, 
A. H. Britton, 
C. A. Herbert, 
Fred S. Johnson, 
A. L. Walker, 

S. S. Upham, 
A. G. Jewett, 
P. T. Smith, 



Fred S. Johnson, Lieutenant. 



W. AV. Kennedy, 
A. O. Mansur, 
O. Thompson, 

E. A. Saltmar.sh, 

D. B. Newhall, 
W. K. Wingate, 
C. H. Barrett, 

F. Leighton, 
H. P. Bowers, 

E. D. Ashley. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CITY MARSHAL. 



Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit to you the re- 
port of the police departmerrt for the year beginning 
January 1, 1911, and ending December 31, 1911. 

EOSTER. 

City Marshal. 

George A. S. Kimball. 

AssiST.iNT City ]\Iarshal. 

Charles H. Rowe. 

Captain. 

Victor I. Moore. 

Serge.\nt. 

Christopher T. AVallace. 

Regular Patrolmen. 

Samuel L. Batchelder, George H. Silsby, 

Samuel Rodd, Elmer J. Brown, 

Irving B. Robinson, Albert W. Braley, 

Edward J. McGirr, Harry L. Woodward, 

Joseph E. Silva, Fred N. Marden. 

Janitor of Police Station, Charles W. Hall. 



318 city of concord. 

Special Reserve Officers. 

CAPTAIN. 

Thomas P. Davis. 
Harry F. Jones, W. A. Little, 

Joseph A. Flanders, Fred H. Clifford, 

George G. Allen, Alvin H. Urann, 

Orrin H. Bean, Fred S. Pendleton, 

Charles E. Kelley, Charles W. Hall, 

Harper B. Giles, « George E. Drury, 

Walter H. Beane. 

Financial Statement. 
Total receipts for lines and costs, $3,055.00 



Total appropriation for 1911, 






$16,309.81 


Special appropriation. 


the year 


1911, 


989.50 


Total amount expended for 


. $17,299.31 


Disbursements. 






Fuel for city and Penacook, 






$397.80 


Helmets, caps and buttons. 






68.75 


Horse hire, city and Penacook, 






220.00 


Board and shoeing horse. 






356.00 


Ice, 
Incidentals, 






6.87 
1,066.25 


Salaries, regulars, 






13,420.77 


Salaries, specials, 






971.26 


Salary of janitor. 






300.00 


Lights, city and Penacook, 






146.80 


Water, 






43.00 


Telephone signal system. 






164.32 


Police commissioners. 






137.49 


Total, 


$17,299.31 



police department. 319 

Number of Arrests and Causes. 



Whole number of arrests, including Penacook, 


1,076 


Whole number of arrests at Penacook, 


79 


Brought before the court, 


692 


Discharged by the court. 


•4 


Discharged without being brought before the court. 


384 


Adultery, 


1 


Assault, 


17 


Breaking and entering. 


2 


Gambling, 


11 


Drunkenness, including Penacook, 


708 


Drunkenness at Penacook, 


47 


Non-support, 


9 


Evading railroad fare. 


3 


Fornication, 


19 


Insane, 


20 


Larceny, 


23 


Rude and disorderly conduct, 


15 


Safe-keeping, 


189 


Threatening to do bodily harm, 


2 


Refusing to send children to school. 


3 


Bastardy, 


2 


Keeping liquor for sale, 


2 


Cruelty to animals, 


2 


Fighting, 


4 


Using horse unfit for labor, 


1 


Over-speeding automobiles. 


7 


Obstructing an officer, 


1 


Riding bicycles on sidewalk. 


1 


Selling cigarettes to minor, 


1 


Running auto while intoxicated, 


1 


Running taxi without a license, 


1 


Runaway boys, 


3 


Committing a nuisance. 


1 



320 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Arrested for out of town officers, 5 

Present at gambling, 1 

Escaped from Industrial School, 2 

Insulting an officer, 1 

Gross conduct, 1 

False pretense, 2 

Firing cannon in street, 1 

Firing shotgun in street, 1 

Begging, 1 

Burglary, 1 

Abusing family, 1 

Attempting to rape, 1 

Carrying concealed weapons, 3 

Escaped insane, 1 

Escaped from House of Correction, 1 

Failing to comply with the pure food law, 2 

Miscellaneous. 

Whole number of lodgers, including Penacook, 1,426 

Whole number of lodgers at Penacook, 431 
Number of doors found open and secured, including 

Penacook, 147 

Whole number of doors tried, including Penacook, 473,624 

Num])er of doors tried at Penacook, 7,884 
Number of doors found open and secured at Penacook, 22 

Lost children returned to their parents, 8 

Disturbance quelled, 57 

Stray teams found, 2 

Stray horses found, 3 

Number of times ambulance used, 128 

Number of duty calls rung in on police signal, 47,659 

Accidents reported, 8 

Dogs killed, 7 

Bicycles found, 24 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 321 

Dead bodies found, 3 

Cases investigated hy officers, including Penacook, 615 

Cases investigated by officers in Penacook, 97 

Defects in sidewalks and streets reported, 3 

Dangerous dogs reported, 4 

Dangerous wires reported, 6 

Fire alarms rung in by officers, 2 

Gas street lights reported out, 6 

Horses found cast, 2 

Lanterns placed at dangerous places, 12 

Water le^iks reported, 3 

Lost dogs restored, 6 

Runaway horses stopped by officers, 3 

Street obstructions removed, 3 

Assisted at accidents, 9 

Assisted in cases of sickness, 119 

Persons reported bitten by dogs, 6 

Intoxicated persons helped home, 4 

Lights reported out, 215 
Number of officers attending tires, including Penacook, 118 

Number of officers attending fires at Penacook, 10 

Sick persons given aid at station, 8 

Sick and injured persons assisted, ^ 4 

Bound over to the superior court, 18 

Committed to jail, 12 

Committed to Industrial School, 3 

Committed to House of Correction, 226 

Committed to New Hampshire State Hospital, 20 

Number of fines paid, 280 

Mittimus not to issue until called for, 164 

Appeals, 1 

Assistance rendered at drowning accidents, 4 

Bail furnished, 6 



322 city of concord. 

Location of Police Signal. Service Boxes. 

Bridge Street and Stiekney Avenue. 
South Main and West Streets. 
South Main and Concord Streets. 
South Main and Pleasant Streets. 
North Main and School Streets. 
North Main and Park Streets. 
North ^lain and Washington Streets. 
North ]\Iain and Church Streets. 
North State and Penacook Streets. 
North State, opposite Cemetery. 
West Concord. 
Penacook. 

Washington and Union Streets. 
South, near Thompson Street. 
South and Downing Streets. 
White Park. 

Recommendations. 

Since the license law went into effect the business of tliis 
department has more than doubled, and during the summer 
months, owing to the vacations, we need more help ; there- 
fore, I hope that you will see the necessity of having at 
least two more officers appointed. 

I consider a padded cell an absolute necessity for the safe 
confinement of the violently insane, and I earnestly recom- 
mend that one be constructed in our station. 

Conclusion. 

During the year this department has met with three seri- 
ous losses in the deaths of Capt. Daniel S. Flanders and 
Officer Hoyt Robinson, both having served the city faith- 
fully for many years. In the death of Edmund S. Cook, 



Box 


1. 


Box 


2. 


Box 


3. 


Box 


4. 


Box 


5. 


Box 


6. 


Box 


7. 


Box 


8. 


Box 


9. 


Box 


10. 


Box 


11. 


Box 12. 


Box 


13. 


Box 


14. 


Box 


15. 


Box 


16. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 323 

our late city solicitor, we lost a good adviser and a staunch 
friend. Every member of this department sincerely mourns 
the loss of these men. 

I thank the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen 
for their kindness and support, also the judge of the police 
court and the city solicitor for their kind and courteous 
treatment. To the officers of the department I extend my 
gratitude for their hearty co-operation and the faithful 
performance of their duties. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1911. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

In compliance with the ordinance creating this depart- 
ment, the nineteenth annual report showing the expendi- 
tures and operations of the engineering department for the 
year ending December 31, 1911, is herewith submitted: 



Paid for engineer and assistants, 


$2,913.01 


supplies. 


114.13 


car-fares and livery. 


167.87 


postage. 


2.13 


repairs, 


24.55 


express, 


5.70 


telephone, rental and tolls, 


27.30 




$3,254.69 


Paid for labor and supplies, assessors' maps, 


995.05 


Total, 


$4,249.74 


Appropriation, 


$4,175.00 


Resolution, 


74.74 



$4,249.74 
Expended, $4,249.74 

Sewers. 

The amount of money expended on construction and re- 
pairs will be found in the report made to the board of 
public works covering this field. 



report op city engineer. 325 

"Water- Works. 

Together with the superintendent, I made a preliminary 
examination of the conditions about Penacook Lake, with 
reference to increased storage capacity, and secured data 
to show infringement of the city's rights by the steamboat 
company doing business on the lake. 

Streets. 

Granite Street lay-out was changed to more nearly com- 
ply with the original petition. 

South Pemliroke Street was laid out and the lines def- 
initely marked. 

The above changes added no extra mileage to our high- 
ways, which remains the same as last year, viz. : 44.75 
miles in the compact portion of the city, and 126.26 miles 
in the outlying districts, making a total of 170.01 miles of 
highways in the town. 

Lines and grades were given for the macadam roadways 
in North Main Street, the Hopkinton Road and Pleasant 
Street, also for the gravel roadways on the Loudon Road 
and South Street, the new sidewalks and monthly measure- 
ments for new coal-tar sidewalks, with repairs to existing 
walks, were made, statements of quantities laid prepared 
and delivered to the superintendent of streets. 

Fire Department. 

Plans showing the location of hydrants and fire-alarm 
boxes, both in the city proper and in Penacook, were 
brought up to date, blue prints made and delivered to the 
chief engineer of this department. 



326 city of concord. 

Building Permits. 

Together with the chief engineer of the fire department 
1 have attended twenty-four hearings, on petitions for new 
l)iiildino:s and for alterations to existing structures. 

Twenty-six petitions were presented to us, two were with- 
drawn by the applicants and twenty-four granted. 

Cemeteries. 

A survey was made and plan prepared showing the pro- 
posed addition to the cemetery on the Loudon Road. 

In Blossom ITill Cemetery grading on the new block was 
completed, the lots laid out, plans made for the same, blue 
prints of which were given to the superintendent and filed 
in the deed books of the commissioners. 

The deed books were brought up to December 31, 1911. 

Assessors' Maps. 

Much time has been spent on this work, with the result 
that the territory lying between the Merrimack River on 
the east, Hopkinton line on the west, Bow line on the south, 
the Contoocook River, the Borough Road and the Sewall's 
Falls Road on the North, has been covered and plans of the 
same will be ready for the assessors in April, 1912. 

Few people realize the amount of detail in this work in 
looking up the titles, locating tracts lying off the highways, 
many of which are indefinitely bounded in loosely made 
deeds, and some of which have been handed down for gen- 
erations without any settlement of estates. 

To place the present owners requires much searching of 
the public records, but, when finally found is of material 
aid to the assessors as well as the general public. 

The rapid accumulation of plans for this business seri- 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 327 

ously cramps our small vault and some safe place for their 
storage should be provided. 

We have now over thirty-nine hundred owners listed and 
their property shown on the plans. Many of these owners 
have several tracts of land and the above number does not 
indicate the total number of tracts shown. 

We have copied the plans at the register of deeds office, 
showing the division of properties into house lots, so far as 
they pertain to Concord real estate. 

We are continually adding to our list of owners who 
have neglected to return inventories, or have forgotten 
lands of value Avhen the assessor came around. It would be 
impossible for any board of assessors to find all the lands 
without some plans and deeds to guide them. We believe 
that the money expended for this work will soon be re- 
turned to the city treasury in the shape of new taxable 
ju'operty brought to light. 

The special appropriation for this work was $1,000, of 
which amount $995.05 was expended. The balance was car- 
ried to the engineering department. 

The employees of the engineering department during the 
past season w^ere : Fred W. Lang, principal assistant ; 
Daniel H. B. Starr, assistant; John W. Raymond, I. F. 
Morrison, transitmen; Charles F. Pierce, Waldo H. 
Quimby, Robert N. Kennedy, Harold H. Betton, Earland 
B. Cook, George W. Burke and Arthur McCauley, rodmen. 

Miscellaneous. 

Street lines and grades, for grading done by private 
parties, have been given on application. 

Meetings of the Board of Aldermen, its committees and 
the Board of Public Works have been attended when re- 
quested and such information as this department had in 
its possession, or could acquire, was given. Plans and 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

estimates ■were furnished the different departments as 
needed. 

The labors of tlie Board of Examiners of Plum])ers and 
the Hydrant (commissioners will be found under their re- 
speetive headings. 

To the IMayor and the Board of Aldermen I wish to 
express my apjireeiation for many courtesies extended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1911. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex officio. 

EDSON J. HILL, to March 31, 1915. 

GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, to March 31, 1915. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, to March 31, 1914. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, to March 31, 1914. 

SOLON A. CARTER, to March 31, 1913. 

BURNS P. HODGI\IAN, to March 31, 1913. 

HENRY C. HOLBROOK, to March 31, 1912. 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, to March 31, 1912. 

SOLON A. CARTER, President. 
EDSON J. HILL, Clerk of Board. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



330 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members 

Abraham Gr. Jones,* ex officio, 1872 — three months. 
John M. Hill,* 



Benjamin A. Kimball, 
Josiah Minot,* 
David A. Ward,* 
Edward L. Knowlton,* 
Benjamin S. Warren,* 
John Kimball, ex officio, 
John Abbott,* 
John S. Russ,* 
Abel B. Holt,* 



1872-1878. 

1872-1878. 

1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

1872-1874. 

1872. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

1872-1873. 

1872-1876. 

1873-1876. 

1874-1877. 

1874-1877. 

1875. Resigned July 1, 1891. 



Samuel S. Kimball,* 

Geo. A. Pillsbury,* ex officio, 1876-1878. 

Luther P. Durgin,* 1876-1885. 

John Kimball, 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William M. Chase, 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Horace A. Brown,* ex officio, 1878-1880. 

James L. Mason,* 1878-1893. 

James R. Hill,* 1878. Died in 1884. 

(leo. A. Cummings,* ex officio, 1880-1883. 

Edgar H.Woodman,*e.roj^ao, 1883-1887. 

Joseph H. Abbot,* 1884-1893. 

George A. Young,* 1885-1894. 

John E. Robertson, ex officio, 1887-1889. 

Sti]lmanHumphrey,*ej:;oj^c20,1889-1891. 

Henry W. Clapp,* ex officio, 1891-1893. 

Willis 1). Thompson, 1891-1895. 



Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 331 

William P. Fiske, 1891-1902. 

James H. Chase,* 1891. Died in 1893. 

John Whitaker,* 1892. . Died in 1903. 

Heniy E. Conant,* 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

I'arsonsB.Cogswell,*cj; officio, 1893-1895. 

Solon A. Carter, 1893. Now in office. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William M. Mason, 1893-1899. 

William E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Robinson, ex officio, 1895-1897. 

Ebenezer B. Hutchinson,* 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 

Edson J. Hill, 1895. Now in office. 

Albert B. Woodworth,* ex officio, 

1897-1899. 

Nathaniel E.Martin, exofficio, 1899-1901. 

Henry E. Conant,* 1899. Died in 1911. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 

Harry G. Sargent,* ex officio, 1901-1903. 

Obadiah Morrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott, 1901. Now in office. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 

Charles R. Corning, ex officio, 1903-1909. 

Henry C. Holbrook, 1903. Now in office. 

Harley B. Roby, 1905. Resigned Jan. 21, 1911. 

Charles J. French, ex officio, 1909. Now in office. 

Burns P. Hodgman, 1911. Now in office. 

Frank P. Quimby, 1911. Now in office. 

Presidents op the Board. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1874-1875. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

* Deceased. 



332 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



John Kimball, 
Benjamin A. Kimball, 
John Kimball, 
William P. Fiske, 
Solon A. Carter, 



1875-1876. 

187G-1878. 

1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

1891-1902. 

1902. Now in office. 



Superintendents. 



V. C. Hastings, 
P. R. Sanders, 



1873. Died March 14, 1907. 
1907. Now in office. 



Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 333 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, ilowage and water rights: 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights, $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000.00 
W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for -n 

kit-shop privilege, 4,90O.OO* 
flowage rights around Pena- 

cook Lake, 4,375.61 

W. P. Cooledge, Hutchins lot, 1,050.001 

Mary C. Rowell, for land, 1,500.00 

Moses H. Bradley, for land, 5,000.00 

Joseph B. Walker, for land, 2,214.00 

John G. Hook, for land, 370.00 

A. S. Ranney, for land, 1,350.00 

Alfred Roberts, for land, 1,275.00 

Charles E. Ballard, for land, 2,500.00 

Mary G. Carter, for land, 1,250.00 

Elizabeth Widmer, for land, 1,564.50 

A. L. Proctor, for land, 450.00 

Robert Crowley, for land, 3,000.00 

I\Iiles Hodgdon, for land, 2,200.00 
heirs of Lowell Brown, for 

land, 1,032.55 

Coffin & Little, for land, 800.00 



* Original cost, $5,000; land sold for $100. 

t Original cost house and lot, $2,250; portion of lot sold for $1,200. 



334 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid 0. F. Richardson, for land, $100.00 

M. H. & C. R. Farnum, for 

land, 4,500.00 

Cook & Hood, for land, 1,750.00 

Charles H. Farnum, for land, 1,410.36 
Fred N. Ladd, for land, 300.00 

A. W. Hill, for land, 6,500.00 

Helen G. Evans and others, 

for land, 2,000.00 

Frank B. Kilburn, for land, 2,500.00 
Joseph A. and Mary E. Hal- 

loran, for land, 600.00 

Wheelock Glub, for land, 1,400.00* 

Dr. I. A.'watson, for land, 2,490.00t 
Frank E. Horner, for land, 1,900.00 
Frank E. and William H. 

Horner, for land, 100.00 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Association, 20,000.00 
dam, gate-house and appurte- 
nances, 32,756.17 
conduit and gate-houses, 29,484.05 
mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to the 
reservoir, fire main through 
North and South INIain 
Streets, and high service 
Main from Penacook Street 
to Stark Street, Penacook) , 182,241.70 



♦Original cost, $1,500; house sold for $100. 
t Original cost, $2,700; house sold for $210. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 335 

Cost of distribution pipe, $375,720.69 
service pipe, 58,910.80 
reservoir, 42,460.09 
pumping station, shop, sta- 
ble and storehouse, 22,954.48 
pumping- machinery, 17,000.42 
engineering and superintend- 
ence, 14,913.12 
incidentals, 6,531.19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1912, $1,016,854.73 

Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding: 

Amount. 

$9,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

9,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

7,000.00 

4,000.00 

5,000.00 

. 384,000.00 

20,000.00 

30,000.00 

15,000.00 

15,000.00 

$553,000.00 



Wlien due. 


Rate. 


April 




1912, 


31/2, 


Jan. 




1913, 


4, 


Jan. 




1914, 


4, 


Jan. 




1915, 


4, 


Jan. 




1916, 


4, 


Jan. 




1917, 


4, 


Jan. 




1918, 


4, 


Jan. 




1919, 


4, 


Nov. 




1920, 


3, 


Nov. 




1921, 


3, 


April 




1921, 


31/2, 


Jan. 




1922, 


4, 


March 


.1, 


1922, 


31/2, 


April 




1922, 


31/2, 


Jan. 




1923, 


31/2, 


Jan. 




1924, 


31/., 



336 CITY OF CONCORD. 



. HENRY E. CONANT. 

Born at Barre, Mass., May 24, 1832. 
Died at Concord, N. H., July 27, 1911. 

Member of the Board of Water Commissioners 

from 

1892 to 1895 

and 
1899 to 1911. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 337 

REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Office of the Board of Water Commissioners, 

Concord, N. II., February 15, 1912. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners transmits herewith 
the report of Percy R. Sanders, superintendent, exhibiting 
in detail the operations of the department for 1911, to- 
gether with the report of Henry A. Rowell, engineer at the 
pumping station, which documents are made a part of this 
report. 

The pLint is in excellent condition and has met all rea- 
sonable demands upon it during the past year. 

The season of 1911 has been the seventh successive season 
when the rainfall has been below the normal with the result 
that the mean height of w^ater in Penacook Lake has been 
less than in any year since 1895. 

The board thought it wise to caution water takers against 
waste and to restrict the use of garden hose during the 
heated term, but believes that no one was seriousl}^ incon- 
venienced in consequence. 

It is confidently expected that the coming season will 
sliow a change for the better and that for a series, of years 
the mean height of water will be nearly or quite normal. 

With fewer demands for extensions and renewals of dis- 
tributing mains, the expenditures have been less and the 
board has been able to anticipate the redemption of water 
l)onds to the amount of $17,000, and will undoubtedly be 
able to anticipate the payment of $15,000 of the water debt 
the coming year, thus effecting a material saving in interest 
charges. 

22 



338 CITY OP CONCORD. 

The board takes tliis opportunity to express its apprecia- 
tion of the intelligent and faithful performance of their 
duties, by its employees in all departments. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON J. HILL, 

GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 

SOLON A. CARTER, 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, 

HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, ex officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 339 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the fortieth annual report of 
the operations of this department, sho\Adng the receipts, ex- 
penditures and abatements, together with a statement of 
tlie extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1911 : 

Eeceipts. 

For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates, $16,150.38 



For w^ater, from consumers by meter 




rates, 


54,995.17 


From delinquents, 


100.68 


For water for building purposes. 


65.76 


hay and apples sold. 


25.00 


pipe and stock sold and labor. 


277.37 


old brass and iron sold. 


31.09 


w^ood sold, 


37.00 


building sold, 


230.00 


telephone tolls. 


.65 




4?71 019 10 




tp I X,t/JLO.-LU 


Deduct abatements. 


31.76 


Net receipts for 1911, 


$71,881.34 



Expenditures. 

general expenses. 

Paid pay-rolls, 'salaries and labor, $8,252.05 
S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop in 
Penacook, 24.00 



340 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid Ira C. P^vans Co., printing and 
postage, 
Rumford Printing Co., books, 
Bro\\Ti & Saltmarsh, frame. 
Concord Evening ^Monitor, ad- 
vertising, 
Patriot Printing Co., advertising. 
Will D. Hutchinson, distributing 

bills, 
Concord Electric Co., lighting, 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephones, 
John C. Thorne, rubber boots, 
Thorne Shoe Store, rubber boots 

and mittens, 
Thompson & Ploague Co., hard- 
ware, 
"W. J. Jenks & Co., hardware, 
Concord Hardware Co., hardware, 
A. H. Britton & Co., hardware, 
Joseph T. Walker, hay, 
Walter S. Dole, grain and stra\\*, 
G. N. Bartemus & Co., grain and 

straw, 
I. A. Watson, power boat, 
Chandler Eastman Sons Co., 

dump cart and repairs, 
John Swenson, exploders, 
F. L. Johnson, batteries. 
Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 
Page Belting Co., supplies and 

labor, 
Batchelder & Co., oil, etc., 
C. H. ^Martin & Co., naphtha, lard 

oil, etc.. 
Fowler Drug Co., supplies, 



$252.39 

70.50 

3.50 

30.00 
30.10 

10.00 
13.81 
93.46 
17.00 

20.00 



154.25 


48.13 


4.00 


2.98 


107.32 


97.23 


77.76 


150.00 


97.25 


2.00 


1.80 


20.08 


19.65 


21.50 


24.52 


2.06 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 341 

Paid F. E. Fitts Manufacturing and 

Supply Co., waste, $12.20 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 17.90 

Charles Millar & Son Co., cast- 
iron pipe, 1,218.34 

Builders Iron Foundry, castings, 174.00 

Water- Works Equipment Co., 

castings and valves, 448.80 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., valves 

and hydrants, 388.55 

Rensselaer Mfg. Co., hydrants, 328.79 

Norwood Engineering Co., hy- 
drants, 148.00 

Bingham & Taylor, gate boxes, 111.69 

Richards & Co., pig lead, 194.29 

A. jM. Byers Co., wrought-iron 

pipe, 109.70 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

castings, 26.24 

F. L. Badger, brass castings, 12.69 

Hays ]\tfg Co., service boxes, 28.39 

Walworth ^[fg. Co., tools and 

supplies, 205.40 

George E. Gilchrist & Co., tools 

and supplies, 28.50 

Braman Dow Co., tools and sup- 
plies, 16.50 

H. Mueller ]Mfg. Co., tools and 

supplies, 11.86 

Grip Coupling Co., tools and sup- 
plies, 14.88 

Orr & Rolfe, fittings, 5.61 

City Sewer Department, pipe, 3.60 

Harold L. Bond Co., tools, 117.72 

Beckman Sanitary Spec. Co., 65.00 



342 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Paid National Meter Co., meters and. 

repairs, $720.18 
Thonison Meter Co., meters and 

repairs, 487,67 
Neptune Meter Co., meters and 

repairs, 420.35 
Union Water Meter Co., meters 

and repairs, 149.10 
Henry R. Worthington, meters 

and repairs, 72.25 

Pitts])urg Meter Co., meters, 30.00 

Ilersey JMfg. Co., meter repairs, 18.55 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, smith 

work, 80.00 

Ross W. Cate, smith work, 23.10 

J. M. Crossman, smith work, 16.00 

George D. Huntley, repairs, 10.85 

George L. Fogg, repairs, 6.55 

R. M. Johnson, repairs, 5.00 

Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., repairs, 2.85 

James Cookson, repairs, 6.50 

C. Pelissier, repairs and supplies, 21.55 

Henry M. Richardson, team work, 119.25 

E. H. Runnells, team work, 10.00 

George L. Theobald, team work, 7.72 

E. S. King, auto hire, 16.00 
C. H. Carter, auto hire, 9.00 
I. E. Gray, auto hire, 6.00 

F. A. Clough, horse hire, 114.66 
George F. Tandy, repairing con- 
crete, 66.00 

Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber 

and lal)or, 105.90 

C. W. Dadmun, electrical work 

and supplies, 22.10 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 343 

Paid George Abbott, Jr., painting and 

supplies, $9.65 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance 

and bond, 227.00 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance, 9.00 

Boston & Maine R. K, freight, 212.90 
Boston & Maine R. R., repairing 

siding, 127.53 

town of Webster, taxes, 50.00 

Engineering News, 5.00 
A. G. Cochran, clerk, paid out 

car fares, express, postage, etc., 112.58 
P. R. Sanders, expenses to "Water- 
Works convention, 15.00 
Martin & Howe, legal expenses, 100.00 
I. A. Watson, land, 2,700.00 
F. E. Horner, land, 1,900.00 
F. E. & W. H. Horner, land, 100.00 
F. E. Gale, damages, 100.00 
incidentals, 22.29 

$21,574.07 



PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 

Paid pay-rolls, engineer and fireman, $1,819.48 

labor on fuel, 45.57 

E. S. Tenney & Co., coal, 1,093.50 
W. C. Robinson & Sons Co., oil, 30.30 
Eagle Oil & Supply Co., packing, 44.38 
Boston Belting Co., packing, 16.00 

F. E. Fitts Mfg. & Supply Co., 

waste, 17.15 

Crandall Packing Co., packing, 2.28 

Walworth Mfg. Co., supplies, 1.94 

McLeod & Henry, supplies, 24.00 

N. E. Roller Grate Co., repairs, 5.00 



344 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid Hodge Boiler Works, repairs, $14.00 
Ford & Kim])all, grates, 61.40 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., .52 
Thompson & Iloagiie Co., hard- 
ware, 10.32 
Walter L. Jenks & Co., hardware, 3.15 
C. W. Drake, repairs, 1.45 
Orr & Eolfe, supplies, 1.24 
Page Belting Co., supplies, 20.30 
Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 48.51 
Concord Light & Power Co., 

lighting, 11.64 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephones, 36.90 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 3.50 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, 28.00 

$3,340.53 

Total expenditures for 1911, $24,914.60 

The expenditures are divided as follows : 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

For office expenses, $1,218.25 

maintenance, 6,164.37 

inspection, 780.00 

care and repair of hydrants, 225.03 

new service-pipes, 518.95 

new distribution-pipes, 3,108.95 

new hydrants, 1,309.37 

new meters, 2,167.53 

work at Penacook Lake, 470.02 
care of wood-lots at Penacook Lake, 168.66 

land, 4,700.00 

incidentals, 682.94 

$21,574.07 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 345 

PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 

For salaries, engineer and fireman, $1,819.48 



fuel, 


1,139.07 


oil and packing, 


92.96 


repairs. 


154.88 


supplies, 


54.10 


lighting and telephone, 


48.54 


insurance, 


28.00 


freight, 


3.50 



$3,340.53 

EXTENSIONS AND mPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron main and distribution pipes have been laid and 
hydrants set during the year as follows: 

In High Street, 

extended south from Franklin Street, 27 feet 10-ineh 
pipe. 

In LaA'c Street, West Concord, 

extended from North State Street to H. C. Holden's, 
1,23 6 feet 8-inch pipe; also from H. C. Holden's to 
Quaker Street, 465 feet 6-ineh pipe. 

In Elm Street, 

south from Fayette Street to Thompson, 270 feet 
6-inch pipe. 

In Grove Street, 

south from Monroe Street to Downing, 1,093 feet 
6-inch pipe. 



346 CITY OP CONCORD. 

In DarimouUi Street, 

extended south, 59 feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Myrtle Street, 

south from Thompson Street, 99 feet 4-inch pipe. 

In Jefferson Street, 

south from Thompson Street, 138 feet 4-inch pipe. 

On hydrant tranches, 
152 feet 6-inch pipe. 

Also 194 feet IV^-inch pipe ; 614 feet 1-inch discontinued. 

Thirteen new hydrants have been set, as follows : 
On Monroe Street, at Rumford School. 
On Thorndike Street, at South State. 
On McKinley Street, at Dunklee Street extension. 
On Pleasant Street, at South Church. 
On Dartmouth Street, at Clinton. 
On Hanover Street, near No. 10. 
On Penacook Street, opposite T. Hannigan's. 
On High Street, at Valley. 
On Beacon Street, at White. 
On North State Street, at Tahanto School. 
On Lake Street, West Concord, at Quaker. 
On Lake Street, West Concord, near H. C. Holden's. 
On Lake Street, West Concord, near Mrs. Besse's. 

There have been set 22 gates. 



water department. 
Summary of the Foregoing. 



347 



NEW PIPES, HYDRANTS AND STOP-GATES. 



Pipes. 


Hydrants. 




Stop-Gates. 




114-m., 194 feet. 


In city, 


13 


4-in., 


1 


4-in., 237 '' 






6-in., 


19 


6-m., 2,039 " 






8-in., 


1 


8-in., 1,216 '' 






20-in., 


1 


10-in., 27 " 




13 






3,713 feet. 


22 


equal to .703 mile. 











Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
362,003 feet, equal to 68.56 miles. 

Total number of gates now in use, 982. 
Total number of hydrants now in use, 417. 

Service Pipes. 

There have been laid during the year and connected mth 
the main pipes, 37 service pipes consisting of 



28 %-inch, 
5 1-inch, 
4 2-inch, 
1 4-inch, 

38 



724 feet. 
174 feet. 

23 feet. 

20 feet. 

941 feet. 



Whole number of sei'vices at the present time, 3,738 ; 
total length of service pipes, 87,099 feet, or 16.49 miles. 

We have set 145 meters during the year; 3 have been 
removed, making the total number now in use, 2,153. 



348 CITY OP CONCORD. 

The following' table shows the height of water in Pena- 
eook Lake on tlie first day of each month : 



Janiiary, 


177.90 


July, 


178.15 


Fe])niary, 


177.90 


August, 


177.40 


]\iarch, 


178.20 


September, 


177.00 


April, 


178.65 


October, 


176.10 


IVIay, 


179.30 


November, 


175.70 


June, 


179.75 


December, 


175.95 



The lowest point reached during the year was on October 
18, being 175.45 ; the highest was on May 15, and Avas 
179.80; mean height for the year was 177.60, which was 
2.62 feet low^er than the mean height for the year 1910. 

There have been few calls for extension of the distribu- 
tion system this season ; two petitions have been considered 
but were not deemed advisable to grant. This has given 
the department an opportunity to improve the service in 
several short streets that were supplied one way only, by 
extending and making an additional connection, so eliminat- 
ing the dead ends. In West Concord conditions have been 
much improved on Lake Street by giving this section the 
benefit of the high service both for domestic and fire pro- 
tection, the continual low water at the lake having made it 
difficult to supply this street satisfactorily. 

The service pipes have been relaid in ]\Iain Street from 
Pearl to Centre Street and in other sections as conditions 
demanded. 

Thirteen new hydrants have been placed in service this 
year. All hydrants have been thoroughly tested and put 
in the best possible working order. With extension of the 
high service planned for next season of 10-inch lines in 
School Street from Main to Rumford, Warren Street from 
Main to State, and Pleasant Street from ]\Iain to State, 



WATER DEPART aiENT. 349 

the system will be in a position to give the utmost protec- 
tion to the business center of the city. 

The cement-lined mains in use continue to give good 
service, there having been but few leaks of any account. 

The meter system continues to meet the approval of con- 
sumers, 145 being set this year. That the use of meters 
certainly checks a great waste of water can be seen by 
examining the records of notices sent from this office for 
leaky fixtures. Without the number of meters that we 
have, it would be difficult to tell what M^ould be the stage 
of the water at the lake after this dry spell. 

The height of the water in the lake has been watched 
very carefully and the shore also has received a great deal 
of attention. ]\lany stumps have been removed and dis- 
posed of. 

On account of the low water this summer it was con- 
sidered advisable to issue notices to consumers to adhere 
strictly to rules regarding the use of hose and it was very 
gratifying to note their willingness to co-operate with the 
board to conserve the water. 

The small pine seedlings planted four years ago have 
made marked growth and next year a large number will 
be ready to transplant in suitable locations around the lake. 
■ All the buildings of the Water Department are in good 
condition, the cottage at the lake has been thoroughly over- 
hauled and repaired and put in good condition. 

The pumping station machinery and grounds show the 
results of the excellent care placed upon them by the en- 
gineer, Mr. Rowell. 

We have lost by death this year one of the members of 
the board, Mr. H. E. Conant, who served as a member for 
fifteen years. He was always ready and A\alling to give 
the department at all times the benefit of his knowledge 
and experience, and his loss will be a personal one to all 



350 CITY OF CONCORD. 

who were associated, with hiin in the management of the 
water-works. 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank each member of 
the board for his advice and assistance during the year 
and also to express to the different departments and to all 
the employees of this department my appreciation of their 
co-operation with us to carry on the work of the year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

P. R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 351 

REPORT OF THE ENGINEER OF THE PUMPING 
STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water- Works. 
P. R. Sanders, Superintendent: 

SiR,^ — I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station is in good working order. 

Pump No. 1, with nineteen years' service, is in fairly 
good order. 

Pump No. 2 is in first-class working order and is giving 
good results. 

The boilers are in good order, as reported by the insur- 
ance inspector. 

In September a Ford & Kimball shaking grate was in- 
stalled under Boiler No. 2, which is a great improvement 
over the old grate. 

Following will be found a statement of coal and other 
supplies used at the pumping station during the year, with 
a table showing the work for each month. 

Statement. 

11-i tons 245 j)ounds Pocahontas coal. 
121 tons 1,946 pounds New River coal. 

92 gallons of oil. 

38 pounds of waste. 

11 pounds of grease. 

14 cords of slabs. 



352 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ENGINE RECORD. 



Months. 



bt bo 



be 



o « 



bs 


p. 


p. 














3. 
g 


5 


r- 


a 


P. 


5 




(D 


S. 


frH 


s 


t/j 


3 




t*. 


o 


■*^ 


-M 




<o 


"5 


■" 


bD 

■a . 


"S 


■^bi 






? n 


O 


©.« 




H 


H 


<C 





, 


„ 


*- 


ft 


o 




^-6 










bc:^ 

OS ■" 




r-6 




<u 




s « 


c o 


S 


c« ~ 


fto 








„ c 




53 

o « 


::z c 




Oj 


^^ 


Q 


H 


Q 


H 



So 
S '-' 

ftO 
oj'O 

s e 

C S 

=: o 



.fanuary 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November . .. 
December . . . 

Total 

Daily aver'ge 









H. M. 


H. M. 


3 


26 


26 


279 :3i) 


9: 


2 


24 


23 


262: 


9:21 


3 


25 


27 


272 :30 


8:47 


Ij 23 


24 


230: 


7:40 


3 


26 


26 


301: 


9:42 


4 


22 


26 


277:30 


9:15 


3 


28 


31 


314: 


10: 7 


1 


26 


27 


262: 


8:27 


2 


24 


26 


243 :30 


8: 6 


2 


26 


26 


274: 


8:50 


2 


23 


25 


241 :30 


8:03 


2 


25 


26 


274: 


8:50 


28 


298 


313 


3,231:3) 


8:51 











25,228, 
24,510. 
24,588, 
20,489, 
27,108, 
25,594, 
28,097, 
21.819, 
21.133. 
23,927. 
20,90 1! 
23.182, 



526 813,823 
,«36 875,387 
,361 793,172 
,878 682,995 
984 874,483 
.■J44!S.53,148 
845 906,382 
328703,849 
942 1 704,464 
485; 77 1. 854 
,714696,723 
802 747,832 



286,584,145i785,l62 
85,162' 



46,431 1,497] 
44,527! 1,5901 

45.010 1,452 

37.09711,286 

49.001 1 l,(i00; 
47,206,1,573 
5i,021|l,G45; 
41,402! 1,335 
38,800|1,293 
44,500 1.4;55| 
39,209 1,306 
43,787 1,412 



528,591 
1,448 



1,448 



2,172 543 
2,190 550 
2,197 546 
2,112 .530 
2,586 546 
1,787; 542 
482 550 
l,805i 527 
1,7781 544 
2,-16l' 537 
1,7021 533 
2,965 533 



24,237 



542 



* Amount of coal consumed includes that used for starting fires, banking 
fires and heating buildings. 

Amount of coal consumed per thousand gallons pumped, 
1.83 pounds. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 353 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 



W. F. Thayer, Treasurer, in account with Concord 
Water- Works : 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1911, $27,380.13 
v. R. Sanders, superintendent, 71,881.34 

$99,261.47 



Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $22,212.50 

Bonds paid, 22,000.00 

Interest, 516.53 

Orders paid, 24,914.60 

Cash on hand, 29,617.84 



$99,261.47 



Auditor's Statement. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the books showing 
the receipts of the Concord Water- Works from January 1, 
1911, to December 31, 1911, and find the same correct ; and 
that the total amounts given therein correspond with the 
amount of receipts given by Percy R. Sanders, superintend- 
ent, in his report for the year and also with the receipts 
reported by William F. Thayer, city treasurer. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Concord, N. H., March 6, 1912. 

23 



APPENDIX. 



356 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. 



Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of the 

Works. 

For the year ending January 31, 1874, $4,431.10 

For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875, 17,535.00 

For the year ending April 1, 1876, 16,921.24 

1877, 19,001.07 

1878, 20,763.03 

1879, 21,869.86 

1880, 22,451.53 

1881, 26,744.58 
For nine months ending December 31, 1881, 25,534.01 
For the year ending December 31, 1882, 27,243.06 

1883, 28,255.48 

1884, 28,915.65 

1885, 30,222.54 

1886, 30,862.64 

1887, 34,047.52 

1888, 38,441.32 

1889, 40,237.53 

1890, 42,133.41 

1891, 46,075.16 

1892, 48,351.52 

1893, 52,299.66 

1894, 53,230.10 

1895, 55,343.19 

1896, 56,557.81 

1897, 55,156.42 

1898, 59,147.54 

1899, *53,953.13 

1900, *57,003.71 

1901, 62,253.61 

1902, 63,430.85 

1903, 65,088.45 

1904, 68,570.48 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 



357 



Total receipts for 39 years 



mber 31, 1905, 


$71,076.44 


1906, 


73,063.45 


1907, 


73,782.64 


1908, 


71,362.67 


1909, 


t67,307.84 


1910, 


68,673.71 


1911, 


71,881.34 


ears. 


$1,769,220.29 



* No hydrant I'ental this year. 
t No hydrant rental after 1908. 



B. 



]\Iean Height of Water Each Year, 



1873, 


175.86 


1893, 


173.38 


]874, 


179.50 


1894, 


172.81 


1875, 


180.00 


1895, 


171.15 


1876, 


180.28 


1896, 


178.96 


1877, 


176.46 


1897, 


183.33 


1878, 


179.50 


1898, 


184.31 


1879, 


179.74 


1899, 


183.49 


1880, 


175.30 


1900, 


183.09 


1881, 


174.70 


1901, 


183.86 


1882, 


179.15 


1902, 


184.98 


1883, 


176.40 


1903, 


184.75 


1884, 


178.18 


1904, 


184.40 


1885, 


176.80 


1905, 


183.37 


1886, 


178.10 


1906, 


183.94 


1887, 


179.04 


1907, 


183.59 


1888, 


181.96 


1908, 


183.41 


1889, 


180.91 


1909, 


181.40 


1890, 


181.90 


1910, 


180.22 


1891, 


180.00 


1911, 


177.60 


1892, 


174.32 







358 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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CITY OF CONCORD. 
D 

FIRE-HYDRANTS. 







'i 




Streets. 


Locations. 


3 

is 


o 



North Main . 



South Main . 



Water. 
Hall . . 



Hammond 
Railroad. . 
Fiske. . . . 
Summer. . 
Durgin . . . 



.Southwest corner North Main and Penacook 

East side North Main, roar J. B. Walker's 

.Junction North Main and Fiske 

East side North Main, near Larkin's store 

Northwest corner North Main and Franklin 

East side North Main, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner North Main and Washington 

West side North Main, opp. Historical Society rooms. 

F.ast side North Main, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner North Main and Court 

Northwest corner North Main and Pitman 

Northwest corner North Main and Montjromery 

East i-ide North Main, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner North Main and Centre 

Southeast corner North Main and Bridge 

Southwest corner North Main and Park 

lOast Ficie North Main, opposite Park 

Northwest corner North Main and Capitol 

Northwest corner North Main and School 

West side North Main, at Centennial Block 

East side North Main, opposite Centennial Block 

East side North Main, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side North Main, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner North Main and Warren 

West side North Main, at Central Block 

Northeast corner North Main and Depot 

Northwest corner North Main and Pleasant 

Southeast corner South Main and Pleasant 

Northeast corner South Main and Freight 

East side South Main, opposite Fayette 

East side South Main, opposite Thompson 

.Southeast corner South Main and Chandler 

Northwest corner South Main and Wentworth .Vvenue. 

Northwest corner South Main and Thorndike 

East side South Main, opposite St. John's Church... 

Northwest corner South Main and Perley 

West side South Main, near Abbot-Downing Co.'s... 
East side South Main, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s. 

Rast side South Main, near West 

Northeast corner South Main and Gas 

West side South Main, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co . . . 

.Southwest corner South Main and South State 

Northwest corner South Main and Pillsbury 

East side South Main, opposite Pillsbury 

West side South Main, opposite Langdon 

West side South Main, at .T. H. Lamprey's 

West side South Main, at W. J. Sawyer's 

West side Water, near Capt. James Thompson's 

West side Hall, oi)posite Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 

West side Hall, near E. W. Robinson's 

West side Hall, near F. H. George's 

West side Hall, opposite Hammond 

West side Hall, below Hammond 

East side Hall, opposite W. H. Page's 

East side Hall, near Rumford Field 

North side Hammond, near Bridge 

East side Railroad, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side Fiske, near North Stale 

Northeast corner Summer and Pitman 

East side Durgin, opposite Toof's laundry 



27 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Conhwued 



365 




North State. 



South State . 



Mills 

Dakin . . . 
Dunklee. 

Broadwav 



Donovan 
Green . . . 

South . . . 



Bradley 

Union 

Jackson 

Lyndon 

North Spring. 



Southwest corner North State and Penacook 

Northwest corner North State and Walker 

Northwest corner North State and Church 

Northeast corner North State and Franklin 

Northwest corner North State and Tremont 

Northeast corner North State and Washington 

West side North State, opposite Court 

Southwest corner North State and Maple 

Southeast corner North State and Centre 

Southeast corner North State and Park 

Southwest corner North State and School 

Southeast corner North State and Warren 

Northwest corner North State and Pleasant 

Plast side South State, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner South State and Thompson 

Southwest corner South State and Monroe 

East side South State, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner South State and Downing 

Northeast corner South State and West 

Southwest corner South State and Harrison 

West side Mills, near Levi Call's 

Northwest corner Mills and Allison 

West side Dakin, near C. E. Harriman's 

West side Dunklee, 150 feet south of West 

Northwest corner Dunklee and Allison 

Northwest corner Dunklee and Pillsbury 

West side Broadway at H. H. Metcalf's 

Northwest corner Broadway and Allison 

Northwest corner Broadway and Carter 

Northwest corner Broadway and Stone 

West side Broadway, at Rollins Park 

West side Broadway, opposite McKinley 

West side Broadway, between McKinley and Rockingham 

Northeast corner Donovan and Wiggin 

Northwest corner Green and Prince 

East side Green, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner Green and Warren 

West side South, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner South and Payette 

Northwest corner South and Tliompson 

West side South, opposite Monroe 

West side South, opposite Laurel 

West side South, below N. H. Memorial Hospital. .. . 

West side South, opposite Downing 

West side South, opposite Allison 

West side South, opposite Pillsbury 

West side South, near Abbot farm 

West side South, opposite I. W. Bushev's 

Northwest corner South and Iron Works Road 

East side South, at Quint's 

West side South, near Bow line 

Southwest corner Bradley and Penacook 

Northwest corner Bradlev and Walker 

East side Bradley, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner Bradley and Franklin 

Northwest corner Union and Maple 

Northeast corner Jackson and Church 

Southwest corner Lyndon and Tremont 

East side Lvndon. opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner North Spring and Maple 

Southwest corner North Spring and Centre 

East side North Spring, opposite High School 



366 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FmE-B.YDR\^TS.— Continued. 




South Spring. 



Academy 
Hanover 
Rumford 



Huntington 
Tahauto. . . 
Pine 

Holt 

High 

Valley 

Auburn ... 



Ridge Road. . . 
We.stbourue Rd 

Giles 

Dartmouth . . . 
Princeton. . . . 

Fruit 

Minot 

Penacook .... 



Walker. . 
Albin . . . 
Highland 

Church . . 
Franklin . 



Southwest corner Soutli Spring and Oak . . 

West side South Spring, opposite Thompson 

West side South Spring, opposite Concord 

West side So. Spring, opp. Perley proposed extension . 

East side Academy, at William E. Bow's 

West side Hanover, at No. 10 

West side Rumford, south of cemetery gate 

West side Rumford. opposite Perkins 

Northeast corner Rumford and Albin 

Northeast corner Rumford and Franklin 

Northwest corner Rumford and Beacon 

Northeast corner Rumford and Abbott 

Northeast corner Rumford and Cambridge 

Northwest corner Rumford and Centre 

Northeast corner Rumford and School 

West side Huntington, at head of Short 

Northwest corner Tahanto and School 

Southwest corner Pine and Centre 

Southwest corner Pine and Warren 

East side Holt, at Nason's 

Northwest corner High and Auburn 

Northwest corner Pligh and Valley 

East side High, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner High and Franklin 

Nortlieast corner Valley and Forest 

Northeast corner Auburn and Chestnut 

Northeast corner Auburn and Forest 

North side Auburn, between Centre and Forest 

West side Ridge Road, opposite J. B. Camnbell's 

North side Westbourne Road, northof Mrs. F. P. Hallett's 

Southeast corner Giles and School 

Southwest corner Dartmouth and Clinton 

Southwest corner Princeton and Clinton 

Nortliwest corner Princeton and Noyes 

Nortboast corner Fruit and Woodman 

West side Fruit, near H. T. Gilman's 

East side Fruit, opposite W. VV. Critchett's 

East side Fruit, ojiposite Kilburn's 

West side Minot, north of Odd Fellows' Home 

AVest side Minot. south of Odd Fellows' Home 

Northwest corner Minot and Pleasant 

South side Penacook, near Concord Ijumber Co.... 
South side Penacook, east of P. B. Co.'s storehouse. . 

Soutli side Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s 

South side Penacook, near P. B. Co.'s office 

Southeast corner Penacook and North Main 

Southwest corner Penacook and Rumford 

North side Penacook, opposite T. Hannigan's 

Southeast corner Penacook and Coiunil)us Avenue. . . . 

Southwest corner Walker and Martin 

Nortii side Albin, near D. Weathers' 

North side Highland, between Bradley and Rumford. 

Nortlieast corn<>r Highland and Rumford 

South side Church, east of P.radlev 

North side Church, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner Church and Rumford 

Nrn-tliwest corner Fi'anklin and .Jackson 

\ortbeast corner Franklin and Lvndon 

Souttiwest corner Franklin and Rumford 

Soutli side Franklin, opposite W. .T. Ahern's 

North side Franklin, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner Franklin and Auburn 



WATER DEPxS-RTMENT. 

Fm^-RYBRANTS.— Continued. 



367 




Chestnut . 
Tremont . 



Pearl. . 
Beacon . 



Rowell. . . . 
Blanchard. 
Perry 



Washington . 



Chapel 

Montgomery 
Centre 



Bridge. 



Park . . 
Capitol. 
Garden . 
School . 



Warren . 



Depot . 



Blake . . . 
Orchard . 
Pleasant. 



Northwest corner Chestnut and High 

Xorth side Tremont, east of Harrod 

Southwest corner Tremont and Jackson 

North side Pearl, at Kimball Flanders' 

North side Beacon, opposite Merrimack School 

Northwest corner Beacon and Jackson 

Southwest corner Beacon and Lyndon , 

North side Beacon, opposite White 

South side Beacon, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner Rowell and White 

Northwest corner Blanchard and Essex 

North side Ferry, opposite Ford's foundry 

Nortli side Ferry, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side Ferry, east of C. & M. B. R 

Northwest corner Ferry and Huntoon Avenue 

North side Washington, opposite Rollins 

Southv.'est corner Washington and Union 

Northeast corner Washington and Lvndon 

Northwest corner Washington and Riimford 

Northwest corner Washington and North Essex 

North side Washington, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side Chapel, near Methodist Church 

South side Montgomery, opposite Mrs. George Minot's. 

Northeast corner Centre and North State 

Southwest corner Centre and Green 

Northwest corner Centre and Union 

Northwest corner Centre and North Spring 

South side Centre, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner Centre and Summit Avenue 

Nortlieast corner Centre and Ridge Road 

South side Bridge, near easterly barn 

Nortli side Bridge, opposite Concord Coal Co.'s 

North side Bridge, opposite Concord Shoe Factory... 

North side Park, at St. Paul's Church 

Noi-theast corner Capitol and North State 

Northeast corner Garden and Huntington 

Nortliwest corner Sjhool and Green 

Nortli west corner School and North Spring 

Northwest corner School and Rumf ord 

Northwest corner School and Merrimack 

Northwest corner School and Pine 

Nortlieast corner School and Liberty- 

North side School, opposite E. B. Woodworth's 

Southeast corner Wai'ren and Fremont 

Northwest corner Warren and North Spring 

Northwest corner Warren and Ruraford 

Southwest corner Warren and Merrimack 

Northwest corner Warren and Tahanto 

Northeast corner Warren and Liberty 

Northeast corner Warren and Giles 

Junction of Warren and Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side Depot, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner Depot and Railroad Square 

South side Blake, at John B. McLeod's 

South side Orchard, opposite Shei-burne's 

Northwest corner Pleasant and Railroad Sqiiare 

South side Pleasant, at South Congregational Church. 

Southeast corner Pleasant and South 

Northeast corner Pleasant and Fremont 

Southwest corner Pleasant and Spring 

South side Pleasant, opposite Rumford 

South side Pleasant, opposite Merrimack 



368 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co7iimwed. 




Pleasant . 



Mill Road 

St. P. School. . 

OldHopkint'n 

Roiul 

Wall 

Miirsliiill 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue. 

Fayette 

Thompson . . . . 

Chandler 

Concord 



Monroe. . . . 
Thnrndike. 

Laurel .... 
Perley 

Downing. . , 
Clinton. . . . 

West 



Avon .... 
Harrison . 
Humphrey 
Allison . . . 
Pillsbury . 

Carter . . . , 



South side Pleasant, opposite Pine 

South side Pleasant, opposite Liberty 

North side Pleasant, near city stable 

South side Pleasant, near Gale 

South side Pleasant, opposite Mrs. Aiken's 

South side Pleasant, near Mrs. Eddv's cottage. 

North side Pleasant, near .James Lane's 

North side Pleasant, near J. McC. Hammond's. 

South side Pleasant, opposite Piske Road 

Southwest corner Pleasant and School Avenue. 

North side Pleasant, opposite infirmary 

South side Pleasant, in field near gasometer... 
South side Pleasant, near new Upper School. 

Fast side Mill Road, near laboratory 

North side Mill Road, at Orphans' Home 

South side Mill Kouu. at tenement No. 7 



Junction old and new Hopkinton roads 

Northeast corner Wall and Elm 

North side Marshall, opposite Fuller 

North side Freight, at southwest corner passenger station 

Southwest corner Hill's Avenue and Railroad Square. . 

Northeast corner Hill's Avenue and South Main 

Northwest corner Fayette and Elm 

North side Thompson, opposite Jefferson 

South side Chandler, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner Concord and South State 

Nortliwest corner Concord and Jefferson 

Nortlieast corner Concord and South 

North side Monroe, opposite Grove 

South side Monroe, at Rumford School 

Southwest corner Thorndike and South State 

N<irtheast corner Thorndike and Grove , 

North side Thorndike, opposite Pierce 

N'17-tlieast corner Thorndike and South Spring 

Northwest corner Laurel and Grove 

Xorttiwest corner Laurel and Pierce 

Southwest corner Perley and South State 

Northwest corner Perley and Grove 

Northeast corner Perley and Pierce 

South side Perley, near old brook 

South side Downing, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner Downing and Mills 

Southwest corner Downing and Redwood Avenue. . . . 

North side Clinton, opposite Harvard 

North side Clinton, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner Clinton and Fruit 

Nortli side Clinton, near Snell's 

North side Clinton, at State Fair grounds 

Nortli side West, near South Main 

North side West, near Badger 

Northeast corner West and Mills 

North side West, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner West and Broadway 

Northwest corner Avon and South 

Northwest corner Harrison and Morton 

North side Humphrey, near Kimball 

Northeast corner Allison and Badger 

North side Pillsbury, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner Pillsbury and Broadway 

Northwest corner Pillsbury and Kimball 

Northeast corner Carter and Eastman 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDUANT^.— Continued. 



369 




Stone 

Hollv 

McKinley . . . . 
Rockingham. . 

Iron Works Rd 
Prospect 



Curtice Ave. 
North State. 



Palm. 



North State. 



Fisher. 
View. . 
Electric 

Clarke . 
Lake. . 



Knight 

Hutchins. . . 

Second 

PenacookRd 



Vorth side Stone, 300 feet from Bow 

North side Holly, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee Street proposed extension 

Northeast corner Rockingham and Broadway 

North side Rockingham, at Donovan 

South side Iron Works Road, at Brown's 

Northwest corner Prospect and Granite Avenue 

East side Prospect, north of Granite Avenue 

North side Curtice Avenue, near John C. Kenney's. . . . 
West side North State, at Water- Works storehouse. . . . 

Northeast corner North State and Foster 

East side North State, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner North State and Curtice Avenue. . . . 

East side Nortli State, near W. H. Perry's 

East side North State, near north entrance Blossom 

Hill Cemetery 

W^est side North State, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side North State, near A. L. Colburn's 

East side North State, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side North State, at south line of prison wall. . . . 
West side North State, at north line of prison wall .... 

East side North State, near Asa L. Gay's 

Northwest corner North State and Palm 

West side North State, near Conjord Woodworking Co. 

P2ast side North State, near C. H. Farnum's 

East side North State, near Cyrus R. Farnum's 

East side North State, near M. H. Farnum's 

East side North State, opposite Dolan 

East side North State, opposite John H. Flood's 

West side North State, opposite S. Abbott's 

North side of Palm, west of Fairbanks 

WEST CONCORD. 



Southeast corner North State and K 

Northeast corner North State and Peabody 

East side North State, at George Partridge's 

East side North State, near engine house 

East side North State, opposite D. Holden's 

West side North State, near west mill 

East side North State, opposite Simeon Partridge's. 

East side North State, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side North State, opposite A. Hollis' 

East side North State, near Sewall's Falls Road... 

Southwest corner Fisher and Engel 

Northeast corner View and K 

Northeast corner of Electric and North State 

North side Electric, near power station 

Northeast corner Clarke and Fisher 

East side Lake, near S. W. Kellom's 

West side Lake, near H. C. Holden's 

West side Lake, near Mrs. C. H. Besse's 

East side Lake, near Mrs. H. C. Holden's 

South side Lake, near Quaker 

South side Knight, opposite railroad station 

North side Hutchins, near B. T. Putney's 

North side Hutchins, near C. & C. Railroad 

North side Hutchins, at Turcotte's 

North side Second, near A. H. Knight's '. 

W^est side Penacook Road, opposite Frost's 

W^est side Penacook Road, opposite Blanchard's. . . . 
West side Penacook Road, near Warner Road 



370 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Conhnwcd 




Main . 



West Main. 
High 



Washington . 



Elliott. . 
Charles. 



West Canal . 
East Canal. 



Crescent . . . 
Merrimack . 



Summer. 



Spring. 
Maple. , 
Winter. 
Centre . 



Cross . 
Rolf e . 



Penacook. 



PENACOOK. 

West side Main, at Annis's 

West side Main, at Garvin's 

West side Main, south of Willow Hollow 

West side Main, near Mr. Currier's 

West side Main, at south end of Woodlawn Cemetery 
West side Main, at north end of WootUawn cemetery 

West side Main, opposite Stark 

West side Main, near Iloyt's garage 

West side Main, near Prescott's 

Southwest corner Main and Union 

Washington Square, opposite Washington 

Northwest corner Main and Charles 

North side Main, opposite East Canal 

North side Main, near iron bridge 

West side West Main, opposite cemetery 

West side West Main, at Pine 

Northwest corner High and Stark 

East side High, opposite Summit 

Norihwest corner High and Maple 

Northwest corner High and Spring 

.Southeast corner Washington and Union 

South side Washington, opposite John Whitaker's. . . . 

Soutli side Washington, opposite Charles 

South side Washington, near Contoocook bridge. . . . 

Northeast corner Elliott and Electris Avenue 

Soutliwest corner Charles and Warren 

North side Charles, near George W. Corey's 

Southeast corner West Canal and Warren 

North side East Canal, near Contoocook Mfg. Co. .. . 

North side East Canal, near Crescent 

West side Crescent, north of Canal 

South side Merrimaek, opposite Merrimack Avenue. . 

North side Merrimack, opposite D. W. Pox's 

North side Merrimack, opposite Cross 

South side Merrimack, opposite Rolfe's shop 

South side Merrimack, opposite Symonds' factory. . . . 

North side Merrimack, near road to Island 

Northwest corner Merrimack and Penacook 

North side Summer, ojjjiosite High 

Northeast corner Summer and Centre 

North side Summer, opposite Church 

Northeast corner Spring and Church 

Northeast corner Maple and Pleasant 

North side Winter, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner Centre and Spring 

West- side Centre, at Corbett's 

Southwest corner Cross and Summer 

North side Rolfe, near James Corbett's 

Northwest corner Rolfe and Penncook 

West side Penacook, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 

West side Penacook, at E. L. Davis' 

East side Penacook, at John Chadwick's 

Whole number public hydrants 



3 
417 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Conceit cZed. 



871 



Locations. 



^ r« 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 



Concord Shoe Factory 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard. 
Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. . . 

State Prison 

Abbot-Dowiiir.g Oo.'s yard 

Page Belting Co.'s yard 

W. P. Ford & Co.'s yard 

N. H. State Hospital yard 

Concord Gas Light Co.'s yard 

St. Paul's School 

Waterworks Pumping Station grounds. 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

Crescent Worsted Co 



Whole number private hydrants 



372 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. 
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1911. 

. In form recommended liy the New England Water- 
AVorks Association. 

CONCORD WATER- WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1910—21,497. 
Date of construction — 1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

]\Iode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING STATISTICS. 

1. Builders of pumping uiachinery — Henry R. Worthing- 

ton, Harrison, N. J. 

2. Description of fuel used— a. Kind — ^Ijituminous. 

h. Brand of coal — New River. 

c. Average price of coal per 

gross ton delivered, $4,531. 

d. Percentage ash, 10%. 
3. Coal consumed for the year — 236 tons. 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 373 

4. (Pounds of wood consumed )-^3=equivalent amount 
of coal— 8,079. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year for 
pumping purposes — 239.58. 

6. Total pumpage for the year without allowance for 
slip— 286,584,145 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pump works — 
199.30 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pump works — 
200.46 feet. 

9. Number of gallons i)umped per pound of equivalent 
coal — 534. 

10. Duty= 

86,584,14.') gallons pumped, X 8.34 (lbs.) x 100 x dynamic head, 200-40 QQ 278 550 

Total fuel cousumed, 53(5,670 pounds. ' ' 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station ex- 
penses, $3,340.53. 

11. Per million gallons pumi)ed — $11.65. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0,058. 

STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTION 
SYSTEM. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-ineh. 

3. Extended — 3,633 feet during year. 

4. Renewed — 3,963 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 614 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 68.54 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3,23 
miles. 



374 CITY OF CONCOIID. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 
13 ; i)rivate, none. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 417 ; pri- 
vate, 63. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 22. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 982. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four inch — none. 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 82. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 
18.. Extended— 941 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 119 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 87,099 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during j^ear — 38. 

22. Number now in use — 3,738. 

23. Average length of service — 23.3 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — 

25. Number of meters added during year — 145. 

26. Number now in use — 2,153. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 57.59. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 77.2. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 10. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 42. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In compliance with liie city charter, the Board of Public 
Works herewith submits its first annual report for the year 
ending December 31, 1911. 

The board has held forty-eight meetings, nine of which 
were hearings held in various parts of the city on the 
premises covered by the petitions considered. 

One hundred and ten petitions have been presented to 
the board and disposed of as follows: eighty-five were 
granted; in nine eases the petitioners were given leave to 
withdraw; two were referred to the mayor with full power 
and fourteen are still on the table for further consideration. 

Nine petitions for street lights have been considered. 
Five were granted, one given leave to withdraw and three 
are still on the table for consideration. The petitions 
granted were for lights in the following locations : one arc 
light on Bridge Street at the alley betv/een Stickney Block 
and Orr & Rolfe Block; five incandescent lights on South 
Pembroke Poad, from ''Lower Bridge" to top of Black 
Tlill; one incandescent light at junction of Fruit and 
Woodman Streets; two Wellsbach gas-lights on Downing 
Street, one opposite No. 74, on south side of street, and one 
opposite No. 62, en north side of street. In the East Con- 
cord lighting precinct one incandescent light was located 
on Eastman Street near Boston & Maine Railroad station. 

ilr. Alfred Clark, commissioner of highways under the 
old charter, Avas retained as superintendent of streets under 
the new charter. 



376 CITY OP CONCORD. 

For a detailed account of work on streets and highways, 
garbage and sprinkling precincts, including receipts and 
expenditures, see report of sui)er'intendent of streets, here- 
with appended. 

For report of the work in the several sewer precincts, 
see report of the city engineer, herewith appended. 

Respectfully sul)mitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, 
OLA ANDERSON, 
ELMER 11. FARRAR, 
R. A. BROWN, 

Board of Public Works. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 377 

REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



Office of Superintendent of Streets. 

To the Board of Piihlic Works: 

Gentlemen, — The superintendent of streets herewith 
submits the annual report relating to the operations and 
expenditures of the highway department for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1911. 

Permanent Improvements. 

The first work taken up at the beginning of the season 
was the macadamizing of North Main Street from Church 
to Pearl. The macadam with Tarvia binder, which was put 
in the season before on the section of North Main from 
Church Street north, proved very satisfactory and the 
same kind of macadam was built this year except for a 
slight difference in the surface treatment. It was ex- 
pected that clay might be found in the excavating and that 
considerable filling w^ould be necessary, but such did not 
prove to be the case and therefore a balance was left on the 
appropriation. The gutters were paved, sidewalk bank- 
ings graded and the street much improved in general ap- 
pearance. A section of this street should be macadamized 
each year until Center Street is reached as it is in bad 
shape. 

. A section of the Hopkinton road was macadamized next. 
This was a continuation of the water-bound macadam put 
in two years ago. Both pieces will need surface treatment 
of tar or asphalt next season or they will not stand the 
traffic. Such treatment would be in the way. of economy. 
South Street was graveled for 2,100 feet in length, which 



378 CITY OF CONCORD. 

completes a good gravel road from Bow line to Carter 
Street. South Street from Carter to Pleasant is in very 
bad condition, and if a section of macadam could be built 
eaeli year, as has been done on others, we should soon have 
a fine road all the way to Bow line. 

Another section of the Loudon road was graveled this 
year and the same amount of work done another year 
would complete work on that road. The Pittsfield road 
from the Loudon road to the Soucook River bridge should 
be graveled, for at the present time that is the worst piece 
of road which we have in Concord. 

South Main Street from Thorndike to Perley has been in 
very bad condition for several years, but work on it has 
been put off from year to year on account of the sewer 
work which might have to be done there. If nothing is 
to be done on the sewer soon this street should be re- 
constructed. 

Capitol Street from State to Green has been laid twenty- 
two years, and from State to Main twenty years, and no 
great amount has been expended on it for repairs. It now 
needs resurfacing badly. 

Reconstruction and Resurfacing. 

This year it was necessary to resurface that portion of 
Pleasant Street called the "Eddy Road." The two and a 
half inch trap rock surface was completely worn away and 
the road was reconstructed with Tarvia X as a binder. 
The remainder of the road as far as St. Paul's School has 
been laid over eight years and should be resurfaced the 
coming season. The daily automobile traffic over this road 
is heavy and the road has withstood it exceedingly well 
but it needs some surface treatment immediately. The 
same applies to the Penacook road. Several sections of 
that have been in a long time and one piece about two thou- 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 379 

sand feet in length was built fifteen years ago and is com- 
pletely Avorn out and will have to be reconstructed. 
Tarvia B was used on a portion of the Penacook road this 
year and more should be used next. The same surface 
treatment was used on the South Pembroke road and I 
should advise further use of it there another year. The 
use of tar or asphalt on macadam roads, while aiding in 
the laying of dust, is used more to bind the macadam to- 
gether that it may withstand the traffic. The same mate- 
rial could not be used on an unimproved street but there 
are several streets where some dust layer should be used 
which would help to preserve the road as well as lay the 
dust. The road through West Concord from the railroad 
crossing to the macadam on the Penacook road is very 
dusty, owing to the constant automobile traffic, and I would 
recommend the use of some dust layer there. There are 
other streets through which the street cars run where the 
sprinkling with water is hardly a sufficient dust layer un- 
der all weather conditions and I think some oil could be 
used to good advantage. 

Bridges. 

The Federal, Horse Hill, and a number of smaller 
bridges have been repaired and replankecl this year. The 
Pembroke and the Main Street bridge, Penacook, should be 
replanked next season. 

Catch Basins. 

Hardly the usual number of catch basins were built this 
year, but there are a number of ncAV ones which should be 
put in and several old ones to be reconstructed next 
summer. 



380 city op concord. 

Concrete Walks, 

Less than an average number of petitions for concrete 
walks and edgestone were granted this year, but all were 
l)ut in excepting two small pieces in Penaeook and the edge- 
stone around the Historical Building on Park, Green and 
Centre. It was so late when the contractors completed 
their work there that it was thought best to wait until 
spring before putting in the edgestone. The usual amount 
of concrete walks were repaired. 

Trees. 

To properly care for the trees in Concord is becoming a 
problem. We have a great many, some of them quite old, 
which require trimming and a number should be removed. 
A few years ago the brown-tail moth arrived in Concord 
and brought unlimited work to the department in the effort 
to exterminate them. We may feel that the effort has been 
fairly successful for only a few trees have been lost on ac- 
count of them and this year there seem to be fewer nests 
than last. But a new pest, the elm-tree beetle, threatens 
to do more harm as they are harder to exterminate. Last 
summer the elms in different parts of the city began to 
show the ravages of the pest. The amount of time in which 
any work is effective in destroying the beetle is short, as 
the spraying should be done as soon as the leaves appear. 
It is impossible to spray the number of elms which we have 
in Concord at the proper time with only one sprayer and 
if we are to preserve them, it is a matter to which the board 
should give their immediate attention. I also find that 
the gypsy moth is becoming numerous in the city and the 
extermination of them will require considerable expendi- 
ture of time and money. Possibly the state moth agent 
may aid us in the work against this pest. Beside the work 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 381 

of extermination of the various moth pests, the trimming 
and removing of old trees, something should be done in 
setting out new trees to take the place of the old ones. But 
1 would call your attention to the planting of poplar trees 
in Concord. A few years ago these rapid growing trees 
were set out quite extensively. They are now trees of con- 
siderable size and we are beginning to have trouble with 
the sewers which have become filled with the roots. In 
many western cities they have an ordinance prohibiting 
the planting of poplar trees. While such measures may 
not be necessary in Concord, I think it would be well to 
discourage the planting of poplars. When everything is 
taken into consideration I think you can easily see that the 
business of caring for the trees in Concord requires a great 
deal of time and attention and the work necessary is in- 
creasing each year. 

Sprinkling. 

The street sprinkling has been done the past season in the 
usual manner. Several petitions to have the precinct en- 
larged are now in the hands of the board and if these are 
granted, unless some other dust layer should be used on 
some of the streets, it will be necessary to purchase more 
sprinklers. A new sprinkling precinct was established in 
Penacook instead of doing the work by subscription as for- 
merly. I think it would be advisable for that precinct to 
own the sprinkling cart the same as is done in the city 
proper. 

Garbage. 

The amount of garbage collected was some three hundred 
loads more than last year. The method of collecting the 
garbage and paper has proved satisfactory, but it is becom- 
ing a problem to dispose of it. It becomes necessary each 



382 CITY OP CONCORD. 

year to haul it farther, which increases the expense. Fire 
destroyed the crematory on the river bank early in the 
season, which made it necessary to build a new one. 

General Maintenance. 

From the appropriation for general maintenance come 
the general repairing and grading of all streets and side- 
walks, the care of bridges, drinking fountains and watering- 
troughs, care of ice and snow, maintenance of the city 
stable where we have thirteen horses, and all the miscel- 
laneous expenses of the department. Many years December 
is an expensive month on account of heavy storms, and 
never feeling sure what it may be, it is necessary to exer- 
cise considerable economy in the expenditure of this ap- 
propriation throughout the year. There are always a num- 
ber of repairs which should be made, but the appropriation 
will not allow the expenditure. This year there was a small 
balance which could have been used to good advantage in 
repairs, as the expense for caring for ice and snow in Decem- 
ber was not heavy. There should be a new shed and store- 
room built at the city stable lot, as we have not sufficient 
suitable room to store all the equipment of the department. 

Road Conventions. 

Being a member of the IMassacliusetts Highway Associa- 
tion, it has been my fortune to attend several interesting 
meetings of that society and also to attend the American 
Road Builders' Convention, at Rochester, N. Y. Both of 
these societies help to keep one up to date in all matters 
pertaining to road-building. The road convention held in 
Concord, December 13 and 14, was interesting and instruc- 
tive and I hope this first successful meeting may be fol- 
lowed by one annually. Such conventions are helpful and 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 383 

deal with a subject which is becoming of the greatest im- 
portance to the people. 

For the interest which the Board of Public Works has^ 
taken in the work of the highway department and for the 
manner in which they have dealt with various problems 
brought before them, I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Siiperintendent of Streets. 



384 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

WARD ONE. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



■Borough Road 

Bye 

Centre 

Charles 

Cliurch 

Crescent 

Cross 

East Cnnal 

KUiott 

p:.lni 

Fowler 

HiKh ; 

Horse Hill Roiid 

Horse Hill Roart (Horse Hill) 
Main 

Maple 

Morrimaek Avenue 

Merrimaek 

Pena cook 

Pleasant 

River Road 

River Hill Road 

Rolfe ', 

Runnells '.. . . . 

Sawyer Road .."."' 

Scales 

Spriufr 

Summer 

Summit 

Sweati's Hill Road....'!!.'.'.'.'! 
Union 

Walnut !!!!!!!! 

Warner Road 

Warren !!!!!!!! 

Washinj^ton ! ! ! 

Webster !!!! 

Webster Road !!!!!!!, 

West Canal !!!!!!! 

West Main !!.!!! 

Winter 



General reiiairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
(Icneral rei)airs 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Rnildinsr sidewalks 

General repairs , 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repa irs 

Repairing concrete Avalks 
General repairs 



$18.75 
25.88 
55.40 

9.80 

1.23 
115.67 

1.89 

2.21 
12.45 
41.19 
35.58 
12.45 
82.03 
120.65 
37.13 
40.05 
125.44 
1.54.34 
135.29 
32.42 

1.43 

1.38 
44 ..55 
43 ..54 

9.13 
.593.47 
11.33 
19.39 
35.02 
46.38 
41.70 
31.39 
31,38 

2.83 
51.14 

2.60 
15. UO 
13.78 
91.27 

2.56 

8.83 
14.83 
70.28 

2.21 
30.06 

6.96 
41.65 

3. .57 



WARD TWO. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Canterbury Road 
Cemetery Road.. 

Curtis Road 

Eastman 

East Ponacook . . 
Klaghole Road . . 



General repairs . 



$15.42 
2.33 
15.07 
27.97 
2.91 
9.33 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD TWO.— Concluded. 



385 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 







$48 49 








11 67 


Hot IIoli' rond Road .. . . 




4S OS 






54 SO 






7 OS 






4 30 




o 6(i 






"^1 XI 


Hoit District 




I) 33 


" " Sanborn Distriot. .. 




21 00 






7 00 






7.00 






8 77 






4 67 






74.81 






278.89 






122 54 


Hoit District 




84.68 






17.52 


Potter 




65 55 


Sanborn 




11 67 


Sewall's Falls Road 




4 67 






77.63 


Virgin District 




12.10 


Shawmut 




50.S0 


Snows Pond Road 




10.68 


Turnpike 




1.04 


Tyargo 




9.33 


Virgin 




61 45 











WARD THREE. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 


Beech Hill Road 






$9 50 


Bog Road 








35 14 


Carter Hill Road 




63 05 


Clark 


10 53 


' ' Dug way " 




9 47 


Engel 




13 00 


Highland Road 




5 78 


Hutchins 




48 84 


K 





44 


Knight 


3 80 


Lake 


" 


7 28 


Long Pond Road 


" 


47 30 


North State 


Repairir 


" 


186.81 




ig concrete walks 


66.07 


Number Four Road 


repairs 


66 61 


Number Five Road 






44.48 


Penacook 


" 


2 00 


Pine Hill Road 




13 36 


Quaker 


" 


1.13 


River Road 




49 44 


River Hill Road 




23 90 


Saltmarsh Road 




43.40 


Sand Hill Road 


" 


.22 


Sewall's Falls Road 




29.81 


View 




.44 


West Parish Road 


" 




16.81 













2S 



386 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD FOUR. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Abbott 

Academy 

Auburn 

Beacon 

Blancbard 

Bradley 

(;am bridge 

Center 

Chapel 

Church 

Court 

East Penaeook . . . 

Fiske 

Forrest 

Franklin 

Oranite 

Harrod 

High 

Highland 

Holt 

Jackson 

Lyndon 

Maple 

MnntRoniiTy 

North Essex 

Nortli Main 

North Spring 

North State 

Park Ridge 

Pearl 

Penaeook 

Pitman 

Ridge Road 

Rowell 

Rumford 

Summer 

Tremont 

Union 

Vernon 

Walker 

Washington 

White 

Winter 

West bourne Road 



General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks 

General repairs 

Macadamizing 

Repairing concrete walks 

roadway . 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. . . . 
roadway 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 



Rei)airing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD FIVE. 



387 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Center 

Durgin 

Fremont 

Giles 

Green , 

Liberty 

Merrimack 

Nortli Main 

North Spring 

North State 

Odd Fellows' Avenue 

Park 

Pine 

Pleasant 

Prince 

School 

Warren 

West Washington . . . . 
Woodman 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

roadway 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
!! !! roadway 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. .. 

roadway 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

roadway 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

roadway 

General repairs 



$11..57 

2.83 

47.74 

.22 

18.74 

6.66 

35,73 

5.83 

7.10 

29.42 

18.45 

63.52 

1.21 

23.03 

8.16 

8.78 

21.75 

25.20 

.54 

11.20 

105.23 

5.31 

35.26 

72.57 

14.66 

22.10 

90.14 

43.03 

215.95 

26.11 

1.09 



WARD SIX. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Clinton.. 
Concord . 

Downing 

Elm 

Fayette . . 

Fruit . . . . 
Grove 

Laurel . . . 

Marshall. 
Monroe. . 

Oak 

Perley.. . 
Pierce.... 
Pleasant. 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks, 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs , 

Repairing concrete walks 

General repairs , 

Repairing concrete walks 



121.30 
38.21 

9.79 
18.22 
24.84 

2.09 
18.00 
10.82 
12.14 
51.40 
25.] 2 
30.70 
33.22 
131.32 
22.47 

4.28 
59.51 

2.78 
.35.51 

2.45 
11.19 

6.86 



388 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

WARD SIX— Concluded. 



STREET. 



.Expense. 



South 

South Main.. 
South Spring 
South State.. 

Thompson.. . 
Thorndike... 
Wall 



Repairing concrete walk: 
General repairs 

Repairing concri'te walk: 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walk 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walk 



$95.30 

158.87 
70.31 
60.06 

115.06 
99. 6H 

116.56 
20.86 
16.62 
29.18 
52.80 
5.81 
24.34 



WARD SEVEN. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Allison 

Birch 

Bog Road 

Broadway 

Clinton 

Downing 

Dunklee 

Dun barton Road 

Fiske Road 

Glen 

Hall 

Hopkinton Road 

Hopkinton New Road 
Hopkinton Old Road. 

Humphrey 

Iron Works Road 

Kensington Road 

Kimball 

Long Pond Road 

Mills 

Minot 

Morton 

Mose Brown Road 

North Fruit 

Noyes 

Pillsbury 

Pleasant 

Rockingham 

South 

South Main 

South State 

Stickney Hill Road.. . 

Stone 

Tuttle 

Water 

West 

Woodman 

Yale 



General repairs 

New concrete walks 
General repairs 

New concrete walks 
General repairs 

Macadamizing 

General repairs 

• t> 4. 

Re-surfacing 

General repairs 

Graveling 

General repairs 



$49.99 

11.33 

167.31 

90.13 

223.41 

33.82 

21.15 

20.16 

16.95 

82.94 

74.72 

4.64 

77.66 

196.82 

2,028.85 

126.97 

109.06 

7.62 

220.59 

50.44 

2.09 

75.75 

7.86 

7.69 

2.58 

2.56 

18..54 

11.92 

19.51 

221.94 

1.532.07 

23.39 

221.11 

1,270.39 

298.19 

27.74 

72.13 

67.96 

15.20 

10.20 

68.73 

13.00 

146.80 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD EIGHT. 



389 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Bridge 

Chandler 

Clough's Mill Koad 

Depot 

Fayette 

Garvin's Falls Road... 

Hill's Avenue 

Loudon Road 

North Main 

North Pembroke Road 

Pittstteld Road 

Pleasant Extension . . . 

Sheep Road 

South Main 

South Pembroke Road 

Stickney Avenue 

Sugar Bowl Road 

Thompson Road 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

General repairs 

Building sidewalks 

Graveling 

Repairing concrete walks — 

roadway 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . . 
General repairs 



$270.30 

9.10 

8.10 

15.53 

1.76 

2>i.08 

41.61 

4.49 

257.47 

439.79 

1,467.47 

172.91 

43.90 

214.87 

88.63 

68.95 

28.59 

48.60 

30.74 

102.70 

8.35 

23.84 

80.17 



WARD NINE. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 




General repairs 


$2.28 




27.52 




<. ■. 


3.78 






2.88 






47 ..57 






10.84 






6.31 






18.27 






71.58 


High 




160.27 






39.69 




110.08 






24.52 


North State 




105.69 






38.97 






2.28 






. 35.48 




20.97 


Walker 




69.69 






43.75 









390 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $27,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Central District. 

general repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls, $8,688.50 

Acme Road Machinery Co., tar tank, 230.00 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 98.36 

A. C. Taylor, gravel, 5.00 

N. E. T. & T. Co., telephone service, 39.41 

Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., repairs, 13.10 

Samuel Holt estate, labor, 2.00 

Herbert A. Stuart, axle grease, .25 

George L. Theobald, repairs, .75 

Tenney Coal Co., coal, 12.78 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, .25 

Perley Badger, gravel, 4.20 

Concord Fire Department, horses, 300.00 • 

Marl Chase, gravel, 5.70 

Caleb Brunei, overtime, 16.89 

N. P. Richardson, gravel, 1.50 
Alfred Clark, superintendent, expense 

to convention, 39.25 

N. H. Patriot Co., advertising, 1.80 

Monitor & Statesman Co., advertising, 2.10 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 391 

C. H. Dudley, tallow, $0.28 

Jeremiah Colby, gravel, 2.10 

George H. Cilley, gravel, 17.80 

A. B. Stearns, gravel, 6.40 
Mark M. Blanchard, oil, 1.65 
Ford Foundry Co., repairs, etc., .90 
Robert Crowley, gravel, 2.30 
Jolin Jordan, gravel, 1.30 

B. F. Griffin, gravel, 1.50 
G. H. Baker, gravel, .70 
Concord Water- Works, water, 24.00 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 72.66 
Concord Electric Co., lights, 258.97 
Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 37.04 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 25.08 
G. S. Milton & Co., repairs, etc., 6.32 

B. & M. R. R., freight, 16.74 
Hutchinson Bldg. Co., stakes, etc., 7.44 

C. H. Swain & Co., repairs, 10.45 
Star Stamp Co., stamps, 1,00 
C. F. Nichols & Son, supplies, 5.90 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 2.50 
Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 107.19 
Alfred Clark, superintendent, cash paid 

out, 24.15 

George L. Theobald, horses, 275.00 

Rumford Printing Co., books, 32.00 

A. R. Andrews, supplies, 6.75 

C. C. Martin, shoeing, 57.40 

Norman Nicholson, shoeing, 31.60 

Ross W. Cate, shoeing, 61.50 

W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 818.70 

J. T. Walker, hay, 594.45 

F. W. Page, hay, 442.96 
W. A. Sleeper, repairs, 11.30 



8.50 



392 CITY OF CONCORD. 

R. J. Macguire, veterinary services, $54.45 

C. Pelissier & Co., repairs, etc., 52.19 

Thomas Robinson, oil, 3.00 

Ford & Kimball, repairs, 6.12 

George D. Huntley, repairs, 92.40 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., re- 
pairs, 

Mrs. H. W. Lakin, laundry, 6.00 

Tenney Coal Co., coal, 15.00 

Robert Crowley, coal, 24.50 

Charles Millar & Sons Co., pipe, 124.38 
George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

roadway, 406.75 
x\. B, Black Road Machinery Co., re- 
pairs, 215.25 
Page Belting Co., repairs, 78.13 









CULVERTS. 




Labor 


pay- 


rolls. 














SIDEWALKS 


AND CROSSINGS. 


Labor 


pay 


-rolls. 


repairing, 




$152.90 


Labor 


pay- 


-rolls. 


building, 




572.36 



$13,514.54 



50.51 



SIGNS. 



725.26 



Labor pay-rolls, $2.15 

George Prescott, lettering signs, 5.20 

Fletcher-Prescott Co., lettering signs, 4.00 



11.35 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WOEKS. 393 

WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 



Labor pay-rolls, 


$61.49 




Concord Water- Works, water. 


180.00 




George B. Quiniby, use watering trough 


I, 3.00 




Frank Bourdeau, use watering trough, 


3.00 




M. E. Prescott, labor on trough, 


41.00 




G. S. Milton & Co., repairs, 


9.72 




W. L. Jenks & Co., repairs, 


.63 




A. H. Britton & Co., supplies. 


3.61 




Orr & Rolfe, repairs. 


5.64 


$308.09 






GUTTERS. 






Labor pay-rolls, repairing. 


$4.47 




paving, 


20.60 




cleaning, ! 


2,108.23 


2,133.30 


BRIDGES. 





Labor pay-rolls, $71.96 

Concord Electric Co., lights, 40.01 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 477.45 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 11.25 



MACADAM. 

Labor pay-rolls, resurfacing, $471.83 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, 124.53 

George F. Tandy, tar, 72.00 

Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 645.95 

B. & M. R. R., freight, 155.86 



600.67 



1,470.17 



394 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FENCES. 

Labor pay-rolls, $25.67 

Orr & Rolfe, supplies, etc., 8.15 

Ford & Kimball, posts, 2.66 

Concord Hardware Co., paint, 4.30 



WINTER EXPENSE. 



Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads. 


$23.11 


plowing walks, 


195.60 


shoveling walks and 




crossings. 


27.75 


sanding walks, 


518.38 


leveling snow, 


363.50 


rolling snow, 


24.00 


snowing bridges, 


11.79 


draining gutters, 


452.40 


J. N. Abbott, sand. 


9.20 


Alice G. Hutchinson, rent of land, 


12.00 


A. B, Black Road Machinery Co., plow. 


55.00 


George L. Theobald, repairs. 


.50 



Penacook District, 

general repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls, $1,166.13 

Edward Ordway, gravel, 3.00 

Edward IT. French, gravel, 6.70 

D. F. Dudley, gravel, 23.40 

Edward Bacon, agent, gravel, 23.10 

H. H. Chase, gravel, 16.80 

D, Warren Fox, supplies, 10.15 



$40.78 



1,693.23 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 395 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, $2.24 

J. E. Brown, repairing tools, 13.65 

Sanborn Bros., fuse, .15 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 1.79 

George Neller estate, pipe, 5.64 

W. H. Meserve, cement, .52 

$1,273.27 



CULVERTS. 



Labor pay-rolls, $132.72 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, .66 

C. H. Barnett, brick, .40 



133.78 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 



Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $298.41 

Labor pay-rolls, building, 82.83 

Sanborn Bros., powder and fuse, 2.80 



384.04 



FENCES. 



Labor pay-rolls, $19.02 

D. "Warren Fox, supplies, .44 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 2.40 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 8.67 



30.53 



WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Labor pay-rolls, $8.18 

Concord "Water-Works, water, 40.00 
C. M. & A. "W. Rolfe, use watering 

trough, 3.00 



396 CITY OF CONCORD. 

T. S. Holland, use watering trough, $3.00 

E. E. Babb, repairs, 1.00 



GUTTERS. 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $356.74 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, 32.74 



BRIDGES. 

Labor pay-rolls, $58.90 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights, 50.00 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 107.09 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 1.66 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 1.80 



MACADAM. 



Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $9.65 

Labor pay-rolls, oiling, 20.75 



WINTER EXPENSE. 



Labor pay-rolls, sanding walks, $149.80 

plowing walks, 83.65 

draining gutters, 144.84 

snowing bridges, 11.78 

rolling snow, 11.99 

leveling snow, 10.17 

breaking roads, 13.86 
shoveling walks and 

crossings, 17.66 

B. & M. R. R., car boards, 1.60 



$55.18 



389.48 



219.45 



30.40 



445.35 



board op public works, 397 

West Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $404.74 



sanding walks. 


44.91 


plowing walks, 


61.56 


draining gutters, 


67.48 


snowing bridges, 


11.55 


leveling snow. 


3.81 


repairing sidewalks, 


37.87 


watering troughs, 


6.66 


fences, 


7.03 


culverts. 


22.41 


cleaning gutters, 


167.54 


J. M. Grossman, repairing tools. 


7.80 


Concord "Water- Works, water. 


40.00 


G. S. Milton & Co., repairs. 


3.20 


Concord Electric Co., liglit. 


16.00 



East Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $790.19 

sanding walks, 16,74 

plowing walks, 17.50 

leveling snow, 1,41 

breaking roads, 2.27 

draining gutters, 17.14 

cleaning gutters, 15.67 

bridges, 2.67 

culverts, 2.89 

W. L. Jenks & Co., pipe, 3,09 

Concord Hardware Co., pipe, 1.16 

Frank Fanny, use watering trough, 3.00 

J. C. Farrand estate, gravel, 10.50 

Concord Electric Co., gravel, 15.70 



$902.56 



398 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary F. Robinson, water for trough, $10.00 

Harry B. Sanborn, posts and rails, 1.00 

M. J. Lacroix, repairs, 3.00 



Penacook Intervale District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $34.75 

Ai J. Smith, use watering trough, 3.00 



HoiT District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $155.81 

W. L. Jenks & Co., pipe, 7.70 

Fred Mayo, use watering trough, 3.00 

Luther Nutting, gravel, 1.50 



Virgin District. 

Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, $4.89 

general repairs, 91.26 

W. L. Jenks & Co., pipe, 24.64 

F. P. Virgin, use watering trough, 3.00 



Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $69.25 

John T. Tenney, use watering trough, 3.00 



$913.93 



37.75 



168.01 



123.79 



Sanborn District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, 51.35 

Potter Street District. 



72.25 



board of public works. 399 

Hot Hole Pond District. 



Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $38.15 

breaking roads, 1.20 



Egypt District, 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $26.02 

N. P. Richardson, use watering trough, 3.00 



Horse Hill District. 



Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, 


$290.68 


breaking roads. 


3.14 


H. H. Chase, gravel, 


24.00 


Herbert Long, gravel. 


1.70 



Number Four District, 



Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, 
breaking roads, 
F. H. Currier, rails, etc., 
Alfred Clark, gravel, 
"W. L. Jenks & Co., pipe. 



Transferred to trees, 



$39,35 



29.02 



319.52 



$304.77 




7.12 




6.90 




6,00 




5.60 






330.39 






$26,497.30 




502.70 



$27,000.00 



400 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CATCH BASINS. 



Appropriation, 

Expenditures — 



Central. District. 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 
repairing, 
building, 
thawing, 
W. L. Jenks & Co., pipe. 
Concord Coal Co., slabs, 
Woodworth & Co., cement. 



$447.62 
66.30 
87.82 
166.34 
17.17 
35.10 
8.20 



Concord Foundry & Machine Co., outfits, 140.31 
C. F. Thompson, rubber boots, 12.00 

Edson Mfg. Co., hose, etc., 22.68 

A. H. Britton & Co., suppHes, 1.25 

Concord Hardware Co., pipe, 7.28 

Mrs. Mary E. Bourne, brick, 21.20 



$1,400.00 



1,033.27 



Penacook District. 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 


$80.81 


repairing, 


4.92 


rebuilding. 


28.89 


thawing, 


32.04 


W. H. Meserve, cement, 


4.20 


Foote, Brown & Co., supplies. 


.45 


C. H. Bamett, brick. 


18.55 



169.86 



West Concord District. 



Labor pay-rolls, building, 
thawing, 
Dickerman & Co., cement. 



$21.61 
1.11 
2.00 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 401 



Concord Foundry & Machine Co., outfits, $4.80 
Concord Hardware Co., pipe, 2.24 



$31.76 



$1,234.89 
Transferred to trees, 165.11 



$1,400.00 



TREES. 

Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Transferred from general maintenance, 502.70 
catch basins, 165.11 

sidewalks and cross- 
ings, new, 127.76 



Expenditures — 

Central District. 



Labor pay-rolls, trimming and remov- 




ing, 


$167.34 


removing moth nests. 


2,018.20 


spraying trees, 


152.83 


burning moths. 


46.03 


Ira C. Evans Co., postals and printing, 


18.00 


Alfred Clark, superintendent, cash paid 




out. 


22.90 


H. P. Lamprey, filing saws. 


1.70 


Hutchinson Bldg. Co., poles. 


4.00 


Elmer Trombly, climbers, 


12.50 


C. E. Staniels, insurance premium. 


50.00 


Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 


1.76 


A. H. Britton & Co., arsenate of lead, 




etc., 


323.25 


26 





5,795.57 



402 CITY OF CONCORD. 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, $17.96 

L, W. Howard, moth destroyers, 50.00 

G. H. Richardson & Co., gasolene, 5.25 

C. W. Dadinun, supplies, 2.50 

Gray's Garage, gasolene, 5.25 

C. W. Drake, setting glass, .75 

B. & M. R. R., freight, .25 

W. B. Durgin Co., oil, 12.22 

Page Belting Co., supplies, .45 



$2,913.14 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and remov- 
ing, $5.64 
collecting moth nests, 424.06 



429.70 



West Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, collecting moth nests, 116.31 

East Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, collecting moth nests, 336.42 



$3,795.57 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 

Appropriation, $1,000.00 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, grading for concrete 

walks, $20.24 

setting edgestone, 71.18 

I*. Crowley, edgestone, 207.20 



BOARD OF PUBI>IC WORKS. 403 

Richard Collins, stone, $2.50 

George F. Tandy, concrete walks, 413.38 

George F. Tandy, concrete crossings, 90.74 

$805.24 



Transferred to sidewalks and crossings, 

repair, 55.46 

Transferred to trees, 127.76 

Unexpended balance, 11.54 



$1,000.00 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $2,250.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and cross- 
ings, new, 55.46 

$2,305.46 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, resetting edgestone, $45.45 

George F, Tandy, repairs concrete 

walks, 2,024.34 

George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

crossings, 127.58 

2,197.37 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, resetting edgestone, $7.84 

George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

walks, 47.80 

George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

crossings, 32.42 



88.06 



404 city of concord. 

West Concord District. 

George F. Tandy, repaii-s concrete 
walks, $12.43 

George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

crossings, 7.60 



PERMANENT WORK. 

Hopkinton Road. 

Appropriation, $2,000.00 

Transferred from North Main Street, 28.85 



Expenditures— 



Labor pay-rolls, excavating, 




$456.48 


macadamizing. 




1,480.73 


Tenney Coal Co., coal. 




75.74 


Hutchinson Bldg. Co., stakes. 




1.50 


Mark M. Blanchard, oil, 




1.35 


A. B. Black Road Machinery Co., 


repairs, 5.00 


Concord Lumber Co., lumber. 




2.75 


Page Belting Co., repairs. 




5.30 


South Stbptkt, 




Appropriation, 






Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, 




$1,270.39 


Unexpended balance. 




229.61 



$20.03 



$2,305.46 



$2,028.85 



$2,028.85 



$1,500.00 



$1,500.00 



board of public works. 405 

Loudon Road. 
Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, $1,330.97 

Hutchinson Bldg. Co., stakes, 1.50 

William D. Welcome, gravel, 34.70 

Mrs. C. S. Jenness, gravel, 46.00 

Robert H. Allen, gravel, 52.30 

J. S. Hanson, right of way, 2.00 



$1,467.47 

Unexpended balance, 32.53 



$1,500.00 



North Main Street. 
Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Expenditures — 



Labor pay-rolls, excavating, 


$295.69 


macadamizing. 


1,037.21 


paving gutters, 


300.52 


Concord Coal Co., coal, 


6.37 


Tenney Coal Co., coal. 


65.30 


B. & M. R. R., freight, 


89.79 


Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


380.91 


A. H. Britton & Co., supplies. 


8.72 


P. H. Larkin Co., oil. 


4.35 


W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 


4.90 


Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 


3.84 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 


re- 


pairs. 


3.30 


Page Belting Co., repairs, etc.. 


19.40 



$2,220.30 



406 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Transferred to Hopkinton Road, $28.85 

Pleasant Street, 32.07 

Unexpended balance, 718.78 



.. .»i. i.i 



$3,000.00 



Pleasant Street. 

Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Transferred from North Main Street, 32.07 



Expenditures- 




Labor pay-rolls, resurfacing. 


$583.78 


Page Belting Co., oil. 


3.25 


Tenney Coal Co., coal, 


36.90 


Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia. 


433.04 


B. & M. R. R., freight. 


233.34 


Essex Trap Rock & Construction Co., 




crushed stone, 


241.76 



$1,532.07 



$1,532.07 



SALARY SUPERINTENDENT. 



Appropriation, 




$1,600.00 


Expenditures — 






Alfred Clark, salary. 




$1,600.00 


GARBAGE. 






Balance from 1910, 


$105.62 




Appropriation, 

By Joint Resolution No. 48, j 

Deficiency to 1912, 


6,500.00 
269.26 
220.81 


*7 m^ M 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 407 

Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, collecting garbage, $2,863.09 

collecting paper, 473.61 

burning paper, 90.19 

leveling ashes, 503.70 

cleaning crossings, 603.94 
cleaning streets with 

patrol carts, 1,837.90 

rebuilding crematory, 83.13 

H. Thompson, brooms, 71.00 

George D. Huntley, repairs, 33.03 

Eoss W. Gate, shoeing, 12.80 

C. C. Martin, shoeing, 20.50 

Norman Nicholson, shoeing, 6.00 

W. S, Dole, grain, etc., 373.16 
Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber for 

crematory, 57.59 
Concord Lumber Co., lumber for 



crematory, 


22.00 


Home & Hall, labor on crematory, 


6.40 


Concord Hardware Co., roofing for 




crematory. 


37.65 


SPRINKLING. 




Balance from 1910, 


$84.95 


Appropriation, 


7,500.00 



$7,095.69 



$7,584.95 



Expenditures — 
Labor pay-rolls, painting and repair- 
ing carts, $178.04 
repairing standpipes, 42.42 
sprinkling streets, 5,831.65 



408 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Abbot-Downing Co., repairs, $9.30 

B. Bilsboroiigh & Sons, paint, etc., 49.53 
George L. Theobald, repairs, 1.50 
A, F. Gross, repairs, 1.50 
Chandler Eastman & Co., repairs, 76.73 
George D. Huntley, repairs, 17.45 
Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., valves, 45.90 
W. L. Jenks & Co., hose, 31.35 
Concord Water- Works, water, 700.00 

C. C. Martin, shoeing, 37.59 



.$7,022.96 

Balance to 1912, 561.99 



$7,584.95 



SPRINKLING— Penacook. 

Appropriation, $500.00 

Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, building standpipes, $15.91 

sprinkling streets, 323.78 

Concord Water- Works, water, 50.00 
Penacook & Boscawen Water- Works, 

water, 12.00 

E. E. Babb, labor and supplies, 64.44 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 2.35 

$468.48 

Balance to 1912, 31.52 

$500.00 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 



409 



Deposited with the city treasurer as follows 



Dr. 0. B. Douglas, labor on trees, $1.13 

John Brooks, labor on trees, 1.15 
N. H. State Hospital, dressing, 100.00 

Miss Abbie Hopkinson, labor on trees, 1.13 

J. T. Wood, labor on trees, .45 

Union School District, collecting ashes, 33.39 

E. G. Erickson, labor on trees, 1.00 

D. K. Abbott, dressing, 50.00 
Mrs. Clara Stewartson, labor on trees, 1.05 

E. K. Woodworth, labor on trees, 1.13 
E. E. Senter, labor on trees, .56 
Jerry Foley, labor on trees, 1,12 
Oliver Racine, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. Annie A. Sanborn, labor on trees, .56 
Thomas Higgins, labor on trees, .90 
R. T. Damon, labor on trees, .56 
J. E. Sewall, labor on trees, .90 
Alex Hannis, labor on trees, .19 
Mrs. Ellen Fury, labor on trees, 1.30 
'J. H. Moody, labor on trees, .56 
N. A. Willis, labor on trees, 1.13 
Fred Powell, labor on trees, .50 
Fred Johnson, labor on trees, .38 
Concord Light & Power Co., labor, 10.91 
Mrs. N. F. Blaisdell, labor on trees, 1.13 
J. A, Clough, labor on trees, .56 
Mrs. Charles Ballard, labor on trees, 4.30 
A. 0. Preston, labor on trees, 3.00 
Mrs. Lucy Sargent, labor on trees, .56 
Mrs. E. F. Gordon, labor on trees, 3.75 
Boston & Maine R. R., use steam roller, 56.65 
Mrs. M. G. Aldrich, labor on trees, 1.12 
Mrs. Thomas Burke, labor on trees, .90 



410 CITY OP CONCORD. 

A. J. ShurtleflF, labor on trees, $1.95 

Fred Drew, labor on trees, 2.00 

Loren Clough, labor on trees, 2.00 

Mrs. Perkins, labor on trees, 6.00 

Russell Burroughs, labor on trees, 1.10 

Union School District, collecting ashes, 35.87 
George A. Foster, agent, labor on trees, 10.05 
George A. Foster, treasurer, labor on trees, .35 

Mrs. D. L. Gurney, labor on trees, .80 

George H. Rolfe, labor on trees, .56 

Levi Call, labor on trees, .85 
United States Government, labor on trees, .55 

H. M. Cavis, labor on trees, .80 

George Abbott, Jr., labor on trees, 2.35 

C. L. Jackman, labor on trees, .35 

J. N. Patterson, labor on trees, 8.70 

A. W. Flanders, labor on trees, 1.25 

James Collins, labor on trees, ,60 

A. H. Chase, labor on trees, .70 

L. C. Merrill, labor on trees, 1.45 

Mrs. A. B. Thompson, labor on trees, 1.00 

Mrs. Irene Huse, labor on trees, .85 

E. H. Larkin, agent, labor on trees, 1.20 
A. H. Britton, labor on trees, .45 

F. L. Gerrish, labor on trees, 4.05 
W. W. Niles, labor on trees, 2.95 
W. D. Chandler, labor on trees, 4.35 
Mrs. Mary E. Lund, labor on trees, 1.50 
J. A. Cochran, labor on trees, .35 
Henry W. Stevens, labor on trees, 3.15 
John P. Nutter, labor on trees, 1.25 
Henry McFarland, labor on trees, 6.95 
C. R. Walker, labor on trees, 2.80 
C. S. Parker, labor on trees, 4.25 
W. K. McFarland, labor on trees, 7.90 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



411 



Eichard Jolmson, labor on trees, $0.40 

Daniel Boisvert, labor on trees, 2.30 

Mrs. J. M, Hill, labor on trees, .50 

Miss S. J. Leaver, labor on trees, .55 

Roby & Knowles, agent, labor on trees, .95 

Mrs. Susan A. Lyford, labor on trees, 1.25 

G. H, McAlpine, labor on trees, 1.00 

Mrs. S. D. Batclielder, labor on trees, 2.00 

Mrs. P. Mclntire, labor on trees, .45 

B. M. Cressy, labor on trees, .40 
F. W. Cheney, labor on trees, 2.25 
Fred N. Ladd, labor on trees, 2.85 
N. F. Carter, labor on trees, .55 
J. Eaton, labor on trees, 1.80 
F. A. Stillings, labor on trees, 1.50 
F. W. Rollins, labor on trees, 5.60 
Mrs. W. H. Alexander, labor on trees, .85 
Herbert G. Abbott, labor on trees, .35 
Fred Lovering, labor on trees, 1.95 
Wonolancet Club, labor on trees, 2.85 
L. N. Freeman, labor on trees, 1.20 
"W. F. Thayer, labor on trees, 1.90 
Alfred Clark, labor on trees, .13 
Mrs. George A. Cumraings, labor on trees, .35 
F. M. Knowles, agent, labor on trees, 1.75 
Henry C. Brown, labor on trees, 3.05 
W. A. Stone, labor on trees, 3.50 
Stone & Badger, labor on trees, 3.50 
Mrs. J. C. A. Hill, labor on trees, 4.40 
Mrs. Samuel IMorrill, labor on trees, 1.35 

E. F. Lake, labor on trees, .65 

F. A. Martin, labor on trees, .40 
John Ford, labor on trees, 2.00 
William F. Gay, labor on trees, 1.65 

C. N. Towle, labor on trees, .35 



412 CITY OF CONCORD. 

J. H. Caswell, labor on trees, $0.35 

J. W. Bourlet, labor on trees, 1.15 

Mrs, M. E, Seavey, labor on trees, .85 

D. D, Taylor, labor on trees, .90 
Mrs. M. E. McQuesten, labor on trees, .25 
John Sleeper, labor on trees, 1.25 
J. B. Weeks, labor on trees, 3.15 
James Morrison, labor on trees, 1.80 
]\Irs. E. G. Erickson, labor on trees, .70 
Harriet E. Carter, labor on trees, 7.30 
St. Mary's School, labor on trees, 1.75 
S. W. Barker, labor on trees, ,70 
U. E. Murphy, labor on trees, 6.30 
C. H, Thorndike estate, labor on trees, 4.15 
T. F. Clifford, labor on trees, ,35 
G. E. Chesley, labor on trees, .80 
Mary E. Hagerty, labor on trees, 2.60 
Mrs. Oliver Ballon, labor on trees, .25 
Mrs. J. F. Peters, labor on trees, .50 
J. E. Dwight, labor on trees, .35 
C. R. Corning, labor on trees, 2.15 
Mrs. A. W. Hardy, labor on trees, 3.45 
G. L. Butterfield, labor on trees, .85 
Mrs. J. J. Keane, labor on trees, .90 
Mrs. M. E. Sherburne, labor on trees, 1.20 
Mrs. L. C. Whittemore, labor on trees, 1.00 
Merrimack County, labor on trees, 8.50 
11. C. Bailey, labor on trees, 25.25 
W. H. Smith, labor on trees, 1.15 
J. C. Keenan, labor on trees, 1.85 
Dr. J. E. Hoyt-Stevens, labor on trees, 2.55 

E. S. Tenney, labor on trees, 2.00 
John H. Brown, labor on trees, 1.50 
Mrs. H. G. Sargent, labor on trees, .35 
J. E. Pecker, labor on trees, 2.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



413 



Clarence Tibbetts, labor on trees, $2.00 

Mrs. Ann Emery, labor on trees, 2.00 

W. H. Jenkins, labor on trees, 1.25 

J. F. Sabin, labor on trees, .56 
Mrs. Jessie B. Harriman, labor on trees, 1.00 

Mrs. H. E. Sanborn, labor on trees, .55 

Mrs. F. C. Pendergast, labor on trees, .75 

Walter S. Blanehard, labor on trees, .30 

W. E. Gordon, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. John Aliern, labor on trees, 1.00 

E. J. Hill, labor on' trees, 1.90 

F. L. Seavey, labor on trees, .40 
D, P. Goodhue, labor on trees, 2.25 
Charles Day, labor on trees, 1.45 
W. E. Hood, labor on trees, .35 
Jerome Runnells, labor on trees, .65 
J. E. Robinson, labor on trees, 1.05 
L. D. Caldon, labor on trees, 2.75 
N. P. Stevens, labor on trees, 1.30 
Mrs. E. E. Earle, labor on trees, .40 
P\ L. "Watson, labor on trees, .55 
Harry N. Lane, labor on trees, .90 
Miss Pluma Eaton, labor on trees, .35 
T. P. Sullivan, labor on trees, 1.15 
George D. "Waldron, labor on trees, .35 
Henry Tucker, labor on trees, 1.00 
Mrs. S, J. Woodward, labor on trees, .70 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, labor on trees, 1.35 
IMary A. Robinson, labor on trees, .30 
Margaret Shaughnessy, labor on trees, .30 
Isaac Hill, labor on trees, 1.95 
Carl Rosendale, labor on trees, 2.25 
Fred Johnson, labor on trees, 1.75 
J. E. Morrison, labor on trees, .70 
A. C. Sanborn, labor on trees, 20.60 



414 CITY OF CONCORD. 

George D. Huntley, labor on trees, $0.25 

Mrs. A. J. Lund, labor on trees, 1.00 

C. G. Remick, trustee, labor on trees, 4.55 

H. Levingston, labor on trees, 1.55 

Mrs. E. A. Farrar, labor on trees, 4.25 

F. H. Smith, labor on trees, 1.00 

L. Pickering, labor on trees, 1.80 

C W. Lynam, labor on trees, 1.00 
Miss Harriet Lynam, agent, labor on trees, 3.00 

Mrs. Daniel Weathers, labor on trees, 1.10 

Miss Kate P. Blodgett, labor on trees, .60 

Mrs. Jennie L. Pratt, labor on trees, 1.45 

N. H. Historical Society, labor on trees, 2.65 

John W. Edgerly, labor on trees, 4.10 

W. H. Young, labor on trees, 1.25 

Mrs. E. L. Douglass, labor on trees, 2.20 

Miss Mary A. Sanborn, labor on trees, .40 

C. A. Kendall, labor on trees, .25 

F. W. Landon, labor on trees, .70 

Miss Annali Kimball, labor on trees, .60 

A. P. Hall, labor on trees, .35 
First Congregational Society, labor on 

trees, 1.00 

Kingsbury Jackson, labor on trees, 3.25 

Mrs. C. D. Rowell, labor on trees, 9.50 

Mrs. Alice W. Wilkins, labor on trees, .45 

J. E. Fernald, trustee, labor on trees, .65 
National State Capital Bank, labor on 

trees, 1.00 

H. K. Morrison, labor on trees, 2.35 

A. L. Dana, labor on trees, 1.00 

Mrs. Lucy J. Sturtevant, labor on trees, 1.45 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, labor on trees, 2.45 

Mrs. Mary L. Stearns, labor on trees, .75 

Mary E. Thompson, labor on trees, 1.75 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 415 

W. M. Leaver estate, labor on trees, $0.45 

Josiah Locke, labor on trees, 4.00 

Mrs. W. H. Alexander, labor on trees, 7.00 

Miss L. A. Clifford, labor on trees, .25 

Frank Potter, labor on trees, 32.75 

Mrs. Samuel Holt, labor on trees, 1.30 

Mrs. Abner Blodgett, labor on trees, .35 

Contoocook Mfg. Co., labor on trees, .60 

Mrs. M. E. Hills, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. Cyrus Robinson, labor on trees, 6.00 

Mrs. A. P. Fitch, labor on trees, 1.35 

N. H. Corliss, labor on trees, 2.40 

Charles Bartlett, labor on trees, 1.55 

E. C. Dutton, labor on trees, .95 

Oeorge L. Theobald, labor on trees, .40 

H. F. Hollis, labor on trees, 8.80 

Frank Johnson, labor on trees, • .70 

J. W. Storrs, labor on trees, .25 

L. A. Engel, labor on trees, .60 

Mrs. Nellie M. Carter, labor on trees, .85 

Mrs. H. M. Graves, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. A. L. Gay, labor on trees, 2.35 

]\[rs. Henry Robinson, labor on trees, 1.50 

J. S. Matthews, agent, labor on trees, .85 

Mary Lee, agent, labor on trees, .40 

Mrs. L. B. Hoit, labor on trees, 1.70 

Mrs. Julia Gill, labor on trees, .95 

C. L. Jackman, agent, labor on trees, .55 

E. A. Grover, agent, labor on trees, .70 

A. C. Griffin, labor on trees, 1.45 

0. "Wheaton, labor on trees, 1.25 

W. D. Wallace, labor on trees, 2.85 

J. C. French, labor on trees, 2.00 

L. B. Gilbert, labor on trees, 2.90 

Mrs. Lydia A. Abbott, concrete, 3.00 



416 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A. L. Sanborn, concrete, $16.19 
A. L. Sanborn, labor on trees, 1.00 
Jeremiah Hickey, labor on trees, 1.60 
P. J. Bolger, labor on trees, 1.75 
AV. A. Chase, agent, labor on trees, 2.20 
Maurice Barnard, labor on trees, .30 
F. H. George, labor on trees, 1.35 
Harry G. Emmons, labor on trees, 1.25 
Mrs. E. A. Stockbridge, labor on trees, 2.25 
Rev. T. J. E. Devoy, labor on trees, 1.15 
Dr. C. N. Towle, labor on trees, 1.00 
Otis G. Hammond, labor on trees, 6.50 
Margaret Shaughnessy, concrete, edge- 
stone, 18.00 
Mrs. Harry Leighton, concrete, 21.94 
Mrs. Harry Leighton, labor on trees, .25 
Charles Braithwaite, labor on trees, 1.80 
W. P. Chandler, labor on trees, 4.70 
Mrs. Helen "Woodwortli, labor on trees, 8.60 
P. R. Sanders, labor on trees, .25 
H. F. Hill, labor on trees, .95 
John E. Gay, labor on trees, 3.30 
Paul R. Holden, labor on trees, 9.64 
Mrs. M. Felteault, labor on trees, .70 
H. C. Bailey, agent, labor on trees, 1.10 
C. H. Sinclair, labor on trees, .75 
C. C. Titcomb, labor on trees, .50 
Union School District, labor on trees, 1.20 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, labor on 

trees, 6.65 

S. F. Goodrich, labor on trees, 13.00 

J. Y. Lane, labor on trees, .70 

Mrs. Eugene Bickford, labor on trees, .85 

Dr. G. P. Conn, labor on trees, 4.60 

S. C. Eastman, labor on trees, 4.25 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 417 

J. B. Tennant, labor on trees, $1.13 

Allan Hollis, labor on trees, 5.10 

Mrs. G. W. Pliipps, labor on trees, .15 

D. K. Richardson, labor on trees, .35 

Rev. A. L. Smith, labor on trees, 1.70 

Mrs. Mary F. Barron, labor on trees, 2.50 

Mrs. Carl Blaisdell, labor on trees, .90 
Mrs. Johanna Goodman estate, labor on 

trees, .40 

Penacook Park Grange, labor on trees, 1.95 

Charlotte Bartlett, labor on trees, .30 

Thomas Haskins, labor on trees, .45 

Mrs. J. P. Kittredge, labor on trees, l-.OO 

A. C. Fifield, labor on trees, 1.00 

Noyes estate, labor on trees, 3.38 

C. Pelissier, labor on trees, 3.20 

G. S. Locke, labor on trees, 2.00 

Mrs. M. R. Hadley, labor on trees, 1.00 

Mrs. George Cushing, labor on trees, 2.10 

N. B. Emery, labor on trees, 2.55 

C. 0. Partridge, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. Francis Partridge, labor on trees, 1.35 

W. J. Drew, agent, labor on trees, .60 

Mrs. John Bourlet, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. C. W. Davis, labor on trees, .75 

Miss A. M. Fletcher, labor on trees, 3.07 

Katherine Welcome, labor on trees, 2.15 

A. C. Sanborn, agent, labor on trees, 11.80 

George B. Davis, labor on trees, .70 

R. A. Brown, concrete, 29.37 

John Socier, concrete, 13.35 

A. R. Ayers, labor on trees, .55 

Mrs. Gustavus "Walker, labor on trees, .70 

Mrs. Lydia A. "Wright, labor on trees, 1.15 

27 



418' CITY OP CONCORD. 

Mrs. Ida C. Humphrey, labor on trees, $0.90 

A. H. Whitney, concrete, 9.17 

Dr. C. P. Bancroft, labor on trees, 1.25 

W. D. Nutting, labor on trees, .70 

Joseph Moore, labor on trees, .40 

Mrs. Charles Herbert, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. E. B. Carlton, labor on trees, .55 

Guilbault & Gervais, concrete, 17.08 

Francis Johnson, concrete, 12.33 

"William Green, labor on trees, ,75 

W. S. Holt, labor on trees, 1.45 

Mrs. W. H. Crockett, labor on trees, 1.50 

Roy George, labor on trees, .60 

Clinton E. Parker, concrete, 12.33 

Miss E. M. West, labor on trees, 2.90 

C. R. Farnum, labor on trees, 2.50 

William Murchie, labor on trees, .40 

Fred Powell, labor on trees, 1.00 

Solon A. Carter, labor on trees, .95 

Mrs. H. A. Jones, labor on trees, .50 

John Dunklee, labor on trees, 7,50 

L. B. Blanchard, labor on trees, .35 

Mrs. J. C. Ordway, labor on trees, 2.90 

C. H. Barrett, labor on trees, 1.35 

Charles E. Fogg, concrete, 14.42 

Mark R. Holt, labor on trees, 2.80 

0. T. Spaulding, labor on trees, ,70 

Mrs. F. E. Cloudman, labor on trees, .35 

E. H. Merrill, guardian, labor on trees, 1.00 
H, H. Blake, labor on trees, 1.50 

F. A. Jordan, labor on trees, 2.25 
Charles Strom, treasurer, labor on trees, .55 
Harry Dolloff, labor on trees, 1.25 
Concord Electric Co., labor on trees, 6.60 
St. Paul's Church, labor on trees, 2.50 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 



419 



L. W. James, labor on trees, $2.25 

Mrs. R. S. Ploit, labor on trees, 1.00 

J. A. Clough, labor on trees, 1.40 

C. H. Duncklee, labor on trees, 1.50 

H. G. Abbott, labor on trees, 1.00 

B. C. White, labor on trees, 1.85 

B. J. Heath, labor on trees, 1.00 

James Moore estate, labor on trees, .70 

Joseph Archambault, labor on trees, 2.00 

II. E. Abbott, labor on trees, 3.65 

Mary H. Pierce, labor on trees, 3.80 

Mrs. M. E. Symonds, labor on trees, 1.00 

George Carter, labor on trees, 3.05 

Mrs. F. 0. Clark, labor on trees, .45 

Mrs. H. E. Downing, labor on trees, 2.00 

Mrs. Mary B. Clement, labor on trees, .65 

Mrs. 0. F. Richardson, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. R. M. Morgan, labor on trees, 1.70 

Boston & Maine R. R., labor on trees, 5.50 

Mrs. A. B. Woodworth, labor on trees, 2.10 

J. M. Blake, labor on trees, 14.40 

E. G. Annable, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. Lucretia Frink, labor on trees, 3.08 
Mrs. Oscar Smith, labor on trees, .85 
A. V. Planchet, labor on trees, .60 
Joseph Cote, labor on trees, 1.70 

F. G. Bartlett, labor on trees, .70 
W. A. Sewall, labor on trees, 1.30 
L. Brown, labor on trees, 1.75 
R. E. Gallinger, labor on trees, 1.00 
N. Isabel, labor on trees, 1.60 
Mrs. E. A. Pickering, labor on trees, .95 
0. W. Dnrrell, labor on trees, .70 
F. S. Parker, labor on trees, 1.25 
I). McLeod, labor on trees, .70 



420 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Charles Woodman, labor on trees, $6.80 

Mrs. H. L. Knowles, labor on trees, 2.85 

John Roberts, labor on trees, .80 

Belle C. Severance, labor on trees, .65 

F. S. Streeter, labor on trees, 4.20 

Mrs. P. Philbriek, labor on trees, 2.90 

Charles R. Schoolcraft, labor on trees, 1.30 

Harry Mooney, labor on trees, 1.25 

Miss May Kimball, labor on trees, 4.15 

Nellie Clough, labor on trees, .30 

Mrs. Lucy Sargent, labor on trees, 2.00 

J. G. Murray, labor on trees, 1.00 

E. E. Senter, labor on trees, .70 

Charles Barnett, labor on trees, .85 

E. P. Runnells, concrete, 18.77 

W. H. Laws, labor on trees, 1.25 

Annie M. Dennen, concrete, 9.67 

"William Horner, labor on trees, .70 

E. A. Stevens, labor on trees, 4.15 

Fred Loverin, labor on trees, .70 

C. C. Currier, labor on trees, .30 

B. E. Rice, labor on trees, .70 
Miss Harriet Lynam, agent, labor on 

trees, .70 

C. W. Lynam, labor on trees, 1.00 
H. M. Cavis, labor on trees, .25 
Mrs. A. L. Gay, labor on trees, 2.80 
Mrs. C. M. Billings, labor on trees, .90 
Frank Cressy, labor on trees, 1.15 
I. E. Keeler, labor on trees, 1.50 
N. E. Martin, labor on trees, * .90 
Miss Effie Thorndike, labor on trees, .90 
J. H. Jackman, labor on trees, .85 
Mrs. M. G. Aldrich, labor on trees, .70 
S. S. Upham, labor on trees, 1.80 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS, 



421 



W. R. Heath, labor on trees, $0.25 

William Yeaton, labor on trees, .45 

N. F. Carter, labor on trees, .70 

Mrs. Mary II. Burleigh, labor on trees, .70 

J. Benson, labor on trees, 2.55 

Charles H. Hay ward, labor on trees, .30 
George W. Abbott estate, labor on trees, .50 

II. N. Dyke, labor on trees, .65 

L. N. Sinclair, concrete, 13.64 

J. E. Fernald, trustee, labor on trees, .70 

Andrew Abbott, labor on trees, 6.10 

James W. Bourlet, labor on trees, .45 

"W. F. Thayer, labor on trees, .70 

N. H. Corliss, labor on trees, 1.15 

C. H. Sinclair, labor on trees, .70 

J. Smith, labor on trees, .25 

N. E. Elkins, labor on trees, .25 
Mrs. Henry McFarland, labor on trees, .70 

A. J. Shurtleff, labor on trees, 2.63 

F. A. Stillings, labor on trees, .70 

Mrs. Eliza M. Hardy, labor on trees, .70 

Miss A. B. Packard, labor on trees, 1.25 

Miss Francis Minot, labor on trees, .95 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, labor on 

trees, 1.38 

John Morrill, labor on trees, 1.35 

L. S. Carroll, labor on trees, 2,28 

C. E. Staniels, labor on trees, 2.00 

Dr. G. H. Clark, labor on trees, .70 

GJeorge Gate, labor on trees, 2.00 

A. A. George, labor on trees, 1.50 

W. H. Ring, labor on trees, 1,00 

C, F. "Welcome estate, labor on trees, .25 
Mrs. Amos Dodge estate, labor on trees, 1.10 

F. R. Parsons, labor on trees, 1.00 



422 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Edward Bacon, agent, labor on trees, $1.00 

H. Thompson, labor on trees, .70 

David Twomey, agent, labor on trees, .50 

Fred Sargent, labor on trees, .70 

H. N. Dodge, labor on trees, .45 

I'red Emerton, labor on trees, .45 

Miss M. F. Putnam, labor on trees, 1.25 

Richard Manion, labor on trees, 1.50 

J. P. Kelly, labor on trees, .95 

Mrs. Blaisdell estate, labor on trees, .65 

M. F. Rogers, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. H. F. Mudgett, labor on trees, .90 

E. S. Cook estate, labor on trees, 1.00 

Home for Aged, labor on trees, 2.08 

Page Belting Co., labor on trees, 2.75 

E. G. Burgum, labor on trees, .70 

Mrs. Fred Blackwood, labor on trees, .90 

A. S. Marshall, labor on trees, 3.60 

E. A. Saltmarsh, labor on trees, .25 
Lyman Jaekman, labor on trees, .25 
Miss Clara Sewall, labor on trees, 2.20 

F. W. Landon, labor on trees, .70 
J. B. Walker, labor on trees, 55.00 
E. A. Stevens, labor on trees, .90 
St. Mary's School, labor on trees, 1.38 
A. B. Batchelder, labor on trees, .70 
David Shaw, labor on trees, 1.15 
Mrs. A. G. Parkhurst, labor on trees, .70 
Mary K. Abbott, labor on trees, .45 
Mrs. L. B. Hoit, labor on trees, .70 
T. G. Norris, labor on trees, 1.20 
Fred Johnson, labor on trees, .70 
Mrs. Daniel Weathers, labor on trees, .45 
II. M. Cook, labor on trees, .70 
A. L. Howe, labor on trees, .70 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 423 

Mrs. Charles Herbert, labor on trees, $0,70 

St. Paul's School, edgestone, 39.88 

H. F. Bournay, labor on trees, .95 

M. A. Smith, labor on trees, .70 

B. Donahoe, labor on trees, 1.60 
Mrs. V. C. Hastings, labor on trees, .25 
W. D. Thompson, labor on trees, .90 
M. H. Bradley estate, labor on trees, 25.35 
Levi Heath, labor on trees, .45 
Mrs. I. S. Livingston, labor on trees, .40 
Mrs. J. M. Killeen, labor on trees, 2.28 
G. W. Bartlett, labor on trees, 1.40 
William Smith, labor on trees, 2.00 
]\lrs. W. M. Carr, labor on trees, .30 
Walter Sewall, labor on trees, .70 
Mrs. Ellen H. Drake, labor on trees, .45 
Mrs. C. T. Struthers, labor on trees, .70 
Miss Cora Russell, labor on trees, .60 
Harry G. Emmons, labor on trees, 1.40 

E. A. G rover, labor on trees, .45 
Michael Casey, labor on trees, .70 
Dr. A. K. Day, labor on trees, .45 
W. E. Hunt, edgestone, 3.94 
J. S. Blanchard, labor on trees, .25 

F. A. Gale, treasurer, edgestone, 43.68 

C. J. Pelissier, labor on trees, 2.05 
Mrs. M. E. Seavey, labor on trees, .45 
C. J. Sennotte, labor on trees, .45 
Miss Helen Carpenter, labor on trees, .70 
J. E. Sewall, labor on trees, 1.75 
B. S. Rolfe, labor on trees, .90 
George Carter, labor on trees, 1.80 
Mrs. W. M. Colby, labor on trees, 1.25 
H. H. Blake, labor on trees, 2.75 
N. H. State Hospital, dressing, 100.00 



424 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Walter Sanborn, labor on trees, $0.75 

N. A. Willis, labor on trees, 2.90 

J. B. Walker, labor on trees, 2.87 
J. S. Matthews, treasurer, labor on trees, 11.39 
Cemetery Commissioners, labor on trees, 94.99 

L. F. Emery, labor on trees, 8.41 

W. B. Ranney, labor on trees, 2.72 

A. W. Rolfe, labor on trees, 6.50 

John Chadwick, labor on trees, 3.61 

W. J. Coffin, labor on trees, .70 

Dr. S. G. Morrill, labor on trees, 2.45 

W. P. Fiske, labor on trees, 2.10 

Miss Grace Morrill, labor on trees, .90 

Clara E. Stewartson, labor on trees, 1.10 

G. K. Hazeltine, labor on trees, .45 

C. R. Corning, labor on trees, 1.85 

J. B. Ellis, labor on trees, .45 

Jerome Rimnells, labor on trees, .70 

J. H. Carpenter, labor on trees, 3.15 

W. A. Whittemore, labor, 1.15 

E. A. Howe, labor on trees, 1.25 

E. M, Nason, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. G. M. Lane, labor on trees, 4.55 

J. H. Jackman, labor on trees, .40 

Herbert Knowles, labor on trees, 1.68 

L. Ardella Bean, labor on trees, .70 

J. A. Clough, labor on trees, .90 

Mrs. Laura T. Lull, labor on trees, .65 

Mrs. Richard Ayer, labor on trees, 1.80 

John Quimby, labor on trees, 1.50 

C. E. Robertson, labor on trees, .45- 

E. K. Woodworth, labor on trees, 2.85 

J. E. Ryan, labor on trees, .45 

J. Howard Moody, labor on trees, .25 

Penacook Sewer Precinct, diaphragm, 2.25 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 425 

A. S. Trask, labor, $3.33 

Penacook Baptist Society, labor on trees, 1.75 

Mrs. Ellen E. Fury, labor on trees, 

W. L. Riford, labor on trees, 

Mrs. A. F. Tenney, labor on trees, 

Annie A. Sanborn, labor on trees, 

E. L. Douglass, labor on trees, 

John Brooks, labor on trees, 

James J. Collins, labor on trees. 

Concord Light & Power Co., labor. 

Concord Gun Club, labor on trees, 

$1,832.54 



1.15 


.45 


3.25 


.25 


.70 


.75 


.25 


5.91 


1.80 



426 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1911. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

The nineteenth report from this office and the first 
report to this board, giving the funds available and the 
expenditures for construction and maintenance in the 
city sewer precinct, the "West Concord precinct, the East 
Concord precinct and the Saint Paul's School sewerage 
precinct, is herewith submitted, together witli a statement 
of the condition of our sewers in the city precinct. 

City Precinct. 

The condition of the main sewers in this precinct calls 
for your serious consideration, owing to the overloaded 
sections and the necessity for enlarged mains at as early 
a date as they can be constructed. 

The damages to flooded premises during vret seasons 
increase from year to year, owing to the additional terri- 
tory in the drainage areas. 

Some work should be done toward relieving the situa- 
tion wliich has existed for some years. The worst condi- 
tions are in the districts most remote from the outlets 
and nothing can be done to relieve them until mains hav- 
ing sufficient capacity are built and extended to include 
the districts now inadequately provided with drainage 
facilities. Most of the laterals of the system are adequate 
to perform the work they were built to do, and are in 
good condition. 

The work of construction in this precinct, during the 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 427 

past season, was under ordinary conditions, excepting 
the McKinley Street sewer extension ; here the work was 
made particularly difficult, owing to the treacherous 
foundation of running sand and an unlimited flow of 
water. This combination made the work on this short 
section expensive, but we believe that the sewer as com- 
pleted will stand the test of time and do the work ex- 
pected of it. 

The damage caused by the Manchester Traction Com- 
pany's flash-boards, at Garvin's Falls, has been amicably 
settled out of court. 

This case took much time of the engineering depart- 
ment, but with the able assistance of the experts em- 
ployed, our rights were protected and damages to the 
amount of $7,600 paid. 





New Work. 






BROADWAY. 




898 feet of 10-inch Akron 


pipe laid. 




lid for labor, 






$245.54 


pipe. 






133.92 


cement, 






2.00 


brick. 






17.00 


castings, 






22.50 


trucking, 






1.50 



Total, $422.46 

Average cost per lineal foot, $1.061-(-, 
Material excavated, loam and sand. 



DUNKLEE STREET. 



165 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe laid. 
Paid for labor, $51.32 

pipe, 46.48 



428 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid for cement, $2.00 

trucking, 3.28 



Total, $103.08 

Average cost per lineal foot, $0.624-f-. 
Material excavated, sand. 



MCKINLEY STREET. 



80 feet of 15-inch Akron 


pipe 


laid. 




Paid for labor. 






$859.16 


pipe. 






11.07 


cement, 






15.60 


brick. 






17.00 


trucking, 






9.98 


jute packing, 






4.80 


hardware, 






1.18 


oil, 






3.10 



Total, $921.89 

Average cost per lineal foot, $11. 511 -|-. 
Material excavated, loam and running sand. 





NOYES 


STREET. 




740 feet of 15-inch Akron 


pipe laid. 




14 feet of 16-inch cast-iron pipe laid. 




Paid for labor, 






$704.27 


pipe. 






390.29 


cement, 






24.00 


brick, 






42.50 


castings, 






73.59 


trucking, 






25.50 


freight, 






.50 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 429 

Paid for wrought-iron, $2.58 

oil, 2.00 



Total, $1,265.23 

Average cost per lineal foot, $1.678-|-. 
Material excavated, loam and sand. 

Repairs. 



North Main Street, account 


of macadam, 


$11.55 


20-iueli outlet, 1910 bill, 




80.89 


Allison Street, 1910 bill, 




1.25 


Highland Street, 




19.72 


Thorndike Street, 




7.02 


Waverly Street, 




2.66 


Dow sewer. 




5.16 


Jackson Street, 




5.84 


South Spring Street, 




5.09 


Total, 


$139.18 


New work, 




$2,712.66 


Repairs, 




139.18 


Gauge at South End sewer, 




2.21 


Flushing, 




293.27 


Expenses to convention, 




63.10 


Tools, 




51.70 



Total, $3,262.12 

Funds available, appropriation, $2,000.00 

Balance from 1910, 136.31 

Noyes Street, special, 1,400.00 



430 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Rent of pump and materials sold to 

Water- Works, $5.10 

Received from Manchester Traction Co., 7,600.00 



$11,141.41 
Expended, new work and repairs, 3,262.12 



$7,879.29 
Expenses Traction Company case, 713.32 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1911, $7,165.97 

Sewers Built in 1911. 

15-inch pipe, 834 feet. 

10-inch pipe, 563 " 



Total, 1,397 feet. 

Sewers Built in City Precinct to December 31, 1911. 

6-inch, • 1,928 feet. 

8-inch, 25,285 

10-inch, 51,295 

12-inch, 39,427 

] 5-inch, 12,144 

18-inch, 6,404 

20-incli, 4,549 

24-inch, 3,370 

30-inch, 1,024 

■Brick, 12-inch x 14-inch, 2,758 

14-inch X 22-inch, 350 

16-inch X 24-inch, 1,848 

20-inch x 32-inch, 2,527 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 431 

Brick, 24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 feet. 

28-inch x 48-inch, 883 

24-inch circular, 1,515.5 

30-inch circular, 402 

38-inch circular, 4,080 

24-inch cast-iron, 1,576 

30-inch cast-iron, 1,054.5 

42-inch concrete and brick, 246 

60-inch concrete and brick, 1,450 



Total, 182,053 feet. 

Total miles in city precinct to date, 34.48-(-. 

East Concord Precinct. 

No work was done in this precinct and no money ex- 
pended. The balance remains the same as last season; 
viz.: $127.53. 

West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

The only expenditure in this precinct was for flushing 
the sewer system as no repairs were necessary. 
Funds available, balance from 1910, $81.30 

Paid for flushing, 28.78 



Balance December 31, 1911, $52.52 

St. Paul's School Sewerage Precinct. 

On the Hopkinton road roots caused a stoppage near 
the flush-tank and repairs were made at an expense of 
$16.31. The annual charge for water service of $45 was 
also paid. 



432 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Funds available, appropriation, $45.00 

Balance from 1910, 33.86 



Total, $78.86 

Expended, 1911, 61.31 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1911, $17.55 

For the courtesies extended to me by this board I wish 
to thank you, and also for the privilege of attending the 
annual meeting of the American Society of Municipal 
Improvements. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1911. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The twelfth annual report of this board is herewith 
submitted. 

During the past year the death of Thomas F. Foley, 
chairman of this board, caused a vacancy and Harris S. 
Parmenter was appointed to fill it. 

The membership of the present board is as follows : 
Charles H. Cook, M. D. ; Harris S. Parmenter, a journey- 
man plumber, and Will B. Howe, city engineer. 

The board organized with Harris S. Parmenter, chair- 
man, and Will B. Howe, clerk. 

The total receipts were thirty-two (32) dollars, for 
which amount the clerk of the board holds the receipts 
of the city treasurer, and the expenditures were eighteen 
(18) dollars and sixteen (16) cents. 

Nine meetings were held during the year. Nine appli- 
cants for journeymen's licenses were examined; eight 
were granted licenses and one failed to pass. 

Two applicants for masters' licenses successfully 
passed the required examination and received their 
licenses. 

The following list gives the names of all registered 
plumbers authorized by this board to work at the busi- 
ness of plumbing during the year ending March 31, 1912. 



28 



434 city op concord. 

Master Plumbers. 

W. Arthur Bean, certificate reneAved. 
Elmer E. Babb, license renewed. 
Charles W. Bateman, license renewed. 
George A. Bisson, license renewed. 
Louis J. Cherrier, licensed December 6, 1911. 
Mary E. Clifford, certificate renewed. 
John J. Cronin, license renewed. 
Edward F. Donovan, license renewed. 
Seth R. Hood, certificate renewed. 
George A. Harwood, certificate renewed. 
William A. Lee, certificate renewed. 
Michael J. Lee, certificate renewed. 
Richard J. Lee, certificate renewed. 
George S. Milton, certificate renewed. 
Manley W. Morgan, license renewed. 
George A. Nichols, license renewed. 
Benjamin H. Orr, certificate renewed. 
Willis H. Robbins, certificate renewed. 
John C. Smith, license renewed. 
William M. Trottier, license renewed. 
Albert S. Trask, certificate renewed. 
Frank Turnbull, license renewed. 
Albert L. Worthen, license renewed. 
John W. Zebringer, licensed August 15, 1911. 

Journeyman Plumbers. 

Joseph P. Audett, license renewed. 
Arthur W. Bunten, license renewed. 
Patrick A. Clifford, certificate renewed. 
Henry P. Cilley, certificate renewed. 
Frederick F. Converse, license renewed. 
Albert Cooper, licensed March 3, 1911. 



EXAMINERS OP PLUMBERS. 435 

Alfred L. Crane, licensed December 6, 1911. 
Edward F. Edgeworth, license renewed. 
John L. Fahey, licensed August 15, 1911. 
Philip King, certificate renewed. 
Harry H. Kennedy, certificate renewed. 
P. Harrison D. Leary, certificate renewed. 
Foster E. Macharg, licensed September 12, 1911. 
Frank M. Murray, license renewed. 
John Morin, Jr., license renewed. 
"William H. McGuire, certificate renewed. 
Harris S. Parmenter, license renewed. 
William L. Reagan, certificate renewed. 
Charles J. Reagan, license renewed. 
Henry Riley, license renewed. 
Arthur "W. Robinson, licensed April 15, 1911. 
James F. Stevens, licensed August 15, 1911. 
William M. Sutton, license renewed. 
Joseph E. White, licensed January 12, 1911. 
Frank C. Whipple, licensed August 15, 1911. 

Master plumbers, 24 

Journeyman plumbers, 25 



Total issued 1911, 49 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRIS S. PARMENTER, 
WILL B. HOWE, 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1911. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The sixth annual report of this board is herewith sub- 
mitted, showing its recommendations to the Board of 
Water Commissioners. 

On February 21, 1911, a meeting of the full board was 
held and it was voted to recommend placing hydrants at 
the following locations : 

On the westerly line of the South Church lot and on the 
.southerly side of Pleasant Street. 

Monroe Street, opposite the Rumford School House 
and on the southerly side of Monroe Street. 

South State Street, westerly side, at Thorndike Street. 

McKinley Street, northerly side, midway between 
South Main and Broadway. 

Southerly side of Clinton Street at Dartmouth Street. 

At the junction of Valley and High Streets. 

At the junction of Beacon and White Streets. 

Easterly side of North State Street, on northerly line 
of the Tahanto School lot. 

Hanover Street, westerly side, near No. 10. 

At a meeting held July 26, it was voted to recommend 
placing three hydrants on Lake Street, in West Concord, 
as follows : 

On northerh' line of premises numbered nine. 

On southerly line of the westerly end of Lake Street. 

On the westerly line of Quaker Street. 



HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 437* 

On September 2, it was voted to recommend the plac- 
ing of a hydrant on the westerly side of the Fisherville 
road, half-way between the hydrants north and south of 
John Harriman's house. 

On December 18, it was voted to recommend the in- 
stallation of the following liigh-service hydrants : • 

A four-way hose connection at Durgin Street on School 
Street. 

A four-way hose connection at the junction of School 
and North State Streets. 

A four-way hose connection at the junction of School 
and Green Streets. 

At Nortli Spring and School Streets. 

A four-way hose connection at South State and Pleas- 
ant Streets. 

A four-way hose connection on North Spring Street, 
opposite the High School. 

A four-way hose connection at North State and War- 
ren Streets. 

A four-way hose connection at Warren Street and Odd 
Fellows Avenue. 

A four-way hose connection on the westerly line of 
White's Block and on the northerly side of Capitol Street. 

It is expected that the above high-service hydrants will 
be set early the coming season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 
W. C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 
Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

Tliis report is intended to show the condition of law- 
suits and legal proceedings in w^hieh the city had any 
interest at the time of my assumption of office in July, 
1910, and the progress made with them, as well as the 
proceedings commenced since that time, together with the 
progress made with such proceedings. The present con- 
dition of the legal matters in which the city is interested 
will also appear. 

The case of Boston & Maine Railroad v. Concord is a peti- 
tion which was filed at the October term, 1910, of the 
superior court, praying for the abatement of the taxes as- 
sessed by the city upon Contoocook River Park for the year 
1910. The railroad claims that this property is not taxable 
by the city of Concord, but is included in the general rail- 
road tax. A reserved case is in process of being drawn, 
and when completed the case will be transferred to the 
supreme court. Two petitions for the abatement of taxes, 
both entitled Joseph Stickney v. Concord (for the years 
1900 and 1901), have been settled by the payment of two 
hundred dollars in each case. Jennie P. Martin v. Concord, 
a suit to recover damages for injuries to the plaintiff's real 
estate on the corner of South State and Downing Streets, 
alleged to have been caused by defective sewers, will proba- 
bly be tried in April, 1912. Carolyn F. Stickney v. Con- 
cord, an appeal from an award of $300 damages made to 
the plaintiff by the board of mayor and aldermen on ac- 
count of the laying out and construction of a sewer from 
North Main Street through the pLaintiff's land to the Mer- 
rimack River wall also be tried in April, 1912. Concord 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 439 

Street Raihvay v. Concord, an appeal taken by the Concord 
Street Raihvay from an award of damages to it by the 
board of mayor and aldermen upon the laying out of a 
highway in Penaeook, entered at the April term, 1900, Jias 
not been pressed but still remains on the docket. Grace 0. 
Dutton V. Concord, a suit for damages sustained by reason 
of a defective highway, as alleged, w^as entered at the April 
term, 1911, and will be tried at the April term, 1912. The 
same may be said of the case of Gilbert S. Hihhard v. Con- 
cord, except that it was entered at the October term, 1911. 

The case of Concord v. Patriot PuMishing Company, for 
taxes for 1910, entered at the October term, 1910, has been 
settled, the city to have judgment against the trustees. 
Early in August I brought suit against F. W. Hartford for 
two months' rent of the Auditorium. The defendant ad- 
mitted liability but claimed a set-off for lights furnished at 
Walker lectures, etc. The case was settled by the payment 
in full of the city's claim, $200. The board is familiar with 
the city's action against the ^Manchester Traction, Light & 
Power Company, commenced in August, 1911, and con- 
tinued through the fall. The amount paid the city in set- 
tlement of the case was $7,600. 

I have, since my appointment, furnished written opinions 
on the following topics: validity of the Auditorium lease, 
in view of the bankruptcy of the lessee ; duties of the boara 
in the laying out of streets ; and the authority of the board 
of public works to delegate its duties. I have made detailed 
reports of the progress of the sewer controversy, have 
drafted ordinances, resolutions, contracts, etc., advised city 
officials, committees of the board, and have prosecuted 
many criminal cases for the police department before the 
police court. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDER IMURCHIE, 
January 9, 1912. ^^^V Solicitor. 



REPORT OF CLERK OF POLICE 
COURT. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The clerk of the police court submits the following re- 
port for the year 1911 : 

Number of civil cases entered in court January to 
December, inclusive, was forty-five. Received as entry 
fees for same at fifty cents each, twenty-two dollars and 
fifty cents ($22.50). Paid to city treasurer twenty-two 
dollars and fifty cents ($22.50). 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUFUS H. BAKER, 
Clerk of the Police Court. 
Concord, N. H., April 9, 1912. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE 
JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The Jolm Kimball playground was appropriated the 
sum of three hundred and seventy-five dollars ($375), out 
of which was expended the following: 

Labor, $129.50 
Arthur McCauley, instructor, $15 per week for 

ten weeks, 150.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 45.66 

Concord Water-Works, 6.00 

Posts used for fencing, 9.00 

Orr & Rolfe, one bubbling cup, , 4.15 

Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber, 5.38 

A. H. Britton & Co., paints, 13.50 



Total expenses, $363.19 

Amount appropriated, $375.00 

Total expenses, 363.19 



Balance, $11.81 

ROY W. FRASER, 
OLA ANDERSON, 
R. A. BROWN. 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY 
COMMISSIONERS. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The amount placed at our disposal for the year 1911 
for Blossom Hill Cemetery amounted to $6,252.82, and we 
have expended $6,204.44. For the Old North we received 
$533.94 and expended $513.33, for a detailed account of 
which we refer you to the report of the City Treasurer. 

The burials for the past year have been, in Blossom Hill 
Cemetery, two hundred and nine (209) ; in the Old North, 
seven (7) ; and in the Minot Cemetery, two (2). The 
chapel has been used nine times. 

In addition to the usual appropriation of $100 for the 
Old North Cemetery, we would recommend an additional 
one of $100 for the resetting and straightening up of 
many monuments and head-stones that have been thrown 
out of position by frost and have not been attended to by 
the owners of the lots and which give the cemetery a very 
bad appearance. "We would also recommend the purchase 
of the old Quaker burial lot adjoining the northeast cor- 
ner of the Old North Cemetery, which is in a very bad 
condition and a disgrace to our city. This lot is owned 
by Otis G. and Harr}^ P. Hammond and can be bought for 
$300. 

The usual appropriation of $1,000 for Blossom Hill w^e 
think will be sufficient for the coming year. 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, 

Secretary. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 443 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

Your committee for West Concord Cemetery submit the 
following report for 1911 : 

1911. 
Jan. 1. Cash on hand, $14.42 

Sale of lots, 44.00 









$58.42 


Paid out : 






April 8. 


W. L. Jenks & Co., 


$4.00 




June 19. 


One lawn edger. 


5.50 




Sept. 11. 


W. F. Thayer, 


6.00 




Oct. 14. 


"Water bill. 


6.00 




Dec. 27. 


W. F. Thayer, 


12.00 




30. 


J. M. Crossman, 


5.00 




30. 


L. S. Parmenter, 


5.00 




30. 


G. R. Parmenter, 


5.00 


48.50 


1912. 










Jan 1. 


Cash on hand, 




$9.92 



J. M. CROSSMAN, 
L. S. PARMENTER, 
GEORGE R. PARMENTER, 

Committee. 



To Bis Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

Your Committee on Cemeteries in East Concord submit 
the following report for the year 1911 : 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

receipts. 
Appropriation, $150.00 

One half sale of lots for 1911, 15.00 

$165.00 



444 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



KXPENSES. 



Freeman Potter, teaming, 


$30.70 


Frank E. Fairfield, teaming. 


24.00 


Raymond W. Colby, labor. 


13.32 


Joseph Carter, labor, 


16.35 


Henry A. Colby, labor. 


8.75 


S. L. French, labor. 


47.15 


Scott French, labor. 


3.50 


James A. Hussey, labor. 


2.63 


Samuel L. Batchelder, grade. 


3.60 


Cash on deposit. 


15.00 



January 15, 1912. 



$165.00 



Old Fort Cemetery, 
receipts. 
Appropriation, 1911, 



$25.00 



EXPENSES. 



Frank E. Fairfield, teaming and grade, $3.50 



Raymond W. Colby, labor. 


2.63 


Henry A. Colby, labor, 


2.53 


James A. Hussey, labor, 


1.75 


S. L. French, labor. 


14.49 




djof-; 


January 15, 1912. 


<p^tJ . 




SCOTT FRENCH, 




Secretary. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 445 

To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Millville Cemetery Committee respectfully submit 
the following report of the receipts and expenditures for 
the year 1911 : 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on account, 1910, 
Interest on trust funds, 
Mrs. Moulton, 

Mrs. Nellie Brown and Miss M. S. Cur- 
rier, one-half lot No. 30, 
Mrs. Pike, 
Mrs. Smart, 

Wellington E. Yeo, one half lot No. 20, 
Alfred Clark, one half lot No. 117, 
George W. Chesley, otie load loam (a gift). 
City treasurer, 65.00 

James L. Green, one half lot No. 82, 2,50 

Sabrina B. Butterfield, 5.00 

$152.12 



$5.51 


48.61 


5.00 


2.50 


2.00 


1.00 


2.50 


12.50 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid F. G. Proctor, 


$99.50 


sharpening lawn mowers, 


3.00 


G. W. Chesley, 


15.75 


water bill, 


6.00 


Irving T. Chesley, 


4.50 


A. H. Britton & Co., 


12.75 


Unexpended, 


10.62 



$152.12 

ISAAC N. ABBOTT, 
ALBERT S. TRASK, 
FRANK G. PROCTOR, 

Committee. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The board of assessors submits to your consideration 
the following facts and figures showing the valuation of 
the city and of each of its school districts and special pre- 
cincts, with the amount of taxes raised in each and re- 
turned to the tax collector for collection. 

An increase in the amount of the warrants submitted, 
with changes in valuations, some taxable property having 
been taken to other places, caused an increase of the tax 
rate over the preceding year. 



assessors' report. 



447 



Tabulation op Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 

Valuation of City and Precincts with 

Rate for Each in 1911. 



General Tax. 



Appropriation 

by 

warrants. 



Tax 

rate per 
$1,000. 



Asse.ssed val- 
uation of 
city and pre- 
cincts. 



State 

County 

School required by law... 

City 

Extra for schools : 

Union District 

Town District 

No. 20 
Penacook District* 

Union 

Precincts : 

Sprinkling , 

Garbage 

City sewer 

City lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sewer 

Penacook sprinkling , 

West Concord sewer 

St. Paul's School sewer. . . 

East Concord sewer 

East Concord lights 

Total 



$46,389,001 
39,973.07 I 
49, 702.. 50 I 
47,000. 00 J 

.5.5,033.00 

2,000.00 

0.^.8.00 

.5,287.78 

7, .500. 00 

6,.500.00 

5,097.-50 

19,000.00 

1,300.00 

1,480.00 

,500.00 

1,395..50 

.590.00 

117..50 

.500.00 



$290,023.85 



$15.00 



.5.20 
2.ft0 

4.50 

.90 

.70 

.00 

1.90 

1.60 

1.80 

.80 

5.30 

5.80 

4.80 

2.40 



$12. .507 ,847 



10,810,031 
705,816 

988.875 

8,988,696 

9,12.5,169 

9,741,115 

10,844,823 

85.5,310 

844,130 

627,-525 

271,90-5 

104,720 

23,200 

218,145 



* District No. 20 and Penacook Union District: part paid by Boscawen. 



448 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Number of sliares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hamp- 
shire and credited to this city, shomng our losses under 
the law passed at the legislative session of 1909: 



Railroad. 



1908. 



1909. 



1910. 



Boston & Maine 

Concord <fe Montreal 

Concord & Portsmouth 

Connecticut River 

Fitchburg 

Manchester & Lawrence 

Nashua ct Lowell 

Nashua Street 

New Boston 

Northern 

Peterborough 

Pemigew^asset Valley 

Portland & Ogdensburg 

Suncook Valley 

Upper Coos 

Wilton 

Worcester, Nashua & Rochester 



2,1.'V1 

17,702 

26Gi 

357 

143 

1,001 

27 

.503 

37.S 

4,178 

15 

8;n 

100 

653g 

45(J 



539 
10,308 

lis 

357 

27 

442 

17 

439 

73 

1,410 

8 

219 



291 

10,485 

118 

362 

27 

429 

17 

412 

7'^ 

1,395 

8 

196 



346 

10,270 

118 

362 

27 

457 

17 

468 

72 

1,516 

8 

190 



53 



assessors' report. 



449 



List op Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in Each 
Ward, 1910 and 1911. 





Polls. 


Valuation. 


Resident tax assessed. 


Wards. 
















1910. 


1911. 


1910. 


1911. 


1910. 


1911. 


Wardl 


508 


rAl 


$1,020,373 


$1,044,935 


$21 ,078 .,55 


$23,789.97 


Ward 2 


201 


201 


311,758 


318,680 


6,259.67 


6,747.85 


Wards 


340 


355 


692,785 


689,600 


14,434.47 


14,961.05 


Ward 4 


1,027 


1,061 


2,437,453 


2,476,411 


55,563.34 


59,919.15 


Ward 5 


738 


627 


2,860,838 


2,712,705 


65,791.57 


65,8.51.18 


Wardd 


850 


961 


1,774,534 


1,766,672 


38,969.43 


42,830.07 


Ward- 


1,044 


1,111 


1,554,810 


1,589.025 


33,&45.51 


36,695.24 


Wards 


368 


382 


1,409 649 


1,419,385 


31,079.60 


33,149.14 


Ward 9 


500 


545 


481,622 


490,434 


10,405.34 


11,183.91 


Totals 


5,576 


5,7S1 


$12,543,822 


$12,507,847 


$277,487.48 


$295,127.56 



Totals submitted to tax collector: 
In 1910 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 

Total, 

In 1911 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list. 



Total, 



$277,487.48 
977.29 

$278,464.77 

$295,127.56 
946.71 

$296,074.27 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, 

Board of Assessors. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the City CoioiciJ: 

I lierewith submit the report of collector of taxes to the 
close of business, December 30, 1911 : 

Tax Levy for lf)07. 

Kesident list as committed, $271,819.85 

Errors and omissions to date added, 6,000.75 

Resident list as corrected to date, $277,820.60 

Non-resident list, 1,225.89 

Interest collected to date, 1,318.10 



$280,364.59 



C:ash paid treasurer, $273,823.11 

Abatements to date, 6,473.97 

Unadjusted accounts, 2.78 

Cash in office Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 53.41 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 11.32 

$280,364.59 

Tax Levy for 1908. 

Kesident list as committed, $275,685.02 

Errors and omissions to date added, 1,270.64 

Resident list as corrected to date, $276,955.66 

Non-resident list, 1,784.50 

Expense of moths, 117.15 

Interest collected to date, 1,238.30 

$280,095.61 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 4a 1 

Cash paid treasurer, $273,521.68 

Discounts allowed amounting to, 1,969.21 

Abatements to date, 4,370.11 

Unadjusted accounts, 3.48 

Cash in office Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 43.25 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 187.88 

$280,095.61 



Tax Levy for 1909. 

Resident list as committed, $299,190.48 

Errors and omissions to date added, 718.15 

Resident list as corrected to date, $299,908.63 

Non-resident list, 2,091.24 

Expense of moths, 79.68 

Interest collected to date, 1,347.67 



$303,427.22 

Cash paid treasurer, $294,440.87 

Abatements to date, 8,600.13 

Cash in office Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 40.67 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 345.55 

$303,427.22 

Tax Levy for 1910. 

Resident list as committed, $277,487.48 

Errors and omissions to date added, 1,399.86 

Resident list as corected to date, $278,887.34 

Non-resident list, 977.29 

Expense of motlis, 90.95 

Interest collected to date, 1,223.49 

$281,179.07 



452 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cash paid treasurer, $274,499.67 

Discounts allowed amounting to, 2,445.20 

Abatements to date, 3,513.18 

Cash, in office Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 3.44 

Uncollected Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 717.58 

$281,179.07 

Tax Levy for 1911. 

Resident list as committed, $295,127.56 

Errors and omissions to date added, 2,807.22 

Resident list as corrected to date, $297,934.78 

Non-resident list, 946.71 

Expense of moths, 50.83 

Interest collected to date, 32.78 



$298,965.10 



Cash paid treasurer, $244,825.00 

Discounts allowed amounting to, 2,544.46 

Abatements to date, 3,344.12 

Cash in office Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 908.78 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 1911, at closing, 47,342.74 

$298,965.10 

Concord, N. H., January 1, 1912. 

Taxes sold the city of Concord in the office of the col- 
lector for redemption : 

Years 1902 and 1903. 

Amount, $710.97 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $576.63 

Int. and fees, 190.84 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 190.84 

Amount unredeemed, 134.34 

$901.81 $901.81 



TAX collector's REPORT. 453 

Yeah 1904. 

Amount, $816.38 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $697.36 

Int. and fees, 113.20 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 113.20 

Amount unredeemed, 119.02 



$929.58 $929.58 

Yeab 1905. 

Amount, $2,934.38 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,726.42 

Int. and fees, 225.72 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 225.72 

Amount unredeemed, 207.96 



$3,160.10 $3,160.10 

Year 1906. 

Amount, $3,156.13 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,849.35 

Int. and fees, 490.95 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 490.95 

Amount unredeemed, 306.78 



$3,647.08 $3,647.08 

Ykir 1907. 

Amount, $3,298.11 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,656.49 

Int. and fees, 590.34 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 590.34 

Amount unredeemed, 641.62 

$3,888.45 $3,888.45 



454 city of concord. 

Year 1908. 

Amount, $3,291.76 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $3,033.62 

Int. and fees, 578.36 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 578.36 

Amount unredeemed, 258.14 



$3,870.12 $3,870.12 

Year 1909. 

Amount, $3,898.72 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $3,345.40 

Int. and fees, 414.42 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 414.42 

Amount unredeemed, 553.32 



$4,313.14 $4,313.14 

Year 1910. 

Amount, $3,653.97 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,446.13 

Int. and fees, 62.17 Paid treasurer amount 



interest and fees. 
Amount unredeemed, 


62.17 
1,207.84 


$3,716.14 

WENDELL P. 
Concord, N. IL, January 1, 1912. 


$3,716.14 

LADD, 

Collector. 



REPORT OF CITY CLERK. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1911 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1911 : 

From Merrimack County, aid to county poor, $3,991.04 
Merrimack County, aid to dependent 

soldiers, 836.00 

fees of all kinds, 470.20 

licenses, pool and billiard tables, 400.00 

licenses, hack and job teams, 80.00 

licenses, junk dealers, 146.00 

licenses, dogs, 1,783.44 

rent, Auditorium, 2,000.00 

quarr}^ rents, 168.75 

declarations of candidacy, city primary, 115.00 
sale of old junk, grass, etc.. Committee 

on Lands and Buildings, 10.52 

town of Hopkinton, aid J. G. Libbey, 28.88 

Manchester Traction Light & Power Co., 713.32 

Manchester Traction Light & Power Co., 6,886.68 



$17,629.83 



The foregoing amount has been paid into the city 
treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FORTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVER- 
SEER OF THE POOR. 



FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1911. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the forty-fourth an- 
nual report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards 
1 and 2, for the year ending December 31, 1911 : 

City Poor. 

Appropriation, $800.00 

Resolution No. 39, 800.00 

Resolution No. 48, 499.03 

$2,099.03 



Paid groceries, 


$556.44 


fuel, 


247.74 


rents, 


561.71 


care, children, 


452.75 


board. 


104.12 


care, sickness, 


127.57 


medicine, 


33.90 


shoes and clothing, 


14.80 



$2,099.03 



POOR DEPARTMENT, 




457 


County Poor. 






Paid groceries and provisions, 


$1,752.53 




fuel. 


1,047.29 




rents,. 


2,073.00 




care children, 


1,642.58 




care, sickness, 


330.50 




board. 


722.50 




shoes and clothing, 


211.87 




funerals, 


37.00 




miscellaneous, 


51.99 


$7,869.26 







Total amount paid for aid to poor, $9,968.29 

Dependent Soldiers, City. 

Appropriation, $200.00 

Paid care, sickness, $104.00 

Dependent Soldiers, County. 



Paid groceries and 


provisions. 


$558.09 




fuel, 




480.94 




rents. 




235.60 




board, 




257.75 




care, sickness, 




15.00 




shoes and clothing, 


6.00 










$1,553.38 



Total amount paid for aid to dependent 

soldiers, $1,657.38 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



TRUST FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Trust 
Funds. 

abial walker trust. 

For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1911, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 
countess of rumpord trust. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be 
applied to the charitable uses and ])uri)oses of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Balance of income from last year, $40.00 

Income received, 1911, 80.00 

120.00 

Paid Grace E. Foster, treasurer of the 

society, 120.00 

Invested in Eagle and Phenix Hotel Com- 
pany 4 per cent, note, secured l)y mortgage, $1,000.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $1,000.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 459 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of 
the duly ai)pointed officials, or members of the Minot Cemetery Association. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1911, 105.00 

I'aid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at SYo per cent.) with City of Concord, in 
general account. 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

The purpose of the donor of this trust was that the income should be used 
for the purchase of school-books for poor children; but since the bequest was 
made, a state law has been enacted that requires the town and cities to buy 
all the school-books; consequently the beneficiary of the fund, $200, and ac- 
cumulations, amount to $533.71, and same will continue to accumulate for- 
ever without any benefit to any object, unless some legal action can be taken 
to divert the income from the specified purpose of the donor. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance income from last year, $313.27 

Income received, 1911, 20.44 

333.71 



Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank ; income deposited in the Union Guaranty Savings 
Bank. 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the pur- 
chase of books of a biographical, geographical, historical^ and scientific char- 
acter, and the books relating to science shall be those that give the latest 
developments and discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1911, 83.03 

Paid into the city treasury, 83.03 



460 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Deposited in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, $1,500.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1911, 35.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 35.00 

Invested in City of Concord 31^ per cent. bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST, 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1911, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Guaranty Savings Bank, 500.00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY^ PUBLIC LIBRARY^ TRL^ST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1911, 17.50 

Paid into the city treasury, 17.50 

Invested in City of Concord 3i/> per cent. bond. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by tlie addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1911, $24,154.92 
Keceived from one half sale of lots, 

1911, 1,524.69 

Received from income of fund, 956.16 

■ $26,635.77 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 4(jl 

Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $956.16 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1912, 25,679.61 

$26,635.77 

Invested in City of Concord 4% 

bonds, $8,500.00 

Invested in City of Concord 3 14% 

bonds, 2,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 5,842.04 

Deposited in Union Guaranty Sav- 
ings Bank, 9,337.57 

$25,679.61 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an in- 
crease of the fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1911, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 30.10 

$845.10 



Credited City of Concord general 

account, $30.10 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1912, 815.00 



$845.10 



Invested in City of Concord 3i/2% 

bonds, $500.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 315.00 



$815.00 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 



This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of West Concord Cemetery. 



462 CITY OP CONCORD, 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1911, $484.50 
Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary, 1911, 269.98 
Received from income of fund, 1911, 29.74 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 18.00 



$802.22 

Unexpended income January 1, 1912, $263.41 
Expended, 1911, 36.31 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1912, 502.50 

■ ■ $802.22 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merri- 
mack County Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

Tliis fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of 
interested parties. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1911, $1,010.00 

Capital increased by legacy of 

Elizabeth E. Griffin, 1,000.00 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1911, 55.06 

Received from income, 1911, 39.75 

Received from one half sale of lots, 

1911, 20.00 

■ $2,124.81 



Capital, January 1, 1911, $1,010.00 

Capital increased from sale of lots, 20.00 
Capital increased by legacy of 

' Eliza])eth E. Griffin, 1,000.00 



Capital, January 1, 1912, $2,030.00 

Unexpended income January 1, 1912, 94.81 



$2,124.81 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 463 

Deposited in Loau & Trust Savings Bank, $1,124.81 

Deposited in Merrimack Connty Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1911, $297.50 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 25.00 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1911, 257.65 
Received from income of fund, 1911, 22.20 

$602.35 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1912, $279.85 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1912, 322.50 

$602.35 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in New 
Hampshire Savings Bank. 

WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establi.shing the West Concord sewer precinct, and author- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund which provided that the following amounts should be raised 
annually upon the taxable property of the precinct, for the purpose of paying 
the bonds as they matiire, viz.: 

$1,400 annually for five years from October 1, 1907. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1911, $-I-,687.11 
Income received, 1911, 184.14 

Received from City of Concord, 1,400.00 

$6,271.58 



464 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Transferred to City of Concord gen- 
eral account, in accordance with 
joint resolution passed by city 
council, March 27, 1911, $400.00 

Deposited in Union Guaranty Sav- 
ings Bank, 5,871.58 



$6,271.58 

PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook sewer precinct, and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking 
fund, which provided that the following amounts should be raised annually 
upon the taxable property of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds 
as they mature, viz. : 

$100 annually for fifteen years from October 1, 1900. 
$1,000 annually for five years from May 1, 1908. 
$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 
$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1911, $3,247.77 
Income received, 1911, 127.88 

Received from City of Concord, 1,100.00 

$4,475.65 

Balance on hand January 1, 1912, $4,475.65 

Deposited in Union Guaranty Savings Bank. 

EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord sewer precinct, and author- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund, which provided that the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) 
should be raised annually for twenty years from July 1, 1895, upon the tax- 
able property of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds as they 
mature. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1911, $115.28 

Income received, 1911, 4.60 

Received from Citv of Concord, 100.00 



$219.88 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 465 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1912, $219.88 

Deposited in Union Guaranty Savings Bank. 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city- 
bond, tlie income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping 
Jot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition ; six dollars each 
year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a monument fund; 
and the balance of the income to be expended each year in purchasing books 
for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Unexpended for care of lot, Jan- 
uary 1, 1911, $2.50 
Income received, 1911, 35.00 

$37.50 



Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account for public library, 17.00 

Paid for care of lot, 14.50 



$37.50 



Capital invested in City of Concord 3i/o% bond. 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. 
The entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1911, $358.28 

From S. K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1911, 13.23 

$377.51 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



468 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 487 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds 
are added to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds 
are paid on a special order from the mayor, from the income of individual 
deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclu- 
sively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

Mrs. Ann Tandy, burial, $3.00 

George A. Ballard, burial, 3.00 

Edward W. Merrill, burial, 3.00 

A. C. San])orn, care, 1.00 

Henry Carpen's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Cunningham's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. S. F. Cushing, care, 1.00 

Ellen C. Brown, burial, 1.00 

Mrs. Czarine Gilmore's estate, burial, 5.00 

Iron sold, 1.76 

Mrs. Belle Norris, burial, 5.00 

Charles H. Thorndike's estate, burial 

and repairs, 6.50 

C. K. Lamprey's estate, burial, 5.00 
Mrs. Ira C. Evans, repairs and plants, 5.00 

John F. "Wilson, care, 1.00 

Iron sold, 3.18 

Minot Cemetery Association, care, 137.25 

William Abbot trust, 15.00 

Samuel Alexander trust, 3.00 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, 3.00 

Timothy K. Blaisdell trust, 10.00 

Richard Bradley trust, 2.50 

John F. Chaffin trust, 2.00 

Charles C. Dearborn trust, 2.00 

Robert L. Ela trust, 1.55 

Samuel Evans trust, . 5.00 



488 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ITos^ea Fessenden trust, $2.00 

Theodore French trust, 3.50 

Harvey J. Gilbert trust, 3.00 

Mitchel Gilmore trust, 4.00 

Clara V. S. Glidden trust, 2.50 

Pamelia L. Hall trust, 1.50 

Frank S. Harradan trust, 5.00 

Louise L. Hoyt trust, 3.00 

William T. Locke trust, 3.00 

Asa McFarland trust, 3.00 

Mary Ann Morrill trust, 1.50 

Mary R. Morrill trust, 3.00 

Samuel and David L. Morrill trust, 8.00 

Isaac H. Ordway trust, 2.00 

True Osgood trust, 3.00 
W. B. and H. Palmer and S. P. Savory 

trust, 5.00 

Alice W. Parker trust, 4.00 

Asa Parker trust, 1.50 

Samuel G. Parker trust, 1.50 

Mrs. E. A. Pecker trust, 13.00 

Henry J. Rhodes trust, 1.50 

Hiram Richardson trust, 20.00 

Ijyman D. Stevens trust, 8.00 

Sarah A. Stevens trust, 1.50 

Joseph Stickney trust, 25.00 

Nathan Stickney trust, 1.75 

Abigail Sweetser trust, 10.00 

Sarah M. Wadleigh trust, 5.00 

Timothy and A. B. Walker trust, 6.00 

Albert Webster trust, 5.00 

Paul Wentworth trust, 5.00 

Harriet E. Wheeler trust, 3.00 

Sylvia A. Wolcott trust, 4.00 

Charlotte H. Wollson trust, 3.00 



$403.49 



treasury department. 489 

Credit. 

Income from sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account transferred 
to City of Concord general account, $215.80 

Transferred to City of Concord general 

account, 187.69 

$403.49 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 



One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the per- 
manent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and in- 
come of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. 
The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the 
mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that 
purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 



Receipts. 

John M. Fletcher, lot 14, block V, $72.00 
John M. Fletcher, lot 14, block V, 

grading, 48.00 
Mrs. Mary L. Nichols estate, lot 121, 

block Y, 35.00 

F. E. Nelson, lot 7, block Z, 61.50 

F. E. Nelson, lot 7, block Z, grading, 41.00 
Mrs. Susan M. Jones estate, lot 5, 

block Z, 72.00 
INIrs. Susan i\I. Jones estate, lot 5, 

block Z, grading, 48.00 

W. S. Baker, lot 61, block V, 86.17 

W. S. Baker, lot 61, block V, grading, 57.44 

C'harles L. Morgan's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Elizabeth Robinson's estate, burial, 8.00 

C. W. Lynam, care, 2:00 



490 CITY OP CONCORD. 

W. J. Green, care, $2.00 

I'rank D. Abbott, care, 1.00 

Nelson Abbott's estate, burial, 5.00 

A. li. Ayers, repairs, 12.50 

AV. E. Emerson, care, 2.50 

J. W. Bourlet's estate, burial, 3.00 

W. E. Hunt, care, 7.00 

S. C. Eastman, care, 1.50 

Thomas Hannigan, rent, 10.00 

Mrs. E. G. Annabel's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mary L. Nichol's estate, burial, 3.00 

A. B. Packard, care, 1.50 
W. H. Perry's estate, balance account, 1.25 

T. C. Burke, burial, 3.00 

W. I. Sargent, burial, 8.00 

G. L. Hodgman, burial, 3.00 

C. T. Langley, burial, 3.00 

Mr. Peterson, burial, 8.00 

Martin Lindstrom, burial, 8.00 

O. L. Byron, burial, 3.00 

A. Kallberg, burial, 8.00 

C. W. Johnson, burial, 4.00 

J. B. Green, burial, 3.00 

F. W. Edgerly, burial, 3.00 

John Martin, burial, .50 

Fred Price, burial, 3.00 

Lane & Co., use of tomb, 1.00 

George INI. Kimball, care, 2.50 

Mrs. Esther M. Colby, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. James Minot, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Burleigh, care, 1.50 

John Ford, care, 3.00 

F. E. Nelson, burial, 8.00 

Mrs. Susan M. Jones' estate, burial, 3.00 

George P. Cleaves, burial, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 491 

E. R. Atherton, burial, $3.00 

Ara Morrill, care, 2.00 

W. S. Baker, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. J. J. Wyman, care, 3.00 

George A. Williams' estate, burial, 3.00 

Miss M. Woods, care, 3.00 

Mrs. George Crockett, care, 3.00 

Mrs. N. A. Dunklee, care, 1.00 

Samuel Holt's estate, burial, 8.00 

M. J. Duffy, labor, 3.00 

George L. Jackson's estate, care, 2.50 

Mrs. R. M. Morgan, care, 2.00 

A. and E. M. Willis, care, 1.50 

Mrs. H. G. Sargent, care, 2.00 

Mrs. J. J. Donovan, care, 1.50 

Mrs. H. S. Jenk's estate, burial, 5.00 

Mr. Lovely, care, 2.00 

T. H. Dunstane, rent and labor, 27.00 

Fred Emerton, care, 1.50 
Mrs. Henry L. Sanders, west part lot 

115, block V, 70.63 

W. W. Flint, care, 1.50 

H. E. Tandy's estate, burial, 3.00 

H. C. Mace, burial, 6.00 

H. L. Sander's estate, burial, 4.00 

C. H. Noyes' estate, care, 1.50 

¥. A. Stillings, care, 4.00 

Mrs. J. II. Carr, care, 3.00 

W. L. Jeuks, care, 3.00 

G. Henry Buswell, care, 3.00 

N. H. Shattuck's estate, care, 1.50 
N. H. State Hospital, F. Kidder, burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, Lester Powhattan, 

burial, 3.00 



492 CITY OF CONCORD. 

N. II. State Hospital, Emma J. Hill, 

burial, $3.00 
David Blair's estate, burial, 9.00 
Eben Blodgett's estate, burial, 3.00 
J. Henry Dearborn's estate, burial, 11.00 
Mrs. J. E. Twombly's estate, burial, 3.00 
Dolly I. Dickson's estate, burial, 3.00 
Alta M. Parker, lot 53, block Y, 25.00 
George Anquin, lot 75, block Q, 10.50 
Amos C. "Whittier and Charles L. Wig- 
gin, lot 29; block Y, 54.00 
Mrs. John R. Chase, lot 93, block Y, 25.00 
Mrs. Elizabeth Cox, lot 119, block Y, 31.20 
Mrs. Emma J. Dearborn, lot 60, block Y, 30.00 
Mrs. Susan I\r. Moore, west half lot 183, 

block W, 60.00 
Mrs. Louise Folsom, east part lot 115, 

block V, 56.87 

Isaac L. Heath, lot 67, block V, 72.00 
Isaac L. Heath, lot 67, block V, grading, 48.00 

William H. Morton, lot 2, block Y, 40.80 
William H. Morton, lot 2, block Y, 

grading, 20.40 

N. F. Favreault, lot 58, block Y, 37.50 

E. G. Cummings' estate, care, 2.00 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 1.00 
W. H. Johns, repairs and burial, 8.00 
W. II. Horner, care, 1.25 
Mary A. Luscomb's estate, burial, 3.00 
C. W. Lane, care, 1.50 

F. A. Knight's estate, burial, 3.00 
AV. E. Ray's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. II. W. Worthen's estate, burial, 5.00 
Mrs. P. F. Stevens, care, 1.00 
Miss Bliss' estate, burial, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



493 



Mrs. E. B. Morgan's estate, burial, $3.00 

D. L. Neal, care, 2.00 
Mrs. K. P. Cliesley's estate, burial, 10.00 
Mrs. Mary E. Merrill's estate, burial, 5.00 
A. S. Whittier, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. J. S. Merrill, care, 1.00 
J. H. Cox's estate, burial, 3.00 
Charles H. Day's estate, burial, 10.00 
James W. Moore's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mr. A. McKinnon's estate, burial, 8.00 
John R. Chase's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Mary E. Gammon's estate, burial, 4.00 
George B. Morton's estate, burial, 3.00 

E. J. Champlin's estate, burial, 3.00 
Fred W. Page, care, 3.00 
Vase sold, 1.50 
W. W. Young's estate, burial, 3.00 
L. "W. Cushman's estate, burial, 3.00 
Plants and dressing sold, 2.40 
Mrs. Mansfield, labor, .50 
Macliine sold, 1.00 
Trees sold, 3.85 
Mr.- and jNIrs. N. M. Kayes' estate, 

burial, 10.00 

Mrs. Maria IT. Jones' estate, burial, 3.00 

Henry McFarland's estate, burial, 10.00 

Argot Rylunder, lot 51, block Y, 25.00 

Mary W. Mackay, lot 61, block Y, 30.00 
Heirs Mrs. Catherine Webster, south 

half lot 49, block W, 38.00 
Heirs Mrs. IMary Luscomb, east half lot 

183, block W, 60.00 
L. D. Watson and Charlotte Dorr, lot 

96, block Y, 30.00 
Fred E. Nelson, lot 8 and walk between 

7 and 8, block Z, 98.10 



494 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Fred E. Nelson, lot 8 and walk between 

7 and 8, block Z, grading, $65.40 

C. A. Lockerby's estate, care, 2.50 

Miss Abbie Morse, care, 2.50 

Fred Colton, burial, 6.00 

John J. AVhittier's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mr. Maekay's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Webster's estate, 

burial, 6.00 

A. C. Jones, burial, 3.00 

W. L. Whitney, foundation, 8.00 

John A. Dearborn's estate, burial, 3.00 

Morey & Whitney, care, 4.00 

Frank E. Ingall's estate, care, 11.00 

C. A. Bailey, foundation, 11.25 

H. H. Chapman, care, 1.00 

Abbie J. Moore's estate, burial, 3.00 

George W. Waters, labor, 1.50 
George E. I^eete and Stella M. Newman, 

lot 52, block U, 96.96 
George E. Leete and Stella M. Newman, 

lot 52, block U, grading, 64.64 
Mrs. Hannah E. Downing, lot 12, block Z, 90.00 
Mrs. Hannah E. Downing, lot 12, block 

Z, grading, 60.00 

Edward N. Pearson, lot 11, block Z, 54.00 
Edward N. Pearson, lot 11, block Z, 

grading, 36.00 
Mrs. Margaret Johnson and Mrs. Bessie 

G. Sims, east half lot 64, block V, 60.00 
Mrs. Margaret Jolmson and ]\Irs. Bessie 

G. Sims, east half lot 64, block V, 

grading, 40.00 
Mrs. Clarence S. Bartlett, lot 157, 

block W, 67.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 495 

Mrs. Clarence S. Bartlett, lot 157, block 

W, grading, $54.00 

George S. Milton, lot 143, block Y, 37.80 
L. S. and D. R. Bean, east half lot 152, 

block W, 60.00 
L. S. and D. R. Bean, east half lot 152, 

block W, grading, 40.00 
Mrs. Almira Stinson, south half lot 49, 

block X, 60.00 
Martin A. Hadley, north half lot 49, 

block X, 60.00 

C. E. Newman's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. A. Gale's estate, burial, 3.00 
E. N. Pearson, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. J. B. Green's estate, burial, 3.00 
George S. Milton, burial, 3.00 
R. E. Gallinger's estate, burial, 10.00 
Mrs. Marion Robinson, burial, 3.00 
•James B. Colby's estate, burial, 5.00 
Mrs. Jannette Henry's estate, burial, 4.00 
Arthur Mentane's estate, burial, 8.00 
Henry P. IMoore's estate, burial, 3.00 
William Carroll, use of tomb, 1.00 
George Tonkin, burial, 3.00 

D. C. Woodman, burial, . 10.00 
Mrs. Mary Carter, burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, R. Richardson, 

burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, William Lee, 

burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, Frank McMillin, 

burial, 3.00 

N. H. State Plospital, John Bath, burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, Evelyn Tuck, 

burial, 3.00 



496 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. Mary Rounsafel, burial, $3.00 

Mary E. Brown, burial, 3.00 

S. Webster, use of tomb, 1.00 

J. G. Leighton's estate, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. Mabel S. Young, lot 121, block W, 82.35 

Frank P. Andrews, lot 1, block Y, 7.50 

Lou Miller, lot 25, block Y, 35.00 
Charles F. Mudgett, west half lot 152, 

block W, 60.00 
Charles F. Mudgett, west half lot 152, 

block W, grading, 40.00 
Heirs of John T. Kimball, lot 84, block P, 45.00 

Mrs. Jennie E. Cook, lot 21, block Z, 130.50 
Mrs. Jennie E. Cook, lot 21, block Z, 

grading, 87.00 

Leroy C. Tandy, lot 37, block M, 36.00 

Mrs. Oliver B. Abbott, lot 30, block F, 25.00 

Charles L. Brown's estate, burial, 3.00 

Fifield & Hubbard, services, 2.00 

Frank F. Young's estate, burial, 3,00 

H. A. Strickland, burial, 3.00 

Carl Carlson's estate, burial, 8.00 

Mrs. Emily P. Dodge's estate, burial, 3.00 

John T. Kimball's estate, burial, 3.00 

George "W. Abbott's estate, burial, 3.00 

E. S. Cook's estate, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. George Tonkin, burial, 3.00 
J. Stephen Abbot's estate, care and labor, 16.00 
Carmi S. Hamblett, lot 118, block Y, 117.00 
Carmi S. Hamblett, lot 118, block V, 

grading, 78.00 
John H. Caswell and Emma C. Clapp, 

west half lot 32, block V, 60.00 
John H. Caswell and Emma C. Clapp, 

west half lot 32, block V, grading, 40.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



497 



G. Scott Locke, lot 58, block W, $85.50 
G. Scott Locke, lot 58, block W, grading, 57.00 

Carmi L. King, lot 25, block Z, 80.00 

George W. Waters, labor, 1.50 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 5.00 

H. T. Clapp's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mark F. Abbott, burial, 2.00 

Mrs. Baxter's infant, burial, .50 

George Scott Locke, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Stratton, repairs, 1.00 

James S. Palmer, burial, 3.00 

David Young, Jr., care, 3.00 

George W. Chesley's estate, burial, 4.00 

Gumming 's Bros., labor, 13.00 

Rev. R. D. Grant, care, 1.50 
Mrs. Mary A. Hancock's estate, burial, 4.00 

A. W. Hobbs, care, 1.00 

]\liss Ida ]\Ioore's estate, burial, 4.00 

Miss E. Sturtevant, care, 1.00 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Bourlet, east 

half lot 31, block Z, 45.00 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Bourlet, east 

half lot 31, block Z, grading, 30.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo L. Garvin, west 

half lot 31, block Z, 45.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Alonzo L. Garvin, west 

half lot 31, block Z, grading, 30.00 

Carl J. Strom, lots 5, 6, block Y, 77.00 

Susan G. Perkins estate, burial, 10.00 

Larson & Carlson, foundation, 22.00 

Herbert L. Smith, repairs, 2.00 

J. M. Fletcher, burial, 4.00 
Miss H. S. Ordway's estate, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, labor, 4.00 

J. D. Avery, burial, 3.00 

32 



498 CITY OF CONCORD. 

C. A. Bailey, labor, $1.75 

Mrs. Farrar, repairs, 2.00 

George W. Waters, burial, 8.00 

Clayton W. Perkins' estate, burial, 3.00 

H. H. Kennedy, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Mary E. Sargent, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. C. L. Manning, burial, 3.00 

Alba Woods, burial, 3.00 

George Sims, burial, 3.00 

William Kainie, burial, 3.00 

Carrie A. Rowe, burial, 3.00 

M. V. B. Stinson, burial, 8.00 

Euth Young, burial, .50 

B. F. Watson, burial, 3.00 
Harry Ivey, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. T. B. Hall, burial, 3.00 
L>. H. Williams, burial, 3.00 
A. Rylander, burial, 8.00 
Sarah M. Clough, burial, 8.00 
E. M. Farrar, burial, 3.00 
L. G. Flanders, burial, 9.00 

C. W. Maddens, burial, ' 8.00 
Charles H. Noyes, burial, 3.00 
C. A. Lawrence, burial, 3.00 
Carmi L. King, burial, 3.00 
Carl J. Strom, burial, 8.00 
C. J. French, foundation, 19.00 
Everett Hoitt, lot 28, block Z, 80.00 
Mrs. John J. Whittier, lot 52, block Y, 25.00 
Mrs. Helen M. Conn, lot 15, block Z, 80.00 
Cummings Bros., foundation, 5.00 
George W. Waters, burials, 6.00 
Concord Lumber Co., timber, 5.00 
C. E. Tenney, grave and burial, 5.50 
Everett Hoitt, burial, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



499 



Grover Simpson, grave and burial, $8.00 

Mrs. J. B. Colby, repairs, 1.50 
Mrs. C. M. Baker, ^lorrill lot, repairs, 4.00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 14.00 

M. Keane, labor, 5.00 

M. E. Thompson, repairs, 1.50 

Mrs. N. E. Martin's estate, burial, 4.50 

J. H. Gallinger, care, 3.00 

Mrs. R. M. Day, care, 3.00 

John N. Lane's estate, burial, 4.00 

C. P. Bancroft, care, 2.00 

C. E. Harrington, foundation, 5.00 

F. S. Streeter, care, 2.50 

A. P. Carpenter's heirs, care, 2.50 

F. H. Clement, care, 1.00 

Hamilton Hartz, burial, .50 

Mrs. M. J. IMorgan, burial, 3.00 

Henry Sweat, burial, 3.00 

William Salon, burial, 3.00 

Dolphine Durant, burial, 3.00 

Abbie Fisk, burial, 3.00 

Geyoire De Lucca, burial, 3.00 

Jennie Gibbons, burial, 3.00 

LTnknown infant, burial, .50 

Edward Telford, burial, 3.00 

Sarah IMelanson, burial, 3.00 

Emma Brown, burial, 3.00 

Eliza Wells, burial, 3.00 

James JMcNeil, Jr., burial, 3.00 

Georgianna Forsyth, burial, 3.00 

Daniel S. Flanders, burial, 3.00 

Caroline Kimball, burial, 3.00 

J. B. Hussey, care, 1.50 

Jeremiah Smith, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. E. S. Cook, labor, 4.00 



500 CITY OP CONCORD. 

H. M. Cavis, care, $1.00 

Isaac L. Heath, burials, 6.00 

Charles E. Burnside, care, 3.00 
"Walter S. Blanchard, east half lot 184, 

block W, 95.00 

Noah J. Moses, lot 11, block Z, 96.00 

James 0. Gate, lot 33, block Y, 35.00 

George W. Abbott trust, 1.42 

Mary Ann Abbott trust, 1.50 

Fidelia F. Adams trust, 2.00 

Sarah J. Adams trust, 4.00 

Sarah M. K. Adams trust, 20.00 

Allen, Smith and Dimond trust, 3.00 

Frederick Allison trust, 2.00 

Mary B. Allison trust, 1.75 

Lavinia Arlin trust, 1.50 

Sarah S. Ash trust, 1.75 

Alonzo Atherton trust, 2.00 

Lizzie Knight Badger trust, 2.00 

Abbie L. Bailey trust, 4.00 

Oliver Ballou trust, 1,50 

Charles Barker trust, 4.00 

George W. Barnes trust, 1.50 

James W. Barton trust, 3.50 

Mary A. Bass trust, 1.50 

Robert Bell trust, 1.50 

Matilda Benson trust, 1.25 

Ellen C. Bixby trust, 3.00 

James D. Blaisdell trust, 3.00 

James M. Blake trust, 5.00 

AVilliam J. Blak»ly trust, 3.00 

Emily P. Blanchard trust, 15.00 

Nathaniel Bouton trust, 6.00 

Charles L. Brown trust, 2.00 

Mary N. Preston Buntin trust, 7.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 501 

W. P. Burbank trust, $2.00 

Harriet W. Butters trust, 3.00 

Benjamin F. Caldwell trust, 8.00 

Levi Call trust, 2.00 

Bradbury G. Carter trust, 2.00 

Hiram J. Carter trust, 2.00 

Nathan F. Carter trust, . 3.00 

Lizzie Cate trust, 1.50 

Samuel M. Chesley trust, 3.00 

Caroline Clark trust, 4.00 

Rufus Clement trust, 4.00 

William W. Cloud trust, 3.00 

Frederick Clougli trust, 5.50 

George Clough trust, 3.00 

Mrs. N. P. Clough trust, 2.00 

Weston Cofran trust, 1.00 

Amos L. Colburn trust, 1.50 

Sarah T. Colby trust, 4.00 

Charles A. Cooke trust, 2.00 

Mrs. Josiah Cooper trust, 2.50 

Mary Crow trust, 10.00 

Lucretia R. Currier trust, 3.00 

Silas Curtis trust, 3.00 

Charles C. Danforth trust, 4.00 

Charles S. Danforth trust, 1.50 

Cordelia A. Danforth trust, 1.50 

Benjamin B. Davis trust, 1.50 

Edward Dow trust, 4.50 

Mrs. Charles Dudley trust, 1.50 

Charles V. Dudley trust, 1.50 

William B. Durgin trust, ' 4.00 

J. B. Dyer trust, 2.00 

Mrs. E. J. Eastman trust, 4.00 

Stephen B. Eaton trust, 2.00 

Lydia F. Edgerly trust, 3.00 



502 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Georgianna P. Ela trust, $4.00 

Ella M. Elliott trust, 1.50 

Elizabeth G. Emerson trust, 3.00 

George H. Emery trust, 3.00 

David E. Everett trust, 2.00 

Lydia A. Farley trust, 4.00 

Mary M. Farnum trust, • 3.00 

Alvah C. Ferrin trust, 3.00 

Hiram W. Ferrin trust, 1.50 

J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French trust, 1.50 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Harland Flanders trust, 2.50 

George G. Fogg trust, 10.00 

Alice T. Ford trust, 5.00 

Jerome Ford trust, 3.00 

Asa Fowler trust, 16.00 

Mary A. Gage trust, 2.00 

Mrs. A. W. Fale trust, 1.75 

John D. Gale trust, 8.00 

John Gear trust, 3.00 

Sarah L. Gear trust, 2.50 

Caroline L. George trust, 12.00 

Enoch Gerrish trust, • 3.00 

Samuel K. Gill trust, 3.00 
G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood trust, 1.75 

Loren W. Glysson trust, 2.00 

Hannah A and Fannie A. Goss trust, 5.00 

George N. Greeley trust, 12.00 

John B. Green trust, 2.00 

William E. Greene trust, 3.00 

Betsey Hadley trust, 3.00 

George M. Harding trust, 2.00 

Mary D. Hart trust, 14.50 

Timothy Haynes trust, 3.00 

Cliarles F. Hildreth trust, 3.00 

Mrs. Emma J. Hill trust, 2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



503 



John M. Hill tnist, $8.00 

Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove trust, 1.50 

J. Frank Hoit trust, 5.00. 

Harriet F. Ilolman trust, 3.00 

Elizabeth F. Holt trust, 5.00 

Hoyt and Stetson trust, 3.00 

Sarah E. Irish trust, 3.00 

Henry Ivey trust, 1.50 

E. 0. Jameson trust, 2.50 

Herman E. Jewell trust, 1.50 

Julia A. Jones trust, 3.00 

Seth K. Jones trust, 14.50 

John and B. A. Kimball trust, 6.00 

Ellen B. Kittredge trust, 1.50 

Edward L. Knowlton trust, 20.00 

AVilliam Ladd trust, 3.00 

Leete and Newman trust, 1.00 

Mrs. Charles Libby trust, 5.00 

Lincoln and Forrester trust, 2.50 

John L. Lincoln trust, 2.00 

E. W. and E. J. Little trust, 6.00 

John McCauley trust, 2.00 

Henry McFarland trust, 3.00 

G. and E. McQuesten trust, 4.00 

James McQuesten trust, 7.00 

Henry A. Mann trust, 3.00 

H. W. and H. 0. Matthews trust, 3.00 

Charles S. IMellen trust, 6.00 

J. B. Merrill trust, 3.00 

Sarah A. D. Horace trust, 3.00 

Samuel F. Merrill trust, 3.00 

Sullivan G. Mills trust, 5.00 

Charles Moody trust, 3.00 

George H. ]\Ioore trust, 2.50 

Carlos B. and Abbie F. Moseley trust, 5.00 



504 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary J. Moses trust, $3.00 

Caroline B. Murdock trust, 2.00 

Mrs. C. II. Newhall trust, 6.00 

Eliphalet S. Nutter trust, 3.00 

Woodbridge Odlin trust, 3.00 

Eugene S. Ordway trust, 3.00 

II. S. and J. Sedgley Ordway trust, 5.00 

George B. Packer trust, 2.00 

George F. Page trust, 1.50 

Moses W. and Mary A. Page trust, 1.50 

Cyrus W. Paige trust, 4.00 

John B. Palmer trust, 2.00 

William H. Palmer trust, 2.00 

Felicite Pingault trust, 2.00 

Lucy J. Perkins trust, 1.00 

Mary N. Perley trust, 5.00 

Isabella Perry trust, 1.50 

Hannah E. Phipps trust, 5.00 

Irving L. Pickering trust, 3.00 

W. H. Pitman trust, 5.00 

S. Lizzie Pixley trust, 2.00 

Edwin F. Palmer trust, 2.00 

Prescott and Noyes trust, 4.50 

Rand and Libby trust, 1.50 

James E. Rand trust, 1.50 

Henry W. Ranlet trust, 2.00 

George L. Reed trust, 4.00 

Judith A. Richardson trust, 3.00 

Mrs. James H. Rigney trust, 2.50 

Frances K. Roberts trust, 4.00 

Moses F. Rogers trust, 2.00 

E. H. Rollins trust, 6.00 

David D. Rowe trust, 1,50 

Moses "W. Russell trust, 5.00 

Jonathan Sanborn trust, 4,00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 505 

Mrs. I. S. R. Sanborn trust, $1.00 

Frank A. Sargent trust, 2.00 

John B. Sargent trust, 3.00 

Jonathan E. Sargent trust, 10.00 

Edward Sawyer trust, 2.00 

Shackford and Dame trust, 4.50 

Mary W. Smith trust, 3.00 

I\Ioses B. Smith trust, 1.50 

William Smith trust, 1.50 
Hattie B. Southmaid trust, * 1.50 

Julia F. Stark trust, 3.00 

Onslow Stearns trust, 6.00 

C'harles F. Stewart trust, 1.50 

J. M. and M. E. Stewart trust, 3.00 

John W. Straw trust, ' 1.50 

Mary J. Streeter trust, 3.00 

Thomas Stuart trust, 3.00 

Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., trust, 5.00 

Charles L. Tappan trust, 2.00 

Hiram B. Tebbitts trust, 5.00 

John H. Teel trust, 1.50 

John S. Thompson trust, 4.00 

John C. Thorne trust, 3.00 

Pliny Tidd trust, 1.50 

J. L. Tilton and A. D. Locke trust, 1.50 

John H. Toof trust, 3.00 

Jane R. Twombly trust, 3.00 

Eliza W. Upham trust, " 5.00 

C. P. Virgin trust, 1.50 

Gustavus Walker trust, 3.00 

Mary E. Walker trust, 11.00 

Mary J. Wardwell trust, 3.00 

Mary E. West trust, 3.00 

Albert T. Whittemore trust, 1.50 

George F. Whittredge trust, 3.00 



506 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary Williams trust, $3.00 

Sarah A. AVilliams trust, 3.00 

Eobert Woodruff trust, 8.00 

E. W. Woodward trust, 3.00 

Sarah F. Woodworth trust, 3.00 

William Yeaton trust, 4.00 



Credit. 

One half sale of lots for 1911 added 

to permanent fund, $1,524.69 

Income sundry trust funds as charged 
to this account, transferred to City 
of Concord general account, 755.67 

Transferred to City of Concord gen- 
eral account, 3,551.32 



$5,831.68 



$5,831.68 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



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512 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 





MUNICIP^VL. 








Bonds. Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


City 


Hall Building, Sept. 1, 1912 


;^y2, 


$8,000 




Sept. 1 


1913 


31/2, 


8,000 




Sept. 1 


1915 


31/2, 


8,000 




' " Sept. 1 


1916 


31/2, 


8,000 




' " Sept. 1 


1918 


31/2, 


8,000 




Sept. 1 


1919 


31/2, 


8,000 




' " Sept. 1 


1920 


3y2, 


8,000 




Sept. 1 


1921 


31/2, 


7,000 




Sept. 1 


1922 


31/2, 


7,000 




Sept. 1 


1923 


31/2, 


5,000 




July 1 


1924 


31/2, 


10,000 




July 1 


1925 


31/2, 


10,000 




July 1 


1926 


31/2, 


10,000 




July 1 


1927 


31/2, 


10,000 




July 1 


1928 


31/2, 


10,000 




July 1 


1929 


31/2, 


5,000 


State 


Library, June 1 


1914 


31/2, 


25,000 




Precinct. 





Bonds. 



$155,000 



Sewer, 



Due. Rate. Amount. 

June 1, 1914, 31/2, $25,000 

Dec. 1, 1914, 31/2, 9,000 

July 1, 1917, 31/2, 25,000 

May 1, 1928, 31/2, 25,000 



84,000 



Union School District, Oct. 1, 1912, 31/2, $7,000 

Oct. 1, 1913, 31/0, 7,000 

" " " July 1, 1915, 31/2, 8,000 

" July 1, 1916, 31/2, 8,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



513 





Bon 


ds. 


Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


Union School District, July 1, 1918, 31/2, 


$8,000 








' July 1, 1919, 31/2, 


8,000 








' July 1, 1920, 31/2, 


8,000 








' July 1, 1921, 31/2, 


8,000 








' July 1, 1922, 31/2, 


8,000 








' July 1, 1923, 31/2, 


10,000 








' July 1, 1924, 31/0, 


5,000 








' July 1, 1925, 31/2, 


5,000 








' July 1, 1926, 31/2, 


5,000 








' July 1, 1927, 31/2, 


35,000 








' July 1, 1928, 31/2, 


4,000 








' July 1, 1929, 31/2, 


10,000 








' July 1, 1930, 31/2, 


10,000 








' July 1, 1931, 3y2, 


9,000 


School District No. 20, Sept. 1, 1913, 31/2, 


$5,000 








' Sept. 1, 1914, 31/2, 


500 








' Sept. 1, 1915, 31/2, 


500 








' Sept. 1, 1916, 314 


500 








' Sept. 1, 1917, 31/2, 


500 








' Sept. 1, 1918, 31/2, 


500 








' Sept. 1, 1919, 31/2, 


500 








' Sept. 1, 1920, 31/2, 


500 








' Sept. 1, 1921, 31/2, 


500 








' Sept. 1, 1922, 31/2, 


500 








Sept. 1, 1924, 31/2, 


4,300 


S. P. S. Sewerage 


, July 1, 1912, 3, 


$500 




<( 


C i 


July 1, 1913, 3, 


500 



$163,000 



13,800 



1,000 



33 



514 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. 


Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


'est Concord Sewer, Oct. 


1, 1912, 4, 


$7,000 


Oct. 


1, 1913, 31/2, 


500 


'" " " Oct. 


1, 1914, 31/2, 


500 


Oct. 


1, 1915, 31/2, 


500 


Oct. 


1, 1916, 31/2, 


500 


Oct. 


1, 1917, 31/2, 


500 


Oct. 


1, 1918, 31/2, 


500 


" Oct. 


1, 1919, 31/2, 


300 



East Concord Sewer, July 1, 1915, 3V2, 



Penacook Sewer, 



May 




1913, 


4, 


$5,000 


July 




1914, 


4, 


500 


July 




1915, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 




1915, 


3, 


500 


July 




191(3, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 




1916, 


3, 


500 


July 




1917, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 




1917, 


3, 


500 


July 




1918, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 




1918, 


3, 


500 


July 




1919, 


4, 


500 



$10,300 



500 



10,000 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city, ex- 
clusive of water department, 



$437,600 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1911, 

municipal, $267.75 

Precinct, 162.50 

Union School District, 35.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 515 



DUE 1911. 




Municipal, 


$5,530.00 


Precinct, sewer, 


2,940.00 


Union School District, 


5,950.00 


Penacook sewer, 


380.00 


West Concord sewer, 


395.50 


East Concord sewer, 


17.50 


St. Paul's School sewer. 


45.00 


School District No. 20, 


483.00 



$16,206.25 



Cr. 
Municipal paid, $5,656.00 



Precinct, sewer. 


2,922.50 


Union School District, 


5,985.00 


St. Paid's School sewer, 


45.00 


Penacook sewer, 


380.00 


West Concord sewer, 


395.50 


East Concord sewer. 


17.50 


School District No. 20, 


483.00 


Municipal due, not presented. 


141.75 


I'recinct due, not presented. 


180.00 



$16,206.25 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER- WORKS ACCOUNT. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, in account with Concord Water- 
Works : 

Receipts, 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1911, $27,380.13 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 71,881.34 

$99,261.47 



516 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Expenditures. 



Jnterest on bonds, 
Bonds paid, 
Interest, 
Orders paid. 
Cash on hand, 



$22,212.50 

22,000.00 

516.53 

24,914.60 

29,617.84 



$99,261.47 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 



When due. Rate. 


Amount. 


When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Ai)ri] 


1, 1912, 31/0, 


$9,000 


Nov. 1, 1920, 


3, 


$7,000 


Jan. 


1, 1913, 4, 


10,000 


Nov. 1, 1921, 


3, 


4,000 


Jan. 


1, 1914, 4, 


10,000 


April 1, 1921, 


31/2, 


5,000 


Jan. 


1, 1915, 4, 


5,000 


Jan. 1, 1922, 


4, 


384,000 


Jan. 


1, 1916, 4, 


9,000 


April 1, 1922, 


31/2, 


30,000 


Jan. 


1, 1917, 4, 


10,000 


JMarchl. 1922, 


31/2, 


20,000 


Jan. 


1, 1918, 4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 1923, 


31/2, 


15,000 


Jan. 


1, 1919, 4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 1924, 


31/2, 


15,000 



$553,000 

STATEJ^IENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1911, 

and not presented, $171.00 

Coupons due, 1911, 22,272.50 

$22,443.50 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1911, $22,212.50 

Coupons due and not presented, 231.00 



$22,443.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 517 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
account of William F. Thayer, city treasurer, for the year 
1911, and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein 
properly recorded and authenticated by appropriate 
vouchers, and the several items correctly cast, and cash 
balance to be seventy-seven thousand three hundred thirty- 
seven dollars and twenty-one cents ($77,337.21), and as 
treasurer of the city water department, cash balance to be 
twenty-nine thousand six hundred seventeen dollars and 
eighty-four cents ($29,617.84). 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking 
funds of the city, and find such trust and sinking funds in- 
vested, and the income thereof for the year 1911 accounted 
for, as shown by the book of the city treasurer, kept for 
that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Citij Clerk. 



REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS, 1911. 

For payment of interest on bonds, $5,477.50 

payment of interest on temporary loan, 200.00 

payment of interest on cemetery trust funds, 1,400.00 

support of city poor, 800.00 

dependent soldiers, city, 200.00 

incidentals and land damages, 4,000.00 

salaries, Board of Aldermen, 1,905.00 

printing and stationery, 2,000.00 

aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 3,000.00 
aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 

for Women and Children, 500.00 

Memorial Day, 460.00 

public school text-books, 3,500.00 



518 CITY OP CONCORD. 

For open air concerts, $325.00 

public baths, 225.00 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,000.00 

Old North Cemetery, 100.00 

West Concord Cemetery, 90.00 

Millville Cemetery, 65.00 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 150.00 

Old Fort Cemetery, 25.00 

Horse Hill Cemetery, 15.00 

Woodlawn Cemetery, 25.00 

Soucook Cemetery, 20.00 

parks, 3,500.00 

Penacook Park, 125.00 

Washington Square, 25.00 

repairs buildings, 2,000.00 

• police station bonds, 3,000.00 

board of health, 2,625.00 

police department, 16,309.81 

public library, 5,300.00 

engineering department, 4,175.00 

highway department, 45,750.00 

fire department, 24,109.50 

salaries, 12,270.00 

schools, 114,453.44 

state tax, 46,389.00 

county tax, 39,973.07 

garbage precinct, 6,500.00 

lighting precinct, 19,000.00 

sprinkling precinct, 7,500.00 

sewer precinct, city, 5,097.50 

St. Paul's School sewer precinct, 590.00 

Penacook sewer precinct, 1,480.00 

West Concord sewer precinct, 1,395.50 

East Concord sewer precinct, 117.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



Far East Concord lighting precinct, 

street sprinkling precinct, "Ward 1, 
Penacook lighting precinct, 



519 

$500.00 

500.00 

1,300.00 

$389,467.82 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS BY RESOLUTIONS, 

1911. 

11 Text-books, Union School District, $1,110.74 

13 Text-books, Town School District, 30.79 

18 Text-books, Penacook School District, 480.63 

24 Horses, tire department, 600.00 

29 Aid, military organizations, 250.00 

31 Real estate sold for unpaid taxes, 3,653.97 

33 John Kimball Playground, 375.00 

34 Hand engine. West Concord Fire Station, 200.00 

37 Incidentals and land damages, 2,000.00 

38 Printing and stationery, 1,000.00 

39 City poor, 800.00 
43 Hose, fire department, 509.00 
48 Board of health, 5.58 
48 City poor, 499.03 
48 Engineering department, 74.74 
48 Fire department, 1,672.99 
48 Incidentals and land damages, 2,729.47 
48 Interest, cemetery trust funds, 65.50 
48 Police and watch, 989.50 
48 Salaries, 838.18 

$17,885.12 



CITY EXPENSES. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1911. 



City Poor. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, $2,099.03 

Dependent Soldiers, City. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, $10-4.00 



Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $5,342.99 
New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., rentals, 25.00 
Walter S. Dole, seed, grain, etc., 16.42 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 56.57 
E. A. Moulton, superintendent, cash 

paid out, 134.91 

A. P. Home & Co., shrubs, 246.75 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 9.10 

Amos L. Coburn, dressing, 7.50 

John Tilton, dressing, 7.50 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 7.11 

Donald McLeod, plants, 221.08 



CITY EXPENSES. 521 

Hutchinson Building Co., markers, $6.00 

Concord Water-Works, water and pipe, 97.04 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 23.00 
City of Concord, highway department, 

collecting moth nests, 74.18 

George A. Foster, secretary, salary, 25.00 

W. F, Thayer, treasurer, salary, 25.00 

$6,325.15 



Old North Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls^ $417.77 

W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 16.50 

Donald McLeod, plants, 38.25 

Concord Water-Works, water, 10.00 

Cummings Bros., repairing slabs, 10.00 
City of Concord, highway department, 

collecting moth nests, 20.81 



West Concord Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $87.75 

L. S. Parmenter, paint, etc., 1.99 



$513.33 



$89.74 



MiLLViLLE Cemetery. 
Isaac N. Abbott, treasurer, appropriation, $65.00 



522 city of concord. 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Frank E. Fairfield, labor, 
Joseph Carter, labor, 
Samuel L. French, labor, 
Freeman Potter, labor, 
Raymond Colby, labor, 
S. L. Bachelder, gravel, 
Henry A. Colby, labor, 
Seott French, cutting grass, etc., 
J. A. Hussey, labor. 



Old Fort Cemetery. 

S. L. French, labor and supplies, $14.49 

F. E. Fairfield, teaming, etc., 3.50 

H. A. Colby, labor, 2.63 

Raymond Colby, labor, 2.63 

J. A. Hussey, labor, 1.75 



r, 


$24.00 




16.34 




47.15 




30.70 




13.33 




3.60 




8.75 


ass, etc.. 


3.50 




2.63 







$150.00 



$25.00 



Horse Hill Cemetery. 
J. H. Royce, labor, $9.25 



WooDLAWN Cemetery. 
E. H. Brown, treasurer, appropriation, $25.00 



SoucooK Cemetery. 
Nahum Prescott, care, $20.00 



city expenses. 523 

Dog Licenses. 

Monitor & Statesman, advertising, $3.00 
N. H. Patriot, advertising, 2.70 
F. J. Batchelder, blanks, 8.00 
C. M. Young, hens killed by dogs, 26.00 
Carl Rosendale, dog killed by dogs, 10.00 
A. D. Phillips, hens killed by dogs, 5.00 
J. L. Prescott, hens killed by dogs, 6.00 
E. E. Emerson, hens killed by dogs, 59.00 
C. A. Burroughs, hens killed by dogs, 10.00 
C. G. Sanborn, sheep killed and dam- 
aged by dogs, 35.00 
C. H. Farnum, hens killed by dogs, 15.00 
Weston Fellows, hens killed by dogs, 6.00 

$185.70 



Engineering Department. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls. 

Ladder & Probst, supplies. 

New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., rental and tolls, 

George A. Place, cleaning typewriter 

C. L. Berger & Sons., repairs and sup- 
plies, 

W. B. Howe, cash paid out, 

Tliompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 

Thorpe & Martin Co., paste, 

Samuel N. Brown, cards, 

Edmund H. Brown, cards. 

The Gift Shop, cards, 

Charles E. Moss, supplies, 

N. A. Dunklee, horse hire. 



$3,654.13 


148.23 


27.30 


3.50 


19.15 


128.85 


.90 


1.20 


6.61 


5.88 


10.00 


35.44 


72.50 



524 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Virgin & Forrest, stakes, $30.00 

J. E. Gage, repairs, 

Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 

J. F. Waters, automobile hire, 

C. F. Nichols & Son, ink, 

J. B. Lippincott Co., book, 

E. C. Eastman, paper, 



1.90 


3.65 


91.50 


1.00 


7.50 


.50 



Fire Department. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $10,854.72 
W. P. Ladd, tax collector, semi-annual 

pay-roll, 7,130.00 
Frank C. Blodgett, semi-annual pay- 
roll, 45.00 
John B. Dodge, semi-annual pay-roll, 75.00 
P. C. White, semi-annual pay-roll, 30.00 
Fred M. Dodge, salary, superintend- 
ent Penacook fire alarm, 100.00 
R. F. Robinson, rent Veterans' Asso- 
ciation, 150.00 
R. F. Robinson, blankets, 17.01 
Tenney Coal Co., fuel, 216.39 
G. N. Bartemus, grain, etc., 505.35 
W. S. Dole, straw, etc., 239.68 
n. T. Corser, horse hire and hay, 1,270.66 
D. Hammond & Son, carrots, 2.40 
H. H. Chamberlin, grain, 140.90 
N. Nicholson, horseshoeing, 27.95 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, horseshoeing, 140.45 
C. C. Martin, horseshoeing, 108.65 
Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., sup- 
plies, 26.88 



$4,249.74 



CITY EXPENSES. 525 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, $32.19 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, 647.29 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil, etc., 23.05 
W. C. Green, cash paid out, 132.86 
G. D. Huntley, repairs, 36.40 
H. Thompson, brooms, 17.25 
"W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 23.35 
G. B. Robbins Disinfectant Co., disin- 
" fectant, 36.25 
George P. Morrill, wringer, 1.75 
New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls, 136.62 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 40.79 
E. L. Click, supplies, 5.70 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 36.91 
Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 2.70 
Taylor Manufacturing Co., soap, 1.25 
M. E. Clifford & Co., nickle cleaner, .40 
E. C. Paige, horse hire and trucking, 5.75 
R. H. Kiel, horse hire, 38.50 

C. W. Dadmun, electrical supplies, 60.00 
Hutchinson Building Co., supplies, 2.45 
American La France Fire Engine Co., 

bottles, 18.00 

J. R. Hill & Co., supplies, 3.25 

Rumford Printing Co., supplies, 26.00 

Thomas J. Nolan, repairs, 6.50 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 10.40 
Arthur Bruce, trustee, witch hazel, 7.50 
G. F. Sewall, Jr., trucking and freight, 10.11 
C. Pelissier & Co., supplies and repairs, 53.56 
W. D. Nutting, cleaning clock, .75 
Robert J. INIacguire, veterinary services, 161.95 
P'red S. Farnum, repairs, 14.63 
Sara F. Scannells, typewriting, 3.50 



526 CITY OF CONCORD. 

M. J. Lacroix, repairs, etc., $3.85 

H. G. Emmons, supplies, 11.04 

Cushman Electric Co., labor, 22.40 

Western Union Telegraph Co., time 

service three months, 15.00 

Pendleton-White Co., waxine, 9.00 

Home & Hall, repairs, 14.04 

W. S. Kaime, horse hire, 5.50 
Eureka Fire Hose Manufacturing Co., 

relining hose, 494.00 

J. M. Hardy, relining hose, etc., 26.50 

F. E. Gilford, wood, 24.80 
J. H. Toof & Co., laundry, 52.00 
Stuart Howland Co., Avire, etc., 81.50 
Gamewell Fire-Alarm Telegraph Co., 

supplies, 52.66 

Concord Water-Works, water, 111.50 

L. E. Alexander, water, 8.00 

Aid-Ant Remedy Co., aid-ant, 3.00 

Abbot-Downing Co., repairs, 97.99 

J. Hurd Brown, lubricant, 3.76 

H. S. Sanborn, supplies, 15.91 

G. L. Theobald, pair of horses, 600.00 
G. L. Theobald, horse hire, 117.00 
F. L. Johnson, automobile hire, 55.00 
x\ndrew J. Abbott, horse hire, 2.50 
C. O. Partridge, horse hire, 41.50 
Harry Gray, horse hire, 29.50 
Robert Crowley, coal, 493.85 
Penacook Electric Light Co., electricity, 121.23 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies, 35.20 
AV. C. Spieer, supplies, 2.70 
C. H. Swain & Co., labor, etc., 7.10 
H. M. Sawyer & Sons, coat, 5.00 
J. Howard Andrews, lunches, 10.62 



CITY EXPENSES. 527 

V. F. Atkins, lunches, $27.75 
J. E. Clinton, lunches, 18.50 
Eureka Fire Hose IMfg. Co., hose, 800.00 
G. 0. Robinson, horse hire, 20.00 
I'homas Robinson, trucking, 2.75 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 26.56 
Combination Ladder Co., bottles, 10.00 
Somerville Brush Co., supplies, 9.80 
Cornelius Callahan Co., 10.50 
Ford & Kimball, supplies, 21.82 
N. A. Dunklee, sponges and horse hire, 17.00 
G. S. Milton & Co., supplies, 2.91 
J. C. McLaughlin, shoeing, 48.85 
W. E. Lynch, horse hire, 9.50 
E. L. Davis, horse hire, 211.75 
Concord Veteran Firemen's Associa- 
tion, hand engine, 200.00 
Knight & Thomas, Inc., fire extinguishers, -lO.OO 
Samuel Eastman & Co., supplies and 

repairs, 16.60 

W. B. Ranney, cards, 1.25 

W. F. Hoyt, supplies, .60 

G. E. Farrand, supplies, 2.45 

Shepard Bros. & Co., supplies, 2.70 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, .58 

J. C. Farrand, coal, 149.78 

H. V. Tittemore, horse hire, 9.00 

W. S. Kimball, horse hire, 1.50 

C. P. Grimes, automobile hire, 6.00 

P. J. Kelley, horse hire, 5.00 

G. E. Wood & Son, supplies, 10.75 
Ira C. Evans Co., supplies and printing, 6.36 

Keenan Bros., lunches, 2.25 

Ross W. Gate, lunches, 7.50 

S. Waldman, horse hire, 1.50 



528 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



F. W. Sanborn, supplies, 

Globe Manufacturing Co., coats, 

B. M. Weeks, supplies, 
Mary K. Abbott, storage, 

Mrs. George Jones estate, storage, 
W. B. Cunningham, trucking, 

C. W. Drake, glass. 
Concord Ice Co., ice, 
I. E. Gray, polish, 

George Abbott, Jr., paint, etc., 
Coates Clipper ]\Ianufacturing Co. 

supplies, 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, supplies, 
Concord Axle Co., labor, 
Rogers Case, supplies, 
H. A. Stuart, oil. 



$9.25 
10.50 

1.08 
12.00 
15.00 

4.55 

.35. 

27.31 

3.75 
19.09 

6.10 

24.00 

.80 

3.00 

.90 



$27,091.49 



Health Department. 
Itemized in report of sanitary officer. 



$2,630.58 



Highway Department. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $44,757.54 



Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Safety Check Protector Co., check pro- 
tector, $20.00 
Eastman & Merrill, bonds and insurance, 274.25 
Baker & Keeler, insurance, 263.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 529 

Morrill & Danforth, bonds and insur- 
ance, $401.25 

H. H. Chase, bond, 75.00 

Ghase & Martin, insurance, 75.00 

Robj'' & Knowles, insurance, 285.00 

Capital Fire Insurance Co., insurance, 39.00 

H. E. Chamberlin, cash paid out, 48.16 
11. E. Chamberlin, completing birth 

records, 73.25 
New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls, 70.56 
Concord Electric Co., electricity and 

supplies, city hall, 613.98 
M. A. Spencer, services, city clerk's 

office, 606.41 
Isaac H. Proctor, salary, janitor, city 

hall, 600.00 
"W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 

vital statistics, 268.75 

Arthur Booth, supplies, city hall, 14.65 

E. M. Proctor, cash paid out, 17.15 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas, clock 

and city buildings, 147.54 

Samuel N. Brown, recording deeds, 3.25 
Mary C. B. Walker, executrix, rent 

of hall, 100.00 

Charles J. French, cash paid out, 51.76 

Margaret A. Conway, typewriting, 1.00 

William M. Haggett, typewriting, 3.25 
William M. Haggett, typewriter and 

desk, assessors, 115.00 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, city hall, 1.20 

Reed Laundry Co., laundry, city hall, 11.28 

Thomas J. Nolan, repairing flag, 3.00 

C. W. Drake, supplies, mayor's office, 3.45 

34 



530 CITY OF CONCORD. 

H. T. Corser, horse hire, city solicitor, $12.00 

Union School District, flags and poles, 20.00 
Tenney Coal Co., coal and wood, city 

hall, 841.46 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, city hall, 31.46 
E. C. Eastman, Public Statutes, as- 
sessors, 6.00 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, .35 

A. H. Knowlton & Co., supplies, 4.50 
Lee Bros. Co., supplies, board of ex- 
aminers of plumbers, 14.60 

Lee Bros. Co., labor, sewer, Mr. 

Dame's house, 18.00 

George V. Hill, salary, probation officer, 100.00 
Andrew J. Abbott, grasshoppers de- 
stroyed, 221.00 

B. H. Farnum, grasshoppers destroyed, 17.00 
J. S. Hanson, land, extension of Sou- 
cook Cemetery, 100.00 

The Gift Shop, card cabinet and cards, 

assessors, 96.50 

Charles E. Jones, taxes refunded, 9.65 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies, 

city hall, 67.10 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, city 
hall, 

J. E. Hobson, bill boxes, assessors, 

H. V. Tittemore, trucking, 

Alexander Murchie, expenses, flash- 
board case, 

A. J. Shurtleff, entry fees, 

Orr & Rolfe, supplies, 

C. Pelissier & Co., bill book, 
Concord Water-Works, water, drink- 
ing fountains and ward houses, 34.00 



1.50 


5.25 


6.00 


9.45 


3.20 


7.06 


1.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 531 

W. B. Cunningham, express, $1.00 

Metcalf & Eddy, consulting engineers, 661.41 
Concord Ice Co., ice, fountains and 

city hall, 369.96 

N. E. Martin, attorney, taxes refunded, 400.00 

A. Perley Fitch, vaccination supplies, 22.72 
Eobert Crowley, coal, city hall, 146.54 
James H. Morris, stamps, assessors, 7.50 
J. H. Brown, postmaster, stamped en- 
velopes, tax collector, 235.84 

C. H. Swain & Co., supplies, city hall, 9.28 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, re- 
turn of meetings, 16.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 

cleaning sewer, Mr. Dame's house, 8.00 
James J. Keen, taking poll list. Ward 9, 30.00 

P. S. Farnum, taking poll list, Ward 2, 15.00 
0. L. Shepard, taking poll list. Ward 3, 17.50 

B. F. Tucker, taking poll list, Ward 4, 30.00 
J. Fleming, taking poll list, Ward 8, 30.00 
W. E. Farrand, taking poll list. Ward 1, 30.00 
W. H. Riley, taking poll list. Ward 6, 30.00 
M. W. Nims, taking poll list. Ward 5, 30.00 
J. D. Foley, taking poll list. Ward 7, 30.00 
American Express Co., express, city 

reports, 9.25 

C. H. Carter, automobile hire, hearings, 18.00 
Rand, McNally & Co., atlas, 15.00 
T. J. E. Devoy, taxes refunded, 23.00 
H. B. Sanborn, playground. Ward 2, 25.00 
N. A. Dunklee, horse hire, 5.50 
Alma E. Nilson, looking up titles to 

real estate, 10.00 

D. C. Wingate, ringing chimes, July 4, 3.00 
C. F. Straw, ringing chimes, July 4, 3.00 



532 CITY OF CONCORD. 

W. II. Putnam, ringing bell, July 4, $2.00 

G. M. Quimby, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

John Stanley, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

J. ]\I. Inman, ringing ])ell, July 4, 2.00 

L. G. Adams, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

F. Nerbone, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

0. W. Crowell, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

T. McCarthy, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

Globe-Wernicke Co., guide, assessors, 6.00 
D. McLeod, flowers, IMemorial Arch, 

1910-1911, 50.90 
Burroughs Adding IMachine Co., clean- 
ing machine, 3.00 
AVestern Union Telegraph Co., time 

service, city hall, 6.88 
L. Dale Brown, automobile hire, hearings, 9.50 
Eagle Garage, automobile hire, hearings, 12.00 

L. J. Sebra, labor, ward-room, "Ward 1, 2.20 

J. E. Hutchinson, care of lawn. Ward 7, 7.00 
Merrimack County, use of building, 

elections, 50.00 
Hutchinson Building Co., labor, ward- 
room. Ward 7, 11.00 
F. E. Gilford, wood, 17.25 
T. P. Higgins, labor, ward-room, and 

sawdust, 6.00 
Concord Lumber Co., wood, ward- 
room, Ward 9, 4.00 
C. McCormiek, labor, elections, Ward 8, 7.00 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, sawdust and lumber, 2.60 
Concord Hardware Co., supplies, city 

hall, 1.40 

It. J. ]\Iacguire, examining Button horse, 3.00 

D. J. Adams, services, forest fire- 
warden, 170.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 533 

R. H. Kiel, horse hire, forest fires, $4.00 

C. G. Martin, watching ])rush fires, 2.50 

Lewis Cote, watching brush fires, 2.50 

Eli Langlois, watching brush fires, 2.50 

J. Winnestrom, watching brush fires, 2.50 

F. H. Fowler, watching brush fires, 2.50 

G. H. Hubbard, tax collector, taxes 1911, 5.75 
Library Bureau, files, etc., assessors, 13.85 
G. D. B. Prescott, clearing sewer, 8.00 
E. H. Brown, commissioner, recording 

deed, .62 

E. L. Davis, trucking and ice, Ward 1, 41.50 
C. W. Dadmun, electric fans, city hall, 60.00 
H. D. Weathers, damage to horse, 30.00 
Jed Carter, taxes refunded, 11.30 
Tnion Publishing Co., city directories, 45.50 

F. W. Sanborn, automobile hire, hearings, 9.00 
E. A. Stevens, labor, elections. Ward 4, 16.65 
S. L. Bachellor, team carrying ballots, 2.00 
C. Boliss, trucking, 3.00 
E. C. Eastman, Session Laws, tax col- 
lector, 1.50 

J. D. Foley, use of team, assessors, 4.00 
C. F. Nichols & Son, supplies, assessors, 3.25 
J. Blanche Newhall, services, flash- 
board case, 13.60 

G. F. Sewall, Jr., trucking, 1.50 

$8,729.47 



Land Sold for Taxes. 
W. P. Ladd, tax collector, $3,653.97 



534 city op concord. 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, appropriation, $3,000.00 



New Hampshire IMemorial Hospital. 
Emma F. Ingalls, treasurer, appropriation, $500.00 



Memorial Day. 

James Minot, quartermaster, E. E. 

Sturtevant Post, $305.00 

S. N. Brown, quartermaster, W. I. 

Brown Post, 105.00 

J. M. Grossman, quartermaster, Davis 

Post, 50.00 



Aid jMilitary" Companies. 

S. A. Hall, captain Co. E, $100.00 

0. G. Hammond, captain Co. C, 100.00 
Kussell Wilkins, ^l. D., aid. Hospital 

Corps, 50.00 



$460.00 



$250.00 



Open Air Concerts. 
Nevers' Second Regiment Band, concerts, $325.00 



city expenses. 535 

Parks. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,653.50 

G. D. Huntley, repairs, .75 

George Abbott, Jr., painting, 13.53 

W. S. Dole, grain, 37.92 

H. P. Kelsey, shrubs, 35.25 

G. W. Chesley, teaming, etc., 17.15 

C. R. Fish & Co., shrubs, 4.00 
F. W. Sanborn, sharpening lawn 

mowers, 3.00 

"VV. L. Riford, horse hire and trucking, 58.47 

W. H. Richardson, cash paid out, 37.74 

H. B. Hammond, care of swans, 25.00 
M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and supplies, 30.81 

K. J. McMullin, labor, 6.00 

W. G. C. Kimball, plants, 10.25 

AV. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 27.05 

Virgin & Forrest, labor and supplies, 6.05 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 4.18 

Frank Atkinson, cash paid out, 5.25 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies and 

iron fence, 469.59 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, glass and putty, 2.28 

Concord Water-Works, water, 29.00 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 1.60 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 4.66 

Eli Brunei, carrots, etc., 6.10 

.$3,489.13 



Penacook Park. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $90.17 



536 city op concord. 

Washington Square. 
E. H. Brown, treasurer, appropriation, $25.00 



Playground — John Kimball. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $129.50 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 45.66 

Arthur McCauley, instructor, 150.00 

Concord "Water- Works, water, 6.00 

Orr & Rolfe, bubbling cup, 4.15 

Hutchinson Building Co., supplies, 5.38 

Fred Chase, posts, 9.00 

A. H. Britton & Co., paint, 13.50 



Police and Watch. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $14,692.03 
W. S. Kaime, horse hire and board, 535.00 
Manchester Hat Works, helmets, 45.50 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, 115.65 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 5.52 
I'enaeook Electric Light Co., lights, 25.63 
G. A. S. Kimball, cash paid out, 454.93 
G. A. S. Kimball, automobile hire, 24.00 
New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls, 173.93 
New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., j)rivate line, 164.32 
E. C. Eastman, supplies, 8.16 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing and sup- 
plies, 44.20 



$363.19 



CITY EXPENSES. 



537 



Batchelder & Co., supplies, $9 

D. E. J\[iirphy, draping station, 7 

E. L. Davis, trucking and wood, 10 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 3 
A. "W. Braley, one-half telephone expense, 8 
C. T. Wallace, one-half telephone expense, 8 
V. I. Moore, one-half telephone expense, 

E. J. Brown, one-half telephone expense, 9 
H. L. Woodward, one-half telephone 

expense, 
Iloyt Robinson, one-half telephone 

expense, 
Irving Robinson, one-half telephone 

expense, 
J. E. Silva, one-half telephone expense, 
Donnelly-Johnson Co., buttons, 
Harry Gray, horse hire, 
C. H. Fowler Drug Co., supplies, 
Hoyt's Garage, supplies. 
Eagle Garage, supplies, 
E. L. Gliek, supplies, 
Mitchell Manufacturing Co., badges, 
W. D.' Nutting, cleaning clock, 

A. H. Knowlton & Co., supplies, 
Giles Wheeler, salary, commissioner, 

B. W. Couch, salary, commissioner, 
G. S. Locke, salary, commissioner, 
Concord Water- Works, water. 
Concord Ice Co., ice, 

A. Perley Fitch, supplies, 
Pendleton- White Co., waxine, 
Harry G. Emmons, supplies, 

B. M. Weeks, supplies, 
Robert Crowley, coal, 
J. C. Farrand, coal. 



.81 
.00 
.25 
.55 
.33 
.25 
.75 
.00 



8.25 



2.25 



45 

45 

45 

43 

6 

7 

2 

2 

2. 

277. 

106. 



50 
,80 
00 
50 
63 
50 
88 
34 
60 
75 
80 
83 
83 
83 
00 
87 
25 
10 
50 
70 
39 
16 



538 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Concord Coal Co., Avood, $8.75 
A. Henry, plating badges, 3.00 
C. Pelissler & Co., supplies, 4.45 
West Disinfecting Co., liquid soap, 2.50 
Jacob Reed's Sons, Inc., belts, 3.50 
Granite State ^Manufacturing Co., re- 
pairing chairs, 17.50 
AV. F. Fuller, supplies, 2.55 
N. H. Patriot Co., advertising, 6.75 
Monitor & Statesman Co., advertising, 17.60 
C. P. Grimes, labor, 1.65 
C. W. Dadmun, lamps, 2.50 

C. C. IMartin, shoeing, 20.00 
Hardy & McSwiney, hat, 4.50 
S. R. Mastrangialo, caps, 9.75 
G. D. Huntley, repairs, 25.00 
AVestern Union Telegraph Co., time 

service, 11.25 
The Evans Press, printing and supplies, 8.50 

R. F. Keane, repairs, 17.00 

Nelson Case, horse hire, 1.50 

Concord Steam Laundry, laundry, 1.00 

Charles Carter, automobile hire, 6.00 

T. J. Nolan, putting up awnings, etc., 3.50 

S. L. Bachellor, horse hire, 5.00 

E. E. Babb, repairs, 2.73 

F. L. Johnson, supplies, 8.13 
N. A. Dunklee, horse hire, 1.00 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 5.35 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 5.23 

G. F. Hodgman, supplies, 37.60 
T. H. Randall, vermigo, 9.00 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, .75 
Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 1.25 



CITY EXPENSES. 539 

J. E. Gage, repairs, $3.70 

G. L. Lincoln & Co., repairs, 4.75 

C E. Burclisted, veterinary services, 21.00 

$17,299.31 



Precinct Garbage. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $7,095.69 



Precinct Lighting Streets. 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, $4,631.31 

Concord Electric Co., electricity, 14,514.99 

$19,146.30 



Precinct Lighting Streets, East Concord. 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, $514.00 



Precinct Lighting Streets, Penacook. 
Charles H. Barnett, treasurer, appropriation, $1,300.00 



Precinct Sewer, City. 

^V. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,178.05 

Boston & Maine R. R., labor, 79.89 

H. V. Tittemore, trucking, 2.25 

"Woodworth & Co., cement, 2.10 

C. A. Yeadon, trucking, 3.50 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 409.98 



540 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Thomas Robinson, trucking, $1.00 
Dickerman & Co., cement, 43.60 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., sup- 
plies, 4.60 
J. F. Ward, trucking, 6.25 
W. A. Thompson, rubber boots, 16.00 
J. E. Gage, sharpening tools, .30 
Samuel Holt estate, brick, 76.50 
W. L. Jenks & Co., supplies, 201.85 
G. L. Theobald, teaming, 25.78 
W. L. Riford, trucking, 3.50 
Builders' Iron Foundry, supplies, 12.75 
Ford & Kimball, manholes, etc., 67.50 
Cushman Electric Co., labor, 25.00 
Hutchinson Building Co., lumber, 1.46 
W. B. Howe, expenses to convention 

and freight, 63.85 
E. C. Page, trucking, 1.75 
W. H. Ash, trucking, .50 
Concord Water-Works, pipe, 15.84 
Edson Manufacturing Co., supplies, 12.02 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, sharpen- 
ing tools, etc., 1.20 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil, etc., 5.10 



$3,262.12 



Precinct Sewer, East Concord. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund. 



$100.00 



Precinct Sewer, Penacook. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $180.71 
AY. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund, 1,100.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 541 

J. E. Brown, sharpening tools, $3.25 

Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 2.02 

D. F. Dudley, gravel, .30 

W. H. Meserve, cement, 1.55 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 4.44 
City of Concord, highway department, 

diaphragm, 2.25 

$1,294.52 



Precinct Sewer, St. Paul's School. 

Concord Water-Works, water, $45.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 14.55 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund, 500.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 1.76 



$561.31 



Precinct Sewer, West Concord. 

AV. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $28.78 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund, 1,400.00 



$1,428.78 



Precinct Sprinkling Streets. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $7,022.96 



Precinct Sprinkling Streets, Penacook. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $468.48 



542 city op concord. 

Printing and Stationery. 

J. H. Brown, postmaster, stamped en- 
velopes, $32.06 
New Hampshire Patriot Co., adver- 
tising, 130.40 
Monitor & Statesman Co., advertising, 154.51 
Independent Statesman, advertising, 14.63 
Rumford Printing Co., printing and 

supplies, ■ 585.25 
Ira C. Evans Co., reports, etc., 1,845.65 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 9.53 

Phaneuf & Son, printing and supplies, 23.50 

C. F. Nichols & Son, supplies, 4.30 

Star Stamp Co., rubber stamps, 4.19 

Ideal Stamp Co., rubber stamps, .75 

Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 24.60 

A. R. Andrews, supplies, 14.30 

P. J. Batchelder, supplies, 32.00 

Carl S. Magoon, typewriter ribbon, .60 

Thomas J. Dyer, supplies, 7.50 
Derby Jew^elry Co., adding machine 

paper, 1.50 
The Treworgy Ink & Pen Manufac- 
turing Co., ink, 4.25 
Edward N. Pearson, secretary, en- 
grossing acts, 5.25 
The Gift Shop, cards, etc., 16.95 
The Evans Press, printing and supplies, 3.25 
G. H. Richardson & Co., pens, 3.50 
Yauman & Erbe Manufacturing Co., 

cards, 6.75 
Concord Evening Monitor, advertising, 2.70 

W. M. Haggett, typewriter ribbons, 4.00 



$2,931.92 



city expenses. 543 

Public Baths. 

John P. Donovan, services and cash 

paid out, $155.73 

Bert Long, labor and teaming, 2.75 

Holt Brothers, stakes, 3.00 

Thompson & Hoagiie Co., supplies, 5.26 

Virgin & Forrest, labor and supplies, 2.79 

Thomas Robinson, trucking, 6.00 

Joseph Archambeault, use of boat, etc., 9.95 
A. C. Sanborn, agent, right of way, 15.00 

$200.48 



Public Library. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 
C. E. Lauriat Co., books, 
E. C. Eastman, books, 
DeWolfe & Fiske Co., books, 
Lillian S. Putnam, subscription, 
American City Publishing Co., sub- 
scription, 
S. E. Cassino Co., subscription. 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, 
Tenney Coal Co., wood. 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., rental, 
Grace Blanchard, cash paid out, 
licxington Book Shop, book. 
The Sprague Publishing Co., sub- 
scription, 
Lee Brothers Co., repairs, 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance. 



$2,791.24 


314.07 


187.32 


4.10 


5.00 


2.00 


.80 


255.93 


5.00 


47.85 


80.20 


2.53 


1.00 


21.70 


7.05 


47.50 



544 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The II. W. Wilson Co., books, $20.00 

Cambridge University Press, books, 91.00 

Dow, Jones & Co., subscription, 12.00 

Patriot Publishing Co., subscription, 6.00 

F. J. Barnard & Co., binding books, 250.1(5 
Concord Water-Works, water, 11.00 
AVilliam T. Bailey, repairs, 14.26 
Robert Crowley, coal and wood, 240.46 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing and supplies, 45.75 
N. E. Historic Genealogical Society, 

books, 5.00 
Rumi'ord Printing Co., binding books, 

etc., 34.20 

G. W. Griffin, plans, 17.50 
Hutchinson Building Co., repairs, 178.90 
W. B. Cunningham, transportation of 

books to Penacook, 52.00 

Library Art Club, assessment, . 6.00 

New Hampshire Patriot, subscription, 12.00 

Library Bureau, files, 1.35 

George Abbott, Jr., painting, 341.36 

G. H. Richardson & Co., pens, 1.50 

C. H. Sanders, care of books, Penacook, 52.00 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs and 

supplies, 106.40 
Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 16.90 
The Independent, subscription, 2.00 
H. K. Turner Co., books, 3.42 
H. A. Stuart, care of books. East Con- 
cord, 8.00 
University of Chicago Press, sub- 
scription, 1.35 
A. L. A. Publishing Board, reports, 2.08 
R. W. Eldridge, subscription, 176.25 
W. C. Gibson, subscriptions, 51.94 



CITY EXPENSES. 545 

Abby C. Morse, subscriptions, $3.00 

Morrill & Danfortli, insurance, 40.00 

Concord Ice Co., ice, . 2.35 

J. W. Bourlet, book, 2.70 

Pearson & Marsh, Inc., books, 15.75 

C. H. Swain & Co., labor and supplies, 7.20 

Monitor & Statesman Co., subscription, 6.00 
B. F. Sturtevant Co., vacuum cleaner, 130.00 

$5,741.07 



Eepairs Buildings. 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, city hall, $69.54 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, fire 

station, 216.89 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, police 

station, 91.66 

G. L. Fogg, labor and supplies, police 

station, 1.50 

Ford & Kimball, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 64.60 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, fire 

stations, 77.42 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and sup- 
plies, city hall, 25.87 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and sup- 
plies, fire stations, 23.46 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and sup- 
plies, police station, 76.90 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, fire 

stations, 11.20 

George A. Griffin, painting, etc., fire 

station, Ward 1, 76.50 

35 



546 CITY OF CONCORD. 

George A. Griffin, painting, police sta- 
tion, Ward 1, $3.13 

A. N. Merryman, repairs, roof, city 

hall, 3.18 

A. N. Merryman, labor and supplies, 

police station, 4.38 

A. II. Britton & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, fire stations, 1.60 

Hutchinson Building Co., counter, as- 
sessor's room, 69.00 

Everett Mann, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 152.92 

Everett Mann, labor, bell tower, 58.82 

Everett Mann, labor and supplies, 

police station, 35.90 

Virgin & Forrest, floor. Central Fire 

Station, 97.80 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, papering, resi- 
dence chief engineer, 22.53 

Concord Electric Co., installing 

switches, East Concord station, 4.02 

C. H. Swain & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, city hall, 4.45 

C. H. Swain & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, fire station, 68.81 

W. Carpenter, labor and supplies, resi- 
dence chief engineer, 26.44 

W. Carpenter, painting, bell tower, 88.50 

(\ W. Drake, labor. Central Fire Station, 3.05 

F. C. Blodgett, labor, engine house. 

Ward 3, 3.00 

G. F. Tandy, concrete, fire station. 

Ward 3, 52.22 

G. F. Tandy, concrete, Auditorium, 2.40 

James Coleman, painting, police station, 5.95 



CITY EXPENSES. 547 

G. E. Wood & Son, shades, fire stations, $3.00 

W. II. Young, labor, residence chief 

engineer, 2.85 

M. L. Swain & Co., mason work, Cen- 
tral Fire Station, 7.94 

W. T. Bailey, labor, city hall, 12.90 

W. T. Bailey, labor. Central Fire Station, 13.46 

Globe Horseshoeing Shop, labor, fence 

rail, city hall, .75 

Louis J. Sebra, rack, ladders, fire sta- 
tion. Ward 1, 50.00 

Louis J. Sebra, steps, police station. 

Ward 1, 8.53 

F. W. Landon & Co., labor, city hall, 20.00 
E. N. Sanborn, labor, residence chief 

engineer, 5.25 

G. H. Richardson & Co., supplies, po- 
lice station, 

W. E. Lynch, repairs, city hall, 

W. E. Lynch, labor, engine house. 

West Concord, 
George Abbott, Jr., labor. Alert Hose 

House, 
W. H. Young, labor. Central Fire 

Station, 

$1,576.42 



1.25 


1.75 


1.50 


2.60 


1.00 



Salaries. 



Charles J. French, mayor, $1,458.33 

Henry E. Chamberlin, city clerk, 1,200.00 

Henry E. Chamberlin, overseer of the 

poor, Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, 350.00 



548 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Henry E. Cham])erliu, clerk, board of 

public works, $76.29 
Edward M. Proctor, city messenger, 874.98 
George M. Fletcher, police justice, 1,000.00 
Edmund S. Cook, city solicitor, 250.00 
Alexander Murchie, city solicitor, 250.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, 250.00 
Charles H. Cook, Jr., city physician, 450.00 
Elmer U. Sargent, assistant city phy- 
sician, 50.00 
John P. Paige, care city clocks, 85.00 
"W. H. Putnam, care city clock, 25.00 
Eufus H. Baker, clerk police court, 200.00 
"W. H. McGirr, overseer of poor, 

"Ward 1, 30.00 
Harry B. Sanborn, overseer of poor. 

Ward 2, 10.00 

0. J. Fifield, assessor, Ward 1, 12.00 

J. E. Shepard, assessor, Ward 3, 54.00 

George W. Parsons, assessor, Ward 4, 12.00 

Osro M. Allen, assessor, Ward 6, 42.00 

John H. Quimby, assessor. Ward 7, 87.00 

W. A. Lee, assessor. Ward 8, 75.00 

James J. Donagan, assessor. Ward 9, 103.00 

James H. Morris, assessor, 1,403.85 

J. E. Shepard, assessor, 701.93 

M. H. Donovan, assessor, 701.93 

W. P. Ladd, tax collector, 2,038.87 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 

moderators and ward clerks, 360.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 

supervisors and inspectors of election, 955.00 
Harry J. Brown, special police justice, 2.00 



$13,108.18 



city expenses. 549 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $1,866.00 



Schools. 



L. J. Rundlett, agent. Union School 

District, $92,088.19 

David T. Twoniey, treasurer, Pena- 

cook School District, 9,577.73 

Frank E. Dimond, treasurer, Town 

School District, 5,188.60 

$106,854.52 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

OF THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1911. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, City Poor, $800.00 \ 

Eesohition No. 39, 800.00 C $2,099.03 

Resolution No. 48, 499.03 ) 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, City, $200.00 $104.00 $96.00 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, County $1,553.38 

Aid, County Poor, $7,869.26 

Aid, Local Military Companies, 

Eesohition No. 36, $250.00 $250.00 



Cemeteries : 

Blossom Hill, $1,000.00 $6,325.15 

Transferred, Cemetery Account, 3,551.32 

Income Cemetery Fund, 956.16 

Income Trust Funds, 755.67 

$6,263.15 $6,325.15 

Old North, $100.00 $513.33 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 187.69 

Income Cemetery Fund, 30.10 

Income Trust Funds, 215.80 

$533.59 $513.33 

West Concord, $90.00 $89.74 $0.26 

Pine Grove, 150.00 150.00 

Old Fort, 25.00 25.00 

Millville, 65.00 65.00 

Horse Hill, 15.00 9.25 5.75 

Soucook, 20.00 20.00 

• Woodlawn, . 25.00 25.00 



F'og Licenses, 

Engineering Department 
Salary Engineer, 
Salary Assistants, 
Supplies, 
Repairs, 
Incidentals, 
Assessor's Map, 
Resolution No. 48, 



Fire Department : 
Salaries, 

Salaries, Semi-annual, 
Rent Veterans' Association, 
Forage, 

Fuel and Lights, 
Horse Hire and Shoeing, 
Fire Alarm, 
Chemical Supplies, 
Washing, 
Water, 

Penacook Fire Alarm, 
New Hose, 
Incidentals, 
Horses, 

Resolution No. 24, 
Hand Engine, 

Resolution No. 34, 
Eelining Hose, 

Resolution No. 43, 

Resolution No. 48, 



Health, Board of: 

Salary, Sanitary OflScer, 
Milk Inspection, 
Fumigation Supplies, 
Incidentals, 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 551 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
$185.70 

$1,600.00 $1,600.00 

1,300.00 1,312.76 

100.00 105.88 

25.00 21.05 

150.00 214.75 

1,000.00 995.30 

74.74 

$4,249.74 $4,249.74 

$8,028.00 $8,791.15 

7,280.00 7,280.00 

150.00 150.00 

1,800.00 1,731.99 

1,700.00 1,591.14 

1,200.00 1,296.15 

800.00 753.92 

50.00 52.07 

52.00 52.00 

119.50 119.50 

130.00 166.47 

800.00 800.00 

2,000.00 2,998.10 

600.00 600.00 

200.00 200.00 

509.00 509.00 

1,672.99 

527,091.49 $27,091.49 

$1,400.00 $1,400.00 

300.00 300.00 

125.00 68.01 

600.00 649.57 



552 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Antitoxin and Medical Supplies, $200.00 $21.3.00 

Eesohition No. 48, 5.58 

$2,630.58 $2,630.58 

Highway Department: 

Salary Superintendent, $1,000.00 $1,600.00 

General Maintenance and Eepair, 27,000.00 26,497.30 

Permanent Work, Loudon Eoad, 1,500.00 1,467.47 

Permanent Work, South Street, 1,500.00 1,270.39 

Permanent Work, Ilopkinton Road, 2,000.00 2,028.85 

Permanent Work, Main Street, 

Fiske to Pearl, 3,000.00 2,220.30 

Permanent Work, Pleasant Street, 1,500.00 1,532.07 

Sidewalks and Crossings, New, 1,000.00 805.24 

Sidewalks and Crossings, Repair, 2,250.00 2,305.46 

Catch Basins, 1,400.00 1,234.89 

Trees, 3,000.00 3,795.57 

$45,750.00 $44,757.54 $992.46 

Incidentals and Land Damages, $4,000.00 $8,729.47 

Resolution No. 37, 2,000.00 

Resolution No. 48, 2,729.47 

$8,729.47 $8,729.47 

Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds, $1,400.00 $1,465.50 

Resolution No. 48, 65.50 

$1,465.50 $1,465.50 

Interest, Notes and Bonds, $5,477.50 $5,656.00 

Interest, Temporary Loan, $200.00 $63.89 $136.11 

John Kimball Playground: 

Resolution No. 33, $375.00 $363.19 $11.81 

Land Sold for Unpaid Taxes, 1910, 

Resolution No. 31, $3,653.97 $3,653.97 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 553 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Memorial Day, $460.00 $460.00 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, $500.00 $500.00 

Open' Air Concerts, $325.00 $325.00 

Parks, $3,500.00 $3,489.13 $10.87 

Penacook Park, $125.00 $90.17 $34.83 

Washington Square, $25.00 $25.00 

Police Station Bonds, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Police and Watch : 

Salaries, $14,150.00 $14,692.03 

Police Commissioners, 137.49 137.49 

Fuel, 400.00 397.80 

Horse Hire, Board and Shoeing, 435.00 576.00 

Helmets and Buttons, 25.00 71.75 

Ice and Water, 48.00 49.87 

Lights, 150.00 146.55 

Telephone, Private Line, 164.32 164.32 

Incidentals, 800.00 1,063.50 

Eesolution No. 48, 989.50 

$17,299.31 $17,299.31 

Precinct, Garbage, $6,500.00 $7,095.69 

Balance, 1910, 105.62 

Eesolution No. 48, 269.26 

$6,874.88 $7,095.69 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, City, $19,000.00 $19,146.30 

Balance, 1910, 93.12 

$19,093.12 $19,146.30 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, 

East Concord, $500.00 $514.00 

Balance, 1910, 23.87 

$523.87 $514.00 $9.87 



554 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Precinct, Lighting Streets, 

Penacook, $1,300.00 $1,300.00 

Precinct, Sewer, City: 

Construction and Eepairs, $2,000.00 $1,998.89 

Balance, 1910, 136.31 

Noyes Street, 1,263.23 

Interest on Bonds, 3,097.50 2,922.50 

Debit Balance, 1910, 157.50 

Eesolution No. 44, 6,886.68 



$13,420.49 $7,642.12 $5,778.37 

I'recinct, Sewer, East Concord: 
Construction and Eepairs, 

Balance, 1910, $127.53 $127.53 

Interest on Bonds, 17.50 $17.50 

Sinking Fund, 100.00 100.00 

$245.03 $117.50 $127.53 

Precinct, Sewer, Penacook: 
Construction and Eepairs, 

Balance, 1910, $113.74 $194.52 

Interest on Bonds, 380.00 380.00 

Sinking Fund, 1,100.00 1,100.00 

$1,593.74 $1,674.52 



Precinct, Sewer, St. Paul's School: 



Construction and Eepairs, $45.00 , ^„^ „, 

Balance, 1910, • 33.86 

Interest on Bonds, 45.00 45.00 

Sinking Funds, 500.00 500.00 



$623.86 $606.31 $17.55 



Precinct, Sewer, West Concord: 
Construction and Eepairs, 

Balance, 1910, $81.30 $28.78 

Interest on Bonds, 395.50 395.50 





FINANCIAL 


STATEMENT 




555 






Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Sinking Fund, 
Eesohition No. 12, 




$1,000.00 \ 
400.00 1 


$1,400.00 






$1,876.80 


$1,824.28 


$52.52 


Precinct, Sprinkling 
Balance, 1910, 


Streets, 


$7,500.00 ^ 
84.95 1 


$7,022.96 


$561.99 


Precinct, Sprinkling 


Streets, 








Penacook, 




$500.00 


$468.48 


$31.52 


Printing and Stationery, 


$2,000.00 


$2,931.92 




Eesolution No. 38, 




1,000.00 








$3,000.00 


$2,931.92 


$68.08 


Public Baths, 




$225.00 


$200.48 


$24.52 


I'ublic Library: 










Salaries, 




$2,760.00 


$2,791.24 





Incidentals, 




2,540.00 


2,949.83 




Trust Funds, 




192.53 






Catalogues, 




2.05 






Fines, 




254.00 








$5,748.58 


$5,741.07 


$7.51 


Repairs of Buildings 


J 


$2,000.00 


$1,576.42 


$423.58 


Salaries: 










Mayor, 




$1,500.00 


$1,458.33 




City Clerk, 




1,200.00 


1,200.00 




Overseers of Poor, 




390.00 


390.00 




Solicitor, 




500.00 


500.00 




Treasurer, 




250.00 


250.00 




Messenger, 




800.00 


874.98 




City Physicians, 




500.00 


500.00 




Care City Clocks, 




110.00 


110.00 




Assessors, 




3,000.00 


3,192.71 




Moderators and Ward Clerks, 


360.00 


360.00 




Supervisors and Inspectors of 








Election, 




960.00 


955.00 





556 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Judge, Police Court, $1,000.00 $1,002.00 

Clerk, Police Court, 200.00 200.00 

Collector of Taxes, 1,500.00 2,038.87 

Clerk, Board of Public Works, 76.29 

Kesolution No. 48, 838.18 

$13,108.18 $13,108.18 

Salaries, City Council, $1,905.00 $1,866.00 $39.00 

Schools : 

Union School District: 

General Fund, Balance 1910, $23,677.45 $92,088.19 

Appropriations, 42,955.88 

Amount Voted by District, 42,870.84 

Literary Fund, 1,875.52 

Dog Licenses, 1,380.86 

Text -books, 3,024.91 

Text-books, Eesolution No. 11, 1,110.74 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 34.57 

I^t«^-««t' 5,950.00^ 3__Q(^ 

Balance, 1910, 2,642.50 j 

Bond, 7,000.00 7,000.00 



$132,523.27 $105,073.19 $27,450.08 

Town District : 

General Fund, Balance 1910, $657.81 $5,188.60 

Appropriation, 2,804.70 

Amount Voted by District, 2,000.00 

Literary Fund, 122.46 '. 

Dog Licenses, 90.16 

Text-books, 197.50 

Text-books, Resolution No. 13, 30.79 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 2.26 

One-half Salary Superintendent, 266.66 

$6,172.34 $5,188.60 $983.74 

Penacook District: 

General Fund, Balance 1910, $1,992.20 $9,577.73 

Account, 1911, 929.90 



FINANCIiVL STATEMENT. 557 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Appropriation, $3,941.92 

Amount Voted by District, 3,720.04 

Literary Fund, 172.10 

Dog Licenses, 126.72 

Text-books, 277.59 

Text-books, Resolution No. 18, 480.63 

Sinking Fund, 175.00 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 3.17 

One-half Salary Superintendent, 525.00 

Interest, 483.00 483.00 



$12,827.27 $10,060.73 $2,766.54 



Temporary Loan : 

Eesolution No. 30, $25,000.00 $25,000.00 

County Tax, $39,973.07 

Slate Tax, $46,389.00 



RECEIPTS. 



Receipts of tlie City, for the year ending December 31, 1911: 

Balance on hand January 1, 1911, $60,030.72 

Taxes, 1909, 100.00 

Taxes, 1910, 45,424.67 

Taxes, 1911, 244,825.00 

Fines and Costs, City Marshal, 3,055.00 

Library Fines, 254.00 

Sale of Catalogues, 2.05 

Garbage, 269.26 

Highway Department, 1,563.28 

Fees, City Clerk, 304.20 

Billiard and Pool Table Licenses, 400.00 

Hack and Job Team and Junk Dealers ' Licenses, 226.00 

Quarry Eents, 168.75 

Milk Licenses, 191.70 

Auditorium, 2,000.00 

Cemetery Trust Funds, 2,600.00 



558 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Amusement Licenses, $685.00 

Dog Licenses, ],783.44 

Dog License Fees, . 166.00 

Bounty on Grasshoppers, 112.00 
Taxes Sold City and Redeemed, 1904, 1906, 1907, 1908, 

1909, 1910, 9,231.66 

Temporary Loan, 25,000.00 
State Board of License Commissioners: 

Balance, 1910, 13.84 
Account, 1911, 5,273.21 
County Paupers off Farm, 3,99L04 
Dependent Soldieis, County, 836.00 
Declarations of Candidacy, City Primary, 115.00 
State of New Hampshire, Insurance Tax, 1,656.38 
" " Eailroad Tax, 49,518.87 
" " " Savings-bank Tax, 48,531.84 
" " " Literary Fund, 2,170.08 
" Proportion School Fund, 791.66 
" " " Building and Loan Associa- 
tion Tax, 167.39 
Transferred from Old North Cemetery Account, 187.69 
" " Blossom Hill Cemetery Account, 3,551.32 



West Concord Sewer, \ 
Precinct Sinking Fund, f 



400.00 



Income Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools, 40.00 

P. B. Cogswell Trust Fund, Library, 83.03 

* ' G. Parker Lyon Trust Fund, Library, 35.00 

" Franklin Pierce Trust Fund, Library, 40.00 

" Thomas G. Valpey Trust Fund, Library, 17.50 

" Seth K. Jones Trust Fund, Library, 17.00 

" Blossom Hill Cemetery Fund, 956.16 

" Old North Cemetery Fund, 30.10 

Blossom Hill Cemetery Trust Fund, 755.67 

Old North Cemetery Trust Fund, 215.80 

Forestry Protection, 537.40 

Manchester Traction, Light and Power Co., Expense 

Flash-board Case, 713.32 
Mancliester Traction, Light and Power Co., Sewer Pre- 
cinct, 6,886.68 
Miscellaneous, 716.36 

$526,641.07 



FINANCLVL, STATEMENT. 



559 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Disbursements: 

City Departments, $149,746.83 

City Poor and Soldiers, - 2,203.03 

County Poor and Soldiers, 9,422.64 

City Notes, 25,000.00 

City Bonds, 3,000.00 

City Interest on Notes and Bonds, 5,719.89 

Interest Cemetery Trust Funds, 1,465.50 

Schools, 106,854.52 

Schools, Interest on Bonds, 6,468.00 

School Bonds, 7,000.00 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, City, 7,022.96 

' ' Sprinkling Streets, Penacook, 468.48 

" Lighting Streets, City, 19,146.30 

" Lighting Streets, Penacook, 1,300.00 

" Lighting Streets, East Concord, 514.00 

" Garbage, 7,095.69 

* ' Sewers, Interest on Bonds, 3,760.50 

' ' Sewers, Eepairs and Extensions, 3,546.73 

Sewers, Sinking Funds, 3,100.00 

County Tax, 39,973.07 

State Tax, 46,389.00 

Paid outstanding orders, 367.32 

Treasury balance, January 1, 1912, 77,337.21 

$526,901.67 

Less outstanding order, unpaid January 1, 1912, 260.60 

$526,641.07 



CONCORD WATEE-WORKS. 

Receipts. Expenditures. 

Cash on hand, January 1, 1911, $27,377.38 

Receipts deposited with treasurer, 71,881.34 

Expended per orders, $24,914.60 

Bonds, 22,516.53 

Interest, 22,212.50 

Treasury balance January 1, 1912, 29,617.84 

$99,258.72 $99,261.47 
Less outstanding order, unpaid January 1, 

1912, 2.75 

$99,258.72 $99,258.72 



560 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MUNICIPAL DEBT. 
Funded Debt. 

City hall bonds, $130,000.00 

Slate library bonds, 25,000.00 



Total funded city debt, $155,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1912, $2(50.60 
Interest accrued, not yet due, munici- 
pal bonds, 1,910.42 
Coupons overdue, not presented, mu- 
nicipal bonds, 141.75 
Due school districts, 31,200.36 
Due precinct lighting streets. East 

Concord, 9.87 

Due precinct sewer. East Concord, 127.53 

Due precinct sewer, city, 5,778.37 

Due precinct sewer, St. Paul's School, 17.55 
Due precinct sewer. West Concord, 52.52 

Due precinct sprinkling streets, 561.99 

Due precinct sprinkling streets, Pena- 

cook, 31.52 

Cemetery trust funds, 43,542.64 



Total debt not funded, 83,635.12 



Total city indebtedness, $238,635.12 



financial statement. 561 

Available Assets. 

Treasurer's cash balance, January 1, 

1912, $77,337.21 

Taxes of 1907, uncollected, 11.32 

Taxes of 1908, uncollected, 187.88 

Taxes of 1909, uncollected, 345.55 

Taxes of 1910, uncollected, 717.58 

Taxes of 1911, uncollected, 47,342.74 

Cash in hands of tax collector, Jan- 
uary 1, 1912, 1,049.55 
Taxes bid in by city, 3,429.02 
Due for quarry rents, 116.66 
Due highway department, 171.14 
Due clerk, police court, 16.00 
Due state of New Hampshire, grass- 
hoppers killed, 238.00 
Due Merrimack County, county poor, 3,849.34 
Due Merrimack County, dependent 

soldiers, 717.38 

Overdraft, precinct, lighting streets, 

city, ^ 53.18 

Overdraft, precinct, garbage, 220.81 

Overdraft, precinct, Penacook sewer, 80.78 

$135,884.14 



Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 

1912, $102,750.98 

Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 

1911, 115.222.87 



Decrease for the year, $12,471.89 



36 



562 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PRECINCT DEBT. 
Funded Debt. 

Water-works bonds, $553,000.00 

SeM^er bonds, 84,000.00 

$637,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Coupons overdue, water bonds, not 

presented, $231.00 

Coupons overdue, sewer bonds, not 

presented, 180.00 

Interest accrued, sewer bonds, not yet 

due, 682.50 

Interest accrued, water bonds, not yet 

due, 10,130.83 

11,224.33 



$648,224.33 
Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1912, $29,617.84 

Due highway department, garbage 

precinct, 71.00 

$29,688.84 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1912, $618,535.49 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1911, 642,968.08 



Decrease for the year, $24,432.59 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, $163,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,730.00 

$165,730.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 563 

Penaeook School District bonds, $13,800.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 161.00 

$13,961.00 



Net liability of school districts, $179,691.00 



West Concord sewer bonds, $10,300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 98.88 



$10,398.88 



East Concord sewer bonds, $500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 8.75 



$508.75 



Penaeook sewer bonds, $10,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 108.34 



$10,108.34 



St. Paul's School sewer bonds, $1,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 15.00 



$1,015.00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $102,750.98 

precinct debt, 618,535.49 

school districts, 179,691.00 

West Concord sewer debt, 10,398.88 

East Concord sewer debt, 508.75 

Penaeook sewer debt, 10,108.34 

St. Paul's School sewer debt, 1,015.00 



Aggregate indebtedness over available as- 
sets, January 1, 1912, $923,008.44 
Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1911, 967,516.67 



Decrease for the year, $44,508.23 



INVENTORY 

Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1912. 



Water rights— land, etc., $1,016,854.73 

Water offiee^furniture, etc., 650.00 
Pumping station — furniture, 

supplies, etc., 991.00 
Shop at pumping station — 

machinery, tools, etc., 2,000.00 
Stable and basement at pump- 
ing station, horse, wagons, etc., 855.00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water 

gates, etc., 2,000.00 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 2,086.00 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 15.00 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00 



$1,025,491.73 



CITY PROPERTY 

Having Value but not Considered Available Assets. 



The following is a summary of the inventory of the 
property belonging to the city January 1, 1912, made by 
the heads of the various departments having the same in 
charge. Itemized statements are on file in the city clerk's 
office. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Central fire station, $44,718.00 

Kearsarge steamer company, 3,755.00 

Eagle steamer company, 4,540.00 

Governor Hill steamer company, 3,070.00 

Hook and ladder company, 2,710.00 

Chemical engine company, ' 1,920.00 

Good "Will hose company, 7,852.00 

Alert hose company, 4,607.00 

Pioneer steamer company, 17,868.00 

Old Fort engine company, 4,280.00 

Cataract engine company, 9,742.50 

Hose, 9,000.00 

Fire alarm apparatus, 10,395.00 

Residence chief engineer, 3,000.00 

Heating apparatus, 100.00 

Furniture, Pioneer engine house, 70.00 

Old Fort engine house, 69.00 

Cataract engine house, 71.00 

$127,767.50 



566 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Central District. 

New city stable, sheds, lot, tools, 

etc., $24,523.15 

Penacook District. 
Tools, etc., $155.75 

West Concord District. 
Tools, etc., $19.25 

East Concord District. 
Tools, etc., $18.00 



$24,716.15 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Furniture, tools and supplies, $657.50 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 
Tools and supplies, $648.95 

Precinct, Penacook Sewer. 
Tools and supplies, $40.15 

Precinct, West Concord Sewer. 
Tools and supplies, $50.75 



CITY PROPERTY. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



567 



Isolation hospital and furniture, 
Office furniture and supplies, 



$740.00 
150.50 



$890.50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Police station, city, 
Police station, Penacook, 
Equipment, furniture, etc.. 



$25,000.00 
6,000.00 
2,253.65 



., '-"''-'•) 



$33,253.65 



CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, etc., $1,135.00 



COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, $140.17 



Furniture, 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 



$107.45 



ASSESSOR'S ROOM. 



Furniture, etc., 



$320.00 



568 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, etc., $205.20 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES' OFFICE. 

Weights, measures, balances, etc., $200.00 



CITY MESSENGER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Committee room, $73.70 

City council rooms, 774.50 

Property in and about city hall, 1,403.09 

$2,251.29 



PARK COMMISSIONER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Tools, etc.. White Park, $200.00 

Tools, etc., Rollins Park, 25.00 

$225.00 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Tools, etc., Blossom Hill Cemetery, $250,00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Books, $9,500.00 

Furniture, 500.00 

$10,000 00 



CITY PROPERTY. 569 

\ 

MILK INSPECTION. 
Tools, etc., $43.77 



CITY HISTORY COMMISSION. 

One Bouton 's History, ' $10.00 



570 CITY OF CONCORD, 

REAL ESTATE. 

Real Estate Belonging to the City not Included in 
Any of the Foregoing Inventories. 

City hall lot and building, $150,000.00 

City farm, pasture and quarries, 5,000.00 

Gravel banks, 1,050.00 

Ward house, West Street, 4,500.00 

I'layground on Intervale, 1,500.00 

Playground, Fosterville, 1,500.00 

White Park, 14,000.00 

Rollins Park, 10,807.50 

Penacook Park, 2,500.00 

Market place, Warren Street, 15,000.00 

Cemeteries, 20,100.00 
Bradley, Fiske (so called). Ridge 

Road and Pecker Parks, 2,200.00 

$228,157.50 



GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 



AVater department. 


$1,025,491.73 


Fire department, 


127,767.50 


Highway department. 


24,716.15 


Engineering department, 


637.50 


Sewer department. 


648.95 


I'enaeook sewer. 


40.15 


West Concord sewer. 


50.75 


Health department. 


890.50 


Police department, 


33,253.65 


City clerk's office, 


1,135.00 


Commissioner's office. 


140.17 


Mayor's office. 


107.45 



CITY PROPERTY. 571 



Assessors' room, $320.00 
Tax collector's office, 205.20 
Sealer of weights and measures, 200.00 
City messenger's department, 2,251.29 
Park commissioner's department, 225.00 
Cemetery commissioner's depart- 
ment, 250.00 
Public library, 10,000.00 
]\Iilk inspection, 43.77 
City history commission, 10.00 
Pteal estate, . 228,157.50 



$1,456,542.26 



POLLS, VALUATION, AND TAXES ASSESSED. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real 
and personal estate of Concord since 1901. 

Valuation. Tax. 

$11,393,694 $241,588.57 

11,394,218 241,216.83 

11,643,466 240,025.79 

11,559,482 250,222.29 

11,614,011 258,043.86 

11,768.897 260,976.67 

12,114,322 273,045.74 

12,342,190 277,469.52 

12,405,465 301,281.72 

12,543,822 278,464.77 

Valuation. Tax. 

$1,044,935 $23,789.97 

318,680 6,747.85 

689,600 14,961.05 



Year. 


Polls. 


1901 


5,378 


1902 


5,249 


1903 


5,407 


1904 


5,188 


1905 


5,400 


1906 


5,474 


1907 


5,757 


1908 


5,289 


1909 


5,442 


1910 


5,576 


1911. 


Polls. 


Ward 1, 


541 


2, 


201 


3, 


355 



572 CITY OF CONCORD, 



191 1. 

Ward 4. 
5, 


Pollg. 

1,061 
627 


Valuation. 

$2,476,411 
2,712,705 


Tax. 

$59,919.15 
65,851.18 


6, 


961 


1,766,672 


42,830.07 


7, 

8, 
9, 


1,111 

382 
545 


1,589,025 

1,419,385 

490,434 


36,695.24 
33,149.14 
11,183.91 


Non-resident 


5,784 


$12,507,847 


$295,127.56 
946.71 




$296,074.27 



1911. 

Population of city (census 1910), 21,497 

Valuation of city, $12,507,847 

Tax assessed for the year, $296,074.27 

Rate of taxation, $15 per $1,000. 
Kate of Union School District, $5.20. 
Rate for precinct, $4.10. 
Total rate, $24.30 per $1,000. 



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Nancy Barr. 
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INDEX. 



Aijpropriations, regulai' 517 

special 519 

Assessors, board of, report of 446 

Assets, city. See Municipal Assets. 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 489 

Board of Health. Sec Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 512 

Cemetery department, reports of 442 

City clerk, report of 455 

expenses, itemized 520 

government, departments, personnel of 57 

assessors 59 

board of aldermen r>7 

boards of education 81 

board of jjublic works 58 

cemetery committees C8 

clerk 58 

collector of taxes 59 

commissioners of cemeteries . . . ' ' 69 

committees of board of aldermen 58 

culler of staves 72 

engineer 59 

fence-viewers 71 

fire department, offices of 66 

health officers 67 

hydrant commissioners 68 

inspector of petroleum 70 

mayor 57 

messenger 59 

overseers of poor ■ 61 

park commissioners b& 

physician, city and assistant 60 

plumbers, board of examiners of 76 

pound-keeper 71 

police department, officers of court 61 

officers and members of police force 62 

public library, trustees of ■ 64 

librarian and assistants 64 

registrar of vital statistics 67 

sanitary officer and inspector of pluml)ing 60 

sealers of leather 71 

sealer of weights and measures 71 

solicitor '. 60 



628 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

City street department, superintendent of streets 60 

drain-layers 75 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 69 

superintendent of clocks 64 

superintendent of parks 68 

superintendent of schools 83 

surveyors of painting 73 

masonry 73 

stone 73 

wood, lumher and bark 74 

treasurer 59 

truant officer 83 

undertakers 70 

ward officers 76 

water-works, city, commissioners 65 

superintendent 65 

weigher 73 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 72 

solicitor, report of 439 

Clerk of police court, report of 440 

Coupon account, statement of 514 

Debts, recapitulation 563 

Engineer, city, report of 324 

Financial statement .• 550 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 241 

fire alarm 288 

Penasook fire-alarm telegraph 294 

regulations 297 

roll of members 311 

Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery 460 

East Concord Cemetery 463 

East Concord sewer 464 

Millville Cemetery 462 

Old North Cemetery 461 

Pen acock sewer . 464 

Seth K. Jones monument 465 

trust 465 

West Concord Cemetery 461 

sewer 463 

Highway commissioner, financial statement of 390 

department, report of superintendent 377 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 436 

John Kimball Playground, report of committee on 441 

Mayor's address 3 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 78 

Municipal debt 560 

regulations • 2 



INDEX. 



629 



PAGE. 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 487 

Ordinances and resolutions 22 

Pai'ks, public, report of commissioners 234 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 433 

T'C'lice department, report of city marshal 317 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1901 571 

Poor department, report of overseer 456 

Population 573 

Precincts, debts of 562 

Property, city, inventory of 564 

Public library, report of trustees 191 

librarian 192 

Public Works, board of, report of 375 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 199 

complaints, etc 210 

contagious diseases 208 

milk inspector, report of 201 

mortality report 217 

sanitary officer, report of 203 

School reports 81 

Union School District, annual school meeting warrant 184 

annual school meeting 186 

attendance, tables of 136 

board of education, report of 84 

buildings and repairs, report of com- 
mittee 86 

census, 1911 143 

cost per capita 92 

elocutionary contest 182 

English prize essay contest 151 

financial agent, report of 90 

fire drills 160 

graduating classes 162 

honor, roll of 169 

manual training, report of 124 

members, officers and standing com- 
mittees 81 

Memorial Day offering 181 

movement of pupils through grades. . . 152 

school nurse, report of 122 

stamp saving system 143 

superintendent, report of 94 

teachers, list of 145 

truant officer, report of 142 

Town School District, treasurer's report 189 

Sewer department, report of 426 

Tax collector, report of 450 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 507 



680 INDEX. 

PAGE. 

Ti'easury, report of 458 

Trust funds 458 

Trusts, individual cemetery 467 

A'ital statistics, tables of 577 

Water department, report of 329 

commissioners, report of '.i'il 

coupon, account of 510 

engineer's report 351 

fire hydrants 364 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 516 

receipts for each year 356 

schedule of pipes and gates 358 

summary of statistics 3 72 

superintendent, report of 339 

treasurer's report 353-515