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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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CITY OF CONCORD 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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9 



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1912 
SIXTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1912 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




THE RUMFORD PRESS 

CONCORD, N. H. 

1913 



N 
552,07 

C" 

\ C \\Z 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or 
delivered on city poor account, except on the written order 
of the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than 
until his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 23, 1913. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES 

An Ordinance enlarging the city and ward one street sprink- 
ling PRECINCTS. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the territory abutting on and included in that 
section of the city bounded and described as follows, is hereby added 
to the city street sprinkling precinct : Commencing at the junction of 
South and Allison streets; thence southerly on South Street to Carter 
Street; thence easterly on Carter Street to Broadway; thence northerly 
on Broadway to Allison Street; thence westerly on Allison Street to 
the point begun at, meaning to add to the territory already included 
in said precinct, Eastman Street, Kimball Street, Pillsbury Street 
from South Street to Broadway, and Carter Street from South Street 
to Broadway; also the following described territory: Commencing at 
the junction of Bradley and Penacook Streets; thence westerly on 
Penacook Street to Rumford Street; thence southerly on Rumford 
Street to Church Street; thence easterly on Church to Bradley Street; 
thence northerly on Bradley Street to the point begun at, meaning to 
add to the territory already included in said precinct Highland Street, 
Albin Street- Perkins Street, Martin Street, Jackson Street from Church 
Street to Highland Street; Walker Street from Bradley Street to 
Rumford Street, Penacook Street from Bradley Street to Rumford 
Street, and Rumford Street from Penacook Street to Church; also 
Rumford Street from Penacook Street to North State Street; also 
Avon Street from Clinton Street to South Street. 

Sect. 2. That the Ward One street sprinkling precinct be and 
hereby is enlarged to include Walnut Street from the corner of Center 
Street and Bye Street from Walnut Street to Merrimack Street. 

Sect. 3. That all the territory included by or abutting on the 
streets mentioned in the two preceding sections with their inhabitants, 
shall be included in their respective street sprinkling precincts. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 11, 1912. 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the garbage precinct for the ensuing finan- 
cial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the Garbage Precinct 
of said city, the sum of seven thousand dollars ($7,000) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said precinct $7,000 
Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the penacook sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates, within the Penacook Sewerage 
Precinct the sum of sixteen hundred thirty dollars ($1,630) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of the said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $1,100 .00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 380.00 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said precinct 150 . 00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the west concord sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered to 

be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord 

Sewerage Precinct, the sum of thirteen hundred ninety-five and 50- 



ORDINANCES. 5 

100 dollars ($1,395.50) to defray the necessary expenses and charges 
of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appro- 
priated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $1,000 . 00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 395 . 50 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



An Okdinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the street sprinkling precinct for the ensu- 
ing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the Street Sprinkling 
Precinct of said city, the sum of seven thousand five hundred dollars 
($7,500) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $7,500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the lighting precinct for the ensuing financial 

YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Lighting Precinct 
of said city, the sum of nineteen thousand five hundred dollars ($19,500) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For fighting streets $19,500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



b CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of st. paul's school sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within St. Paul's School 
Sewerage Precinct, the sum of five hundred seventy-five dollars ($575) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance with 

an ordinance creating a sinking fund $500 . 00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 

cinctbonds 30.00 

For repairs and construction of sewers in said precinct 45 . 00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the east concord sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord 
Sewerage Precinct, the sum of one hundred seventeen and 50-100 
dollars ($117.50) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $100.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 17 . 50 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



ORDINANCES. i 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the sewerage precinct for the ensuing finan- 
cial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Sewerage Precinct of 
said city, the sum of eight thousand nine hundred forty dollars ($8,940) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For repairs and construction $6,000 . 00 

For interest on bonds 2,940 . 00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the street sprinkling precinct in ward 1. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Street Sprinkling 
Precinct in Ward 1 the sum of seven hundred fifty dollars ($750) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinking streets $750 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the east concord lighting precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord Light- 
ing Precinct, the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) to defray the neces- 
sary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets within said precinct $500 . 00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised for the ensuing financial year for the use of 

THE CITY. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum of forty- 
three thousand dollars ($43,000) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, together with 
the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads and from other 
sources shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds $5,425 . 00 

For payment of interest on temporary loan 100 . 00 

For payment of interest on cemetery trust funds 1,500.00 

For support of city poor 800 . 00 

For dependent soldiers, city 200 . 00 

For incidentals and land damages 4,000 . 00 

For salaries, Board of Aldermen 1,905 . 00 

For printing and stationery 2,000.00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000.00 

For aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital for Women and 

Children 500.00 

For Memorial Day 460.00 

For Open Air Concerts 325 . 00 

For Public Baths 225.00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery 1,000.00 

For Old North Cemetery 200.00 

For West Concord Cemetery 90.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 150 . 00 

For Old Fort Cemtery 25.00 

For Millville Cemetery 75 . 00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery ' 15.00 

For Soucook Cemetery 20 . 00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25 . 00 

For Parks 3,500.00 

For Penacook Park 125.00 

For Washington Square 25 . 00 

For East Concord Playground 25 . 00 

For John Kimball Playground 400.00 

For repairs buildings 2,000. 00 

For city hall bonds 8,000.00 

$36,115.00 



ORDINANCES. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Salary, Sanitary Officer $1,400.00 

Milk Inspection 300.00 

Fumigation Supplies 100 . 00 

Antitoxin and Medical Supplies 200 . 00 

Incidentals 600.00 



$2,600.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $14,608.75 

Fuel 400.00 

Horse Hire, Board and Shoeing 450 . 00 

Helmets and Buttons 25 . 00 

Ice and water 48 . 00 

Lights 150.00 

Telephone, Private Line 164 . 32 

Incidentals 800.00 



$16,646.07 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Salaries $2,760.00 

Books and Incidentals 2,240.00 



$5,000.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, Engineer $1,600.00 

Salary, Assistants 1,400 . 00 

Supplies 100.00 

Repairs 25.00 

Incidentals 150.00 

Assessor's Map 1,000.00 

$4,275.00 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

General Maintenance $30,000.00 

Catch Basins 1,400.00 

Trees 3,000.00 

Sidewalks and Crossings, New 1,000 . 00 

Sidewalks and Crossings, Repair 2,250 . 00 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Salary, Superintendent $1,600 .00 

Permanent Work, Loudon Road 500 . 00 

Permanent Work, Pittsfield Road 500.00 

Permanent Work, South Street, Pleasant to Fayette 2,000 . 00 

Permanent Work, North Main Street, Pearl to Chapel 2,700.00 

Permanent Work, Penacook Road, reconstructing 2,000.00 

$46,950.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $9,044.00 

Salaries, Semi- Annual 8,640 . 00 

Rent, Veterans' Association 150 . 00 

Forage 1,800.00 

Fuel and Lights 1,600.00 

Fire Alarm 800.00 

Horse Hire and Shoeing 1,200.00 

Washing 52.00 

Water 119 . 50 

Chemical Supplies 50 . 00 

Penacook Fire Alarm 247 . 50 

Incidentals 2,000.00 

New Hose 800.00 

$26,503.00 

SALARIES. 

Mayor $1,500.00 

City Clerk 1,200.00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works 100.00 

Overseer of Poor 390 . 00 

City Solicitor 500.00 

City Treasurer 250 .00 

City Messenger 900.00 

City Physicians 500 .00 

Care City Clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,000.00 

Moderators and Ward Clerks 360 .00 

Supervisors and Inspectors of Election 960 . 00 

Judge, Police Court 1,000.00 

Clerk, Police Court 200.00 

Collector of Taxes, so much as may be necessary of the sum 

of 1,500.00 

Building Inspector 200 .00 

$12,670.00 



ORDINANCES. 11 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of forty-eight 
thousand five hundred two and 50-100 dollars ($48,502.50) for the 
support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, together with 
the income of the Abigail Walker fund, shall be appropriated and divided 
among the several school districts according to the valuation thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
•cemeteries of the city one half of the income from the sale of lots and 
the income derived from the care of lots and grading, which sum shall 
be deposited by the superintendent, or others receiving them, in the 
city treasury. The care of lots for which the city hotels trust fund shall 
be paid from the money appropriated for the care of cemeteries and so 
much of the income of these trust funds as may be thus expended shall 
be deposited in the city treasury at the close of the year and the remainder 
in each instance, credited to the individual funds. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
use of the Public Library in the purchase of books the amount collected 
for fines. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 29, 1912. 



An Ordinance prohibiting the distribution of certain litera- 
ture AND MEDICINE. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That no person shall in any part of the City of Concord 
distribute hand-bills, cards, papers or advertising matter of any kind or 
description, which purport to describe symptoms of so-called medical 
-diseases, and prescribe cures therefor, and 

Sect. 2. That no person shall in any part of the City of Concord 
■distribute free samples of medicine of any description whatever, which 
purport to cure the diseases mentioned in section one of this ordinance. 

Sect. 3. Any person violating any of the provisions of this ordinance 
shall be fined not exceeding twenty dollars for each offence. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 8, 1912. 



An Ordinance in amendment of an ordinance passed April 8, 
1907, relative to the employment of teams. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That an ordinance passed April 8, 1907, relative to the 
employment of teams be, and hereby is, amended by striking out the 
whole of section one of said ordinance and substituting the following: 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Section 1. The heads of departments employing teams for the use 
of the city are hereby authorized to pay for said team four dollars and 
fifty cents per day of nine hours or such proportionate part of four 
dollars and fifty cents as the time worked bears to nine hours for each 
two-horse team with driver, provided such driver be paid by the owner 
of said team not less than one dollar and seventy-five cents per day. 

Passed May 13, 1912. 



An Ordinance fixing the salary of special, policemen. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Each special police officer shall receive at the rate of 
two dollars and fifty cents ($2.50) in full for each day's service. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed May 13, 1912. 



An Ordinance prescribing the pay of firemen in the city 
proper. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That call firemen in the city proper shall be paid one 
hundred dollars per annum, lieutenants of companies one hundred and 
five dollars, captains one hundred and ten dollars, steam fire engineers 
one hundred and thirty-five dollars, and assistant engineers one hundred 
and forty-five dollars. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 10, 1912. 



An Ordinance providing for the semi-monthly payment of 
members of the fire department, including the chief. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That all permanent members of the Fire Department 
including the chief shall be paid semi-monthly. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed July 8, 1912. 



ORDINANCES. 13 

An Ordinance fixing compensation for additional clerical 
help in the assessor's office. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of two hundred and four dollars ($204) 
be, and hereby is, appropriated, out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, in payment of bill of John H. Leary account of 
«xtra work in the office of the Board of Assessors. 

Sect. 2. Tins ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed Sept. 9, 1912. 



An Ordinance in amendment of an ordinance passed march 
29, 1912, entitled " an ordinance fixing and determining 
the amount of money to be raised for the ensuing finan- 
cial year for the use of the city." 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That an ordinance passed March 29, 1912, entitled 
^'An Ordinance Fixing and Determining the Amount of Money to be 
Raised for the Ensuing Financial Year for the Use of the City" be 
amended by striking out of Section 1 under Highway Department the 
words "Permanent Work, North Main Street, Pearl to Chapel, $2,700.- 
00," and insert in the place thereof the words "Permanent Work, West 
Concord Road from West Concord cemetery so far South as money 
permits— $2,700.00." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect on its passage. 
, Passed Oct. 14, 1912. 



An Ordinance fixing a date for the payment of poll taxes, 
real estate taxes and personal property taxes for 1912. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the poll taxes and taxes assessed upon personal 
property for the year 1912 shall be deemed due and payable at the 
collector's office on or before the first day of January, 1913; and if the 
same shall not then be paid notice may be served upon all persons whose 
said taxes remain unpaid, who shall pay the sum of 20c for such notice 
according to the provisions of Section 19, Chapter 60, of the Public 
Statutes. 

Sect. 2. That all interest which shall accrue between December 1, 
1912, and January 1, 1913, upon taxes assessed upon real estate during 
the year 1912, be, and the same is hereby abated. 

Passed Nov. 11, 1912. 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance adopting the provisions of chapter 129 of the 
session laws of 1909 entitled "an act to license pawn- 
brokers and to regulate the conduct of their business." 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. The provisions of Chapter 129 of the Session Laws of 
1909 entitled "An Act to License Pawnbrokers and to Regulate the 
Conduct of Their Business" is hereby adopted to be in force in the 
City of Concord. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed Jan. 13, 1913. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 15 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

A Resolution in relation to paying salaries, pay-rolls and 

RENTS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his warrant on 
the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, pay-rolls and rents as 
the same shall become due during the present municipal term, and all 
bills so paid shall be laid before the committee on accounts and claims 
at their next meeting. 

Passed January 23, 1912. 



A Resolution providing for the printing of rosters of the 
city government. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the present 
city government and cause copies thereof to be printed and that the 
expense of printing the same be charged to the account of printing and 
stationery. 

Passed January 23, 1912. 



A Resolution authorizing the committee of lands and build- 
ings TO MAKE CURRENT REPAIRS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the committee on lands and buildings be authorized to expend 
such sums as may be necessary for current repairs, not exceeding three 
hundred dollars in any one month, the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for repairs to buildings. 

Passed January 23, 1912. 



A Resolution providing for the printing of the mayor's 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city clerk be authorized and instructed to have printed copies 
of the mayor's inaugural address, the expense of the same to be charged 
to the account of printing and stationery. 

Passed January 23, 1912. 



1G CITY OF CONCORD 

A Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and 

BINDING THE ANNUAL CITY REPORTS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 
proposals for printing and binding the City reports for the year 1911 
and submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full 
power to act in the matter. 

Passed January 23, 1912. 



A Resolution providing for a special committee of investiga- 
tion. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That a special committee consisting of five members, viz., His Honor 
the Mayor, the City Solicitor and three members of the Board of 
Aldermen, to be appointed by the Mayor, be appointed to make a 
thorough investigation, and report to this Board at an early date, as 
to the price at which illuminating gas can be manufactured, with a 
view to determining if it be not possible to obtain from the Concord 
Light & Power Co., illuminating gas for the citizens of Concord at a 
lower price than now prevails; and authority is hereby granted such 
special committee to secure the attendance of such persons and papers 
and to expend such a reasonable sum or sums, out of any money now 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, as may be necessary for 
such purpose. 

Passed March 11, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating ten hundred twenty and five one- 

HUNDREDTHS DOLLARS FOR TEXT-BOOKS USED IN UNION SCHOOL 
DISTRICT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of ten hundred twenty and five one- 
hundredths dollars ($1,020.05) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated for the purchase 
of text-books used in Union School District. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 11, 1912. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 17 

A Resolution relative to printing the revision of the city 

ORDINANCES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor and the city clerk are hereby authorized 
to invite bids for the printing of the revision of the city ordinances and 

Sect. 2. That in the discretion of the mayor, said clerk and the city 
solicitor, thirty copies of said revision may be printed in the form of a 
proposed revision, for the use of the mayor and aldermen, prior to the 
printing of the final revision. 

Passed March 11, 1912. 



A Resolution authorizing the transfer of two hundred and 

TWENTY-TWO DOLLARS FROM THE GENERAL CITY FUND TO THE 
CITY SEWER PRECINCT FUND. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred and twenty-two dollars ($222) received 
as rental for the use of the portable engine belonging to the equipment 
of the city sewer precinct be transferred by the city treasurer from the 
general city funds to the credit of the city sewer precinct. 

Passed March 11, 1912. 



A Resolution authorizing the transfer of funds of the west 

CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to transfer the 
sum of four hundred dollars ($400) from the West Concord Sewerage 
Precinct sinking fund account to the city treasury, said fund to con- 
stitute a part of the amount to be raised for the sinking fund for 1912 
which, together with one thousand dollars ($1,000) raised by taxation, 
amounts to one thousand four hundred dollars ($1, 400), the sum required 
by ordinance. 

Passed March 22, 1912. 



A Resolution relative to the auditorium. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Whereas, the lease of the Auditorium to George D. Waldron will 
expire May 5, 1912, the question of whether the lease shall be renewed, 
2 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

or what disposition shall be made of the Auditorium after the expira- 
tion of said lease, is hereby referred to the Mayor and Committee on 
Lands and Buildings with full power to act as in their judgment shall 
seem for the best interest of the city. 
Passed March 29, 1912. 



A Resolution exempting certain new capital of the abbot and 

DOWNING COMPANY PROM TAXATION FOR A TERM OF TEN YEARS. 

Resoloed by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Whereas, It is represented that the business of the late Abbot- 
Downing Company is to be re-established in the City of Concord, 
capable of giving employment to over two hundred hands, and that 
new and additional capital is to be invested in said business and 

Whereas, It is represented that the re-establishment of said business 
would be of great benefit to the City of Concord and that the exemption 
from taxation for a period of ten years of the new capital invested 
therein would be an inducement and aid thereto, 

Now, therefore, voted that the Abbot and Downing Company are 
hereby exempted from taxation for a period of ten years from the date 
of the passage of this resolution upon any new and additional capital 
invested in said business. 

That for the purpose of distinguishing between what is new capital and 
old capital invested in said business, the present assessed valuation of 
said Abbot and Downing Company shall be taken as a basis for the old 
capital, and all the rest of the property shall be considered new capital 
and exempt from taxation. 

Passed March 29, 1912. 



A Resolution requesting the public service commission to in- 
vestigate AND ASCERTAIN WHETHER THE COST OF GAS IN THE 
CITY OF CONCORD IS EXCESSIVE AND UNREASONABLE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That it is the opinion of this board that the cost of 
gas in the city at the present rate is excessive and unreasonable. 

Sect. 2. That the city solicitor be, and hereby is, instructed to 
file in the name of the city a formal complaint with the Public Service 
Commission, setting forth therein the sense of this board as expressed 
in section one of this resolution, and praying that said commission 
examine into the said cost of gas in the city in accordance with Session 
Laws of 1911, chapter 164, section 10 c, said complaint to close with a 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 19 

prayer for such relief as to said commission seems just and reasonable, 
under and by virtue of section 11 c of said chapter 164 of said Session 
Laws of 1911. 

Sect. 3. That the city solicitor be and hereby is authorized to 
represent the city before said commission at said investigation in so 
far as in his opinion seems necessary, and to incur the necessary expense, 
incident to a proper presentation of facts before said commission, in 
so far as it is the duty of the city to so present said facts. 

Passed April 8, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating the stjm of three hundred twenty- 
five DOLLARS FOR THE PURCHASE OF A HORSE FOR THE CENTRAL 
FIRE STATION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred twenty-five dollars ($325) be, and 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated for the purchase of a horse for the Central Fire Station; 
said sum to be expended under the direction of the chief of the fire 
department. 

Passed April 8, 1912. 



A Resolution providing for a special committee on the john 

KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Mayor is hereby authorized to appoint a special committee, 
to consist of two members of the Board of Aldermen and one member 
of the Woman's Club, to have charge of and expend the appropriation 
for the John Kimball Playground for the year 1912. 

Passed April 12, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating a sum not exceeding ten hundred 

AND FIFTY DOLLARS FOR THE PURCHASE OF A SPRAYING MACHINE 
AND THE NECESSARY EQUIPMENT OF THE SAME. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That a sum not exceeding ten hundred and fifty dollars ($1,050) be, 
and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other 
wise appropriated for the purchase of a spraying machine and the 
necessary equipment for the same. 

Passed April 19, 1912. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution appropriating money for the use of the mayor. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200) be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated for the necessary expenses and supplies for the mayor's office. 
The same to be expended under the direction of the mayor and charged 
to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed May 13, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating thirty-seven dollars and fifty- 
two CENTS TO REIMBURSE JULIA A. DAVIS FOR TAXES ERRONEOUSLY 
ASSESSED. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of $37.52 be, and the same is hereby, appropriated to 
reimburse Julia A. Davis for taxes paid to the City of Concord for the 
year 1911, the same having been erroneously assessed. The amount 
hereby appropriated shall be charged to the account of incidentals and 
land damages. 

Passed May 13, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating money for a vault door in city hall- 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated for a vault door in city hall. The said sum to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the mayor and charged to the account of 
incidentals and land damages. 

Passed May 13, 1912. 



A Resolution in relation to coal, wood and ice. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the committee on finance be, and hereby are, directed to ask for 
bids for supplying the city with coal, wood and ice for the ensuing year, 
and that said committee have full power to accept or reject any bids 
offered. 

Passed May 13, 1912. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS, 21 

A Resolution appropriating the sum of two hundred ninety 

DOLLARS FOR THE PURCHASE OF A HORSE FOR THE POLICE DEPART- 
MENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred ninety dollars ($290) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the purchase of a horse for the Police Department; said sum 
to be expended under the direction of the city marshal. 

Passed May 13, 1912. 



A Resolution releasing land sold for taxes for the year 1910 

IN THE NAME OF MARY L. COLLINS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the land in the name of Mary L. Collins in Ward 7 sold to the 
City of Concord at the tax collector's sale held May, 1911, for taxes due 
in 1910, be, and hereby is, released from said sale, the taxes on said prop- 
erty having previously been paid. 

Passed May 13, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating the sum of two hundred dollars. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars is hereby appropriated to be 
expended by the Committee on Lands and Buildings to furnish the 
Board of Assessors with an additional room, and that the same shall be 
charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed June 10, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating fifteen hundred four and 09-100 

DOLLARS TO PAY FOR REAL ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY OF CONCORD 
FOR UNPAID TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1911. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of fifteen hundred four and 09-100 dollars ($1,504.09) 
be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated to pay the amount due the City of 
Concord for real estate purchased at the tax collector's sale of real estate 
for the unpaid taxes for the year 1911. s 

Passed June 10, 1912. 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution appropriating the sum of one hundred dollars 

FOR THE PLAYGROUND AT ROLLINS PARK. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100.00) be appropriated out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to lay out and 
equip a playground in Ward 7, south of Rollins Park, and to maintain 
the same during the season of 1912. Said appropriation to be expended 
by, and said playground to be conducted under the management of a 
special committee consisting of Alderman Farrar, Alderman Pelissier 
and Miss Ruth Kent. 

Passed June 10, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating three hundred forty-three and 07- 

100 DOLLARS FOR TEXT BOOKS USED IN PENACOOK SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of three hundred forty-three and 07-100 
dollars ($343.07) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purchase of text- 
books used in Penacook School District. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 10, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating the sum of six hundred dollars for 

THE PURCHASE OF A PAIR OF HORSES FOR THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred dollars be, and hereby is, appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated for the 
purchase of a pair of horses for the Fire Department; said sum to be 
expended under the direction of the chief of the fire department. 

Passed June 10, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating money for the use and encourage- 
ment OF THE MILITIA. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated for the use of Company C, First Regiment, N. H. N. G., the 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 23 

sum of one hundred dollars ($100) for the use of Company E, First 
Regiment, N. H. N. G., and the sum of fifty dollars ($50) for the use of 
the Hospital Corps, being the military organizations now stationed at 
the State Armory in the city of Concord ; and that these several amounts 
be paid to the commanding officers of these respective organizations at 
any time after the passage of this resolution. 
Passed June 10, 1912. 



A Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 

SEVENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed seventy-five thousand dollars 
($75,000), for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the year 1912, 
upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall determine. 

Passed June 19, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating two hundred twenty dollars and 

FORTY CENTS TO PAY THE VERDICT AND COSTS IN THE SUIT OF GRACE 
O. DUTTON V. CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred twenty dollars and forty cents be, and 
hereby is, appropriated out of money in the treasmy not otherwise 
appropriated to pay the verdict and costs in the case of Grace O. Dutton 
v. City of Concord. 

Passed June 19, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars 

FOR THE SUPPORT OF CITY POOR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated for the support of City Poor. 

Passed July 8, 1912. 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars 

FOR PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for printing and stationery. 

Passed July 8, 1912. 



A Resolution authorizing the withdrawal of the gas complaint. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the Concord Light & Power Company has satis- 
fied this Board that said company will reduce the price of gas in the 
city of Concord five cents per one thousand feet commencing August 
1, 1912, and 

Sect. 2. That the city solicitor be, and hereby is, instructed to 
withdraw the complaint of this Board against said company from the 
Public Service Commission, upon the taking effect of such reduction. 

Passed July 29, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating money for soucook cemetery fence. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred fifty dollars ($250) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for repairing the old fence and the building of a new fence 
around the plot recently added to Soucook Cemetery, and that Nahum 
Prescott, undertaker of said cemetery, be authorized to expend said 
sum. 

Passed August 12, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating the sum of three thousand dollars 

FOR INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed August 12, 1912. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 25 

A Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 

TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Committee of Finance are hereby authorized to borrow 
on the credit of the city a sum not to exceed twenty-five thousand 
dollars ($25,000) for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for 
the year 1912, upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee 
shall determine. 

Passed September 21, 1912. 



A Resolution authorizing the board of public works to inves- 
tigate THE SUBJECT OF STREET LIGHTING. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Board of Public Works are hereby authorized and instructed 
to investigate the subject of street lighting and for that purpose to 
visit some other city and such actual expense as may be necessary to 
reasonably investigate the subject be paid out of the appropriation 
for incidentals and land damages when approved by the mayor. 

Passed October 9, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating three hundred dollars for the 

PURCHASE OF THE OLD QUAKER CEMETERY LOT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) be, 
and the same is hereby, appropriated out of money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for the purpose of purchasing the old 
Quaker cemetery lot, so-called, adjoining the Minot enclosure in the 
OldiNrorth Cemetery. 

Sect. 2. That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to purchase 
said lot in the name of the city after the title has been approved by the 
city solicitor. 

Passed October 14, 1912. 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution appropriating money for repairs at millville 

CEMETERY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of fifty dollars ($50) be, and the same hereby is, appro- 
priated for painting fence and buildings connected with Millville Ceme- 
tery; the same to be charged to the account of incidentals and land 



Passed October 14, 1912. 



A Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not to exceed 

TWENTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance are hereby authorized to borrow 
on the credit of the city a sum not to exceed twenty-five thousand 
dollars ($25,000) for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the 
year 1912, upon such terms and for such amounts as the Committee 
shall determine. 

Passed October 14, 1912. 



A Resolution exempting the brampton woolen company from 

TAXATION ON NEW CAPITAL. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

\ Whereas, It is represented that the Brampton Woolen Company 
proposes to operate the plant formerly operated by the Concord Man- 
ufacturing Company in Penacook, so-called, in the City of Concord, 
and proposes to install new machinery and appliances and to build 
such additions as may be necessary, and thus put said plant into first 
class operating condition, and 

Whereas, It is believed that these additions and improvements will 
be of especial benefit to this City and the citizens thereof: now, there- 
fore, 

Voted, that said The Brampton Woolen Company be, and hereby 
is, exempted from taxation for a period of five years from the date of 
the passage of this resolution upon the new machinery, fixtures, stock 
and new construction to be installed by it and upon any new and addi- 
tional capital invested in said plant. 

Passed November 11, 1912. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 27 

A Resolution authorizing the board of public works to nego- 
tiate THE TERMS OF A LIGHTING CONTRACT WITH THE CONCORD 
LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Board of Public Works is hereby constituted a committee 
with power to negotiate the terms of a contract with the Concord 
Light and Power Company for the lighting of the streets of the City 
by gas lights, the terms of said contract to be submitted to and passed 
upon by the full Board. 

Passed December 9, 1912. 



A Resolution authorizing the board of public works to nego- 
tiate THE TERMS OF A LIGHTING CONTRACT WITH THE CONCORD 
ELECTRIC COMPANY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Board of Public Works is hereby constituted a committee 
with power to negotiate the terms of a contract with the Concord Elec- 
tric Company for the lighting of the streets of the City by electric 
lights, the terms of said contract to be submitted to and passed upon 
by the full Board. 

Passed December 9, 1912. 



A Resolution providing for the acceptance of a plot of land 

ON KIMBALL STREET FOR HIGHWAY PURPOSES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That a plot of land on Kimball Street offered by Patrick McCann 
be, and the same is hereby, accepted for highway purposes. 
Passed December 9, 1912. 



A Resolution providing for an investigation of the police 

DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That in view of the fact that certain criticisms have been made by 
citizens of the city concerning certain members of the police department 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

with respect to their conduct in recovering the body of a person recently 
drowned in Horse Shoe Pond, so-called, a special committee of three 
aldermen be appointed by the mayor to inquire into the facts sur- 
rounding said incident and to report its conclusions to this board with 
recommendations as to the action which should be taken. 
Passed December 9, 1912. 



A Resolution exempting the new England box company from 

TAXES DURING A PERIOD OF TEN YEARS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Whereas the New England Box Company, incorporated under the 
laws of the State of Maine, desires to locate its factory and carry on 
its business in the City of Concord, provided sufficient inducements 
are given it by the city government: 

That if the New England Box Company will locate and establish 
its business in this city and will expend not less than $50,000, in the 
erection of a factory to carry on said business, said factory and the real 
estate upon which the same is located and the machinery therein and 
the capital necessary in conducting said business shall be exempted 
from all taxation for a period of ten years from April 1, 1913. 

Passed December 16, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating the sum of three hundred and 

NINETY-TWO DOLLARS AND FORTY-THREE CENTS TO REIMBURSE 
THE MANCHESTER TRACTION, LIGHT AND POWER COMPANY AND 
CHARLES L. WALLACE FOR TAXES ERRONEOUSLY ASSESSED. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred and ninety-two dollars and forty- 
three cents be, and the same is hereby appropriated, to reimburse the 
Manchester Traction, Light and Power Company $390.00, taxes for 
the year 1912, and Charles L. Wallace $2.43 taxes for the year 1911, 
the same having been erroneously assessed. The same to be charged 
to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed December 30, 1912. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 29 

A Resolution authorizing the mayor to sign the lighting 

CONTRACT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to sign in the name of 
the City a contract, for lighting the streets of the city, with the Concord 
Electric Company, said contract to embody all the terms and conditions 
agreed upon by and between said company and the Board of Public 
Works in the name of the city. 

Passed December 30, 1912. 



A Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the 

SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1 . That the sum of eight thousand seventeen and forty one 
hundredths dollars be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay outstanding claims as 
follows: 

City poor $485.90 

Fire department 1,492 . 95 

Incidentals and land damages 1,512 . 21 

Interest, cemetery trust funds 56 . 53 

Interests, temporary loans 1,774 . 65 

Police and watch 1,607.00 

Printing and stationery 741 . 42 

Old Fort cemetery 3 . 72 

Soucook cemetery .02 

Salaries 343 .00 



$8,017.40 

Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sewers 
for the year 1912, the sum of forty-six and ninety-five one hundredths 
dollars ($46.95) the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for gar- 
bage the sum of seventy-one dollars ($71.00), the same being the 
earnings of this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sprink- 
ling the sum of thirty-four cents ($0.34) the sum being the earnings of 
this department. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 13, 1913. 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution to exempt the matson machine company from 

TAXATION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the real estate, machinery, capital invested by Matson Brothers 
in certain property known as the "Old Prison Shops," situated in said 
Concord between Beacon and Tremont streets, is hereby exempt from 
taxation for the term of ten years from the date of the passage of this 
resolution. 

Passed January 13, 1913. 



A Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and 

BINDING THE ANNUAL CITY REPORTS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 
proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1912, 
and submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full 
power to act in the matter. 

Passed January 13, 1913. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1912. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 
MAYOR. 

Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

HON. CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

Office: City Hall, Room 4. 
I 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per annum, 
with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts and Claims. 

Aldermen-at-Large. 

Term Expires January, 1914. 

OLA ANDERSON, 256 North State Street 

ELMER H. FARRAR, 78 South State Street 

RICHARD. A BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

Term Expires January, 1916. 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, Penacook 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 81 School Street 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward Aldermen. 

Term Expires January, 1914. 

Ward 1— WILLIAM H. McGIRR. 
Ward 2— FRED S. FARNUM. 
Ward 3— MATHEW H. PEABODY. 
Ward 4— CHARLIE A. BARTLETT. 
Ward 5— AUGUSTINE R. AYERS. 
Ward 6— HENRY O. POWELL. 
Ward 7— ARISTIDE L. PELISSIER. 
Ward 8— MICHAEL J. LEE. 
Ward 9— EUGENE J. O'NEIL. 



CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

OLA ANDERSON, Term expires January, 1914 

ELMER H. FARRAR, 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Clerk 

Salary, $100 per annum. 



1914 
1914 
1916 
1916 
1916 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 33 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Peabody, Blackwood, O'Neil. 
On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Powell, Hobbs, Pelissier. 
On Elections and Returns — Aldermen Lee, Brown, Farnum. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Powell, Ayers, Anderson. 
On Finance — 

The Mayor; Aldermen Blackwood, Peabody, 
Bartlett, Hobbs. 
On Fire Department — Aldermen McGirr, Farrar, Pelissier. 
On Lands and Buildings — Aldermen Lee, Davis, Farnum. 
On Police and License— r 

Aldermen Anderson, McGirr, Brown, 
On Public Instruction — Aldermen Bartlett, Ayers, O'Neil. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance of the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $250 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,600 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $900 per annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 

3 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to satis- 
faction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of first $60,000; seven and 
one-half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

SETH R. DOLE. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $750 per annum. Clerk, $1,500 per annum. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1916 

JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1914 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1918 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salary, $1,600. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,400 per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $450 per annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 35 

ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $50 per annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $500 per annum. 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward 1— WILLIAM H. McGIRR, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 2— FRED S. FARNUM, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards, 8, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9— HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,000 per annum, fixed by Board of 

Aldermen. 

GEORGE M. FLETCHER. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $2 per day of actual service. 

BENJAMIN W. COUCH. 



36 CITY OF CONCORB. 

CLERK OF POLICE COURT. 

Appointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by the Legislature. 

RUFUS H. BAKER, 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required 
Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

CHARLES H. ROWE. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Term, 
unlimited. Salary, $2.50 per day for first year, and $2.70 per day thereafter. 

Victor I. Moore, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $1,050 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant, 

Salary, $2.75 per day. 

Samuel L. Batchelder, Elmer J. Brown, 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

Albert W. Braley, Edward J. McGirr, 

George H. Silsby, Joseph E. Silva, 

Harry L. Woodward, Fred N. Marden. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



37 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 



Thomas 
O. H. Bean, 
W. A. Little, 
George G. Allen, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
Charles H. Guilbault, 
James Hepson, 
Jonas Welcome. 



Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 
Charles E. Kelley, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
Harry F. Jones, 
George E. Drury, 
Walter H. Beane, 
Nelson Forrest, 
Clark D. Stevens. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by Police Commissioners. Salary, $2.50 each per day of actual service. 



Almah C. Leavitt, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowell, 
Joseph C. Eaton, 
Alphonso Venne, 
Edward M. Nason, 
William H. Hammond, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Charles Ada, 
George L. Danforth, 
Arthur J. Taylor, 
Alfred H. Walker, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Ira C. Phillips, 



W. H. Meserve, 
Moses T. Rowell, 
Frank W. Johnson, 
Judson F. Hoit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Milton Colby, 
Asbury F. Tandy, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor, 
John G. Solchow, 
Clarence W. Brown, 
John McGirr, 
Edward H. Smart, 
Charles W. Hall, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
Willie Flanders. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

JOHN P. PAIGE. 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, none. 

Ward 1— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 2— CHARLES E. STANIELS. 
Ward 3— PAUL R. HOLDEN. 
Ward 4— FRANK W. ROLLINS. 
Ward 5— AMOS J. SHURTLEFF. 
Ward 6— REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward 8— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward 9— GEORGE V. HILL. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $500 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Fowler Library Building. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



39 



CITY WATER WORKS. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

SOLON A. CARTER, Term expires March 31, 1913 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, " " " 1914 

N. E. MARTIN, " " " 1914 

H. H. DUDLEY, " " " 1914 

EDSON J. HILL, " " " 1915 

G. D. B. PRESCOTT, " " " 1915 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, " " " 1916 

H. C. HOLBROOK, " " " 1916 

President — Solon A. Carter. 
Clerk — Edson J. Hill. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 



Appointed by Board of Water "Commissioners. Salary $1,600 per annum. Term 

unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,250 per annum and 

rent of house. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $125 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
JOHN J. McNULTY.* 
SYLVESTER T. FORD.** 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $25 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 

Salary, $20 per annum. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 

Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $75 per annum. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 



* Resigned May 1, 1912. 

** Elected to fill vacancy May 13, 1912. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 41 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

P. C. WHITE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 

Salary, $200 per annum. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Aider- 
men. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio. 
DR. FRED A. SPRAGUE. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each birth, 
marriage and death received, recorded and returned to the State Registrar. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



42 *CITY OF CONCORD. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 

No salary. 

WILL B. HOWE, City Engineer 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief of the Fire Department 
PERCY R. SANDERS, Supt. of the Water- Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years by Major, subject to confirma- 
tion by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, Term expires January, 1913 

GARDNER B. EMMONS, " " " 1913 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, " " " 1914 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, " " " 1914 

BEN C. WHITE, " " " 1915 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, " " " 1915 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7, consolidated) 
appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confirmation 
by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, Term expires January, 1913 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, " " " 1914 

D. WARREN FOX, " " " 1915 

Ward 2. 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, Term expires January, 1913 

SCOTT FRENCH, " " " 1914 

HENRY A. COLBY, " " " 1915 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



43 



Ward 3. 

JAMES M. CROSSMAN, Term expires January, 1913 

GEORGE R, PARMENTER, " " " 1914 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, " " " 1915 

Ward 7. 
ALBERT S. TRASK. Term expires January, 1913 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, "' " " 1914 

ISAAC N, ABBOTT,* " " " 1915 

J. NEWTON ABBOTT,** " " " 1915 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 



For Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, Term expires March, 1913 

FRANK P. ANDREWS, " " " 1913 

CHARLES G. REMICK, " " " 1914 

FRANK J. BATCHELDER, " " " 1914 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, " " " 1915 

JAMES C. NORRIS, " " u 1915 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

EDWARD A. MOULTON. 



* Died February 2, 1912. 

** Appointed to fill vacancy. February 12, 1912. 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
LOUIS A. LANE, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS, 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 45 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 



IRVING T. CHESLEY,' 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
GILES WHEELER. 



* POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents each for all other 
creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, for sealing each scale beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, and for each 
measure, 10 cents; five or more to one person, half price — paid by owners of scales or 
measures. 

EDWARD K. GOVE. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



4G 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; 
butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — paid by party for 
whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

m 
Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder 
men. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring service. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Thomas Hill, 
John H. Mercer, 
Everett L. Davis, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 
C. W. Flanders, 
James F. Fitzgerald, 
Edward W. Brockway, 
John H. Flanders, 
C. W. Hazelton, 
Hiram Brown, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Fred H. Perley, 
Amos J. Peaslee, 
William Goodwin, 
Mark M. Blanch ard, 
Lurman R. Goodrich, 
James H. Harrington, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Joseph Robarge, 
Charles E. Hardy, 
William F. Cheever, 
Alphonse King, 

William 



Seth R. Dole, 
Arthur N. Day, 
William H. Meserve, 
John E. Rossell, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 
William J. Mullen, 
Elmer E. Young, 
Henry A. Borwn, 
Milo G. Davis, 
Fred F. Tucker, 

F. H. Smith, 
Fred A. Barker, 
Hamilton C. Morgan, 
James B. Riley, 

G. N. Hills, 
Charles E. Cook, 
S. D. Walker, 
Ernest F. Carr, 
Charles Peaslee, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brown 
Oliver Armstrong 
Galen W. Hunter 

F. Cutting. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 47 

CITY WEIGHER. 
EDWARD K. GOVE. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 

Edward A. Moulton, George Griffin, 

George Abbott, Jr. Fred Rollins, 

Charles F. Mudgett, Moses E. Haines, 

Timothy P. Sullivan. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 

Fred L. Plummer, Charles L. Fellows, 

Stephen H. Swain, William Rowell, 

Timothy P. Sullivan, Henry Morrill. 



SURVEYOR OF STONE. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 

Timothy Sullivan. 



48 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M; boards and 
timber, 16 cents per M; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents 
per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Jonathan B. Weeks, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert O. Preston, 
William A. Chesley, 
Alfred Clark, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Smith, 
Clinton Os Partridge, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hay ward, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus 0. Clark, 
Silas Wiggin, 
Edward Stevens, 
Daniel Griffiths, 
W. F. Hayward, 
F. E. Frost, 
Walter J. Sanborn, 
Leonard H. Smith, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
John Q. Woods, 



Frank E. Dimond, 
Albert O. Preston, 
Arthur E. Maxam, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Martin E. Kernia, 
E. A. Cole, 
William E. Virgin, 
William H. Gay, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Edward Runnels, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
Crosby A. Sanborn, 
Herbert M. Danforth, 
Hiram W. Drouin, 
W. F. Frost, 
George Sanborn, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
E. F. Miller, 
George Oakley, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Walter F. Hayward. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



49 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Miles F. Farmer, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
George S. Milton, 
Michael J. Lee, 
B. Frank Varney, 
John E. Frye, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Robbins, 
William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
John Sweeney, 
Charles L. Fellows, 
John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe, 
Henry P. Cilley, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Edward H. Donovan, 
Ned J. Morrill. 



William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Seth R. Hood, 
Albert S. Trask, 
William L. Regan, 
Frederick T. Converse, 
Charles W. Bateman, . 
Benjamin H. Orr, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
George W. Chesley, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
F. F. Converse, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Alex Ralph, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Philip King, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Henry Morrill, 
Frederick E. Gilford. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 

No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio, 
WILL B. HOWE, ex-officio, 
HARRIS S. PARMENTER. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK LISTS. 

Ward 1— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
BERNARD J. FERRIN, 
WILLIAM S. HOLLAND. 

Ward 2— FREEMAN F. POTTER, 
C. E. ROBINSON, 
WALTER C. SANBORN. 

Ward 5— JOHN M. HILAND, 

EDWARD P. ROBINSON, 
J. ARTHUR SWENSON. 

Ward 4— HARRY H. KENNEDY, 
J. WESLEY PLUMMER, 
EBEN M. WILLIS. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
ARTHUR P. MORRILL, 
JOHN W. WOOD WORTH. 

Ward <?— WARREN E. EMERSON, 
WALTER WILLIAMSON, 
J. EDWARD MORRISON. 

Ward 7— HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
WALTER H. BEANE, 
FRED P. CLEMENT. 

Ward 8— WILLIAM L. REAGAN, 

CORNELIUS McCORMICK, 
THOMAS P. HIGGINS. 

Ward 9— ANDREW E. SALTMARSH, 
MARCUS V. BOURNE, 
JAMES J. REEN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 51 

WARD CLERKS. 

Ward 1— JAMES W. GAHAGAN. 
Ward 2— RALPH L. STEARNS. 
Ward S~ ERVIN E. WEBBER. 
Ward 4— LOUIS P. ELKINS. 
Ward 5— GEORGE* E. CHESLEY. 
Ward <?— EDWARD J. LEARY. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE 
Ward 8— TIMOTHY W. DONOHOE. 
Ward 9— JAMES W. KENNEY. 

MODERATORS. 
Ward 1— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward £— HERBERT L. KNOWLES. 
Ward 3— CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
Ward 4— ALLEN HOLLIS. 
Ward 5— EDWARD C. NILES. 
Ward 5— CHARLES DUNCAN. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON 
Ward 8— MICHAEL MULCAHY. 
Ward 9— BARTHOLOMEW COLLINS 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 1853, and 
until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor has been elected 
for two years at each biennial election in November. Under the City Charter, adopted 
May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in December, 1910, for one year, and biennially 
thereafter in November, beginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853-'54. 

" RUFUS CLEMENT,* '55. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856-'57-'58. 

" MOSES T. WILLARD, 1859-'60. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861-'62. 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863-'64. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1866-'67. 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868-'69. 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870-71. 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 1872-73-74-75. 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876-77. 

" HORACE A. BROWN,| 1878-79-'80. 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,t 1880-'81-'82. 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883-'84-'85-'86. 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887-'88. 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889-'90. 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891-'92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893-'94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895-'96. 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897-'98. 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901-'02. 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903-'08. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 
t Term closed in November, 1880. 
t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 1912-1913. 



OFFICERS. 



Hon. Harry H. Dudley 
Mrs. Alice M. Nims . 



President. 
Secretary. 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 



1913. 



Hon. George H. Moses, 
Mrs. Alice M. Nims, 
Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 



1914. 



Dr. Dennis E. Sullivan, 
Mrs. Fanny E. Minot, 
Mr. Omar S. Swenson, 



1915. 



William H. Sawyer, Esq., 
Miss Carrie E. Evans, 
Edward C. Niles, Esq., 



80 Centre Street 

5 Blake Street 

89 North State Street 



7 North State Street 

23 South State Street 

14 Auburn Street 



105 North State Street 

14 Maple Street 

119 School Street 



56 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

FINANCE. 

Mr. Dudley. Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Niles. 



Mr. Moses. 



high school. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Niles. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



grammar schools. 
Mr. Moses. 



Mrs. Nims. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



primary school. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Niles. 



Mrs. Nims. 



KINDERGARTENS. 

Miss Evans. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Swenson. Mr. Dudley. Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



discipline. 
Miss Evans. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



HYGIENE. 

Miss Evans. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Swenson. 



MANUAL TRAINING. 

Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Moses. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



57 



Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Minot. Miss Evans. Mrs. Nims. 



Mr. Swenson. 



MUSIC. 

Miss Evans. 



Mr. Moses. 



Mrs. Minot. 



drawing. 
Mr. Sawyer. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



text-books. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



Mrs. Nims. 



training school. 
Mr. Niles. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



night school. 
Dr. Sullivan. Miss Evans. Mr. Dudley. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINAN- 
CIAL AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett. 

3 Pine Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours : 8 to 9 a. m., school clays. Office open 8 a. m. to 12 m. 
1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

George Natt Fellows. 

8 Warren Street. Parker School. 

Office hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLERK. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 

4 Rockingham Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 

Office hours: 8 a. m. to 12 m., 1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Elizabeth Maria Murphy. 

442 North State Street, West Concord, N. H. 

Office, Supt. of Schools, Parker School. 

Office Hours: 4 to 5 p. in., Mondays and Thursdays. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

John B. Abbott Moderator. 

Louis C. Merrill Clerk. 

Henry H. Metcalf, John P. George . . Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCA- 
TION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
MARCH 14, 1913. 



Concoed, N. H., March 3, 1913. 

To the Citizens of Union School District: 

The Board of Education of Union School District hereby 
presents its fifty-third annual report. It gives the Board 
pleasure in stating that the schools of Union School 
District have been maintained during the year with effi- 
ciency and the results obtained have, as a rule, proved 
satisfactory to all concerned. 

It is with expression of deepest regret that the School 
Board loses this year, by the resignation of Dr. Vannevar, 
a most valuable member, who served the Board as its 
President, was always wise, in counsel and had a warm 
personal interest in helping to advance modern conditions 
for the schools of the city. On the resignation of Dr. 
Vannevar the Board elected Hon. George H. Moses to 
fill the vacancy. 

The interest in the Manual Training School is still 
increasing and we feel that this branch of our school system 
is working out successfully, with results that are highly 
appreciated by the parent and pupil. The report of 
Principal French you will find of interest and we feel that 
the recommendations made by him should have careful 
consideration. 

The new system of grading and promotion suggested by 
Superintendent Rundlett and put in operation by him, 
with the approval of the Board, is proving satisfactory 
and Superintendent Rundlett is deserving of much credit 
for working out so commendable a system, which is attract- 



60 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ing the attention of noted educators, and the plan ha& 
received much favorable comment from them. 

The Board is confronted this year with the problem — 
what shall be done with the Merrimack school? This is 
the oldest school building in the district and has become 
antiquated and out of date and, in the Board's opinion, 
wholly unfit to be used longer as a school building. There 
has recently been presented to the Board a petition signed 
by a large number of taxpayers and residents, requesting 
the Board to give their earnest attention to the matter 
of providing a sanitary and safe school building for pupils 
attending the Merrimack school. The Board of Educa- 
tion fully realizes the unfavorable condition of the Merri- 
mack school and feels it their duty to recommend to the 
voters of Union School District, at the coming annual 
meeting, the appropriation of a sum large enough to build 
a school building that will take care of all pupils now at- 
tending the Merrimack school, and also care for children 
attending school from the section of the city north of the 
Merrimack school for years to come. 

We invite your careful attention to the report of the 
superintendent and other reports, which we feel you will 
find of interest. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
ALICE M. NIMS, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
WILLIAM H. SAWYER, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
EDWARD C. NILES, 
D. E. SULLIVAN. 

Board of Education.. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 
AND REPAIRS. 



Concord, N. H., March 3, 1913. 
To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

We respectfully submit the following report showing 
how the money appropriated for repairs to school buildings 
has been expended; and also containing suggestions for the 
coming year. 

The work of more than ordinary nature may be summed 
up as follows: A new heating and ventilating plant was 
installed in the Penacook building during last summer. 
The contractors were the Stone-Underhill Company of 
Boston. This has worked satisfactorily in all respects. 

A new tubular boiler was installed in the Chandler 
school to take the place of the old one. The contractors 
were the Lee Brothers Company. The boiler built accord- 
ing to specifications required by the Fidelity and Casualty 
Company is one of the very best. 

The Eastman school was fitted up with metal weather 
strips. This resulted in a decreased consumption of coal. 

After deliberation it was decided to defer the installation 
of a new heating and ventilating plant in the Merrimack 
building until after the annual meeting in March. 

The Bow Brook building was sold by public auction on 
March 16, 1912, for the sum of $1325. In addition to 
this amount about $80 was realized from the sale of old 
iron, etc., which had been housed there. 

All the pupils' desks and chairs of the Parker and Walker 
schools have been repaired and refinished. 

New forges, lights, and electric ventilating apparatus 
for the forge room were put into the Morrill Manual Train- 
ing school. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

We believe the interests of the North End would be sub- 
served best by the erection of one building on the site 
of the Wal'ker School sufficient to accommodate about 
five hundred pupils. If such a place were in operation 
now the current expense would be decreased annually by 
at least fifteen hundred dollars. This sum would pay the 
interest on any bond issue that would have to be made. 
The Merrimack building is old, ill-lighted and in many 
respects unsafe. The lot is not well suited for the erection 
of any school building the yard room being too sloping 
and small. The west light at all times, especially in the 
afternoon, is unfitted for and injurious to the eyesight of 
pupils closely applied to study. The cost of putting in an 
efficient heating and ventilating plant would amount to 
more than the building would bring by public auction. 

The buildings of the district are in quite good repair. 
The interior of the new High school building should be 
refinished during the coming summer. "This includes 
kalsomining the ceilings and painting the walls. 

Detailed Report of Repairs Made. 
Cogswell School. 

Concrete around the building renewed. Two new Webb 
fountains for basement. Ceilings of both rooms kalso- 
mined. Bulkhead repaired. Basement floors concreted. 
Basement walls whitewashed. 

Penacook School. 

New flag-pole. New curtains for two rooms. Two new 
Webb fountains. New heating and ventilating system 
installed. New windows at head of each stairway to base- 
ment. Concrete around building renewed. Blackboards 
repaired. Flush tank relined. 

Dewey School. 

Furnaces cleaned and repaired. Outside doors varnished. 
Flag-pole painted. Teacher's desk refinished. Concrete 



SCHOOL REPORT. 63 

around building repaired. Tables scraped and varnished. 
Chimney cap repaired. 

Walker School. 

Furnaces cleaned and repaired. Pupils' desks and chairs 
in three rooms repaired and refinished, also all teachers' 
desks and chairs. Roof repaired. 

Franklin School. 

Fence repaired. Furnaces cleaned and repaired. Con- 
crete around building repaired. Basement walls whitened. 
Basement floor concreted. 

Kimball School. 

New windows for basement. New shelves for book- 
room. Basement floors patched and concreted. New 
gutters on roof. Basement walls whitewashed. 

Rvmford School. 

New interior for hall furnace. Water gauge repaired. 
New lead for feed pipe. Curtains for various rooms. Base- 
ment floors concreted. Basement walls whitened. 

Merrimack School. 

Ceilings repaired. Furnaces and ventilating shaft re- 
paired. Slate on roof repaired. Flush box repaired. 

Parker School. 

New treads for east stairway. Pupils desks and tablet 
chairs refinished. Basement floors concreted. Basement 
walls whitened. Woodwork in lower halls and entries 
varnished. New tables for sewing room. East side of 
yard regraded. Front doors varnished two coats. New 
W T ebb drinking fountain. Manhole and trap packed. 
New pump for boiler. 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Tahanto School. 
Furnaces cleaned and repaired. 

Harriet P. Dame School. 

Window sash and plastering in lower hall repaired. Fur- 
naces cleaned and repaired. Woodwork of basement 
painted. 

Garrison School. 

Teacher's desk refinished. Furnaces cleaned. Glass re- 
set. New lights installed for night school. 

Eastman School. 

Furnaces cleaned and repaired. Plastering and brick- 
work of building repaired. 'Chimneys built over on out- 
side. Chamberlin Metal Weather Strips for entire build- 
ing. Doors and locks repaired. 

Chandler School. 

New boiler. Water pipes in basement repaired. New 
main water pipes from building to street. Yard regraded. 
Basement floors concreted. 

High School. 

Fence painted. Outside doors varnished. Fire-boxes 
to boiler repaired. Basement floors concreted. Basement 
walls whitewashed. New lights for one room in basement. 

Morrill School. 

New forges installed. New electric ventilating appa- 
ratus for forge room. New lights for different rooms. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OMAR S. SWENSON, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
D. E. SULLIVAN, 
Committee on Buildings and Repairs. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

Ladies and Gentlemen: — The addition of another 
year to the history of the schools of this district affords 
me the privilege of submitting my twenty-eighth annual 
report, the fifty-third of its series. Inasmuch as the report 
of last fall is printed in this volume under Appendix I and 
gives essentially the condition of the regular schools at the 
present time, the greater part of this report will be devoted 
to special interests. I invite your careful reading of the mat- 
ter contained in the appendices. 

School Attendance. 

Thus far no problems of congested attendance have been 
presented that cannot be solved satisfactorily. The high 
school enrollment is phenomenally large, having reached 
six hundred forty-eight pupils during the last semester, or 
one hundred forty-eight more than the high school building 
can accommodate. The number enrolled in the four-year 
course is 211 per cent, more than in 1905, and 27 per cent, 
more than in 1910 when the reorganization scheme began. 
The number enrolled in the five-year course has increased 
31.9 per cent, since 1910. The forecast for next September 
is about the same as the present enrollment. 

Comparative Table. 

1911. 1912. Increase. Decrease. 

Number of pupils in the public schools 2,844 2,826 18 

parochial schools 711 728 17 

" private schools 63 75 12 

" night schools 109 126 17 

" industrial schools 10 ' 20 10 

Totals 3,737 3,775 56 18 

Net increase 38 

PUBLIC DAY SCHOOLS. 

Number of pupils in high school 829 867 38 

" elementary schools 1,727 1,720 7 

" kindergartens 278 219 59 

" industrial schools 10 20 10 

Totals 2,844 2,826 48 66 

Net decrease 18 



66 CITY OF CONCORD. 

NIGHT SCHOOLS. 

Number of pupils enrolled (male) 94 103 9 

(female) 15 23 8 

Totals 109 126 17 

Net increase 17 

Manual Training. 

The department of manual training has made steady 
progress in pupil enrollment as well as in the amount and 
quality of the work done. Methods of instruction and the 
details of the courses have been improved. The school 
has lost, by resignation, the services of Mr. Ira E. Brock 
and Mr. Joseph H. Barber, and by death, Mr. Edward F. 
Gordon. Mr. Gordon had been identified with this school 
from its early days and his genial manners and wholesome 
influence will never be forgotten by those whose good fortune 
it was to have known him. 

The principal asks for wood turning lathes and forges in 
addition to those which were furnished last summer. The 
repair work on all machinery is done by the school. The 
annual exhibition was a delight and a revelation to the 
five hundred visitors who attended. During the year 
ending June 14, 1912, over 1,000 models were made by 
pupils from the elementary schools, and over 3,300 drawings 
by high school pupils. Wood-work representing over forty 
pieces now in process of construction includes six library 
tables, one Dutch-seat, five medium cupboards, five book 
cases, three writing desks, two large mission rockers, one 
large side-board and many smaller pieces. In the machine 
department the following are being constructed, four 12- 
horsepower, three 6-horsepower, and one 3-horsepower 
gasolene engines, the best showing ever made in this line. 
There are two printing presses in commission. In the 
first year 45,000 impressions were made, last year 110,000. 
The character of this work is uniformly excellent but its 
chief value is vocational. The district has saved some 
expense, but the outlay is in excess of the saving. The 
expense must be accounted for practically by the benefit 
the work brings to the students who take it and this is very 



SCHOOL REPORT. 67 

considerable. Since the beginning of the industrial classes 
fifty boys have been enrolled. Seventy per cent, of those 
leaving have adopted some mechanical vocation. 

Domestic Arts. 

The new course in Domestic Arts adopted by the Board 
of Education in June, 1912, became operative in September. 
It has for its object the betterment of the home. For a 
number of years we have had instruction in cooking and 
sewing fairly well organized. The technique of the work 
done is first-class, but outside of these two departments 
there has been no well-defined plan to raise the standard of 
the home as a whole. It is admitted on all sides that there 
is great need of this as evidenced by the unusual amount 
of attention given it from the small city to the educational 
department of the United States government. The course 
is five years in length psychologically scheduled to suit the 
conditions prevailing in the adolescent period. It is quite 
well established that the requirements of the classical course 
are not calculated to enable the girl of ordinary ability to 
get the most from her educational life that she ought, and 
as it may be inferred that the large number of girls in school 
will eventually become home makers, it is of moment to the 
public that they be given work which at once combines 
culture and utility. We confidently expect that the course 
now in operation will prove to be such an one. The local 
demand for this work is shown by the fact that in classes 
O and P, representing one year of school, fifty-six girls are 
taking it. A copy of the entire course in detail has been 
submitted to each member of the Board of Education. 
Two full years of the course are now in operation and the 
purpose is to add one year's requirements at a time until 
it is entirely in effect. Mathematics as a requirement is 
omitted after the first year. The course has worked well 
as far as it has been tried except that the classes in cooking 
and sewing have been too large. In one class we have tried 
to carry on the work in cooking with thirty-three pupils, 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

but it could not be done to advantage. Fifteen is a reason- 
able number for a class of this kind. As the course comes 
into operation each successive year it will require additional 
instructors and its success will be measured by their equip- 
ment for the work in hand. These instructors must be 
enthusiastic and prepared to teach the various requirements 
of the course, household sanitation, household mechanical 
appliances, housekeeping accounts, home nursing, house- 
hold design and decoration, appreciation of art, apprecia- 
tion of music, and the ordinary requirements in English for 
secondary schools. They should have a breadth of knowl- 
edge and method that will enable them to arouse and sustain 
an interest in the work that one possessed of mere technical 
knowledge would fail to bring about. Heretofore the money 
spent for secondary instruction has been dominated largely 
by academic requirements but as the secondary school has 
come to represent the demands of ordinary living more and 
more, the expenditure of money for instructors can well be 
guided in part by these demands. It may be of advantage 
for us to review what has been going on for the past ten 
years in regard to the different branches. Taking the 
number of pupils enrolled each year as a base we find the 
following: 

The number of pupils taking Latin since 1905 has 

decreased 30.0% 

The number of pupils taking Greek since 1905 has 

decreased 13.4% 

The number of pupils taking Biology since 1905 has 

decreased 11.6% 

The number of pupils taking French since 1905 has 

increased 18 . 0% 

The number of pupils taking German since 1905 has 

increased 5 . 0% 

The number of pupils taking Wood and Iron Work 

since 1905 has increased 50.3% 

The number of pupils taking Sawing since 1905 

has increased 13.2% 



SCHOOL REPORT. 69 

The number of pupils taking Cooking since 1905 

has increased 27.9% 

This tabulation shows to what extent ideas are changing, 
however much we may regret it, but this change is not with- 
out its great significance. It shows that more pupils are 
staying in school, staying longer and that the number who 
go to school without definite purpose is on the decrease, so 
that the saner adjustment of school courses will eventually 
result in a better education for all. 

Cooking. 

There are 217 pupils enrolled in the cooking classes and 
other branches of domestic science. Better discipline, and 
a more wholesome interest have been manifest than last 
year and the classes have been well taught. Twenty high 
school girls were drilled in setting tables and in serving 
luncheon to demonstrate cooking school methods before 
the Concord Woman's Club. In addition to the course 
requirements the classes in cooking have prepared the 
following: 42 quarts peaches, 57 glasses of jelly, 23 pints 
marmalade, 58 quarts of tomatoes, 6 quarts pickled pears, 
8 quarts piccalilli. In September a special class for girls 
was started in the cooking school under the direction of 
Miss Harrington. The number, limited to six, has held its 
membership full and has done creditable work with the 
limited facilities offered. They have kept housekeeping 
accounts including every item of expenditure of the cooking 
and the industrial classes. They have made caps and towels 
at cost for the cooking classes; caps, aprons, night dresses, 
and simple dresses for themselves. Their household prac- 
tice consists of sweeping, dusting, care of sink, cupboard 
and icebox, and washing windows. They have laundered 
595 towels for the manual training school, three dozen for 
the high school and several dozen for the cooking school. 
In the second semester the time of the cooking teacher was 
so fully occupied as to make it necessary to have one of the 
senior training girls on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The course is now limited to one year. If it is to be 
lengthened into a two years' course more convenient quar- 
ters and an additional teacher much be furnished. In the 
central part of the city no other room is available for this 
work. 

Sewing. 

The most noteworthy changes in this department have 
been the giving up of some seemingly useless work in models 
and devoting more attention to the construction of useful 
articles. The requirements of the domestic arts course are 
of great practical value. In the first year classes M and N, 
127 girls are at work making undergarments. In the high 
school Group I, and Group II (Parker School), 74 girls are 
cutting and making garments. In the elementary schools 
333 girls are constructing models. Many requests come 
from those who wish to work beyond the regular hours 
but the time is all taken and the instructors cannot grant 
them. Miss Stevens having been given a year's leave of 
absence Mrs. Parsons, a former teacher in this school, was 
employed in her place. Miss Mildred Phillips is also 
employed forenoons. The school has been furnished with 
new chairs, a new cutting table, a stand for hanging skirts, 
four new sewing tables, and an additional sewing machine. 

Drawing. 

Although the attention given drawing in the elementary 
schools has been much less than heretofore, the work has 
been done as well as any supervisor could do it with such a 
handicap. It seems to have outgrown the possibility of 
being taught by one person. The time for the high school 
pupils has been taken from the elementary schools. Last 
year visits to these schools were made by the supervisor 
once in every four weeks. This was not a sufficient amount 
of attention, but this year the intervals have been increased 
to six weeks. Six visits a year by the supervisor cannot 
give regular teachers enough help. Next year with the 
addition of two new classes in the high school, this school 



SCHOOL REPORT. 71 

must have at least twenty-one out of thirty periods a week 
making it impossible to allow more than one visit every 
eight weeks to the elementary schools. The only solution 
seems to be the employment of an assistant at a nominal 
sum to do at least a part of the elementary work under 
the direction of the supervisor. The results in drawing for 
the past few years have been more than satisfactory and 
should be kept up to the standard. 

The Dewey Training School. 

This institution is of great value to the district because 
it enables us to have the services of trained teachers who are 
acquainted with our course of study, who have a personal 
and a professional interest in its success, and are not so 
liable to be called away to other cities, home interests 
keeping them here. These young women are trained care- 
fully, conscientiously and with rare judgment. They 
begin to teach, serious minded, as a professional should be 
and generally grow in strength as time goes on. During 
their period of training they render the district valuable 
aid in the various schools by helping deficient and backward 
pupils. They are assigned to those buildings that do not 
have the assistance of a special teacher and their service 
causes no expense to the district save that of their training. 
Valued in dollars and cents for the time given and based 
upon the average salary of special teachers they are saving 
the district at least twelve hundred dollars a year in extra 
help. This is more than it costs to maintain the training 
school. The regular schools in this building are models as 
they should be. A Victor machine was kindly furnished 
by the committee for use in marching and in calisthenics. 
A class in Bancroft's Physical Drill gave an exercise before 
the Merrimack Valley Teachers' Association this winter 
showing to what perfection such work can be brought. 



72 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Music. 

The demands upon the time of Mr. Conant by the domes- 
tic arts course has caused a change in the schedule for the 
elementary schools. The special work in this course began 
in September with thirty-three pupils. Twenty-nine fin- 
ished the work of class O and twenty-seven entered class 
O in January. The pupils are interested and make steady 
progress. The supervisor credits the Parker school and 
the High school with unusual interest. In the former there 
is fine singing, a good orchestra and special "musical hours. " 
In the high school chorus there are 215 pupils, the largest 
in the history of the school. The orchestra is composed 
of eleven pieces, and the double quartette of mixed voices 
is the best that I have ever heard from any school. Their 
efforts, in the Merrimack Valley Teachers' Association and 
before the Concord Woman's Club, merited general praise. 
The instructor sees advancement along all lines but shows 
his progressive spirit by saying that it should be better. I 
believe it would be very difficult to duplicate the training 
which pupils are receiving in music. 

Night Schools. 

Even though extraordinary efforts were made to secure 
an increased enrollment |or the night schools in the city 
proper, only two rooms were opened to accommodate a 
smaller number than last year. For this I have been 
unable to assign any satisfactory cause. The limited 
number whose attendance was regular made quite rapid 
progress in learning to read and talk the English language. 
A longer term would have been welcomed by these people, 
but the meager attendance would not warrant the expense 
of continuing it. 

During the fall term a request was made by residents of 
West Concord for a night school there. This was begun 
November 18, 1912, and continued for nine weeks. The 
total enrollment here was 49, 38 males and 11 females. Of 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



73 



this number 18 were Swedes, 29 Finlanders, 1 Norwegian, 
1 Spaniard. 

Males. Females. Total. 

Whole number attending Parker School, 65 12 77 

Whole number attending Garrison School, 38 11 49 



103 23 

Average membership Parker School, 48.68 

Average membership Garrison School, 33 . 20 



Average daily absence Parker School, 17.90 

Average daily absence Garrison School, 9.05 



Average daily attendance Parker School, 30.74 
Average daily attendance Garrison School, 24.11 

Per cent, of daily attendance Parker School, 61 .00 
Per cent, of daily attendance Garrison School, 72 . 63 



126 



81.88 



26.90 



54.85 



Age of youngest pupil Parker School, 
Age of youngest pupil Garrison School, 
Age of oldest pupil Parker School, 
Age of oldest pupil Garrison School, 
Average age Parker School, 
Average age Garrison School, 



- 66.81 
14 years. 
18 years. 
42 years. 
41 years. 
23 years. 
27 years. 



\ 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



Garrison School — John Anderson, A. Friedland, Emil 
Johnson. 



Swedish, 

Finnish, 

Italian, 

Turkish, 

Norwegian, 



NATIONALITIES. 



29 Armenian, 

34 American, 

8 Albanian, 

10 Greek, 

1 Spanish, 



1 Canadian, 

2 English, 
6 Russian, 

18 Polandish, 
1 



74 city of concord. 

Health in the Schools. 

The good health of the pupils and the instructors is of 
concern to the public, who seem alive to needful measures 
for its protection. The Board of Education is not neglectful 
of this phase of public school work. Through the care of 
the sub-committee on hygiene extraordinary efforts have 
been made to observe methods of improving the sanitary 
conditions of the schools. We have modern methods of 
heating and ventilating the buildings, sanitary drinking 
fountains, individual pencils, paper towels, adjustable fur- 
niture, oiled floors, the proper use of disinfectants, the 
fumigation of school books and supplies, liquid soap, regular 
exercises in calisthenics, and the valuable services of a 
school nurse. It seems as if the germs of contagious disease 
would give up their warfare in the face of this formidable 
array of preventives; on the contrary, only the strict vigi- 
lance of all will protect the pupils from increasing danger. 
Sometime it will dawn upon the people that medical in- 
spection is as needful for the pupils here as it is in other 
cities and let us hope that it will not take a serious epidemic 
and the consequent loss of life to bring this about. 

Quite determined efforts have been made to induce the 
parents to cooperate with the teachers in making children 
observe proper changes in clothing before entering the school 
room and upon leaving it. Attempts have been made also 
to keep the schoolrooms at a lower and more even tem- 
perature. These have aroused some opposition, but it was 
almost always the result of a misunderstanding of the 
nature of the orders given, for when they were explained 
and the motive behind them made known the reasonable 
side of the matter seldom failed to carry conviction. I 
think I may, with propriety, in connection with this topic, 
call your attention to the loss of health and the failure to 
do school work by those children who are unfortunate in 
the use of tobacco. Investigation made recently in one 
western high school reveals the following facts: Twenty- 
seven boys who never smoked averaged 84.5 per cent, in 



SCHOOL REPORT 75 

their studies. Fifty- five habitual smokers in school aver- 
aged 76 per cent. Forty-five habitual smokers who had 
left school recently averaged 69 per cent. -No doubt, that 
during the period of adolescence when the nervous and 
physical organism of children is undergoing a critical 
change, this use of tobacco manifests itself in a loss of 
moral, mental and physical tone resulting in discourage- 
ment and the giving up of school life. The report of Miss 
Murphy, the school nurse, may be found in Appendix I. 

Waste of School Time. 

The misuse of the five hours of school time allotted to 
the pupil daily means the waste of public school revenue 
to a like degree. This waste may be charged up in part 
to lax discipline, absence of rational methods in teaching, 
faulty arrangement of the school program, and bad appor- 
tionment of the work. 

A healthy discipline carries with it a respect for persons 
in authority, polite manners on all occasions, and a whole- 
some school spirit. Such a discipline breeds little discon- 
tent, wrangling, scolding, sarcastic remarks, absence from 
school, tardiness, and does not subordinate exacting work 
to social pleasures. If these several things obtain in any 
school it is at the expense of the continuous waste of school 
money. In time gone by such things as enumerated 
above have been passed over too lightly as being necessary 
evils that attach themselves to the administration of school 
affairs. If by analogy, we carried such judgment to the 
affairs of professional or business life the percentage of 
failures would be increased to great proportions. It is 
likely that this waste caused by lax discipline can never 
be even reasonably computed, but estimate alone should 
cause serious thought to be given to it. 

A study of rational methods in teaching should be a 
requirement for a teacher of any grade. For a number 
of years the elementary teachers and those of the first 
two years of the high school have met in groups for this 



76 CITY OF CONCORD. 

purpose with gratifying results shown in a more reasonable 
discipline, more rational teaching, a more fraternal spirit 
between pupil and teacher, and a school atmosphere 
clarified by the giving up of the educational bigotry which 
distinguished the old time pedagogue. The following table 
will give some idea of the extent of this work. 



School. 


No. meetings 

for the study of 

pedagogy. 


No. works on 
pedagogy stud- 
ied and read. 


No. periodicals 
read. 


High, 





32 


73 


Parker, 


29 


43 


13 


Chandler, 


29 


21 


5 


Walker, 


14 


6 


10 


Garrison, 


19 


11 


13 


Eastman, 


25 


8 


3 


Rumford, 


21 


30 


21 


Kimball, 


21 


19 


14 


Merrimack, 


14 


8 


3 


Penacook, 


12 


11 


7 


Franklin, 


13 


4 


4 


Dewey, 


19 


24 


28 


Harriet P. Dame, 


14 


11 


5 


Cogswell, 


12 


6 


2 


Tahanto, 


11 


3 


3 



It may be of value to note the recent offering of $1,250,000 
by Andrew Carnegie for the advancement of teaching. 
This is called "The Carnegie Foundation for the Advance- 
ment of Teaching." Of the income, $60,000 is to be devoted 
to finding the best known ways of teaching and in experi- 
menting to find still better ways. I beg leave to direct 
your attention to the useless waste of time by boys and 
girls of the Manual Arts and Domestic Arts classes in 
going and coming from their lessons. Assuming that on 
the average each pupil uses ten minutes each way, in a 
week he wastes If hours, in a year 63 hours or two and 
a half weeks of school time. Each girl for two lessons a 
week loses just two fifths of that time. During the last 



SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

semester this loss has been decreased by allowing boys 
of the Parker school to go directly to the Morrill school 
in the morning four days of the week but such an arrange- 
ment could not be made for the girls. I recommend that 
the cooking school of the Chandler building be moved to 
the high school and another smaller equipment be furnished 
the Parker school. This would save the girls of the two 
largest buildings practically all the loss of time now experi- 
enced. It is quite possible that some better arrangement 
may be made for sewing to avoid a similar loss. Much 
scientific thought is now being directed toward the elimi- 
nation of time waste in the school life of the child. It 
has been conclusively demonstrated that private instruc- 
tors can save from three to five years of the ordinary 
school time and it is fair to suppose that even in the public 
school, where mass instruction is a necessity, at least a 
fraction of the time may be saved. In the last twenty- 
eight years the time of doing public school work in this 
city has been reduced from fifteen years to eleven. In 
the country at large from fourteen to twelve. The next 
twenty-five years may bring about still further reduction 
by the elimination of all duplication and by scientific 
management in general. 

Kindergartens. 

The attendance in the kindergartens has been appre- 
ciably larger than last year. They have been conducted 
on about the same plan as heretofore with results to cor- 
respond. In the Garrison and the Tahanto schools the 
scheme of having no regular assistant has been continued. 
Should a commodious building be erected on the Walker 
school lot one large kindergarten would be located here with 
accommodations for the northern part of the city. The 
supervisor has held the usual number of teachers' meetings 
and also has given instruction to one young woman study- 
ing for the profession. 



78 city of concord. 

Notes of the Year. 

Washington's Birthday and Memorial Day were observed 
by the schools as usual. 

Health Day was observed in all the schools by special 
exercises, and the following people kindly offered their 
valuable services: 

High School — Dr. H. H. Amsden. 

Parker School — Dr. Marion L. Bugbee. 

Chandler School— Dr. C. R. Metcalf. 

Rumford School — Mrs. J. M. Fontaine. 

Tahanto, Garrison, Dewey Schools — Miss E. M. Murphy, 
school nurse. 

Merrimack School — Dr. C. M. Duncan. 

Walker School— Mr. W. T. Purrington. 

An exhibition of kindergarten plays, folk lore games, 
and physical drill was given by the consolidated kinder- 
gartens, and the pupils of the Rumford, Kimball, Merri- 
mack and Dewey schools, at White's Park, on Tuesday, 
June 11, 1912, at two o'clock p. m. Over two thousand 
people assembled to see them. The affair reflected great 
credit upon the teachers and pupils who took part. 

The annual exhibition of manual training, sewing, cook- 
ing and drawing showed the same proficiency as in former 
years. 

The usual observances of parents' days have taken place. 

The first parents' night at the Morrill School of Me- 
chanic Arts was held on Thursday, February 27, 1913, at 
the building. Unfortunately the weather was rainy and 
kept away many who otherwise would have come; not- 
withstanding, the attendance was large and appreciative. 

On the afternoon of Friday, February 28, 1913, the girls 
of the high school domestic arts classes and the industrial 
class of the Chandler school representing the cooking 
school taught by Miss Harrington served a luncheon to 
the members of the Concord Woman's Club at their 
rooms in the Parish Memorial House. The place-cards 
and the bon bon boxes were made and decorated by 



SCHOOL REPORT. 79 

pupils of the drawing classes under the direction of Miss 
Stalker. The menus were printed by the pupils of the 
Morrill School of Mechanic Arts, Mr. French instructor. 
The affair was very successful. 

Many teachers have been called from the schools of this 
district to other places. The loss of efficient teachers 
at any time is serious enough, but occurring as it often 
does in the working period of the school year the change 
becomes doubly disastrous to the efficiency of the schools. 
Many places evidently do not allow this variation of con- 
tracts. Other positions made more attractive by larger 
salaries and extended privileges have called away the 
following teachers during the year. 

High School — Miss Helen L. Brown, Miss Grace V. 
Knowles, Mr. Harold C. Bales, Mr. Walter L. Barnum. 

The design on the cover of this report, and that on the 
title page were drawn by Miss Edith Hardy and Miss 
Madeline Gibbs, respectively, of the high school. 

Those of the 1912 report by Miss Ethel Watson and 
Miss Edith Marden. 

i 

Conclusion. 

The mission of a school report would be but half accom- 
plished if it rested with the enumeration of a year's events. 
Its broader field lies in calling attention to the construc- 
tive forces which are to determine the future progress of 
education. The popular conception of education in the 
past has been determined by the measure of book knowl- 
edge, but the present is asking and the future will persist 
in asking, Are public school pupils healthy? Are they 
socially pure? Are they obedient? Are they respectful? 
Are they studious? 

The past has been content to ask of the teachers, that 
they be well equipped for the subjects which they are to 
teach. The present is beginning to ask and the future 
will persist in asking in addition, Have they rational meth- 
ods in teaching? Have they habits to strengthen their 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

pupils by example? Do they give proper attention to the 
individual pupil? Do they have a proper interest in the 
general uplift of the community where they work? All 
these questions vitally concern national life and civic 
welfare. 

The trend of constructive education takes form in the 
following things: Agriculture, vocational subjects, the 
public use of school grounds and buildings, pensions for 
teachers, normal training for teachers, state certification 
of teachers, continuation schools, compulsory school atten- 
dance, technical and industrial education for elementary 
grades, textile schools, etc. 

There is a growing movement for a six-hour day for 
secondary schools, also a strong tendency to reorganize 
school systems upon the three-group plan similar to the 
one in operation here but varying somewhat in detail 
according to the local needs. 

There is more or less talk of a university devoted to the 
training of students for the profession of teaching, and 
already sixteen or more colleges and universities have in- 
stituted departments of education allowing credit toward 
an A.B. degree for proficiency in the study of pedagogy. 

The prevailing system of marking by points is being 
mercilessly assailed and it ought to be. This in connection 
with the abuse of the option privilege is out of temper 
with the American youth in that it sets a false standard 
by the substitution of driving for true teaching, by creating 
an improper attitude toward study, and by subordinating 
mastery of a subject to the attainment of a passing mark. 
Those who defend such a system would do well to read 
Milton's "Letter on Education." 

The character of the work done in our schools is worthy 
of the sanction of all. Its favorable review in different 
parts of the country, the confirmation of its efficiency by 
adoption of methods in use here, and its commendation 
by noted educators in many different localities are all of 
more than passing moment to the city. The consciousness 
of this, however, should not cause us to become satisfied 



SCHOOL REPORT. 81 

with prevailing conditions to the exclusion of attempts 
to improve nor to allow the horizon line of the broader 
education to grow dim; rather should it result in expansion 
regulated by the conservative application of our financial 
resources. 

Constantly reminded of my obligations to you the Board 
of Education, to the loyalty and efficient work of a noble 
corps of teachers, and to a patient, appreciative public, 
I hope the repose of such confidence in me may be partly 
justified by my devotion to the interests of Concord's 
schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 



APPENDIX I. 



APPENDIX I. 



Concord, N. H., September 26, 1912. 
To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

I am submitting for your consideration the second 
annual report of the reorganization scheme put into prac- 
tice two years ago. 

Financial. 

While a financial statement of this kind must involve some 
estimates, there is enough that is definite, however, to give 
it positive value. To enlarge the high school building 
would have required an additional bond issue of at least 
$30,000. The interest on this sum at 3| per cent, would 
have amounted to $1,050 a year. From reliable estimates, 
tabulations of which have been sent to the committee from 
time to time, the district has been saved a current expense 
of at least $5,000 during the two years, and we have been 
enabled to discontinue two rooms which, at the maximum 
salary, would have amounted to $1,300. 

The scheme allows us to charge full high school tuition 
for one year more than under the old plan. In two years 
this has amounted to $459. The doing away with grad- 
uations has saved the parents a sum of money which must 
be arrived at largely by estimate. Basing this upon the 
testimony of teachers, business men, parents, and pupils I 
have no doubt that the saving in two years has amounted 
to at least two thousand dollars, fourteen hundred of which 
could be charged up to high school graduations. 

There are other small miscellaneous expenses for which 
I have given no estimate. Summing up the above we find 
the following: 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Bond issue $30,000 

Interest on same two years at 3| per cent 2,100 

Current expense 3,000 

Rooms discontinued (salaries alone) 1,300 

Additional tuition 459 

Graduation expenses 2,000 

Total $38,859 

The average cost per pupil for the teaching force alone 
has been materially reduced during the last two years as 
may be seen from the following table: 

High Elementary Avpra „ p 

School. Schools. Average. 

1909-1910— (Old Plan)* $33 . 14 $14 . 76 $23 . 95 

1910-1911— (New Plan) 29.28 15.80 22.54 

1911-1912— (New Plan) 26.47 14.09 20.28 

Decrease in the average cost per pupil $3.67. 
The net increase in tuition receipts is shown in the 
following: 

Year. High School. Elementary Schools* 

1909-1910 $1,577.39 $576.66 

1910-1911 1,863.37 453.97 

1911-1912 2,301.31 454.90 

Increase in two years 723 . 92 

Decrease in two years $121 . 76 

Net increase in two years. . . $602. 16 

Of this increase $439 may be set down as additional revenue 
from the increase of $27 per pupil in the additional year of 
the high school course. 

Teachers. 

The teaching force has improved in equipment because 
the high school curricula call for more than ordinary prepar- 
ation. 



* (This year, high school four years and elementary schools eight years.) 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

A college degree is required of all teachers in the four 
highest years except those who were certified for the fresh- 
man class by the state. Hereafter a college degree with 
experience in the grades, or grade experience with extended 
study should be made requirements for those who seek posi- 
tions in the first year of the high school. During the past 
summer vacation three teachers from Concord have taken 
courses in as many different summer schools, connected 
with leading colleges and universities. 

Work of the Schools. 

High School- — Group 1 . 
Classes Q, R, S, T, U, V. 

The number of pupils reported at the end of the year was 
300. 

The number of these attaining a mark of A— or better 
was 14. 

The number of these attaining a mark of B— or better 
was 158. 

The per cent, of the whole number attaining A— or better 
was 4.66. 

The per cent, of the whole number attaining B— or better 
was 52.66. 

The number not promoted was 2.34 per cent, less than 
in 1910 and 1.94 per cent, less than in 1911. 

The number leaving school was 1| per cent, less than 
in 1910 and 3 3-5 per cent, larger than in 1911. 

The number of A— pupils, while showing a gratifying 
gain, still lacks 4 per cent, of reaching the standard of "ten 
per cent, of the number enrolled." 

This standard is not arbitrary, many educators placing 
it much higher. The number of B— pupils showed a re- 
markable increase and is 2.66 per cent, above the standard 
of "fifty per cent, of the number enrolled." 



88 city of concord. 

The Sophomore Class. 

Much interest attaches to the results attained by this 
class because it was the first one of its kind under the new 
scheme and because it was the best prepared freshman class 
that has ever come within my experience. While it did 
not maintain its freshman standard, and this was not 
expected, nevertheless it did show strength by comparison 
and confirmed the impression that the more modern ways 
of conducting recitations are quite superior to those which 
have held sway for half a century and are now slowly falling 
into disuse. This is particularly manifest in the all impor- 
tant matter of arousing an interest in school work which in 
itself means advancement. 

Comparing the yearly record of this class with those of 
the past fifteen years we find the following : 

1897—78 . 80% 1905—79 . 10% 

1898—73.72 1906—77.50 

1899—70.49 1907—74.72 

1900—68.95 1908—77.86 

1901—71.19 1909—77.26 

1902—73.00 1910—75.27 

1903—72.42 1911—76.29 

1904—72.18 1912—76.70 

The general average of the classes for fifteen years is 
74.33 per cent., so that the 1912 class stood 2.37 per cent, 
higher than this average. 

That this class had ability and interest may be shown by 
the fact that for the first two periods it averaged 80.63 
per cent., while after twenty-eight weeks of high school work 
it dropped to 78.52 per cent. 

Class average for the first five weeks was 77 . 17% 

Class average for the second five weeks was 84 . 10 

Class average for the third five weeks was 78 . 46 

Class average for the fourth five weeks was. .. .77.26 



SCHOOL REPORT. 89 

Class average for the fifth five weeks was 78.67% 

Class average for the sixth five weeks was 78 . 37 

Consulting the following table we find that the class stood 
high in the following studies: Latin, Greek, Geometry, 
Biology, Commercial Arithmetic, Drawing, Manual Train- 
ing, Cooking, and Sewing. 

The marks in English, French, and History were not 
good. It is quite possible that much better work could 
have been done in these studies. 

Class average in Latin for the first six periods. . . .80.54% 
Class average in English for the first six periods . . 74 . 97 
Class average in Greek for the first six periods .... 77 . 49 
Class "average in French for the first six periods . . 74 . 80 
Class average in History for the first six periods . . 66 . 94 
Class average in Geometry for the first six periods . . 77 . 43 
Class average in Biology for the first six periods. .85.38 
Class average in Commercial Arithmetic for the 

first six periods 85 . 17 

Class average in Drawing for the first six periods . . 82 . 05 
Class average in Manual Training for the first six 

periods 81 . 17 

Class average in Cooking for the first six periods ... 83 . 85 
Class average in Sewing for the first six periods .... 85 . 30 

In Latin the number of failures (0) was 7.54 per cent, less 
than in 1910 and 8.67 per cent, less than in 1911. 

In English the number of failures (2) was 19-100 per cent, 
larger than in 1910 and 1.86 per cent, less than in 1911. 

In Geometry the number of failures (10) was 4.31 per 
cent, less than in 1910 and 13.56 per cent, less than in 1911. 

In French the number of failures (24) was 10.4 per cent, 
larger than in 1910 and 6.36 per cent, larger than in 1911. 

In Commercial Arithmetic the number of failures (2) 
was 5.68 per cent, less than in 1910 and 21.61 per cent, less 
than in 1911. 



90 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CLASSES Q, R. 





1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


Studies. 


Q..2 


T3 


■a 


^T3 




i 

Ph 


'3 


IN 

Ph*~ 


I 3 


"1 l! 

a '3 

Ph ■ Ch 


Sv 




128 
124 

53 

4 

120 

39 


112 
122 

49 

4 

107 

35 


16 
2 
4 


13 
4 


12.5 
1.61 
7.54 


10.83 
10.25 


115 
109 

35 

6 

121 

42 


90 
105 

32 

6 

103 

31 


25 
4 
3 

18 
11 


21.74 
3.66 
8.57 


14.87 
26.19 


122 
111 

36 

3 

113 

44 


112 10 
109 2 
36! 

31 
89 24 

42 2 


8.19 




1.80 














21.23 




4.54 



Latin. 
This was the first class to take sophomore Latin after a 
year and a half of instruction under the " Morrison Method." 
It would seem that the class was well fitted when we con- 
sider that the classes immediately preceding had been 
handled by a teacher who had specialized in this subject 
and was widely experienced. The average of the class for 
the first two periods was 81.22 per cent. For the last two 
periods it was 79.74 per cent. A poorly fitted class would 
show a reversal. The per cent, of failures was 1\ per cent, 
less than in the class of 1910. The average per cent, of 
sophomore classes since 1907 has been 80.6 per cent. The 
average of this year's class was 79.3 per cent. In this year's 
class no failures were reported. There is no doubt that 
its former standing would have maintained if the method 
of last year had been employed. 

Other classes read the four books of Caesar's Gallic War, 
approximately one third being sight reading. 

This class read the following: 
Sight Reading: two thirds of Nepos, one half of Ovid, and 
many selections from Cicero, Rufus, and 
Csesar. 
Studied Reading: Nepos — Selected Lives of Great Men. 

Ovid — Four Ages and the Flood, Pyramus 
and Thisbe, Philemon and Baucis, 
Orpheus and Eurydice, The Story of 
Midas, Apollo and Daphne. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 91 

Compared with Freshman Record. 

The number who exceeded the freshman standing was 9. 

The number who equalled the freshman standing was 14. 

The number who fell below the freshman standing was 89. 

The number who came reasonably near the freshman 
standing was 58. 

The number who fell unreasonably below the freshman 
standing was 31. 

In the 1911 class there were no A— pupils, in this class 
five. 

In the 1911 class there were twenty-four B— pupils, in 
this class forty-seven. 

As a general conclusion we may safely say that the class 
was one of unusual power and attainments. While its 
sophomore record was creditable, its ability was not realized 
nor its former interest in school work maintained. It may 
be of value also to note the instances of those who have 
entered other secondary and preparatory institutions from 
this class and maintained their freshman standing in the 
sophomore year. 

High School — Group 2 
{Parker School) 

The amount of work done in this school measures up well 
with that of last year in character and amount. The 
per cent, of A— pupils was not as large, one class being 
abnormally slow; however, it exceeds the standard of ten 
per cent, of the number enrolled by 3.79 per cent. The 
per cent, of B— pupils was materially larger than last year 
and exceeds the standard by 18.53 per cent., a record 
achieved in the face of many adverse conditions. 

All the various activities have been carried on as usual 
and the proper amount of interest in school work has been 
shown. 



92 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMPARATIVE TABLE. 





1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


Classes. 


"a. 

3 
P. 

d 


l" 

< 


\ 


-d 
'3 


"3 
o 


'3 

3 
P. 

d 


1* 

<1 


r 


-d 

'3 
fa 


o 

o 

►3 


'3. 

3 
P. 

d 


r 


l" 


•d 

'3 
fa 


o 
o 

►J 


0, P 


143 


3 39 


17 


28 


185 


31 


68 


13 


22 


232 


32 


127 


14 


16 



From this table it may be seen that the 1912 class shows 
superiority in every department. 





1910. 




1911. 




1912. 


Studies. 


n§ 






J 








^ 


jS 






« 




3 

p. 


-a 


T3 




3 
A 


-a 


-a 


oJH 


3 
P. 


T3 


TJ 


g^OJ 




6 






fclS 


d 


i 




fc.2 


d 


3 


03 


fe<2 




S3 


fa 


fa 


fa 


!<5 


fa 


fa 


fa 


!3 


fa 


fa 


fa 





151 


115 


36 


23.84 


182 


167 


15 


8.24 


138* 


133 


5 


3.62 








96 


88 


8 


8.33 


107 


100 


7 


6.54 


83 


82 


1 


1.20 








149 


138 


11 


7.38 


163 


146 


15 


9.20 


137 


135 


2 


1.45 




44 


41 


3 


6.81 


53 


53 








36 


33 


3 


8.33 








| 39 


38 


1 


5.12 


54 


46 


8 


16.66 


43** 


43 








Commercial Geography. . . 


39 1 87 


2 


5.12 


56 


48 


8 


16.66 























(*1910-1911 Algebra.) 

(*1913-Myers' First Year in Mathematics for Secondary School.) 

(**Two subjects taken as one.) 



Freshman Classes. 



The class of 1912 compared with those of 1910 and 1911. 

In Mathematics the number of failures (5) was 20.22 
per cent, less than in 1910 and 4.62 per cent, less than in 
1911. 

In Ancient History the number of failures (1) was 7.13 
per cent, less than in 1910 and 5.34 per cent, less than in 
1911. 

In English the number of failures (2) was 5.93 per cent, 
less than in 1910 and 7.75 per cent, less than in 1911. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



93 



In Latin the nuiriber of failures (3) was 1.52 per cent, 
more than in 1910 and 8.33 per cent, more than in 1911. 

In Commercial History and Geography the number of 
failures (0) was 5.12 per cent, less than in 1910 and 16.66 
per cent, less than in 1911. 

In everything but Latin the showing in one of unques- 
tioned progress. Compared with the 1910 class, the last 
one under the old method, it shows to good advantage. 
Compared with the 1911 class it does not show up well 
because the 1911 class was unusually bright and the 1912 
class very much below the average. 

Group 2. 

{Eastman, Garrison, Walker, Kimball, Chandler and 
Rumford Schools.) 
These schools have been conducted upon the same lines 
as last year but have not held up to the standard. Com- 
pared with the class of 1911 we find that the number of 
A— pupils dropped 4.41 per cent, yet was 35-100 per cent, 
above the standard. The number of B— pupils dropped 
10.87 per cent, and lacked 12.55 per cent, of reaching the 
standard. From the following table one may see where the 
difference occurred. 





Percent. A— Pupils. 


Per cent. B— Pupils. 


School. 


OS 


oa 


i 

c 


eS 

a> 

o 


OS 


c-i 


1 

a 


oj 

03 

s 
Si 

a 




36.3 


12.5 




23.8 


72.7 


62.5 




10.2 






Kimball 


13.8 


5.1 




8.7 


44.4 


17.3 




27.1 








4.3 


5.7 


1.4 




39.1 


20. 




19.1 








0. 


10.5 


10.5 




20. 


15.8 




4.2 








22.2 


13.0 




9.2 


50. 


65.2 


15.2 










7.4 


12.3 


4.9 




45.7 


44.8 




.9 








26.3* 








57.8* 
























14.76 


10.35 




4.71 


48.32 


37.45 




10.87 

























(*No school here 1912.) 



94 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The showing may be due to several causes probably 
largely to abnormally dull pupils centering in these classes 
and in some cases the pupils were not well fitted when they 
entered class M. 

The decrease in the number of B— pupils is of more con- 
cern than the decrease of A— pupils. These schools have 
been conducted without friction and a healthy interest has 
been manifest. The Latin classes were finely fitted and 
individual help was given in all needful cases. There were 
no breaches in discipline reported during the year. 

In General. 

As a general proposition the scheme has surpassed 
expectations. Improvements in some of the groups have 
more than balanced failures in others. More children are 
taking the high school course than ever before, due in no 
small degree, to the fact that under this plan many are 
compelled by law to take the two first years of high school 
course before going to work. This may be seen from the 
following table. 

GROWTH OF HIGH SCHOOL. 



Year. 


"a 
ll 


Total enrollment 
high school. 


Total enrollment 
high school, old 
plan. 


o 

gb o 

Ji-8 

<U >-. 00 


o 

oj3 o 

CU M 03 

Ph 


1912-13 


2,619 
2,574 
2,573 
2,602 
2,638 
2,715 
2,705 
2,612 
2,461 


805 

777 

652 

668* 

651* 

470* 

546* 

452* 

337* 


557 
482 
494 
458 
438 
372 
347 
323 
209 


30.73 
30.18 
25.34 
25.67 
24.67 
17.31 
20.19 
17.30 
13.69 


21.26 


1911-'12 


18.72 


1910-'ll 


19.20 


1909-'10 


17.60 


1908-'09 


16.60 


1907-'08 


13.70 


1906-'07 


12.82 


1905-'06 


12.36 


1904-'05 


8.49 







*In the years preceding 1910 -'11 this number is made up of high school four years and grade eight 
of the elementary course. 
t(Equal per cent, of pupils based on total enrollment. 

Since 1910-1911 the increase has been 63 pupils in the 
old four-year high school and 153 in the five-year plan. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

As all of the newer branches such as commercial studies 
and manual training were in force before that time it is 
fair to suppose that a per cent, of the increase is due to 
regrading. There is little prospect of the high school 
building being large enough to accommodate the four 
highest yearly classes for some time, perhaps never, in its 
present form and the efforts of all should be directed with 
force toward bringing about the least possible break in the 
transition of pupils from one grade to another especially if 
they change buildings at the same time. The methods used 
should not only vary as little as possible but they should 
be in accord with the ideas which the best pedagogical 
thought has brought out in the last few years. The amount 
devoted to educational purposes by the district is large and 
its expenditure should call forth unity of effort from all 
who benefit by it. 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



96 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Scholarship Table — 1912. 

high school. 



School. 


a 
O 


o. 

3 

o. 
6 
55 


a. 3 
3 1 IS 

o u 

z ° 


a 
u 


-2 tl 

a S 
3 1 "£ 

° t? 

z ° 


Per cent. 


■a 


M 



i-5 


U 

£6 

MM 
£ ° 
s 


a 
% 


High 
Group 1 


V 

u 

T 

s 

R 
Q 


70 
13 
68 
24 
108 
17 


4 

5 

5 



5.71 
0.00 
7.35 
0.00 
4.62 
0.00 


52 
2 

45 
7 

49 
3 


74.28 
15.38 
66.17 
29.16 
45.36 
17.64 



1 

4 
6 
3 




1 

4 
2 
9 

7 


23 
1 

24 
6 

32 
5 




1 

2 
2 
8 
4 


Total 




300 


14 


4.66 


158 


52.66 


14 


23 


94 


17 








Parker 
Group 2 


P 



128 
104 


18 
14 


14.06 
13.46 


71 

56 


55.46 
53.84 


6 
8 


5 
11 


12 
14 


4 
8 


Total 




232 


32 


13.79 


127 


54.74 


14 


16 


26 


12 








Chandler 
Group 2 


N 

M 


66 
30 


11 
1 


16.66 
3.33 


33 
2 


50.00 
6.66 


3 

2 


8 
5 


20 
4 


2 

2 


Total 




96 


12 


12.50 


35 


36.45 


5 


13 


24 


4 








Garrison 
Group 2 


N 
M 


9 

7 


2 



22.22 
0.00 


7 
3 


77.77 
42.85 


1 
3 


3 

2 



1 


3 

1 


Total ;.. 




16 


2 


12.50 


10 


62.50 


4 


5 


1 


4 








Eastman 
Group 2 


N 
M 


6 
13 


1 

1 


16.66 
7.69 


2 
1 


33.33 
7.69 



6 
















Total 




19 


2 


10.52 


3 


15.78 


6 

















Walker 
Group 2 


N 


46 


6 


13.04 


30 


65.21 


4 


3 


1 


1 


Total 




46 


6 


13.04 


30 


65.21 


4 


3 


1 


1 








Kimball 
Group 2 


M 


39 


2 


5.12 


9 


23.07 


6 


2 


5 


2 


Total 




39 


2 


5.12 


9 


23.07 


6 


2 


5 


2 








Rumford 
Group 2 


M 


35 


2 


5.71 


7 


20.00 


13 


1 








Total 




35 


2 


5.71 


7 


20.00 


13 


1 














Grand H. S.Total 




783 


72 


9.19 


379 


48.40 


66 


63 


151 


40 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


137 


11 


8.02 


64 


46.71 


13 


9 




6 




K 


91 


3 


3.29 


35 


38.46 


15 


7 









J 


141 


10 


7.09 


52 


36.87 


14 


5 




3 




I 


96 


3 


3.12 


37 


38.54 


23 


14 









H 


167 


17 


10.82 


54 


34.69 


21 


6 




2 




G 


95 


7 


7.36 


25 


26.31 


21 


4 




3 




F 


171 


15 


8.77 


54 


31.57 


17 


2 









E 


76 


7 


9.21 1 


26 


34.21 


15 


1 







Total 




964 


73 


7.57 


347 


35.99 


139 


48 




14 


Grand Total 




1,747 


145 


8.29 


726 


41.55 


205 


111 


151 


54 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE. 



Superintendent L. J. Rundlett: 

Dear Sir, — I beg leave to submit for your approval 
my third annual report. Few branches of work offer such 
opportunities for usefulness as that of the public school 
nurse. Much has been accomplished in the past year 
but we have not attained the maximum. The many 
instances of change that give one courage, the interest 
and appreciation of parents are gratifying. The physi- 
cians have rendered valuable support and cordial cooper- 
ation. There are no free clinics in our city but skilled 
physicians have given their services when requested. The 
hospitals also give care and treatment free. Parents pay 
for service when they can but no one is denied care. Chil- 
dren whose parents could not attend to treatment have 
been taken to physicians and hospitals and their treatment 
supervised. The most valuable work of a school nurse 
is in following the child to the home to explain the trouble 
to the parent and see that proper treatment is given. 
These visits take a great deal of time and become delicate 
and difficult tasks because one must be persistent to be 
successful. Medical inspection is our greatest need and 
it could be had with but little expense. 

I most gratefully acknowledge the kindness and financial 
aid of many who have helped make this work a success. 
Let us remember that anything which tends to raise the 
physical standard of the human being raises the standard 
of citizenship in our nation. 



98 



city of concord. 
Home Calls. 



Adenoids and enlarged tonsils, 56 

Defective vision, 36 

Strabismus, 15 

Congenital cataract, 3 

Conjunctivitis, 1 

Defective hearing, 5 

Impetigo, 43 

Spinal curvature, 8 

Retardation, 5 

Otitis, 4 

Aenemia, 2 

Unkempt conditions, 4 

Exzema, 2 

Epileptic, 4 

Masturbation, 1 

Whooping cough, 5 



Orthopedic, 
Scalp disease, 
Defective teeth 
Chorea, 
Pediculosis, 
Ringworm, 
Enlarged glands, 
Tuberculosis, 
Tuberculosis of bones, 
Tubercular suspect, 
Infected ear, 
Infected wound of leg, 
Measles, 
Undiagnosed, 



4 
5 

10 

3 

14 

1 
1 
2 
7 
5 
1 
1 
2 
6 

256 



Number of home calls recorded, 
Number of home calls unrecorded, 
Number of visits at schools, 
Number of children taken for treatment, 
Interviews with officials and others, 
Number of dressings done, 
Number of free glasses provided, 
Number of eye tests made, 



256 

24 
127 

87 

99 

40 

8 pairs 
225 



Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH M. MURPHY, R. N., 

School Nurse. 



OUTLINE OF DOMESTIC ARTS COURSE. 



Course V. 

First Year of Course, Seventh Year of School. 

English 5 periods, Arithmetic and Algebra (5), English 
Grammar and Composition (5), United States History (5), 
Domestic Arts, Music, Art (4). 

Music. 

Signature, Clefs, Four-part singing, Minor Scale, Chorus 
Work. 

Art. 

Portfolio Construction, Lettering, Applied Design, Pose 
Drawing, Theory of Color, Still Life, Landscapes. 

Sewing. 

Machines, Textile Study, Materials, Drafting, Cutting 
and Fitting, Night Dresses, Skirts, Hygiene. 

Cooking. 

Elementary Chemistry, Stoves, Preparation of Foods, 
Cooking Exercises. 

Second Year of Course, Eighth Year in School. 

English (5), French (5), Music and Art (5), Domestic 
Arts (5). 

Music. 

Musical Theory, Psalmization, Music Writing, Melody 

Writing. 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Art. 

Theory of Color,, Elementary Design, Embroidery Design, 
Millinery and Garment Design, Nature Work, Color Har- 
monies, History and Appreciation of Art. 

Sewing. 
Design, Textile Study, Materials, Cutting and Fitting. 

Cooking. 

Cooking Appliances, The Dining Room, Study of Food 
Stuffs, Cooking Processes, Cooking Exercises. 

Third Year of Course, Ninth Year of School. 

English (5), French or German (5), Music and Art (5), 
Domestic Arts (5). 

Music. 

Melody Writing, Part Writing, Harmony, Music for the 
Home. 

Art. 

Embroidery Design, Dress Design, Millinery, Color Har- 
mony, History and Appreciation of Art. 

Sewing. 

Design, Textile Study, Materials, Cutting and Fitting, 
Millinery. 

Household Mechanical Appliances. 

Heating Appliances, Fuels, Plumbing, Lighting Power in 
the Household. 

Household Sanitation. 

Bacteriology, Ventilation, Water Supply, Food Supply, 
Drugs and Medicine, Disposal of Refuse, Personal Hygiene, 
Study of House and Furniture. 



school report. 101 

Fourth Year of Course, Tenth Year in School. 

English (5), French or German (5), Music and Art (5), 
Domestic Art (5). 

Music. 

History of Music, Folk Songs, Musical Schools, Musical 
Instruments, Phonographic Reproduction, Songs of Differ- 
ent Countries. 

Art. 

Color and Composition, Artistic Anatomy, Decoration 
and Design, History and Appreciation of Art. 

Physiology and Hygiene. 
Scientific Physiology, Hygiene and Sanitation. 

Home Nursing. 

Surgical Cleanliness, Emergencies, Minor Injuries, Eeds, 
Temperature, Pulse, Respiration, Baths, Enemata, External 
Applications, Nursing Children and the Aged, Invalid 
Cooking. 

Fifth Year of Course, Eleventh Year in School. 

English (5), French or German (5), Music and Art (5), 
Domestic Art (5). 

Music. 

Musical History, Monophony, The Opera, The Oratorio, 
Supplementary Course in Applied Music. 

Art. 

Mechanical Drawing, The House, construction, installa- 
tion, materials, architecture, doors, windows etc., furniture, 
carpet, rugs and other accessories. 



102 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cooking — (Analytic) . 

Review of processes and practice in cooking, Food Con- 
stituents, Food Relation, Bacteriology of Foods, Nutrition, 
Simple Foods, Food Costs, Invalid Cooking. 

Housekeeping Accounts. 

Book-keeping, Marketing, Clothing, Furniture, Fuel, Mis- 
cellaneous Purchases. 



COURSE FOR INDUSTRIAL CLASS. 



Girls. 



Mathematics. 

Reading numbers. Writing numbers. 
The four fundamental operations. 
Fractions, common and decimal. 
Calculating cost of materials. 
Purchase of materials. 
Household Accounts — method of keeping. 
Bank Account — method of keeping. 

English. 

ORAL. 

Correcting common errors in speech. 
How to ask questions properly. 
How to answer questions properly. 
Correct use of vocal organs in speaking. 

WRITTEN. 

The direct statement. 

Common errors, corrected. 

Essays — Three each semester. 

Notes of all lessons — accuracy, neatness, legibility. 

Correct letter-writing. 

Penmanship. 
Taught in connection with all written work. 

Spelling. 
Prepared list of common words. 



104 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cooking. 

The Kitchen — Furniture and care of. 
The Laundry — How to prepare clothes for the wash. 
How to wash clothes properly. 
Water — Kinds. 

How to make hard water soft. 
Washing and Ironing. 
Plain clothes. 
Fancy clothes. 



Sewing. 
Simple hand work. 
Underwear. 

Wash dresses for children. 
Wash dresses for adults. 
Shirt Waists — plain. 
Power Operation- — simple. 
Dressmaking — simple. 

In General. 

Make school aprons and caps. 

Make and repair kitchen articles. 

Make clothes for poor children. 

Articles for schools in general, etc 

Launder towels for manual training. 

Keep kitchen clean at all times. 

Can fruit for outsiders. 

Make preserves for outsiders. 

Iron models for sewing classes, etc.. 

Make work bags. 

Launder kitchen articles. 

Method of re-binding books. 

Repair school flags. 

Make towels for manual training. 

Prepare lunches for Chandler School pupils. 

Prepare lunches (limited) for conventions. 



APPENDIX II. 



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SCHOOL REPORT. 



109 



HIGH SCHOOL TABLE. 

Showing the Number of Students Taking Each 
Study— Fall Term, 1912. 





Group II. 


Group I. 




STUDY. 


Class. 


Class 


Total. 




M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 
120 


R. S. 
18 94 


T. 
16 

2 

12 
1 
1 
4 


U. 

72 
3 
19 
29 
17 
71 
2 


V. 


Post 
Grad. 


Special. 




English 


150 


91 


157 


82 




2 


802 
6 
168 
297 
38 
329 






3 

3n 










30 


41 
38 


25 

4 


23 
108 
















15 R9 


1 


1 












21 

1 

19 

3 




150 


95 
























2 








24 












28 








29 












31 
2 
1 
2 

43 
4 
4 

21 




2 
1 




40 
3 






















124 


78 


49 


10 


4 


5 


271 










1 




3 
















1 


6 
2 
4 

4 


50 














5 


(W 


1 
2 






74 












20 


1 1 






32 




















25 


























Book-keeping 










52 

51 






4 


25 








81 


Commercial Arithmetic 
















51 














35 
35 

19 


2 

2 


19 

19 
4 


1 

1 






57 




















57 


Wood — Iron 


71 
79 

78 
150 


40 
55 
55 
95 


35 
33 
33 
33 
35 


20 
8 
8 

7 
20 


13 

14 
13 


5 


1 




201 




11 2 
11 


188 




3 

3 










188 


Free-hand Drawing 


5 


7 
12 


6 
5 








315 


Mechanical Drawing 








90 


Arithmetic, Common School . . 


150 


95 










245 

























110 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE— Concluded. 





Group II. 


Group I. 




STUDY. 


Class. 


Class. 


Total. 




M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


Post 
Grad. 


Special. 






150 
150 


95 


43 


25 






218 




















245 




43 
111 
46 
46 

137 

• 


25 
57 
25 
25 
67 


















68 
























171 
























71 
























71 




150 


95 


68 
26 


10 
5 


67 
26 


8 
1 


22 
12 


2 


1 


2 


629 




70 




150 














150 






33 




















33 





























SCHOOL REPORT. 



Ill 



MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 
June 14, 1912. 



SCHOOLS. 



53 



High 

Parker 

Chandler , 

Garrison , 

Eastman , 

Walker , 

Kimball , 

Rumford 

Merrimack 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame 6 

Parochial, St. John's | 21 



Wood and Iron. 



Cookinq. 



Sewing. 



53 -a 



Parochial, St. Mary's. . . 
Parochial, Sacred Heart. 
Industrial Class 



Totals | 442 



Iff 



_2 a 

~3 3 J| 
-a p.^3 



3 

3 

1 
2 
17 

102 



3 
18 
19 
21 
15 

340 






27 



294 



: m a 

3 s-q 



24 



77 ! 217 



649 



106 



1 *-JS 



543 



112 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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SCHOOL REPORT. 



113 



STAMP SAVING SYSTEM. 



Cogswell School, 
Harriet P. Dame School, 
Dewey School, 
Eastman School, 
Franklin School, 
Garrison School, 
Kimball School, 
Merrimack School, 
Penacook School, 
Rumford School, 
Walker School, 
Chandler School, 
Tahanto School, 



Saved from 
Mrrch 1, 1912, 

to 
March 1, 1913. 


Total amount 

saved since the 

inauguration of 

the system. 


$4.49 
10.92 


$4.49 
157.03 


130.66 

7.95 


648.16 
117.15 


55.10 


459.15 


13.86 


261.85 


20.46 


802.52 


30.95 


108.36 


158.47 


807.47 


59.16 
14.06 


2,180.83 
450.35 




106.02 




33.19 



$506.08 



$6,136.57 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1912. 



SUMMARY. 



Boys. 


Girls. 


1.563 


1,711 


63 


17 


1,532 


1,683 


1,144 


1,261 


386 


386 


8 


30 


25 


32 


10 


19 


7 


6 


8 


7 


2 


2 


71 


82 



Total. 



Number of children enumerated 

Increase since 1911 

Number attending school since 1911 

Number attending public schools 

Number attending parochial schools 

Number attending private schools 

Number 5 to 16 not attending school regularly 

Number 5 to 8 not attending school regularly 

Number 8 to 14 not attending school regularly 

Number 14 to 16 not attending school regularly 

Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write the English language correctly 
Moved into the district since 1911 



3,274 

80 

3,215 

2,405 

772 

38 

57 

29 

13 

15 

4 

153 



114 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

NATIVITY OF PARENT. 



American born 

Foreign born 

Russia 

West Indies 

Italy 

New Brunswick 

England 

Poland 

Sweden 

Roumania 

Ireland 

Armenia 

French Canadian 

Denmark 

Turkey 

Germany 

Norway 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island. 

Finland 

Scotland 

Syria 

Albania 



1,933 

1,341 

57 

1 

83 

6 

117 

8 

168 

6 

194 

10 

541 

4 

6 

12 

12 

43 

24 

20 

23 

2 

4 



NATIVITY OF CHILD. 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 




1,501 
62 
14 
32 

4 
8 
1 
3 
1 
8 
7 
1 
3 
1 


1,592 

119 

7 

32 

1 

4 

5 

1 

3 

4 

14 


3,094 




180 




21 




64 




1 




8 


Italy 


13 




2 




6 




5 




22 




8 15 





4 
4 


1 




7 


Turkey 


5 







SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE. 



115 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



High School. 
Group I. — Classes 
P, Q. R, S, T, U, V. 

Charles F. Cook 'Principal. 

Charles E. Moors Assistant, 

Alphonzo R. Tarr Assistant, 

Elmer G. Brennon 

Walter B. Lyman 

Elizabeth Averill 

May B. McLam 

Lillian Yeaton 

Elizabeth S. Sargent 

Mabel L. Warner 

Carrie E. Baker 

Mary C. Tewksbury. . . . 
Edna L. Hanson 



Mary E. Jenness. 
Mary K. Taylor. 



Elizabeth M. Driscoll. 



Carrie A. Hood. . . . 
Walter L. Barnum. . 
Harold C. Bales.... 
Edith W. Lawrence. 
Helen L. Brown. . . . 
Grace V. Knowles. . 



Group II. — Parker 

School. 

Classes 0, P. 



Luella A. Dickerman 
Mabel T. Durivage.. . 



Helen 0. Stephenson. 
May L. Ryan 



Eleanor A. Moulton. 



Rachel Courser. 
Beatrice Tasker. 



Julia M. Melifant. 
Mary K. Taylor. . 



Marion Woodworth. 
Edna L. Hanson. . . 



Gertrude N. Rideout . 
Mary C. Tewksbury. 



Chandler School. 
Classes M, N. 



Harriet S. Emmons. 
Cora T. Fletcher. . . 



Mary Flavin 

Elizabeth J. Donovan. 

Mary C. Caswell 

Ada M. Mann 



room 1 . 
room 7. 

" 2. 

" 2.' 

" 9. 

" 11. 

" 4. 

" 13. 

" 10. 

" 3. 



Principal, room 5. 
Assistant, " 7. 

" 1. 

" 2. 



Principal, room 1 . 
Assistant, " 2 . 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



U. S. History and Civics. . 
Mathematics, Chemistry. . 

Book-keeping 

Mathematics, Economics. . 

Physics 

French and German 

Greek and History 

English 

Mathematics, Biology. . . . 

Latin and English 

French and History 

History and English 

French 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of town. 



English and Latin 

Stenography, Typewriting. 

Typewriting and Clerk. . . . 
Resigned end of fall term.. . 
Resigned end of spring term. 
Resigned end of spring term. 
R esignedtend of spring term . 
Resigned end of fall term... . 



Mathematics, Latin, Eng- 
lish 

Mathematics, English 

Mathematics, Penmanship. 
Commercial History, Geog- 
raphy, English 

History, English 



English History 

6 French, Mathematics, Eng- 
lish 



800 

800 



750 
70(1 



GOO 
tioo 



7.-0 
450 



10 Pine St. 

13 Rumford St. (Marlboro.N.H.) 

7 Hanover St. 

31 South St. 

38 Rumford St.(Hudson,Mass.) 
36 Pine St. 
35 Perley St. 
66^ No. State St. 
101 Center St. 

12 South SUWaltham, Mass.). 
UlSchool St.(Lancaster, N.H.). 
76 Pleasant St. ("Randolph, Vt.). 
16 Green St. (Centre Harbor, 
i N.H.). 

12 South St. (Dover, N. H.). 

32 Pine St. (No. Cambridge, 

Mass.) 
189 No. Main St. (Holliston, 

Mass.) 
140 Rumford St. 



1,200 
750 



600 

600 



64 South St. 

40 No. Spring St. (Isle Lamotte, 

Vt.) 
40 No. Spring St. (Lowell, Vt.) 



Clerk. 



Transferred to High School 
at end of spring term. 

Resigned end of spring term. 

Transferred to High School 
end of spring term. 

Resigned end of spring term. 

Transferred to High School 
at end of first semester. 



Mathematics, Music 

English, Mathematics, 
Physiology, Latin 



16 Holly St. 
750 3J Liberty St. (Manchester, 

N. H.) 
500 3^Liberty St. 

500 3| Liberty St. (Manchester, 

N. H.) 
450 3 Elm St. 



English, Latin, History. . . . 
English Grammar, Drawing 

Clerk 

Resigned end spring term . . 



700 6 So. State St. 

700 41 School St. (57 Abbott St., 

Lawrence, Mass.) 
700 58 School St. 
850 28 Thorndike St. 
190 121 Warren St. 



116 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Walker School. 
Elizabeth J. Talpey 

Garrison School. 
Celia Standish 

Eastman School. 
Florence E. George 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Principal, room 3 Class M 

Principal, room 5 Classes M, N. 

Principal, room 1 Classes M, N. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence, ( ) Out of town. 



$700 



700 



71 )i i 



41 Warren St. 



S Rumford St. 



62 Beacon St. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 



Elizabeth J. Talpey. 
Margaret T. Kelley. 

Eva H.Tandy 

Louisa Herbert 

Julia G.Clark 

Alice J. Pearl 



Garrison School. 



Celia Standish 

Bertha L. Holbrook. 
Mary A. Jones. 



Agnes R. Kelley 

Margaret T. Lynch, 
lyla Chamberlin. . . 
Mabel H. Gay 



Margaret R. Eastman. 
Margaret T. Kelley. . . 



Eastman School. 

Florence E. George 

Emma G. Nickerson. . . 
Stella M.French 

Kimball School. 



Mary E. Melifant. 

Jessie N. Stimson 

Grace B. Knowlton. . . 
Edna M. Kennedy. . . . 
Mary A. McGuire. . . . 
Margaret A. Donovan 
Lottie E. Pearson. 

Mary Fcrnald 

Myrta B. Lowe 

Mary T. Gannon 

Alice J. Pearl 



Florence E. Durivage. 



Principal, room 3 . 
Assistant, " 4. 

" 2. 

" 1 . 



See High School. 

Classes H, I 

Classes D, E 

" A, B. C 

Resigned end winter term. 
Resigned end spring term. 



Principal, room 5 See High School. 

Assistant, " 7 Classes I, K. . .. 

" 4 " F, G. H. 



Principal, room 1 

Assistant, " 2 

•• 4 



Principal, room 6 . 
Assistant, " 5. 



" C, D, E 

'* A, B 

Kindergarten and Primary 
Kindergarten 



Resigned end spring term 
Transferred to Walker Sch'l 
beginning fall term. 



Classes L (M, N, see High 
School — Group II). 
" 4,5 



1,2,3..., 



Class L 

K 

J 

H, I 

F, G 

D, E 

A, B, C 

Kindergarten and Primary 

Kindergarten 

Special teacher 

Transferred to Walker end 

winter term. 
Resigned end spring term. 



650 

650 



2650 
650 

550 

550 

650 

95 



550 

650 



650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
450 
650 
650 
450 
400 



11 No. Spring St. (Wilton.N.H.) 
66 High St. 
3 Rollins St. 



542 No. State St. 

152 No. Main St. Penacook, 

N.H. 
34 Church St. 
446 No. State St. 
2 View St., West Cor cord, N. H. 
9 Knight St., West Concord, 

N.H. 



E. Concord, N. H. (Gloucester, 

Mass.) 
E. Concord, N. H., R. F. D. 5 



3 Elm St. 

9 Holt St. 

38 So. Spring St. 

10 Blanchard St. 
77 So. State St. 
84 Centre St. 

52 Beacon St. 
9 Tahanto St. 
60 No. Spring St. 
7 So. Spring St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



117 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Rumford School. 

Elizabeth E. Robertson . , 

Anna M. Keenan 

Alice M. Swain , 

Annette Prescott 

Abbie T. McDonald 

Fannie B. Lothrop 

Gara E. McQuesten 

Elizabeth M. McAfee. . . . 

Katharine L. Remick 

Maud B.Binet 

Elizabeth J. Donovan. . . , 



Merrimack School. 
Harriet C. Kimball Principal, room 3 



Viola J. Brock Assistant, " 4. 

Alice M. M. Phaneuf " "2. 

Agnes V. Sullivan " " 1. 

Margaret Morrill " " 1 . 



Position and room. 



Principal, room 8. 

Assistant, " 7. 

" 6. 

" 4. 

" 3. 

" 2. 

" 1. 



Penacook School. 



Annie M. Branon. . . 
Clara E. Flanders. . . 
Harriet L. McGrath. 
Cecilia P. Jones. . . .• 



Franklin School. 



Principal, room 4. 
Assistant, " 3. 

" 2. 

" 1. 



Abbie A. Donovan Principal, room 3. 

Minnie E. Ladd Assistant, " 4. 

Mary G. Doherty " "2. 

Marion E. Haines " " 1 . 



Dewey School. 



Addie F. Straw 

Helen L. Southgate. 



Susan M. Little. . 
Anna D. Shaw. . . 
Alice M. Sargent. 
Belle E. Shepard. 
Helen L. Gibbs. . 
Margaret Reed . . . 



Assistant, 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Class L. 
" L. 

Classes . 



Special teacher 

Kindergarten and Primary 

Kindergarten 

Transferred to Chandler 
School beginning fall t'm 



Classes K, L. 



" J, K 

" A, C,D 

Kindergarten and Primary 
Kindergarten 



Classes I, J. . . . 
" G,H... 
" E, F.... 
" A, B.C. 



Classes H, I. . . . 
" F, G... 
" D, E... 
" A, B.C. 



Principal, room 6 [Training teacher 



Supervisor, Kindergarten, 

training 

Classes H, I 

" E, G 

" B, C 

" A, B 

Kindergarten 

Resigned end spring term. 



Salary 

per 

year. 



Residence, ™( )"Out of town. 



$650 151J No. State St. 
600 193 High St. Penacook N. H. 
450132 Pine St. 
650 25 Green St. 
650 17 Essex St. 

650 ! 32 Perley St. (Bristol, N. H.) 
650!9 Wall St. 
500195 School St. 
65014 Fayette St. 
375 246 No. Main St. 



650 179 No. Main St. (Hopkinton 

Road) . 
650 99 No. State St. 
650 90 Rumford St. 
650 49 Lyndon St. 
425 123 No. State St. 



650 55 Thorndike St. 
650 51 South St. 
650(Hooksett, N. H.) 
650:75 South St. 



650 
650 
550 

600 



84 Centre St. 
72 Washington St. 
145 No. State St. 
29 Bradley St. 



1,000 101 No. State St. 

700 2 So. Spring St. 
650 90 School St. 
650 72 School St. 
650 78 Warren St. 
650 36 Pine St. 
350 3 Liberty St. 



TRAINING CLASSES. 
Elementary Grades to J. 

SENIOR TRAINING CLASS. 

(Graduates June, 1913) 

Ethel Brockway 25 Oak St., Penacook.'N.'H. 

Mary Agnes Coughlin '22 Albin St. 

Mary Margaret Doherty 11 Thorndike St. 

♦Alice Elizabeth Jackson 80 Allison St. 

Mary Lodema Keniston 4 Railroad Sq. 

Marie Anastasia Scully Little Pond Road. 

junior class. 
(Graduates June, 1914.) 

Katherine Winnifred Mannion 19 Walker St. 

Vivien Rebecca Morgan 10 Avon St. 

Hannah Elizabeth O'Brien 60 Franklin St. 

Bernice Laura Prescott 482 North State St., West Concord. 

Alice Lizzie Riford 63 High.St. 

May Belle Thompson 114 South State.St. 

* Has leave of absence this year; will graduate next year. 



118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Salary 
per 
year. 


Residence. ( ) Out of town. 


Harriet P. Dame School. 


Principal, 
Assistant, 


room 3 

" 2 

" 4 




S650 
450 
400 

650 

600 

95 

650 
550 

1,700 
800 
800 
900 

570 
800 

650 
450 
285 
180 

600 

1,175 

900 

100 


29 Center St., Penacook, N. H. 


Elizabeth T Nash 


" 3,4 




Mabel Clark 


" 1,2 


126 Warren St. 




Transferred to Rumford 
School end spring term. 

Classes A, B, C 

Kindergarten and Primary 




Tahanto School. 
Sara E. McOlure 


Principal, 

Assistant, 

Principal, 

Assistant, 

Principal, 

Assistant, 


room 2 

" 1 

" 1 

room 1 

" 2 

room 6 

room 1 

" 3 

" 4 

" 2 

"2,5 


1 1 Cummings Ave. 
30 Perley St. 


Annie D. Bishop 

Cogswell School. 
Mildred I. Cilley 


11 Bradley St. 




13 Blake St. (Dunbarton, N.H.) 




" C.D 


60 So. Main St. 


Morrill School. 
(Manual Training ) 


Supervision and lectures, 






12 So. Spring St. 


Raymond P. Gilman 


Machine shop practice, in- 




Charles P. Nash 


Wood-work, joinery, indus- 






21Clark St.(W.Concord,N.H.) 


Harry R. L.Chellman 


Joinery, drawing, industrial 


Ill School St. (Roslindale, 




Cabinet work, turning, forg- 


Mass.) 




12£ So. Spring St. (Cambridge, 


Edmund W. Kempton 

Robert E. Hamill 


Academic, pattern making, 

industrial class 

Wood work, industrial class 

Died during fall term 

Resigned end spring term.. 
Resigned during fall term. 

High, Elementary Class. . . 
Leave of absence for year. . 


Mass.) 
17 Tahanto St. (Worcester, 




Mass.) 














Sewing. 
(Parker School.) 


Principal . 

Assistant. 




167 No. Main St. 






32 So. Spring St. 






71 So. Main St. 


F. Mildred Phillips 




48 Rumford St. 








Cooking. 
(Chandler School.) 


Principal . 
Instructoi 




16 Green St. (Toledo, O.) 


Music 




61 School St. 


Drawing. 
Faith C. Stalker 






4 Rumford St. (Worcester, 


Military Drill. 
George W. Morrill 






Mass.) 
78 Franklin St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Concluded. 



119 



Names of buildings and 
teachers. 


Position and rooms. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Salary 
per 
year. 


Residence. ( ) Out of town. 


Janitors, 






780 
546 
780 
624 
624 
675 
624 
624 
624 
300 


114 So. State St. 








114 So. State St. 








5 Chapel St. 








6 Avon St. 


Oland M. Brodgett 






58 Perley St. 








7 Maple St. 










Frank L. Dudley 


Penacook and Cogswell. 




20 Dakin St. 








Philander C. White 














300! 8 Warren St. 








228 Route 6 








150 11 Waverlev St. 













120 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





Kind'n. 


ELEMENTARY 


YEAR. 




1 


2 . 


Class. 


1 and 2. 


A. 


B. 


C. 


D. 




P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N 


P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 
































































Walker 






7 
7 


4 
4 


7 
11 
11 
17 
8 

8 
8 
14 
12 
13 
17 


1 

3 
4 
5 






12 
11 







19 





7 


3 


ft 






11 2 




41 
27 
53 



2 
5 


5 
8 
3 

13 
9 
4 

3 

13 


4 
7 

14 
4 
2 
3 

14 
3 
6 


12 3 


17 3 


Kimball 


11 


3 


16| 








1 
3 
1 

2 

4 


i3 

12 
6 



5 











15 2 




20 


12 


14 2 


H. P. Dame 


12 
9 
18 







20 


2 






3 




11 


2 


5 










Total 


180 


21 


72 


65 


126 




24 


62 


lfi 


135 


23 
















89.55 


52.55 


84.00 


79.48 


85.44 





















AVERAGE AGE 



High 




































Walker 




7yr. 
7 


0m. 



7yr. 

7 

6 

7 

7 

7 

7 

6 

7 


2 m. 

6 
11 

4 

1 

2 

6 

6 

1 




8yr. 

8 

8 

9 

8 


2 m. 




5 yr. 


11m. 


8yr. 


m. 


7 




3 




5 
4 
5 


1 

11 
3 


7 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
7 
7 
6 


6 
9 
2 
9 
3 
10 
1 
3 
7 


8 
9 


3 
1 


5 


TCimhal] 


6 








8 
7 
7 


7 

9 








9 

7 
8 
9 
7 







5 


5 


in 


H. P. Dame 


4 




4 


11 


7 
7 


6 
3 




4 




8 


2 


10 










5 yr. 


3 m. 


6yr. 


10 m. 


7yr. 


2 m. 


8yr. 


lm. 


8yr. 


6 m. 







SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1912. 



121 



SCHOOLS. 



3 


4 


5 


6 


E. 


F. 


G. H. 

1 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


P. N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 






















































































13 
17 
13 
21 
23 



1 
2 
5 



13 


5 




17 


6 


11 


2 








5 


2 

4 
3 


7 3 


10 
12 1 
20 1 
17 5 


11 5 


7 


3 


15 4 




10 
12 
19 


.4 
1 
2 


10 




i3 3 
15 


20 3 
10 2 


25 
15 
26 


9 
1 
4 


29 5 
29 4 
33 2 


12 


6 
1 


19 
18 
12 
21 


3 17 3 20 2 18 


3 


19 







14 


2 

12 
2 


16 





25 8 
1!) 5 
11 2 












3 


7 


24 
12 


7 





















8 




































































61 


15 


157 


27 


81 14 


134 24 


85 26 


107 


16 


73 


17 


124 15 


80.26 


85.32 


85.26 


84.81 


76.57 


86.99 


81.11 


89.20 



PER CLASS. 





















































9 yr. 0m. 
10 8 

9 9 
10 3 
10 


10 yr. 7 m. 
10 4 




11 yr. 8 m. 
11 2 


12 yr. 1 m. 






9yr.8m. 


10 yr. 6 m. 

11 3 
11 2 
11 3 


12 yr. 2 m. 

12 7 

13 5 
12 3 


12 yr.10 m. 
12 11 




14 2 
13 
11 9 


9 2 
9 3 


10 8 
10 


13 2 
11 


13 6 

12 10 

13 6 


9 2 


9 11 
9 10 
9 9 
11 


11 2 

9 9 


11 6 

11 
10 5 

12 6 


12 


12 3 




9 1 








12 2 












12 11 




14 8 










































9yr. 3 m. 


10 yr. m. 


10 yr. 5 m. 


11 yr. 2 m. 


llyr.lOm. 


12 yr. 8 m. 12 yr. 7 m. 


13 yr. 2 m. 



122 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





HIGH 


YEAR. 


7 


8 


Class. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 




P. N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


;n. p. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 
























96 


8 


122 


6 




28 


2 


63 
43 

8 
6 


3 
3 

1 





Walker 












4 
8 
22 
34 


3 
5 
13 
5 












































































































H. P. Dame 








































































Total 


96 


2S 


120 


7 


96 


8 


122 


6 














77.41 


94.48 


92.30 


95.31 





















AVERAGE AGE 



High 
















14 yr. 9 m. 






14 yr. 9 m. 
14 8 
14 3 
14 
14 4 
14 


14 yr.10 m. 












15 3 
14 3 


















Kimball 














































H. P. Dame 










































14 yr. 4 m. 


14 yr. 9 m. 


14 yr. 9 m. 









SCHOOL REPORT. 



123 



THE GRADES— JUNE, 19*2.— Concluded. 



SCHOOL. 



9 


10 


11 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


14 3 


102 


6 


20 


4 


68 





13 


1 


71 

























































































































































































































































































































14 3 


102 


6 


20 


4 


68 





13 


1 


71 


82.35 


94.44 


83.33 


100.00 


92.85 


100.00 



PER CLASS— Concluded. 



17 yr. m. 


17 yr. m. 


17 yr. 5 m. 


17 yr. 5 m. 


18 yr. 10 m. 


18 yr. 6 m. 










































































































































































17 yr. m. 


17 yr. m. 


17 yr. 5 m. 


17 yr. 5 m. 


18 yr. 10 m. 


18 yr. 6 m. 



124 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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* 






TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, AT PHENIX HALL 

Thursday Evening, March 13, 1913, 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

PROGRAM. 

ORIGINAL DECLAMATION— HIGH SCHOOL— GROUPS i and 2. 

1 . The Wampum Chain 

URSULA FISKE KIMBALL, '16 

2. The Children's Cry 

CORINNE LEONA HEATH, '13 

3. My Native City 

JUSTIN FRED BARNARD, '14 

4. The Model City 

FRANK AUGUSTINE MAHONEY, '15 

Chorus — "March of The Stars" Paul Wachs 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION— HIGH SCHOOL— GROUP 2. 

1. "America, Fairest of Freedom's Daughters" J.E.Rankin 

ROBERT THOMAS SPAULDING, EASTMAN SCHOOL 

2. "Frederick's Address to His Generals and Staff Officers" 

Frederick The Great 

RALPH SHARPLES WELDON, GARRISON SCHOOL 

3. "The Inspiration of Sacrifice" James A. Garfield 

WILLIAM THOMAS TIPPET, "WALKER SCHOOL 

4. "Lincoln, The Immortal" Henry Watterson 

EVERETT HENRY BURNEY, CHANDLER SCHOOL 

Chorus — -"The Gay Gipsies" Ed. St. Quentin 

With Tambourine Obligato by Eight Girls from the Chandler School 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION— HIGH SCHOOL— GROUP 2. 

1. "How He Saved St. Michael's" Mary A. P. Stansbury 

MARION VOSE, CHANDLER SCHOOL 

2. "Flash, the Fireman's Story" Will Carleton 

MARION DORIS CRABBE, WALKER SCHOOL 

3. "The Day of Judgment" Elizabeth Stuart Phelps 

KATHLEEN MELISSA SARGENT, EASTMAN SCHOOL 



126 CITY OF CONCORD. 

4. "Sue's Wedding" Thomas Bailey Aldrick 

CORA NETTIE CLARK, GARRISON SCHOOL 

Chorus — "My Old Kentucky Home" Foster 

Semi-Chorus from Parker School 
Extra musical number 

Chorus — "There is a Perfume." Offenbach 

AWARD OF PRIZES 

Original Declamation — High School, groups 1 and 2. 

First Prize, $15, awarded to Ursula Fiske Kimball, '16. 
Second Prize, $10, awarded to Justin Fred Barnard, '14. 
Forensic Declamation — High School, group 2. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to William Thomas Tippet, Walker 

School. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Everett Henry Burney, Chandler 
School. 
Miscellaneous Declamation. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Marion Vose, Chandler School. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Kathleen Melissa Sargent, Eastman 
School. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Albert DeMeritt, Esq., Durham, N. H. 
Rev. Thomas Chalmers, Manchester, N. H. 
Maj. James F. Brennan, Peterborough, N. H. 

PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 

RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year's account, $2,630.60 

Interest on same to January 1, 1913, 103.36 

Sale of 448 tickets at 35& 156.80 



$2,890.76 



EXPENDED. 

Rent of Phenix Hall and piano, $20.00 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services, 50.00 

Programs, 4.50 

Prizes, including books, 53.25 

George R. Pearce, printing and selling tickets, 6.25 

English Composition, prizes and expense, High School, 45.00 
E. M. Proctor, transporting, putting up and taking down seats, 10.00 

Miscellaneous expense, 1-50 

Balance on hand as a guarantee fund for future contests, 2,700.26 

$2,890.76 



RECORD OF FIRE-DRILLS. 





/ 


High School. 






Sept. 27. 


82 seconds. All doors open. 






Nov. 27. 


80 seconds. All doors open. 






Feb. 6. 


70 seconds. All doors open. 




# 


Feb. 29. 


82 seconds. South stairs, south door closed. 


April 17. 


62 seconds. All doors open. 






May 2. 


68 seconds. All doors open. 










Walker School. 






Sept. 


11. 


46 seconds. Feb. 


29. 


45 seconds. 


Dec. 


13. 


55 seconds. April 


16. 


75 seconds.* 


* One exit closed. 












Garrison School. 






Oct. 


9. 


50 seconds. Feb. 


20. 


55 seconds. 


Nov. 


29. 


55 seconds. March 


14. 


60 seconds. 


Nov. 


9. 


50 seconds. May 


1. 


50 seconds. 


Jan. 


1. 


50 seconds. 

Eastman School. 






Sept. 


20. 


35 seconds. March 


14. 


30 seconds. 


Nov. 


20. 


30 seconds. April 


24. 


33 seconds. 


March 


5. 


31 seconds. June 
Rumford School. 


8. 


31 seconds. 


Oct. 


24. 


62 seconds. March 


8. 


66 seconds. 


Oct. 


31. 


67 seconds. May 


23. 


70 seconds. 


Nov. 


23. 


65 seconds. June 


6. 


70 seconds. 


Feb. 


7. 


63 seconds. 

Kimball School. 




i 


Nov. 


24. 


90 seconds. May 


14. 


65 seconds. 


Dec. 


7. 


80 seconds. June 


7. 


60 seconds. 


Apr. 


16. 


65 seconds. 







128 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Merrimack School. 



Sept. 


11. 


65 seconds. Feb. 


15. 


50 seconds. 


Nov. 


8. 


55 seconds. May 
Penacook School. 


14. 


43 seconds. 


Sept. 


25. 


30 seconds. May 


7. 


35 seconds. 


Nov. 


7. 


29 seconds. May 


24. 


34 seconds. 


March 


6. 


30 seconds. June 
Franklin School. 


10. 


34 seconds. 


Oct. 


5. 


44 seconds. March 


8. 


40 seconds. 


Oct. 


11. 


45 seconds. May 


22. 


40 seconds. 


Feb. 


27. 


46 seconds. May 
H. P. Dame School. 


28. 


45 seconds. 


Nov. 


28. 


30 seconds. June 


3. 


23 seconds. 


Dec. 


7. 


27 seconds. June 


13. 


29 seconds. 


March 


12. 


30 seconds. 

Tahanto School. 






Oct. 


10. 


30 seconds. March 


5. 


20 seconds. 


Jan. 


24. 


20 seconds. May 


15. 


20 seconds. 


Feb. 


7. 


20 seconds. June 
Cogswell School. 


9. 


20 seconds. 


Sept. 


25. 


22 seconds. March 


14. 


18 seconds. 


Oct. 


12. 


25 seconds. April 


29. 


24 seconds. 


March 


8. 


20 seconds. June 
Dewey School. 


7. 


20 seconds. 


Sept. 


11. 


not timed. Feb. 


6. 


55 seconds. 


Sept. 


13. 


not timed. March 


8. 


55 seconds. 


Sept. 


26. 


60 seconds. April 


30. 


45 seconds. 


Oct. 


10. 


55 seconds. June 
Parker School. 


3. 


60 seconds. 


Oct. 


11. 


50 seconds March 


14. 


40 seconds. 


Nov. 


2. 


45 seconds. May 


14. 


35 seconds. 


Feb. 


19. 


42 seconds. June 
Chandler School. 


3. 


40 seconds. 


Sept. 


20. 


38 seconds. Feb. 


26. 


40 seconds. 


Dec. 


12. 


30 seconds. March 


27. 


30 seconds. 


Dec. 


13. 


30 seconds. May 


28. 


37 seconds. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



129 



GRADUATING CLASSES OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

June 14, 1912. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Margaret Locke Batchelder. 
Marjorie Shirley Barnard. 
Guy Alvin Batchelder. 
Ida May Bell. 
Florence Evelyn Besse. 
Arthur Fillmore Bickford. 
Amelia Bilotti. 
Alice Ruth Brown. 
Lloyd Ridley Brown. 
Everette Lewis Bunker. 
Max Albert Butterfield. 
May Elizabeth Callahan. 
Harry Dudley Challis. 
Edith Gladys Clark. 
Gladys Arliene Clement. 
Marion Elmore Coffin. 
Anna Frances Cogswell. 
Hilary Joseph Connor. 
Carroll Henry Crosby. 
Leland Worthen Davis. 
Otto Winfred Davis. 
Philip Stevens Day. 
Charles Hubbard Dudley. 
Anne Teresa Dunn. 
Ruth Gladys Dunstane. 
Charles Franklin Durgin. 
Arthur Day Edmunds. 
Clarence Wyman Fipphen. 
Harold George Fowler. 
Rolland Rich Gove. 
Harry Leonard Gustafson. 
Iva May Hammond. 
Robert Porter Harvey. 
Shirley Wilcox Harvey. 
Nettie Miller Haselton. 
Mildred Emma Holbrook. 
Ada Lenora Huntley. 
Emery Isabell Lapierre. 
Katherine Winifred Mannion. 



Ruby Helene Maxam. 

Editha Leonora Belle Maxham. 

John Waldo Maynard. 

Charles James McKee. 

Harold Wadleigh Milette. 

Ellen Rynard Monroe. 

Vivien Rebecca Morgan. 

Margaret Elizabeth Morrison. 

Winifred Mary Murphy. 

Lila Blanche Nelson. 

Anna Elizabeth O'Brien. 

Charles Henry Parsons, Jr. 

Mabel Lillian Parsons. 

Florence Mildred Phillips. 

Olive Brown Pitman. 

Bernice Laura Prescott. 

Elmira Elizabeth Putnam. 

Marie Blanche Quimby. 

Alice Riford. 

Ray Towle Roberts. 

Copley McPherson Rundlett. 

Cora Alice Runnells. 

Neil Abner Sargent. 

Helen Lane Sawyer. 

Mabelle Irene Shapleigh. 

Marion Silsby. 

Seth Greenleaf Smith. 

Henry Sinclair Sturtevant. 

Vera Isabel Sullivan. 

Lizzie Sophia Swenson. 

Constance Richardson Taylor. 

May Belle Thompson. 

Dorothy Sibbel Turnbull. 

Walter Ira Waite. 

Ethel Mae Wason. 

Chandler Tubbs White. 

Marion Almira Winch. 

Marion Roberta Woodman. 



130 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Carl R. Carlson. 
Chandler Eastman. 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 



Agnes J. Gustafson. 
Ada Matthews. 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



Beryls Arlin. 
Harold A. Arlin. 
Harland F. Baker. 
Airris R. Beaudet. 
Mildred A. Cheney. 
George D. Converse. 
G. Everett Dearborn. 
Lucy Donovan. 
Alice R. Dooning. 
Evelyn A. Douglass. 
Marion E. Emery. 
Harold C. Hayward. 
Dorothy M. Hook. 



Harriet M. Knuckey. 
Aurora E. Langlois. 
Edna H. Lyna. 
Hazel M. Martin. 
Frank S. Merrill. 
Rebecca K. Merrill. 
William H. Palmer. 
Rassio Parenteau. 
Wells E. Tenney. 
Lottie E. Tittemore. 
Celia B. Tuttle. 
Ruth H. Vandemark. 



(Helen J. Baker, Anna R. Shreve, January 26, 1912.) 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



Nathaniel J. Gardner. 
George D. Knowles. 
John H. Morrill. 
Ernest Riley. 



Charlotte M. Gardner. 
Albena L. Gibeault. 
Gladys E. Muzzey. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 



Bradley L. Baker. 
Dorothy E. Brown. 
Esther A. Calkin. 
Ethel C Carr. 
Albert Trask Chapman. 
Almeda G. Clough. 
Roland D. Crosby. 
Adeline S. Culluin. 
Russell E. dishing. 
Margaret C. Drew. 
Willis Dyment. 
Golden E. Farmanian. 



Katherine M. Gannon. 
Clara A. Hanson. 
Annie Heartz. 
John A. Hawkes. 
Hazel I. Howard. 
Luella M. Johnson. 
Florence S. Johonnott. 
Joseph M. Lacasse. 
Allan N. Leavitt. 
Harley W. McCauley. 
Frank E. Mobcrg. 
Edna M. Osborne. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 131 

Ruth Pike. Nellie Tippet. 

Harriett L. Quackenbush. Alice A. E. Tremblay. 

Eva M. Quackenbush. Elsie P. Waterhouse. 

Bernice Riford. Ethel M. Wilkie. 
Margaret W. Teague. 

(Alena Bateman, June 11, 1911.) 

RUMFORD SCHOOL. 

Doris P. Bartlett. Hazel A. Hartford. 

Leon K. Bishop. Francis E. Henry. 

Clara I. Burroughs. Catherine E. L. Johnson. 

Helen W. Call. Harry F. Koehler. 

Abbie R. Carter. Margaret H. Madisen. 

Elizabeth E. Chickering. Ruby L. Moore. 

Doris G. Cook. Goldie V. E. Morrison. 

Anna M. Drouin. Nettie A. S. Olsen. 

Eleanor M. Ford. Bertha O. Sandquist. 

William F. French. Helen F. Stevens. 

Archie N. Gourlay. George E. Wooster. 
Ernest Hammar. 

January 24, 1913. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Helen A. Grover. Annie D. Steele. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 

Mary E. Ahearn. Dorothy F. Booth. 

Grace M. Beaulac. Leroy E. Brown. 

Oscar A. C. Benson. Aurilla O. Brusseau. 

George W. Bergstrom. Everett H. Burney. 

Ralph E. Blake. Ida C Carter. 

Edward H. Blanchette. Edna S. B. Chandler. 

Noyes F. Bond. Maude Cloudman. 



132 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Hattie M. Cofran. 
Arthur R. Cole. 
Ruth G. Converse. 
Hugh G. Cruikshank. 
Warren Entwistle. 
William J. Giddis. 
Franklin W. Goodsell. 
Eva M. Haines. 
Helen P. Hartford. 
Ruth E. Haynes. 
George E. Houston. 
William T. Jennings. 
Ethelyn M. Kempton. 
Frank C. Keniston. 
Arthur O. Lyford. 



Ethel M. McCrillis. 
M. Doris Merrill. 
Homer H. Nute. 
Rita G. Preble. 
John W. Richardson. 
Bella E. Sanel. 
Ida R. Sanel. 
Earl M. Sawyer. 
Anna S. Sherr. 
Dorothy D. Silver. 
Evon M. Trudell. 
Eleanor W. Vinton. 
Willard S. West. 
Donald J. White. 
Lena M. Winslow. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 



Miriam Batchelder. 
Marion Florence Cheney. 
Teresa Rose Diversi. 
Frances Heath. 
Allen Hollis, Jr. 
Robert James Jewell. 
James Mills Kent. 
Harry Nathan Kimball. 
Lawrence Dana Kimball. 
Addison Nathan Martin. 
Harry Arthur Morrison. 



Anna Elizabeth Murphy. 
Elinor Marion Nardini. 
Ruth Peckham. 
Clifford Rydholm. 
Earl Howard Staniels. 
Ruth Martha Tenney. 
Phillips Elder Wilson. 
Marion Vose. 
William Ezra Gordon. 
Robert Ward Cook. 



WALKER SCHOOL. 



William John Angwin. 
Marion Elizabeth Baxter. 
Minnie Clara Bernard. 
Real Napoleon Bourke. 
Emily Josephine Brunell. 
Emanus Francis Brusa. 
Agnes Carlson. 
Evelyn Champagne. 
Marion Doris Crabbe. 
Vernon Doherty. 
Paul Dufraine. 
Dorothea Mae Dunn. 
Ray Alexander Dyment. 



Harold Emerson Fraser. 
Violet E. Freeman. 
Margaret Theresa Halligan. 
Evelene Marion Haven. 
Robert Long Haynes. 
Esther Wilhelmina Elizabeth 

Holmgren. 
Helen Mary Hurley. 
Olga Laird. 
Ida Elcanora Larson. 
Ross Hiram Currier Lovejoy. 
Elizabeth McBain. 
Earl Draper Prcscott. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



133 



Albert Frederick Roach. 
Rowland Stanyan Rhodes. 
Clara Elsie Smith. 
Edith Elizabeth Sorranty. 
Helen Elizabeth Tebeau. 



William Thomas Tippet. 
Jane Tonkin. 
Myra Welton Woods. 
Edward John Worthington. 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 



Elmer M. Anderson. 
Redfield A. Anderson. 
O. Waldo Anderson. 
Dorothy P. Chase. 
Cora N. Clark. 
Lila B. Clarke. 
Nora Cotter. 
Nannie M. Dahlgren. 
J. Elso Davis. 



Arthur F. Henry. 
Hilma Hokenson. 
Marjorie Knight. 
William J. Lynch. 
Bernice J. Persons. 
Amelia Pollard. 
Florence M. Prescott. 
Ralph S. Weldon. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



Raymond E. Chambcrlin. 
Neil W. Chandler. 
Lena M. Chase. 
E. Parker Little. 



Leonard M. Quimby. 
Harrison E. Radford. 
Kathleen M. Sargent. 



134 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

ROLL OF HONOR. 



Names of Pupils not Absent or Tardy during the Year. 



( ) =No. years. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Guy A. Batchelder. 
Harry L. Gustafson. 
Editha L. B. Maxham. 
Vivien R. Morgan (4) . 
Copley M. Rundlett (2). 
William A. Blanchette (2).' 
Ralph S. Carr. 
Ruth Clough. 
Eastman E. Fisher. 
Charlotte C. Hammond (3). 
Edith E. Hardy. 
Corinne Heath. 



Sarah L. Jennings. 
Lillian M. Phaneuf (3). 
Margaret Worthington (2). 
Harold M. Dearborn. 
Harold Eastman (2). 
Myra E. Engstrom. 
Harold Johnson. 
Dons H. Roberts. 
Edna B. Robinson (2). 
Wendell K. Scott (2). 
John B. Wilson. 
Margaret E. Smith. 



PARKER SCHOOL. 



Madeline F. Barry (2). 
Frank Bean (2). 
Mildred Brown (2). 
Katharyn Cheney (2). 
Blanche Dimond. 
Gladys Dole. 
Homer Edson. 
Gerda Ekstrom (2). 
Elcy Fletcher. 
Madeline Gilman. 
Charles Gordon. 
Leslie Gross (2). 
LeliaHall (2). 
Muriel Hall. 
Vera Hall. 
Hester Hamilton. 
Proctor Haywood. 
Louise Hook (2). 



Alice Lmdgren. 
Lottie Marston. 
Helen Murphy. 
Gladys Nute. 
Ethel Noonan (2). 
Edward Pichette. 
Raymond Potter (2). 
Roland Powell (2). 
Alice Prescott. 
Donald White. 
Irene Williamson (2). 
Charlotte Young (2). 
Evelyn Fulford (2). 
Annie Jones. 
Garfield Reed. 
Leslie Jones. 
Lena Leavitt. 
Edward Smith (2). 



Eva Campbell. 
Walter J. Clark. 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 

Fannie Cling. 
Lucy Donovan. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



135 



Clarence A. Drown. 
Edith M. Holmes. 
Florence B. King. 
Ruth Lemmon. 
Hazle M. Martin. 
Ruth G. Morgan. 
Ethel M. Moulton. 



Mary L. Hall (2). 
Charles R. Zambs (2). 
John E. Branswell (1). 



Nellie M. Houston. 
Laura I. Foote. 
Bernice C. Silver v 
George E. Gilpatrick. 
Lottie E. Tittemore. 
Harold C. Haywood. 



WALKER SCHOOL. 



Dorella A. Levesque (1). 
Oliver Shepard (1). 



Carl A. Anderson. 
Agnes J. Gustafson. 
Evelyn R. D. Noonan. 
Nora Cotter. 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 



Omar E. F. Ekstrom. 
Hilia E. Silver. 
Carl R. Carlson. 
Elsie C. Carlson. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



William F. Cate. 
W. Carl Riley. 
George D. Knowles. 
Ruth I. Fairfield. 



Dorothy E. George. 
Kathryn S. Gross. 
Russell D. Sawyer. 
J. Kenneth Sullivan. 
Emma E. Tucker. 
Dorothy A. Gross. 
Helen L. Bunker (4). 
Arleen B. Crossley. 
Lora E. Sleeper. 
Grace Beaulac. 
Helen Hartford. 
George Houston. 
Warren Entwistle (2). 
Ruby L. Moore. 
Goldie V. Morrison. 
Marshall D. French. 
Clyde H. Gray. 



Joseph N. Gardner. 
Dorothy E. Maynard. 
Harriet C. Gage. 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 



Frank R. Houston. 
Andrew F. Lane. 
George E. Welch. 
W. Arthur Odey. 
Louise A. Durrell. 
Rachel R. George. 
Ernest H. West. 
Dorothy Silver. 
Oscar Benson. 
Frank Keniston. 
Arthur Lyford. 
Bertha Sandquist. 
W. Fitch French. 
Edward J. Odey. 
Gardner H. Wales. 
Helen L. Young. 
Robert Tilt on. 



L36 



I IT\ OF I'OM'HLH. 



Irene L, l Dudley. 
Josephine El Belisle. 
Arthur E, Kunberger. 
Paul T. Nolan. 
Mary Ahearn. 
Leroy Brown. 



i ,111:1. B. Courser, 
Janice ( rriffen, 
1 [arold E. Lovejoy. 
Carmi P. W. Browne. 
Eva M. I [aines. 
Merville J. Lacasse. 
Ruth E. Blake. 
Mary (l.l tillsgrove. 
Edwins M . Th6riault. 



IIdrIi Cruikshank. 
Doris Bartlett. 
Elizabeth E. < Ihiokering. 
William Jennings. 
< reorge E, Wooster. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 



( reorge W. Jones. 
Phillips E. Wilson. 
Florence Johonnott. 
Ralph 1 1. Sargent. 
Lillian A. Elaggett (2). 
Louise 1 Ionic (3). 
Flora P. I >avis. 
Albert T. Chapman. 
Allan Leavitt. 



Orgin R. PhilUps, 
( Icii rude Pearce. 
[da Larson. 
Myra Woods. 
Barley Ford. 
Helen Bailey. 



MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

Clara E. Smith. 

Ross Lovejoy. 

Edna Bailey. 
Emily Brunell. 
I lelen Tebeau. 



I'LNACOOk SCHOOL. 



( ilen Burney. 
1 lotion ( Jameron (3 1. 
Lelia Young. 
Eugene Maxam. 
Arlene Booth . 
Majel Evans. 
( Hadys l [arris. 
\\ ildrr Madison. 
Stewart Lyford (2). 
Arvilla Powell, 
ll.ur\ Levin. 



Evelyn WatkinB (1). 
Thomas Kent . 



Gladys Avery. 
Marcia Madison. 
I rene Lord. 
Wilbur Tucker (2). 
Ruth Virgin. 
Priscilla Noycs. 
( tordon Bartlel 1. 
( reorge < Jolby. 
I >oro1 iiy Kendall, 
l [erbert Ti1 temore. 



IK \NKLIN SCHOOL. 



Waller ll. Stanley. 
Ellsworth Cherry. 



SCHOOL REPORT 



1:57 



DEWE? SCHOOL. 



Anna Laflamme. 
( lennaine Shannon. 
Helen Foster. 
Eva M. Dearborn. 
Edward •)• Shannon. 
( ilarenoe E. I tuggins. 
John A. Morrison. 
Philhps VV. Vose. 
Eric M. N. Sandquist. 



Ruth B. Dearborn (2). 
Edith 1 1. Brown. 
George R. Walker (1). 
Mary E. ( lhampagne 
Roger E. I rarand (2) 
( lornelia 1 1. Kimball (2). 
Grace M. Patch. 
Harold N. Runnells. 
Utha E. Walker (3). 



HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 



II any Anderson. 
Evelyna M. Parenteau (2). 
Phillip ( ). Parenteau. 



I' rederick Robinson. 
Walter E Plummer (1). 

\ t n f ia L. Parenteau (1). 



COGSWELL school. 
Helen M. Dcnncrly (2). Alice < lorrivei 



TAHANTO school. 
James Breslin (1). 



138 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HONOR LISTS. 

For the Year 1911-1912. 

Names of Pupils in Union School District who attained a mark of A — 
or better in their school work during the past year. 

HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Class V. 

Charles H. Dudley, Rolland R. Gove, Henry S. Sturtevant, Marion 
A. Winch. 

Class U. 
None. 

Class T. 

Ruth H. Daggett, Ethel Dole, Ruth Garland, Rosa A. Guilbault, 
Bertha M. Venne. 

Class S. 
None. 

Class R. 

Mira W. Crowell, Elsie F. Kendall, Jane W. Matthews, Agnes V. 
Murphy, Leland K. Wildes. 

Class Q. 
None. 

PARKER SCHOOL. 
Class O. 

John Amsden, Doris Cree, Thomas Dudley, Leslie Gross, Vera Hall, 
Dorothy Kendall, Joseph Lane, Judith Lawson, Gladys Pearson, Sadie 
Rabinovitz, Eva Rossell, Alice Spaulding, Harold Whitcomb, Donald 
White. 

Class P. 

Myra Bowers, Blanche Dimond, Gladys Dole, Edith Ericson, Rebekah 
Goldberg, Arthur Harris, Annie Jones, Ralph Kenney, Lena Leavitt, 
Alice Lindgren, Alden Moody, Helen Murphy, John M. Murray, 
Margaret Owen, Caroline Pearson, Earl Sawyer, Marion Stuart, Olive 
Tabor, Denis Sullivan. 

CHANDLER SCHOOL. 

Class M. 
Rebecca Merrill. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 139 

Class N. 

Helen Barker, Eva Campbell, Helen Davis, Earl Fipphen, Paul 
Flanders, Daniel Flint, Francis Henry, Hazel Jones, Roger Leavitt, 
Robin Macquire, Richard Pearson. 

WALKER SCHOOL. 

Class N. 

Ruth Wirrell, Mary Willis, Elsa Johnson, Charlotte Sawyer, Edna 
White, Julius Sturm. 







GARRISON SCHOOL, 






Class M. 


None. 




Class N. 


None. 




EASTMAN SCHOOL. 
Class M. 


George D. 


Knowles. 


Class N. 


Guy E. Griffin. 








KIMBALL SCHOOL. 






Class M. 


Bradley E. 


Baker, Esther A.Calkin. 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 
Class M. 
Leon T. Bishop, Elizabeth E. Chickering. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Names of pupils in Union School District who attained a mark of B — 
or better in their school work during the past year. 

HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 
Grade III. 

Joseph L. Champ igny, Ruth Mahoney, Leona S. Savoy, Philip O. 
Parenteau, Margaret Robinson, Allen Hillsgrove, Everett L. Gagnon, 
Thomas Fleming, Oscar Drew. 



140 CITY OF < ONCORD. 

Grade IV. 

Harry Anderson, Emma Boulay, Nathalee McDonnell, Dorothy 
Robinson, Ellen Grant. 

Grade V. 

Mary Champigny, Charles Foote, Edith Giddis, Walter Plummer, 
Edwin Robinson, Lily Rowland, Arthur Stickney, Harold Welch. 

Class L. 
Edward Blanchette, Franklin Goodsell, Ida King, John Richardson. 



DEWEY SCHOOL. 
Class F. 

Sally Clement, Charles Gannon, Margaret A. Gordon, Franklin 
Hollis, Albert King, Zelia King, John A. Morrison, Phillips W. Vose, 
Dorothy E. Watson. 

Class H. 

Harriett I. Albee, Aubrey M. Brown, M. Phyllis Carpenter, Dorothy 
M. Clark, John P. Murphy, Nellie M. Riford, Eric M. N. Sandquist, 
Theodore M. Stewart, Madeline Vose, Margaret H. Wall, Raymond 
D. Moore. 

Class I. 

Ethel M. Nudd, John L. Peckham. 

Class J. 

Francis Crowley, C. Parker Huntington, Ruth H. Kibby, Cornelia 
H. Kimball, Grace M. Patch, Mary A. Shannon, Altha E. Walker, E. 
Follis Wall. 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

Class E. 

Martha D. Persons, Clifton R. Wilcox, Jennie Ford, Richard Van 
De Mark, Philip E. Stohrer, L. Evelyn Parker, Richard H. Felton. 

Class F. 

Marion Davis, Eunice M. Haven, Eva M. Sanborn, Dorothy M. Scott, 
Robert G. Tucker, Walter W. Waterhouse. 

Class G. 

Earl J. Brunelle, Rhoda K. Reilly, Edna M. Smith, Walter H. Stan- 
ley, Doris D. Wilkins. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 141 

Class H. 

Katherine E. Crabbe, Arthur Ledward, Ruth Leavitt, Helen D. 
Morrison, Hige Najarian, Mary A. Otis, Myrtle G. Osgood, Mildred 
A. Patterson, Krekor Shaterian, Helen F. Wall, Edith L. Ford, Thomas 
Kent. 

PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

Class E. 
Olive Hartford. 

Class F. 

Orrin Beane, Weltha Belrose, Melvin Cohen, Helen Curran, Stewart 
Lyford, Lillian Randquist, Ruth Virgin, Leila Young. 

Class G. 

Florida Bean, Gordon Bartlett, Edward Cousins, Carl Harris, Harry 
Levin, Eugene Maxam. 

Class H. 
Ruth Lyford, Annie Wilson. 

Class I. 

Ruth Cofran, Majel Evans, Emma Jones, Dorothy Kendall, Marion 
Skillen, Frances Wason. 

Class J. 

Doris Akeley, Edward Cofran, Madaleine Curran, Beatrice Douglas, 
E. Irene Lord. 

MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 
Class K. 

Helen Bailey, Charlotte Cheney, Gladys Evans, Henry Anderson, 
Ellen Lamprey, Marjorie Newbold, Angelina Oligati, Marion Cochran, 
Oren Peters, Frank Stohrer. 

Class L. 

William Angwin, Marion Baster, Emily Brunell, Harold Fraser, 
Eveline Haven, Esther Holmgren, Ross Lovejoy, Ida Larson, Esquion 
Najarion, Elizabeth McBain, Elizabeth Sorranty, Clara Smith, Helen 
Tebeau. 

KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

Class E. 

Grace M. Spaulding, Janice Griffin, Frank E. Bagnall, George S. 
Copp, Nettie M. Jewell, Andrew F. Pike. 



142 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Class F. 

Emma J. Cox, Elizabeth Morrill, Edmund A. Laport, Philip Garland, 
George C. Kimball, Edmund A. Cox, May Smith, Lawrence T. Stevens, 
Moses Harper, George Gordon, Mariana Odlin. 

Class G. 

Doris L. Dyer, Humphrey J. Emery, C. Wendell Kimball, Oscar 
Silverman, Milton Shapiro, H. Gwendolyn Jones, Harold W. Henry. 

Class H. 

Elizabeth Benton, Dean R. Colton, Peter Mamos, Doris E. Sturm, 
George F. Clark, M. Edith Johnson, Shirley W. Jones, Helen Mansur, 
Charles J. Silverman. 

Class I. 

Sarah F. Jewell, Blanche E. Walker, Beatrice I. Bagnall, Philip B. 
Gove, Edith E. Hook, Amy F. Kaime, Harold E. Lovejoy, Earl L. 
Ludlow. 

Class J. 

Carmi P. W. Brown, Gladys L. Currier, Guy O. Edmunds, Haskell 
Cohn, Marion L. Colby, Pauline Lane, Oney P. Smith, Doris G. White, 
M. Charlene L. Pettengill. 

Class K. 

Elizabeth B. Adams, Rachel G. Andrews, Rachel Barker, Dorothy 
Daggett, Sidney Cullum, Carlton Strong, Ruby Underhill, Edward C. 
Wilson, Annabel Walker, Louise Home. 

Class L. 

Miriam Batchelder, Anna E. Murphy, Marion Vose, Allen Hollis, 
Harry N. Kimball, Evelyn S. Fowler, Eva M. Haines, Frances Heath, 
Eleanor Holland, Ruth Peckham, Lois Rundlett, Lawrence D. Kimball, 
Harry A. Morrison. 

RUMFORD SCHOOL. 
Class E. 

Lillian F. Guerin, Arnold Hill, Harold L. Johnson, Merle G. Tabor, 
Roy C. Perry, Ethel Ravitch, Josephine A. Cote, Joseph Brooks. 

Class F. 

C. Edgar Kunbcrger, Robert N. Nelson, Robert P. Dutton, Pearl E. 
Parker, Celia F. Sherr, Henry M. Clay, Nathan Sanel. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 143 

Class G. 
Willis J. Sawyer, Irene A. Young. 

Class H. 

Mary P. Walker, Field C Perry, Sadie G. Ash, Freda G. Sargent, 
Priscilla Wood, Louise Struthers, Emile J. Cote, Margaret L. Osgood, 
Ethel J. Robinson, Elsie B. Colby. 

Class I. 

Pearl Goldman, Irene Dudley, Lillian E. Berry, Arthur L. Copp, 
Leslie Ellis, Dorothy A. Gross, Florence M. Hunt, Myrtle B. Beaulac, 
Daniel W. Howe, Gertrude Ravitch, Eunice E. Quinn. 

Class J. 

Rachel George, Helen Morgan, Arthur Kumberger, Fred Moulton, 
Hynlan Sherr, Nina Ramsay. 

Class K. 

Josehine Belisle, John Burrows, Benjamin Cohen, Arleen Crossley, 
Louise Durrell, Lillian Gilman, Maud Gurley, Maurice Jones, Willard 
Nute, Fred Nylen, Frederick Smith, Guy Tabor. 

Class L. 

Hugh Cruikshank, Mary Ahern, Grace Beaulac, Noyes Bond, Leroy 
Brown, Aurilla Brusseau, Everett Burney, Etta Cohen, Warren Ent- 
whistle, Helen Hartford, George Houston, Rita Preble, Bella Sanel, 
Earl Sawyer, Anna Sherr, Elinor Vinton. 

EASTMAN SCHOOL. 
Class F. 

Herbert E. Bombard, Ralph R. Chamberhn, Ethel M. Cate, Lura 
A. French, Miriam E. French, Goldie M. Gage, Irene I. Haselton, 
Alfred P. Larochelle, Luella E. Powell, Ina L. Tebbetts, Lottie I. Sargent, 
Mary A. Spaulding. 

Class H. 

Doris H. Chamberlin, Elizabeth E. Cushing, George V. Lacroix, 
Dorothy E. Maynard, Evelyn D. McAlpine, Dorothy W. Morrison. 

Class J. 

Marion E. Atwood, Josephine E. Cushing, Ruth I. Fairfield, Lawrence 
H. Gardner, Esther L. Haselton, Reuben A. Murray, W. Carl Riley, 
Ruth C. Staniels, Mildred L. Haselton. 



144 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Class L. 

Arthur F. Bombard, Raymond E. Chamberlin, Adnyrum C. Chesley, 
E. Parker Little, Robert T. Spaulding, Kathleen A. Sargent, Ruth E. 
Sargent. 

GARRISON SCHOOL. 

Class F. 

Florence Clark, Gertrude Rossell, Neva Lindgren, Ella Shepard, 
John Engel, Morrill Shepard, Lawrence Cotter, Paul Ericson, Elmar 
Hammar. 

Class G. 

Evelyn Blackwood, Carl Lindstronne. 

Class H. 

Gertrude Anderson, Valborg Anderson, Paul Bailey, Greta Clark> 
Richard Henry, Lilly E. Silver, Edgar Larson, Bertil Rossell. 

Class J. 

Edith Carlson, Robert Clark, Lawrence Danforth, Fritz Gustafson, 
Viola Holmquist, Jeannette Ryan, Clarence Spofford. 

Class K. 
Astrid Olson, Roger Eastman, Carl Ekstrom, Fred Rossell. 

Class L. 

Elmer Anderson, Redfield Anderson, Dorothy Chase, Cora Clark, 
Nora Cotter, Lila Clark, Nannie Dahlgren, Amelia Pollard, Florence 
Prescott. 

WALKER SCHOOL. 
Class F. 
John E. Branswell, Elise M. Denis, Jeannette Laplante, Maurise S. 
Nelson. 

Class G. 
George A. Howard, Stella V. Johnson, Agnis V. Johnson, Harry J. 
Morley, Nathaniel Sawyer. 

Class I. 
Myra Flanders, Doris Sabin, Martin Hyland, Mildred Byers, George 
Boulay, Satnig Najarian, Gertrude Tippett, Madeline Potter, Cora 
Shepard, Florence Lucier. 

Class J. 
Louise Guyol, Melvin Crowell, Herbert Stevens, Everett White, 
Harriet Wallace, Bertha Eraser. 



KINDERGARTEN GAMES. 

FOLK LORE GAMES, PLAY GROUND GAMES AND PHYSICAL EXERCISES BY THE 
PUPILS OF THE RUMFORD, KIMBALL, MERRIMACK, GARRISON, TAHANTO AND 
DEWEY SCHOOLS AT WHITE'S PARK TUESDAY, JUNE 11, 1912 AT 2 O'CLOCK P. M. 

PROGRAM, 
i. 

Kindergarten Games 
by the pupils of the 

RUMFORD, KIMBALL, MERRIMACK, GARRISON, TAHANTO, AND DEWEY KINDERGARTENS. 

1. "Skipping Tag." 2. "Swedish Game." 3. "Blacksmith Game." 

4. "Five Little Chickadees." 5. "Swedish Clapp Danzen." 6. "Soldier Boy." 

II. 
Dewey School. 

, 'Pussy White" — Folk Lore Game Classes A, B, C, D 

"Physical Exercise" — from "Bancroft's Physical Drill" Classes F, H, I, J 

"Hansel and Gretel" — Folk Lore Game Classes F, H, I, J 

" Pass Ball Relay " — Play Ground Game Classes F, H, I, J 

III. 
Kimball School. 

" Reap the Flax" — Folk Lore Game Classes J, K, L 

"Kull Danzen" — Folk Lore Game Classes J, K, L 

"Mountain March" — Folk Lore Game Classes J, K, L 

IV. 
Merrimack School. 

"Lady Dainty Dance" — Folk Lore Game Class K 

"Barn Dance" — Folk Lore Dance Class K 

"Hungarian Dance " : — Folk Lore Dance Class L 

"Tarantella" — Folk Lore Game Class L 

V. 
Rumford School. 

" Dumb Bell Exercise" — Physical Drill Class M 

"May Pole Dance" Classes J, K 

N. B. If Tuesday should prove to be rainy, the games will be held on the first pleasant after- 
noon next following. 



10 



MEMORIAL DAY OFFERING, MAY, 1912. 



High School $9.98 

Parker School 8 .23 

Walker School 4.11 

Chandler School 3.59 

Rumford School 11 .82 

Kimball School 9.26 

Penacook School 6 . 09 

Dewey School 5 .87 

Garrison School 5 . 04 

Franklin School 3.95 

Merrimack School 3 .67 

Cogswell School 3 . 19 

Eastman School 2 .96 

Harriet P. Dame 2.37 

Tahanto School 77 

Sacred Heart School 4 . 03 

St. John's School 3 . 15 

$88.08 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. H., 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street in said district on the twenty-eighth day of 
March, 1912, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening to act upon the 
following subjects: 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years to fill vacancies arising from 
the expiration of the term of office of William H. Sawyer, 
Carrie E. Evans, and Edward C. Niles and to fill any other 
vacancies that may occur in said board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors and all other necessary 
officers for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year, 
including industrial education, military drill, night school 
and medical inspection. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for occasional and extraordinary repairs of the 
school buildings during the ensuing year. 



148 CITY OF CONCORD. 

9. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this ninth day of March, 1912. 

JOHN VANNEVAR, 
WILLIAM H. SAWYER, 
ALICE N. NIMS, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
EDWARD C. NILES, 
D. E. SULLIVAN, ■ 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY. 
Board of Education of Union School District. 

Concord, N. H., March 11, 1912. 

I certify that on the eleventh day of March, 1912, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant, attested by the Board 
of Education of said district at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copy at the police station in the 
city of Concord, N. H., being a public place in said district. 

Signed L. J. RUNDLETT. 

Concord, N. H., March 11, 1912. 
Then personally appeared before me, on this date the 
said L. J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certi- 
ficate by him signed is true. 

Signed GEORGE N. FELLOWS, 

Justice of the Peace. 

A true copy of the warrant, return of service, and certi- 
ficate of the oath. 

Attest: LOUIS C. MERRILL, 

Clerk. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 149 

Concord, N. H., March 28, 1912. 

Agreeable to the foregoing warrant, a meeting of the legal 
voters in Union School District was held at the Auditorium, 
in the city of Concord, N. H., on March 28, 1912, at 7.30 
o'clock in the evening. 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator John 

B. Abbott who read the foregoing warrant. 

Article 1. The Moderator called for votes for moder- 
ator. Mr. H. H. Dudley moved that the clerk cast one 
vote for John B. Abbott for moderator for the ensuing 
year and it was so voted. The clerk cast the vote as directed 
and John B. Abbott having the only vote cast, was declared 
elected moderator, and was duly sworn by Louis C. Merrill, 
Justice of the Peace. 

Article 2. Mr. Henry H. Metcalf moved that the 
moderator cast one vote for Louis C. Merrill for clerk for 
the ensuing year. The moderator cast the vote and declared 
Louis C. Merrill elected Clerk and was sworn by Edward 

C. Niles, Justice of the Peace. 

Article 3. Moved by Henry H. Metcalf to accept the 
reports as printed, motion seconded, a vote taken and 
declared adopted. 

Article 4. Mr. Metcalf moved to ballot for three mem- 
bers of the Board of Education for three years, all the names 
to be on one ticket and that the polls be kept open until 
8.15 o'clock and it was so voted and the Moderator declared 
the polls open. 

On motion of Mr. Harry H. Dudley it was voted to pro- 
ceed with the other articles of the warrant. 

Article 5. Mr. Elwin L. Page moved that the clerk cast 
one ballot for Henry H. Metcalf and John P. George as 
Auditors for the ensuing year and it was so voted, the ballot 
cast and the moderator declared Henry H. Metcalf and 
John P. George elected Auditors. 

Article 6. Mr. Walter T. McLam offered the following 
resolution and moved its adoption : 



150 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolved, That there be raised by tax on the polls and 
ratable estates within Union School District the sum of 
Twelve Thousand Seven Hundred Five Dollars ($12,705) of 
which sum Seven Thousand Dollars ($7,000) shall be 
appropriated for the payment of bonds maturing October 
1, 1912, and Five Thousand Seven Hundred Five Dollars 
($5,705) for the payment of the interest on its funded debt 
accruing during the year. 

A vote was taken and resolution declared adopted. 

Article 7. Mr. Henry H. Metcalf offered the following 
resolution: 

Resolved, That there shall be raised and is hereby ordered 
to be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District for the support of schools for the 
ensuing year such a sum as in addition to the sum assigned 
to the district by the city of Concord out of the appro- 
priation for schools will amount to the sum of Ninety-One 
Thousand Three Hundred Four Dollars and Ninety Three 
Cents ($91,304.93). 

Mr. Metcalf moved the adoption of the resolution, a 
vote was taken and the moderator declared the resolution 
adopted. 

Article 8. The following resolution was offered by Mr. 
Charles G. Remick who moved its adoption : 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District and appropriated for occasional and extra- 
ordinary repairs of school buildings, the sum of Three 
Thousand Eight Hundred Ten Dollars ($3,810), and that 
the expenditure of this sum shall be under the direction of 
the Board of Education of said district, motion seconded. 

A vote was taken and the resolution was declared adopted. 

Article 9. No business being presented, it was voted 
to pass over the article. The Moderator declared the polls 
closed at 8.15 o'clock and appointed Miss Harriet L. 
Huntress, Nathaniel W. Hobbs and Harrie E. Waite a 



SCHOOL REPORT. 151 

committee to sort and count the votes, with the following 
result, 

Whole number of votes cast 172 

Necessary for a choice 87 

John P. George 1 

Harry F. Lake 1 

William H. Sawyer 169 

Edward C. Niles 171 

Carrie E. Evans 171 

and William H. Sawyer, Edward C. Niles, and Carrie E. 
Evans were declared elected members of the Board of 
Education of Union School District for three years and 
then sworn by Louis C. Merrill, Justice of Peace. 
On motion voted to adjourn. 
A true record, Attest : 

LOUIS C. MERRILL, 
Clerk. 



TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

The treasurer of the Town School District of the city 
of Concord respectfully submits the following report of 
the receipts and expenditures for the year ending March, 
1913: 

EECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand March 23, 1912, $200.06 

Amount required by law, 3,316.44 

Additional voted by district, 2,000.00 

Literary fund, 150.70 

Amount received from Walker fund, 2.74 

Amount received from dog licenses, 105.19 
One half superintendent's salary, from state 

treasury, 283.34 

Costs in Potter case, 13.05 

Rebate on tuition from Union District, 9.26 



Total receipts, $6,080.78 

EXPENDITURES. 

Teachers' salaries, $2,774.25 

Text-books and supplies, 158.72 

Fuel, 165.00 

Tuition, Union District, high school, 1,127.37 

Tuition, Union District, Dewey school, 12.00 

Tuition, Union District, H. P. Dame school, 9.00 

Tuition, Penacook, high school, 24.30 

Tuition, school district of Bow, 16.25 

Tuition, school district of Pembroke, 104.50 

Repairs, 228.58 

Conveying scholars, 121.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 


153 


Enumerating children, 


$7.50 


Incidentals, 


86.68 


Janitors, 


75.80 


Water, 


12.00 


Superintendent, 


493.33 


Legal expenses, 


50.00 


Water jars, 


15.26 


Salary of school board, 


200.00 


Salary of treasurer, 


25.00 


Salary of auditor, 


2.00 


Printing check lists, 


10.10 


Balance on hand March 15, 1913, 


362.14 



$6,080.78 

FRANK E. DIMOND, 

Treasurer. 

This certifies that I have examined the foregoing treas- 
urer's accounts and I find them correctly cast and properly 
vouched. 

JOSEPH W. ABBOTT, 
Auditor School Account. 
March 15, 1913. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Concord: 

The annual report of the librarian for the year 1912, 
which is hereto annexed, shows that the work of the library 
has been prosecuted with eminent success, in view of the ex- 
isting conditions. A perusal of that document is recom- 
mended to all who are interested in the educational welfare 
of the city. 

The trustees desire that the usual appropriation for the 
support of the library be made for the present year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. E. WALKER, 
President, Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN FOR 1912. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen, — This has been a year of steady and normal 
work rather than of exceptional accomplishment. 

The number of volumes purchased has been, 580 

Received by gift, 28 

Bound periodicals, 117 

Total number of accessions, 725 

Worn-out volumes withdrawn, 335 

Total increase, 390 

Number of volumes now in library, 31,625 

The net gain to our shelves has been small but our addi- 
tions have been well assorted, providing recent publications 
for the thinker, latest handbooks for the worker and recrea- 
tional literature for old and young.' Those who wish the 
newest fiction can obtain it at small cost from two circulat- 
ing libraries in our city — excellent enterprises with which 
our library has not thought it desirable to compete by start- 
ing a so-called "pay collection." 

The desk circulation has amounted to 87,287, only two 
books being lost out of this number. In 1911 the circula- 
tion was 91,338. If we had purchased every book asked 
for without considering whether such purchases were wise 
and if we had bought unlimited copies of the stories by 
McCutcheon, Myrtle Reed, Harold Bell Wright, Gene 
Stratton-Porter, Ellis and Stratemeyer, we might not have 
had a 4,000 decrease in circulation to report. But would 
such a disproportionate expenditure of money be approved 
by the most inveterate novel reader if she were at the same 
time a taxpayer? 



156 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ten years ago it would have caused us worry to find the 
desk work falling short, but as every year is increasingly 
crowded with entertainments in town, it seems inevitable 
that fewer books will be taken out from a public library for 
home reading when people stay less and less in their homes. 

Our windows command a low-priced theatre and its 
crowded entrance gives us food for thought; not for harsh 
criticism, for persons perhaps see there that which instructs 
or cheers; and we remember that the most commended 
portions of Travelogs by men like Elmendorf are made up 
of motion pictures. Moreover, an able paper lately read in 
conservative England said that every well-equipped library 
should own besides its customary lecture hall, a moving 
picture apparatus which would do more than anything else 
to help it be a great force in education. The loss in the 
patronage of this librae has been chiefly an evening loss, 
and I wish we owned the best cinematograph in Concord 
and by it could win back those lads from the poorer classes 
who used to flock in to our young folks' corner to hunt 
for entertaining books; and that we could by it make habit- 
ual customers of those children who frequent the library 
only when pressed by their teachers to do so. 

The Library Journal has hinted that our annual report 
lacks statistics. I own to a neglect of them; yet they would 
be given from a sense of duty if such tables of numbers 
would give what statistics should, namely, facts. But until 
public libraries agree fully in classifying and the method of 
making records, one library will say it circulates 45.4 per 
cent, fiction and another 77.6, and the fact will be that 
both serve an average public in an average way; and that 
recorded use is not the actual use I find emphasized by fel- 
low-librarians. Our fiction reading hovers around the 70 
per cent, mark; but as there is more work done by fewer 
assistants in this library than in any of our acquaintance, 
it does not seem desirable to take time to figure out that 
fiction lost .005 of 1 per cent, in its hold upon a trustworthy 
public. 

But any remissness on our part in formulating tables of 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 157 

statistics should be made up for so far as possible by un- 
remitting observation, and for every sum we do not do, we 
should make a note of the changes in the trend of public 
reading, so that our institution may "function up to the 
new needs of the times." 

It would be ungrateful not to confess that now and then 
we avail ourselves of the estimates made by other libraries; 
for example, we learn through the always fine report of the 
Grand Rapids Public Library that about 75 per cent, of 
those who have registered at a library remain its readers. 
We have over 9,600 signed application blanks; 650 new 
names were added in 1912. Allowing for many cards having 
lapsed without their owners duly notifying us, we are keep- 
ing hold of a creditable share of 22,000 citizens, though far 
below the number we want to retain. In one town the li- 
brarian never uses the word borrowers, feeling that as the 
library is public property it is a misnomer to employ a word 
which implies that people are getting a favor rather than a 
right. I will term anybody a first cause or an ultimate 
object of the library if he will only take out often our worth- 
while books. 

Comparative librarianship is the study of our leisure 
moments and it appears that we fall behind those librarians 
who wage aggressive appeal, who send reminders to absentee 
card-holders, who ask the use of school buildings for branch 
libraries, who buy advertising space in street cars, who 
send book-lists to be enclosed in shop pay-rolls, who write 
circular letters to all in the City Directory living in homes 
where no one is using the library, who send printed re- 
minders to graduating boys and girls that this is a contin- 
uation school, who pile up privileges for teachers, who make 
model exhibits at State Fairs. Upon reading of these 
admirable doings, I project a similar campaign but am 
checked bj r the thought which amounts to certainty, that 
superintendent and principals are too busy for that recom- 
mended "persistent and systematic cooperation between 
school and library"; and that in Concord, at least, many 
interesting and beneficial classes have already been formed 



158 CITY OF CONCORD. 

which do not have a good attendance. How can one ask 
.young folks to join clubs even to improve their literary- 
taste, when one hears them complain of having too much to 
do and sees some of them break down from a surfeit of 
engagements to meet? 

No, our library shall be as well stocked and as alluring 
as modest funds and a crowded building will permit, and 
attention shall be called to it as frequently as it seems wise 
to ask the newspapers for space; but it must rely largely 
on its merits for custom. Does it not go against the grain 
of a library to have to keep coaxing people into it? Should 
one have to burn red fire or beat a tambourine in front of 
its reading room, which is light, warm, supplied with sixty 
periodicals and located on a central street-corner? 

We had meant to advance the library by extreme methods, 
but conclude we lack the temperament that can push; 
therefore we take this opportunity to say that we should 
like to be asked to do any of the extension work outlined 
above. 

Meanwhile, because stagnation is death, we try to vary 
the library attractively; witness the alcove in the School 
Street hall where seats before shelves containing 200 new 
books enable persons to browse as in a little bookstore. 
The} r have taken kindly to the corner, and a traveling man 
who read there on three occasions exclaimed, 

"Oh, these comfortable New England libraries! I don't 
know what I should do without them!" 

In these days when children have to do so much supple- 
mentary reading that they grow to regard the library as 
another task-giver, it has been a welcome sight to see a 
boy or girl take out a book in this alcove, sit down and 
be lost to all thought of chores and the supper hour. 

When at the other end of the hall was placed an exhibition 
of large photographs of famous paintings, our little unpre- 
tentious building had in humble measure the ideal atmos- 
phere for a public library, inasmuch as art and literature 
were there free to all. 

If the appreciation of the new-book alcove continues 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 159 

sufficient and no petty thievery is attempted, the feature 
may be maintained longer than the month for which it was 
arranged. Some of its patrons are surprised that we think 
surveillance may be necessary; but it is a fact and perhaps 
ought to be more generally known, that we are occasionally 
troubled by mutilation and theft of magazines, by the 
taking out of books without bringing them to the desk to 
be charged and by the misbehaviour of readers, not merely 
juvenile ones but those of high school and street loafer 
age. It is discouraging to feel that as free as the library 
is in every way, there are yet some who are abusing its 
privileges. 

I was in Ottawa last July at the time of the meeting in 
that city of the American Library Association and with 150 
out of the 800 delegates took the post-conference trip up 
the Saguenay River. One may not learn much at a na- 
tional gathering that she can introduce into her own small 
library, but one cannot be a fortnight in hotel, steamboat 
and shops without realizing from what she herself experi- 
ences, that the essential of ministering to the public is 
pleasantness. Is this an obligation, however, when dealing 
with disorderly customers? Should the sentiment about 
boys being boys shield them from sharp reprimand and 
prompt ejection? This autumn when there came a recur- 
rence on Sunday afternoons of trouble with young folks 
who were not obedient to correction and were wilful rather 
than thoughtless, it was decided to engage a man for Sunday 
attendant. He has now been on duty nine times; he has 
felt the need of arranging for the quick call of a policeman 
on some occasions, while on other afternoons he has seen 
as many as 76 readers come and go quietly; of these, 48 
were male and 28 female. It is regrettable that more 
transient people do not enjoy the reading room on Sundays; 
those who come then are usually the ones who frequent the 
library and are already familiar with its resources. 

It is gratifying to see, through reports of other libraries, 
that our usage both as concerns discipline and privileges 
is in accord with that found advisable bv them. Each 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

had had to solve her own problems as intuition and experi- 
ence dictated; but the resultant code of rules varies little 
for all libraries. We alter ours seldom now except to 
remove restrictions. This last year we have omitted with- 
out perceiving any harmful results, the clause, "Persons 
may not exchange their books oftener than once in three 
days." Originally inserted to prevent children from over- 
devouring stories, this regulation prevented our consistently 
giving out material really needed by adults. 

It was voted at our last annual meeting to issue a con- 
tinuation to the fiction catalogue and accordingly Supple- 
ment No. 2 was printed at a cost of 40 cents each. They 
were put on sale at 25 cents each, but only $7.75 worth have 
thus far been disposed of. 

It is a pleasure to speak of the work of the Reference 
Room for it has been good in quantity and quality. It is 
impossible to keep accurate count of all who consult the 
books on its shelves because many come to the room when 
the attendant is at dinner, but she has recorded from the 
beginning of the school year, i. e., the third week in Sep- 
tember, to December 31, 1,620 inquirers; for December 
alone, 345; for the entire year, 4,476, a gain of more than 
500 over 1911. The information sought has been of the 
miscellaneous character usual in reference rooms. In one 
day Miss Brown looked up answers to the following 
questions : 

How do you make bayberry candles? 

Should capital punishment be abolished? 

Are the New Hampshire laws for the protection of ani- 
mals well-devised? 

What does induction mean? 

What is the life history of a partridge? 
• Who has the power to impeach the President? 

Has the poor man more temptations than the rich? 

How does public opinion stand in regard to railroad 
rates? 

Where shall I find a critique of Churchill's novels? 

Have you any books on household decoration? 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 161 

Can you give me late laws and articles relating to child 
labor? 

And while encyclopaedias, bound magazines and Poole's 
Index were being consulted above stairs, on the first floor 
varied demands were being met. Arrangement was being 
made with the efficient secretary of the Y. M. C. A. to send 
books monthly to the jail. A fit quotation was being 
sought for engraving on a private Christmas card. A man 
was consulting as to whether a certain subscription set was 
worth buying. One of our valued customers was asking 
what would enlighten him along philosophical and religious 
lines and also what would assist his wife in writing a club 
paper. The director of the Morrill School had come for 
the purpose of ascertaining what trade periodicals we would 
take for the coming year and how they could be used to 
best advantage by his pupils. A foreigner was in for books 
in French and to solicit us to pass along the notice that he 
would teach that language. And the afternoon ended with 
the willing loan of our bindery trays wherewith to move a 
lady's private library. 

A day like this is a very happy one to a librarian, no 
matter how tiring it may be, for hers has fulfilled the modern 
mission of a public library and become "more a fountain 
than a reservoir." 

It was President Faunce of Brown University (recalled 
by Concordians as living when a boy where the Telephone 
building now stands), who said to the Hartford Theological 
Seminary that the public library should be a part of the 
working capital of every pastor. It is pleasing to state 
that the ministers of our city are keen to seize upon the best 
we have in their department. I wish the same could be 
said of the craftsmen; and we should welcome any sugges- 
tion as to hew the library could be made more useful to 
industrial workers. 

From the questions instanced, it will be seen that inquiry 
does not run as of old when the majority of subjects looked 
up were literary. A librarian who grew up among standard 

11 



162 CITY OF CONCORD. 

works is in danger of feeling intellectual snobbishness when 
the rising generation does not know her old gods. A boy 
learning to be a compositor in the Manual Training School 
brings in for our revision his galley proof of a reading list 
and it is rather a shock to see thereon titles such as : — 

Heney Esmond 

Idles of the king 

The Vicar of Mansfield 

The Outcast of the Breakfast Table 

We happen to know that the Vicar lived at Wakefield 
and to have had a lifelong acquaintance with the Autocrat, 
but that boy knows things that we do not; he is going to 
make a printer whose craftsmanship would amaze the un- 
practical Vicar, and he is absorbing ideas from the beauti- 
ful pages of Printer's Art instead of from the Atlantic Monthly. 
A library, like an individual, has got to help people in their 
way not in its way; it must feel no touch of resentment if a 
man wants "Twentieth Century Socialism" and does not 
want George Meredith's Letters. Enough if it has made 
provision for the higher education of all citizens. 

Personally I have this past year realized afresh that a 
library can be something vital to an individual, for during 
a period of ill health in the spring a book like " Nerves and 
Common Sense" was a genuine tonic; and I believe that, 
as is said in "The Human Way" (essays which are them- 
selves most sustaining to the spirit), "There will always be 
those who will have to lean upon the printed word." 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

City Librarian. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Health submits the following report for 
the year ending December 31, 1912. 

Regular meetings have been held on the first Monday of 
each month. At these meetings considerable business of a 
routine nature has been transacted, bills scrutinized and 
matters pertaining to the health of the city discussed with 
the sanitary officer and others who were present. 

The city has been singularly free from epidemics of con- 
tagious disease during the past year, and as a natural con- 
sequence no extraordinary action has been required of this 
board. 

The report of the sanitary officer, Mr. Palmer, and that 
of the milk inspector, Dr. Duncan, shows in some detail 
the work coming under the supervision of this board. 
These reports are hereby transmitted and made a part of 
this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, 
CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., 
F. A. SPRAGUE, 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen, — The records of all milk examinations are 
tabulated in the general department report. These records 
as soon as made are a matter of public record in the office 
of the Board of Health. 

Examinations show that the milk sold in Concord is a 
wholesome, clean milk in most cases. We can frankly say- 
that with one exception it is the best milk sold in any city 
in New Hampshire. Not all milk sold is equally good. 
The best milks are those that come from farms owned and 
operated by the man who brings our milk to the door. 
Personality has a great deal to do with clean milk. The 
best milk plants in the city lose their value immediately 
when a careless "hired man" contaminates through igno- 
rance or otherwise the working apparatus of that plant. 

The inspector cooperates with the retailers of our city 
in every way. I was present by invitation at their annual 
meeting and listened with great interest to their discus- 
sion of the conditions about Concord. In a talk to them 
I made clear our methods of examination of milk and showed 
how the "filtration test" is managed, by performing the 
test before them, and invited their cooperation with the 
inspector for cleaner milk. 

The men do cooperate with the inspector, and examina- 
tions made for them to detect adulteration in milk they buy 
for their trade is a routine procedure. Often I am called 
upon to pass upon a milk for taste, odor or color, due to 
bacteria in the milk in most cases, but in others due to dis- 
ease of cow. Most complaints the inspector receives are 
from milks of the last mentioned character and in some 
cases the fault lies with the consumer as well as the retailer. 

The guinea pig test for tuberculosis is still a routine pro- 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 165 

cedure. It is our only safeguard without the aid of the 
tuberculin test to protect the public from milk containing 
the germ of tuberculosis. One positive test was found dur- 
ing the year and the condition corrected. 

The public should be taught to use milk only from tuber- 
culin tested cows. There is no means at present to force 
this test upon those who raise milk in our city, but there is 
a spirit among the farmers to go more than half way with 
any means that might be devised to have the test done, if 
the cost could be made reasonable. The state takes no 
action in such matters but there is every reason that the 
matter should be seriously considered by both city and 
state as the only means by which we can be sure we are 
not consuming tubercular contaminated milk. 

Yours truly, 

CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen, — The report of the sanitary officer for the 
year ending December 31, 1912, is herewith submitted, 
giving the various tables which show in detail the work of 
the department. 

With the exception of a slight epidemic of measles in 
February and March which continued until after the school 
closed in June, the city was remarkably free from contagious 
diseases. During the year there were reported 17 cases of 
diphtheria with 1 death; 7 cases of scarlet fever with no 
deaths; 15 cases of typhoid fever with 4 deaths; 321 cases 
of measles with 2 deaths and 2 cases of infantile paralysis 
with 1 death, making a total of 362 cases and 8 deaths, com- 
pared with 95 cases and 6 deaths for the year 1911. Cases 
of whooping cough, chicken pox and mumps are not re- 
ported to this department. 

There were 466 deaths returned for the year 1912, 7 
more than in 1911. The deaths of non-residents and still 
births, which totaled 181, were not included in reckoning 
the death rate. With these omitted the death rate, based 
on a population of 21,497, was 13.25, compared with 13.34 
in 1911. There were 252 deaths in the nine wards of the 
city and 214 deaths at the public institutions. The mor- 
tality from tuberculosis was such lower than ever before, 
there being only 15 deaths for the year 1912, 14 less than 
in 1911, 17 less than in 1910 and 25 less than in 1909. 
This shows a steady decline which is certainly gratifying. 
There were 189 bodies removed from Concord for burial 
in other places and 129 bodies were brought here for inter- 
ment. 

The use of formaldehyde was continued in fumigation 
and your attention is called to the table which shows the 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 167 

amount of work done in this line. The school books owned 
by Union School District were fumigated at the close of 
school in June. Besides the fumigation after recovery or 
death from contagious diseases, rooms were fumigated upon 
request in a number of instances for various causes, the 
material being paid for by the owner. 

The plumbing jobs completed during the year complied 
with the regulations, water tests being made of all new 
work and peppermint tests made of old work upon request. 
Several changes were made in our plumbing rules when the 
City Ordinances were revised. 

Inspections were made of all the barber shops in our city 
and with one exception conditions were found to be good 
and the rules governing barber shops were being complied 
with. 

Samples of Penacook Lake water were analyzed at the 
State Laboratory at different times and found to be satis- 
factory. A sample of water taken from the well at White 
Park in June showed no improvement over past anaylses, 
and a new well was driven later in the month which showed 
water practically identical in character. When this water 
was found to be unsuitable for public use, arrangements 
were made for the use of city water for drinking purposes. 

In our efforts in carrying out the vaccination law in 
Union School District, in private and parochial schools and 
in the schools in Penacook we have received the hearty 
cooperation of the school boards, superintendents, princi- 
pals and teachers, and have had no trouble in producing 
satisfactory results. But in the out-lying districts we have 
been opposed by the school board, the superintendent and 
the teachers, with two exceptions, and have received no 
assistance whatever. I have been obliged to exclude chil- 
dren from school and also to call on the city solicitor for 
his services in bringing about such results as have been 
obtained, and I recommend to the law abiding citizens of 
the out-lying district to elect such persons to office as will 
not oppose the carrying out of the laws that govern our 
state and city. 



168 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The appropriation for the Health Department for the 
year 1912 was $2,600 and the expenses were $2,542.92, 
showing a balance of $57.08. We received $31.01 from the 
sale of antitoxin and fumigation supplies. Owing to the 
small number of cases of diphtheria it was unnecessary to 
purchase antitoxin, there being a supply on hand at the 
close of the year 1911. This antitoxin was returned to the 
manufacturers when it became out-dated and a fresh supply 
was sent us in exchange. 

In closing this report I wish to thank the Mayor and the 
other members of the Board of Health, the members of the 
city government, the city solicitor and all others who have 
given me advice and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



health department. 169 

Expenditures of the Board of Health of the City of 
Concord for the Year Ending December 31, 1912. 

salaries. 

Charles E. Palmer, sanitary officer, salary, $1,400.00 

Charles Duncan, M. D., milk inspector, salary, 300.00 

fumigation supplies. 

International Chemical Company, germ destroy- 
ers, 22.40 

A. H. Knowlton & Co., formaldehyde and per- 
manganate, 16 . 29 

Charles E. Palmer, freight charge on fumigation 

supplies, . 82 

antitoxin and medical supplies. 

A. H. Knowlton & Co., medical supplies, 1.75 

W. C. Spicer, Larkspur Lotion, 6 . 00 

incidental expenses. 

C. H. Cook, M. D., substituting for sanitary 

officer, 1911 and 1912 80.43 

Helen O. Monier, services, 535 . 00 

Rumford Printing Company, mortuary reports, 24 . 00 
New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

rental, 20.75 
Charles E. Palmer, postage, car fare, etc., 33.65 
The Evans Press, printing, 24 . 00 
Ira C. Evans Company, printing, 2 . 50 
Edson C. Eastman, office supplies, 3 . 35 
Brown and Saltmarsh, office supplies, . 75 
Rumford Printing Company, pamphlets and cir- 
culars, 21.75 
A. R. Andrews, office supplies, 1 . 15 
The Gift Shop, carbon paper, . 88 
The Cragg Bindery, record books, 20 . 00 



170 CITY OF CONCORD. 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., filing cabinet, $12.50 
C. W. Drake, setting glass, . 40 
Library Bureau, vaccination cards, 1 . 65 
George L. Theobald, burying horse, 2 . 00 
Raphael Bias, burying pig, 1 . 00 
A. P. Baker, provisions, Provencal family, diph- 
theria, 9 . 90 

Total, $2,542.92 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1912. 

Milk license fees, $ 186 . 65 

Sale of diphtheria antitoxin, 19 . 70 

Sale of fumigation supplies, 11.31 

Total, $217.66 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



171 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during each month of the year and the 
deaths resulting therefrom: 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet Typhoid 
fever. fever. 


Infantile 
paralysis. 


Measles. 


Months. 


i 


■3 
p 


3 


la 
P 


O 


P 


3 


1 

03 
P 


'& 
o 


■5 

P 




3 


2 

1 












3 

23' 
52 
60 
58 
83 
36 

4 

1 








































April 


2 
















2 






1 
















3 
4 
1 






2 
1 

1 
9 
2 




2 


1 






1 










1 




1 
2 
1 


















3 






























December 


1 




2 












1 


















Totals 


17 


1 


7 




15 


4 


2 


1 


321 


2 



REPORT OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 



Wards. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Totals. 










2 




4 
3 
11 


1 

2 
1 


9 


1 


17 




1 




1 


7 




3 








15 
























1 

46 






1 

47 






2 




86 


7 


24 


26 


64 


3 


18 


321 




• 



172 



CITY OF <'<>\<<)R1). 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the 
years since and including 1890: 





Infantile 
paralysis. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals. 


Years. 


8 
S 
o 


03 

Q 


8 
3 

o 


03 

Q 


s 


o3 

Q 


i 


1 

03 

Q 


1 

03 

o 


Jja 

Q 


8 
3 

o 


J3 
Q 


i 


J 

Q 


1890.... 






6 
12 
13 
48 
17 
35 
55 
13 
4 
9 
29 
65 
29 
42 
55 
15 
14 
63 
44 
131 
30 
51 
17 


2 
3 
3 
7 
3 
8 
8 
1 

5 
5 
5 

2 
4 
3 
1 
2 
2 
4 
6 
1 
2 
1 


9 

7 
37 
41 
113 
44 

4 
22 

8 

99 
39 
11 

6 
39 
18 
80 
27 
26 

7 
23 
10 

8 

7 


3 

6 

8 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


17 
14 

7 
13 
13 
21 
15 
17 

8 
14 
18 
13 
23 
17 
12 
23 
32 
11 

6 
28 
16 
10 
15 


5 
6 
1 
2 
3 
3 
5 
2 
4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

1 

4 

3 

4 


6 

2 

2 

300 

21 
158 
452 
138 
126 
299 
476 

40 

27 
582 

31 
181 
101 
118 
100 
1,168 
143 

26 
321 






38 


7 


1891.... 












35 


9 


1892.... 












59 
402 
164 

258 


7 


1893. . . . 












q 


1894.... 












n 


1895.... 












19 


1896... 












526 


13 


1897.... 












190 
146 
421 
562 
130 
87 
682 
116 
299 
175 
218 
157 
1,350 
199 
95 
362 


4 


1898.... 












4 


1899. . . . 












7 


1900.... 






1 
4 






7 


1901... 






1 
2 

2 


1 


9 


1902.... 






5 


1903.... 






11 


1904.... 






4 


1905.... 






1 
1 




5 


1906.... 






1 .... 


6 


1907... . 






3 


1908.... 










5 


1909. . . . 






1 




11 


1910.... 








?, 


1911... 










fi 


1912.. 


2 


1 


2 




8 









health department. 173 

Nuisances, Complaints and Inspections. 

A statement of the number and character of the nuisances 
for the year 1912 appears below: 

Accumulation of ashes and other rubbish, 11 

Catch basin traps broken, 6 

Complaints made without cause, 3 

Conditions in grocery stores and markets, 2 

Dead animals, 24 

Drinking water questionable, 3 

Dumping rubbish and odor from dumps, 9 

Expectorating in house and on street, 3 

Food suspected of being adulterated, 1 

Keeping geese unconfined, 1 

Keeping hens, 6 

Keeping hogs, 15 

Milk ordinance not being complied with, 1 

Odor from garbage, 12 

Odor from manure, 6 

Odor from privy vaults, 7 

Odor from sewers, 1 

Odor from slaughtering, 2 

Odor from stables, 3 

Odor in blocks, 4 

Odor in houses, 20 

Odor in stores, 2 

Other complaints and inspections, 54 

Pediculosis, 2 

Sewers obstructed, 1 

Sink drains offensive, 7 

Stagnant water, 1 

Stone drains obstructed, 1 

Suspected contagious disease, 1 

Suspected rabies, 1 

Throwing out slops and rubbish, 8 

Uncleanly condition of barber shops, 1 

Uncleanly condition of premises, 14 



174 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Uncleanly condition of water closets, 7 

Uncleanly condition of watering troughs, 1 

Water closets out of repair, 9 

Water in cellars, 9 

Total, 259 

Inspection of Plumbing. 

Plumbing permits granted, 95 

Number of inspections made, 190 

Water-closets put in, 179 

Sinks put in, 171 

Bath-tubs put in, 78 

Wash-bowls put in, 140 

Wash-trays put in, 27 

Urinals put in, 3 

Shower baths put in, 6 

Slop-sinks put in, 8 

Glass washers put in, 1 

Number of sewers inspected, 38 

, Fumigation. 

Rooms fumigated, 290 

Schoolrooms fumigated, 20 

School buildings fumigated, 1 

Wards at hospitals fumigated, 19 

Cellars fumigated, 5 

Closets fumigated, 10 

Dungeons at prison fumigated, 6 
Dormitories fumigated, 
Taxicabs fumigated, 
Stables fumigated, 
Tombs fumigated, 
Gymnasium fumigated, 
Books and pieces of clothing fumigated, 



health department. 175 

Report of Milk Examinations and Inspection of Milk 

Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 214 

Number of examinations below standard, 1 

Number of samples dirty, 2 

Number of tests for tuberculosis found negative, 2 

Number of tests for tuberculosis found positive, 1 

Number of milk farms inspected, 43 

Conditions good, 17 

Conditions fair, 17 

Conditions poor, 9 

Number of notices and recommendations given, 24 

Summary. 

Houses placarded in cases of contagious diseases, 199 

Placards removed, 199 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 302 

Burial permits issued, 466 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, 129 

Transit permits issued, 189 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were issued, 190 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, . 52 
Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to the 

state board of health, 52 
Number of reports sent to the surgeon general, public 

health and marine-hospital service, 52 

Number of mortuary reports issued, 948 
Number of vaccination certificates issued to school 

children, 1,039 
Number of permits issued for children to return to 

school after recovery from contagious diseases, 45 

Number of samples of water collected for analysis, 7 

Number of inspections of barber shops, 19 



176 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



DEATHS DURING 1912, BY SEX, CONDITION 
AND NATIVITY, BY MONTHS. 



Males 

Females 

CONDITION. 

Married 

Single 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Not stated 

NATIVITY. 

Concord 

New Hampshire 

Other states 

Foreign 

Not stated 



18 | 18 
20 17 



244 
222 

165 
165 

118 
7 
11 

117 
157 
80 
97 
15 



health department. 177 

Deaths by Age. 

Under 1 year, 59 

From 1 to 5 years, 11 

From 5 to 10 years, 7 

From 10 to 15 years, 5 

From 15 to 20 years, 6 

From 20 to 30 years, 25 

From 30 to 40 years, 39 

From 40 to 50 years, 36 

From 50 to 60 years, 67 

From 60 to 70 years, 68 

From 70 to 80 years, 92 

From 80 to 90 years, 45 

From 90 to 100 years, 3 

Not stated, 3 

Total number of deaths, 466 



12 



178 



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188 



CITY OF CONCORD. 






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190 



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HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



191 



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CITY OF CONCORD. 



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194 



CITY OF CONCORD. 






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PUBLIC PARKS. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council: 

The Park Commissioners present herewith their report 
for the year ending December 31, 1912: 



Receipts. 




General appropriation, 


$3,500.00 


For Penacook Park, 


125.00 




<ro anx of) 




tPO,U<£O.UU 


Unexpended, 


4.58 




$2,620.42 


Expenditures. 




Salary of superintendent, 


$1,080.00 


WHITE PARK. 




Paid for labor, 


$1,057.63 


labor on ice, 


31.50 


labor removing moths, 


36.25 


shrubs, 


88.15 


repairs, 


79.03 


hardware, 


8.25 


city water, 


15.00 


care of swans and ducks, 


40.00 


incidentals, 


181.65 

fl rot Aa 




<jpl,Oo I .*±o 


ROLLINS PARK. 




Paid for labor, 


$480.25 


trees and shrubs, 


50.00 



196 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid for lepairs, $36.33 

hardware, 16.00 

incidentals, 27.21 

incidentals, 106.00 

$715.79 

PENACOOK PARK. 

Paid for labor, etc., 123.17 

BRADLEY PARK. 

Paid for labor, 38.00 

FISKE PARK. 

Paid for labor, 35.00 

COURT HOUSE PARK. 

Paid for labor, 45.00 

RIDGE AVENUE PARK. 

Paid for labor, 18.00 

PECKER PARK. 

Paid for labor, 12.00 

AREA AT SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 

Paid for labor, 16.00 



$3,620.42 



In summing up the work on the parks for the past year, 
it can only be a rehearsal of the character of the work in 
former years, yet in the review of the last year some progress 
has been made. The iron fence has been extended along 
Center Street at White Park, leaving only about two hun- 
dred feet to complete this side. It is hoped to begin on 
White Street, which with a suitable entrance would add 
greatly to the utility and preservation of the grounds. 

A sanitary drinking fountain was placed at the White 
Street entrance and it has proved a convenience and others 
should be installed. In June the use of the park was given 
to the schools of the city to inaugurate the Folk Dances 
which had been practised in the schools. It was a most 



PUBLIC PARKS. 197 

successful event and it would have been hard to find a more 
beautiful setting for the occasion. It is hoped that it will 
be repeated from year to year. 

The usual work at Rollins Park has been carried on and 
the grounds have presented a splendid effect. The play- 
ground south of this park has been developed this year more 
than ever by united efforts and it has proved a success. 

The superintendent, Mr. Atkinson, has been diligent, in 
making the most at hand to maintain the character of the 
work on the parks during the past year. 

At the request of the mayor, the superintendent has cared 
for the plants and flowers at Memorial Arch. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex officio, 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 

GARDNER B. EMMONS, 

BENJ. C. WHITE, 

WILLIAM P. FISKE, 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 

Commissioners. 



198 



CITY OF CONCORD. 









d the following 

$1,700.00 
500.00 

50.00 
on to original 
0. 

ity has made 
lying 86,557.50 


B 


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shore of Per 
control of t 
95. City h 
3 spent fn 
in 1883, ; 
3. 




nd in East Conco 
was paid for by 
. Eastman Pccki 
Park, to which 
for sun-dial a 




1 

o 

55 


ceive 

11, 
1, 

.dditi 
$2,10 

he c 

ift, pi 


the 
ader 
in 18 
I ha: 
work 
444.1 






White Park has re 

gifts- 
Mrs. N. White, 
Mrs. C. H. Newha 
Mr. C. H. Newhal 

for bridge, 
The city made a 

gift, paying therefor 

Rollins Park. T 
addition to original g 
therefor. 

Penacook Park, on 
cook Lake, came ui 
park commissioners 
charge before, and 
commencement of 
additional sum of $4, 




A small piece of la 
r as developed and 
ift of $200 from J 
nd named Pecker 
as added $160.96 
ther improvements. 








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FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordin- 
ance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1912. 

The department responded to 63 bell alarms and 192 still 
alarms. 

In addition two fires occurred in Penacook for which 
no alarms were given, making a total for the year of 257, 
a decrease of 58 compared with the record of the previous 
year. 





Bells. 


Still. 


No Alarm. 


Total. 


Precinct, 


33 


150 




183 


Penacook, 


21 


26 


2 


49 


East Concord, 


5 


7 




12 


West Concord, 


4 


9 




13 



63 192 2 257 

This report will be found to contain statements in de- 
tail embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete 
roll of the department with residence and occupation of 
each member, a record of all fires and alarms which have 
occurred during the year and the causes thereof as nearly 
as could be ascertained, with the names of the owners or 
occupants and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance re- 
covered in each case. 

No particularly dangerous fires occurred during the year 
and there was a marked decrease in the number of forest 
fires. 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The largest loss accompanying one fire was that entailed 
by the lumber yard fire at Penacook June 29th. 

The apparatus is in good condition and no extensive 
repairs were required during the year. 

The fire alarm telegraph systems of the city proper and 
Penacook are in good condition. 

It was found necessary to renew the battery elements of 
the former in June. 

Two boxes, 131, 191, for use in the northwest section of 
the city were purchased but not delivered in time to be 
placed in position before the close of the year. 

Eight hundred feet of 2^-inch hose and three horses were 
purchased. 

The Alert Station was remodeled and the wagon is now 
running as a two-horse wagon. 

This leaves but one one-horse wagon in the precinct and 
I respectfully recommend that this be made a two-horse 
wagon. 

I also recommend the purchase of at least 500 feet of 
2|-inch hose during the coming year. One noticeable 
improvement made during the year was the installing of 
a standpipe in the Central Station with hose connections 
in basement and on first and second floors. 

The expense of this as well as that attending remodeling 
the Alert Station was borne by the Committee on Lands 
and Buildings. During the month of September, I had the 
pleasure of attending the convention of the International 
Association of Fire Engineers held at Denver, Col., a report 
of which I rendered at that time. The convention was a 
largely attended and instructive one and for the privilege 
afforded me to learn I was sincerely grateful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 



fire department. 203 

Appropriations. 



Appropriation, 


$26,503.00 


Joint resolution, horse, 


325.00 


pair horses, 


600.00 


outstanding claims, 


1,492.95 




<P^O,i7i£U . uO 


Disbursements. 


Permanent men, 


$8,114.00 


Vacations, 


834.60 


Rent, Veterans' Association, 


150.00 


Call men, 


8,640.00 


Forage, 


2,245.33 


Fuel, 


968.49 


Lights, 


706.42 


Incidentals, 


2,351.97 


Horse shoeing, 


358.50 


Horses purchased, 


925.00 


Horse hire, 


890.53 


Laundry, 


52.00 


Fire alarm, 


1,422.18 


Supplies, chemical engine, 


45.14 


Hose, 


800.00 


Water, 


119.50 


House man, 


100.00 


Penacook fire alarm, 


197.29 

foo nor* ok 




tjj)^o,j7iiU . yj 


ALARMS. 




Precinct. 





Box 25. January 3, 9.14 p. m. Fire on third floor of 
Governor Hill block, 64 North Main Street, owned by Harry 
G. Emmons, C. C. Hill and Mary W. Ladd. Occupied by 
various parties. Fire originated in room used by W. W. 
Hill for the storage of furniture. Caused by defective 



204 CITY OF CONCORD. 

smoke pipe which ran through the room. Fire confined to 
room. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $30,000.00 $40.00 $20,000.00 $40.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 377.62 1,700.00 377.62 

Box 413. January 4, 12.30 p. m. False alarm. Recall 
12.35 p. m. Culprit heavily fined the following day. 

Still. January 4, 12.31 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
charring of piece of meat in oven in residence of James O. 
Lyforcl, 11 Pitman Street. Attended to by members of 
Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 7.27 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. H. Cox, 147 North State Str*eet. Extinguished by 
chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 10.21 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Earl Newton, 50 North Spring Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 10.58 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of B. W. Couch, 7 Merrimack Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 2.56 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. Cote, 49 Thorndike Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of B. A. Kimball, 44 South Main Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Company. No loss. 

Still. January 7, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. A. K. Goodale, 44 South Main Street. Members of 
Good Will Company responded. See next alarm. 

Still. January 7, 9.48 a. m. A call for assistance from 
the scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. January 7, 2.13 p. m. A. C. Cochrane, 6 Mont- 
gomery Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No 
loss. 

Still. January 7, 2.31 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Sherman Comstock, 5 Monroe Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 205 

Still. January 8, 2.13 p. m. Slight fire in residence of 
Frank O'Brien, 16 Water Street. Caused by attempt to 
thaw pipe with fire. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. January 12, 10.17 a. m. Alarm occasioned by re- 
port that the city crematory was afire. Chemical Company 
responded but no assistance was required. Employees 
burning brush. No loss. 

Still. January 13, 4.25 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
smoking of stove in Home Realty Block, 34 Warren Street. 
Chemical Company responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. No fire. 

Still. January 14, 11.00 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
blowing up of water front in stove in residence of Mrs. J. C. 
Ordway, 13 Center Street. Chemical Company responded 
but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. January 14, 3.55 p. m. Set of buildings consist- 
ing of house, combined barn, shed and ice house, on the 
shore of Penacook Lake owned and occupied by Frank E. 
Horner destroyed. Cause probably overheated chimney. 
No apparatus sent as it would have been of no avail. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Buildings, $1,500.00 $1,500.00 $1,100.00 $1,100.00 

Contents, 1,000.00 1,000.00 400.00 300.00 

2-2-2. January 15, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. January 17, 6.38 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Stallers, 6 Lewis Court. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. January 20, 1.13 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at 3 Turner Avenue. Chemical Company responded. No 
fire. No loss. 

Still. January 20, 4.47 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Marcus, 3 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Box 35. January 20, 8.08 p. m. Burning of awning on 
building, 2 North Main Street, owned by Nancy L. Dut- 
ton, and occupied by George W. Nutter, druggist. Caused 



206 CITY OF CONCORD. 

probably by throwing of cigarette stub from above. Recall, 
8.15 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $20,000.00 $7.01 $5,000.00 $7.01 

Contents, 14,600.00 57.30 2,000.00 57.30 

Still. January 21, 8.16 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Robert J. Macquire, 88 Pleasant Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 3.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Perry, 45 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 5.25 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. E. E. Blair, 105 School Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 8.08 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. E. P. Clark, 79 South Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 28, 12.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. H. Currier, 24 Maple Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 28, 3.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Wilfred Struthers, 37 Concord Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. January 28, 5.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Woodbury Hunt, 10 Court Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 6.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Charette, 14 Ferry Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 3, 6.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Abbott, 236 North Main Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. February 6, 11.23 p. m. Slight fire in residence, 
13 Oak Street, owned and occupied by Henry Chandler. 
Cause unknown. Extinguished by Chemical Company. , 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $5.00 $1,500.00 $5.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 207 

Still. February 8, 2.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. M. Stearns, 220 North Main Street, Extinguished 
by detail from Central Station. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 8.26 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. W. Brown, 77 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 2.12 p. m. Fire in frame building 
rear 68 North Main Street owned by the Nathaniel Jen- 
kins' heirs and occupied by C. H. Swain & Co., builders. 
Caused probably by defective chimney. Chemical Com- 
pany responded, but the fire had assumed such proportions 
that an alarm was ordered from Box 25. 

Box 25. February 10, 2.15 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Three hundred feet of hose wet. One man 
injured. Recall 3.26 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $350.00 $325.00 $325.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 1,069.15 1,200.00 1,069.15 

Still. February 10, 5.37 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. G. O. Dickerman, 64 South Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 11, 7.56 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Guido Schinella, 12 Perkins Court. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 11, 5.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. C. Robinson,' 22 Pierce Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 35. February 11, 9.41 p. m. Fire in block 1-5 
Odd Fellows Avenue, owned by L. A. Brown & Co., liquor 
dealers. Cause unknown. Recall 10.01 p. m. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $10,000.00 $80.00 $6,000.00 $80.00 
Contents, 9,000.00 229.96 5,500.00 229.96 

Box 413. February 15, 6.59 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Miss Louisa Morrill, 87 South Main Street. 



208 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Needless alarm. Extinguished with pony chemical. Re- 
call 7.09 p. m. No loss. 

Still. February 15, 7.25 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at scene of preceding fire. Detail from Good Will Company 
responded, but found no fire. 

Still. February 17, 11.40 a. m. Slight fire on roof of 
residence, 7 Turner Avenue, owned by Miss Louisa Morrill 
and occupied by J. P. Conway. Caused probably from 
spark from chimney. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $800.00 $7.00 $500.00 $7.00 

Still. February 17, 11.49 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of S. Ash, 1 Lewis Court. Extinguished by detail 
sent with Kearsarge wagon. No loss. 

Still. February 17, 12.20 p. m. Chimney fire reported 
at residence 27 South State Street. Chemical Company 
responded, but found no fire. 

Still. February 18, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. A. Donigan, 60 Washington Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 18, 9.17 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. E. Bacon, 19 Prince Street. Extinguished by detail 
sent with Kearsarge wagon. No loss. 

Box 35. February 24, 5.27 p. m. Slight fire in building 
rear of 15 North Main Street, owned by the J. H. Chase 
Associates and occupied by W. G. C. Kimball, photog- 
rapher. Caused by igniting of chemicals in sink. Extin- 
guished by occupants. Recall 5.33 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $0,000.00 $15.00 $4,500.00 $15.00 

Still. February 28, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Eli Langlois, 5 Perry Avenue. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. Margaret Sheehan owner. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,200.00 $15.82 $1,500.00 $15.82 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 209 

Still. March 1, 7.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. H. Stoneham, 44 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 4, 5.41 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Orr, 8 Union Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 9.35 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. J. Angwin, 47^ North Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Cnemical Company. No loss. 

Box 55. March 5, 8.49 p. m. Slight fire under car in 
passenger train shed, Railroad Square. Cause, employees 
filling gas tank probably too near lighted lantern. No 
assistance required. Loss trifling. Recall 8.57 p. m. 

Still. March 9, 9.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph King, 2 Jefferson Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Company. No loss. 

Still. March 11, 9.26 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of D. H. Goodhue, 50 Hall Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Box 51. March 16, 12.51 a. m. Fire on roof of black- 
smith shop at the new plant of the Boston & Maine R. R. 
at the South End. Cause unknown. One thousand, four 
hundred feet of hose wet by the city department. Four 
hundred feet by the Boston & Maine department. Recall 
2.49 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, 114,000.00 $1,159.11110,000.00 $1,159.11 

Contents, 13,000.00 966.12 7,550.00 966.12 

Box 42. March 18, 11.56 p. m. Fire in Lee Block, 
51-57 South Main Street, owned by Kate G. Lee and Mary 
A. Lee and occupied by the Central Pharmacy, Lee Brothers 
Grocery and Concord Pipe Co., on the first floor and by 
various parties overhead as residences. Fire originated in 
wooden waste barrel in rear of grocery store from cause 
unknown. Fourteen hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 
12.31 a. m., 19th instant. 

14 



210 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $15,000.00 $712.00 $8,000.00 $712.00. 

Contents: 
Central 

Pharmacy, $1,300.00 300.00 1,100.00 300.00 
Lee Bros. 

Grocery, 1,350.00 350.00 1,350.00 350.00 

Concord 

Pipe Co., 10,000.00 368.20 3,150.00 368.20 

Box 42. March 19, 3.27 a. m'. Rekindling of fire in 
Lee Block, scene of preceding fire. Recall 4.20 a. m. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 42. March 20, 2.51 p. m. Fire in residence 39 
South State Street, owned and occupied by John W. Sleeper. 
Cause, defective chimney. Four hundred feet of hose svet. 
Recall 3.10 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $224.00 $1,600.00 $224.00 

Contents, 1,500.00 40.00 900.00 40.00 

Still. March 20, 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. H. Bresnahan, 94 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 20, 8.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
at 11 Holt Street owned by Frank Adams and occupied by 
Fred Proctor. Chemical Company being in service, Kear- 
sarge wagon and detail sent. 

Still. March 20, 9.10 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany. Loss trifling. 

Still. March 23, 5.50 p. m. Slight fire in barn con- 
nected with the residence of Alice Pratt, Loudon Road. 
Chemical Company responded, but were stopped at the 
Eagle Hotel by information that assistance was not re- 
quired. Extinguished by passer-by. Cause of fire, chil- 
dren and matches. No loss. 

Still. March 24, 4.28 p. m. Slight gasoline fire in 
basement of store, 14 School Street, conducted by G. H. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 211 

Hodgman. Cause unknown. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. March 25, 10.22 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. G. Libbey, 18 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 25, 6.45 p. m. Fire in bed in room 88, 
Endicott Block, 3 South Main Street, owned by and fur- 
nished by Hon. John B. Smith. Cause, dropping of gas 
mantle into bed. Chemical Company responded, but no 
assistance was required. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $100.00 $22.00 None. None. 

Still. March 26, 4.07 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Byron, 11 Washington Street. Extinguished 
by members of Alert Company. No loss. 

Still. March 26, 6.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. F. B. (lark, 47 Green Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 1, 7.22 a. m. Slight fire on roof of New 
England Granite Company's shed north of Ferry Street. 
Caused by sparks from chimney. Chemical Company 
responded, but no assistance was required. Extinguished 
by employees. Loss trifling. 

Still. April 8, 8.12 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. W. Brew, 44 Perley Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 7.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. J. Durgin, 19 Downing Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. April 11, 5.44 p. m. Chimney fire in Chadbourne's 
studio, 98 North Main Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Box 47. April 12, 12.45 a. m. Barn connected with set 
of buildings corner of South and Clinton Streets, owned by 
Miss Mari F. Putnam and occupied by owner, W. P. Fellows 
and Mrs. A. J. Fellows; destroyed. Cause unknown. 
Nine hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 1.55 a. m. 



212 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,600.00 $410.00 $1,200.00 $410.00 

Contents : 

W. P. Fellows, 200.00 200.00 None. None. 

Mrs. A. J. Fellows, 1,000. 00 120.00 800.00 120.00 

Still. April 13, 3.12 p. m. Brush fire east of Pembroke 
Road in rear of old brick yard. Chemical Company re- 
sponded. See next alarm. 

4-4-4. April 13, 3.46 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Barge and detail from the depart- 
ment sent under command of Engineer J. J. McNulty. 
Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. April 15, 12.15 p. m. Chimney fire in McShane 
Block, 1-5 Odd Fellows Avenue. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 3.22 p. m. Fire in residence 23 Maple 
Street owned by J. S. Hubbard and occupied by James H. 
Fagan and Charles Sullivan. Cause unknown. Chemical 
Company responded, but the fire had reached such propor- 
tions that a bell alarm was ordered. See next alarm. 

Box 26. April 22/ 3.25 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Twenty-three hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 4.04 
p. m. Fire confined to the Fagan tenement. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$2,000.00 


$428 . 00 


$1,300.00 


$428.00 


Contents : 










J. H. Fagan, 


300 . 00 


100.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. April 23, 3.23 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Bluto, 6 Winter Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. April 25, 1.24 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Harry Shapiro, 40 Merrimack Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 7.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Hickey, 70 Runiford Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 213 

Still. April 28, 1.50 a. m. Grass fire in White's Park. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company and police. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 8.08 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. H. Blossom, 57§ South Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 11.46 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 18 
Hall Street. Chemical Company responded, but no assist- 
ance was required. Extinguished by railroad employees. 
No loss. 

Box 42. April 28, 2.25 p. m. Fire in basement of resi- 
dence 55 South State Street owned by Alphonse Belleveau 
and Mrs. Hubert Isabel. Cause, attempt to rob gas meter, 
using matches for light. Concord Light and Power Co. 
lost two gas meters. Two hundred feet of hose wet. Re- 
call 2.36 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid 

Building, $3,500.00 $40.00, $2,500.00 $40.00 

Contents : 
Meters, 20.00 20.00 None. None. 

Still. May 1, 9.12 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
William Martin, 75 South State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. May 4, 9.04 a. m. Fire on roof of residence 136 
Warren Street owned and occupied by Mrs. Elizabeth 
Sullivan. Caused by spark from chimney. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $25.00 $1,200.00 $25.00 

4-4-4. May 4, 10.40 a. m. Brush fire west of Ridge 
Road. Detail from the department sent under command of 
Engineer J. J. McNulty. Labored one hour. Cause un- 
known. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 4, 12.29 p. m. Brush fire in same locality 
as preceding fire. Cause unknown. Detail from the de- 
partment sent under command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. 
Labored two hours. 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. May 8, 9.58 p. m. Slight fire in waste barrel in 
storehouse in Railroad Square southeast of passenger sta- 
tion. Cause unknown. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. May 20, 5.31 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
H. F. Ferrin, 104 South State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. May 20, 8.47 p. m. Outbuilding in rear of 16 
Perkins Court destroyed. Cause unknown. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. Loss trifling. 

Still. May 23, 11.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. H. Urann, 38 Thompson Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. May 23, 12.18 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Edwin Abbott, 7 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. June 3, 1.17 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. H. E. Reardon, 78 Washington Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. June 3, 8.23 p. m. Fire in Fowler building, 
corner State and Pleasant Streets, owned by W. P. Fowler 
and occupied by various parties. Fire occurred on second 
floor, Room C, occupied by Ida Louise Swain as a hat 
store. Caused by broken gas mantle falling into assortment 
of hats. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $40,000.00 $82.75 $30,000.00 $82.75 

Contents, 2,000.00 1,239.83 1,500.00 1,239.83 

Still. June 6, 1.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Frank O'Brien, 16 Water Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. June 6, 10.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. A. Donigan, 60 Washington Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. June 7, 12.19 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Martha Morrill, 78 Franklin Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 215 

Still. June 10, 6.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of N. M. Kayes, rear of 114 South Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. June 10, 12.16 p. m. A call for help from Bow. 
Grass fire near the Perrigo place. Set by sparks from road 
roller. Detail sent in auto with pony extinguishers. Chem- 
ical engine followed as soon as extra horses could be secured. 
No loss. 

Still. June 10, 8.52 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Delucca, 15 Forest Streex. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. June 13, 3.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Watts, 112 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 51. June 14, 10.06 a. m. Alarm occasioned by ex- 
plosion of gasoline in the tin department Boston & Maine 
R. R. shops. No fire. No loss. Recall 10.17 a. m. 

Still. June 16, 9.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of N. B. Cole, 111 South State Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. June 22, 9.07 p. m. Fire in abandoned carriage 
shed south of Kimball playground North State Street. 
Chemical responded, but upon arrival pulled in alarm 
from box 12. 

Box 12. June 22, 9.15 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Eight hundred feet of hose wet. Cause of fire un- 
known. Recall 9.32 p. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. June 29, 1.48 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Margaret Casey, 11 Waverly Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

11-11. June 29, 10.47 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Penacook. Eagle wagon, Kearsarge engine, twelve hun- 
dred feet of hose and detail from the department sent 
under command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. Engine worked 
two hours. All of the hose sent used in addition to that 
used by the Penacook and Boscawen departments and 
Concord Mfg. Co. Detail -returned at 4.00 a. m., 30th 
instant. (See Penacook report.) 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. July 2, 1.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Peter Derouin, 12 Tuttle Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. July 4, 5.50 p. m. Alarm given in answer to a 
call from East Concord for assistance in extinguishing a 
brush fire near the Canterbury line. Detail from the 
department sent in command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. 
After proceeding some three miles it was stopped and 
ordered to return, word having been received at head- 
quarters from the scene of the fire that it was under control. 
Hardly had the return trip been made when word was 
received that it had broken out afresh and the detail was 
started again. During the evening details were sent from 
Penacook and West Concord. Men were kept at work on 
this fire until the evening of the 7th instant. (See East 
Concord report.) 

Still. July 5, 4.46 p. m. Fire in dump in rear of heating 
plant of the Boston & Maine R. R. yard opposite north end 
of passenger station. The heat had ignited a window casing 
causing alarm. Chemical wagon and Eagle wagon sent. 
No assistance required. Extinguished by employees. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. July 7, 3.27 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 234 
North State Street. Chemical Company responded, but 
no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. July 15, 10.07 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dr. E. A. Rowe, 85 South Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 13. July 26, 1.13 p. m. One-story shed owned and 
occupied by Ellery Cass, north of Franklin and west of 
Rumford Street destroyed. A small quantity of hay and 
one pig lost. Cause unknown. Five hundred and fifty 
feet of hose wet. Recall 1.49 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid, 


Building, 


$15.00 


$15.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


55.00 


55.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. August 1, 9.27 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 217 

of George A. Laraba, 11 Center Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. August 4, 12.01 p. m. Chimney fire in the John 
Clinton restaurant, 8 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. August 7, 3.00 p. m. Slight fire on roof of dry 
bridge, Bridge Street. Caused by sparks from locomotive. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. Loss trifling. 

Box 48. August 10, 2.48 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
kettle of pitch on oil stove boiling over and igniting in 
broom factory of H. Thompson, rear of 56 South Street. 
Son of proprietor severely burned on arm in throwing 
kettle and stove outside. What little fire remained on 
arrival of the department easily extinguished with pony 
extinguisher. Recall 2.59 p. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. August 17, 8.27 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Lapierre, west of Auburn Street, near junction of 
Penacook Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
No loss. 

Box 47. August 23, 12.56 p. m. Slight fire in residence 
20 Broadway, owned by Frank Butterfield and occupied 
by E. B. Greenleaf. Caused by child and matches. Ex- 
tinguished with chemicals. Recall 1.16 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $800.00 $25.00 None. None. 

Still. August 25, 12.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. L. Woods, 61 Downing Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 24. August 29, 7.14 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
smoking of stove in stable rear of opera house. Needless 
alarm. Recall 7. 28 p. m. 

Still. August 30, 11.39 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 
58 Hall Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
No loss. 

Still. September 5, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Peter Derouin, 12 Tuttle Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 



218 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 25. September 5, 7.10 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
automobile taking fire at Johnson's garage rear of Eagle 
Hotel. Cause unknown. Machine owned by W. A. Has- 
seltine of Claremont, N. H., and contained auto supplies 
which owner had just purchased. Recall 7.27 p. m. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Auto, 


$950.00 


$600.00 


$800.00 


$600.00 


Contents, 


350.00 


350.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. September 14, 8.27 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. D. Smith, 4 Fuller Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. September 16, 9.29 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Asa Gee, 21 1| North State Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. September 17, 9.23 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Sennott, 76 South Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. September 17, 10.39 a. m. Chimney fire reported 
at residence of Mrs. F. G. Mason, 46 Washington Street. 
Chemical Company responded. No fire. 

Still. September 29, 8.02 a. m. Chimney fire reported 
at McShane's Block, 13 Warren Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded, but found on fire. Escaping steam. No 
loss. 

Still. September 29, 10.40 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence 116 Pleasant Street owned by Mrs. Carrie Storrs 
and occupied by W. C. Levy. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $7,000.00 $40.62 $6,000.00 $40.62 

Still. October 2, 11.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of B. A. French, 17 Dakin Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. October 12, 2.47 a. m. Fire in Unitarian chapel, 
owned and occupied by the Second Congregational (Uni- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 219 

tarian) Society, corner Green and Capitol Streets. Caused 
by defective fireplace. Chemical Company responded, but 
the fire had assumed such proportions that a bell alarm was 
sent in. See next alarm. 

Box 28. October 12, 2.50 a. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. One thousand eight hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall 4.32 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $40,000.00 $2,431.00 $17,500.00 $2,431.00 

Contents, 3,000.00 788.52 1,000.00 788.52 

Still. October 14, 10.54 a. m. Chimney fire in Com- 
mercial House, 143 North Main Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 17, 3.27 p. m. Grass fire near railroad 
track, west of Hall Street south of Hammond Street. 
Chemical Company responded, but no assistance was re- 
quired, the section men having it well in hand. No loss. 

Still. October 18, 9.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Dora Durgin, 19 Downing Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 22, 5.31 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. J. McFarland, 109 South Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 22, 6.22 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. H. Colby, 2 Chandler Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 23, 7.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of R. M. Clark, 7 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Company. No loss. 

Still. October 27, 8.05 a. m. Chimney fire in the 
W. S. Kimball stable, corner Green and Warren Streets. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 30, 4.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Nelson Forrest, 23 Thorndike Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 31, 11.04 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Perry, 45 Bradley Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 



220 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Still. November 2, 7.38 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Horn, 227 North Main Street. Extin- 
guished by detail from Central Station. No loss. 

Still. November 2, 8.14 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Riley, 14 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 1.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. S. Dutton, 21 Lyndon Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 2.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. W. Young, 6 Pearl Street. Extingushed by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 3.16 p. m. Fire in residence 
9 Marshall Street owned and occupied by E. E. Sinter. 
Caused by overheated chimney. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $63.50 $1,500.00 $63.50 

Box 55. November 3, 6.26 p. m. Slight fire in coal 
hoister in Boston & Maine R. R. yard opposite Chandler 
Street. Cause unknown. Four hundred and fifty feet of 
hose wet. Recall 6.56 p. m. Loss trifling. 

Box 48. November 6, 9.37 a. m. Fire in tenement 
block 6-14 Pierce Street owned by W. D. Nutting and 
occupied by various parties. Fire originated on second 
floor of tenement No. 8 occupied by Frank Spring. Caused 
by rats and matches. Slight damage by water resulted 
in tenement No. 6 occupied by Mrs. A. M. Spokesfield. 
Four hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 9.53 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$3,00.00 


$50.00 


$2,500.00 


$50.00 


Contents : 










A.M. Spokes- 










field, 


700.00 


10.00 


300.00 


10.00 


Frank Spring, 


500.00 


50.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. November 9, 10.29 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 221 

dence of Miss Addie Leighton, 17 Monroe Streeet. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 12, 9.38 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Peter Jennings, 174 North State Street. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 54. November 16, 4.20 a. m. Slight fire in resi- 
dence 39 Stone Street owned by George L. Theobald and 
occupied by Fred Peters. Caused by overheated chimney. 
Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 5.20 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $200.00 $35.00 $700.00 $35.00 

Still. November 22, 12.46 a. m. Fire in wooden ash 
barrel corner of Spring and Pleasant Streets. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 19. November 23, 3.37 p. m. Slight fire in resi- 
dence, 20 Forest Street owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Melvina Tarintino. Caused by clothes hanging too near 
stove taking fire and dropping into wood box. Extinguished 
with chemicals and garden hose. Recall 4.10 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,800.00 $25.00 $1,500.00 $25.00 

Contents, 1,200.00 20.00 900.00 20.00 

Still. November 24, 10.02 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. L. B. Morrill, 87 South Main Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 6.30 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
back firing of automobile in the Gilford garage rear of 
77 South Main Street. Chemical Company responded, 
but no assistance required. No loss. 

Still. November 29, 11.03 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. L. Gilford, 75 South Main Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 1, 9.56 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. Avanosee, 3 Foster Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 1, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



222 CITY OF CONCORD. 

dence of H. A. Cutting, 30| Center Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 7.01 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Ada Kelley, 7 Harrod Street. Extinguished 
by members of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. December 6, 7.1G p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank H. Smith, 17 Valley Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 9, 5.17 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles L. Ash, 86 Broadway. Chemical Com- 
pany responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 4.18 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of A. Lapierre, near junction of Long Pond road 
and Penacook Street. Chemical Company responded, four 
horses being required to make the run. No assistance 
required. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 8.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Massuckette, 15 Monroe Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 13, 12.38 p. m. Grass fire south of 
the Page Belting Company plant, East Penacook Street- 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 14, 4.16 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. E. Gilford, 75 South Main Street. Chemical 
Company responded, but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. December 14, 10.25 p. m. Slight fire in flooring 
of the Currier and Atkins saloon, 7 Depot Street. Caused 
by contact of floor and steam pipe. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. Loss trifling. 

Still. December 18, 8.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Connors, 6 Maitland Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 18, 10.34 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of A. E. Clark, 297 Pleasant Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 19, 3.31 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

dence of Airs. Carrie McDaniels, 22 Beacon Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 19, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Dr. F. A. Stillings, 42 Pleasant Street. 
Chemical Company responded, but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Still. December 19, 7.14 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. F. Smart, 32 Stone Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 4.59 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Napoleon Roy, 32 Woodman Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 9.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. L. Turcotte, 4 Oak Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 23, 7.22 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
collision of two locomotives in the Boston & Maine R. R. 
yard opposite Chandler Street, the desire being the extin- 
guishing of the fires in both fire boxes. Chemical 
Company responded, but as there was a heavy fire in both 
engines, it was deemed a little expensive to extinguish them 
by that method, there being a hydrant close by. 

Still. December 23, 7.36 p. m. A call for assistance 
from scene of preceding fire. Kearsarge wagon and detail 
from Good Will Hose Company sent. Three hundred and 
fifty feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. December 25, 8.28 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. C. Chapman, 300 Pleasant Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 7.48 a. m. Fire in basement of 
Colonial Block, 9-15 South Main Street owned by H. 
Shapiro and occupied on the first floor by the owner as 
clothing and shoe stores and the Mohican Company as a 
food department store. The upper floors were occupied 
by various tenants, most of whom were fortunate enough 
to escape loss from the gas and smoke which poured in 
dense volume from the basement. The fire originated un- 



224 CITY OF CONCORD. 

der the clothing store at No. 15 from spontaneous combus- 
tion of soft coal of which there were some fifty tons together 
with several tons of hard coal, most of which the firemen 
were compelled to remove in order to reach the seat of the 
trouble. Upon the arrival of the Chemical Company the 
extent of the task in hand was realized and a call for assist- 
ance sent in. 

Still. December 26, 7.55 a. m. Kearsarge wagon sent 
to Colonial Block and one high service laid as a precau- 
tionary measure but no water used. Chemical Company 
dismissed and detail from the department started to re- 
move the coal. On account of the gas it was necessary to 
work the men in short shifts. One man was overcome soon 
after operations commenced and sent to the hospital, and 
later in the day another was overcome. At noon another 
detail of men was added to the force at work. . 

Still. December 26, 1.26 p. m. Increased heat indi- 
cated near approach to the fire and the Chemical Company 
was again summoned. 

Box 35. December 26, 1.31 p. in. Hardly had the 
Chemical Company entered the basement when a large 
quantity of gas was released which immediately ignited and 
the whole basement was aflame. Holes were cut in the 
floor above and a deluge of water soon,ended the trouble as 
far as danger to the block was concerned. Nineteen hun- 
dred fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 2.54 p. m. Detail 
labored removing the coal until 5.00 p. m. 



Value. 


Loss. Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, $40,000 . 00 


$842.71135,000.00 


$842.71 


Contents : 






H.Shapiro, 24,830.40 


1,280.42 11,000.00 


1,280.42 


Mohican Co., 11,801.55 


532.76 10,621.40 


543.76 


M. D. Aldrich, 1,050.00 


98.00 500.00 


98.00 


J.B.McLeod, 1,500.00 


75.00 1,000.00 


75.00 



Still. December 30, 7.08 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Benjamin Kachdoorian, 10 Foster Street. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Company. No loss. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


$500.00 


$500 . 00 


None. 


None. 


250.00 


250.00 


None. 


None. 


150.00 


150.00 


None. 


None. 



fire department. 225 

Penacook. 

Still. January 5, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
owned by Frank E. Bean, 4 Charles Street. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
2 Fowler Street owned by Dr. E. E. Graves. No loss. 

Still. January 13, 8.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 22 Summer Street owned by John H. Rolfe. No loss. 

Box 48. January 26, 6.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Samuel McClinton, 46 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

No Alarm. January 31. House at Mast Yard owned 
by Herbert Long and occupied by Fred Davis discovered 
on fire at 9.30 p. m. House and contents total loss. Cause 
unknown. 

Building, 

Contents : 
Fred Davis, 
* Mrs. Long, 

Still. February 12, 4.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 5 Merrimack Street owned by Charles Barnett. No 
loss. 

Still. February 22, 4.13 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 9 Webster Street owned by Contoocook Mfg. Co. 
No loss. 

Box 35. February 29, 12.40 a. m. Chimney fire Bos- 
cawen side. Recall 1.30 a. m. 

Still. March 1, 6.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Henry Rolfe, 26 Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
61 South Main Street owned by Miss Lizzie Rolfe. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 9.30 p. m. Slight fire in block 11 
Main Street owned by New Hampshire - Spinning Com- 
pany. Caused by defective chimney. Extinguished by 
members of Pioneer Company with chemicals. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $12.00 $1,000.00 $12.00 

* Goods in storage. 
15 



22G CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 47. March 21, 9.33 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
burning of chair in residence of John Ferrin, 14 Rolfe Street. 
Recall 9.42 a. m. 

Box 35. March 31, 11.45 a. m. Slight fire in Chadwick 
Block, 10 East Canal Street. Building owned by John 
Chadwick and occupied b}' J. Vezina as meat market and 
bakery. Fire originated in the meat market from an oil 
stove. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 11.57 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $20.00 $1,500.00 $20.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 45.00 1,700.00 45.00 

Box 35. April 3, 11.35 a. m. Fire in residence 20 
Merrimack Street owned and occupied by John McGirr, 
Jr. Caused by defective chimney. Eight hundred feet of 
hose wet. Recall 12.40 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $90.00 $2,500.00 $90.00 

Contents, 500.00 40.00 500.00 40.00 

Box 38. May 5, 12.27 a. m. Fire in barn 16 West 
Main Street owned and occupied by Isaac Tetreault. 
Cause unknown. Upper portion of barn destroyed. Rear 
of house adjoining also owned by Isaac Tetreault slightly 
damaged by heat. One thousand feet of hose wet. Recall 
2.18 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Barn, $500.00 $300.00 $300.00 $300.00 

House, 2,700.00 20.00 1,500.00 20.00 

Still. May 14, 2.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
20 Penacook Street owned by C. D. Ingraham. No loss. 

4-4-4. June 9, 7.32 p. m. Brush fire on the Plains on 
the Brown lot, so called. Labored one hour and twenty 
minutes. Loss trifling. Recall 8.50 p. m. 

Still. June 14, 11.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
104 Merrimack Street owned by Miss Lizzie Rolfe. No 
loss. 

Still. June 15, 2.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Isaac Tetreault, 20 West Main Street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



227 



Box 38. June 15, 2.2G p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Recall 4.30 p. m. 

4-4-4. June 23, 3.38 p. m. Brush on Plains opposite 
the J. H. Harriman place. Three hundred feet of hose wet. 
Labored forty-five minutes. Recall 4.22 p. m. No loss. 

4-4-4. June 29, 6.58 p. m. Brush fire near the Contoo- 
cook River Park. Labored one hour and three quarters. 
Recall 8.45 p. m. 

Box 37. June 29, 10.10 p. m. Fire discovered in lumber 
yard owned by C. M. & A. W. Rolfe on Washington Street 
which soon extended to the storehouse of the Central New 
Hampshire Power Company. Sparks also set fire to the 
roof of the Borough bridge and also endangered other build- 
ings in the neighborhood. Assistant Engineer Dodge at 
this time deemed it prudent to send a call to the city proper 
for assistance. Upon the arrival of the steamer and hose 
company from the precinct the danger to surrounding build- 
ings was over, but valuable aid was rendered in extinguish- 
ing the fire in the lumber. Recall 3.25 a. m., 30th instant. 
Detail left with hydrant stream until 5.30 a. m. Hose 
wet, Penacook, 2,400 feet, Boscawen 700 feet, Precinct, 
1,200 feet. Between 250,000 and 300,000 feet of lumber 
destroyed. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid, 


Building, 


$200.00 


$200.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents : 










C. N. H. P. 










Co., 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


None. 


None. 


C. M. & A. W. 










Rolfe, 


9,000.00 


6,000.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. June 30, 10.20 a. m. Brush fire near Contoocook 
River Park. Labored thirty minutes. No loss. 

4-4-4. July 1, 1.05 p. m. Brush fire near Contoocook 
River Park. One thousand feet of hose wet. Labored 
two and one-quarter hours. No loss. 

Box 25. July 3, 2.30 p. m. Alarm occasioned by igni- 
tion of oil in blacksmith shop owned by the Hoyt Electrical 



228 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Instrument Works, Washington Street. Shop detached 
from main plant. Extinguished by employees. Recall 
2.35 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $200.00 $25.00 $200.00 $25.00 

4-4-4. July 3, 5.55 p. m. Brush fire near Contoocook 
River Park. Labored fifty minutes. Recall 6.45 p. m. 
No loss 

Still. July 4, 5.05 p. m. Brush fire near Outlet, Wash- 
ington Street. Labored forty minutes. No loss. 

11-11. July 4, 7.52 p. m. Brush fire at East Concord. 
Detail sent. Labored thirteen and one-half hours. 

Still. July 4, 9.00 p. m. Grass fire near Outlet, 
Washington Street. Labored forty-five minutes. No loss. 

11-11. July 5, 11.40 a. m. Brush fire at East Concord. 
Detail sent. Labored five and one-half hours. 

Still. July 22, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
8 West Main Street, owned by Joseph Stone. No loss. 

Still. July 24, 7.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Hoyt, 12 Summit Street. No loss. 

No Alarm. July 24, 2.30 p. m. Tent on island at 
Contoocook River Park owned and occupied by Gale 
Brothers for camping purposes destroyed with contents, 
Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Tent, $12.00 $12.00 None. None. 

Contents, 90.00 90.00 None. None. 

Box 37. August 11, 6.02 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Charles Rowe, 75 Washington St. Recall 
6.40 a. m. No loss. 

Still. August 24, 4.00 p. m. Chimne}^ fire in Eastman 
Block, 39 Summer Street. No loss. 

Box 45. September 22, 12.45 p. m. Needless alarm. 
Fumigating Summer Street school house. Recall 12.49 
p. m. 

Still. October 16, 7.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 6 Union Street owned bv Mrs. Bowen. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 229 

Box 35. October 31, 1.20 p. m. Fire on Boscawen side. 
Recall 1.37 p. m. 

Still. November 17, 10.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence. 12 Center Street owned by J. E. Symonds. No loss. 

Still. November 17, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 12 Center Street owned by J. E. Symonds. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 6.00 a. m. Chimney fire in Post 
Office, Main Street. No loss. 

Box 47. November 30, 11.30 a. m. Fire on roof of 
store house owned and occupied by C. M. & A. W. Rolfe 
near passenger depot. Caused by spark from locomotive. 
Six hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 12.10 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $400.00 $30.83 $400.00 $30.83 

Contents, $2,200.00 275.40 2,100.00 275.40 

Still. December 7, 4.30 a. m. Chimney fire in block 
8 Walnut Street owned by Contoocook Mfg. Co. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 10.50 a. m. Chimney fire in block 
5 Main Street owned by Mrs. W. C. Spicer. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 2.20 p. m. Chimney fire in block 
5 Main Street owned by Mrs. W. C. Spicer. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $6.50 $2,000.00 $6.50 

Box 34. December 9, 4.55 a. m. Fire on roof of block 
44-48 Charles Street owned by Mrs. Mary Baty. Caused 
by spark from chimney. Three hundred and fifty of feet 
hose wet. Recall 6.30 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $1.98 $2,000.00 $1.98 

Still. December 10, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 38 Rolfe Street owned by Mrs. Wales. No loss. 

Still. December 21, 7.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Martin Nolan near passenger depot. No loss. 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 



East Concord. 



Still. January 6, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
owned by Mary F. Robinson on Portsmouth Street. No 
loss. 

Bell. January 6, 12.10 p. m. Set of buildings owned 
and occupied by Joseph Wilcox on Pecker Street destroyed 
with contents. Caused by defective chimney. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $1,500.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Contents, 300.00 300.00 None. None. 

Still. January 6, 1.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph King, Pecker Street. No loss. 

Still. January 23, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Carter, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. January 26, 4.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. J. Lyle, Pembroke Street. No loss. 

Bell. February 22, 10.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Sarah Gardner, Pembroke Street. Needless 
alarm. No loss. 

Still. February 22, 2.15 p.m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred S. Farnum, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. March 18, 2.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
corner of Penacook and Shawmut Street owned by Mrs. 
Perkins, Tilton, N. H. No loss. 

Still. May 7, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
owned by C. E. Staniels, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. July 4, 7.30 a. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
David Sanborn and others, near the Canterbury line. 
Labored four hours. No loss. 

Bell. July 4, 2.15 p. m. Brush fire in same locality 
as preceding fire. Labored five hours. No loss. See pre- 
cinct report. 

Bell. December 13, 12.45 p. m. Brush fire on land 
owned by Albert Stevens, on the mountain. Labored one 
hour. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 231 



West Concord. 



Still. January 17, 5.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Girard, 452 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 6.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Bernard Donahue, 514 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. March 25, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Matherson, 5 Lake Street. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 9.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of David Piper, 9 Peabody Street. No loss. 

Bell. May 4, 10.00 a. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by John Swenson and the city. Labored two hours. No 
loss. 

Still. June 14, 9.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Tucker, 454 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. June 24, 8.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James H. Harrington, 533 North State Street. No loss. 

Bell. July 4, 8.30 p. m. Brush fire at East Concord. 
Detail from Cataract Company sent by order of Chief 
Green. See precinct report. 

Bell. August 9, 4.30 a. m. Wooden building, 526 
North State Street, owned by Clinton O. Partridge and 
occupied by James M. Crossman, blacksmith, and Harry 
Danforth, potato chip maker. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $400.00 $400.00 $400.00 $400.00 

Contents: 

J. M. Crossman, 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 

H. Danforth, 400.00 400.00 225.00 225.00 

Bell. August 22, 11.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Walter G. Fuller, 499 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. November 1, 6.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Eva Silva, Hutchins Street. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 10.30 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of James H. Harrington, 533 North State 
Street. Loss trifling. 

Still. November 27, 1.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Benjamin H. Kemp, 461 North State Street. 
No loss. 



232 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SUMMARY. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Insurance 
paid. 


Net loss. 


BUILDINGS. 


$250,065.00 

17,012.00 

1,500.00 

400.00 


$9,203.52 

1,218.31 

1,500.00 

400.00 


$161,725.00 

11,400.00 

1,000.00 

400.00 


$8,763.52 

506.31 

1.000.00 

400.00 


$440.00 




712.00 




500.00 










Total 


$268,977.00 

$105,606.95 

1S.190.00 

300.00 

700.00 


$12,321.83 

$9,755.88 

10,850.40 

300.00 

700.00 


$174,525.00 

$41,850.00 
4,300.00 


$10,669.83 

$8,233.88 
360.40 


$1,652.00 


CONTENTS. 


$1,522.00 




10,490.00 




300.00 




525.00 


525.00 


175.00 






Total. 


$124,796.95 
268,977.00 


$21,606.28 
12,321.83 


$46,675.00 
174,525.00 


$9,119.28 
10,669.83 


$12,487.00 




1,652.00 






Buildings and contents 


$393,773.95 


$33,928.11 


$221,200.00 


$19,789.11 


$14,139.00 



Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows : 
Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," with modern hose wagon, 
attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men); 
one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kearsarge, " and 
modern hose wagon, attached to the Kearsarge Steam Fire 
Engine Company (14 men); one second-class Amoskeag 
engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, in charge of an 
engineer and firemen and one double 60-gallon-tank Hollo- 
way chemical engine, in charge of two permanent men; one 
ladder truck, "City of Concord," attached to Hook and 
Ladder Company (21 men); one house man at Central 
Fire Station. There are twelve horses kept at this station. 
There are six permanent men located at the Central Fire 
Station and one permanent man at each fire station within 
the precinct. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 233 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent 
man and two horses. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has a modern 
hose wagon with permanent man and two horses. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hook and ladder truck, one hose reel and one wagon 
in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
a Hunneman 6-inch cylinder hand engine and a modern hose 
wagon. 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4|-inch cylin- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank. 

Hose. 
Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 
East Concord, 



9,400 feet 


3,000 


a 


1,400 


it 


500 


cc 



Public Reservoirs. 



14,300 feet. 



Capacity- 
cubic feet. 



1. Main Street, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s, 1,000 

2. Main Street, middle front State House yard, 1,500 

3. Main Street, rear Court House, 2,000 

4. State Street, corner Washington Street,* 2,000 

5. Rumford Street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's, 1,000 

6. Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street,* 4,000 

7. School Street, corner of Summit Street,* 3,500 



* Brick cemented. 



234 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire- 
alarm boxes, the city is divided into six districts, viz.: 

District 1. Embraces that section of the city north and 
west of Washington Street, Box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
ton Streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
Streets. 

Districts 4, 5, and 6. Embrace all south of Pleasant 
Street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the district. 

District No. 1. 

9. New Hampshire State Prison. 

12. Curtice Avenue. 

13. Franklin and Rumford. 

14. Bradley and Walker. 

15. Main and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. C. S. Gale's Store. 

19. Centre and Liberty. 
131. Franklin and Charles. 
191. Auburn and Granite. 

District No. 2. 

21. State, opposite Court. 

23. Main and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 

25. Main and School. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 235 



26. Centre and Union. 

27. School and Merrimack. 

28. School and Spring. 

29. Centre and Essex. 



District No. 3. 

32. Warren and Pine. 

34. Central Fire Station. 

35. Martin's Drug Store. 

36. Pleasant and Spring. 

37. Pleasant and North Fruit. 

38. Orchard and Merrimack. 



District No. 4. 

41. South and Thompson. 

42. Good Will Hose House. 

43. Main and Fayette. 

45. Nelson & Durrell's Store. 

46. Perley and Grove. 

47. South, opposite Downing. 

48. Thorndike and South. 

49. West and Mills. 

412. Wall and Elm. 

413. Main, opposite Thorndike. 

414. State and West. 

471. Clinton and South Fruit. 

District No. 5. 

51. Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. 

52. South Main and Allison. 

53. Hall and Hammond. 

54. Broadway and Pillsbury. 
56. St. Paul's School. 



236 CITY OF CONCORD. 

57. Pleasant View. 

521. Broadway and Rockingham. 

522. South Main and Holly. 

District No. 6. 
62. South Main, opposite Holt Bros. 

Private Boxes. 

5. Boston & Maine Railroad, north end passenger depot. 

6. The Abbot-Downiug Company. 

7. New Hampshire State Hospital. 

8. Page Belting Company. 

9. Three boxes inside New Hampshire State Prison. 
33. State House. 

39. Odd Fellows' Home. 

55. Boston & Maine Railroad, old repair shops. 



FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 413, 414, 471, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 62, 521 and 
522, will not be responded to by the Alert Hose Company 
until signaled. The signal to proceed to the fire will be 
four blows or second alarm, excepting alarms rung in from 
Box 56. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 32, 37, 39 and 56 will not 
be responded to by the Good Will Hose Company until 
signaled. It will be governed by the same signals govern- 
ing Alert Hose Company. The Alert Hose and Good Will 
Hose Companies will hitch up and remain in readiness 20 
minutes after the first alarm, to all boxes not responded 
to on first alarm. Then, receiving no signal, the officers 
in charge shall dismiss their companies. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 237 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 12, 37, 53, 54, 57, 191, 471 
and 521 will not be responded to by the Kearsarge Company 
on first alarm. 

The signal to proceed to the fire will be two blows, four 
blows, or second alarm, as circumstances may warrant. 

Kearsarge Steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose Company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to Box 6, on first alarm; to Boxes 23, 24, 
25, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43, 45 and 413, on second; to all others 
on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill Steamer will respond to Boxes 7, 8, 9 
and 39 on first alarm; to Boxes 5, 6, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 
48, 49, 412, 414, 471, 52, 54, 55, 57, 62, 521 and 522, on 
second; to all others on third. 

Chemical Engine will respond to all box alarms except 
8, 9, 51, 56, 57 and 521. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company will respond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating 
from same box or not. 

Two rounds of 11 strokes each will signalize the re- 
quirement of assistance out of town, and will be responded 
to by a detail of three men from each company, appointed 
for the purpose, and by those alone. 

Two additional blows will indicate that the call for assis- 
tance emanates from East Concord. Such apparatus will 
be detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further aid 
is necessary, Box 34 (Central Station) will follow. 

All-out signal, three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on 
the bells and will be responded to by a detail of four men 
from each company, appointed for the purpose, and by 
those alone. 



238 city of concord. 

Military Signal. 
Two rounds of 3-1-2. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause 
of 15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will be given 
at 8 o'clock, a. m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given 
at 1 o'clock p. m. 

The signal to close all schools for one session w r ill be given 
at 11.30 a. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It will be one 
single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Fire-alarm Telegraph. 

is the "Gamewell" patent. It embraces 42 miles of wire. 

On the lines are 46 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the city, 
and 10 private boxes— in all, 56. There are three alarm 
bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell metal), one of 3,740 pounds 
(bell metal), and one of 2,000 pounds (American steel). 
There are also 16 mechanical tappers, 40 direct action 
tappers, one four-circuit repeater, and six indicators. 

The battery consists of 252 storage battery cells. 

The alarm system was installed in 1880 by the Gamewell 
Fire-alarm Telegraph Company. 



fire department. 239 

Directions for Giving an Alarm. 

Above all things, keep cool. 

To obtain the key to the box, break the glass in the key- 
box located beneath the alarm box. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale," 
designed expressly for the purpose of informing you whether 
an alarm is being transmitted the instant you open the 
door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull down 
the hook once only and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to 
attempt to pull another until the one already pulled had 
performed its mission. 

Wait until 20 seconds have elapsed after the "tell-tale" 
has stopped ringing, close the door, which will restore the 
armature to the position it left when the door was opened. 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go. 

Should there be no response, pull it again. 

Then should there be no response, go to the next box. 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the department. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PENACOOK FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 
W. C. Green, Chief Engineer: 

I herewith submit for your consideration the following 
report of the Penacook fire-alarm telegraph system. The 
system is the Gamewell patent, and consists of four and 
one-half miles of No. 9 iron wire. On the lines are eleven 
boxes owned by the city, two private boxes, one 1,500-pound 
bell, one indicator, three mechanical gongs and three direct- 
action tappers. The battery consists of thirty-six storage 
battery cells. One new box was added the past year. I 
would respectfully recommend the addition to the system 
of two new boxes the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED M. DODGE, 

Superinterident of Fire Alarm. 

Location of Boxes. 

31. Elm Street, near S. N. Brown's house. 

34. Charles Street. 

35. Washington Square. 

37. Washington Street, near outlet. 

38. Junction of West Main and South Main Streets. 

39. South Main Street, near cemetery. 

41. Corner of Centre and East Canal streets. 

42. High Street, opposite Maple Street. 

45. Summer Street, opposite Church Street. 

47. Merrimack Street, opposite Hose House. 

48. Corner Penacook and Rolfe streets. 

Private Boxes. 

25. Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works. 
62. Concord Axle Works. 



fire department. 241 

All-out Signal. 
Three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 
Three rounds of four strokes each. 

Out-of-Town Signal. 
Two rounds of eleven strokes each. 

For Fire on Boscawen Side. 
Box 35, with two additional strokes. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause 
of 15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close all schools for the forenoon session 
will be given at 7.30 a. m. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session at the Charles 
Street building will be given at 8.00 a. m. 

The signal to close all schools for the afternoon session 
will be given at 12.15 p. m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session at the Charles 
Street building will be given at 12.45 p. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Saturday afternoon at 12.50 o'clock precisely. It will be 
one single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

16 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

Directions For Giving an Alarm. 

To open the box, break the glass and turn the key. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale," 
designed expressly for the purpose of informing you 
whether an alarm is being transmitted the instant you 
open the door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull down the 
hook the whole length of the slot, once only, and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to 
attempt to pull another until the one already pulled had 
performed its mission. 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the department. 
Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 

The Penacook fire-alarm system was installed in June, 
1908, under direction of the chief engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



243 



REVISED ORDINANCE. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Section 

1. Fire department — how constituted. 

2. Tenure of office, vacancies. 

3. Chief engineer, salary. 

4. Chief engineer, powers and duties. 

5. Assistant engineer, powers and 

duties in absence of chief. 

6. Foremen, duties of inspection, etc. 

7. Foremen, duties at fires. 

8. Stewards, Alert and Good Will 

Hose companies. 

9. Apparatus to be cleaned, etc. 

10. Badges and uniforms. 

11. Salaries and pay. 

12. Extra services, charges for. 

13. Apparatus and firemen to be kept 

in city. 

14. Engineers to inspect buildings; to 

take means for speedy extin- 
guishment of fires. 

15. Absence, neglect of duty. 

16. Volunteer companies. 

17. Parade, drill, and inspection. 

18. Engineers — full control at fire. 

19. Regulations concerning shavings 

and combustibles. 

20. Board of engineers to make regu- 

lations. 



Section 

21. Disobedience and neglect of duty; 

qualifications of members. 

22. Applications for membership; offi- 

cers and members not to take 
part in political matters. 

23. Fire alarm telegraph — chief engi- 

neer to have control. 

24. Vacation without loss of pay, when. 

25. Supplies, purchase of. 

26. Removal and protection of prop- 

erty endangered by fire. 

27. Hydrants to be personally exam- 

ined by chief engineer. 

28. Pay-roll of department. 

29. Care and control of fire depart- 

ment buildings in Wards 1, 2, 
and 3. 

30. Stewards of companies in outside 

wards. 

31. Regulations concerning drivers and 

permanent men; chief engineer 
to be furnished with horse and 
wagon. 

32. Brush and forest fires. 

33. Veteran Firemen's Associations 

made auxiliary branch. 

34. Appropriation for. 



Section 1. The fire department shall consist of a chief engineer, 
two assistants within the precinct, one engineer each from Ward 1, 
Ward 2, and Ward 3; two steamer and hose companies, one company to 
consist of thirteen men, including driver, and one company to consist 
of fourteen men, including driver, one relief steamer (company) to consist 
of two men; two hose companies to consist of eleven men, including 
driver; a chemical engine company to consist of two men; a hook and 
ladder company to consist of twenty-one men, including driver, a house 
man at Central, Fire Station; steamer Pioneer, not less than twenty nor 
more than forty men; hand engine companies No. 2 and No. 3, not less 
than twenty nor more than thirty men each. Each company shall be 
allowed three substitutes, except Hook and Ladder company, No. 1, 
which shall have five, to be approved by the chief -engineer. The 
engineers shall exercise the powers of fire wards, and those within the 
precinct shall constitute the board of engineers. 



244 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 2. The chief engineer and assistant engineers and all other 
members of the fire department shall hold their respective offices and 
places until they are removed, or their offices or places are otherwise 
vacated. The board of mayor and aldermen, for cause, and after a due 
hearing, may at any time remove from office or place the chief engineer, 
any assistant engineer, or any officer or member of the department. 
In case of vacancies from any cause in the department, of officers or 
men connected in any manner with the fire service, such vacancies 
shall be filled by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 3. The chief engineer shall give his entire time to the duties of 
his office, unless herein otherwise provided, and shall not engage in or 
be connected with any other business or occupation, and shall reside in 
a house to be furnished by the city free from rent. He shall receive in 
full for his services as chief, in addition to the use of said house, rent 
free, the sum of twelve hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 

Sect. 4. The chief engineer shall have the sole command at fires over 
all persons, whether members of the fire department or not. He shall 
direct all proper measures for extinguishing fires, protecting property, 
preserving order, and enforcing the laws, ordinances and regulations 
respecting fires; and shall examine into the condition of the fire engines 
and all other fire apparatus, and of the fire engine houses, and other 
houses belonging to the city and used by the department, and by the 
companies thereto attached, as often as once a week, and whenever 
directed to do so by the mayor, or the committee on fire department 
through its chairman. He shall certify all bills and submit the same for 
inspection monthly to the joint standing committee on fire department. 
He shall report to the board of aldermen annually a statement of the 
receipts and expenditures of the fire department, the condition of the 
fire engines and all other fire apparatus, a detailed schedule of the prop- 
erty in his charge, the names of the officers and members, and all other 
facts in relation to the department. Whenever the fire engines or other 
fire apparatus require repairs he shall, under the direction of the com- 
mittee on fire department, cause the same to be made, and as far as 
practicable he shall examine into the location and condition of fire' appa- 
ratus belonging to corporations or private individuals within the limits 
of the city. He shall require permanent men, when not otherwise 
engaged, to perform such other duties and do such other work as in his 
judgment may be deemed proper. He shall be responsible for the proper 
care of all property connected with the fire department. He shall keep 
fair and exact rolls of the respective companies, specifying the time of 
admission and discharge, and the age of each member, and shall report 
annually, or oftener if directed, all accidents by fire which may happen 
within the city, with the causes thereof, the number and description of 
the buildings destroyed or injured and the amount of loss and insurance 
on the same, together with the names of owners or the occupants and 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 245 

shall make returns as required by the public statutes. He shall visit 
each department house as often as practicable, and inspect the men, 
the books of the house, and see that the quarters are properly conducted 
and in good order. He shall have the power to suspend any officer or 
member of the department for insubordination, disorderly conduct, or 
neglect of duty, said suspension to continue pending the action of the 
mayor and aldermen. The chief engineer shall examine all places where 
shavings and other combustible materials may be collected or deposited, 
and cause the same to be removed by the tenants or occupants of such 
places, or at their expense, whenever in his opinion such removal is 
necessary for the security of the city against fires. 

Sect. 5. In the absence of the chief engineer, the next assistant 
engineer in rank, who may be present, shall have the powers and per- 
form the duties of the chief engineer, and the seniority in rank of the 
engineers shall be determined by the board of engineers at their first 
meeting. 

Sect. 6. The captain of each engine, hose, and hook and ladder 
company, immediately after every fire at which said company may 
have attended, shall examine into the condition of the fire apparatus 
belonging to his respective company, and report any deficiency which 
may exist to the chief engineer. He shall keep, or cause to be kept by 
the clerk of his company, exact rolls, specifying the time of admission, 
discharge, and age of each member, and accounts of all city property 
entrusted to the care of the several members, and of all cases of absence 
and tardiness, in a book provided for that purpose by the city, which 
rolls and record books are always to be subject to the order of the chief 
engineer and mayor. They shall also make, or cause to be made, to the 
chief engineer, true and accurate returns of all members, with their 
ages, and of the apparatus entrusted to their care, whenever called upon 
so to do. 

Sect. 7. The captain of each company shall, under the direction of 
the chief engineer, have charge and management of his company at 
fires; the lieutenant shall assist the captain in the discharge of his 
duties and act as clerk of the company, and in the absence of the captain 
assume his authority. The captain and lieutenant shall be appointed 
by the chief engineer. 

Sect. 8. The stewards of the Alert and Good Will Hose companies 
shall act as drivers of hose carriages, take charge of and properly care 
for and exercise the horses used by each company. They shall be 
permanently engaged and devote their whole time to the department, 
and sleep in their respective stations at night; and for the proper 
execution of all duties required of them shall be subject to the direction 
of the chief enigneer. 

Sect. 9. It shall be the duty of every engine, hose, and hook and 
ladder company to have its engine, hose and other apparatus cleaned 



246 CITY OF CONCORD. 

washed, oiled, reeled and housed immediately after its return from 
any fire or service, and at all times to maintain the same in good 
condition, and the members of the several companies shall perform 
any necessary duties which the chief engineer or their respective cap- 
tain may direct. 

Sec. 10. All members of the department when on duty shall wear 
some suitable badge, to be designated by the board of engineers. The 
chief and permanent members shall wear at all times when on duty the 
regulation uniform worn by the fire department. 

Sec. 11. The pay-rolls for the board of engineers and the several 
fire companies shall be made up by the chief and clerk of the board of 
engineers semi-annually, on the first day of January and July. Cap- 
tains and clerks of companies will forward their pay-rolls to the board 
of engineers for approval, and after the action of said engineers and 
the committee on accounts and claims, said pay-rolls shall be passed 
over to the city tax collector, under whose sole direction all sums for 
services of call firemen shall be disbursed. 

Sec. 12. No charge for extra services will be allowed any member of 
the department unless upon an order of a member of the board of engi- 
neers. 

Sec. 13. No engine, hose or hook and ladder carriage shall be taken 
to a fire out of the city without permission from the chief engineer, 
except steamer Pioneer, which may be taken to any fire in the village 
of Penacook, not shall any apparatus of the fire department be taken 
from the city except in case of fire without permission from the board of 
mayor and aldermen; and in sending any apparatus to aid in extin- 
guishing fires in neighboring localities, the chief in all cases will authorize 
his assistant next in rank available to take charge of the direction of such 
apparatus, and not allow any firemen, at such an emergency, to leave 
the city, except such a number as is actually required to man the appa- 
ratus, and no member to leave without permission or direction from 
the chief engineer. 

Sec. 14. It shall be the duty of engineers and firemen, whenever 
there is an alarm of fire in the city, to repair immediately to the place of 
such fire, wearing a suitable badge, and the engineers shall take proper 
measures that the several engines and other apparatus be arranged and 
duly worked for the speedy and effectual extinguishment of the fire. 
The engineers shall inspect and make themselves familiar with all shops, 
hotels, tenement blocks, and all public buildings, halls, churches, school- 
houses and asylums once in each six months, and study the location of 
all hydrants and reservoirs in the city, and generally inform themselves 
in all matters pertaining to their duties as engineers. No engineer shall 
interfere with or attempt to give orders relative to the location or use 
of a line of hose, when he has ascertained that another has command of 
it, unless by consent of the engineer in command of it, or by orders of 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 247 

the officer in command at the fire; and it shall be his duty to enquire 
if there is an officer in charge. 

Sec. 15. For each absence from fire, or neglect of duty, the chief 
engineer, the assistant engineers, and engineers of steamers shall be 
fined three dollars, and each other member of the department one dollar; 
provided, however, that any fireman liable as above may in case of 
sickness have power of substitution by giving notice, each assistant 
engineer to the chief, each captain to an engineer, and each other member 
to the captain of his company. All fines shall be paid to the clerks of 
respective companies at the first regular meeting after they are incurred. 
The clerks of companies shall disburse the fines to substitutes answering 
for absent members in cases where there were substitutes. In cases where 
there were no substitutes the fines shall be paid to the city. 

Sec. 16. Any volunteer company using the apparatus of the city 
at any fire shall be under the control and command of the chief engineer 
and his assistants, agreeably to the foregoing provisions of this chapter. 

Sec. 17. The department shall appear for public parade, drill and 
inspection at such times as the chief engineer and committee on fire 
department shall order, for which purpose three hundred dollars may 
be expended annually. The companies in Ward 1, 2, and 3 will attend 
by invitation and voluntarily. Each company in the department under 
the direction of the chief engineer or assistants shall take out their 
respective engines and apparatus for exercise and drill as often as he 
shall direct, such exercise and drill to take place in public, not oftener 
than once a month, and at least once in two months, between the first 
of April and November. 

Sec. 18. The engineers shall have control of all persons appointed to 
serve in any company of the fire department and power to direct and 
control the labor of all persons present at any fire. An engineer may and 
shall cause any fire deemed by him to be dangerous in any place to be 
extinguished or removed. 

Sec. 19. The engineers may establish such regulations respecting 
the kindling, guarding, and safe keeping of fires, and for the removal of 
shavings and other combustibles from any building or place, as they shall 
think expedient. Such regulations shall be signed by a majority of the 
engineers. Such regulations shall be approved by the mayor and alder- 
men, recorded by the city clerk, and copies attested by him posted up in 
two or more places in the city thirty days, when they shall take effect. 
Penalties not exceeding twenty dollars for each offence may be prescribed 
by the engineers for the breach of such regulations, and such regulations 
shall remain in force until altered or annulled. 

Sec. 20. The board of engineers may from time to time make and 
enforce such regulations for the government of the department as may 
be deemed proper, subject to the approval of the board of mayor and 
aldermen. 



248 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sec. 21. If any member of any of the several companies shall wil- 
fully neglect or refuse to discharge his duty, or shall be guilty of dis- 
orderly conduct or disobedience to any officer or to any engineer, he 
shall for any such offence be forthwith dismissed from the department by 
direction of the chief engineer. No person shall be a member of, or 
serve in, the fire department, who is under the age of twenty years, 
and no person whose occupation is carried on outside the city shall be 
appointed a member of the fire department. 

Sec. 22. All applicants for membership shall be nominated, by the 
chief engineer, and shall receive pay and be considered members of the 
department from the date of their confirmation by the board of mayor 
and aldermen. 

No person shall hereafter be appointed to any position in the fire 
department unless and until the committee on fire department shall 
have certified in writing to the board of mayor and aldermen that such 
person has been examined by them, or under their supervision, and is 
in their opinion qualified to perform the duties of the position to which 
he is nominated. 

No officer or member of the permanent, or officer of the call force 
shall attend any political convention as a delegate, distribute tickets at 
any election, or take any part whatever in political matters other 
than to exercise the right of suffrage, and no political or religious dis- 
cussion shall be permitted in any of the department houses. 

Sec. 23. The chief engineer shall have the care and management of 
the rooms, apparatus, machinery, wires, poles, and signal boxes con- 
nected with the fire-alarm telegraph. He shall prepare rules and direc- 
tions for giving alarms of fire through the telegraph. He shall have the 
superintendence, and under the direction of the joint standing committee 
on the fire department have control, of the several stations, the appara- 
tus, the furniture therein, and all other property appertaining to the 
department. He shall, with the assistance of the permanent men at 
the Central station, make the necessary repairs and take care of the 
fire-alarm system, including the batteries, all alarm boxes, and every- 
thing pertaining to the fire-alarm system. He shall personally be able 
to master the fire-alarm in every particular, and every permanent man at 
the Central station shall be obliged to understand the fire-alarm system 
in order that the chief engineer may call upon any of them to attend to 
and repair any part of the same. This provision shall not be construed 
to prevent the chief engineer from employing extra linemen when neces- 
sary , or from acting promptly in any emergency. 

Sec. 24. Permanent officers and men of the department shall be 
entitled to a vacation without loss of pay of fourteen days in each year. 
In addition they shall be entitled to be off duty without loss of pay two 
days in each month, such two days not to be taken in the same week. 
In the weeks that they are not off duty for a day, under the above 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 249 

provision, they shall be entitled to be off duty for one night without loss 
of pay. All vacations and absences from duty under the above to be 
under the direction of the chief engineer. 

Sec. 25. The standing committee on fire department, subject to the 
board of mayor and aldermen, shall by themselves or agent purchase all 
supplies in connection with the fire department, ^and direct all repairs of 
apparatus; and all bills contracted for the department must receive their 
approval before being passed on by the committee on accounts and 
claims. They shall hold stated meetings at least once each month at the 
Central fire station, and all communications to the city government from 
the fire department must come through said committee, and annually 
at the call of the finance committee, in connection with the chief 
engineer, they shall make recommendations as to the amount of 
appropriations the wants of the department will require for the 
coming year. 

Sec. 26. The city marshal and regular police officers shall have in 
charge all matters relating to the removal and protection of personal 
property endangered by fire, and any person entering a building or 
removing property contrary to the orders of the city marshal or such 
police officers shall be fined five dollars; and in the absence of firemen at 
fires from their respective department houses, the policemen in that 
vicinity will take charge of said houses. 

Sec. 27. It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause all snow 
and ice or other obstructions to be removed from and around all fire 
hydrants owned by the city, so that at all times the fire department 
can make immediate connection of the hose to the hydrants. 

Sec. 28. The annual pay of the members of the fire department 
shall be as follows, and in full for all services in said department: 

Chief, twelve hundred and fifty dollars per annum and house-rent; 
permanent force at Central fire station, eight hundred and forty dollars 
each, drivers at Good Will and Alert hose houses, eight hundred and 
forty dollars each, the members of the chemical company nine hundred 
and twelve dollars each, per annum, payable semi-monthly; assistant 
engineers, within the precinct, one hundred and forty-five dollars each; 
engineers of steamers, within the precinct, one hundred and thirty- 
five dollars each; captains of companies, within the precinct, each one 
hundred and ten dollars per annum; lieutenants of companies, within 
the precinct, one hundred and five dollars per annum; members of 
steamer, hose, and hook and ladder companies, within the precinct, 
and house man at Central fire station one hundred dollars per annum; 
outside the precinct, engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, three hundred 
and forty dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer company No. 3, six hundred 
dollars, said sums to be divided among the members as each company 
shall direct; engineer of steamer at Penacook, seventy-five dollars per 
annum; assistant engineer at Penacook, twenty-five dollars; assistant 



250 CITY OF CONCORD. 

engineer at East Concord, twenty dollars; and assistant engineer 
at West Concord, twenty dollars. 

Sec. 29. The several engineers residing in Wards 1, 2 and 3 shall 
have the entire care and control, under the direction of the chief engi- 
neer, of the buildings and appurtenances occupied in part by the fire 
department situated in said wards, respectively, to whom all applica- 
tions for the use of the halls, or any other part of such building, shall 
be made. Said engineers may severally appoint janitors, at annual 
salaries not to exceed fifteen dollars, who shall serve under the exclusive 
direction of the engineer having the care and control of the building 
where said janitor shall be appointed. Each of said engineers shall 
annually, in the month of December, render a detailed statement, in 
writing, to the mayor and aldermen, of all receipts and expenditures for 
the preceding year on account of such buildings. 

Sec. 30. Stewards for the Pioneer Steamer company and engine 
companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be appointed by the mayor and aldermen, 
and shall receive for all services performed by them in that capacity 
the following sums : For Pioneer Steamer company, thirty dollars per 
annum, and when performing the duties of janitor of the building an 
additional sum of forty-five dollars per annum; and for stewards of 
engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, thirty dollars per annum each. No 
steward shall be allowed to purchase supplies for such building, or for 
the department, unless by the authority and direction of the committee 
on fire department; and in no case shall he have any care or control 
of the building or its appurtenances occupied by the company of which 
he is a member, except in the immediate service of the company, unless 
he shall be appointed janitor thereof, when he shall be under the direc- 
tion of the engineer, as provided in the foregoing section. 

Sec. 31. The permanent men and horses at all of the fire stations 
in Concord shall at all times be on duty at their respective stations to 
attend to fire alarm calls; and neither the permanent men nor the 
permanent horses connected with the fire department shall engage in 
any work for any other department of the city. 

The men at the diff erent fire stations shall do such work in connection 
with the station and apparatus as the chief engineer or his assistants 
may direct. All permanent men shall lodge in their respective stations 
(except the chief), and in all cases of absence a substitute must be 
furnished; and in all cases when any extra service is required, the chief, 
with the sanction of the committee on fire department shall have power 
to hire the same; the chief may also increase as far as possible the number 
of call men who wish to lodge at any fire station, subject to the regula- 
tions of the fire department. The chief engineer shall be furnished 
with a horse and wagon, to be maintained by the city, for his use at all 
times. 

Sec. 32. All alarms for brush or for forest fires shall be responded 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 251 

"to by members of the fire department under such rules and regulations 
as shall be prescribed by the chief engineer. 

Sec. 33. The Veteran Fireman's Association is hereby constituted 
and made an auxiliary branch of the regular fire department of this 
city, the members of said association to be considered as honorary 
and to organize a cooperative working force to serve in emergency, with- 
out compensation, such service to be under the direction and control of 
the officers of the regular organization in allegiance and compliance 
thereto. 

Sec. 34. The standing committee of the board of aldermen on 
fire department is authorized and directed to rent, at an expense not 
exceeding one hundred and fifty dollars a year, suitable rooms for the 
accommodation of said Veteran Firemen's Association, the same to be 
selected by said association, the same to be charged to the regular 
appropriation for fire department. 



ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS. 

Article 1. Any engine or hose company running out a 
-line of hose from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled 
to the pipe, although the hose of other companies may be 
attached, in order to reach the fire. And any company 
coming to a fire, and finding an incompleted line of hose 
laid out from a hydrant or steamer, shall attach to and 
lengthen out such line, in lieu of laying a line of its own. 

Art. 2. When two or more engine companies are play- 
ing in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the com- 
pany attaching to hydrant or steamer as provided in the 
foregoing article; but any company furnishing the entire 
line, and receiving water from a steamer, the pipe shall 
belong to such company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Hose companies shall attach first lines to high- 
pressure hydrants where accessible; steamers attaching to 
those of low pressure, or reservoir. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant 
or reservoir unless their hose and apparatus for attaching 
to the same are at hand and ready for use. 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning 
from fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, and 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

it is required of officers of companies to maintain perfect 
order and decorum in their respective commands during 
all such service. 

Art. 6. In case of fire the foreman first arriving shall 
be in command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 7. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding to 
a fire, to use the utmost care and caution consistent with 
promptness. Racing between companies is forbidden 
under any circumstances. Any collision or casualty 
occurring to horses or apparatus will be considered a 
sufficient cause for the suspension of the driver in charge 
at the time. 

Art. 8. Fire hats are furnished by the city for the 
protection and identification of the firemen, and they must 
be worn at all fires except in the severest weather, when 
caps may be worn. 

Art. 9. While attending fires it shall be the duty of 
members of the department, when not performing active 
service, to concentrate about their respective pieces of 
apparatus. 

Art. 10. All engine and hose companies responding 
to second or general alarms will connect, but will not 
lay their lines until they have reported to the officer in 
command for orders. 

Art. 11. The wearing of badges shall not be regarded 
by members of the department as conveying to them the 
privilege of free access to premises after fire has been 
extinguished. 

Art. 12. All members of the department shall address 
all officers by their respective titles while on duty at fires. 

Art. 13. The roll of each company shall be called as 
soon as the apparatus is housed, and no member will be 
excused except in case of sickness. Rolls must be called 
after every alarm. No officer or member will be marked 
present on the company roll unless present at fires and 
returns to house with apparatus, unless excused by an. 
engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 253 

Art. 14. All orders issued by the chief or an assistant 
engineer shall be promptly obeyed. At all fires occurring 
in the night, the chief engineer shall be identified by a 
red light, assistant engineers by blue lights. 

Art. 15. Members of the department are expected to 
cheerfully comply with all rules and regulations which 
are adopted or which may be adopted. Captains will be 
held responsible for all lack of promptness and efficiency 
in their commands. 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1912. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, Office, Central Fire Station^ 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

Walter J. Coffin, 1st Asst., Shipping clerk, 63 Pleasant Streets 

Sylvester T. Ford, 2d Asst. .Moulder, 41 So. Main Street. 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



Fred M. Dodge, 



Elbridge Emery, 



WARD 1. 

Electrical Inst, maker, 

WARD 2. 
Butcher, 



61 Merrimack Street. 



Potter St., East Concord- 



George W. Kemp, 



WARD 3. 

Overseer, 443 No. State St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

J. Edward Morrison, Captain. Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

1 J. Edward Morrison, 

2 Charles Powell, 

3 James H. Sanders, 

4 Thomas J. Morrison, 

5 C. W. Gay, 

6 George B. Davis, 

7 Herbert M. Sanders, 

8 Harry P. Blake, 

9 Harry L. Messer, 

10 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

11 H. C. Taylor, 

12 Geo. L. Livingston, 

13 L. F. Andrews, 

14 A. P. Turner, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter, 
Carriage painter, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter, 
Collector, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage trimmer, 
Machinist, 
Gas inspector, 
Permanent driver, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 
66 Perley Street. 
3 South Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
3 Broadway. 
5 Leigh ton Avenue. 
81 South State Street. 
38 Jackson Street. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



255 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 1. 



J. C. McGilvray, Captain. 



Nos. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 Charles H. Sanders, 

21 Orrin C. Hodgdon, 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 

23 John M. Inman, 

24 John B. McLeod, 

22 Eli Langlois, Jr., 

26 Charles W. Bateman 

28 F. H. Fowler, 

29 Daniel J. Brennan, 

27 Henry D. Johnson, 
*30 A. B. Smart, 

*On leave of absence, 



OFFICERS. 



J. D. Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 



Occupations. 
Jig-sawyer, 
Janitor, 
Machinist, 
Engineer, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter, 
Electrician, 
Painter, 
Plumber, 
Electrician, 
Electrician, 
Bookkeeper, 
Permanent driver, 
Henry Newton substitute driver. 



Residences. 
9 Pearl Street. 
107 North Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 
31 Beacon Street. 
39 Thorndike Street. 
16 Wall Street. 
Colonial Block. 
5 Perry Avenue. 
60 Centre Street. 
34 North Spring Street. 
18 School Street. 
28 Centre Street. 
Central Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



RELIEF ENGINE. 
Badge 
Nos. Names. Occupations. 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, .Ewffiraeer.Machinist, 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 South State Street. 
11 Thompson Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 



Ernest E. Saben, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

36 E. E. Saben, 

37 C. C. Chesley, 

41 J. H. Brunelle, 

39 C. J. French, 

40 C. H. Rowell, 

42 F. P. McKenna, 

43 J. M. Davis, 

44 J. Winnistrom, 

45 M. G. Davis, 

38 Geo. L. Osgood, 

46 F. H. Silver, 



OFFICERS. 

Charles C. Chesley, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
J. M. Davis, Treasurer. 



Occupations. 
Car builder, 
Builder, 
Blacksmith, 
Mayor, 
Builder, 
Clerk, 
Blacksmith, 
Lineman, 
Builder, 
Clerk, 
Permanent driver, 



.Residences. 
88 No. State Street. 
11 Prince Street. 
43 Tremont Street. 

5 Perkins Street. 

147 North Main Street. 
19 Franklin Street. 
4 Tahanto Street. 
145 North Main Street. 

6 Beacon Street. 

9 Thompson Street. 
Alert Station. 



256 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 



John C. Mills, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 

Hiram T. Dickerman, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
George H. Sawyer, Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

50 Joho C. Mills, 

51 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

52 George H. Sawyer, 

53 Frank S. Putnam, 

54 Jasper R. Mudgett, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

56 Edgar D. Clark, 

57 Albert W. Thompson, 

58 Harry L. Peacock, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 

Blacksmith, 

Painter, 

Blacksmith, 

Woodworker, 

Wood-worker, 

Machinist, 

Machinist, 

Janitor, 

Painter, 

Electrician, 

Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
34 Downing Street. 
36 Broadway. 
5 Allison Street. 

113 South State Street. 
98 South State Street. 
23J Perley Street. 

125 South State Street. 

114 South State Street. 
36 Warren Street. 

104 South State Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

66 Frank T. Bean, 

67 Benjamin Ouillette, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Foster, 

73 Sam B. Morgan, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

76 D. Charles Parker, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

78 Carmi L. King, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 

82 William R. Reagon, 

83 Harry Leary, 

84 F. C. Young, 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Renovater, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 
Steam fitter, 
Plumber, 
Permanent driver, 



Ed E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 

5 Fremont Street. 
Odd Fellows' Home. 
10 Jefferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 

13 West Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 

10 Avon Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 
100 Warren Street. 
63 South Street. 

Ins. Blk., School Street. 

11 Warren Street. 

68 South Spring Street. 

7-1 South Street. 

92 West Street. 

53 South Main Street. 

6 Fremont Street. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



257 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 1. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 C. G. Pinkham, 



Occupations. 
Permanent engineer and driver, 
Permanent assistant engineer, 



Residences. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



Henry Rolfe, Captain. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 



OFFICERS. 

Frank P. Robertson, Lieut., Clerk and Treat. 
John B. Dodge, Steward. 

MEMBERS. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Walter H. Rolfe, 
106 Fred H. Morrill, 

109 Alfred Beddow, 

111 William H. McGirr, 

110 JohnB. Dodge, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

118 George A. Griffin, 

103 Harry F. Jones, 

123 William Corbett, 

120 Frank D. O'Brien, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

114 Henry E. Templeton, 

112 Ambrose Sweet, 

119 William H. Holbrook, 

116 Loren H. Emerson, 

117 Guy B. Chase, 

121 Albert Cassavaugh, 

104 Fred E. Miller, 



Occupations. 
Highway agent, 
Machinist, 
Foreman, 
Sash-maker, 
Stationary engineer, 
Second hand, 
Janitor, 
Table-maker, 
Painter, 
Teamster, 
Axle-maker, 
Expressman, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wine clerk, 
Laborer, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Table-maker, 
Teamster, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 
37 Centre Street. 
45 Summer Street. 
44 Elm Street. 

36 Charles Street. 
59 Merrimack Street. 
92 High Street. 
15 Washington Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
44 Centre Street. 

19 Church Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 
41 Washington Street. 
67 Washington Street. 
9 Webster Street. 
110 Merrimack Street. 
Union Street. 
9 Union Street. 
Merrimack Avenue. 



17 



258 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

East Concord. 



George O. Robinson, Captain. 
C. E. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 



Names. 
George O. Robinson, 
C. E. Robinson, 
John C. Hutchins, 
William L. Batchelder, 
Samuel G. Potter, 
Charles P. White, 
William E. Virgin, 
Rufus S. Boynton, 
Fred S. Farnum, 
Shad Cate, 
Ross W. Cate, 
Herbert Knowles, 
James Cox, 
Daniel Lewis, 
Parker French, 
Wesley Field, 
John W. Sanborn, 
Walter C. Sanborn, 
Arthur P. Swain, 
Michael Lacroix, 
Clarence Tibbetts, 
Reuben L. Cate, 
John T. Cate, 
C. A. Chamberlin, 
William F. Paige, 
Lloyd Virgin, 
Daniel W. Sanborn, 
Thomas E. Chase, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
Hiram Gardner, Jr., 



Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Clerk, 
Engineer, 
Farmer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Janitor, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Horseshoer, 
Carpenter, 
Blacksmith, 
Driver, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Wood-worker, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Blacksmith, 
Storekeeper, 
Blacksmith, 



John C. Hutchins, Treasurer. 
Charles P. White, Steward. 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Potter Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Eastman Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



259 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 
West Concord. 

OFFICERS. 
Hiram E. Quimby, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 

Alfred J. Fraser, Lieut, and Clerk. Frank C. Blodgett, Steward. 

Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



Names. 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Frank G. Peterson, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Edward Lovering, 
Abram D. Cushing, 
Joseph Daley, 
Luther E. Rowe, 
Robert Henry, 
Benjamin Kemp, 
Clarence J. Spead, 
Arthur Spead, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Ekstrom, 
Oscar Johnson, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Blacksmith, 
Quarryman, 
Silversmith i 
Laborer, 
Plumber, 

Stationary engineer, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 



Residences. 
490 North State Street. 
19 Clark Street. 
382 North State Street. 
5 Engel Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Street. 
346 North State Street. 
436 North State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
517 North State Street. 
455 North State Street. 
453 North State Street. 
513 North State Street. 
461 North State Street. 
439 North State Street. 
439 North State Street. 
14 View Street. 
480 North State Street. 
16 Gladstone Avenue. 
516 North State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



VETERAN'S AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



William E. Dow, Captain. 



OFFICERS. 



Fred S. Johnson, Lieutenant. 



W. E. Dow, 
J. E. Howard, 

E. F. Home, 

F. D. Hurd, 

G. H. Davis, 
J. M. Colbert, 
D. Holloran, 
C. E. Palmer, 
C. C. Hill, 

C. L. Mason, 



MEMBERS. 
W. M. Chase, 

C. F. Thompson, 

D. L. Neal, 
A. H. Britton, 
C. A. Herbert, 
Fred S. Johnson, 
A. L. Walker, 

S. S. Upham, 
A. G. Jewett, 
F. T. Smith, 



W. W. Kennedy, 
A. O. Mansur, 
O. Thompson, 

E. A. Saltmarsh, 

D. B. Newhall, 
W. K. Wingate, 
C. H. Barrett, 

F. Leighton, 
H. P. Bowers, 

E. D. Ashley. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CITY MARSHAL. 



To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Alddermen for the 
Year ending December 31, 1912: 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to submit to you the report 
of the Police Department for the year beginning January 1, 
1912, and ending December 31, 1912. 

ROSTER. 

City Marshal. 
- George A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant City Marshal. 
Charles H. Rowe. 

Captain. 
Victor I. Moore. 

Sergeant. 
Christopher T. Wallace. 

Regular Patrolmen. 
Samuel L. Bachelder, George H. Silsby, 

Samuel Rodd, Elmer J. Brown, 

Irving B. Robinson, Albert W. Braley, 

Edward J. McGirr, Harry L. Woodward, 

Joseph E. Silva, Fred N. Marden. 

Janitor of Police Station. 
Charles W. Hall. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



261 



Special Reserve Officers. 



Harry F. Jones, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
George G. Allen, 
Orrin H. Bean, 
Charles E. Kelley, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
Nelson Forrest, 



captain. 
Thomas P. Davis. 

W. A. Little, 
Charles H. Guilbault, 
Jonas Welcome, 
James Jepson, 
George E. Drury, 
Walter H. Beane, 
Clark D. Stevens. 



Financial Statement. 
Total receipts for fines and costs, 



$2,586.40 



Total appropriation for 1912, 
Special appropriation for horse, 
Special appropriation, 



$16,646.07 

290.00 

1,607.00 



Total expenditures, 


$18 ; 543.07 


Disbursements. 




Fuel, 


$398.46 


Helmets, caps and buttons, 


38.35 


Horse-hire, city and Penacook, 


334.00 


Board and shoeing horse, 


258.90 


Ice, 


6.05 


Incidentals, 


1,425.65 


Salaries (regulars), 


14,549.10 


Salaries (specials), 


835.85 


Salary of janitor, 


300.00 


Lights, 


181.39 


Water, 


43.00 


Police signal system, 


172.32 



Total, 



$18,543.07 



262 city of concord. 

Number of Arrests and Causes. 

Whole number of arrests, including Penacook, 1,366 

Whole number of arrests at Penacook, 159 

Brought before the court, 905 

Discharged by the court, 4 

Discharged without being brought before the court, 461 

Adultery, 3 

Assault, 22 

Assault on officer, 2 

Assault with intent to kill, 1 

Aggravated assault, . 2 

Breaking and entering, 4 

Bastardy, 2 

Assault with intent to rape, 1 

Breaking seal on freight car, 1 

Drunkenness, including Penacook, 925 

Drunkenness at Penacook, 93 

Deserters, 4 

Obtaining money by false pretences, 1 

Escaped from House of Correction, 1 

Pulling in a false alarm of fire, 1 

Fornication, 9 

Arrests for out-of-town officers, 9 

Insane, 20 

Fighting, 4 

Larceny, 23 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 8 

Safe-keeping, 235 

Threatening to do bodily harm, 1 

Rude and indecent conduct, 3 

Failing to send children to school, 5 

Evading railroad fare, 1 

Begging, 1 

Killing deer in closed season, 3 

Non-support, 7 

Hunting without a license, 5 

Carrying concealed weapons, 1 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 263 

Intent to cheat and defraud, 1 

Fraud, 5 

Embezzlement, 2 

Overspeeding automobiles, 8 

Runaway boys, 2 

Killing robins, 1 

Setting snares, 1 

Keeping liquor for sale, 5 

Abandonment, 1 

Idle persons, 4 

Interfering with a locomotive, 1 

Obstructing an officer, 2 

Street walkers, 1 

Running an automobile without proper lights, 1 

Overloading a horse, 1 

Riding bicycles on sidewalks, 4 

Running a lottery, 1 

Gambling, 3 

Abusing his wife, 2 

Escape from jail, 1 

Polluting a water supply, 1 

Escapes from the Industrial School, 2 

Procuring liquor for man on the black list, 1 

Selling eye glasses without a license, 1 

Abusive language on a public street, 1 

Pointing a loaded gun at his wife, 1 

Running an employment bureau without a license, 1 

Procuring liquor for minors, 3 

Selling liquor, 2 

Miscellaneous 

Whole number of lodgers, including Penacook, 1,205 

Whole number of lodgers at Penacook, 436 
Number of doors found open and secured, including 

Penacook, 145 
Number of doors found open and secured at Penacook, 53 
Whole number of doors tried, including Penacook, 509,980 



264 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Whole number of doors tried at Penacook, 67,980 

Lost children returned to their parents, 8 

Disturbances quelled, 51 

Stray teams found, 2 

Stray horses found, 1 

Number of times ambulance used, 132 
Number of duty calls rung in on the police signal, 47,769 

Accidents reported, 12 

Dogs killed, 16 

Bicycles found, 38 

Dead bodies found, 6 

Cases investigated by officers, including Penacook, 748 

Cases investigated by officers at Penacook, 80 

Defects in sidewalks and streets reported, 3 

Dangerous dogs reported, 15 

Dangerous wires reported, 7 

Fire alarms rung in by officers, 3 

Gas street lights reported out, 5 

Lanterns placed at dangerous places, 4 

Water leaks reported, 4 

Lost dogs restored, 6 

Runaway horses stopped by officers, 4 

Street obstructions removed, 5 

Assisted at accidents, 8 

Assisted in cases of sickness, 124 

Persons reported bitten by dogs, 8 

Lights reported out, 156 
Number of officers attending fires, including Penacook, 115 

Number of officers attending fires at Penacook, 9 

Sick persons given aid at Police Station, 6 

Sick persons given aid at Penacook Police Station, 2 

Sick and injured persons assisted, 10 

Bound over to the superior court, 23 

Committed to jail, 32 

Committed to the House of Correction, 308 

Committed to the New Hampshire State Hospital, 20 

Number of fines paid, 271 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 265 

Mittimuses not to issue till called for, 259 

Appeals, 1 

Cases nol prossed, 11 

Assistance rendered at drowning accidents, 2 

Location of Police Signal Boxes. 

Bridge Street and Stickney Avenue. 

South Main and West Streets. 

South Main and Concord Streets. 

South Main and Pleasant Streets. 

North Main and School Streets. 

North Main and Park Streets. 

Washington, between North Main and State 

Streets. 
North Main and Church Streets. 
North State and Penacook Streets. 
Curtice Avenue and North State Street. 
West Concord, opposite Shepard's store. 
Penacook (Square). 
Center, opposite Union Street. 
South and Perley Streets. 
Broadway, corner Carter Street. 
Center and Pine Streets. 
Pleasant and South Streets. 
Warren, opposite Tahanto Street. 
Beacon and Rumford Streets. 

Recommendations. 

I believe that the efficiency of this department would 
be greatly increased if we had a combination ambulance and 
patrol automobile, and I recommend the purchase of one. 

I also recommend the appointing of two more patrolmen. 



Box 1. 


Box 2. 


Box 3. 


Box 4. 


Box 5. 


Box 6. 


Box 7. 


Box 8. 


Box 9. 


Box 10. 


Box 11. 


Box 12. 


Box 13. 


Box 14. 


Box 15. 


Box 16. 


Box 17. 


Box 18. 


Box 19. 



266 city of concord. 

Conclusion. 

I will take this opportunity of expressing my apprecia- 
tion to His Honor, Mayor Charles J. French and the Honor- 
able Board of Aldermen, Judge George M. Fletcher, and 
City Solicitor Alexander Murchie for their many favors and 
courtesies extended to me during the past year. 

I also wish to thank the officers and patrolmen for their 
valuable assistance and loyal support in enforcing the laws 
and maintaining the efficiency and discipline of the Police 
Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall. 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1912. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

In compliance with the ordinance creating this depart- 
ment, the twentieth annual report showing the expendi- 
tures and operations of the engineering department for the 
year ending December 31, 1912 is herewith submitted: 

Paid for engineer and assistants, $2,893.25 

car-fares, livery and express, 102.44 

supplies, 150.90 

telephone rental and tolls, 23 . 20 
services, supplies and transportation, 

assessors' maps, 994.73 



[, 164. 52 



Appropriation, $4,275 . 00 

Expended, 4,164.52 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1912, $110.48 

Sewers. 

The amounts expended on construction, repairs and 
maintenance, together with a statement of the general 
condition of the sewers in the city precinct, will be found 
in the report made to the Board of Public Works covering 
the work done under their supervision. 



268 city of concord. 

Water Works. 

Considerable time was spent in making surveys for pro- 
posed additional storage at Penacook Lake, flowage areas 
computed and much valuable data secured for future use. 

Fire Department. 

Plans showing the location of the hydrants and fire- 
alarm boxes, both in the city proper and in Penacook, 
were brought up to date, prints of same made and turned 
over to the chief engineer of the department. 

Building Permits. 

Together with the chief engineer of the fire department 
I have attended twenty-six hearings, on petitions for new 
buildings and for alterations to existing structures. 

Twenty-five petitions were granted and one petition was 
referred to the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Cemeteries. 

No new blocks were laid out the past season, but in 
company with the superintendent of cemeteries we have 
formulated plans for additional lots during the coming 
season and all material available for grading has been used 
to the best advantage in grading the new portion. 

The deed books have been brought up to date, covering 
the lots sold and transferred during the past year. 

Town Lines. 

The lines between Concord and the towns of Webster, 
Boscawen, Canterbury and Loudon were perambulated 
during the fall of 1912, together with the selectmen of said 
towns, or, a portion of their boards. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 269 

The old bounds were found in good condition with the 
exception of one on the Boscawen line, which is situated on 
the "Island," so called, where the plant of the Symonds 
Table Company is located. 

The old bound was broken off and had to be replaced. 
This was done by the city paying for the bound and cutting 
same, the town of Boscawen transporting the bound to its 
proper location and setting the same. Your engineer was 
present at the setting of the new bound and saw it placed 
in the ground on the location formerly occupied by the old 
one. The new bound is much more substantial than the 
old one and should not be disturbed by future freshets. 

Streets. 

Linden Street, in Ward One, was laid out and accepted 
for a distance of four-hundred feet and grades established. 

Home Street, running easterly from Hall Street for a 
distance of 926.65 feet was laid out and grades established. 

River Street, in West Concord, was laid out with the 
usual provision, that the abuttors rough grade the street, 
for a distance of 393.9 feet. 

Gladstone Street was extended 100 feet as an accepted 
street. 

The above changes make our street mileage as follows: 

In the compact portion of the city 44.94 miles and in the 
outlying districts 126.33 miles, a total of 171.27 miles of 
streets and highways in the town. 

Lines and grades were given for macadam roadways on 
South Street, North State Street, in West Concord; for 
gravel roadway on the Loudon road and for new concrete 
sidewalk construction and for other work of the street 
department when requested. 

The usual monthly measurements of concrete sidewalks 
were made during the season for this work, and statements 
showing the square yards laid, cost and location of the 
same made and delivered to the superintendent of streets. 



270 city of concord. 

Assessors' Maps. 

The field work on these maps was carried on as usual 
during the summer months. We have now covered the 
territory lying west of the Merrimack river and plans cover- 
ing this territory will be ready for the assessors in April 
1913. 

The special appropriation for this work was $1,000, of 
which amount $994.73 was expended. The balance was 
carried to the credit of the engineering department. 

Many pieces of property are still carried as estates of 
former owners, and it requires much time and labor to 
properly show ownership of them. 

It is surprising to note the number of unsettled estates 
and the number of people who do not record their deeds. 

Many deeds are very indefinite in their descriptions and 
we have not tried to settle disputes over property lines 
but show the various properties as they are occupied. 

The general filing of inventories the past season aided us 
in many cases to place property which was obscurely located 
and hard to locate without the aid of plans and deeds. 

We have now listed about forty-five hundred owners and 
their property shown on plans. Many of these owners have 
several tracts of land and the above number does not indi- 
cate the number of tracts shown. 

Miscellaneous. 

Grades were given the committee on playgrounds at the 
Kimball playground and a start made to properly grade 
this lot. Owing to the small appropriation available the 
results obtained were not all that could be desired. 

Street lines and grades for private parties have been 
given as desired. 

Meetings of the Board of Aldermen, the Board of Public 
Works and committees of the Board of Aldermen have been 
attended when requested and information given or acquired 
for their use. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 271 

The labors of the Board of Examiners of Plumbers and 
the Hydrant Commissioners are set forth under their 
respective headings, in reports to your Board. 

The employees of this department during the past sea- 
son were : 

Fred W. Lang, principal assistant; Forrest F. Owen, 
assistant; Orion H. Hardy, transitman; William E. Nash, 
Harrold H. Betton, George W. Burke and Earland B. Cook, 
rodmen. 

To the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen, I wish to 
express my appreciation for the many courtesies shown. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1912 



to March 


31, 


1916 


to March 


31, 


1916 


to March 


31, 


1915 


to March 


31, 


1915 


to March 


31, 


1914 


to March 


31, 


1914 


to March 


31, 


1913 


to March 


31, 


1913 



Board of Water Commissioners. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex officio. 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 

SOLON A. CARTER, President. 
EDSON J. HILL, Clerk of Board. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 273 

CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members. 

Abraham G. Jones,* ex officio, 1872 — three months. 

John M. Hill,* 1872-1878. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1872-1878. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

David A. Ward,* 1872-1874. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1872. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

Benjamin S. Warren,* 1872-1873. 

John Kimball, ex officio, 1872-1876. 

John Abbott,* 1873-1876. 

John S. Russ.* 1874-1877. 

Abel B. Holt,* 1874-1877. 

Samuel S. Kimball,* 1875. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Geo. A. Pillsbury,* ex officio, 1876-1878. 

Luther P. Durgin,* 1876-1885. 

John Kimball, 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William M. Chase, 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Horace A. Brown,* ex officio, 1878-1880. 

James L. Mason,* 1878-1893. 

James R. Hill,* 1878. Died in 1884. 

Geo. A. Cummings,* ex officio, 1880-1883. 

Edgar H. Woodman, *ex officio, 1883-1887. 

Joseph H. Abbot,* 1884-1893. 

George A. Young,* 1885-1894. 

John E. Robertson, ex officio, 1887-1889. 

Stillman Humphrey,*ea: offi do, 1889-1891. 

Henry W. Clapp,* ex officio, 1891-1893. 

Willis D. Thompson, 1891-1895. 

William P. Fiske, 1891-1902. 

James H. Chase,* 1891. Died in 1893. 

John Whitaker,* .1892. Died in 1903. 



♦Deceased. 
18 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Henry E. Conant,* 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

Parsons B. Cogswell, *?# o$ao,1893-1895. 

Solon A. Carter, 1893. Now in office. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William M. Mason, 1893-1899. 

William E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Robinson, ex officio, 1895-1897. 

Ebenezer B. Hutchinson,* 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 

Edson J. Hill, 1895. Now in office. 

Albert B. Woodworth,* ex officio, 

1897-1899. 
Nathaniel E. Martin, ex officio, 1899-1901. 
Henry E. Conant,* 1899. Died in 1911. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 

Harry G.Sargent,* ex officio, 1901-1903. 
Obadiah Morrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott, 1901. Now in office. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 

Charles R. Corning, ex officio, 1903-1909. 
Henry C. Holbrook, 1903. Now in office. 

Harley B. Roby, 1905. Resigned Jan. 24, 1911. 

Charles J. French, ex officio, 1909. Now in office. 
Burns P. Hodgman, 1911. Now in office. 

Frank P. Quimby, 1911. Now in office. 

Presidents or the Board. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1874-1875. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

John Kimball, 1875-1876. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1876-1878. 

John Kimball, 1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William P. Fiske, 1891-1902. 

Solon A. Carter, 1902. Now in office. 

♦Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 275 



Superintendents. 



V. C. Hastings,* 1873. Died March 14, 1907. 

P. R. Sanders, 1907. Now in office. 



♦Deceased. 



276 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights: 

Paid B. F. & D. Holclen, for water 

rights, $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000.00 
W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 
Humphrey & Farnum, for 

kit-shop privilege, 4,900.00* 
flowage rights around Pena- 

cook Lake, 4,375.61 

W. P. Cooledge, Hutchins lot, 1 ,050.00f 

Mary C. Rowell, for land, 1,500.00 

Moses H. Bradley, for land, 5,000.00 

Joseph B. Walker, for land, 2,214.00 

John G. Hook, for land, 370.00 

A. S. Ranney, for land, 1,350.00 

Alfred Roberts, for land, 1,275.00 

Charles E. Ballard, for land, 2,500.00 

Mary G. Carter, for land, 1,250.00 

Elizabeth Widmer, for land, 1,564.50 

A. L. Proctor, for land, 450.00 

Robert Crowley, for land, 3,000.00 

Miles Hodgdon, for land, 2,200.00 
heirs of Lowell Brown, for 

land, 1,032.55 

Coffin & Little, for land, 800.00 

O. F. Richardson, for land, 100.00 
M. H. & C. R. Farnum, for 

land, 4,500.00 

Cook & Hood, for land, 1,750.00 

Charles H. Farnum, for land, 1,401.36 



* Original coal, $5,000; land sold for $100. 

t Original cost house and lot, $2,250; portion of lot sold for $1,200. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 277 

Paid Fred N. Ladd, for land, $300.00 

A. W. Hill, for land, 6,500.00 

Helen G. Evans and others, 

for land, 2,000.00 

Frank B. Kilburn, for land, 2,500.00 

Joseph A. and Mary E. Hal- 

loran, for land, 600.00 

Wheelock Club, for land, 1,400.00* 

Dr. I. A. Watson, for land, 2,490.00f 

Frank E. Horner, for land, 1,900.00 

Frank E. and William H. 

Horner, for land, 100.00 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Association, 20,000.00 

dam, gate-house and appurte- 
nances, 32,756.17 

conduit and gate-houses, 29,484.05 

mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to the 
reservoir, fire main through 
North and South Main 
Streets, and high service 
Main from Penacook Street 
to Stark Street, Penacook), 182,241.70 

distribution pipe, 383,930.97 

service pipe, 61,505.65 

reservoir, 42,460.09 

pumping station, shop, sta- 
ble and storehouse, 22,954.48 

pumping machinery, 17,000.42 



* Original cost, $1,500; house sold for $100. 
t Original cost, $2,700; house sold for $210. 



278 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cost of engineering and super- 
intendence, $14,913.12 
incidentals, 6,531.19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1913, 



$1,027,659.86 



Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding: 

Amount. 

$10,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

9,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

7,000.00 

4,000.00 

5,000.00 

352,000.00 

20,000.00 

30,000.00 

15,000.00 

15,000.00 



When due. 


Rate. 


Jan. 


1, 1913, 


4, 


Jan. 


1, 


1914, 


4, 


Jan. 


1, 


1915, 


4, 


Jan. 


1, 


1916, 


4, 


Jan. 


1 


1917, 


4, 


Jan. 


1 


1918, 


4, 


Jan. 


1 


1919, 


4, 


Nov. 


1 


1920, 


3, 


Nov. 


1 


1921, 


3, 


April 


1 


, 1921, 


o 2 , 


Jan. 


1 


1922, 


4, 


March 1 


, 1922, 


°2) 


April 


1 


, 1922, 


«J<2 , 


Jan. 


1 


, 1923, 


°2) 


Jan. 


1 


, 1924, 


°2> 



$512,000.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 279 

REPORT OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Office of the board of Water Commissioners, 

Concord, N. H., February 24, 1913. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners transmits herewith 
the report of the superintendent, exhibiting in detail the 
operations of the department for the year ending December 
31, 1912, together with the report of the engineer of the 
pumping station, which documents are made a part of 
this report. 

The works have continued to meet all reasonable demands 
upon them and the supply has been abundant for domestic 
purposes and for fire protection. 

The report of the superintendent shows that the expen- 
ditures for repairs and extensions have been comparatively 
small for the past year. 

The pump which was installed in 1892 in connection 
with the high service system will require a considerable 
expenditure the coming year to put it in first-class condi- 
tion, but the auxiliary pump which was installed in 1904 
will undoubtedly furnish an ample supply while the repairs 
are in progress. 

The board has been confronted with a serious problem 
by the appearance of the gypsy moth in the grove adjoining 
Penacook Park, which seriously threatened not only the 
growth on the tract controlled by the board, but also 
that under control of the park commission and that in 
the city lot. 

The city government has taken steps to endeavor to 
control the ravages of the pest and it is hoped the effort 
will be successful. 

In the report of the board for the year 1911, it was 
stated that it was probable that it would be possible to 
anticipate the redemption of $15,000 of the water bonds 



280 CITY OF CONCORD. 

during the year 1912. The decreased expenditures for 
repairs and extensions have permitted the redemption of 
$41,000 of the water bonds during the year, of which 
$32,000 were due January 1, 1922. 

The following statement of the amount of bonds issued 
for the construction of the works, the amount paid and 
the balance outstanding January 1, 1913, will undoubtedly 
prove of interest to all citizens of Concord: 

Total amount bonds issued, $1,140,000.00 

of which, 420,000.00 

were refunding issues. 

Net amount bonds issued, $720,000.00 

Total amount bonds paid, $628,000.00 

Paid by refunding issues, 420,000.00 

Net amount bonds paid, $208,000.00 

Bonds outstanding January 1, 1913, 512,000.00 

Net issues as above, $720,000.00 

The construction account of the Concord Water Works 
to January 1, 1913, is $1,027,659.86. 

The debt on above account, January 1, 1913, is $512,000. 

Paid from earnings of system, $515,659.86. 

The board desires to commend its emplo} r ees in all 
departments for the intelligent and faithful performance 
of their duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
CHARLES J. FRENCH, ex-officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 281 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the forty-first annual report of 
the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement 
of the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1912: 

Receipts. 
For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates, $15,326.36 

For water, from consumers by meter 

rates, 60,267.00 

From delinquents, 93.68 

For water for building purposes, 76.64 

pipe and stock sold and labor, 401.03 

old brass and iron sold, 68.25 

$76,232.96 

Deduct abatements, 87.83 

Net receipts for 1912, $76,145.13 

Expenditures. 

general expenses. 
Paid pay-rolls, salaries and labor, $10,278.32 

S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop in 

Penacook, 24.00 

Ira C. Evans Company, print- 
ing and postage, 189.15 

Rumford Printing Company, 
books, 53.75 

George H. Richardson, pens, 3.50 

Frost & Adams Co., office 

supplies, 6.93 



282 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid E. C. Eastman, office supplies, 


$3.55 


Addressograph Company, ad- 




dressograph, graphotype and 




supplies, 


344.14 


Concord Evening Monitor, 




advertising, 


4.60 


Patriot Printing Company, 




advertising, 


4.30 


Concord Electric Company, 




lighting, 


55.21 


N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 




Company, telephones, 


93.10 


Mitchell Manufacturing Com- 




pany, badges, 


5.56 


W. A. Thompson, rubber boots, 


16.00 


Thorne Shoe Store, rubber 




boots, 


10.00 


Concord Hardware Company, 




hardware, 


72.03 


Thompson & Hoague Co., 




hardware, 


61.13 


Joseph T. Walker, hay, 


200.41 


Walter E. Dole, grain and 




straw, 


118.77 


G. N. Bartemus & Co., grain 




and straw, 


94.50 


H. Thompson, rattan brooms, 


6.25 


Robert Crowley, coke, 


3.70 


Barrett Manufacturing Com- 




pany, paint, 


15.92 


Tragle Cordage Company, 




packing, 


28.49 


Eagle Garage, gasoline, 


13.00 


Standard Oil Company, gaso- 




line, 


8.25 


John Swenson Granite Com- 




pany, dynamite, 


10.50 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 283 

Paid Cushman Electric Company, 

transformer, $111.50 

Concord Lumber Company, 

lumber, 20.58 

Page Belting Company, sup- 
plies, 61.87 

Concord Belting Company, 

supplies, 10.50 

Batchelder & Co., oil, etc., 37.20 

George Abbott, Jr., supplies, 3.61 

C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, 15.99 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 14.85 

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry 

Co., cast-iron pipe, 2,395.79 

R. D. Wood & Co., cast-iron 

pipe and hydrant repairs, 422.95 

Builders Iron Foundry, cast- 
ings, 364.93 

A. P. Smith Manufacturing 
Company, castings and 
valves, 132.60 

Water Works Equipment Com- 
pany, castings and valves, 36.80 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing 
Company, valves and hy- 
drants, 803.94 

Rensselaer Manufacturing 
Company, valves and hy- 
drants, 597.61 

Norwood Engineering Com- 
pany, hydrants, 84.00 

Pratt & Cady Co., valves, 16.00 

Bingham & Taylor, gate-boxes, 148.92 

Chadwick-Boston Lead Com- 
pany, pig lead and lead pipe, 347.80 

Richards & Co., pig lead, 177.89 

Prescott Piano Company, old 

lead, 2.19 



284 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid A. M. Byers Company, wrought- 

iron pipe, $ 176.05 

Hays ManufacturingCompany, 

service box rods, 10.00 

Concord Foundry & Machine 

Co., castings, 27.65 

F. L. Badger, brass castings, 12.07 

"Walworth Manufacturing Com- 
pany, tools and supplies, 152.72 

H. Mueller Manufacturing 
Company, brass goods and 
tools, 143.48 

Peter A. Frasse & Co., trench 

horses, 17.00 

Harold L. Bond Co., tools, 12.70 

Chandler & Farquhar Co., 

tools, 2.81 

Concord Pipe Company, pipe 

and fittings, 57.74 

Or & Rolfe, fittings, 3.67 

National Meter Company, me- 
ters and repairs, 770.26 

Thomson Meter Company, me- 
ters and repairs, 362.80 

Neptune Meter Company, 

meters, 327.60 

Henry R. Worthington, meters 

and repairs, 89.54 

Union Water Meter Company, 

meters and repairs, 72.00 

Mrs. Nellie Spicer, meter, 9.00 

Hersey Manufacturing Com- 
pany, meter repairs, 7.20 

Globe Horseshoeing Shop, 

smith-work, 110.10 

Ross W. Cate, smith-work, 43.05 

Jasper E. Brown, smith-work, 4.33 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 285 



Paid 



J. M. Grossman, smith-work, 


$2.80 


Chandler Eastman Company, 




repairs, 


30.95 


George D. Huntley, repairs, 


15.35 


Abbot & Downing Co., repairs, 


3.22 


C. Pelissier & Co., repairs and 




supplies, 


15.35 


George L. Theobald, team- 




work, 


146.00 


Henry M. Richardson, team- 




work, 


65.00 


E. L. Davis, team-work, 


7.50 


C. H. Carter, auto hire, 


19.00 


N. A. Dunklee, auto hire, 


2.75 


William S. Kaime, livery, 


2.00 


F. A. Clough, horse hire, 


98.65 


C. E. Bartlett, transportation 




of men, 


44.00 


George F. Tandy, repairing 




concrete, 


582.04 


Hutchinson Building Company, 




lumber and labor, 


232.27 


Rowell & Plummer, mason- 




work, 


32.55 


B. Bilsborough & Sons, paint- 




ing, 


33.03 


C. W. Dadmun, electrical work 




and supplies, 


18.27 


Morrill & Danforth, insurance 




and bond, 


415.55 


Eastman & Merrill, insurance, 


15.00 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight, 


477.60 


town of Webster, taxes, 


40.00 


Engineering News, 


5.00 


A. G. Cochran, clerk, cash paid 




out, car fares, express, post- 




age, etc., 


117.64 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid Lulu M. Hastings, clerical work, $45.83 
city highway department, re- 
pairs to streets, 25.50 
incidentals, 52.28 

$22,489.48 

PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 



Paid pay-rolls, engineer and fire- 




man, 


$1,869.65 


labor on fuel, 


102.53 


Concord Lumber Company, 




coal and slabs, 


889.57 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight on coal, 


239.77 


W. C. Robinson & Sons Co., 




oil, 


59.93 


Eagle Oil & Supply Co., pack- 




ing, 


33.20 


Revere Rubber Company, 




packing, 


11.69 


Jenkins Brothers, packing, 


15.68 


Philadelphia Grease Company, 




grease, 


4.75 


Crosby Steam Gage Company, 




gauge, 


3.85 


William T. Bailey & Co., re- 




pairs, 


13.69 


Globe Horseshoeing Shop, 




repairs, 


2.50 


M. E. Clifford & Co., supplies, 


6.63 


Concord Hardware Company, 




supplies, 


4.40 


W. S. Dole, grass seed, 


7.00 


Chandler & Farquhar Co., tools, 


5.96 


Concord Light & Power Co., 




lighting, 


11.25 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 287 



Paid N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 




Co., telephone, 


$34.50 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight, 


1.27 


Morrill & Danforth, insurance, 


75.00 


incidentals, 


1.25 

9. 304 07 




0,057Tb, U/ 


Total expenditures for 1912, 


$25,883.55 



The expenditures are divided as follows: 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

For office expenses, $1,549.67 

maintenance, 6,658.61 

inspection, 830.00 

care and repair of hydrants, 341.71 

new service-pipes, 872.80 

new distribution-pipes, 7,739.80 

new hydrants, 1,431.08 

new meters, 1,722.05 

work at Penacook Lake . , 49.00 
care of wood-lots at Penacook 

Lake, 513.91 
new shed at cottage at Penacook 



Lake, 


265.30 


incidentals, 


515.55 




«J>^^,ttOi7.'±0 


PUMPING STATION 


EXPENSES. 


For salaries, engineer and fireman, 


$1,869.65 


fuel, 


1,232.07 


oil and packing, 


121.15 


repairs, 


16.19 


supplies, 


34.46 


lighting and telephone, 


45.75 


insurance, 


75.00 



1,394.07 



288 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron main and distribution pipes have been laid 
and hydrants set during the year as follows: 

In School Street, 

west from North Main Street to Rumford, 1,796 feet 
feet 10-inch pipe. 

In Warren Street, 

west from North Main Street to North State, 454 feet 
10-inch pipe. 

In Pleasant Street, 

west from Main Street to State, 375 feet 10-inch pipe. 

In Pleasant Street, 

on connection at North Spring Street, 22 feet 10-inch 
pipe. 

In North Spring Street, 

north from Pleasant Street, 357 feet 10-inch pipe. 

In North Spring Street, 

south from School Street, 33 feet 10-inch pipe. 

In North State Street, 

north from Warren Street, 31 feet 10-inch pipe. 

In South State Street, 

south from Pleasant Street, 21 feet 10-inch pipe. 

In Rumford Strc< t, 

on connection at School Street, 15 feet 10-inch pipe. 

In South Main Street, 

south from Maitland Street to Langdon, 182 feet 10- 
inch pipe in place of 6-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Pleasant Street Extension, 

east from Main Street, 292 feet 8-inch pipe. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 289 

In Odd Fellows Avenue, 

south from Warren Street, 19 feet 8-inch pipe. 

In Fiske Road, 

north from Pleasant Street, 750 feet 6-inch pipe in 
place of 2-inch and 1-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Home Avenue, 

east from Hall Street, 362 feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Langdon Street, 

east from South Main Street, 358 feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Sexton Avenue, 

east from South Main Street, 210 feet 6-inch pipe in 
place of 1-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Maiiland Street, 

west from South Main Street, 192 feet 6-inch pipe in 
place of 1-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Penacook Street, 

extended east, 179 feet 6-inch pipe in place of 1-inch 
pipe discontinued. 

In Clarke Street, West Concord, 

extended east, 23 feet 6-inch pipe in place of 1-inch 
pipe discontinued. 

In Linden Street, Penacook, 

south from Washington Street, 285 feet 6-inch pipe. 

On hydrant branches, 

137 feet 8-inch pipe and 36 feet 6-inch pipe. 
Also 931 feet 1-inch pipe. 

Thirteen new hydrants have been set, as follows : 

On Capitol Street, at south gate of State House Yard. 
On School Street, at Durgin. 
On School Street, at North State. 

19 



290 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



On School Street, at Green. 
On Warren Street, at Odd Fellows' Avenue. 
On North State Street, at Warren. 
On Pleasant Street Extension, at Railroad Square. 
On South State Street, at Pleasant. 
On North Spring Street, at High School. 
On North Spring Street, at School. 
On Fiske Road, at Trask's. 
On Penacook Road, at Harriman's. 
On Electric Avenue, Penacook, at Washington. 
There have been set 31 gates. 

Summary of the Foregoing, 
new pipes, hydrants and stop-gates. 



Pipes. 




Hydrants. 




Stop-Gates. 




1-inch, 931 feet. 


In 


City, 


11 


4-inch, 


1 


4-inch, 4 feet. 


In 


Penacook, 


2 


6-inch, 


12 


6-inch, 2,395 feet. 








8-inch, 


11 


8-iDch, 448 feet. 








10-inch, 


7 


10-inch, 3,286 feet. 






13 






7,064 feet. 


31 


equal to 1.337 miles. 













Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
367,395 feet, equal to 69.58 miles. 

Total number of gates now in use, 1011. 
Total number of hydrants now in use, 430. 

Service Pipes. 
There have been laid during the year and connected^ with 
the main pipes, 43 service pipes consisting of 
34 f-inch, 822 feet. 

2 1-inch, 81 feet. 

3 2-inch, 52 feet. 

4 4-inch, 104 feet. 



43 



1,059 feet. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 291 

There have been discontinued, 28; of these, 21 were 
services which had supplied buildings now town down and 
most of them had been shut off for several years. Whole 
number of services at the present time, 3,752; total length 
of service pipes, 87,520 feet or 16.57 miles. 

We have set 99 meters during the year; 9 have been 
removed, making the total number now in use, 2,243. 

Of the 3,752 services now connected, 1,206 are on high 
service and 2,546 on low service; of the 2,243 meters, there 
are on high service, 663 and on low service, 1,580; of the 
430 hydrants, 216 are on high service and 214 on low service. 

The following table shows the height of water in Pena- 
cook Lake on the first day of each month : 



January, 


176.50 


July, 


180.80 


February, 


176.15 


August, 


180.15 


March, 


175.95 


September, 


179.05 


April, 


178.90 


October, 


178.45 


May, 


180.60 


November, 


178.00 


June, 


181.00 


December, 


178.05 



The lowest point reached during the year was on March 
10, being 175.85; the highest was on June 10 and was 181.40; 
mean height for the year was 178.86 which was 1.26 feet 
higher than the mean height for the year 1911. 

A chart showing the rise and fall of the water in Penacook 
Lake during the years 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911 and 1912 is 
included with this report. It will be seen that the lake 
shows at the end of each year for the first four years, a net 
loss of head; the several years showing, 
a loss of 4.85 feet from Jan. 1, 1908, to Dec. 31, 1908, 
" " " 1.00 " " " 1, 1909, " " 31, 1909, 
" " " 1.25 " " " 1, 1910, " " 31, 1910, 
" " " 1.40 " " " 1, 1911, " " 31, 1911, 
making a total loss of head of 8.50 feet from January 1, 
1908, to December 31, 1911. 

The year 1912 shows a net gain of 1.60 feet from January 
1 to December 31. 



292 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The rainfall for the past six years was as follows: 



1907, 


39.36 inches 


1908, 


26.25 " 


1909, 


30.94 " 


1910, 


30.19 " 


1911, 


34.13 " 


1912, 


36.43 " 



The normal amount of rainfall is 40.11 inches and these 
figures are given in order to show the effect of the less than 
normal amount upon the lake during the past few years. 

There being but few calls for extensions this year, the 
work of the department has been mainly the extension of 
the high service system in the section as already noted in 
this report. These lines are connected directly to the 20- 
inch main in North Main Street with the exception of 
North Spring Street which is an extension from the Pleas- 
ant Street 10-inch main. The ten hydrants which have 
been set on these lines are 8-inch, four-way, independent 
nozzle valve hydrants and are connected to the mains by 
8-inch laterals. With these extensions, the high pressure 
service is enabled to be of protection to a much larger 
district than heretofore. The class of property thus pro- 
tected includes public schools, churches, business blocks, 
apartment houses, the Y. M. C. A. building and the Central 
Fire Station. The total cost was $6,023.60. 

All hydrants have been tested regularly and thoroughly 
examined and left in the best possible condition. 

During the months of February and March we* had a 
large number of frozen services owing to the unusually cold 
winter. The process of thawing water pipes by the use 
<of electricity is familiar to many water departments but 
its application to water pipes in Concord was tried for the 
first time this year and found to be very satisfactory. A 
transformer was purchased from the Cushman Electric 
Company and with the assistance of the Concord Electric 
Company, the services connected to iron mains were thawed 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 293 

by this method. The time occupied in thawing a service 
was generally from eight to fifteen minutes after connecting 
the wire to the pipes, and we were enabled to thaw some 
services which otherwise would have had to remain frozen 
until spring. 

There have been relaid 32 services in streets that were to 
be resurfaced and curb-stops were placed on 21 old supplies. 

We continue to use cement-lined wrought-iron pipe for 
all services, being convinced that for our water supply it 
has no superior. 

The three-year-old pine seedlings raised by the depart- 
ment were transplanted to permanent locations around the 
lake and five thousand four-year-old seedlings were pur- 
chased from the Concord Electric Company and also set 
out. These have thrived in almost every case, very few 
having died for any reason. 

Gypsy moths are beginning to make their presence known 
upon our water-shed and with the help of the brown-tail 
moth are doing considerable damage. It will be necessary 
to remove the hard wood in the infected districts to stop 
their destructive work and further spread. 

There are not many requests at present for extensions in 
1913 and it will not require a large amount of pipe for new 
work. 

Our office equipment has been greatly improved by the 
addition of an addressograph to be used in making water 
bills and in addressing postal card notices, and a graphotype 
for making the metal plates used in the addressograph. 

In conclusion, I would express my appreciation of the 
continued support and cooperation of your board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R, SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



294 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE ENGINEER OF THE 
PUMPING STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water Works. 
P. R. Sanders, Superintendent, 

Sir: — I would report that the pumping machinery at 
the pumping station will need some repairs the coming 
year. 

Air pump on Pump No. 2 will need new sleeves on the 
water end very soon as they are badly worn and do not 
hold up a good vacuum. 

Pump No. 1 will need a general overhauling which will 
put the plant in good working condition for some years 
to come. 

During the past four years the pumping has decreased 
on an average of eight million gallons a year which would 
show that the capacity of the plant is sufficient for some 
years. 

The boilers have been inspected within three months 
and pronounced in very good condition. 

Following is a statement of coal and other supplies . used 
at the pumping station during the year, with a table showing 
the work for each month. 

Statement. 

126 tons 1,023 pounds New River coal. 
9 tons 1,822 pounds Cumberland coal. 
104 tons 1,537 pounds Pocahontas coal. 
81 gallons valve oil. 

12 gallons engine oil. 
36 pounds waste. 

13 pounds grease. 
11| cords slabs. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



295 



ENGINE RECORD. 



Months. 



-a o 
6* 






ST?! 



-1 Ǥ 

c ° 



fte» 
9 S 



H °> 



-J 



January. . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December . 



Total 

Daily average. 



2s 



29 31 

30 31 

24 25 
27. 27 

2-1 24 

25 25 



H.M. 
289:30 
287:30 
282:30 
267: 
271: 
298: 
307: 
261:30 
282:30 
272:30 
219:30 
231:30 



315 332 



3,270: 



H.M. 
9:20 
9:54 
9: 6 

8:54 
8:44 
9:56 
9:54 
8:26 
9:25 
8:47 
7:19 
7:28 



25,117,332, 
25,481,695 i 
25,080,802 
22,957,857' 
23,340,285, 
26,573,646 
27,020,673 
22,170,656 
20,825,342 
23,547,763 
19,584,440 
20,100,518 



810,236 
878,679 
809,058 
765,261 
752,912 
885,788 
871,957, 
715,182 
694,178 
759,605 
652,814 
648,403 



46,731 
48,977 
49,132 
43,803 
44,145 
49,475 



1,507 
1,688 
1,584 
1,460 
1,424 
1,649 



51,057 1,644 
43,464 1,402 
40,117 1,337 
45,926 1,481 
37,914 1,263 
39,00i; 1,258 



2,139 537 

2,165 520 

2,385 510 

2,685 524 

2,618 528 

1,841 537 

864 529 

386 510 

2,047 519 

1,727 512 

2,164 516 

2,618 515 



8:57 



281,801,009; 772,953 539,742, 1,474 [23,639 522 
772,953! 1.474 



* Amount of coal consumed includes that used foi starting fires, banking fires and heating buildings . 



Amount of coal consumed per thousand gallons pumped, 
1.94 pounds. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, in account with Concord 
Water Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1912, $29,617.84 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 76,145.13 

$105,762.97 

Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $20,920.00 

Bonds paid, 41,000.00 

Interest, 960.94 

Orders paid, 25,883.55 

Cash on hand, 16,998.48 

$105,762.97 

Auditor's Statement. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the books showing 
the receipts of the Concord Water- Works from January 1, 
1912, to December 31, 1912, and find the same correct; and 
that the total amounts given therein correspond with the 
amount of receipts given by Percy R. Sanders, superintend- 
ent, in his report for the year and also with the receipts 
reported by William F. Thayer, city treasurer. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 



APPENDIX 



298 



CITY OF CQNCORD. 



A. 



Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of 
the Works. 



For the year ending January 31, 


1874, 


$4,431.10 


For fifteen months ending April 1, 


1875, 


17,535.00 


For the year ending April 1, 


1876, 


16,921.24 


tt tt it 


1877, 


19,001.07 


a a a 


1878, 


20,763.03 


It it it 


1879, 


21,869.86 


a a tt 


1880, 


22,451.53 


tt a a 


1881, 


26,744.58 


For nine months ending December 3 1 , 1 88 1 , 


25,534.01 


For the year ending December 31 


1882, 


27,243.06 


tt it tt 


1883, 


28,255.48 


it a a 


1884, 


28,915.65 


it a << 


1885, 


30,222.54 


tt it it 


1886, 


30,862.64 


it it a 


1887, 


34,047.52 


tt tt a 


1888, 


38,441.32 


tt it tt 


1889, 


40,237.53 


tt tt tt 


1890, 


42,133.41 


tt tt a 


1891, 


46,075.16 


tt tt tt 


1892, 


48,351.52 


tt tt it 


1893, 


52,299.66 


it tt tt 


1894, 


53,230.10 


tt tt a 


1895, 


55,343.19 


tt a tt 


1896, 


56,557.81 


tt tt tt 


1897, 


55,156.42 


ti tt it 


1898, 


59,147.54 


a a a 


1899, 


*53,953.13 


tt tt tt 


1900, 


*57,003.71 


tt tt tt 


1901, 


62,253.61 


tt it it 


1902, 


63,430.85 


tt it tt 


1903, 


65,088.45 



* No hydrant rental this year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



299 



For the year ending December 31, 


1904, 


$68,570.48 




1905, 


71,076.44 




1906, 


73,063.45 




1907, 


73,782.64 




1908, 


71,362.67 




1909, 


f67,307.84 




1910, 


68,673.71 




1911, 


71,881.34 




1912, 


76,144.83 


Total receipts for 39 years, 


$1,845,365.12 



B. 



Mean Height of Water Each Year. 



1873, 


175.86 


1893, 


173.38 


1874, 


179.50 


1894, 


172.81 


1875, 


180.00 


1895, 


171.15 


1876, 


180.28 


1896, 


178.96 


1877, 


176.46 


1897, 


183.33 


1878, 


179.50 


1898, 


184.31 


1879, 


179.74 


1899, 


183.49 


1880, 


175.30 


1900, 


183.09 


1881, 


174.70 


1901, 


183.86 


1882, 


179.15 


1902, 


184.98 


1883, 


176.40 


1903, 


184.75 


1884, 


178.18 


1904, 


184.40 


1885, 


176.80 


1905, 


183.37 


1886, 


178.10 


1906, 


183.94 


1887, 


179.04 


1907, 


183.59 


1888, 


181.96 


1908, 


183.41 


1889, 


180.91 


1909, 


181.40 


1890, 


181.90 


1910, 


180.22 


1891, 


180.00 


1911, 


177.60 


1892, 


174.32 


1912, 


178.86 



t No hydrant rental after 1908. 



300 



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WATER DEPARTMENT. 



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305 



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306 CITY OF CONCORD. 

D. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service; L, Low Service. 




North Main. 



South Main. 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Walker's 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin's store 

Northwest corner of Franklin , 

East side, opposite Pearl . . . 

Northwest corner of Washington 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery 

East side, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

East side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block 

East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, at Central Block 

Northeast corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Freight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue . . . 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. John's Church 

Northwest corner of Perley 

West side, near Abbot-Downing Co.'s 

East side, opposite Abbot-Downing Co.'s . . 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co . . . . 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

East side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops 
West side, at Lamprey's 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



307 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




South Main . 

Water 

Hall 



Hammond . 
Railroad. . . 

Fiske 

Summer. . . 
Durgin .... 
North State 



South State . 



Mills... 

Dakin. . 
Dunklee 



Broadway 



West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opposite Rolfe and Rumford Asylum 

West side, near E. W. Robinson's 

West side, near W. A. Phillips 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, opposite Roy's 

East side, near Rumford Field 

North side, near Bridge 

East side, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 

West side, near Levi Call's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

West side, near C. E. Harriman's 

West side, 150 feet south of West 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

West side, at H. H. Metcalf's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Carter 

Northwest corner of Stone 

West side, at Rollins Park 

West side, opposite McKinley 



20 
1 



14 



308 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Broadway 
Donovan . 
Green 

South 



Bradley .... 

Union 

Jackson. . . . 
Lyndon .... 

North Spring 



South Spring . 



Academy 
Hanover. 
Rumford 



Huntington. 



West side, between McKinley and Rockingham 

Northeast corner of Wiggin 

Northwest corner of Prince 

East side, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

West side, opposite Monroe 

West side, opposite Laurel 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital. . . 

West side, opposite Downing 

West side, opposite Allison 

West side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, near Paige's 

West side, opposite I. W. Bushey's 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Road 

East side, at Quint's 

West side, near Bow line 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

East side, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northeast corner of Church 

Southwest corner of Tremont 

East side, opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner of Maple 

Southwest corner of Centre 

West side, at High School 

East side, opposite High School 

Southwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Oak 

West side, opposite Thompson 

West side, opposite Concord 

West side, near Memorial Hospital 

East side, at F. E. Hook's 

|West side, at No. 10 

West side, south of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Northeast corner of Albin 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

Northeast corner of Cambridge 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at head of Short 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



309 



FIRE-HYDRANTS— Conformed. 




Tahanto 
Pine. . . 

Holt . . . 
High... 

Valley.. 
Auburn 



Ridge Road . . . 
WestbourneRd. 

Giles 

Dartmouth . . . 
Princeton 

Fruit 

Minot 

Penacook 



Walker. . 
Albin... 
Highland 

Church . . 
Franklin . 



Chestnut . 
Tremont 



Northwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Centre 

Southwest corner of Warren 

East side, at Nason's 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

Northeast corner of Forest 

Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest 

North side, between Centre and Forest . . . 

West side, opposite Mrs. Jackman's 

North side, north of Mrs. F. P. Hallett's . . 

Southeast corner of School 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Northeast corner of Woodman 

West side, near H. T. Oilman's 

East side, opposite W. W. Critchett's 

East side, opposite Kilburn's 

West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home . . . 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home . . . 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

South side, near Concord Lumber Co 

South side, east of P. B. Co.'s storehouse. . 

South side, near P. B. Co.'s 

South side, near P. B. Co.'s office 

Southeast corner of North Main 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

North side, opposite T. Hannigan's 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue 

Southwest corner of Martin 

North side, near D. Weathers' 

North side, between Bradley and Rumford 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

South side, east of Bradley 

North side, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

South side, opposite W. J. Ahern's 

North side, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of High 

North side, east of Harrod 



310 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Tremont 
Pearl. . . 
Beacon . 



Rowell. . . 
Blanchard . 
Ferry. . . . 



Washington . 



Chapel 

Montgomery . 
Centre 



Bridge . 

Park . . 

Capitol 

Garden 
School . 



Warren . 



Southwest corner of Jackson 

North side, at Kimball Flanders' 

North side, opposite Merrimack School. . . . 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Southwest corner of Lyndon 

North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner of White 

Northwest corner of Essex 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue 

North side, opposite Rollins 

Southwest corner of Union 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of North Essex 

North side, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side, near Methodist Church 

South side, opposite Minot's 

Northeast corner of North State 

Southwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Union 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

South side, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue 

Northeast corner of Ridge Road 

South side, near easterly barn 

North side, opposite Concord Coal Co.'s . . . 
North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory . 

North side, at St. Paul's Church 

North side, at south gate of State House yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

North side, opposite E. B. Woodworth's . . . 
Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue . . . 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



311 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Warren 



Depot . . 

Blake . . 
Orchard 

Pleasant 



Fiske Road. . . 
Mill Road, 
St. P. School . . 

Old Hopkinton 

Road 

Wall 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue. . 

Fayette 

Thompson. . . . 

Chandler 

Concord 



Northwest corner of Rumford 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

Northeast corner of Giles 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at H. B. Boutwell's 

South side, opposite Sherburne's 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at South Congregational Church . 

Southeast corner of South 

Northeast corner of Fremont 

Southwest corner of Spring 

South side, opposite Rumford 

South side, opposite Merrimack 

South side, opposite Pine 

South side, opposite Liberty 

North side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite Mrs. Aiken's 

South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage 

North side, near James Lane's 

North side, near J. McC. Hammond's 

South side, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner of School Avenue 

North side, opposite infirmary 

South side, in field near gasometer 

South side, near new Upper School 

East side, at Trask's , 

East side, near laboratory , 

North side, at Orphans' Home 

South side, at tenement No. 7 



Junction of Hopkinton road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

North side, at southwest corner passenger stat'n 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Jeff ersOn 

Northeast corner of South 



H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

11 

L 

L 

H 

II 

L 

L 

L 

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II 

11 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

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II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

II 

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L 

L 
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L 
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21 

1 



312 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Monroe . . 
Thorndike . 

Laurel . . . 
Perley .... 

Downing . 
Clinton. . . 

West 



Avon 

Harrison 

Humphrey 

Allison 

Pillsbury 

Carter 

Stone 

Holly 

McKinley 
Rockingham . . 

Iron WorksJRd 
Prospect 



Curtice Ave . . 
North State . . 



North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Rumford School 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner of South Spring 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, near old brook 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Redwood Avenue 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near Snell's 

North side, at State Fair grounds 

North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee Street proposed exten'n 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, near John C. Kenney's 

West side, at Water- Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tali an to School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near W. II. Perry's 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



313" 



FIRE-HYDRANTS— Continued. 




North State. 



Palm . 



North State . 



Fisher . 
View . . 
Electric 

Clarke . 
Lake. . 



Knight 

Hutchins . . . 

Second 

Penacook Rd 



East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side, near A. L. Colburn's 

East side, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side, at south line of prison wall 

West side at north line of prison wall 

East side, near Asa L. Gay's 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co ... . 

East side, near C. H. Farnum's 

East side, near Cyrus R. Farnum's 

East side, near John True's 

East side, opposite Dolan 

East side, opposite John H. Flood's 

West side, opposite S. Abbott's 

North side, west of Fairbanks 



WEST CONCORD. 



Southeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at George Partridge's 

East side, near engine house 

East side, opposite Braithwaite's 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co ... . 
East side, opposite Simeon Partridge's . 

East side, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side, opposite A. Hollis' 

East side, near Sewall's Falls Road . . . 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kellom's 

West side, near H. C. Holden's 

West side, near Wilson's 

East side, near H. C. Holden's 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station . . 

North side, near B. T. Putney's 

North side, near C. & C. Railroad. . . . 

North side, at Turcotte's 

North side, near A. H. Knight's 

West side, opposite Frost's 

West side, opposite Blanchard's 

West side, near Warner Road 



20 
1 



10 
1 
1 

2 
1 



314 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE-HYDRANTS— Continued. 




South Main. 



West Main . 
High 



Washington . 



Electric Ave 

Elliott 

Charles 



West Canal . 
East Canal . 

Crescent. . . 
Merrimack . 



Summer 

Spring . 
Maple. . 

Winter . 



PENACOOK. 

West side, at Harriman's 

West side, at Annis's 

West side, at Garvin's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cemetery 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cemetery 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt's garage 

West side, near Prescott's 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opposite Washington .... 

Northwest corner of Charles 

North side, opposite East Canal 

North side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Northwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northwest corner of Spring 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, opposite John Whitaker's 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge 

South side, junction of Washington 

Northeast corner of Electric Avenue 

Southwest corner of Warren 

North side, near George W. Corey's 

Southeast corner of Warren 

North side, near Contoocook Mfg. Co 

North side, near Crescent 

West side, north of Canal. 

South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue 

North side, opposite D. W. Fox's 

North side, opposite Cross 

South side, opposite Rolfe's shop 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory 

North side, near road to Island 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

North side, opposite High 

Northeast corner of Centre 

North side, opposite Church 

Northeast corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

North side, near Pleasant 



15 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Concluded. 



315 



Streets. 



Locations. 



Centre. . 

Cross. . . 
Rolfe.. . 

Penacook 



Northwest corner of Spring 

West side, at Corbett's 

Southwest corner of Summer 

North side, near James Corbett's 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

West side, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 

West side, at E. L. Davis' 

East side, at John Chadwick's 

Whole number public hydrants . . . 

PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Concord Shoe Factory 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard . 
Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. . 

State Prison 

State Prison 

Abbot-Downing Co.'s yard 

Page Belting Co.'s yard 

Page Belting Co.'s yard 

W. P. Ford & Co.'s yard 

N. H. State Hospital yard 

Concord Gas Light Co.'s yard 

St. Paul's School 

Water Works Pumping Station grounds 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

Crescent Worsted Co 

Whole number private hydrants . . . 



430 



H 


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4 


H 


15 


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2 


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4 


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2 



65 



316 CITY OP CONCORD. 

E. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1912. 

In form recommended by the New England Water- 
Works Association. 



CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1910 — 21,497. 
Date of construction — 1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING STATISTICS. 

1. Builders of pumping machinery — Henry R. Worthing- 

ton, Harrison, N. J. 

2. Description of fuel used — a. Kind — bituminous. 

b. Brand of coal — Poca- 
hontas. 

c. Average price of coal per 
gross ton delivered, $4,817. 

d. Percentage ash, 10%. 

3. Coal consumed for the year — 240.96 tons. 

4. (Pounds of wood consumed) -J- 3 = equivalent amount 
of coal— 7,880. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year for 
pumping purposes — 244.46. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 317 

6. Total pumpage for the year without allowance for 
slip— 281,801,009 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pump works — 
103.84 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pump works — 
105 feet. 

9. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent 
coal — 514. 

10. Duty = 

2 81,801,009 gallons pumped , X 8.34 (lbs.) X 100 X dynamic head, 105 _ . _ „«„ ^-q 
Total fuel consumed, 547, 622 pounds. ~~ 40,U0.<S,0 ( \) 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses, 
$3,393.77. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $12.04. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — SO. 115. 



STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTION 

SYSTEM. 

• 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 6,882 feet during year. 

4. Renewed — 182 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 1,672 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 69.58 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.14 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 
13; private, 2. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 430; pri- 
vate, 65. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 31. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1011. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four inch — 

14. Number of blow off gates — 83. 



318 CITY OF CONCORD. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

- \ 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 1,059 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 638 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 87,520 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 43. 

22. Number now in use — 3,752. 

23. Average length of service — 23.3 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — 

25. Number of meters added during year — 99. 

26. Number now in use — 2,243. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 59.78. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 79.65. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 10. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 41. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 319 



INVENTORY. 

Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
the Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1913. 



Water rights— land, etc., $1,027,659.86 

Water office— furniture, etc., 975.00 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 850.00 
Shop at pumping station — machinery, tools, 

etc., 2,200.00 
Stable and basement at pumping station, 

horse, wagons, etc., . 855.00 

Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, etc., 2,000.00 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 1,600.00 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 15.00 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00 



$1,036,194.86 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In compliance with the city charter, the Board of Public 
Works herewith submits its second annual report for the 
year ending December 31, 1912. 

The board has held forty-seven meetings, eleven of which 
were hearings held in various parts of the city on the premi- 
ses covered by the petitions considered. 

One hundred and eight petitions have been presented to 
the board; seventy-six petitions have been granted; in eight 
cases the petitioners have been given leave to withdraw; in 
six cases the petitions have been referred to the proper 
officials with full power. 

A contract made between the City of Concord and the 
Concord Electric Company for lighting the streets with 
electricity, for a period of ten years, expired September 1, 
1912; also a contract made between the City of Concord 
and the Concord Light & Power Co. for lighting the streets 
with gas, for a period of five years, expired December 30, 
1912. The board has under consideration a contract with 
the Concord Electric Compariy for lighting the whole city 
with electricity, which the Board of Public Works consider 
advantageous to the city. 

For a detailed account of work on streets and highways, 
garbage and sprinkling precincts, including receipts and 
expenditures, see report of superintendent of streets, here- 
with appended. 

For report of the work in the several sewer precincts, see 
report of the city engineer, herewith appended. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, 
OLA ANDERSON, 
ELMER H. FARRAR, 
RICHARD A. BROWN, 
FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 
EVERETT L. DAMS, 
NATHANIEL \Y. HOBBS, 

Board of Public Works. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 321 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



Office of Superintendent of Streets. 
To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen, — As superintendent of streets I herewith 
submit the annual report of the work of the highway 
department for the year ending December 31, 1912. 
Permanent Improvements and Their Maintenance. 

The sum of $7,700 was appropriated in 1912 for per- 
manent improvements in Concord divided as follows: 
South Street from Pleasant to Fayette $2,000, North Main 
Street from Pearl to Chapel $2,700, Penacook Road $2,000, 
Loudon Road, $500, Pittsfield Road, $500. The macada- 
mizing of South Street was the first piece of work to be 
done. Tarvia was used in construction and at the end of 
the season the road appeared to be in good condition and 
to have withstood the motor traffic well. The gutters 
were paved, sidewalk bankings graded, crossings repaired 
and the road put in good shape for $1,953.86. With the 
continuation of work on this street each year and with 
proper maintenance South Street will become one of our 
most attractive streets and I would recommend that the 
section from Fayette to Thorndike be macadamized next 
season. At the beginning of the year when the annual 
appropriations were made it was expected to continue the 
work on North Main Street south from Pearl but the 
extensive work done on the sewer made it seem advisable 
to leave it until another year. It would have been unwise 
to put in macadam until the street had settled properly 
and next year it will no doubt be in condition to macadamize 
and I would recommend that that piece of road be one of 
the first to receive attention. Instead of using the appro- 
priation on North Main Street it was transferred to North 
State for improving that street through West Concord 
village. This road had a fairly good stone chip foundation 

21 



322 CITY OF CONCORD. 

but was exceedingly rough. With such foundation it was 
unnecessary to excavate to any great extent and we were 
able to improve the road for some distance at a compara- 
tively small expense. The macadam should be continued 
south to Calvary cemetery to meet the macadam already 
in and the road should receive surface treatment early in 
the season. 

A section of macadam on the Penacook Road near Willow 
Hollow had become so badly worn that complete reconstruc- 
tion was necessary. Tarvia was used in construction. The 
surface of this entire road from Penacook to Concord should 
have surface treatment as early in the summer as possible. 
Merrimack Street in Penacook which leads to the railroad 
station has a section of macadam which has been in a long 
time and I would recommend that its reconstruction would 
be a matter of economy. Park Street from State to Main 
was macadamized about sixteen years ago and it should be 
reconstructed also. 

Gravel was used again last summer in improving the 
Loudon and Pittsfield Roads and the work should be con- 
tinued next summer. 

While the highway between Penacook and Concord 
receives a great amount of automobile traffic the travel on 
Pleasant Street to St. Paul's School is fully as great. The 
larger part of that road has been in about ten years and 
the section from the Eddy estate to the School needs con- 
siderable repairing and resurfacing which should be done 
next summer. In fact all of the macadam should receive 
more or less surface treatment in order to keep it up to the 
standard. Last year we received $650 from the state for 
resurfacing that portion of the Merrimack Valley boulevard 
on which the state had aided in constructing. The same 
road should be repaired this year and application has been 
made to the state highway department for aid in the work. 

Concord has not gone into the matter of highway improve- 
ments to any great extent in any one year but have been 
doing a little each year. Our annual appropriations for 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 323 

permanent improvements have been small as compared 
with other cities in -the state and by this method we have 
gradually increased the mileage of good roads and endeav- 
ored to keep them in repair. The mileage is not so great 
that it requires large sums to maintain the roads but con- 
stant maintenance is necessary. The necessity for main- 
tenance is increasing each year as the amount of motor 
traffic increases and it seems most unwise to build good 
roads unless we intend to keep them in repair. The in- 
crease in the motor traffic is making it more evident that 
more effective methods of dust laying must be used. There 
are a number of good dust layers for macadam roads but 
to find a satisfactory one for the unimproved streets is a 
problem. Last summer we used some tasscoil which was 
quite satisfactory. 

Trees. 

The amount of work necessary on the trees is increasing 
instead of decreasing. We still have the brown-tail moth 
and the elm tree beetle and the indications are that we 
shall have a considerable amount of work on account of the 
gypsy moth. With the additional sprayer purchased last 
spring we were able to do effective work against the spread 
of the elm tree beetle and we hope that another season will 
show that no great amount of damage has been done to 
the elms in Concord. 

Sprinkling. 

The street sprinkling service last summer was very un- 
satisfactory, due to the lack of teams to run the sprinklers. 
The amount of automobile traffic on all the streets is increas- 
ing; for, beside the pleasure riding, we have the delivery 
truck, etc., which makes effective dust laying necessary. 
I would recommend that oil be used on the streets where it 
would be practical. 



324 city of concord. 

Garbage. 

The collection of garbage is becoming quite a proposition 
as the amount to be collected and the distance that it must 
be hauled increases. Wherever we have dumped garbage 
there have arisen so many complaints that we have been 
forced farther and farther back until the dumps are some 
distance away and for that reason I think the purchase of 
an auto truck for the collection of garbage would be an 
economy. 

General Work of Department. 

The usual amount of general work was done by the 
department during 1912. Several smaller bridges were re- 
paired, one on the Canterbury Road over Hackett's Brook 
rebuilt and the Pembroke and Loudon bridges repaired. 
The bridge at Richardson Mill needs repairing but I under- 
stand that the town of Pembroke is to recommend a new 
bridge at their annual town meeting. If a new bridge is 
built it will be necessary for Concord to rebuild their 
abutment. The Horse Hill bridge is in special need of 
painting and, in fact, all the iron bridges in the city need 
painting. The usual amount of new catch basins were 
built and several reconstructed. About the same number 
of new concrete walks were laid and the edgestone around 
the new Historical building was reset. A large number of 
old concrete walks were repaired and there are still a great 
many in need of repairs. Quite a number of gravel side- 
walks were built during the year. There is urgent need of 
a new shed and storeroom at the city lot as we lack suitable 
room to properly house the equipment of the department 
and is a matter which should receive your immediate 
attention. 

The arrangements whereby we were able to locate the 
crusher at the old Putney Quarry, so-called, in West Con- 
cord has been a great advantage to the department as it is 
much easier of access and more convenient in every way. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 325 

Our crusher has been in use for a long time and has become 
so expensive to repair that I would recommend the purchase 
of a new one. Several meetings of the Massachusetts 
Highway Association and the Good Roads convention at 
Cincinnati, Ohio, which I attended have been a great help 
in keeping informed on the best methods of road building 
and other work of a highway department. 

I would thank the board of public works for their in- 
terest in the department and for their courtesies to me. 
The financial statement shows the various sub-divisions of 
the work of the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



326 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD ONE. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 






$86.06 


Bye 




9.91 




ii 


49.57 




" " 


90.88 




" " 


13.05 




" " 


27.65 






20.98 






32.62 






207.85 


Elliott 

Eton 


General repairs 


23.73 
201.83 




" " 


6.91 


High 


<■ ii 


81.72 




• i i. 


190.83 




ii ii 


162.24 






37.51 






65.20 






3 89 






63.42 




ii ii 


14.13 




ii ii 


192.19 




ii ii 


9.38 




.1 ii 


50.52 




ii ii 


60.01 






1,994.50 






308.83 




General repairs 


308.82 


River Hill Road 


67.67 


Rolfe 


.1 u 


16.99 




• i ii 


64.94 




.1 ii 


34.46 




ii ii 


44.96 






7.63 






21.09 


Sweatt Hill Road 




42.69 


Union 


ii ii 


3.65 


Walnut 


ii ii 


71.36 




ii ii 


1.89 




ii ii 


142.03 




ii ii 


5.54 




ii ii 


31.27 




■I ii 


2.16 









WARD TWO. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 






S30.63 






i I. 


25.95 




i ii 


15.70 




i ii 


12.50 




• ii 


1.78 




• ii 


10.00 




■ ii 


55.04 




. ii 


13.18 




i ii 


10.00 




■ ii 


69.39 




• ii 


33.87 


1'eckcr 


■ ■ 


5.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD TWO.— Concluded. 



327 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Pembroke General repairs. 

Penaeook Road, Hoit District 

Penacook Road, Penaeook Intervale .... 

Penaeook Road, Sanborn District ' 

Penacook Grading. ...... 

Pond Road General repairs. 

Portsmouth 

Potter 

Sanborn Road 

Sewall's Falls Road 

Shaker Road 

Shaker Road, Virgin District 

Shawmut 

Tyargo Road 

Virgin Road 



S2S.47 

147.38 

4.00 

4.67 

386.77 

9.22 

64.34 

269.24 

12.50 

8.00 

104.29 

21.80 

82.52 

10.00 

11.11 



WARD THREE. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Beech Hill Road. . . 

Bog Road 

Carter Hill Road. . . 
Clark 

Electric Avenue. . . 

Engel 

Ferrin Road 

Fisher 

Flander's Hill Road 

Hutchins 

Knight 

Lake 

Little Road 

Long Pond Road. . 
North State 

Number Five Road. 

Peabody 

Penacook Road 

Pine Hill Road 

Quaker 

River Road 

Saltmarsh Road . . . 
Sand Bank Road. . 

Second 

Sewall's Falls Road 
Taylor Hill Road.. 

View 

West Parish Road. 



General repairs 

Building sidewalks. . . 
General repairs 

Building sidewalks. . . 
General repairs 

New concrete crossing 
General repairs 

Macadamizing 

General repairs 

Surface treatment. . . . 
General repairs 



S16.39 
21.38 
43.00 
72.42 
39.29 

3.47 
10.12 

6.00 
16.53 
16.61 
38.25 
51.95 

8.17 
19.80 
19.00 

3.50 

92.03 

435.17 

2.22S.44 

48.83 

2.50 
310.36 
21.72 

1.78 
114.62 
98.85 

6.25 

3.92 
59.32 
18.22 

1.81 
33.47 



328 



(II V OF CONCORD. 

WARD FOUR. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Repairing concrete walks. . . 
Building sidewalk and wall. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Abbott New concrete walks. 

Auburn General repairs 

Beacon 

Bradley 

Centre 

Chapel 

Church 

East Penacook 

Essex 

Forrest 

Franklin 

Granite 

High 

Highland 

Jackson 

Lyndon 

Montgomery 

North Main 

North Spring 

North State 

Park Ridge 

Pearl 

Penacook 

Perry Avenue 

Pitman 

Rumford 

Summer 

Tremont 

Union 

Vernon 

Walker 

Washington 

White 



Repairing concrete walks. . . 

roadway. 

General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. . . 

roadway. 

GeneraJ repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General Repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 

New concrete walks 

New concrete walks 



$17.83 

52.91 
16.80 
164.15 
308.74 
41.46 

5.52 
27.41 
19.22 

8.31 
25.19 
10.76 
140.25 
146.52 
43.16 

2.54 
13.13 
21.90 

8.74 

118.39 

94.47 

72.75 

5.92 
10.13 
20.22 
53.68 
37.55 

3.49 

4.09 

5.08 
20.61 

2.40 
90.65 
15.05 
28.81 
11.79 
49.77 
19.65 
13.48 
82.89 
56.90 
54.34 
19.35 



WARD FIVE. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 


Blake 




$1.65 






76.33 






658.95 






2.31 






47.94 






48.46 






40.56 






3.67 






.79 


Giles 


<> ii 


30.92 




■I ii 


23.78 
50.18 







BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD FIVE.— Concluded. 



329 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 






$3.02. 






2.14 






28.72 






30.71 






2.69 






14.22 






56.00 


North Fruit 


General repairs 


10.95 
33.27 








155.01 






18.06 


North State 




34.67 




" walks 


46.53 

2.07 






3.23 


Park . 




12.39 






41.77 


Pine 




31.31 






16.50 






75.01 






30.01 






7.31 






2.39 






2.22 




U l. 


12.51 






23.10 






299.73 






239.86 






7.40 






16.75 


Short 




3.80 






2.28 




11 II 


2.48 






19.54 






135.50 






66.51 






127.49" 






8.90 









WARD SIX. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. ' 



Clinton. . 
Concord . 
Downing 
Elm 

Fayette. 

Fruit. . . 
Grove. . , 
Jefferson 
Laurel . . 
Monroe. 
Oak.... 

Perley. . 



General repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 



$20.68 
11.17 
11.77 
12.46 
56.10 

9.23 
94.11 
13.59 

9.86 

2.32 
19.03 
12.04 
15.51 

9.88 
86.77 
43.89 



330 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD SIX.— Concluded. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 






$11.38 






35.96 




" " 


69.16 






17.42 






196.70 






1,953.86 






85.01 






65.65 






20.18 






129.82 






51.88 






95.63 






67.09 






18.92 






59.54 






9.23 






12.77 






35.49 


Wall 


General repairs 


17.04 




31.30 









WARD SEVEN. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 








S48.92 






59.63 


NN 


Repairing concre 




12.54 




4.05 






4.95 


Birch 


<■ it 


75.32 




■i ii 


13.86 




■i ii 


172.91 




•I ■■ 


1.14 




ii ii 


76.90 




Repairing concret 




1.15 






4.99 






104.74 




•I ii 


11.94 




ii ii 


37.52 




■ i ii 


5.89 




ii ii 


8.41 




ii ii 


55.27 


Gale 


■ i ii 


14.08 


Gas 


ii ii 


41.28 


Glen 


ii ii 


34.63 


Hall 


ii ii 


122.49 




ii ii 


18.51 




•■ ii 


35.15 




ii ii 


88.58 




ii ii 


100.84 


Old " 


ii ii 


162.10 




•• ii 


34.89 




ii ii 


31.45 




ii ii 


34.89 




■ i ii 


2.20 


Mills 






112.04 






17.01 




" :: 




3.14 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD SEVEN.— Concluded. 



331 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Mose Brown Road. 

North Fruit 

Noyes 

Piusbury 

Pleasant 

Princeton 

Rockingham 

Silk Farm Road. . . 

South 

South Main 

Stickney Hill Road 

Stone 

Tuttle 

Water 

West 

Woodman 



General repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks. 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

New concrete walks 

Repairing macadam 

General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



SI 1.08 

12.47 

183.38 

10.90 

7.58 

27.07 

37.47 

282.90 

269.20 

44.69 

56.41 

76.37 

158.83 

211.77 

87.84 

75.61 

52.47 

4.49 

7.05 

46.68 

12.99 



WARD EIGHT. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Break o' Day Road. . . 

Bridge 

Chandler 

Clough Mill Road 

Depot 

Ferry 

Freight 

Loudon Road 

North Main 

PittsBeld Road 

Pleasant Extension. . . 
Sexton Avenue 

Sheep Davis Road. . . . 
South Main 

South Pembroke Road 

Stickney Avenue 

Sugar Bowl Road 

Tim Chase Road 

Water 



General repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Grading 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
" roadway. 

Grading 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 

Surface treatment 

General repairs 



$13.85 

634.43 

22.59 

15.96 

7.84 

1.15 

129.51 

12.21 

176.91 

499.40 

64.35 

46.31 

493.39 

10.45 

2.98 

18.61 

19.47 

47.07 

26.34 

160.94 

813.41 

15.95 

31.88 

51.03 

78.94 



332 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD NINE. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Auburn 

Bradley 

Charles 

Church 

East Penacook 

Franklin 

Granite 

High 

Highland 

Little Pond Road .... 

Long Pond Road 

North State 

Penacook 

Perkins 

Rumford 

Snow Shoe Club Road 

Walker 

Waverly 

Wyman 



General repairs. 



Building sidewalks 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs ; 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



S79.92 

4.60 

13.91 

3.09 

24.11 

82.91 

175.20 

27.53 

33.92 

01.12 

55.74 

169.05 

224.48 

277.41 

69.39 

2.22 

30.82 

26.19 

5.17 

5.28 

25.98 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 333 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $30,000.00 

Transferred from catch basins, 36.16 

),036.16 



EXPENDITURES. 

Central District. 

general repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls, $9,096.53 
A. B. Black Road Machinery Com- 
pany, repairs, 40.92 
Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., repairs, 4.75 
C. H. Swain & Co., repairing tools, 5.90 
Hugh Tallant, lumber, 351.28 
Ohio Pipe Culvert Co., drag, 19.00 
Treworgy Pen & Ink Mfg. Co., ink, .75 
George H. Richardson, pens, 2.00 
Acme Road Machinery Co., repairs, 120.80 
C. H. Farnum, hay, 330.12 
Thomas Robinson, oil, 3.00 
W. A. Sleeper, repairs, 8.55 
R. J. Macquire, services, 73.75 
C. Pelissier & Co., supplies and re- 
pairs, 69.63 
Geo. D. Huntley, repairs, 159.10 
C. H. Martin Company, supplies, 3.00 
Concord Lumber Company, lumber, 19.35 
■Cushman Electric Company, repairs, 2.50 



334 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Orr & Rolfe, repairs, $0.45 

Norman Nicholson, shoeing, 31.90 

G. S. Milton, repairs, .75 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, GO. 27 

A. P. Baker, lantern, 1.00 

Eyeless Tool Company, picks, 23.16 

J. W. Sanborn, hay, 98.10 

C, E. Mills Oil Company, Oil, 28.44 

C. C. Martin, shoeing, 34.10 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 5.60 
Ira C. Evans Company, printing and 

supplies, 105.72 
C. A. Eastman, straw, 10.01 
N. E. T. & T. Co., telephone service, 41.19 
C. F. Nichols & Son, supplies, 2.00 
A. R. Andrews, supplies, 14.93 
Ross W. Cate, shoeing and repairs, 38.15 
Alfred Clark, Supt., cash paid out, 53.35 
Alfred Clark, Supt., expense to con- 
vention, 65.00 
A. C. Sanborn, hay, 50.16 
Geo. F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

roadway, 1,191.14 

F. W. Grafton, M. D., services, 5.00 
C. H. Cook, M.D., services, 21.00 
Miller & Hill, shoeing, 2.25 
Snell & Hill, shoeing, 6.40 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 3.70 
Mrs. C. H. Fellows, hay, 107.42 
Tenney Coal Company, coal, 36.99 
C. W. Drake, glass, 5.28 
Concord Electric Company, lights, 232.96 
Concord Water Works, water, 24.00 
Harry G. Emmons, supplies, 5.42 
Mrs. H. W. Lakin, laundry work, 1.50 
Mrs. Helen Thompson, laundry work, 9.00 
W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 1,382.62 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



335 



Page Belting Co., repairs, 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

repairs, 
F. W. Paige, hay, 
F. W. Paige, gravel, 
B. F. Griffin, gravel, 
Perley Badger, gravel, 
N. B. Cloutman, gravel, 
N. B. Cloutman, hay, 
Mark Upton, gravel, 
William D. Welcome, gravel, 
Luther Nutting, gravel, 
John Jordan, gravel, 
George H. Cilley, gravel, 
Concord Fire Department, horse, 
Concord Belting Co., supplies, 

B. & M. R. R., freight, 

Thompson Hoague Company, supplies, 

C. H. Martin Company, supplies, 
Concord Water Works, pipe, 
Hutchinson Building Company, 

labor, 
C. H. Dudley, tallow, 
Ford & Kimball, sled shoes, 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil, 
Concord Hardware Company, sup- 
plies, 
Monitor & Statesman Co., advertis- 
ing, 
Cushman Electric Company, repairs, 
The Studebaker Corporation, oiler, 
The Studebaker Corporation, repairs, 
Lucien Pickering, labor, etc., 



$15.31 

1.15 

428.71 

4.50 

.80 

6.40 

6.10 

82.86 

1.70 

.90 

3.40 

3.00 

.70 

200.00 

2.25 

16.72 

7.21 

3.10 

61.24 

1.50 

2.00 

12.96 

9.75 

154.73 

.70 

.25 

250.00 

2.80 

4.60 



$15,295.23 



336 CITY OF CONCORD. 



CULVERTS. 

Labor pay-rolls, $51.55 

Concord Hardware Company, pipe, 5.60 



57.15 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 



Labor pay-rolls, buildings, $425.54 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, 300.67 

Concord Hardware Company, pipe, 6.72 



SIGNS. 




Labor pay-rolls, 


$0.39 


Home & Hall, signs, 


3.87 


Fletcher Prescott Company, letter- 




ing signs, 


8.40 



732.93 



12.66 



WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 



Labor pay-rolls, 


$42.91 


Orr & Rolfe, repairs, 


12.84 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 




repairs, 


1.50 


A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 


1.50 


Concord Hardware Company, sup- 




plies, 


.25 


H. Mueller Mfg. Co., valves, 


11.97 


Concord Water Works, water, 


180.00 


Mrs. Frank Bourdeau, use watering 




trough, 


3.00 


George B. Quimby, use watering 




trough, 


3.00 



256.97 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 337 



GUTTERS. 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $58.10 

Labor pay-rolls, paving, 108.36 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 2,047.58 



BRIDGES. 

Labor pay-rolls, $141.00 

Concord Electric Company, lights, 40.02 

Boutwell & Baker, lumber, 209.50 

Hugh Tallant, lumber, 20.40 

B. & M. R. R., freight, 12.00 



MACADAM. 




Labor pay-rolls, repairing, 


$178.25 


Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


112.13 


B. & M. R. R., freight, 


48.00 


Labor pay-rolls, tarring South Pem- 




broke Road, 


393.71 


Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


218.52 


B. & M. R. R., freight, 


52.40 


A. C. Manning, gravel, 


20.50 


Jeremiah Colby, gravel, 


4.10 


Labor pay-rolls, oiling, 


12.70 


FENCES. 




Labor pay-rolls, 


$12.64 


Page Belting Company, supplies, 


.35 



2,214.04 



422.92 



1,040.31 



12.99 



22 



338 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



WINTER EXPENSE. 



Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, 



$211.09 



plowing walks, 


139.61 


shoveling walks and 




crossings, 


15.07 


sanding walks, 


336.13 


leveling snow, 


540.04 


rolling snow, 


79.57 


draining gutters, 


517.04 


snowing bridges, 


7.23 


J. N. Abbott, sand, 


12.50 


Alice G. Hutchinson, rent of land, 


12.00 



1,870.28 



Penacook District. 



GENERAL REPAIRS. 

Labor pay-rolls, $1,572.19 

E. D. Clough, gravel, 8.40 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 15.81 
H. H. Chase, gravel, 7.30 
Edward Bacon, agent, gravel, 19.60 

D. F. Dudley, gravel, 39.60 
D. Warren Fox, supplies, 12.64 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies, 1.95 
Thompson Hoague Company, pipe, 4.48 
J. E. Brown, repairs, 16.71 
George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

roadway, 32.62 

F. M.Morse & Co., supplies, .12 



1,731.42 



CULVERTS. 



Labor pay-rolls, 



$56.89 



56.89 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 339 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 



Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $168.80 

Labor pay-rolls, building, 14.71 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, * 3.20 



186.71 



FENCES. 



Labor pay-rolls, $13.11 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, .22 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 3.70 



17.03 



WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Labor pay-rolls, $5.21 

Concord Water Works, water, 40.00 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, use watering 

trough, 3.00 

T. S. Holland, use watering trough, 3.00 

F. M. Morse & Co., supplies, .34 

D. Warren Fox, supplies .32 



51.87 



GUTTERS , 



Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $43.20 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 541.09 



584.29 



BRIDGES. 

Labor pay-rolls, $37.57 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights, 50.00 

Fowler Drug Company, paint, 1.35 

D. W T arren Fox, supplies, 2.12 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 40.90 



131.94 



340 CITY OF CONCORD. 



MACADAM. 




Labor pay-rolls, repairing, 




$25.55 


Labor pay-roll, tarring 


Penacook 




Road, 




93.74 


Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 




170.89 


B. & M. R. R., freight, 




33.30 


J. E. Shepard, agent, sand 


t 


10.90 



WINTER EXPENSE. 

Labor pay-rolls, sanding walks, $81.32 



plowing walks, 


84.56 


draining gutters, 


88.40 


snowing bridges, 


14.09 


rolling snow, 


32.00 


leveling snow, 


67.36 


shoveling walks and 




crossings, 


55.80 


breaking roads, 


52.67 



West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $723.54 

sanding walks, 32.29 

plowing walks, 36.39 

breaking roads, 69.34 

snowing bridges, 26.81 

draining gutters, 55.94 

leveling snow, 16.06 

repairing sidewalks, 37.58 

building sidewalks, 52.46 

watering troughs, 22.24 

fences, 7.52 

cleaning gutters, 188.51 

oiling road, 12.14 



334.38 



476.20 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 341 



Labor pay-rolls, tarring Penacook 




Road, 


$106.16 


Mrs. Jennie P. Fuller, gravel, 


2.60 


J. M. Crossman, repairs, 


26.93 


Concord Water Works, water, 


40.00 


Orr & Rolfe, repairs, 


2.93 


Alden Speare's Company, tasscoil, 


301.33 


Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


170.90 


B. & M. R. R,, freight, 


33.30 



East Concord District. 



Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, 


$868.16 


breaking roads, 


31.67 


draining gutters, 


7.69 


sanding walks, 


4.39 


leveling snow, 


33.38 


plowing walks, 


18.00 


watering troughs, 


1.58 


culverts, 


20.17 


bridges, 


102.73 


Concord Hardware Company, sup- 




plies, 


42.85 


M. J. Lacroix, repairs, 


12.55 


J. T. Batchelder estate, gravel, 


5.40 


Concord Electric Company, gravel, 


11.90 


Samuel Potter, gravel, 


2.50 


Frank Fletcher, use watering trough, 


3.00 


Mary F. Robinson, water and re- 




pairs, 


22.00 


Hugh Tallant, lumber, 


101.03 



1,964.97 



1,289.00 



342 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Penacook Intervale District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $31.25 

Ai J. Smith, use watering trough, 3.00 



Egypt District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $38.50 

N. P. Richardson, use watering 

trough, 3.00 



Hoit District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $132.85 

Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, 24.67 

Frank Mayo, use watering trough, 3.00 



Virgin District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $44.78 

Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, 34.00 

F. P. Virgin, use watering trough, 3.00 



Sanborn District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $67.50 

Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, 5.11 



Potter Street District. 
Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $251 .60 



34.25 



41.50 



160.52 



81.78 



72.61 



251.60 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



343 



Hot Hole Pond District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $38.83 

Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, 8.52 



Horse Hill District. 



Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, 
Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, 
H. H. Chase, gravel, 



$81.80 

24.09 

2.50 



Number Four District. 



Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, 
Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, 
Concord Hardware Company, pipe, 
F. E. Dimond, gravel, 



CATCH- BASINS. 



Appropriation, 



Expenditures — 



$394.48 

77.60 

16.80 

9.10 



47.35 



1.08.39 



497.98 



$30,036.16 



$1,400.00 



Central District. 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 
thawing, 
repairing, 
building, 

Orr & Rolfe, repairs, 

Concord Coal Company, slabs, 

Mrs. Mary E. Bourne, brick, 



$470.31 
53.09 
28.40 
88.32 
1.35 
18.00 
106.40 



344 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Edson Mfg. Co., repairs, 38.43 

C. F. Thompson, rubber boots, 8.00 

Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 6.25 

Geo. D. Huntley, repairs, 7.20 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 30.75 

Concord Hardware Co., pipe, 51.78 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

outfits, 41.70 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $100.45 

thawing, 26.72 

repairing, 10.67 

building, 54.36 

F. M. Morse & Co., supplies, 1.61 

W. H. Meserve, cement, 6.86 

N. H. Spinning Mills, brick, 2.70 

W. B. Cunningham, trucking, 2.25 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

outfits, 9.00 



West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, building, $56.30 

Concord Hardware Company, pipe, 30.80 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 8.40 

Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 29.13 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

outfits, 16.80 



949.98 



214.62 



141.43 

i 

$1,306.03 
Transferred to general maintenance, 36.16 

Transferred to trees, 57.81 

$1,400.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 345 



TREES. 



Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Transferred from catch basins, 57.81 
Transferred from permanent work, 

South Street, 45.13 



Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving, $103.77 
removing moth nests, 1,011.05 
spraying trees, 314.72 
Labor pay-rolls, burning moths, 42.20 
W. B. Durgin Company, oil, 6.51 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

repairs, 1.28 
Ira C. Evans Company, postals, 21.25 
Brown & Batchelder, slickers, 6.00 
Concord Belting Company, supplies, .53 
Geo. D. Huntley, repairs, 4.00 
Concord Hardware Company, sup- 
plies, 59.47 
Hutchinson Building Company, re- 
pairs, .50 
C. E. Staniels, insurance premium, 67.50 
C. H. Martin & Co., arsenate lead, 68.75 
I. E. Gray, gasoline, 15.00 
Alfred Clark, Supt., cash paid out, 14.20 
Geo. H. Richardson, gasoline, 2.25 
C. Pelissier & Co., climbers, 5.40 
N. H. Auto Company, oil, 2.00 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 399.73 
Capital City Garage, gasoline, .75 



1,102.94 



346 CITY OF CONCORD. 

S. B. Church, repairs, $3.00 

Thompson Hoague Company, arsen- 
ate lead, etc., 22.62 



Penacook District. 



Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 




moving, 


$31.26 


spraying, 


38.13 


collecting moth nests, 


424.74 


burning moths, 


12.40 


D. Warren Fox, supplies, 


.94 


Hoyt Electrical Instrument Com- 




pany, supplies, 


2.40 


F. M. Morse & Co., supplies, 


.36 


Concord Auto Sales Company, gaso- 




line, 


5.10 


Guy H. Hubbard, boxes, 


1.50 



West Concord District. 



Labor pay-rolls 


, trimming and re- 






moving, 


$6.78 




collecting moth 






nests, 


128.91 



East Concord District. 



Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 




moving, 


$4.09 


collecting moth 




nests, 


272.85 


Concord Hardware Company, prun- 




ers, 


1.00 



2,172.48 



516.83 



135.69 



277.94 
!, 102.94 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 347 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 

Appropriation, $1,000.00 

Expenditures — 

Central Distroct. 
Labor pay-rolls, grading for concrete 



walks, 


$14.54 


setting edgestone, 


94.19 


P. Crowley, edgestone, 


140.00 


St. Paul's School, edgestone, 


10.00 


George F. Tandy, concrete walks, 


316.46 


George F. Tandy, concrete crossings, 


81.67 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, grading concrete 

walks, ' $76.34 

George F. Tandy, concrete walks, 196.53 



656.86 



272.87 



West Concord District. 
George F. Tandy, concrete crossing, $19.80 19.80 



$949.53 
Unexpended balance, 50.47 

$1,000.00 



348 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 
Appropriation, $2,250.00 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, re-setting edgestone, $87.18 
George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

walks, 1,920.74 

George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

crossings, 192.29 

2,200.21 



Penacook District. 

George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

walks, $19.13 

George F. Tandy, repairs crossings, 28.82 



47.95 



' $2,248.16 

Unexpended balance, 1.84 



$2,250.00 



PERMANENT WORK. 

South Street, Pleasant to Fayette. 
Appropriation, $2,000.00 

Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, excavating, $402.32 

macadamizing, 867.72 

paving gutter, 134.15 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 349 

Massachusetts Broken Stone Com- 
pany, trap rock, $39.74 
Tenney Coal Company, coal, 49.20 
B. & M. R. R., freight, 61.05 
George F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

crossing, 115.68 

Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 276.00 

T. H. Dunstane, curbing, 8.00 

1,953.86 



Transferred to trees, 45.13 

Unexpended balance, 1.01 



$2,000.00 



North Main Street, Pearl to Chapel. 
Appropriation, $2,700.00 

Expenditures — 

Transferred to North State Street, West Con- 
cord, 2,700.00 

North State Street, West Concord. 

Appropriation, transferred from North Main 

Street, $2,700.00 



Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, excavating, 


$129.85 




macadamizing, 


1,937.49 




Shepard Bros., Co., oil, 


5.40 




A. B. Black Road Machinery Com- 






pany, repairs, 


28.50 




Tenney Coal Company, coal, 


121.20 




Hutchinson Building Co., stakes, 


6.00 


2,228.44 
471.56 


Unexpended balanoe, 





$2,700.00 



350 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Pittsfield Road. 



Appropriation, 



$500.00 



Expenditures- 



Labor pay-rolls, grading, 


$457.39 




Adolphus Green, gravel, 


36.00 


493.39 
6.61 


Unexpended balance, 






$500.00 


Loudon Road. 






Appropriation, 




$500.00 


Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, grading, 


$452.00 




A. B. Stearns, gravel, 


38.60 




Adolphus Green, gravel, 


8.80 


499.40 
.60 


Unexpended balance, 






$500.00 


Penacook Road. 






Appropriation, 




$2,000.00 


Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, excavating, 


$21.40 




macadamizing, 


1,336.59 




Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


457.73 




B. & M. R, R., freight, 


55.98 




Tenney Coal Company, coal, 


92.77 




E. L. Davis, cpal, 


30.03 


1,994.50 






Unexpended balance, 




5.50 



$2,000.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 351 

SALARY SUPERINTENDENT. 

Appropriation, $1,600.00 



Expenditures — 






Alfred Clark, salary, 




$1,600.00 


GARBAGE. 






Appropriation, 


$7,000.00 




By Joint Resolution No. 96, 


71.00 


$7,071.00 






Expenditures — 






Deficiency from 1911, 


$220.81 




Labor pay-rolls, collecting garbage, 


2,893.01 




collecting paper, 


542.44 




burning paper, 


97.81 




leveling ashes, 


544.00 




cleaning streets, with 






patrol carts, 


1,910.26 




cleaning crossings, 


608.05 




John Eisenmann & Co., brooms, 


6.00 




H. Thompson, brooms, 


40.60 




George D. Huntley, repairs, 


8.40 




Concord Hardware Company, wire, 


13.90 




W. S. Dole, grain, 


94.53 




Norman Nicholson, shoeing, 


7.50 




Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 


17.20 




Miller & Hill, shoeing, 


4.10 




Snell & Hill, shoeing, 


4.80 


7,013.41 






Balance to 1913, 




57.59 




$7,071.00 



352 CITY OF CONCORD. 



SPRINKLING. 

Balance from 1911, $561.99 

Appropriation, 7,500.00 

By Joint Resolution No. 96, .34 



5,062.33 
Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, painting and repair- 
ing carts, $136.41 
repairing standpipes, 24.47 
sprinkling streets, 3,919.90 
oiling streets, 139.34 
Alden Speare's Company, tasscoil, 422.75 
Orr & Rolfe, repairs, 17.75 
Concord Water Works, water, 700.00 
Abbott & Downing Co., repairs, 32.10 
B. Billsborough & Sons, paint, etc., 91.70 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 5.80 

B. & M. R. R., freight, 10.00 
George D. Huntley, repairs, 11.25 
Concord Hardware Company, sup- 
plies, 11.70 

Chandler Eastman. 'Company, re- 
pairs, 11.65 
Norman Nicholson, shoeing, 7.50 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 3.70 

$5,546.02 

Balance to 1913, 2,516.31 

$8,062.33 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 353 



PENACOOK SPRINKLING PRECINCT. 

Balance from 1911, $31.52 

Appropriation, 750.00 



Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing stand- 
pipes, $10.90 
sprinkling streets, 358.50 
Chandler Eastman Company, re- 
pairs, 6.10 
Chandler Eastman Company, sprink- 
ler, 250.00 
E. L. Davis, use of sprinkler, 40.50 
E. E. Babb, repairs, 22.46 
Fowler Drug Company, paint, 2.20 
Penacook & Boscawen Water Pre- 
cinct, water, 12.00 
Concord Water Works, water, 50.00 



&781.52 



752.66 

Balance to 1913, 28.86 

$781.52 



2 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Deposited with the city treasurer as follows: 

Union School District, collecting 

ashes, $71.00 

L. P. Elkins, labor on trees, .35 

Mrs. A. F. Holt, labor on trees, .85 

C. C. Martin, overdraft on bill, .34 

Byron Moore, labor on trees, 2.15 

Mrs. Lucy Sargent, labor on trees, .70 

A. O. Preston, labor on trees, 3.60 
Mrs. Etta Kimball, labor on trees, 3.45 
Mrs. Charles Ballard, labor on trees, 2.15 
Mrs. Thomas Burke, labor on trees, 1.25 
J. A. Donegan, labor on trees, .45 
J. A. Dadmun, labor on trees, 1.00 
Thomas Reed, labor on trees, 2.75 
Mrs. Dana Batchelder, labor on trees, 2.50 
Samuel Batchelder, labor on trees, 1.00 
James Hussey, labor on trees, 1.00 
C. P. White, labor on trees, 1.00 
Miss Sophie Fernald, labor on trees, 1.00 
Mrs. Ann Emery, labor on trees, 2.50 
Loren Clough, labor on trees, 2.00 
Russell Burroughs, labor on trees, 5.16 
John Roach, labor on trees, 1.65 
George Robinson, labor on trees, 1.00 
Miss S. J. Leaver, labor on trees, .55 
L. W. Sargent, labor on trees, 1.00 

B. C. White, labor on trees, .25 
Geo. A. Foster, labor on trees, 4.35 
E. H. Smart, labor on trees, .70 
G. L. Butterfield, labor on trees, .55 
Mrs. W. H. Alexander, labor on trees, .70 
A. C. Sanborn, labor on trees, 27.00 
I. T. Chesley, labor on trees, 2.00 
J. H. Cob urn, horse, 90.00 
Mrs. F. S. Pendleton, labor on trees, .45 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 355 

J. P. Dixon, labor on trees, $0.50 

James Bourlet, labor on trees, .75 

Joseph Bean, concrete, 5.67 
Dr. J. E. Hoyt Stevens, labor on 

trees, 1.90 

C. J. Sennott, concrete, 9.25 

G. S. Locke, concrete, 12.45 

George K. Hazeltine, concrete, 18.90 

George D. Huntley, labor on trees, .25 

William D. Wallace, labor on trees, 1.85 

Mrs. A. L. Virgin, labor on trees, .75 

H. W. Stevens, labor on trees, 1.90 

Edson J. Hill, labor on trees, 1.00 

J. C. Derby, labor on trees, .50 

H. M. Cavis, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. J. H. Rowell, labor on trees, .55 

N. P. Stevens, labor on trees, 1.20 

W. H. Horner, labor on trees, .50 

Seth R. Dole, labor on trees, 1.00 

Mrs. C. H. Thorndike, labor on trees, 1.90 

Richard Manion, concrete, 27.00 

Mrs. A. M. Marden, labor on trees, 1.95 

Philip Flanders, labor on trees, .50 

W. K. McFarland, labor on trees, 3.60 

Miss A. M. Fletcher, labor on trees, 1.90 

E. N. Pearson, labor on trees, 1.00 
Harry R. Cressy, labor on trees, .55 
Mrs. Olive A. Robinson est., labor 

on trees, .75 

T. F. Clifford, labor on trees, .55 

C. J. French, labor on trees, .50 

Joseph Charpentier, concrete, 6.68 

F. W. Rollins, labor on trees, 1.75 
H. H. Dudley, Treas., labor on trees, 1.90 
Harry G. Emmons, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. F. W. Cheney, labor on trees, 1.55 
N. F. Carter, labor on trees, .55 



356 CITY OF CONCORD. 

H. F. Hill, labor on trees, $0.75 

Mrs. W. H. Alexander, labor on trees, 3.50 

C. L. Jackman, agent, labor on trees, .75 
A. C. Griffin, labor on trees, 1.40 
Mrs. Mary F. Robinson, labor on 

trees, 6.00 

G. E. Tinker, labor on trees, 1.20 

John Storrs, labor on trees, 1.00 
Mrs. Mary A. Cummings, labor on 

trees, 2.85 

Miss L. B. Gilbert, labor on trees, 1.70 

Mrs. F. M. Johnson, labor on trees, .65 

Frank Mitchell, labor on trees, .55 

J. P. Nutter, labor on trees, .55 

L. J. H. Frost, labor on trees, .75 

D. D. Taylor, labor on trees, 1.88 
Mrs. Mary J. Lake, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. George A. Cummings, labor on 

trees, .55 

Harry N. Lane, labor on trees, .55 

S. W. Barker, labor on trees, 1.05 
Miss Elizabeth Randlett, labor on 

trees, .70 

Mrs. Mary E. Lund, labor on trees, .55 

A. H. Daggett, labor on trees, 1.00 

D. E. Sullivan, labor on trees, .90 

Mrs. J. M. Hill, labor on trees, .75 

J. E. Fernald, Treas., labor on trees, 1.15 

J. E. Fernald, labor on trees, 2.20 

J. E. Fernald, trustee, labor on trees, .75 

W. A. Stone, labor on trees, 2.40 

Stone & Badger, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. E. B. Davis, labor on trees, .50 

Henry Fletcher, labor on trees, .90 

Mrs. J. R. Wyman, labor on trees, .35 

Mary E McQuesten, labor on trees, .55 

W. E. Hunt, labor on trees, 1.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 357 

Mrs. Henry McFarland estate, labor 

on trees, $1.00 

F. E. Cloudman, labor on trees, .75 
J. E. Pecker, labor on trees, 1.50 
A. H. Chase, labor on trees, .55 
C. S. Parker, labor on trees, 1.25 
M. Feltault, labor on trees, .75 
E. B. Hanchay, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. Timothy Green, labor on trees, 1.80 
Bernard Donahue, labor on trees, 4.35 
C. H. Mellen, labor on trees, 1.00 
Penacook Park Grange, labor on 

trees, 1.90 

Mrs. Mary L. Stearns, labor on trees, .50 

W. J. Bolster, concrete, 2.77 

Henry Bunker, labor on trees, .35 

Mrs. J. J. Keane, labor on trees, .40 
W. A. Thompson, agent, labor on 

trees, 1.00 

N. H. Spinning Mills, concrete, 64.72 

L. A. Engel, labor on trees, .50 
Crescent Worsted Company, labor 

on trees, 4.35 

G. S. Locke, labor on trees, 1.65 
C. H. Wiggin, labor on trees, .50 
C. H. Sinclair, labor on trees, 2.25 
Mrs. M. E. Hills, labor on trees, .55 
CO: Partridge, labor on trees, 1.75 
Fred Lovering, labor on trees, .55 
W. E. Gordon, labor on trees, .55 
Milton Colby, agent, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. E. M. West, labor on trees, 1.75 
Mrs. S. R. Hood, labor on trees, 2.30 
John Ford, labor on trees, 1.00 
J. P. Breton, labor on trees, .50 
J. Y. Lane, labor on trees, .75 
Mrs. J. B. Abbott, labor on trees, .75 



358 CITY OF CONCORD. 

L. D. Caldon, labor on trees, SI. 25 

Dr. E. G. Annable, labor on trees, .35 

G. E. Belisle, labor on trees, .70 

Mrs. 0. F. Richardson, labor on trees, .60 

Mrs. Daniel Gienty, labor on trees, 1.00 

W. S. Holt, labor on trees, 1.15 

A. G. Stevens, labor on trees, .50 

F. E. Colton, labor on trees, .55 

G. E. Blanchard, labor on trees, .70 
H. E. Abbott, labor on trees, 1.25 
Mrs. E. A. Pickering, labor on trees, .75 
W. W. Niles, labor on trees, .55 
J. E. Gay, labor on trees, 4.35 
Charles Lyman, labor on trees, 1.00 
Miss Harriett Lyman, agent, labor 

on trees, 2.30 

James Bourlet, Treas., labor on trees, .55 

N. B. Emery, labor on trees, 1.15 

L. H. Carrol], labor on trees, 1.70 

George Huckins, labor on trees, .75 

F. J. Batchelder, labor on trees, 2.50 

C. N. Towle, labor on trees, 1.00 

George Davis, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. Harvey Hevenor, labor on trees, .75 

Miss Mary Hagerty, labor on trees, .55 

Mrs. J. F. Hoit, labor on trees, .55 

William Green, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. Samuel Holt, labor on trees, .75 

J. S. Matthews, labor on trees, 1.20 

J. C. Thorne, labor on trees, .55 

M. T. Whittier, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. M. R. Hadley, labor on trees, .75 

H. F. Boinay, labor on trees, .55 

DeWitt C. Howe, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. Henry Robinson, labor on trees, .55 

A. R. Ayers, labor on trees, .55 

Mrs. A. L. Gay, labor on trees, 1.80 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 359 

Charles R. Corning, labor on trees, $1.15 

Mrs. J. C. A. Hill, labor on trees, 2.15 

W. L. Moulton, labor on trees, .50 

Miss Nellie C. Clough, labor on trees, .45 

Mrs. Mary B. Clement, concrete, 11.05 

G. D. Waldron, labor on trees, .55 

C. F. Batchelder, labor on trees, .95 
Alfred Barber, labor on trees, .25 
Miss Mary Dennett, labor on trees, .55 
Jerome Runnells, labor on trees, .50 
E. H. Farrar, labor on trees, .30 
Mrs. F. A. Sanborn, labor on trees, .75 
Mrs. M. E. Sherburne, labor on trees, .75 
J. N. Patterson, labor on trees, 4.10 
Katherine Smith, labor on trees, 1.45 
Crehan and Farrar, labor on trees, .30 
Miss Jennie Abbott, labor on trees, .75 
L. P. Elkins, labor on trees, .25 

D. P. Goodhue, labor on trees, 1.70 
Charles Barrett, labor on trees, 1.20 
George Moore, labor on trees, .50 
Amanda J. Lund, labor on trees, .55 
C. G. Remick, trustee, labor on trees, .55 
H. A. Kendall, labor on trees, 2.25 
Abijah Hollis, labor on trees, .35 
Joseph Daly, labor on trees, .30 
Frank George estate, labor on trees, .70 
Mrs. A. Barrett, labor on trees, .35 
Mrs. H. S. Ordway, labor on trees, .50 
J. D. Ryan, labor on trees, 4.70 
W. G. C. Kimball, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. J. O. Lyford, labor on trees, .55 
Mrs. Henry Conant, labor on trees, 1.25 
J. C. French, labor on trees, 1.70 
W. S. Blanchard, labor on trees, .50 
Dr. C. R. Walker, labor on trees, 1.40 
Otis G. Hammond, labor on trees, 2.35 



360 CITY OF CONCORD. 

D. E. Murphy, labor on trees, $6.00 

F. E. Shepard, labor on trees, .75 

Mrs. E. S. Cook, labor on trees, .75 

J. E. Morrison, labor on trees, .55 

Andrew Shepard, labor on trees, .50 

Stephen Swain, labor on trees, .35 

Mrs. Ellen Kittredge, labor on trees, .75 

J. B. Weeks, labor on trees, 1.00 

Henry Tucker, labor on trees, 1.15 

J. Frank Webster, labor on trees, .55 

C. C. Currier, labor on trees, .55 
M. B. Smith, labor on trees, .35 
Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., labor on trees, .50 
Hugh Tallant, labor on trees, .50 
J. E. Leahy, labor on trees, .50 
Miss Jennie Abbott, labor on trees, .50 
J. E. Sewall, labor on trees, .55 
W. A. Sewall, labor on trees, .55 
Mrs. S. C. Morrill, labor on trees, .55 
Mrs. E. A. Stockbridge, labor on 

trees, 1.50 

Fred Johnson, labor on trees, .55 

D. Lynch, labor on trees, 1.15 
Dr. F. A. Stillings, labor on trees, 1.20 
Fred Emerton, labor on trees, .50 
Clarence Tibbetts, labor on trees, 2.00 
Miss Maria Woods, labor on trees, .75 
Isaac Hill, labor on trees, 1.00 

E. C. Dutton, labor on trees, .50 
Amos Blanchard, labor on trees, 1.40 
Mrs. W. A. Whittemore, labor on 

trees, .70 

P. J. Bolger, labor on trees, .70 

A. E. Dole, labor on trees, 1.25 

F. S. Streeter, labor on trees, 3.30 
W. H. Sawyer, labor on trees, .75 
Mrs. Ida C. Humphrey, labor on trees, .75 
Mrs. Mary A. Morrill, labor on trees, 1.90 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 361 

W. H. Bean, labor on trees, $0.50 

Mrs. J. F. Durrell, labor on trees, .50 

John Swenson, labor on trees, 1.00 

F. L. Hodgdon, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. I. E. Ranney, labor on trees, .25 

E. E. Earle, labor on trees, .55 

Lyman Jackman, labor on trees, .55 

Mrs. F. L. Watson, labor on trees, .50 

W. D. Nutting, labor on trees, 1.55 

J. Benson, labor on trees, 1.00 

E. H. Larkin, labor on trees, 2.20 

A. J. Shurtleff, labor on trees, . 1.00 

Ross W. Cate, labor on trees, 1.00 

Mrs. John Ahern, labor on trees, .55 

Mrs. Carl Blaisdell, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. D. L. Gurnsey, labor on trees, .50 

W. A. Chase, agent, labor on trees, .75 

George E. Chesley, labor on trees, .50 

C. P. Grimes, labor on trees, 2.50 

Miss Kate P. Blodgett, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. Patrick Coleman, labor on trees, 3.90 
N. H. Memorial Hospital, labor on 

trees, 1 .40 

Mrs. H. E. Downing, labor on trees, 1.00 

Joseph Jordan, labor on trees, .40 

J. J. Nolan, labor on trees, .75 
Mrs. F. O. Clark estate, labor on 

trees, .75 
N. H. State Highway Department, 

state aid account highways, 582.68 

J. B. Walker, labor on trees, 36.00 

H. J. Creaser, concrete, 8.56 

Joseph Eaton, labor on trees, .75 

Mrs. G. R. Cushing, labor on trees, 1.15 

M. R. Holt, labor on trees, 1.85 

Howard Holbrook, labor on trees, 1.00 
Cemetery Commissioners, labor on 

trees, 20.00 



362 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I 

W. E. Hood, labor on trees, $0.70 

E. M. Nason, labor on trees, .40 
J. M. Davis, labor on trees, .40 
John Roberts, labor on trees, 1.35 
W. T. McLam, labor on trees, .50 
State of New Hampshire, labor on 

trees, 4.30 

Emily B. Copp, concrete, 11.48 

Isaac Baty, concrete, 24.63 

St. Paul's School, concrete, 127.38 

L. C. Merrill, labor on trees, .70 

George N. Curtis, labor on trees, 1.00 

Miss Clara Sewall, labor on trees, .55 

Howard M. Dodge, labor on trees, 1.15 

Mrs. E. E. Senter, labor on trees, .50 

F. S. Parker, labor on trees, .50 
J. Conn, concrete, 8.25 
J. H. Moody, labor on trees, .50 
W. W. Elkins, labor on trees, 1.40 
Lyman Jackman, labor on trees, .40 
L. H. Carroll, labor on trees, 1.40 
Miss Harriett Lyman, agent, labor 

on trees, .80 

W. H. Horner, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. L. D. Stevens, labor on trees, .20 

Miss Emma Young, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. Fred Blackwood, labor on trees, .40 

Frank Cressy, labor on trees, .60 

Mrs. Daniel Weathers, labor on trees, .40 

Thomas Kelly, labor on trees, .60 

W. L. Fickett, labor on trees, .20 

Fred Drew, labor on trees, 2.00 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, labor on trees, .20 

J. W. Bourlet, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. M. G. Aldrich, labor on trees, .80 

Geo. B. Quimby, labor on trees, 5.50 

Lucy J. Sturtevant, labor on trees, 1.10 

J. A. Clough, labor on trees, 2.05 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 363 

Michael Casey, labor on trees, $0.50 

J. B. Walker, labor on trees, .60 

J. H. Gallinger, labor on trees, 1.70 

Mrs. G. H. Seavey, labor on trees, .40 

Joseph Cote, labor on trees, .40 
Miss Margaret Shaughnessy, labor 

on trees, .50 

Miss Grace Whitney, labor on trees, 1.81 

E. A. Grover, labor on trees, .40 
Miss Minnie Hall, labor on trees, .50 
H. G. Emmons, labor on trees, .80 
Mrs. W. G. Carter estate, labor on 

trees, .60 

William Yeaton, labor on trees, .40 

Samuel C. Eastman, labor on trees, .35 

W. L. Riford, labor on trees, .40 
Mrs. Henry McFarland estate, labor 

on trees, .60 

Jerry Foley, labor on trees, 3.25 

Mrs. S. C. Morrill, labor on trees, .40 

John Dunklee, labor on trees, . 8.75 

J. L. Lockwood, labor on trees, .40 

C. H. Foster, labor on trees, .40 

G. A. Phelps, labor on trees, .20 

John Morrill, labor on trees, .40 

F. S. Streeter, labor on trees, .40 
A. P. Carpenter estate, labor on trees, 1 .20 
Mrs. Phipps estate, labor on trees, .25 
N. H. Historical Society, labor on 

trees, 3.30 

Wonolancet Club, labor on trees, 4.90 

H. C. Bailey, labor on trees, .95 

W. S. Monroe, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. J. J. Keane, labor on trees, .40 

N. E. T. & T. Co., labor on trees, 2.00 

A. L. Pelissier, labor on trees, 1.50 

Mrs. C. H. Thorndike, labor on trees, .40 

T. G. Norris, labor on trees, .60 



364 CITY OF CONCORD. 

F. W. Rollins, labor on trees, $2.40 
James Reed, labor on trees, .50 
Dr. G. M. Kimball, labor on trees, .80 

G. W. Stevens, labor on trees, .40 
Mrs. L. B. Hoit, labor on trees, .40 
Mrs. Catherine Welcome, labor on 

trees, .75 

C. S. Parker, labor on trees, .80 
Ernest Dudley, labor on trees, 2.35 
E. H. Merrill, guardian, labor on 

trees, 1.00 

Ola Anderson, labor on trees, 3.70 

Mrs. A. S. Marshall, labor on trees, 2.00 

E. B. Hanchay, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. M. E. Jordan, labor on trees, .35 

B. P. Hodgman, labor on trees, .40 

J. H. Worthen, labor on trees, 6.00 

A. B. Batchelder, labor on trees, .60 

St. Paul's School, labor on trees, 34.20 

E. Frank Bean, agent, labor on trees, 1.45 
Ernest Roberts, Treas., labor on 

trees, 1.20 

Frances E. Whittaker, labor on trees, 2.70 

Mrs. Charles Herbert, labor on trees, .40 

D. Lynch, labor on trees, .50 
N. H. Memorial Hospital, labor on 

trees, 1.40 

G. L. Lincoln, labor on trees, .40 

F. A. Stillings, labor on trees, .40 
Lena M. Minot, labor on trees, .95 
Mrs. Lucy Sargent, labor on trees, 1.80 
W. D. Thompson, labor on trees, .80 
O. K. Dexter, labor, etc., 15.94 
W. M. Colby est., labor on trees, 1.00 
H. H. Blake, labor on trees, 1.23 
J. Conn, concrete, 14.70 
J. C. Keenan, labor on trees, .40 
George A. Foster, labor on trees, .60 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 365 

Park Commissioners, labor on trees, $8.60 

Nathan Carter, labor on trees, 1.80 

H. N. Dyke, labor on trees, .55 
Mrs. G. O. Dickerman, labor on 

trees, .40 
W. Arthur Bean, agent, labor on 

trees, 3.45 

A. R. Ayers, dressing, 2.50 

Harry Mooney, labor on trees, .70 

E. M. Nason, labor on trees, .20 
Mrs. E. L. Douglass, labor on trees, .80 
Mrs. Amelia Hill, labor on trees, .70 
Frank Fletcher, labor on trees, 1.00 
Charles R. Corning, labor on trees, 1.80 

F. W. Cheney, labor on trees, 3.75 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, labor 

on trees, .75 
Mrs. Eugene Bickford, labor on 

trees, .85 

Mrs. Geo. R. Cushing, labor on trees, .90 

George Carter, labor on trees, 2.00 

Alfred Abbott, labor on trees, 7.75 

Mrs. R. S. Hoit, labor on trees, .50 

Town of Boscawen, labor on trees, 5.00 

Clara E. Stewartson, labor on trees, .75 

C. H. Farnum, labor on trees, 4.00 

Mrs. Geebo, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. G. F. Lane, labor on trees, 2.55 

Nelson Forrest, labor on trees, .20 

Frank W. Paige, dressing, 60.00 

N. H. Corliss, labor on trees, .20 

A. C. Sanborn, labor on trees, 10.95 

J. H. Jackman, labor on trees, .80 

J. J. Collins, labor on trees, .40 

Charles Woodman, labor on trees, 1.80 

Mrs. J. M. Killeen, labor on trees, 2.00 

— $1,769 03 



A {■ CONCORD. 



REPORT OF SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Cm Engineer's Office, Cm Hail 
Concord, N. 11.. December 31, 1912. 

Th« - : . um.ua] to this board, showing the 

funds available and the expenditures for construction and 

s and maintenance in the city precinct, 

the Wesl Concord precinct, the East Concord precinct and 

Saint Paul's School precinct, is herewith submitted. 
. general statement of the condition of the 
sewers in the City precinct. 

City Sewer Precinct. 

ne much d addition has been made to the mains in 

this precinct, viz.: a new main in North Main Street, from 
Hall's Court northerly to the junction with Washington 
91 wer. This sewer was built of "Segmental Block" 
after an investigation of other materials and cos: of same. 

The Board of Public Works voted to adopt this block - 
promise a saving of $1,000 over concrete and 
brick construction. 

In the opinion of your engineer this amount v s saved to 
the city by the use of this block. The sewer was completed 
and put in operation, and. up to date. I see no reason to 

gret the adoption of this material. 

The work was, n pleted as early as was desired, but 

condition of the labor market made it practically impos- 
sible to get a sufficient number of laborers to complete the 
work as was intended. 

The majority of the main sewers in this precinct are 
inadequate in size to perform the work required of them, 
and their condition together with some measures for relief 
should receive immediate attention, as many serious com- 



BOJ 

I 

lack of . 

load.-., in c 
Thi 

season, j 

a continual . 
ity. 
Yc . 

■ 
The ec North Mai:. .- materially 

mere- 
three hundred fe* The txraldi 

r .hem by 
hand drilling was about $150. I*. 

ing to the | g ain and the 

mnectionf i er and water being laid bare 

-h. 

A . Railroad Square f: root 

of P. - 28 inch :. near 

the north end of * . tation trainer. 

r was laid, al 

erage 
faciliv 

ge of an old culvert under North Mai. 3 
near the Lyster Brothers market, nee dtaJ 
a drain to the rear of the fishmarket on their | 
An agi ide with th c r the 

maintenaee of the drain m, if the raid con- 

struct it. 

file in t ierk. 



368 city of concord. 

New Work 1912. 

railroad square. 

273 feet of 10-inch pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $294.16 

pipe, 77.29 

cement, 13.30 

brick, 25.50 

trucking, 23.00 

castings, 23.32 

oil, 1.10 

B. & M. R.R. services, 1.15 



S458.82 



Average cost per lineal foot, $1,680 + . 
Material excavated, sand, gravel, hard-pan and soft 
clay. 



LYSTER BROTHERS DRAIN. 



id for labor, 








$291.77 


pipe, 








40.01 


cement, 








3.80 


brick, 








11.05 


sand, 








1.50 


castings, 








11.85 


trucking, 








2.10 


tools, 








.40 


salt, 








6.30 


blacksmith, 








8.05 


oil, 








.50 


repairing concrete 


sidewalk 


and 


road- 




way, 








21.47 



$398.80 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 369 
NORTH MAIN STREET. 

1.055 feet. of Segmental Block. 

Paid for labor, $4,980.44 

segmental block, 2,340.14 

unloading same, 58.42 

cement, 147.05 

brick, 113.75 

castings, 67.38 

oil, 8.80 

hardware, 45.10 

Water Works for water, 7.48 

for lumber, 277.59 

blacksmithing, 45.68 

repairs, 7.65 

shanty, 132.23 

trucking, 265.50 

medical services, 2.00 

repairs to concrete crossings, 30.01 



$8,529.22 
Average cost per lineal foot, $8,084 + . 
Material excavated, sand, gravel, clay, hard-pan and 
boulders. 

CARTER STREET. 

100 feet of 10 inch pipe laid. 
Paid for labor, 
pipe, 
cement, 
trucking, 



$35.36 


25.88 


1.00 


3.50 



.74 



Average cost per foot, $0,657 + . 
Material excavated, sand. 



24 



370 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPAIRS. 

Waverly Street, $1.46 

Chandler Street, 118.70 

West Street, 23.96 

North State Street, 12.67 

Lyndon Street, 4.35 

South Street, on account of macadam, 10.45 





$171.59 


Expense of spring and fall flushing, 


339.56 


Tools and flushing hose, 


410.91 


New work, 


9,452.57 


Total expenditure, 1912, for construc- 




tion & repair, 


$10,374.63 


Funds available for construction and repair, 


$12,034.92 


Expended, 


10,374.63 



Unexpended balance, $1,660.29 



Sewers Built in City Precinct to December 31, 1912. 

6-inch, 1,928 feet. 

8-inch, 25,285 

10-inch, 51,668 

12-inch, 39,427 

15-inch, 12,144 

18-inch, 6,284 

20-inch, 4,549 

24-inch, 3,370 

30-inch, 1,024 

Brick, 12-inch x 14-inch, 2,758 

14-inch x 22-inch, 350 

16-inch x 24-inch, 1,848 

20-inch x 32-inch, . 2,527 

24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 



883 feet. 


1,515.5 


<< 


402 


n 


4,080 


a 


1,576 


a 


1,054.5 


n 


1,055 


a 


246 


it 


1,450 


n 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 371 

Trick, 28-inch x 48-inch, 

24-inch circular, 

30-inch circular, 

38-inch circular, 
24-inch cast-iron, 
30-inch cast-iron, 
42-inch segmental block, 
42-inch brick and concrete, 
60-inch brick and concrete, 

Total to date, 182,998 feet. 

Total miles in the city precinct to date, 34.988+. 
Discontinued in 1912, not included in above statement, 
120 feet of 18-inch pipe. 

West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

The usual spring and fall flushing of the system in this 
precinct was made at an expense of $39.60. 

Rattlesnake brook, the outlet for the sewers at the lower 
end of this precinct, was badly clogged with debris of all 
kinds and was cleaned out at an expense of $26.78. 

The macadamizing of North State Street entailed an 
expenditure of $82.88, for raising and changing manholes 
and lampholes. 

The available funds for construction and repair was a 
balance from 1911 of $52.52. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1912, $52.52 

Total expenditure, 149.26 



Overdrawn, $96.74 

East Concord Sewer Precinct. 

No repairs were made and no extensions were built during 
the last season, leaving the balance available for construc- 
tion and repair the same as last season, viz. : $127.53. 



372 city of concord. 

Saint Paul's School Sewer Precinct. 

This system needed no repairs during the season of 1912. 
The only sum spent was the usual charge for water. 
Funds available for construction and repair, $62.55 

Total expenditure, 45.00 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1912, $17.55 

For the many courtesies extended this department, I 
wish to thank the Board of Public Works. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EXAM- 
INERS OF PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1912. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The thirteenth annual report of this board is herewith 
submitted. 

The membership of the board is as follows: Charles H. 
Cook, M.D., Harris S. Parmenter, a journeyman plumber, 
and Will B. Howe, city engineer. 

Harris S. Parmenter is chairman of the board and Will B. 
Howe, clerk. 

Three meetings were held. Six applicants for journey- 
men's licenses were examined and passeol. One applicant 
failed to present himself for examination after having paid 
the required fee of one (1) dollar. 

The total receipts from all sources were thirty-two (32) 
dollars, for which amount the clerk holds the receipts of the 
city treasurer. 

The total expenditure for the year was one (1) dollar for 
postage. 

The attached table gives the names of all plumbers 
authorized by this board to work at the business of plumb- 
ing for the year ending March 31, 1913, the date of renewal 
and expiration of said licenses, or certificates, the dates 
of examinations, opposite the men examined and the fees 
received. 



374 



CITY OF ( ON< OKI). 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1912. 
To the Board oj Mayor and Aldermen: 

The seventh annual report of this board, showing its 
recommendations to the Board of Water Commissioners 
and the number of hydrants set during the year 1912, is 
herewith submitted. 

At a meeting of the board May 1, 1912, it was voted 
to recommend setting a hydrant on the easterly side of 
Fisk Road, opposite the residence of Albert S. Trask. 

On July 18, 1912, a communication was received from 
residents of Penacook requesting this board to recommend 
the placing of a hydrant at, or near, the junction of Electric 
Avenue and Washington Street. On July 23, the board 
visited the location above mentioned and voted to recom- 
mend that a hydrant be placed at the southwesterly corner 
of the aforementioned streets. 

The following hydrants have been set during the year: 

A four-way high service on School Street near Durgin 
Street. 

A four-way high service on School Street at North State 
Street. 

A four-way high service at the junction of School and 
Green Streets. 

A high service at North Spring and School Streets. 

A four-way high service at South State and Pleasant 
Streets. 

A four-way high service on North Spring Street at the 
High School. 

A four-way high service at North State and Warren 
Streets. 



HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 377 

A four-way high service at Warren Street and Odd 
Fellows Avenue. 

A four-way high service on Capitol Street between North 
Main Street and North State Street. 

A hydrant on Fisk Road opposite A. S. Trask's house. 

A hydrant on Washington Street at its junction with 
Electric Avenue. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 
W. C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In this, my second annual report as city solicitor, I 
desire to present for the information of the board the posi- 
tion of the city in regard to the various legal matters in 
which it has been interested during the year 1912. This 
report will describe the progress that has been made with 
the various cases brought against the city and will show 
their status at the present time. 

There were two cases entitled Boston & Maine Railroad 
v. Concord, upon the docket of the Merrimack County 
Superior Court at the October term, 1912. These were 
both petitions praying for the abatement of taxes assessed 
by the city upon Contoocook River Park, one for the year 
1910 and one for the year 1911. The railroad claimed 
that this property was not taxable by the City of Concord 
but that it is included in the general railroad tax for the 
years mentioned. The first case was reserved for the Su- 
preme Court but never transferred and in December of 
last year both cases were voluntarily dismissed by the 
petitioner without cost to the city. Another case, Jennie 
P. Martin v. Concord, a suit to recover damages for injuries 
to the plaintiff's real estate on the corner of South State 
and Downing Streets alleged to have been caused by de- 
fective sewers, I expected to have tried during the year but 
owing to the inability of counsel to attend to the same this 
case is still on the docket. Carolyn F. Stickney v. Concord, 
is another case in the same situation. This was an appeal 
from an award of $300 damages made to the plaintiff by 
the board of aldermen on account of the laying out and 
construction of a sewer from North Main Street through 
the plaintiff's land to the Merrimack River. I have strong 
hopes that this case may be settled eventually for the 
amount awarded by the board of aldermen. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 379 

Concord Street Railway v. Concord, an appeal taken by 
the Concord Street Railway from an award of damages 
to it by the board of aldermen upon the laying out of a 
highway in Penacook entered at the April term, 1900, has 
been dismissed for lack of prosecution. 

Grace 0. Button v. Concord, a suit for damages sustained 
by reason of a defective culvert in a highway, which was 
entered at the April term, 1911, was tried by jury at the 
April term, 1912. The plaintiff asked $500 damages and 
the verdict of the jury awarded her $187. 

Another case brought against the city for personal 
injuries sustained by reason of a defective highway is that 
of Gilbert S. Hubbard v. Concord which was entered at the 
October term, 1911, and in which the plaintiff claims he is 
damaged to the amount of $5,000. I had strong hopes of 
trying this case at the April term, 1912, but it was not 
reached. It will be in order for trial at the April term, 1913. 

The case of Concord v. Patriot Publishing Company for 
taxes for the years 1909 and 1910, entered at the October 
term, 1910, has been dismissed from the docket. This 
case was against the old Patriot Company and not the pres- 
ent owners, but was settled by the present company, 
the New Hampshire Patriot Company, for the old com- 
pany. Another case in which the city is concerned is that 
of Eben Hemphill v. Concord, a case for personal injuries 
brought in Hillsborough County in which the plaintiff 
asks $6,000 damages, having sustained a broken leg while 
working for the city upon the highway. This case will be 
in order for trial by jury at the May term of the Superior 
Court for Hillsborough County in Manchester. 

Some interest was created in the city's prosecution 
of the case State v. N orris A. Dunklee. The defendant was 
operating taxi-cabs within the city limits without having 
obtained a license so to do from this board. He claimed 
that the city ordinance requiring all persons who operated 
hackney coaches, cabs, etc., within the city limits for the 
purpose of carrying passengers for hire did not apply to 
him as he had obtained licenses for his taxi-cabs from the 



380 CITY OF CONCORD. 

secretary of state in accordance with the state statutes. 
The defence was set up also that our city ordinance was 
inconsistent with the motor vehicle law passed by the Legis- 
lature and was, therefore, superseded by it. This law 
provides that no city ordinance which restricts the use of 
automobiles upon any of the highways of the state should 
be valid. My contention before the supreme court was 
that our ordinance merely regulated the conduct of 
certain business with automobiles and that the city should 
have the right to regulate the business of carrying passengers 
for hire under its police powers. The result was that the 
Supreme Court upheld the state's view of the case and re- 
quired the defendant to submit himself to the jurisdiction 
of this board in the conduct of his business. 

I am glad to report that the case of Henry M. Baker, 
Exr. v. Concord, a petition for the abatement of taxes 
assessed for the year 1911 upon the homestead of Mrs. 
Mary Baker G. Eddy, has been voluntarily dismissed, 
the petitioner having elected to pay the taxes assessed 
rather than prosecute the case. 

Two other cases in which the city is interested and 
which complete the list are Concord v. Frank W. Sanborn, 
and George L. Theobald v. Concord, the first a suit brought 
by the city for the collection of taxes, and the second a 
suit brought against the city for damages arising out of a 
dispute over the legality of the teaming ordinance. Neither 
case has as yet reached the trial stage. 

During the year in addition to the handling of the above 
named cases I have performed the routine work of the office 
such as drafting ordinances, resolutions, contracts, deeds, 
etc., advising committees of the board and city officials. 
I have also prosecuted the usual number of criminal cases 
for the police department before the police court. 

In closing this report for the year 1912 I desire to express 
my appreciation for the month's leave of absence granted 
me on account of ill health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE, 
January 11, 1913. City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF CLERK OF POLICE COURT. 



Concord, N. H., February 24, 1913. 
To The City Council: 

The clerk of the police court submits the following report 
for the year 1912. 

Number of civil cases entered in court January to Decem- 
ber,, 1912, inclusive, was thirty-nine. Received entry fees 
for same at fifty cents each, nineteen dollars and fifty cents 
($19.50). Paid to city treasurer nineteen dollars and fifty 
cents ($19.50). 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUFUS H. BAKER, 

Clerk of Police Court. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE JOHN 
KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year 1912. The sum of four hundred dollars ($400) 
was appropriated, which was expended. The work done 
on the Kimball Playground this year was exceedingly in- 
teresting from several points of view. The instructor was 
a man capable of instilling the principles of morality as 
well as of managing the games and sports. He was able 
to reduce profanity on the grounds to a very small amount. 
All of this has tended to establish the playground as a factor 
in education. 

The instructor commented favorably on the use of the 
grounds by little children in the morning, by the older girls 
on spare Saturday afternoons, and by the boys in the 
early evenings. Contests were enjoyed by the boys and 
girls, and interest was excited by simple prizes. Partic- 
ularly good work was done in jumping and vaulting. 

While no special means were taken to advertise the work 
accomplished, the committee feel sure that it has not been 
equalled in any previous year. A complete equipment, 
level grounds, and accommodations for very hot weather 
would add greatly to its value. 

Labor, $131.45 

P. J. Hackett, instructor for 11 weeks, 165.00 

Thompson & Hoague, supplies, 61.35 

Isaac King, labor and supplies, 10.50 

John P. Kelley, badges, 2 . 00 

H. H. Betton, vaulting pole, 2.75 

W. Carpenter, supplies, 2.40 

Larson & Davis, lumber, .50 



JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 383 

Concord Water Works, 
G. W. Chesley, loam, 
F. E. Nelson, supplies, 
Eastern Nurseries, trees, 
Frank Atkinson, cash paid out, 
Home & Hall, supplies, 

Total expenses, $400 . 00 

Amounted appropriation, $400 . 00 

EUGENE J. O'NEIL. 
LUELLA A. DICKERMAN. 
R. A. BROWN. 



$6.00 


9.00 


1.25 


5.90 


.90 


1.00 



WARD 2 PLAYGROUND. 



January 1, 1913. 
To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

Financial Report of Pecker Athletic Field. 

April 14. To cash paid out: 

Fence wire for back stop, 

Posts and labor, 

H. L. Knowles, grading with team, 

H. A. Newton, labor, 

Concord Light Company, for plank 

and posts, 
Labor, putting up seats, 
F. E. Fairfield, mowing and clearing 

grounds three times, 



By appropriation of City of Concord, 

Made up by subscription, 

FRED L. FARNUM, 

Financial Agent. 



$1 


.50 


1 


.50 


3 


.00 


2 


.50 


5 


.31 


6 


.00 


6 


.00 


$25.81 


25 


00 


$0.81 




81 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The amount placed at our disposal for the year 1912 for 
Blossom Hill Cemetery was $5,948.71 and we have expended 
$6,110.57; and for the Old North we received $594.12 and 
expended $593.51 for a detailed account of which we refer 
you to the report of the City treasurer. The burials for 
the past year have been: in Blossom Hill Cemetery, one 
hundred and ninety-six (196), and in the Old North fourteen 
(14). The chapel has been used six (6) times. In addition 
to the usual appropriation of $100 for the Old North Ceme- 
tery we would recommend an additional one of $200, for 
a new fence on the north side and to enclose the Quaker 
burial lot recently purchased. The usual appropriation of 
$1,000 for Blossom Hill we think will be sufficient for the 
coming year. 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, Secretary, 
Board of Cemetery Commissioners. 



■ 

West Concord, N. H., January 1, 1913. 

To the City Council: 

The West Concord cemetery committee respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1912: 

1912 

Jan. 1. Cash on hand, $9.92 

Sale of lots, 39 . 00 

$48.92 



25 



386 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





PAID 


OUT. 




April 25. 


A. W.Hobbs, 






2.85 


Oct. 19. 


Water bill, 






6.00 


Dec. 23. 


L. S. Parmenter, 






5.00 


26. 


W. F. Thayer, 






19.50 


30. 


J. M. Crossman, 
G. R. Parmenter, 






5.00 
5.00 




<B>TtO . OO 


1913 










Jan. 1. 


Cash on hand, 






$5.57 






J. 


M. 


CROSSMAN, 






L. 


S. 


PARMENTER, 






G. 


R, 


PARMENTER, 

Committee. 



His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

Your Committee on Cemeteries in East Concord re- 
spectfully submit the following report for the year 1912: 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



receipts. 



Appropriation, $150.00 

One-half sale of lots, 12 . 50 

EXPENSES. 

J. W. Sanborn, teaming, $36.00 

Freeman Potter, teaming, 36.00 

John Maltais, labor, 10.50 

Joseph Carter, labor, 14.00 

S. L. French, labor, 12.74 

Concord Electric Co., grade, 2.20 

Scott French, labor, 36.75 

S. Frank Smith, labor, 1 . 75 

Cash on deposit, 12.50 

Unexpended, • 06 



$162.50 



$162.50 



cemetery department. 387 

Old Fort Cemetery. 

receipts. 
Appropriations, $25 . 00 

EXPENSES. 



John Maltais, labor, 


$1.75 


Joseph Carter, labor, 


1.75 


S. L. French, labor, 


1.75 


J. W. Sanborn, teaming, 


4.50 


Freeman Potter, teaming, 


4.50 


Scott French, labor and flowers, 


10.47 


Unexpended, 


.28 




»or 




tJPiiO . 




SCOTT FRENCH, 




Secretary 


January 13, 1913. 





To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Millville Cemetery Committee respectfully submit 
the following report of the receipts and expenditures for 
the year 1912. 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on account 1911, $10.62 

Interest on trust funds, 52 . 70 

Mrs. Ellen D. Trull, one-half lot No. 98, 2 . 50 

Mrs. L. H. Gilmore, one-half lot No. 103, 1 . 25 

City treasurer, 75.00 

Mrs. Andrew Smith, resetting stones, 2 . 00 

Mr. William Currier, one-half Lot. No. 65, 2 . 50 

City treasurer, 50 . 00 

Mr. F. G. Proctor, 2.00 

Mrs. Pike, 2.00 

White lead, 25 pounds, 2 . 07 
Mr. J. N. Abbott, one-half day's work, 

Mr. J. N. Abbott, .77 

$203.41 



388 CITY OF CONCORD. 



EXPENDITURES. 




id T. G. Proctor, 


$148.50 


A. H. Britton, 


16.50 


I. T. Chesley, 


6.75 


J. N. Abbott, 


10.00 


Receipt book, 


2.50 


W. L. Dole, grass seed, 


1.95 


sharpening lawn mowers, 


5.75 


water bill, 


6.00 


Mark Blanchard, seed and phosphate, 


5.46 




$203.41 


J. N. ABBOTT, 




FRANK G. PROCTOR, 


A. S. TRASK. 






Committee. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The board of assessors submits to your consideration the 
following facts and figures showing the valuation of the 
city and of each of its school districts and special precincts, 
with the amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the 
tax collector for collection. 

The work of making up the inventory for the year was 
commenced in March and the tax warrants given the tax 
collector November 18. 

All real estate in the city was inspected by the full board, 
and valuations equalized as much as possible, in the time 
at our command, some property being placed at three, four, 
and even five times its former valuation. 

In the work of making up the lists for taxation we found 
the maps of the various wards of great assistance. 

The strict enforcement of the return of inventories dis- 
closed a large amount of bonds, money at interest, and other 
taxable property. 



390 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Tabulation of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 

Valuations of City and Precincts with 

Rate for Each in 1912. 



Warrant. 



\ III. (1 1 U J 

of 

warrants. 



State 

County 

School required by law 

City 

Extra for schools: 

Union 

Town 

(No. 20.... 
Penacook I 

( Union. . . . 

Precincts: 

Sprinkling 

Garbage 

City sewer 

City lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sprinkling. . . 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord lights. . 

West Concord sewer. . 

East Concord lights. . . 

East Concord sewer. . . 

St. Paul's School sewer 



$51,736.00") 
35.945.52 
48,502.50 
43,000. 00 J 

66,487.71 
2.000.00 

*7,645.00 

7,500.00 

7,000.00 

8,940.00 

19,500.00 

1,300.00 

750.00 

1,630.00 

750.00 

1.395.50 

500.00 

117.50 

575.00 



Tax 

rate per 

$1,000. 



Assessed val- 
uation of 
city anil pre- 
cincts. 



$10.00 



4.20 
1 till 

4.20 

.60 

.GO 

.70 

1.40 

1.10 

.60 

.10 

.80 

4.00 

2.10 

4.50 

3.40 



$18,708,791 



15.942.666 
1,279,245 

1,967,321 

13.156.673 

12,741.440 

13,941,844 

14,408,354 

1,287.208 

1,274,468 

1,224,468 

987.360 

353.910 

250.690 

26.975 

175,715 



* Penacook Union School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



ASSESSOR S REPORT. 



391 



Number of shares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hamp- 
shire and credited to this city. 



Railroad. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 




539 

10,308 

118 

357 

27 

442 

17 

439 

73 

1,410 

8 

219 


291 

10,485 

118 

362 

27 

429 

17 

412 

72 

1,395 

8 

196 


346 

10,270 

118 

362 

27 

457 

17 

468 

72 

1,516 

8 

190 


323 




13,216 




118 




362 




27 




360 




18 




509 




60 




1 281 




8 




168 








13 


51 


53 


40 






Wilton 


5 

20 


5 

10 


5 




Worcester, Nashua & Rochester 











392 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Inventory of the City of Concord. 



No. 

Polls, 5,691 

Improved and unimproved lands and 

buildings, 
Horses, 1,203 

Asses and mules, 7 

Oxen, 12 

Cows, 1,013 

Other neat stock, 117 

Sheep, 95 

Hogs, 122 

Fowls, 

Carriages and automobiles, 
Portable mills, 
Boats and launches, 
Stock in public funds, 
Stock in banks and other corporations in 

state, 
Wood and lumber, 

Money on hand, at interest, or on deposit, 
Stock in trade, 
Milling, carding machines, and factories 

and their machinery, 

Total, 



Valuation. 

$569,100 



14,998,612 

150,375 

1,280 

1,225 

40,540 

3,492 

478 

1,633 

220 

146,685 

1,000 

3,675 

403,310 

138,527 

20,305 

240,704 

1,472,880 

507,550 

$18,701,591 



Amount of taxes committed to collector, $316,117.69. 
Average rate per cent, of taxation for all purposes, $1 .69 +. 



assessor's report. 



393 



List of Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in 
Each Ward, 1911 and 1912. 





Polls. 


Valuation. 


Resident tax assessed. 


Wards. 


1911. 


1912. 


1911. 


1912. 


1911. 


1912. 


Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Ward 7 

Ward 8 

Ward 9 


541 
201 
355 

1,061 
627 
961 

1,111 
382 
545 


510 
198 
351 

1,047 
701 
921 

1,091 
358 
514 


$1,044,935 

318,680 

689,600 

2,476,411 

2,712,705 

1,766,672 

1,589,025 

1,419,385 

490,434 


$1,553,845 
558,810 
1,268,025 
3,213,884 
3,730,090 
2,416,564 
2,918,232 
2,316,235 
725,906 


$23,789.97 
6,747.85 
14,961.05 
59,919.15 
65,851.18 
42,830.07 
36,695.24 
33,149.14 
11,183.91 


$25,030.65 
7,726.77 
19,650.14 
56,339.76 
65,281.07 
42,675.92 
47.731.67 
38,909.45 
12,036.00 


Totals 


5,784 1 5.691 


$12,507,847 


$18,701,591 S295.127.5fi i S315.382.43 















Totals submitted to tax collector: 
In 1911 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 

Total, 
In 1912 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 



$295,127.56 
946.71 

$296,074.27 

$315,382.43 

735.26 



Total, $316,117.69 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, 

Board of Assessors. 



394 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLLS, VALUATION., AND TAXES ASSESSED. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real 
and personal estate of Concord since 1902 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1902 


5,249 


$11,394,218 


$241,216.83 


1903 


5,407 


11,643,460 


240,025.79 


1904 


5,188 


11,559,482 


250,222.29 


1905 


5,400 


11,614,011 


258,043.86 


1906 


5,474 


11,768,897 


260,976.67 


1907 


5,757 


12,114,322 


273,045.74 


1908 


5,289 


12,342,190 


277,469.52 


1909 


5,442 


12,405,465 


301,281.72 


1910 


5,576 


12,543,822 


278,464.77 


1911 


5,784 


12,507.847 


296,074.27 


1912. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


Ward 1, 


510 


SI, 553,845 


$25,030.65 


2, 


198 


558,810 


7,726.77 


3, 


351 


1,268,025 


19,650.14 


4, 


1,047 


3,213,884 


56,339.76 


5, 


701 


3,730,090 


65,281.07 


6, 


921 


2,416,564 


42,675.92 


7, 


1,091 


2,918,232 


47,731.67 


8, 


358 


2,316,235 


38,909.45 


9, 


514 
5,691 


725,906 


12,036.00 




$18,701,591 


$315,382.43 


Non-residei 


nt, 




735.26 




$316,117.69 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the City Council: 

I herewith submit the report of collector of taxes to the 
close of business December 31, 1912. 

Tax Levy for 1907. 

Resident list as committed, $271,819.85 

Errors and omissions to date added, 6,000.75 

Resident list as corrected to date, $277,820.60 

Non-resident list, 1,225.89 

Interest collected to date, 1,318.10 



$280,364.59 



Cash paid treasurer, $273,879.30 

Abatements to date, 6,485.29 



$280,364.59 



Tax Levy for 1908. 

Resident list as committed, $275,685.02 

Errors and omissions to date added, 1,266.04 

Resident list as corrected to date, $276,951.06 

Non-resident list, 1,784.50 

Expense moths, 117.15 

Interest collected to date, 1,238.50 



$280,091.01 



Cash paid treasurer, $273,566.68 

Discounts allowed amounting to, 1,969.21 

Abatements to date, 4,555.12 



$280,091.01 



396 city of concord. 

Tax Levy for 1909. 

Resident list as committed, $299,190.48 

Errors and omissions to date added, 718.15 

Resident list as corrected to date, —$299,908.63 

Non-resident list, 2,091.24 

Expense moths, 79.68 

Interest collected to date, 1,347.67 



$303,427.22 



Cash paid treasurer, $294,551.11 

Abatements to date, 8,876.11 



$303,427.22 



Tax Levy for 1910. 

Resident list as committed, $277,487.48 

Errors and omissions to date added, 1,401.68 

Resident list as corrected to date, 

Non-resident list, 

Expense moths, 

Interest collected to date, 



Cash paid treasurer, $274,685.67 

Discounts allowed amounting to, 2,445.20 

Abatements to date, 3,632.72 

Cash in office December 31, 1912, at 

closing, .23 

Uncollected December 31, 1912, at 

closing, 417.77 

— $281,181.59 



$278,889.16 

977.29 

90.95 

1,224.19 


$281,181.59 



tax collector's report. 397 

Tax Levy for 1911. 

Resident list as committed, $295,127.56 

Errors and omissions to date added, 4,757.48 

Resident list as corrected to date, $299,885.04 

Non-resident list, 946.71 

Expense moths, 128.70 

Interest collected to date, 1,151.23 



$302,111.68 



Cash paid treasurer, $291,178.09 

Discounts allowed amounting to, 2,544.93 

Abatements to date, 7,748.11 

Cash in office December 31, 1912, at 

closing, 12.90 

Uncollected December 31, 1912, at 

closing, 627.65 

$302,111.68 



Taxes sold the City of Concord, N. H., in the office of 
collector for redemption. 

Year 1902 and 1903. 

Amount, $710.97 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $576.63 

Int. and fees, 190.84 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 190.84 

Amount redeemed, 134.34 

$901.81 $901.81 



398 city of concord. 

Year 1904. 

Amount, $816.38 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $697.36 

Int. and fees, 113.20 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 113.20 

Amount redeemed, 119.02 



$929.58 $929.58 

Year 1905. 

Amount, $2,934.38 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,726.42 

Int. and fees, 225.72 Paid treasurer amount 



interest and fees, 
Amount unredeemed, 


225.72 
207.96 


$3,160.10 

Year 1906. 


$3,160.10 



Amount, $3,156.13 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,945.60 

Int. and fees, 517.22 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 517.22 

Amount unredeemed, 210.53 



$3,673.35 $3,673.35 

Year 1907. 

Amount, $3,298.11 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,749.76 

Int. and fees, 612.58 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 612.58 

Amount unredeemed, 548.35 

$3,910.69 $3,910.69 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



399 



Amount, 
Int. and fees, 



Amount, 
Int. and fees, 



Amount, 
Int. and fees, 



Year 1908. 
1,291.76 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $3,033.62 

579.06 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 579.06 

Amount unredeemed, 258.14 



1,870.82 



$3,870.82 



Year 1909. 
1,898.72 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $3,417.51 

438.43 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 438.43 

Amount unredeemed, 481.21 



t,337.15 



t,337.15 



Year 1910. 
1,653.97 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,766.56 

97.46 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 97.46 

Amount unredeemed, 887.41 



$3,751.43 


$3,751.43 


Year 1911. 




Amount, $1,503.13 Paid treasurer amount 




redeemed, 


$578.28 


Int. and fees, 11.17 Paid treasurer amount 




interest and fees, 


11.17 


Amount unredeemed, 


924.85 



$1,514.30 $1,514.30 

WENDELL P. LADD, 

Collector. 
Concord, N. H., January 1, 1913. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the report of the col- 
lector of taxes to the close of business December 31st, 1912. 

Tax Levy for 1912. 

Resident list as committed, $3 15,382.43 

Errors and omissions to date 
added, 1,722.73 

Resident list as corrected to date, $317,105.16 

Non-resident list, 735.26 

Expense of moths, 133.35 



$317,973.77 

Cash paid treasurer, $265,500.00 

Abatements to date, 1,761.02 

Cash in office at closing December 

31, 446.17 

Uncollected at closing December 

31, 50,266.58 

$317,973.77 

Respectfully submitted, 

SETH R. DOLE, 

Collector. 
Concord, N. H., January 31, 1913. 



REPORT OF THE PUBLIC BATH 



For the Summer Ending 1912. 



Mr. C. J. French, 

Mayor, City of Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir: — I hereby submit to you a report of the 
public bath during the months of June, July, August, and 
the first week of September. 

The public bath was officially opened June 14 and closed 
on Labor Day, September 2. 

The conditions at the bath house were ideal for the past 
summer. We had extremely good weather all the season. 
The attendance was large and composed of mainly from 
boys of city. 

The boys conducted themselves in a creditable manner 
and caused very little trouble. 

June 1,657 

July 6,642 

August 2,524 

September 39 

Total attendance 10,862 

Number of boys saved from probable drowning, 5. 
Cause in each case due to exhaustion. 

Number of boys who have learned to swim during the 
past summer. 33. 



26 



402 city of concord. 

Recommendations. 

The bath house, as it now stands should be moved nearer 
the river. (It is at present a distance of 150 yards from 
the river.) 

The money saved from this year's appropriation should 
be spent for a new boat. (The one at present is in bad 
condition.) 

That a suitable bath house be built for the use of women 
bathers. (There is a great deal of interest among women 
for a suitable place for the use of women bathers.) 

On Labor Day I got up a series of races for the boys of 
the city, as a fitting climax of the summer's work. Each 
store that I called on gave a suitable present for the various 
events; in all I had twenty-six presents. The races were 
entirely successful and ended the public bath season in a 
very fitting manner. 



Attendance — June 14 to September 2. 

JUNE. 

June 14 to 15 61 

17 to 22 451 

24 to 29 863 

30 282 

Total attendance for June 1,657 

July. 

July 1 to 6 1,752 

8 to 13 1,677 

15 to 20 -r 1,420 

22 to 27 1,231 

29 to 31 562 

Total attendance for July 6,642 



report of public bath. 403 

August. 

August 1 to 3 409 

5 to 10 813 

12 to 17 67g 

19 to 24 : '///.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..[[ 363 

26 to 31 261 

Total attendance for August 2 524 

September 1 — Labor Day — 39. 
Respectfully submitted, 

TIMOTHY REARDON, 

Instructor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1912. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1912: 

From Merrimack County, aid to county poor, $7,963.37 
Merrimack County, aid to dependent soldiers, 1,617.19 



fees of all kinds, 


459.85 


licenses, pool and billiard tables, 


380.00 


licenses, hack and job teams, 


66.50 


licenses, junk dealers and employment office 


155.00 


licenses, dogs, 


1,791.81 


rent, Auditorium, 


1,350.00 


quarry rents, 


106.25 


declarations of candidacy, state primary. 


159.00 


sale of old junk, grass, etc., 


24.75 


aid J. Hersey, 


8.00 


rent, Merrimack Hall, 


11.00 


rent, hoisting engine, 


222.00 


Old Town Records, 


5.00 




$14,319.72 



The foregoing amount has been paid into the city treasury 
Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVER- 
SEER OF THE POOR. 



FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1912. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the forty-fifth annual 
report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards 1 
and 2, for the year ending December 31, 1912: 

City Poor. 
Appropriation, $800.00 

Resolution No. 78, 1,000.00 

Resolution No. 96, 485.90 

$2,285.90 



Paid groceries, 


$592.18 


fuel, 


330.20 


rents, 


649.50 


care, children, 


346.00 


board and care, 


267.12 


medicine, 


53.65 


shoes and clothing, 


32.25 


burial, 


15.00 



5,285.90 



406 CITY OF CONCORD. 



County Poor. 






Paid groceries and provisions, 


$2,161.87 




fuel, 


1,063.14 




rents, 


2,213.50 




care, children, 


1,370.50 




board, 


824.50 




shoes and clothing, 


266.55 




burials, 


78.00 




miscellaneous, 


29.68 


$8,007.74 






Total amount paid for aid to poor 


> 


$10,293.64 


Dependent Soldiers, 


City. 




Appropriation, 




$200.00 


Paid care, sickness, 




$104.00 


Dependent Soldiers, 


County. 


- 


Paid groceries and provisions, 


$614.49 




fuel, 


521.85 




rents, 


180.00 




board, 


272.25 




shoes and clothing, 


13.50 


$1,602.09 






Total amount paid for aid to 


dependent 




soldiers, 




$1,706.09 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



TRUST FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Trust 

Funds. 

abial walker trust. 

For the benefit of the school fun . 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1912, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Femab Charitable Society. Income to be applied 
to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1912, 90.00 

Paid Grace E. Foster, treasurer of the society, 90.00 

Invested in Union Trust Company, 1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 



408 CITY OF CONCORD. 



MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually by the 
superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellishment of the burial 
lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of the duly appointed officials, 
or members of the Minot Cemetery Association. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1912, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at 3| per cent.) with City of Concord, in 
general account. 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

The purpose of the donor of this trust was that the income should be used for the 
purchase of school-books, for poor children; but since the bequest was made, a state 
law has been enacted that requires the town and cities to buy all the school-books; 
consequently the beneficiary of the fund, $200, and accumulations, amount to $555.03 
and same will continue to accumulate forever without any benefit to any object, unless 
some legal action can be taken to divert the income from the specified purpose of the 
donor. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance income from last year, $333.71 

Income received, 1912, 21.32 

355.03 

Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank; income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 



COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase of book- 
of a biographical, geographical, historical and scientific character, and the books relate 
ing to science shall be those that give the latest developments and discoveries by scien- 
tific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1912, 85.87 

Paid into the city treasury, 85.87 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. . 409 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 



G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1912, 35.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 35.00 

Invested in City of Concord 3£ per cent. bond. 



FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1912, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500.00 



THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1912, 17.50 

Paid into the city treasury, 17.50 

V 
Invested in City of Concord 3| per cent. bond. 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. Theincomeof thefundisusedfor the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1912, $25,679.61 
Received from one half sale of lots, 

1912, 1,666.77 

Received from income of fund, 1,022.16 

$28,368.54 



410 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $1,022.16 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1913, 27,346.38 

$28,368.54 

Invested in City of Concord 4% 
bonds, $8,000.00 

Invested in City of Concord Z\°/ 

bonds, 2,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 5,842.04 

Deposited in Union Trust Com- 
pany, 11,405.34 

$27,346.38 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an increase of the 
fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Old North Ceme- 
tery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1912, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 30.10 



Credited City of Concord general 

account, $30.10 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1913, 815.00 



$845.10 



$845.10 



Invested in City of Concord 3|% 

bonds, $500.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 315.00 



$815.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 411 

WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received 
from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and ornamentation 
of West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1912, $502.50 
Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary, 1912, 263.41 
Received from income of fund, 1912. 30.56 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 19.50 



$815.9 



Unexpended income January 1, 1913, $293.97 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1913, 522.00 

$815.97 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
County Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of interested 
parties. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Millville 
Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1912, $2030.00 

Capital increased by legacy of Eliz- 
abeth E. Griffin, ' 52.15 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1912, 94.81 

Received from income, 1912, 93.10 

Received from one half sale of lots, 

1912, 6.25 

$2,276.31 



Capital, January 1, 1912, $2030.00 
Capital increased from sale of lots, 6.25 
Capital increased by legacy of Eliz- 
abeth E. Griffin, 52.15 



412 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Capital, January 1, 1913, $2088.40 

Unexpended income January 1, 1913, 187.91 



$2,276.31 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, $1,175.62 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $1,100.69 



EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received 
from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of 
East Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1912, $322.50 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1912, 279.85 
Received from income of fund, 1912, 24.00 

$626.35 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1913, $303.85 
Amount of capital, January, 1 1913, 322.50 



$626.35 



Capital and unexpended income deposited in New Hamp- 
shire Savings Bank. 



WEST CONCOED SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct, and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund which 
provided that the following amounts should be raised annually upon the taxable prop- 
erty of the precinct, for the purpose of paying the bonds as they mature, viz: 

$1,400 annually for five years from October 1, 1907. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1912, $5,871.58 

Income received, 1912, 178.84 

Received from city of Concord, 1 ,400.00 

$7,450.42 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 413 

Transferred to City of Concord 
general account to pay bonds 
maturing, 1912, $7,000.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 450.42 

$7,450.42 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook sewer precinct, and authorizing loana 
on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, which 
provided that the following amounts should be raised annually upon the taxable prop- 
erty of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds as they mature, viz. : 

$100 annually for fifteen years from October 1, 1900. 
$1,000 annually for five years from May 1, 1908. 
$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 
$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1912, -$4,475.65 

Income received, 1912, 179.00 

Received from City of Concord, 1,100.00 

$5,754.65 

Balance on hand January 1, 1913, $5,754.65 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 

EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord sewer precinct, and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, which 
provided that the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) should be raised annually for 
twenty years from July 1, 1895, upon the taxable property of the precinct for the pur- 
pose of paying the bonds as they mature. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1912. $219.88 

Income received, 1912, 8.76 

Received from City of Concord, 100.00 

$328.64 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1913, $328.64 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



414 CITY OF CONCORD. 



SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city bond, the 
income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping lot in Blossom 
Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition ; six dollars each year to be deposited in 
some savings institution to create a monument fund; and the balance of the income to 
be expended each year in purchasing books for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1912, 35. 00 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6. 00 

Transferred to City of Concord 

general account for public library, 17.00 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

$35.00 



Capital invested in City of Concord 3|% bond. 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. The 
entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new monument on 
his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1912, $377.51 

From S. K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1912, 14.96 

$398.47 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



416 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 437 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds are added 
to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a 
special order from the mayor, from the income of individual deposits made with the 
city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 

H. J. Alexander, care, $2.00 

Alleyne Eastman, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. L. T. Flint, burial, 3.00 

Thomas D. Merrill lot, care, 1.00 

J. F. Webster, care, 1.00 

W. P. Hardy, care, 1.50 

Annie Fox, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. S. Cushing, care, 2.00 

E. T. Morrison, removal, 4.00 

Mrs. Nancy Langmaid's estate, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. Mary F. White's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Frank Graves' estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Mary French's estate, burial, 7.00 

Miss H. N. Cloudman, burial, 3.00 

H. J. Alexander, care, 3.00 

Iron sold, 11.25 

John F. Wilson, care, 1.00 

C. A. Hardy, care, 1.50 

Minot Cemetery Association, care, 84.52 
Mrs. S. F. Cushing's estate, burial and 

care, 6.00 

Mrs. H. E. Carter's estate, burial, 8.00 

William Abbott, trust, 10.00 

Samuel Alexander, trust, 3.00 

Leonard Bell, Jr., trust, 4.00 

Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, 10.00 

Richard Bradley, trust, 4.00 

John F. Chaffin, trust, 1.50 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 2.00 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 2.00 



438 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Samuel Evans, trust, 


$5.00 


Samuel N. Farnsworth, trust, 


1.00 


Hosea Fessenden, trust, 


3.00 


Theodore French . trust, 


3.00 


John Flanders, trust, 


1.50 


Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 


2.00 


Mitchel Gilmore, trust, 


3.50 


Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 


2.50 


Pamela L. Hall, trust, 


1.50 


Frank S. Harraden, trust, 


3.00 


Louise L. Hoyt, trust, 


3.00 


William T. Locke, trust, 


3.00 


Asa McFarland, trust, 


5.00 


Ida Moore, trust, 


1.50 


Mary Ann Morrill, trust, 


2.00 


Mary R. Morrill, trust, 


3.00 


Samuel and David L. Morrill, trust, 


6.00 


Isaac H. Ordway, trust, 


2.00 


True Osgood, trust, 


3.00 


Palmer and Savory, trust, 


5.00 


A. W. Parker, trust, 


4.00 


Asa Parker, trust, 


1.50 


Samuel G. Parker, trust, 


1.50 


E. A. Pecker, trust, 


10.00 


Henry J. Rhodes, trust, 


1.50 


Hiram Richardson, trust, 


20.00 


Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 


6.00 


Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 


2.00 


Joseph Stickney, trust, 


20.00 


Nathan Stickney, trust, 


1.75 


Abigail Sweetser, trust, 


10.00 


Sarah M. Wadleigh, trust, 


5.00 


Timothy and A. B. Walker, trust, 


7.00 


Albert Webster, trust, 


5.00 


Paul Wentworth, trust, 


5.00 


Harriet E. Wheeler, trust, 


3.00 


S. A. Wolcott, trust, 


5.00 


Charlotte H. Woolson, trust, 


3.00 



$364.02 



treasury department. 439 

Credit. 

Income from sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account transferred 
to City of Concord general account, $207.25 

Transferred to City of Concord general 

account, 156.77 

$364.02 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with 
the amounts "received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are 
paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made 
with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

Fred W. Lang, lot 45, block W, $42.00 

J. H. Albin, care, 2.00 

Mrs. E. B. Woodworth, plants, 3.00 

Mrs. G. K. Lang, care, 1.00 

Charles H. Noyes, estate, care, 1.50 

Miss A. L. Merrill, care, 5.00 

Mrs. E. H. Schutz, care, 6.00 

J. E. Dwight, care, 2.00 

F. W. Bordman, care, 1.50 

Mrs. B. C. Hill, flowers, 1.00 

P. S. Smith, care, 1.50 

Nathaniel Walker, burial, 4.00 

B. F. Smith, burial, 3.00 

Mr. Sargent, care, 2.00 

E. L. Peacock, burial, 3.00 

Lucy M. Poore, care, 1.50 

E. F. Chase, repairs, etc., 10.00 

John W. Edgerly, care, 2.00 

Charles P. Tucker, care, 1.50 



440 CITY OF CONCORD. 

James Minot's estate, burial, $8.00 

W. S. Blanchard, burial, 3.00 

T. J. Niles, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth Hill, burial, 3.00 

George Clark, foundation, etc., 42.00 

C. W. Lane, care, 1.50 

Henry Hilson, repairs, 4.00 

F. A. Stillings, care, 3.00 

Joseph G. Taylor, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. W. G. Carter, care, 2.00 

Mrs. S. Humphrey, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Nathaniel White, care, 25.00 

W. M. Chase, care, 2.00 

Miss E. Morrill, care, 2.00 

Mrs. J. O. Lyford, care, 5.00 

E. B. Hutchinson's estate, care, 7.00 
Jonothan Brown, care, 1.50 
George H. Marston's estate, care, 4.00 
Miss A. Packard, care, 3.00 
Mrs. Hiram Gerrish's estate, burial, 3.00 
Charles H. Cummings, care, 5.00 
Mrs. A. S. Marshall, care, 1.50 
Mrs. C. C. Lund, care, 5.00 
Dunlap & Jeffers, care, 4.00 
C. R. Dame, care, 1.50 

C. E. Palmer, care, 1.25 
W. E. Hunt, care, 7.00 
S. C. Eastman, care, 1.50 
W. E. Chandler, care, 5.00 

D. G. Lowell, care, 1.00 
W. W. Flint, care, 1.50 
Edson J. Hill, care, 8.00 
George H. Russ, care, 3.00 
W. J. Green, care, 2.00 
W. P. Fiske, care, 2.50 

F. E. Colburn, care, 1.50 
George L. Stratton, care, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 441 



W. K. McFarland, care, 


$2.00 


W. E. Chesley, care, 


1.50 


George Connell, care, 


2.00 


Fred W. Lang, burial, 


3.50 


Annah Kimball, care, 


1.50 


Mrs. Charlotte Merrill, care, 


2.00 


Henry Corser, care, 


1.50 


George D. Huntley, care, 


1.00 


W. E. Carpener, care, 


1.00 


Benjamin Bilsborough, care, 


1.00 


George W. Hill, care, 


1.00 


J. F. Jones estate, care, 


2.00 


Barker & Howe, care, 


1.50 


Mrs. A. Blanchard's estate, burial, 


3.00 


Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care, 


1.00 


W. E. Emerson, care, 


2.50 


Mrs. N. A. Dunklee, care, 


1.00 


Mrs. George E. Todd, care, 


2.00 


S. F. Morrill's estate, care, 


2.00 


Miss H. Robinson, care, 


1.00 


Lyman Jackman, care, 


2.00 


T. Hannigan, rent, 


10.00 


Otis Hammond, repairs, 


2.00 


John Swenson Company, foundation, 




etc., 


70.25 


F. A. Stillings, care, 


3.00 


J. F. Webster, care, 


3.00 


Mrs. Sprague, care, 


2.00 


J. A. Cochran, care, 


1.00 


J. C. French, care, 


1.00 


W. H. Horner, care, 


1.25 


C. F. Nichols, burial, 


4.00 


W. F. Thayer, care, 


4.00 


C. W. Bradlee, care, 


1.50 


Mrs. J. H. Chase, care, 


4.00 


Patrick Duhame, burial, 


8.00 


Abraham B. Batchelder, lot 3, block Z, 


129.00 



442 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. Charles W. Davis, lot 4, block 

Z, $100.00 

Joab N. Patterson and Julia N. P. 

Guyol, lot 16, block Z, 96.00 

Mrs. Hattie Murry, east half lot 21, 

block V, 75.00 

W. B. Mclnnis, repairs, 1.50 

C. W. Lyman, care, 1.00 
H. A. Rowell, care, 1.50 
R. F. Robinson, care, 1.50 
Mrs. C. W. Davis, burial and removal, 4.50 
Joseph Palmer, care, 2.00 
J. P. Nutter, care, 1.00 
Mrs. G. L. Nutter, care, 1.00 
George H. Rolfe, repairs, 2.50 
Miss S. Leaver, repairs, 2.00 
Amos Blanchard, care, 1.00 
W. A. Happany, repairs, 4.00 
W. F. Gay, care, 1.50 
H. Pickering's lot, care, 1.50 
Mrs. Burleigh's lot, care, 1.50 
Mrs. George Crockett, care, 1.50 
Mrs. P. F. Stevens, care, 1.00 
Mrs. D. D. Donovan, care, 1.50 
Miss M. Woods, care, 3.00 
Solon Carter, care, 2.00 
J. E. Fernald, care, 1.50 
Howard Merrill, care, 1.00 
Mrs. D. Streeter's estate, burial, 11.00 
Mrs. J. H. Dearborn, care, 4.00 
David L. Neal, care, 1.00 

D. Holden heirs, care, 2.50 
C. A. Kendall's estate, burial, 3.00 
John Ford, care, 2.00 
Mrs. George O. Dickerman, plants, 1.50 
A. Vitraglina, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. J. N. Patterson's estate, burial, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 443 

Mr. J. A. Tuck, repairs, $3.00 

Robt. J. Graves, lot 76, block Z, 120.25 

Edward C. Niles, lot 6, block Z, 120.00 

Mrs. H. L. Rand, lot 9, block Z, 185.62 

E. M. Willis, care, 1.50 

J. F. Murrey's estate, burial, 3.00 

R. Dowdy, burial, 3.00 

John Nutting, burial, 3.00 

James Remick, burial, 4.00 

Frank Smith, burial, 3.00 

D. Stackpole, burial, 3.00 
Betty Larson, burial, 3.00 
Elizabeth Greenough, use of tomb, 1.00 
Mrs. Pliny Tidd, burial, 3.00 
Weston Cofran, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Jacobs-Moses, burial, 5.00 
Prentiss M. Kent, repairs, 2.00 
David Purrington's estate, burial, 3.00 
Joseph R. Bean, burial, 4.50 
H. E. Conant's estate, burial, 6.00 
A. F. Dolley's estate, burial, 3.00 
Frank L. Sweat, lot 65, block Z, 72.00 
Mrs. Viola C. Hughes, lot 74, block Z, 40.00 
Frank A. Drew, lot 123, block Y, 35.00 
Lucy M. and William G. Roach, lot 

24, block Y, 35.00 

Jasper N. Johnson, lot 120, block Y, 35.00 
Mrs. Mary E. Mansur, south half, lot 

127, block W, 51.00 

E. T. Morrison and Joseph J. T. 
Searles, lot 191, block W, 171.00 

Andrew S. Farnum and Frank A. Mer- 
rill, lot 23, block Z, 96.00 
Hosea B. Langley, lot 59, block W, 1 14.00 
E. C. Niles, burial, 10.00 
H. L. Rand's estate, burial, 8.00 
Home for Aged, Mrs. Jones burial, 4.00 
N. H. Shattuck's estate, care, 1.50 



444 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Henry Buswell, care, $1.50 

Richard Harvey, rent, 12.00 

Miss Abbott, labor, .50 

C. F. Batchelder, care, 1.00 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 1.00 

H. W. Marcy, care, 2.50 
Kendall & Foster, J. Truckhouse, 

care, 3.00 

J. T. Searles, care, 3.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 15.00 

G. W. Waters, McNalley burial, 8.00 

Mrs. W. McCauley, burial, 3.00 

James Kenneday (Couch), burial, 1.25 

George D. Batchelder, Jr., burial, 1.25 

Bessie A. Clay, lot 86, block Y, 30.00 

Walter S. Dole, lot 53, block Z, 125.00 

Gustavus Carlson, lot 123, block W, 68.00 

George L. Butterfield, lot 18, block Z, 80.00 

Abbie A. T. Staniels, lot 73, block Z, 60.00 
Mrs. William Spargo, west half, lot 66, 

block V, 70.00 
Heirs of Robert A. Marshall, lot 48, 

block P, 37.50 

Will B. Howe, lot 75, block Z, 87.50 
Harry E. Roby, Kate A. Roby, and 
Mrs. Minnie C. Aldrich, east half, 

lot 1, block V, 100.00 
Rev. D. E. Miller, west half, lot 130, 

block W, 105.00 

Mrs. L. M. Bradley's estate, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. F. A. Drew, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. W. M. Colby, burial, 3.00 

Fred Fisher, burial, 1.00 

J. E. Thompson, repairs, 3.00 

J. F. Potter, burials, 4.00 

J. P. W. Roach, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. N. P. Rines, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. H. E. Phipps, burial, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



445 



James F. Nelson, burial, $3.00 

Amos Mansur, burial, 3.00 

C. P. Watts, burial, 3.00 

Perry Brothers, foundation, 18.25 

H. B. Langley, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Stotten, repairs, 2.00 

Mr. Head, care, 3.00 

George B. Packer, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Burbank-Abbott, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Walter's infant, burial, .50 

Maurice Lamprey, burial, 3.00 

Thomas D. Avery, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. J. M. Killeen, care, 10.00 

Jasper Johnson, labor, 1.00 

Elmer E. Brown, grading, 3.00 

W. D. Wallace, care, 2.00 

J. A. Hill infant, burial, .50 

Miss Manning, labor, 6.00 

Mrs. J. W. Walker, repairs, 2.00 

Frank Sua, burial, 6.00 

S. M. Clay, burial, 3.00 

C. S. Dana, burial, 3.00 

Manure sold, 2.00 

James W. Lane's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Addie Butterfield's estate, burial, 3.00 

A. G. McAlpine, foundation, 50.00 

E. C. Fisher, burial, 1.00 

F. H. George's estate, burial, 3.00 
William Spargo's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Abbie Pinkham, burial, 3.00 
R. A. Marshall, burial, 3.00 
William H. Morton, walk between 

lots 1 and 2, block Y, 7.50 
Mrs. Charles P. Watts, lot 48, block 

Y, 25.00 
Heirs, Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Stanyan, 

lot 32, block Z, 207.50 



446 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Richard A. Brown, lots 3 and 4, block 

Y, $55.00 

John E. Carter, lot 95, block Y, 25.00 

Rev. D. E. Miller, burial, 6.00 

Mrs. George Huntoon, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. J. E. Hutchins, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Sarah Mills, burial, 3.00 

Mr. Ellis, burial, 5.00 

M. V. B. Davis, burial, 3.00 

Josiah Gannett, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Millie Gleason, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. S. F. Patterson, burial, 4.00 

H. M. Staples, burial, 4.00 

George Prescott, burial, 4.00 
N. H. State Hospital, Mr. Stuart, 

burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, Timothy Whit- 

temore, burial, 3.00 

C. A. Wright, burial, 3.00 

Sprague, infant, burial, .50 

Hodgman, infant, burial, .50 

Mrs. Warren Clark's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. A. F. Tandy, burial, 3.00 

Miss Addie Straw, plants, 1.25 
Mrs. Mary F. McFarland estate, 

burial, 10.00 

A. L. Merrill, labor, 5.00 

Mrs. G. W. Beck, labor, 4.25 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 20.00 

John W. Ferrin's estate, burial, 4.00 

Hiram Stanyan's estate, burial, etc., 8.00 

Mrs. Bessie DurelPs estate, burial, 3.00 

Miss A. Staniels, burials, 4.00 

Mrs. Amos Locke, lot 123, block W, 68.00 
Mrs. James P. Hook, north half, lot 

127, block W, 51.00 

Mrs. H. A. Roby,- burial, 3.00 

Mrs. A. C. Ferrin's estate, labor, 5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



447 



George Brown's estate, burial, $3.00 

Amos Locke's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. George Prescott, setting posts, 2.00 

Mr. Lovely, care, 1.00 

Mrs. T. J. Niles, repairs, 4.00 

E. A. Moulton, labor, 5.00 

Rev. E. Creighton, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 2.00 
Mrs. Charlotte Merrill, care and 

labor, 9.00 

Stillman J. Quinby's estate, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. George Prescott, repairs, 5.00 

Watson Garland, burial, 2.00 

Mrs. William Prowse's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Fred Pinkham, repairs, 8.00 

Mrs. J. P. Hook, removals, 10.50 

Mrs. W. Stevenson's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. E. F. Holt, care, 10.00 

Miss E. Sturtevant, care, 1.00 

Prentiss Kent, care, 3.00 
Mrs. Lydia A. Chamberlin, lot 9, 

block Y, 64.80 

John Brooks, lot 68, block Z, 105.62 

Joseph Martin, lot 63, block Z, 48.00 
Mrs. Charlotte A. Spencer, lot 38, 

block Z, 80.00 

William H. Howe's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mr. Guy, single grave and burial, 6.00 

Mrs. W. H. Page, repairs, 2.00 

C. A. Bailey, foundation, 6.00 
Mrs. J. A. Snell, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. J. A. Snell, removal, 8.00 
E. P. Burroughs, repairs, 1.00 

D. E. Miller, foundation, 5.00 
Mrs. John Cloudman, repairs, 1.00 
Cummings Brothers, foundation, 10.00 
Joseph Martin, burial, 3.00 
A. W. Hobbs, care, 1.00 



448 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Wood sold $5.00 

Irvan Walker, burial, .50 

William S. Badger, burial, 3.00 

Paul Braley, burial, 1.00 

Elizabeth Jenness, use of tomb, 1.00 

Howson Avlons, burial, 8.00 

George Parsons, use of tomb, 1.00 

Sarah Taylor, burial, 8.00 

Marianna Marston, burial, 3.00 

Albert Keniston, burial, 3.00 

Sarah Rossiter, use of tomb, 1.00 

Mr. Andolph, burial, 3.00 

George D. Rollins, lot 67, block Z, 61.25 

W. A. Kenney, lot 35, block Y, 35.00 

E. N. Spencer's estate, burial, 5.00 

Luther Jones' estate, burial, 3.00 

J. E. Robbins' estate, burial, 4.00 

George Perry, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Frances Lane's estate, burial, 8.00 

E. A. Moulton, burial, 5.00 
Irving T. Chesley, burial, 3.00 
J. H. Gallinger, care, 3.00 
Mrs. Nathaniel White, care, 25.00 
Mrs. G. W. Beck, repairs, 13.00 
J. B. Palmer, care, 2.00 
W. M. Chase, care, 2.00 
Mrs. L. F. Lund, care, 5.00 
Mrs. E. H. Schutz, care, 6.00 
Mrs. G. H. Adams, care, 2.00 
L. H. Carroll, care, 4.00 
George H. Marston's estate, care, 5.00 
A. P. Carpenter's heirs, care, 2.50 

F. S. Streeter, care, 2.50 
J. E. Dwight, care, 1.50 
Mrs. J. E. Scales, care, 1.50 
Dewitt C. Howe, lot 22, block Z, 220.00 
Mrs. F. E. Ingalls, repairs, 11.00 
C. E. Burnside, care, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



449 



Daniel Holden's heirs, care, $4.00 

John W. Drew, care, 8.50 

F. L. Watson, repairs, 4.00 

Miss A. L. Merrill, repairs, 11.50 

John Swenson Company, foundation, 3.00 

Gordon & Edgerly, care, 2.00 

J. W. Barton, labor, 3.00 
Mrs. Betsey T. Barton's estate, 

burial, 8.00 

Miss Annah Kimball, care, 1.50 

Mrs. A. S. Marshall, care, 1.50 

Richard Harvey, rent, 24.00 

Mrs. James Minot, care, 1.50 
Mrs. Betsey Burleigh's estate, repairs, 13.50 

John H. Sanborn, burial, 3.00 

A. J. Mixer, repairs, 2.00 

W. W. Flint, care, 1.50 

Edson J. Hill, care, 8.00 

C. H. Noyes' estate, 3.00 

Dewitt C. Howe, burial and removal, 10.50 

Samuel Locke's estate, burial, 3.00 

C. P. Bancroft, care, 2.00 

Fred W. Boardman, care, 1.50 
Mrs. John H. Carr's estate, burial and 

care, 6.00 

Mrs. J. O. Lyford, care, 5.00 

Larson and Carlson, foundation, 7.00 

Mrs. George K. Lang, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Mary Clement, removal, 7.00 

Mrs. Mary Stevenson's estate, repairs, 1.50 

John B. Abbott, repairs, 13.30 

Nathan M. Carter's estate, burial, 3.00 

Howard Merrill, care, 1.00 

J. B. Hussey, care, 1.50 

Rev. C. W. Bradlee, care, 1.50 

Versil Mersin, burial, 8.00 

F. A. Pinkham, burial, 3.00 

Frank Whipple, burial, 8.00 

29 



450 CITY OF CONCORD. 

N. H. State Hospital, Alice Hawes, 

burial, $300 

Mary Fulstrom, burial, .50 

George Hodge, burial, 50 

Eben Hutchins' estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Mabel Moulton, burial, 3.00 

Samuel Holt's estate, repairs, 4.00 

Dunlap & Jeffers, care, 4.00 

Dr. G. M. Kimball, care, 5.00 

W. P. Fiske, care, 3, 50 

George L. Stratton, care, 3. 00 

Mrs. G. E. Todd, care, 2.00 

W. K. McFarland, care, 2.00 

Batchelder Brothers, care, 2.50 

W. E : Chandler, care, 5. 00 

F. E. Colburn, care, 1,50 

John Brooks, burial, etc., 9.50 

George W. Abbott, trust, 4.00 

Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 1.50 

Fidelia F. Adams, trust, 3.00 

Sarah J. Adams, trust, 4. 00 

Sarah M. K. Adams, trust, 20.00 

Allen, Smith & Dimond, trust, 3.00 

Frederick Allison, trust, 3. 00 

Mary B. Allison, trust, I.75 

Lavinia Arlin, trust, 3.00 

Sarah S. Ash, trust, I.75 

Alonzo Atherton, trust, 3.00 

Lizzie K. Badger, trust, 4.00 

Annie L. S. Bailey, trust, 4. 00 

Oliver Ballon, trust, 1.50 

Charles Barker, trust, 3. 50 

George W. Barnes, trust, 1.50 

James W. Barton, trust, 3. 50 

Mary A. Bass, trust, 2.00 

Robert Bell, trust, 1.50 

Matilda Benson, trust, 1.50 

Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 451 

James D. Blaisdell, trust, $3.00 

James M. Blake, trust, 5.00 

William J. Blake ly, trust, 3.00 

Emily P. Blanchard, trust, 12.00 

Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 6.00 

Charles L. Brown, trust, 2.50 

Annie L. Brown trust, 2.50 

Mary N. P. Buntin, trust, 7.00 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 2.00 

Harriet W. Butteis, trust, 3.00 

Benjamin F. Caldwell, trust, 8.00 

Levi Call, trust, 2.00 

Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 3.00 

Hiram J. Carter, trust, 3.00 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 3.00 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 1.50 

Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 5.00 

Caroline Clark, trust, 4.00 

Rufus Clement, trust, 4.00 

William W. Cloud, trust, 5.00 

Frederick Clough, trust, 5.00 

George Clough , trust, 5.00 

Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 2.00 

Weston Cofran, trust, 4.00 

Amos L. Colburn, trust, 1.50 

Sarah T. Colby, trust, 4.00 

Charles A. Cooke, trust, 2.00 

Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust, 2.50 

Mary Crow, trust, 15.00 

Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 5.00 

Silas Curtis, trust, 3.00 

Charles C. Danforth, trust, 5.00 

Charles S. Danforth, trust, 1.50 

Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 1.50 

Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 1.50 

Edward Dow, trust, 5.00 

Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 1.50 

Charles V. Dudley, trust, 2.50 



452 CITY OF CONCORD. 



William B. Durgin, trust, 


$5.00 


J. B. Dyer, trust, 


5.00 


Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 


5.00 


Stephen B. Eaton, trust, 


3.00 


Lydia F. Edgerly, trust, 


5.00 


Georgianna P. Ela, trust, 


3.50 


Ella M. Elliott, trust, 


2.00 


Elizabeth G. Emerson, trust, 


3.00 


George H. Emery, trust, 


3.00 


David E. Everett, trust, 


3.00 


Lydia A. Farley, trust, 


4.00 


Mary M. Farnum, trust, 


3.00 


Alvah C. Ferrin, trust, 


5.00 


Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, 


1.50 


J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust, 


2.00 


Mr. and Mrs. Harlan A. Flanders, 




trust, 


3.00 


George G. Fogg, trust, 


10.00 


Alice T. Ford, trust, 


5.00 


Jerome Ford, trust, 


4.00 


Asa Fowler, trust, 


16.00 


Mary A. Gage, trust, 


5.00 


Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 


1.75 


John D. Gale, trust, 


8.00 


John Gear, trust, 


3.00 


Sarah L. Gear, trust, 


3.00 


Caroline L. George, trust, 


15.00 


Enoch Gerrish, trust, 


3.00 


Samuel K. Gill, trust, 


3.00 


Glover and Osgood, trust, 


1.75 


Loren W. Glysson, trust, 


3.00 


Hannah A. and Fannie A. Goss, trust, 


6.00 


George N. Greeley, trust, 


12.00 


John B. Green, trust, 


3.00 


Jennie E. Green, trust, 


1.50 


Wm. E. Greene, trust, 


3.00 


Betsey Hadley, trust, 


3.00 


George M. Harding, trust, 


2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 453 

Mary D. Hart, trust, $12.00 

Timothy Haynes, trust, 3.00 

Charles F. Hildreth, trust, 3.00 

Emma J. Hill, trust, 2.00 

John M. Hill, trust, 10.00 

Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 1.50 

J. Frank Hoit, trust, 8.00 

Harriet F. Holman, trust, 5.00 

Elizabeth F. Holt, trust, 3.50 

Hoyt and Stetson, trust, 3.00 

Sarah E. Irish, trust, 3.00 

Henry Ivey, trust, 2.00 

E. O. Jameson, trust, 3.00 

Herman E. Jewell, trust, 2.00 

Julia A. Jones, trust, 3.00 

Seth K. Jones, trust, 12.00 

John and B. A. Kimball, trust, 8.00 

Ellen B. Kittredge, trust, 2.00 

Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 20.00 

William Ladd, trust, 3.00 

Leete and Newman, trust, 3.00 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 5.00 

Lincoln and Forrester, trust, 2.50 

John L. Lincoln, trust, 1.50 

J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 5.00 

John McCauley, trust, 5.00 

Henry McFarland, trust, 6.00 

G. and E. McQuesten, trust, 3.00 

James McQuesten, trust, 10.00 

Henry A. Mann, trust, 3.00 

Martin and Brown, trust, 3.00 

H. W. and H. O. Mathews, trust, 3.00 

Charles S. Mellen, trust, 6.00 

Horace Merrill, trust, 1.50 

J. B. Merrill, trust, 3.00 

Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 2.50 

S. F. Merrill, trust, 3.00 

Sullivan G. Mills, trust, 10.00 



454 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Charles Moody, trust, $5.00 

George H. Moore, trust, 3.00 

C. B. and A. F. Moseley, trust, 5.00 

Mary J. Moses, trust, 3.00 

Caroline B. Murdock, trust, 3.00 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 6.00 

E. S. Nutter, trust, 3.00 

Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 3.00 

E. A. Ordway, trust, 2.50 

Ordway and Sedgley, trust, 7.00 

George B. Packer, trust, 3.00 

George F. Page, trust, 1.50 

M. W. and M. A. Page, trust, 3.00 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 4.00 

J. B. Palmer, trust, 2.00 

William H. Palmer, trust, 1.50 

Felicite Pingault, trust, 2.50 

L. J. Perkins, trust, 1.00 

Mary N. Perley, trust, 8.00 

Isabelle Perry, trust, 1.50 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 8.00 

I. L. Pickering, trust, 4.00 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 4.00 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 5.00 

E. F. Plummer, trust, 1.75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 4.00 

Rand and Libby, trust, 1.50 

James E. Rand, trust, 1.50 

Henry W. Randlet, trust, 2.00 

George L. Reed, trust, 4.00 

Judith A. Richardson, trust, 3.00 

Mrs. J. H. Rigney, trust, 1.50 

Frances K. Roberts, trust, 5.00 

Moses F. Rogers, trust, 3.00 

Edward H. Rollins, trust, 8.00 

David D. Rowe, trust, 1.50 

James H. Rowell, trust, 5.00 

Moses W. Russell, trust, 5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 455 

Mrs. Isaac S. R. Sanborn, trust, SI. 50 

Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 4.00 

Frank A. Sargent, trust, 3.00 

John B. Sargent, trust, 3.00 

Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 15.00 

Edward Sawyer, trust, 2.00 

Shackford and Dame, trust, 3.50 

Mary W. Smith, trust, 3.00 

Moses B. Smith, trust, 2.00 

William Smith, trust, 1.50 

Hattie R. Southmaid, trust, 1.50 

Julia F. Stark, trust, 4.00 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 7.00 

Charles F. Stewart, trust, 2.00 

J. M. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 5.00 

John W. Straw, trust, 1.50 

Mary J. Street er, trust, 3.00 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 3.00 

Sturtevant Post 2 G. A. R., trust, 5.00 

Charles L. Tappan, trust, 2.00 

Hiram B. Tebbits, trust, 6.00 

John H. Teel, trust, 1.50 

John S. Thompson, trust, 4.00 

John C. Thorne, trust, 3.00 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 2.00 

Tilton and Locke, trust, 2.00 

John H. Toof, trust, 3.00 

Jane R. Twombly, trust, 4.00 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 5.00 

Charles P. Virgin, trust, 1.50 

Gustavus Walker's estate, trust, 5.00 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 15.00 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 3.00 

Mary E. West, trust, 3.00 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 1.50 

George F. Whittredge, trust, 3.00 

Charles H. Cummings, trust, 4.00 

Mary Williams, trust, 2.00 



456 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Sarah A. Williams, trust, 
Robert Woodruff, trust, 
E. W. Woodward, trust, 
Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 
William Yeaton, trust, 



S3. 00 

8.00 
5.00 
4.00 
3.00 



>,642.59 



Credit. 



One half sale of lots for 1912 added to 

permanent fund, $1,666.77 

Income from sundry, trust funds as 
charged to this account, transferred 
to City of Concord general account, 879.25 

Transferred to City of Concord general 

account, 3,096.57 



$5,642.59 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



461 



>0 (M O 
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462 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 



Bonds. 

City Hall Building, 



State Library, 



Bonds. 

Sewer, 



Municipal. 

Due. 

Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 1 
July 1 
June 1 



Rate. 



, 1913, 


3i 


, 1915, 


3*, 


, 1916, 


3*, 


, 1918, 


H, 


,1919, 


8*, 


, 1920, 


3|, 


,1921, 


3|, 


, 1922, 


H, 


, 1923, 


31, 


i i^ 4 ; 


3|, 


,1925 


3|, 


, 1926, 


3|, 


1 1927, 


3|, 


, 1928, 


3|, 


, 1929, 


3i 


,1914 


3|, 



Amount. 

$8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

7,000 

7,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

25,000 



Precinct. 






Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


June 1, 1914, 


°2, 


$25,000 


Dec. 1,1914, 


°2, 


9,000 


July 1,1917, 


°2, 


25,000 


May 1, 1928, 


o 2 , 


25,000 



$147,000 



$84,000 



Union School District, Oct. 1, 1913, 3§, $7,000 

July 1,1915, 3i 8,000 

July 1, 1916, 3^ 8,000 

July 1,1918, 3|, 8,000 

July 1,1919, 3|, 8,000 

July 1,1920, 3i 8,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



463 



Bonds. 



Due. 



Rate. 



Amount. 



Union School District, July 1,1921, 3f, $8,000 

July 1,1922, 3J, 8,000 

July 1,1923, 34, 10,000 

July 1,1924, 34, 5,000 

July 1,1926, 34, 5,000 

July 1,1927, 34, 35,000 

July 1,1928, 34, 4,000 

July 1,1929, 34, 10,000 

July 1,1930, 3J, 10,000 

July 1, 1931, 3|, 9,000 



School District No. 20 


, Sept. 1, 1913, 


34 


$5,000 


(( (< a 


Sept. 1, 1914, 


34 


500 


a a a 


Sept. 1, 1915, 


34 

o 2 , 


500 


a it it 


Sept. 1, 1916, 


3A 

o 2 , 


500 


It ii a 


Sept. 1, 1917, 


3i 

°2> 


500 


a it it 


Sept. 1, 1918, 


34 

°2; 


500 


it it tt 


Sept. 1, 1919, 


3i 

o 2 , 


500 


a a it 


Sept. 1, 1920, 


34 

o 2 , 


500 


a a a 


Sept. 1, 1921, 


31 

o 2 , 


500 


it it a 


Sept. 1, 1922, 


34 

o 2 , 


500 


a u a 


Sept. 1, 1924, 
July 1,1913, 
Oct. 1, 1913, 


34 

Of, 

3, 

3 1 
o 2 , 


4,300 


S. P. S. Sewerage, 


$500 


West Concord Sewer, 


$500 




Oct. 1,1914, 


34 

o 2 , 


500 




Oct. 1,1915, 


34 

o 2 , 


500 




Oct. 1,1916, 


"2'> 


500 




Oct. 1,1917, 


34 

o 2 , 


500 




Oct. 1,1918, 


34 

o 2 , 


500 




Oct. 1,1919, 


34 

°2> 


300 



$156,000 



$13,800 



$500 



$3,300 



464 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. Due. Rate. Amount. 

East Concord Sewer, July 1, 1915, 3|, $500 



$500 



Penacook Sewer, 



May 

July 
July 
Oct. 
July 
Oct. 
July 
Oct. 
July 
Oct. 
July 



1913 
1914 
1915 
1915 
1916 
1916 
1917 
1917 
1918 
1918 
1919 



4, 
4, 
4, 
3, 
4, 
3, 
4, 
3, 
4, 
3, 
4, 



>,000 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 

500 
$10,000 



Total bonded indebtedness of the 
city, exclusive of water depart- 
ment, 



$415,100 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 



Due and unpaid January 1, 1912, mu- 




nicipal, 


$141.75 


Precinct, 


180.00 


DUE 1912. 




Municipal, 


$5,425.00 


Precinct, sewer, 


2,940.00 


Union School District, 


5,705.00 


Penacook sewer, 


380.00 


West Concord sewer, 


395.50 


East Concord sewer, 


17.50 


St. Paul's School sewer, 


30.00 


School District No. 20, 


483.00 




$15,697.75 



treasury department. 465 

Cr. 

Municipal paid, $5,306.00 



Precinct, sewer, 


2,800.00 


Union School District, 


5,600.00 


St. Paul's School sewer, 


30.00 


Penacook sewer, 


340.00 


West Concord sewer, 


395.50 


East Concord sewer, 


17.50 


School District No. 20, 


483.00 


Municipal due, not presented, 


260.75 


Precinct due not presented, 


320.00 


Union School District due, not pre- 




sented, 


105.00 


Penacook sewer due, not presented, 


40.00 




$15,697.75 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, in account with Concord 
Water-Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1912, $29,617.84 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 76,145.13 

$105,762.97 



Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $20,920.00 

Bonds paid, 41,000.00 

Interest, 960.94 

Orders paid, 25,883.55 

Cash on hand, 16,998.48 



$105,762.97 



30 



466 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 



When 


due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


When due. Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1 


1913, 


4, 


$10,000 


Nov. 


1, 1921, 3, 


$4,000 


Jan. 1 


1914, 


4, 


10,000 


Apr. 


1, 1921, 3§, 


5,000 


Jan. 1 


1915, 


4, 


5,000 


Jan. 


1, 1922, 4, 


352,000 


Jan. 1 


1916, 


4, 


9,000 


Apr. 


1, 1922, 8|, 


30,000 


Jan. 1 


1917, 


4, 


10,000 


Mar. 


1, 1922, 3£, 


20,000 


Jan. 1 


1918, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 


1, 1923, 3§, 


15,000 


Jan. 1 


1919, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 


1, 1924, 3i 


15,000 


Nov. 1 


1920, 


3, 


7,000 









$512,000 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 



Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1912, 

and not presented, $231.00 

Coupons due, 1912, 21,042.50 



$21,273.50 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1912, $20,920.00 

Coupons due and not presented, 353.50 



$21,273.50 



I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
account of William F. Thayer, city treasurer, for the year 
1912, and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein 
properly recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouch- 
ers, and the several items correctly cast, and cash balance 
to be ninety-one thousand seven hundred eleven dollars 
and fifty- two cents ($91,711.52), and as treasurer of the 
city water department, cash balance to be sixteen thousand 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 467 

nine hundred ninety-eight dollars and forty-eight cents 
($16,998.48). 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking 
funds of the city and find such trust and sinking funds 
invested, and the income thereof for the year 1912 accounted 
for, as shown by the book of the city treasurer, kept for that 
purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS, 1912. 



For payment of interest on bonds, 


$5,425.00 


payment of interest on temporary loans, 


100.00 


payment of interest on cemetery trust 




funds, 


1,500.00 


support of city poor, 


800.00 


dependent soldiers, city, 


200.00 


incidentals and land damages, 


4,000.00 


salaries, Board of Aldermen, 


1,905.00 


printing and stationery, 


2,000.00 


aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 


3,000.00 


aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 




for Women and Children, 


500.00 


Memorial Day, 


460.00 


open air concerts, 


325.00 


Public baths, 


225.00 


Blossom Hill Cemetery, 


1,000.00 


Old North Cemetery, 


200.00 


West Concord Cemetery, 


90.00 


Pine Grove Cemetery, 


150.00 


Old Fort Cemetery, 


25.00 


Millville Cemetery, 


75.00 


- Horse Hill Cemetery, 


15.00 


Soucook Cemetery, 


20.00 


Woodlawn Cemetery, 


25.00 



468 CITY OF CONCORD. 



For parks, 


$3,500.00 


Penacook Park, 


125.00 


Washington Square, 


25.00 


East Concord playground, 


25.00 


John Kimball playground, 


400.00 


repairs buildings, 


2,000.00 


city hall bonds, 


8,000.00 


board of health, 


2,600.00 


police department, 


16,646.07 


public library, 


5,000.00 


engineering department, 


4,275.00 


highway department, 


46,950.00 


fire department, 


26,503.00 


salaries, 


12,670.00 


schools, 


122,993.42 


state tax, 


51,736.00 


county tax, 


35,955.52 


garbage precinct, 


7,000.00 


Penacook sewer precinct, 


1,630.00 


West Concord sewer precinct, 


1,395.50 


street sprinkling precinct, 


7,500.00 


lighting precinct, 


19,500.00 


St. Paul's School sewer precinct, 


575.00 


East Concord sewer precinct, 


117.50 


sewer precinct, city, 


8,940.00 


street sprinkling precinct, Ward 1, 


750.00 


East Concord lighting precinct, 


500.00 


Penacook lighting precinct, 


1,300.00 




$410,652.01 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 469 

SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS BY RESOLUTIONS, 

1912. 



55 


Text-books, Union School Distrist, 


$1,020.05 


62 


Horse, fire department, 


325.00 


63 


Spraying machine, 


1,050.00 


68 


Horse, police department, 


290.00 


71 


Real estate sold for unpaid taxes, 


1,504.09 


72 


Playground, Rollins Park, 


100.00 


73 


Text-books, Penacook School District, 


343.07 


74 


Pair of horses, fire department, 


600.00 


75 


Aid, military organizations, 


250.00 


77 


Grace 0. Dutton v. City of Concord, 


220.40 


78 


City poor, 


1,000.00 


79 


Printing and stationery, 


1,000.00 


81 


Soucook Cemetery, 


250.00 


82 


Incidentals and land damages, 


3,000.00 


45 


Clerical help, assessor's office, 


204.00 


85 


Old Quaker Cemetery lot, 


300.00 


96 


City poor, 


485.90 


96 


Fire department, 


1,492.95 


96 


Incidentals and land damages, 


1,512.21 


96 


Interest, cemetery trust funds, 


56.53 


96 


Interest, temporary loans, 


1,774.65 


96 


Police and watch, 


1,607.00 


96 


Printing and stationery, 


741.42 


96 


Old Fort Cemetery, 


3.72 


96 


Soucook Cemetery, 


.02 


96 


Salaries, 


343.00 




$19,474.01 



CITY EXPENSES. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1912. 



City Poor. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, $2,285.90 



Dependent Soldiers, City. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, $104.00 



Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $5,188.94 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rental, 21.00 
E. C. Woods, removing moth nests, 65.28 
Philadelphia Lawn Mower Com- 
pany, lawn mower, 10.26 
Concord Hardware Company, sup- 
plies, 111.04 
W. S. Dole, seed, 18.20 
A. P. Home & Co., shrubs, 219.50 
Whitmore Brothers, shrubs, 100.00 
G. S. Milton & Co., labor and 

supplies, 21.47 
Hutchinson Building Company, la- 
bor and supplies, 37.23 



CITY EXPENSES. 471 

E. A. Moulton, superintendent, 

cash paid out, $75.07 

Donald McLeod, plants, etc., 221.26 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Company, 

paint, 16.50 

City of Concord, highway depart- 
ment, spraying trees, 13.75 

Concord Water Works, water, 92.00 

George A. Foster, secretary, salary, 25.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, salary, 25.00 

$6,261.50 



Old North Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $527.56 

E. C. Woods, removing moth nests, 10.00 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 2.50 

Donald McLeod, plants, 19.60 
Highway department, spraying 

trees, 6.25 

Concord Water Works, water, 10.00 



West Concord Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $87.49 

L. S. Parmenter, cash paid out, 2.10 



$575.91 



$89.59 



Millville Cemetery. 
J. N. Abbott, treasurer, appropriation, $75.00 



472 city of concord. 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Scott French, labor, ' $36.75 

Samuel L. French, labor, 12.74 

John Maltais, labor, 10.50 

Joseph Carter, labor, 14.00 

Concord Electric Company, gravel, 2.20 

S. F. Smith, labor, 1.75 

J. W. Sanborn, teaming, 36.00 

F. F. Potter, teaming, 36.00 



Old Fort Cemetery. 

Scott French, labor, $14.47 

Joseph Carter, labor, 1.75 

S. L. French, labor, 1.75 

John Maltais, labor, 1.75 

J. W. Sanborn, teaming, 4.50 

F. F. Potter, teaming, 4.50 



Horse Hill Cemetery. 



$149.94 



.72 



J. H. Royce, labor, $6.50 



Woodlawn Cemetery. 
E. H. Brown, treasurer, appropriation, $25.00 



city expenses. 473 

Soucook Cemetery. 

Nahum Prescott, care and labor, $99.73 

B. J. Prescott, teaming and labor, 101.33 

Otis Prescott, labor, 51.75 

F. J. Boynton, labor, 13.03 

F. P. Curtis, repairing drills, 4.18 

$270.02 



Old Quaker Cemetery Lot. 

Otis G. Hammond, one-half lot, $150.00 

H. P. Hammond, one-half lot, 150.00 



Dog Licenses. 

Ira C. Evans Companjr, printing, $9.50 
The Evans Press, blanks, 5.00 
N. H. Patriot Company, advertis- 
ing, 2.40 
George M. Chase, sheep killed by 

dogs, 91.00 

E. B. Prescott, hog killed by dogs, 30.00 
Clarence G. Sanborn, sheep killed 

by dogs, 15.00 
George McC. Sanborn, sheep killed 

by dogs, 80.00 

C. B. Clarke, sheep killed by dogs, 8.00 

M. Cherillo, hens killled by dogs, 12.50 



$300.00 



$253.40 



Grace O. Dutton v. City of Concord. 
N. E. Martin, attorney, settlement of claim, $220.40 



474 city of concord. 

Engineering Department. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $3,607.25 
Ira C. Evans Company, supplies, 16.50 
Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 4.50 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rental and tolls, 23.20 
Ledder & Probst, supplies, 90.82 
E. H. Brown, Commissioner, cards, 8.01 
Ray E. Burkett, typewriting, 21.78 
W. B. Howe, cash paid out, 125.75 
C. E. Moss, supplies, 70.53 
The Cragg Bindery, binding, etc., 4.00 
Concord Auto Sales Company, auto 

hire, 27.50 

Harry Gray, auto hire, 61.50 

J. F. Waters, auto hire, 13.20 

W. S. Kaime, horse hire, 3.00 

Virgin & Forest, stakes, 25.20 
Spaulding Print Paper Company, 

supplies, 12.03 

J. E. Gage, repairs, 4.15 

John Wiley & Sons, book, 5.00 

J. M. Stewart & Sons' Co., cabinet, 30.00 

Thorpe & Martin Co., files, 10.60 



Fire Department. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $10,763.54 
Seth R. Dole, tax collector, semi- 
annual pay-rolls, 8,490.00 
P. C. White, semi-annual pay-roll, 30.00 
John B. Dodge, semi-annual pay- 
roll, 75.00 
Frank C. Blodgett, semi-annual 

pay-roll, 45.00 



c ,164.52 



CITY EXPENSES. 475 

F. M. Dodge, salary, superintend- 
ent, Penacook alarm, $100.00 

R. F. Robinson, rent veterans' 

association, 150.00 

Talbot Dye wood & Chemical Co., 

soda, 13.44 

Concord Electric Company, elec- 
tricity, 660.19 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 32.82 

G. N. Bartemus & Co., forage, 474.24 
H. H. Chamberlin, forage, 180.10 
W. S. Dole, forage, 584.30 
H. T. Corser, horse hire and hay, 1,324.04 
E. C. Paige, horse hire, 105.00 
W. S. Kimball, horse hire, 59.50 
W. S. Kaime, horse hire, 48.00 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, horse- 
shoeing, 231.30 

C. C. Martin, horseshoeing, 35.05 
N. Nicholson, horseshoeing, 62.20 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls, 133.40 
C. W. Dadmun, supplies, 24.56 
Cushman Electric Company, sup- 
plies, 17.41 
Concord Hardware Company, sup- 
plies, 25.05 
C. Pelissier & Co., repairs, 119.30 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 87.24 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 39.97 
H. Thompson, brooms, 22.00 
H. L. Peacock, painting, 40.00 
Star Dressing Company, dressing, 1.00 
W. C. Green, cash paid out, 170.27 
I. E. Gray, polish, 13.50 
H. S. Sanborn, supplies, 12.09 
Fred M. Dodge, cash paid out, 2.00 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 28.09 



476 CITY OF CONCORD. 

George B. Robbins Disinfectant 

Company, supplies, $37.50 

Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 6.85 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, 4.25 

G. F. Sewall, trucking, 3.38 

Harry G. Emmons, supplies, 28.83 
Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph 

Company, supplies and repairs, 590.89 

G. L. Theobald, horse hire, 5.78 

Harry Gray, horse hire, 8.00 

E. E. Lane, labor and supplies, 2.15 
Abbot & Downing Co., repairs, 10.55 
G. D. Huntley, repairs, 16.70 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, repairs, 1.45 
Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany, time service, 13.75 

Winchester Tar Disinfectant Com- 
pany, disinfectant, 29.75 

Stuart-Howland Company, sup- 
plies, 10.48 

J. Hurd Brown, lubricant, 3.76 

J. H. Toof & Co., laundry, 52.00 

C. H. Martin Company, supplies, 15.70 
Concord Water Works, water, 111.50 
L. E. Alexander, water, 8.00 
Robert Crowley, coal, 28.07 

F. E. Trow, horse, 325.00 
J. C. McLaughlin, horseshoeing, 52.50 

D. W. Fox, supplies, 3.41 
Aid Ant Remedy Company, Aid 

ant, 2.25 

N. A. Dunklee, sponges, 24.00 

Taylor Mfg. Co., whips and soap, 11.25 

Eureka Fire Hose Mfg. Co., hose, 800.00 
Penacook Electric Light Company, 

electricity and supplies, 126.55 
Combination Ladder Company, 

supplies, 40.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 




C. S. Ogden, labor, 


$1.25 


W. E. Lynch, wood and horse hire, 


5.00 


Tenney Coal Co., coal, 


783.40 


R. J. Macquire, services, 


122.40 


F. H. Abbott, oil, 


1.50 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 




supplies, 


.90 


C. E. Mills Oil Company, polish, 


10.00 


Chandler Eastman Company, labor, 


3.00 


F. E. Gilford, wood, 


12.40 


Samuel Eastman Company, sup- 




plies, 


21.00 


Arthur Bruce, trustee, witch-hazel, 


3.75 


J. A. Dadmun, repairs, 


2.25 


Ford & Kimball, supplies, 


4.69 


H. T. Corser, pair of horses, 


600.00 


C. 0. Partridge, horse hire, 


25.00 


Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 


8.55 


E. L. Davis, horse hire, 


213.25 


E. L. Davis, coal, 


99.72 


George E. Farrand, supplies, 


.83 


B. M. Weeks, supplies, 


3.56 


A. H. Hoyt, horse hire, 


6.00 


A. Morrill Smith, horse hire, 


8.00 


G. 0. Robinson, horse hire, 


15.00 


J. C. McGilvray, horse hire, 


42.00 


Percy Sanborn, horse hire, 


2.50 


J. G. LaValley, horse hire, 


3.00 


David Sanborn, horse hire, 


3.00 


E. E. Sawyer, wood, 


29.40 


H. A. Stuart, supplies, 


5.90 


D. J. Adams, cash paid out, 


7.70 


Concord Axle Company, repairs, 


2.75 


Manchester Machine Works, test- 




ing boiler, 


63.96 


Cornelius Callahan Company, sup- 




plies, 


18.50 


Elmer Trombly, supplies, 


2.75 



477 



478 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Keenan Brothers, lunch, $2.75 
B. Bilsborough & Sons, labor and 

supplies, 17.34 

Matheson Alkali Works, soda, 13.44 

Knight & Thomas, labor, 2.50 

Ira C. Evans Company, printing, 6.45 
Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works, 

labor, 1.40 

L. D. Jennison, pasturing horse, 25.50 

H. H. Hayward & Co., wood, 12.00 

William Holbrook, labor, 1.00 
Rowell & Plummer, labor and 

supplies, 1.80 

John Jordan, milk, 3.51 
Brown Sargent Company, chamois 

skins, 3.00 

Concord Ice Company, ice, 19.31 

Penacook Lake Ice Company, ice, 11.08 

W. R. Davis, supplies, 4.45 

George Abbott, Jr., supplies, 34.20 

Susan W. Jones, estate, storage, 15.00 

Miss M. K. Abbott, storage, 12.00 

Holt Brothers Mfg. Co., labor, 2.00 

W. B. Ranney, cards, .35 

Shepard Bros. & Co., supplies, 1.57 

Wetmore-Savage Company, wire, 17.49 

H. V. Tittemore, horse hire, 2.50 

A. B. Smart, horse hire, 2.50 

W. B. Cunningham, horse hire, 1.00 



$28,920.95 



Health Department. 
Itemized in report of sanitary offices, $2,542.92 



city expenses. 479 

Highway Department. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $46,412.41 



Incidentals and Land Damages. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll 

"Old Culvert," $85.49 

M. A. Spencer, services, city clerk's 

office, 628.00 

Isaac H. Procter, janitor, city hall, 600.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 

vital statistics, 254.25 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls, 86.15 

Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany, time services, 15.00 

Concord Electric Company, elec- 
tricity and supplies, city hall, 545.47 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 

clock and city buildings, 148.73 

Henry E. Chamberlin, cash paid 

out, 57.16 

Henry E. Chamberlin, completing 

birth records, 58.00 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance and 

bonds, 277.25 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance and 

bonds, 283.13 

Henry H. Chase, bond, 75.00 

Baker & Keeler, insurance, 162.50 

Roby & Knowles, insurance, 99.00 

Chase & Martin, insurance, 135.00 

Dickerman & Co., cement, "Old 

Culvert," 2.80 

Hutchinson Building Company, la- 
bor and supplies, 60.64 



480 CITY OF CONCORD. 



W. L. Riford, trucking, "Old Cul- 




vert," 


$4.00 


W. B. Howe, cash paid out, "Old 




Culvert," 


.30 


J. P. Sargent, cleaning ward room, 




Ward 5, 


8.00 


A. H. Knowlton & Co., vaccine 




points, 


12.05 


Concord Hardware Company, sup- 




plies, city hall, 


75.02 


Reed Laundry Company, laundry, 




city hall, 


9.24 


Tenney Coal Company, fuel, city 




hall, 


1,106.25 


Tenney Coal Company, wood, 




ward room, Ward 7, 


4.20 


Harry G. Emmons, supplies, audi- 




torium, 


20.28 


W. D. Nutting, repairs, clock, 


1.25 


F. G. Proctor, labor, 


26.00 


The Gift Shop, cards, assessors, 


33.60 


W. B. Howe, cash paid out, Board 




of Examiners of Plumbers, 


1.00 


Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 




city hall, 


12.65 


W. H. Dunlap & Co., supplies, city 




hall, 


1.20 


Arthur Booth, supplies, city hall, 


7.12 


Edward A. Stevens, labor, ward 




room, Ward 4, 


38.97 


Concord Water Works, water, 


34.00 


S. L. Bachelder, carrying ballots, 


3.00 


A. L. Cloudman, copying fire and 




building code ordinance, 


9.50 


Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, audi- 




torium, 


44.17 


James Fleming, poll list, Ward 8, 


30.00 


B. F. Tucker, poll list, Ward 4, 


30.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 481 

J. H. Clinton, poll list, Ward 6, $30.00 

J. H. Leary, poll list, Ward 5, 30.00 

F. H. Blanchard, poll list, Ward 1, 30.00 

J. J. Reen, poll list, Ward 9, 30.00 

0. L. Shepard, Jr., poll list, Ward 3, 25.00 
R. J. Macquire, services, Dutton 

case, 7.00 

J. E. Gage, repairs and supplies, 3.25 

C. J. French, expense to Fitchburg, 10.00 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 28.53 

L. D. Brown, auto hire, hearings, 8.25 

1. E. Gray, auto hire, hearings, 22.00 
F. L. Johnson, auto hire, hearings, 11.25 
J. C. McGilvray, auto hire, hear- 
ings, 11.00 

C. H. Carter, auto hire, hearings, 13.50 

J. M. Stewart & Sons' Co., repairs, 4.05 

Julia A. Davis, taxes, refunded, 37.52 

Scott French, poll list, Ward 2, 25.00 
Concord Coal Company, wood, city 

ball, 6.00 

F. E. Gilford, wood, city hall, 2.50 

T. J. Nolan, repairing flag, 1.50 

C. J. French, expenses to Boston, 17.60 

F. W. Sanborn, auto hire, 9.00 

Edward M. Proctor, cash paid out, 16.02 
George V. Hill, salary, probation 

officer, 100.00 
J. H. Brown, postmaster, stamped 

envelopes, tax collector, 234.96 
Orr & Rolfe, batteries, city hall, 1.00 
C. H. Swain & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, city hall, 7.49 
C. P. Smith, serving notices, 9.25 
H. J. Mackin, serving notices, 3.90 
American Express Company, ex- 
press, city reports, 9.18 

31 



482 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. C. Brisco, painting, flag pole, $20.00 
Herrin-Hall-Marvin Safe Company, 

vault door, 65.46 

Eagle Garage, polish and auto hire, 20.00 
Mrs. Annie Ahearn, cleaning ward 

room, Ward 9, 14.00 

Alma E. Nelson, transcript, 4.00 
G. W. Morrill, ringing chimes, 

July 4, 3.00 
Cora F. Straw, ringing chimes, 

July 4, 3.00 

G. E. Andrews, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

T. McCarthy, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

F. J. Nerbone, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 
W. H. Putnam, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 
L. G. Adams, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

G. N. Quimby, ringing bells, July 4, 2.00 
John Stanley, ringing bells, July 4, 2.00 
Phaneuf & Son, letter heads, 

mayor, 3.50 

D. McLeod, plant, Memorial Arch, 32.92 

H. V. Tittemore, trucking, 2.50 
Rowell & Plummer, labor, vault 

door, 9.70 
G. L. Theobald, moving, vault 

door, 20.00 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 

vault door, 3.54 

C. J. French, cash paid out, 14.00 
C. J. French, expense, New England 

Box Company, 25.00 

C. J. French, expense, Portsmouth, 12.00 

J. F. Waters, auto hire, Portsmouth, 25.00 

Guy H. Hubbard, collector taxes, 5.24 
G. R. Pearce & Co., rubber stamps, 

assessors, 2.30 

J. F. Waters, auto hire, hearings, 6.00 

N. A. Dunklee, horse hire, hearing, 2.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 483 

G. E. Wood & Son, furniture, tax 

office, $33.00 

C. H. Martin Company, supplies, 3.90 

Concord Lumber Company, wood, 

ward house, Ward 9, .75 

A. Perley Fitch, vaccination sup- 
plies, 22.33 

G. L. Fogg, labor, vault door, 1.50 

L. A. Sanders, M.D., services, police 

station, 3.00 

Harry Gray, horse hire, assessors, 4.00 

H. T. Corser, delivering city 

reports, 1.50 

Alexander Murchie, services, revi- 
sion ordinances, 780.00 

Robert Jackson, services, revision 

ordinances, 85.00 

Alexander Murchie, cash paid out, 30.29 

John Swenson Granite Company, 

sheds on city land, 100.00 

J. E. Hutchinson, care lawn, Ward 

7, 7.00 
E. L. Davis, trucking and ice, 

Ward 1, 38.00 
R. F. Keane, damages, 17.62 
Union Publishing Company, direc- 
tories, 45.50 
J. N. Abbott, treasurer, repairs, 

Millville Cemetery, 50.00 

Annie M. Dennen, damages, 35.00 

E. W. Gage, damages, 25.00 
T. P. Higgins, cash paid out, Ward 

8, 7.50 
C. H. French, curtains, tax office, 1.50 
Merrimack County, use of build- 
ing, elections, 100.00 

Mary C. Adams, labor, assessors' 

office, 35.00 



484 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Silas Wiggin, services, assessors, $40.00 

M. F. Bickford, horse hire, 

assessors, 147.00 

Geo. E. Carter, supplies, assessors, 4.00 

C. L. Wallace, taxes refunded, 2.43 

Manchester Traction Light & Power 

Co., taxes refunded, 390.00 

W. B. Cunningham, express, city 

reports, 1.25 

E. H. Brown, commissioner, re- 
cording deed, .77 

B. S. Rolfe, lettering curtain, tax 

office, 1.00 

W. T. McLam, services, assessors' 

office, 62.50 

J. D. Foley, poll list, Ward 7, 30.00 

J. D. Foley, horse hire, assessors, 7.50 

Penacook Electric Light Company, 

supplies, ward room, Ward 1, 3.30 

Henneberry & Halligan, boundary 

posts, 5.00 

C. McCormick, labor, booths, 

Ward 8, 11.25 
Concord Ice Company, ice? foun- 
tains, 195.04 
E. Emery, cleaning, Merrimack 

Hall, 12.50 

N. C. Nelson & Co., repairs, clock, 2.00 

Brown & Saltmarsh, repairs, 10.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 

ward clerks, 22.00 



^,512.21 



Land Sold for Taxes. 
W. P. Ladd, tax collector, $1,504.09 



city expenses. 485 

Labor Assessors' Office. 
John H. Leary, $204.00 



Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, appro- 
priation, " $3,000.00 



New Hampshire Memorial Hospital. 
Emma F. Ingalls, treasurer, appropriation, $500.00 



Memorial Day. 

J. M. Crossman, Q. M., Davis 

Post, $50.00 

M. E. Haines, Q. M., Brown Post, 105.00 

I. M. Savage, Q. M., Sturtevant 

Post, 305.00 



$460.00 



Aid Military Companies. 

C. H. Colby, Captain Company E, $100.00 
0. G. Hammond, Captain Com- 
pany C, 100.00 



$200.00 



Open Air Concerts. 
Nevers' Second Regiment Band, concerts, $320.00 



486 city of concord. 

Parks. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,685.63 

Rowell & Plummer, cement, etc., 11.56 

H. B. Hammond, care of swans, 40.00 

Samuel Holt, estate, brick, 2.00 

George Abbott, Jr., supplies, 2.51 
Concord Hardware Company, 

supplies, 50.32 

W. S. Dole, grain, 56.36 

C. F. Thompson, rubber boots, 8.00 

Frank Atkinson, cash paid out, 20.15 

Eastern Nurseries, shrubs, 5.35 

Thomas Meehan & Sons, shrubs, 132.80 

W. J. McMullin, labor, 11.40 

Ira C. Evans Company, notices, 5.75 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 14.54 
M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and 

supplies, 128.12 

W. L. Riford, horse hire, 58.50 
Highway department, spraying 

trees, 8.60 

Concord Water Works, water, 34.00 
G. W. Chesley, estate, teaming and 

loam ; 70.75 

Concord Lumber Company, lumber, 9.52 

Eli Brunei, carrots, 5.00 

S. L. French, care, Pecker Park, 12.00 

Virgin & Forest, labor and supplies, 24.97 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 80.92 

Lyman Jackman, marl. 4.50 

W. G. C. Kimball, shrubs, 6.00 

Mrs. A. Trenoweth, gravel, 8.00 



1,497.25 



city expenses. 

Penacook Park. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $70.31 

H. B. Lindgren, labor and supplies, 36.39 

J. M. Crossman, supplies, 1.35 

Shepard Brothers & Co., supplies, 2.62 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 12.50 



487 



$123.17 



Washington Square. 
E. H. Brown, treasurer, appropriation, 



$25.00 



Playground — East Concord. 
Fred S. Farnum, appropriation, 



$25.00 



Playground — John Kimball. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $248.45 

Isaac King, labor, 10.50 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 61.35 

Larsen & Davis, lumber, .50 

H. H. Betton, vaulting pole, 2.75 

W. Carpenter, supplies, 2.40 

F. E. Nelson & Co., supplies, 1.25 
J. P. Kelley, badges, 2.00 
W. E. Lynch, teaming, 4.50 

G. H. Cilley, teaming, 36.00 
Concord Water Works, water, 6.00 
G. W. Chesley, estate, loam, 9.00 
Home & Hall, supplies, 1.00 
Eastern Nurseries, trees, 5.90 
Frank Atkinson, cash paid out, .90 
Elmer Trombly, labor, 7.50 



$400.00 



488 city of concord. 

Playground — Rollins Park. 

F. E. Nelson & Co., supplies, $2.83 

Ruth Kent, cash paid out, 14.64 

J. B. Varick Company, supplies, 8.75 
Hutchinson Building Company, 

labor and supplies, 14.03 
C. H. Swain & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, 6.28 
H. W. Rainie, band, 15.00 
George A. Place, repairs, 2.50 
Ira C. Evans Company, printing, 4.25 
J. P. Kelley, badges, 4.75 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 20.55 



Police and Watch. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $15,684.95 
Concord Electric Company, elec- 
tricity, 164.63 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 10.71 
Penacook Electric Light Company, 

lights, 29.13 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls, 202.59 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., private line, 172.32 
George A. S. Kimball, cash paid out, 370.91 
George A. S. Kimball, use of auto, 48.00 
W. S. Kaime, board of horse and 

horse hire, 534.00 
Harry Gray, horse hire, 28.50 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, horse- 
shoeing, 17.40 
L. J. Keenan, horse hire, 2.00 
H. T. Corser, horse hire, 16.50 



$93.58 



CITY EXPENSES. 489 

Concord Coal Company, wood, $51.50 

E. L. Davis, coal, 65.33 

Robert Crowley, wood, 13.25 

Tenney Coal Company, coal, 266.88 

Concord Lumber Company, wood, 6.50 

C. T. Wallace, one-half telephone 
expense, 9.00 

J. E. Silva, one-half telephone ex- 
pense, 9.00 

A. W. Braley, one-half telephone 

expense, 9.75 

E. J. Brown, one-half telephone 

expense, 8.25 

H. L. Woodward, one-half telephone 

expense, 9.00 

Fred N. Marden. one-half telephone 

expense, 9.00 

I. B. Robinson, one-half telephone 

expense. 9.75 

Western Union Telegraph Company 

time service, 12.50 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 2.65 

E. L. Davis, trucking, 3.00 

F. W. Landon & Co., supplies, 3.25 
E. C. Eastman, supplies, 9.70 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 4.73 
Batchelder & Co., supplies. 10.59 
The Evans Press, blanks, etc., 67.10 
Ira C. Evans Company, blanks, etc., 30.00 
Fowler's Drug Store, supplies, 5.65 
Manchester Hat Works, supplies, 26.35 
Donnelly-Johnson Company, sup- 
plies, 7.50 

Hardy & McSwiney, hat, 2.00 

W. F. Marble, helmet, 2.50 
Dawson Machine Company, hand 

cuffs, 24.00 

C. C. Schoolcraft, supplies, 5.80 



490 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A. Perley Fitch, supplies, $12.98 
Concord Water Works, water, 43.00 
Concord Ice Company, ice, 6.05 
Pendleton- White Company, waxine, 5.00 

B. M. Weeks, supplies, 12.55 
Foote, Brown & Co., supplies. 1.10 
R. F. Keane, pressing coat, 3.00 
E. A. Gordon, supplies, 3.50 
G. D. Huntley, repairs, 42.30 
Harry G. Emmons, blankets, 2.71 
T. J. Nolan, labor, 4.00 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 15.12 
Concord Evening Monitor, adver- 
tising, 13.20 

R. J. Macquire, services, 2.00 

G. F. Stevens, horse, 250.00 

George E. Farrand, supplies, 3.40 
Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works, 

supplies, 1.78 
N. H. Patriot Company, advertis- 
ing, 15.40 
E. E. Babb, labor, 2.75 
G. L. Lincoln & Co., supplies, 7.00 
E. L. Glick, supplies. 2.85 
Hart's Lunch, lunch, 4.05 
Eagle Garage, gasolene, etc., 19.11 

C. H. Martin Company, supplies, 1.05 
N. C. Nelson & Co., repairs, .50 
G. F. Hodgman & Co., labor and 

supplies, 62.90 
C. W. Dadmun, supplies, 3.50 
J. A. Dadmun, repairs, 1.00 
Concord Auto Sales Company, re- 
pairs, .25 
West Disinfectant Company, soap, 2.50 
R. W. Cate, grappling irons, 2.00 
C. H. Barnett, labor, .60 
Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 2.25 



CITY EXPENSES. 491 

Rumford Printing Company, 

postals, $2.00 

W. B. Cunningham, express, 1.00 

George Abbott, Jr., paint, .25 

J. E. Gage, repairs, 4.65 

C. Pelissier & Co., repairs, 8.75 

Hamilton Heartz, lunches* 10.85 

$18,543.07 



Precinct Garbage. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $6,792.60 



Precinct Lighting Streets. 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, $4,705.61 

Concord Electric Company, elec- 
tricity, 14,682.47 



$19,388.08 



Precinct Lighting Streets, East Concord. 
Concord Electric Company, electricity, $522.00 



Precinct Lighting Streets, Penacook. 
Charles H. Barnett, treasurer, appropriation, $1,300.00 



Precinct Lighting Streets, West Concord. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, appropriation, $750.00 



492 city of concord. 

Precinct, Sewer City. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $6,044.88 

Boston & Maine railroad, freight, 809.22 
American Sewer Pipe Company, 

blocks, 1,532.07 

Dickerman & Co., cement. 176.75 

Larsen & Davis, labor and supplies, 89.58 

W. L. Riford, trucking, 19.25 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 415.48 

W. H. Ahern, trucking, .85 

F. Green, trucking, 1.00 
Samuel Holt, estate, brick, 166.17 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, repairs, 44.75 

E. C. Paige, trucking, 290.00 

G. F. Tandy, concreting, 43.98 
G. L. Theobald, trucking, 80.88 
Edson Mfg. Co., supplies, 57.15 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

castings, 15.15 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 100.91 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 4.35 
Blaw Steel Centering Company, 

form, 12.25 

Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 1.00 

H. A. Trudel, trucking, 2.50 

W. B. Howe, freight, 1.11 

W. H. Ash, trucking, 1.75 

Concord Lumber Company, lumber, 207.20 

W. S. Dole, straw.. 1.72 

C. F. Copp, trucking, 1.00 

Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., supplies, 3.35 

Boutwell & Baker, lumber, 111.69 

M. J. Lee, supplies, 1.33 

George Dow, repairs, 11.28 

F. S. Eveleth, M.D., services, 2.00 
A. L. Colburn, marl, 8.00 
Concord Coal Company, wood, 6.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 493 

Concord Water Works, water : $7.48 

Ford & Kimball, supplies. 90.70 

John Murphy, trucking, .35 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil. 11.50 

$10,374.63 



Precinct Sewer. East Concord. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund, $100.00 



Precinct Sewer, Penacook. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $508.50 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking 

fund, 1,100.00 

Concord Axle Company, supplies, .83 



$1,609.33 



Precinct Sewer, St. Paul's School. 
Concord Water Works, water, $45.00 



Precinct Sewer, West Concord. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $65.03 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking 

fund, 1,400.00 

G. L. Theobald, team hire, 9.38 

E. C. Paige, trucking, 5.00 

W. L. Riforcl. trucking, 3.50 

Thomas Robinson, trucking, 3.50 



494 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

supplies, $13.05 

Dickerman & Co., cement, 1.75 

Ford & Kimball, covers, 48.05 



$1,549.26 



Precinct Sprinkling Streets. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $5,546.02 



Precinct Sprinkling Streets, Penacook. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $752.66 



Printing and Stationery. 


Rumford Printing Company, print- 




ing and supplies, 


$470.40 


Rumford Printing Company, pub- 




lishing ordinances, 


483.97 


Ira C. Evans Company, printing 




and supplies, 


615.95 


Ira C. Evans Company, city re- 




ports, 


1,666.00 


The Evans Press, printing and 




supplies, 


17.25 


Concord Monitor, advertising, 


62.24 


Monitor & Statesman Co., adver- 




tising, 


87.00 


N. H. Patriot Company, advertis- 




ing, 


154.16 


C. F. Nichols & Son, supplies, 


1.25 


Star Stamp Company, supplies, 


.95 



CITY EXPENSES. 495 

A. R. Andrews, supplies, $10.80 

Phaneuf & Son, printing, 33.85 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 4.60 
Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 18.15 
Adams Mfg. Co., letter bath, 5.00 
Treworgy Pen & Ink Mfg. Co., ink 

and pens, 4.25 
J. H. Morris, stamps, 11.00 
The Cragg Bindery, books, 68.80 
G. H. Richardson & Co., pens, 4.50 
W. J. Chadbourne, picture, 1.50 
Burroughs Adding Machine Com- 
pany, paper, .80 
Irving Hammond, tally sheets, 5.00 

F. J. Batchelder, weigher's books, 14.00 

$3,741.42 



Public Baths. 

Timothy Reardon, services and 

cash paid out, $185.20 
Concord Hardware Company, sup- 
plies, .23 
Hutchinson BuildingCompany, sup- 
plies, 1.80 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, .72 
C. F. Stickney, right of way, 15.00 
Ira C. Evans Company, badges, 5.00 



Public Library. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,873.79 
E. C. Eastman, books and supplies, 139.97 
Robert Crowley, wood, 6.00 



$207.95 



496 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Grace Blanchard, cash paid out, $101.42 
Concord Electric Company, elec- 
tricity, 239.65 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rental. 42.10 
International Text-Books Com- 
pany, books. 33.30 
C. E. Lauriat Company, books. 538.22 
Old Corner Book Store, books, 33.54 
Christian Science Publishing 

Society, subscription, 9.17 

Dow, Jones & Co., subscription, 12.00 
F. J. Barnard & Co., binding books, 

etc., 205.94 

N. F. Carter, book, 2.50 
Young Folks' Educational League, 

books, 8.75 

Ira C. Evans Company, supplies, 174.15 

W. C. Gibson, books, etc.. 62.63 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs, 25.00 

The Cragg Bindery, binding books, 28.69 

Howard M. Cook, book, 1.25 

Rand, McNally & Co., atlas, 25.00 
Albert Bonnier Publishing House, 

books, 4.01 
Concord Ice Company, ice, 2.50 
Boston Book Company, books, 4.00 
A. L. A. Publishing Board, sub- 
scription, 1.00 
R. W. Eldridge, subscriptions, 182.40 
Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 5.53 
Lee Brothers Company, labor and 

supplies. 6.82 

Abbie C. Morse, subscription, 3.00 

George F. Sleeper, care, 5.00 

Dennison Mfg. Co., supplies. 2.00 

Concord Water Works, water, 11.00 

Tenney Coal Company, coal. 279.16 



CITY EXPENSES. 497 

Library Bureau, supplies, $46.25 

Concord Hardware Company, sup- 
plies, 3.50 

Rumford Printing Company, bind- 
ing books, 39.70 

Library Art Club, assessment, 6.00 

W. B. Cunningham, express books, 

Penacook, 52.00 

C. H. Sanders, care of books, 

Penacook, 54.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 3.25 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 3.00 

Patriot Publishing Company, sub- 
scription, 6.00 

Monitor & Statesman Co., subscrip- 
tion, 6.00 

H. W. Wilson Company, subscrip- 
tion, 10.00 

G. L. Lincoln & Co., supplies, 38.00 

Gaylord Brothers, supplies, 2.50 

$5,339.69 



Repairs Buildings. 

W. T. Bailey, repairs, ward rooms, $10.87 

W. T. Bialey, repairs, city hall, 26.37 
J. M. Stewart & Sons' Co., supplies, 

fire stations, 11.20 

T. J. Nolan, laboi , auditorium, 2.00 

T. J. Nolan, labor, police station, 22.00 
Concord Electric Company, repairs, 

police station, 3.15 

W. H. Young, painting, fire station, 1.25 
Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 98.89 



32 



498 CITY OF CONCORD. 

M.J. Lee, labor and supplies, police 

station, $148.91 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, city 

hall, 56.46 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, fire 

stations, 467.27 

H. O. Jackson, labor and supplies, 

fire station, 140.50 

C. H. Swain & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, auditorium, 42.73 

C. H. Swain & Co., labor and 
supplies, police station, 23.88 

C. H. Swain & Co., labor and 

supplies, fire station, 6.29 

Rowel 1 & Plummer, labor and sup- 
plies, police station, 57.35 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and 

supplies, fire stations, 52.61 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and sup- 
plies, city hall, 56.23 

Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 

auditorium, 78.00 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 

auditorium, 14.30 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, city 

hall, 1.35 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, fire 
stations, 2.13 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, supplies, police 

station, 2.50 

Larsen & Davis, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 246.28 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, repairs, 
auditorium, 5.27 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, repairs, fire 

stations, 30.81 

Fowler's Drug Store, supplies, 

police station, 18.12 



CITY EXPENSES. 499 

G. A. Griffin, painting, police 

station, $28.96 

G. L. Lincoln, & Co. supplies, 

police station, 11.20 

W. Carpenter, repairs, fire stations, 50.00 

G. L. Theobald, loam, police 

station, 3.00 

Ford & Kimball, labor and sup- 
plies, city hall, 19.15 

Ford & Kimball, labor and supplies, 

police station, 35.50 

Pickering Furniture Company, sup- 
plies, fire stations, 2.00 

George Abbott, Jr., repairs, police 

station, 33.61 

Chamberlin Metal Weather Strip 
Company, windows, police sta- 
tion, 22.00 

W. Arthur Bean, labor and sup- 
plies, 15.05 

Henry Morrill, labor, fire stations, 10.34 

Virgin & Forrest, labor, city hall, 2.40 

Virgin & Forrest, labor and sup- 
plies, fire stations, 8.10 

C. W. Drake, glass, fire stations, 12.35 

Hutchinson Building Company, 

supplies, fire stations, 29.61 

John Canney, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 2.25 

E. E. Babb, labor and supplies, 

police station, 2.55 

E. L. Davis, teaming, fire station, 8.50 

W. W. Allen & Co., supplies, fire 

station, 15.18 

W. T. Bailey, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 31.98 

L. J. Sebra, repairs, police station, 1.35 



500 CITY OF CONCORD. 

L. H. Crowther, supplies, fire 

station, $3.00 

F. E. Williams, labor, police station, 3.43 

C. H. Barnett, labor and supplies, 

police station, 1.37 



Salaries. 

Charles J. French, mayor, $1,500.00 

Henry E. Chamberlin, city clerk, 1,200.00 
Henry E. Chamberlin, clerk, board 

of public works, 100.00 
Henry E. Chamberlin, overseer of 

poor, Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, 350.00 

Edward M. Proctor, city messenger, 900.00 

George M. Fletcher, police justice, 1,000.00 

Alexander Murchie, city solicitor, 500.00 
James H. Morris, assessor and 

clerk of board, 1,500.00 

Joseph E. Shepard, assessor, 750.00 

Michael H. Donovan, assessor, 750.00 
Rufus H. Baker, clerk, police 

court, 200.00 

W. C. Green, building inspector, 200.00 

John P. Paige, care city clocks, 85.00 

C. H. Cook, M.D., city physician, 450.00 
E. U. Sargent, M.D., assistant 

city physician, 50.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, 250.00 
W. H. McGirr, overseer of poor, 

Ward 1, 30.00 
Fred S. Farnum, overseer of poor, 

Ward 2, 10.00 

B. W. Couch, special police justice, 46.00 
Harry J. Brown, special police 

justice, 2.00 



$1,979.60 



CITY EXPENSES. 501 

W. H. Putnam, care, clock, Ward 1, $25.00 

Seth R. Dole, tax collector, 1,800.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 

moderators and ward clerks, 360.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 
supervisors and inspectors of 
election, 955.00 

$13,013.00 



Salakies, Board of Aldermen. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $1,899.00 



Schools. 



L. J. Rundlett, agent, Union School 

District, $95,162.63 

David T. Twomey, treasurer, Pena- 

cook School District, 9,766.54 

Frank E. Dimond, treasurer, Town 

School District, 5,483.74 

$110,412.91 



Spraying Machine. 
A. H. Britton & Co., sprayer, $1,035.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1912. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, City Poor, $800.00 1 

Resolution No. 78, 1,000.00 \ $2,285.90 

Resolution No. 96, 485.90 J 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, City, 200.00 104.00 $96.00 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, County, 1,602.09 

Aid, County Poor, 8,007.74 

Aid, Military Companies, 

Resolution No. 75, 250.00 200.00 50.00 

Cemeteries : 

Blossom Hill, 1,000.00 6,261.50 

Income Trust Funds, 879.25 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1,022.16 

Transferred, Cemetery Account, 3,096.57 

$5,997.98 $6,261.50 

Old North, 200.00 575.91 

Income Trust Funds, 207.25 

Income Cemetery Fund, 30.10 . : 

Transferred, Cemetery, Ac- 
count, 156.77 

$594.12 $575.91 $18.21 

West Concord, 90.00 89.59 .41 

Pine Grove, 150.00 149.94 .06 

Old Fort, 25.00 ) 2g ?2 

Resolution No. 96, 3.72 J 

Millville, 75.00 75.00 

Horse Hill, 15.00 6.50 8.50 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



503 





Appropriation. 


Expended. Balance. 


Soucook, 


20.00 1 




Resolution No. 81, 


250.00 \ 


270.02 


Resolution No. 96, 


.02 J 




Woodlawn, 


25.00 


25.00 


Old Quaker Cemetery Lot: 






Resolution No. 85, 


300.00 


300.00 


Clerical Help, Assessor's Office, 






Ordinance No. 45, 


204.00 


204.00 


Dog Licenses, 




253.40 


Engineering Department: 






Salary, Engineer, 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


Salary, Assistants, 


1,400.00 


1,293.25 


Supplies, 


100.00 


150.90 


Repairs, 


25.00 


, 


Incidentals, 


150.00 


125.64 


Assessor's Map, 


1,000.00 


994.73 




$4,275.00 


$4,164.52 $110.48 


Fire Department: 






Salaries, 


9,044.00 


9,048.60 


Salaries, Semi-Annual, 


8,640.00 


8,640.00 


Rent, Veteran's Association, 


150.00 


150.00 


Forage, 


1,800.00 


2,245.33 


Fuel and Lights, 


1,600.00 


1,674.91 


Fire Alarm, 


800.00 


1,422.18 


Horse Hire and Shoeing, 


1,200.00 


1,249.03 


Washing, 


52.00 


52.00 


Water, 


119.50 


119.50 


Chemical Supplies, 


50.00 


45.14 


Penacook Fire Alarm, 


247.50 


197.29 


Incidentals, 


2,000.00 


2,351.97 


New Hose, 


800.00 


800.00 


Horse, 






Resolution No. 59, 


325.00 


325.00 


Horses, Pair of, 






Resolution No. 74, 


600.00 


600.00 


Resolution No. 96, 


1,492.95 






$28,920.95 


$28,920.95 



504 city or 


CONCORD. 




i 




Appropriation. 


Expended. Balance. 


Health, Board of: 








Salary, Sanitary Officer, 




1,400.00 


1,400.00 


Milk Inspection, 




300.00 


300.00 


Fumigation Supplies, 




100.00 


39.51 


Antitoxin and Medical 


Sup- 






plies, 




200.00 


7.75 


Incidentals, 




600.00 


795.66 




$2,600.00 


$2,542.92 $57.08 


Highway Department: 








Salary, Superintendent, 




1,600.00 


1,600.00 


General Maintenance, 




30,000.00 


30,036.16 


Catch Basins, 




1,400.00 


1,306.03 


Trees, 




3,000.00 


3,102.94 


Sidewalks and Crossings, 


new, 


1,000.00 


949.53 


Sidewalks and Crossings, 


Re- 






pair, 




2,250.00 


2,248.16 


Permanent Work, 








Loudon Road, 




500.00 


499.40 


Permanent Work, 








Pittsfield Road, 




500.00 


493.39 


Permanent Work, 








South St., Pleasant to Fay- 






ette, 




2,000.00 


1,953.86 


Permanent Work, 








North State St., West Con- 






cord, 




2,700.00 


2,228.44 


Permanent Work, 








Penacook Road, Reconstruc 






tion, 




2,000.00 


1,994.50 




$46,950.00 


$46,412.41 $537.59 


Grace 0. Dutton vs. City of Con- 






cord: 








Resolution No. 77, 




220.40 


220.40 


Incidentals and Land Damages, 


4,000.00 


8,512.21 


Resolution No. 82, 




3,000.00 




Resolution No. 96, 




1,512.21 






$8,512.21 


$8,512.21 



FINANCIAL 


STATEMENT. 




505 




Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds, 


1,500.00 


1,556.53 




Resolution No. 96, 


56.53 








$1,556.53 


$1,556.53 




Interest, Temporary Loan, 


100.00 


1,874.65 




Resolution No. 96, 


1,774.65 








$1,874.65 


$1,874.65 




Interest, Bonds, 


5,425.00 


5,306.00 


119.00 


John Kimball Playground, 


400.00 


400.00 




East Concord Playground, 


25.00 


25.00 




Rollins Park Playground, 








Resolution No. 72, 


100.00 


93.58 


6.42 


Land Sold for Unpaid Taxes, 1911, 








Resolution No. 71, 


1,504.09 


1,504.09 




Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 




N. H. Memorial Hospital, 


500.00 


500.00 




Memorial Day, 


460.00 


460.00 




Open Air Concerts, 


325.00 


320.00 


5.00 


Parks, 


3,500.00 


3,497.25 


2.75 


Penacook Park, 


125.00 


123.17 


1.83 


Washington Square, 


25.00 


25.00 




City Hall Bonds, 


8,000.00 


8,000.000 




Spraying Machine, 








Resolution, No. 64, 


1,050.00 


1,035.00 


15.00 


West Concord Sewer Bonds, 




7,000.00 




Received from Sinking Fund, 


7,000.00 







50b CITY OF 


CONCORD. 






Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 


Police and Watch: 






Salaries,, 


14,608.75 


15,684.95 


Fuel, 


400.00 


403.46 


Horse Hire, Board and Shoe- 






ing, 


450.00 


598.40 


Helmets and Buttons, 


25.00 


38.35 


Ice and Water, 


48.00 


49.05 


Lights, 


150.00 


175.96 


Telephone, Private Line, 


164.32 


172.32 


Incidentals, 


800.00 


1,170.58 


Horse, 






Resolution No. 68, 


290.00 


250.00 


Resolution No. 96, 


1,607.00 






$18,543.07 


$18,543.07 


Precinct Garbage: 


7,000.00 


6,792.60 


Resolution No. 96, 


71.00 




Debit, Balance, 1911, 




220.81 . . . • 




$7,071.00 


$7,013.41 $57.59 


Precinct, Lighting Streets, City, 


19,500.00 


19,388.08 


Debit balance, 1911, 




53.18 




$19,500.00 


$19,441.26 $58.74 


Precinct, Lighting Streets, East 






Concord, 


500.00 


522.00 


Balance, 1911, 


9.87 






$509.87 


$522.00 


Precinct, Lighting Streets, Pena- 






cook, 


1,300.00 


1,300.00 


Precinct, Lighting Streets, West 






Concord, 


750.00 


750.00 


Precinct, Sewer, City: 






Construction and Repairs, 


6,000.00 1 




Balance, 1911, 


5,765.97 


> 10,374.63 


Resolution No. 57, 


222.00 


Resolution No. 96, 


r 46.95 





FINANCIAL 

Interest on Bonds, 
Balance, 1911, 


STATEMENT 
Appropriation. 

2,940.00 1 
17.50 J 


Expended. 

2,800.00 


507 

Balance. 


Precinct, Sewer, East Concord: 
Construction and Repairs, 
Balance, 1911, 
Interest on Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, 


$14,992.42 

127.53 

17.50 

100.00 


$13,174.63 

17.50 
100.00 


$1,817.79 
127.53 


Precinct, Sewer, Penacook: 
Construction and Repairs, 
Debit balance, 1911, 
Interest on Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, 


$245.03 

150.00 

380.00 
1,100.00 


$117.50 

509.33 

80.78 

340.00 

1,100.00 


$127.53 


Precinct, Sewer, West Concord: 
Construction and Repairs, 
Balance, 1911, 
Interest on Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, 
Resolution No. 58, 


$1,630.00 

52.52 

395.50 

1,000.00 \ 

400.00 J 


$2,030.11 

149.26 
395.50 

1,400.00 




Precinct, Sewer, St., Paul's School 
Construction and Repairs, 
Balance, 1911, 
Interest on Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, 


$1,848.02 

45.00 1 
17.55 J 
30.00 
500.00 


$1,944.76 

45.00 

30.00 
500.00 




Precinct, Sprinkling Streets: 
Balance, 1911, 
Resolution No. 96, 


$592.55 

7,500.00 

561.99 

.34 


$575.00 
5,546.02 


$17.55 




$8,062.33 


$5,546.02 


$2,516.31 



508 CITY 


OF 


CONCORD. 










Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, Pena- 








cook, 




750.00 


752.66 




Balance, 1911, 




31.52 








$781.52 


$752.66 


$28.86 


Printing and Stationery, 




2,000.00 


3,741.42 




Resolution No. 79, 




1,000.00 






Resolution No. 96, 




741.42 








$3,741.42 


$3,741.42 




Public Baths, 




225.00 


207.95 


$17.05 


Public Library: 










Salaries, 




2,760.00 


2,873.79 




Incidentals, 




2,240.00 


2,465.90 




Balance, 1911, 




7.51 






Trust Funds, 




195.37 






Fines, 




249.00 







$5,451.88 $5,339.69 $112.19 

Repairs of Buildings, 2,000.00 1,979.60 $20.40 

Salaries : 

Mayor, 1,500.00 1,500.00 

City Clerk, 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works, 100.00 100.00 

Overseers of Poor, 390.00 390.00 

City Solicitor, 500.00 500.00 

City Treasurer, 250.00 250.00 

City Messenger, 900.00 900.00 

City Physicians, 500.00 500.00 

Care, City Clocks, 110.00 110.00 

Assessors, 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Moderators and Ward Clerks, 360.00 360.00 

Supervisors and Inspectors of 

Election, 960.00 955.00 

,Judge, Police Court, 1,000.00 1,048.00 

Clerk, Police Court, 200.00 200.00 

Collector of Taxes, 1,500.00 1,800.00 

Building Inspector, 200.00 200.00 

Resolution No. 96, 343.00 



$13,013.00 $13,013.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 509 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, 1,905.00 1,899.00 $6.00 

Schools: 

Union School District: 

General Fund, Balance 1911, 24,842.58 95,162.63 

Appropriation, 41,331.33 

Amount Voted by District, 49,973.60 

Repairs, 3,810.00 

Literary Fund, 1,878.03 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 34.08 

Dog Licenses, 1,310.95 

Text Books, Resolution No. 

55, 1,020.05 

Interest, 5,705.00 1 _ ftnn ftn 

Balance, 1911, 2,607.50 J 5 ' b °°- UU 

Bonds, 7,000.00 7,000.00 

$139,513.12 $107,762.63 $31,750.49 

Town District : 

General Fund, Balance 1911, 983.74 5,483.74 

Appropriation, 3,316.44 

Amount Voted by District, 2,000.00 

Literary Fund, 150.70 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 2.74 

Dog Licenses, 105.19 

One-half Salary Superintend- 
ent, 283.34 

$6,842.15 $5,483.74 $1,358.41 
Penacook District: 

General Fund, Balance 1911, 2,766.54 9,766.54 

Appropriation, 3,854.73 

Amount Voted by District, 5,117.32 

SinkingFund, 400.00 

Literary Fund, 175.15 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 3.18 

Dog Licenses, 122.27 

One-half Salary Superintendent, 500.00 

Text Books, Resolution No. 

73, 343.07 

Interest, 485.00 483.00 



$13,767.26 $10,249.54 $3,517.72 



510 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance-. 

Temporary Loans: 

Resolution No. 76, 75,000.00 125,000.00 

Resolution No. 83, 25,000.00 

Resolution No. 87, 25,000.00 

$125,000.00 $125,000.00 

County Tax, 35,955.52 

State Tax, 51,736.00 



RECEIPTS. 

Receipts of the City for the year ending December 31, 1912 : 



Balance on hand January 1, 1912, 


$77,337.21 


Taxes, 1907, 


56.19- 


" 1908, 


45.00 


" 1909, 


110.24 


" 1910, 


186.00 


" 1911, 


46,353.09 


" 1912, 


265,500.00 


Fines and Costs, City Marshal, 


2,598.13 


Library Fines, 


249.00 


Dog Licenses, 


1791.81 


Dog License, Fees, 


167.00 


Fees, City Clerk, 


292.85 


Billiard and Pool Table Licenses, 


380.00 


Hack and Job Team Licenses, 


66.50 


Junk Dealers' and Employment Bureau Licenses, 


155.00 


Highway Department, 


1,697.69 


Garbage, 


71.00 


Sprinkling, 


.34 


Rent, Auditorium, 


1,350.00 


Cemetery Trust Funds, 


3,175.00 


Bounty on Grasshoppers, 


238.00 


Amusement Licenses, 


805.00 


Rent, Hoisting Engine, 


222.00 


Taxes Sold City and Redeemed, 1906, 1907, 1908, 1909, 




1910,1911, 


1,262.07 


County Paupers off Farm, 


7,963.37 


Dependent Soldiers, County, 


1,617.19 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 511 



Milk License Fees, 


186.65 


Temporary Loans, 


125,000.00 


Forestry Protection, 


92.87 


Declarations of Candidates, 


159.00 


State Board of License Commissioners : 




Balance, 1911, 


450.89 


State Board of License Commissioners: 




Account, 1912, 


5,388.38 


State of New Hampshire, Insurance Tax, 


1,828.87 


" " Railroad Tax, 


56,507.58 


" " " Savings Bank Tax, 


51,537.11 


" " " Literary Fund, 


2,203.88 


" " " Proportion, School Fund, 


783.34 


" " " Building and Loan Asso. Tax, 


191.76 


Transferred from Old North Cemetery Account, 


156.77 


" Blossom Hill " 


3,096.57 


" West Concord Sewer 1 
Precinct Sinking Fund, J 


7,000.00 




Income Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools, 


40.00 


" P. B. Cogswell " " Public Library, 


85.87 


G. Parker Lyon, " 


35.00 


Franklin Pierce " " " " 


40.00 


Thos. G. Valpey " 


17.50 


Seth K.Jones " 


17.00 


" Blossom Hill Cemetery Fund, 


1,022.16 


Old North 


30.10 


Blossom Hill Cemetery Trust Fund, 


879.25 


Old North, " " " 


207.25 


Quarry Rent, 


106.25 


Miscellaneous, 


774.58 


' 


$671,528.31 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements: 

City Departments, $154,919.81 

City Poor and Soldiers, 2,389.90 

County Poor and Soldiers, 9,609.83 

City Notes, 125,000.00 

City Bonds, 8,000.00 

City Interest on Botes and Bonds, 7, 180.65 

Interest Cemetery Trust Funds, 1,556.53 

Schools, 110,412.91 

Schools, Interest on Bonds, 6,083.00 



512 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



School, Bonds, 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, City, 

" " " Penacook, 

" Lighting Streets, City, 

" " " Penacook, 

" " East Concord, 

" West Concord, 
" Garbage, 

" Sewers, Repairs and Extension, 
" " Interest on Bonds, 

" " Sinking Funds, 

Bonds, 

County Tax, 

State Tax, 

Paid outstanding orders, 

Treasury balance, January 1, 1913, 



Less outstanding orders unpaid January 1,1913, 



7,000.00 

5,546.02 

752.66 

19,388.08 

1,300.00 

522.00 

750.00 

6,792.60 

11,078.22 

3,583.00 

3,100.00 

7,000.00 

35,955.52 

51,736.00 

256.40 

91,711.52 

$671,624.65 
96.34 

$671,528.31 



CONCORD WATER WORKS. 

Receipts. Expenditures 

Cash on hand, January 1, 1912, $29,617.84 

Receipts deposited with treasurer, 76,145.13 

Expended per orders, $25,883.55 

Bonds, 41,960.94 

Interest, 20,920.00 

$105,762.97 $88,764.49 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 513 

MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

City hall bonds, $122,000.00 

State library bonds, 25,000.00 



Total funded city debt, $147,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 



Orders outstanding January 1, 




1913, 


$96.34 


Interest accrued, not yet due, mu- 




nicipal bonds, 


1,817.09 


Coupons, overdue, not presented, 




municipal bonds, 


260.75 


Due school districts, 


36,626.62 


Due precinct sewer, East Concord, 


127.53 


Due precinct sewer, city, 


1,817.79 


Due precinct sewer, St. Paul's 




School, 


17.55 


Due precinct sprinkling streets, 


2,516.31 


Due precinct sprinkling streets, 




Penacook 


28.86 


Due precinct garbage, 


57.59 


Due precinct lighting streets, city, 


58.74 


Cemetery trust funds, 


46,717.64 


Total debt not funded, 


90,142.81 


Total city indebtedness, 


$237,142.81 



33 






514 city of concord. 

Available Assets. 



Treasurer's cash balance, January 




1, 1913, 


$91,711.52 


Taxes of 1910, uncollected, 


417.77 


Taxes of 1911, uncollected, 


627.65 


Taxes of 1912, uncollected, 


50,266.58 


Cash in hands of tax collector, Jan- 




uary 1, 1913, 


459.30 


Taxes bid in by city, 


3,771.81 


Due for quarry rent, 


50.00 


Due highway department, 


226.31 


Due Merrimack County, county 




poor, 


3,893.71 


Due Merrimack County, depend- 




ent soldiers, 


702.28 


Overdraft, precinct, lighting 




streets, East Concord, 


12.13 


Overdraft, precinct, Penacook 




sewer, 


400.11 


Overdraft, precinct, West Concord 




sewer, 


96.74 




<JplOi£,Uo0.t7± 


Indebtedness above assets January 


1, 1913, $84,506.90 


Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1912, 102,750.98 



Decrease for the year, $18,244.08 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 515 



PRECINCT DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 
Water-works bonds, $512,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 84,000.00 

$596,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 



Coupons overdue, water bonds, 




not presented, 


$353.50 


Coupons overdue, sewer bonds, 




not presented, 


320.00 


Interest accrued, sewer bonds, not 




yet due, 


682.50 


Interest accrued, waterbonds, not 




yet due, 


9,439.59 



10,795.59 



,795.59 



Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department 

January 1, 1913, $16,998.48 

Due highway department, garbage 

precinct, 108.06 



$17,106.54 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1913, $589,689.05 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1912, 618,535.49 



Decrease for the year, $28,846.44 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, . $156,000.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,668.75 

$158,668.75 



516 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Penacook School District bonds, $13,800.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 161.00 

13,961.00 



Net liability of school districts, $172,629.75 



West Concord sewer bonds, $3,300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 28.87 



East Concord sewer bonds, $500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 8.75 



Penacook sewer bonds, $10,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 108.34 



St. Paul's School sewer bonds, $500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 7.50 



1,328.87 



$508.75 



$10,108.34 



$507.50 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $84,506.90 

precinct debt, 589,689.05 

school districts, 172,629.75 

West Concord sewer debt, 3,328.87 

East Concord sewer debt, 508.75 

Penacook sewer debt, 10,108.34 

St. Paul's School sewer debt, 507.50 



Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1913, $861,279.16 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1912, 923,008.44 



Decrease for the year, $61,729.28 



INVENTORY. 

Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
the Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1913. 



Water rights— land, etc., $1,027,659.86 

Water office — furniture, etc., 975.00 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 850.00 
Shop at pumping station — machinery, tools, 

etc., 2.200.00 
Stable and basement at pumping station, 

horse, wagons, etc., 855.00 

Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, etc., 2,000.00 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 1,600.00 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 15.00 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00 



$1,036,194.86 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Having Value but Not Considered Available Assets- 



The following is a summary of the inventory of the 
property belonging to the city January 1, 1913, made by 
the heads of the various departmenst having the same in 
charge. Itemized statements are on file in the city clerk's 
office. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Central fire station, 


$44,818.00 


Kearsarge steamer company, 


3,755.00 


Eagle steamer company, 


4,540.00 


Governor Hill steamer company, 


3,070.00 


Hook and ladder company, 


2,710.00 


Chemical engine company, 


1,920.00 


Good Will hose company, 


8,102.00 


Alert hose company, 


5,257.00 


Pioneer steamer company, 


17,943.00 


Old Fort engine company, 


4,280.00 


Cataract engine company, 


9,742.50 


Fire alarm apparatus, 


10,900.00 


Hose, 


10,000.00 


Residence chief engineer, 


3,000.00 


Heating apparatus, 


400.00 


Furniture, Pioneer engine house, 


70.00 


Old Fort engine house, 


69.00 


Cataract engine house, 


71.00 




$130,647.50 



CITY PROPERTY. 519 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Central District. 

New city stable, sheds, lots, tools, 

etc., $27,007.00 

Penacook District. 
Tools, etc., 155.75 

West Concord District. 
Tools, etc., 19.25 

East Concord District. 

Tools, etc., 18.00 

$27,200.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 
Furniture, tools and supplies, $533.50 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 
Tools and supplies, $710.25 

Precinct Penacook Sewer. 
Tools and supplies, $40.15 

Precinct West Concord Sewer. 
Tools and supplies, $23.65 



520 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Isolation hospital and furniture, $740.00 

Office furniture and supplies, 163.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police station, city, $25,000.00 

Police station, Penacook, 6,000.00 

Equipment, furniture, etc., 2,153.65 



$903.00 



,153.65 



CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, etc., $1,135.00 



COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, etc., . $140.17 

MAYOR'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, $107.45 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, etc., $325.00 



CITY PROPERTY. 521 

TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, etc., $225.20 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES' OFFICE. 
Weights, measures, balances, etc., $200.00 



CITY MESSENGER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Committee room, $73.70 

City council rooms, 774.50 

Property in and about city hall, 1,403.09 

$2,251.29 



PARK COMMISSIONER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Tools, etc., White Park, $200.00 

Tools, etc., Rollins Park, 25.00 

$225.00 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER'S DEPARTMENT. 
Tools, etc., Blossom Hill Cemetery, $250.00 



522 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Books, $9,500.00 

Furniture, 500.00 

$10,000.00 



MILK INSPECTION. 
Tools, etc., $43.77 



CITY HISTORY COMMISSION. 
One Bouton's History, $10.00 



CITY PKOPERTY. 523 

REAL ESTATE. 



City hall lot and buildings, 


$150,000.00 


City farm, pasture and quarries, 


5,000.00 


Gravel banks, 


1,050.00 


Ward House, West Street, 


4,500.00 


Playground on Intervale, 


1,500.00 


Playground, Fosterville, 


1,500.00 


White Park, 


14,000.00 


Rollins Park, 


10,807.50 


Penacook Park, 


2,500.00 


Market place, Warren Street, 


15,000.00 


Cemeteries, 


20,400.00 


Bradley, Fiske (so called), Ridge 




Road and Pecker Parks, 


2,200.00 




<S>660f^-0 1 •k)\J 



GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 

Water department, $1,036,194.86 
Fire department, 130,647.50 
Highway department, 27,200.00 
Engineering department, 533.50 
Sewer department, 710.25 
Penacook sewer, 40.15 
West Concord sewer, 23.65 
Health department, 903.00 
Police department, 33,153.65 
City clerk's office, 1,135.00 
Commissioner's office, 140.17 
Mayor's office, 107.45 
Assessor's office, 325.00 
Tax collector's office, 225.20 
Sealer of weights and meas- 
ures, 200.00 



524 CITY OF CONCORD. 



City messenger's department, 


2,251.29 


Park commissioner's depart- 




ment, 


225.00 


Cemetery commissioner's de- 




partment, 


250.00 


Public library, 


10,000.00 


Milk inspection, 


43.77 


City history commission, 


10.00 


Real estate, 


228,457.50 




$1,472,776.94 



1912. 

Population of city (census 1910), 21,497 

Valuation of city, $18,701,591 

Tax assessed for the year, $316,117.69 

Rate of taxation, $10 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District, $4.20. 
Rate for precinct, $3.30. 
Total rate, $17.50 per $1,000. 



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SUMMARY. 

Total number of births returned for the year 392 

Total number of marriages returned 170 

Total number of deaths in the different wards 252 

Total number of deaths in public institutions 214 

Total number brought to the city for burial 129 

I hereby certify that the foregoing is a transcript from the records of said city of Concord. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 
Cily Clerk. 



INDEX 



Appropriations, regular 467 

special 469 

Assessors, board of, report of 389 

Assets, city. See Municipal Assets. 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 439 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 462 

Cemetery department, reports of 385 

City clerk, report of 404 

expenses, itemized 470 

government, departments, personnel of 31 

assessors 34 

board of aldermen 31 

boards of education 55 

board of public works 32 

cemetery committees 42 

clerk 32 

collector of taxes 34 

commissioners of cemeteries 43 

committees of board of aldermen 33 

culler of staves 46 

engineer 33 

fence-viewers 45 

fire department, offices of 40 

health officers 41 

hydrant commissioners 42 

inspector of petroleum 44 

mayor 31 

messenger 33 

overseers of poor 35 

park commissioners 42 

physician, city and assistant 34 

plumbers, board of examiners of 49 

pound-keeper 45 

police department, officers of court 35 

officers and members of police force 36 

public library, trustees of 38 

librarian and assistants 38 

registrar of vital statistics 41 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 34 

sealers of leather 45 

sealer of weights and measures 45 

solicitor 35 

street department, superintendent of streets 34 

drain-layers 49 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 43 

superintendent of clocks 37 

superintendent of parks 42 

superintendent of schools 57 



582 INDEX. 

PAGE. 

urveyors of painting 47 

masonry 47 

stone 47 

wood, lumber and bark 48 

treasurer 33 

truant officer 57 

undertakers 44 

ward officers 50 

water-works, city, commissioners 39 

superintendent 39 

weigher 47 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 46 

solicitor, report of 378 

Clerk of police court, report of 381 

Coupon account, statement of 464 

Debts, recapitulation 516 

Engineer, city, report of 267 

Financial statement 502 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 201 

fire alarm 234 

Penacook fire-alarm telegraph 240 

revised ordinance 243 

roll of members 254 

Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery 409 

East Concord Cemetery 412 

East Concord sewer 413 

Millville Cemetery 411 

Old North Cemetery 410 

Penacook sewer 413 

Seth K. Jones monument 414 

trust 414 

West Concord Cemetery 411 

sewer 412 

Highway commissioner, financial statement of 333 

department, report of superintendent 321 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 376 

John Kimball Playground, report of committee on 382 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 52 

Municipal debt 513 

regulations 2 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 437 

Ordinances and resolutions 3 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 195 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 373 

Police department, report of city marshal 260 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1902 394 

Poor department, report of overseer 405 

Population ., 525 

Precincts, debts of 515 

Property, city, inventory of 517 



INDEX. 583 

PAGE. 

Public bath, report of 401 

Public library, report of trustees 154 

librarian 155 

Public Works, board of, report of 320 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 163 

complaints, etc 173 

contagious diseases 171 

milk inspector, report of 164 

mortality report 180 

sanitary officer, report of 166 

School reports 55 

Union School District, annual school meeting warrant 147 

annual school meeting 149 

attendance, tables of 106 

board of education, report of 59 

buildings and repairs, report of committee. ... 61 

census, 1912 113 

domestic arts course, outline of 99 

elocutionary contest 12.5 

English prize essay contest 124 

fire drills 127 

graduating classes 129 

honor, roll of 134 

industrial class, course for 103 

kindergarten games 145 

members, officers and standing committees .... 55 

Memorial Day offering 14i> 

movement of pupils through grades 120 

school nurse, report of 97 

Stamp saving system 113 

superintendent, report of 65 

teachers, list of 115 

truant officer, report of 112 

Town School District, treasurer's report lo2 

Sewer department, report of 366 

Tax collector, report of 395 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 457 

Treasury, report of 407 

Trust funds 407 

Trusts, individual cemetery 415 

Vital statistics, tables of 527 

Water department, report of 272 

commissioners, report of 279 

coupon, account of 406 

engineer's report 294 1 

fire hydrants 306 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 466 

receipts for each year ' 298 

schedule of pipes and gates 300 

summary of statistics 316 

superintendent, report of 281 

treasurer's report 296-465