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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"




CITY=ffi=CONCORD 

Annual Report 
1913 




1913 
SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



, CITY OF CONCORD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1913 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCORD. N. H.: 

Ira C. Evans Co., Printers 

1914 



M 

3S2.07 
C74 
\^i3 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishiug materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should Icnoiv that the person is duly authorized to 
contract such liabilit}^ 

The city will not be liolden for merchandise sold or 
delivered on city poor account, except on the written 
order of the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time 
than until his successor shall have been appointed and 
qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the 
person authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, 
no action can be had upon the bill by the Committee on 
Accounts and Claims, and no order will be given for its 
payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on 
or before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



MAYOR FRENCH'S FOURTH INAUGURAL 
ADDRESS. 



January 27, 1914. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: 

We have met here to-day to inaugurate a third admin- 
istration under our new charter, and, I am happy to say, 
the fourth in which I am to be the chief magistrate of our 
cit}^ At the beginning, I desire to express my deep ap- 
preciation of the honor conferred upon me by my selec- 
tion for a fourth time as such chief magistrate. During 
my past administration, economy in the expenditure of 
the city funds has always been my watchword, to the 
end that the taxpayers of the city might be relieved as 
much as possible from the financial burdens necessarily 
placed upon them. I feel, as I have said in the past, that 
I have been fair and impartial to all in the way I have 
conducted the affairs of the city, striving always to do 
that which is for the best interests of all. That I have 
been independent all will admit, but my recommendations 
have been made in the spirit which tends to promote good 
municipal government. The fact that my recommenda- 
tions have not generally been adopted and that I have 
been returned for the fourth time bears me out when I 
repeat again that the people of this city approve of the 
principles for Avhich I have stood, and still desire my 
recommendations carried into effect. 

The present city charter has had a fair trial and I think 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

there is a chance for improvement in it. Contrary to our 
expectations, the results have not been what they should 
have been. This, however, is not wholly due to the 
charter ; I think the last board has not acted as wisely at 
times as it knew. Deception to a certain extent has been 
practiced upon the taxpayers. Politics, I am sorry to 
say, has not been entirely eliminated in the transaction 
of city affairs. I am strongly opposed to such political 
action, and I trust we shall not encounter it during the 
present administration. 

Many cities have adopted forms of government similar 
to ours and from all reports they have been meeting with 
a marked degree of success. Undoubtedly this result is 
due to the election of non-partisan boards in the several 
cities, and this is what our city intended to accomplish 
when our present charter was adopted in 1910. I am 
sorry to say the attempt has been a failure. 

Having called your attention to these things of a gen- 
eral nature, concerning which I think we are justified in 
finding some fault and which I hope to see changed in 
the future, I shall now make some recommendations which 
I trust will meet with your hearty approval. 

And first I shall pass to a consideration in detail of the 
various departments of the city. In this connection I 
shall make such recommendations as seem to me to be 
valuable to the taxpayers who are entitled to our first 
consideration. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

No city the size of Concord has a better fire depart- 
ment. The personnel of the department cannot be easily 
improved. From the chief down the men are steady, 
honest, competent and faithful, and are very efficient in 



mayor's address. 5 

the discharge of their duties. In this department I think 
the city gets the worth of its money. During my past 
administration we have had several reports from the chief 
recommending motor driven apparatus. This recommen- 
dation I did not approve of, but during the last adminis- 
tration the Board of Aldermen thought differently and 
voted to purchase one piece of motor-driven apparatus 
at a cost of $6,000, with the understanding that the Fire 
Department could be run cheaper than it was being run 
under the existing conditions. I thought differently. It 
was understood by the board that the appropriation for 
forage would be reduced by selling the two horses that 
were attached to the horse-drawn chemical. Those horses 
have been retained and three more permanent men added 
to the department. Therefore, the cost of the fire de- 
partment in 1914 will exceed that of 1913. I am aware 
of the fact that horse-drawn fire apparatus is fast becom- 
ing a thing of the past, but I would not advise purchasing 
any more motor-driven apparatus at this time because 
our horse-drawn apparatus is in very good condition. I 
recommend the installation of a few more fire alarm boxes 
for the public safety. 

In Penacook, Ward One, I think a saving to the tax- 
payers can be made by the purchase by the city of two 
horses for that district for use on the highways. These 
horses could be stabled at the fire station and do the 
work of sprinkling around the thickly inhabited part of 
the ward, thus saving to the taxpayers $4.50 per day, the 
cost of a two-horse team, and also saving the $200 per year 
now paid for the team used for fire department purposes. 
This I think is worthy of your consideration. 



g CITY OP CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

An efficient police department is necessary in every 
city for the safety of individuals and for the protection 
of property. Experienced men arc much more effective 
as police officers than new ones can he. If, in the admin- 
istration of city affairs, experience shall show that any 
official, whether in the police or any other department, is 
unfaithful or untrustworthy, so far as I have the power 
he will be held to a rigid accountahility, and I shall deem 
it a personal favor to me if any person having a grievance 
on account of the actions of any of the police officers will 
forward to me his complaint in writing. I will attend to 
the matter at once, as this department is now directly 
responsible to the city government and is under the con- 
trol of the mayor, who is its chief. The salaries of all 
the regular police officers are approximately one thou- 
sand dollars each per year, and for this amount I think the 
city is entitled to the services of able-bodied men and to 
their entire attention to the duties of the work. 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

Well lighted streets are a necessity for the safety and 
convenience of the public. Although the city is de- 
pendent upon one electric lighting plant to furnish its 
electric lighting, the service the city receives at the 
present time is equal to that in any other city in New 
England. The last contract for lighting our streets was 
made by the Board of Public Works. This contract is 
the best lighting contract that the city has ever obtained. 
These results were brought about by competition between 
the Concord Electric Co. and the Concord Light and 
Power Co., and on account of such competition the city 



mayor's address. 7 

was enabled to make a contract with the Concord Electric 
Co., which will mean a saving to the city in ten years of 
approximately $8,500. 

I have in the past solicited the co-operation of the 
board in devising a means to bring about a reduction in 
the cost of gas. This has been accomplished to a slight 
extent. Much has been said in regard to the city own- 
ing its own gas plant. This I do not advise at this time, 
for I think the bonded indebtedness of the city is suf- 
ficient at present and the taxpayers are now carrying as 
heavy a burden as can be expected of them. 

STREETS. 

Good streets and sidewalks are necessary in all well- 
governed cities. Much work is being done and much 
money expended in building new and maintaining worn- 
out streets and sidewalks. It appears to me that the 
amount of money appropriated does not return its full 
value. In some sections of the city our highways ex- 
tending to and connecting with the highways of adjoining 
towns do not compare favorably with the highways of 
our neighbors. It is common knowledge that some of the 
adjoining towns have better roads than the connecting 
roads from our city. I trust that during this administra- 
tion the board will deem it advisable to see that the 
approaches to our city are cared for so that no criticism 
can be made in the future along these lines. I recom- 
mend at this time that a sufficient sum of money be ap- 
propriated to put South Main Street, North Main Street 
between Chapel and Pitman Streets, South State Street 
between Pleasant and Concord Streets, and the Pittsfield 
Road in proper condition. Steps should be taken to 
repair that part of the highway between Pleasant View 
and St. Paul's School. 




8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I also recommend that more oil be put on our public 
streets and fewer of them sprinkled with water, I think 
it is the cheaper of the materials used and gives better 
satisfaction to the public. I hope that part of West 
Concord known as North State Street will be added to 
the sprinkling precinct so that those living on that street, 
and who now suffer a great deal on account of the dust 
caused by the large volume of automobile travel passing 
through that section, may get the relief due them. 

PARKS. 

Our parks are in much better condition than they have 
been for some years prior to 1913. For this our super- 
intendent is deserving of much credit. Public play- 
grounds are much in demand these days and I wish in 
this connection to call your attention first to the John 
Kimball playground at the north end of the city. This 
playground is fast being put into proper shape so that in 
a few years it will be an ideal playground and one that 
the city may be proud of. I recommend that a sum of 
money be appropriated sufficient for the purpose of this 
playground. Seats should be more freely distributed in 
all our parks for the accommodation of the public. I 
trust during the administration of His Excellency Samuel 
D. Felker, as has been frequently recommended by me, 
that seats will be installed in the State House Park for 
the benefit of all who may visit our city. I think that 
an act of this kind would be appreciated by the many 
people who visit the state's capitol every year. Rollins 
Park, at the south end, is also worthy of your considera- 
tion, a most beautiful spot for a playground. A small 
sum of money was expended last year on this playground, 
but through the assistance of the Board of Public Works 



mayor's address. 9 

and the superintendent of highways it was put in very- 
good shape. I recommend that a sufficient sum of money 
be appropriated to make this an up-to-date playground. 

SCHOOLS. 

Too much cannot be said in regard to our public 
schools. The education of the youth of the city is one 
of the most important functions of city administration. 
Although more than one hundred thousand dollars is ap- 
propriated annually for schools we have no voice in this 
expenditure. This fact makes our duties less onerous, 
and as long as these funds are used as efficiently and 
honestly as at present we can have no possible ground 
for complaint. The schools are well managed. Liberal 
views are taught and various subjects are open to the 
pupil's choice. The high school and business course is 
proving a great benefit to the students and also to those 
who have occasion to employ help. Appreciating these 
facts, let us co-operate at ail times to further the interests 
of our young people by lending our support to those who 
direct their education. Much criticism has been ex- 
pressed against the Board of Education in the methods 
that were pursued in rebuilding on the Walker school- 
house site. It had seemed to me a great saving could 
have been made by retaining the Walker School as it was 
and rebuilding on the Merrimack schoolhouse lot, know- 
ing, as we do, that that building should be condemned on 
account of its unsanitary condition. 

HOSPITALS. 

It has been customary for years to make an annual ap- 
propriation of $3,000 for the Margaret Pillsbury General 
Hospital. Since 1909 this hospital has had a restriction 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

placed upon it which has been a direct financial saving 
to the taxpayers of this municipality. Since this restric- 
tion was placed upon this appropriation the saving to 
tlie municipality has been approximately $3,000, and I 
recommend that this appropriation continue with the same 
restriction. The Memorial Hospital on South Street is 
also Avorthy of the appropriation heretofore given it, 
and I recommend the appropriation of $500 for this 
hospital. Both of these hospitals are doing excellent work 
among our worthy poor and deserve all the financial aid 
that the city can afford them. 

soldiers' relief. 

Those who fought and won the battle for emancipation 
of a race from chattel slavery deserve most generous 
treatment, and I trust all that is possible in this direction 
will be freely done for them. The William I. Brown Post, 
No. 31, of Penacook, and the Davis Post, No. 44, of West 
Concord, are furnished with suitable quarters by the city. 
Other cities throughout the state are giving free quarters 
to their G. A. R. posts, and I feel that the few members 
of the E. E. Sturtevant Post that remain with us are due 
for some consideration, and I recommend that their 
quarters be rented for them by the city. 

FOR THE PUBLIC BENEFIT. 

On several occasions my attention has been called to 
an idea that I trust will meet with the hearty approval 
of all. It is a public comfort station for men, women 
and children. Almost every city in the land maintains 
a station of this sort. I have looked forward during my 
past administrations to see some member of our several 
boards introduce an ordinance on this particular subject, 
and I recommend for your approval tlie erection of a 



mayor's address. 11 

public comfort station. I think this woukl be a direct 
benefit to all and is worthy of your consideration. 

HEALTH. 

Since the establishment of this department on its pres- 
ent basis the sanitary condition of the city has greatly 
improved and to-day our city ranks second in healthiness 
and cleanliness among the cities of the United States. 
There is little danger of any contagious disease gaining 
a strong foothold here. My attention has been called 
very recently to the matter of diseased meat being sold 
in our city. This subject is very important and deserves 
our immediate attention. We all recognize the impor- 
tance of this branch of the city government and its very 
efficient management. I especially commend it for its 
efforts to see that the inhabitants of the city are furnished 
with milk produced under sanitary conditions. In this 
connection I am glad to say that all plumbing is examined 
by and taken charge of by our sanitary officer. 

TAXATION. 

No more important office exists in the city than that of 
the Board of Assessors. Every citizen should bear his 
just proportion of the public tax. The property assessed 
by them amounts to $20,482,846 in value. Equalization 
of taxation is all the people demand and that is what 
they are entitled to have. Some people try to evade their 
proportional part of the tax. This is done in making 
out their inventories and forgetting to do it properly. I 
think our Board of Assessors are men Avho are fearless 
in the discharge of their duties and have accurate judg- 
ment on property values, and I recommend that they dis- 
charge their duties in the same fearless manner as in 
the past. 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

LEGAL DEPARTMENT. 

The affairs of the legal department of the city are 
in first class shape. Several suits against the city have 
been disposed of by the payment of small sums appro- 
priated by the Board of Aldermen. 

LABOR. 

The laborers of our city are worthy of all our considera- 
tion. I do not think that American citizens are given 
any preference as the ordinance prescribes. I think this 
matter is worthy of your attention. It is an established 
fact that almost every corporation in the city gives to 
their employees a half-holiday weekly during the summer 
months. The city gives to its officers in the city building 
Saturday afternoons during the months of June, July and 
August with pay, and I recommend the passage of an 
ordinance providing for a weekly half-holiday for all 
men employed by the city who are designated as laborers. 

NEW CHARTER AMENDMENTS. 

I think tlie charter sliould be amended to some extent, 
namely : 1 . The abolishing of the office of ward alderman. 
2. The election of the superintendent of streets by the 
people. 

]\Iuch has been said in regard to the mayor's salary not 
being sufficient. I think the salary of the mayor is suf- 
ficient and shall oppose any legislation that will raise 
the salary of that office ; but I am honest when I say that 
I think the salary of the superintendent of streets is 
excessive and should be reduced by the Board of Public 
Works to $1,600, the same as it was before the adoption 
of the new charter. I think an act of this kind would 
be greatly appreciated by the taxpayers, the people whom 
you were elected to represent. 



mayor's address. 13 

board of public works. 

Under our new charter the highway department was 
practically abolished and the work placed under the 
supervision of the Board of Public Works. The charter 
provides that "The Board of Public Works hereby es- 
tablished shall have full charge, direction and control of 
the construction, reconstruction, maintenance, repair and 
improvement of public streets, highways, bridges, sewers 
and drains, sidewalks, of the sprinkling of streets, and 
of the collection and disposal of garbage." Section 33 
provides that the board "shall, as early as practicable in 
each year, submit to the Board of Aldermen or its Com- 
mittee of Finance a detailed estimate in writing of the 
appropriations required for that year for the purposes 
referred to" in sections 31 and 32. Sections 31 and 32 
do not empower the Board of Public Works to raise 
money without first notifying the Board of Aldermen, 
and when the Board of Public Works fixed the superin- 
tendent of highway's salary at $1,600 per year that matter 
went to the Board of Aldermen for their approval, and 
was adopted. Later in the year 1913 the Board of Public 
Works raised the salary of the superintendent of streets 
$200 and no ordinance has as yet been presented to the 
Board of Aldermen raising said sum, but this sum has 
been paid to the superintendent of streets out of a balance 
that remained in the appropriation for roads and bridges. 
This had been appropriated for such work as is prescribed 
in section 31 of the charter. That part of the charter 
was violated when the superintendent of streets was paid 
$150 per month with no funds legally appropriated for 
that purpose, and I trust that the Board of Aldermen 
will see that nothing of this nature occurs during the 
years 1914-1915. 



14 city of concord, 

Financial Statement, 
receipts. 



Cash on hand January 1, 1913, 


$91,711.52 


Receipts, 1913, 


463,892.07 




$555,603.59 


DISBURSEMENTS. 


City departments, 


$179,280.06 


City poor and soldiers, 


2,246.84 


County poor and soldiers, 


9,444.94 


City bonds (City Hall), 


8,000.00 


City interest on bonds, 


4,863.50 


Schools, 


114,812.12 


Schools, interest on bonds, 


6,113.00 


Schools, bonds, 


12,000.00 


Precinct, sprinkling streets. 


9,147.84 


Precinct, sprinkling streets, 




Penacook, 


521.88 


Precinct, lighting streets, city. 


19,246.0& 


Precinct, lighting streets, Pena- 




cook, 


1,000.00 


Precinct, lighting streets. East 




Concord, 


522.00 


Precinct, lighting streets. West 




Concord, 


740.00 


Precinct, garbage. 


7,998.16 


Precinct, sewers, repairs, etc.. 


7,351.20 


Precinct, sewers, interest on 




bonds. 


2,933.00 


Precinct, sewers, sinking funds, 


1,700.00 


Precinct, sewers, bonds. 


5,500.00 


County tax. 


25,945.52 


State tax. 


51,736.00 


• 


'1 81 1 0'' 1 '^ 




TtO±jA.\J^,±^ 



Approximate balance, January 23, 1914, $74,501.47 



mayor's address. 15 

municipal debt. 



Funded debt 



City Hall bonds, 


$114,000.00 




State Library bonds, 


25,000.00 




Total funded city 'debt, 




$139,000.00 


Debt not funded: 






Interest accrued, not yet due, 






municipal bonds. 


$1,723.75 




Due school districts. 


37,149.36 




Due precinct lighting streets, 






East Concord, 


.87 




Due precinct sewer, East Con- 






cord, 


127.53 




Due precinct sewer, West Con- 






cord, 


127.07 




Due precinct sewer, St. Paul's 






School, 


17.55 




Due precinct sprinkling streets. 






Penacook, 


6.98 




Due precinct sewer. 


126.82 




Cemetery trust funds, 


47,667.64 




Total debt not funded, 


ess, 


86,947.57 


Approximate city indebtedn 


$225,947.57 


PRECINCT DEBT. 




Funded debt: 






Water-v."orks bonds, 


$502,000.00 




Sewer bonds. 


84,000.00 


$586,000.00 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Debt not funded: 
Interest accrued, sewer bonds, 

not yet due, $682.50 

Interest accrued, water bonds, 

not yet due, 9,239.57 

$9,922.07 



$595,922.07 



AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



Cash on hand, water department, January 
1, 1914, 32,627.55 



Net precinct debt, January 1, 1914, $563,294.52 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1913, $589,689.05 

Approximate decrease for the year, $26,394.53 

OTHER PRECINCT LIABILITIES. 

Union School District bonds, $149,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,607.50 

$151,607.50 

Penacook School District bonds, $8,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 102.68 

8,902.68 



Net liability of school districts (approxi- 
mate), $160,510.18 

West Concord sewer bonds, $2,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 24.48 

■ $2,824.48 



mayor's address. 17 



East Concord sewer bonds, 


$500.00 




Interest accrued, not yet due, 


8.75 


$508.75 






Penacook sewer bonds, 


$5,000.00 




Interest accrued, not yet due, 


75.00 


$5,075.00 






RECAPITULATION. 




Net regular municipal debt. 


$102,639.99 




precinct debt, 


563,294.52 




school districts, 


160,510.18 




West Concord sewer debt. 


2,824.48 




East Concord sewer debt, 


508.75 




Penacook sewer debt, 


5,075.00 




Approximate indebtedness 


above assets, 




January 23, 1914, 




$834,852.92 


Aggregate indebtedness above 


assets, Jan- 




uary 1, 1913, 


rear 1913, 


861,279.16 


Approximate decrease for j 


$26,426.24 


APPROXIMATE DECREASE OF CITY DEBT 




1909, 


$27,227.90 


-^;i_ai2r;f^f.;'— •;, _i 


1910, 


37,500.00 




1911, 


37,910.68 




1912, 


61,729.28 




1913, 


26,426.24 





Total, $190,794.10 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion I ask for your faithful co-operation in 
conducting the business of the city without fear, prej- 
udice or jealousy. The task before us should cause you 
all to stop and consider carefully what your attitude will 
be during the next two years. You are the directors of 
a large corporation with assets worth more than twenty 
millions of dollars. The taxpayers are the stockholders 
who have selected you to represent them. Into your 
hands has been entrusted the management of the affairs 
of this municipality. Time, patience and fidelity will be 
demanded in the performance of your duties. In this 
way alone shall we do our duty and perform the service 
expected of us. "When you leave this hall you will go 
out as public servants sworn to the faithful performance 
of the trust reposed in you by the people. Let it not 
be said that you have failed in your duty to your fellow- 
citizens, to yourselves and to humanity. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS 
Passed During the Year Ending January 12, 1914. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 18, section 28 of the 

REVISED ordinances RELATING TO FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Be it ordained ly the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That chapter 18, section 28 of the Eevised Ordinances 
be amended as follows: Strike out of the sixteenth line of said sec- 
tion the words "Six hundred dollars," and insert in place thereof the 
words one thousand dollars so that said clause as amended shall read, 
' ' Pione«r Steamer Company No. 3, one thousand dollars. ' ' 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 24, 1913. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 41, section 14 of the 

REVISED ordinances RELATING TO SALARY CITY ENGINEER. 

Be it ordained ty the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section ]. That chapter 41, section 14 of the Eevised Ordinances 
be amended as follows: Strike out of said section the words "sixteen 
hundred dollars" and insert in place thereof the words "eighteen 
hundred dollars" so that said section as amended shall read: The 
city engineer shall receive in full for his services the sum of eighteen 
hundred dollars per year, payable monthly. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 24, 1913. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 19, section 1 of the 

REVISED ordinances RELATIVE TO LIGHTING PRECINCTS. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section ]. That section 1 of chapter 19 of the Eevised Ordinances 
be hereby amended by adding thereto the following ' ' also the fol- 
lowing described territory: commencing at a point in the center of 
the Merrimack River under the Loudon bridge, on Bridge Street; 
thence easterly by Bridge Street to the westerly line of land of Henry 
C. Champigney; thence southerly by the westerly line of said Cham- 
pigney land and the westerly line of land formerly of Rand and 
Stevens, as shown on a plan recorded in Merrimack County Registry, 
vol. 209, page 324, to its southwesterly corner; thence easterly by the 
southerly line of said land to land of Ira W. Arlin ; thence southerly, 
westerly, southerly and easterly by the westerly, northerly, westerly 
and southerly lines of said Arlin land to the northwesterly corner of 
land of David J. Adams ; thence southerly on the westerly line of said 
Adams land to his southwesterly corner ; thence easterly by said 
Adams ' southerly line to South Pembroke Street ; thence northeasterly 
across said street to the southwesterly corner of the State Camp 
Ground; thence easterly by its southerly line to its southeasterly 
corner; thence northerly on its easterly line to the northerly line of 
Buchanan Street, as shown on above mentioned plan ; thence easterly 
on the northerly line of said Buchanan Street to the Branch Turn- 
pike, so called ; thence northeasterly on said Turnpike to Canterbury 
Street, so called, as shown on above mentioned plan ; thence northerly 
by said Canterbury Street to the northeasterly corner of Jones Park, 
so called, on North Pembroke Street; thence northerly on the easterly 
line of said Jones Park and said easterly line extended to the center 
line of the Loudon Road; thence westerly by the center line of said 
Loudon Road to the easterly line of land of Bernice H. Frost; thence 
northerly on the easterly line of said Frost land to its northwesterly 
corner; thence westerly on the northerly line of all lots on the north- 
erly side of Loudon Road to the northwesterly corner of George L. 
Green land; thence southerly and easterly by said Green's westerly 
and southerly line to the Loudon Road; thence westerly by Loudon 
Road and Bridge Street to the westerly line of land of Henry C. 
Champigney. 

"Said precinct shall include, in addition to the territory within the 
aforesaid limits, all lots, with their inhabitants, abutting on Bridge 



ORDINANCES. 21 

Street, from the center of the Merrimack River to its juDction with 
the Loudon Eoad," so that said section as amended shall read as 
follows : 

Section 1. A lighting precinct in the city proper, as authorized 
by the act of the legislature entitled "An act in amendment of the 
charter of the city of Concord," approved June 27, 1857, is hereby 
fixed and established as follows : 

Said lighting precinct shall embrace all the territory together with 
its inhabitants, within the following described limits, to wit: 

Beginning at a point in the center of the Merrimack River at the 
Pembroke Bridge, so called; thence southerly along the center line 
of said river to the point where the line between Concord and Bow 
intersects said line; thence westerly by said town line to the Turkey 
River; thence northerly along the center line of said Turkey River 
to Clinton Street; thence westerly by the center line of Clinton 
Street to the Silk Farm Road; thence northerly by the Silk Farm 
Road to the road on the southerly side of the Orphans' Home; 
thence westerly by said road and the Stickney Hill Road to the west- 
erly line of land of William W. Flint; thence northerly and easterly 
by said Flint's westerly and northerly lines to the land of Saint 
Paul's School; thence northerly by the westerly line of land of said 
school to the old road leading from Concord to Hopkinton ; thence 
westerly by the Hopkinton Road to the road leading to Penacook 
Lake; thence easterly by the Hopkinton Road to the easterly line 
of land of Charles A. Fowler and the westerly line of land of Saint 
Paul's School (on the northerly line of the new road); thence north- 
erly and easterly by the westerly and northerly lines of said school 
lands to Fiske Road; thence across said Fiske Road to the northwest- 
erly corner of the land of said school; (on the easterly side of Fiske 
Road) thence easterly and southerly by the northerly and easterly 
lines of said school lands to the land of Susan E. Mercer; thence 
east-erly by said Mercer's northerly line and the northerly line of land 
of Emma C. Willcox to the northeasterly corner of said last men- 
tioned land; thence southerly by the easterly line of said Willcox 
land to land of the heirs of Mary S. Chesley; thence northerly and 
easterly by the westerly and northerly lines of said Chesley land to 
land of John K. Tibbits; thence northerly by said Tibbits' west- 
erly line and the westerly line of land of Saint Paul's School to the 
southwesterly corner of land of J. B. Weeks; thence northeasterly 
by said Weeks' southerly line to the northeasterly corner of land of 
Saint Paul's School; thence southerly by the easterly line of said 
school's land to land of the heirs of Frank Coffin; thence northerly 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

by tbe westerly line of said Coffin land to land of Little and Day; 
thence northerly and westerly by the westerly and southerly lines of 
said Little's and Day's land to the Little Pond Eoad; thence north- 
erly across said road to the southwesterly corner of land of Arthur 
N. Day; thence northerly by the westerly line of said Day's land to 
land of John C. Buckley and others; thence westerly by said Buck- 
ley's southerly line to land of John Jordan; thence northerly by 
said Jordan 's easterly line to land of the New England Granite Com- 
pany; thence northerly and easterly by said company's westerly and 
northerly lines to North State Street; thence easterly across said 
street to the ravine near the residence of the late Asa Gay; thence 
easterly by said ravine to the Merrimack Eiver; thence southerly by 
said river to the point begun at; also the Pembroke Eoad from Pem- 
broke bridge to the top of Black Hill; also the following described 
territory: commencing at a point in the center of the Merrimack 
Eiver imder the Loudon bridge, on Bridge Street; thence easterly 
by Bridge Street to the westerly line of land of Henry C. Cham- 
pigney; thence southerly by the westerly line of said Champigney 
land and the westerly line of land formerly of Eand and Stevens, as 
shown on a plan recorded in Merrimack County Eegistry, vol. 209, 
l^age 324, to its southwesterly corner; thence easterly by the south- 
erly line of said land to land of Ira W. Arlin; thence southerly, west- 
erly, southerly and easterly by the westerly, northerly, westerly and 
southerly lines of said Arlin land to the northwesterly corner of land 
of David J. Adams; thence southerly ou the westerly line of said 
Adams land to his southwesterly corner ; thence easterly by said 
Adams' southerly line to South Pembroke Street; thence northeasterly 
across said street to the southwesterly corner of the State Camp 
Ground; thence easterly by its southerly line to its southeasterly cor- 
ner; thence northerly on its easterly line to the northerly line of 
Buchanan Street, as shown on above mentioned plan; thence east- 
erly on the northerly line of said Buchanan Street to the Branch 
Turnpike, so called; thence northeasterly on said turnpike to Can- 
terbury Street, so called, as shown on above mentioned plan; thence 
northerly by said Canterbury Street to the northeasterly corner of 
Jones Park, so called, on North Pembroke Street; thence northerly 
on the easterly line of said Jones Park and said easterly line ex- 
tended to the center line of Loudon Eoad; thence westerly by the 
center line of said Loudon Eoad to the easterly line of land of Ber- 
nice H. Frost; thence northerly on the easterly line of said Frost 
land to its northwesterly corner; thence westerly on the northerly line 



ORDINANCES. 23 

»f all lots ou the northerly side of Loudon Eoad to the northwesterly 
corner of George L. Green land; thence southerly and easterly by 
said Green's westerly and southerly line to the Loudon Road; thence 
westerly by Loudon Road and Bridge Street to the westerly line of 
laud of Henry C. Champigney. 

Said precinct shall include, in addition to the territory within 
the aforesaid limits, all lots, with their inhabitants, abutting on 
Bridge Street, from the center of the Merrimack River to its junc- 
tion with the Loudon Road. 

Passed March 24, 1913. 



Ax Ordinakce fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE RAISED FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR FOB THE USE OF THE 
CITY. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloics : 

Section L There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum of 
thirty-eight thousand dollars ($38,000) to defray the necessary ex- 
penses and charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, 
together with the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads and 
from other sources, shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds $5,145.00 

For payment of interest on temporary loans 200.00 

For payment of interest on cemetery trust funds 1,600.00 

For support of city poor 800.00 

For dependent soldiers, city 150.00 

For incidentals and land damages 4,000.00 

For salaries, board of aldermen 1,905.00 

For printing and stationery 2,000.00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000.00 

For aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital for Women 

and Children 500.00 

For Memorial Day 460.00 

For open air concerts 325.00 

For public baths 225.00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery 1,000.00 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

For Old North Cemetery $200.00 

For West Concord Cemetery 90.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 150.00 

For Old Fort Cemetery 30.00 

For Millville Cemetery 75.00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery 10.00 

For Soucook Cemetery 30.00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25.00 

For parks 3,500.00 

For Penaeook Park 100.00 

For Washington Square 25.00 

For East Concord playground 25.00 

For John Kimball playground 400.00 

For EoUins Park playground 150.00 

For repairs, buildings 2,000.00 

For City Hall bonds 8,000.00 



$36,120.00 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

4 

Salary, sanitary officer $1,400.00 

Milk inspection 300.00 

Fumigation supplies 100.00 

Antitoxin and medical supplies 200.00 

Incidentals 600.00 



$2,600.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $14,608.75 

Fuel 400.00 

Horse hire, board and shoeing 450.00 

Helmets and buttons 25.00 

Ice and water 48.00 

Lights 150.00 

Telephone, private line 164.32 

Incidentals 800.00 

$16,646.07 



ORDINANCES. 25 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Salaries $2,760.00 

Books and incidentals 2,240.00 



$5,000.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, engineer $1 ,800.00 

Salaries, assistants 1,400.00 

Supplies 100.00 

Eepairs 25.00 

Incidentals 150.00 

Assessor 's map 1 ,000.00 



$4,475.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

General maintenance $35,000.00 

Catch basins 1 ,400.00 

Trees 3,000.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, new 1,000.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, repair 2,250.00 

Salary, superintendent 1,600.00 

Permanent work. North Main Street, Pearl to Chapel 2,700.00 

Permanent work, South Street, Fayette to Concord 2,500.00 

Permanent work, Pittsfield Eoad 500.00 

Permanent work, Merrimack Street, Penacook 1,000.00 

Permanent work, North State Street, railroad crossing to 

Calvary Cemetery 2,500.00 



$53,450.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $9,064.00 

Salaries, semi-annual 8,840.00 

Rent, Veterans' Association 150.00 

Forage 1,800.00 

Fuel and lights ' 1,600.00 

Fire alarm 800.00 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

liorse liire and shoeing $1,200.00 

Washing 52.00 

Water 119.50 

Chemical supplies 50.00 

Penacook fire alarm 200.00 

Incidentals 2,500.00 

New hose 800.00 



$27,175.50 



SALARIES. 

Mayor $1,500.00 

City clerk 1,200.00 

Clerk, board of public works 100.00 

Overseers of poor 390.00 

City solicitor 500.00 

City treasurer 250.00 

City messenger 900.00 

City physicians 500.00 

Care, city clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,000.00 

Moderators and ward clerks 360.00 

Supervisors and inspectors of election 960.00 

Judge, police court 1,000.00 

Clerk, police court 200.00 

Collector of taxes, so much as may be necessary of the 

sum of 1,500.00 

Building inspector 200.00 



$12,670.00 



Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of forty- 
eight thousand five hundred two and 50-100 dollars ($48,502.50) 
for the support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, to- 
gether with the income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be appropri- 
ated and divided among the several school districts according to the 
valuation thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 
the cemeteries of the city one half of the income from the sale of lots 
and the income derived from the care of lots and grading, which sums 
shall be deposited by the superintendent, or others receiving them, in 



ORDINANCES. 27 

the city treasury. Tlie care of lots for which the city holds trust 
funds shall be paid from the money appropriated for the care of 
cemeteries and so much of the income of these trust funds as may 
be thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at the close of 
the year and the remainder, in each instance, credited to the indi- 
vidual funds. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
use of the public library in the purchase of books the amount col- 
lected for fines. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 24, 3913. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the penacook sewerage precinct for the en- 
suing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. There shall l^e raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook sew- 
erage precinct the sum of twenty-seven hundred seventy-eight and 
40-100 dollars ($2,778.40) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall 
be appropriated as follows: 

For the paym.ent of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $1,100.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 280.00 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said precinct... 1,398.40 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



28 CITY OP CONCORD. 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT IN WARD ONE. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling 
precinct in Ward 1 the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT FOR THE EN- 
SUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling 
precinct of said city, the sum of fifty-five hundred dollars ($5,500) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $5,500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



ORDINANCES. 29 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of st. paul's school sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be ii ordained iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, a^ 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within St. Paul's School 
sewerage precinct, the sum of five hundred sixty dollars ($560) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $500.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 15.00 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said precinct. . 45.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

be raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE EAST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord 
sewerage precinct, the sum of one hundred seventeen and 50 100 
dollars ($117.50) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of 
said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropri- 
ated as follows: 

For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance 

with an ordinance creating a sinking fund $100.00 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds $17.50 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
the limits of the sewerage precinct for the ensuing FINAN- 
CIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the sewerage pre- 
cinct of said city, the sum of seventy-four hundred forty dollars 
($7,440) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said pre- 
cinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
follows : 

For repairs and construction $4,500.00 

For interest on bonds 2,940.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 191 3. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 

THE limits of THE GARBAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINAN- 
CIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the garbage precinct 
of said city, the sum of seven thousand dollars ($7,000) to defray 



ORDINANCES. 31 

the necessary expecses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said, 
precinct $7,000.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE LIGHTING PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINAN- 
ri.\L YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the lighting precinct 
of said city, the suhi of eighteen thousand eight hundred dollars 
($18,800) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said pre- 
cinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
follows : 

For lighting streets $18,800.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS "WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE EAST CONCORD LIGHTING PRECINCT FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be if ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord 
lighting precinct, the sum of five hundred thirty-five dollars ($535) 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets within said precinct $535.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the "west concord sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord 
sewerage precinct, the sum of eight hundred sixty-five and 50-100 
dollars ($865.50) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of 
said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appro- 
priated as follows: 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said precinct. . . $250.00 
For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 115.50 

For the payment of bonds 500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 24, 1913. 



An Ordinance authorizing the board op assessors to employ 

CLERICAL assistance. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the board of assessors are hereby authorized to 
employ additional clerical assistance in the office of said board, the 
expense of the same not to exceed four hundred dollars ($400) per 



ORDINANCIS. 33 

annum and to be charged to the account of incidentals and land dam- 
ages. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance to take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 14, 1913. 



An Ordinance to extend the water precinct in ward one. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the water precinct as heretofore existing be ex- 
tended to embrace all the territory, together with the inhabitants, 
within the following described limits, to wit : Beginning at a point on 
the Borough Eoad where the westerly line of land of the heirs of the 
late Martha J. Morrill intersects said road; thence westerly by the 
Borough Eoad to the easterly line of land of the heirs of the late 
Alonzo Elliott; thence southerly by the easterly line of said Elliott 
land to land of Lewis D. Nevers; thence westerly on a line 350 feet 
southerly from the Borough Eoad and parallel with said road to the 
westerly line of land of Belina Clouette; thence northerly by said 
Clouette's westerly line to the Borough Eoad; thence northwesterly 
across the Borough Eoad to the westerly line of land of Isaac Clou- 
ette ; thence northerly by said Clouette 's westerly line to the ' ' Out- 
let, " so called; thence easterly by said "Outlet," to the westerly 
line of land of the heirs of the late Martha J. Morrill; thence south- 
erly by said westerly line of the Morrill land to the Borough Eoad 
at the point of beginning. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 9, 1913. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 18 op the revised 
ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloios : 

Section 1, That section 28 of chapter 18 of the Eevised Or- 
dinances be, and hereby is, amended by striking out after the words 



34 CITY OP CONCORD. 

' ' assistant engineer at Penacook ' ' the words twenty -five and insert- 
ing in place thereof the words seventy-five. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take efl'ect upon its passage. 

Passed July 14, 1913. 



An Ordinance relating to the regulation of street traffic. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
foUoivs : 

ARTICLE 1. definitions. 

Section 1. The word "vehicle" herein shall include horses hitched 
to vehicles, horses ridden or led, motor vehicles of all kinds, bicycles, 
tricycles propelled by hand, and everything on wheels or runners ex- 
cept street cars and light carriages for the convej^ance of children. 

Sect. 2. The word "horse" herein shall include all domestic 
animals. 

Sect. 3. The word ' ' driver ' ' herein shall include the rider or 
driver of a horse, the rider of wheels and the operator of a motor 
vehicle. 

article 2. VEHICLES IN MOTION. 

Section 1. A vehicle except when passing a vehicle ahead shall 
keep to the right and as near the right curb as possible. 

Sect. 2. Vehicles meeting shall pass each other to the right. 

Sect. 3. A vehicle overtaking another vehicle shall, in passing, 
keep to the left, but it shall not leave the line on the right unless 
there is a clear way to advance on the left. 

Sect. 4. A vehicle turning to the right into another street shall 
turn the corner as near to the curb as j)racticable. 

Sect. 5. A vehicle turning to the left into another street shall 
pass to the right of and beyond the street's intersection before turn- 
ing. 

Sect. 6. A vehicle crossing from one side of the street to the 
other shall do so by turning to the left so as to head in the same 
direction as the traffic on that side of the street and shall not make 
the turn at a street intersection. 

Sect. 7. Slow moving vehicles shall keep as close as possible to 



ORDINANCES. 35 

tlie curb on the right so as to allow faster moving vehicles free 
passage on the left. 

Sect. 8. No person having charge of a vehicle shall allow the 
same to come within ten feet of any vehicle in front of him when 
approaching and passing over a crossing where a pedestrian is about 
to cross. 

Sect. 9. The driver or person having charge of any vehicle, be- 
fore turning the corner of any street or 'turning out or starting from 
or stopi)ing at the curb line of any street, shall first see that there 
is sufficient space free from other vehicles so that such turn, stop or 
start may be safely made, and shall then give a plainly visible or 
audible signal. 

Sect. 10. No vehicle shall stop with its left side to the curb on 
Main Street between Freight and Center Streets, or on Pleasant, War- 
ren, School, Capitol, Park and Center Streets between Main and State 
Streets. 

Sect. 11. When a horse drawn vehicle is backed up to the curb, 
the horse or horses shall be turned so as to stand as near parallel with 
the sidewalk as possible and headed in the general direction of travel 
for the side of the street on which the vehicle is standing. 

Sect. 12. Unless in an emergency or to allow another vehicle to 
cross its path, no vehicle shall stop in any public street or highway 
of this city except close to the curb line. 

Sect. 13. No vehicle shall be allowed to stand within five feet of 
a fire hydrant. 

Sect. 14. In approaching or passing a street railway car which 
has been stopped to allow passengers to alight or to embark the 
driver of every motor vehicle shall slow down, and, if it be necessary 
for the safety of the public, he shall bring said vehicle to a full stop. 

article 3. SIGNALS, NOISES AND SMOKE. 

Section 1. Every driver of a vehicle shall, in slowing up or stop- 
ping, give a signal to those behind by raising a whip or hand verti- 
cally. 

Sect. 2. In turning while in motion or in starting to turn from 
a stand-still, a signal shall be given by the driver of the vehicle about 
to be turned by raising a whip or hand indicating the direction in 
which the turn is to be made. 

Sect. 3. Ample warning shall be given by voice or uplifted hand 
before backing, and while backing unceasing vigilance must be exer- 
cised by the person driving any vehicle. 



36 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Sect. 4. Vehicles must stop so as not to interfere with or prevent 
the passage of pedestrians at crossings. 

Sect. 5. The police department shall control all traffic in the 
streets or highways. All vehicles and cars shall stop and start im- 
mediately on signal given by any police officer. 

Sect. 6. (Extract from Motor Vehicle Law, section 12.) Upon 
approaching any intersecting way or a curve or corner in a way 
every person operating a motor vehicle shall slow down and give 
timely signal with his bell, horn or other device for signalling; pro- 
vided, that in the thickly settled parts of a city or town no bell, horn 
or other device for signalling shall be sounded so as to make an un- 
reasonable noise, except in the case of fire and police department 
vehicles; and provided further, that no operator or chauffeur of any 
motor vehicle shall on any way permit any unreasonable amount of 
smoke to escape from said motor vehicle, nor shall any operator or 
chauffeur on any way permit said motor vehicle to make any un- 
necessary noise, by cutting out the muffler, or otherwise. 

ARTICLE 4. RIGHT OF WAY. 

Section 1. Police, fire department, United States mail vehicles, 
ambulances, funeral processions and emergency repair wagons of pub- 
lic service corporations shall have the right of way in any street and 
through any procession, and nothing in these rules shall apply to said 
vehicles. 

Sect. 2. A person driving or controlling a vehicle waiting at the 
curb shall promptly give place to a vehicle about to take on or let 
off passengers. 

article 5. CARE IN DRIVING; CONDITION AND TREATMENT OF HORSES. 

Section 1. No person shall drive or conduct any vehicle in such 
condition or so loaded as to be likely to cause delay in traffic, or 
accident or injury to man, beast or property. 

Sect, 2. No person shall carry or cause to be carried on any vehi- 
cle in any public street a load the weight of which exceeds six tons 
unless such load consists of an article which cannot be divided, and 
then only in accordance with a permit from the police department. 

Sect. 3. No person shall drive a horse not in every respect fit 
for use and capable for the work on which it is employed and free 
from lameness and sores and vices or disease likely to cause delay in 
traffic or accident or injury to persons or property. 



ORDINANCES. 37 

Sect. 4. No person shall ill-treat, overload, overdrive or cruelly 
or unnecessarily beat any horse. 

Sect. 5. No person shall steal a ride upon any vehicle or street 
car, and no person shall ride upon the rear of any vehicle without 
the consent of the person in charge thereof. 

Sect. 6. Any police officer in uniform, in his discretion, may re- 
move any horse or vehicle left upon any street not in the apparent 
charge of any driver or other person, or which is in violation of any 
of these regulations, to another place on said street or from such 
street to another street or to the city yard or to a garage or stable 
and there leave the same. 

ARTICLE 6. STREET CARS. ^ 

Section 1. No street car shall stand in the intersection of streets. 

Sect. 2. Drivers of street cars shall not pass the intersection of 
State and Pleasant Streets without audible warning, nor at a speed 
greater than ten miles an hour, and shall not enter the intersection 
of Warren and Merrimack Streets at any speed which would prevent 
such driver from bringing his car to a full stop, in emergency, be- 
fore reaching the center line of the intersection of said streets. 

article 7. penalties for violation. 

Section 1. Except as otherwise provided in the Motor Vehicle 
Law of the state, any person violating any of the provisions herein 
contained shall be liable to a penalty not to exceed ten dollars for 
the first offence, or not to exceed twenty dollars for any subsequent 
offence. 

Sect. 2. Complaints against any person violating any of the pro- 
visions herein contained may be made at police headquarters or to 
any police officer. 

Sect. 3. Copies of this ordinance may be obtained at police head- 
quarters. 

Sect. 4. The city clerk shall publish the provisions of this ordi- 
nance in accordance with the requirements of section 15 of the Motor 
Vehicle Law of the state. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 6. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage except 
as to Article 6, section 1, which section shall take effect September 
1, 1913. 

Passed July 14, 1913. 



38 CITY OP CONCORD, 

An Okdinance defining the thickly settled farts of the city op 
concord for the purpose of preventing the destruction of 
gray squirrels. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follotvs : 

Section 1. That the territory Yv'ithin the lighting precincts of the 
city of Concord, East Concord, West Concord and Penacook (Ward 
1) of said city and also all territory in and eighty rods on either side 
of all highways, private roads and lanes and all parks, groves, ceme- 
teries and commons and all territory within eighty rods therefrom 
be, and hereby is, defined as the thickly settled part of the city of 
Concord within the meaning of Session Laws of 1913, chap. 174, re- 
lating to the protection of gray squirrels. 

Sect. 2. Any person taking, killing, selling or offering for s;^le 
any gray squirrels within the territory above defined shall be fined 
ten dollars for each gray squirrel so taken, killed, sold or offered 
for sale. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect uj)on its passage. 

Passed October 14, 1913. 



An Ordinance in amendment of section 2, chapter 21 of the city 
ordinances relating to the garbage precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That section 2 of chapter 21 of the City Ordinances 
relating to the garbage precinct be amended by adding after the 
word "road" in the thirtieth line the words "also Foster Street, 
Prospect Street, Granite Avenue, Curtis Avenue, Perkins Court, and 
all property abutting on the east side of North State Street to the 
Concord & Claremont Eailroad crossing. ' ' 

Sect. 2. This ordinance to take effect January 1, 1914. 

Passed December 29, 1913. 



RESOLUTIONS. 39 



RESOLUTIONS. 

A Eesolution relative to the cutting of the wood and timber 

ON THE city lot IN WARD 3. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section L That the wood and timber on the city lot, so called, 
in Ward 3, said to be infested with gypsy moths, be cut and marketed 
or otherwise used for the benefit of the city, under the direction of 
a committee of four which shall consist of the mayor, and one mem- 
ber of the committee on lands and buildings of the board of aldermen, 
one member of the committee on lands and buildings of the board of 
park commissioners, to be appointed by the mayor, and the superin- 
tendent of water-works. 

Sect. 2. That said committee be, and hereby is,, authorized to 
enter into a contract with suitable persons in the name of the city 
for the operation of said lot. 

Passed February 3, 1913. 



A Resolution amending a resolution passed December 16, 1912, 

exempting the new ENGLAND BOX COMPANY FROM TAXES DURING 
A PERIOD OP TEN Y''EARS. 

Ixesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That a resolution passed December 16, 1912, exempting the New 
England "Box Company from taxation during a period of ten years 
be amended by adding after the words "in the erection" the words 
' ' and equipment, ' ' so that said resolution as amended shall read as 
follows : 

Whereas the New England Box Company, incorporated under the 
]aA^s of the state of Maine, desires to locate its factory and carry on 
its business in the city of Concord, provided suflficient inducements are 
given it by the city government : 

That if the New England Box Company will locate and establish 



40 CITY OP CONCORD. 

its business in this city and will expend not less than $50,000 in the 
erection and equipment of a factory to carry on said business, said 
factory and the real estate upon which the same is located and the 
machinery therein and the capital necessary in conducting said busi- 
ness shall be exempted from all taxation for a period of ten years 
from April 1, 1913. 

Passed February 3, 1913. 



A Eesolution relating to pleasakt view. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That it would be conducive to the best interests of the 
city, and a furtherance of the feeling of friendship and good will 
entertained herein by the citizens hereof toward the memory of that 
distinguished citizen, the late Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy, to have 
preserved the late residence of said Mrs. Eddy, called Pleasant View, 
substantially intact, as a lasting monument to her, and 

Sect. 2. That a copy of this resolution be sent to the trustees of 
the Christian Science Church of Boston. 

Passed March 10, 1913. 



A Eesolution appropriating $500 to settle the case of Caroline 
F. stickney v. city of concord. 

JResolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of $500 be, and the same is, hereby 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the purpose of settling the suit of Caroline F. SticTcney v. 
The City of Concord. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 24, 1913. 



RESOLUTIONS. 41 

A Eesolution authorizing the payment of the amounts due the 

OPERATORS OF THE WOOD AND TIMBER ON THE CITY LOT, SO CALLED. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the mayor and superintendent of water-works 
be, and hereby are, authorized to determine the amounts due the 
operators of the city wood lot, so called, and 

Sect. 2. That said amounts when so determined shall be paid to 
said operators and charged to the account of incidentals and land 
damage. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 24, 1913. 



A EESOLUTION APPROPRIATING THE SUM OF FOUR THOUSAND DOLLARS 
FOR INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Besolved hy the Board, of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of four thousand dollars ($4,000) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed May 12, 1913. 



A Eesolution accepting the gift of an ornamental fountain by 

THE PENACOOK WOMAN'S CLUB. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the offer of the Penacook Woman's Club of Pen- 
acook, New Hampshire, of an ornamental fountain to be placed on 
the grass plot in Washington Square in the said village of Penacook 
be accepted. 

Sect. 2. That in accepting this gift it is understood that the city 
does not obligate itself to maintain said square in any other manner 
than it is at present maintained. 

Passed May 12, 1913. 



42 CITY OP CONCORD. 

A Eesolution appropriating money for the purchase of land to 

BE added to JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 

EcsoJved l)>i the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
foUoivs: 

That a sum of money not to exceed one hundred seventy-five dol- 
lars ($175) be, and hereby is, appropriated for the purchase 
of lot No. 18, on plan 219, recorded in the Merrimack County Reg- 
istry of Deeds, said lot to be added to and to become a part of the 
John Kimball Playground. 

Passed June 9, 1913. 



A Eesolution appropriating money for the use of the mayor. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated for necessary expenses and supplies for the maj'or 'b 
office. The same to be expended under the direction of the mayor 
and charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed June 9, 1913. 



A Eesolution for the purchase of land to be added to the play- 
ground south of ROLLINS PARK. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the committee on lands and buildings be, and hereby is, au- 
thorized to procure by purchase the tract of land adjoining the play- 
ground below Eollins Park, between Bow Street and Broadway, and 
known as the Emerson lot, at a cost not to exceed three hundred fifty 
dollars ($350); the deed to be approved by the city solicitor; and 
said sum to be charged to the account of incidentals and land dam- 
ages. 

Passed June 9, 1913. 



RESOLUTIONS. 43 

A Resolution appropriating money for the benefit of the mili- 
tary ORGANIZATIONS IN THE CITY OF CONCORD. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sura of one hundred dollars be hereby appropriated for 
the use of Company C, 1st Infantry, N. H. N. G., the sum of one 
hundred dollars for the use of Company E, 1st Infantry, N. H. N. G., 
and the sum of fifty dollars for the use of the Hospital Corps, N. 
II. N. G., now stationed in the city of Concord, and that the said 
sums be paid by warrant of the mayor to the commanding officers of 
the said organizations respectively at any time, on demand, after 
the passage of this resolution. 

Passed June 9, 1913. 



A RESOLUTION APPROPRIATING TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS TO PAY FOR THE 
BUILDING OF AN IRON FENCE AT OLD FORT CEMETERY. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars be, and is hereby, appropri- 
ated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated 
for the building of an iron fence on the north side of the Old Fort 
Cemetery on Shawmut Street in Ward 2, said fence to be erected 
under the supervision of the mayor and committee on Pine Grove 
Cemetery. 

Passed June 9, 1913. 



A Resolution appropriating eleven hundred eighty-six and 93-100 

DOLLARS ($1,186.96) TO PAY FOR REAL ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY 
OF CONCORD FOR UNPAID TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1912. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of eleven hundred eighty-six and 96-100 dollars 
($1,186.96) be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay the amount 
due the city of Concord for real estate purchased at the tax collector 's 
sale of real estate for the unpaid taxes for the year 1912. 
Passed June 9, 1913. 



A Eesolution providing for a special committee on traffic rules 

FOR the city of CONCORD. 

Besolved ty the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to appoint a commit- 
tee of not more than five, one member of which shall be the mayor, 
for the purpose of inquiring into the advisability of drafting a code 
of traffic rules for the city of Concord, which committee shall report 
a draft of such a code if it deems the same necessary. 

Passed June 9, 1913. 



A Resolution providing for a discount on taxes paid prior to 
JULY 20, 1913. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That a discount of 2% shall be allowed on all taxes assessed for the 
year 1913 which are paid on or before the twentieth day of July, 
1913. 

Passed June 9, 1913. 



A Eesolution appropriating money for the purchase of an auto 
combination chemical engine and hose wagon. 

Besolved ty the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum necessary, not to exceed six thousand dollars ($6,000), 
be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
other appropriated, for the purchase of an auto combination chem- 



RESOLUTIONS. 45 

ical engine and hose wagon. Said sum to be expended under the 
direction of the committee on fire department. 
Passed July ]4, 1913. 



A Eesolution relating to an inclined floor in the auditorium. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the committee on lands and buildings are hereby authorized 
and directed to employ the services of an architect to draw plans and 
specifications for an inclined floor in the Auditorium and to ask for 
sealed bids for the construction of the same with the right to 
reject any or all of said bids. 

Said committee shall respectively, after the completion of the plans 
and after the obtaining of bids, report, and submit the same to the 
mayor. 

Passed July 14, 1913. 



A Eesolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars 

FOR the support OF CITY POOR, 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for the support of city poor. 

Passed July 14, 1913, 



A Eesolution appropriating the sum of five thousand dollars 

FOR incidentals AND LAND DAMAGES, 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed July 14, 1913. 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars 

FOR PRINTING AND. STATIONERY. 

Itcsolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for printing and stationery. 

Passed July 14, 1913. 



A Resolution appropriating money for the concord district nurs- 
ing ASSOCIATION. 

Sesolvcd hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follows: 

That the sum of three hundred dollars be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for aid to the Concord District Nursing Association. 

Passed August 11, 1913. 



A Resolution appropriating five hundred dollars ($500) for the 
USE of blossom hill cemetery. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs: 

Section 1. That the sura of five hundred dollars ($500) be, and 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for the use of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 11, 1913. 



A Resolution appropriating four hundred dollars for an in- 
clined floor in the auditorium. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs: 

That the sum of four hundred dollars ($400) be, and the same is 



RESOLUTIONS. 47 

hereby, appropriated for an inclined floor in the Auditorium ; the 
amount to be expended under the direction of the committee on lands 
and buildings and charged to the account of incidentals and land 
damages. 

Passed August 11, 1913. 



A Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and buildings 

TO ERECT VOTING BOOTHS IN THE SEVERAL V7ARDS OF THE CITY AND 
appropriating MONEY THEREFOR. 

Fit'SoJved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the committee on lands and buildings be, and hereby is, au- 
thorized to confer with the supervisors of the several wards of the 
city and provide necessary voting booths; and that so much as may be 
necessary of the sum of $700 be appropriated therefor and charged 
to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed September 17, 1913. 



A EeSOLUTION APPROPRIATING ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS TO 
SETTLE THE CASE OF HEMPHILL V. CONCORD. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of one hundred twenty -five dollars be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for the purpose of settling the case of Hemphill v. 
Concord. 

Passed October 14, 1913. 



A Resolution appropriating one hundred seventy-five dollars to 

SETTLE the CASE OF HIBBARD V. CONCORD. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of one hundred seventy-five dollars be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

wise appropriated for the purpose of settling the case of Hihhard v. 
Concord. 
Passed October 14, 1913. 



A Eesolution appropriating the sum of five thousand dollars 

FOR incidentals AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed November 10, 1913. 



A Eesolution appropriating money for gasoline pump at central 

FIRE station. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the committee on lands and buildings is hereby authorized to 
expend the sum of one hundred twenty-six and 19-100 dollars 
($126.19) for the installation of a gasoline pump at Central Fire 
Station; said sum to be charged to the account of incidentals and 
land damages. 

Passed December 8, 1913. 



A Eesolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the sev- 
eral departments. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of six thousand one hundred twelve and 
21-100 dollars ($6,112.21) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay out- 
standing claims as follows: 

Board of health $177.70 

City poor 342.84 



EESOLUTIONS. 49 

Fire department $2,967.34 

Horse Hill Cemetery 4.00 

Incidentals and land damages 212.23 

Interest, cemetery trust funds 53.79 

Parks 69.68 

Playground, Rollins Park 17.51 

Police and watch 1,971.78 

Printing and stationery 52.86 

Salaries 242.48 



$6,112.21 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sew- 
ers for the year 1913, the sum of eighteen and 38-100 dollars 
($18.38), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for garb- 
age for the year 1913, the sum of four hundred thirty-three and 
76-100 dollars ($433.76), the same being the earnings of this depart- 
ment. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 12, 1914. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1913. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 
MAYOR. 

Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

HON. CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

Office : City Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims. 

Aldermen-at-Large. 

Term Expires January, 1914. 

OLA ANDERSON, 256 North State Street 

ELMER H. FARRAR, 78 South State Street 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

Term Expires January, 1916. 
FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, Penacook 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 81 School Street 

Ward Aldermen. 
Term Expires January, 1914. 
Ward i— WILLIAM H. McGIRR. 
Ward 2— FRED S. FARNUM. 
Ward 5— MATHEW H. PEABODY. 
Ward 4— CHARLIE A. BARTLETT. 
Ward 5— AUGUSTINE R. AYERS. 
Ward ^— HENRY 0. POWELL. 
Ward 7— ARISTIDE L. PELISSIER. 
Ward S— MICHAEL J. LEE. 
Ward 5— EUGENE J. O'NEIL. 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per 

annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

OLA ANDERSON, Term expires January, 1914 

ELMER H. FARRAR, 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 

FREDERICK L BLACKWOOD, 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Clerk 

Salary, $100 per annum. 



1914 
1914 
1916 
1916 
1916 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Peabody, Blackwood, 'Neil. 
On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Powell, Hobbs, Pelissier. 
On Elections and Returns — Aldermen Lee, Brown, Farnum. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Powell, Ayers, Anderson. 
On Finance — The Mayor ; Aldermen Blackwood, Peabody, 

Bartlett, Hobbs. 
On Fire Department — Aldermen McGirr, Farrar, Pelissier. 
On Lands and Buildings — Aldermen Lee, Davis, Farnum. 
On Police and License — 

Aldermen Anderson, McGirr, Brown. 
On Public Instruction — Aldermen Bartlett, Ayers, O'Neil. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



53 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance 
of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $250 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,800 per 

annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $900 per 

annum. 



EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to 
satisfaction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of first $60,000; 
seven and one-half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

SETH R. DOLE. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $750 per annum. Clerk, $1,500 per annum. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1916 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1914 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, '' " " 1918 



54 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salary, $1,800. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,400 per 

annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $450 per 

annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $50 per annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $500 per 

annum. 



ALEXANDER MURCHIE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. §5 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward i— WILLIAM H. McGIRR, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 5— FRED S. FARNUM, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 5— HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 
City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
POLICE JUSTICE.* 

Api>ointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,000 per annum, fixed by 
Board of Aldermen. 

GEORGE M. FLETCHER. 

OflSce: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE.* 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $2 per day of actual service. 

BENJAMIN W. COUCH. 



CLERK OF POLICE COURT.* 

Appointed by Police Justice. Salary, $200 per annum, fixed by the Legislature. 

RUFUS H. BAKER. 



Abolished by act of Legislature. 



56 CITY OP CONCORD. 

CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 



Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,200 per 

annum. 



CHARLES H. ROWE.f 
VICTOR I. MOORE.t 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 
Term, unlimited. Salary, $2.50 per day for first year, and $2.70 per day 
thereafter. 

Victor I. Moore, Captain of Night Watch. || 
Samuel L. Bachelder.§ 

Salary, $1,050 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $2.75 per day. 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

George H. Silsby, Edward J. McGirr, 

Harry L. Woodward, Joseph E. Silva, 

Charles H. Guilbault, Fred N. Marden, 

John B. Long, Frank B. McDaniels. 



t Resigned December 1, 1913. 
t Appointed to fill vacancy. 
II Captain to December 1, 1913. 
§ Appointed to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



57 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 

0. H. Bean, Charles E. Kelley, 

"W. A. Little, Joseph A. Flanders, 

George G. Allen, George E. Drury, 

Elmer Tremblay, Walter H. Beane, 

James Jepson, Cleveland H. Curtis, 

Jonas Welcome, Clark D. Stevens, 

Harper B. Giles, John McGirr, 

John J. Halligan, Willie A. Flanders. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 



Appointed by the City Marshal 
Aldermen. Salary, $2. 

Almah C. Leavitt, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowell, 
Alphonse Venne, 
Edward M. Nason, 
William H. Hammond, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moult on, 
Charles Ada, 
George L. Danforth, 
Arthur J. Taylor, 
Alfred H. Walker, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Ira C. Phillips, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Harry R. Sturm, 
William J. Ahem, 



subject to confirmation by the Board of 
50 each per day of actual service. 

Judson F. Hoit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Milton Colby, 
Asbury F. Tandy, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor, 
Clarence W. Brown, 
John McGirr, 
Edward H. Smart, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
Orland M. Blodgett, 
James J. Collins, 
George N. Fellows, 
Leger Gauvreau, 
Asahel H. Jewell, 
William A. Kelley, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Charles M. Norris, 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Horace B. Annis, Frank T. Powell, 

Albert P. Davis, 0. F. Richardson, 

Frank W. Johnson, Timothy P. Reardon. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

MERVIN E. BANKS. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 
TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 5— CHARLES E. STANIELS. 
Ward 5— PAUL R. HOLDEN. 
Ward 4— FRANK W. ROLLINS. 
Ward 5— AMOS J. SHURTLEFF.* 
Ward 5— REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward S— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward 5— GEORGE Y. HILL. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



'Died September 6, 1913. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 59 

ASSISTANTS. 

Salar}', $500 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Fowler Library Building. 



CITY WATER WORKS. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

N. E. MARTIN, Term expires March 31, 1914 

H. H. DUDLEY, " " " 1914 

EDSONJ. HILL, " " " 1915 

G. D. B. PRESCOTT, ** " " 1915 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, " " " 1916 

H. C. HOLBROOK, " " " 1916 

SOLON A. CARTER, " " " 1917 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, " " " 1917 

PREsroENT — Solon A, Carter. 
Clerk — Edson J. Hill. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, $1,800 per annum. 
Term, unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



60 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Terai, unlimited. Salary, $1,250 per annum 
and rent of house. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 
Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 
Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $75 per annum. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 61 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

P. C. WHITE. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-offido. 

Salary, $200 per annum. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-offido. 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-offido. 
DR. FRED A. SPRAGUE. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each 
birth, marriage and death received, recorded and returned to the State 



Registrar. 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 

No salary. 

WILL B. HOWE, City Engineer 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief of the Fire Department 

PERCY R. SANDERS, Supt. of the Water-Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 



WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 
BEN C. WHITE, 
WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 



Term expires January, 1914 
1914 
1915 
1915 
1916 
1916 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 63 

CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7, con- 
solidated) appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, Term expires January, 1914 
D.WARREN FOX, '' '' " 1915 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, '^ " " 1916 

Ward 2. 

SCOTT FRENCH, Term expires January, 1914 

HENRY A. COLBY, " " '' 1915 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, '' " " 1916 

Ward 3. 

GEORGE R. PARMENTER, Term expires January, 1914 
LEWIS S. PARMENTER, " " " 1915 

JAMES M. GROSSMAN, " " " 1916 

Ward 7. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, Term expires January, 1914 

J. NEWTON ABBOTT, " " " 1915 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " " " 1916 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

CHARLES G. REMICK, Term expires March, 1914 

FRANK J. BATCHELDER, " " " 1914 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, Term expires March, 1915 

* JAMES C. NORRIS, " " " 1915 
**FRANK J. PILLSBURY. 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, " " " 1916 

FRANK P. ANDREWS, " " " 1916 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

EDWARD A. MOULTON. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 



FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
LOUIS A. LANE, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS, 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 



''Died September 18, 1913. 
**Elected to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 65 

FOR MILVILLE CEMETERY. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner 
of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in .January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
GILES WHEELER. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for imjiounding sheep, and five cents each 
for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



66 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, for sealing each scale beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, 
and for each measure, 10 cents; five or more to one person, half price — 
paid by owners of scales or measures. 

EDWARD K. GOVE. 

Office : Rear of Police Station. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 
40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — 
paid by party for whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring 
service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, Omar C. Allard, 

Thomas Hill, Arthur N. Day, 

John H. Mercer, William H. Meserve, 

Everett L. Davis, John E. Rossell, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



67 



George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 
James F. Fitzgerald, 
Edward "W. Brockway, 
John H. Flanders, 
C. W. Hazelton, 
Hiram Brown, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Fred H. Perley, 
Amos J. Peaslee, 
Mark M. Blanchard, 
Lurman R. Goodrich, 
James H. Harrington, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Joseph Robarge, 
Charles E. Hardy, 
William F. Cheever, 
Alphonse King, 
William Gooden, 
Harry Lee, 
Guy Rowell, 
Otis Lynch, 
Arthur E. Rowell, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
Charles J. Sawyer. 



Asher E. Ormsbee, 
William J. Mullen, 
Elmer E. Young, 
Henry A. Brown, 
Milo G. Davis, 

F. H. Smith, 
Fred A. Barker, 
Hamilton C. Morgan, 
James B. Riley, 

G. N. Hills, 
Charles E. Cook, 
S. D. Walker, 
Charles Peaslee, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brown, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
Galen W. Hunter, 
William F. Cutting, 
E. F. Miller, 

Earl Woodbury, 
Ernest Saltmarsh, 
Amos Blanchard, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 
Emery Delaney. 



CITY WEIGHER. 
EDWARD K. GOVE. 



Office: Rear of Police Station. 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Edward A. Moulton, 
George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles F. I\rudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Fred Rollins, 
Moses E. Haines. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



Charles L. Fellows, 
"William Rowell, 
Henry ]\Iorrill. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; 
boards and timber, 16 cents per M. ; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per 
cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person 
employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Jonathan B. Weeks, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert 0. Preston, 
William A. Chesley, 
Alfred Clark, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 



Gilbert H. Berry, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Arthur E. JMaxam, 
Henry Rolf e, 
Martin E. Kenna, 
E. A. Cole, 
William E. Virgin, 
William H. Gay, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



69 



Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Smith, 
Clinton 0. Partridge, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hayward, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus 0. Clark, 
Silas Wiggin, 
Edward Stevens, 
Daniel Griffiths, 
W. P. Hayward, 
F. E. Frost, 
"Walter J. Sanborn, 
Leonard H. Smith, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
John Q. Woods, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
B. J. Preseott, 
Charles S. Robinson, 



Fales P. Virgin, 
Edward Runnels, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D, Ashley, 
Crosby A. Sanborn, 
Herbert M. Danforth, 
Hiram W. Drouin, 
W. F. Frost, 
George Sanborn, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
E. F. Miller, 
George Oakley, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 
Leslie Hammond, 
Herbert W. Rolfe, 
Arthur C. Stewart. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Miles F. Farmer, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 



William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W, Presby, 
Zeb F. Swain, 



70 



CITT OF CONCORD. 



Greorge S. Milton, 
Michael J. Lee, 
B. Frank Vamev, 
John E. Frve, 
"W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Bobbins. 
William H. McGuire. 
P. Henry D. Learr, 
J<dm Sweeney. 
Charles L. Fellows. 
John R. HalL 
Henry Bolf e, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Edward H. Donovan, 
Ned J. Morrill, 



Seth B. Hood, 
Albert S. Trask, 
William L. Beagan. 
Frederick T. Converse, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Elmer E. Babb. 
Harry H. Kennedy. 
Arthur W. Buntin. 
F. F. Converse, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Philip King, 
Henry Biley. 
Fred W. Lang. 
Henry MorrilL 
Frederick E. Gilford, 
William Stanlev. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 






:a:::n by Board of 



CHARLES H. COOK. M. D., ex-officio. 
WILL B. HOWE, fx-omcio. 
HAPwBIS S. PABMENTEB. 



CITY GOVEBXMENT. 71 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPEEVISOES OF CHECK LISTS. 

Ward i— FRANK P. ROBERTSOX, 
RICHAR.D McBRIDE. JR., 
^V^TTJJAAr S. HOLLAXD. 

Ward i— FREE:MAX F. POTTER. 
C. E. ROBINSON. 
WALTER C. SANBORN. 

Ward 3— A. W. DA^IS. 

EDATAED P. ROBINSON. 
J. ARTHUR SVENSON. 

Ward i— HARRY H. KENNEDY. 
J. WESLEY PLOBLER. 
EDWARD W. LEACH. 

Ward J— JOSEPH P. SAEGENT, 
ARTHITl P. MORRILL, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward 6-— THOMAS J. DYER. 

WALTER WILLIAMSON. 
BENJA^HN H. ROLFE. 

Ward r— HARRY C. BRUNEL. 
A. M. JOHNSON. 
FRED P. CLEilENT. 

Ward 5— WILLIAAI L. REAGAN, 
MOSES PELREN. 
W. H. SEXTON. 

Ward 9—R. E. DONOVAN. 

R. B. GALLAGHER. 
JA3IES J. REEN. 



72 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD CLERKS. 

Ward i— ERNEST L. CROSS. 
■^ard 5— DANIEL W. SANBORN. 
IVard 5— ERVIN E. WEBBER. 
-Ward 4— LOUIS P. ELKINS. 
Ward 5— GEORGE E. CHESLEY.* 
Ward ^—EDWARD J. LEARY. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward S— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward 5— JAMES W. KENNEY. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward i— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward 5— RALPH L. STEARNS. 
Ward 5— CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
Ward 4— ALLEN HOLLIS. 
Ward 5— EDWARD C. NILES. 
Ward 5— CHARLES DUNCAN. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward S— MICHAEL MULCAHY. 
Ward 5— BARTHOLOMEW COLLINS. 



*Died October 7, 1913. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 73 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 
1853, and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the 
Mayor has been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. 

Under the City Charter, adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected 

in December, 1910, for one year, . and biennially thereafter in November, 
beginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853- '54. 

" RUFUS CLEMENT,* '55. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856- '57- '58. 

" MOSES T. WILLARD, 1859- '60. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861- '62. 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863- '64. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1866- '67. 

'' LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868- '69. 

*' ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870- '71. 

'' JOHN KIMBALL, 1872- '73- '74- '75. 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876- '77. 

" HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878- '79- '80. 

'' GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,t 1880- '81- '82. 

" EDGAR H. "WOODMAN, 1883- '84- '85- '86. 

'' JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887- '88. 

*' STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889- '90. 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891- '92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893- '94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895- '96. 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897- '98. 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901- '02. 

'' CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903- '08. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 
t Term closed in November, 1880. 
t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1913-1914. 



OFFICERS. 



Edward C. Niles, Esq. 
Mrs. Fanny E. Minot 



President. 

Secretary. 



MEMBERS. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



1914. 



Dr. Dennis E. Sullivan, 
Mrs. Fanny E. Minot, 
Mr. Omar S. Swenson, 

Hon. William H. Sawyer, 
]\riss Carrie E. Evans, 
Edward C. Niles, Esq., 

Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 
Hon. George H. ]\Ioses, 
Mrs. Lillian R. Shepard, 



1915. 



7 North State Street 

23 South State Street 

14 Auburn Street 

105 North State Street 

14 Maple Street 

119 School Street 

1916. 

89 North State Street 

5 Auburn Street 

Hutchins Street, "West Concord 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

finance. 
Mr. Dudley. Dr. Sullivan. Mr. Sawyer. 



high school. 
Mr. Niles. Mrs. Minot. Mr. Moses. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



grammar schools. 
Mr. Moses. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



78 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



primary schools. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Miss Evans. 



kindergartens. 
Mr. Sawyer. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mr. Swenson. 



buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Moses. 



discipline. 
Miss Evans. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



HYGIENE. 

Miss Evans. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Swenson. 



manual training. 
Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



Mrs. Minot. 



Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Shepard. 



Miss Evans. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



MUSIC. 

Miss Evans. 



Mr, Swenson. 



Mrs. Minot. 



drawing. 

Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



text-books. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



training school. 
Mr, Niles. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



night school. 
Miss Evans. 



Mr. Dudley. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 79 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL 

AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett. 

3 Pine Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8 to 9 a. m., 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Office open 

8 to 12 a. in., 1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

George Natt Fellows. 

5 Chapel Street. Office : Parker School. 
Hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. 



CLERK. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 

4 Rockingham Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 

Office hours: 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 
Elizabeth Maria Murphy. 

442 North State Street, West Concord, N. H. 

Office hours: 4 to 5 p. m., Mondays and Thursdays, at 

Superintendent's Office. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

Louis C. Merrill Moderator. 

Fred Leighton Clerk. 

Henry H. Metcalf, John P. George . Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF UNION 

SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR THE YEAR 

ENDING MARCH 31, 1914. 



To the Citizens of Union School District: 

The work of the past year has been carried on under 
peculiar difficulties by reason of the overcrowding of the 
elementary schools, made necessary by the abandonment of 
the old Walker school. In spite of these drawbacks, how- 
ever, it has gone on satisfactorily, and the largest number 
of scholars ever in our schools have been handled with 
really surprising success in their cramped quarters. With 
the completion of the new Walker school, the district will 
be better equipped than for many years past to care for 
its continually increasing supply of pupils. 

The work and needs of our schools are reviewed in detail 
in the report of the superintendent, which deserves most 
careful study and consideration by every intelligent citizen. 
From that report it will be seen that our schools are not 
merely holding their own, but are making continual and 
marked progress in adapting the courses and methods of 
instruction to the varied and changing needs of all classes 
of our community. 

More and more those in charge of our public schools are 
realizing the folly and injustice of so shaping the educa- 
tional system as to adapt it solely to the requirements of 
that very small fraction of our pupils who are to have the 
benefit of a college education. In the past it has generally 
been the rule that the mass of our high school pupils, the 
country over, were pursuing courses of study which, while 
of course possessing real cultural value, seemed to have no 
close and vital relation to and offer no adequate prepara- 
tion for the work which they were to take up at the com- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 81 

pletion of their school course. The high school curriculum, 
to fulfil its true function, must be a development upward 
from the elementary schools, and must afford sufficient 
variety to accommodate itself to all the reasonable require- 
ments of the community which it serves. The aim should 
be so to arrange the courses and methods of instruction as 
to make it evident to all intelligent parents that the high 
school offers something which their children ought to have. 
The remarkable increase in the attendance at our high 
school, in recent years, indicates that the efforts made in 
this direction have met with a gratifying measure of ap- 
preciation. 

In order further to increase the unification of our entire 
school system, the jurisdiction of the superintendent has 
during the past year been so extended as to cover the en- 
tire high school as well as the elementary schools, and 
methods of instruction which have met with conspicuous 
success in lower grades are to be extended, of course with 
necessary modifications, throughout the entire course. This 
change, which affords numerous occasions for misunder- 
standings and friction, has been accomplished with the 
utmost harmony and good feeling, and in a manner reflect- 
ing the highest credit upon all affected by it. 

Our schools are not perfect, — the perfect school has yet 
to be found, but it is our aim to make them as adequate 
instruments for meeting the educational needs of the dis- 
trict as is possible with the means at our disposal. In 
carrying out this purpose, we recognize that we are an in- 
tegral part of the educational system of the state, and will 
endeavor in every reasonable and possible way to act in 
harmony with the policies adopted by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction. 

One practice has during the past year caused great in- 
convenience and injury to our schools, notably to the high 
school. Our teachers are engaged by a contract in writ- 
ing, signed by them, in which they agree that they will 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

not resign during tlie j^ear to accept a position elsewhere. 
Early in the year a teacher asked that his resignation be 
allowed, in order that he might accept a very attractive 
offer from a school in another state. An efficient substi- 
tute being secured, the board accepted the resignation. 
This action seems to have been regarded as a precedent, 
and since that time several other teachers in the high 
school have resigned, and have informed the board that if 
their resignations were not accepted they would go, not- 
withstanding their contract. In one case we were in- 
formed by the teacher that the Board of Education of the 
place to which she was going had been told of the form 
of her contract, and had said that they did not care any- 
thing about the contract. All these teachers have gone to 
Massachusetts cities. It is indeed a remarkable thing that 
those who have been deemed fit to be put in charge of the 
education of the young in respectable cities should be will- 
ing to induce teachers to break their solemn engagements, 
or sliould even be willing to accept teachers who would 
break them. That such could be the case would be in- 
credible were it not for the fact that we have had several 
such experiences during the present year. Under the cir- 
cumstances, we must do all in our power to protect our 
schools from the demoralization consequent upon frequent 
changes in the teaching force. No teacher is obliged to 
sign a contract with the district. All who hereafter do 
so will be given clearly to understand that under no cir- 
cumstances will they be allowed to resign to accept posi- 
tions elsewhere, unless the board are of the opinion that 
the severance of their relations with the district will be 
for the benefit of our schools. If hereafter a teacher leaves 
Concord during the school year to take a position else- 
where, the public can understand, either that he has been 
faithless to his agreements, or that his departure is due 
to the judgment of the board that our schools will do bet- 
ter with some one else in his place. We know that we do 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

not pay as large salaries as are paid in some Massachusetts 
cities. But teachers are glad to contract for them in June. 
They must be prepared to stand by their contracts in 
January. 

AVith the few unpleasant exceptions above referred to, 
the teaching force of the district has shown the highest 
measure of loyalty and devotion. Concord has an excep- 
tionally fine body of teachers. Only those who have ob- 
served the work of schools in less fortunate places can 
rightly estimate their superior quality. Acting under the 
zealous and efficient oversight of our superintendent, they 
are doing for our children a very fine work, which the 
board and, we are sure, our citizens generally, most 
highly appreciate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
"WILLIAM H. SAWYER, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
GEORGE H. MOSES, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 

Board of Education. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND 
REPAIRS. 



To the Board of Education: 

The report of your committee each year is made with 
the idea of keeping you in touch with the general condi- 
tion of the buildings and grounds. Much public revenue 
can be wasted by allowing buildings to run down. The 
money appropriated for repairs we believe to have been 
expended with reasonable care and judgment. Work in- 
volving unusually large expenditures has been let out 
by contract to the lowest bidder. There exists a differ- 
ence of opinion about the wisdom of such a course, but 
it seems to be the best plan for a public corporation to 
pursue. We find that conscience regarding the fulfilment 
of such contracts is quite elastic, but we have tried to be 
strict in adhering to the terms in order to be just to all 
other bidders. The most important items of work done 
are enumerated as follows : 

Painting the entire interior of the high school. 

Painting the zinc trimmings of the Morrill school. 

Replacing the old Magee furnaces of the Franklin 
school with new Stone-Underhill heaters. 

Rebuilding the dry cremating closets in the Harriet P. 
Dame school. 

Establishing two new cooking rooms, one each in the 
Parker and the high schools. 

A new urinal for the boys' basement in the Franklin 
school. 

]\Iany of the ceilings in the different school buildings 
need renewing. 

The ventilators of the Harriet P. Dame school should be 
remodeled so as to prevent the rain and snow from beat- 
ing in and injuring the interior. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

Electric lights should be installed in the Parker school. 

Many of the school grounds are being used by people 
who take short cuts to their destination. The yards are 
fast becoming eyesores to all. IMeasures should be taken 
to protect these grounds from such trespass. Those which 
are badly used are the Parker, Cogswell and Kimball 
yards. 

A detailed statement of the work done in each building 
follows : 

Chandler School. 

"Wood and iron work in basement painted. New book 
shelves. New basketball racks. New doors to girls' 
closets. Repairs to boiler. Sink removed. Plastering 
repaired. Wash bowl repaired. Inside of doors painted. 
New valve for boiler. Blow-off cock repaired. 

Eastman School. 
Windows repaired, glass set. New grates to furnaces. 

Morrill School. 

Wiring built over to conform to law. Motor wired. 
Smoke pipe cleaned. Drinking fountain repaired. New 
muffler to gasoline engine. Outside zinc trimmings 
painted. 

Eumford School, 

May poles. New batteries. Pipe in boys' basement 
repaired. Furnaces cleaned. 

Dewey School, 

New book shelves. Floors to teachers' room varnished. 
Soiled places in walls renewed. Plastering repaired. 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

New awnings. Kindergarten rings painted. "Window- 
sills painted. Rug cleaned. 

Franklin School. 

New urinal. Bulkhead repaired. New post. New sills 
for windoAvs in cold-air room. New furnaces entire. New 
awnings. Seats in closets repaired. Basement walls 
painted. New pipes in place of frozen trap. 

Tahanto School. 

New float for flush box. Furnaces cleaned and re- 
paired. Drinking fountain repaired. 

Kimball School. 

New valleys on roof. Grates to boilers repaired. 
Valves to radiators reseated. Fence repaired. Teachers' 
room varnished. New drinking fountains. New cur- 
tains. New tube for boiler. 

Garrison School. 

Koof repaired. New aeripyre. Furnaces cleaned. Ra- 
diators in outer halls detached. 

Parker School. 

Vestibule repaired. New screens. Chairs repaired. 
Basement door repaired. Hat racks made. Cooking 
room painted. Flag pole painted. New cooking plant. 
Boilers packed. New manhole. New valves. Radiator 
valves renewed. New pipes. Radiators repaired. 
Water pipes repaired. Coat racks placed in dressing 
room. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

Harriet P. Dame Schooi-, 

Slate roof repaired. Broken sash renewed. Outside 
steps repaired. Flag pole painted. Leak in roof re- 
paired. New dry closets. Plastering repaired. 

Merrimack School. 

Kindergarten rings painted. Flush-box repaired. 
Closet seats repaired. Furnace repaired. Plastering 
patched. 

Penacook School. 

New aeripyre. Bulkhead repaired. Furnace cleaned. 
Basement walls painted. 

High School. 

Copper roof repaired. Five new drinking fountains. 
New birch floor for cooking room. Cooking room painted. 
New outfit for cooking room. Radiators bronzed. Tables 
finished. Boiler packed. Fire-boxes relined. New hot- 
water boiler. New sink and piping for cooking room. 
Entire interior of the building repainted. New curtain 
for hall. 

Cogswell School. 

Furnaces cleaned. Basement walls painted. Basement 
floors concreted. Bulkhead painted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OMAR S. SWENSON, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 

Committee on Buildings and Repairs. 



Report of Financial Agent, Union School District. 



April 1, 1913, to March 25, 1914. 
Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 

RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand April 1, 1913, $4,790.85 

Received from city, appropriated by law, 41,814.67 

" " " appropriated by Union School 



District, 


54,933.42 


" " " literary fund. 


1,993.37 


" " " dog tax, 


1,386.20 


" " Abial Walker fund, 


34.48 


■' " miscellaneous cash sales. 


25.38 


" " cash sales for text-books. 


157.91 


" " cash sales for manual training, 


81.38 


" " insurance refunded on "Walker 




School, 


66.51 


'' " sale of old iron and repairs. 


24.72 


'' " tuition, high school. 


3,812.41 


" '' " elementary schools, 


436.35 




$109,557.65 



EXPENDED, 



Fuel, 

Miscellaneous, 

Supplies, 

Repairs, 

Trucking, 



^6,432.41 

1,455.03 

1,813.81 

3,233.89 

156.32 



SCHOOL REPORT. 89 

Transportation, $855.26 

Care of houses (maintenance), 169.20 

Care of houses (salaries), 6,875.48 

Insurance, 340.00 

Manual training (maintenance), 1,552.63 

Manual training (salaries), , 8,799.06 

Military drill (salaries), 100.00 

Salaries, 69,067.98 

Text-books, . 3,329.94 

Night school (maintenance), 7.63 

Night school (salaries), 203.50 

Balance, 5,165.51 



$109,557.65 



Concord, N. H., March 25, 1914. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the forego- 
ing accounts of the financial agent, and find the expendi- 
tures correctly cast and a proper voucher for each item. 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 
H. H. METCALF, 

Auditors. 



90 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COST PER CAPITA. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses . 
Cost per pupil, including all current expenses 

based on average membership 
Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, 

drawing, superintendent, etc. 
Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing and superintendent . . . . 
Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing, superintendent, in all schools below 

the high school 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music 

drawing, superintendent, in the high school 
Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in 

high school 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools below high school 
Cost per pupil for kindergarten material 
Cost per pupil for kindergarten material and 

tuition ...... 

Cost per pupil for paper 

Cost per pupil for pens 

Cost per pupil for pencils . 

Cost per pupil for manual training, entire 

Cost per pupil for manual training, salaries 

Cost per pupil for manual training, material 

Cost per pupil for wood and iron-working, in 

elusive of instruction .... 
Cost per pupil for wood and iron-Avorking, ex 

elusive of instruction .... 
Cost per pupil for cooking, inclusive of instruc- 
tion 



$36.12 
40.92 
23.31 
21.78 

17.21 

33.53 

1.15 

1.39 

.44 

.30 

23.35 
.16 

.008 
.019 
7.57 
6.45 
1.13 

17.96 

2.70 

3.02 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



91 



Cost per pupil for cooking, exclusive of instruc- 
tion 

Cost per pupil for sewing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion ......... 

Cost per pupil for sewing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion ....:.... 

Cost per pupil for drawing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion 

Cost per pupil for drawing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion ......... 

Cost per pupil for music, inclusive of instruction 

Cost per pupil for music, exclusive of instruc- 
tion 

Cost per pupil for military drill, inclusive of 
instruction ....... 



$1.14 

3.07 

.04 

.67 

.08 
.52 

.07 

.29 



TUITION RECEIPTS. 



High School 












$3,812.41 


Dewey School 












78.00 


Kimball School 












129.00 


Penacook School 












22.10 


Rumford School 












171.12 


Eastman School 












13.45 


Morrill School 












14.21 


Garrison School 












2.15 


Cogswell School 












6.00 


Franklin School 












.32 



$4,248.76 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

Ladies and Gentlemen, — The vital forces which pro- 
mote and maintain the efficiency of a public school system 
are many. This efficiency can be measured quite accu- 
rately by the number of pupils Avhich are called into the 
schools, the character and breadth of work offered by 
the curriculum of studies, the professional preparation 
of the teaching corps, the progressive aims of adminis- 
tration, and the public will. Educational growth is a 
clear reflection of the public will. People usually get 
what they demand. The intercommunication of munici- 
palities is so common and quickly accomplished that civic 
pride elects to equal if not exceed the opportunities of- 
fered by neighboring places. The idea so common in the 
past that "whatever is is right" no longer concerns the 
thinking public of this twentieth century. Inquiry and 
research are becoming so keen that nobody can safely 
shut his eyes and say in regard to public education that 
because, as of old, a noun still continues a noun and two 
and two still make four, modern methods and adjustments 
of educational courses are wrong. These things are not 
to be dismissed without consideration, nor should the 
public purse-strings be pulled so tightly as to render im- 
possible the adoption of new rational ideas. It is my 
privilege each year to call public attention to the larger 
horizon of the educational world that it may know action 
is not confined to our local boundaries, that a distinct 
world movement in educational work is a tremendous 
force, and that we shall be remiss in our duties if we con- 
tribute nothing to it. One of these world movements is 
along the lines of manual and domestic arts, England fur- 
nishing a most noteworthy example of relative advance, 
perhaps the greatest in the history of education. An- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 93 

other, vocational training, must gain its success by the 
way it is applied in public education. If its application 
is the outgroAvth of the scheme of corporate power to 
increase the supply of skilled workmen primarily for its 
own pecuniary gain, the plan will not only fail but in the 
meanwhile will promote un,wholesome conditions during 
the period of child life which should be devoted solely 
to general development. 

In our own country we note with satisfaction the grow- 
ing activity of the National Department of Education. 
Within the year much matter has been sent out bearing 
upon the following subjects: "The Economy of Time in 
Education," "School Hygiene," "Comparison of Our 
Own Educational System with That of Foreign Coun- 
tries," "Sanitary Schoolhouses, " "Reorganization of 
School Playgrounds," "Special Features in Public School 
Systems," "Economy in School Expenditures," "Or- 
ganized Health Work in Schools," "Agriculture in 
the Public Schools," "Industrial Education," "Open 
Air Schools" and "The Reorganization of Secondary 
Schools." 

I am giving very briefly a few of the important items : 

The average area of school grounds in one city is four 
acres. 

Another city purchased seven acres for a city play- 
ground. The school board not having the funds to equip 
it properly, the public school pupils raised $4,000 for the 
purpose by public subscription. 

One city reorganized its system for the employment 
and promotion of its teachers by classifying them accord- 
ing to experience, preparation and success rather than 
by experience alone. The result appears in the unusually 
large number who attend summer schools, normal schools 
and colleges. 

The "six-hour-a-day" plan is being adopted quite 
largely. 



94 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The "class sponsor" idea for high schools has gained 
prominence. 

Medical inspection for public schools has revealed the 
following : 

Of the 20,000,000 school children in this country 15,- 
000,000 have physical defects which are a menace to good 
health ; 400,000 have organic heart disease ; 1,000,000 have 
now or have had tuberculosis of the lungs ; 1,000,000 have 
spinal curvature or other moderate deformities; 1,000,000 
have defective hearing; 5,000,000 have defective vision; 
5,000,000 suffer from mal-nutrition ; 6,000,000 have en- 
larged tonsils or enlarged cervical glands ; 10,000,000 have 
defective teeth, which injure the general health; several 
millions have a combination of these diseases. 

Out of this movement is growing a wider diffusion of 
knowledge about the condition of school children. 

The "open air school" idea proves to be a success 
wherever it is tried. Not only are these schools good for 
sick, ill-nourished and tuberculous children but also for 
the pupils who are in normal health. There is a growing 
number of people in Concord who are interested in a trial 
of this scheme in our schools. It could be done without 
much additional expense in the Walker building. 

These are but a very few of the subjects that occupy 
the til oughts of leading educators, but they serve to re- 
assure us in the knowledge that progress in education 
measures up with that in other lines of civic improve- 
ment. 

Attendance. 

COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

1912 1913 Increase Decrease 

Number of pupils in the public schools. . . 2,846 2,890 44 

Number of pupils in the parochial schools. 723 667 . . 61 

Number of pupils in the private schools.. 7^ 61 .. 14 

Number of pupils in the night schools. . . . 126 104 . . 22 



Totals 3,775 3,722 44 97 

Net decrease 53 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

PUBLIC DAY SCHOOLS. 

Number of pupils in the high school 867 802 . . 65 

Kumbei- of pupils in the elementary schools 1,720 1,815 95 

Number of pupils in the kindergartens. . . . 219 245 26 

Number of pupils in the industrial class. . 20 17 . . 3 

Totals 2,826 2.879 121 68 

Net increase 53 

NIGHT SCHOOL. 

Number of pupils enrolled (male) 103 82 . . 21 

Number of pupils enrolled (female) 23 22 . . 1 



Totals 126 104 . . 23 

Net decrease* 22 

No very unusual manifestations in school attendance 
have been in evidence this year. The annual increase in 
the total number of pupils is slow, not troubling present 
aeeomniodations to such an extent as to cause anxiety. 
The high school attendance is large for a city of this 
size and it is v/ith no little satisfaction that we note our 
favorable standing as shown in circular No. 6 sent out 
b}^ the State Department of Public Instruction. In com- 
parison with other cities of the state having twenty 
thousand or more population, Concord High School 
ranked first in per cent, of pupil enrollment based upon 
the whole number attending in all the schools, and sixth 
when compared with all the other cities and towns in 
the state. This good showing may be fairly ascribed to 
the new scheme of grading, to the practicability and flex- 
ibility of the course of study, and to the working of the 
laws governing labor. 

During the summer the old Walker building, erected 
in 3873, was dismantled to make way for the more com- 
modious structure now in process of construction. This 
brought about the perplexing problem of accommodating 
about one hundred fifty pupils more in the Chandler, 
Kimball, Dewey, Franklin, Merrimack and Tahanto build- 



*No Bchool in West Concord this .rear. 



96 CITY OP CONCORD. 

ings, which was not accomplished without much incon- 
venience to parents, teachers and pupils. I am indebted 
to them for the generous spirit and kindly forbearance 
with which this situation was received. It is expected 
that the new Walker building to be opened in the fall 
will furnish ample accommodations for many years. 
During the coming year the new box manufactory at the 
north end will be put in operation and at the south 
end undoubtedly a number of employees in the railroad 
shops will be taken to other places, but these changes 
will not, in all probability, alter the present conditions 
to any great extent. 

The Labor Laws. 

During the year eighty-three emjDloyment certificates 
have been issued from this office and the labor laws have 
been strictly and faithfully enforced. When not viewed 
through the eyes of political prejudice, these laws may 
be said to work great good to the schools and to the 
child population of the state. While it is to be regretted 
that their enforcement causes some apparent injustice and 
creates some conditions that seem illogical and harsh, 
nevertheless we must bear in mind that no such laws 
can ever be enacted whose enforcement will be satisfac- 
tory to all. 

Night School. 

This school began November 17, 1913, and ended Janu- 
ary 27, 1914. The average attendance for the first week 
was 661/4, and for the last week 29. The average for the 
highest room for the first week was 2534, for the last 
9^. The average of the lowest room for the first week 
was 4.0y2, for the last 19 ^-o. Extraordinary efforts were 



SCHOOL REPORT. 97 

made to secure a large attendance. In addition to the 
usual advertising, the efforts of Mr. Clark of the Rail- 
road Y, M. C. A. were enlisted and to him most cordial 
thanks are due for valuable assistance. Two concerts 
were given to the school on successive Thursday nights 
in the hope that they might prove to be a stimulus for in- 
creasing the attendance, but the plan failed because many 
did not care to stay after hours as it made the day too 
long. In connection with this feature, I extend thanks 
to Miss Florence Little, Miss A. L. Bean and Mr. C. S. 
Conant for their contributions in a musical way. 

No school was asked for in "West Concord this year 
and therefore none was begun. Your attention is called 
to the following statistics : 



SUMMARY. 








Males 


Females 


Total 


Whole number attending, 


82 


22 


104 


Average membership, 






55.148 


Average daily absence. 






13.72 


Average daily attendance, 






41.42 


Age of youngest pupil. 






15 


Age of oldest pupil. 






42 


Average age, 






23 


ROLL OF 


HONOR. 







Vincent Ottobrino, Lony Stotleos, Jim S. Stotleos, Con- 
stantin Mamos, Sotalos Martin. 



NATIONALITIES. 



Swedish, 14 ; Armenian, 3 ; Canadian, 18 ; Finnish, 8 ; 
American, 7 ; Italian, 9 ; Albanian, 7 ; Russian, 6 ; Turk- 
ish, 14; Greek, 12; Polandish, 2; Irish, 4. 



98 city of concord. 

High School. 

GROUP I. 

This group, made up of the last three years of the 
school curriculum located in the high school building, 
is larger than ever before in point of pupil enrollment. 
With the advent of eight-five new pupils at the beginning 
of the second semester and the graduation of only six, 
the capacity of the building is severely taxed. The at- 
tendance now has reached 446, the largest number ever 
registered in the school under the prevailing scheme of 
grading. Next June sixty will graduate and in the fall 
between one hundred twenty and one hundred fifty new 
pupils will enter, which, with the usual number of with- 
drawals will certainly result in an attendance of over 475. 
That the building will be crowded is plainlj^ evident. 
After next year, the number of graduates will approxi- 
mate the number of new pupils and a normal attendance 
will result which can be used safely for future calcula- 
tions. 

In the fall the principal was requested to make unusual 
efforts along the following lines: General discipline, gen- 
eral morale and general scholarship. Noticeable improve- 
ments have been made. The school maintains a corps of 
cadets, a school paper The Volunteer, and the athletic 
activities usually attached to schools of this grade. There 
are five distinct courses of study: Course I (college pre- 
paratory) ; II, Academic; III, Commercial; IV, Mechanic 
Arts (boys) ; V, Domestic Arts (girls). 

The enrollment in these courses is as follows : 

Course 
I, 

n, 
III, 

V, 

387 485 872 



Boys 


Girls 


Total 


115 


161 


276 


38 


58 


96 


82 


185 


267 


152 




152 




81 


81 



Class 

M, 
N, 
0, 
P, 
Q, 
R, 
s, 

T, 
U, 
V. 



lOOL REPORT. 




99 


[NG FOR 


COLLEGE. 






Boys 




Girls 


Total 


11 




9 


20 


10 




15 


25 


3 




1 


4 


'4 




5 


9 


14 




6 


20 


19 




1 


20 


10 




2 


12 


8 




4 


12 


4 




2 


6 


10 




4 


14 



93 49 142 



From this tabulation it appears that out of 872 pupils 
only 142 or 16-|- per cent, intend entering college, leaving 
the remaining 730 pupils or 83-|- per cent., after gradu- 
ation, to enter upon the various duties of life. For 500 
pupils we are maintaining courses III, IV and V. It 
would seem that many, approximately 80, are taking 
courses I and II largely for sentiment with no particular 
end in view, others probably with the delusion that a 
serviceable education can be gained in no other way. 

COURSE I. 

Latin and Greek are not now demanded for entrance 
into college. This fact coupled with the absolutely dead 
and dry methods of handling the subjects is responsi- 
ble for their sIoav elimination from the requirements of 
the secondary schools. The number now taking Greek 
in this school is five, which would be increased to seven 
if classes of one student each were allowed to be formed. 
The number electing Latin remains about the same as in 
former years. It is probable that this number may grow 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

if the rational method of teaching it in the early years 
is followed throughout the course. 

COURSE II. 

Course II is really supplementary to Course I, the only 
difference being in the substitution of one subject for 
another, and as a distinct course it has little or no sig- 
nificance. 

COURSE HI. 

The idea of this course is to make everything practi- 
cable. The continuity of the work has been badly broken 
by a change of instructors. No matter how much supe- 
rior the succeeding teacher may be to the one retiring, a 
break in method and manner during the working period 
is bound to be keenly felt and should be obviated in the 
future, 

COURSE IV. 

The interest in this course for mechanic arts increases 
year by year, and much work apart from the schedule is 
done whenever the students get time for it. 

COURSE V. 

This course of domestic arts for girls is in full oper- 
ation through class R. Its aims and accomplishments 
are fully set forth under domestic arts elsewhere in this 
pamphlet. 

Pupils who are fitting for college are given the best 
attention possible with the conditions which prevail. To 
some extent individual work is done outside the class 
recitation. I am quite sure that the segregation of these 
students, as far as possible, holding them strictly account- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

able for the requirements made by the colleges and di- 
vorcing all others from such, would bring results worth 
any additional expense that might be incurred. The fail- 
ure of students to pass the examinations of the college 
board may or may not show the quality of work done 
in a high school. If the student of average ability is recom- 
mended for examination and fails after four years of 
preparation, then it may be assigned to poor teaching and 
school management. 

The best test of efficiency in our high school from the 
point of college preparation is the fact that since 1906 
over one hundred students have entered the various col- 
leges directly from this school. 

There are now enrolled in these institutions nearly 
sixty from Concord, or over twenty per cent, of its gradu- 
ates have entered college. Returns on file show that, 
with but two or three exceptions, all have done satisfac- 
tory work. Beyond the initial class standing in college, 
a high school should not be held accountable for the 
failure of its graduates because the question of environ- 
ment and the peculiar features of college life may undo 
their preparation, however excellent it may have been. 

ENGLISH. 

The English teaching in public schools is under severe 
criticism from the press of the country. Possibly much 
of this would be declared unjust if weighed carefully ac- 
cording to the conditions under which the teachers labor. 
Some of it is just, however, and steps are being taken to 
correct various faults that are manifest. Vitality in the 
work is to be brought about through the medium of de- 
bates, oral compositions, speeches at imaginary banquets, 
group work with reports, and dramatizations (in part for 
the recitation room, in the whole for the hall). 

Last year one division in group work composed two 



102 CITY OF CONCORD. 

novels, one play and a set of tableaux based on the 
** Idylls of the King." Guide-books, post-cards, maps of 
journeys and other forms of illustration are used. Pupils 
taking Sohrab and Rustum are now preparing the book 
for delivery before the class. This department needs a 
combination projector and reflectroscope and I recom- 
mend the purchase of one. The lantern owned by the 
school is made for slides only. The school is now pre- 
paring "Cricket on the Hearth" (Dickens) to be given 
at the end of the term. I cannot commend too strongly 
the productions of such plays. It is not too much to ex- 
pect of this school that it produce plays representing the 
best features of the course in English literature. 

STUDY HOURS. 

The severe occupation of the building makes it impossi- 
ble to reserve any rooms for study alone. Considerable 
work with deficient pupils is done by the teachers in the 
afternoon. Next year attempts will be made to divorce 
study from the recitation rooms and to have the study 
periods more carefully supervised. 

STUDY OF GENERAL METHOD. 

I regret to report that no movement has yet been made 
toward having teachers' meetings for the study and dis- 
cussion of general method. Leaving this to the discre- 
tion of each teacher might produce some good, but it can 
never accomplish what may be gained from interchange 
of ideas and general discussion coming from an organized 
body. 

LATIN. 

In class a trial is being made of sight reading with- 
out review with a short drill on syntax at the beginning 



SCHOOL REPORT. 103 

of each recitation. One period a week is given to Latin 
prose composition. 

THE TEACHING FORCE. 

There is evidence of a Willingness to receive sugges- 
tions, to do extra work, and to take an interest in the 
welfare of the individual pupil. The lack of professional 
etbics, disregard of honor and the lawlessness which some 
teachers have shown in breaking solemn contracts be- 
tween themselves and this district finds its equal only 
in the spirit displayed by the school boards who have 
urged them to do so and employed them in the face of 
contract breaking. Steps are being taken to relieve 
teachers from much of the drudgery of teaching in order 
that they may give more attention to their profession. 
Any system that imposes duties upon a teacher which it 
takes seven days a week to perform, defeats the object 
for which it is done and violates individual rights which 
we are bound to respect. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The entire seating capacity of the building is now 479. 
The general equipment is sufficient for carrying on the 
work. During the summer vacation the entire interior 
of the building was decorated and now presents an at- 
tractive, restful appearance. A new curtain and desk 
are being made for the hall and an additional room for 
domestic science was fitted up in the basement. 

Many new books have been placed in the library. This 
leads me to ask that this room be placed in the constant 
charge of some one who has skill in the care and arrange- 
ment of libraries. I am quite sure it can be done with- 
out much extra expense. 



104 CITY OP CONCORD. 

GENERAL PROGRESS. 

I believe the school to be gaming in efficiency and that 
it compares favorably with other secondary schools con- 
ducted under similar conditions. The work of many stu- 
dents is of high order. On the whole there are perhaps 
too many of average standing, which shows a lack of vari- 
ation in effort. This can be remedied only through the 
medium of vitality in recitation caused by life, interest 
and professional study by the teacher. 

Distinct gain has been made in the following particu- 
lars: Confining notices of social and athletic activities 
to the bulletin boards in the hall; observing more closely 
the bounds beyond which the pupils must not go at re- 
cess ; working with the home in special cases ; reduction 
of tardy marks. 

The Parker School. 

GROUP II. 

The purposes with which this school has been conducted 
and the results achieved are those of former years. 

It exemplifies methods of instruction in a modern way. 
This results in eliminating largely the waste of school 
time and in maintaining remarkable proficiency in school 
work. Throughout the entire first semester the building 
was so badly crowded as to forbid exercises in physical 
drill which have always formed a distinct feature here. 
The room of the Board of Education had to be used for 
recitations. 

The usual observance of parents' night took place in 
the winter term. The pupils conducted an exposition of 
school work, and an introductory hour was given to 
dramatizations in English, Latin and French, essays, oral 
compositions, and music in the hall which was filled with 



SCHOOL REPORT. 105 

the parents of the pupils. These exercises were brought 
to a close with a short address by Hon. H. C. Morrison, 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Much thought is being given to close correlation of 
studies so that they may more nearly approach to real 
life — a plan which arouses energy and interest in the 
pupil causing him to loA''e his work and strive to his ut- 
most to accomplish it. During the fall term the school 
began the six-hour-a-day plan. The success of this scheme 
was evident from the beginning as shown by the follow- 
ing results : 

A more rational arrangement of study and recitation 
periods. 

A more careful supervision of the studies by the 
teacher. 

A reduction of home study to a reasonable minimum. 

A better and easier accomplishment of the work. 

The home dinner more fully realized. 

A stronger interest shown by the pupils. 

A better general scholarship. 

The more I study the working of this scheme the better 
I like it, and I am free to say that for any school which 
calls its pupils from very long distances it is the best ar- 
rangement with which I have had experience, and stands 
as one of the most desirable steps taken for improving 
the education of high school pupils. I would recommend 
it for all schools where extraordinary conditions call for 
it. 

The Chandler, Garrison and Eastman Schools. 

"Whatever has been said about the Parker School is true 
to a degree of these. 

The Chandler School is model in its teachers, school 
spirit and accomplishments. The conduct of the work 
upon the departmental plan rounds out more fully the 



106 CITY OF CONCORD. 

work in this line begun in the Kimball and the Rumford 
schools. The methods in use are as distinctly modern 
and effective and the discipline all that can be desired. 
The school has a distinct reputation for fine work and 
entertains many visitors from other towns, but is badly 
handicapped for want of sufficient room. 

Tinder these conditions the teachers are to be com- 
mended for their freedom from complaint. 

The Elementary Schools. 

I commend to your notice the general excellence of the 
work done in this group. Each teacher is furnished at 
the beginning of the year with a typewritten course of 
study from which she may gain an idea of the amount 
of work to be done and the general method to be em- 
ployed. The steps in the various studies are intended to 
be logically successive resulting from many conferences 
between the teachers and the superintendent. Beginning 
with the fifth grade the superintendent gives tests twice 
each year. These are subject to revision in joint meet- 
ings of the teachers and superintendent before they are 
given to the pupils. 

The teachers of each building meet at least once in 
two weeks to discuss work in connection with their 
schools and also to pursue the study of some work in 
pedagogy of acknowledged merit. The results of these 
meetings are very noticeable in improving the general 
conduct of the schools. Such gatherings are not only of 
great educational value to the schools but decidedly eco- 
nomical for the district. 

May I be permitted also to call your attention to the 
great advances being made in many subjects through 
specific methods in handling them. This is true espe- 
cially in geography and history and to a great extent in 
all the other branches. Much thought is now being given 



SCHOOL REPORT. 107 

to the proper teaching of the art of spelling both in the 
oral and the written forms. We hope this eventually 
may be apparent in increased efficiency in the higher 
grades. The results of the Palmer system of penmanship 
are fairly satisfactory in legibility and eminently so in 
regard to speed in execution. 

Morrill School of Manual Tr/UNing and Mechanic Arts. 

enrollment. 

The entire enrollment has been less this year than last, 
but that of the mechanic arts classes has been larger. 
The following table shows the growth of the mechanic 
arts classes : 

September, 1908, 10 

1909, 27 

1910, 56 

1911, 71 

1912, 93 

1913, 110 
February, 1912, 96 

1913, 99 

1914, 128 

In February 75 new class K boys were admitted. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The following equipment was installed during the year: 
One 51/^ horse-power electric motor in place of the old 
2 horse-power. 

One proof press for printing shop. 
Twenty-four new quick-action vises in room 3. 
One 1 11-16'' shaft in place of old 1 3-16'' shaft. 



108 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Twelve new tables in the drawing-room. These were 
made entirely by the school and twelve more are being 
built. 

Needed for next year: 

Six new lathes for wood-turning. 

Four neAV forges. 

One universal grinder. 

One gas forge. 

WOOD-WORKING. 

A large amount of furniture has been made — fifty- 
eight pieces in all, representing a value of $800 intrin- 
sically and much more educationally. This is additional 
to the work of the curriculum. 

MACPIINE SHOP. 

The interest in machine work may be estimated from 
the fact that seventeen boys of the sophomore class work 
regularly afternoons doing a part of the junior require- 
ments in advance. 

In addition to the regularly scheduled work the fol- 
lowing pieces have been made : Four 18 H. P. engines, 
two 6 H. P. and one 3 H. P. and two bench emery 
grinders. 

PRINTING. 

Not quite so much has been accomplished, as a smaller 
number of boys have elected this work. Eight are taking 
printing as a special. 

The department has turned out the following work 
during the year from February 13, 1913, to February 12, 
1914: 



SCHOOL REPORT. 109 

Superintendent's Office. 

4,000 Programs. 

100 Postals. 

500 Truant officer's reports. 
3,000 Promotion cards. 
1,000 Reports of pupils leaving school. 

200 Applications to Dewey Training school. 
1,150 Prize speaking tickets. 
35 Postal cards. 

500 Delivery slips. 

400 Parker school programs. 
10,000 Parker school luncheon tickets. 
1,000 Election cards. 
4,400 Parents' excuse slips. 

500 Notices of receipts. 

500 Study hour slips. 
2,400 ]\[emorial Day envelopes. 

500 Postal cards. Board of Education. 

500 Receipt slips. 
1,200 Notices of Teachers' course. 
1,100 Tickets for Teachers' course. 
2,000 Registration slips. 

200 Invitations to school musical. 
28,000 Cards for Parker school. 

High School. 

200 Programs for graduation. 
1,200 Program cards. 

400 Ballots for Vohmteer. 

500 Blank ballots. 
1,000 Registration cards. 
1,000 Traders' National Bank drafts. 

300 Election cards. 

300 Tickets for interscholastic debate. 

800 Programs for interscholastic debate. 



110 CITY OF CONCORD. 

4,000 Study slips. 
8,300 Recitation slips. 
5,000 Geometry papers. 

100 Lists of graduates. 
3,500 Library cards. 
1,000 Letterheads. 
5,000 Library slips. 

500 Billheads. 

800 Programs for dramatic club. 

600 Programs for debate. 

300 Tickets for indoor dual meet. 

300 Tickets for indoor class meet. 
50 Invitations for High School Club. 

500 Programs for graduation. 

100 Letterheads for High School Club. 

Morrill School. 

200 Invitations to visit Morrill school, 

500 Program cards. 
1,600 Daily cards. 
1,600 Registration cards. 
2,400 Daily cards. 

1,000 Invitations to mid-year exhibit. 
2,000 Reports of pupils absent. 
1,000 Outline of wood-working course. 
1,000 Invitations to June exhibit. 

100 Letterheads. 

500 Receipts for dues, N. H. Man. Training Club. 

100 Return envelopes, N. H. Man. Training Club. 
1,000 Letterheads for Morrill school. 

DRAWING. 

The improvement in this department is decided. Pupils 
have to work with great diligence to reach the standard. 
A number of boys are taking drafting as an elective. 



I 



il 



SCHOOL REPORT. Ill 

INDUSTRIAL CLASS. 

The class was discontinued at the end of the semester in 
January principally for lack of room. This is a matter 
of regret because some boys will lose from one to two 
years of school life on this .account. Over 70% of those 
who have graduated have gone to work at trades the rudi- 
ments of which were learned in this school. In the future 
provision may be made for such pupils to take certain lines 
of regular school work in the public day school and also 
extra work in manual training at this school. 

Work Done by This Class. 

Sleeveboard for sewing school. 

Repaired two doors at Chandler school. 

Made shelf for Rumford school. 

Repaired five drawing tables for high school. 

Took off storm doors, Dewey school. 

Put on awnings, Dewey school. 

Made board for cooking school. 

Removed double windows, Tahanto school. 

Removed double windows, H. P. Dame school. 

Made two table tops, Kimball school. 

Planed thirty bread boards, cooking school. 

Made and fitted board for cupboard, cooking school. 

Put up blackboard for cooking school. 

Put up curtain pole for cooking school. 

Repaired screen for Dewey school. 

Repaired desk cover for high school. 

Repaired two chairs for high school. 

Put on storm v/indows at H. P. Dame school. 

Repaired steps, H. P. Dame school. 

Cut hole in window sash. Chandler school. 

Took off awnings for Dewey school. 



112 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Put ou storm windows, Dewey school. 

Took off awnings for Franklin school. 

Eepaired umbrella stand, high school. 

Made umbrella stand, high school. 

Made fifteen drawers for card file, Morrill school. 

Moved bank in business department, high school. 

TEACHERS. 

Several changes in the teaching force have occurred 
within the year. Mr. Hamill was retired at the end of 
the spring term. Mr. Kempton went to Dover, N. H., Mr. 
Chellman went to Pittsburgh, Pa., Mr. Brock, who form- 
erly taught here, was employed, and Mr. Gove enrolled 
as a student assistant, a scheme which has become an es- 
tablished policy here. The time of the teachers is fully 
taken up, each one having a regular room and held respon- 
sible for its care. 

NEW IDEAS. 

A new dark-room has been built for special work in 
photography. A course of lectures pertaining to this 
work will be given by the principal during this semester. 

A reading room and library ought to be added to con- 
tain books and current periodicals closely related to the 
lines of work done here. The moral effect upon the schools 
would be decidedly helpful as boys who otherwise might 
drift into places very much less desirable could be induced 
to spend their afternoons here from 3 to 5 o'clock supple- 
menting their school work by additional reading. 



school report. 113 

Domestic Arts, 
high school. 
Cooking — Group II. 

Classes M, N, 0, P receiye instruction in cooking from 
Miss Adams at the cooking room in the Parker school. 
During the first semester classes from the Chandler school 
were taught at this place by Miss Buttrick. At the end of 
the spring term Miss Helen A. Harrington, who had taught 
here for a number of years, resigned to accept a position 
in the northwest. So many girls were electing domestic 
arts that it was found necessary to employ not only a 
regular instructor of cooking but also an additional 
teacher in the high school who could handle the various 
branches required. Miss Marion B. Adams, of Dorches- 
ter, was chosen to succeed Miss Harrington and Miss Mar- 
ian Buttrick, of Arlington, Mass., was elected for the high 
school work. The course calls for a teacher who can 
carry the following subjects : Household mechanical ap- 
pliances, household sanitation, physiology and hygiene, 
home nursing, invalid cookery. In addition to the first 
two branches Miss Buttrick has handled the special classes 
in cooking and in English. 

The work in cooking has been marked by an interest 
and progress noticeable in many ways. Several girls are 
making bread for their respective homes, taking pride in 
the privilege and responsibility accorded them. The 
class note-books have much more nearly approximated 
models of neatness and accuracy. The largest number 
in any class is reported as twenty-six. Fifteen is an ideal 
number, but it is doubtful if we can be assured of not ex- 
ceeding it. Last year the numbers were larger than this. 
At the parents' night in the Parker school the students 
furnished samples of their work in bread making in the 
form of loaves, biscuits, Parker House rolls; also, coffee 



114 CITY OP CONCORD. 

and lemon jellies, snow pudding, plain and caramel cus- 
tards, Spanish cream, and plain, sponge and frosted cakes. 
During the first two weeks of the first semester the follow- 
ing canning was done by the pupils for various people : 

50 glasses of grape marmalade, with raisins and nuts. 

6 glasses of grape jelly. 
30 glasses of spiced grape. 
20 glasses of crab-apple jelly. 

2 jars of preserved crab-apple. 
25 jars of ripe tomatoes. 
34 jars of preserved peaches. 

4 jars of picalilli. 
12 jars of preserved pears. 

The housekeeping features of the course have received 
special attention throughout the year. 

The Work of Group I. 

The first class to be given this work is enrolled now as 
class R. It has finished household mechanical appliances 
and is now taking up household sanitation. Specific 
method has been outlined for this work to be carried out 
by the teacher. The work is made as practicable as pos- 
sible including all forms of illustration, trips to plants, 
etc. In class Q two lessons a week in household chem- 
istry are given. The special classes of this school in 
cooking are handled by Miss Buttrick. 

Music. 

The first three semesters of this work are given over to 
musical theory and melody writing. The girls of class Q 
became so proficient that they have done creditable work 
in composing original, two-part songs. Following this 
comes work in harmony, and then a study of music for 



SCHOOL REPORT. 115 

the home. A Victor horn machine has been purchased for 
the work to demonstrate the various forms of music appre- 
ciation. 

Sewing. 

The character of the work done in the elementary schools 
has varied little from that of previous years in method of 
performing it or in general content. 

THE DOMESTIC ARTS CLASSES. 

Remarkable improvement is noted in the work of the 
pupils in classes S, T. These girls started this work two 
years ago in class 0. The gain is noticeable in the amount 
of garment making. At this writing there are 70 working 
on dresses and another class begins in a few weeks; 130 
girls are working on undergarments. In addition to this 
those of Q and R classes make their spring and their win- 
ter hats. The results of the second trial were greatly 
superior to those of the first and the improvement is steady 
and sure. 

This department, as well as that of cooking, labors under 
the disadvantage of having a room too small for its work. 
If larger and more convenient quarters could be had, the 
amount of work turned out by the pupils would be in- 
creased. The work must be made to correlate quite closely 
with that of the art department when household decoration, 
is begun. 

The exhibition at the end of the year displayed 25 fin- 
ished kimonos, 40 dresses, and besides the usual model 
work from the elementary schools, a great variety of under- 
garments and embroidery. 

An exhibition of class work was held on parents' night- 
at the Parker school. 



1]^(5 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ART. 

There are now six classes in the . domestic arts course 
in which sixty-five pupils are enrolled. All the different 
requirements are being fulfilled. Correlation of dress de- 
sign and millinery is being carried on in connection with 
sewing. The history and appreciation of art are being at- 
tempted with more or less success. The most useful 
scheme of accomplishing this remains to be worked out, 
and will probably be done by its transfer to the history de- 
partment of the high school, a rearrangement of the order 
in which it is to be taken up, and by the selection of some 
text suitable for such work. 

The call for the domestic arts class may be known from 
the fact that with the course but half in operation sixty- 
five girls are taking it. 

The value of this course is not well understood by the 
parents in general. If a girl is not to take a college course, 
become a teacher, doctor, lawyer, or a commercial worker, 
but the mistress of a home, then this course in domestic 
arts is the one to be chosen. Its prime object is to improve 
home conditions so that home influence may resume its 
one time position of being the most powerful factor in 
sustaining and upbuilding our republican form of govern- 
ment. During the coming year a circular will be printed 
and sent to the homes in Concord setting forth this course 
as ideal in its conception, in its make-up, and in its execu- 
tion. I believe its conception combines more of the cul- 
tural with the practical than any other course ever offered 
in the public schools. 

The Training School. 

The purposes, scope of work, excellence of instruction 
and results remain about the same as heretofore. En- 
trance to these classes is now confined to graduates from 



fl 



SCHOOL REPORT. 117 

high school courses I and II. The numbers taking train- 
ing do not vary much from year to year and on graduation 
they invariably find positions if they seek them. The 
graduates of this school, through the established rule of 
the Board of Education, eventually find ijlaces in our city 
schools, meanwhile they are quite well scattered over the 
country and are always welcomed wherever they may be. 
The seniors give invaluable assistance to the various 
schools in the capacity of instructors for backward and 
deficient pupils. 

Drawing. 

The requirements of the domestic arts classes made so 
great demands upon the time of Miss Stalker that it was 
found necessary to employ Miss Mary A. Jones as an as- 
sistant. Miss Jones seems to have the same measure of 
success in this work that she did as a regular teacher, which 
was always worthy of high commendation. Her duties are 
confined mainly to the first five years. The arrangement 
already shows its effects in more even sets of drawings, 
increased interest and confidence among the teachers. Miss 
Stalker's work is confined to the training classes, seventh 
year classes and the domestic arts classes. 

An exhibition of drawing Avas held at the Parker school 
in June and was worthy of the high appreciation bestowed 
upon it. 

The cover design and the title page of this report were 
designed and drawn by Eva Campbell, '16, and Hazel 
Jones, '16, respectively, pupils of the domestic arts course. 

Music. 

The standard of music instruction in our schools has 
never been higher and I doubt very much if a place can 
be found where it is so well scheduled as a distinct element 
in a public school course. This is shown by a keen interest 
in all musical matters. 



118 CITY OP CONCORD. 

There are three good choruses, one in the Chandler 
school, one in the Parker school and an unusually large 
one in the high school. There is also an orchestra of merit 
made up of pupils as follows: High school, 8; Parker 
school, 5 ; Chandler school, 6 ; a total of nineteen members. 
Rehearsals are held Mondays in the afternoon and the 
pupils receive credit for this work. The instrumentation 
is as follows: Seven first violins, six second violins, one 
viola, two 'cellos, one cornet, one drums and bells, one 
piano. 

This orchestra played before the Concord Musical Club 
on the sixth of January at a public debate and at two after- 
noon musicals in the high school hall. I recommend that 
some of the instruments be purchased and held as prop- 
erty of the district. These would include double bass, 
viola, trombone and tympani. The work of the elementary 
schools is constructive and well carried out. The instruc- 
tor gives special mention to the results attained by the 
pupils of the Rumford and Penacook schools, asks for 
chromatic pitch-pipes, and arrangements that will allow 
more pupils to take chorus singing during the first period 
in the high school. 

Kindergartens. 

Owing to crowded conditions the Tahauto kindergarten 
was given up. The work of these quite essential parts of 
our school system has been good. The attendance has 
shown a slight increase. There is a growing movement in 
the country to make kindergartens a part of the regular 
system as they should be. The value of this preliminary 
training has been demonstrated by a long continued exist- 
ence against the most trying and often uncompromising 
influences. There has never been a time when they were 
so generally accepted as they are to-day, due wholly to 
the spread of the purposes of the instruction, a widening 



SCHOOL REPORT. 119 

field of operation, and the steadfastness of their adher- 
ents. It is well for Concord that it has this work ante- 
cedent to that of the regular schools. The age limits are 
now from four to six years, which are quite reasonable. 
The entering age of the primary schools is five years. This 
is one year younger than is the case in many other places. 
I recommend that the kindergarten ages he fixed by regu- 
lation from four to six years and that the entering age of 
the primary grades be made six years instead of five. 

Events of the Year. 

The John and Molly Stark Societies, Children of the 
Eepublic, of the Rumford school, held an open meeting 
for the D. A. R. on June 6, 1913. 

The annual English prize essay contest was held on Sat- 
urday, May 4, 1913. 

On March 31, 1913, the pupils of the girls' industrial 
class of the Chandler school furnished a lunch for some 
members of the Board of Education and the superintendent 
of schools, six in all, for a total cost of $0,967. Another 
lunch was also prepared by one of the cooking classes for 
seven people for $1,123. A detailed account of these 
menus may be found in Appendix I to this report. 

Health day was observed by all the schools. The fol- 
lowing people spoke at the various schools : 

Dr. Bugbee, high school, girls. 

Dr. Graves, high school, boys. 

Dr. Metcalf, Parker school. 

Dr. Amsden, Rumford school. 

Dr. Hoyt-Stevens, Merrimack school. 

Dr. Day, Kimball school. 

Dr. George Clarke, Dewey school. 

Dr. Wilkins, Penacook school. 

Dr. Kerr, Chandler school. 



120 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dr. Sprague, H. P. Dame school. 
Mr. Wallace Purrington, Garrison school. 
Miss Mollie Smith, R. N., Franklin school. 
Miss Elizabeth R. Murphy, R. N., Rumford, Kimball, 
Tahanto, Penacook, Cogswell and Eastman schools. 

The annual exhibitions of handwork were held at the 
close of the spring term at the Morrill manual training 
school; sewing, cooking and drawing at the Parker school. 

The Daughters of the American Revolution offered two 
prizes of $6 and $4, respectively, for the two best essays 
on "The Patriotism of To-day," open to all members of 
the high school, group I. The contest is to take place at 
the close of this term. 

Rev. Robert Marshall, of Dartmouth College, gave talks 
to the pupils of the high and the Parker schools on Novem- 
ber 17, 1913. 

Appropriate exercises were held in all the schools in ob- 
servance of Columbus Day, Washington's Birthday, Christ- 
mas Day, Health Day and Memorial Day. 

The second annual pageant of folk dances was held at 
White Park on June 10, 1913. The program, which in- 
cluded representations from all the elementary schools and 
kindergartens in the city, was more varied than the pre- 
ceding one, and was faultlessly carried out to the satisfac- 
tion of the thousands of people who witnessed it. It is a 
matter of regret that we cannot have one this year. The 
unusual tax placed upon some teachers on account of the 
giving up of the Walker school will not admit of it. If the 
schools had the services of one who could direct a strong 
course in physical culture, including such features as this, I 
believe the general health and poise of the pupils would 
be greatly improved. 



school report. 121 

Economy of School Time. 

The amount of time formerly lost by pupils of the high 
and Parker schools in going to and from a central cooking 
room has been obviated by establishing a new cooking room 
in each building. Such loss will be further reduced when 
the Walker school building is occupied, facilities for cook- 
ing and sewing being well provided for. It may prove de- 
sirable, eventually, to establish a manual training room in 
the basement of the Rumford school building for the ac- 
commodation of the Rumford boys and those of the south 
end parochial schools. 

Aside from this one source of economic waste permit me 
to call your attention to the time lost by closing school 
for divers reasons. Our allotted school year is thirty- 
eight weeks in length. The following statement gives a 
definite idea of conditions which prevail not only here but 
to a greater or less extent in all other cities : 

Days Lost. Partial Day Losses. 

Labor Day, 1 Exercises for Columbus Day. 

Columbus Day, 1 Exercises for Washington's 
State Teachers' Association, 1 Birthday. 

Thanksgiving recess, 2 Exercises for Memorial Day. 

New Year 's Day, 1 Exercises for Christmas Day. 

End of first semester, 1 Exercises for Folk Games. 

Washington's Birthday, 1 Exercises for Health Day. 
Merrimack Valley Teachers' 

Association, 2 

Fast Day, 1 

Memorial Day, 1 

Last day of year, 1 

13 

A loss of three weeks' school time would surely result 
from the above tabulation without counting one sessions 



122 CITY OP CONCORD. 

and no sessions on account of inclement weather. In view 
of this we are asked to do in thirty-eight weeks that for 
which Massachusetts cities are allowed forty. Certainly 
some plan should be devised by which all or a part of this 
time shall be restored. I wrote somewliat at length in 
ray last report about the misuse of periods allotted to reci- 
tation. This waste Avas much more noticeable in the old 
days than now. The floggings, wrangles and other un- 
seemly practices have virtually passed away and, through 
professional training of teachers, have given place to a 
friendly relation between teacher and pupil, improved 
methods of teaching and a more earnest desire in the 
pupil to attend school. The amount of time saved for 
school work by the elimination of such useless practices 
can be answered best by noting a greater amount of work 
done, much better, in four years less time than it was 
when "barring out" and red pepper practices were in 
vogue. There still remains with a few the tendency to 
use the recitation time for disciplinary matters which 
would better be handled at some other time and in some 
other way. The recitation period has a more dignified 
function and should not suffer from such encroachments. 
It may be of value to direct your attention to the waste 
in forcing a curriculum of studies upon unwilling, abnor- 
mal and lazy pupils. All these different types obtain in all 
schools and Concord is no exception. The unwilling is 
being educated by injunction, either from parental decision 
or by public statute, often both. The abnormal is in 
school either because his parent is unwilling to admit of 
his being so or because he is too poor to send his child to 
an institution maintained specially for such children. The 
lazy pupil is tliere usually because he has no liking for 
hard work and wishes to prolong his school life for no 
otlier reason. He is the most undesirable of all for he 
offers no example that is commensurate with his ability, 
continually misleads his parents, and does more real harm 



SCHOOL REPORT. 123 

to the school than the others combined. He is constantly 
troublesome but always within the limit, always attracting 
followers and evading, as far as possible, the school regu- 
lations. Many of these pupils are capable of taking a 
high standing but care to gain only a passing mark. Pupils 
struggling the best they can for creditable work, yet at- 
taining hardly mediocrity, deserve vastly more than do 
these capable idlers who seek to defeat the purpose for 
which man was created— to work. My deductions are 
drawn from long personal experience, the testimony of 
teachers and admissions of the pupils themselves. The one 
peat function of all school sj^stems should be to provide 
its pupils with enough of that which they seek to evade- 
hard work. 

In closing this report, I wish to testify to the great con- 
cern of the Board of Education for the upbuilding of our 
schools, the readiness to consider new ideas and to adopt 
measures for bringing them about. 

I am pleased to credit the corps of teachers with being 
responsible for the largest measure of success which may 
have been realized during the past busy year. With the 
same earnest concern we hope to return to the public, an- 
other year, a still better account for the money expended 
in maintaining their schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintende7it. 



APPENDIX I 



APPENDIX I. 



Concord, N. H., September 25, 1913. 
To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

I submit herewith the third semi-annual report of the 
condition of the schools under the reorganization scheme 
inaugurated in 1910. 

Financial. 

The deductions under this head are based somewhat upon 
estimates, but they are made with conservatism and result 
largely from comparisons and the combined judgment of 
business men, teachers and others. 

Bond issue which would have been incurred for 

enlarging new high school building, $30,000 

Interest on same for three years at 3i/2 per cent., 3,150 

Current expenses, 4,500 

Rooms discontinued, 1,950 

Additional tuition, 688 

Graduation expenses, 3,000 



$43,288 



The average cost per pupil has been reduced as may be 
seen from the following table : 

~ High School. Elementary Schools. Average. 

1909-1910 (old plan),* $33.14 $14.76 $23.95 

1910-1911 (new plan), 29.28 15.80 22.54 

1911-1912 (new plan), 26.24 14.09 20.28 

1912-1913 (new plan), t 28.09 18.03 23.06$ 

Decrease in average cost per pupil over old plan, $0.89. 
Increase in average cost per pupil over last year,t $2.78. 

* This year the high school four years and elementary schools eight years. 
t Increase due to raising the salaries of teachers by about $6,000. 
} The average cost per pupil under the old plan of salary schedule would have 
been $21.35 or $2.60 less than under 1910. 



128 city of concord. 

The Tuition Receipts. 

High School. Elementary Schools. 

1909-1910, $1,577.39 $576.66 

1910-1911, 1,863.37 453.97 

1911-1912, 2,301.31 ,, 454.90 

1912-1913, 3,603.24 603.92 

Increase in 3 years, 2,025.85* 

Increase in 3 years, 27,26 
Net increase in 3 years, $2,053.11.1 

Teachers. 

It is all-important that the equipment of the teaching 
force be kept up to the standard. The upper grades have 
suffered heavily because many teachers were induced to 
take positions elsewhere by the offer of larger salaries. 
This had a bad effect upon the general standing of the 
school. The recruiting force for classes M and N has been 
drawn from the ranks of the elementary teachers who have 
taken and are now taking courses in standard summer 
schools. The state requires study of at least two summers 
for certification for these grades. These teachers usually 
prove to be efficient for this work because tlieir grade ex- 
perience supplemented by extended study renders their 
services particularly desirable just at this point in the 
course. It is quite necessary that the teachers of group 
I should become quite familiar with the character of the 
work done in group II so that they may shape their methods 
of instruction toward uniformity in carrying on the thor- 
ough work of these schools. Concerted harmony of spirit 
and work is all essential toward maintaining the high 
standard which we require. -j 



* This increase is due partly to raising the rate of tuition from $45 to $55, so 
that under the former rates these should read *$1,575.67, t$l,602.92. 



t 



school report. 129 

General Scholarship. 

The general efficiency of school work under the prevailing 
plan is evidenced through personal observation and tabu- 
lated results. A careful inspection of the tabulations given 
herewith shows a general gain over last year and a very 
decided gain over 1910, the last year under the old plan. 

The number of pupils attaining a mark of A — or better 
was .06 per cent, larger than last year. 

The number of pupils attaining a mark of B — or better 
was .43 per cent, less than last year. 

The number of failures was 25 less than last year. 

The number of pupils leaving school for good was 54, 
the same as last year. 

By comparisons from various sources I can say with the 
utmost confidence that general scholarship of the schools 
has attained a much higher standard than it did under the 
old scheme of grading. For instance, comparing the results 
attained by the school of 1909-1910, the last year under the 
old scheme, with that of the last year's class, 1912-1913, 
we find the high school (4 years) under the old scheme 
averaged 76.15 per cent. That of last year averaged 80.77 
per cent. Assuming the pupils to be of the same ability 
this shows that the average scholarship has increased 4.62 
per cent. If my memory serves me correctly, I believe the 
school of 1909-1910 was superior in native ability to last 
year's class. 

By Classes. 

1909-'10. 1912']3. Increase. Decr'se. 

Senior class average for year, 78.66% 81.10% 2.44% 

Junior class average for year, 77.48 76.23 1.25 

Soph, class average for year, 78.56 82.09 3.53 

Fresh, class average for year, 69.91 83.69 13.78 



76.15 80.77 19.75 1.25 



130 CITY OP CONCORD. 

What is particularly significant in the above table is the 
fact that the freshman class of last year, a class inferior in 
natural endowment to the one of 1910, showed a gain of 
13.78 per cent, in scholarship. This can be ascribed to 
nothing but its isolation from the upper classes, its divorced 
attention from athletics, and not the least to the superior 
teaching it was fortunate to receive. 

The work of the elementary schools shows gain in some 
respects and a loss in others. There is a loss of .58 per 
cent, over last year in A — pupils and a loss of .94 per 
cent, in B — pupils. The number of failures is 14.42 per 
cent, less than last year. As a general thing the results 
are about average. 

Attendance. 

The growth in high school attendance may be ascribed 
to four different things. The improvement in laws regard- 
ing compulsory attendance at school, the enrichment of 
the courses of study, the improvement in methods of teach- 
ing, and the general effect of the system of regrading. 

1909-1910 1912-1913 
Whole number attending the high 

school (4 yrs.), 467 615 

Per cent, of whole number enrolled 

attending high school (4 yrs.), 16.42 21.76 

Whole number attending high 

school (5 yrs.), 677 867 

Per cent, of whole number enrolled 

attending high school (5 yrs.), 23.81 30.67 

Another significant fact is that the number leaving school 
has shown a very decided decline. This may be justly 
ascribed largely to the present system of grading. From 
the following table one may note improvement in nearly 
every item, the greatest being shown in the freshman class. 



I 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



131 



which is segregated from the three highest years of the 
high school. 





No. 


No. left 


Per cent, of 


In- 


De- 


High School (4yrs.) 


pupils. 


school. 


whole number. 


crease. 


crease 


19091910, 


481 


64 


13.30 






1912-1913, 


607 


53 


8.73 




4.57 


Senior Glass. 












19091910, 


64 


3 


4.68 






19121913, 


85 


4 


4.70 


.02 




Junior Class. 












1909-1910, 


96 


9 


9.37 






1912-1913, 


100 


9 


9.00 




.37 


Sophomore Class. 












1909-1910, 


143 


23 


16.08 






1912-1913, 


174 


21 


12.07 




4.01 


Freshman Class. 












1909-1910, 


178 


29 


16.27 






1912-1913, 


248 


19 


7.66 




8.61 



GROWTH OP HIGH SCHOOL (AVERAGE MEMBERSHIP). 









Total 


Per cent, of 


Per cent, of 




Total 


Total 


enrollment. 


enrollment. 


enrollment, 




enrollment. 


enrollment. 


high school, 


high s^^hool, 


high school. 




all schools. 


high school. 


old plan. 


new plan. 


old plan. 


1913-1914, 


2,552 


746 


523 


29.23 


20.49 


1912-1913, 


2,544 


820 


671 


32.23 


26.37 


1911-1912, 


2,599 


788 


485 


30.31 


18.65 


1910-1911, 


2,616 


641 


456 


24.50 


17.43 


19091910, 


2,673 


616* 


431 


23.04 


16.12 


1908-1909, 


2,653 


527* 


362 


19.86 


13.64 


1907-1908, 


2,645 


535* 


316 


20.22 


11.94 


1906-1907, 


2,654 


496* 


310 


18.69 


11.68 


1905-1906, 


2,611 


498* 


305 


19.07 


11.68 


1904-1905, 


2,627 


493* 


292 


18.76 


11.11 


1903-1904, 


2,553 


446* 


257 


17.47 


10.07 


Increase since 1903-1904, 






11.73 










(Total en 


rollment. ) 




1914, 


2,890 


802 


566 


27.75 


19.58 


1913. 


2,826 


867 


615 


30.67 


21.76 


1912, 


2,844 


829 


573 


29.14 


20.14 


1911, 


2,892 


762 


496 


26.34 


17.15 


1910, 


2,843 


757* 


457 


26.62 


16.07 


1909, 


2,856 


644* 


372 


23.54 


13.02 


1908, 


2,877 


583* 


350 


20.26 


12. IG 


1907, 


3,886 


541* 


340 


18.74 


11.73 


1906, 


2,846 


532* 


322 


18.69 


11.31 


1905, 


2,839 


509* 


307 


17.92 


10.81 


1904, 


2,908 


490* 


285 


16.85 


9.80 



Under the old scheme of grading. 



132 CITY OP CONCORD. 

TABLE SHOWING VARIATIONS IN THE AVERAGE AGE OP PUPILS. 

GRADES. 



Year. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 


10 


11 


1910 

1911 


y. m. 
6.10^ 

7.4 

7. 

8.2 


y. m. 

8,55 
8.4 
8.34 
9.65 


y. m. 
9.4J 
9.8 
9.7J 

11. 4J 


y. in. 

10.71 

10.9 

10.94 

11.8 


y. m. 

12.4 

11.11 

11.9 
11.54 


y. m. 

13.6 

13.2 

12.10 

13.10 


y. m. 

14.3 

14.1 

14.6 

14.6 


y. m. 

14.6 
15.10 
15.1 
16.1 


y. m. 

15.6 

17.6 

17. 

16.5 


y. m. 

16.6 

17.8 

17.5 

17.5 


y. m. 

17.6 

18.3 


1912 


18.8 


1913 


18.7 






Increase . . 


1.3J 


1.1 


2. 


1.5 .5 


.4 


.3 


1.7 


.11 


.11 


1.1 



The increase in the average age per pupil is a surprise 
to me and I can find nothing to account for it unless it be 
that pupils are staying in school who otherwise would have 
dropped out after the elementary grades were finished and 
that parents are voluntarily holding their children until 
they are older. Both of these things are favorable and 
strengthening. 

Hion ScnooL. 
Group 1. 

The number of A — pupils was 30, representing a gain 
of 3.69 per cent, over last year. 

The number of pupils leaving school was 19, represent- 
ing a gain of .37 per cent, over last year. 

The number of B — pupils was 167, representing a loss 
of 6.15 per cent, over last year. 

The number of failures was 22, representing a loss of 
1.46 per cent, over last year. 



11 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



133 



CLASSES Q AND R. 





No. pupils 


] 


""er cent. 


No. pupi 


s 


I 


'er cent. 




enrolled. 


Passed. 


Failed. 


failed. 


enrolled. 


Passed. 


Failed. 


failed. 


Geometry, 


128 


112 


16 


12.5 


115 


90 


25 


21.73 


English, 


124 


122 


2 


1.61 


109 


105 


4 


3.66 


Latin, 


53 


49 


4 


7.54 


35 


32 


3 


9.37 


Greek, 


4 


4 








6 


6 








French, 


120 


107 


13 


10.83 


121 


103 


18 


14.05 


C. Arith., 


39 


35 


4 


10.25 


42 


31 


11 


26.19 



1912. 1913. 

No. pupils Per cent. No. pupils Per cent, 

enrolled. Passed. Failed, failed, enrolled. Passed. Failed, failed. 



Geometry, 


122 


112 


10 


8.19 


57 


46 


11 


19.3 


English, 


111 


109 


2 


1.80 


113 


111 


2 


1.76 


Latin, 


36 


36 








21 


21 








Greek, 


3 


3 








5 


5 








French, 


113 


89 


24 


21.23 


102 


97 


5 


4.90 


C. Arith., 


44 


42 


2 


4.54 


73 


68 


5 


6.85 



The above table is made up from annual reports of the 
entering class. In geometry the number of failures was 
larger than usual which may be ascribed to the book being 
new both to teacher and pupils. 

In English the per cent, of failures was somewhat reduced 
over last year. 

In Latin there has not been a failure for two years. This 
may justly be accredited not only to efficient teaching but 
to the excellent preparation the pupils get in group 2. 

The number of failures in French was reduced over those 
of last year by 16.33 per cent. 

Commercial Arithmetic showed a loss of 2.31 per cent. 

The showing of the last two years by classes entering this 
group would seem to refute any statements that may have 
been made about their being badly fitted for this school. 

The general average of the school in scholarship was 
79.90 per cent. 



]^34 city of concord. 

Parker School. 
Group 2. 

The number of A — pupils was 28, representing a loss of 
2.50 per cent, over last year. 

The number of B — pupils was 146, representing a gain 
of 3.32 per cent, over last year. 

The number of pupils leaving school was 10, representing 
a gain of 1.14 per cent, over last year. 

The number of failures was 11, representing a gain of 
1.60 per cent over last year. 

1910. 1911. 
No. Left No. Left 

Classes, pupils. A — B — Failed, school, pupils. A — B — Failed, school. 

0, P, 143 38 39 17 28 185 31 68 13 22 



1912. 



1913. 



No. Left No. Left 

Classes, pupils. A — B — Failed, school, pupils. A — B — Failed, school. 
O, P, 232 32 127 14 16 248 28 146 11 19 

The work done here speaks for itself. There is little 
time lost to activities that do not either directly or indi- 
rectly aid the pupils in their regular work. 

The general average of the school in scholarship was 
84.30 per cent. 

Chandler, Walker, Garrison and Eastman Schools. 
Group 2. 

The number of A — pupils was 25, representing an in- 
crease of 4.72 per cent, over last year. 

The number of B — pupils was 89, representing an in- 
crease of 7.91 per cent, over last year. 

The number of pupils leaving school was 12, representing 
an increase of .54 per cent, over last year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



135 



The number of failures was 17, representing a decrease of 
3.50 per cent, over last year. 





1911. 


1912. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1912. 


1913. 


Increase. 


Decrease 


Garrison, 


36.3 


12.5 




23.8 


12.5 


29.16 


16.66 




Kimball, 


13.8 


5.1 




8.7 


5.1 








Rumford, 


4.3 


5.7 


1.4 




5.7 








Eastman, 





10.5 


10.5 




10.5 


9.52 




.98 


Walker, 


22.2 


13. 




9.2 


13. 


13.88 


.88 




Chandler, 


7.4 


12.3 


4.9 




12.3 


7.74 




4.56 


Merrimack 


26.3* 

















Average, 14.76 10.35 



4.16 10.35 15.07 



Garrison, 

Kimball, 

Rumford, 

Eastman, 

Walker, 

Chandler, 



1911. 
72.7 
44.4 
39.1 
20. 
50. 
45.7 



Merrimack, 57.8 



1912. 
62.5 
17.3 
20. 
15.8 
65.2 
44.8 



Per cent. B — pupils. 
Increase. Decrease. 1912. 



10.2 

27.1 

19.1 

4.2 



62.5 

17.3 

20. 

15.8 

65.2 

44.8 



1913. 
72.00 



33.33 
44.44 
31.69 



Increase. Decrease. 
7.51 



17.53 



Average, 48.32 37.45 



7.65 37.45 45.36 



8.43 



The average scholarship of these schools was 80.11 per 
cent. 

The results enumerated above show a good standard of 
scholarship and reflect credit upon the schools. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



By Schools. 

General average of the Garrison School for the year ending June 13, 1913, 86.6 

Walker, 80.4 

Eastman, 77.1 

Chandler, 76.5 

Parker, 83.6 

High, 79.3 

General average of the High School entire for the year ending June 13, 

1913, 80.3 



136 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



By Classes. 

General average of Class M for the year ending June 13, 1913, 
N 
O 
P 



77.4 

82.7 

87.5 

81.0 

78.2 

78.9 

72.82 

82.09 

76.23 

81.10 



Greek. 



1908 


Number 
graduates. 

3 


Numb 
these enterii 

1 


1909 


4 


2 


1910 


6 


4 


1911 


4 


3 


1912 








1913 


4 


a 



Number who had to tutor 
!. outside in the subject. 



2 


1 



The above list represents only those students who have 
completed the full three years' course in Greek. 



BY BUILDINGS. 



Average Number Pupils to a Teacher. 

1 — Franklin School, 42 

2 — Penacook School, 39 1-2 

3 — Cogswell School, 38 1-2 

4 — Tahanto School, 37 1-2 

5 — Chandler School, 37 1-5 
6 — Harriet P. Dame School, 33 2-3 

7 — Parker School, 31 5-8 

8 — Rumford School, 30 1-2 

9 — Eastman School, 29 1-3 

10 — Kimball School, 27 3-5 

11 — Merrimack School, 26 

12 — Garrison School, 24 3-7 

13 — High School, 22 10-17 

14 — Dewey School, 21 1-6 



Average Cost per Pupil for Teachers' 

Salaries. 

1 — High School, $40.07 

2 — Dewey School, 27.75 

3 — Garrison School, 27.40 

4 — Merrimack School, 23.84 

5 — Parker School, 22.33 

6— Kimball School, 21.73 

7 — Chandler School, 20.96 

8 — Rumford School, 20.65 

9 — Eastman School, 20.31 

10 — Cogswell School, 18.00 

11 — Tahanto School, 18.00 

12 — Penacook School, 16.77 

13 — Harriet P. Dame School, 15.71 

14 — Franklin School, 15.47 



SCHOOL REPORT. 137 

I find nothing in the working of the scheme that is not 
desirable and economical. It is worthy of notice that there 
is a decided movement throughout the country along lines 
approximating those of our graded system. Methods of 
economizing school time, school expenditure and plans 
of keeping pupils in school longer are in process of evolu- 
tion resulting from scientific experiments and legislative 
enactments. Along this line comes the necessity of vary- 
ing the requirements in high school for those pupils who 
are not to take a college course. That a pupil in the com- 
mercial course or domestic arts course should be com- 
pelled to meet the requirements of college entrance courses 
in English is absurd. The very fact that such things are 
demanded causes a lack of interest, influencing many to 
leave school who otherwise might continue to their own 
advantage. The next problem should be a careful read- 
justment of the requirements for the various high school 
courses and legislation requiring the study of modern 
methods of teaching by the teachers of every grade. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. EUNDLETT, 

Superintendent . 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOLARSHIP TABLE— 1913. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 









Mj, 




00 J, 










(1 








— ' © 




— (B 






o 




o 


SCHOOL. 


CO 


'S 


S O 


o 


" O 


Cj 


£ 


o 


Ci o 

tog 
ho 


<4H 




^ 


o 


6<Si 


o 


cXtS 


a; 


cS 


(B 


"^o 


.« 




CI 


Iz; 


2; 


Ph 


'i^ 


Oh 


b 


J 


h-] 


fe" 


High 


V 


64 


4 


6.25 


44 


68.75 











14 


Group 1 


IJ 


21 








6 


28.57 


2 


4 


2 


1 




'1' 


80 


11 


13.75 


42 


52.50 


1 


2 


2 


18 




s 


20 








2 


JO. 00 





7 


3 


3 




R 


95 


9 


9.47 


41 


43.15 


8 


1 


5 


12 




Q 


79 


6 


7.59 


32 


40.50 


11 


14 


7 


11 


Total 




359 


30 


8.35 


167 


46.51 


22 


34 


19 


59 


Parker 


P 


139 


13 


9.35 


81 


58.27 


7 


14 


7 


19 


Group 2 


O 


109 


15 


13.76 


65 


59.63 


4 


5 


3 


9 


Total 




248 


28 


11.29 


146 


58.06 


11 


19 


10 


28 


Chandler 


N 


72 


9 


12.50 


26 


34.72 


1 


3 


2 





Group 2 


M 


70 


2 


2.85 


19 


27.14 


8 


2 


2 









Total 




142 


11 


7.74 


45 


31.69 


9 


5 


4 





Garrison 


N 


17 


5 


29.41 


15 


78.23 


1 


2 


2 


2 


Group 2 


M 


7 


2 


28.57 


6 


85 71 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Total 




24 


7 


29.16 


21 


87 50 


2 


3 


3 


3 


Eastman 


N 
M 


12 
9 


2 



16.66 



5 

2 


42.50 
22.22 



5 



2 



2 





Group 2 





Total 




21 


4 


9.52 


7 


33.33 


5 


2 


2 





Walker 


N 


25 


16.00 


10 


40.00 


1 











Group 2 


M 


11 


1 


9.11 


6 


G6 66 


1 


2 


2 





Total 




36 


5 


13.88 


16 


44.44 


1 


2 


2 





Grand H. S. total 


j 830 


83 


10.00 


402 


48.19 


50 


65 


40 


90 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 
K 
J 
I 
G 
H 
F 
E 


142 
97 
157 
119 
179 
70 
140 
97 


13 

4 
10 

1 
23 

2 
17 




9.15 
4 12 
6.36 
.009 
12.84 
2.85 
12.14 



77 
48 
65 
33 
57 
21 
44 
6 


54.22 
49.48 
41.40 
27.72 
31.84 
30.00 
31.42 
6.18 


9 
3 
15 
23 
30 
12 
17 
21 


3 

7 
6 
1 
5 
3 
1 
2 


2 
6 
5 
1 








Total 




1,001 


70 


6.93 


351 


35.06 


130 


28 


14 




Grand total .... 




1,831 


153 


8.35 


753 


41.11 


180 93 


54 


90 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE. 



3Ir. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent : 

Dear Sir, — I herewith submit for your approval my 
fourth annual report. The work has been conducted prac- 
tically on the same plan as in previous years wath the ex- 
ception of devoting considerable time to dental hygiene. 

Through the interest of Dr. Harold Plaisted three hours 
a week have been given by him to the care of the teeth of 
children unable to pay for treatment. This experiment has 
produced wonderful results in promoting the general health 
of the children. 

By keeping in constant touch with the Board of Health 
I feel that a certain amount of contagion is eliminated from 
our schools; but this is not sufficient — we need expert 
medical supervision. 

"We have laws compelling parents to send their children 
to school and we certainly have not the right to keep them 
there without proper care. Not only the protection of the 
well child should be thought of, but the care of the child 
who is ill. This supervision should come through a medical 
inspector, assisted by a nurse. As a nurse in no sense is a 
diagnostician, one without the other is insufficient and 
should no longer be considered. 

All public health workers are in a great sense social 
workers, and a school nurse is fast becommg a great factor 
in social w^ork between the school and the home. Won- 
derful results could be obtained in this way if a little more 
time could be given. By close co-operation between the. 
Charity Organization Society and the Visiting Nurses' 
Association, much good has been accomplished. 

I acknowledge with gratitude and appreciation the kind- 



140 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ness of those who have so generously helped in this work, 
and to the physicians who have so loyally supported me in 
my efforts. 



Number of visits made at schools, 


104 


Number children taken to physicians, dentists and 




hospitals for treatment, 


190 


Number interviews and conferences with officials and 




others. 


58 


Number home calls made for 




defective vision. 


25 


defective teeth, 


15 


enlarged tonsils and adenoids, 


26 


pediculosis, 


20 


eczema, 


5 


epileptic, 


2 


paralysis, 


1 


mentally retarded, 


5 


scabies. 


3 


tuberculosis, 


3 


impetigo, 


2 


ringworm. 


2 


unkempt condition. 


2 


nervous condition. 


2 


skin infections. 


2 


dressings done, 


3 


investigations for communicable diseases, 


12 



Total number calls made at homes, 130 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH R. MURPHY, R. N. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



141 



Lunch Served at the Chandler School 

March 31, 1913, 

To Members of the Board of Education and the Superin- 
tendent of Schools — Six Persons. 



MENU. 

Cream of Cabbage Soup Lettuce Salad 

Toasted Crackers Meat Croquettes 

Baked Potatoes Baking Powder Biscuit 

Lemon Sherbet 

Coffee 

Cream of Cabbage Soup 
2 c. Cabbage @ 3 c. per lb., 

1 tsp. Butter @ 37c. per lb., 

2 tsp. Flour @ 80c. per Va bbl., 
2 c. Milk @ 4c. per pt., 
1 Onion, 





Lettuce Salad 




.01 


1 Head Lettuce, 


.05 


.025 


4 tsp. Oil and Vinegar, 


.04 


.003 


Seasonings, 


.00 


.04 






.01 




.09 



Meat Croquettes 

1 lb. Beef @ 15c. per lb., 

1 Egg @ 24e. per doz., 

Vs lb. Crackers @ 8c. per lb., 

V2 Onion @ Ic. each. 



Baking Powder Biscuit 

2 tsp. Butter @ 37c. lb., 

2 c. Flour @ 80c. per % bbl., 

% c. Milk @ 4e. pt., 

4 tsp. Baking Powder @ 50c. pkg.. 



.088 



.15 
.02 
.01 
.005 

.185 



.025 
.078 
.015 
.018 

.106 



Baked Potatoes 

6 Potatoes @ 24c. per pk. 

Butter Balls, 



Lemon Sherbet 

4 Lemons @ 3c. each, 

2 c. Sugar @ 5c. lb., 

11/^ qts. Milk @ 8c. qt., 

2 lbs. Rock Salt @ 5c. per 5 lbs., 

Ice @ 10c. cake. 



Coffee 

7 tsp. Coffee @ 27c. per lb., .033 

Vi pt. thin Cream @ 34c. per pt., .010 
3 tsp. Sugar @ 5c. per lb., .005 

2 Egg Shells, .000 

.048 

Cream of Cabbage Soup, $0,088 

Lettuce and French Dressing, .09 

Meat Croquettes, .185 

Baked Potatoes, .05 

Baking Powder Biscuits, .106 

Butter Balls by weight, .04 

Lemon Sherbet, .37 

Cofifee, .048 

Total cost of lunch, $0,977 

Average cost per person, $0,162 5-6. 



.05 
.04 



.09 



.12 
.06 
.12 

.02 
.05 

.37 



142 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Lunch Served hy Cooking Class 

To Seven Persons at the Chandler School. 

Spring Term, 1913. 



MENU. 

Cream of Celery Soup Toasted Crackers Salmon Loaf 

Baked Stuffed Potatoes 

Creamed Peas in Baskets 

Tomato Mold Bread and Butter Sandwiches 

Philadelphia Ice Cream 



Cream of Celery Soup 
Vz bunch Celery @ 22c., 

1 tsp. Butter @ 36c. lb., 

2 c. Milk @ 8c. qt.. 



Tomato Mold 

IV2 tsp. Gelatine @ 10c. box, 

1 Egg @ 24c. doz., 

1 can Tomatoes @ 63c. bo., 

1 head Lettuce @ 7c. head, 



Creamed Peas in Baslcets 

2 tsp. Flour @ 80c. per % bbl. 

1 tsp. Butter @ 36c. per lb., 

1 c. Milli @ 8c. qt., 

1 can Peas @ 13c. can, 

1 loaf Bread @ 8c. loaf. 



.11 

.01 
.04 



.03 
.03 
.04 
.07 

.16 



.003 

.01 

.02 

.13 

.05 

.215 



Toasted Crachera 
1-5 lb. Crackers, 
Baked Stuffed Potatoes 
6 Potatoes @ 24c. pk.. 
Seasonings, 



Salmon Loaf 

1 can Salmon @ 12V2C. can, 

1 Egg @ 24c. doz., 

1-5 lb. Crackers @ 5c. lb., 

1/2 c. Milk @ 8c. qt.. 



Bread and Butter Sandwiches 
V2 loaf Bread @ 3c. per loaf, 
Vs lb. Butter @ 36c. per lb., 

Philadelphia Ice Cream 
% pt. Cream @ 30c, per pt., 
% pt. Milk @ 4e. per pt., 
1 c. Sugar @ 6c. per lb., 
1 tsp. vanilla, 



.01 



.05 
.01 



.06 



.125 
.02 
.01 
.01 

.165 



.015 
.045 

.060 

.225 
.03 
.03 
.01 

.295 



Cream of Celery Soup, $0.16 

Toasted Crackers, .01 

Salmon Loaf, .165 

Baked Stuffed Potatoes, .06 

Creamed Peas in Baskets, .213 

Tomato Mold, .16 

Bread and Butter Sandwiches, .06 

Philadelphia Ice Cream, .295 

Total for seven persons, $1,123 

Average cost per person, $0,160 3-7. 



APPENDIX II. 



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school report. 129 

General Scholarship. 

The general efficiency of school work under the prevailing 
plan is evidenced through personal observation and tabu- 
lated results. A careful inspection of the tabulations given 
herewith shows a general gain over last year and a very 
decided gain over 1910, the last year under the old plan. 

The number of pupils attaining a mark of A — or better 
was .06 per cent, larger than last year. 

The number of pupils attaining a mark of B — or better 
was .43 per cent, less than last year. 

The number of failures was 25 less than last year. 

The number of pupils leaving school for good was 54, 
the same as last year. 

B}^ comparisons from various sources I can say with the 
utmost confidence that general scholarship of the schools 
has attained a much higher standard than it did under the 
old scheme of grading. For instance, comparing the results 
attained by the school of 1909-1910, the last year under the 
old scheme, with that of the last year's class, 1912-1913, 
we find the high school (4 years) under the old scheme 
averaged 76.15 per cent. That of last year averaged 80.77 
per cent. Assuming the pupils to be of the same ability 
this shows that the average scholarship has increased 4.62 
per cent. If my memory serves me correctly, I believe the 
school of 1909-1910 was superior in native ability to last 
year's class. 

By Classes. 

1909-'10. 1912-M3. Increase. Decr'se. 

Senior class average for year, 78.66% 81.10% 2.44 7o 

Junior class average for year, 77.48 76.23 1.25 

Soph, class average for year, 78.56 82.09 3.53 

Fresh, class average for year, 69.91 83.69 13.78 



76.15 80.77 19.75 1.25 



130 CITY OF CONCORD. 

What is particularly significant in the above table is the 
fact that the freshman class of last year, a class inferior in 
natural endowment to the one of 1910, showed a gain of 
13.78 per cent, in scholarship. This can be ascribed to 
nothing but its isolation from the upper classes, its divorced 
attention from athletics, and not the least to the superior 
teaching it was fortunate to receive. 

The work of the elementary schools shows gain in som^e 
respects and a loss in others. There is a loss of .58 per 
cent, over last year in A — pupils and a loss of .94 per 
cent, in B — pupils. The number of failures is 14.42 per 
cent, less than last year. As a general thing the results 
are about average. 

Attendance. 

The growth in high school attendance may be ascribed 
to four different things. The improvement in laws regard- 
ing compulsory attendance at school, the enrichment of 
the courses of study, the improvement in methods of teach- 
ing, and the general effect of the system of regrading. 

1909-1910 1912-1913 
Whole number attending the high 

school (4 yrs.), 467 615 

Per cent, of whole number enrolled 

attending high school (4 yrs.), 16.42 21.76 

Whole number attending high 

school (5 yrs.), 677 867 

Per cent, of whole number enrolled 

attending high school (5 yrs.), 23.81 30.67 

Another significant fact is that the number leaving school 
has shown a very decided decline. This may be justly 
ascribed largely to the present system of grading. From 
the following table one may note improvement in nearly 
every item, the greatest being shown in the freshman class, 



I 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



131 



which is segregated from the three highest years of the 
high school. 





No. 


No. left 


Per cent, of 


In- 


De- 


High School (4 yrs.) 


pupils. 


school. 


whole number 


crease. 


crease. 


1909-1910, 


481 


64 


13.30 






1912-1913, 


607 


53 


8.73 




4.57 


Senior Class. 












1909-1910, 


6-1 


3 


4.68 






1912-1913, 


85 


4 


4.70 


.02 




Junior Class. 












1909-1910, 


96 


9 


9.37 






1912-1913, 


100 


9 


9.00 




.37 


Sophomore Class. 












1909-1910, 


143 


23 


16.08 






1912-1913, 


174 


21 


12.07 




4.01 


Freshman Class. 












1909-1910, 


178 


29 


16.27 






1912-1913, 


248 


19 


7.66 




8.61 



GROWTH OP HIGH SCHOOL (AVERAGE MEMBERSHIP). 











Total 


Per cent, of 


Per cent, of 




Total 


Total 


enrollment. 


enrollment. 


enrollment, 




enrollment, 


enrollment. 


high school, 


high sjhool, 


high school, 




all schools. 


high school. 


old plan. 


7iew plan. 


old plan. 


1913-1914, 


2,552 


746 


523 


29.23 


20.49 


1912 


1913, 


2,544 


820 


671 


32.23 


26.37 


1911 


1912, 


2,599 


788 


485 


30.31 


18.65 


1910 


1911, 


2,616 


641 


456 


24.50 


17.43 


1909 


1910, 


2,673 


616* 


431 


23.04 


16.12 


1908 


1909, 


2,653 


527* 


362 


19.86 


13.64 


1907 


1908, 


2,645 


535* 


316 


20.22 


11.94 


1906 


1907, 


2,654 


496* 


310 


18.69 


11.68 


1905- 


1906, 


2,611 


498* 


305 


19.07 


11.68 


1904- 


1905, 


2,627 


493* 


292 


18.76 


11.11 


1903- 


1904, 


2,552 


446* 


257 


17.47 


10.07 


Increase since 1903-1904, 






11.73 










(Total enrollment.) 




1914, 


2,890 


802 


566 


27.75 


19.58 


1913. 


2,826 


867 


615 


30.67 


21.76 


1912, 


2,844 


829 


573 


29.14 


20.14 


1911, 


2,892 


762 


493 


26.34 


17.15 


1910, 


2,843 


757* 


457 


26.62 


16.07 


1909, 


2,856 


644* 


372 


22.54 


13.02 


1908, 


2,877 


583* 


350 


20.26 


12.16 


1907, 


2,886 


541* 


340 


18.74 


11.73 


1906, 


2,846 


532* 


322 


18.69 


11.31 


1905, 


2,839 


509* 


307 


17.92 


10.81 


1904, 


2,908 


490* 


285 


16.85 


9.80 



* Under the old scheme of grading. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
TABLK SHOWING YAKIATIOKS IN THE AYEKAGE AGE OE PUPILS. 

GRADES. 



Yeak. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


el . 


8 


9 


10 


11 


J910 


y. m- 
e.ioi 

7. 
8.2 

1.3^ 

1 


y. m. 
8.5i 
8.4 

8.3-1 
9.6^ 


y. m. 
9Ai 
9.8 
9.7i 
11. 4j 


y. m. 
10.7^ 
10.9 
10. 9J 
11.8 


y. m. 
12. i 
11.11 
11.9 
11. 5A 


y. m.' 

13.6 

13.2 

12.10 

13.10 


y. m. 

14.3 

14.1 


y. m. 

14.6 

15.10 


y. m. 

15.6 

17.6 

17. 

16.5 


y. m. 
16.6 

17.8 
17.5 
17.5 


y. m. 
17.6 


1911 


18.3 


1912 


14.6 15.1 


18.8 


J913 


14.6 


16.1 


18.7 


Increase . . 


1.1 


2. 


l.i 


.5 


.4 


.3 


i 1.7 

1 


.11 


.11 


1.1 



The increase in the aYcrage age per pupil is a surprise 
to me and I can find nothing to account for it unless it be 
that pupils are staying in school who otherwise would haYe 
dropped out after the elementary grades were finished and 
that parents are Yoluntarily holding their children untd 
they are older. Both of these things are faYorable and 
strengthening. 



High School. 
Group 1. 

The number of A— pupils was 30, representing a gain 
of 3.69 per cent, over last year. 

The number of pupHs leaYing school was 19, represent- 
ing a gain of .37 per cent. OYcr last year. 

The number of B— pupils was 167, representing a loss 
of 6.15 per cent, over last year. 

The number of failures was 22, representing a loss of 
1.46 per cent, OYcr last year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



133 



CLASSES Q AND R. 



1911. 





No. pupil: 


3 




Per cent. 


No. pupi 


Is 


P« 


;r cent. 




enrolled. 


Passed. 


Failed 


. failed. 


enrolled 


. Passed. 


Failed. 


failed. 


Geometry, 


128 


112 


16 


12.5 


115 


90 


25 


21.73 


English, 


124 


122 


2 


1.61 


109 


105 


4 


3.66 


Latin, 


53 


49 


4 


7.54 


35 


32 


3 


9.37 


Greek, 


4 


4 








6 


6 








French, 


120 


107 


13 


10.83 


121 


103 


18 


14.05 


C. Arith., 


89 


35 


4 


10.25 


42 


31 


11 


26.19 



1912. 1913. 

No. pnpils Per cent. No. pupils Per cent, 

enrolled. Passed. Failed, failed, enrolled. Passed. Failed, failed. 



Geometry, 


122 


112 


10 


8.19 


57 


46 


11 


19.3 


English, 


111 


109 


2 


1.80 


113 


111 


2 


1.76 


Latin, 


36 


36 








21 


21 








Greek, 


3 


3 








5 


5 








French, 


113 


89 


24 


21.23 


102 


97 


5 


4.90 


C. Arith., 


44 


42 


2 


4.54 


73 


68 


5 


6.85 



The above table is made up from annual reports of the 
entering class. In geometry the number of failures was 
larger than usual which may be ascribed to the book being 
new both to teacher and pupils. 

In English the per cent, of failures was somewhat reduced 
over last year. 

In Latin there has not been a failure for two years. This 
may justly be accredited not only to efficient teaching but 
to the excellent preparation the pupils get in group 2. 

The number of failures in French was reduced over those 
of last year by 16.33 per cent. 

Commercial Arithmetic showed a loss of 2.31 per cent. 

The showing of the last two years by classes entering this 
group would seem to refute any statements that may have 
been made about their being badly fitted for this school. 

The general average of the school in scholarship was 
79.90 per cent. 



134 city of concord. 

Parker School. 
Group 2. 

The number of A — pupils was 28, representing a loss of 
2.50 per cent, over last year. 

The number of B — pupils was 146, representing a gain 
of 3.32 per cent, over last year. 

The number of pupils leaving school was 10, representing 
a gain of 1.14 per cent, over last year. 

The number of failures was 11, representing a gain of 
1.60 per cent over last year. 

1910. 1911. 

No. Left No. Left 

Classes, pupils. A — B — Failed, school, pupils. A — B — Failed, school. 

0, P, 143 38 39 17 28 185 31 68 13 22 



1912. 



1913. 



No. Left No. Left 

Classes, pupils. A — B — Failed, school, pupils. A — B — Failed, school. 
O, P, 232 32 127 14 16 248 28 146 11 19 



The work done here speaks for itself. There is little 
time lost to activities that do not either directly or indi- 
rectly aid the pupils in their regular work. 

The general average of the school in scholarship was 
84.30 per cent. 

Chandler, Walker, Garrison and Eastman Schools. 
Group 2. 

r 

The number of A — pupils was 25, representing an in- 
crease of 4.72 per cent, over last year. 

The number of B — pupils was 89, representing an in- 
crease of 7.91 per cent, over last year. 

The number of pupils leaving school was 12, representing 
an increase of .54 per cent, over last year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



135 



The number of failures was 11, representing a decrease of 
3.50 per cent, over last year. 



Per cent. A— pupils. 



1911. 


1912. 


Increase 


Decrease. 


1912. 


1913. 


Increase. 


Decrease 


Garrison, 36.3 


12.5 




23.8 


12.5 


29.16 


16.66 




Kimball, 13.8 


5.1 




8.7 


5.1 








Kumford, 4.3 


5.7 


1.4 




5.7 








Eastman, 


10.5 


10.5 




10.5 


9.52 




.98 


Walker, 22.2 


13. 




9.2 


13. 


13.88 


.88 




Chandler, 7.4 


12.3 


4.9 




12.3 


7.74 




4.56 


Merrimack, 26.3* 














... 



Average, 14.76 10.35 



4.16 10.35 15.07 



1911. 
Garrison, 72.7 
Kimball, 44.4 
Rumford, 39.1 
Eastman, 20. 
Walker, 50. 
Chandler, 45.7 
Merrimack, 57.8 



Per cent. B — pupils. 
1912. Increase. Decrease. 1912. 



62.5 

17.3 

20. 

15.8 

65.2 

44.8 



Average, 48.32 37.45 



10.2 
27.1 
19.1 

4.2 



62.5 

17.3 

20. 

15.8 

65.2 

44.8 



1913. 
72.00 



33.33 
44.44 
31.69 



Increase. Decrease. 
7.51 



17.53 



7.65 37.45 



45.36 



8.43 



The average scholarship of these schools was 80.11 per 
cent. 

The results enumerated above show a good standard of 
scholarship and reflect credit upon the schools. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



By Schools. 

General average of the Garrison School for the year ending June 13, 1913, 86.6 

Walker, 80.4 

Eastman, 77.1 

Chandler, 76.5 

Parker, 83.6 

High, 79.3 

General average of the High School entire for the year ending June 13, 

1913, 80.3 



136 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



By Classes. 

General average of Class M for the year ending June 13, 1913, 

■ N 
O 



77.4 

82.7 

87.5 

81.0 

78.2 

78.9 

72.82 

82.09 

76.23 

81.10 



Greek. 



1908 


Number Numb 
graduates. these enterii 

3 1 


1909 


4 


2 


1910 


6 


4 


1911 


4 


3 


1912 








1913 


4 


3 



Number who had to tutor 
i. outside in the subject. 



2 


1 



The above list represents only those students who have 
completed the full three years' course in Greek. 



BY BUILDINGS. 



Average Number Pupils to a Teacher. 

1 — Franklin School, 42 

2 — Penacook School, 39 1-2 

3 — Cogswell School, 38 1-2 

4 — Tahanto School, 37 1-2 

5 — Chandler School, 37 1-5 
6 — Harriet P. Dame School, 33 2-3 

7 — Parker School, 315-8 

8 — Rumford School, 30 1-2 

9 — Eastman School, 29 1-3 

10 — Kimball School, 27 3-5 

11 — Merrimack School, 26 

12 — Garrison School, 24 3-7 

13 — High School, 22 10-17 

14 — Dewey School, 21 1-6 



Average Cost per Pupil jor Teachers' 

Salaries. 

1— High School, $40.07 

2 — Dewey School, 27.75 

3 — Garrison School, 27.40 

4 — Merrimack School, 23.84 

5 — Parker School, 22:33 

6 — Kimball School, 21.73 

7 — Chandler School, 20.96 

8 — Rumford School, 20.65 

9 — Eastman School, 20.31 

10 — Cogswell School, 18.00 

11 — Tahanto School, 18.00 

12 — Penacook School, 16.77 

1.3 — Harriet P. Dame School, 15.71 

14 — Franklin School, 15.47 



SCHOOL REPORT. I37 

I find nothing in the working of the scheme that is not 
desirable and economical. It is worthy of notice that there 
is a decided movement throughout the country along lines 
approximating those of our graded system. Methods of 
economizing school time, school expenditure and plans 
of keeping pupils in school longer are in process of evolu- 
tion resulting from scientific experiments and legislative 
enactments. Along this line comes the necessity of vary- 
ing the requirements in high school for those pupils who 
are not to take a college course. That a pupil in the com- 
mercial course or domestic arts course should be com- 
pelled to meet the requirements of college entrance courses 
in English is absurd. The very fact that such things are 
demanded causes a lack of interest, influencing many to 
leave school who otherwise might continue to their own 
advantage. The next problem should be a careful read- 
justment of the requirements for the various high school 
courses and legislation requiring the study of modern 
methods of teaching by the teachers of every grade. 

Eespeetfully submitted, 

L. J. BUNDLE TT, 

Superintendent. 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOLARSHIP TABLE— 1913. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



SCHOOL. 




"S 
6 


— 1 4) 

2i 


+3 
c 
o 


!K J, 

" o 


s 

o 

u 

Ph 


'a 


o 
o 


o 
o . 

o o 

SB 

if ^ 




High 

Group 1 


V 

u 

T 
S 
R 
Q 


64 
21 
80 
20 
95 
79 


4 

11 

9 
6 


6.25 

13.75 

9.47 
7.59 


44 
6 

42 
2 

41 

32 


68.75 
28.57 
52.50 
10.00 
43.15 
40.50 



2 
1 

8 
11 




4 
2 

7 

7 

14 




2 
2 
3 
5 

7 


14 

t 

18 
3 
12 

n 


Total 




359 


30 


8.35 


167 


46.51 


22 


34 


19 


59 


Parker 

Group 2 


P 




139 
109 


13 
15 


9.35 
13.76 


81 
65 


58.27 
59.63 


7 
4 


14 
5 


7 
3 


19 
9 






Total 




248 


28 


11.29 


146 


68.06 


11 


19 


10 


28 


Chandler 

Group 2 


N 
M 


72 
70 


9 
2 


12.50 
2.85 


26 
19 


34.72 
27.14 


1 
8 


3 

2 


2 
2 










Total 




142 


11 


7.74 


45 


31.69 


9 


5 


4 





Garrison 


N 
M 


17 
7 


5 
2 


29.41 
28.57 


15 
6 


78.23 
85.71 


1 
1 


2 
1 


2 

1 


2 


Group 2 


1 






Total 




24 


7 


29.16 


21 


87 50 


2 


3 


3 


S 


Eastman 


N 
M 


12 
9 


2 



16.66 



5 
2 


42.50 
22.22 



5 




2 



2 





Group 2 









Total 




21 


2 


9.52 


7 


33 33 


5 


2 


2 





Walker 

Group 2 


N 
M 


25 
11 


4 
1 


16.00 
9.11 


10 
6 


40.00 
66 66 


1 
1 




2 



2 






Total 




36 


5 


13.88 


16 


44.44 


1 


2 


2 





Grand H. S. total 


830 


83 


10.00 


402 


48.19 


50 


65 


40 


90 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


142 


13 


9.15 


77 


54.22 


9 


3 


2 






K 


97 


4 


4 12 


48 


49.48 


3 


7 


6 






,) 


157 


10 


6.36 


65 


41.40 


15 


6 


5 






I 


119 


1 


.009 


33 


27.72 


23 


1 


1 






G 


179 


23 


12.84 


57 


31.84 


30 


5 









H 


70 


2 


2.85 


21 


30.00 


12 


3 









F 


140 


17 


12.14 


44 


31.42 


17 


1 









E 


97 








6 


6.18 


21 


2 







Total 


1,001 
1,831 


70 


6.93 


351 


35.06 


130 


28 


14 




Grand total .... 


153 


8.35 


753 


41.11 


180 


93 


54 


90 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent : 

Dear Sir, — I herewith submit for your approval my 
fourth annual report. The work has been conducted prac- 
tically on the same plan as in previous years with the ex- 
ception of devoting considerable time to dental hygiene. 

Through the interest of Dr. Harold Plaisted three hours 
a week have been given by him to the care of the teeth of 
children unable to pay for treatment. This experiment has 
produced wonderful results in promoting the general health 
of the children. 

By keeping in constant touch with the Board of Health 
I feel that a certain amount of contagion is eliminated from 
our schools; but this is not sufficient — we need expert 
medical supervision. 

We have laws compelling parents to send their children 
to school and we certainly have not the right to keep them 
there without proper care. Not only the protection of the 
well child should be thought of, but the care of the child 
who is ill. This supervision should come through a medical 
inspector, assisted by a nurse. As a nurse in no sense is a 
diagnostician, one without the other is insufficient and 
should no longer be considered. 

All public health workers are in a great sense social 
workers, and a school nurse is fast becoming a great factor 
in social work between the school and the home. Won- 
derful results could be obtained in this way if a little more 
time could be given. By close co-operation between the. 
Charity Organization Society and the Visiting Nurses' 
Association, much good has been accomplished. 

I acknowledge wath gratitude and appreciation the kind- 



140 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ness of those who have so generously helped in this work, 
and to the physicians who have so loyally supported me in 
my efforts. 

Number of visits made at schools, 104 

Number children taken to physicians, dentists and 

hospitals for treatment, 190 

Number interviews and conferences with officials and 

others, 58 

Number home calls made for 

defective vision, 25 

defective teeth, 15 

enlarged tonsils and adenoids, 26 

pediculosis, 20 

eczema, 5 

epileptic, 2 

paralysis, 1 

mentally retarded, 5 

scabies, 3 

tuberculosis, 3 

impetigo, 2 

ringworm, 2 

unkempt condition, 2 

nervous condition, 2 

skin infections, 2 

dressings done, 3 

investigations for communicable diseases, 12 



Total number calls made at homes, 130 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH R. MURPHY, R. N. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



141 



Lunch Served at the Chandler School 

March 31, 1913, 

To Members of the Board of Education and the Superin- 
tendent of Schools — Six Persons. 

MENU. 

Cream of Cabbage Soup Lettuce Salad 

Toasted Crackers Meat Croquettes 

Baked Potatoes Baking Powder Biscuit 

Lemon Sherbet 

Coffee 

Cream of Cabbage Soup 
2 c. Cabbage @ 3 c. per lb., 

1 tsp. Butter @ 37c. per lb., 

2 tsp. Flour @ 80c. per Vs bbl., 
2 c. Milk @ 4c. per pt., 
1 Onion, 





Lettuc-e Salad 




01 


1 Head Lettuce, 


.05 


025 


4 tsp. Oil and Vinegar, 


.04 


003 


Seasonings, 


.00 


04 






01 




.09 



Meat Croquettes 

1 lb. Beef @ 15c. per lb., 

1 Kgg @ 24c. per doz., 

% lb. Crackers @ 8c. per lb., 

Yz Oniou @ Ic. each, 



Baking Powder Biscuit 

2 tsp. Butter @ 37c. lb., 

2 c. Flour @ 80c. per % bbl., 

% c. Milk @ 4c. pt., 



.088 



.15 
.02 
.01 
.005 

.185 



.025 
.078 
.015 



4 tsp. Baking Powder @ 50c. pkg., .018 



.106 



Bnl-ed Potatoes 

G Potatoes @ 24c. per pk.. 

Butter Balls, 



Lemon Sherbet 

4 Lemons @ 3c. each, 

2 c. Sugar @ 5c. lb., 

IVz qts. Milk @ 8c. qt., 

2 lbs. Bock Salt @ 5c. per 5 lbs.; 

Ice @ 10c. cake. 



Coffee 

7 tsp. Coffee @ 27c. per lb., .033 

Vi pt. thin Cream @ 34c. per pt., .010 

3 tsp. Sugar @ 5c. per lb., .005 

2 Egg Shells, .000 

.048 



.0.5 
.04 



.09 



.12 

.06 
.12 

.02 
.05 

.37 



Cream of Cabbage Soup, $0,088 
Lettuce and French Dressing, .09 

Meat Croquettes, .185 

Baked Potatoes, .05 

Baking Powder Biscuits, .106 

Butter Balls by weight, .04 

Ijemon Sherbet, .37 

Coffee, .048 

Total cost of lunch, $0,977 

Average cost per person, $0,162 5-6. 



142 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Lunch Served by Cooking Class 

To Seven Persons at the Chandler School. 

Spring Term, 1913. 



MENU. 

Cream of Celery Soup Toasted Crackers Salmon Loaf 

Baked Stuffed Potatoes 

Creamed Peas in Baskets 

Tomato Mold Bread and Butter Sandwiches 

Philadelphia Ice Cream 



Cream of Celery Soup 
Vz bunch Celery @ 22c., 

1 tsp. Butter @ 36c. lb., 

2 c. Milk @ 8c. qt., 



Tomato Mold 

IVz tsp. Gelatine @ 10c. box, 
1 Egg @ 24c. doz., 
1 can Tomatoes @ 63c. bo., 
1 head Lettuce @ 7c. head. 



Creamed Peas in Baskets 

2 tsp. Flour @ 80c. per i^ bbl. 

1 tsp. Butter @ 36c. per lb., 

1 c. Milk @ 8c. qt., 

1 can Peas @ 13c. can, 

1 loaf Bread @ 8c. loaf, 



.11 

.01 
.04 

.16 



.03 
.02 
.04 
.07 

.16 



.215 



Toasted Crackers 
1-5 lb. Crackers, 
Baked Stuffed Potatoes 
G Potatoes @ 24c. pk.. 
Seasonings, 



Salmon Loaf 

1 can Salmon @ 12V^c. can, 

1 Egg @ 24c. doz., 

1-5 lb. Crackers @ 5c. lb., 

Vz c. Milk O 8c. qt., 



Bread and Butler Sandwiches 
Vz loaf Bread @ 3c. per loaf, 
Vs lb. Butter @ 36c. per lb.. 



Philadelphia Ice Cr-eam 
% pt. Cream @ 30c. per pt., 
% pt. Milk @ 4c. per pt., 
1 c. Sugar @ 6c. per lb., 
1 tsp. vanilla, 



Cream of Celery Soup, 

Toasted Crackers, 

Salmon Loaf, 

Baked Stuffed Potatoes, 

Creamed Peas in Baskets, 

Tomato Mold, 

Bread and Butter Sandwiches, 

Philadelphia Ice Cream, 



Total for seven persons, $1,123 

Average cost per person, $0,160 3-7. 



D.16 
.01 
.165 
.06 
.213 
.16 
.06 
.295 



.01 



.05 
.01 



.06 



.125 
.02 
.01 
.01 

.165 



.015 
.045 

.060 

.225 
.03 
.03 
.01 

.295 



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SCHOOL REPORT. 



147 



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148 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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SCHOOL REPORT. 



149 



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150 


CITY OF 


CONCORD. 












MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 




June 13, 1913. 








Sewing. 


Cooking. 


WOOD-WORKI'' 








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75 


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SCHOOLS. 


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CO 


fH =* a 


o a 


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f3 


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a 


9 




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21 


4 


17 


21 


4 


17 


47 


4 


Parker 


62 
106 


7 
29 


55 
77 


90 
116 


13 
39 


77 
77 


62 
70 


12 ' 


Chandler 


5 


Garrison 


30 
25 
36 
63 
72 
47 


2 
4 
8 
5 
5 
10 


28 
21 
28 
58 
67 
37 


14 

9 

34 

12 


3 
3 
13 

2 


11 

6 

21 

10 


25 
16 
17 
36 
43 
34 


1 


Eastman 


2 


Walker 





Kimball 


4 


Rumford 


6 

7 




Merrimack 




Penacook 


20 
11 
22 
19 
17 


2 
2 

2 



18 
9 
22 
17 
17 














Franklin 










Dewey 










Harriet P. Dame 


1 




8 
17 


1 





Parochial, St. John's 


18 





18 1 




" St. Mary's 


17 


4 


13 


23 


10 


13 


20 


2 




" Sacred Heart 


21 
11 


2 
6 


19 
6 








20 


1 




Industrial Class 


11 


6 


5 















Totals 


600 


92 


508 


348 


93 


255 


415 


45 









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November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 


a 
3 
1-5 


1 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

STAMP SAVING SYSTEM. 





Saved from 
March 1, 1913, 

to 
March 1, 1914. 


Total amount 

saved since 

the inauguration 

of system. 


Cogswell School, 


$23.25 


$26.74 


Harriet P. Dame School, 


40.08 


197.11 


Dewey School, 


87.51 


735.67 


Eastman School, 


22.12 


139.27 


Franklin School, 


36.59 


495.74 


Garrison School, 


71.06 


332.91 


Kimball School, 


54.35 


856.87 


Merrimack School, 


29.20 


137.56 


Penacook School, 


115.89 


923.36 


Rumford School, 


148.56 


2,329.39 


"Walker School, 


12.46 


462.81 


Chandler School, 




106.02 


Tahanto School, 


.28 


33.47 



$641.35 



$6,777.92 



SCHOOL REPORT. 153 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1913. 

SUMMARY. 

Number of children enumerated 3300 

Increase since 1912 36 

Number attending school since 1912 3247 

Number attending public schools 2596 

Number attending parochial schools 623 

Number attending private schools 48 

Number of children between the ages of 5 and 16 3031 

Number between the ages of 10 and 16 not able to read and write the 

English language 1 

Number of the latter born in New Hampshire 

Number born elsewhere in the United States 

Number born in foreign countries 1 

Number between the ages of 5 and 8 who do not regularly attend school 4 
Number between the ages of 8 and 14 who do not regularly attend 

school 5 

Number between the ages of 14 and 16 who do not regularly attend 

school 4 

NATIVITY OF PARENTS. 

American born 2236 Scotland 18 

Foreign born 1064 New Brunswick 2 

Nova Scotia 28 Germany 10 

Canada 490 Denmark 6 

Roumania ■. 5 Albania 2 

Russia 10 Greece 2 

England 78 Finland 38 

Ireland 190 Holland 2 

Italy 46 Australia 1 

Poland 5 India 1 

Turkey 3 Norway 1 

Prince Edward Island 20 West Indies 2 

Sweden 107 

NATIVITY OP CHILD. 

American born 3161 Mexico 1 

Foreign born . . . . : 139 Italy 8 

Prince Edward Island 8 Turkey 1 

Scotland 4 Albania 3 

Sweden 18 Greece 3 

Russia 17 Norway 3 

Ireland 4 Finland 1 

Canada 46 Armenia 1 

England 21 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 



CO ^1 



Residence. 
( ) Out of towi 



High School. 
Group I. 



Charles F. Cook . 
Charles E. Moors 



Walter B. Lyman. 

Arthur R. Kaiser . 
George C. Clarke.. 



Master 

Sub-master, room 1 



lecture 



Elisabeth Averill 

May B. McLam 

Lillian Yeaton 

Elizabeth S. Sargent. 

Carrie E. Baker 



Mary K. Taylor 

Edna L. Hanson 

C. Azella Hood 

Elizabeth Driscoll. 

Mary E. Jenness.. . 
Marie Merrill 



Marion Buttrick 

Elmer G. Brennon . . . 
Mabel L. Warner . . . 

Alphonso R. Tarr 

Mary K. Tewksbury. 
Sarah E. Little 



Group IL— Parker 
- School. 

Luella A. Dickerman. 
Mabel I. Durivage 

Helen O. Stephenson. 

Jessie H, Nettleton... 



Rachel Courser. 
Ruth A. Home. 



Margaret N. Dickson. 
Harriet R. Blodgett . . 



Julia M. Melifant. 
Beatrice Tasker... 



Eleanor A. Moulton . 
May L. Ryan 



Assistant, 

room 

Assistant, room 7 
2 



U. S. History, Civics 

Mathem'tics, Chem- 
istry 

Mathematics, Phys- 
ics 

Book-keeping 

Economics, Book- 
keeping, Com- 
mercial Arith. 

French, German ... 

Greek History , 

English 

12.. Mathematics, Biol 

I ogy 

3.. French, History..., 



6.., English, 
3.. French.. 



" 13., 
" 10. 

Assistant, cooking 
room 



Typewriting and 
Clerk ... 

Stenography, Type- 
writing 

English, French. 

Latin, History... 



Domestic arts 



Principal, room 5. 
Assistant, " 7. 

" 1., 

" 2. 



Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resisjned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned during 

fall term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned during 

winter term. 



Mathematics 

Mathematics, Eng- 
lish 

Mathematics, Pen- 
manship 

Com. Hist., Geogra- 
phy, English, Pen- 
manship 

Ancient History 

French, English . .. 



English 

English, History. 



Clerk 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

first semester. 



i2,300 85 Warren St. 
1,500 8 Liberty St. 

1,150 38 Rumford St. (Hi 

' Mass.) [ 

1,050 37 Green St. (Mati 

900 9 Short St. (For 

Me.) 

900 36 Pine St. 

8511 35 Perley St. 

850 66^A North State St. 

850 101 Center St. 

850,111 School St. (Lam 

I N. H.) 
750 111 School St. (No. 

bridge, Mass.) 
750 16 Green St. (Ceute 

I bor, N. H.) 
550; 140 Rumford St. 

80o!l89 North Main St. 

liston, Mass.) 
6509 Holt St. (Dover, J 
700 20 Auburn St. (Hav 

I Mass.) 
500 20 Auburn St. (Arli 

I Mass.) 



1,200 
SOO 

650 

390 

550 
500 

500 

650 

450 



64 South St. 

40 North Spring St. 

40 North Spring St. 

ell. Vt.) 
26 Eastman St. (Pem 

N.H.) 

2]4 Liberty St. 

15 Rumford St. (Ma 

ter, N. H.) 
67 Pleasant St. (Le\ 

Me.) 
(Suncook, N. H.) 

3 Elm St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



155 



imes of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 






Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



[ANDLER School. 
•riet S. Emmons, 
a T.Fletcher 



ry Flavin 

labeth J. Donovan 
ia E. Talpey 



T C.Caswell 

lREIson School. 

rence E. George... 
aC. Standish 

iSTMAN School. 

ma G. Nickerson. . 

rence E. George.... 



Principal, room 1.. 
Assistant, " 1.. 

" " 2.. 

3.. 
4.. 



Principal, " 5. 



Principal . 



Mathem 'tics, Gram- 
mar, Music 

History, Latin, 
Mathem a t i c s , 
Physiology 

English, Latin, His- 
tory 

English, Drawing. . 

English, Mathe- 
matics 

Clerk 



Resigned at end of 
spring terra. 



Transferred to Gar- 
rison at end of 
spring term. 



$700 
700 

700 

700 
700 

300 



South State St. 

41 School St. (Lawrence 
Mass.) 

58 School St. 

28 Thorndike St. 
41 Warren St. 

121 Warren St. 



9 Gladstone St. 



600 



East Concord. 
ter, Mass.) 



(Glouces- 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



ALKER School. 



iscontinued for 
new building. 



a E. Talpey 

garet T. Kelley .. 

H.Tandy 

isa Herbert 

.RRisoN School. 

•ence E. George ... 
:haL. Holbrook... 

ence L. Saltmarsh 

Luth Kelley 

isa Herbert 

garet T. Lynch. 

Chamberlin... 



id Binet Binet 

aC. Staudish 



el F. Lane 



y A. Jones 



Principal, room 5. 
Assistant, " 7. 

6. 

4. 
3. 
2. 



Transf erred to 
Chandler School. 

Transler'd to Kim- 
ball School. 

Transferred to Ta- 
hanto School. 

Transferred to Gar- 
rison School. 



Class L 

Classes I, J.. . 

" G, H. 

" E,F.. 

" CD. 

" A, B. 



Kindergarten and 
Primary 

Kindergarten 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Traiisfer'd to Rum- 
ford School dur- 
ing the fall term. 

Resigned at end of 
spr i n g term. 
Elected assistant 
drawing teacher.. 



$700 9 Gladstone St. 
650,(542 North State St., West 

Concord, N.H.) 
400 11 Chestnut St. 
600 7 Harrod St. 
650;3 Rollins St. 
550;(446 North State St., West 

Concord, N. H.) 
650 (2 View St., West Concord, 

N.H.) 
400 246 North Main St. 



156 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of biiildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 



^a$ 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



Eastman School. 

Emma G. Nickersou. 

Elizabeth T. Nash... 

Stella M. French 

Florence E. George. . 



Principal, room 1.. Class L 
Assistant, " 



Kimball School. 

Mary E. Melifant 

Grace B. Knowlton... 
Edna M. Kennedy.... 
Margaret T. Kelley . . . 

Mary A. McGuii'e 

Margaret A. Donovan 

Lottie E. Pearson 

Mary Fernald 



Myrta B. Lowe 

Mary A. Coughlin 
.Fessie N. Stimson. 



Mary T. Gannon. 



RuMFORD School. 



Jessie N. Stimson. 
Anna M. Keenan. . 



Mabel F. Lane 

Annette Prescott 

Abbie T. McDonald... 
Fannie B. Lothrop.... 
Gara E. McQuesten . . 
Katliarine L. Remick, 



Nellie J. Halloran — 

Elizabeth M. McAfee. 
Elizabeth E. Robert- 
son 

Alice M. Swain 



MERRiMAck School. 

Harriet C. Kimball . . . 

Viola J. Brock 

Alice M. M. Phaneuf . 
Agues V. Sullivan 



Margaret Morrill 

Penacook School. 



Annie M. Branon 

Clara E. Flanders ... 
Harriet L. Megrath.. 
Cecilia P. Jones 



Principal, room 
Assistant, " 



Classes 4, 5 

" 1,2,3 

Transferred to Gar 
rison School at 
end of spring 
term. 



Principal, room 8.. 
Assistant, " 7.. 



and 



Class L 

" K 

Classes I, J ... 
" G, H.. 
" E, F... 
" C, D .. 
" A, B.. 
Kindergarten 

Primary 

Kindergarten 

Special 

Transfer'd to Rum- 
ford School at end 
of spring term. 
Transferred to Har- 
riet P. Dame 
School at end of 
spring term 



Class L. 
Class K 



Classes I> J 

" G,H 

" E,F 

" CD 

" A,B 

Kindergarten and 

Primary 

Kindergarten and 

Primary 

Special 

Resigned at end of 

sprivig term. 
Resigned during 
fall term. 



Principal ! CI asses K and L .... 

Assistant JClass J 

" Classes A, B, C 

" ! Kindergarten and 

I Primary 

" Kindergarten 



Principal, room 4.. 
Assistant, " 3.. 

2.. 

1.. 



Classes I. J 

" G,H.... 
" E,F.... 
" A, B, C. 



$600 

500 
650 



Route 5, East Concord, 
H. (Gloucester, Mass 
Route 5,East Concord,N 
Route 5, " " 



650 3 Elm St. 
650 38 South Spring St. 
G50 10 Blanchard St. 
650 12 Perley St. 
650 77 Soiith State St. 
500 84 Center St. 
650 52 Beacon St. 
650 9 Tahanto St. 

450 60 North Spring St. 
400 22 A Ibin St. 



I 



650 9 Holt St. 

6.50 (193 High St., Penaco 
N. H.) 

500|]05 North State St. 
650 25 Green St. 
650j 17 Essex St. 
C50 32 Perley St. 
650,9 Wall St. 
650 4 Fayette St. 



650 
500 



30 Perley St. 
57 Pleasant St. 



650[l89 North Main St. 
650,99 North State St. 
650 90 Rumford St. 
650 49 Lyndon St. 



450 



123 North State St. 



650 55 Thorndike St. 
650:51 South St. 
650 (Hooksett, N. H.) 
650175 South St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



157 



SCHOOL TABh^.— Continued. 



mes of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 



«9 f^ ^ 

« D eS 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



iNKLiN School. 

ie A. Donovan 

Qie E. Ladd 

rertrude Doherty. 
ion E. Haines 

EWEY School. 

ie F. Straw 

m L. Soutligate. . . 

,n M. Little 

ella Shaw 

3 M. Sargent 

jE. Shepard 

m L. Gibbs 



Principal, room 3. 
Assistant, " 4. 



Principal, room 6. 

Assistant, " 2. 



Glasses H, I 

'• F,G.... 
" D,E.... 
" A, B, C. 



Trainer for pupil 
teacher 

Supervi s o r and! 
trainer for kin 
dergarteu 

Class I 

" G , 

Classes C, E 

" A,B 

Kindergarten 



$650 84 Center St. 
650 72 Washington St. 
600 il45 North State St. 
650:29 Bradley St. 



1,000 101 North State St. 
700 2 South Spring St. 



650 90 School St. 
650 72 School St. 
650 78 Warren St. 
650 36 Pine St. 
375 3 Liberty St. 



TRAINING CLASSES. 

seniors. 

(Gi^aduutes June, 1914.) 

3 E. Jackson 80 Allison St. 

larine W. Mannion 19 Walker St. 

en R. Morgan 10 Avon St. 

oah E. O'Brien 60 Franklin St. 

liceL. Prescott (482 North State St., West Concord, N. H.) 

3 L. Riford 62 High St. 

B. Thompson 114 South State St . 



juniors. 
{Graduates June, 1915.) 

ionF. Callahan 14 Beacon St. 

A. Guilbault. Resigned during fall term 75 Pillsbury St. 

raret A. Fanning 80 >^ South State St. 

rice C. Lapierre 36 Merrimack St . 

an M. Phaneuf 90 Rumford St. 



158 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and sub- Ig « !e 

jects taught r^*^? 



Residence. 
( ) Out of towi 



Harriet P. Dame 
School. 

Nettie M. Bow en .... 



Mary T. Gannon • • • 

Mabel Clark 

Elizabeth T. Nash. 



Tahanto School. 



SaraE. McClure ,.. 

Eva H. Tandy 

Nellie T. Halloran. 



Cogswell School. 

Mildred I. Cilley 

Eleanor B. Kelley 

Morrill School. 

(Manual Training.) 
Arthur W. French — 
Raymond P. Gilraan.. 

C.Ellsworth Taylor.. 
Charles P. Nash 

Henry F. Oesting. Jr.. 



Arthur I. Brock.. 
Holland R. Gove. 



Principal, room 3.. 

Assistant, " 2.. 
" " 1.. 



Principal, room 1. 
Assistant, " 2. 



Edmund W. Kempton 
Harry R. L. Ohellman 

Robert E. Hamill 

Sewing. 

(Parker School.) 

Louise C. Howe 



M. Hortense Berry.. 
M. Emma Parsons.. 
F. Mildred Phillips. 
Marion L. Stevens.. 



Principal, room 1. 
Assistant, " 2. 



Principal, room 6., 
Assistant. " l.. 



Classes K, L. 



3,4 

1,2 

Transfer'd to East 
man School at be 
ginning of fall 
term. 



Classes A, B 

" CD, E. ... 

Transfer'd to Rum 
ford Kindergar- 
ten. 



Classes A, B .. 
" CD.. 



2. 



Printing, supervi- 
sion, lectures 

Machine-shop prac- 
tice, high school, 
industrial school. 

Drawing 



Woodwork, joinery, 
forging', repairs, 
care ot machin'ry 

Joinery, cabi n e t - 
making, pattern- 
making, elemen- 
tary woodw'rking 

Elementary wood- 
working, joinery. 
6, 2 Academic work, in- 
dustrial class, 
wood-turning. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Resigned during 
fall term. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



Principal, room 5. 

Assistant, " 5. 
5. 
5. 



All High School 
classes 



Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



(Peni 



1650 29 Center St 

t N. H.) 
450 7 South Spring St, 
450 126 Warren St. 



650 11 Cummings Ave. 
650 66 High St. 



6503 South St. (Dunb 

j N. H. ) 
600 60 South Main St. 



1,800 12 South Spring St. 

950:111 School St. (West 
erville, Mass.) 

800 20 Pine St. (No. Har 

Mass. ) 
850(21 Clark St., West 

cord, N. H.) 



800 



665 
380 



500 



12^ South Spring St. ( 
bridge, Mass.) 



(Manchester, N. H.,1 

1.) 
38 Monroe St. 



167 North Main St. 



I 32 Soutli Spring St. 
450 88 North State St. 
258 148 Rumford St. 



■ 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Concluded. 



159 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and sub- 
jects taught. 



>> .1 

W qj cS 

03 >^| 



Residence. 
( ) Out of town. 



High School classes 
M,N,0,P 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



Director . . 
Assistant , 



Director 



Instructor . 



High and Morrill 



Parker 

Kimball 

Rumford 

Merrimack and Ta- 

ban to — .. 

Dewey and Frank- 



Pen acook and Cogs- 
well 

Garrison 



Eastman . 



Chandler 

Harriet P. Dame. 



Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



$675 15 Rumford St. (Dorches- 
ter, Mass.) 



900 2 Rumford St. (Worces- 
ter, Mass) 
650(Penacook,N. H.) 



1,175 



100 



61 School St. 



75 North Spring St. 



780 114 South State St 
546 49Tremont St. 
780 5 Chapel St. 
650'6 Avon St. 
650 58 Perley St. 
675 7 Maple St. 



675 
650 
624 
300 

300 

228 



Route 6, Plains. 
20 Dakin St. 

(4 Highland Road, West 

Concord, N. H.) 
(Route 5, East Concord, N. 

H.) 
5 Chapel St. 
Route 6, Plains. 



160 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





Kind'n. 


ELEMENTARY 


YEAR. 




1 


2 


Class. 


1 and 2. 


A. 




B. 




C. 


D. 




P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. 


P. 


P. 


N. 


P. 


P. 


N. 


P. 


p. 


N. P. 


High 






















Parker 






















Chandler 




























5 
6 


11 

7 


11 
17 

5 
15 
13 
15 
13 

9 
12 

7 
13 
19 


3 

2 
5 
2 
3 
3 
1 
2 


6 
6 


10 
9 

"is 

7 



3 

""3 
3 








20 


7 


8 
11 
17 
16 
11 

"12 
13 
12 

7 
16 


7 




4 


Rumford 

Kimball 


38 
32 
53 



3 



6 

7 


5 

8 


1 





2 




11 

7 
9 
8 
4 
8 


2 
8 
4 
7 
3 
8 


6 

8 
6 


2 
6 















Dewey 


38 













Tahanto 


14 


4 






6 




17 


4 


1 










Total 


195 


14 


71 


63 


149 


33 


76 


21 


123 


21 


Per cent, promoted 


93.30 


52.98 


81.92 


78.35 


86.43 



AVERAGE AGE 



High 












Parker 












Chandler 












Walker 




6 yr. 11 m 

7 


7 yr. 10 m 
7 8 

6 9 

7 10 

8 

6 11 
8 9 

7 10 

6 5 

7 2 
7 5 
7 4 


8yr. Om. 
8 1 

8 ••■4'"" 

7 11 






5 yr. 7 in. 


9yr.2 m. 
8 1 


Eastman 


Rumford 


4 9 

5 3 
5 1 


6 9 

7 4 


8 1 


Kimball 


8 9 


Merrimack 


8 2 


Pen acook 


6 10 

6 1 

7 1 

6 4 

7 6 
6 6 


8 

7 6 

8 5 




Franklin 




8 3 


Dewey 


4 9 
^... ...... 


7 5 


Harriet P. Dame 


9 1 


Tahanto 




8 S 


Cogswell 


7 11 


8 4 








Average 


5 yr. m. 


6yr. 10 m 


7 yr. 5 m 


8 yr. m. 


8yr.4m, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

rHE GRADES— JUNE, 1913. 



161 



ICHOOL. 





3 








4 






£ 








( 






E. 


F. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


































































































8 


2 
5 


19 
8 
8 
15 
15 


1 

1 
4 
3 







20 
• 18 
14 
19 
19 


3 
8 
2 
6 
1 


14 

7 


2 















7 






19 
13 
24 
19 
21 
14 


1 
2 
2 
3 
2 







11 
10 
41 
31 
23 


1 




"ie 

13 


...... 

5 







5 
1 


10 
15 


7 
3 


34 
25 

22 


2 
3 



6 
5 





8 
1 


16 
14 
16 
13 


3 
1 
2 
2 


16 

12 


1 
6 


15 
13 
13 

18 


2 
3 

(i 
5 


19 

17 
12 


8 
2 
3 
















20 
12 


5 























14 



















































































75 


22 


124 


17 


57 


13 


149 


30 


94 


25 


142 


15 


81 


5 


130 


12 


77.31 


87.94 


81.42 


83.24 


78.99 


90.44 


94.18 


91.54 



•ER CLASS. 



















































9 yr. 9 m. 
9 9 


9 y.ll m. 
9 10 
9 1 
9 3 
9 10 




10 y. 4 m. 

10 11 

11 4 

11 1 

12 


11 y. 2 m. 










11 y. Om. 

11 

12 5 

11 8 

12 8 
12 4 




11 y. 6 m. 
13 5 








g 10 

2 


11 y. m. 
11 3 


11 1 
11 9 


13 y. 3 m. 
12 4 
12 5 


13 2 
13 8 
13 


9 2 


9 7 
9 1 
9 1 
9 U 


12 
11 2 


ii 2 
10 9 

10 7 

11 10 


11 6 

10 7 

11 4 




9 4 








11 5 
13 3 












14 












































9yr. 9 m. 


9 yr. 6 m. 


11 y. 4 m. 


11 y. 1 m. 


11 y. 2 m. 


11 y.ll m. 


12 y. 8 m. 


13 y. im. 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





HIGH 


YEAR. 


7 


8 


Class. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 




P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


Hio-h 


















Parker 


"62 
9 
6 
4 


8 

2 
1 
5 


"70 
24 
17 
12 


2 

1 




105 


4 


132 


7 


Walker 




























































































Franklin 






























■ 
























Taliatito 
































1 














4 


1 


Total 


81 


16 


123 


3 


105 


1321 7 














S'^.'iO 


97.fi I 


SP.^I 


94.9fi 





















AVERAGE AGE 



Hitrh 










Parker 






15 y. 11 m 


15 y. 5 m. 


Chandler 


lay 

14 
13 
14 


7ni. 


7 
7 


14y. 6 m. 
15 1 
13 8 
13 10 


Walker 






Garrison 






Eastman 






Rum ford 






Kiinliall 










Merrimack 










Penacook 










Franklin 










Dewev 










Harriet P. Dame 




Tall an to 










Cogswell 




















Average 


13 y 


Urn 


14 y. 3 m. 


15 y. lira 


15 y. 5 m. 







SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1913. 



163 



SCHOOL. 





9 






10 






11 




Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


u. 


V. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


p. 


N.P. 


p. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


67 


11 


89 


8 


20 





77 


3 


19 


2 


64 









































































































... 













































































































































































































































67 


11 


89 


8 


20 





77 


3 


19 


2 


64 





83 


33 


91 


75 


lOO 


.00 


96 


25 




30.47 


1 


00.00 



PER CLASS. 



15 yr. 11 m. 


16 yr. 6 m. 


17 yr. 5 m. 


16 yr. 10 m. 


18 yr. 9 m. 


18 yr. 5 m. 











































































































































































15 yr. 11 m. 


16 yr. 6 m. 


I7yr. 5 m. 


16 yr. 10 m. 


18 yr. 9 m. 


18 yr. 5 m. 



164 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TWENTY=SIXTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OF UNION SCHOOL DISTEICT, AT HIGH SCHOOL HALL 
Thursday Evening, March 19, 1914, 

AT EIGHT o'clock. 

PROGRAM 

ORIGINAL DECLAMATION— High School— Groups 1 and 2 

Overture— " The Spirit of the Winds" Bennett 

HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 

1. In the Days of Eichard the Lion Hearted 

HUGH GILBERT CRUiKSHANK, '17 — Parker SchooI — 2 

2. The Panama Canal 

THOMAS JOHN DOVPNs, '15 — High School — 1 

3. Heroes of Peace and War 

RUTH ISABELL LEMMON, '16— High Sctiool 1 

4. Napoleon at St. Helena 

Vl^ILLOUGHBY AMOS COLBY, '14 Hig]» Scbool — 1 

Waltz Song — ' ' Carmena ' ' Wilson 

SCHOOL CHORUS 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION-High School-<:roup 2 

1. ' ' The American Indian ' ' Syrague 

LAURENCE HERBERT DANFORTH, GARRISON SCHOOL — 2 

2. "True Liberty" Mobertson 

WILFRED CARL RILEY, EASTMAN SCHOOL — 2 

3. "The Future of America" Webster 

"WALLACE EVERARD STEARNS, CHANDLER SCHOOL — 2 

"Legend of the Bells" Planquette 

SCHOOL CHORUS 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION-High School Group-2 

1. "The Light on Deadman's Bar" Eexford 

DORIS GERTRUDE WHITE, CHANDLER SCHOOL — 2 

2. "Elizabeth Zane" Adams 

IDA CAROLINA CARLSON, GARRISON SCHOOL 2 

3. "Story of the Little Kid Hin" "Mrs. Whitney" 

ESTHER SIBYL HASELTON, EASTMAN SCHOOL — 2 

Waltz — ' ' Sympathy ' ' Friml 

HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 



166 CITY OF CONCORD. 

AWARD OF PRIZES 
Original Declamation — High School, groups 1 and 2. 

First prize, $15, awarded to Willoughby Amos Colby, '14. 
Second prize, $10, awarded to Euth Isabell Lemmon, '16. 
Forensic Declamation — High School, group 2. 

First prize, $6, awarded to Wilfred Carl Eiley, Eastman 

School. 
Second prize, $4, awarded to Wallace Everard Stearns, Chan- 
dler School. 
Miscellaneous Declamation — High School, group 2. 

First prize, $6, awarded to Doris Gertrude White, Chandler 

School. 
Second prize, $4, awarded to Esther Sibyl Haselton, Eastman 
School. 

BOAED OF JUDGES. 

Hon. GeohGe H. Whitcher, Penacook, N. H. 
SuPT. Henry S. Egberts, Pembrolie, N. H. 
Hon. George E. Farrand, Penacook, N. H. 

PEIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 
RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year's account, $2,700.26 

Interest on same to January 1, 1914, 106.49 

Sale of 434 tickets at 35 cents, 151.90 



$2,958.65 



expended. 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services, • $50.00 

Programs, 4.5O 

Prizes, including books, 50.00 
Miscellaneous expenses, judges, selling and taking tickets, 

etc., 11.25 

English Composition prizes and expense, 37.50 

Cash on deposit as a guaranty fund for future contests, 2,805.40 

$2,958.65 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



167 



FIRE DRILLS, 3912-1913. 









High School. 






Oct. 


9, 


'12. 


63 seconds. All doors opec 


I. 




Dec. 


3, 


'12. 


95 seconds. North stairs. 


north 


door closed. 


Jan. 


28, 


'13. 


75 seconds. All doors open 






Feb. 


34, 


'13. 


61 seconds. All doors oper 


1. 




Apr. 


10, 


'13. 


70 seconds. All doors oper 


1. 




May 


6, 


'13. 


63 seconds. All doors open 
Chandler School. 






Sept. 12, 


'12. 




50 seconds. Jan. 30, 


'13, 


40 seconds. 


Oct. 14, 


'12. 




50 seconds. Mar. 24, 


'13. 


50 seconds. 


Oct. 16, 


'12. 




40 seconds. Apr. 29, 


'13. 


40 seconds. 


Nov. 6, 


'12. 




40 seconds. 

Garrison School. 






Oct. 9, 


'12. 




60 seconds. Mar. 6, 


'13, 


55 seconds. 


Nov. 8, 


'12. 




45 seconds. Apr. 28, 


'13. 


54 seconds. 


Nov. 20, 


'12, 




50 seconds. June 12, 
Eastman School. 


'13. 


45 seconds. 


Oct. 22, 


'12. 




30 seconds. Mar. 6, 


'13, 


32 seconds. 


Dec. 11, 


'12. 




30 seconds. May 8, 


'13. 


30 seconds. 


Feb. 17, 


'13. 




32 seconds. June 12, 
RuMFORD School. 


'13. 


30 seconds. 


Sept. 10, 


'12. 




72 seconds. Dec. 5, 


'12. 


65 seconds. 


Sept. 19, 


'12. 




73 seconds. Mar. 5, 


'13. 


62 seconds. 


Oct. 15, 


'12. 




70 seconds. Feb. 21, 


'13. 


71 seconds. 


Nov. 12, 


'12. 




65 seconds. May 8, 
Kimball School. 


'13. 


70 seconds. 


Oct. 9, 


'12. 




70 seconds. Jan. 15, 


'13. 


70 seconds. 


Nov. 12, 


'12. 




70 seconds. Mar. 12, 


'13. 


70 seconds. 


Dec. 3, 


'12. 




75 seconds. May 19, 
Penacook School. 


'13. 


70 seconds. 


Oct. 1, 


'12. 




35 seconds. Apr. 8, ' 


'13. 


35 seconds. 


Oct. 22, 


'12. 




31 seconds. May 14, 


'13. 


29 seconds. 



168 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Franklin School. 



Oct. 


2, 


'12. 


45 seconds. 


Apr. 24, '13. 


43 seconds. 


Oct. 


28, 


'12. 


45 seconds. 


May 27, '13. 


43 seconds. 


Jan. 


30, 


'13. 


46 seconds. 


June 3, '13. 


40 seconds. 


Feb. 


20, 


'13. 


40 seconds. 
Dewey 


School. 




Sept. 


25, 


'12. 


55 seconds. 


Mar. 4, '13. 


60 seconds. 


Oct. 


30, 


'12. 


53 seconds. 


May 1, '13. 


55 seconds. 


Feb. 


13, 


'13. 


65 seconds. 
Harriet P. 


June 5, '13. 
Dame School. 


55 seconds. 


Oct. 


4, 


'12. 


29 seconds. 


Apr. 10, '13. 


35 seconds. 


Oct. 


10, 


'12. 


30 seconds. 


(Pupils opened 


door after bell.) 


Jan. 


19, 


'13. 


29 seconds. 


Apr. 10, '13. 


30 seconds, 



Tahanto School. 



Oct. 


4, 


'12. 


20 seconds. 


Apr. 17, 


'13. 


20 


seconds. 


Nov. 


22, 


'12. 


30 seconds. 


May 8, 


'13. 


20 


seconds. 


Feb. 


21, 


'13. 


20 seconds. 
Cogswell 


June 3, 
School. 


'13. 


20 


seconds. 


Sept. 


16, 


'12. 


25 seconds. 


Apr. 9, 


'13. 


25 


seconds. 


Oct. 


31, 


'12. 


25 seconds. 
Parker 


June 5, 
School. 


'13. 


26 


seconds. 


Oct. 


14, 


'12. 


55 seconds. 


Mar. 10, 


'13. 


60 


seconds. 


Nov. 


19, 


'12. 


50 seconds. 


Apr. 21, 


'13. 


55 


seconds. 


Fe-b. 


20, 


'13. 


46 seconds. 
Walker 


May 27, 
School. 


'13. 


55 


seconds. 


Sept. 


14, 


'12. 


58 seconds. 


Apr. 14, 


'13. 


46 


seconds. 


Oct. 


1, 


'12. 


50 seconds. 


May 20, 


'13. 


45 


seconds. 


Jan. 


24, 


'13. 


52 seconds. 


June 13, 


'13. 


48 


seconds. 


Mar. 


10, 


'13. 


48 seconds. 
















Merrimack School. 








Sept. 


25, 


'12. 


65 seconds. 


Jan. 15, 


'13. 


42 


seconds. 


Nov. 


20, 


'12. 


45 seconds. 


Apr. 23, 


'13. 


36 


seconds. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



169 



GRADUATING CLASSES OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

June 13, 1913. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Class Officers. 

Fresideyit — Kohl C. Wiggin 

Vice-President — Prescott A. Brown 

Secretary and Treasurer — Corinne L. Heath 



Eiith Marion Bachelder 
Ann Farley Beggs 
"William Aldrieh Blanchette 
George Loucions Blossom 
Mary Kose Breslin 
Nelson Raymond Brown 
Prescott A. Brown 
George Kenneth Burgum 
Madeleine Smith Caldon 
Marion Frances Callahan 
Frances Butler Campbell 
Ralph Stevens Carr 
Harold Curtis Chamberlin 
Robert Martin Chase 
Elizabeth Helen Clinton 
Ruth Elizabeth Clough 
Carl Converse Colby 
Harriet Dearborn Crapo 
John Currier 
Ruth Hancock Daggett 
Julia Agnes Dee 
Anna Elizabeth Diversi 
Ethel Dole 
Ro1)ert Guy Dow 
Catherine Agnes Ducey 
Florence Edna Durgin 
Ethel Gertrude Edmunds 
Margaret Agnes Fanning 
Lawrence Colby Farnum 
Barbara Gertrude Forrest 



Ruth Mildred Garland 
Ralph Albert Glassey 
Rose Alma Guilbault 
James Joseph Halligan 
Agnes Rose Halpin 
Charlotte Celeste Hammond 
Edith Ella Hardy 
Verna Carola Hardy 
Frances Honora Harrison 
Robert James Hart 
Corinne Leon a Heath 
Percy Elwin Holbrook 
Frank William Home 
John McKay Hyde 
Harold Willey Jenkins 
Claude Archer LaBelle 
Eva Leoda Langley 
Alfred Rudolph Larson, Jr. 
Pauline Lawrence 
Corinne Albina Liberty 
Mary Elizabeth Mannion 
Theodore Plummer McLam 
Catherine Agnes Morrisroe 
Wilma Hazle Mudgett 
Julia Ellen Murphy 
Marie Nelson 
Margaret Rose O'Connell 
Perley Walter Ordway 
Lillian Marie E. Phaneuf 
Harold John Philip 



170 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Katberine Pike 
Jeremiah Timothy Eeardon 
Katberine Frances Eeen 
Hamilton Cawley Eolfe 
Josephine Helen Eourke 
Louise Gertrude Sexton 
Arline Bessie Smith 
James Seth Stevens 
Eva Langley Swain 



Lena Maude Sweatt 

Willis Duer Thompson, Jr. 

Bertha Marie Venne 

Hilda Victoria "Wester 

Katherine Teresa Cray White 

Rohl Chase Wiggin 

Thelma Wilson 

]\Iargaret Mary Worthington 

Daisy lone Young 



Elementary Schools. 



WALKER SCHOOL. 



Henry Gustaf Anderson 
Clarence Edward Chapman 
Gladys Susan Evans 
Ellen Mildred Lamprey 
Arthur Robert Murdoch 



Marjorie Jean Newbold 
Angelina Olgiati 
Helen Elizabeth Patterson 
Helen Alice Prew 
William Paul O'Neil 



Adnyrum C. Chesley 
Robert T. Spaulding 



Roger M. Eastman 
Carl H. Ekstrom 
Beulah R. Nash 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

E. Inez GriiSn 
Ruth E. Sargent 

GARRISON SCHOOL. 

Lily B. Nelson 

J. Frederick Rossell 

Isidore Turcotte 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



Marion O. Abbott 
Elizabeth B. Adams 
Roland O. Armstrong 
Edna Bailey 
Helen Bailey 
Kathleen C. Bateman 
Josephine E. Belisle 
Albert W. Blake 
Joseph T. Breen 



Helen L. Bunker 
Gladys V. Carroll 
Marion A. Carroll 
Ruth E. Chase 
Charlotte B. Cheney 
Charles M. Clark 
Fletcher H. Clough 
Sidney A. Cullum 
E. Marion Currier 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



171 



Dorothy Daggett 
Kay Dyment 
L. Hattie Ellis 
J. Mabelle Fish 
Sadie M. Flanders 
Dean K. Foster 
Lillian I. Oilman 
A. Maude Gourley 
Clarence W. Ilannaford 
Frederick Hansen 
Oscar V. Hanson 
Kobert J. Jewell 
George W. Jones 
Maurice A. Jones 
John Kilburn 
Ida M. King 
Maitland LaBelle 
Bertha Lamoutagne 



Agnes A. Levin 
Marion O. Lithgow 
Dorothy MaeDonald 
Harold J. McAllister 
George E. McGilvray 
Claude K. Norris 
Willard H. Nute 
Fred O. Nylen 
Astrid L. Olson 
Anetta L. Parenteau 
John Shaw 
Lora E. Sleeper 
Frank E. Stohrer 
Carlton M. Strong 
Euth M. Tenney 
Victoria E. Welcome 
Edward C. Wilson 
Lorraine B. Wood 



January 30, 1914. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Henry Putney Bachelder 
Martha Ursula Emerson 
Marion Clark Hook 



Sarah Louisa Jennings 
Eonald Carson Macquire 
Margaret Mary Shugrue 



Doris G. Akeley 
Eachel G. Andrews 
Gladys E. Avery 
Eleanor E. Bailey 
Eachel S. Barker 
Euth M. Barnard 
Wilfred Benson 
Eufus F. Bond 
Fred E. Brown 



Elementary Schools. 

CHANDLEE SCHOOL. 



Carmi P. W. Browne 
Henry K. Bugbee 
John H. Burrows 
Bertha Burton 
Mary I. Champigny 
Elizabeth S. Chase 
Charlotte B. Cheney 
Marjorie G. Cheney 
Abbott A. Clark 



172 



CITY OP CONCORD, 



John S. Clinton 
Marion S. Cochran 
Edward A. Cofran 
Haskell II. Cohn 
George L. Colby 
Marion L. Colby 
Solon B. Colby 
Aimce M. Corriveau 
Melvin E. Crowell 
Francis M. Crowley 
Madeline M. Curran 
Winnie L. Dame 
Paul O. Davis 
Mabel A. Downs 
W. Ernest Durgin 
Louise A. Durrell 
Albert Y. Dytnent 
Guy O. Edmunds 
L. Ilattie Ellis 
Luella F. Fogg 
Charles L. Foote 
Bertha M. Eraser 
Gladys A. French 
Harold E. French 
Edith L. Giddis 
Euby A. Gillett 
Edith M. Gordon 
Philip B. Gove 
Clarence Hammond 
Albert Hansen 
Myrtle A. Hartford 
Eldon W. Heartz 
Ernest I. Heath 
Louise Home 
Parker Huntington 
Eichard L. Hurd 
Carl C. Jensen 
M. Olive Kelly 
Euth H. Kibby 
Cornelia H. Kimball 
Arthur E. Kuuberger 
Euby W. Lawrence 
Victor W. LeMay 



E. Irene Lord 
Joseph Mahen 
Albert J. Matson 
Mildred D. Maxham 
Eva Mayo 
Harry E. Mclntire 
Ida Mclntyre 
John H. B. Mills 
Bernice E. Morrison 
Lucile I. Nelson 
Paul T. Nolan 
Martha S. Page 
Grace M. Patch 
Walter E. Plummer 
Nina G. Eamsay 
Winnie Eamsey 
Mildred P. Eandlett 
Matilda A. Eeynolds 
Helen H. Ehodes 
Maude K. Eobinson 
Harold N. Eunnells 
Lucille G. Savoy 
Mary A. Shannon 
Hyman H. Sherr 
Frederick A. Smith 
Oney P. Smith 
Jean F. Stearns 
Wallace E. Stearns 
Arthur F. Stickney 
Guy E. Tabor 
Gladys H. Towle 
L. Claire Turner 
Altha E. Walker 
Annabel Walker 
George E. Walker 
E. Follis Wall 
Harriet E. Wallace 
Harold J. Welch 
Euth West 
Doris G. White 
Everett A. White 
Elsie I. Woodworth 
George E. Young 



, SCHOOL REPORT. 173 

GAERISON SCHOOL. 

Eobert A. Clarke J. Raymond Manning 

Lawrence H. Danforth Clarence A. Spofford 

Harold H. Ericson Edith E. Carlson 

Fritz H. Gustafson Ida C. Carlson 

George II. Johnson Edith I. Ilammar 

Richard T. Kellom Alice M, Newbcld 

EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

Josephine Edwidge Gushing Ruth Celia Staniels 

Ruth Ida Fairfield Reuben Edward Murray 

Esther Sibyl Haselton Wilfred Carl Riley 

Anna Mary Larochelle Isabelle Beatrice White 



174 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

ROLL OF HONOR. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



William Blanchette (3) 
George Burgum 
Buth Daggett 
LawTence Famum 
Charlotte Hammoud (4) 
Editli Hardy (2) 
Percy Holbrook 
Katherine White 
Corinne Heath (2) 
Kathryn Cheney (3) 
Charles Gordon (2) 
Irene White 
Nina Nash 
Clara Sewall 
Esther Shattuck 
Arline Sullivan 
Doris Williamson 



Edward Kelley 
Thomas Downs 
Evelyn Fulford (3) 
Margaret Shugrue 
Gladys Clark 
Thelma Howland 
Mabel Jewett 
Lena Leavitt 
Ethel Noonan (3) 
Eagnar Peterson 
John Reed 
Arthur Harris 
Alta Green 
Eeljekah Goldberg 
Pauline Hill 
Thomas Dudley 
Yvonne Theriault 



Frank Bean (3) 
Arthur Donovan 
Mederic LeBlanc 
Mildred Campbell (2) 
Florence King (2) 
Edgar Bourke 
Omar Ekstrom 



Marion Abbott 
Josephine Belisle 
Eva Haines 
George Houston 
Ross Love joy 
Mary Ahearn 
Hugh Cruikshank 
Helen Hartford 



PARKER SCHOOL. 

Julius Sturm 
Laura Foote (2) 
Ethel Moulton (2) 
John Crosby 
Edmund Hill 
Mildred Anderson 
Hester Hamilton (2) 

CHANDLER SCHOOL. 

George Jones 
Arthur O. Lyford 
Edna Bailey 
L. Hattie Ellis 
Annie Heartz 
Agnes Levin 
Dorothy D. Silver 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



175 



WALKER SCHOOL. 

Clara Smith 

GAEEISOX SCHOOL. 



Elmer Anderson 
Valborg E. Anderson 
Amelia Pollard 
John N. Carlson 
Fritz H. Gustafson 
Lilly B. Silver 



Elizabeth E. King 
Lester A. Maynard 
Dana S. Morrison 
Vesta P. Morrison 
Ethel M. Gate 
Goldie M. Gage 



Oscar T. Forsberg 
Henry Ekstrom 
Richard A. Ileury 
O. Waldo Anderson 
John M. Engel 
Anna Anderson 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



Dorothy E. Maynard 
George C. Stuart 
Neil W. Chandler 
Ruth C. Staniels 
Dorothy W. Morrison 
Lottie I. Sargent 



EUMFORD SCHOOL. 



Aimee M. Corriveau 
Ruby Gillet 
Rufus F. Bond (2) 
Arthur Kunberger (2) 
Oney Smith 
Mabel A. Downs 
Myrtle Hartford 
Carmi P. Browne (2) 



Grace Patch (2) 
Louise Home (4) 



Altha Walker 
Ethel M. Nudd 



Edward Cousins 
John Nolan 
Ruth Lyford 
Edgar Jewett 



Paul Nolan (2) 
Ernest West 
Rachel R. G'eorge 
Bernice Morrison 
George L. Colby 
Frederick Smith 
George E. Young 

KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

Mary Shannon (1) 



MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

Elsie Woodworth 
Eldon Heartz 

PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

Priscilla Noyes 
Harry Levin 
Arvilla Powell 



176 



Clarence E. Bartlett 
Duncan Murdock 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

Edna Smith 

DEWEY SCHOOL. 



Josepli Sandqiiist 
Hugh S. Morrison 
Dorothy E. Watson 
Euth E. Dearborn (3) 
Germaine K. Shannon (2) 
Edward J. Shannon (2) 



Mildred S. Abbott 
Eric M. N. Sandquist (2) 
Oscar T. Sandquist 
Clarence E. Huggins (2) 
Harriet I. Albee 



HAERIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 



Ada V. Curtis 
Marion S. Curtis 
George E. Ilillsgrove 
Edmond L. Parenteau 
Celia D. Eichardson 
Joseph L. Champigny 
Allan E. Hillsgrove 



Euth M. Mahoney 
Evelyna M. Parenteau 
Walter Plummer (3) 
Lillian Blanchette 
Mary Champigny 
Euth Eobinson 
Harold Welch 



TAHANTO SCHOOL. 
None. 



Alfred Kunberger 
Joseph Couture 



COGSWELL SCHOOL. 
Perley Neff 



SCHOOL REPORT. 177 

HONOR LISTS 

For the Year 1912-1913. 

Names of pupils in Union School District who attained a mark of 
A — or better in their school work during the past year. 



HIGH SCHOOL— Grovp I. 

CLASS V. 

Marion Callahan, Ethel Dole, Eose Guilbault, Bertha Venne. 

CLASS U. 

None. 

CLASS T. 

Willoughby Colby, Heraan Fogg, Marjorie Hill, Katherine Hurd, 
Elsie Kendall, Richard Kimball, Etta Monroe, Agnes Murphy, Ger- 
trude Pollard, Ethel Walker, Leland Wildes. 

CLASS S. 

Noue. 

CLASS R. 
Edith Ericson, Eebekah Goldberg, Arthur Harris, Ealph Kenney, 
Helen Murphy, Margaret Owen, Caroline Pearson, Dora Sherr, Olive 
Tabor. 

CLASS Q. 

Yera Hall, Judith Lawson, Sadie Eabinovitz, Eva Eossell, Alice 
Spaulding, Leslie Gross. 

POST-GRADUATE. 

Eolland Gove, Helen Sawyer. 

HIGH SCHOOL (Parker School, Group II). 

CLASS P. 

John Blair, Eva Campbell, Earl Fipphen, Paul Flanders, Euth Gon- 
yer, Maynard Georgi, Guy Griffin, Hazel Jones, Edith Ordway, Eich- 
ard Pearson, Irene Williamson, Gladys Wilcox, Mary Willis. 

CLASS 0. 

Bradley Baker, Leon Bishop, Esther Calkins, Elizabeth Chickering, 
Archie Gourley, Francis Henry, Hazel Hartford, Stuart Holbrook, 
Hazel Howard, Eobert Knowlton, Agnes Lake, Edna Osborne, Win- 
field Phillips, Mary Stearns, Margaret Teague, 

12 



]78 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGH SCHOOL (Chanw.er School, Group II). 

CLASS N. 

Miriam Batelielder, Marion Cheney, Arthur Cole, Hugh Cruikshank 
Allen Hollis, Jr., Harry Kimball, Anna Murphy, Euth Peckham, Lenj 
Winslow. 

CLASS M, 

Bertha Lamontague, Astrid Olson. 

WALKER SCHOOL. 

CLASS N. 

Margaret Halligan, Eveleen Haven, Ida Larson, Emily Brunell. 

CLASS M. 

Helen Patterson. 

HIGH SCHOOL (Garrison School, Group II). 

CLASS N. 

Elmer M. Anderson, Eedfield A. Anderson, Dorothy P. Chase, 
Nannie Dahlgren, Chandler Eastman, Amelia Pollard. 

CLASS M. 

Eoger M. Eastman, J. Frederick Eossell. 

HIGH SCHOOL (Eastman School, Gro\ip II). 

CLASS N. 

Neil Y\. Chandler, E. Parker Little. 

CLASS M. 



None. 



Elementary Schools. 



i 



Nam.es of pupils in L^nion School District who attained a mark of 
B — or better in their school work during the past year. 

WALKEE SCHOOL. 

CLASS I. 

Humphrey Emery, Carl Johnson, Mildred Patterson, George How- 
ard, Agnes Johnson, Nathaniel Sawyer, Stella Johnson, William 
Limprey. j 



SCHOOL REPORT. 179 

j CLASS H. 

John Branswell, Oliver Cliapdelaine, Edith Heartz, Jeannette La- 
plante, Elise Denis, Maurice Nelson. 

CLASS F. 

" Theodora Adam, Percival Eveleth, Arthur Holmgren, Mary Hall, 
Mildred Lucier, Paul Lampron, Paul Otis, James Sweet, Jessie San- 
born, L. Howard Smith, Ursula Sanders, Beatrice Tremblay, Ealph 
Walters, Charles Zambs. 

I CLASS E. 

Marguerite Fernald, Frank George. 

GAEEISON SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 
Fritz H. Gustafson, Clarence C. Spofford, George H. Johnson, 
Eobert A. Clarke, Edith E. Carlson, Alice M. Newbold, Harold H. 
Ericson. 

CLASS J. 
Eichard A. Henry, Bertil C. Eossell, Edgar H. Larson, Paul L, 
Bailey, Elmer W. Anderson, Greta E. Clark, Valborg E. Anderson, 
Viola J. Holmquist, Euth P. Martin, Lilly E. Silver, Jeannette B. 
Eyan. 

CLASS I. 

Evelyn P. Blackwood, Carl G. A. Nelson, Carl O. Lindstrom, Edwin 
A. Peterson, A. Harrison Graham, C. Eleanor H. Davis. 

CLASS K. 
John N. Engel, Lawrence E. Cotter, Florence L. Clarke, Neva I. 
Lindgren, Gertrude L. Eossell, Elinor A. Hammar, Morrill F. Shep- 
ard, Paul E. Ericson, Lawrence T. Stevens, Wilho J. Koski, Ernest 
A. Hammar, Ella A. Shepard, Edna A. Peterson, Lewis A. Ballard. 

CLASS F. 

Helen E. Eyan, Gustaf W. Forsberg, Mary J. Henry. 

EASTMAN SCHOOL. 
CLASS L. 
Euth C. Staniels, Lawrence M. Gardner, Eeuben Murray, W. Carl 
Riley, Josephine E. Gushing, Euth I. Fairfield, Esther S. Haseltou. 

GRADE V. 

Harold A. Gate, Doris H. Chamberlin, Elizabeth E. Gushing, Sadie 
A. Huston, George V. Lacroix, Evelyn D. McAlpine, Dorothy W. Mor- 
rison, Eichmond H. Pendleton. 



180 CITY OP CONCORD. 



GRADE IV, 



Ethel M. Gate, Miriam E. French, Lnella E. Powell, Lottie I. Sar- 
gent, Mary L. Spaulding, Ina L. Tebbett. 



Lester A. Maynard, Hazel E. Blauchard, Ethel Brown, Dana S. Mor- 
rison, Madeline Sargent, Dorothy E. Staniels, 

EUMFORD SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

Madaline Curran, Mabel Downs, Carmi P. Browne, Edward Cofran, 
Oney Smith, Doris Akeley, Gladys Avery, Arleen Crossley, Aimee 
Corriveau, Louise Durrell, Eachel George, Ruby Gillet, Judith Ham- 
mar, Myrtle Hartford, Bernice Morrison, Irene Lord, Charlene Pet- 
tingill, Nina Eamsay, Matilda Reynolds, Doris White, Dorothea Wil- 
cox, George Colby, Arthur Kunberger, Harry Mclntire, Hyman Sherr, 
Frederick Smith, Guy Tabor, George Young. 

CLASS K. 

Gertrude Ravitch, Marion Skillen, Francis Trason, Clara West, Fred 
Moulton, Inza Mitchell, Evelyn McManus, Sylvia McLaughlin, Marcia 
Madison, Earl Ludlow, Dorothy Kendall, Emma Jones, William Har- 
gen, Dorothy Gross, Pearl Goldman, Mabel Evans, Leslie Ellis, Irene 
Dudley, Roland Douglass, Philip Cote, Arthur Copp, Lloyd Chamber- 
lin, Lillian Berry, Myrtle Beaulae. 

CLASS J. 

Simeon Goldman, Field Perry, Harold Winslow, Edgar Hammond, 
Carroll Cilley, Rose Trudell, Margaret Osgood, Eniile Cote, Glenda 
Merrill, Louise Struthers, Florence Little, Doris Kennedy, Sadie Ash, 
Priscilla Wood, George Bailey. 

CLASS I. 
Willis Sav,yer, Edith Unwin, Irene Young, Emma Tucker. 

CLASS H. 

Robert Button, Rachel Sandquist, Nathan Sanel. Eda Sanel, Edgar 
Kunberger, John Allquist, Henry Clay, Harry Colby, Pearl Parker, 
Celia Sherr. 

CLASS G. 

Ethel Ravitch, Josephine Cote, Arnold Hill, Merle Tabor, Joseph 
Brooks, Roy Perry, Ruth Morrow, Sarah Goldman. 



I 



SCHOOL REPORT. 181 



Leon Goldberg, Eldred Davie, Kennetli Sullivan, Eussell Sawyer, 
Emma Trudell, Ethel Carpenter, Georgia Osgood. 

CLASS E. 

Jerome Leavitt, Eoss MacDonald. 

KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

Marjorie Cheney, Cornelia Kimball, Grace Patch, Dorothy Eourke, 
Mary Shannon, Jean Stearns, Wallace Stearns, Eachel Andrews, 
Haskell Cohn, Marion Colby, Gladys French, Edith Gordon, Philip 
tj Gove, Parker Huntington, Pauline Lane, Helen Ehodes. 

CLASS K. 

Charles E. Eoche, Paul H. Burroughs, John L. Peckham, Eunice 
E. Quinn, Helen I. MacDonald, Edith H. Brown, Jean W. Shepard, 
Harold E. Lovejoy, F. Ivan Wood, Verna I. C'orser, Euth E. Chase, 
' ■ Chadwick Connell, Annie D. Moran. 

CLASS J. 

Elizabeth Benton, Dean E. Colton, Sarah F. Jewell, Arthur Led- 
j ward, Doris E. Sturm, Mary P. Walker, Blanche E. Walker. 

CLASS I. 

H. Gwendolyn Jones, Milton Shapiro, Oscar Silverman. 

CLASS H. 
C. Wendell Kimball, Edmund A. Laport, Elizabeth Morrill, May 
E. Smith, Ansell J. Dixon, George H. Gordon, George C. Kimball, 
Mariana B. Odlin, Euth A. Saltmarsh. 

CLASS G. 
j George S. Copp, Janice Griffin, Nettie M. Jewell. 

CLASS F. 

Virginia Morrill, Gertrude Champigny, Margaret S. Jackman, Lena 
E. Corser, Allan I. Shapiro, Hazel L. Tuttle, Daniel T. Wilkins. 

I MEEEIMACK SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

Euth Barnard, Jennine Bourke, Melvin Crowell, Francis Crowley, 
Albert Dyment, Bertha Eraser, Harley Ford, Louise Guyol, Euth 
Kibby, Harold Eunnells, Eaymond Eeed, Everett White, Altha 
Walker, Elsie Woodworth, Harriet Wallace. 



182 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLASS K. 

Alice Baker, Harold Bean, Florence Osgood, Madeline Potter, 
Eobert Potter, Herbert Stevens, Etbel Nudd, Mildred Byers, Marion 
Whitcomb, Amelia Fanny, Laura Phillips, Alice Carleson, Florence 
Hunt. 

CLASS J. 

Helen I. Morrison, Krekor Sbaterian, Mary Otis, Katherine Crabbe, 
Herbert Hill, Lydia King. 

PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

CLASS J. 

Euth Lyford, Jennie Nute, Webster Bridges, Maxwell Coulter, 
Edgar Jewett, Desire Denoncourt, Annie Wilson. 

CLASS J. 
Arline Booth, Gordon Bartlett, Eugene Maxam, Carl Harris, Harry 
Levin. 

CLASS H. 

Conrad Benson, Ralph Dueniling, Stewart Lyford, Lillian Doug- 
lass, Anna Magnuson, Lillian Eancpiist. 

CLASS G. 

Euth Holt, Sophia Lucia, Mildred Swenson. 

CLASS F. 

Kenneth E. Kimball, Robert Sylvester, Stewart Sylvester, Alice 
Corriveau, Elizabeth Higgins, Merton Messer. 

CLASS E. 

Edward Sanel, Eleanor Harris. 

FEANKLIN SCHOOL. 

CLASS I. 

Cecelia Coun, Edna Smith, Ehoda Eeilly, Arthur Parker, Jennie 
Kemp. 

CLASS H. 

Dorothy Scott, Marjorie Butterfield, Eobert Tucker, Eva Sanborn, 
Marion Davis, Arthur Nudd. 

CLASS G. 

Laura E. Parker, Margaret Mallette, Martha D. Persons, Jennie 
Ford, Alfred Flamaad, Nellie Cox, Mary Crutchfield. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 183 

CLASS F. 

Kathleen B. Wall, Dorothy E. Moberg, Robert E. Morrison. 

CLASS E. 

Douglas S. Bean, Doris W. Hayford, Doris M. Knee, Dominie Del- 
brauco, May Cochran, Arthur J. Adams, Berniee M. Berry. 

DEWEY SCHOOL. 

CLASS J. 

Leslie Dixon, Eric Sandquist, Madeline Vose, Harriett J. Albee, 
jreorge Clark, Phyllis Carpenter, Euth E. Dearborn, J. Gray Estes, 
Ethel M. Felton, Harriett J. Gordon, Cora Maltais, Eaymond D. 
\Icore, John Murjihy, Margaret Wall, Helen Wall, Mary Wood. 

CLASS I. 
Porter Eoberts, Dorothy E. Watson. 

CLASS H. 

Zelia M. King, Phillips W. Vose, Anna Audet, Sally Clement, 
IJharles J. Gannon, Margaret A. Gordon, Clarence E. Huggins, Al- 
)ert J. King, John A. Morrison. 

CLASS F, 

Hilda Buchan, Joseph Demers, Martha A. Lane, Hugh S. Mor- 
ison, Eowland H. Smith, Oramel W. Swain, Beatrice Winch. 

HAEEIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 

CLASS L. 

Louise Dutton, Mabel Foote, Lily Eowland, Lucille Savoy, Walter 
'lummer, Mary Champigny, Edith Giddis, Albert Hansen, Edwin 
'obinson, Arthur Stickney, Harold Welch. 

CLASS J. 
Harry Anderson, Leona Savoy, Euth Eobinson, Lillian Blanehette, 
fathalie McDonnell, Eobert Hillsgrove, Ellen Grant. 

GRADE IV. 

Joseph Champigny, Everett Gagnon, Allan Hillsgrove, Eunice 
raven, Clifton Stickney, Gertrude Foote, Philip Parenteau, Euth 
[ahoney. 

GRADE III. 

Madeline Blanehette, Myrtle Hillsgrove, William Mahoney, Evelyna 
arenteau, Wilfred Eichardson, Joseph Locke, Oscar Parenteau. 



SECOND ANNUAL PAGEANT. 



Folk Lore and Kindergarten Games at White Park, 
Tuesday, June 10, 1913. 

PROGRAM. 

All Schools — ' ' The Danish Dance of Greeting. ' ' 

Consolidated Kindergartens — "See Saw," "Pigeon House," "How 

Do You Do My Partner," "Soldier Boy." 
Tahanto and Franklin Schools — ' ' The Shoemaker "s Dance, ' ' 

Classes A, B, C, D. 
Walker School— " Poppies and Butterflies," Classes B, C, E, P. 

Dewey School — "Hickory Dlckory Dock," Classes A, B, C, D. 

Kimball School — "Carrousel," "Hop Mother Annika, " 

Classes A, B, C, D. 
Harriet P. Dame School — "The Mountain Mai-eh, " Classes 3, 4, 5, L. 
Penacook School — ' ' The Ace of Diamonds, ' ' Classes E, F, G, H. 

"Afternoon Tea," Classes I, J. 

Dewey School — "Merry Chimes," Classes E, G, I, J. 

Franklin School — ' ' Hansel and Gretel, ' ' Classes F, G, H, I. 

Eastman School— " Trallen, " "The Kinderpolka," 

Classes 4, 5, L, >[, N. 
Cogswell School—' ' Flag Drill, ' ' Classes C, D. 

Merrimack School — " Cseheboggar, " " The Wooden Shoes," 

Classes J, K. 
Kimball School — "Laudnum Bunches," Classes I, J. 

Garrison School — "Tantoli, " " Nickodickomidij," "Eeap the 

Plax," Classes H, I, K, L. 

Merrimack School— " Irish Jig," "Tarantella," Classes K, L. 

Walker School— " Scotch Reel," Classes H, I, M, N. 

Eumford School — "May Pole Dances," Classes I, J, K, L. 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WAERANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. 
H., qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet in the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the third day of April, 
1913, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the fol- 
lowing subjects : 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years to fill vacancies arising from 
the expiration of the term of office of George H. Moses, 
Alice M. Nims, and Harry H. Dudlej^ and to fill any other 
vacancies that may occur in said board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors and other necessary 
officers for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year 
including industrial education, military drill and medical 
inspection. 

8. To see if the district will vote to erect a new school 
building or to enlarge the existing building upon the lot 
now occupied by the Walker school building, appoint a 
committee with power to erect the same, to raise and ap- 
propriate money and authorize a contract with the City 



13(5 CITY OP CONCORD, 

of Concord for its credit as contemplated by the laws of 
the State of New Hampshire, and take such other or fur- 
ther action as may be necessary to the completion of the 
premises. 

9. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this tenth day of March, 1913. 

FANNY E. MINOT, 
ALICE M. NIMS, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
EDWARD C. NILES, 
WILLIAM H. SAWYER, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 

I certify that on the eighteenth day of March, 1913, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant attested by the Board 
of Education of said district, at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copj" at the police station in the 
city of Concord, N. H., being a public place in said district. 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 

Concord, N. IL, March 24, 1913. 
Personally appeared before me, on this date, the said 
Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certificate 
by him signed is true. 

GEORGE N. FELLOWS, 

Jiistice of the Peace. 

In accordance with the foregoing "warrant, a meeting of 
the legal voters of Union School District was held at the 
Auditorium, in the city of Concord, on Thursday, April 
3, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 187 

In the absence of the moderator, John B. Abbott, the 
meeting was called to order by the clerk, Louis C. Merrill, 
Esq. 

Article 1. Henry H. Metealf moved, and it was sec- 
onded, that Rev. Howard F. Hill be elected moderator 
pro tern, the clerk to cast the ballot. Carried. The clerk 
attended to the duty assigned, and declared Mr. Hill elected 
clerk pro tern. He was sworn to the discharge of his duties 
by Louis C. Merrill, justice of the peace. 

The moderator read the warrant and called for a l)allot 
for moderator. 

Mr. Harry H. Dudley moved and it was seconded that 
Howard F. Hill cast one ballot for Louis C. Merrill for 
moderator of the district. Carried. ]\Ir. Hill attended to 
the duties assigned, and Mr. Merrill was declared elected. 

He was sworn to the discharge of his duties by Henry 
E. Chamberlin, justice of the peace. 

Art. 2. On motion of Henry H. Metealf, duly seconded, 
it was voted that the moderator cast one ballot for Fred 
Leighton for clerk, and he was declared elected. The oath 
of office was administered by Louis C. Merrill, justice of 
the peace. 

Art. 3, On motion of Henry E. Chamberlin, duly sec- 
onded, it was voted that the reports of the Board of Educa- 
tion, the financial agent and other officers of the district 
be accepted and ordered on file without reading. 

Art. 4. On motion of Henry H. Metealf, duly sec- 
onded, it was voted that the district proceed to vote for 
three members of the Board of Education for three years 
each, on one ballot, and that the polls be kept until 8.45 
p. m. 

To a question of George A. Wooster, of ward seven, the 
moderator ruled that families annexed to Union School 
District by act of the present legislature had a right to vote 
at this meeting. On motion of Mr. Henry H. Metealf, duly 



138 CITY OF CONCORD. 

seconded, it was voted that three tellers be appointed to 
sort and count the votes, one by the friends of Mrs. Mar- 
garet M. Lee, one by the friends of Mrs. Lillian R. Shepard, 
and one by the moderator to represent the district. 

Howard F. Hill was named for Mrs. Lee. 

Henry E. Chamberlin was named for Mrs. Shepard. 

The moderator named Arthur F. Sturtevant. 

Mr. Chamberlin not appearing, Mr, A. H. Knight, of 
West Concord, was substituted. 

On motion of Harry H. Dudley, duly seconded, it was 
voted to proceed to a consideration of the other articles 
on the warrant. 

Art. 5. On motion of Edward S. Cummings, duly sec- 
onded, it was voted that the clerk cast one vote for John 
P. George and Henry H. Metcalf as auditors of the dis- 
trict. 

The clerk cast the ballot, and the gentlemen named were 
declared elected. 

Art. 6. Mr. W. T. McLam presented the following reso- 
lution: Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby 
ordered to be raised on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District the sum of twelve thousand and four 
hundred sixty dollars ($12,460), of which sum seven thou- 
sand dollars ($7,000) shall be appropriated for the pay- 
ment of the bonds of the district maturing October 1, 1913, 
and five thousand four hundred sixty dollars ($5,460) for 
the payment of the interest on its bonded debt accruing 
during the year. Mr. McLam moved the adoption of the 
resolution, and on the second being recorded, it was carried 
unanimously. 

Art. 7. Harry F. Lake, Esq., presented the following 
resolution and moved its adoption: Resolved, That there 
be raised and is hereby ordered to be raised on the polls 
and ratable estates within Union School District for the 
support of schools for the ensuing year, such a sum as in 



SCHOOL REPORT. 189 

addition to the sum assigned to the district by the city of 
Concord out of its appropriation for schools will amount 
to the sum of ninety-six thousand seven hundred forty- 
eight and nine hundredths dollars ($96,748.09). Carried 
unanimously. 

Art. 8. Kev. George H. Reed, D. D., presented the fol- 
lov/ing and moved its adoption : 

Voted, That a school building be erected and equipped 
upon the Walker school lot with accommodations for at 
least four hundred and fifty pupils, either by altering and 
adding to the building now standing on said lot or by the 
erection of a new building as the Board of Education may 
by vote determine, and that the Board of Education of 
Union School District be and hereby are appointed a com- 
mittee with authority to determine the location of said 
school building upon said Walker school lot, to erect and 
furnish said building, to employ architects, agents and such 
other assistants as they may require and in the name and 
on behalf of Union School District to do such other acts and 
enter into such contracts and agreements as may be neces- 
sary to carry this vote into effect ; that the sum of fifty 
thousand dollars ($50,000) be and the same is hereby ap- 
propriated for the erection and completion of said build- 
ing; that the indebtedness of the district arising from 
the erection, equipment, and completion of said building 
be funded at a rate of interest not exceeding four per cent. 
(4%) per annum and that a sufficient sum of money be 
assessed upon the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District on the first day of April in each year there- 
after to meet the payments of the interest and the principal 
of said indebtedness at the date or dates of maturity of the 
principal and interest as the same may be fixed, as here- 
inafter provided ; and that the money obtained by said 
assessments be and hereby is appropriated to make said 
pajTuents; that the district request the city of Concord 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

to aid in funding the indebtedness of the district arising 
from the construction and the furnishing of said school 
building as the city is authorized to do by law, provided 
said city will borrow the money necessary for the purpose 
set forth in this vote and will allov,' the district to have 
the use of the money so borrowed, and further, that, if this 
request is complied with, the district will seasonably pay 
the city sufficient sums of money to enable the city to meet 
the payments of the principal and interest upon this indebt- 
edness so created, as the same may fall due, and all inci- 
dental expenses, and will apply the money to be raised, as 
herein provided, to the payments aforesaid ; and said com- 
mittee is hereby further authorized to make and request of 
the city the date or dates when the principal of said in- 
debtedness and the interest thereon shall mature, and do 
all other acts and things necessary to carry this vote into 
effect. 

Henry H. Metcalf moved to substitute for the recom- 
mendation of the board a motion that a committee of five 
to consist of Harry H. Dudley, Carrie E. Evans, Dr. 
George M. Kimball, DeWitt C. Howe and John P. George 
be elected to investigate the subject contained in the report 
of the board and to report recommendations at an ad- 
journed meeting to be held two weeks from to-night. 

Discussion followed, at the conclusion of wiiich the mo- 
tion of Mr. Reed, duly seconded, was carried. 

Mr. George W. Phillips presented the following resolu- 
tion : 

Resolved, That Union School District build a new school 
building of granite (of the rock face, broken, ashlar type, 
with Hammond trimmings), using the brick in the old 
building for interior walls, said building to be sufficiently 
monumental to properly mark the spot where legislature of 
this state ratified the constitution of the United States. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 191 

On motion of Howard F. Hill the district voted to refer 
the resolution to the Board of Education. 

The hour of 8.45 having arrived the moderator declared 
the polls closed and announced the result of the balloting, 
as follows: 

Whole number cast, 1,386 

Necessary for choice, 694 

Plarry H. Dudley had 1,053 

George H. Moses, 1,039 

Lillian R. Shepard, 813 

Margaret M. Lee, 326 

Harry F. Lake, 1 

and Harry H. Dudley, George H. Moses and Lillian E. 

Shepard were declared elected members of the Board of 

Education for a term of three years. 

No further business appearing, it was voted to adjourn. 

Harry H. Dudley was sworn to the discharge of his duties 

by the moderator. 

A true record. Attest: 

FRED LEIGHTON, Clerk. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inliahitants of Union School District qualified to 
vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street in said district on Monday, the 23d day of 
June, 1913, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the 
following subjects : 

1. To see if the district, by vote, will authorize the 
Board of Education to make the new school building to be 



;[92 CITY OF CONCORD. 

erected upon the Walker School lot as nearly fire proof as 
said Board of Education may think practicable and to raise 
and appropriate such further amount of money as may be 
necessary to carry the same into effect. 

2. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this second day of June, 1913. 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
D. E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
WILLIAM H. SAWYER, 
GEORGE H. MOSES, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 

Concord^ N. H., June 5, 1913. 
I certify that on the fifth day of June, 1913, I posted a 
copy of the written warrant, attested by the Board of Edu- 
cation of said district, at the place of meeting within named, 
and a like attested copy at the police station in the city of 
Concord, N. H., being a public place in said district. 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 

Concord, N. H., June 5, 1913. 
Then personally appeared before me on this date the said 
L. J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certificate by 
hiin signed is true. 

GEORGE N. FELLOWS, 

Justice of the Peace. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 193 

Pursuant to the warrant the legal voters of Union School 
District met in the Auditorium on Prince Street in Concord 
on the evening of Monday, June 23, 1913, at 7.30 p. m. 

In the absence of the moderator, Mr. Louis C. Merrill, 
the meeting was called to order by Fred Leighton, clerk of 
the district. On motion of Edward C. Niles, James 0. 
Lyford, Esq., was elected moderator pro tern., the clerk 
casting the ballot. The oath to the moderator-elect was 
administered by Mr. Niles, a justice of the peace. The 
warrant for the meeting was read by the moderator. 

Article 1. George H. Moses, Esq., presented the fol- 
lowing, and moved its adoption hj ballot. 

Voted, That the sum of twenty thousand dollars ($20,- 
000) be and hereby is raised and appropriated additional 
to the sum already raised and appropriated at the last 
annual meeting of Union School District held Thursday, 
April 3, 1913, for the erection and completion of a new 
school building on- the Walker School lot, and that the in- 
debtedness arising from the raising and appropriating said 
twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) additional to the sum 
already appropriated for the erection and completion of 
said new school building be funded at a rate of interest not 
exceeding four per cent. (4%) per annum, and that a suf- 
ficient sum of money be assessed upon the polls and ratable 
estates within Union School District on the first day of 
April in each year thereafter to meet the payments of the 
interest and principal of said indebtedness at the date or 
dates of the maturity of the principal and interest as the 
same may be fixed, as hereinafter provided ; and that the 
money obtained by said assessments be and hereby is ap- 
propriated to make said payments ; that the district re- 
quests the city of Concord to aid in funding the indebted- 
ness of the district arising from the construction and the 
furnishing of said school building as the city is authorized 
to do by law, provided said city will borrow the money 



294 CITY OP CONCORD. 

necessary for the purposes set fortli in this vote and will 
allow the district to have the use of the money so borrowed, 
and further, that if this request is complied with the district 
will seasonably pay the city sufficient sums of money to 
enable the city to meet the payments of the principal and 
interest upon this indebtedness so created, as the same may 
fall due, and all incidental expenses, and Avill apply the 
money to be raised, as herein provided, to the payments 
aforesaid ; and said committee is hereby authorized to make 
and request of the city the date or dates when the prin- 
cipal of said indebtedness and interest thereon shall mature, 
and do all other acts and things necessary to carry this 
vote into effect. 

Discussion ensued. 

Edward C. Niles, Esq., presented the following and 
moved that it be substituted for the vote introduced by ]\Ir. 
Moses. 

Voted, That the sum of twenty thousand dollars be raised 
and appropriated, in addition to the sum of fifty thousand 
dollars already appropriated, to be expended by the Board 
of Education of Union School District in building and 
equipping a new schoolhouse on the Walker School lot, 
and that the Board of Education be authorized to hire the 
above money on the notes of the district, to be signed by 
the president of the Board of Education and the financial 
agent of the district, or as otherwise provided by law, such 
notes to be for such amounts, not exceeding twentj" thou- 
sand dollars in the aggregate, on such time, and at such rate 
of interest, not exceeding five per cent., as maj' be deter- 
mined by vote of the Board of Education, and that the 
amount of the principal and interest of said notes from 
time to time, as they may come due, be assessed and taxed 
upon the ratable polls and estates in said Union School 
District, all in compliance with "An Act in Amendment 
of Chapter 89 of the Public Statutes of New Hampshire 



SCHOOL REPORT. 195 

Relating to the Exemption of Money at Interest Loaned 
to School Districts," approved March 31, 1913; and that 
the notes so issued shall be exempt from taxation when 
held by citizens of Concord. 

Mr. Moses accepted the vote presented by Mr. Niles as 
a substitute for the vote presented by him. 

The question was then on the adoption of Mr. Niles ' vote 
and on this a ballot was ordered, which resulted : 

Yes, 241 

No, 3 

and the vote was declared adopted. 

No business appearing under Article 2 of the warrant, 
on motion of Harry H. Dudley, Esq., the meeting ad- 
journed. 

A true record. Attest: 

FRED LEIGHTON, Clerk. 



TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT. 
Report of Superintendent. 



We herewith submit this our fourth annual report to 
the school board and citizens of the town district of 
Concord. 

The work of the year has, in the main, been construc- 
tive in character, without any features that can be called 
striking or radical. The teachers have been loyal, ap- 
parently, and faithful in their work. They have co- 
operated to serve the best interests of the pupils. But 
few changes have been made in method and these were 
to follow more closely the state program of studies. 

Our aim has been the preparation of boys and girls 
for life. How to make this the best, and how to give to 
youth such an outlook upon life that he may be best 
prepared to face honestly and courageously the diffi- 
culties which he is sure to meet, is the problem which 
faces us to-day. Whether the schools shall follow tradi- 
tion or take up the more efficient preparation for life along 
the manual arts and secure a greater appreciation for 
the work of father and mother, are the great questions 
to be answered. 

A somewhat conservative spirit has prevented us from 
doing as much as we would like and is being done in the 
city and the other towns under our supervision. Through 
what we have done we have proven that w^e can gather 
the best of the new about the tried of the old and give 
our pupils a preparation for country life without Aveaken- 
ing that preparation which time has proven to be essen- 
tial. Our progress should be constructive and conser- 
vative, and not destructive and radical. 

Much attention has been given to the improvement and 
the adjustment of text-books as in other years. There is 
still a need for more reading material that better habits 



SCHOOL REPORT, 197 

of reading may be secured and a greater cultural basis 
laid. 

The teachers have been directed in method and helped 
in the solution of problems of management. Nearly all 
of the teachers are reading along professional lines. They 
are keeping in touch with the best things in the city 
work and general educational advancement. We are 
grateful for the hearty co-operation Avhich we have re- 
ceived from the teachers. 

Nine rural one-room schools, varying in size from four 
to tAventy-five pupils, have been maintained thus far 
during the school year. Approximately 110 pupils have 
been generally regular in attendance. There are a few 
eases where there is need of the truant officer, brought 
to our attention by the state department. 

The school buildings are generally in good condition. 
Some needed improvements have been made in Mr. Hol- 
land's part of the town, and in other parts such improve- 
ments as the emergencies have demanded. 

We ask your support and co-operation in making the 
schools of Concord town district real live institutions for 
the training of the youth for citizenship, by the use of 
methods calculated to employ the natural buoyant loyal 
spirit of the pupil and by introducing the substance of 
life and its activities into the work of the school. By 
this method we shall be able to demonstrate that even 
the isolated country school, while it shall continue to 
exist, may be made to merit the praise of the community 
in which it is found on account of the impetus and the 
ideals of living that the school inculcates. Work of this 
kind needs not only the active participation of a super- 
intendent but the co-operation of school officials, teachers 
and parents. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. J. BEST, 

Superintendent. 



Town School District Treasurer's Report. 



The treasurer of the ToAvn School District of the city 
of Concord respectfully submits the following report of 
the receipts and expenditures for the year ending March, 
1914: 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand March 22, 1913, 

Amount required by law. 

Additional voted by district, 

Literary fund, 

Amount received from "Walker fund, 

Amount received from dog licenses, 

One half superintendent's salary, from state 

treasury, 
Rebate on tuition from Union District, 

Total receipts, $5,951.52 

EXPENDITURES. 

Teachers' salaries, $2,947.50 

Text-books and supplies, . 102.65 

Fuel, ■ 205.07 

Tuition, Union District, high school, 948.24 

Tuition, Union District, Dewey school, 12.00 

Tuition, Union District, H. P. Dame school, 9.00 

Tuition, Penacook, high school, 24.31 

Tuition, school district of Bow, 24.50 

Tuition, school district of Pembroke, 111.50 

Repairs, 148.17 

Flags and appliances, 17.50 



$362.14 


3,041.89 


2,000.00 


145.01 


2.51 


100.84 


283.34 


15.79 



SCHOOL REPORT. 199 



Conveying scholars, 


$83.50 


Enumerating children, 


8.00 


Incidentals, 


96.51 


Janitors, 


77.33 


Water, 


12.00 


Superintendent, 


706.67 


Truant officer, 


2.00 


Salary of school board. 


200.00 


Salary of treasurer, 


25.00 


Salary of auditor. 


2.00 


Balance on hand March 11, 1914, 


188.07 



$5,951.52 

FRANK E. DIMOND, 

Treasurer. 

This certifies I have examined the foregoing treasurer's 
accounts and find them correctly cast and properly 
vouched. 

J. N. ABBOTT, 
Auditor of School Accounts. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CITY MARSHALL. 



To the Honorable Mayoi^ and Board of Aldermen, Concord, 
N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit to you the 
report of the police department for the year beginning 
January 1, 1913, and ending December 31, 1913. 

ROSTER. 

City Marshal. 
George A. S. KimbalL 

Assistant City Marshal. 

Charles H. Rowe, resigned December 1, 1913. 

Successor, Victor I. Moore. 

Captain. 

Victor I. Moore to December 1, 1913. 

Successor, Samuel L. Bachelder. 

Sergeant. 
Christopher T. "Wallace. 

Regular Patrolmen. 
Samuel Rodd, Harry L. Woodward, 

Irving B. Robinson, Fred N. Marden, 

George H. Silsby, Charles H. Guilbault, 

Edward J. McGirr, Frank B. McDaniels, 

Joseph E. Silva, John B. Long. 

Janitor of Police Station, William A. Kelley. 



police department, 201 

Special Reserve Officers. 

CAPTAIN. 

Thomas P. Davis. 

Willie A. Little, John J. Halligan, 

Orrin H. Beane, Willie A. Flanders, 

Charles E. Kelley, Cleveland H. Curtis, 

George G. Allen, Elmer Tremblay, 

Joseph A. Flanders, Clark D. Stevens, 

Harper B. Giles, George E. Drury, 

John McGirr, James Jepson, 

Walter H. Beane, Jonas Welcome. 

Financial Statement. 

Total receipts for fines and costs, from Jan- 
nary 1, 1913, to July 1, 1913, $826.66 

*Total receipts for officers' fees, from July 1, 
1913, to January 1, 1914, $408.21 

Appropriation for 1913, $16,646.07 

Special appropriation, 1,971.78 



Total, $18,617.85 

Disbursements. 

Fuel, $517.00 

Helmets, caps and buttons, 56.95 

Horse-hire, city and Penacook, 83.75 

Board and shoeing horse, 398.25 

Lights, 207.71 

Incidentals, 1,114.13 



*A1I fees received by officers are turned over to the city treasurer every 
three months. 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Salaries (regulars), $14,246.60 

Salaries (specials), 1,405.02 

Salary of janitor, 300.13 

Water, 43.00 

Police signal system, 245.31 



Total, $18,617.85 

Number of Arrests and Causes. 

Whole number of arrests, including Penacook, 1,556 

Whole number of arrests at Penacook, 231 

Brought before the court, 895 
Discharged without being brought before the court, 661 

Adultery, 2 

Assault, 25 

Assault on officer, 2 

Escapes from Industrial School, 6 

Aggravated assault, 3 

Breaking and entering, 2 

Bastardy, 3 

Trespass, 1 

Shoplifting, 1 

Runaway boy, 1 

Sodomy, 1 

Incest, 1 

Breaking, entering and larceny, 1 

Spitting on sidewalk, 1 

Escapes from State Hospital, 2 

Employing boy under 16 years old, 2 
Running automobile while under influence of liquor, 2 

Drunkenness, including Penacook, 1,084 

Drunkenness at Penacook, 150 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 203 

Deserter, 1 

Bigamy, 1 

Escapes from House of Correction, 3 

Carrying concealed weapons, 2 

Receiving stolen goods, 1 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk, 1 

For out of town officers, 8 

Insane, 19 

Non-support, 16 

Keeping disorderly house, 1 

Larceny, 32 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 7 

Safekeeping, 288 

Buying junk of minors, 2 

Riinniiig auto Avitliout lights, 1 

Abandoning children, 1 

Vagrancy, 2 

Stubborn child, 1 

Keeping liquor for sale illegally, 1 

Fugitive from justice, . 1 

Rude and indecent conduct, 2 

Resisting an officer, 1 

Running auto recklessly, 1 

Forgery, 2 

Failure to send child to school, 9 

Embezzlement, 2 

Begging, 2 

Exposing person, 1 

Fighting, 3 

Hold up, 1 

Escaped, 1 

Superior Court mittimus, 2 



204 city of concord. 

Miscellaneous. 

Whole number of lodgers, including Penacook, 1,399 
Whole number of lodgers at Penacook, 200 
Number of doors found open and secured, includ- 
ing Penacook, 231 
Number of doors found open and secured at 

Penacook, 37 

Lost children returned to parents, 41 

Disturbances quelled, including Penacook, 58 

Disturbances quelled at Penacook, 15 

Complaints investigated, including Penacook, 950 

Complaints investigated at Penacook, 89 
Number of times doors tried, including Penacook, 782,295 

Number of times doors tried at Penacook, 23,460 
Number of doors found unlocked, including 

Penacook, 221 

Number of doors found unlocked at Penacook, 37 

Stray teams found, 3 

Stray horses found, 3 
Alarms of fire rung in by officers, including 

Penacook, 3 

Alarms of fire rung in by officers at Penacook, 2 
Number of officers attending fires, including 

Penacook, 125 

Number of officers attending fires at Penacook, 6 

Ambulance calls, 164 

Number of duty calls rung in on signal system, 51,843 

Burst water pipes found in blocks, 3 

Stray cows found in street, 1 

Runaway girls returned home, 2 

Holes in bridges reported, 3 

Dogs killed by electric cars, 2 

Horses put up at stables, 4 

Officers assisting at drowning accidents, 13 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 205 

Insane persons found on streets, 6 

Accidents reported, 20 

Dogs killed, 3 

Bicycles found, 3 

Dead bodies found, 4 

Defects in sidewalks and streets reported, 11 

Dangerous dogs reported, 9 

Bitten by dog, 1 

Dangerous wires reported, 5 

Lanterns placed at dangerous places, 3 

Water leaks reported, 2 

Lost dogs restored to owners, 4 

Runaway horses stopped by officers, 3 

Street obstructions removed, 13 

Assisted at accidents, 5 

Assisted in cases of sickness, 154 

Reported bitten by dogs, 2 

Lights reported out, 61 

Sick persons given aid at police station, 10 

Sick and injured assisted, 9 

Accidental drownings, 1 

Disabled horses reported to S. P. C. A., 1 

Suicides, 3 

"Windows found open, 42 

Asphyxiated by gas, 2 

Persons injured in automobile accidents, 6 

Bound over to the Superior Court, 25 

Committed to jail, 32 

Committed to House of Correction, 352 

Committed to N. H. State Hospital, 9 

Number of fines paid, 236 

Mittimus not to issue till called for, 191 

Appeals, 1 

Cases nol-prossed, 8 

Sentences suspended, 37 



206 city of concord. 

Location of Police Signal Boxes. 

Bridge Street and Stickney Avenue. 
South Main and West Streets. 
South Main and Concord Streets. 
South Main and Pleasant Streets. 
North Main and School Streets. 
North Main and Park Streets. 
Washington between North Main and State 

Streets. 
North Main and Church Streets. 
North State and Penacook Streets. 
Curtice Avenue and North State Street. 
West Concord, opposite Shepard's store. 
Penacook (Square). 
Center, opposite Union Street. 
South and Perley Streets. 
Broadway, corner Carter Street. 
Center and Pine Streets. 
Pleasant and South Streets. 
Warren, opposite Tahanto Street. 
Beacon and Rumford Streets. 

Recommendations. 

The new traffic ordinance passed last summer by your 
Honorable Body has in my opinion proven to be a great 
success, but it necessitated taking one of our night patrol- 
men to assist in enforcing the rules, thereby reducing the 
night squad. I am of the opinion that we should have an- 
other officer appointed for night duty and a traffic officer 
whose duty shall be to look after that branch of the work. 
I would respectfully suggest that our appropriation be 
increased to meet the demands of the situation. 

I still live in hope that this department will have a com- 
bination automobile patrol and ambulance at an early date. 



Box 1. 


Box 2. 


Box 3. 


Box 4. 


Box 5. 


Box 6. 


Box 7. 


Box 8. 


Box 9. 


Box 10. 


Box 11. 


Box 12. 


Box 13. 


Box 14. 


Box 15. 


Box 16. 


Box 17. 


Box 18. 


Box 19. 



police department. 207 

Conclusion. 

I wish to express my appreciation to His Honor the 
Mayor and the Honorable Board of Aklermen, County 
Solicitor Robert C. Murchie, Judge A. Chester Clark, City 
Solicitor Alexander Murchie and all who have assisted 
us the past year. 

I extend to the officers and patrolmen of the department 
my hearty thanks for their loyal support in enforcing the 
laws and maintaining the efficiency and discipline of the 
department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



In Memory of 

Ex-City Marshal James E. Rand, 

Appointed Patrolman, April 16. 1861 ; Captain, 

April 16, 1891 ; Assistant Marshal, April 16, 

1894 ; City Marshal, January 27, 1902. 

Died February 12, 1913. 

Charles W. Hall, Died June 8, 1913. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Concord : 

The trustees of the Public Library herewith transmit the 
annual report of the librarian, from which it wall appear 
that the library continues to perform its public function 
with all the efficiency possible under present conditions. 

In view of the fact that another assistant is necessary 
to relieve the others of the over work they are obliged to 
do and to still further promote the usefulness of the 
library, the trustees voted at their annual meeting to ask 
that the appropriation for the library be increased to 
$5,500. 

REUBEN E. WALKER, 

President, Board of Trustees. 

February 6, 1914. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1913. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen, — The first two-thirds of the year which we 
are reviewing were months of no unusual activities in our 
library. The patronage followed its annual order by rising 
to high-water mark in March and then sinking when spring 
called people out of doors and summer took them away 
on vacations. 

We were expecting, because during each of the last four 
years our circulation has fallen off a few hundreds, that 
1913 would see another reduction. If, as is asserted, the 
tendency of modern life is toward action and color, then 
the tendency is not toward a library, where quietness and 
restraint, both literal and figurative, are valued. Further- 
more, a public library cannot legitimately draw custom by 
purveying the latest sensations in print; if new lights are 
appearing on the horizon, in drama, poetry, and so forth, 
the library may mark them down on its chart and buy 
enough to let persons know what these faddish things are 
which dazzle, but it cannot really steer its purchases by 
them; and if it cannot keep up with the public's desire to 
read the books that are being talked about, and if it becomes 
less alluring than other i3laces of entertainment in the city, 
the result may well be a loss in figures of circulation. 

But contrary to expectation, and owing to brisk business 
with schools, more books were handed over the delivery 
desk in 1913 than in 1912, and it was after September first 
that the surplus came about. Therefore the last four 
months have demanded of the librarian and three assistants 
excessive work. The help hired intermittently of high 



210 CITY OP CONCORD. 

school pupils has not been enough. Do not for a moment 
think that work has been speeded up, under increasingly 
complex conditions, in office and store and shop, and re- 
mained as easy to do in the library as it was a decade ago. 
It may become necessary to recommend the appointment 
of another assistant, for this board would not want such 
a quantitij of service exacted of the library employees that 
it would fail in quality. 

Eighty-seven thousand six hundred thirty books were 
charged out for home reading; but in the reference room, 
6,426 borrowers were waited on additionally. This was 
against 4,476 in 1912, and is a record of which Miss Brown, 
who has the care of that department, may justly be proud. 
I should say that nowadays fewer adults frequent the room 
but that more pupils come to consult matter assigned by 
their teachers. Especially do debates send boys and girls 
to ask for Poole's Index, with all that that entails of 
further research. ! 

The reading room fills and empties without count being | 
made of its visitors except occasionally. On a recent Sun- ' 
day, between two and five o'clock p. m., 62 males and 22 } 
females came in to look at the seventy-five periodicals sub- | 
scribed for. It seemed best, in view of the lowered stand- 
ard of some magazines, not to duplicate exactly our list of 
previous years, and it was gratifying to hear our periodical 
agent say that so many subscriptions were dropping off, \ 
owing to deterioration, that publishers may be led to call | 
a halt to the daring in their pages. I 

Seven hundred fifty-six new borrowers have been enrolled i 
during 1913. The net increase to our shelves was 400 
volumes. Never before have we weeded out so many ; 
hundreds of old books. It is only by so doing that it is pes- j 
sible to make the crowded little building still answer for \ 
the city library. 

The only noteworthy change in the character of the books 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 211 

taken out is in regard to those dealing with civics and 
sociology ; the increased demand along those lines has led 
the reference librarian to ask for a yea,r's trial subscrip- 
tions to the "Annals of the American Academy of Political 
and Social Science" and to the "Journal of Political 
Economy. ' ' 

The art exhibits continue to interest even those who 
do not enter the building primarily to see them. We have 
many inquiries where the pictures come from : a Library 
Art Club, with headquarters in Massachusetts, owns 175 
photographic sets. A membership fee of six dollars and 
part payment of transportation expenses entitles an indi- 
vidual or institution to receive these exhibits in rota- 
tion, each one to remain three weeks. 

One new feature has been introduced into our building, 
and I should like you to look at the east side of our School 
Street hall where we have placed and labelled rows of 
juvenile books and set some small chairs. These are usually 
filled, and such daily wholesome content is evident there, 
that this "Young Folks' Alcove" has come to stay! The 
contrast is striking, however, between it and what a 
library should have in the way of a children 's room. 

When purchases of new books now arrive, instead of 
keeping them in the librarian's office till they can be cata- 
logued, we put an attractive dozen where the public can 
sit and read. This little display is changed every few 
weeks and anybody with five minutes or a^n hour of leisure 
would find it worth while to take the seat before the rack 
and examine these books. It is intended the dozen shall 
always include a few to interest the intellectually blase or 
critical. 

The Concord collection, where behind glass doors safely 
stand writings by residents, has lately had additions in- 
eluding : 

Lucy Heath's "From Christmas to Easter." 



212 CITY OF COXGORD. 

Frank W. Eollins" -"Safe Deposit Box Xo. 4016." 

John C. Thome's "Thorne Genealogy." 

E. J. Aiken's ''First 100 Years of the X. H. Bible 
Society. ' ' 

"SVill Cressy's "HiUs o' Hampshire," his travel letters 
and pictures. 

The librarian's second story for girls. 

The memorial volume of John Kimball, edited by Frances 
M. Abbott, and her pamphlet collaborated with Mrs. Susan 
J. "Woodward, giving the history of the Stratford Club. 

It would sui'prise anybody to see how many Concor- 
dians are represented in this collection, which has been 
fifty years in the making, and to which every citizen is 
urged to contribute his writings. 

Xo twelvemonth passes without our receiving gifts. I\Irs. 
Armenia S. ^White, :Mrs. H. H. Wright and 'Mr. S. C. East^ 
man have long been abundant givers of books and mag- 
azines. From the scores of organizations which send us 
their valuable publications, it would be invidious to single 
out any. Several donors wish to remain anonymous. A 
lady lately handed in a dollar bill for us to buy a book 
with, and "Polly anna" seemed best suited to her idea of 
something that should do general good. 

The year has brought a loss in the death of Mr. A. J. 
Shurtleff which the library feels keenly. Its trustee for 
twenty years and president of the board for seven, he 
was much in the building officially. Yet even more did 
he come because drawn by the best there is in books. He 
knew thoroughly what material the library contaiued and 
went straight to the needed work. But however much he 
took away in knowledge, he gave infinitely more by way 
of influence. . His quiet coming and going was a blessing. 
little as he suspected it. There was never a hard, busy 
day but his serene seeking of the good, the true and the 
beautiful on our shelves seemed to re-dignify the place 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 2 13 

and revive courage for our tasks; for we knew lie had 
come from doing his own day's work admirably, and yet 
had not let his spirit lose its fine aloofness. He was of 
those who "keep in. sight their ideals in order that the 
things which are instrumental shall not become dominant. ' ' 

Was it not a tonic for us who see thousands reading the 
ephemeral, to have ^Nlr. Shurtleff so often bring a half- 
score of classics to the desk to be charged to him ? I want 
to testify' how in those who listened to him frequently there 
was fanned alive something of literary judgment and taste. 
It was a great good for a library staff during twenty years 
to have as a familiar presence a man whose intellect was 
of exceptional catholicity, thoroughness and refinement; 
who sought not only the lofty truths of life but the most 
perfect expression of them in literature. 

Yet he was wonderfully tolerant of that in which he him- 
self was not interested, — a respecter of every man's indi- 
viduality. One side of Mr. Shurtleff we were privileged 
to see. — the relaxing of his mind into play of wit and 
humor ; for daily there are droll happenings in a public 
library and amusing things in print, and repeatedly we 
saw his eye, which nothing escaped, light up with enjoy- 
ment, while we waited for his comment that made a mem- 
orable thing more memorable. We never asked his help in 
vain, even on humble practical points, when the same 
painstaking reply was thought out for us as if our ques- 
tion had concerned a nobler subject. 

He seemed as much a part of the library as the light 
which streams in its windows, and without him we shall 
be more in danger of "forgetting the glory of our goal 
in the distractions of our task." 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLAXCHARD. 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The following annual report is intended to show the j 
condition of the legal affairs in which the city was in- | 
terested at the beginning of the present year and to review | 
the progress made during the past year with the suits to j 
which the city was a party. 

The case of Jennie P. Martin v. Concord, a suit to re- 
cover damages for injuries to the plaintiff's real estate on 
the comer of South State and Downing Streets, alleged 
to have been caused by a defective sewer, remains in the 
same condition as reported a year ago. It is upon the J 
Merrimack County docket and will, no doubt, be dis- 
posed of during the present year, perhaps at the April 
term of the Superior Court. Carolyn F. Stickn^y v. Con- 
cord, an appeal from an award of damages made to th^r 
plaintiff by the board of aldermen on account of the la^'ing 
out and construction of a sewer from North Main Street 
through the plaintiff's land to Merrimack River, has been 
settled by the payment of $500 ; .$600 having been asked. 

Two personal injury cases which have been pendin? 
against the city for a considerable length of time hav-^ 
both been settled for small amounts during the year. One 
case, Gilbert S. Hibhard v. Concord, was entered at the 
October term. 1911. .$.5,000 being asked for injuries re- 
ceived, as alleged, by reason of a defective culvert in a 
highway. This case was settled by the payment of $175. 
The second case, Ehen Hemphill v. Concord, a case for 
personal injuries, brought in Hillsborough County at the 
May term, 1912. in which the plaintiff asked $6,000 
damages on account of a broken leg received while working 



REPOBT OF CITY SOLICTTOB. 215 

for the city in the highway department, has been settled 
by the pa^^nent of $125. 

In Concord v. Frank W. Sanhorn, the defendant haTing 
gone into bankmptcy. the city's claim for taxes, a small 
amount has been proved before the referee in bankruptcy. 

George L. Theohald v. Concord was a suit brought 
against the city on account of a dispute over the legality 
of the teaming ordinance, so called. The plaintiff's pay for 
team work in excess of $4 per team per day was held up 
because the plaintiff refused to sign the stipulation required 
by the above mentioned ordinance, agreeing to pay his 
teamsters $1.75 per day while working for the city. The 
plaintiff, subsequent to the time of bringing suit, having 
signed the stipulation, the case has been settled by the 
releasing of the money he claimed due him. 

In the matter of the petition of Elwin L. Page for con- 
struction of the wiU of the late Mary Darcy. I am informed 
that a settlement is to be made among the heirs. The city 
was interested because $100 was left to the city as trustee 
for the purpose of caring for a cemetery lot. 

Annie Taylor v. Grace 0. Dufton. City of Concord. Trus- 
tee, has been settled by the payment by the defendant of 
the plaintiff's claim, the city having been discharged 
thereby. 

Woodivorth dr Co. v. Concord is a petition for abate- 
ment of taxes. This matter has been referred to the tax 
commission and will probably be heard next week. 

During the last session of the legislature I represented 
the city in a matter of considerable importance. House 
biU Xo. 510 was designed to repeal that section of the law 
which gives to cities and towns in this state, in addition 
to the one-quarter part of the railroad taxes charged 
against rights of way and buildings, such proportional 
part of the remaining three-quarters as the stock of such 
railroad held in the particular city or town bears to the 



216 CITY OP CONCORD. 

total issue of stock. If this bill had passed the legislature 
the city of Concord would have been the loser by some 
$29,000 per year. I considered it my duty to state the 
plain facts to the committee in charge of the bill and to call 
the matter to the attention of such other solicitors and 
selectmen of towns and cities, as I thought would be 
interested. The result was that the bill failed of passage. 
In addition to the handling of the above matters, I have 
performed the routine work of the office, such as drafting 
ordinances, resolutions, contracts, deeds, etc. During the 
year I have advised the tax assessors in tax matters and the 
heads of departments. I have also furnished the board of 
education with opinions at various times. I have aided the 
building inspector in his work, have attended meetings of 
the committee on accounts and claims when requested, and 
have prosecuted the usual number of criminal cases for the 
police department before the police court. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE, 

City Solicitor. 
January 25, 1914. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Health submits the following report for 
the year ending December 31, 1913 : 

The first meeting was held February 3, 1913. The board 
was organized as follows : — Mayor French, ex-officio, chair- 
man; Dr. Charles H. Cook, ex-officio, secretary; and Dr. 
Fred A. Sprague, member. 

Subsequent meetings were held on the first Monday of 
each month and in addition to these regular monthly 
meetings several special meetings were held. 

Dr. Charles Duncan was re-appointed milk inspector. 

Owing to the generally healthy condition of the city the 
work of the board has been largely routine. 

A mild outbreak of diphtheria made its appearance in 
the north section of the city in the fall. Many of those 
coming down with the disease were pupils at the Roman 
Catholic School on Bradley Street. Accordingly much 
time was given in an effort to locate the source of the 
contagion. 

Whenever a child was reported sick with the disease the 
schoolroom attended by this pupil was fumigated by the 
health officer. The throats of all the children in the room 
were then inspected by a physician. A culture was usually 
taken from the throats of pupils sitting adjacent to the 
infected child. It is worthy of note that no case of diph- 
theria made its appearance in any child inspected within 



218 CITY OF CONCORD, 

a period of two weeks subsequent to such inspection. This 
may be taken as indicating that no case was overlooked 
during its initiatory stages. 

If any cases were present and undetected they must 
have been of the ' ' carrier ' ' type ; that is, cases carrying in 
their throats germs of the disease but not themselves having 
the disease. 

The cultural method is sometimes resorted to for the 
detection of these cases. That is, a bit of absorbent cotton 
is wrapped around a wire probe and put into a glass tube, 
the mouth of which is plugged with a wad of cotton. As 
many of these tubes are prepared as there are pupils to 
be examined. They are then put into an oven and sterilized 
by intense heat, when they are ready for use. Taking one 
of these "swabs" the throat of each pupil is wiped over 
in the hope of wiping off some of the bacteria if any are 
present. The swab is then returned to its tube which is 
labelled with the name of the pupil and any other data 
bearing on the case. "When all have been taken they are 
sent in to the State Laboratory of Hygiene for incubation 
and examination. A test tube containing a suitable culture 
media or "soil" is required for each swab. The material 
in the tube is wiped over with the swab and then placed 
in an incubator for a period of eight to twenty-four hours 
in the hope that if any bacteria have reached the culture 
media they Avill grow and start "colonies." 

At the end of the period of incubation some of the 
material from the surface of the culture media is trans- 
ferred to a glass slide and after being stained wdth dyes 
is examined through a microscope, search being made for 
the minute bodies known as the Klebs Loefler bacilli, or 
in common parlance, diphtheria germs. 

If any of these germs are found by this method it es- 
tablishes the fact beyond question, that the throat of that 
child contains some diphtheria germs and that the child 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 219 

is a menace to the community unless quarantined. How- 
ever, should no such germs be found on examination of the 
material from the culture tube it does not in like manner 
follow that the throat of that child is free from diphtheria 
germs. 

The examiner may not have succeeded in getting them 
on his swah. They may not have been transferred to the 
culture media. The culture media may have heen faulty 
and growth may not liave taken place. They may have 
heen overlooked under the microscope. These are some of 
the reasons why the test is not conclusive when the result 
is negative. 

Coming back to the situation in the Bradley Street 
School, where it was assumed that there must be carrier 
cases, as fresh cases were occurring from time to time 
among children who had attended this school. 

Accordingly, a special meeting was called on November 
14, 1913, to decide what further action ought to be taken 
to stamp out the disease. Having in mind the uncertainty 
of the cultural method as outlined above, together with 
the fact that if this method was used it would be necessary 
to take cultures daily from the throats of about 150 chil- 
dren for an indefinite period, involving an immense amount 
of detail work as well as considerable expense, it was de- 
cided that the interests of the community would be best 
served by ordering the school in question closed for a 
period of ten days. 

This was accordingly done. No further cases have ap- 
peared traceable to that school, thus showing the wisdom 
of the action. 

The report of the sanitary officer, Mr. Charles E. Palmer, 
is hereby transmitted and made a part of this report. You 
will note that it contains a detailed account of the work of 
the department as well as the always interesting vital 
statistics. 



220 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Your attention is also called to the report of the milk 
inspector, Dr. Charles Duncan. We are pleased to note 
that, as a result of the ''Regulations for the care and sale 
of milk" ordinance supplemented by the campaign of 
education inaugurated and carried out by Dr. Duncan and 
Sanitary Officer Palmer, the conditions surrounding the 
production of milk and dairy products in the city are con- 
stantly improving. 

Concord is very fortunate in having an almost unlimited 
supply of pure Avater. It is truly an asset of the greatest 
value. This board wishes to commend Superintendent 
Sanders of the "Water Department for the good work he 
has done in cleaning up the shores of Penacook Lake. The 
policy of acquiring possession or control of the shore land 
also meets with our approval. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, 
CHARLES H. COOK, 
F. A. SPRAGUE, 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen, — The department report tables sIioav the 
number and results of analyses of milk for the year 1913. 
They also show the number of farms visited and the find- 
ings of the inspectors. 

The department has no excuses to offer for Concord's 
milk under the basis it is now produced and sold. Our 
relations with the producer have been exceedingly pleas- 
ant and instructive. However, there seems to be on the 
part of the public a tendency to blame all or nearly all 
sickness in their family to the milk supply. This has been 
particularly true in our present epidemic of sickness called 
acidosis. We are appealed to by the milkmen to examine 
their milk as protection against his customer, and that 
same customer of his has appealed to us to find the cause 
of their sickness in the milk. We set all such matters 
straight as best we may and always find that the milk is 
never at fault. 

It may be put down as generally true, except for tuber- 
culosis, that all milk-borne epidemics of disease, or indi- 
vidual cases of sickness from milk, for that matter, are a 
result of contamination of a pure milk by humans after 
it has left the cow. 

A sick cow that produces sickness from her milk is a rare 
thing; besides, a sick cow is a mighty poor asset and as a 
business proposition does not remain long in the dairy 
barn. 

Recently the State Board of Health has created what 
is known as "Inspected Milk" — milk which is the product 
of tubercular tested cows produced and handled under 
definitely known sanitary conditions. 



222 CITY OF CONCORD. 

All the features of this state proposition have been made 
known to the local men by Mr. Purrington and Professor 
Rasmussen, of Durham, at the annual meeting of the Con- 
cord Milk Producers' Association, held last December. 

We believe that already Concord's milk meets the re- 
quirements of most of the conditions of "Inspected Milk" 
and if the city would meet the conditions that require all 
herds to be tuberculin tested our supply would be as safe 
as desired. 

I have in previous reports had much to say on tuber- 
culosis in cattle and the value of the tuberculin test prop- 
erly applied and will not again speak of it here, only to 
say that its application besides assuring a tubercular- 
germ- free milk for our city 's consumption w' ould also bring 
about a condition of tubercular-free cattle. This fact would 
put to rest, whether true or not, the rumors that tubercular- 
diseased meat is both sold and offered for sale in our city. 

All our citizens are entitled to a milk as safe as the State 
Board of Health "Inspected Milk." The few changes in 
our present system would enable us to have such a milk 
and prevent what is sure to happen if a few producers 
only accept the State Board of Health proposition. Then 
we will have two grades of sanitarij milk at two prices, a 
safe milk for the ' ' well to do " ; a less safe milk for the 
poor. 

Concord ought to guarantee all her citizens alike a safe 
milk, both the rich and the poor. No milk is safe unless 
produced from tuberculin-tested cows. 

I wish to thank the Board of Health for their co- 
operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit the report of the sani- 
tary officer for the year ending December 31, 1913, calling 
your attention to the tables which show in detail the work 
done by this department. 

With the exception of the epidemic of measles the first 
half of the year we were fortunate in having so few cases 
of contagious diseases. Reports were made of 33 cases of 
diphtheria with 3 deaths, 28 cases of scarlet fever with no 
deaths, 10 cases of typhoid fever with 1 death, 5 cases 
of infantile paralysis with 1 death, and 687 cases of measles 
with no fatalities, making a total of 763 cases reported 
with 5 deaths, compared with 362 cases and 8 deaths for 
the previous year. Forty-one of these cases were cared 
for at the Foster Ward, Margaret Pillsbury General 
Hospital during the year. 

Returns were made of 519 deaths for the year 1913, 53 
more than in 1912. One hundred seventy-one non-residents 
and 19 still-births were excluded from this number in 
reckoning the death rate, which, based on the population 
of 21,497, was 15.3, compared with 13.25 in 1912. There 
were 246 deaths at the six public institutions, and 273 in 
the nine wards of the city. The bodies of 87 persons dying 
in other places were brought here to be interred, and 214 
bodies were removed from Concord to other places for 
burial. 

Samples of Penacook Lake water were analyzed by the 
state chemist at difiPerent times during the year and found 
to be satisfactory. In company with the superintendent 
of the water-works, I have made several inspections of the 



224 CITY OP CONCORD. 

lake shore as well as the reservoir and found conditions 
good. 

Inspections were made of all the barber shops in the city 
which were found to be in good sanitary condition. Copies 
of the amended law relating to the sanitary management 
of barber shops were left at all the shops and I feel that 
this law will be complied with and that the shops will be 
kept in a cleanly condition. 

Water tests were made of new plumbing and 120 permits 
were issued during the year. Peppermint tests were made 
of old work whenever requests were received. 

The vaccination law was enforced in the outlying dis- 
tricts with the support of the town school board, and this 
co-operation was greatly appreciated. Very little trouble 
in enforcing this law is experienced when the superin- 
tendents and teachers give us their help by insisting that 
no child shall attend school without a vaccination certificate 
bearing the seal of the Board of Health. 

Notices prohibiting the use of the public drinking cup, 
taking effect July 1, were sent to those persons having 
charge of public parks, streets, public institutions, hotels, 
theatres and public halls. 

The formaldehyde-permanganate method of fumigating 
was used as in former years. This method should be given 
credit, as it has always proved efficient in controlling the 
spread of contagious diseases. The school books in Union 
School District were fumigated at the close of the June 
term. Articles of clothing and bedding as well as books 
were fumigated at our fumigating room from time to time. 

In company with Dr. Duncan, I have made such inspec- 
tions of milk farms as time would permit, but with the 
inspections of sewers, plumbing, nuisances and complaints, 
the care of contagious diseases and the increasing demand 
for fumigation, we have not been able to accomplish as 
much as should be done along this line, but during the 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 225 

coming year we hope to be able to do more of this work, 
as this is a very important matter connected with this 
office. 

The expenses of the Health Department for the year 
1913 were $2,777.70 and our appropriation was $2,600.00, 
showing a deficit of $177.70. The receipts from the sale 
of antitoxin and fumigation supplies, $83.45, and milk 
license fees, $190.80, offset this deficit, however. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my thanks to the Mayor 
and the other members of the Board of Health, the city 
solicitor, the members of the city government and all others 
who have given me their advice and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Office?'. 



15 



226 city of concord. 

Expenditures of the Board op Health of the City op 

Concord for the Year Ending December 31, 1913. 

salaries. 

Charles E. Palmer, sanitary officer, salary, $1,400.00 

Charles Duncan, M. D., milk inspector, salary, 300.00 

FUMIGATION SUPPLIES. 

A. H. Knowlton & Co., formaldehyde and per- 
manganate, 50.95 
A. H. Britton & Co., 5 pails, 1.75 

ANTITOXIN AND MEDICAL SUPPLIES. 

Schieffelin & Co., diphtheria antitoxin, 120.70 

A. H. Knowlton & Co., medical supplies, 1.65 

C. H. Martin Co., medical supplies, 1.50 

A. Perley Fitch, medical supplies, 1.75 

"W. C. Spicer, medical supplies, 9.00 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Helen 0. Monier, services, 580.00 
C. H, Cook, M. D., substituting for sanitary 

officer, 53.62 

Eumford Printing Co., mortuary reports, 24.00 
New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., 

rental and tolls, 21.15 

Charles E. Palmer, postage, car fare, etc., 35.79 

The Evans Press, printing, 17.50 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing, 16.40 

Edson C. Eastman, office supplies, 2.70 

Brown & Saltmarsh, office supplies, .95 

A. R. Andrews, rubber stamps, 2.15 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 227 

Remington Typewriter Co., typewriter ribbon, $0.75 
Charles H. Whittier, Jr., inkwell, .90 
The Cragg Binder}^, milk license book, 10.25 
I. E. Gray, automobile hire, 2.00 
"Wm. S. Kaime, horse hire, 9.00 
Concord Hardware Co., one axe, 1.00 
Downing & Phillips, provisions, Coleman fam- 
ily, scarlet fever, 76.49 
Concord Coal Co., wood, Coleman family, scarlet 

fever, 17.50 
F. W. Grafton, M. D., consultation, Coleman 

case, scarlet fever, 3.00 
C. R. Dame, provisions, Chapdelaine family, 

diphtheria, 10.95 
Concord Coal Co., coal, Chapdelaine family, 

diphtheria, 2.40 
Robert Crowley, wood, Charpentier family, 

diphtheria, 1.90 



Total, 


$2,777.70 


RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1913. 




Milk license fees, 


$190.80 


Sale of diphtheria antitoxin. 


74.30 


Sale of fumigation supplies. 


9.15 



Total, $274.25 



228 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table shows the number of contagions dis- 
eases reported during each month of the j^ear, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom : 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Infantile 
paralysis. 


Measles. 


Months. 


Cases. 
Deaths. 




5 
Is 

a 


rn 


■i 

o 
O 


0) 

O 


P 


Cases. 
Deaths. 








6 

7 
7 












.51 

■220 

175 

90 

69 

54 

20 

4 

1 




February 


1 
































2 


1 














May 


1 




1 










June 


8 












July 


1 






2 

1 

2 

1 

1 












1 
2 






1 








2 
4 
8 
6 








1 


1 


1 






1 


1 
























Totals 


33 


3 


28 




10 


1 


5 


1 


687 





REPORT OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 



Wards. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Totals. 


Diphtheria 








7 
6 

1 


4 
2 
2 


1 
6 


10 
6 
4 


5 
6 


6 
2 


33 


Scarlet fever 




2 
1 




28 






10 








[sis 
Infantile paraly- 








2 
168 


1 

71 


1 
94 


1 
179 






5 




3 


9 


24 


69 


70 


687 







HExYLTH DEPARTMENT, 



229 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the 
years since and including 1890: 



Years. 



Infa 


ntile 


Diph- 


Scarlet 


Typhoid 


Measles. 


Small- 


Tota 


paralj'sis. 


theria. 


fever. 


fever. 




pox. 




. 


S 




rC 




rA 




cj 




2 




.s 




$ 


a 


o 


G 


Oi 


03 


CD 


c4 


0) 


CS 


<D 


OS 


a 


cS 


a 


o3 


a> 




O 


c3 


<D 


cS 


a) 


03 




cS 


O 


« 


O 


R 


O 


P 


O 


Q 


O 


P 


O 


P 


O 



1890.... 
1891.... 
1892.... 
1893.... 
1894.... 
1895.... 
1896.... 
1897.... 
1898.... 
1899.-.. 
1900- ••• 
1901 . . • • 
1902.... 
190S.-.- 
1901. ••• 
1905.... 
1906.... 
1907.... 
1908. . . . 
1909.... 
1910.... 
1911.... 
1912.... 

igi3.... 



20 



17 
14 

7 
13 
13 
21 
15 
17 

8 
14 
18 
13 
23 
17 
12 
23 
32 
1] 

6 
28 
16 
10 
15 
10 



300 

21 

158 

452 

138 

126 

299 

476 

40 

27 

582 

31 

181 

101 

118 

100 

1,168 

143 

26 

321 

687 



59 
402 
164 
258 
526 
190 
146 
421 
562 
130 

87 
682 
110 
299 
175 
218 
157 
1,350 
199 

95 
362 
763 



7 

9 

7 

9 

12 

19 

13 

4 

4 

7 

7 

9 

5 

11 

4 

5 

6 

3 

5 

11 



230 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



DEATHS DURING 1913, 
NATIVITY, 



BY SEX, CONDITION AND \ 
BY MONTHS. I 



^ 






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^! 




X5 




5 


B 








O 








o 




M 


O 


'A 


32 


20 


24 


19 


17 


19 


16 


14 


15 


23 


8 


16 


12 


15 


10 

2 


15 


6 


8 


17 


12 


18 


10 


9 


7 


7 


10 


9 


2 




1 



SEX. 

Males 

Females 

CONDITION. 

Married 

Single 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Not stated 

NATIVITY. 

Concord 

New Hampshire . . 

Other states 

Foreign 

Not stated 



284 
235 

167 
200 
138 



140 
179 



100 
12 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



231 





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232 city op concord. 

Nuisances, Complaints and Inspections. 

A statement of the number and character of the 
nuisances for the year 1913 appears below: 

Accumulation of ashes and other rubbish, 1 

Catch basin traps broken, 1 

Catch basin traps filthy, 1 

Cesspools overflowing, 2 

Complaints made without cause, 7 

Dead animals, 16 

Dumping rubbish and odor from dumps, 5 

Food suspected of being adulterated, 1 

Keeping hens, 16 

Keeping hogs, 8 

Odor from garbage, 3 

Odor from manure, 2 

Odor from privy vaults, 6 

Odor from stables, 8 

Odor in blocks, 2 

Odor in houses, 7 

Odor to water, . 3 

Other complaints and inspections, 82 

Pediculosis, 1 

Plumbing done in violation of law, 2 

Sewage backing into cellars, 2 

Sewers obstructed, 6 

Sink drains offensive, 5 

Throwing out slops, swill and rubbish, 25 

Uncleanly condition of and about premises, 10 

Uncleanly condition of toilet rooms, 2 

Uncleanly condition of water-closets, 8 

Water-closets out of repair, 8 

Water in cellars, 3 

Total, 243 



health department. 233 

Inspection of Plumbing. 

Plumbing permits granted, 120 

Number of inspections made, 240 

Water-closets put in, 154 

Sinks put in, 77 

Bath-tubs put in, 96 

Wasli-bowls put in, 108 

Wash-trays put in, 31 

Slop-sinks put in, 1 

Number of sewers inspected, 44 

Fumigation. 

Rooms fumigated, 360 

Schoolrooms fumigated, 44 

School buildings fumigated, 1 

Wards at hospitals fumigated, 17 

Cellars fumigated, 9 

Closets fumigated, 2 

Barns fumigated, 1 

Books fumigated, 72 

Pieces of bedding, clothing, etc., fumigated, 22 

Eeport op ]\Iilk Examinations and Inspection of Milk 

Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 172 

Number of examinations above standard, 172 

Number of teams inspected, 13 

Number of milk rooms inspected, 1 

Number of milk farms inspected, 38 

Conditions satisfactory, 31 

Conditions fair, 7 

, Number of notices and recommendations given, 13 



234 city op concord. 

Summary. 

Houses placarded in cases of contagious diseases, 448 

Placards removed, 448 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 1,106 

Burial permits issued, 519 

Burial permits issued for interment of bodies 

brought here, 87 

Transit permits issued, 214 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were 

issued, 191 

Number of persons to whom garbage licenses 

were issued, 44 

Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to 

the State Board of Health, 52 

Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, 

public health and marine-hospital service, 52 

Number of mortuary reports issued, 972 

Number of vaccination certificates issued to 

school children, 981 

Number of permits issued for children to return 

to school after recovery from contagious 

diseases, 173 

Number of samples of water collected for 

analysis, 6 

Number of inspections of barber shops, 19 

Number of notices sent ordering compliance 

with the rule prohibiting the use of the public 

drinking-cup in certain places, 18 



health department. 235 
Deaths by Age. 

Under 1 year, 71 

From 1 to 5 years, 20 

From 5 to 10 years, 8 

From 10 to 15 years, 2 

From 15 to 20 years, 7 

From 20 to 30 years, 30 

From 30 to 40 years, 44 

From 40 to 50 years, 43 

From 50 to 60 years, 61 

From 60 to 70 years, 88 

From 70 to 80 years, 82 

From 80 to 90 years, 52 

From 90 to 100 years, 11 

Total number of deaths, 519 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



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1 CO • rH 


_ o : ^ : 0, 


'• rH ; '"' • -# 


! '^ 


e 


c 


J 5 


J - 


r. 




[testines 
itoneum and in- 

[testines 
itoneum and in- 


3 ^ 

3 c 

5 f 


• 


: cs c 
'• o c 
: o "c 

• 2 ^ 

• S c 


3 

3 , 


bladder 

sigmoid 

sigmoid 

itum 

turn 





." 0) a; -^ ^3 
ti O O S ;5 



o o 


o o o 


c3 6 6 o 


o 


o 


o 


6 


o o o 


C3 
O 


o 


o o 


o o 






























^ - 7-t r-i 






















: rH : rH 








r-i 
















• • : ^ 




































- 


01 


























01 


- 






::■'::: 






-- 










rH 






::-"::: 




































01 • 












' 


-" : 










































































rH rH 




-- 














1 rH 


1m 
























r 



16 



f^ S El, S ^ 



^ 1^ |i( 



242 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



-^ 



o 
O 



P5 
O 
Oh 

I— I 

p^ 
o 



03 

(D 


•06 JaAO 

■06 o} 08 










: -^ 










: ; rH ■* 






•08 o^ 01 




: '^ 


i • • : 00 M 






•Qi 0% 09 






j • : • CI 1-1 




. r- c., : 


•09 0} OS 






j : ■ 1 c^ : ,-4 




•OS o; Of 






::::-•'- 




i ; " : 


'Of o? OS 






: : -^ : r- - 






•OS o% 05 
















•05 o:} SI 
















•SI 0^ 01 
















■01 OJS 














Mi" 


•SOU 




1— < . . . 








: : : - 


•I JopuQ 


CT -* ■ ; 












a 

a 


•sa[T3iua^ 


: ■* : ^ 




i - 




■ : M : 


■S8i;Bi\r 


: ^ : : 


. rt . -H 


: "" 


" : '^ : 


•S[B}OX 


• to ; T-i 


: ^ : ^ 


• CO 

C^ 


1-1 1 •«( : 


H 

W 

P 

o 

W 

< 


Congenital debility 

Congenital debility 

Congestion of lungs 

Congestion of lungs 

Cnnvnlsinns 


Convulsions 

Cystitis and pyelitis 

Cystitis and pyelitis 


.2 

c 

3 
Q 


'a 

to 

0. 




Diarrhea and enteritis 

Diarrhea and enteritis 

Diphtheria 


00 

o 


•lIAVOtlJIUQ 










•jaqui809fj 


: -^ : : : : • 


• : - 




; : - 


•j3qiuaAo>j 


: : : : -^ : : 


':"■.': 




: -^ : 


•jaqojoo 






• »-l O) • 






■jaqtuajdag 






: -^ : : 






•jsuSny 






■ M 1-1 ; 




• " : 


•A[nc 








-^ : 




: : -" 


■auiip 








-^ : 






•XBIM 


:-"::: 




-^ : : 




- : j 


■lUdy 






Ot CM '■ 






•qojT3i\; 


(M (M : : : 




(M CI • 






•XjBnjqa^ 






CI • -H • 




•jiJBnnBf 


: : : - : 


: - : 


C^ .1 j i 


! -^ : 




•xas 1 


S pc, 


s &; §" 


fci S fq 


S 


fe 


s 


fe 


^ ^ ^ 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



243 

































: '"' 


























: ^ : : ^ : ^ : ^ 


: - 




















: " : : : 


i " 


■ n 




" 










: : -^ 




- " : : 






-- 






- : : : 


: : : : ^ 
















- 














































































































IH 
















































" 


" 


(N 


'^ 


^ : : : rt : rt : rn 


M '■ 




N j 






'^ 






: rt . ^ : rt : : : 


'^ : 


'^ : 


CO 


- 


e<5 


- 


.-1 : rH • (M • (N i rt 


■* '• 


-^ : 


: ® 
: ? 

'. u 
o 


O 
03 

a 
o 

"5 






a 
S 




5 


braiu 

ilinonary 


, cardiac 

, cardiac 

, cerebral 

, cerebral 

. Dulmonarv 


> 

O 


ri 





rt rt jt 5^. 



5 P 



>>>.>> .2 



= S 



ci ^ ^- 



Q Q Q P W W 



.^2 ^ rO 



-C rs rg a 

WWW 



s g 



;::; " :i: <u <u 



fl 


s 


fl fi 


s 


s 


a 


P 


w 


w 


w w 


w 


w 


W 


W 



Sfe^w^&iSw^w'SwSwSwSw 



fa S 



244 



CITY OP CONCORD, 



<» 

Si 
•<s> 

?i 
o 



o 

P^ 

I— I 

< 

O 



CO 

aj 
< 


06 JaAQ 


















•06 01 08 
















•08 O} OL 


- : : I - 




•-I 










•Oi OJ 09 


• • " : 






-^ 










•09 01 09 


" i • : 






: -- 




- : 




•09 0% Of 


: : -" : 


C) 


'- 










■Of 01 OS 




" -H 






: : - ; 


•08 0% OS 


'^ : : : 


.-( IN : 






- : 




•05 01 St 






-" : 










•SI 01 01 


















•or 01 s 


















•son 


















•I Japan 


(M C^ ,-1 « 




- 




-^ : : 




s 

a) 

2 


•saieraa^ 


CO • •<* • T<1 


T)< '■ »H 


: "^ : ; 




•saiBiv[ 


M ■ IM ■' r-l 


■* 1 ■* 




■ Cl 


" 


•Sj^lOJ, 


CO : CO j M 


00 ■ in 


rt '. (N 


»H 


H 

W 
Q 

O 

H 




Endocarditis 

Enteritis 

Enteritis 


c 

> 

1 


- C 

c 


1 1 

I _a c 
'33 '3 

> ;-i ;- 


< 

i, r: 
C 

C 


C 
? 

_a. 

'-Z 

c 


Fracture, base of skull 

Fracture, base of skull 

[tebra 
Fracture eighth dorsal ver- 

[tebra 
Fraotin-e eiehth dorsal ver- 


o3 

-a 

a 



•[iAi.on5[nfi 
















•.TaquiaoaQ 




iH 












•jaquiaAojsj 


: : - : 
















•jaqoiDQ 


: ; - ; - 














■jaqraaidag 


















•IsnSnv 


: -^ : : 




-^ : 










•if[nf 


: : - - 




: : -^ 




: : -^ 


•auuf 


: - - : 




- : 










•X^iv 


« : : ; 


^ : " 










•[udy 


•H j : : « (N rH 1 






- ; 




■q0JBj\[ 


- : : : 




- : 










•XiBnaqaj 


: i • i 






<N 




- - : . 




•AJBUUBf 








*H 










•xag 


fe S pu ^ fe 


S 


fe 


S fe 


§ 


fe 


§■ fe s 


& 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



245 

























l^ 


























-' 














c 


cc 






IM 


^ 
























" 




C' 


tc 






to •* j 


I rH ' 














n 








oc 


•* 






CD •« 


'^ 






























ir 








CO ^ '• 




































C^ <M j 


























IM 


c^ 














'^ 






















': - 
















- 






































- 



















C<1 




^ 
















■^ 








<N 


'^ 


C-l 




a 








1—1 






































CO 








S 












^ 




- 




- 




IM 


- 


CJ 




-t 








cS 












IH 


























^ 


P 














>. 


>> 
































































CO 






i- 






^ 






^ 




cS 

d 
o 

a 


c3 




















'H 






c 
r 


C 


.5 


03 
5 


.2 


t 


o 
^ 


a 


O 
















a 


(» 






^ 


c 


a 


OJ 












a 


^ 


,s 


o 


o 
o 




c 

a 


a 


O 

M 
0. 
a- 
r 
a. 
a 


c 
1/ 

a 

e 

a 


C 
a 
C 
r 


c 
a 
c 


a 


o 

fcil 


aJ 
fin 




"S 

bo 


a 

h 


D bo 


bo 










. a 


a 


Of 


a 


c 


to 


> 


> 


C 


CS 


cj 




S cS 


ir 


cS 





'o 'C ^ ~ t; 



bfi be 



sh •r' •r' •r' ■r' 



cs ce cs <» 



fefcifafeCSOOOoOKKffi 



S a :i a a 

C^ 0^ © 0^ o 

S ii3 K ;:3 lii 



X S :^ Pd 





































■ •# CO • I IM tH I 




















— 1 •# -H '• • -H ■ j 




: -^ : 
















: CO <N • : "^ ■ ; 




















1 CO CO rt j -1 (M 1 








— 












----::::: 














- : : 


; — 1 (M • ; -^ C^ • 










- 








: rt (M ; : -H (N ^ 




















: J., : : : Tji 1 1 




-^ : : 




- 










: (M (M : : ^ ^ : 




















: : IM • j <N ; ; 


















• ; - 


: c^ '■ : : rH CO \ 
















; - : : 


: : CO ':':': ^ ''' '. 



























Sfe§E^Sfe§c^^&iSP^Sf^StaSfeSc^Sfe 



246 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



'« 



o 
O 



P5 
O 

P^ 

H 

t-H 

P^ 
O 



to 


•06 J8A0 












: : : : : ■ ' 


06 01 08 












:-:::: 


•08 0% OL 








: -" 




:::::: 


•Oi 0% 09 












:::.•■"• 

: : 




•09 OJ OS 












• : : : : 


•OS O? Of 












::-"::: 


•Of 0} OS 


: " 


: '^ : : 




::«::: 


•OS 0} 05 










" :-.--. : : : 


•OSOJSl 












: : : : : • 


•SI 0% 01 












:::::: 


•01 0% S 












:"••:" 


•SOJ I 












::::'-': 


•I JOpUfl 






-^ 






: • : ; ! 


0) 

S 

fl 
fl 
o 


■sa^'Bragj 


rH 


'^ 






: : ■* : -^ : 
• : : : 


•saiBI,\[ 








rH . rt 


„ : ^ : : : 

■ ': : : ; 

. . 1 


■sr«*ox 


: "^ 


'^ 


^ : r- 


-;»=;-;' 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 


[iowiui;' operation 
Hemorrliase, secondary, lol- 

[lowins operation 
Hemorrliage, secondary, fol- 


o 

i 5 

fl r 

1 1 
S c 


o aJ a 
oo +^ - 

cj S = 
(DOC 


> 

'c 

r 


nsanity 

ntestinal obstruction 

[ulceration of 
ntestine, perforation and 

(ulceration of 
ntestine, perforation and 

ntestines, strangulation of. 




CO 

a 
o 


•Ui\iou}]nQ 














•i9qiuao9Q 














■j9qai9A0^ 








: - 




: • 1 


•aaqojoO 














•J9qUl8!JCl9S 












: iM c^ : ; j 


•jsnSny 






: - : : 




:-:::: 


•^inp 














•Gunf 












;:;::;! 


'ivj/i 


: ^ 










•ludV 














•qoa«j\[ 












■ ^' • : : 


•.ijBnjqa^ 










" ; : : : : : 


•jSj'BTlU'Bf 






- . 








•X9g 


S fe 


^ 


fe S 


fe § Ec^ 


§■ 


; 1 

fe S fe g to S I 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



247 







































: : : " : 










: ^ 










• cq --H 
















; '^ 














































: -^ : 




:-"::: 


• • " ■ 














: -^ 






: : : : -^ : 


















• : <N • 










































































































• . . . r-l . 




<M 








'•' 


'•' : 


: '^ 


rH : "-I : "^ : " ': '^ : 


^ : w : 






■ tH ' C^ i 










" ; " ; 


- : 


rt : Ti i CO 


rt : •-< : '^ : " : '^ : 


o 

B 

_o 

"3 

bo 

c 

OS 

» 
a 


[ease ot 
ys and prostate, dis- 

[ease of 
ys and prostate, dis- 


a, 


(D S 
ft o 

.£■ o 


3 
o 


o o 

to M 

M m 
o o 

rt cS 


cirrhosis of 

cirrhosis of 

congestion of 


congestion of 

enlarged 

enlarged 

[lorus) 
itrition (stenosis of py- 

[lorus) 
itrition (stenosis of dv- 




ft E 








5 w y 






c4 £« cS rt 



JhJujH^l-lJJ^JJJ 



s s 



&H S &i 



S fe 



fe S Eq S fe 



fa g fe § [I, 



fa § 



248 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



"S» 

S^: 
o 



O 

H-l 

H 
P5 
O 



CO 

<D 
bJ) 

< 


•06J9AO 










: "^ 




OG OJ 08 










: - 


•08 01 Oi 










• TH fl 


•Oi 0% 09 




^' : : : : 






. ; c, 


•09 o; OS 




N ■ • • 






: : - 


•OS o; Of 




: -^ ; : : 






: - ; 


•OV 0% OS 




■'':■• 










•OS 01 03 






• : • " 






■07, 0% SI 














•SI 01 01 










- 




•01 01 S 




: : -^ : : 










•S Oi T 




::"•;"••: 








•I jgpnfi 


-^ ::::::: -^ : 








s 

a 

/a 


•S9[Bra9j; 


i-t • Tf t -1 ; — 1 ; rH 


'-' 


;s 


•saiB]^ 


IN • M • (N 








-* 


•s[rJiox 


eo \ '^ -IN '■ 1-1 '. -1 ; -J 


- 


o 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 




lia 

lia 

s, cerebral 

[indigestion 

s, following acute 

[indigestion 

s, following acute 

[monic 

s, probably pneu- 

[monic 

s, probably pneu- 

s (typhoid fever).. 

s (typhoid fever).. 


9 

> 
m 


K 




Melanchc 

Melanchc 

Meningit 

Meningit 

Meningit 

Meningit 

Meningit 

Meningit 

Meningit 

Meningit 

Myelitis, 

Myelitis, 

Myocardi 

Myocardi 


[0 

a 
o 


•HAVOU^mfl 














•J9qra909(i 












- 


•jgqinaAO^ 




:"::.■ 










•jaqoiOQ 










: - 




•J9qra9id9g 














"IsuSny 


-::::: 








-IH' 


•iSluf 




- : : : : 


: : : - 






•gnuf 










: : . -1 


•Abi\[ 




::-:;-:-: 








•[TJdv 




"•Mi 








" 


•qoaBj\[ 










: r-( f1 


•iCaBDjqgj 




• e<i --I '• '■ 






: " - 


•^JBHUBf 




: -^ : : : 






; - : 




•X9g 


fa 


g fa § fa S fa 


g fa S fa 


S 


fa §■ 


^ 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



249 











■^ 




















^ ^ . . rH r- 


: : : '^ 






'^ 










rH ■ • rt CO (N 






















- : - 


IN j 


: " : 










- 








.-1 w IN 


T)< J 






-- : 








" 








r : 


: -* 






'^ : 


















^ : 


- - 


• a ■ 






- 












- : : 




















- 






" : 




















































— : 




















































(M ; : 






















- - 




^ tH 


lO 


'^ : : 






'^ 


-' 


'^ 


'-' 




t- • CO 


^^ 


: -ji 


rH '. (N 






'-' 


■^ 


■^ 




^ '■ rf 


to 


rt ; -*i 


« '• (N 


- 


(M 


(N 


M 


0- 

4J 


tis 

tis. diffuse 





.5 "aJ 
■-5 S 
a — 
- o 


sis (not insane) 

sis of insane 

sis of insane 

sis. senile 


'5 


: : a 


c. 


■s 


rr 


_a 




y 


."" 


tn 


^ ^ ;-< 


^ 


n t» 


>> >> >> >> >^ -r: ■-:: tn iD a ci a a '^' 


CO 



® O 01 CJ o 



t- ;-i ^ 



,^;g;5;2;t5!5pHa<ii,OMii,&H(ii(i,o-eLiCL,3HP-iQHeu,pH 

























r< : : : th (N 1 




















• ■' '• j e^) --H • 














- 


-^ : : 


::::-":: 






— 
















:-"::-:: 


- 




-^ : : 












::":::; 


- 
















- : 


rt . : : ffi) : : 








-H : : ^ 




-- 




«;::,-,.: 






















- -^ - : - : ; 


- 




















":";;;!'"; 




















::•::-': 


- 


















: - 


:-":-:: = 






















^ "-I • • C^ *-i I 




- 






- 































!x< S fe S fa 



Et|S(i(Sfa§fa<^fa 



fa .Si fa 



250 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



-^ 



o 



O 
Ph 

I— I 

< 
H 

P^ 
O 



fco 

<5 


•06 I3AO 












: 


•06 oi 08 


Oq C-, . . . ,-( ,1 








•08 o? Oi 


M TH rH : ^ : : '^ 






'- 


•Oi OJ 09 


•# CO --1 <-! 












09 01 OS 


,-H • • t-H 












•03 o% Ot 


^ Ci '■ \ 


: -^ 










•0^ o% 08 


- - ; : 












■08 01 Oo 


: : " : 






^ . ^ : 




•0?. 0% SI 


" - : : 


: -^ 










•SI 0} 01 














•01 0% S 




: „ ^ 








•SOI I 


(M ; rt r-( 












i jijpifn 


1 IM C^ • 








: •«>■<' ; 


s 
s 


•S9lBUia^ 


• <M • M 


.-( 1 (N 


.-1 ^ r-l -I" • 


•S31BK 


1 "2 : == 


rH ; •* 




j 1 j «o 1 


•s[eio,r. 


. Ci ■ 


(M ■ O 


-H ; "-1 : 2 


H 

H 

H 
Q 

O 
tn 
H 
cc 

-< 
o 


Pneumonia 

Pneumonia, broncho- 

Pnennionia. livnost.ntic 


Pneumonia, liypostatic 

Pneumonia, lobar 

Pneunioiiin. lobar 


Poliomyelitis, acute anterior 
Poliomyelitis, acute anterior 

Pregnancy, toxemia of 

Pregnancy, toxemia of 

Premature birth 

Premature birth 


>> 

o 

oo 
1 


1 


•UMOII>(UQ 














•J9qraao9Q 


- : - : 


: - 






: : " 




•J9qui9AO^ 


: : - : 


W -H 






: ^ ,H 




•J9qojoo 


■ ^ : ': 






- : : : 




•jaqma^dag 


ca -H rt : 












•IsnSnv 


: -^ : : 












•M^e 


; - : : 


; - 






^ . C-l i-l • 


•9auf 


•* l-H ; 1 












•Xbj\[ 


M '. ^ . •- '■ : "-I 




: : '^ 




•[uclv 


(N ! ,-1 rt 










•qDJ«j\[ 


M ,-( • r-( 






: : : ^ ^ 


•jCjBn.Tq9j 


1-1 eo ; I 










•jfjBnoBf 


i-i m "-i "H 








; ; .-c C^ ; 




•xas 


S fe S fe S 


fe S fa 


§ 


Eti 


S fa S fe 


s 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



251 

















~ 


'^ 


: ~' : 














'^ : 




■-c Cd Tt< CO 


















t- N 
















: - 




• !N 


















« « ^ « 


*, '. '^ ; 




: : ^ 






















: -' 




" 












• 




T-1 
















































































: " 


































































: ': " ' 


'^ 






"' : 


: ^ 


00 


rj< • -1 ' 




" : '^ 




-' 


\ \^ \^ 


o 


T)< j ■ 1 rt : 


« • ■M 


" 


-- 


r-l : .-( * C-1 


00 


00 . -H '. l-t '. 


1 cystitis 

austive 

austive 


.2 S 


[convulsions 
imiimiia and 

M]ital 


"c 




minal 

;e 

3e 






"t- 


: ^ a 

: o o 


1 1 


22 

5 



^ Ti Ti S :B brfcc'-'s 



— :=; jj 0) s) 



,-H _. o 



•^ s s s P s s 



t- ^ — ^ 



.2 .2 ,5: " 






<^ S 



bi ;< h 



O) SJ "2 



>-i r-. ^ 



-- -- -- -- : -r v.\i vw V.SJ I.J ^\i I.W ^' VvJ S4/ >4^ N^ ^^ ^^ 



n ft 

X! CO 























: -- 














C^ M ^ 1 • rt ; '■ 1 


















" " : ; : 




















- : : : : 






-- 


: - 






- 


M • (N "-I 












: « 








" : : - : 










^ : 






























■ (M I • • 


•" : : 










: : - 




i-l rH M : ■ 




















: : : -^ : 








































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CAUSES OF DEATH. 


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[juries 

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REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1913. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The twenty-first annual report of the Engineering De- 
partment is herewith submitted, in compliance with the 
ordinance creating this department. 

The expenses of the department for the j'ear 1913 were as 
follows : 



Paid for engineer and assistants, 


$3,043.25 


ear-fares and liver}^, 


65.21 


express. 


2.70 


supplies. 


88.35 


telephone service, 


24.84 


repairs. 


19.51 


services and supplies, assessors' maps. 


1,120.35 


convention expenses. 


44.30 




$4,408.51 


Appropriation, 


$4,475.00 


Expended, 


4,408.51 


Unexpended balance. 


$66.49 



The expenditures for construction, repairs and mainte- 
nance, together with the recommendations relating to 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 255 

needed changes in the city precinct, will he found in my 
report to the Board of Public Works, covering the work 
done under its supervision. 

Water- Works. 

The question of additional water supply from sources 
within the town limits, required some field work and study 
of natural conditions, to determine the feasibility of any 
attempt to utilize the suggested sources of supply. The 
results of these investigations are in the hands of the super- 
intendent of the works and the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners. 

Fire Department. 

The plans covering the city proper and the Penacook 
district, showing the location of fire-alarm boxes and the 
location of all hydrants, have been brought up to date and 
blue prints of the same turned over to the chief engineer 
of the fire dex^artment. 

Building Permits. 

Together with the chief of the fire department, I have 
attended thirty-one hearings on petitions for new buildings, 
or alterations to existing structures. All petitions were 
granted, with such restrictions as seemed advisable to us. 

Cemeteries. 

One new block has been graded in Blossom Hill ceme- 
tery and will be ready to lay out in lots the coming season. 
Some provision to care for the brook, in the northwesterly 
portion of this cemetery, should be made in order that 



256 CITY OP CONCORD. 

future laying out of blocks, in this section, may be carried 
on in a symetrical and economical manner. 

The deed books of Blossom Hill Cemetery have been 
brought up to date, covering the sale of lots during the 
past year. 

Streets. 

Lines and grades were given for macadam roadways on 
North State Street, North Maine Street, South Street, Mer- 
rimack Street, "Ward One and for gravel roadway on the 
Loudon road, also for concrete sidewalk construction, when 
requested. 

The monthly measurements for coal-tar concrete walks 
and street surface repairs were made and statements of 
the square yards laid, cost and location of the same made 
and delivered to the parties ordering the same. 

Assessors' Maps. 

The field work for these maps was carried on during the 
summer and fall and the territory lying between the Sou- 
cook River, the Merrimack River, the Loudon line, westerly 
from the Soucook River to the Oak Hill Road, do^vn the 
Oak Hill Road to the residence of the late John T. Batch- 
elder, the Batch elder Road, the Turnpike and Pembroke 
Roads to the Merrimack River. 

The Plains section, so called, has brought out many 
owners heretofore unknown, the location of whose property 
has entailed a vast amount of record searching and many 
lots located whose owners did not know where their prop- 
erty was situated. "We now have listed and shown on the 
maps about five thousand three hundred separate pieces of 
real estate. 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 257 

The special appropriation for this work was $1,000. 
There has been expended on this work $1,120.55, the over- 
draft for which was charged to the Engineering Depart- 
ment. 

Miscellaneous. 

Grades for rough grading the ball ground, at Rollins 
Park, were given and the grounds partially graded Avith 
material from South Street. Much more grading should 
be done on these grounds before they are in proper shape 
for their intended use. 

Lines and grades, where established, have been given to 
all applicants. 

Meetings of your board and the Board of Public "Works 
have been attended when information from this department 
has been requested. 

The Avork of the Board of Examiners of Plumbers and 
the Hj^drant Commissioners have been placed before you 
in their respective annual reports to your board. 

The employees of this department during the past season 
were : Fred W. Lang, principal assistant ; Forrest F. 
Owen, assistant ; Orion H. Hardy, transitman ; William E. 
Nash, Harold H. Betton, George W. Burke, Arthur Me- 
Cauley and Leland P. Robinson, rodmen. 

The convention of the American Society of Municipal 
Improvements, held at Wilmington, Delaware, in October, 
was one of vital interest to all municipal officers, the papers 
and discussions, at this session, covered the questions of 
water-vforks, sew^age, its removal and treatment, garbage 
and street cleaning, street lighting, fire prevention, the 
construction and maintenance of all kinds of street sur- 
faces and the question of financing public Avorks. I hope 
that some members, of this board will attend the next 

17 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. j 

I 

meeting of this society, which will be lield in Boston, iij 
October, 1914. | 

To the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen I wish ti' 
express my appreciation for the privilege of attending thi| 
above mentioned convention and for the many courtesiel 
shown this department during the past year. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. I 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1913. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The fourteenth annual report of this board is herewith 
submitted. 

The present membership of the board is as follows: 
Charles H. Cook, M. D., Patrick A. Clifford, a journeyman 
plumber; and "Will B. Howe, city engineer. 

Patrick A. Clifford is chairman of the board and Will B. 
Howe, clerk. 

Five meetings were held. Three applicants for master's 
licenses and six for jorneyman's licenses were examined 
and passed. 

The total receipts from all sources were thirty-two and 
one-half dollars ($32.50), for which amount the clerk of 
the board holds receipts of the city treasurer. 

The total expenditures for the year were, one and one- 
half dollars ($1.50) for postage and sixteen and thirty- 
eight one-hnudredths dollars ($16.38) for materials used 
in the practical work of the examinations. 

The attached table gives the names of all plumbers 
authorized by this board to work at the business of plumb- 
ing for the year ending March 31, 1914, the date of re- 
newal and expiration of said licenses, or certificates, the 
dates of examination, opposite the names of the men ex- 
amined and the fees received. 



2G0 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF HYDRANT; 
COMMISSIONERS. I 



Concord, N. II., December 31, 1913. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen : j 

The eighth annual report of this board, showing its rec-i 
ommendations to the Board of Water Commissioners and^ 
the number of hydrants set during the year 1913, is here-i 
with submitted : | 

On May 26, 1913, it was voted to recommend the pla-i| 
cing of additional hydrants in Penacook as follows: one on 
Washington Street, westerly side, opposite the barn near 
the Eolfe sawmill ; one on Fowler Street, opposite number ! 
8, and one on Fowler Street opposite number 39. ! 

On June 9, 1913, it was voted to recommend that a hy- 
drant be set on the northerly side of the Hopkinton Road, { 
opposite the center of the new infirmary, at Saint Paul's ' 
School. 

On September 15, 1913, it was voted to recommend the 
placing of a high-service hydrant on North State Street, 
on the northerly line of Oliver Racine's lot, and one on 
Merrimack Street, Penacook, near Bye Street. 

All the above hydrants have been set during the season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 
W. C. GREEN, 
P. R. SANDERS, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1913. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 

I CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

I 

*!OLON A. CARTER, to March 31, 1917. 

JURNS P. HODGMAN, to March 31, 1917. 

lENRY C. HOLBROOK, to March 31, 1916. 

'^RANK P. QUIMBY, to March 31, 1916. 

^.DSON J. HILL, to March 31, 1915. 

JEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, to March 31, 1915. 

lARRY H. DUDLEY, to March 31, 1914. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, to March 31, 1914. 

SOLON A. CARTER, President. 
EDSON J. HILL, Clerk of Board. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

foreman. 
JAMES T. DAVIS. 

INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of 



Abraham G. Jones,* ex officio, 1872 
John M. Hill,* 1872- 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1872- 

Josiah I\Iinot,* 1872. 

David A. Ward,* 1872- 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1872. 

Benjamin S. Warren,* 1872- 

John Kimball,* ex officio, 1872- 
John Abbott,* 1873- 

John S. Euss,* 1874- 

Abel B. Holt,* 1874- 

Samuel S. Kimball,* 1875. 

Geo. A. Pillsbury,* ex officio, 1876- 
Laither P. Durgin,* 1876- 

John Kimball,* 1877. 

William M. Chase, 1877. 

Horace A. Brown,* ex officio, 1878- 
Ja,mes L. Mason,* 1878- 

James R. Hill,* ]878. 

Geo. A. Cummings,* ex officio, 1880- 
EdgarH.Woodman,*ej;Oj^c?o, 1883- 
Joseph H. Abbot,* 1884- 

George A. Young,* 1885- 

John E. Robertson, ex officio, 1887- 
StillmanHnmphrey,*ea;oj9?ci6>,1889- 
Henry W. Clapp,* ex officio, 1891- 
Willis D. Thompson, 1891- 



service of members. \ 

— three months. 
1878. 
1878. 

Resigned Jan. 10, 1874 
1874. j 

Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 
1873. 
1876. 
1876. 
1877. 
1877. 

Resigned July 1, 18911 
1878. I 

1885. ' 

Resigned July 1, 1891 1 
Resigned July 1, 1891' 
1880. 
1893. 

Died in 188-1 
1883. 
■1887. 
1893. 
1894. 
1889. 
•1891. 
1893. 
1895. 



* Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 2G5 

William P. Fiske, 1891-1902. 

James IT. Chase,* 1891. Died in 1893. 

John Whitaker,* 1892. Died in 1903. 

Henry E. Conant,* 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

Parsons B.Cogswell,*cx Oj^ao, 1893-1895. 

Solon A. Carter, 1893. Now in office. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William M :\lason, 1893-1899. 

William E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Robinson, ex officio, 1895-1897. 

Ebenezer B. Hutchinson,* 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 

Edson J. Hill, 1895. Now in office. 

Albert B. Woodworth,* ex officio, 

1897-1899. 
Nathaniel E.Martin, ex officio, 1899-1901. 
Henry E. Conant,* 1899. Died in 1911. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 

Harry G. Sargent,* ex officio, 1901-1903. 
Obadiah Morrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott, 1901. Now in office. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 

Charles R. Corning, ex officio, 1903-1909. 
Henry C. Holbrook, 1903. Now in office. 

Harley B. Roby, 1905. Resigned Jan. 24, 1911. 

Charles J. French, ex officio, 1909. Now in office. 
Burns P. Hodgraan, 1911. Now in office. 

Frank P. Quimby, 1911. Now in office. 

Presidents of the Board. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1874-1875. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

* Deceased. 



266 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



John Kimball,* 
Benjamin A. Kimball, 
John Kimball,* 
William P. Fiske, 
Solon A. Carter, 



1875-1876. 

187G-1878. 

1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

1891-1902. 

1902. Now in office. 



Superintendents. 



V. C. Hastings,* 
P. R. Sanders, 



1873. Died March 14, 1907. 
1907. NoAv in office. 



Deceased. 



CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights : 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights, $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000.00 
W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 
Humphrey & Farnum, for 

kit-shop privilege, 4,900.00* 
flowage rights around Pena- 

cook Lake, 4,375.61 
W. P. Cooledge, Hutchins lot, l,050.00t 

Mary C. Rowell, for land, 1,500.00 

Moses H. Bradley, for land, 5,000.00 

Harry Phillips, for land, 100.00 

Joseph B. Walker, for land, 2,214.00 

John G. Hook, for land, 370.00 

A. S. Ranney, for land, 1,350.00 

Alfred Roberts, for land, 1,275.00 

Charles E. Ballard, for land, 2,500.00 

Mary G. Carter, for land, 1,250.00 

Elizabeth Widmer, for land, 1,564.50 

A. L. Proctor, for land, 450.00 

Robert Crowley, for land, 3,000.00 

Miles Hodgdon, for land, 2,200.00 
heirs of Lowell Brown, for 

land, 1,032.55 

Coffin & Little, for land, 800.00 



*Original cost, $5,000; land sold tor $100. 

tOriginal cost house and lot, $2,250; portion of lot sold for $1,200. 



268 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid 0. F. Richardson, for land, $100.00 

M. H. & C. R. Farnum, for 

land, 4,500.00 

Cook & Hood, for land, 1,750.00 

Charles H. Farnum, for land, 1,410.36 

Fred N. Ladd, for land, 300.00 

A. W. Hill, for land, 6,500.00 

Helen G. Evans and others, 

for land, 2,000.00 

Frank B. Kilburn, for land, 2,500.00 

Joseph A. and Mary E. Hal- 

loran, for land, 600.00 

Wheelock Club, for land, 1,400.00* 

Dr. I. A. Watson, for land, 2,490.00)- 

Frank E. Horner, for land, 1,900.00 

Frank E. and William H. 

Horner, for land, 100.00 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Association, 20,000.00 

dam, gate-house and appurte- 
nances, 32,756.17 

conduit and gate-houses, 29,818.94 

mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to the 
reservoir, fire main through 
North and South Main 
Streets, and high service 
main from Penacook Street 
to Stark Street, Penacook), 182,241.70 



♦Original cost $1,500; house sold for $100. 
tOriginal cost, $2,700; house sold for $210. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 269 

Cost of distribution pipe, $388,168.66 
service pipe, 63,059.57 
reservoir, 42,460.09 
piutipin<? station, shop, sta- 
ble and storehouse, 24,017.60 
pumping machinery, 17,000.42 
engineering and superin- 
tendence, 14,913.12 
incidentals, 6,531.19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1914, $1,034,949.48 

Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding : 



Wlien d 


ae 


Jan. 




1914, 


Jan. 




1915, 


Jan. 




1916, 


Jan. 




1917, 


Jan. 




1918, 


Jan. 




1919, 


Nov. 




1920, 


Nov. 




1921, 


April 




1921, 


Jan. 




1922, 


March 




1922, 


April 




1922, 


Jan. 




1923, 


Jan. 




1924, 



Rate 


Amoinit 


4, 


$10,000.00 


4, 


5,000.00 


4, 


9,000.00 


4, 


10,000.00 


4, 


10,000.00 


4, 


10,000.00 


3, 


7,000.00 


3, 


4,000.00 


31/2, 


5,000.00 


4, 


347,000.00 


31/2, 


20,000.00 


31/2, 


30,000.00 


31/2, 


15,000.00 


31/2, 


15,000.00 




$497,000.00 



REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To His Honor ike Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners transmits herewith 
the reports of the superintendent and the engineer of the 
pumping station, exhibiting in detail the operations of this 
department for the year ending December 31, 1913, which 
are made a part of this report. 

The expense of extensions has been less than in some 
previous years, affording an opportunity to make extensive 
repairs and improvements on the buildings and equip- 
ment of the system, which is now in a most satisfactory 
condition. 

In the not distant future the cement-lined pipes sup- 
plying the St. Paul's School and the Penacook districts 
must be replaced with cast-iron. It is probable that the 
work of relaying the line to St. Paul's School will be 
undertaken the coming season, giving that important dis- 
trict a cast-iron main with an increased capacity over the 
present line. 

• Certain disinterested ( ?) parties have lately through 
the columns of one of our daily newspapers, criticized this 
board for its alleged failure to prevent the contamination 
of the water of Penacook Lake and possibly some sensi- 
tive individuals have been persuaded that in using the 
water supplied through our mains, their health has been 
endangered and that they are being poisoned by degrees. 

The board avails itself of this opportunity to state its 
attitude on this question. 

The ideal condition undoubtedly would be for the city 
to control tlie entire watershed supplying the lake. It is 
evident that such absolute control is impracticable if not 
altogether impossible. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 271 

It should be borne in mind that the present board, as 
well as its immediate predecessors, inherited the conditions 
complained of. It is no reflection upon the judgment of 
the honorable gentlemen and public spirited citizens who 
served the city upon the board at the time the system 
w^as installed, or their immediate successors, to state that 
they did not foresee the possibility of the location of a 
colony of summer cottagers near the shores of the lake. 

The conditions complained of in the newspaper articles 
referred to have received the thoughtful consideration of 
the board for more than twenty years and the most objec- 
tionable features have been eliminated as rapidly as circum- 
stances would permit. 

For a detailed statement of the properties acquired by the 
city, you are referred to the construction account in the 
report of this department. 

It has been the aim of the board to supply our citizens 
with an abundance of pure water. To accomplish our 
purpose, vre have caused careful policing of the shores, in- 
spection of suspected premises and frequent analyses of the 
water. 

"We have had the cordial co-operation of our local and 
state boards of health, whose suggestions and advice have 
been of great assistance and are gratefully acknowledged. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
CHARLES J. FRENCH, ex officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the forty-second annual report 
of the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together wdth a statement of 
the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1913. 

RECEIPTS. 

For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates, $15,057.37 

'For water, from consumers by meter 

rates, 60,492.18 

From delinquents, 91.59 

For shutting off and turning on water, 2.00 

water for building purposes, 45.32 



pipe and stock sold and labor, 
wood sold, 
freight refunded. 


465.88 

60.00 
36.65 


$76,250.99 
96.54 


Deduct abatements. 




Net receipts for 1913, 

Expenditures. 

general expenses. 


$76,154.45 



Paid pay-rolls, salaries and labor, $9,183.19 

S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop in 
Penacook, 24.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 273 

'aid Ira C. Evans Co., printing and 



postage, 


$184.97 


Rumford Printing Co., books. 


16.00 


Addressograph Co., office sup- 




plies, 


22.09 


Frost & Adams Co., office sup- 




plies, 


6.93 


A. R. Andrews, office supplies, 


6.00 


Chas. F. Nichols & Son, office 




supplies, 


5.25 


C. H. Swain & Co., bill case. 


7.03 


N. H. Patriot Co., advertising, 


11.30 


Concord Evening Monitor, ad- 




vertising. 


7.10 


Concord Electric Co., lighting. 


15.61 


N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 




Co., telephones. 


99.20 


J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., sup- 




plies. 


6.00 


Thorne Shoe Store, rubber 




boots. 


4.50 


Thompson & Hoague Co., hard- 




ware. 


82.78 


Concord Hardware Co., hard- 




ware. 


23.27 


A. H. Britton & Co., hardware. 


16.79 


A. G. Stevens, axes, 


4.00 


Joseph T. Walker, hay, 


52.96 


Walter S. Dole, grain and 




straw. 


60.01 


G. N. Bartemus & Co., grain 




and straw. 


70.00 


W. W. Critchett, pasturing 




horse. 


4.50 


18 





274 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid Barrett VJg. Co., paint, 


$21.09 


Tragle Cordage Co., packing, 


50.16 


Howard & Morse, copper 




screens, 


125.60 


Clinton Wire Cloth Co., wire, 


17.47 


Boston Bolt & Iron Co., iron 




frames. 


110.00 


N. H. Forestry Commission, 




pine seedlings, 


157.50 


Edson ilfg. Co., trench pump 




engine. 


102.75 


Wilson & Silsby, spray hood. 


16.00 


Eagle Garage, automobile and 




supplies. 


766.22 


Chandler Eastman Co., truck 




body and seat. 


53.50 


Standard Oil Co., gasoline and 




tank, 


112.65 


Hoyt Electrical Instrument 




Co., supplies, 


6.00 


Concord Vulcanizing Works, 




supplies. 


5.10 


Page Belting Co., supplies. 


33.56 


C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, supplies, 


4.20 


Batehelder & Co., supplies, 


21.43 


C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, 


13.49 


C. W. Dadmun, electrical sup- 




plies, 


24.93 


Woodworth & Co., cement. 


49.90 


Dickerman & Co., cement. 


32.25 


R. D. Wood & Co., cast-iron 




pipe. 


1,753.95 


Andover Village Precinct, cast- 




iron pipe, 


309.46 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 275 



Paid l^iiilders' Iron Foundry, cast- 




ings, 


.$129.60 


New England Box Co., cast- 




ings. 


13.90 


Concord Mfg. Co., castings. 


7.00 


Rensselaer Mfg. Co., valves and 




hydrants, 


367.40 


Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., valves 




and hydrants. 


174.27 


Darling Pump and Mfg. Co., 




valves. 


75.00 


NorAvood Engineering Co., hy- 




drants, 


66.00 


Bingham & Taylor, gate-boxes, 


78.84 


Chadwick-Boston Lead Co., 




pig lead and lead pipe, 


237.83 


Richards & Co., lead wool, 


35.50 


A. M. Byers Co., wrought-iron 




pipe. 


119.70 


Hays Mfg. Co., service boxes, 


75.75 


Concord Foundry and Machine 




Co., castings, 


46.96 


F. L. Badger, brass castings, 


6.19 


George E. Gilchrist Co., tools 




and fittings. 


107.70 


"Walworth Mfg. Co., tools and 




fittings. 


71.06 


Harold L. Bond Co., tools, 


38.15 


Nye Tool and Machine Co., 




pipe cutter. 


2.25 


Orr & Rolfe, fittings, 


6.98 


Concord Pipe Co., fittings, 


3.38 


National Meter Co., meters and 




repairs. 


504.20 



276 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid Thomson Meter Co., meters and 




repairs, 


$201.60 


Neptune Meter Co., meters and 




repairs, 


222.20 


Henry R. Worthington, meters, 


72.00 


Globe Horseshoeing Shop, 




smith work, 


72.79 


Ross W. Cate, smith work. 


23.40 


Jasper E. Brown, smith work, 


7.12 


Abbot & Downing Co., repairs, 


66.97 


George D. Huntley, repairs, 


17.00 


C. Pelissier & Co., repairs and 




supplies. 


3.25 


Henry M. Richardson, team 




work and labor, 


237.25 


E. L. Davis, team work, 


43.00 


George L. Theobald, team work. 


26.75 


Benjamin Farnum, team work. 


13.50 


Charles H. Farnum, team work, 


4.50 


E. S. King, auto hire, 


13.00 


John F. Waters, auto hire. 


9.00 


C. H. Carter, auto hire, 


8.75 


J. C. McGilvray, auto hire. 


4.50 


"William S. Kaime, livery. 


2.00 


George F. Tandy, repairing 




concrete. 


33.00 


H. Levingston, repairing con- 




crete, 


5.11 


Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber 




and labor. 


27.79 


Home & Hall, lumber and 




labor. 


10.93 


M. L. Swain & Co., mason 




work, 


101.71 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 277 



Paid Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 


$8.50 


George Abbott, Jr., painting, 


211.97 


B. Bilsborougli & Sons, paint- 




ing, 


42.30 


Morrill & Danforth, insurance 




and bond. 


287.96 


Eastman & Merrill, insurance, 


45.00 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight. 


378.20 


town of Webster, taxes. 


40.00 


state of New Hampshire, auto 




registration and license. 


15.00 


Engineering News, 


5.00 


A. G. Cochran, clerk, cash paid 




out, car fares, express and 




sundries. 


192.19 


Rochester Brass and Wire 




Works Co., fence. 


963.00 


Harry Phillips, land. 


100.00 


Silas S. Wiggin, estimating 




lumber. 


10.00 


incidentals, 


65.48 



$19,460.10 



PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 

Paid pay-rolls, engineer and fireman, $1,832.25 
labor on fuel, 60.49 

labor on indicator, 13.75 

Concord Lumber Co., coal, 1,076.04 

H. M. Richardson, drawing wood, 30.63 
W. C. Robinson & Sons Co., oil, 28.78 
A. W. Harris Oil Co., oil, 25.83 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., pack- 
ing, etc., 53.25 



278 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Paid Revere Rubber Co., packing, $16.26 
Jenkins Bros., packing, 36.50 
Thompson & Hoague Co., sup- 
plies, 42.97 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 8.28 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, 3.35 
P. H. Larkin & Co., supplies, 1.55 
Batchelder & Co., supplies, 1.28 
Orr & Rolfe, fittings, 7.70 
Union Electric Supply Co., elec- 
tric supplies, 57.59 

C. W. Dadmun, electric supplies, 6.29 

Stuart-Howland Co., electric sup- 
plies, 4.59 
Concord Electric Co., electric 

supplies, 4.45 

Concord Wiring and Supply Co., 

electric supplies, 1.15 

Home & Hall, lumber and labor, 6.15 

Henry M. Richardson, trucking 

poles, 9.50 

George E. Winslow, indicator, 181.00 

Harold L. Bond & Co., manhole 

cover, 18.45 

. Henry R. Worthington, repairs 

on pumps, 1,391.66 

Page Belting Co., repairs on 

pumps, 198.51 

J. H. Long Machine Co., repairs 

on pumps, 84.84 

Hutchinson Building Co., repairs 

on pumps, 62.40 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, painting 
buildings and pumps, 207.43 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 279 

Paid Nason ^Ifg. Co., valve, $1.05 

McLeod & Henry, fire brick, 47.75 

N. E. Koller Grate Co., grate 

bars, 60.00 

Ford & Kimball, grate bars, 1.95 

Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 59.30 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., lino- 
leum, 78.31 

George L. Lincoln & Co., shades, 11.73 

Granite State Mfg. Co., repairing 

chairs, 3.00 

Poole Mfg. Co., tube cleaner, 5.50 

Concord Light and Power Co., 

lighting, 14.88 

New England Telephone and 

Telegraph Co., telephones, 34.75 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight, 8.32 

A. G. Cochran, clerk, cash paid 

out, 45.96 

incidentals, 2.21 

$5,847.63 



$25,307.73 



The expenditures are divided as follows : 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 

For office expenses, $1,221.14 

maintenance, 6,874.38 

inspection, 840.00 

care and repair of hydrants, 277.46 

new service pipes, 579.41 

, new distribution pipes, 4,244.88 

new hydrants, 395.91 



280 CITY OF CONCORD. 

For new meters, $1,043.91 

work at lake, 

repairs at brick gate-house, 
care of wood-lots, 
automobile, 

fence at pumping station, 
land at pumping station, 
incidentals, 



PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 

For salaries, engineer and fireman, $1,832.25 



165.75 




334.89 




1,280.06 




610.75 




1,050.00 




100.00 




441.56 






$19,460.10 



fuel. 


1,167.16 


oil and packing. 


124.12 


repairs. 


388.66 


supplies. 


24.63 


lighting and telephone. 


49.63 


repairing pumps. 


1,898.06 


indicator. 


363.12 



$5,847.63 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron distribution pipes have been laid and hydrants 
set during the year as follows : 

In Hopkinton Road, 

west from Pleasant Street, 615 feet 6-inch pipe in place 
of 4-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Dartmouth Street, 

extended south, 293 feet 6-incli pipe. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



281 



In Beacon Street, 

extended east, 104 feet 6-mch pipe. 

In Washington Street, Penacook, 

extended west from Electric Avenue, to Rolfe's saw- 
mill, 712 feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Fowler Street, Penacook, 

east from "Washington Street, 1,300 feet 6-inch pipe. 

On hydrant hranches, 

128 feet 6-inch pipe ; 6 feet 6-inch pipe discontinued. 
Also 132 feet 1-inch pipe. 

Seven new hydrants have been set as follows : 

On Hopkiuton Road, near new infirmary. 

On School Street, near Giles. 

On North State Street, near Racine's. 

On Washington Street, Penacook, at Rolfe's sawmill. 

On Fowler Street, Penacook, near Elliott's. 

On Fowler Street, Penacook, at Charles Holmes'. 

On Merrimack Street, Penacook, at Bye. 

There have been set 11 gates; discontinued, 1. 

Summary of the Foregoing. 

NEW PIPES, hydrants AND STOP-GATES. 

Stop-Gates. 



Pipes. 
1-inch, 132 feet 
6-ineh, 3,152 " 



3,284 feet, 
equal to .621 mile. 



Hydrants. 
In city. 
In Penacook, 



6-inch, 
18-inch, 



10 
1 

11 



282 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Pipes. 
4-iiich, 475 feet. 
6-iuch, 6 " 



DISCONTINUED. 

Hydrants. 
In city, 



Stop-Gates. 
4-inch, 1 



481 feet, 
equal to .091 mile. 



Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
370,111 feet, equal to 70.09 miles. 

Total number of gates now in use, 1,021. 
Total number of hydrants now in use, 436. 

Service Pipes. 

There have been laid duiriig the year and connected with 
the main pipes, 42 service pipes, consisting of 

38 3^.inch, 948 feet. 

1 1-inch, 33 feet. 

1 4-inch, 18 feet. 

2 8-inch, 40 feet. 



42 



1,039 feet. 



There have been discontinued, 2 ; total number of service 
pipes at the present time, 3,792; total length of service 
pipes, 88,533 feet, or 16.76 miles. 

"We have set 76 meters during the year, total number now 
in use, 2,318. 

There have been relaid 50 service pipes and 15 curbs 
have been placed on old supplies. There are still about 
one thousand services in the city without curb-stops and 
I would recommend that five hundred be placed on these 
old supplies the coming year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 283 

[i 

'' The following table shows the height of water in Pena- 
eook Lake on the first day of each month: 

January, 178.10 July, 180.45 

February, 178.65 August, 179.55 

March, 178.40 September, 178.60 

April, 180.65 October, 178.30 

May, 181.25 November, 177.80 

June, 181.45 December, 177.25 

Tiie lowest point reached during the year was on De- 
cember 31, being 176.85; the highest was on May 9 and 
June 2, and was 181.45 ; mean height for the year was 
179.20, which was .34 foot higher than the mean height 
for the year 1912. 

The triple expansion Worthington pumping engine which 
has been in operation since the high service was installed 
in 1892, was found to be in need of extensive repairs. The 
pump has been thoroughly overhauled by the manufac- 
turers, the steam valves rebored, connecting rods renewed 
and the valves on the water end renewed. This engine 
is now in first-class condition and is capable of giving good 
service for many years. The No. 2 engine was also over- 
hauled at the same time, but having been in service only 
since 1904 was found to be only slightly M^orn and with 
renewal of some minor parts is in as good condition as 
ever. 

The wooden floor in the new gate-house at the dam, hav- 
ing rotted so as to become unsafe, was replaced with one 
of concrete, as was also the floor in the old gate-house. 

A Winslow electrical recording indicator, w^hich shows 
the height of water in the reservoir at any period of night 
or day and also makes a record of the same, has been 
installed in the pumping station. The indicator consists 
of a transmitter operated by diaphragm and lever at the 



284 CITY OF CONCORD. 

reservoir wliicli is connected to the 10-inch blow-off pipe, 
and a register at the station. This gage is a much needed ! 
improvement at the station and a great help to the engi- j 
neer in the operation of the pumps. ! 

All of the buildings owned by the department have 
been painted and repaired and are in good condition. 

An iron fence has been purchased to replace the present 
wooden fence at the pumping station, the old fence being in 
such condition that it was necessary to renew it. The iron 
fence has been received from the manufacturers but has 
not yet been erected, having arrived too late in the season 
for the work. 

Thirty-one thousand pine seedlings from the state nurs- 
ery at Boscawen have been set out on the pasture laud 
owned by the city at Penacook Lake. 

The growth of these pines will be watched with interest 
as departing from the usual custom of transplanting in 
the spring. These were set out in the fall after the season's 
growth was completed, upon the recommendation of State 
Forester Hirst. 

I would recommend that the department purchase as 
many more to be set out in 1914. 

A model 17 Buiek touring car was purchased by the de- 
partment early in the season of 1913, the tonneau removed, 
and converted into a service truck of about 1,200 lbs. 
capacity. This machine has been of great advantage, es- 
pecially in carrying men and supplies to and from work 
and in answering the many calls which the care of the 
system demands. 

The shores of the lake have been gone over several 
times during the year and all rubbish burned. 

In my last report your attention was called to the 
presence of the gypsy moth in the woodlot on the south 
side of Forge Pond adjoining the Park and lots under 
control of the city, similarly infested, and also to the 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 285 

damage that had been done by browntail moths among 
the white oak. 

A joint meeting of the Land and Buildings Committees 
of the Water Board, the Park Commissioners and the City 
Government was held January 20, 1913, and it was voted 
to engage the services of an expert lumberman to examine 
the lots and estimate the amount of lumber on the same. 
The committees engaged Mr. Silas S. Wiggin, who esti- 
mated the lots at 500,000 feet. 

On February 3, a meeting of the City Government was 
held and a resolution was passed authorizing the wood and 
timber on the city lot infested with gypsy moths to be 
cut and marketed under the direction of a committee of 
four consisting of the Mayor, one member of the Land and 
Buildings Committee of the Park Commissioners, one mem- 
ber of the Land and Buildings Committee of the City 
Government and the Superintendent of the Water-Works, 
and said committee was authorized to enter into a contract 
with responsible persons in the name of the city for the 
operation of said lots. 

Bids were called for by this committee for cutting, saw- 
ing, sticking and marketing the hard and soft lumber. 

The bids were advertised in the local papers and on 
February 13, the date set for opening them, the committee 
met and the following proposals were considered : 

Albert J. Morrill, to cut, saw and stick, $8 per M. 
Knowles & Marston, to cut, saw and stick, $8.50 per M. 
Boutwell & Baker, to cut, saw and stick, $6.50 per M. 

to market, $1 per M. 
Boutwell & Baker, having made the lowest bid, the con- 
tract was aw^arded to that firm. 

On March 24 the Board of Aldermen met and authorized 
the Mayor and Superintendent of Water-Works to deter- 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 

mine the amounts due tlie contractors, the same to be 
charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Operations on the lot were commenced about the first 
of March and were completed the last of June. 

As the lots under the separate control of the Water Board 
and the city were operated jointly, it was impossible to 
keep the lumber separate, so it was agreed, after looking 
the ground over thoroughly by the contractors and the 
committee, that the city's proportion of expenditures and 
receipts would be three-fifths, and that of the Water- 
Works, two-fifths, of the total. 

A gang of men was put in to cut the cord wood at $1.25 
per cord ; after working until July, we Avere obliged to 
raise the price per cord to $1.60. The wood was measured 
by Mr. H. M. Richardson and amounted to 1124.5 cords. 
The cord wood will be removed from the lot during the 
winter and yarded where it Mali be convenient to handle. 

A large portion of the lots has been cleared of the brush 
and it is our intention to clear the remainder ready to be 
reforested. 

Following is a statement of the expenditures up to 
December 31, 1913 : 

Expenditures. 

Paid Boutwell & Baker, 

to sawing 874,396 ft. 
lumber at $6.50 
per M, $5,683.57 

less 10% until final 

settlement, 568.35 

$5,115.22 

to sawing 15,804 ft. W. W. logs 

at $3 per M, 47.41 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 287 

Paid Boutwell & Baker, 

to operating 41,213 ft. bntts at 

•1^4.25 per M, $175.16 

to operating 12,750 ft. tele- 
phone poles at $1.75, 22.32 

to cutting 1,265 round posts at 

$0.02, 25.30 

to delivering 2,512 ties to rail- 
road, 47.10 

to labor delivering sawed lum- 
ber, yarding and delivering 
poles, posts, butts, peeling 
and piling ties and extra 
. v»'ork loading teams, 1,249.03 





$6,700.14 


Paid H. M. Richardson, team work, 


9.75 


surveys. 


20.00 


advertising, 


6.60 


insurance, 


102.00 



Expenditures for operating lumber, $6,828.49 

Paid for chopping cord wood, 710.75 



cords at $1.25, 


$888.44 




for chopping cord wood, 413.75 






cords at $1.60, 


662.00 




for yarding and delivering 






cord wood, 
i Expenditures for chopping wood. 


359.35 






1,909.79 


Paid for inspection and cleaning brush 

1 




832.73 



Expenditures to December 31, 1913, $9,571.01 



288 city op concord. 

Receipts. 

Amount of lumber sold and delivered from city lots : 

708,277 ft. sawed lumber, ] 
41,213 ft. white oak butts, ! 
12,750 ft. telephone poles, { ' 

205 round posts, j 

Amount collected on above and paid into city 

treasury, $7,559.27 

Amount collected on cord wood sold and paid 

into city treasury, 28.00 



Receipts to December 31, 1913, $7,587.27 

Following this is the report of Mr. Rowell, the engineer, 
giving the operations of the pumping engines in detail. 

Acknowledging the continued support and co-operation 
of your board, this report is 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water- Works. 

P. R. Sanders, Superintendent : 

Sir, — I Avoiild report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station is in a first-class condition. 

Pump No. 1 has been thoroughly overhauled during 
:he year, and is in good working order. 

Pump No. 2 has had some repairs made, the air pump 
;iaving new sleeves put in, also new valve stems made 
[or the engine, and new rubber valves for the water end 
)n both pumps. 

The electrical indicator and recording gauge that was 
[installed by your order is giving good satisfaction. It 
?ives the exact height of the water in the reservoir at all 
imes, day or night. 

Following is a statement of coal and other supplies, 
ised at the pumping station during the year, with a table 
jihowing the work for each month. 

i! 

Statement. 

23G tons 1,255 pounds Pocahontas coal. 
131 gallons valve oil. 

15 gallons engine oil. 

47 pounds of w^aste. 

15 pounds of grease. 

13 cords of wood. 



290 



CITY OP CONCORD. 
ENGINE RECORD. 



Months. 



hn 


ii) 


hf) 


p. 

s 

3 


p. 


c 


a 


.s 


a 


Pt 


a 


ft 


d 


a . 


5<N 


3 


Pi 

s 


D.O 




p< 




rr,'^ 


t>> 


pi 




>,<S 


>j 03 


c< 




OJ 


a c 


-s 


•"* 


fco 




"^■5 


"3 


Is M 




O S) 


o S 


o 


C"^ 




'A 


^ 


H 


H 


<; 



A 


, 


^^ 


«M 






c3 


o . 


s 


'^ 


O 




tf 


o 


o 


ft 


o 




'Cfl 


bo 

2 

> 


'3 


be 

cs5 


s3 

— o 


X'bB 






'5-5 


O S 


C3 O 


0& 


Q 


H" 


Q 


H 



Jan uary . . . 
February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October. 

November., 
December . , 



Total .... 
Daily av'rge 




8:58 



281,261,3951773,318 529,895 1,451 
773,318 1,4511 



20,494 53 



* Amount of coal consumed includes that used for starting fires, bankini 
fires and heating buildings. 

Amount of coal consumed per thousand gallons pumped 
1.88 pounds. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, in account with Concord Water- 
Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1913, $16,998.48 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 76,154.45 
I $93,152.93 



Expenditures. 

Illnterest on bonds, $20,263.34 

iBonds paid, 15,000.00 

Orders paid,' 25,307.13 

Cash on hand, 32,582.46 



$93,152.93 



Auditor's Statement. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the books show- 
ing the receipts of the Concord Water-Works from Jan- 
uary 1, 1913, to* December 31, 1913, and find the same 
correct; and that the total amounts given therein cor- 
respond with the amount of receipts given by Percy R. 
Sanders, superintendent, in his report for the year, and 
also with the receipts reported by William F. Thayer, 
2ity treasurer. 
i HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 



APPENDIX. 



294 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. 

Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of thi 

Works. 

For the year ending January 31, 1874, 
For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875, 
For the year ending April 1, 1876, 

1877, 

1878, 

1879, 

1880, 

1881, 
For nine months ending December 31, 1881, 
For the year ending December 31, 1882, 

1883, 

1884, 

1885, 

1886, 

1887, 

1888, 

1889, 

1890, 

1891, 

1892, 

1893, 

1894, 

1895, 

1896, 

1897, 

1898, 

1899, 

1900, 

1901, 

1902, 

1903, 

1904. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



295 



For the vear ending Dece 



Total receipts for 39 years, 



mber 31, 1905, 


$71,076.44 


1906, 


73,063.45 


1907, 


73,782.64 


1908, 


71,362.67 


1909, 


167,307.84 


1910, 


68,673.71 


1911, 


71,881.34 


1912, 


76,145.13 


1913, 


76,154.45 


years. 


$1,921,519.87 



* No hydrant rental this year. 
t No hydrant rental after 19C8. 





]\rEAN Height 


B. 

OF Water Each 


Year, 


1873, 


175.86 


1894, 


172.81 


1874, 


179.50 


1895, 


171.15 


1875, 


180.00 


1896, 


178.96 


1876, 


180.28 


1897, 


183.33 


1877, 


176.46 


1898, 


184.31 


1878, 


179.50 


1899, 


183.49 


1879, 


179.74 


1900, 


183.09 


1880, 


175.30 


1901, 


183.86 


1881, 


174.70 


1902, 


184.98 


1882, 


179.15 


1903, 


184.75 


1883, 


176.40 


1904, 


184.40 


1884, 


178.18 


1905, 


183.37 


1885, 


176.80 


1906, 


183.94 


1886, 


178.10 


1907, 


183.59 


1887, 


179.04 


1908, 


183.41 


1888, 


181.96 


1909, 


181.40 


1889, 


180.91 


1910, 


180.22 


1890, 


181.90 


1911, 


177.60 


1891, 


180.00 


1912, 


178.86 


1892, 


174.32 


1913, 


179.20 


1893, 


173.38 







296 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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302 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



D 



FIRE-HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service ; L, Low Service, 



Streets. 


Locations. 


'> 

It 


S 


North Main . . . 


Southwest corner of Penacook 


L 

L 

L 

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L 

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L 

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H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

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L 

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East side, near J. B, Walker's 






Junction of Fiske 






East side, near Larkin's store 






Northwest corner of Franklin 






East side, opposite Pearl 






Northwest corner of Washington 






West side, at West Garden 






East side, opposite Chapel 






Northwest corner of Court 






Northwest corner of Pitman 


i 




Northwest corner of Montgomery 


1 




East side, opposite Montgomery 


A 




Northwest corner of Centre 






Southeast corner of Bridge 






Southwest corner of Park 






East side, opposite Park 






Northwest corner of Capitol 






Northwest corner of School 






West side, at Centennial Block 






East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, in rear Eagle Hotel 






East side, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 






West side of Central Block 






Northwest corner of Depot 






Northwest corner of Pleasant 


'>.7 


South Main 


Southeast corner of Pleasant 






Northeast corner of Freight 






East side, opposite Fayette 






East side, opposite Thompson 






Southeast corner of Chandler 






Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue.... 
Northwest corner of Thorndike 






East side, opposite St. John's Church 

Nortliwest corner of Perley 






West side, near Abbot & Downing Co.'s. . . . 
East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s. . 
East side, near West 






Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co 





WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co?ifini*ecZ. 



303 




South Main. 



Water 
Hall.. 



Hammond. . 
Railroad. . . . 

Fiske 

Summer. . . . 

Durgin 

North State 



South State. 



Mills. . . 

Dakin.. 
Dunklee 



Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of #*illsbury 

East side, opposite Pillsbmy 

West side, opposite entrance to E. E. shops. 

West side, at Lamprey's 

West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Eolfe and Eumford Asylum 

West side, near E. W. Eobinson's 

West side, near W. A. Phillips' 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, opposite Eoy's 

East side, near Eumford Field 

North Side, near Bridge 

East side, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof 's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 

West side, near Levi Call 's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

West side, near C. E. Harriman's 

West side, 150 feet south of West 



H 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 



20 
1 



14 



304 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con^tHHcJ. 




Dunklee. . 
Broadway. 



Donovan , 
Green. . . 



South. 



Bradley. 



Union . . 
Jackson . 
Lyndon . 



North Spring. 



South Spring. 



Academy. 



Northwest corner of Allison L 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury L 

West side, at H. H. Metcalf 's L 

Northwest corner of Allison L 

Northwest corner of Carter L 

Northwest corner of Stone L 

West side, at Rollins Park L 

West side, opposite McKinley L 

West side, between McKinley and Rockingham L 

Northeast corner of Wiggin L 

Northwest corner of Prince H 

East side, opposite Prince L 

Northwest corner of Warren | L 

West side, opposite Wall | L 

Northwest corner of Fayette | L 

Northwest corner of Thompson j L 

West side, opposite Monroe | L 

West side, opposite Laurel | L 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital. .| L 

West side, opposite Downing | L 

West side, opposite Allison | L 

West side, opposite Pillsbury | L 

West side, near Paige 's | L 

West side, opposite I. W. Bushey's | L 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Road | L 

East side, at Quint 's | L 

West side, near Bow line | L 

Southwest corner of Penacook | H 

Northwest corner of Walker | L 

East side, opposite Highland j L 

Northwest corner of Franklin | L 

Northwest corner of Maple | L 

Northeast corner of Church | H 

Southwest corner of Tremont j H 

East side, opposite Abbott | H 

Northeast corner of Maple | L 

Southwest corner of Centre | H 

West side, at High School | H 

East side, opposite High School | L 

Southwest corner of School | H 

Southwest corner of Oak | L 

West side, opposite Thompson | L 

West side, opposite Concord | L 

West side, near Memorial Hospital | L 

East side, at F. E. Hook's | H 



14 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



305 



FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co/(/i»»erf. 




Streets. 



Hanover . 
Ruin ford. 



Huntington. 

Tahaiito 

Pine 



Holt . 
Hi oh. 



Valley. . 
Auburn . 



Eidgo Koad . . . . 
West bourne Ed 

Dartmouth 

Princeton 



Fruit. 



Minct . . . . 
PenaecoiC . 



Walker. 
Albin.. 



West side, at No. 10 

West side, south of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Mortheast corner of Albin 

N'ortlieast corner of Franklin 

Nortliwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

N'ortbeast corner of Cambridge 

NTortlawest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at head of Short 

Northwest corner of Sfhool 

Southwest corner of Centre 

Southwest corner of Warren 

East side, at Nason 's 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

N"orthwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

NTortheast corner of Forest 

N'ortbeast corner of Chestnut 

N'ortbeast corner of Forest 

North side, between Centre and Forest. . . 

West side, opposite Mrs. Jackman's 

N"orth side, north of Mrs. F. P. Halletfs. 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Northeast corner of Woodman 

West side, near V. A. Dearborn 's 

East side, opposite W. W. Critchett 's. . . . 

ii^ast side, opposite Kilburn 's 

West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home. . 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home. . 

Xorthwest corner of Pleasant 

South side, near Concord Lumber Co 

South side^, east of P. B. Co. 's storehouse. 

South side, near P. B. Co. 's 

South side, near P. B. Co. 's office 

Southeast corner of North Main 

Southwest corner of Eumford 

^Torth side, opposite T. Hannigan's 

Southeg/^t corner of Columbus Avenue 

Southwest corner of Martin 

North side, near D. W^eathcrs ' 



L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 



:806 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co;(/i/(i/ecZ. 




Highland 
Church. . 

Frariklin . 



Chestnut . 
Tremont . 



Pearl. . 
Beacon. 



Rowell . . . . 
Blanchard. 
Ferry 



Washing-ton . 



Chapp] 

Montgomery. 
Centre 



Bridge . 
Park. . 



N'orth side, between Bradley and Rumford. 

Northeast corner of Euniford 

South side, east of Bradley 

North side, opposite Lj-ndnn 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

South side, opposite W. J. Ahern's 

North side, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of High 

North side, east of Harrod 

Southwest corner of Jackson 

North side, at Kimball Flanders' 

North side, opposite Merrimack School.... 

Northwest corner of .Jackson 

Southwest corner of Lyndon 

North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner of White 

Northwest corner of Essex 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Hnntoon Avenue 

North side, opposite Rollins 

Southwest corner of Union 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of North Essex 

North side, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side, near Methodist Church , 

South side, opposite Minot 's , 

Northeast corner of North State 

Southwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Union , 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

South side, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue 

Northeast corner of Ridge Road 

South side, near easterly barn 

North side, opposite Concord 'Coal Co.'s.... 
North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory. 
North side, at St. Paul's Church 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con^i/med. 



307 




North side, at south gate of State House yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of G reen 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

North side, opposite E. B. Woodworth's. . . . 

Southeast corner of Giles 

Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue. . . . 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Eumford 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

Northeast corner of Giles 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at H. B. Boutwell 's 

South side, opposite Sherburne's 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at South Congregational Clmreh. 

Southeast corner of South 

Northeast corner of Fremont 

Southwest corner of Spring 

South side, opposite Rumford 

South side, opposite Merrimack 

South side, opposite Pine 

South side, opposite Liberty 

North side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite Mrs. Aiken's 

South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage 

North side, near James Lane's 

North side, near J. McC. Hammond's 

South side, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner of School Avenue 



H 
H 
H 
H 
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L 
L 
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L 
L 
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II 
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H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
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H 
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H 
H 
H 
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11 



308 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co;^^t?^<ecZ. 




Pleasant . 



Piske Eoad. . . 
Hopkinton Ed.. 
Mill Eoad, 
St. P. School.. 

Old Hopkinton 

Eoad 

Wall 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue. , 



Payette. . . 
Thompson . 
Chandler. . 
Concord. . 



Monroe. . . 
Thorndike. 



Laurel . 
Perley. 



Down in Of. 



Clinton. 



West. 



North side, opposite infirmary 

South side, in field near gasometer. 
South side, near new Upper School. 

East side, at Trask's 

South side, near new infirmary 

East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home.... 
South side, at tenement No. 7 



Junction of Hopkinton road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

No. side, at southwest corner pass, station. 

Southwest corner of Eailroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Eailroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Jefferson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Eumford School 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce , 

Northeast corner of South Spring 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove , 

Northeast corner of Pierce , 

South side, near old brook , 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Eedwood Avenue.... 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near Snell 's 

North side, at State Pair grounds 

North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin : 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 309 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co/(/i/H<efZ. 



Streets. 



Locations. 



West 

Avon 

Harrison. . 
Huinplirej. 
Allison. . . . 
Pillsbury. . 



Carter 

Stone 

Holly 

McKinley 

Rockingham. . . 

Iron Works Rd 
Prospect 

Curtice Ave. . . 
North State. . . 



Palm . 



N'orthwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed exteu'n. 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown 's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, near John C. Keuney's 

West side, at Water-Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near W. H. Perry 's 

East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side, near Oliver Racine 's 

East side, near A. L. Colburn 's 

East side, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side, at south line of prison w'all 

West side, at north line of prison wall 

East side, near Asa L. Gay's | 

Northwest corner of Palm | 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co. . . | 

East side, near C. H. Farnum 's | 

East side, near Cyrus R. Farnum 's | 

East side, near John True 's | 

East side, opposite Dolan | 

East side, opposite John H. Flood's | 

West side, opposite S. Abbott's | 

North side, west of Fairbanks j 



L 


5 


L 


1 


L 


1 


L 


1 


L 


1 


L 




L 




L 


3 


L 


1 


L 


1 


L 


1 


L 


1 


L 




L 


2 


L 


1 


L 




L 


2 


L 


1 


L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




H 




L 




H 




L 




H 1 




L 1 




L 1 




L 1 




H 1 




L 1 




L 1 




H 1 




L 1 




L 1 




H 1 




L 1 


21 


H| 


1 



310 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co» tin ucd. 




North State. 



Fisher. . 
View . . . 

Electric . 

Clarke. . 
Lake . . . 



Knight. . 
Hutching . 



vSecond 

Penacook Ed. 



South Main. 



Southeast corner of K 

N"ortheast corner of Peabody 

East side, at George Partridge 's 

East side, near engine house 

East side, opposite Braithwaite's 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co 

East side, opposite Simeon Partridge's. 

East side, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side, opposite A. Hollis' 

East side, near Sewall's Palls Eoad. . . . 

Southwest corner of Engel 

N^ortheast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State 

Xorth side, near power station 

Xortheast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kellom 's 

West side, near H. C. Holden 's 

West side, near Wilson's 

East side, near H. C. Holden 's 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station. . . . 

North side, near B. T. Putney's 

North side, near C. & C. Eailroad 

North side, at Turcotte 's 

North side, near A. H. Knight's 

West side, opposite Frost's 

West side, opposite Blanchard 's 

West side, near Warner Eoad 



PENACOOK. 

West side, at Harriman 's 

West side, at Annis's 

West side, at Garvin 's 

West side, south of W^illow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'y 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Ceni'y 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt's garage 

West side, near Prescott 's 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opposite Washington.. 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



10 
1 
1 

2 
1 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co ?! ^ui uecZ. 



3114 



Streets. 



Locations. 



^■ 



South Main. 

"West Main. 
High 



Washington. 



Fowler 



Electric Ave. 

Elliott 

Charles. . . . ; . 



West Canal. 
East Canal. . 

Crescent .... 
Merrimack. . 



Summer. 



Spring. 
Maple . 
Winter. 
Centre . 



Cross . 
Rolfe. 



Penacook. 



NTorthwcst corner of Charles 

N'orth side, opposite East Canal 

>Jorth side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

NTorthwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

N'orthwest corner of ]\Iaple 

Northwest corner of Spring 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, opposite -Tohn Whitaker's.. 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge.... 

N'orth side, at Eolfe's sawmill 

West side, at Charles Holmes' 

Hast side, near Elliott 's 

South side, junction of Washington. . . . 
?fortheast corner of Electric Avenue. . . 

Southwest corner of Warren 

North side, near George W^ Corey's. . . . 

Southeast corner of Warren 

North side, near Contoocook Mfg. Co. . . 

Xorth side, near Crescent 

West side, north of Canal 

South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue. 

Xorth side, opposite D. W. Fox's 

N'orth side, opposite Cross 

South side, opposite Bye 

South side, opposite Eolfe's shop 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory. 

North side, near road to Island 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

North side, opposite High 

Northeast corner of Centre 

North side, opposite Church 

Northeast corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

North side, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Spring 

West side, at Corbett 's 

Southwest corner of Summer 

North side, near James Corbett 's 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

West side, opposite A. W. Eolfe's. ...... 

West side, at E. L. Davis ' 

East side, at McGirr's 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



15' 



Whole number public hydrants. 



436 ■■ 



312 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE HYDRANTS.— Concluded. 



Locations. 



03 l:z; 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Concord Shoe Factory 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard . . . 
Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. . . . 

State Prison 

State Prison 

Abbot & Downing Co. 's yard 

Page Belting Co. 's yard 

Page Belting Co. 's yard 

W. P. Ford & Co. 's yard 

N. H. State Hospital yard 

Concord Gas Light Co. 's yard 

St. Paul 's School '. 

Water Works Pumping Station grounds. 

W,m. B. Durgin Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

Crescent Worsted Co 

ISr. E. Box Co 

Whole number private hydrants 



H 


1 


L 


4 


H 


15 


H 


4 


L 


2 


H 


G 


H 


9 


L 


1 


L 


1 


H 


12 


L 


1 


H 


1 


H 


1 


H 


1 


H 


4 


1 H 


2 


1 H 


3 



68 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 313 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1913. 

In form recommended by the New England Water- 
Works Association. 

CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1910 — 21,4:97. 
Date of construction — 1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING STATISTICS. 

1. Builders of pumping machinery — Henry R. Worthing- 

ton, Harrison, N. J. 

2. Description of fuel used — a. Kind — bituminous. 

5. Brand of coal — Poca- 
hontas. 

c. Average price of coal per 

gross ton delivered, 
$5,154. 

d. Percentage ash, 9%. 



314 CITY OP CONCORD. 

3. Coal consumed for year — 236.56 tons. 

4. (Pounds of wood consumed )-^-3=equivalent amount 
of coal — 6,831. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year for 
pumping purposes — 239.61. 

6. Total pumpage for the year without allowance for 
slip— 281,261,395 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pump w^orks — 
103.84 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pump works — 
105 feet. 

9. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent 
coal— 524. 

10. Duty=: 

281,261,395 gallons piimped, X 8 34 (lbs.) X 100 X dynamic head.lOo :r=45 88fi fiSO 
Total fuel consumed, 536,720 pounds. ' 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses — 
$5,484.51. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — 19.49. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0,185. 

STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe— cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes— from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 2,537 feet during year. 

4. Renewed — 615 feet during jesiY. 

5. Discontinued — 481 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 70.09 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.15 
miles. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 315 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 6 ; 
private, 3. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 436 ; pri- 
vate, 68. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 10. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,021. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 84. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 1,039 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 26 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 88,533 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 42. 

22. Number now in use — 3,792. 

23. Average length of service — 23.3 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — 

25. Number of meters added during year — 76. 

26. Number now in use — 2,318. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 61.12. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 79.92. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 10. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 41. 



316 CITY OF CONCORD, 

INVENTORY 

Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and "Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1914. 

"Water rights— land, etc., $1,034,949.48 

"Water office — furniture, etc., 975.00' 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 850.00 i 

Shop at pumping station — machinery, tools, i 

etc., 2,300.00 
Stable and basement at pumping station, 

horse, wagons, etc., 1,200.00' 

Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, etc., 2,890.00 j 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 2,200.00; 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 15.00 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00! 



$1,045,419.48' 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINESH. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
lance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
>f the Fire Department for the year 1913. 

The department responded to 98 bell alarms and 231 still 
ilarms. 

In addition one tire occurred in the city proper for 
vhich no alarm was given, making a total for the year 
)f 330, an increase of 73 compared with the record of the 
)revious year. 





Bell. 


still. 


No alarm. 


Total. 


?*reeinct, 


58 


201 


1 


260 


Penacook, 


21 


18 




39 


3ast Concord, 


10 


o 
O 




13 


West Concord, 


9 


9 




18 



98 231 1 330 

This report will be found to contain statements in de- 
rail embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete 
roll of the department with residence and occupation of 
3ach member, a record of all fires and alarms v/hich have 
occurred during the year and the causes thereof as nearly 
as could be ascertained, with the names of the owners or 
occupants and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance re- 
covered in each case. 



3iy CITY OF CONCORD. 

The apparatus is in good condition and no extensive 
repairs were required during the year. 

The fire alarm telegraph systems of the city proper and 
Penacook are in good condition. 

Eight hundred feet of 2i^-inch hose and three horses 
were purchased. 

Three permanent men were added to the force and an 
auto combination piece of apparatus purchased during 
the year, two long steps in the line of efficiency. 

The last one-horse wagon in the city proper was made 
a two-horse wagon carrying 200 feet more hose than 
formerly. 

This increase, w4th the complement of 1,000 feet re- 
quired by the auto combination, necessitated the removal 
from the racks of 1,200 feet. 

It will be seen by this that an alarm from the business 
section is responded to by apparatus carrying 1,200 feet 
more hose than ever before on first alarm, or an aggregate 
of 5,000 feet. I therefore respectfully recommend the pur- 
chase of 1,200 feet of 2i,'2-iiich hose. 

All of the hose wagons in the city proper and one at 
Penacook were provided with electric search lights during 
the year. 

As Inspector of Wires I would report that the relations 
existing between this office and corporations doing busi- 
ness in the city are of the most pleasant character and I 
have reason to believe that the aim of each is to render 
to the public efficient service accompanied by the factor 
of safety. As Inspector of Buildings I would report 
that there has been a ready response to the requirements 
of the law relative to fire-escapes. Several have been 
already applied and plans have been drawn for others. 
In several instances conditions in blocks and basements 
have required attention. 

During the month of September I had the pleasure of 
attending the convention of the International Association 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 3J9 

)f Fire Engineers held at New York City, a report of 
vhicli I rendered at that time. 

It was similar to the previous conventions, Vv-ell at- 
;ended and educational, and the privilege afforded me of 
ittending was thoroughly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 

Appropriations. 

Appropriation, $27,175.50 

Resolution, outstanding claims, 2,967.34 

$30,142.84 



Disbursements. 
?*ermanent men, $8,114.00 



i^acations, 


837.40 


ient. Veterans' Association, 


150.00 


^all men. 


9,065.00 


borage. 


1,761.80 


^uel. 


1,044.54 


Lights, 


734.93 


[ncidentals. 


3,891.78 


fforse shoeing. 


490.22 


[iorses purchased. 


910.00 


Sorse hire, 


1,018.10 


Laundry, 


52.00 


Fire alarm. 


796.19 


Supplies, chemical engine, 


46.29 


flose. 


830.60 


Water, 


119.50 


House man, 


100.00 


Penacook fire alarm, 


180.49 




$30,142.84 



320 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ALARMS. 

Precinct. 

Still. January 1, 11.03 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
burning of pile of old ties under high tension wires on 
B. & M. R. R. line, near uortluvest line of the J. B. Walker 
farm. In order to reach the fire it was necessarj^ to cross 
the farm. Four horses used. Extinguished by Chemical 
Compan3^ No loss. 

Still. January 2, 4.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. G. Libby, 45 West Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. January 3, 8.24 p. ni. Chimney fire in residencv^ 
of Z. Farmanian, 193 North State Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 4, 9.49 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Frances Nichols, 9 Perry Avenue. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 7.46 a. m. Slight fire back of stove 
in residence of R. P. Sanborn, 54 Washington Street. 
Chemical Company responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. Caused by overheated stove. Loss, trifling. 

Box 14. January 7, 4.47 p. m. Fire in residence 157 
Rumford Street, owned and occupied by Philip Freo. 
Caused by child breaking lantern. Thirteen hundred feet 
of hose wet. Recall, 6.03 p. m. 

Value. Lo^s. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $200.00 .$100.00 None. None. 

Contents, 200.00 150.00 None. None. 

Still. January 8, 6.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. 0. Carpentier, 26 West Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 9, 12.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 321 

dence of John Winnestrom, 145 North Main Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 10, 6.36 a. m. Reported chimney fire 
in residence of B. A. Kimball, 44 South Main Street. 
Chemical Company responded but no assistance was re- 
(juired. No fire. 

Still. January 25, 7.03 p. m. Reported fire on roof 
of freight depot, R. R. Square. Chemical Company re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No fi.re. 

Box 5. January 29, 3.17 a. m. Fire in old repair shop 
B. & M. R. R. yard southeast of passenger station. Cause 
inknoAvn. Nineteen hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Re- 
3all, 5.55 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $14,000.00 $500.00 $1,300.00 $500.00 

Box 55. January 29, 3.19 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Needless alarm. 

Still. January 29, 9.19 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
ieuce of Miss A. M. ]\Ioulton, 33 Washington Street. Ex- 
;iuguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 12.14 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
ience of Walter Hanson, 58 High Street. Extinguished 
3y Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. January 31, 3.53 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
ience of Frank Woods, 29 Tremont Street. Extinguished 
3y Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 55. February 1, 5.10 a. m. Slight fire in sand 
lOuse in B. & j\I. R. R. yard, opposite Chandler Street. 
Clause unknown. Six hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Re- 
iall, 5.49 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $10.00 $2,000.00 None. 

Still. February 2, 8.41 a. m. Fire in Bowers' Block, 
5-4-6 Warren Street. See next alarm. 

21 



322 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 25. February 2, 8.43 a. m. Box pulled for pre- i 
ceding fire. Building owned by Harry P. Bowers and I 
occupied by owner as saloon; Frank J. Babineau, barber i 
shop ; George N. Fellows, Mrs. Sophia W. Sanborn, Ernest | 
T. Hebert and E. I. "Wd;herbee as residences. Fire j 
originated in basement from an overheated smoke pipe. | 
Twenty-three hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 11.16 ' 
a. m. Detail left for four hours. j 



Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, $15,000.00 


$4,706.69 $10,000.00 


$4,706.69 


Contents : 








H. P. Bowers, 6,000.00 


2,570.79 


4,000.00 


2,570.79 


F. J. Babineau, 500.00 


148.00 


300.00 


148.00 


G. N. Fellows, 500.00 


263.30 


500.00 


263.30 


Mrs.S.W.Sanborn, 400.00 


200.00 


None. 


None. 


E. F. Hebert, 700.00 


670.00 


700.00 


670.00 


E. I. Wetherbee, 1,000.00 


100.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. February 5, 6.49 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Louis N. Derry, 14 Fremont Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 412, February 5, 11.36 p. m. Fire in brick building 
in rear of 24 Fayette Street, owned by Mrs. Carrie Dyke 
and occupied by Dr. C. E. Burehsted as a stable and animal 
hospital. Eight valuable dogs perished. Residence, 24 
Fayette Street, owaied and occupied by Mrs. Carrie Dyke, 
slightly damaged. Cause of fire unknown. Seventeen 
hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 1.13 a. m., 6th inst. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Buildings : 
Hospital, $2,500.00 $600.00 $300.00 $300.00 

Residence, 3,000.00 12.50 2,000.00 12.50 

Contents : 
Hospital, 3,000.00 2,000.00 450.00 217.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 323 

Still. February 6, 4.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Nellie Callahan, 49 Washington Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 8.26 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. H. S. Willcox, 286 Pleasant Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 9, 10.08 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Dennis Sweeney, 250 North Main Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 9, 8.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. J. Dooning, 7 Water Street Extension. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 53. February 9, 8.53 p. m. Fire in residence 50 
Hall Street, owned by Joseph Eastman and occupied by 
E. M. Nutting. Caused by overheated stove. Two hundred 
feet of hose wet. Recall, 10.03 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,400.00 


$510.00 


$1,000.00 


$510.00 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


315.00 


1,000.00 


315.00 



Still. February 10, 8.47 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of 0. Pareglis, 14 Perkins Court. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 9.21 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. F. Thayer, 115 School Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. » 

Still. February 11, 7.27 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. J. H. Cox, 147 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 12, 11.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Christo Meamos, 7 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 13, 12.19 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. S. Monroe, 8 Sexton Avenue. Chemical Com- 



324 CITY OF CONCORD. 

pany being in service, Kearsarge wagon sent with detail. 
No loss. 

Box 55. February 14, 2.01 a. m. Slight fire on roof of 
sand house in B. & M. R. R. yard opposite Chandler Street. 
Caused by spark from locomotive. Needless alarm. Re- 
call, 2.23 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $5.00 $2,000.00 None. 

Still. February 16, 8.48 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of P. A. Murphy, 108 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 42. February 18, 2.23 a. m. Slight fire in resi- 
dence 21 Concord Street, owned by John Roach and oc- 
cupied by J. Lucier. Caused by roomer smoking in bed. 
One hundred fifty feet of hose wet, but no water used in 
building. Recall, 3.43 a. m. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. Loss, trifling. 

Still. February 18, 12.54 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. B. Lemay, 8 North Spring Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 18, 4.56 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Patrick Garvigan, 3 Waverly Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 3.03 p. m. Slight fire on roof of 
residence «25 Perley Street, owned by E. H. Farrar and 
occupied by F. A. French. Caused by sparks from chimney. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. February 19, 3.57 p. m. Chimney fire in tele- 
phone stock room, Durgin Street. Chemical Company re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. February 23, 3.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. E. Senter, 9 Marshall Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 325 

Still. February 23, 6.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of S. E. Baker, 6 North Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 25, 2.42 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Henry Batchelder, 25 Pierce Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 25, 6.35 p. m. Chimney fire in grocery 
store 226 North Main Street, occupied by H. H. Chamber- 
lin. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 25, 8.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. S. Carleano, 20 "Walker Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 10.08 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Soucy, 91 South Main Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 7.35 p. m. Slight fire in residence 
9 Hanover Street, owned and occupied by Miss Emma Os- 
good. Caused by legs slipping out from under stove, allow- 
ing it to tip over. Chemical Company responded but no 
assistance was required. Extinguished by occupant. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $1,000.00 $5.00 $500.00 $5.00 

Box 43. March 4, 1.48 a. m. Fire in residence 9 Fayette 
Street, owned by Mrs. E. J. Knee and occupied by Frank 
C. Bickford. Fire originated in wooden ash barrel in base- 
ment, probably from hot ashes. Three hundred feet of 
hose wet, but no water used in building. Extinguished 
with chemicals. Eecall, 2.21 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$3,500.00 


$207.00 


$3,000.00 


$207.00 


Contents, 


1,200.00 


35.00 


600.00 


35.00 



Still. March 5, 6.08 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 



326 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of W. E. Merrill, 59 Perley Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 5.25 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Moran, 127 Warren Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 10. 9.04 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at Rumford Printing Plant, Depot Street. Chem- 
ical Company responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. March 11, 11.23 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. F. Hannaford, 11 Jackson Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 13, 5.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Peter Millette, 9 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 18, 1.59 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
22 Elm Street, owned by Hon. Wm. ]\I. Chase and occupied 
by W. C. White. Extinguished by detail from Central 
Station. Loss, trifling. 

Still. March 18, 9.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Murphy, 23 Concord Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Company. No loss. 

Still. March 23, 12.06 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Steele, 163 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. March 28, 1.31 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Frances Nichols, 9 Perry Avenue. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 2, 8.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
0. K. Snell, 108 Clinton Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. April 2, 4.14 p. m. Fire in hollow tree near resi- 
dence of Gen. J. N. Patterson, 35 Penaeook Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 



FIEE DEPARTMENT. 327 

Still. April 2, 5.23 p. m. Same as preceding fire. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 2, 8.44 p. m. Chimney fire in restaurant 
of G. N. Nardini, 6 North Main Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. On way to preceding fire one 
man with pony extinguisher was left at wine store of Jacobs 
Brothers, Depot Street, to extinguish fire on awning. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $5,000.00 $6.50 $4,500.00 $6.50 

Box 49. April 2, 10.08 p. m. Fire in residence 72 West 
Street, owned by Mrs. Hannah V. Bell and occupied by 
Keuben Cohen. Cause unknown. Two hundred and fifty 
feet of hose wet but no water used in the building. Ex- 
tinguished with chemicals. Recall, 10.31 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$2,000.00 


$22.86 


$1,600.00 


$22.86 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


100.00 


1,000.00 


100.00 



No alarm. April 3, 1.45 a. m. Fire in residence 20 
Bradley Street, owned and occupied by Thomas J. Degnan. 
Caused by clothes hanging too near stove. Extinguished 
by occupants. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,000.00 


$13.50 


$500.00 


$13.50 


Contents, 


500.00 


6.00 


200.00 


6.00 



Still, April 3, 10.43 p. m. Fire in residence 1 Mar- 
shall Street, owned by H. Thompson and occupied by John 
Breen. Caused by overheated smoke pipe. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $75.00 $1,400.00 $75.00 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. April 4, 9.28 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
A. M. Gerry, 10 Pierce Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. April 7, 8.19 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
George Denning, 3 Cottage Court. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 7, 9.10 p. m. Same location as preceding 
fire. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 8, 10.32 a. m. Grass fire rear of residence 
244 North Main Street. Chemical Company responded but 
no assistance was required. Extinguished by railroad men. 
No loss. 

Still. April 8, 11.40 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Eobert Dyment, 141/2 Lyndon Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. • 

Still. April 10, 9.45 a. m. Reported chimney at Elks" 
Home, 170 North Main Street. Chemical Company re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. April 11, 12.05 a. m. Reported chimney fire at 
Aldine Stable, Durgin Street. Chemical Company re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. April 11, 1.24 p. m. Chimney fire in N. E. Tel. 
& Tel. Co. stock room, Durgin Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 35. April 14, 6.49 a. m. Fire in basement of build- 
ing 1 Pleasant Street Extension, owned by Mrs. Nancy 
Dutton and occupied by J. H. Elliott as pool room, cigar 
store, etc. Caused by flare-back from heater while being 
fired. Eleven hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 7.31 a. m. 
Janitor removed from building in semi-conscious condition 
before alarm was given. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


$180.00 


$2,000.00 


$180.00 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


200.00 


1,200.00 


200.00 



K FIRE DEPARTMENT. 329 

Still, April 15, 10.44 a. m. Fire in tar shed owned 
and occupied by N. H. State Hospital. Located east of 
South Fruit Street. Caused by boiling over of tar kettle. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. Loss, trifling. 

Still. April 18, 11.34 a. m. Grass fire on W. H. 
Thayer lot on Liberty Street side. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 7.04 p. m. Chimne}^ fire in residence 
of H. R. Burleigh, 24 Allison Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 20, 3.17 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Bert Young, 73 Dunklee Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 3.13 p. m. Grass fire opposite 6 Dunk- 
lee Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No 
loss. 

Still. April 21, 10.25 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of T. P. Davis, 21 Monroe Street. Extinguished by Chemi- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. April 24, 3.40 p. m. Brush fire on Rumford 
Street, north of the Dunstane stone shed. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 414. April 25, 3.29 p. m. Fire in residence 1 
Cottage Court, owned by George A. Foster and occupied 
by Arthur M. Palmer. Caused by child playing with 
matches. Seventeen hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 4.10 
p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,500.00 


$220.00 


$1,000.00 


$220.00 


Contents, 


750.00 


200.00 


500.00 


200.00 



Still. April 26, 2.40 p. m. Brush fire corner of Rum- 
ford and Penacook Streets. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 



330 CITY OF CONCORD. 

H. F. Paul, 114 South Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 27, 4.40 p. m. Brush fire northwest of j 
junction of Ridge Road and Forest Street, near the W. F. i 
Thayer lot. Detail from the department under command 
of Engineer W. eT. Coffin sent. No loss. Labored one and I 
one-half hours. 

Still. April 27, 7.04 p. m. Brush fire north of Pena- 
cook and west of Rumford Streets, on so-called Stone | 
Crusher Road. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No 
loss. 

Still. April 28, 11.37 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. C. Jones, 59 Clinton Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Still. April 30, 11.04 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of Mrs. H. L. Wood, 6 Liberty Street. 
Chemical Company responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. Back draft. No fire. No loss. 

Still. April 30, 12.14 p. m. Brush fire north of Pena- 
cook and west of Rumford Streets on so-called Stone 
Crusher Road. Extinguished by Chemical Company. No 
loss. 

4-4-4. May 2, 10.12 a. m. Brush fire on the Plains, on 
land owned by Caleb Little. Detail from the department 
sent under command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. Needless 
alarm. No loss. 

Still. May 2, 8.12 p. m. Brush fire on Call Street. 
Detail sent in automobile with pony extinguishers. No 
loss. 

Still. May 3, 7.37 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Miss Lizzie Mclntire, 77 School Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. May 3, 11.54 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at 166 North Main Street. Chemical Company 
responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 331 

Still. May 3, 12.32 p. m. Chimney fire reported in 
residence of F. B. Hobbs, 64 Centre Street. Chemical 
Company responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. May 3, 1.46 p. m. Brush fire on city lot near 
Penacook Lake. Detail and extinguishers sent from Central 
Station in auto. No loss. 

Still. May 4, 2.04 p. in. Brush fire at Abbotville, West 
Concord, reported to be near houses. Detail and ex- 
tinguishers sent in auto. Needless alarm. See West Con- 
cord report. 

Still. May 6, 10.30 a. m. Fire in Broadway dump 
below Rollins Park. Chemical Company responded and 
succeeded in stopping it at the edge of brush land, after 
svhich a call was sent in for assistance in extinguishing the 
main fire. 

Still. May 6, 10.45 a. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Detail and 200 feet of hose sent 
in chief's buggy. Line of hose laid and Chemical Com- 
pany dismissed. 

Still. May 6, 7.30 a. m. Reserve hose wagon and 
mother detail sent to preceding fire. Another line of hose 
[aid. Four hundred fifty feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. jNIay 6, 11.35 a. m. Chimney fire reported in 
•esidence of Caroline Rogers, 5 Green Street. Detail sent 
:rom Central Station but no assistance was required. No 
ire. 

Still. May 6, 6.15 p. m. A call to investigate cause of 
imoke at 144 North Main. Chemical Company responded 
mt no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. May 6, 6.30 p. m. Fire in Broadway dump. De- 
ail sent with reserve hose wagon. Four hundred feet of 
lose wet. No loss. 

Still. May 7, 5.08 a. m. Chimnev fire in residence of 



332 CITY OF CONCORD. 

N. Pichette, 26 Prospect Street. Extinguished by Cliemi- ' 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. May 1, 10.49 a. m. Brush fire near the Mercer i 
and Willcox residences, Pleasant Street. Extinguished ' 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 7, 10.52 a. m. Alarm given for preceding-i 
fire. Before barge was ready to leave the station word was 
received that the fire was under control and it was not 
sent. $ 

Still. May 8, 6.53 p. m. Chimney fire in residence ot 
F. B. Gilmore, 17 Centre Street. Chemical Company re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 9, 10.12 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. Moore, 62 North Spring Street. Chemical Company 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 11, 10.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Proctor, 11 Holt Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Compam^ No loss. 

Still. May 11, 5.32 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. 0. N. Davis, 20 Chestnut Street. Extinguished by 
ChemJcal Company. No loss. 

Box 17. 'May 11, 11.06 p. m. Fire in waste barrel in 
rear of building corner of Washington and North Spring 
Streets, owned by the William G. Mason Association and 
occupied by the People's Market. Side of building 
scorched. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall, 11.25 p. m. 

Value. Loss. lusurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $6,000.00 .$10.00 None. None. 

Still. May 13, 12.28 p. m. Slight fire on deck of dry 
bridge on Water Street near gas house. Caused probably 
from spark from locomotive. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Box 191. May 13, 1.12 p. m. Fire in chicken coop in 



I 



FraE DEPARTMENT. 333 

ear of 39 Auburn Street, owned and occupied by James 
Jurbeck. Caused by kerosene lamp attached to brooder. 

Sxtinguished with chemicals. Recall, 1.30 p. m. 

j 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $8.00 $8.00 None. None. 

Still. May 15, 8.34 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
I. A. Roby, 7 Summer Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Dompany. No loss. 

Still. May 17, 11.20 a. m. Fire in ash barrel in rear 
)f 47 Green Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
>To loss. 

j Still. May 17, 1.49 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Charles Byrne, 11 Washington Street. Extinguished by 
phemical Company. No loss. 

j .Still. May 17, 4.55 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
3f smoke in Concord Hall, 97 North Main Street. Chemical 
Company responded but no assistance v/as required. Back 
draft. No loss. 

i Still. May 18, 11.09 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Ehvin L. Page, 12 Court Street. Chemical Company 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 20, 2.34 p. m. Chimney fixre in residence of 
H. A. Bragg, 20 Stone Street, Extinguished by Chemical 
Company, No loss, 

} Still, May 20, 5.37 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 24 
South Spring Street. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 
No loss. 

' Still. May 21, 4.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
W. King, 40 Concord Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company, No loss. 

Still. May 27, 8.13 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. A. Bicknor, 8 Pierce Street. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 



;-j34: CITY OF CONCORD, 

Still. May 30, 12.50 p. m. Brush fire in rear of build- 
ing on Rockingham Street, between Bow Street and Broad- 
way. Chemical Company responded and succeeded in keep- 
ing it away from buildings, but it covered such an area 
that it was deemed prudent to summon assistance. No loss. 
Still. May 30, 1.34 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Eagle Avagon sent and tw^o lines 
laid, one from Rockingham Street and the other from 
Broadway. Five hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. No 
loss. 

Still. June 1, 9.58 p. m. Alarm occasioned by burn- 
ing of large pile of brush on city dump near crematory. 
Chemical Company responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. No loss. 

Still, June 2, 6.54 p. m. Slight fire in flooring of 
lower bridge. Water Street. Caused probably by cigarette 
stub thrown from automobile. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. 

Box 3. June 2, 7.17 p. m. Slight fire in north end of 
old repair shop, B. & M. R. R. yard. Cause unknown. 
Six hundred fifty feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. June 3, 6.35 a. m. Reported chimney fire at 44 
Ferry Street. Chemical Company responded. No fire. 

Still. June 3, 9.31 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. R. Brew, 44 Perley Street. Extinguished by detail from 
Central Station. No loss. 

Still. June 3, 12.03 p. m. Residence, barn and shed 
on Weston Street, Plains District, owned by Mrs. Sumner 
Thompson and occupied by W. H. Ash and E. A. Ash de- 
stroyed. Cause unknown. As there is no water on the 
plains and the wind was blowing a gale, the buildings 
were doomed at the outset. Chemical Company responded 
but could do little outside of protecting surrounding 
buildings. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 335 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $1,500.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Contents : 

W. H. Ash, 500.00 500.00 None. None. 

E. A. Ash, 400.00 400.00 None. None. 

Still. June 8, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 

F. E. Woods, 34 Thompson Street. Extinguished by detail 
from Central Station, No loss. 

4-4-4. June 9, 10.23 a. m. Brush fire South Pembroke 
Street, Plains. Detail from the department sent under 
command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. Labored one hour. 
Detail left to watch. No loss. 

Still. June 11, 1.10 p. m. Set of buildings on the 
Hopkinton Road owned and occupied by Frank G. Proctor 
destroyed. Cause unknown. As these buildings were far 
removed from fire protection and the wind blowing a 
gale, nothing could be done to save them. A detail with 
pony extinguishers was immediately sent by automobile and 
the Chemical Company followed as soon as extra horses 
could be procured. Upon arrival, however, the Frank W. 
Paige buildings located some one thousand feet southeast 
of the Proctor buildings and on the other side of the road 
had been fired by flying brands and were beyond saving, 
the department losing two extinguishers, axe, and roof 
ladder in the attempt. From here the fire leaped through 
the fields into the woods, endangering houses near Turkey 
River, and at 2 p. m. Kearsarge engine and Eagle wagon 
were sent for and an alarm given at the St. Paul's School 
calling out the firemen of that institution. At 2.22 p. m. 
the brush fire alarm was ordered given in the city and 
details were sent out in automobiles. Residence some one 
hundred and fifty feet south of the Proctor buildings, 
owned by the Kate Flint Estate and occupied by Miss Har- 
riet Kimball, slightly damaged on roof while the Smith 



336 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



buildings directly opposite the Proctor buildings escaped 
all loss. 

Still. June 11, 2 p. m. See alarm, 1.10 p. m., same 
date. 

4-4-4. June 11, 2.22 p. m. See alarm, 1.10 p. m., same 
date. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Buildings : 

F. G. Proctor, $2,000.00 $2,000.00 $800.00 $800.00 

P. W. Paige, 7,000.00 7,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Kate Flint Est., 3,000.00 18.50 2,400.00 18.50 

Contents : 

F. G. Proctor, 700.00 500.00 200.00 175.00 

F. W. Paige, 1,600.00 1,000.00 None. None. 

City, 45.00 45.00 None. None. 



Too much praise cannot be accorded the St. Paul's School 
boys for the assistance rendered by them throughout this 
fire. 

Still. June 14, 7.22 a. m. Fire in residence 210 Pleas- 
ant Street, owned and occupied by 0. K. Dexter. Fire 
originated in clothes closet from some unknown cause. 
Chemical Company responded but before arrival a bell 
alarm had been sent in. 

Box 37. June 14, 7.24 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Eleven hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 8.23 
a. m. 



Building, 
Contents, 



Value. 

$8,000.00 
3,000.00 



Loss. 



Insurance. 



Ins. paid. 



$1,350.00 $4,500.00 $1,350.00 
402.00 1,500.00 402.00 



Still. June 16, 8.11 p. m. Slight fire in Nardini's 
restaurant, 6 North Main Street. Fire originated in rags 
on boiler. Chemical Company responded but no assistance 
M^as required. Extinguished by employees. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 337 

Still. June 23, 8.07 a. m. Fire in box car used as 
refuse ear in B. & M. R. R. yard, opposite Depot Street. 
See next alarm. 

Box 5. June 23, 8.08 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Four hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 9.37 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Car, $500.00 $100.00 $200.00 $100.00 

Still. June 23, 6.03 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in basement of 9 Capitol Street. Chemical Com- 
pany responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

4-4-4. June 28, 12.06 p. m. Brush fire in city lot, 
Penacook Lake. Detail from the department sent under 
Bommand of Engineer S. T. Ford. Labored three hours. 

Still. June 28, 12.41 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Kearsarge engine and reserve reel 
sent. Engine worked two hours. Loss, trifling. 

Still. June 30, 11.28 a. m. Fire in dump on Bridge 
Street near crematory. Chemical Company responded but 
the fire had worked so far underneath the surface that a 
bydrant line was necessary. 

Still. June 30, 11.45 a. m. A call for assistance from 
the scene of preceding fire. Reserve reel, reserve wagon, 
and Eagle wagon sent and line laid. Sixteen hundred fifty 
feet of hose wet. No loss. 

4-4-4. June 30, 12.12 p. m. Brush fire near the Ports- 
mouth bridge. Detail from the department sent under 
command of Engineer S. T. Ford. Labored four hours. 
Cause unknown. This was the beginning of a brush fire 
rrhich burned until the evening of July 5, when rain came 
as a relief. In the meantime details were kept on duty 
night and day and as occasion required assistance was 
rushed to the scene from the city. Before it was ex- 

22 



338 CITY OP CONCORD. 

tinguished it had crossed the Garvin's Falls Road, en- 
dangering buildings, but by hard work these were saved. 
No loss. 

Still. June 30, 1.18 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Exchange Block, 96 North Main Street. Chem- 
ical Company responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

4-4-4. June 30, 9.49 p. m. Continuation of the Ports- 
month bridge brush fire. Detail from the department sent 
under command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. Labored three 
hours. 

Box 23. July 1, 1.16 a. m. Fire in the building owned 
and occupied by the N. E. Granite Works north of Ferry 
Street and east of the Northern Railroad tracks. Cause 
unknown. Three thousand fifty feet of house wet. Re- 
call, 4.49 a. m. Several cars owned by B. & M. R. R. 
scorched. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$7,100.00 


$3,900.00 


$7,100.00 


$3,900.00 


Contents, 


20,700.00 


4,271.48 


20,700.00 


4,271.48 



4-4-4. July 1, 10.52 a. m. Continuation of brush fire 
near the Portsmouth bridge. Detail from the department 
sent under command of Engineer S. T. Ford. Labored 
seven hours. 

4-4-4. July 1, 1.04 p. in. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Detail from the department sent. 
Labored four hours. 

Still. July 1, 1.09 p. m. Another call for help from 
scene of preceding fire, which at this time had reached the 



Garvin's Falls Road, endangering the Passaconaw^ay Club 
buildings. Chemical Company responded, four horses be- 
ing used to make the run. Buildings saved by ploughing 
and back firing. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 339 

Box 55. July 1, 8.40 p. m. Slight fire in empty oil bar- 
rels east of round-house, B. & M. R. R. yard. Cause un- 
known. Extinguished by employees. Seven hundred 
5fty feet of hose wet. Recall, 9.03 p. m. No loss. 

4-4-4. July 2, 1.40 p. m. Passaconaway Club buildings 
igain in danger from the Garvin's Falls brush fire. Detail 
jent from the department under command of Engineer W. 
T. Coffin. Labored five hours. City spraying machine also 
jcnt over but was not used. 

Still. July 2, 2.43 p. m. Alarm occasioned by kettle 
)f fat in oven of gas stove taking fire in the residence of 
Siobert Tucker, 6 Allison Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
cal Company. No loss. 

Still. July 3, 3.40 p. m. A call for ladders and ex- 
inguishers from the patrol on duty on the Garvin's Falls 
■oad. Fire alarm ladder gig and ponies sent by auto. 

Still. July 3, 3.55 p. m. Slight brush fire north of 
Bridge Street near public bath. Extinguished by detail 
Tom Central Fire Station. No loss. 

Still. July 4, 11.38 a. m. Fire in residence 6 Winter 
Street, owned and occupied by J. N. Bluto. Cause un- 
mown. See next alarm. 

Box 21. July 4, 11.41 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
ire as a precautionary measure. Extinguished Avith chem- 
cals. Recall, 12.04 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,500.00 


$86.00 


$1,000.00 


$86.00 


Contents, 


1,000.00 


82.00 


500.00 


82.00 



Still. July 4, 4.07 p. m. A call for a small detail from 
;he patrol on duty at the Garvin's Falls Road brush fire. 
Detail sent by electric car. 

Still. July 4, 8.18 p. m. Grass fire in rear of residence 
^5 Franklin, Street. Chemical Company responded but 



340 CITY OF CONCORD. 

no assistance was required. Extinguished by neighbors 
No loss. 

Still. July 7, 12.28 p. m. Slight fire on roof of build 
ing 2 Montgomery Street, owned by Mrs. A. W. Hil 
Caused by spark from chimney. See next alarm. 

Box 24. July 7, 12.30 p. m. Box pulled for precedin 
fire as a precautionary measure. No water used. Recal 
12.57 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. pai( 

Building, $3,000.00 $6.00 $2,500.00 $6.0 

4-4-4. July 7, 9.39 p. m. Brush- fire on Plains, east o 
South Pembroke Street and south of camp grounds. Detai 
from the department sent under command of Engineer V^ 
J. Coffin. No assistance was required. Extinguished b; 
nearby residents. 

Still. July 7, 11.02 p. m. Chimney fire in residenc 
of A. F. Cheney, 79 Rumford Street. Extinguished b: 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. July 8, 2.20 p. m. Brush fire on Plains, east o 
South Pembroke Street and south of camp grounds. Detai 
from the department sent under command of Engineer S 
T. Ford. Labored three hours. This was the beginniu' 
of another dangerous fire, as numerous buildings stood ii 
its path, which extended over an area of four miles ir 
length and of width varying from three-quarters of i 
mile to a mile and a half. Fanned by a gale it raged unti 
the morning of the 10th inst., when rain came as a tem- 
porary relief. Patrol duty was kept up day and night 
Back fires were set around the buildings and in some in- 
stances ploughing was resorted to. As occasion required, 
help was rushed to the scene from the city. No buildingf= 
were destroyed, which was regarded as remarkably fortu- 
nate. Some hay which lay in the fields was burned but 



PffiE DEPARTMENT. 341 

probably would not exceed three tons, the grasshoppers 
having taken care of the rest before it was cut. 

4-4-4. July 9, 12.46 p. m. Continuation of preceding 
fire. Detail from the department sent under command of 
Engineer W. J. Coffin. Labored eight hours. 

4-4-4. July 9, 2.35 p. m. Additional detail sent to scene 
of preceding fire in response to a call for help. Labored 
eight hours. 

Still. July 9, 3.45 p. m. Continuation of preceding 
fire. Stearns building on the Loudon Road in danger. 
Chemical Company sent, four horses being used to make 
the run. The arrival of this contingent was most timely. 

Still. July 9, 4.16 p. m. Another call for help from 
the scene of the Plains brush fire. An alarm was ordered 
given at East Concord and a detail taken over in the 
Suburban Transit Company's auto. Labored four hours, 
when a brush fire in its own district compelled the return 
of the detail. 

Still. July 9, 4.20 p. m. A call for ladders from same 
brush fire. Prentiss buildings in danger. Ladders sent 
3n fire alarm gig attached to auto. 

4-4-4. July 9, 9.36 p. m. This alarm was given that the 
ietail responding at 12.46 p. m. might be relieved. Detail 
Prom the department sent to State Fire Warden D. J. 
A.dams. Labored six hours when rain came, which, while 
aot putting the fire completely out, relieved the situation 
greatly. 

4-4-4. July 10, 2.40 p. m. Brush fire on city lot. West 
Iloncord. Detail from the department sent under command 
)f Engineer S. T. Ford. Labored five hours. 

Still. July 10, 4.45 p. m. A call for help from scene 
)f preceding fire. Kearsarge engine, reserve reel, and re- 
lerve wagon sent. Seven hundred feet of hose wet. Engine 
worked one and one-half hours. Loss, trifling. 



342 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. July 11, 10.50 a. m. Plains brush fire re-kindled. 
Extinguished by small detail sent in auto. 

Still. July 12, 10.55 a. m. Plains brush fire reported 
as burning again. Small detail sent in auto. This fire was 
found to be four hundred feet from the edge of the former 
fire. Evidently set. Detail succeeded in extinguishing it 
with pony extinguishers. 

Still. July 13, 2.42 p. m. Grass fire east of railroad 
tracks opposite Thorndike Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Box 51. July 13, 10.09 p. m. Fire in old cars in B. & 
M. R. R. yard below new shops. As it was the intention to 
burn these cars the next day, wdien there would have been 
plenty of men to take care of them, the loss was nothing. 
Six hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 10.37 p. m. 

Still. July 14, 7.38 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Isaac Bushey, South Street below^ Rollins Park. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. July 14, 9.25 a. m. Fire in wooden ash barrel 
in rear of residence 36 Mills Street. Shed slightly 
scorched. Extinguished by Chemical Company. Loss, 
trifling. 

Still. July 15, 2 p. m. Chimney fire in Priscilla Block, 
8 South Main Street. Extinguished by Chemical Com- 
pany, No loss. 

Still. July 16, 7.45 p. m. Fire in dump, Bridge Street. 
Chemical Company responded but could do nothing. 
Highway department left man to watch during the night. 

Still. July 17, 10.15 a. m. Fire in dump. Bridge 
Street. Kearsarge wagon, reserve reel and reserve wagon 
sent. As a line was being laid word was received from 
the highway department that the spraying machine with 
detail was on the way to take care of it. Fire department 
apparatus dismissed. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 343 

Still. July 20, 11.00 a. m. Fire in dump, Bridge 
Street. Kearsarge engine and reserve wagon with detail 
sent. Engine worked four hours. Five hundred feet of 
hose wet. No loss. 

Still. July 20, 1.45 p. m. Grass fire reported as burn- 
ing east of railroad tracks opposite Thorndike Street. 
Chemical Company responded but could find no fire. 

Box 56. July 24, 2.59 p. m. Set of buildings o"\vned 
and occupied by Forrest E. White destroyed. These 
buildings were located on the Fiske Road far from fire 
protection. Cause of fire unknown. Ten hundred fifty 
feet of hose wet by mistake, the end being out of sight 
of the hydrant man. This amount of hose w^as about half 
of the amount which would have been required to reach 
the buildings, besides running up a very steep hill. Taking 
into consideration the fact that the buildings were 
located some three miles from the city, the uselessness of 
laying a complete line became apparent. Recall, 4.44 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Buildings, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

Contents, 800.00 50.00 200.00 50.00 

Still. July 29, 11.37 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Leo Mills, 7 Hutchinson Avenue. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. July 31, 12.40 p. m. A call for assistance from 
West Concord. Barn full of hay burning near the John 
Swenson granite sheds. Eagle wagon sent but on arrival 
it was found that the Cataract Company had the situation 
well in hand and the apparatus was not used. See West 
Concord report. 

Still. August 2, 12.55 p. m. Fire on roof of shed used 
[or storage purposes, owmed and occupied by John Coburn. 
Building located on north side of Penacook Street east of 



344 CITY OF CONCORD. 

pumping station. Caused by spark from locomotive. 
Chemical Company responded. Before arrival a bell alarm 
was sent in. 

Box 15. August 2, 12.58 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Six hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 1.17 
p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $300.00 $30.00 $200.00 $30.00 

Still. August 2, 3.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Adams, 4 Foster Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 

Box 25. August 3, 4.59 a. m. Fire in garage rear of 90 
North IMain Street, owned by the Franklin Low estate 
and occupied by Nelson Braley. Caused probably by 
leaky gasoline tank. Five hundred feet of hose wet. Ee- 
call, 5.40 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $300.00 $100.00 None. None. 

Contents, 600.00 500.00 None. None. 

Still. August 4, 4.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Spene, 11 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. August 6, 5.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Moses Rosendale, 27 Jackson Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. August 7, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Seymour, 43 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. August 18, 7.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Nora Forty, 19 Prince Street. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 345 

4-4-4. August 21, 11.46 a. m. Brush fire on the Plains 
lear residence of Mrs. Fleming Mozee. This was the be- 
yinuing of another exceedingly dangerous fire, numerous 
louses lying in its path and a southerly gale prevailing. 
^Vhile by night it had been hemmed in by back fires and 
ill buildings saved, it was far from safe to leave and 
nen were kept on duty until midnight of the 22d inst., 
vhen rain came. Estimated area of ground swept by fire, 
L,500 acres. Loss, unknown. Detail responding to this 
darm under command of Engineer S. T. Ford. 
. 4-4-4. August 21, 1.05 p. m. A call for assistance from 
;cene of preceding fire. Another barge and detail imme- 
liately sent. 

Still. August 21, 2.35 p. m. A call for the Chemical 
Company from scene of preceding fire. Immediately sent, 
:our horses being required to make the run. 

Still. August 21, 2.40 p. m. Another call for assist- 
mce. Twelve men sent in autos. 

Still. August 22, 1.19 p. m. Fire on roof of the N. E. 
jranite Works shed, north of Ferry Street. Caused from 
ipark from hoisting engine. Chemical Company responded 
)ut no assistance was required. Estinguished by employees. 
L/oss, trifling. 

Still. September 5, 9.06 p. m. Fire in box car in rail- 
road yard near freight house. Car loaded with refuse. 
I^ause unknown. Loss unknown. Extinguished by Chem- 
cal Company. 

Still. September 10, 10.46 a. m. Chimney fire in brick 
Dlock 144 North Main Street, owned by Mrs. Carolyn 
Stickney and occupied in part by G. H. Hunter as residence. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $40,000.00 $15.00 $25,000.00 $15.00 



346 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 13. September 13, 5.30 p. in. Slight fire in resi- 
dence 50 Franklin Street, owned and occupied by Joseph 
H. Ford. Caused by child, matches, and lace curtainsj 
Extinguished by occupants. Recall, 5.36 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,800.00 


$15.00 


$1,500.00 


$15.00 


Contents, 


600.00 


20.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. September 14, 6.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi-i 
dence of Rev. I. W. Sherr, 4 Pierce Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. September 15, 9.56 a. m. Chimney fire in un- 
occupied residence, 83 Centre Street. Painters at work' 
in building built fire in stove. Extinguished by Chemical 
Company. No loss. - 

Still. September 16, 6.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi-] 
dence of Joseph Germann, 98 Rumford Street. Ex-j 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. September 16, 7.44 p. m. Chimney fire in car- 
penter shop owned and occupied by C. H. Swain & Co., 
26 Bridge Street. Door forced to obtain entrance. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. Loss, trifling. 

Still. September 23, 9.47 p. m. Slight fire in tree, , 
corner of West and Dakin Streets, caused by an electric '■ 
wire. Chemical Company responded. Needless alarm. 

4-4-4. September 30, 4.12 p. m. A call for assistance 
from "West Concord brush fire. Detail sent in Suburban ' 
Transit Company omnibus. See West Concord report. 

2-2-2. October 2, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Box 14. October 4, 6.03 p. m. Slight fire in residence , 
175 Rumford Street, owned by Mrs. Lucy M. Sargent and ' 
occupied by C. F. Eldridge. Caused by swinging of gas ! 
jet into lace curtains. Recall, 6.14 p. m. 



I 



FIEE DEPARTMENT. 347 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


luilding, 


$1,000.00 


$15.00 


$500.00 


$15.00 


lontents, 


1,000.00 


5.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. October 10, 7.01 p. m. Slight fire in horse shed 
ast of Baptist Church, North State Street. Caused prob- 
bly by children and matches. Extinguished by Chemical 
iomi^any. Loss, trifling. 

Box 413. October 12, 10.44 p. m. Fire in freight sheds 
ivned and occupied by the B. & M. R. E., south of Chandler 
treet. Cause unknown. Eight hundred feet of hose wet. 
recall, 11.32 p. m. Loss, unknown. 

Still. October 14, 10.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
ence of David Webster, 40 Centre Street. Extinguished 

Y Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 11.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
ence of Terrance Byrne, 19 Prince Street. Extinguished 

Y Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 42. October 16, 11.50 p. m. Slight fire in base- 
lent of residence, 48 South State Street, owned by the J. 
nnable estate. Cause, unknown. Six hundred feet of 
ose wet. Recall, 12.14 a. m., 17th inst. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

uilding, $3,500.00 $5.00 $2,500.00 $5.00 

Box 57. October 19, 3.28 p. m. False alarm. Recall, 
50 p. m. By neat detective work on the part of the police 
ilprit arrested and punished October 30. 

Still. October 19, 4.24 p. m. Fire reported in unoc- 
ipied residence 10 South Spring Street. Chemical Com- 
any responded but no assistance was required. Fumi- 
iting. 

Still. October 20, 6.16 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
: George Long, 861/0 North Spring Street. Extinguished 

Y Chemical Company. No loss. 



348 CITY OF CONCORD. j 

I 

Still. October 22, 4.16 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
smoking of stove in residence 371/2 South Street, owned! 
by J. B. Baker and occupied by E. H. Blossom. Family! 
away and stove left with damper closed. Chemical Com-| 
pany responded, forced door to obtain entrance and opened ' 
dampers. Loss, trifling. 

Still. October 27, 12.37 p. m. Chimney fire in resi-l 
dence of D. "W. Mahoney, 81 Broadway. Extinguished by I 
Chemical Company. No loss. j 

Still. October 30, 6.39 p. m. Chimney fire in residence} 
of Alexander Phillip, 81 Rumford Street. Extinguished! 
by Chemical Company. No loss. I 

Box 24. November 4, 9.04 p. m. Alarm occasioned by I 
chimney fire at 133 North Main Street. Extinguished with! 
chemicals. Recall, 9.33 p. m. No loss. : 

Still. November 5, 1.11 p. m. Fire in pile of old' 
sleepers in B. & M. R. R. yard opposite Depot Street, i 
Chemical Company responded but it was deemed better to' 
lay a line of hose. Chemical Company "dismissed and' 
Kearsarge wagon sent for. See next alarm. j 

Still. November 5, 1.18 p. m. A call for Kearsarge' 
wagon to take place of chemical engine at scene of pre-; 
ceding fire. Two hundred fifty feet of hose wet. No lossA 

Still. November 6, 2.30 p. m. An appeal from Beech 
Hill for help in extinguishing forest fire. Detail sent from 
"West Concord. Caused by owner's employees burning 
sticking in careless manner. Detail labored until night-ij 
fall. Premises patrolled until evening of the 7th inst. 
See West Concord report. ' 

Still. November 7, 2.34 p. m. Brush fire on Auburn-j 
Street north of Franklin Street. As the fire was reported' 
to be in its incipiency and the chemical engine horses; 
were exercising, the chief's buggy with extinguishers was] 
sent. Fire held in check until arrival of Chemical Com-' 
pany. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 349 

Still. November 7, 2.37 p. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Extinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 5. November 9, 3.16 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
a slight fire in closet in roundhouse, B. & J\I. R. R. yard. 
Extinguished by employees before arrival of department. 
Recall, 3.24 a. m. No loss. 

Still. November 9, 11.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Edward Johnson, 41 Hall Street. Extinguished 
by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 9.24 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Everett Mann, 47 Centre Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company, No loss. 

Box 24. November 11, 6.15 a. m. Fire in brick build- 
ing 10-14 Bridge Street. Owned by Frances C. Rand and 
Emily G. Savory and occupied by Dickerman & Company, 
wholesale grocers. Cause, unknown. Thirty-eight hundred 
fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 7.20 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $18,000.00 $254.69 $12,000.00 $254.69 

Contents, 64,000.00 5,250.00 60,000.00 5,250.00 

Still. November 11, 9.30 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke 5 School Street. Chemical Company re- 
sponded. Boiler dampers closed too tight. No fire. 

Still. November 15, 7.56 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. A. Drew, 5 Albin Street. Extinguished by 
Chemical Company. No loss. 

Box 24. November 15, 10.54 a. m. Alarm occasioned 
by child setting fire to a stove full of rubbish which had 
been disconnected from the chimney in the Harry Rudner 
shoe store, 1 Centre Street. Recall, 11.02 a. m. No loss. 

Still. Noveml:>er 24, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Miss F. A. Baker, 70 Warren Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 



350 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 25. November 27, 10.24 p. m. Fire in building h 
rear of 76 North Main Street, owned by the Franklin Lo\ 
Estate and occupied by David E. Murphy for the storag 
and baling of paper. Cause unknown. Eight hundrec 
feet of hose wet. Recall, 11.28 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid 

Building, $800.00 $218.82 $800.00 $218.81 

Contents, 500.00 144.33 500.00 144.3! 

Still. December 3, 12.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi 
dence of E. C. Chapman, 300 Pleasant Street. Ex 
tinguished by Chemical Company. No loss. 

Still. December 6, 7.52 p. m. Slight fire in roof o: 
Ford Foundry Company plant, Ferry Street. Cause, im 
known. Extinguished by Chemical Company. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid 

Building, $4,500.00 $18.53 $3,500.00 $18.5^ 

Box 17. December 8, 9.56 a. m. Fire in wooden build 
ing corner of Beacon and North State Streets, owned b> 
John A. and Thomas S. Pilsbury, and occupied as a garagt 
and upholstering shop by Fred Straw and Fred Clough 
Fire originated in barrel of refuse, probably by careless 
throwing of match into same after lighting pipe, as a mar 
was seen leaving the building smoking and a moment latei 
the alarm was given. Three hundred fifty feet of hose 
wet. Eecall, 10.31 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $500.00 $10.00 $300.00 $10.00 

Still. December 8, 6 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Aaron Turner, 3 Pleasant Street Extension. Ex- 
tinguished by detail from Central Station. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 8.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 351 

ce of Fred Peters, 39 Stone Street. Extinguished by 

ibination Company. No loss. First run for new auto 

bination car which went into commission on the 9th 

., at 4.30 p. m. 

TILL. December 11, 10 a. m. A call to Chadbourne's 

dio, 98 North Main Street, on account of smoke. Com- 

ition Company responded but no assistance was re- 

^ed. No fire. 

TILL. December 13, 11.19 a. m. Slight fire in closet 

residence of H. W. Knee, 95 Franklin Street. Cause 

:nown. Combination Company responded but no assist- 

e was re(iuired. Loss, trifling. 

TILL. December 13, 1.04 p. m. Set of farm buildings 

the North Pembroke Road, owned and occupied" by 

;lla Prentiss destroyed. Cause, defective chimney. 

nily absent at time of discovery. Combination Com- 

ly responded but little could be done except removing 

niture from lower floor of house, there being no water 

liable. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

ilding, $1,500.00 $1,500.00 $600.00 $600.00 

itents, 200.00 200.00 None. None. 

ary Frost, 150.00 50.00 None. None. 

5TILL. December 14, 10.24 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 

wing off of boiler in basement of the John Roach wine 

•m, 131 North Main Street. Combination Company re- 

►nded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

5till. December 17, 11.40 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 

oking stove in residence of Charles B. Tardif, 28 Perley 

'eet. Combination Company responded but no assistance 

s required. No fire. 

Still. December 19, 8.44 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



ods in storage. 



H52 CITY OF CONCORD. 

dence of M. Gossline, 89 "Water Street. Extinguished bj 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 19, 9.16 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank Bartlett, 4 Jackson Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 20, 4.31 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harry Kling, 3 Hammond Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 10.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George B. Lauder, 26 Franklin Street. Combina- 
tion Company resj)onded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

Still. December 22, 2.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. H. Staniels, 21 Hammond Street. Extinguished 
by detail sent with Kearsarge wagon. No losa. 

Still. December 22, 4.18 p. m. Chimney fire in resi-: 
dence of Walter Hackshaw, 36 Mills Street. Extinguished! 
by detail sent with chemical engine. No loss. j 

Still. December 22, 6.11 p. m. Chimney fire in resi-j 
dence of L. J. Metevier, 51 Thorndike Street. Extinguished: 
by detail sent with chemical engine. No loss. I 

Still. December 23, 4.08 p. m. Reported chimney fire; 
in residence 172 North Main Street. Combination Com-I 
pany responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Box 412. December 23, 7.15 p. m. Fire in residence 21,j 
Fayette Street, owned by Norris Duncklee and occupied by:i 
E. J. Leary. Fire originated on top of bureau on second! 
floor, from cause unknown. Three hundred feet of hose 
wet but no water used in building. Recall, 7.32 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paiil 

Building, $4,000.00 $25.00 $3,000.00 $25.00 

Contents, 1,500.00 125.00 1,000.00 125.00' 

Still. December 26, 8.13 a. m. Chimney fire in resi-, 
dence of George Brown, Long Pond Road, near junction 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 353 

Fiske Road. Combination Company responded but at 
e jiinction of Anbnrn and Penaeook Streets tire chain 
ouble developed and by the time repairs were made word 
as received that no assistance was required. The run 
as, therefore, not finished. No loss. 
Still. December 27, 8.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
!nce of W. A. Townes, 8 Mills Street. Extinguished by 
3mbination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 28, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
aice of Levin J. Chase, 30 Sewall's Falls Road. Combina- 
m Company responded but on arrival found that a detail 
om the Cataract Company had the situation well in 
md. See West Concord report. 

Still. December 28, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
snce of John Murphy, 18 South Fruit Street. Combina- 
311 Company being in service a detail was sent with 
earsarge wagon. 

Still. December 28, 9.19 a. m. A call for assistance 
om the scene of preceding fire.. Extinguished by Combi- 
ition Company. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 9.59 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
mce of Mrs. Ella Niles, 47 Centre Street. Extinguished 
r Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 6.41 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
mce of Mrs. Hattie Abbott, 44 Bradley Street. Ex- 
Qguished by Combination Company. No loss. 
Still. December 31, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in the 
eartz restaurant, 16 Warren Street. Detail from the 
entral Station sent. No assistance was required. No loss. 
Still. December 31, 10.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
mce of P. A. Murphy, 108 North State Street. Ex- 
Qguished by Combination Company. No loss. 



23 



354 city of concord. 

Penacook. 

Box 35. January 8, 9.15 a. m. Fire in the Hoyt Elec- 
trical Instrument Works, Washington Street. Caused by 
ignition of gasoline from cause unknown. Loss confined 
to contents. Four hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 9.28 
a. m. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $1&,000.00 $265.00 $6,000.00 $265.00 

Box 35. January 26. 4.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John McGirr, Jr., 20 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. February 7, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank Ferrin, 5 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 5.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Carl Holmes, 42 Spring Street. No loss. 

Still. March 8, 8.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dr. E. W. Sargent, 22 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Box 38. March 24, 12.52 p. m. Grass fire on lot on 
Chandler Street between High and South Main Streets, 
owned by W. P. Chandler. No loss. 

Still. March 26, 6.05 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of David J. Driscoll, 11 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 4.30 p. m. Brush fire on Elm Street, 
on lot owned by Clarence Davis. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 26, 6.32 p. m. Brush fire near River Hill 
railroad station, Ward 3. Labored one and three-quarters 
hours. Loss, trifling. Recall, 8.30 p. m. 

4-4-4. April 27, 11.06 a. m. Brush fire on wood lot 
owned by W. Arthur Bean. Labored one hour. Recall, 
12.16 p. m. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 9.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Andrew Goodwin, 137 South Main Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 29, 7.50 p. m. Brush fire on Elm Street 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 355 

in laud owned by Henry Hardy. Eecall, 8.07 p. m. No 

OSS. 

Box 35. 'May 5, 1.49 p. m. Brush fire on Boscawen 
ide. Recall, 2.10 p. m. 

Box 35. May 5, 5.10 p. m. False alarm. Eecall, 5.14 
». m. 

Still. May 8, 11.00 a. m. Brush fire on Centre Street, 
jabored one-half hour. No loss. 

Box 34. May 8, 11.07 p. m. Fire in four-tenement 
ilock, 46-48 Charles Street, owned by Mrs. Mary Baty 
,nd occupied by L. E. Hawkins, Edward J. McGirr, and 
ithers. Fire originated ii^ shed room of ell from cause 
inkuown and when the alarm was given the flames had 
(urst through the roof, but hard work confined the fire to 
hat portion of the building, although considerable dam- 
ge was wrought to walls and ceilings of the other part by 
[6t air explosion. Twenty-three hundred feet of hose wet. 
lecall, 1.40 a. m., 9th iust. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

building, $4,500.00 $1,619.50 $3,000.00 $1,619.50 

Contents : 

J. E. Hawkins, 650.00 150.00 None. None. 

!]. J. McGirr, 500.00 100.00 None. None. 

Still. May 11, 9 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement block, 
12 Spring Street. No loss. 

Still. May 22, 8.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
'f Jerry Sanborn, 100 Washington Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. July 25, 1.55 p. m. Brush fire on River Road on 
state of Prof. H. S. Hering. Labored one hour. Recall, 
' p. m. Loss, trifling. 

Box 42. July 27, 9.55 a. m. Slight fire in wood shed, 
esidence of James Mulligan, 82 High Street. Cause un- 
nown. Recall, 10.06 a. m. 



356 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,100.00 $15.00 $900.00 $15.00 

Still. July 28, 11.25 a. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
Block, Main Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. August 8, 5.15 p. m. Brush fire. River Hill, 
Ward 3. 

4-4-4. August 8, 5.44 p. m. Second alarm given in 
response to call for assistance from scene of preceding fire. 
Cord wood owned by Justin Clark destroyed. Caused by 
sparks from locomotive. Labored two hours. Loss, un- 
known.. Recall, 7.30 p. m. 

4-4-4. August 16, 4.50 p. m. Brush fire, River Hill. 
Caused by sparks from locomotive. Labored one and one- 
half hours. Recall, 6.20 p. m. No loss. 

4-4-4. August 19, 1.55 p. m. Brush fire at the Borough 
on land owned by Dr. E. E. Graves. Cause unknown. 
Labored three and one-fourth hours. Recall, 5.15 p. m, 
Loss, trifling. 

Still. August 22, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in Greaser 
Block, Main Street. No loss. 

Box 37. August 24, 3.40 p. m. Grass fire at the Bor- 
ough on land owned by C. M. & A. W. Rolfe. Cause; 
unknown. Recall, 4.25 p. m. No loss. 

Still. August 24, 7.50 p. m. Tree on fire. River Roadj 
No loss. 

Still. August 29, 7.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residencej 
of John H. Rolfe, 22 Summer Street. No loss. 

Box 35. August 30, 3.40 a. m. Fire in Greaser Block j 
Main Street. Kindling wood in bakery in basement caughli 
fire, presumably from spark from oven. Loss confined tc! 
breaking of glass in door to effect entrance. Recall, 4 a. mj 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid) 

Building, $6,000.00 $2.50 $3,000.00 $2.5(:j 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 357 

I 

Still. September 2, 8 a. m. Brush fire at the Borough 
in land owned by C. M. & A. W. Rolfe. Cause unknown. 

fio loss. 

; Still. September 3, 10 a. m. Brush fire at the Bor- 
ough on land owned by C. M. & A. W. Eolfe. No loss. 
I 4-4-4. September 29, 3.45 p. m. Brush fire at the Bog. 
Cause unknown. Loss unknown. Labored two and three- 
fourths hours. Eecall, 6.30 p. m. 

4-4-4. September 30, 2 p. m. Brush fire at the Bog. 

4-4-4. September 30, 2.30 p. m. Second alarm given in 
response to call for assistance from scene of preceding fire. 
Labored five hours. Loss unknown. Cause unknown. Re- 
call, 7 p. m. 

Still. October 12, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Richard Lessard, 18 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. October 19, 7 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Arsene Cluette, 7 Church Street. No loss. 

Box 47. November 19, 12.27 p. m. Slight fire in wood 
shed of residence, 93 Merrimack Street, owned by J. E. 
Symonds. Caused by children playing Vvdth matches. No 
loss. 

Still. December 11, 7.35 p. m. Slight fire in residence 
of J. A. Massie, Hardy Avenue. Clothing owned by painter 
took fire, probably spontaneously, burning small hole 
through floor. Extinguished with chemicals. 



Building, 



Still. February 1, 2.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Chesley, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. February 14, 9.30 p. m. Sawmill owned and oc- 
cupied by Knowles & Marston, located on Potter Street, 
destroyed. Cause unknown. 



Value. Loss. 


Insurance. 


Ins. paid. 


$4,500.00 $20.00 


$2,500.00 


$20.00 


East Concord. 







358 CITY OF CONCORD. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Building, 


$100.00 


$100.00 


None. 


Contents, 


1,100.00 


1,100.00 


None, 



Ins. paid. I 

None. I 
None. ; 
i 

Still. April 12, 9.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence I 
owned by "William II. Smith, Eastman Street. No loss. j 

Still. April 17, 9.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence j 
owned by Shadrach Cate, Pembroke Street. No loss. 

Bell. April 25, 7.30 p. m. Brush fire on Shaker Road I 
near Snow 's Pond. No loss. j 

Bell. April 27, 2 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by ] 
C. E. and G. 0. Robinson. No loss. ; 

Bell. May 10, 4 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by j 
Fred W. Davis, on the Intervale. Detail left to patrol. 1 
No loss. I 

Bell. June 6, 2 p. m. Grass fire on land owned by A. 
Gage near railroad. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Bell, June 19, 8 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by \ 
C. E. and G. 0. Robinson on the Plains. No loss. 

Bell. June 20, 2.30 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by C. E. and G. 0. Robinson on the Plains. Labored one! 
hour. No loss. 

Bell. June 22, 9 a. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
C. E. and G. 0. Robinson on the Plains. Labored four 
hours. No loss. 

Bell. July 9, 4.15 p. m. Brush fire on Plains near 
Break of Day. Labored four hours. See precinct report, i 

Bell. July 9, 7.30 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by Mary F. Robinson. Labored two hours. Detail left to 
patrol. No loss. 

"West Concord. 

Still. March 2, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence j 
of Charles Blanchard, 344 North State Street. No loss. ; 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 359 

Still. March 7, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Benjamin H. Kemp, 461 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. March 18, 7 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Joseph Smith, 384 North State Street. No loss. 

Bell. April 24, 11 a. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Abijah Hollis, North State Street. No loss. 

Bell. IMay 3, 10.15 a. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Abijah Hollis, North State Street. No loss. 

Bell. IMay 4, 2.15 p. m. Brush fire on the William 
Person lot, Dolan Street. No loss. 

Bell. June, 28, 11.55 a. m. Brush fire on city lot, 
Penacook Park. Loss, trifling. 

Still. June 30, 2 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
owned by Nathan Haskell, 2 Hutchins Street. No loss. 

Bell. July 10, 2.45 p. m. Brush fire on city lot east 
of Penacook Park. Labored four hours. Loss on cord 
wood, $40, no insurance. 

Bell. July 31, 12.45 p. m. Barn and contents owned 
by John H. Flood, 365 North State Street, destroj-ed. 
Caused by sparks from locomotive. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $300.00 $300.00 $300.00 $300.00 

Contents, 635.00 635.00 425.00 425.00 

Paid by B. & M. R. R. 

Still. August 2, 10 a. m. Slight fire in debris of pre- 
3eding fire. No loss. 

Bell. September 3, 1.50 p. m. Brush fire on land 

)wned bj^ Clough and I\Iartin near River Hill. Labored 
;wo hours. Loss, trifling. 

Still. September 29, 4.30 j). m. Brush fire on land 

)wned by Clough and Martin, near River Hill. Labored 
;wo hours. Loss, trifling. 

Bell. September 30, 2.30 p. m. Brush fire on land 



360 CITY OF CONCORD. ] 

owned by Clougli and ]\Iartin, near River Hill. Labored j 
one hour. Loss, trifling. j 

Still. October 31, 12.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- j 
dence of John E. Gay. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 2.30 p. m. Brush fire on Beech 
Hill on land owned by DeWitt C. Howe. Caused by care- 
less burning of sticking by employees. Labored four hours. 
Loss, $75.00. No insurance. Premises patrolled until eve- 
ning of the 7th inst. See precinct report. 

Bell. December 24, 11.05 p. m. Fire in four-tene- 
ment house, 370-372 North State Street, owned by Andrew 
J. Abbott and occupied by Elis Luorna, John Salo, Kalle 
Elglund and Aullie Harlikka. Caused by overheated stove. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $2,500.00 $2,500.00 $2,500.00 

Contents : 

John Salo, 250.00 250.00 250.00 250.00 

A. Harlikka, 300.00 250.00 300.00 250.00 

Elis Luorna, 200.00 200.00 None. None. 

K. Elglund, 225.00 225.00 None. None. 

Still. December 28, 8 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
30 Sewall's Falls Road, owned by Concord Electric Com- 
pany and occupied by Superintendent Levin J. Chase. 

Value. Loss. Insurance. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $80.00 $2,000.00 $80.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 

SUMMARY. 



361 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insur- 
ance. 


Insur- 
ance paid. 


Net loss. 


BUILDINGS. 


$172,900.00 

16,100.00 

100.00 

4,800.00 


$28,310.09 

1,657.00 

100.00 

2,880.00 


$102,000.00 
9,400 00 


$19,715 09 
1,657.00 


$8,025.00 


macook 


ist Concord 


100 CO 


est Concord 


2,880.00 


2,880 00 








Total 

Contents. 
ecinct 


$193,900.00 

$122,553.00 

19,150.00 

1,100.0::» 

1,725.00 


$32,977.09 

$20,522.40 

515.00 

1.100.00 

1.G75.00 

$23,812.40 

32,977.09 


$114,280.00 

$100,050.00 
6,000.00 


$24,252.09 

$15,236.40 
265.00 


$8,725.00 

$5,286.00 
250 00 


nacook 


ist Coucord 


1,100.00 
760.00 


est Coucord 


975.00 


925.00 


Total 


$144,528.00 
193,900.00 


$107,025.00 
114,280.00 


$16,426.40 
24,252.09 


$7,386.00 


lildings 


8,725.00 


Juildiiig-s and con- 
teuts 


$338,428.00 


$ 56,789.49 


$221,305.00 


$40,678.49 


$16,111.00 







Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows : 
Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
ass Amoskeag engine, ' ' Eagle, ' ' with modern hose wagon, 
:tached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men) ; 
le second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kearsarge," and 
odern hose wagon, attached to the Kearsarge Steam Fire 
ngine Company (14 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag 
igine, ''Governor Hill," relief engine, in charge of an 
igineer and firemen ; and one auto combination car in 
large of five permanent men ; one ladder truck, ' ' City of 
oncord," attached to Hook and Ladder Company (21 
en) ; one house man at Central Fire Station. There are 
even horses kept at this station. There are nine perma- 
?nt men located at the Central Fire Station and one per- 
anent man at each fire station within the precinct. 



362 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The Alert Hose Companj^ (11 men), located on Wash-, 
ington Street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent! 
man and two horses. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on thei 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has a moderni, 
hose wagon with permanent man and two horses. | 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 1 

One hook and ladder truck, one hose reel, one chemical! 
engine and one wagon in reserve. j 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), atl 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two| 
hose wagons. j 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has| 
a Hunneman 6-incli cylinder hand engine and a modem! 
hose wagon. \ 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4i/2-inch cylin-j 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and! 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank. ' 

Hose. 1 



Precinct, 9,950 feet.l 

Penacook, 3,000 

West Concord, 1,400 
East Concord, 500 



t 



Public Eeservoirs. 



14,850 feet. 



Capacity 
cubic feet. 



1. Main Street, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s, 1,000 

2. Main Street, middle front State House yard, 1,500 

3. Main Street, rear Court House, 2,000 

4. State Street, corner Washington Street,* 2,000 

5. Rumford Street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's, 1.000 

6. Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street,* 4.000 

7. School Street, corner of Summit Street,* 3.500 



* Brick cemented. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 363 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPPI. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire- 
larm boxes, the city is divided into six districts, viz. : 

District 1. Embraces that section of the city north and 
est of Washington Street, Box 17 of this division being 
icated on the south side of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
m Streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasiint and School 
treets. 

Districts 4, 5 and 6. Embrace all south of Pleasant 
treet. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the 
istrict. 

District No. 1. 

9. New Hampshire State Prison. 

12. Curtice Avenue. 

13. Franklin and Rumford. 

14. Bradley and AValker. 

15. Main and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. C. S. Gale's Store. 

19. Centre and Liberty. 
131. . Franklin and Charles. 
191. Auburn and Granite. 

District No. 2. 

21. State, opposite Court. 

23. INlain and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 



364 CITY OF CONCORD. 

25. Main and School. 

26. Centre and Union. 

27. School and ^Merrimack. 

28. School and Spring. 

29. Centre and Essex. 

District No. 3. 

32. "Warren and Pine. 

34. Central Fire Station. 

35. Martin's Drug Store. 

36. Pleasant and Spring. 

37. Pleasant and North Fruit. 

38. Orchard and Merrimack. 

District No. 4. 

41. South and Thompson. 

42. Good Will Hose Plouse. 

43. Main and Fayette. 

45. Nelson & Durrell's Store. 

46. Perley and Grove. 

47. South, opposite Downing. 

48. Thorndike and South. 

49. West and I\Iilis. 

412. Wall and Elm. 

413. Main, opposite Thorndike. 

414. State and West. 

471. Clinton and South Fruit. 

District No. 5. 

51. Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. 

52. South Main and Allison. 

53. Hall and Hammond. 

54. Broadway and Pillsbury. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 365 

56. St. Paul's School. 

57. Pleasant View. 

521. Broadway and Rockingliam. 

522. South Main and Ilolly. 

District No. 6. 
62. South IMain, opposite Holt Bros. 
Private Boxes. 

5. Boston & IMaine Railroad, north end passenger depot. 

6. The Abbot & Downing Company. 

7. Nev,^ Hampshire State Hospital. 
S. Page Belting Company. 

9. Three boxes inside New Hampshire State Prison. 

33. State House. 

39. Odd Fellows' Home. 

55. Boston & Maine Railroad, old repair shops. 



FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 413, 414, 471, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 62, 521 and 
522, will not be responded to by the Alert Hose Company 
until signaled. The signal to proceed to the fire will be 
four blovv's or second alarm, excepting alarms rung m 
from Box 56. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 32, 37, 39 and 56 will not 
he responded to by the Good Will Hose Company until sig- 
naled. It will be governed by the same signals govern- 
ing Alert Hose Company. The Alert Hose and Good AVill 
Hose Companies will hitch up and remain in readiness 20 
minutes after the first alarm, to all boxes not responded 



366 CITY OF CONCORD. j 

to on first alarm. Then, receiving no signal, the officersi 
in charge shall dismiss their companies. j 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 12, 37, 53, 54, 57, 191, 471 
and 521 will not be responded to by the Kearsarge Com- 
pany on first alarm. 

The signal to proceed to the fire will be two blows, four 
blows, or second alarm, as circumstances may warrant. 

Kearsarge Steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose Company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to Box 6, on first alarm; to Boxes 23, 24, 
25, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43, 45 and 413, on second ; to all others! 
on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill Steamer will respond to Boxes 7, 8, 9 
and 39 on first alarm ; to Boxes 5, 6, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 
48, 49, 412, 414, 471, 52, 54, 55, 57, 62, 521 and 522, on sec- 
ond ; to all others on third. 

Combination Company will respond to all box alarms. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company will respond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating 
from same box or not. 

Two rounds of 11 strokes each will signalize the re- 
quirement of assistance out of town, and will be re- 
sponded to by a detail of three men from each company, 
appointed for the purpose, and by those alone. 

Two additional blows will indicate that the call for 
assistance emanates from East Concord. Such apparatus 
will be detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further 
aid is necessary, Box 34 (Central Station) will follow. 

All-out signal, three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on 
the bells and will be responded to by a detail of four men 
from each company, appointed for the purpose, and by 
those alone. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 367 

■ ]\IiLiTARY Signal. 
Two rounds of 3-1-2. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause 

15 seconds between the rounds. 
The signal to close for the forenoon session will be given 

8 o'clock a. m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given 

1 o'clock p. m. 

The signal to close all schools for one session w^ill be given 

11.30 a. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
e fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
onday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It will be one 
Qgle round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
e number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
ill vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 
Upon each other v/eek-day a single blow upon the bells 
ill be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Fire-alarm Telegraph 

the "Gamew^ell" patent. It embraces 42 miles of wire. 

On the lines are 46 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the 
ty, and 10 private boxes — in all, 56. There are three 
arm bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell metal), one of 
740 pounds (bell metal), and one of 2,000 pounds 
A.merican steel). There are also 16 mechanical tappers, 
) direct action tappers, one four-circuit repeater, and six 
idicators. 

The battery consists of 252 storage battery cells. 

The alarm system was installed in 1880 by the Gamewell 
ire-alarm Telegraph Company. 



368 C;iTY OF CONCORD. I 

I 

I 
Directions for Giving an Alarm, 

1 
Above all things, keep cool. I 

To obtain the key to the box, break the glass in the keji 
box located beneath the alarm box. ■ 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale,' { 
designed expressly for the purpose of informing yov,! 
whether an alarm is being transmitted the instant you operj 
the door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull down] 
the hook once only and let go. ' 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that' 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to at-| 
tempt to pull another until the one already pulled had per-i 
formed its mission. I 

Wait' until 20 seconds have elapsed after the "tell-tale'i 
has stopped ringing, close the door, wliich will restore the' 
armature to the position it left when the door was opened,] 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go.\ 

Should there be no response, pull it again. i 

Then should there be no response, go to the next box. i 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the} 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the depart-' 
rnent. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 369 

PENACOOK FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

V. C. Green, Chief Engineer: 

I herewith submit for your consideration the following 
3port of the Penacook fire-alarm telegraph system: The 
,^stem is the Gamewell patent, and consists of four ana 
ae half miles of No. 9 iron wire. On the lines are eleven 
Dxes owned by the city, two private boxes, one 1,500-poiind 
ill, one indicator, three mechanical gongs and three direct- 
ition tappers. The battery consists of thirty-six storage 
ittery cells. I would respectfully recommend the addi- 
on to the system of tAvo new boxes the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED M. DODGE, 

Superintendent of Fire-Alarm. 

Location op Boxes. 

31. Elm Street, near S. N. Brown's house. 

34. Charles Street. 

35. Washington Square. 

37. Washington Street, near outlet. 

38. Junction of West Main and South Main Streets. 

39. South Main Street, near cemetery. 

41. Corner of Center and East Canal Streets. 

42. High Street, opposite Maple Street. 
45. Summer Street, opposite Church Street. 

47. ]\Ierrimack Street, opposite Hose House. 

48. Corner Penacook and Rolfe Streets. 

Private Boxes. 

25. Hoj^t Electrical Instrument Works. 
62. Concord Axle Works. 



370 city op concord. 

All-out Signal. 

Three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each. 

Out of Town Signal. 

Two rounds of eleven strokes each. 

For Fire on Boscawen Side. 

Box 35, with two additional strokes. 

S1GN.VLS for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a paust' 

of 15 seconds betvreen the rounds. i 

The signal to close all schools for the forenoon sessiom 

7 I 

will be given at 7.30 a." m, j 

The signal to close for the forenoon session at the Charlesj 
Street building will be given at 8.00 a. m. 1 

The signal to close all schools for the afternoon session 
will be given at 12.15 p. in. I 

The signal to close for the afternoon session at the Charlefj 
Street building vinll be given at 12.45 p. m. 

Testing SiGN.y^s. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy oi 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every, 
Saturday afternoon at 12.50 o'clock precisely. It will b(i 
one single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bellfi 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpowij 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bellsj 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentionedfj 

The Penacook fire-alarm sj'stem was installed in June.' 
1908, under direction of the chief engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



571 



REVISED ORDINANCE. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



TION 

.. Fire department — - how consti- 
tuted. 

!. Tenure of office, vacancies. 

!. Cliief engineer, salary. 

I. Chief engineer, powers and 
duties. 

. Assistant engineer, powers and 
duties in absence of chief. 

». Foremen, duties of inspection, 
etc. 

'. Foremen, duties at fires. 

'. Stewards, Alert and Good Will 
Hose companies. 

I. Apparatus to be cleaned, etc. 

). Badges and uniforms. 

.. Salaries and pay. 

!. Extra services, charges for. 

!. Apparatus and firemen to be 
kept in city. 

I. Engineers to inspect buildings; 
to take means for speedy ex- 
tinguishment of fires. 

». Absence, neglect of duty. 

). Volunteer companies. 

r. Parade, drill, and inspection. 

i. Engineers — full control at fire. 

). Regulations concerning shavings 
and combustibles. 

). Board of engineers to make reg- 
ulations. 



Section 

21. Disobedience and neglect of 

duty ; qualifications of mem- 
bers. 

22. Applications for membership; 

officers and members not to 
take part in political matters. 

23. Fire alarm telegraph — chief en- 

gineer to have control. 

24. Vacation without loss of pay, 

when. 

25. Supplies, purchase of. . 

26. Removal and protection of 

property endangered by fire. 

27. Hydrants to be personally ex- 

amined by chief engineer. 

28. Pay-roll of department. 

29. Care and control of fire depart- 

ment buildings in Wards 1, 
2, and 3. 

30. Stewards of companies in out- 

side wards. 

31. Regulations concerning drivers 

and permanent men ; chief 
engineer to be furnished with 
horse and wagon. 

32. Brush and forest fires. 

33. Veteran Firemen's Associations 

made auxiliary branch. 

34. Appropriation for. 



Section 1. The fire department shall consist of a chief 
^ineer, two assistants within the precinct, one engineer 
ih from Ward 1, Ward 2 and Ward 3 ; two steamer and 
;e companies, one company to consist of thirteen men, in- 
ding driver, and one company to consist of fourteen 
n, including driver; one relief steamer (companj^) to 
isist of two men; two hose companies to consist of eleven 



372 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I 

men, including driver; [*a chemical engine company l| 
consist of two men] ; a hook and ladder company to consii) 
of twenty-one men, including driver ; a house man at Cei; 
tral Fire Station; steamer Pioneer, not less than twent 
nor more than forty men ; hand engine companies No. 
and No. 3, not less than twenty nor more than thirty me 
each. Each company shall be alloAved three substitute! 
except Hook and Ladder Company, No. 1, which sha 
have five, to be approved by the chief engineer. Thj 
engineers shall exercise the powers of fire-wards, and thosj 
within the precinct shall constitute the board of engineer' 

Sect. 2. The chief engineer and assistant engineers anil 
all other members of the fire department shall hold thei] 
respective offices and places until they are removed, or theii 
offices or places are otherwise vacated. The board of mayoj 
and aldermen, for cause, and after a due hearing, may v 
any time remove from office or place the chief enginee:] 
any assistant engineer, or any officer or member of the d(| 
partment. In case of vacancies from any cause in the dq 
partment, of officers or men connected in any manner wit I 
the fire service, such vacancies shall be filled by the boarl 
of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 3. The chief engineer shall give his entire tini; 
to the duties of his office, unless herein otherwise pre. 
vided, and shall not engage in or be connected with anj 
other business or occupation, and shall reside in a housi 
to be furnished by the city free from rent. He shall re; 
ceive in full for his services as chief, in addition to thj 
use of said house, rent free, the sum of twelve hundred anij 
fifty dollars per annum. , 

Sect. 4. The chief engineer shall have the sole command 
at fires over all persons, whether members of the fire del 
partment or not. He shall direct all proper measures fo 



''Displaced by Combination Company, December 9. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 373 

■xtinguishing fires, protecting property, preserving order 
md enforcing the laws, ordinances, and regulations re- 
pecting fires; and shall examine into the condition of the 
ire engines and all other fire apparatus, and of the fire en- 
gine houses and other houses belonging to the city and used 
)y the department, and by the companies thereto attached, 
IS often as once a week, and whenever directed to do so by 
he mayor, or the committee on fire department through its 
;hairman. Pie shall certify all ])il]s and submit the same 
'or inspection monthly to the joint standing committee on 
ire department. He shall report to the board of aldermen 
,nnually a statement of the receipts and expenditures of 
he fire department, the condition of the fire engines and 
11 other fire apparatus, a detailed schedule of the prop- 
rty in his charge, the names of the officers and members, 
nd all other facts in relation to the department. When- 
ver the fire engines or other fire apparatus require repairs 
e shall, under the direction of the committee on fire de- 
artment, cause the same to be made, and as far as practi- 
able he shall examine into the location and condition of 
re apparatus belonging to corporations or private indi- 
iduals within the limits of the city. He shall require per- 
lanent men, wiien not otherwise engaged, to perform such 
ther duties and do such other work as in his judgment 
lay be deemed proper. He shall be responsible for the 
roper care of all property connected with the fire depart- 
lent. He shall keep fair and exact rolls of the respective 
Dmpanies, specifying the time of admission and discharge, 
nd the age of each member, and shall report annually, or 
ftener if directed, all accidents by fire which may happen 
'ithin the city, with the causes thereof, the number and 
escription of the buildings destroyed or injured, and the 
mount of loss and insurance on the same, together with the 
ames of oAvners or the occupants, and shall make returns 
3 required by the public statutes. He shall visit 



374 CITY OF CONCORD. 

each department house as often as practicable, an 
inspect the men, the books of the house, and see thai 
the quarters are properly conducted and in good ordei; 
He shall have the power to suspend any officer or membej 
of the department for insubordination, disorderly conduct 
or neglect of duty, said suspension to continue pending tlij 
action of the mayor and aldermen. The chief engineer sha ! 
examine all places where shavings and other combustiblj 
materials may be collected or deposited, and cause the sam' 
to be removed by the tenants or occupants of such places, oi 
at their expense, whenever in his opinion such removal i: 
necessary for the security of the city against fires. 

Sect. 5. In the absence of the chief engineer, the nesl 
assistant engineer in rank, who may be present, shall hav| 
the powers and perform the duties of the chief enginee' 
and the seniority in rank of the engineers shall be deteii 
mined by the board of engineers at their first meeting, i 

Sect. 6. The captain of each engine, hose, and hoo.j 
and ladder company, immediately after every fire at whicj 
said company may have attended, shall examine into th| 
condition of the fire apparatus belonging to his respectivj 
company, and report any deficiency which may exist to th. 
chief engineer. He shall keep, or cause to be kept by th 
clerk of his company, exact rolls, specifying the time of ad 
mission, discharge, and age of each member, and account: 
of all city property entrusted to the care of the severa 
members, and of all cases of absence and tardiness, in I 
book provided for that purpose by the city, which rolls arn; 
record books are always to be subject to the order of th| 
chief engineer and mayor. They shall also make, or cauS' 
to be made, to the chief engineer, true and accurate return! 
of all members, with their ages, and of the apparatus enj 
trusted to their care, whenever called upon so to do. ,1 

Sect. 7. The captain of each company shall,^ under tbi; 
direction of the chief engineer, have charge and manage! 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 375 

lent of his company at fires ; the lieutenant shall assist 
le captain in the discharge of his duties, and act as clerk 
£ the company, and in the absence of the captain assume 
is authority. The captain and lieutenant shall be ap- 
ointed by the chief engineer. 

Sect. 8. The stewards of the Alert and Good Will Hose 
ompanies shall act as drivers of hose carriages, take charge 
I and properly care for and exercise the horses used by 
ich company. They shall be permanently engaged and 
evote their whole time to the department, and sleep in 
leir respective stations at night ; and for the proper 
iscution of all duties required of them shall be subject to 
le direction of the chief engineer. 

Sect. 9. It shall be the duty of every engine, hose, and 
3ok and ladder company, to have its engine, hose and other 
jparatus cleaned, washed, oiled, reeled and housed imme- 
lately after its return from any fire or service, and at all 
mes to maintain the same in good condition, and the mem- 
iTS, of the several companies shall perform any necessary 
ities which the chief engineer or their respective captain 
ay direct. 

Sect. 10. All members of the department when on duty 
tail wear some suitable badge, to be designated by the 
)ard of engineers. The chief and permanent members 
tail wear at all times w^hen on duty the regulation 
aiform worn by the fire department. 

Sect. 11. The pay-rolls for the board of engineers and 
le several fire companies shall be made up by the chief 
id clerk of the board of engineers semi-annually, on the 
•st day of January and July. Captains and clerks of 
mpanies will forward their pay-rolls to the board of en- 
neers for approval and after the action of said engineers 
id the committee on accounts and claims, said pay-rolls 
all be passed over to the city tax collector, under whose 
le direction all sums for services of call firemen shall 
I disbursed. 



376 CITY OF CONCORD. ! 

Sect. 12. No charge for extra services will be allowec 
any member of the department unless upon an order of i 
member of the board of engineers. 

Sect. 13. No engine, hose, or hook and ladder carriagf 
shall be taken to a fire out of the city without permissior 
from the chief engineer, except steamer Pioneer, which maj 
be taken to any fire in the village of Penacook, nor shall anj 
apparatus of the fire department be taken from the citj 
except in case of fire, without permission from the boarc 
of mayor and aldermen; and in sending any apparatus tc 
aid in extinguishing fires in neighboring localities, the chiel 
in all cases will authorize his assistant next in rank avail- 
able to take charge of the direction of such apparatus, and 
not allow any firemen, at such an emergency, to leave the 
city, except such a number as is actually required to mar 
the apparatus, and no member to leave without permission 
or direction from the chief engineer. 

Sect. 14. It shall be the duty of engineers and firemen, 
Vv'henever there is an alarm of fire in the city, to repair im- 
m-ediately to the place of such fire, wearing a suitable badge, 
and the engineers shall take proper measures that the sev- 
eral engines and other apparatus be arranged and duly 
vrorked for the speedy and effectual extinguishment of the 
fire. The engineers shall inspect and make themselves 
familiar with all shops, hotels, tenement blocks, and all pub- 
lie buildings, halls, churches, schoolhouses and asylums once 
in each six months and study the location of all hjalrants 
and reservoirs in the city, and generally inform themselves 
in all matters pertaining to their duties as engineers. No 
engineer shall interfere with or attempt to give orders rela- 
tive to the location or use of a line of hose, when he has 
ascertained that another has command of it, unless by con- 
sent of the engineer in command of it, or by orders of the 
officer in command of the fire ; and it shall be his duty to 
inquire if there is an officer in charge. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 377 

Sect. 15. For each absence from fire, or neglect of duty, 
he chief engineer, the assistant engineers, and engineers of 
teamers shall be fined three dollars, and each other mem- 
ler of the department one dollar; provided, however, that 
my fireman liable as above may in case of sickness have 
)Ower of substitution by giving notice, each assistant en- 
:ineer to the chief, each captain to an engineer, and each 
ther member to the captain of his company. All fines 
hall be paid to the clerks of respective companies at the 
irst regular meeting after they are incurred. The clerks 
f companies shall disburse the fines to substitutes answer- 
Qg for absent members in cases where there were sub- 
titutes. In cases vrhere there were no substitutes the fines 
hall be paid to the city. 

Sect. 16, Any volunteer company using the apparatus 
f the city at any fire shall be under the control and com- 
land of the chief engineer and his assistants, agreeably to 
lie foregoing provisions of this chapter. 

Sect. 17. The department shall appear for public pa- 
ade, drill and inspection at such times as the chief engineer 
nd committee on fire department shall order, for which 
urpose three hundred dollars may be expended annually, 
'he companies in Wards 1, 2 and 3 will attend by invita- 
.on and voluntarily. Each company in the department 
nder the direction of the chief engineer or assistants shall 
ike out their respective engines and apparatus for exercise 
nd drill as often as he shall direct, such exercise and drill 
) take place in public, not oftener than once a month, and 
t least once in two months, between the first of April and 
iQvember. 

Sect. 18. The engineers shall have control of all per- 
ms appointed to serve in any company of the fire depart- 
lent and power to direct and control the labor of all per- 
)ns present at any fire. An engineer may and shall cause 
ay fire deemed by him to be dangerous in any place to be 
stinguished or removed. 



378 CITY OF CONCORD. j 

i 

Sect. 19. The engineers may establish such regulation) 
respecting the kindling, guarding and safe-keeping of firej 
and for the removal of shavings and other combustible; 
from any building or place, as they shall think expedient] 
Such regulations shall be signed by a majority of the en! 
gineers. Such regulations shall be approved by the mayo:' 
and aldermen, recorded by the city clerk, and copie;! 
attested by him posted up in two or more places in the citjj 
thirty days, when they shall take effect. Penalties not ex| 
ceeding twenty dollars for each offense may be prescribecj 
by the engineers for the breach of such regulations, anc'; 
such regulations shall remain in force until altered or ani 
nulled. 

Sect. 20. The board of engineers may from time to timi: 
make and enforce such regulations for the government o^' 
the department as may be deemed proper, subject to the' 
approval of the board of mayor and aldermen. I 

Sect. 21. If any member of any of the several com-; 
panics shall wilfully neglect or refuse to discharge his duty, 
or shall be guilty of disorderly conduct or disobedience tc 
any officer or to any engineer, he shall for any such offense 
be forthwith dismissed from the department by direction 
of the chief engineer. No person shall be a member of, or 
serve in, the fire department, who is under the age of 
twenty years, and no person whose occupation is carried on 
outside the city shall be appointed a member of the fire 
department. 

Sect. 22. All applicants for membership shall be nom- 
inated by the chief engineer, and shall receive pay and be 
considered members of the department from the date of 
their confirmation by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

No person shall hereafter be appointed to any position in 
the fire department unless and until the committee on fire 
department shall have certified in writing to the board of 
mayor and aldermen that such person has been examined 



I 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 379 



)y them, or under their supervision, and is in their opinion 
[ualified to perform the duties of the position to which he 
s nominated. 

No officer or member of the permanent, or officer of the 
:all, force shall attend any political convention as a dele- 
;ate, distribute tickets at any election, or take any part 
vhatever in political matters other than to exercise the right 
if suffrage, and no political or religious discussion shall be 
>ermitted in any of the department houses. 

Sect. 23, The chief engineer shall have the care and 
nanagement of the rooms, apparatus, machinery, wires, 
)oles and signal boxes connected with the fire-alarm tele- 
graph. He shall prepare rules and directions for giving 
.larms of tire through the telegraph. He shall have the 
uperintendenee, and under the direction of the joint stand- 
ng committee on fire department have control of the several 
tations, the apparatus, the furniture therein, and all other 
>roperty appertaining to the department. He shall, wdth 
he assistance of the permanent men at the Central Station, 
nake the necessary repairs and take care of the fire-alarm 
ystem, including the batteries, all alarm boxes, and every- 
hing pertaining to the fire-alarm system. He shall per- 
onallj^ be able to master the fire-alarm in every particular, 
,nd every permanent man at the Central Station shall be 
'bliged to understand the fire-alarm system, in order that 
he chief engineer may call upon any of them to attend to 
,nd repair any part of the same. This provision shall not 
le construed to prevent the chief engineer from employing 
xtra linemen when necessary, or from acting promptly in 
,ny emergency. 

Sect. 24. Permanent officers and men of the depart- 
aent shall be entitled to a vacation without loss of pay of 
ourteen days in each year. In addition they shall be en- 
itled to be off duty wdthout loss of pay two days in each 
iionth, such two days not to be taken in the same week. 



380 CITY OF CONCORD. j 

I 

In the weeks that they are not off duty for a day, under} 
the above provision, they shall be entitled to be off duty for ] 
one night without loss of pay. All vacations and absences ; 
from duty under the above to be under the direction of 
the chief engineer. 

Sect. 25. The standing committee on fire depart- 
ment, subject to the board of mayor and aldermen, shall j 
by themselves or agent purchase all supplies in connection j 
with the fire department, and direct all repairs of ap^ ] 
paratus ; and all bills contracted for the department must j 
receive their approval before being passed on by the 
committee on accounts and claims. They shall hold stated 
meetings at least once each month at the Central fire 
station, and all communications to the city government 
from the fire department must come through said com- 
mittee, and annually at the call of the finance committee, 
in connection with the chief engineer, they shall make 
recommendations as to the amount of appropriations the 
wants of the department will require for the coming year. 

Sect. 26. The city marshal and regular police officers 
shall have in charge all matters relating to the removal 
and protection of personal property endangered by fire, 
and any person entering a building or removing property 
contrary to the orders of the city marshal or such police 
officers shall be fined five dollars ; and in the alxsence of 
firemen at fires from their respective department houses, 
the policemen in that vicinity will take charge of said 
houses. 

Sect. 27. It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to 
cause all snow and ice or other obstructions to be removed 
from and around all fire hydrants owned by the city, so that 
at all times the fire department can make immediate con- 
nection of the hose to the hydrants. 

Sect. 28. The annual pay of the members of the fire 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 381 

department shall be as follows, and in full for all services 
in said department : 

Chief, twelve hundred and fifty dollars per annum and 
house-rent ; permanent force at Central fire station, eight 
hundred and forty dollars each, drivers at Good Will 
and Alert hose houses, eight hundred and forty dollars 
each, the members of the chemical company nine hundred 
and twelve dollars each, per annum, payable semi- 
monthly ; assistant engineers, within the precinct, one 
hundred and forty-five dollars each ; engineers of steam- 
ers, within the precinct, one hundred and thirty-five dol- 
lars each; captains of companies, within the precinct, 
each one hundred and ten dollars per annum ; lieutenants 
of companies, within the precinct, one hundred and five 
dollars per annum ; members of steamer, hose, and hook 
and ladder companies, within the precinct, and house man 
at Central fire station one hundred dollars per annum ; 
outside the precinct, engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, three 
hundred and forty dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer 
company No. 3 [*six hundred dollars], said sums to be 
divided among the members as each company shall direct ; 
engineer of steamer at Penacook, seventy-five dollars per 
annum; assistant engineer at Penacook [ftwenty-five 
dollars] ; assistant engineer at East Concord, twenty 
dollars ; and assistant engineer at West Concord, twenty 
dollars. 

Sect. 29. The several engineers residing in Wards 1, 
2 and 3 shall have the entire care and control, under the 
direction of the chief engineer, of the buildings and ap- 
purtenances occupied in part by the fire department 
situated in said wards, respectively, to whom all applica- 
tions for the use of the halls, or any other part of such 

* Advanced to one thousand dollars. Effective January 1, 1913. 
tAdvanced to seventy-five dollars. Effective July 1, 1913. 



382 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I 

building, shall be made. Said engineers may severallyj 
appoint janitors, at annual salaries not to exceed fifteen] 
dollars, who shall serve under the exclusive direction' 
of the engineer having the care and control of the' 
building where said janitor shall be appointed. Eachj 
of said engineers shall annually, in the month of Decem-i 
ber, render a detailed statement, in writing, to the mayor; 
and aldermen, of all receipts and expenditures for the 
preceding year on account of such buildings. 

Sect. 30. Stewards for the Pioneer Steamer Company 
and Engine Companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be appointed 
by the mayor and aldermen, and shall receive for alii 
services performed by them in that capacity the follow-] 
ing sums : For Pioneer Steamer Company, thirty dollars 
per annum, and when performing the duties of janitor' 
of the building an additional sum of forty-five dollars per 
annum ; and for stewards of Engine Companies Nos. 2 and 
3, thirty dollars per annum each. No steward shall be al- 
lovv^ed to purchase supplies for such building, or for the 
department, unless by the authority and direction of the 
committee on fire department; and in no case shall he 
have any care or control of the building or its appur- 
tenances occupied by the company of which he is a mem- 
ber, except in the immediate service of the company, un- 
less he shall be appointed janitor thereof, when he shall 
be under the direction of the engineer, as provided in the 
foregoing section. 

Sect. 31. The permanent men and horses at all of the 
fire stations in Concord shall at all times be on duty at 
their respective stations to attend to fire-alarm calls ; and 
neither the permanent men nor the permanent horses con- 
nected Avith the fire department shall engage in any work 
for any other department of the city. 

The men at the different fire stations shall do such work 
in connection with the station and apparatus as the chief 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 383 

igineer or his assistants may direct. All permanent men 
lall lodge in their respective stations (except the chief), 
ad in all cases of absence a substitute must be furnished ; 
ad in all cases when any extra service is required, the 
lief, with the sanction of the committee on fire depart- 
lent, shall have power to hire the same ; the chief may 
[so increase as far as possible the number of call men who 
ish to lodge at any fire station, subject to the regulations 
f the fire department. The chief engineer shall be fur- 
ished with a horse and wagon, to be maintained by the 
ity, for his use at all times. 

Sect, 32. All alarms for brush or for forest fires shall 
e responded to by members of the fire department under 
Lich rules and regulations as shall be prescribed by the 
hief engineer. 

Sect. 33. The Veteran Firemen's Association is hereby 
onstituted and made an auxiliary branch of the regular 
re department of this city, the members of said associa- 
ton to be considered as honorary and to organize a co- 
perative working force to serve in emergency, without 
ompensation, such service to be under the direction and 
ontrol of the officers of the regular organization in alle- 
[iance and compliance thereto. 

Sect. 34. The standing committee of the board of 
.Idermen on fire department is authorized and directed 
rent, at an expense not exceeding one hundred and fifty 
lollars a year, suitable rooms for the accommodation of 
aid Veteran Firemen's Association, the same to be 
selected by said association, the same to be charged to 
he regular appropriation for fire department. 



384 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS. 

Article 1. Any engine or hose company running out ; 
line of hose from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled 
to the pipe, although the hose of other companies may b( 
attached, in order to reach the fire. And any company 
coming to a fire, and finding an incompleted line of hos* 
laid out from a hydrant or steamer, shall attach to anc 
lengtlien out such line, in lieu of laying a line of its own 
Art. 2. When two or more engine companies are play 
ing in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the com 
pany attaching to hydrant or steamer as provided in thd 
foregoing article ; but any company furnishing the entire 
line, and receiving water from a steamer, the pipe shal 
belong to such company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Hose companies shall attach first lines to higl,. 
pressure hydrants where accessible ; steamers attaching 
to those of low pressure, or reservoir. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant 
or reservoir unless their hose and apparatus for attaching 
to the same are at hand and ready for use. i 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning 
from fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, 
and it is required of officers of companies to maintain per-i 
feet order and decorum in their respective commands durn 
ing all such service. I 

Art. 6. In case of fire the captain first arriving shall' 
be in command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 7. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding toi 
a fire, to use the utmost care and caution consistent with] 
promptness. Racing between companies is forbidden un-,j 
der any circumstances. Any collision or casualty occur-j 
ring to horses or apparatus will be considered a sufficient; 
cause for the suspension of the driver in charge at the' 
time. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 385 

Art. 8. Fire hats are furnished by the city for the pro- 
tction and identification of the firemen, and they must be 
orn at all fires except in the severest weather, when 
ips may be worn. 

Art. 9. While attending fires it shall be the duty of 
embers of the department, when not performing active 
srvice, to concentrate about their respective pieces of 
pparatus. 

Art. 10. All engine and hose companies responding to 
;cond or general alarms will connect, but will not lay 
leir lines until they have reported to the ofScer in eom- 
and for orders. 

Art. 11. The wearing of badges shall not be regarded 
Y members of the department as conveying to them the 
rivilege of free access to premises after fire has been 
stinguished. 

Art. 12. All members of the department shall address 
[1 officers by their respective titles while on duty at fires. 
Art. 13. The roll of each company shall be called as 
)on as the apparatus is housed, and no member will be 
sensed except in case of sickness. Rolls must be called 
fter every alarm. No officer or member will be marked 
resent on the company roll unless present at fires and 
3turns to house with apparatus, unless excused by an 
Qgineer. 

Art. 14. All orders issued by the chief or an assistant 
agineer shall be promptly obeyed. At all fires occurring 
I the night, the chief engineer shall be identified by a 
3d light, assistant engineers by blue lights. 
Art. 15. Members of the department are expected to 
heerfully comply with all rules and regulations which 
re adopted or which may be adopted. Captains will be 
eld responsible for all lack of promptness and efficiency 
1 their commands. 

25 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1913. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

■William C. Green, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

Walter- J. Coffin, 1st Asst., Shipping clerk, 63 Pleasant Street, 

Sylvester T. Ford, 2d Asst., Molder, 41 So. Main Street. 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



Fred M. Dodge, 



Elbeidge Emery, 



George W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 

Electrical Inst, maker, 61 Merrimack Street. 

WARD 2. 
Butcher, Potter St., East Concord 

WARD 3. 
Overseer, 443 No. State St., West Concord..' 

i 



KEAKSARGE STEA:\r FIRE ENGINE AND HOSEi 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

J. Edward Morrison, Captt-di;. Charles Powell, Lisutenant ayid Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

1 J. Edward Morrison, 

2 Charles Powell, 

3 James H. Sanders, 

4 Thomas J. Morrison, 

6 George B. Davis, 

7 Herbert M. Sanders, 

8 Harry P. Blake, 

9 Harry L. Messer, 

10 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

11 Harry C. Taylor, 

12 George L. Livingston, 

5 Chester W. Gay, 

13 Christopher Cunningham, 

14 Joseph H. Brunelle, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter. 
Collector, 
Machinist, 
JIachinist, 
Carriage Trimmer, 
Machinist, 
Gas inspector. 
Machinist 
Permanent Driver, 
Permanent Driver, 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 
3 South Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
3 Broadway. 
41 Thorndike Street. 
2 No. State Street. 
38 Jackson Street. 
66 Perley Street. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



387 



AGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



C. McGiLVRAY, Captain. 

idgc 

IS. Names. 

John C. McGilvray, 
• David J. Adams, 

Charles H. Sanders, 

Orrin C. Hodgdon, 

Willis J. Sawyer, 

John M. Inman, 

John B. McLeod, 

Eli Langlois, Jr., 

Charles W. Bateman, 

F. H. Fowler, 

Daniel J. Brennan, 

P. J. O'Connell, 

Henry Newton, 



OFFICERS. 

D. J. 

MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Jig-sawj'er, 
Janitor, 
Machinist, 
Engineer, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Electrician, 
Painter, 
Plumber, 
Electrician, 
Electrician, 
Silversmith, 
Permanent driver. 



Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Residences. 
9 Pearl Street. 
107 North Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 
31 Beacon Street. 
44 Thorndike Street. 
16 Wall Street. 
Colonial Block. 
5 Perry Avenue. 
60 Centre Street. 
34 North Spring Street. 
18 School Street. 
38 No. Spring Street. 
Central Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



'dge 



RELIEF ENGINE. 
t. Names. Occupations. 

Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 
Henry 0. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 South State Street. 
11 Thompson Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

NEST E. Saben, Captain. Charles C. Chesley, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

J. M. Davis, Treasurer. 



dge 

s. Names. 

E. E. Saben, 
C. C. Chesley, 
C. J. French, 

C. H. Rowell, 
P. P. McKenna, 
J. M. Davis, 

M. G. Davis, 
George L. Osgood, 
J. E. Howard, 

D. J. Murphy, 

F. H. Silver, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Car-builder, 
Builder, 
Mayor, 
Builder, 
Clerk, 

Blacksmith, 
Builder, 
Clerk, 

Woodworker, 
Molder, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
88 North State Street. 
11 Prince Street. 

5 Perkins Street. 

147 North Main Street. 
19 Franklin Street. 
4 Tahanto Street. 

6 Beacon Street. 

9 Thompson Street. 
6 Rollins Street. 
2 No. State Street. 
Alert Station. 



388 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 



OFFICERS. 
John C. Mills, Captain. Hiram T. Dickerman, Lieutenant and CUrk\ 

Albert W. Thompson, Treasurer. i 

I ' 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

50 John C. Mills, 

51 Hii-am T. Dickerman, 

52 George H. Sawjer, 

53 Frank S. Putnam, 

54 Jasper R. Mudgett, 

55 Honry H. Ash, 

56 Edgar D. Clark, 

57 Albert W. Thomi)son, 

58 Harry L. Peacock, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Blacksmith, 
Painter, 
Blacksmith, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Janitor, 
Painter, 
Electrician, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
34 Downing Street. 
36 Broadway. 
5 Allison Street. 
6'hk Thorndike Street. 
98 South State Street. 
231/2 Perley Street. 
125 South State Street, 
114 South State Street. 
36 Warren Street. 
104 South State Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM-, 
PANY, NO. 1. i 



Will A. King, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

66 Frank T. Bean, 

67 Benjamin Ouillette, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Poster, 

73 Sam B. Morgan, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

76 D. Charles Parker, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

78 Carmi L. King, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 

82 William H. Reagan, 

83 Harry Leary, 

84 F. C. Young, 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk\ 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Renovater, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 
Steam fitter. 
Plumber, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 

5 Fremont Street. 
16 Avon Street. 

10 Jefferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 

13 West Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 

10 Avon Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 
100 Warren Street. 
63 South Street. 

Ins. Blk., School Street., 

11 Warren Street. 

68 South Spring Street. 

71 South Street. 

92 West Street. 

53 South Main Street. 

6 Fremont Street. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



389 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1. 



I. S. Wakefield, Captain. 

iadge 

^08. Names. 

1 M. S. Wakefield, 

3 C. G. Pinkham, 

3 M. J. Martin, 

4 E. O. Fowler, 

5 A. P. Turner, 



OFFICERS. 

C. G. Pinkham, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Occupations. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
1st Chauffeur, 
2(1 Chauffeur, 
3d Chauffeur, 

House Man, 
A. L. Downing. 



Residsnces. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



»IONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



OFFICERS. 

[enky Rolfe, Captain. Feank P. Robertson, Lieut., Clerk and Treas. 

rALTEE H. RoiiFE, Engineer. John B. Dodge, Steward. 



OS. Names. 
DO Henry Rolfe, 

31 Frank P. Robertson, 

32 Walter H. Rolfe, 
36 Fred H. Morrill, 
39 Alfred Beddow, 

11 William H. McGirr, 
10 John B. Dodge, 
13 Peter A. Keenan, 

18 George A. Griffin, 
30 Harry F. Jones, 

23 William Corbett, 
)3 Frank D. O'Brien, 

24 Delmar R. Jones, 

L4 Henry E. Templeton, 
L2 Ambrose Sweet, 

19 William H. Holbrook, 
L6 Loren H. Emerson, 

L7 Guy B. Chase, 

il Albert Cassavaugh, 

)5 Cornelius W. O'Brien, 

)8 Alfred J. York, 

L5 Carl G. Holmes, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Highway agent, 
Machinist, / 

Foreman, 
Sash-maker, 
Stationary engineer, 
Second hand. 
Janitor, 
Table-maker, 
Painter, 
Teamster, 
Axle-maker, 
Expressman, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wine clerk. 
Laborer, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Table-maker, 
Hotel clerk, 
Spinner, 
Miller, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 
39 Centre Street. 
45 Summer Street. 
44 Elm Street. 

36 Charles Street. 
59 Merrimack Street. 
92 High Street. 
15 Washington Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
44 Centre Street. 

19 Church Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 

41 Washington Street. 
67 Washington Street. 
9 Webster Street. 

110 Merrimack Street. 

Union Street. 

9 Union Street. 

43 South Main Street. 

Merrimack Avenue. 

42 Spring Street. 



390 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



George O. Robinson, Captain. 
C. E. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Names. 
George O. Robinson, 
C. E. Robinson, 
John G. Hutchins, 
William L. Batchelder, 
Samuel G. Potter, 
William E. Virgin, 
Rufus C. Boynton, 
Shad Gate, 
Herbert Knowles, 
Parker French, 
Westley Field, 
John W. Sanborn, 
Walter C. Sanborn, 
Arthur P. Swain, 
Michael Lacroix, 
Clarence Tibbetts, 
Reuben L. Gate, 
John T. Gate, 
C. A. Chamberlin, 
William F. Paige, 
Daniel W. Sanborn, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
Thomas Chase, 
Hiram Gardner, 
John Canney, 
Thomas D. Morrison, 
Fred Gardner, 
Howard Stevens, 
Fred J. Garter, 
Ross Gate, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Clerk, 
Engineer, 
Farmer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Farmer, 
Carpenter, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Wood-worker, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Machinist, 
Clerk, 
Machinist, 
Blacksmith, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Stonecutter, 
Horseshoer, 



John G. Hutchins, Treasurer. 
Michael Lacroix, Steward} 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Potter Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pena3ook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Mill Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



391 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

"West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 

Hiram E. Quimby, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 

Alfekd J. Eraser, Lieut, and Clerk. Frank C. Blodgett, Steward. 

Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



Names. 
3iram E. Quimby, 
i.lfred J. Fraser, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
reremiah Cotter, 
'atriek Ryan, 
i.bial C. Abbott, 
I'rank G. Peterson, 
'rank C. Blodgett, 
Mward Levering, 
ibram D. Cusliing, 
osepli Daley, 
iUther E. Rowe, 
Robert Henry, 
ienjamiu KemiD, 
larence J. Spead, 
Jthiir Spead, 
latthew H. Peabody, 
arl A. Anderson, 
arl A. Ekstrom, 
scar Johnson, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Sfbne-cuttei", 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Blacksmith, 
Quarryman, 
Silversmith, 
Laborer, 
Plumber, 

Stationary engineer, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 



Residences. 
490 North State Street. 
19 Clark Street. 
382 North State Street. 
5 En gel Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Street. 
346 North State Street. 
436 North State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
422 North State Street. 
455 North State Street. 

15 Lake Street. 

513 North State Street. 

River Street. 

439 North State Street. 

439 North State Street. 

14 Yiew Street. 

480 North State Street. 

16 Gladstone Avenue. 
516 North State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



OFFICERS. 



''ILLIAM E. Dow, Captain. 



John E. Gove, 1st Lieutenant. 



:ank D. Hurd, 
snnis Holloran, 

P. Davis, 
. H. Carpenter, 

D. Ashley, 
larles F. Thompson, 



S. S. Upham, 2d Lieutenant. 

MEMBERS. 

Elba F. Home, 
Arthur H. Britton, 
O. H. Thompson, 
W. K. Wingate, 
A. L. Walker, 
James Jepson, 



George H. Davis, 
Fred S. Johnson, 
F. O. Libbey, 
M. P. Thompson, 
A. G. Jewett, 
W. "W. Kennedy. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF 
PUBLIC WORKS. 



To the Board of Aldermen: | 

The Board of Public Works herewith submits its third' 
annual report for the year ending December 31, 1913. { 

The board has held thirty-nine meetings including hear- 1 
ings, which have been held on the premises covered by the 
petitions considered. | 

One hundred and nine petitions have been presented to 
the board ; ninety-three petitions have been granted ; four- j 
teen were referred to the various heads of departments and j 
two were given leave to withdraw. I 

Early in January a contract was made between the cityi 
of Concord and the Concord Electric Company to light the } 
streets with electricity for a period of ten years, using \ 
Tungsten street lamps, so called. The use of gas for street v 
lights Avas discontinued March 1, 1913. New lamps were ] 
installed during the year as follows : 

One on the Plains, corner of North Pembroke Road and \ 
Robinson Street. 

One, corner School and Fruit Streets. 

One on Gladstone Street. 

For a detailed account of work on streets and highways, 
garbage and sprinkling precincts, including receipts and 
expenditures, see report of superintendent of streets, here- 
with appended. 

For report of the work in the several sewer precincts, see 
report of the city engineer, herewith appended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, 
OLA ANDERSON, 
ELMER H. FARRAR, 
RICHARD A. BROWN, 
FREDERICK I. BLx\CKWOOD, 
EVERETT L. DAVIS, 
NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 

Board of Public Works. 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 393 

REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



Office of Superintendent of Streets, 

Concord, N. H., January 20, 1914. 

Po tJie Board of Puhlic Works: 

Gentlemen, — The superintendent of streets herewith 
lubmits the annual report of the work of the highway de- 
)artinent for the year ending December 31, 1913. 

The past year was an unusually busy one for the depart- 
nent, especially along the line of permanent work and gen- 
;ral repairs. In my last report, I stated that all the 
n'idges should be painted and expected that the work could 
)e done during the year, but it was impossible to paint any 
except the Horse Hill bridge. The others should be painted 
iarly next spring. The Main Street and Walnut Street 
)ridges in Penacook and the Federal bridge will have to be 
'eplanked and the Federal bridge may need new stringers, 
rhe plank for the Federal bridge is ready and the work 
nUI be done as early as the weather permits. The town 
)f Pembroke has not taken any action in regard to repair- 
ing the Richardson Mill bridge, but I think something 
should be done on it as it was necessary to restrict traffic 
:here last season. 

The usual amount of work was done on concrete walks, 
30th new and repairs, and quite a number of gravel walks 
were also built. There were not so many catch basins put 
n as usual, not that less were needed but it was impossible 
;o get the work done. There were a large number of iron 
pipe driveways put in and the calls for them are increas- 
ing on account of the automobiles. 

Considerable tarvia was used as a surface treatment on 
:he macadam last summer and the results were satisfactory, 
[t will be necessary to give all the macadam some kind of 



394 CITY OF CONCORD. 

surface treatment early in the season as the automobil(| 
traffic makes it necessary in order to hold the macadanj 
together. The state highway department furnished aid irl 
resurfacing the South Pembroke and Penacook roads ancj 
no doubt will do so each year for the work on the trunl 
lines through the city. i 

The trees in the city are still infested with the browntai!! 
and gypsy moths and the elm tree beetle. There was nc 
apparent flight as usual of the browntail in July and ill 
looked as though tiie trees might not be badly infested, bull 
later in the season we found that there were more nests^l 
than usual. I think possibly the smaller lights of the new; 
lighting system did not attract the moths and thereforei 
the trees became more thickly infested. The present indi-l 
cations are that we shall find that the gypsy moth has^j 
spread over a larger territory this year. In several previ- 
ous reports I have called your attention to the number of 
trees that have died and been removed and recommended 
that new ones should be set out. I think that a large num- 
ber of the trees have been killed by gas from defective gas 
pipes. If the department were to set out a few trees each 
year, taking care to plant the same kind of trees as are 
already on the street, we should in time do much toward 
improving the appearance of many of the streets. It is a 
deplorable fact that so many poplar trees have been set 
out in different sections of the city and I hope that no more 
will be planted in the streets. 

The use of oil last summer for dust laying instead of 
water, while possibly a little more expensive, gave much 
more satisfactory results. With oil the dust is laid for 
the whole day and evening, while with water, if windy, the 
streets are soon dried up and often become very dusty 
soon after the sprinklers have finished for the day. I think 
it would be wise to use oil again next summer. We had 
an unusually dry season last year and it was necessary to 
run more sprinklers later into the fall than ever before. 



BOARD OF rUBLIC WORKS. 395 

It is hard to find any place for dumping garbage within 
asy hauling distance and I would again recommend the 
(urehase of an auto truck for the collection of garbage, 
^'he recent extension of the precinct and the difiiculty of 
inding proper places for disposing of the garbage, have 
acreased the expense considerably and for that reason 

think a truck would be an economy. And not only do I 
elieve that a truck for garbage would be economical but 

smaller auto for general use in the department would be 

saving of time and a great convenience. During the sum- 
ler the work is scattered over the city and the time nec- 
ssary to go from one piece of work to another is consider- 
ble, especially when the extent of the city is taken into con- 
ideration. 

The permanent improvements for 1913 were the macad- 
miziug of a section of South Street from Fayette to Con- 
ord. This was a continuation of the work begun the 
ear before. Tarvia was used in construction and a good 
liece of road was built for $2,110.21. The work of macad- 
mizing on North Main Street from Chapel to' Pearl, which 
i^as put over from last year, was done in August. Con- 
iderable work was necessary in cutting down at Pearl 
,nd Chapel Streets on account of the grade but the work 
ias completed for .$2,550.29. Macadam was also put in on 
"Jortli State Street from Calvary Cemetery to the railroad 
rossing. A jilain water-bound macadam was built with 
,n application of tarvia put on later. With a very little 
epairing in the early spring and another application of 
arvia the road should be in condition to withstand heavy 
raffic. The section of macadam on Merrimack Street in 
'enacook which was put in a number of years ago was re- 
milt. On account of the drainage it was thought best to 
arry tlie macadam on a little farther than the original sec- 
ion and the work was done for $1,162.96. A section of the 
i^ittsiield road was graveled for $494.62. 

In recommending permanent improvements for the com- 



396 CITY OF CONCORD. j 

I 

ing year, I am fully aware of the fact that there are manji 
places besides those which I shall mention that need to bel 
improved and am suggesting only such places as it seems^ 
will serve the most people and at the same time continue! 
work which has already been begun. Therefore, I shouldi 
recommend that another section of South Street be macad-i 
amized and North Main Street from Chapel to Pitman.! 
South Main Street, which is the main thoroughfare into the| 
city, is in very bad shape. I have recommended for several! 
years past that the street should be macadamized but thei 
work has been put off on account of the work that should 
be done on the sewer there. Now that the sewer has been; 
relaid I hope the street may be macadamized from Thorn-! 
dike to Perley. With the adoption of the new traffic rules, 
which confines tlie traffic to oue side of the street, there have*' 
arisen many complaints of the condition of the paving on 
the east side of North Main Street from Park to Center. 
The granite block paving there is very rough and I think 
it should be taken up and concrete laid the same as on the 
west side of the street. The macadam on the Hopkinton 
road from the Eddy estate to Saint Paul's School is in bad 
condition and should be resurfaced as early in the season 
as possible. It should have been done last year and any 
further delay in repairing the road would be unwise. Some 
portions of North State Street above the railroad crossing 
are much in need of repair. Certain sections are fairly 
good stone chip road but there are a number of places that 
should be macadamized. Last year I recommended that 
Park Street be rebuilt but the work Avas not done and I 
would again suggest that it be repaired. Before any work 
is done there, however, the edgestone on the south side 
past the State House should be reset and the walks re- 
paired. The north walk on Capitol Street past the State 
House is also in very bad condition and needs to be rebuilt. 
Possibly the state might aid in the work of reconstructing 
the sidewalks. The work of graveling the Pittsfield road 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 397 

lould be continued next year. In Penaeook, the eontinu- 
tion of the work on Merrimack Street would seem wise 
ad I hope the work in Washington Square which was con- 
jraplated last year may be completed. 
The subject of building roads and the maintenance of 
lem is being more widely discussed every year and the 
roblems arising from the conditions of traffic, etc., become 
Lore perplexing. In the opportunities afforded me at the 
arious conventions which I have attended to meet others 
Qgaged in the same kind of work, I find that we are keep- 
ig abreast with other cities in our road building and are 
speriencing the same difficulties. I wish to thank. the 
►oard of Public "Works for the interest with which they 
ave considered the questions that have been brought be- 
ore them in regard to highway work, for their interest 
nd fair consideration assist greatly in the performance 
f the work of the department. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



398 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

WARD ONE. 




Borough Road . . . . 
Center 

Charles 

Church 

Cross 

Crescent 

East Canal 

East Canal 

Elm 

High 

Horse Hill Road. . 

Linden 

Main 

Mast Yard Road. . 
Merrimack Avenue 
Merrimack 

Penacook 

Pine 

Pleasant 

River Road 

River Hill Road. . 

Rolfe 

Runnells Road. . . 
Spring 

Stark 

Summer 

Summit 

Sweatt Hill Road. 

Union 

Walnut 

V.''arren 

Washington 

West Canal 

West Main 

Winter 



General repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks. 
CTeueral repairs 



Repairing concrete roadway 
" " walks. . . 

New concrete walks 

General rei^airs 



$56.04 I 

39.37 I 

17.94 

29.10 I 

4.45 I 

8.38 I 

9.03 I 

11.83 I 

14.03 I 

1.92 j 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 

Macadamizing 

General repairs 



I 1 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 



91.37 
78.45 j 
41.74 I 
5.59 ' 
115.41 ( 
46.30 I 
158.36 I 
282.49 ; 
6.83 ] 
241.59 I 
,162.96 I 
50.77 ' 
29.06 j 
13.25 
436.43 I 
5.93 I 
35.85 i 
58.18 ! 
24.69 j 
12.30 ' 
4.00 1 
26.95 j 
4.44 I 
5.38 ' 
2.72 
2.33 
108.14 
12.45 ' 
92.58 
10.71 
22.33 
5.44 



WARD TWO. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 


Appleton .• . . . 




$12.74 






9.22 


Cemetery Road 




10.49 


Clinton 




23.10 


Curtis Road 


16.71 


East Clinton 




7.54 


Eastman 




5.64 


Flaghole Road 




9.22 


Graham Road 




62.96 


Havward Road 




6.21 


Hot Hole Pond Road 




18.44 


Intervale Road 




42.22 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD TWO.— Concluded. 



399 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



ilburn Road 

)udon Road 

Duntain Road 

jcker 

jmbroke 

jnacook Road, Hoit District. . 
jnacook Road, Sanborn Dist.. 
?nacook Rd., Penacook Int. Dist, 
»na30ok Rd. and Penacook St, 

artsraouth - 

atter 

inborn Road 

;hooIliouse Road 

jwall's Falls Road 

laker Road 

laker Road, Virgin District. . 

lawmut 

yargo Road 

irgin Road 



General repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



$18.4-1 
22.08 
5.25 
6.92 
77.98 
38.25 
23.05 
17.18 

789.63 

152.96 
33.65 

123.80 

33.97 

5.02 

45.44 

178.76 

75.93 

72.76 

7.07 

106.23 



WARD THREE. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expen.se. 


eech Hill Road 




$32.85 
372 79 


og Road 




arter Hill Road 


11 .. 


17 44 


lark 


.. 


13.17 


olan 


.. .. 


1 30 


lestric Avenue 


.. 


67.14 


nge! 


11 .1 


71 59 


errin Road 


1. 


10.36 


isher 


It 11 


71 65 


Futchins 


" 


113 30 






1 61 


Inigbt 




2 89 


ake 




38.20 


ittle Road 

ong Pond Road 


" " 


8.35 
95 32 


fortb State 


11 


179 52 


'umber Four Road 




29 97 


'eabodv 


11 11 


3 06 


'ine Hill Road 


11 


39 40 


Juaker 


.1 


2 00 


liver Road '. 


11 ,1 


246 49 


laltmarsh Road 

andbank Road 


" " 


64.58 
24.81 


>econd 


11 It 


1 1 80 


'ewall's Falls Road 


11 


83.40 


'iew 


ti 11 


1 89 


Vest Parish Road 


It 


1 22.75 









400 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

WARD FOUR. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Abbott 

Academy 

Auburn 

Beacon 

Blanchard 

Bradlej' 

Center 

Chapel 

Charles 

Church 

Court 

East Penacook 

Essex 

Perry 

Piske 

Franklin 

Harrod 

High 

Jaclison 

Lyndon 

Maple 

Montgomery 

North Main 

North Spring 

North State 

1 

Pearl 

Pitman 

Ridcre Road 

Rollins 

Rumford 

Summer 

Tremont 

Union 

Valley 

Washington 

White 

Winter 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete roadway 
" " walks . . 

Macadamizing 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete roadway 

" " walks. . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . 

General repairs 

New concrete walks 

Repairing concrete walks. . 



WARD FIVE. 



STREET. 


Work. Expense 

! 


Blake . . 








Capitol 


Repairing concrete roadway | -SS 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD FIVK.— Concluded. 



401 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Center 

Durgin 

Fremont 

jiles 

3reen 

Huntington 

Liberty 

Merrimack 

North Fruit 

N'orth Main 

S^orth Spring 

STorth State 

Odd Fellows Avenue 
Park 

Pine 

Pleasant 

Prince 

Rumford 

School 

Summit Avenue .... 

Pahanto 

Warren 

West Washington . . . 



I 

General repairs $36.56 

Repairing concrete walks | 72.36 

General repairs | 3.26 

1 4.87 

Repairing concrete walks | 1.70 

General repairs | .50 

i 58.90 

Repairing concrete roadway ! 32.36 

walks ! 23.04 

General repairs | 4.65 

Repairing concrete walks I 1.00 

General repairs I 19.48 

Repairing concrete walks t 3.38 

General repairs | 221.12 

i 9.06 

Repairing concrete walks I 129.26 

roadway I 232.92 

General repairs | 6.55 

Repairing concrete walks I 23.73 

" ! 71.77 

roadway ! 120.79 

j 19.73 

walks 1 .79 

General repairs ! 20.62 

Repairing concrete roadway ! .41 

walks ! 36.80 

General repairs J 13.54 

I 20.68 

Repairing concrete walks i 56.96 

" " roadway ! 41.18 

General repairs 1 20.74 

Repairing conirete roadway ! 2.62 

walks I 30.72 

General repairs ! 177.76 

Repairing concrete walks I 90.14 

" " roadway I 69.47 

General repairs I 4.71 

i 2.96 

" " ' 267.91 

Repairing concrete walks ' 26.27 

" " roadway I 266.55 

New concrete walks ! 23.56 

General repairs ' 5.76 



WARD SIX. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Clinton 
Concord 

Downing 
Elm . . . 

Payette 
Rrove . 
Laurel , 
Lincoln 

26 



General repairs I 

Repairing concrete walks I 

New concrete walks I 

General repairs I 

Repairing concrete walks I 

General repairs I 

" I 



$30.02 

29.47 

11.86 

28.08 

14.41 

13.04 

52.52 

5.47 

7.17 

13.31 

3.54 



402 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

"WARD SIX.— Concluded. 



Monroe . . . 

Perley .... 

Pierce .... 
Pleasant . . 

South 

South Main 

South Sprini 
South State 

Thompson . 

Thorndike . 
Wall 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
" " roadvva 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 

Macadamizing 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete roadwa 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 



WARD SEVEN. 




Albin Road 

Allison 

Badger 

Birch 

Birchdale Road 

Bog Road 

Bow 

Broadway 

Carter 

Clinton 

Dakin 

Dartmouth 

Downing 

Fiske Road 

Fruit 

Glen 

Hall 

Hammond 

Harrison 

Harvard 

Holly 

Hopkinton Road. . . 
Hopkiiiton Old Roa-' 
Hopkinton New Road 

ITumphrey 

Iron Works Road. . . 
Kensington Road. . . . 

Kimball 

Long Pond Road. . . . 



General repairs. 



New concrete walks 

Repairing concrete walks . 
General repairs 



New concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD S^VE^N.— Concluded. 



403 



STREET. 



[ills 

[inot 

[orton 

oyes 

'illsbury 

leasant 

lockinKliam 

aw Mill Road ... 
ilk Farm Road. . 
outh 

outh Main 

outh State 

tickney Hill Road 

tone 

uttle 

i'^est 

biggin 

i^oodman 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

New concrete walks. . . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 



Expense. 



$33.51 

9.77 

3.83 

6.71 

2.43 

55.27 

163. 2f> 

50.87 

36.32 

31.98 

152.81 

221.11 

276.26 

110.27 

28.16 

85.13 

1.60 

12.67 

62.74 

41.97 

7.33 



WARD EIGHT. 



STREET. 



Sridge 

!handler 

)epot 

'reight 

laines Road 

lill's Avenue 

aekson 

jQudon 

forth Main 

forth Pembroke Road 
Mttsfield Road 

iexton's Avenue 

iheep Davis Road. . . . 
South Main 

South Pembroke Road. 

^ira Chase Road 

sugar Bowl Road. . . . 
Vater 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 

ReiJairing concrete walks. 

" " roadway 

General repairs 

Grading 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 

" " roadway 

General repairs 



Expense. 



$577.32 

8.71 

28.87 

10.17 

2.55 

39.39 

6.69 

28.65 

22.50 

4.17 

306.46 

72.17 

52.26 

246.51 

424.72 

494.62 

1.10 

15.60 

40.15 

102. 5T 

29.44 

10.15 

258.61 

21.00 

10.25 

8.04 



404 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD NINE. 



Expen; 



Auburn 

Bradley 

Break o' Day Road 

Charles 

Church 

East Penacook. . . . 

Franklin 

Gladstone 

Granite 

Highland 

Little Pond Road. . 
Long Pond Road. . 
North State 

Penacook 

Perkins 

Rumford 

Walker 



General repairs. ........ 

Repairing concrete walks. 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 

General repairs 



Macadamizing . . 
General repairs. 



$55, 

97,, 
104, 

17, 

35. 
136. 

13. 
1. 

20. 

12. 
171. 
108. 

30. 

15. 

7, 

137. 

43. 
203. 
,516. 

71. 
6. 

78. 

19. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 405 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

ppropriation, $35,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Central District. 

general repairs. 

ibor pay-rolls, $12,260.00 

E. T. & T. Co., telephone service, 31.45 

H. Clark, horses, 525.00 

mtwell & Baker, lumber, 104.16 

ving T. Chesley, trap rock, 15.75 

)od Roads Machinery Co., repairs, 217.65 

)bott & Clark, sand, 7.60 

^eless Tool Co., picks, 34.59 

H. Dunstane, curbing posts, 12.00 

ileb Brunei, labor, 18.00 

ige Belting Co., supplies, 103.87 

. F. Lincoln, lighting lanterns, 3.00 

)nitor & Statesman Co., advertising, 1.80 

B. Cloutman, gravel, 23.40 

U'k Upton, gravel, 1.50 

rley Badger, gravel, 11.50 

irl Chase, gravel, 2.20 

bert Saltmarsh, gravel, 16.50 

W. Paige, gravel, 1.50 

irrett Mfg. Co., pump, 30.00 
orge F. Tandy, repairs concrete 
roadway, 1,087.27 



406 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Jeremiah Colby, gravel, $3.90 

B. F. Griffin, gravel, 1.00 
A. C. Taylor, gravel, 1.50 
Brown & Batchelder, supplies, 3.15 
Mrs. Cros])y Knox, gravel, 1.60 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, oil, 8.28 
A. B. Stearns, gravel, 12.60 
Capital Hardware Co., supplies, 23.15 
Alfred Clark, superintendent, expense 

to convention, 45.00 

George L. Theobald, horse, 250.00 

Wood worth & Co., cement, 1.15 

Concord Electric Co., lights, 109.20 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 153.61 

C. H. Swain & Co., repairs, 2.85 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 6.47 
Plutchinson Building Co., stakes, etc., 19.00 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 41.43 
Concord Hardv/are Co., supplies, 193.50 
Brown & Saltraarsh, supplies, 3.00 
Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 86.22 
TreAvorgy Pen & Ink Mfg. Co., ink, .75 
A. R. Andrews Co., supplies, 4.85 
The Cragg Bindery, book, 17.00 
Alfred Clark, superintendent, cash paid 

out, 54.66 

Edson C. Eastman, supplies, .60 

Mrs. Helen Thompson, laundry, 10.00 

Tenney Coal Co., coal, 18.00 

Robert Crowley, coal, 16.00 

Orr & Rolfe, repairs, 3.34 

C. W. Drake, glass, .90 

Concord Water-Works, water, 24.00 

Harry G. Emmons, sheets, etc., 3.88 

W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 1,013.98 

Ford & Kimball, sled shoes, 6.18 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 407 

J. N. Abbott, hay, $199.99 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, j^aint, 12.50 
W. A. Sleeper, repairs, 10.90 
Thomas Robinson, oil, 7.00 
F. W. Paige, hay, 874.30 

C. Pelissier & Co., repairs and supplies, 165.48 
C. A. Fowler, hay, 108.10 
Ross W. Gate, shoeing, 317.85 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 31.00 
Norman Nicholson, shoeing, 27.25 
R. J. Macqnire, services, 114.50 
George D. Huntley, repairs, 136.80 
R. D. Wood & Co., pipe, 294.46 
Concord Water-Works, freight, 35.74 
Acme Road Machinery Co., repairs, 58.50 
N. E. Road Machinery Co., repairs, 247.60 
Concord Lumber Co., lumber, .75 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

repairs, 5.85 



$19,298.06 



CULVERTS. 



Labor pay-rolls, $6.91 

Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 7.20 



14.11 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 



Labor pay-rolls, building, $303.50 

repairing, 280.68 



584.18 



SIGNS. 



Labor pay-rolls, $1.99 

Fletcher-Prescott Co., lettering signs, 4.65 



6.64 



408 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Labor pay-rolls, $38.65 

Orr & Rolfe, repairs, 4.13 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., bibbs, 12.60 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

repairs, 2.15 

M. J. Lee, bubblers, 25.80 

George B. Quimby, use watering trough, 3.00 
Mrs. Frank Bourdeau, use watering 

trough, 3.00 

G. S. Milton & Co., repairs, .90 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 1.75 

Concord Water-Works, water, 180.00 



GUTTERS. 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $1,967.90 

repairing, 32.16 

paving, 7.41 



BRIDGES. 

Labor pay-rolls, $77.78 

Concord Electric Co., lights, 10.02 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 2.25 
George F. Tandy, repairing concrete 

floor, 6.37 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 52.00 

Boutwell & Baker, lumber, 506.00 



FENCES. 

Labor pay-rolls, $38.60 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, .70 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, .80 



2,007.4 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 409 

MACADAM. 

jabor pay-rolls, repairing, $275.85 
resurfacing Penacook 

Road, 96.30 
resurfacing So. Pem- 
broke Road, 210.39 
resurfacing No. State 

Street, 98.14 
resurfacing South 

Street, 16.93 
Ik resurfacing No. Main 

" Street, 29.00 
resurfacing Hopkin- 

ton Road, 65.72 

lass. Broken Stone Co., trap rock, ] 00.40 

ioston & Maine R. R., freight, 269.77 

.. C. Manning, gravel, 7.20 

larrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 1,255.37 

$2,425.07 



WINTER EXPENSE. 



abor pay-rolls, breaking roads. 


$9.09 


plowing walks. 


128.69 


shoveling walks and 




crossings, 


12.86 


sanding walks, 


328.36 


leveling snow, 


305.83 


rolling snow. 


26.00 


draining gutters, 


138.30 


snowing bridges, 


46.46 


bbott & Clark, sand, 


27.00 


lice C. Hutchinson, rent of land. 


12.00 


N. Abbott, sand, 


19.40 



1,053.99 



410 



city of concord. 
Penacook District, 



GENERAL REPAIRS. 



Labor pay-rolls, 



$1,495.60 



F. M. IMorse & Co., oil, 

Mrs. Ella ChadAvick, grindstone, 

Mrs. Emma J. Neller, pipe, 

D. F. Dudley, gravel, 
Sanborn Bros., powder, 
H. H. Chase, gravel, 
William Sawyer, gravel, 
George W. Gage, gravel, 
F. H. Currier, gravel, 

E. L. Davis, labor, 
Herbert I. Long, gravel, 
W. H. Meserve, cement, etc., 
•J. E. Brown, repairs tools, 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 

George F. Tandy, repairing concrete 
roadway. 



CULVERTS. 



Labor pay-rolls, 

W. 11. Meserve, cement, 

Mrs. Emma J. Neller, pipe, 



.92 

1.00 
.90 

7.30 

2.10 
13.80 
10.20 

2.60 
18.80 
25.50 

4.90 

2.69 
H.50 
42.01 
16.64 

14.03 
$1,673. 



$54.46 

.25 

15.00 



SIDEW^VLKS AND CROSSINGS. 



Labor pay-rolls, repairing, 
building, 



$150.71 
30.90 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 411 

FENCES. 



Labor pay-rolls, 

C. I\r. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 
Fowler Drug Store, paint, etc., 

D. Warren Fox, supplies. 



$93.45 


50.85 


19.95 


3.07 



$167.32 



WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $61.66 
account fountain in 

Square, 13.06 

Concord Water- Works, water, 40.00 

D. M. & A. W. Rolfe, use of watering 
trough, 3.00 

r. S. Holland, use of watering trough, 3.00 

E. E. Babb, repairs, 10.45 

F. E. Williams, mason work on foun- 
tain, 10.63 

[saac Baty, paint for fountain, 1.25 

Concord Axle Co., iron for fountain, .46 

J. E. Brown, labor on fountain, 3.80 

W. H. Meserve, cement for fountain, 1.96 
rhompson & Hoague Co., iron for 

fountain, 3.65 
Mrs. Emma J. Neller, pipe for foun- 



tain. 


2.56 


E. E. Babb, labor on fountain. 


11.67 


D. Warren Fox, supplies for fountain. 


.20 


GUTTERS. 




Labor pay-rolls, repairing. 


$49.22 


cleaning, 


583.12 



167.35 



632.34 



412 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SIGNS. 

Labor pay-rolls, 

BRIDGES. 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $52.15 

painting, 90.10 

Penacook Electric Light Co., lights, 62.50 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 69.00 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 3.89 
A. H. Britton & Co., paint, 54.40 



MACADAM. 



Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $23.46 

resurfacing Penacook 

Road, 1.94 



WINTER EXPENSE. 

Labor pay-rolls, sanding walks, $107.68 



plowing walks. 


78.90 


draining gutters. 


29.55 


snowing bridges. 


15.40 


rolling snow. 


18.00 


shoveling walks and 




crossings, 


43.04 


breaking roads, 


5.56 


D. F. Dudley, sand. 


1.00 



West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $1,041.54 

sanding walks, 31.30 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 413 

(abof pay-rolls, plowing walks, $40.11 



snowing bridges, 


15.38 


draining gutters, 


12.46 


shoveling walks and 




crossings, 


1.95 


repairing bridges, 


5.50 


fences. 


24.78 


watering troughs. 


2.00 


repairing sidewalks, 


21.38 


building sidewalks. 


80.95 


culverts. 


11.55 


cleaning gutters. 


198.31 


oiling No. State Street, 


6.78 


resurfacing Penacook 




Road, 


83.53 


Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 


1.20 


r. M. Grossman, repairing tools, 


1.20 


Andrew J. Abbott, right of way. 


2.00 


^. H. Currier, gravel, 


3.00 


I. H. Chase, gravel. 


5.40 


r. E. Shepard, Agent, sand, 


7.90 


Joneord Water-Works, water. 


40.00 


Irr & Rolfe, repairs, 


2.40 


ilden Spear's Sons Co., tasscoil. 


320.00 



East Concord District. 



Liabor pay-rolls, 


general repairs. 


$1,104.62 




sanding walks. 


4.27 




plowing walks. 


18.50 




leveling snow, 


3.86 




bridges. 


14.38 




culverts, 


20.26 




sidewalks. 


28.53 



$1,960.62 



cleaning gutters, 35.52 



414 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, $22.62 

H. A. Stuart, supplies, .50 

J. T. Batchelder, gravel, 3.40 

Luther Nutting, gravel, 7.40 

Concord Electric Co., gravel, 2.60 

Mary F. Robinson, water for trough, 20.00 

Mrs. Jennie Sargent, gravel, 5.50 

M. J. Lacroix, repairs, 4.90 

Boutwell & Baker, lumber, 181.86 

Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 22.00 



Penacook Intervale District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $164.25 

Ai J. Smith, use of watering trough, 3.00 



Egypt District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $47.50 

N. P. Richardson, u.se of watering trough, 3.00 



HoiT District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $142.22 

Fred Mayo, use of watering trough, 3.00 



Virgin District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $193.70 

Concord Hardware Co., pipe, 7.68 

F. P. Virgin, use of watering trough, 3.00 



145. 



204. 



board of public works. 
Sanborn District. 
iabor pay-rolls, general repairs, 



415 



$83.19 



Potter Street District. 

jabor pay-rolls, general repairs, $11.75 

olm T. Tenney, use of watering trough, 3.00 



I 



Hot Hole Pond District. 
jabor pay-rolls, general repairs, 



14.75 



10.50 



Horse Hill District. 
jabor pay-rolls, general repairs, 



7.59 



Number Four District. 



Liabor pay-rolls, general repairs, 
P. E. Dimond, gravel, etc., 
Ailfred Clark, gravel, 
P. H. Currier, gravel, 
Concord Hardware Co., pipe, 



$445.91 
15.60 

2.50 

28.00 

3.08 



495.09 



$34,545.85 
Transferred to salary superintendent, 144.99 

Transferred to sidewalks and crossings, repair, 170.23 

Transferred to trees, 138.93 



$35,000.00 



416 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CATCH BASINS. 

Appropriation, 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $437.70 
thawing, 14.55 
repairing, 41.77 
building, 12.42 
C. F. Thompson, rubber boots, 11.50 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight, .50 
Edson Mfg. Co., hose, etc., 73.62 
Concord Coal Co., slabs, 4.47 
Concord Pipe Co., repairs, .50 
WooQAvorth & Co., cement, 12.60 
Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 20.60 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., out- 
fits, 4.50 
Concord Hardware Co., pipe, 15.36 
Dickerman & Co., cement, 2.15 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 2.42 



Penacook District. 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 


$83.79 


repairing, 


14.26 


building. 


111.10 


rebuilding. 


7.00 


"Mrs. Emma J. Neller, pipe. 


16.20 


Samuel Holt estate, brick, 


19.10 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., out- 


fits, 


42.00 


J. H. ]Moore, agent, brick. 


2.63 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 417 



J. H. Meserve, cement, $8.31 

. M. Morse & Co., supplies, .72 



$305.11 



"West Concord District. 

abor pay-rolls, cleaning, 
building, 
/"oodworth & Co., cement. 
Dwell & Plummer, mason work, 
oncord Foundry & INIachine Co., out- 
fits, 
hoinpson & Iloague Co., pipe. 



ransferred to trees, 



$17.55 

22.60 

4.20 

13.20 

8.40 
4.80 


70 75 






$1,030.52 
369.48 



$1,400.00 



TREES. 



ppropriation, 


$3,000.00 


ransferred from general maintenance, 


138.93 


catch basins, 


369.48 


North Main Street, 


149.71 


South Street, 


183.77 



$3,841.89 



Expenditures — 

Central District. 

abor pay-rolls, trimming and remov- 
ing trees, $162.53 
removing moth nests, 1,836.23 
spraying trees, 170.47 



418 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



C. E. Staniels, insurance premium, 
Alfred Clark, superintendent, cash 

paid out, 
Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 
Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 
Elmer Tromblay, climbers, 
C. H. Martin Co., creosote, 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs, 
Dudley Bros., gasoline, etc., 
Stephen B. Church, repairs. 
Concord Foundry & jNIachine Co., 

repairs, 
A. H. Britton & Co., arsenate lead. 
Brown & Batchelder, oil coats, 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 
Page Belting Co., supplies, 
I. E. Gray, gasoline, 



$67.50 



15.90 


16.50 


4.76 


11.00 


4.75 


.50 


22.72 


24.60 


.88 


215.00 


6.00 


6.48 


.50 


3.30 



$2,569. 



Penacook District. 



Labor pay-rolls, trimming and remov- 




ing trees, 


$16.77 


collecting moth nests, 


457.11 


spraying trees. 


65.70 


Mrs. Lucia Hill, pruner. 


.80 


D. Warren Fox, supplies. 


4.83 


Hoyt Electrical Instrument Co., gas- 




oline. 


1.10 



546. 



East Concord District. 



Labor pay-rolls, collecting moth nests, $390.27 
H. A. Stuart, cord, .70 



390. 



board of public works. 419 

West Concord District. 
ibor pay-rolls, collecting moth nests, $334.99 



$3,841.89 
SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 

$1,000.00 



ppropriation, 




Expenditures — 




Central District. 




ibor pay-rolls, grading for concrete 




walks, 


$70.47 


setting edgestone. 


26.24 


eorge F. Tandy, concrete walks, 


436.23 


eorge F. Tandy, concrete crossings. 


142.64 


rs. Martha Weathers, edgestone. 


23.21 


)hn Swenson Granite Co., edgestone. 


97.66 


. H. Dunstane, curbing posts. 


2.00 



Penacook District. 

abor pay-rolls, grading for concrete 

walks, $14.28 

setting edgestone, 29.36 

ohn Swenson Granite Co., edgestone, 50.00 

eorge F. Tandy, concrete walks, 50.80 



ran.sferred to sidewalks and cross- 
ings, repair. 



$798.45 



144.44 



$942.89 

57.11 

$1,000.00 



420 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $2,250.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and cross- 
ings, new, 57.11 
Transferred, general maintenance, 170.23 



,477.;i 



Expenditures — ! 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, resetting edgestone, $4.83 

George F. Tandy, repairing concrete 

walks, 2,091.07 

George F. Tandy, repairing concrete 

crossings, 184.34 i 

$2,280.!' 

East Concord District. 
George F. Tandy, repairing concrete walks, 152.(' 

Penacook District. 

George F. Tandy, repairing concrete 
walks, $28.33 

George F. Tandy, repairing concrete 

crossings, 15.81 

44; 

$2,477.; 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



421 



PERMANENT WORK. 

South Street, Concord to Fayette. 
)propriation, $2,500.00 

Expenditures — 



bor pay-rolls, excavating, 




$553.05 




macadamizing. 




798.52 




paving gutter, 




199.11 




rrett Mfg. Co., tarvia. 




342.99 




stou & Maine R. R., freight, 




45.60 




ge Belting Co., supplies. 




7.80 




Qney Coal Co., coal, 




67.61 




orge F. Tandy, stone, 




27.90 




orge F. Tandy, repairing crossings, 


67.63 










$2,110.21 






msferred to Merrimack Street, 


Penacook, 


162.96 


North State Street. 






16.20 


trees, 






183.77 


expended balance. 






26.86 



Pittsfield Road, 



propriation, 
Expenditures — 

3or pay-rolls, grading, 
H. Kitterel, gravel, 
Dmpson & Hoague Co., pipe, 

expended balance, 



$2,500.00 



$500.00 



$448.12 




43.30 




3.20 






$494.62 






5.38 



$500.00 



422 city of concord. 

North Main Street, Pearl to Chapel. 



Appropriation, 




$2,700.0(; 


Expenditures — 




1 


Labor pay-rolls, excavating, 


$340.75 


1 


macadamizing. 


1,140.28 


1 


paving gutter, 


247.08 




P. H. Larkin Co., oil. 


3.60 




Page Belting Co., supplies, 


24.53 




Tenney Coal Co., coal, 


91.48 


1 

1 


Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


504.63 




Boston & Maine R. R., freight. 


68.40 




J. N. Abbott, sand. 


3.00 




George F. Tandy, repairing crossings, 


126.54 


$2,550.2 






Transferred to trees. 


- 


149.7 




$2,700.0 



North State Street, Calvary Cemetery to RailroaJ 

Crossing. 



Appropriation, $2,500.00 

Transferred from South Street, 16.20 



$2,516.2' 



Expenditures — 



Labor pay-rolls, excavating, 


$176.59 


macadamizing, 


2,150.67 


P. IT. Larkin Co., oil. 


1.80 


Tenney Coal Co., coal. 


175.95 


Page Belting Co., supplies. 


11.19 



$2,516.2! 



board op public works. 423 

MerriMxVck Street, Penacook. 



Appropriation, $1,000.00 

I'rausferred from South Street, 162.96 



$1,162.96 



Expenditures- 



jabor pay-rolls, excavating. 


$70.11 


macadamizing, 


869.79 


13. L. Davis, coal, 


19.50 


ilssex Trap Rock & Construction Co., 




trap rock. 


101.27 


Joston & Maine R. R., freight. 


63.86 


^enney Coal Co., coal, 


38.43 



$1,162.96 



SALARY SUPERINTENDENT. 



Appropriation, $1,600.00 

!'ransf erred from general maintenance, 144.99 

$1,744.99 

Expenditures — 
Alfred Clark, salary, $1,744.99 

PENACOOK SPRINKLING PRECINCT. 

klance from 1912, $28.86 

Appropriation, 500.00 

$528.86 



Expenditures — 

lahor pay-rolls, repairing carts, $13.80 

repairing standpipes, 2.90 

sprinkling streets, 442.50 



424 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Concord Water-Works, water, $50.00 
Penaeook & Boscawen water precinct, 

water, 32.00 

E. E. Babb, repairs, .68 



$521.8 

Balance to 1914, 6.9 



SPRINKLING. 

Balance from 1912, $2,516.31 

Appropriation, 5,500.00 

Deficiency to 1914, 1,131.53 



Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, painting and repair- 
ing carts, $96.72 
repairing standpipes, 22.75 
sprinkling streets, 5,801.74 
oiling streets, 154.07 
Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 7.80 
George L. Theobald, repairs, 3.95 
Abbot & Downing Co., repairs, 19.00 
George D. Huntley, repairs, 7.75 
Concord Water- Works, water, 700.00 
W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 118.25 
Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., valves, 36.45 
Orr & Rolfe, repairs, 6.28 
The Alden Speare's Sons Co., tass- 

eoil, 1,455.78 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 239.26 

The Texas Co., oil, - 478.04 



$9,147.8 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 425 

GARBAGE. 



lalance from 1912, 


$57.59 


.ppropriation, 


7,000.00 


ly Joint Eesolution No. 127, 


433.76 


leficiency to 1914, 


506.81 



Expenditures — 
abor pay-rolls, collecting garbage, $3,434.15 



collecting paper. 


618.98 


burning paper. 


135.53 


leveling ashes. 


589.82 


cleaning streets with 




patrol carts, 


2,193.01 


cleaning crossings. 


679.74 


eorge D. Huntley, repairs. 


7.60 


[. Thompson, brooms, 


47.00 


orman Nicholson, shoeing. 


21.60 


lobe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 


20.95 


J. S, Dole, grain, etc., 


231.90 


.. H. Britton & Co., garbage cans, 


14.88 


letcher-Prescott Co., lettering cans, 


3.00 



$7,998.16 



$7,998.16 



426 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Deposited with the city treasurer as follows: 

Hathaway Outing Club, labor on trees, $0.95 

A, C. Griffin, labor on trees, 7.70 

Concord Water-Works, labor, 25.50 

E. M. Stevens, labor on trees, 3.50 

A. J. Shurtleff, labor on trees, .40 
E. E. Graves, labor on trees, 7.50 
Boston & Maine R. R., labor on trees, 3.00 
Mrs. Etta Kimball, labor on trees, 1.65 
Lyman Jackman, labor, etc., 12.05 

B. A. Kimball, trap rock, 25.20 
N. H. State Hospital, dressing, 100.00 
Concord Electric Co., labor on trees, 6.00 
Miss May Kimball, labor on trees, .80 
Orr & Rolfe, labor, 5.00 
Mrs. Mary I. French, labor on trees, .60 
Concord Light & Power Co., labor, 11.75 
Union School District, collecting ashes, 134.36 
Concord sewer department, labor, 6.25 
W. J. Coffin, labor on trees, .20 
Boston & Maine R. R., labor, 2.00 
Andrew Bean, labor on trees, 1.50 

C. White, labor on trees, .75 
J. F. Brock, labor on trees, 1.50 
S. L. French, labor on trees, .75 
Andrew Farnum, labor on trees, 1.00 
Miss Sophie Fernald, labor on trees, 1.00 
Loren Clough, labor on trees, 2.00 
S. L. Batchelder, labor on trees, .75 
George Kenney, labor on trees, .50 
B. C. White, labor on trees, .75 
G. L. Butterfield, labor on trees, .45 
G. W. Stevens, labor on trees, 2.45 
Frank Potter, labor on trees, 33.50 
Vina D. Proctor, labor on trees, .45 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 427 

C. E. Wason, labor on trees, $0.60 

Walter Williamson, concrete, 11.46 

Allie Bartlett, labor on trees, .40 

Frank Osgood, labor on trees, 1.00 

Mrs. Ella J. Chad wick, labor on trees, 1.50 

Osro M. Allen, labor on trees, .50 

Mrs. Osro M. Allen, labor on trees, .75 

Mrs. Daniel Sanborn, labor on trees, 7.00 

F. S. Johnson, labor on trees, .85 
Miss Grace Whitney, labor on trees, .25 
A. C. Sanborn, agent, labor on trees, 2.10 
J. A. Donegan, labor on trees, .85 
I. E. Keeler, labor on trees, 1.40 

5. C. Eastman, labor on trees, 1.05 

6. P. Conn, labor on trees, 3.15 
A. H. Brittou, labor on trees, .25 
George A. Foster, agent, labor on trees, 7.40 
P. R. Sanders, labor on trees, .25 
W. J. Ahern, labor on trees, 1.40 

G. M. Savage, labor on trees, .30 
N. F. Carter, labor on trees, 1.05 
Charles Barrett estate, labor on trees, 1.60 
H. M. Cavis, labor on trees, 1.40 
H. T. Sweet, labor on trees, .85 
J. P. Nutter estate, labor on trees, 1.05 
G. S. Locke, labor on trees, .85 
Frank L. Gerrish, labor on trees, 1.75 
T. McIMiillen, labor on trees, .25 
Mrs. F. A. Bntterfield, labor on trees, .25 
Mrs. Mary R. Cummings, labor on trees, 1.85 
W. E. Hood, labor on trees, .35 
Harry R. Cressy, labor on trees, .20 
Frank Cressy, labor on trees, .30 
E. M. Shannon, labor on trees, .30 
H. F. Paul, labor on trees, .20 
Dr. J. H. Worthen, labor on trees, 3.65 



428 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Solon A. Carter, labor on trees, $0.35 

Henry Kimball, labor on trees, 2.55 

Edson J. Hill, labor on trees, 2.10 

F, J. Sanborn, labor on trees, .25 

Forest Linus, labor on trees, .65 

Mrs. H. L. Sanborn, labor on trees, .45 

John E. Gay, labor on trees, 3.40 

Alfred Barber, labor on trees, .75 

Mrs. Joseph Phaneuf, labor on trees, .25 

M. Felteault, labor on trees, .60 

J. H. Gallinger, labor on trees, 1.30 

"W. E. Hunt, labor on trees, .25 

Crescent Worsted Co., labor on trees, 5.85 

Mrs. A. P. Fitch, labor on trees, .90 

E. N. Pearson, labor on trees, .60 
Mrs. Alice W. Wilkins, labor on trees, .35 
Mrs. Fanny Minot, labor on trees, .45 
C. L. Jackman, agent, labor on trees, .60 
Mrs. S. D. Batchelder, labor on trees, 6.00 
Mrs. George Phipps estate, labor on trees, .15 
H. W. Stevens, labor on trees, 1.75 
John Lamprey estate, labor on trees, .90 
C. H. Farnum, labor on trees, 3.15 
B. P. Hodgman, labor on trees, .35 
L. C. Merrill, labor on trees, 1.70 
H. G. Emmons, labor on trees, 1.15 
N. M. Carter estate, labor on trees, .30 
H. H. Dudley, treasurer, labor on trees, 2.45 
Bradley estate, labor on trees, 6.00 
0. G. Hammond, agent, labor on trees, 1.60 
O. G. Hammond, labor on trees, 3.95 
Rev. T. J. E. Devoy, labor on trees, 1.15 
Mrs. M. E. Jordan, labor on trees, .70 

F. G. Chandler, labor on trees, .75 
George L. Theobald, labor on trees, .30 
Mrs. A. G. Fogg, labor on trees, .15 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 429 

August Truchon, labor on trees, $0.70 

Mrs. A. L. Gay, labor on trees, 2.50 

George Goodhue, labor on trees, .75 

Mrs. A. Locke, labor on trees, .15 

Mrs. "W. Moynilian, labor on trees, .30 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, labor on trees, .30 

L. A. Engel, labor on trees, 1.50 

George Moore, labor on trees, .15 

Mrs. D. S. Flanders, labor on trees, .45 

E. A. Moulton, labor on trees, .45 
George E. Iluekins, lal)or on trees, .30 
George F. Tandy, labor on trees, .50 
A. H. Chase, labor on trees, .45 
m-s. C. II. Thorndike, labor on trees, 2.90 
Kichard Johnson, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. Mary J. Lake, labor on trees, .25 
H. C. Pearson, labor on trees, .35 
L. D. Caldon, labor on trees, .90 
George Curtis, labor on trees, 1.00 
N. P. Stevens, labor on trees, 1.55 
Mrs. Henry Robinson, labor on trees, 1.70 
Eliza A. Cole, labor on trees, 2.45 

F. A. Stillings, labor on trees, 1.95 
F. C. Parker, labor on trees, .15 
Mrs. Carrie Davis, labor on trees, .30 
E. L. Davis, labor on trees, 1.70 
A. L. Hobbs, labor on trees, .50 
Adeline S. Emerson estate, labor on trees, 2.45 
Charles R. Corning, labor on trees, 2.80 
Henry F. Hollis, labor on trees, 4.50 
Mrs. Leonard JMudgett, la])or on trees, .25 
Mrs. V. C. Hastings, labor on trees, .45 
T. P. Sullivan, labor on trees, .25 
Hathaway Outing Club, labor on trees, 1.70 
C. II. Sinclair, labor on trees, 2.20 
Miss Harriett Lynam, agent, labor on 

trees, " 3.20 



430 CITY OF CONCORD. 

C. W. Lynam, labor on trees, $1.25 
Mrs. Amelia Hill, labor on trees, .25 
Thomas Hannigan, labor on trees, .25 
Mrs. M. C. Walker, labor on trees, .15 
George W. Peabody, labor on trees, .90 
J. E. Pecker, labor on trees, 1.50 
Mrs. 6. A. Randall, labor on trees, .35 
Bailey & Sleeper, labor on trees, .25 
J. E. Morrison, labor on trees, .60 
Miss Kate P. Blodgett, labor on trees, .30 

D. E. Mnrphy, labor on trees, 2.60 
II. A. L. Feltch, labor on trees, 1.60 
J. F. Webster, labor on trees, .70 
Memorial Parish House, labor on trees, .30 
Mrs, H. G. Sargent, labor on trees, .35 
Mrs. Ruth Breckenridge, labor on trees, 1.30 
J. H. Welch, labor on trees, 7.50 
]\Irs. S. C. Morrill, labor on trees, .70 
Paul R. Holden, labor on trees, 4.70 
D. T>. Taylor, labor on trees, 1.15 
H. F. Boinay, labor on trees, .60 
Mrs. Susan Green, labor on trees, .15 
Mrs. J. C. A. Hill, labor on trees, 5.00 
Fred Lovering, labor on trees, 1.20 
Mrs. Carl Blaisdell, labor on trees, .60 
W. D. Thompson, labor on trees, .60 
J. E. Fernald, agent, labor on trees, 1.15 
George H. Richardson, labor on trees, .25 
National State Capital Bank, labor on 

trees, .25 

B. A. Kimball, labor on trees, 1.30 
W. B. ]\lclnness, labor on trees, .25 

C. R. Dame, labor on trees, .45 
Frank Blodgett, labor on trees, 1.00 
W. D. Wallace, labor on trees, 1.80 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



431 



Martha E. Hills, labor on trees, $0.35 

A. F. Tandy, labor on trees, 4.50 

Mrs. C. R. Robinson, labor on trees, 4.00 

A. C. Fosgate, labor on trees, .35 

Mrs. J. J. Keane, labor on trees, .80 

W. A. Stone, labor on trees, 1.40 

E. II. JMerrill, guardian, labor on trees, .75 

IMary K. Abbott, labor on trees, 3.15 

Joseph A. Gervais, labor on trees, .65 

A. Faretra, labor on trees, .45 

L. Adella Bean, labor on trees, .60 

J. E. Robinson, labor on trees, .25 

Miss Kate Donahoe, labor on trees, .90 

Bernard Donahoe, labor on trees, 5.50 

J. Y. Lane, labor on trees, .30 

Penacook Park Grange, labor on trees, 2.00 

John Storrs, labor on trees, 1.40 

J. S. Matthews, labor on trees, .35 

A. H. Daggett, labor on trees, 1.40 

E. G. Burgura, labor on trees, .60 

I. H. Hammond, labor on trees, .25 

D. E. Sullivan, labor on trees, 1.05 

E. L. Cloudman, labor on trees, 1.05 
Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital, 

labor on trees, 1.00 

Mary A. Osgood, concrete, 31.99 

Mrs. A. ]\I. Oakley, labor on trees, .45 

David Evans, labor on trees, .25 

F. S. Streeter, labor on trees, 1.05 
Mary H. Pierce, labor on trees, 1.40 
Mrs. A. E. Dole, labor on trees, .30 
Mrs. George A. Cummings, labor on trees, .35 
P. J. Bolger, labor on trees, .60 
John Swenson, labor on trees, .50 
D. C. Howe, labor on trees, 1-15 
Herbert Smith, labor on trees, .70 



432 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. A. Mixer, labor on trees, $0.25 

J. P. Clough, labor on trees, 1.05 

W. D. Nutting, labor on trees, .90 

Mrs. L. C. Whittemore, labor on trees, .70 

John Kimball estate, labor on trees, .15 

E. C. Button, labor on trees, .60 

L. L. Hoit estate, labor on trees, .15 

C. J. Pelissier, labor on trees, .85 

A. L. Pelissier, labor on trees, 1.25 

Mrs. E. A. Stockbridg'e, labor on trees, 1.80 

A. P. Carpenter estate, labor on trees, 1.95 
West Congregational Church, labor on 

trees, .50 

Nellie S. Brown, labor on trees, .25 

E. B. McCrillis, concrete, 11.58 
George E. Chesley, labor on trees, * .90 

John H. Dudley, concrete, 11.98 

Fisher Bros., labor on trees, .15 

J. H. Carpenter, labor on trees, 2.55 

A. P. Nylen, labor on trees, .45 

A. J. Lane, labor on trees, .45 

Burleigh Marden, labor on trees, .75 

Mrs. Carl Eobertson, labor on trees, .45 

Mrs. L. M. Hall, labor on trees, .45 

N. B. Emery, labor on trees, .60 

John B. Baker, concrete, 11.91 

Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., labor on trees, .75 

Mrs. E. M. West, labor on trees, 2.10 

Concord Electric Co., labor on trees, 5.00 
Elizabeth Emerson estate, labor on trees, .25 

John Hutchins, labor on trees, 1.00 

G. W. Thompson, labor on trees, .45 

John T. Dodge, concrete, 16.86 

Nathan Haskell, labor on trees, 1.40 
State of New Hampshire, labor on 

trees, 2.20 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 433 

Mrs. C. M. Rogers estate, labor on trees, $0.30 

H. V. Tittemore, labor on trees, 1.10 

Mrs. S. R. Hood, concrete, 15.69 

Mrs. D. P. Goodhue, labor on trees, 1.75 

]\Iary B. Clement, labor on trees, .45 

J. F. Sullivan, labor on trees, .30 

Miss S. J. Leaver, labor on trees, 1.40 

James Bourlet, labor on trees, 1.05 

Mrs. ]\Iartha J. Weathers, concrete, 42.87 

Charles Gay, labor on trees, .65 

F. W. Johnson, labor on trees, .20 
Matson Bros., labor on trees, .45 
George Carter, labor on trees, 1.75 
Mrs. Samuel Holt, labor on trees, 1.95 
Mrs. R. S. Hoit, labor on trees, .35 
Mrs. J. F. Gill, labor on trees, 1.90 
Mrs. P. F. Richardson, labor on trees, 1.00 
Mary J. Dana, labor on trees, 1.30 
N. H. State Prison, labor on trees, 1.95 
C. F. Batchelder, labor on trees, .50 
Nancy F. Paul estate, labor on trees, .60 
William Green, labor on trees, .45 
Mrs. Catherine Welcome, labor on trees, .65 
John Wilde, labor on trees, .50 
Mrs. Mary Baril, labor on trees, .50 

C. 0. Partridge, labor on trees, 2.00 
P. G. Bartlett, labor on trees, .60 

D. Lynch, labor on trees, .70 
A. C. Stewart, labor on trees, .25 

E. H. Larkin, labor on trees, .75 
J. C. Thorne, labor on trees, 2.80 
Henry Holden, labor on trees, 2.50 
Mark R. Holt, labor on trees, 1.05 
L. H. Carroll, labor on trees, 2.80 
Henry Fletcher, labor on trees, 1.00 

G. 0. Pillsbury, labor on trees, .85 

28 



434 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. Ella M. Edmunds, labor on trees, $0.25 

G. M. Hutton, labor on trees, .35 

W. C. Davis, labor on trees, 1.30 

Andrew Koski, labor on trees, 3.00 

Mrs. P. S. Pendleton, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. E. S. Cook, labor on trees, 1.25 

Mrs. H. ]\I. Graves, labor on trees, .45 

Hugh Tallant, labor on trees, .45 

Mrs. W. II. Alexander, labor on trees, 4.25 

N. H. Historical Society, labor on trees, 2.20 

John Roberts, labor on trees, 2.00 

Edward Nash, labor on trees, 3.00 

F. S. Parker, labor on trees, .30 

Universalist Church, labor on trees, .20 

Alma T. Carlen, labor on trees, .35 
First Congregational Society, labor 

on trees, ' .85 

]\I. T. Berry, labor on trees, .25 

AV. S. ]\Ioore, labor on trees, .15 

Durrell & Taylor, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. J. F. Durrell, labor on trees, 1.10 

0. W. Durrell, labor on trees, .30 

Charles R. Walker, labor on trees, 2.10 

J. B. Walker estate, labor on trees, 45.75 

Rolfe & Rumford Home, labor on trees, 75.50 

Mrs. Ella Wells, labor on trees, .25 

F. L. Hodgdon, labor on trees, .30 

William E. Callahan, concrete, 10.91 

J. N. Patterson, labor on trees, 6.30 

Mrs. E. E. Earle, labor on trees, .20 

W. W. Elkin, labor on trees, 2.30 

Mrs. R. W. Powers, labor on trees, 1.05 

W. J. Simpson, labor on trees, 2.55 

Swedish Baptist Church, lal)or on trees, .25 

James Nolan, agent, labor on trees, .25 

James Nolan, labor on trees, 2.00 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 



435 



Omar S. Swenson, concrete, $28.17 

Mrs. F. W. Cheney, labor on trees, 2.35 

F. AV. Cheney, labor on trees, 2.45 

H. J\I. Gibney, labor on trees, .45 

Mrs. James Scully, labor on trees, 1.30 

Mrs. Augnsta jMorgan, labor on trees, .60 

Z. Trottier, labor on trees, .25 

J. F. Spellman, concrete, 11.31 
Mrs. John IMarsli estate, labor on trees, .30 

Hiram Colby, labor on trees, 1.00 

J. D. Ryan, labor on trees, 2.00 

Mrs. Ann Emery, labor on trees, 2.50 

L. B. Blanchard, labor on trees, .25 

T. B. Little, labor on trees, .35 

A. C. Griffin, labor on trees, .25 

Lewis C. Randall, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. V. I. ]\[oore, labor on trees, .60 

A. Allen, stone, 3.00 

J. Benson, labor on trees, .15 

W. H. Bean, labor on trees, .45 

Frank Collins, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. P. IT. Coleman, labor on trees, 1.40 

E. F. Wells, labor on trees, .20 

Harry L. Alexander, concrete, 16.68 

Mrs. A. McDonald, labor on trees, 1.10 

Old Fort Cemetery, labor on trees, 1.50 

Mrs. Nellie jM. Bnrke, labor on trees, .85 

Ambrose Sweet, concrete, 27.62 

William IMurchie, labor on trees, .50 

C. Chiklis, concrete, 19.80 

Charles Larson, labor on trees, .15 

P. E. Sawyer, concrete, 13.12 

Southard & Hayes, labor on trees, 1.35 

Clinton Stewart, concrete, 11.60 

E. K. Woodworth, labor on trees, 1.40 

T. M. Collins, labor on trees, .70 



436 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Reuben Gate, labor on trees, $1.00 

Miss Lena Minot, labor on trees, 2.85 

N. H. State Hospital, dressing, 75.00 

J. C. Richards, labor on trees, .25 
State of NeAv Hampshire, labor on trees, 6.00 

Mrs. W. M. Colby, labor on trees, 1.15 

Schuyler Morgan, labor on trees, .15 

Clarence Tibbetts, labor on trees, 2.00 

John Foley estate, labor on trees, .30 

A. J. Shurtleff, labor on trees, .30 

W. J. Grey, labor on trees, .50 

William H. Cahill, labor on trees, .25 

Mary E. Hagerty, labor on trees, .30 

Mrs. Hannah Bell, labor on trees, .25 

G. Chiklis, concrete, 9.32 

Isaac Saidel, concrete, 11.98 

H. "W. Stevens, labor on trees, 2.50 

]\Irs. M. E. Mooney, labor on trees, .60 

Harry Mooney, labor on trees, .15 

Mrs. Frank Nutting, labor on trees, 1.00 

Harry Dawe, labor on trees, .25 

James Stewart, labor on trees, .25 

John A. Gate, concrete, 15.58 

P. H. Cahill, agent, labor on trees, .85 

J. M. Inmann, labor on trees, .25 

Frank Fletcher, labor on trees, 1.00 

0. K. White, labor on trees, 1.00 

Andrew Abbott, labor on trees, 6.25 

W. S. Blanchard, labor on trees, .95 

Mrs. A. W. Flanders, labor on trees, 1.95 

Albert Saltmarsh, labor on trees, 2.00 

A. H. Chase, labor on trees, .75 

W. H. Horner, labor on trees, .50 

H. F. Smith, labor on trees, .25 

T. F. Clifford, labor on trees, .35 

Frank Cressy, labor on trees, .50 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 437 

"William Yeaton, labor on trees, $0.50 

Mrs. L. M. Sargent, labor on trees, 6.05 

G. A. Phelps, labor on trees, .75 

Adam Engel, labor on trees, .50 

J. F. Reilly, labor on trees, .45 

John True, labor on trees, 3.50 

Mrs. S. M. Jones, labor on trees, .85 

A. 0. Preston, labor on trees, .15 

W. A. Stone, agent, labor on trees, .75 

0. D. Crockett, labor on trees, 1.30 

Mrs. E. F. Sanborn, labor on trees, .25 

Isaac Hill, labor on trees, 2.85 

Margaret Shaughnessy, labor on trees, .45 

Walter Sewall, labor on trees, .80 

Mrs. 0. C. Sargent, labor on trees, .15 

Sarah J. Nutter, labor on trees, .45 

Mary E. Donovan, labor on trees, .30 

Miss A. M. Fletcher, labor on trees, 1.25 

Andrew Shepard, labor on trees, 1.50 
Miss Harriett Lynam, agent, labor on 

trees, .75 

Miss Frances Miuot, labor on trees, .50 

W. P. Ladd, labor on trees, .75 

W. H. Sawyer, labor on trees, .45 

Jonathan Weeks, labor on trees, . 1.05 

J. B. Ellis estate, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. E. J. Holt, labor on trees, .25 

Carl Hall, labor on trees, 1.50 

Mrs. Lucy Borden, labor on trees, 10.25 

M. Q. Bean estate, labor on trees, 4.75 

Mrs. S. C. Morrill, labor on trees, 1.80 
Joseph Archambeault estate, labor on 

trees, 3.25 

Howard Holbrook, labor on trees, 1.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., labor on trees, 1.35 

John George, labor on trees, .60 



438 CITY OF CONCORD. 

G. W. Stevens, labor, $7.77 

Mrs. H. E. Downing, labor on trees, 1.70 

John McCann, labor on trees, 1.15 

Mrs. Frances Whitaker, labor on trees, 2.25 

F. W. Paige, labor on trees, 1.50 

C. W. Hall estate, labor on trees, .30 

W. A. Lewis, labor on trees, 2.95 

Florence Young, labor on trees, 2.00 

Bennett Batchelder, labor on trees, .45 

W. S. Jones, labor on trees, 1.95 

John Collins, labor, 1.60 

N. A. Willis, labor on trees, 2.65 

Mary E. Thompson, labor on trees, 6.35 

C. J. Pelissier, labor on trees, 2.00 

C, C. Norwood, labor on trees, 1.15 

Joseph Cote, labor on trees, .75 

P. McCann, labor on trees, .60 

Earl F. Newton, labor on trees, .30 

Mrs. M. S. Osgood, labor on trees, .30 

John Thornton, labor on trees, .50 

John S. Moses, labor on trees, .30 

H. C. Brown, labor on trees, .60 

I. T. Chesley, labor on trees, 2.50 

F. A. Stillings, labor on trees, 1.00 
N. E. Granite Works, labor on trees, 7.45 
John Dnnklee, labor on trees, 15.60 
Henry P. Lamprey, labor on trees, 4.15 
H. M. Cook, labor on trees, .45 
C. E. Staniels, labor on trees, 3.00 

G. H. Folsom, labor on trees, .25 
Michael Chambers estate, labor on trees, .25 
C. W. Davis estate, labor on trees, .75 
A. B. Batchelder, labor on trees, .25 
J. K. Tibbits, labor on trees, .25 
M. D. Cnmmings, labor on trees, 7.35 
Edna F. Watson, labor on trees, 1.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 439 

J. N. Patterson, labor on trees, $1.00 

S. B. IMorley, labor on trees, .50 

Cemetery Commissioners, lalior on trees, 15.00 

Cornelias Lyons, labor on trees, .15 

E. L. Clondman, labor on trees, .30 
PI. A. Kendall, labor on trees, .50 
T. II. Dnnstane, labor on trees, .25 
Mrs. E. W. Hardy, labor on trees, .50 

F. R. Parsons, labor on trees, .45 
L. W. Hall, labor on trees, .15 
H. N. Dyke, labor on trees, .70 
Estate of M. H. Johnson, lal)or on 

trees, 2.95 

M. J. Powers, labor on trees, 7.80 
Concord Woodworking Co., labor on 

trees, 1.30 

E. H. Houston, labor on trees, 2.15 

Mrs. G. R. Cnshing, labor on trees, .25 

Ford & Kimball, labor on trees, .45 

W. H. Foster, labor on trees, 1.95 
Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital, 

labor on trees, .75 

Frank W. Paige, dressing, 60.00 

Frank W. Paige, street sweepings, 25.00 

Mrs. Frank "Woodbury, labor on trees, 2.00 

George Davis, labor on trees, .85 

W. E. Darrah, labor on trees, .90 

E. H. Brown, labor on trees, 7.50 

E. H. Brown, agent, labor on trees, 7.50 

H. B. Hammond, labor on trees, ,70 

E. C. Chapman, labor on trees, .25 

Peter Clark, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. George A. Cnmmings, labor on trees, 3.75 

A. W. Elliott, labor on trees, 3.00 

Crehan & Farrar, la])or on trees, .35 

Mrs. Jennie Abbott, labor on trees, 1.40 



440 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Mrs. W. ]\I. Carr, labor on trees, $0.30 

John Bluto, labor on trees, .25 

Mrs. M. Bateman, labor on trees, .50 

State Highway Department, state aid, 601.34 

Mrs. W. C. Leavitt, labor on trees, .25 

Augusta M. Fellows, labor on trees, .35 

E. M. Stevens, labor on trees, 3.85 

A. C. Fifield, labor on trees, .15 

C. J. Sennott, labor on trees, .60 

Union School District, collecting ashes, 99.40 

L. R. Burkett, labor on trees, .75 



$2,315.2 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 441 

REPORT OF SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1913. 

To the Board of Pntlic Works: 

The third annual report to this board, showing the 
funds available for construction and repairs, flushing, tools 
and maintenance, in the city precinct, the West Concord 
precinct, the East Concord precinct and the Saint Paul's 
School precinct, is herewith submitted in detail, together 
with a partial statement of the needs of the main sewers 
in the city precinct. 

City Sewer Precinct. 

The sewer in South Main Street, from Thorndike Street 
to the outlet sewer below Holt Brothers' shop, was re- 
lieved the past season by the laying of a supplementary 
sewer of Akron pipe from 18 inches in diameter at its 
southerly end to 10 inches in diameter at its upper end. 
This sewer will relieve the congested conditions hereto- 
fore existing in this vicinity and remove the cause of 
complaints from flooded premises on this line of pipe. 

The amount of hard-pan encountered for one thousand 
feet in length of this work added about $400 to the cost 
of the same. 

The sewer in South State Street from Perley Street to 
South j\Iain Street should be enlarged to relieve the con- 
ditions now prevalent during and immediately following 
sudden and heavy rainfalls. Your attention has been 
previously called to these conditions and you are familiar 
with them. Some action should be taken to remedy the 
existing conditions in the section served by this sewer. 

The Washington Street supplementary sewer was laid 



442 CITY OF CONCORD. 

into the easterly end of Washington Street to avoid the 
necessity of disturbing the new street surface laid in 
Nortli Main Street during the past season. 

The sewers in Washington Street, Beacon Street and 
Rumford Street, draining through Washington Street, 
should be relieved in the immediate future, as many 
complaints come from the territory tliese sewers serve. 

Washington Street from North Main Street to North 
State Street should be laid at once, and more on the same 
line if funds can be raised to prosecute the work. The 
extension of larger mains on this sewer division will af- 
ford relief to a large section of the city, which, at pres- 
ent, is not adequately provided with sewer accommoda- 
tions. Your board are already familiar with the claims 
presented for iiooded premises and you have seen the 
conditions existing after heavy showers or protracted 
storms. 

A new sewer was laid in Durgin Street and extensions 
were made to the sewers in Carter Street, Stone Street, 
Oak Street and Ridge Road. 

Work on the Palm Street sewer was started at the 
North State Street main and about forty feet of pipe was 
laid to enable the street to be surfaced with macadam 
and avoid disturbing the new roadway when completed. 
Lack of funds prohibited the completion of this sewer. 
The northerly end of Palm Street should be brought to 
grade before any attempt is made to lay a sewer therein. 

The macadam on North State Street required the rais- 
ing of man-holes and lamp-holes, which were changed to 
fit the new conditions at an expense of $194.75. 

On South Street the expense of changing lamp-holes 
was $5.10. 

On North Main Street the expense of changing man- 
holes was $4.57. 

The usual spring and fall flushings were given the 
entire system and minor repairs made where needed at 
the time of flushing. 



board of public works. 443 

New Work, 1913. 
south main street. 



850 feet of 18-mch pipe 


laid. 




676 feet of 15-inch pipe 


laid. 




534 feet of 10-inch pipe 


laid. 




Paid for labor, 




$2,705.93 


pipe. 




1,141.91 


cement, 




77.40 


brick. 




115.50 


trucking, 




96.25 


castings. 




67.50 


wronght-iron. 




3.92 


sand. 




7.50 


blacksmithing. 




79.05 


oil, 




4.80 


repairs. 




1.95 


supplies. 




1.59 


labor masons. 




65.20 


coal-tar concrete crossings, 


9.94 



$4,378.44 
Average cost per lineal foot, $2.125-[-. 
Material excavated, gravel, clay and hard-pan. 

WASHINGTON STREET. 

62.5 feet of 30-inch pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $145.50 

pipe, 184.00 

cement, 8.60 

brick, 9.75 

trucking, 12.25 

crushed stone, 2.00 

oil, .60 



$362.70 



Average cost per lineal foot, $5,803-}-. 
Material excavated, sand and gravel. 



444 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PALM STREET. 

30 feet of 10-ineh pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $36.16 

pipe, 7.70 

cement, 2.15 

brick, 10.50 

trucking, 4.75 

wroiight-iron, .45 

$61.71 
Average cost per lineal foot, $2,057, including man-hole. 
Material excavated, sand and gravel. 

OAK STREET. 

68 feet of S-inch pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $28.5C 

pipe, 18.26 

trucking, 3.00 

oil, M 



Average cost per foot, $0,740+. 
Material excavated, gravel and hard-pan. 



$50.36 



STONE STREET. 



148 feet of 10-inch pipe laid. 
Paid for labor, $34.69 



pipe, 



53.12 



trucking, 1.00 

$88.81 

Average cost per lineal foot, $0,600-]-. 
Material excavated, sand. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 445 
CARTER STREET. 

108 feet of 10-ineh pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $33.65 

pipe, 37.12 

trucking, 4.00 



Average cost per lineal foot, $0.692-f-- 
Material excavated, sand. 



RIDGE ROAD. 



Average cost per lineal foot, $1,074-]-. 
Material excavated, hard-pan. 



Average cost per lineal foot, $1.246-f-. 
Material excavated, sand and gravel. 



$74.77 



110 feet of 8-inch pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $90.72 

pipe, 25.52 

trucking, 2.00 



$118.24 



DURGIN STREET. 

249 feet of 10-inch pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $142.25 

pipe, 88.01 

cement, 8.60 

brick, 21.90 

trucking, 12.50 

castings, ' 26.85 

wrought-] ron, ,45 

coal-tar concrete, 9.89 



$310.45 



446 



city of concord. 
Repairs. 



Beacon Street, 

Downing Street, 

McKinley Street, 1912 bill, 

North ]\rain Street, account of macadam, 

Chandler Street, 1912 bill, 

North State Street, account of macadam, 

Dow sewer. 

South Street, account of macadam, 

Prospect Street, 



Flushing sewers. 

Tools, 

Covers for sewer plans. 



Paid for new work. 

Total expended for construction and re- 
pairs. 

Funds available for construction and repairs. 
Expended, 

Unexpended balance December 31, 1913, 

Sewers laid, 1913, 2,835.5 feet. 



Sewers built in city precinct to December 31, 1913 : 

n-inch pipe, 1,928 feet. 

8-inch pipe, 25,463 " 

10-inch pipe, 52,737 " 

12-inch pipe, 39,427 " 

15-inch pipe, 12,820 " 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 447 

18-inch pipe, 7,134 feet. 

20-ineh pipe, , 4.549 

24-inch pipe, 3,370 

30-inch pipe, 1,086.5 

Brick, 12-ineh x r4-inch, 2,758 

14-incli X 22-inch, 350 

16-inch X 24-inch, 1,848 

20-inch x 32-inch, 2,527 

24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 

28-inch x 48-inch, 883 

24-inch circular, 1,515.5 

30-inch ' ' 402 

38-ineh '' 4,080 

24-incli cast-iron, • 1,576 

80-inch cast-iron, 1,054.5 

42-inch segmental block, 1,055 

42-inch brick and concrete, 246 

60-inch brick and concrete, 1,450 



Total to date, 186,196.5 ft. 

Total miles in city precinct to date, 35.264+. 

West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

The nsual spring and fall flushing of the sewer system 
in this precinct was made at an expense of $26.19. No 
repairs or extensions were made during the past season. 

Cash on hand for construction and repairs, $153.26 

Expended, 26.19 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1913, $127.07 



448 CITY OF CONCORD. i 

I 

East Concord Sewer Precinct. ' 

"i 
No repairs were needed and no extensions were built; 

in this precinct the past season, leaving the balance on| 

hand the same as last season, viz. : $127.53. i 

Saint Paul's School Sewer Precinct. 

No repairs or extensions were made to the system in! 
this precinct during 1913. The only charge against thel 
precinct Avas the usual annual charge of the water-works 
for the use of water in the flush-tanks. 

Balance for 1913, $62.55| 

Expended, 1913, 45.00| 



Balance December 31, 1913, $17.55 

I 

Late in the fall a cast-iron relief server was built across 
the New Hampshire Spinning Mills' canal in Penacook 
and extended to the river with Akron pipe. This sewer 
should afford relief to the East Canal Street sewer in' 
times of excessive flow in it. The cost of same will be 
shown in the Penacook sewer precinct report. 

For the many courtesies extended to this department,! 
I wish to express my appreciation. ! 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



PUBLIC PARKS. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council: 

The Park Commissioners present herewith their report 
for the year ending December 31, 1913 : 

Receipts. 

General appropriation, $3,500.00 

For Penaeook Park, unexpended, 125.00 



$3,625.00 
Deficit on general appropriation, 17.25 



$3,607.75 
To cover overdraft, 69.68 



Expenditures. 




$3,677.43 


Salary of superintendent, 




$1,080.00 


WHITE PARK. 






Paid for labor, 


$1,121.98 




labor on ice, 


9.00 




labor removing moths, 


41.25 




shrubs. 


31.55 




balance due on fence, 


149.35 




fertilizer, 


60.80 




swan purchased. 


13.50 




care of swans and ducks, 


40.00 




tools and hardware, 


14.60 




city water. 


20.00 




incidentals. 


76.18 




repairs. 


39.97 


1 f:i« i« 



450 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ROLLINS PARK. 



Paid for labor, 


$491.25 


tools and hardware, 


49.00 


incidentals, 


49.80 


shrubs and flowers, 


18.45 


city water. 


10.00 


repairs. 


4.45 


purchase of deer. 


25.00 



$647.95 

PENACOOK PARK. 

Paid for labor, etc., 107.75 1 

BRADLEY PARK. 

Paid for labor, 47.50 



FISKE PARK. 




Paid for labor, 


$57.35 


I. T. Chesley, new walk, 


38.50 


for incidentals, 


5.70 


COURT HOUSE PARK. 




Paid for labor, 




RIDGE AVENUE PARK. 




Paid for labor, 




PECKER PARK. 




Paid for labor. 





301.55 



36.001 



22.50 



12.0' 

AREA AT SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 

Paid for labor, 4.0C 



$3,677.4^ 



PUBLIC PARKS. 451 

Not much that is new can be said of the parks for the 
past year. The superintendent has continued his good 
work and maintained the character of former years. The 
commissioners hope to extend the iron fence around White 
Park during the coming year. 

The sanitary drinking fountain has thus far been a suc- 
cess and we shall hope to install others. A new swan has 
been purchased during the last summer. In June, at 
"White Park, the schools continued the folk dances which 
were inaugurated last year. The large number present 
showed the interest of parents and others in these delight- 
ful dances. The commissioners will gladly add their co- 
operation in making this a success year after year. 

The continued encroachment of the moth pest, and this 
year of the gypsy moths, which have infested the oak grove 
on the west side of the park, calls for a larger expenditure 
of money and possibly a sacrifice of the trees. 

At Rollins Park the rustic work will practically all have 
to be renewed this year. The bridge and pavilion have 
become of no account. A new buck deer was purchased 
of the Blue Mountain Forest Association. The superin- 
tendent gives much care and cultivation to plantations of 
laurel and rhododendrons and it is most distressing to find 
that people who do not know any better mutilate the plants 
and carry them away from the grounds. The superin- 
tendent has had charge of the plants and flowers at Memo- 
rial Arch during the summer. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, 3Iayor, ex officio, 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 

GARDNER B. EM.AIONS, 

BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 

WTIiLIAM P. FISKE, 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 

Commissioners. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE 
JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year 1913 : 

The four hundred dollars ($400) appropriated for the 
current expenses of the playground has been expended in 
as judicious a manner as the committee could direct. The 
appearance of this playground has been a constant reproach 
to the interested citizens of Concord and efforts have been 
expended on improving conditions. Grading — a necessary 
but expensive process — and new apparatus in accordance 
with modern ideas are certainly steps toward making this 
place more attractive and useful. 

It is a long and costly proceeding to transform an un- 
sightly vacant lot into a civic playground worthy of the 
name. 

The playground has been enjoyed by the children of the 
neighborhood and interest in its success was shown by the 
enthusiastic groups that witnessed the games and sports 
of its closing day. The committee gratefully acknowledges 
the kindness of Miss Kent and her associates in the games. 

There is an opportunity for civic betterment in the play- 
grounds unequaled in any department in the city, and the 
opportunity should not be overlooked. 

Itemized Expenses. 

Labor, $69.50 

D. Hyland, caretaker, 77.00 

Thompson & Hoague, supplies, 32.18 



JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 453 

C. P. Little, teaming, $45.00 

Concord Water- Works, 6.00 

C. W. Drake, glass, .80 

J. P. Kelley, badges, . 2.25 

J. Framanian, soda, .65 

F. W. Woolworth, candy, 1.00 

W. H. Reed, teaming, 1.00 

W. Carpenter, paint, 2.00 

I D. E. Murphy, supplies, 13.63 

'. Miss Kent, cash paid out, 1.20 

M. E. Clifford, apparatus, 120.00 

' W. S. Chenitte, labor and supplies, 5.20 

I Eastern Nurseries, poplars, 5.20 

1 Concord Lumber Co., supplies, 7.16 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 2.50 

t Frank Atkinson, express, 2.21 

i Wright & Ditson, supplies, 4.62 

Unexpended, .90 



Total, $400.00 

Appropriated, $400.00 

EUGENE J. O'NEIL, 
LUELLA A. DICKERMAN, 
R. A. BROWN. 



REPORT OF THE PUBLIC BATH. 



Concord, N. H., September 6, 1913. 

Mayor C. J. French. 

Dear Sir, — The season of 1913 which just closed has 
been one of the most successful seasons since the public 
bath was instituted. 

The daily attendance was up to the average except dur- 
ing the hot spell of July when it surpassed all expectations. 

A pleasing feature of this year's season at the public 
bath was allowing the use of the public bath to women bath- 
ers on Wednesday afternoons. The experiment proved 
most successful, as the young women of the city took ad- 
vantage of the opportunity to learn to swim and came 
over to the river in great numbers. 

FoUoM'ing the custom of every year, a water carnival 
was run off for the benefit of the boys on Labor Day. Suit- 
able prizes, contributed by the merchants of tlie city, were 
awarded for each event. 

The following data is a record of the attendance, etc. : 

Opened June 14, 73 

Week ending June 21, 1,318! 

28, 1,403 

July 5, 1,822 1 

12, 1,6121 

19, 1,561 1 

26, 1,6281 

Aug. 2, 1,463 

9, 1,342! 

16, 1,410 



REPORT OF PUBLIC BATH. 455 

Week ending Aug. 23, ' 1,207 

30, 1,036 

Sept. 5 (closed), • 632 



Total attendance, 16,507 

Total attendance of women bathers : 

July 16, 41 

23, 102 

30, 98 

Aug. 6, 71 

13, 137 

20, 186 

27, 146 

Sept. 3, 153 



Total, 934 

Number of boys saved from probable drowning, 6. 
(Cause, in each case, going beyond their depth.) 

Number of boys who have learned to swim this sea- 
son, 26. 

Number of girls who have learned to swim this sea- 
sou, 34. 

Recommendations. 

1. A suitable bath house be built for the use of girl bath- 
ers. (The city owns plenty of rough lumber and this can 
easily be accomplished, the only cost being for the labor.) 

2. A new boat be secured. (The present one has out- 
lived its usefulness.) 

Eespectfully submitted, 

TIMOTHY REARDON, 

l7istructor. 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY 
COMMISSIONERS. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The amount placed at our disposal for the year 1913 for 
the Old North Cemetery was $651.10 and we have expended 
$647.02, and for Blossom Hill Cemetery we received 
$6,980.36 and expended $7,800.19, for a detailed account 
of which we refer j^ou to the report of the city treasurer. 
The large expenditures at Blossom Hill Cemetery were 
occasioned by the filling and grading of a new plot which 
we were obliged to do on account of the demand for more 
lots, the sale of which will soon return the extra expense 
incurred. The burials for the past year have been: In 
Blossom Hill Cemetery, one hundred and eighty-five (185) ; 
and in the Old North, seventeen (17). The chapel has 
been used seven (7) times. 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, 

Secretary. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Council: 

Your committee on West Concord Cemetery respectfully! 
submit the following report for 1913 : 



1913. 








Jan. 1. 


Cash on hand. 


$5.57 






Sale of lots, 


20.00 


$25.57 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 457 

Paid out: 



May 16. 


A. W. Hobbs, 


$5.70 




Oct. 11. 


"Water bill, 


6.00 




Dee. 31. 


W. F. Thayer, 


10.00 


$21.70 






]014. 








Jan. 1. 


Cash on hand, 




$3.87 



J. I\I. GROSSMAN, 
GEORGE R. PARMENTER, 

Committee. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Gemetery Gommittee of East Goncord respectfully 
su1)niit their report for 1913: 

Pine Grove Gemetery. 

receipts. 

Appropriation. $150.00 

One half sale of lots, 12.50 

$162.50 



EXPENSES. 



1913. 






Sept. 4. 


Scott French, mowing, etc., 


$25.00 


Dec. 1. 


Scott French, teaming. 


71.00 




S. L. French, labor, 


26.00 




Gharles Murray, labor. 


1.75 




Herbert Gardner, labor. 


2.63 


23. 


Scott French, teaming. 


22.50 




Gash on deposit, 


12.50 




Unexpended, 


1.12 



$162.50 



458 city op concord. 

Old Fort Cemetery. 

receipts. 
Appropriation, 

EXPENSES. 

Highway department, gathering moth 

nests, $1.50 

Capital Hardware Co., lead and oil, 6.28 

Scott French, painting, mowing, etc., 15.75 

Unexpended, 6.47 



RECEIPTS. 



Special appropriation for iron fence 
and grading, 



EXPENSES. 



1913. 






Sept. — . 


Concord Hardware Co., 


$98.24 


Oct. 1. 


Scott French, labor, 


10.00 




Samuel L. French, labor, 


10.00 




Concord Lumber Co., lumber. 


.70 




H. T. Corser, livery team, 


4.00 




C. H. Martin Co., paint, 


1.25 


Nov. 1. 


Samuel L. French, labor, 
Scott French, labor, loam. 


8.50 




etc., 


29.45 


Dec. 1. 


Samuel L. French, labor, 
Scott French, labor, seed. 


5.00 




etc., 


5.45 




Unexpended balance. 


27.41 

ct9nn 




— — *4^ta-i w 

SCOTT FRENCH, 






Secretary 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 459 

To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

The Millville Cemetery Committee respectfully submit 
the following report of the receipts and expenditures for 
the year 1913 : 

RECEIPTS. 

Interest on trust funds, $53.94 

G. L. Yoe, one half lot No. 12, 2.50 

Albert P. Baker, one half lot No. 85, 2.50 
Aunie A. Willard, one half lot No. 

137, 10.00 
Gihnan PI. Baker, one half lot No. 

Ill, 7.50 

Mrs. Pike, 2.00 

City treasurer, 75.00 

$153.44 



EXPENDITURES. 




F. G. Proctor, 


$70.00 


A. H. Britton, 


6.00 


I. T. Chesley, loam, 


9.25 


W. S. Dole, cement, 


.60 


Sharpening lawn mowers. 


4.50 


Water bill, 


6.00 


Unexpended, 


57.09 



$153.44 

J. N. ABBOTT, 
FRANK G. PROCTOR, 
ALBERT S. TRASK, 

Committee. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The board of assessors submits to your consideration the 
following facts and figures showing the valuation of the 
city and its school districts and special precincts, with thej 
amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the tax col- 
lector for collection. 

More inventories were filed than were filed in any previ- 
ous year, involving much clerical work, but they were of 
great aid to this department. 

The valuation placed on property by this board has been 
contested in three instances : The Boston & Maine Railroad, 
Woodworth & Co., and Roselle M. Day, and these cases are 
now before the court for adjudication. 

The total valuation of the city was materially increased! 
by property taxable to the estate of Mary Baker G. Eddy. 
A large part of this property may be removed from the city 
during the coming year. 



ASSESSORS REPORT. 



461 



Tabulation op Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 

Valuations of City and Precincts with 

Rate for Each in 1913. 



Warrant. 



Amount 

of 
warrants. 



Tax 

rate per 

$1,000. 



Assessed val- 
uation of 
city and pre- 
cincts. 



State 

County 

School required by law. 

City 

Extra for schools: 

Union 

Town 

( No. 20 

Penacook ] 

( Union* 

Precincts: 

Sprinkling 

Garbage 

City sewer 

City lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sprinkling ... 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord liglits. . . , 

West Concord sewer 

East Concord lights 

East Concord sewer. . . . 

St. Paul's School sewer 



$51,736,001 
35.945.5'2 I 
48,502.00 
38,000.00 J 

67,393.00 

2,000.00 

881.00 

7,290.00 

5,500.00 

7,000.00 

7,440.00 

18,800.00 

1,350.00 

500.00 

2,778.00 

740.00 

865.00 

535.00 

117.50 

560.00 



$8.80 



3.90 

1.00 

.60 

3.70 

.40 
.50 
.50 
1.20 
1.10 
.50 
2.30 
.80 
2.50 
2.30 
4.50 
3.60 



520,482,846 



17,658,542 
1,284,604 
1,539,700 
2,034,630 

15,131,637 

14,000,012 

15,952,807 

10,521,172 

1,241,710 

1.114,890 

1,222,320 

987,240 

358,890 

236,840 

26,070 

162,320 



*Penacook 17nion School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



462 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Number of shares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hainpl 
shire and credited to this city. 



Railroad. 

Boston & Maine 

Concord & Montreal 

Concord & Portsmouth., 

Connecticut River 

Fitchburg 

Manchester & Lawrence 

Nashua & Lowell 

Nashua Street 

New Boston 

Northern 

Peterborough 

Pemige wasset Val ley 

Suncook Valley 

Wilton 



1910. 



1911. 



1912. 



1913. 



291 

10,485 

118 

362 

27 

429 

17 

412 

72 

1,395 

8 

196 

51 

5 



346 

10,270 

118 

362 

27 

457 

17 

468 

72 

1,516 

8 

190 

53 

5 



323 

13,216 

118 

362 

27 

3G0 

18 

509 

60 

1,281 

8 

108 

46 



39: 

9,77; 

1 

ll;i 

I 
34( 

I 
2, 

36j 

1 

«| 

7'; 

1,20 

te! 

4 



assessors report. 46 j 

Inventory of the City op Concord. 









No. 


Valuation. 


Polls, 






5,687 


$568,700 


Im|)roved aud unimproved 


lands 


and 






buildings, 








15,637,384 


Horses, 






1,229 


163,545 


Asses and mules, 






2 


300 


Oxen, 






14 


1,545 


Cows, 






1,023 


40,575 


Other neat stock, 






127 


3,760 


Sheep, 






94 


564 


Hogs, 






93 


1,130 


Fowls, 








285 


Carriages and automobiles. 








187,855 


Portable mills, 








1,700 


Boats and launches, 








1,950 


Stock in public funds, 








120,500 


Stock in banks and other corporations in state, 


225,825 


Wood and lumber. 








15,750 


Money on hand, at interest, 


or on 


deposit, 


1,379,028 


Stock in trade, 








1,911,500 


Milling, carding machines, 


and factories and 




their machinery, 
Total, 








220,950 


$20,482,846 



Amount of taxes committed to collector, $305,460.56. 

Average rate per cent, of taxation for all purposes, 
$1.49+. 



464 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



List of Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed ini 
Each Ward, 1912 and 1913. ! 



Wards. 



Polls. 



1912. 



Valuation. 



1912. 



1913. 



Resident tax assessed, i 



1912. 



1913. 



Ward 1. 

Ward 2. 
Ward 3. 
Ward 4. 
Ward 5. 
Ward 6. 
Ward 7. 
Ward 8. 
Ward 9. 

Totals 



510 


519 


198 


194 


351 


366 


1,047 


1,061 


701 


608 


921 


860 


1,091 


1,146 


358 


337 


S14 


506 


5,691 


5,687 



81,553.845 
558,810 
1,268,025 
3,213,884 
3,730,090 
2,416.564 
2,918,232 
2,316.235 
725,906 



$1,602,405 
558,004 
1,256,840 
3,394,767 
4,786,564 
2,471,581 
3.277.615 
2,402,800 
732,270 



618,701,591 



$20,482,846 



$25,030.65 

7,726.77 
19,650.14 
56,339.76 
65,281.07 
42,675.92 
47,731.67 
38,909.45 
12,036.00 



$25,472,051 

7,109.851 
I 

17,343.751 
I 

51,464.89] 

73,229.45) 

1 
37,798.85] 

46,492.77] 

35,240.961 

1 0,667.83 j 



$315,382.43 



$304,820.40| 



Totals submitted to tax collector 
In 1912 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 

Total, 

In 1913— Resident tax-list. 

Non-resident tax-list, 



Total, 



$315,382.43 
735.26 

$316,117.69 

$304,820.40 
640.16 

.$305,460.50 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SIIEPARD, 
JAMES H. IMORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, 
Board of Assessors. 



assessors' report. 465 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and 
ersonal estate of Concord since 1903 : 

ear. Polls. Valuation. Tax. 

903 5,407 $11,643,466 $240,025.79 

904 5,188 11,559,482 250,222.29 

905 5,400 11,614.011 258,043.86 

906 5,474 11,768,897 260,976.67 

907 5,757 12,114,322 273,045.74 

908 5,289 12,342,190 277,469.52 

909 5,442 12,405,465 301,281.72 

910 5,576 12,543,822 278,464.77 

911 5,784 12,507,847 296,074.27 

912 5,691 18,701,591 316,117.69 

1913. 

^ard 1 519 $1,602,405 $25,472.05 

2 194 558,004 7,109.85 

3 366 1,256,840 17,343.75 

4 1,061 3,394,767 51,464.89 

5 698 4,786,564 73,229.45 

6 860 2,471,581 37,798.85 

7 1,146 3,277,615 46,492.77 

8 337 2,402,800 35,240.96 

9 514 732,270 10,667.83 



k 



5,687 $20,842,846 $304,§20.40 

^on-resident, 640.16 



$305,460.56 



30 



REPORTS OF TAX COLLECTORS. 



Report of Wendell P. Ladd, Collector. 



To the City Council: 

I herewith submit the report of collection of taxes to 
close of business, January 16, 1914: 

Tax Levy for 1910. 

Resident list as committed, $277,487.48 

Errors and omissions, 1,401.68 



Resident list as corrected, $278,889.16 

Non-resident list, 977.29 

Expense, moths, 90.95 

Interest collected, 1.224.19 



$281,181.59 



Cash paid treasurer, $274,690.38 

Discounts allowed amounting to, 2,445.20 

Abatements, 4,046.01 



$281,181.59 



Tax Levy for 3911. 

Resident list as committed, $295,127.56 

Erroi's and omissions, 4,757.48 



Resident list as corrected, $299,885.04 

Non-resident list, 946.71 

Expense, moths, 128.70 

Interest collected, 1,151.63 

$302,112.08 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 467 

Cash paid treasurer, $291,197.40 

Discounts allowed amounting to, 2,544.93 

Abatements, 8,369.75 



$302,112.08 



Taxes sold the city of Concord, N. H., in the office of 
collector for redemption : 

Years 1902 and 1903. 

Amount, $710.97 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $576.63 

Int. and fees, 190.84 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 190.84 

Amount unredeemed, 134.34 



$901.81 $901.81 

Year 1904. 

Amount, $816.38 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $686.93 

Int. and fees, 113.20 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 113.20 

Amount unredeemed, 129.45 



$929.58 $929.58 

Year 1905. 

Amount, $2,934.38 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,726.42 

Int. and fees, 225.72 Paid terasurer amount 

interest and fees, 225.72 

Amount unredeemed, 207.96 

$3,160.10 $3,160.10 



468 city of concord. 

Year 1906. 

Amount, $3,156.13 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,945.6i 

Int. and fees, 514.77 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 514.7' 

Amount unredeemed, 210.5; 



$3,670.90 $3,670.91 

Year 1907. 

Amount, $3,298.11 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $2,749.7' 

Int. and fees, 612.58 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 612.5 

Amount unredeemed, 548.3 



$3,910.69 $3,910.6 

Year 1908. 

Amount, $3,291.76 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $3,033.6' 

Int. and fees, 579.06 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 579.0 

Amount unredeemed, 258.1 



$3,870.82 $3,870.8^ 

Year 1909. 

Amount, $3,898.72 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $3,417.5 

Int. and fees, 431.39 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 431.31 

Amount unredeemed, 481.2i 

$4,330.11 $4,330.1 



TAX collector's REPORT. 469 

Year 1910. 

Amount, $3,653.97 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, ' $2,816.80 

Int. and fees, 112.48 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 112.48 

Amount unredeemed, 837.17 



$3,766.45 $3,766.45 

Year 1911. 

Amount, $1,504.09 Paid treasurer amount 

redeemed, $783.94 

Int. and fees, 31.62 Paid treasurer amount 

interest and fees, 31.62 

Amount unredeemed, 720.15 



$1,535.71 $1,535.71 

WENDELL P. LADD, 

Collector. 



470 city of concord. 

Report of Setii R. Dole, Collector. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

Tlie undersigned herewith submits the report of the col 
lector of taxes to the close of business December 31, 1913 : 

Tax Levy for 1912. 

Resident list as committed, $315,382.43 

Additions and corrections to date, 2,126.76 







$317,509.1? 


Non-resident list. 




735.2( 


Receipts for moths, 




171.1( 


Receipts for interest. 




638.84 




$319,054.3{ 


Cash paid city treasurer. 


$311,000.00 




Cash in office at closing, 


38.98 




Abatements, 


6,217.69 




Uncollected at close, December 31 


J 




1913, 


1,797.72 


$319,054.3: 



Txvx Levy for 1913. 

Resident list as committed, $304,820.42 

Errors and omissions to date added, 1,102.79 



Resident list as corrected to date, $305,923.2 

Non-resident list, 640.1|j 

Expense of moths, 79.81' 

Interested collected to date, 38.5 

$306,681.6; 



TAX collector's REPORT. 471 

Cash paid city treasurer, $264,000.00 

Discounts, 3,123.13 

Abatements, 1,698.82 

Cash in office at closing, Decem- 
ber 31, 271.49 
Balance uncollected at closing De- 
cember 31, 1913, 37,588.24 

$306,681.68 

Taxes sold the city of Concord, N. H., in the office of the 
tax collector for redemption : 

1912. 

. Amount, $1,186.96 Paid treasurer amount 

■ redeemed, $202.73 

Interest, 7.69 Interest, 7.69 

Amount unredeemed, 984.23 



$1,194.65 $1,194.65 

Respectfully submitted, 

SETH R. DOLE, 

Collector. 
Concord, N. H., January 1, 1914. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1913. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1913 : 

From Merrimack County, ajd to county poor, $7,731.43 
Merrimack County, aid to dependent 

soldiers, 
fees of all kinds, 
licenses, billiard and pool tables, 
licenses, junk dealers, 
licenses, employment bureau, 
licenses, pawnbroker, 
licenses, hack and job teams, 
licenses, dogs, 
rent, auditorium, 

declarations of candidates, city primary, 
rent, Merrimack Hall, 
grass sold from city land, 
use of city land, I. Wilson, 
junk sold, 

mayor, account of proceeds city lot, 
Ward 3, 

$21,114.11 

The foregoing amount has been paid into the city 
treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



1,537.95 


468.55 


540.00 


120.00 


5.00 


25.00 


75.00 


1,708.91 


1,200.00 


94.00 


3.00 


10.00 


5.00 


3.00 


7,587.27 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVER- 
SEER OF THE POOR. 



FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1913. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the forty-sixth an- 
mial report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards 
1 and 2, for the year ending December 31, 1913: 





City Poor. 






Appropriation, 




$800.00 




Resolution No. 116, 




1,000.00 




Resolution No. 127, 




342.84 


$2,142.84 


Paid groceries. 




$593.56 




milk, 




129.14 




fuel, 




360.20 




rents. 




490.00 




care, children. 




200.00 




board and care. 




297.12 




medicine, 




14.87 




shoes and clothing 


', 


57.95 





$2,142.84 



474 CITY 


OF 


CONCORD. 




County Poor. 




Paid groceries, 






$1,586.97 


milk, 






148.22 


fuel, 






1,024.91 


rents, 






2,148.00 


care, children, 






1,713.70 


board, 






778.10 


shoes and clothing. 






255.75 


burials. 






86.00 


transients, 






58.74 


miscellaneous, 






25.00 



Total amount paid for aid to poor. 

Dependent Soldiers, City. 

Appropriation, 

Paid care, sickness, 

Dependent Soldiers, County. 

Paid groceries, $551.03 

milk, 29.20 

fuel, 566.07 

rents, 180.00 

board, 283.00 

clothing, 10.25 



Total amount paid for aid to dependent 
soldiers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY B. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



TRUST FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Trust 
Funds. 

abial walker trust. 

For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1913, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

countess of rumford trust. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be 
applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1913, 80.00 

Paid Grace E. Foster, treasurer of the society, 80.00 

Invested in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

MIXOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of 
the duly appointed officials, or members of the Minot Cemetery Association. 



476 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1913, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at 31/2 per cent.) with city of Concord, in 
general account. 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

The purpose of the donor of this trust was that the income should be used 
for the purchase of school-books for poor children ; but since the bequest was 
made, a state law has been enacted that requires the town and cities to buy 
all the school-books; consequently the beneficiary of the fund, $200, and ac- 
cumulations, amoamt to $555.03, and same will continue to accumulate for- 
ever without any benefit to any object, unless some legal action can be taken 
to divert the income from the specified purpose of the donor. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance income from last year, $355.03 

Income received, 1913, 22.12 

■ 377.15 



Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank. 

Income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OP THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the pur- 
chase of books of a biographical, geographical, historical and scientific char- 
acter, and the books relating to science shall be those that give the latest 
developments and discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1913, 85.90 

Paid into the city treasury, 85.90 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 477 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1913, 35.00 

Paid into city treasnr}^, 35.00 

Invested in City of Concord S^/o per cent. bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1913, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500.00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1913, 17.50 

Paid into the city treasury, 17.50 

Invested in City of Concord 314 per cent. bond. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1913, $27,346.38 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

19] 3, 1,592.57 

Received from income of fund, 1,083.84 

$30,022.79 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1,083.84 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1914, 28,938.95 

$30,022.79 



478 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Invested in City of Concord 4% 

bonds, $8,000.00 

Invested in City of Concord 31/2% 

bonds, 2,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 5,842.04 

Deposited in Union Trust Com- 
pany, 13,096.91 



$28,938.95 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 



As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an in- 
crease of the fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1913, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 30.10 

• $845.10 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $30.10 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1914, 815.00 



$845.10 



Invested in City of Concord 3^/2% 

bonds, $500.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 315.00 



$815.00 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 



This fund is insreased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1913, $522.00 
Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary, 1913, 293.97 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 479 

Received from income of fund, 1913, $32.52 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 10.00 

$858.49 

Jnexpended income, January 1, 1914, $326.49 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1914, 532.00 

• $858.49 

[Capital and unexpended income deposited in 
]\Ierrimack County Savings Bank, $858.49 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of 
nterested parties. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
;ion of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1913, $2,088.40 

[Jnexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1913, 187.91 

Received from income, 1913, 90.86 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

J 913, 22.50 

$2,389.67 



Capital. January 1, 19L3, $2,088.40 

Capital increased from sale of lots, 22.50 



Capital, January 1, 1914, $2,110.90 

Unexpended income January 1, 1914, 278.77 



$2,389.67 



Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, $1,244.98 

Deposited in ]\Ierrimack County Savings Bank, 1.144.69 



EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the aniount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery. 



480 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1913, $322.50 
Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1913, 303.85 
Received from income of fund, 1913, 25.04 



$651.3^ 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1914, $328.89 
Amount of capital, January ], 1914, 322.50 

$651.3S 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in New Hampi 
shire Savings Bank. 

WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and authori 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created rj 
sinking fund the conditions of which have already been fulfilled. There is 
still outstanding five bonds of $500 each and one of $300. One of the $50Cj 
bonds matures each year until 1919, when the $300 bond is payable. Thf| 
presumption is that these bonds will be paid each year from taxes assesseci 
upon the property of the precinct. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1913, $450.42 

Income received, 1913, 18.00 , 



$468.45| 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. $468.4. 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook sewer precinct, and authorizing] 
loans on the credit of the city to construst the system, also created a sinking! 
fund, which provided that the following amounts should be raised annually 
upon the taxable property of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds 
as they mature, viz.: 

$100 annually for fifteen years from October 1, 1900. 
$1,000 annually for five years from May 1, 1908. 
$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 
$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 



I 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 481 



Balance on hand January 1, 1913, $5,754.65 

Income received, 1913, 230.16 

Received from city of Concord, 1,100.00 

$7,084.81 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account to pay bonds matur- 
ing 1913, $5,000.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1914, 2,084.81 

I ' $7,084.81 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $2,084.81 

ft 

EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord sewer precinct, and author- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund, which provided that the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) 
should be raised annually for twenty years from July 1, 1895, upon the tax- 
able ijroperty of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds as they 
mature. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1913, $328.64 

Income received, 1913, 13.12 

Received from city of Concord, 100.00 

— $441.76 



Balance on hand January 1, 1914, $441.76 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city 
bond, the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping 
lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition; six dollars each 
year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a monument fund; 
and the balance of the income to be expended each year in purchasing books 
for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1913, 35.00 



482 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account for public library, 17.00 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 



$35.00 



Capital invested in City of Concord 3y2% bond. 

SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. 
The entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1913, $398.47 

From S. K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1913, 15.78 

$420.25 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



I 



484 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



485 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



487 



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488 



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489 



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490 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



491 



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492 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



493 



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494 



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506 CITY OF CONCORD. 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds 
are added to the annual appropriation. Ihe amounts expended on trust funds 

are paid on a special order from the mayor, from the income of individual 
deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclu- 
sively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

John F. Webster, care, $1.00 

Mrs. Ella R. Munsey, burial, 3.00 

S. H. Wentwortli 's estate, burial, 4.00 

E. F. Gordon's estate, burial, 8.00 

Joseph B. Walker's estate, burial, 6.00 
Mrs. L. Ordway Runnell's estate, 

burial, 3.00 

Edwin H. Houston's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. George L. Green's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Horace Paul's estate, burial, 3.00 

Louis Tebeau, repairs. 4.00 

Mrs. C. H. Herbert, .50 
Mrs. George C. Robinson's estate, 

burial, 3.00 

C. P. Ordway, repairs, 5.00 

Mrs. John H. Ballard, repairs, 10.00 

Carrie I. Wyatt's estate, burial, 10.00 

Miss L. B. Kelley, repairs, 1.50 

Sarah Fox, 3.00 

Lucy Kimball, repairs, 3.00 

Mrs. Clara A. Eastman's estate, burial, 3.00 

William G. Carlton, burial, 3.00 

Thomas Robinson, burial and labor, 8.00 

Mrs. John N. Hill's estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. S. F. Gushing 's estate, care, 2.00 

J. F. Wilson, care, 1.00 

Mrs. L. B. Hoit, repairs, 4.75 

C. A. Hardy, care, 1.50 

Mrs. J. B. Walker's estate, burial, 5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



507 



H. J. Alexander, care, $3.00 

E. A. Gordon, use of tomb, 1.00 

George E. Chesley's estate, burial, 8.00 

George S. Little, burial, 3.00 

Minot Cemetery Association, care, 73.00 

William Abbott, trust, 15.00 

Samuel Alexander, trust, 3.00 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, 3.00 

Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, 10.00 

Kicliard Bradley, trust, 3.00 

John F. Chaffiu, trust, 1.50 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 2.00 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 3.00 

Samuel Evans, trust, 3.00 

S. N. Farnsworth, trust, 1.00 

Hosea Fessenden, trust, 3.00 

John Flanders, trust, 2.00 

Theodore French, trust, 3.00 

Moses Gerould, trust, 1.50 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 2.00 

Mitch el Gilmore, trust, . 3.50 

Clara Y. S. Glidden, trust, 2.50 

Pamela L. Hall, trust, 1.50 

Frank S. Harraden, trust. 3.00 

William H. Horner, trust, 3.00 

L. Louisa Hoyt, trust, 5.00 

William T. Locke, trust, 3.00 

Asa McFarland, trust, 3.00 

Ida jMoore, trust, 1.50 

Mary Ann Morrill, trust, 2.00 

Mary R. Morrill, trust, 3.00 

Samuel and D. L. Morrill, trust, 6.00 

Isaac n. Ordway, trust, 5.00 

True Osgood, trust, 3.00 

W. B. Palmer and S. P. Savory, trust, 5.00 

Alice W. Parker, trust, 4.00 

Asa Parker, trust, 1.50 



508 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Samuel G. Parker, trust, 
Pearson White Savory, trust, 
Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust, 
Henry J, Rhodes, trust, 
Hiram Richardson, trust, 
Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 
Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 
Joseph Stickney, trust, 
Nathan Stickney, trust, 
Abigail Sweetser, trust, 
Mrs. James M. Tilton, trust, 
Sarah M. "Wadleigh, trust, 
Timothy and A. B. "Walker, trust, 
Albert Webster, trust, 
Paul Wentworth, trust, 
Plarriet E. Wheeler, trust, 
Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust, 
Charlotte H. Woolson, trust, 



$1.50 
3.00 

15.00 
2.50 

20.00 
7.00 
1.50 

15.00 
1.75 

14.00 
2.00 
5.00 
7.00 
3.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3.00 



$421.00 



BLOSSO]\I mLL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the reseipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the per- 
manent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and in- 
come of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. 
The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the 
mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that 
purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 



George L. Theobald, lot 10, block Z, $97.50 
Arthur E. Rowell, Nelson J. Millett, 

lot 124, block Y, 42.00 

Mrs. George W. Swett, lot 142, block Y, 44.10 
Mrs. Flora L. Snell, west half lot 

184, block W, 95.00 

Mrs. H. E. Sturtevant, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 509 

Benjamin Bilsboroiigh, care, $1.00 

D. G. Lowell, care, 1.00 

W. E. Carpenter, care, 1.00 

W. E. Emerson, care, 2.50 

Mr. J. H. Chase, care, 4.00 

W. J. Green, care, 2.00 

George Carter, care, 1.50 

George N. Swett's estate, burial, 3.00 

George D. Huntley, care, • 2.00 

Charles L. Jackman, care, 1.00 

F. A. Stillings, care, 3.00 

Henry Corser, care, 1.50 

Miss H. Robinson, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Sprague, care, 1.00 

John P. Nutter, care, 1.00 

Mrs. George Nutter, care, 1.00 

]Mrs. E. C. Eastman, repairs, 3.00 

Lliss Tressidder, repairs, 2.00 

Thomas Murphy, care, 1.00 

Fred Powell, care, 2.00 

C. H. Greene's estate, burial, 3.00 

D. L. Neal, care, 1.00 
R. J. Robinson, care, 1.50 
S. C. Eastman, care, 1.50 
"Sirs. J. D. Blaisd ell's estate, burial, 3.00 
J. A. Cochran, care, 1.00 
S. R. Dole, care, 2.00 
Mrs. G. E. Todd, care, 2.00 
Mrs. N. A. Dunklee, care, 1.00 
George H. Buswell, care, 1.50 
N. H. Shattuck lot, care, 1-50 
Mrs. S. Humphrey, care, 1-00 
H. N. Sargent, burial, 4.00 
John H. Burroughs, care, 1-00 
Berry Bros., foundation, 18.50 

E. A. Bunker, repairs, 6.25 
George H. Davis' estate, burial, 3.00 



510 CITY OF CONCORD. 

J. H. Albin, care, $2.00 

Isaac Hill, bulbs, 1.50 

Mrs. Plevenor, care, 2.00 

Ruth M. Johnson, burial, 3.00 

Morey & Whiting, care, 2.00 

C. P. Tucker, care, 1.50 

W. E. Chandler, care, 5.00 
Edson C. Eastman's estate, burial 

and care, 15.00 
N. H. State Hospital, E. St. Parks, 

burial, 3.00 

James Publicover, burial, 8.00 

Harriet Woodbury, burial, 3.00 

Rev. R. D. Grant, burial, 6.00 
N. H. State Hospital, George Knapp, 

burial, 3.00 
Mrs. A. H. Fellows' estate, burial, 3.00 
Lavinia Glasgo, burial, 8.00 
Daniel Cutting's estate, burial, 3.00 
James McMichael, burial, 8.00 
N. H. State Hospital, H. M. Trum- 
bull, burial, 3.00 
Nelia S. Haynes, burial, 8.00 
S. Morgan, repairs, 5.00 
J. M. Fletcher's estate, burial, 4.50 
C. T. Lane, care, 1.50 
W. A. Chesley, care, 1.50 
Arthur E. Rowell, burial, 4.00 
Home for Aged, Miss Slack, burial, . 3.00 
Mr. Hannigan, rent, 10.00 
C. A. Bailey, foundation, 35.50 
George W. Hill, care, 1.00 
George H. Russ, care, 3.00 
W. F. Thayer, care, 4.00 
Clara Thayer, burial, 3.00 
J. M. Runnells, care, 1.50 
John F. Webster, care, 3,00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 511 

John F. Jones' estate, care, $2.00 

George Connell, care, 2.00 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 1.00 

E. B. Hutchinson's estate, care, 7.00 
Jonathan Brown, care, 1.50 
C. C. Saben, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. E. Gawler's estate, burial, 3.00 
C. E. Palmer, care, 1.25 
S. F. Morrill's estate, care, • 2.00 
Mrs. R. M. Morgan, care, 2.00 
George H. Rolfe, care, 2.00 
C. R. Dame, care, 1.50 
John C. French, care, 1.00 
Harry C. Barrett, lot 66, block Z, 78.00 
Horace E. Russell, lot 59, block Y, 30.00 
H. P. Davis, lot 7, block Y, 66.60 
Mrs. Sarah Phillips, lot 116, block Y, 35.00 
John E. Sweet, lot 137, block Y, 40.50 
Henry A. Colby, lot 115, block Y, 35.00 
George Edmund's estate, burial, 3.00 
George N. Bartemus, care, 1.00 
Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care, 1.00 
Mrs. P. F. Stevens, care, 1.00 
C. H. Dunklee's estate, burial, 4.00 
Howard Cook, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. E. J. Wason's estate, burial, 3.00 
I. A. Watson, care, 2.00 
Charles H. Barrett's estate, burial, 10.00 
H. E. Russell, burial, 3.50 
W. I. Lovely, burial, 4.00 

F. R. Dennis, burial, 3.00 
Joseph Marquis, burial, 3.00 
Thomas McKee, burial, 3.00 
John Legacy, burial, 3.00 
Jaques Mathier, burial, 3.00 
Charles Connam. burial, 3.00 
Parker Stillborn, burial, -50 



512 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Julia LaChance, burial, $3.00 

Solomon Pinaid, burial, 3.00 

Miss Caroline C. Smith's estate, burial, 9.00 

Daniel C. Allen's estate, burial, 3.00 

C. W. Lynam, care, 1.00 

H. P. Davis, burial, 3.00 

James E. Rand's estate, burial, 10.00 

Jolm H. Phillips' estate, burial, 4.00 

John Swenson Co., foundation, 19.00 

Henry A. Colby, burial, 7.00 

Amos Blanehard, repairs, 9.50 

Mrs. A. D. Parsons, 7.00 

George H. Silsby, repairs, 2.50 

Barker & Howe, care, 1.50 

George W. Waters, labor, 3.00 

Thomas Fox, foundation, 3.50 

Mrs. Susan Hillsgrove's estate, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. J. L. Pickering's estate, burial, 3.00 
Lottie A. Locke, east half lot 66, 

block Y, 70.00 

Frank P. Andrews, lot 132, block Y, 10.50 

Edward D. Ashley, lot 129, block W, 97.65 

E. E. Newbold, lot 77, block Z, 85.00 

W. R. Green, lot 122, block Y, 35.00 

George A. Dow, lot 50, block Y, 30.00 
Mrs. George 0. Dickerman's estate, 

burial, 4.00 

Miss M. W. Dennett, repairs, 1.00 

W. "W. Stone's estate, burial, 4.00 

Miss Maud Cook, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Julia Rines' estate, burial, 3.00 

N. H. State Hospital, Jessie Still, burial, 3.00 

Benjamin Jewitt's infant, burial, .50 

Myron Lewis, burial, 3.50 

George Silva's infant, burial, .50 

Mrs. J. Frank Newhall, burial, 3.00 

E. H. Calvert, burial, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 5J3 

Miss Annie A. Grant, burial, $4.00 

Mrs. J. H. Dearborn, care, 1.50 

Mrs. A. T. Grey, grave and burial, 8.00 

Frank II. Clement, care, 2.00 

Mr. Billings, burial, 3.00 

James C. Badger's estate, burial, 3.00 

A. Morrill Smith, burial, 1.50 

T. H. Dunstane, rent, 40.00 

E. D. Ashley, burial, 3.00 
Herbert G. Allen, lot 65, block Y, 30.00 
Leon W. Smith, lot 66, block Y, 30.00 
Edwin C. Sanborn, lot 64, block Y, 30.00 
Wendell P. Marden, lot 72, block Z, 60.00 
Alexander D. Lyon, lot 63, block Y, 30.00 
T. C. Struthers, lot 85, block Y, 30.00 
Mrs. Clara Billings, lot 83, block Y, 30.00 
Ira Leon Evans, lot 20, block Z, 96.00 

F. J. Batchelder, labor, 5.00 
E. li. Newbold, foundation, 14.50 
L. C. Tandy, repairs, .50 
Mrs. Fannie T. Snelts' estate, burial, 3.00 
Joseph C. Eaton's estate, burial, 3.00 
Gustaf Anderson's estate, burial, 9.00 
John Wood worth's estate, burial, 6.00 
Edwin C. Sanborn's estate, burial,- 3.00 
Hiram H. Hazeltine's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. H. LI. Sinclair's estate, burial, 3.00 
Alexander D. Lyon, burial, 3.00 
John C. Mills, care, 1.00 
Mrs. ]\Iyra J. West's estate, burial, 5.00 
A. J. Robinson, repairs, 3.00 
Mrs. Marsh, repairs, .25 
Curamings Bros., foundation, 1.00 
Mrs. Mary V. Sweet, burial, 3.00 
Alton Hunt's estate, burial, 10.00 
W. E. Hunt, care, 7.00 

33 



514 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Lucy Poore, care, $1.50 

E. S. George's estate, burial, 3.00 

C. F. Mudgett, labor, .25 

J. J. Dooning, burial, 3.00 

C. H. Stevens, repairs, 8.00 
Miss L. A. Ingalls, Mrs. Delia I. 

Lewis, lot 61, block W, 114.00 
Loren S. Richardson, lot 1, west half, 

block 5, 100.00 
John A. Wilkins, lot 160, block W, 

north half, 62.55 

H. T. Douglass, lot 34, block Y, 35.00 
Heirs of Milton T. Berry, lot 130, 

east half, block W, 105.00 

Mrs. Carrie L. Gray, lot 29, block Z, 96.00 

I. Leon Evans, burial, .50 

E. B. Chandler, removals, 4.00 
Mrs. LTillette, plants, 1.50 
C. H. Roberts' estate, labor, 2.00 
Mrs. King, plants, 2.00 
Dressing sold, 1.75 
Plants sold, .36 
Mrs. A. F. Batchelder, burial, 3.00 
Plants sold and labor, 1.25 
Mrs. Kemp, repairs, 4.00 
W. E. Adams, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Jackson Crosby's estate, burial, 3.00 
Charles A. Herbert's estate, burial, 8.00 
H. M. Cooper, burial, 5.50 
M. T. Berry's estate, burial, 4.00 
"W. A. Thompson's estate, burial, 5.00 

F. D. Abbott, care, 1.00 
Thomas Gray's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Moses F. Rogers' estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Betsey Dow's estate, burial, 3.00 
Homer B. Walker's estate, burial, 3.00 
Miss Malmgren, burial, 4.00 



I 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 515 

George F. Ames & Co., foundation, $7.00 
Mrs. Fannie M. Lang's estate, burial, 4.00 
Mrs. A. G. Hughes, care, 1.00 
Chester P. Colby, lot 114, block Y, 35.00 
Mrs. Joanna E. Critchett, lot 51, block Z, 80.00 
Henry A. Davis, Admr., lot 133, block Y, 18.00 
Mrs. Annie L. Walker, lot 47, block W, 54.00 
C. J. Ericson, lot 210, block M, addi- 
tion to ninth side, 9.00 
Mrs. Florence P. Lau, lot 82, block Y, 30.00 
Amos Chapman, lot 134, block Y, 56.70 
John Sergg, burial, 5.00 
Mrs. Clara Billings, removal, 5.00 
Cyrus W. Barton's estate, burial, 3.00 
Eoyal Wells' estate, burial, 3.00 
Osro M. Allen, burial, 5.00 
Mrs. L. M. Mason's estate, 8.00 
John Kimball's estate, burial, 7.00 
Amos Chapman, burial, 3.00 
George A. Dow, labor, .75 
George M. flutton's estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Minnie D. Hutton, lot 21, west 

half, block V, 75.00 

Fred P. Fisher, lot 8, block Y, • 64.80 
James H. Heartz, lot 1 53, north half, 

block W, 61.00 
N. J. Moses' estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. C. P. Gyle's estate, burial, 3.00 
Larson & Carlson, labor, .50 
James H. Heartz, burial, 3.00 
Miss E. Sturtevant, care, 1.00 
F. E. Lovering, repairs, .50 
George E. Hutchins' estate, foundation, 6.00 
Josiah Batchelder, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Leander White, burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, Mary May- 
ward, burial, 3.00 



516 CITY OP CONCORD, 

Henry Johnson, child, burial, $1.50 

Marian T. Hodge, burial, 3.00 

Mr. Olmstead, infant, burial, .50 
N. H. State Hospital, George Fisher, 

burial, 3.00 

Mr. Lewis, infant, burial, .50 

S. P. Danforth's estate, burial, 12.00 

Herbert M. Danforth, lot 69, block Z, 121.50 

David Shaw's estate, burial, 3.00 

Harry Phillips, foundation, 5.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 13.00 
Mr. and Mrs. George Davis' estate, 

burial, 5.00 

"W. A. Whittemore, labor, 3.00 

Edward A. Abbott's estate, burial, 10.00 

Anton Apostle's estate, burial, 8.00 

Mr. Ole Hanson, burial, 8.00 

H. M. Cavis, care, 1.00 

C. A. Bailey, foundations, 12.25 

Austin L. Howe's estate, burial, 10.00 

Mr. Taylor, burial, 1.00 

Bulbs sold, 1.00 

A. "W. Hobbs, care, 1.00 

Mr. Forsyth, plants, 6.00 

George W. Carter, burial, 8.00 

W. W. Critchett, removal, 3.00 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Sibley and 

Mrs. Katherine A. Sibley, lot 69, 

east half, block V, 100.00 

John J. Woods, lot 164, block W, 101.25 

Mrs. F. J. Paige, removal, 6.00 

George D. B. Prescott, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Alta Parker's estate, burial, 3.00 

Herbert L. Smith, luirial, 4.00 

Mrs. Alice Richards' estate, burial, 3.00 

L. Dale Brown, repairs, 1.00 

Mrs. C. C. Webster, repairs, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 517 

H. B. Hardy, repairs, $4.00 

F. E. Hook, care, 1.00 

P. M. Keut, care, 4.00 

John Lane's estate, care, 2.00 

Mr. R. M. Day, care and flowers, 6.00 

W. H. Ga}^, care and flowers, 1.00 
J. Stevens Abbott's estate, care and 

flowers, 10.00 
George H. Marston's estate, care and 

flowers, 5.00 

Charles P. Bancroft, care and flowers, 2.00 

Mrs. H. Rand's estate, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. E. H. Schutz, care, 6.00 

John W. Drew, care, 3.00 

R. P. Stevens Co., foundation, 7.00 

Mrs. R. D. Grant, care, 1.50 

C. W. Bradley, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Isabella Perry's estate, burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, F. L. Quimby, 

burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, F. Sanders, burial, 3.00 
N. PI. State Hospital, James Clark, 

burial, 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, E. Andrews, 

burial, 3.00 
N. II. State Hospital, John Bartlett, 

burial, • 3.00 
N. H. State Hospital, Celia Kelley, 

burial, 3.00 

Mr. Young's child, burial, 1.50 

Theodore Loveland, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Daniel Clark, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Jane M. Emery, burial, 3.00 

Frank Adams, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Esther Atwood, burial, 3.00 

Merrimack County, J. Hobert, burial, 3.00 

Burton F. Smith, burial, 3.00 



I 



518 CITY OF CONCORD, 

George H. Richardson, $4.00 

John W. Lynch 's estate, burial, 3.00 

E. A. Gordon, use of tomb, burial, 1.00 
Augustus Bean's estate, burial, 3.00 
John W. Ford, care, 2.00 
C. Fred Osgood, care, 3.00 
Mrs. John Sabin, repairs, 4.00 
George W. Barteraus, care, 1.00 
John Lugg, repairs, 2.00 
Fred S. Johnson, care, 2.00 
Miss A. L. Merrill, care, 5.00 
C. E. Burnside, care, 3.00 
Mrs. George K. Lang, care, 1.00 
Mrs. E. B. Wood worth, care and plants, 6.00 

F. S. Streeter, care and plants, 2.50 
A. P. Carj^enter's heirs, care and plants, 2.50 
Frank E. Brown's estate, burial, 10.00 
Col. S. Carter, care, 4.00 
E. A. Ordv/ay, repairs, 5.00 
Joseph Palmer, care, 2.00 
Mrs. Frank E. Brown, lot 79, block Z, 105.00 
Charles Newman Hall, lot 64, block Z, 94.50 
Charles F. Forsyth, lot 30, block Z, 120.00 
Mrs. Albert Grant, lot 113, block Y, 42.00 
E. Scott Owen, lot 54, block Z, 80.00 
George D. Worth, lot 80, block Y, 30.00 
E. H. Smart, lot 190, west half, block W, 95.00 
Burton J. Heath, lot 126, block Y, 30.00 

G. W. and C. L. French, lot 84, block W, 42.00 
W. J. Drew, burial, 4.00 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 1.00 
Home for the Aged, burial, 9.00 
Mr. Guy Marden, labor, 2.50 
Mrs. A. S. Marshall, care, 1.50 
C. N. Hall, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. N. White, care, 25.00 
Annah Kimball, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 519 

Edson J. Hill, care, $8.00 

J. S. Matthews, care, 1.50 

Mrs. L. F. Lund, care, 5.00 
Merrimack County, J. Simpson, burial, 3.00 

Sylvester Smith, foundation, 31.00 

J. H. Gallinger, care, 2.50 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 1.00 

W. W. Fernald, care, 1.50 

Fred W. Boardman, care, 1.50 

J. H. Albin, care, 2.00 

Dunlap & Jeffers, care, 4.00 

E. G. ('iinimings' estate, care, 4.00 

H. S. Batchelder, burial, 3.00 

George H. Russ, care, 3.00 

J. B. Hursey, care, 1.50 

S. R. Dole, care, 1.00 

Mrs. N. Dnnklee, care, 1.00 

W. A. Chesley, care, 1.50 

Mrs. R. Morgan, care, 2.00 

Batchelder Bros., care, 2.50 

W. P. Fiske, care, 2.50 

D. E. Miller's estate, burial, 3.00 

Abbie J. Simpson, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. "Worton, burial, 8.00 

Elijah Eligian. burial, 3.00 

George Waldron, burial, 3.00 

C. T. Blood, burial, 3.00 

C. W. Hall burial, 3.00 
Daniel Wyraan's estate, burial, 4.00 
Mrs. Charlotte Morrill, care, 2.00 

D. G. Lowell, care, 1.00 
Mrs. C. W. Moore, repairs, 3.00 
W. E. Chandler, care, 5.00 
A. J. Shurtleff, burial, 3.00 
C. R. D&jne, care, 1-50 
W. E. Carpenter, care, 1-00 
George D. Huntley, care, 1-50 



520 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Benjamin Bilsboroiigh, care, $1.00 

Mrs. n. C. Sturtevant, care, 1.50 

C. L. Jackman, care, 1.00 
W. K. McFarland, care, 2.00 
George L. Stratton, care, 3.00 
Mrs. H. L. Ingalls, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. George E. Todd, care, 2.00 
Mrs. F. P. Virgin, care, 2.00 

A. M. Stearns, care, 1.00 
Joseph Eeinbald, burial, .50 
Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care, 1.00 
Miss Helen Robinson, care, 1.00 

D. L. Neal, care, 1.00 
F. E. Colburn, care, 1.50 
J. F. "Webster, care, 4.00 
J. C. French, care, 1.00 
II. F. Corser, care, 1.50 

B. J. Harriott, burial, 1.00 

C. E. Palmer, care, 1.25 
Mrs. P. F. Stevens, care, 1.00 
J. A. Cochran, care. 1.00 
Mrs. W. B. Durgin, labor, 3.00 
Cummings Bros., foundation, 5.00 
N. P. Stevens, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. George A. Blanchard, burial, 3.00 
Albert Grant, burial, 3.00 
Larson & Carlson, foundation, 29.00 
Blazing Star Lodge, grading, 25.00 

E. Scott Owen, burial, 7.00 
A. G. McAlpine & Co., foundation, 34.25 
J. P. Nute, burial, 3.00 
Merrimack County, burial, 9.00 
Lyman Jackman 's estate, care, 6.00 
George W. Waters, burial, ]2.00 
C. P. Tucker, care, 1.50 
E. M. Willis, care, 3.00 
W. J. Green, care, 2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 521 

E. H. Smart, burial, • $3.00 

George D. North, burial, 3.00 

B. J. Heath, burial, 1.00 

George W. French, burial, 3.00 

J. E. Wright, care, 1.50 

Lydia A. Lane, burial, 3.00 

E. A. Moulton, labor, 3.18 

Dr. 0. B. Douglas, care, 6.00 

George li. Sawyer, repairs, 1.50 

W. A. Young, burial, 6.00 

]\Iis. H. A. Hutchinson, 4.00 

Thomas Fox, foundation, 5.00 

George W. Abbott, trust, 5.00 

Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 2.00 

Fidelia F. Adams, trust, 4.00 

Sarah J. Adams, trust, 6.00 

Sarah M. K. Adams, trust, 20.00 

Allen, Smith & Dimond, trust, 4.00 

Frederick Allison, trust, . 4.00 

Mary B. Allison, trust, 1.75 

Lavinia Arlin, trust, 2.50 

Sarah S. Ash, trust, 1.75 

Alonzo Atherton, trust, 6.00 

Thomas D. Avery, trust, 4.00 

Lizzie Knight Badger, trust, 5.00 

Annie L. S. Barley, trust, 3.50 

Oliver Ballon, trust, 3.00 

Charles Barker, trust, 3.50 

George W. Barnes, trust, 1.50 

James W. Barton, trust, 5.00 

Mary A. Bass, trust, 3.50 

Robert Bell, trust, 2.50 

Matilda Benson, trust, 2.00 

Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 3.00 

James D. Blaisdell, trust, 4.00 

James M. Blake, trust, 6.00 

William J. Blakely, trust, 5.00 



522 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Emily Blanchard, trust, $15.00 

Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 8.00 

Annie L. Brown, trust, 5.00 

Charles N. Brown, trust, 5.00 

Mary N. Preston Buntin, trusty 10.00 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 3.00 

Harriet W. Butters, trust, 4.00 

Benjamin F. Caldwell, trust, 8.00 

Levi Call, trust, 3.00 

Bradbury 6. Carter, trust, 4.00 

Hiram J. Carter, trust, 4.00 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 4.00 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 2.00 

A. P. and K. P. Chesley, trust, 3.00 

Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 5.00 

Caroline Clark, trust, 5.00 

Fannie 0. Clark, trust, 3.00 

Eufus Clement, trust, 5.00 

William W. Cloud, trust, 5.00 

Frederick Clough, trust, 5.00 

George Clough, trusi, 5.00 

Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 2.50 

Yfestou Cofran, trust, 5.00 

Amos L. Colburn, trust, 2.00 

Sarah T. Colby, trust, - 4.00 

Charles A. Cooke, trust, 5.00 

Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust, 2.50 

Mary Crow, trust, 15.00 

Charles H. Cummings, trust, 5.00 

Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 6.00 

Silas Curtis, trust, 5.00 

Charles C. Danforth, trust, 6.00 

Charles S. Danforth, trust, 2.00 

Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 2.00 

Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 2.00 

Edward Dow, trust, 5.00 

Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 523 

Charles V. Dudley, trust, $3.00 

William B. Durgin, trust, 6.00 

J. B. Dyer, trust, 5.00 

Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 4.50 

Stephen B. Eaton, trust, 4.50 

Lydia F. Edgerly, trust, 4.00 

Georgianna P. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Ella M. Elliott, trust, 2.00 

Elizabeth G. Emerson, trust, 4.00 

George II. Emery, trust, 4.00 

David E. Everett, trust, 4.50 

Lydia A. P'arley, trust, 3.50 

Mary M. Farnum, trust, 4.50 

Alva C. Ferrin, trust, 6.00 

Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, 2.50 

J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust, 3.00 
Mr. and Mrs. Harlan A. Flanders, trust, 5.00 

George G. Fogg, trust, 12.00 

Alice T. Ford, trust, 5.00 

Jerome Ford, trust, 5.00 

Asa Fowler, trust, 16.00 

Mary A. Gage, trust, 5.00 

Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 1.75 

John D. Gale, trust, 8.00 

John Gear, trust, 4.00 

Sarah S. Gear, trust, 4.00 

Caroline L. George, trust, 20.00 

Enoch Gerrish, trust, 3.00 

Samuel K. Gill, trust, 4.00 

G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, trust, 1.75 

Loren W. Glysson, trust, 4.00 

Hannah A. and Fannie A. Goss, trust, 7.00 

George M. Greeley, trust, 15.00 

Jennie E. Green, trust, 2.00 

John B. Green, trust, 3.00 

William E. Greene, trust, 4.00 

Betsey Hadley, trust, 3.50 



524 CITY OF CONCORD. 

George M. Harding, trust, $3.00 

Mary D. Hart, trust, 15.00 

Timothy Haynes, trust, 4.00 

Charles F. Plildreth, trust, 4.00 

Emma J. Hill, trust, 2.00 

John M. Hill, trust, 10.00 

Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 2.00 

J. Frank Hoit, trust, 8.00 

Harriet F. Holman, trust, 5.00 

Elizabeth F. Holt, trust, 3.00 

Hoyt & Stetson, trust, 3.00 

Sarah E. Irish, trust, ~ 4.00 

Henry Ivy, trust, 3.00 

E. 0. Jameson, trust, 4.00 

Herman E. Jewell, trust, 2.00 

Julia A. Jones, trust, 5.00 

John and Benjamin A. Kimball, trust, 8.00 

Ellen B. Kittrdege, trust, 2.00 

Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 20.00 

William Ladd, trust, 4.00 

Leete & Newman, trust, 3.00 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 5.00 

Lincoln & Forrester, trust, 2.50 

J. L. Lincoln, trust, 2.00 

J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 6.00 

John McCauley, trust, 5.00 

Henry McFarland, trust, 6.00 
Greenough and Evarts McQuesten, trust, 4.00 

James McQuesten, trust, 10.00 

Henry A. Warren, trust, 5.00 

Martin & Brown, trust, 3.00 

H. W. and H. 0. Mathews, trust, 5.00 

Charles S. Mellen, trust, 6.00 

Horace Merrill, trust, 2.00 

J. B. Merrill, trust, 5.00 

S. F. Merrill, trust, 5.00 

Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



525 



Sullivan G. Mills, trust, $10.00 

Charles Moody, trust, 5.00 

George H. Moore, trust, 4.00 

Carlos B. aud Abbie M. Moseley, trust, 6.00 

Mary J. Moses, trust, 5.00 

Caroline B. JMurdock, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 7.00 

Eliphalet S. Nutter, trust, 4.00 

Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 6.50 

Eugene A. Ordway, trust, 2.50 

H. S. Ordway and J. Sedgley, trust, 10.00 

George B. Packer, trust, 3.00 

George F. Page, trust, 2.00 

Moses W. and Mary A. Page, trust, 2.00 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 4.00 

John B. Palmer, trust, 2.00 

William H. Palmer, trust, 1.50 

Felicite Pengault, trust, 3.00 

Hamilton E. Perkins, trust, 7.00 

Lucy J. Perkins, trust, 1.00 

Mary N. Perley, trust, ]0.00 

Isabella Perry, trust, 2.00 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 8.00 

Irving L. Pickering, trust, 6.00 

W. II. Pitman, trust, 4.00 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 5.00 

Edwin F. Plummer, trust, 1.75 

Prescott &, Noyes, trust, 3.50 

D. 0. Rand and N. V. Libby, trust, 1.50 
James E. Rand, trust, 2.00 
Henry W. Ranlet, trust, 5.00 
George L. Reed, trust, 4.00 
Judith A. Richardson, trust, 4.00 
Mrs. James H. Rigney, trust, 1.50 
Frances K. Roberts, trust, 5.00 
Moses F. Rogers, trust, 4.00 

E. H. Rollins, trust, 10.00 



526 CITY OF CONCORD. 

David D. Rowe, trust, $2.50 

James 11. Rowell, trust, 5.00 

Moses Yf . Russell, trust, 7.00 

Mrs. Isaac S. R. Sanborn, trust, 1.50 

Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 4.00 

Frank A. Sargent, trust, 5.00 

John B. Sargent, trust, 5.00 

Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 10.00 

Edward Sawyer, trust, 5.00 

Shaekford & Dame, trust, 3.50 

Mary W. Smith, trust, 5.00 

Moses B. Smith, trust, 2.00 

William Smith, trust, 1.50 

Ilattie R. Southmaid, trust, 1.50 

Hiram Stanyan, trust, 3.50 

Julia F. Stark, trust, 6.00 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 10.00 

Mary L. Stevenson, trust, 1.50 

Charles F. Stewart, trust, . 2.00 

M. J. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 10.00 

John W. Straw, trust, 2.00 

Mary J. Streeter, trust, 4.00 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 5.00 
Sturtevant Post No. 2, G. A. R., trust, 10.00 

Charles L. Tappan, trust, 5.00 

Hiram B. Tebbitts, trust, 10.00 

John H. Teel, trust, 1.50 

John S. Thompson, trust, 4.00 

John C. Thorne, trust, 4.00 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 3.00 

J. L. Tilton and A. B. Locke, trust, 2.00 

John H. Toof, trust, 4.00 

Jane R. Twombly, trust, 4.00 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 8.00 

Charles P. Virgin, trust, 1.50 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 7.00 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 10.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 527 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, $3.00 

Pauline E. Welles, trust, 1.50 

Mary E. West, trust, 7.00 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 1.50 

George F. Whittredge, trust, 3.00 

Mary Williams, trust, 1.75 

Sarah A. Williams, trust; 3.00 

Robert AVoodruff, trust, 10.00 

E. W. Woodward, trust, 5.00 

Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 5.00 

William Yeaton, trust, 3.00 

$5,742.19 



528 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



533 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 







Municipal. 






Bonds. 




T>\ 


le. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


City Hall Bmldiiig, 


Sept. 




1915, 


3V2, 


$8,000 






Sept. 




1916, 


31/2, 


8,000 






Sept. 




1918, 


31/2, 


8,000 






Sept. 




1919, 


314 


8,000 






Sept. 




1920, 


3y2, 


8,000 






Sept. 




1921, 


31/2, 


7,000 






Sept. 




1922, 


31/2, 


7,000 






Sept. 




1923, 


31/2, 


5,000 






July 




1921, 


3y2, 


10,000 






Jtily 




1925, 


31/2, 


10,000 






July 




1926, 


31/2, 


10,000 






July 




1927, 


31/2, 


10,000 






July 




1928, 


31/2, 


10,000 






July 




1929, 


31/2, 


5,000 


State Library, 




June 1, 1914, 
Precinct, 


31/2, 


25,000 







$139,000 



Bonds. 



Sewer, 



Due. Bate. Amount. 

June 1, 1914, 3^/2, $25,000 

Dec. 1, 1914, 31/2, 9,000 

July 1, 1917, 31/2, 25,000 

May 1, 1928, 31/2, 25,000 



84,000 



Union School District, July 1, 1915, 3 1/2, $8,000 

" July 1, 1916, 31/2, 8,000 

" July 1, 1918, 31/2, 8,000 

" July 1, 1919, 31/2, 8,000 

" July 1, 1920, 31/2, 8,000 

- July 1, 1921, 3y2, 8,000 



534 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. Due. Rate. Amount. 

Union School District, July 1,1922,^31/2, $8,000 

July 1, 1923,^31/2, 10,000 

July 1, 1924, 31/2, 5,000 

July 1, 1925, 31/2, 5,000 

July 1, 1926, 31/2, 5,000 

July 1, 1927, 31/2, 35,000 

July 1, 1928, 31/2, 4,000 

July 1, 1929, 31/2, 10,000 

July 1, 1930, 31/2, 10,000 

July 1, 1931, 31/2, 9,000 



School District No. 20, Sept. 


1, 


1914, 


31/2, 


$500 


Sept. 


1, 


1915, 


3y2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1916, 


314 


500 


" Sept. 


1, 


1917, 


31/2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1918, 


31/2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1919, 


314 


500 


" " *' Sept. 


1, 


1920, 


314 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1921, 


31/2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1922, 


31/2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1924, 


314, 


4,300 


West Concord Sewer, Oct. 


1, 


1914, 


31/2, 


$500 


" Oct. 


1, 


1915, 


31/2, 


500 


" Oct. 


1, 


1916, 


31/2, 


500 


" Oct. 


1, 


1917, 


3%, 


500 


- " Oct. 


1, 


1918, 


31/2, 


500 


" Oct. 


1, 


1919, 


31/2, 


300 



$149,000 



5,800 



East Concord Sewer, July 1, 1915, 3i^, 



2,800 
500 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 535 





Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


Penacook Sewer, 


July 


1, 1914, 4, 


$500 




. i 


July 


1, 1915, 4, 


500 




i i 


Oct. 


1, 1915, 3, 


500 




1 1 


July 


1, 1916, 4, 


500 




I ( 


Oct. 


1, 1916, 3, 


500 




I i 


July 


1, 1917, 4, 


500 




I c 


Oct. 


1, 1917, 3, 


500 




I ( 


July 


1, 1918, 4, 


500 




i i 


Oct. 


1, 1918, 3, 


500 




i .' 


July 


1, 1919, 4, 


500 



$5,000 

Total bonded indebtedness of the city, ex- 
clusive of water department, $389,100 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 
Due and unpaid January 1, 1913, 



municipal, 


$260.75 


Precinct, 


320.00 


Union School District, due 1913, 


105.00 


Penacook sewer. 


40.00 


Municipal, 


5,145.00 


Precinct, sewer. 


2,940.00 


Union School District, 


5,460.00 


Penacook sewer, 


280.00 


West Concord sewer. 


115.50 


East Concord sewer, 


17.50 


St. Paul's School sewer. 


15.00 


School District No. 20, 


483.00 




$15,181.75 



536 city of concord. 

Cr. 



Municipal paid, 


$5,297.25 


Precinct, sewer, 


3,045.00 


Union School District, 


5,565.00 


St. Paul's School sewer. 


15.00 


Penacook sewer, 


320.00 


West Concord sewer, 


115.50 


East Concord sewer. 


17.50 


School District No. 20, 


465.50 


Municipal due, not presented, 


108.50 


Precinct due, not presented, 


215.00 


School District No. 20, 


17.50 




$15,181.75 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

W. F. Thayer, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water- 
Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1913, $16,998.48 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 76,154.45 

$93,152.93 



Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $20,263.34 

Bonds paid, 15,000.00 

Orders paid, 25,307.13 

Cash on hand, 32,582.46 



$93,152.93 



TREiVSURY DEPARTMENT. 537 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 



Amount. 

$4,000 
5,000 
347,000 
30,000 
20,000 
15,000 
15,000 



When due. Rate. 


Amount 


When due. Rate. 


Jan. 


1, 1914, 4, 


$10,000 


Nov. 1, 1921, 3, 


Jan. 


1, 1915, 4, 


5,000 


April 1, 1921, 31/2, 


Jan. 


1, 1916, 4, 


9,000 


Jan. 1, 1922, 4, 


Jan. 


1, 1917, 4, 


10,000 


April 1, 1922, 31/2, 


Jan. 


1, 1918, 4, 


10,000 


March 1, 1922, 31/2, 


Jan. 


1, 1919, 4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1, 1923, SVo, 


Nov. 


1, 1920, 3, 


7,000 


Jan. 1, 1924, 31/0, 



$497,000 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 



Dr. 



To coupons overdue January 1, 1914, 

and not presented, $353.50 

Coupons due, 1913, • 20,135.84 



$20,489.34 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1913, 
Coupons due and not presented. 



$20,263.34 
226.00 



$20,489.34 



I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing ac- 
count of William F. Thayer, city treasurer, for the year 
1913, and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein 
properly recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouch- 
ers, and the several items correctly cast, and cash balance 
to be seventy-seven thousand fifty-one dollars and fifteen 
cents ($77,051.15), and as treasurer of the city water de- 
partment, cash balance to be thirty-two thousand five hun- 
dred eighty-two dollars and forty-six cents ($32,582.46). 



538 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking 
funds of the city and find such trust and sinking funds 
invested, and the income thereof for the year 1913, ac- 
counted for, as shown by the book of the city treasurer, 
kept for that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS, 1913. 

For payment of interest on bonds, $5,145.00 

payment of interest on temporary loans, 200.00 
payment of interest on' cemetery trust funds, 1,600.00 

support of city poor, 800.00 

dependent soldiers, city, 150.00 

incidentals and land damages, 4,000.00 

salaries, board of aldermen, 1,905.00 

printing and stationery, 2,000.00 

aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 3,000.00 

aid. New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 500.00 

Memorial Day, 460.00 

open air concerts, 325.00 

public baths, 225.00 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,000.00 

Old North Cemetery, 200.00 

"West Concord Cemetery, 90.00 

Pine Grove Cemetery, 150.00 

Old Fort Cemetery, 30.00 

Millville Cemetery, 75.00 

Horse Hill Cemetery, 10.00 

Soucook Cemetery, 30.00 

Woodlawn Cemetery, 25.00 

parks, 3.500.00 

Penacook Park, 100.00 

Washington Square, 25.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



539 



For East Concord playground, 




$25.00 


John Kimball playground, 




400.00 


Rollins Park playground. 




150.00 


repairs buildings. 




2,000.00 


City Hall bonds. 




8,000.00 


board of health, 




2,600.00 


police department, 




16,646.07 


public library. 




5,000.00 


engineering department, 




4,475.00 


highway department, 




53,450.00 


tire department, 




27,175.50 


salaries. 




12,670.00 


schools, 




126,066.92 


state tax, 




51,736.00 


county tax. 




35,945.52 


Penacook sewerage precinct, 


2,778.40 


street sprinkling precinct, 


Ward 1, 


500.00 


street sprinkling precinct. 


city. 


5,500.00 


St. Paul's School sewerage precinct, 


560.00 


East Concord sewerage pr 


ecinct, 


117.50 


sewer precinct, city. 




7,440.00 


garbage precinct. 




7,000.00 


lighting precinct, 




18,800.00 


East Concord lighting precinct, 


535.00 


West Concord sewerage pr 


ecinct, 


865.50 




$415,798.91 



540 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS BY RESOLUTIONS, 

1913. 

102 Case, Caroline F. Stickney v. City of Con- 
cord, $500.00 
104 Incidentals and land damages, 4,000.00 

109 Aid, military organizations, 250.00 

110 Iron fence, Old Fort Cemetery, 200.00 

111 Real estate sold for unpaid taxes, 1,186.96 
114 Auto combination chemical engine and 

hose wagon, 6,000.00 

116 City poor, 1,000.00 

117 Incidentals and land damages, 5,000.00 

118 Printing and stationery, 1,000.00 

119 Concord District Nursing Association, 300.00 

120 Blossom Hill Cemetery, 500.00 

123 Case, Hemphill v. City of Concord, 125.00 

124 Case, Hibbard v. City of Concord, 175.00 

125 Incidentals and land damages, 5,000.00 
127 Board of health, 177.70 
127 City poor, 342.84 
127 Fire department, 2,967.34 
]27 Horse Hill Cemetery, 4.00 
]27 Incidentals and land damages, 212.23 
127 Interest, cemetery trust funds, 53.79 
127 Parks, 69.68 
127 Playground, Rollins Park, 17.51 
127 Police and watch, 1,971.78 
127 Printing and stationery, ^ 52.86 
127 Salaries, 242.48 

$31,349.17 



CITY EXPENSES. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1913. 



Auto Chemical and Hose Wagon. 

Robinson Fire Apparatus Mfg. Co., motor chem- 
ical and hose wagon, $6,000.00 



City Poor. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, 



$2,142.84 



Dependent Soldiers, City. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, 



$104.00 



Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $6,494.54 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, salary, 25.00 

George A. Foster, secretary, salary, 25.00 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rental, 21.00 

E. C. Woods, removing moth nests, 53.16 

Hutchinson Building Co., supplies, etc., 81.10 

G. W. Waters, dressing, 40.00 
City of Concord, highway department, 

spraying trees, 12.00 



542 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. A. Moulton, superintendent, cash 

paid out, $90.93 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, 110.63 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, 21.50 
A. P. Home & Co., shrubs, etc., 208.50 
Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 119.68 
W. S. Dole, grass seed, 12.25 

D. G. Lowell, labor, 25.32 
Concord Water-Works, water, 92.00 
C. C. Hill, dressing, 22.50 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 10.47 
M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and supplies, 35.41 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, shrubs, 75.00 
Donald McLeod, plants, 239.14 
Horticultural Chemical Co., weed killer, 8.50 
Orr & Rolfe, labor and supplies, 21.99 
Bellett Lawson, Jr., cement markers, 19.00 
Page Belting Co., canvas, 9.00 
Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co., law^n 

mowers, 20.16 



Old Nokth Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $567.99 
City of Concord, highway department, 

removing tree, 3.00 

E. C. Woods, removing moth nests, 11.28 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 19.75 

Concord Water-Works, water, 10.00 

Donald McLeod. plants, 20.00 

Wliitmore Bros., trees, 15.00 



$7,893.7^ 



city expenses. 
West Concord Cemetery. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls. 



543 



$89.87 



MillvilijE Cemetery. 



J. N. Abbott, treasurer, appropriation. 



$75.00 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



? Scott French, labor, 
S. L. French, labor, 
C. S. Murray, labor, 
Herbert Gardner, labor, 



$118.50 

26.00 

1.75 

2.63 



$148.88 



Old Fort Cemetery. 

City of Concord, highway department, 

labor, trees, $1.50 

Capital Hardware Co., supplies, 6.28 

Scott French, labor, 15.75 



$23.53 



Iron Fence, Old Fort Cemetery. 



Concord Hardware Co., iron fence, etc., 

Scott French, labor, 

Samuel L. French, labor, 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 

H. T. Corser, horse hire, 

C. H. Martin Co., paint, 



$98.24 

44.90 

23.50 

.70 

4.00 

1.25 



$172.59 



L 



544 city of concord. 

Horse Hill Cemetery. 

J. 0. Clark, labor on trees, $2.00 

H. A. Quimby, labor, 12.00 



$14.00 



WooDLAWN Cemetery. 
E. H. Brown, treasurer, appropriation, $25.00 



SoucooK Cemetery. 
Nahum Preseott, care, $30.00 



Caroline F. Stickney vs. City of Concord. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, attorney, settlement of 

claim, $500.00 



District Nursing Association. 

E. Gertrude Dickerman, treasurer, appropria- 
tion, $300.00 



Dog Licenses. 

Ira C. Evans Co., postals, " $9.50 

The Evans Press, blanks, , 6.50 

John T. Dodge, sheep killed by dogs, 25.00 
Clarence G. Sanborn, sheep killed and 

damaged by dogs, 45.00 
Eugene H. Parsons, dog killed by 

police officer, 15.00 



$101.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



545 



Engineering Department. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $3,883.00 

Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 1.50 

Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 2.50 

W. B. Howe, cash paid out, 106.01 

E. II. Brown, cards, 20.34 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, .90 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rental 

and tolls, 24.84 

Ledder & Probst, supplies, 34.15 

Charles E. Moss, supplies, 31.96 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 9.01 

C. L. Berger & Son, repairs, 14.10 

Spaulding Print Paper Co., supplies, 6.49 

The Gift Shop, supplies, 12.15 

Virgin & Forrest, stakes, 30.00 

John F. Waters, auto hire, 224.50 

J. E. Gage, repairs, 2.55 

H. B. Lindgren, labor, 2.86 

A. H. Britton & Co., shellac, 1.00 

C. Yv^. Drake, shellac, .65 



$4,408.51 



Fire Department. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $10,757.65 
S. R. Dole, collector, semi-annual pay- 
rolls, 8,915.00 
John B. Dodge, serai-annual pay-roll, 75.00 
Frank C. Blodgett, serai-annual pay- 
roll, 45.00 
P. C. White, serai-annual pay-roll, 15.00 
Michael Lacroix, semi-annual pay-roll, 15.00 
Fred M. Dodge, salary, superintendent, 100.00 

35 



546 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Fred M. Dodge, cash paid out, $6.50 

Fred L. Hill, horse, 285.00 

R. F. Robinson, rent, 150.00 

R. F. Robinson, supplies, 4.50 

E. L. Davis, coal, 246.11 

E. L. Davis, horse hire, 207.85 

H. T. Corser, hay, horse hire, etc., 1,010.78 

H. T. Corser, pair horses, 625.00 

H. S. Sanborn, hay, 189.80 

G. N. Bartemus & Co., grain, etc., 142.55 

W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 848.92 

Concord Electric Co., electricity, 655.13 

Wetmore-Savage Co., supplies, 54.66 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 46.60 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 36.52 

A. F. Gross, shoeing, 29.29 

N. Nicholson, shoeing, 57.10 

Thompson & Iloague Co., supplies, 79.50 

Arthur Bruce, trustee, witch hazel, 7.50 

Harry 6. Emmons, supplies, 36.75 

Brown &, Saltmarsh, supplies, 6.48 

H. Thompson, brooms, 22.00 

Abbot & Downing Co., repairs, 117.33 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 44.40 
"Western Union Telegraph Co., time 

service, 15.00 

Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 164.75 

R. J. Maequire, services, 137.90 

W. C. Green, cash paid out, 140.19 

C. W. Dadmun, supplies, 10.21 

W. R. Davis, supplies, 27.90 

C. Pelissier & Co., repairs and supplies, 61.24 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals 

and tolls, 145.54 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, 27.38 

Mathieson Alkali Works, soda, 26.88 



I 



CITY EXPENSES. 547 

jD. Hammond & Son, carrots, $10.40 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 45.32 
Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co., 

repairs, 44.40 

6. D. Huntley, repairs, 16.00 

I. E. Gray, polish and auto hire, 35.00 

Sarah F. Scannell, typewriting, 3.30 

H. A. Stuart, services, 3.20 
Cornelius Callahan Co., supplies and 

repairs, 75.07 

John Canney, services, 7.20 

Brown, Sargent & Co., chamois skins, 6.00 

A. P. Swain, services, 2.00 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 16.00 

F. E. Gale, oil, 2.25 
The Evans Press, notices, 8.50 
Somerville Brush Co., brushes, etc., 18.35 
J. H. Toof & Co., laundry, 52.00 
Eureka Fire Hose Mfg. Co., hose, 800.00 
J. C. McLaughlin, shoeing, 200.38 
Tenney Coal Co., wood and coal, 774.28 
Concord Water-Works, water, 111.50 
M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, 5.16 
Swift & Co., supplies, 9.60 
J. A. Dadmun, labor and supplies, 15.15 
Coates Clipper Mfg. Co., supplies, 18.87 
Cushman Electric Co., labor, 1.25 
L. J. Keenan, horse hire, 6.50 
A. B. Smart, auto hire, 6.00 
H. W. Bean, horse hire, 1.00 

G. 0. Robinson, horse hire, 35.00 
Penacook Electric Light Co., electricity ' i 

and supplies, 123.93 

Sam Cunningham, services, 2.00 

A. IT. Perley, fire hood, 5.00 

B. M. Weeks, supplies, 2.05 



548 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Hirara Gardner, services, $2.00 

Pendleton- V/hite Co., waxine, 6.75 

Albert Cassavaugh, services, 2.80 

P. A. Keenan, services, 1.20 

The Pendleton Co., waxine, 4.50 

Kent & Smeltzer, shoeing, 40.50 

"W. E. Lynch, wood, 3.75 

CO. Partridge, horse hire, 28.00 

D. E. Stearns, services, 2.40 

W. C. Sanborn, services, 1.20 

J. B. Fillene & Son, repairs, 4.66 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 5.43 

H. V. Tittemore, horse hire, 7.50 

Suburban Transit Co., auto hire, 74.50 

G. L. Theobald, horse hire, 10.50 

F. L. Johnson, auto hire, 55.25 

G. E. Farrand, supplies, 6.03 
G. B. Bobbins Disinfectant Co., liquid 

soap and disinfectant, 51.25 

Thomas Chase, services, 3.20 

Francis Chase, services, 3.20 

Hamilton Heartz, lunches, 63.90 
Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works, 

auto hire, 18.75 

Harry Gray, horse hire, 2.00 

A. C. Sanborn, pasturing horse, 6.75 

J. H. Mercer, auto hire, 12.00 

J. C. McGilvray, auto hire, 42.50 
D. J. Adams, cash paid out, forest fires, 207.76 

Pettingill-Andrews Co., steel pin, 7.50 

W. H. Gay, cash paid out, 9.00 

J. M. Hardy, couplings, etc., 134.15 

Dudley Bros., gasolene, 1.10 

Hutchinson Building Co., repairs, 14.00 

Combination Ladder Co., bottles, 21.00 

W. H. Holbrook, services, 1.60 

Rogers' Quick Lunch, lunches, 3.70 



CITY EXPENSES. ' 549 

G. Nardini & Son, lunches, $17.50 

W. \l. Emerson, labor, etc., 29.40 

Eli Langlois, labor, etc., " 22.75 

W. J. Corbett, horse hire, 14.50 

R. J. Graves, services, 3.00 

G. E. Wood & Son, springs, 32.00 

Runiford Printing Co., binding book, 8.50 

L. E. Alexander, water, 8.00 
Samnel Eastman Co., hose and fire 

extinguisher, 32.35 

Reed's Lunch, lunches, 3.36 

Stuart-Howiand Co., supplies, 3.17 

J. Hurd Brown, lubricant, 1.88 

C. W. Abbott, rubber coats, 48.00 

Union Electric Supply Co., supplies, 25.82 

Concord Ice Co., ice, 5.77 

Revere Rubber Co., relining hose, 709.50 

Penaeook Lake Ice Co., ice, 21.56 

Standard Oil Co., gasoline, 43.46 

Ford & Kimball, supplies, 17.19 

John Jordan, milk, 2.44 

Larkin Mfg. Co., nozzle, 15.37 

Page Belting Co., repairs, .75 

G. E. Patch, services, 19.25 

George Abbott, Jr., paint, 10.38 

W. D. Stearns, oil, .55 

Shepard Bros, k Co., supplies, 1.25 

S. M, Jones estate, storage, 15.00 

Boice-Perrine Co., supplies, 52.79 

W. B. Cunningham, trucking, 1.75 

Marj^ K. Abbott, storage, 12.00 

Eagle Garage, supplies, 7.95 

Philadelphia Grease Mfg. Co., grease, 18.75 

A. Henry, plating rings, 4.00 • 

W. T. Happny, search lights, 20.00 

$30,142.84 



550 city of concord. 

Hemphill v. City of Concord. 
John O'Neil, attorney, settlement of claim, $125.00 



Hex\lth Department. 
Itemized in report of sanitary officer, $2,777.70 



Highway Department. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $53,417.76 



Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Isaac H. Proctor, salary, janitor, city 

hall, $600.00 

M. A. Spencer, services city clerk's 

office, 708.00 
Charles J. French, cash paid out, 35.23 
Charles J. French, expenses to conven- 
tion, New York City, 50.00 
John Brown, postmaster, stamped en- 
velopes, 309.66 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance, 191.25 
Morrill & Danforth, bond, city treasurer, 75.00 
Henry H. Chase, bond, tax collector, 75.00 
Baker & Keeler, insurance, 20.00 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance. 342.45 
Eastman & Merrill, bonds, city officials, 26.00 
Roby & Knowles, insurance, 375.00 
Chase & Martin, insurance, 75.00 
George D. Waldron, insurance, 18.00 
Charles C. Jones, insurance, 118.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 551 

Jackman & Lang, insurance, $45.00 

The Evans Press, license blanks, 5.25 

H. V. Tittemore, trucking, 1.50 

A. Perley Fitch, vaccination supplies, 27.70 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas and 

supplies, 153.90 
Mary C. B. Walker, rent, account 

elections, 100.00 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 2.88 

Concord Ice Co., ice, city hall, 103.90 
Western Union Telegraph Co., time 

service, 15.00 

C. H. Martin Co., vaccination supplies, 6.13 

Orr & Rolfe, supplies and labor, 36.38 
Concord Hardware Co., supplies, city 

hall, 9.66 

Henry E. Charaberlin, cash paid out, 50.71 
Henry E. Chamberlin, completing birth 

records, 61.50 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, city hall, 7.50 

Reed Laundry Co., laundry, city hall, 11.08 

Valomi Products Co., supplies, city hall, 6.50 
Concord Electric Co., electricity and 

supplies, city, hall, 501.48 
Concord Electric Co., lights, band stand, 5.00 
Burroughs Adding Machine Co., clean- 
ing machine, 3.05 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals 

and tolls, 90.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, vital 

statistics, 251.75 
H. B. Lindgren, labor, ward room, 

Ward 3, 8.15 
R. S. Emery, services, account trees, 

Penacook Park, 10.00 
Boutwell & Baker, operating woodlot, 6,700.14 



552 CITY OP CONCORD. 

I. E. Provanclia, cutting wood, city lot, $364.06 

Edd Johnson, cutting wood, city lot, 47.33 
W. F. Thaj^er, treasurer, pay-rolls, city 

vfood lot, 832.73 
Henry ]\I. Richardson, cutting wood, 

etc., city lot, 515.82 

John Matherson, cutting wood, city lot, 3.12 
Chase & Martin, insurance, lumber, 

city lot, 92.00 

Willie DaGreen, cutting wood, city lot, 989.21 

P. L. Johnson, polish, etc., city hall, 12.50 
]\r. E. Banks, express, repairs. North 

Church clock, 2.25 

E. Howard Clock Co., repairs, North 
Church clock, 71.50 

H. T. Corser, horse hire, 1.50 

Concord Water-Works, water, 34.00 

J. H. Morris, postage, 16.32 
Maude C. Bradley, services, assessors' 

office, 203.62 

Arthur McCauley, listing polls. Ward 6, 30.00 
John H. Bachelder, listing polls. Ward 2, 17.50 

B. F. Tucker, listing polls, Ward 4, 30.00 

James Fleming, listing polls. Ward 8, 30.00 

James J. Eeen, listing polls, Ward 9, 30.00 

David A. Palmer, listing polls, Ward 5, 30.00 
Omar L. Shepard, Jr., listing polls, 

Ward 3, 30.00 

F. H. Blanehard, listing polls, Ward 1, 30.00 
J. D. Foley, listing polls. Ward 7, 30.00 
Mary C. Adams, services, assessors, 85.75 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs and 

supplies, city hall, 3.67 

J. F. Waters, auto hire, hearings, 12.00 

Dunklee's Garage, auto hire, hearings, 12.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 553 

Batchekler & Co., supplies, city hall, $1.00 
Concord Wiring & Supply Co., sup- 
plies, city hall and ward rooms, 79.97 
Y7. G. Crosby, auto hire, mayor, 3.00 
Ferncroft Farm, plants. Memorial Arch, 25.50 
State of New Hampshire, engrossing 

bill, 1.50 

Star Stamp Co., city seal press, 13.50 

George V. Hill, salary, probation officer, 50.00 
Arthur W. Stevens, addition John 

Kimball playground, 175.00 
American Express Co., express, reports, 8.91 
Guy H. Hubbard, collector, taxes, 1913, 5.86 
W. B. Howe, expense. Board of Exam- 
iners of Plumbers, 1.50 
E. H. Brov/n, recording deeds, 3.08 
Tenney Coal Co., coal and wood, city 

hall, 941.82 

I. E. Gray, auto hire, hearings, 9.00 

E. S. King, auto hire, hearings, 19.00 

J. M. Inman, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

Park French, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

John Stanley, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

William Nerbonne, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

0. W. Crowell, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

W. H. Putnam, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

Timothj^ McCarthy, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

V. E. Bryant, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

G. W. Morrill, ringing chimes, July 4, 3.00 

Levi G. Adams, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

W. D. Nutting, repairs, clock, city hall, .50 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, brushes, city 

hall, 1.90 

C. H. Carter, auto hire, hearings, 16.00 
C. F. Bunker, supplies, city hall, 9.50 
M. F. Bickford, horse hire, assessors, 6.00 



551 CITY OF CONCORD. 

L. J. Keenan, horse hire, assessors, $5.00 

E. M. Proctor, cash paid out and serv- 
ices, l)and concerts, 13.29 
Isaac H. Proctor, cash paid out, 4.00 
M. E. Clifford & Co., supplies, Board of 

Examiners of Plumbers, 16.38 

Andrew J. Abbott, bounty on grass- 
hoppers, 148.00 

E. A. Stevens, labor, etc., elections, 

"Ward 4, 31.50 

C. H. SAvain & Co., inclined floor, Audi- 
torium, 339.00 
G. "W. Griffin, inclined floor. Audi- 
torium, 33.90 
C. H. Barnett, voting booths, 573.01 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, city 

hall, 2.78 

W. L. Reagan, expenses setting up 

booths, etc., 22.50 

F. W. Landon & Co., wiring booths, 10.00 
The Pendleton Co., waxine, city hall, 2.25 
"West Disinfecting Co., liquid soap, city 

hall, 10.00 
Suburban Transit Co., auto hire, hear- 
ings, 17.50 
Union Publishing Co., city directories, 45.50 
J. P. Sargent, supplies, elections, Ward 5, 5.00 
Louis J. Sebra, voting booths, "Ward 1, 45.60 

G. A. Griffin, shellacing booths. Ward 1, 2.63 
Hutchinson Building Co., labor, etc., 

Ward 7 ward house, 19.40 

J. E. Hutchinson, care lawn, etc., 

Ward 7 ward house, 9.00 

Penacook Electric Light Co., supplies, 

Ward 1 ward house, 3.01 



CITY EXPENSES. 555 

H. B. Lindgren, booths, Ward 9, $71.16 
Mrs. John Ahern, cleaning Ward 9 

ward room, 7.00 
S. F. Bowser & Co., gasoline pump, 

Central fire station, 126.19 
Merrimack County, use of building, 

elections, 50.00 
L. A. Sanders, trustee, land adjoining 

Kollins Park, 350.00 

Elbridge Emery, care of hall, Ward 2, 6.00 
Cornelius McCormick, stamps, etc., 

elections. Ward 8, 1.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 

ward clerks, returns of elections, 16.00 

N. C. Nelson & Co., clock, city clock, 1.50 

E. L. Davis, ice, fountain. Ward 1, 26.25 

Alexander Murchie, cash paid out, 10.21 

J. J. Foley, horse hire, assessors, 4.00 

$18,212.23 



Land Sold for Taxes. 
Seth R. Dole, tax collector, $1,186.96 



Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, appropriation, $3,000.00 



New Hampshire Memorial Hospital. 
Emma F. Ingalls, treasurer, appropriation, $500.00 



556 city op concord. 

Memorial Day. 

J. ]\L Grossman, quartermaster, Davis 

Post, $50.00 

I. M. Savage, quartermaster, E. E. 

Sturtevant Post, 305.00 

J. E. Symonds, quartermaster, W. I. 

Brown Post, 105.00 



Aid Military Companies. 

Russell Wilkins, commanding officer, $50.00 
0. G. Hammond, captain Company C, 100.00 
G. W. Morrill, captain Company E, 100.00 



Open Air Concerts. 

Nevers' Second Infantry Band, con- 
certs, $321.00 
E. L. Davis, moving bandstand, 4.00 



Parks. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,710.63 

Thompson & Ploague Co., supplies, 314.85 

W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 57.25 
Blue Mountain Forest Association, 

deer, 25.00 

The Kimball Studio, photographs, 3.85 

Frank Atkinson, cash paid out, 35.10 



$460.00 



$250.00 



$325.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 557 

Framingliam Nurseries, shrubs, $31.55 

Rowell & Plummer, cement, 2.50 

H. B. Haminoiid, care of swans, 40.00 

G. D. Tilley, swan, 13.50 

W. J. McMuliin, trucking, 9.75 
M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and supplies, 14.32 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 14.60 

W. L. Riford, teaming, 56.50 

I. T. Chesley, loam, etc., 118.35 

C. E. Burclisted, services, 4.50 
Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 10.15 
George Abbott, Jr., painting, 17.45 
Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 12.38 

D. McLeod, plants, 18.45 
Concord Water-Works, v/ater, 38.00 
S. L. French, care Pecker Park, 12.00 
Eli Brunei, supplies, 9.00 

$3,569.68 



Penacook Park. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $66.75 

Shepard Bros. & Co., supplies, 1.00 

Edward Stevens, labor and supplies, 15.00 



$82.75 



Washington Square. 

Concord Water-Works, water, $10.00 

E. H. Brown, treasurer, balance appro- 
priation, 15.00 



$25.00 



558 city of concokd. 

Playground — East Concord. 
C. I. Tibbetts, supplies, etc., 



$13.75 



Playground — John Kimball. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $146.50 

W. S. Chenette, labor and supplies, 5.20 

Eastern Nurseries, poplars, 5.20 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 7.16 

Frank Atkinson, cash paid out, 2.21 

D. E. Murphy, supplies, 13.63 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 32.18 

Wright & Ditson, supplies, 4.62 

C. P. Little, team work, 45.00 

Concord Water-Works, water, 6.00 

Zack Farmanian, soda, .65 

C. W. Drake, glass, .80 

J. P. Kelley, badges, 2.25 

F. W. Woolworth & Co., supplies, 1.00 

Ruth Kent, cash paid out, 1.20 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 2.50 

W. H. Reed, labor, 1.00 

W. Carpenter, paint, 2.00 

M. E. Clifford & Co., apparatus, 120.00 



$399.10 



Playground — Rollins Park. 

George A. AVooster, labor, $71.50 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 7.00 

Ruth Kent, cash paid out, 4.75 

Wright & Ditson, supplies, 10.75 

F. E. Nelson & Co., supplies, 1.08 



CITY EXPENSES. 



559 



Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 
Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 
J. P. Kelley, badges, 
Batchelder & Co., beans, 
P. E. Colbnrn, bags, 

F. W. Woolwortli & Co., crepe paper. 

G. W. Nutter, crepe paper, 

A. L. Pelissier, cash paid out, 
E. H. Blossom, labor, 
H. W. Rainie, band, 
C. F. Copp, trucking, 



$9.81 

.50 

3.00 

.40 

.25 

.50 

.90 

16.15 

24.67 

15.00 

1.25 



$167.51 



Police and Watch. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $15,951.75 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing and 

labor, 47.40 
"W. S. Kaime, board of horse and horse 

hire, 389.00 

Harry Gray, horse hire, 33.00 

L. J. Keenan, horse hire, ]9.75 

W. R. Davis, supplies, 9.15 
G. L. Lincoln & Co., furniture and 

repairs, 23.18 

Penacook Electric Light Co., electricity, 27.96 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 11.68 

G. A. S. Kimball, cash paid out, 213.37 

G. A. S. Kimball, use of auto, 68.00 

Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 6.17 

Batchelder & Co., supplies, 15.30 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 9.20 

Donnelly-Johnson & Co., supplies, 31.00 

L. Sonneborn Sons, disinfectant, 4.00 



560 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Western Union Telegrar^li Co., time 

service, $15.00 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, .30 

G. E. Farrand, supplies, 2.60 

B. M. Weeks, supplies, 19.90 
E. L. Davis, drawing ashes, 3.00 
E. L. Davis, coal, 144.45 
Fowler's Drug Store, supplies, 3.31 
II. G. Emmons, supplies, 4.15 
Concord Electric Co., electricity and 

supplies, 197.50 

E. J. Brown, one-half telephone expense, .75 
Irving Robinson, one-half telephone 

expense, 10.50 

C. T. Wallace, one-half telephone ex- 
pense, 8.25 

Fred N. Marden, one-half telephone 

expense, 3.00 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., rentals and tolls, 228.88 
New England Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., private line, 245.31 

A. Perley Fitch, supplies, 8.10 

Ira C. Evans Co., reports, etc., 13.75 

The Evans Press, printing and supplies, 59.32 

J. E. Silva, one-half telephone expense, 8.25 

A. W. Braley, one-half telephone expense, 3.75 
II. A. Woodward, one-half telephone 

expense, 6.48 

Concord Water-Works, water, 43.00 

Tenney Coal Co., coal, 364.80 

E. C. Eastman, supplies, 17.52 
Ileartz Restaurant, lunches, 47.90 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 4.95 
The Mitchell Mfg. Co., badges, 7.50 
M. Linsky & Bros., caps, etc., 25.95 

F. L. Johnson, auto hire and supplies, 2.40 



CITY EXPENSES. 561 

Pendleton- White Co., waxine, " $1.00 
W. J. Corbett, horse hire, 2.00 
The Pendleton Co., waxine, 2.25 
Concord Vulcanizing Works, supplies, 28.40 
W. J. Chadbourne, photos, criminals, 13.50 
G. F. Hodgman, supplies, 41.05 
T. J. Nolan, labor, 2.00 
G. D. Huntley, repairs, 13.30 
M. J. Healey, repairs, 22.84 
C. C. Schoolcraft, supplies, 1.80 
Fletcher-Prescott Co., signs, 48.90 
J. A. Dadmun, repairs, .75 
Stewart-Warner Speedometer Co., sup- 
plies, 2.31 
John Wilson, wood, 7.75 
E. A. Hartford, trucking, .75 

C. W. Dadmun, supplies, 20.85 

B. J. Prescott, horse hire, 2.00 
The Worrell Mfg. Co., vermin-go, 20.00 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 2.55 
George Abbott, Jr., paint, .80 

C. H. Barnett, repairs, .73 
C. Pelissier & Co., supplies and repairs, 18.34 
J. F. Waters, auto hire, 3.50 

$18,617.85 



Precinct Garbage. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $7,998.16 



Precinct Lighting Streets. 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, $788.42 

Concord Electric Co., electricity, 18,457.64 



$19,246.06 



36 



5g2 city of concord. 

Precinct Lighting Streets, East Concord. 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, $522.00 



Precinct Lighting Streets, Penacook. 
C. H. Barnett, treasurer, appropriation, $1,000.00 



Precinct Lighting Streets, "West Concord. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, appropriation, $740.00 



Precinct Sewer, City. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $3,485.50 
Highway department, labor and sup- 
plies, 6.25 
E. A. Hartford, trucking, .75 
Hutchinson Building Co., labor and 

supplies, 1.25 
C. E. Bartlett, trucking, .50 
W. L. Riford, trucking, 3.25 
Cragg Bindery, portfolio, 1.50 
Diekerman & Co., cement, 98.90 
G. L. Theobald, team, flushing, 187.25 
J. E. Gage, supplies, 4.00 
Concord Hardware Co., pipe, etc., 810.84 
Concord Foundry &; Machine Co., sup- 
plies, 17.40 
Samuel Holt estate, brick, 163.25 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, repairs, 76.90 
E. C. Paige, trucking, 28.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



563 



Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, etc., $758.93 

H. B. Lindgren, labor, 1.50 

Rowell & Phimmer, mason work, 138.19 

G. A. Dow, sharpening drills, 4.60 

B. F. Robinson, trucking, .25 
J, F. Ward, trucking, .75 
W. H. Ash, trucking, 1.75 
Ford & Kimball, supplies, 202.23 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 6.00 
S. Waldman, trucking, .50 

C. F. Thompson, rubber boots, 3.75 
G. F. Tandy, repairs, 19.83 
W. G. Elliott, mason work, 9.40 
F. W. Lang, filing saw, .25 



$6,033.47 



Precinct Sewer, East Concord. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund. 



$100.00 



Precinct Sewer, Penacook. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $772.19 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund, 1,100.00 

New England Granite Works, supplies, 1.20 

F. M. Morse & Co., supplies, 5.15 

Orr & Rolfe, supplies, 3.27 

J. E. Brown, supplies, etc., 28.31 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, supplies, 40.53 

C. H. Sanders, rubber boots, 21.50 
John Swenson Granite Co., supplies, 30.50 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, L5.91 
D. F. Dudley, sand, 4.20 



564 CITY OF CONCORD, 

F. E. Williams, labor, $14.00 

Concord Hardware Co., pipe, 178.22 
Hoyt Electrical Instrument "Works, 

labor and supplies, 2.50 

Sanborn Bros., fuse, 2.40 

L. J. Keenan, horse hire, 1.25 

I. Baty, supplies, .55 

W. 11. Meserve, supplies, 15.19 

Samuel Holt estate, brick, 8.00 

W. B. Cunningham, trucking, 2.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 86.00 

Water Department, pipe, etc., 58.72 

Mrs. W. L. Spicer, lunches, 2.10 

Ed. McShane, sharpening tools, .30 

E. L. Davis, trucking, 1.20 

Henry Rolfe, grain sacks, 4.35 



$2,346.54 



Precinct Sewer, St. Paul's School. 
Concord Water-Works, water, $45.00 



Precinct Sewer, West Concord. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $20.44 

G. L. Theobald, team, flushing, 5.75 



$26.19 



Precinct Sprinkling Streets. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $9,147.84 



city expenses. 565 

Precinct Sprinkling Streets, Penacook, 
Itemized in report of highway department, $521.88 



Printing and Stationery. 

Eumford Printing Co., printing and 

supplies, $410.75 
Kiimford Printing Co., city reports, 1,835.40 
Monitor & Statesman Co., advertising, 128.43 
N. H. Patriot Co., advertising, 120.20 
Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 8.60 
The Evans Press, printing and supplies, 33.85 
The Cragg Bindery, books, etc., 57.00 
A. R. Andrews estate, supplies, 3.30 
A. R. Andrews Co., supplies, 11.38 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing and sup- 
plies, 364.50 
E. C. Eastman, supplies, 12.15 
The Independent Statesman, adver- 
tising, 17.25 
Treworgy Ink & Pen IMfg. Co., ink and 

pens, 7.50 
Spaulding Print Paper Co., pocket scales, 1.80 

The Gift Shop, supplies, 6.25 

C. F. Nichols & Son, envelopes, .75 

Whitcomb & Barrows, dictionary, .90 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., paper, 1.50 

T. J. Dyer, letterheads, 1.00 

Fletcher-Whittier Co., ink wells, 3.00 

C. C. Hager Co., ink pads, 2.60 

Concord Evening Monitor, advertising, 23.25 

Charles H. Whittier, Jr., ink well, 1.50 



$3,052.86 



566 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Public Baths. 

Timothy Reardon, salary and cash paid 

out, ^ ' $184.80 

James Reardon, repairs, boat, 1.00 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, 3.79 

C. H. Swain & Co., labor and supplies, 9.33 

Ira C. Evans Co., badges, 5.00 

Larsen & Davis, labor and supplies, 7.15 



$211.07 



Public Library. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,870.29 

E. C. Eastman, books, 214.24 
C. E. Lauriat Co., books, 465.63 
Albert Bonnier Publishing House, books, 1.43 
Enterprise News Co., subscription, 10.00 

F. J. Barnard & Co., binding books, etc., 214.87 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, 246.85 
Grace Blanchard, cash paid out, 80.71 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rental, 42.00 

G. H. Richardson & Co., pens, 1.50 
Hall & Locke Co., books, 8.00 
The Cragg Bindery, binding books, 54.92 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing and sup- 
plies, 50.70 

The H. R. Huntting Co., books, 77.66 

The Wall Street Journal, subscription, 12.00 

R. W. Eldridge, subscription, .78 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs, 4.50 

Lee Bros. Co., repairs, 15.88 

Johnson's Bookstore, supplies, 31.45 

Concord Water-Works, water, 11.00 

Morrill & Danforth, insurance, 62.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 567 

Concord Hardware Co., supplies, $3.15 
Tenney Coal Co., coal, 270.20 
Library Art Club, assessment, 6.00 
Rumford Printing Co., binding maga- 
zines, etc., 43.00 
W. B. Cunningham, express on books, 

Penacook, 52.00 

C. H. Sanders, care of books, Penacook, 52.00 

Auditorium Associates, advertising, 2.00 

Irving T. Chesley, work on lawn, 36.59 

Carol Cox Book Co., books, 17.25 

Concord Ice Co., ice 3.00 

Harper & Bros., books and subscription, 24.00 

Old Corner Book Store, books, 20.28 

W. C. Gibson, subscriptions and books, 56.10 

Herman Goldberger, subscriptions, 178.35 

H. H. Metcalf, subscription, 1.00 

Abby C. Morse, subscription, 3.00 

A. H. Britton & Co., ash cans, 2.50 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 2.00 

Library Bureau, supplies, 75.71 

A. L. A. Publishing Board, subscription, 1.00 

N. H. Patriot Co., subscription, 6.00 
Christian Science Publishing Society, 

subscription, 5.00 

Monitor & Statesman Co., subscription, 6.00 

A. W. Brayley, subscription, 4.00 

H. W. Wilson Co., book, 10.00 

R. H. Ilinkley Co., books, 35.00 

The Bobbs-Merrill Co., books, 10.80 

Frank Pergande, book, 5.00 

Eastman & Merrill, insurance, 25.00 

Jackman & Lang, insurance, 75.00 

$5,507.84 



568 city of concord. 

Repairs Buildings. 

J. S. Mansur, labor and supplies, police 

station, $54.15 

J. S. Mansur, painting, etc., chief's 

house, 73.11 

Concord Wiring & Supply Co., labor 
and supplies, city hall, 22.62 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, police 

station, 139.05 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, fire sta- 
tions, 564.61 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, city hall 

and Auditorium, 55.61 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, fire 

stations, 115.99 

A. H. Britton & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, fire stations, 29.01 

A. H. Britton & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, police station, 9.10 

Concord Light & Power Co., water 

heater, police station, 16.00 

Concord Light & Power Co., water 

heater, Alert Hose House, 16.00 

Hutchinson Building Co., labor and 

supplies, police station, 11.27 

Hutchinson Building Co., labor and 

supplies, fire stations, 36.79 

Chamberlin Metal Weather Strip Co., 

windows, police station, 29.44 

C. W. Drake, labor and supplies, police 

station, 1.25 

M, G. Davis, labor and supplies, fire 

stations, 12.40 

C. W. Dadmun, labor and supplies, 

police station, 14.87 



CITY EXPENSES. 569 

C. W. Dadmun, labor and supplies, 

city engineer's office, $10.00 

E. E. Babb, repairs, police station, 

Ward 1, 5.50 

W. H. Young, painting, chief's house, 3.30 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and supplies, 

police station, 35.22 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 92.88 

Rowell & Plummer, repairs, Auditorium, 20.75 
George Miner, repairs flag pole, city 

hall, 15.00 

H. B. Lindgren, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 39.01 

H. B. Lindgren, labor and supplies, 

police station, 98.94 

F. P. Annis, painting, police station, 2.83 
C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, labor and sup- 
plies, fire station, Ward 1, 15.94 

Henry Morrill, labor and supplies, fire 

station, Ward 1, 40.70 

Yf. Arthur Bean, labor and supplies, 

fire station. Ward 1, 3.91 

George A. Griffin, painting ward room. 

Ward 3, 87.04 

George A. Griffin, labor and supplies. 

Old Fort Engine House, 48.45 

J. M. Stew'art & Sons Co., supplies, fire 

stations, 24.84 

W. H. Meserve, cement, fire station. 

Ward 1, 14.00 

W. Carpenter, painting chief's house, 71.75 
E. L. Davis, trucking and freight, 19.98 

W. T. Bailey, repairs, ward room. 

Ward 7, 3.86 

W. T. Bailey, repairs. Good Will Hose 

House, 7.51 



570 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Tlioinpson & Hoague Co., supplies, $4.70 

Louis J. Sebra, repairs, fire station, 

Ward ], 15.15 

G. F. Tandy, concrete, fire stations, 92.69 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, fire station, 

Ward 1, 3.16 

F. E. Williams, labor, fire station. 

Ward 1, 1.50 

Virgin & Forrest, repairs, fire station. 

Ward 2, 6.31 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, paint, Good 

Will Hose House, .81 

A. S. Waite, weather strips, police 

station, 1.50 



Salaries. 

Charles J. French, mayor, $1,500.00 

Henry E. Chamberlin, city clerk, 1,200.00 
Henry E. Chamberlin, clerk, board of 

public works, 100.00 
Henry E. Chamberlin, overseer of 

poor, Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, 350.0^ 

Edward M. Proctor, city messenger, 900.00 

George M. Fletcher, police justice, 500.00 

Rufus H. Baker, clerk, police court, 100.00 
J. H. Morris, assessor and clerk of 

board, 1,500.00 

J. E. Shepard, assessor, 750.00 

M. H. Donovan, assessor, 750.00 

John P. Paige, care, city clocks, 3.50 

Mervin E. Banks, care, city clocks, 81.50 

W. H. Putnam, care, clock. Ward 1, 25.00 

W. P. Ladd, tax collector, 362.48 



$1,988.50 



CITY EXPENSES. 571 

Seth R. Dole, tax collector, $1,980.00 

W. C. Green, building inspector, 200.00 

Alexander Murcliie, city solicitor, 500.00 

Charles H. Cook, M. D., city physician, 450.00 
E. U. Sargent, M. D., assistant city 

physician, 50.00 
W. H. McGirr, overseer of poor. Ward 

1, 30.00 
Fred S. Farnum, overseer of poor, 

Ward 2, 10.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, 250.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 

moderators and ward clerks, 360.00 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 

supervisors and inspectors of election, 960.00 

$12,912.48 



Salaries, Board op Aldermen. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $1,905.00 



Schools. 



L. J. Rundlett, agent, Union School 

District, $97,437.99 

David T. Twomey, treasurer, Pena- 

cook School District, 11,015.72 

Frank E. Dimond, treasurer. Town 

School District, 6,358.41 

$114,812.12 



572 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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CITY OF CONCORD. 



Concord Water-Works. 





Receipts. 


Expenditures. 


Cash on hand, January 1, 1913 


$16,998.48 
76,164.45 








$•25,307.73 






15,000.00 






20,2C)3.34 






32,582.46 








Less outstanding order unpaid Jan. 1, 1914 


$93,152.93 


$93,153.53 
.60 




$93,152.93 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 581 

MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

City hall bonds, $114,000.00 

State library bonds, 25,000.00 



Total funded city debt, $139,000.00 

Debt Not Funded, 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1914, $193.50 
Interest accrued, not yet due, munici- 
pal bonds, 1,723.75 
Coupons, overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 108.50 

Due school districts, 39,774.36 

Due precinct sewer. East Concord, 127.53 

Due precinct sewer, city, 145.20 

Due precinct sewer, St. Paul's School, 17.55 

Due precinct sewer. West Concord, 127.07 
Due precinct lighting streets. East 

Concord, .87 
Due precinct lighting streets, Penacook, 350.00 
Due precinct sprinkling streets, Pena- 
cook, 6.98 
Cemetery trust funds, 48,584.31 



Total debt not funded, 91,159.62 



Total city indebtedness, $230,159.62 



582 city of concord. 

Available Assets. 

Treasurer's cash balance, January 1, 

1914, $77,051.15 

Taxes of 1912, uncollected, 1,797.72 

Taxes of 1913, uncollected. 37,588.24 

Cash in hands of tax collector, Janu- 
ary 1, 1914, 310.47 
Taxes bid in by city, 4,511.53 
Due quarry rents, 191.70 
Due highway department, 180.50 
Due Merrimack County, county poor, 3,987.67 
Due Merrimack County, deiDcndent 

soldiers, 783.88 

Overdraft, precinct, garbage, 506.81 

Overdraft, precinct, lighting streets, 387.32 

Overdraft, precinct, Penacook sewer, 288.25 

Overdraft, precinct, sprinkling streets, 1,131.53 

$128,716.77 

Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1914, $101,442.85 
Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1913, 84,506.90 



Increase for the year, $16,935.95 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 583 

PRECINCT DEBT. 
Funded Debt. 

Water-works bonds, $497,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 84,000.00 

$581,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Coupons overdue, water bonds, not 

presented, $226.00 

Coupons overdue, sewer bonds, not 

presented, 215.00 

Interest accrued, sewer bonds, not yet 

due, 682.50 

Interest accrued, water bonds, not yet 

due, 9,239.57 

10,363.07 



$591,363.07 
Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, January 1, 
1914, $32,582.46 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1914, $558,780.61 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1913, 589,689.05 



Decrease for the year, * $30,908.44 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, $149,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,607.50 

$151,607.50 



584 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Penacook School District bonds, $8,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 102.68 



$8,902.68 



Net liability of school districts, $160,510.18 



■^^est Concord sewer bonds, $2,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 24.48 



East Concord sewer bonds, $500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 8.75 



Penacook sewer bonds, $5,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 75.00 



$2,824.48 



$508.75 



$5,075.00 



EECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $101,442.85 

precinct debt, 558,780.61 

school districts, 160,510.18 

West Concord sewer debt, 2,824.48 

East Concord sewer debt, 508.75 

Penacook sewer debt, 5,075.00 



Aggregate indebtedness over available as- 
sets, January 1, 1914, $829,141.87 
Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1913, 861,279.16 



Decrease for the year, $32,137.29 



CITY PROPERTY. 



Having Value but not Considered Available Assets. 



The following is a summary of the inventory of the prop- 
erty belonging to the city January 1, 1914, made by the 
heads of the various departments having the same in 
charge. Itemized statements are on file in the city clerk's 
office. 

WATER DEPARTMENT. 

Itemized in report of water department, $1,045,419.48 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Central fire station, $44,771.00 

Kearsarge steamer company, 3,775.00 

Eagle steamer company, 4,560.00 
Governor Hill steamer company, 3,070.00 

Hook and ladder company, 2,710.00 

Chemical engine, 1,850.00 

Combination company, 6,100.00 

Good Will hose company, 8,120.00 

Alert hose company, 5,275.00 

Pioneer steamer company, 18,063.00 

Old Fort engine company, 4,280.00 

Cataract engine company, 9,742.50 

Fire alarm apparatus, 10,900.00 

Fabric hose, 14,850 feet, 10,500.00 



586 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Residence, chief engineer, 


$3,000.00 




Heating apparatus. 


400.00 




Ward room and hall furniture : 






Pioneer station, 


70.00 




Old Fort station, 


69.00 




Cataract station. 


71.00 


$137,326.50 







HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Central District. 

New city stable, sheds, lots, tools, 

etc., $27,007.00 

Penacook District. 
Tools, etc., 155.75 

West Concord District. 
Tools, etc., 19.25 

East Concord District. 
Tools, etc., 18.00 



$27,200.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 
Furniture, tools and supplies, $533.50 



SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Tools and supplies, $710.25 



city property. 587 

Precinct, Penacook Sewer. 
Tools and supplies, $40.15 

Precinct, West Concord Sewer. 
Tools and supplies, $23.65 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Isolation hospital and furniture, $740.00 

Office furniture and supplies, 200.00 



$940.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Police station, city, $25,000.00 

Police station, Penacook, 6,000.00 

Equipment, furniture, etc., 2,153.65 



$33,153.65 



CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, etc., $1,135.00 



COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, etc., $140.17 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Furniture, $107.45 



588 CITY OP CONCORD. 

ASSESSORS' OFFICE. 
Furniture, etc., $325.00 



TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE. 
Furniture, etc., $225.20 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES' OFFICE. 

"Weights, measures, balances, etc., $200.00 



CITY MESSENGER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Committee room, $73.70 

City council rooms, 774.50 

Property in and about city hall, 1,403.09 

• $2,251.29 



PARK COMMISSIONERS' DEPARTMENT. 

Tools, etc., White Park, $200.00 

Tools, etc., Rollins Park, 25.00 

$225.00 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS' DEPARTMENT. 
Tools, etc.. Blossom Hill Cemetery, $250.00 



CITY PROPERTY. 589 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Books, $9,500.00 

Furniture, 500.00 



$10,000.00 



MILK INSPECTION. 

Tools, etc., $43.77 



CITY HISTORY COMMISSION. 
One Bouton's History, $10.00 



REAL ESTATE. 

City hall lot and buildings, $150,000.00 

City farm, pasture and quarries, 5,000.00 

Gravel banks, 1,050.00 

Ward house. West Street, 4,500.00 

Playground on Intervale, 1,500.00 

Playground, Fosterville, 1,675.00 

White Park, 14,000.00 

Rollins Park and playground, 11,157.50 

Penacook Park, 2,500.00 

Market place, Warren Street, 15,000.00 

Cemeteries, 20,400.00 
Bradley, Fiske (so called), Ridge 

Road and Pecker Parks, 2,200.00 



$228,982.50 



590 CITY OP CONCORD. 

GENERAL RECAPITULATION. 

Water department, $1,045,419.48 

Fire department, 137,326.50 

Highway department, 27,200.00 

Engineering department, 533.50 

Sewer department, 710.25 

Penacook sewer, 40.15 

"West Concord sewer, 23.65 

Health department, 940.00 

Police department, 33,153.65 

City clerk's office, 1,135.00 

Commissioner's office, 140.17 

Mayor's office, 107.45 

Assessors' office, 325.00 

Tax collector's office, 225.20 

Sealer of weights and measures, 200.00 

City messenger's department, 2,251.29 

Park commissioners' department, 225.00 
Cemetery commissioners' department, 250.00 

Pnblic library, 10,000.00 

Milk inspection, 43.77 

City history commission, 10.00 

Real estate, 228,982.50 

$1,489,242.56 



1913. 

Population of city (census 1910), 21,497 

Valuation of city, $20,482,846 

Tax assessed for the year, $305,460.56 

Eate of taxation, $8.80 per $1,000. 
Eate of Union School District, $3.90. 
Eate for precinct, $2.60. 
Total rate, $15.30 per $1,000. 



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INDEX. 



, . ,. , PAGE. 

Appropriations, regular ,„„ 

538 

special g^p 

Assessors, board of, report of 

Assets, city. See Municipal Assets. 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of -Qg 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness. . . 

533 

Cemetery department, reports of 

City clerk, report of . . . . 

472 

expenses, itemized ; 

government, departments, personnel of 5^ 

assessors 

53 

board of aldermen 

board of public works 

building inspector 

cemetery committees 

clerk ^^ 

CO 

collector of taxes ... 

53 

commissioners of cemeteries 

committees of board of aldermen J, 

culler of staves 

engineer 

fence-viewers 

fire department, officers of 

health officers ^° 

hydrant commissioners 



inspector of petroleum . 

■ ■ ■ ■ 65 



messenger ^^ 

overseers of poor ^^ 

park commissioners 

physician, city and assistant ^^ 

plumbers, board of examiners of . . . ^^ 

pound-keeper ^^ 

police department officers and members "of po'li'ce' force tl 

public library, trustees of 

,., . , 58 

librarian and assistants. ... t-o 

registrar of vital statistics 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing.' ." ^^ 

sealers of leather ; °* 

sealer of weights and measures.' .',... ^^ 

* 66 



654 CITY OF CONCORD. 



City solicitor 54 

street department, superintendent of streets 54 

drain-layers 69 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 64 

superintendent of clocks 58 

superintendent of parks 62 

surveyors of painting 68 

masonry 68 

wood, lumber and bark 68 

treasurer 53 

undertakers 64 

•ward officers 71 

water- works, city, commissioners 59 

superintendent 59 

■weigher 67 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 66 

solicitor, report of 214 

Clerk of police court, report of 381 

Coupon account, statement of 535 

Debts, recapitulation 584 

Engineer, city, report of 254 

Financial statement 572 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 317 

fire alarm 363 

Penacook fire-alarm telegraph 369 

revised ordinance 371 

roll of members 386 

Highways, financial statement of 405 

department, report of superintendent 393 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 262 

John Kimball Playground, report of committee on 452 

Mayor's address 3 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 73 

Municipal debt 581 

regulations 2 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 506 

Ordinances and resolutions 19 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 449 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 259 

Police department, report of city marshal 200 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1903 465 

Poor department, report of overseer 473 



INDEX. 655 

PAGE. 

Population 591 

Precincts, debts of 583 

Property, city, inventory of 585 

Public bath, report of 454 

Public library, report of trustees 208 

librarian 209 

Public Works, board of, report of 392 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 217 

complaints, etc 232 

contagious diseases 228 

milk inspector, report of 221 

mortality report 238 

sanitary officer, report of 223 

School reports 55 

Union School District, annual school meeting warrant 185 

annual school meeting 186 

attendance, tables of 144 

board of education 77 

board of education, report of 80 

buildings and repairs, report of committee 84 

census, 1913 153 

clerk 79 

elocutionary contest 165 

English prize essay contest 164 

financial agent, report of 88 

fire drills 167 

graduating classes 169 

honor, roll of 174 

kindergarten games 184 

movement of pupils through grades 160 

officers of the district 79 

school nurse 79 

school nurse, report of 139 

stamp saving system 152 

superintendent 79 

superintendent, report of 93 

teachers, list of 154 

truant officer 79 

truant officer, report of 151 

Town School District, report of 196 

Sewer department, report of 441 

Tax collector, report of 4gQ 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 528 

Treasury, report of 475 

Trust funds 475 

Trusts, individual cemetery 434 

Vital statistics, tables of 594 



656 CITY OF CONCORD. 

■* PAGE. 

Water department, report of 263 

commissioners, report of 270 

coupon, account of 537 

engineer's report 289 

fire hydrants 302 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 5 3 7 

receipts for each year 294 

schedule of pipes and gates 296 

summary of statistics 313 

superintendent, report of 272 

treasurer's report 291-536