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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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CITY OF CONCOR 

ANNUAL REPORT 



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1914 
SIXTY- SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1914 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




THE RUMFORD PRESS 

CONCORD, N. H. 

1915 






MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to 
contract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or 
delivered on city poor account, except on the written 
order of the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time 
than until his successor shall have been appointed and 
qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 11, 1915. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 5, chapter 16, of the 
revised ordinances, relative to cemeteries. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That Section 5, Chapter 16, of the Revised Ordinances 
be amended as follows: Strike out the word "and" in the second line 
and add after the word "seven" in the second Line the words "and 
eight;" strike out the word "four" in the fourth line and add the word 
"five" in place thereof and strike out the word "and" in the fifth line 
and add after the word "seven" in the fifth line the words "and one for 
ward eight," so that said section as amended wUl read as follows: 

"Sec. 5. The several public cemeteries in Wards One, Two, Three, 
Seven and Eight shall be imder the superintendence and control of com- 
mittees elected by the board of aldermen, in the month of January, annu- 
ally. The committees shall be five in number, viz.: one for Ward One, 
one for Ward Two, one for Ward Three, one for Ward Seven, and one for 
Ward Eight, and shall consist of three members each, as at present 
constituted, one of whom shall be elected annually, and hold his office 
for the term of three years. Any vacancy occurring in either of said 
committees shall be filed by an election of the board of aldermen for the 
unexpired term. Any member of the cemetery committee may at any 
time be removed by the board of aldermen for sufficient cause. The 
members of said committees as at present constituted shall hold office 
during the terms for which they have been elected. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed February 9, 1914. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 41, sections 2 and 8 op 

THE revised ordinances RELATING TO SALARIES CLERK, BOARD 

of public works and sanitary officers. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That Chapter 41, Section 2 of the Revised Ordinances be 

amended as follows : Strike out of said section the words "one himdred 

dollars" and insert in place thereof the words "two hundred dollars" 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

80 that said section as amended will read : "The city clerk shall receive 
in full for his services the sum of twelve hundred dollars per annum, 
and two hundred dollars additional for his services as clerk of the board 
of public works." 

Also section 8 be amended as follows : Strike out of said section the 
words "fourteen hundred dollars" and insert in place thereof the words 
"fifteen hundred dollars" so that said section as amended wiU read: 
"The sanitary officer of the board of health shall receive in fuU for his 
services the sum of fifteen hundred doUars per annum." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE GARBAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the poUs and ratable estates within the Garbage Precinct of 
said city, the sum of eight thousand five hundred dollars ($8,500) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 
For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said precinct, $8,500.00 
Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the sewerage precinct for the ensuing finan- 
cial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Sewerage Precinct of 
said city, the sum of nineteen thousand four hundred forty dollars 
($19,440.00) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said pre- 
cinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as fol- 
lows: 

For repairs and construction $7,500.00 

For interest on bonds 2,940.00 

For payment of bonds 9,000.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



ORDINANCES. 5 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the ldvirrs of the east concord sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord Sewerage 
Precinct, the sum of one hundred seventeen and 50-100 dollars ($117.50) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shaU be appropriated as follows: 
For the payment of the sum becoming due in accordance with 

an ordinance creating a sinking fund .$100.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 17. 60 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the west concord sewerage precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord Sewerage 
Precinct, the sum of five hundred ninety-eight dollars ($598.00) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 
For the payment of interest that may be due on precinct 

bonds $98.00 

For the payment of bonds 500.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shaU take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING 
FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 

raised on the poUs and ratable estates within the limits of the Street 



b CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sprinkling Precinct of said city, the sum of nine thousand three hundred 
dollars ($9,300) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
follows : 

For sprinkling streets $9,300.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE LIGHTING PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
TEAR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the poUs and ratable estates within the Lighting Precinct of 
said city, the sum of twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For Ughting streets $20,000.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March .27, 1914. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the street sprinkling precinct in ward one. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Street Sprinkling Pre- 
cinct in Ward One the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars ($450) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $450,00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



ordinances. / 

An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount op money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the penacook sewerage precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook Sewerage 
Precinct the sum of three hundred fifty dollars ($350) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs and maintenance of sewers in said precinct $350 . 00 

Sect. 2, This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the east concord lighting precinct for the 
ensuing financial teak. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord Lighting 
Precinct, the sum of five hundred thirty-five dollars ($535) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For lighting streets within said precinct $535.00 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take efifect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised for the ensuing financial year for the use of the 

CITY. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum of thirty- 
eight thousand doUars ($38,000.00) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, together with 
the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads and from other 
sources shall be appropriated as foUows: 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

For payment of interest on bonds $4,690.00 

For payment of interest on temporary loans 100.00 

For payment of interest on cemetery trust funds 1,700.00 

For support of city poor 800 . 00 

For dependent soldiers, city 150.00 

For incidentals and land damages 8,000 . 00 

For salaries, Board of Aldermen 1,905.00 

For printing and stationery 2,000.00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000.00 

For aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 500.00 

For Memorial Day 460.00 

For aid, E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., rent 450.00 

For aid, Military Companies 250.00 

For Open Air Concerts 325.00 

For PubUc Baths 325.00 

For Blossom HiU Cemetery 1,200.00 

For Old North Cemetery 200.00 

For West Concord Cemetery 100.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 150.00 

For Old Fort Cemetery 30.00 

For Millville Cemetery 75.00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery 10.00 

For Suncook Cemetery 30 . 00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25 . 00 

For Parks 3,700.00 

For Penacook Park 100.00 

For Washington Square 25 . 00 

For East Concord Playground 25 . 00 

For John Kimball Playground. 400.00 

For RoUins Park Playground 250.00 

For repairs buildings 2,000 . 00 

For State Library Bonds 10,000.00 



$42,975.00 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Salary, Sanitary Officer $1,500.00 

Milk Inspection 300.00 

Fumigation Supplies 100 . 00 

Antitoxin and Medical Supplies 200.00 

Incidentals 700.00 

$2,800.00 



ORDINANCES. 9 
POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $15,708.75 

Fuel 450.00 

Horse Hire, Boai'd and Shoeing 450.00 

Helmet and Buttons .35.00 

Ice 10.00 

Lights 150.00 

Telephone, Private Line 245 . 31 

Incidentals 800 .00 

$17,849.06 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Salaries $3,060.00 

Books and Incidentals 2,240.00 

$5,300.00 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, Engineer 1,800.00 

Salaries, Assistants 1,500 . 00 

SuppUes 100.00 

Repairs 25 .00 

Incidentals 150.00 

Assessor's Map 1,000.00 

$4,575.00 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

General Maintenance $35,000.00 

Catch Basins 1,200.00 

Trees 4,000.00 

Sidewalks and Crossings, New 1,000.00 

Sidewalks and Crossings, Repair 2,250 . 00 

Salary, Superintendent 1,800.00 

Permanent Work, South Street, Concord to Thorndike. . . . 2,200.00 

Permanent Work, South Main Street, Thorndike to Perley 1,600.00 

Permanent Work, North Main Street, Chapel to Pitman. . . 2,500.00 
Permanent Work, North State Street, Railroad Crossing, 

North 2,500.00 

Permanent Work, Eddy Estate to Fiske Road 1,500.00 

Permanent Work, Hopkinton Road to Town Line 1,500.00 

Permanent Work, Pittsfield Road 500.00 

Permanent Work, Penacook Square 1,500.00 

Permanent Work, Penacook, Merrimack Street 1,000.00 

Permanent Work, East Penacook Street, C. & C. Railroad 

Crossing, East 1,000 .00 

$61,050.00 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $11,244.00 

Salaries, Semi-Annual 9,090 . 00 

Rent Veteran's Association 150.00 

Forage 1,800.00 

Fuel and Lights 1,600.00 

Fire Alarm 800.00 

Horse Hire and Shoeing 1,200.00 

Washing .52.00 

Supplies, Auto Combination 100.00 

Penacook Fire Alarm 200.00 

Incidentals 2,000.00 

New Hose 800.00 



$29,036.00 

SALARIES. 

Mayor _ $1,500.00 

City Clerk 1,200 .00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works 200 .00 

Overseers of Poor 390 . 00 

City SoUcitor 500.00 

City Treasurer 250.00 

City Messenger 900.00 

City Physicians 500.00 

Care, City Clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,000 .00 

Moderators and Ward Clerks 360.00 

Supervisors and Inspectors of Election 960 . 00 

Collector of Taxes 2,000.00 

Building Inspector 200 .00 



$12,070.00 



Sect. 2. There shall be raised in Uke manner the sum of forty-four 
thousand nine hundred ninety-two and 50-100 dollars ($44,992.50) for 
the support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, together 
with the income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be appropriated and 
divided among the several school districts according to the valuation 
thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
cemeteries of the city one half of the income from the sale of lots and the 
income derived from the care of lots and grading, which sum shall be de- 
posited by the superintendent, or others receiving them, in the city treas- 
ury. The care of lots for which the city holds trust funds shall be paid 
from the money appropriated for the care of cemeteries and so much of 



ORDINANCES. 11 

the income of these trust funds as may be thus expended shall be depos- 
ited in the city treasury at the close of the year and the remainder in 
each instance, credited to the individual fund. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
use of the Public Library in the purchase of books the amount collected 
for fines. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance enlarging the limits of school district no. 20 
street lighting precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That the Limits of School District No. 20 Street Light- 
ing Precinct be enlarged by the addition thereto of the following de- 
scribed territory, to wit: Beginning at the intersection of the north- 
westerly line of said precinct with the Contoocook River and Outlet, 
so-called; thence up the center line of said Contoocook River to the 
point where said Outlet, so-caUed, flows from the Contoocook River; 
thence down the center line of said Outlet, so-caUed, to its junction 
with the said Contoocook River, it being the point begun at; meaning to 
include in the addition all the property and inhabitants included be- 
tween the above described Unes. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance in amendment of section 5, chapter 36 of the city 
ordinances relating to "laborers, wages, hours of em- 
ployment, etc," 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That Section 5, Chapter 36 of the City Ordmances be 
amended by adding the words "Laborers, who have been in the employ 
of any department of the city, excepting the police and fire departments, 
for one consecutive year, shall be entitled to one week's vacation be- 
tween June 1 and September 1 in each year without loss of pay. The 
heads of the departments shall designate the time at which each laborer 
shall take his vacation," so that, as amended, said section will read as 
foUows: Sect. 5. Nine hours shall constitute a day's labor, in all de- 
partments of the city, excepting the fire and poUce departments. La- 
borers, who have been in the employ of any department of the city, 
excepting the pohce and fire departments, for one consecutive year, 
shall be entitled to one week's vacation between June 1 and September 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

1 in each year without loss of paj'. The heads of the departments 
shall designate the time at which each laborer shaU take his vacation. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 27, 1914. 



An Ordinance to borrow money in aid of union school district 
IN concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That coupon bonds of the City of Concord, amounting 
to the sum of seventy thousand dollars ($70,000) be issued and delivered 
to Union School District in Concord, in accordance with the request 
and upon the terms contained in resolutions adopted by its voters at 
meetings of said district held on April 2, 1913, June 23, 1913, and 
April 2, 1914. 

Said bonds shall be signed by the mayor and city treasurer and coun- 
tersigned by the city clerk. 

Said bonds shall be dated May 1, 1914, of the denomination of five 
hundred dollars ($500) or one thousand dollars ($1,000) each, or a part 
in each denomination, as the city treasurer may determine, and be pay- 
able as follows: 

$8,000 thereof May 1, 1917. 
$2,000 thereof May 1, 1920. 
$2,000 thereof May 1, 1921. 
$2,000 thereof May 1, 1922. 
$5,000 thereof May 1, 1924. 
$10,000 thereof May 1, 1925. 
$5,000 thereof May 1, 1926. 
$6,000 thereof May 1, 1928. 
$10,000 thereof May 1, 1932. 
$10,000 thereof May 1, 1933. 
$10,000 thereof May 1, 1934. 

The interest on said bonds shall be at the rate of four (4) per cent, 
per annum, payable semi-annually on the first days of November and 
May in each year, at the First National Bank, in Boston, Mass., and 
the office of the city treasurer, in said city of Concord, upon presenta- 
tion of said coupons. 

Sect. 2. The treasurer is hereby authorized to procure proposals 
for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized, and such bids as seem for 
the best interest of the city shall be accepted by him, provided the same 
are approved by the finance committee. 

Sect. 3. AU of said bonds, while owned by citizens of said City of 
Concord, shall be exempt from taxation, as provided by law. 



ORDINANCES. 13 

Sect. 4. The mayor and treasurer are authorized to execute in the 
name and behalf of the city, such agreements, in writing, between it 
and said district as they may deem necessary and advisable to protect 
the rights of the respective parties, growing out of this transaction. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance sliall take effect and be in force from and 
after its passage. 

Passed May 11, 1914. 



An Ordinance in amendment of section 1, chapter 20 of the city 
ordinances relating to the street sprinkling precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That Section 1 of Chapter 20 of the City Ordinances 
relating to the street sprinkling precinct be amended by adding after 
the words "Penacook Street to North State Street" the words "and 
South Fruit Street from Pleasant Street to Clinton Street." 
Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed May 26, 1914. 



An Ordinance in amendment op chapter .3 of the revised ordi- 
nances OF the city of concord relative to the election of 
the city clerk and city treasurer. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That Chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of the City 
of Concord be amended by adding thereto sections 20 and 21, as follows: 

Sect. 20. The Board of Aldermen shall in January, 1915, and 
biennially thereafter elect a city clerk who shall hold office until his 
successor is chosen unless sooner removed by said Board. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful performance of his duties. The present 
incumbent shall hold office until January, 1915, or until his successor 
has been appointed. 

Sect. 21. The Board of Aldermen shall in January, 1915, and bien- 
nially thereafter elect a treasurer for the City of Concord who shall 
hold office until his successor is chosen unless sooner removed by said 
Board. He shall give bonds for the faithful performance of his duties. 
The present incumbent shall hold office until January, 1915, or until 
his successor has been appointed. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed December 14, 1914. 



14 CITY OF CO-NX'ORD. 

An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 21 of the revised ordi- 
nances OF THE city of CONCORD, RELATING TO THE GARBAGE 
PRECINCT. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That Section 2 of Chapter 21 of the Revised Ordinances 
(page 118) be amended by adding to said section, after the words 
"Ridge Road from Forest Street northerly to the premises numbered 
23 on said road" the words, "Also Avon Street and Clinton Street west 
to Princeton Street," so that as amended, said section would read as 
heretofore, with these words added 

"Also Avon St., and Clinton St., west to Princeton St." 
Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect January 1st, 1915. 
Passed December 14, 1914. 



An Ordinajstce providing for the issuance of $15,000 of bonds 
to refund the treasury for money expended in the pay- 
ment of $15,000 of public park bonds. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows' 

Section 1. That the Treasurer of said City is hereby authorized to 
procure by loan on the credit of the City the sum of fifteen thousand 
dollars ($15,000) for the purpose of refunding to the Citj-- Treasury 
the sum of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000) paid in taking up PubUe 
Park bonds which matured June 1, 1914. 

Sect. 2. Bonds of said City shall be issued for said loan, signed by 
the Mayor and countersigned by the City Treasurer, and shall in all re- 
spects comply with the provisions of the Municipal Bonds Act of 1895. 
Said bonds shall be dated December 1, 1914, and shall be numbered 
consecutively from 1 to 30, and shall be for the sum of five hundred 
dollars ($500) each. Twenty of said bonds, in then- order as numbered, 
commencing with No. 1, shaU become due and payable on the first day 
of December, 1931; ten of said bonds, in their order as numbered, com- 
mencing with No. 21, shall become due and payble on the first day of 
December, 1933. Said bonds shall be payable to the bearer, with 
interest at a rate not exceeding four per cent, per annum, payable semi- 
annually on the first days of June and December in each year, upon the 
presentation of the coupons attached to said bonds respectively. 

Sect. 3. The Treasurer, subject to the approval of the finance 
committee, is hereby authorized to procure proposals for the sale of 
bonds hereinbefore authorized, with the right to reject any and aU bids, 
and if said bids are not satisfactory, said Treasurer is hereby authorized 
to dispose of said bonds at public sale. 

Sect. 4. That all of said bonds shall be exempt from taxation as 
provided by statute. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed December 28, 1914. 



ORDINANCES. 15 

An Ordinance providing for the issuance of $25,000 of bonds to 
refund the treasury for money expended in the payment 
of $25,000 of sewerage bonds. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the Treasurer of said City is hereby authorized to 
procure by loan on the credit of the City the sum of twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars ($25,000) for the purpose of refunding to the City Treas- 
ury the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) paid in taking 
up sewerage bonds which matured June 1, 1914; that all money paid on 
account of said bonds, either as principal or interest, shall be charged 
to the sewerage precinct. 

Sect. 2. Bonds of said City shall be issued for said loan, signed by 
the Mayor and countersigned by the City Treasm-er, and shall in all 
respects comply with the provisions of the Municipal Bonds Act of 
1895. Said bonds shall be dated December 1, 1914, and shall be 
numbered consecutively from 1 to 25 consecutively and shall be for 
the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) each; five of said bonds, 
in their order as numbered, commencing with No. 1, shall become due 
and payable on the first day of December, 1930; ten of said bonds, in 
their order as numbered, commencing with No. 6, shall become due 
and payable on the first day of December, 1932; and ten of said 
bonds, in their order as numbered, commencing with No. 16, shall be- 
come due and payable on the first day of December, 1934, said bonds 
shall be payable to the bearer, with interest at a rate not exceeding 
four per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually on the fu-st days of 
June and December in each year, upon presentation of the coupons 
attached to said bonds respectively. 

Sect. 3. The Treasurer, subject to the approval of the finance 
committee, is hereby authorized to procure proposals for the sale of 
bonds hereinbefore authorized, with the right to reject any and all 
bids, and if said bids are not satisfactory, said Treasurer is hereby 
authorized .to dispose of said bonds at pubUc sale. 

Sect. 4. That all of said bonds shall be exempt from taxation, as 
provided by statute. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed Dec. 28, 1914. 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Resolution providing for the printing op the mayor's inaugural 

ADDRESS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
That the city clerk be authorized and instructed to have printed 

copies of the mayor's inaugural address; the expense of the same to be 

charged to the account of printing and stationery. 
Passed January 27, 1914. 



Resolution providing for the printing of rosters of the city 

government. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows; 

That the city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the present city 
government and cause copies thereof to be printed and that the expense 
of printing the same be charged to the account of printing and stationery. 

Passed January 27, 1914. 



Resolution in relation to paying salaries, pay-rolls and rents. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his warrant on 
the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, pay-rolls and rents as 
the same shall become due during the present municipal term, and all 
bills so paid shall be laid before the committee on accounts and claims 
at their next meeting. 

Passed January 27, 1914. 



Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and bind- 
ing the annual city reports. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 

proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1913 and 

submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full power to 

act in the matter. 
Passed January 27, 1914. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 17 

Resolution authoeizing the committee on lands and build- 
ings TO MAKE CURRENT REPAIRS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
That the committee on lands and buildings be authorized to expend 
such sums as may be necessary for current repairs, not exceeding three 
hundred dollars in any one month, the same to be charged to the appro- 
priation for repairs to buildings. 
Passed January 27, 1914. 



Resolution exempting the new England cable company from 
taxes for a period of ten years. 

Whereas the New England Cable Company, a corporation now doing 
business in Lowell, Massachusetts, desires to locate and carry on its 
business in the City of Concord and has requested the Board of Alder- 
men to grant an exemption from taxes: 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of said city that if the New 
England Cable Company wUl locate and establish its business in said 
city, the machinery and equipment owned by said Company and the 
capital necessary in conducting its business in said City shall be ex- 
empted from all taxation for a period of ten years from April 1, 1914. 

Passed March 9, 1914. 



Resolution authorizing the transfer of funds of the penacook 
sewerage precint. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to transfer the 
sum of six hundred eighty dollars ($680) from the Penacook Sewerage 
Precinct sinking fund account to the city treasury, said fund to con- 
stitute the sum to be raised for the payment of the amount due on bonds 
and interest for the year 1914. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



Resolution relative to exemption from taxation of certain 

PROPERTIES of THE MARGARET PILLSBURY GENERAL HOSPITAIi 
UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 115, LAWS OF 1913, BEING AN 
ACT TO EXEMPT PROPERTY OF EDUCATIONAL, CHARITABLE AND RE- 
LIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS AND OF TEMPERANCE SOCIETIES FROM TAXA- 
TION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the taxable items in the funds held by the Marga- 
ret Pillsbm-y General Hospital for charitable purposes to amount in 
2 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

value not exceeding $125,000, — and the following items of real estate, 
to wit: — The Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital, the Foster ward 
for Contagious Diseases, the Nurse's Home on South Main Street, and 
one-half of a double tenement house on Maitland Street used as a dor- 
mitory for night nurses, and the land upon which they are located, of 
the value of $200,000, be and the same hereby are exempted from taxa- 
tion under the provisions of Chapter 115, Laws of 1913, making the 
amount of the exemption as valued herein over and above the $150,000 
exemption provided in said act, the sum of $175,000. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect as of March 31, 1914. 

Passed March 27, 1914. 



Resolution relative to exemption from taxation op certain 
properties of the new hampshire centennial home for the 
aged, under the provisions of chapter 115, laws of 1913, being 
an act to exempt property of educational, charitable and 
religious institutions and temperance societies from taxa- 
TION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the real and personal property of the New Hamp- 
shire Centennial Home for the Aged be and the same hereby are ex- 
empted from taxation under the provisions of Chapter 115, Laws of 
1913, to the amount of $100,000 over and above the $150,000 exemption 
provided in said Act. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect as of March 31, 1914. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



Resolution relative to the exemption from taxation of certain 

PROPERTIES of ST. PAUL's SCHOOL IN CONCORD, UNDER THE PRO- 
VISIONS of CHAPTER 115, LAWS OF 1913, BEING AN ACT TO EXEMPT 
PROPERTY OF EDUCATIONAL, CHARITABLE AND RELIGIOUS INSTI- 
TUTIONS AND OF TEMPERANCE SOCIETIES FROM TAXATION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the taxable items in the funds held by St. Paul's 
School for educational, charitable and religious purposes to an amount 
in value not exceeding $400,000, — and the following items of real estate, 
to wit, — the School, the Old Boiler House, Cricket House, Tool House, 
Middle School, Old Infirmary, Chapel, Racquet Courts, Annex, School 
House, Old Chapel, Gymnasium, Skate House, Lower School, Manual 
Training Building, Heating Plant, Library Building, Laboratory, Stone 
Dormitory, Upper School, Cemetery, New Infirmary, as and when com- 
pleted, and the land upon w^hich they are located, as shown on a plan 
of Lands and Buildings of St. Paul's School on file in the office of Board 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 19 

of Assessors of said Concord, of the value of $500,000; be and the same 
hereby are exempted from taxation under the provisions of Chapter 
115, Laws of 1913, making the amount of the exemption, as valued 
herein, over and above the $150,000 exemption provided in said Act, 
the sum of $750,000. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect as of March 31, 1914. 

Passed March 27, 1914. 



RESOLtTTION RELATIVE TO EXEMPTION FROM TAXATION OF CERTAIN PROP- 
ERTIES OP THE NEW HAMPSHIRE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, UNDER THE 
PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 115, LAWS OF 1913, BEING AN ACT TO EX- 
EMPT PROPERTY OF EDUCATIONAL, CHARITABLE AND RELIGIOUS 
INSTITUTIONS AND TEMPERANCE SOCIETIES FROM TAXATION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the real and personal property of the New Hamp- 
shire Historical Society be and the same hereby are exempted from taxa- 
tion under the provisions of Chapter 115, Laws of 1913, to the amoimt 
of $450,000 over and above the $150,000 exemption provided in said 
Act. 
Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect as of March 31, 1914. 
Passed March 27, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of a motor 
garbage truck for the use of the highway department. 

Resolved-by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
That the sum of four thousand dollars ($4,000) be, and the same 

hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury, not otherwise 

appropriated, for the purchase of a motor garbage truck for the use 

of the Highway Department. 
Passed April 13, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for the concord district nurs- 
ing ASSOCIATION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) be, and hereby is, ap- 
propriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for aid to the Concord District Nursing Association. 
Passed May 11, 1914. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriatixg four hundred dollars for the purchase 

OF AN adding machine FOR THE OFFICE OF THE BOARD OF ASSES- 
SORS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That so much of the sum of four hundred dollars as may be necessary 
is hereby appropriated for the purchase of an adding machine for the 
office of the Board of Assessors, to be charged to the account of inciden- 
tals and land damages. 
Passed May 11, 1914. 



Resolution in relation to coal, wood and ice. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the committee on finance be, and hereby is, directed to ask for 
bids for supplying the city with coal, wood and ice for the ensuing j'^ear, 
and that said committee have full power to accept or reject any bids 
offered. 

Passed May 11, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for a steel filing case for the 
tax collector's office. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
That the sum of eighteen dollars and sixty cents ($18.60) be, and 

hereby is, appropriated for a steel filing case for the tax collector's office; 

said sum to be charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 
Passed May 11, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of a transit 

FOR the engineering DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars ($250) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the purchase of a transit for the Engineering Department; 
said sum to be expended under the direction of the city engineer. 
Passed May 11, 1914. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 21 

Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of a combina- 
tion MOTOR police PATROL AND AMBULANCE WAGON FOR THE USE 
OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for the purchase and equipment of a combination 
motor police patrol and ambulance wagon for the use of the police de- 
partment. Said sum to be expended under the direction of the Finance 
Committee. 

Passed June 8, 1914. 



Resolution providing for a discount on taxes paid prior to july 
15, 1914. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That a discount of 2 per cent, shall be allowed on all taxes assessed 

for the year 1914 which are paid on or before the fifteenth day of July, 

1914. 
Passed June 8, 1914. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding fifty 
thousand dollars. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) 
for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the year 1914, upon such 
terms and for such amoimts as the committee shall determine. 
Passed June 8, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for fire alarm boxes, penacook. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the purchase of two fire alarm boxes for Penacook. Said 
money to be expended under the direction of the committee on fire 
department. 

Passed July 13, 1914. 



22 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Resolution releasing wendell p. ladd from all further obliga- 
tions ON ACCOUNT OF HIS DUTIES AS TAX COLLECTOR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That since Wendell P. Ladd, formerly Tax Collector for 
the City of Concord, has collected aU taxes for which he held a warrant, 
and turned the same into the city treasury, that he be requested to turn 
over the papers, books and records relating to the duties of his office, 
also all claims which the city may have on land sold for unpaid taxes 
and left in his hands for redemption, to Seth R. Dole, Tax Collector, 
and upon so doing that the said Wendell P. Ladd be released from all 
further obligations on account of the duties of his office. 
Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed July 13, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating eighteen hundred eleven and 71-100 

DOLLARS ($1,811.71) to PAY FOR REAL ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY 
OF CONCORD FOR UNPAID TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1913. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of eighteen hundred eleven and 71-100 dollars ($1,811.71) 
be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated to pay the amount due the City of Con- 
cord for real estate purchased at the tax collector's sale of real estate 
for the unpaid taxes for the year 1913. 
Passed July 13, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars for 

THE support of CITY POOR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same is 

hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 

appropriated for the support of city poor. 
Passed July 13, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of twelve hundred dollars 
for printing and stationery. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
That the sum of twelve hundred dollars ($1,200) be, and the same is 

hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 

appropriated for printing and stationery. 
Passed July 13, 1914. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 23 

Resolution appropriating money for a new bridge over the sou- 
cook RIVER. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for a new bridge over the Soucook River at Richardson's Mills, 
so-called. Said amount to be expended under the direction of the Board 
of Public Works. 

Passed July 13, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of fire appa- 
ratus FOR WARD three, CONCORD. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

That so much as may be necessary of the sum of twenty-five hundred 
dollars ($2,500) be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated for the purchase of 
a motor driven hose carriage fitted to carry a suitable equipment for 
the Fire Department at West Concord. Said sum to be expended under 
the direction of the Committee on Fire Department. 
Passed August 10, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating three hundred eighty-five dollars 
($-385) for the purpose of repairing the roof drainage system 
of the city hall building. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That three hundred eighty-five dollars ($385) be 

and the same is hereby appropriated for the purpose of repairing the 

roof drainage system of the City Hall building. To be charged to 

Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed August 10, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of ten dollars for taxes 
erroneously assessed. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of ten dollars ($10) be, and the same hereby is appro- 
priated, to reimbm'se Bessie A. Savage for taxes erroneously assessed 
for the year 1914. The same to be charged to the account of Incidentals 
and Land Damages. 
Passed August 10, 1914. 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriating money for purchase of a gravel bank. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for the purchase of land in Ward 9 known as the Dr. 
Hoyt-Stevens gravel bank for the use of the highway department. 

Passed September 14, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for repairs at city hall. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of five hundred fifty dollars ($550) be, 
and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for painting the walls, kalsomining the ceilings, 
refinishing the wood work in the offices of Board of Health, the Mayor's 
Office, Office of the City Clerk, the Board of Water Works, Main Corri- 
dor and such other work as called for in the specification and for shades 
and fixtures for said offices. The work to be done under the direction 
of the Committee on Lands and Buildings. 

Sect. 2. This resolution to take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 14, 1914. 



Resolution providing for a discount on taxes paid prior to 
OCTOBER 1, 1914. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That a discount of 1 per cent, shall be allowed on 

all taxes assessed for the year 1914 which are paid on or before the 

first day of October, 1914. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed September 14, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for the erection of a garage 

FOR THE highway DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, for the erection of a garage for the use of the highway depart- 
ment. Said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of 
Public Works and added to the appropriation for Roads and Bridges. 
Passed October 12, 1914. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 25 

Resolution transferring balances of appropriation from roof 

draining systems to repairs of city hall. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the unexpended balances of money appropriated for repairing 
the roof drainage system of the City Hall Building and for repairs at 
City Hall be used for the kalsomining of the ceilings and painting the 
waUs of the Assessors' office, the office of the Superintendent of Streets 
and the Tax Collector's office, the work to be done under the direction 
of the Committee on Lands and Buildings. 

Passed October 12, 1914. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 

$50,000. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed $50,000 for current expenses 
in anticipation of taxes for the year 1914, upon such terms and for such 
amount as the committee shall determine. 

Passed October 12, 1914. 



Resolution donating the sum of twenty-five dollars out of the 

income from the DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-five dollai's ($25) be hereby 
donated out of the income from the David Osgood trust, to the poor 
children of the French Parochial School, who are inhabitants of the 
city of Concord, for the purpose of buying school books for said children. 

Sect. 2. That said sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be paid to and 
expended under the direction of the principal of said school. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 9, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating one hundred and fifty dollars to 

settle the case of JENNIE P. MARTIN V. CITY OP CONCORD. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars be, and 
the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury, not 
otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of settling the case of Jennie 
P. Martin v. City of Concord now pending on the Merrimack County 
Superior Court docket. 

Sect. 2.. That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed November 9, 1914. 



26 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Resolution appropriating the sum of six hundred dollars foe 

THE support op THE CITY POOR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as folloics: 

That the sum of six hundred dollars ($600) be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the support of city poor. 
Passed November 9, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of four thousand dollars for 
incidentals and land damages. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
That the sum of four thousand dollars ($4,000) be, and the same ia 

hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 

appropriated for incidentals and land damages. 
Passed November 9, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of five hundred dollars for 

POLICE AND watch. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for poUce and watch. 
Passed November 9, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay for the reward offered 
for the arrest of john gouin. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated to pay for the reward, offered by the Mayor and City Marshal, 
for information that would lead to the arrest of John Gouin. 
Passed November 9, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of three hundred dollars 

FOR printing and STATIONERY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for printing and stationery. 
Passed November 9, 1914. 



JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 27 

Resolution relating to proposed garage for the police ambu- 
lance AND PATROL AUTOMOBILE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

Section 1. That the Board of Public Works of said city be, and 
the same is hereby authorized to take immediate steps toward the secur- 
ing of plans and specifications and the approximate cost of a suitable 
garage for the housing of the Police Patrol and Ambulance, said garage 
to be adjacent to the PoUce Station in said city; said Board of PubUc 
Works to report its action and findings to the full Board of Aldermen 
at its adjourned meeting to be held at some specified date during the 
last week of December, 1914. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed December 14, 1914. 



Resolution authorizing the board of public works to construct, 

AT A cost not exceeding TWENTY-SIX THOUSAND DOLLARS, A 
STEEL bridge TO REPLACE THE BRIDGE KNOWN AS THE PEMBROKE 
BRIDGE ACROSS THE MERRIMACK RIVER. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

1. That the Board of PubUc Works be, and hereby is authorized to 
construct on the credit of the City, at a cost not exceeding twenty-six 
thousand dollars (126,000), a steel bridge to replace the bridge known 
as the Pembroke bridge across the Merrimack River. 

2. That said Board be and hereby is authorized to enter into a 
contract in the name of the City, with a reliable person or company for 
the construction of said bridge. 

3. This resolution shaU take effect on its passage. 
Passed December 28, 1914. 



Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the several 
departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of thirty-seven hundred eighty-four and 
09-100 dollars (.13,784.09) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay outstanding 
claims as follows: 

City Poor $299.55 

Fire Department 996.89 

Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds 50 .00 

Interest, Temporary Loans 345.76 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Penacook Park $21 . 68 

Playground, Rollins Park 5 . 23 

Police and Watch 525.05 

Printing and Stationery 4.76 

Repairs Buildings 238. 87 

Roads and Bridges 1,046.30 

Salaries 250 .00 



$3,784.09 

Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for garbage 
for the year 1914, the sum of one hundred thirty-two and 39-100 dollars 
($132.39), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for Roads 
and Bridges for the year 1914, the sum of twenty-five hundred sixty- 
eight and 18-100 dollars ($2,568.18), the same being the earnings of 
this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sewers 
for the year 1914, the silm of two and 70-100 dollars ($2.70), the same 
being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 11, 1915. 



Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and binding 

THE annual city REPORTS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 

proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1914 

and submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full 

power to act in the matter. 
Passed January 11, 1915. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1914. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 
MAYOR. 

Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

HON. CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

Office: City HaU, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per annum, 
with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts and Claims. 



Aldermen-at-Large. 

Term Expires January, 1916. 
FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, Penacook 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 81 School Street 

Term Expires January, 1918. 
RICHARD A. BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 60 So. State Street 

MICHAEL J. LEE, 59 So. Main Street 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward Aldermen. 

Term Expires January, 1916. 
Ward ;— FRED M. DODGE, Penacook 

Ward ^—GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, East Concord 

Ward 5— HENRY M. RICHARDSON, West Concord 
Ward 4— CHARLIE A. BARTLETT, 5 Jackson Street 
Ward 5— AUGUSTINE R. AYERS, 8 No. State Street 
Ward <?— WALTER WILLIAMSON, 24 Monroe Street 
Ward 7— HARRY C. BRUNEL 8 Dunklee Street 

Ward <§— WILLIAM L. REAGAN, 53 So. Main Street 
Ward P— EUGENE J. O'NEIL, 115 Rumford Street 



CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City HaU. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 

Term expires January, 1916 
EVERETT L. DAVIS 
NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 
RICHARD A. BROWN, 
ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, " 
MICHAEL J. LEE, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Clerk. 

Salary, $200 per annum. 





1916 




1916 




1918 




1918 




1918 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 31 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Blackwood, O'Neil, Brunei. 
On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Ayers, Williamson, Robinson. 
On Elections and Returns — ■ 

Aldermen Reagan, Hobbs, Brown, 
On Engrossed Ordinances — ■ 

Aldermen O'Neil, Sturtevant, Richardson. 
On Finance — 

The Mayor; Aldermen Blackwood, Hobbs, Bartlett, 
Sturtevant. 
On Fire Department — Aldermen Dodge, Lee, Robinson. 
On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Richardson, Reagan, Davis. 
071 Police and License — Aldermen Bartlett, Brown, Dodge. 
On Public Instruction— Aldermen Hobbs, Davis, Lee. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance of the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $250 per annum. 

WILLIAM F. THAYER. 

OflSce: First National Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,800 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $900 per annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to satis- 
faction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of first $60,000; seven and 
one-half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

SETH R. DOLE. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $750 per annum. Clerk, $1,500 per annum. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1916 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1920 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1918 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salary, $1,800. 

•ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $450 per annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 33 

ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $50 per annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $500 per annum. 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward 7— FRED M. DODGE, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward ^—GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, S, 5— HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salarj', $1,500 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



34 CITY OF COXCORD. 

ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,200 per annum 

VICTOR I. MOORE. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen, Term 
unlimited. Salarj', $2.50 per day for first year, and $2.70 per day thereafter. 

Samuel L, Bachelder, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $1,050 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $2.75 per day. 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

George H. Silsby, Edward J. McGirr, 

Harry L. Woodward, Joseph E. Silva, 

Charles H. Guilbault, Fred N. Harden, 

John B. Long, Frank B, McDaniels. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 

0. H. Bean, Nelson Forest. 

W. A. Little, Charles E. Kelley, 

George G. Allen, Joseph A. Flanders, 

Elmer Tremblay, George E. Drury, 

James Jepson, Cleveland H. Curtis, 

Jonas Welcome, John McGirr, 

Harper B. Giles, Willie A. Flanders, 

James J. Halligan, Earl D. Gaskell. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



36 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by the City Marshal, subject to confirmation by the Board of Aldermen. 
Salary, $2.50 each per day of actual service. 



Almah C. Leavitt, 
Richard P. Sanborn, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowell, 
Alphonse Venne, 
Edward M. Nason, 
William H. Hammond, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Charles Ada, 
George L. Danforth, 
Arthur J. Taylor, 
Alfred H. Walker, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
Ira C. Phillips, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Harry R. Sturm, 
William J. Ahern, 
Clark D. Stevens, 
Horace B. Annis, 
Albert P. Davis, 
Frank W. Johnson, 



Judson F. Hoit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Milton Colby, 
Asbury F. Tandy, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor, 
Clarence W, Brown, 
John McGirr, 
Edward H. Smart, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
Orland M. Blodgett, 
James J. Collins, 
George N. Fellows, 
Asahel H. Jewell, 
William A. Kelley, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Charles M. Norris, 
W. H. Bean, 
Frank T. Powell, 
O. F. Richardson, 
Timothv P. Reardon. 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Appointed bieimi&lly in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward ;g— CHARLES E. STANIELS. 
Ward 5— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward ^—REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward 5— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward 5— GEORGE V. HILL. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $500 per aimum. 

CLARA F. .BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Fowler Library Building. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



37 



CITY WATER WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four yeara by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-offido. 



EDSON J. HILL, Term expires March 31, 1915 


G. D. B. PRESCOTT, 


1915 


FRANK P. QUIMBY, 


1916 


H. C. HOLBROOK, 


1916 


SOLON A. CARTER, 


1917 


BURNS P. HODGMAN, 


1917 


N. E. MARTIN, 


1918 


H. H. DUDLEY, 


1918 



President — Solon A. Carter. 
Clerk — Edson J. Hill. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 

Appmnted by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, $1,800 per amram. Term, 

unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,250 per annum and 

rent of house. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN.. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 
Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $75 per annum. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 39 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salarj-, $30 per annum. 

M. J. LACROIX. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 

Salary, $200 per annum. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per aimum. 

MERVIN E. BANKS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio. 
DR. FRED A. SPRAGUE. 



40 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each birth 
marriage and death received, recorded and returned to the State Registrar. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 

No salary. 



WILL B. HOWE, 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



City Engineer 

Chief of the Fire Department 

Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confirmation 
by Board of Aldermen. No salary. , 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-offido. 



BEN C. WHITE, 



Term expires January, 1915 



WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 
WILLIS D. TLLOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
WILLIAM P. FISKE, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 



1915 

1916 

1916 

1917* 

1917 

1917t 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



• Diea July 23, 1914. 

t Elected to fill vacancy Sept. 14, 1914. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 41 

CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7, consolidated) ap- 
pointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by 
Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

D. WARREN FOX, Term expires January, 1915 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, '' " " 1916 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, " " " 1917 

Ward 2. 

HENRY A. COLBY, Term expires January, 1915 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, " '' " 1916 

SCOTT FRENCH, " " '' 1917 

Ward 3. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, Term expires January, 1915 
JAMES M. CROSSMAN, '' " " 1916 

GEORGE R. PARMENTER, " '' " 1917 

Ward 7. 

J. NEWTON ABBOTT, Term expires January, 1915 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " " " 1916 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, " " " 1917 

Ward 8. 

ALMAH C. LEAVITT, Term expires January, 1915 

ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, " " " 1916 

NAHUM PRESCOTT, '' " " 1917 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

GEORGE A. FOSTER, Term expires March, 1915 

FRANK J. PILLSBURY, " " '■ 1915 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, " " " 1916 

FRANK P. ANDREWS, " " " 1916 

CHARLES G. REMICK, " '' . " 1917 

JOHN P. GEORGE, '' " - 1917 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

EDWARD A. MOULTON.* 
FRED N. HAMMOND.f 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
LOUIS A. LANE, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS, 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 

• Resigned* 

t Elected to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 43 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

CLARENCE L TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
GILES WHEELER. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents each for all other 
creatures, paid by owners. 



OMAR L. SHEPARD. JR. 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldei^ 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 



JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, for sealing each scale beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, and for each 
measure, 10 cents; five or more to one person, half price — paid by owners of scales 
or measures. 

WILLIA]\I A. KELLEY. 

OflBce: Rear of Police Station. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents- 
butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; beading, 33 cents per M. — paid by party for 
whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder; 
men. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, Omar C. Allard, 

Thomas Hill, Arthur N. Day, 

John H. Mercer, William H. Meserve, 

Everett L. Davis, John E, Rossell, 

Joseph A. Cote, David Rossell, 

Fred B. Clark, Nelson Forrest, 

Hallett E. Patten, George B. Whittredge, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



45 



Howard Perley, 
James F. Fitzgerald, 
Edward W. Brockway, 
John H. Flanders, 
C. W. Haselton, 
Hiram Brown, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Fred H. Perley, 
Amos J. Peaslee, 
Mark M. Blanchard, 
Lurman R. Goodrich, 
James H. Harrington, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Joseph Robarge, 
Charles E. Hardy, 
William F. Cheever, 
Alphonse King, 
William Gooden, 
Harry Lee, 
Guy Rowell, 
Otis Lynch, 
Arthur E. Rowell, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
Charles J. Sawyer, 
E. E, Young, 
J. W. Currier, 
H. C. Morgan, 
R. J. Rowland, 



Asher E. Ormsbee, 
WiUiam J. Mullen, 
Elmer E. Young, 
Henry A. Brown, 
Milo G. Davis, 

F. H. Smith, 
Fred A. Barker, 
Hamilton C. Morgan, 
James B. Riley, 

G. N. Hills, 
Charles E. Cook, 
S. D. Walker, 
Charles Peaslee, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brown, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
Galen W. Hunter, 
WilHam F. Cutting, 
E. F. Miller, 

Earl Woodbury, 
Ernest Saltmarsh, 
Amos Blanchard, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 
Emery Delaney, 
S. A. Clark, 
C, J. Roers, 
G. F. Rogers. 



CITY WEIGHER. 
WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

OflSce: Rear of Police Station, 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed anniyilly in Januarj- b\- Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 

Edward A. Moulton, George Griffin. 

George Abbott, Jr. Fred Rollins, 

Charles F. Mudgett, Moses E. Haines. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in Januarj- by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder* 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 

Fred L. Plummer, Charles L. Fellows, 

Stephen H. Swain, William Rowell, 

Fred Cilley, Henry Morrill. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in Januarj- by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M.; boards and 
timber, 16 cents per M.; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents 
per hour for over twentf' cords — paid by person employing. 

Arthur G. Stevens, Gilbert H. Berry, 

Jonathan B. Weeks, Frank E. Dimond, 

Wallace M. Howe, Arthur E. Maxam, 

John A. Blackwood, Henry Rolfe, 

Albert 0. Preston, Martin E. Kenna, 

WiUiam A. Chesley, E. A. Cole, 

Alfred Clark, WilUam E. Virgin, 

J. Frank Hastings, William H. Gay, 

Edgar D. Eastman, Oliver J. Fifield. 

Harry Jones, 0. B. Jerome, 

Wm. Pierce, Hallett E. Patten, 

George Darrah, George Wilkins, 

Arthur N. Day, Fales P. Virgin, 

Ernest C. Smith, Edward Runnels, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



47 



Clinton 0. Partridge, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hay ward, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus 0. Clark, 
Silas Wiggin, 
Edward Stevens, 
Daniel Griffiths, 
W. F. Hayward, 
F. E. Frost, 
Walter J. Sanborn, 
Leonard H. Smith, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
John Q. Woods, 
B. J. Prescott, 
Charles S. Robinson, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 



Andrew S. Farnum, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B, Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
Crosby A. Sanborn, 
Herbert M. Danforth, 
Hiram W, Drouin, 
W. F. Frost, 
George Sanboi'n, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
E. F. Miller, 
George Oakley, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 
Leslie Hammond, 
Herbert W. Rolfe. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No' salary. 



William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Patrick A. Chfford, 
Arthur W. Robinson, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
Michael J. Lee, 
John E. Frye, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Bobbins, 
WiUiam H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 



Wilham J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
James H. Branigan, 
Albert S. Trask, 
William L. Reagan, 
Frederick T. Converse, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 



48 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Edward H. Donovan, 
Ned J. Morrill, 
Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 



Arthur W. Buntin 
F. F. Converse, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Philip King, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Henry Morrill, 
Frederick E. Gilford. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 

No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio. 
WILL B. HOWE, ex-officio. 
PATRICK A. CLIFFORD. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 49 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK LISTS. 

Ward i— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
RICHARD McBRIDE, JR., 
WILLIAM S. HOLLAND. 

Ward ^—FREEMAN F. POTTER, 
C. E. ROBINSON, 
WALTER C. SANBORN. 

Ward 3—k. W. DAVIS, 

EDWARD P. ROBINSON, 
J. ARTHUR SWENSON. 

Ward 4— HARRY H. KENNEDY, 
J. WESLEY PLUMMER, 
EDWARD W. LEACH. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
ARTHUR P. MORRILL, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward ^—THOMAS J. DYER, 

WALTER WILLIAMSON, 
BENJAMIN H. ROLFE. 

Ward 7— JAMES P. FORSYTH, 
A. M. JOHNSON, 
FRED P. CLEMENT. 

Ward <?— FRED SMITH, 

MOSES PELREN, 
W. H. SEXTON. 

Ward 9—R. E. DONOVAN, 

R. B. GALLAGHER, 
JAMES J. REEN. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD CLERKS. 

Ward 7— ERNEST L. CROSS. 
Ward ;g— DANIEL W. SANBORN. 
Ward 5— ERVIN E. WEBBER. 
Ward 4— LOUIS P. ELKINS. 
Ward 5— RAY E. BURKETT. 
Ward 6—LOmS I. MOULTON. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward 5— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward S— JAMES W. KENNEY. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward i— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward ^— RALPH L. STEARNS. 
Ward 5— CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
Ward 4— ALLEN HOLLIS. 
Ward 5— EDWARD C. NILES. 
Ward g— CHARLES DUNCAN. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward 5— MICHAEL MULCAHY. 
Ward 5— BARTHOLOMEW COLLINS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 51 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 1853, and 
until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor has been elected 
for two years at each biennial election in November. Under the City Charter, 
adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in December, 1910, for one year, 
and biennially thereafter in November, beginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853-'54. 

'' RUFUS CLEMENT,* '55. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856-'57-'58. 

" MOSES T. WILLARD, 1859-'60. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861-'62. 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863-'64. 

'' MOSES HUMPHREY, -'65. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1866-'67. 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868-'69. 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870-'71. 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 1872-73-'74-'75. 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876-'77. 

" HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878-'79-'80. 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,! 1880-'81-'82. 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883-'84-'85-'86. 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887-'88. 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889-'90. 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891-'92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893-'94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895-'96. 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897-'98. 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901-'02. 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903-'08. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- 



* Died in ofiBce, January 13, 1856. 
t Term closed in November, 1880. 
X Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1914-1915. 



OFFICERS. 



Edward C. Niles, Esq Preddeni. 

Mrs. Fan:n'y E. Mixot Secretary. 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 
1915. 



Hon. William H. Sawyer, 105 North State Street 

Miss Carrie E. Evans, 14 Maple Street 

Edward C. Niles, Eso,., 119 School Street 

1916. 

Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 89 North State Street 

Hon. George H. Moses, 5 Auburn Street 
Mrs. Lillian R. Shepard, Hutchins Street, West Concord 

1917. 

Dr. Dennis E. Sullivan, 7 North State Street 

Mrs. Fanny E. Minot, 23 South State Street 

Mr. Omar S. Swenson, 14 Auburn Street 



56 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Mr. Dudley. 



FINANCE. 

Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



Mr. Niles. 



high school. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Moses. 



grammar SCHOOLS. 

Dr. Sullivan. Mr. Moses. Mrs. Shepard. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



PRIMARY schools. 

Mrs. Minot. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Miss Evans. 



kindergartens. 
Mr. Sawyer. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Swenson. Mr. Dudley. Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Moses. 



discipline. 
Miss Evans. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



hygiene. 
Miss Evans. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Swenson. 



MANUAL TRAINING. 

Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



Mrs. Minot. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Shepard. 



57 



Miss Evans 



Mr. Swenson. 



MUSIC. 

Miss Evans. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Minot. 



DRAWING. 

Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



text-books. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Sawyer. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



training school. 
Mr. Niles. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



night school. 

Miss Evans. 



Mr. Dudley. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL 

AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett. 

3 Pine Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Office open 8 to 12 a. m., 

1.30 to 6 p. m. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

George Natt Fellows. 

5 Chapel Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLERK. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 
4 Rockingham Street. 
Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 
Office hours: 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Elizabeth Maria Murphy. 

442 North State Street, West Concord, N. H. 

Office hours: 4 to 5 p. m., Mondays and Thursdays, at 

Superintendent's Office. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

Louis C. Merrill Moderator. 

Fred Leighton Clerk. 

Henry H. Metcalf, John P. George . Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCA- 
TION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
MARCH 14, 1915. 



To the Citizens of Union School District: 

The report of the Superintendent of schools so fully details 
the progress made in school work during the past year that 
there is little occasion for any further comment by the 
Board of Education. 

The coordinating of the entire school system by so extend- 
ing the jurisdiction of the Superintendent as to include the 
high school has been effected without friction of any kind. 
The resulting benefits are already apparent, and will cer- 
tainly be still more notable in the future. 

The abandonment of the Merrimack and Tahanto Schools 
and the housing of their pupils in the new Walker School, 
places us in the position of having now no group of pupils 
occupying an inadequate and unfit building. All of the 
buildings now in use are reasonably adapted to the purposes 
for which they are employed. 

The Walker School^ built by the Board, under the 
immediate supervision of its Committee on lands and 
buildings, marks a new departure in school construction in 
this city. Beautiful without being ornate, solid in con- 
struction, and adequate in size, it ought, for many years to 
come, to meet the requiremeijits of that part of the city 
which it serves. 

An article in the warrant will bring before the voters of 
the district the proposal to appropriate money for procuring 
and equipping suitable grounds for athletic sports and 
physical culture, to be carried on under competent super- 
vision and instruction. No definite plan has yet been 
adopted for the use of whatever funds may be provided. 



60 CITY OF CONCORD. 

But in general it would be deemed wise to start on a small 
scale, undertaking no more than we are sure we can carry 
out, and gradually to expand our activities in this direction 
as experience shows that expansion is desirable. The chief 
difficulty, and the chief expense, will be involved in the 
securing of suitable land. After that, the cost will be 
small. And the benefits, especially to that large class of 
our pupils who by reason of inferior physical development 
can have no part in athletic activities as now organized, will 
be very great. 

We most earnestly recommend the appropriation of a 
reasonable sum for this purpose. 

All that can be undertaken at present is the provision of 
out-door facilities for exercise and recreation. The need 
of such facilities indoors, for use during the winter months, 
is even greater. But the expense of providing suitable 
gymnasiums capable of accommodating all our children 
would be so great as to be beyond the means of the district. 
For such facilities we must look to private enterprise and 
philanthropy. And we take this opportunity to recom- 
mend this object to the attention of public-spirited citi- 
zens desirous of devoting a part of their wealth to the 
public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
EDWARD C. NILES, 
WILLIAM H. SAWYER, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
GEORGE H. MOSES. 



THE NEW WALKER SCHOOL. 



The construction of the new Walker School building, to 
take the place of the former building on the site of the 
old North Church, was begun in the late fall of 1913, and 
the building as occupied February 1, 1915. It was 
designed by Huse Templeton Blanchard of New York 
City, a former Concord boy, and a graduate of our High 
School in the class of 1897. 

The building is of a modified colonial type, of brick 
construction, with granite trimmings. The construction 
throughout is nearly fireproof, the walls being of brick, 
the frame steel, the floors concrete, partitions brick and 
hollow tile, and the stairways of steel and concrete. The 
only wood used in the building is that in the finished floors, 
which are of birch, the interior finish, such as doors, door 
frames, window frames, etc., and the roof. The floors of 
the corridors and stairways are finished in Puritan cement. 
Standpipes run through the building, and a sufficient 
supply of hose and nozzles is provided for each story. 
There are four exits to the building, two on the north and 
two on the south sides, and the doors of same are fitted 
with panic bolts, making congestion in the immediate 
passage to the doorways practically impossible. 

The basement contains the following rooms: Boiler 
room, coal bin, janitor's room, manual training room, 
store room, wood room, cooking room, boys' and girls' 
lavatories (each provided with shower baths), and boys' 
and girls' wardrobes. 

The first floor contains six recitation rooms, a large 
kindergarten room with ample lavatory and supply rooms, 
and two teachers' rooms. 

The second floor contains six recitation rooms, two 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

teachers' rooms, and a large assembly hall capable of 
accommodating five hundred. 

The building is heated bj^ steam, having both direct 
and indirect application, and the ventilation conforms to 
the most up-to-date ideas. 

The lighting is modern and sufficient for all purposes^ 
the natural lighting being from one side of the rooms only. 
In the recitation rooms, no pupil's desk is over 18 feet from 
the source of light. 

There are two bubbling drinking fountains on each floor. 
All the rooms in basement are connected by telephone. 

The three lowest grade rooms are equipped with Moul- 
throp movable chairs, the newest idea in school furniture^ 
and all rooms have ample closets for books, etc. Eight 
of the recitation rooms are in use, although only six are 
actually occupied by pupils, while one is used for an extra 
recitation room, and one for a sewing room. The cooking 
room is equipped completely for its required work, and can 
accommodate twenty-four pupils. The manual training 
room has fifteen working benches, and the sewing room 
twenty-four individual sewing tables. 

The work was done by the following firms: 

General construction, Hutchinson Building Company 
of this city. 

Heating and ventilating. Stone Underhill Heating and 
Ventilating Company, of Boston, Mass. 

Wiring, Orr & Rolfe of this city. 

Plumbing, Orr & Rolfe of this city. 

Grading, Geo. L. Theobald of this city. 

Granolithic, Hutchinson Building Company of this city. 

Lighting, Johns-Manville Company. 

There are three hundred thirty-four children attending 
school at the present time, under the provision of ten regu- 
lar teachers. 

The Merrimack and Tahanto buildings have been dis- 
continued, as well as one room in the Franklin School, 
and the majority of the pupils have been transferred to 
the Walker School. It is to be noted that several recitation 



SCHOOL REPORT. 63 

rooms are not yet in use, and these extra rooms should be 
sufficient to accommodate a considerable increase in the 
number of children in the vicinity of this building for 
several years. Furthermore, if it becomes necessary at 
any time to increase the size of this building, additions 
can be made to the north or south sides of the end pavilions 
without in any way affecting the lighting of the present 
building. 

A large concrete plaza was constructed in front of the 
south side of the building, and the balance of the school 
grounds properly graded. 

It is our opinion that when the rooms are fitted up com- 
pletely. Concord can claim the Walker School building to 
be one of the best of its kind in the state, and that it was 
built at a minimum cost. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OMAR S. SWENSON, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 

Bvilding Committee of the Board of Education. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

The awful conflict of foreign nations casting its pall over 
the entire world overshadows, for a time, the prominence of 
educational endeavor. In the minds of many people it 
has raised serious doubt as to whether centuries of educa- 
tional effort is now reaping the harvest it ought when so 
many of the brightest minds are being sacrificed in the strug- 
gle of passions. The peaceful conditions in our own coun- 
try, the earnest philanthropy manifested in the relief of 
suffering, and the effort being made to bring about an early 
and lasting world peace reassures us that past endeavor in 
the education of our complex population has been of avail. 

It is with this thought in mind that I venture to call 
your attention from the horrors of war to what is being 
done within our horizon line of education and then to the 
condition of the schools about which you have always mani- 
fested great concern. 

The work which the United States Bureau of Education 
is doing is of great importance. The scope of this work 
embraces all kinds of educational effort in public as well as 
private schools and its publications on different lines are 
indispensable to the student of education. I take the 
liberty to mention a few of the subjects treated in these 
reports. 

Readjustment of School Time. 

Searching inquiry into the economy of school time, the 
wider use of school plants, and the waste in public expendi- 
tures, has given rise to a study of the amount of time, both 
yearly and daily, which is devoted to pupil instruction. 
Thus far there appears to be an idea prevailing throughout 
the country that both are too short. One of the pioneers 



SCHOOL REPORT. 65 

in this movement is the city of Gary, Indiana, which pro- 
vides for a six-hour day throughout the entire year, one 
quarter of the year being optional. I call this to your 
attention particularly as a most remarkable, most inter- 
esting, and, with local adjustments, a most desirable scheme 
of conducting public schools. 

The Training of Teachers. 

The teachers of the country receive their training from 
the following sources: Teachers colleges, state normal 
schools, city training schools and universities. Professional 
training in the last is still in its beginning and not enough 
advanced to have its influence felt as it is bound to be later, 
but this professional movement forecasts the end of teach- 
ing by those who depend solely upon scholarly equipment 
for success because such evidence of preparation for pro- 
fessional training is an implied acknowledgment of defi- 
ciency in this particular. 

The Reorganization of Secondary Schools. 

Reference to this was made in my last annual report. 
Since that time the idea of junior high school, of which 
our system was one of the early exponents, has taken root 
widely and beyond the question of a doubt is to become a 
distinct feature of the national secondary school system. 

School Savings Banks. 

The plan of school savings banks when first inaugurated 
was doomed to an early death by opponents but its value 
is'shown in a continuous growth and other known elements 
of strength. The report of the Bureau reveals the follow- 
ing: 

Number of depositors in the country, 216,806 

Amount of money deposited, $4,258,068. 15 

Amount of money withdrawn, 2,668,751.33 

Amount of money still on deposit, 1,589,316.82 



66 city of concord, 

Vocational Education. 

The working out of a plan for the successful application 
of vocational education is still in embryo. It had its incep- 
tion in the idea that those pupils who leave school early 
should have some direction as to what may be best for them 
to do; in the idea that this class above all others has power 
in the upbuilding and maintaining of a democracy and that 
they must have an education suited to their needs. The 
plan is one which has come to stay but its necessity should 
be most clearly defined before a trial is made in our system. 

In Our Own State. 

Teachers' Pensions. 
The movement in favor of state pension legislation has 
at last assumed definite form in a bill now before the legis- 
lature. This bill is sanctioned by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, by the New Hampshire Educational 
Associations, and by all fair-minded people, as a just return 
for a life work in service of the state. 

State-Wide Supervision. 
This bill provides for compulsory supervision in all towns. 
No other bill in recent years emanating from the Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction has such a broad significance as 
this, and its passage would work great good to the state in 
general. 

Professional Training. 

As evidence of the thought being given to the profes- 
sional training of teachers permit me to call to your atten- 
tion the following: 

Dartmouth College has employed a professor of pedagogy. 

The State College has established a department for the 
professional training of secondary school teachers. 

The state has two flourishing normal schools and asks 
for a third. 

The city training schools are doing efficient work. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 67 



Attendance. 



Comparative Table. 

1913. 1914. Increase. Decrpase 

Number of pupils in the public schools 2,890 2,958 68 

" " " " " parochial schools 667 677 10 

' " " private schools 61 56 5 

" night schools 104 105 1 

3,722 3,796 79 5 

Net increase for the year 74 

PUBLIC DAY SCHOOLS. 

Number of pupils in the high school 802 896 94 

" elementary school 1,815 1,824 9 

kindergartens 245 238 7 

' " " industrial class 17 17 

2,879 2,958 103 24 

Net increase for the year 79 

NIGHT SCHOOL. 

Number of pupils enrolled (male) 82 89 7 

" (female) 22 16 6 

104 105 7 6 

Net increase for the year 1 

The first subject to be treated in the ordinary school 
report is pupil attendance as revealing an increase or loss 
in population. In growing places, especially manufacturing 
towns, a deficiency from one source is usually quickly made 
up by gains in others, but, in a city like ours, with industries 
limited in character and in number, this is not the case. 

The aggregate attendance in all schools for the year end- 
ing June 19, 1914, exceeded that of the preceding year by 
seventy-four pupils but the enrollment this year has fallen 
off decidedly owing to the fact that many families moved to 
Billerica, Mass., when the working force at the Boston & 
Maine Railroad shops was curtailed. 

On looking over past tabulated attendance I find that 
maximum and minimum periods occur about once in every 
ten years. Increases have been noted this year in the 
Harriet P. Dame School and in the High School. In the 
first-named, the crowded condition of the lowest, primary 
room called for an additional school which was started in 
the fall and placed in charge of one of the pupil teachers from 
the training school. Later a regular teacher was employed. 
The truancy report shows the usual number of pupils who 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

for various reasons needed the services of the truant officer. 
No epidemics of great importance have occurred except 
whooping-cough in the winter term. 

The High School. 

Junior High. 
The working out of the junior high school plan proves 
most satisfactory in every way. In Appendix I, I have 
given the usual semi-annual report, which was submitted 
to you last fall. The transition from classes M and N to 
classes and P is smooth and without apparent friction 
either in discipline or the prosecution of studies. We were 
fortunate in retaining the entire corps of teachers for 
another year in the Chandler School. The number of pupils 
enrolled here for the first semester was 184 and, for the 
second, 172. The capacity of the building is not adequate 
for the work but even under its difficulties the school remains 
model. The Parker School suffered a loss of four teachers 
at the end of the spring term. Miss Courser accepted a 
more lucrative position in Falmouth, Mass., Miss Blodgett 
gave up teaching for a time, Miss Dickson returned to 
home duties in Maine, and Miss Home was transferred to 
the senior high school. The new teachers are earnest and 
efficient and display a commendable spirit in their work. 
The high school classes in the Walker, the Garrison and the 
Eastman Schools are in good condition. I am free to say 
that for earnestness, faithfulness, professional progress of 
the teaching force, and in wholesome school spirit, it will be 
very difficult to find schools superior to and not many the 
equal of the junior high schools. This statement is borne 
out not only by residents of this city but also by visiting 
educators of note. 

Senior High School. 
This school experienced the following changes: 
Mr. Lyman accepted a position in Massachusetts. 
Mr. Clarke resigned to go elsewhere. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 69" 

Miss Hanson is engaged in diet kitchen work in Boston. 

Miss Merrill resigned to go elsewhere. 

Miss Sargent has been granted a leave of absence for the 
remainder of the year beginning January 1. 

Mr. Thomas Twomey was chosen to substitute for Miss 
Sargent. 

Teachers' Meetings. 

During the first semester fourteen teachers' meetings were 
held, seven devoted to organization, programs, notices, 
records, etc., six to considering problems of daily occurrence 
in school work and one to discussing professional reading 
by the teachers. Thirty-five different books have been 
read or studied by the teaching force varying from two to 
six to a teacher. In addition, the teachers have free access 
to leading educational magazines. 

I appreciate this gain in professional interest but the 
fact that only one meeting has' been given over entirely to 
the professional side of teaching leads me to renew my state- 
ment in last year's report. Individual effort alone in pro- 
fessional uplift can never accomplish its end unless 
frequently supplemented by round-table talks at which free 
interchange of ideas and friendly discussions are indulged 
in by a number of teachers together. Another year we 
hope the professional idea may be conducted along these 
lines. During the first semester twenty-seven such meet- 
ings were held by combined teaching forces in the Chandler 
and the Parker Schools. All the elementary schools hold 
meetings once every two weeks. 

Attendance. 

The enrollment in this school for the first semester was 
437 pupils — the second semester 463. The graduating 
class of last year numbered 85, 6 in January and 79 in June. 
Eleven of these entered college, and 7 take special work in 
college or university. 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

From this term on the attendance at the High School 
will not vary greatly inasmuch as the graduating classes 
will about compensate for the entering classes. 

English. 

The course in English for the full five years high school 
has been put into concrete form by the superintendent with 
the advice and suggestions of the teachers. This embraces 
a course in Concord History taken up in essay writing. 
Some excellent results are already in evidence. Spelling 
contests in various ways have been held frequently. 

Latin. 

The course in Latin has been arranged in definite detail 
and the entire subject is being treated more rationally than 
before. The work in sight reading has improved, reaching 
its maximum efficiency in the Chandler and the Parker 
Schools. 

School Sessions. 

At the beginning of the fall term the school began the 
six-hour session plan. The additional time was taken up 
in lengthening the recess twenty-five minutes, the re- 
maining time being given to recitation period. The original 
plan was to arrange for a fifty-minute period as follows: 
Forty minutes for the actual recitation period, and ten 
minutes for supervised study. In the comparatively few 
instances where this is carried out the value of the plan is 
plainly evident. The longer noon recess enables one-half 
of the students to eat dinner at home. A nourishing lunch 
is furnished in the drill room for those who are obliged to 
remain in the building, details of which maj^ be found in 
another article. The average time spent by the pupils in 
eating lunch is about twenty minutes, leaving twenty-five 
minutes for pupil leisure. The principal found it necessary 



SCHOOL REPORT. 71 

in the interest of discipline to provide occupation for the 
time, especially in the winter, and this was done by allowing 
dancing two days during the week. On the other days 
concerts by mandolin clubs, glee clubs, dramatic clubs, the 
victrola, and also other various forms of entertainment have 
been provided. This period if handled with good dis- 
criminating judgment ought to prove of distinct value as 
an uplifting factor in the school. 

Parent Interest. ■ 

The interest of the parents in this school is not what it 
should be. No distinct effort appears to have been made 
to have such an interest aroused. As far as time permits 
the various teachers have visited parents to talk over 
student interest but this at best must be limited. I see 
no reason why a Parents' Night could not be observed to 
advantage here as well as it is in other schools. By this 
means parents could be induced to come and get acquainted 
with the ways of the school and the teaching force. 

Athletics. 

The constitution and by-laws governing athletic interests 
has been put into shape and submitted to the different 
principals and the members of the Board of Education. 
This is one important step but of itself it is insignificant 
unless carried out faithfully and supplemented by things 
that will give it strength. 

First, an athletic field is one of the pressing needs. I 
have talked about this for a long time both to teachers and 
citizens but the matter has not taken definite form, until 
recently proposed by Mr. Cook and Mr. Moors. A field 
rented for this purpose would not fill the requirements of 
economy. The amount given for rental might be applied 
in whole or in part annually in improving the ground if it 
were owned by the district. The students would take pride 



72 CITY OF CONCORD. 

in maintaining a field of their own more than one they 
hired. Following this a man should be employed to act as 
physical director, his duties to be those enumerated in the 
constitution and by-laws. In addition to these duties he 
should be required to take charge of military drill, act as 
substitute teacher when needed and teach regularly each 
day as his other duties would allow. His qualifications 
should be in addition to those already mentioned: 

1. A graduate from a college or university. 

2. Free from habits which naturally tend to lower the 
moral standards of pupils. 

3. A firm purpose to elevate the standards of athletic 
exercises and contests especially by weeding out all vicious 
and unsportsmanlike practices. 

4. His duties should hold him responsible for the intro- 
duction and carrying out of a system of physical exercises 
for both boys and girls which would be strengthening to 
their physical, mental and moral standing. 

In General. 

I am impressed with the gain in all the various schools. 
The courses are being maintained as strongly as may be 
found in the average secondary schools — perhaps stronger. 
Graduates now attending higher institutions of learning 
are acquitting themselves creditably. This in itself is 
deserving of a great deal of praise but must not be reckoned 
as the final word in the effectiveness of high schools. They 
are now to be judged by efficiency in all lines of work, by 
the number of pupils they can enroll with profit, by the 
ease and dispatch with which they can accommodate them- 
selves to the growing needs of the community, by the sane 
methods of teaching employed, by the healthy moral tone 
they can show, and by the standards they can give to the 
elementary schools and to the public. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 73 



The Domestic Arts Course. 

The number of girls taking this course is eighty-three, a 
fact which alone justifies its establishment. These are 
divided into classes as follows: Class 0, 8, Class P, 21, 
Class Q, 11, Class R, 14, Class S, 15, Class O, 14. The 
ending of another year will see the first graduating class 
from this course, and I venture to say that for fitness to 
enter upon the exacting duties of the home, there has never 
been a previous class in any other course graduated from 
this school with better ideas of what life means, and of what 
the home of the average man should be. This first class 
has always been enthusiastic and capable. Miss Buttrick 
has had entire charge of it for two years and deserves all 
kinds of credit for the excellent work she has done. The 
various departments of Music, Drawing, Sewing and Cook- 
ing all have manifested the greatest concern for the success 
of these young women and they have achieved it. I look 
forward to the continuation of this course as one of the 
economic features of Concord school system. 

BREAD TEST. 
Marun Buttrick, 
•^ Domestic Science Teacher, 

Concord, N. H. 

Amount of material per loaf. Cost of each ma- Coet of Wt. of loaf Wt.of 

terial per loaf. each per lb. (fresh). loaf (dry). 

ic. of milk $.0050 $.008 (per qt.) 325. a g 237. o g 

ic. of water or or 

itb. oflard 0010 .16 11.4 oz. 8.3 oz. 

jtb. of butter 0025 .33 

Jtb. of sugar 0003 .05 (Percentage composition of 

J yeast cake 0050 .02 (each) H'j in loaf 27.1 per cent.) 

l^c. flour 0261 .035 

it. salt .000024 .05 

$.039924 

N.B.— Prices used are current in Concord, N. H., May, 1914. Prices are not the lowest because 
the supplies used in the Concord High School are through necessity purchased in rather small quanti- 
ties. 



74 city of concord. 

The Elementary Schools. 

We cannot afford to look with less favor upon the work 
of the elementary schools, their efforts and accomplishments. 
Their comparative obscurity in the system, their less pre- 
tentious kind of work and their traditional title of " Common 
Schools" make them less conspicuous than those of second- 
ary grade, yet for scientific teaching, for vital importance to 
the public school system and as a sub-structure for higher 
grade work they are entitled to first consideration. We 
must bear in mind, however, that these pupils, and these 
teachers labor with great patience and energy in preparing 
for subsequent work. It may be gratifying to some to 
know that the superintendent is in appreciation of their 
efforts and does not hesitate to say in print what he has 
often said in grade meetings that the responsibility for effect- 
ive work in the higher grades does not rest lightly upon 
them and that they meet it faithfully and uncomplainingly. 
Frequent readjustments of the work are being made which 
suit prevailing conditions, the outcome of conferences with 
the teaching corps. This year these changes have been 
confined mostly to arithmetic, geography, history, and 
spelling, with the object of bringing them more fully within 
the comprehension of the pupils. New spelling lists have 
been prepared for classes C, D, E, F, I, J, and specific 
methods for handling the subject submitted to the teachers. 
The carrying out of the five-period topical plan of teaching 
various subjects has been attended by results positively 
gratifying. I commend the work of these schools without 
reserve. 

Kindergartens. 

There are five kindergartens in our school system and 
they are all successful. The new kindergarten room at the 
Walker School is one of the most commodious in the country. 
The attendance has been smaller than last year but it is 
gradually growing again. Recent reports by experts who 
have made exhaustive research on the subject go to show 



SCHOOL REPORT. 75 

that pupils who have had kindergarten instruction invari- 
ably do a higher class of work than those who have never 
had it. This standard ranges from 15 per cent, to 25 per 
cent, higher. 

The Dewey Training School. 

Seven young women graduated from this institution last 
June and all are engaged in teaching — two in Union District, 
and the others in various parts of the state. The present 
senior class numbers four and the junior class three. 
The usual activities of the school have been maintained 
successfully. The requirements of the state with reference 
to obtaining state certificates are being met and the gradu- 
ates experience little difficulty in passing the examinations 
for certification and are having regular work in sewing, cook- 
ing and woodworking. Recent tabulations by the United 
States Bureau of Education show the following regarding 
city training schools: 

Cities having training schools, 67. 

Number of students in training: Male, 253; female, 7,913 
= 8,166. 

Manual Training. 

I am pleased to report the continued success in this de- 
partment. I call J- our attention to the detailed report of 
Mr. French in Appendix I, which deals definitely with the 
different forms of work carried on here. 

Cooking. 

Miss Marion B. Adams resigned at the end of the year 
to accept a position offered by the state. Miss Marion J. 
Roby succeeding her brought to her work a sincerity, good 
judgment, firmness, and a personality which is proving 
successful. The first two weeks of the fall term were given 
over to preserving fruit, canning tomatoes, and making 
jellies. Classes M and N do much in proving recipes at 
home because time for this in class work is limited. Classes 
and P have shown interest and much pride in keeping 



76 CITY OF CONCORD. 

their note books accurate and neat. They have learned to 
serve a simple luncheon and breakfast and gave a demon- 
stration of this on Parents Night. Some of the classes are 
still too large to be handled economically, the largest num- 
bering twenty-eight. 

Sewing. 

The interest in sewing is reflected in the great amount of 
finished work, resulting largely from the fact that as soon 
as a garment is completed it may be taken home and put 
to immediate use before the maker has outgrown it. Reg- 
ular class exercises were carried on during Parents Night 
at the Parker School enabling people to see the girls at 
work. The new room at the Walker School has been 
equipped and is in use each week. 

Enumeration of Work Done. 

48 finished dresses 28 unfinished dresses 9 dress skirts 

9 kimonos 6 shirtwaists 75 sewing aprons 

130 pieces of underwear, also several hundred models. 

For the Cooking School. 
3 table-cloths 8 towels 1 drapery curtain 

For the District Nursing Association. 
3 pillow slips 1 child's night-dress 

The interest in upper-class work finds expression in dress- 
making and embroidery rather than millinery, probably 
because it has not been so fully developed, but we shall 
expect a continued interest and steady improvement in 
millinery as a necessary part of the course. 

Drawing. 

Few if any other cities can show work of the first four 
grades which is the equal of that in our schools. The 
progress of the domestic arts classes in this line of work 
has been sure but it has been greatly hindered by the un- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

fortunate scheduling of some of the lessons, which could 
hardly be obviated. The study of Art History calls for a 
good text-book but such an one is not in print. The one we 
use is in pamphlet form published by the Prang Educational 
Co. The schedule of this year allowed thirty minutes less 
time per week in classes A, B, C, D and gave the same addi- 
tional time to classes E, F, G, H. Miss Jones, assistant, 
has charge of the entire work in classes A to L inclusive. 
The drawings from these schools are looked over by the 
supervisor once each semester, and her actual teaching time 
is given to the Domestic Arts classes. Classes M and N, 
the studio class and to high school electives. 

Music. 

The study of music has a disciphnary value equal to that 
of any other branch in the entire curricula of school work. 
The results of a year's effort in this line show increasing 
ability to read music at sight, improvement in tonal quality, 
better expression of musical emotion, and a cheerfulness 
among pupils while doing the work. 

In the junior high schools chorus singing grows in strength, 
solidity and intelligence. This is especially noted in tenor 
and bass parts. 

In the senior high school the chorus comprises three 
hundred voices of average ability. Interest in glee clubs 
and other musical organizations has been maintained. 
The school orchestra, made up of pupils from this school 
and the junior high schools, is an organization of which the 
city should be proud. It has lost some of its former effi- 
cient members by graduation but the earnestness displayed 
by those who comprise it now will undoubtedly repair this 
loss. A set of tympani and a double bass have been pur- 
chased out of the high school concert fund. 

The requirements for the domestic arts classes have been 
modified somewhat in favor of art appreciation. 

The intructor will ask for some changes of text-books and 
I believe they are needed. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Night School. 

The night school of this year began October 2, 1914, and 
ended January 21, 1915. The history of previous schools 
of this kind has been repeated in the one of this year in 
about every detail. We have been able to secure the serv- 
ices of the same corps of teachers for the past few years, a 
fact in itself of great benefit to those who attend. The 
enrollment of 1915 was larger by one pupil than that of 
1914. The prevailing nationalities were Albanian, Greek, 
Swedish, Finnish, Turkish and Russian. Expansion of the 
night school into one taking up advanced work in manual 
training lines I believe should be tried next year. Prob- 
ably a class in mechanical drawing would give a fair idea 
of how extensive such a demand might be. There are room 
conveniences and no doubt competent teachers can be 
secured. 

Summary. 





Male. 


Female. Total. 


Whole number s 


ittending, 89 


16 105 


Average membership. 


54.22 


Average daily absence. 


15.3 


Average daily attendance. 


38.92 


Age of youngest 


pupil. 


16 


Age of oldest pupil, 


42 


Average age. 


Roll of Honor. 


27 


Christi Costas 


Loney Stotleos 


William Laswick 


Jim Stotleos 


Charley Culigd 
Nationalities 




Albanian, 20 


Cuban, 1 


Irish, 2 


American, 1 


Finnish, 12 


Italian, 4 


Armenian, 2 


French, 


Polandish, 4 


Austrian, 5 


German, 


Russian, 8 


Canadian, 4 


Greek, 17 


Swedish, 14 
Turkish, 11 



school report. 79 

Some Events of the Year. 

Historic Pageant. 
At the close of the school year last June the history of 
Concord was memorialized by the pupils of the Parker 
School in a pageant of events enacted in costume at White 
Park. The work which this entailed was carried out by 
the teaching corps and the pupil body with zeal. Very 
many people attended and it was the general opinion that 
the affair was highly creditable and well worth the effort 
it cost. Miss Dickerman and her able corps, of assistants 
received due praise for its conception and success. The 
entire cost of this event was 



English Prize Essay Contest. 

The contest in English prize essays was held at the Parker 
School on Saturday, May 2, 1914. Fifty-five pupils took 
part, being the largest number ever recorded in such a con- 
test in this city and resulting from a plan put in operation 
for the first time. This allowed pupils of the various classes 
to compete against each other without the futility of con- 
tending against the older and more experienced pupils. 
The plan follows : 

For pupils of classes M and N, and P, Q and R, S and T, 
U and V, two prizes of $3 and $2 respectively, for best and 
second best essays in each division were offered. 

Out of the entire number of contestants the ones having 
the best and second best essays were awarded an additional 
$6 and $4 respectively. The contest was judged to be 
meritorious and of value to the schools. More detailed 
information may be found in Appendix II. 

Events of the Year. 

The new Walker School was opened February 1, 1915. 
The dedicatory exercises occurred February 8, 1915. 

Memorial Day commemorative exercises were held in all 
the schools. 

The Star Spangled Banner was sung by all the pupils 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of the city and the nation at the same hour on September 
14, 1914. 

The annual exhibition of Manual Training was held 
Wednesday, June 17, 1914 — attendance, 408. 

The annual exhibition of Drawing, Sewing and Cooking 
was held at the Parker ochool On Friday and Saturday, 
June 19, 20, 1914 — attendance large. 

Parents' Day was observed at the Parker School, Decem- 
ber 11, 1914 — attendance large. 

Victrolas were purchased through the efforts of the pupils 
in the Penacook and the Harriet P. Dame Schools. The 
following schools now have them: Cogswell, Penacook, 
Dewey, Franklin, High, Harriet P. Dame. 

Defective Children. 

Another waste in the expenditure of public money is to be 
found in asking the teacher to use her time in attempting 
to develop the minds of some children whose capacity for 
such development is wanting. Our country is to be guided 
and its destiny determined by the capable part of our 
population, the part possessed by nature of sufficient 
mentality to respond to the effects of the teaching corps 
and it is in this one respect that we may be in serious error — 
that of using the most of our energy, our money, and our 
care in trying to bring fortune out of misfortune, mental 
vigor out of imbecility and virtue out of vice. No nation on 
earth is so possessed of the humanistic idea as our own and 
it is right if, in our kindness of heart, we do not make the 
bright pay tribute to the dull, the courageous to the cow- 
ardly, and the virtuous to the vicious. It is this capable 
portion of our pupil population that needs our great if not 
our greatest public concern. By segregating the incapables 
into schools or institutions fitted specially for the unfortun- 
ate, the capable portion may realize that amount of atten- 
tion which justly belongs to them. The public school 
teacher should not be compelled to attempt the impossible. 
The teachers of the elementary schools were asked by the 



SCHOOL REPORT. 81 

superintendent to send to him an answer to the following 
question. 

"Will you please submit to me the number of pupils in 
each class whom you know to be feeble-minded to such an 
extent that they are a drag on the school and would be 
better off in special institutions?" The results of the 
question are as follows: 

Class, A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. L. 

303225200199 = 36 
♦Deduct, 4 5 = 12 

30321410015 14 = 24 

*Not sure about special institution. One teacher said 
not Laconia. 

These twenty-four children are a source of economic 
waste because the mass instruction that must necessarily 
prevail in public schools cannot reach their individual needs. 
Either they should be segregated in a school by themselves 
or sent to those institutions which make a specialty of 
training deficient children. 

School Lunches. 

Coincident with the adoption of the six-hour session in 
the high school a school lunch was begun. This custom 
had been observed in the Parker School for a number of 
years, also in a very limited way at the Chandler School. 
The work is now more completely organized than ever be- 
fore. It has been successful first in promoting better health 
among the pupils, second in relieving the anxieties of many 
parents about the noon meals for their children, and third 
in being remunerative to those who furnish it. The whole 
matter was put into the hands of the committee on cooking 
who carefully worked the plan out and carried it to success. 
These lunches furnished by Joseph Nardini are under the 
immediate charge of Harry Danforth. Supervision is given 
by Miss Dickerman and the corps of teachers at the Parker 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

School assisted by Mr. Ada, and bj^ Mr. Cook and Miss 
Buttrick at the high school. The scheme has met with good 
success and the character of the food is such that many of 
the teachers partake of it each day and, in the Parker School, 
visitors from this and neighboring states have expressed 
satisfaction with it. A number of pupils from the Chandler 
School get their noon meal at the Parker lunch. Delega- 
tions from the public schools of Tilton and Belmont visited 
here and chose it for their noon meal. A large number of 
the superintendents from various parts of the state took 
dinner here on February 24 and manifested their approval. 
I personally have averaged one visit a week to this lunch 
and find it adequate in quantit}'' and quality for a good meal. 

A Day's Menu. 

Soup and rolls, a different kind each day, 5 cents 

Cocoa or milk and rolls, 5 cents 
Meat and potato and rolls, a different kind each day, 10 cents 

Coffee rolls, 10 cents 

Ice cream, 5 and 10 cents 

Fruit, 5 cents 

Sandwiches, 5 cents 

The Wider Use of the School Plant. 

The idea of allowing public property to lie idle for any 
length of time has little of true economy. If our people 
are called upon to build expensive buildings they should be 
built for continuous use and not for thirty-eight weeks out 
of the fifty-two. This movement has just begun in our 
city and should be carried very much farther. It has been 
solved partly by lengthening the school day and by granting 
the use of some halls for various organizations distinctly 
public in their nature. The formation of the proposed 
Civic Union should go a long way toward bringing this use 
of school buildings about but it can be done still more effec- 
tively by having an optional continuous school session 
throughout the entire year. This might be begun in a 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

simple way by trying out continuation scliools during the 
summer months one in the Walker building and one in the 
Rumford building. 

On Friday, February 26, 1915, I made inquiry of the 
elementary schools regarding something which may tend 
to show that this idea is not visionary. The state child 
labor laws with slight modifications forbid the employment 
of children under the age of fourteen years. The average 
age of pupils in the highest elementary school grade is 
thirteen years so that we may safely say that t^^ of these 
pupils remaining at home during the summer are not allowed 
to work by law. From this inquiry I have made the follow- 
ing tabulation: 

1 . Number pupils in elementary schools reported, 1 ,534 

2. Number going away from home during the entire 

summer vacation, 251 

3. Number going away from home a part of the sum- 

mer vacation (not included in No. 2), 483 

4. Number remaining at home during the entire sum- 
mer vacation, 800 

From this it would appear that a number of the 800 pupils 
were neither allowed to work during the summer vacation 
nor does the state make any provision for their occupation 
in any way. As many of the parents of these pupils are 
obliged to work all day it would seem as if the state or the 
city should make some provision for their children in the 
form of useful occupation during the summer vacation when 
they cannot be employed lawfully at manual labor. I be- 
lieve we should make an attempt to relieve the situation 
somewhat by a trial of continuation schools the object 
being 

1. To furnish some useful manual occupation. 

2. To furnish a reasonable amount of mental occupation. 

The result should show (a) in a larger high school enroll- 
ment, reasoning that backward pupils might thus gain two 
months' extra help; (b) in keeping pupils away from places 
of ill repute and from the evils of idleness; (c) in giving 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

pupils more careful bodily training; (d) in relieving work- 
ing parents of anxiety over the whereabouts of their chil- 
dren. From the table we find the following situation; 

North p. „.,„ South 
End. '^^^r^- End. 

1. Number of pupils enrolled, 345 389 496 

2. Number of pupils going away during the 

entire summer, 63 111 84 

3. Number of pupils going away a part of the 

summer, 97 177 191 

4. Number of pupils staying at home during 

the entire summer, 185 101 221 

From these figures showing the large number of pupils 
remaining at home during the entire summer it would seem 
as if provision should be made in their interest. 

Modernism in Schools. 

The flight of time becomes so apparently more rapid to 
one of advancing years that conception of its departure and 
the changes that necessarily attend it frequently work to 
the disadvantage of even rational progress. The school 
of today is not the school of yesterday either in content or 
intent. To have it remain so would require no change in 
the character of the population, in ways of living, in manner 
of employment, and in public ideals. No change means 
stagnation. Ways of doing things vary with the onward 
march of time much to the surprise and often the disgust 
of those who were taught under different conditions. How- 
ever strong the pictures of our youth, however dear the 
customs of our fathers, nevertheless this age of invention 
will not abide the one-horse chaise, the horsecar nor the 
stage-coach. Inability to grasp the true meaning of this 
idea has caused many a business failure. The principle 
is just as true of education as of any other field of activity, 
and true in all its different phases. Old methods in edu- 
cation handed down by Greek philosophers, and changing 
through the centuries as conditions compelled, have not 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

entirely disappeared. The Platonic theory of education 
sought the development of a race of philosophic statesmen 
who would rule with absolute justice and truth. To realize 
this it would prescribe the study of music, literature, gym- 
nastics, generalized arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, 
musical harmony, pure philosophy, and dialectic but only 
for those who possessed a proper commingling of the phys- 
ical and the mental with gentleness of spirit. The tendency 
of education after the plans of Greek philosophy was to 
become centered in the few, to promote class consciousness, 
and to draw a harsh line between the educated and the 
uneducated, a scholasticism distinctly autocratic. Other 
manifestations of education were long-drawn countenances, 
flowing unkempt beards and hair, cloaks of sombre hue and 
a variety of other really meaningless insignia, reflections 
of which may be seen even today. 

These ideas in changing form and adaptability ran down 
through the centuries completely possessing the popular 
mind and revealing themselves in the isolation of the highly 
educated from the plain people, giving rise to peculiar mani- 
festations from the supernatural revelations of the alchemist 
to the educational miser concealing valuable scientific truths 
because they were held to be too sacred for the common run 
of mankind. The sacredness of education as a thing suffi- 
cient unto itself has largely left the popular mind and in 
its place appears an educational plan born of wonderful 
advances in art and science to be applied to the constantly 
changing civilization of today, the most complex in the 
history of the world. Even up to the threshold of the 
twentieth century the philosophic idea held almost undis- 
' puted sway in the educational world. The theory of formal 
discipline remained unshaken because unassailed and its 
futile attempts to realize complete concepts in everything 
often called the unfortunate individual who failed "good 
for nothing," and pushed aside as of no use those who were 
not mentally strong enough to grasp the abstract. Such a 
condition caused to spring up forms of punishment, the tor- 
tures of an "Educational Inquisition," such as severe 



86 CITY OF CONCORD, 

bodily beatings, tying up pupils' heads in towels, putting 
clothes-pins on tender tongues, thumbing cracks in floors 
until fainting relieved the unfortunate victim and a hundred 
and one other savageries, disgusting to recall, all because 
God had not given the child ability to become interested in 
that which could not interest him^ — because the fine-spun 
theories of the scholastics failed to materialize at the right 
time. 

Modern educational methods result from material 
changes brought about in very recent years. Our present 
civilization calls for the greater amount of human effort to 
be directed toward elevating the masses to a higher plane 
of living, toward breaking down the barriers of autocratic 
scholasticism, toward teaching the average man how to live, 
and to have his position in life valued at its true worth. 
The scholastic of today and the one of a century ago are 
two different types. Today, as before and as it ever will 
be, ripe scholarship continues to be the ruling force in 
education; but its garb, its manifestations, and its purposes 
are not to be those of former days. Education now is for 
the uplift of all humanity. About once in ten years the 
idea becomes recurrent that modern methods and ways in 
education are destroying childhood and fail of accomplishing 
proper results; that any plan which interferes with the 
conventionalities of ancient methods of posture in recita- 
tion with its measured movement, rigid positions, and the 
whispered hush, is also necessarily destructive of a child's 
chances of obtaining a proper education. This usually 
finds its most concrete form in those whose hastening pace 
toward the reward of a well-spent life breeds great con- 
cern over the freedom allowed the motor activities of grow- 
ing children in the school room, those who have not yet 
shaken off the idea that the "solemn stillness " of the schools 
of yore is yet the best atmosphere for the modern school. 
It is true that many learned men came forth from those 
schools, often in spite of them, not necessarily because of 
them. All these departures from rigid Puritanism are but 
results from a reaction against academic specialization and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

an evergrowing lack of confidence in methods born of an- 
cient theories. Modern methods discount manners in recita- 
tion, discount formahty and seek to put in its place a free 
manifestation of individual interest mattering not whether 
the pupil raises his hand in a natural way, whether he 
stands or sits as his ease and interest may suggest. An 
expression of individual interest and thought by the pupil 
is a fundamental of good teaching. The purpose of our 
education is a direct preparation for the demands of active 
life by making this preparation and general discipline 
mutually dependent. Our present mode of living, our 
democratic form of government, our ideas of progress will 
never again abide avenues to education through specialized 
unapproachable subjects and methods which repress full 
expression, nor will our schools ever again be permeated with 
the oppressive hush, the awe, and the rigid positions of old, 
but they will continue to open up to the child possibilities 
of mental freedom, lively interest, an earnest desire for 
educational growth, and to lend a helping hand to all, not 
the few alone. Their chief work should be broadly hu-' 
manistic. The unfortunate who has little chance to shake 
off the grip of his miserable environments needs our con- 
cern, the ill-nourished child, the child of the drunkard, the 
child who is forced to work beyond his strength. Such as 
these, while they may never become shining lights in any 
■field, nevertheless may become steadfast responsible citi- 
zens and our country needs them now if ever. It is this 
strengthening of personality, this estabUshing of character 
through perfect knowledge that means community uplift. 
Personality will vary with the individual but whatever 
measure he may possess will be gained through perfecting 
knowledge and character. Our modern education, then, 
is not to be governed by Platonic theory nor ancient caprices, 
rather more nearly by the ideas of Socrates who, as the 
friend of man, saw some good in every human being. 

The year just closing has been productive of much for 
which the citizens of this district should be thankful. I 
take this occasion to commend the entire teaching corps 



88 CITY OF CONCORD. 

for their zeal, their forbearance, and steadfastness in our 
educational endeavor, to compliment the Board of Educa- 
tion for their sincerity, accuracy, and firmness in working 
for the true interests of the schools and the people in 
general. The best I can offer in return is my full measure 
of strength and concern for the educational interests of 
Concord. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Su-perintendent. 



APPENDIX I. 



APPENDIX I. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

I submit herewith the fourth semi-annual report of the 
condition of the schools under the reorganization scheme 
adopted in 1910. 

Financial. 

The financial statements in previous reports of this kind 
have been marked by conservatism, based upon the judg- 
ment of business men, teachers and others and a liberal 
discount allowed from this. The late Judge John M, 
Mitchell called the estimates too conservative and named 
$50,000 as none too large a sum to build a serviceable 
addition to the high school. Current expenses include addi- 
tional fuel, janitor service, lighting, etc. Additional tuition 
is that shown by the difference between elementary school 
tuition and high school (classes M, N) tuition — $37 for each 
tuition pupil. Graduation expenses include expense of hall, 
orator, graduation suits for pupils (saved to parents) reck- 
oned at $10 per pupil, and other incidentals. Rooms dis- 
continued. At the time one room was discontinued in the 
Walker building thus saving the salary of one teacher. 

Bond issue (additional) $50,000 .00 

Interest on same four years at 3| per cent. . . 7,000.00 
Current expenses that would have been in- 
curred 6,000 . 00 

One room discontinued (three years) 1,950.00 

Additional tuition (classes M, N) " 1,356.00 

Graduation expenses 4,000 . 00 

$70,306.00 



92 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



It has been hinted that the increase in the annual budget 
is caused by this scheme. In the first place it should be 
apparent to anybody that, under like conditions, an edu- 
cational system of eleven years can be conducted more 
economically than one of twelve years. 

In 1909-1910 the annual budget was S86,478.63 

In 1913-1914 the annual budget was 96,748.09 

Excess of 1914 budget over 1910 was $10,269.46 

I think the following table, carefully prepared, will fully 
account for this increase. 



1909-1910. 


1913-1914. 


82,200.00 


?2,300.00 


1,000.00 


1,500.00 


1,000.00 


1,200.00 


800.00 


900.00 


550.00 


650.00 


300.00 


400.00 


475.00 


650.00 


300.00 


400.00 


375.00 


450.00 


300.00 


350.00 



Increase. 



The maximum salary of High School Teachers (master) . . 

The maximum salary of High School Teachers (sub-mas- 
ter) 

The maximum salary of High School Teachers (male as- 
sistants) 

The maximum salary of ffigh School Teachers (women) . . 

The maximum salary of Grade Teachers 

The minimum salary of Grade Teachers. 

The maximiun salary of Kindergartens (principals) 

The minimum salary of Kindergartens (principals) 

The maximum salary of Kindergartens (assistants) 

The minimam salary of Kindergartens (assistants) 



$100.00 

500.00 

200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
175.00 
100.00 
75.00 
50.00 



Basing my deductions upon this I find the following: 



Increase over 1910. 

High School salaries $1 

Parker School salaries 

Chandler School salaries allowed 
as expense caused by the system 

Garrison School salaries 

Eastman School salaries 

Rumford School salaries 1 

Kimball School salaries 1 

Penacook School salaries 

Dewey School salaries 

Franklin School salaries 

Merrimack School salaries 



,650.00 
350.00 



750.00 
250.00 
,650.00 
,350.00 
400.00 
275.00 
350.00 
600.00 



$2,400.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 1>3 

H. P. Dame School salaries $300.00 

Tahanto School salaries 200 . 00 

Cogswell School salaries 200.00 

Morrill School salaries 3,250.00 

Sewing School salaries 758 . 00 

Cooking School salaries 125.00 

Music 

Military Drill 

Janitors 373 . 00 

Superintendent 

Financial Agent 

Superintendent's Clerk 60.00 

Truant Officer 

Nurse 700.00 



$13,591.00 $2,400.00 
Excess of 1913-1914 salaries over 

1909-1910 11,191.00 



$13,591.00 $13,591.00 

Excess of raises in salaries over excess in budget = $11,- 
191 .00 - $10,269.46 = $921.54. 

In addition to this we may note that school supplies 
have generally increased in price in the last four years. We 
bought coal for $6.05 in 1910. Last year it cost $6.45 
this year $6.80. Cord wood has advanced. Slabs cost 
$2 a cord more and other things accordingly. 

I alloAved $2,400 increased expense in the Chandler 
School. As a matter of fact this school would have to be 
in commission under any system as matters now stand. I 
have not the least hesitation in saying that under the eleven 
year organization we are conducting the schools from three 
to four thousand dollars a year more economically than 
under the former plan. 



94 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The Teaching Force. 





Number of teafhers. 


Number of pupils. 


-A^verage number of 
pupils to a teacher. 




1910. 1914. 


1910. 


1914. 


1910. 1914. 


High School (4 years) 


i ! 

18 1 26 458 


657 ' 25^ 


255's 



This shows that the increase in teaching force is war- 
ranted by the increase in the number of pupils. 



All schools. 



I 

84 S9 ' 2,604 i 2,666 

ill 


31 



This shows an increase of five teachers over 1910 ac- 
counted for as follows: 

1-Extra teacher called for bj' introduction of the domestic 

arts course in high school. 
2-Special teachers one each in Rumford and Kimball Schools 

(Plan adopted by the Board since 1910). 
1 -Clerk in Chandler school. 

1-A new school of sixteen pupils in the Garrison School. 
1-New school in Harriet P. Dame building (called for by 

increase in pupils). 
1-Kindergarten assistant in West Concord. 

This makes seven extra teachers for whom the reorgani- 
ization scheme is not responsible, otherwise we would be 
employing two less teachers than in 1910. 



Average Cost per Pupil — Teaching Force. 

High school. SleSe'n.' Average. 

1910 ■. $33.14 $14.76 $23.95 

1914 27.18 20.25 23.46 

Shows a slight decrease over 1910 although salaries are 
n.uch increased. 



school report. 95 

Tuition Receipts 

High school. Elementary 

1910 $1,577.39 $576.66 

1914 3,812.41 436.35 

Increase in four years $2,235 . 02 

Decrease 140 . 31 

Net increase in four years $2,094 . 71 

General Scholarship. 
High School. 
Four years. 

1909-'10. 1913-14. Increase. Decrease. 

Senior Class— Av. for year . . 78 . 66 80 . 06 1 . 40% 

Junior Class— Av. for year . . 77 . 48 80 . 96 3 . 48 
Sophomore Class — Av. for 

year 78.56 78.14 .42 

Freshman Class — Av. for 

vear 69.91 82.30 12.39 



304.61 321.46 17.21 42 

Failures 1914. 
Standard 10 per cent, of the Enrollment. 

Enrollment. Failed. Je^-t,•. ^,AW. J^^low 

High 422 35 8.29 1.71 

Parker 210 7 3.33 6.67 

Chandler 188 24 12.76 2.76 

Garrison 10 

Eastman 11 

Five years High 831 66 7.94 2.06 

Four years High 622 42 6.75 3.25 

1913. 1914. 

Average of entire High School (4 years) . . 81 . 45% 80 . 36% 
Average of entire High School (5 years) . . 80 . 30% 80 . 03% 



96 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Group I. 

The number of A— pupils represents a loss of 1.32 per 
cent, over last year. 

The number of B— pupils represents a gain of 3.49 per 
cent, over last year. 

The number of failures represents a gain of 19.2 per cent, 
over last year. 

CLASSES Q AND R. 



1914. 



ja . 








JS . 


































3 = 








3=: 








■a 


"O 


i.^ 




•a 


■s 


d <" 


i 






d •" 


^ 


'3 


Z 


a, 


fe 


Pk 


Z 


CM 


£ 


128 


112 


16 


12.5 


73 


63 


10 


124 


122 


2 


1.61 


167 


164 


3 


53 


49 


4 


7.54 


40 


37 


3 


4 


4 

















120 


107 


13 


10.83 


134 


126 


8 


39 


35 


4 


10.25 


204 


165 


39 



Geometry 
English. . 
Latin. . . . 
Greek . . . . 
French. . . 
C. Arith.. 



13.69 
1.30 
7.30 

5.97 

19.11 



In Geometry the per cent, of failures was 1.19 per cent, 
larger than the year 1910. 

In English the per cent, of failures was .19 per cent, larger 
than the year 1910. 

In Latin the per cent, of failures was .04 per cent, less than 
the year 1910. 

In French the per cent, of failures was 4.86 per cent, less 
than the year 1910. 

In Commercial Arithmetic the per cent, of failures was 
8.86 per cent, larger than the year 1910. 

The large increase of failures in Commercial Arithmetic 
was due to changing teachers three times during the year. 



Group II. 
Parker School. 
The number of A— pupils was 21 representing a loss of 
1.29 per cent, over last year. 

The number of B — pupils was 120 representing a loss of 
.92 per cent, over last year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



97 



The number of failures was 7 representing a gain of 
8.55 per cent, over last year. 

The general average of the school was 84.30 per cent, in 
1913 and 82.30 per cent, in 1914. 



1910. 


1914. 






















































§• 








M 


a, 












Classes. 


o. 






-o 




3 

o. 






"S 


S 






o 


1 

< 


1 


^ 


2 


^ 


1 

< 


1 


"3 


2 


0, P 


143 


38 


39. 


17 


28 


210 


21 


120 


7 


12 







Chandler, Garrison and Eastman Schools. 

The number of A— pupils was 18, representing a loss of 
2.07 per cent, over last year. 

The number of B — pupils was 86, representing a gain of 
2.11 per cent, over last year. 

The number of pupils leaving school was 12 representing 
a gain of .009 per cent, over last year. 

The number of failures was 24 representing a gain of 
2.84 per cent, overjast year. 

The average scholarship of these schools was 79.36, repre- 
senting a loss of 2.88 per cent, over last year. 



High School, Entire. 

General Averages. 
1913. 1914, 

Garrison School 

Eastman School 

Chandler School 

Parker School 

High School 

General Average 80 . 62 

By Classes. 

M 77.40 

N 82.70 



86.6 


81.40 


77.1 


77.60 


76.5 


79.09 


83.6 


82.30 


79.3 


79.76 



80.03 



74.81 
82.53 



98 



CITY OF CONCOED. 



O. 
P. 

Q. 
E, 

s. 

T. 

U 

V. 



Attendance. 



Whole number attending high school 
(4 years) 

Per cent, of whole number enrolled at- 
tending high school (4 years) 

Whole number attending high school 
(5 years) 

Per cent, of whole number enrolled at- 
tending high school (5 years) 



87.50 


79.12 


81.00 


82.46 


78.20 


77.82 


78.90 


78.52 


72.82 


80.18 


82.09 


81.57 


76.23 


73.37 


81.10 


83.84 


1909-1910. 


1913-1914. 


456 


637 


17.43 


25.79 


641 


857 


24.50 


34.75 



GROWTH OF HIGH SCHOOL (AVERAGE MEMBERSHIP). 





a 


h 

oja 


g'o 
It 

".ad 


Per cent, of en- 
rollment, high 
school, new 
plan. 


Per cent, of en- 
rolhnent, high 
school, old 
plan. 


1913-1914 


2,470 
2,552 
■ 2,544 
2,599 
2,616 

2,958 
2,890 
2,826 
2,844 
2,892 


857 
746 
820 
788 
641 

896 
802 
867 
829 
762 


637 

523 

671 

485 

456 
(Total en- 
rollment) 

823 

566 

615 

573 

496 


34.75 
29.23 
32.23 
30.31 
24.50 

30.29 
27.75 
30.66 
29.14 
26.34 


25.79 


1912-1913 


20.49 


1911-1912 ' 


26.37 


1910-1911 


18.65 


1909-1910 


17.43 


1914 


27.82 


1913 


19.58 


1912 

1911 

1910 


21.76 
20.14 
17.15 



SCHOOL REPORT, 
TABLE SHOWING VARIATIONS IN THE AVERAGE AGE OF PUPILS. 



99 



Grades. 



Year. 


1 
y.m. 


2 
y. m. 


3 

y. m. 


4 
y. m. 


5 
y. m. 


6 
y. m. 


7 
y.m. 


8 
y. m. 


9 
y.m. 


10 
y.m. 


11 
y.m. 


1910 


6.10 

7.6 

7. 

8.2 

7.1 

.3 


8.5 
8.4 
8.3 
9.6 

8.4 

.1* 


9.4 
9.8 
9.7 
11.4 
9.7 

.3 


10.7 
10.9 
10.9 
11.8 
10.11 

.4 


12.6 
11.11 
11.9 
11.5 
11.11 

.7* 


13.6 

13.2 

12.10 

13.10 

12.11 

.7* 


14.3 
14.1 
14.6 
14.6 
14.2 

*.l 


14.6 

15.10 

15.1 

16.1 

14.7 

.1 


15.6 

17.6 

17. 

16.5 

16.4 

.10 


16.6 
17.8 
17.5 
17.5 
17.5 

.11 


17.6 
18.3 
18.8 
18.7 
18.10 

1.4 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 

Increase 



* Decrease. 



PUPILS LEAVING SCHOOL. 



High School — 4 years. 



Entire school. 


No. pupils. 


No. left 
school. 


Per cent, of 
entire en- 
rolhnent. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


1909-1910 

1913-1914 

Senior Class 
1909-1910 


481 
622 

64 
90 

96 
127 

143 
195 

178 
210 


64 
98 

3 

9 

14 

23 
31 

29 
33 


13.30 
15.75 

4.68 
2.22 

9.37 
11.02 

16.08 
15.89 

16.27 
15.71 


2.45 
1.65 




1913-1914 


2.46 

.19 

.56 


Junior Class 

1909-1910 

1913-1914 

Sophomore Class 

1909-1910 

1913-1914 


Freshman Class. . . . 

1909-1910 

1913-1914 





COMPARATIVE TABLE. 



Average cost 

per pupil for 

teachers' 



Average num- 
ber of pupils 
to a teacher. 



High School 

Dewey School 

Garrison School 

Chandler School 

Eastman School 

Rumford School 

Parker School 

Merrimack School 

Harriet P. Dame School 

Kimball School 

Penacook School 

Tahanto School 

Cogswell School 

Franklin School 



39.25 
31.33 
25.83 
22.01 
20.41 
20.34 
19.33 
18.90 
18.58 
18.36 
16.89 
16.56 
16.15 
15.52 



Dewey School 

High School 

Garrison School 

Parker School 

Harriet P. Dame School 

Eastman School 

Rumford School 

Kimball School 

Merrimack School 

Chandler School , 

Penacook School 

Franklin School 

Tahanto School 

Cogswell School 



100 CITY OF CONCORD, 

In a final summing up of the advantages of this plan of 
grading we may say without fear of contradiction that for 
four years it has proved its worth in the following particu- 
lars : 

1. In financial economy 

a. District saved from additional bonds — see state- 

ment at the beginning. 

b. District saved interest on same to the amount of 

statement at the beginning. 

c. Current expense of same. 

d. Receipt of additional tuition. 

e. Parents saved expense of graduation. 

f. Average number of pupils to a teacher no smaller 

— means no additional expense. 

g. Average cost per pupil for teacher salaries less than 

under the former plan. 

2. In scholarship 

a. The freshman class since separation has showed an 

advance in scholarship of 11.21 per cent. 

b. The entire high school shows a gain of 3.92 per cent. 

3. Attendance 

a. The four years high school has shown 10.65 per 

cent, increase in attendance (see table.). 

b. The five years high school has shown 10.25 per cent. 

increase in attendance (see table). 

c. The freshman and sophomore classes have shown a 

decided decrease in the number leaving school (see 
table) . 

It is safe to conclude that this gain is due in a large meas- 
ure to the elimination of one year from the former grading 
system. This may be seen in a decrease in the number 
leaving school during the first two years, in the working of 
the compulsory attendance laws, and from the fact that, 
being compelled to attend the high school, many desire to 
continue the course even after the compulsory Jaws are of 
no effect. The average age of pupils has decreased ten 
months since last year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

Nothing has appeared in the working of the system that 
can be used as a criticism against it. Its mission is being 
realized in about all the ways mentioned in 1910. Wherever 
the junior high school plan is being tried it has come to 
stay if appearances indicate anything. Its application here 
is marked by increasing strength, and a return to the ex- 
pense of the former schemes of grading would probably 
not be tolerated. The points brought forward in its favor 
at its inception were 1. A saving of school time. 2. Com- 
plete utilization of school room. 3. A saving of school 
money. 4. Putting off one year longer social and athletic 
distractions which unfortunately attach themselves to 
high schools. 5. More efficient school work. 

A four-years' trial has seen them realized. 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. J. RuNDLETT, Superintendent. 



102 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Scholarship Table, 
high school. 



School. 


o 


id 
'3. 

3 
P. 


"a 1 


a 


SI 






1 


3 
8 


s 

o 

U 


High 


V 

u 

T 
S 
R 

Q 


72 
18 
74 
53 
104 
91 


6 


7 
5 
7 
4 


8.33 



9.45 

9.43 

6.73 

4.39 


50 

3 

46 

27 
46 
34 


69.44 
16.66 
62.16 
50.94 
44.23 
37.36 



2 
3 

9 
21 



5 
5 
14 
18 
23 



2 
3 
11 
14 
14 


19 


Group I 


10 




8 
15 
10 
17 


Total 




412 


29 


7.03 


206 


50.00 


35 


65 


44 


79 






Palter 


P 



127 
83 


16 
5 


12.59 
6.02 


82 
38 


64.56 
45.78 


3 
4 


23 
10 


9 
3 


17 




8 






Total 




210 


21 


10.00 


120 


57.14 


7 


33 


12 


25 






Chandler 


N 
M 


99 
89 


14 
3 


14.14 
3.37 


46 
31 


46.46 
34.83 


3 
21 


13 
10 


8 
4 














Total 




188 


17 


9.04 


77 


40.95 


24 


23 


12 











N 
M 


10 



1 



10. 



7 



70. 







1 











Group 2 









Total 




10 


1 


10. 


7 


70. 





1 












Fin,«ti"(\" . . . 


N 
M 


6 
5 










1 
1 


16.66 
20. 


























Total 




11 








2 


18.18 


















Grand H. S. Total . . . 




831 


68 


8.18 


412 


49.57 


66 


122 


68 


104 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


140 


13 




74 




11 


5 


1 







K 


103 


9 




31 




15 


9 


3 







J 


160 


13 




56 




19 


5 










1 


96 


2 




21 




22 


6 










H 


157 


14 




66 




28 


9 


1 







G 


80 


2 




17 




15 


4 










F 


118 


7 




45 




22 


5 


1 





• 


K 


107 


2 




31 




9 


4 








Total (Elem.) 




961 


62 


6.44 


341 


35.48 


141 


47 


6 





Grand H.S. and Elem. 






















Total 




1,792 


130 


7.25 


753 


42.02 


207 


169 


74 


104 







Standards. 

General Average of Scholarship 80 per cent. 

Number of A— pupils 10 per cent, of enrollment. 

Number of B — pupils 50 per cent, of enrollment. 

Number of Failures 10 per cent, of enrollment. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent: 

Dear Sir: I submit for your approval my fifth annual 
report. In reviewing the work done during the year, much 
has been accomplished of undisputed value to child and 
parent alike. 

Prevention is the keynote of all public health work and 
toward this end all eiforts are directed. By prevention is 
meant the minimizing of conditions which retard mentally 
and physically the child's development, and produce effects 
which interfere with the school life. 

A school-nurse might well be called a teacher of practical 
hygiene, as work with a child does not end in the school. 
Too much cannot be said in favor of "follow-up" work or 
home visiting, and this is by far the most important and 
far-reaching in its results. In this way one comes in con- 
tact with the conditions which produce and foster disease. 

All defects discovered are reported to parents and they 
are urged to obtain the services of their family physician. 
When there is no such physician, as is frequently the case, 
and circumstances require it, provision for this treatment is 
made. We hope that a medical examiner will be appointed 
whose duty shall be to make a physical examination of 
every child in our city. 

The problem of the retarded child is an alarming one, 
and should receive serious consideration. A list of these 
children is being prepared, and the Binet test will be given 
by an expert before the mental age is decided. 

If a fresh air room could be opened in the Walker school, 
much benefit would be derived and several children now 
out of school by reason of ill-health would be able to re- 
turn. 



104 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Number visits made at schools, 


160 


Number children taken to physicians, dentists, hospitals, for exam- 




ination and treatment, 


140 


Number interviews and conferences with oflBcials and others, 


78 


Number home calls made for : 




Defective vision. 


78 


Defective teeth. 


5 


Enlarged tonsUs and adenoids, 


85 


Pediculosis, 


27 


Scabies, 


8 


Unkempt condition. 


10 


Tuberculosis, 


9 


Mentally retarded. 


6 


Deafness, 


13 


Congenital cataract, 


3 


Discharging ear. 


13 


Skin eruptions. 


5 


Cleft palate. 


1 


Deformity of limbs. 


10 


Tonsilitis, 


2 


Conjunctivitis, 


4 


Aenemic condition. 


15 


Nervous condition. 


5 


Infected foot, 


5 


Rheumatism, 


1 


Chicken pox. 


1 


Whooping cough. 


5 



Total number home calls made, 311 



SCHOOL REPORT. 105 

Health Day was observed in the public schools today, 
addresses being given as follows: 

High School — Mr. Wallace Purington. 

Parker School — Dr. Robert J. Graves. 

Chandler School — Dr. Oscar H. Stanley. 

Rumford School— Dr. Carlton R. Metcalf . 

Kimball School — Dr. Henry H. Amsden. 

Merrimack School — Dr. Loren A. Sanders. 

Penacook School— Miss MoUie Smith, R. N. 

Cogswell School— Miss Ehzabeth M. Murphy, R. N. 

Tahanto School— Miss Ehzabeth M. Murphy, R. N. 

Dewey School — Dr. Marion L. Bugbee. 

Garrison School — Dr. Robert B. Kerr. 

Eastman School — Dr. Fred A. Sprague. 

Harriet P. Dame School — Miss Ehzabeth M. Murphy, R. N. 

I acknowledge with appreciation the cooperation of the 
teachers who have so cordially assisted me in my efforts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH M. MURPHY, R. N. 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THE 
MORRILL SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

In reply to your request I submit the following report of 
the work at the Morrill School for the past year, which has 
been marked by no exceptional changes while on the other 
hand there has been no lack of activity. 
* In the elementary schools, pupils taking Manual Training 
in the afternoon have received two hours per week of in- 
struction since last September. This is an increase of 33 
per cent, in time and has resulted in considerable increase 
in the amount of work accomplished. I have noticed no 
ill effects on the health of the pupils and have received no 
complaints. The amount of stock used has increased in 
the same proportion and will cause an additional cost for 
Manual Training. Two hours a week is little enough time 
to be devoted to this work in the 6th and 7th grades, many 
cities allowing two and one-half and three hours. 

Change in Teachers. 

At the end of the school year 1913-1914 we lost two of 
our teachers. Both had served their time here as student 
assistants and received certificates. Mr. Oesting received 
a good position in the High School of Plainfield, N. J., and 
Mr.! Brock accepted a position in Manchester, N. H. To 
fill the vacancies thus caused, Mr. Julius Wiesmann, a 
practical pattern-maker was employed and Mr. Perley W. 
Ordway was taken in as a student assistant. Mr. Ordway 
graduated from the Concord High School in June, 1913, 
and spent one year doing practical work at the carpenter 
trade. Both are doing very satisfactory work. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 107 

New Work: Dewey Training Class. 

In September the class from the Dewey Trainmg School 
was admitted. This is the first work in Manual Training 
to be done with girls in Concord. They have spent two 
hours a week at the Morrill School. One hour has been 
spent in demonstrating the problems and lectures on the 
history and theory- of Manual Training and the other hour 
has been spent on regular bench work; the girls following 
the regular course as outlined for the K class pupils. A 
few special pieces have been made by those in advance of 
the class. Although this class has had only one-half the 
time in the shop that is given the boys, its members have 
done nearly twice the amount of work of any boys' class 
and the quality is far superior. At present we are taking 
up th"S chapter on Manual Training which appears in Ty- 
ler's book "Growth and Education." This is read aloud 
and discussed. 

Printing Department, 

The printing department has been open to special pupils 
in the afternoon from 1.30-5.00. We have a few boys who 
come here from the elementary schools every afternoon. 
These are the older boys who would gain by this practical 
work, but the bulk of the class consists of boys from the 
Parker and High Schools. At the beginning of the year 
we were greatly handicapped because these boys were all 
beginners but notwithstanding this fact we have done 
more printing this year than ever before in actual impres- 
sions as the attached list will show. We have printed 
122,000 sheets which consisted of 160,000 impressions (some 
work has to be run through the press two or three times) 
while last year 76,000 was our output. There can be no 
question of the value of this department either from a finan- 
cial or an educational standpoint. There are 25 boys en- 
rolled at present from the Parker and High Schools and 
they are doing this work entirely outside of their regular 
school hours simply because they are interested in it. 



108 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Suggestions for Repair Work. 

There are in the elementary schools today quite a num- 
ber of boys who are backward and would be benefited by 
some of the rougher and cruder forms of hand work. Dur- 
ing the fall term we took 12 of these for afternoon work. 
They were carefully examined and graded by the Binet sys- 
tem of measuring intelligence and were given two afternoons 
of woodworking and three of printing a week. While only 
3 showed any ability to do printing all seemed to improve 
in woodworking. 

At present the crowded condition of the school is such 
that we can take these boys only once a week for the regular 
manual training work with the regular classes. Under 
these conditions the teachers cannot do repair work nor 
odd jobs but must" confine themselves more or less to an 
outlined course. 

It would seem that a great many odd jobs and much 
repair work could be done by a man specially employed for 
this purpose. He could have his headquarters at the Morrill 
School; could use the specials for helpers and also the power 
and equipment available here. If a man could be pro- 
cured who was an all-round workman, capable of not only 
doing woodworking but also painting, plumbing, and elec- 
tric wiring he could be kept busy and at the same time 
these boys would get a form of industrial training which 
they could receive in no other way. I believe it would pay 
the District to employ a man for this work. It is to be 
regretted that there is no longer room in the Morrill School 
for an Industrial class. This class was a decided success 
and was discontinued only because of the crowded condi- 
tions of the school and not because of the lack of pupils. 

New Walker School. 
On the completion of the new Walker School the wood- 
working equipment consisting of sixteen benches was re- 
moved from the north basement of the High School to the 
room designed for manual training in the new building. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 109 

This room will accommodate 17 pupils. It is well lighted 
both in the day time and by artificial lights at night. It is 
situated directly at the foot of the stairs leading from an 
outside door which gives easy access without disturbing 
the rest of the school. The floors above are absolutely 
sound-proof and not the slightest noise can be heard in the 
room above. At present it is being used one forenoon and 
three afternoons a week, a. teacher being sent from the 
Morrill School for these periods. The pupils from the 
Walker, Eastman, St. John's and a few from the Garrison 
are accommodated here. 

New Equipment. 

During the past year quite a little new equipment was 
added. In the forge shop four new forges were installed 
making a total of ten, filling the room. In the woodworking 
department six lathes were added making a full equipment. 
In both cases this equipment has been in use and it would 
not have been possible to have given all the pupils the re- 
quired instruction without it. * 

In the machine shop a gas forge and a universal grinder 
were added. The gas forge is a great assistance in this 
department as it saves the instructor leaving his class to 
go to the forge shop to dress tools or oversee the babbitting 
of engines and such work. 

With the grinder we are able to do hardened steel work 
and also grind centers and cutters and other work which 
in the past had to be sent outside. 

The school as a whole, with the exception of the machine 
shop, is now fully equipped and in fine condition. Of course 
small additions will have to be made from time to time but 
with the exception of the department above mentioned 
there need be no great expense for additional equipment for 
some time to come. The equipment in the machine shop 
is very good as far as it goes but lacks two or three of the 
modern types of machines. In order to teach in accordance 
with modern methods of shop practice we should add these 



110 CITY OF CONCORD, 

important machines. The milling machine is one of the 
most useful machine tools used in modern manufacture and 
boys taking the shop practice course should be instructed 
in its use. With it we could do a considerable amount of 
small tool-making and gear-cutting. At present we are 
obliged to have all gear work done outside, thus losing the 
educational value to the pupils. A Hendy Universal Mill- 
ing machine can be bought for $725 while the freight, belt- 
ing, and extra tools would cost about $75, 

There are 43 boys taking machine shop practice at pres- 
ent who would profit by the instruction given on this equip- 
ment. Visitors invariably remark on the completeness of 
every other department in the school and upon the absence 
of this machine. The Berlin High School has a milling 
machine and the Nashua High School is about to purchase 
one. 

Conclusion. 

In conclusion I would say that the past year has been 
one of the brightest I have ever spent at teaching, I have 
not only had the hearty and efficient support of an excellent 
corps of assistants but there has been a feeling of closer rela- 
tion and sympathy with the general teaching force of the 
District, I wish to express my appreciation for the hearty 
support I have received from the Superintendent of Schools 
and also from the principals of the High, Parker, and 
Chandler Schools and the teachers in general. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR W. FRENCH. 
February 17, 1915. 



SCHOOL REPORT. HI 

Report of Printing Done by Classes. 
Feb. 13, 1914— Feb. 12, 1916. 

1,000 Report Card Envelopes. 

864 Prize Speaking Tickets. 

600 Bill Heads for Business Department. 

700 Election Cards. 
2,000 Book Reviews. 
3,000 Discount Memorandums. 
3,500 DeUvery SUps. 

500 Discharge Cards. , 

2,500 Registration Cards. 
1,600 Parker School Luncheon Tickets. 
3,500 Books Read Cards. 
1,200 Hoffman Quartet Programs. 

600 High School Concert Tickets. 

300 Cards for C. H. S. Cadets. 
3,600 Promotion Cards. 
2,500 BiU Folders. 
2,000 Report of Outside Work. 
5,800 Manual Training Reports. 
3,500 Memorial Day Envelopes. 
3,500 Promotion Cards. 
2,000 Letter Heads for High School. 
2,000 Book Record for High School. 
1,450 Invitations to Morrill School Exhibit. 
4,000 Notices Parker School Pageant. 
1,200 Programs for Concord Teachers' Association. 

150 High School Graduation Programs. 
10,300 Parker School Luncheon Tickets. 
10,300 High School Luncheon Tickets. 
12,200 High School Library Tickets. 

100 High School Waiter's Tickets. 
1,000 High School Report Card Envelopes. 
2,000 Elementary School Report Card Envelopes. 

275 High School Field Trip Records. 
1,300 Teachers' Association Tickets. 

90 Binet Record Cards. 
100 Board of Education Post Cards. 
500 Morrill School Labels. 
2,000 Morrill School Registration Cards. 
3,000 Voucher Covers. 

1,500 Concord Teachers' Association Programs. 
1,000 MorriU School Stock Orders. 
1,000 School Census. 



112 CITY OF CONCORD. 

1,500 High School Program Cards. 

600 High School Election Cards. 
1,000 High School Enrollment Cards. 
1,000 Financial Agent Envelopes. 

500 Morrill School Letter Heads. 

500 Morrill School Christmas Booklets. 
1,200 Parker School Parents' Day Programs. 

200 Morrill School Christmas Cards. 

500 Board of Education Letter Heads. 
3,000 Slip No. 1 to Parents. 
1,000 Grammar School Envelopes. 

200 Alphabets. 

100 C. H. S. Graduating Class. 
1,000 Parker School Election Cards. 
5,000 High School Report Card Envelopes. 
3,000 Promotion Cards. 



APPENDIX II. 



05 



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t~ 00 05005 


05 


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05 




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05t--*-*50 


° 






• (diqsjaqmam aSBJaAB no 
pasBq) aauBpua^^B jo -luao jaj 


79.66 

89.82 

77.57 

83.5 

93. 


o> 


05 




•diqsjaqmara aSBjaAy 


24.30 

46. 

35.31 

48.11 

37.07 


05 

o 

05 


o 
■* 

1 

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5.82 

5. 

7.92 

7.92 

2.43 


s 

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05 




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18.48 
41.32 
27.39 
40.19 
34.64 


o 

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■* 




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Oi-HOOO 


'"' 


2 




Whole number of 
different pupils not 
previously regis- 
tered in any other 
school in town dur- 
ing the school year. 


"3 
1 


00(MOi-l(M 
(MO-* CD-* 


CO 


i 

05 




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1 


«t^U5005 


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CO 


00 




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jo BjjasAi ui [ooqas jo qiSnai 


36.6 
36.6 
36.6 
36.4 
36.6 


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in 


CO 
CO 




o 
W 




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i 

a 
a 

C 


p. 


i 

£ 


a 

2c 


a 









SCHOOL REPORT. 



117 



HIGH SCHOOL TABLE. 

Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study, 
First Semester, 1914-1915. 





Group II. 


Group I. 




SUBJECTS. 


Class. 


Class. 


Total 




M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q 

126 


R. 
75 


S. 1 
90 4 


r. u. 


V. 


Post 
Grad. 




English 


154 


71 


155 


77 


3 86 

1 1 

2 10 
29 
8 6 
5 80 






877 


Greek 






2 


Latin 


39 


19 


31 
30 


19 
12 


26 
111 


13 
64 


18 1 
715 
16 






187 


French 






367 


German 


.... 








30 


United States History. 


154 


71 














310 


Ancient History 


86 


48 












134 


EngUsh History 










15 1 


4 1 
1 1 


2 


1 


31 


Medisval and Modern History 










12 


7 


22 








48 


20 


68 


Mathematics, Review 










9 


2 12 




1 


24 


Algebra 




70 


134 


68 






272 


Geometry, Plane 




57 

39 


39 










06 


Arithmetic, Commercial 


















30 


Arithmetic, Common School 


154 


71 






. 










226 


Book-keeping 






50 


31 
34 
34 
31 


29 1 
25 1 
31 1 
29 1 


5 28 
I 24 
t 25 

5 28 






153 


Stenography 














97 


Tjfpewriting 












1 




105 


Penmanship 


154 


71 


48 
48 


20 
20 


50 


446 


OpfiE^p^yi (^nmrnpTfin] 






68 














J 30 

5 2 

12 

29 


4 




37 


Physics 














40 1 
1 . 


60 


Biology 










21 


10 


1 




45 


Economics 










29 


Hygiene 


154 
154 


71 
71 
















225 


SpeUing 


















225 























118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



HIGH SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 





Group II. 


Group I. 




SUBJECTS. 


Class. 


Class 


Total. 




M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


Post 
Grad. 




Mechanic Arts 


73 


28 


47 


26 


17 














191 






15 


6 


2 


3 


< 


26 














12 


12 








4 
47 

21 
21 

22 

22 


4 
21 

11 
9 

10 
10 






1 
6 








9 








17 

14 
14 

14 


12 

15 
15 
15 


17 

14 
14 


4 


1 




125 


Domestic Arts 






75 
















73 




81 
81 


43 

42 


4 
4 


8 
8 






197 








167 








14 






14 














15 










15 












14 












14 


















































195 




123 
154 


52 
71 


155 
4 


75 
5 


3 

67 

1 


3 
60 

1 


3 
85 
3 


5 
62 


6 

59 
2 














752 




1 




47 











SCHOOL REPORT. 



119 



MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 
June 19, 1914. 



SCHOOLS. 



High 

Parker 

Chandler 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Kimball 

Rumford 

Merrimack 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame 

Parochial, St. John's. . . . 
Parochial, St. Mary's. . . 
Parochial, Sacred Heart. 
Industrial Class 



Sewing. 



S 



0JS 



54 
37 
134 
20 
27 
74 
63 
41 
25 
17 
12 
16 
23 
16 
12 

571 



46 
28 
104 
18 
25 
65 
51 
36 
21 
14 
12 
16 
22 
11 
10 

479 



Cooking. 



as 

O 3 



73 

45 

100 

4 

6 



22 
16 
5 

198 






|| 

64 
27 
93 
3 
4 



22 
14 
5 

168 



Mechanic Arts. 









78 
87 
128 
27 
14 
45 
64 
34 



2 
22 

6 
17 
12 

536 





1 
5 
10 

145 






2 
22 

5 
12 

2 

391 



120 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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o 


o 


o 


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- 


^ o 


O O O O "-i o 


o 


CO 




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g 


to 00 


CO CD t^ Ol ■* to 
lO Tj* to lO CO to 


CD 




O 

n 


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no punoj aSe \oorps -o^ 


N 


o ■* 


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•* 


6 § <« 


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■* CO 


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■* 




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- 


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00 


o 


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punoj psiioina }on s^aemx 


n 


«> CO 


CO eq eo e^ N o 


- 


§§ 


CO 

H 

w 

CO 
PQ 


•pntioj }on -0^ 


° 


o o 


o o o o o o 


o 


o 


^ 
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XiqBpiOAOTn asmjaiiio -o^ 


o 


CJ t- 


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2: 


CO 




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siqBun pnB :jDis pnnoj -o^ 




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to O to 1-t OS o 

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c. 


CO .I 


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o> 


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CO 


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CO 


lO CO 


to M N Til 0> •* 


o • 


CO 


o 


P 


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- 


»H CO 


rt « rt •* CO CO 


- 


g 


P^ 


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o> 


CO o 


to o to •* ■* >- 


s 


00 

CO 


> Si 
6 >. 


•spoqas [BiqaojBj 


o 


cq CO 


U3 •»< C<l ■* CO ■«>< 


t^ 


Td 




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t- 


g g 


§ g § g s 3 


to 

CM 






ll 


•siooqas [BiqooJBj 


o 


CO to 


to to CO to lO cc 


00 




O 


•siooqas X^tQ 




to (M 

to •w 


to o "5 e<< o t- 

■* •* to « to u- 


ss 




O 

P5 






H 
Z 
O 
2 


1 


1 

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SCHOOL REPORT. 



121 



STAMP SAVING SYSTEM. 





Saved from 
March 1, 1914, 

to 
March 1, 1915. 


Total amount 

saved since the 

inauguration of 

the system. 


Cogswell School, 


$42.48 


$69.22 


Harriet P. Dame School, 


11.44 


208.55 


Dewey School, 


49.52 


785.19 


Eastman School, 


23.59 


162.86 


Franklin School, 


28.43 


524.17 


Garrison School, 


59.55 


392.46 


Kimball School, 


36.63 


893.50 


Merrimack School, 


11.93 


149.49 


Penacook School, 


98.20 


1,021.56 


Rumford School, 


73.67 


2,403.06 


Walker School, 


2.50 


465.31 


Chandler School, 




106.02 


Tahanto School, 


8.62 


42.09 



$446.56 



$7,223.48 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1914. 



SUMMARY. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Total 



Number of children enumerated 

Decrease since 1913 

Number attending public schools 

Number attending parochial schools 

Number attending private schools 

Number 5 to 16 not attending regularly 

Number 5 to 8 not attending regularly 

Number 8 to 14 not attending regularly 

Number 14 to 16 not attending regularly _. 

Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write the English language correctly. . . 
Moved into the district since 1913 



1,563 



1,253 
295 
IS 
4 
10 
1 
3 
1 
■ 70 



3,271 

8 

2,626 

598 

47 

8 

15 

2 

4 

3 

146 



122 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
NATIVITY OF PARENT. 



American bom 

Foreign born 

New Brunswick 

England 

Russia 

Poland 

Italy 

Sweden 

Roumania 

Ireland 

French Canadian 

Turkey 

Germany 

Norway 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 

Finland 

Scotland 

Albania 

West Indies 

India. 

Armenia 

Greece 

Newfoundland 



1,956 

1.315 

1 

72 

82 

41 

86 

166 

45 

126 

482 

19 

25 

4 

29 

40 

58 

21 

5 

3 

2 

2 

3 

3 



NATIVITY OF CHILD. 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 




1,491 

72 

7 

12 

15 

3 

21 



2 

1 

1 

4 

3 

1 



2 


1,613 

95 

9 

21 

11 

3 

28 
3 

6 
2 
3 
4 

3 
2 


3,104 




167 




16 




33 




26 




6 




49 


Turkey 


3 




2 




7 




3 


Italy 


7 




7 




1 




3 


Finland . . . . 


4 







SCHOOL REPORT. 



123 



SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of town. 



Group I. — High 
School. 

Charles F. Cook 

Charles E. Moors 



Robert S. Baker. 



Charles L. Harris .... 
Walter J. Hutchinson. 



Elizabeth Averill. . . . 
May B. McLam. . . . 

Lilian Yeaton 

Elizabeth S. Sargent. 

Carrie E. Baker 

Mary K. Taylor. . . . 



Carrie A. Hood. 



Mary E. Jenness. 
Marion Buttrick. 



Marian C. Hixson. 
Ruth A. Home. . . 



Abbie M. Sanger. . 
Fannie E. Lincoln. 

Wallor B. Lyman. 

Arthur R. Kaiser. . 

George C. Clarke. . 

Edna L. Hanson. 

Elizabeth Driscoll. 

Marie Merrill 



Group II — Parker 
School. 
Luella A. Dickennan. . . . 



Mabel I. Durivage. . . 
Helen 0. Stephenson. 

Jessie H. Nettleton. . 
Gertrude Stone 



Vivia Stone. 



Kathryn B. White. 
Mary W. Cross . . . 
Julia M. Melifant. , 
Rachel Courser. . . . 



Margaret H. Dickson. 
Harriet R. Blodgett. . 
Ruth A. Home 



Master 

Sub-Master, room 1 . 



Assistant. 



Assistant., 



Principal, room 5. 
Assistant, " 7. 



" 4. 
" 1. 



" 2. 
" 6. 



Clerk. 



Stenography and Typewrit 

ing 

English, French 

English, Domestic Arts . . . 

English 



Latin. 



U. S. History and Civics 

Mathematics and Chemis- 
try 

Book-keeping, Economics, 
Penmanship, Commer- 
cial Law 

Physics, Geometry 

Commercial Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping 



French and German 

History, Greek 

English 

Mathematics, Biology . . . 

French 

EngHsh 



French 

Clerk, Stenographer, Type- 
writer 

Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Resigned at end of winter 

term. 
Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Resigned at end of winter 

term. 
Resigned at end of spring 

term. 



English, Latin, Mathemat- 



English. . . 

Mathematics, Penmanship, 
Latin 

French, English 

Commercial History, An- 
cient History 



Commercial History, An- 
cient History 



English 

Mathematics . 



Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Transferred to high school 

at end of spring term. 



$2,500 
1,600 



1,050 
1,100 

850 

900 
900 
900 
900 
900 
800 



600 
700 
650 



550 
700 



85 Warren St. 
8 Liberty St. 



37 Green St. 

76 Pleasant St. (Detroit, Me.) 

Ill School St. (Waterbury. 

Conn.) 
36 Pine St. 
35 Perley St. 
66^ No. State St. 
101 Centre St. 

1 1 1 School St. (Lancaster,N. H) . 
3| Liberty St. (No. Cambridge, 

Mass.) 

140 Rumford St. 

9 Holt St. (Dover, N. H.) 

197 No. Main St. (Arlington, 

Mass ) 
197 No. Main St. (Sharon, 

Mass.) 
101 Center St. (Manchester, 

N. H.) 
(197 Bow St., Franklin, N. H.) 

R. F. D. No. 3. 



1,300 

850 



700 
550 



500 
650 
450 



64 South St. 

40 No. Spring St. 

40 No. Spring St. (Lowell, Vt.) 
35 Monroe St. (Pembroke.N. H.) 



St. (Springfield, 



46 Jackson 

Vt.) 



46 Jackson St. (Springfield, 

Vt.) 
7 Short St. 
(Franklin, N. H.) 
36 So. State St. 



124 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of town, 



Chandler School. 
Harriet S. Emmons. . . . 



Cora T. Fletcher. 



Mary Flavin 

Elizateth J. Donovan , 
Emma G. Nickerson. . 



Mary C. Caswell . . . 
Elizabeth J. Talpey 



Garrison School. 
Bertha L. Holbrook. . . . 
Florence E. George 



Eastman School. 
Florence E. George. . . . 
Emma G. Nickerson. . . 



Walker School. 
Elizabeth J. Talpey 



Principal, room 1 . 

Assistant, " 1 . 

" 2. 
" 3. 



Clerk. 



Principal, room 5 , 



Principal. 



Principal. . 



Mathematics, Granunar, 
Music 

History, Latin, Mathema- 
tics, Physiology 

English, Latin, History. . . 

Latin, English, Spelling. . . 

English, Physiology, Draw- 
ing, Mathematics. . . 



Transferred to Walker 
School at end of first se- 
mester. 



H. S. Group II M 

Transferred to Eastman 

School at end of first 

semester. 



H. S. Group II M, N 

Transferred to Chandler 

School at end of first 

semester. 



H. S. Group II M,N. 



$800 

800 
800 
800 
650 

400 



800 



800 



6 So. State St. 



41 School St. (Lawrence, M»a».) 

58 School St. 

28 Thorndike St. 

58 School St. (Gloucester, M»ai.; 

121 Warren St. 



542 No. State St., West Concord 



9 Gladstone St. 



41 Warren St. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 

Elizabeth J. Talpey 

Elisabeth R. Elkins 

Viola J. Brock 

Grace L. Putnam 

Eva H.Tandy 

M. Gertrude Doherty . 
Alice M. M. Phaneuf. 

Sara E. McClure 

Agnes V. Sullivan. 
Margaret Morrill. 
Margaret T. Kelley. 



Garrison School, 

Bertha L. Holbrook 

Flossie L. Saltmarsh. . . 
May B. Thompson . . . . 

A. Ruth Kelley 

Louisa Herbert 

Margaret T. Lynch. . . . 

lyla Chambcrlin 

Maude B. Binet 



Eastman School. 

Florence E. George 

Annie E. Saltmarsh. . . . 

Stella M. French 

Elizabeth T. Nash 




Emma G. Nickerson. 



Principal, 

Assistant 



Principal, room 1 
Assistant, " 2. 
" 4. 



High School 

I, J, K, L, M, N . . 

K, L 

I, J 

G,H 

E, F 

C,D 

A, B 

Kindergarten and primary 

Kindergarten 

Resigned during second 
semester. 



ss L 

Classes J, K 

' H.I 

' E, F 

' CD 

' A, B 

Kindergarten and Primary 
Kindergarten 



ssK 

Classes 4, 5 

' 1,2,3 

Resigned at end of spring 

term. 

Transferred to Chandler 
School at end of first 
semester. 



650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
450 



650 
550 
400 
650 
650 
600 
650 
425 



800 
500 
650 



41 Warren St. 
24 Union St. 
99 No. State St. 
13 Carter St. 
66 High St. 
145 No. State St. 
90 Rumford St. 
1 1 Cummings Ave. 
49 Lyndon St. 
123 No. State St. 



542 No. State St., West Concord, 

11 Chestnut St. 

74 Allison St. 

4 Harrod St. 

3 Rollins St. 

446 No State St., West Concord. 

2 View St., West Concord. 

246 No. Main St. 



9 Gladstone St. 

2 Rollins St. 

East Concord, Route 6. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



125 



SCHOOL TABhE.—Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of town. 



Kimball School. 

Mary E. Melifant 

Edna M. Kennedy 



Mary A. McGuire 

Harriet L. Megrath. . . 
Mary A. Coughlin. . . . 
Margaret A. Donovan. 

Lottie E. Pearson 

Mary Fernald 

Myrta B. Lowe 

Harriet C. Kimball 

Grace B. Knowlton. . . 



Principal, room 6 , 
Assistant, " 5 . 



Special teacher. 



Margaret T. Kelley 

RuMPORD School. 

Jessie N. Stimson 

Anna M. Keenan 



Mabel F. Lane 

Annette Prescott 

AbbieT. McDonald.. 
Fannie B. Lothrop. . . 
Gara E. McQueston. . 
Katharine L. Remick. 
Nellie T. Halloran. . . . 
Elizabeth M. McAfee. 



Principal, room 8 . 

Assistant, " 7. 

" 6. 

" 4. 

" 3. 

" 2. 

" 1. 

" 5. 

" 5. 



Merrimack School. 

Discontinued at end of first 

semester. 

Viola J. Brock 

Margaret T. Kelley 

Alice M. M. Phaneuf. . . . 

Agnes V. Sullivan 

Margaret Morrill 

Harriet 0. Kimball 



Principal, room 3 , 
Assistant, " 4. 

" 2. 

" 1. 

" 1. 



Penacook School. 

Annie M. Branon 

Clara E. Flanders 

Ada B. Martin 

Cecilia P. Jones 

Harriet L. Megrath 



Principal, room 4 , 
Assistant, " 3. 

" 2. 

" 1. 



Dewey School. 

AddieF. Straw 

Helen L. Southgate. . . . 

Susan M. Little 

Anna D. Shaw 

Alice M. Sargent 

Belle E. Shepard 

Helen L. Gibbs 



Principal, room 6 . 
Assistant, room 1 . 

5. 

4. 

2. 

2. 

1. 



Class L — Language 

K — Geography and 

History ._. . . 

Classes I, J — Arithmetic. . 

" G, H 

" E, F 

" C, D 

" A,B 

Kindergarten and Primary 
Kindergarten 



Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Transferred to Merrimack 

School. 



Class L — ^Arithmetic 

" K — Geography, His- 
tory 

Classes I, J — Language.. . . 

' G, H 

' E, F 

' CD 

' A,B 

Kindergarten and Primary 
Kindergarten and Primary 
Special teacher 



Classes K, L 

' J, K 

' A, B, C 

Kindergarten and Primary 

Kindergarten 

Transferred to Kimball 
School at end of spring 
term. 



Classes I, J 

' G,H 

' E, F 

' A, B.C.... 

Transferred to Kimball 
School at end of spring 
term. 



Training teacher 

Supervisor of Kindergarten 
Classes H, I 

' E,F 

' CD 

' A, B 

Kindergarten 



S650 

650 
650 
650 
450 
650 
650 
650 
450 
500 



650 

650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
500 



650 
650 
650 
650 
450 



650 
650 
500 
650 



1,000 
700 
650 
650 
650 
650 
400 



36 So. State St. 

10 Blanchard St. 
77 So. State St. 
(Hooksett, N. H.) 
22 Albin St. 
84 Centre St. 
52 Beacon St. 
9 Tahanto St. 
60 No. Spring St. 
Hopkinton Road. 



9 Holt St. 

(93 High St., Penacook, N. H.) 

105 No. State St. 

25 Green St. 

17 Essex St.. 

32 Perley St. (Bristol, N. H.) 

9 Wall St. 

4 Fayette St. 

30 Perley St. 

57 Pleasant St. 



99 North State St. 
12 Perley St. 
99 Rumford St. 
49 Lvndon St. 
123 No. State St. 



55 Thomdike St. 
51 South St. 
27 Warren St. 
75 South St. 



101 No. State St. 

2 So. Spring St. 
90 School St. 
72 School St. 
78 Warren St. 
36 Pine St. 

3 Liberty St. 



TRAINING CLASSES. 

SENIORS. 

(Gradvatei June, 191B.) 

Marion F. Callahan 14 Beacon St. 

Margaret A. Fanning 8O2 South State St. 

Beatrice C Lapierre 36 Merrimack St. 

Lillian M. Phaneuf 90 Rumford St. 

JUNIORS. 

(Graduates June, 1916.) 

Margaret L. Haynea 40 Beacon St. 

Ida A. Otaey 82 School St. (Claremont, N. H.). 

Frances M. Twomey 23 Forrest St. 



126 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of Town 



Franklin School. 

Abbie A. Donovan 

Minnie E. Ladd 

M. Gertrude Doherty . . . 

Mabel Clark 

Marion E. Haynes 



M. Gertrude Doherty , 



Principal, room 3 . 
Assistant, " 4. 

" 2. 

" 1. 



Harriet P. Dame School. 

Nettie M. Bowen 

Mary T. Gannon 

Helen K. Hallinan 

Hannah E. O'Brien 

Mabel Clark 



Classes H, I 

" F, G 

" D, E 

" A, B, C 

Resigned at end of winter 

term. 
Transferred to Walker 

School at end of first 

semester. 



Principal, room 3 
" 4. 

Assistant, " 1. 
" 2. 



Annie E. Saltmarsh. 



Tahanto School. 

Discontinued at end of first 

semester. 

Sara E. McClure 

Eva H.Tandy 



Principal, room 2 
Assistant, " 1. 



J, K, L 

" 3,4 

" 1 

" 1,2 

Transferred to Franklin 
School at end of winter 
term. 

Transferred to Eastman 
School at end of spring 
term. 



Classes A, B 

" C, D, E. 



Cogswell School. 

Mildred I. Cilley 

Eleanor B. Kelley 



Principal, room 1 , 
Assistant, " 2. 



Classes A, B . 
" CD. 



Morrill School. 
Arthur W. French 



Raymond P. Oilman. 
C. Ellsworth Taylor. . 



Charles P. Nash. 



Master, room 6 . 

Assistant, " 1. 
" 4. 



Photography, supervision 

and lectures 

Machine shop practice. . . . 
Drawing 



Julius Wiesman. 



Wood-work, joining, forg- 
ing, care of machinery. . 

Pattern-making, elemen- 
tary wood-carving 



Rolland R. Gove. 



Per ley W. Ordway. 
Henry F. Ocsting. . 
Arthur T. Brock. . , 



" 6, 3. 



Student, Assistant. .2,3 



Sewing. 
(Parker School.) 

Louise C. Howe 

M. Hortense Berry.. . . 
M. Emma Parsons. . . . 
F.Mildred Phillips.... 



Cooking. 
Marion J. Roby. . . 



Principal, room 3 . 
Assistant, " 3. 

'• 3. 

" 3. 



Wood-work, joining, print- 
ing (Student and Assis 
tant) 

Wood-working, wood-turn- 
ing 

Resigned at end of spring 
term. 

Resigned at end of spring 
term. 



Sewing, Dress-making . . . 
Millinery 



Principal. 



Marion B. Adams. 



Drawing. 
Edith C. Stalker. . . . 



High School Classes M, N, 
0, P 

Resigned at end of spring 
term. 



Mary A. Jones. 



Music. 
Charles S. Conant. 



Director. . 
Assistant. 



Military Drill. 
George W. Morrill 



Director. . 
Instructor. 



$650 
650 

65C 
500 



650 
500 
500 
400 



84 Centre St. 
72 Washington St. 
145 No. State St. 
126 Warren St. 



(29 Center St., Penacook, N.H. 

7 So. Spring St. 
281 Pleasant St. 
60 Franklin St. 



650 
650 



650 
650 



1,800 

1,050 

900 



950 



475 
380 



650 
500 
450 
300 



900 
700 

1,300 

100 



11 Cummings Ave. 
66 High St. 



3 South St. (Dunbarton, N. H. 
60 So. Main St. 



12 So. Spring St. 
10 Maple St. 

20 Pine St. (No. Hanovei 
Mass.) 

(21 Clarke St. West Concord 

N.H.) 

93 Warren St. (West Roxburj 
Mass.) 



38 Monroe St. 

3 Jackson St. (Loudon, N. H. 



167 No. Main St. 
32 So. Spring St. 
S8 No. State St. 
148 Rumford St. 



9 Merrimack St. 



26 Center St. (Worcestei 

Mass.) 
(152 No. Main St., Penacook 

N.H.) 

61 School St. 
78 Franklin St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



127 



^"""^'reaS"*^' ^°*^ Position and room. Grades and^subjecta 


Salary 
per 
year. 


Residence. ( ) Out of town. 


Janitors. 
Albert W. Thompson 






$780 
546 
780 
650 
650 
676 
676 
650 
624 

300 
300 

228 


74 Allison St. 








16 Gladstone St. 








5 Chapel St. 




Kimball 




6 Avon St. 


Oland M. Blodgett 






3 So. Main St. 




Walker 




7 Maple St. 








Route 6, Plains. 


Frank L. Dudley 


Penacook and Cogswell. 




20 Dakin St. 






(4 Highland Road, West Con- 








cord, N. H.) 
(Route 5, East Concord, N. H.) 








5 Chapel St. 


Mrs. H. D. Robinson 


Harriet P. Dame 




Route 6, Plains. 






Resigned at end of spring 
term. 











128 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





Kind'n. 


ELEMENTARY 


YEAR. 




1 


2 


Clam. 


1 and 2. 


A. 


B. 


0. 


D. 




P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 






















Parker 














































21 


2 


10 
7 

12 
6 
8 
9 
8 
6 
12 
13 
11 


4 
2 
5 
2 
1 
1 
3 
6 
13 
5 
8 


14 


4 


8 
10 
9 
10 
6 
8 
8 
8 


3 
2 
5 
4 

1 
1 
9 
1 


14 


2 








46 
37 

48 




1 



20 
26 
13 
,10 
15 
14 
9 
11 
13 


4 
4 
1 
3 
6 
2 

3 
3 


19 
17 


1 


Kimball 


1 


















18 
16 
11 
11 
18 


8 




38 








H. P. Dame 











11 
14 


2 
5 






















Total 


190 


3 


102 


50 


145 


30 


92 


33 


124 


12 
















98-44 


67.10 


94.21 


73.60 


91.17 

























AVERAGE AGE 



High 












Parker 


























5yr. 


7 m. 


7yr. 

7 
7 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 


2 m. 

4 



2 
11 
11 

4 
10 

2 
10 

9 


7yT. 


6 m. 


7yr. 

8 

8 

8 

8 

7 

7 

8 


11m. 
2 
3 


2 
9 
7 

8 


9yr. 


4 m. 








5 
5 
5 


10 
1 
4 


7 
9 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 


1 

4 

2 



1 

11 

11 

4 

10 


8 

S 


9 


Kimball 


1 










Franklin 




8 
8 
8 
9 
8 . 


6 




5 


1 


11 


H. P. Dame 


f. 


Tahanto 




7 
8 


11 


3 
















5- 


4 


6 


11 


7 


7 


8 





8 


7 







SCHOOL REPORT, 



129 



THE GRADES— JUNE 1914. 



SCHOOLS. 



3 


4 


5 


6 


E. 


F, 


G. 


H. 


I. J. 


K. L. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


M.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


































































































n 


3 
1 

1 



13 


2 






10 
11 

22 
20 


5 

1 
2 
5 


5 





18 
13 
18 
20 
15 
20 


4 
4 
5 
4 
2 







18 
13 
30 
35 

20 





13 













23 
10 


18 
21 


2 
6 


19 
17 


3 
3 


19 
15 


4 
4 


28 
29 
31 


8 
5 
2 


2 
7 
2 


17 


1 

2 


17 
17 
16 
9 


4 
5 

1 
2 


13 
15 


4 
6 


12 
17 
22 
14 


5 

4 
3 

4 


10 

18 
8 


9 
2 
2 




13 












18 
19 


6 























11 





10 


1 














































































98 


9 


111 


22 


64 


16 


128 


29 


75 


21 


141 


19 


88 


15 


127 


11 


91.58 


83.45 


91.42 


81.52 


78.12 


88.12 


85.43 


92.02 



PER CLASS. 



















































10yr.3m. 


11 yr. 3in. 




10 yr. 2 m. 


iiyr. 8 m. 


11 yr. 9 m. 




13 yr. 2 m. 
13 2 


9 




9 4 
9 1 


9 9 
10 5 


10 yr. 9 m. 

11 7 


10 10 

12 7 


12 6 
12 2 


12 5 

11 11 

12 11 
12 4 


12 yr. Urn. 
12 2 
12 6 


12 6 
12 9 
12 9 


9 


10 3 
9 11 
9 5 

10 5 


10 2 
10 11 


11 5 
11 3 
9 9 
U 11 


11 5 

11 1 

12 9 




9 5 








11 7 

12 11 












13 9 


9 1 








































9 3 


10 2 


10 10 


11 1 


11 11 


12 3 


12 6 


13 



130 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





HIGH 


YEAR. 


7 


8 


Class. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 




P. 


N.P. 


P- 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 




























79 


4 


123 


4 




68 


21 


96 
10 
6 


3 


















5 























Kimball 


























































































H. P. Dame 








































































Total 


73 


21 


112 


3 


79 


4 


123 


4 














77 fi.'i 


97 39 


^HAS 


96.8.'5 





















AVERAGE AGE 



High 










Parker 






14 yr. 6 m. 


14 yr. 


8m 




14 yr. 


4 m. 


13yr. 10 m. 

13 7 

14 4 












14 


11 












Kimball 












, 






































H. P. Dame. 










Tahanto. . 
































4 


7 


13 11 


14 6 


14 


8 







SCHOOL REPORT. 



131 



THE GRADES— JUNE 19U.— Concluded. 



SCHOOL. 


9 


10 


11 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. N. P. 

1 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


70 


21 


95 


9 


53 





71 


3 


9 


2 


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70 


21 


95 


9 


53 





71 


3 


9 


2 


79 





76.92 


91.34 


100.00 


95.94 


81.81 


100.00 


PER CLA^S.— Concluded. 


16 yr. 2 m. 


16 yr. 7 m. 


16 yr. 11m. 


17 yr. 8 m. 


18 yr. 11m. 


18 jT. 7 m. 
































































































































































16 2 


16 7 


16 11 


17 8 


18 11 


18 7 



132 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, AT HIGH SCHOOL HALL 

Thursday Evening, March 18, 1915 

AT EIGHT o'clock. 

PROGRAM. 
ORIGINAL DECLAMATION, HIGH SCHOOL, GROUPS i and 2. 

Overture— "The Cavalier" Rollinson 

CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 

1. Traitors 

FLORENCE MARION CHENEY, GrOUp 1 

2. Universal Peace 

DENIS TIMOTHY SULLIVAN, GrOUp 1 

3. Belgium, the Past and the Present 

CHESTER LINWOOD LANE, GrOUp 1 

4. The Boy of Today 

HASKELL HIEMAN COHN, GrOUp 2 

March— "On, Gallant Company" Becker 

CHORUS 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION, HIGH SCHOOL, GROUP 2. 

1. "A Message to Garcia" Hubbard 

RICHARD ABBOTT HENRY, GARRISON SCHOOL 

2. "The Dawn of Peace" Tuck 

PAUL LLOYD BAILEY, CHANDLER SCHOOL 

3. "The Character of Webster" Bayard 

RAYMOND JONES CHANDLER, EASTMAN SCHOOL 

Waltz— "Nightingale and Rose" Lehnert 

CHORUS 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION, HIGH SCHOOL, GROUP 2. 

1. "Penelope's Christmas Dance" Cloud 

GLADYS LEILA CURRIER, CHANDLER SCHOOL 

2. "Mice at Play" Forrest 

EVELYN DALTON MCALPINE, EASTMAN SCHOOL 



SCHOOL REPORT. 135 

3. "The Pebble and the Acorn" Gould 

JEANNETTE BELLE RYAN, GARRISON SCHOOL 

Selection — "Evening Chimes" RoUinson 

CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 

AWARD OF PRIZES. 

Original Declamation — High School, groups 1 and 2. 

First Prize, $15, awarded to Haskell Hieman Cohn, '18. 

Second Prize, $10, awarded to Denis Timothy Sullivan, '15. 
Forensic Declamation — 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Paul Lloyd Bailey, Chandler School. 

Second Prize, $4, awarded to Richard Abbott Henry, Garrison 
School. 
Miscellaneous Declamation — 

First Prize, $G, awarded to Evelyn Dalton McAlpine, Eastman 
School. 

Second Prize, $4, awarded to Gladys Leila Currier, .Chandler School. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Hon. Edwin C. Bean, Belmont, N. H. 
Hon. George I. Haselton, Manchester, N. H. 
Hon. Alvin J. Lucier, Nashua, N. H. 

PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 

RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year's account, $2,805 . 40 

Interest on same to January 1, 1915, 108.45 

Sale of 329 tickets at 35 cents, 115.15 



5,029.00 



EXPENDED. 



Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services, $50.00 

Programs, 4 . 35 

Prizes, including books, 47 . 50 

Miscellaneous expenses, judges, selling and taking tickets, etc., 10 . 15 
English Composition Prizes and expense, 63.00 

Cash on hand as a guaranty fund for future contests, 2,854.00 

$3,029.00 



FIRE-DRILLS. 



Kimball School. 

Dec. 16. 80 seconds. March 4. 75 seconds. 

Feb. 20. 75 seconds. May 19. 70 seconds. 

Feb. 26. 75 seconds. June 9. 70 seconds. 

Franklin School. 

Oct. 29. 50 seconds. March 17. 45 seconds. 

Nov. 18. 47 seconds. May 14. 50 seconds. 

March 4. 50 seconds. June 18. 50 seconds. 
March 13. 45 seconds. 



Oct. 
Dec. 



Garrison School. 
22. 55 seconds. April 

5. 58 seconds. May 



March 5. 50 seconds. 



June 



14. 55 seconds. 

7. 60 seconds. 

10. 50 seconds. 



Harriet P. 
Nov. 19. 29 seconds. 
Dec. 17. 25 seconds. 
March 12. 30 seconds. 



Dame School. 
May 
June 
June 



7. 30 seconds. 

1. 29 seconds. 

18. 25 seconds. 



RuMFORD School. 
Nov. 4. 70 seconds. March 

Dec. 18. 70 seconds. May 

Feb. 19. 73 seconds. June 



2. 70 seconds. 
6. 65 seconds. 
1. 65 seconds. 



Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov. 



Cogswell School. 
6. 30 seconds. April 

April 



27. 30 seconds. 
6. 26 seconds. 



June 



6. 25 seconds. 

23. 24 seconds. 

1. 23 seconds. 



Chandler School. 
Sept. 26. 50 seconds. Feb. 

Oct. 8. 45 seconds. May 

Nov. 10. 45 seconds. May 

Nov. 25. 50 seconds. June 

Dec. 17. 35 seconds. 



19. 45 seconds. 

11. 45 seconds. 

19. 50 seconds. 

3. 40 seconds. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



137 



Eastman School. 



Oct. 


22. 


30 seconds. March 


12. 


28 seconds. 


Dec. 


17. 


30 seconds. April 


15. 


27 seconds. 


Feb. 


24. 


30 seconds. June 
Dewey School. 


8. 


25 seconds. 


Nov. 


11. 


50 seconds. March 


9. 


50 seconds. 


Dec. 


9. 


55 seconds. April 


23. 


65 seconds. 


Feb. 


19. 


55 seconds. May 
Tahanto School. 


22. 


50 seconds. 


Nov. 


25. 


45 seconds. May 


4. 


32 seconds. 


Dec. 


17. 


25 seconds. . . May 


22. 


28 seconds. 


March 


. 10. 


20 seconds. June 
Penacook School. 


11. 


25 seconds. 


Oct. 


8. 


29 seconds. April 


14. 


32 seconds. 


Nov. 


14. 


26 seconds. May 


15. 


28 seconds. 


April 


3. 


38 seconds. June 
Merrimack School. 


19. 


27 seconds. 


Oct. 


23. 


50 seconds. March 


10. 


42 seconds, 


Dec. 


17. 


47 seconds. May 


21. 


40 seconds. 


Feb. 


3. 


45 seconds. June 


11. 


44 seconds. 



Parker School. 



Nov. 3. 55 seconds. 
Dec. 15. 52 seconds. 
Feb. 17. 55 seconds. 



March 

April 

May 



11. 55 seconds. 
28. 53 seconds, 
19. 55 seconds. 



High School. 



Oct. 23, 1913 
Nov. 7, 1913 
Feb. 26, 1914 
Mar. 20, 1914 
Apr. 3, 1914 
May 7, 1914 



10.30 a. m. 
10.02 a. m. 
10.57 a. m. 

10.31 a. m. 
9 a. m. 

10.35 a. m. 



62 sec. 
83 sec. 
74 sec. 
64 sec. 
70 sec. 
68 sec. 



All doors open. 
North door closed. 
All doors open. 
All doors open. 
All doors open. 
Front door closed. 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GRADUATING CLASSES OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 
June 19, 1914. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Edmund Chancey Adams, Academic. 

Arthur Julius Anderson, Mechanic Arts. 

Ethel Harriet Andrews, Academic. 

Bryan Woodward Barker, Academic. 

Justin Fred Barnard, Classical. 

Helen Ray Bartholomew, Academic. 

Sydney Wentworth Beauclerk, Academic. 

Harlan Frederic Besse, Academic. 

Horton Lloyd Chandler, Classical. 

Esther Cheney, Academic. 

Willoughby Amos Colby, Classical. 

Mary Rose Conroy, Classical. 

Katherine Eleanor Coughlin, Commercial. 

Mira Wellman Crowell, Academic. 

Robert Brooks Day, Academic. 

Harold Moore Dearborn, Commercial. 

Paul Royal Donovan, Classical. 

Eva Emma Eastman, Classical. 

Harold Lowell Eastman, Mechanic Arts, 

T)rra Evalda Engstrom, Commercial. 

Rene Joseph A. Feltault, Academic. 

Nicholas Engel Fisher, Academic. 

Heman Charles Fogg, Mechanic Arts. 

Leslie Ernest Frost, Mechanic Arts. 

Frieda Florence Goldberg, Academic. 

Esther Emma Green, Academic. 

Edith Florence Hammond, Commercial. 

Margaret Louise Haynes, Academic. 

Earl George Heath, Academic. 

Marjorie Clark Hill, Commercial. 

Pauline Helen Hill, Academic. 

Mildred Mary Hodgman, Commercial. 

Katherine Howard Hurd, Classical. 

Harold Johnson, Mechanic Arts. 

Elizabeth Ann Johnston, Commercial. 

Elsie Frances Kendall, Classical. 

Frances Margaret Kenney, Commercial. 

Richard Hazen Kimball, Classical. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



139 



Donald Knowlton, 
Helen Louise Lunt, 
Helen Esther Mannion, 
Edith Frances Marden, 
William Augustas Megrath, 
Donald Osmond McLeod, 
Martha Etta Monroe, 
Agnes Virginia Murphy, 
Elizabeth Helen Murphy, 
Nina Blanche Nash, 
Gertrude Elizabeth Nolan, 
Frances Elizabeth O'Brien, 
Flossie Evelyn Plummer, 
Gertrude Margaret Pollard, 
Naomi Mary Quinn, 
Hannah Catherine Reardon, 
John Joseph Reardon, 
Hortense Chandler Sanborn, 
Doris Hannah Roberts, 
Wendell Kirk Scott, 
Katheryn Canfield Scully, 
Kathleen Elizabeth Scully, 
Clara Urling Sewall, 
Esther Jane Shattuck, 
Marion Devereux Shepard, 
Maude Shirley Sims, 
Clarence Wilson Sleeper, 
Helena Frances Spain, 
Mabel LiUian Stevens, 
Harry Walter Strandquist, 
Evelyn Agnes Symonds, 
Christie Evelyn Tabor, 
Gertrude Dunbar Trask, 
Frances Mary Twomey, 
Ethel May Walker, 
Annie Ehzabeth Watkins, 
Vivian May Wiggin, 
Karl Leland Wildes, 
Doris May Williamson, 
John Brainerd Wilson, Jr., 
Mildred Marion Morgan, 



Academic. 

Academic. 

Commercial. 

Academic. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Classical. 

Commercial. 

Classical. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Academic. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Academic. 

Commercial 

Mechanic Arts. 

Academic. 

Classical. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Classical. 

Academic. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Academic. 

Classical. 

Commercial. 

Academic. 

Academic. 

Commercial. 

Classical. 

Academic. 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



CHANDLER 
Ruth Stanley Bateman. 
Myrtle Bell Beaulac. 
Lillian Elsie Berry 
Irene Rose Bonehill. 
Jeannine Lena Bourke. 
Paul Harriott Burroughs. 
Mildred Christina Byers. 
Alice Viola Carlson. 
Bertha Eleanor Carpenter. 
Marjorie May Carter. 
Marion Elizabeth Cass. 
Lloyd Manley Chamberlin. 
Mary Ellen Emma Champagne. 
Ruth Evelyn Chase. 
Chadwick Connell. 
Arthiu: Lemuel Copp. 
Vema Idalene Corser. 
Phihp Cote. 
Irving Henry Cox. 
Lihan Russell Davison, 
WiUiam Walter DuemUng. 
Leslie Arthur ElUs. 
Majel EHzabeth Evans. 
Harley Joseph Ford. 
Edgar Joseph Foy. 
Rachel Rosetta George. 
Dorothy Ada Gross. 
Judith Elenora Hammar. 
Laurence Hammond. 
Henry WiUiam Hansen. 
Frank Crockett Jameson. 
Emma Clara Jones. 
Mary Dorothy Kendall. 
Rupert Vernon LaBelle. 
Pauline McLane. 
Anna Mary Ceciha Leary. 



SCHOOL. 

Harold Edward Lovejoy. 
Marcia Gertrude Engabor Madisen. 
Margaret Genevieve Mannion. 
Sylvia Ahce McLaughhn. 
Paysen Studley Minor. 
Helen Almina Morgan. 
Annie Dorothy Morono. 
Charles Fred Moulton. 
Ida Lucille Nelson. 
Harry S. Jameson. 
Ethel May Nudd. 
Robert David O'Brien. 
Florence Evelyn Osgood. 
Francis James Patterson. 
John Leonard Peckham. 
Oren Stanley Peters. 
Mary Charlene Laura Pettingill. 
Laura Dorothy PhiUips. 
Eunice Evelyn Quinn. 
Gertrude Ravitch. 
Edwin Robinson. 
Charles Ernest Roche. 
Lily Elinor Rowland. 
Lois Rundlett. 
Cora Anna Mary Shepard. 
Rowland H. Douglass. 
Howard C. Yeadon. 
Mary Agnes Catherine Smith. 
Harry Albert Snell. 
Herbert Joseph Stevens. 
Estella Ruth Stone. 
Walter Henry Thomas. 
Frances Louise Wason. 
Clara Ruth West. 
Frances Ivan Wood. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

Clara Agnes Blanchard. Gladys Ellen Marcotte. 

Lawrence Howard Gardner. Frank Irving White. 
Mildred Sarah Haselton. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



141 



January 29, 1915. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Carlton JMuzzy Davis, 
Agnes Helen Donovan, 
Sidella Grace Fish, 
Charles Harold Fournier, 
Harvey Fletcher JoneSj 
Mary Teresa Reen, 
Ruth Agnes Shugrue, 



Academic. 

Academic. 

Academic. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



Mildred Smith Abbott. 
Harriett Isabella Albee. 
Harry Anderson. 
Paul Lloyd Bailey. 
Carrie Ella Baker. 
Elizabeth Benton. 
NeUie Bridget Blanchette. 
George Louis Boulay. 
Webster Easterbrook Bridges. 
Aubrey Myrle BrowTi. 
Edith Harriett Brown. 
Martha Phyllis Carpenter. 
Lawton Brown Chandler. 
EUsworth Whalen Cherry. 
George Carroll Cilley. 
George Fred Clark. 
Dean Richardson Colton. 
Vema Idalene Corser. 
Emile Joseph Cote. 
Gladys Leila Currier. 
D6sir6 Albert Denoncourt. 
Josephine Dufraine. 
Josiah Gray Estes. 
Amelia Frances Fanny. 
Myra Bell Flanders. 
Albert FarreU Fhnt. 



Iva LueUa Freeto. 
Croghan George Gault. 
Simeon Goldman. 
Eva Alice Hadley. 
Edgar Stephen Hammond. 
WilUam James Hargen. 
Kathleen Edna Heath. 
Herbert Robinson Hill. 
Robert Leslie Hill. 
Clarence Henry HoUand. 
Martin Eugene Hyland. 
Sarah Florence Jewell. 
Edgar Griffin Jewett. 
Amy Frances Kaime. 
Doris Mae Kennedy. 
Joseph Alphonse King. 
Ruth Aremine Leavitt. 
George Arthur Led ward. 
Clarence Edward Locke. 
Ruth Lyford. 
Merle Herbert Mann. 
Bertha Leona Marston. 
Caleb Joseph Marston. 
Inza Pearl Mitchell. 
Raymond Dodge Moore. 
Helen Irene Morrison. 



142 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



John Ordway Morton. 
John Patrick Murphy. 
Edythe Mae Nevers. 
Annie Hilda Nordine. 
Jennie Gertrude Nute. 
WilUam Arthur Odey. 
Margaret Lillian Osgood. 
Mary Arlene Otis. 
Field Clifton Perry. 
Madeline Beth Potter. 
Robert William Potter. 
Arvilla Edna Powell. 
Ruth Eleanor Quinn. 
Raymon Gladstone Reed. 
Howard Bradford Richardson. 
Ruth Robinson. 
Doris Constance Sabin. 
Eric Martin Sandquist. 
Leona Sophia Savoy. 
Harold Lyman Schofield. 
Marion Elizabeth Shaw. 
Jean Wilson Shepard. 
Beatrice Lockwood Shreve. 



Elisabeth Steams. 
George Hohnes Stearns. 
Marion Louise Struthers. 
Gertrude Annie Tippet. 
Herbert James Tittemore. 
Rose Trudell. 
Madeline Virginia Vose. 
Blanche EUzabeth Walker. 
Mary Parsons Walker. 
Margaret Hilda Wall. 
Helen FolHssa Wall 
Elsie May Ellen Wallace. 
Harry Emil Wester 
Hazel Irene White. 
Dorothea Alberta Wilcox. 
Leamon Albert Willard. 
Milton Francis Willard. 
Annie Eleanor Wilson. 
Ahce Evadna Wilson. 
Charles Norman Winslow. 
Harold Gates Winslow. 
Mary Ahce Wood. 



GARRISON 



Elmer W. Anderson. 
Valborg E. I. Anderson. 
Eric J. Carlson. 
Bertha E. Danforth. 
Richard A. Henry. 
Edgar H. Larson. 
Carl O. Lindstrom. 
Alice E. Matheson. 



SCHOOL. 
Edwin A. Peterson. 
Henry Randall. 
Arthur A. Roberts. 
Bertil C. Rossell. 
Jeannette B. Rj'an. 
Lily E. Silver. 
Roger C. Tyler. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

Harold Arthur Gate. Dorothy Evelyn Maynaxd. 

Raymond Jones Chandler. Evelyn Dalton Mc Alpine. 

Doris Hazel Chamberlin. Evelyn Mildred McManis. 

Elizabeth Elodie Gushing. Dorothy William Morrison. 

George Victor Lacroix. Richmond Hoyt Pendleton. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



143 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



Names of Pupils not Absent or Tardy during the Year. 
( ) =No. years. 



Edmund Adams. 
Harold Dearborn. 
Tyra Engstrom. 
Flaurence F. Goldberg. 
PauUne HiU (2). 
K. Leland WUdes. 
Elizabeth M. Brown. 
Florence Carroll. 
Gladys Dole. 
Gerda Ekstrom. 
Harland Baker. 
Daniel Byrne. 
Alfred Crutchfield. 
Allen Leavitt. 
Mary Stearns. 
Evelyn Fulford (4). 
Alta Green (2). 
Lelia Hall. 
Alice King. 
Roland Powell. 
Thelma Howland (2). 
Chester Lane. 
Ethel Noonan (4) 



Hugh J. Cassidy. 
Russell E. Gushing. 
Cora Clark. 
Nora Cotter. 
Nannie Dahlgren. 
Warren Entwistle. 
Harold Fraser. 
Ruth Haynes. 
Annie Heartz (2). 
George Houston. 
Ida Larson. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Ella Quinn. 
James G. Reed. 
Doris Bartlett. 
Albert Chapman. 
Robert Ivnowlton. 
Helen Madison. 
Irene Williamson. 
Afton White. 
Mildred Anderson 
Edgar Bourke (2). 
Elsie Carlson. 
Helen Davis. 
Earl Fipphen. 
Maurice Hatch. 
Edmund Hill (2). 
Daniel Flint. 
Florence King (3). 
Roger Leavitt. 
Raymond Potter. 
Ai T. Richie. 
JuUus Sturm (2). 
Olive Sweatt. 



(2). 



PARKER 



SCHOOL. 
Arthur Lyford (2). 
Wilham Lynch. 
Ethel McCrUlis. 
Ruth Peckham. 
Helen Powers. 
Marie Roy. 
Clifford Rydholm. 
Earl Sawyer. 
Rose Valliers. 
George Wooster. 



144 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CHANDLER 

Rufus S. Bond (3). 
Carmi P. W. Brown (3). 
Henry K. Bugbee. 
Ruth E. Chase. 
Marion S. Cochran. 
George Colby (2). 
Aimee Corriveau (4). 
Madeline Cnrran. 
Verna Corser. 
Paul Davis. 
Mabel A. Downs (2). 
William W. Duemling. 
HattieL. EUis (2). 
Charles L. Foote. 
Gladys French. 
PhiUp B. Gove. 
Dorothy Gross. 
Clarence H. Hammond. 
Cornelia H. Kimball. 



SCHOOL. 

Arthur E. Kunberger (3). 
Ruby W. Lawrence. 
Marcia G. E. Madison. 
Joseph Maheu. 
Bernice E. Morrison. 
Paul Nolan (3). 
Ethel M. Nudd (2). 
Grace Patch (3). 
Walter E. Plummer (4). 
Helen H. Rhodes. 
Harold N. Runnells. 
Mary A. Shannon. 
Cora A. M. Shepard. 
Frederick A. Smith (2). 
Altha E. Walker (5). 
George R. Walker. 
Harold J. Welch (2). 
W. Ernest Durgin. 



GARRISON 



Henry Eckstrom. 
Omar Johnson. 
Uno Huopila. 
Oscar T. Forsberg. 
Jeannette McLeod. 
Helen E. Ryan. 



SCHOOL. 
Carl A. Anderson. 
Gustaf W. Forsberg. 
Robert Lindstrom. 
Raymond C. Mutlart. 
Bertha E, Danforth. 
Lilly E. Silver. 



Dorothy E. Maynard. 
Herbert E. Bombard. 
Dana S. Morrison. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

Mabel W. Gate. 
Nellie J. French. 



RUMFORD 



J. Edward Davis. 
Dorothy E. George. 
Kathryn S. Gross. 
RusseU D. Sawyer. 
Emma C. Trudell. 
Lillian Unwin. 
Martin H. Gurley. 
Harriet McLeod. 
Gardner H. Wales. 



SCHOOL. 
Ii'ving E. Welch. 
Gordon Bartlett (2). 
Carl Harris. 
Schuyler Holbrook. 
Harry Levin (2). 
Esther Armstrong. 
Rachel Sandquist. 
Edgar G. Jewett. 
Glenda E. MerriU. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



145 



Arvilla E. Powell. 
Robert Dutton. 
Hazel W. Fifield. 
Daphne A. Young. 
Julia Trudell. 
Paul For tin. 



Berger Hall. 

Luella Palmer. 

Calvin Barnard. 

C. Edward Kunberger. 

Alphonse Normandeau. 

Lloyd Nutting. 



Jack Mansur. 
Lawrence Philbrick. 
Irma E. Davis. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

Florence E. Fulford. 
Ruth A. Saltmarsh. 
Irving C. Davis. 



MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 



Axel V. Anderson. 
Antonio Rossi. 
Krekor Sharterian. 
Ruby Bartlett. 
Rachel Bartlett. 
Raymond Hannaford. 



Joseph Heartz. 
DoriUa A. Levesque. 
Mildred A. Patterson. 
Edna M. Smith (2). 
Eva M. Sanborn. 
Roger E. Tyler. 



Gertrude Roy. 
Elvi Denoncourt. 
Charles Benson. 
Madeline Roy. 
Sophia Lucia. 
Wilder Madison. 



PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

H. Horton Cameron. 
Steward Lyford. 
Lillian Ranquist. 
Hazel Roy. 
Rosa Wittenberg. 



Martha Persons. 
Arthur Holmgren. 
Harry Bartlett. 
Reginald Livingston, 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

Harry Hobson. 
Laura Moran. 
Ruth J. CiUey. 



DEWEY SCHOOL. 



Clarence E. Bartlett (2). 
Anna E. Chapman. 
Joseph Demers. 
Douglass N. Everett. 
Arthur Flamand. 



Helen Foster. 
Anna Laflamme. 
Hugh S. Morrison (2). 
John A. Morrison. 
Germaine K. Shannon (3). 



10 



146 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 



George R. Hillsgrove. 
Ada V. Curtis. 
Oscar W. Parenteau. 
Harry Anderson. 
Harry Goodsell. 



Allen Hillsgrove (2). 
Ruth Robinson. 
Margaret Robinson. 
Leona Savoy. 



Marie DuBois. 
Ernest Aranosian. 



TAHANTO SCHOOL. 

Bertha Tousignant. 
Sarah Tousignant. 



Stanley Benson. 
Louis Corriveau. 



COGSWELL SCHOOL. 

Harry Rosendale. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 147 

HONOR LISTS. 

For the Year 1913-1914. 

Names of pupils in Union School District who attained a mark of 
A— or better in the High School during the past year. 

HIGH SCHOOL— GROUP I. 

Class V. 
Willoughby A. Colby, Katherine H. Hurd, Elsie F. Kendall, Richard 
H. Kimball, Etta M. Monroe, Agnes V. Murphy. 

Class U. 
None. 

Class T. 
Blanche F. Dimond, Edith C. Ericson, Rebekah Goldberg, Robert 
Johnson, Helen Murphy, Margaret Owen, Caroline Pearson. 

Class S. 
John P. Amsden, Leslie Gross, Vera L. Hall, Sadie Rabinovitz, Eva 
Rossell. 

Class R. 
Eva M. Campbell, Paul B. Flanders, Dorothy Kendall, Florence B. 
King, Richard M. Pearson, Mary Willis. 

Class Q. 
Esther A. Calkin, M. Agnes Lake, Mary E. Steams, Edna M. Osborne. 

Group II. 
PARKER SCHOOL. 

Class P. 
Elmer Anderson, Helen Barker, Miriam Batchelder, Aurilla Brus- 
eeau, Marion Cheney, Arthur Cole, Hugh Cruikshank, Margaret Holli- 
gan, Allen Hollis, Harry Kimball, Parker Little, Rebecca Merrill, 
Gordon Moses, Anna Murphy, Ruth Peckham, Amelia Pollard. 

Class O 
Annie Fifield, Astrid Olson, Nora Reardon, Clara Smith, Annie Vinton. 



148 CITY OF CONCORD. 

GARRISON SCHOOL. 

Class N. 
Harold H. Ericson. 

Class M. 
None. 

EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

Class N. 
Esthei S. Haselton. 

Class M. 
'Frank L White. 

CHANDLER SCHOOL. 

Class N. 
Fred Brown, Elizabeth Chase, Solon Colby, Aimee Corriveau, Made- 
line Curran, Parker Huntington, Agnes Johnston, Martha Page, Grace 
Patch, Mary Shannon, Oney Smith, Jean Stearns, Gladys Towle. 

Class M. 
Charles Roche, Lois Rundlett, Walter Thomas. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Names of pupils in Union School District who have attained a mark of 
B— or better in then' school work during the year. 

RUMFORD SCHOOL. 

Class L. 
Annie H. Nordine, Ruth Lyford, G. CarroU Cilley, Desire A. Denon- 
court, Simeon Goldman, Edgar S. Hammond, Doris M. Kennedy, 
Margaret L. Osgood, Arvilla E. PoweU, Louise M. Struthers, Annie E. 
Wilson, Beatrice L. Shreve, Field C. Perry, Jennie G. Nute, Florence 
H. Little, Paul L. Bailey, Webster E. Bridges, Lawton B. Chandler, 
PrisciUa Wood. 

Class K. 
E. Gordon Bartlett, Isadore J. Edelstein, Carl A. Magnuson, Harry 
J. Levin, Willis J. Sawyer Freda G. Sargent, Eugene C. Maxam, 
Edith M. Unwin, Carl W. Harris, Willis R. Lyna, Fred W. Mann, 
Arlene M. Booth. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 149 

Class J. 
John Allquist, James D. Colbert, Harry B. Colby, Robert P. Dutton, 

C. Edgar Kunberger, Nathan Sanel, Eva M. Fortua, Gertrude linight. 

Class I. 
Joseph Brooks, Sarah Goldman, Josephine Cote, Ruth Johnson, 
Ethel Ravitch Ethel Houston, Arnold Hill, Ruth A. Brew. 

Class H, 
Ethel M. Carpenter, Russell D. Sawyer, Emma C. Trudell, Marion 
E. Wason, Lihian Unwin, Georgia M. Osgood, Clarence H. Morgan, 
Leon J. Goldberg, J. Eldred Davie, Mary L. Hall, Merton W. Messer. 

Class G. 
EHzabeth J. Dane, Aldea Denoncourt, Dorothy E. George, Earl W. 
Sawyer, Edward A. Trudell. 

Class F. 
Martin" H. Gurley, Helen Hutton, Louise C. Gifford, Andrew F. 
Lane, Frances D. Smythe, Miriam C. Lowell, Amos A. Turner, Marshall 

D. French, Dorothy G. Kiley, Abraham V. Baer, Gardner H. Wales. 

Class E. 
Pearl E. Tabor, Emile B. Dupuis, Clark W. Aldrich, Leon S. Emery, 
Clifford H. Woodward, Charles T. Brewster. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

Class L. 
MUdred S. Abbott, Harriett Albee, Edythe Nevers, Raymond D. 
Moore, G. Arthur Ledward, Amy Kaime, Sarah F. Jewell, Kathleen 
Heath, J. Gray Estes, Gladys Currier, Dean R. Colton, Hazel White, 
Mary P. Walker, Margaret Wall, Aubrey Brown, George F. Clark, 
Ruth E. Quinn, EUsabeth Stearns, Madeline Vose. 

Class K. 
Dorothy E. Watson, Leshe J. Dixon, Katherine Chandler, Irma E. 
Davis, Florence E. FuKord, Mary G. Hillsgrove, H. Gwendolyn Jones, 
Wm. J. Limpery, Helen Mansur, Porter Roberts, H. Gifford S. Woods. 

Class J. 
Raymond M. Henry, Mariana B. Odlin, Ruth A. Saltmarsh, May E. 
Smith, Ernest F. Spaulding, Geo. H. Gordon, C. Wendell Kimball, 
Ehzabeth Morrill. 



150 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Class I. 
Geo. S. Copp, Elizabeth Dyment, Nettie M, Jewell, Roy C. Perry, 
Andrew F. Pike, Janice Griffin, Ruth Whittier. 

Class H. 
Lena Corser, Percival Eveleth, Agnes Fenton, Margaret Jackman, 
Virginia Morrill, Allan Shapu-o, Charles Zambs. 

Class G. 
Marian Davis, Eleanor Diversi, Doris Minor, Leo Turner. 

Class F. 
Doris E. Abbott, Mildred Dole, Malcohn L. Flanders, Clyde H. Gray, 
Fred K. Hodgman, Sara G. Jackman, Jack Mansur, Moses L. Silver- 
man. 

Class E. 
None. 

GARRISON SCHOOL. 

Class L. 
Elmer W. Anderson, Richard A. Henry, Edgar H. Larson, Bertil C. 
Rossell, Edward Hendrickson, Carl O. Lindstrom, Carl G. Nelson, Val- 
borg E. A. Anderson, Bertha E. Danforth, AUce E. Matheson, HQda 
S. Nelson, Jeanette B. Ryan, Lily E. Silver. 

Class J. 
Spencer Beaudoin, Florence L. Clarke, Lawrence E. Cotter, John N • 
Engel, Paul E. Ericson, Herbert FoUansbe, Wilho J. Koski, Neva L 
Lindgren, Ella A. Shepard, Morrill F. Shepard, Lawrence T. Stevens, 
Gertrude L. Rossell. 

Class I. 
Bernard S. Webster. 

Class H. 
Mary J. Henry, Helen E. Ryan, Elizabeth H. Brooks, Gustaf W- 
Forsberg, Rosez A. Chapman, Jeannette McLeod, Maynard Hendrick- 
son, Carl Dahlgren, Axel C. Gustafson, Florence Newton. 

Class F. 
Margaret Brooks, Oscar T. Forsberg, Tyne Huopila, Doris E. Toone- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 151 

EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

Class L. 
Evelyn D. McAlpine, Doris H. Chamberlin, Elizabeth E. Cushing, 
Sadie A. Huston, George V. Lacroix, Dorothy W. Morrison. 

Class J. 
Honora J. Cate, Lottie I. Sargent, Ruth E. Blanchard, Herbert E. 
Bombard, Ethel M. Cate, Ina L. Tebbetts, Roylston E. Sanderson. 

Class H. 
Ethel M. Brown, Lester A. Maynard, Dorothy E. Staniels, Caroline 
J. Cate, P. Leon Mann, Dana S. Morrison. 

Class F. 
Theresa I. Bombard, Mable W. Cate, Mary E. Cate, Marion Haskell, 
Samuel Huston, Elizabeth E. King, Bertha M. Lacroix, Arthur Laro- 
chelle, Vesta P. Morrison, Nora A. Roy, Mildred G. Sanborn, 

PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

Class J. 
Stewart Lyford, Conrad Benson, Edward Cousins, LiUian Ranquist, 
Helen Curran, Lillian Hearson, Hazel Roy. 

Class I. 
Merle Tabor, Sophia Lucia. 

Class H. 
Estrid Bergstrom, Rosa Wittenberg, OUve Hartford. 

Class G. 
Charles Benson, Edward Sannel, Eleanor Harris, Enid Fish, Carlton 
Angwin, Madeline Roy. 

Class F. 
Alvin Angwin, EsteUe Avery, Grace Bacheller, LiUian Cohen, Lulu 
Gordon, Paul Holbrook, Alvin Hussey, Leola Maher, Walter Palmer. 

Class E. 
Ruel Colby, James Forsyth, Forrest Forsyth, Ruth Jackman, Ruth 
Olson, Edgarda Laird. 



152 CITY OF CONCORD. 

DEWEY SCHOOL. 

Class J. 
John A. Morrison, Franklin Hollis, Margret A. Gordon, Anna E. 
Chapman, Marion Davis, Albert J. King, Archibald D. Cullum, Charles 
C. Currier, Clarence E. Huggins. 

Class I. 
Earl S. Temple. 

Class H. 
Dorothy Barnard, Joyce L. Brown, Hilda A Buchan, Joseph Demers, 
Douglas N. Everett, Richard H. Felton, Martha A. Lane, Hugh S. 
Morrison, Robert R. Morrison, Dorothy R. Moberg, Edward J. Shan- 
non, Rowland H. Smith, Oramel W. Swain, Dorothy Twomey, Flor- 
ence A. Walker, Kathleen Wall, Beatrice Winch. 

Class F. 
Doris E. Brown, Emma Flamand, Helen Foster, Elizabeth Peckham, 
Oscar Sandquist, Germaine B. Scully, Evelyn Watkins, Constance 
Wood worth. 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

Class I. 
Mary Crutchfield, Gertrude Hodge, Martha Persons, Evelyn Parker. 

Class H. 
Ursula Sanders-, Paul Tracy, Beatrice Tremblay, Jessie Sanborn, 
Paul Lampron, Clarice Newbold, Paul Otis, Theda Lafleur, Ralph 
Walters, Leonard Smith. 

Class G. 
Dominie Delbianco, Frank E. George, Bernice M. Berry, Mary 
Cochran, Marguerite Fernald, Blanche Huneau, Doris Hayford, Fran- 
cis Lyon, Fannie Matson. 

Class F. 
Harry Bartlett, Helen Burbank, Philip Guyol, Grover Paclat, Pauline 
Ballard, Samuel Sanders. 

Class E. 
Hoyt Reille, R. Stanley Gray, Doris York, Dorothy Williard, Roland 
Robinson, Neil Rawlinson, Dorothy Plummer, Lillian Hansen. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 153 

' MERRIMACK SCHOOL. 

Class L. 
Helen Morrison, Gertrude Tippet, George Boulay, Mary Otis, 
Madeline Potter, Robert Potter, Doris Saben, Milton Willard. 

Class K. 
Edward J. Twomey, Gladys M. Leighton, Agnes Johnson, Humphrey 
J. Emery, Arthur W. Andrews, Nathaniel Sawyer, Cecilia Conn, Nellie 
Riford, Edna Smith, Stella Johnson, George Evans, Roland Tippet. 

Class J. 
Elmar A. Hammar, Robert Tucker, Eva Sanborn, Elise Denis. 

TAHANTO SCHOOL. 

None. 

HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 

Class L. 
Harry Anderson, Nellie Blanchette, Ellen Grant, Nathalie McDon- 
nell, Dorothy Robinson, Ruth Robinson, Leona Savoy. 

Class J. 
Joseph Champigny, Oscar Drew, Frederick French, Everett Gognon 
Harry Goodsell, Eunice Haven, Alien Hillsgrove, Frederic Robinson, 
Clifton Stickney, Lloyd Venne. 

Class H. 
Margaret E. Blanchette, Gertrude B. Champigny, Myrtle B. HiUs- 
grove, William Mahoney, Earl A. Woodward. 

Class F. 
Eva M. Haselton. 



PAGEANT 

OF 

INCIDENTS IN CONCORD HISTORY. 



TO BE GIVEN AT 

WHITE PARK, CONCORD, N. H. 



Tuesday Afternoon, June 9, 1914, 3.30 P. M. 



This pageant, arranged and given by the Parker School, will portray 
events that have occurred in Penacook, Rumford and Concord. 

If Tuesday should be rainy, the pageant will be given on the first 
pleasant day. 

MARCH. 

Prologue. 
"I, the heir of all the ages, in the foremost files of time. " 

1 . Spirit of the Parker School. 

2. The fairy's announcement. — "Boy, I find you wondering about this 

fair city, how it came to be, and what manner of boys they were 
who went to school in the old days. What you are idly dreaming 
of, I will show you. Know, then, that certain spirits, brave, 
steadfast, and untiring, have built this city. They are Penacook, 
Rumford, and Concord. You shall see them." 

3. Spirit of Penacook. — "You Uttle Imow of the toil and the fears that 

attended the beginnings of this settlement. Wild forests were 
cleared away, and Indian enemies subdued before my Plantation 
of Penacook was habitable and safe. " 

4. Spirit of Rumford. — "I have the dignity of an Incorporated Town, 

yet the terror of the Indians and the arduous taming of the land 
was not over even in my day." 

6. Spirit of Concord. — "Upon the toils of my sisters, Penacook and 
Rumford, as foundation, I have built my stately city. I have 
ever wished to make industrious and able workers, and patriotic 
citizens, and to this end I have made the schools my special care." 



SCHOOL REPORT. 155 

6. The Spirit of Parker School. — •"! have never known of you and 

your sisters, nor of these long-ago happenings. It all sounds as 
if it would make a good story for you to tell me. " 

7. Spirit of Concord. — "Better than that, I can call up before you here 

some scenes which were enacted on this ground in the past. 
Come and git by me, and you shall see strange sights. It is right 
that you should loiow these men of old, for you, boy, are their 
heir, deeply indebted to them. Penacook, send your war- 
riors to summon a scene from the past!" 

Incident I. 
The Bridal of Penacook; or, The Legend of Weetamoo, 1631. 
(Dramatized from Whittier's "The Bridal of Penacook.") 

Episode I. The Wedding. 

Scene — "Thy Penacook Valley was fairer than these, ' 
And greener its grasses and taller its trees, 
Ere the sound of an axe in the forest had rung. 
Or the mower his scythe in the meadows had swung." 
Weetamoo greets her father, Passaconaway, chief of the Penacook 
Indians. — Entrance of Winnepurket and Weetamoo. — Dance. — 
Interruption from an aged medicine man with a prophecy of coming 
evil. — Departure of Weetamoo and Winnepurket to the latter's 
northern country. 

Episode II. The New Home. 

Scene — "And eastward cold, wide marshes stretched away, 
Dull, dreamy flats without a bush or tree." 

Weetamoo meets her husband returning from the trail. — Winne- 
purket, though proud of the dark-eyed Weetamoo, does not love 
her passionately. — His interests are centered only in the fight and 
himt. — ^Entrance of messenger from far-off Penacook.— Requests 
that Weetamoo be allowed to visit her old home. — Permission 
granted by council. 

Episode III. The Fate of Weetamoo. 

Scene — "The hills are dearest which our childish feet have cUmbed 

the earhest." 
Passaconaway's confidence to his warriors, that Weetamoo, happy 
at first to be once more with her people, has become anxious because 
Winnepurket has not summoned her back to her home. — Message 
sent to the Saugus Sachem: — • 

"Eagle of Saugus, — in the woods the dove 
Mourns for your sheltering wings of love." 



156 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Entrance of runner with a return message: — 
"If now no more a mat is found 
Of all which line her father's wigwam round, 
Let Penacook call out her warrior train 
And send her back with wampum gifts again." 
Rage of Passaconaway. — Refused to allow Weetamoo to return. — 
Sorrow of Weetamoo.- — Determination of Weetamoo to go alone 
to Winnepui-ket.— Telling of her plans to two Indian maidens. — 
Departure. — Entrance of breathless messenger with news that 
Weetamoo has met her fate in the river's treacherous falls. 

Song of the Indian women — 

"The Dark eye has left us, 
The Spring Bu'd has flown. 
On the pathway of spu-its 
She wanders alone. 
The soVig of the wood-dove has died on our shore, — 
Mat wonck kunna — monee! We hear it no more." 

Incident II. 
The Story of Hannah Dustin, 1697. 

Episode I. Arrival at the Camp. 

On an island near Penacook, the squaws and children await the ar- 
rival of the braves. — ^With them is a captive boy, Leonardson. — 
Loud warwhoops are heard. The war party returns, dragging 
with them two white captives, Hannah Dustin and Mary Neff. — 
The dance of victory is performed.- — -The party goes on, leaving 
two Indian families with prisoners. 

Episode II. The Taunting. 

The squaws jeer at the women and laugh at their weariness. — They 
threaten torture, saying, "Think what awaits you in our village! 
Stript must ye be and scourged! The gauntlet must ye run!" — 
Mary Neff weeps. — One little child offers her some berries. His 
mother strikes them from his hand and tramples them under foot. 
An Indian brave strides forward, and tauntingly says, "What 
need you trouble yourself? If the God of the pale-face will have 
you delivered, you shall be so."— The Indians crowd into a wig- 
wam. — The captives are left alone. 

Episode III. The Plot. 

Hannah Dustin repeats the Indian's words, "If the God of the pale- 
faces will have you delivered, you shall be so." — Springs to her 



SCHOOL REPORT. 157 

feet, crying out, "We shall be delivered!" — Mary Neff believes 
her insane, but Hannah says, "Our deliverance must be through 
our own hands!" Crosses to Leonardson and questions him as to 
the Indian customs. He says, "Tonight they will eat and drink 
much, and then sleep heavily." — -She charges him to learn to use 
the tomahawk in order that he may teach them, and thus all es- 
cape. — -A warrior approaches. — Leonardson flatters him into teach- 
ing the stroke. — -Indian leaves them. — -Hannah plots with Mary 
Neff to kill them at night when all are in a drunken slumber. — 
Mary demurs, but Hannah speaks of her slaughtered baby and 
explains, "To kill such wretches is to do God's own will." — Leon- 
ardson teaches them the stroke. 

Episode IV. The Deliverance. 

The drunken Indians sleep after the feast. — -Hannah, Mary Neff and 
Leonardson steal upon them. — They kill and then scalp the savages. 
— One squaw escapes. — -The child, who showed kindness, is spared. 

Episode V. The Departure. 

The white women and boy steal a canoe. — They escape from the 
island, and go down the Merrimack to Haverhill. — Return of 
escaped squaw with Indians. The slain Indians are taken away. 

Spirit of Concord. — "Rumford, will you not send for some scene that 
you can show us?" 

Rumford sends messengers. 

Incident III. 
The Bradley Massacre, 1746. 

Episode I. The Ambush. 

(a) Indians hold a short conversation. — Go into ambush. 

Episode II. The Encounter. 

(a) Indian steps out. — Looks along the path. — -Signals his com- 

panions. — Steps back. 

(b) Bradley's command approaches on way to mill. 

(c) Daniel Oilman pursuing a hawk passes Indians in safety. — • 

Peters, Lufkin and Bean come next, followed by Samuel Brad- 
ley and Stickney, Roberts and Lieutenant Bradley bring 
up the rear. 



158 CITY OF CONCORD, 

(d) When men are opposite ambush Indians open fire. — Peters, 

Bean and Lufkin fall. — Second volley is answered by the 
Bradleys. — Samuel Bradley falls. — -Indians surround rest. — 
Stickney and Roberts are captured. 

(e) Lieutenant Bradley, refusing quarter, fights alone until killed. 

Episode III. The Victors. 

(a) Indians loot the bodies. — Join in war dance. — Interrupted by 
three shots from Rumford Garrison. — Flee. 

Episode IV. The Relief. 

(a) The Ladd detachment arrives on the run followed by ox-cart 

and settlers. 

(b) Party halts at scene of conflict. — Places dead in cart. — File 

off. 

(c) Met by settlers from town. 

Dance Interlude. 

The Spirit of Out-of-Doors, as personified in the Indian girl, teaches 
woodland gi-ace to the Spirit of the Town as tj^jified by the won- 
dering Puritan maid. — In turn, the Puritan influences the Indian 
to thrift and industry. 

Spirit of Concord. — "StiU attend, O Spirit of the Parker School, to 
these in my later town of Concord. Go, Spii-its, and bid them bring 
a Concord scene!" 

Incident IV. 

The Signing of the Constitution, 1788. 
" United, we stand; Divided, we fall." 

Episode I. 

Village green near Meeting House. — Time, noon. — Boys blowing 
May-horns. — Crowd assembles.^ — ^Amuses itself by games and 
tricks. — Constable keeps order. — Dignitaries of State and minis- 
ters arrive.- — ^Enter meeting-house. — Crowd continues interrupted 
amusements. — Dignitaries sign Constitution. — One copy handed 
to mounted messenger who departs post-haste for Philadelphia. — 
Belated members arrive. — Clerk reads duplicate copy to crowd. — 
Crowd disperses, cheering lustil}\ 



SCHOOL REPORT. 159 

Incident V. 
Lafayette's Visit to Concord, 1825. 
Episode I. 

(a) A rider brings the news. 

(b) The Committee of Welcome confers with the people. 
WiUiam Kent: "How is the visitor to be entertained?" 
Citizens: "We should be glad to have His Excellency at our house, 

but my wife is ill." — "We are having an eU built on, and it wiU 
not be finished." — Etc. 
Mistress Kent: "I think, gentlemen, that the general will enjoy 
the May Dance that the children are preparing. Then I will have 
a reception in his honor." 

Episode II. 

(a) Lafayette is met by the committee. 

William Kent: "General Lafayette, in behalf of the citizens of Con- 
cord, we offer you a cordial welcome to our village and hospitaUties. 
In the various cMmates through which you have recently passed, 
you have experienced a imiform temperatiure in the pubhc feeling 
toward you. It has been warm, it has been grateful; and in this 
northern region, sir, where we are no strangers to cold and frost, 
you will find no chill in our affections." 

Lafayette: "Citizens of Concord, it is not unusual to find a torrid 
zone frigid, and a frigid zone torrid, but to come to a land tem- 
perate in climate, and, I hope, in feeling, is delightful. I am glad 
to find your city in such a prosperous condition, and hope it will 
continue so." 

(b) The citizens sing: 

"North and South, and East, and West, 
Grateful homage have expressed — 
Greeting loud the nation's guest: 

Son of Liberty; — 
Whom tyrants cursed, whom Heaven approved — 
And mOlions long have mourned and loved — 
He comes by fond entreaties moved 

The Granite State to see." 

(c) Lafayette meets the Revolutionary veterans: "I am proud 

to meet them. It would be a pity if any town did not have 
some one who had represented it in that heroic war." 

(d) The children dance. 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Episode III. 

(a) A reception is held at the Kents' house. Lafayette leads the 
minuet with Mistress Kent. 

Episode IV. 

(a) The general departs for Dover. 

(b) The committee congi-atulate each other: 

"I think Concord has done its duty." 

Finale. 

"Nothing useless is or low, 
Each thing in its place is best." 

Concord greets Spirit of the Past — 

Concord: "Who art thou?" 

Spirit: "I am the Spirit of the Past, and thou?" 

Concord: "1 am modern Concord." 

Spirit: "And what hast thou to show me for thy labors?" 

Concord raises stafT. Figures glide in, representing 

Raih'oads, Commerce, 

Belting Industry, Education, 

Printing, Music, 

Quarrying Industry, History, 

Electricity, Foundry, 

Woodwork, Agriculture, 

Silver Industry, Manufacturing, 

Church, Charities, 

The State, Militia. 

Concord raises staff. — ^Enter Spirit of the Future. 
Concord: "WIio art thou?" 

Spirit: "1 am the Spirit of the Future who shall come after thee." 

Concord again raises staff. — Figures take places. 

Concord: "Spirit of the Past, these are what I have to show thee 

for the centuries that have passed since thy time. Spirit of the Future, 

these are what I bequeath to thee from which thou wilt build even 

greater than I." 

Spirit of Parker School leads Spirit of the Future to the center. 

TABLEAU. 
Chorus — Hurrah for old New England. 
"This is our own, our native home, 
Tho' poor and rough she be, 
The home of many a noble soul, 
The birth place of the free." 

"The Star Spangled Banner." 



SCHOOL REPORT. 161 



ORDER OF EXERCISES 

AT THE 

DEDICATION 

OF THE 

WALKER SCHOOL HOUSE. 
(Old Building). 
Singing. 

Report of the Building Committee, and transfer of the Property to the 

Board of Education. 
Singing. 

Address by Rev. Dr. Bouton. 
Brief addresses by other gentlemen. 
Dedicatory Prayer, by Rev. Dr. Merrill. 



HYMN. 



Science! we offer at thy shrine 
A gift to thee and truth; 

M,ake thou its halls with wisdom shine 
To light the way of youth. 

Make it a city on a hill 
Whose light cannot be hid; 

A beacon-ray, to guard from ill 
The path 3'oung footsteps tread. 

Let gentle peace with brow of hght 
Here fold her balmy wing, 

And love and wisdom both unite 
Their sweetest strains to sing. 

So shall the gems of mental worth 
That gather in these halls, 

In poUshed brilliancy come forth 
To meet stern duty's calls. 

And this shall be the "mount of light," 
Whence rays of beauty rare 

Shall gild the gloom of error's night 
With heavenly radiance fair. 

Benediction. 
11 



162 CITY OF CONCORD. 



DEDICATION OF NEW WALKER SCHOOL 
Monday, February 8, 1915. 

PEOGRAM. 

Musical selections 

HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA. 

Preliminary remarks 

OMAR S. SWENSON, CHAIRMAN. 

Remarks 

HUSE T. BLANCHARD, ARCHITECT. 

Remarks 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT, SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Address 

EDWARD C. NILES, ESQ., PRESIDENT BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Address 

HON. HENRY C. MORRISON, STATE SUPERINTENDENT PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 



REPORT OF FINANCIAL AGENT OF 
UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



April 1, 1914 to March 23, 1915. 
LOUIS J. RUNDLETT, Agent. 



RECEIVED. 



Balance on hand April 1, 1914, 


$5,165.51 


Received from city: 




appropriated by law, 


38,477.35 


appropriated by Union School District, 


61,385.09 


literary fund, 


1,917.93 


dog tax. 


1,294.74 


Abial Walker Fund, 


34.21 


miscellaneous sales, 


56.81 


Received from cash sales: 




for text-books, 


205.47 


for manual training. 


37.50 


Received from tuition: 




high school, 


3,232.24 


elementary schools. 


497.26 




$112,304.11 


EXPENDED. 




Fuel, 


$7,116.80 


Miscellaneous, 


983.01 


Supphes, 


2,436.56 


Repairs, 


2,986.59 


Trucking, 


130.89 


Transportation, 


1,004.34 


Care of houses (maintenance), 


408.22 


Care of houses (salaries). 


6,833.50 



164 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Insurance, $741 . 60 

Manual Training (maintenance), 2,276.69 

Manual Training (salaries), 8,684.08 

Military Drill (maintenance), 15.25 

Military drill (salaries) , 100 . 00 

Salaries, 70,972.59 

Text-books, 4,108.89 

Night school (maintenance), ' 5.46 

Night school (salaries), 275.00 

Balance, 3,224.64 



12,304.11 



Concord, N. H., March 23, 1915. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of financial agent and find the expenditures cor- 
rectly cast and a proper voucher for each item. 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 
H. H. METCALF, 

Auditors. 

COST PER CAPITA. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses, $36 . 87 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses 

based on average membership, 40.99 

Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, 

drawing, superintendent, etc., 23.42 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing and superintendent, 21 .64 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing, superintendent, in all schools below 

the high school, 17.06 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing, superintendent, in the high school, 32.17 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools, 1 • 38 



SCHOOL REPORT. 165 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in 

high school, $1.88 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools below high school, .44 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material, .46 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material and 

tuition, 24 . 24 

Cost per pupil for paper, . 18 

Cost per pupil for pens, .011 

Cost per pupil for pencils, .017 

Cost per pupil for manual training, entire, 8 . 39 

Cost per pupil for manual training, salaries, 6 . 65 

Cost per pupil for manual training material, 1 . 74 

Cost per pupil for wood and iron-working, in- 
clusive of instruction, 15.33 

Cost per pupil for wood and iron-working, ex- 
clusive of instruction, 3 . 56 

Cost per pupil for cooking, inclusive of instruc- 
tion, 4.08 

Cost per pupil for cooking, exclusive of instruc- 
tion, 1 . 62 

Cost per pupil for sewing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion, 3 . 38 

Cost per pupil for sewing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion, . 07 

Cost per pupil for drawing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion, . 66 

Cost per pupil for drawing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion, .08 

Cost per pupil for music, inclusive of instruc- 
tion, . 54 

Cost per pupil for music, exclusive of instruc- 
tion, . 07 

Cost per pupil for military drill, inclusive of 

instruction, . 30 

Cost per pupil for military drill, exclusive of in- 
struction, . 04 



166 CITY OF CONCORD. 





TUITION RECEIPTS. 




High School, 




$3,232.24 


Dewey School, 




54.00 


Dewey Training School, 


16.00 


Kimball School, 




171.00 


Penacook School, 




12.68 


Rumford School, 




180.00 


Eastman School, 




21.16 


Morrill School, 




1.52 


Merrimack School, 




1.90 


Walker School, 




9.00 


Cogswell School, 




' 6.00 


Harriet P. Dame School, 


24.00 



5,729.50 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. H., 
qualified to vote in District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium, on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the second day of April 
1914, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the fol- 
lowing subjects: 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing j^ear. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of Edu- 
cation for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years, to fill vacancies arising from 
the expiration of the term of office of Dennis E. Sullivan, 
Fanny E. Minot and Omar S. Swenson, and to fill any other 
vacancies that may occur in said Board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year, 
and also all other necessary officers. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year, 
including military drill, manual, training, night school, 
medical inspection, etc. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for occasional and extraordinary repairs of 
school buildings during the ensuing year. 

9. To see if the district will authorize the Board of Edu- 
cation to sell the Merrimack School House and lot on 
Washington Street either by private sale or public auction. 



168 CITY OF CONCORD. 

10. To see if the district will vote to issue its bonds in 
place of the notes of the district authorized to be issued by 
vote of a special meeting holden June 23, 1913. 

11. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this second day of March 1914. 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
WM. H. SAWYER, 
GEORGE H. MOSES, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
Board of Education of Union ScJiool District. 

I certify that on the sixteenth day of March, 1914, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant, attested by the Board 
of Education of said district, at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copy at the police station in the 
City of Concord, N. H., being a public place within said 
district. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



March 16, 1914. 
Personally appeared before me, on this date, the said 
Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certificate 
by him signed is true. 

GEORGE N. FELLOWS, 

Justice of the Peace. 

A true copy of the warrant, return of service, and certifi- 
cate of oath. 

FRED LEIGHTON, 

Clerk. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 169 

In accordance with the foregoing warrant a meeting of 
the legal voters of Union School District was held at the 
Auditorium on Prince Street in Concord on the evening of 
April 2, 1914, at 7.30 o'clock. 

Article 1. On motion of Henry H. Metcalf, duly sec- 
onded, the clerk of the district cast one ballot for Louis C. 
Merrill for moderator, and he was declared elected and was 
sworn to the faithful discharge of his duties by Henry E. 
Chamberlin, City Clerk. 

Article 2. On motion of Henry E. Chamberlin, the 
moderator was authorized to cast one ballot for Fred Leigh- 
ton for clerk, and he was declared elected. The oath was 
administered by the moderator. 

Article 3. On motion of Arthur F. Sturtevant, duly 
seconded, the report of the Board of Education having 
been printed, it was accepted and ordered on file with 
reading. 

Article 4, On motion of Henry H. Metcalf, seconded 
by Arthur F. Sturtevant, it was voted to ballot for three 
members of the Board of Education to serve for three j^ears, 
on one ballot, the polls to be kept open until 8,15 P. M. 

Article 5. On motion of Harry H, Dudley, John P, 
George and Henry H. Metcalf were elected auditors of the 
district for the ensuing year, the clerk casting the ballot. 

Article 6. On motion of John C. Thorne, duly sec- 
onded, the following resolution was adopted. 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District the sum of Five Thousand Two Hundred Fifteen 
Dollars ($5,215) for the payment of the interest on its 
bonded debt accruing during the year. 

Article 7, On motion of Arthur F, Sturtevant, duly 
seconded, the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That there be raised on the polls and ratable 
estates within Union School District for the support of 
schools for the ensuing year, such a sum as in addition to 
the sum assigned to the district by the City of Concord out 



170 CITY OF CONCORD, 

of its appropriation for schools will amount to the sum of 
Ninetj^-nine Thousand Eight Hundred Sixty-two and 
tVu Dollars ($99,862.44). 

Article 8. Was passed over. 

Article 9. The following presented by Walter T, Mc- 
Lam was unanimously adopted: 

Voted, That the Board of Education be authorized to 
sell the Merrimack School House and lot on Washington 
Street either by public auction, or by private sale. 

Article 10. On motion of A. R, Ayers, duly seconded, 
the following was adopted: 

Voted, That the sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars 
($20,000) be and hereby is raised and appropriated addi- 
tional to the sum already raised and appropriated at the 
annual meeting of Union School District held Thursday, 
April 3, 1913, for the erection and completion of a new 
school building on the Walker School lot, and that the 
indebtedness arising from the raising and appropriating 
said Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000) additional to the 
sum already appropriated for the erection and completion 
of said new school building be funded at a rate not exceeding 
four per cent (4%) per annum, and that a sufficient sum of 
money be assessed upon the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District on the first day of April in each year 
thereafter to meet the payments of interest and principal 
of said indebtedness at the date or dates of the maturity of 
the principal and interest as the same may be fixed, as 
hereinafter provided; and that the money obtained by said 
assessments be and hereby is appropriated to make said 
payments; that the district requests the City of Concord to 
aid in funding the indebtedness of the district arising from 
the construction and the furnishing of said school building 
as the city is authorized to do by law, provided said city 
will borrow the money necessary for the purposes set forth 
in this vote and will allow the district to have the use of 
the money so borrowed, and further, that if this request is 
complied with the district will seasonably pay the city 



SCHOOL REPORT. 171 

sufficient sums of money to enable the city to meet the 
payments of the principal and interest upon this indebted- 
ness so created, as the same may fall due, and all incidental 
expenses, and will apply the money to be raised, as herein 
provided, to the payments aforesaid; and the Board of 
Education is hereby authorized to make and request of the 
city the date or dates when the principal of said indebted- 
ness and interest thereon shall mature, and do all other 
acts and things necessary to carry this vote into effect. 

The sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars ($20,000) hereby 
appropriated shall be in place of, and not in addition to, 
the like sum appropriated by vote of the district at a special 
meeting held June 23, 1913, and the authorization given 
the Board of Education by said vote at said special meeting 
to hire said sum upon the notes of the district is hereby 
revoked. 

The ballot for three members of the Board of Education 
to serve for three years, resulted as follows : 

Whole number cast 95 

Necessary for a choice 48 

John B. Wilson had 1 

Dennis E. Sullivan had 90 

Fanny E. Minot had 90 

Omar S. Swenson had 90 

and Dennis E. Sullivan, Fanny E. Minot and Omar S. 
Swenson were declared elected members of the Board of 
Education of Union School District, to serve for three 
years. 

Dennis E. Sullivan and Fanny E. Minot were present 
and the oath was administered by the moderator. 

No further business appearing it was voted to adjourn 
on motion of Arthur F. Sturtevant. 

A true record. 

Attest : 

FRED LEIGHTON, 

Clerk. 



172 CITY OF CONCORD. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. H., 
qualified to vote in District affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet in the Parker School 
Hall on School Street, in said district, on the twenty-ninth 
day of July, 1914, at 7.30 in the evening to act upon the 
following subjects: 

1. To see if the district will ratify and confirm the agree- 
ment dated June 18, 1914, between the City of Concord 
and the Board of Education of Union School District relat- 
ing to the issue of Seventy Thousand Dollars ($70,000) 
bonds of the City of Concord, the proceeds of which are to 
be used by the district in erecting and completing a new 
school building upon the Walker School lot and to ratify 
and confirm all other acts of the Board of Education taken 
with reference to the said bonds. 

2. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this thirteenth day of July, 1914. 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



I certify that on the fourteenth day of July, 1914, I posted 
a copy of the written warrant attested by the Board of 
Education of said district, at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copy at the police station in the 
City of Concord, N. H., being a public place in said dis- 
trict. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 173 

Concord, N. H., July 14, 1914. 
Personally appeared before me on this date the said 
Louis J. Rundlett and made oath that the above certificate 
by him signed is true. 

FRED LEIGHTON, 
Justice of the Peace. 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of 
Union School District met in special session in the hall of 
the Parker School Building on the twenty-ninth day of 
July, 1914, at 7.30 p. m. 

The moderator of the district, Mr. Louis C. Merrill, 
presided. 

Article 1. Edward C. Niles, Esq., presented the follow- 
ing which was unanimously adopted after the need of such 
action had been explained by him. 

Voted, That the agreement dated June 18, 1914, between 
the City of Concord and the Board of Education of Union 
School District acting through its building committee 
relating to the issue of Seventy Thousand Dollars ($70,000) 
bonds of the City of Concord the proceeds of which are to 
be used by the district in erecting a new school building 
upon the Walker School lot and all other action of the 
Board of Education taken with reference to the said bonds 
be and the same are hereby ratified, approved and con- 
finTied as the acts of the district. 

No further business appearing, it was voted to adjourn. 

A true record. 

Attest : 

FRED LEIGHTON, 

Clerk. 



TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT TREASURER'S 
REPORT. 



$188.07 


3,014 


.05 


2,000 


.00 


150 


.24 


2 


.68 


101 


.42 



The treasurer of the Town School District of the city of 
Concord respectfully submits the following report of the 
receipts and expenditures for the year ending March, 1915: 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand March 11, 1914, 
Amount required by law. 
Additional voted by district, 
Literary fund. 

Amount received from Walker fund. 
Amount received from dog licenses, 

Total receipts, $5,456.46 

EXPENDITURES. 

Teachers' salaries, $2,943.50 

Text-books and supplies, 101 .08 

Fuel, 285.07 

Tuition, Union District, high school, 920.00 

Tuition, Union District, Dewey school, 12.00 

Tuition, Union District, H. P. Dame school, 23.68 

Tuition, Penacook, high school, 59.31 

Tuition, school district of Bow, 18.00 

Tuition, school district of Pembroke, 70 . 00 

Repairs, 244.67 

Flags and appliances, 4 . 25 

Conveying scholars, 98 . 80 

Enumerating children, 8 . 00 

Incidentals, 87 . 14 

Janitors, 87 . 40 



SCHOOL REPORT. 175 



Water, 

Superintendent, 

Salary of school board, 

Salary of treasurer. 

Services of auditor. 

Balance on hand March 11, 1915, 



$12.00 


146 


.67 


200 


.00 


25 


.00 


2 


.00 


107 


.89 



$5,456.46 



FRANK E. DIMOND, 

Treasurer. 



This certifies I have this day examined the accounts of 
the treasurer and find them correctly cast and properly 
vouched. 

J. N. ABBOTT, 

Auditor. 
Concord, N. H., March 12, 1915. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Concord: 
The trustees of the Public Library are pleased to transmit 
the annual report of the Librarian for the past year, from 
which it appears that the demands upon that department 
have been greater than for the preceding year. It is grati- 
fying to note that the output of books has increased by 
over a thousand volumes. 

The employment of an additional assistant for a part 
of the time has been fully appreciated by the rest of the 
force and has enabled the library to more nearly fulfil its 
mission as a civilizing agent in the community. No mis- 
take was made in this respect. 

The trustees request that the amount of the appropria- 
tion for the library for the ensuing year may be the same 
as last year, viz., fifty-three hundred dollars. 

REUBEN E. WALKER, 

President, Board of Trustees. 

Concord, N. H., February 1, 1915. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 19 14. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen: When on December 31a librarian annually 
adds up the daily records of desk circulation to learn how 
many books have been given out, it is largely an instinctive 
or preliminary proceeding — like taking the pulse, to see how 
much life there is. By this test our Library is found not 
to have lost ground in 1914, as 88,807 volumes were taken 
away by borrowers, and that is 1,000 more than in 1913. 
Evidently the Library's arteries have not hardened enough 
to warrant great anxiety. 

Its veins, however, may be thought to run with sugared 
water instead of with beef, iron and wine, when the per- 
centages of reading are declared and that of fiction stands 
at over seventy per cent. 

During twenty years we have tried in a way meant to be 
unassuming and which has certainly proved unavailing, to 
bring about a noticeable decrease in this extreme partiality 
for fiction; and to that end we have interposed no red-tape 
between non-fiction and would-be readers of it, and on count- 
less occasions we have charged the desired worthy book to 
the name and address of the borrower who had neglected 
to bring his Library card as requested by our rules. 

How do librarians manage it, so as to report that they 
have reduced fiction reading to sixty per cent.? We cannot! 
There is one influence which may lead people to give up 
novels, but it will be by causing them to give up all reading: 
The "movies" may make the printed page irksome, even 
in a love story, to the millions who see one picture embody 
the vital part of a chapter in a book. 

But so long as our statistics continue to prove that cus- 
tomers ask for 7 stories out of every 10 books called for, 
two palliating facts can be borne in mind: First, a great 
12 



178 CITY OF CONCORD. 

number of these stories are classical reading required of 
pupils in order that they shall write book reviews, and sec- 
ond (a fact which every year emphasizes), namely, that 
though the bizarre and erotic in print may draw public 
attention, they do not hold it; while on the other hand the 
demand for wholesome and cheery books is constant. 
Those bold, bad novels flatteringly described as "strong" 
are not wanted as steadily as is that on whose flyleaf we 
find scrawled, "This is a sweet book." 

Our reference work has' prospered as never before, for 
Miss Brown reports 66 applicants in one day, 800 in one 
month, 6,500 in the year. This department of our Library 
is frequently requested to help residents of other towns, 
and we do so at a nominal charge. On a recent day per- 
sons from Woodsville, Suncook, Pittsfield and Contoocook 
came in for information to assist them in writing papers. 

Over the boxes which go periodically to our four deposit 
stations. Miss Clarke continues to exercise her excellent 
supervision. 

Though we have bought 1,000 books the past year, the 
total number in the Library is now only 28,387, whereas 
in 1913 it was 32,025. This deficit leads to the subject of 
the inventory which was taken during the summer under 
the direction of Miss Dennett. While inventorying, we 
daily came across books which were indisputably past their 
usefulness, either for instruction, recreation or inspiration. 
These we discarded. Their removal seemed the only way, 
and a justifiable one, of stretching the capacity of our 
crowded Imilding. The shelf-room thus gained is already 
almost filled by new publications of which the Library 
stood in want. For one thing we purchased Emerson's 
Journals because it seemed that these ten volumes should 
be pu))licly accessible; and it is gratifying to note that 
Edwin D. Mead, speaking of the present need of testing 
things religious and political, recommends an aid in investi- 
gation between true and false philosophy and advises: "If 
ever there was a time when all men should be reading Emer- 
son anew, that time is now." 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 179 

If the pendulum of public taste swings back and individ- 
uals and clubs revert to the study of art and literature, we 
shall have retained ample material on subjects formerly 
dear to the common heart. Nowadaj^s, interest turns to 
sociology, suffrage, American travel, modern drama, inter- 
national relations and preparedness. 

The war has affected library conditions as well as all 
others, for it interrupted the international book exhibit at 
Leipzig, it has destroyed a library like that at the University 
of Louvain; and it has caused library workers in mobilized 
though not fighting countries to establish reading rooms 
and travelling libraries for the soldiers who are quartered 
in villages and farms; while already on the program of a 
library conference in the United States has appeared the 
topic : 

"Some probable effects of the European War relating to 
Library Work." The nations are being thrown into the 
melting pot, and if, as is further said, there is to emerge the 
Great Society and a new World Spirit (all with capitals), 
surely public libraries will have to readjust and reproportion 
their material. Not only will geographies and histories 
have to be rewritten, but a general book like, "A Day in 
Old Athens" may be supplanted by one which wdll bear the 
title, "A Day in Old Brussels." 

The employment of Miss Elizabeth Fowler, trained in 
the library department of Simmons College, as an assistant 
on half time, has brought great relief in the pressure of 
work. We can now arrange that all of our staff shall not 
return every evening to the Library; and the four of us who 
were feeling over-taxed, now have confidence that our 
strength will be equal to the day's demands, and we are 
able to put more buoyancy and geniality into our deaUngs. 

The annoying conduct of gangs of boys and girls in the 
Library on Sunday afternoons has necessitated the almost 
weekly engagement of a man to enforce quiet. These 
roughs are a reminder that a public library cannot get a 
real hold, much as it w^ould like to, upon either extreme in 
society. At one end is a person who loves a book so much 



180 CITY OF CONCORD. 

that in order to own it he will, like Beecher, "sleep on a 
hard bed, eat coarse food, wear threadbare clothes, refrain 
from social deUghts and watch eagerly the slow savings 
until the price is reached." Bibliophiles like him, unat- 
tracted by the atmosphere of a public library, build up one 
of their own. Neither do we deal with their opposite, for 
of course the illiterate do not seek our doors. It was not 
one of our customers who wondered what to give a mate as 
a Christmas present and ta the suggestion, "Give her a 
book," replied meditatively, "No, she's got a book." 

But between the book-worm and the chorus girl are 
ranged the thousands upon thousands whom a public 
library enrolls as its appreciative and courteous users. 
This generation may be, as E. S. Martin says, "a lunch- 
counter one, so that in reading we take what we can get, 
where we can find it, and hurry on"; yet that even a chance 
nibble of the mind may have a far-reaching effect would be 
urged by a national civic worker who writes: " I have come 
into close touch with a large number of the vital men who 
are creating the new America, and in those quiet conversa- 
tions which occur at the home fireside or in the smoker of 
the Pullman when men open up their inner hearts, I have 
found that nearly every one of them traced his first inspira- 
tion, or the acquisition of a new point of view which has 
■determined the direction of his whole life, to some book. 
Occasionally it is a man or woman, but more often it is a 
book." 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Librarian. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The report of the Board of Health for the 
year ending December 31, 1914, is respectfully submitted. 

The organization was as follows: — ^Mayor Charles J. 
French, ex-officio, Chairman; Dr. Charles H. Cook, City 
Physician, secretary, and Dr. Fred A. Sprague, member. 
Mr. Charles E. Palmer was sanitary officer and Dr. Charles 
Duncan was continued in the office of milk inspector. 

There were fewer cases of contagious diseases reported 
during the year than for any like period since 1892. 

Not many matters other than those of a routine nature 
have been presented for consideration at our monthly meet- 
ings. 

The report of the sanitary officer is transmitted herewith 
and contains the usual valuable statistical data together 
with details of the departmental activities. 

The milk inspector's report is fikewise transmitted. 
We note with interest his suggestion that the Board of 
Health devise some plan for ridding our dairy herds of 
tuberculosis. This Board believes that if a workable plan 
could be devised for eradicating tuberculosis from the 
dairy herds of our city many cases of tuberculosis could be 
avoided. This board therefore recommends that the in- 
coming board cooperate with Doctor Duncan in an effort 
to devise a plan to accomplish this purpose. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, 
CHAS. H. COOK, M D., 
FRED A. SPRAGUE, M. D., 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: The department report tables show the 
number and result of analysis of milk for the year 1914. 
They also show the number of farms and milk stations vis- 
ited and the findings of the inspector. 

The milk supply of the city has warranted but few com- 
plaints during the year and the analyses have been well 
within the law. Complaints have been made as to taste 
and a few because of ropy milk. Undesirable taste in milk 
is due in great part to feed and is easily corrected. In 
fact, it is generally corrected by the farmer before the com- 
plaint of the inspector reaches him. Ropy milk, as has 
been previously stated in reports, is due to bacteria (bacil- 
lus vicosus) and its removal from equipment by more care- 
ful sterilization readily corrects the condition. 

During the year there has been an unusual number of 
changes in ownership of the retail routes in the city. These 
constant changes are to be regretted, as it minimizes the 
value of personal instruction. It is a telling argument to 
demonstrate the fact that the raising and delivery of milk 
is not a profitable business for the average farmer and the 
reason for this is not far to seek. 

The average milk man passes the farms of several of his 
competitors in reaching the city where in the course of 
delivery of his product within the wide city limits he passes 
dozens in a like pursuit. This all means expense and that 
work is being done by many with great loss of time and 
labor on the farms that should be done by the few. 

The future will correct this when an enlightened public 
demands a much better milk at a low price. This means a 
central milk station where milk may be assembled and 
delivered with the least possible amount of labor and ex- 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 183 

pense. Our city has already one milk station capable of 
handling what would amount to ten or twelve of one aver- 
age retailer's supply. This plant has a large pasteuriza- 
tion apparatus and has great future possibilities. 

The greatest problem by far of any in our milk situa- 
tion is the tuberculosis one. Fully twenty per cent, of tuber- 
culosis in children, some authorities say, is caused by 
tubercular germs in milk. There is now no systematic 
government procedure to keep the cattle of either our city 
or state free from tuberculosis. Findings repeatedly show 
us that the disease in cattle is very prevalent. I have 
mentioned this in previous reports, but again would advise 
that some action be taken to compel all herds in our city 
to be tuberculin-tested. Until this is done no milk is a 
safe milk for either man or child, and until it is brought 
about I would advise all our citizens to patronize the men 
who have the tubercular-free herd, determined to be so by 
yearly inspection and tests. 

The inspector has met during the year with the local 
milk men's organization and has imparted to them all the 
views here expressed. I believe there is a fine spirit of co- 
operation among the men in this business in our city and 
much more could be done along the Une of freeing the city 
from tubercular cattle if only some plan could be devised 
by the Board of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: I herewith present my report as sanitary 
officer for the year ending December 31, 1914, and your 
attention is respectfully called to the tables which give a 
detailed account of the work, 

I desire to call particular attention to the marked decrease 
in the number of cases of contagious diseases. There were 
74 cases reported with two deaths, the smallest number for 
any one year since 1892. Aside from an outbreak of diph- 
theria and scarlet fever at the Millville Orphans' Home 
early in the summer there were no epidemics. Reports 
were made of 30 cases of diphtheria, 28 cases of scarlet 
fever, 7 cases of typhoid fever with 2 deaths, 3 cases of 
infantile paralysis and 6 cases of measles. 

There were 237 deaths in the nine wards of the city and 
235 deaths in the six public institutions, making a total of 
472 deaths, compared with 519 deaths in 1913. Of this 
number 168 were non-residents and 16 were stillbirths 
and excluding these from the total number of deaths our 
death rate was 13.26. The death rate for the first six 
months of the year was based on the census population 
of 1910, which was 21,497, and for the last six months on 
the estimated population of 22,000. There were 123 bodies 
brought here from out of town for burial and 193 transit 
permits were issued for the removal of bodies from Con- 
cord to other places for interment. 

All complaints which were made to the office were in ves- 
tigated and the necessary action taken to abate the nuisances. 
In the spring inspections were made of many of the yards and 
alleyways about town and all objectionable rubbish was 
ordered removed. 

Samples of city water were analyzed at the State Labora- 
tory from time to time and found satisfactory. I have 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 185 

made several collections of samples of water running through 
lead pipe which were analyzed to determine the presence of 
lead, and in two or three instances the lead pipe was removed 
from buildings. A number of inspections were made of the 
shores of Long Pond at different seasons of the year. 

There were 122 plumbing permits issued and water tests 
were made of all new work and peppermint tests of old work 
when necessary. 

As in former years inspections were made of the barber 
shops in the city and conditions were found to be good and 
the barbers willingly complying with the law. 

Very little trouble was experienced in enforcing the 
vaccination law and in ODly a few instances was it necessary 
to exclude children from school for failure to comply with 
the regulations. 

I am pleased to report a small balance left of our original 
appropriation which was due to the fact that little assistance 
was given to families by reason of quarantine, aside from 
the diphtheria antitoxin. All Board of Health cases were 
cared for at the Foster Ward, Margaret Pillsbury General 
Hospital, under the general appropriation. The total 
expenses for the Health Department for the year were 
$2,757.74, the balance being $42.26. The receipts for the 
year were $201.84, including milk license fees and the sale 
of diphtheria antitoxin and fumigation supplies. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Mayor and the other mem- 
bers of the Board of Health, the members of the City 
Government and the various city officials for their assistance 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



,500.00 


300, 


.00 


52, 


.88 


19 


.75 


5 


.20 


55 


.80 


18 


.80 


1 


.75 




.80 



186 city of concord. 

Expenditures of the Board of Health of the City of 
Concord forthe Year Ending December 31, 1914. 

salaries. 

Charles E. Palmer, sanitary officer, salary, 
Charles Duncan, M. D., milk inspector, salary, 

fumigation supplies. 

A. Perley Fitch Co., fumigation supplies, 
A. H. Knowlton & Co., fumigation supplies. 
Central Chemical Co., fumigators, 

antitoxin and medical supplies. 

Schieffelin & Co., diphtheria antitoxin, 
A. Perley Fitch Co., diphtheria antitoxin, 
A. H. Knowlton & Co., medical supplies, 
A. Perley Fitch Co., crude petroleum, 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

Helen 0. Monier, services, 600.00 

C. H. Cook, M. D., substituting for sanitary 

officer, 
Rumford Printing Co., mortuary reports. 
New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., 

rental, 
Charles E. Palmer, postage, car fare, etc., 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing, 
The Evans press, printing, 
Edson C. Eastman Co., office supplies, 
Geo. H. Richardson & Co., pens. 
Library Bureau, vaccination cards, 
A. R. Andrews Co., typewriter ribbon, 
C. W. Drake, setting glass, 
A. L. Cook, automobile hire, 
Robert J. Macquire, examining veal calves. 

Total, $2,757 . 74 



59 


.23 


24.00 


21 


.00 


29 


.94 


36.00 


15 


.25 


5 


.80 


1 


.50 


3.09 


1 


.00 




.45 


3 


.50 


2 


.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 187 
RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1914. 

Milk license fees, $189.50 

Sale of fumigation supplies, • 8 . 49 

Sale of diphtheria antitoxin, etc., 3.85 

Total, $201.84 



188 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom: 





Diph- 
theria: 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Infantile 
paralysis. 


Measles. 


Months. 


6 


1 
Q 


O 


^ 


o 


1 


O 


5 


i 




January 


9 

7 




3 
1 
1 

1 
2 
13 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 








1 








February 










1 
1 




March 














April 


2 
2 
9 
















May 




1 
1 
1 

2 

1 












June 


1 
1 






1 
1 

2 




July 








August 






1 






September 








October 
















November 








i 




1 








December 


1 


























Totals 


30 




28 




7 


2 


3 




6 









REPORT OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 



Wards. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


Totals 


Diphtheria 








5 
1 
3 


4 
1 

1 


2 

7 


14 

14 

1 


2 


3 


30 






5 




28 


Typhoid fever 






2 


7 


Smallpox 










Infantile paralysis 


2 












1 
2 






3 


Measles 






1 






1 


2 


6 
















Totals 


2 


5 




10 


6 


9 


32 


3 


7 


74 







HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



189 



COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the 
years since and including 1890: 





Infantile 
paralysis. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals. 


Yeaes. 




1 


Q 


1 
o 


o 




1 


1 


1 


i 


S 


1 


o 


1 


1890 






6 

12 
13 
48 
17 
35 
55 
13 
4 
9 
29 
65 
29 
42 
55 
15 
14 
63 
44 
131 
30 
51 
17 
33 
30 


2 
3 
3 

7 
3 

8 

1 

5 
5 
5 
2 
4 
3 
1 
2 

2 
4 
■6 

1 
2 
1 
3 


9 

7 

37 
41 
113 

44 
4 

22 

8 

99 

39 

11 

6 

39 

18 

80 

27 

26 

7 

23 
10 
8 
7 
28 
28 


3 

6 

8 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 


17 

14 

7 
13 
13 
21 
15 
17 

8 
14 
18 
13 
23 
17 
12 
23 
32 
11 

6 
28 
16 
10 
15 
10 

7 


5 

6 
1 

2 
3 
3 
5 
2 
4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

1 
4 

3 

4 

1 
2 


6 

2 

2 

300 

21 
158 
452 
138 
126 
299 
476 

40 

27 
582 

31 
181 
101 
118 
100 
1,168 
143 

26 

321 

687 

6 








38 

35 

59 

402 

164 

258 

526 

190 

146 

421 

562 

130 

87 

682 

116 

299 

175 

218 

157 

1,350 

199 

95 

362 

763 

74 


7 


1891 












g 


1892 












7 


1893 












9 


1894 












12 


1895 












19 


1896 












13 


1897 












4 


1898 












4 


1899 












7 


1900 






1 

4 






7 


1901 






1 
2 
2 


1 


q 


1902 






5 


1903... 






11 


1904 






4 


1905 






1 
1 






5 


1906 










6 


1907 






■? 


1908 












5 


1909 






1 






11 


1910 













1911 












fi 


1912 

1913 


2 
5 
3 


1 

1 


2 






8 
5 


1914 








9. 













190 city of concord, 

Nuisances, Complaints and Inspections. 

A statement of the number and character of the nui- 
sances for the j^ear 1914 appears below: 

Accumulation of ashes and other rubbish, 5 

Catch basin traps broken, 4 

Cesspools offensive, 1- 

Complaints made without cause, 9 

Dead animals, 16 

Drinking water dirty, 2 

Dumping rubbish and odor from dumps, 10 

Food improperly handled, etc., 6 

KeejDing hens, 10 

Keeping hogs, 19 

Odor from garbage, 2 

Odor from manure, 13 

Odor from privy vaults, 13 

Odor from stables, 13 

Odor in blocks, 2 

Odor in houses, 17 

Other complaints and inspections, 82 

Pediculosis, 1 

Plumbing out of repair, etc., 14 

Sewage backing into cellars, 3 

Sewers obstructed, 1 

Throwing out slops, swill and rubbish, 30 

Uncleanly condition of and about premises, 17 

Uncleanly condition of toilet rooms, 3 

Water in cellars, 2 



295 



Inspection of Plumbing. 

Plumbing permits granted, 122 

Number of inspections made, 244 

Water-closets put in, 181 

Sinks put in, 86 

Bath-tubs put in, 85 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 191 

Wash-bowls put in, 116 

Wash-trays put in, 19 

Urinals put in, ' 2 

Automobile washers put in, 1 

Drinking fountains put in, 6 

Ranges of water-closets put in, 2 

Watering troughs put in, 2 

Shower baths put in, 5 

Sitz baths put in, 1 

Number of sewers inspected, 51 

Fumigation. 

Rooms fumigated, 350 

Schoolrooms fumigated, 4 

Halls fumigated, 2 

Wards at hospitals fumigated, 11 

Attics fumigated, 3 

Cellars fumigated, 7 

Dormitories fumigated, 9 

Barns fumigated, 2 

Books fumigated, 55 

Pieces of bedding, clothing, etc., fumigated, 12 

Report of Milk Examinations and Inspection of Milk 

Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 167 

Number of examinations above standard, 165 

Number of examinations below standard, 2 

Number of milk farms and milk rooms inspected, 29 

Conditions good, 19 

Conditions fair, 9 

Conditions poor, 1 

Number of notices and recommendations given, 15 



192 CITY OF CONCORD, 



Summary. 



Houses placarded in cases of contagious diseases, 23 

Placards removed, 23 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 161 

Burial permits issued, 472 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, • 123 

Transit permits issued, 193 
Number of persons to whom milk licenses were issued, 199 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, 47 
Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to the 

State Board of Health, 52 
Number of reports sent to the Surgeon-general, Pub- 
lic Health and Marine-hospital Service, 52 
Number of mortuary reports issued, 1,000 
Number of vaccination certificates issued to school 

children, 885 
Number of permits issued for children to return to 

school after contagious diseases, 51 
Number of samples of water, etc., collected for anal- 
ysis, 17 
Number of inspections of barber shops, 21 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



193 



DEATHS DURING 1914, BY SEX, CONDITION AND 
NATIVITY, BY MONTHS. 





03 

a 


1 


i 


< 


i 

S 


i-i 


"3 


M 
< 


J 

a 

"c. 


1 

O 


1 

1 


1 

i 

Q 


1 
o 


SEX. 

Males 


23 
26 

14 

18 

15 

1 

1 

13 
16 
11 

8 

1 


27 
18 

14 

18 

12 

1 


21 
18 

13 
14 
12 


22 

18 

24 

7 

7 
1 
1 

5 

18 
8 
8 
1 


16 
16 

13 
8 
11 


20 
18 

15 
12 
9 

2 


15 
13 

13 

7 
7 
1 


20 
16 

16 

10 
6 
1 
3 

4 
15 
6 
9 
2 


19 
21 

12 
13 
13 
2 


16 

28 

9 
17 
17 

1 


26 
18 

15 

20 

9 


21 
16 

14 
13 
10 


■^46 


Females 


99fi 


CONDITION. 


179 




157 




1''8 




10 








5 


NATIVITT. 

Concord 


11 
12 
6 
12 

4 


10 
14 
9 
6 


6 
15 
3 
7 
1 


13 
9 
6 

10 


7 
9 
5 

7 


6 
14 

7 
13 


11 
16 
8 
8 

1 


16 
13 

7 
7 
1 


9 
12 

8 
8 


111 


New Hampshire 


163 


Other states 


84 


Foreign 


103 




11 











18 



194 city of concord. 

Deaths by Age. 

*Under 1 year, 51 

From 1 to 5 years, g 

From 5 to 10 years, 4 

From 10 to 15 years, 4 

From 15 to 20 years, 2 

From 20 to 30 years, 18 

From 30 to 40 years, 42 

From 40 to 50 years, 51 

From 50 to 60 years, 58 

From 60 to 70 years, 96 

From 70 to 80 years, 87 

From 80 to 90 years, 41 

Over 90 years, 9, 

Not stated, 1 

Total number of deaths, 472; 



* Including 16 stillbirths. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



195 





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CITY OF CONCORD. 






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FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CfflEF ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1914. 

The department responded to 43 bell alarms and 266 still 
alarms. 

In addition, four fires occurred, entailing loss, for which 
no alarms were given, making a total of 313 for the year, 
a decrease of 17 compared with the record of the previous 
year. 





Bell. 


. Still. 


No alarm. 


Total. 


Precinct, 


21 


211 




1 


233 


Penacook, 


13 


36 






49 


East Concord, 


6 


10 






16 


West Concord, 


o 
O 


9 




3 


15 



43 266 4 313 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete roll of 
the department with residence and occupation of each 
member, a record of all fires and alarms which have occurred 
during the year and the causes thereof as nearly as could 
be ascertained, with the names of the owners or occupants 
and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance recovered in 
each case. 

The record of alarms compared with that of 1913 shows 
a decrease of 55 in bell alarms and an increase of 35 in still 
alarms. 



~ FIRE DEPARTMENT, 213 

It will be seen that Penacook with 49 alarms suffered 
no loss whatever. A most agreeable record, but not one 
likely to often occur. 

Such was not the case in West Concord, however, where 
several sets of buildings were destroyed, being located far 
from protection against fire. But one dangerous fire 
occurred in the city proper, that of July 27th. 

Although many firemen have been severely injured while 
in the performance of duty, this fire was the first in the 
history of the department where the life of a fireman was 
part of the toll exacted. In the tragic death of Amos P. 
Turner, the department lost a good fireman, a genial 
companion and an expert reins-man. 

The apparatus is in good condition, the three steam 
fire engines located in the city proper having been thoroughly 
tested and repaired. The engine at Penacook, being a 
recent acquisition, needed no attention. 

The Robinson auto-combination placed in commission 
December, 1913, has fully met expectations and the White 
auto-combination, purchased in October, 1914, is performing 
well. The fire alarm telegraph systems of the city proper 
and Penacook are in good condition. One private box 
was added to the precinct system and two public boxes to 
the Penacook system. 

Eight hundred feet of 2^ in. hose was purchased during 
the year and I respectfully recommend the purchase of the 
same amount during the coming year. 

So many comparative tables have been submitted and 
so many arguments have been advanced all tending to 
prove the indisputable advantages possessed by motor- 
driven over horse-drawn apparatus that further effort in 
that line would seem superfluous. I respectfully recom- 
mend the motorizing of the apparatus in this department 
as fast as your honorable body can see the way clear to do it. 

As Inspector of Wires, I would report that the lines of 
all corporations doing business in the city are in good con- 
dition. The relations existing between the electric light, 
telephone, electric car and fire alarm people are of the most 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 

pleasant character, the aim of each being to help the others 
in every way whenever aid is required. In this way the 
lines of all are kept in a safe and efficient condition. 

As Inspector of Buildings I would report that several 
fire escapes have been applied to buildings during the year. 

Building operations within the precinct were confined 
to the erection of one apartment building. Suggestions 
offered were cheerfully accepted and acted upon. 

Conditions in basements and on fire escapes in numerous 
cases were remedied. 

One heavy item of expense borne by the department 
was that resulting from the epidemic among horses which 
visited the city in October and continued until February 
of the present year. Fortunately but one horse was lost 
and as the department owned one spare horse the purchase 
of another was not compulsory. The veterinary and horse 
hire bills however were distinctly noticeable. 

During the month of October, I had the pleasure of 
attending the convention of the International Association 
of Fire Engineers held at New Orleans, La., a report of 
which I rendered at that time. I wish again to take 
occasion to thank your honorable body for the opportunity 
afforded me to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 



3n illemoriam. 

AMOS P. TURNER 
Combination Co. No. 1 
Killed in the performance of duty 
July 27, 1914. 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriations. 


Appropriation, 


$29,036.00 


Resolution, outstanding claims, 


996.89 

•fn 0'^'^ so 




<Jl)OU,UOZ . o» 


Disbursements. 


Permanent men, 


$10,634.00 


Vacations, 


469.46 


Call men. 


9,090.00 


Rent, Veteran's Association, 


150.00 


House man. 


100.00 


Forage, 


1,801.48 


Fuel, 


1,074.81 


Lights, 


775.53 


Incidentals, 


3,134.88 


Horse shoeing. 


402.04 


Horse hire. 


666.50 


Fire alarm, 


628.72 


Penacook fire alarm. 


161.80 


Supplies, auto-combination, 


91.67 


Hose, 


800.00 


Laundry, 


52.00 




— $30,032.89 



Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows: 
Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," with modern hose wagon, 
attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men); 
one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kearsarge," and 
modern hose wagon, attached to the Kearsarge Steam Fire 
Engine Company (14 men); one second-class Amoskeag 
engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, in charge of an 
engineer and fireman; and one auto-combination car in 
charge of five permanent men; one ladder truck, "City of 
Concord," attached to Hook and Ladder Company (21 
men); one house man at Central Fire Station. There are 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 217 

ten horses kept at this station. There are nine perma- 
nent men located at the Central Fire Station and one per- 
manent man at each fire station within the precinct. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent 
man and two horses. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has a modern 
hose wagon with permanent man and two horses. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hook and ladder truck, one hose reel, one chemical 
engine, one hand engine and one wagon in reserv^e. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
an auto-combination car and a modern hose wagon. 

Old Fort (30 men). East Concord, has a 4^-inch cylin- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank. 

Hose. 

Precinct, • 10,500 feet cotton, rubber lined. 
Penacook, 3,200 " 

West Concord, 1,400 " 

East Concord, 500 " 



15,600 



Public Reservoirs. capacity 

Cubic Feet. 

1. Main Street, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s, 1,000 

2. Main Street, rear Court House, 2,000 

3. State Street, corner Washington Street,* 2,000 

4. Rumford Street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's, 1,000 

5. Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street,* 4,000 
9. School Street, corner of Summit Street,* 3,500 



* Brick Cemented. 



218 CITY OF CONCORD. 



ADDITIONAT, FIRE SERVICE FURNISHED FREE. 

Abbot & Downing Co Sprinkler system and 20,000 gal. tank. 

Boston & Maine Kailroad: 

Car barns and lumber shed at ] 

shops and power station at ^ Sprinkler systems. 
West Concord. J 

Brampton Woolen Co Sprinkler system. 

Concord Shoe Factory Sprinkler system and 20,000 gal. tank. 

City, City Hall One fire connection for stand-pipes. 

Central Fire Station One fire connection for stand-pipes. 

High School One fire connection for stand-pipes. 

Walker School One fire connection for stand-pipes. 

Kimball School One fire connection for stand-pipes. 

Conn's Theatre One fire connection for stand-pipes. 

Concord Woodworking Co Sprinkler system. 

Concord Worsted Mills Sprinkler system. 

Hutchinson Building Co. Sprinkler system. 

Monitor tfe Statesman Co Sprinkler system. 

N. E. Box Co. Sprinkler system. 

N. H. Spinning Mill Sprinkler system. 

N. H. State Hospital Standpipes. 

N. H. State Prison Sprinkler system and stand-pipes. 

Page Belting Co Sprinkler system. 

Prescott Piano Co Sprinkler system. 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe Two fire connections for stand-pipes. 

St. Paul's School: 

The School, Middle School, 

New Lower School, Upper I o • 1 1 * j 4. j • 

School and power aAd heat- \ Sprinkler systems and stand-pipes. 

ing plant. 



New Upper School and School \ 04.„„ j„: „ 

Hnnsp Standpipes. 



House. 
J. E. Symonds Table Co One fire connection for stand-pipes. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



219 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire- 
alarm boxes, the city is divided into six districts, viz.: 

District L Embraces that section of the city north and 
west of Washington Street, Box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
ton Streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
Streets. 

Districts 4, 5 and 6. Embrace all south of Pleasant 
Street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the 
district. 

District No. 1. 

9. New Hampshire State Prison. 

12. Curtice Avenue. 

13. Franklin and Rumford. 

14. Bradley and Walker. 

15. Main and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. C. S. Gale's Store. 

19. Centre and Liberty. 
131. Franklin and Charles. 
191. Auburn and Granite. 

District No. 2. 



21, State, opposite Court. 

23. Main and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 

25. Main and School. 



220 CITY OF CONCORD 



26. 


Centre and Union, 




27. 


School and Merrimack. 




28. 


School and Spring. 




29. 


Centre and Essex. 

District No. 3. 




32. 


Warren and Pine. 




34. 


Central Fire Station. 




35. 


Martin's Drug Store. 




36. 


Pleasant and Spring. 




37. 


Pleasant and North Fruit. 




38. 


Orchard and Merrimack. 
District No. 4. 




41. 


South and Thompson. 




42. 


Good Will Hose House. 




43. 


Main and Fayette. 




45. 


Nelson & Durrell's Store. 




46. 


Perley and Grove. 




47. 


South, opposite Downing. 




48. 


Thorndike and South. 




49. 


West and Mills. 




412. 


Wall and Elm. 




413. 


Main, opposite Thorndike. 




414. 


State and West. 




47L 


Clinton and South Fruit. 
District No. 5. 




51. 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 


new shops, 


52. 


South Main and AUison. 




53. 


Hall and Hammond. 




54. 


Broadway and Pillsbury. 




56. 


St. Paul's School. 





FIRE DEPARTMENT. 221 

57. Pleasant View. 

521. Broadway and Rockingham. 

522. South Main and Holly. 

District No. 6. 
62. South Main, opposite Holt Bros. 

Private Boxes. 

5. Boston & Maine Railroad, north end passenger depot. 

6. The Abbot & Downing Company. 

7. New Hampshire State Hospital. 

8. Page Belting Company. 

9. Three boxes inside New Hampshire State Prison. 
33. State House. 

39. Odd Fellows' Home. 

55. Boston & Maine Railroad, old repair shops. 

92. New England Box Company. 



FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 413, 414, 471, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 62, 521 and 
522, will not be responded to by the Alert Hose Company 
until signaled. The signal to proceed to the fire will be 
four blows or second alarm, excepting alarms rung in from 
Box 56. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 32, 37, 39, 92 and 56 will 
not be responded to by the Good Will Hose Company 
until signaled. It will be governed by the same signals 
governing Alert Hose Company. The Alert Hose and Good 
Will Hose Companies will hitch up and remain in readiness 
20 minutes after the first alarm, to all boxes not responded 
to on first alarm. Then, receiving no signal, the officers 
in charge shall dismiss their companies. 



222 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 12, 37, 53, 54, 57, 191, 471 
and 521 will not be responded to by the Kearsarge Com- 
pany on first alarm. 

The signal to proceed to the fire will be two blows, four 
blows, or second alarm, as circumstances may warrant. 

Kearsarge steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose Company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to Box 6, on first alarm; to Boxes 23, 24, 
25, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43, 45 and 413 on second; to all others 
on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill Steamer will respond to Boxes 7, 8, 9, 39 
and 92 on first alarm; to Boxes 5, 6, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 
48, 49, 412, 414, 471, 52, 54, 55, 57, 62, 521 and 522, on 
second; to all others on third. 

Combination Company will respond to all box alarms. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company will respond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating 
from same box or not. 

Two rounds of 11 strokes each will signalize the re- 
quirement of assistance out of town, and will be responded 
to by a detail of three men from each company, appointed 
for the purpose, and by those alone. 

Two additional blows will indicate that the call for 
assistance emanates from East Concord. Such apparatus 
will be detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further 
aid is necessary. Box 34 (Central Station) will follow. 

All-out signal, three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on 
the bells and will be responded to by a detail of four men 
from each company, appointed for the purpose, and by 
those alone. 

Military Signal. 

Two rounds of 3-1-2. 



fire department. 223 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause 
of 15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will be given 
at 8 o'clock a. m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given 
at 1 o'clock p. m. 

The signal to close all schools for one session will be 
given at 11.30 a. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It will be one 
single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells the 
number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose will 
vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Fire-alarm Telegraph 

is the "Gamewell" patent. It embraces 42 miles of wire. 

On the lines are 46 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the 
city, and 10 private boxes — in all, 56. There are three 
alarm bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell metal), one of 3,740 
pounds (bell metal), and one of 2,000 pounds (American 
steel). There are also 16 mechanical tappers, 40 direct 
action tappers, one four-circuit repeater, and six indicators. 

The battery consists of 252 storage battery cells. 

The alarm system was installed in 1880 by the Gamewell 
Fire-alarm Telegraph Company. 

Directions for Giving an Alarm. 

Above all things, keep cool. 

To obtain the key to the box, break the glass in the key 
box located beneath the alarm box. 



224 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale." de- 
signed expressly for the purpose of informing you whether 
an alarm is being transmitted the instant you open the door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull down the 
hook once only and let go. 

But if the bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to 
attempt to pull another until the one already pulled had 
performed its mission. 

Wait until 20 seconds have elapsed after the "tell-tale" 
has stopped ringing, close the door, which will restore the 
armature to the position it left when the door was opened. 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go. 

Should there be no response, pull it again. 

Then should there be no response, go to the next box. 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the department. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

PENACOOK FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

W. C. Green, Chief Engineer: 

I herewith submit for your consideration the following 
report of the Penacook fire-alarm telegraph system: The 
system is the Gamewell patent, and consists of five miles 
of No. 9 iron wire. On the lines are thirteen boxes owned 
by the city, two private boxes, one 1,500-pound bell, one 
indicator, three mechanical gongs and three direct-action 
tappers. The battery consists of thirty-six storage battery 
cells. There has been added two new boxes the past year, 
Box 36 near Rolfe's saw mill on Washington Street and 
Box 46 on Merrimack Street opposite Cross Street. I 
would respectfully recommend the addition to the system 
of one new box the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED M. DODGE, 

Superintendent of Fire Alarm. 



Location of Boxes. 

3L Elm Street, near S. N. Brown's house. 

34. Charles Street, near schoolhouse. 

35. Washington Square. 

36. Washington near sawmill. 

37. Washington Street, near outlet. 

38. Junction of West Main and South Main Streets. 

39. South Main Street, near cemetery. 

41. Corner of Center and East Canal Streets. 

42. High Street, opposite Maple Street. 

45. Summer Street, opposite Church Street. 

46. Merrimack Street opposite Cross Street. 

47. Merrimack Street, near Hose House. 

48. Corner Penacook and Rolfe Streets. 

15 



226 city xdf concord. 

Private Boxes. 

25. Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works. 
62. Concord Axle Works. 

All-out Signal. 
Three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 
Three rounds of four strokes each. 

Out of Town Signal. 
Two rounds of eleven strokes each. 

For Fire on Boscawen Side. 
Box 35, with two additional strokes. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

After this date the High School and Summer Street 
School will not be closed by signal. 

The Charles Street School and the Elementary Grades 
in Main Street School will be closed whenever the signal 
is sounded. When sounded at 7.30 a. m., there will be 
no morning session of these schools; when sounded at 12.15 
p. m., there will be no afternoon session. 

The signal used will be the same as heretofore: — Two 
strokes of the fire alarm bell given three times with a pause 
of fifteen seconds between the rounds (2 — 2 — 2). Jan. 25^ 
1915. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Saturday afternoon at 12.50 o'clock precisely. It will be 
one single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 227 

the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Penacook fire-alarm system was installed in June, 
1908, under direction of the chief engineer. 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 19 14. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, OfBce, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 



PRECINCT. 

Walter J. Coffin, 1st Asst., Shipping clerk, 
Sylvester T. Ford, 2d Asst., Molder, 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



63 Pleasant Street. 
41 So. Main Street. 



Fred M. Dodge, 
Elbridge Emery, 
George W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 

Electrical Inst, maker, 61 Merrimack Street. 



WARD 2. 

Butcher, 



Potter St., East Concord. 



WARD 3. 
Overseer, 443 No. State St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

J. Edward Morrison, Captain. Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

1 J. Edward Morrison, 

2 Charles Powell, 

3 James H. Sanders, 

4 Thomas J. Morrison, 

6 George B. Davas, 

7 Herbert M. Sanders, 

8 Harry P. Blake, 

9 Harry L. Messer, 

10 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

11 Harry C. Taylor, 

12 George L. Livingston, 
15 George H. Abbott, 

acting for 

5 Chester Gay. 

13 Joseph H. Brunei, 

14 Henry E. Drew, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter. 
Collector, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage Trimmer, 
Machinist, 
Gas inspector, 
Shipping clerk, 



Permanent Driver, 
Permanent Driver, 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 
3 So. Main Street. 
52 No. State Street. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
3 Broadway. 
41 Thorndike Street. 
2 No. State Street. 
38 Jackson Street. 
63 School Street. 



Central Station. 
Central Station. 



EIRE DEPARTMENT. 



229 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



J. C McGiLVRAT, Captai-.i. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 Charles H. Sanders, 

21 Orrin C. Hodgdon, 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 

23 John M. Inman, 

24 John B. McLeod, 

22 Eli Langlois, Jr., 

26 Charles W. Bateman, 

27 P. J. O'ConneU, 

28 F. H. Fowler, 

29 H. E. Kendall, 

30 Christopher Cunningham, 



OFFICERS. 



D. J. Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Jig-sawyer, 
Janitor, 
Machinist, 
Engineer, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Electrician, 
Painter, 
Plumber, 
Silversmith, 
Electrician, 
Electrician, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
9 Pearl Street. 
107 No. Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 
31 Beacon Street. 
44 Thorndike Street. 
16 Wall Street. 
Colonial Block. 
5 Perry Avenue. 
60 Centre Street. 
38 No. Spring Street. 
34 No. Spring Street. 
11 Pleasant Street. 
Central Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, E.igineer, 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, 



RELIEF ENGINE. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 So. State Street. 
81 So. State Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 



Ernest E. Saben, Captain. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

36 E. E. Saben, 

37 C. C. Chesley. 

39 C. J. French, 

40 C. H. RoweU, 

42 F. P. McKenna, 

43 J. M. Davis, 

45 M. G. Davis, 

38 George L. Osgood, 

41 J. E. Howard, 

44 D. J. Murphy, 

46 F. H. Silver, 



OFFICERS. 

Charles C. Cheslet, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
J. M. Davis, Treasurer. 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Car-builder, 
Builder, 
Mayor, 
Builder, 
Clerk, 
Blacksmith, 
Builder, 
Clerk, 

Woodworker, 
Molder, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
88 No. State Street. 
1 1 Prince Street. 
5 Perkins Street. 

5 Abbott Court. 
19 Franklin Street. 
4 Tahanto Street. 

6 Beacon Street. 

9 Thompson Street. 
9 Montgomery Street. 
2 No. State Street. 
Alert Station. 



230 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

H1BA.M T. DicKERMAN, Captain. Frank S. PaxNAM, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Albert W. Thompson, Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

60 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

51 Frank S. Putnam, 

52 George H. Sawyer, 

54 Jasper R. Mudgett, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

67 Albert W. Thompson, 

58 Harry L. Peacock, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 

53 John W. McGowan, 

61 J. E. Cochran, 

acting for 

56 Edgar D. Clark. 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Painter, 
Wood-worker, 
Blacksmith, 
Wood-worker, 
Machinist, 
Janitor, 
Painter, 
Electrician, 
Plumber, 
Molder, 



Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
36 Broadway. 
6i Thorndike Street. 
5 Allison Street. 
98 So. State Street. 
23i Perley Street. 
74 Allison Street. 
36 Warren Street. 
104 So. State Street. 
Good Will Station. 
38 Downing Street. 



Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER 
COMPANY, NO. 1. 

OFFICERS. 
Will A. King, Captain. Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

66 Frank T. Bean, 

67 Benjamin Ouillette, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Foster, 

73 Sam B. Morgan, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

76 D. Charles Parker, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

78 Carmi L. King, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 

82 WiUiam H. Reagan, 

83 Harry Leary, 

84 F. C. Young, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Renovater, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 
Steam fitter. 
Plumber, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 

5 Fremont Street. 
16 Avon Street. 

10 Jefferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 

13 West Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 
10 Avon Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 

30 Green Street. 
63 South Street. 

Ins. Blk., School Street. 

15 Warren Street. 

34 Downing Street. 

71 South Street. 

92 West Street. 

53 South Main Street. 

6 Fremont Street. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



231 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1. 



M. S. Wakefield, Captain, 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 C. G. Pinkham, 

93 M. J. Martin, 

94 L. D. Dunham, 

95 John Driscoll, 



OFFICERS. 

C. G. Pinkham, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Occupations. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
1st Chauffeur, 
2d Chauffeur, 
3d Chauffeur, 

House Man 
A. L. Downing. 



Residences. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



Henry Rolfe, Captain. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Walter H. Rolfe, 
106 Fred H. Morrill, 

109 Alfred Beddow, 

111 RusseU E. Rolfe, 

110 John B. Dodge, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

118 George A. Griffin, 

120 Harry F. Jones, 

123 William Corbett, 

103 Frank D. O'Brien, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

114 Henry E. Templeton, 

112 Ambrose Sweet, 

119 WUUam H. Holbrook, 

116 Loren H. Emerson, 

117 Guy B. Chase, 

121 Albert Cassavaugh, 
105 CorneUus W. O'Brien, 
108 Alfred J. York, 

115 Carl G. Holmes, 



OFFICERS. 

Frank P. Robertson, Lieut., Clerk and Treat. 
John B. Dodge, Steward. 

MEMBERS. 



Occupations. 
Highway agent, 
Machinist, 
Foreman, 
Sash-maker, 
Stationary engineer, 
Clerk, 
Janitor, 
Table-maker, 
Painter, 
Teamster, 
Axle-maker, 
Teamster, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wine clerk, 
Laborer, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Table-maker, 
Hotel clerk, 
Spinner, 
Miller, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 
39 Centre Street. 
45 Summer Street. 
44 Elm Street. 

39 Center Street. 

59 Merrimack Street. 

92 High Street. 

15 Washington Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
44 Centre Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 

41 Washington Street. 
4 Charles Street. 

10 Church Street. 
110 Merrimack Street. 
Union Street. 
9 Union Street. 
43 So. Main Street. 
36 Centre Street. 

42 Soring Street. 



232 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 
East Concord. 



George O. Robinson, Captain. 
C. E. Robinson, Lieut and Clerk. 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

120 George O. Robinson, 

121 C. E. Robinson, 

122 John C. Hutchins, 

125 Samuel G. Potter, 

126 WilUam E. Virgin, 

127 Rufus C. Boynton, 

128 Shad Gate, 

129 Ross W. Gate, 

130 Herbert Knowles, 

131 Parker French, 

132 Westley Field, 

133 John W. Sanborn, 

134 Walter C. Sanborn, 

136 Arthur P. Swain, 

123 Michael Lacroix, 

137 Clarence Tibbetts, 

138 Reuben L. Gate, 

135 John T. Gate, 

140 G. A. Ghamberlin, 

139 William F. Paige, 

141 Daniel W. Sanborn, 

142 Thomas E. Chase, 

143 H. A. Stuart, 

144 Hiram Gardner, 

145 John Canney, 

146 Thomas Morrison, 

147 Fred Gardner, 
149 Fred J. Garter, 

148 Claude H. Swain, 

124 Herbert E. Merrill, 



Occupation!!. 
Water-dealer, 
Clerk, 
Engineer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Farmer, 
Horseshoer, 
Carpenter, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Wood-worker, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Machinist, 
Blacksmith, 
Storekeeper, 
Blacksmith 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Stonecutter, 
Clerk, 
Blacksmith, 



John C. Hutchins, Treasurer, 
Michael Lacroix, Steward. 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Eastman Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Mill Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



233 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

West Concord. 

OFFICERS. 

Hiram E. Quimbt, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer 

Alfred J. Fraser. Lieut, and Clerk. Frank C Blodgett, Steward. 

Patrick Ryan, Foreman of Hose. 



Names. 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Frank G. Peterson, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Edward Lovering, 
Abram D. Cushing, 
Joseph Daley, 
Luther E. Rowe, 
Robert Henrj-, 
Benjamin Kemp, 
Clarence J. Spead, 
Arthur Spead, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Ekstrom, 
Oscar Johnson, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Blacksmith, 
Quarryman, 
Silversmith, 
Laborer, 
Plumber, 

Stationary engineer. 
Stationary engineer. 
Stationary engineer. 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 



Residences. 
490 North State Street. 
19 Clark Street. 
382 North State Street. 
5 Engel Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Street. 
346 North State Street. 
436 North State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
422 North State Street. 
455 North State Street. 

15 Lake Street. 

513 North State Street. 

River Street. 

439 North State Street. 

439 North State Street. 

14 View Street. 

480 North State Street. 

16 Gladstone Avenue. 
516 North State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



OFFICERS. 



William E. Dow, Captain. 



Dennis Holloran, 
A. P. Da\'is, 
H. H. Carpenter, 
E. D. Ashley, 
Charles F. Thompson, 
Elba F. Home, 



John E. Gove, 1st LieutenarU. 



S. S. Upham, 2d Lieutenant. 

MEMBERS. 
Arthur H. Britton, 
O. H. Thompson, 
W. K. Wingate, 
A. L. Walker, 
James Jepson, 
George H. Davis, 



Fred S. Johnson, 
F. O. Libbey, 
M. F. Thompson, 
W. W. Kennedy, 
J. J. McNulty, 
E. J. Brown. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



Concord, N. H,, January 1, 1915. 

To His Honor Mayor Charles J. French and the Honorable 
Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit herewith to 
your Honorable Board my Sixth Annual Report of the 
work performed by the members of the Police Department 
of the City of Concord for the year ending December 31, 
1914. 

ROSTER. 

City Marshal. 
George A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant City Marshal. 
Victor I. Moore. 

Captain. 
Samuel L. Bachelder. 

Sergeant. 
Christopher T. Wallace. 

Regular Patrolmen. 
Samuel Rodd, Harry L. Woodward, 

Irving B. Robinson, Fred N. Marden, 

George H. Silsby, Charles H. Guilbault, 

Edward J. McGirr, Frank B. McDaniels, 

Joseph E. Silva, John B. Long. 

Janitor of Police. Station. 
William A. Kelley. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



235 



Special Reserve Officers. 



Captain. 
Thomas P. Davis. 



Willie A. Little, 
Orrin H. Beane, 
Charles E. Kelley, 
George G. Allen, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
Harper B. Giles, 
John McGirr, 
Nelson Forest, 



James J. Halligan, 
Willie A. Flanders, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
Earl D. Gaskell, 
George E. Drury, 
James Jepson, 
Jonas Welcome. 



Financial Statement. 

Cash received from District Court for officers' 
fees and paid to City Treasurer, 



$621.61 



Total appropriation for 1914, 


$17,849.06 


Special appropriation. 


1,025.05 


Total, 


$18,874.11 


Disbursements. 




Fuel, 


$589.34 


Helmets and buttons. 


83.70 


Horse-hire (city and Penacook), 


63.25 


Board and shoeing horse. 


386.13 


Ice, 


7.80 


Incidentals, 


1,157.00 


Salaries of regulars. 


14,417.85 


Salaries of specials. 


1,426.69 


Janitor's salary. 


300.00 


Lights, 


206.04 


Police signal system, 


236.31 



,874.11 



236 city of concord. 

Number of Arrests. 

1909 281 

1910 586 

1911 1,076 

1912 1,366 

1913 1,556 

Whole Number of Arrests and Causes for the 
Year 1914. 



Total arrests, including Penacook, 


1,850 


Total arrests at Penacook, 


169 


Brought before the Court, 


1,125 


Discharged by the Court, 


14 


Discharged without being brought before the Court, 


711 


Adultery, 


12 


Assault, 


32 


Assault on an officer, 


1 


Overdriving a horse, 


2 


Aggravated assault, 


4 


Breaking and entering, 


5 


Bastardy, 


1 


Brawl, 


1 


Runaway boys, 


6 


Drunkenness, including Penacook, 


1,191 


Drunkenness at Penacook, 


75 


Using profane language. 


1 


Carrying concealed weapons. 


2 


Escapes from House of Correction, 


S 


Evading car fare, 


3 


Furnishing liquor to minors, 


2 


Fornication, 


7 


Arrested for out-of-town departments, 


S 


Insane, 


9 


Disposing of a horse unfit for labor. 


1 


Failure to send child to school. 


40 
4 


Larceny, 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 237 

Safe-keeping, 393 

Making false statement of age in order to procure 

liquor, 1 

Delivering cigarettes to minor, 1 

Injuring personal property, 1 

Firing gun in compact part of city, 1 

Escapes from State Hospital, 6 

Beating board bill, 2 

Non-support, 10 

Running auto while under the influence of liquor, 2 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk. 
Selling cigarettes to a minor. 
Cruelty to a child. 
Violating sanitary food law, 
Fighting in the street. 
Hunting without a license, 
Shooting gray squirrels. 
Selling mortgaged property. 
Rape, 

Obscene language, 
Runaway girl, 
Idle person, 

Employing boy under 16 years of age, 
Interrupting funeral procession. 
Embezzlement, 
Fraud, 
Forgery, 

Impersonating an officer, 
Drunk and fighting, 
Failure to connect premises with sewer, 
Abandoning child. 

Running job team without a license, 
Overspeeding automobile, 
Overspeeding motorcycle. 
Larceny from the person. 
Running automobile recklessly, 
Keeping unlicensed dog. 
Printing obscene pictures, 



238 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Showing obscene pictures, 

Malicious mischief, 

Begging, 

False pretences, 

Playing cards on the Lord's Day, 

Keeping a disorderly house, 

Keeping liquor for sale. 

Buying junk of a minor. 

Violation of the 55-hour law. 

Stubborn child, 2 

Abandonment of a horse, 1 

Miscellaneous. 

Whole number of lodgers, including Penacook, 2,939 

Whole number of lodgers at Penacook, 628 
Number of doors found open and secured, including 

■ Penacook, 577 
Number of doors found open and secured at Penacook, 12 

Lost children returned to their parents, 26 

Called to quell disturbances, 58 

Stray teams found, 10 

Stray horses found, 3 

Ambulance calls, 116 
Number of duty calls rung in from patrol boxes, 49,968 

One two-months old baby found in B. &. M. depot, 1 

Injured persons cared for at Police Station, 6 

Brush fires reported to police, 3 

Complaints of roosters crowing, 3 

Dead taken from Merrimack River, 2 

Suicides, 2 

Dogs run over by automobiles, 3 

Persons run into by automobiles, 5 

Complaints of horses and cows in streets, 3 

Horses shot by officers, 1 

Automobiles run into teams, 8 

Boys breaking windows, 11 

Niggerheads reported broken, 2 

Horses found cast, 3 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 239 

Complaints of dogs killing hens, 2 
Officers assisting at drowning accidents, 18 
Complaints of teams driving through funeral pro- 
cessions, 2 
Man found in box car (sick), 1 
Parents abusing children, 3 
Lights reported out by officers, 476 
Out-of-town runaway boys caught and sent home, 4 
Runaway horses caught by officers, 2 
Complaints of boys sliding across railroad tracks, 7 
Old persons strayed from home and taken home by 

police, 3 

Water pipes reported burst, 2 

Runaway children reported, 6 

Officers attending fires, 58 

Animals in distress reported to S. P. C. A., 3 

Fires discovered by poHce, 1 

Complaints about dogs, 13 

Wires reported broken and down, 8 

Officers called upon to remove dead bodies, 2 

Officers called upon to assist people injured, 5 

Horses taken from street on account of cold, 5 

Lost children found on streets and taken home, 21 

Holes in bridges reported, 3 

Holes in streets reported, 4 

Holes in sidewalks reported, 3 

Insane people found on streets, 5 

Persons asphyxiated by gas and taken to hospital, 2 

Limbs from trees reported in streets, 4 

Bound over to the Superior Court, 28 

Committed to jail, 45 

Continued for sentence, 10 

Committed to House of Correction, 438 

Committed to the New Hampshire State Hospital, 9 

Number of fines paid, 247 

Complaints dismissed by the Court, 19 

Mittimus not to issue till called for, 8 

Sentences suspended, 280 



240 city of concord. 

Location of Police Signal Boxes. 

Box 1. Bridge Street and Stickney Avenue. 

Box 2. South Main and West Streets. 

Box 3. South Main and Concord Streets. 

Box 4. South Main and Pleasant Streets. 

Box 5. North Main and School Streets. 

Box 6. North Main and Park Streets. 

Box 7. AVashington between North Main and State 

Streets. 

Box 8. North Main and Church Streets. 

Box 9. North State and Penacook Streets. 

Box 10. Curtice Avenue and North State Street. 

Box 11. West Concord, opposite Shepard's store. 

Box 12. Penacook (Square). 

Box 13. Center, opposite Union Street. 

Box 14. South and Perley Streets. 

Box 15. Broadway, corner Carter Street. 

Box 16. Center and Pine Streets. 

Box 17. Pleasant and South Streets. 

Box 18. Warren, opposite Tahanto Street. 

Box 19. Beacon and Rumford Streets. 

Suggestions to Storekeepers and Others. 

Five hundred and seventy-seven doors were found open 
in the night time during the year, and were secured and the 
proprietors notified. The carelessness of people in securing 
their doors and windows is remarkable. There can be no 
estimate of the value of property saved by the police through 
their vigilance in detecting unlocked doors and windows, 
and their promptness in notifying the owners is commend- 
able. In every case of this character larcenies might have 
occurred for which the police would have had to bear a 
responsibility which rightly belonged to others. In con- 
nection with this subject, I recommend that the public 
exercise more care in securing their doors and windows on 
the ground floors and those which may be reached by 
means of piazzas and balconies. 



police department. 241 

Conclusion. 

I desire to extend my sincere thanks to His Honor the 
Mayor and to the members of your Honorable Board for 
the courteous treatment and cordial support I have re- 
ceived at your hands in discharging the duties of the office. 
I also extend my heartfelt thanks to Judge Clark, City 
Solicitor Murchie, Clerk Curtis and all others who have 
assisted during the year. To the members of the police 
department, I have only words of praise for the manner 
in which they have performed their duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



16 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1914. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The twenty-second annual report of the engineering 

department is herewith submitted, in comphance with the 

ordinance creating this department. 

The expenses of the department for the year 1914 were 

as follows: 

Paid engineer and assistants, $3,266.80 

car fares and livery, 123.37 

express, 4 . 25 

supplies, 118.68 

telephone service, 23 . 10 

repairs, 11.85 

services and supplies. Assessors Maps, 857 . 65 

postage, 2 . 51 

convention expenses, 23 . 00 



t,431.21 



Appropriation, $4,575 . 00 

Expended, 4,431.21 



Balance unexpended, $143 . 79 

A special appropriation for the purchase of a transit for 

this department, amounting to $250.00 was made, the 

instrument purchased for $245.25 leaving a balance of $4.75. 

Sewers. 

The expenditures for construction, repairs and main- 
tenance, together with the recommendations relating to 
needed changes in the city precinct, also a statement of the 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 243 

condition of the principal bridges in the city, will be found 
in the reports to the Board of Public Works covering the 
work done under its supervision. 

Fire Department. 

Plans of the city proper and the Penacook district, 
covered by fire-alarm and hydrant service, have been made, 
showing the location of hydrants and fire-alarm boxes, and 
turned over to the chief of the fire department. 

Building Permits. 

In company with the chief of the fire department, I have 
attended thirty-eight hearings on petitions for new build- 
ings or alterations to existing structures. 

All petitions were granted. We also examined one 
building, occupied as a tenement, which was thought unsafe 
for occupancy, but minor repairs were all that was necessary 
to make the building safe. 

Cemeteries. 

The addition to the Soucook Cemetery was laid out in 
lots the past season. 

A new block was staked out and rough-graded in Blossom 
Hill Cemetery. This will give two new blocks for lotting 
the coming spring and give purchasers of lots in this ceme- 
tery a better choice for location and price than has been the 
case for the past season. 

I would again renew my recommendation that some pro- 
vision for the care of the brook in the northwesterly section 
of this cemetery be soon made, that new blocks may be 
systematically and economically laid out in this portion of 
Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

The deed books of Blossom Hill Cemetery have been 
brought up to date covering the sale of lots during the past 
year. 



244 city of concord. 

Playgrounds. 

Plans for a shelter for Kimball plaj'ground were made, 
the masonry and roof supports put in, but the structure 
was not completed as there was a lack of funds for the entire 
work. 

A lawn tennis court was staked out at the Rollins Park 
playground, grades, etc., given for its construction and 
provision made for further extensions when needed. A 
ball field was laid out here and also at White Park. 

Town Lines. 

Together with the selectmen of Hopkinton and Bow, the 
lines between Concord and these two towns were peram- 
bulated, the marks renewed and all monuments described 
in former perambulations found. 

Descriptions of the lines showing the locations of the 
various monuments marking it were made and after being 
signed by the perambulators were deposited with the city 
clerk. 

Assessors' Maps. 

The northerly and easterly portions of the township were 
covered during the past season, but much detail remains 
to be filled in. With a good season we should complete the 
field work the coming summer and be able next winter to 
give the assessors complete maps of the whole township. 

We are still finding property heretofore unknown and 
many pieces could not be located without the aid of maps. 

There was expended from the $1,000.00 appropriation 
for this work, the sum of $857.65, in 1914. 

Miscellaneous. 

Meetings of your board and the board of public works 
have been attended when information has been requested 
from this department. 

The work of the board of examiners of plumbers and the 
board of hydrant commissioners has been placed before 
you in their respective reports to this board. 



EEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 245 

The employees of this department during the past season 
were: Fred W. Lang, principal assistant; Orion H. Hardy, 
transitman; Daniel S. Dinsmore, in charge of field work 
assessors' maps; George W. Burke, William E. Nash, Har- 
rold H. Betton and James E. Stevens, rodmen, all of whom 
rendered efficient service in their respective positions. 

The annual session of the American Society of Municipal 
Improvements was held in Boston, Mass., and was the 
first visit of the society to New England. Its sessions were 
filled with valuable papers and discussions of the same by 
men well qualified to talk on municipal matters; they were 
a source of profit to all who attended them. 

The city of Boston was carrying on work in almost every 
line one could desire to see and the Boston men were only 
too ready to show any and all members public works in 
which they were particularly interested. 

To the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen, I wish to 
express my appreciation for the privilege of attending the 
above-mentioned meetings and also to express to you my 
full appreciation for the interest taken and the hearty sup- 
port given this department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The Park Commissioners present herewith their report 
for the year ending December 31, 1914. 

Receipts. 

General appropriation, $3,700 . 00 

For Penacook Park, 100.00 

Overdraft on Penacook Park, 21 . 68 



Total receipts. 




$3,821.68 


Expenditures. 






Salary of Superintendent, eleven months. 


$990.00 


WHITE PARK. 






Paid for labor. 


$908.64 




labor removing moths. 


93.53 




labor on ice. 


40.00 




cash paid Frank Atkinson, 


31.25 




cement. 


11.10 




laying culvert stone. 


9.60 




city of Concord, spraying trees, 


, 11.70 




incidentals, 


58.70 




tools and hardware, 


8.45 




balance on iron fence. 


288.00 




M. E. Clifford & Co., 






labor and supplies, 


15.66 




teaming to ball ground. 


101.32 




teaming, 


4.50 




horse hire. 


49.00 




dressing. 


33.50 




grain. 


8.00 


out «70 QK 





PUBLIC PARKS. 




24:7 




ROLLINS PARK. 






Paid for labor, 




$477.74 




labor removing moths, 


30.26 




lumber. 




196.71 




shrubs. 




47.30 




dressing, 




9.00 




grain, 




77.99 


$839.00 










PENACOOK PARK. 






Paid for labor. 




$114.63 




tools and hardware, 


6.50 




incidentals. 




.55 


121.68 




BRADLEY PARK. 




Paid for labor. 


FISKE PARK. 




38.00 


Paid for labor, 


COURT HOUSE. 




37.50 


Paid for labor, 


RIDGE ROAD. 




53.00 


Paid for labor, 


PECKER PARK. 




15.50 


Paid for labor. 






12.00 


AREA 


AT soldiers' monument. 




Paid for labor. 


ires, 




1.00 


Total expendit\ 


$3,780.63 


General appropriation unexpended 


i, 


41.05 



$3,821.68 

The only features added to the parks the past year have 
been, 352 feet of iron fence on White Street at White's Park, 
a shelter and renewal of rustic bridge at Rolhns' Park. 

An appropriation for $200.00 was made for improve- 
ments on the ball ground at White's Park. It was not all 



248 CITY OF CONCORD. 

used and the balance of $41.05 remained unexpended at 
the close of the year. 

The expense of removing gypsy moths is increasing each 
year. 

A continuance of the fence on Centre Street should be 
made and more SAvings and amusements for the children 
provided which they do not have now on account of the 
lack of funds to install same. 

The Pageant of Incidents of Concord History was given 
at White's Park, Tuesday, June 9th, and was greatly en- 
joyed by everyone present. 

A new buck deer was caught near Garvins' Falls by the 
fish and game officials and placed in Rollins' Park. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-offido, 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 

GARDNER B. EMMONS, 

BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Commissioners. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1914. 



to March 31, 


1918. 


to March 31, 


1918. 


to March 31, 


1917. 


to March 31, 


1917. 


to March 31, 


1916. 


to March 31, 


1916. 


to March 31, 


1915. 


to March 31, 


1915. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 
CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 

SOLON A. CARTER, President. 
EDSON J, HILL, Clerk of Board. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



250 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members. 




Abraham G. Jones,* ex-officio, 


1872— three months. 




John M. Hill,* 


1872-1878. 




Benjamin A. Kimball, 


1872-1878. 




Josiah Minot,* 


1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 


1874 


David A. Ward,* 


1872-1874. 




Edward L. Knowlton,* 


1872. Resigned Sept. 25, 


1875 


Benjamin S. Warren,* 


1872-1873. 




John Kimball,* ex-officio, 


1872-1876. 




John Abbott,* 


1873-1876. 




John S. Russ,* 


1874-1877. 




Abel B. Holt,* 


1874-1877. 




Samuel S. Kimball,* 


1875. Resigned July 1, 


1891 


Geo. A. Pillsbury,* ex-officio, 


1876-1878. 




Luther P. Durgin,* 


1876-1885. 




John Kimball,* 


1877. Resigned July 1, 


1891 


Wilham M. Chase, 


1877. Resigned July 1, 


1891 


Horace A. Brown,* ex-officio, 


1878-1880. 




James L. Mason,* 


1878-1893. 




James R. Hill,* 


1878. Died in 1884. 




Geo. A. Cummings,* ex-officio. 


1880-1883. 




Edgar H. Woodman,*ea:-c>^ao, 


1883-1887. 




Joseph H. Abbot,* 


1884-1893. 




George A. Young,* 


1885-1894. 




John E. Robertson, ex-officio. 


1887-1889. 




Stillman Humphrey,* ex-offici 


0, 
1889-1891. 




Henry W. Clapp,* ex-officio, 


1891-1893. 




Willis D. Thompson, 


1891-1895. 




William P. Fiske,* 


1891-1902. 




James H. Chase,* 


1891. Died in 1893. 




John Whitaker,* 


1892. Died in 1903. 





* Deceased 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 251 

Henry E. Conant,* 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

Parsons B. Cogswell,* ex-officio, 

1893-1895. 
Solon A. Carter, 1893. Now in office. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William M. Mason, 1893-1899. 

William E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Robinson, ex-officio, 1895-1897. 
Ebenezer B. Hutchinson,* 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 
Edson J. Hill, 1895. Now in office. 

Albert B. Wood worth,* ex-officio, 

1897-1899. 
Nathaniel E. Martin, ex-officio, 

1899-1901. 
Henry E. Conant,* 1899. Died in 1911. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 

Harry G. Sargent,* ex-officio, 1901-1903. 
Obadiah Morrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott, 1901. Now in office. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 

Charles R. Corning, ex-officio, 1903-1909. 
Henry C. Holbrook, 1903. Now in office. 

Harley B. Roby, 1905. Resigned Jan. 24, 1911. 

Charles J. French, ex-officio, 1909. Now in office. 
Burns P. Hodgman, 1911. Now in office. 

Frank P. Quimby, 1911. Now in office. 

Presidents of the Board. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1874-1875. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

John Kimball,* 1875-1876. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1876-1878. 

John Kimball,* 1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William P. Fiske,* 1891-1902. 

Solon A. Carter, 1902. Now in office. 

♦Deceased. 



252 CITY OF CONCORD, 



Superintendents. 

V. C. Hastings,* 1873. Died March 14, 1907. 

P. R. Sanders, 1907. Now in office. 

* Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 253 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rigl 


Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 




rights, 


$60,000.00 


Concord Manufacturing Co., 




for water rights, 


83,000.00 


W. P. Cooledge, for mill 




privilege and land, 


5,500.00 


Humphrey & Farnum, for 




kit-shop privilege. 


4,900.00* 


Flowage rights around Pen- 




acook Lake, 


4,375.61 


W. P. Cooledge, Hutchins 




lot, 


l,050.00t 


Mary C. Rowell, for land. 


1,500.00 


Moses H. Bradley, for land. 


5,000.00 


Harry Phillips, for land, 


100.00 


Joseph B. Walker, for land, 


2,214.00 


John G. Hook, for land. 


370.00 


A. S. Ranney, for land. 


1,350.00 


Alfred Roberts, for land. 


1,275.00 


Charles E. Ballard, for land, 


2,500.00 


Mary G. Carter, for land. 


1,250.00 


EUzabeth Widmer, for land, 


1,564.50 


A. L. Proctor, for land, 


450.00 


Robert Crowley, for land. 


3,000.00 


Miles Hodgdon, for land, 


2,200.00 


heirs of Lowell Brown, for 




land. 


1,032.55 


Coffin & Little, for land. 


800.00 


0. F. Richardson, for land. 


100.00 


M. H. & C. R. Farnum, for 




land. 


4,500.00 



♦Original cost, $5,000; land sold for $100. 

t Original cost house and lot, $2,250; portion of lot sold for $1,200. 



254 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid Cook & Hood, for land, $1,750.00 

Charles H. Farnum, for land, 1,410.36 
Fred N. Ladd, for land, 300.00 

A. W. Hill, for land, 6,500.00 

Helen G. Evans and others, 

for land, 2,000.00 

Frank B. Kilburn, for land, 2,500 . 00 
Joseph A. and Mary E. Hal- 

loran, for land, 600.00 

Wheelock Club, for land, 1,400 . 00* 

Dr. I. A. Watson, for land, 2,490. OOf 
Frank E. Horner, for land, 1 ,900 . 00 

Frank E. and William H. 

Horner, for land, 100.00 

Alva A. Young, for land, 2,700 . 00 

Henry J. Putnam, for land, 2,600 . 00 

Alert Boat Club, for land, 2,160 . 00| 

C. F. Moseley, for land, 1,500.00 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Association, 20,000 . 00 
dam, gate-house and appur- 
tenances, 32,756 . 17 
conduit and gate-houses, 29,818.94 
mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to 
the reservoir, fire main 
through North and South 
Main Streets, and high 
service main from Pena- 
cook Street to Stark 
Street, Penacook), 182,241.70 



♦Original cost, $1,500; house sold for $100. 
•t Original cost, $2,700; house sold for $210. 
X Original cost, $2,250; buildings sold for $90. 



WATER DEPAETMENT. 



255 



Cost of distribution pipe, $395,911 .56 
service pipe, 63,639.57 
reservoir, 42,460 . 09 
pumping station, shop, sta- 
ble and storehouse, 24,165.35 
pumping machinery, 17,000.42 
engineering and superintend- 
ence, ■ 14,913.12 
incidentals, 6,531 . 19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1915, 



$1,052,380.13 



Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding: 



When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1 


1915, 


4, 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1916, 


4, 


9,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1917, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1918, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1919, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Nov. 1 


1920, 


3, 


7,000.00 


Nov. 1 


1921, 


3, 


4,000.00 


April 1 


1921, 


3i, 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1922, 


4, 


337,000.00 


March 1 


1922, 


02, 


20,000.00 


April 1 


1922, 


3|, 


30,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1923, 


3|, 


15,000.00 


Jan. 1 


1924, 


3|, 


15,000.00 




$477,000.00 



256 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners transmits herewith 
the reports of .the superintendent and the engineer of the 
pumping station, exhibiting in detail the operations of this 
department for the year ending December 31, 1914, which 
are made a part of this report. 

The past year has been an unusually busy one for the 
employees of the department. 

The 8-inch cement-lined pipe installed in 1887 to supply 
St. Paul's School and adjacent territory has been replaced 
with 12-inch cast-iron pipe involving an expenditure of 
$16,778.00. 

On the night of August 21, the six-way hydrant in front 
of Central Block on No. Main Street was forced by the 
pressure from its connection with the high service main. 
The flow of water from a 10-inch pipe under 88 lbs. pressure 
quickly undermined the concrete sidewalk, a portion of the 
foundation of the block, flooded the basements and damaged 
a considerable quantity of merchandise stored therein. 
Only the prompt response of the department employees in 
shutting off the water prevented much more serious conse- 
quences. The Board has adjusted all the claims for 
damages to the satisfaction of the claimants. 

The accident was unprecedented; the superintendent 
has adopted measures to prevent a recurrence by tying each 
six-way hydrant with f-inch iron rods to a yoke attached to 
the nearest bell joint. 

The unusual amount of extension work has made it im- 
practicable to carry out the policy of tree planting on the 
land acquired by the city, but it is hoped that that work will 
be resumed the coming year. 

In addition to the redemption of the annual instalment 
of $10,000, 49 water loan bonds due January 1, 1914, it has 
been possible to anticipate the payment of an equal amount 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 257 

due at later dates, thus materially reducing the annual 
interest charge. 

During the summer of 1914, the Board authorized an 
inspection of our system by a sanitary engineer. 

Under date of July 13, 1914, Mr. George C. Whipple, the 
engineer selected to make the inspection, submitted his 
report. This report with preliminary comments by the 
Board under date of July 22, 1914, was printed in pamphlet 
form and distributed to the public. 

In view of the importance of the subject treated by Pro- 
fessor Whipple, the value of the statistics embodied in the 
comments of the Board and the desirability of preserving 
them in permanent form, we reproduce the pamphlet re- 
ferred to. 

At the suggestion and on the recommendation of Professor 
Whipple, a subsequent investigation was made by Prof. 
John W. M. Bunker, covering certain features which were 
not considered in the examination conducted by Professor 
Whipple. 

Professor Bunker submitted a report of his investigation 
which the Board considers should be preserved in permanent 
form supplementing as it does the very satisfactory report 
of Professor Whipple. 

While Professor Bunker's report contains many technical 
terms which may not be intelligible to the public generally, 
his conclusions cannot fail to be understood and appreciated 
by all. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE *D. B. PRESCOTT, 
CHARLES J. FRENCH, ex-officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 

17 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT ON THE WATER SUPPLY OF CONCORD. 

By George C. Whipple, Consulting Engineer, New 
York City. 

Office of the Board of Water Commissioners, 

Concord, N. H., July 22, 1914. 

To the Patrons of the Concord Water-Works and the Citizens 
of Concord: 

It has been the aim of the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners to supply the patrons of the system with an abun- 
dance of pure water and to make the service satisfactory. 

In our efforts we have had the assistance, cooperation 
and approval of our local and state boards of health (es- 
pecially the latter), and to them the board desires to ex- 
press its appreciation. 

From time to time the board has discussed the desir- 
ability of employing some sanitary engineer of more than 
local reputation whose experience in the matter of public 
water supplies would entitle his views to respectful consid- 
eration, to carefully inspect our system and report his 
conclusions. 

At a recent meeting of the board the employment of 
such an expert was authorized, and the president and 
superintendent were instructed to secure the services of a 
competent sanitary engineer to make such inspection. 

Under these instructions, Mr. George C. Whipple, Gor- 
don McKay Professor of Sanitary Engineering of Har- 
vard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, was employed. Professor Whipple is a member of 
the firm of Hazen & Whipple, sanitary engineers of New 
York City. Each member of the firm has published sev- 
eral volumes on water supplies and allied subjects. Each 
member has a national reputation and is recognized as 
an authority on the subject. 

Professor Whipple was requested to make a thorough, 
systematic and comprehensive investigation of our sys- 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 259 

tern and report to the board his conclusions and to make 
such suggestions for its improvement as he deemed ad- 
visable. 

Most, if not all of his suggestions under the latter clause 
had received the careful consideration of the board, and 
steps have been taken to correct the conditions referred 
to. 

Since 1893, the board has acquired twenty-six parcels 
of real estate on the shores of the lake at an aggregate 
cost of $47,872.41. 

The city now owns 365.47 acres, comprising more than 
80 per cent, of the shore line. 

The state (State Hospital) owns about 10 per cent., leav- 
ing a little less than 10 per cent, of shore line controlled by 
nine individual owners. No part of the city's holdings is 
used for pasturage, and all will eventually be covered by 
forest growth. 

In addition to the natural growth of hard and soft woods,, 
the board, during the past five years, has set out 150,000' 
seedling pines. 

The report of Professor Whipple is presented herewith 
for the information of our citizens, with the recommenda- 
tion that it be studied carefully. 

It is our confident belief that a critical perusal of the 
report will convince all fair-minded people that Mr. Whipple 
is justified in his general conclusions, that the water of 
Penacook Lake can be used for all domestic purposes with 
perfect safety. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
GEORGE D. B. PRESCOTT, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
CHARLES J. FRENCH, ex-officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



260 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT ON THE WATER SUPPLY OF CONCORD. 
By George C. Whipple. 

July 13, 1914. 
Mr. Percy R. Sanders, Superintendent of the Water-Works, 
Concord, A\ H., 

Dear Sir: In accordance with the request of the Presi- 
dent of the Water Commissioners, I have made a careful 
sanitary inspection of the water supply of your city, and 
I hereby present my report. 

In preparation for the investigation I have examined 
the Annual Reports of the Water Department, the reports 
of the Concord Health Department, and the analyses that 
have been made from time to time in the laboratory of the 
State Board of Health, I have also read certain reports 
on the quality of the water made by Dr. Charles D. How- 
ard, the chemist of the State Board of Health. 

In the forenoon of Friday, June 26, I made an inspection 
of the catchment area in company with you and Doctor 
Howard. On this trip samples of water were collected and 
tested for the presence of algae, etc. I also visited the high 
service reservoir and the pumping station. In the after- 
noon of the same day an inspection of the reservoir was 
made, using a launch. 

As a result of these investigations it is my opinion that 
the city of Concord has an excellent water supply. It 
is safe and sanitary and there is no reason why it should 
not be used for drinking and for all domestic purposes. 
It is unnecessary to boil it, and it is unnecessary for the 
citizens of Concord to purchase spring water from fear 
that the water drawn from the taps is not safe. 

The Board of Health records of the city show no indi- 
cation that the water has been the cause of typhoid fever 
•or diseases which may be spread through the agency of 
a public water supply. The water is attractive in ap- 
pearance, almost odorless, clear and nearly colorless. It 
is soft and palatable. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 261 

The odor of the water is the only physical quality which 
seems likely to be occasionally at fault. All New Eng- 
land lakes and reservoirs are affected occasionally with 
growths of microscopic organisms. Some of these pro- 
duce unpleasant tastes and odors. There is no question 
but that such growths of organisms occur in Penacook 
Lake and they will doubtless occur in the future. Un- 
pleasant as they may be, there is no reason to believe 
that the odors or the microscopic plants which cause them 
are deleterious to health. They should not occasion alarm 
as they do not indicate infection of the water. At the 
present time the water has no odor due to this cause. 

Having made this general statement, I will now discuss 
some of the conditions in detail and call attention to cer- 
tain matters which, in my judgment, should be attended 
to. 

The Cleanliness of the Catchment Area. 

When surface waters are used without purification, 
they should be collected from a catchment area that is 
reasonably clean and free from pollution by fecal matter. 
The records of the Water Department state that the 
catchment area of Penacook Lake is about three square 
miles. The area of the lake is about 338 acres, and to 
this should be added about 30 acres which represents the 
area of Forge Pond, now practically a part of the lake. 
Forge Pond has a catchment area of about 200 acres. 
The lake has a total length of approximately two miles. 
The catchment area comprises woodland and farmland. 
On the west side of the lake a highway extends from the 
lower end of Forge Pond to the extreme upper end of 
the lake. Its distance from the lake shore varies from 
500 to 2,000 feet except at the two ends of the lake where 
it approaches closely to the shore. A part of the catch- 
ment area of the east side of the lake is also traversed 
by a highway, but this is at a considerable distance from 
the lake. 

There are on the catchment area somewhat over a dozen 



262 CITY OF CONCORD. 

dwelling houses occupied permanently throughout the year. 
All of these were visited by us. The premises were ex- 
amined and information obtained as to the number of 
persons and farm animals at each place. As a result of 
this hastily made census it was found that the permanent 
population of the catchment area is about 75 persons, or 
something less than 25 persons per square mile. During 
the summer this population is increased by an indefinite 
number of persons who temporarily occupy the cottages 
along the shore of the lake. It seems probable that during 
short periods of the summer season the population of the 
catchment area may be considered as about 50 per square 
mile. There are about 100 cows and between 30 and 40 
horses kept at the various farms. At Sunnyside there is a 
poultry yard where about 700 hens are said to be kept. 
There seems to be nothing abnormal for a farming region 
on this catchment area, if we except the cottages which 
are located near the lake shore. 

There are no artificial sewerage disposal systems on the 
watershed. The sanitary conveniences at the different 
houses include privies and cesspools. Most of these are 
satisfactorily located with respect to the lake. The soil 
of the watershed is generally porous and well adapted to 
the reception and natural purification of the liquids from 
the cesspools. The largest cesspools are those at the 
State Farm, but they are located several hundred feet 
from the lake in sandy soil and there is not the slightest 
reason to believe that any of the contents reach the waters 
of the lake by percolation. There are one or two cases 
where there is an opportunity for surface water to carry 
household wastes into the lake at times of rain, but these 
are matters that can easily be corrected and have all been 
brought to your attention. The chief danger from cess- 
pools, however, is not while they are in use but at the time 
when they are being cleaned. In some cases we were 
informed that it was the practice to dispose of the contents 
on the surface of the ground, but in a number of instances 
the practice is to bury the fecal matter in the ground, cover- 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 263 

ing it with earth. This is the proper method and should 
be insisted upon, whether the privy be located near the 
lake or at a considerable distance from the lake. The 
object of this is to avoid accidental contamination of the 
water. 

While it is true that animal manure does not cause 
typhoid fever, yet this substance should be kept out of 
public water supplies. Obviously, it is impossible to 
eliminate all animal manure from catchment areas which 
include farms and farm lands. Cows, sheep, and other 
animals require water and it is but natural that they seek 
it in streams and ponds. In this way all surface waters 
become more or less contaminated. Even streams which 
drain nothing but forest lands may become contaminated 
from the manure of birds, squirrels and other warm-blooded 
animals. These sources of contamination are relatively 
unimportant from a hygienic point of view when compared 
with pollution by human fecal matter. In the case of the 
water supply of Concord, the water is subjected to long 
storage before it flows to the city, which causes the danger 
of even the animal contamination to be reduced to a 
minimum. The use of manure on plowed fields is a natu- 
ral use of the land. The washings of fields thus manured 
are bound to enter the lake at certain times of the 
year. While this is a source of contamination that can- 
not be wholly eliminated, it should be reduced when 
possible. Often this may be accomplished by friendly 
arrangements with the landowners. Some of the fields of 
the State Farm are located near the lake and it is said that 
during the past season this land was heavily manured with 
the result that the washings entered the lake. This con- 
dition might and should be prevented. When manure is 
applied to land on watersheds ridges at the bottoms of the 
hills should be constructed to retard the surface flow, and 
cause more of the water to soak into the ground before 
reaching the lake. This would benefit the farmer as well 
as the water supply. The poultry farm maintained by the 
state is another possible source of contamination by animal 



264 CITY OF CONCORD. 

manure. While these are matters that should be attended 
to, I do not regard them in the present instance as being 
serious. The analyses of the Concord water made by the 
State Board of Health do not indicate any marked con- 
tamination from this source. 

For the most part, swamps are conspicuously absent on 
the catchment area and accordingly the color of the water 
is very low. There is, however, a small swamp at the upper 
end of the lake which, in my judgment, should be drained. 
At the present time it forms a breeding place for micro- 
scopic organisms. 

The summer cottages along the shore deserve special 
consideration. Here, if anywhere, the waters of the lake 
are in danger of contamination by human fecal matter. 
Many of the cottages have been already purchased by the 
city. This general policy of the Concord Water Board is 
one which I approve. The city should control the entire 
shore line of the lake in order to prevent the sources of 
contamination from being located too near the water. 
This does not necessarily mean that it is necessary for the 
city to actually own all of the land along the shore. Doubt- 
less arrangements can be made by which the owners of 
land will take adequate precautions against contamination. 
The wisdom of purchasing any given piece of property 
must depend largely upon the price for which it can be 
purchased. The present situation does not warrant the 
paying of excessive prices for the mere sake of holding title 
to the shore line. 

I have inspected the premises at the St. Paul's School 
boat-houses, and find the sanitary arrangements to be satis- 
factory. The water used in the shower baths does not 
enter the lake, but is discharged into the ground. It is 
my judgment that the use of the lake for boating carried 
on under proper restrictions is not deleterious to the hy- 
gienic quality of the water supply of Concord. 



water department. 265 

Summer Versus Winter Conditions. 

It is a well-known fact that the typhoid fever bacillus 
does not multiply in water. If the germs of this disease 
get into the water they do not live many weeks, and very 
few of them live more than a few days. They are able 
to survive much longer in cold water than in warm water, 
and it is a fact that most typhoid fever epidemics which 
have been traced to water have occurred during the colder 
months of the year, and that water-borne typhoid fever 
is more common in northern than in southern latitudes. 
Surface waters are less likely to transmit intestinal dis- 
eases during the summer than during the winter. This 
tends to minimize the effect of temporary summer pollu- 
tion on the watershed, the effect of summer cottages, and 
the effect of accidental contamination from persons who 
boat or fish on the lake or along the shores. Furthermore, 
sedimentation, the disinfecting influence of sunlight, and 
other destructive agencies combine to minimize the effect 
of contamination during warm weather. 

The Typhoid Fever Record of Concord. 

The typhoid fever record of Concord for many years 
has been exceptionally good. Data received from the local 
Board of Health and hereto appended have indicated that 
during the twelve years from 1902 to 1913, the largest 
number of deaths from this disease in any one year was 
four, while during two of these years there were no deaths 
from typhoid fever. The maximum typhoid fever deaths 
per 100,000 was 18.3, the average, 10.3, and the minimum 0. 
These records compare very favorably with those of cities 
supplied with filtered water or with well water. Even 
more significant than this low typhoid fever death-rate is 
the distribution of the typhoid fever cases during the year. 
The records show that most of the cases have occurred dur- 
ing the late summer and autumn, and that the number 
of cases of this disease occurring during the winter has 
been very small. Since water-borne typhoid fever occurs 



266 CITY OF CONCORD. 

chiefly in cold weather this distribution would not have 
occurred if any considerable amount of this disease had 
been caused by the public water supply. To me, the fig- 
ures mentioned are significant and indicate unmistakably 
that the water supply of the city has been safe. 

Objections to Surface Water. 

It must be admitted that there are certain inherent ob- 
jections to a water supply taken from the surface of the 
ground. One of these is the possibility of accidental con- 
tamination by the fecal matter of some person who happens 
to be sick with typhoid fever, or who is one of those un- 
fortunate individuals, who, having had this disease, retain 
the germs of it in their system for long periods of time. 
Such persons are termed "typhoid fever carriers." It is 
said that in round numbers about one person out of every 
40 or 50 who have had this disease remain carriers for a 
considerable period of time. Fortunately the number of 
typhoid fever carriers in the country at large is decreas- 
ing, for the reason that this disease is being gradually 
stamped out. It is partly because of the danger of this 
accidental contamination that sanitary engineers favor the 
filtration of surface waters. It is recognized, however, 
that storage is an important agency in protecting a water 
supply against accidental infection, and the long storage 
provided by Penacook Lake is in itself an important factor 
in the local problem. 

Another objection to the use of surface waters is from 
the growth of microscopic organisms which takes place in 
waters stored in reservoirs and lakes. In respect to these 
growths great differences are noticed between different 
parts of the country, and sometimes between different lakes 
and reservoirs quite near together. The effect of these 
microscopic organisms, most of which belong to the vegeta- 
ble kingdom, is to make the water slightly turbid and pro- 
duce unpleasant tastes and odors of water at certain times 
of the year, chiefly in summer. Penacook Lake is not en- 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 267 

tirely free from such growths, and the water occasionally 
acquires a vegetable and woody, or it may be a fishy odor. 
At the time of my inspection the water contained only a 
few of these organisms and the odor which they produced 
was practically negligible. Algse have been observed in 
the waters of the lake for many years. They were men- 
tioned by Dr. T. M. Drown in the report which he made 
to the city in the year 1891. Apparently, they have been 
no more numerous in recent years than they were then. 
The growth of these organisms depends upon many dif- 
ferent conditions which cannot be discussed at length 
in this brief report. One of the important factors, how- 
ever, is the food supply which they demand. Manure is 
used to fertilize the land and contribute to the growth of 
the crops. When it is allowed to wash into the lake it 
tends to fertilize the lake and contribute to the growth 
of microscopic plants. This is one of the reasons why 
care should be taken to exclude surface wash from Pena- 
cook Lake. 

Stagnation. 

In this latitude all lakes which are as deep as Penacook 
Lake undergo two periods of what is called "stagnation," 
one during the summer and one during the winter. At 
these times the water at the bottom does not mix with the 
waters above, and it usually becomes foul through the 
decomposition of organic matter. Following these peri- 
ods of stagnation the foul water becomes mixed with the 
waters above and may give rise to noticeable odors. At 
such times also microscopic organisms are likely to de- 
velop and add to the odor. In all probability this con- 
dition occurs in Penacook Lake, but thus far it has not 
been studied. 

Nothing can be done to prevent this, and it is men- 
tioned here merely to explain why it is that during the 
spring and fall there is a slightly noticeable odor to the 
water. 



268 city of concord. 

Cleanliness of the Distribution System. 

The water supply of Concord is taken from the lake at 
a point several hundred feet from the gate-house. It 
first passes through a brick conduit laid along the bottom 
of Forge Pond, It then passes through two sets of screens 
in the gate-house and flows to the city through cast-iron 
pipes. An inspection of the screens showed an accumu- 
lation of organisms of various kinds. On the screens were 
found leaves, small fish, frog spawn, fragments of water 
plants, fresh water sponge, and more or less miscellaneous 
debris. It is probable that the conduit at the bottom 
of the lake is not entirely clean and that growths of fresh 
water sponge are there present. This pipe moss, as it 
is sometimes called, is almost always present in conduits 
through which surface waters are flowing. The algae, 
above mentioned, serve as food for these pipe organisms. 
Practically the only harm they do in the pipes is to oc- 
casionally make the water slightly dirty and turbid in 
some parts of the city where by reason of excessive draughts 
they become dislodged. 

Samples taken by us from certain of the taps of the 
city showed that in most cases the water was exception- 
ally free from turbidity. A sample from the tap in the 
State Laboratory, however, contained a considerable 
amount of sediment, which was evidently derived from 
the pipes. 

I have suggested to you that the screens of the gate- 
houses be cleaned daily during the summer season and 
that the pipes of the city be thoroughly flushed by taking 
certain streets, one at a time, and increasing the velocity 
of the water through the pipe so as to thoroughly clean 
out any accumulated dirt. A velocity of about 8 feet per 
second is needed for efficient flushing. To do the work 
properly will require several weeks. It should be done at 
night. 



water department. 269 

High Service Reservoir. 

The water in the high service reservoir appeared to be 
free of algse growth at the time of our inspection. 

Water Analyses. 

I have examined with care the analyses of the Concord 
water which have been made by Doctor Howard in the 
laboratory of the State Department of Health. The meth- 
ods used have conformed to standard methods. 

The chemical analyses have been more complete than is 
necessary. It would be useful, however, to have micro- 
scopical examinations of the water made regularly by the 
Sedgwick-R after method and by the use of the cotton 
filter. It would also be useful to maintain records of the 
number of bacteria in the water and the approxim.ate 
number of B. coli. At present these tests are made, but 
infrequently. 

Quantity of Water Available. 

At the present time there are no records which ade- 
quately show the quantity of water that is being used 
by the city. It is thought, however, that this quantity is 
not far from 3,000,000 gallons per day. If this figure is 
correct, it seems probable that the limit of the capacity 
of the catchment area of Penacook Lake has been nearly 
reached, and that the most important problem of the near 
future will be to secure an additional supply of water. 
The level has been below high-water mark for a number- 
of years. The chief reason for this probably has been the 
recent lack of rainfall, but doubtless an increased water 
consumption has been another reason. 

In anticipation of the need of additional water, it seems 
to me that immediate steps should be taken to secure accu- 
rate records of the water now being used, and I recom- 
mend the installation of Yenturi meters on the pipe lines 
leading to the city. The expense of these meters would 
not be large and the definite results obtained would be 
of great value to the city. 



270 city of concord. 

Conclusion. 

In conclusion, I Avish to express my thanks to the Mayor, 
and the members of the Water Board, the Secretary and 
Chemist of the State Board of Health, and yourself for 
affording me the ample opportunities for conducting the 
present inspection. And I wish to congratulate the citi- 
zens of Concord on having at hand such an excellent water 
supply as that of Penacook Lake. 

Attached to this report will be found certain data in 
regard to the typhoid fever records of the city and some 
of the cotton discs which were used in the examination of 
samples of the sediment found in the water in different 
parts of the system. 

Yours respectfully, 

(Signed) GEORGE C. WHIPPLE, 

Consulting Engineer. 

CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
Typhoid Fever Death-Rates, 1902-1913. 









Typhoid Fever 






Typhoid Fever 


Death Rate 


Year. 


Population. 


Deaths. 


per 100,000. 


1900 


19,632 






1901 


19,819 




.... 


1902 


20,006 


3 


14.9 


1903 


20,193 


3 


14.8 


1904 


20,380 


1 


4.9 


1905 


20,566 


3 


14.6 


1906 


20,753 


3 


14.4 


1907 


20,940 





0.0 


1908 


21,127 


1 


4.7 


1909 


21,314 


4 


18.8 


1910 


21,497 





O.Q 


1911 


21,684 


3 


13.8 


1912 


21,871 


4 


18.3 


1913 


22,058 


1 


4.5 


Average, '. 


1902-1913, 




10.3 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



271 



Number of Cases of Typhoid Fever Reported to the 
Concord Board of Health during the Months from 
January, 1902, to December, 1913. 



Year. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar 


Apr. 


May. 


June 


. July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total 


1902 














1 


2 


2 





13 


4 





1 


23 


1903 





2 





1 








1 





2 


6 


3 


2 


17 


1904 

















1 


5 





2 


3 


1 





12 


1905 


3 


1 


1 





1 


3 





1 





8 


4 


1 


23 


1906 


3 








1 








5 


8 


5 


5 


2 


3 


32 


1907 


2 


2 


2 

















2 





3 





11 


1908 











1 











2 





3 








6 


1909 


2 





2 








1 


2 


2 


3 


11 


3 


2 


28 


1910 


1 


1 





1 


1 








6 


1 


2 


1 


2 


16 


1911 


1 





2 


1 





1 








1 


2 


2 





10 


1912 

















2 


1 


1 


9 


2 








15 


1913 














1 





2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


10 


Total 


12 


6 


7 


5 


4 


10 


18 


21 


40 


47 


21 


12 


203 


Notes: 
1903. 


"Large 


number of 


cases traced to 


sources 


out- 



side of city." 

1904. "Source of most of these cases was located be- 

yond the limits of the city." 

1905. "Several of hospital cases were brought here 

for treatment from other places." 

1906. "Largest number of cases ever reported to 

this office in one year . . . widely 
scattered over the city. Several trace 
their origin outside." 

1909. "Eight of these cases were brought to the 

hospitals from out of town." 

1910. "Origin of several of these cases was traced 

to sources outside of the city." 



272 CITY OF CONCORD. 



MEMORANDUM CONCERNING RESEARCH AT 
PENACOOK LAKE. 

Concord, N. H., September 21, 22, 1914. 

On September 21, 1914, I went to Concord, N. H., with 
Mr. Mackenzie and Mr. Barker, students in Sanitary 
Engineering at Harvard to make limnological investigations 
of the water in Penacook Lake. 

We were met by Mr. Sanders, superintendent of the 
water-works, who was with us during most of the investiga- 
tion. 

The following determinations were made throughout 
the vertical at the deepest portion of the lake on two suc- 
cessive days. 

(1) Temperature. 

(2) Dissolved oxygen. 

(3) Carbon dioxide. 

(4) Quantitive test for microorganisms. 

(5) Cotton disc records at top, middle and bottom. 
The work was greatly expedited by the use of the water- 
works launch operated by Mr. Richardson. 

The apparatus used was as follows: 
From Harvard Sanitary Laboratory, 

Thermophone and coil for temperature work. 

Dissolved oxygen sampler. 

Field laboratory. 

Microscope and field outfit for algae work. 

Sounding line and lead. 
From city engineer. Concord, 

Transit and rod. 

Soundings. 

The wide part of the lake just west of the gate house was 
selected as being that portion of the body of water on which 
to concentrate our efforts. On the afternoon of September 
21 a hydrographic survey of this portion of the lake was 
run, soundings being taken along selected lines. The 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 273 

position of each reading was determined by the time between 
soundings and checked by transit angles from a shore sta- 
tion. These soundings were plotted on a map furnished by 
the city engineer, and ten-foot contours of the lake bottom 
run out. Five-foot contours were plotted by interpolation. 
The stage of the water was 180.3 and the contours are 
corrected to the same base and so designated on the blue 
prints. These contours are probably accurate in the main 
to .5 foot. The deepest sounding was 73 feet at this stage 
of the water and there is a small area of this depth at the 
region indicated. This reading was obtained several times 
and rechecked by cross line soundings. All determinations 
were made at a point over this deep hole. 

Temperature. 

The temperature of the water in Penacook Lake showed 
little decrease during the first twenty feet, with the exception 
of the warming of the surface layers from the sun's rays. 
The air temperature on September 21 was 89° in the shade. 
There was no wind on this or the succeeding day, the sur- 
face of the water being flat and glassy. Between twenty 
and twenty-five feet there was a drop in water temperature 
of 3° F. This drop increased greatly up to twenty-nine 
feet where the temperature was 15° lower than the surface. 
Between twenty-nine and thirty-one feet there was a region 
of more uniform temperature, and from this depth the 
water became gradually cooler until sixty feet was reached 
where the minimum reading was obtained of 43.1° F. This 
temperature was maintained to the bottom. These results 
are plotted on a blue print diagram. 

The interpretation of these results shows that at some 
time of heavy wind the water of the lake was stirred to 
circulation to a depth of thirty feet. The average wind 
action however stirs it to a depth of only twenty or at most 
twenty-five feet. In this upper layer there is considerable 
circulation most of the time and the water contained in this 
layer is frequently brought in contact with the air. In this 
manner it acquires an even temperature throughout. 

18 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Below twenty-five feet is a period of non-circulation. 
Here the water remains more or less quietly and will so 
remain until the fall overturn. 

Microscopic Organisms. 

Samples were examined for the presence of microorgan- 
isms at the surface, twenty, thirty, forty and seventy foot 
depth. A surprisingly small number of organisms was 
found. At the surface there was a growth of anabaena 
which from inspection seemed to have increased by the end 
of the second hot day. On September 21 there were how- 
ever only 72 standard units of this form per cubic centi- 
meter. It was visible as minute specks at the surface of 
the water, and under the microscope was shown to be tan- 
gled in clumps. This organism is subject to rapid increase 
and sudden death and decay. In the latter stage it some- 
times imparts to the water a disagreeable odor, but prob- 
ably never in such small quantities as this. 

In addition to this form there was a sprinkling of proto- 
zoan forms and a few rotifers. The protozoa were in no 
case members of that class which thrive in polluted waters 
but rather of the group which I have come to regard as 
clean water organisms. 

Dissolved Oxygen. 

The first twenty feet of water showed a dissolved oxygen 
content of between 90 and 100 per cent, saturation. From 
this point the per cent, of saturation gradually fell off until 
at a depth of sixty feet there was only 11 per cent, of the 
saturation amount for that temperature. This depletion 
of oxygen in the non-circulating depths is due to the oxida- 
tion of organic matter in decay. At no point was there any 
complete depletion of oxygen. 

Carbon Dioxide. 

Carbon dioxide is a product of oxidation either in res- 
piration or in decay. As dissolved oxygen in water is 
used up it is expected that carbon dioxide will increase. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 275 

The carbon dioxide in Penacook lake is distributed in the 
normal manner. From 2 to 2.5 parts per million are found 
in the circulating surface waters of the first twenty feet, 
below which depth there is an increase corresponding to 
the decrease of dissolved oxygen. The maximum normal 
content at seventy feet was about 9 parts per million. 

Certain determinations made at a slightly different point 
showed a peculiar variation in the CO2. For instance at 
the forty-foot depth a content of 10 parts per million was 
noted and checked, while at the sixty-foot depth at this 
point only 7.7 parts could be found. Minor fluctuations 
were noted also in the upper levels. Inasmuch as there 
were no concentrations of microorganisms at the layers 
indicated, it would seem that some other explanation for 
this phenomenon must be obtained. A possible explana- 
tion might be that ground water enters the lake at various 
points in so-called springs, and with its high CO2 content 
seeks its proper temperature level, before spreading. 

Odor. 

The water at the surface had a very faint vegetable odor 
that would hardly be detected by the ordinary observer. 

Below the surface no odor was detected until the 70' 
level was reached. Inasmuch as the intake is at a depth 
of between fifteen and twenty feet the present city supply 
is odorless. 

At the seventy-foot level a distinct odor of H2S is present, 
the product of decomposing organic matter in all probabil- 
ity. 

Cotton Disc Records. 

The cotton disc records had no apparent value in this 
case as the water is too clean to make any stain beyond a 
very slight darkening of the cotton. This record was 
therefore discarded as time was pressing. 



276 city of concord. 

Conclusions. 

The physical and biological qualities of the water of 
Penacook lake were excellent at the time of examination, 
there being very little color, turbidity or odor. 

At the time of this examination the condition of the 
water is practically the same for the first thirty feet, and is 
not likely to undergo any natural change until the time of 
the fall overturn. 

The small number of organisms present would seem to 
indicate that the pond is at present not heavily seeded 
with their spores or that there is a deficiency of those sub- 
stances which form their food supply. 

The swampy pool west of the lake, across the road from 
St. Paul's School boathouses is richly populated with vari- 
ous microorganisms, some of which are ciliate, protozoa. 
These latter forms indicate possible unclean water. 

The lower layers are "stagnant" in that they are non- 
circulating at this season but cannot be regarded as "stag- 
nant" as the word is popularly used, i. e. foul, unsightly 
or ill-smelling. 

Penacook Lake is unusually free from organic matter. 
The condition of the sounding lead indicated a clean bottom. 
Samples of water from various depths down to 65 feet were 
generally clear and sparkling. 

J. W. M. Bunker, Ph.D., 
Laboratory of Sanitary Engineering, Harvard University. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 277 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the forty-third annual report 
of th^ operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement 
of the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1914. 



Receipts. 




For water, from consumers 


by fixed 




rates. 




$12,985.65 


For water, from consumers 


by meter 




rates. 




60,791.64 


From delinquents. 




85.01 


For water for building purposes. 


27.58 


pipe and stock sold and labor, 


449.31 


old brass and iron sold. 


1 


46.58 


buildings. 




90.00 


freight refunded, 




.57 




$ < ^,^ / . o* 


Deduct abatements. 




54.19 


Net receipts for 1914, 


$74,422.15 



There has also been furnished the city free of charge the 
following use of water: 



Fire department, 


$111.50 


Police department, 


43.00 


Public Library, 


11.00 


Ward 7, ward house, 


7.00 


Ward 9, ward house, 


7.00 


S. P. School Sewer Precinct, flush 




tanks, 


45.00 


City playground, 


6.00 



278 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Parks, city, $38.00 

Park, Washington Square, 10.00 

Cemeteries, 108.00 

Drinking fountains, 20 . 00 

Watering troughs, 260 . 00 

Street department, stable, 18 . 00 

Stone crusher, 6.00 

Stand pipes, city and Penacook, 750 . 00 

436 fire hydrants, at $25.00, 10,900 . 00 



$12,340.50 



Expenditures. 



GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Paid pay-rolls, salaries and labor, $13,961 .60 
S. G. Sanborn, rent of shop in 

Penacook, 24 . 00 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing and 

postage, 292 . 50 
Rumford Printing Co., books, 87 . 75 
Geo. B. Graff Co., office sup- 
plies, 5 . 25 
Library Bureau, office supplies, 4 . 45 
W. C. Gibson, office supplies, 2 . 50 
Geo. H. Richardson & Co., office 

supplies, 1 . 50 

A. R. Andrews, office supplies, 1.00 
The Old Corner Book Store, 

book, 4.00 
Brown & Saltrnarsh, repairing 

frames, 1 . 25 
Granite State Mfg. Co., repair- 
ing chairs, 2 . 35 
W. L. Fickett & Co., repairing 

clock, 2.00 
Concord Evening Monitor, ad- 
vertising, 8 . 00 



5 


.50 


8 


.75 


4 


.00 


3 


.00 


1 


.25 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 279 

Paid N. H. Patriot Co., advertising, $3 . 30 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 

Co., telephones, 96.52 

Concord Electric Co., lighting 

and thawing pipes, 50 . 42 

Hazen & Whipple, report on 

water supply, 153.36 

J. W. M. Bunker, survey of 

Penacook Lake, 25 . 70 

Will D. Hutchinson, distribut- 
ing report, 9 . 30 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., sup- 
plies, 
W. A. Thompson, rubber boots, 
Thorne Shoe Store, rubber 

boots. 
Hardy & McSwiney, oil coats, 
J. G. McQuilkin, oil coat. 
Globe Stamp Works, pay 

checks, 3 . 20 

Thompson & Hoague Co., hard- 
ware, 226.88 
A. H. Britton & Co., hardware, 69.63 
Dickerman & Co., lanterns, 10.80 
John Swenson Co., dynamite, 8.13 
Joseph T. Walker, hay, 138 . 80 
Walter S. Dole, grain and 

straw, 64.08 

G. N. Bartemus & Co., grain, 44.84 

W. S. Darley & Co., pipe locator, 65 . 00 
Niagara Searchlight Co., lamp, 3.75 

Wm. P. Ballard, chestnut posts, 30 . 00 

Tragle Cordage Co., packing, 30.72 

Frank E. Fitts Mfg. Co., waste, 25 . 14 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 21 . 71 

Standard Oil Co., gasoline, 143.70 

Eagle Garage, supplies and re- 
pairs, 219.77 



$126.09 


4 


,00 


9 


.00 


3, 


.00 


29, 


.00 


8.80 


11, 


.41 


4, 


.10 


11 


.10 


31 


.50 



280 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid Carl A. Hall, supplies, 
Hall Bros., supplies. 
Ward's Vulcanizing Works, 

supplies, 
Fred A. Eastman, supplies, 
P. H. Lairkin Co., supplies, 
Batchelder & Co., supplies, 
C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, 
W. Carpenter, supplies, 
C. W. Dadmun, electrical sup- 
plies, 
Woodworth & Co., cement, 
Donaldson Iron Co., cast-iron 

pipe, 9,301.88 

Standard Cast Iron Pipe & 

Foundry Co. , cast-iron pipe, 3 1 2 . 80 

Builders Iron Foundry, castings, 449 . 47 
Rensselaer Mfg. Co., valves and 

hydrants, 840.32 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., valves 

and hydrants, 691.21 

Water Works Equipmet Co., 
Water Works Equipment Co., 

valve and sleeve, 44.70 

X^itj of Boston, valve and 

sleeve, 40.15 

Bingham & Taylor, gate boxes, 88 . 81 

Chad wick-Taylor Lead Co., pig 

lead and lead pipe, 698.02 

Richards & Co., pig lead, 168.34 

Boston Pipe & Fittings Co., 

wrought-iron pipe, 225 . 13 

Geo. E. Gilchrist Co., service 

boxes, 144.50 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., service 

boxes and tools, 119.04 

Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., brass 

goods, 6 . 05 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 281 

Paid Concord Foundry & Machine 
Co., machine work and cast- 
ings, $84.47 
Ford & Kimball, castings, 2.43 
Walworth Mfg. Co., tools and 

fittings, 164.19 

Harold L. Bond Co., tools, 82.55 

Chandler & Farquhar Co., tools, 11 . 76 

The Borden Co., tool, 1 . 90 
Page Belting Co., pipe, fittings 

and supplies, 2 1 4 . 74 

Crane Co., fittings, 30.94 , 

Orr & Rolfe Co., fittings, 11 . 25 

Concord Pipe Co., fittings, 8.19 
National Meter Co., meters and 

repairs, 519.22 
Thomson Meter Co., meters 

and repairs, 386 . 97 
Neptune Meter Co., meters 

and repairs, 370 . 70 
Henry R. Worthington, meters 

f and repairs, 155.14 
Union Water Meter Co., meters 

and repairs, 69 . 72 

Pittsburgh Meter Co., repairs, 2 . 96 

Hersey Mfg. Co., meter repairs, 1 . 50 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, smith 

work, 241.66 
A. L. Dickerman & Co., repairs, 78 . 72 
Manchester Welding Co., re- 
pairs, 27 . 50 
Cushman Electric Co., repairs, 24.77 
George D. Huntley, repairs, 18.65 
E. P. Cornish, repairs, 10.00 
Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., repairs, 7.00 
Abbot & Downing Co., repairs, 6.83 
Wm. T. Bailey & Co., repairs, 5.82 
George G. Fogg, repairs, 5 . 80 



282 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid A. Henry, repairs, 


$4.00 


C. Pelissier & Co., repairs and 




supplies. 


17.75 


George L. Theobald, team work, 


439 . 50 


Henry M. Richardson, team 




work. 


52.21 


E. L. Davis, team work. 


8.75 


E. H. Runnells, labor. 


12.25 


C. H. Carter, auto hire. 


52.00 


John F. Waters, auto hire, 


11.00 


E. S. King, auto hire. 


11.00 


William S. Kaime, livery. 


29.00 


H. T. Corser, livery. 


4.00 


C. E. Bartlett, carrying men, 


192.11 


George F. Tandy, repairing con- 




crete. 


294.89 


Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber 




and labor, 


15.08 


Home & Hall, lumber and 




labor. 


1.90 


Rowell & Plummer, mason 




work. 


173.21 


B. Bilsborough & Sons, paint- 




ing, 


99.06 


Morrill & Danforth, insurance. 


436 . 52 


Eastman & Merrill, insurance, 


45.00 


Boston & Maine R. R. freight 




and repairing siding. 


159.28 


Town of Webster, taxes. 


40.00 


State of New Hampshire, auto 




registration and license. 


11.00 


A. G. Cochran, clerk, cash 




paid out, car fares, express 




and sundries, 


170.27 


P. R. Sanders, expenses to Wa- 




ter-Works convention. 


20.00 


Engineering News, 


5.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 283 

PaidiHardy & McSwiney, damages 
on account leak at Central 
Block, $2,000.00 

Carl A. Hall, damages on ac- 
count leak at Central Block, 385 . 00 

N. C. Nelson & Co., damages 
on account leak at Central 
Block, 66.71 

Lee Bros. Co., repairs on ac- 
count leak at Central Block, 230 . 24 

Fred E. French, repairs on ac- 
count leak at Central Block, 26 . 85 

James S. Mansur, repairs on ac- 
count leak at Central Block, 14.64 

Frank Morrill, repairs on ac- 
count leak at Central Block, 9 . 50 

Parisian Dry Cleaning Co., 
cleansing on account leak at 
Central Block, 111.03 

Warren W. Lee, washing, on 
account leak at Central 
Block, 37.65 

Alva A. Young, land, 2,700 . 00 

Henry J. Putnam, land and 

buildings, 2,600.00 

The Alert Boat Club, land 

and buildings, 2,250.00 

C. F. Moseley, land and build- 
ings, 1,500.00 

E. H. Brown, recording deeds, 3 . 80 

John H. Walker, damages, 25.00 

Florence B. Walker, damages, 25.00 

Margaret R. Eastman, damages, 80 . 00 

Silas S. Wiggin, appraising 

damages, 10 . 00 

incidentals, 11.70 

$46,191.10 



284 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUMPING STATION EXPENSES. 



Paid pay-rolls, salaries and labor, 


$1,947.36 


labor on fuel,. 


90.68 


Tenney Coal Co., coal, 


973.76 


Bader Coal Co., coal. 


43.96 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight on coal. 


162.65 


H. M. Richardson, drawing 




slabs, 


1.87 


W. C. Robinson & Sons Co., oil, 


59.38 


Eagle Oil & Supply Co., pack- 




ing, etc., 


109.99 


Thompson & Hoague Co., sup- 




plies. 


12.56 


C. H. Martin & Co., supplies, 


8.20 


Batchelder & Co., supplies, 


4.30 


F. A. Eastman, polish. 


.50 


J. A.. & W. Bird & Co., soda 




ash. 


2.50 


The Borden Co., tools, 


15.00 


Walworth Mfg. Co., tools, 


11.15 


Chandler & Farquhar Co., tools. 


4.23 


M. E. Clifford & Co., fittings, 


1.45 


Orr & Rolfe Co., fittings, 


1.20 


Page Belting Co., fittings. 


2.09 


Rowell & Plummer, mason 




work, 


26.95 


Globe Horseshoeing Shop, smith 




• work, 


2.00 


George E. Winslow, indicator 




supplies, 


20.28 


Wm. H. Reed, Jr., loam. 


9.00 


F. W. Kelsey Nursery Co., 




shrubs. 


7.50 


C. W. Dadmun, wiring for elec- 




tric fights. 


172.72 


Concord Electric Co., lighting, 


2.28 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 285 



id Concord Light & Power Co., 




lighting, 


$8.56 


N. E. Telephone & Telegraph 




Co., telephone, 


34.60 


Boston & Maine Railroad, re- 




pairing siding and freight, 


62.42 


A. G. Cochran,, clerk, cash 




paid out, 


1.15 


Morrill & Danforth, insurance. 


28.00 

(ffp poo on 




$0,0^0.^«f 




$50,019.39 



The expenditures are divided as follows: 

GENERAL EXPENSES. 



For office expenses. 


$1,278.73 


maintenance, 


7,814.86 


inspection, 


840.00 


care and repair of hydrants. 


346.81 


new service pipes. 


1,884.85 


new distribution pipes, 


17,932.34 


new hydrants, 


741.16 


new meters. 


1,519.91 


work at lake. 


344.61 


care of wood-lots. 


41.49 


erecting fence at pumping 


sta- 


tion. 


147.75 


leak at Central Block, 


3,329.71 


land at Penacook Lake, 


9,050.00 


insurance, 


476.52 


incidentals, 


442.36 




$46,191.10 


PUMPING STATION 


EXPENSES. 


For salaries and labor, 


$1,947.36 


fuel, 


1,272.92 


oil and packing, 


170.69 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 



For supplies, 


$83.76 


repairs and repairing siding, 


90.05 


care of grounds, 


17.35 


wiring for electricity. 


172.72 


lighting and telephone, 


45.44 


insurance, 


28.00 



J,828.29 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 287 



EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron distribution pipes have been laid and hydrants 
set during the year as follows: 

In Pleasant Street, 

west from Liberty Street to New Upper School, St. 
Paul's School 10,191 feet 12-inch pipe in place of 
8-inch cement-lined and cast-iron pipe and 6-inch 
cement-lined and cast-iron pipe discontinued. 

In Mill Road, so called, St. Paul's School, 

south from Pleasant Street, 750 feet 8-inch pipe in 
place of 6-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Kensington Road, 

north from Pleasant Street, 207 feet 8-inch pipe. 

In Stevens Avenue, 

north from Pleasant Street, 53 feet 8-inch pipe. 

In Hopkinton Road. 

extended west from Gray's, 692 feet 2-inch pipe. 

In Merrimack Street, Penacook. 

at Washington Square, 70 feet 10-inch pipe in place 
of 8-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

In Summer Street, Penacook, 

at Washington Square, 54 feet 10-inch pipe in place 
of 8-inch cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

On hydrant branches, 

27 feet 8-inch and 177 feet 6-inch pipe; 116 feet 6-inch 
cement-lined pipe discontinued. 

On blow-offs, 

22 feet 6-inch pipe; 50 feet 4-inch cement-lined pipe 
discontinued. 



288 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Also 1,291 feet 1-inch and f-inch pipe. 

We have also lowered 100 feet of 6-inch pipe on Pillsbury 
Street and 576 feet of 1-inch and 2-inch pipe on Stevens 
Avenue and Kent Street. 

Seven new hycirants have been set as follows: 
On Kensington Road at Pleasant Street. 
On Stevens Avenue at Pleasant Street. 
On Pleasant Street, at No. 251. 
On Pleasant Street, opposite No. 270. 
On Pleasant Street, opposite No. 291. 
On Washington Street, Penacook, near South Main 

Street. 
On South Main Street, Penacook, opposite Exchange 

Block. 

One hydrant has been removed: 

In Washington Square, Penacook, opposite Wash- 
ington Street. 
There have been set 29 gates; discontinued, 22. 

Summary of the Foregoing. 



NEW PIPES, HYDRANTS AND STOP-GATES. 



Pipes. 




Hydrants. 




Stop-Gates. 




f-inch, 


153 feet. 


In 


city, 


5 


4-inch, 


1 


14nch, 


1,138 feet. 


In Penacook, 


2 


6-inch, 


16 


2-inch, 


692 feet. 








8-inch, 


4 


6-inch, 


199 feet. 








10-inch, 


1 


8-inch, 


1,037 feet. 








12-inch, 


7 


10-inch, 


124 feet. 












12-inch, 


10,191 feet. 






7 








13,534 feet. 


29 


equal to 2.563 miles. 













WATER DEPARTMENT. 



289 



1-inch, 
4-inch, 
6-inch, 
8-inch, 



Pipes. 

96 feet. 

76 feet. 
3,461 feet. 
7,661 feet. 



DISCONTINUED. 

Hydrants. 
In Penacook, 



11,294 feet, 
equal to 2.139 miles. 



Stop-Gates. 

4-inch, 5 

6-inch, 14 

8-inch, 3 



22 



Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
372,293 feet, equal to 70.51 miles. 

Total number of gates now in use, 1,028. 
Total number of hydrants now in use, 442. 

Service Pipes. 

There have been laid during the year and connected 
with the main pipes, 51 service pipes, consisting of 



41 f-inch, 

1 1-inch, 
3 4-inch, 

2 6-inch, 
2 8-inch, 
2 10-inch, 

51 



1,015 feet. 
21 feet. 
56 feet. 
43 feet. 
66 feet. 
51 feet. 



1,252 feet. 



There have been discontinued, 6 ; total number of service 
pipes at the present time, 3,837; total length of service 
pipes, 89,579 feet, or 16.96 miles. 

There have been relaid 20 services and 60 curbs have been 
placed on old services. 

We have set 76 meters during the year; removed 1; total 
number now in use, 2,393. 



19 



290 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The following table shows the height of water in Penacook 
Lake on the first day of the month : 



January, 


176.85 


July, 


181.10 


February, 


176.80 


August, 


180.65 


March, 


177.20 


September, 


180.80 


April, 


179.20 


October, 


179.90 


May, 


181.60 


November, 


179.40 


June, 


181.65 


December, 


178.95 



The lowest point reached during the year was on February 
28, being 176.65; the highest was on May 14 and was 181.95; 
mean height for the year was 179.55 which was .35 foot 
higher than the mean height for the year 1913. 

All of the buildings under the control of this department 
are in good condition. The iron fence for the pumping 
station grounds which arrived too late in 1913 to erect that 
season has been set up and adds greatly to the appearance 
of the grounds. The pumping machinery is giving good 
service and shows evidence of the care bestowed upon it by 
the engineer. 

All hydrants, public and private, have received the cus- 
tomary thorough inspection and care. Beginning with 
freezing weather in the fall and continuing through the 
winter until all danger of freezing is over the hydrants are 
inspected once a week and oftener if necessary. 

The meter system continues to meet the approval of 
consumers; there are now nearly 2,400 meters in service and 
their care and maintenance occupy nearly the entire time 
of two men and a team. 

The 8-inch cement-hned main laid in 1887 supplying 
Pleasant street west from Liberty and St, Paul's School 
has been replaced by a 12-inch cast-iron main. Li Mill 
Road, so called, 750 feet of 8-inch pipe was laid in place of 
6-inch; as this highway was discontinued several years ago, 
this expense was borne by St. Paul's School. 

Five new hydrants were set on the Pleasant street line 
in locations determined by the Board of Hydrant Com- 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 291 

missioners, and the St. Paul's School Corporation has been 
given four sprinkler connections and has set eleven private 
hydrants around the school buildings. 

On August 21 occurred one of the worst leaks in the his- 
tory of the department. At 10.15 p. m. notice was received 
of a bad leak on North Main street near Central Block. 
Upon arrival at the block the large six-way hydrant in 
front of the Postal Telegraph office was nowhere to be seen. 
As soon as we were able to shut off the water and pump 
out the cellars of the block, we found that the hydrant had 
been moved completely off from the 10-inch lateral connect- 
ing it to the 20-inch high service main. The pressure at 
this section is 88 lbs. per square inch and from the indicator 
record at the pumping station it is estimated that in the 
short time that the water was running over 500,000 gallons 
ran to waste. All damages to the blocks and the occupants 
arising from this break were satisfactorily settled. 

There have been but two breaks on the cement-lined pipes 
in Penacook this season and with no greater signs of deterio- 
ration than this, the mains ought to give good service for a 
number of years yet. 

Following is the report of Mr. Rowell, the engineer, giving 
the operations of the pumping engines in detail. 
Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



292 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING 
STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water Works. 
P. R. Sanders, Superintendent: 

Sir: I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station is in good working condition. 

The boilers are in as good condition as can be expected for 
the years they have been in service, and will need but few 
repairs the coming year. The fire box will need building 
over on boiler No. 2. 

Following is a statement of coal and other supplies, 
used at the pumping station during the year, with a table 
showing the work for each month. 

Statement. 

126 tons 809 pounds of Pocahontas coal. 
107 tons 1,427 pounds of New River coal. 

18 tons 1,695 pounds of Bader coal. 
129 gallons of valve oil. 

9 gallons of engine oil. 
42 pounds of waste. 
12 pounds of grease. 
6 cords of wood. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



29a 



ENGINE RECORDS. 



Months. 






•3 . 



o 



January. . . 
February. . 
March.... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 



H. M. 
309: 
287: 
273:30 
246: 
256: 
295: 
269: 
277:30 
293: 
310: 
302: 
285: 



H.M. 
9:58 

10:15 
8:43 
8:12 
8:15 
9:50 
8:40 
8:57 
9:46 

10: 

10: 4 
9:11 



25,676,816 
23,817,373 

23,575,240 
20,388,242 
21,578,129 
26,062,982 
22,401,943 
23,639,591 
25,794,491 
27,798,877 
26,501,353 
24,597,643 



828,284 
850,620 
760,491 
679,608 
696,068 
868,766 
722,643 
762,567 
859,816 
896,737 
883,378 
793,472 



49,088 
48,452 
46,230 
39,958 
41,842 
49,165 
42,358 
45,353 
49,972 
53,332 



1,583 
1,730 
1,491 
1,331 
1,349 
1,638 
1,366 
1,463 
1,665 
1,720 



52,160 1,738' 
48,261 1,556 1 



Total 

Daily average. 



179 



225 



354 



3412: 



291,832,680 
799,541 



799,541 



566,171 
1,551 



1,440 

389 

2,048 

2,236 

1,629 

1,303 

672 

620 

426 

1.217 



1,551 ll,i 



523 
491 
509 
510 
515 
530 
528 
521 
516 
521 
481 
609 



515 



• Amount of coal consumed includes that used for starting fires, banking fires and heating buildings. 



Amount of coal consumed per thousand gallons pumped, 
1.94. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



294 CITY OF CONCORD, 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, in account with Concord 
Water- Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1914, $32,582.46 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 74,422.15 

■ • $107,004.61 

Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $18,758.32 

Bonds paid, 20,000.00 

Orders paid, 50,006.01 

Cash on hand, 18,240.28 

$107,004.61 

Auditor's Statement. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the books showing 
the receipts of the Concord Water-Works from January 1, 
1914, to December 31, 1914, and find the same correct; and 
that the total amounts given therein correspond with the 
amount of receipts given by Percy R. Sanders, superintend- 
ent, in his report for the year and also with the receipts 
reported by William F. Thayer, city treasurer. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 



APPENDIX. 



296 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. 



Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of 
THE Works. 

For the year ending January 31, 1874, $4,431.10 

For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875, 17,535.00 

For the year ending April 1, 1876, 16,921.24 

1877, 19,001.07 

" 1878, 20,763.03 

" 1879, 21,869.86 

" 1880, 22,451.53 

1881, 26,744.58 
For nine months ending December 31, 1881, 25,534.01 

For the year ending December 31, 1882, 27,243.06 

1883, 28,255.48 

1884, 28,915.65 
■ " 1885, 30,222.54 

1886, • 30,862.64 

" 1887, 34,047.52 

" 1888, 38,441.32 

" 1889, 40,237.53 

1890, 42,133.41 

" 1891, 46,075.16 

1892, 48,351.52 

" 1893, 52,299.66 

" 1894, 53,230.10 

" 1895, 55,343.19 

" 1896, 56,557.81 

1897, 55,156.42 

." 1898, 59,147.54 

" 1899, *53,953.13 

" 1900, *57,003.71 

" 1901, 62,253.61 

- 1902, 63,430.85 

" 1903, 65,088.45 

1904, 68,570.48 



• No hydrant rental this year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



297 



For the year ending December 31, 1905, 


$71,076.44 






1906, 


73,063.45 






' 1907, 


73,782.64 






'' 1908, 


71,362.67 






1909, 


*67,307.84 






1910, 


68,673.71 






' 1911, 


71,881.34 






' 1912, 


76,145.13 






1913, 


76,154.45 




il receipts for 42 yea 


1914, 
rs. 


74,422.15 


Toil 


$1,995,942.02 


_ 


Mean Height 


B. 

OF Water Each 


Year. 


1873, 


175.86 


1894, 


172.81 


1874, 


179.50 


1895, 


171.15 


1875, 


180.00 


1896, 


178.96 


1876, 


180.28 


1897, 


183.33 


1877, 


176.46 


1898, 


184.31 


1878, 


179.50 


1899, 


183.49 


1879, 


179.74 


1900, 


183.09 


1880, 


175.30 


1901, 


183.86 


1881, 


174.70 


1902, 


184.98 


1882, 


179.15 


1903, 


184.75 


1883, 


176.40 


1904, 


184.40 


1884, 


178.18 


1905, 


183.37 


1885, 


176.80 


1906, 


183.94 


1886, 


178.10 


1907, 


183.59 


1887, 


179.04 


1908, 


183.41 


1888, 


181.96 


1909, 


181.40 


1889, 


180.91 


1910, 


180.22 


1890, 


181.90 


1911, 


177.60 


1891, 


180.00 


1912, 


178.86 


1892, 


174.32 


1913, 


179.20 


1893, 


173.38 


1914, 


179.55 



* No hydrant rental after 1908. 



298 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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WATER DEPARTMENT. 



299 



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300 



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301 



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CITY OF CONCORD. 






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WATER DEPARTMENT. 



303 



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304 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



D. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service; L, Low Service. 




North Main . 



South Main. 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Walker's 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin's store 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

East side, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner of Washington 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery 

East side, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

East side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block 

East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side at Central Block 

Northwest corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Freight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue . . . 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. John's Church 

Northwest corner of Perley 

West side, near Abbot <t Downing Co.'s . . . 
East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co. . . . 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

East side, opposite Pillsbury 



L 

L 

L 

H 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

H 

L 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

H 

I. 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIEE-HYDRANTS.— Cow^mwed 



305 




South Main 



Water. 
HaU.. 



Hammond . 
Railroad . . . 

Fiske 

Summer . . . 
Durgin .... 
North State 



South State 



Mills 

Dakin . . . 
Dunklee. . 

Broadway 



20 



West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops 

West side, at Lamprey's 

West side, below Wigj>;in 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 

West side, near E. W. Robinson's 

West side, near W. A. PhiUips' 

W'est side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, opposite Roy's 

East side, near Rumford Field 

Noi'th side, near Bridge 

East side, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof s laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren ' 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 

West side, near Levi Call's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

West side, near C. E. Harriman's 

West side, 150 feet south of West 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

West side, at H. H. Metcalf's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Carter 

Northwest corner of Stone 



H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
I, 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 



20 
1 



14 



306 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con^mwed. 




Broadway 

Donovan . 
Gretm ... 

South 



Bradley . . . . 

Union 

Jackson . . . . 
Lyndon . . . . 

North Sprin 



South Spring 



Academy 
Hanover . 
Riimford 



West side, at Rollins Park , 

West side, opposite MoKinley , 

West side, between McKinley and Rockin 

ham , 

Northeast corner of Wiggin , 

Northwest corner of Prince , 

East side, opposite Prince , 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

West side, opposite Monroe 

West side, opposite Laurel 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital 

West side, opposite Downing 

West side, opposite Allison 

West side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, near Paige's 

West side, opposite L W. Bushey's 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Road . . . . , 

East side, at Quint's 

West side, near Bow line 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

East side, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northeast corner of Church 

Southwest corner of Tremont 

East side, opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner of Maple 

Southwest corner of Centre 

West side, at High School 

East side, opposite High School 

Southwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Oak 

West side, opposite Thompson 

West side, opposite Concord 

West side, near Memorial Hospital 

East side, at F. E. Hook's 

West side, at No, 10 

West side, soutli of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Northeast corner of Albin 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

Northeast corner of Cambridge 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con/mwed. 



307 




Rumford . . 

Huntington 
Tahanto. . . 
Pine 

Holt 

High 

Valley 

Auburn ... 



Ridge Road . . . 
Westbourne Rd 
Dartmouth . . . . 
Princeton 

Fruit 

Minot 

Kensing-ton Rd, 
Stevens Ave. . . 
Penacook 



Walker . . 
Albin . . . 
Highland 

Church . . 
Franklin . 



Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at head of Short .' 

Northwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Centre 

Southwest corner of Warren 

East side, at Nason's 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

Northeast corner of Forest 

Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest . . . .' 

North side, between Centre and Forest. . . . 

West side, opposite Mrs. Jackman's 

North side, north of Mrs. F. P. Hallett's . . 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Northeast corner of Woodman 

West side, near V. A. Dearborn's 

East side, opposite W. W. Critchett's 

East side, opposite Kilburn's 

West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home . . . 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home . . . 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

South side, near Concord Lumber Co 

South side, cast of P. B. Co.'s storehouse . 

South side, near P. B. Co.'s 

South side, near P. B. Co.'s office 

Southeast corner of North Main 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

North side, opposite T. Hannigan's 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue . . . . 

Southwest corner of Martin 

North side, near D. Weathers' 

North side, between Bradley and Rumford 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

South side, east of Bradley 

North side, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Southwest comer of Rumford 

South side, opposite W. J. Ahern's 



308 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con^rnt/erf. 




Franklin. 

Chestnut 
Tremont 

Pearl . . . 
Beacon. . 



Rowell . . . 
Blanchard 
Ferry. . . . 



Washington 



Chapel 

Montgomery 
Center 



Bridge . 

Park . . 

Capitol 

Garden 
School . 



North side, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of High 

North side, east of Harrod , 

Southwest corner of Jackson 

North side, at Kimball Flanders' 

North side, opposite Merrimack School 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Southwest corner of Lyndon 

North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Chaiies 

Northeast corner of White 

Northwest corner of Essex 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue 

North side, opposite Rollins 

Southwest corner of Union 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Northwest corner of Rumf ord 

Northwest corner of North Essex 

North side, opposite Ferry Avenue 

South side, near Methodist Church 

South side, opposite Minot's 

Northeast corner of North State 

Southwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Union 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

South side, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue 

Northeast corner of Ridge Road 

South side, near easterly barn 

North side, opposite Concord Coal Co.'s . . . . 
North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory. . 

North side, at St. Paul's Church 

North side, at south gate of State House yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 



H 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

H 

H 

L 

H 

H 

L, 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

H 

H 

H 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con^tnwe^^. 



309 




School . 
Warren , 



Fiske Road 

Hopkinton Road 

Mill Road 

St. P. School . . . 

Old Hopkmton 

Road 

Wall 

Marshall 



Depot. . 

Blake . . 
Orchard 
Pleasant 



North side, opposite E. B. Woodworth's . . . 

Southeast corner of Giles 

Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue . . . 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumf ord 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

Northeast corner of Giles 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at H. B. Boutwell's 

South side, opposite Sherburne's 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at South Congregational Church . 

Southeast corner of South 

Northeast corner of Fremont 

Southwest corner of Spring 

South side, opposite Rumford 

South side, opposite Merrimack. 

South side, opposite Pine 

South side, opposite Liberty 

North side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite Mrs. Aiken's 

South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage 

South side, at Lavery's 

South side, opposite No. 270 

North side, near James Lane's 

North side, opposite No. 291 

North side, near J. McC. Hammond's 

South side, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner of School Avenue 

North side, at chapel 

South side, opposite Lower School 

South side, near new LTpper School 

East side, at Trask's 

South side, near new infirmary 

East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home 

South side, at tenement No. 7 



Junction of Hopkinton road . 
Northeast corner of Elm . . . 
North side, opposite Fuller . 



H 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

L 
L 



11 



24 
1 
1 



310 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Conimwec?. 




Freight 

Hill's Avenue 

Fayette 

Thompson . . 
Chandler .... 
Concord. . . . 

Monroe 

Thorndike. . . 

Laurel 

Perley 

Downing . . . . 
Chnton 



West. 



Avon 

Harrison 

Humphrey . . . . 

Allison 

Pillsbury 

Carter 

Stone 

Holly 

McKinley . . . . , 
Rockingham . . , 

Iron Works Rd 



No. side at southwest corner pass, station. . 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of- Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of JefTerson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Rumford School 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner of South Spring 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, near old brook 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Redwood Avenue 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near Snell's 

North side, at State Fair grounds 

North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed extension 

North east corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown's 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Con^iVmed. 



311 




Prospect . 



Curtice Ave. 

North State 



Palm, 



North State 



Fisher . 
View . . 
Electric 

Clarke . 
Lake . . 



Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, near John C. Kenney's 

West side, at Water-Works storehouse. . . . 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near W. H. Perry's 

East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side, near Oliver Racine's 

East side, near A. L. Colburn's 

East side, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side, at south line of prison wall .... 
West side, at north line of prison wall .... 

East side, near Asa L. Gay's 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co. 

East side, near C. H. Farnum's 

East side, near Cyrus R. Farnum's 

East side, near John True's 

East side, opposite Dolan 

East side, opposite John H. Flood's 

West side, opposite S. Abbott's 

North side, west of Fairbanks 



WEST CONCORD. 

Southeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at George Partridge's 

East side, near engine house 

East side, opposite Braithwaite's 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co 

East side, opposite Simeon Partridge's . 

East side, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side, opposite A. Hollis' 

East side, near Sewall's Falls Road . . . 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kellom's 

West side, near H. C. Holden's 

West side, near Wilson's 

East side, near H. C. Holden's 



21 
1 



10 
1 
1 

2 
1 



312 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Cor?<inwe(i. 




Lake 

Knight 

Hutchins . . . . 

Second 

Penacook Rd, 



South Main . 



West Main , 
High 



Washington 



Fowler 

Electric Ave 

Elliott 

Charles. . . . 

West Canal 
East Canal . 

Crescent. . . 



South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station 

North side, near B. T. Putney's 

North side, near C. & C Railroad 

North side, at Turcotte's 

North side, near A. H. Knight's 

West side, opposite Frost's 

West side, ofjposite Blanchard's 

West side, near Warner Road 

PENACOOK. 

West side, at Harriman's 

West side, at Annis' 

West side, at Garvin's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow HoUow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'j' 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cem'y 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt's garage 

West side, near Prescott's 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opposite Exchange Block 

Northwest corner of Charles 

North side, opposite East Canal 

North side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Northwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northwest corner of Spring 

South side near South Main 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, opposite John Whitaker's 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge 

North side, at Rolfe's sawmill 

West side, at Charles Hohnes' 

East side, near Elliott's 

South side, junction of Wasliington 

Northeast corner of Electric Avenue 

Southwest corn(>r of Warren 

North side, near George W. Corey's 

Southeast corner of Warren 

North side, near Contoocook Mfg. Co 

North side, near Crescent 

West side, north of Canal 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FlRE-liY'DB.ANTS.— Concluded, 



313 



Streets. 



Locations. 



a 



Merrimack . 



Summer . 

Spring . . . 
Maple . . . 
Winter. . 
Centre . . 

Cross ... 
Rolfe . . . 

Penacook 



South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue. 

North side, opposite D. W. Fox's 

North side, opposite Cross 

South side, opposite Bye 

South side, opposite Rolfe' s shop 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory . . 

North side, near road to Island 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

North side, opposite High 

Northeast corner of Centre 

North side, opposite Church 

Northeast corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

North side, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Spring 

West side, at Corbett's 

Southwest corner of Summer 

North side, near James Corbett's 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

West side, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 

West side, at E. L. Davis' 

East side, at McGirr's 

Whole number public hydrants .... 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Abbot & Downing Co 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard . . . 

Boston & Maine Railroad, shops 

Boston & Maine Railroad, power house, West 

Concord 

Brampton Woolen Co 

Concord Gas Light Co 

Concord Shoe Factory 

Concord Worsted Mills 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Ford Foundry Co 

N. E. Box Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

N. H. State Hospital 

N. H. State Prison 

N. H. State Prison 

Page Belting Co 

Page Belting Co 

St. Paul's School _ "..... 

Water Works Pumping Station 

Whole number private hydrants 



442 



6 

4 

15 

1 
3 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
3 

6' 

12 

4 

2 

9 

1 

13 

_1 

98 



314 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. 
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1914. 

In form recommended by the New England Water- 
Works Association. 

CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1910 — 21,497. 
Date of construction — ^1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING STATISTICS. 

1. Builders of pumping machinery — Henry R. Worthing- 

ton, Harrison, N. J. 

2. Description of fuel used^ — a. Kind — bituminous. 

h. Brand of coal — Poca- 
hontas and New River. 

c. Average price of coal per 
gross ton delivered, 
$5,067. 

d. Percentage ash, 9.4 %. 

3. Coal consumed for year — 252.75 tons. 

4. (Pounds of wood consumed) -r- 3 = equivalent amount 
of coal— 3,773 lbs. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year for 
pumping purposes — ^254.44 tons. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 315 

6. Total pumpage for the year without allowance for 
slip— 291,832,680 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pump works — 
103.84 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pump works — 
105 feet. 

9. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent 
coal — 504. 

10. Duty = 

291,832,680 gallons pumped, X8.34 (lb3.)X100Xdynamic head, 105 _ a a 2QQ KQK 
Total fuel consumed, 578,157 pounds. ' ' 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses — 
$3,828.29. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $13.12. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0,125. 



STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTION 

SYSTEM. 

MA-INS. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 2,339 feet during year. 

4. Renewed — 11,195 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 11,294 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 70.51 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — ■ 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — ^3.51 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 6; 
private, 12. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — -public, 442; pri- 
vate, 80. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 7. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,028. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than 4-inch — 

14. Nmnber of blow-off gates — 81. 



316 CITY OF CONCORD. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind bf pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 1,252 feet. 

19. Discontinued — ^94 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 89,691 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 51. 

22. Number now in use — 3,841. 

23. Average length of service — 23.35 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — • 

25. Number of meters added during year — 75. 

26. Number now in use — 2,393. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 62.3. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 82.39. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use: — 10. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 41 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 317 



INVENTORY. 

Of the Property op the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1915. 



Water rights— land, etc., $1,052,380 . 13 

Water office — furniture, etc., 975 . 00 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 850.00 
Shop at pumping station: 

Machinery, tools, meters, etc., ' 3,000.00 

Service truck, horse, wagons and supplies, 1 , 200 . 00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, special 

castings, etc., 2,013.22 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 2,615.88 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 15.00 

Shop at West Concord — ^pipe, etc., 40.00 



$1,063,089.23 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Public Works has held forty-nine meetings 
during the year, nine of which were hearings held on the 
premises covered by the petitions considered. One hun- 
dred and four petitions were received and eighty-three 
petitions were granted. 

A three-ton motor garbage truck was purchased for the 
highway department during the year. 

The City of Concord and the Town of Pembroke, jointly, 
rebuilt the single span bridge over the Soucook River at 
Richardson's Mill. The contract was let to the Berhn 
Construction Company of Berlin, Conn., and a steel bridge 
was constructed. 

The board ordered an examination of all the bridges and 
after a report, signed by W. B. Howe, city engineer, and 
John W. Storrs, was presented to the board December 17, 
bids were received for replacing the Pembroke Bridge with a 
steel structure: the contract has been awarded and the 
bridge will probably be completed about June 15, 1915. 

For a detailed account of the work in the various depart- 
ments under this board see attached reports of the super- 
intendent of streets and the city engineer. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. J. FRENCH, Mayor. 
FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 
EVERETT L. DAVIS, 
NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 
RICHARD A. BROWN, 
ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 
MICHAEL J. LEE, 

Board of Public Works. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 319 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen: The superintendent of streets herewith 
submits the annual report of the work of the highway de- 
partment for the year ending December 31, 1914. 

As usual, the year was a busy one for the department. A 
large amount of general repairing was necessary on the roads 
throughout the city which, taken with the permanent work 
to be done, required considerable planning to accomplish. 
The appropriation for general maintenance is insufficient to 
meet the demands made upon it. The amount of traffic is 
steadily increasing and, with the number of miles of street 
which we have, the ordinary repairs require a considerable 
amount of the appropriation. Some years the expense of 
caring for the ice and snow is quite heavy. The snow- 
storm of last February 14 and 15 cost the department 
$1,586.77, which was simply the breaking out of the roads 
and sidewalks and leveling off the snow. The following 
week a severe rainstorm made further expense, all of which 
was for work which did not show on the roads after the snow 
was gone. 

The usual amount of concrete walks were repaired and, 
with one exception where the petitioner asked for further 
time, all new concrete walks granted by the board were 
laid. A number of gravel walks were also built. More 
work than usual was done on catch basins last season, a 
number of new ones being built and some rebuilt. 

For permanent improvements in 1914, macadam was laid 
on South Street from Concord to Thorndike, South Main 
from Perley to Thorndike, North Main from Chapel to 
Pitman, a section of North State Street above the railroad 
crossing, Penacook Street from the railroad crossing east 
and Merrimack Street in Penacook. Washington Square 
in Penacook was macadamized and a portion of it con- 
creted. Sections of the Pittsfield and Hopkinton road were 



320 CITY OF CONCORD. 

gravelled and a portion of the Eddy road re-surfaced. In 
every place there was decided need of the improvement. A 
section of the South Pembroke road was re-constructed and 
the whole of it treated with tarvia, the state paying one-half 
of the expei^se. A section of the Penacook road past Maple 
Grove cemetery in West Concord was also re-constructed 
and the department received one half of the amount ex- 
pended from the state. 

There are any number of places in the city proper where 
permanent improvements are needed but I hope that next 
year the work may at least be continued on those streets 
where" permanent improvements have already been begun. 
The section of North Main Street from Pitman to Centre on 
the east side should be macadamized which would complete 
the street to the pavement. The section from Park to Cen- 
tre on the east side which is granite block paving should be 
concreted, as the paving is very rough. Another section of 
South Main Street and South Street should be macadamized 
and North State Street from Dolan Street to the railroad 
crossing completed. The Hopkinton road should be grav- 
elled to the town line and the remainder of the Edd}^ road 
re-surfaced. South State Street from Pleasant south is in 
bad condition and ought to be permanently improved. 
Washington and North Spring Streets both receive a large 
amount of traffic and should be repaired. 

Tarvia was used last season on the macadam streets with 
very satisfactory results and all of the macadam should 
have a tar surface treatment as early in the season as 
possible. The increase in the use of the automobile and 
especially of the heavy auto truck make it imperative that 
the surface of macadam roads be kept in as good condition 
as possible. Recently I attended an experience meeting of 
superintendents of streets and road builders from the cities 
around Boston and they gave some verj'' interesting and 
helpful talks on their experience with bituminous macadam. 
It was especially gratifying to learn that the majorit}^ of 
those present had used tar products to considerable extent 
and were well satisfied with the results. Many of them 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 321 

recommend heavier binders in road construction as thej'^ 
find that the automobile chains are doing great damage to 
the roads. At the same meeting there was considerable 
discussion in regard to the digging up of streets that had 
just been repaired. Some advocated that wherever a street 
was to be permanently improved the owners of all sewer, 
gas and water pipes be required to lay them to the property 
line before work on the street was begun, even though the 
property were not developed. It certainly is becoming such 
a common occurrence to have a new street dug up within a 
short time after the work is -completed that some regula- 
tions should be made to prevent it. 

Again I would recommend that the city do something 
toward a systematic planting of trees. The number of 
dead trees removed each year is increasing and in some 
places new ones should be set out. Much of the beauty of 
the city is due to the large elms and other shade trees, most 
of them planted years ago by the residents. Last season 
a very large elm was taken down on North Main Street 
near the Walker place and another on North Main was 
blown down by a hurricane. It seemed best to remove 
several other large trees in the same vicinity. Apparently 
there are not as many brown-tail moths as in other years but 
a considerable increase is noticed in the number of gypsy 
moth nests. Late in the spring the office received many 
complaints that the trees were being badly eaten by brown- 
tail moths. On investigation we found that the trouble 
was due to the tent caterpillar and not the brown-tail moth. 
No doubt we shall find the same trouble the coming season. 

The garbage precinct was extended during the past year 
and the amount of garbage to be collected is increasing. 
The auto truck purchased for collecting garbage has given 
much satisfaction and has proved to be a great convenience. 
A garage for the truck has been built on the city lot and 
we are able to house the steam roller in the same building. 
There is not sufficient room, however, to properly house the 
sprinklers and other equipment of the department and I 

21 



322 , CITY OF CONCORD. 

hope the board will consider the matter of new sheds on the 
city lot. 

The use of light oils for dust laying has proved satisfac- 
tory. On the dirt streets it does not give as good results as 
on the macadam but I would recommend its use another 
season. 

The privilege of attending the American Road Builders 
convention at Chicago and various meetings of the Massa- 
chusetts Highway Association have been much appreciated. 
As the problems of practical road building and maintenance 
grow more i^erplexing, such meetings tend to keep one in 
touch with the work of other cities and it is encouraging to 
find that our diflSculties are exactly the same as those found 
in other places. I greatly appreciate the interest of the 
board in the working out of the many problems which come 
to a department like this as it is their cooperation that is 
most needed by a superintendent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD ONE. 



323 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 






$117.12 
33 48 












8 28 




I .< 


12 30 






25 30 




1 11 


4 45 


Elliott 


i .1 


8 87 


Elm 


. M 


19 63 


Fowler 




41 79 


High 


I .. 




Horse Hill Road 


1 II 


155 65 


Linden 




7 91 




I II 


18 65 


Maple 


1 11 


1 45 


Mast Yard Road 


' " 


124 14 






1 75 




1 II 


93 43 




Ma 

Gen 

Re- 
Oen 


ladamizing 


1,210.51 
22 38 










19 63 




surfacing (Part Ward 3) 


505 04 


Pine 




4.08 
22 84 








River Hill Road 


1 II 


1 49 






117 99 


Rolfe 


1 II 


26 86 




1 II 


23 07 




1 II 


10 17 


Stark 




17 57 




1 II 


19 01 




1 11 


4 03 


Sweatt Hill Road 




28 50 




1 11 


12 69 


Walnut 


1 II 


86 72 






3 56 


Washington 


1 II 


235 82 




Nev 
Ma 
Gen 


V concrete walks 


29 28 


Washington Square 




1,544.79 
1 56 






West Canal 




6 44 




1 11 


29 85 


Winter 


1 II 


2 53 









WARD TWO. 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Appleton 

Canterbury Road 

Cemetery Road 

Curtis Road 

Gushing Road 

Flaghole Road 

Graham Road 

Hay ward Road 

Hot Hole Pond Road 

Intervale Road 

Kearsarge 

Kilburn Road 

Larkin Road 

Loudon Road 



General repairs. 



$46.80 

34.03 

4.00 

10.89 

26.00 

9.34 

19.40 

5.06 

9.23 

73.12 

2.72 

4.25 

6.00 

21.31 



324 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD TWO.— Concluded. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 


Mills 


General repairs. . 




$48 57 


Mountain Road 




16 09 


Pecker 




5 45 


Pembroke '. 




63 50 


Penacook 


>• « 


77 71 




IC 11 


292 07 


" (Hoit) 


II II 


89 43 




11 II 


20 89 




1. II 


58 10 


Portsmouth 


II 11 


17 14 


Potter 


II II 


179 83 




II 11 


63.43 




II II 


10 12 


Sewall'g Falla Road 


11 11 


46 68 


Shaker Road 


II II 


280 42 




11 11 


28.06 




11 11 


6 78 


Snows Pond Road 


II II 


10 89 


Tyargo Road 


II II 


19 16 




II II 


21.20 









WARD THREE. 



, STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Beech Hill Road. . . 

Bog Road 

Broad Cove Road. . 
Carter ffill Road. . . 

Clark 

Engel 

Ferrin Road 

Hutchins 

Knight 

Lake 

Little Road 

Long Pond Road. . . 
North State 

Parsonage Hill Road 

Penacook Road , 

Pine Hill Road 

River Road 

Saltmarsh Road. . . . 

Second 

Sewall's Falls Road . 
Taylor Hill Road. . . . 
West Parish Road. . 



Genera! repairs. 



Macadamizing. . 
General repairs. 
Re-constructing. 
General repairs. 



128.30 

157.95 

30.80 

51.89 

2.83 

6.25 

48.75 

38.22 

.97 

13.93 

39.17 

141.41 

130.23 

2,499.28 

24.25 

655.32 

21.92 

99.80 

73.63 

12.18 

29.20 

14.50 

9.73 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD FOUR. 



325 



STREET. 



Expense. 



Abbott 

Academy 

Albin 

Auburn 

Beacon 

Bradley 

Center 

Chapel 

Charles 

Church 

Court 

East Penacook. . 

Ferry 

Fiske 

Franklin 

Giles 

ffigh 

Iron Works Road 
Jackson 

Lyndon 

Maple 

Montgomery 

North Main 



North Spring. 
North State. . 

Pearl 

Penacook. . . . 
Perry Avenue 

Pitman 

Ridge Road. . 
Rumford. . . . 

Tremont. . . . 
Union 

Washington . . 

White 



General repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks . 
New " " 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
New " " 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Building sidewalks. 
General repairs. . . . 



Repairing concrete walks. 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. 



General repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks. . . 

" " roadway. 

New concrete walks 

Macadamizing 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

" " roadway. 



General repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. 
General repairs 



$2.22 
1.11 
21.43 
84.51 
53.13 
46.16 
34.87 

5.38 
39.51 
81.73 
32.93 

6.33 
37.31 
20.91 
19.50 
134.60 

2.00 

6.43 
50.59 
28.23 
18.78 
16.99 
56.55 
30.63 
14.04 
60.12 

6.40 
34.21 
11.48 

2.37 

223.96 

231.55 

97.97 

37.63 

2,413.25 

20.55 

24.57 

13.70 

94.26 

20.50 

6.54 

7.72 

7.08 
16.60 
504.69 
59.72 
16.74 
16.35 
19.31 
10.40 
91.64 
98.64 

5.20 



326 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD FIVE. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Blake 

Capitol 

Center 

Durgin 

Garden 

Giles 

Green 

Hanover 

Liberty 

Merrimack 

North Fruit 

North Main 

North Spring 

North State 

Odd Fellows' Avenue 
Orchard 

Park 

Pleasant 

Rumford 

School 

Tahanto 

Warren 

West Washington. . . 
Woodman 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
" " roadw 

" " walks 

General repairs 

New concrete walks 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . 
" " roadway 

" " walks. . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete roadway 
" " walks. . . 

" " roadway 

" " walks. . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
" roadway 

" " walks . . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
General repairs 

New concrete walks 

Repairing concrete walks 

General repairs. . 



$1.44 
108.40 

2.63 
1G0.86 
49.05 
13.24 
15.37 
10.14 

1.50 
39.14 
173.55 
25.29 
22.27 
15.42 

4.72 

6.88 

7.53 

171.20 

15.57 

14.90 

100.33 

5.34 
18.20 
11.57 
18.97 
16.00 
.66 
12.12 
60.09 
78.59 
134.43 

1.22 
40.63 
58.25 

6.15 
150.72 
38.72 
12.69 
108.08 
10.98 

7.39 



WARD SIX. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Clinton. . 
Concord. 

Downing 

Elm 

Grove. . . 
Jefferson. 
Laurel . . 
Monroe. 
Perley. . 

Pierce. . . 

Pleasant. 

South. . . 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete roadway 
" " walks.. 



J7.45 
30.70 
37.81 
59.72 
59.32 

1.49 
83.30 

6.06 
21.86 

9.28 
100.00 
46.03 
73.23 
11.21 
14.75 
54.41 
139.06 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

WARD SIX.— Concluded. 



327 



STREET. 



South 

South Main. 

South Spring 
South State . 

Thompson. . 
Thorndike. . 

WaU 



General repairs 

Macadamizing. 

Repairing concrete walks 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

New concrete walks 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 



$194.84 

2,074.42 

1.457.53 

219.24 

51.87 

230.45 

154.92 

113.71 

113.84 

25.20 

31.49 

7.54 

60.88 

35.30 

6.74 

5.17 



WARD SEVEN. 



STREET. 


Work. 


Expense. 






$33.58 






71.39 






117.83 


Birch 




1.05 






141.31 




11 .1 


67.16 




<• X 


103.61 




14 11 


102.34 




11 11 


19 23 




11 11 


22.42 




• 1 11 


20.80 


Fiske 


11 11 


30.55 


Fruit 


11 11 


28.62 


Gale 


11 11 


2.22 


Glen 


11 11 


9.75 


Hall 


It 11 


83.50 




11 11 


59.18 






27.90 






63.08 






351.28 






1,734.51 






27.75 






153.82 




11 11 


21.95 




11 11 


12.91 


Kimball 


11 1. 


5.17 




1. 11 


45.10 


Mills 


11 11 


14.50 




11 11 


9.11 




11 11 


11.00 






7.41 






75.91 






4.89 


Pillsbury 




68.08 




11 11 


302.47 






1,609.46 


Silk Farm Road 




57.25 


South 




143.14 






21.84 






78.19 






248.47 


South State 




91 


Stickney Hill Road . . . . 


11 11 


95.14 




11 11 


116.60 


Tuttle 


11 11 


2.61 


Wept . . . . 


11 11 


74.78 


Yale 


11 11 


2.27 









328 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD EIGHT. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Branch Turnpike 

Break O'Day Road . . . 

Bridge 

Chandler 

Depot 

Freight 

Garvin's Falls Road. . . 

Hill's Avenue 

Loudon Road 

North Main 

North Pembroke Road 

Pleasant 

Pittsfield Road 

South Main 

South Pembroke Road. 

Stickney Avenue 

Sugar Bowl Road 



Genera! repairs. 



Repairing concrete walks.. . 
" " roadway. 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

Grading 

General repairs 



Repairing concrete walks. . . 
" " roadway. 

General repairs 

Re-surfacing 

Re-constructing 

General repairs 



$2.22 

10.00 

429.94 

17.84 

3.00 

36.58 

4.73 

2.00 

281.10 

17.31 

101.66 

1.49 

1.60 

496.83 

17.18 

12.51 

97.13 

74.77 

85.46 

490,26 

790.04 

76.49 

17.00 



WARD NINE. 



STREET. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Auburn 

Bradley 

Church 

Curtice Avenue. . 

Forest 

Franklin 

Gladstone 

Granite 

High 

Highland 

Little Pond Road 
Long Pond Road. 

Martin 

North State 

Penacook 

Perkins 

Rumford 

Walker 

Waverly 



General repairs 

Building sidewalks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . . 

Re-surfacing 

Macadamizing (Part Ward 4) 
General repairs 

Building sidewalks 

Repairing concrete walks. . . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . . 



$62.12 

52.51 

12.88 

3.20 

4.05 

189.14 

160.22 

63.22 

2.20 

.60 

14.81 

181.61 

9.28 

17.69 

131.08 

11.20 

419.06 

1,109.61 

88.63 

20.19 

105.18 

139.03 

31.70 

39.62 

12.01 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 329 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $35,000.00 

By Resolution No. 172, 2,495.68 



EXPENDITURES. 
Central District. 

general repairs. 

Labor pay-rolls, $11,104.89 
E. C. Eastman, supplies, . 75 
Library Bureau, supplies, 4.67 
C. W. Dadmun, repairs, 1 . 65 
H. T. Corser, hay, 45.25 
R. J. Macquire, services, 162.15 
Central Cash Market, hay, 25 . 80 
Treworgy Pen & Ink Mfg. Co., ink, 1 .50 
A. R. Andrews, supplies, . .75 
Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 5 . 42 
Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 85.36 
Alfred Clark, Supt., cash paid out, 46.54 
W. W. Critchett, hay, 21 . 50 
Norman Nicholson, shoeing, 22 . 30 
C. H. Dudley, solvet, 7.50 
Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., repairs, 9.04 
Henry P. Lamprey, hay, 254.15 
J. T. Walker, hay, 123.79 
C. W. Drake, glass, etc., 3.00 
Orr & Rolfe Co., repairs, 22 . 05 
C. H. Dudley, hay, 25.70 
Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber, 26.40 
Alfred Clark, Supt., expense to con- 
vention, 73 . 50 



$37,495.68 



330 CITY OF CONCORD. 

C. H. Farnum, hay, $154.24 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 14 . 60 
Acme Road Machinery Co., repairs, 7.21 
Geo. S. Prince, filing saws, 10.45 
G. S. Milton & Co., repairs, 4.30 
J. N. Abbott, hay, 66.40 
W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 1,718.53 
B. Bilsborough & Son, paint, 22.05 
N. E. Road Machinery Co., repairs, 136.86 
West End Garage, livery, etc., 3 . 60 
Dudley Bros., livery, etc., 65.38 
Page Belting Co., repairs and sup- 
plies, 109.16 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 86 . 79 
Good Roads Machinery Co., re- 
pairs, 24 . 30 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 35.41 
A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 337.81 
N. E. T. & T. Co., service, 43.07 
Robert Crowley, coal, 69 . 40 
Concord Wiring & Supply Co., sup- 
plies, 1 . 25 
Concord Electric Co., lights, , 67.07 
W. H. Dunlap & Co., supplie's, 13.30 
Capital Hardware Co., supplies, 32.50 
Geo. L. Theobald, horses, 550 . 00 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

repairs, 41.44 
Eyeless Tool Co., picks, 34.60 
Ames Plow Co., repairs, 9.00 
Geo. D. Huntley, dump cart, 178.00 
Brown & Batchelder, supplies, 4 . 60 
Frank R. Clark, sharpening tools, 2 . 25 
Joseph Laflamme, cement, etc., 4.75 
F. E. Burroughs, gravel, 1 . 80 
Monitor & Statesman Co., adver- 
tising, 2 . 40 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 331 

N. H. Patriot Co., advertising, $1 .80 
Winchester Rock & Brick Co., 

crushed stone, 21 . 62 
Mass. Broken Stone Co., crushed 

stone, 97 . 00 
Essex Trap Rock & Construction 

Co., crushed stone, 27.09 

Thomas Robinson, oil, 1 . 00 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, .75 

Geo. D. Huntley, repairs, 94.50 

Joseph Grant, repairs, 56 . 10 

A. P. Fitch Co., supplies, 2.50 

Donaldson Iron Co., pipe, 296.79 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 2 . 10 

Kinney Mfg. Co., repairs, 37.75 
Geo. F. Tandy, repairs concrete 

road way, 903.99 
Ford & Kimball, sled shoes, 1 . 88 
F. W. Paige, gravel, 2.60 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 15 . 12 
Headley Good Roads Co., road oil, 19.08 
C. A. Fowler, hay, 67.45 
Ross W. Gate, shoeing, 248 . 25 
C. Pelissier & Co., repairs and sup- 
plies, 123.03 

$17,946.58 









CULVERTS. 






Labor 


pay-rolls. 




$85 


.22 


A. 


H. 


Britton & Co., 


, pipe. 


152 


.00 



237.22 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 



Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $167.99 

building, 310.13 



478.12 



662 CITY OF CONCORD. 




SIGNS. 




Labor pay-rolls, 


$10.21 


Fletcher-Prescott Co., lettering 




signs, 


24.05 


Baltimore Enamel & Novelty Co., 




signs, 


41.00 


Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 


1.32 


Home & Hall, labor. 


3.08 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 




sign holders, 


9.00 



$88.66 



WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Labor pay-rolls, $29 . 64 

Capital Hardware Co., supplies, 2.10 

G. S. Milton & Co., repairs, 2.55 

Orr & Rolfe Co., repairs, 6.83 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

repairs, . 60 

Geo. B. Quimby, use of trough, 3.00 

Mrs. Frank Bourdeau, use of trough, 3 . 00 









GUTTERS. 






Labor 


pay- 


■rolls, 


cleaning, 


$2,654.58 








repairing, 


20, 


.44 








paving. 


57, 


.77 



47.72 



2,732.79 



BRIDGES. 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $243 . 08 

repairing federal 

bridge, 178.59 

West End Garage, livery, 1 . 50 

Boutwell & Baker, lumber, 111.45 

Hugh Tallant, lumber, 10 . 60 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 333 

Geo. F. Tandy, repairing concrete 

floor, 130.47 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, paint, 7 . 50 

Capital Hardware Co., supplies, 11.48 

Hutchinson Bldg. Co., lumber, 90.06 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 45.25 

$738.98 



14.89 



FENCES. 




Labor pay-rolls, 


$11.45 


Home & Hall, labor. 


3.44 


MACADAM. 




Labor pay-rolls, repairing. 


$59.56 


re-surfacing, 


287.95 


Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia. 


1,244.85 


Boston & Maine R. R., freight. 


284.85 


Page Belting Co., repairs. 


1.97 


Mass. Broken Stone Co., crushed 




stone. 


49.99 


Essex Trap Rock & Construction 




Co., crushed stone. 


47.38 


Winchester Rock & Brick Co., 




crushed stone, 


14.00 



1,990.55 



RE-SURFACING SOUTH PEMBROKE ROAD. 

Labor pay-rolls, $51 1 . 80 

Jeremiah Colby, gravel, 4.40 

A. C. Manning, gravel, 4.40 

Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 513.53 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 142.39 
Mass. Broken Stone Co., crushed 

stone, 81 . 53 
Essex Trap Rock & Construction 

Co., crushed stone, 22.25 



1,280.30 



334 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



RE-SURFACING PENACOOK ROAD. 



Labor pay-rolls, 
Joseph Eastman, gravel, 
Robert Crowley, coal, 
Barrett Mrg. Co., tarvia, 
Boston & Maine E. R., freight, 
Winchester Rock & Brick Co. 
crushed stone, 



.15 

9.60 

26.00 

328.44 

34.78 

18.44 



WINTER EXPENSE 




Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, 


$258.18 


plowing walks 


239.05 


sanding walks, 


562.06 


leveling snow, 


964.40 


rolling snow, 


101.22 


draining gutters ; 


557.57 


snowing bridges, 


28.07 


Geo. H. Cilley, labor. 


10.00 


Alice C. Hutchinson, rent of land, 


12.00 



L,023.41* 



2,732.55 



Penacook District. 



GENERAL REPAIRS. 



Labor pay-rolls. 


$1,450.38 


J. E. Brown, repairing tools, 


21.00 


W. B. Cunningham, trucking, 


1.65 


Issac Baty, repairs. 


4.50 


F. M. Morse & Co., supplies. 


7.09 


E. L. Davis, coal. 


23.10 


William Sawyer, gravel. 


15.50 


D. F. Dudley, gravel. 


27.00 


C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 


35.15 


Sanborn Bros., supplies. 


2.66 


D. Warren Fox, supplies. 


22.60 







1,610.63 



* One-half paid by state. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 335 

CULVERTS. 

Labor pay-rolls, $29 . 25 $29 . 25 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS. 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $137.34 

building, 20.40 

157.74 



FENCES. 

Labor pay-rolls, $7 . 44 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 1 .80 



9.24 



WATERING TROUGHS AND DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Labor pay-rolls, $9.44 

E. E. Babb, repairs, .90 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, .04 

C. M. & W. W. Rolfe, lumber, 8.96 

T. S. Holland, use watering trough, 3.00 



22.34 



GUTTERS. 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $460 . 85 

repairing, 2 . 69 



463 . 54 



BRIDGES. 

Labor pay-rolls, $288.14 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, lumber, 762.08 

C. H. Barnett, labor, 68.80 
W. H. Bonney, signs, 3.50 
Henry Hardy, stringers, etc., 35.10 
W. H. Meserve, cement, 1 . 00 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 42.96 
Penacook Electric Light Co., lights, 9 . 36 



1,210.94 



336 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MACADAM. 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing, $1 . 18 

re-surfacing Pena- 

cook Road, 79.95* 



WINTER EXPENSE. 

Labor pay-rolls, sanding walks, $148.02 

plowing walks, 96 . 18 

draining gutters, 104.33 

snowing bridges, 16 . 26 

rolling snow, 27 . 23 

shoveling walks, 28 . 54 

leveling snow, 87 . 39 

breaking roads, 90 . 47 



West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $450.26 

sanding walks, 51.91 

plowing walks, 58 . 85 

snowing bridges, 21 .95 

draining gutters, 27 . 24 

shoveling walks, 27 . 87 

breaking roads, 92 . 98 

repairing bridges, 8 . 56 

watering troughs, 39 . 58 

repairing sidewalks, 44 . 83 

culverts, 6.17 

cleaning gutters, 195.99 
oiling North State 

St., 53.58 
re-surfacing Pena- 

cookRoad, 67.00* 

J. M. Grossman, repairs, 5.85 



$81 . 13 



598.42 



" One-half paid by state 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 337 

Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, $2 . 00 

Orr & Rolf e Co., repairs, 2.60 

Standard Oil Co., oil, 126.00 

$1,273.22 



East Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $1,249.41 



sanding walks, 


25.23 


plowing walks. 


18.00 


leveling snow, 


14.13 


draining gutters. 


5.31 


shoveling walks. 


5.50 


breaking roads, 


116.77 


cleaning gutters, 


15.57 


culverts, 


35.94 


bridges. 


68.51 


fences, 


1.04 


repairing sidewalks. 


5.34 


M. J. Lacroix, repairing tools, 


19.10 


H. A. Stuart, supplies. 


.56 


Ross W. Gate, lumber. 


2.00 


Mary F. Robinson, water for trough, 


20.00 


Chas. H. Sanborn, gravel. 


15.80 


J. L. Muzzey, stringers. 


18.00 


F. P. Virgin, stringers. 


18.00 



PENAC90K Intervale District. 

Labor pay-rolls general repairs, $16.93 

bridges, 10.00 

A. J. Smith, use watering trough, 3.00 



Egypt District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, 
breaking roads, 

N. P. Richardson, repairing bridge, 
use watering trough, 
22 


$75.89 

21.69 

13.50 

3.00 



1,654.21 



29.93 



114.08 



338 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HoiT District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $92 . 28 

breaking roads, 30 . 94 

Fred Mayo,. use watering trough, 3.00 



Virgin District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, S89 . 04 

breaking roads, 19 . 00 

F. P. Virgin, use watering trough, 3 . 00 



Sanborn District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $188.87 

breaking roads, ^ 4.44 



Potter Street District. 
John T. Tenny, use watering trough, $3 . 00 



Hot Hole Pond District. 
Labor pay-rolls, breaking roads, $6 . 53 



Number Four District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general repairs, $401.69 

breaking roads, 87 . 45 



$126.22 



111.04 



193.31 



3.00 



6.53 



489.14 
$37,495.68 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 339 

CATCH BASINS. 



Appropriation, $1 ,200 . 00 

By Resolution No. 172, 246.96 



Expenditures — 




Central District 




Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 


$546.81 


thawing, 


48.58 


repairing, 


30.33 


building, 


195.76 


re-building, 


4.08 


Robert Crowley, slabs, 


15.00 


Page Belting Co., repairs. 


1.12 


C. F. Thompson, rubber boots, 


7.00 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 




outfits, 


97.80 


Woodworth & Co., cement, 


37.80 


Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 


47.64 


Samuel Holt Est., brick. 


35.74 


Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 


19.20 


A. H. Britton & Co., pipe, 


60.56 


Penacook District. 


Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 


$119.72 


repairing. 


7.18 


building, 


80.36 


F. E. Williams, mason work, 


25.92 


John McGirr, brick, 


5.00 


W. H. Meserve, cement. 


10.83 


Town of Boscawen, pipe, 


10.20 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 




outfits, 


3.60 



West Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $26.53 



,446.96 



1,147.42 



262.81 



26.53 



340 city of concord. 

East Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, building, $4 . 85 

cleaning, 2.15 

ThompsoTL& Hoague Co., pipe, 3.20 



TREES. 
Appropriation, $4,000 . 00 

By Resolution No. 172, 407 . 86 



Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving trees, S406 . 04 
removing moth 

nests, 2,084.43 

spraying trees, 115.13 

C. E. Staniels, insurance premium, 78.28 

Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 18.25 

Hutchinson Bldg. Co., supplies, 12.00 

Alfred Clark, Supt., cash paid out, 11.00 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 251 . 15 

C. Pellissier & Co., supplies, 7.20 

C. F. Nichols & Son, supplies, 2.75 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 2.10 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

repairs, • 75 

West End Garage, gasohne, 13 . 65 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving trees, $18.67 
collecting moth 

nests, 678.06 



$10.20 
L,446.96 

t,407.86 



},002.73 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 341 



Labor pay-rolls, spraying, $28.41 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, . 28 



$725.42 



West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, collecting moth 

nests, $269.97 



269.97 



East Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving trees, $2 . 72 
collecting moth 
nests, 407.02 



409.74 



14,407.86 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 
Appropriation, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, grading for con- 
crete walks, 
setting edgestones, 
T. H. Dunstane, curbing, 
Geo. F. Tandy, new concrete walks 
new concrete cross- 
ings. 



Transferred to Sidewalks and Cross 
ings, Repair, 
Permanent Work 
Hopkinton Road, 



$34.46 




36.72 




4.00 




285 . 56 




135.09 






$495.83 




" 


206.29 




234.51 



342 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Transferred to Washington Square, $44 . 79 

Eddy Road, 18.58 



$1,000.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $2,250 . 00 

Transferred from Sidewalks and 

Crossings, New, 206.29 



Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, re-setting edgestone, $32 . 64 
Geo. F. Tandy, repairing concrete 

walks, 2,018.16 

repairing concrete 

crossings, 373 . 90 



},456.29 



2,424.70 



Penacook District. 



Geo. F. Tandy, repairing concrete 

walks, $31.59 31.59 



J,456.29 



PERMANENT WORK. 



South Street, Concord to Thorndike. 
Appropriation, $2,200.00 

Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, excavating, $437 . 34 

macadamizing, 594 . 27 

paving gutter, 105 . 78 
Tenney Coal Co., coal, 28.82 

Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe, 22.50 

Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 472.05 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 173 .09 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 343 

Essex Trap Rock & Construction 

Co., crushed stone, $141 . 10 

Winchester Rock & Brick Co., 

crushed stone, 20 . 83 

Geo. F. Tandy, concrete crossings, 78 . 64 

$2,074.42 



Transferred to Permanent Work, 

Merrimack St., Penacook, 125.58 



$2,200.00 

South Main Street, Thorndike to Perley. 



Appropriation, 




$1,600.00 


Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, excavating, 


$254.44 




macadamizing. 


369.89 




paving gutter. 


92.42 




Page Belting Co., repairs. 


16.82 




Essex Trap Rock & Construction 






Co., crushed stone. 


119.73 




Winchester Rock & Brick Co., 






crushed stone. 


4.20 




Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


356.94 




Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 


133.67 




Tenney Coal Co., coal, 


39.32 




Geo. F. Tandy, concrete crossings, 


70.10 


$1,457.53 






Transferred to Permanent Work, 






Eddy Road, 




90.88 


Merrimack St., Penacook, 




51.59 



$1,600.00 
HoPKiNTON Road. 
Appropriation, $1,500 . 00 

Transferred from Sidewalks and 

Crossings, New, 234.51 

$1,734.51 



344 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Expenditures — • 






Labor pay-rolls, grading, 


$1,351.12 




culvert. 


56.25 




tarring. 


64.05 




Robert Crowley, coal. 


16.25 




Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia. 


123.75 




Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 


26.89 




F. W. Paige, gravel, 


96.20 


$1,734.51 






PiTTSFIELD RoAD 


i. 




Appropriation, 




$500.00 


Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, grading, 


$471.93 




Dickerman & Co., cement. 


2.10 




W. H. Kitterel, gravel, 


22.80 


$496.83 






Transferred to Permanent Work, 






Penacook St., 




3.17 



$500.00 



Penacook Street, Railroad Crossing, East. 

Appropriation, $1,000.00 

Transferred from Permanent Work, 



North Main St., 


53.41 


Pittsfield Road, 


3.17 


North State St., 


.72 


By Resolution No. 172, 


52.31 


Expenditures — 




Labor pay-rolls, excavating. 


$152.53 


macadamizing, 


507.38 


paving gutter. 


41.51 


Page Belting Co., supplies. 


20.39 


Mass. Broken Stone Co., crushed 




stone, 


167.52 



1,109.61 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 345 

Essex Trap Rock & Construction 



Co., crushed stone, 


$61.95 




Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 


158.33 


$1,109.61 






North Main Street, Chapel to Pitman. 


Appropriation, 




$2,500.00 


Expenditures — ■ 






Labor pay-rolls, excavating, 


$522.57 




macadamizing. 


908.53 




paving gutter, 


198.56 




Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia. 


415.89 




Winchester Rock & Brick Co., 






crushed stone. 


37.42 




Essex Trap Rock & Construction 






Co., crushed stone, 


50.95 




Mass. Broken Stone Co., crushed 






stone, 


58.65 




Page Belting Co., supplies. 


1.96 




Tenney Coal Co., coal, 


17.78 




Robert Crowley, coal, 


39.46 




Boston & Maine R, R., freight. 


161.48 


$2,413.25 






Transferred to Permanent Work, 






Merrimack St., Penacook, 




33.34 


Penacook St., 




53.41 



$2,500.00 

North State Street, North of Railroad Crossing. 

Appropriation, $2,500 . 00 

Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, excavating, $168.72 

macadamizing, 1 ,255 . 23 

Page Belting Co., supplies, 11 .74 



346 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Robert Crowley, coal, 


$97.50 




Tenney Coal Co., coal, 


17.59 




Shepard Bros. Co., oil. 


1.65 




Winchester Rock & Brick Co., 






crushed stone, 


154.32 




Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 


202.94 




Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia, 


589.59 


$2,499.28 






Transferred to Permanent Work, 






Penacook St., 




.72 




$2,500.00 


Eddy Road. 






Appropriation, 


$1,500.00 




Transferred from Sidewalks and 






Crossings, New, 


18.58 




Permanent Work, 






So. Main St., 


90.88 


$1,609.46 






Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, re-surfacing, 


$779.22 




paving gutter. 


27.50 




drain, 


45.63 




Mark Blanchard, oil. 


1.20 




Thompson & Hoague Co., pipe. 


20.00 




Barrett Mfg. Co., tarvia. 


357.48 




Boston & Maine R. R., freight. 


161.20 





Mass. Broken Stone Co., crushed 

stone, 91.67 

Essex Trap Rock & Construction 

Co., crushed stone, 79.19 

Tenney Coal Co., coal, 46.37 



$1,609.46 



board of public works. 347 

Merrimack Street, Penacook. 

Appropriation, $1 ,000 . 00 

Transferred from Permanent Work, 



,210.51 



No. Main St., 


33.34 


So. Main St., 


51.59 


South St., 


125.58 


Expenditures — 




Labor pay-rolls, excavating. 


$313.08 


macadamizing. 


569.85 


gutter, 


23.80 


Essex Trap Rock & Construction 




Co., crushed stone. 


156.14 


Boston & Maine R. R., freight. 


108.64 


Robert Crowley, coal. 


39.00 


Washington Square, 


Penacook. 


Appropriation, 


$1,500.00 


Transferred from Sidewalks and 




Crossings, New, 


44.79 


Expenditures — 




Labor pay-rolls, excavating. 


$321.25 


macadamizing. 


779.44 


setting edgestone, 


10.74 


changing trough. 


14.53 


Robert Crowley, coal, 


13.00 


Geo. F. Tandy, concrete roadway, 


242.57 


repairing concrete. 


163.26 



,210.51 



,544.79 



.,544.79 



348 CITY OF CONCORD. 

GARAGE— CITY LOT. 

Appropriation, $1,500.00 

By Resolution No. 172, 411.67 



Expenditures — 




Labor pay-rolls, foundation, etc., 


$180.95 


Woodworth & Co., cement, 


63.00 


Page Belting Co., supplies. 


18.92 


Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 




supplies, 


1.80 


Hutchinson Bldg. Co., contract, 


1,647.00 



[,911.67 



[,911.67 



SALARY SUPERINTENDENT. 



Appropriation, $1,800.00 $1,800.00 

Expenditures — 
Alfred Clark, salary, $1 ,800 . 00 $1 ,800 . 00 

GARBAGE. 

Appropriation, $8,500.00 

By Resolution No. 172, 132.39 

Deficiency to 1915, 708.40 

— ■ $9,340.79 



Expenditures — 

Deficiency from 1913, $506 . 81 

Labor pay-rolls, collecting garbage, 3,807.90 

collecting paper, 697 . 72 

burning paper, 118.61 

leveling ashes, 862 . 96 
cleaning streets 

with patrol carts, 2 , 1 82 . 49 

cleaning crossings, 697 . 34 

Peerless Motor Gar Co., repairs, 46.55 

Ira C. Evans Co., supplies, 1.25 

State of New Hampshire, license, 15.00 

H. Thompson, brooms, 47.50 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 349 

West End Garage, gasoline, etc., 134.29 

Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 1 . 90 

Norman Nicholson, shoeing, 9 . 00 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, rent of 

land, 35.00 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 13 .32 

Eastern Oil Tank Co., oil tank, 101 .70 

Beacon Motor Car Co., repairs, .56 

Page Belting Co., repairs, 11.63 

Dudley Brothers, gasoline. 149 . 26 

$9,340.79 



SPRINKLING. 

Appropriation, $9,300 . 00 

Deficiency to 1915, 645 . 58 



Expenditures- 
Deficiency from 1913, $1,131 . 53 
Labor pay-rolls, painting and re- 
pairing carts, 182.32 
standpipes, 71.49 
sprinkling streets, 5,724 . 37 
oiling streets, 285 . 34 
Dustoline for Roads Co., dustoline, 1,559.58 
Standard Oil Co., oil, 734.66 
Abbott & Downing Co., repairs, 134.74 
B. Bilsborough & Sons, paint, 53.32 
Holt Bros. Mfg. Co., repairs, .25 
J. C. McLoughlin, repairs, .75 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

repairs, . 25 

Geo. D. Huntley, repairs, 13.90 

Geo. L. Theobald, repairs, 3.00 

G. S. Milton & Co., repairs, 2.87 

Woodworth & Co., cement, 2.10 

Orr & Rolfe Co., repairs, 15.11 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 30.00 



),945.58 



),945.58 



350 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PENACOOK SPRINKLING PRECINCT. 

Balance from 1913, $6.98 

Appropriation, 450 . 00 

Deficiency to 1915, 10.45 



Expenditures — 




Labor pay-rolls, repairing carts, 


$20.83 


standpipes. 


13.35 


sprinkling streets. 


385.75 


oiling streets, 


2.00 


C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, repairs, 


1.35 


Concord Axle Co., repairs, 


.65 


Penacook & Boscawen Water Pre- 




cinct, water, 


12.00 


Standard Oil Co., oil, 


31.50 



.43 



$467.43 

Deposited with the City Treasurer as follows : 

State Aid Highways, $1,220.33 

Sale of horses, 200 . 00 

Concrete, 152 . 32 

Labor, etc., 206.93 

Trees, 788 . 60 

$2,568.18 

Garbage, 132.39 

$2,700.57 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 351 



REPORT OF THE SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1914. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

The fourth annual report to this Board, showing the 
expenditures for construction, repairs, flushing, tools and 
general maintenance of the several sewer precincts of the 
city, containing a statement of the funds available for the 
work, is herewith submitted, together with some suggestions 
as to the needs of the city precinct. 

City Precinct. 

The new main laid in South State Street, from South 
Main Street to Downing Street, will afford much needed 
relief to the district served by this line. This sewer was 
laid at a greater depth than the old one and will enable the 
dwellings at its southerly end to properly drain into it, 
which has been practically impossible with the old sewer. 
This sewer replaced a line of fifteen-inch pipe with twenty- 
four- and twenty-inch Akron pipe, laid in the old trench but 
deeper. The twenty-four-inch pipe extends from South 
Main Street to West Street and the twenty-inch pipe from 
West Street to Downing Street. 

The sewers in Washington, Beacon and Rumford Streets 
are too small for the duty they are called upon to perform 
and should be relieved in the immediate future, as the 
complaints from this district are constantly increasing. 
Your Board are familiar with the claims for flooded prem- 
ises and have seen the conditions existing in this portion 
of the city. 

New sewers have been laid in Palm Street, Dartmouth 
Street, Kensington Road and extensions made in Prospect 
Street and Gladstone Street. 

The work in Palm Street was the most expensive of this 



352 CITY OF CONCORD. 

season's undertakings, as we had to practically grade the 
upper end of the street, at an expense of some $200.00, 
which amount should not be assumed by the Sewer Pre- 
cinct. In South State Street we had to provide for the 
disposal of "the sewage flowing in the old sewer, which we 
did by pumping. At the southerly end of this work, where 
we were below the level of the old work, much ground-water 
was encountered, which added to the exj^ense of relaying 
this line. 

The spring flushing of the entire system was made as 
usual, but the lateness of the season's work did not permit 
the fall flushing of the entire system. 

Bridges. 

The bridge at Richardson's Mill, having become unsafe 
for anything but the lightest traffic, was condemned and a 
new bridge was constructed which will safely carry any 
traffic likely to come upon the highwaj^ 

The Berlin Construction Company, of Berlin, Conn., 
were the successful bidders on the superstructure, for the 
sum of $1,852.00. 

Repairs to the Concord masonry consisted of putting a 
reinforced concrete jacket around the old abutment. 
Bids were solicited for this work and only one bid was 
received, which bid was for the sum of $1,200.00. 

This bid seemed excessive and your board instructed the 
city engineer to construct this work with day labor, which 
was done for the sum of $731.08. 

The total cost of replacing this work was as follows : 
Paid for masonry, $731.08 

bridge, 926.00 

plans, 100.00 

street department, railing, etc., 13 . 56 

mayor, auto hire, 2 . 00 

grading, 29 . 00 

gravel, 5 . 00 

$1,806.64 



$112. 
21, 


,95 
,00 


$133, 

1,806. 


,95 

,64 


$1,940.59 

$2,000.00 

1,940.59 


$59.41 
133.95 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 353 



Labor and materials used on Pembroke abut- 
ment, 
Cement sold sewer department, 



Expended as above, 

Total expended, 

Appropriation, 

Expended, 

Balance, 

Plus credits for labor and materials, 

Net balance, $193.36 



The bridges over the Merrimack River and the Contoo- 
<!Ook River were examined by Mr. John W. Storrs and your 
engineer, in pursuance of a vote of your Board, April 8, 
1914, and a report made to you under date of June 3, 1914. 

On November 9, 1914, it was "Voted that the city engi- 
neer, Mr. Storrs and the superintendent of streets be a 
committee to secure data relative to new bridges (to take 
place of those not up to standard as recommended by the 
city engineer's report) giving length of stringers, spans, 
etc., and estimate of cost." 

On November 10, 1914, at a meeting held at the Pem- 
broke Bridge it was "Voted that steps be taken looking to 
the erection of a new steel bridge and that the city engineer 
and Storrs & Storrs, get specifications and estimates for 
the same with planked, wood block paving and concrete 
roadways." 

Under the vote of November 10, plans were made by 
Storrs & Storrs for a bridge with a concrete slab floor with 
a coal-tar wearing surface. 

These plans were submitted to your Board, adopted, bids 
secured and the contract awarded to the Berlin Construc- 

23 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tion Company of Berlin, Conn., for the sum of $23,993.00 
and the contract will be signed early in January. 

On your vote of November 9, your committee visited the 
bridges and the report of Mr. John W. Storrs and your 
engineer, under date of December 14, 1914, was presented 
to your Board. The superintendent of streets did not 
join with us in this report. 

Under action of your Board following this last report^ 
plans and specifications were prepared for the Federal, 
Sewall's Falls, Main Street, Penacook and the Borough 
bridges and bids asked for early in January, 1915. 

The floors of the Soucook River bridges, with the excep- 
tion of the Richardson's Mill bridge, need strengthening to 
properly carry the allowable loads which may come upon 
them. 

There are a number of smaller bridges in the city which 
need rebuilding to safely carry the legal loading. In some 
cases the masonry should be rebuilt. 

Plans for a garage and heating plant for the same to be 
built on the city stable lot were made at the request of your 
Board. 

Plans for an addition to the police station, with three stall 
garage on the lower floor and a ward room on the second 
floor were made under the direction of your Board. 

Lines and grades were given for macadam roadways on 
South Street, North State Street, East Penacook Street, 
Pleasant Street; Washington Square, Merrimack Street 
and Bye Street, Penacook, and for gravel roads on the 
Hopkinton and Pittsfield roads. 

The monthly measurements for coal-tar concrete walks 
and roadway repairs were made, statements of the square 
yards laid, cost and location of same shown and these 
statements turned over to the parties ordering the work 
done. 

Following is a detailed account of work done in the various 
sewer precincts. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 355 



NEW WORK, 


1914. 




Prospect Street. 




240 feet of 10-inch laid. 






Paid for labor, 




$104.03 


trucking, 




4.00 


brick, 




3.00 


cement, 




2.15 


pipe, 




85.72 


oil, 




.60 



Average cost per lineal foot, $0,831 +. 
Material excavated, sand. 



$199.50 





Palm Street. 




854 feet of 10-inch laid. 




Paid for labor, 




$1,203.63 


pipe. 




238.96 


cement, 




19.35 


brick. 




47.18 


trucking. 




92.00 


castings, 




23.43 


blacksmith, 




37.98 


hardware, 




13.96 


medical, 




3.00 


oil, 




1.80 



$1,681.29 
Average cost per lineal foot, $1,968+. 
Material excavated, gravel, rock and hardpan. 

South State Street. 

694 feet of 24-inch pipe laid. 

480 feet of 20-inch pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $2,295 . 73 

brick, 69.05 

pipe, 1,456.32 



356 , CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid for cement, ' S46 . 50 

trucking, 92 . 75 

hardware, 31.56 

lumber, 6.14 

blacksmith, 18.15 

oil and gasoUne, 21 . 95 

jute, 42.67 

coal-tar concrete, 85 . 92 

castings, 67 . 50 



Average cost per lineal foot, $1,582+. 
Material excavated, gravel and rock. 



Average cost per lineal foot, $0,691+. 
Material excavated, sand. 



t,234.24 



Average cost per lineal foot, $3,606 + 
Material excavated, sand, gravel and clay. 

Gladstone Street. 

154 feet of 10-inch pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $188.05 

pipe, 44.62 

trucking, 11.00 



$243.67 





Dartmouth Street. 




410 feet of 10-inch 


pipe 


laid. 




Paid for labor. 






$127.08 


pipe. 






123.04 


cement. 






8.60 


trucking, 






9.50 


brick, 






11.50 


hardware. 






.88 


castings, 






1.25 


oil, 






1.60 



$283.45 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 357 



Kensington Road. 



194 feet of 8-inch pipe laid. 
Paid for labor, 

pipe, 

brick, 

blacksmith, 

cement, 

trucking, 

castings, 



Average cost per lineal foot, $1,175+. 
Material excavated, hardpan and boulders. 



$135.31 


45 


.76 


11 


.50 


6 


.15 


8.35 


9 


.75 


11 


.25 



.07 



REPAIRS. 




Thorndike Street, 


$4.17 


North State Street, 


2.75 


Lyndon Street, 


18.83 


Beacon Street, 


1.50 


Downing Street, 


.75 


Wall Street, 


10.67 


Dakin Street, 


4.83 


South Spring Street, 


3.33 




$46.83 


Flushing sewers. 


148.67 


Tools, 


253 . 76 




f/i/lO oa 


Paid for new work, 


6,870.22 


Total expended for construction and repairs, $7,319.48 


Funds available for construction and repairs, $7,647.90 


Expended, 


7,319.48 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1914, $328.42 



358 CITY OF COXCORD. 

Sewers laid, 1914, 3,026 feet. 
Sewers built in city precinct to December 31, 1914. 

6-inch pipe, 1,928 ft. 

8-inch pipe, 25,657 

10-inch pipe, 54,395 

12-inch pipe, 39,427 

15-inch pipe, 11,646 

18-inch pipe, 7,134 

20-inch pipe, 5,029 

24-inch pipe, 4,066 

30-inch pipe, 1,086.5 

Brick, 12-inch x 14-inch, 2,758 

14-inch X 22-inch, 350 

16-inch X 24-inch, 1,848 

20-inch x 32-inch, , 2,527 

24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 

28-inch x 48-inch, 883 

24-inch circular, 1,515.5 

30-inch " 402 

38-inch " 4,080 

24-inch cast-iron, 1,576 

30-inch cast-iron, 1,054.5 

42-inch segmental block, 1,055 

42-inch brick and concrete, 246 

60-inch brick and concrete, 1,450 



Total to date, 188,050 . 5 ft. 

Total miles in city precinct to date, 35.615 -f. 

West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

Spring flushing was made in this precinct at an expense 
of $12.22; there was also expended the sum of $13.97 for 
labor and materials used in raising manholes and lampholes 
in North State Street where it was macadamized. 
Expended on account of flushing, $12.22 

Expended on account of changing manholes, 13 .97 



Total expended, $26 . 19 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 359 

Funds available for construction and repairs, $127.07 

Expended, 26.19 



Balance, $100.88 

East Concord Sewer Precinct. 

No money was expended in this precinct during the past 
season, leaving an unexpended balance of $127.53. 

Saint Paul's School Sewer Precinct. 

There was expended in this precinct on repairs in Hop- 
kinton Road, $16.50. On repairs to Outlet, $44.50. 
Making total expenditures of $61.00. 

There was a balance from 1913 of $17.55; expended, 
$61.00; overdraft, $43.45. 

For the many courtesies extended to this department, I 
wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HYDRANT COM- 
MISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1914. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The ninth annual report of this board giving its recom- 
mendations to the Water Board and the number of hydrants 
set during the year 1914, is herewith submitted. 

On May 18, it was voted to recommend the installation 
of the following hydrants: 

One at Kensington Road, on Pleasant Street; one at 
Stevens Avenue, on Pleasant Street; two between the cot- 
tage on the Eddy property and the residence of Eben B. 
Chesley, on Pleasant Street; one between Mr. Chesley's 
and Mr. Chapman's, on Pleasant Street, also a high-service 
hydrant on North State Street, opposite the residence of 
Andrew Abbott. 

In Penacook it was recommended that a four-way hy- 
drant be placed at the southwesterly corner of the grass- 
plot in Washington Square, and that the hydrant in the 
square be moved into Washington Street. 

All of the above-mentioned hydrants were set, excepting 
the one on North State Street opposite the residence of Mr. 
Andrew Abbott. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 
W. C. GREEN, 
PERCY A. SANDERS, 
Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1914. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The fifteenth annual report of this board is herewith 
submitted. 

The present membership of the board is as follows: 
Patrick A. Clifford, a journeyman plumber. Chairman; 
Charles H. Cook, M. D., and Will B. Howe, City Engineer, 
Clerk of the board. 

Nine meetings were held during the year and nine men 
examined: Four for master plumber's licenses, of which 
number one received a license and the other three failed 
to meet the requirements of the board. Five were exam- 
ined for journeymen plumber's licenses, all of whom passed 
the requirements. 

One journeyman's license was issued to an applicant for 
a master's license. 

The total receipts of the board were $35.50, for which 
amount the clerk of the board holds the receipts of the city 
treasurer. There was expended for postage, $1.00, for sup- 
plies, $8.80, making a total of $9.80. 

The accompanying table gives the names of all plumbers 
authorized by this board to work at the business of plumb- 
ing for the year ending March 31, 1915; the date of renewal 
and expiration of their licenses, or certificates, the date of 
examination opposite the names of men examined and the 
fees received. 



362 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COM- 
MISSIONERS. 



To the Board of Alderifien: 

By the report of the superintendent the amount placed 
at our disposal for the year 1914 for the Old North Ceme- 
tery was $621.26 and we have expended $618.67, and for 
Blossom Hill Cemetery we received $6,017.85 and expended 
$6,763.20 for the detailed account of which we refer you to 
the report of the City Treasurer. The burials for the year 
have been in Blossom Hill Cemetery, two hundred and 
eight (208), and in the Old North Cemetery, fourteen (14). 
The Chapel has been used nine (9) times. 

On October 1st, Edward A. Moulton, who has been super- 
intendent for the past twenty-one years, resigned, and Fred 
N. Hammond was elected to fill the vacancy and the fol- 
lowing resolution was passed by the commissioners : 

"Resolved: That this Board, having accepted the resig- 
nation of Edward A. Moulton as Superintendent of Ceme- 
teries, after a continuous service of twenty-one years, 
desires to place upon record our full appreciation of the 
kindly and efficient manner in which Mr. Moulton has 
performed the exacting duties of that office. During his 
administration it has fallen to his sad lot to consign to their 
last resting place, more than four thousand (4,000) of our 
citizens, and his dignity and courtesy at all times have been 
a credit to our city. 

"In his management of public funds he has been honest, 
careful and conservative; and we extend to him at this 
hour of parting, our best wishes for a long life and contin- 
uous prosperity." 

The building of a new fence at the Old North Cemetery 
is very much needed and a special appropriation for that 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 365 

purpose should be made. The usual appropriation for 
Blossom Hill Cemetery will probably be all that will be 
needed. 

CHAS. J. FRENCH, Mayor. 
GEORGE A. FOSTER, 
FRANK J. PILLSBURY, 
CHAS. G. REMICK, 
FRANK P. ANDREWS, 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
JOHN P. GEORGE. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Millville Cemetery Committee respectfully submit 
the following report of the receipts and expenditures for the 
year 1914: 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on account 1915, $57.09 







Interest on trust funds, 


56.00 




Jan. 




F. Dodge Stoner, 


8.00 




June 


5 


Mrs. Pike, 


2.00 




Oct. 


24 


City Treasurer, 


75.00 




Dec. 


26 
30 


F. G. Proctor, 

Walter Nutting, on half lot No 
149, 


2.00 
7.50 


$207.59 




• 












199.40 




$8.19 






EXPENDITURES. 






May 


9 


F. G. Proctor, labor, 


$10.00 




June 


3 


F. G. Proctor, labor, 


27.00 




July 


1 


F. G. Proctor, labor. 


19.00 




Aug. 


15 


A. H. Britton, 


2.25 




Oct. 


27 


F. White, irons and sharpening 
mower, 


11.00 





366 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Oct. 


28 


F. G. Proctor, labor, 




$60.00 


Nov. 


4 


Water bill, 

Thompson & Hoague, 
W. Dole, 




6.00 
4.00 
1.15 




14- 


I. T. Chesley, loam, 




22.50 




18 


A. H. Britton, roller 
tilizer, 


and fer- 


16.50 


Dec. 


30 


F. G. Proctor, 




20.00 



$199.40 



J. N. ABBOTT, 
A. S. TRASK, 
FRANK G. PROCTOR, 

Committee. 



To His Honor the Mmjor and Board of Aldermen: 

The following is the report of West Concord Cemetery 
for 1914: 

$3.87 
187.00 



Jan. 1 


Cash on hand. 
Sale of lots. 








PAID 


OUT. 






W. F. Thayer, one- 


-half sale 






of lots, 




$93.50 




G. R. Parmenter, 




5.00 




L. S. Parmenter, 




17.35 


1915 




Jan. 1 


Cash on hand, 







$190.87 



115.85 



$75.02 



G. R. PARMENTER, 

Treasurer. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 367 

To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

Your committee on cemeteries in East Concord submit 
the following report for the year 1914: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

receipts. 
Appropriation, $150.00 

One-half sale of lot, 2 . 50 



EXPENSES. 



Paid city treasurer for one-half sale of 

lot, $2.50 

Scott French, labor, etc., 148.50 

Balance for appropriation, 1 . 50 



$152.50 



Old Fort 


tipj.<j^. 
Cemetery. 


RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation, $25 . 

EXPENSES, 


Paid Scott French, labor. 
Balance of appropriation, 


$22.50 
2.50 




^£dO . 




SCOTT FRENCH, 

Secretary. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

Definite progress has been made during the past year 
with the cases in which the City of Concord is interested, 
especially the tax cases. 

The case of Jennie P. Martin v. Concord, with which 
the board is quite famihar, has been settled. 

Woodworth & Co. v. Concord, which is a petition for 
abatement of taxes, was tried before the tax commission 
August 13th. The commission has not yet filed its findings 
of fact. When it does, in all probability, this case will 
go to the supreme court and there be finally decided. 
The question is whether the assessors are limited to taxing 
as stock in trade simply the goods on the shelves or whether 
the total assets used in carrying on the business may be 
included. 

Roselle M. Day v. Concord is another petition for abate- 
ment of taxes, the petitioner contending that the assessors 
over-valued the Sanborn block at the corner of Main and 
Capitol streets. This case was tried December 9th before 
the tax commission which now has it under consideration. 
At the trial it was intimated by counsel for the petitioner 
that, so far as the petitioner was concerned, the finding 
of the tax commission would be accepted as final. 

Boston & Maine Railroad v. Concord, is a petition for 
the abatement of taxes assessed for the year 1913 on goods 
and materials at the local shops. The case was tried Dec- 
ember 18th before the tax commission, and arguments 
made January 6th. It is likely that this case, which in- 
volves a number of thousand dollars each year in taxes 
for the city, will reach the supreme court some time this 
spring. 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 369 

The commission has not yet reported on any of the tax 
cases. 

Finman v. Concord is a case brought to recover the value 
of the picture booth in the auditorium, which, under the 
terms of the lease, the city contends passed to it when 
F. W. Hartford ceased to be the lessee. The case was 
brought in the superior court for Hillsborough county and 
will be in order at the present January term. 

In Concord v. Frank W. Sanhorn the defendant went 
into bankruptcy and the city's claim for taxes was proved 
before the referee in bankruptcy, was allowed April 11, 
and subsequently paid. 

For several months of the past year, owing to my inca- 
pacity, the affairs of the office were handled by Harry F. 
Lake, Esq., who attended to routine matters while I was 
absent. These matters include every kind -of legal work 
for the various heads of departments of the city, such as 
drafting ordinances, resolutions, contracts, deeds, etc., 
advice to the tax assessors and the health department 
and assistance in the prosecution of criminal cases for the 
police department before the police court. 

For granting me a leave of absence during the first half 
of the year I desire to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE, 
January 19, 1915. Cihj Solicitor. 



24 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE 
ON JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The Committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year 1914. The appropriation for the year has 
been spent as the following report shows. The work accom- 
plished on the playgrounds has been of a higher order than 
before. Mr. Loomis, physical director at Y. M. C. A., was 
able to give some time during July and August. His work 
was very acceptable in all respects and much enthusiasm 
was aroused among the young boys in the neighborhood. 
The total attendance for the season was 448 boys. Miss 
lyla Chamberlain accomplished a great deal with the girls. 
She was present on 22 days and had an average attendance 
of 15 in her class. A doll, clothed with garments made by 
the girls in the sewing class, was presented to the Franklin 
Orphans' Home. The doll won many compliments for 
the little seamstresses and was gratefully received by the' 
little girls at the Orphanage. Miss Chamberlain also took 
the class on a picnic to Bow, and a good time was enjoyed 
in spite of rather unfavorable weather. 

At the Field Day a good time was enjoyed by all and the 
manner in which the different contests and games were 
entered into showed a most commendable spirit. 

Little by little the playground is coming to present a 
better appearance, to meet more of the needs of the com- 
munity and to furnish more varied recreation to the neigh- 
borhood. A much needed new shelter is in process of con- 
struction. This will satisfy a long-felt want as it will fur- 
nish a shelter from the hot sun during the summer months 
not only to the children but to the mothers and babies. It 
will also give a proper place for the assembling of classes or 
club groups and make the duties of a supervisor easier. 



THE JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 



371 



Appropriation $400.00, expended as follows 


3: 


Pay-roll, 


$44.31 


Daniel Highland, care-taker, 


60.00 


H. A. Loomis, instructor. 


50.00 


prizes, 


1.00 


Thompson & Hoague, supplies, 


27.77 


Trees, 


31.40 


Daniel McAllister, building shelter. 


78.62 


M. H. Mulcahy, posts. 


43.11 


W. H. Reed, teaming. 


26.00 


W. L. Riford, teaming, 


5.18 


Capital Hardware, supplies, 


1.00 


Miss lyla Chamberlain, services. 


10.00 


cash paid out. 


5.00 


Concord Electric, pole. 


3.00 


J. C. Derby, supplies, 


.80 


Ehrman Mfg. Co., badges. 


.95 


M. J. Lee, supplies, 


8.05 


Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 


.86 


Concord Foundry, supplies. 


1.35 


C. H. Martin, paint. 


1.60 



Total, 



$400.00 
Respectfully submitted, 

EUGENE J. O'NEIL. 
LUELLA A. DICKERMAN. 
R. A. BROWN. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE 
ON THE ROLLINS PARK PLAYGROUND. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year 1914. 

The $250 appropriated for the current expenses of the 
playground has been expended after careful consideration. 
A clay tennis court has been added, the baseball diamond 
and croquet ground improved. 

The instructors for the girls were on the grounds three 
days a week, Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdaj^s through 
July and August, Miss Myrna Howe through July, Miss 
Florence Hodgdon from August 1 to August 15 and Miss 
Myra Crowell from August 15 to the close. The records 
kept by the instructors show the follo^dng attendance 
during the period the grounds were under supervision on 
the above days ; 

Girls, 803 

Boys, 311 

Mothers, 73 

Babies, 45 

Fathers, 4 

Other guests, 28 

Games played include volley ball, tennis, croquet, archery, 
dodge ball, bean bag, three deep, indoor baseball; and folk 
dancing has occupied a part of some of the afternoons. 

Mr. Loomis, the instructor for the boys, was on the 
ground Mondays and Wednesdays from July 13 to August 
31. On one Saturday afternoon he went with the boys 
on a hike to Garvin Falls. 

In addition to the above, the South End Baseball League 
under efficient directors and officers played scheduled games 



THE ROLLINS PARK PLAYGROUND. 373 

nearly every evening during the season and on Saturday 
afternoons. The total attendance at these games was 
10,825. 

Through the Mayor and Park Commissioners a flag 
pole was obtained and the pole erected by volunteer work. 
Out of the subscription taken the night of the Fourth of 
July suflScient money was subscribed to purchase a good- 
sized flag. 

The tennis court has been in demand since its completion 
August 1st. The persons using it are of all ages, the children 
during the hours assigned them, and the young people and 
aged spectators during odd hours. 

On August 10 eight motor trucks carried 93 children to 
an auto ride to St. Paul's School and return. Later in the 
season 50 people in twelve touring cars enjoyed a ride to 
Boscawen where they visited the Library. 

The exhibition of basketry and embroidered doilies on 
Field Day showed what had been accomplished in the way 
of work, and the children found it an interesting and enjoy- 
able place. 

Four hundred were present on Field Day when the in- 
structors, with many helpers, gave an exhibition of their 
work with the children. 

The success of the playground is in a large measure due to 
the active work given by Charles A, Clark, former Secretary 
of the R. R. Y. M. C. A. The cooperation and the volunteer 
work has been commendable. 

Individual Assistance. 

The playground was presented at the beginning of the 
season with a First Aid to the Injured Cabinet fully 
equipped. 

Six dollars was given which was used for basketry, em- 
broidery work, prizes, etc. 

Two bluebird pins were given as prizes for basketry work. 



374 city of concord. 

Expenses for South End Playground, 1914. 

Geo. L. Theobald, rolling baseball diamond, $4.50 

Express, equipment from city hall to playground, . 75 

Miss Myrna Howe, services for July, 25 . 00 

F. B. Ale!xander Co., supplies, 3.06 

Hauling clay, 22.00 
Irving Chesley, making tennis court and work on 

croquet ground, 125.00 

H. A. Loomis, services for July and August, 50.00 

F. E. Nelson Co., crepe paper for Field Day, 1.35 
Ehrman Mfg. Co., badges for boys and girls on 

Field Day, 6.02 

H. W. Rainie, band on Field Day, 10.00 

Thompson & Hoague, prizes Fourth of July for boys, 1 . 00 

supplies, 5 . 50 

supplies, 1 . 05 



Total, $255.23 

Appropriated, 250 . 00 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
FRED I. BLACKWOOD, 
ELSIE L. JOHNSON. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The board of assessors submit to your consideration the 
following facts and figures showing the valuation of the 
city and its school districts and special precincts, with the 
amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the tax 
collector for collection. 

At the last session of the legislature the poll tax was 
made a flat rate of $2.00 each. Polls have previously been 
assessed at $100.00 each, and under the present law, the 
total valuation of the citj^ has been reduced by the number 
of polls, or $573,500.00. 

The preparation of a separate list of poll taxes has made 
additional work for this office, and at this time it is uncer- 
tain whether the poll taxes are collected better than when 
dehvered with all tax bills. It is the intent of the law 
that they should be collected immediately upon receipt 
by the poll tax payer of his bill. 

In the petitions for abatement by the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, Woodworth & Co., and Roselle M. Day, each 
petition has been heard by the State Tax Commission and 
further action is pending. 



376 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Tabulation of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 
Valuation of City and Precincts with 
Rate for Each in 1914. 



Warrant. 



Amount of 
warrants. 



Tax rate 
per $1,000. 



Assessed valua- 
tion of city and 
precincts. 



State 

County , 

School required by law 

City 

Extra for schools: 

Union 

Town 

[No. 20... 
Penacook j 

[ Union*. . . 

Precincts: 

Sprinkling 

Garbage 

City sewer 

City lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sprinkling. . , 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord lights. . 

West Concord sewer. . 

East Concord lights. . . 

East Concord sewer. . . 



$47,992.50 
33,734.66 
44,992.50 
38,000.00 

66,601.40 
2,000.00 
1,058.00 
9,920.00 

9,300.00 

8,500.00 

19,440.00 

20,000.00 

1,500.00 

450.00 

350.00 

740.00 

598.00 

535.00 

117.50 



$8.70 



4.10 

1.60 

.70 

5.20 

.65 

.65 

1.30 

1.30 

1.10 

.40 

.30 

.80 

1.80 

2.30 

4.00 



$19,177,428 



16,400,438 
1,284,695 
1,492,295 
1,972,379 

13,921,128 

12.906,818 

14,720,153 

15,350,193 

1,378,995 

1,077,760 

1,180,975 

955,235 

316,900 

230,025 

29,765 



* Penacook Union School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



assessors' report. 



377 



Number of shares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hamp- 
shire and credited to this city. 



Railroad. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


Boston & Maine 


346 

10,270 

118 

362 

27 

457 

17 

468 

72 

1,516 

8 

190 

53 

5 


323 

13,216 

118 

362 

27 

360 

18 

509 

60 

1,281 

8 

168 

46 


398 

9,775 

118 

342 

27 

365 

16 

497 

72 

1,205 

8 

168 

46 

5 


379 


Concord & Montreal 


9,866 




124 


nonnppt.iciit. Rivpr 


342 


Fitehburg ■ 


27 
371 




16 


Nashua Street 


488 




72 


Northern 

Peterborough 

Pemigewasset Valley 


1,137 

8 

133 




46 


Wilton 


5 









378 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Inventory of the City 


OF Concord 








No. 


Valuation. 


Polls, 




5,735 


$11,470 


Improved and unimproved lands 


and 






buildings. 






15,739,099 


Horses, 




1,301 


160,805 


Asses and mules, 




2 


400 


Oxen, 




25 


2,475 


Cows, 




1,112 


54,245 


Other neat stock, 




154 


4,510 


Sheep, 




70 


550 


Hogs, 




118 


1,210 


Fowls, 






365 


Carriages and automobiles. 






252,500 


Portable mills. 






950 


Boats and launches. 






2,350 


Stock in public funds. 






327,735 


Stock in banks and other corporations in 






state, 






204,652 


Wood and lumber, 






19,160 


Money on hand, at interest, or on deposit, 


• 


274,817 


Stock in trade. 






1,917,305 


Milling, carding machines, and factories 






and their machinery. 




$ 


214,300 


Total, 


19,188,898 



Amount of taxes committed to collector, $316,447.67. 
Average rate per cent, of taxation for all purposes, $1.58+. 



assessors' report. 379 

Polls, Valuation and Taxes Assessed. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and 
personal estate of Concord since 1904: 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1904 


5,188 


$11,559,482 


$250,222.29 


1905 


5,400 


11,614,011 


258,043.86 


1906 


5,474 


11,768,897 


260,976.67 


1907 


5,757 


12,114,322 


273,045.74 


1908 


5,289 


12,342,190 


277,469.52 


1909 


5,442 


12,405,465 


301,281.72 


1910 


5,576 


12,543,822 


278,464.77 


1911 


5,784 


12,507,847 


296,074.27 


1912 


5,691 


18,701,591 


316,117.69 


1913 


5,687 


20,842,84,6 


305,460.56 


1914. 

Ward 1 


588 


$1,567,450 


$24,696.52 


2 


226 


545,345 


6,874.92 


3 


384 


1,226,605 


16,801.48 


4 


984 


3,314,585 


54,388.79 


5 


677 


3,790,329 


63,284.82 


6 


981 


2,360,359 


39,437.70 


7 


1,094 


3,221,175 


49,269.02 


8 


322 


2,440,860 


38,436.02 


9 


479 


710,720 


11,174.47 




5,735 


$19,177,428 


$304,363.74 


Non-residen 


t, 




613.93 




$304,977.67 



380 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



List of Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in 
Each Ward, 1913 and 1914. 





Polls. 


Valuation. 


Resident tax assessed. 


W.VRDS. 


1913. 


1914. 


1913. 


1914. 


1913. 1914. 


Ward 1 

Ward 2 . 


519 
194 
366 

1,061 
fi9S 
860 

1,146 
337 
506 


588 
226 
3S4 
984 
677 
981 
1,094 
322 
479 


$1,602,405 
558,004 
1,256,840 
3,394,767 
4,786,564 
2,471,581 
3,277.615 
2,402,800 
732,270 


$1,567,450 
545,345 
1,226,605 
3,314,585 
3,790,329 
2,360,359 
3,221,175 
2,440,860 
710,720 


$25,472.05 
7,109.85 
17,343.75 
51,464.89 
73,229.45 
37,798.85 
46,492.77 
35,240.96 
10,667.83 


$24,696.52 
6,874.92 
16,801.48 
54,388.79 
63,284.82 
39,437.70 
49,269.02 
38,436.02 
11,174.47 


Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Wards 

Ward 6 

Ward 7 

Wards 

Ward 9 


Totals 


5,6S7 


5,735 


$20,482,846 $19,177,428 


$304,820.40 


$304,363.74 



Totals submitted to tax collector: 
In 1913 — ^Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list. 

Total, 

In 1914 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 



Total, 



$304,820.40 
640.16 

$305,460.56 

$304,363.74 

613.93 

11,470.00 

$316,447.67 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 



assessors' report. 381 

The following extract from the report of the State Tax 
Commission is submitted, upon the suggestion of same Tax 
Commission. 

REPORT STATE TAX COMMISSION 1914. 
Increase in Public Expenditures. 

No power has constituted the members of the tax com- 
mission guardians of the public in respect to expenditures 
for the support of government, and they have no disposition 
to assume that role. Nevertheless, " economy being a most 
essential virtue in all states," and it being "the duty of 
legislators and magistrates ... to countenance and 
inculcate the principles of . . . economy," all as set 
forth in the constitution of this state, the commissioners 
believe themselves to be amply justified in urging, as they 
have so often urged before, the importance of this subject 
upon the voters of the state. The public revenue, state and 
municipal, is the voters' business and they aie responsible, 
directly or indirectly, for every extravagance affecting it 
from the inception to the termination of the fund. 

Every compulsory contribution levied by public authority 
upon people or property is iri the broad sense of the term a 
tax, nor is it made less obnoxious or burdensome if called a 
fee or a fine. In the figures that follow therefore, all fees, 
fines, and other exactions, if any, are included with the taxes 
upon polls and estates. To illustrate the comparative 
importance of the two classes, it may be said that the taxes 
upon polls and estates represent about 95 per cent, and all 
other income about 5 per cent, of the total revenue of the 
state, and of the counties, cities, towns, districts, and pre- 
cincts therein. 

Taxes as defined above have increased by leaps and bounds 
in recent years. In 1903 the sum of all the taxes assessed by 
and with inthe state of New Hampshire was $5,373,420.22; 
in 1913 it was $8,765,039.07, an increase of $3,391,618.85; 
or 63 per cent., in ten years. But these figures do not 
adequately represent the velocity the upward movement 



382 CITY OF CONCORD. 

has now attained. To show that it is necessary to divide 
the ten-year period: The levy in 1908 was $924,388.79, 
or 17 per cent, greater than in 1903, while that in 1913 was 
$2,467,230.06, or 39 per cent, greater than in 1908. By so 
much did^the advance in the last half of said period exceed 
that in the first half. These figures will be the more alarm- 
ing if it is remembered that w^hile taxes already sufficiently 
heavy were advancing 63 per cent., the population of the 
state increased only about 4| per cent., and while the one 
was advancing 39 per cent., the other increased only about 
2| per cent. 

It is instructive to study the subject from another angle. 
In the ten years from 1904 to 1914', both inclusive, the 
annual increase in all taxes defined and limited as above 
was as follows: 

1904 $34,459.91 

1905 286,590.14 

1906 115,468.39 

1907 411,257.46 

1908 76,612.89 

1909 539,995.97 

1910 • 787,565.31 

1911 215,848.50 

1912 296,216.85 

1913 627,603.43 

The average yearly increase for the whole period was 
$336,561.85. The upward trend is more plainly shown, 
however, by dividing, as before, the ten-year period in the 
middle and considering the halves separately. For the 
first five years the average annual increase was $184,877 . 76; 
for the last five years it was $493,446.01. It is surely 
pertinent to consider how long the little state of New Hamp- 
shire, almost stationary in wealth, can sustain a tax already 
burdensome and increasing at the rate of practically half 
a million dollars a year without crippling her industries and 
impoverishing her people. Plainly it is a condition not 



assessors' report. 383 

calculated to attract capital from without the state or to 
encourage business within the same. 

From the 'per capita standpoint the situation is not less 
disturbing. In 1903 there were assessed $12.88 in taxes 
for each man, woman and child in the state. Five years 
later there were assessed $14.75 for each individual, and in 
five years more $20.09. If in 1913 taxes had been equally 
distributed among all the people it would have meant a 
burden of $100 for each family of five members. Though 
in reality there was little such equality in the assess- 
ment there was much in the payment. The fact is 
that those who occupy, use or consume property, no matter 
who owns it, are those who in the last analysis pay most, 
if not all, of the taxes thereon. If the wage earner or the 
man of limited means understood he was in reality pajang 
something like $100 a year in state and municipal and half 
as much more in federal taxes for the government of himself, 
his wife and three children his influence and his vote would 
more frequently make for economy in appropriations and 
expenditures than heretofore. 

No statistics for the year 1914 appear in the above para- 
graphs for the reason that they are not yet at hand except 
in part. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submit the report of the 
collector of taxes to the close of business December 31, 1914: 

Tax Levy 1912. 
Resident list, $315,382.43 

Additions and corrections, 2,128.95 

$317,511.38 

Non-resident list, 735 . 26 

Received for moths, 172.50 

Received for interest, 649 . 09 





$319,068.23 


Cash paid treasurer. 


$311,400.00 


In office at close. 


41.23 


Abatements, 


6,498.66 


Uncollected, 


1,128.34 




<lpoiy,UDo . ^o 


Tax Levy 


1913. 


Resident list. 


$304,820.42 


Additions and corrections. 


1,170.53 




ilpouo,yyu . yo 


Non-resident, 


640.16 


Collection for moths. 


157.25 


Received for interest, 


807.60 




$307,595.96 


Cash paid treasurer. 


$297,900.00 


Discounts, 


3,123.68 


Abatements, 


3,286.37 


Balance cash at close. 


51.36 


Balance uncollected, 


3,234.55 




• $307,595 . 96 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



385 



Tax 


Levy 


1914. 


Resident list, 




$304,363.00 


Poll taxes, 




11,470.00 


Additions and corrections, 




902.72 




<lpOiD, < «30 . ( ^ 


Non-resident list, 




613.93 


Collections on moth account, 


95.45 


Collections for interest, 




51.58 




$317,496.68 


Cash paid city treasurer. 




$277,400.00 


Discounts, 




3,387.53 


Abatements, 




2,028.07 


Cash on hand. 




330.91 


Uncollected, 




34,350.17 
$317,496 . 68 



Taxes sold the City of Concord, N. H. in the office of the 
tax collector for redemption: 









1912. 






Amount, 


$1,186 . 96 Paid treasurer amount 




' 








redeemed. 


$538.07 


Int. and fees, 


55 


.03 


Interest and fees, 


55 


.03 








Unredeemed, 


648. 


.89 




$1,241, 


,99 


$1,241 


.99 








1913. 






Amount, 


$1,811. 


.71 


Paid treasurer, 


$676.37 


Int. and fees. 


17, 


21 


Interest and fees. 


17. 


.21 








Unredeemed, 


1,135. 


34 



L,828.92 



$1,828.92 



25 



386 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Taxes sold the City of Concord, N. H. for redemption as 
turned over by Mr. Ladd, former collector: 



For the years 1902 and 1903, 

For the year 1904, 

For lihe year 1905, 

For the year 1906, 

1907. 
Amount, $539 . 65 Paid treasurer. 

Interest, 39.36 Uncollected, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



$432.10 

1910. 
$837.17 Paid treasurer, 
21. 15 Uncollected, 



$500.99 



$134.34 
129.45 
207.96 
210.53 



$91.15 

487.86 





$579.01 


$579.01 




1908. 




Amount, 


$258 . 14 Paid treasurer, 


$86.51 


Interest, 


34.12 Uncollected, 


205.75 




$292.26 


$292.26 




1909. 




Amount, 


$402 . 20 Paid treasurer, 


$87.40 


Interest, 


29.90 Uncollected, 


344.70 



$432.10 



$75.30 
783 . 02 



Amount, 
Interest, 


$858.32 

1911. 
$483 . 34 Paid treasurer, 
17.65 Uncollected, 


$858.32 

$78.09 
422.90 



$500.99 
SETH N. DOLE, 

Collector. 



REPORT OF THE PUBLIC BATH FOR THE 
SEASON OF 1914. 



Hon. C. J. French, 

Mayor, City of Concord. 

Dear Sir: The past swimming season at the public bath 
has been very successful in many ways. The public bath 
was officially opened on Friday, June 12, and closed 
Saturday, September 5. 

The weather at times this summer was very poor for 
swimming, frequent rains and cool days tending to mar the 
proper enjoyment of the aquatic sport. 

On Saturday, September 5, the Annual Water Carnival, 
which marks the end of the season, was held at the public 
bath and was witnessed by a very large crowd. The 
merchants of the city donated excellent prizes for the various 
events and the city gave suitable ribbons for each event. 

A pleasing feature this year, from the young women's 
point of view, was the addition of one more afternoon a 
week for the use of the young women, making two after- 
noons a week for their exclusive use. 

The following is a weekly record of the attendance, etc.: 

Week ending June 13 147 

20 408 

27 1,305 

July 4 (cool weather) 322 

11 1,043 

18 1,292 

25. 1,154 

Aug. 1 (cool weather) 560 

8 1,118 

15 1,084 

22 982 

29 (cool weather) 763 

Sept. 5 833 

Total . 11,011 



388 city of concord. 

Attendance of Girls. 

Wed., June 24 108 

July 1 (cool weather) 30 

8 (cool weather) 77 

15 123 

■ 22 51 

29 (rain) 

Fri. 31 61 

Wed., Aug. 5 219 

Fri., 7 81 

Wed., 12 88 

Fri., 14 103 

Wed., 19 64 

Fri., 21 (rain) 14 

Wed., 26 231 

Fri., 28 (rain) 

Wed., Sept. 2 103 

Fri., 4 131 

Sat., 5 12 

Total 1,496 

The temperature of the water varied from 66° to 77° 
during the season. 

Total number of boys saved from probable drowning, 4 ; 
(cause, exhaustion and going beyond depth.) 

Total number of boys who learned to swim this summer,24. 

Total number of girls who learned to swim this summer,41. 

Recommendations: Same appropriation for next year, 
$350.00. 

Very truly 3^ours, 

TIMOTHY P. REARDON. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1914. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1914: 

From fees of all kinds, S494 . 30 

rent, Auditorium, 1,100.00 

dog licenses, 1,634.97 

hack and job team licenses, * 92.00 

employment bureau license, 5.00 

pawnbroker's license, 25 . 00 

junk dealers' licenses, 110.00 

billiard and pool table licenses, 470.00 

bounty on grasshoppers from state, 148.00 

receipts, state primary, 129.00 
refund, Boscawen's proportion of school 

fund, 1,831.60 

quarry rent, John Friberg, 25 . 00 

quarry rent, Holmberg & Peterson, 25 . 00 

quarry rent, F. R. Clark, 50 . 00 
Merrimack County, aid to dependent 

soldiers, 1,809.48 

Merrimack County, aid to county poor, 9,123 . 11 

proceeds city lot. Ward 3, 11,937.63 



,010.09 

The foregoing amount has been -paid into the city treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the Board oj Mayor and Aldermen: 

The following is a report of the work of the city physician 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1914: 

Number of house calls, city poor, 103 

" " house calls, board of health, 10 

" " police station calls, 28 

" " office calls, city poor, 79 

" " office calls, board of health, 11 

" " school inspections, 5 

" " confinement cases, 1 

" " vaccinations and examinations for same, 162 

In addition to above, the city physician is an ex-officio 
member of the board of health and has served that board 
as secretary for several years past. 

The city physician has also served as a member of the 
board of examiners of plumbers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. COOK, 

City Physician. 
March 30, 1915. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FORTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVER- 
SEER OF THE POOR. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1914. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the forty-seventh 
annual report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards 
1 and 2, for the year ending December 31, 1914: 



City Poor. 



Appropriation, 
Resolution No. 151, 
Resolution No. 165, 
Resolution No. 172, 



$800.00 

1,000.00 

600.00 

229.55 



Paid groceries, 


$633 . 98 


milk. 


136.06 


fuel. 


370.20 


rents. 


347.00 


care, children. 


414.00 


board and care. 


665.27 


medicine, 


20.14 


shoes. 


12.40 


burials. 


25.00 


miscellaneous, 


5.50 



},629.55 



J,629.55 



392 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



County 


Poor 




Paid groceries, 




$2,593.06 


milk, 




228.75 


fuel, 




1,496.35 


rents, 




2,931.55 • 


care,' children, 




1,394.00 


board. 




1,181.75 


shoes and clothing, 




317.64 


transient account, 




18.55 


burials. 




40.00 


miscellaneous, 




39.94 

fin '^n fio 




iipiUj^'ii . oy 


Total amount paid for aid to 


poor. 


$12,871.14 


Dependent Soldiers, 


City. 


Appropriation, 




$150.00 


Paid care, sickness. 




$106.00 



Dependent Soldiers, County. 

Paid groceries, $609 . 99 

milk, 29 . 20 

fuel, 742.78 

rents, 229 . 50 

board and care, 324 . 00 

clothing, etc. 16 . 00 



Total amount paid for aid to 
dependent soldiers. 

Respectfully submitted, 



.,951.47 
J,057.47 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



TRUST FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Trust 

Funds. 

abial walker trust. 

For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1914, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40 . 00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 
countess of rumford trust. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be applied to 
the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1914, 80.00 

Paid Grace E. Foster, treasurer of the society, 80 . 00 

Invested in Union Trust Company, 1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings bank, 1 ,000 . 00 



394 CITY OF CONCORD. 



MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually by the 
superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellishment of the burial 
lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of the duly appointed ofEcials, 
or members of the Minot Cemetery Association. 

Capital, ' $3,000.00 

Income received, 1914, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105 . 00 

Deposited (at 3| per cent.) with city of Concord, in 
general account. 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 

Capital, $200 . 00 

Balance income from last year, $377 . 15 

Income received, 1914, 23.00 

$400.15 



Paid Rev. Geo. A. Demers, Treas., 

French Parochial School, $25 . 00 

Income on hand, January 1, 1915, 375 . 15 



$400.15 

Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank; income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 



COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase of books 
of a biographical, geographical, historical and scientific character, and the books relating 
to science shall be those that give the latest developments and discoveries by scientific 
persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1914, 85.90 

Paid into the city treasury, 85 . 90 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 395 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500 . 00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1914, 33 . 10 

Paid into city treasury, 33.10 

Invested in city of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1914, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40 . 00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500 . 00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500 . 00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1914, 16 . 55 

Paid into the city treasury, 16.55 

Invested in city of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received 
from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, protection and orna- 
mentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1914, $28,938 . 95 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1914, 1,282.00 

Received from income of fund, 1,129 . 70 

$31,350.65 



396 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1,129.70 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, 30,220.95 

$31,350.65 

Invested in city of Concord 4% 

bonds, $10,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 7,124.04 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 13,096 . 91 

$30,220.95 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an increase of the 
fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Old North Ceme- 
tery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1914, $815 . 00 
Received from income of fund, 30. 10 



.10 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $30.10 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, 815.00 



$845.10 



Invested in city of Concord 3^% 

bonds, $500 . 00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 315.00 



$815.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 397 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received 
from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and ornamentation 
of West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1914, $532.00 
Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1914, 326.49 
Received from income of fund, 1914, 34 . 28 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 93 . 50 

$986.27 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1915, $360 . 77 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, 625.50 

$986.27 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
County Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of interested 
parties. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Millville Ceme- 
tery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1914, $2,110.90 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1914, 278.77 

Received from income, 1914, 95.01 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1914, . 7.50 

$2,492.18 



Capital, January 1, 1914, $2,110.90 

Capital increased from sale of lots, 7 . 50 



Capital, January 1, 1915, $2,118.40 

Unexpended income January 1, 1915, 373 . 78 



J,492.18 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, $1,294.23 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $1,197.95 



398 CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of East 
Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1914, $322.50 
Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1914, 
Received from income of fund, 1914, 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1915, 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, 



Capital and unexpended income deposited in New Hamp- 
shire Savings Bank. 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund the 
conditions of which have already been fulfilled. There is still outstanding five bonds 
of $500 each and one of $300. One of the $500 bonds matures each year until 1919, 
when the $300 bond is payable. The presumption is that these bonds will be paid each 
year from taxes assessed upon the property of the precinct. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1914, $468 . 42 

Income received, 1914, 18.72 



328.89 
26.04 


$677.43 
$677.43 


, $354.93 
322.50 



$487.14 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $487.14 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook sewer precinct, and authorizing loans 
on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, which 
provided that the following amounts should be raised annually upon the taxable prop- 
erty of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds as they mature, viz.: 

$100 annually for fifteen years from October 1, 1900. 
$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914, 
$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 399 

Balance on hand January 1, 1914, $2,084.81 

Income received, 1914, 83.36 



$2,168.17 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account to pay bonds matur- 
ing 1914, and interest on bonds out- 
standing, $680 . 00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1915, 1,488 . 17 

$2,168.17 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,488. 17 



EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND, 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord sewer precinct, and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, 
which provided that the sum of one hundred dollars (SlOO) should be raised annually 
for twenty years from July 1, 1806, upon the taxable property of the precinct for the 
purpose of paying the bonds as they mature. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1914, $441 . 76 

Income received, 1914, 17.64 

Received from city of Concord, 100.00 

$559.40 



Balance on hand January 1,1915, $559 . 40 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city bond, the 
income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping lot in Blossom 
Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition; six dollars each year to be deposited in 
some savings institution to create a monument fund; and the balance of the income to 
be expended each year in purchasing books for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1914, 35.00 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 



400 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account for public library, $17.00 
Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

$35.00 

Capital invested in city of Concord 31 per cent. bond. 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. The 
entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new monument on 
his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1914, $420.2.5 

From S. K. Jones trust, 6 . 00 

Income received, 1914, 16.66 

• $442.91 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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s 


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lO 


lo 


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cc 






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.a js .a o 



410 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



'e 



o 



Xfl 

H 
H 



■fiiei 'I 'nBf poBq 
no amoDut jo aanB(Bg 



5 OC 


O 


Q 




00 


f^ 


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lO 


o 












*"" 




>ra 




t^ 






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~ 






5 



■*I6I 'pspnadxa 



s o 


o 


o 




lO 




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^ 










t^ 




I^ 






>o 






O 


1 " 


t^ 




CO 












m 




M 


o 



■f>I6i 'psAiaaaj ainooni 



CO CO ^ 



•SIB3X BnOlABjd 

JO araoani papnadxanj^ 



•[BIldUQ 



= CO 


o 


o 




oo 


<M 






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o 






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-H ,-1 ^ rt « 



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OOCOOOOCO 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



411 



— I o — < 



^ ec ^ 



CC ^H lO CO <M T-t 



■CM" 



C^l »0 «5 C^ Ci 



ec»-HcocoiMi— 1»— <M 



CO CO " " 



•r-. O -H 



3 ja" 



o o a a 



S o 5 



o o a o o 



I ^ ^- "^ =^. >; g s :s o f2 

OOOCOWKKKWa 



412 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



O 



H 
H 

m 

H 



•ei6I 'I 'nBr pn^q 
no suiODni jo aon^jeg 





o 


<M 


■O 


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00 


o 


o 


o 


f^ 




U3 


^^ 


t^ 






CO 


ira 


n 




to 


to 








CM 


to 


<M 




CO 




CO 




CO 



■f-iei 'papnadxg 



IC to lO lO W5 



•f-X6I 'psAiaoaj araoanj 



•-H rt CO 



CO CO CO CO CO »-< 



JO araoDni pspuadxaufi 





o 






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to 


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f^ 


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lO 






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^ ^ £? 

cT qT S 

.5 .S -p 

'OJ 'S ^ 

eg d & 

U U M 



i -a 

B 12 



i -a 



w w 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



413 



Q 


- 


- 


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= 


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lO 




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I" ? I i .■§ b 

w m w a A ,5 



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= a :§ 






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414 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



■^ 



o 



H 
H 

H 



V 



0) 



v 



OP 



CO oj ^ 

c.--- od- 

_Q O Q 

Ci(M>-'C100iO»OiO'-'OC0'**' 



■ei6I 'T -n^f pnnq 
no anioaui jo aouBiBg 



■f-161 'pspuadxg 






»0 lO CO 



■1'16I 'psAiaoaj auioanj 



•SJE3X snouajd 
JO anioDui papnadxanfi 



-rji T-. ^ 



■[BiidBj 



I^ o o 



c o o c 



B < :z 



^ J? 



1 


zr 

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(X 
c 


^ 


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^ -< .2 



^ "^ ^. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



415 



^^ 


00 


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416 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



i 

•■s> 



m 
H 

H 



•SI6I 'I •nsf pncq 
no amoani jo 9anB|Bg 



<M lO CO CO O (M »0 

'^ lo m e^ »o c^ CO 



•1-161 'papnadxg 



5 O 




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Q 




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lO 






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lO C^ O CD »-H O 



■{•161 'p8Ai8D8j araoDnj 



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JO araoDui papuadxanfi 



•* lO C<1 



•I«|idBO 



C^ 1-H T-. 



o 

a - 

> s „ 

3 =^ "? 3 

_;■ -S^ -o K 

^ o o o 

.~ o o o 

s s s s 




; S 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



417 



St 


; 


: 


: 


; 


: 


I 


: 


: 


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8 




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27 






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J- o S 






^ '^ '■^. 



418 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



-ts 



O 



H 
H 

W 
H 

(I) 
O 



eiei 'I -nBf puBq 
uo araoDui jo aonBjBg 



■t-iei 'papnadxg 







o 


o 


O 


o 


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o 


Q 


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t-* 




2 


« 


lO 


o 


CO 



•f 151 'P3A1303J araoonj 



•SJBS,t snoiA9jd 
JO araoaai pspnadxanfi 



■lEiidBO 



^H T-t c<l C^ ^^ 



a o 



S s tn 



•r -r a 



§ a a 4i 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



419 



OO CO lO c^ 



CO ■^ ■^ 



^ 




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Di tf tf tf PS rt 



420 



CITY OF CONCORD. 






H 

in 



00 1(5 (M CO C^ 



•9I6I 'I 'aBf puwi 
no amooai jo aooBisg 



•H6I 'ppnadxa 



iO lO C4 Ud 



■f I6T 'psA-isDM ainooaj 



^ ^H t>> 



CO eo (M CO 



-SJ83X snoiAud 
JO anioaat papnadxaaf^ 



•p^tdsQ 



CO IM OO CO 



rt T-< O) ^ »H 




TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



421 



Sit : 


: 


z 


r 


: 


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I 


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to 


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CO 


t~ 


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t» 


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CO 





5 


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^ ^" ^ ^ 

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OQ CQ CO aj 



^ m 



s s 



W -S 



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cctotoccoJczjaiaictKCQcci/icc 



422 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



O 



H 

xn 

H 

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o 







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no atnoonT jo paouBiBg 










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s 




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^ 








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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



423 



kO(MOr^asicoococ^o».'3 



1-1 CC lO 



O C5 



s 


o 


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(M 1-1 « eo CO •-1 



Q 




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^^&:fefe:^^S:^&:^ 



B S 
.2 .2 



424 



CITY OF CONCORD. 






O 



H 
H 



•SI6I 'I "ncf puBq 
no araooui jo aonci^g 



rt t>. « 



•^161 'papnadxa 



CO CO CO 



U^ kO to US CO 



"Hei 'P9AI908.I araoouj 



CO CO « 



CO CO CO CO OJ 



-fijTOX snouajd 
JO araoDui papuadxanfi 



inidBO 



i-H 00 lO 



OS Tjl 04 i-H 



cS 8 



2 ^ 6 



1 ^ 



^ is ^ 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 425 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from simdry collections and income of permanent funds are added 
to the annual appropriation. The amoimts expended on trust funds are paid on a 
special order from the mayor, from the income of individual deposits made with the 
city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 

Mrs. A. C. Tebeau's estate, burial, $4.00 

Mrs. Grace E. Foster, repairs, 1 . 50 

Iron sold, 13.91 
Home for the Aged, Mrs. Tilton, • 

burial, 3 . 00 

E. A. Gordon, burial, 3 . 00 

Walter S. Blanchard, repairs, 1 . 50 

C. W. Hardy, burial, 3.00 

Clara A. Abbott, burial, 3 . 00 

Louis Tebeau, care, 2 . 00 

Miles F. Farmer's estate, burial, 3 . 00 

E. P. Gerould's estate, burial, 3 . 00 
Mrs. L. P. Pearson's estate, burial, 4 . 00 
W. A. Knight, burial, 3 . 00 
Mrs. E. M. Staples, care, 3 . 00 
Mrs. A. D. Cutting estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. A. S. Andrews, care, 3.00 
Isabelle Greeley, care, 5 . 00 
Thomas Robinson, care, 4 . 00 
John Swenson Granite Co., founda- 
tion, 5.00 . 

Horace Paul estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Martha M. Dowe estate, burial, 3 . 00 
Mrs. Charles H. Thorndike estate, 

burial, 3.00 

F. A. Newhall estate, burial, 5 . 00 
H. J. Alexander, care, 3.00 
Mrs. E. E. Clarke estate, burial, 3 . 00 
Frank Batchelder, burial, 3 . 00 
Emma Osgood estate, burial, 3 . 00 



426 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



Minot Cemetery Association, care, $65 . 25 

Mrs. Henry Tucker, care, 2 . 00 

William Abbott, trust, 15 . 00 

Samuel Alexander, trust, 3 . 50 

L. Bell, Jr.,' trust, 4.00 

Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, 10.00 

Richard Bradley, trust, 3 . 50 

John F, Chaffin, trust, 1 . 75 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 3 . 50 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 3 . 50 

Samuel Evans, trust, 3.50 

Hosea Fessenden, trust, 4 . 00 

John Flanders, trust, 1 . 75 

Theodore French, trust, 3 . 50 

Moses Gerould, trust, 1 . 75 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 1.75 

Mitchel Oilman, trust, 3 . 50 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 2 . 50 

Pamela L. Hall, trust, 1 . 75 

Frank S. Harraden, trust, 3.50 

William N. Horner, trust, 3.50 

Louisa L. Hoyt, trust, 6.00 

William T. Locke, trust, 3 . 50 

Asa McFarland, trust, 3.50, 

Ida Moore, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary Ann Morrill, trust, 3 . 00 

Mary R. Morrill, trust, 5 . 00 

Samuel D. L. Morrill, trust, 5.00 

Isaac H. Ordway, trust, 6.00 

True Osgood, trust, 5.00 

W. B. Palmer and S. P. Savory, trust, 3 . 50 

Alice W. Parker, trust, 4.00 

Asa Parker, trust, 1 . 75 

Samuel G. Parker, trust, 1.75 

Pearson-White-Savorj% trust, 3.50 

Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust, 7.00 

Henry J. Rhodes, trust, 1 . 75 

Hiram Richardson, trust, 20 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 427 



Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 
Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 
Joseph Stickney, trust, 
Nathan Stickney, trust, 
Abigail Sweetser, trust, 
Mrs. James M. Tilton, trust, 
Sarah M. Wadleigh, trust, 
Timothy and A. B. Walker, trust, 
Albert Webster, trust, 
Paul Went worth, trust, 
Harriet E. Wheeler, trust, 
Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust, 
Charlotte N. Woolson, trust, 



Credits. 
1914. 
December Income from sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account transferred 
to City of Concord gen- 
eral account, $229 . 50 
Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 164.16 



$7. 


00 


1. 


75 


15. 


,00 


1 


,75 


7 


.00 


1 


.75 


7, 


.00 


, 7, 


.00 


4 


.00 


7 


.00 


4 


.00 


5 


.00 


3 


.50 



$393 . 66 



$393.66 



428 CITY OF CONCORD. 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the 
amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are 
paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made 
with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the 
lot specified in each trust. 

* 

Receipts. 
1914 

Harry H. Dudley, Annie M. Dudley, 
Thomas C. Bethune," Sadie M. Bethune, 
lot 1, block Z, $231.00 

Ross C. Banks, lot 136, block Y, 37 . 50 

J. M. Runnells, care, 1 . 00 

Mrs. C. A. Burroughs estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. James Minot, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs, Burleigh's estate, care, 1 . 50 

E. B. Hutchinson's estate, care, 7.00 
Geo. W. Waters— O'Connor, burial, 3.00 
Charles F. Batchelder, burial, 11.00 
R. C. Banks, burial, 1.50 
Richard Harvey, rent, 24.00 
Mrs. J. F. Peters' estate, burial, 3 . 00 
W. Ludlow, repairs, 1 . 50 
A. P. Holden, care, 1 . 50 
H. Maria Woods, care, 6.00 
Glenville Reynolds, burial, 8 . 00 
Isaac Hill, care, 3.00 
Amos Blanchard, care, 1 • 00 
R. F. Robinson, care, 1.50 
Geo. W. Hill, care, 1.00 

F. A. Stillings, care, 3.00 
L. H. Carroll, care, 2.00 
Mrs. S. F. Morrill, care, 2.00 
W. F. Thayer, care, 4 . 00 
Mrs. Hugh Phillips' estate, burial, 7 . 00 
C. W. Lane, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 429 

Mrs. Burrington's estate, care, $3.00 

Joseph Bean, repairs, 6 . 50 

Mrs. S. Humphrey, care, 1.00 

Fred Ladd, care, 2.50 

H. A. Rowell, care, 1.50 

W. E. Hunt, care, 7 . 00 

Perry Brothers, foundation, 19.00 

Leland A. Smith's estate, burial, 11.00 

C. Webster, burial, 1.00 

H. Plummer, burial, 8.00 

Mrs. D. S. Woods' estate, burial, 10.00 

Muhanet Beketach's estate, burial 8 . 00 

J. E. Fernald, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. Hiram Rolfe's estate, burial, 3 . 00 

John L. Durgin, lot 62, block Z, 72 . 00 

G. C. Eastman, burial, 13 . 00 

G. M. Kimball, care, 2.50 

C. H. Adams' estate, burial, 3.00 

Thomas Hannigan, rent, 10 . 00 

Geo. E. Blanchard's estate, burial, 4.00 

I. Henry Hamilton's estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Mrs. Samuel Holt, care, 6 . 00 

T. H. Dunstane, rent, 20 . 00 

Lucy M. Poore, care, 1 . 50 

Arthur W. Austin, lot 22, block Y, 42 . 00 

Fred P. Wheeler, lot 21, block Y, 35 . 00 

Herman W. Clay, lot 165, block W, 101 . 25 

E. A. Vernal, lot 101, block Y, 25.00 
Mrs. Jennie C. Sprague, lot 24, block 

Z, 96.00 
Walter L. and Florence W. Spaulding, 

lot 45, block Z, 80.00 

C. F. Forsyth, removal, 5 . 00 

Clara A. Edgerly's estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Morrison L. Sanborn, burial, 4 . 00 

Charles A. Dole, burial, 5 . 00 

Ralph C. Hoone, burial, 1 . 00 

Sarah Ellis, burial, 1.00 



430 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paul Knee, burial, 

John L. Durgin, burial, 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 

Mr. Labonta, burial, 

C. W. Lyman, care, 

C. F. Bunker, burial, 

Horace Merrill's estate, burial, 

Mrs. Sarah L. Coutman's estate, 

burial, 
R. A. Evans, setting tablets, 
Fred L. Boardman, burial, 
Geo. Carter, care, 
J. S. Mills' estate, burial, 
N. H. Shattuck's estate, care, 
Geo. H. Buswell, care, 
S. A. Clark, lot 79, block Y, 
Harriet J. Smith, lot 78, block Y, 
Charles Bartlett, burial, 
W. L. Spaulding, removals, 
Mrs. Julia F. Gill's estate, burial, 
Mrs. Mary R. Cummings estate, 

burial, 
W. L. Spaulding, burial, 
S. A. Clark, burial, 
J. S. Button's estate, burial, 
Charlotte E. Webster, burial, 
Sarah Ellis, burial. 
Dr. E. A. Clark's estate, burial, 
Ben Dodge, care, 
Geo. E. Rothwell, burial, 
S. D. Trussell, repairs, 
Mrs. E. W. Brooks, burial, 
John Gibney, burial, 
Mrs. John W. Dunklee, burial, 
Mr. H. G. McQuesten, burial, 
C. W. Harrington, burial, 
Mr. Struthers, care, 
C. A. Burroughs, repairs. 



$0. 


50 


3. 


00 


15. 


00 


3. 


00 


1. 


00 


10. 


00 


5. 


00 


3. 


00 


3. 


50 


3. 


00 


1. 


50 


3. 


00 


1. 


,50 


1, 


,50 


30 


,00 


30 


,00 


3 


.00 


11 


.00 


8 


.00 


3 


.00 


1 


.50 


1 


.50 


5 


.00 


8 


.00 


8 


.00 


3 


.00 


2 


.00 




.50 


5 


.00 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


4 


.00 


2 


.00 


5 


.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 431 

G. L. CaiT, burial, $1.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundations, 9 . 00 

H. W. Clay, burial, 3.00 

Langley & Scampini, foundation, 5 . 00 
J. Sidney Sargent's estate, lot 100, 

block Y, 25 . 00 
Geo. F. Sewell, Jr., estate, lot 125, 

block Y, 36.00 
John Swenson Co., foundation, 116. 10 
Mrs. Phebe E. Mason and heirs, lot 

27, block Z, 96.00 
F. L. Carr, Newbury, N. H., lot 129, 

block Y, 25 . 00 

Asa Gee, lot 99, block W, 42.00 

Napoleon B. Coutman, lot 67, block Y, 30 . 00 

Charles H. Staniels, lot 57, block Z, 96.00 

George R. Perry, lot 47, block Y, 25.00 

H. B. Langley's estate, burial, 5.00 

Harvey Mclntire's estate, burial, 9 . 00 

J. Sidney Sargent's estate, burial, 3 . 00 

George Sewall, Jr. estate, burial, 5.00 

Geo. W. Mitchell's estate, burial, 3.00 

C. H. Mason's estate, burial, 3.00 

Miss Mabel Johnson's estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Howard C. Brown, burial, 3 . 00 

Miss Hopkinson, use of tomb, 1 . 00 

Ida F. Barth, burial, 3.00 

Vaughn Standish, burial, 3 . 00 

William Yeaton, use of tomb, 1 . 00 

Mr. Bishop, infant burial, . 50 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 4.00 

W. S. Rowell, labor, 2.00 

Mrs. J. B. Colman, burial, 17.00 

Chas. H. Staniels, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Susan Green's estate, burial, 3.00 

James Fraser, repairs, 1 . 00 

Miss L. W. Ames estate, burial, 3 . 00 



432 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Heirs of Mrs. Josiah Farrar, lot 23, 

block Y, $42.00 
Louisa Folsom, lot 61 west half block 

Z, 40.00 

Isabella M. Tuttle, lot 130, block Y, 25.00 
Lucy G. Clement, Mrs. Harriet L. 

Hall, lot 68, block V, 180 . 00 

Leon F. Shallis, lot 93, block W, 35 . 00 

Burns P. Hoclgman, lot 35, block Z, 80 . 00 

Mrs. Louise Folsom, removal, 10.00 
Mrs. Josiah Farrar's estate, burial 

and labor, 9 . 00 

A. P. Tuttle, burial, 3 . 00 

Mrs. M. R. Holt's estate, burial, 3 . 00 

C. A. Bailey, foundation, 12.25 

Fred Kenney, burial, 3 . 00 

Wood sold, 2 . 00 

Mrs. Hackett, burial, 3 . 00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 4 . 00 

Susan B. Johnson, lot 70, block Z, 113.75 

Alfred D. Burroughs, lot 103, block Y, 25 . 00 

Mrs. E. Paro, lot 128, block Y, 30.00 
Mrs. George A. Makepeace, lot 190, 

block W, 95.00 
J. H. Dickson, lot 61 east half, block 

Z, 40.00 
Dr. F. A. Sprague, removals and in- 
terments, 20 . 50 
Mr. Suscombs, labor, 5.00 
Geo. A. Makepeace's estate, burial, 4 . 00 
J. H. Dickson, burial, 3.00 
Larson & Carlson, foundation, 26 . 00 
Grace R. Whitney, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. Pendergast, care, 1 . 00 
W. P. Fiske estate, burial, 10.00 
Mrs. J. W. Carter, lot 112, block Y, 36.00 
John Dahlfred, lot 97, block Y, 30 . 00 
Mrs. Louise S. Bean, lot 99, block Y, 25 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 433 

Geo. N. Woodward, lot 167, east half, 

block W, $100.00 

Swen J. Carlson, lot 98, block Y, 25 . 00 

Ash lumber sold, 3 . 50 

A. W. Hobbs, care, 1 . 00 

Mrs. F. A. Burnham, care, 2.00 

C. M. Brown, repairs, 7.00 

G. L. Strow's estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Samuel Lock's estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Mrs. M. E. Chase, repairs, • 1 . 00 

Wood sold, 12.00 

Herman Shattuck, burial, 3 . 00 

John Dahlfred, burial, 1 . 50 

Mrs. C. I. Johnson, care, 2.00 

Mr. Carlson, burial, 3 . 00 

Miss Grace P. Smith, repairs, 10.00 

Mrs. Henry Morin's estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Mrs. C. P. Lyons estate, burial, 4.00 
N. H. S. Hospital— C. H. Moody, 

burial, 3 . 00 

Nathaniel Knowles, burial, 8.00 

James McBain's estate, burial, 3 . 00 

E. S. Cummings, infant, burial, 1 . 00 

Ella Sturtevant, burial, 3 . 00 

Silas S. Wiggin, lot 74, block Y, 30.00 

Chas. Cochran, burial, 3.00 

Sylvanus Smith, foundation, 5 . 00 

Mr. Carlson, grave and burial, 6.00 

Joseph Maning, burial, 3 . 00 
N. H. State Hospital, Frank Noyes, 

burial, 3.00 

Wm. Gordon, burial, 4.00 
N. H. State Hospital, Mary Conners, 

burial, ' 3.00 

John F. Potter, child, burial, 1.50 

Unknown man, burial, 3 . 00 

A. P. Turner, burial, 4.00 

28 



434 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Carl B. Jonkland, burial, $3.00 

Mrs. M. H. Campbell, burial, 3.00 

Ernest Chabbott, burial, 3 . 00 

Mrs. S. F. Cole, burial, 3.00 

C. J. Jay, burial, 3 . 00 

Wm. Giles, burial, 5.00 

E. F. Batchelder, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Daggett, burial, 5 . 00 

M. A. Gale, burial, 3 . 00 

Mrs. Almira Staples, burial, 3 . 00 

Geo. A. Fellows, burial, 3 . 00 
N. H. State Hospital, Mrs. Parker, 

burial, 3.00 

Wm. H. Mudge, burial, 3 . 00 

H. H. Shoemaker lot, lot 18, block Y, 25 . 00 

Wm. J. White, lot 127, block Y, 30.00 

W. A. Marshall, repairs and burial, 30.00 

E. A. Moulton, labor, 2.00 

M. Ahern, wood, 2.00 

H. E. White, burial, 3.00 

Cummings Brothers foundation, 5 . 00 

E. A. Moulton, labor, 1 . 00 

J. E. Hobson, care, 1.00 

E. A. Moulton, labor, 8 . 00 
Eva Peran, burial, " 3 . 00 
Mary Kelliher, burial, 3 . 00 
Mary Bennett, burial, 3 . 00 
Mary McLaughlin, burial, 3 . 00 
James Good, burial, 3.00 
Rose Champney, burial, 3.00 
Cummings Brothers, foundation, 8 . 00 

F. R. Adams, repairs, 5.00 
Ellen L. Quimbj^ estate, burial, 1 . 00 
W. A. Capen, lot 17, block Z, 96.00 
Mrs. John N. Lane, lot 69, block Y, 30.00 
John H. Bowler, lot 76, block Y, 30.00 
Charles Bergstron, lot 70, block V, 12 . 50 
Mrs. C. W. Clarke estate, burial, 12.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 435 



Helen W. Walker estate, burial, 
Perry Brothers, labor, 
Mrs. G. F. Sewall, Jr., foundation, 
Mrs. Alice West estate, grave and 

burial, 
Mrs. W. A. Capen, burial, 
Charlotte S. Giles, repairs and care, 
N. J. Millette, care, 
Mr. Shoemaker estate, burial, 
0. L. Hazelton, foundation, , 
Mrs. John N. Lane, foundation, 
John H. Sanborn, care, 
Abbie C. Morse estate, burial, 
John H. Bowler, Jr., estate, burial, 
Cummings Brothers, labor, 
R. P. Stevens & Co., foundation, 
Mrs. Geo. K. Lang, care, 
J. H. Gallinger, care, 
Hellen Conn estate, burial, 
Frank Conn, burial, 
Elizabeth Chandler, burial, 
Mrs. N. White, care, 
0. Hill, care, 
F. S. Streeter, care, 
A. P. Carpenter estate, care, 
Mrs. Mary J. Marshall, care, 
Cyrus Cummings estate, burial, 
Mrs. Fred Wheeler estate, burial, 

E. M. Willis, care, 

Wm. K. McFarland, care, 

F. A. Stillings, care, 
Wm. M. Chase, care, 

Geo. H. Marston estate, care, 

Geo. H. Russ, care, 

J. H. Bartlett, foundation, 

Fred Whiting, care, 

Mrs. Geo. N. Todd, care, 

Eva A. Heath estate, burial, 



$10.00 


5. 


50 


5. 


00 


8. 


00 


4. 


00 


5. 


00 


1. 


75 


3. 


00 


11. 


50 


6. 


00 


4. 


.00 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


2 


.00 


7, 


.00 


1 


.00 


2 


.50 


5 


.00 


5 


.00 


8 


.00 


25 


.00 


3 


.00 


2 


.50 


2 


.50 


2 


.00 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


2 


.00 


2 


.00 


3 


.00 


5 


.00 


2 


.00 


2 


.00 


4 


.00 



436 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. Mary Hoit, care, $1 . 50 
Miss Maria Woods, care, 6.00 
Mrs. Mary P. Woodworth, care, 3.00 
Joseph B. Hussey, care, 1.50 
Levi G. Chase estate, burial, 4 . 00 
John Swenson Granite Co., founda- 
tion, 55 . 00 
Mrs. F. P. Virgin, care, 2 . 00 

D. Clarke Parker, care, 2.00 
Henry Mackin's estate, lot 135, block 

Y, 31.50 

Chas. T. Page, lot 41 , block Z, 202 . 50 

Anna Kimball, care, 1 . 50 

Mary J. Dana estate, burial, 4.00 

C. W. Lane, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. Ann Morrison estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Mrs. E. A. Abbott estate, burial, 3 . 00 

John Dane estate, use of tomb, 1 . 00 

Dr. G. M. Kimball, care, 5.00 

Miss Adelaid Merrill, care, 5 . 00 

C F. Thompson, vases, . 70 

Mrs. D. W. Waldron estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Edson J. Hill, care, 8.00 

Elizabeth A. Downing estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Mrs. James Minot, care, 5.50 

Mrs. Burleigh, care, 1 . 50 

W. P. Fiske estate, care, 2.50 

E. B. Hutchinson estate, care, 7.00 
Mrs. James H. Chase, care, 4.00 
Fred W. Bardman, care, 1 . 50 
Mrs. Josiah Batchelder, care, 3.00 
S. A. Carter, care, 4.00 
C. P. Bancroft, care, 2.00 
Mrs. Oliver Wentworth estate, burial, 4 . 00 
Mrs. C. E. Billings estate, burial, 3 . 00 
J. F. Wilson, care, 1 . 00 
W. W. Flint, care, 1 . 50 
H. F. Corser, care, 1 . 50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 437 

W. E. Carpenter, care, $1 . 00 

Dunlap & Jeffers, care, 4 . 00 

C. R. Dame, care, 1.50 
Fred Ladd, care, 2 . 50 
Charlotte Merrill, care, 2.00 
Fred Powell, care, 1 . 00 
Mrs. H. C. Sturtevant, care, 1.50 
R. F. Robinson, care, 1 . 50 
J. C. French, care, 1.00 
Fred Plummer, care, 1 . 50 
Clara H. Hubbard estate, burial, 3.00 
Jeremiah Smith estate, burial, 4 . 00 
Nancy Farnum estate, burial, 3.00 
Isabelle Flanders estate, burial, 3 . 00 

D. G. Lowell, care, 1.00 

B. Bilsborough estate, care, 1.00 
Mary Hutchins, repairs, 11 .25 
S. R. Dole, care, 5.00 
Mrs. R. M. Day, care, ' 3.00 
Behnda Woods estate, burial, 4 . 00 

E. F. Ginnis, child, burial, 1.50 
J. Kelley, infant, burial, 1.00 
Mrs. Estabrook estate, burial, 5 . 00 
Myrtle Weeks estate, burial, 3 . 00 
Raymond Caswell, grave and burial, 6.00 

C. H. Seavey estate, burial, 4.00 
Eastman estate, use of tomb, 1 . 00 
W. A. Chesley, care, 1 . 50 
L. H. Carroll, care, 2.00 
J. A. Cochran, care, 1 . 00 
Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care, 1.00 
Mrs. N. A. Dunklee, care, 1.00 
Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 1 . 00 
G. D. Huntley, care, 1,50 
Fred Osgood, care, 1.50 
John Runnells, care, 1 . 00 
E. G. Cummings estate, care, 2.00 
Mrs. A. L. Proctor, repairs, 7.00 



438 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. S. F. Morrill, care, 


$2.00 


Mrs. H. E. Webster, care. 


1.00 


W. F. Gay, care, 


1.00 


I. T. Chesley, labor. 


2.00 


John W. Drew, care. 


3.00 


Mrs. Jennie B. Blake, estate, burial, 


3.00 


Alvah Sprague, care, 


1.00 


Mrs. F. E. Shepard estate, burial, 


10.00 


Henry Makin estate, care 


3.00 


Joseph B. Palmer, care, 


2.00 


W. E. Hunt, care, 


7.00 


Lizzie A. Storrs estate, burial, 


3.00 


Warren E. Mersom, care, 


2.50 


Millie C. Christman estate, burial, 


5.00 


Mrs. E. H. Shutz, care. 


6.00 


John W^. Ford, care. 


2.00 


D. E. Clarke estate, repairs. 


5.00 


C. E. Palmer, care. 


1.25 


Abbie E. Stone estate, burial, 


4.00 


Lydia Morgan estate, burial. 


3.00 


George W. Sanders, care. 


2.00 


Wm. F. Thayer, care. 


4.00 


Richard Harvey, rent, 


24.00 


T. H. Dunstane, rent, 


20.00 


Mrs. Isabelle Tuttle, foundation, 


6.00 


C. W. Bradlee, care. 


1.50 


Chas. D. Bean estate, burial. 


4.00 


Lakeman estate, care. 


2.00 


J. S. Woods, reburial. 


3.00 


J. H. Albin, care. 


3.00 


J. E. Dwight, care. 


1.50 


Walter Jenks, care. 


1.50 


Chas. P. Tucker, care, 


1.50 


J. E. Fernald, care. 


2.00 


John Swenson Granite Works, founda- 




tion. 


22.00 


H. A. Rowell, care, 


1.50 


E. R. Newbold, care. 


1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 439 

G. W. Abbott, trust, $7 . 00 

Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 2 . 00 

Fidelia F. Adams, trust, 4 . 00 

Sarah J. Adams, trust, 8.00 

Sarah M. K. Adams, trust, 24.00 

Allen-Smith-Dimond, trust, 4.00 

Frederick Allison, trust, 4 . 00 

Mary B. Allison, trust, 1 .75 

Lavinia Arlin, trust, 2 . 00 

Sarah Ash, trust, 1.75 

Alonzo Atherton, trust, 8.00 

Thomas D. Avery, trust, 3 . 50 

Lizzie Knight Badger, trust, 4.00 

Annie L. S. Bailey, trust, 3.50 

Oliver Ballou, trust, 2 . 00 

Charles Barker, trust, 3 . 50 

George W. Barnes, trust, 2 . 00 

James W. Barton, trust, 5 . 00 

Mary A. Bass, trust, 3 . 00 

Robert Bell, trust, 2 . 50 

Matilda Benson, trust, 4 . 00 

Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 3 . 50 

James D. Blaisdell, trust, 3.50 

James M. Blake, trust, 7 . 00 

William Blakeley, trust, 5 . 00 

Emily Blanchard, trust, 15 . 00 

Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 8 . 00 

Annie L. Brown, trust, 5 . 00 

Charles L. Brown, trust, 7 . 00 

Mary N. Preston Buntin, trust, 10.00 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 1 . 75 

Harriet W. Butters, trust, 4.00 

Benjamin Caldwell, trust, 8.00 

Levi Call, trust, 4.00 

Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 4.00 

Hiram J. Carter, trust, 6 . 00 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 5 . 00 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 3 . 00 



440 CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. P. and K. P. Chesley, trust, 


$5.50 


Samuel N. Chesley, trust, 


5.00 


Caroline Clark, trust, 


6.00 


Fannie A. Clark, trust, 


3.00 


Rufus Clement, trust. 


6.00 


William W. Cloud, trust, 


5.00 


Frederick Clough, trust, 


3.50 


George Clough, trust, 


3.50 


Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 


1.75 


Weston Cofran, trust, 


7.00 


Amos L. Colburn, trust. 


1.75 


Sarah T. Colby, trust. 


3.50 


Charles A. Cook, trust, 


5.00 


Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust. 


2.50 


Mary Crow, trust. 


15.00 


Charles H. Cummings, trust, 


20.00 


Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 


6.00 


Silas Curtis, 


5.00 


Charles C. Danforth, trust. 


6.00 


Charles S. Danforth, trust. 


2.00 


Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 


1.75 


Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 


4.00 


Edward Dow, trust. 


4.00 


Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 


1.50 


Charles V. Dudley, trust. 


3.50 


William B. Durgin, trust. 


7.00 


J. B. Dyer, trust, 


5.00 


Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust. 


3.50 


Stephen B. Eaton, trust. 


6.00 


Lydia F. Edgerly, trust. 


3.50 


Georgiana Ela, trust. 


3.50 


Ella M. Elliott, trust. 


1.75 


Elizabeth G. Emerson, trust, 


5.00 


George H. Emery, trust. 


3.50 


David E. Everett, trust. 


2.50 


Lydia A. Farley, trust. 


3.50 


Mary M. Farnum, trust. 


3.50 


Alva C. Ferrin, trust. 


6.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 



441 



Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, 


$1.75 


J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust. 


1.75 


Mr. and Mrs. Harlow A. Flanders, 




trust. 


3.50 


George G. Fogg, trust. 


15.00 


Alice T. Ford, trust. 


7.00 


Jerome Ford, trust, 


3.50 


Asa Fowler, trust, 


17.50 


Mary A. Gage, trust, 


7.00 


Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 


1.75 


John D. Gale, trust, 


8.00 


John Gear, trust, 


3.50 


Sarah L. Gear, trust. 


3.50 


Caroline L. George, trust, 


20.00 


Enoch Gerrish, trust. 


3.50 


Samuel K. Gill, trust, 


5.00 


G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, trust. 


1.75 


Loren W. Glysson, trust. 


5.00 


Hannah A. Goss and Fannie A. Goss, 




trust, 


7.00 


George Greeley, trust, 


17.50 


Jennie E. Green, trust, 


1.75 


John B. Green, trust, 


3.50 


William E. Green, trust. 


5.00 


Betsey Hadley, trust, 


3.50 


George M. Harding, trust. 


1.75 


Mary D. Hart, trust. 


15.00 


Timothy Haynes, trust. 


4.00 


Charles F. Hildredth, trust, 


4.00 


Emma J. Hill, trust, 


1.75 


John M. Hill, trust, 


8.00 


Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust. 


2.00 


Frank J. Hoit, trust. 


8.00 


Harriet F. Holman, trust. 


5.00 


Elizabeth F. Holt, trust. 


3.50 


Hoyt and Stetson, trust, 


3.50 


Sarah E, Irish, trust. 


4.00 


Henry Ivey, trust, 


2.00 



442 CITY OF CONCORD. 



E. A. Jameson, trust, 


$5.00 


Herman E. Jewell, trust. 


1.75 


Julia A. Jones, trust. 


5.00 


John F. Jones, trust. 


4.00 


John and Benjamin A. Kimball, trust. 


7.00 


Ellen B. Kittredge, trust. 


1.75 


Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 


26.00 


William Ladd, trust. 


4.00 


Leete and Newman, trust, 


3.50 


Mrs. Charles Libby, trust. 


6.00 


Lincoln and Forrester, trust, 


2.50 


J. L. Lincoln, trust, 


1.75 


J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 


7.00 


Wm. L Lovely, trust. 


2.00 


John McCauley, trust. 


5.00 


Henry McFarland, trust. 


8.00 


McQuesten, Evarts and Greenough, 




trust. 


4.00 


James McQuesten, trust. 


10.00 


Martin and Brown, trust. 


3.50 


H. W. and H. 0. Matthews, trust, 


5.00 


Jennie P. Martin, trust. 


3.50 


Morgan and Colby, trust, 


5.00 


Charles S. Mellen trust. 


12.00 


Horace Merrill, trust, 


2.00 


B. J. Merrill, trust. 


5.00 


S. F. Merrill, trust. 


5.00 


Sullivan G. Mills, trust. 


10.00 


Charles Moody, trust, 


5.00 


George H. Moore, trust, 


4.00 


Carlos B. and Abbie M. Moseley, 




trust. 


7.00 


Mary J. Moses, trust. 


5.00 


Caroline B. Murdock, trust, 


4.00 


Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 


7.00 


Eliphalet S. Nutter, trust, 


4.00 


Woodbridge Odlin, trust. 


3.50 


Eugene A. Ordway, trust. 


2.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 443 

H. S. Ordway and J. Sedgley, trust, $10 . 00 

George B. Packer, trust, 3.50 

George F. Page, trust, 2.00 

Moses W. and Mary A. Page, trust, 1 . 75 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 3 . 50 

John B. Palmer, trust, 2.00 

William H. Palmer, trust, 1.75 

Felicite Pingault, 3.50 

Hamilton E. Perkins, trust, 7 . 00 

Lucy J. Perkins, trust, 1 . 00 

Mary N. Perley, trust, 12.00 

Isabella Perry, trust, 2 . 00 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 5.00 

Irvin L. Pickering, trust, 10.00 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 3 . 50 

Lizzie S. Pixley, trust, 4.00 

Edwin F. Plummer, trust, 1 . 75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 3 . 50 

D. 0. Rand and N. V. Libby, trust, 1 . 75 
James E. Rand, trust, 2.00 
Henry W. Ranlet, trust, 5 . 00 
George L. Reed, trust, 4.00 
Judith A. Richardson, trust, 4.00 
Mrs. Janus H. Rigney, trust, 1.75 
Frances K. Roberts, trust, 7.00 
Moses F. Rogers, trust, 4.00 

E. H. Rollins, trust, 12.00 
David D. Rowe, trust, 2.00 
James H. RoAvell, trust, 6.00 
Moses W. Russell, trust, 9 . 00 
Mrs. Isaac S. R. Sanborn, trust, 1.75 
Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 3 . 50 
Frank A. Sargent, trust, 5.00 
John B, Sargent, trust, 5.00 
Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 10.00 
Edward Sawyer, trust, 5 . 00 
Shackford and Dame, trust, 3 . 50 
Mary W. Smith, trust, 7 . 00 



444 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Moses B. Smith, trust, 

William Smith, trust, 

Hattie E. Southmaid, trust, 

Hiram Stanyan, trust, 

Julia F. Stark, trust, 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 

Mary L. Stevenson, trust, 

Charles F. Stewart, trust, 

M. J. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 

John W. Straw, trust, 

Mary J. Streeter, trust, 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 

Sturtevant Post, No. 2, G. A. R., trust, 

Charles L. Tappan, trust, 

Hiram B. Tebbitts, trust, 

John H. Teel, trust, 

John S. Thompson, trust, 

John C. Thorne, trust, 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 

J. L. Tilton and A. B. Locke, trust, 

John H. Toof, trust, 

Jane R. Twombly, trust, 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 

Charles P. Virgin, trust, 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 

Pauline E. Wells, trust, 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 

George T. Whittredge, trust, 

Mary Williams, trust, 

Sarah A. Williams, trust, 

Robert Woodruff, trust, 

E. B. Woodard, trust, 

Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 

William Yeaton, trust, 

Seth K. Jones, trust. 



$1 


.75 


1 


.75 


1 


.75 


3 


.50 


3 


.50 


8 


.00 


1 


.75 


2 


.00 


10 


.00 


2 


.00 


4 


.00 


4 


00 


10 


00 


3 


50 


12 


00 


1 


75 


3 


50 


5 


00 


1 


75 


1 


75 


4 


00 


4 


00 


10 


00 


1 


50 


7 


00 


10 


00 


2 


50 


1 


75 


1 


75 


3 


50 


1 


75 


3 


50 


12 


00 


4 


00 


4. 


00 


3. 


00 


12 


00 



),284.05 



treasury department, 445 

Credits. 
1914 
December One half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $1,282 . 00 
Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, 1,134.75 
Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 2,867.30 

$5,284.05 



446 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





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449 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



451 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 



Bonds. 

City Hall Building, 



Public Park, 



Municipal. 



Due. 



Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
Sept. 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 1 



Rate. 



, 1915, 


3i 


, 1916, 


31, 


, 1918, 


3i 


, 1919, 


02, 


, 1920, 


02, 


, 1921, 


3i 


, 1922, 


02, 


, 1923, 


31, 


, 1924, 


31, 


, 1925, 


02, 


, 1926, 


02, 


, 1927, 


02, 


, 1928, 


3|, 


, 1929, 


32, 


, 1931, 


4, 


, 1933, 


4, 



Amount. 

$8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

7,000 

7,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 



$129,000 



Bonds. 

Sewer, 



Precinct. 

Due. Rate. Amount. 

July 1, 1917, 31, $25,000 

May 1, 1928, 3|, 25,000 

Dec. 1, 1930, 4, 5,000 

Dec. 1, 1932, 4, 10,000 

Dec. 1, 1934, 4, 10,000 



Union School District, July 1, 


1915, 31, 


$8,000 


July 1, 


1916, ^, 


8,000 


May 1, 


1917, 4, 


8,000 


July 1, 


1918, 3*, 


8,000 


" " " July 1, 


1919, 3*, 


8,000 



May 1, 1920, 4, 2,000 



$75,000 



452 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. 



Due. 

1 

1 

1 

1 



Rate. 



Union School District, July 
May 
July 
May 

July 1 

July 1 

May 1 

July 1 

May 1 

July 1 

May 1 

July 1 

July 1 

May 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

July 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 



School District No 



, 1920, 


3|, 


, 1921, 


4, 


, 1921, 


32, 


, 1922, 


4, 


, 1922, 


02, 


, 1923, 


02, 


, 1924, 


4, 


, 1924, 


02, 


, 1925, 


4, 


, 1925, 


31, 


, 1926, 


4,^ 


, 1926, 


32, 


, 1927, 


02, 


, 1928, 


4,^ 


, 1928, 


32, 


, 1929, 


31, 


, 1930, 


<->2, 


, 1931, 


31, 


, 1932, 


4, 


, 1933, 


4, 


, 1934, 


4, 



Amount. 

$8,000 

2,000 

8,000 

2,000 

8,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

35,000 

6,000 

4,000 

10,000 

10,000 

9,000 

10,000 

10,000- 

10,000 



20, Sept. 1, 


1915, 


31, 


$500 


Sept. 1, 


1916, 


31, 


500 


Sept. 1, 


1917, 


31, 


500 


Sept. 1, 


1918, 


31, 


500 


Sept. 1, 


1919, 


3i 


500 


Sept. 1, 


1920, 


31, 


500 


Sept. 1, 


1921, 


31, 


500 


Sept. 1, 


1922, 


3i, 


500 


Sept. 1, 


1924, 


3i 


4,300 



$219,000 



$8,300 



West Concord Sewer, Oct. 1, 1915, 3|, $500 
Oct. 1, 1916, 3^, 500 
Oct. 1, 1917, 3h, 500 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



453 



Bonds. Due. Rate. Amount. 

West Concord Sewer, Oct. 1, 1918, 3i $500 
Oct. 1, 1919, 3|, 300 



(( ti 



$2,300 

East Concord Sewer, July 1, 1915, 3|, $500 

Penacook Sewer, 



July 1, 


1915, 


4, 


$500 


Oct. 1, 


1915, 


3, 


500 


July 1, 


1916, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 1, 


1916, 


3, 


500 


July 1, 


1917, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 1, 


1917, 


3, 


500 


July 1, 


1918, 


4, 


500 


Oct. 1, 


1918, 


3, 


500 


July 1, 


1919, 


4, 


500 



$4,500 

Total bonded indebtedness of the city, exclusive 

of water department, $438,600 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 

Dr. 

Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1914, 

municipal, $108.50 

Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1914, 

precinct, 215.00 

Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1914, 

School District No. 20, 17 . 50 

Due in 1914, municipal, 4,427.50 

" " " precinct, sewer, 2,502.50 

" " " Union School District, 6,615.00 

" " " Penacook sewer, 180.00 

" " " West Concord sewer, 98.00 

" " " East Concord sewer, 17.50 

" " " School District No. 20, 308.00 



$14,489.50 



454 city of concord. 

Cr. 
Municipal, paid, S4,224 . 50 
Precinct, sewer, paid, 2,607.50 
Union School District, paid, 6,455.00 
Penacook s6wer, paid, 160.00 
West Concord sewer, paid, 80 . 50 
East Concord sewer, paid, 17 . 50 
School District No. 20, paid, 325.50 
Municipal due, not presented, 311.50 
Precinct due, not presented, 110.00 
West Concord sewer due, not pre- 
sented, 17.50 
Penacook sewer due, not presented, 20 . 00 
Union School District due, not pre- 
sented, 160.00 

■ $14,489.50 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

W. F. Thayer, Treasurer, in account with Concord 
Water- Works. 

Receipts. 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1914, $32,582 . 46 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 74,422.15 



$107,004.61 



Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $18,758.32 

Bonds paid, 20,000.00 

Orders paid, 50,006.01 

Cash on hand, 18,240.28 



$107,004.61 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



455 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 



When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Whei 


1 due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 




1915, 


4, 


$5,000 


April 1 


1921, 


O2, 


$5,000 


Jan. 




1916, 


4, 


9,000 


Jan. 1 


1922, 


4,^ 


342,000 


Jan. 




1917, 


4, 


5,000 


April 1 


1922, 


3i, 


30,000 


Jan. 




1918, 


4, 


10,000 


Mar. 1 


1922, 


02, 


20,000 


Jan. 




1919, 


4, 


10,000 


Jan. 1 


1923, 


02, 


15,000 


Nov. 




1920, 


3, 


7,000 


Jan. 1 


1924, 


02, 


15,000 


Nov. 




1921, 


3, 


4,000 






- 





$477,000 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 

1915, and not presented, $226 . 00 

Coupons due, 1914, 18,998.32 

,224.32 



Cr. 
By coupons paid, 1914, $18,583.32 

Coupons due and not presented, 641 .00 



,224.32 



I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing ac- 
count of Wilham F. Thayer, city treasurer, for the year 1914, 
and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein prop- 
erly recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouchers, 
and the several items correctly cast, and cash balance to be 
forty thousand and eighty-one dollars ($40,081.00), and 
as treasurer of the city water department, cash balance to 
be eighteen thousand two hundred forty dollars and 
twenty-eight cents ($18,240.28). 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking 
funds of the city and find such trust and sinking funds 



456 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



invested, and the income thereof for the year 1914 accounted 
for, as shown by the book of the city treasurer, kept for 
that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS, 1914. 



For payment of interest on bonds. 


$4,690.00 


payment of interest on temporary loans. 


100.00 


payment of interest on cemetery trust 




funds, 


1,700.00 


support of city poor, 


800.00 


dependent soldiers, city. 


150.00 


incidentals and land damages, 


8,000.00 


salaries, board of aldermen. 


1,905.00 


printing and stationery. 


2,000.00 


aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 


3,000.00 


aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 


500.00 


Memorial Day, 


460.00 


aid, E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 


450.00 


aid, militarj^ companies. 


250.00 


open air concerts. 


325.00 


public baths, 


325.00 


Blossom Hill Cemetery, 


1,200.00 


Old North Cemetery, 


200.00 


West Concord Cemetery, 


100.00 


Pine Grove Cemetery, 


150.00 


Old Fort Cemetery, 


30.00 


Millville Cemetery, 


75.00 


Horse Hill Cemetery, 


10.00 


Soucook Cemetery, 


30.00 


Woodlawn Cemetery, 


25.00 


parks. 


3,700.00 


Penacook Park, 


100.00 


Washington Square, 


25.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 457 



For East Concord Playground, 


$25.00 


John Kimball Playground, 


400.00 


Rollins Park Playground, 


250.00 


repairs buildings, 


2,000.00 


State Library bonds. 


10,000.00 


board of health, 


2,800.00 


police department. 


17,849.06 


public library, 


5,300.00 


engineering department. 


4,575.00 


highway department. 


61,050.00 


fire department. 


29,036.00 


salaries. 


12,070.00 


schools. 


121,660.03 


state tax, 


47,992.00 


county tax, 


33,734.66 


garbage precinct, 


8,500.00 


sewer precinct, city, 


19,440.00 


East Concord sewer precinct, 


117.50 


West Concord sewer precinct. 


598.00 


street sprinkling precinct, city, 


9,300.00 


street sprinkling precinct, Ward 1, 


■ 450.00 


lighting precinct. 


20,000.00 


Penacook sewer precinct. 


350.00 


East Concord lighting precinct. 


535.00 



,332.25 



458 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS BY RESOLUTIONS, 

1914. 



139 


Motor garbage truck, 


$4,000.00 


140 


Concord District Nursing Association, 


300.00 


144 


Transit, engineering department, 


250.00 


145 


Motor police patrol and ambulance wagon, 


3,000.00 


148 


Fire alarm boxes, Penacook, 


125.00 


150 


Real estate sold for unpaid taxes. 


1,811.71 


151 


City poor. 


1,000.00 


152 


Printing and stationery. 


1,200.00 


153 


Bridge over Soucook River, 


2,000.00 


154 


Motor-driven fire apparatus. Ward 3, 


2,500.00 


157 


Gravel bank. 


3,000.00 


158 


Repairs, city hall, 


550.00 


160 


Garage, highway department. 


1,500.00 


164 


Claim, Jennie P. Martin vs. City of 






Concord, 


150.00 


165 


City poor. 


600.00 


166 


Incidentals and land damages. 


4,000.00 


167 


Police and watch. 


500.00 


168 


Arrest, John Gouin, 


100.00 


169 


Printing and stationery, 


300.00 


172 


City poor, 


299.55 


172 


Fire department, 


996.89 


172 


Interest, cemetery trust funds, 


50.00 


172 


Interest, temporary loans. 


345.76 


172 


Penacook Park, 


21.68 


172 


Playground, Rollins Park, 


5.23 


172 


PoHce and watch, 


525.05 


172 


Printing and stationery, 


4.76 


172 


Repairs, l^uildings, 


238.87 


172 


Roads and bridges. 


1,046.30 


172 


Salaries, 


250.00 



,670.80 



CITY EXPENSES. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1914. 



Arrest John Gouin. 
Frank W. Twombly, reward, $100 . 00 



City Poor. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, $2,629 . 55 



Dependent Soldiers, City. 
Itemized in report of overseer of poor, $106 . 00 



Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $5,880.16 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, salary, 25.00 

George A. Foster, secretary, salary, 25.00 

E. C. Woods, removing moth nests, 83.66 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rental, 22 . 20 

Geo. W. Cunningham, dressing, 30.00 
E. A. Moulton superintendent, cash 

paid out, 180 . 97 

A. P. Home & Co., shrubs, etc., 201.00 

W. S. Dole, seed, 3.75 

Whitmore Brothers, shrubs, 22 . 00 

Concord Lumber Co., loam, 30.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., dressing, 52.50 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, 33.38 

W. Carpenter, labor, 10.33 



460 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A. H. Britten & Co., supplies, $13.65 

Donald McLeod, shrubs, 240.91 
Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co., lawn 

mowers, ' 20 . 76 

Capital Hardware Co., supplies, 7.87 

J. H. Coburn, team-work, 11.25 

The Evans Press, bill heads, 4 . 75 

F. N. Hammond, cash paid out, 7.87 
City of Concord, highway department, 

labor on trees, 15.27 



Old North Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $568 . 20 

E. C. Woods, removing moth nests, 16.50 

Thompson & Hoague Co., dressing, 17.50 

Donald McLeod, shrubs, 16.25 



West Concord Cemetery. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $92.50 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 7.25 



Millville Cemetery. 

J. N. Abbott, treasurer, appropria- 
tion, $75.00 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 
Scott French, mowing, etc., $148.50 



),922.28 



$618.45 



.75 



Old Fort Cemetery. 
Scott French, labor and supplies, $22.50 



city expenses. 461 

Horse Hill Cemetery. 
H. A. Quimby, labor, $7.00 



WooDLAWN Cemetery. 
E. H. Brown, treasurer, appropriation, $25 . 00 



SoucooK Cemetery. 
Nahum Prescott, care, $30 . 00 



Claim, Jennie P. Martin vs. City of Concord. 
N. E. Martin, executor, settlement of claim, $150 . 00 



Claim, Hibbard vs. City of Concord. 
N. E. Martin, attorney, settlement of claim, $175 . 00 



District Nursing Association. 
Maude D. Emmons, treasurer, appropriation, $300 . 00 



Dog Licenses. 

W. B. Cloutman, lamb killed by dogs, $8 . 00 
Mary P. Buckner, hens killed by 

dogs, 4 . 00 

The Evans Press, license blanks, 6 . 50 

Ira C. Evans Co., postals, 10 . 50 
Clarence G. Sanborn, sheep killed 

by dogs, 20.00 



462 CITY OF CONCORD. 

George McC. Sanborn, sheep killed 

by dogs, $30.00 

Eli Brunei, chickens killed by dogs, 13 . 00 
Wilfred BoUrke, fowls and ducks 

killed by dogs, 9.00 

C. B. Clarke, turkeys killed by dogs, 10.00 

W. A. Phillips, hens killed by dogs, 10 . 00 



Engineering Department. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 
Munson Supply Co., speed keys, 

B. L. Makepeace, supplies, 
W. B. Howe, cash paid out. 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rental 

and tolls. 
Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies. 
Home & Hall, supplies, 
W. S. Kaime, horse hire. 
The Cragg Bindery, binding book, 
E. H. Brown, cards, 
G. B. Graff Co., envelopes, 
G. R. Pearce & Co., rubber stamps, 

C. E. Moss Co., blue print paper, 
I^edder & Probst, tracing cloth, etc., 
J. H. Forster, cleaning typewriter, 
J. F. Waters, auto hire, 
W. E. Virgin, supplies, 
The Gift Shop, paper, 
Thompson & Hoague Co., suppHes, 
J. E. Gage, repairs, 
C. L. Berger & Sons, repairs, etc., 
West End Garage, auto hire. 



$3,890.63 


3 


50 


33 


.11 


100 
1 


68 


1 

23 


10 


2.75 


4 


83 


16 


50 


1 


50 


14 


55 


10 


25 


1 


95 


19 


66 


50 


89 


5 


00 


184.75 


16 


50 


5 


00 




96 


5 


35 


30 


75 


9 


00 



$121.00 



1,431.21 



CITY EXPENSES. 463 



Fire Department. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $12,590.47 
S. R. Dole, collector, semi-annual 

pay-rolls, 8,940.00 

John B. Dodge, semi-annual pay-roll, 75 . 00 

F. C. Blodgett, semi-annual pay-roll, 45 . 00 

M. J. Lacroix, semi-annual pay-roll, 30 . 00 

F. M. Dodge, salary, superintendent, 100 . 00 
R. F. Robinson, rent, 150 . 00 
R. F. Robinson, supplies, 8.00 
Robert Crowley, coal, 7.12 
N. W. Smeltzer, horseshoeing, 3 . 00 
N. Nicholson, horseshoeing, 54.85 
J, C. McLaughlin, horseshoeing, 221.79 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, horse- 
shoeing, 103 . 85 

John Crowley, horseshoeing, 18.55 

G. L. Theobald, horse hire and bury- 
ing horse, 24 . 00 

W. E. Lynch, horse hire, 4 . 50 
W. E. Lynch, wood, 7.50 
H. T. Corser, horse hire and hay, 1,027.80 
W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 1,053.63 
Mathieson Alkali Works, soda, 26.88 
C. H. Martin Co., supplies, 24.62 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, 698.48 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 36.19 
Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 20 . 22 
W. R. Davis, supplies, 20.75 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 57.66 
C. Pelissier & Co., supplies and re- 
pairs, 62.16 
The Pendleton Co., waxine, 17.00 
Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 5. 10 
H. Thompson, brooms, 20.00 
Eagle Garage, supplies, 28.15 
J. H. Hardy, supplies, 30.00 



464 CITY OF CONCORD. 

G. B. Robbins Disinfectant Co., sup- 
plies, $58.25 
D. Warren Fox, supplies, 7.63 

B. F. Robinson, labor, 4.00 
Western Union Telegraph Co., time 

service, 15.00 

C. M. & A. W. Rolfe, repairs, .95 
I. E. Gray, polish, etc., 28.75 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 57.59 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 67.44 
F. E. Fitts Mfg. & Supply Co., 

waste, 29.98 

W. C. Green, cash paid out, 198.49 

M. J. Lee, labor, 21.01 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals 

and tolls, 174.89 

Standard Oil Co., gasoline, 44.00 

B. M. Weeks, supplies, 8.73 
W. H. Holbrook, shoveling, etc., 6.50 

C. W. Dadmun, supplies, 15.22 
J. A. Dadmun, supplies, 6.25 
Holt Brothers, Mfg. Co., supplies, 1.00 
Samuel Eastman Co., patent holders, 

hose, etc., 197.37 
J. H. Toof & Co., laundry, 52.00 
Tenney Coal Co., coal and wood, 895.46 
Holtzer-Cabot Electric Co., brushes, 2.44 
Penacook Electric Light Co., elec- 
tricity, 109 . 76 
Somerville Brush Co., brushes, 9.98 
Frank Sargent, repairs, 2.85 
Abbot & Downing Co., repairs, 94.18 
Ross W. Cate, lunches, 8.50 
R. J. Macquire, services, 298.40 
The Globe Mfg. Co., coats, 98.50 
A. L. Dickerman, labor, 6.00 
Pendleton-White Co., waxine, 4.25 
Heaney Mfg. Co., soap, 4.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 



465 



Eagle S. F. E. & Hose Co. No. 1, coats, 

A. B. Smart, auto hire, 

Eureka Fire Hose Mfg. Co., hose, 

Harry Gray, horse hire, 

C. W. Drake, glass, 

Geo. D. Huntley, repairs, 

Fowler Drug Co., supplies, 

Carl A. Hall, supplies, 

H. G. Emmons, supplies, 

Stuart-Howland Co., supplies, 

Boston Badge Co., badges, 

Winchester Tar Disinfectant Co., 
disinfectant, 

A. J. Peaslee, horse hire, 

H. A. Stuart, horse hire, 

W. T. Bailey & Co., repairs. 

Page Belting Co., brushes. 

Combination Ladder Co., extinguish- 
ers, 

C. C. Fuller, lunches, 

Cushman Electric Co., supplies, 

CO. Partridge, horse hire, • 

E. L. Davis, horse hire, 

C. E. Robinson, horse hire, 
Inter-State Machine Co., supplies, 
Swift & Co., washing powder, 
G. O. Robinson, horse hire, 
Philadelphia Grease Mfg. Co., grease, 
Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co., 

repairs, 
Pettingill-Andrews Co., supplies, 

F. E. Colburn, lunch, 
Stearns' Brothers, supplies, 

G. E. Wood & Son, mattress, 
G. Nardini & Son, lunches, 

John Swenson Granite Co., supplies, 
Orr & Rolfe Co., labor and supplies, 

30 



$15.00 

17.50 

800.00 

3.00 

3.11 

8.80 

1.08 

7.00 

36.06 

20.45 

23.86 

34.00 
7.00 

20.00 
2.00 
2.00 

20.00 

2.50 

20.50 

25.00 

412.73 

4.00 

5.23 

8.55 

5.00 

7.50 

64.41 
5.70 
2.70 
1.31 
6.25 
12.75 
24.50 
4.45 



466 CITY OF CONCORD. 

J. C. McGilvray, auto hire, $12.00 

Cornelius Callahan Co., supplies, 9.00 

Joseph Grant, repairs, 21.60 

Wonder-Mist Co. , Wonder-Mist, 3 . 00 

Eastern Oil Tank Co., gasoline filter, 3 . 15 

Fred M. Dodge, cash paid out, 18.80 

Arthur Bruce, trustee, witch hazel, 3.75 

Boutwell & Baker, pasturing, 24.00 

Union Electric Supply Co., supplies, 19. 14 

Rumford Printing Co., cards, 1.00 

L. E. Alexander, water, 8.00 

The Evans Press^ letter heads, 7.00 

Worrell Mfg. Co., vermin-go, 20.00 

Larkin Mfg. Co., clamp, 15.00 

The White Co., supplies, 10.60 

W. B. Ranney, cards, .75 

A. Perley Fitch & Co., supplies, 7.49 

G. A. Griffin, horse hire, 1 . 50 
J. B. Filleul & Son, testing engine, 

etc., 82.42 

D. Hammond & Son, carrots, 4 . 80 

H. V. Tittemore, horse hire, - 4 . 50 

M. A. Noury, repairs, 1.00 

Geo. Abbott, Jr., paint, etc., 5.90 
Electric Machine & Instrument Co., 

repairs, 7 . 50 

M. F. Collins Co., links, 4.02 

Shepard Brothers & Co., supplies, 2.48 

Ford & Kimball, castings, 1 . 69 

Concord Ice Co., ice, 30.22 

Mary K. Abbott, storage, 12.00 

Mary A. Norris, storage, 15.00 



$30,032.89 



city expenses. 467 

Fire Alarm Boxes, Penacook. 

Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co., 

fire alarm boxes, $100.68 

Wetmore-Savage Co., iron wire, 7.80 

Isaac Baty, pipe, .65 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 7 . 50 

$116.63 



Fire Truck, Ward 3. 
The White Co., fire truck, $2,500.00 



Garbage Truck. 
Peerless Motor Car Co., truck, $3,944.00 



Gravel Bank. 
Elizabeth Hoyt-Stevens, land, $3,000 . 00 



Health Department. 
Itemized in report of sanitary officer, $2,757 . 74 



Highway Department. 
Itemized in report of highway department, $66,164.48 



468 city of concord. 

Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Isaac H. Proctor, salary, janitor, city 

hall, • ' S645.00 
M. A. Spencer, services, city clerk's 

office, 720.00 

Boutwell & Baker, operating woodlot, 1 ,284 . 95 

H. M. Richardson, labor, woodlot, 765 . 25 
Western Union Telegraph Co., time 

service, city hall, 15.00 
Concord Light & Power Co., gas and 

supplies, 166.18 
Concord Electric Co., electricity and 

supplies, 534 . 48 
Reed Laundry Co., laundrj^, city 

hall, 9.09 

Henry E. Chamberlin, cash paid out, 52. 30 
Henry E. Chamberlin, completing 

birth records, 51.50 
A. K. Day, M. D., examinations, 9.00 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls, 88.85 
Mary C. B. Walker, executrix, rent, 

account, elections, 150.00 
Merrimack County, rent account, 

elections, 50 . 00 

Concord Lumber Co., supplies, .50 
John H. Brown, P. M., stamped 

envelopes, 277 . 68 
Henry H. Chase, bond, tax collector, 75.00 
Chase & Martin, insurance, 75.00 
Morrill & Danforth, bond, city treas- 
urer, 75.00 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance, 333 . 25 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance, 257.25 
Eastman & Merrill, bonds, city 

officials, 33 . 09 

Charles C. Jones, insurance, 263 . 50 



CITY EXPENSES. 469 

Roby & Knowles, insurance, $285.00 

Jackman & Lang, insurance, 15.08 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 

doctors and clergymen, 284 . 00 

Capital Hardware Co., supplies, city 

hall, 48.59 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies 

and repairs, city hall, 149 . 24 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, city 

hall, 32.67 

Concord Ice Co., ice, fountains, 1913 

and 1914, 540.81 

Concord Ice Co., ice, city hall, 66.11 

Charles J. French, cash paid out, 14.77 

W. B. Howe, postage, board exam- 
iners of plumbers, 1 . 00 
F. H. Blanchard, Hsting polls, Ward 1, 30 . 00 
J. H. Bachelder, listing polls. Ward 2, 20 . 00 
O. L. Shepard, listing polls. Ward 3, 25 . 00 
J. H. Leary, listing polls. Wards 4 

and 5, 60.00 

J. C. Donovan, listing polls. Ward 6, 30 . 00 
J. D. Foley, listing polls. Ward 7, 30 . 00 

James Fleming, listing polls. Ward 8, 30 . 00 
J. J. Reen, listing polls. Ward 9, 25 . 00 

J. H. Morris, postage, 10.00 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., 

cleaning machine, 3 . 50 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., 

adding machine, assessors, 367 . 50 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 

city hall. 
Eagle Garage, supplies, city hall, 
Tenney Coal Co., wood and coal, 

city hall, 
F. W. Grafton, M. D., services, 
Oscar E. Jewell, sealing scales, 



14 


.28 


1 


.25 


,150, 


.42 


2, 


,00 


4.25 



470 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Capital City Garage, auto hire, hear- 
ings, $5 . 00 
I. E. Gray, auto hire, 23.75 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 

city woodlot, 146.32 

Baker- Vawter Co., steel filing case, 18.60 
Maud C. Bradley, services, assessor's 

office, 165.25 
Mary C. Adams, services, assessor's 

office, 56 . 00 
Hoj^t Electrical Instrument Works, 

auto hire, assessors, 3 . 50 
G. E. Wood & Son, furniture, cit}^ 

hall, 134.50 

J. F. Waters, auto hire, 2 . 50 

G. H. Hubbard, taxes, Boscawen, 6.75 
Ferncroft Farm, plants. Memorial 

Arch, 27.50 
M. F. Bickford, horse hire, assessors, 14 . 00 
The Cudahy Packing Co., soap pow- 
der, city hall, 15.02 
New Hampshire Forestry Commis- 
sion, pine trees, 21.03 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 

city hall, 5 . 05 
Pendleton Co., sweeping compound, 

city hall, 2 . 25 

J. M. Inman, ringing bell, July 4, 3 . 00 

John Stanley, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

V. E. Bryant, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

W. H. Putnam, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

L. G. Adams, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

G. W. Morrill, ringing chimes, July 4, 5 . 00 

O. W. Crowell, ringing bell, July 4, 2.00 

Timothy Shugrue, ringing bell, July 4, 2 . 00 

E. H. Brown, recording deeds, 1 . 39 

R. F. Keanc, damages, sewer, 13.00 

Bessie A. Savage, taxes refunded, 10.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 471 

F. H. Matheson, grasshoppers de- 
stroyed, $27 . 00 

Geo. L. Lincoln Furniture Co., furni- 
ture, city hall, 165.48 

C. H. Martin Co., vaccination sup- 
plies, 19.08 

A. Perley Fitch, vaccination sup- 
plies, 8.98 

E. S. King, auto hire, 45.00 

C. N. Miner, repairing clock, 4.00 

E. M. Proctor, cash paid out and 

services band concerts, 10.20 

E. T. Morrison, damages, sewer, 6.72 

M. J. Lee, repairs, roof, city hall, 263.00 

R. F. Robinson, supplies, city hall, 23 . 54 

M. E. CHiford & Co., supplies, board 

of examiners of plumbers, 8 . 80 

Michael Lacroix, repairs, voting 

booths, 2.00 

W. H. Ash, moving voting booths. 

Wards, 16.00 

A. J. Abbott, grasshoppers destroyed, 46 . 00 

Union Pubhshing Co., city directo- 
ries, 45 . 50 

Beane & Corbett, painting, etc., city 
hall, 

Hutchinson Building Co., labor, 

J. P. Sargent, cleaning ward room. 
Ward 5, 

J. E. Hutchinson, care lawn and 
ward room. Ward 7, 

W. H. Stanley, repairs, Avard room, 
W^ard 9, 

E. M. Hinds, labor on booths, W^ard 

4, 
L. Tremblay, broom, ward room. 

Ward 9, 
L. J. Keenan, auto hire. 



138.00 


5. 


,86 


3 


,50 


7 


.00 


1 


.50 


13 


.80 




.45 


3 


.00 



472 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. L. Davis, moving band stand and 

and ice, fountain, $33 . 25 

J. E. Gage, repairs, city hall, 3 . 25 

H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 

city hall, 2 . 26 

Mrs. Annie Ahern, cleaning ward 

room. Ward 9, 10.00 

C. W. Drake, window glass, city hall, 2. 12 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, 

ward clerk's reports, 16.00 

Elbridge Emery, care Merrimack 

Hall, 10.00 

J. D. Foley, horse liire, assessors, 4.00 

Cornelius McCormick, cash paid 

out, elections, 1 . 59 

Alexander Murchie, cash paid out, 15.74 

J. H. Leary, services, assessors' office, 12 . 00 



$10,838.37 



Land Sold for Taxes. 
S. R. Dole, tax collector, $1,811.71 



Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, appropriation, $3,000.00 



New Hampshire Memorial Hospital. 
Emma F. Ingalls, treasurer, appropriation, $500.00 



I 







CITY EXPENSES. 










Memorial Day. 






J. 


M, Crossman, quartermaster, 








Davis Post, 




$50.00 


I. 


M. Savage, 


quartermaster, E, E. 








Sturtevant Post, 


305 


.00 


J. 


E, Symonds, quartermaster, W. I. 








Brown Post, 


— 


105 


.00 






Aid Military Companies. 




J. 


Conn, capta 


in Company C, 


$100.00 


G 


. W. Morrill, 


captain. Company E, 


100, 


.00 


Russell Wilkins, commanding officer, 


50, 


,00 






Open Air Concerts. 




Nevers' Second Infantry Band, con- 








certs. 




$315.00 


Concord Electric Co., lights. 


10. 


00 



473 



Parks. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 
I. T. Chesley, teaming, 
Frank Atkinson, cash paid out, 
W. H. Reed, teaming, 
E. Langlois, Jr., painting, 
Thompson & Hoague Co., iron fence 

and supplies. 
Holt Brothers Mfg. Co., lumber, 
R. J. McMullen, dressing. 



$2,693 


.17 


87, 


.82 


31, 


.25 


39 


.00 


6, 


.00 


287. 


60 


12, 


,69 


9. 


.00 



$460.00 



$250.00 



$325.00 



474 CITY OF CONCORD. 

H. B. Hammond, care, swans and 

ducks, $41.50 
Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 11.10 
W. S. Dole, grain, etc., 85.99 
H. G. Little, shrubs and labor, 16.20 
J. C. French & ^Son, rubber boots, 5.00 
A. H. Britton & Co., water pot, .85 
M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and sup- 
plies, 15.66 
John Lugg, relaying culvert stones, 9 . 60 
W. E. Virgin, labor and supplies, 170.75 
Donald McLeod, shrubs, 31 . 10 
E. A. Cole, labor, 3 . 00 
City of Concord, highway depart- 
ment, 11.70 
W. L. Riford, horse hire, 61 . 50 
Concord Lumber Co., shingles and 

lumber, 13 . 27 

S. L. French, care, Pecker Park, 12.00 
Globe Horseshoeing Shop, sharpening 

tools, 3.20 



Penacook Park. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $92 . 00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., pump, 6.50 

Shepard Brothers Co., oil, .55 

Edward Stevens, labor and supplies, 22.63 



Washington Square. 

E. H. Brown, treasurer, appropria- 
tion, ,$25.00 



$3,658.95 



$121.68 



city expenses. 475 

Playground — John Kimball. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $104.31 
F. W. Kelsey, Nursery Co., shrubs, 

etc., 31.40 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 27.77 

W. H. Reed, teaming, 26.00 

W. L. Riford, teaming, 5.18 

M. J. Lee, drinking fountain, etc., 8.05 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, .86 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

base and grate, 1 . 35 

Capital Hardware Co., supplies, 1.00 

H. A. Loomis, services and prizes, 51.00 

Concord Electric Co., pole, 3.00 

J. C. Derby, supplies, • .80 

Ehrman Mfg. Co., badges, .95 
lyla Chamberlin, services and cash 

paid out, 15.00 

Daniel McAlUster, building shelter, 78 . 62 

M. H. Mulcahy, posts, 43.11 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, 1 . 60 

$400.00 



Playground — Rollins Park. 

G. L. Theobald, teaming, etc., $4.50 

Elsie L. Johnson, cash paid out, .75 

Myrna Howe, services, 25.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor on grounds, 125 . 00 

F. B, Alexander, supplies, 3.06 

H. A. Loomis, services, etc., 51.00 

F. E. Nelson Co., crepe paper, 1.35 

Samuel Holt, estate, grade, 22 . 00 

Ehrman Mfg. Co., badges, 6.02 

H. W. Raine, band, 10.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 6.55 



$255.23 



476 city of concord. 

Police and Watch. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $16,144 . 54 
Concord Electric Co., electricity and 

supplies, 162.65 

Concord Light & Power Co., gas, 16.76 
W. S. Kaime, board of horse and 

horse hire, 380 . 50 

Globe Horseshoeing Shop, shoeing, 26 . 13 

A. Henry, plating, 2.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., suppHes, . 14.04 
M. Linsky & Bros., helmets and 

wreaths, 56 . 70 

C. H. Carter, auto hire, 2.00 

A. Perley Fitch, supplies, 3.45 

J. E. Gage, repairs, 6.90 
Western Union Telegraph Co., time 

service, 15.00 

Squire Supply Co., laundry, 16.75 

L. Sonneborn Sons, Inc., disinfectant, 7 . 75 

Fuller's Lunch, lunches, 41 . 10 

I. E, Gray, auto hire, 3.00 

E. C. EastmaD, supphes, 15.85 

Batchelder & Co., supplies, 20.40 

Concord Ice Co., ice, 7.80 
G. A. S. Kimball, cash paid out, and 

use of auto, 141 .83 

G. E. Farrand, supplies, 3 . 72 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rentals 

and tolls, 286 . 92 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., private 

line, 236.31 
Harry Gray, horse hire, 26.25 
L. J. Keenan, horse hire, 26 . 50 
Penacook Electric Light Co., elec- 
tricity, 32 . 28 
C. T. Wallace, one half telephone 

expense, 6 . 00 



CITY EXPENSES. 477 



4.50 
4.50 
4.50 
4.50 



F. N. Marden, one half telephone 

expense, $4 . 50 

J. E. Silva, one half telephone ex- 
pense, 4.50 

Irving B. Robinson, one half telephone 
expense, 

C. H. Guilbault, one half telephone 
expense, 

F. B, McfDaniels, one half telephone 

expense, 
H. L. Woodward, one half telephone 

expense, 
Donnelly-Johnson Co., buttons, 27.00 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, ' 2.95 

B. M. Weeks, supplies, 3 . 70 
Fowler's Drug Store, supplies, 1 . 90 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 6.38 
Tenney Coal Co., coal and wood, 443. 13 

E. L. Davis, coal, wood and truck- 
ing, 150.21 

Stewart-Warner Speedometer Co., 

speedometer, 7 . 00 

Wards Vulcanizing Works, supplies, 24 . 00 

Isaac Baty, lamps, etc., 13.70 

W. F. Hoyt, supplies, .30 

C. W. Dadmun, labor and suppHes, 12.78 
C. H. French, repairs, 3.25 
The Evans Press, supphes and print- 
ing, 47 . 50 

Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works, 

supplies, 
Robert Crowley, wood, 
M. J. Lee, labor and supplies. 
The Pendleton Co., waxine, 
Rumford Printing Co., supplies and 

printing, 
Hutchinson Building Co., supplies, 
The Dunklee Garage, supphes. 



2 


,50 


3 


.00 


4 


.65 


3 


.25 


12, 


,25 


2 


.80 


18. 


,25 



478 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Fletcher-Prescott Co., street signs, S10.50 

West Disinfecting Co., liquid soap, 2.50 

Reed Laundry Co., laundrj'', 1.75 

C. E. Bartlett, trucking, 8.00 

W. J. Corbett, horse hire, .50 

G. F. Hodgman, repairs, motor cycle, 44.84 
Hendee Mfg. Co., repairs, motor 

cycle, 34.38 

J. A. Dadman, supplies and repairs, 4.60 

J. B. Varick Co., supplies, 1.08 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, 2.50 

E. E. Babb, labor, 2.58 

J. F. Waters, auto hire, • 99.00 

Harry Gray, horse hire, 1.00 

Frank Brackett,' auto hire, 2.00 

Leger Gauvreau, repairs, motor cycle, 11 .90 

W. A. Walker, supplies and repairs, 4.11 

Eagle Garage, labor, 1 . 25 

T. J. Nolan, labor, 2.00 

Ira C. Evans Co., envelopes, 2.60 

C. B. Dodge Co., disinfectant, 4.50 

E. S. King, auto hire, 3.00 

Hall Brothers Supply Co., supplies, 6.79 

The Worrell Mfg. Co., vermin-go, 10.00 

The Manchester L^mon, advertising, 21.00 

Keenan Brothers, lunch , . 50 

R. J. Macquire, services, 10.20 

Johnson's Bookstore, supplies, 7.75 

Hamilton Heartz, lunches, 15.05 

E. A. Cole, supphes, 1.75 

Hawkes & Robinson, auto hire, 3.00 

Lee Brothers Co., labor, .25 
W. J. Chadbourne, developing and 

print, ■ 50 

W. M. Haggett, copy work, 1.50 

C. Pelissier & Co., supplies and repairs, 12 . 35 

G. D. Huntley, storage, 18.25 



,874.11 



city expenses. 479 

Police Ambulance and Pateol Wagon. 
Velie Motor Vehicle Co., $2,700 . 00 



Precinct Garbage. 

Itemized in report of highway de- 
partment, $8,833:98 



Precinct Lighting Streets, City. 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, $19,177.33 



Precinct Lighting Streets, East Concord. 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, * $522.00 



Precinct Lighting Streets, Penacook. 

C. H. Barnett, treasm*er, appro- 
priation, $1,550.00 



Precinct Lighting Streets, West Concord. 

W. F. Thayer treasmier, appropria- 
tion, .§740. 00 



Precint Sewer, City. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $4,185.52 

W. G. Elliott, labor, 27.81 

W. A. Thompson, rubber boots, 6 . 50 

Thomas Robinson, trucking, 1 . 50 

G. L. Theobald, team-work, 206.00 

Dickerman & Co., cement, 63.95 



480 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Samuel Holt, estate, brick, $142.23 

W. L. Riford, trucking, 8.50 

H. B. Lindgreri, labor and supplies, 2.11 
Globe Horsehoeing Shop, sharpening 

tools, etc. 56 . 28 

E. C. Paige, trucking, 7.25 

W. B. Howe, flashlight, . 1.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 2,131.47 

Richardson's Mill Bridge, cement, 21 . 00 

Rowell & Plummer, mason work, 24 . 00 

Edson Mfg. Co., gasohne engine, etc., 173 . 93 

J. A. Dadmun, pipe, .90 

E. A. Hartford, trucking, .75 
Hutchinson Building Co., lumber, 6. 14 
C. H. Cook, M. D., services, 3.00 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight, 2 . 24 

F. L. Johnson, supplies, 1 . 90 
. Moses Edmunds, trucking, 1 . 00 

H. A. Trudel, trucking, 1 . 50 

Eagle Garage, oil, .60 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

lamp holes and covers, 8 . 70 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 10.40 

M.J. Duffy, use of forge, 6 . 00 

G. F. Tandy, concrete, 85.92 
G. H. Richardson & Co., gasoline, 1.70 
A. L. Dickerman & Co., repairs, 11 .85 
Ford & Kimball, manhole, etc., 106.18 
G. H. Cox, trucldng, • .75 
Ward's Vulcanizing Works, gasoline, . 85 
J. F. Ward, trucking, 1 .00 
C. A. Richardson, gasoline, .85 
H. C. Sturtevant & Son, supplies, 8.20 



',319.48 



Precinct, Sewer, East Concord. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, sinking fund, $100 . 00 



city expenses. 481 

Precinct, Sewer, Penacook. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $374.22 

A. H. Britton & Co., supplies, 22.30 

Mrs. Emma J, Neller, pipe, 1 .00 
Concord Foundry & Machine Co., 

lantern hole and cover, 3 . 50 

F. A. Barker, trucking, 2 . 50 

Isaac Baty, supplies, 3.00 

F. E. Williams, labor and supplies, 12 . 75 

W. H. Meserve, cement, 7.06 

D. Warren Fox, supplies, 4 . 85 
W. M. Howe, brick, 2.87 

E. L. Davis, brick, 1.39 

F. M. Morse & Co., supplies, 1 .09 
J. E. Brown, repairs, 3.65 

S440.18 



Precinct, Sewer, St. Paul's School. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $32.00 

G. L. Theobald, team-work, 10 . 50 

E. C. Paige, trucking, 1.00 

Thomas Robinson, trucking, 2.50 

E. B. Chesley, labor, 15.00 



Precinct, Sewer, West Concord. 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $12.22 

W. G. Elliott, labor and supplies, 13.97 



$61.00 



$26.19 



Precinct, Sprinkling Streets. 

Itemized in report of highway de- 
partment, $8,814.05 

31 



482 city of concord. 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, Penacook. 

Itemized in report of highway de- 
partment, $467 . 43 



Printing and Stationery. 

The Cragg Bindery, books and bind- 
ing, $114.50 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing and 

suppUes, 283.90 
Ira C. Evans Co., city reports, 2,092.00 
E. C. Eastman, supplies, 9 . 40 
Monitor & Statesman Co., advertis- 
ing, 171.30 
The Evans Press, printing and sup- 



plies. 


54.18 


A. R. Andrews Co., supplies, 


20.68 


Rumford Printing Co., printing and 




Supplies, 


515.25 


Brown & Saltmarsh, supplies, 


4.40 


Irving Hammond, blanks, 


22.00 


Treworgy Ink & Pen Mfg. Co., ink, 


6.00 


Star Stamp Co., rubber stamps. 


4.50 


G. H. Richardson & Co., pens, 


3.50 


N. H. Patriot Co., advertising. 


121.65 


H. P. Hammond, pens, 


5.00 


The Concord Press, checklists. 


15.00 


Independent Statesman, advertising. 


61.50 




J 

3 


Public Baths. 


Timothy Reardon, salary and cash 




paid out, 


$192.00 


H. K. Larsen, repairs, bath house, 


50.10 


C. H. Swain & Co., labor and sup- 




plies, 


2.95 



CITY EXPENSES. 483 



Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, $5.51 

Thomas J. Dyer, badges, 5 . 00 



Public Library, 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $2,981.94 

E. C. Eastman, books and supplies, 115.77 
C. E. Lauriat Co., books, 776.86 
Stuart Wood, treasurer, subscription, 5 . 00 

F. J. Barnard & Co., binding books, 47 . 53 
Grace Blanchard, cash paid out, 85.35 
Concord Electric Co., electricity, 248.40 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., rental 

and tolls, 42 . 55 
Library Bureau, supplies, 5 . 14 
The Wall Street Journal, subscrip- 
tion, 12.00 
The Schoenhof Book Co. , books, 1 4 . 99 
W. B. Cunningham, transportation 

of books, Penacook, 8.50 

The Cragg Bindery, binding books, 253 . 58 

G. Broes Van Dort Co., book, 5 . 40 
I. E. Gray, transportation of books, 

Penacook, 4.50 
Eastman & Merrill, insurance, 47 . 50 
W. C. Gibson, books and subscrip- 
tions, 61 . 54 
The Century Co., books, 46.37 
Ira C. Evans Co., printing and sup- 
plies, 42 . 05 
Tenney Coal Co., wood and coal, 279 . 83 
W. T. Bailey & Co., repairing roof, 160. 69 
The H. R. Huntting Co., books, 41 . 71 
Johnson's Bookstore, books, 3.30 
Rumford Printing Co., binding mag- 
azines and supplies, 50 . 00 
Dennison Mfg. Co., labels, 1.86 



$255 . 56 



484 CITY OF CONCORD. 

N. C. Nelson & Co., repairing clock, $2.25 

Concord Lumber Co., wood, 3.00 

Library Art Club, assessment, 6.00 
D. J. Bombard, transportation of 

books, Penacook, 41.00 
C. H. Sanders, care of books, Pena- 
cook, 52.00 
Old Corner Book Store, books, 1 . 13 
Doubleday, Page & Co., book, 1.75 
Hall & Locke Co., books, 3.25 
Ward's, photo moisteners, 4.50 
Morrill & Danforth, insurance, 40 . 00 
Lee Brothers Co., labor and supplies, 3 . 07 
Concord Ice Co., ice, 3.75 
J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., repairs, 4.90 
Herman Goldberger, subscriptions, 169.29 
Christian Science Pubhshing Co., 

subscription, 5.00 
Enterprise News Co., subscription, 5.00 
A. L. A. Publishing Board, subscrip- 
tion, 1.00 
N. H. Patriot Co., subscription, 6.00 
Monitor & Statesman Co., subscrip- 
tion. 6.00 
H. W. Wilson, Co., subscription, 10.00 
Union Library Association, books, 9 . 30 



Repairs, Buildings. 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, fire 

stations, $467 . 60 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, police 

station, 13.70 

M. J. Lee, labor and supplies, city 

hall. 454.57 

H. B. Lindgren, labor and supplies, 

city hall and auditorium, 98. 14 



),720.55 



CITY EXPENSES. 485 

H. B. Lindgien, labor and supplies, 

police station, $8.15 

Home & Hall, labor and supplies, 

fire stations, 167. 10 

Fowler's Drug Store, supplies, fire 

station. Ward 1, 1.65 

Ford & Kimball, repairs, fire stations, 20 . 02 
Bean & Corbett, painting, etc., 

Good Will Hose House, 16.45 

Bean & Corbett, painting, etc., 

police station, 319.57 

Rowell & Plummer, labor and sup- 
plies, fire stations, 12.06 
H. E. Fisher & Co., iron columns. 

Central Fire Station, 15.00 

W. T. Bailej^ & Co., repairs, roof, 

city hall, 82.31 

W. T. Bailey & Co., repairs, fire 

station, Ward 1, 3.22 

G. F. Tandy, concreting, Central 

Fire Station, 11.67 

G. F. Tandy, repairs, city hall, 1 . 92 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 

fire stations, 4.18 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 

police station, 5 . 20 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., shades. 

Central Fire Station, 8.00 

Abbot & Downing Co., supplies. 

Central Fire Station, 13.70 

C. H. Martin Co., supplies, fire 
stations, 2 . 46 

A. H. Britton & Co., repairs, tower 

clock, 1.20 

A, H. Britton & Co., supplies. Cen- 
tral Fire Station, 71 . 58 

D. AVarren Fox, supplies, fire station. 

Ward 1, 6.16 



486 CITY OF COXCORD. ' 

D. Warren Fox, brackets, police 

station, Ward 1, $0.30 

H. K. Larsen, repairs, Good Will 

Hose House, 46 . 57 

Eli Langlois, Jr., painting, Central 

Fire Station, 12.50 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, labor and 

supplies, Central Fire Station, 30.84 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, repairs, 

chief's house, 3.41 

D. J. Bombard, repairs, fire station, 

Ward 1, 2.50 

G. A. Griffin, repairs, police station. 

Ward 1, 66.81 

Lee Bros. Co., repairs, police station, 7. 50 

Lee Bros. Co., repairs. Central Fire 

Station, 6.00 

W. Carpenter, painting, tower clock, 140.35 
Concord Wiring & Supply Co., chan- 
delier, ward room, Ward 2, 
A. D. Gushing, repairs, fire station, 
Ward 3, 

C. H. Barnett, repairs, fire station, 
Ward 1, 

E. L. Davis, repairs, fire station, 
Ward 1, 

Chandler Eastman Co., repairs, fire 

station. Ward 3, 
C. W. Drake, window glass, etc., 

Central Fire Station, 



5 


.30 


9. 


65 


90.08 


2. 


50 


2 


.50 


6 


.45 



J,238.87 



Repairs, City Hall. ■ 

Bean & Corbett, painting, etc., offices and 

corridors, $445.00 



CITY EXPENSES. 487 



Richardson's Mill Bridge. 



W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, $298 . 56 

Brown-Wales Co., supplies, 35.70 

J. F. Waters, auto hire, 69 . 50 

G. L. Theobald, teaming, 110.50 

W. S. Kaime, livery, 2.00 

H. L. Bond Co., screen, 10.80 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 22.56 

Concord Lumber Co., lumber, 95.03 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight, 2 . 44 

I. E. Gray, auto hire, 2.00 

W. S. Dole, cement, 222.00 

W. P. Richardson, rent of shed, etc., 23 . 50 

N. E. Martin, grade, 20.00 

Berlin Construction Co., contract, 926.00 

Storrs Engineering Co., services, 100.00 



Salaries. 

Charles J. French, mayor, $1,500.00 

Henry E. Chamberlin, city clerk, 1,200.00 
Henry E. Chamberlin, clerk, board 

of public works, 200.00 
Henry E. Chamberlin, overseer of 

poor, Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, 350.00 

Edward M. Proctor, city messenger, 900.00 
J. H. Morris, assessor and clerk of 

board, 1,500.00 

J. E. Shepard, assessor, 750.00 

M. H. Donovan, assessor, 750 . 00 

Seth R. Dole, tax collector, 2,250.00 

W. C. Green, building inspector, 200.00 

M. E. Banks, care, city clocks, 85.00 

W. H. Putnam, care, clock, Penacook, 25.00 

Alexander Murchie, city solicitor, 500 . 00 

C. H. Cook, M. D., city physician, 450 . 00 



,940.59 



488 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. U. Sargent, M.D., assistant city 

physician, $50 . 00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, 250.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 
supervisors and inspectors of elec- 
tion, 960.00 

W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-rolls, 

moderators and ward clerks, 360 . 00 

Fred M. Dodge, overseer of poor. 

Ward 1, 30.00 

George 0. Robinson, overseer of 

poor. Ward 2, 10.00 



$12,320.00 



Salaries, Board of Aldermen. 
W. F. Thayer, treasurer, pay-roll, $1,905 . 00 



Schools. 



L. J. Rundlett, agent. Union School 

District, $114,062.14 

David T. Twomey, treasurer, Pena- 

cook School District, 14,563.63 

Frank E. Dimond, treasurer. Town 

School District, 5,073.59 



$133,699.36 



E, E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R. 
L. S. Richardson, trustee, appropriation, $450.00 



Transit, Engineering Department. 
C. L. Berger & Sons, transit, $245 . 25 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



490 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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city of concord. 
Temporary Loans and Bonds. 



Receipts. 



Paid. 



To Resolution No. 147 


$50,000,001 
50,000.00/ 




" 162 




By Notes 


S 100,000. 00 


Union School District: 


70,000.001 
1,511.30 ^ 

777.78 J 












Transferred to District 


72,289.08 









Concord Water- Works. 



Receipts. 



Expenditures. 



Cash on hand, January 1, 1914. .... . 

Receipts deposited with Treasurer. . . , 

Expended per orders. 

Outstanding order paid account, 1913. 

Bonds 

Interest 

Cash on hand 



Less outstanding order unpaid Jan. 1, 1915. 



$32,582.46 
74,422.15 



$107,004.61 



$50,019.39 

.60 

20,000.00 

18,758.32 

18,240.28 



$107,018.59 
13.98 



$107,004.61 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 499 



MUNICIPAL DEBT. 



Funded Debt. 

City hall bonds, $1 14,000 . 00 

State library bonds, 15,000.00 



Total funded city debt, $129,000 . 00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1915, $341 . 82 

Interest accrued, not yet due, muni- 
cipal bonds, 1,700.83 

Coupons, overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 311.50 

Due school districts, 25,388.68 

Due public library account trust 

funds, 20 . 75 

Due precinct sewer. East Concord, 127 . 53 

Due precinct sewer, city, 713 . 42 

Due precinct sewer, Penacook, in- 
terest, 20 . 00 

Due precinct sewer. West Concord, 618 . 38 

Due precinct lighting streets, city, 499.32 

Due precinct lighting streets. East 

Concord, 13.87 

Due precinct lighting streets, Pen- 
acook, 300 . 00 

Cemetery trust funds, 50,743.00 



Total debt not funded, $80,799 . 10 



Total city indebtedness, $209,799. 10 



500 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Available Assets. 

Treasurer's cash balance, January 

1,1915, S40,081.00 

Taxes of 1912, uncollected, 1,128.34 

Taxes of 1913, uncollected, 3,234 . 55 

Taxes of 1914, uncollected, 34,350 . 17 

Cash in hands of tax collector, Jan- 
uary 1, 1915, 423.50 
Taxes bid by city, 4,708 . 74 
Due quarry rents, 50 . 00 
Due highway department, 155.00 
Due Merrimack County, county 

poor, 5,088.15 

Due Merrimack County, dependent 

soldiers, 925.87 

Overdraft, precinct, Penacook 

sewer, 378 . 43 

Overdraft, precinct, St. Paul's 

School sewer, 43 . 45 

Overdraft, precinct, sprinkling 

streets, 645 . 58 

Overdraft, precinct, sprinkling 

streets, Ward 1, 10.45 

Overdraft, precinct, garbage, 708.40 



$91,931.63 

Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1915, $117,867 . 47 

Indebtedness above assets January 1, 1914, 101,442 . 85 



Increase for the year, $16,424 . 62 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 501 



PRECINCT DEBT. 



Funded Debt. 

Water-works bonds, $47 7 ,000 . 00 

Sewer bonds, 75,000.00 

$552,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Coupons overdue, water bonds, 

not presented, $641.00 

Coupons overdue, sewer bonds, 

not presented, 110.00 

Interest accrued, sewer bonds, not 

yet due, 739.58 

Interest accrued, water bonds, not 

yet due, 8,841.66 

,332.24 



$562,332.24 
Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, January 1, 

1915, $18,240.28 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1915, $544,091.96 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1914, $558,780.61 



Decrease for the year, $14,688.65 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, $219,000 . 00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 4,474.17 

,474.17 

8,396.83 



Penacook School District bonds, $8,300 . 00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 96.83 



Net Hability of school districts, $231,871.00 



502 CITY OF CONCORD. 

West Concord sewer bonds, 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 

East Concord sewer bonds, 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 

Penacook sewer bonds, 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $117,867.47 

precinct debt, 544,091 . 96 

school districts, 223,474 . 17 

West Concord sewer debt, 2,320.13 

East Concord sewer debt, 508.75 

Penacook sewer debt, 4,565.00 



$2,300.00 
20.13 


$500.00 

8.75 


$4,500 
65 


00 
00 



},320.13 



.75 



t,565.00 



Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1915, $892,827.48 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets, 

January 1, 1914, 829,141.87 



Increase for the year, $63,685.61 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Having Value But Not Considered Available Asset? 



Water department, $1,052,380 . 13 
Fire department, 141,126.50 
Highway department, 32,200.00 
Engineering department, 758 . 50 
Sewer department, 835.25 
Penacook sewer, 40.15 
West Concord sewer, 23 . 65 
Health department, 940 . 00 
Pohce department, 35,653.65 
City clerk's office, 1,150.00 
Commissioner's office, 140.17 
Mayor's office, 250.00 
Assessor's office, 600 . 00 
Tax collector's office, 240.00 
Sealer of weights and measures, 200 . 00 
City messenger's department, 2,250.00 
Park commissioner's department, 225 . 00 
Cemetery commissioner's depart- 
ment, 250 . 00 
Pubhc library, 10,000.00 
Milk inspection, 43 . 77 
City history, commission, 10.00 
Real estate, 331,982.50 



,611,299.02 



I9I4. 



Population of city (census 1910), 

Valuation of city, 

Tax assessed for the year, 

Rate of taxation, $8.70 per $1,000. 

Rate of Union School District, $4.10. 

Rate for precinct, $3.90. 

Total rate, $16.70 per $1,000. 



21,497 

,177,428.00 

$304,977.67 



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INDEX. 



Appropriations, regular 456 

special. 458 

Assessors, board of, report of , 375 

Assets, city. See Municipal Assets. 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 428 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 451 

Cemeterj- department, reports of 364 

City clerk, report of 389 

expenses, itemized . . .' 459 

government, departments, personnel of 29 

assessors 32 

board of aldermen 29 

board of public works 30 

building inspector 39 

cemetery committees 41 

clerk 30 

collector of taxes 32 

commissioners of cemeteries 42 

committees of board of aldermen 31 

culler of staves 44 

drain layers 47 

engineer 31 

fence-viewers 43 

fire department, officers of 38 

health officers 39 

hydrant commissioners 40 

inspector of petroleum 43 

niayor 29 

messenger 31 

overseers of poor 33 

park commissioners 40 

physician, city and assistant 32 

plumbers, board of examiners of 48 

pound-keeper 43 

police department officers and members of police force •. 33 

public library, trustees of 36 

librarian and assistants 36 

registrar of vital statistics 40 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 32 

sealers of leather 44 

sealer of weights and measures 44 

solicitor 33 

street department, superintendent of streets 32 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries . . '. 42 

superintendent of clocks 39 



564 CITY OF CONCORD. 



City superintendent of f)arks 40 

surveyors of painting 46 

masonry 46 

wood, lumber and bark 46 

treasurer 31 

undertakers 42 

ward oflBcers 49 

water-works, city, commissioners 37 

superintendent 37 

weigher 44 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 44 

solicitor, report of 36& 

Coupon account, statement of 453- 

Debts, recapitulation 502 

Engineer, city, report of 242 ■ 

Financial statement 490 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 212 

fire alarm 219 

in memoriam 215 

Penacook fire-alarm telegraph 225 

roll of members 228 

Highways, financial statement of 329 

department, report of superintendent 319 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 360 

John Kimball Playground, report of committee on 370 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 51 

Municipal debt 499 

regulations 2 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 425 

Ordinances and resolutions 3 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 246 

Physician, city, report of 390 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 361 

Police department, report of city marshal 234 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1904 379 

Poor department, report of overseer 391 

Population 504 

Precincts, debts of 501 

Property, city, inventory of 503 

Public bath, report of 387 

Public library, report of trustees 176 

librarian 177 

Public Works, board of, report of 318 

Rollins Park Playground, Report of committee on 372 



INDEX. 565 

PAGE. 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 181 

complaints, etc 190 

contagious diseases 188 

•milk inspector, report of 182 

mortality report 193 

sanitary officer, report of 184 

School reports 55 

Union School District, annual school meeting warrant 167 

annual school meeting 109 

attendance, tables of 114 

• board of education 55 

board of education, report of 59 

buildings and repairs, report of committee. ... 61 

census, 1914 121 

clerk 58 

elocutionary contest 134 

English prize essay contest 132 

financial agent, report of 163 

fire drills 136 

graduating classes 138 

honor, roll of 143 

Morrill School of Mechanic Arts 106 

movement of pupils through grades 128 

officers of the district 58 

Pageant, Concord History 154 

school nurse 58 

school nurse, report of 103 

stamp saving system 121 

superintendent 57 

superintendent, report of 64 

teachers, list of 123 

truant officer 57 

truant officer, report of 120 

Walker School, Dedication of 161 

Town School District, report of 174 

Sewer department, report of 351 

Tax collector, report of 384 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 446 

Treasury, report of 393 

Trust funds 393 

Trusts, individual cemetery 402 

Vital statistics, tables of 506 

Water department, report of 249 

commissioners, report of 256 

coupon, account of 455 

engineer's report 292 

fire hydrants 304 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 455 

receipts for each year 296 

schedule of pipes and gates 298 

summary of statistics 314 

superintendent, report of 277 

treasurer's report 294-454 

water supply, reports of 260