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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

CITY OF CONGORD, N. H. 



SIXTY^HIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



1915 
SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1915 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCORD, N. H.: 

Ira C. Evans Co., Printers 

1916 



K\ 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

For Payment op Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city poor account, except on the written order of 
the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



MAYOR HOBBS' INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



January 25, 1916. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: 

We are entering now upon the forty-sixth term of our 
city government and are met here to-day at the inaugura- 
tion of the twenty-fourth mayor of the city. To be chosen 
as that one, is an honor of Avhich anyone may justly be 
proud. 

At the very beginning I desire to express my deep appre- 
ciation of this great honor that has been conferred upon me. 

I realize fully that the office to which I have been elected 
is one of great trust, of great responsibility and of many 
and various duties. All these I accept with the sole desire 
that I may give to the city a fair, clean and efficient admin- 
istration. 

It has been my privilege and pleasure to have been a 
member of the city government during the last four terms. 
The experience gained thereby will, I believe, be a help 
during the next two years. 

Concord, with its large area, its many miles of roads, and 
its many bridges, taken together, with the various demands 
made to suit the tastes of its people and the great amount 
of valuable property which is untaxable, is an expensive 
city to conduct, but from comparisons made with other 
cities of the same size, none are cleaner or have their needs 
better provided for. 

Our departments are under the care of honest and 
capable heads and are all most efficiently conducted. 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The affairs of a city are continually increasing, making 
more details for its officers to consider. These take time 
and are always open to changes and improvements. 

The change made tive years ago in our city charter has 
been generally for the good of the city. The results show 
a closer attention to duty, more attention to the details and 
a deeper sense of responsibility. The change, as it should 
be, has also resulted in the elimination of all party politics. 

I will now discuss briefly matters pertaining to the sev- 
eral departments. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

As everyone knows, this is one of the most important 
departments in any municipality. Ours, I believe, will 
rank with any other in a city of the same size. The officers 
and members of the department are experienced, competent 
and fearless. 

The advent and perfection of the motor gasoline engine 
has made great changes in the fire apparatus of to-day. It 
is now everywhere realized that the use of horses on fire 
apparatus is fast becoming a thing of the past, not only 
on account of the greater speed and efficiency obtained by 
the use of motor apparatus but in the saving in cost for its 
care and running expense. 

During the last three years the city has purchased four 
pieces of motor fire apparatus and all are doing most ex- 
cellent work. As far as practical and as our means will 
allow, I believe in the continuation of the equipment of the 
department with this apparatus. 

The advisability of installing a combination motor-pump- 
ing engine and hose wagon, at the Central Fire Station, 
and combination motor chemical and hose wagons in the 
Alert Hose and Pioneer Engine houses should now be 
carefully considered. Extensive repairs will soon have to 
be made on one of the steamers and instead of going to the 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 5 

great expense which will be necessary to put it in first-class 
condition, it would seem to me better to replace it with a 
modern motor-pumping engine. This would afford much 
better protection to the western end of the city and to the 
sections not equipped with the high pressure service. Bet- 
ter ward room and fire house accommodations for Ward 4 
are much needed. 

"We cannot go to all this expense at once, but I believe 
these needs and changes should now be investigated, so that 
careful consideration may be given them before any action 
is taken. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Depending on this department for the protection of our 
citizens and our homes, none is more essential to the wel- 
fare of a community. Its duties are more varied than in 
any other department. It requires men, not only of good 
physique and nerve but of good judgment and habits. The 
members of the force, in general, are most efficient in all 
their duties. 

Two additional patrolmen have recently been appointed 
to the force and the expenses this year will, therefore, be 
somewhat increased. 

A motor combination patrol and ambulance wagon was 
bought and put in commission last year. It has done fine 
work as a patrol wagon but on account of its lacking cer- 
tain necessary riding qualities, is not well adapted for 
ambulance w^ork. I hope the board will immediately in- 
vestigate into the advisability of remedying its defects. 

An addition to the police station was also built last year, 
providing a garage, and also extra room on the second 
floor with the idea that separate detention accommodations 
should be provided for women and juveniles. This needed 
improvement, I believe, should be arranged for as soon as 
possible. 



6 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TAXATION. 

This subject is probably one of the most discussed of any 
with which the law-makers have to deal. The best system 
for the equal distribution of the assessment of taxes has 
been threshed over for years and probably will be for years 
to come. To provide funds for the supj)ort of municipali- 
ties and its institutions, taxation is necessary. On what 
classes of i^roperty the taxes are to be levied is not for our 
assessors to say ; it is their duty to assess such property as 
is stipulated by law. 

"We are fortunate in having an able board of assessors. 
Their duties are arduous but I believe they perform them 
with fairness to all. 

During the last seven years our rate of taxation has 
somewhat increased. This is due principally to the increase 
in the state tax, and to the increased expense necessary to 
conduct our schools. Below is an analysis of our tax- 
rate per $1,000, for 1915 :— 

State tax, $2.42 

County, 1.72 

Schools, 7.37 

City, 2.18 

Precincts, 3.30 

With the exception of the city and precinct taxes, the city 
government has nothing to do with the assessments. 

FINANCES. 

Though the balance in the city treasury is the lowest in 
many years, due principally to the many large abatements 
which had to be made during the last year, the general 
financial affairs of our city are in excellent condition and 
our credit is of the best. The limit to which bonds ma}^ be 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 7 

issued is still large, notwithstanding the fact that a large 
issue was sold last year. 

In the conduct of the financial affairs of a city I believe 
that all general expenses and all improvements, as far as 
possible, should be paid for out of the yearly income and 
bonds should be issued only for some great improvement, 
the benefits from which are to extend over many years. 
This, in general, has been the city's policy and should be 
continued. 

It is an easy matter to tell how expenses may be reduced, 
but it is not such an easy task to accomplish. Some ex- 
pense could be saved by eliminating appropriations made 
annually to aid certain worthy institutions and objects. 
Such action, I know, would not meet with public approval. 
The appropriations should be continued for the charity 
societies, for band concerts, for soldiers' relief, for the 
N. H. Memorial Hospital, a most worthy institution, and 
for the Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, which is now really a 
part of the city and is indispensable to its welfare. 

The bonded indebtedness January 1, 1916, was as fol- 
lows : — 

Union School District, $211,000 

Penacook School District, 7,800 

Sewer, city, 75,000 

Sewer, West Concord, 1,800 

Sewer, Penacook, 3,500 

Water, 458,000 

City Hall, 106,000 

State Library, 15,000 

Bridge, 86,000 



Total, $964,100 

The bonded indebtedness, January 1, 1915, was $915,600 
Increase during the year, 48,500 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The aggregate indebtedness over available as- 
sets, January 1, 1916, was .$1,002,031.94 
Same, January 1, 1915, was 901,224.31 
Increase for year, 100,807.63 

These increases are mainly due to the recent issue of 
bridge bonds. 

SCHOOLS. 

Most vital to future generations and the welfare of a 
community is the education of the children. Our citizens 
have always realized this and have maintained our schools 
on the highest plane. Liberal and practical subjects are 
taught and every effort is made to properly fit the schol- 
ars for their work in life. 

In the new Walker schoolhouse, recently opened, we have 
one of the best examples of a modern fireproof schoolhouse, 
with its splendid system of lighting and ventilation. It is 
a credit to the school board, to the superintendent and to 
the city. 

BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS AND ITS DEPARTMENTS. 

A large part of tlie work of the city government is under 
the control of this board : the care of the roads, sewers, side- 
walks, the disposal of garbage, the granting of lights, and 
many other miscellaneous matters. 

In our superintendent and engineer, who direct the work 
done, we have officials who are most attentive to and effi- 
cient in all their various duties. 

Our roads and sidewalks will compare favorably with 
those in other cities, and are better than many I have seen. 

Good roads are considered one of the greatest necessities 
and are receiving more attention now in this country than 
ever before. They are a great asset to a city and reflect 
largely the prosperity of its people. I wish we could ex- 
periment with some of the new processes and constructions 
which are being tried in other cities,* but the expense is too 
large to allow us to contemplate any such work at this 



mayor's address. 9 

time. We must do as well as we can with the amount we 
have to spend. Much work has been done in the past in 
new construction and on repairs and this work must be 
continued. 

The state and some of the towns are using what is called 
the patrol system in the repair of their roads. I believe 
this system could be profitably used by our highway depart- 
ment and I recommend its adoption. 

I recommend that appropriations be made this year for 
the completion of the St. Paul's School road, the Hopkin- 
ton road and South Street, for the continuation of the 
macadam on South State Street and for the repair of Park 
Street and North State Street. - Some work should also be 
done on East Penacook Street and the Pittsfield road. 

The city, in general, is very well lighted and at a fair 
cost. I would like to see Main Street made a ' ' white way, ' ' 
so called, but it does not seem advisable at this time to 
undergo this additional expense. 

The sewer system is in good condition and is ample to 
take care of the city's needs except in times of exceptional 
rains. The gradual growth of the city towards the west 
and in other parts necessitates the gradual enlargement of 
the main sewers. A systematic plan for such work de- 
vised with the aid of the city engineer would, I think, be a 
help to the board especially at the beginning of each year 
when the work is laid out and the appropriations voted. 

To comply with the requirements of our state laws, five 
new steel bridges Avere recently constructed and several re- 
paired. They are now in such good condition that it will 
be a long time before any further expense will be necessary. 

LABOR. 

The ordinance giving preference to the employment of 
American citizens in our departments should, I think, be 
strictly adhered to. so that our people, if able, would have 
the chance to profit by any public work done in their 
own city. 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

At times a large number of our people are out of work 
and I believe the city should aid as far as possible in help- 
ing them to find employment. In this connection, I am 
glad to commend the work of the Board of Trade in their 
efforts in this line by the establishment of a registry bu- 
reau and also their other efforts in behalf of the welfare 
of the city. 

PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS. 

In our parks we justly take a great deal of pride. They 
have been gradually and well developed and beautified 
under the supervision of a board of commissioners who 
have given their time freely and faithfully to the work. 

I have been glad to have aided in the establishment of 
the playgrounds. They are an asset to the city and a 
safeguard to the children. The cost of maintenance is 
small compared with the great good resulting. 

I believe that all their necessary needs should be amply 
provided for and that this work should be extended by the 
establishment of places where the children can safely enjoy 
skating and other winter sports. 

Other departments to which I have not referred are the 
water-works, cemeteries and the public library, each under 
the control of separate boards, the legal department and 
the board of health. These, I know, are well and pru- 
dently managed. 

There are other minor matters which will require your 
consideration, but I will not mention them at this time, but 
will direct your attention to them as occasion requires. 

The responsibility now rests upon us. 

The results accomplished will be due to all of us and 
not to any one member. 

We must remember that we are acting for the people and 
are their servants and that we should administer our offices 
for the best interests of the whole city, for the protection 
of its people and for the safeguarding of its credit and its 
good name. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 10, 191G. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordixance relating to cemeteries. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. The office of treasurei* of the board of cemetery com- 
missioners and of the cemetery committees for Wards One, Two, Three, 
Seven and Eight, is hereby abolished. All money derived from the 
sale and care of lots in the cemeteries of the city shall be paid to 
the city treasurer once in three months, and the pay-rolls for such 
cemeteries shall be made up and forwarded to the city treasurer once 
each month, and shall be paid by said treasurer in the same manner 
as pay-rolls for other departments are now paid. 

Sect. 2. There shall be used for the upkeep of the cemeteries of 
the city the income derived from the care of lots and for grading, 
one-half of all money accruing from the sale of lots, and the income 
from securities purchased with the other half of the money accruing 
from sale of lots. Any money or income thus derived shall be ex- 
pended for the care of the particular cemetery from which it orig- 
inated. 

Sect. 3. Lots for which the city holds trust funds shall be cared 
for out of the money heretofore authorized to be expended for the 
care of cemeteries, and so much of the income from these trust funds 
as may be thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at 
the close of the year, and the remainder, in each instance, credited 
to the individual funds. 

Sect. 4. The several accounts for the cemeteries of the city shall 
be kept by the city treasurer, who shall receive the sum of twenty- 
five dollars annually for the work, in addition to his regular salary. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect on its passage. 

Passed March 8, 1915. 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 2 op chapter 11, and sec- 
tion 3 of chapter 41 OF the revised ordinances, relating to 

THE duties and SALARY OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 2 of Chapter 11 of the Eevised Ordi- 
nances by striking out the words "joint or" in the twenty-second 
line of said section and adding to said section the words, ' ' and he 
shall, during the first three months of each year, prepare and furnish 
to the city government and all city officials and such others as the 
board may from time to time designate, printed copies of new or- 
dinances, and annotations of ordinances amended or repealed, in 
convenient form for insertion in the Eevised Ordinances of 1912, the 
printing to be done at the expense of the city, ' ' so that said section 
as amended shall read as follows: 

' ' Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of said city solicitor, by himself or 
by some person by him duly authorized, for whose conduct, skill, and 
faithfulness he shall be accountable, to draft all bonds, deeds, obli- 
gations, contracts, leases, conveyances, agreements, and other legal 
instruments, of whatever nature, which may be required of him by 
any ordinance or order of the mayor and aldermen, or which may be 
requisite to be done and made by the city of Concord, and any person 
or persons contracting with the city in its corporate capacity, and 
which, by law, usage, and agreement, the city is to be at the expense 
of drawing; to commence and prosecute all actions and suits to be 
commenced by the city before any tribunal in this state, whether in 
law or in equitj^; and also to appear in, defend, advocate the rights and 
interests of the city, in any suit or prosecution, wherein any estate, 
right, privilege, ordinances, or acts of the city government, or any 
breach of any ordinance, may be brought in question. And said solici- 
tor shall also appear before the legislature of this state, or before any 
committee thereof, whether of either or both branches of the same, 
and there, in behalf of the city, represent, answer for, defend, and 
advocate the interests and welfare of said city whenever the same 
may be directly or indirectly affected, whether to prosecute or defend 
the same; and he shall in all matters do all and every professional 
act incident to the office which may be required of him by the city 
government, or by any special committee thereof; and he shall, when 
required, furnish the mayor and the board of aldermen, or any special 
committee of said board and any officer of the city government who 
may require it in the official discharge of his duties, with his legal 
opinion on any subject touching the duties of their respective offices, 



ORDINANCES. 13 

and he shall, during the first three months of each year, prepare and 
furnish to the city government and all city officials and such others 
as the board may from time to time designate, printed copies of new 
ordinances, and annotations of ordinances amended or repealed, in 
convenient form for insertion in the Revised Ordinances of 1912, the 
printing to be done at the expense of the city." 

Sect. 2. Amend Section 3 of Chapter 41 of the Eevised Ordinances 
by striking out the word ' ' five ' ' in the second line of said section 
and inserting in place thereof the word ' ' eight, ' ' so that said sec- 
tion as amended shall read as follows : 

"Sect. 3. The city solicitor shall receive in full for his services 
the sum of eight hundred dollars per annum. ' ' 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 15, 1915. 



An Ordinance fixing the s.\lary op the clerk of the municipal 
court. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloirs : 

Section 1. The salary of the clerk of the municipal court shall 
be three hundred fifty dollars per annum, payable monthly. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its jiassage. 

Passed March 15, 1915. 



An Ordinance relating to the collection of taxes. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen, of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 3 of Chapter 32 of the City Ordinances 
by striking out in the first line the words ' ' poll taxes and, ' ' so that 
said section as amended shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 3. All taxes assessed upon personal property shall be 
deemed due and payable at the collector 's office on or before the first 
day of September, annually; and, if the same are not then paid, notice 
may be served on all persons whose said taxes remain unpaid, who 



14 CITY OP CONCORD. 

shall i^ay the sum of twenty cents for such notice, according to the 
provisions of Section 19, Chapter 60 of the Public Statutes." 

Sect. 2. Amend said Chapter 32 by adding the following section: 

' ' Sect. 4. Poll taxes shall be paid to the collector on demand, 
without previous notice, and if not paid on or before June 1st, twenty 
cents costs shall be added." 

Sect. 3. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed March 15, 1915. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 37, section 1, of the 

REVISED ordinances RELATIVE TO THE BOND OF THE CLERK OF THE 

police court. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That Section 1 of Chapter 37 of the Eevised Ordi- 
nances of the City of Concord be amended by striking out the last 
three words in said section and inserting in the place thereof the 
words one thousand dollars. 

Sect. 2. This ordinajice shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 29, 1915. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 14, section 2, of the 

REVISED ordinances OP AUGUST 15, 1912, RELATING TO THE BOARD 
OF EXAMINERS OP PLUMBERS. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. Section 2 of Chapter 14 of the ordinances approved 
August 12, 1912, is hereby amended by striking out the word "jour- 
neyman" in the first sentence of said section, so that the first sen- 
tence shall read : ' ' There is hereby created a board of examiners of 
plumbers for the City of Concord, consisting of a member of the 
board of health, the city engineer and a plumber of not less than five 
years' active and continuous practical experience." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect on its passage. 

Passed April 12, 1915. 



ORDINANCES. 15 

An Ordinaxce extending the sewer precinct. 

Be it ordained iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. The sewer precinct of the city proper is hereby ex- 
tended to embrace the following described territory, together with 
the inhabitants abutting thereon : 

Beginning at a point on the northerly side of Pleasant Street at its 
junction with Stevens Avenue; thence northerly on said avenue to 
Kent Street; thence easterly by said Kent Street to the westerly line 
of land of Mary D. Aiken. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed April ]7, 1915. 



An Ordinance enlarging school district no. 20 street lighting 
precinct. 

Be it ordained ty the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloivs : 

Section 1. Said precinct is hereby enlarged by adding thereto the 
following described territory, together with its inhabitants: 

Commencing at the westerly end of the dam at Contoocook Eiver 
Park; thence westerly on the northerly line of land of the Concord 
Street Railway 200 feet ; thence up said Contoocook Eiver at a dis- 
tance of 200 feet from the river bank to the railroad bridge near 
Riverhill station ; thence up the center of the river to the brook on 
the southerly side of said river and near the cottage of John H. 
Worthen; thence up said brook to the first highway leading to River- 
hill station; thence easterly and northerly by the center of said high- 
way to the railroad track at Riverhill station ; thence northerly on the 
easterly line of the cottage lots next north of said station, to the Bog 
Road, so called; thence across said road to the southeasterly corner 
of land of Kate P. Colby; thence northerly by the easterly line of 
said Colby, Herman S. Herring and Thomas Murray to the southerly 
bank of the Contoocook River; thence down said river to the point 
begun at. There also shall be added to School District No. 20 
Street Lighting Precinct that portion of District No. 20 lying south- 
erly of the Contoocook River which has not heretofore been included 
in said street lighting precinct. 

Passed May 10, 1915, 



16 CITY OF CONCORD, 

An Okdinance relative to the control and maintenance of pena- 
cook park. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That portion of the old City Farm land lying westerly 
of the old cart path leading southerly from Lake Street, opposite the 
passway across the dam at the outlet of Forge Pond and southerly 
of high water mark of Forge Pond, heretofore set apart as Penacook 
Park, shall from and after the passage of this ordinance be in the 
custody and control of the board of water commissioners, and shall 
by said board be kept and maintained as a park at the expense of 
the water department. 

Sect. 2. The board of water commissioners is hereby vested with 
all powers and duties in regard to said parcel of laid as by virtue of 
Section 2 of Chapter ]5 of the Eevised Ordinances of the City of 
Concord, 1912, are vested in the board of park commissioners for the 
custody, management, improvement and control of other parks in the 
City of Concord. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 5, 1915. 



An Ordinance extending the sewer precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sewer precinct be and hereby is extended 
from the southerly line of the present precinct on South Main Street 
to the southerly line of the land of Dolly Wallace Sargent, said ex- 
tension to include the property abutting the westerly side of South 
Main Street within the limits of the above-described line. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 14, 1915. 



ORDINANCES. 17 

An Ordinance authorizing the appointment of a board of trus- 
tees FOR THE HANDLING OF TRUST FUNDS FOR THE CITY OP 
CONCORD. 

Be it ordained hy ilie Board of Aldermen of ilie City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. There is hereby established a board of trustees for the 
purpose of receiving and earing for trust funds and property accru- 
ing to the city by deed, gift or devise, in accordance with an act of 
the legislature, entitled ' ' An Act Eelating to Trust Funds Held by 
Towns and Cities," approved April 21, 1915. 

Sect. 2. Said board shall consist of three members appointed by 
the mayor, subject to confirmation by the full board; one of such 
trustees, who shall be chairman of the board, shall be appointed for 
a term of three years, and each of the other two members for a term 
of two years and one year respectively. At the expiration of the 
term of any member of said board his successor shall be appointed 
for a term of three years. 

Sect. 3. All trust funds now held by the city shall be turned over 
to said board and a note shall be given to said board for the full 
amount of trust funds which have been used by the city under the 
laws existing previous to April 21, 1915. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 13, 1915. 



An Ordinance fixing the amount of bond for the trustees ap- 
pointed UNDER LAWS OF 1915, CHAPTER 162. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Coneord as 
follows : 

Section 1. The board of trustees appointed by virtue of Laws of 
1915, Chapter 162, entitled "An Act Eelating to Trust Funds Held 
by Towns and Cities," shall give a joint and several bond in the sum 
of twenty-five thousand ($25,000) dollars as indemnity to the city for 
the due performance of their duties, and the city shall pay the pre- 
mium yearly upon said bond. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed October 11, 1915. 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance amending chapter 5 of the revised ordinances re- 
lating TO the police department. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloivs: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter 5 of the Eevised Ordinances by strik- 
ing out all of Section 1 and inserting in place thereof the following: 

"Section 1. The permanent police force shall consist of a city 
marshal, an assistant city marshal, a captain of the night watch and 
twelve regular police and night watch. 

"The city marshal and assistant city marshal shall be appointed 
to the office of constable, and, before entering upon the duties of 
their office, shall take the oath prescribed by law, and shall each give 
bond in the sum of three hundred dollars, with sureties to be approved 
by the mayor and aldermen, for the faithful performance of the 
duties of his office, which oath and bond shall be recorded in the city 
clerk's office." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 15, 1915. 



An Ordinance extending the city lighting precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Said precinct is hereby extended by adding the following described 
territory: Commencing at the northeasterly corner of land of the New 
England Granite Works on the westerly line of North State Street; 
thence westerly by the said New England Granite Works' northerly 
line to the southwesterly corner of land formerly owned by Wilkins, 
Foster and Clough ; thence northerly by the westerly line of said land 
to its northwesterly corner and to land of Charles H. Farnum ; thence 
easterly by said Farnum 's southerly line to the Concord & Claremont 
Railroad; thence southerly by said railroad to North State Street; 
thence southerly by the westerly line of said North State Street to the 
point begim at. 

This ordinance shall take effect vipon its passage. 

Passed November 8, 1915. 



ORDINANCES. 19 

An Ordinance amending section 1 of chapter 41 of the revised 
ordinances relating to the salary of the city treasurer. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. Amend Section 1 of Chapter 41 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances by striking out all of said section and inserting in place 
thereof the following: "Section 1. The city treasurer shall receive 
in full for his services the sum of twelve hundred dollars per annum." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect as of January 1st, 1916. 

Passed December 13, 1915. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Resolution authorizing the board of public works to construct, 

AT A cost not exceeding SIXTY THOUSAND DOLLARS, FOUR STEEL 
BRIDGES. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

Section 1. That the board of public works be, and hereby is, 
authorized to construct on the credit of the city, at a cost not exceed- 
ing sixty thousand dollars ($60,000), four steel bridges to replace the 
bridges known as the Federal Bridge, Main Street Bridge, Sewall 
Falls Bridge and the Borough Bridge. 

Sect. 2. That said board be and hereby is authorized to enter 
into contracts in the name of the city with reliable persons or com- 
panies for the construction of said bridges. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 30, 1915. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of a rand card 

INDEX FOR the OFFICE OF THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

That the sum of fifty-six dollars ($56) be, and the same hereby is, 
appropriated for the purchase of a Rand Rotary Visible Card Index 
for the office of the tax collector, and the same be charged to the 
account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed February 8, 1915. 



Resolution to reimburse Penacook Union School District for 
money paid on account of school district no 20. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 
Section 1. That the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) be, and 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for Penacook Union School District to reimburse 



RESOLUTIONS. 21 

said district for money advanced to the city for the purpose of paying 
School District No. 20 bond of $500 due September 1, 1914, said 
bond having been previously paid by the city treasurer with money 
raised by taxation on the polls and ratable estates of said District 
No. 20. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 8, 1915. 



Eesolution authorizing the transfer of funds of the penacook 
sewerage precinct. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
io ws : 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to transfer 
the sum of six hundred sixty dollars ($660) from the Penacook Sew- 
erage Precinct sinking fund account to the city treasury, said fund to 
constitute the sum to be raised for the payment of the amount due on 
a bond payable October 1, and interest on bonds for the year 1915. 

Passed March 8, 1915. 



KESOLUTION authorizing the TRANSFER OF FUNDS OF THE EAST CON- 
CORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 

Eesolved "by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to transfer 
the sum of five hundred seventeen and 50-100 dollars ($517.50) from 
the East Concord Sewerage Precinct sinking fund account to the city 
treasury, said fund to constitute the sum to be raised for the pay- 
ment of the amount due on bonds and interest for the year 1915. 

Passed March 8, 1915. 



EESOLUTION APPROPRIATING MONEY TO DEFRAY THE EXPENSES OF THE 
CELEBRATION OF THE OND HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF 
THE GRANTING OF A CHARTER TO THE PARISH OB TOWN OF CONCORD. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 
That in accordance with the provisions of the enabling act passed 
by the legislature at the January session, 1915, the sum of two thou- 
sand five hundred dollars ($2,500) be, and the same is, hereby appro- 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated 
for the purpose of defraying the expenses incident to the celebration 
of the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the granting of the 
charter to the parish or town of Concord, and that the mayor and 
board of aldermen be a committee to expend said appropriation. 
Passed March ]5, 1915. 



Eesolution appropriating money in aid of concord charity organ- 

IZATION society. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
loivs : 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, for aid to the Concord Charity Organization Society. 

Passed March 15, 1915. 



Eesolution appropriating money for the purchase of an auto 
combination chemical engine and hose wagon to be located 
at the good will hose house in ward six. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lotus: 

That the sum necessary, not to exceed three thousand dollars 
($3,000), be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purchase of an 
auto combination chemical engine and hose wagon to be located at 
the Good "Will hose house in Ward 6. Said sum to be expended under 
the direction of the committee on fire department. 

Passed March 29, 1915. , 



Resolution appropriating money for a police station garage. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

That the sum of forty-four hundred twenty-eight dollars ($4,428) 
be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated for the construction of an addition to the 
police station on Warren Street to be used as a garage, said sum to 
be expended under the direction of the board of public works. 

Passed March 29, 1915. 



RESOLUTIONS. 23 

Eesolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised for the ensuing financial year for the use of the 

CITY. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum of 
forty-four thousand dollars ($44,000) to defray the necessary ex- 
penses and charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, 
together with the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads 
and from other sources shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds $6,310.00 

For payment of interest on temporary loans 300.00 

For payment of interest on cemetery trust funds 1,800.00 

For support of city poor 2,000.00 

For dependent soldiers, city 150.00 

For incidentals and land damages 8,000.00 

For salaries, board of aldermen 1,905.00 

For printing and stationery 2,000.00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000.00 

For aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 500.00 

For aid. Concord District Nursing Association 300.00 

For Memorial Day 460.00 

For aid, E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. E., rent 450.00 

For aid, military companies 250.00 

For open air concerts 325.00 

For public baths 325.00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery 1,400.00 

For Old North Cemetery 200.00 

For Maple Grove Cemetery 100.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 150.00 

For Old Fort Cemetery 30.00 

For Millville Cemetery 100.00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery 10.00 

For Soucook Cemetery 30.00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25.00 

For parks 3,500.00 

For Penacook Park : 100.00 

For East Concord playground 25.00 

For John Kimball playground 500.00 

For Eollins Park playground 400.00 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Tor repairs buildings , $2,000.00 

For City Hall bonds 8,000.00 

$44,645.00 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Salary, sanitary officer $1,-500.00 

Milk inspection 300.00 

Fumigation supplies 100.00 

Antitoxin and medical supplies 150.00 

Incidentals 700.00 



$2,750.00 

POLICE DEPARTMEXT. 

Salaries ..- $16,927.25 

Fuel 450.00 

Horse hire, board and shoeing 210.00 

Helmets and buttons 35.00 

Ice 10.00 

Lights 150.00 

Telephone, private line 245.31 

Incidentals 800.00 

$18,827.56 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Salaries $3,060.00 

Books and incidentals 2,240.00 

$5,300.00 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, engineer $1,800.00 

Salaries, assistants 1,700.00 

Supplies 100.00 

Kepairs 25.00 

Incidentals 150.00 

Assessors ' map 500.00 

$4,275.00 



. RESOLUTIONS, 25 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

General maintenance $38,000.00 

Catch basins 1,200.00 

Trees 4,000.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, new 750.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, repair 2,500.00 

Salary, superintendent 1,800.00 

Permanent work, South Main Street, Perley to West 1,850.00 

Permanent work, South Street, Thorndike to Broadway.... 2,000.00 

Permanent work, North Main Street, Pitman to Center.... 1,250.00 
Permanent work. North State Street, Dolan to Railroad 

crossing 2,000.00 

Permanent work, Pleasant Street, resurfacing to St. Paul 's 

School 3,000.00 

Permanent work. Bye and Walnut streets 1,500.00 

Permanent work, South State Street 1,500.00 

Permanent work, Penacook Street 1,000.00 

Permanent work, Washington Squarfe, Penacook 500.00 



$62,850.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $11,209.00 

Salaries, semi-annual 9,090.00 

Eent, Veterans' Association 150.00 

Forage 1,800.00 

Fuel and lights 1,600.00 

Fire alarm 800.00 

Horse hire and shoeing 1,000.00 

Washing 52.00 

Supplies, auto combination 100.00 

Penacook fire alarm 200.00 

Incidentals 2,000.00 

New hose 800.00 



$28,801.00 



SALARIES. 



Mayor $1;500.00 

City clerk 1,200.00 

Clerk, board of public works 200.00 



26 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Overseers of the poor $390.00 

City solicitor 800.00 

City treasurer 275.00 

City messenger 900.00 

City physicians 500.00 

Care city clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,000.00 

Moderators and ward clerks 360.00 

Supervisors and inspectors of election 960.00 

Collector of taxes 2,000.00 

Building inspector 200.00 

Judge, police court 1,000.00 

Clerk, police court 291.66 



$13,686.66 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of forty-five 
thousand five hundred seventeen and 50-100 dollars ($45,517.50) for 
the support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, together 
M'ith the income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be appropriated and 
divided among the several school districts according to the valuation 
thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
cemeteries of the city one-half of the income from the sale of lots 
and the income derived from the care of lots and grading, which 
sum shall be deposited by the superintendent, or others receiving 
them, in the city treasury. The care of lots for which the city holds 
trust funds shall be paid from the money appropriated for the care 
of cemeteries, and so much of the income of these trust funds as may 
be thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at the close 
of the year and the remainder in each instance credited to the indi- 
vidual fund. 

Sect. -4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
use of the public library in the purchase of books, the amount col- 
lected for fines. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take eifect upon its passage. 

Passed March 29, 1915. 



RESOLUTIONS. 27 

Kesolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OF THE EAST CONCORD LIGHTING PRECINCT FOR THE ENSU- 
ING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the East Concord Light- 
ing Precinct the sum of five hundred fifty dollars ($550) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets within said precinct $550.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount op money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits OF the lighting precinct for the ensuing financial 
year. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 
Section 1. There shall be ra^ised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Lighting Precinct 
of said city the sum of twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets $20,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount op money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the street sprinkling precinct in ward one. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Street Sprinkling 
Precinct in Ward One the sum of four hundred seventy-five dollars 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

($475) to defray the necessary exjjenses and charges of said precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $475.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



Kesolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OF THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING 
FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the limits of the Street 
Sprinkling Precinct of said city, the sum of nine thousand five hun- 
dred dollars ($9,500) to defray the necessary expenses and charges 
of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appro- 
priated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $9,500.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



Eesolution fixing and determining the amount OF money TO BE 

RAISED ON THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
limits op the GARBAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
YEAR. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Garbage Precinct 
of said city, the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said 

precinct $10,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



RESOLUTIONS. 29 

Eesolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of st. paul's school sewerage precinct for the ensu- 
ing financial year. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the St. Paul 's School 
Sewerage Precinct, the sura of one hundred dollars ($100) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs .* $100.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



Eesolution fixing and determining the amount op money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the west concord sewerage precinct for the ensu- 
ing financial year. 

Eesolved iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
loivs : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord Sew- 
erage Precinct the sum of six hundred eighty and 50-100 dollars 
($680.50) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said pre- 
cinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
follows : 

For repairs $100.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 80.50 

For the payment of bonds 500.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OF THE PENACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING 
FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook Sewerage 
Precinct the sum of eleven hundred fifty dollars ($1,150) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs $650.00 

For the payment of bond due July 1, 1915 500.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED ON the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OF THE SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
YEAR. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldervien of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Sewerage Precinct 
of said city the sum of ten thousand fifty dollars ($10,050) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs and construction $7,300.00 

For interest on bonds 2,750.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1915. 



Resolution in relation to a tempor.\.ry loan not to exceed fifty 

THOUSAND dollars. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of -the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 
That the committee on finance are hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars for 



RESOLUTIONS. 31 

current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the year 1915, upon 
such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall determine. 
Passed April 3, 1915. 



Resolution doxating the sum of twenty-five dollars out of the 
income from the david osgood trust. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be hereby 
donated out of the income from the David Osgood trust to the poor 
children of the French Parochial School, who are inhabitants of the 
City of Concord, for the purpose of buying school books for said 
children. 

Sect. 2. That said sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be paid to 
and expended under the direction of the principal of said school. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 17, 1915. 



Resolution providing for the issuance of $86,000 of bonds to 
pay for the construction of bridges over the merrimack and 
contoocook rivers. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

Section 1. That the treasurer of the city is hereby authorized to 
procure by loan on the credit of the city the sum of eighty-six thou- 
sand dollars ($86,000) to pay for the construction of the Pembroke, 
Sewall 's Falls, Borough, Federal, and Main Street, Penacook, bridges, 
so called, over the Merrimack and Contooeook rivers. 

Sect. 2. Bonds of said city shall be issued for said loan, signed 
by the mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer, and shall in all 
respects comply with the provisions of the Municipal Bonds Act of 
1895. Said bonds shall be dated June 1, 1915, and shall be issued in 
two series, one series to be for the sum of five hundred dollars each, 
and numbered 1 to 52, and two of said five hundred dollar bonds shall 
become due and payable in their order as numbered, on June 1 of 
each year, commencing June 1, 1916, until June 1, 1935, when the 
remainder of said bonds shall become due; the second series shall be 
for the sum of one thousand dollars each, and numbered 1 to 60, and 
three of said one thousand dollar bonds shall become due and payable, 
in their order as numbered, on June 1 of each year, commencing June 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

1, 1916. Said bonds shall be payable to the bearer, with interest at 
a rate not exceeding four per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually 
on the first days of June and December in each year, upon the presen- 
tation of the coupons attached to said bonds respectively. 

Sect. 3. The treasurer, subject to the approval of the finance com- 
mittee, is hereby authorized to procure proposals for the sale of bonds 
hereinbefore authorized, with the right to reject any and all bids, 
and if said bids are not satisfactory, said treasurer is hereby author- 
ized to dispose of said bonds at public sale. 

Sect. 4. That all of said bonds shall be exempt from taxation as 
provided by statute. 

Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 10, 1915. 



Resolution making an appropriation to provide for the partici- 
pation OP the school children in the celebration of the 
150th anniversary of the city op concord. 

Hesolved by the Board of Aldermen of tJie City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

That the sum of one hundred fifty dollars ($150) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated in addition to the sum of two thousand five 
hundred dollars ($2,500) heretofore appropriated for defraying the 
expenses of the celebration of the one hundred and fiftieth anniver- 
sary of the City of Concord, said additional sum to be exj^ended in 
defraying the expense of the participation of the school children of 
Concord in said celebration, and to be paid out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated. Said sum shall be expended on 
authorization of the same committee as the moneys heretofore appro- 
priated. 

Passed May 10, 1915. 



Resolution appropriating money for playground purposes, pen- 

ACOOK. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated for playground purposes, Penacook. Said sum to be 
expended under the direction of the committee on lands and buildings 
and charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed M-jy 10, 1915. 



RESOLUTIONS. 33 

Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of land for 
the use of the cemetery commissioners. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of tlie City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

That the sum of seven hundred dollars ($700) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated for the purchase of a tract of land on the Intervale, 
near Fort Eddy, adjoining land now owned by the City of Concord. 
Said sum to be expended under the direction of the cemetery commis- 
sioners and charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed May 10, 1915. 



EESOLUTION APPROPRIATING MONEY FOR PLAYGROUND PURPOSES, WARD 
EIGHT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

That the sum of fifty dollars ($50) be, and hereby is, appropriated 
for playground purposes in the Plains District, Ward Eight. Said 
sum to be expended under the direction of a special committee con- 
sisting of Alderman Reagan, Edward Welch and P. B. Phillips, and 
charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed May 10, 1915. 



Resolution appropriating money for a motor driven fire appara- 
tus FOR EAST concord. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

That the sum necessary not to exceed twenty-five hundred dollars 
($2,500) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purchase of a combina- 
tion fire truck and double tank chemical to be located in the fire 
station at East Concord. Said sum to be expended under the direc- 
tion of the committee on fire department. 

Passed June 14, 1915. 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Eesolution authorizing the city solicitor to engage expert 
assistance in the case of concord manufacturing company 
v. concord. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

Section 1. The city solicitor is hereby authorized to engage expert 
assistance in the case of Concord Manufacturing Company v. Concord, 
and to incur such expense as is necessary therefor subject to the 
approval of the mayor. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 28, 1915. 



Eesolution appropriating six hundred eleven dollars and sev- 
enty-five CENTS ($611.75) to pay taxes assessed in 1914 on 

property that "WAS SOLD TO THE CITY IN 1914 FOR TAXES 
ASSESSED IN 1913. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

Section 1. That the sum of six hundred eleven dollars and sev- 
enty-five cents ($611.75) be and the same is hereby appropriated out 
of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay 
taxes on property assessed in 1914 that was sold to the city in 1914 
for taxes assessed in 1913. 

Sect. 2. The city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the col- 
lector of taxes the said amount of six hundred eleven dollars and 
seventy-five cents ($611.75). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 28, 1915. 



Eesolution providing for a discount on taxes paid prior to july 
15, 1915. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

That a discount of two per cent, shall be allowed on all taxes 
assessed for the year 1915 which are paid on or before the fifteenth 
day of July, 1915. 

Passed June 28, 1915. 



RESOLUTIONS. 35 

Eesolution appropriating twelve hundred twenty-eight and 
92-100 DOLLARS ($1,228.92) to pay for real estate sold to the 
city op concord for unpaid taxes for the year 1914. 

Eesolvcd by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

That the sum of twelve liundred twenty-eight and 92-100 dollars 
($1,228.92) be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay the amount 
due the City of Concord for real estate purchased at the tax collec- 
tor's sale of real estate for the unpaid taxes for the year 1914. 

Passed July 12, 1915. 



Eesolution appropriating the sum of $2,635 for the purpose of 

building a sidewalk on the federal bridge, so called. 
/ 

Eesolved iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

Section 1. That the sum of two thousand, six hundred thirty-five 
dollars ($2,635) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the building of a 
sidewalk upon the Federal Bridge, so called. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 9, 1915. 



Eesolution appropriating the sum of fifteen hundred dollars 

FOR printing and STATIONERY. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

That the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for printing and stationery. 

Passed August 9, 1915. 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Eesolution authorizing the erection of a public urinal. 

Resolved hy ihe Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

Section L That the board of public works and the city engineer 
are authorized and directed to select a site and erect a public urinal 
for men, women and children at a cost not to exceed five thousand 
dollars ($5,000), the same to be paid out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated. 

Sect. 2. This resolution to take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 13, 1915. 



Eesolution appropriating the sum of two hundred dollars for 
repairs on the tomb at blossom hill cemetery. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Coneord as fol- 
lows: 

L That the sum of two hundred dollars (!{;200) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for repairs on the tomb at Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 11, 1915. 



Resolution appropriating money for the payment of the salary 
OF an additional police officer. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 

Section ]. That the sum of two hundred six dollars and twenty- 
five cents ($206.25) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of 
paying the salary of an additional police officer during the remainder 
of. the present fiscal year. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 15, 1915. 



RESOLUTIONS. 37 

Kesolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding fifty 
thousand dollars. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
io us: 

That the committee on finance is liereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to e.xceed fifty thousand dollars 
($50,000) for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the year 
1915, upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall 
determine. 

Passed October 25, 1915. 



EeSOLUTION appropriating the sum of one THOUSAND DOLLARS FOR 
INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Hesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
io ivs : 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed November 8, 1915. 



EESOLUTION APPROPRIATING THE SUM OF TWELVE HUNDRED DOLLARS 
FOR THE SUPPORT OF CITY POOR. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
loios : 

That the sum of twelve hundred dollars ($1,200) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for the support of city poor. 

Passed November 8, 1915. 



EESOLUTION OF ACCEPTANCE OF A CEMETERY TRUST FUND UNDER THE 
WILL OF FRANCES E. WHITAKER. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 
That a legacy of the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars under 
the second clause of the will of Frances E. Whitaker, which was as 
follows: "Second. I give and bequeath unto the City of Concord 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the sum of one liuiidred and fifty dollars, to be held forever in trust, 
the income therefrom to be used for the care and maintenance of my 
family burial lot in Woodlawn Cemetery at Penacook, and I direct 
that all moss and stain be removed at least once in five years from 
whatever stones there may be standing on said lot ; " be, and hereby 
is, accepted in accordance with its terms. 
Passed December 13, 1915. 



EESOLUTION appropriating money for a municipal CHRISTMAS TREE. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows : 

That the sum of one hundred dollars be, and hereby is, appropriated 
for a municipal Christmas tree celebration on December 24, 1915, 
said sum to be expended under the direction of a special committee 
consisting of the mayor and Aldermen Lee and Brunei, and to be 
charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed December 13, 1915. 



EESOLUTION appropriating money for the SALARY OF THE CITY 
TREASURER. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
loics : 

That the sum of nine hundred fifty dollars ($950) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, for the salary of the city treasurer. 

Passed December 31, 1915. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of five hundred and fifty-one 
dollars and thirty-four cents, to settle woodworth & co. 's 
appeal from the assessment of taxes. 

Resolved "by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lotvs : 

That the sum of five hundred and fifty-one dollars and thirty-four 
cents be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to settle the appeal of Wood- 
worth & Co., from the assessment of taxes for the year 1912. 

Passed December 31, 1915. 



RESOLUTIONS. . 39 

Eesolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the several 
departments. 

Resolved iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 
Section 1. That the sum of fifty-two hundred ninety and 41-100 
dollars ($5,290.41) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay outstanding claims 
as follows: 

Board of health $345.09 

City poor 285.27 

Fire department 2,079.70 

Incidentals and land damages 1,471.68 

Interest, temporary loans 441.62 

Parks '. 16.61 

Playgrounds, Eollins Park 4.65 

Police and watch 481.06 

Printing and stationery 26.87 

Kepairs buildings 57.61 

Salaries 80.25 



$5,290.41 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for roads 
and bridges for the year 1915 the sum of one hundred seven and 
93-100 dollars ($107.93), the same being the earnings of this depart- 
ment. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sewers 
for the year 1915 the sum of thirty-one and 50-100 dollars ($31.50), 
the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 10, 1916. 



Eesolution appropriating .$4,391.61 to pay the water-vs^orks de- 
partment FOR money due it TO DECEMBER 31, 1915, UNDER THE 
agreement TO OPERATE THE WOOD LOTS IN W^ARD 3, UNDER THE 
CONTROL OF THE CITY AND THE WATER-WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as fol- 
lows: 
Section 1. That the sum of $4,391.61 be, and the same is hereby, 
appropriated out of money in the treasury not otherwise appropri- 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 



ated, to pay the water-works departineiit its share of the proceeds of 
the joint operation of the wood lots in Ward 3, to December 31, 
1915, in accordance with the action of the committee having the 
same in charge, said action having been taken December 21, 1911:. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 10, 1916. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1915. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, 1914. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

HON. CHAELES J. FRENCH. 

Office: Citv Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims. 



Aldermen-at-Large. 
Term Expires January, 1916. 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, Penacook 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 81 School Street 

Term Expires January, 1918. 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 60 South State Street 

MICHAEL J. LEE, 59 South ^Main Street 



42 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Ward Aldermen. 



Term Expires January, 1916, 



Ward 1- 
Ward 2- 
Ward 3- 
Ward 4- 
Ward 5- 
Ward 6- 
Ward 7- 
Ward 8- 
Ward 9- 



-FRED M. T30DGE, 
-GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, 
-HENRY M. RICHARDSON, 
-CHARLIE A. BARTLETT, 



Penacook 

East Concord 

West Concord 

5 Jackson Street 



-AUGUSTINE R. AYERS, 8 North State Street 
-WALTER WILLIAMSON, 24 Monroe Street 
-HARRY C. BRUNEL, 8 Dunklee Street 

-WILLIAM L. REAGAN, 53 South Main Street 
-EUGENE J. O'NEIL, 115 Rumford Street 



CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per 

annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 

Term expires January, 1916 
1916 
1916 
1918 
1918 
1918 



EVERETT L. DAVIS, 
NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 
RICHARD A. BROWN, 
ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 
MICHAEL J. LEE, 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Clerk. 



Salary, $200 per annum. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 43 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — • 

Aldermen Blackwood, O'Neil, Brunei. 
On Bills, Second Beading — 

Aldermen Ayers, Williamson, Robinson. 
On Elections and Beturns — 

Aldermen Reagan, Hobbs, Brown. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen O'Neil, Sturtevant, Richardson. 
On Finance — 

The Mayor; Aldermen Blackwood, Hobbs, Bartlett, 
Sturtevant. 
On Fire Department — Aldermen Dodge, Lee, Robinson. 
On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Richardson, Reagan, Davis. 
On Police and License — Aldermen Bartlett, Brown, Dodge. 
On Puhlic Insiruction — Aldermen Hobbs, Davis, Lee. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance 
of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and $25 
as Treasurer of Cemeteries. 

ISAAC HILL. 

Office: National State Capital Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,800 per 

annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $900 per 

annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within si.x days to 
satisfaction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of first |60,000 ; 
seven and one-half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

SETH R. DOLE. 

Office : City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $750 per annum. Clerk, $1,500 per annum. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1916 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1920 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1918 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salary. $1,800. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,500 per 

annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 45 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $450 per 

annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $50 per annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $800 per 

annum. 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward i— FRED M. DODGE, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 5— GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 5— HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 



Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,200 per 

annum. 



VICTOR I. MOORE. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 
Term, unlimited. Salary, $2.50 per day for first year, and $2.70 per day 
thereafter. 

Samuel L. Bachelder, Captain of Night "Watch. 

Salary, $1,050 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $2.75 per day. 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

George H. Silsby, Edward J. McGirr, 

Harry L. Woodward, Joseph E. Silva, 

Charles H. Guilbaiilt, Fred N. Marden, 

John B. Long, Frank B. McDaniels. 
James J. Ilalligan, 

Richard C. McGarey, Chauffeur. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



47 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 



W. A. Little, 
George G. Allen, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
James Jepson, 
Jonas WeleomCj 
Thomas M. Harrison, 
Nelson Forest, 
Charles E. Kelley, 



Joseph A. Flanders, 
George E. Drury, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
John ]\IcGirrj 
Willie A. Flanders, 
Earl D. Gaskell, 
Walter H. Bean, 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by the City Marshal, subject to confirmation by the Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, $2.50 each per day of actual service. 



Almah C. Leavitt, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowell, 
Edward M. Nason, 
William H. Hammond, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Charles Ada, 
Arthur J. Taylor, 
Alfred H. Walker, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Harry R. Sturm, 
William J. Ahern, 
Clark D. Stevens, 
Horace B. Annis, 
Albert P. Davis, 
Frank W. Johnson, 
John E. Gay, 
Lonnie E. Neff, 



Edson J. Ormsbee, 
Judson F. Hoit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Milton Colby, 
Asbury F. Tandy, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor, 
Clarence W. Brown, 
Edward H. Smart, 
James J. Collins, 
George N. Fellows, 
William A. Kelley, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Charles M. Norris, 
W. H. Bean, 
Frank T. Powell, 
Timothy P. Reardon, 
Thomas Harrison, 
Axel S. Swanson. 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 5— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
Ward 5— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward ^—REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAIM W. FLINT. 
Ward S— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward .9— GEORGE Y. HILL. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,000 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $500 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Fowler Library Building. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 



49 



CITY WATER WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for iour years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
H. C. HOLBROOK, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
N. E. MARTIN, 
H. H. DUDLEY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
CHARLES R. WALKER, 

President — Solon A. Carter. 
Clerk — Edson J. Hill. 



Term expires 


March 31, 1916 




1916 




1917 




1917 




1918 




1918 




1919 




1919 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, $2,000 per annum. 
Term, unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 

ISAAC HILL, Term expires January, 1917 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, '' " " 1918 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, " " " 1919 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,250 per annum 
and rent of house. 

"WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 
Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 
Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED i\r. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $75 per annum. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 51 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

M. J. LACROIX. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED :\r. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 



Salary, $200 per annum. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

3^IERVIN E. BANKS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in .laniiarv, by M;iyor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio. 
DR. FRED A. SPRAGUE. 



52 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each 
birth, marriage and death received, recorded and returned to the State 
Registrar. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 



No salary. 



WILL B. HOWE, 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



City Engineer 

Chief of the Fire Department 

Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two ai^pointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to con- 
firmation by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, Term expires January, 1916 

GARDNER B. EMMONS, " " " 1916 

CPIARLES P. BANCROFT, " " " 1917 

JOHN P. GEORGE, " " " 1917 

BEN C. WHITE, " " " 1918 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, " " " 1918 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 53 

CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7, consoli- 
dated) appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

OLIVER J. FIFIEIiD, Term expires January 1916 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, '' " " 1917 

D. WARREN FOX, '' " " 1918 

Ward 2. 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, Term expires January, 1916 
SCOTT FRENCH, " " " 1917 

C. A. CHAMBERLIN, " '' " 1918 

Ward 3. 

JAMES M. CROSSMAN, Term expires January, 1916 

GEORGE R. PARMENTER,* " " " 1917 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, '' " " 1918 

Ward 7. 

ALBERT S. TRASK, Term expires January, 1916 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, " " " 1917 

J. NEWTON ABBOTT, " " " 1918 

Ward 8. 

ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, Term expires January, 1916 
NAHUM PRESCOTT, " " " 1917 

ALMAH C. LEAVITT, " " " 1918 



Died November 25, 1915. 



54 CITV OF CONCORD. 

COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, sub- 
ject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, IMayor, ex-officio. 



JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
FRANK P. ANDREWS, 
CHARLES G. REMICK, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
FRANK J. PILLSBURY, 
EDWARD A. MOULTON, 



Term expires March, 1916 
1916 
1917 
1917 
1918 
1918 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

FRED N. HAMMOND. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
LOUIS A. LANE, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY. 

for WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

J. FRANK HASTINGS, 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 55 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner 
of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
GILES WHEELER.* 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in .January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents each 
for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



Died February 11, 191.'>. 



56 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEALER OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Pees, for sealing each scale beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 
cents, and for each measure, 10 cents; five or more to one person, half 
price — paid by owners of scales or measures. 

WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 
40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per 
M. — paid by party for whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid, by party requiring service. 

Arthur G. Stevens^ J. W. Currier, 

Thomas Hill, H. C. Morgan, 

John H. Mercer, R. J. Rowland, 

Everett L. Davis, Archie Black, 

Fred B. Clark, W. D. Stearns, 

Hallett E. Patten, Charles H. Smithy 

Omar C. Allard, Asher E. Ormsbee, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



57 



Arthur N. Day, 
William H. Meserve, 
John E. Rossellj 
David Rossell, 
Nelson Forrest, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 
James F. Fitzgerald, 
Edward W. Brockway, 
John H. Flanders, 
C. W. Ilaselton, 
Hiram Brown, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Fred H. Perley, 
Amos J. Peaslee, 
Mark M. Blanchard, 
James H. Harrington, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Joseph Robarge, 
Charles E. Hardy, 
"William F. Cheever, 
Alphonse King, 
William Gooden, 
Harry Lee, 
Guy Rowell, 
Otis Lynch, 
Arthur E. Rowell, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
Charles J. Sawyer, . 
E. E. Young, 



William J. Mullen, 
Elmer E. Young, 
Henry A. Brown, 
^lilo G. Davis, 

F. H. Smith, 
Fred A. Barker, 
Hamilton C. Morgan, 
James B. Riley, 

G. N. Hills, 
Charles E. Cook, 
S. D. Walker, 
Charles Peaslee, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brown, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
Galen W. Hunter, 
William F. Cutting, 
E. F. Miller, 

Earl Woodbury, 
Ernest Saltmarsh, 
Amos Blanchard, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 
Emery Delaney, 
S. A. Clark, 
C. J. Roers, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
Leigh F. Woodman, 
Alvin B. Edmunds. 



CITY WEIGHER. 
WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



58 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Edward A. Moulton, 
George Abbott.. Jr., 
Charles F. Mudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Fred Rollins, 
Moses E. Haines. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



William Rowell. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subjest to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; 
boards and timber, 16 cents per M. ; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per cord 
or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person em- 
ploying. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Jonathan B. Weeks, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert O. Preston, 
William A. Chesley, 
Alfred Clark, 
J. Frank Hastings, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Harry Jones, 
William Pierce, 
George Darrah, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Smith. 



Silas Wiggin, 
Edward Stevens, 
Daniel Griffiths, 
W. F. Hayward, 
F. E. Frost, 
Walter J. Sanborn, 
Leonard H. Smith, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
John Q. Woods, 
B. J. Prescott, 
Charles S. Robinson, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Richard E. Nelson, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



59 



Gilbert H. Berry, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Arthur E. Maxam, 
Henry Rolfe, 
E. A. Cole, 
William E. Virgin, 
William H. Gay, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
O. B. Jerome, 
Hallett E. Patten, 
George Wilkins, 
Fales P, Virgin, 
Edward Runnels, 
Clinton 0. Partridge, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M, Brown, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hayward, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Albert Saltmarsh, 
Justus 0. Clark, 



Andrew S. Farnum, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
Crosby A. Sanborn, 
Herbert M. Dauforth, 
Hiram W. Drouin, 
W. F. Frost, 
George San])orn, 
Oliver Armstrong, 
E. F. Miller, 
George Oakley, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 
Leslie Hammond, 
Herbert W. Rolfe, 
Robert Hoit, 
N. B. Flanders. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Patrick A. ClifiPord, 
Arthur W. Robinson, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
Michael J. Lee, 
John E. Frye, 
W. Arthur Bean, 



Harry H. Kennedy, 
John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Edward H. Donovan, 
Ned J. IMorrill, 



60 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Willis H. Robbins, 
"William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Eichard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
Albert S. Trask, 
William L. Reagan, 
Frederick T. Converse, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Elmer E. Babb, 



Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 
George E. Robinson, 
Joseph J. Booths 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
F. F. Converse, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Philip King, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
E. H. Smart. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio. 
W^ILL B. HOWE, ex-officio. 
FRED CONVERSE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 61 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward i— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
RICHARD McBRIDE, JR., 
EPHRAIM ROY. 

Ward 5— FREEMAN F. POTTER, 
C. E. ROBINSON, 
WYMAN D. STEARNS. 

Ward 5— CLARENCE R. BLANCHARD, 
ROBERT W. BROWN, 
GUY A. SWENSON. 

Ward 4— HARRY H. KENNEDY, 
J. WESLEY PLUIVmER, 
EDWARD W. LEACH. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
ANTONIO J. SOUZA, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward ^— WILL B. HOWE, 

WARREN E. EMERSON, 
ARTHUR H. KNOWLTON. 

Ward 7— JAMES P. FORSYTH, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HARRIS S. PARMENTER. 

Ward S— FRED SMITH, 

MOSES PELREN, 
JAMES BRANIGAN. 

Ward 9—R. E. DONOVAN, 

R. B. GALLAGHER, 
JAMES J. REEN. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD CLERKS. 

Ward i— LOUIS F. CORBETT. 
Ward ^^— DANIEL W. SANBORN. 
Ward 5— EDWARD P. ROBINSON. 
Ward 4— LOUIS P. ELKINS. 
Ward 5— RAY E. BURKETT. 
Ward ^— LOUIS I. MOULTON. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward S— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward 9—F. D. KENNEY. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward i— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward ^?— RALPH L. STEARNS. 
Ward .?— CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
Ward 4— ALLEN HOLLIS. 
Ward 5— EDWARD C. NILES. 
Ward ^—CHARLES DUNCAN. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward S— MICHAEL MULCAHY. 
Ward P— BARTHOLOMEW COLLINS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 63 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 1853, 

and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor has 
been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. Under 
the City Charter, adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in December, 
1910, for one year, and biennially thereafter in November, beginning in the 
year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853- '54. 

" RUFUS CLEMENT,* '55. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856-'57-'58. 

'' ]\rOSES T. WILLARD, 1859-'60. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861-'62. 

" BENJAML\F..GALE, 1863-'64. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1866-'67. 

'' LYMAN D. STIWENS, 1868- '69. 

" ABRAHA:\[ G. JONES, 1870- '71. 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 1872- '73- '74- '75. 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876- '77. 

" HORACE A. BROWN, t 1878- '79- '80. 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,! 1880-'81-'82. 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883- '84- '85- '86. 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887- '88. 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889- '90. 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891- '92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, ^ 1893- '94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895- '96. 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897- '98. 

" NATHANIEL E. :\rARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901- '02. 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, ' 1903- '08. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 

t Term closed in November, 1880. 

t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1915-1916. 



OFFICERS. 



Edward C. Niles, Esq President. 

Mrs. Fanny E. Minot '. .. .. Secretary. 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 
1916. 

Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 89 North State Street 

Hon. George H. Moses, 5 Auburn Street 

Mrs. Lillian R. Shepard, Hutchins Street, West Concord 



Dr. Dennis E. Sullivan, 
Mrs. Fanny E. MinoI", 
Mr. Omar S. Swenson, 



Edward C. Niles, Esq., 
Dr. Charles Duncan, 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 



1917. 



1918. 



7 North State Street 

23 South State Street 

14 Auburn Street 



119 School Street 

43 South Spring Street 

123 North State Street 



68 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Moses. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mrs. Minot. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

finance. 
Dr. Sullivan. 

HIGH school. 

]\Irs. ]\Iinot. 

grammar schools. 
Mr. Moses. 

primary schools. 
Mrs. ]\Iinot. 

kindergartens. 
Dr. Duncan. 

buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Dudley. 

discipline. 
Mrs. Morrill. 

HY'GIENE. 

]\Irs. ]\Iorrill. 

manual training. 
Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Dudley. 

Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Shepard. 



Dr. Duncan. 



]\Ir. Moses. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Niles. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 
MUSIC. 

Mrs. ]\Iorrill. 

DRAWING. 

Mr. Swenson. 

text-books. 
Mrs. Minot. 

training school. 
Mr. Niles. 

night school. 
Mrs. Morrill. 



69 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Moses. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Dudley. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL 

AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett. 

3 Pine Street. Office: Parker School. Hours: 4 to 6 

p. m., school days. Office open 8 to 12 a. m., 

1.30 to 6 p. m. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

Arthur James Taylor. 

6 Avon Street. Office : Parker School. Hours : 8.30 to 9 
a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLERK. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 

4 Rockingham Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 
Office hours: 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Elizabeth ]\Iaria IMurphy'. 

442 North State Street, West Concord, N. H. 

Office hours: 4 to 5 p. m., Mondays and Thursdays, at 
Superintendent's Office. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

Louis C. Merrill Moderator. 

Fred Leighton Clerk. 

Henry H. Metcalf, Anson S. Marshall .. .. Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCA- 
TION. 



To the Citizens of Union School District: 

The work of the schools in this district has progressed 
satisfactorily during the past year. There have been no 
notable changes in methods or conditions, but there has 
been, as there alwaj^s should be, a general toning up all 
along the line, and improved coordination in the various 
departments of scholastic activities. For a detailed account 
of what has been done, we urge all interested in our schools 
to read the very full and illuminating report of the super- 
intendent. 

Two or three things possibly call for brief notice at our 
hands. 

During the past fall the chief of the fire department, at 
our i-equest, made a thorough inspection of all the school 
buildings of the district, and submitted a report in writing 
detailing all the particulars in which in each building 
changes could profitably be made to guard against the oc- 
currence of fires, and to make easier and safer the egress 
of the children in case of fire during school hours. The 
board voted to adopt and put in force at once all recom- 
mendations, the expense of which could be defrayed out of 
this year's appropriations, and to secure estimates of the 
cost of the remaining alterations recommended. A sum 
sufficient for making these much-needed improvements is 
included in the appropriations which you are requested to 
make. 

The district is greatly indebted to the chief of the fire 
department for the thoroughness and expert intelligence 
with which his investigation and report were made, and to 



72 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the committee on lands and buildings for the energy and 
zeal with Avhich they have followed out his recommenda- 
tions. 

The problem of the backward child is one with which 
schools everywhere are finding that they must deal in a 
positive, constructive way. The problem is acute every- 
where, and not less in Concord than elsewhere. Teachers 
have always been sadly aware of individual cases coming 
under their immediate attention, but the magnitude of the 
problem in the district, as a whole, has never been the sub- 
ject of stud}^ or estimate. 

A partial survey of our schools made recently has shown 
so large a number of children who for one cause or another 
are unable to perform the work normally to be expected at 
their age, that it has become evident that for the good of 
the individuals involved, Avho can receive only harm from 
attempting tasks beyond their powers, and for the good of 
the normal children, who are held back by their slower com- 
panions, exceptional treatment must be provided for these 
exceptional cases. 

A room has, therefore, been provided in which these chil- 
dren will be grouped together under a teacher watli special 
qualifications and training for this class of work. Some of 
them will doubtless, with special attention, be able after a 
time to resume their places in the regular classes of our 
schools. And the others will receive that kind of instruc- 
tion of which they are capable, and which will be of the 
greatest possible benefit to them. 

After a more complete study of the situation has been 
made, it is probable that another similar room will be 
opened in another part of the city. 

At the last annual meeting of the district, an appropria- 
tion of five thousand dollars was made to provide grounds 
for outdoor sports for our school children. This appro- 
priation has not yet been expended. 

It is probable that the primary object of those who were 



SCHOOL REPORT. 73 

most active in promoting this appropriation was to secure 
a suitable field for the use of the baseball, football and track 
teams of the High school. This is a desirable object, and, 
if it were to be considered by itself, would be comparatively 
simple and easy of attainment. But it is impossible to plan 
for this without at the same time taking into account the 
needs, manifold greater as they are, of all the children of 
the district, — not merely or principally those who are mem- 
bers of High school teams. 

Concord is far behind not only larger cities or cities of 
like size in other states, but even much smaller places in 
New Hampshire, in the matter of provision for physical 
training and recreation for her children. Under the pres- 
ent system, or lack of system, attention is centered on those 
who least need it, — those older boys whose natural physical 
development is such that they are able to make places on 
the athletic teams of the High school. This is all wrong. 
The most attention should be given to those children who 
are most deficient in natural physical development. And 
all should have such attention as will build up their bodies 
to the highest possible point of strength and efficiency. 

A recent report shows that in the schools of New York 
City last year more than three hundred thousand children 
took part in athletic competitions. It should be our aim 
and we should provide the facilities to make it possible, 
that every boy and girl in our schools, not crippled or other- 
wise incapacitated, shall take part, under expert instruction 
and supervision, in sound, wholesome competitive athletic 
sports. For competition gives the zest which raises phy- 
sical development from the plane of tiresome drudgery to 
health and character-building recreation. 

To accomplish this we need large grounds, sufficient for 
numerous baseball grounds in summer, football fields in the 
fall, and flooded skating rinks in the winter, with tennis 
courts, running tracks, grounds for field hockey, basket ball 
and other sports for girls. And to make it complete there 



74 CITY OF CONCORD. 

should be gymnasiums vrith adequate swimming pools, 
where every boy and girl of ten or twelve years should 
learn to swim. 

This is the ideal. We can of course for a time get on 
with less. But we ought at once to have at least as much 
as the neighboring small town of Pittsfield, with its finely 
equipped and endowed field of fifteen acres, the gift of a 
generous and public-spirited citizen. Concord itself, in the 
athletic grounds, hockey rinks and gymnasium of St. Paul's 
School, furnishes an example of what we ought to have. 

All this would cost more money than we could well raise 
by taxation. We are spending on our schools about all that 
we can afford. And yet, if it does not come from some 
other source, it may soon seem the duty of the board to 
appeal to the voters of the district to raise the necessary 
funds to provide at least the most essential elements of an 
equipment for the proper physical training of all our 
children. 

A study of the available supply of land suitable for these 
purposes shows that there is such land which at some ex- 
pense could be put in suitable condition for our uses. For- 
tunately, perhaps, the title is in such shape, and our uncer- 
tainty as to what we really wanted has been such, that it 
has not yet been practicable to go far in negotiations with 
the owners. We say fortunately, because it would be very 
unfortunate to proceed to acquire a field for our High 
school teams which would not fit in with a general scheme 
for providing athletic facilities for all our children, if that 
■ is likely soon to be possible. While if we were considering 
the High school teams alone, a very different location 
might seem most desirable. 

If no prospect of anything better appears, w^e will un- 
doubtedly feel it our duty during the coming year to pro- 
vide the field for the High school. 

But in the meantime, we appeal to our public-spirited 
citizens to consider, as an object of philanthropy surpassed 



SCHOOL REPORT. 75 

in importance by no other, the furnishing to our children 
now and for all time to come of adequate facilities for phy- 
sical instruction and development and wholesome recrea- 
tion. The name of the donor of such facilities would go 
down through all future generations as that of one of Con- 
cord's wisest and most far-seeing benefactors. 

We are also greatly in need of funds for equipping a 
dental clinic, in which a very large number of children in 
our schools desperately in need of dental treatment can 
obtain it free, or at trifling cost. The expense would be 
from five or six hundred to one thousand dollars, according 
to the completeness of the equipment provided. 

We understand that the dentists of the city are prepared 
generously to give their services, as our physicians do in 
our hospitals. 

We commend this to our citizens as a most useful and 
greatly needed benefaction. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD C. NILES, ' 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
GEORGE H. MOSES, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 

Board of Education. 



REPORT OF FINANCIAL AGENT OF 
UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



March 24, 1915, to March 23, 1916. 
Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 



RECEIVED. 




Balance on hand March 23, 1915, 


$3,224.64 


Received from city, appropriated by law. 


39,178.82 


appropriated by Union School 


District, 


65,692.16 


literary fund, 


1,916.79 


dog tax. 


1,166.60 


Abial Walker fund, 


34.43 


miscellaneous cash sales. 


345.09 


cash sales for text-books. 


171.78 


cash sales for manual training, 


73.02 


cash sales for supplies. 


48.62 


insurance rebate. 


9.99 


tuition. 


4,480.10 




$116,342.04 


EXPENDED. 




Fuel, 


$7,650.37 


Miscellaneous, 


1,556.96 


Supplies, 


2,201.64 


Repairs, 


3,558.74 


Trucking, 


143.45 


Transportation, 


1,129.96 


Care of houses (maintenance), 


346.18 


Care of houses (salaries). 


6,969.02 


Insurance, 


683.30 


Manual training (maintenance), 


2,087.72 



SCHOOL REPORT. 


■ 77 


Manual training (salaries), 


$9,018.77 


Military drill (salaries), 


100.00 


Salaries, 


75,537.88 


Text-books, 


4,208.26 


Night school (maintenance). 


21.80 


Night school (salaries). 


312.00 


Balance, 


815.99 




$116,342.04 



Concord, N. H., March 24, 1916. 

We hereby certify that Ave have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the financial agent, including the "Walker school 
account, and find the expenditures correctly cast and a 
proper voucher for each item. 

A. S. MARSHALL, 
HENRY H. METCALF, 

Auditors. 



COST PER CAPITA. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses 
Cost per pupil, including all current expenses 

based on average membership 
Cost per pupil for tuition.. including music, draw 

ing, superintendent, etc. .... 
Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music 

drawing and superintendent . 
Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music 

drawing, superintendent, in all schools below 

the high school ..... 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music 

drawing, superintendent, in the high school 



$39.36 
43.15 
25.17 
23.33 

18.45 
33.98 



78 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools $1.43 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in high 

school . 1.72 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools below high school .... .31 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material , , .74 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material and 

tuition 24.70 

Cost per pupil for paper .31 

Cost per pupil for pens ..... .006 

Cost per pupil for pencils ..... .02 

Cost per pupil for manual training, entire . 8.33 

Cost per pupil for manual training, salaries . 6.77 

Cost per pupil for manual training, material . 1.56 

Cost per pupil for wood and iron-working, inclu- 
sive of instruction . . . . . .14.82 

Cost per pupil for wood and iron-working, exclu- 
sive of instruction . . . . . . 3.31 

Cost per pupil for cooking, inclusive of instruc- 
tion 2.90 

Cost per pupil for cooking, exclusive of instruc- 
tion 83 

Cost per pupil for sewing, inclusiA^e of instruc- 
tion 3.72 

Cost per pupil for sewing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion .04 

Cost per pupil for drawing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion ......... .65 

Cost per pupil for drawing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion ......... .05 

Cost per pupil for music, inclusive of instruction .61 

Cost per pupil for music, exclusive of instruction .13 

Cost per pupil for military drill, inclusive of in- 
struction ........ .25 

Cost per pupil for military drill, exclusive of in- 
struction 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



79 



TUITION RECEIPTS. 



High School 














$3,970.20 


Walker School 














25.58 


Eastman School 














53.26 


Rum ford School 














124.09 


Kimball School 














96.52 


Penaeook School 














12.00 


Dewey School 














70.45 


Dewey Training School 










80.00 


Harriet P. Dame School 










42.00 


Cogswell School 














6.00 



$4,480.10 



WALKER SCHOOL ACCOUNT. 



Receipts. 



Sale of Bonds, 

Interest on daily balances (Meclianieks National 

Bank), 
Sale of Merrimack school lot, 
Sale of Tahanto school lot, 
Union School District, to balance, 



$72,289.08 

185.65 
3,000.00 
1,250.00 

100.17 





$76,824.90 


Expenditures, 




Building construction, 


$72,041.70 


Grading, 


2,200.00 


Furniture, 


1,908.49 


Bonds, 


77.50 


Interest and commission. 


544.49 


Miscellaneous, 


52.72 



$76,824.90 



FURNITURE. 

George Abbott, Jr., finishing desks, chairs, tables, $343.37 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, finishing desk, 1.25 

Concord Light & Power Co., cooking school, 123.85 

J. C. Derby, clocks, 20.00 
Hutcliinson Building Co., tables, sewing, outfit for 

cooking, etc., 157.80 

Langslow-Fowler Co., desks, 666.56 
George L. Lincoln Furniture Co., desks, chairs, 

curtains, '^ 573.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 81 

Milton Bradley Co., kindergarten chairs, $16.66 

Charles Smith, finishing piano, 6.00 



$1,908.49 



BONDS. 



Boston Bank Note Co., engraving, $63.50 

W. F. Thayer, circular bids, express, and stamp- 
ing bonds, 14.00 



$77.50 



INTEREST. 



Mechanicks National Bank, interest on notes, $506.09 

Merrimack County Savings Bank, interest on 

notes, 38.40 



$544.49 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



S. S. Kimball, trucking, $6.02 

Mechanicks National Bank, revenue stamps, .70 

B. F. Robinson, trucking, 46.00 



$52.72 



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 



Architect : 

Huse T. Blanchard, commission, $3,326.86 
Huse T. Blanchard, expenses, 763.74 

$4,090.60 

B. Bilsborough & Sons, painting, 53.54 

Clifton W. Drake, windows, 4.05 

Hutchinson Building Co., contract, 58,161.94 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Menconi Brothers, composition keystones for 

hall, $25.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., push bars, 18.62 

Heating and ventilating, Stone-Underhill Heat- 
ing and Ventilating Co., contract, 5,320.00 

Plumbing, Orr & Rolfe, contract, 2,636.27 

Wiring, fixtures: 

American Express Co., 2.75 

Concord Electric Co., 47.50 

Irving Iron Works Co., 200.00 

H. W. Johns-Manville Co., 285.30 

Mitchell Vance Co., 271.81 

Orr & Rolfe, contract, 919.71 

The Yale-Towne Manufacturing Co., 4.61 



$72,041.70 



GRADING. 

Hutchinson Building Co., granolithic walks, con- 
tract, $800.00 
George L. Theobald, grading lot, contract, 1,400.00 

$2,200.00 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Memhers of the Board of Education of Union School 
Distnct: 

It is with pleasure that I submit for your careful consid- 
eration my thirty-first annual report, being the fifty-sixth 
of its series. The object of this report primarily is to 
place before you sufficient data bearing upon the general 
condition of the schools to enable you to make intelligent 
comparisons with similar issues of former years. It also 
essays to give you as briefly as possible written statements 
which cover the work of the past year, and such sugges- 
tions as may be of service in making further improvement. 
As usual, I take the liberty to mention one or two things 
which are absorbing the minds of educating forces. 

Eeorganization Schemes. 

Concord was one of the first cities in the country to adopt 
the junior high school idea, probably the first to put in 
operation the eleven-year scheme of grading. For the past 
five years the junior high school has grown to large pro- 
portions throughout the country, and the 6 — 2 — 3 plan is 
being discussed in the highest educational bodies, some 
cities having already put it in successful working order. 

The Democracy of Education. 

It is gratifying to know that the ancient exclusiveness 
of the higher education and the severe dominance of the 
College Entrance Board in New England are giving way 
to saner methods for public educational service. The Uni- 
versity of Maine and the New Hampshire State College, 
both presided over by Western men, have opened their 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

doors to all graduates of accredited high schools. The 
movement is bound to be far-reaching and of great value 
in many ways. It permits all graduates to matriculate in 
college, some of whom might never have had the chance 
under the rigid scheme heretofore in use. It will also 
tend to make high schools use more discrimination in grant- 
ing diplomas to students, and to reform the requirements 
by making them correspond more specifically to the needs! 
of the large majority of students w^ho can never enter 
higher educational institutions. Present requirements 
are often beyond their capacity, and most certainly be- 
yond their needs. This complex situation, disastrous to 
all, can be remedied by making the public school courses 
six years elementary, four years secondary, and two years 
collegiate, so that continuity of method and care of the in- 
dividual pupil may permit the many to gain two years more 
of extended study. It may also be partially obviated by 
all the colleges opening their doors as has been done by 
those previously mentioned. 

Vocational Schools. 

The vocational idea is now under fire and evidently Avill 
be for some time to come. It will finally succeed, but only 
when it is more rationally connected with the general 
scheme of public education, when it has become absolutely 
free from the domination of corporate interests, and when 
the age of entering is fixed in accord with the best psyco- 
logical ideas. 

Preparedness. 

The perturbed state of the public mind revealed in all 
other human activities is reflected in the educational world 
by the various ideas regarding the attitude of the public 
schools toward military preparedness. Even the most vio- 
lent advocate of militarism must be aware of the fact that 
these schools have always held strong for preparedness in 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

its most comprehensive sense. Fitting pupils for success- 
ful lives is the one great aim of all our public educational 
institutions. The complete realization of such a function 
would in itself insure an intelligent soldiery, and this with 
an elementary knowledge of military tactics is all that 
should be asked of them as educational institutions. The 
successful prosecution of any war depends not only upon 
the number of men engaged, their knowledge of military 
tactics, courage and patriotism, upon armament and fortifi- 
cation, but as much upon their general intelligence as mani- 
fested in professional, commercial, and industrial life. Pre- 
paredness for war will be determined by conditions in times 
of peace and the question for the public school to answer 
is, "Are we furnishing our young people the kind of an 
education that makes for supremacy in all the prominent 
activities of life?" The American pupil gives abundant 
evidence of lacking power of application and a want of 
proper discipline. The American people have hardly 
dreamed of the possibilities of our national resources. The 
German makes every square foot of soil give strict account 
of itself, while the American each year leaves thousands of 
acres of productive soil uncultivated. All such things 
show weak national discipline. With these conditions 
existing, we can never be thoroughly prepared for 
national defense. To obviate the difficulty the public 
schools must bend their energies more toward educating 
the uneducated millions and less toward educational aris- 
tocracy. Shall our schools teach military tactics? By all 
means, in a limited way, if it can be done in strict con- 
formity with the best military discipline, and without cheap 
sentimentality, but the public school will concern itself par- 
ticularly with making the ways of preventing disease more 
perfect and more generally known, with making more com- 
plete the means of preventing the loss of life through acci- 
dents, with putting waste land to its productive limit, with 
reclaiming abandoned farms, with removing the curse of 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

intemperance from our common citizenship and with train- 
ing young people directly for clean living, thus giving to 
the country more skilled mechanics, engineers, and farmers, 
and also more efficient housewives. Make the number of 
illiterates so small that it may be regarded as a curiosity 
instead of a national menace, and by wise legislation re- 
move the causes of degeneracy. This is the preparation 
which should concern the public schools most, so that future 
generations may know practicability, and be alive to the 
possibilities of national growth through an improved na- 
tional discipline and the scientific development of natural 
resources, then if war should ever come upon us, through 
our schools it will find the country economically, phj' siolog- 
ically and industrially, prepared to carry it to a success- 
ful termination. 

Attendance. 
Comparative TaMe. 

ALL SCHOOLS. 

1914. 1915. Increase. Decrease. 

Number of pupils in the public schools. . . . 2.958 2,935 23 

" " " " " parochial schools. 677 631 46 

" " " " " private schools. . . 56 85 29 

" " " " " night schools 105 75 30 

Totals 3,796 3,726 29 99 

Net decrease for the jear 1914-1915 70 

PUBLIC DAY SCHOOLS. 

Number of piipils in the high schools 896 922 26 

" " " " elementary schools 1,824 1,783 41 

" " " " " kindergartens . . . 238 230 8 



Totals 2,958 


2,935 


26 


49 








23 


NIGHT SCHOOL. 








mber of pupils enrolled (male) 89 


67 




22 


" " " " (female) 16 


8 




8 


Totals 105 


75 




30 


Net decrease 


30 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

From the above tabulation we find that in the public 
day, the parochial, and the night schools there has been 
a decided decrease in enrollment, and that the only in- 
crease has been shown in private schools. With the ex- 
ception of the night school, this tabulation contrasts the 
results of the year ending June, 1914, and June, 1915, 
but does not take in any part of the current school year. 
At the beginning of the fall term a substantial increase 
was evident. The very lowest grades were filled to incon- 
venience. In all other grades the attendance was well 
sustained. In the various high schools there has been a 
steady gain and during the last semester all were crowded. 
Many of the divisions in the Parker school were too large 
to teach to the best advantage. The enrollment for the 
last half of this year has been as follows : 



Decrease. 





First 


Second 






Semester. 


Semester. 


Increase. 


High school. 


461 


487 


26 


Parker school, 


216 


237 


21 


Chandler school. 


150 


174 


24 


Walker school. 


61 


40 




Garrison school. 


14 


25 


11 


Eastman school. 


9 


11 


2 




911 


974 


84 


Net increase, 




63 





21 



21 



This is not only the largest enrollment of the entire 
five-year course in the history of the schools, but the larg- 
est, also, of the four-year high school, which registers, as 
may be seen, seven hundred and twenty-four pupils, and 
I fail to find any good reason why this should not be 
maintained and perhaps gradually increased as the years 
go on. If this gain is steady, it will not be long before 
the question of more room for high school purposes again 
presents itself. 



88 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The attendance in the kindergartens has held its own 
even against drawbacks which they are called upon to 
face. The Walker kindergarten is the largest in the dis- 
trict, having reached an enrollment of fifty-six. 

Teachers. 

The teachers of the schools determine the success or 
failure of the system. If they are honest, capable, con- 
scientious, and energetic, then the schools will stand in 
the front rank. If they are just the opposite the pendu- 
lum of success will swing the other way. I can say with 
a great deal of emphasis and satisfaction that they meas- 
ure well up to the highest standard, and this statement is 
borne out by the uniform excellence of the work. 

High School. 

The senior high school has done much this year that 
merits praise. The atmosphere has assumed a more seri- 
ous aspect than displayed in previous years and detail has 
been attended to wdtli care. At last the school library 
has been placed in charge of a specialist in that line. Miss 
Fowler has brought to her duties a knowledge of the re- 
quirements and a willingness to work for the interests of 
the school. A better standard of work may be looked for 
in French, stenography, and typewriting, and a liking for 
English is not so much in evidence as in the junior high 
schools. However, conspicuous improvement is noticed in 
both English prize contests. The scholarship marks well 
up to the standard. The matter of a room devoted ex- 
clusively to study is the school's greatest need. The 
order of prominence in school work is now given to 
the amount and character of study, and not to the recita- 
tion as formerly. Supervised study is badly needed here 
and can be realized by utilizing the study hall for this 
purpose. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 89 

I cannot find that the standard of work in the junior 
high schools has dropped in any way. We continue to 
have here pupils whose first thought is for school work 
and not for a good time. It is not necessary to maintain 
order by introducing any extraordinary expedient. The 
pupil mind is centered on his duties and not on the frivol- 
ities of the outside world. The scholars are taught in each 
study according to an approved method and by teachers 
who never allow the end of the session to relax their ef- 
forts in behalf of fine work, the general excellence of 
which as compared with others is invariably mentioned by 
educators from without the city. 

The Elementary Schools. 

Not for many years has the work of these schools pro- 
gressed so quietly and effectively as during the one just 
finished. The course of study has become more nearly 
adjusted to the grading, and the teachers more familiar 
with its requirements which have been carefully defined 
and based upon pedagogical principles as far as condi- 
tions will permit. Spelling lists have been provided for 
all the grades, C to L inclusive, and the work conducted 
along specific lines. Geography and history are now made 
to represent more than a collection of facts. The methods 
employed are based upon the correct principles of teaching 
and are broad in their application. Apart from the great 
fund of general information which is incidentally given, 
abundant drill is afforded in location, in the discipline of 
the recitation, and in general illustrative work. All the 
different buildings need illustrative apparatus, and each 
ought to have a reflectoscope. 

I commend to you the reading in the various schools as 
somewhat above the ordinary, being recognized as such 
not only within but also without the city. 

The efforts of the teaching corps and the pupils in gen- 



90 CITY OF CONCORD. 

eral are worthy of the highest praise for their untiring ef- 
forts to make the schools a credit to .all concerned. 

Victrolas or grafonolas may be found in many build- 
ings, and they play an important part in the general edu- 
cation of the youth. 

The requirements in history and ethics are calculated 
to inculcate patriotic principles through regular exercises 
suited to the various grades. 

The results in i^enmanship are not at all what they 
should be. A more or less perfected movement is appar- 
ent, but as exemplified in legible writing of the daily work 
the sj^stem fails to produce professed results. 

The Kindergartens. 

The kindergartens of this district play an important 
part in the success of the public school system. Even 
aftfer a trial of twenty-five years we occasionally hear of 
some one who is ignorant of their purposes and accomplish- 
ments as well as their true relation to grade work. Fre- 
quently there appear methods of attack malicious and 
unjust, but yvith all these adverse influences the good 
sense of the people seems to prevail and "we can point 
with satisfaction to a gradual increase in attendance and 
a growing knowledge of their great merit. This work 
should be extended and perfected for the following rea- 
sons which actual experience has proved to be true : 

1. It is given at an age when children need much indi- 
vidual attention. 

2. Having had this training they are mentally advanced 
at the end of the third year over those who have not 
had it. 

3. As a general rule they are better children. 

4. Their training not only benefits them, but educates 
their parents as well. 

5. It cultivates a liking for school. 



SCHOOL REPORT. ' 91 

6. It strongly tends to eliminate viciousness and tru- 
ancy. 

7. It develops child nature and accomplishes its object 
along" lines of truth, love, good manners, politeness and 
sense of duty, but not at all through fear, one of the 
worst elements to be found in childhood as in later years 
it is often manifested in various forms of misdemeanor. 

Night School. 

The annual session of the night school began November 
8, 1915, and ended January 13, 1916. It was under the 
direction of Mr. Thomas J. McGauley, principal, Mrs. 
Grace L. Putnam and Mrs. Delia I. Lewis, assistants. 
There Avere three rooms, the highest being given over 
ostensibly to advanced studies, and the other two to those 
who were learning the rudiments of our language. The 
school was more widely advertised than ever before, but 
the aggregate attendance was the lowest for many years. 
Much interest was shown and it was unfortunate for those 
who were learning to speak and read English that the 
school could not have been continued longer. The term 
was brought to a close because the appropriation became 
exhausted earlier than usual. I recommend that the 
amount devoted to this work be increased another year. 

Speclvl Activities. 

I respectfully call to your notice the several reports of 
the various departments, and hope they will receive care- 
ful reading. ]\Ianual training in the Morrill school ex- 
pands each succeeding year in the matter of useful 
employment. Projects are being worked out in all the 
departments. The spirit of progress is revealed in the 
efforts of the instructors. The school is finely equipped. 
The last acquisition, a milling machine, proves its worth 
at all times both as an educational factor and as a means 
of economy. 



92 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The sewing department is gradually recognizing the 
value of g-aining technique in the making of useful arti- 
cles and now gives a minimum of attention to models. 
The results shown by the domestic arts classes are in keep- 
ing with the intent of the course, and exhibit a variety 
and an excellence in work that appeals to all who look 
it over. 

The cooking has been most faithfully and effectively 
carried out. The noticeable trend toward the intensely 
practical is in accord with the most advanced ideas re- 
garding this work. The canning and preserving done by 
the pupils in the fall was most effective, but this and 
similar work remain to be more fully worked out and 
expanded. 

Mr. Conant's work in music as revealed by practical re- 
sults is excelled nowhere. It is brought about by common 
sense methods and the pupils not only sing, and sing well, 
but they know why they do it and how to do it intelli- 
gently. 

The course in drawing is being most successfully prose- 
cuted. The lower school work gains Avith each succeed- 
ing year. The course in domestic science relating to this 
department, of great import to the requirements of the 
work in sewing and architecture, is being carefully devel- 
oped and the students show much interest and progress. 

The Dewey training school, one of the best of its kind, 
continues to send out teachers who take high rank in 
their profession. I have yet to hear of a failure among 
those who have gone to work elsewhere. We have been 
able to continue the services of the seniors as helpers in 
the different buildings. The present junior class is the 
largest in the history of the school. 

Military drill was made optional this year and the re- 
ports seem to confirm the wisdom of the change. 



school report, 93 

Domestic Science. 

The first class to complete the Domestic Science course 
graduates next June. This course having been on trial 
for four years, shows its desirability because of the 
variety and character of the work laid out, the results 
attained and the number of girls taking it. The enroll- 
ment is as follows : 

Class V— 11; Class U— 12 ; Class T— 10; Class S— 7 ; 
Class R— 17; Class Q— 10; Class 0—17; Class P— 23. 
Total— 107. 

The graduating class v>dll have finished the following 
course next June : 

Music (5 years) — Theory of Music, Melody Writing, 
Harmony, Music for the Home, History of ]Music, Music 
Systems, Folk Songs, The Opera, The Oratorio. 

Drawing (5 years) — Construction, Pose Drawing, The- 
ory of Color, Landscape Drawing, Design, Patterns, Em- 
broidery, Millinery, Dress, Nature Work, Color Harmonies, 
Lettering, Mechanical Drawing, Color and Composition, 
The House, Architecture, Doors, Windows, Furniture, Car- 
pets, Rugs, Accessories. 

Sewing (3 years) — Basting, Back-stitching, Overcasting, 
Hemming, Overhauding, Button-holes, Hemstitching, Darn- 
ing, Skirt Patterns, Machines, Textile Study, Materials, 
Drafting, Cutting, Fitting, Hygiene, Design, Millinery, 
Proportion, Gowns, Linen Fabrics, Artistic Marking, Em- 
broidery. 

Cooking (2 years) — Appliances, Processes, Exercises, 
Boiling, Frying, Baking, Stewing, Measuring, Proportion, 
Invalid Cookery. 

The Household (3 years) — Mechanical Appliances: 
Heating, Plumbing, Electricity, Gas, Oil, Power in the 
Household, Labor-saving Machinery. Household Sanita- 
tion: Bacteriology, Ventilation, Water-supply, Milk Sup- 
pl}^. Food Supply, Drugs, Medicines, Refuse, Hygiene, 



94 CITY OF CONCORD. 

House, Furniture. Physiology and Hygiene: The Skeleton, 
Histology, Muscles and Motion, Digestion, Circulation, Res- 
piration, Excretion, Special Senses, Nervous System, Bac- 
teria, Disinfection. Home Nursing: Cleanliness, Emer- 
gencies, Minor Injuries, Bed-making, Temperature, Pulse, 
Respiration, Bath, Enemata, External Applications, Nurs- 
ing Children, The Aged, Invalid Cookery. HoMsehold Ac- 
counts: Books, Income, Expenditure, Balancing, Checking, 
Blank Forms, Marketing, Clothing, Furniture, Fuel, Mis- 
cellaneous. 

English (5 years). French (3 years). United States 
History (2 years). Arithmetic (1 year). 

This class has done remarkably good work. I am quite 
positive that they are sufficiently cultured, eminently prac- 
tical, and as well-prepared to take up the active duties of 
life as any other equal number of girls who have- grad- 
uated from these schools. It is now proposed to give an 
exhibition of the results and practical working of this 
course some time in the spring in a display of work and 
by class exercises, hoping that the public thereby may be- 
come more fully aware of its importance. 

Events of the Year, 
high schools. 

The election of a librarian for the schools. 

The retention of the entire corps of teachers for one year 
according to contract. 

School lunches served on a more rational and satisfactory 
basis. 

Concord High school football team champions of T. I. L. 

Pageant repeated at "White Park by the pupils of the 
Parker school in connection with the one hundred fiftieth 
anniversary of the chartering of Concord. 

English divisions A and B of the Parker school gave a 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

commercial travelers' banquet in connection with their 
work, October 20, 1915. 

Direct method of teaching Latin successfully tried by 
Miss Elizabeth J. Donovan at the Chandler school. 

Pupils conduct recitations at the Chandler school. Miss 
Flavin teacher, incidentally for the purpose of becoming 
courteous to each other. 

Written tests reduced to twice each semester. 

A new and more rational course in French for the Do- 
mestic Science classes. 

Military drill made optional. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

New spelling lists for classes C and G. 

New victrolas in Harriet P. Dame, Kimball, and Walker 
schools. 

New balopticon for the Walker school. 

Change in school hours. 

Hours at the Harriet P. Dame school changed for the 
afternoon to from one to three o'clock, to suit the con- 
venience of the pupils transported for long distances. 

IN GENERAL. 

Lecture on Bird Architecture to classes K to Y, inclusive, 
by Rev. Mr. Townsend of Nashua, N. H., under the aus- 
pices of the Civic Union of Concord, High school hall, Jan- 
uary 24, 1916. 

Entertainment at the Walker school. Proceeds devoted 
to the purchase of a balopticon. 

Dr. Charles R. Walker presented a portrait of Hon. Jo- 
seph B. Walker to the Walker school. 

Anniversary parade of the school children of the city, 
June 8, 1915. 

Summer school in manual training conducted by ]\Ir. 
French at the Morrill school. 

Schools closed on September 16, 17, 1915, on account of 
the excessive heat. 



96 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Much activity by the Committee on Hygiene regarding 
the sanitation of buildings and the care of defectives. 

The employment of a man for general repairs. 

The sale of the Merrimack and Tahanto schools. 

A boulder placed in the Walker school yard by the Rum- 
ford Chapter of D. A. R, 

Each building furnished fire extinguishers. 

Recommendations, 
elementary schools. 

That the age of entering these schools be fixed at six 
years. 

That each large building be furnished a reflectoscope. 

HIGH SCHOOLS. 

That school lunches be placed in charge of a competent 
woman. 

That the assembly hall be furnished with a sufficient 
number of movable desks and used when necessary for 
study periods. 

IN GENERAL. 

That the machine shop of the jMorrill school have better 
facilities for heating. 

That a supply of apparatus for physical exercise be fur- 
nished each school yard. 

That a medicine cupboard be furnished each building. 

That Flag Day be observed by the pupils of the schools 
annually in a school parade and field sports in the fore- 
noon, and by folk-dancing in the afternoon. 

SOCIETY AND SCHOOL. 

Ripe scholarship is supposed to reflect itself in an ad- 
vanced state of world society. It is not to be held suffi- 
cient unto itself. It must yield to its maker a sufficient 



SCHOOL REPORT, 97 

return for its cost, and this can be manifest only in an 
improved public mind and in holier living. Our public 
schools and the higher institutions of learning have a work 
to perform that precedes, and is vitally essential to, the 
realization of true scholarship. Whatever may be insti- 
tuted, whatever attempted, whatever accomplished, if it is 
to be done well enough to raise the plane of living to the 
right standard, will depend upon the attitude of mind in 
the student. He must have the right educational perspec- 
tive in order to get the greatest amount of service out of 
that part of his life devoted to school. We say that our 
educational processes must be governed by this attitude on 
the part of the student in order that society may reap the 
reward which is its due. Do we ever stop to consider what 
the reciprocal relation of society to the school is? Very 
seldom, I think. If society continually lowers its standard 
by debauches in so-called high circles, then the attitude of 
its children toivard gaining an education must necessarily 
become lowered. The decadence of the drama, the dwind- 
ling numbers of literary clubs and kindred organizations, 
the sensuousness of the modern dance, the craze for moving 
pictures, all offer, to the public schools, pupils whose state 
of mind is unfit for attempting school duties. It is this 
worldliness and other forms of decay that constantly attach 
themselves to mankind which cause a corresponding drop 
in the ideals, aspirations, and wholesome accomplishments 
of society, because it constantly feeds to itself false stand- 
ards through the general intemperance of not only men, 
but of women also. I believe it to be generally conceded 
that the social conditions prevailing in the highest grades 
of public schools are not calculated to be most strengthen- 
ing to the student mind, and this may be safely attributed 
to a low social standard, to the gradual loss of those early 
customs that made the home strong, and to an undue 
amount of cheap social entertainment. Teachers are quick 
to seize these as a convenient shelter behind which to hide, 



98 CITY or CONCORD. 

when they should view them as strong incentives for firmer 
discipline, keener study and a determination to maintain 
the one function of the public school — the purification and 
the uplift of society. Generally pupils who enter the sec- 
ondary schools to-day do so not with the clear perspective, 
the scholarly ambition, the zeal for knowing the value of 
an education, but rather, even with very few exceptions, 
they are obsessed with the idea of having a good time first, 
last, and always. This may be attributed to many things, 
but, whatever may be the cause, our duty as educators, as 
public Servants, and as moulders of future society, is plain. 
To look for a remedy. If such remedy is not to be found 
without, then must it be sought within the schools. This 
being so, we have the right to ask that every function 
which the school represents should have this purifying, up- 
lifting influence plainly marked. We are not supposed to 
cater to the tastes of the student body unless we have 
determined first whether such tastes' are free entirely from 
those elements which would not be tolerated in any home. 
Nothing should be allowed in any school unless it has a 
distinct educational flavor from all points of view. When 
the teaching force, the student body, the administration 
will abide nothing that threatens the stability of society, 
then will the public school fulfill its obligations to the state 
in the highest measure. 

As the years go by we feel more than ever before the 
dependence one upon another. The strength of our com- 
mon work looks to hearty cooperation. The past year has 
revealed to me the power of united effort, and I am sincere 
in expressing recognition of all the help I have received 
from the Board of Education, the corps of teachers and 
the public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE MASTER OF THE 
HIGH SCHOOL. 



Supt. L. J. Rundlett, Concord, N. H.: 

Dear Sir : I am sending at your request a brief report of 
the work in the senior high school for the year February, 
1915— February, 1916. 

Attendance. 

The total number of students registered during the first 
semester was 469. The enrollment of the second semester 
is at present 488. Of this number, twenty-one are post- 
graduates who come in only for recitation. With but 479 
desks in the building, it was impossible to arrange for them 
otherwise. These figures show that we are already testing 
the capacity of the building. They also show a remark- 
able increase in enrollment for the High school when com- 
pared with the first semester of 1906- '07. The total enroll- 
ment then was 357. The enrollment of the High and Par- 
ker schools, which contain the corresponding classes, for the 
past semester has been 693. In a decade, then, the school 
has nearly doubled in size. 

Graduation. 

On June 18, 1915, a class of eighty received their diplo- 
mas. In January, 1915, the graduates numbered seven, 
making a total of eighty-seven for the year. The mid-year 
class of the present year numbered twenty-seven, fifteen of 
whom are doing post-graduate work. 

Half-Year Promotions. 

This class also is the first class to graduate which entered 
on the half-year promotions. It marks the completion of 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

extending that system through the High school. To do 
this has meant more work on the part of the teachers, but 
the results to the school have, I am convinced, been bene- 
ficial. 

Athletics. 

The outcome of the football season was gratifying not 
only in the success of the team but particularly because of 
the sportsmanlike spirit displayed by the boys, and also 
because of the financial success of the season. The results 
were full of promise for the benefits which will be gained 
from athletics when we can have a suitable athletic field 
and are able to place the whole matter in the charge of a 
competent director. 

Teachers' Meetings. 

We have had nine teachers' meetings so far this year. 
Four of them were devoted entirely to details of school 
work. In the other five the first part of each period was 
given to school work and the rest to discussion of some 
definite topic of general interest. 

School Work. 

There has been no important change in the course of 
study or general program of the school. The regular work 
in classroom and study hour has been well up to the stand- 
ard of preceding years. The records, so far as received, 
from students who have entered college report results 
which show satisfactory preparation. In the commercial 
department there is need of a filing cabinet to teach various 
methods of filing. At present we have practically nothing 
for this purpose. Efficiency on the part of a clerk depends 
about as much on knowledge of filing as on stenography or 
bookkeeping. 

After each report this year an honor list of those whose 
average rank was A — , or better, has been posted on the bul- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

letin board. T]xe first report showed 33 on the list ; the 
second, 39 ; the third, 45 ; the fourth, 44 ; the entire semes- 
ter, 31. This has been to some extent at least an incentive 
to the students. 

The appointment of a librarian is a decided advantage. 
The books are now being classified and arranged so they 
will be more available for use. With one person in charge 
who knows the resources of the library and who can also 
direct students in reference work, more definite and com- 
petent assistance can be given than has been possible here- 
tofore. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. COOK. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
SEWING. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of the Schools of Union 
School District, Concord, N. H.: 

Dear Sir : The following is a report of the work accom- 
plished in the sewing department of the Union School Dis- 
trict for the year ending March, 1916 : 

As evidence of the interest shown in sewing, sixteen girls 
from the High and Parker schools have elected it. This 
work is done outside of school hours in addition to their 
regular duties, and it certainly gives us proof of interest. 

Another pleasing feature is the desire of the girls to do 
their sewing for help of the unfortunate, rather than for 
themselves. For the development of character, as well as 
for skill in sewing, I think we ought to encourage this 
"charity" sewing. It is a practical lesson in helpfulness. 

The equipment at the Walker school sewing room was 
completed by the making of a large cutting table by the 
pupils of the Morrill training school. 

"Work completed last June included 14 finished dresses, 
28 unfinished dresses, 18 finished skirts, 40 finished waists, 
12 kimonos, 74 pieces of finished undergarments, 95 pieces 
of unfinished undergarments, 34 pillow slips, 80 aprons. 

The work for others included 6 pillow slips, 100 towels, 
7 covers for type cases, 2 covers for presses, 14 banners 
cut and made for Concord's tercentennial, 4 shades, 1 
screen, 3 children's dresses, 10 petticoats. 

An interested friend of the school paid for the making 
of the six pillow slips. "With this money the flannel for three 
petticoats Avas procured. Another friend furnished ma- 
terial for the others. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE C. HOWE. 



REPORT OF COOKING TEACHER. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: The classes in cooking all had valuable prac- 
tice in canning and preserving various fruits during the 
first part of the fall term. This work was aided by mem- 
bers of the school committee and others interested, so that 
the problems could be worked on an extended scale. One 
jar of each fruit so preserved, canned, or jellied, is retained 
by the school for exhibition purposes. 

The aim of this department is to make the pupils become 
familiar with the vai-ious dishes that go to make up a 
breakfast or luncheon ; then, as a practical review, they 
serve the meal. 

One of the upper classes served a single banquet to the 
members of a class in literature in the Parker school and 
profited much in setting and serving by this experience. 

In the second semester the classes increased so that the 
total enrollment is one hundred and ninety girls. Several 
of the classes are too large, but the unbounded enthusiasm 
and the group work obviates the difficulty to a certain 
extent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTH A. FAUNCE, 

Teacher of Cooking. 
February 25, 1916. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF 
DRAWING. 



Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, Supenntendent of Union School Dis- 
trict, Concord, N. H.: 

My time is now given entirely to the Domestic Arts 
classes, the pupils of the High school who elect drawing, 
and to the training classes of the Dewey school. 

In the domestic arts course there are now six classes at 
the High school and two at the Parker, each class receiv- 
ing three fifty-minute periods of drawing a week. In the 
Chandler, "Walker, Garrison, and Eastman schools, it is 
impossible to give the girls of the M and N classes separate 
instruction, so they are taught work to be useful at a later 
time for either boys or girls. At the Chandler school two 
of the classes are taught by the supervisor and the others 
by Miss Nickerson. At the "Walker school classes M and N 
were under the instruction of the supervisor until Feb- 
ruary first, when Miss Jones took them. The supervisor 
visits classes M and N of the Garrison and Eastman schools 
on alternate weeks. The crowded condition of the Parker 
school makes it necessary to teach classes and P in the 
assembly hall, a place ill-fitted for the work in about every 
way. At the close of the last semester the drawing outline 
for the domestic arts course was revised by leaving out the 
History of Art, making a few minor changes. In place 
of this subject more free-hand drawing can be given in 
the course and a more thorough treatment to several of the 
design problems. Class U receives instruction in architec- 
tural drawing from Mr. Taylor. His pupils have produced 
an excellent set of drawings and seem to have an euthu- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 105 

siastic interest in the subject. Class V studies wood 
finishes and furniture construction, with Mr. French, one 
of its three weekly periods of drawing. 

The unusually large number of students in the Dewey 
training classes makes their class work more pleasant and 
interesting. They have a drawing lesson of two hours each 
week. Miss Jones assists in the instruction of these classes 
and also teaches the drawing in all classes, A to L inclusive, 
and assists for part of the time in the domestic arts and 
P classes at the Parker school. The work done under her 
charge continues to be of the highest quality. 

The supervisor visits the schools at the close of each 
semester to inspect the drawings. Last year the usual 
exhibition was omitted. "While these exhibitions entail a 
vast amount of work for those who prepare them, it would 
seem unwise to discontinue them entirely, as they are a 
means of instruction to both pupils and teachers who visit 
them by showing the standard of work desired. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FAITH C. STALKER, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent : 

Dear Sir: I submit for your approval my sixth annual 
report. In a report so brief it is impossible to indicate the 
details or the scope of the work of a school nurse. I deem 
it essential, however, to explain a little the method of pro- 
cedure in dealing with the various cases. 

All defects found in children are carefully recorded and 
as soon as possible reported to the parents, who are re- 
quested to consult their own physician in regard to secur- 
ing treatment. Frequently it happens that for one reason 
or another proper treatment cannot be obtained by them, 
and upon request of the parents this treatment is secured 
by the nurse. 

It goes without saying that it would be useless to employ 
a physician or a nurse to examine children for defects or 
disease unless some agency is found through which the 
correction of those defects may be secured. "While we 
have no free clinics or dispensaries in our city, it has 
always been possible to find the right person or place will- 
ing to help those needing attention. I feel that this has 
been a most successful year and only a very small per cent, 
of the cases reported remain untreated. 

By working in close cooperation with the board of health 
it has been possible to check the spread of contagion, and 
I am sure that what threatened to be a serious outbreak of 
diphtheria was prevented. 

Our greatest need at present is a dental clinic where 
children unable to pay for treatment may receive proper 
attention. "' 

I cannot speak too highly of the cooperation of the 
teachers and their splendid interest in their work. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



107 



My appreciation is also extended to the physicians and 
hospitals for their loyal support and assistance in giving 
the children of our schools adequate treatment. 

Home Calls, 



Enlarged tonsils and adenoids, including discharg- 




ing ears and deafness, 






95 


Orthopedic, including all deformities 


and 


spinal 




curvature, 






77 


Defective vision. 






55 


Tuberculosis, 






35 


Tuberculosis suspects. 






16 


Investigation contagious diseases, 






35 


Nervous condition. 






11 


Undiagnosed, 






28 


Pediculosis, 






20 


Hernia, 






2 


JEnemia, 






6 


Skin eruptions. 






5 


Skin infections, 






2 


Enlarged glands. 






2 


Goitre, 






3 


Malignant growths, 






4 


Unkempt conditions. 






5 


Mentally retarded. 






4 


Conjunctivitis, 






7 


Number of calls made at schools. 






170 


Interviews W'ith officials and others, 






102 


Number of children taken to physicians and hos- 




pitals for examination and treatment, 






134 


Number of treatments and dressings, 






20 



Respectfully submitted, 
ELIZABETH M. MURPHY, R. N. 



REPORT OF MILITARY DRILL 
INSTRUCTOR. 



Concord, N. H., February 28, 1916. 
3Ir. L. J. Rundlett, S uperinteiident : 

Sir : In submitting a report on military drill very litile 
may be written beyond an explanation of the change in 
system. 

Previously this subject has been conducted during the 
regular school hours. Every boy in the High school, un- 
less a conflict with some other subject existed, was obliged 
to drill for two periods each week. The wearing of uni- 
form was optional. The defects of this plan were as fol- 
lows: Many boys were forced to devote valuable time to a 
subject which was distasteful to them ; the time allotted, 
forty-five minutes, was so short as to enable the giving of 
no practical instruction, and owing to the addition of 
other subjects to the school curriculum a great many con- 
flicts resulted. 

The new system makes drill elective and uniforms com- 
pulsory. The subject is now taken on one afternoon in 
each week on the boys' own time. Instruction in rifle 
practice has been added to the regular course, thus en- 
abling us to take advantage of a recent act of congress 
authorizing the issue of rifles and ammunition to high 
schools having a corps of cadets. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to Prin- 
cipal C. F. Cook for his hearty cooperation and to the 
adjutant-general of the state for his interest and kindness 
which enables us to use the state armory for drill purposes 
and the local rifle range for target practice. 

GEORGE W. MORRILL, 

Instructor, Military Drill. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF 
MUSIC. 



February 24, 1916. 

Mr. L. J. Bundleit, Supenntendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: At present, owing to the increased demands 
upon my time made by the classes in the fifth course, I 
have been able to visit the elementary schools and also 
classes M and N in all buildings other than the Chandler 
only on alternate weeks. The regular teachers have, how- 
ever, taken up the added work ably and cheerfully and 
practically as much work has been done as has been cus- 
tomary hitherto. 

The encouraging features of the Avork are an enthusiasm 
on the part of the pupils and the evident desire and deter- 
mination of the teachers to improve upon past efforts. 
That this spirit is productive of good results is indicated 
by very excellent work throughout the High school section. 
In the Chandler school, and in similar grades in the 
"Walker, the singing during the jDast year has been un- 
usually good, and as a result of this the Parker school has 
at the present time the best singing that I have heard there 
since the present arrangement of grades went into effect, 
and at the beginning of this semester the High school had 
enrolled the largest chorus since singing was made an 
optional exercise. 

It is in the higher grades, where many voices are massed 
together, that we seem to reap the reward of our efforts, 
but I do not for a moment forget that it is in the elemen- 
tary grades where the hard work, which makes possible 
these rewards, must be faithfully done. I have experi- 
enced great pleasure, during the past year, in visiting 
rooms in the elementary grades .vhere care had been taken 



110 CITY OF CONCORD. 

not only to teach sight-singing, but also to cultivate a beau- 
tiful tone, and even to teach successfully that most difficult 
and elusive element of song, emotional expression. All such 
teachers, who strive to secure not only the letter but the true 
spirit of song, I remember gratefully Avhen I am enabled 
to secure better than average results in the higher grades. 

At the High school, as I have mentioned, the chorus is 
large and, when we consider the time given to practice, 
sings very well. Both a boys' and a girls' glee club meet 
for practice on Friday afternoons after school. 

"We need very much an additional chorus book for the 
work here. The one in use has been here for many years 
and it is difficult, especially in the senior class, to maintain 
a healthy interest without new and fresh material. This 
book is valuable and I do not think that it should be dis- 
carded, but one is not sufficient for the three years' work 
in the High school. I earnestly ask for a supplementary 
book, which shall contain wholly new material, to be used 
alternately with the one we now have. Such a book may 
be had for this especial purpose with each number orches- 
trated for high schools, and by its use we could unite the 
chorus and orchestra, which would be of great advantage 
to both. 

The orchestra of twenty-five members practices weekly 
for an hour and a half on Wednesdays after school. Good 
work is being done, and as the members are largely from 
classes N to S, it should increase in efficiency during the 
next two years. 

The annual High school concert was given on the eve- 
ning of April 12th, and thirty dollars was added to the 
on deposit to the credit of the High school chorus. 

The course in music for the domestic science and arts 
classes will receive its final test with the completion of the 
work of class V during the present semester. The course 
as originally planned has, so far, been successfully com- 
pleted and has been a source of satisfaction to the instructor 



SCHOOL REPORT. HI 

and, I think, of interest and value to the pupils. We 
need, in the High school library, a music encyclopedia for 
reference work in connection with this course. 

The work for the pupils of the teachers' training school 
at the Dewey has been more systematized and better re- 
sults are being obtained. The time which the instructor is 
now able to give (one-half hour to each class per week) is 
not enough. 

If we have creditable singing in the schools of Concord, 
and, through the work given in the fifth course, are devel- 
oping a better taste and an intelligent appreciation for the 
good things in music, credit must be given to the school 
officials who have recognized the value of music as an in- 
fluence in education, and to the corps of teachers who have 
always done their best to further the efforts of the special 
instructor. To each and all of these I extend my hearty 
thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES S. CONANT. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
MANUAL TRAINING. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

I am privileged to submit my annual report of the prog- 
ress of the work of the Morrill School of Mechanic Arts. 
The necessity of making it as brief as possible will allow 
me to mention only the most notable features of the work. 

The most important step made in the school during the 
past year has been the change in the method of instruction. 
In the past we have emphasized progressive tool instruc- 
tion, and with this in mind w^orked out an elaborate sys- 
tem of models and problems, most of which were useful 
articles of interest to the boys. The courses were planned 
to follow a definite line of instruction and were closely 
adhered to. A complete system of blue-prints was worked 
out in detail, covering almost everything that a boy might 
be allowed to make. ]\Iost of the work the boys did for 
themselves, as this idea had been followed for over twenty 
years, and the precedent thus formed was difficult to over- 
come. 

Our aim this year has been to stimulate the interest of 
the pupils in practical projects either for themselves or 
for the schools, and have them work out all the details of 
design and construction by sketches and drawings before 
making the projects, thus giving the pupils many practical 
problems to solve and an opportunity to do a large amount 
of constructive thinking. 

In the elementary schools Ave have used the blue-print 
system as a starting point. We have found it impossible 
to put all the pupils on project work, and in order to keep 
them busy we must have some system to fall back upon. 
I believe that for some time the combination of the two 



SCHOOL REPORT. 113 

systems will be necessary and that to throw out the blue- 
print course entirely would be a grave mistake, especially 
from the point of discipline. 

In the High school we have had little difficulty about 
interesting the pupils in projects for th^ schools. The at- 
tached list will illustrate the class of work we have been 
able to do with the grade pupils in manual training and 
with the High school pupils in the mechanic arts course. 
Almost everything in these lists has been sketched out 
free-hand and the details worked by the pupils, and not 
taken from stock patterns. 

New work added during the year has consisted of a 
course in architectural drawing for the girls in the domes- 
tic arts course, which has comprised the copying of a model 
house plan, drawing plans of their own homes and making 
up a set of original plans for a house. 

In the boys' work we have added a two-weeks course in 
foundry practice, given in the foundry of the Ford & Kim- 
ball Company. The boys in class Q, who previously had 
some elementary pattern-making, spent two weeks in the 
school foundry moulding from their own patterns, after 
which they were taken to the Ford & Kimball foundry for 
ten days to learn something of the practical side of mould- 
ing. They were divided up among the workmen, a boy to 
a man for a day, and the following day were changed, so 
that each boy had an opportunity of seeing all the different 
kinds of work. In many cases the boys were allowed to 
do some of the work. The value of this kind of practice 
cannot be over-estimated. It is not only educational but 
also has a civic value in bringing the pupils of the school 
in closer contact Avith the actual conditions of the manu- 
facturing world, and teaches them to have a wholesome 
respect for skilled labor wherever they find it. At the end 
of the foundry course the boys were required to present a 
written essay on the subject, which was corrected from a 
technical standpoint and also accepted as a regular essay 



114 CITY OF CONCORD. 

in the English department, thus correlating the work of the 
shop with that of the academic course. 

The addition of a milling machine to the machine shop 
has put the school in excellent condition and it will not be 
necessary to ask for a special appropriation for new equip- 
ment this year. 

For improvements on the building, I would suggest that 
a wash-room with twenty-four individual bowls connected 
with hot and cold water be installed in the basement. The 
boys working in the blacksmith and machine shops need a 
place in which to wash before returning to the High school, 
where they have to handle books. At present we h^ve only 
two ordinary sinks and a few common wash basins. 

In the drawing-room we need two semi-indirect domes 
for lighting the room on dark days. 

In the machine shop there is need of more steam pipes, 
as the radiating surface at present is not sufficient to bring 
the room up to a reasonable temperature when the rest of 
the building is very comfortable. 

The total expense of these improvements would not be 
over $400. 

Respectfully submittecl, 

ARTHUR W. FRENCH. 



MORRILL SCHOOL. 



PRINTING DONE AT THE MORRILL SCHOOL. 



February 12, 1915-February 15, 1916. 

1,000 Morrill School Stock Orders. 

1,000 Tuberculosis Rules. 

1,000 Health Alphabets. 

3,000 Book Reviews. 

1,250 Receipts. 

2,000 Tuition Receipts. 

2,000 Grammar School Daily Cards. 

1,000 Prize Speaking Tickets. 

500 Athletic Association Letterheads. 

500 High School Letterheads. 

500 Teachers' Applications. 

500 C. H. S. Concert Tickets. 

700 C. H. S. Play Tickets. 

500 Substitution Report. 

125 Kimball School Tickets. 

500 L. J. R. Slips. 

3,000 Memorial Day Envelopes. 

1,000 Athletic Association Order Blanks. 

700 Walker School Programs. 

700 Walker School Tickets. 

200 Teachers' Association Invitations. 

200 Teachers' Association Return Slips. 

150 Teachers' Association Menus. 

1,000 Letterheads, Miss Murphy. 

4,000 Character Slips, A— D. 



116 CITY OF CONCORD. 

500 Dance Orders. 

4,000 Recitation Slips. , 

500 Civic Union Cards. i 

150 Board of Education Postals. ; 

150 Teachers' Meeting Postals. • 

200 Salutes. .] 

1,000 Morrill School Announcements. ] 

200 High School Graduation Lists. ' 

3,000 Project Cards. • ! 

800 Time Cards. i 

2,000 Residence Slips. ] 

1,000 Excuse Slips. j 

2,000 Report Card Envelopes. ■ 

200 Stock Orders. 1 

2,000 Character Slips, A— D. ' 

300 Board of Education Postals. 
2,000 Delivery Slips. 

4,000 High School Attendance Slips. ; 
1,500 High School Letterheads. 

8,900 High School Luncheon Tickets. : 

3,000 High School Library Slips. I 

1,000 High School Athletic Association Order I 
Blanks. 

500 High School Library Attendance Slips. i 

500 High School Teachers' Meeting Slips. 
1,246 Concord Teachers' Association Tickets. 

1,750 Football Tickets. i 

5,000 Course Cards. ' 

500 Report of Corporal Punishment. ! 

500 ' ' Study Helps ' ' Circular. i 

500 Circular Letters to Parents. I 

300 Alumni Dance Orders. . 

400 Alumni Dance Tickets. j 

2,800 Civic Union Slips. j 

1,000 Morrill School Daily Cards. ! 



SCHOOL REPORT. 117 

2,000 High School Theorem Blanks. 
2,000 Character Slips, A— D. 
2,000 Morrill School Letterheads. 
1,000 Morrill School Charge Slips. 

200 High School Debate Tickets. 

500 Walker School Tickets. 
1,000 Receipt Slips, 

500 "Walker School Programs. 

500 Morrill School Christmas Cards. 
1,000 Receipt Slips. 

500 C. H. S. Program Cards. 

500 C. H. S. Commercial Department Letterheads. 
1,000 C. H. S. Commercial Department Billheads. 

700 C. H. S. '16 Levee Tickets. 
50 C. H. S. Banquet Tickets. 
50 C. H. S. Menus. 

500 C. H. S. Dance Orders. 

100 C. H. S. Graduating Lists. 
5,000 C. H. S. Book Cards. 
1,000 C. H. S. Book Records. 
1,000 Morrill School Tardy Cards. 

200 Truant Officer Cards. 
1,000 Machine Shop Time Cards. 
1,000 C. H. S. Library Cards. 

300 Morrill School Program Cards. 
4,000 Serbian Relief Slips. 
3,000 Parker School Lunch Tickets. 

100 Machine Shop Program Cards. 

800 Prize Speaking Tickets. 



118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



PROJECTS. 



Elementary Schools. 



SIXTH AND SEVENTH GRADES. 



September, 1915-February 15, 1916. 



Footstools (5). 

Indian bows (2). 

Butter print. 

Picture frames' (4). 

Clothes box. 

Tent poles. 

Sleds (5). 

Sleds repaired (5). 

Double runners. 

Double runners repaired 

(2). 
Plant stands (3). 
Taborets (7). 
Book racks. 

Electric switch bases (2). 
Skiis. 
Card files. 
Receipt file box. 
Toy sail boats (2). 
"Wood drums. 
Erector boxes (2). 
Clothes sticks (2). 
Medicine cupboard. 
Stand for sounder. 
Penholder and watch stand 

(2). 
Paddle rack. 



Base for spark gap. 

Boxes (3). 

Cupboard. 

Shelves. 

Hammer handles. 

Towel racks. 

Card frame. 

Toy engine bases (2). 

Roof for lumber pile. 

Battery tester. 

Foot rest. 

Ramrod. 

Notebook holder. 

Gun-stock repaired. 

Fishing tackle box. 

Fishing tackle (ice). 

Cartridge carrier. 

Jumping standards. 

Small table. 

Submarine model. 

Doll tables (2). 

Loose coupler for wireless. 

Pencil stands. 

Sharpening carving tools 

(11). 
Hatchet handle. 
Box kite. 



school report. 119 

Joinery and Cabinet Making, 
February, 1915-Febriiary 15, 1916. 

MADE FOR THE SCHOOLS. 

Drawing boards (33). 

Tee squares (35). 

Card files (several). 

Moulding boards for Walker cooking school (30). 

Bird houses for Rollins park (13). 

Drawing tables for High school (31). 

Moulding boards for foundry (6). 

Tomahawks for pageant (65). 

Poles for banners for schools (15). 

Medicine cupboards for schools (3). 

Jumping standards. 

Umbrella stands for Walker school (6). 

Large cutting table for Walker sewing-room. 

Flagstaffs (2). 

School signs (3). 

Drawer for motor bench. 

Victrola stand for Kimball school. 

Dictionary stand for Parker school. 

Drawers for lockers (18). 

Paper cases (5). 

Cement mould. 

Bookcase for High school. 

MADE FOR THE HOMES. 

Oriental Taboret. Round tables (3). 

Morris chair. Dictionary stand. 

Music cabinet. Nail box. 

Bookcase. Umbrella stand. 

Screens (3). Cross-bar for sleigh. 

Library Tables (10). Helix. 
Medicine cupboards. 



120 ■ CITY OF CONCORD, 

IN PROCESS AT THE PRESENT TIME. 

"Woodworking benches for the IMorrill school (24), 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Tool steel punches (10). 

Sleds ironed (4). 

Forge tongs (2). 

Double runners ironed (2). 

Riveting tool. 

Heading tool. 

Ice chisel. 

Box openers (9). 

Automobile front axles (2) for "Lad's car." 

Automobile irons for ' ' Lad 's car, ' ' 

Universal joint for "Lad's car," 

Toasting fork. 

Bolts for milling machine (10). 

Repairs on stanchion chain. 

Stove poker. 

Irons for carving bench. 

Iron braces. 

Furnace poker. 

Cleaning rod. 

Ash sifter hooks. 

Pipe hanger. 

Brackets for school signs. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 121 ' ^ 

K Machine Shop Projects, ^ 

j 

(Including sketching, pattern-making, and some black- j 

smithing. ) \ 

One 1-cylinder 2 H. P. gasoline engine. i 

One 2-eylinder 6 H. P. gasoline engine. I 

One 1-cylinder 2 H. P. gasoline engine for school. j 

Bench grinders (6). 

Machinists' hammers (10). ] 

Brass hammers (2). i 

Steel mandre]s (8). ^ 

Tee rest for 8-inch lathe. 

Square thread taps 1-inch, 4 pitch (3). i 

Centers for lathes (2). i 

Guard for shaper belt. 

Jacks for milling machine (4). ^ 

Rockers for lathe tool post (2), i 

Pair of 6-inch calipers ( 1 ) . 

.22 calibre cannon and mount (1). 

Flash pins for moulding department. ] 

Repairs on 12 block planer (made new rollers). | 

Round nose tools (12). '1 

Valves turned and seat ground for auto. i 

Core-plates squared up (6). j 

Pairs of shears sharpened (14). ' 

Gasoline pipe unions. 

Prick punches (4). . , 

Slotting tool for shaper. i 

Jig for boring pistons. I 

Pulleys and shafts for room 2 (2). 

Idler pulley and bracket for printing press. i 

Facing tool for valves. i 

Grinding meat chopper cutters. j 

Pinion for drill press. 

Grinder for forge shop. ' | 

Pulley for electric motor. \ 



122 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Rails for chip boxes. « 

Machinist vise handle. . 
Manifold for gas engine. 
Stud bolts (2). 
Screws for pulleys. 

ERECTING. 

Setting up milling machine and putting up countershaft. 
Setting up shaper and putting up countershaft. 
Setting up grinder and putting up countershaft. 
Lining up and leveling lathfes. 

IN PROCESS. 

Chair-irons, High school. 

Gasoline engine, 4 H. P. 

Gasoline engine, 2 H. P. (2). 

Gasoline engine, 4 H. P., 2 cylinder (2). 

Piston jig. 

.38 calibre cannon and mount. 

Household grinder. 

Bench grinder. 

Boring arbor for miller. 

Ash can carrier. 

Grain truck. 

Iron vise. 

Grate shaker, Walker school. 



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APPENDIX I. 



TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL ELOCU- 
TIONARY CONTEST. 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Of Union School District, at High School Hall, Thursday Evening, 
March 2, 1916, at Eight O 'Clock. 



PEOGRAM. 
March, "On to Victory," 

High School Orchestra. 



1. ' ' Opportunity. ' ' 



ORIGINAL DECLAMATION. 



Evelyn Fowler, Group 1. 



2. "Efficiency as Promoted by Prohibition." 

Paul Lloyd Bailey, Group 2. 

3. ' ' The White Hills ; Wards of State and Nation. ' ' 

Eichard Metcalf Pearson, Group 1. 

4. "In the Land of His Dreams." 

Marion Vose, Group 1. 

March, "Up the Street," 

Chorus. 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION — GROUP 2. 

1. "Citizens to Blame," 

Paul Edwin Ericson, Garrison School. 

2. "Goethals," 

Elmer Adolf Hammar, Walker School. 

3. "Progress," 

George Howard Gordon, Chandler School. 

4. "The Southern Soldier," 

Harold Benjamin Paige, Eastman School. 



Beeves 



Morse 



Folk 



Maclcaye 



South 



Grady 



128 



CITY OP CONCORD, 



Violin Solo, ' ' Walther 's Preislied, ' ' from ' ' Die Meisterainger, ' ' 

Wagner-Wilhelmj 
Miss Louise Sweet. 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION GROUP 2. 

1. "How the Camel Got His Hump," Kipling 

Ina Letitia Tebbetts, Eastman School. 

2. "How Mose Counted the Eggs," Anon 

Cora Eleanor Davis, Garrison School. 

3. ' ' Jerry, ' ' Dickinson 

Dorothy Mae Scott, Walker School. 

4. "Darius Green and His Flying Machine," Trowbridge 

Edith Elizabeth Hook, Chandler School. 



'Old Folk's Medley," 



Sheridan 



Chorus. 



Selection, "The Ivy and the Eose," 

Orchestra. 



Bennet 



AWARD OF PRIZES. 

Original Declamation — High School, Groups 1 and 2: 
First prize, $15, awarded to Evelyn Fowler. 
Second prize, $10, awarded to Marion Vose. 

Forensic Declamation — Junior High School, Group 2: 

First prize, $6, awarded to George Howard Gordon. 
Second prize, $4, awarded to Harold Benjamin Paige. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — Junior High School, Group 2 : 
First prize, $6, awarded to Dorothy Mae Scott. 
Second prize, $4, awarded to Edith Elizabeth Hook. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 



Prof. Henry G. Blount, Pembroke, N. H. 
Mr. James A. Massie, Penacook, N. H. 
Mr. Frank E. Blodgett, Suncook, N. H. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



129 



PKIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 

Eeceived. 

Balance from last year's account $2,854.00 

Interest on same for one year 110.12 

Sale of 435 tickets, at 35c 152.25 

Expended. 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services $50.00 

Prizes, including books 49.50 

English prize composition and expense 76.25 

Miscellaneous expense, including selling and 

taking tickets, music, ushers, etc 12.75 

Cash on hand as a guaranty fund for future 

contests 2,927.87 



$3,116.37 



$3,116.37 



STAMP SAVING SYSTEM. 



Saved from 
March 1, 1915, 

to 
March 1, 1916. 

Cogswell School $58.88 

Harriet P. Dame School 20.77 

Dewey School 58.58 

Eastman School 7.56 

Franklin School 27.74 

Garrison School 44.37 

Kimball School 27.50 

Merrimack School (in with Walker) 

Tahanto School (in with Walker) 

Chandler School (in with Kimball 

and Eumford) 

Penacook School 71.15 

Eumford School 108.60 

Walker School 31.20 



Total amount 

saved since the 

inauguration of 

the system. 

$128.10 
229.32 
843.77 
170.42 
551.91 
436.83 
974.01 



1,092.71 
2,564.67 
• 688.09 



$456.35 



$7,679.83 



130 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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SCENES FROM CONCORD HISTORY. 



Presented by the Parker school, at White Park, June 7, 
1915, at 4.15 p. m., in honor of the one hundred and fiftieth 
anniversary of the chartering of Concord. 

"Look kindly at this effort to call up the ghosts of our dim past." 
— Whittier. 

THE PEOLOGUE. 

The Spirits of Concord, Rumford and Penaeook. 

"The Present moves attended 

With all of brave and excellent and fair 
That made the old time splendid. ' ' — Loivell. 

A Rumford lass wandering in the forest meets an Indian maid, 
who after greeting her gravely, invites her to dance. At first the 
little settler is reluctant, not so much through fear of the Indian girl 
as of the wild and unaccustomed life she represents. By a brief but 
frolicsome dance, Penaeook wins her sympathy and they dance to- 
gether. The knowledge of the wild, the freedom and unstudied grace 
of nature, come to Rumford through association with the child of the 
forest. The spirit of Concord appears, dim at first but slowly draw- 
ing nearer — a gracious vision of the city that is to be. The two of 
olden time allure her by their winsome play to dance with them. 
Soon the white-clad spirits of the Future appear to conduct Concord 
afar. She goes with them, serene, confident of what will be. The 
Indian and settler return to the dim of the Past. 

INCIDENT I. 

The Bridal of Penaeook, or The Legend of Weetamoo. 

— Whittier. 

1631. 

Episode I. The Wedding. 

"In their sheltered repose looking out from the wood, 
The bark-builded wigwams of Penaeook stood." 



134 CITY OF CONCORD, 

(a) Weetamoo greets her father, Passaconaway, chief of the Pena- 

cook Indians. Entrance of Winnepurket. 

"For the Saugus Sachem had come to woo 
The Bashaba's daughter, Weetamoo." 

(b) The wedding dance. 

' ' The step was quicker, the song more shrill, 
And the beat of the small drums louder still 
Whenever within the circle drew 
The Saugus Sachem and Weetamoo. ' ' 

(c) Interruption from an aged medicine man with a prophecy of 

coming evil. Departure of Weetamoo and Winnepurket to 
the latter 's home. 

Episode II. The Eeturn to PenacooJc. 

' ' Yet midst the desolate things of sound and view, 
Thru the long winter moon smiled dark-eyed Weetamoo. ' ' 

(a) Weetamoo meets her husband returning from the trail. She 

dances for him. 

"Her heart had found a home, 
For o'er those hills and from that dreary plain, 
Nightly she welcomed home her hunter chief again." 

His interests, nevertheless, are centered only on the fight and 
hunt. 

(b) Entrance of messenger from far-off Penacook. Eequests that 

Weetamoo be allowed to visit her old home. 

(c) Permission granted by the council. 

Episode III. The Fate of Weetamoo. 

"No dusky messenger from Saugus brought 
The grateful tidings which the young wife sought. ' ' 

(a) Passaconaway confides to his warriors that Weetamoo, although 
happy at first to be with her people, has become anxious 
that Winnepurket has not summoned her back to her home. 

Message sent to Saugus Sachem: — 

"Eagle of Saugus — in the woods the dove 
Mourns for your sheltering wings of love." 



SCHOOL REPORT. 135 

(b) Entrance of runner with return message: — 

' ' If now no more a mat is found 
Of all which line her father's wigwam round, 
Let Penacook call out his warrior train 
And send her back with wampum gifts again." 

Anger of Passaeonaway. Eefuses to allow Weetamoo to return, 

(e) Weetamoo determines to go to Winnepurket. Tells her plans 
to two Indian maidens. Departure. 

' ' Sick and aweary of her lonely life, 
Heedless of peril, the still faithful wife 
Had left her mother 's grave, her father 's door. 
To seek the wigwam of her chief once more. ' ' 

(d) Messenger arrives with news that Weetamoo has met her fate 
in the treacherous falls of the Merrimack. 

Lament of the Indian women — 

"The Dark eye has left us, 

The Spring Bird has flown. 
On the pathway of spirits 

She wanders alone. 
The song of the wood-dove has died on our shore, — 
Mat wonch Kunna — monee! We hear it no more." 

INCIDENT IL 

Heroic Action of Hannah Dustin, March 15, 1697. 

Episode I. Arrival of Captives. 

"Thy Penacook valley was fairer than these, 
And greener its grasses and taller its trees." 

On an island near Penacook, the squaws and children are awaiting 
the arrival of the braves. A captive boy, Leonardson, is with 
them. Warwhoops are heard. The war party returns dragging 
with them two captives, Hannah Dustin and Mary Neff. The 
dance of victory is performed. The war party goes on, leaving 
the prisoners with only a few Indians as guards. 

Episode II. Prisoners in the Indian Camp. 

Indians taunt the captives. Squaws jeer and laugh at the women. 
They torment them. One little child offers berries, but the Indian 



136 CITY OF CONCORD, 

mother strikes him and tramples the berries. Finally, the Indians 
withdraw to wigwams, and the captives are alone. 

Episode III. The Plot. 

Hannah Dustin plans escape. Discloses her plan to Mary Neff and 
Leonardson. Questions the boy about Indian customs. Plana 
that Leonardson get Indian to teach him how to use the toma- 
hawk. An old Indian appears. The boy flatters him into teach- 
ing him the stroke. Indian leaves. Hannah Dustin persuades 
Mary Neff to join in killing the Indians. All practice with the 
tomahawk as Leonardson teaches them. 

Episode IV. Tlie Deliverance. 

The drunken Indians sleep heavily. Hannah Dustin, Mary Neff 
and Leonardson steal upon them. They kill and scalp the sav- 
ages. 

' ' Above the sleeping warrior 's life 
Gleams quick and keen the scalping knife. ' ' 

One squaw escapes. The child that gave the berries is saved. 

"And on the greensward many a stain 
And here and there the mangled slain." 

Episode V. The Departure for Haverhill. 

Leonardson steals a canoe. While on his way to boat, Hannah 
goes back to be sure all are dead. They embark in canoe. Re- 
turn of escaped squaw with Indian party. They search for the 
captives. They carry away the dead Indians. 

' ' By moonlight sped the Merrimack along his bed. ' ' 

INCIDENT III. 
The Settling of Penny Cook, May 13, 1726. 

Episode I. 

The search for a new home. Arrival of settlers from Massachusetts 
colony. They pass slowly by on horseback looking for a new site for 
a settlement. One, Captain Eastman, returns. Catches view of lake. 
Looks to surrounding hills. Signals to the others. All retrace the 
path. Captain Eastman points out advantages. All investigate and 



SCHOOL REPORT, 137 

agree. Dismount and stand as if in prayer. Move slowly off in 
pleasant conversation. 

Episode II. 

Wattanummon 's grant. Captain Eastman and men start to mow 
the field. Work industriously with little outlook for Indians. Sud- 
den appearance of Wattanummon and his braves. Orders settlers to 
stop mowing. They refuse. Altercation begins. Captain Eastman 
interferes. Pacifies Wattanummon with soothing words and produces 
jug. Wattanummon tastes and then drinks. Eefuses to allow Cap- 
tain Eastman to offer jug. Wattanummon offers Eastman the land 
and receives jug in return. Settlers return to their work. Indiana 
withdraw. Settlers stop work at sound of dinner horn. 

INCIDENT IV. 
The Bradley Massacre, August 11, 1746. 

Episode I. The Ambush. 

"Just on the margin of the wood 
Wild from their native wilderness. ' ' 

(a) Indians plot the massacre. 

(b) Eetire to ambuscade. 

Episode II. 

(a) Indian awaits the coming party. Stays on watch until he 

he hears the approach of the party coming from Rumford 
garrison on their way to the mill. 

(b) Daniel Gilman pursuing a hawk passes Indian in safety. The 

rest of the party follow. 

"Quiet and calm without a fear of danger lurking near." 

(c) When the Rumford men are opposite the Indian ambuscades, 

the Indians open fire. Peters, Lufkins and Bean fall. The 
second volley is answered by the Bradleys. Samuel Brad- 
ley falls. Indians surround the rest. Stickney and Rob- 
erts are captured. Lieutenant Bradley, refusing quarters, 
fights alone until he is killed. 

"Then smote the Indian tomahawk." 



138 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Episode III. Indian Triumph. 

(a) Indians loot bodies. Join in war dance. Three shots from 
Eumford garrison interrupt the rejoicing. All flee. 

Episode IV. The Belief. 

(a) Captain Ladd's company arrives on the run. 

(b) Men attempt to revive fallen comrades. Search for Indians. 

(e) Arrival of ox-cart from Rumford. Dead bodies are placed 
in the cart. 

(d) Friends and neighbors escort the ox-cart and its sad burden 
back to Eumford. 

INCIDENT V. 
Visit of General Fafayette to Concord, June 22, 1825. 

Episode I. The Arrival. 

(a) Arrival of Lafayette. Greetings from citizens. 

(b) Speech of welcome made by Hon. William A. Kent. 

(c) Introduced to veterans. 

Episode II. Greetings to School. 

(a) Greeted by pupils of a girls' school. 

(b) Girls give drill. 

(c) Lafayette's compliments to school-mistress. 

Episode III. The Reception. 

(a) Escorted to Madame Kent's house. 

(b) Reception to dignitaries. 

(c) The minuet. 

Episode IV. The Departure. 

(a) Farewell to Lafayette. 

(b) Presentation of bouquet by Miss Mary Clark. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 139 

FINAL TABLEAU. 

Audience is requested to join in the singing of "The Star Spangled 
Banner. ' ' 

"This we know, that the greatest lustres of our past already tend 
to fade in our memory, not because nothing that the past has accom- 
plished can content us; because we are loking for greatness beyond 
greatness, truth beyond truth ever yet spoken. The ideal of a repub- 
lic is built on the uncommon fineness in the common man! To live 
for that ideal is the true Americanism, the larger patriotism. To 
that ideal, not on the field of battle as in Europe, but in the arduous 
toil of peace let us be willing to give the 'last full measure of 
devotion.' " — Felix Adler. 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING 
WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inhahitants of Union School Distnct in Concord 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium, on 
Prince street in said district, on the first day of April, 
nineteen hundred fifteen, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to 
act upon the following subjects: 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years to fill the vacancies arising 
from the expiration of the term of office of William H. Saw- 
yer, Carrie E. Evans, and Edward C. Niles, and to fill any 
other vacancies that may occur in said board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year, 
including industrial education, military drill, and calis- 
thenics. 

8. To see if the district will authorize the Board of 
Education to sell the Tahanto schoolhouse and lot located 
in Posterville, so called, either by private sale or by public 
auction. 

9. To see if the district will authorize the Board of Edu- 
cation to purchase, fit up, and equip an athletic field for 



SCHOOL REPORT. 141 

the use of the schools of the district, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

10. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 15th of March, 1915. 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
CARRIE E. EVANS, 
GEO. H. MOSES, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
WILLIAM H. SAWYER, 
* DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
LILIAN R. SHEPARD, 
OMAR S. SAVENSON, 

Board of Education of Union School District. 

I certify that on the sixteenth day of March, 1915, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant, attested by the Board 
of Education of said district, at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copy at the police station in the 
city of Concord, N. H., being a public place in said dis- 
trict. 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 

Concord, N. H., March 16, 1915. 

Then personally appeared before me, on this date, the 
said Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above cer- 
tificate by him signed is true. 

GEORGE N. FELLOWS, 

Justice of the Peace. 



142 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In accordance with the foregoing warrant, a meeting of 
the legal voters of Union School District was held at the 
Auditorium on Prince street, in said district, on the even- 
ing of April 1, 1915, at 7.30 o'clock. 

On motion of George H. Moses, I. Eugene Keeler was 
elected clerk pro tern, and took the oath of office before 
Louis C. Merrill, moderator of said district. 

Article 1. On motion of Harry H. Dudley, one ballot 
was cast by the clerk for Louis C. Merrill for moderator, 
and he was declared elected. 

Art. 2. On motion of Henry H. Metcalf, one ballot was 
cast for Fred Leighton for clerk, and he was declared 
elected. 

Art. 3. On motion of Edward C. Niles, the report of 
the Board of Education, having been printed, was accepted 
and ordered on file without reading. 

Art. 4. On motion of George H. Moses, duly seconded, 
it was voted to proceed to the election of three members of 
the Board of Education, to serve for three years, on one 
ballot, the polls to be kept open until 8.30 p. m. Henry 
H. Chase, Eben M. Willis and Arthur C. Sturtevant were 
elected tellers, on motion of John P. George. 

Art. 5. On motion of Harry F. Lake, John P. George 
and Henry H. Metcalf were nominated for auditors of the 
district for the ensuing year. Mr. George declined to serve 
and placed in nomination, in his stead, Anson S. Marshall. 
One ballot Avas cast for Mr. Metcalf and Mr. Marshall, and 
they were declared elected. 

Art. 6. On motion of Alpheus M. Johnson, the follow- 
ing resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That there shall be raised and is hereby ordered 
to be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District the sum of seventeen thousand two 
hundred seventy-five dollars ($17,275.00), of which sum 
eight thousand dollars ($8,000.00) shall be appropriated 
for the payment of bonds maturing July 1, 1915, and nine 



SCHOOL REPORT. 143 

thousand two hundred seventy-five dollars ($9,275.00) for 
the payment of interest On its funded debt accruing during 
the year. 

Art. 7. On motion of Charles S. Parker, the following 
resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That there shall be raised and is hereby ordered 
to be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District and appropriated for the support of 
schools for the ensuing year such a sum as in addition to 
the sum assigned to the district by the city of Concord 
out of its appropriation for schools will amount to the sum 
of one hundred four thousand eight hundred seventy dol- 
lars and ninety-eight cents ($104,870.98). 

Art. 8. On motion of George H. Moses, the following 
resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Board of Education be authorized to 
sell the Tahanto School building and lot situated in Foster- 
ville, so called, either by public auction or by private sale. 

Art. 9. On motion of Robert Jackson, the following res- 
olution was adopted : 

Resolved, That there shall be raised and is hereby ordered 
to be raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District and appropriated for purchasing, fitting 
up, and equipping an athletic field for the pupils of the 
public schools of the district the sum of five thousand dol- 
lars ($5,000.00). 

The ballot for three members of the Board of Education, 
to serve for three years, resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes cast, 731 

Necessary for a choice, 366 

"W. Hammond had 2 

Joseph S. Otis had 284 

Charles Duncan had < 457 

Edward C. Niles had 686 

Osma C. Morrill had 714 



144 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and Charles Duncan, Edward C. Niles and Osma C. Morrill 
were declared elected members of the Board of Education 
of Union School District, to serve for three years. 

No further business appearing, it was voted to adjourn, 
on motion of Arthur H. Knowlton. 

A true -record. Attest: 

I. EUGENE KEELER, 

Clerk pro tern. 



APPENDIX II, 



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SCHOOL REPORT, 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE 



149 



Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study, 
First Semester, 1915-1916. 





Group II. 


Group I. 




SUBJECTS. 


Class. 


Class. 






M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. T. 


U. 


V. 


Spe- 
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Post 
Qrad. 


"3 
o 
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103 


59 


162 


60 


130 

2 

27 

124 


65 
4 
16 

48 


93 
3 

18 
74 
13 


63 


82 


29 




1'^ 


847 




9 




26 


14 


28 
46 


15 
12 


7 

30 

9 


11 

24 

7 

91 


4 

15 






166 








373 












33 


United State** History 


103 


59 














253 




85 


25 
















110 












38 

7 


20 










58 












9 


10 










26 








64 


18 












82 
















2 
18 








2 




















14 






32 








138 


54 














192 








60 
46 


37 












2 


99 












1 










47 




103 


59 
















162 








45 


17 
25 
25 
17 


39 
34 
37 
39 


23 
15 
17 
23 


25 

20 
23 
25 








158 












1 
1 


2 

2 


107 














114 




103 


59 


49 
64 


18 
18 


45 


387 








82 
















32 








39 
















48 

1 


19 
4 






67 












10 


6 


1 








oo 


Commercial Law 






... 




13 






13 



150 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABh'E.— Co )i eluded. 





Group 11. 


GhOUP I. 




SUBJECTS. 


Class. 


Class. 






M. 


N. 


0. P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. T. 


U. 


V. 


Pno. 
cial. 


Post 
Grad. 


3 

o 




















35 








35 




W?, 
54 


59 
59 

25 




















162 




16'^ 


Mechanic Arts: 


33 


14 


24 


13 












1 
1 


164 


Slachine Shop Practice 


14 


5 


6 


2 


3 


31 










13 
3 
14 

7 
7 
7 

7 


24 

5 

24 

18 
18 
19 




37 








G 

2:i 
23 
23 
23 


13 


1 
14 

10 

10 


1 
5 

11 

11 










16 








6 

12 
12 


2 


6 


1 


118 


Domestic Arts: 






88 














88 




49 
49 


33 
33 


1 






140 








112 






14 














14 


Household Mechanical Apparatus 










21 
















21 
















12 








12 
















10 


12 








oo 
















12 

24 

1 








12 




77 


45 

59 

1 


23 
102 

2 


60 
5 


70 
6 


8 

37 

6 


16 

68 

1 


11 

48 

1 








214 


10 






641 








25 

















SCHOOL REPORT. 151 

MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 

June 18, 1915. 





Sewing. 


Cooking. 


Mechanic Arts. 




■J.'O 


ci 


i be 




ci 


^'C fc, 




^ 


^T3 tn 




"::: 


S 


ft.n 


'. o 
o ^ ^' 
^ <1> 0/ 


^ 






tH 




• 


,'§? 


o 


^■5 u 

1^ ua 


o 




c|^ 


o 
'5 


= = 0; 


SCHOOLS. 


2.2 "^ 


a 


^ — 0.^ 


%^ '"; 


> 


IftSj 


ffi 


•5 abo 




S^Si 


;-A 


^ S ° 




t4 
c . 




S ^ be 


(4 

o . 






~ fc^ ^ 


iic 


III 


ill 


c 


mi 




■S o 


llll 




^ 


-A 


=^ 


^ 


J 


■$■ 


&: 


>-] 




High 


53 


34 


19 








87 


38 


49 


Parker 


.32 


4 


28 


32 


4 


28 


88 


43 


45 


Chandler 


126 
57 


35 

4 


91 
53 


126 

20 


34 
1 


92 


98 
43 


49 
2 


49 


Walker 


41 




2C 
65 
70 


5 
2 
5 


13 
24 
60 
70 


5 
6 


1 


6 
6 


35 
11 
64 

57 
25 


15 
1 
38 
33 
25 


20 


Eastman 


10 


Rumford 


26 










24 


Merrimack 










Penacook 


25 


2 


23 










Franklin 














Dewey 


15 
15 

10 


3 
2 


12 

13 
10 








7 
15 
10 


1 

1 
1 


6 


H. P. Dame 








14 


St, Mary's 


10 




10 


9 


St. John's 


21 
15 


1 


20 
15 


11 


1 


12 


14 
13 
2 


2 
3 
1 


12 


Sacred Heart 


10 


Morrill 








1 


















Total 


553 


97 


4.56 


210 


41 


175 


569 


253 


316 



NIGHT SCHOOL. 



SUMMAEY. 



Whole number of different jjupils attending 

Average membership 

Average daily absence 

Average daily attendance 

Age of youngest pupil 

Age of oldest pupil 

Average age 



Male. 
67 



Female. 

8 



Total. 
75 

60.78 
12.58 
48.20 
16 
41 
24 



EOLL OF HONOE. 



Christas Costas, 
Arthour Grammas, 
Christos Plastiras, 
Gami Vese, 



Mrs. Putnam's room. 
Mrs. Lewis' room. 



American, 30. 
Cuban, 1. 
Danish, 1. 



NATIONALITIES. 



Albanian, 4. 
Russian, 1. 
Spanish, 1. 



Polanders, 2. 
Turkish, 4. 
Italian, 3. 
Greek, 9. 



Norwegian, 3. Finnish, 6. 

Canadian, 2. Lithuanian, 1. Nova Seotian, 1. 



Irish, 1. 
Austrian, 1. 
Swedish, 3. 
Portuguese, 1. 



Scholarship Table, 
high school. 



School. 


5 


3 


a" u 
3 ao 


1 

< 

o 

!'^ 


1 

pa 

o 

s a 
55 


1 

M 

o 

Ph 




o 
o 

o 


u 

o 

o 
o 
.c . 

'" c 
if c 
"St. 

I-) 


o 
o 

^-< 

be ■ 

c '^ 

.- M 


O y; 
• O 


Cm 


a) • 
Ph 


High 


V 

u 

T 

s 

R 
Q 


74 
10 
81 
62 
99 
81 


7 

I 

2 
8 
4 


9.45 
12.50 
9.87 
3.22 
8.07 
4.93 


55 
19 
41 
19 
48 
26 


74.32 
47. 50 
50.49 
30.64 
48.48 
32.09 




5 

7 

11 

12 

20 



7 
7 
15 
10 
14 



4 
4 

10 
7 

12 


14 
8 
19 
11 
15 
13 


100.00 


Group I 


87.50 12.50 




91.36 

82. 59 
87.88 
75.31 


8.64 
17.41 
12.12 
24.69 

12.12 


Total 




437 


34 


7.78 


208 


47.59 


55 


53 


37 


80 


87. 88 




Parker 


P 




130 

67 


— 


17 
5 

22 


13.07 

7.46 


69 
39 


53.07 
58.20 


5 
3 


26 




19 



19 

8 


96.16 
95.53 


3.84 




4.47 






Total 


197 


11.16 


108 


54.31 


8 


26 19 


27 


95.94 

97.40 
81.95 


4.06 










Chandler 

Group II 


N 
M 


115 

72 


10 
12 


8.6S 
16.66 


56 
39 


48.69 
54.16 


3 
13 


13 

8 


5 
1 




2.60 
18.05 






Total 




192 




22 


10.41 


95 


49.47 


16 


21 


6 




91.67 

100.00 
96.00 


8.33 






Walker 


N 
M 


13 
25 





0.00 
12.00 


11 


53.84 
44.00 



1 










0.00 


Group II 


4.00 






Total 




38 




3 


7.89 


18 


47.36 
35.71 


1 










1 



97.37 
92.86 


2.63 




' 






N 
M 


14 



2 



14.66 



5 





1 



7 14 


Group II 










Total 




14 




2 


14.66 


5 


35.71 







1 


1 


92.86 


7.14 


Eastman 

Group II 


N 
M 


10 











3 



30.00 


















100.00 


0.00 








Total 




10 










3 


30.00 














100.00 
90. 10 




Grand H. S. total.. 


888 




83 


9.34 


437 


49.21 


80 


102 


63 


108 


9.90 



General average of scholarships High School entire 78.66. 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 
K 
J 
I 
H 
G 
F 
E 


156 
101 
151 

89 
148 

94 
131 

94 


22 
'5 
15 

8 
13 

7 
19 

4 


14.10 
4.95 
9.93 
8.98 
8.78 
7.47 

14.50 
4.25 


84 
35 
83 
29 
50 
34 
65 
26 


53. 84 
34.66 
54.96 
32.58 
33.78 
36.17 
49.61 
27. 65 


25 
16 
11 
18 
36 
19 
14 
21 


5 

4 
4 
2 
2 
4 
5 


5 


2 

i 









96.80 
100 00 
97. 36 
95.40 
98. 65 
97.88 
96.95 
94.69 


3.20 
0.00 
2.64 
4.60 
1.35 
2.12 
3.05 
5.31 


Total— Elementary 




964 


93 


9.64 


406 


42.11 


160 


26 
12s 


8 





97.31 


2.69 


Grand H. S. and 
Elementary— total. 




1,852 


176 


9.5 


843 


45.51 


240 


71 


108 


93.09 


6.91 



Scholarship, 
Number of A- 
Number of B- 
Failures, 



Standards. 
80% 



-pupils, 
-pupils, 



50% 
10% 



of enrollment. 



154 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 



Group I.— High 
School. 
Charles F. Cook — 
Charles E. Moors... 



Robert S. Baker. 



Charles L. Harris , 
Ralph B. Young... 



Elisal)eth Averill. . . 

May B. McLam 

Lillian Yeaton 

Elizabeth S. Sargent. 
Carrie E. Baker 



MaryJK. Taylor. 



Mary E. Jenness. 
Blanche E. Field. 



Carrie A. Hood 

Marion G. Hixson ... 

Abbie M. Sanger. ... 
Margaret E. Durgin.. 
Fannie E. Lincoln... 



Walter J. 
son 



Hutchin- 



Ruth A. Home. .. 
Marian Buttrick. 



Group H.— Parker 

School. 
Luella A. Uickerman 

Mabel I. Durivage. .. 
Helen O. Stephenson 

Jessie H. Nettleton.. 

Kathryn B. White... 
Gertrude Stone 



Master 

Sub-Master, room l 



Assistant. 



room 9.. 
room 11. 
room 4. . 
room 12. 



U. S. History. Civics. 

RIatliematics, Chem- 
istry 

Book-keeping, Eco- 
nomics. Commer- 
cial Law 



Physics, Mathematics 

Commercial Arithme- 
tic. Book-keeping.. 

French, German 

Greek, History 

English 

.Mathematics.Biology 
French 



English. 



Clerk. 



English 

Domestic Science 

'stenography, Type- 

i writing 

English, French 



French 

Latin 

Stenography, 
writing 



Type- 



Vivia Stone. 



Mary W. Cross 

Ida A. Olney 

Julia M. Melifant. 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7. 
" room 4. 



room 5. 
room 1. 



Resigned at end of 
spring term 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 



English, Mathemat- 

i(;s 

P^nglish 

Mathematics, Latin.. 



French, English. 



jEngli.sh 

Literature, Ancient 
tlistory 



room 8. 



Commercial History, 
I Ancient History 



] Mathematics. 
I Penmanship.. 



Clerk . 



J2,500 
1,700 

1,150 
1,200 



114 School St. 
8 Liberty St. 



76 Pleasant St. (West Har- 
wich, Mas.-i.) 
76 Plea-iant St. (Detroit, 

Me.) 



1,000 34Thorndike St. 
ilOO 111 School St. 
noo 35 Perley St. 
900 66 '2. North State St. 
900 101 Center St. 
900 111 School St. (Lancaster, 

N. H.) 
900 3^2 Liberty St. (Cambridge, 

Mass.) 

800 9 Holt St. (Dover, N. H.) 
700] 12 So. Spring St. (Griunell, 

la.) 

700 140 Rumford St. 

900, 47 So. Spring St. (Sharon, 

Mass. 
800j (197 Bow St. Franklin, N.H.) 
650 13 Summit Ave. 

500 Concord, N. H.. R. F. D. 3. 



1,300 28 So. Main St. 
900 40 No. Spring St. 
800' 40 No. Spring St. (Lowell, 

I Vt.) 
6.50 41 South St. (Pembroke, 

N. H.) 
COO 7 Short St. 

700 46 Jackson St. (Springfield, 
Vt.) 

650 46 Jackson St. (Springfield, 

Vt.) 
750 10 Wpbster St. (Franklm, 

N.H.) 
76' 82 School St. (Claremont, 

N. H.) 
450; 36 So. State St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



155 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of >)uil(ling's 
and teacliers. 



Position and room. 



(irades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 

per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. % 



Chandler School. 
Harriet S. Emmons.. 



Cora T. Fletcher. 



Mary Flavin 

Elizabeth J . Donovan 
Emma G. Nickerson. 



Mary C. Caswell 



Walker School. 
J. Elizabeth Talpey. 

Viola J. Brock 



Florence A. Chandler 



Garrison School. 
Bertha L. Hoi brook.. 

Eastman School. 
Florence E. George.. 



Principal, room 1. 
Assistant, room 1. 



room 4. 
room 3. 



Mathematics, Gram 
mar, Music. 

History, Literature, 
Mathematics, Phys- 
iology 



Clerk. 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7. 

" room 8. 

Principal, room 5. 
Principal, room 1. 



English, Latin, His- 
tory 

Laiin, English 

Mathematics, Eng- 
lish, Drawing 



Latin, English. Com 
po.sition, Hygiene.. 

Class N— History, Ge- 
ography, Litera- 
ture, Hygiene 

Class M— Arithmetic, 
Spelling, Litera- 
ture, Music 



H. S , Group n, M... 



H. S., Group H, M. 



1850 6 So. State St. 



800 41 Scliool St. (Lawrence, 
i Mass.) 

800 58 School St. 
800 28Thorndike St. 

I 
750] 58 School St. (Gloucester, 

Mass. ) 
400' 121 Warren St. 



850, 41 Warren St. 
750j 99 North State St. 



650 (20 Winter St., Penacook, 

I N. H.) 
.^00 542 No. State St., West 

j Concord. 

800 9 Gladstone St. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 
J. Elizabeth Talpey.. 

Viola J. Brock. 

Florence A. Chandler 

M. Louise Phillips 



Mabel F. Lane 

Eva H.Tandy 

M. Gertrude Doherty 
Alice M. M. Phaneuf . 

Sara E. McClure 

Agnes V. Sullivan... 
Margaret Morrill. ... 
Elisabeth R. Elkins.. 

Grace L. Putnam 



G.^RRisoN School. 
Bertha L. Holbrook.. 

Flossie L Saltmarsh. 
May F>. Tliompson. .. 

Agnes R Kelley 

Louisa Herbert 

Margaret T. Lynch .. 



lyla Chamberlin. 

Charlotte White.., 
Maude B. Binet.. 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7. 
" room 8. 



room 10. 
room 5. 
room 4. 
room 3 . 
room 2 



Principal, room 5.. 

Assistant, room 7.. 

room 6.. 
" room 4.. 

rooms.. 
" room 2.. 

" room 1.. 



High School 

Classes K, L, Lan- 
guage, Geography, 

Literature 

Classes L J 

" G, H 

E,F 

" CD 

A,B 

Kinde:rgarten 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 

Class L 

Classes I, K 

G, H 

E,F 

CD 

A,B 

Kindergarten and 
Primary 

Kindergarten 

Transferred to Rum- 
ford School at end 
of spring term 



$850 41 Warren St. 
750, 99 North State St. 
650 (20 Winter St., Penacook, 
N.H.) 



650 148 Rumford Pt. 

650 105 No. State St. 
650 66 High St. 
650| 148 No. State St. 



650 
650 
6.50 
450 



91 Rumford St. 
11 Cummings Ave. 
49 Lvndon St. 
123 No. State St. 



800 542 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. 
600 11 Chestnut St. 
450 74 Allison St. 
650 4 Harrod St. 



650 
650 



650 
350 



3 Rollins St. 
446 No. State St., West Con- 
cord. 

2 View St., West Concord. 
15 Capitol St. 



156 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Cojiiinued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and roonT. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Salary 

per 

year. 


Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 


Eastman School. 
Florence E.George.. 
Vivien R. Morgan... 
Stella M. French 


Principal, room 1... 

Assistant, room 2. . . 

room 4... 


Class K 


$800 
450 
650 

650 

650 

650 
550 
650 
500 
650 
500 

650 

450 

650 

650 

650 
650 
500 
550 
650 
500 

650 
450 

650 
650 
550 
450 

650 
650 
550 


9 Gladstone St. 


Classes 4,5 .* 


10 Avon St. 


Classes 1, 2, 3 

Transferred to' Rum- 
ford School at end 
of spring term. 

Class L— Arithmetic. 
Class K— Geography, 


Concord, N. H., Route 5. 


RcrMFORD School. 

Jessie N . Stimson 

Anna M. Keenan 


Principal, room 8. . . 
Assistant, room?.. . 

" room 6. .. 

room 4. .. 

room 3... 
" room 2... 
" room 1. .. 

" room 5... 

room 5. . . 


9 Holt St. 

(93 High St., Penacook 


Annette Prescott 


Classes I, J— Lan- 
guage 

Classes G, H 


N. H.) 
25 Green St. 
60 Beacon St. 


Abbie T McDonald 


E, F 


17 Essex St. 


Mary M. Doherty 

Gara E. McQuesten.. 
Elizabeth M. McAfee 
Katharine L. Remick 

Maude B. Binet 


CD 


11 Thorndike St. 


A,B 


9 Wall St. 


Special teacher 

Kindergarten and 

Primary 

Kindergarten and 

Primary 


39 So. Spring St. 
4 Fayette St. 
246 No. Main St. 




Transferred to Walk- 
er School at end of 
spring term. 

Transferred to Cogs- 
well School at end 
of spring term. 

Transferred to Kim- 
ball School at end 
of spring term. 

Class L— Language.. . 
Class K— Geography. 

History 

Classes L J— Arith- 




Fannie B Lothrop. .. 






Nellie T Halloran 






Kimball School. 
Mary E. Melif ant.. . 
Edna M. Kennedy. .. 

Mary A. McGuire.... 


Principal, room 6... 
Assistant, rooms... 

" room 8... 

room 7... 
" room 4... 
" room 1... 

room 3... 


36 So. State St. 
10 Blanchard St. 
77 So. State St. 






(Hooksett, N. H.) 


Mary A^Coughlin .. . 


E, F 


22 Albin St. 


C, ]> 


281 Pleasant St. 


Lottie E. Pearson . . . 
Harriet C. Kimball . 


" A,B 

Special teacher 

Kindergarten and 
Primary 


52 Beacon St. 
Hopkintou Road. 


Nellie T. Halloran... 


" room 2... 
" room 2... 


30 Perley St. 


Myrta B. Lowe 

Margaret A.Donovan 

Marv Fernald 


Kindergarten 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 


60 No. Soring St. 






Penacook School. 


Principal, room 4... 
Assistant, room 3. . . 

room 2... 

room 1... 


55 Thorndike St. 


Clara E. Flanders . . 


" G, H 


51 Sooth St. 




" E. F 


27 Warren St. 


Hannah E. O'Brien.. 


" A.B.C 

Transferred to Cogs- 
well School at end 
of spring term 

Cla.sses G,H 


60 Franklin St. 


Fkanklin School. 


Principal, room 3... 

Assistant, room 4... 

" room 1... 


84 Center St. 




" CD 


72 Washington St. 


Mabel Clark 


I " A,B 


126 Warren St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABhE.— Continued. 



157 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Salary 
per 
year. 


Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 


Dewey School. 

AddieF. Straw 

Helen L. Southgate.. 


Principal, room 6... 
Assistant, room l... 

" rooms... 
" room 4... 
" room 2... 
room 2... 
" rooml... 


Training teacher 

Supervisor of Kin- 
dergarten 


$1,000 
700 


101 North State St. 

9. So Snrincr .^h 


Susnn M. Little 


Classes L G 


6501 90 School St 


A. Delia Shaw 


E, F 


650 72 Scliool St. 


Alice RL Sargent. ... 


" CD 


650 78 Warren St. 


Belle E. Shepard 


" A,B 


650 
425 


111 School St 


Helen L. Gibbs 


Kindergarten 


3 Liberty St. 



TRAINING CLASSES. 

Seniors. 

(Graduates June, 1916.) 

Margaret L. Haynes 40 Beacon St. 

Ida A. Ohiey 82 School St. (Claremont, N. H.> 

Frances M. T womey 23 Forest St. 

Junio7-s. 

(Graduates June, 1917.) 

Ellen H. S. Anderson 1 View St., West Concord, N. H. 

Florence M. Carroll 8 Perley St. 

Edith C. Ericson 226 North Stare St. 

Gerda H. Ekstrom 16 Gladstone Ave., West Concord, N. H. 

Irene W. Hart 43 High St. 

Rose M. Keenan 93 High St.. Penacook, N. H. 

Kathleen M. Kelley 60 South Main St. 

Minta A. Locke (Suncook. N.H., R. F. D. 1.) 

Ruth M. Mc( ;aig ■ 13 Rockingham St. 

Eva R. Sanborn (Manchester, N. H.. R. F. D. I.) 

Marguerite M. J. Tetrault 38 Concord St. 

Kathenne J. Twomey (56 Summer St., Penacook, N. H.) 

Charlotte M. Young 47 Laurel St. 

Marion R. Stebbins 23 Union St. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Harriet P. Dame 

School. 

Nettie M. Bowen 



Mary T. Gannon 

Kathleen M. Hickey. 
Bernice L. Pr^scott .. 
Helen K. Hallinan . . . 



Hannali E. O'Brien. 



Cogswell School. 
Fannie B. Lothrop. . . 

Cecilia P. Jones 

Mildred L Cilley 

Eleanor B. Kelley.... 



Principal, room 4. 

Assistant, room 3. 

room 2. 

" room 1. 



Principal, room 1. 
Assistant, room 2 



Classes 5, K, L. 



Class 2 , 
1. 



3,4. 



Transferred to Kim- 
ball School at end 
of spring term. 

Transferred to Pena- 
cook School at end 
of spring lerm. 

Classes C, D 

" A, B 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned during the 

spring term. 



Salary 

per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 



$650 (29 Center St., Penacook. 
N. H.) 
550 7 Soutli Spring St. 
500i70Rumford St. 
450 482 North State St. 

i 



650 3 South St. (Bristol, N. H.) 
650 75 South St. 



158 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
tauglit. 



Salary 

per 

year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 



MORKILT, PCHOOL. 

Arthur W. French... 

Raymond P. Oilman. 

C. Ellsworth Taylor. 
Harold P. Johnson.. . 



Jules Wiesman, Jr.. 



Roland R. Gove.... 
Perley VV. Ordway. 



Charles P. Nash.... 

Sewing. 
(Parker School.) 
Louise G. Howe .. . 
M. Horten.se Berry. 
M. Emma Parsons . . . 
F. Mildred Phillips.. 



Principal, room 6... 

Assistant, room 1, . 

" room 4... 

" rooms... 



Student, Assistant, 
rooms 6 and A 

Student, Assistant, 
rooms 2 and 3 



Supervision and lec- 
tures 

Machine shop prac- 
tice 

Drawing- 

Elementary wood- 
working, joinery, 
pattern making 

P a 1 1 e r n -in a k i n g, 
elementary wood- 
working ..•. 

Prill ting, blacksmith - 
ing 



Wood-turning, ele 
m e n tar y wood- 
working 



Principal, room 3. 

Assistant, room 3. 

room 3. 

" room 3. 



Cooking. [ 

Ruth A. Faunce Principal . 



Marion J. Roby . 

Drawing. 
Faith C. Stalker. 

Mary A. Jones... 



Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Sewing, Dressmaking 

Millinery 



High School, Classes 
M, N,0, P 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 



Director. 



Assistant 



Musir. 
Charles S, Conant... .^Director. 



Military Drill. | 
George W. Morrill.. .Instructor. 



Janitors. [ 

Albert W. ThompsonHigh and Morrill 

Otto J. Carlen — 

Charles .-Vda 

Arthur J. Taylor 

Harry R. Sturm 

James W. Powers... . 
William D. Merrick.. 
Gland M. Blodgett... 
Charles M. Thomas.. 
Frank L. Dudley 



Henry D. Robinson . . 

Mrs. Henry D. Robin- 
son 

Charles M. Thomas.. 

George R. Parmenter 
George N. Fellows... 



Special Repair 

Man. 

Wright C. Walker., 



Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Rum ford 

Kimball 

Penacook and Cogs- 
well 

Dewey and Frank- 
lin 



Harriet P. Dame. 



Transferred to Kim- 
ball School 

Died during fall term 
Resigned 



$1,800 
1,050 



51 South Spring St. 
10 Maple St. 



1,000 76 Rum ford St. 



800 8 Lyndon St. (South Bos- 
ton, Mass.) 

900 3'A Liberty St. (West Rox- 

bury, Mass.) 
570 38 Slonroe St. 



475 38 Auburn St. (Loudon, 

N. H.) 



700 167 North Main St. 
550 32 Sduth Spring St. 
500, 8,S North State St. 
350 HS Rum ford St. 



450 



900 
700 



15 Riimford St. (Marlboro, 

Mass.) 

26 Center St. (Worcester, 
Mass.) 

(152 North Main St., Pena- 
cook, N. H.) 



1,300 61 School St. 

100 51 North Spring St. 

780, 74 Allison St. 

546 6 Center St. 

780 5 Chapel St. 

300 6 Avon St. 

7801 15 Court St. 

624 3 Fisher St. 

300 Concord, N. H., Route 5. 

650 22 Pillsbury St. 

546 16 Gladstone St. 

650 20 Dakin St. 

676 Concord, N. H., Route 6. 

Concord, N. H., Route 6. 



31 West St. 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 
1915. 



SUMMAEY. 

Boys. 

Number of children enumerated 1,462 

Decrease since 1914 

Number attending school since 1914 1,061 

Number attending public schools 1,113 

Number attending parochial schools 245 

Number attending private schools 8 

Number 5 to 16 not attending regularly 26 

Number 5 to 8 not attending regularly 17 

Number 8 to 14 not attending regularly 3 

Number 14 to 16 not attending regularly 6 

Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write 

the English language correctly 1 

Moved into the district since 1914 31 

NATIVITY OF PAEENT. 

American born 

Foreign born 

Eussia 

West Indies 

Italy 

New Brunswick 

England 

Poland , 

Sweden 

Eoumania 

Ireland 

Armenia 

French Canadian 

Denmark 

Turkey 

Germany 

Norway 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 

Finland 

Scotland 

Albania 

Austria 

Switzerland 

Holland 

Greece 

Australia 

Newfoundland 



Girls. 


Total. 


1,516 


2,978 




293 


786 


1,847 


1,173 


2,286 


233 


478 


9 


17 


13 


39 


8 


25 


4 


7 


3 


9 


1 


2 


46 


77 


1,198 




734 




21 




2 




52 




3 




73 




3 




135 




1 




120 




2 




201 




2 




1 




8 




2 




18 




25 




34 




7 




1 




1 




1 




2 




3 




1 




2 





160 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



NATIVITY OF CHILD. 

Boys. 

American born 1,390 

Foreign born 72 

Russia 3 

Italy 5 

England 11 

Sweden 7 

Ireland 4 

Armenia 

French Canadian 29 

Turkey 2 

Norway 

Prince Edward Island 2 

Scotland 

Albania 1 

Greece 2 

Nova Scotia 2 

Finland 3 

Australia 1 



Girls. 


Total. 


1,437 


2,827 


79 


151 


8 


11 


3 


8 


10 


21 


6 


13 


4 


8 


1 


1 


26 


55 





2 


1 


1 


3 


5 


5 


5 


2 


3 


2 


4 


4 


6 


3 


6 


1 


2 



FIRE-DRILLS. 







HIGH 


SCHOOL. 


October 7 




75 seconds. 


All doors open. 


October 29 




150 




Students all in Assembly Hall 


February 9 




80 




All doors open. 


March 5 




82 




All doors open. 


March 16. 




90 




East doors closed. 


April 1 




140 




Students all in Assembly Hall. 


April 29 




75 




All doors open. 


PAEKER SCHOOL 




EASTMAN SCHOOL. 


Oct. 15. 


55 


seconds. 


Sept. 16. 28 seconds. 


Nov. 16. 


53 






Dec. 4. 25 " 


Feb. 17. 


55 






Feb. 5. 25 '' 


March 11. 


50 






March 8. 25 " 


April 21. 


55 






April 8. 25 " 


May 5. 


55 






May 24. 25 " 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



161 



CHAKDLEE SCHOOL. 

Sept. 17. 45 seconds. 



Oct. 6. 


30 




Oct. 14. 


45 




Nov. 17. 


40 




March 3. 


50 




March 18. 


45 




April 5. 


45 




WALKER SCHOOL. 


March 16. 


90 


seconds 


May 25. 


85 


I ( 



PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

Sept. 21. 32 seconds. 

Oct. 20. 30 " 

Feb. 9. 30 " 

March 10. 29 " 

May 4. 29 " 

June 9. 28 " 

EEANKLIN SCHOOL. 
Oct. 8. 48 seconds. 



Dec. 1. 


47 




March 8. 


50 




March 16. 


38 




May 18. 


45 




May 25. 


45 




GAEEISON SCHOOL. 


Oct. 1. 


50 


seconds 


Dec. 10. 


55 




March 10. 


55 




April 2. 


50 




April 8. 


70 




April 12. 


70 




April 20. 


50 




May 18. 


55 





COGSWELL SCHOOL. 

Sept. 21. 26 seconds. 



Oct. 15. 


22 


March 1. 


20 


March 19. 


22 


May 4. 


20 



EUMFOED SCHOOL. 

Sept. 28. 90 seconds. 

Oct. 26. 75 " 

Dec. 11. 55 " 

March 2. 65 " 

March 18. 65 " 

May 12. 66 " 

May 26. 65 " 

TAHANTO SCHOOL. 

Sept; 29. 45 seconds. 



Nov. 



9. 45 



HAEEIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 

Oct. 21. 27 seconds. 

Dec. 1. 31 " 

Jan. 15. 30 " 

Jan. 22. 30 " 

April 9. 31 " 

April 27. 30 " 

KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

Oct. 19. 70 seconds. 

Nov. 30. 65 . " 

Dec. 14. 75 " 

March 16. 75 " 

April 9. 65 " 

May 7. 75 " 

DEWEY SCHOOL. 
Sept. 29. Not timed. 



Oct. 


6. 


( t 


1 1 


Oct. 


7. 


i I 


{ I 


Oct. 


15. 


50 


seconds. 


Nov. 




55 


< ( 


Jan. 


15. 


65 


< < 


Feb. 


24. 


65 


< ( 


April 


20. 


55 


1 1 


May 


6. 


55 


1 1 


MEEEIMACK 


SCHOOL 


Oct. 


2. 


50 


seconds. 


Dec. 




48 


< < 



162 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





Kind'n. 


ELEMENTARY 


YEAR. 




1 


2 


Class. 


1 and 2. 


A. 


B. 


C. 


T>. 




P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 


































































Walker 


54 

2S 






S 
6 


2 


17 
12 
7 
20 
20 
14 

iri 

13 
16 
14 


8 
4 
1 

4 
5 

1 

8 
1 


12 
13 


^2 


14 
10 
8 
19 
16 


4 









1 




3.") 
40 


3 



9 
6 

10 

14 


5 
7 
1 
6 



11 
10 

9 
11 

6 


5 

1 
3 
1 


1 


Kimball 


6 












20 
11 
10 
31 


4 




42 


1 







11 








7 


10 


7 


3 


1 




199 






Total 


4 


66 


40 


148 


35 


79 


30 


139 


28 














98. 02 


6 


2.26 


80.87 


72.49 


83.23 





















AVERAGE AGE 



High 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker . .. . 

Oarrlson 

Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame. 
Cogswell 



Average 



5 yr. 7 ra 



yr. 1 m 



/ yr. 

7 



7 yr.U m. 

8 4 



(25-34) 
6 



(51-51) 
10 



(09-30) 
1 



(07-59) 
11 



9yr. Om. 
S 3 
S 
9 11 



(75-37) 

8 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1915. 



163 



SCHOOLS. 



3 


4 


5 


6 


E. F. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 



































































































12 


5 
3 

""'4' 
5 
3 


21 
11 
10 
18 
13 
15 


1 
3 

1 
1 
3 
2 


18 


4 


16 
12 
11 
15 

8 
20 

9 
13 

7 


1 

10 
2 
4 
5 
5 
2 
2 
6 


10 



2 
• 5 


28 
11 
14 
17 
37 
20 


4 

1 
2 

1 

2 


8 
12 


4 

1 


23 
13 
11 
32 
41 


4 










2 


18 
8 
9 


16 
15 
15 
11 



7 
3 
3 
2 



19 
11 
19 


4 

2 


33 
32 


8 
3 


3 

7 












14 


1 


21 

8 



3 


12 


5 
















14 









11 


9 


















































73 


21 


117 


14 


75 


19 


111 


37 


71 


18 


141 


10 


85 


16 


131 


25 


77.65 


89.31 


79.78 


75.00 


79.77 


93.37 


84.15 


83.97 



PER CLASS. 









i 






































9yr. 5m. 
10 4 


9yr.llm. 

9 8 
9 3 

8 10 

9 7 
9 6 


10 yr. 8 m. 


llyr.llm. 
10 10 

10 8 
10 10 
10 3 

n 8 
10 5 

10 6 

11 5 


I2yr. 8 m. 

11 6 


12 yr. m. 

11 

12 10 

11 9 

12 9 

13 5 


13yr.3m. 
14 2 


14yr. 4m. 

12 4 






13 10 


9 3 
9 5 

8 7 


10 6 
10 4 

10 4 

11 1 


11 5 

12 5 
12 


12 5 

13 1 


14 1 
13 5 








9 1 


9 10 
10 4 


11 s 
13 1 
















14 2 




























(34-25) 
9 4 


(72-59) 
9 7 


(51-23) 
10 7 


(93-66) 
10 11 


(82-33) 
12 1 


(77-33) 
12 3 


(52-11) 
13 2 


(80-26) 
13 8 



164 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

MOVExMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





HIGH 


YEAR. 


7 


8 


Class. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 




P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 



High 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

EastniHn 

Runiford 

Kimball 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame. 
Cogswell 



Total . 



Per cent, promoted 



M 



124 



89.G1 



98.32 



95.38 



AVERAGE AGE 



High 
Parke 



Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman . 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame. 
Cogswell 



Average. 



14yr.0m 
13 10 



(41-12) 
14 C 



Hyr.Ti 
13 11 

13 6 

14 



14 yr. 7 lu. 



15 yr. m. 



(.M-24) 
14 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1915.— Continued. 



165 



SCHOOL. 


9 


10 


11 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


61 


20 


87 


12 


51 


11 


74 


7 


35 


5 


74 



































































































































































































































































































61 


20 


87 


12 


51 


11 


74 


7 


35 


5 


74 





75.30 


86.85 


■ 82.25 


91 .35 


87.50 


100.00 



PER ChAS^.— Continued. 



16 yr. m. 


10 yr. 9 m. 


17 yr. 6 m.' 


18 yr. 2 m. 


17 yr. 8 m. 


18 yr. Om. 

















































































































































16 


16 9 


17 6 


18 2 


17 8 18 



GRADUATING CLASSES, JUNE, 1915. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Name. 
J. Arthur Abbott, 
Ellen Helena Sofia Anderson, 
E. Forrest Band, 
Gladys Gertrude Batchelder, 
Eosalie Veronica Beckett, 
Frank Hoben Blodgett, 
Myra Ellen Bowers, 
Mildred Elizabeth Brown, 
Euth Olive Brown, 
Florence Mildred Carroll, 
Euth Kathryn Chase, 
Margaret Doris Clark, 
Lucile Cogswell, 
Arthur James Coyle, 
Mary Alice Currier, 
Helen C. Currier, 
Blanche Farnum Dimond, 
Florence Euth Doherty, 
Gladys Dole, 
Mary Ellen Ducey, 
Gerda Henrietta Ekstrom, 
Edith Caroline Ericson, 
Mary Margaret Farrell, 
Evelyn Deakin Fulford, 
Joseph Morrill Gale, 
Madeline Shaw Gibbs, 
Madeline Belle Gilman, 
Eebekah Goldberg, 
Alta G. Green, 
Lelia Mildred Hall, 
Muriel Laura Hall, 
Arthur E. Harris, 
Irene Winifred Hart, 
Marian Virginia Healey, 
Samuel Theodore Holmgren, 
Mabel May Jewett, 



Course. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 



167 



Name. 
Annie Gertrude Jones, 
Helen Frances Jones, 
Abraham Kaiiffman, 
Edward Joseph Kelley, 
Kathleen Mary Kelley, 
Alice Ida King, 
Vesta Knight, 
Margery Irene Lawrence, 
Lena Marian Leavitt, 
Alice Josephine Lindgren, 
Frank Augustine Mahoney, 
Stella Christina Marshall, 
Euth Marion McCaig, 
Mary Ellen McGoflf, 
Emma Bertha Milette, 
Alden Howard Moody, 
Paul Hayden Moore, 
Helen Ann Murphy, 
John Milne Murray, 
Ina Belle Mnttart, 
Ernest William Noonan, 
Ethel Gertrude Noonan, 
Margaret Theresa O'Brien, 
Lena Gertrude Ordway, 
Margaret Owen, 
Ella Mary Quinn, 
Caroline Pearson, 
Edward Albert Pichette, 
Poland Alvah Powell, 
John E. Keed, 
Gladys Ethel Saltmarsh, 
James Knowlton Sanborn, 
Earle Wesley Sawyer, 
Marian Farr Sawyer, 
Euth Marian Sinclair, 
Marion Beatrice Stuart, 
Denis Timothy Sullivan, 
Olive Louise Tabor, 
Marguerite M. Tetreault, 
Gertrude Kathleen Tittemore, 
Eva Anna Trombly, 
Mary Gertrude Wilson, 



Course. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 



168 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Name. 
Catherine Woods, 
Pauline Carter Wright, 
Charlotte Maude Young, 



Course. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 

Classical. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Chandler School. 



Axel Yillhelm Anderson, 

Maud Elizabeth Ash, 

Sadie Gertrude Ash, 

Ealph S. Badger, 

George Norris Bailey, 

Gordon Edward Bartlett, 

Martin Francis O'Donnell Beggs, 

Eoy Howard Blake, 

Ethel Irene Blanchette, 

Lillian Gertrude Blanchette, 

Arlene May Booth, 

Gene Everett Carroll, 

Percy Caswell, 

Dorothy Head Clark, 

Cecelia Margaret Conn, 

Katherine Elsie Crabbe, 

Euth Esther Dearborn, 

Leslie James Dixon, 

Marjorie Effie Douglass, 

Alida Eose Dufraine, 

Isadore John Edelstein, 

Ethel Felton, 

Wilbur Lea Fenton, 

Florence Emily Fulford, 

Harriet Gordon, 

Sarah Ellen Grant, 

Helen Gertrude Hadley, 

Carl William Harris, 

Frank Claredon Harris. 

Gladys Elizabeth Harris, 

Edward Eoe Haskell, 

Grace Minnie Haskell, 

Florence Victoria Hoagland, 

Helen Gwendolyn Jones, 



Shirley Wade Jones, 
Harry John Levin, 
William John Linipery, 
Willis Eichard Lyna, 
Carl Arthur Magnuson, 
Fred White Manu, 
Helen Mansur, 
Eugene Charles Maxam, 
Nathalie Florence McDonnell, 
Marjorie Elizabeth Veronica 

McGuire, 
Glenda Elvera Merrill, 
Bernard Emery Nelson, 
Myrtle Grace Osgood, 
Bevan Wilton Pierce, 
Forrest E. Proctor, 
Ellen Margaret Eeardon, 
Nellie Moulton Eiford, 
Porter Eoberts, 
Dorothy Eobinson, 
Freda Goldie Sargent, 
Willis James Sawyer, 
Milton Shapiro, 
Alice Emily Smith, 
Lloyd William Straw, 
Louise Mary Stuart, 
Doris Elizabeth Sturm, 
Edith May Unwin, 
Charles Dustin Waldron, 
Dorothy Elizabeth Watson, 
Herbert Gifford Stanley Wood, 
Frank Elmer Wright, 
Irene Althea Young. 
Leola Eobinson, January 29, 1915. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



169 



Walker School. 



Arthur Wesley Andrews, 

Evelyn Pearl Blackwood, 

George Louis Boulay, 

Clara Maria Drew, 

Humphrey Julian Emery, 

George Harold Evans, 

Mildred Elizabeth Hobson, 

Euth Lillian Josephine Holmgren, 

Agnes Vera Johnson, 

Carl Edward Gustaf Johnson, 

Stella Viola Johnson, 

Alice Lillian Keaton, 

Esther Sar 



Lydia Mary King, 
Dorilla Anna Levesque, 
Mildred Augusta Patterson, 
Abner Sewall Pearl, 
Arthur Vivian Perkins, 
Eena Bella Ploude, 
Lena Mary Eacine, 
Ehoda Catherine Eeily, 
Antonio Eossi, 
Nathaniel Sawyer, 
Edna May Smith, 
Eoland Charles Tippet, 
ah Treisman. 



Eastman School. 



Forrest S. Canney, 



George H. Chesley, 
Sarah A. Huston. 



GRADUATING CLASSES, JANUARY 28, 

1916. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Name. 
John Page Amsden, 
Gladys Veronica Clark, 
Hattie Mariam Dudley, 
Thomas Minot Dudley, 
Harold C. Gibson, 
Vera Lillian Hall, 
Eowena Merrill Holbrook, 
Thelma Elisabeth Howland, 
Leslie Henry Jones, 
Chester Linward Lane, 
Joseph Hilliard Lane, 
Frederic True Marden, 
Helen Pamelia Matthews, 
Mary Letitia Merrick, 
Winnifred Eose Phillips, 
Sadie Eabinovitz, 
Eva Dorothea Eossell, 
Alice Mae Spaulding, 
Albert Marden Sargent, 
Marion Etta Smith, 
Willard Ellsworth Spinney, 
James Fiddes Steele, 
Elsie Amy Walker, 
Vera Elenora Wester, 
Afton Belle WTiite, 
Donald Greeley White, 
Irene Bernice White, 



Course. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 



ELEMENTAEY SCHOOLS. 
Chandler School. 



Chester T. Adams, 
John W. Allquist, 
Adna H. Armstrong, 



William E. Augat, 
Lewis A. Ballard, 
Oliver E. Bennett, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



171 



Conrad O. J. Benson, 
Newell C. Benton, 
Wilfrid J. Boisvert, 
Zelia E. Bourassa, 
George A. Bourdeau, 
Eobert G. Brown, 
Earl J. Brunell, 
Harry H. Cameron, 
Ida L. Gate, 
Joseph L. Champigny, 
Anna E. Chapman, 
Henry :M. Clay, 
Harry B. Colby, 
Archibald D. Ciillum, 
Helen M. Curran, 
Charles C. Currier, Jr., 
Harold W. Cutter, 
Irma E. Davis, 
Oscar L. Drew, 
Eobert P. Dutton, 
Odilon Feltault, 
Gertrude E. Foote, 
Eolland H. Ford, 
Eva M. O. Fortin, 
John F. French, 
Mary A. Gooden, 
Harry P. Goodsell, 
Gwendoline B. Goodwin, 
George H. Gordon, 
Margaret A. Gordon, 
Flavius A. Harris, 
Maude E. Haskins, 
Eunice M. Haven, 
Mary F. Hawkins, 
Lillian A. Hearson, 
Allen E. Hillsgrove, 
Mary G. Hillsgrove, 
Franklin HoUis, 
Edith E. Hook, 
Ora M. Hurd, 
Helen G. Jones, 



George C. Kimball, 
Charles W. Kimball, 
Gertrude F. Knight, 
Charley E. Kunberger, 
Hazel E. Lacasse, 
Stewart A. Lyf ord, 
Anna M. Magnuson, 
Dorothy M. Martin, 
Howard T. Moore, 
Edna E. Morrill, 
Elizabeth Morrill, 
John A. Morrison, 
Alice E. Nettleton, 
Pauline M. Newman, 
John H. Nolan, 
Lloyd D. Nutting, 
Mariana B. Odlin, 
Dorothy W. Pray, 
Edith L. Eanquist, 
Fredric W. Eobinson, Jr., 
Jessie B. Eowell, 
Hazel M. Eoy, 
Eva M. Sanborn, 
Theada M. Sanborn, 
Eda Sanel, 
Nathan Sanel, 
Annie M. Sannel, 
Leo G. Savoy, 
Charles Silverman, 
Natalie Silverman, 
Oscar Silverman, 
Christina E. Smart, 
May E. Smith, 
Theodore M. Stewart, 
Eobert F. Sweeney, 
Mabel Symonds, 
Eeginald F. Terrill, 
Emma E. Tucker, 
Lloyd A. Venne, 
Marion E. "White, 
Emily C. Wilson. 



172 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Doris A. Bachelder, 
Eula A."F. Bowen, 
John E. Bramswell, 
Oliver J. Chapdelaine, 
Katherine L. Collins, 
Marion Davis, 
Elise M. Denis, 
Clara M. Drew, 
Linda B. Farnum, 
Edith L. Ford, 
Elmer A. S. Hammar, 
George A. Howard, 



Walker School. 

Arthur T. Johnson, 
Jennie P. Kemp, 
Edmund A. Laport, 
Pauline E. Mayo, 
Duncan Murdock, 
Carl G. A. Nelson, 
Maurice S. Nelson, 
, Harold A. Perkins, 
Dorothy M. Scott, 
Krekor Shaterian, 
Edward J. Twomey, 
Elizabeth Twomey, 
Clarence Tucker. 



Garrison School. 



Spencer D. Beaudoin, 
Lawrence H. Cotter, 
John N. Engel, 
Paul E. Ericson, 
Wilbro J. Koski, 
Herbert A. Follansbee, 
Eaymond C. Muttart, 



Morrill F. Shepard, 
Laurence T. Stevens, 
Cora E. Davis, 
Neva D. Lindgren, 
Edna I. Peterson, 
Gertrude L. Eossell, 
Ella A. Shepard. 



Harold B. Paige, 
Eoylston E. Sanderson, 
Ethel M. Gate, 



Eastman School. 



Honora J. E. Gate, 
Lottie I. Sargent, 
Tna L. Tebbetts. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



High School.— Arthur Abbott, Lena Leavitt, Florence Carroll (2), 
Gerda Ekstrom (2), Evelyn Fulford (5), Madeline Gibbs, Ruth Mc- 
Caig, Chester Lane (2), Donald White, Eodney Hill, Gladys Clark, 
Ethel Noonan (5), Eva Eossell, Edgar Bourke (3), Paul Flanders, 
Ariel Wood, Ernest King, Helen Davis (2), Laura Foote, Dorothy 
Kendall, Agnes Moberg, Ruth Morgan, Arthur Stevens, Florence 
King (4), Frank Merrill, Allan Leavitt (2), Doris Bartlett (2), Es- 
ther Calkins, Mary Stearns (2), Lottie Tittemore, Elmer Anderson, 
Hugh Cassidy (2), Raymond Chamberlin, Harold Fraser (2), George 
Houston (2), Parker Little, George Wooster (2), Dorothy Brown, 
Emily Brunell, Nora Cotter (2), Nannie Dahlgren (2), Ida Larson 
(2), Helen Madison (2), Ida Marquis, Rebecca Merrill, Ruth Peck- 
ham (2), Eleanor Phelps, Marie Roy (2), Helen Tebeau, Rose Val- 
liere (2), Carl Ekstrom, George Jones, Frederick Rossell, Helen Bun- 
ker, Marion Carroll, Gladys Carroll, Dorothy Daggett, Agnes Levin, 
Marion Lithgow, Beulah Nash, Dorothy Silver, Lora Sleeper, Clara 
Smith, Myra Woods. 

Parker School. — Ruth Barnard, Rufus Bond, Carmi Browne (4), 
Bertha G. Burton, Henry P. Callahan, James H. Casey, Aimee Corri- 
veau (5), Nora Cotter (3), Lawrence Danforth, Paul O. Davis (2), 
Louise Durrell, Guy O. Edmunds, Gladys French (2), Philip B. Gove 
(2), Fritz H. Gustafson, Clarence H. Hammond (2), Esther B. Hasel- 
ton, Cornelia H. Kimball (2), Arthur Kunberger (4), Ida M. Mcln- 
tire, Mary S. Shannon (2), Altha Walker (6). 

Chandler School. — Mildred S. Abbott, Harriet I. Albee, Harry 
Anderson, Gordon E. Bartlett, Martin F. Beggs, Elizabeth Benton, 
Mary E. Champagne, Lawton B. Chandler, Florence Fulford (2), S. 
Ellen Grant, Edgar S. Hammond, Gladys E. Harris, Joseph A. King, 
Harry J. Levin (3), Helen Mansur, Inza P. Mitchell, Helen A. Mor- 
gan, Helen I. Morrison, Arvilla E. Powell, Ellen M. Reardon, Howard 
B. Richardson, Ruth Robinson, Erie M. Sandquist, Lloyd W. Straw, 
Blanche E. Walker, Frances L. Wason. 



174 CITY OF CONCORD. 

"Walker School. — Arthur Odey, Madeline Potter, Gertrude Tippet, 
Dorilla Levesque, Mildred Patterson, Antonio Eossi, John E. Brans- 
well, Arthur T. Johnson, Edmund Laport, Martha Persons, Euth Salt- 
marsh', J. Henry Saltmarsh, Paul Otis, Arthur Flamand, Arthur Holm- 
gren, Ursula Sanders, Ivy Bobbins, Ealph Walters, Clifton Walters, 
Harry Hobson, John Simonian, Irene Heartz, Mildred Hobson, Ed- 
ward Lampron, Georgia L. Lampron, Catherine Mather, Dorothy 
Weathers. , 

Garrison School. — Laurence E. Cotter, Herbert E. FoUansbee, 
Bertha E. Danforth (2), Lily E. Silver (2), John M. Carlson, Eob- 
ert E. Coburn, Carl A. Dahlgren, Gustaf W. Forsberg (2), E. Jean- 
nette McLeod (2), Dan Swanson, Bernard S. Webster, Lillian M. 
Case, Ethel V. M. Johnson, Agnes V. Nelson, Arthur Anderson, Al- 
fred Hermansen, Sonia Mauritson, L^^no J. Huopila (2), Willo Kup- 
sala, Fanny Hermanson. 

Eastman School. — George C. Stuart, Sadie E. Brown, Arlene M. 
Stuart, Ethel M. Brown, Mable W. Gate, Mary E. Gate, Vesta P. Mor- 
rison, Dana S. Morrison, Harold A. Gate, Honora J. E. Gate, Dorothy 
W. Morrison, Harold B. Paige, Lottie I. Sargent. 

EuMFORD School.— Eobert P. Dutton (2), Schuyler M. Holbrook 
(2), Flavins A. Harris, Edgar C. Kunberger (2), Stuart A. Lyford 
(2), Eeginald F. Terrill, Eva M. Fortin, Alice E. Nettleton, Lillian 
Eanquist (2), Hazel M. Eoy (2), Eobert H. Nelson, Lawrence D. 
Gordon, Helen G. Miller (2), Euth A. Morrow (2), Eobert D. Bailey, 
Esther S. Armstrong (2), Ethel M. Carpenter, Bernice M. Bennett, 
Jerome E. Leavitt, Crosby H. Lewis, Evelyn E. McAllister, Lena B. 
Eobinson, Henry W. Carpente^-, Marion A. Donahoe, Leon S. Emery, 
Louise C. Gifford, Clarence S. Hoagland, Harriet McLeod, Earle C. 
Eobinson, Gardner H. Wales (2), Edna M. Carroll, Hazel W. Fifield 
(2), Alfred C. Kunberger, William C. Pluff, Gyrene E. Lewis, George 
L. Crockett, Eleanor M. Dutton, Danforth E. Gurley, Let'itia George, 
Gertrude Saltmarsh, Charles E. Chandler, Eleanor E. Gilford, Alfred 
Hyland, Esther L. Donahoe, Earl G. Hills, J. Kenneth McLeod, 
Evelyn E. Pluff, Annie Hyland, Lillian Sandquist. 

Kimball School. — Grace M. Chase, Eleanor M. Diversi, Hugh S. 
Morrison, Edward J. Shannon, Charles E. Zambs, Thelma Currier, 
Janice Griffin, Everett C. Benton, Harry Bartlett, Jack Mansur, Carl 
Badger, Donald Shaw. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 175 

Penacook School. — Leo~ Boisvert, Joseph Couture, Alvin Hussey, 
Frank Houston, Paul Holbrook, Andrew Lane, George Dennerly, Theo- 
dore Martell, Wilbur Tucker, Lulu Gordon, Frances Smythe, Charles 
Houston. 

Franklin School. — Vera Anderson, Carl Augat, Euth Cilley (2), 
Glynn Young, Oscar Sandquist, Engrid D. Rosendale, Rachel Bart- 
lett. 

Dewey School. — Frances E. Erskine, Helen Foster (4), Mary 
Home, Edwina Laflamme, Robert D. Morrison, Elizabeth Peckham. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Helen C. Foote, Charles F. Hillsgrove, 
Willard C. Ash, George R. Hillsgrove, Nelson S. Rogers, Warren 
Foote, Myrtle Hillsgrove, Evelyna Parenteau (2), Oscar Parenteau 
(2), Joseph Champigny, Allen Hillsgrove (4), Philip Parenteau, 
Eunice Haven. 

Cogswell School. — Raymond McAllister, Raymond McCaig, Ray- 
mond Young. 



HONOR LIST— HIGH SCHOOL. 



Pupils Who Have Attained an Average of A — ■ in Thehr 
Studies for the Past Year. 

High School. — Edith Ericson, Eebekah Goldberg, Alice Lindgren, 
Helen Murphy, Margaret Owen, Caroline Pearson, Olive Tabor, John 
Amsden, Vera Hall, Eowena Holbrook, Sadie Eabinovitz, Eva Ros- 
sell, Paul Flanders, Dorothy Kendall, Florence King, Fannie Kling, 
Agnes Moberg, Eichard Pearson, Julius Sturm, Mary Willis, Esther 
Calkins, Mary Stearns, Helen Barker, Miriam Batchelder, Hugh 
Cruikshank, Margaret Halligan, Ida Marquis, Eebecca Merrill, Euth 
Peckham, Amelia Pollard, Euth Chase, Astrid Olson, Nora Eeardon, 
Clara Smith. 

Parker School. — Eachel George, Eva Hadley, Margaret Mannion, 
Charles Roche, Lois Eundlett, Eleanor Alley, Eachel Andrews, Rachael 
Barker, Fred Brown, Elizabeth Chase, Haskell Cohn, Marion Colby, 
Madeline Curran, Esther Haselton, Parker Huntington, Agnes John- 
ston, Cornelia Kimball, Robert McCormick, Ida McFyre, Martha Page, 
Jean, Stearns, Wallace Stearns. 

Chandler School. — Elizabeth Benton, Lawton Chandler, Ruth Ly- 
ford, Helen Morgan, Helen Morrison, Annie Nordine, Eric Sandquist, 
Mary Walker, Frances Wason, Charles Winslow, Cecelia Conn, Kath- 
erine Crabbe, Alida Dufraine, Helen Hadley, Edward Haskell, Grace 
Haskell, William Limpery, Bevan Pierce, Freda Sargent, Alice Smith, 
Dorothy Watson, Leslie Dixon. 

Walker School. — George Boulay, Mildred Patterson, Nathaniel 
Sawyer. 

Garrison School. — Richard A. Henry, Jeannette B. Ryan. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS- HONOR LIST. 



Pupils Who Have Attained a ]\Iark of B — or Better 
FOR the Year. 

Walker School. — Linda B. Farnum, Edmund A. Laport, Harold 
A. Perkins, Eva M. Sanborn, Dorothy M. Scott, Clara Denis, Elise M. 
Denis, Elmar A. Hammar, Arthur T. Johnson, Gladys M. Leighton, 
Duncan Murdock, Ruth A. Saltmarsh, Walter II. Stanley, Clarence E. 
Tucker, Eobert G. Tucker, Jeannette Laplante, Arthur E. Nudd, Mar- 
tha D. Persons, Euth E. Yeadon, Bernice Berry, Frank George, Mar- 
guerite Fernald, Leonard Smith, Domine Bianco, Howard Hammar, 
Ralph Walters, Paul Traeey, Ruth Drew, Paul Lanipron, Albert Fi- 
field, Robert Reid, Robert Morrison, Theda Lafluer, Beatrice Trem- 
blay, Clarice Newbold, Paul Otis, Jennie Ford, Oramel Swain, Doug- 
las Everett, Kathleen Wall, Ursula Sanders, Jessie Sanborn, Richard 
Felton, Viola Carlson, Hoyt Reille, Roland Robinson, Dorothy Wil- 
lard, Edith Walker, Ellen Woodworth, Doris York, Helen Burbank, 
Pauline Ballard, Philip Guyol, Grover Paclat, Lawrence F. Ahern, 
Anna B. Clark, Ada M. Brown, Lawrence P. Donlin, Pauline F. Dun- 
stane, Gladys J. Hickox, Gunnar T. Olson, Raymond K. Perkins, A. 
Frederick Daggett, Madeline Hobson, Dorothy A. Hinds, Edward N. 
Lampron, C. Edward Morton, Richard A. Morton, Edward J. Odey, 
Delia J. Paige, Ellen F. Paige, Samuel E. Powers, Elnor L. Smith, 
Mabel E. Stanley, Lillian D. Sanders, C. Murray Sawyer, Margaret 
H. Rushlow, Katherine V. Wirrell, Daisy A. Wirrell, Robert T. Walker. 

Garrison School. — Gertrude L. Rossell, Ella A. Shepard, Spencer 
Beaudoin, Lawrence E. Cotter, John X. Eugel, Paul E. Ericson, Her- 
bert E. Follansbee, Morrill F. Shepard, Laurence T. Stevens, Neva I. 
Lindgren, Esther E. Muttart, Oscar J. Nordstrom, Dan Swanson, 
Emil H. Rylander, Freda A. Pearce, Mildred I. Vinton, Helen E. 
Ryan, Jeannette F. McLeod, Gustaf W. Forsberg, Axel C. Gustafson, 
Carl A. Dahlgren, Mary J. Henry, Rosez A. Chatman, Doris E. Toone, 
Margaret L. Brooks, Oscar T. Forsberg, Helen P. Rylander, S. Mar- 
jorie Matheson, Maurice B. Abare, M. Esther Gushing, Elsa Olson, 
Mila V. Lindgren, Louise D. Shepard, Olga V. Swenson, Ernest Swen- 
son, Ruth I. Swenson. 

12 



178 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Eastman School. — Francis E. Beane, Harold B. Paige, Eoylston 
E. Sanderson, Helen A. Abbott, Etiiel M. Gate, Honora J. E. Gate, 
Lottie I. Sargent, Ina L. Tebbetts, Ethel M. Brown, Warren Mc- 
Manis, P. Leon Mann, Caroline J. Gate, Goldie M. Gage, Lura A. 
French, Miriam E. French, Lester A. Maynard, Dorothy E. Staniels, 
.Vesta P. Morrison, Theresa I. Bombard, Nora A. Eoy, Bertha M. 
Lacroix, Hazel Blanchard, Mary E. Gate, Eiith A. Lewis, George C. 
Stuart, G. Pauline Tebbetts. 

EuMFORD School.— E. Lillian Eanquist, Alice E. Nettleton, Helen 
L. Gurran, Eva M. Fortin, Gorinne E. Wilson, Eeginald Terrill, Anna 
M. Magnuson, Marion L. McLaughlin, Hazel M. Eoy, Harry B. Colby, 
Henry M. Clay, Eobert P. Button, Conrad O. Benson, Flavins A. 
Harris, Annie M. Sannel, George D. Cloudman, C. Edgar Kunberger, 
John W. Allquist, Stewart A. Lyford, Nathan A. Sanel, Gertrude F. 
Knight, Pearl Parker, Ethel Eavitch, Euth Bailey, Euth Brew, Ellen 
Chase, Sarah Goldman, Margaret Lovejoy, Sophia Lucia, Helen Mil- 
ler, Merle Tabor, Euth Morrow, Eachel Sandquist, Joseph Brooks, 
Ealph Duemling, Eobert Nelson, George Welch, Ethel Carpenter, Ber- 
tha Carroll, Ida M. Cilley, J. Eldred Davie, Isadore Goldman, Leon 
Goldberg, Hazel Grant, Paul Maxham, Georgia Osgood, Eussell Saw- 
yer, Emma Trudell, Lillian Unwin, Marion Wason, Charles Benson, 
Jessie Cruikshank, Alice Haskell, Arlene Jellison, Jerome Leavitt, 
Lena Eobinson, Edward Sanel, Earl Sawyer, Edward Trudell, Hilda 
Wilenkin, Edith Baeeker, Martin Gurley, Helen Hutton, Gardner 
Wales, Abraham Baer, Jacob Eabinovitz, Dorothy Powell, Harry Par- 
ker, Dorothy Kiley, Bruce Duncan, Emiie Dupuis, Clifford Woodward, 
Henry Carpenter, Ernest Taylor, Clark Aldrich, Charles Brewster, 
Frank L. Clark, Leslie Knowlton, Edith Cruikshank, Louise E. Waite, 
Laurence I. Duncan, Herbert Geary, Kenneth M. Huckins, Emma J. 
Curtis, E. Stanley Benson, Eaymond S. Eoers, Hilda Miller. 

Kimball School. — Chester Adams, William Augat, Doris Bach- 
elder, Septimus Bellows, Eobert Brown, Anna Chapman, Sally Clem- 
ent, Harold W. Gutter, Marion Davis, Eileen Emerson, Gwendoline 
Goodwin, Margaret Gordon, George H. Gordon, Mary Hillsgrove, 
Franklin Hollis, Charles W. Kimball, George C. Kimball, John A. 
Morrison, Elizabeth Morrill, Marion Odlin, Dorothy Pray, Oscar Sil- 
verman, Mary E. Smith, Elizabeth Twomey, Marion White, George F. 
Abbott, Euth Anderson, George S. Copp, Mary E. Grutchfield, Janice 
Griffin, Harold W. Henry, Gertrude M. Hodge, Eoy C. Perry, William 
F. Smith, Euth E. Whittier, Hilda A. Buchan, Gertrude B. Champigny, 
Grace M. Chase, Gertrude N. Conn, Lena E. Corser, Percival H. Eve- 



SCHOOL REPORT, 179 

leth, Agnes E. Fenton, Margaret S. Jackman, Martha A. Lane, Mar- 
garet K. Lowell, Hugh S. Morrison, Dorothy R. Moberg, Edward J. 
Shannon, Allan I. Shapiro, Rowland H. Smith, Grace M. Spaulding, 
Frank C. Story, Hazel L. Tattle, Dorothy W. Twomey, Beatrice Winch, 
Virginia Morrill, Margaret Campbell, Elizabeth J. Dame, Eleanor M. 
Diversi, H. Raymond Kimball, Doris Abbott, Florence Philbriek, Jack 
Mansur, Clyde Gray, Mildred Dole, Fred Hodgmau, Malcolm Flanders, 
Harry Bartlett, Marjory Tenney, Waldo Sanborn, Elizabeth Norton, 
Dorothy Shepard, Stanley Pillsbury, John Jones, Everett Benton, 
Jean Gove, Katharine Graves, Charlotte Jackman, Ethalind Cooper, 
Madeline Haggett. 

Penacook School. — Merton Messer, Evith Holt, Arnold Lewis, 
Theodore Martell, Janet Chalmers, Clarence Morgan, Agnes Ring, 
Dorothy Batchelder, Wilbur Tucker, Rosa Wittenberg, Laura Lacail- 
lade, Eleanor Harris, Elmer Johnson, Kenneth Kimball, Madeline 
Roy, Grace Rice, Lulu Gordon, Frances Smythe, Alvin Hussey, Ruth 
Jackman, Ruth Olson, Myrna Simpson, Ruel Colby, Agnes Chalmers, 
Mable Maher, Constance Dimick, Helen Belrose, Lloyd Simpson, 
Eugene Olson, Myrtle Moody, Leon Calkins, Esther Duemling, Esther 
Magnuson, Thelma Silver, Gertrude Roy, Evelyn Johnson, Rachel 
Hall, Thomas Angwin, Dorothea Wheeler, Pasquello Chevalo. 

Franklin School.— Oscar Sandquist, Reginald Livingston, Stanley 
Gray, Lillian Hansen, Ruth Cilley. 

Dewey School. — Emma M. Flamand, Ruth E. Ford, Olive P. 
LaHar, Barbara Blake, Doris E. Brown, Helen Foster, Isabel M. 
Nicoll, Elizabeth Peekman, Germaine B. Scully, Constance Wood- 
worth, Harriet Barton, Martin Bengsch, Alice Boroian, Maurice H. 
Conn, Ida Crossland, Adella Flamand, Anna Henry, Mary Home, 
Laura Moran, Robert D. Morrison, Pauline Oyston, Laura Plummer, 
Esther Thompson, L. Dale Brown, Edward Bourdon, Margaret Lyon, 
Robert J. Prowse, Theodore R. Smith, Winnifred Wheeler. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Joseph Champigny, Oscar Drew, Fred- 
erick French, Gertrude Foote, Harry Goodsell, Everett Gognon, 
Eunice Haven, Allen Hillsgrove, Frederic Robinson, Leo Savoy, Clif- 
ton Stickney, Ha Ashland, Walter Davis, William Mahoney, Oscar 
Parenteau, James Sweet, Eva M. Haselton, Joseph H. Locke, Origen 
R. Phillips, Nelson S. Rogers, Ola L. Ashland, Ada V. Curtis, Louise 
C. Newton, Grace M. St.Cyr, Lillian S. St.Cyr, George R. Hills- 
grove. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To thf Boflrd of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Con- 
cord: 

Gentlemen : The trustees of the Public Library here- 
with submit the annual report of the librarian, which 
demonstrates that this institution is performing the work 
assigned to it with remarkable success, in view of the 
limited accommodations it has to contend with. 

During the past year a bequest for the benefit of the 
library under the will of Caroline E. H. Ela, amounting 
to $3,312.60, has been paid into the city treasury. Ac- 
cording to the terms of the will this fund is "to be 
known as the Joseph H. Hazeltine Fund," and the income 
is to be used "for the purchase of high-class literature." 

At the annual meeting in January the trustees voted 
that the city be requested to appropriate for the use of 
the library the sum of $6,000, which the trustees regard 
as reasonably necessary for the proper maintenance of 
the library. While this is an increase of $700 over the 
appropriation of last year, it is fully justified by increased 
expenditures authorized by the trustees for the coming 
year, in the pay of the library force, in the purchase of 
books, and in other respects. 

Respectfully submitted, 

REUBEN E. WALKER, 

President Board of Trustees. 
February 10, 1916. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1915. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen : The report showing the work of the 
library is herewith presented : 

Whole number of volumes January 1, 1915, 28,987 

Volumes purchased, 885 

Volumes received by gift, 35 

Bound periodicals, 80 

Worn-out volumes, 609 

Net increase, 391 



Total number of volumes December 31, 1915, 29,378 

Of the 885 purchased, 514 were new titles and 376 were 
replacing copies and duplicates ; 190 were new works of 
fiction. As the City of Erie buys annually 93 new stories, 
Buffalo 298, Cleveland 234, Utica 163, it would seem by 
this comparison that our buying shows liberality toward 
the fiction-lover, and yet stops far short of adding all the 
ephemeral novels. A rental collection such as is main- 
tained by many public libraries is rendered unnecessary 
in Concord because of Gibson's subscription library. 

The number of monthly magazines currently 

received is 55 

The number of w^eekly periodicals, 16 

The number of newspapers, 13 

The use of the library for the circulation of books has 
been the largest in eight years, and in twenty-six years 
has been exceeded only three times. As the Grand 
Rapids librarian says: ''The normal work of a public 
library makes little stir in a community, for everybody 
takes it as more or less a matter of course." But this 
library's custom, if one stops to consider its figures, is 



182 CITY OF CONCORD. 

surprisingly large and satisfactory in tendency, because 
the demands made by our public are of a quality which 
show an increasing understanding of the services they 
have a right to expect. This I maintain despite the pop- 
ularity of fiction : the circulation of that varies from 54 
per cent, in some libraries to 8-i in others ; with us it was 
70 per cent, in 1915 : that is a reduction over any previous 
year. 

The work of the reference department has increased in 
the freciuency with which material has been brought to- 
gether for students, debaters and writers ; 7,160 persons 
have been counted as seeking assistance in the reference 
room ; this is against 6,500 in 1914. Adding desk and 
reference figures, we do a 100,000 business. From other 
places have come inquiries to answer ; for this service we 
charge a minimum sum and require a temporary deposit 
if a book is taken away; 43 out-of-town applicants have 
been furnished information. I think the public has no 
idea of the great school use that is continually being made 
of our reference section. In the olden days children 
wrote compositions ; now they are told to prepare for an 
extempore speech, to M'rite a one-act play, and to know 
current world-conditions; and this having to look up all 
sorts of subjects obliges them to refer to every class of 
book. 

As it may have occurred to some persons to wonder 
whether a public library spreads disease, let me quote an 
authority in P&pulnr Science Monthly for July, 1914: 
"Disease germs . . . are not to any important extent 
brought in on books or toys or clothing, where, if any 
infection existed it has mostly dried up lastingly. Three 
types of transmission, alliteratively described as fingers, 
flies and food, account for ninety-nine eases of commu- 
nicable diseases out of a hundred.'' 

In September we undertook that revision of our list of 
borrowers which had long been needed, because this list 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 183 

was carrying the names of hundreds who had died or 
removed from town. Three thousand persons have re- 
registered in these three months ; over 200 of these have 
been taking books since 1890; 690 were new applicants. 
During the first seven days of this registration 1,352 came 
in to sign the new application blanks. 

That the library privileges are appreciated by many 
we have reason to know from the cordial attitude and 
words of nine-tenths of our customers, and from personal 
kindnesses we experience at their hands. By contrast, 
some of the young people who depend on the library both 
for pleasure reading and for help in their studies forget 
that there are certain obligations due from them. This 
ingratitude of naughty boys cuts deeply. On Sunday 
afternoons the reading-room has so frequently been dis- 
turbed by groups of youths who have come in for mis- 
chief that the supervision of a man is now exercised there 
weekly. We no longer display new juvenile books where 
they might rightfully and delightfully attract notice, be- 
cause lawless boys carry them off without waiting to have 
them charged. Scores of books thus abstracted have been 
left hidden in doorways and under the lumber piles 
around the post-office, and have kindly been brought back 
by men happening to find them. Two bound volumes of 
the Outlook were found on the top shelf of a store. Pen- 
holders and penknives vanish by the half-dozen from the 
reference-room, and besides these petty larcenies the 
library last fall was entered by someone, who rummaged 
for a scanty harvest of fine-money and postage-stamps. 
The librarian of Pittsburg says the Boy Scout movement 
has considerably improved the hoodlum element there; 
perhaps it will be of similar benefit here. 

We receive in exchange reports from over fifty public 
libraries ; they are usually larger institutions and most 
of the forward steps they are taking we cannot follow; 
yet I glean many an idea to talk over with the rest of the 



184 CITY OF CONCORD. 

staff; and here, where we seem to have touched the limit 
of our usefulness unless facilities for work are enlarged, 
it may prevent stagnation to discuss what we would like 
to do, even if we cannot do it. An assembly-room is made 
a part of every sizable new library, and though I am the 
one person still holding out against the movies as enter- 
tainment, I do realize their possible educational value, and 
I wish that for the good of our borrowers, especially of 
the many young foreigners we are enrolling, we had a 
hall and lantern-slides. As a library which is equipped 
with a reflectoscope reports: "How many will read a 
book on the Panama Canal? The total circulation of all 
the books we have on that subject will not equal the num- 
ber of people who have heard one of the illustrated lec- 
tures on the canal." The directors of the Shakespeare 
room in this building rented it one season to a depart- 
ment of the Woman's Club. I do not know that they 
would care to let it again ; but it seems rather a pity that 
so centrally located a room is not used more than tliree 
afternoons and one evening each week. I feel my own 
former attitude, namely, that we did not want the noise 
which people would make going up and down our stair- 
way, to have been that of a narrow and old-fashioned 
librarian, in view of the enjoyment and enlightenment to 
be derived by congenial groups meeting for lectures and 
classes. 

The city government, in the matter of appropriations, 
has been favorable to the library, but our requests have 
been modest, as a few figures will show: Rochester, N. H., 
with 8,868 population, grants $3,000 annually ; Dover, 
with 13,247, gives $5,800. "We have lately been receiving 
$5,300. It seems curious that twenty-five years ago, when 
the library administration was simpler and carried on at 
less expense, the city appropriation was more than once 
$6,000. The Haseltine bequest, which the president of the 
board has reported to you, will be most welcome as helping 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. ■ 185 

along the Hue of its specified object, i. e., the purchase of 
worth-while books. 

It is our building itself which does not expand, and all 
will admit that though adequate when it was moved into 
twenty-eight years ago, it does not satisfy present re- 
quirements. To cite one proof of this, the sixty children 
who came to the last story-hour had to sit packed closely 
together on the floor of the reference-room. As for our 
shelves, they are so crowded that we shall soon have to 
hire a storage place or discard volumes even more dar- 
ingly than we do at present. 

In closing, I wish to acknowledge our indebtedness to 
the local papers, which have been ready to call to the 
attention of their readers the exhibits and library news 
we have desired to emphasize. I want also to pay tribute 
to the efficient and cheerful aid my assistants give me 
when I am here, and to the good judgment and care they 
exercise when I am absent. Above all, I want to thank 
my Board of Trustees most heartily for their confidence 
and cordial support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

City Librarian. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : The Board of Health begs to submit the 
following report for the year ending December 31, 1915 : 

The board was organized as follows : Mayor Charles J. 
French, ex-officio, chairman ; Dr. Charles H. Cook, city 
physician, secretary ; and Dr. F. A. Sprague acting as the 
third member. 

There has been a regular meeting on the first Monday 
of each month, as well as several special meetings. 

Four cases of smallpox were reported during the year 
and as this board had to assume the entire care of one of 
the cases it became necessary to open up the detention 
hospital in the Plains district for the first time in many 
years. The care of this case, including nursing, food for 
patient and nurse, and various supplies needed during the 
six weeks' quarantine, incurred a considerable item of 
expense which should be taken into consideration when 
the total expenditures of the department are under dis- 
cussion. 

An outbreak of diphtheria in the Penacook school in 
December was promptly checked by daily inspection of 
the school children. Cultures were taken from the 
throats and thus several so-called carrier cases were de- 
tected. When these were excluded from school and prop- 
erly treated no further cases developed. 

The reports of Health Officer Charles E. Palmer and 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT, ' 187 

of Milk Inspector Dr. Charles Duncan are hereby trans- 
mitted and made a part of this report. To these reports 
we refer you for details. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, 
CHAS. H. COOK, 
FRED A. SPRAGUE, 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : The general health report will give a tab- 
ulation of the number of milk examinations and will also 
give the findings of the inspector. 

The milk inspector receives so many inquiries about 
milk and particularly our own Concord milk supply that I 
am taking the liberty of making this report a general dis- 
cussion of the whole milk question. 

Milk in Concord, as everywhere else in the world, is* 
the best and cheapest food in the market ; not only is it 
the best and cheapest, but it is for reasons every family 
with children knows an indispensable food. 

Milk is a perishable food ; not only is it perishable, but 
it has wide variations as to its food value, according as 
to how it is produced and cared for till consumed. There 
is milk and milk that differ in their value as food, just as 
there is butter and butter, and cheese and cheese, that 
have different food value. 

The question the consumer asks is, "Do I get a clean, 
wholesome milk for a reasonable price?" In Concord 
the answer is "Yes." Different communities answer this 
question with greater or less difficulty, according as the 
authorities in charge of the health of the citizens possess 
the requisite knowledge, and it is too true that many 
communities cannot answer it at all. The health author- 
ities should possess, a knowledge of the cows from which 
their milk supply comes, a knowledge of the conditions 
under which they are housed and fed, a knowledge of the 
methods of handling the product and a knowledge of the 
individuals who have to do with both the production and 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 189 

the delivery. We should, in other words, be able to fol- 
low the milk from the cow to the consumer and know 
what is happening to it every minute of the time. For 
the small community this is a simple problem, but for the 
large community it is great and complexing; to the small 
community it means inspection under competent oiRcials. 
The large community cannot solve it by inspection, and 
consequently the large community has its class of citizens 
who say that pasteurization is the only solution for a safe 
milk supply. 

Let us consider a few of these problems which allows 
Concord to say it may have a safe, wholesome milk 
supply. 

A discussion of the cow may become an endless one if 
we go into the subject of breeds. The breed is a factor 
in the wiiolesomeness and quality of the milk there is no 
doubt, and milk of one breed has a greater market value 
than that of others, but as yet milk is not bought and 
sold on its true food value and does not enter the discus- 
sion because the laws of New Hampshire are all shaped 
to permit the milk that has the lowest food value being 
sold. What is required of the inspector under the law 
is that a milk sold is pure, unadulterated cow's milk. 

The public, however, has other interests in the cow. 
All communities have laws demanding that the product 
shall be from a healthy, clean cow. I have in previous 
reports spoken of tuberculosis and the disease of cattle 
and will not repeat it here, only to say that it is not easy 
to determine by inspection whether a cow is infected with 
tuberculosis or other disease ; hence I believe that every 
citizen is entitled to milk from a tuberculin-tested cow. 
Laws now do not require this, but there are laws, unjust, 
I believe, that now give the producer of milk a premium 
of a cent or two per quart for his product if he keeps 
his herd tuberculin-tested. 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

How COWS are housed and fed should be a matter of 
the inspector's record, and such record is of the greatest 
value to the health of the community. Proper air, light, 
food, and frequent carding for the cow means a cleaner, 
more wholesome milk, free from dirt, bacteria, and in 
many instances pus of udder infection. 

After milking, the care of the milk is all-important ; a 
bitter tasting, feedy, cowey-smelling milk is not a whole- 
some food. Milk should be handled and cared for by 
clean persons in clean places, as other food we eat and 
enjoy. Unsanitary handling by unsanitary persons 
means milk of impaired food value and may mean milk 
contaminated and capable of producing and spreading 
the various infectious diseases, and in many cases is re- 
sponsible for epidemic sore throats. 

Inspection for sanitary instruction for the handling of 
milk is Concord's privilege. It has replaced examination 
in part, but goes hand in hand with examination for the 
determination of efficiency. 

The man who delivers the milk at your door is worthy 
of your greatest consideration. He has the care of your 
milk for a considerable period of time and in many cases 
is the very man who produces it, especially in the small 
community. Sometimes he is the man who knows noth- 
ing about the milk before he gets it, and because he does 
not know, you will not, unless your city has an inspector 
who has looked up this man's supply. This limited 
knowledge of the conditions of the source of milk is the 
large city's greatest evil. It has created the class of citi- 
zens who demand the assembling and pastuerization of 
all milk sold, and who even insist that it then be sent out 
in sealed packages to prevent further contamination, cer- 
tainly a wise precaution where the source of milk cannot 
be properly inspected and the rules of sanitation enforced, 
and since pastuerized milk is as good and wholesome as 
is the raw product. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 191 

Lack of knowledge of the source of the city's milk 
supply is responsible for almost endless discussion and 
many laws of all kinds and descriptions relative to in- 
spection, transportation and handling, and has led to 
great confusion and misunderstanding. 

The man who delivers your milk should hand it to you 
cold, with a well-marked division of top and bottom milk, 
and without dirt in the bottom of the bottle. 

Concord is fortunate that the source of her supply of 
milk is easily a matter of inspection ; that the price of the 
m;ilk is low for its quality, and this fact is seen to be 
responsible for many changes in the personnel of those 
who deliver at our door, for it is not a lucrative vocation. 

Much has been done here and elsewhere in milk inspec- 
tion and much more may be attempted. Efficiency means 
clean methods, whatever the equipment. It means coop- 
eration between farmer and consumer, middleman and 
health authorities, but it means best of all the life and 
health of the babies, and should receive our heartfelt and 
soulfelt enthusiasm that the enterprise might flourish. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : Herewith is submitted the annual report 
of the sanitary officer for the year ending December 31, 
1915. Your attention is respectfully called to the tables 
attached, which show in detail the work of the depart- 
ment. 

The expenditures for the year exceeded our appropria- 
tion by $345.09, and this deficit was entirely due to the 
assistance required by persons placed in quarantine. The 
expenses for the case of smallpox which was cared for 
at the isolation hospital in the summer was $266.44. The 
total expenses for the department were $3,095.09, and 
the receipts were $202.98. 

The total number of deaths in Concord for the year 
1915 were 466, including 146 deaths of non-residents and 
20 still-births, which were not included in the death rate. 
Estimating the population at 22,000, this gave Concord 
a death-rate of 13.63. The deaths in the various w^ards 
of the city totaled 265 and at the public institutions 201. 
Transit permits to the number of 179 were issued for the 
removal of bodies to other places for burial. There were 
97 bodies brought to Concord for interment in our ceme- 
,teries. 

Reports of 94 cases of contagious diseases were made 
to this office, with two deaths resulting. During the 
year the State Board of Health ruled that whooping 
cough must be reported, and w^hile houses were not pla- 
carded, a record was made of all cases brought to our 
attention. In April, the first case of smallpox in nine 
years was reported and quarantine w^as immediately es- 
tablished at the home of the patient. This patient, an 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 193 

adult, had been traveling in the South, where he doubt- 
less contracted the disease. In July, two more cases were 
reported in one family and the house was placarded and 
quarantine established. We feel that if quarantine regu- 
lations are obeyed it is as safe to care for smallpox in a pri- 
vate home as a case of scarlet fever or diphtheria. Our 
fourth case of this disease was that of a young lady living 
in a boarding-house, and as soon as the diagnosis was made 
she was removed to the isolation hospital, where she was 
cared for in a very comfortable manner. While the cases 
were of a marked type, none proved fatal, all recovering 
satisfactorily. Quarantine for smallpox is maintained for 
six weeks from the date of the first symptoms of the dis- 
ease. Your attention is called to the contagious disease 
table, which gives the diseases as reported each month. 

Fewer complaints w^ere received during the year than 
for many years passed, due in part to the coolness of the 
summer months and partly to the fact that people are 
realizing more than ever the rights of their neighbors 
and thereby eliminating nuisances before complaints are 
made to this office. There were 175 complaints and in- 
spections made during the year, which were due to dead 
animals, keeping hens and pigs, odors from stables, un- 
covered garbage, broken catch-basin traps, uncleanly 
privy vaults, and plumbing out of repair, the throwing 
out of slops and swill and uncleanly conditions of and 
about premises. As usual, many complaints were re- 
ceived which were hard to classify, but which required 
time and attention to abate. The year brought numerous 
complaints of unsightly dumps, and while this depart- 
ment recognizes the fact that it is an advantage to the 
city to have lots filled in with desirable material, we still 
feel that the ashes and other rubbish should be covered 
over with sand or gravel to keep these dumps from be- 
coming a nuisance to the neighborhoods in which they 
exist. 



194 CITY OF CONCORD. 

As in former years, inspections were made of all the 
barber shops in the city and conditions were found to be 
satisfactory in every shop visited. 

At the last session of the state legislature a law was 
passed restricting the use of the common towel in public 
halls, schools, hotels, churches, barber shops, stores, rail- 
road stations, and other public places, this statute to be 
enforced by the local health officer. Fifty notices were 
served in Concord, ordering compliance with this law. 
At several places visited paper towels were found in use 
and nearly everyone seemed willing and ready to comply 
with the laAV. 

Letters were sent to the school authorities asking for 
their cooperation in helping enforce the vaccination law. 
Parents are so familiar with this law that in most cases 
children were vaccinated Avithout direct orders from this 
department, but in instances where the teachers were un- 
able to procure certificates, notices were sent to the 
parents ordering compliance with the law within a rea- 
sonable time ; if our notices were not complied with the 
children were excluded from school. 

A large amount of fumigating was necessar}' during the 
year and the formaldehyde candle was used in most cases, 
it being impossible to obtain potassium-permanganate at 
a reasonable cost. These candles are easy and safe to 
use and the results are good. 

Inspections were made of as many milk farms as time 
from other duties would permit. A majority of the dairies 
visited were found to be in good condition and the pro- 
ducers complying with our regulations. When a dairy 
was found showing lack of care, suggestions were given 
the owner as how best to improve the conditions of his 
place. Many times a coat of whitewash on the interior 
of a stable and the carding-down of the cows each day 
is all that is necessary to put a dairy into satisfactory 
shape. Much good would be accomplished if more time 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 195 

could be given to inspecting dairies, but with one horse 
it is impossible to visit all these farms which are situated 
from three to ten or twelve miles from the city. With 
the aid of an automobile the ground could be covered two 
or three times each year, and I am confident that great 
good would result from more frequent inspection. 

In closing my report I wish to thank the members of 
the Board of Health and the members of the city govern- 
ment for their assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



196 city of concord. 

Financial Statement of the Board of Health for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1915. 

appropriation. 

Salary, sanitary officer... $1,500.00 

Salary, milk inspector 300.00 

Fumigation supplies 100.00 

Antitoxin and medical supplies 150.00 

Incidental expenses 700.00 

Resolution No. 217 345.09 

Total $3,095.09 

expenditures. 

Salary, sanitary officer $1,500.00 

Salary, milk inspector 300.00 

Fumigation supplies 91.00 

Antitoxin and medical supplies 10.35 

Incidental expenses 1,193.74 

Total $3,095.09 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1915. 

Milk license fees $196.55 

Sale of fumigation supplies 6.43 

Total $202.98 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



197 



The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom: 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Small- 
pox. 


Whooping 
cough. 


Measles. 


Opthalmia 
Neonato- 
rum. 


Months. 


1 


4) 

Q 


0) 


<v 
Q 


i 


a 


i 

O 




(D 

Q 


J3 
si 
Q 


a 


*3 




03 

Q 


January 
























j 




February.. 






























March 


2 

1 




2 
2 
4 
2 
3 
4 
1 
6 
2 

26 




2 












2 








April 




1 














May 










1 


1 


5 








June 


1 
2 

1 

14 

21 








1 












July 




1 


3 












1 




August 














September. 
























October.... 


im 


3 

1 
1 








7 
5 
12 












November. 












December.. 


... 

1 


4 


^^ 




2 
9 
















Totals.. 


8 


25 


1 




1 





198 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMPARATIVE TABLE. 



The following table contains the number of cases of 
contagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for 
the years since and including 1890 : 





Opthalmia 
neonato- 
rum. 


Whooping 
cough. 


Infantile 
paralysis. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals. 


Years. 


a 




CD 

a 
O 


(D 


Ol 




OS aj 

o a 


o 

IS 

O 


a 


0) 

5 




1 

s 


a 


O 






Q 


1890 ... 














6 
12 
13 
48 
17 
35 
55 
13 
4 
9 
29 
65 
29 
42 
55 
15 
14 
63 
44 
131 

.:o 

51 
17 
33 
30 
21 


2 
3 
3 
7 
3 
8 
8 
1 

5 
5 
5 
2 

4 

1 
2 

2 
4 
6 
1 
2 

1 
3 


9 

7 

37 

41 

113 

44 

4 

8 
99 
30 
11 

6 
39 
18 
8(1 
27 
2G 

23 
10 

8 

28 
28 
26 


3 

6 

8 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


17 
14 
7 
13 
13 
21 
15 

1' 
8 
14 
18 
13 

17 
12 

32 
11 
6 
28 
10 
10 
15 
10 
7 
8 


5 
6 
1 
2 

3 

5 

2 

4 

1 
1 
3 

1 

3 

1 
4 

4 
1 
2 
1 


6 

2 
300 
21 
158 
452 
138 
126 








38 

35 

59 

402 

164 

2.58 

526 

190 

146 

421 

562 

130 

87 

682 

116 

299 

175 

218 

157 

1350 

199 

95 

362 

763 

74 

94 


7 


1891 




















<t 


1892 




















7 


1803 ... 














9 


1894 




















n 


1895 




















19 


18% 




















13 


1897 




















4 


1898 


















4 


1899 






















1900 














476 

40 

27 

582 

31 

181 

101 

118 

100 

1168 

143 

26 

321 

687 

6 

<) 


1 

4 


1 
2 
2 


1 


7 


1901 . .. 














9 


1902 














5 


1903 














11 


1904 














4 


1905... . 














1 

1 






5 


1906 














6 


1907 
















1908 




















5 


1909 














1 






11 


1910 














o 


1911 




















6 


1912 










5 
3 


1 
1 


2 






8 


1913 










5 


1914 










9. 


1915. ;... 


1 




25 


1 




4 












"i 





health department. 19.9 

Report of IMilk Examinations and Inspection of Milk 

Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 160 

Number of examinations above standard, 154 

Number of examinations below standard, 6 

Number of milk farms and milk rooms inspected, 40 

Conditions good, 25 

Conditions fair, 11 

Conditions poor, 4 

Number of notices and recommendations given, 15 

De-\ths Reported by Wards and Public Institutions. 

Ward 1, 35 

Ward 2, 13 

Ward 3, 16 

Ward 4, 40 

Ward 5, 32 

Ward 6, 41 

Ward 7, 41 

Ward 8, 25 

Ward 9, 21 

New Hampshire State Hospital, 122 

Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital, 51 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 18 

New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, 3 

New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged, 7 

Not stated, 1 

Deaths by Age. 

*Under 1 year, 49 

From 1 to 5 years, 11 

From 5 to 10 years, 3 

From 10 to 15 years, 2 



Including 20 still-births. 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

From 15 to 20 years, 6 

From 20 to 30 years, 20 

From 30 to 40 years, 36 

From 40 to 50 years, 43 

From 50 to 60 years, 69 

From 60 to 70 years, 69 

From 70 to 80 years, ' 93 

From 80 to 90 years, 54 

Over 90 years, 10 

Not stated, 1 



Total number of deaths, 466 

Deaths During 1915 by Sex, Condition, and Nativity. 

Sex: 

Males, 227 

Females, 239 

Condition : 

Married, 175 

Single, 135 

Widowed, 147 

Divorced, 5 

Not stated, 4 

Nativity : 

Concord, 109 

New Hampshire, 155 

Other states, 89 

Foreign, 98 

Not stated, 15 



health department. 201 

Causes of Deaths for the Year Ending December 31, 

1915. 



Cause. 


No. of deaths. 


Accident, automobile, 


2 


burns, 


1 


drowning, 


3 


railroad, 


3 


Acidosis, 


5 


Adeno-sareoma of ovary. 


1 


Alcoholism, 


1 


Anemia, pernicious. 


1 


secondary. 


1 


Angina pectoris. 


7 


Apoplexy, 


9 


Appendicitis, 


1 


Asphyxia neonatorum, 


1 


Atheroma, cerebral, 


1 


Brain tumor, 


1 


Bright 's disease. 


2 


Bronchitis, 


8 


capillary. 


1 


Cancer of axilla. 


1 


of breast. 


3 


of breast, arm, hand, side, back, and neck, 1 


of colon. 


1 


of liver. 


2 


of lungs (metastatic), 


1 


of pancreas. 


1 


of spleen. 


1 


of stomach, 


4 


of stomach and liver. 


1 


of thorax, 


1 


of thyroid gland, 


1 


of uterus, 


4 


Carcinoma of vulva, 


1 


Cardio-renal sclerosis. 


3 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cause. No. 


of deaths, 


Congenital debility, 


2 


Congestion, pulmonary. 


1 


Convulsions (broncho-pneumonia) , 


1 


Convulsions (premature birth), 


1 


Cystitis, 


1 


Dementia, 


2 


Diabetes, 


6 


Dysentery, 


1 


Edema, cerebral. 


2 


of lungs, 


1 


Embolism, 


1 


cardiac, 


1 


Encephalitis, 


2 


Endocarditis, 


12 


Enteritis, gastro-. 


2 


Epilepsy, 


3 


Erysipelas, 


1 


Esophagus, stricture of 


1 


Foramen ovale, non-closure of, 


1 


Gangrene, 


2 


Heart, diseases of. 


64 


Hemiplegia, 


1 


Hemorrhage, cerebral, 


30 


pulmonary, 


2 


Hemorrhagica, purpura. 


1 


Hepatitis, acute. 


1 


Hiccough (cerebral arterio-selerosis), 


1 


Hydrocephalus, 


1 


Ileus, 


1 


Imperfect development. 


1 


Inanition, acute (persistent vomiting). 


1 


(under 1 year), 


2 


Indigestion (cardiac and respiratory paralysis), 


1 


Influenza, 


2 


Intestinal obstruction. 


1 


La Grippe, 


2 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 203 



Cause. 


No. of deaths. 


Lepto-meningitis, chronic, 


1 


Leukemia, myeloid, 


1 


Liver, cirrhosis of, 


2 


Malformation, congenital. 


3 


Malnutrition (loss of blood due to accident), 


1 


Meningitis, tubercular. 


2 


Myocarditis, 


4 


Nephritis, 


20 


diffuse. 


2 


interstitial. 


11 


parenchymatous. 


3 


Nephrosis, pyelo-. 


1 


Ovarian cyst (ovanotomy exhaustion). 


1 


Pancreatitis, acute hemorrhagic. 


1 


Paralysis agitans. 


1 


(not insane), 


4 


of brain. 


1 


Paresis, 


17 


Pellagra, 


1 


Peritonitis ( appendicitis) , 


2> 


general. 


1 


(performing ulcer of stomach). 


1 


suppurative (pelvic abscess), 


1 


tubercular. 


1 


Pleurisy, hemorrhagic. 


1 


with effusion, 


1 


Pneumonia, 


11 


broncho. 


11 


lobar. 


7 


Poisoning from carbolic acid. 


1 


Premature birth, 


5 


Ptomain poisoning, 


1 


Pyemia from' abscess. 


1 


(pneumonia). 


1 


Pylephlebitis, suppurative. 


1 


Sapremia (diabetic gangrene). 


1 



204 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cause. No. 


of deathi 


Sarcoma of breast, 


1 


of lungs, 


1 


of ovary, 


1 


Sclerosis, arterio-, 


15 


Senile debility, 


8 


Septicemia ( arthritis ) , 


1 


(cystitis and enlarged prostate), 


1 


from absorption. 


1 


(infection of prostate gland), 


1 


general (ulcerations on leg). 


1 


Stenosis, aortic. 


1 


Still-born, 


20 


Suicide, 


7 


Surgical shock (curetage for retained secundine), 


1 


(hysterectomy). 


3 


Tetanus, 


1 


Thrombosis, cerebral. 


6 


Tubercular laryngitis, 


1 


Tuberculosis of intestines. 


1 


pulmonary, 


33 


Tumor (probably fibroid of uterus), 


1 


Typhoid fever, 


1 


Unknown (natural causes), 


1 


Uremic coma (pregnancy). 


1 


Whooping cough, 


1 



Total, 466 

Total number of deaths for the year 1915, 466, com- 
pared with 472, 1914. 

Average death-rate for the year 1915, 13.63, compared 
with 13.26, 1914. 

Total number of births for the year 1915, 429, compared 
with 417, 1914. 

Total number of marriages for the year 1915, 181, com- 
pared with 216, 1914. 



health deiwrtment. 205 

Summary. 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 247 

Burial permits issued, 466 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies 

brought here, 97 

Transit permits issued, 179 
Number of persons to whom milk licenses were 

issued, 201 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses 

were issued, 49 
Number of reports of contagious diseases sent 

to the State Board of Health, 52 
Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, 

Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service, 52 
Number of samples of water, etc., collected for 

analysis, 7 
Number of inspections of barber shops, 20 
Number of nuisances, complaints, and inspections, 175 
Number of rooms, etc., fumigated, 631 
Number of plumbing permits granted, 114 
Number of inspections of plumbing, 228 
Number of sewers connected, 45 
Number of notices served requiring compliance 
with "An Act to Restrict the Use of the Com- 
mon Towel," 50 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



Concord, N. H., January 1, 1916. 

To His Honor the Mayon and the Honorable Board of 
Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit herewith to 
your honorable board my seventh annual report of the 
work performed by the members of the police department 
of the City of Concord for the year ending December 31, 
1915. 

ROSTER. 

City Marshal. 

George A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant City Marshal. 

Victor I. Moore, 

Captain. 

Samuel L. Bachelder. 

Sergeant. 

Christopher T. "Wallace. 

Regular Patrolmen. 

Samuel Rodd, Harry L. "Woodward, 

Irving B. Robinson, Fred N. Marden, 

George H. Silsby, Charles H. Guilbault, 

Edward J. McGirr, Frank B. McDaniels, 

Joseph E. Silva, John B. Long, 

James J. Halligan. 

Richard McGarey, Chauffeur. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



207 



Special Reserve Officers. 
Captain. 



Thomas P. Davis. 



Willie A. Little, 
Charles E. Kelley, 
George G. Allen, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
John McGirr, 
Nelson Forest, 
Thomas M. Harrison, 



Willie A. Flanders, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
Earl D. Gaskell, 
George E. Drury, 
James Jepson, 
Jonas Welcome, 



Walter H. Bean. 



Total appropriation for 1915, 


$18,827.56 


Special appropriation, 


687.31 


Total, 


$19,514.87 


Disbursements. 




Fuel (city). 


$433.53 


Fuel (Penacook), 


112.58 


Helmets and buttons. 


53.41 


Horse hire (city and Penacook), 


40.75 


Board and shoeing horse. 


115.85 


Ice, 


17.34 


Incidentals, 


1,361.59 


Salaries of regulars. 


14,807.45 


Salaries of specials, 


2,018.30 


Janitor, 


75.00 


Lights, 


236.60 


Police signal, 


242.47 



Total, 



$19,514.87 



208 





CITY OF CONCORD. 






Number 


OF 


Arrests 


. 


1909, 








281 


1910, 








586 


1911, 








1,076 


1912, 
1913, 








1,366 
1,556 


1914, 








1,850 



"Whole Number of Arrests and Causes for the 
Year 1915. 

Whole number of arrests, including Penacook, 1,599 

Whole number of arrests at Penacook, 117 

Brought before the court, 1,022 

Discharged by ' the court, 3 
Discharged without being brought before the court, 574 

Overspeeding motorcycle, 3 

Fornication, 2 

Escaped boys from Industrial School, 3 

Not stopping auto when requested to by an officer, 3 

Eloping, 2 

Escaped insane, 3 

Cruelty to animals, 2 

Building brush tires, 1 

Assault on police officer, 1 

Abusing a horse, 1 

Stubborn child, 1 

Adultery, 7 

Assault, 24 

Obstructing an officer, 1 

Assault with intent to kill, 3 

Bastardy, 4 

Deserter (caught), 1 

Beastiality, 1 

Drunks, including Penacook, 996 

Escape from the Home for the Feeble-Minded, 1 

Failing to send child to school, 3 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 209 

Robbery, 3 

Escape from the House of Correction, 5 

Evading carfare, 7 

Overspeeding auto, 2 

Running auto when drunk, 5 

For out-of-town officers, 8 

Insane, 18 

Stealing ride on Boston & ]\Iaine train, 2 

Receiving stolen goods, 2 

Larceny, 28 

Disorderly conduct, 8 

Spitting on floor in Boston & Maine depot, 1 

Safekeeping, 339 

Burglary, 3 

Fighting in street, 6 

Runaway girls from out-of-town, 2 

Pawn-brokering without a license, 1 

Interfering with a locomotive, ' 1 

Out-of-town boys caught, 5 

Selling skimmed milk, 1 

Disorderly person, 1 

Idle person, 7 

Runaway boys from the Industrial School, 2 

Selling misbranded and adulterated foods, 1 

Begging, 10 

Deserting a baby, 2 

Practicing palmistry, 1 

Non-support, 14 

Committing a nuisance, 1 

Accessory, 1 

False pretence, 1 

IManslaughter, 1 

Selling liquor without a license, 1 

Fraud, ' 2 

Enticing away a female child for immoral purposes, 1 

Embezzlement, 1 

Cruelty to children, 2 



210 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Exchanging a horse unfit for labor, 2 

Disorderly house, 1 

Arrested for out-of-town police, 5 

Gambling, » 3 

Prostitutes, 4 

Bujdng liquor for a man on the blacklist, 1 

Tearing down fence, 2 

Shooting deer with a rifle, 1 

Overspeeding a horse, 3 

Misbranding food, 1 

Keeping liquor for sale, 1 

Rape, , 1 

Concealing property attached by a sheriff, 1 

Arrested for sheriff, 1 

Obscene words, 2 

Exposing person, 1 

Driving auto through funeral procession, 1 

Peeping-Tom, 1 

Defrauding, 1 

Miscellaneous. 

Bound over to higher court, 33 

Committed to jail, 25 

Committed to house of correction, 376 

Committed to asylum, 17 

Mittimus not to issue until 'tailed for, 7 

Appeal to higher court, 5 

Nol prossed, 26 

Sentence suspended, 317 

Mittimus called for by the judge, 4 

Runaway horses caught by police, 4 
Complaint about boys sliding across vailroad track, 13 
Old persons strayed away from home and taken 

home by police, 3 

Water pipes reported burst, 3 

Runaway children, 4 

Officers attending fires, 83 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 211 

Animals reported to S. P. C. A., - 7 

Fires found by police, 5 

Complaint about dogs, 10 

Wires reported down, 17 

Officers called upon to remove people injured, 14 

Officers called upon to remove people dead, 5 
Horses taken from the street on account of the cold, 5 

Lost children found in the street and taken home, 26 

Holes in bridges reported to street department, 2 

Holes in street reported to street department, 13 

Holes in sidewalk reported to street department, 9 

Insane people found on street, 2 

Persons asphyxiated by gas, 2 

Limbs of trees reported down in street, 14 

People killed in auto accident, 1 

Complaints investigated, 89 

Complaints of dogs biting people, 4 

Dogs killed by police, 3 
Bo3^s caught who ran away from the Feeble-Minded 

Home, 1 

Accidents investigated, 21 

Complaint about boys riding Avheels on sidewalks, 7 

People found dead in rooms, 3 

Houses looked after during summer months, 9 
Merchants notified of burst water-pipes or damage 

by water, 11 

Complaints of autos running Avithout lights, 26 

People given medical attendance at the station, 17 
Number of times doors of business places tried, 794,970 
Lodgers, 2,586 

Number of doors found open, 524 

Called to quell disturbances, 38 

Stray teams found, 3 

Stray horses found, 5 

Ambulance calls, 158 

Emergency calls for pulmotor, 8 
Number of calls on police boxes, 51,544 



212 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Nine-months-old baby found on steps, 1 

Injured people cared for at the police station, 6 

Brush fires reported to the station, 2 

Complaints of roosters crowing nights, 3 

Dead people taken from the river, 4 

Suicides, 5. 

Dogs run over by autos, 6 

People run into by autos, 10 

Complaints of horses and cows in the street, 2 

Horse shot by police officer, 1 

Autos run into teams, 10 

Boys breaking windows, 25 

Nigger heads reported to street department, 2 

Horses found cast, 2 

Complaint of dogs killing hens, 5 

Officers assisting at drowning accidents, 6 

Parents abusing children, 2 

Lights reported out by police, 661 
Out-of-town runaway boys detained and sent home, 9 
Out-of-town runaway girls detained and sent home, 2 

Ambulance emergency calls, 23 

Fire alarms rung in by officers, 2 

Location of Police Signal Boxes. 

Bridge Street and Stickney Avenue. 

South IMain and West Streets. 

South Main and Concord Streets. 

South JMain and Pleasant Streets. 

Nortli i\Iain and School Streets. 

North Main and Park Streets. 

Washington, between North ]\Iain and State 

Streets. 
North Main and Church Streets. 
North State and Penacook Streets. 
Curtice Avenue and North State Street. 
West Concord, opposite Shepard's store. 



Box 


1. 


Box 


2. 


Box 


3. 


Box 


4. 


Box 


5. 


Box 


6. 


Box 


7. 


Box 


8. 


Box 


9. 


Box 


10. 


Box 


11. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 213 

Box 12. Penacook (square). 

Box 13. Center, opposite Union Street. 

Box 14. South and Perley Streets. 

Box 15. Broadway, corner Carter Street. 

Box 16. Center and Pine Streets. 

Box 17. Pleasant and South Streets. 

Box 18. School and Giles Streets. 

Box 19. Beacon and Rumford Streets. 

Recommendations. 

I recommend that a suitable room be constructed for 
the detention of women and juveniles, and that the old 
ward room be remodeled into a guard-room for the 
officers. 

I think that a pulmotor would be a good asset for the 
department. 

Conclusion. 

The new combination auto patrol and ambulance has 
added efficiency to the department. Calls are attended to 
much more quickly, and it is much more satisfactory than 
the horse-drawn vehicle. 

I desire to extend my sincere thanks to His Honor the 
Mayor and to the members of your honorable board for 
the courteous treatment and cordial support I have re- 
ceived at your hands in discharging the duties of the 
office. I also extend my heartfelt thanks to Judge Clark, 
City Solicitor Murchie, Clerk Robinson, and all others 
who have assisted during the year. To the members of 
the police department, I have only words of praise for 
the manner in which they have performed their duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. A. S. KIMBALL, 

• City Marshal. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1915. 

The department responded to 49 bell alarms and 295 still 
alarms. 

In addition, two fires occurred, entailing loss, for which 
no alarms were given, making a total of 346 for the year, 
an increase of 33 compared with the record of the previous 
year. 

Bell. Still. No alarm. Total. 

Precinct, 27 227 1 255 

Penacook, 8 38 1 47 

East Concord, 9 12 .... 21 

West Concord, 5 18 .... 23 



49 295 2 346 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete roll of 
the department with residence and occupation of each mem- 
ber, a record of all fires and alarms which have occurred 
during the year and the causes thereof as nearly as could 
be ascertained, w'ith the names of the owners or occupants 
and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance recovered in 
each ease. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 215 

But two really dangerous fires occurred during the 
year, those of July 24 and August 5, the First Methodist 
Church and the State Hospital. 

Tavo auto combination cars were placed in commission 
during the year. — one Winton six-cylinder at the Good 
Will station, and one White four-cylinder at the Old Fort 
station, making a total of four now in the department. 
All are fully meeting expectations. 

Three horses were disposed of, two by way of sale, and 
one in trade for another. 

The complement of hose was increased by 800 feet. 

One motor-generator charging outfit for charging stor- 
age batteries was also purchased. 

The apparatus is in good condition and no extensive 
repairs were required during the year. 

The fire alarm telegraph system is also in good condi- 
tion. 

At an expense of approximately $500 a new battery 
rack was placed in position and all of the battery elements 
were renewed. No alarm boxes were added. 

The alarm system at Penacook is also in good condi- 
tion, and one new box was installed. 

It is a well known fact that in a few sections of the city 
conditions relative to water pressure are not of the best. 
To remedy these conditions I respectfully recommend the 
purchase of an auto combination pumping engine and hose 
car. I would also respectfully recommend the purchase 
of 500 feet of 2y2-inch hose. 

As inspector of wires I would report that what little 
there has been to do in the line of removing dead wires 
and remedying defects has been attended to. 

As inspector of buildings I would report that property 
owners are yielding cheerful compliance to the require- 
ments of the fire escape law ; that several buildings have 
been equipped during the year and plans have been drawn 
for many more. 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

On June 7, upon invitation of jNIayor French and my- 
self, the Fire Chiefs' Club, of Massachusetts, of which we 
are members, visited the city and were given a demonstra- 
tion of protective facilities in the business section. 

I wish to give assurance that the action of your honor- 
able body in providing for the entertainment of the guests 
was thoroughly appreciated by all concerned. 

During the month of September, I had the pleasure of 
attending the convention of the International Association 
of Fire Engineers held at Cincinnati, a report of which I 
rendered at that time. 

I wish again to take occasion to thank your honorable 
body for the opportunity afforded me to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 



Appropriations. 

Appropriations, $28,801.00 

Resolution, outstanding claims, 2,079.70 



$30,880.70 



Disbursements. 



Permanent men, 


$10,634.00 


Vacations, 


478.85 


Call men. 


. 9,090.00 


Rent, Veterans' Association, 


150.00 


House man, 


100.00 


Forage, 


1,871.66 


Fuel, 


1,089.12 


Lights, 


703.68 


Incidentals, 


3,365.14 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 217 



Horse shoeing, 


$341.47 


Horse hire, 


707.20 


Fire alarm, 


1,172.49 


Penaeook fire alarm, 


198.10 


Supplies, auto-combination, 


126.99 


Hose, 


800.00 


Laundry, 


52.00 


ALARMS. 




Precinct. 





$30,880.70 



Still. January 1, 5.09 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dr. Sibley Morrill, 31 Green Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. January 2, 3.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of R, E. Baraby, 18 Monroe Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. January 2, 8.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. A. Cheney, 73 North Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. January 4, 12.06 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Michael Highland, 81/4 Curtice Avenue. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. January 5, 2.45 p. m. Awning owned by the 
Mohican Company, 9 South Main Street, damaged. Caused 
probably by cigarette stub thrown from above. Combi- 
nation Company responded but no assistance was required. 
Extinguished by occupants. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Awning, $10.00 $5.00 $5.00 $5.00 

Still. January 9, 9.05. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. E. Gould, 2 Chandler Street. Extinguished by Combi- 
nation Company. No loss. 



218 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 9, 12.42 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. Tebeau, 4 Mayo Court. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. No loss. 

Still. January 14, 1.50 p. m. Fire in kitchen in resi- 
dence of J. W. Cirves, 76 North Spring Street. Caused by 
breaking of bottle of alcohol over stove. Combination 
Company responded but no assistance was required. Ex- 
tinguished by occupants. Loss trifling. 

2-2-2. January 18, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. January 19, 7.11 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Ahearn, 198 North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. January 20, 4.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Marsh, 14 Holly Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

No Alarm. January 25, 6.10 p. m. Fire in clothes 
closet in residence of W. J. Sawyer, 44 Thorndike Street. 
Caused by spontaneous combustion. Extinguished by oc- 
cupants. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $1,200.00 $25.00 $300.00 $25.00 

Still. January 26, 7.11 p. m. Slight fire in basement 
of residence of George W. Byers, 60 Church Street. 
Caused by overheated smoke pipe. Combination Com- 
pany responded but no assistance was required. Extin- 
guished by occupants. No loss. 

Still. January 26, 7.20 p. m. Fire reported in base- 
ment of new unoccupied block, corner of North State and 
Centre Streets. Combination Company being in service, 
Kearsarge wagon sent. Furnace door being open led to 
the belief that a fire was in progress. No fire. 

StilI). January 30, 7.40 p. m. Slight fire in store of 
A. H. Britton & Co., 12 North IMain Street. Caused by 
OA^erheated chimney. Detail sent from Central Station. 
Chimnev watched through the night. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 219 

Box 48. January 31, 9.43 a. m, Fire in double tene- 
ment house 45-47 Thorndike Street owned by Mrs. Cora 
E. Tozier and occupied by owner and A. Provost. Caused 
by overheated chimney. Seven hundred fifty feet of hose 
wet. Recall, 10.34 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


$600.00 


$2,000.00 


$600.00 


Contents : 










A. Provost, 


900.00 


150.00 


None. 


None, 


C. Tozier, 


1,000.00 


99.50 


600.00 


99.50 



Still. January 31, 10.22 a. m. Slight fire under sink 
in residence ot* J. D. Nichols, 63 School Street, caused by 
attempt to thaw water pipe with newspapers. Combina- 
tion Company responded, but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

Still. February 1, 11.59 a. m. Fire in laundry of 
building, 34 South Main Street, owned and occupied by 
St. Mary's School. Caused by wooden partition bearing 
upon heater used for drying purposes. Combination 
Company responded but the fire had assumed such pro- 
portions that a bell alarm was sent in as a precautionary 
measure. 

Box 43. February, 12.06 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Seven hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 
12.41 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $6,000.00 $122.61 $5,000.00 $122.61 

Still. February 1, 1.49 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. W. White, 95 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. February 2, 12.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. Gould, 2 Chandler Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 



220 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 2, 8.31 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Ernest Lewis, 35 Thompson Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. February 3, 11.18 a. ra. Slight fire in paper 
sheets in Rumford Printing- Company building, Depot 
Street. Cause unknown. Extinguished by Combination 
Company and employes. No loss. 

Still. February 7, 7.28 a. ra. Fire in residence 119 
North State Street owned and occupied by Andrew 
lioven. Caused by overheated smoke pipe. Combina- 
tion Company responded, but later it was found neces- 
sary to send in a bell alarm. See next alarm. 

Box 17. February 7, 7.40 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Two hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 8.31 
a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$1,500.00 


$220.00 


$1,000.00 


$220.00 


Contents, 


600.00 


65.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. February 10, 11.49 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Miss Lizzie Mclntire, 77 School Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. February 11, 11.07 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. C. Schoolcraft, 5 Church Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. February 12, 5.31 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Norris. 87 North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

STiLii. February 13, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in Me- 
Shane block, 3 Odd Fellows Avenue. Combination Com- 
pany responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Box 24. February 14, 12.59 a. m. Fire in bed in resi- 
dence at 6 Centre Street. Caused by roomer smoking in 
bed. Extinguished by Combination Company. Needless 
alarm. Recall, 1.15 a. m. Loss, trifling. 

Still. February 17, 2.30 a. m. Set of buildings on 
Garvin's Falls road owned and occupied by S. A. Rich- 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 221 

ardson destroyed. Cause unknown. These buildings 
were located far from protection and nothing could be 
done toward saving them. Kearsarge wagon and detail 
sent, however. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Buildings, 


$700.00 


$700.00 


$300.00 


$300.00 


Contents, 


500.00 


500.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. February 18, 7.39 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Patrick Jordan, 12 North Spring Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 4.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. A. Belleveau, 46 Laurel Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 7.36 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles E. Pike, 4 ^Merrimack Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. February 22, 6.47 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. A. Ashland, North Pembroke Road near Rob- 
inson Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. 
No loss. 

Still. February 24, 7.47 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. A. Bartlett, 105 South State Street. Combi- 
nation Company responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. No loss. 

2-2-2. February 25, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. February 25, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. H. S. Willcox, 286 Pleasant Street. Extin- 
guished by detail from Central Station sent with chief's 
buggy. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Alfred Boulay, Rock-side, Plains district. As 
the river was over the road making it impossible to send 
aid from the city proper, David J. Adams, a resident of 
the Plains and a member of the department, was des- 
patched to the scene by auto, with pony extinguishers, 
and soon had it in hand. No loss. 



222 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 27, 12.48 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. P. Ballard, Long Pond road. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. February 27, 1.21 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph King, 24 Woodman Street. Combination 
Company being in service Kearsarge wagon and detail 
from Central Station sent. No loss. 

Still. February 27, 1.26 p. m. Fire in ofSce of Lee 
Bros, plumbing shop, 12 Pleasant Street. Caused by 
throwing of match into waste basket filled with paper. 
Loss confined to desk under which the basket set. Com- 
bination and Kearsarge wagon being in service Eagle 
wagon and detail from Central Station sent. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $1,500.00 $60.00 $1,500.00 $60.00 

Still. February 27, 3.12 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
in residence of John Kiley, 14 Walker Street. Combina- 
tion Company responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. February 28, 7.28 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. M. Carter, South Street, near Wheeler's Cor- 
ner. Extinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 1, 7.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Edward Plummer, Weston Street, Plains district. Ex- 
tinguished by D. J. Adams, member of the department 
and resident of said district. No loss. 

Still. March 3, 7.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. H. Towle, 65 Perley Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 4, 1.56 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Stickney block, 120 North Main Street. Com- 
bination Company responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. No fire. 

Still. March 5, 7.59 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. J. O'Neil, 115 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

Still. March 8, 6.51 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 32 
Hall Street. Combination Company responded but no 
assistance was required. Extinguished by railroad em- 
ployee. No loss. 

Still. March 9, 1.50 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 24 
Hall Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. 
No loss. ' 

Still. ^March 11, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. A. Boutwell, 48 Monroe Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 12, 7.27 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John George, 205 North Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. Loss trifling. 

Still. March 12, 12.40 p. m. Slight fire on piazza 
roof of residence, 2214 South State Street, owned by the Lee 
Bros. Associates. Extinguished by Combination Company. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $4,500.00 $5.69 $2,500.00 $5.69 

Still. March 13, 2.45 p. m. Slight awning fire at 16 
Warren Street. Combination Company responded but 
no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. March 13, 3.13 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Cunningham, 54 Church Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 14, 3.20 a. m. Slight fire in residence 7 
Blake Street owned by tlie Ann Woodward heirs and 
occupied by Clarence Allen. Caused by explosion of 
kerosene lamp. Extinguished by occupants and detail 
from Central Station. 





Value. 


Loss. Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$3,800.00 


$7.00 $2,500.00 


$7.00 


Contents, 


1,000.00 


40.00 500.00 


40.00 



Still. March 15, 6.08 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George B. Lauder, 26 Franklin Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 



224 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. March 16, 10.44 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 13 
Curtice Avenue, Extinguished by Combination Com- 
pany. No loss. 

4-4-4. March 16, 10.59 a. m. Grass fire on the Denton 
place. Oak Hill road. Combination Company, barge and 
detail sent under command of Engineer W. J. Cotfin. 
Barge stopped by telephone at East Concord, word hav- 
ing been received that the fire was under control. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 19, 2.49 p. m. Slight fire in basement 
of residence of H. L. Knowlton, 1 Marshall Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination Company with horse-drawn 
chemical engine, as the auto combination was temporarily 
out of commission on account of broken spring. Fire 
caused by bagging coming in contact with lighted gas 
jet. No loss. 

Still. March 19, 3.44 p. m. Chimney fire in the H. 
0. Matthews paint shop, rear of old state prison shop. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 20, 9.55 a. m. Grass fire at 9 Eastman 
Street. Combination Company responded but no assist- 
ance was required. Extinguished by residents of vicin- 
ity. No loss. 

Still. March 20, 3.11 p. m. Grass fire, North State 
Street, opposite pumping station. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. ]\larch 21, 9.24 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Carleano, 20 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. ]\[arch 21, 10.06 a. m. Fire on roof of resi- 
dence 9 Merrimack Street owned and occupied by H. B. 
Roby. Caused by sparks from chimney. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $5,000.00 $15.00 $3,500.00 $15.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

Still. March 21, 1.39 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. McDonald. 5 South Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 22, 9.35 p. m. Chimney fire in the 
George Abbott, Jr., paint shop, rear of 70 North Main 
Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. No 
loss. 

Still. ]\rarch 24, 11.19 a. m. Grass fire on Hall 
Street north of The Pines. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. . No loss. 

4-4-4. March 24, 1.20 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 220 
Pleasant Street. Barge and detail sent under command 
of Engineer S. T. Ford. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. March 24, 1.21 p. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Extinguished by Combination Company and detail. No 
loss. 

Still. March 25, 10.18 a. m. Grass fire at 123 Rum- 
ford Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. 
No loss. 

Still. March 25, 12.04 p. m. Grass fire on Kimball 
playground. North State Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 25, 12.44 p. m. Grass fire on Hall Street 
south of Hammond. Extinguished bj^ Combination Com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. ]\rarch 27, 8.05 a. m. Reported chimney fire at 
3 Prince Street. Combination responded but no assist- 
ance was required. No fire. 

Still. ]\[arch 27, 8.29 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of :\rartin Steve, 212 North State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 8.45 a. m. As Combination Com- 
pany was about to leave the scene of preceding fire it was 
discovered that the roof of the next residence north, 
2121/^ North State Street, owned and occupied by James 
McGuire, was burning. Caused by sparks from chimney. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. Loss trifling. 

16 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 

4-4-4. March 27, 11.57 a. m. Brush fire on Long Pond 
road opposite the John Jordan place. Combination Com- 
pany sent and barge ordered for detail. Before a start 
was made by the barge word was received by telephone 
that the fire was under control which was not the case. 
Combination Company, however, by hard work succeeded 
in extinguishing it. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 2.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Mercier, 3 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 2.40 p. m. Brush fire on Penacook 
Street opposite the reservoir. Detail sent in auto in 
charge of D. J. Adams. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. ]\Iarch 27, 4.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Tardif, 28 Perley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 28, 9.38 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph LaFlamme, 128 Pleasant Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 28, 3.14 p. m. Grass fire on the Silk 
Farm Road. Extinguished by St. Paul's School boys and 
Combination Company. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. March 28, 3.42 p. m. Grass fire on North State 
Street opposite the pumping station. Combination Com- 
pany being in service, detail from Central Station sent 
with horse-drawn chemical engine. No loss. 

Still. March 29, 5.13 p. m. Slight fire in building 
43 North Main Street owned by the Lee Associates and 
occupied by John J. Lee as a bowling alley. Caused by 
cigarette stub thrown against mopboard. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $15,000.00 $10.00 $10,000.00 $10.00 

Still. March 30, 9.30 a. m. Fire on roof of residence 
212^/2 North State Street owned and occupied by James 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 227 

McGuire. Caused by sparks from chimney. Second time 
within three days. Extinguished by Combination Com- 
pany. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $500.00 $15.00 $400.00 $15.00 

Still. March 30, 10.05 a. m. Grass fire at the corner 
of Penacook and Rumford Streets. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 30, 12.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Horace Moody, 80 South State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. March 30, 4.16 p. m. Brush fire on Penacook 
Street near reservoir. Extinguished by Combination 
Company. No loss. 

Still. March 30, 4.20 p. m. Grass fire on Hall Street 
south of Hammond Street. Combination Company being 
in service Kearsarge wagon and detail sent. 

Box 53. March 30, 4.25 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire, houses being in danger. Recall, 5.10 p. m. 
Seven hundred fifty feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. March 30, 4.45 p. m. Grass fire on grounds of 
the Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. Probably started by 
steam fire engine while on the way to preceding fire. 
Extinguished by detail from Eagle Company. Three 
hundred feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. March 31, 6.03 a. m. Slight fire on roof of res- 
idence 9 Bradley Street. Caused by sparks from chimney. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. 

Box 14. March 31, 6.08 a. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Needless alarm. Recall, 6.25 a. m. 

Still. April 2, 10.02 a. m. Brush fire west of Rum- 
ford Street opposite Albin Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 3, 11.04 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Ora Parker, 14 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 



228 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. April 3, 1.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. J. S. Button, 21 Lyndon Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 4, 5.18 a. m. Fire in brooder, 7 Green 
Street, owned by D. R. Strong. Sixty-five chickens per- 
ished. Caused by explosion of oil heater. Combination 
responded but no assistance was required. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Brooder, 


$5.00 


$5.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


11.70 


11.70 


None. 


None. 



Still. April 7, 6.01 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
0. T. Burnham, 175 South ]\Iain Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 5.28 p. m. Alarm occasioned by blow- 
ing of fuse in electric street car, corner of Pleasant and 
Green Streets. Combination Company responded but no 
assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 2.58 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Clough, 5^/^ Curtice Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 11, 7.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of K. Hagopign, 18 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 12, 1.38 p. m. Grass fire corner of Church 
and Bradley Streets. Combination Company responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 12, 6.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Menhaum Sect, 9 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 13, 9.06 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Grand, 3 ]\Iyrtle Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 14, 12.17 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Huntley, 39 Centre Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 229 

Still. April 16, 12.10 p. m. Fire in building 127 
South Main Street owned by G. B, "Whittredge and occu- 
pied by C. A. Bunker, grocer. Caused by carelessness in 
filling kerosene oil tank. Combination Company re- 
sponded but before arrival a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 45. April 16, 12.12 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Two thousand seven hundred fifty feet of hose 
wet. Recall, 1.15 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. .Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $500.00 $2,200.00 $500.00 

Contents, unadjusted. In litigation. 

Still. April 16, 3.37 p. m. Grass fire at 151 North 
State Street. Combination Company responded, but no 
assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 17, 10.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Lowry, 49 Green Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 8.22 a. m. Brush fire south of the 
Concord Gun Club grounds. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. Loss trifling. 

Still. April 18, 12.20 p. m. Brush fire opposite 61 
Penacook Street. Extinguished by Combination Com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 1.17 p. m. Brush fire on Gull}^ Hill. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 1.18 p. m. Brush fire on Rumford 
Street, near the stone crusher. Kearsarge wagon and 
detail sent. 

Still. April 18, 1.23 p. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Detail from Good Will sent in automobile. 

Still. April 18, 1.30 p. m. Continuation of preceding 
fire. Combmation Company having extinguished the 
Gully Hill fire, dispatched to the scene. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 5.24 p. m. Grass fire on the Fan Road, 
near the Day icehouses. Extinguished by Combination 
Company. No loss. 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 54. April 19, 9.04 a. m. Residence, 52 Pillsbury 
Street, owned and occupied by Gertrude M. Smith. Goods 
stored by Walter E. Huntoon. Caused by explosion of oil 
stove. Two thousand, one hundred feet of hose wet. Re- 
call, 10.12 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $1,310.00 $2,500.00 $1,310.00 

Contents : 

G. M. Smith, 1,500.00 380.90 1,000.00 380.90 

W. E. Huntoon, 200.00 41.55 100.00 41.55 

Still. April 20, 9.23 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Mulligan, 65 Penacook Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 20, 2.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. J. Hawkins, 54 Perley Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 20, 4.12 p. m. Brush fire opposite 65 Pen- 
acook Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. 
No loss. 

Still. April 21, 8.26 a. m. Slight fire in residence of 
C. L. Jackman, 79 Centre Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. Caused by overheated smokepipe. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. April 21, 9.20 a. m. Slight fire in residence, 24 
Lyndon Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. 
Caused by hot ashes in wooden barrel. Loss trifling. 

Still. April 21, 1.32 p. m. Grass fire, corner of North 
State and Penacook Streets. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 1.53 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. M. Belrose, 103 Broadway. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. M. Morrison, 13 Waverley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 231 

Still. April 22, 12.55 p. m. Brush fire on Broadway, 
south of Rollins Park. Extinguished by Combination 
Company. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 2.45 p. m. Brush fire on High Street 
Extension. Extinguished by Combination Company. No 
loss. 

Still. April 22, 3.56 p. m. Brush fire on Farnum land, 
opposite the prison. Extinguished by Combination Com- 
pany. Labored one and one-half hours. No loss. 

Box 191. April 22, 2.13 p. m. Fire in residence, 36 
Auburn Street, owned and occupied by W. C. and Hattie 
E. Davis. Cause unknown. Two thousand, eight hundred 
fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 10.35 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,800.00 $2,376.00 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

Contents, 1,700.00 436.89 800.00 436.89 

Still. April 24, 9.03 p. m. Dump fire on Wyman lot, 
north of Franklin Street and west of Rumford Street. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 25, 8.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Stella Newman, 28 North Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. L. Jellison, 3 Merrimack Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 1.33 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Exchange Block, 98 North Main Street. Com- 
bination Company responded, but no assistance was re- 
quired. No fire. 

Still. April 26, 3.13 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 56 
Hall Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. No 
loss. 

Still. April 26, 10.20 p. m. A call for assistance from 
West Concord. Combination Company responded and wet 
five hundred feet of hose. See West Concord report. 



232 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. April 27, 11.29 a. m. Brush fire on South Pem- 
broke Street, soutli of tlie camp grounds. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. April 27, 5.49 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. Frank Webster, 6 Cambridge Street. Combination 
Company responded, but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

2-2-2. April 30, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

No Alarm. May 1. Slight fire in residence of George 
L. Osgood, 9 Thompson Street. Caused by head of match 
flying into draperies. Extinguished by occupants. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $1,500.00 $9.00 $1,000.00 $9.00 

Still. May 3, 8.37 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. Isaac King, 12 Foster Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 3, 10.14 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. H. Sanders, 11 Chapel Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 3, 8.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
S. 0. Dow, Clinton Street, near Turkey Pond. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 7, 2.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
F. G. Crowell, 51 Washington Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 11, 11.08 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. E. Carr, 9 Chestnut ^treet. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 11, 1.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. B. Quint, 271 South Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 14, 9 a. m. Slight fire in automobile at 49 
South State Street. Extinguished by members of Good 
Will Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 233 

Still. May 15, 2.47 p. m. Brush fire on Long Pond 
Road, near the John Jordan place, resultant upon demon- 
stration under auspices of state officials, of an infallible 
fire extinguisher in powder form, especially valuable in 
subduing forest fires. The result was failure most evident, 
as the instant the torch was applied the services of the 
Combination Company were earnestly requested. No loss. 

Still. May 16, 2.53 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Cornelius Doherty, 11 Thorndike Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 17, 12.33 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Patrick Jordan, 12 North Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 17, 12.33 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Peter John, 2 Turner Place. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 20, 8.14 a. m. Slight fire on roof of resi- 
dence, 31 "West Street, owned by B. F. Brown and occupied 
by E. M. Eoyce. Caused hy sparks from chimney. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination Company. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $25.00 $2,000.00 $25.00 

Still. May 22, 3.28 p. m. Fire in building rear of 43 
North Main Street, owned by the Lee Associates and occu- 
pied by L. E. Currier as a saloon. Fire originated in the 
basement through the careless handling of matches. Com- 
bination Company responded, but had hardly arrived upon 
the scene when a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 35. May 22, 3.30 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Fire confined to basement. Eight hundred feet of 
hose wet. Recall, 3.57 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$15,000.00 


$45.00 


$10,000.00 


$45.00 


Contents, 


6,500.00 


626.34 


2,000.00 


626.34 



234 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. May 26, 9.04 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mannis Scott, 61 South Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. No loss. 

Still. May 27, 12.13 p. m. Brush fire on Silver Hill, 
between Clinton Street and Iron Works Road. Combina- 
tion Company responded, but before arrival word was re- 
ceived at Central Station that the fire was spreading rap- 
idly and a bell alarm was given. 

4-4-4. May 27, 12.15 p. m. Alarm given for preceding 
fire. Detail sent from the department under command of 
Engineer W. J. Coffin. Labored four hours. Fire watched 
through the following day. No loss. 

Still. May 27, 7.39 p. m. Chimney fire reported in 
residence of A. W. Flanders, 15 Montgomery Street. Com- 
bination Company responded, but no assistance was re- 
quired. Commotion caused by chimney swallows. No fire. 

Still. May 29, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Andrew Bean, 63 "Warren Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 29, 2.03 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Andrew Bean, 63 Warren Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. May 29, 5.39 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
T. W. Strattwin, 31 Pine Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. June 1, 9.56 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
S. Rulkouski, 2 Lee Avenue. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. No loss. 

4-4-4. June 3, 10.51 a. m. Brush fire rear of the Crow- 
ley property, Penacook Lake. Detail from the department 
sent under command of Engineer S. T. Ford. Labored five 
hours. Detail left to watch. No loss. 

2-2-2. June 7, 8.41 a. m. School signal. 

Still. June 7, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Arthur Davis, 19 Centre Street. Extinguished by mem- 
bers of Alert Company. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 235 

Box 35. June 10, 5.09 p. m. Fire in basement of the 
E. Pelissier & Company's harness store, 9 Warren Street. 
Caused by the ignition of gasoline which was being used 
for cleaning purposes. Extinguished by Combination 
Company. Recall, 5.19 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, .$4,000.00 .$55.00 $3,500.00 $55.00 

Still. June 15, 3.43 p. m. Garage with motor lawn- 
mower owned by St. Paul's School destroyed. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid, 


Building, 


$300.00 


$300.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


800.00 


800.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. June 19, 3.41 p. m. Slight fire on roof of the 
Ford Foundry building, Ferry Street. Caused by sparks 
from stack. Extinguished by Combination Company and 
employes. Loss trifling. 

Still. June 25, 1.54 p. m. Brush fire on Rockingham 
Street, near Wheeler 's Corner. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. No loss. 

Still. June 28, 8.18 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Myra Putnam, 84 South Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. June 30, 12.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of G. H. Abbott, 63 School Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still. July 6, 4.14 p. m. Fire in residence at St. Paul's 
School owned by same and occupied by Clarence Walker. 
Cause unknown. Combination Company responded and 
spliced line which had been run by the School department. 
Two hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Loss trifling. 

Still. July 12, 10.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Hines, 35 Thompson Street. Combination Com- 
pany responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. July 18, 7.51 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 



236 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of Peter John, 2 Turner Place. Extinguished by Com- 
bination Company. No loss. 

Still, July 19, 2.52 a. m. Fire in wooden block, 14-20 
Warren Street, owned by A. Pelissier and occupied by F. 
A. Piper & Sons as a bowling alley. Combination Com- 
l^any responded, but it soon became apparent that addi- 
tional help was needed and a bell alarm was sent in. Cause 
of fire unknown. 

Box 35. July 19, 3.04 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Four hundred feet of hose wet, but no water used 
in building. Recall, 4.29 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$8,000.00 


$45.00 


$4,500.00 


$45.00 


Contents, 


3 0,000.00 


693.00 


5,000.00 


693.00 



Still. July 23, 11.09 p. m. Slight fire in automobile 
in front of Hall Bros.' garage, 31 South Main Street. 
Caused by lighting of match near tank which was being 
filled. Combination Company responded, but no assist- 
ance was required. Extinguished by employes. No loss. 

Box 21. July 24, 10.01 p. m. Fire in First Methodist 
Church, corner of North State and Chapel Streets. Cause 
unknown. 

Box 21. July 24, 10.22 p. m. Second alarm for pre- 
ceding fire. Four thousand seven hundred feet of hose 
wet. Recall, 12.42 a. m., the 25th inst. Roofs of nearby 
residences slightly damaged by flying brands. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Church, $28,600.00 $20,300.00 $8,300.00 $8,300.00 

Contents, • 3,000.00 2,200.00 800.00 800.00 

Still. July 25, 4.18 a. m. Rekindling of fire in debris 
at scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by Combination 
Company. One hundred feet of hose wet. Line left in 
position. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 237 

Still. July 25, 2.10 p, m. Same as preceding fire. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. July 26, 7.24 a. m. Fire in automobile truck 
owned by Thomas Robinson. Fire broke out near the 
John Lane place, St. Paul's School Road, while laborers 
were being conveyed to work. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. Caused by leaky condition of tank. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Automobile, $600.00 $200.00 None. None. 

Still. July 26, 8.46 a. m. Rekindling of fire in debris 
of church, corner of North State and Chapel Streets. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination Company. One hundred feet 
of hose wet. Detail left through the day. No loss. 

Box 7. August 5, 6.56 p. m. Fire in Industrial Build- 
ing, New Hampshire State Hospital. Cause, originated in 
dry room. Five thousand, two hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall, 11.05 p. m. Detail left throughout the night. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid, 


Building, 


$10,000.00 


$5,000.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


5,000.00 


3,000.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. August 13, 11.28 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Bert Baker, 13 Dakin Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. August 15, 5.03 p. m. Fire in residence, 94 
"Warren Street, owned by Joseph Benton and occupied by 
A. B. Cole. Caused by lightning. Combination Company 
responded, but before arrival a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 32. August 15, 5.05 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Three hundred feet of hose wet, but no water 
used in building. Recall, 5.40 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


.$50.00 


$2,200.00 


$50.00 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


79.50 


1,000.00 


79.50 



238 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. August 31, 12.22 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. J. Tandy, 16 Montgomery Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. September 15, 7.28 a. m. Slight fire in coal 
pocket, Bridge Street. Caused by spontaneous combus- 
tion. Extinguished by Combination Company. Six hun- 
dred feet of hose wet. Loss trifling. 

Still. September 17, 7.05 a. m. Buildings on Pitts- 
field Road in Pembroke destroyed with contents. Cause 
unknown. Property owned by Bert Holt. Combination 
Company responded, but could do little except to prevent 
fire from penetrating woods. See Pembroke report. 

Still. September 18, 11.01 a. m. Grass fire in Cole 
Court. Combination Company responded, but no assist- 
ance was required. No loss. 

Still. September 18, 1.54 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. B. Stogers, 9 Perkins Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. September 22, 2.01 p. m. Slight fire in parti- 
tion in rear of house of James Halligan, 13 Walker Street. 
Combination Company responded, but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Still. September 24, 12.37 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Thomas Nawn, 41 North Spring Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. September 25, 5.45 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
escaping steam in the Endicott Block, South Main Street. 
Combination Company responded, but no assistance was 
required. No fire. 

Still. September 26, 7.09 p. m. Fire in hollow tree 
on North State Street, near Foster Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. September 28, 2.18 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. F. Clark, Hall Street, over the Bow line. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. Roof consider- 
ably damaged. See Bow report. 



PIKE DBPABTMENT. 239 

Box 8. October 1, 12.35 a. m. Slight fire in office of 
Page Belting Company's plant, East Penacook Street. 
Caused probably by spontaneous combustion in oily rags 
which painters had left upon the floor. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. Loss trifling. Recall, 12.57 a. m. 

Still. October 4, 6.49 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Richard Jacobs, 8 Chapel Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. October 5, 1.13 a. m. Slight fire in bed in Mar- 
den Block, 147 North Main Street. Caused probably by 
smoking in bed. Extinguished by Combination Company. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. October 9, 2.42 a. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
Hotel, 110 North Main Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion Company. No loss. 

Still. October 11, 12.04 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles H. Sanders, 11 Chapel Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. October 23, 3.24 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. Nightingale, 37 Centre Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. October 24, 8.11 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harrison Brown, Bow INIills. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. October 28, 1.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Henry Knee, 95 Franklin Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. October 30, 7.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William Mahoney, 81 Broadway. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. October 31, 2.02 p. m. Slight fire in basement 
of building, 170 North Main Street, owned by Carolyn 
Stickney and occupied by the Elks Club. Caused by 
intense heat emanating from dry boiler setting fire to 
pipe wrapping. No damage to building. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. Loss trifling. 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 5. October 31, 5.38 p. m. Fire in freight ear in 
railroad yard near passenger station. Condemned ear 
loaded with refuse. Cause unknown. Three hundred fifty 
feet hose wet. Recall, 6.20 p. m. No loss. 

Still. October 31, 10.02 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Clarence Silver, 147 North Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 7.26 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Clinton, 34 South Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 4, 8.41 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
escaping steam at 13 Capitol Street. Combination Com- 
pany responded, but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. November 4, 5.03 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Westeott, 24 Lyndon Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No. loss. 

Still. November 8, 11.59 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. W. Chandler, 8 Wheaton Avenue. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 9, 7.02 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of David Sannel, 24 Clinton Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 10.51 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Fred White, 12 Montgomery Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 4.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. E. B. Niles, 47 Centre Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 10.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Leon Wetherbee, 270 Pleasant Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 14. 7.05 p. m. Fire in rubbish in rear 
of 22 School Street. Extinguished by Combination Com- 
pany. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 7.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Hon. E. C. Bean, 5 Blake Street. Detail from 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 241 

Central Station responded, but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

Still. November 20, 4.44 a, m. Frame building on 
Birch Street, used for storage of carriages and farming im- 
plements, destroyed with contents. Building owned by- 
Mrs. Elizabeth A. Bennett. Cause of fire unknown. Com- 
bination Company responded, but could do little save to 
protect neighboring buildings. Detail left to watch ruins. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $200.00 $200.00 

Contents, 500.00 500.00 200.00 200.00 

Still. November 20, 4.54 a. m. A call for assistance 
from scene of preceding fire. Combination 3 sent. 

Still. November 21, 12.28 a. m. Grass fire on Walker 
Island. Extinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 21, 1.53 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Barnard, 3 Jackson Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. November 21, 8.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur Goodreau, 41 Concord Street. Extin- 
guished by members of Good "Will Company. No loss. 

Still. November 22, 6.08 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Ed. Abbott, 10 Ferry Street. Combination Com- 
pany responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. November 23, 1.52 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at 96 North State Street. Combination Company re- 
sponded, but could find no fire. 

Still. November 23, 5.39 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Gen. J. N. Patterson, 35 Penacook Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 5.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. E. Fisher, 63 Franklin Street. Combination 
Company responded, but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

16 



242 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Still. December 3, 9.29 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Henry Crowley, 2 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 5, 8.54 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
boiling over of a kettle of fat in residence of B. C. White, 
8 Pine Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. 
No loss. ' 

Still. December 7, 3.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. H. Noyes, 16 Laurel Street. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Co. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 6.29 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
explosion of lantern in residence of J. W. Sullivan, 3 Rum- 
ford Street. Extinguished by Combination Company. No 
loss. 

Still. December 10, 9.58 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. M. A. Johnson, 141 Dunklee Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 10.52 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Corbett, 19 Fayette Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. William Hunneman, 224 North State Street. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 2.10 p. m. Chimney fire in build- 
ing, 18 Concord Street, owned by Benjamin A. Rolfe and 
occupied by Page Brothers as a market. Extinguished by 
members of Good Will Co. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Benjamin Leighton, 101 Rumford Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 11, 8.54 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. F. L. Sawyer, 48 South Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Box 17. December 11, 8.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Lyman Runnells, 33 Union Street. Needless 
alarm. Recall, 9.16 p. m. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 243 

Still. December 11, 9.11 p. m. At the time of the 
alarm from Box 17 Combination Company was on the way 
to a south-end fire on still alarm. Having returned to 
quarters, at the above-mentioned time it was summoned to 
the scene of preceding fire and other apparatus dismissed. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Box 12. December 12, 10.40 a. m. Fire in 'residence, 
198 North State Street, owned by M. J. Powers and occu- 
pied by John S. Harael. Cause unknown. One thousand, 
six hundred fifty feet of hose wet. Recall, 11.33 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$1,000.00 


$175.00 


$300.00 


$175.00 


Contents, 


600.00 


50.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. December 14, 12.59 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. A. Belleveaii, 46 Laurel Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 9.59 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. A. Taylor, 6 Avon Street. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 16, 5.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John W. Hanson, 9 Dakin Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 18, 6.58 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. C. Woods, 79 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 18, 10.16 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Henry Chase, 181 North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 19, 12.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Asa Gee, 196 North State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 20, 6.04 p. m. Set of buildings on the 
Dunbarton Road, near foot of Stickney Hill, owned and 
occupied by Thomas E. Looney. Fire originated in barn 
from cause unknown. Combination Company responded, 



244 CITY OF CONCORD. 

but could do little save assist in removing furniture from 
house. One horse and two pigs perished. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $4,000.00 $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

Contents, 1,000.00 800.00 None. None. 

• 

Still. December 20, 8.40 p. m. Combination Company 
and detail sent to scene of preceding fire to wet down ruins, 
a change and rise of wind having alarmed a nearby prop- 
erty owner. 

Still. December 21, 5.01 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
ignition of gasoline in garage, 48 Walker Street. Combina- 
tion Company responded, but no assistance was required. 
Extinguished by occupants. No loss. 

Still. December 24, 4.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Bertha Ludlow, 16 Pleasant Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 24, 11.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George J. Dennerly, 3 Cottage Court. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 3.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Jeremiah Gove, 38 Monroe Street. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. >■ 

Still. December 26, 4.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Robert Byrne, 1 Wyman Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 27, 6.25 p. m. Slight fire in residence, 
24 South Spring Street, owned and occupied by W. A. 
Stone. Caused by head of match flying into lace curtain. 
Combination Company responded, but no assistance was re- 
quired. Extinguished by occupants. 





Vahip. 


IjOSs. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$5,500.00 


$62.03 


$5,000.00 


$62.03 


Contents, 


6,000.00 


38.97 


5,500.00 


37.07 



Still. December 29, 5.59 a. m. Fire in brick block, 
10-12' Warren Street, owned by Mrs. Alice M. Pickering 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 245 

and occupied by W. H. Bugbee, grocery store, A. D. Pig- 
gott, linotyper, M. Walker, carpenter. Pilgrim Fathers and 
Modern Order of Woodmen. Fire originated in the room 
occupied by A. D. Piggott on the second floor from some 
cause unknown, and had burned through the floor and 
dropped into the oil room of the grocery store on the first 
floor before being discovered. Combination Company re- 
sponded, but the fire had assumed such proportions that a 
bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 35. December 29, 6.01 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. One thousand, eight hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall, 7.52 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$8,000.00 


$750.00 


$5,000.00 


$750.00 


Contents : 










W. H. Bugbee, 


4,000.00 


900.00 


3,000.00 


900.00 


A. D. Piggott, 


2,800.00 


700.00 


2,500.00 


678.00 


M. S. Walker, 


300.00 


15.00 


175.00 


15.00 



Still. December 29, 10.27 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Maggie Morrill, rear 87 South Main Street. 
Extinguished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 5.16 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Patrick Welch, 371/0 Thorndike Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 10.54 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. F. Newton, 50 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination Company. No loss. 

Penacook. 

Still. January 10, 11.45 a. m. Grass fire between 
Pleasant and South ^Main Streets, in front of Catholic 
Church. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 6.45 p. m. Chimney fire in block 
owned by Contoocook Manufacturing Company, East 
Canal Street. No loss. 



246 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 19, 8 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Ferrin, 6 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Box 35. January 24, 5.50 p. m. False alarm. Recall, 
5.54 p. m. 

Box 38. February 25, 10.55 a. m. Fire in residence, 16 
West Main Street, owned and occupied by Isaac Tetreault. 
Fire started on second floor in front room in papers back 
of organ from some cause unknown. Extinguished with 
pony extinguishers. Recall, 11.59 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,700.00 


$17.95 


$1,600.00 


$17.95 


Contents, 


800.00 


118.95 


500.00 


118.95 



Still. March 14, 12.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of "William Bonney, 41 Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. March 15, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Ferrin, 17 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Box 35. March 15, 8.50 p. m. New, unfinished sum- 
mer cottage and garage, owned by George E. Jacobs, lo- 
cated on River Road, destroyed. Cause unknown. Recall, 
9.50 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $1,400.00 $1,400.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Still. March 22, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Levi Hinds, East Penacook Street, East Concord. Ex- 
tinguished by members of Pioneer Company. See East 
Concord report. 

4-4-4. March 25, 7.35 p. m. Grass fire on Rolfe Street. 
Recall, 8 p. m. No loss. 

Still. March 26, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. George Sager, 28 High Street. No loss. 

Still. March 26, 6.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of T. Lambrukos, 7 West Canal Street. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 9.34 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Nerbone, 172 South Main Street, No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. ' 247 

Still. March 27, 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Robertson, 44 West Main Street. No loss. 

Still. March 31, 6.35 p. m. Chimney fire in Baty 
Block, Main Street. No loss. 

Still. April 3, 8.45 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 8 Church Street, owned by D. W. Fox. No loss. 

Still. April 3, 3.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
on East Canal Street, owned by Moses Bassett. No loss. 

Still. April 8, 8 a. m. Chimney fire in residence, 9 
Union Street, owned by Mrs. A. Emery. No loss. 

Box 42. April 15, 12.38 p. m. Grass fire on High 
Street. Recall, 12.47 p. m. No loss. 

Still. April 16, 6.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of I. F. Richards, 48 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. April 17, 10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
106 Merrimack Street, owned by Miss Lizzie Rolfe. No 
loss. 

Still. May 1, 12.48 p. m. Chimney fire in Fifield 
Block, 10 Warren Street. No loss. ' 

4-4-4. May 28, 2.15 p. m. Brush fire on Boston & 
Maine Railroad on White Mountains Division, between 
Boyce and Canterbury. Labored three hours. Loss un- 
known. Recall, 5.05 p. m. 

Still. June 1, 10 a. m. Slight fire on roof of the E. L. 
Davis coal shed, near railroad depot. No loss. 

Still. July 22, 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
12 Charles Street, owned by W. H. Meserve. No loss. 

Still. August 20, 10.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred H. Burnham, 34 High Street. No loss. 

Still. August 31, 10.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence owned by Mrs. M. Wales, 2 Walnut Street. No loss. 

Still. September 30, 10.15 a. m. Fire in coal pile 
owned by Boscawen Mills. Extinguished by employes. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. October 5, 6 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Nelson Cluette, 41 Summer Street. No loss. 



248 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 24, 10 a. m. Grass fire in rear of resi- 
dence of Mrs. J. E. Harden on Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. October 31, 2 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Nelson Magee, 54 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 8 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. H. Garvin, South Main Street. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 9.15 a. m. Chimney fire in Far- 
rand and Chandler Block, Main Street. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 9.30 p. m. Chimney fire in Far- 
rand and Chandler Block, ]\Iain Street. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 11.10 p. m. Chimney fire in Far- 
rand and Chandler Block, JNlain Street. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 1.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Edward McGirr, 43 Penacook Street. No loss. 

Box 48. November 11, 5.40 p. m. Fire in shed con- 
nected with residence, 36 Rolfe Street, owned and occu- 
pied by James Devlin. Cause unknown. Extinguished 
with chemicals and garden hose. Recall, 6.10 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $1,600.00 $40.00 $1,200.00 $40.00 

No Alarm. November 11, 1.30 a. m. Fire in front hall 
of residence, Elm Street, owned and occupied by Justin 
Banker. Cause unknown. Extinguished by family and 
neighbors. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$1,000.00 


$21.00 


$800.00 


$21.00 


Contents, 


500.00 


44.00 


300.00 


44.00 



Still. November 19, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house owned by C. H. Sanders, 45 Elm Street. No 
loss. 

Still. November 20, 9 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Henry Rolfe, 26 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. December 1, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Ralph Sherburne, 42 Elm Street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 249 

Still. December 10, 11 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of David F. Dudley, 29 High Street. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence, 30 East Canal Street, owned by Moses Bassett. 
No loss. 

Still. December 10, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Richard Lessard, 18 jMerrimaek Street. No loss. 

Still. December 11, 9.07 a. m. Chimney fire in Hay- 
ward Block, 20 East Canal Street. No loss. 

Box 38. December 15, 11.45 a. m. Fire in desk in 
Hoyt's Garage, Main Street. Cause unknown. Extin- 
guished with pony extinguishers. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $8,000.00 $50.00 $2,000.00 $50.00 

Still. December 31, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Murdock, 76 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

East Concord. 

Still. February 15, 10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. S. Huston, Shawmut Street. No loss. 

Still. March 15, 6.30 p. m. Chimne}^ fire in residence 
of John F. Brock, Eastman Street. No loss. 

Bell. March 16, 11 a. m. Brush fire on the Denton 
lot. Potter Street. Aid summoned from city proper. Com- 
bination No. 1 detailed. Labored two hours. No loss. 

March 22, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of Levi 
Hinds, East Penacook Street, near Penacook line. Still 
alarm given at Penacook. Extinguished by members of 
Pioneer Company. See Penacook report. 

Value. Tyoss. " Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $17.00 $1,200.00 $17.00 

Still. March 25, 7.15 p. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by Charles T. Staniels. No loss. 



250 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. March 27, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Grace Farniim, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. April 2, 10.45 a. m. Brush fire on the Bachelder 
lot, Shawmut Street. Loss trifling. 

Bell. April 5, 10.40 a. m. Brush fire on Mountain 
Road, on land owned by Albert Morrill. No loss. 

Bell. May 9, 12.01 p, m. Brush fire on the A. J. Bath 
lot. No loss. 

Still. May 10, 7.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John W, Sanborn, Mountain Road. No loss. 

Still. May 20, 9 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Clarence Sanborn, Mountain Road. No loss. 

Bell. May 25, 12.30 p. m. Brush fire on Plains, on 
land owned by C. E. and G. 0. Robinson. Labored three 
hours. Detail left to watch. No loss. 

Bell. June 2, 1.45 p. m. Brush fire on broken ground, 
on land owned by W. B. Maynard. Labored two hours. 
Detail left to watch. No loss. 

Bell. June 11, 10.30 a. m. Brush fire on the Bachel- 
der lot, Shawmut Street. Labored two hours. No loss. 

Bell. June 14, 5 p. m. Fire in residence, Portsmouth 
Street, owned by Mrs. C. R. Robinson. Caused by over- 
heated chimney. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $25.00 $1,500.00 $25.00 

Still. July 30, 8.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Curtis, Pembroke Street. No loss. 

Bell. August 13, 10.30 a. m. Brush fire on the Bach- 
elder lot, Shawmut Street. Needless alarm. No loss. 

Still. August 22, 2 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Westley Swain, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. August 28, 2.30 p. m. Slight fire in wood pile 
near boiler in residence of Ross "W. Gate, Penacook Street. 
No loss. 

Still. November 27, 7 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 251 

of C. E. Robinson, Penacook Street. First run for auto. 
No loss. 

Still. November 30, 9.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Peaslee, Mill Street. No loss. 

Still. December 14, 2 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
fy§ Mrs. Fred Farnum, Penacook Street. No loss. 

West Concord. 

Still. February 4, 4.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frances Partridge, 449 North State Street. No 
loss. 

Still. February 26, 3.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John E. Ryan, 422 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. February 27, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Patrick Conway, 486 North State Street. No 
loss. 

Still. March 3, 6 p. m. Chimney fire in Shepard 
Bros. ' store, 490 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. March 3, 7.05 p. m. Chimney fire in Shepard 
Bros.' store, 490 North State Street. Second call. No loss. 

Bell. April 21, 5.40 p. m. Brush fire on city land, 
near Penacook Lake. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Bell. April 22, 9.45 a. m. Brush fire. North State 
Street, on land owned by Abijah Hollis. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 10.30 p. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by Charles B. Clark, near Boston & Maine Railroad. No 
loss. 

Still. April 24, 5.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. H. Rogers, Second Street. No loss. 

Still. April 25, 11.15 a. m. Brush fire on city land, 
near Penacook Park. No loss. 

Bell. April 25, 11.45 a. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Labored two hours. Loss trifling. 

Bell. April 28, 10.20 p. m. Barn owned and occupied 
by the John Swenson Granite Company, with contents con- 



252 CITY OP CONCORD. 

sisting of four horses, hay, harness, etc., destroyed. Cause 
unknown. One thousand, four hundred feet of hose wet. 
See precinct report, same date. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$1,500.00 


$1,500.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. May 24, 8 a. m. Slight fire in roof of stone 
crusher building. North State Street. Loss trifling. 

Still. iMay 27, 8.03 p. ra. Chimney fire in residence of 
John A. Anderson, 414 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. June 2, 7.45 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
the Concord Electric Company, near Sewall's Falls. La- 
bored three hours. No loss. 

Bell, June 3, 11 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
owned by the Concord Electric Company, on the Sewall's 
Falls Road, known as the Stewart house. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,200.00 $25.00 $1,200.00 $25.00 

Still. September 2, 3.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Willis Kellom, 412 North State Street. No loss. 

Still. November 7, 9 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Turcotte, 40 Hutchins Street. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 5.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles B. Clark, Clark Street. No loss. 

Still. December 5, 8.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harry A. Danforth, 491 North State Street. No 
loss. 

Still. December 6, 6.30 p. m. Grass fire on land 
owned by Charles B. Clark and Andrew J. Abbott, near 
Boston & Maine Railroad. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Carl Makin, Penacook Road. No loss. 

Still. December 11, 3.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred A. Eastman, 504 North State Street. Loss 
trifling. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 253 







Summary. 






Buildings: 


Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Net Loss. 


Precinct, 


$138,315.00 


$37,843.33 


$92,905.00 


$16,262.33 


$21,581.00 


Penacook, 


6,700.00 


1,478.95 


4,600.00 


1,078.95 


400.00 


East Concord, 


3,500.00 


42.00 


2,700.00 


42.00 




West Concord, 


2,700.00 


1,525.00 


1,200.00 


25.00 


1,500.00 



$151,215.00 $40,889.28 $101,405.00 $17,408.28 $23,481.00 
Contents: 

Precinjt, $57,611.70 $12,277.35 $29,475.00 $5,178.65 $7,098.70 

Penacook, 9,300.00 212.95 2,800.00 212.95 

West Concord, 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 



. $68,911.70 $14,490.30 $32,275.00 $5,391.60 $9,098.70 
Buildings, 151,215.00 40,889.28 101,405.00 17,408.28 23,481.00 



Buildings and 

contents, $220,126.70 $55,379.58 $133,680.00 $22,799.88 $32,579.70 



Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows : 
Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," with modern hose 
wagon, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company 
(13 men) ; one second-class Araoskeag engine, "Kear- 
sarge," and modern hose wagon, attached to the Kear- 
sarge Steam Fire Engine Company (14 men) ; one second- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, in 
charge of an engineer and fireman ; and one auto-combina- 
tion car in charge of five permanent men ; one ladder 
truck, "City of Concord," attached to Hook and Ladder 
Company (21 men) ; one house man at Central Fire Sta- 
tion. There are ten horses kept at this station. There 
are nine permanent men located at the Central Fire Sta- 
tion and one permanent man at each fire station within 
the precinct. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent 
man and two horses. 



254 CITY OP CONCORD. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an auto- 
combination car with permanent man. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hook and ladder truck, one hose reel, one chemical 
engine, one hand engine and two wagons in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
an auto-combination car and a modern hose wagon. 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 414-inch cylin- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank, 
and one auto-combination car. 

Hose. 

Precinct, 11,000 feet cotton, rubber lined. 
Penacook, 3,200 " 

West Concord, 1,400 " 
East Concord, 500 " 



16,100 " 
Public Reservoirs. 

Capacity 
Cubic Feet. 

1. Main Street, rear Court House, 2,000 

2. State Street, corner Washington Street,* 2,000 

3. Rumford Street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's, 1,000 

4. Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street,* 4,000 

5. School Street, corner of Summit Street,* 3,500 



* Brick cemented. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 255 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the tire- 
alarm boxes, the city is divided into six districts, viz. : 

District 1. Embraces that section of the city north and 
west of Washington Street, Box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
ton Streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
Streets. 

Districts 4, 5 and 6. Embrace all south of Pleasant 
Street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the 
district. 

District No. 1. 

9. New Hampshire State Prison. 

12. Curtice Avenue. 

13. Franklin and Rumford. 

14. Bradley and Walker. 

15. I\Iain and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. C. S. Gale's Store. 

19. Centre and Liberty. 
131. Franklin and Charles. 
191. Auburn and Granite. 

District No. 2. 

21. State, opposite Court. 

_.23. Main and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 

25. Main and School. 



256 CITY OF CONCORD. 

26. Centre and Union. 

27. School and Merrimack. 

28. School and Spring. 

29. Centre and Essex. 

District No. 3. 

32. "Warren and Pine. 

34. Central Fire Station. 

35. Martin's Drug Store. 

36. Pleasant and Spring. 

37. Pleasant and North Fruit. 

38. Orchard and Merrimack. 

District No. 4. 

41. South and Thompson. 

42. Good Will Hose House. 

43. Main and Fayette. 

45. Nelson & Durrell's Store. 

46. Perley and Grove. 

47. South, opposite Downing. 

48. Thorndike and South. 

49. West and ]\Tills. 

412. Wall and Elm. 

413. Main, opposite Thorndike. 

414. State and West. 

471. Clinton and South Fruit. 

District No. 5. 

51. Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. 

52. South Main and Allison. 

53. Hall and Hammond. 

54. Broadway and Pillsbury. 
56. St. Paul's School. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 257 

57. Pleasant View. 

521. Broadway and Rockingham. 

522. South :\Iain and Holly. 

District No. 6. 
62. South ]\[ain, opposite Holt Bros. 
Private Boxes. 

5. Boston & Maine Railroad, north end passenger depot. 

6. The Abbot & Downing Company. 

7. New Hampshire State Hospital. 

8. Page Belting Company. 

9. Three boxes inside New Hampshire State Prison. 
33. State House. 

39. -Odd Fellows' Home. 

55. Boston & Maine Railroad, old repair shops. 

92. New England Box Company. 



FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 413, 414, 471, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 62, 521 and 
522, will not be responded to by the Alert Hose Company 
until signaled. The signal to proceed to the fire will be 
four blows or second alarm, excepting alarms rung m 
from Box 56. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15. 16, 17, 
18. 19, 131, 191,. 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 32, 37, 39, 92 and 56 will 
not be responded to by the Good Will Hose Company until 
signaled. It will be governed by the same signals govern- 
ing Alert Hose Company. The Alert Hose and Good Will 
Hose Companies will hitch up and remain in readiness 20 
minutes after the first alarm, to all boxes not responded 

17 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. 

to on first alarm. Then, receiving no signal, the officers 
in charge shall dismiss their companies. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 12, 37, 53, 54, 57, 191, 471 
and 521 will not be responded to by the Kearsarge Com- 
pany on first alarm. 

The signal to proceed to the fire will be two blows, four 
blows, or second alarm, as circumstances may warrant. 

Kearsarge Steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose Company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to Box 6, on first alarm ; to Boxes 23, 24, 
25, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43, 45 and 413, on second ; to all others 
on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill Steamer will respond to Boxes 7, 8, 9, 
39 and 92 on first alarm ; to Boxes 5, 6, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 
48, 49, 412, 414, 471, 52, 54, 55, 57, 62, 521 and 522, on sec- 
ond ; to all others on third. 

Combination Company will respond to all box alarms. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company will respond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating 
from same box or not. 

Two rounds of 11 strokes each will signalize the re- 
quirement of assistance out of town, and will be re- 
sponded to by a detail of three men from each company, 
appointed for the purpose, and by those alone. 

Two additional blows will indicate that the call for 
assistance emanates from East Concord. Such apparatus 
will be detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further 
aid is necessary, Box 34 (Central Station) will follow. 

All-out signal, three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 

Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on 
the bells and will be responded to by a detail of four men 
from each company, appointed for the purpose, and by 
those alone. 



fire department. 259 

Military Signal. 
Two rounds of 3-1-2. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause 
of 15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will be given 
at 8 o'clock a. m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given 
at 1 o'clock p. m. 

The signal to close all schools for one session will be given 
at 11.30 a, m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
IMonday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It will be one 
single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each v:eek, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Fire- Alarm Telegraph. 

is the "Gamewell" patent. It embraces 42 miles of wire. 
On the lines are 46 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the 
city, and 9 private boxes — in all, 55. There are three 
alarm bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell metal), one of 
3,740 pounds (bell metal), and one of 2,000 pounds 
(American steel). There are also 16 mechanical tappers, 
40 direct action tappers, one four-circuit repeatef, and six 
indicators. 



260 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The battery consists of 259 storage battery cells. 
The alarm system was installed in 1880 by the Gamewell 
Fire-Alarrn Telegraph Company. 

Directions for Giving an Alarm. 

Above all things, keep cool. 

To obtain the key to the box, break the glass in the key 
box located beneath the alarm box. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale," 
designed expressly for the purpose of informing yon 
whether an alarm is being transmitted the instant j^ou open 
the door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull down 
the hook once only and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to at- 
tempt to pull another until the one already pulled had per- 
formed its mission. 

Wait until 20 seconds have elapsed after the "tell-tale" 
has stopped ringing, close the door, which will restore the 
armature to the position it left when the door was opened. 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go. 

Should there be no response, pull it again. 

Tlien should there be no response, go to the next box. 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the depart- 
ment. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never give an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 261 

PENACOOK FIKE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 
Number, Location, Etc. 

W. C. Green, Chief Engineer: 

I herewith submit for your consideration the following 
report of the Penacook fire-alarm telegraph system: The 
system is the Gamewell patent, and consists of five miles 
of No. 9 iron wire. On the lines are fourteen boxes owned 
by the city, two private boxes, one 1,500-pound bell, one 
indicator, three mechanical gongs and three direct-action 
tappers. The battery consists of forty-two storage bat- 
tery cells. There has been added one new box the past 
year, Box 43, corner of Spring and Centre Streets. I 
would respectfully recommend the addition to the system 
of one new box the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED M. DODGE, 
Superintendent of Fire-Alarm. 

Location of Boxes. 

31. Elm Street, near S. N. Brown's house. 

34. Charles Street, near schoolhouse. 

35. Washington Square. 

36. "Washington, near sawmill. 

37. Washington Street, near outlet. 

38. Junction of West Main and South Main Streets. 

39. South Main Street, near cemetery. 

41. Corner of Centre and East Canal Streets. 

42. High Street, opposite Maple Street. 

43. Spring and Centre Streets. 

45. Summer Street, opposite Church Street. 

46. Merrimack Street, opposite Cross Street. 

47. Merrimack Street, near Hose House. 

48. Corner Penacook and Rolfe Streets. 



262 city of concord, 

Private Boxes. 

25. Iloyt Electrical Instrument "Works. 
62, Concord Axle Works. 

All-out Signal. 
Three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 
Three rounds of four strokes each. 

Out op Town SiGNAii. 
Two rounds of eleven strokes each. 

Foe Fire on Boscawen Side. 
Box 35, with two additional strokes. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

■ After this date the High School and Summer Street 
School will not be closed by signal. 

The Charles Street School and the Elementary Grades 
in Main Street School will be closed whenever the signal 
is sounded. When sounded at 7.30 a. m., there will be no 
morning session of these schools ; when sounded at 12.15 
p. m., there will be no afternoon session. 

The signal used will be the same as heretofore : — Two 
strokes of the fire-alarm bell given three times with a pause 
of fifteen seconds between the rounds (2 — 2 — 2). Jan. 25, 
1915. 

Testing Sign.vls. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Saturday afternoon at 12.50 o'clock precisely. It will be 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 263 

one single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other Aveek-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Penacook fire-alarm sj^stem was installed in June, 
1908, under direction of the chief engineer. 



264 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1915. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

Walter J. Coffin, 1st Asst., Shipping clerk, 60 Pleasant Street. 

Sylvester T. Ford, 2d Asst., Holder, 41 So. Main Street. 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



Fred M. Dodge, 
Elbeidge Emery, 
George W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 

Electrical Inst, maker, 61 Merrimack Street. 

WARD 2. 
Butcher, Potter St., East Concord. 

, WARD 3. 
Overseer, 16 Fisher St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAIM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

J. Edward Morrison, Captain. Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

1 J. Edward Morrison, 

2 Charles Powell, 

3 James H. Sanders, 

4 Thomas J. Morrison, 

5 George B. Davis, 

6 Herbert M. Sanders, 

7 Harry P. Blake, 

8 Harry L. Messer, 

9 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

10 George L. Livingston, 

11 Harry C. Taylor, 

12 George H. Abbott, 

13 Joseph H. Brunei, 

14 Henry E. Drew, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage jjainter. 
Collector. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage Trimmer, 
Gas inspector, 
Machinist, 
Shipping clerk. 
Permanent Driver, 
Permanent Driver, 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 
3 South Main Street. 
Fowler Block. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
3 Broadway. 
41 Thorndike Street. 
38 Jackson Street. 
2 No. State Street. 
63 School Street. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



265 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



J. C. lilcGiLVKAY, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 Charles H. Sanders, 

21 Orrin C. Hodgdon, 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 

23 John M. Inman, 

24 John B. McLeod, 

22 Eli Langlois, Jr., 

26 Charles W. Bateman, 

27 P. J. O'Connell, 

28 F. H. Fowler, 

29 H. E. Kendall, 

30 Christopher Cunningham 



OFFICERS. 

D. J. 

MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Jig-sawyer, 
Janitor, 
Machinist, 
Engineer, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter, 
Electrician, 
Painter, 
Plumber, 
Silversmith, 
Electrician, 
Electrician, 
Permanent driver, 



Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Residences. 
9 Pearl Street. 
107 North Main Street. 
11 Chapel Street. 
31 Beacon Street. 
44 Thorndike Street. 
16 Wall Street. 
5 Rumford Street. 
5 Perry Avenue. 
3 Maple Street. 
38 No. Spring Street. 
34 North Spring Street. 
11 Pleasant Street. 
Central Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



Badge RELIEF ENGINE. 

Nos. Names. Occupations. 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 South State Street. 
81 So. State Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

Ernest E. Saben, Captain. Chaeles C. Chesley, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

J. M. Davis, Treasurer. 



Badge 


MEMBERS. 




Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


36 E. E. Saben, 


Car-builder, 


88 North State Street. 


37 C. C. Chesley, 


Builder, 


11 Prince Street. 


39 C. J. French, 


Mayor, 


5 Perkins Street. 


40 C. H. Rowell, 


Builder, 


5 Abbott Court. 


42 F. P. McKenna, 


Clerk, 


19 Franklin Street. 


43 J. M. Davis, 


Blacksmith, ^ 


4 Tahanto Street. 


45 M. G. Davis, 


Builder, 


6 Beacon Street. 


38 George L. Osgood, 


Clerk, 


9 Thompson Street. 


41 J. E. Howard, 


Wood-worker, 


9 Montgomery Street. 


44 D. J. Murphy, 


Molder, 


2 No. State Street. 


46 F. H. Silver, 


Permanent driver. 


Alert Station. 



266 



CITY OP CONCORD, 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

.Hiram T. Dickerman, Captain. Frank S. Putnam, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Albert W. Thompson, Treasurer. 



Badye 

Nos. Names. 

50 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

51 Frank S. Putnam, 

52 George H. Sawyer, 

54 Jasper R. Mudgett, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

57 Albert W. Tliompson, 

58 Harry L. Peacock, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 

53 John W. McGowan, 

56 J. E. Cochran, 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Painter, 
Wood-worker, 
Blacksmith, 
Wood-worker, 
Machinist, 
Janitor, 
Painter, 
Electrician, 
Plumber, 
Molder, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
36 Broadway. 
48 South Main Street. 
5 Allison Street. 
93 South State Street. 
231/2 Perley Street. 
74 Allison Street. 
36 Warren Street. 
104 South State Street. 
Good Will Station. 
38 Downing Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 

Badye 

Nos. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

66 Frank T. Bean, 

67 Benjamin Ouillette, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Foster, 

73 Sam B. Morgan, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

76 D. Charles Parker, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

78 Carmi L. King, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 

82 William H. Reagan, 

83 Harry Leary, 

84 C. G. Howser, 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Cleric. 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Wood- worker. 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Renovater, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 
Steam fitter. 
Plumber, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 
5 Fremont Street. 
16 Avon Street. 
10 Jeiiferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 

13 West Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Wai-ren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 
10 Avon Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 

30 Green Street. 

63 South Street. 

Ins. Blk., School Street. 

64 Rumford Street. 
34 Downing Street. 
71 South Street. 

92 West Street. 
53 South Main Street. 
22 Fremont Street. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



267 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1. 



M. S. Wakefield, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 C. G. Pinkham, 

93 M. J. Martin, 

94 L. D. Dunham, 

95 John Driscoll, 



OFFICERS. 

C. G. Pinkham, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Occupatio ns. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
1st Chauffeur, 
2d Chauffeur, 
3d Chauffeur, 

House Man, 
A. L. Downing. 



Residences. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



Henry Eolfe, Captain. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 



OFFICERS. 

Frank P. Robertson, Lieut., Clerk and Treas. 
John B. Dodge, Steward. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Walter H. Rolfe, 

109 Alfred Beddow, 

111 Russell E. Rolfe, 

110 John B. Dodge, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

118 George A. Griffin, 

120 Harry F. Jones, 

123 William Corbett, 

103 Frank D. O'Brien, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

114 Henry E. Templeton, 

112 Ambrose Sweet, 

119 William H. Holbrook, 

116 Loren H. Emerson, 

117 Guy B. Chase, 

121 Albert Cassavaugh, 
105 Cornelius W. O'Brien, 
108 Alfred J. York, 

115 Carl G. Holmes, 



MEMBERS. 



Occupations. 
Highway agent, 
Machinist, 
Foreman, 

Stationary engineer, 
Clerk, 
Janitor, 
Table-maker, 
Painter, 
Teamster, 
Axle-maker, 
Teamster, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wine clerk, 
Laborer, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Table-maker, 
Hotel clerk. 
Spinner, 
Miller, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 
39 Centre Street. 
44 Elm Street. 
39 Centre Street. 

59 Merrimack Street. 

92 High Street. 

15 Washington Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
44 Centre Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 

41 Washington Street. 
4 Chai-les Street. 

10 Church Street. 

110 Merrimack Street. 

Union Street. 

9 Union Street. 

43 South Main Street. 

36 Centre Street. 

42 Spring Street. 



268 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



George O. Robinson, Captain. 
C. E. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



John C. Hutchins, Treasurer. 
Michael Lacroix, Steward. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

120 George O. Robinson, 

121 C. E. Robinson, 

122 John C. Hutchins, 

125 Samuel G. Potter, 

126 William E. Virgin, 

127 Rufus C. Boynton, 

128 Shad Gate, 

129 Ross W. Gate, 

130 Herbert Knowles, 

131 Parker French, 

132 Westley Field, 

133 John \V. Sanborn, 

134 Walter G. Sanborn, 

136 Arthur P. Swain, 

123 Michael Lacroix, 

137 Clarence Tibbetts, 

138 Reuben L. Gate, 

135 John T. Gate, 

140 C. A. Chamberlin, 

139 William F. Paige, 

141 Daniel W. Sanborn, 

143 H. A. Stuart, 

144 Hiram Gardner, 

145 John Ganney, 

146 Thomas Morrison, 

147 Fred Gardner, 
149 Fred J. Carter, 

148 Claude H. Swain, 

124 Herbert E. Merrill, 

142 William E. Batchelder, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Clerk, 
Engineer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Farmer, 
Horseshoer, 
Sawyer, 
Janitor, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Wood-worker, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Machinist, 
Salesman, 
Blacksmith, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Stone-cutter, 
Clerk, 

Blacksmith, 
Machinist, 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Clinton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



269 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



Alfred J. Fraser, Captain. 

Abram D. Gushing, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Names. 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
A. D. Gushing, 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Edward Levering, 
Joseph Daley, 
Luther E. Eowe, 
Robert Henry, 
Benjamin Kemp, 
Frank Peterson, 
Arthur Spead, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Ekstrom, 
Oscar Johnson, 
Ax&l Swanson, 



MEMBERS. 



Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 
Frank C. Blodgett, Steward. 



Occupations. 

Stone-cutter, 

Blacksmith, 

Stone-cutter, 

Farmer, 

Blacksmith, 

Stone-cutter, 

Quarryman, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Blacksmith, 

Quarryman, 

Silversmith, 

Laborer, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stationary engineer, 

Stationary engineer. 

Stationary engineer, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 



Residences. 
10 River Street. 
420 North State Street. 
490 North State Street. 
382 North State Street. 
5 Engel Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
543 North State Streei. 
436 North State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
455 North State Street. 

15 Lake Street. 

513 North State Street. 

3 River Street. 

346 North State Street. 

439 North State Street. 

14 View Street. 

9 Lake Street. 

16 Gladstone Avenue. 
516 North State Street. 
434 North State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 

OFFICERS. 

John E. Gove, Captain. S. S. Upham. First Lieutenant. 

Frank F. Morse, Second Lieutenant. 



Dennis Holloran, 
A. P. Davis, 
H. H. Carpenter, 
E. D. Ashley, 
Charles F. Thompson, 
Elba F. Home, 



MEMBERS. 

Arthur H. Britton, 
O. H. Thompson, 
W. K. Wingate, 
A. L. Walker, 
James Jepson, 
George H. Davis, 



Fred S. Johnson, 
F. O. Libbey, 
M. F. Thompson, 
W. W. Kennedy, 
J. J. McNulty, 
E. J. Brown. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1915. 



Board of WxVTer Commissioners. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

EDSON J. HILL, to March 31, 1919. 

CHARLES R. WALKER, to March 31, 1919. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, to March 31, 1918. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, to March 31, 1918. 

SOLON A. CARTER, to March 31, 1917. 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, , to March 31, 1917. 

HENRY C. HOLBROOK, to March 31, 1916. 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, to March 31, 1916. 

SOLON A. CARTER, President. 

EDSON J. HILL, Clerk of Board. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

foreman, 
JAMES T. DAVIS. 

INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



271 



CONCORD WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members. 



Abraham G. Jones,* ex officio, 1872- 
John M. Hill,* 1872- 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1872- 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. 

David A. Ward,* 1872- 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1872. 

Benjamin S. Warren,* 1872- 

John Kimball,* ex officio, 1872- 
John Abbott,* 1873- 

John S. Russ,* 1874- 

Abel B. Holt,* 1874- 

Samuel S. Kimball,* 1875. 

Geo. A. Pillsbiiry,* ex officio, 1876- 
Luther P. Durgin,* 1876- 

John Kimball,* 1877, 

William M. Chase, 1877. 

Horace A. Brown,* ex officio, 1878- 
James L. IMason,* 1878- 

James R. Hill,* 3 878, 

Geo. A. Cummings,* ex officio, 1880- 
Edgar H.Woodman,*exoj^Cio, 1883 
Joseph H. Abbot,* 1884 

George A. Young,* 1885 

John E. Robertson, ex officio, 1887 
StillmanHumphrey,*6x officio, 1889 
Henry W. Clapp,* ex officio, 1891 
Willis D. Thompson, 1891 



three months. 
1878. 
1878. 

Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 
1874. 

Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 
1873. 
1876. 
1876. 
1877. 
1877. 

Resigned July 1, 1891. 
1878. 
1885. 

Resigned July 1, 1891. 
Resigned July 1, 1891. 
■1880. 
1893. 

Died in 1884. 
■1883. 
■1887. 
•1893. 
1894. 
■1889. 
■1891. 
•1893. 
■1895. 



* Deceased. 



272 CITY OF CONCORD, 

William P. Fiske,* 1891-1902. 

James II. Chase,* 1891. Died in 1893. 

John Whitaker,* 1892. Died in 1903. 

Henry E. Conant,* 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

Parsons B.Cogswell,*ex Oj97 no, 1893-1895. 

Solon A. Carter, 1893. Now in office. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William M. Mason, 1893-1899. 

William E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Robinson, ex officio, 1895-1897. 

Ebenezer B. Hutchinson,* 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 

Edson J. Hill, 1895. Now in office. 

Albert B. Woodworth,* ex officio, 

1897-1899. 
Nathaniel E.Martin, exofficio, 1899-1901. 
Henry E. Conant,* 1899. Died in 1911. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 

Harry G. Sargent,* ex officio, 1901-1903. 
Obadiah IMorrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott, 1901-1915. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 

Charles R. Corning, ex officio, 1903-1909. 
Henry C. Holbrook, 1903, Now in office. 

Harley B. Roby,* 1905. Resigned Jan. 24, 1911. 

Charles J. French, ex officio, 1909. Now in office. 
Burns P. Hodgman, 1911. Now in office. 

Frank P. Quiraby, 1911. Now in office. 

Charles R. Walker, 1915. Now in office. 



Presidents op the Board. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1874-1875. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 



Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 273 

John Kimball,* 1875-1876. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1876-1878. 

John Kimball,* 1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William P. Fiske,* 1891-1902. 

Solon A. Carter, 1902. Now in office. 

Superintendents, 

V. C. Hastings,* 1873. Died March 14, 1907. 

P. R. Sanders, 1907. Now in office. 

* Deceased. 



18 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 

. CONSTRUCTION, 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights ; 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights, $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000.00 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for 

kit-shop privilege, 5,000.00 

flowage rights around Pena- 

cook Lake, 4,375.61 

for land at Penacook Lake, 62,082.41 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Association, 20,000.00 

dam, gate-house and appur- 
tenances, 34,146.05 

conduit and gate-houses, 29,818.94 

mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to the 
reservoir, fire main through 
North and South Main 
Streets, and high service 
main from Penacook Street 
to Stark Street, Penacook), 182,241.70 

distribution pipe, 398,791.56 

service pipe, 64,992.00 

reservoir, including land, 45,044.09 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 275 

Cost of pumping station, shop, sta- 
ble and storehouse, includ- 
ing land, $29,265.35 

pumping machinery, 17,000.42 

engineering and superin- 
tendence, 14,913.12 

incidentals, 6,531.19 



Cost of works, January 1,1916, $1,067,702.44 

Less amount received for lumber, land and 

buildings sold, 7,736.61 



$1,059,965.83 



Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding : 



Wlien due 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1, 1916, 


4, 


$9,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1917, 


4, 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1918, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1919, 


4, 


10,000.00 


Nov. 1, 1920, 


3, 


4,000.00 


Nov. 1, 1921, 


'J, 


3,000.00 


April 1, 1921, 


31/2, 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1922, 


4, 


335,000.00 


March 1, 1922, 


31/2, 


20,000.00 


April 1, 1922, 


31/2, 


26,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1923, 


31/2, 


15,000.00 


Jan. 1, 1924, 


31/2, 


15,000.00 




$457,000.00 



276 CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To His Honor the Mayor and tlie Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners of the city of Con- 
cord transmits herewith the report of Superintendent 
Percy R. Sanders, exhibiting the operations of the depart- 
ment for the year 1915, including all receipts and expend- 
itures and the customary statistics pertaining to the con- 
struction, administration and present condition of the sys- 
tem, which is made a part of the report of this board. 

The policy of acquiring by purchase shore-line proper- 
ties, where the same could be accomplished on satisfactory 
terms, has been consistently adhered* to and five parcels 
have been acquired during the year at a cost of $8,000. 

The control of Penacook Park has been placed in the 
hands of this board by the city government ; the highway 
around Forge Pond has been discontinued and the board 
has caused to be removed all the unsightly and unsanitary 
boathouses, landings and wharves from the shores of 
Forge Pond. 

At the request of this board, the State Board of Health 
adopted and promulgated a code of regulations applicable 
to all municipal systems supplying water for domestic pur- 
poses. 

Upon the adoption of the state board's code, your board 
has revised its regulations and both codes are published as 
an appendix to this report for the information of the 
public. 

In the opinion of this board, these measures mark a long 
step in advance towards better conditions and the protec- 
tion of the purity of our supply, and in their enforcement 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 277 

we ask and confidently expect to receive the approval and 
hearty cooperation of a very large majority of our fellow 
citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON J. HILL, 
CHARLES R. WALKER, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGaiAN, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
CHARLES J. FRENCH, cx-officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



278 I CITY OF CONCORD, 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Wafer Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the forty-fourth annual report 
of the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement of 
the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1915. 

Eeceipts. 



For water, from consumers by fixed 






rates. 


$12,629.32 




For water, from consumers by meter 






rates, 


60,536.11 




From delinquents. 


81.15 




For water for building purposes, 


341.06 




pipe and stock sold and labor, 


741.59 




old brass and iron sold, 


102.82 




buildings, 


140.00 




adding machine. 


25.00 




freight and insurance refunded. 


6.17 




From proceeds of wood-lot, 


4,391.61 


$78,994.83 






Deduct abatements, 




54.77 



Net receipts for 1915, $78,940.06 

There has also been furnished the city free of charge the 
following use of water : 

Fire department, $111.50 

Police department, 43.00 

Public Library, 11.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 279 



Ward 7, ward house, 


$7.00 


Ward 9, ward house, 


7.00 


St. Paul's School sewer precinct, 




flush tanks, 


45.00 


City playgrounds. 


12.00 


Parks, city, 


38.00 


Park, Washington Square, Pen- 




acook, 


10.00 


Cemeteries, 


108.00 


Drinking fountains. 


20.00 


Watering troughs. 


260.00 


Street department, stable, 


18.00 


Stone crusher. 


6.00 


Standpipes, city and Penacook, 


750.00 


448 fire hydrants at $25, 


11,200.00 


Expenditures. 





maintenance account. 
General care and maintenance : 



Salaries and labor, $5,658.18 


Maintenance of team, 


212.45 


Maintenance of autos. 


489.45 


Teaming and livery. 


264.00 


Miscellaneous supplies and 




repairs. 


251.70 


Tools, 


104.91 


Eepairs of buildings, 


322.06 


Bond and liability insur- 




ance. 


378.50 


Telephones and lighting. 


79.00 


Incidentals, 


86.87 



$12,646.50 



$7,847.12 



280 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Office expenses: 

Salaries, $921.52 

Postage and printing, 287.09 

Miscellaneous supplies, 94.53 
Adding machine and letter 

file, 316.49 

Telephone, 34.19 

$1,653.82 

Care and repair of hydrants : 

Stock, $94.39 

Labor, 274.51 

368.90 



Care and repair of meters: 

Stock, $984.50 

Labor, 1,091.07 



2.075.57 



Relaying service pipes : 

Stock, $99.48 

Labor, 200.55 

300.03 

Work at Lake, 939.05 

Care of wood-lots : 

Planting pines, $737.84 

General care, 368.14 

1,105.98 



Protection of water supply, 370.92 

Penacook Park : 

Repairing buildings, $219.46 

General care, 534.74 

754.20 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 281 



Automobile, 




$879.80 


Legal expenses. 




150.00 


Taxes, town of Webster, 




48.00 


Incidentals, 




45.00 


Pumping station : 






Salaries and labor. 


$2,099.00 




Fuel, 


1,041.58 




Supplies and repairs, 


504.06 




Telephone and lighting, 


52.45 




Insurance, 


82.00 


3,779.09 



Total maintenance account, $20,317.48 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 

Distribution pipes: 



Stock, $864.23 

Labor, 613.49 



$1,477.72 



Service pipes: 

Stock, $400.52 

Labor, 114.44 



514.96 



Hydrants : 

Stock, $470.75 

Labor, 32.83 



503.58 



Meters : 

Stock, $759.52 

Labor, 77.88 



837.40 



282 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Ventiiri meter, $1,389.88 



Total construction account, $4,723.54 

LAND AT PENACOOK LAKE. 

H. M. Eichardson, $5,000.00 

Eva B. Lauder, 1,600.00 

John G. McQuilkin, 800.00 

Grace M. Wilkins, 600.00 

Recording deeds, 2.74 

8,002.74 



Total expenditures for 1915, $33,043.76 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 283 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron distribution pipes have been laid and gates and 
hydrants set during the year as follows : 

In SeivaU's Falls Road, 

north from A. H. Knight's to Second Street, 1,310 feet 
G-inch pipe in place of 2-inch discontinued. 

In Second Street, West Concord, 

east from Sewall's Falls Road, 40 feet 6-inch pipe in 
place of 2-inch discontinued. 

In Walker Street Extension, 

west from Rumford Street, 609 feet 6-inch pipe. 

In Walnut and Bye Streets, Penacook, 

west from Merrimack to East Canal Street, 884 feet 
6-inch pipe in place of 1- and 2-inch pipe discontinued. 

In Crescent Street, Penacook, 

between "Walnut and East Canal streets, 58 feet 6-ineh 
pipe. 

0)1 hydrant branches, 

69 feet 6-inch pipe ; 9 feet 6-inch pipe discontinued. 

Total amount laid during the year, 2,970 feet. 
Total amount discontinued during the year, 1,937 feet. 
Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
373,324 feet, equal to 70.70 miles. 

There have been set during the year 11 gates. 
Total number of gates now in use, 1,039. 

Six new hydrants have been set as follows : 

On "Walker Street Extension, 500 feet west from Rum- 
ford. 



284 CITY OF CONCORD. 

On Centre Street, at east line of Dewey School lot. 

On South State Street, at Fayette Street. 

On Thorndike Street, between South State and South 

Main streets. 
On Sewall's Falls Road, at north line of cemetery. 
On Walnut Street, Penacook, at Bye Street. 

Total number of hydrants now in use, 448. 

Service Pipes. 

There have been laid during the year and connected with 
the main pipes, 28 service pipes, consisting of 

21 %-inch, 1,255 feet. 

4 1-ineh, 572 feet. 

3 2-inch, 70 feet. 



28 1,897 feet. 

There have been discontinued, 7 ; total number of service 
pipes at the present time, 3,858 ; total length of service 
pipes, 91,236 feet, or 17.27 miles. 

There have been relaid 45 services and 24 curbs have 
been placed on old services. 

We have set 72 meters during the year ; removed, 6 ; 
total number now in use, 2,459. 

The following table shows the height of water in Pena- 
cook Lake on the first day of each month : 



January, 


178.50 


July, 


178.60 


February, 


178.60 


August, 


180.45 


March, 


179.75 


September, 


181.45 


April, 


179.85 


October, 


180.75 


May, 


180.10 


November, 


180.40 


June, 


179.60 


December, 


180.10 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 285 

The lowest point reached during the year was on Janu- 
ary 17, being 178.25; the highest was on September 1 and 
was 181.45; mean height for the year was 180.00, which 
was .45 foot higher than the mean height for the year 1914. 

Our water supply has continued to prove ample for the 
needs of the city and has maintained its high standard of 
excellence. The shores of the lake have been thoroughly 
patrolled and all rubbish and other material removed. 

The buildings at Penacook Park, the control and care 
of wdiich have been turned over to this department, have 
been repaired, shingled and painted, and are now in good 
condition. The boat houses, landings and wharves on the 
shore ad,iaeent to the park have all been removed and all 
boating on Forge Pond has been prohibited. 

The action of the board in making and carrying out this 
order is a move which does much to protect our supply 
from pollution. 

A Venturi meter has been placed in operation at the 
lake by means of which the entire flow of water to the city 
is measured and recorded on a weekly chart. These 
charts show that the draft of w'ater will average 2,400,000 
gallons per da^^ 

The rate of flow^ from 7 a. m. to 5 p. m. is nearly 4,200,000 
gallons per 24 hours, and from 5 p. m. to 7 a. m. about 
1,400,000 gallons per 24 hours. 

There have not been many calls for extensions during 
the year, as will be shown by the schedule of pipe laid. 

Services have been relaid in all streets resurfaced or 
macadamized. 

We have set out 40,000 pine seedlings, procured from 
the state nurseries at North Boscawen, on vacant land 
around the lake. This work was done in the spring as 
soon as possible after the frost was out of the ground. 
The percentage of loss from any cause has been very small. 
The seedlings set out in the past few years have shown 
marked growth, especially those near the upper gate-house. 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The cement-lined pipes remaining in the system, namely, 
the Penacook main and distribution pipes and the 18-inch 
main from the lake to the city, have given no trouble on 
account of leaks, and apparently can be continued in use 
for some time. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 287 

REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING 
STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water-Works. 

P. R. Sanders, Superintendent : 

Sir : I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station is in good working condition. 

The boilers are in good condition; boiler No. 2 was in- 
spected the first of January, 1916, and found to be in good 
condition. 

The brick work on boiler No. 1 will need some repairs. 

Following is a statement of coal and other supplies used 
at the pumping station during the year, with a table show- 
ing the work for each month: 

Statement. 

25 tons 483 pounds of Bader coal. 

192 tons 402 pounds of New River coal. 
Ill gallons of valve oil. 
7 gallons of engine oil. 

28 pounds of waste. 

10 pounds of grease. 

59 cords of wood. 

26 gallons of perolin boiler compound. 



288 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
ENGINE RECORDS. 



Months. 



be 


so 


bi) 


a 

s 


a 




s 


s 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


2 


2 ; 


S^i 


2 


a 


s . 


=! 


:3 






ao 


ao 


a 


£ 


s 


y, 


'A 


M 




*_^ 












k.® 


^<^ 


OS 




OJ 


cs c 


C3 S 


■a 


■■^ 


fcc 


•°-a 


■^■5) 


"3 


le fci 


SSP 




C o 


c 


C-" 


>••-' 


kq 


:< 


H 


H 


«u 



a 


1 


"5 


o . 


s 


p:; 


o 










^ 






w o 


a 

C3 


o 

O 
o 

^T3 




Is 

c 22 




?e 






*S 


— o 


-« o 


d i) 


Cm 


o ^ 


Q 


H 


Q 


H 



a© 



eg 

S o 
c« a 
O 



January... 
February.. 

March 

April . . 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December.. 

Total . . . . 









H. M. 


H.M, 


IS 


14 


29 


271: 


8:44 


14 


17 


28 


253: 


9: 2 


17 


15 


31 


266: 


8:34 


IS 


17 


29 


248 :30 


8:16 


15 


l(i 


31 


252 :30 


8: 8 


16 


IS 


30 


297: 


9:54 


25 


6 


31 


240 :30 


7:45 


10 


k; 


31 


249::30 


8: 2 


14 


If, 


30 


265:30 


8:51 


17 


If, 


31 


276:30 


8:55 


Ifi 


16 


30 


262:30 


8:45 


12 


20 


31 


263 :30 


8:30 


193 


187 


362 


3,146 : 


8:37 











23,801,651 
21,567,924 
22,332,180 
21,871,141 
22,039,750 
26,439,523 
20,238,611 
21,098.577 
22,826.591 
23,:WS,555 
21,816,241 
22,158,371 



269,529,115 



767,795 
770,283 
720,392 
729,038 
710,959 

88i,:n 

652,858 
6S0,599 
760,886 
752,856 
727,208 
714,786 



738,435 



42,046 
31 ,125 
25,7.34 
42,408 
42,586 
49,930 
38,667 
40,106 
43,481 
44,593 
42,735 
44,554 

488,015 

1,334 



1,48,^ 
1,495 
1,487 
1,413 
1,373 
1,664 
1,247 
1,293 
1,449 
1,438 
1,424 
1.437 



11,815 
32,282 
61,176 

380 



280 



517 
514 
484 
511 
517 
529 
523 
526 
523 
523 
510 
496 



105,933 516 



Coal consumed for the year, 217.91 tons. 

(Pounds of wood consumed) -^ 3 = equivalent amount 
of coal— 35,311 lbs. 

Total equivalent coal consumed for the year includes 
that used for pumping, starting fires, banking fires and 
heating buildings, 233.67 tons. 

Amount of equivalent coal consumed per thousand gal- 
lons pumped, 1.93. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 289 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER- WORKS ACCOUNT. 



Isaac Hill, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water- 
Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1915, $18,240.28 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 78,940.06 

$97,180.34 

Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $18,814.90 

Bonds paid, 20,000.00 

Orders paid, ' 33,033.74 

Cash on hand, 25,331.70 

$97,180.34 



19 



APPENDIX. 



292 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



A. 

Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of the 

Works. 

For the year ending January 31, 1874, $4,431.10 

For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875, 17,535.00 

For the year ending April 1, 1876, 16,921.24 

1877, 19,001.07 

1878, 20,763.03 

1879, 21,869.86 

1880, 22,451.53 

1881, 26,744.58 
For nine months ending December 31, 1881, 25,534.01 
For the year ending December 31, 1882, 27,243.06 

1883, 28,255.48 

1884, 28,915.65 

1885, 30,222.54 

1886, 30,862.64 

1887, 34,047.52 

1888, 38,441.32 

1889, 40,237.53 

1890, 42,133.41 
-1891, 46,075.16 

1892, .48,351.52 

1893, 52,299.66 

1894, 53,230.10 

1895, 55,343.19 

1896, 56,557.81 

1897, 55,156.42 

1898, 59,147.54 

1899, *53,953.13 

1900, *57,003.71 

1901, 62,253.61 

1902, 63,430.85 

1903, 65,088.45 

1904, 68,570.48 



No hydrant rental this year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 



293 



For th€ 


! year ending December 31, 


1905, 


$71,076.44 










1906, 


73,063.45 










1907, 


73,782.64 










1908, 


71,362.67 










1909, 


*67,307.84 










1910, 


68,673.71 










1911, 


71,881.34 










1912, 


76,145.13 










1913, 


76,154.45 










1914, 


74,422.15 








rs. 


1915, 


78,940.06 


Total 


receipts f 


or 43 yea 


$2,074,882.08 






B. 






Mean Height of 


Water Each Year. 


1873, 


175.86 


1895, 




171.15 


1874, 


179.50 


1896, 




178.96 


1875, 


180.00 


1897, 




183.33 


1876, 


180.28 


1898, 




184.31 


1877, 


176.46 


1899, 




183.49 


1878, 


179.50 


1900, 




183.09 


1879, 


179.74 


1901, 




183.86 


1880, 


175.30 


1902, 




184.98 


1881, 


174.70 


1903, 




184.75 


1882, 


179.15 


1904, 




184.40 


1883, 


176.40 


1905, 




183.37 


1884, 


178.18 


1906, 




183.94 


1885, 


176.80 


1907, 




183.59 


1886, 


178.10 


1908, 




183.41 


1887, 


179.04 


1909, 




181.40 


1888, 


181.96 


1910, 




180.22 


1889, 


180.91 


1911, 




177.60 


1890, 


181.90 


1912, 




178.86 


1891, 


180.00 


1913, 




179.20 


1892, 


174.32 


1914, 




179.55 


1893, 


173.38 


1915, 




180.00 


1894, 


17 


2.81 









No hydrant rental after 1908. 



294 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



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300 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



D. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service ; L, Low Service. 




North Main. 



South Main. 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Walker's 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin's store 

ISTorthwest corner of Franklin 

East side, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner of Washington 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court . 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery 

East side, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

East side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block 

East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, at Central Block 

Northwest corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Freight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue . . 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. John's Church.... 

Northwest corner of Perley 

West side, near Abbot & Downing Co.'s.. 
East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co... 



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WATER DEP.^RTMENT. 

FmE-BYDRANT^.— Continued. 



301 




South Main. 



Water. 
Hall . . 



Hammond. . 
Railroad. . . . 

Fiske 

Summer. . . . 

Durgin 

North State 



South State. 



Mills... 

Dakin. . 
Dunklee 



Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

East side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops. . 

West side, at Lamprey's 

West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 

West side, near E. W. Robinson's 

West side, near W. A. Phillips' 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, opposite Roy's 

East side, near Rumford Field 

North side, near Bridge 

East side, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof 's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penaeook 

Northwest corner of W'alker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Southeast corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 

West side, near Levi Call 's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

West side, near C. E. Harriman's 

West side, 150 feet south of West | 



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302 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

FmE-nYBR ANTS.— Continued. 




Dunklee. . 
Broadway. 



Donovan 
Green. . . 

South... 



Bradley 

Union 

Jackson 

Lyndon 

North Spring. 



South Spring. 
Academy 



Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury ^... 

West side, at H. H. Metcalf 's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Carter 

Northwest corner of Stone . . . 

West side, at Eollins Park 

West side, opposite McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Eockingham 

Northeast corner of Wiggin 

Northwest corner of Prince 

East side, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

West side, opposite Monroe 

West side, opposite Laurel 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital. . 

West side, opposite Downing 

West side, opposite Allison 

West side, opposite Pillsbury | 

West side, near Paige 's j 

West side, opposite L W. Bushey's 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Eoad. . . 

East side, at Quint's 

West side, near Bow line 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

East side, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northeast corner of Church 

Southwest corner of Tremont 

East side, opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner of Maple 

Southwest corner of Centre 

West side, at High School 

East side, opposite High School 

Southwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Oak 

West side, opposite Thompson 

West side, opposite Concord 

West side, near Memorial Hospital 

East side, at F. E. Hook's 



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WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Confiniterf. 



303 




Hanover . 
Euniford. 



Huntington . 
Tahanto. . . . 
Pine 



Holt. 
High. 



Valley.. 
Auburn . 



Ridge Eoad. . . . 
Westbourne Ed 
Dartmouth .... 
Princeton 



Fruit . 



Minot. 



Kensington Ed . 
Stevens Ave. . . 
Penacook 



Walker . 
Albin.. 



West side, at No. 10 

West side, south of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Northeast corner of Albin 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

Northeast corner of Cambridge 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at head of Short 

Northwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Centre , 

Southwest corner of Warren , 

East side, at Nason 's 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

Northeast corner of Forest 

Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest 

North side, between Centre and Forest .... 

West side, opposite Mrs. Jackman's 

North side, north of Mrs. F. P. Hallett's. . 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Northeast corner of Woodman 

West side, near V. A. Dearborn 's 

East side, opposite W. W. Critchett's 

East side, opposite Kilburn 's 

West side, north of Odd Fellows ' Home . . . 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home. . . 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

South side, near Concord Lumber Co 

South side^ east of P. B. Co.'s storehouse. . 

South side, near P. B. Co. 's 

South side, near P. B. Co. 's office 

Southeast corner of North Main 

Southwest corner of Eumford 

North side, opposite T. Hannigan's 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue 

Southwest corner of Martin 

South side, 500 feet west from Eumford. . 
North side, near D. Weathers' 



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304 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

FIRE-BYDRA'NT^.— Continued. 



Streets. 


Locations. 


in 

m 


s 

1 


Highland 


North side, between Bradley and Eumford. . 
Northeast corner of Rumford 


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Church 


South side, east of Bradley 






North side, opposite Lyndon 






Northeast corner of Rumford 


B 




Northwest corner 'of Jackson 






Northeast corner of Lyndon 






Southwest corner of Rumford 






South side, opposite W. J. Ahern's 

North side, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner of Auburn 


6 


Chestnut 


Northwest corner of High 


1 


Tremont 


North side, east of Harrod 






Southwest corner of Jackson 


?, 


Pearl 


North side at Kimball Flanders' 


1 


Beacon 


North side, opposite Merrimack School 

Northwest corner of Jackson 






Southwest corner of Lyndon 






North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Charles 


,«> 


Rowell 


Northeast corner of White 


1 


Blanchard 


Northwest corner of Essex 


1 


Ferry 

Washington. . . . 


North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue 

North side, opposite Rollins 


4 


Southwest corner of Union 






Northeast corner of Lyndon 






Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of North Essex 




Chapel 

Montgomery. . . 


North side, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side near Methodist Church 


6 
1 


South side, opposite Minot's 


1 


Northeast corner of North State 






Southwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Union 

Northwest corner of North Spring 






South side opposite Essex 






Southwest corner of Summit Avenue 

South side, on east line of Dewey School lot 
Northeast corner of Ridge Road 


8 


Bridge 

Park 


South side near easterly barn 




North side, opposite Concord Coal Co.'s.... 
North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory. 
North side, at St. Paul 's Church 


3 

1 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Co>ih» wed. 



305 




Capitol 

Garden 
School. 



Warren . 



Depot . . 

Blake. .. 
Orchard . 
Pleasant 



jSTorth side, at south gate of State HoHse yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Eumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

North side, opposite E. B. Woodworth 's . . . . 

Southeast corner of Giles 

Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue. . . . 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

Northeast corner of Giles 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at H. B. Boutwell's 

South side, opposite Sherburne's 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at South Congregational Church. 

Southeast corner of South 

Northeast corner of Fremont 

Southwest corner of Spring 

South side, opposite Rumford 

South side, opposite Merrimack 

South side, opposite Pine 

South side, opposite Liberty 

North side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite Mrs. Aiken's 

South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage 

South side, at Lavery's 

South side, opposite No. 270 

North side, near James Lane's 

North side, opposite No. 291 



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306 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Conhnwet^. 




Pleasant . 



Fiske Eoad. . . 
Hopkinton Ed. 
Mill Eoad, 
St. P. iSchool. . 



Old Hopkinton 

Eoad 

Wall 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue. , 



Fayette . . . 
Thompson . 
Chandler. . 
Concord. . , 



Monroe. . . 
Thorndike. 



Laurel . 
Perley. 



Downing. 
Clinton. . 



North side, near J. McC. Hammond's. 

South side, opposite Fiske Eoad 

Southwest corner of School Avenue. . 

North side, at chapel , 

South side, opposite Lower School . . , 
South side, near new Upper School. 

East side, at Trask's 

South side, near new infirmary 



East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home. 
South side, at tenement No. 7 . . 



.Junction of Hopkinton road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

No. side, at southwest corner pass, station . . 

Southwest corner of Eailroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Eailroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Jefferson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Eumford School 

North side, between So. Main and So. State 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner of South Spring 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, near old brook 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Eedwood Avenue 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near Snell 's 

North side, at State Fair grounds 



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WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIRE-HYDRANTS.— Cow^MmetZ. 



307 




West. 



Avon 

Harrison. . 
Humphrey. 
Allison. . . . 
Pillsbury. . 



Carter 

Stone 

Holly 

McKinley 

Rockingham. , . 

Iron Works Rd 
Prospect 



Curtice Ave. 
North State. 



Palm. 



North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed exten'n 

Northeast corner of Broadway , 

North side, at Donovan , 

South side, at Brown 's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, near John C. Kenney 's 

West side, at Water- Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side, near W. H. Perry's 

East side, near Oliver Racine's 

East side, near A. L. Colburn 's 

East side, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side, at south line of prison wall 

West side, at north line of prison wall 

East side, near Asa L. Gay's 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co. . . 

East side, near C. H. Farnum's 

East side, near Cyrus R. Farnum's 

East side, near John True's 

East side, opposite Dolan 

East side, opposite John H. Flood's 

West side, opposite S. Abbott's 

North side, west of Fairbanks 



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308 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FlUE-JIYBRANT^.— Continued. 




North State. . 



Fisher . . 
View . . . 
Electric. 



Clarke. 
Lake. . 



Knight. . 
Hutchins . 



Second 

Sewall's Falls 

Eoad 

Penacook Ed . . 



South Main. 



Southeast corner of K. 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at George Partridge's 

East side, near engine house 

East side, opposite Hodgson's 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co 

East side, opposite Simeon Partridge's. 

East side, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side, opposite A. HoUis' 

East side, near Sewall 's Falls Eoad . . . . 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kelloni 's 

West side, near H. C. Holden's 

West side, near Wilson's 

East side, near H. C. Holden's 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station. . . . 

North side, near B. T. Putney's 

North side, near C. & C. Bailroad 

North side, at Turcotte's 

North side, near A. H. Knight's 



East side, at north line of cemetery H 

West side, opposite Frost 's I H 

Wiest side, opposite Blanchard 's | H 

West side, near Warner Eoad | H 



PENACOOK. 



West side, at Harriman 's 

West side, at Annis's 

West side, at Garvin 's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'y 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cem'y 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt 's garage 

West side, near Prescott's 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opp. Exchange Block . . 



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WATER DEPARTMENT. 

FIKE-BYDRANTS.— Continued. 



309 




South Main. 

West Main. 
High 



Washington . 



Fowler. 



Electric Ave. 

Elliott 

Charles , 



West Canal, 
East Canal. 

Crescent . . . . 

Walnut 

Merrimack. . 



Summer. 



Spring. 
Maple. 
Winter. 
Centre. 



Cross. 



Northwest corner of Charles 

Xorth side, opposite East Canal 

Xorth side, near iron bridge , 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Xorthwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Xorthwest corner of Maple 

Xorthwest corner of Spring 

South side, near South Main 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, opposite John Whitaker's. . 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge.... 

North side, at Eolfe's sawmill 

West side, at Charles Holmes' 

East side, near Elliott 's 

South side, junction of Washington. . . . 
Northeast corner of Electric Avenue... 

Southwest corner of Warren 

North side, near George W^ Corey's. . . . 

Southeast corner of Warren 

North side, near Contoocook Mfg. Co. . . 

North side, near Crescent 

West side, north of Canal 

North side, at Bye 

South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue. 

North side, opposite D. W. Fox's 

North side, opposite Cross 

South side, opposite Bye 

South side, opposite Rolfe's shop 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory. 

North side, near road to Island 

Northwest corner of Penaeook 

North side, opposite High 

Northeast corner of Centre 

North side, opposite Church 

Northeast corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

North side, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Spring 

West side, at Corbett 's 

Southwest corner of Summer 



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310 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE iLYDUANTS.— Concluded. 



Streets. 



Locations. 



•? 



Kolfe. 



Penacook . 



North side, near James Corbett's.. 
Northwest corner of Penacook.... 
West side, opposite A. W. Eolfe's. . 

West side, at E. L. Davis' 

East side, at McGirr 's 

Wliole number public hydrants 



PEIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Abbot & Downing Co 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard. . . . 

Boston & Maine Railroad, shops 

Boston & Maine Railroad, power house, West 

Concord 

Brampton Woolen Co 

Concord Gas Light Co 

Concord Shoe Factory 

Concord Worsted Mills ., 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Ford Foundry Co 

N. E. Box Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

N. H. State Hospital 

N. H. State Prison 

N. H. State Prison 

Page Belting Co 

Page Belting Co 

St. Paul's School 

Water-works pumping station 

Whole number private hydrants 



448 



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87 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 311 

E. 
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1915. 

In form recommended by the New England "Water- 
Works Association. 

CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 

CITY OP CONCORD, COUNTY OP MERRIMACK, STATE OP NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1910—21,497. 
Date of construction — 1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING STATISTICS. 

1. Builders of pumping machinery — Henry R. Worthing- 

ton, Harrison, N. J. 

2. Description of fuel used — a. Kind — bituminous. 

&. Brand of coal — New 
River. 

c. Average price of coal per 

gross ton delivered, 
$4.94. 

d. Percentage ash, 10.2%. 

3. Coal consumed for year — 217.39 tons. 



312 CITY OF CONCORD. 

4. (Pounds of wood consumed )-^-3=eqmvalent amount 
of coal — 35,311 lbs. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year for 
pumping purposes — 233.67 tons. 

6. Total pumpage for the year without allowance for 
slip— 269,529,115 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pump works — 
103.84 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pump works — 
105 feet. 

9. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent 
coal — 515. 

10. Duty= 

269,529,115 ga llons pumped, X 8 34 (lbs.) X 100 x dynamic head,105 ^45 098 500 
Total fuel consumed, 523,32(5 pounds. ' ' 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses — 
$3,779.09. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $14.02. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0.13. 

STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement -lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 1,033 feet during year. 

4. Renewed — 1,937 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 1,937 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 70.70 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.14 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 6; 
private, 1. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 313 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 448; pri- 
vate, 87. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 11. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,039. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 81. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourtlis-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 1,897 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 240 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 91,236 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 28. 

22. Number now in use — 3,858. 

23. Average length of service — 23.64 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — 

25. Number of meters added during year — 72. 

26. Number now in use — 2,459. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 63.7. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 82.33. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 10. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 44. 



314 CITY OF CONCORD, 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Of the State Board of Health and the Board op Water 
Commissioners of the City of Concord for the Sani- 
tary Protection of the Waters of Long Pond, Some- 
times C-\LLED PeNACOOK LaKE, AND FORGE PoND, USED 

BY THE City of Concord as Sources of Water Supply. 

Adopted by the State Board of Health, September 14, 1915, 
and by the Board of Water Commissioners, February 3, 
1916. ^ 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Wpiereas, a legal petition having been presented to the 
State Board of Health, asking for the establishment of 
regulations to protect the purity of the water of Penacook 
Lake, under the provisions of chapter 57, Laws of 1899, 
entitled ''An Act for the better protection of public water 
supplies, ' ' the following regulations are promulgated : 

Regulations of the State Board of Health for the Pro- 
tection OF THE Purity of the Water of 
Penacook Lake. 

1. No cesspool, privy, or other place for the reception, 
deposit or storage of human excrement, and no urinal or 
water-closet not discharging into a sewer, and no pig-pen, 
stable, or other building or structure in which horses, cat- 
tle, swine, or other animals, or fowls are kept, shall be 
built, continued, or maintained within two hundred feet 
of high water mark of Penacook Lake, meaning to include 
that part of the same sometimes called Forge Pond, or 
within two hundred feet of any bay, cove or inlet thereto, 
or within two hundred feet of any stream, tributary to said 
lake, bays, coves, or inlets except upon the approval of the 
State Board of Health. 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 315 

No stable or other place as above enumerated, shall be 
located, constructed, built, continued or maintained within 
two hundred feet of high water mark of Penacook Lake, or 
within two hundred feet of any open waters flowing as 
aforesaid into said lake, unless suitable or adequate pro- 
vision is made to prevent manure or other polluting matter 
from flowing or being washed into said lake or such open 
water. 

2. No sink drainage, urine, or water that has been used 
for washing or cleansing either persons or materials shall 
be allowed to run into said lake, or into any bay, cove, or 
inlet thereof, or into any stream tributary thereto, or into 
any excavation or cesspool in the ground or on the surface 
of any ground within two hundred feet of high water mark 
of said lake or of any bay, cove or inlet, or within two hun- 
dred feet of any stream tributary thereto, except by con- 
sent of and under such regulations and conditions as may 
be given by the Board of Health of the city of Concord, 
upon approA'al of the State Board of Health. 

3. No dead animal, or fish, or parts thereof, or food, or 
any article perishable or decayable, and no excrement, 
either human or animal, kitchen waste, swill, or garbage, 
shall be thrown into or deposited in said lake, or left or 
permitted to remain within two hundred feet of the high 
water mark thereof, or into any bay, cove, or inlet of said 
lake, or into any stream tributary thereto, or within two 
hundred feet of such bay, inlet or stream. 

4. No human excrement shall be kept in, or deposited 
or discharged into any cesspool, privy or other receptacle 
situated within two hundred feet of high water mark of 
said lake, or within two hundred feet of any open waters 
which flow directly or ultimately into said lake, unless such 
cesspool, privy or other receptacle is so constructed, con- 
tinued or maintained as to conform to such regulations 
and conditions as the Board of Health of the city of Con- 
cord may prescribe. 

5. No sawdust shall be thrown or be allowed to fall into 
the said lake or into any stream tributary thereto. 



316 CITY OF CONCORD. 

6. No person shall bathe or swim in said lake, and no 
swimming pool, or other contrivance of any nature for pub- 
lic or private bathing whose waters do not discharge into 
a sewer or cesspool constructed as approved or required by 
the Board of Health of the city of Concord, shall be built, 
continued, or maintained within two hundred feet of high 
water mark of said lake. 

7. No matter, waste, or materials described in sections 
2, 3, 4, and 5, shall be thrown, or allowed to remain upon 
the ice of the water of said lake, or upon that of any bay, 
cove, or inlet thereof, or of any stream tributary thereto. 

8. No cattle, horses, or other animals used for teaming, 
driving, or speeding, shall be driven, guided, or speeded 
upon the ice of said lake, except by permission of and under 
regulations established by the Board of Health of the city 
of Concord. 

9. No system of sewers or other works for the collection, 
conveyance, disposal, or purification of sewage or drainage, 
or any other putrescible matter whatsoever, shall, except in 
accordance with plans first approved in writing by the 
State Board of Health, be constructed or maintained at any 
place within the drainage area of said lake. No private or 
separate sewer shall be constructed or maintained having an 
outlet uj^on or into the ground Avithin two hundred feet of 
high water mark of any reservoir, lake, pond, stream, ditch, 
water-course or other open waters, the water of which flows 
or drains into said lake, except upon approval of the State 
Board of Health. 

10. No public or private hospital, or other place in- 
tended for the reception or treatment of the sick, shall, 
until the location or construction thereof has been approved 
in writing by the State Board of Health, be located or con- 
structed at any place within the drainage area of said lake. 

11. No sewage, garbage, manure, or putrescent matter, 
whatsoever, shall be permitted to be in any place or locality 
from which the seepage, drainage, or washage may endan- 
ger the purity of the water of the said lake, or its tributa- 
ries. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 317 

12. No condition or practice of whatever kind that may 
endanger the purity of the waters of the said lake, shall be 
permitted to exist. 

13. It shall be the duty of the Board of Health of the 
city of Concord to enforce these regulations, and any per- 
son violating the same is liable to a fine of twenty dollars 
and costs for each offense as provided by the statutes of 
New Hampshire. 

14. Upon the adoption of the foregoing rules and regu- 
lations by the State Board of Health, they shall supercede 
the rules and regulations for the protection of the waters of 
Penacook Lake, adopted by said State Board on August 16, 
1901. 

I hereby certify that the foregoing rules and regulations 
were adopted at a special meeting of the State Board of 
Health held at the State House, Concord, this fourteenth 
day of September, 1915. 

IRVING A. WATSON, 

Secretary. 



Ordinances of the City of Concord. 

Chapter 22, Sec. 20. No person shall swim, bathe or go 
into Penacook Lake, or put therein, or upon ice thereof in 
the winter season, or upon the shores so near to the water 
thereof as to cause the defilement or pollution of said waters, 
any animal or vegetable matter, or any other substance that 
will defile or pollute said water. It shall be unlawful for 
any person to cut ice from Penacook Lake or for any per- 
son to go upon any ice that may have formed upon said 
lake, either personally, or with teams, or animals. 

Sec. 21. Any person violating any of the provisions of 
the preceding section shall be fined not exceeding twenty 
dollars for everv violation thereof. 



318 city op concord. 

Rules and Regulations op the Board op Water Commis- 
sioners FOR THE City op Concord, New Hampshire. 

For the purpose of preventing the pollution and securing 
the sanitary protection of the waters of Long Pond, some- 
times known as Penaeook Lake, and Forge Pond, and their 
tributaries, used by the city of Concord, New Hampshire, 
as sources of water supply. 

The Board of Water Commissioners for the city of Con- 
cord, New Hampshire, acting under the authority contained 
in chapter 76 of the Laws of New Hampshire of 1895, and 
every other act or law thereto enabling, hereby makes the 
following rules and regulations for the purpose of prevent- 
ing the pollution and securing the sanitary protection of 
the waters of Long Pond, sometimes called Penaeook Lake, 
and Forge Pond, and their tributaries, used by the said city 
of Concord as sources of water supply, which shall remain 
in force until further order, and which may be hereafter 
from time to time amended or added to : 

1. Said Board of Water Commissioners hereby adopts 
in full all the regulations promulgated by the State Board 
of Health on the 14th day of September, 1915, and all ordi- 
nances of the city of Concord heretofore adopted relating 
to the protection of the purity of the water of Penaeook 
Lake, in the city of Concord. 

2. No boat, either for public or private use, nor house- 
boat or other construction, except such as may be used by 
the Water Commissioners, its officers, agents or employees, 
shall be permitted to float, steam, sail or be propelled in 
any way upon the waters of Forge Pond, and no wharves, 
landings or moorings for boats, rafts or other watercraft 
shall be built or permitted upon the shores of said Forge 
Pond. 

3. The placing of houseboats upon the waters of Long 
Pond, and the floating, steaming, or sailing upon said pond, 
or any other use or occupation of same on any of said 
waters, is absolutely prohibited. 



"WATER DEPARTMENT, 319 

4. No person or persons other than a member of said 
Board of Water Commissioners, its officers, agents or em- 
ployees, or public officers whose duty may so require, shall, 
unless permitted by regulation or permit of the Superin- 
tendent of Water-Works for said city, enter or go in any 
boat, skiff, raft or other contrivance, on or upon the water 
of said Long Pond, and no person or persons shall, unless 
permitted by a special regulation or by a written permit of 
the said superintendent, fish from boats in or upon the 
waters of said Long Pond. The application for a permit 
to boat or fish upon the waters of said Long Pond shall be 
in substantially the following terms and shall be signed by 
the party making said application : 

' ' Concord, N. H., 19 

To the Superintendent of Water- Works, Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir : The undersigned, residing at No 

Street, in hereby requests that per- 
mission be granted to him and to the following members 

of his household, to wit : — to boat 

and fish in and upon the waters of Long Pond, except with- 
in one quarter of a mile of the intake of the Concord Water- 
Works, and to use for said purpose his (row, sail or power) 
boat therefor. 

The undersigned agrees for himself and the said mem- 
bers of his household that he and they will comply with the 
following conditions : — 

a. No fire-arms or explosives will be used while upon the 
water of said pond. 

b. No fish, food, animal or vegetable matter, spittle or 
any other matter tending to pollute the water will be 
thrown into the water of said Long Pond or left upon its 
shores. 

c. No cans, bottles or boxes will be thrown into the water 
of said pond or left upon its shores. 

d. All rules and regulations of the State Board of 
Health and the Board of Water Commissioners relative to 



320 CITY OP CONCORD. 

the waters or to the Avatershed of said Long Pond will be 
complied with. 

e. The permit granted in compliance with this applica- 
tion will be exhibited to any officer of the law or any agents, 
officer, member or employee of the State Board of Health 
or of the Water Commissioners of said city of Concord. 

f. No person or persons will be allowed to use on said 
pond the boat to be licensed under this application unless 
accompanied by the undersigned or one of the members of 
his household herein named. 

g. The number borne by the permit issued in compli- 
ance with this application will be so carried as to be plainly 
visible on the outside of the boat above described, on each 
side of the bow above the water line, in figures not less than 
three inches in height. 

h. No boating or fishing will be done in or upon that 
portion of said pond within one quarter of a mile of the 
intake of the Concord Water-Works. 

i. The undersigned agrees that the authority to boat 
or fish shall, unless sooner revoked by the Board of Water 
Commissioners or the State Board of Health, expire in 

months. 

._ (Signed), 



5. No person shall enter upon said Long Pond or said 
Forge Pond for the purpose of cutting and taking out, or 
cut or take ice from either of said ponds, without a written 
permit, signed by the Superintendent of Water-Works, 
stating the time and place for which such permission is 
given. 

6. No cattle, horses, or other animals, used for teamiug, 
driving, racing or speeding, shall be driven, guided, raced, 
or speeded upon the ice of said ponds, except by permis- 
sion of and under regulations established by said Board of 
Water Commissioners or the Board of Health of the city 
of Concord. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 32J 

7. These rules and regulations shall become operative 
on and after February 3, 1916. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SOLON A. CARTER, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
CHARLES R. WALKER, 
HARRY PI. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
HENRY C. HOLBROOK, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, ex-officio, 
Board of Water Commissioners. 



21 



322 CITY OF CONCORD. 



INVENTORY 



Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1916. 



Water rights— land, etc., $1,059,965.83 

Water office — furniture, etc., 1,144.50 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 850.00 
Shop at pumping station : 

Machinery, tools, meters, etc., 3,000.00 
Service truck, runabout, horse, wagons and 

and supplies, 1,800.00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, special 

castings, etc., 2,372.45 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 1,996.20 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 15.00 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00 



$1,071,183.98 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. , 

To the Board of Puhlic Works: 

Gentlemen : I herewith submit the annual report of the 
work of the highway department for the year 1915. 

It wouki he hard to find a year when this department 
was not busy with ordinary repair work, to say nothing of 
the permanent improvements, and the past one has been 
no exception. Instead of doing as much in the way of new 
work, I think the time lias come when more should be done 
in repairing and re-surfacing the macadam which has been 
built in the past few years. A good deal of it needs to be 
repaired and all of it should have surface treatment. To 
do this would put all of our macadam in a better condition 
to withstand the increasing automobile traffic, but if al- 
lowed to go another year or two, much of it will be so badly 
worn that more extensive as well as more expensive work 
will be necessary. With this in mind, I would strongly 
recommend an increased appropriation for general main- 
tenance. 

During the year 1915 the number of demands for repair 
work on the streets was probably greater than in any pre- 
vious year, due no doubt to the increased automobile traffic. 
The smaller bridges for the same reason had to be strength- 
ened and repaired. Nearly every bridge over the Soucook, 
Big and Little Turkey rivers, and those over the smaller 
streams were repaired, and they seem now to be in condi- 
tion to withstand the traffic. There is, however, one ex- 
ception, a bridge on the Canterbury road over Hackett 



324 CITY OP CONCORD. 

brook, wliicb slionld be rebuilt soon. A new cement floor 
was built on the Waternumnions bridge, which should last 
a great many years. The Outlet bridge in Penacook was 
rebuilt, new stringers and floor being put in and the bridge 
thoroughly repaired. A new concrete floor should be put 
in the Loudon bridge next season. Without doubt a num- 
ber of the steel bridges will have to be painted next year. 

From the appropriation for general maintenance all the 
macadam was given a surface treatment of tarvia. Such 
work is necessary if we are to keep the macadam in repair. 
In connection with this I would recommend that the de- 
partment have a storage tank, so that we might have ma- 
terial for surface treatment at the proper time. It is 
pretty nearly impossible to regulate the work on account 
of weather conditions, and often it is not practical to use 
a whole tank car at once. If we had material on hand, it 
would be much easier and cheaper to fix up a piece of 
macadam when it showed that it needed treatment, rather 
than wait a number of weeks for the material, and then 
have to wait until the weather was suitable to do the work. 
The use of the automobile is becoming, so general through- 
out the winter months that the chains are doing consider- 
able damage to the roads. With such condition the streets 
having bituminous binder should have surface treatment 
just as early in the spring as the weather permits. 

I understand that the Concord Light and Power Com- 
pany are to extend their line through West Concord village. 
This will do much damage to a good road, parts of which 
have been in only two years. I think that the company 
should be requested to complete their work at an early date, 
so that this department may not be delayed in re-surfacing 
the road at the proper time. The digging up of streets 
that have been macadamized so soon after the work is done 
is a serious damage to our roads. In all there were 185 
permits for opening streets and 62 for obstructing issued 
last year by this department. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 325 

In connection with the general repair work, as well as 
with the permanent improvements, the crnsher plays an 
important part. Our portable plant has been in use eight- 
een years, but it has become very expensive to keep in 
repair, and I think a new outfit should be purchased. This 
could be set up at the gravel bank recently acquired by the 
city and the bank would furnish material enough to run 
the crusher for a number of years. It would be more con- 
venient and practical to run the crusher by electric power. 

The department is still in need of more shed room at the 
city lot. Much of the equipment is not properly protected 
and it is becoming imperative that something be done. 

The runabout purchased for the use of the highway de- 
partment has been of great assistance in the work. It is 
much easier to cover the territory and see when and what 
repairs should be made, but it also makes it plain that 
larger appropriations are necessary if we are to do all the 
work for which there is a demand and all that should be 
done. 

Fortunately the number of brown-tail moth nests seems 
to be decreasing, but the territory infested with the gypsy 
moth is much larger than a year ago. Gypsy moth nests 
are found on a considerable number of trees and these are 
painted with creosote and we are continuing the work of 
cutting off the brown-tail motl) nests. For several years 
I have recommended that new trees be set out, as so many 
have died and been removed. The appropriation for trees 
has not been sufficient to allow any work along this line 
until last year, when there was a balance on the appro- 
priation. Unless some new pest appears, with the same 
amount for trees as last year the department might be 
able to do something toward a systematic planting of 
trees. 

A number of catch basins were put in last summer to 
care for the surface water, and there are still some places 
in need of them. 



326 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Quite a number of old concrete walks were repaired 
and a few new ones laid. The new granolithic walks 
around the state house were completed last fall and are 
a great improvement. The state put in the walks and 
the city furnished and set the edgestone. 

The amount of garbage to be collected still increases 
each year, but the use of the truck has proved its ef- 
ficiency. The body of the truck has been repaired, but 
aside from that there has been but little repair work 
necessary and the truck has given very satisfactory serv- 
ice. A light truck could also be used to great advantage 
in the general work of the highway department. The 
work is often in some remote part of the city and a truck 
could be used to convey the men and tools to and from 
the work. The number of storms and heavy rains last 
summer caused many emergency calls Avhere a truck 
would have been of great service. 

But one application of oil was used in the sprinkling 
precinct last season and a large part of that was washed 
away by the heavy rains. Owing to the heavy rainfall 
it was not necessary to sprinkle the streets as much as 
usual and there was a balance left on the appropriation. 

For permanent work in 1915, South Main, South State, 
North Main, North State, South, Penacook, and Bye and 
"Walnut Streets in Penacook were macadamized, a section 
of Washington Square in Penacook concreted, and a part 
of Pleasant Street resurfaced. I would recommend that 
the macadam be continued on South, South Main and 
South State Streets. The work on Pleasant Street should 
be continued to connect with the Hopkinton Road. Park 
Street, from Main to State, has been dug up so much that 
it is in bad shape, and now that the new walks around the 
state house have been completed I hope that the street 
may be macadamized. The paving on the east side of 
Main Street should be taken up and the street concreted, 
as that is the only section of block paving left on Main 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 327 

Street. The section on North Main, from Center to Pit- 
man on the west side of the street railway track, should 
be macadamized. The paving on parts of Pleasant Street 
Extension shonld be relaid, and Bridge, Freight, and 
Depot Streets are in great need of improvement. North 
State Street, by the mill in West Concord, should be 
macadamized and from Penacook Street to Call Street, 
so called, North State Street should be reconstructed. If 
the state highway department is not to do anything on 
the central trunk line this year, it might be wise for the 
city to wait another year before doing anything on the 
Hopkinton and Pittsfield roads. 

"While bringing to your attention all these various 
streets wiiere permanent improvements are needed, and 
feeling that in each place there is great need of the work, 
still I believe that it would be wise to do more this coming 
year in the way of thoroughly repairing the macadam 
which has been built in the past instead of doing so much 
new permanent work. With the traffic conditions as they 
are at the present time the proper maintenance of those 
roads which we have built seems very important. 

I wish to assure the board of my appreciation of their 
interest in the work of the highway department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



328 CITY OF coisrcoRD. 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DE- 
PARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $38,000.00 
Expenditures. 
^ central district. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $13,394.66 
Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 7,303.14 
Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 81.31 
repairing sidewalks, 448.51 
building sidewalks, 164.70 
signs, .50 
Supplies, signs, 18.05 
Labor pay-rolls, watering-troughs and 

drinking-fountains, 22.70 
Supplies, watering-troughs and drink- 
ing-fountains, 46.81 
Labor pay-rolls, cleaning gutters, 3,184.45 
repairing and pav- 
ing gutters, 134.18 
bridges, 304.79 
Supplies, bridges, 915.87 
Labor pay-rolls, fences, 65.36 
Supplies, fences, 56.85 
Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 104.12 
resurfacing macadam, 847.73 
Supplies, resurfacing macadam, 1,807.05 
Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 1,935.95 
Supplies, Aviuter expense, 97.25 

$30,933.98 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 329 



PENACOOK DISTRICT. 



Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $1,585.26 
Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 153.23 
Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 10.56 
sidewalks. 202.40 
watering-troughs and 

drinking fountains, 5.32 
Supplies, watering-troughs and drink- 
ing fountains, 8.40 
Labor pay-rolls, cleaning gutters, 594.37 
repairing and paving 

gutters, 30.98 

bridges, 234.36 

Supplies, bridges, 209.14 

Labor pay-rolls, fences, 56.70 

Supplies, fences, .15 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 8.22 
resurfacing macadam, 24.50 

Supplies, resurfacing macadam, 6.00 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 388.42 



$3,518.01 



WEST CONCORD DISTRICT. 



Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 




and repair, 


$631.24 


Supplies, general maintenance and re- 




pair, 


19.86 


Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 


3.75 


repairing sidewalks. 


77.65 


cleaning gutters. 


163.50 


bridges. 


18.00 


resurfacing macadam, 


' 72.58 


winter expense. 


135.81 


Supplies, winter expense. 


.70 



1,123.09 



330 city of concord. 

East Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $1,097.26 
Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 191.32 
Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 4.72 
Supplies, culverts, 7.00 
Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 60.89 

$1,361.19 

Penacook Intervale District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $92.16 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 3.00 

95.16 



Egypt District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $102.75 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 7.00 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 9.17 



Hoit District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $164.08 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 6.60 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 10.78 



118.92 



181.46 



board of public works. 331 

Virgin District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $134.01 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 3.00 



$137.01 



Sanborn District. 



Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 78.47 

Number Four District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $359.36 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 8.70 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 11.00 

379.06 



Total expenditures, $37,926.35 

Transferred to sidewalks and crossings, new, 73.65 



$38,000.00 

CATCH BASINS. 

Appropriation, $1,200.00 

Transferred from trees, 66.43 

$1,266;43 



Expenditures. 




CENTRAL district. 




Labor pay-rolls, cleaning. 


$587.03 


repairing. 


143.24 


building, 


128.52 


Supplies, 


180.75 



$1,039.54 



332 CITY OF CONCORD. 



PENACOOK DISTRICT. 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $143.93 

repairing, 23.54 

building, 8.20 

Supplies, 25.50 

$200.17 

WEST CONCORD DISTRICT, 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $24.55 

repairing, 2.17 

26.72 



Total expenditures, $1,266.43 

TREES. ^ 

Appropriation, $4,000.00 

Expenditures. 

CENTRAL district. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving trees, $200.92 

Labor pay-rolls, care of gypsy and 

brown-tail moths, 1,502.06 

Supplies, • 224.74 

^ $1,927.72 



PENACOOK district. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and remov- 
ing trees, $107.46 

Labor pay-rolls, care of gypsy and 

brown-tail moths, 345.08 

Supplies, 7.93 



460.47 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 333 

WEST CONCORD DISTRICT. 

Labor pay-rolls, care of gypsy and brown-tail 

moths, $.216.97 

EAST CONCORD DISTRICT. 

Labor pay-rolls, care of gypsy and brown-tail 

moths, 244.62 



Total expenditures, - $2,849.78 

Transferred to catch basins, 66.43 

sidewalks and crossings, new, 744.14 

sidewalks and crossings, repair, 47.87 

permanent work. North State 

Street, 290.78 



$4,000.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 

Appropriation, $750.00 

Transferred from general mainte- 
nance, 73.65 
Transferred from trees, 744.14 

$1,567.79 

Expenditures. 

central district. 

Labor pay-rolls, setting edgestone, etc., $485.73 
Edgestone, 882.64 

Concrete, 199.42 

$1,567.79 



334 CITY OF CONCORD, 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $2,500.00 

Transferred from trees, 48.87 

$2,548.87 

Expenditures. 

central district. 

Labor pay-rolls, resetting edgestone, $71.91 

Concrete, 2,308.15 

$2,380.06 

PENACOOK DISTRICT. 

Concrete, 121.06 

WEST CONCORD DISTRICT. 

Concrete, 47.75 



Total expenditures, $2,548.87 

PERMANENT WORK. 

South Street — Thorndike Street, South. 
Appropriation, $2,000.00 

expenditures. 

Labor paj'-rolls, macadamizing, $1,262.91 

Supplies, 727.23 



Total expenditures, $1,990.14 

Transferred to permanent work, 

North State Street, 9.86 

$2,000.00 



board of public works. 335 

South Main Street — Perley to West Street. 
Appropriation, $1,850.00 

expenditures. 

Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $1,132.28 

Supplies, 645.75 



Total expenditures, $1,778.03 

Transferred to permanent work, 

South State Street, 51.91 

Transferred to permanent work. 

North State Street, 20.06 

$1,850.00 

South State Street. 

Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Transferred from permanent work. 

South Main Street, 51.91 

$1,551.91 



EXPENDITURES. 



Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $867.62 

Supplies, 684.29 



Penacook Street. 



Appropriation, 

expenditures. 

Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, 
Supplies, 


$545.89 
450.41 


Total expenditures. 
Transferred to permanent work, 
North State Street, 


$996.30 
3.70 



$1,551.91 
$1,000.00 



$1,000.00 



336 city of concord. 

North ]\Iain Street — Pitman to Center Street. 
Appropriation, $1,250.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $486.52 

Supplies, 518.21 



Total expenditures, $1,004.73 

Transferred to permanent work, 

North State Street, 245.27 

$1,230.00 

North State Street — Dolan Street to Kailroad 
Crossing. 

Appropriation, $2,000.00 



Transferred from trees, 


290.78 


Transferred from permanent work : 




North Main Street, 


245.27 


South i\Iain Street, 


20.06 


South Street, 


9.86 


Penacook Street, 


3.70 


Pleasant Street, 


47.53 




4^'> 61 7 '>0 




•p^j^JJ- 1 ,^\J 


expenditures. 





Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $1,427.08 

Supplies,' 1,190.12 

$2,617.20 

Pleasant Street. 
Appropriation, $3,000.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 337 



EXPENDITURES. 




Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, 


$1,350.12 


Supplies, 


1,601.57 


Total expenditures, 


$2,951.69 


Transferred to permanent work. 




North State Street, 


47.53 


Transferred to permanent work, 




Bye and Walnut Streets, 


.78 



$3,000.00 

Bye and Walnut Streets — Penacook. 

Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Transferred from permanent work: 

Washington Square, 11.51 

Pleasant Street, .78 

By Joint Resolution, No. 217, 107.93 

$1,620.22 



expenditures. 

Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $1,053.45 

Supplies, 566.77 

$1,620.22 

Washington Square — Penacook. 
Appropriation, $500.00 

expenditures. 

Labor pay-rolls, $27.85 

Concrete, 460.64 



Total expenditures, $488.49 

Transferred to permanent work. 

Bye and Walnut Streets, 11.51 



$500.00 



338 city of concord. 

Salary Superintendent. 
Appropriation, $1,800.00 

EXPENDITURES, . . 

Salary, $1,800.00 

Garbage. 
Appropriation, $10,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Deficiency from 1914, $708.40 

Labor pay-rolls, collecting garbage, 3,256.07 

collecting paper, 744.42 



burning paper. 


146.47 


leveling ashes. 


731.56 


patrol carts. 


2,324.38 


cleaning crossings. 


570.59 


Supplies, 


722.85 


Total expenditures, 


$9,204.74 


Balance to 1916, 


795.26 




+;1 000 Oft 




>P-LU,VyUU.U\/ 


Sprinkling. 





Appropriation, $9,500.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Deficiency from 1914, $645.58 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing carts, 67.85 

repairing standpipes, 25.17 

sprinkling with 

water, 5,459.46 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 339 

Labor pay-rolls, sprinkling with oil, $23.05 
Oil, 1,257.07 

Supplies, 446.22 



Total expenditures. 


$7,924.40 




Balance to 1916, 


1,575.60 


$9,500.00 






Penacook Sprinkling Precinct. 




Appropriation, 




$475.00 


EXPENDITURES. 






Deficiency from 1914, 


$10.45 




Labor pay-rolls, repairing standpipes. 


20.57 




sprinkling streets, 


347.19 




Supplies, 


14.95 




Total expenditures. 


$393.16 




Balance to 1916, 


81.84 


4i/L7^ nr\ 



Deposited with the City Treasurer as Follows: 

State aid, highways, $709.72 

Concrete, 323.33 

Trees, 404.24 

Labor, etc., 246.46 

Lumber from bridges, 541.15 

$2,224.90 



340 CITY OF CONCORD. 



WAED ONE. 

Street. Work. Expense. 

Borough Eoad General repairs $27.07 

Bye " " 9.19 

Bye and Walnut Macadamizing 1,620.22 

Center General repairs 47.24 

Charles " " 5.27 

Repairing concrete walks 29.26 

Church General repairs 3.86 

Cross " " 42.47 

East Canal " " 16.49 

Repairing concrete walks 6.58 

Elm General repairs 41.56 

Repairing concrete walks 32.12 

Fowler General repairs 4.45 

High " " 65.37 

Horse Hill Road " " 187.52 

Main " " 78.67 

Repairing concrete walks 48.66 

Mast Yard Road General repairs 122.90 

Merrimack " " 199.05 

Penacook " " 15.83 

Pleasant " " 16.37 

River Hill Road " " 7.95 

River Road " " 241.59 

Rolfe " " 13.41 

Runnell's Road " " 10.23 

Spring " " , 38.11 

Stark " " .97 

Summer " " 10.15 

Repairing concrete walks 9.13 

Sweatt Hill Road General repairs 11.98 

Union " " 1.39 

Walnut " " 71.46 

Warren " " 8.56 

Washington " " 188.86 

Washington Square.. ..Concreting 488.49 

Webster Road General renairs 1-12 

West Canal " " 7.88 

West Main " " 45.43 

WARD TWO. 

Street. Worl: Expense. 

Appleton General repairs $22.05 

Cemetery " " ^--^O 

" 26.31 

'' 4.54 

" 12.50 

" 77.12 

" 12.64 

'' 33.21 



Cnrtis Road 

Eastman , 

Flaghole Road , 

Graham Road , 

Hot Hole Pond Road. 
Intervale Road 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



341 



street. Worl: 

Loudon Road General repairs 

Mountain Road 

Pecker 

Penibrolve 

Penacook Road 

(Penacook Int.) 

(Hoit) 

(Sanborn) 

Penacook 

Pond Road 

Portsmouth 

Potter 

Sanborn Road 

Sehoolhouse Road 

Sewall's Falls Road.... 
Shaker Road 

(Virgin) 

Shawmut 

Snow's Pond Road 

Tyargo Road 

Virgin Road 



Expense. 
$3.71 
35.90 
98.67 

217.78 

172.28 
89.90 
81.63 
31.00 

352.41 

8.00 

26.78 

111.91 
10.00 
20.22 
2.50 
83.-53 
30.86 
10.00 
1.39 
10.00 

1.11 



WARD THREE. 



Street. Worlc. 

Beech Hill Road General repairs 

Bog Road 

Borough Road 

Broad Cove Road • 

Carter Hill Road 

Clark 

Dolan 

Electric Avenue 

Ferrin Road 

Fisher 

Hutchins 

K 

Knight 

Repairing concrete walks 

Lake General repairs 

Little Road " " 

Long Pond Road " " 

North State " " 

Repairing concrete vralks 



Expense. 
$37.25 
71.74 

4.84 
30.80 
77.28 
14.61 

1.83 

6.48 
14.37 
20.07 
67.50 

3.66 
20.66 
25.66 
37.66 
31.66 
134.79 
146.25 
18.81 



Macadamizing 2,617.20 



Palm General repairs 

Parsonage Hill Road.. " " 

Peabody " " 

Pine Hill Road " " 

Quaker " " 

River Road " " 

Saltmarsh Road " " 



.91 
1.75 
12.42 
17.09 
6.64 
82.01 
69.26 



342 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Street. Work. Expense. 

Sand Bank Eoad General repairs $17.00 

Second " " 10.06 

Sewall's Falls Eoad.... " " 50.38 

View " " 19.93 

West Parish Road " " 76.30 

WARD FOUR. 

Street. Work. Expense. 

Abbott General repairs $4.60 

Academy " " 11.23 

Auburn " " 44.90 

Beacon " " 33.33 

Cambridge " " 4.74 

Center " " 127.38 

Chapel " " 11.41 

Chestnut " " 2.94 

Church " " 33.19 

Court " " 12.95 

Repairing concrete walks 162.32 

Ferry General repairs 2.27 

Fiske " " 30.17 

Franklin " " 62.34 

Repairing concrete walks 77.10 

Giles General repairs 19.95 

Gordon Court Repairing concrete walks 9.31 

High General repairs 20.77 

Jackson " " 28.95 

Jackson West Court.... " " 2.16 

Lyndon " " 23.37 

Maple ■ " " 14.88 

Montgomery Repairing concrete walks 6.84 

North Essex General repairs 1.57 

North Main " " 84.67 

Repairing concrete walks 93.43 

Repairing concrete roadway ., 29.69 

Macadamizing 1,004.73 

North Spring General repairs 45.50 

Repairing concrete walks 142.80 

North State General repairs 39.25 

Repairing concrete walks 48.94 

Repairing concrete roadway 30.33 

Park Ridge General repairs 3.67 

Pearl " " 12.14 

Penacook " " 10.23 

Perry Avenue " " 13.62 

Pitman " " 1.38 

Ridge Road New concrete walks 24.31 

Rollins Repairing concrete walks 9.80 

Rumford General repairs 33.74 

Repairing concrete walks 24.20 

Tremont General repairs 24.42 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



343 



Street. 



Work. 



Union General repairs 

Kepairing concrete walks , 

Valley General repairs 

A^ernon 

Walker 

Washington 

^Yhite 

Winter 



Expense. 



$38.17 

8.60 

15.82 

2.81 

29.83 

206.22 

7.45 

2.66 



WAKD FIVE. 



Street. 



Work. 



Expense. 



Blake General repairs 

Capitol Repairing concrete roadway 

Setting edgestone 

Center General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Fremont General repairs 

Giles " " 

Green " " .- 

Repairing concrete roadway 
Hanover General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Huntington General repairs 

Liberty " " 

Merrimack " " 

North Fruit " " 

North Main Repairing concrete walks 

Repairing concrete roadway 

Setting edgestone 

North Spring General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

North State General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Repairing concrete roadway 

Setting edgestone 

Odd Fellows' Ave Repairing concrete walks 

Repairing concrete roadway 
Orchard General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Park General repairs 

Repairing concrete roadway 

Setting edgestone 

Pine General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Pleasant General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Repairing concrete roadway 

Rumford Repairing concrete walks 

School General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Repairing concrete roadway 



117. 

327. 

88, 

87. 

1. 

4. 

36 

18. 

4 

2. 

5 

27, 

2 

5 

60 

150 

224 

31 

156, 

3, 

65, 

54. 

196, 

25, 

13, 

9, 

56. 

32. 

4. 

368. 

36. 

108. 

216. 

214. 

19. 

53. 

78. 

79. 

30. 



.32 
,47 
.62 
.86 
,93 
.54 
.61 
.44 
.92 
.19 
,98 
.41 
.62 
.43 
.15 
.90 
.26 
.42 
.54 
.29 
.67 
.15 
.82 
.42 
.05 
.65 
.02 
56 
.95 
.05 
.69 
.58 
33 
.72 
.56 
85 
45 
,49 
94 
44 



344 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Street. Worl: Expense. 

Short General repairs $16.92 

Kepairing concrete walks 12.87 

Summit Avenue General repairs 12.95 

Tahanto " " 31.63 

Repairing concrete walks 88.72 

Warren General repairs 206.73 

Repairing concrete walks 143.62 

Repairing concrete roadway 109.91 

West Washington General repairs 16.65 

Woodman " " 20.82 

WARD SIX. 

Street. Work. Expense. 

Clinton General repairs $8.10 

Building sidewalks 46.29 

Concord General repairs 25.58 

Repairing concrete walks 3.63 

Downing General repairs 53.40 

Elm " " 5.47 

Repairing concrete walks 20.16 

Fayette General repairs 26.46 

Fuller " " 3.12 

Laurel " " 47.94 

New concrete walks 15.98 

Marshall General repairs 9.08 

New concrete walks 190.42 

Monroe General repairs 20.36 

Myrtle '' " 9.24 

Oak New concrete walks 33.76 

Perley General repairs 30.91 

Repairing concrete walks 114.74 

Pierce General repairs 47.37 

Pleasant " " 175.89 

Repairing concrete roadway 13.96 

South General repairs 89.16 

Repairing concrete walks 125.81 

Macadamizing 1,990.14 

South Main General repairs 141.61 

Repairing concrete walks 178.64 

Repairing concrete roadway 23.70 

Macadamizing 889.02 

South Spring General repairs 72.81 

Repairing concrete walks 16.76 

South State General repairs 102.16 

Repairing concrete walks 166.75 

Macadamizing 1,551.91 

Thompson General repairs 17.64 

Thorndike " " 24.01 

New concrete walks 23.69 

Repairing concrete walks 21.63 

Wall General repairs 5.14 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 345 

WARD SEVEN. 

Street. Work. Expense. 

Albin Road General repairs $40.62 

Allison " " 22.86 

Badger " " 29.01 

Birch " " 2.21 

Birehdale Road " " 12.64 

Bog Road " " 92.29 

Bow " " .89 

Broadway " " 204.96 

Carter' " " 2.85 

Clinton " '' 14.98 

Building sidewalks 10.54^ 

Dakin General repairs 38.95 

Downing " " 36.89 

Dunbarton Road " '' 2.27 

Eastman " " 2.85 

Fiske Road " " 58.39 

Fruit '' '' 58.46 

New concrete walks 74.22 

Gale .-. General repairs 17.51 

Hall " '' 645.99 

Home Avenue " " 25.78 

Building sidewalks 152.94 

Hopkinton Road General repairs 360.45 

Hopkinton New Road.. " " 70.55 

Hopkinton Old Road.. " '' 31.85 

Humphrey " " 2.05 

Iron Works Road " " 22.39 

Kensington Road " " 45.22 

Kent " " 59.20 

Kimball " " 12.19 

Long Pond Road " '' 104.78 

Maitland " " 11.51 

McKinley " " 1.60 

Minot " " 10.52 

Noves " " 2.18 

Pilisbury " " 63.98 

Pleasant " " 172.97 

Resurfacing 2,951.69 

Rockingham General repairs 8.74 

Sawmill Road " " 9.87 

Silk Farm Road " " 22.50 

South " " 79.57 

South Main " " 268.83 

Repairing concrete walks. 27.01 

Macadamizing 889.01 

South State General repairs 36.93 

Stiekney Hill Road '' " 201 ..59 

Stone " " 6.77 

Tuttle " " 5.45 

Building sidewalks 90.14 

Water General repairs 98.34 

West " " 119.51 

Wiggin " " 4.92 



346 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



WARD EIGHT. 



Street. 



Work. 



Bridge General repairs 

Depot " " , 

Repairing concrete walks 

Freight General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Garvin's Falls Road... -General repairs 

Hill's Avenue " " 

Repairing concrete walks 

Loudon Road General repairs 

North Main Repairing concrete walks 

Repairing concrete roadway 

Pittsfield Road General repairs 

Railroad " " 

Robinson " " 

Sheep Road " " 

South Main ,. " " 

Repairing concrete roadway 

Macadamizing 

Repairing concrete walks 

South Pembroke 

Road (Plains) Repairing account detour 

So. Pembroke Road.... General repairs 

Sticknev Avenue " " 

Sugar Bowl Road " " 



Expense. 
$622.25 
22.31 
70.63 
58.38 
45.45 

4.67 
]9.90 
87.54 
• 470.23 
31.07 
64.54 
29.09 
17.82 

3.67 
19.20 
99.71 
27.79 
889.01 
31.93 

646.06 

68.23 

6.80 

10.50 



WARD NINE. 



repairs 



Street. Work. 

Albin General repairs 

Auburn 

Beacon 

Bradley 

Charles 

Church 

Forest 

Fi'anklin 

Gladstone Grading 

Granite General 

Highland " 

Jackson " 

Little Pond Road " 

Long Pond Road " 

Martin " 

North State " 

Penacook " 

Macadamizing . 

Perkins General repairs 

Prospect " " 

Rumford " " 

Walker " " 



Expense. 

$1.66 

6.21 

2.16 

1.27 

3.99 

2.17 

2.02 

68.71 

369.71 

21.33 

16.58 

1.54 

147.53 

49.15 

2.22 

213.57 

370.38 

996.30 

2.32 

9.56 

67.29 

17.74 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 347 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1915. 

To the Board of Puhlic Works: 

The fifth animal report to this board, showing work 
done under the supervision of the engineering depart- 
ment, for this board, is herewith submitted. 

Bridges. ^ 

Five new steel bridges were built during the past sea- 
son, three across the Merrimack River, the Pembroke, 
Federal and Sewall's Falls bridges; one over the Contoo- 
cook River at Main Street, Penacook, and one across the 
"Outlet" on Washington Street, Penacook. 

PEMBROKE bridge. 

The contract for this bridge was awarded to the Berlin 
Construction Company in December, 1914, but was not 
signed until January 2, 1915. 

Work of removing the old structure was begun on May 
12, and in the removal of the old bridge sufficient proof 
was found to sustain the report presented to your board by 
the city engineer and your consulting engineer in 1914. 
The floor stringers were broken and patched in many places, 
and a large number were found broken at the time of re- 
moval. The old trusses were in fairly good condition but 
not heavy enough to carry a new and adequate floor system 
had one been installed. No mistake was made in removing 
this menace to public safety. The city is truly fortunate in 
not having had an accident of a serious nature occur on 
this old bridge. 



348 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The new structure was completed and opened for traffic 
August 25, 1915. The unusual rains of the past season 
delayed the completion of this bridge twenty-eight days. 
Had we been favored with the usual summer weather the 
bridge would have been ready for traffic the latter part 
of July. The floor in this bridge is of re-inforced con- 
crete with a wearing surface one and one-half inches 
thick of coal-tar concrete, thus making the floor nearly 
permanent and removing the danger from broken plank 
and the cost of renewal of a plank floor at frequent in- 
tervals. 

The cost of this structure and the necessary changes in 
the masonry and approaches was as follows : 



Labor and materials for masonry changes. 
Superstructure complete, 
Storrs & Storrs, plans, etc., 
Work by highway department, 



$286.94 

23,993.00 

1,199.65 

28.43 

$25,508.02 



On January 23, 1915, the following bids were opened for 
the Borough, Federal, Main Street and Sewall's Falls 
bridges : 





Amount of Bid. 


NAME OF BIDDER. 


Borough. 


Federal. 


Main 
Street. 


Sewall's. 


All Four 
Combined. 


Berlin Construction Co 


$4,075.00 


$20,625.00 


$15,965.00 


$14,318.00 


$53,985.00 


The Boston Bridge Works 


5,094.00 


24.213.00 


15.938.00 


15,897.00 


59,125.00 


The Jobson-Gifford Co 


5,470.00 


27.060.00 


15,410.00 


17,580.00 


65,520.00 


King Bridge Co 


5.700.00 


26,200.00 


17,100.00 


16,800.00 


65,000.00 


Laclcawanna Bridge Co 


5,391.00 


26,425.00 


14,640.00 


17,942.00 


61,792.00 


McClintic-Marshall Co 


5,098.00 


25,644.00 


15,036.00 


17,841.00 


62,460.00 


Penn Bridge Co 


^ 5.380.00 


22,800.00 


12,900.00 


15.400.00 


54,200.00 


The Pennsylvania Steel Co . . . 


5,600.00 


27,090.00 


13.700.00 


18,400.00 


63,300.00 


Phoenix Bridge Co 


6,350.00 


27,120.00 


15,300.00 


19,360.00 


66,130.00 


The United Construction Co.. 


5,488.00 


28.750.00 


16,918.00 


18,970.00 


66,940.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 349 

Contracts, based on the above bids, were awarded as 
follow^s : 

Borough bridge, to Berlin Construction Com- 
pany, $4,075.00 

Federal bridge, to Berlin Construction Com- 
pany, 20,625.00 

Main Street bridge, to Penn Bridge Company, 12,900.00 

Sewall's Falls bridge, to Berlin Construction 

Company, 14,318.00 

Later it was deemed advisable to add a sidewalk to the 

Federal bridge and the contract was awarded to Berlin 

Construction Company for $2,635. 

BOROUGH BRIDGE. 

The contract with the Berlin Construction Company 
for this bridge was signed February 3, 1915, and the new 
structure opened for traffic on August 16, 1915. The floor 
in this bridge is of re-inforced concrete watli a w^earing 
surface of one and one-half inches of coal-tar concrete, 
thus removing the wooden floor troubles from this bridge. 

The cost of superstructure and necessary foundation 
changes were as follows : 

Labor and materials for foundation changes, $247.46 

Superstructure, complete, 4,075.00 

Storrs & Storrs, plans, etc., 203.75 



$4,526.21 



FEDERAL BRIDGE. 

The contract for this bridge was signed by the Berlin 
Construction Company on February 3, 1915, and the new 
structure completed and opened for public travel Septem- 
ber 30, 1915. Some delay was occasioned here by the high 
water carrying away one complete span of the false-works 
and a portion of another span. 



350 CITY OP CONCORD. 

The floor in this bridg'e is of re-inforced concrete with a 
one and one-half inch wearing surface of coal-tar concrete, 
thus abolishing the wooden floor on this bridge. 

The necessary masonry changes at this bridge were cov- 
ered in the bid for the bridge, excepting the additional 
change made necessary by the addition of a sidewalk, for 
which change the sum of $25 was paid the erector. The 
amount expended on this work was as follows : 

Daniel Marr & Son Company, masonry change, 

account of sidewalk, $25.00 

Superstructure and original masonry changes, 20,625.00 

Sidewalk, 2,635.00 

Storrs & Storrs, plans, etc., 1,163.00 

Trucking, 2.50 



$24,450.50 



MAIN STREET BRIDGE. 

In rebuilding this bridge it became necessary to build 
two new piers, and a contract for the same was made with 
the New Hampshire Cement Construction Company, of 
Manchester, N. II., after opening the following bids : 

Beaver Contracting and Engineering Company, 

Boston, Mass., $6,500.00 

J. Normandeau, Concord, N. II., 6,850.00 

H. P. Cummings Construction Company, Ware, 

Mass., 4,465.00 

New Hampshire Cement Construction Com- 
pany, Manchester, N. H., 4,370.00 

Work on the piers was begun May 19, 1915, and com- 
pleted June 21, 1915, at a cost of $4,370. 

The contract for the bridge was signed by the Penn 
Bridge Company on February 5, 1915. The new struc- 
ture was completed and opened for traffic October 27, 
1915. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 351 

This bridge is a plate girder, with plain cement-con- 
crete arch floor with one and one-half inches of coal-tar 
concrete wearing surface in the roadway, and two re- 
inforced concrete sidewalks with granolithic surfaces. 

The cost of this bridge, piers and necessary changes 
in the abutments was as follows : 

Piers, $4,370.00 

Abutment changes, 268.25 

Superstructure, 12,875.00 

Foot-walk, 300.00 

Storrs & Storrs, plans, etc., 645.00 



$18,458.25 



sewall's falls bridge. 

This bridge was contracted for February 3, 1915, and 
was so far completed that it was opened for travel Decem- 
ber 24, 1915. There remains to be done by the con- 
tractor the placing of the coal-tar roadway surface and 
the completion of the painting. This structure is the 
only new bridge having a wooden floor, but with the light 
traffic on it, the coal-tar wearing surface should make 
floor renewals of rare occurrence if the earth is kept off 
of the easterly end of the bridge. 

There has been expended, to date, at this site the fol- 
lowing amounts : 

Labor and materials for foundation changes, $193.18 

On account of superstructure, 13,318.00 

Storrs & Storrs, plans, etc., 715.90 



$14,227.08 



There will be a balance of $1,000 due the Berlin Con- 
struction Company when they have completed their 
work the coming season. 



352 CITY OP CONCORD. 

The total amount expended on the five bridges during 
the past season is as follows: 

Pembroke bridge, $25,508.02 

Borough bridge, 4,526.21 

Federal bridge, 24,450.50 

Main Street bridge, 18,458.25 

Sewall's Falls bridge, to date, 14,227.08 



57,170.06 



Expended by highway department, charge- 
able to the Borough, Federal, Alain Street 
and Sewall's Falls bridges, 369.13 



$87,539.19 
Received from bond sale and interest, 87,229.83 



Leaving a deficit of, $309.36 

Add balance to bridge company, 1,000.00 



Total deficit, $1,309.36 

There was received for the old metal at the 

Main Street and Federal bridges the sum of, $748.09 

From sale of old lumber, 541.15 

For cast-iron from Federal bridge, 25.40 



A total of $1,314.64 

which amount will cover the deficit shown above. 

The addition of a sidewalk to the Federal bridge in- 
creased the original estimates $2,635, thus causing the de- 
ficit in funds raised. 

All the bridges were erected by Daniel Marr & Son 
Company, of Boston, Mass., under the direction of their 
foreman, Mr. Harry Martin. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 353 

During the erection of all the bridges your engineer, 
or some man representing this department, has been on 
the work. The concrete floors were laid under the direc- 
tion and supervision of Mr. Fred W. Lang from this office. 

On the final completion of the Sewall's Falls bridge 
the city will be in good shape for some years to come, so 
far as the long-span bridges are concerned, excepting the 
"Twin Bridge," so called, which bridge should be care- 
fully watched, as it is an old re-built structure and it is 
not up to the standard of our other bridges. It was 
fortunate that the city let these bridges at the right time 
to secure lovv' prices, thereby saving about $24,000 on 
the entire lot. 

Police Station. 

Plans for the proposed addition to the police station 
as prepared by this department were adopted, the build- 
ing let to the Hutchinson Building Company, who com- 
pleted the original contract and made changes in the 
same for which they were paid $150. Heating and light- 
ing plans were also made. The lighting of the garage 
was done by the Orr & Rolfe Company, the ward room 
by F. "W. Landon. The heating of both garage and ward 
room was done by ^l. J. Lee. The present boiler at the 
police station is too small for the radiation attached, and 
it should be replaced with one of larger capacity for eco- 
nomical heating of the building. 

The money expended for this improvement was paid as 
follows : 

Hutchinson Building Company, original con- 
tract, $4,428.00 
Hutchinson Building Company, changes, 150.00 
Orr & Rolfe Company, lighting garage, 38.00 
F. W. Landon, lighting ward room, 31.25 
M. J. Lee, heating garage and ward room, 152.50 

23 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Thompson & Hoague Company, screens for 

garage windows, $16.50 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Company, window shades, 5.55 



Total, $4,821.80 

Plans were made for the steel work for a detention 
room and prices secured for the same, but nothing further 
was done with it during the past season. 

Sewers. 

The need for more rapid extension of the proposed en- 
largements of the mains in several drainage districts was 
demonstrated by the severe rains which visited us during 
the summer of 1915. The district drained through Beacon 
Street suffered more than any other, from the complaints 
received at this office, and should receive your early atten- 
tion. 

There has been expended for maintenance and construc- 
tion the following amounts: 

WASHINGTON STREET. 

694 feet of 30-inch Akron pipe laid. 



Paid for labor. 


$2,040.34 


pipe. 


1,497.30 


brick, 


40.60 


cement, 


44.00 


castings, 


22.50 


trucking. 


141.50 


tools, 


8.30 


hardware. 


6.31 


blacksmith. 


.45 


oil. 


6.05 


highway department, repaving gutters. 


34.17 


highway department, resetting edgestone 


2.36 



$3,843.95 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 355 

Material excavated, gravel, clay, hardpan and large 

boulders. 
Average cost per foot, $5.538-f-. 





FRANKLIN 


STREET. 




522 feet of 10-inch Akron 


pipe 


laid. 


- 


Paid for labor, 








$466.46 


pipe, 








126.00 


brick. 








10.00 


cement, 








8.40 


castings. 








19.95 


trucking, 








10.50 


sand. 








1.50 


oil, 








.55 



$643.36 



Llaterial excavated, gravel, hardpan and boulders. 
Average cost per foot, $1.232-|-. 



PLEASANT STREET. 

414 feet of 6-inch Akron pipe laid. 
12 feet of 6-inch cast-iron pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $312.61 

pipe, • 63.85 

brick, 13.00 

cement, 6.00 

castings, 12.15 

trucking, 1.25 

cast-iron pipe, 5.36 

oil, 1.10 



$414.32 



Material excavated, gravel and clay. 
Average cost per foot, $0.972-|— 



356 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SOUTH MAIN STREET, BELOW MCKINLEY STREET. 

236 feet of 12-ineh Akron pipe laid. 

Paid for labor, $321.44 

pipe, 86.50 

brick, 16.00 

cement, 8.60 

castings, 11.25 

trucking, 5.25 

wrought-iron, 1.30 

salt, 2.80 



Material excavated, gravel and clay. 
Average cost per foot, $1,920+. 



$453.14 





GRANITE STREET, 




242 feet of 10-inch Akron 


pipe 


laid. 




Paid for labor. 








$149.45 


pipe, 








67.20 


cement, 








4.00 


trucking, 








1.00 


oil, 








1.10 



$222.75 

Material excavated, hardpan and boulders. 
Average cost per foot, $0,920+. 

Expended for new work : 

Washington Street, $3,843.95 

Franklin Street, 643.36 

Pleasant Street, 414.32 

South Main Street, 453.14 

Granite Street, 222.75 

$5,577.52 



board op public works. 357 

Eepairs. 



Curtice Avenue, 


$11.94 


Ferry Street, 


22.09 


North Spring Street, 


14.17 


Bowery Avenue, 


12.46 


Passway, east of police station, 


1.77 


North State Street, 


2.22 


Rumford Street, 


5.18 


Prince Street, 


1.67 


Waverly Street, 


2.67 


West Street, 


.75 


Palm Street, 


6.00 


Beacon Street, 


5.31 


Downing Street, 


8.70 


Chandler Street, 


15.10 


South Street, 


1.50 


Prospect Street, 


26.35 


South State Street, account of macadam. 


13.83 


South State Street, 


14.50 


Albin Street, 


33.49 


Walker Street, 


9.03 


Maple Street, 


2.08 


North Main Street, account of macadam, 


2.45 




$213.26 


Paid for new work. 


$5,577.52 


Less credit for old iron. 


29.87 


Total for new work. 


$5,547.65 


repairs, 


213.26 


flushing. 


320.75 


flushing hose, 


324.17 


tools, 


49.75 



$6,455.58 



358 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation, $7,300.00 

Balance from 1914, 382.42 

Earnings, 1915, 31.50 



Total funds available, $7,659.92 

Expended, construction and repairs, 6,455.58 



Balance December 31, 1915, $1,204.34 

Sewers laid, 1915 : 

Washington Street, 694 feet of 30-ineh. 

Franklin Street, 522 feet of 10-inch. 

Pleasant Street, 426 feet of 6-inch. 

South Main Street, 236 feet of 12-inch. 

Granite Street, 242 feet of 10-inch. 



Total, 2,120 feet. 

Sewers built in City Precinct to December 31, 1915 : 

6-incli Akron pipe, 2,354 feet 

8-inch Akron pipe, 25,657 

10-inch Akron pipe, 55,159 

12-inch Akron pipe, 39,663 

12-inch cement pipe, 415 

15-inch Akron pipe, 11,646 

18-inch Akron pipe, 7,134 

20-incli Akron pipe, 5,029 

24-inch Akron pipe, 4.064 

30-inch Akron pipe, 1,780.5 

Brick, 32-inch x 14-inch, 2,758 

14-inch X 22-inch, 350 

16-inch X 24-inch, 1,848 

20-inch x 32-ineh, 2,527 

24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 

28-inch x 48-inch, 883 

24-inch circular, 1,515.5 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 359 



ick, 30-incli circular, 


402 feet. 


38-inch circular, 


4,080 


24-inch cast-iron. 


1,576 


oO-inch cast-iron. 


1,054.5 


42-incli segmental block, 


1,055 


42-inch brick and concrete, 


246 


60-inch brick and concrete, 


1,450 



190,583.50 feet. 
Total miles of sewer in City Precinct, 36.095-|-. 

West Concord Precinct. 

The usual flushing of this system was made, together 
with repairs on the 20-inch outlet and a cleaning out of 
the brook at the southerly outlet ; the expense incurred for 
this work was as follows : 

Paid for flushing, $28.36 

repairs to 20-inch outlet, 18.90 

cleaning old brook at outlet, 12.65 



Total expended for construction and repairs, $59.91 

Funds available, $200.88 

Expended, 59.91 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1915, $140.97 

East Concord Precinct. 

No repairs have been made in this precinct during the 
season of 1915. 

The balance on hand remains the same as last year, viz. : 
$127.53. 



360 city of concord. 

Saint Paul's School Sewerage Precinct. 

Repairs amounting to $8 have been made the past sea- 
son which together with the debit balance from 1914 makes 
a total expenditure of $51.45. 

Appropriation, $100.00 

Expended, 1915, $8 ; 1914 deficit, $43.45 ; total. 51.45 



Unexpended balance, December 31, 1915, $48.55 

A new set of plans showing the sewers and appur- 
tenances was made for the Penacook Precinct and delivered 
to the man in charge of the sewers in this precinct. 

Lines and grades were given the highway department 
for new work on South State Street, East Penacook Street, 
Pleasant Street, South Main Street, South Street, Bye and 
Walnut Streets, Penacook, and North Main Street. 

The usual monthly measurements of coal-tar concrete 
walks and roadway repairs were made, statements of the 
square yards in place, cost and location of same shown and 
these statements turned over to the highway department, 
the committee on lands and buildings and the water-works 
superintendent. 

For the many courtesies extended this department I 
wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



/ 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1915. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The twenty-third annual report of the engineering de- 
partment is herewith submitted, in compliance with the 
ordinance creating this department. 

The expenses for the year 1915 were as follows: 



Paid engineer and assistants. 


$3,480.50 


carfares and livery, 


206.47 


supplies, 


82.58 


express, 


1.10 


telephone service, 


26.40 


telegrams. 


.31 


repairs. 


.90 


services and supplies, assessors' maps, 


315.82 


incidentals. 


20.22 


postage, 


3.82 


convention expenses, 


73.02 




.$4,211.14 


Appropriation, 


$4,275.00 


Expended, 


4,211.14 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1915, $63.86 

Sewers. 

The work done under this heading will be found in the 
report of your engineer to the Board of Public "Works, to- 



362 CITY OF CONCORD, 

gether with a statenieiit of the amounts expended on the 
construction of five new steel bridges during the past sea- 
son. 

Fire Department. 

Plans showing the location of all hydrants and fire-alarm 
boxes, in the city proper and in Penacook, have been made 
and furnished to the chief of the fire department. 

Building Petitions. 

In company with the chief of the fire department, I have 
attended thirty-one hearings. There have been filed a total 
of thirty-two petitions for new buildings and additions to 
existing structures; one petitioner failed to complete his 
petition and no action was taken ; three petitions were re- 
ferred to the Board of Mayor and Aldermen ; two petitions 
were granted, with restrictions, and twenty-six petitions 
were granted as requested in the petitions. 

Cemeteries. 

One new block was laid out in lots at Blossom Hill Ceme- 
tery, and one new block was graded, which block will be 
ready for lotting in 1916. 

An entire new set of block plans was made and deliv- 
ered to the superintendent at Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

I would again renew my recommendation that an appro- 
priation be made for constructing a culvert to care for the 
brook in the northwesterly section of Blossom Hill Cem- 
etery, that new blocks may be laid out in this locality both 
economically and systematically. The open brook as it now 
runs seriously interferes with a lay-out consistent with the 
other portions of this cemetery. 

The deed books of Blossom Hill Cemetery have been 
brought up to date, covering the lots sold during the past 
year and transfers of ownership as recorded in the city 
deed books. 



report of the city engineer. 363 

Playgrounds. 

Plans for the roof on the shelter at the Kimball play- 
ground were completed and the roof built. 

Cement concrete foundations for the memorial fountains 
placed in the Rollins Park playground and in the Kimball 
playground were put in by this department. Two sets of 
drawings for the memorial fountains were made, blue 
prints taken and furnished the committee having the 
drinking fountains in charge. 

Levels and measurements were taken at the Rollins Park 
playground for the betterment of the baseball diamond. 

Water-Works. 

Levels and measurements to determine the lay-out of the 
pipes below the screen house, at Penacook Lake, were taken 
and a plan showing the same furnished the superintendent 
of the works. 

Assessors' Maps. 

No field work was done for these maps during the past 
season owing to the press of work along other lines. The 
town has been covered by our base lines but much detail 
work, to show the different ownership of land, remains to be 
done in the northeasterly corner of the town. 

There was expended from an appropriation of $500 the 
sum of .$315.82 for office work in keeping up the transfers, 
on plans and the lists of owners. 

Miscellaneous. 

The work of the board of examiners of plumbers and the 
board of hydrant commissioners has been placed before you 
in their respective reports to this board. 

Meetings of this board and the Board of Public Works 
have been attended when information has been required 
from this department. 



364 CITY OF CONCORD. 

At the annual session of the American Society of Munici- 
pal Improvement, held in Dayton, Ohio, October last, the 
work on flood prevention for that city was fully explained 
to the convention and an excellent opportunity to see all 
kinds of municipal work under way was taken advantage 
of by the members of the society. The papers were most 
excellent and were fully discussed by eminent practical au- 
thorities well qualified to talk on municipal matters. 

The employees of this department during the past season 
were : Fred "W. Lang, principal assistant ; Orion H. Hardy, 
transitman; George W. Burke and "William E. Nash, rod- 
men, all of whom rendered valuable assistance in their 
respective positions. 

To the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen, I wish to ex- 
press my appreciation of their support and consideration 
of matters in which this department was concerned. I also 
wish to express my sincere thanks for the privilege of at- 
tending the Dayton convention above mentioned. 

Krcspectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1915. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The tenth annual rei^ort of this board giving its recom- 
mendations to the Water Board and the number of hy- 
drants set during the year 1915, is herewith submitted. 

On April 2, it was voted to recommend placing the four- 
way hydrant on Warren Street, in front of the proposed 
addition to the police station, in Odd Fellows Avenue. 
One hydrant at the junction of Walnut Street and Bye 
Street, in Penaeook; one hydrant on the Sewall's Falls 
Road near golf grounds; one hydrant on Walker Street 
Extension. 

On November 13, it was voted to recommend the installa- 
tion of hydrants at the following locations : 

One at the junction of South State Street and Fayette 
Street ; one on Thorndike Street between South State 
Street and South Main Street ; one on the westerly side of 
RrUmford Street, near Morrill school ; one on the easterly' 
line of the Dewey school lot on Center Street ; one four- 
way high-service hydrant on the westerly side of Fiske 
Street southerly from the Walker school building; one at 
the southeasterly corner of Walker Street and Eumford 
Street ; one at the southeasterly corner of Quaker Street 
and Knight Street ; one on the southerly side of Charles 
Street (Penaeook) twenty-five feet easterly from the east- 
erly line of the schoolhouse and one at the junction of 
Cross Street and Spring Street (Penaeook). 



366 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The change from Waren Street to Odd Fellows Avenue 
has been made and the following hydrants set : South State 
Street and Fayette Street and on Thorndike Street between 
South State Street and South Main Street. Materials have 
been bought for the balance of the hydrants recommended 
and they will be set early next season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 
W. C. GREEN, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1915. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The sixteenth annual report of this board is herewith 
submitted. 

The present membership of the board is as follows : 

Frederick F. Converse, a journeyman plumber, chair- 
man; Charles H. Cook, M. D., and .Will B. Howe, city en- 
gineer, clerk of the board. 

Six meetings were held during the year and six men 
were examined: five for master plumber's licenses, of which 
number four received licenses and the fifth failed to meet 
the requirements of the board. One was examined for a 
journeyman plumber's license and received his license. 

The total receipts of the board from all sources was $35, 
for which amount the clerk of the board holds receipts 
from the city treasurer. There was expended by the 
board for examination supplies, $6.84. 

The accompanying table gives the names of all plumbers 
authorized by this board to work at the business of plumb- 
ing for the year ending March 31, 1916, the date of re- 
newal and expiration of their licenses, or certificates, the 
date of examination opposite the names of men examined 
and the fees received. 

"We have on deposit two dollars paid for examinations, 
for which the applicants have never appeared. 



368 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

I desire to make my annual report with reference to 
the present status of litigation in which the city is inter- 
ested, with a brief outline of the progress made during the 
past year. 

In Woodworth & Company v. Concord the assessors 
placed a valuation of $60,000 on the property of the com- 
pany. The capital stock was $60,000 and the assessors 
consider this a fair valuation. The business done by the 
company as shown in the hearings amounted to in excess 
of $450,000 per year while the capitalization was $60,000. 
The assets of the company amounted to more than 
$111,000. The stock was worth in excess of $125 per 
share, par value being $100. The assessors and I felt that 
there should be some method under the statutes whereby 
a portion at least of this excess value could be taxed. At 
the time of the assessment the board had no exact knowl- 
edge as to the assets of the company. This was developed 
upon hearing, so that the amount fixed by them was the 
best judgment they could exercise in the matter, having 
reference to the information then at hand. The company, 
however, upon a hearing, was able to show that the value 
of its merchandise on the average was some $35,000. The 
only statute which seemed to reach the case was the so- 
called stock in trade statute and a listing was made by the 
assessors under the stock in trade statute. The Supreme 
Court, however, held at the December term, the case hav- 
ing been argued at the November term, that the words 
stock in trade did not include "the original capital, the 
surplus, fixtures, such as horses and wagons, book ac- 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 371 

counts, notes receivable and all the property owned by the 
company necessary for the purpose of carrying on the 
business. ' ' 

Accordingly an order was entered requiring that the tax 
on $25,000 worth of stock in trade be abated. 

Another tax case finished during the year was that of 
Roselle M. Day v. Concord, w^hich was a petition for the 
abatement of taxes levied upon the Sanborn block at the 
corner of Main and Capitol streets. The case was tried 
before the Tax Commission, December 9, 1914, and a find- 
ing was made Llarch 31, 1915. The property was assessed 
at $40,000 and the petitioner claimed that $30,000 was a 
fair valuation, although she would be willing to accept a 
valuation fixed at $35,000. The finding of the commission 
was to the effect that this property was taxed at its full 
and true value and no more, that the tax therefore should 
not be abated, but that the petition should be dismissed. 

Boston & Maine Railroad v. Concord is a petition for 
the abatement of taxes assessed for the year 1913 on goods 
and materials at the local shops. The case was tried 
December 18, 1914, before the State Tax Commission and 
arguments made January 6, 1915, and the final report of 
the Tax Commission was made July 2, 1915. The question 
involved in this case is whether some half million dollars 
worth of personal property made up of lumber and shop 
supplies, etc., located within the shops in this city shall 
wholly escape taxation. This property was not included 
in the general railroad valuation, so that no tax whatever 
will be paid upon it unless the city is entitled to tax it. 
The case has been reserved and is now awaiting argument 
in the Supreme Court. It will probably be argued at this 
coming February term. 

Finman v. Concord, as stated in my last annual report, 
w^as brought to recover the value of a picture booth in the 
Auditorium, which under the terms of the lease the city 
contended belonged to it when F. W. Hartford ceased to 
be the lessee. The case was brought in the Superior Court 



372 CITY OF CONCORD. 

for Hillsborough county and was tried at the January 
term, 1915. The plaintitf claimed that the value of the 
booth was $150 and sought recovery of that amount. The 
court found that the booth, on the facts, was not a fixture 
so that it belonged to the city upon the surrender of the 
Hartford lease, and assessed the damages at $50. I re- 
quested the court to draw a reserved case for the purpose 
of transferring it to the Supreme Court, but upon the 
plaintiff's agreement to accept $50 in full settlement, 
thereby remitting some $25 or $30 due him in costs, I 
thought it better judgment to settle the case for that 
amount and this was done. 

Archibald McLcllan & a., Trustees, v. Concord was a pe- 
tition for the abatement of taxes assessed upon the so-called 
Eddy trust estate. Five of the trustees lived in Brook- 
line, Mass., and one in Concord. Concord had previously 
been getting but one-sixth of the tax. In the spring of 
1915 the Supreme Court handed down a decision which 
in the opinion of many was authority for taxation of the 
whole Eddy trust estate in Concord. Accordingly, acting 
under my advice, the board of assessors assessed the es- 
tate at its full value. By agreement of the parties a re- 
served case was drawn and transferred to the Supreme 
Court. Extensive briefs were made on both sides and the 
case was argued at the December term, 1915. The court 
decided at the January term that the statute under which 
the assessment was made was not broad enough at the 
time of the assessment to reach property held in trust by 
non-resident trustees, so that the city of Concord has col- 
lected for the year 1915 the same amounts that it col- 
lected in 1914 from this estate. The statute under which 
the assessment was made was broadened at the last session 
of the legislature and, if constitutional, will undoubtedly 
reach the property during the present year. If this 
statute is declared unconstitutional, in order that this 
property may be taxed in New Hampshire where it is situ- 
ated, it will only be necessary to pass a law forbidding the 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 373 

appointment of non-resident trustees for estates within the 
state of New Hampshire. 

As the Auditorium was to be used for a theatre com- 
mencing' September 1st, this matter was reported to the in- 
ternal revenue collector and the tax assessed for the re- 
mainder of the year. This tax was not paid until October, 
through no fault of the city, but the collector informed us 
that a fifty per cent, penalty had been imposed because the 
tax was not paid during the month. The city became 
liable. I took the matter up with the internal revenue 
collector and he has instructed that the penalty be remit- 
ted because the city made a proper disclosure during the 
month of December, 1915. 

Controversy arose with the bond house which bid in the 
issue of bonds dated December 1, 1914, in accordance with 
a city ordinance passed December 28, 1914. The board 
called upon me for an opinion as to the legality of the 
bonds and I rendered an opinion to the effect that they 
were valid. This was questioned by the attorneys for the 
bond house, but subsequently, after my opinion was eon- 
firmed by Hon. James W. Remick of this city, the attor- 
neys for the bond house agreed and the bonds were ac- 
cepted. 

The usual number of routine matters have been attended 
to during the year, such as drafting contracts, resolutions, 
ordinances, deeds, etc. ; also advising heads of the various 
city departments and the prosecution of criminal cases for 
the police department before the police court. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE JOHN KIMBALL 
PLAYGROUND. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year 1915 : 

This season of 1915 was marked by many improvements 
at the John Kimball playground as well as a very success- 
ful year in general. On Memorial Day a beautiful flag 
was presented by the Daughters of the Revolution, Rum- 
ford Chapter. This was made possible through the gener- 
ous contributions from the members of this patriotic or- 
ganization and the presentation exercises were arranged 
by that chapter. These consisted of the presentation speech 
by the regent, Mrs. Benj-amin C. Rolfe, the acceptance by 
the chairman of John Kimball Playground Committee, Mr. 
Eugene J. O'Neil, and salute to the flag by the school chil- 
dren in that vicinity. The dignity of the occasion was 
greatly enhanced by the presence of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, who kindly delayed their march to the cem- 
etery while a delegation of the veterans, accompanied by 
the band, assisted at the unfurling of the flag. 

Through the efforts of the Concord "Woman's Club the 
city gave from the funds appropriated for the 150th An- 
niversary of the town of Concord a drinking-fountain for 
the playground. The beauty of this granite fountain is a 
pleasure to the frequenters of the place, and surely its use- 
fulness is evident at any time when the children are 
playing. 

The shelter, commenced with the funds of 1914, was fin- 
ished and proved its usefulness immediately. It had been 



JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND, 375 

nearly impossible to conduct classes in sewing, or folk- 
dancing, or to carry on any of the activities of a modern 
playground without protection from the sun. 

The committee was most fortunate in obtaining the serv- 
ices of Miss Charlotte White as director of the girls of 
the playground. Miss White brought to her work gen- 
uine interest and wholesome enthusiasm and got a remark- 
able return from the girls. There were classes in knitting, 
crocheting, sewing and embroidery. The discipline was 
good, the work accomplished satisfactory, and the general 
spirit excellent. The attendance began with 15 and in- 
creased to an enrollment of 130, with an average daily at- 
tendance of 75. Much interest was shown in the folk- 
dancing not on].y by the girls but by their parents. Miss 
White kindly loaned the Victrola for this recreation. It 
would be advisable to continue this activity and to pur- 
chase an inexpensive Victrola for the purpose. Miss 
Chamberlin kindly helped in dressing tlie doll which this 
year was given to the Millville Orphans' Home. On 
August 9 the girls enjoyed a picnic at Bow under the super- 
vision of Miss White and Miss Chamberlin. The happy 
faces testified to the general enjoyment. Valuable assist- 
ance was given by several kind young ladies during the 
summer. Increased effort should be given toward inter- 
esting, thoughtful and kindly disposed young w^omen in 
this work. The cost of the shelter made it impossible to 
obtain the services of an instructor for the boys. The 
caretaker did all that was possible under the circumstances. 

The closing day was marked by the usual games and 
sports and was enjoyed by an unusually large number. 
Prizes were given to the fortunate contestants and an exhi- 
bition of the folk-dances closed the exercises. Miss White 
had charge of the girls' activities while Mr. O'Neil, as- 
sisted by the young men of the neighborhood, managed the 
boys' sports. 



376 CITY OF CONCORD. 

It would be a great advantage to the community if some 
philanthropic person would give a tennis court to the 
playground. The young people would greatly appreciate 
the chance of enjoying the benefits of the game. 

Financial Statement. 

Appropriation, $500.00 
Isaac Hill, treasurer, pay-roll, $91.00 
Building shelter, 220.00 
Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 33.41 
F. E. Nelson & Co., supplies, 1.48 
C. Pelissier & Co., supplies, .25 
Orr & Rolfe Co., supplies, .62 
W. Chennette, labor and supplies, 11.60 
J. Lugg, cement, 75.00 
W. E. Lynch, teaming, 9.00 
W. H. Reed, teaming, 3.00 
Charlotte "White, services as girls' in- 
structor, 53.94 

499.30 



Balance, $0.70 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUGENE J. O'NEIL, 

R. A. BROWN, 

LUELLA A. DICKERMAN. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ROLLINS 
PARK PLAYGROUND. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year : 

The development of playground work in our city, w^hile 
yet in the embryo stage in comparison with that done in 
other cities of our state, is surely proving that it is fast 
becoming an important factor in civic betterment. The 
results attained this year with our small appropriation has 
been most gratifying. 

The playground, while open to children at all times, has 
been under supervision three afternoons a week from 2 
p. m. until 5 p. m. The girls under the instruction of 
Miss Marion D. Shepard, and the boys under the instruc- 
tion of Mr. H. A. Loomis. The attendance on these days 
shows : 

Total number of boys and girls, 1,848 

Average daily attendance, girls, 56 

Average daily attendance, boys, 27 

Largest number of girls present on any one day, 105 

Largest number of boys, 85 

The annual parade of the children occurred on the morn- 
ing of July 4th and a fine display of fireworks, made possi- 
ble by public subscription, drew a very large attendance 
in the evening. 

Instruction in basketry and embroidery was continued 
this season and the exhibition on field day displayed some 
fine needle and basket work. 



378 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Through the efforts of the IMemorial Committee of Con- 
cord's 150th Anniversary the playground was presented on 
June 8th with a granite drinking-fountain. This addition 
to the playground has been greatly appreciated by old and 
young. 

The children's gardens were laid out this season, and 
seventy-two plots 4 by 6 feet were assigned the children. 
Radish, lettuce, carrot, beet and parsnip seeds were planted. 
The results were very good for the first season. 

The tennis court, completed last year, has been improved 
by the addition of backstops and has been in constant use. 

Baseball games, under efficient management, occurred 
nearly every evening from June 1st to August 20th. 

Our appropriation for the year has been spent per fol- 
lowing statement : 

Field day, $38.18 

Basketry, 5.85 

Embroidery, 4.71 

Instruction (girls), 65.00 

Instruction (boys), 50.00 

Caretaker, grading, utensils, 79.90 

Fourth of July (parade and prizes), 7.39 

Tennis court (repairs and backstops), 68.09 

Children's gardens, 22.72 

Cover for fountain, 5.50 

Equipment, 47.95 

Miscellaneous, 9.36 



$404.65 



Appropriation, $400.00 

Resolution No. 217, 4.65 



$404.65 



HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
ELSIE L. JOHNSON, 
FRED I. BLACKWOOD. 



REPORT OF PLAYGROUND COMMIT- 
TEE, WARD 8. 



Concord, N. H., March 13, 1916. 

To the Honorable Board of Mayor and Aldermen of Con- 
cord: 

The Committee on Concord Heights Playground make 
the following report for the year 1915 : 

The fifty dollars appropriated by the board was used to 
pay the expense of laying out the ball field, installing 
swings, croquet sets and volley balls, which were enjoyed by 
both young and old. 

Ball games were played by the Highland club evenings 
and holidays. 

The daily attendance was fifty children, as \vell as a 
large number of adults. 

The Nevers Band gave a concert that w^as enjoyed by a 
large number from the city as well as a large assembly 
from surrounding towns. 

Extending our thanks to Messrs. Downing and Phillips 
for the use of the playground and the ball field, we hope 
you will appreciate the same and appropriate the same 
amount for the coming season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. L. REAGAN, 
EDWARD J. WELCH, 
PERLEY B. PHILLIPS. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS, 



To the City of Concord: 

The Park Commissioners present herewith their report 
for the year ending December 31, 1915 : 

Receipts. 



General appropriation, 




$3,500.00 


Overdraft, 




16.61 


Total receipts, 


$3,516.61 


Expenditures, 






Salary of superintendent, twelve months 


'> 


$1,080.00 


WHITE PARK. 






Paid for labor, 


$925.13 




labor on removing moths. 


127.78 




labor on ice, 


25.50 




cash paid Mr. Atkinson, 


33.75 




cement and lime, 


3.40 




tools, hardware and supplies, 


72.5& 




Thompson & Hoague, back bill. 


351.49 




Clifit'ord, labor and supplies. 


17.79 




horse hire. 


41.00 




dressing. 


21.00 




grain. 


21.55 




swan, 


19.00 




sand, 


7.80 




Ira C. Evans Co., placards. 


4.50 


1 «70 97 





PUBLIC PARKS. 




381 


Paid for labor : 








Bradley Park, 




$35.00 




Fiske Park, 




30.00 




Court House, 




40.00 




Ridge Road, 


- 


12.50 


$117.50 








ROLLINS PARK. 






Paid for labor, 




$458.50 




labor removing moths. 


19.26 




lumber. 




16.24 




Clifford, labor and supplies. 


6.69 




carrots and cabbages, 


5.20 




grain, 




126.95 




Mr. Emmons 


; for carting deer. 


2.00 


634 84 


Care of Pecker Park, 






12.00 



$3,516.61 

No new features were added to the parks in the past 
year, as the general care, repairs and unpaid bills of previ- 
ous years absorbed all of the appropriation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Maijor, ex-officio, 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 

GARDNER B. EMMONS, 

WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 

BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 

Commissioners. 



REPORT OF PUBLIC BATH. 



Concord, N. H., September 7, 1915. 

The season of 1915 which has just closed has been one 
of the most successful seasons ever enjoyed at the public 
bath. This interest was shown by both men and women. 

The daily attendance was above the average during the 
warm weather. 

Following the custom of every year, a water carnival 
was run on the closing days for the boys and girls. It 
was the first ever held at the public bath for the girls and 
much interest was shown. The prizes for the events were 
donated by the merchants of the city. 

The following is a record of attendance : 

75 

1,412 
1,822 
her), 927 

1,385 
1,243 
1,659 
1,162 
1,294 
1,487 
1,274 
1,362 
1,794 



Opened June 12, 






Week ending June 19, 






26, 




July 


3, 
10, 

17, 
24, 
31, 


(rainy v 


Aug. 


7, 

21, 

28, 




Sept. 


4 


(closed). 







PUBLIC BATH. 


Total attendance of 


women bather 


"Week ending June 


19, 
26, 




July 


3, 
10, 
17, 
24, 
31, 




Aug. 


7, 
14, 
21, 

28, 




Sept. 


4 


(closed). 



383 



102 

71 

98 

186 

194 

146 

117 

156 

98 

174 

142 

206 

Number of boys saved from probable drowning, 6. Cause 
in each case, going beyond depth. 

Number of boys who have learned to swim, 45. 
Number of girls who have learned to swim, 38. 

Recommendations. 

1. A suitable bath-house should be built as the present 
one is in very poor shape. V 

2. A new boat, as the present one has outlived its use- 
fulness. 

3. Same appropriation as last year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JEREMIAH T. REARDON, 

Instructor. 



REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL COURT. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

Although there is no provision of the public statutes or 
city ordinances requiring the justice of the municipal court 
to make a report to your board, I deem it proper to present 
to you certain facts in relation to the administrative duties 
performed by me as justice. 

I am handing you herewith the financial statement of 
the court, as submitted by Allan H. Robinson, clerk. This 
shows total receipts of $2,550.60 from March 12, 1915, 
when the court was organized, to January 1, 1916, the close 
of the fiscal year. The recapitulation will give you a sum- 
mary of the disposition made of this sum. Certain items 
of expense contained therein should be materially reduced 
the coming year, as the first cost of dockets, record books, 
filing system and blanks incident to the organization of the 
court is far \n excess of what it should be in the same 
period in the future. 

FINES AND COSTS. 

Soon after the court M'as organized two questions arose 
as to the disposition of moneys received by the clerk. Un- 
der the statutes of the state there is no doubt that the 
court should pay fees to sheriffs and police officers making 
arrests when such fees are actually paid by respondents. 
The City of Concord has, however, an ordinance which 
requires its police officers to account to the city marshal for 
such fees received by them from the municipal court. In 
the police court for the City of Concord, which preceded 
the district court of Concord, it was the custom for the 
marshal to receive all fines and costs in behalf of the court. 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 385 

It was not customary to separate the officers' fees from the 
other receipts, but the whole amount so received was turned 
into the city treasury by him after paying certain expenses 
of the court. Under the present statute all moneys col- 
lected are received by the clerk, but as certain fees are 
earned by police officers, who are paid from the appropria- 
tion for police and are in no way a part of the earnings of 
the municipal court, it appeared that the fees so received 
should be credited to that department. The clerk was in- 
structed to pay these fees to the officers in whose name 
they weve taxed and they in turn should, under the city 
ordinances, account to the city through the marshal for 
the same. 

Difficulty was also encountered in the disposition of 
fines for violation of the motor vehicle and other statutes 
which had been paid under the provisions of the statute to 
the state, or applied to certain specific purposes. The stat- 
utes passed at the session of 1915 did not make it clear 
whether these fines should be applied as formerly or paid 
to the city for its use. The clerk was instructed to hold 
these fines pending some decision by the Supreme Court 
as to whether these prior statutes are now in force. A 
friendly suit was brought by Attorney-General James P. 
Tuttle against the municipal court of Concord for the pur- 
pose of raising this question and securing a decision. The 
case is now in the Superior Court, but will soon be trans- 
ferred to the Supreme Court, where City Solicitor Alexan- 
der Murchie will appear in behalf of the city. Should it 
be decided that the fines above mentioned are not to be ap- 
plied to the specific purposes mentioned in these prior stat- 
utes, such fines will be paid into the city treasury and this 
will mean a material increase in the income of the city from 
the court. The clerk stands ready to pay these fines which, 
up to the close of the fiscal year, amounted to $435.00, to 
the city treasurer or to such other person or persons as may 
appear to be the proper parties to receive them when the 
decision is reached in the case now pending. 



386 CITY OF CONCORD. 

NON-SUPPORT MATTERS. 

I have continued the method which I adopted in the 
district court in handling non-support cases. As soon as a 
respondent has heen proven guilty of this offense and sen- 
tence has heen imposed, such sentence has been suspended 
upon certain conditions. In a few cases it has been deemed 
advisable to allow the respondent to go with the sole con- 
dition that he care for his family properly, leaving him to 
do this in his own way, but always holding him up to as 
high a standard of conduct as possible under the circum- 
stances. 

In the majority of cases, however, it has seemed best to 
order the respondent to pay into court a certain sum, 
which has varied from a small amount each week or month 
to the entire wages of the respondent, Avhen it appeared 
that he was wholly incapable of expending it properly for 
the benefit of himself and family. The money thus re- 
ceived has been expended by the court ; in some few cases 
partially for the benefit of the respondent himself, but in 
most cases entirely for those dependent upon him. Al- 
though this is no part of the duty of the court, the success 
which has attended the care and attention given it appears 
to fully justify the effort. From the inception of the court 
to the close of the fiscal year, a period of less than ten 
months, $974.83 has been received in these matters, all 
except $8.31 of which has been expended under my per- 
sonal direction. The following is a statement of the 
account : 

NoN-SuppoRT Accounts, 







RECEIPTS. 




Received 


in No. 454 


(district court docket), 


$211.00 


i i 


" " 233 


i i 


11 li 


48.00 


i i 


" " 503 


c c 


(I a 


72.00 


( i 


" '' 1,644 


i i 


c ( : c 


224.00 


a 


" " 1,163 


i c 


li 11 


54.00 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 387 



Received in No. 46 (district court docket), 


$36.00 


" " 216 " " " 


126.94 


" " 312, 


6.44 


" " juvenile court matter by agreement, 


42.00 


"No. 540, 


6.00 


" " juvenile court matter by agreement. 


35.00 


" " No. 678, 


81.45 


" " 765, 


32.00 


Total receipts in non-support matters, 


$974.83 


EXPENDITURES. 





Paid Mrs. D. E. Lewis, board, . $89.00 

Mrs. Reuben Gate, board, 89.00 

David E. Murphy, clothing, 1.48 

Endicott Johnson Co., shoes, 1.60 

New Hampshire Orphans' Home, board, 60.00 
wife of respondent in No. 503 (district court 

docket), 72.00 
wife of respondent in No. 1,644 (district court 

docket), 221.29 
Arthur B. Hayden, attorney, account money 

borrowed by respondent, 2.71 
wife of respondent in No. 1,163 (district court 

docket), 54.00 

wife of respondent in No. 46, 36.00 

wife of respondent in No. 216, 56.25 

E. B. Craddock, rent. 24.00 

Page Bros., groceries, 18.50 
A. H. Britton & Co., tools for respondent in 

No. 216, 3.60 
H. E. Chamberlin, city clerk, recording as- 
signment of wages for respondent in No. 

216, .25 

Thomas Robinson, freight and trucking, 3.95 

Fred B. Powell, agent, rent, 20.00 

respondent in No. 216, 1.50 



388 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid M-ife of respondent in No. 312, $6.44 

D. E. Murphy, clothing, 1.59 

Mrs. Eva Provencal, board, 27.00 

Mrs. Mamie McGuire, board, 13.41 

wife of respondent in No. 540, 6.00 

MillviUe Orphans' Home, board, 35.00 

W. W. Emerson, wood, 2.50 

wife of respondent in No. 678, 81.45 

Mrs. Warren Hall, board, 38.00 

Net balance, 8.31 



$974.83 



JUVENILE COURT AND PROBATION. 

I have personally attended to the matter of probation 
in the juvenile court during the period covered by this 
report. Harry F. Lake M-as appointed probation officer 
under the statutes. He had previously been the efficient 
and painstaking official in the district court in charge of 
this work. Since the organization of the new court he has 
turned his salary over to me to be used in the work of the 
juvenile court. It is my intention eventually to do this 
work entirely in an office in the building where my law 
office is located, which is to be fitted up for the purpose, 
thus taking it entirely away from the police station, where 
adult criminals are quartered and tried for their offenses. 
Mr. Lake's contribution will defray practically the entire 
expense of this office. 

In this connection I wish to suggest that the mayor and 
aldermen should consider the advisability of enacting a 
curfew ordinance. I am convinced that such a law, wisely 
enforced, will do much to reduce juvenile delinquency in 
the city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. CHESTER CLARK, 

Justice. 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 389 



REPORT OF ALLAN H. ROBINSON, CLERK, 
MUNICIPAL COURT. 



March. 

receipts. 
Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, $201.66 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid W. D. Chandler, stamps, $4.00 

Evans Press, seal, 2.00 
Frank P. Curtis, clerk, district court 

fines and costs, 24.19 

Evans Press, printing, 12.25 

Thomas J. Dyer, printing, 10.75 

Phaneuf & Son, printing, 12.00 

Rumford Printing Co., printing, 18.25 

Cragg Bindery, record books, 28.50 

George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 34.24 

Frank Hodgdon, witness fee, .77 

Fred G. Evans, fees, 4.50 
F. W. Grafton, M. D., examination ^ 

of E. J. Lafond, 2.00 

Arthur M. Crowley, witness fee, .77 

Fred C. Demond, warrant, 1.50 

Alexander Murchie, warrants, 3.00 

Mrs. "W. L. Jukes, witness fee, .77 

Mrs. Ola Hanson, witness fee, .77 

Earl Gaskell, witness fee, .77 

Richard McGarey, witness fee, .77 

Harry F. Lake, probation officer, 6.67 

Rumford Printing Co., dockets, 20.00 

Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 13.19 

• $201.66 



390 city of concord. 

April. 

receipts. 

Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, $132.17 

Received of A. Chester Clark, justice, sundry fees, 6.60 



$138.77 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Ira C. Evans Co., printing, $30.00 

Charles C. Jones, clerk's bond, 5.00 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., desk, 30.00 

Ernest L. Putnam, stamps, 2.00 
Secretary of State, fine for violation 

of motor vehicle law, 10.00 

Cragg Bindery, docket, 7.50 

Edwin G. Burgmn, lettering, 2.00 

David F. Dudley, special justice, 3.00 

George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 17.60 

V. I. Moore, officers' fees, 8.10 

Norris A. Dunklee, officers' fees, 4.70 

S. J. Carlson, witness fee, .77 

C. F. Nichols & Son, stationery, 2.00 

Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 16.10 



May. 



RECEIPTS. 



$138.77 



Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, $321.46 

Received of A. Chester Clark, justice, sundry fees, 4.82 

$326.28 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 391 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid Harry F. Lake, probation officer 

(April), $10.00 

G. E. Jackman, witness fees, 6.10 

C. H. Dow, officers' fees, 15.24 

E. L. Putnam, stamps, 2.00 

Andrew J. Hook, warrants, 3.00 

V. I. Moore, officers' fees, 4.64 

George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 39.71 

David F. Dudley, warrant, 1.50 

Frank B. McDaniels, witness fee, .77 
Harry F. Lake, probation officer, 

(May), 10.00 

Ira C. Evans Co., printing, 6.50 
Fine of "William W. Cass for violation of 
motor vehicle law, held pending decision 
as to whether it shall be paid to State 

of New Hampshire or City of Concord, 100.00 

Paid Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 126.82 



$326.28 

« 



June, 
receipts. 



Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, $434.19 

Received of A. Chester Clark, justice, sundry fees, 2.90 



$437.09 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid A. E. Kenison, annotations, $1.00 

E. L. Putnam, stamps, 2.00 

Harry F. Lake, warrant, 1.50 
Warren Abbott, treasurer district 

court, costs, 1.50 

H. L. Woodward, witness fee, .77 



392 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid Charles S. Bailey, warrant, $1.50 

George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 39.80 
Harry F. Jjake, probation officer, 10.00 

Fine of Frank Lassond for violation of 
school laws, held pending decision as 
to w^honi it shall be paid, 10.00 

Fine of J. N. Lambert, for violation of 
motor vehicle law, held pending decision 
as to whom it shall be paid, 100.00 

Fine of Edwin M. Saben, for violation of 
motor vehicle law, held pending decision 
as to whom it shall be paid, 100.00 

Paid Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 169.02 

$437.09 

July. 

receipts. 

Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, $136.09 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid E. L. Putnam, stamps, $2.00 

Harry F. Lake, probation officer, 10.00 

George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 34.06 

Carlos H. Foster, witness fee, .77 

C. T. Wallace, witness fee, .77 

Richard McGarey, witness fee, .77 

Charles P. Smith, officers' fee, 2.50 

Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 85.22 

$136.09 

August. 

receipts. 

Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, $280.28 

Received of A. Chester Clark, justice, sundry fees, 14.61 

$294.89 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 393 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid Mrs. Annie Mills, witness fee, $1.73 

Charles P. Smith, officers' fees, 12.50 

Laura Chisholm, witness fees, 1.73 

Louise Putney, witness fees, 1.73 

Frank Richardson, witness fees, 1.73 

Ethel Riley, witness fees, .77 

Abigail Tracey, witness fees, .77 

Geneva Miller, witness fees, ,77 

Alexander Murchie, warrant, 1.50 

E. L. Putnam, stamps, 4.00 

A. E. Kenison, annotations, 1.00 

Elwin C. Lear, officers' fees, 14.66 

George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 54.96 

Joseph W. Worthen, warrant, 1.50 

Wallace F. Purrington, witness fee, .77 

Charles D. Howard, witness fee, . .77 

Antonio Palisi, witness fee, .77 

H. L. "Woodward, witness fee, .77 

Earl D. Gaskell, witness fee, .77 

V. I. Moore, officers' fees, 1.62 
W. P. Beauclerk, M. D., medical 

examination, 5.00 
Joseph A. Donigan, acting justice, 3.00 
0. H. Stanley, M. D., medical ex- 
amination, 3.00 
Harry F. Lake, probation officer, 10.00 
J. W. Sanborn, warrant, 1.50 

Fine of Reuben Cohen for violation of 
pure food laws, held pending decision 

as to whom it shall be paid, 10.00 

Paid Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 157.57 



$294.89 



394 city of concord, 

September. 
receipts. 
Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, 



$360.20 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid George A. Wooster, officers' fees, 
Elwin C. Lear, officers' fees, 
Joseph W. Worthen, warrants, 

E. L. Putnam, stamps, 

David F. Dudley, special justice, 
Mabel L. Stevens, annotating, 
V. I. Moore, officers' fees, 
George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 

F. B. Lother, witness fee, 
F. W. Abbott, witness fee, 
E. S. Blake, witness fee, 
Benjamin W. Couch, warrant, 
Harry F. Lake, probation officer, 

Fine of A. M. Ingersoll for violation of 

motor vehicle law, held pending decision 

as to whom it shall be paid, 
Fine of Harold Dickey, for violation of 

motor vehicle law, held pending decision 

as to whom it shall be paid. 
Paid Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 



$17.89 

8.85 

3.00 

2.00 

3.00 

4.00 

14.58 

42.22 

1.13 

1.13 

1.13 

1.50 

10.00 



100.00 



5.00 
144.77 



$360.20 



October. 

receipts. 

Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, 
Received for bail of George R. Mills, forfeited, 



$103.12 
100.00 



$203.12 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 395 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid E. L. Putnam, stamps, $2.00 

J. W. Stanley, acting justice, 3.00 

Charles P. Smith, officers' fees, 5.00 

Everett L. Ames, officers' fees, 15.24 

V. I. Moore, officers' fees, 1.62 

George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 11.12 

Harry F. Lake, probation officer, 10.00 
Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 155.14 

$203.12 

November. 

receipts. 

Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, $142.58 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid E. L. Putnam, stamps, $2.00 

George A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 33.58 

Charles P. Smith, officers' fees, 2.50 
F. G. Driscoll, attorney, witness fees 

advanced by John J. Keating, 4.47 

The Gift Shop, filing cabinet, 39.00 

Frank G. Driscoll, warrant, 1.50 

Harry F. Lake, probation officer, 10.00 

George Ash, witness fee, .77 

Joseph W. Worthen, warrant, 1.50 

Fine of Alfred Diversi for violation of 

motor vehicle law, held pending decision 

as to whom it shall be paid, 10.00 

Paid Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 37.26 

$142.58 



396 city of concord, 

December. 

receipts. 

Received for fines and costs in sundry cases, $293.16 

Received of A. Chester Clark, justice, sundry fees, 16.76 



$309.92 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid E. L. Putnam, stamps, $3.00 

Evans Press, printing, 14.75 
J. M. Stewart & Sons, chair for court 

room, 20.00 

G. A. S. Kimball, officers' fees, 34.74 

V. I. Moore, officers' fees, 8.02 

C. T. Wallace, witness fees, 3.85 

C. H. Guilbeault, witness fees, 2.31 

F. B. McDaniels, witness fees, 1.54 

J. Elwin Wright, witness fees, 1.54 

J. E. Silva, witness fees, 1.54 
J. W. Plummer, state treasurer, fine. 

State V. Welch, 100.00 

John W. Stanley, State v. Welch, 1.50 

Peter Smith, State v. Welch, 1.62 

Harry F. Lake, probation officer, 10.00 

Isaac Hill, treasurer, balance, 105.51 



$309.92 



Recapitulation. 



Received for fines and costs, 
bail forfeited, 
sundry fees, 

Total receipts. 



$2,404.91 

100.00 

45.69 

$2,550.60 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 397 

Paid for probation officer, $96.67 

medical examinations of respondents, 10.00 

court seal, 2.00 
fines and costs collected on account of district 

court, 25.69 
dockets, filing system, postage, printing and 

other supplies, 284.50 
for officers' and witness fees, and complaints 

and warrants, 559.14 

for clerk's bond, 5.00 

state treasurer, fish and game fine, 100.00 

acting justices, 12.00 

secretary of state, motor vehicle fine, 10.00 

Held pending decision of court, 435.00 
Balance paid to city treasurer, 1,010.60 



Total, $2,550.60 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALLAN H. ROBINSON, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMIS- 
' SIONERS. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The care of the cemeteries for the past year has been 
faithfully attended to. 

In addition to the regular work, a little part of the per- 
manent work has been done. A new block of medium- 
priced lots has been graded and will be ready for lotting 
out in the spring. The block that was graded two years 
ago has been lotted out and several lots sold and occupied. 
The much-needed repairs on the roof of the receiving tomb 
has been thoroughly done to prevent the leaking that has 
troubled for several years. 

The burials for the year have been 223 ; in Blossom Hill 
215, in the Old North 8. 

The chapel has been used about twenty times, showing 
that it was a much-needed convenience. 

As it takes two years to prepare a block for use, it would 
be well if we could have a small appropriation (perhaps 
five hundred dollars) to begin the preparation of another 
block in the summer. 

Nearly two years ago it was voted that the mayor be 
instructed to procure estimates of the cost of a new fence 
at the Old North Cemetery. It is in a very bad condition, 
and most of it is liable to fall at any time, and because of 
this condition it is a common pass-way for the school chil- 
dren and others, who sometimes do considerable damage. 

We have missed the cheerful words and kindly counsel 
of George A. Foster, suddenly removed by death, who for 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT. 399 

some twenty-five years was a faithful member of the board 
of commissioners and its secretary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor. 
FRANK J. PILLSBURY, Ward 6. 

4. 



CHARLES G. REMICK, 

FRANK P. ANDREWS, 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 

EDWARD A. MOULTON, Secretary, 



4. 
4. 
4. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen : 

The East Concord Cemetery committee's report for the 
year 1915 is as follows: 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

receipts. 

Appropriation, $150.00 

One-half sale of lots, 7.50 

$157.50 



EXPENSES, 



Paid City of Concord, highway depart- 
ment, $3.50 
Scott French, labor, loam, etc., 154.00 



$157.50 



Old Fort Cemetery. 



RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation, $30.00 



400 CITY OP CONCORD. 

EXPENSES. 

Paid Scott French, for labor, loam and 

plants, $29.25 

Balance of appropriation, .75 

$30.00 

SCOTT FRENCH, 

Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1915. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1915: 



From fees of all kinds. 


$436.70 


rent. Auditorium, 


500.00 


pawnbroker 's license, 


25.00 


bowling alley, billiard and pool table 




licenses. 


470.00 


dog licenses. 


1,442.34 


junk dealers' licenses, 


130.00 


hack and job team licenses. 


83.50 


employment bureau licenses. 


15.00 


police horse. 


200.00 


bounty on grasshoppers. 


73.00 


refund from Plymouth, account J. Ellis, 


28.00 


refund, account G. B. Farley, 


25.00 


proceeds city lot. Ward Three, 


3,826.40 


Merrimack County, aid to dependent sol- 




diers. 


1,940.59 


Merrimack County, aid to county poor, 


11,845.19 


city primary. 


102.00 


sale of old metal from bridges, 


748.09 



$21,890.81 

The foregoing amount has been paid into the city 
treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 

26 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVER- 
SEER OF THE POOR. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1915. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the forty-eighth an- 
nual report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards 
One and Two, for the year ending December 31, 1915: 

City Poor. 

Appropriation, $2,000.00 

Resolution No. 212, 1,200.00 

Resolution No. 217, 285.27 

$•3,485.27 



id groceries. 


$1,026.92 


milk, 


102.72 


fuel. 


434.02 


rents. 


427.67 


care children. 


504.00 


board and care. 


764.66 


medicine. 


44.20 


shoes and rubbers. 


53.05 


burials. 


68.00 


miscellaneous, 


60.03 



$3,485.27 



POOR 


DEPARTMENT 


403 


County Poor. 




Paid groceries, 




$3,192.79 


milk, 




330.70 


fuel, 




1,864.96 


rents. 




3,608.94 


care children, 




2,196.59 


board and care, 




1,482.55 


shoes and clothing. 




342.27 


transient account. 




32.71 


burials. 




115.00 


miscellaneous, 




28.90 




tp -L O J J- C/ 1^ . Tt X 



Total amount paid for aid to poor. 

Dependent Soldiers, Cm, 
Appropriation, 

Paid care, sickness. 

Dependent Soldiers, County. 

Paid groceries, $592.26 

29.20 

666.36 

270.00 

343.00 

15.13 

2.50 



$16,680.68 

$150.00 
$104.00 



milk, 

fuel, 

rents, 

board and care, 

clothing, etc., 

miscellaneous. 



Total amount paid for aid to dependent 
soldiers. 



1,918.45 



$2,022.45 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The board of assessors submit to your consideration the 
following facts and figures showing the valuation of the 
city and its school districts and special precincts, with 
the amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the 
tax collector for collection. 

During the year the appealed cases of Woodworth & 
Company and Trustees of the Estate of Mary Baker G. 
Eddy were decided against the City of Concord, the 
Supreme Court finding that the property so taxed did 
not come under the statutory classification. 

The appeal of the Boston & Maine Railroad from the 
taxation of materials which were to be used in the shops 
located in this city (the shops being taxed and not in- 
cluded in the matter of the appeal), is now before the 
court. 



assessors' report. 



405 



Tabulation op Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 

Valuation of City and Precincts with 

Rate for Each in 1915. 



WARRANT. 



Amount of 
warrants. 



Tax rate 
per $1,000. 



Assessed val- 
uation of 
city and pre- 
cincts. 



State 

County 

School required by law 

City 

Extra for schools : 

Union 

Town 

(No. 20 

Penacook I 

( Union* 

Precincts: 

Sprinkling 

Garbage 

Sewer 

Lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sprinkling . . 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord lights . . . 

West Concord sewer . . . 

East Concord lights 

East Concord sewer. . . . 

St. Paul's School sewer 



$4S,f,.52.00l 

34,716.50 I 

> 

4.') ,517. 50 I 

44 ,000.00 J 

87,967.16 
2,250.00 
1,040.50 
9,900.00 

9,500.00 

10,000.00 

10,050.00 

20,000.00 

1,650.00 

475.00 

1,1.50.00 

800.00 

680.50 

550.00 

No appro.oriii 

100.00 



$8.60 



5.10 

1.80 

.70 

5.20 

.65 

.75 

.65 

1.25 

1.10 

.50 

1.00 

.80 

2.00 

2.40 



$20,086,789 



17,289, .544 
1 ,302,675 
1,494,570 
1,985,682 

14,779,689 

13.9S4.049 

15.599,799 

16,211.214 

1,514,420 

1,083,165 

1.184,230 

980.631 

313,601 

232,180 

151,.580 



•Penacook Union School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



406 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



Number of shares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hamp- 
shire and credited to this city. 



RAILROAD. 



1912 



1913. 



Boston & Maine 

Concord & Montreal... 
Concord & Portsmouth 
Connecticut River , 



[Street 
Dover, Somersworth ^t Rochester 



Fitchburg 

Manchester & Lawrence . 

Nashua & Lowell 

Nashua Street 

New Boston , 

Northern 

Peterborough , 

Pemigewasset Valley . . . . 

Suncook Valley 

Wilton 



323 

1,21 G 
118 
362 



27 
360 

18 
509 

60 

.281 

8 

168 

■16 



398 
9,77.5 

lis 

342 



365 

16 

497 

72 

1,205 

8 

168 

46 

5 



379 

9,866 

124 

342 



27 

371 

16 

488 

72 

1,137 

8 

133 

46 

5 



380 

9,935 

107 

342 

468 

27 

373 

6 

477 



168 
51 
4 



ASSESSORS REPORT. 



407 



Inventory of the City of Concord. 







No. 


Valuation. 


Polls, 




5,806 


$11,612 


Improved and unimproved land and 






buildings, 






15,927,525 


Horses, 




1,266 


145,120 


Oxen, 




27 


2,520 


Cows, 




1,138 


57,595 


Other neat stock, 




211 


7,025 


Sheep, 




189 


1,280 


Hogs, 




111 


1,430 


Fowls, 






415 


Carriages and automobiles, 






289,140 


Portable mills, 






2,325 


Boats and launches, 






2,000 


Wood and lumber. 






20,075 


Stock in public funds, 






1,304,078 


Stock in banks and other corporations 


in 




this state. 






216,266 


Money on hand, at interest, 


or on deposit, 


266,205 


Stock in trade. 






1,625,640 


Milling, carding machines. 


and factories 




and their machinery. 






218,150 


Total, 


$20,086,789 


Amount of taxes committed to collector 


? 


$339,781.64 



Average rate per cent, of taxation for all 
purposes, 



$1.69+. 



408 city op concord. 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and 
personal estate of Concord since 1905 : 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1905 


5,400 


$11,614,011 


$258,043.86 


1906 


5,474 


11,768,897 


260,976.67 


1907 


5,757 


12,114,322 


273,045.74 


1908 


5,289 


12,342,190 


277,469.52 


1909 


5,442 


12,405,465 


301,281.72 


1910 


5,576 


12,543,822 


278,464.77 


1911 


5,784 


12,507,847 


296,074.27 


1912 


5,691 


18,701,591 


316,117.69 


1913 


5,687 


20,842,846 


305,460.56 


1914 


5,735 


19,177,428 


316,447.67 


1915. 








Ward 1, 


597 


$1,590,490 


$26,013.70 


2, 


219 


532,705 


6,898.28 


3, 


367 


1,254,110 


18,339.78 


4, 


996 


3,296,938 


55,513.65 


5, 


685 


4,800,031 


81,587.44 


6, 


949 


2,347,530 


39,908.05 


7; 


1,105 


3,096,725 


48,255.42 


8, 


347 


2,457,575 


39,725.48 


9, 


541 


710,685 


11,361.66 




5,806 


$20,086,789 


$327,603.46 


Non-residen 


it. 




566.18 




$328,169.64 



ASSESSORS REPORT, 



409 



List op Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in 
Each Ward, 1914 and 1915. 





Polls. 


Valuation. 


Resident tax assessed. 


WARDS. 
















1914. 


1915. 


1914. 


1915. 


1914. 


1915. 


Wardl. ... 


588 


.597 


$1,567,4.50 


$1,590,490 


$24,696.52 


$26,013.70 


Ward 2 


226 


219 


545,345 


532.705 


6,874.92 


6,898.28 


Wards 


384 


307 


1,226,605 


1,2.54,110 


16.801.48 


18,339.78 


Ward 4 


984 


996 


3,314,685 


3,296,938 


.54,388.79 


55,513.65 


Wards 


677 


685 


3,790,329 


4,800,031 


63,284.82 


81,587.44 


Ward 6 


981 


949 


2,360,359 


2,347,530 


39,437.70 


39,908.05 


Ward: 


1,094 


1.105 


3,221,175 


3,096,725 


49,269.02 


48,255.42 


Wards 


322 


347 


2,440,860 


2,4.57 ,.575 


38,436.02 


39,725.48 


Ward 9 


479 


541 


710,72C 


710,685 


11 174.47 


11,361.66 


Totals 


5.735 


5.806 


$19,177,428 


$20,086,789 


$304,363.74 


$327,603.46 



Totals submitted to tax collector: 
In 1914 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 

Total, 

In 1915 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 



Total, 



$304,363.74 

613.93 

11,470.00 

$316,447.67 

$327,603.46 

566.18 

11,612.00 

$339,781.64 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the annual report of 
the Collector of Taxes to the close of business December 
31, 1915: 

Tax Levy, 1912. 

Resident list, $315,382.43 

Additions and corrections, 2,128.95 

$317,511.38 



Non-resident list, 735.26 

Received collection for moths, 172.50 

Received interest, 650.63 



$319,069.77 



Cash paid treasurer, $311,721.34 

Amount abated, 6,979.60 

Amount refunded, 19.19 

Uncollected, 349.64 



$319,069.77 



Tax Levy, 1913. 

Resident list, $304,820.42 

Additions and corrections, 1,205.51 

$306,025.93 

Non-resident list, 640.16 

Amount collections, moths, 157.45 

Amount collections, interest, 1,005.29 

$307,828.83 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 411 

Cash paid treasurer, $299,524.63 

Amount discounts, 3,123.68 

Amount abated, 4,505.44 

Uncollected, 675.08 

$307,828.83 



Tax Levy, 1914. 

Resident list, $304,363.00 

Amount poll taxes, 11,470.00 

Additions and corrections, 936.33 

$316,769.33 

Non-resident list, 613.93 

Collected, moth account, 154.65 

Collected, interest, 932.63 



$318,470.54 



Cash paid treasurer, $308,615.13 

Amount discounts, 3,388.73 

abatements, 4,063.83 

refunded, 10.02 

uncollected, 2,392.83 



$318,470.54 



Tax Levy, 4915. 

Amount of levy, $339,215.46 

Additions and corrections, 642.19 

$339,857.65 

Non-resident list, 566.18 

Interest account, 57.94 

Moth account, 36.50 

$340,518.27 



412 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Cash paid city treasurer, $284,200.00 

Discounts, 3,119.08 

Abatements (ordinary), $1,761.05 
(by order of 
the court), 16,662.76 

18,423.81 

Cash on hand, 233.45 

Uncollected, 34,541.93 

$340,518.27 

Taxes sold the City of Concord in the office of the Col- 
lector for redemption : 

1912. 

Amount, $1,186.96 Paid treasurer, $649.88 

Interest, 66.70 Uncollected, 603.78 



$1,253.66 $1,253.66 

1913. 

Amount, $1,811.71 Paid treasurer, $1,194.08 

Interest, 60.72 Uncollected, 678.35 



$1,872.43 . $1,872.43 

1914. 

Amount, $1,228.92 Paid treasurer, $335.38 

Interest, 4.60 Uncollected, 898.14 



$1,233.52 $1,233.52 

Taxes sold the City of Concord, N, H., for redemption 
as turned over by Mr. Ladd, former collector: 

For the years 1902 and 1903, $134.34 

For the year 1904, 129.45 

For the year 1905, 207.96 

For the year 1906, 210.53 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



413 



Amount, 
luterest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1907. 

$539.65 Paid treasurer, 
39.36 Uncollected, 



$579.01 



1908. 

$258.14 Paid treasurer, 
34.12 Uncollected, 



$292.26 



1909. 

$402.20 Paid treasurer, 
29.90 Uncollected. 



$432.10 



1910. 

$837.17 Paid treasurer, 
21.15 Uncollected, 



$858.32 



1911. 

$483.34 Paid treasurer, 
17.65 Uncollected, 



$500.99 



SETH R. 



$91.15 

487.86 

$579.01 



$86.51 
205.75 

$292.26 



$87.40 
344.70 

$432.10 



$75.30 
783.02 

$858.32 



$78.09 
422.90 

$500.99 

DOLE, 
Collector. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



TRUST FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Trust 
Funds. 

abial walker trust. 

For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1915, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be 
applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1915, 80.00 

Paid Grace E. Foster, treasurer of the society, 80.00 

Invested in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 415 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of 
the duly appointed officials, or mepibers of the Minot Cemetery Association. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1915, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at 31/2 per cent.) with city of Concord, in 
general account. 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance income from last year, $375.15 

Income received, 1915, 22.92 



Income on hand, January 1, 1916, $398.07 

Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank. 

Income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 



COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the pur- 
chase of books of a biographical, geographical, historical and scientific char- 
acter, and the books relating to science shall be those that give the latest 
developments and discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1915, 85.90 

Paid into the city treasury, 85.90 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 



416 CITY OF CONCORD, 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1915, 40.00 

Paid into city treasury, 40.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 



FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1915, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500.00 



THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1915, 20.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 20.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 



JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be e.xpended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital, $3,312.60 

Income received, 1915, 26.66 

Paid into the city treasury, 26.66 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,000.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 417 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amcant 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, $30,220.95 / 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1915, 2,375.28 

Received from income of fund, 1,184.52 

■ $33,780.75 

Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $1,184.52 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, 32,596.23 

$33,780.75 

Invested in City of Concord 4% 

bonds, $6,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 9,499.32 

Deposited in Union Trust Com- 
pany, 13,096.91 

iDeposited in Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 4,000.00 

■ $32,596.23 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an in- 
crease of the fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 30.10 

$845.10 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $30.10 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, 815.00 



$845.10 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

27 



418 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, $625.50 
Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1915, 360.77 
Received from income of fund, 1915, 39.12 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 23.11 

$1,048.50 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1916, $399.89 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, 648.61 

$1,048.50 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
County Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of 
interested parties, and by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of 
Millville Cemetry. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, $2,118.40 

Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1915, 373.78 

Received from income, 1915, 99.62 

Heceived from one-half sale of lots, 

1915, 17.50 

$2,609.30 



Capital, January 1, 1915, $2,118.40 

Capital increased from sale of lots, 17.50 



Capital, January 1, 1916, $2,135.90 

Unexpended income January 1, 1916, 473.40 

$2,609.30 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,345.99 
Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,263.31 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 419 

EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1915, $322.50 

Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1915, 354.93 

Received from income of fund, 1915, 27.08 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1915, 7.50 

$712.01 



Unexpended income, January 1, 1916, $382.01 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, 330.00 

$712.01 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in New Hamp- 
shire Savings Bank. 

WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and author- 
izins: loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund the conditions of which have already been fulfilled. There is 
still outstanding five bonds of $500 each and one of $300. One of the $500 
bonds matures each year until 1919, when the $300 bond is payable. The 
presumption is that these bonds will be paid each year from taxes assessed 
upon the property of the precinct. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1915, $487.14 

Income received, 1915, 19.48 

$506.62 



Deposited in Union Trust Company, $506.62 



PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook sewer precinct, and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking 
fund, which provided that the following amounts should be raised annually 
upon the taxable property of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds 
as they mature, viz. : 

$100 annually for fifteen years from October 1, 1900. 
$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 
$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 



420 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1915, $1,488.17 
Income received, 1915, 59.52 



$1,547.69 



Transferred to City of Concord gen- 
eral account to pay bonds matur- 
ing 1915, and interest on bonds 
outstanding, $660.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1916, 887.69 



$1,547.69 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $887.69 



EAST CONCOKD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord sewer precinct, and author- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund, 'which provided that the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) 
should be raised annually for twenty years from July 1, 1895, upon the tax- 
able property of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds as they 
mature. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1915, $559.40 

Income received, 1915, 21.36 

$580.76 



Transferred to City of Concord gen- 
eral account to pay bonds matur- 
ing 1915, and interest on bonds 
outstanding, $517.50 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1916, 63.26 



$580.76 



Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city 
bond, the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping 
lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition ; six dollars each 
year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a monument fund; 
and the balance of the income to be expended each year in purchasing books 
for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received 1915, 35.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 421 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account for public library, 17.00 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

$35.00 



Capital invested in City of Concord 3iy4 per cent. bond. 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. 
The entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1915, $442.91 
From S. K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1915, 17.54 

■ $466.45 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



424 



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448 CITY OF CONCORD. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the per- 
manent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and in- 
come of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. 
The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the 
mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that 
purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1915. 
Charles H. Loveland, lot 32, east half, 

block V, $100.00 
Mrs. A. F. Holt, care, 2.00 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 1.00 
Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 4.50 
W. J. Green, care, 2.00 
George Nydan estate, burial, 3.00 ' 
Mrs. Julia Merrill estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. C. W. Davis estate, burial, 3.00 
Charles Hale estate, burial, 3.00 
Mrs. George Mayhover estate, burial, 4.00 
G. W. "Waters (Dennett infant), burial, 1.50 
L. A. Lane & Co. (Clement family), re- 
burials, 40.00 
Mrs. James B. Lyford, care, 5.00 
N. W. Maasie, care, 4.00 
Mrs. George W. Crockett, care, 4.50 
George L. Lincoln, care, 1.00 
C. Newman Hall, care, 2.00 
Mrs. L. F. Lund, care, 5.00 
J. Frank Webster, care, 4.00 
C. W. Lyman, care, 100 
Mrs. N. E. "Webster, care, 1.00 
A. G. McAlpine, foundation, 72.25 
Mrs. Lizzie Nevers estate, burial, 5.00 
Mrs. Florence Porter estate, burial, 10.00 
Kendall & Foster (infant), .50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 449 

Herman J. Thompson, lot 109, block Y, $30.00 

Frank L. Kix. lot 68, block Y, 30.00 

Mrs. Ella A. Prince, lot 70, block Y, 30.00 
Frank S. Putnam, lot 166, block W, 101.25 

Grace Ball estate, lot 49, block Y, 30.00 

Mrs. ]\Iarion Robinson, removals, 10.00 

William C. Batchelder estate, burial, 7.00 

S. S. Smith, foundation, 10.00 

Samuel Holt estate, care, 2.00 

G. H. Buswell, care, 1.50 

N. H. Shattuck, care, 1.50 

George R. Connell, care, 2.00 

Fred E. Colburn, care, 1.50 

Mrs. E. N. Spencer, care, 1.50 

Frank D. Abbott, care, 1.00 

Fred S. Johnson, care, 2.00 

C. F. Batchelder, care, 1.00 

John L. Durgin, care, 1.00 

Mary M. Smith estate, burial, 3.00 

George S. Prince estate, burial, 6.00 

Willie W. Sanborn estate, burial, 8.00 

William Vogler estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Julia Gushing estate, burial, 10.00 

Mary E. ^Merchant estate, burial, 7.00 

Abbie E. Merrill estate, burial, 7.00 

Mary J. Standish estate, burial, , 7.00 

Lillian S. Howe estate, burial, 7.00 

S. A. Reub (infant), burial, .50 

Harriman (infant), burial, .50 

Addie S. Kimball estate, burial, 7.00 

Edna M. Whittier estate, burial, 7.00 

Ida P. Colby estate, burial, 7.00 

Sarah R. B. ]\Iartin estate, burial, 4.00 

Nettie M. Putnam estate, burial, 4.00 

J. H. Watts, lot 38, block Y, 35.00 

H. F. Wight, lot 41, block Y, 25.00 

29 



450 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Lyman B. Runnells estate, lot 111, block 

Y, $30.00 
E. 0. Dearborn and S. B. Kellock, lot 

10, block Y, 64.80 
Mrs. Allie E. Lowell, lot 621/2, north 

half, block M, 15.00 
P. J. Parmenter and T. J. ]\Iorrison, 

lot 117, block W, 86.40 

Joseph S. Otis, lot 60, block Z, 104.00 
Fred Sargent, lots 63, 70, 71, including 

walks between block AA, 369.00 

Grace Ball estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Sabina Watts estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Minnie 0. Wight estate, burial, 4.00 

Lyman B. Runnells estate, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Mary A. Pillsbury estate, burial, 6.00 

S. B. Kellock (infant), burial, 1.00 

Mrs. Stella H. Webster estate, burial, 11.00 

Mrs. Lydia A. Moore estate, burial, 4.00 

T. Kerley, repairs, 5.00 

Glen Reynolds, repairs, 1.50 

Mrs. Hattie Belrose, repairs, 2.00 

Hutchings & Sons, repairs, 1.50 

W. A. Marshall, care, 5.00 

Mrs. .Mary Clement, care, 1.50 

Arthur Austin, ^eare, 2.00 

John Burroughs, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Melvina Batchelder estate, burial, 4.00 

E. S. Tenney, lot 120, series AA, 108.00 

Margaret Quaid estate, burial, 5.00 

A. Hammar (child), grave and burial, 7.00 

Richard Blodgett estate, burial, 4.00 
Elizabeth Ashland estate, grave and 

burial, 8.00 

Frederick Boardman estate, burial, 6.00 

Charles H. Thorne estate, burial, 4.00 

Mabelle F. Parmenter estate, burial, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



451 



Grace Kidder estate, burial, $6.00 

Ijaura A. Nims estate, burial, 3.00 

City of Concord — G. B. Farley, burial, 3.00 

Mrs. Charles F. Swain estate, burial, 5.00 

Violette Mace estate, burial, 4.00 

Angier (infant), burial, .50 

Esther Hutchings estate, burial, 4.00 

Sam Martin estate, burial, 3.00 

Guiseppi Macera, burial, 3.00 

Ellen E. Cronin estate, burial, 4.00 

John A. Morris estate, grave and burial, 8.00 

Lillian Vogler estate, burial, 5.00 

Henry Calvert estate, burial, 4.00 

Geo. B. Stratton estate, burial, 11.00 
Herbert Morehouse estate, grave and 

burial, 8.00 

David Neal estate, burial, 6.00 

N. Williams estate, removal, 3.00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 18.50 

John S. Mitchell, foundation, 5.00 

T. Dunstane, labor, 1.00 

David L. Neal estate, repairs, 5.00 

Frank J. Bean, repairs, 4.00 

Mrs. P. F. Stevens, repairs, 15.00 

John Brooks, care, 2.00 

Amos Blanchard, care, 3.00 

Mrs. P. F. Stevens, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Pendergast, care, 1.00 
Alfred J. McClure, lot 99, north half, 

block P, 38.80 
Emma S. Upton, lot 153, south half, 

block W, 60.75 

Charles S. Conant, lot 9, block AA, 72.00 

Edward M. Proctor, lot 17, block AA, 72.00 

W. R. Worth heirs, lot 77, block Y, 30.00 

Mrs. Lilla W. Morrill estate, burial, 11.00 

Orin Pearl estate, burial, 5.00 



452 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Miss Mora Quaye estate, grave and 
' . , $8.00 

burial, 

Alfred J. McClnre (infant), burial, 2.00 

Edson Upton estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Clara M. Eldridge estate, burial, 6.00 

Elizabeth A. Sanborn estate, burial, 4.00 

E. P. Brooks estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Hannah Carr estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. H. J. Moore estate, burial, 4.00 

Miss Helen Robinson estate, burial, 7.00 

Miss Carolyn Martin estate, burial, 2.50 

Elmer Winn estate, burial, ^-^^ 

Lorain Davis estate, burial, 4.00 

Mary E. Fellows estate, burial, 4.00 

Ernest Barber estate, burial, 3.00 

Fred Baker estate, burial, 3.00 

George C. Morrill estate (infant), 

burial, 

George Lyna estate, burial, 

George Roby estate, burial, 

W. I. Johnson estate, burial, 4.00 

Mr. Waight (infant), burial, -^^ 

Mrs. Elizabeth Tandy estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Adelaide IMcDonald estate, burial, 3.00 

Rev. Mr. Smith, use of tomb, l-O^ 

A. D. Ashley, care, 

J. W. George, care. 

Miss Lucy Poore, care, 

Miss Addie Straw, care, 

H. J. Crippen estate, care, 

Mrs. H. J. Dearborn, care, 

John Evans, foundation, 14.50 

Cummings Bros., foundation, ^-^^ 

G. A. Wasto, repairs, 

Mrs. Geo. 0. Robinson, repairs, 

Mrs. E. E. Allen, repairs. 

Woman's Relief Corps, care, 



.50 
4.00 
4.00 



1.00 
2.00 
3.00 
2.50 
9.00 
4.50 



5.00 
8.00 
2.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 453 

N. J. Rogers, care, .$1.00 

James McLaughlin, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Jennie C. Briinell estate, burial, 6.00 

Brinton J. Cate estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Mary A. Batchelder estate, burial, 4.00 

W. R. Worth estate, burial, 3.00 

George A. Foster estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Ida Ballou estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Ida B. Mclntire estate, burial, 4.00 

"W. J. Bishop (infant), burial, .50 

Miss Blanche M. Bliss, repairs, 6.00 

Mrs. Mary Prowse, repairs, 2.00 

John T. Prowse, repairs, 2.50 

Charles F. Bunker, repairs, 9.50 

Fred Brooks, repairs, 3.00 

Mrs. Carrie D. Porter, repairs, 2.50 

James McLaughlin, repairs, • 8.00 

O. L. Hazelton, foundation, 7.50 

Perry Brothers, foundation, 18.00 

Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 24.25 

Fisher Brothers, junk, 4.50 

John Q. Woods estate, burial, 5.00 

Horace Thompson estate, burial, 4.00 

George M. Eaton estate, burial, 3.00 

Miss Ella U. Sherburne, repairs, 5.00 

Mrs. Jessie G. Killeen, care, 5.00 
New Hampshire State Hospital, plot 2, 

northwest corner, 550.00 

H. T. Gilmore estate, lot 102, block Y, 25.00 

Lewis C. Randall, lot 44, block Y, 40.00 
Ariadne A. Eastman estate, lot 19, block 

Y, 35.00 
U. C, S. C, H. J., and Mrs. A. C. Clark, 

lot 81, block Y, 30.00 
William H. Sawyer, lot 37, block Z, 104.00 
George S. Little, lot 30, block Z, 120.00 

George S. Little, lot 43. block Z, 96.00 



454 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ida Rand estate, burial, .^4.00 

Lewis C. Eandall (infant), burial, 2.50 

Herbert T. Gilmore estate, burial, 3.00 

Ariadne A. Eastman estate, burial, 4.00 

Almira L. Woodward estate, burial, 4.00 
Alfred Cotton (infant), grave and 

burial, 5.50 

W. H. Clark estate, burial, 3.00 

Hannah M. Haley estate, burial, 6.00 

Clara A. C. Davis estate, burial, 4.00 

Julia Lamb estate, burial, 3.00 

C. H. Martin estate, burial, 4.00 

George P. Gale estate, burial, 4.00 

B. 0. Pillsbury (infant), burial, 1.50 
Mrs. H. Mclntire, repairs, 5.00 
H. L. Smith, care, 2.00 
Harry Barrett, care, 2.50 
L. H. Lane, care, 2.00 
Mrs. Georgia Morgan, repairs, 10.00 
Mrs. H. Mclntire, care, 1.50 
Katherine P. DuBois, lot 20, block Y, 35.00 
Edith D. Jackson, administratrix, lot 

107, block Y, 30.00 

Harley B. Roby estate, lot 36, block Z, 96.00 
W. G. Elliott, lot 160, south half, block 

W, 63.00 

E. M. Shannon, lot 155, block W, 121.50 

Jennie M. Webster, lot 123, block P, 99.00 
H. L. Clough and E. B. Osgood, lot 146, 

block V, 210.00 

Herman W. Clay, repairs, 8.00 

C. A. Bailey, foundation, 2.00 
Edward L. Hill estate, burial, 6.00 
Harry ]Mooney estate, burial, 15.00 
Mrs. Hattie Rice estate, burial, 5.00 
Brunt (infant), burial, .50 
Lucia (infant), burial, .50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 455 

Price (infant), burial, $0.50 

Mrs. Josephine E. Conant estate, burial, 12.00 

Horace Ingalls estate, burial, 4.00 

Howard M. Cook estate, burial, 4.00 

Kingsbury Jackson estate, burial, 4.00 

Harley B. Roby estate, burial, 13.00 

James Lewis estate, burial, 3.00 

William Martin estate, burial, 3.00 

Mary J. Leavitt estate, burial, 3.00 

James Barney estate, burial, 3.00 

James Conley estate, burial, 3.00 

George S. IMilton estate, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. Sarah A. Shannon estate, burial, 4.00 

Samuel S. French estate, burial, 4.00 
Fidelity Lodge of Rebekahs, regrad- 

ing, 112.00 

Ezra B. Crapo estate, burial, ashes, 2.00 

John H. Albin estate, burial, 11.00 

Elizabeth E. Chase, burial, 5.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 14.00 

Cummings Brothers, repairs, 10.00 

Mrs. Arthur D. Fosgate, repairs, 10.00 

Isaac F. Mooney, lot 52, block Z, 195.00 
Alvin B. and Charles H. AVright, lot 

71, block Z, 84.60 

Clarence F. Eldredge, lot 110, block Y, 30.00 

Frances E. Johnson, lot 61, block AA, 72.00 

Albert E. Bodwell, lot 70, block R, 48.60 

R. E. Kimball, care, 4.00 

Mrs. J. G. Merrill, care, 3.00 

Mrs. E. H. Brann, repairs, 6.00 

A. B. Batchelder, care, 3.00 

Mrs. Mary J. French, repairs, 4.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 12.00 

Cummings Brothers, repairs, 10.00 

Mrs. Laura A. Harwood estate, burial, 4.00 

Flint Granite Co., foundation, 8.00 



456 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Emma F. Ingalls, repairs, $7.00 

E. E. Chase, care, 2.00 
Miss H. A. Forrest, care, 1.00 
Miss Sarah A. Noyes estate, burial, 10.00 
Harry M. Cavis estate, burial, 10.00 
Mrs. Martha Sinnotte estate, burial, 5.00 
Alexander Webster estate, burial, 11.00 
William Powell estate, burial, 8.00 
Paul Wentworth estate, burial, 5.00 
R. P. Stevens, foundation, 7.00 
Mrs. E. B. Crapo, repairs, 1.90 
Charles Johnson estate, burial, 4.00 
David H. Hall estate, burial, 6.00 
George F. Smith estate, burial, 4.00 
John Swenson Granite Co., foundation, 20.63 
Abbie B. Peavey estate, reburial, 3.00 
Mrs. Sarah Spargo, repairs, 6.00 
George F. Smith estate, care, 2.00 
Loren A. Sanders, lot 119, west half, 

block V, 100.00 

Dr. R. M. Weeks, lot 128, block AA, 117.00 

Mrs. George Makepeace, care, 1.00 

Mrs. J. E. Tandy, reburial, 2.00 

Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Nathaniel White, care, 25.00 

J. H. Gallinger, care, 3.00 

J. B. Hussey, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Susan L. Clough, care, 3.50 

William K. McFarland, care, 3.00 

George H. Russ, care, 3.00 

William M. Chase, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Mary P. Woodworth, care, 3.00 

J. F. Webster, care, 9.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 6.00 

F. D. Abbott, care, 1.00 
Mrs. Eliza Lang estate, care, 1.00 
Mrs. Eliza Lang estate, burial, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 457 

Mrs. James ^linot, care, $1.50 
H. Burleigh estate, care, 1.50 
Mrs. A. S. Marshall, care, 2.00 
Fred Cillev, care, 1.50 
E. M. Willis, care, 3.50 
George M. Kimball, care, 5.00 
C. W. Bradlee, care, 1.50 
H. Thompson estate, care, 1.00 
Miss A. L. Merrill, care, 5.00 
Edson J. Hill, care, 8.00 
N. J. Millette, care, 1.00 
August ]\Iatson (child), burial, 2.00 
A. G. McAlpine & Co., foundation, 3^.00 
E. B. Hutchinson estate, care, 8.40 
I. A. Watson, care, 2.00 
Mrs. L. F. Lund, care, 5.00 
0. B. Douglas, care, 3.00 
Mrs. H. B. Day, care, 3.00 
Miss Ann Kimball, care, 1.00 
S. A. Carter, care, 4.00 
William W. Flint, care, 1.50 
Mrs. M. E. Chase, care, 1.00 
C. W. Lane, care, 1.50 
Mrs. George E. Todd, care, 2.00 
0. L. Hazelton, foundation, 22.50 
John Swenson Granite Co., founda- 
tion, 77.00 
C. P. Bancroft, care, 2.00 
E. H. Schultz, care, 6.00 
W. E. Hunt, care, 7.00 
G. L. Stratton, care, 2.00 
Mrs. J. H. Chase, care, 4.00 
Sarah J. Brown, care, 2.00 
Bernard Brown estate, burial, 4.00 
J. B. Palmer, care, 2.00 
E. S. Tenney, foundation, 36.25 
0. L. Hazelton, foundation, 15.50 



458 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. G. Cummings estate, care, $2.00 
Harry P. Hammond, care, 3.00 
Mrs. F. P. Virgin, care, 2.00 
H. J. Griffin estate, burial, 3.00 
0. L. Hazelton, repairs, 2.00 
P. H. Watson (infants), burial, 2.00 
Miss Maria Woods, care, 6.00 
Mrs. Lucy H. Dwight estate, burial, -1.00 
J. E. Dwight, care, 1.50 
G. B. Lauder, care, 2.00 
Mrs. W. A. Thompson, care, 1.50 
J. F. Wilson, care, 1.00 
Mrs. Lucretia Crapo estate, burial, 4.00 
Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 15.10 
Joseph A. Moore estate, burial, 11.00 
S. A. Taylor, lot 95, block K, 229.94 
Albert H. and Parker H. Watson, lot 

163, block W, 101.25 

L. J. Rundlett, lot 10, block AA, 72.00 
Loren A. Sanders, lot 119, east half, 

block V, 100.00 

Robert W. Upton, lot 107, block P, 93.00 
Estate of James B. Tennant, lot 19, 

block Z, 96.00 

IVIrs. Joseph C. Lacasse, lot 56, block Y, 25.00 
John Swenson, lots 39 and 40 and walk 

between, block Z, 216.00 

Carrie C. Rundlett estate, burial, 6.00 

Mrs. S. F. Morrill, care, 2.00 

W. P. Fiske estate, care, 2.50 

Fred W. Boardman, care, 1.50 

F. S. Streeter, care, 1.50 
A. P. Carpenter estate, care, 1.50 
H. A. Rowell, care, 1.50 
J. E. Hobson, care, 5.00 
C. W, Lynam, care, 1.00 
Walter Jenks, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 459- 

Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care, $1.00 

Mrs. George W. Crockett, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Mary F. Hoit, care, 1.50 

"Warren Emerson, care, 2.50 

George Huntley, care, 1.50 

Mrs. N. A. Dunklee, care, 2.50 

W. A. Chesley, care, 1.50 

D. C. Parker, care, 1.50 

J. E. H. Davis, care, 1.50 

C. N. Hall, care, 1.00 
W. F. Gay, care, 1.00 
Mrs. H. Webster, care, 1.00 
Alvah Sprague, care, 1.00 
Warren Emerson, repairs, 15.00 
John W. Ford, care, 3.50 
Mrs. J. 0. Lyford, care, 7.00 
Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 2.00 
Mrs. H. G. Sargent, care, 2.00 
]\Irs. Annie L. Walker, care, 1.50 
James B. Tennant, burial, 5.00 
Helen Upton, burial, 2.00 
Mrs. H. L. Sanders, repairs, 5.00 
Isaac Hill, care, 3.00 
Mrs. E. N. Spencer, care, 1.50 
Mrs. George Osgood, care, 1.50 

D. G. Lowell, care, 1.00 
Mrs. H. C. Sturtevant, care, 1.50 
H. N. Shattuck estate, care, 1.50 
George Buswell, care, 1.50 
F. A. Stillings, care, 3.00 
George Connell, care, 2.00 
Fred N. Ladd, care, 3.00 
Mrs. Ferault, care, 1.00 
Mrs. A. F. Holt, care, 2.00 
D. D. Taylor, care, 4.00 
Charlotte Merrill, care, 2.00 
W. F. Thayer, care, 4.00 



460 CITY OF CONCORD. 

F. E. Colburn, care, $1.50 

E. George, care, 1.00 
Ben Dodge, care, 2.00 
R. F. Robinson, care, 1.50 
George ' Marston estate, care, 2.50 
Diinlap and Jeffers, care, 4.00 
C. R. Dame, care, 1.50 
Horace Chaplin, care, 1.00 
Maria F. Kelley estate,, burial, 4.00 
John Runals, repairs, 8.00 
Cummings Brothers, foundation, 7.50 
George Lincoln, care, 1.00 
C. P. Tucker, care, 1.50 
0. L. Hazelton, foundation, 2.00 
Mrs. Luella B. H. Weeks estate, burial, 11.00 
J. C. Lacasse estate, burial, 5.00 
Mrs. Ellen Swenson estate, burial, 11.00 
John Swenson, reburial of daughter, 13.00 
Mrs. Frances W. Richardson estate, 

burial, 4.00 

Horace Sanders (infant), burial, .50 

Mrs. Caroline Lovejoy estate, burial, 11.00 

George Ambrose estate, burial, 10.00 

F. B. D. Strong estate, burial, 4.00 
Albert J. Wilkins estate, burial, 3.00 
Frank W. Grafton estate, burial, 12.00 
Iva G. Beck estate, burial, 11.00 
Jane Wells estate, burial, 4.00 
William Reynolds estate, burial, 4.00 
John Swenson & Co., foundation, 1.25 
Fred Johnson, care, 2.00 
J. Cochran, care, 1.00 
C. F. Osgood, care, 1.50 
B. Bilsborough, care, 1.00 
S. R. Dole, care, 2.00 
W. J. Green, care, 2.00 
Mrs. Hunt estate, burial, 5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



461 



Mrs. Etta Dunham estate, burial, $3.00 

Mrs. Mary J. Bullock estate, burial, 4.00 

Albert Sandgren estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Ruth Carter estate, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. Sarah M. Ayers, burial, 4.00 

Nat Anderson estate, burial, 3.00 
L. A. Lane & Co. (unknown man), 

burial, 3.00 

E. F. Page estate, burial, 4.00 

Annie S. Kellom estate, burial, 4.00 

Sarah A. Barnard estate, burial, 11.00 

David Hazelton estate, reburial, 12.00 

Rev. Mr. Smith estate, use of tomb, 1.00 

L. H. Carroll, care, 2.00 
Mary A. Smith estate, lot 122, block W, 83.70 

George W. Abbott, trust, 7.00 

Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 1.75 

Fidelia Adams, trust, 2.50 

Sarah J. Adams, trust, 7.00 

Sarah M. K. Adams, trust, 31.00 

Allen-Smith-Dimond, trust, 4.50 

Frederick Allison, trust, 3.50 

Mary B. Allison, trust, 1.75 

Lavinia Arlin, trust, 1.75 

Sarah Ash, trust, 1.75 

Alonzo Atherton, trust, 3.50 

Thomas Avery, trust, 3.50 

Lizzie Knight Badger, trust, 3.50 

Abbie L. S. Bailey, trust, 3.50 

Oliver Ballon, trust, 1.75 

Charles Barker, trust, 3.50 

George W. Barnes, trust, 1.75 

James W. Barton trust, 3.50 

Mary A. Bass, trust, 1.75 

Robert Bell, trust, 2.00 

Matilda Benson, trust, 2.00 

Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 3.00 



462 CITY OF CONCORD. 

James D. Blaisdell, trust, $3.50 

James M. Blake, trust, 7.00 

William Blakeley, trust, 4.00 

Emily Blanchard, trust, 9.00 

Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 7.00 

Annie L. Brown, trust, 3.50 

Charles L. Brown, trust, 7.00 

Mary N. P. Buntin, trust, 11.00 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 1.75 

Harriet W. Butters, trust, 3.50 

Andrew Bunker, trust, 2.50 

Mary A. Burnham, trust, 2.00 

Frank A. Burnham, trust, 1.50 

Charles S. Boardman, trust, 3.00 

Harry M. Cavis, trust, 3.00 

Benj. F. Caldwell, trust, 9.00 

Levi Call, trust, 4.00 

Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 3.26 

Hiram Carter, trust, 2.50 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 4.00 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 2.00 

A. P. and K. P. Chesley, trust, 3.50 

Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 5.00 

Caroline Clarke, trust, 4.00 

Fannie Clark, trust, 2.50 

Rufus Clement, trust, 4.50 

William W. Cloud, trust, 7.50 

S. L. Cloutman, trust, 1.50 

Frederick Clough, trust, 3.50 

George Clough, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 1.75 

Weston Cofran, trust, 7.00 

Amos L. Colburn, trust, 1.75 

Sarah T. Colby, trust, 3.50 

Charles A. Cooke, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Josiali Cooper, trust, 2.50 

Mary Crow, trust, 8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 463 

Charles H. Ciimmings, trust, $35.00 

Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 8.00 

Silas Curtis, trust, 1.75 

Charles C. Danforth, trust, 5.50 

Charles S. Dauforth, trust, 2.00 

Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 2.00 

Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 3.00 

Edward Dow, trust, 3.50 

Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 7.00 

Emma J. Dearborn, trust, 3.00 

Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 1.50 

W. B. Durgin, trust, 7.00 

J. B. Dyer, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 3.50 

Stephen B. Eaton, trust, 4.50 

Clara Edgerly, trust, 3.50 

Georgiana P. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Ella M. Elliott, trust, 1.75 

Elizabeth Emerson, trust, 4.50 

George H. Emery, trust, 3.50 

David E. Everett, trust, 2.75 

Lydia F. Edgerly, trust, 3.50 

Lydia A. Farley, trust, 3.50 

Mary M. Farnum, trust, 3.50 

Alva C. Ferrin, trust, 4.00 

Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, " 1.75 

J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust, 1.75 

Mr. and ]\Irs. H. A. Flanders, trust, 3.50 

George G. Fogg, trust, 15.50 

Alice T. Ford, trust, 7.00 

Jerome Ford, trust, 3.50 

Asa Fowler, trust, 17.50 

Mary A. Gage, trust, 7.00 

Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 1.93 

John D. Gale, trust, 7.00 

John Gear, trust, 4.00 

Sarah S. Gear, trust, 3.50 



4G4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Caroline L. George, trust, $17.50 

Enoch Gerrish, trust, 3.50 

Samuel K. Gill, trust, 4.00 

G. A. Glover-C. A. Osgood, trust, 1.75 

Loren W. Glysson, trust, 3.00 

Hannah A. and Fannie A. Goss, trust, 7.00 

George M. Greeley, trust, 28.50 

Jennie E. Green, trust, 2.00 

John B. Green, trust, 3.50 

William E. Green, trust, 5.00 

James T. Gordon, trust, 1.50 

Betsey Hadley, trust, 3.50 

George M. Harding, trust, 1.75 

Mary D. Hart, trust, 12.00 

Timothy Haynes, trust, 4.00 

Charles F. Hildreth, trust, 3.50 

Emma J. Hill, trust, 1.75 

John M. Hill, trust, 7.00 

Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 1.75 

Frank J. Hoit, trust, 19.00 

Harriet F. Holman, trust, 5.00 

Elizabeth F. Holt, trust, 3.50 

Hoyt and Stetson, trust, 4.00 

George M. Hutton, trust, 1.75 

Sarah Irish, trust, 10.25 

Henry Ivey, trust, 1.75 

E. 0. Jameson, trust, 5.00 

Herman Jewell, trust, 1.75 
Julia A. Jones, trust, ^ 4.00 

John F. Jones, trust, 4.00 

John and Benj. A. Kimball, trust, 7.00 

Ellen B. Kittredge, trust, 1.75 

E. L. Knowlton, trust, 51.00 

William Ladd, trust, 2.75 

Lydia A. Lane, trust, 4.00 

Leete and Newman, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 6.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



465 



Lincoln and Forrester, trust, $3.00 

J. L. Lincoln, tru&t, 1.75 

J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 7.00 

William I. Lovely, trust, 3.00 

John McCauley, trust, 4.00 

Henry McFarland, trust, 7.00 

E. and G. McQuesten, trust, 4.00 

James McQuesten, trust, 8.00 

Martin and Brown, trust, 3.50 

Jennie P. Martin, trust, 4.00 

H. W. and H. 0. Matthews, trust, 5.00 

Henry A. Mann, trust, 6.00 

P. E. Mason, trust, 2.50 

Charles S. Mellen, trust, 10.50 

Horace Merrill, trust, 2.00 

J. B. Merrill, trust, 4.00 

S. F. Merrill, trust, 4.00 

Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 4.50 

Sullivan G. Mills, trust, 11.25 

Charles Moody, trust, 4.00 

G. H. Moore, trust, 4.50 

C. B. and Abbie M. Moseley, trust, 7.00 

Mary J. Moses, trust, 4.50 

Caroline B. Murdock, trust, 3.50 

David E. Miller, trust, 4.00 

Morgan and Colby, trust, 5.50 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 11.00 

E. S. Nutter, trust, 3.50 

David L. Neal, trust, 3.00 

Eugene A. Ordway, trust, 2.50 

Ordway and Sedgerly, trust, 7.00 

Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 3.50 

George B. Packer, trust, 4.00 

George F. Page, trust, 2.00 

M. W. and Mary A. Page, trust, 1.75 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 3.50 



466 CITY OF CONCORD. 

John B. Palmer, trust, $2.00 

William H. Palmer, trust, 1.75 

Felicite Pengault, trust, 3.50 

Hamilton Perkins, trust, 10.50 

Mary N. Perley, trust, 12.00 

Isabella Perry, trust, 2.00 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 4.00 

Irving L. Pickering, trust, 8.75 

Ella A. Pickering, trust, 7.00 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 3.50 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 2.75 

Edwin F. Plummer, trust, 1.75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 3.50 

Hattie J. W. Peters, trusf, 3.00 

D. 0. Rand and N. V. Libby, trust, 1.75 
James E. Rand, trust, 1.75 
Henry W. Ranlett, trust, 5.00 
George L. Reed, trust, 4.00 
Judith A. Richardson, trust, 4.00 
Mrs. James H. Rigney, trust, 2.00 
Francis K. Roberts, trust, 7.00 
Moses F. Rogers, trust, 4.00 

E. H. Rollins, trust, 23.00 
David D. Rowe, trust, 1.75 
James H. Rowell, trust, 7.00 
Moses W. Russell, trust, 14.00 
Mrs. I. S. R. Sanborn, trust, 1.75 
Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 3.50 
Frank A. Sargent, trust, 5.00 
John B. Sargent, trust, 4.00 
Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 9.00 
Edward Sawyer, trust, 4.00 
Shackford and Dame, trust, 3.50 
Mary W. Smith, trust, 10.50 
Moses B. Smith, trust, 1.75 
William Smith, trust, 1.75 
Horace R. Southmaid, trust, " 2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 467 

Hiram Stanyan, trust, $3.50 

Julia F. Stark, trust, 3.50 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 8.00 

Mary L. Stevenson, trust, 1.75 

Charles F. Stewart, trust, 2.00 

J. M. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 12.75 

John W. Straw, trust, 2.00 

Mary J. Streeter, trust, . 3.50 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 4.00 

Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., trust, 7.00 

Leland A. Smith, trust, 7.00 

G. H. Seavey, trust, 3.50 

Charles L. Tappan, trust, 2.75 

Hiram B. Tebbitts, trust, 12.00 

John H. Teel, trust, 2.00 

John S. Thompson, trust, 3.50 

John C. Thorne, trust, 5.00 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 1.75 

J. L. Tilton and A. B. Loeke, trust, 1.75 

John H. Toof, trust, 4.00 

Jane R. Twombly, trust, 3.50 

S. D. Trussell, trust, 1.75 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 7.00 

Charles P. Virgin, trust, 1.50 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 3.50 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 6.50 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 2.50 

Pauline E. Wells, trust, 1.75 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 2.00 

George F. Whittredge, trust, 4.00 

Sarah A. Williams, trust, 4.00 

Robert Woodruff, trust, 12.00 
Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, . 3.50 

Mary L. Williams, trust, 1.75 

E. W. Woodward, trust, 4.00 

B. F. and F. S. Watson, trust, 2.00 

E. A. Wason, trust, 2.50 



468 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary E. West, trust, .^9.00 

Georgianna M. F. Wood, trust, 3.50 

William Yeaton, trust, 2.50 

Seth K. Jones, trust, 12.00 



$8,098.31 



Credits. 

1915. 
December. One-half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $2,375.28 
Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, 1,241.19 
Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 4,481.84 



$8,098.31 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds 
are added to the annual appropriation. Ihe amounts expended on trust funds 
are paid on a special order from the mayor, from the income of individual 
deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclu- 
sively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

George N. Robinson estate, burial, $4.00 

Mrs. Wm. W. Taylor estate, burial, 4.00 

Albert Steavens estate, burial, 3.00 

George N. Robinson estate, repairs, 6.00 

Georgia B. Sanger estate, burial, 5.00 

Thomas W. Stewart estate, burial, 7.00 

John H. Stewart estate, burials, 8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



469 



Louis Tebeaii, care, v$2.00 

Charles P. Ordway estate, burial, 3.00 

Elvira Savory estate, burial, 6.00 

Helen F. Liucoln, repairs, 3.00 

H. C. Blakeley, care, 2.50 

B. F. Hardy, care, 4.50 

Harry C. Taylor, repairs, 5.00 

Thomas W. Thompson, re-grading, 15.00 

Mrs. Ann G. Merrill estate, care, 2.00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 5.00 

H. J. Alexander, care, 3.00 

H. Thompson estate, care, 1.00 

L. A. Woodbury, repairs, 8.00 

Maria D. Locke estate, burial, 11.00 

Mrs. W. A. Thompson, repairs, 3.50 

Minot Cemetery Association, care, 102.50 

Mrs. F. Clifford, repairs, 2.50 

Mrs. Mary A. Nutting estate, burial, 11.00 

William Abbott, trust, 10.50 

Clara Abbott, trust, 1.75 

Samuel Alexander, trust, 4.00 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, . 3.50 

Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, 7.00 

Richard Bradley, trust, 3.50 

John F. Chaffin, trust, 1.75 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 6.00 

Seth Eastman, trust, 5.00 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Samuel Evans, trust, 4.00 

Miles Farmer, trust, 3.50 

Hosea Fessenden, trust, 3.50 

John Flanders, trust, 1.75 

Lucia A. Flanders, trust, 3.50 

Theodore French, trust, 3.50 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 1.75 

Mitchell Gilmore, trust, 3.50 

Clara V. Stevens Glidden, trust, 2.50 



470 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Moses Gerould, trust, $1.75 

Pamela L. Hall, trust, 1.00 

Frank S. Ilarraden, trust, 3.50 

Louisa L. Hoyt, trust, 12.50 

William H. Horner, trust, 3.50 

William T. Locke, trust, ' 4.00 

Asa McFarland, trust, 4.00 

Mary Ann Morrill, trust, 3.00 

Mary E. Morrill; trust, 9.00 

S. and D. L. Morrill, trust, 5.50 

Ida Moore, trust, 1.50 

Isaac H. Ordway, trust, 7.00 

True Osgood, trust, 9.75 
W. B. Palmer and S. B. Savory, trust, 3.50 

Alice Parker, trust, 4.00 

Asa Parker, trust, 2.00 

Samuel G. Parker, trust, 2.00 

Pearson, White and Savory, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust, 11.00 

Henry J. Ehodes, trust, 1.75 

Hiram Richardson, trust, 17.50 

Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 7.00 

Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 2.00 

Joseph Stickne}', trust, 17.50 

Nathan Stickney, trust, 1.75 

Abigail Sweetser, trust, 7.00 

Mrs. J. M. Tilton, trust, 2.00 

Sarah M. Wadleigh, trust, 9.00 

Timothy and A. B. Walker, trust, S.OO 

Albert Webster, trust, 10.50 

Paul Wentworth, trust, 9.00 

Harriet Wheeler, trust, 3.50 

Charlotte Woolson, trust, 3.50 

Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust, 4.00 



$497.50 



treasury department. 471 

Credits. 
1915. 
December. Income from sundry trust 
funds as charged to this 
account transferred to 
City of Concord general 
account, $270.00 

Transferred to City of 

Concord general account, 227.50 

$497.50 



MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of 
permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts 
expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the 
income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income 
being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

L. S. Parmenter, treasurer, balance 

sale of lots, 1914, $46.22 

James Bradford, trust, 1.50 

Stephen Carleton, trust, 2.50 

Augustine C. Carter, trust, 2.00 

Richard Emery, trust, 2.00 

Asa L. Gay, trust, 3.50 

Marshall P. Hall, trust, 1.25 

George Partridge, trust, 3.00 

Ira Rowell, trust, 2.00 

Mary A. Rowell, trust, 2.50 

Caleb M. Holden, trust, ' 1.25 

Hazen E. Abbott, trust, 2.25 
George R. Parmenter, receipts Maple 

Grove Cemetery, 1915, 41.00 

$110.97 



472 city of concord. 

Credits. 

1915. 
December. One-half sale lots added to 

permanent fund, $23.11 

Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to City 
of Concord general ac- 
count, 23.75 
Transferred to City of 

Concord general account, 64.11 



$110.97 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income 
of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The 
amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayo^r 
from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, 
said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each 
trust. 

Receipts. 

Scott French, superintendent, sale of 

lot No. 3, block M, Willis L. Bailey, $5.00 

Scott French, lots 25 and 27, block N, 10.00 

Ruth K. Abbott, trust, " 8.60 

Elizabeth A. Batchelder, trust, 2.25 

Orlando W. Coon, trust, 3.25 

Daniel E. Gale, trust, '4.00 

George Graham, trust, 3.50 

Crosby K. Haines, trust, 2.50 

Jacob Hoyt, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Samuel Hutchins, trust, 4.25 

Lmcilla Pierce Kelley, trust, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 473 

Addie J. P. Kimball, trust, $8.00 

Joseph S. Kimball, trust, 4.00 

B. L. Larkin, trust, 2.00 

Augusta A. Locke, trust, 2.75 

Josiah S. Locke, trust, 2.00 

Reuben B. Locke, trust, 3.50 

Burleigh A. Mardeu, trust, 1.75 

John H. Maynard, trust, 4.25 

William Page, trust, 1.00 
Frank P. Potter and Lydia P. Perry, 

trust, ' 8.00 

Isora H. Ring, trust, 1.75 

Charles D. Rowell, trust, 4.50 

John B. Sanborn, trust, 8.00 

Harriet B. Sanders, trust, 2.00 

G. M. and F. E. Tallant, trust, 3.50 ' 

Harriet N. Tenney, trust, 5.00 

Aaron B. Young, trust, 3.50 

$116.35 



Credits. 

1915. 

December. One-half sale lots added to 

permanent fund, $7,50 

Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to 
City of Concord general 
account, 101.35 

Transferred to City of 

Concord general account, 7.50 



$116.35 



474 CITY OF CONCORD, 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of 
permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts 
expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the 
income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income 
being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

J. N. Abbott, treasurer, balance Jan- 
uary 1, 1915, $8.24 
J. N. Abbott, treasurer, income trust 

funds, 56.00 

Eddie M. Sornberger, lot 115, 15.00 

Daniel H. Rice, lot 140, 15.00 

Abby Ann" Merrill estate, lot 50, 5.00 

Isaac N. Abbott, trust, 3.50 

John Corliss, trust, 3.50 

Annie G. Eaton, trust, 1.75 

C. E. H. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Charles Fisk, trust, 3.50 

Oliver P. Fowler, trust, 3.50 

Julia F. Frye, trust, 1.75 

Clara V. Stevens Glidden, trust, 1.75 

Moses Hall, trust, 7.00 

Dr. Robert Hall, trust, 4.00 

John MeC. Hammond, trust, 1.75 

Ann A. Hazeltine, trust, 3.50 

Augiista A. Hazeltine, trust, 3.50 

Charles H. Merrill, trust, 1.75 

Andrew S. Smith, trust, 3.50 

Cynthia A. Weeks, trust, 3.50 

$150.49 



treasury department. 475 

Credits. 

1915. 
December. One-half sale lots added to 

permanent fund, $17.50 

Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to City 
of Concord general ac- 
count, 51.25 
Transferred to City of 

Concord general account, 81.74 

$150.49 



OLD FORT CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 
Receipts. 

Abigail W. Lang, trust, $4.50 

Nelson Tenney, trust, 2.00 

A. L. Williams, trust, 4.50 



$11.00 



Credits. 



1915. 
December. Income sundry trust funds 
as cliarged to this ac- 
count transferred to City 
of Concord general ac- 
count, $11.00 



476 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 







Municipal. 




Bonds. 


Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


City Hall Bui 


Iding, Sept. 1, 1916, 31/0, 


$8,000 






Sept. 1, 1918, 31/2, 


8,000 






Sept. 1, 1919, 314 


8,000 






Sept. 1, 1920, 3yo, 


8,000 






' , Sept. 1, 1921, 31/0, 


. 7,000 






' ' Sept. 1, 1922. 31/2, 


7,000 






Sept. 1, 1923, 31/2, 


5,000 






July 1, 1924, 31/2, 


10,000 






July 1, 1925, 31/2, 


10,000 






July 1, 1926, 31/2, 


10,000 






July 1, 1927, 31/2, 


10,000 






July 1, 1928, 31/2. 


10,000 






July 1, 1929, 3y2, 


5,000 


Public Park, 


Dec. 1, 1931, 4, 


10000 


i i i i 


Dec. 1, 1933, 4, 


5,000 


Bridge, 


June 1, 1916, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1917, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1918, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1919, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1920, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1921, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1922, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1923, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1924, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1925, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1926, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1927, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1928, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1929, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1930, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1931, 4, 


4,000 






June 1, 1932, 4, 


4,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



4.77 



Bonds. 



Bridge, 



Due. 



Rate. Amount. 



June 1, 1933, 4, 
June 1, 1934, 4, 
June 1, 1935, 4, 



Precinct. 



$4,000 

4,000 

10,000 



$207,000 



Bonds. 



Sewer, 



Due. Rate. Amount. 

July 1, 1917, 31/2, $25,000 



Boi 



Union School District, 



May 


1 


, 1928 


, 31/2, 


25,000 


Dec. 


1 


, 1930 


, 4, 


5,000 


Dec. 


1 


, 1932 


, 4, 


10,000 


Dec. 


1 

D 


, 1934 

ue. 


, 4, 

Rate. 


10,000 




Amount. 


July 




1916 


31/2, 


$8,000 


May 




1917 


4, 


8,000 


July 




1918 


31/2, 


8,000 


July 




1919 


31/2, 


8,000 


May 




1920 


4, 


2,000 


July 




1920 


31/2, 


8,000 


May 




1921 


4, 


2,000 


July 




1921 


31/2, 


8,000 


May 




1922 


4, 


2,000 


July 




1922 


31/2, 


8,000 


July 




1923 


31/2, 


10,000 


May 




1924 


4, 


5,000 


July 




1924 


31/2, 


5,000 


May 




1925 


4, 


10,000 


July 




1925 


31/2, 


5,000 


May 




1926 


4, 


5,000 


July 




1926 


31/2, 


5,000 


July 




1927 


31/2, 


35,000 


May 




1928 


4, 


6,000 


July 




1928 


3y2, 


4.000 


July 




1929 


31/2, 


10,000 


July 


■^ 


1930 


^V2, 


10,000 



$75,000 



478 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. 



Due 



Rate. Amount. 



Union School District, July 1, 1931, 31/2, $9,000 

" May 1, 1932, 4, 10,000 

" May 1, 1933, 4, 10,000 

" May 1, 1934, 4, 10,000 



Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


School District No. 20, Sept. 


1, 1916, 314 


$500 




Sept. 


1, 1917, 31/0, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1918, 31/0, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1919, 31/0, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1920, 314, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1921, 31/2, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1922, 31/2, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1924, 3y5, 


4,300 


Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


West Concord Sewer 


Oct. 


1, 1916, 31/2, 


$500 


( ( i I ( < 


Oct. 


1, 1917, 31/2, 


500 


a ( ( a 


Oct. 


1, 1918, 31/0, 


500 


11 11 ( ( 


Oct. 


1, 1919, 31/2, 


300 


Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


Penacook Sewer, 


July 


1, 1916, 4, 


$500 


< < (I 


Oct. 


1, 1916, 3, 


500 


iC ti 


July 


1, 1917, 4, 


500 


CI li 


Oct. 


1, 1917, 3, 


500 


ii il 


July 


1, 1918, 4, 


500 


a a 


Oct. 


1, 1918, 3, 


500 


a a 


July 


1, 1919, 4, 


500 



$211,000 



$7,800 



$1,800 



$3,500 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city, ex- 
clusive of water department, $506,100 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



479 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 



Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1915, mu- 




nicipal, 


$311.50 


Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1915, pre- 




cinct, 


110.00 


Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1915, Union 




School District, 


160.00 


Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1915, West 




Concord sewer, 


17.50 


Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1915, Pena- 




cook sewer, 


20.00 


Due in 1915, municipal, 


6;310.00 


" " " precinct, sewer, 


2,750.00 


" " " Union School District, 


8,015.00 


" " " Penacook sewer. 


160.00 


" " " West Concord sewer, 


80.50 


" " " East Concord sewer, 


17.50 


" " " School District No. 20, 


290.50 


Cr. 




Municipal, paid, 


$6,311.50 


Precinct, sewer, paid, 


2,547.50 


Union School District, paid. 


7,975.00 


Penacook sewer, paid, 


147.50 


West Concord sewer, paid, 


98.00 


East Concord sewer, paid. 


17.50 


School District No. 20, paid. 


290.50 


Municipal due, not presented, 


310.00 


Precinct due, not presented, 


312.50 


Penacook sewer due, not presented. 


32.50 


Union School District due, not pre- 




sented, 


200.00 



$18,242.50 



$18,242.50 



480 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

Isaac Hill, Treasurer, in Account with Concord Water- 
Works. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1915, $18,240.28 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 78,940.06 



)7,180.34 



expenditures. 



Interest on bonds, 
Bonds paid. 
Orders paid, 
Cash on hand. 



$18,814.90 
20,000.00 
33,033.74 
25,331.70 



$97,180.34 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 



When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 


1, 1916, 


4, 


$9,000 


April 1, 1921, 


31/2, 


$5,000 


Jan. 


1, 1917, 


4, 


5,000 


Jan. 1, 1922, 


4, 


335,000 


Jan. 


1, 1918, 


4, 


10,000 


March 1,1922, 


314 


20,000 


Jan. 


1, 1919, 


4, 


10,000 


April 1, 1922, 


31/2, 


26,000 


Nov. 


1, 1920, 


3, 


4,000 


Jan. 1, 1923, 


31/2, 


15,000 


Nov. 


1, 1921, 


3, 


3,000 


Jan. 1, 1924, 


31/2, 


15,000 



$457,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 481 

state:\ient op coupon account of the 
water precinct. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1915, 

and not presented, $641.00 

coupons due, 1915, 18,364.30 

$19,005.30 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1915, $18,844.30 

coupons due and not presented, 161.00 

$19,005.30 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
account of Isaac Hill, city treasurer, for the year 1915, 
and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein 
properly recorded and authenticated by appropriate 
vouchers, and the several items correctly cast, and cash 
balance to be ten thousand, one hundred forty-nine dol- 
lars and forty cents ($10,149.40), and as treasurer of the 
city water department, cash balance to be twenty-five 
thousand, three hundred thirty-one dollars and seventy 
cents ($25,331.70). 

I have also verified the account of the trust and sinking 
funds of the city and find such trust and sinking funds 
invested, and the income thereof for the year 1915 ac- 
counted for, as shown by the book of the city treasurer 
kept for that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



31 



482 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR THE YEAR END- 
ING DECEMBER 31, 1915. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, City Poor, $2,000.00 

Kesolution No. 217, 285.27 ^ $3,485.27 

Eesolution No. 212, 



fi2,000.00 \ 

285.27 C 

1,200.00 ) 



Aid, Dependent Soldiers, City, $150.00 $104.00 $46.00 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, County, $1,918.45 

Aid, County Poor, $13,195.41 

Bond, City Hall, $8,000.00 $8,000.00 

Cemeteries : 

Blossom Hill, $1,400.00 $8,272.64 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 4,481.84 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1,184.52 

Income Trust Funds, 1,241.19 

Eesolution No. 208, 200.00 



Old North, $200.00 $695.82 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 227.50 

Income Cemetery Fund, 30.10 

Income Trust Funds, 270.00 



Maple Grove, $100.00 $173.75 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 64.11 

Income Trust Funds, 23.75 



^,507.55 $8,272.64 $234.91 



$727.60 $695.82 $31.78 



$187.86 $173.75 $14.11 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 489 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Pine Grove, $150.00 $258.85 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 7.50 

Income Trust Funds, 101.35 

$258.85 $258.85 

Old Fort, $30.00 $40.25 

Income Trust Funds, 11.00 

$41.00 $40.25 $0.75 

Millville, $100.00 $172.55 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 81.74 

Income Trust Funds, 51.25 

$232.99 $172.55 $60.44 

Horse Hill, $10.00 $7.00 $3.00 

Soucook, 30.00 30.00 

Woodlawn, 25.00 25.00 

Concord Charity Organization 
Society : 

Eesolution No. 180, $200.00 $200.00 

Concord District Nursing Asso- 
ciation, $300.00 $300.00 

Concord 's Celebration : 

Eesolution No. 179. " $2,500.00 ) <, ^ 

Eesolution No. 196, 150.00 \ $^'^50.00 

Dog Licenses, . $87.00 

Engineering Department: 

Salary Engineer, $1,800.00 $1,800.00 

Salary Assistants, 1,700.00 1,680.50 

Supplies, 100.00 84.33 

Eepairs, 25.00 .90 

Incidentals, 150.00 329.59 

Assessors' Map, ^ 500.00 315.82 

$4,275.00 $4,211.14 $63.86 



490 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. E., 

Aid, $450.00 $450.00 

Fire Department: 

Pay-Eolls, $11,209.00 $11,212.85 

Pay-Eolls, Semi-annual, 9,090.00 9,090.00 

Eent Veterans' Association, 150.00 150.00 

Forage, 1,800.00 1,871.66 

Fuel and Lights, 1,600.00 1,792.80 

Fire Alarm, 800.00 1,172.49 

Horse Hire and Shoeing, 1,000.00 1,048.67 

Washing, 52.00 52.00 

Supplies, Auto Combination, 100.00 126.99 

Penacook Fire Alarm, 200.00 198.10 

Incidentals, 2,000.00 3,365.14 

New Hose, 800.00 800.00 

Eesolution No. 21 7, 2,079.70 



$30,880.70 $30,880.70 
Auto Truck, East Concord, 

Eesolution No. 200, $2,500.00 $2,500.00 
Good "Will Auto Combination, 

Eesolution No. 181, 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Four Steel Bridges: 

Eesolution No. 174, $60,000.00 ) 

Eesolution No. 205, 2,635.00 j *"-.'^^^-i' 

Health, Board of: 

Salary Sanitary Officer, $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

Milk Inspection, 300.00 300.00 

Fumigation Supplies, 100.00 91.00 

Incidentals, 700.00 1,193.74 

Antitoxin and Medical Supplies, 150.00 10.35 

Eesolution No. 217, 345.09 



$3,095.09 $3,095.09 

Highway Department : 

Salary Commissioner, $1,800.00 $1,800.00 

General Maintenance and Eepair, 38,000.00 37,926.35 
Permanent Work, South Main 

Street, Perley to West, 1,850.00 1,778.03 



$603.83 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 491 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Highway Department: 
Permanent Work, South Street, 

Thorndike to Broadway, $2,000.00 .$],990.]4 

Permanent Work, North Main 

Street, Pitman to Center, 1,250.00 1,004.73 

Permanent Work, North State 

Street, Dolan Street to K. E. 

Crossing, 2,000.00 2,617.20 -. 

Permanent W^ork, Pleasant 

Street, Eesiirfacing to St. 

Paul's School, 3,000.00 2,951.69 

Permanent Work, Bye and 

Walnut Streets, 1,500.00 1,620.22 

Permanent Work, South State 

Street, l,500.0a 1,551.91 ,. 

Permanent Work, Penaeook 

Street, 1,000.00 996.30 

Permanent Work, Washington 

Square, Penaeook, 500.00 488.49 

Sidewalks and Crossings, New, 750.00 1,567.79 

Sidewalks and Crossings, Eepair, 2,500.00 2,548.87 

Catch Basins, 1,200.00 1,266.43 

Care of Trees, 4,000.00 2,849.78 

Eesolution No. 23 7, account 

earnings, 107.93 

$62,957.93 $62,957.93 

Incidentals and Land Damages, $8,000.00 $10,471.68 

Eesolution No. 211, 1,000.00 

Eesolution No. 217, 1,471.68 

$10,471.68 $10,471.68 

Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds, $1,800.00 $1,791.43 $8.57 

Interest, Notes and Bonds, $6,310.00 $6,311.50 

Interest, Temporary Loan, $300.00 ^ ^^^^ 



Eesolution No. 217, 441.6 



) 

2 y $741. 



492 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Land Sold for Taxes: 

Resolution No. 204, $1,228.92 $1,228.92 

Taxes on Land Sold City, 1913, 

Resolution No. 202. 611.75 611.75 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Memorial Day, $460.00 $460.00 

Military Companies, Aid of, $250.00 $250.00 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, $500.00 $500.00 

Open Air Concerts, ' $325.00 $325.00 

East Concord Playground, 25.00 9.00 $16.00 

John Kimball Playground, 500.00 499.30 .70 

Rollins Park Playground, 400.00 



404 65 

Resolution No. 217, 4.65 ^ 

Parks, $3,500.00 ) 

Resolution No. 217, 16.61 | $^'516.61 

Penacook Park, $100.00 $50.00 $50.00 

Proceeds City Lot, Ward 3 : 

Resolution No. 218, $4,391.61 $4,391.61 

Woodworth & Co., Appeal from 
Taxes, 1912: 
Resolution No. 216, $551.34 $551.34 

Pembroke Bridge : 

Resolution No. 171, $26,000.00 $25,508.02 $491.98 

Police Station Garage : 

Resolution No. 182, $4,428.00 $4,428.00 

Police and Watch: 

Salaries, $16,927.25 $16,900.75 

Fuel, 450.00 546.11 

Horse Hire, Board and Shoeing, 210.00 164.60 

Helmets and Buttons, 35.00 53.41 

Ice, 10.00 17.34 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 493 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Police ami Wat'-'h : 

Lights, $150.00 .$211.11 

Telephone, Private Line, 245.31 242.47 

Incidentals, 800.00 1,379.08 

Resolution No. 209, 206.25 

Resolution No. 217, 481.06 

$19,514.87 $19,514.87 

Precinct, Garbage, $10,000.00 $8,496.34 

Debit Balance, 1914, 708.40 

$10,000.00 $9,204.74 $795.26 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, City, $20,000.00 ) 

Balance, 1914, 499.32 \ $19>^57.22 $1,342.10 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, East 

Concord, $550.00 ^ 

Balance, 1914, 13.87 \ ^^30.00 $33.87 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, 

Penacook, $1,650.00 > 

-D 1 -im^ Qnnnn Y $1,600.00 $350.00 

Balance, 1914, 300.00 f ^ ' 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, West 

Concord, $800.00 $800.00 

Precinct, Sewer, City: 

Construction and Repairs, $7,300.00 » • 

Balance, 1914, 328.42;*^'^^^-^^ 

Interest, Bonds, 2,750.00 | 

V ^ 547 50 
Balance, 1914, 385.00 ) -'-J*'-"^" 

Resolution No. 127, account earnings, 31.50 

$10,794.92 $9,003.08 $1,791.84 

Precinct, Sewer, East Concord : 
Construction and Repairs, 

Balance, 1914, $127.53 

Interest on Bonds, $17.50 

Transferred from Sinking Fund, 17.50 



494 CITY OP CONCORD, 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Precinct, Sewer, East Concord: 

Bond, $500.00 

Transferred from Sinking Fund, $500.00 



500.00 -i 
1, 500.00 {" 



1,000.00 



$1,810.00 $1,856.66 
Precinct, Sewer, St. Paul's School: 



Construction and Repairs, 


$100.00 




$8.00 ) 


Debit Balance, 1914, 






43.45 j 


Precinct, Sewer, West Concord: 








Construction and Eepairs, 


$100.00 


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.$59.91 


Balance, 1914, 


100.88 


r 


Interest on Bonds, 


80.50 


1 


98.00 


Balance, 1914, 


17.50 


Bonds, 
Balance, 1914, 


500.00 
500.00 


I 
J 


1,000.00 




$1,298.88 


$1,157.91 


Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 


$9,500.00 




$7,278.82 


Debit Balance, 1914, 






645.58 



$645.03 $517.50 $127.53 

Precinct, Sewer, Penacook: 

Construction and Repairs, $650.00 $330.73 ^ 

Debit Balance, 1914, 378.43 y 

Interest on Bonds, 147.50 

Transferred from Sinking Fund, 160.00 

Bond, 500.00 

Transferred from Sinking Fund, 



$48.55 



$140.97 



$9,500.00 $7,924.40 $1,575.60 



$81.84 



Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 

Penacook, $475.00 $382.71 

Debit Balance, 1914, 10.45 

Printing and Stationery, $2,000.00 \ 

Resolution No. 206, 1,500.00 l $3,526.87 

Resolution No. 217, 26.87 ) 

Public Baths, $325.00 $257.10 $67.90 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 495 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Public Library: 

Salaries, $3,060.00 $3,044.02 



Incidentals, 2,240.00 

Balance, 1914, 



40.00 ^ 
20.75 [ ^' 
Trust Funds, 229.56 



715.81 



Fines, 220.00 

Catalogues, 5.00 



Repairs of Buildings, $2,000.00 

Kesolution No. 217 57.61 



$5,775.31 $5,759.83 $15.48 

I $2,C 



,057.61 



Salaries : 

Mayor, $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

City Clerk, 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works, 200.00 200.00 

Overseers of Poor, 390.00 390.00 

Solicitor, 800.00 800.00 

Treasurer, 275.00 1,225.00 

Messenger, 900.00 900.00 

Building Inspector, 200.00 200.00 

City Physicians, 500.00 500.00 

Care City Clocks, 110.00 110.00 

Assessors, 3,000.00 3,000.00 
Moderators, Ward Clerks and 

Selectmen, 360.00 360.00 
Supervisors and Inspectors of 

Election, 960.00 9.50.00 

Judge, Police Court, • 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Clerk, Police Court, 291.66 291.66 



Tax levy. 
10..50] 1912 



I 2,000.00 29.251 1913 

Collector of Taxes, I 325 50 f 1914 

I 1,725.00J 

Resolution No. 215, 950.00 

Resolution No. 217, 80.25 



1915 



$14,716.91 $14,716.91 
Salaries, Board of Aldermen, $1,905.00 $1,905.00 



496 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Schools : 

Union School District: 

General Fund, Balance 1914, $20,809.32 $100,109.32 

Appropriation, 39,3 78.82 

Amount Voted by District, 65,692.16 

Literary Fund, 1,916.79 

Dog Licenses, 1,166.60 

Athletic Field, 5,000.00 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 34.43 



Interest, 9,275.00 ) .. __ 

Balance, 1914, 1,367.50 [ ''^''^-^^ 

Bonds, 8,000.00 8,000.00 



$152,440.62 $116,084.32 $36,356.30 



Town District: 



General Fund, Balance 1914, 


$768.39 


$5,268.39 


Appropriation, 


2,951.92 




Amount Voted by District, 


2,250.00 





Literary Fund, 


144.42 




Dog Licenses, 


87.90 




Abial Walker Trust Fund, 


2.59 




One-half Salary Superintendent, 


313.37 






$6,518.59 


$5,268.39 $1,250.20 


Penacook District: 






General Fund, Balance 1914, 


$2,443.47 


$12,693.47 


Appropriation, 


3,386.76 




Literary Fund, 


165.69 




Dog Licenses, 


100.84 




Resolution No. 176, 


500.00 




Amount Voted by District, 


7,451.47 




Sinking Fund, 


250.00 




Abial Walker Trust Fund, 


2.98 




One-half Salary Superintendent. 


600.00 






$14,901.21 


$12,693.47 $2,207.74 


School District No. 20: 






Interest, 


$290.50 


$290.50 


Bonds, 


500.00 


500.00 




$790.50 


$790.50 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 497 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Temporary Loans: 
Resolution No. 193, $50,000.00 -) 

Eesolution No. 210, 50,000.00 | $100-000-00 

County Tax, $34,716.50 

State Tax, $48,552.00 



RECEIPTS. 

Eeceipts of the City for the year ending December 31, 1915: 

To Balance on hand, January 1, 1915, $40,081.00 

To Taxes, 1912, 321.34 

To Taxes, 1913, 1,624.63 

To Taxes, 1914, 31,215.13 

To Taxes, 1915, 284,200.00 

Fines and Costa, City Marshal, 189.31 

Library Fines and Catalogs, 225.00 

Highway Department, 1,515.18 

Highway Department State Aid, 709.72 

Billiard and Pool Table Licenses, 470.00 

Employment Bureau Licenses, 15.00 

Hack and Job Team Licenses, 83.50 

Junk Dealers' Licenses, 130.00 

Pawn Broker's License, 25.00 

Dog Licenses, 1,442.34 

Dog License Fees, 132.80 

Municipal Court Fees, 1,010.60 

Fees, City Clerk, 303.90 

Milk Licenses, 196.55 

Cemetery Trust Funds, 2,050.00 

Amusement Licenses, ^ 892.00 

City Reimbursed for Taxes Paid, 1914, 227.70 

Taxes Sold City and Redeemed, 1912, 140.16 

Taxes Sold City and Redeemed, 1913, 511.50 

Taxes Sold City and Redeemed, 1914, 335.38 

Rent, Auditorium, 860.00 

County Paupers off Farm, 11,845.19 

Dependent Soldiers, County, 1,940.59 

32 



498 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Proceeils, City Wood Lot, $3,826.40 

Forest Fires, 444.05 

Declarations of Candidacy, City Primary, 102.00 

Insurance Tax, 2,331.74 

Railroad Tax, 42,256.96 

Savings Bank Tax, 57,835.55 

Literary Fund, 2,226.90 

Proportion School Fund, 913.37 

Building and Loan Association Tax, 243.87 

Transferred, Penacook Sewer Precinct, Sinking Fund, 660.00 

Transferred, East Concord Sewer Precinct, Sinking Fund, 517.50 

Income, Seth K. Jones Public Library Trust Fund, 17.00 

' ' G. Parker Lyon Public Library Trust Fund, 40.00 

'' Thomas G. Valpey Public Library Trust Fund, 20.00 

'' P. B. Cogswell Public Library Trust Fund, 85.90 

" Franklin Pierce Public Library Trust Fund, 40.00 

" Joseph Hazeltine Public Library Trust Fund, 26.66 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools, 40.00 

Old North Cemetery Fund, 30.10 

Blossom Hill Cemetery Fund, 1,184.52 

Transferred, Old North Cemetery Account, 227.50 

" Blossom Hill Cemetery Account, 4,481.84 

" Millville Cemetery Account, 81.74 

" Pine Grove Cemetery Account, 7.50 

" Maple Grove Cemetery Account, 64.11 

Income Trust Funds, Maple Grove Cemetery, 23.75 

" " " Old Fort Cemetery, 11.00 

" " " Pine Grove Cemetery, 101.35 

" " " Millville Cemetery, 51.25 

" " " Old North Cemetery, 270.00 

'< " <' Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,241.19 

State Board License Commissioners' Balance, 1914, 462.21 

State Board License Commissioners' Account. 1915, 7,158.72 

Bounty on Grasshoppers, 73.00 

Temporary Loans, 100,000.00 

Bridge Bonds, 86,000.00 

Premium, 1,092.20 

Interest, 137.63 

Sale of Old Metal, from Bridges, 748.09 

History Commission, 500.00 

Interest, National State Capital Bank, 1,156.31 

Miscellaneous, 689.31 



$700,114.74 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 499 

DISBURSEMENTS. 



Disbursements : 



City Departments, $285,982.96 

City Poor and Soldiers, 3,589.27 

County Poor and Soldiers, 15,113.86 

City Notes, 100,000.00 

City Bonds, 8,000.00 

City Interest on Notes and Bonds, 7,053.12 

Interest Cemetery Trust Funds, 1,79L43 

Schools, 118,071.18 

Schools, Interest on Bonds, 8,265.50 

School Bonds, 8,500.00 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 7,278.82 

'' Sprinkling Streets, Peuacook, 382.71 

" Lighting Streets, City, 19,157.22 

" Lighting Streets, Penacook, 1,600.00 

" Lighting Streets, East Concord, 530.00 

" Lighting Streets, West Concord, 800.00 

' ' Garbage, 8,496.34 

" Sewer, Interest, Bonds, 2.810.50 

" Sewer, Repairs and Extensions, 6,854.22 

' ' Sewer, Bonds, ' 2,500.00 

County Tax, 34,716.50 

State Tax, ^ 48,552.00 

Paid Outstanding Orders, 319.34 

Treasury Balance, January 1, 1916, 10,149.40 

$700,514.37 

Less outstanding orders unpaid January 1, 1916, 399.63 

$700,114.74 



500 CITY OF CONCORD. 



CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 

Receipts. Expenditures. 

Cash balance January 1, 1915, $18,240.28 

Receipts deposited with Treasurer, 78,940.06 

Expended per orders, $33,043.76 

Bonds, 20,000.00 

Interest, 18,814.90 

Paid Outstanding Order, 1914, 13.98 

Treasury balance January 1, 1916, 25,331.70 

$97,204.34 
Less outstanding order unpaid January 1, 

1916, 24.00 

$97,180.34 $97,180.34 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Cleric. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 501 

MUNICIPAL DEBT. 
Funded Debt. 

City Hall bonds, $106,000.00 

State Library bonds, 15,000.00 

Bridge bonds, 86,000.00 

Cemetery trust fund note, 52,176.43 

$259,176.43 

Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding January 1, 

1916, $399.63 
Interest accrued, not yet due, mu- 
nicipal bonds, 1,894.17 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 311.50 
Due school districts, 39,814.24 
public library account trust 

funds, 15.48 

precinct sewer. East Concord, 127.53 

precinct sewer, city, 1,791.84 
precinct sewer, St. Paul's School, 48.55 

precinct sewer, "West Concord, 140.97 

precinct garbage, 795.26 

precinct lighting streets, city, 1,342.10 
precinct lighting streets. East 

Concord, 33.87 
precinct lighting streets, Pena- 

cook, 350.00 

precinct sprinkling streets, city, 1,575.60 
precinct sprinkling streets, Pen- 

acook, 81.84 

cemeteries, 341.99 



Total debt not funded, 49,064.57 



Total city indebtedness, $308,241.00 



502 city of concord, 

Available Assets. 

Treasurer's cash balance January 1, 

1916, $10,149.40 
Taxes, 1912, uncollected, 349.64 
Taxes, 1913, uncollected, 675.08 
Taxes, 1914, uncollected, 2,392.83 
Taxes, 1915, uncollected, 34,541.93 
Cash in hands of tax collector, Jan- 
uary 1, 1916, 233.45 
Taxes bid in by city, 5,441.28 
Due quarry rents, 75.00 
Due highway department, 125.95 
Due Merrimack County, county poor, 6,415.37 
Due Merrimack County, dependent 

soldiers, 903.73 

Overdraft, Penacook sewer, 59.16 

Sullivan County, aid furnished poor, 3.00 
State of New Hampshire, bounty on 

grasshoppers, 29.50 



$61,395.32 



Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1916, $246,845.68 
Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1915, 117,867.47 



Increase for the year, $128,978.21 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 503 

PRECINCT DEBT. 
Funded Debt. 

Water-works bonds, $457,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 75,000.00 

$532,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 



Interest accrued, not yet due, sewer 




bonds. 


$666.67 


Interest accrued, not yet due, water 




bonds. 


8,444.58 


Coupons overdue, water bonds, not 




presented. 


161.00 


Coupons overdue, sewer bonds, not 




presented, 


312.50 




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$541,584.75 



Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1916, $25,331.70 

Due garbage precinct, 96.65 

$25,428.35 



Net precinct debt, January 1, 1916, $516,156.40 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1915, 544,091.96 



Decrease for the year, $27,935.56 



504 city of concord. 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, $211,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,934.16 



-$213,934.16 



Penacook School District bonds, $7,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 91.00 



7,891.00 



Net liability of school districts, $221,825.16 



West Concord sewer bonds, $1,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 15.75 



Penacook sewer bonds, $3,500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 51.25 



$1,815.75 
$3,551.25 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $246,845.68 

precinct debt, 516,156.40 

school districts, 221,825.16 

"West Concord sewer debt, 1,815.75 

Penacook sewer debt, 3,551.25 



Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1916, $990,194.24 

Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1915, 901,224.31 



Increase for the year, $88,969.93 



CITY PROPERTY 

Having Value But Not Considered Avail.^le Assets. 



Water department, 


$1,071,183.98 


Fire department, 




147,179.50 


Highway department, 




32,200.00 


Engineering department, 




758.50 


Sewer department, 




835.25 


Penacook sewer, 




40.15 


West Concord sewer. 




23.65 


Health department, 




940.00 


Police department. 




40,081.65 


City clerk's ofBce, 




1,150.00 - 


Commissioner's office, 




140.17 


Mayor's office, 




250.00 


Assessors' office. 




600.00 


Tax collector's office, 




296.00 


Sealer of weights and measures. 


200.00 


City messenger's department, 


2,250.00 


Park commissioners' department. 


225.00 


Cemetery commissioners' 


depart- 




ment. 




250.00 


Public library, 




10,000.00 


Milk inspection, 




43.77 


City history commission. 




10.00 


Real estate. 




332,682.50 

$1,641,340.12 



1915. 
Population of city (census 1910), 21,497 

Valuation of city, $20,086,789.00 

Tax assessed for the year, $339,781.64 

Rate of taxation, $8.60 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District, $5.10. 
Rate for precinct, $3.30. 
Total rate, $17.00 per $1,000. 



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INDEX. 



Assessors, board of, report of 404 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 448 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 476 

Bridges, report of city engineer 347 

Cemetery department, reports of 398 

City clerk, report of 401 

government, departments, personnel of, 1915 41 

assessors 44 

board of aldermen 41 

board of public works 42 

building inspector 51 

cemetery committees 53 

clerk 42 

collector of taxes 44 

commissioners of cemeteries 54 

committees of board of aldermen 43 

culler of staves 56 

drain layers 59 

engineer 43 

fence-viewers 55 

fire department, officers of 50 

health officers 51 

hydrant commissioners 52 

inspector of petroleum 55 

mayor 41 

messenger 44 

overseers of poor 45 

park commissioners 52 

physician, city and assistant .45 

plumbers, board of examiners of 60 

pound-keeper 55 

police department officers and members of police force 46 

public library, trustees of 48 

librarian and assistants 48 

registrar of vital statistics 52 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 44 

. sealers of leather 56 

sealer of weights and measures 56 

solicitor 45 

street department, superintendent of streets 44 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 54 

superintendent of clocks 51 



564 CITY OF CONCORD. 



City superintendent of parks 52 

surveyors of painting 58 

masonry 58 

wood, lumber and bark 58 

treasurer 43 

trustees of trust funds 49 

undertakers 54 

ward officers 61 

water- works, city, commissioners 49 

superintendent 49 

weigher 57 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 56 

Coupon ajcount, statement of 479 

Debts, recapitulation 504 

Engineer, city, report of 361 

Financial statement 488 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 214 

fire-alarm 255 

Penacook fire-alarm telegraph 261 

roll of members 264 

Highways, financial statement of 328 

department, report of superintendent 323 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 365 

John Kimball Playground, report of committee on 374 

Maple Grove Cemetery, receipts of 471 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 63 

Mayor's inaugural address 3 

Millville Cemetery, receipts of 474 

Municipal debt 501 

regulations '2 

Court, report of 384 

Old Fort Cemetery, receipts of 475 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 468 

Ordinances and resolutions 11 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 380 

Pine Grove Cemetery, receipts of 473 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 367 

Police department, report of city marshal 206 

Polls, valuation, et -., from 1905 408 

Poor department, report of overseer 402 

Population 506 

Precincts, debts of 503 

Property, city, inventory of 505 

Public bath, report of 382 

Public library, report of trustees 180 

librarian 181 

Public Works, board of, report of 323 

Rollins Park Playground, report of committee on 377 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 186 

contagious diseases 197 

milk inspector, report of 188 

sanitary officer, report of 192 



INDEX. 



565 



PAGE. 

School reports 67 

Union School District, annual school meeting warrant 140 

annual school meeting 142 

attendance, tables of 146 

board of education 67 

board of education, report of 71 

census, 1915 159 

clerk 70 

cooking, report of 103 

drawing, report of 104 

elocutionary contest 127 

English prize essay contest 130 

financial agent, report of 76 

fire drills 160 

graduating classes 166 

high school, report of 99 

honor, roll of 173 

military drill, report of 108 

Morrill School of Mechanic Arts 112 

movement of pupils through grades. . . . 162 

music, report of l09 

officers of the district 70 

Pageant, Concord History 133 

school nurse 70 

school nurse, report of 106 

sewing, report of 102 

stamp saving system 129 

superintendent 69 

superintendent, report of 83 

teachers, list of 154 

truant officer 69 

truant officer, report of 123 

Walker School account 80 

Sewer department, report of 354 

Solicitor, report of 370 

Tax collector, repo^rt of '. 410 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 482 

Treasury, report of 414 

Trust funds 414 

Trusts, individual cemetery ' 424 

Vital statistics, tables of 508 

Ward Eight Playground, report of 379 

Water department, report of 270 

commissioners, report of 276 

coupon, account of 481 

engineer's report 287 

fire hydrants 300 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 480 

receipts for each year 292 

rules and regulations 314 

schedule of pipes and gates 294 

summary of statistics 311 

superintendent, report of 278 

treasurer's report 289, 480