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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

CITY OF CONCORD 



ANNUAL REPORT 



1916 



1916 
SIXTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCORD, N. H.: 

The Rumford Press 

1917 






MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city poor account, except on the written order of 
the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 8, 1917. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance prohibiting smoking in school houses. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. All persons are hereby prohibited from smoking in any 
school building within the city. 

Sect. 2. Any person violating the provisions of this ordinance shall 
be fined not more than twenty dollars. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed February 14, 1916. 



An Ordinance providing for chauffeurs for the motor com- 
bination chemical and hose trucks used by old fort engine 
company no. 2 and cataract engine company no. 3. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. A member each of Old Fort Engine Company No. 2 
and Cataract Engine Company No. 3 shall annually be designated by 
the chief of the Fire Department to act as chauffeurs and care-takers of 
the motor trucks used by said companies, subject to confirmation by 
the Board of Aldermen. 

Sect. 2. Said chauffeurs shall receive annually the sum of twenty- 
five dollars each for such services, to be paid semi-annually. In the 
absence of such chauffeurs, other members of said companies shall be 
designated to serve in their 6tead by the engineers of said companies, 
and shall leceive such proportionate part of said twenty-five dollars as 
the time served by him bears to the whole year. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect as of 
January 1, 1916. 

Passed March 13, 1916. 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance repealing section 2 of chapter 19 of the revised 
ordinances and enlarging the city lighting precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Section 2 of Chapter 19 of the Revised Ordinances is 
hereby repealed. 

Sect. 2. Section 1 of Chapter 19 of the Revised Ordinances is hereby 
amended by adding thereto the following, "all the territory in Ward 2 
which is included in the Union School District, together with the inhabi- 
tants thereof." 

Sect. 3. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect upon 
its passage. 

Passed March 29, 1916. 



An Ordinance amending section 1, chapter 20 of the revised ordi- 
nance enlarging the street sprinkling precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That Section 1 of Chapter 20 of the City Ordinances 

relating to the street sprinkling precinct be amended by adding thereto 

the words "West Washington Street from Liberty Street to Warren 

Street." 

Sect. 2. All lots, together with their inhabitants, abutting on West 

Washington Street are hereby included in said sprinkling precinct. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 18, section 24 of the re- 
vised ORDINANCES RELATING TO TIME OFF TO PERMANENT MEMBERS 
OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 24 of Chapter 18 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances of the City of Concord, by striking out the words "Two days in 
each month, such two days not to be taken in the same week. On the 
weeks that they are not off duty for a day, under the above provision, 
they shall be entitled to be off duty for one night without loss of pay," 
and insert in place thereof the words "One day in each week,'' so that 
said section as amended shall read as follows: "Sect. 24. Permanent 
officers and men of the department shall be entitled to a vacation with- 
out loss of pay, of fourteen days in each year. In addition they shall 
be entitled to be off duty without loss of pay one day in each week. All 
vacations and absences from duty under the above to be under the 
direction of the chief engineer." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



ORDINANCES. O 

An Ordinance relating to the erection of signs and advertise- 
ments. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. No person shall place, establish or maintain any sign 
or advertisement over any part of any street, lane, alley or sidewalk 
without first having obtained a permit therefor from the Board of Public 
Works. 

Sect. 2. Such sign or advertisement shall be safely and securely 
fixed and supported, shall be at least eight feet above the sidewalk and 
shall not project more than five and one-half feet beyond the street 
line. Such sign or advertisement shall not be more than five feet in 
width at the widest part and its height shall not be less than four times 
its average width. The distance from the street line to the inner edge 
of such sign or advertisement nearest the building shall not exceed twelve 
inches. The aforesaid restrictions as to signs and advertisements shall 
not apply to flags and temporary banners suspended across streets and 
securely fastened, the lowest part of which shall not be less than twenty 
feet above the street. 

Sect. 3. Persons applying for a permit to erect a sign or advertise- 
ment shall state its size and weight, the nature of the material of which 
it is to be constructed and the manner in which it is to be supported. 

Sect. 4. Any person or corporation violating any of the provisions 
of this ordinance shall be liable to a fine not exceeding twenty dollars. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect on 
its passage. 

Passed March 29, 1916. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 38 of the revised ordinances 
relating to the "city ambulance." 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That Chapter 38 of the Revised Ordinances be hereby amended to 
read as follows : 

Section 1. The city ambulance shall be in charge of the city mar- 
shal, to whom all requests for its use shall be made. The marshal shall 
assign such officers for ambulance and patrol car service, as in his judg- 
ment may appear necessary, in no case shall less than two officers be 
assigned, the said officers to render assistance when required. 

Sect. 2. The use of the ambulance shall be free to all residents of 
the city. 

Sect. 3. Non-residents or out-of-town parties using the ambu- 
lance, for trips within a radius of one mile from the state house, shall 
pay to the marshal the sum of one dollar for each trip. The money 
thus collected shall be paid to the city treasurer annually. 



6 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 4. Any party ordering or using the ambulance for the re- 
moval of a patient suffering from contagious or infectious diseases, shall 
be subject to a fine, not to exceed twenty dollars for each offence. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances or parts of ordinances, inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 6. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 8, 1916. 



An Ordinance prohibiting the excess sale of tickets at public 
entertainments or dances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Theater proprietors and proprietors 'of halls used for 
public assemblage are prohibited from selling or permitting to be sold, 
tickets for public entertainments, or public dances, to be held within 
such theaters or halls, in excess of the established seating capacity of 
such theaters or halls; said capacity being fixed by the proprietors or 
lessees and the building inspector, and said capacity posted in the sev- 
eral theaters or halls, and recorded in the office of the city clerk. 

Sect. 2. The manager of any such entertainment or dance, or the 
ticket-seller, thereat, are likewise prohibited from selling such excess of 
tickets. 

Sect. 3. Any person or corporation violating the provisions of this 
ordinance shall be fined not more.than twenty dollars for each offence 
and the license for the theater or hall where the offence is committed 
shall automatically, upon conviction, be revoked and shall not there- 
after be issued without the consent of the board. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect on its passage . 

Passed May 8, 1916. 



An Ordinance amending section 2 of chapter 36 of the revised 
ordinances relating to the wages of city employees. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 2 of Chapter 36 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances by striking out all of said section and inserting in the place thereof 
the following: "Sect 2. The minimum rate of wages to able-bodied 
city employees working by the day shall be two dollars and twenty-five 
cents per day and the minimum rate to non-able-bodied shall be one 
dollar and eighty-five cents per day of nine hours. City employees 
working by the day or week shall be paid for overtime on weekdays at 
the per diem rate, and for overtime on Sundays at one and one-half 
times the per diem rate." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed July 10, 1916. 



ORDINANCES. 7 

An Ordinance amending section 4 of chapter 36 of the revised 
ordinances relating to the pat of teams employed by the 

CITY. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 4 of Chapter 36 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances by striking out all of said section and inserting in place thereof 
the following: "Sect. 4. Heads of departments employing teams for 
the use of the city are authorized to pay for said teams five dollars per 
day of nine hours or such proportionate part of five dollars as the time 
worked bears to nine hours for each two-horse team with driver." 
Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed July 10, 1916. 



An Ordinance in amendment of an ordinance passed march 13, 
1916, relative to chauffeurs for the motor combination 
chemical and hose truck used by old fort engine company 
no. 2 and cataract engine company no. 3. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 2 of an ordinance providing for chauf- 
feurs for the motor combination chemical and hose trucks used by Old 
Fort Engine Company No. 2 and Cataract Engine Company No. 3, 
passed March 13, 1916, by striking out the whole of said section and 
inserting in place thereof the following: "Sect. 2. The chauffeur for 
Old Fort Engine Company No. 2 shall receive the sum of fifty dollars 
per annum and the chauffeur for Cataract Engine Company No. 3 shall 
receive the sum of fifty dollars per annum, to be paid semi-annually. 
In the absence of such chauffeurs, other members of said companies 
shall be designated to serve in their stead by the engineers of said com- 
panies, and shall receive such proportionate part of said above men- 
tioned sums as the time served by him bears to the whole year." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect as of 
January 1, 1916. 

Passed September 11, 1916. 



An Ordinance in amendment of sections 4 and 5 of chapter 40 of 
the laws and ordinances relating to hazardous buildings. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 4 of Chapter 40 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances by adding after the word "shop" in the fourth fine the words 
"establishment for the cleansing of clothes or other articles with inflam- 



8 CITY OF CONCOKD. 

mable liquids of any kind," so that 6aid section as amended shall read 
as follows: 

" Sect. 4. No permit shall be granted by the city engineer and chief 
of the Fire Department for the erection or remodeling of a building to 
be used as a public garage, steam mifl, furnace, foundry, blacksmith's 
shop, establishment for the cleansing of clothes or other articles with 
inflammable liquids of any kind, or house for storing powder until the 
owner has filed with' the said city engineer and chief of the Fire Depart- 
ment a written certificate stating that the owner has received a license 
therefor from the Board of Mayor and Aldermen, and no building 
already erected shall be used or occupied for any of the above-named 
purposes unless a license to so use or occupy has been granted by the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen ; and the city engineer and chief of the 
Fire Department shall have power to order such changes in existing 
buildings used for the above-named purposes as they deem necessary." 

Sect. 2. Amend Section 5 of Chapter 40 of the Revised Ordinances 
by adding after the word "foundry" in the fifth fine the words "house 
for storing powder, cleansing establishment," so that said section as 
amended hall read as follows: 

"Sect. 5. No person shall hereafter erect or build, or cause to be 
erected or built, any buildings for the aforesaid purposes, until he has 
presented to the Board of Mayor and Aldermen a petition therefor, 
setting out the proposed situation of such public garage, steam mill, 
furnace, foundry, house for storing powder, cleansing establishment, or 
blacksmith shop, the materials of which the same are to be built, the 
dimensions, height, and number of stories of the proposed building, the 
situation of aU boilers therein, the manner in which the same are to be 
secured or set, the height of the chimney, and the various branches of 
business to be carried on or proposed to be carried on in said building 
and having first obtained a license therefor." 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage and all 
ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby 
repealed. 

Passed November 13, 1916. 



An Ordinance accepting the gift of tee west garden and pro- 
viding FOR ITS MANAGEMENT. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 
Section 1. That the "West Garden," located on North Main Street, 
offered as a gift by the trustees under the will of the late Frank W. Rol- 
lins and by his heirs and the fund for its support offered as a gift by the 
heirs of said Frank W. Rollins to the city be, and hereby are, accepted 
in accordance with the terms of said offers. 



ORDINANCES. U 

Sect. 2. The care and management of said garden shall be under 
control of the Park Commissioners and its rearrangement shall be sub- 
ject to their approval. 

Passed December 11, 1916. 



An Ordinance amending section 1 of chapter 19 of the revised 
ordinances and enlarging the city lighting precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
Section 1. That Section 1 of Chapter 19 of the Revised Ordinances 
be, and hereby is, amended by striking out the words "all the territory 
in Ward 2 which is included in the Union School District together with 
the inhabitants thereof" and inserting in place thereof the following 
described tract: 

" Commencing at the point in the Merrimack River where the ward 
lines of Wards 2 and 8 intersect; thence running easterly, northerly 
and northeasterly, on the line between said wards, until it intersects 
the easterly line of land of William P. Curtis; thence northerly by the 
easterly lines of lands of said William P. Curtis and William M. Emer- 
son to said Emerson's northeasterly corner; thence westerly by the 
northerly line of said Emerson's land and across the Curtis property to 
the southeasterly corner of land of A. G. & A. W. Stevens; thence north- 
erly by the easterly line of said Stevens' lands to their northeasterly 
corner and to land of Samuel G. Potter; thence easterly by the south- 
erly line of said Samuel G. Potter's land to his southeasterly corner 
and to land of Frank P. Potter; thence easterly by said Frank P. Pot- 
ter's southerly line to his southeasterly corner; thence northerly by 
said Frank P. Potter's easterly line to land of John T. Tenney; thence 
easterly by said Tenney's southerly line to his southeasterly corner 
adjoining land of Walter B. Maynard; thence northerly by said May- 
nard's westerly line to his northwesterly corner adjoining land of Free- 
man F. Potter; thence easterly by said Freeman F. Potter's southerly 
line to land of Alice E. Potter; thence northeasterly by said Alice E. 
Potter's southerly line to the line between the City of Concord and the 
Town of Loudon; thence northwesterly and northerly along said town 
line to the northeasterly corner of land of the heirs of John T. Batch- 
elder; thence westerly on the northerly line of said Batchelder land 
and westerly, northerly, westerly, southerly, westerly and southerly 
by John T. Tenney's adjoining land to the northeasterly corner of land 
of Frank P. Potter; thence westerly and southerly by said Frank P. 
Potter's land to land of the heirs of John Potter; thence westerly by 
said John Potter's heirs' land to land of Fred A. Muzzey; thence south- 
erly and westerly by said Muzzey's land to land of Harry R. Terrill; 
thence northerly by said Terrill's easterly line to his northeasterly cor- 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ner; thence westerly by his northerly line to his northwesterly corner; 
thence southerly by his westerly line to the southeasterly corner of land 
of Elmer Trombley; thence westerly by the southerly line of said 
Trombley's land to the Mountain Road, so called; thence northerly 
by the center line of said road to the northerly line of land of the Con- 
cord Electric Company; thence westerly by the northerly line of said 
Electric Company's land to and across the right-of-way of the Concord 
& Montreal Railroad; thence northerly by the westerly line of said 
right-of-way to the northerly line of the property of said Concord Elec- 
tric Company; thence westerly on the northerly line of said Electric 
Company's land to the Merrimack River; thence southerly by the 
center of said river to the point begun at." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon January 1, 1917. 

Passed December 11, 1916. 



RESOLUTIONS. 11 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Resolution providing for the printing of the mayor's inaugural 

ADDRESS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the city clerk be authorized and instructed to have printed 

copies of the mayor's inaugural address; the expense of the same to be 

charged to the account of printing and stationery. 
Passed January 25, 1916. 



Resolution providing for the printing of rosters of the city 
government. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the present 

city government and cause copies thereof to be printed and that the 

expense of printing the same be charged to the account of printing and 

stationery. 

Passed January 25, 1916. 



Resolution in relation to paying salaries, pay-rolls and rents. 
Resolved by the" Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his warrant on 
the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, pay-rolls and rents as 
the same shall become due during the present municipal term, and all 
bills so paid shall be laid before the committee on accounts and claims 
at their next meeting. 

Passed January 25, 1916. 



Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and bind- 
ing the annual city reports. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed pro- 
posals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1915 and 
submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full power to 
act in the matter. 

Passed January 25, 1916. / 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and buildings 
to make current repairs. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Lands and Buildings be authorized to ex- 
pend uch sums as may be necessary for current repairs, not exceeding 
1 hree hundred dollars in any one month, the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for repairs to buildings. 
Passed January 25, 1916. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding fifty 
thousand dollars. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) 
for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the year 1916, upon 
such terms and for such amounts as the commi;tee shall determine. 
Passed February 14, 1916. 



Resolution relating to the transfer of certain cemetery trust 

FUNDS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

The mayor and city treasurer are hereby authorized and empowered 
to give the note of the city for the amount of certain cemetery trust 
funds now in the general account, in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 162 of the New Hampshire Session Laws of 1915. 
Passed February 14, 1916. 



Resolution repealing a resolution relating to a temporary 
loan. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the resolution passed February 14, 1916, authorizing the Com- 
mittee on Finance to borrow a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars 
($50,000) for current expenses in anticipation of taxes for the year 1916 
be, and the same is, hereby repealed. 
Passed March 2, 1916. 



Resolution in relation to temporary loan not exceeding fifty 
thousand dollars ($50,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars for ex- 



RESOLUTIONS. 13 

penses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 1916 upon such 
terms and for such amounts as the committee shall determine, said 
loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal year. 
Passed March 2, 1916. 



Resolution authorizing re-voking pawn broker's license issued 
to julius silverman. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the pawn broker's license issued Julius Silverman in February 
1916, is hereby revoked and the city clerk be hereby authorized to refund 
to said Julius Silverman the amount of the fee, viz., twenty-five dol- 
lars ($25). 

Passed March 13, 1916. 



Resolution authorizing the transfer of funds of the west con- 
cord SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to transfer the 
sum of five hundred dollars ($500) from the West Concord Sewerage 
Precinct sinking fund account to the city treasurer, said fund to con- 
stitute the sum to be raised for the payment of the amount due on bonds 
for the year 1916. 

Passed March 13, 1916. 



Resolution authorizing the transfer of funds of the Penacook 
sewerage precinct. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to transfer the 
sum of five hundred dollars ($500) from the Penacook Sewerage Pre- 
cinct sinking fund account to the city treasury, said fund to constitute 
the sum to be raised for the payment of the amount due on a bond 
payable October 1, 1916. 
Passed March 13, 1916. 



Resolution relative to the exemption from taxation of certain 
properties of st. paul's school in concord, under the pro- 
visions of chapter 115, laws of 1913, being an act to exempt 
property of educational, charitable and religious institu- 
tions and of temperance societies from taxation. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the taxable items in the funds held by St. Paul's 
School for educational, charitable and religious purposes to an amount 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

in value not exceeding $1,000,000, — and the following items of real estate, 
to wit, the School, the Old Boiler House, Cricket House, Tool House, 
Middle School, Old Infirmary, Chapel, Squash Racket Court, Annex, 
School House, Old Chapel, Gymnasium, Skate^ House, Lower School, 
Manual Training Building, Heating Plant, Library Building, Labora- 
tory, Stone Dormitory, Upper School, Cemetery, New Infirmary, and 
Lower School Study Building, and the land upon which they are located, 
as shown on a plan of Lands and Buildings of St. Paul's School on file 
in the office of Board of Assessors of said Concord, of the value of 
$500,000; be and the same hereby are exempted from taxation under 
the provisions of Chapter 115, Laws of 1913, making the amount of the 
exemption, as valued herein, over and above the $150,000 exemption 
provided in said act, the sum of $1,350,000. 

Sect. 2. The resolution relative to the exemption from taxation of 
certain properties of St. Paul's School in Concord, passed March 27, 
1914, is hereby repealed, and this resolution shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

Passed March 13, 1916. 



Resolution exempting from taxation for a period of ten years 
certain new capital of the rumford printing company. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Rumford Printing Company is hereby exempted from taxa- 
tion for a period of ten years from the date of the passage of this resolu- 
tion upon new capital invested in an extension of its business to be car- 
ried on in the Prescott Piano Factory Building, so called, located on 
North Main Street. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution transferring the balance from precinct lighting 
streets, east concord, to precinct lighting streets, city. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of thirty-three and 87-100 dollars ($33.87) the balance 
due Precinct Lighting Streets, East Concord, January 1, 1916, be, and 
hereby is, transferred to the account of Precinct Lighting Streets, city. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised for the ensuing financial year for the use of the city. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum of 



RESOLUTIONS. 



15 



eighty-five thousand dollars ($85,000) to defray the necessary expenses 
and charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, together 
with the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads and from other 
sources shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds $7,670 . 00 

For payment of interest on temporary loans 1,000.00 

For payment of interest on cemetery trust funds 1,826.18 

For support of city poor 2,500 . 00 

For dependent soldiers, city 150.00 

For incidentals and land damages 8,000 . 00 

For salaries, Board of Aldermen 1,905.00 

For printing and stationery 3,000 .00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000.00 

For aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 750.00 

For aid, Concord District Nursing Association 300 . 00 

For aid, Concord Charity Organization Society 200.00 

For Memorial Day 460.00 

For aid, E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., rent 450.00 

For aid, Military companies • 250.00 

For open air concerts 325 . 00 

For public baths 325 .00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery 1,500.00 

For Old North Cemetery 200.00 

For Maple Grove Cemetery 100.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 150.00 

For Old Fort Cemetery 30.00 

For Millville Cemetery 100.00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery 10.00 

For Soucook Cemetery 30 . 00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25 . 00 

For parks 3,900.00 

For Pecker Athletic Field 25.00 

For John Kimball Playground 500.00 

For Rollins Park Playground 500.00 

For Ward Eight Playground 50.00 

For repairs buildings 2,000.00 

For City Hall bonds 8,000.00 

For Bridge bonds 4,000.00 



$53,231.18 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Salary, Sanitary Officer $1,500.00 

Milk Inspection 300.00 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Fumigation Supplies $100 .00 

Incidentals 800.00 

Contagious Disease 700 . 00 

$3,400.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $18,843 .50 

Fuel 600.00 

Horse Hire, Penacook 25 . 00 

Helmets and Buttons 50 . 00 

Lights 225.00 

Telephone, Private Line 250 . 56 

Incidentals 1,000 .00 

Supplies, Patrol Wagon 400.00 



$21,394.06 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Salaries $3,535 .00 

Books and Incidentals 2,350 .00 

$5,885.00 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, Engineer $1,800.00 

Salaries, Assistants 1,700 .00 

Supplies 100 .00 

Repairs 25 .00 

Incidentals 150.00 

Assessor's Map 500 .00 

$4,275.00 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

General Maintenance $42,000.00 

Catch Basins 1,300.00 

Trees 4,000.00 

Sidewalks and Crossings, New 1,000 . 00 

Sidewalks and Crossings, Repair 2,500 . 00 

Salary, Superintendent 1,800.00 

Permanent Work, Washington Square, Penacook 400.00 

Permanent Work, Park Street, Main to State 1,500.00 

Permanent Work, South Street to Downing 1,300 .00 

Permanent Work, South Main Street, to complete to West 

Street 300.00 

Permanent Work, South State Street, Fayette to Monroe . . 2,800 . 00 



RESOLUTIONS. 17 

Permanent Work, North Main Street, west side, Pitman to 

Center $600.00 

Permanent Work, Pleasant Street, to second crossing, re- 
surfacing 1,825.00 

Permanent Work, North State Street, Penacook to Call, re- 
surfacing 3,200.00 

-Permanent Work, East Penacook Street 500 . 00 

$65,025.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries '. $11,284.00 

Salaries, Semi-Annual 9,140 .00 

Rent Veteran's Association 150.00 

Forage 1,750.00 

Fuel and Lights 1,885 .00 

Fire Alarm 1,000.00 

Horse Hire and Shoeing 1,100 .00 

Washing 52 .00 

Supplies, Auto Combination 200.00 

Penacook Fire Alarm 250 . 00 

Incidentals 2,700.00 

New Hose 500.00 

$30,011.00 

Motor Pumping Engine and Hose Wagon $8,500.00 

SALARIES. 

Mayor .' : $1,500.00 

City Clerk 1,200.00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works 200 . 00 

Overseers of Poor 390 .00 

City Solicitor 800 . 00 

City Treasurer 1,225 .00 

City Messenger 900 .00 

City Physicians 500 .00 

Care, City Clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,000 .00 

Moderators and Ward Clerks 360.00 

Supervisors and Inspectors of Election 960 . 00 

Collector of Taxes 2,000.00 

Building Inspector 200 .00 

Judge, Police Court 1,200 .00 

Clerk, Police Court 350.00 

$14,895.00 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of forty-five 
thousand five hundred seventeen and 50-100 dollars ($45,517.50) for 
the support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, together 
with the income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be appropriated and 
divided among the several school districts according to the valuation 
thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
cemeteries of the city one half of the income from the sale of lots and 
grading, which sum shall be deposited by the superintendent, or others 
receiving them, in the city treasury. The care of lots for which the 
city holds trust funds shall be paid from the money appropriated for 
the care of cemeteries and so much of the income of these trust funds as 
may be thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at the 
close of the year and the remainder in each instance credited to the 
individual fund. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
use of the public library in the purchase of books the amount collected 
for fines. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the sewerage precinct for the ensuing financial 

YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Sewerage Precinct of 
said city the sum of ten thousand seven hundred fifty dollars ($10,750) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For repairs and construction $8,000 

For interest on bonds ' 2,750 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



RESOLUTIONS. 19 

Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the penacook sewerage precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of tfie City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook Sewerage 
Precinct the sum of eight hundred twenty-five dollars ($825) to defray 
the necessarj^ expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs $200 

For the payment of bond due July 1, 1916 500 

For the payment of interest that may become due on precinct 
bonds 125 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the w t est concord sewerage precinct for the ensu- 
ing financial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord 
Sewerage Precinct the sum of sixty-three dollars ($63) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For the payment of interest that may become due on precinct 
bonds v . . . . $63 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
LIMITS OF ST. Paul's school SEWERAGE PRECINCT for THE ENSU- 
ING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within the St. Paul's School Sew- 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

erage Precinct, the sum of fifty dollars ($50) to defray the necessary 
expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, 
which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For repairs $50 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the garbage precinct for the ensuing financial 

YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Garbage Precinct of 
said city, the sum of nine thousand dollars ($9,000) to defray the neces- 
sary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said precinct . . $9,000 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the street sprinkling precinct in ward one. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Street Sprinkling 
Precinct in Ward One the sum of four hundred twenty-five dollars ($425) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $425 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



RESOLUTIONS. 21 

Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the street sprinkling precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the limits of the Street 
Sprinkling Precinct of said city, the sum of eight thousand dollars 
($8,000) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For sprinkling streets $8,000 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the lighting precinct for the ensuing financial 

YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Lighting Precinct of 
said city the sum of eighteen thousand nine hundred dollars ($18,900) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets $18,900 

Sect 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 29, 1916. 



Resolution authorizing the lands and building committee to 
lease the auditorium to the union evangelistic campaign in 
concord, new hampshire. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. The Lands and Buildings Committee is hereby author- 
ized to lease the auditorium to the Union Evangelistic Campaign in 
Concord, New Hampshire, for such length of time and for such rent as 
said committee shall determine. 
Passed April 10, 1916. 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriating money for supplies for city officers. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of four hundred thirty-nine and 15-100 dollars ($439.15) 
be, and hereby is, appropriated for the purchase of a Wales Adding 
Machine and a Fox typewriter for the office of the city engineer; one 
L. C. Smith typewriter for the Police Department; and one L. C. Smith 
typewriter for the office of the city clerk. The amount thus expended 
shall be charged to the appropriation for incidentals and Land Dam- 
;es. 

Passed April 10, 1916. 



Resolution in relation to coal, wood and ice. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the Committee on Finance be, and hereby is, directed to ask for 

bids for supplying the city with coal, wood and ice for the ensuing year, 

and that said committee have full power to accept or reject any bids 

offered. 

Passed April 24, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money for alterations and repairs on 
the good will hose house. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred and fifteen dollars ($615) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, to pay for alterations and repairs on the Good Will 
Hose House. Said sum to be expended under the direction of the Com- 
mittee on Lands and Buildings. 
Passed April 24, 1916. 



Resolution in relation to temporary loan not exceeding fifty 
thousand dollars ($50,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars for ex- 
penses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 1916 upon such 
terms and for such amounts as the committee shall determine, said loan 
to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal year. 
Passed April 24, 1916. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 23 

Resolution relating to the abatement of taxes on certain prop- 
erty OF JOHN A. PILLSBURY, EMMA E. PILLSBURY AND THOMAS S. 
PILLSBURY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That all the charges above and over the sum of $300 which have 
accrued to April 1, 1916, on all the unpaid taxes assessed against the 
property of John A. Pillsbury, Emma E. Pillsbury and Thomas S. Pills- 
bury located at 111 North State Street and bounded by said State Street, 
Beacon Street, Washington Street and by other land of said John A. 
Pillsbury, be, and hereby are, abated. 
Passed May 8, 1916. 



Resolution donating the sum of twenty-five dollars out of the 
income from the david osgood trust. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be hereby 
donated out of the income from the David Osgood trust, to the poor 
children of the French Parochial School, who are inhabitants of the City 
of Concord, for the purpose of buying school books for said children. 

Sect. 2. That said sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be paid to and 
expended under the direction of the principal of said school. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 8, 1916. 



Resolution providing for a discount on taxes paid prior to july 
15, 1916. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That a discount of 2 per cent, shall be allowed on all taxes assessed 

for the year 1916 which are paid on or before the fifteenth day of July, 

1916. 

Passed May 8, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchasing of a motor- 
cycle FOR THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of $218 (two hundred eighteen dollars) 
be, and the same is hereby appropriated, for the purchasing of a motor- 
cycle, for the use of the Police Department; said sum to be expended 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

under the direction of the city marshal, and charged to the account of 
Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 24, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money to equip a dental clinic for 
children of concord. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury, not otherwise appropriated, 
for the equipment of a dental clinic for children residing in the City of 
Concord. Said sum to be expended under the direction of the Finance 
Committee. , 

Passed June 12, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay the balance due on con- 
struction OF SEW ALL'S FALLS BRIDGE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and hereby is, ap- 
propriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated 
to pay the balance due on construction of Sewall's Falls Bridge. The 
same being money raised by sale of bridge bonds June, 1915. 
Passed July 10, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of two pul- 

MOTORS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred seventy dollars ($370) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated for the purchase of two pulmotors and two extra oxygen 
cylinders for the use of the Police Department. Said sum to be expended 
under the direction of the Finance Committee and charged to the ac- 
count of Incidentals and Land Damages. 
Passed July 10, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money to repair the fire alarm bell 
used at east concord. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the sum of thirty-five dollars be appropriated, for repairs on 

the fire alarm bell used at East Concord. Said sum to be charged to 

the account of Incidentals and Land Damages. 
Passed July 10, 1916. 



RESOLUTIONS. , 25 

Resolution appropriating the sum of six hundred dollars for 
printing and stationery. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred dollars ($600) be, and the same is hereby, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, for printing and stationery. 
Passed August 14, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1915 on 
property sold to the city for taxes in 1913 and 1914. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1 . That the sum of three hundred thirty-nine dollars ($339) 
be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes on property assessed in 
1915 that was sold to the city for taxes in 1913 and 1914. 

Sect. 2. The city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the col- 
lector of taxes said amount of three hundred thirty-nine dollars ($339). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 14, 1916. 



I 

Resolution appropriating six hundred eighty-seven and 48-100 
dollars ($687.48) to pay for real estate sold to the city of 
concord for unpaid taxes for the year 1915. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of six hundred eighty-seven and 48-100 dollars ($687.48) 
be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated to pay the amount due the City of Con- 
cord for real estate purchased at the tax collector's sale of real estate 
for the unpaid taxes for the year 1915. 
Passed August 14, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of a piano for 
the auditorium. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated for the purchase of a piano for the auditorium, said sum 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

to be expended under the direction of the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings and charged to the account of Incidentals and Land Damages. 
Passed September 11, 1916. 



Resolution relative to the discontinuance of a portion of the 
dunbarton road in millville. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a certain portion of the Dunbarton Road, so called, at Millville, 
in said Concord, described as follows : 

"Beginning at a point in the intersection of the center line of Dun- 
barton Road with the southerly side line of Hopkinton Road; thence 
southwesterly along said center line of Dunbarton Road 1083 feet, more 
or less, to the intersection of said center line of Dunbarton Road with 
the center line of the private way southerly past the Sheldon Library, 
from the point marked "C" to the point marked "D" on the plan an- 
' nexed hereto." 

be, and the same is hereby discontinued, so far as the power of the said 
Board of Aldermen of said City of Concord extends, upon condition 
that St. Paul's School, the petitioner for said discontinuance, shall, at 
its own cost and expense, and before said discontinuance shall finally 
become effective, construct a new highway, subject to the approval of 
and the acceptance by the Board of Public Works of said Concord, from 
the point marked "A" to the point marked "B" on the plan annexed 
hereto; and that a petition for said discontinuance, upon the aforesaid 
conditions, be made forthwith to the Superior Court for Merrimack 
County, for the consent of the court thereto, said proceedings to be at 
the cost and expense of St. Paul's School; and the mayor of said City of 
Concord is hereby authorized to sign such petition in the name of said 
city upon receiving reasonable indemnity against said cost and expense, 
and an agreement satisfactory to the mayor of said city by St. Paul's 
School, providing that the city shall at all times have the right to enter 
the road so discontinued for the purpose of laying, relaying or repairing 
city water pipes therein. 
Passed November 13, 1916. 



Resolution relative to the discontinuance of a portion of the 
dunbarton road in millville. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That a certain portion of the Dunbarton Road, so called, at Millville, 

in said Concord, described as follows : 

"Beginning at a point in the intersection of the center line of Dun- 



RESOLUTIONS. 27 

barton Road with the center line of the private way southerly past the 
Sheldon Library; thence southwesterly along said center line of Dun- 
barton Road 1473 feet, more or less, to the intersection of said center 
line of Dunbarton Road with the easterly side line of the highway lead- 
ing from the Dunbarton Road to the Hopkinton Road, from a point 
marked "D" to a point marked "E" on the plan annexed hereto." 
be, and the same is hereby discontinued, upon condition that St. Paul's 
School, the petitioner for said discontinuance, shall, at its own cost and 
expense, and before said discontinuance shall finally become effective, 
construct a new highway, subject to the approval of and the acceptance 
by the Board of Public Works of said Concord, from the point marked 
"A" to the point marked "B" on the plan annexed hereto, — and upon 
further condition that an agreement be executed by St. Paul's School, 
providing that the city shall at all times have the right to enter the road 
so discontinued for the purpose of laying, relaying or repairing city water 
pipes therein. 

Passed November 13, 1916. 



Resolution relative to the laying out of a highway over land 
of st. paul's school in milville. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a public highway be, and the same is hereby laid out and estab- 
lished in Millville, in said Concord, over land of St. Paul's School and 
the Orphans' Home at Concord, said highway being described as fol- 
lows: 

"Beginning at a point in the center line of Pleasant Street 380.5 feet 
easterly of a point 30 feet from and at right angles to a stone bound in 
the southerly side line of Pleasant Street northerly from the Alumni 
House of said St. Paul's School; thence southwesterly, curving to the 
left with a radius of 118.31 feet, 83 feet to said southerly side-line of 
Pleasant Street at a point 301.7 feet easterly along said side-line from 
said first mentioned stone bound; thence following the same curve 32 
feet to a point; thence south 17° 0' west 296.5 feet to a point; thence 
southwesterly, curving to the left, with a radius of 2864.93 feet, 340 
feet to a point; thence south 10° 12' west 200.0 feet to a point; thence 
southerly and westerly curving to the right with a radius of 1146.28 
feet, 1158.6 feet to a point; thence south 68° 08' west 506.5 feet to a 
point; thence westerly, curving to the right with a radius of 2864.93 
feet, 300.0 feet to a point; thence south 74° OS' west 113.2 feet to a 
point; thence westerly, curving to the right with a radius of 1910.08 
feet, 342.2 feet to a point; thence south 84° 24' west 152.8 feet to a 
point; thence westerly, curving to the left with a radius of 1432.69 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

feet, 375.0 feet to a point; thence south 69° 24' west 267.5 feet to a 
point; thence westerly, curving to the right with a radius of 1910.08 
feet, 191.7 feet to a point; thence south 75° 09' west 561.0 feet to a 
point in the intersection of the center line of said proposed highway 
with the present Dunbarton Road, said description being of the center 
line of said proposed road, which shall be 60 feet in width,- — said highway 
extending from the point marked "A" to the point marked "B, " on the 
plan annexed hereto." 

That said highway shall be constructed by St. Paul's School without 
cost or expense to said City of Concord, including all necessary bridges, 
culverts, rails, and walks, and said highway shall be built, in all respects, 
subject to the approval and acceptance of the Board of Public Works of 
said City of Concord. 

Passed November 13, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money for a municipal Christmas tree. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred twenty-five dollars be, and hereby is, 
appropriated for a municipal Christmas Tree celebration on December 
24, 1916, said sum to be expended under the direction of a committee 
consisting of the Mayor, Aldermen Lee and Brunei and to be charged 
to the account of Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Passed December 11, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating seventeen hundred dollars to settle 
the ordway and moore claims. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of seventeen hundred dollars ($1,700) be, 
and the same is, hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for the purpose of settling the claims of Per- 
ley W. Ordway and Arnold W. Moore against the city. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed December 11, 1916. 



RESOLUTIONS. 29 

Resolution appropriating money for the erection of two ice 
hockey rinks. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriated for the building of two ice hockey rinks at White's Park 
for the use of the school children. The same to be charged to the ac- 
count of Incidentals and Land Damages and to be expended under the 
direction of the mayor. 

Passed December 29, 1916. 



Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the several 
departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of forty-three hundred thirty-nine and 
69-100 dollars ($4339.69) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay outstanding 
claims as follows: 

City Poor $639 .62 

Fire Department 158 .46 

Incidentals and Land Damages 2,330 . 93 

Interest, Temporary Loans 620 . 47 

Printing and Stationery 125 .21 

Salaries 465 .00 



$4,339.69 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sewers 
for the year 1916 the sum of forty and 66-100 dollars ($40.66), the same 
being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for garbage 
for the year 1916 the sum of one hundred twenty-two and 18-100 dol- 
lars ($122.18), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sprink- 
ling for the year 1916 the sum of sixty-seven and 80-100 dollars ($67.80), 
the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 8, 1917. 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and binding 
the annual city reports. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed pro- 
posals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1916 and 
submit the same to the Finance Committee, who shall have full power 
to act in the matter. 
Passed January 8, 1917. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1916. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, 1916. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

HON. NATHANIEL W. HOBBS. 

Office: City Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per annum, 
with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts and Claims. 



Aldermen-at-Large . 

Term Expires January, 1918. 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 60 South State Street 
MICHAEL J. LEE, 59 South Main Street 

Term Expires January, 1920. 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, Penacook 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 9 Redwood Avenue 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward Aldermen. 
Term Expires January, 1918. 

Ward 1— FRED M. DODGE, Penacook 

Ward 2— GEORGE O. ROBINSON, East Concord 

Ward 3— HENRY M. RICHARDSON, West Concord 
Ward 4— FREDERICK H. HILL, 97 Warren Street 

Ward 5— GEORGE ARTHUR FOSTER, 

26 North Spring Street 
Ward £— THOMAS J. DYER, 30 South Main Street 
Ward 7— SHUBAEL P. DEARBORN, 35 Clinton Street 
Ward 8— WILLIAM L. REAGAN, 

37 South Main Street 
Ward 9— ROY W. FRASER, 4 Highland Street 



CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, SI, 200 per annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 
RICHARD A. BROWN, Term expires, January, 19 18 
ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, " " " 1918 

MICHAEL J. LEE, " " " 1918 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, " " " 1920 

FRED I. BLACKWOOD, " " " 1920 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, " " " 1920 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Clerk. 

Salary, $200 per annum. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 33 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Brunei, Brown, Reagan. 
On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Dyer, Dearborn, Robinson. 
On Elections and Returns — Aldermen Reagan, Foster, Dyer. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Richardson, Dearbon, Hill. 
On Finance — 

The Mayor; Aldermen Sturtevant, Davis, Lee, Foster. 
On Fire Department — Aldermen Dodge, Robinson, Fraser. 
On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Lee, Richardson, Davis. 
On Police and License — Aldermen Blackwood, Hill, Dodge. 
On Public Instruction — 

Aldermen Sturtevant, Blackwood, Fraser. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance of 
the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and $25 as Treasurer 
of Cemeteries. 

ISAAC HILL. 

Office : National State Capital Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,800 per annum 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 

CITY MESSENGER. 

Eleoted biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $900 per annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to satis- 
faction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of first $60,000; seven and 
one- half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

SETH R. DOLE. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $750 per annum. Clerk, $1,500 per annum. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1922 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1920 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1918 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salary, $1,800. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,500 per annum, 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 35 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $450 per annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Eleoted biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $50 per annum.. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

< Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $800 per annum. 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward 1— FRED M. DODGE, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 2— GEORGE O. ROBINSON, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9— HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Hall. 

Salary, $3">0 per annum. 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, SI, 500 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Saiary, $1,200 per annum. 

VICTOR I. MOORE. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Term, 
unlimited. Salary, $2.50 per day for first year, and $2.70 per day thereafter. 

Samuel L. Bachelder, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $1,050 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $2.75 per day. 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

George H. Silsby, Edward J. McGirr, 

Harry L. Woodward, Joseph E. Silva, 

Charles H. Guilbault, Fred N. Marden, 

John B. Long, Frank B. McDaniels. 
James J. Halligan, 

Richard C. McGarey, Chauffeur, No. 1. 
Axel Swanson, Chauffeur, No. 2. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



3? 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 



W. A. Little, 
George G. Allen, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
Frank S. Rogers, 
Jonas Welcome, 
Thomas M. Harrison, 
Nelson Forest, 
Charles E. Kelley, 



Joseph A. Flanders, 
Arthur H. Rees, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
John McGirr, 
Willie A. Flanders, 
Earl D. Gaskell, 
Walter H. Bean, 
Frank E. Brooks. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by the City Marshal, subject to confirmation by the Board of Aldermen. 
Salary, $2.50 each per day of actual service. 



Almah C. Leavitt, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowell, 
Edward M. Nason, 
William H. Hammond, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Charles Ada, 
Arthur J. Taylor, 
Alfred H. Walker, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Harry R. Sturm, 
William J. Ahern, 
Horace B. Annis, 
Albert P. Davis, 
Frank W. Johnson, 
John E. Gay, 



Edson J. Ormsbee, 
Judson F. Hoit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Milton Colby, 
Asbury F. Tandy, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor, 
Clarence W. Brown, 
Edward H. Smart, 
James J. Collins, 
George N. Fellows, 
William A. Kelley, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Charles M. Norris, 
W. H. Bean, 
Frank T. Powell, 
Timothy P. Reardon, 
Thomas Harrison. 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder* 
men. Salary, none. 

Ward 1— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 2— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
WardS— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward 6— REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward 8— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward 9— GEORGE V. HILL. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,100 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $550 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 



Salary, $100 per annum. 

RUTH M. CHASE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



39 



CITY WATER WORKS. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Salary, none. 

Office: Room 1, City Hall. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 
SOLON A. CARTER, Term expires March 31, 1917 

1917 
1918 
1918 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 



BURNS P. HODGMAN, 

N. E. MARTIN, 

H. H. DUDLEY, 

EDSON J. HILL, 

CHARLES R. WALKER, 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, 

President — Solon A. Carter, 
Clerk — Edson J. Hill. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, $2,000 per annum. Term, 

unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, Term expires January, 1918 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, " " " 1919 

ISAAC HILL, " " " 1920 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,250 per annum and 

rent of house. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 
FOR PRECINCT. 
Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $75 per annum. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 41 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

M. J. LACROIX. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 

Salary, $200 per annum. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

MERVIN E. BANKS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio. 
DR. FRED A. SPRAGUE. 



42 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

The City Clerk is made Registrar by General Laws. Fees, 15 cents for each birth, 
marriage and death received, recorded and returned to the State Registrar. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 

No salary. 

WILL B. HOWE, City Engineer 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief of the Fire Department 
PERCY R. SANDERS, Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confirmation 
by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 



JOHN P. GEORGE, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 
BEN C. WHITE, 
WILLIS G. C. KIMBALL, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 



Term expires January, 1917 
1917 
1918 
1918 
1919 
1919 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 43 

CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward /, consolidated) ap- 
pointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confiimation by 
Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, Term expires January, 1917 
D. WARREN FOX, " " " 1918 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, " " " 1919 

Ward 2. 

SCOTT FRENCH, Term expires January, 1917 

C. A. CHAMBERLIN, " " " 1918 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, " " " 1919 

Ward 3. 

ERVIN E. WEBBER, Term expires January, 1917 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, " " " 1918 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, " " " 1919 

Ward 7. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, Term expires January, 1917 
J. NEWTON ABBOTT, " " " 1918 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " " " 1919 

Ward 8. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT, Term expires January, 1917 

ALMAH C. LEAVITT, " " " 1918 

ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, " " " 1919 



44 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 



CHARLES G. REMICK, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
FRANK J. PILLSBURY, 
EDWARD A. MOULTON, 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 



Term expires March, 1917 
1917 
1918 
1918 
1919 
1919 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

FRED N. HAMMOND. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY, 
FRANK J. KELLEY. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 45 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, 9-2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
EVERETT H. RUNNELLS. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents each for all 
other creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 



JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, for sealing each scale beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 cents, and for 
each measure, 10 cents; five or more to one person, half price — paid by owners of 
scales or measures. 

WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; 
butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — paid by party for 
whom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, H. C. Morgan, 

Thomas Hill, R. J. Rowland, 

John H. Mercer, Archie Black, 

Everett L. Davis, W. D. Stearns, 

Fred B. Clark, Charles H. Smith, 

Hallett E. Patten, Asher E. Ormsbee, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



47 



Arthur N. Day, 
William H. Meserve, 
John E. Rossell, 
David Rossell, 
Nelson Forrest, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 
James F. Fitzgerald, 
John H. Flanders, 
Fred H. Perley, 
Amos J. Peaslee, 
Mark M. Blanchard, 
Simeon Partridge, 
Charles E. Hardy, 
Alphonse King, / 

William Gooden, 
Harry Lee, 
Guy Rowell, 
Otis Lynch, 
Arthur E. Rowell, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
Charles J. Sawyer, 
E. E. Young, 



Fred I. Rolfe, 
William J. Mullen, 
Elmer E. Young, 
Henry A. Brown, 

F. H. Smith, 
James B. Riley, 

G. N. Hills, 
Charles E. Cook, 
Charles Peaslee, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brown, 
William F. Cutting, 
E. F. Miller, 

Earl Woodbury, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 
S. A. Clark, 
C. J. Roers, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
Leigh F. Woodman, 
Alvin B. Edmunds. 



CITY WEIGHER. 
WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Edward A. Moulton, 
George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles F. Mudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Fred Rollins, 
Moses E. Haines. 



48 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



William Rowell. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M.; boards and 
timber, 16 cents per M.: measuring cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents 
per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert O. Preston, 
William A. Chesley, 
Alfred Clark, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Harry Jones, 
William Pierce, 
George Darrah, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Smith, 
Gilbert H. Berry, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Henry Rolfe, 
E. A. Cole, 
William E. Virgin, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
O. B. Jerome, 
Hallett E. Patten, 
George Wilkins, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Clinton O. Partridge, 
Levi M. Shannon, 



Silas Wiggin, 
Daniel Griffiths, 
W. F. Hayward, 
F. E. Frost, 
Leonard H. Smith, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
B. J. Prescott, 
Charles S. Robinson, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Richard E. Nelson, 
Andrew S. Farnum, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Nathaniel P. Richardson, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
W. F. Frost, 
E. F. Miller, 
George Oakley, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 
Leslie Hammond, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



49 



Charles M. Brown, 
Frank L. Swett. 
Harvey H. Hay ward, 
William F. Hoyt, 
I. A. Burbank, 
Stephen W. Newton, 



Herbert W. Rolfe, 
N. B. Flanders, 
Charles C. Osgood, 
Oliver C. Dimond. 
Albert Saltmarsh, 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
Simeon Partridge, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
Michael J. Lee, 
John E. Frye. 
W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Robbins, 
William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
Albert S. Trask, 
William L. Reagan, 
Frederick T. Converse, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
James H. Brannigan, 



Harry H. Kennedy, 
John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Edward H. Donovan, 
Ned J. Morrill, 
Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 
George E. Robinson, 
Joseph J. Booth, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Philip King, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
E. H. Smart. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 

No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio. 
WILL B. HOWE, ex-offitio. 
FRED CONVERSE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 51 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward 1— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
RICHARD McBRIDE, JR., 
EPHRAIM ROY. 

Ward 2— FREEMAN F. POTTER, 
C. E. ROBINSON, 
WYMAN D. STEARNS. 

Ward 3— CLARENCE R. BLANCHARD, 
ROBERT W. BROWN, 
GUY A. SWENSON. 

Ward 4— HARRY H. KENNEDY, 
J. WESLEY PLUMMER, 
EDWARD W. LEACH. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
ANTONIO J. SOUZA, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward 6— WILL B. HOWE, 

WARREN E. EMERSON, 
ARTHUR H. KNOWLTON. 

Ward 7— GEORGE A. HILL, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HARRIS S. PARMENTER. 

Ward 8— FRED SMITH, 

CHARLES H. BRESNAHAN, 
JAMES BRANNIGAN. 

Ward 9—R. E. DONOVAN, 

R. B. GALLAGHER, 
JAMES J. REEN. 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD CLERKS. 

Ward 1— LOUIS F. CORBETT. 
Ward 2— DANIEL W. SANBORN. 
Ward 3— EDWARD P. ROBINSON. 
Ward 4— LOUIS P. ELKINS. 
Ward 5— RAY E. BURKETT. 
Ward 6— LOUIS I. MOULTON. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward 8— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward 9—F. D. KENNEY. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward 1— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward 2— RALPH L. STEARNS. 
Ward 3— CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
Ward 4— JOSEPH S. OTIS. 
Ward 5— EDWARD C. NILES. 
Ward tf— CHARLES DUNCAN. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward 8— MICHAEL MULCAHY. 
Ward 9— BARTHOLOMEW COLLINS. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



53 



MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 1853, and 
until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor has been elected 
for two years at each biennial election in November. Under the City Charter, 
adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in December, 1910, for one year, and 
biennially thereafter in November, beginning in the year 1911. 



Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 

" RUFUS CLEMENTS,* 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 

" MOSES T. WILLARD, 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS, 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 

" HORACE A. BROWN,f 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,J 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 

" NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 

* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 
t Term closed in November, 1880. 
t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



1 853-' 54. 

'55. 

1856-'57-'58. 

1859-'60. 

1861-'62. 

1 863-' 64. 

'65. 

1866-'67. 

1868-'69. 

1870-71. 
1872-'73-'74-'75. 

1876-77. 

1878-79-'80. 

1880-'81-'82. 

1883-'84-'85-'86. 

1887-'88. 

1889-'90. 

1891-'92. 

1893-'94. 

1895-'96. 

1897-'98. 
1899-1900. 

1901-'02. 
, 1903-'08. 

1909-'15. 

1916- 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1916-1917. 



Edward C. Niles, Esq President 

Mrs. Fanny E. Minot Secretary 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 
1917. 



Dr. Dennis E. Sullivan, 7 North State Street 

Mrs. Fanny E. Minot, 23 South State Street 

Mr. Omar S. Swenson, 14 Auburn Street 

1918. 

Edward C. Niles, Esq., 119 School Street 

Dr. Charles Duncan, 43 South Spring Street 

Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 123 North State Street 

1919. 

Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 89 North State Street 
Mrs. Lillian R. Shepard, Hutchins St., West Concord 

Rev. Charles H. Wing, 72 North State Street 



58 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

FINANCE. 

Mr. Dudley. Dr. Sullivan. Dr. Duncan. 



Mr. Niles. 



high school. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Dr. Duncan. 



grammar schools. 
Dr. Sullivan. Mr. Wing. Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Minot. 



primary schools. 

Mr. Wing. Mrs. Shepard. 



kindergartens. 
Mrs. Morrill. Dr. Duncan. Mrs. Shepard. 

buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Swenson. Mr. Dudley. Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Wing. 



discipline. 
Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



HYGIENE. 

Mrs. Morrill. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mr. Swenson. 



MANUAL TRAINING. 

Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mrs. Minot. 



Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 
MUSIC. 

Mrs. Morrill. Mr. Swenson. 



59 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Minot. 



DRAWING. 

Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



text-books. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Wing. 



training school. 
Mrs. Shepard. Mr. Wing. Dr. Sullivan. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



night school. 
Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Dudley. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL 

AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett. 
3 Pine Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Office open 8 to 12 a. m., 
1.30 to 6 p. m. Telephone, 55 M. 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER. 

Arthur James Taylor. 
6 Avon Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.45 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. 
Telephone, 725M. 



60 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLERK. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 

4 Rockingham Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 

Office hours: 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 
Telephone, 702. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Elizabeth Maria Murphy. 
442 North State Street, West Concord, N. H. 

Office hours: 4 to 5 p. m., Mondays and Thursdays, at 
Superintendent's office. Telephone, 321M. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

Louis C. Merrill Moderator. 

Herbert W. Rainie Clerk. 

Henry H. Metcalf and Anson S. Marshall Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION. 



To the Citizens of Union School District: 

The past year of our school life has been comparatively 
uneventful. And yet, as always, there have been such 
changes and innovations as accompany and mark a healthy 
growth. i 

The ungraded school for pupils who for one reason or 
another are retarded in their school work has increased 
both in attendance and in usefulness. The dental clinic, 
conducted through the public-spirited generosity of the 
dental profession, is doing a most useful work, and, to use 
a trite but expressive phrase, is filling a long-felt want, — 
a want the full extent of which was not appreciated until 
the means for meeting it were supplied. 

Within five or six years all the salaries of the teachers in 
the district have been substantially increased. And yet 
the recent marked increase in the general cost of living 
has made it apparent that the salaries as at present fixed 
are in many if not in all cases inadequate. It must be 
certain that if thej r were right when established, they are 
not right now. To raise the greater part of the salaries 
fifty dollars a year, according to a schedule prepared by a 
committee of the board, would involve an additional 
annual expense of about five thousand dollars. To raise 
them all on the basis proposed by the teachers' association 
would cost about fourteen thousand dollars annually. The 
question will be submitted to the voters at the annual 
district meeting, that they may pass upon it intelligently 
and themselves assume the responsibility for whatever 
increase is made. 

A thorough inspection of all our school buildings has dis- 
closed the fact that a number of the older buildings fall far 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

short of the legal requirements in regard to lighting. The 
law upon this point is explicit, and demands action on our 
part. Appropriations will be requested sufficient to meet 
the expense of the requisite reconstruction. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
CHARLES R. DI}NCAN, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, . 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
CHARLES H. WING, 

Board of Education. 



REPORT OF FINANCIAL AGENT OF UNION 
SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



March 23, 1916 to March 20, 1917. 
Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 



received. 



Balance on hand March 23, 1916. $815.99 

Received from city, appropriated by law, 39,028 . 09 

appropriated by Union School 



District, 


76,374.60 


literary fund, 


2,035.20 


dog tax, 


1,117.83 


Abial Walker fund, 


34.30 


cash sales for miscellaneous, 


140.49 


supplies, 


15.29 


repairs, 


8.30 


trucking, 


2.87 


manual training, 


363.23 


text-books, 


208.34 


tuition, 


4,259.28 




$124,403.81 


EXPENDED. 




Fuel, 


$7,203.95 


Miscellaneous, 


1,573.21 


Supplies, 


2,181.82 


Repairs, 


3,791.35 


Trucking, 


202.16 


Transportation, 


1,184.17 


Care of houses (maintenance), 


362.98 


Care of houses (salaries), 


6,982.20 


Insurance, 


992.50 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Manual training (maintenance), 


$1,655.12 


Manual training (salaries), 


9,759.03 


Military drill (maintenance), 


40.00 


Military drill (salaries), 


84.20 


Salaries, 


78,087.80 


Text-books, 


5,655.74 


Night school (maintenance), 


1.60 


Night school (salaries), 


330.00 


Balance, 


4,315.98 




$124,403.81 



Concord, N. H. March 21, 1917. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the financial agent of Union School District, 
and find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper voucher 
for each item. 

HENRY H. METCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 



COST PER CAPITA. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses . $41 . 14 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses, 

based on average membership . . . . 45 . 19 

Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, draw- 
ing, superintendent, etc. 26 . 18 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing and superintendent 24 . 32 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 
drawing, superintendent, in all schools below 
the high school 18.39 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing, superintendent, in the high school . 36 . 28 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



65 



Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools $1.93 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in high 

school ' 2.03 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools below high school .27 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material . . .85 

Cost per pupil for kindergarten material and 

tuition 25.68 

Cost per pupil for paper .72 

Cost per pupil for pens .01 

Cost per pupil for pencils 006 

Cost per pupil for manual training, entire . . 7 . 69 
Cost per pupil for manual training, salaries . . 6 . 57 
Cost per pupil for manual training, material . 1.11 
Cost per pupil for wood and iron-working, inclu- 
sive of instruction 14 . 40 

Cost per pupil for wood and iron-working, exclu- 
sive of instruction 1 . 93 

Cost per pupil for cooking, inclusive of instruc- 
tion 4.14 

Cost per pupil for cooking, exclusive of instruc- 
tion 1.97 

Cost per pupil for sewing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion ... 3.33 

Cost per pupil for sewing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion : .04 

Cost per pupil for drawing, inclusive of instruc- 
tion .71 

Cost per pupil for drawing, exclusive of instruc- 
tion .11 

Cost per pupil for music, inclusive of instruction . . 52 
Cost per pupil for music, exclusive of instruction . 04 
Cost per pupil for military drill, inclusive of in- 
struction .28 

Cost per pupil for military drill, exclusive of in- 
struction .09 

5 



66 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



TUITION RECEIPTS 

High School 
Walker School 
Garrison School 
Eastman School 
Rumford School 
Kimball School 
Penacook School 
Dewey School . 
Dewey Training School 
Harriet P. Dame School 



5,627.41 
18.47 
10.42 

130.01 
97.47 

126.32 

9.79 

42.00 

80.00 

117.39 



t,259.28 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SCHOOLS. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

In compliance with the rules of your honorable body, I 
am offering my thirty-second annual report upon the con- 
dition of the schools under your charge, it being the fifty- 
first of its series. 

National concern has been more particularly directed 
toward questions of war, peace, and commerce than any- 
thing else. However, educational endeavor has not been 
relaxed nor means neglected to bring it forcibly to public 
notice. The junior high school has come to stay and is 
fast growing in public favor. Vocational education is 
slowly assuming its proper significance and will eventually 
prove its right to recognition as a strong element in our 
educational scheme. Military drill, or physical drill which 
accomplishes practically the same thing, has its many 
strong advocates. I hope some measures will be taken to 
give it a place in our schools if for no other reason than for 
its good effect physically upon the student body. 

Never as before the national government is looking after 
the naturalization and education of its foreign-born popu- 
lation, seeking to cooperate with local boards of education 
in the matter of making the night schools of longer duration, 
more attractive and more efficient. I also call your atten- 
tion to the movement inaugurated by the General Educa- 
tion Board in connection with the Teachers' College of 
Columbia University. This movement contemplates a 
scheme of education radically different from that now gen- 
erally in use. It is based almost wholly upon ideas pro- 
mulgated in the last few years which break away from the 
traditional formal discipline and the so-called cultural 
studies and deals largely with science and modern languages 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

as basal elements. The working out of this scheme will be 
awaited with great concern by all interested in modern 
progressive ideas. 

The State Department still continues its effective efforts 
to raise the standing of public education in New Hampshire. 
Secondary school standards particularly are being most 
carefully looked after and it is time they should be. All 
movements in any sphere of work aimed at improvement 
which interferes with traditional methods provoke much 
acrimonious discussion but such severities almost always 
come from sources where reform is sadly needed. 

The schools of Union School District, generally speaking, 
are on a higher plane than ever before. They are not per- 
fect, never ought to be, and never will be, but they can be 
kept at a high standard of excellence if we all bend our 
energies toward making their condition better each suc- 
cessive year. 

Attendance. 

The number of pupils in the schools has decreased during 
the past two years. This is most noticeable in the lowest 
grades and is largely due to the removal from the city of 
many who were formerly employed in the railroad shops. 
From appearances this exodus has about reached its height 
so that normal gains may be looked for in the succeeding 
years. One room was discontinued in the Walker School, 
made possible by closer grading. One room was also given 
up in the Harriet P. Dame School owing to a decrease in the 
attendance in the higher grades; however, the increasing 
enrollment in the lower grades will soon call for its use 
again. 

I think the large attendance in all the high schools is not 
taken seriously enough by anybody except those immedi- 
ately concerned. The senior high school with an enrollment 
of 491 is badly embarrassed for lack of room. The Parker 
School has 230 pupils, the building being originally in- 
tended for 180. The Chandler School with 133 pupils is 
liandicapped badly with but four rooms for use and no 



SCHOOL REPORT. 69 

assembly hall. Whether a decreased enrollment in the 
lower grades will eventually cause a corresponding decrease 
in the number of high school pupils is a matter of conjecture. 
The efforts of the attendance officer and the school nurse 
have been invaluable in maintaining a good average mem- 
bership. I ask your careful reading of their reports. An 
unusual number of labor certificates have been issued from 
the office of the superintendent many of which were taken 
out by pupils who wish to work Saturdays and after school 
hours but still remain enrolled as pupils. 

The Work of the Schools. 

The special reports cover so much of the detailed work 
that this report must deal with results viewed from the 
broader standpoint. The work of any grade can be judged 
only by a well-defined knowledge of what is good as well as 
what is bad and in daily visits I try to leave written records 
of my views respecting both. The high schools of this 
district are now known as junior high and senior high. 
This division has been maintained for the past six years 
with success as is shown by growing efficiency both in 
scholarship and in discipline. For the most effective work- 
ing condition these schools must be mutually dependent. 
This requires that the work be so arranged as to cause a 
minimum of friction when transition from one school to 
another is made; that there be a frequent interchange of 
ideas among the instructors; that there be as much simi- 
larity in methods of work as the different conditions and the 
varying ages of the pupils will admit and that the text- 
books used should be sequent in topical content and free 
from useless repetition. Many of these things we have 
accomplished to a reasonable extent. Others for obvious 
reasons have not been advanced as far as they should be. 

The conduct of affairs in the senior high school has been 
creditable to a good degree. This may be seen in the re- 
newed energy of the teaching corps, in a discipline some- 
what better maintained and also in positive results from the 
studies. A weakness in the English course has been partly 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

obviated by additional effort in the teaching corps but the 
best results can come only when a logically sequent course 
has been adopted to supplant the poorly arranged line of 
work of former years. Such a scheme is now in force in the 
junior high schools. The best interests of the study de- 
mand that the same or similar ideas progressing in logical 
order be carried on for the two next succeeding years. When 
this has been accomplished, steady progress will begin to 
show itself. The course in mathematics is exceptionally 
strong, having a continuous succession of method through- 
out the first three years and a comprehensive review during 
the last year of the course. The excellent results are due to 
the strong foundation work done in the elementary and the 
junior high schools and to the admirable finish in the senior 
high. The corps of mathematics teachers throughout the 
junior and the senior high schools is one of unusual merit. 

Too much care cannot be used in choosing instructors 
whom we can retain by reason of their conspicuous ability. 
A continuance of incompetency in the teaching corps makes 
first-class work impossible. 

The junior high schools, stepping-stones to success in the 
senior high school, have been ably maintained. The line 
of work and the methods of carrying it out which have pre- 
vailed here for the past few years prove to be exceptional^ 
strong. A class in Latin taught by the direct method under 
Miss Donovan in the Chandler School was novel and force- 
ful but not well-suited to the method which necessarily 
followed. It is doubtful if any other teacher in the city 
could have done this as well as Miss Donovan. It was dis- 
continued because none of the succeeding teachers had been 
instructed in this particular method. 

The course in French, beginning in Class 0, is now super- 
vised by Miss Averill of the senior high school. The 
classes in the Parker School taught by Miss Nettleton follow 
a conversational course to an extent. This work has been 
the subject of much favorable comment by noted educa- 
tors. The classes are large and very much interested. 

Miller's English Composition was introduced into 



SCHOOL REPORT. 71 

Classes M, N, O, and P and seems to be doing excellent 
work. This series should be continued without interruption 
through the two lower classes of the senior high school, to 
make the logical sequence of the work complete. Results 
in all other branches have been satisfactory in the main. 

The elementary schools have reached a stable working 
basis and the plan pursued is successful. Whatever excep- 
tion may be taken to this almost invariably is traceable to 
failures of pupils whose home life is marked by a lack of 
proper parental control. Penmanship is improving, the 
primary requirements having been changed. Gain is mani- 
fested in every succeeding grade. The language books 
now in use are thought to be not well-suited for our present 
needs and they should be replaced by a more modern series. 
I call your attention to improvement in spelling, in geog- 
raphy and to the general excellence of the reading. The 
importance of strong work in these grades is too often lost 
sight of by parents and even by teachers of the higher grades 
where the accomplishments in school work are more fre- 
quently made manifest to the public. We are particularly 
fortunate in having a teaching force recruited always from 
trained teachers and also assisted by the senior students of 
the training school. 

The attendance in the kindergartens has fallen off mate- 
rially this year on account of the infantile paralysis scare of 
last fall the effects of which are still with us, and also to 
vicious outside influences calculated to impair the efficiency 
of this work. The general growth of the kindergarten 
movement is shown by the fact that 570 new ones were 
started in the United States last year. In this city ten 
per cent, more kindergarten children are promoted in the 
first primary grade than those who have never attended 
kindergartens. This failure to be promoted represents an 
economic waste which might be obviated if all children up to 
six years of age were required to attend these schools. 

The special subjects of manual training, cooking, sewing, 
music, drawing and military drill have experienced a year 
of prosperity in nearly every instance. The special features 



72 CITY OF CONCORD. 

in manual training and sewing are the unusual number of 
projects which have been consummated. 

Cooking has been done on lines similar to those of pre- 
vious years with the exception of analytic cooking in the 
senior domestic arts class. This has been carried beyond 
the requirements approved by the State Department, 
which has always condemned the subservience of such 
work to luncheons. This will be better adjusted in the 
interests of the pupils of this course which is one of the 
best in the schools. 

The Dewey training school still continues to perform its 
functions in a highly creditable manner. Next June the 
largest class in its history will be graduated and the state 
will be greatly benefited by the addition of some fine 
teachers to its educational force. Thirteen teachers from 
the senior class have rendered valuable assistance in nearly 
all of the buildings having elementary grades. 

Special School for Backward Children. 

This school was started as an experiment, March 27, 
1916, in one of the unused rooms of the Walker School. 
Miss Ada B. Martin, one of the regular teaching corps, was 
placed in charge of it. Miss Martin is very much interested 
in this kind of work, having received special training for it 
to some extent. 

At the beginning the school was small because attendance 
was limited to pupils in the Walker building, but after one 
term's experience, things began to shape themselves so that, 
with transportation furnished free, pupils from different 
parts of the city were enabled to attend. The enrollment 
increased to such an extent that it was thought best to have 
an assistant and to conduct the school on the one-session 
plan. At present the school is in a fairly nourishing con- 
dition having a maximum enrollment of 22 pupils. There 
can be but little question about the good that this school 
is doing and we hope its sphere of usefulness may be en- 
larged in the future. 

At the noon hour a lunch is prepared and served, to those 



SCHOOL REPORT. 73 

who wish it, consisting of hot cocoa and hot soup. In 
addition the children as a usual thing bring a good lunch 
which consists of the following, varied according to the 
individual homes: sandwiches, cold meat, cake, pie, cookies 
and fruit. Many bring glass jars of cooked fruit, preserves, 
boiled rice, etc. Some bring only a small lunch as they 
have a hot dinner when they reach home. Sometimes 
pupils bring potatoes and apples which are converted into 
mashed potato and apple sauce, respectively, at the School. 
Hand-work of good quality is being done daily in addition 
to regular studies, the character of which may be learned 
from the following enumeration: 

The girls have embroidered, crocheted, and have done 
wood- work. 

The boys have made wooden toys and small baskets. 
Besides these may be found the following: Embroidered 
collars, doilies, aprons, mats,, stenciled table covers, sofa 
pillows, small raffia baskets, pen-wipers, needlebooks, 
picture-frames, crocheted woolen scarfs, toques, holders, 
face-cloth, reins, lace, all kinds of wooden toys, match- 
scratchers, calendars, etc. 

One girl has made four beautiful shawls. Four chairs 
have been caned. One boy has done some good charcoal 
landscapes. A display of this feature of our public school 
work will be made at the end of the spring term. 

Hygienic Drill. 

Various happenings in the past few years have served 
notice on our civilization that not enough attention is being 
paid to the physical development of school children. They 
are said to have neither the erect carriage, the capacity for 
breathing, nor opportunities for taking regular systematic 
exercise which means so much to their general health. 

The requirements of modern education ask so much of 
the regular grade teacher that she does not have the ner- 
vous strength to prepare herself for this work and much 
less to carry it out as it should be. 

Physical degeneration among pupils manifests itself 



74 CITY OF CONCORD. 

not only in physical decline but in moral debasement as 
well. Either one is of suficient gravity to ask of us our 
best efforts to adopt some means for counteracting it. The 
most effective way would be to employ somebody, who has 
had special preparation for this work, to develop and apply 
systematic drill from the lowest to the highest grade. The 
disposition of the citizens a few years ago to furnish an 
athletic field for the schools ought to be interpreted as a 
disposition to furnish children better facilities for improving 
their health. 

Recent tests made at the Parker School prove beyond a 
doubt that standard physical development is rare among 
school children and I am influenced by such conditions to 
ask the Board of Education to consider this matter.. 

Free Dental Clinic. 

In the past year a proposition was made by the dentists 
of the city to equip a room for giving free dental work to 
public school children if the Board of Education would set 
apart such a room for the purpose. This request was 
granted and the teachers' room on the first floor of the 
Walker school building was devoted to the work. Costly 
apparatus of the most approved pattern was installed and 
the first clinic held on Saturday, November 18, 1916, at 
two o'clock in the afternoon. Doctor Young and Doctor 
Albee were the officiating dentists and fifteen children re- 
ceived full or partial treatment. A regular helper was fur- 
nished for this work by the Board of Education. The 
treatment is given only to the children whose parents are 
unable to furnish them such privilege but not to any child 
over fifteen years of age. These clinics are held on Satur- 
day afternoons and a fee of five cents is charged each in- 
dividual to help defray the cost of supplies. The treatment 
consists of examination, extraction (with parents' approval), 
cleaning, plastic filling, and root canal treatment of the 
six anterior teeth when necessary. The benefit derived 
from this feature of our educational system may not be 
estimated easily but it certainly adds much to the hygienic 



SCHOOL REPORT. iO 

efficiency with which our schools are conducted. Too much 
credit cannot be given to the dentists for their enterprise 
and generosity in providing such help, to the Charity Or- 
ganization, to the Concord Electric Co., the Concord Light 
& Power Co., M. E. Clifford & Co., Lee Brothers Co., and 
to Miss Murphy, the school nurse, who has put in much 
extra time to make it such a pronounced success. 

The following work had been done up to Saturday, February 
26: Examinations, 77; cleaning, 63; extractions, 134; fillings 
(cement 43, silver 40, gutta-percha 2, copper-cement 2), 87. 

The dentists who are giving their services are Drs. E. H. 
Albee, W. A. Young, F. H. Rowe, J. H. Worthen, C. R. 
Morton, E. W. Rowe, C. J. Washburn, L. I. Moulton, 
G. E. Rowell, H. H. Ring, H. C, Plaisted, L. C. Plaisted, 
E. S. Cummings, E. A. Rowe, F. C, Rowe, O. F. Mackey. 

Night School. 

The night school of this year began Nov. 13, 1916, 
and closed March 1, 1917. This made one of the longest 
terms we have ever had for the school. The sessions were 
held in the High School and although the enrollment in the 
room devoted to the instruction of the foreign-born popu- 
lation was only half as large as usual yet the people kept 
up a fairly good attendance to the end and made commend- 
able progress. 

The innovation of maintaining classes in cooking and in 
mechanical drawing met with much favor and the attend- 
ance was well sustained. The mechanical drawing was 
conducted by Mr. Taylor of the Morrill School two nights 
a week and cooking by Miss Davis one night a week. The 
results from these two schools were good, much beyond the 
ordinary. If the expense can be justified, such work ought 
to be expanded and perfected in the future. I believe the 
school for the foreign element should be located nearer Main 
Street so that a much larger attendance could be secured. 

Accredited Music in the Schools. 
After having gone through the entire list of cultural 
studies and established the claims of the other perhaps less 



76 CITY OF CONCORD. 

deserving subjects, why, may I ask, is the study of music 
not given its proper place in the curriculum as an accredited 
subject? In this country last year $600,000,000 were ex- 
pended along musical lines. What a tremendous influence 
upon the life of the people. In many cities the study of 
music is given proper credit for graduation from high schools. 
Classes in instrumental instruction are maintained on large 
scales. Surely music has as good claims for recognition as 
those other studies I have frequently mentioned. It has 
a distinct history rich in lore, culture, and interest and its 
faithful study combines all elements that go to make up an 
ideal mental discipline — application, perception, judgment, 
criticism, esthetic culture, rhythm, mathematics, har- 
mony, truth and it appeals to the emotions as nothing else 
can. Why then should a live boy or girl in our secondary 
schools be compelled to make the futile attempt to master 
geometry, Latin, algebra or Greek and labor day after day 
in a vain struggle to satisfy tradition when the same amount 
of energy spent upon lines for which he is naturally fitted 
would give to the world much of which it would be proud. 
The frequency with which we find artists of transcendent 
ability, who have not been able to master elementary public 
school education, having a world reputation in their respect- 
ive professions, leads us to believe that the public school has 
not yet opened up all avenues to cultural education. Such 
people may not be called educated in terms of the school 
yet no one can fail to recognize their masterly contribu- 
tions to the world nor deny the cultural effects of their art. 

The Modern School. 

Much unnecessary and, to a great extent, useless debate 
has been going on in the past few years about the relative 
value of the old and the new ideas of education. If the 
energy used in these oftimes heated discussions had been 
applied to problems of improving the common life of our 
people, to psychological truths and their application to 
prevailing home conditions, the world would be much 
better off. Tradition still clings to the hazy, the remote, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

the atmosphere of bygone ages as the one avenue to the 
greatest culture. The obscurity of time always lends a 
certain charm, even though modern works are advanced in 
many ways over the products of ancient times. 

There are those who seem to think we are living in a past 
age and that nothing new can have any comparable cultural 
value. Others look too far into the future and fail to weigh 
carefully enough the fundamental principles which past 
experience has established. To know fully the failure of 
the classical courses as applied formerly in public school 
work one has only to recall the large number of scholars 
who used to leave school at the end of the elementary course 
or between that time and graduation from the high school 
and, comparing it with the improved conditions now, 
conclude that such courses failed miserably to educate the 
masses. Many of the old ideas will remain, ought to remain 
and must remain to satisfy the needs of that considerable 
part of our people who can adopt them with profit ; but the 
time has gone when they can dominate the general scheme 
of public education. The new order of things compels the 
progressive educator to evolve schemes which shall reduce 
illiteracy and bring the average life to a higher plane of 
existence; who shall express concern for the welfare and uplift 
of the vast majority whom God has decreed shall furnish 
the moving power of our democratic form of government, 
and whose daily life and patriotic spirit shall, through its 
high character, determine our national unity. Culture is 
not the slave of class or subjects but finds its way through 
individual interest. The boy who has mastered Greek, 
Latin, history, or the making of an engine has become cul- 
tured in proportion to the amount of interest and enthusiasm 
it has aroused in him and we may even discover more cul- 
ture in the student of mechanic arts who has applied him- 
self faithfully to his work than in the classical student who 
has been content to live in the disinterested and unoccupied 
part of his class. Culture bows to the enthusiasm which 
begets patient careful study in any line of work and if 
one's occupation in no wise arouses any such response, it 



78 CITY OF CONCORD. 

cannot, in that case, be called cultural. Since our high 
schools have been devoted to the needs of the public at 
large, a great change has been brought about. Just as 
many are pursuing the higher education, perhaps more 
than ever before, and outside of these more are becoming 
cultured, hundreds remaining in school who otherwise 
would long ago have joined the vast army of unskilled 
workers, never having received that additional school ex- 
perience which they are now enjoying. One hundred girls 
in the domestic arts course are one hundred testimonials 
to the foresight of modern educators, and to the efficiency of 
modern ideas. The same can be said of boys in the mechanic 
arts courses and of pupils in the business course. 

Apart from all controversies the true test of our school 
system is the power it gives the youth to assume and meet 
successfully great responsibilities. Everything now points 
to vital changes all over the world. The children of this 
generation must face great crises and they must be prepared 
to solve problems of war, peace, and economics, with which 
this generation has never been confronted. Education must 
perform its part by sinking all wranglings, differences, and 
petty disputes in one great common effort to give our 
children the proper mental, physical, and moral fibre to 
meet all contingencies with a fearless spirit and to be pre- 
pared, in its broadest sense, to defend their lives, their in- 
heritance, and national honor. Never before has such an 
opportunity come to us to teach mankind how to live the 
proper life. It must be done not by bowing submissively 
to tradition but by extending wholesome educational privi- 
leges to all the people through varied lines of activity. 

I appreciate the assistance I have received from all who 
are associated with me in the building up of the school sys- 
tem in this district and extend to them my cordial thanks. 
Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE MASTER OF THE 
HIGH SCHOOL. 



Supt. L. J . Rundlett, Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir: I hereby submit the annual report of the 
Senior High School. 

Attendance. 

The total registration during the first semester was 479. 
Of this number but eight were postgraduates. The present 
enrollment is 491 of whom ten are postgraduates. 

Graduation. 

The class graduating in June, 1916 numbered seventy- 
two. The class which graduated in January, 1916 was 
twenty-seven in number. This makes a total of ninety- 
nine for the entire year which is in excess of any previous 
record. The class of January, 1917 was fifty-one in size. 

Library. 

The most important change in the School has been the 
appointment of a Librarian, made at the beginning of the 
second semester last year. Our books are now catalogued 
and arranged according to the most approved system. The 
library, though small, is good in quality and its resources 
are now fully at the command of the school. In addition 
to her regular work the Librarian has given to each division 
in English a series of talks on the use of books, card cata- 
logues and methods in reference work. These have been 
followed with definite work assigned to each pupil which 
has required putting into actual practice the information 
which has been given. Reference work assigned to pupils 
by other teachers in the school has been done under the 
direction of the Librarian. A reference catalogue has been 
started which promises to be of aid to future classes. There 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

have been added to the library 142 books from St. Paul's 
School and eleven sets of current magazines given by differ- 
ent people. These have all been obtained by the Librarian. 
I feel that this department of the school has been of more 
definite aid during the past year than it ever has been before 
and that its value will increase as it is maintained in the 
future. 

Cooking. 

At the beginning of the first semester it was found 
possible to place the Domestic Arts seniors in cooking in 
the periods immediately preceding the noon recess. The 
plan was then adopted of having the articles cooked sold 
to the teachers for lunch. This has been of decided advan- 
tage. It has given the teachers who have to remain in the 
building a good lunch. It has allowed the cooking of the 
class to be of a quantity and a variety which has given more 
practical experience than would otherwise have been possi- 
ble. 

It has proved an incentive to the class since their work 
was daily tested as all cooking is tested. The income from 
the lunches up to and including February 21, 1917, has 
been $179.41 and the expenditures for material for the same 
period have been $175.95. This means that the work of 
this class has been carried on without expense to the school 
so far as materials used are concerned, an item of no small 
importance in these times of high prices. 

Work of the School. 

In general the work of the school compares well with the 
work of previous years. In some respects, however, the 
conditions are not as favorable for good work as they should 
be. We have been obliged in carrying out the program to 
make larger divisions than should be done for the best 
work. During the first semester we had fifteen divisions 
which had thirty or more students. Four of these were 
forty or more and fourteen divisions had from twenty-four 
to thirty-nine. During the present semester we have 



SCHOOL REPORT. 81 

thirteen which are thirty or more in number, and seventeen 
which range between twenty-five and twenty-nine. Two 
divisions are over forty in size. There would be more in 
this list but for the fact that two teachers are teaching six 
periods daily. It is impossible in divisions as large as these 
to give to individual pupils the attention they should have, 
and for a teacher to do either herself or her class justice. 
Neither can a teacher give the full time of six periods to 
class work and maintain that vigor and freshness which the 
work needs. The reason for this condition is found in the 
gradually increasing number of students and possibly to 
a slightly increased number of recitations due to half-year 
classes. The remedy is additional teachers. This would 
mean that we must use the Assembly Hall probably for 
some recitations, as our rooms are in full use now. This 
can be done by using tablet arm-chairs and movable black- 
boards, and would be preferable to the present large divi- 
sions. 

In one other respect there is need of further aid. I refer 
to the clerk in the Principal's office. This position was 
expected to be one in which some assistance would be given 
in typewriting as well as to do clerical work. During the 
present year practically the entire time has been demanded 
in teaching. For office work I have had to depend on inter- 
mittent help from postgraduates and seniors. Some records 
and reports I have been able to turn over to the Librarian, 
but a great deal has had to be done by myself or left undone. 
The result is that I have been unable to write to parents, 
follow up students' work, and keep the general records of 
books, cards, etc. as thoroughly as this should be done. 
There is need of a clerk who can be constantly on duty and 
to whom can be turned over the details of this work. This 
would relieve me and give me greater freedom for adminis- 
trative and supervisory work which, I think, is the most 
important part of my duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. Cook, 
6 Headmaster. 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING. 



Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Union School District, 
Concord, N. H. 

At the time of the closing of school in June two exhibi- 
tions of drawing were held, one of freehand drawing at the 
Parker School and at the High School examples of the work 
of the classes in the Domestic Arts Course were shown as a 
part of the demonstration of the course marking the gradua- 
tion of its first class. Since the course was started it has 
been found advisable to omit the History of Art which 
required so much time to be given, even in condensed form, 
that the Art Course did not receive sufficient attention. 
This has made necessary the revision of the course which 
includes theory of color, design, lettering, dress-design, 
interior decoration, and freehand and mechanical drawing. 
The teaching of Classes and P at the Parker School has 
been somewhat difficult as it has been necessary to give 
them three periods of drawing in succession in one corner 
of the Assembly Hall with other classes frequently entering 
and leaving the hall. At the beginning of the present 
semester it was found possible to make an arrangement by 
which Room 4 can be used for these classes two periods on 
three days and each class has one period, only, at a time. 
Some kind of furniture suitable for the work is needed for 
this room if this arrangement is to be permanent. The 
lack of room at both High and Parker schools makes a 
difficult program for the supervisor who teaches one hour 
per week more than the actual time which schools keep. 
The present program seems, however, the most satisfactory 
one for the pupils that has been arranged. 

The exhibition of Drawing at the Parker School was con- 
sidered one of the best ever shown there. The drawings of 
Classes A to H have been excellent for several years but 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

this year the fifth-year drawings showed marked improve- 
ment. The lettering done by all the classes was excellent. 
Miss Jones takes charge of the drawing of Classes A to L 
with a conscientious care that brings this department fine 
results. A few drawings by High School pupils who take 
Drawing as an elective study were also shown in this exhibi- 
tion. Most of their work is done in classes outside of regular 
school time and there are several who show skill as well as 
interest. 

At the beginning of the year the pupils of the training- 
classes made frames in their manual training work which 
they covered with slated blackboard cloth. This provides 
sufficient space for frequent blackboard drills for the pur- 
pose of helping them to draw with confidence before a class. 
Respectfully submitted, 

FAITH C. STALKER, 
Supervisor of Drawing. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SEWING. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of the Schools of Union 
School District, Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir: The following is a report of the work accom- 
plished in the sewing department of the Union School 
District for the year ending March, 1917. 

The suggestion in my last sewing report for more 
"charity" sewing and project work has been accomplished. 
Class M is working almost wholly on clothes for poor 
children, such as dresses, underwear and boy's waists. 

I think the girls enjoy this work better, and it certainly 
encourages a helpful spirit and gives an opportunity for 
more practical sewing. 

I see no reason why this work cannot increase and become 
a prominent feature in the sewing work. To show the 
range of our work we will mention a few of the projects 
undertaken as: 

Victrola cover for Walker School. 
4 dozen towels for High School. 

4 dozen aprons for dental room. 

5 type case covers for Morrill School. 
1 dozen napkins for cooking room. 

' 5 Flag covers. 

Our charity work includes: 

6 children's dresses. 
35 petticoats. 
1 pillow slip. 
3 corset covers. 

3 pairs drawers. 

4 boy's waists. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

Work completed by the girls for themselves from June, 
1915, to June, 1916, includes: 

14 dresses. 

22 skirts. 

22 waists. 

21 middy blouses. 

. 6 kimonos. 

5 cooking aprons. 
64 pieces underwear. 
48 pillow slips. 

6 napkins. 
3 towels. 

75 sewing aprons. 
44 hats trimmed. 

and 214 unfinished articles. The number of pieces of un- 
finished work is due to the change of classes as a girl often 
begins a new piece of work a lesson or so before she changes 
her grade. We have encouraged this work as it makes the 
connection between school and home work closer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE C. HOWE. 



REPORT OF COOKING TEACHER. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: The girls seemed to be very enthusiastic 
about the cooking. This fall they had an excellent oppor- 
tunity for work on a larger scale in canning and preserving 
through the kindness of several members of the school 
board and others interested. Tomatoes were used in various 
ways, piccalilli, sweet tomato pickle, and canned; blue- 
berries, peaches, pears, damson plums, crabapples were 
canned; grape, crabapple, and plum jelly, carrot marma- 
lade, grape fruit and orange marmalade, grape conserve, 
cranberry conserve, sweet pickled pears and ginger pears 
were made. Most of these were sold, partially defraying 
the expense. We hope that next fall others may be inter- 
ested to allow the girls to do their canning and preserving 
for them. 

The senior class has had a splendid opportunity for 
making out menus, which they put into actual use for the 
teachers' luncheons. They do part of the purchasing, make 
out the actual costs of the recipes, do the serving and plan- 
ning of the meals, which are served cafeteria style, enough 
being charged to cover the cost of all the materials. This 
gives a chance for the cooperation of the teachers and 
pupils, thus benefiting both parties. The fireless cooker, 
which has just been added to the equipment, has been 
proved most successful thus allowing cheaper cuts of meat 
to be cooked, which otherwise could not be used owing to 
lack of class time. Economy of fuel is also illustrated. On 
November first the senior class had a practical lesson in 
preparing and serving a dinner to the members of the school 
board. 

The upper classes visited the meat market where sides of 
beef and lamb were cut up and a further study was made of 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

the uses and prices of the different cuts. A very instructive 
tour of inspection was made of Durgin's Manufactory. 
Through the kindness of a teacher, various classes have 
had the opportunity of preparing light refreshments to 
serve with afternoon tea. 

A new feature of the work was the starting of the evening 
class which has been most interesting. The principles, 
methods, and making of menus and special diets were dis- 
cussed and the actual preparation of menus was carried out. 

The aim of the department is to make the girls familiar 
with the principles and methods of cookery so they can 
successfully prepare meals which will be appetizing, pleas- 
ing, satisfying, and as inexpensive as possible, for any 
family. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRIET B. DAVIS. 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent. 

Dear Sir: I submit for your approval my annual re- 
port. A report of this kind seems unsatisfactory as it is 
impossible to give in detail the various kinds of work one is 
called upon to do, nor is it possible to show results as they 
really are, so many phases of child welfare are covered. 

The problems of the physical condition of school children 
in a city like Concord are the same as those in larger cities, 
but a nurse working alone must rely upon her own judg- 
ment much more than if she had the advice of a medical 
examiner. For this reason the greatest possible coopera- 
tion with the physicians is necessary in order that the work 
may be of value. 

The parents of children having physical defects are sent 
written notices requesting them to consult their family 
physician for advice and treatment. This method alone, 
however, would never bring the desired result, unless the 
cases are followed up and the parents visited when the con- 
dition and its results are made clear to them. Many visits 
are often required before cooperation is secured and in 
many instances there has to be a " seeping in" process which 
takes time. It is most pleasing to note, however, that a 
very large per cent, of the cases reported to the parents 
receive attention. In cases where the financial condition 
of the family require it, treatment can always be arranged. 

In no line of work is cooperation with existing agencies 
more necessary than in a work which deals with the physical 
welfare of children. We are most fortunate in our relation 
with the Charity Organization Society, the District Nursing 
Association, and the Board of Health, each organization 
being ready to do its part toward making our work effective. 

The dental clinic is proving its great value to the children 



SCHOOL REPORT. 89 

and much credit is due the Charity Organization Society 
for the very valuable work they did in helping secure it. 
We are greatly indebted to the dentists for their valued 
assistance and hearty cooperation. 

Our great need at present is an open-air room or school 
for delicate or pre-tubercular children — we have many 
children who need this kind of care and its results would 
soon be apparent. 

If it were not for the occasional gift of money from persons 
interested in this work, many things which have been done 
for children could not have been accomplished; especially 
when braces or other appliances are necessary or the child 
requires treatment which necessitates going out of town. 

The statistical report which follows may not seem large 
in numbers, but figures in connection with this work mean 
little. 

I wish to express my indebtedness to the many societies, 
clubs and individuals who have given such valuable assist- 
ance, to the hospitals and physicians for their constant 
helpfulness and to the teachers for their faithful coopera- 
tion. 

Home Calls and Investigations. 

Defective teeth, 85 

Defective vision, 61 

Discharging ears and deafness, 5 
Nose and throat — including adenoids and enlarged 

tonsils, 72 

Mentally retarded, 18 

Tuberculosis suspects, 12 

Nervous condition, 6 

Goitre, 2 

Pediculosis, 20 

Orthoepedic, 30 

Uncleanliness, 5 

Skin disease, 20 

Infected wounds, 4 

Enlarged glands, 2 



90 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Investigation for contagious diseases, 80 

Heart trouble, 4 

Undiagnosed or not otherwise accounted for, 55 

Malnutrition, 7 

488 

Visits at schools, 200 
Number children taken to physicians and hospitals for 

treatment or examination, 55 

Number interviews with officials, physicians and others, 87 

Number defected vision corrected, 50 

Number operations for throat and nose conditions, 40 

Number orthopedic cases under treatment, 8 

Number braces and other apparatus provided, 3 

Number children referred to out of town specialists, 6 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH M. MURPHY, R. N. 



REPORT OF MILITARY DRILL INSTRUC- 
TOR. 



Concord, March 1, 1917. 
Mr. L. J. Rundlett. 

Sir: Military drill during the year 1916-17 has been 
continued under the plan adopted by the school board in 
1915. The subject has not had the enthusiastic support 
from the students as in former years, probably owing to the 
fact that the receipt of the new rifles was so much delayed. 
One of the results of this delay has been that the number of 
cadets has fallen from sixty-eight in September of 1915 to 
fourteen in the fall of 1916. Since the receipt of the sixty- 
eight Kragg-Jorgensen carbines and six thousand eight 
hundred rounds of ammunition from the government, the 
interest has quickened. We now have forty-six boys taking 
the subject with a prospect of more before the end of the 
school year. 

The lengthened drill period enables us to extend our 
course to hikes, patrolling and rifle practice. The boys are 
taking a very pleasing interest, thereby enabling us to ac- 
complish much more than in former years. 

The receipt of government property will require a trifling 
expense in the way of alterations of the arm racks; also a 
cleaning rack should be erected in the basement of the 
school. 

In closing I wish to express my gratitude to Mr. Cook for 
his earnest cooperation. The school district and especially 
the cadets should be grateful to Gen. C. W. Howard, the 
Adjutant-General, for his courtesy in allowing us the use of 
the state armory and the state rifle range. His personal 
interview with the Chief of Ordnance, U. S. A., was a 
potent factor in the final receipt of the very much needed 
government rifles. 

GEORGE W. MORRILL, 
Instructor, Military Drill. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: No material change has been made in either 
text-books or methods of teaching during the past year. 
The children have entered the third year well prepared to 
take up book work and the individual instruction which 
has been given in all grades from E to L inclusive has 
resulted in reasonably good sight singing and in an interest 
that manifests itself in exceptionally good chorus work in 
the higher grades. 

This is especially noticeable in grades K and L in the 
Rumford and Eastman schools. The Chandler School 
began the present semester with an unusually well balanced 
chorus. The Parker School has maintained its reputation 
for good chorus work and in the High School three hundred 
and eighteen pupils have included chorus singing in the 
work of the course. The High School glee clubs are larger 
than usual. As both chorus and glee club work there is 
wholly elective, this indicates a lively interest in the subject. 

The High School Orchestra is not as good as it was last 
year. Several valuable members have left school and their 
places have not been filled. The contra bass and tympani 
which were purchased two years ago have been in constant 
use and have added very much to the value of the orchestral 
work as a whole. In fact were it not for these instruments 
the orchestra would consist almost entirely of violins. We 
have no brass or woodwind and I feel that we should have 
more of those instruments, which are not suitable for solo 
use at home, owned by the school and loaned to such pupils 
as will learn to play them. 

The music classes in the fifth course have accomplished 
the work assigned them in a creditable manner. A rear- 
rangement of the course of study for Classes U and V will 



SCHOOL REPORT. 93 

enable the present Class V to do more work, in the history 
of music in America, than former classes have done. 

The work with the young ladies in the training class for 
teachers has been placed upon a more systematic basis. A 
record of standing in weekly recitation is kept, a written 
test given every eight weeks and the average standing sent 
to the principal of the Dewey School. 

A rearrangement of program at the beginning of the 
present semester allows the teacher of singing to visit the 
Chandler and grades K and L in the Rumford, Kimball 
and Walker schools weekly. All other schools, excepting 
the Parker and High, are visited once in two weeks. 

The annual High School concert was given in April at a 
financial profit of one dollar and fifty-nine cents. 

The teacher of singing takes pleasure in expressing his 
appreciation of the valuable aid and cheerful cooperation 
which have been given him by the teachers and also extends 
to the Superintendent and members of the Board of Educa- 
tion his hearty thanks for the encouragement and support 
which they have extended to him. 

Very respectfully yours, 

C. S. CONANT, 
Teacher of Singing. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF MANUAL 
TRAINING. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: I hereby submit to you my eighth annual 
report of the work of the Morrill School. 

The activities of this school have so greatly increased in 
the last few years that they can no longer be classified as 
"wood and iron" as they have been in the past. Neither 
can a clear conception of the full scope of the work be gained 
from a report that must be "brief." Therefore I shall be 
able to touch simply the high spots hoping that those who 
are not thus satisfied will visit the school and look into the 
details to their complete satisfaction. 

Manual Training in the Sixth and Seventh Grades. 

Woodworking in the elementary schools has been taught 
entirely by the project method and no blueprints whatever 
have been used. It has been quite evident that this method 
of teaching manual training has its faults and weak points 
if not handled carefully but by a systematic arrangement of 
projects most of these have been overcome. 

Mechanic Arts in High School. 

The work of all departments in high school has been 
about the same as last year. As this work has consisted 
entirely of practical projects little change could be made 
except to improve the quality and increase the quantity. 
Both of these have been accomplished to a certain extent 
by applying the principles of shop efficiency. 

The ever increasing attendance has brought us some 
rather serious problems and has made it necessary to change 
the course of study to meet these conditions. 

Machine shop practice is now confined to the last three 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

semesters instead of the last two years as formerly. This 
change was made because of the limited size of the shop and 
because of the disadvantages arising from placing four 
classes in a three-period day. To fill up the gap thus formed 
the work in the Q, R, and S classes was moved up one 
semester. This brings the patternmaking course in the R 
and S classes instead of Q and R and as this is a technical 
subject which is hard to teach to immature minds it is 
much better placed higher up in the course. This change 
also relieved the necessity of teaching three subjects to one 
class in a semester as we have been doing in the Q class 
where the boys took elementary patternmaking, foundry 
practice and blacksmithing all in nineteen weeks. Under 
the present arrangement no class will receive instruction 
in more than two shop subjects in a half year. 

Another improvement made possible by this new course 
is the placing of printing as a part of the Mechanic Arts 
course. In the past we have taught it only to those pupils 
who elected to take it as an extra subject after school. 
Now all pupils taking this course will have an opportunity 
of doing printing as a part of their regular work and receive 
due credit for it. 

Evening School. 

This is the first year that any of the Mechanic Arts 
courses have been taught to evening classes. A class in 
Mechanical Drawing has been conducted for two evenings 
a week this winter and much interest has been shown. The 
class has been a success from every standpoint and there 
should be provision made for a still larger number next 
year. Several difficulties such as heating, lighting, and 
janitor service had to be contended with but have been 
solved for all time so the class next year can be conducted 
at a very reasonable expense. Mr. Taylor has been the 
teacher and he should be given due credit for its success. 

Summer School. 
During the summer of 1915 a class was organized with 
the assistance and approval of the State Department of 



96 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Public Instruction to meet the needs of teachers wishing to 
perfect themselves in the Mechanic Arts courses. In 1916 
this class was well attended there being teachers from all 
parts of the state including Berlin, Whitefield, Claremont, 
Portsmouth, Pittsfield, Hinsdale, Boscawen, Exeter and 
Fitchburg, Mass. Ninety per cent, of those attending last 
year have signified their intention to return next summer. 
Although this is more or less of a private enterprise it re- 
flects credit upon the Concord school system to have men 
from all parts of the state come here to study the methods 
used during the year. Courses were given last summer in 
woodworking, cabinetmaking, patternmaking and forging. 
This coming summer we are in hopes of starting additional 
courses in machine-shop practice and printing. 

Equipment. 

The equipment of the school is in excellent condition and 
is constantly being improved by repairs made at the school. 
No extra appropriation need be, made this year for equip- 
ment as the necessary tools can be obtained by the appro- 
priation made for maintenance. The two heaviest items to 
be considered are 15 sets of small tools for the machine shop 
which will cost about $80 and a new supply of type which 
will amount to about 



Improvements and Repairs. 

During the past year the building has been improved by 
painting the walls and ceiling of the drawing room, the 
addition of three semi-indirect electric lights and two 
Humphry gas lights. Three gas steam radiators were 
installed in the drawing room for use in the evening school 
and three in the machine shop to assist in heating the room 
for day school. These have been satisfactory in every 
respect and there should be no difficulty in heating this 
building in the future. 

Last year I suggested that a wash room with twenty-four 
bowls connected with hot and cold water should be installed 
in the basement for the use of the pupils working in the 



SCHOOL REPORT. 97 

forge and machine shops. We are still in need of this most 
common convenience. I hope it may be added this year. 
We also need a small sink or wash bowl in the print shop as 
the pupils here have to wash in a room containing grammar 
school classes much to the annoyance of the teacher. The 
plumbing already in the building is arranged in such a 
manner that the installation of this sink will be a very 
simple matter. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR W. FRENCH. 



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APPENDIX I. 



TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY CON- 
TEST. 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT AT HIGH SCHOOL HALL 

Tuesday Evening, February 20, 1917. 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK. 

PROGRAM. 

Overture — "Naiad Queen" Rollinson 

HIGH SCHOOL ORCHESTRA 

ORIGINAL DECLAMATION, HIGH SCHOOL. 

1. "Efficiency through Health" 

oscar Silverman, Group 2, Class '20 

2. "Self-government by Students" 

LUCILLE GLADYS SAVOY, Group 1, ClaSS '18 

3. "Repaying Our Debt to France" 

HUGH GILBERT CRUIKSHANK, Group 1, ClaSS '17 

4. "Toys from the Front" 

JEANETTE BELLE RYAN, Group 1, ClaSS '19 

Selection — "Sparkling Moselle" Gruenwald 

ORCHESTRA 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION. 

1. "The Glorious Constitution" Webster 

PHILANDER LEON MANN, EASTMAN SCHOOL 

2. "Lincoln the Immortal" Watterson 

PAUL STEPHEN OTIS, WALKER SCHOOL 

3. "What is a Minority?" Gough 

BERNARD ST. CLAIR WEBSTER, GARRISON SCHOOL 

4. "The American Flag" Beecher 

PERCIVAL HOWARD EVELETH, CHANDLER SCHOOL 

Selection — "Sidonie," A Grecian Dance Bennet 

ORCHESTRA 



102 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION. 

1. "Makin' an Editor Oute'n O'Hine" Carleton 

HELEN EVELYN RYAN, GARRISON SCHOOL 

2. "The Mourning Veil" Harbour 

DOROTHY ROSE MANNION, WALKER SCHOOL 

3. "The Leak in the Dike" Carey 

GEORGIA MARION OSGOOD, CHANDLER SCHOOL 

4. "Unexpected Guests" Cameron 

DOROTHY EVA STANIELS, EASTMAN SCHOOL 

March — "Second Regiment Connecticut" Reeves 

ORCHESTRA 

AWARD OF PRIZES. 

Original Declamation — High School, Groups 1 and 2. 
First Prize, $15, awarded to Lucille Gladys Savoy. 
Second Prize, $10, awarded to Oscar Silverman. 

Forensic Declamation — Junior High School, Group 2. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Percival Howard Eveleth. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Philander Leon Mann. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Helen Evelyn Ryan. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Dorothy Eva Staniels. 



BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Hon. Jesse M. Barton, Newport, N. H. 
Merrill Shurtleff, Esq., Lancaster, N. H. 
Maurice J. Connor, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



103 



PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 



RECEIVED. 

Balance from last year's account, 
Interest on same for one year, 
Sale of 323 tickets, at 35 cents, 



EXPENDED. 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services, 

Prizes, including books, 

English Prize Composition Contest expense, 

Miscellaneous expense including selling and taking tickets, 

music, ushers, judges, etc., 
Cash on hand as a guaranty fund for future contests, 



2,927.87 
102.07 
113.05 

5,142.99 



$50.00 
47.50 
87.00 

11.00 
2,947.49 

53,142.99 



STAMP SAVING SYSTEM. 



Saved from Total amount 

March 1, 1916, saved since the 

to inauguration of 

March 1, 1917. the system. 

Cogswell $60.36 $188.46 

Harriet P. Dame 52.22 281.54 

Dewey 66.12 909.89 

Eastman 11.14 181.56 

Franklin 41.03 592.94 

Garrison 39.14 475.97 

Kimball 26.53 1,000.54 

Penacook 124.84 1,217.55 

Rumford 323.41 2,888.08 

Walker 39.11 727.20 



$783.90 



$,463.73 



ANNUAL CONTEST IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS. 

Held at the Parker School, Saturday, May 6, 1916. 



School. 

High School Junior, Walker 
High School Junior, Parker 
High School Junior, Chandler 
High School Junior, Garrison 
High School Junior, Senior 



No. Pupils No. Pupils Per cent of 



Enrolled in 


Taking 


Pupils in 


the School. 


Part. 


Contest. 


27 


7 


25.18 + 


231 


51 


22.07 + 


167 


28 


16.76 + 


22 


3 


13.63 + 


476 


15 


3.15 + 



Prizes. 

First, $6 

Second, $4 



First, $3 
Second, I 

First, $3 
Second, 3 

First, $3 
Second, $ 



PRIZES. 
General Prizes. 
Awarded to Class. 

Dorothy P. Kendall V, Senior High 

Eric Sandquist P, Junior High 

(Parker) 

Grade Prizes. 
Classes U, V. 
Dorothy P. Kendall V, Senior High 

Esther A. Calkin U, Senior High 

Classes S, T. 
Mildred A. Cheney T, Senior High 

Miriam Batchelder T, Senior High 

Classes Q, R. 
Lois Rundlett Q, Senior High 

Wallace R. Stearns R, Senior High 



Subject. 

Give Your Opinion 
of Lady Macbeth 

How Did Eppie In- 
fluence the Life 
of Silas Marner? 



Give Your Opinion 
of Lady Macbeth 

Give Your Opinion 
of Lady Macbeth 

My Favorite Idylls 
Lancelot and 
Elaine 

Joan As De Quin- 
cey Saw Her 

How Eppie Influ- 
enced the Life of 
Silas Marner 

Describe the Sewers 
of Paris 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



105 





Classes 0, P. 




First, $3 


Eric Sandquist 


P, Junior High 


How Did Eppie In- 






(Parker) 


fluence the Life 
of Silas Marner? 


Second, $2 


Paul L. Bailey 


P, Junior High 


Describe the Scene 






(Parker) 


Where Godfrey 
Cass Wishes to 
Adopt Eppie 




Classes M, N. 




First, $3 


Dorothy Scott 


N, Junior High 


The Story of Vir- 






(Walker) 


ginia 


Second, $2 


Henry P. Clough 


M, Junior High 
(Chandler) 


Horatius 



N, 



SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL. 



Friday, June 2, 1916, 8 P. M. 
PARKER SCHOOL LAWN. 



Given by the Pupils of the Parker School to Their Parents 
and Friends. 



Song — "Hark! Hark! The Lark" from "Cymbeline" 

"ALL ON A MIDSUMMER'S NIGHT." 

Scene I. 
Village Green on Pevensy Hill. June 23, 1578. 

Children come to the village green carrying apronfuls of wood for the 
Midsummer's fire. 

They knock at Dame Wenlock's cottage and in return for wood dance 
for her "Selinger's Round"; then, at request of the villagers they dance 
"Bo Peep." While they rest the little children play games. After this 
the villagers dance the "Peasecod" dance which is interrupted by the 
Crier who announces the St. John's fire to be set at nine o'clock of the 
Midsummer's Eve. 

Song — "It was a Lover and his Lass" from "As You Like It" 

Scene II. 
Village Green on Evening op Same Day. 
The villagers enter, the Mayor and his lady in lead. The young 
people run in chasing Will Shakespeare, who wins by a trick. For 
forfeit he must tell a story. Two villagers wrestle. Young people 
dance the Morris dance. A whistling contest is won by Shakespeare. 
He then tells the story of the Fire Spirit who dances about the flames 
with her attendants. After leaping over the flames, the young people 
join in a dance which is interrupted by the Town Crier. He announces 
that all good people should go home except the adventurous ones who 
wish to seek the seed of the Magic Fairy. When found at Midnight, 
this seed gives invisibility and leads to treasure. Many laugh and 
depart. Most of the young people go in search of the Magic Seed,. 
Song — "Where the Bee Suck's" from "The Tempest" 



SCHOOL REPORT. 107 

Scene III. 
Midsummer Night's Dream. Act II. Scene I. 
The quarrel of Oberon and Titania, king and queen of the fairies, and 
their reconciliation through the agency of Puck, the village elf. 

The villagers hurry on from different directions. They exclaim, "At 
last!" when they catch sight of Shakespeare and, with many taunts as 
to the magic fern seed, carry him away to the village. 

Song — "Who is Sylvia" from "Two Gentlemen of Verona" 



A DEMONSTRATION OF THE WORK IN DOMESTIC 

ARTS. 

By the Pupils of this Course in the Public Schools op 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Concord, N. H. 





PROGRAM 








Teacher. 


Subject. 


Class. 


Room. 


Time. 


Miss Field 


Household Sanitation 


R 


1 


7.30-7.50 


Mr. Conant 


Music Classics 


T 


2 


7.30-7.50 


Miss Stalker 


Dress Design 


P 


3 


7.30-7.50 


Miss Howe 


Millinery 


Q 


4 


7.30-7.50 


Miss Sanger 


French 


s 


5 


7.30-7.50 


Miss Taylor 


Shakespeare Reunion 


u 


6 


7.30-7.50 


Mr. French 


Wood Finishes 


V 


Library 


7.30-7.50 


Miss Field 


The Digestive Process 


s 


1 


7.50-8.10 


Mr. Conant 


Music for the Home 


R 


2 


7.50-8.10 


Miss Stalker 


Study of Spacing 





3 


7.50-8.10 


Miss Howe 


Dressmaking 


P 


4 


7.50-8.10 


Miss Sanger 


French 


Q 


5 


7.50-8.10 


Mr. Taylor 


Architecture 


u 


Library 


7.50-8.10 




ASSEMBLY HALL 








8.30 to 10.00. 









Music — Selection from "Faust" 

high school orchestra 



Gounod 



"A REUNION OF THE DOASYOUWANTO CLUB." 

A play written by the graduating class of this course. 

Mildred Josephine Anderson Selma Eleonora Johnson 

Rachel Rice Bugbee Hazel Ellen Jones 

Elsie Charlotte Carlson Evelyn Rose Delia Noonan 

Ruth Hildegarde Gonyer Gladys May Wilcox 

Edith Mae Holmes Ruth Hungerford Wilcox 



Music — ' ' Serenade ' ' 



Moszkowski 



ORCHESTRA 



SCHOOL REPORT. 109 

Address — Hon. Henry C. Morrison, 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Music — "Ballet Music" Gruenwald 

ORCHESTRA 



LUNCH. 

Served by the pupils of the classes O and P of the Parker School under 
the direction of 

Miss Faunce, Teacher of Cooking. 



EXHIBITION OF WORK. 

Art. 

Color Scales, Border Designs, Surface Designs, Embroidery Units, 
Problems in Space Division, Modification of Square, Drawings of 
Flower Designs, Painting of Flower Sprays, Designed Curves, Modifi- 
cation of Circle, Lines for Individual Figures, Still Life Groups, Modi- 
fication of Oblong, Design for Simple Dress, Mechanical Drawing, 
Perspective Studies, Design for Separate Coat, Monograms, Lettering 
Sheets, Design for Suit, Stencil Design, Pose Drawings from Life, 
Design for Embroidery for Garment, Design for Embroidery of Towel, 
Compositions on the Decoration of the Home, Color Scheme of Part of 
Room from House designed by Pupils. 

Music. 

Musical Theory, Test papers, Examination papers. 
Original Melodies, Samples of composition. 
Counterpoint, Original work in two- and four-part. 
Harmonies, Original work in four-part. 
History of Music, Test papers, Examination papers. 

Sewing. 

Machines, Care, use, treadling, accessories. 

Textile Study, Samples of cotton, linen, woolen. 

Study of Patterns, Cutting and Fitting, Matching of Stripes and 
Plaids, Kimonos, Middy Blouses, Shirt Waists, Skirts, Dresses, 
Drawn Work, Varieties and Prices, Measurements and calculations, 
Making of Husehold Linen and Home Decorations. 

Initials, Original designs. 

Monograms, Original designs. 

Millinery, Making and trimming of spring hats and winter hats. 



110 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cooking. 

Proteins, Cheese, Five food principles and use, Custards, Meat 
sources, cuts, uses. Ways of cooking and clarifying fat, test for frying, 
preparation for frying, frying and sautering. Eggs, Sources and uses, 
omelet, content, principles, preservation, custard. Luncheon Table- 
Setting and serving; soup, salad, B. P. biscuits, snow pudding, custard 
sauce, cookies, cake, bread, meat, eggs, cheese, fish, custard, preserves, 
doughnuts, potatoes, croquettes, Tuna fish, fruit, vegetables, ice cream, 
candies. 

Household. 

Drawings of various appliances, balanced menus, budgets, household 
expense accounts. 

Plans of pupils' homes, original designs of house plans; samples used 
to illustrate lectures. 

English, French, History. 
Essays, Tests, Examination papers, etc. 



EVENTS OF THE YEAR. 

March 27, 1916. Ungraded school started in the Walker School. 

April 10, 1916. Kindergarten at Rumford School changed to lower 
floor. 

April 18, 1916. Mr. Whitcher investigates commercial department of 
High School. 

April 18, 1916. Mr. Butterfield visits English department of High 
School. 

April 20, 1916. Supt. H. C. Morrison visits all of the school buildings. 

May 16, 1916. English Prize Essay contest. 

June 2, 1916. Shakespearian Festival — Parker School. 

June 15, 1916. A Demonstration of Domestic Arts — High School. 

June 16, 1916. Drawing Exhibit — all grades at Parker School. 

Sept. 10, 1916. Schools closed on account of infantile paralysis epi- 
demic. 

Nov. 18, 1916. Dental clinic started in the Walker building. 

Jan. 1, 1917. Mrs. Albin donates gold medals for excellence in English 
in High School in memory of Gen. John H. Albin, her husband. 

Jan. 3, 1917. U. S. Government furnishes High School Cadets with 
rifles. 

Feb. 20, 1917. Annual Prize Speaking contest. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE AWARD OF 
THE DARTMOUTH PLAQUE, 1917. 



Given by the Trustees to that school, sending three or more students 
to the Freshman Class of Dartmouth College, whose representatives 
stand highest in scholarship for the First Semester of Freshman year. 

WON BY THE CONCORD, N. H., HIGH SCHOOL. 

2 — Nashua High School. 

3 — Phillips Andover Academy. 

4 — Framingham, Massachusetts, High School. 

j New Bedford, Massachusetts, High School. 

\ University High School, Chicago, Illinois. 



Dartmouth College 

Hanover, N. H. 

Offices of Administration 

March seven, 1917. 
My dear Mr. Rundlett: 

The Committee on Admission takes great pleasure in sending you the 
enclosed announcement, which we feel sure will interest you. We wish 
to congratulate you on your school and the splendid record of }^our stu- 
dents in the freshman class, Messrs. Amsden, Dudley, Fipphen, Marden, 
and Pearson. 

Very truly yours, 

James L. McConaught, 
Executive Secretary, Committee on Admission. 

Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, 

Superintendent of Schools, 

Concord, New Hampshire. 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. H., 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 
You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the fifth day of April, 
1916, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the fol- 
lowing subjects: 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of Edu- 
cation for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years, to fill the vacancies arising from 
the expiration of the term of office of Harry H. Dudley, 
George H. Moses, and Lillian R. Shepard, and to fill any 
other vacancies that may occur in said Board. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year, 
and a 1 so all other necessary officers. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year 
including military drill, manual training, night school, 
medical inspection, etc. 

8. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this fifteenth day of March, 1916. 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 113 

I certify that on the seventeenth day of March, 1916, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant, attested by the Board 
of Education of said district, at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copy at the Police Station in the 
City of Concord, N. H., being a public place within said 
district. 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 



March 30, 1916. 
Personally appeared before me, on this date, the said 
Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certificate 
by him sighed is true. 

ISAAC HILL, 
Justice of the Peace. 



A true copy of the warrant, return of service and cer- 
tificate of oath. 

Attest: 

HERBERT W. RAINIE, 

Clerk. 



In accordance with the foregoing warrant, a meeting of 
the legal voters of Union School District was held at the 
Auditorium on Prince Street in Concord on the evening of 
April 5, 1916, at 7.30 o'clock. 

The meeting was called to order by Louis C. Merrill, 
Moderator. 

Upon motion of Edward C. Niles, duly seconded, the 
moderator cast one vote for Herbert W. Rainie as clerk 
pro tern, who was sworn to the discharge of his duties by the 
moderator. 

Article 1. On motion of Harry H. Dudley, duly 
seconded, the clerk pro tern, cast one ballot for Louis C. 
Merrill as moderator for the ensuing year and he was de- 

8 



114 CITY OF CONCORD. 

clared elected. He was sworn to the discharge of his duties 
by Edward C. Niles, Esq. 

Article 2. On motion of Henry E. Chamberlin, duly 
seconded, the moderator was authorized to cast one ballot 
for Herbert W. Rainie as clerk for the ensuing year and he 
was declared elected. The oath was administered by the 
moderator. 

Article 3. On motion of Henry H. Chase, duly sec- 
onded, the report of the Board of Education having been 
printed, was accepted and ordered on file without reading. 

Article 4. Henry H. Metcalf moved, and it was duly 
seconded, that the clerk cast one ballot for Harry H. Dudley, 
Lillian R. Shepard and Charles A. Wing as members of the 
Board of Education for the ensuing three years, and the 
motion was carried unanimously. The moderator an- 
nounced that the polls were open for ballots by any de- 
siring to vote. There being no response, he declared the 
polls closed, and since Harry H. Dudley, Lillian R. Shepard 
and Charles A. Wing had one vote each, he declared them 
duly elected as members of the Board of Education for the 
ensuing three years. 

Article 5. On motion of Harry H. Dudley, duly 
seconded, Henry H. Metcalf and Anson S. Marshall were 
elected as auditors for the ensuing year, the clerk casting 
the ballot. 

Article 6. On motion of Mr. Johnson, duly seconded, 
the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District the sum of fifteen thousand five hundred ninety- 
five dollars ($15,595), of which sum seven thousand five 
hundred ninety-five dollars ($7,595) shall be appropriated 
for the payment of the interest on its bonded indebtedness 
accruing during the year, and eight thousand dollars 
($8,000) for the payment of the bonds of the district ma- 
turing July 1, 1916. 

Article 7. On motion of Henry H. Metcalf, duly 
seconded, the following resolution was adopted: 



SCHOOL REPORT. 115 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District for the support of the schools for the ensuing year, 
such a sum as in addition to the sum assigned to the district 
by the City of Concord out of its appropriation for schools 
will amount to the sum of one hundred fifteen thousand 
four hundred two and 69/100 dollars ($115,402.69). 

There being no further business, on motion of Henry H. 
Metcalf it was voted to adjourn. 

A true record 

Attest: 

HERBERT W. RAINIE, 

Clerk. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
MERRIMACK, ss, April 11, 1916. 

Then personally appearing, Harry H. Dudley, Lillian 
R. Shepard and Charles A. Wing took the oath of office by 
law prescribed as members of the Board of Education of 
Union School District. 
Before me: 

HERBERT W. RAINIE, 

Justice of the Peace. 



TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT TREASURER'S 
REPORT. 



The treasurer of the Town School District of the city of 
Concord respectfully submits the following report of the 
receipts and expenditures for the year ending March, 1917: 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand March 1, 1916, $248.42 

Amount required by law, 3,011.08 
Amount voted by district for support of schools, 1,289. 00 

Salaries of district officers, 267 . 00 

Special repairs and furniture, 2,000. 00 

Text-books and scholars' supplies, 225 . 00 

Flags and appurtenances, 10.00 

High School tuition, 1,200. 00 

Literary fund, 157.02 

Walker trust fund, 2.64 

Dog licenses, 86 . 24 
One-half salary of superintendent from state 

treasury, 300 . 00 

Rebate on tuition from Union District, 1 . 33 

Books sold, 4.14 
Wood used for Sunday school, Iron Works 

district, 2.50 

District note to First National Bank, 600 . 00 



Total receipts, $9,404.37 

"Fire Insurance Fund" deposited in Loan & 

Trust Savings Bank, amount July 1, 1916, 1,845.24 





SCHOOL REPORT. 




117 




Expenditures. 






Teachers' salaries to March 16, 1917: 






Lillian F. Powell, 




$117.00 




Jennie Frawley, 




130.00 




Edna H. Potter, • 




80.00 




Margaret Campbell, 




85.00 




Ruth W. Fitzgerald, 




118.80 




Belle C. Ball, 




156.00 




Ruth J. Hilliard, 




124.20 




Edna F. Watson, 




432.00 




Mabel Johnson, 




336.00 




Mildred Cram, 




288.00 




Isabel A. Call,. 




252.00 




Vivian E. Andrew, 




288.00 




Total, 






$2,407.00 






Conveying scholars to March 16, 1917: 




Mrs. N. L. Smith, 




$30.00 




Frank P. Crowley, 




65.75 




Alfred H. Boulay, 




305.00 




Harry R. Dunstane, 




284.55 




Howard L. Denton, 




148.00 




Judson F. Hoit, 




240.00 




Bert Jesseman, 




97.00 




Total, 






1,170.30 








TUITION. 






Union District, High school, $1,186.32 




Penacook Union District, high school, 


55.13 




Total, 






1,241.45 






ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 




Union District, Dewey school, 


$30.00 




H. P. 


Dame school, 


117.39 




Kimball school, 


27.00 




Eastman school, 


6.00 




Pembroke school district to July, 1916, 


49.50 




Bow school district, 




8.75 




Total 






238.64 



118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SPECIAL REPAIRS AND FURNITURE. 




Paid Hutchinson Building Co., River- 






hill school, 


$536.44 




Hutchinson Building Co., Moun- 






tain school, 


573.86 




Hutchinson Building Co., Mill- 






ville school, 


487.96 




Hutchinson Building Co., Iron 






Works school, 


523.40 




Allen Shade Holder Co.. cur- 






tains and fixtures, 


59.40 




I. T. Chesley, teaming and 






labor, 


20.80 




8 Kaustene system toilets, 


409.00 




Tnffll 




$2,610.86 


-L ULdl, 




Incidental repairs, 


$24.72 




Text-books and scholars' supplies, 


234.41 




Incidentals, 


136.20 




Premium on treasurer's bond, 


6.00 




Printing 300 school reports, 


15.00 




Printing checklists, 


10.00 




Water for Millville school, 


12.00 




Janitors, 


108.35 




Fuel, 


153.59 




Flag and pole, 


2.75 




Enumerating children, 


15.00 




Superintendent's salary (13 months), 


672.23 




Salary of school board, 


200.00 




Salary of treasurer, 


40.00 




Services of Auditor, 


2.00 




Services of truant officer, 


6.00 




Total expenditures, 




$9,306.50 


Balance on hand, March 16, 1917, 




97.87 



),404.37 



SCHOOL REPORT. 119 
INDEBTEDNESS OF DISTRICT. 

Note to First National Bank, $600. 00 

Interest to April 1, 1917, 10.33 



Total, '$610.33 

FRANK E. DIMOND, 

Treasurer. 



Having examined the treasurer's accounts I find them 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

J. N. ABBOTT, 

Auditor. 
March 21, 1916. 



REPORT OF SCHOOL BOARD. 

March 14, 1917. 

To the Citizens of Concord Town School District: 

We had intended postponing the District Meeting until 
the legislature had acted upon a bill proposing the union 
of Concord Town District and Concord Union District. 
Because of developments at the hearing last evening, we 
have decided to call the meeting at once. There is no time 
to print any extensive report. 

One thousand six hundred fifty dollars will be required, 
next year, to pay High School tuitions. Three hundred 
twenty-five dollars will be required for text-books and 
scholars' supplies, and ten dollars for flags and appurte- 
nances. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, 
FLORENCE A. MORRILL, 
WILLIAM S. HOLLAND, 
School Board of Concord Town School District. 



APPENDIX II. 



TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR TI ® 





1. 


2. 


3. 


4. 


5. 


6- ;, 


SCHOOLS. 


is 

.9 

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"8 

M C3 

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~ > 

C3<3 
■g O 

<! 


■°& 

OS 

, o 

l-si 


8H 
-3 

o 

a 

a 

'o 


ent pupils registered 
during theyear(count 
every pupil regis- 
tered). 


3 
ft 

'o 
Ja 

a 


not previously regis- 
tered in any other 
school in town during 
the year. 


<^S g 

■«» 3 

"3 §>" 

i> « J 

I'S. 
a 2 M 
9 

"3 K 3 


school year who have 
attended at least two 
weeks not previously 
registered in any 
other public school in 
town during the year. 


Whole number ot diner - 
ent pupils who had 
been registered pre- 
viously in some other 
town of the state dur- 




>, 

a 
M 


O 


o 


>> 

a 

pq 


3 


C3 
O 


>, 

o 


O 


"a 
Is 
H 


>. 
o 

pq 


a % 


High Schools. 
High 


38. 


13. 

10.1 

12.5 

13. 

13. 

12.5 

14.5 


226 

134 

114 

27 

21 

17 

6 


300 
177 
125 
29 
19 
8 
7 


526 
311 
239 
56 
40 
25 
13 


203 
101 
80 
13 
17 
17 
4 


268 
134 

80 
18 
17 
8 

7 


471 
235 
160 
31 
34 
25 
11 


200 
130 

80 
12 
17 

17 
5 


268 

171 

80 

18 

17 

8 

7 


468 
301 
160 
30 
34 
25 
12 




2 






o » 

n n 

It 

1 

o I 




35.9 
38. 

38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 




Walker, 1 


Walker, 2 








Total 


37.7 

38. 
38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

12. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

35.3 

35.3 

35.3 

35.3 

35.3 

35.2 

35.2 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 


88.6 

13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13.5 
13. 
7. 

12.5 
12.5 
12.5 
12.5 
13.5 
14.5 
14.5 
14.5 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
13.5 
13.5 
13.5 
13.5 
13.5 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14.5 
14. 
14.5 
14. 
14. 
15. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
14.5 
14.5 


545 

8 
44 
49 
30 
29 
30 
32 

7 
19 
12 
20 
22 
16 

7 

7 
16 
34 
40 
40 
35 
27 
30 
38 
36 
23 
32 
21 
28 
30 
30 
31 
31 
32 
34 
10 
27 
29 
15 
30 
31 
17 
11 
13 
19 
27 
22 


665 

9 
39 
39 
30 
30 
24 
20 

6 
14 
13 
16 
11 
17 

8 
16 
21 
46 
43 
33 
30 
33 
23 
18 
43 
36 
42 
31 
26 
30 
26 
31 
26 
29 
31 
18 
22 
22 
33 
27 
26 
19 
20 
11 

9 
28 
32 


1,210 

17 
83 
88 
60 
59 
54 
52 
13 
33 
25 
36 
33 
33 
15 
23 
37 
80 
83 
73 
65 
60 
53 
56 
79 
59 
74 
52 
54 
60 
56 
62 
57 
61 
65 
28 
49 
51 
48 
57 
57 
36 
31 
24 
28 
55 
54 


435 


25 
28 
19 
20 
22 
29 


19 
11 
19 
19 
15 

7 

7 

13 
18 
23 
29 
34 
20 
20 
37 
25 
14 
13 
17 
23 
21 
27 
20 
26 
24 
27 

9 
21 
29 
10 
23 
29 
17 
10 
10 
16 
17 
17 


532 

1 

22 
14 
24 
22 
22 
17 


13 
10 
11 

9 
17 

8 
11 
19 
25 
26 
24 
25 
27 
17 
15 
21 
25 
22 
25 
19 
21 
25 
22 
18 
25 
28 
17 
15 
22 
25 
20 
25 
19 
17 
11 

6 
17 
28 


967 

1 
47 
42 
43 
42 
44 
46 


32 
21 
30 
28 
32 
15 
18 
32 
43 
49 
53 
59 
47 
37 
52 
46 
39 
35 
42 
42 
42 
52 
42 
44 
49 
55 
26 
36 
51 
35 
43 
54 
36 
27 
21 
22 
34 
45 


461 


44 
49 
28 
20 
21 
27 


19 
11 
19 
19 
15 

7 

7 
15 
18 
21 
29 
34 
19 
27 
37 
25 
14 
13 
17 
19 
21 
27 
20 
26 
22 
23 

9 
21 
29 
10 
23 
29 
17 

9 

8 
16 
16 
17 


569 

1 
39 
33 
27 
22 
21 
17 


13 
10 
16 

9 
17 

8 
14 
19 
25 
26 
23 
25 
27 
19 
15 
21 
25 
22 
25 
IS 
21 
25 
22 
18 
23 
25 
16 
15 
22 
25 
20 
25 
19 
17 
11 

6 
17 
28 


1,030 

1 
83 
82 
55 
42 
42 
44 


32 
21 
35 
28 
32 
15 
21 
34 
43 
47 
52 
59 
46 
46 
52 
46 
39 
35 
42 
37 
42 
52 
42 
44 
45 
48 
25 
36 
51 
35 
43 
54 
36 
26 
19 
22 
33 
45 


2 


2 

1 
1 
2 


2 



2 


1 

1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 

1 

1 
1 


1 

2 

1 






1 

3 
2 
1 



6 1 
1 

1 i 

8 

i 




2 








8 

3 
1 

3 
2 
4 




1 
1 
2 


1 
1 
1 



1 

1 
1 



3 
2 

2 




Elementary Schools. 
Walker, 1 


Walker, 2 


Walker, 3 . . . 


Walker, 4 




Walker, 6 


Walker, 7 


Walker, 8 
































Kimball, 1 


Kimball, 2 


Kimball, 3 


Kimball, 4 






Kimball, 7 
































Cogswell, 2 




Total 


37.0 

38. 

38. 

38. 

35.2 

38. 


626.0 

12. 
11. 
12. 
14. 
11. 


1,171 

27 
12 
16 
28 
26 


1,157 

41 
21 
23 
15 
18 


2,328 

68 
33 
39 
43 
44 


879 

27 
11 
15 
28 
26 


852 

39 
21 
21 
14 
18 


1,731 

66 
32 
36 
42 
44 


917 

27 
11 
15 
27 
26 


892 

39 
21 
21 
14 
18 


1,809 

66 
32 
36 
41 
44 


40 


1 





35 

1 






Kindergartens 












Total 


37.44 
37.13 


60. 

774.6 


109 
1,825 


118 
1,940 


227 
3,765 


107 
1,421 


113 
1,497 


220 
2,918 


106 
1,484 


113 

1,574 


219 
3,058 


1 

43 


1 
42 1 


Specials 
Grand Total 





]AR ENDING JUNE 16, 1916. 



-J 7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13. 


14. 


15. 


16. 


17. 


18. 


19. 


20. 

D, 
3 

_C 

>> 

X 

OS 


21. 
o 


22. 


23. 


24. 


Number ot ditterent 
non-resident pupils. 


a 
o 
a 

"o 

a 

X 
X ■ 

!§■ 

0) O. 

2 a 


B 

CS 

■a 

a 

"8 

_>> 

\M 

M 
03 


a 
x 

a 
_>> 

-o 

b0 

03 


'ja 

x 
g 

1 
bo 

C3 


T3 

a 

-O . 
oj'S 
a'4 

03 tj 

!§ 

as g 

3 

"3 > 

o " 

a ° 


9 

'o 


a 

1- 
e'3. 

3 

OJ 0, 
03 03 

a O 


-a 
3 

'a. 

3 

o, 

O tc 
u. a 

s g 

3 03 

a„ 

"3 > 

-a to 


03 

to. 

a 

1 
x 

X 

s 

3 
C . 

-fl'5 


o 

03 

x 

a 

•I 
x 

U 

X 

a o 

3 0) 
B « 

11 


a 

3 

o 

E 

J 

XI 
— . 

§J 

B-2 
-£■0 

O B 

_a 03 


a 

> 

o 

XI It 

9 o3 

c'o 

■11 


"a 

03 

D, 

>. 
X £ 

.t2 -0 
.22 o 

>__ 

u^ B 

a.-s 

3 a 


~3 

o 

a 
o 

'o 

03 

i 

xt'3 

Is 


o 
"fl 

X . 
*o1 

" CO 


£ 4 


03 




o 


H 


< 


< 


< 


< 


Ph 


O 


<! 


£ 


3s 


& 


g: 


ig 


z" 


Z 


55 


z 


zT 


17 


36 


34. 


445. 


17. 


462. 


.96 


955 


1.81 








14 


171 


286 


72 


1 


42 





67 


14 


24 


15. 


215. 


11. 


225. 


.95 


155 


.33 








56 


142 


37 


38 


4 


90 





27 


16 


29 


20. 


153. 


5. 


158. 


.96 


37 


.15 








89 


61 


10 


35 


2 


62 





29 








0. 


27.9 


1.09 


29.0 


.96 


10 


.17 








21 


9 


1 


13 


1 


18 





2 








0. 


18.9 


1.03 


19.9 


.94 


6 


.15 








16 


14 


4 


13 





25 





2 








0. 


23.27 


1 25 


24.5 


.94 


8 


.32 








16 


9 





7 


1 


197 





3 


(I 
47 





0. 


9.75 


.08 


9.8 


.99 


7 


.53 








8 


1 


2 


6 





59 





3 


89 


69. 


892.82 


36.45 


928.2 


.95 


1,178 


.49 








220 


407 


340 


184 


9 


493 





133 


(i 





0. 


13.6 


1.07 


14.6 


.92 


2 


.11 








1 








4 




22 





2 


1 


1 


1. 


32.8 


1.91 


34.7 


.94 


28 


.59 








36 


11 





9 




31 





2 


2 


2 


1. 


37.5 


2.29 


39.8 


.94 


33 


.67 








40 


2 





11 




28 


3 


3 








0. 


36.5 


2.18 


38.68 


.94 


9 


.15 








41 


2 





10 




41 





5 


1 





0. 


37.6 


2.09 


39.73 


.94 


13 


.22 





1 


41 








8 




58 





3 


1 





0. 


33.2 


2.6 


35.8 


.92 


23 


.42 





11 


33 








8 




50 


"0 


1 


1 





0. 


35.4 


2.61 


58.13 


.93 


26 


.50 





42 


4 








8 




45 








t 





0. 


8.46 


1.98 


10.44 


.81 


6 


.46 

















6 


4 


5 








) 





0. 


26.9 


1.78 


28.69 


.93 


14 


.42 








27 


5 





7 




5 





4 


) 





0. 


19.85 


.88 


20.73 


.96 


15 


.60 








19 


2 





9 




16 





1 


) 





0. 


27.02 


1.97 


28.99 


.93 


17 


.47 





4 


24 


2 





7 




20 





1 


J 





0. 


26.67 


1.54 


28.29 


.94 


29 


.87 





3 


25 








7 




18 





1 


) 





0. 


26.77 


3.17 


29.94 


.89 


39 


1.18 





22 


10 








6 


2 


36 








) 





0. 


14.29 


.70 


15. 


.95 


2 


.13 








13 


2 





6 





59 





2 


1 2 


3 


2.9 


18.61 


.89 


19.5 


.95 


7 


.30 








18 








6 





40 





6 


2 


2 


1.98 


27.75 


3.42 


31.18 


.89 


26 


.70 





16 


16 








6 





19 





2 


6 2 


8 


4. 


37. 


1. 


38. 


.97 


7 


.09 








33 


9 


1 


11 


1 


18 





12 








0. 


40.41 


1.92 


42. 


.95 


17 


.20 








36 


13 





5 


1 


23 





6 


2 1 


3 


3. 


43. 


3. 


46. 


.94 


22 


.47 








51 


2 





9 





55 





9 


1 


1 


1. 


37. 


3. 


40. 


.93 


6 


.06 








59 








11 





19 





5 


C 


0- 


0. 


34.38 


2.47 


36.85 


.93 


19 


.31 





7 


40 








6 





24 





5 








0. 


32. 


2. 


34. 


.94 


14 


.20 





22 


15 








10 





32 








1 


1 


1. 


37. 


4. 


41. 


.90 


28 


.7 





50 


2 








8 





51 





2 


1 


1 


1. 


41. 


2. 


43. 


.95 


17 


.21 








25 


20 


1 


9 





22 





4 


2 1 


3 


2. 


30. 


1. 


31. 


.96 


16 


.27 


(1 





33 


4 


2 


9 





26 





3 


2 


2 


2 


38. 


1. 


39. 


.95 


14 


.18 








34 


1 





10 





32 





10 








o'. 


31. 


1. 


32. 


.95 


17 


.33 








42 








10 





66 





2 








0. 


31. 


1. 


32. 


.96 


17 


.34 





• 4 


38 








10 





17 





3 


2 


2 


1. 


39. 


3. 


42. 


.92 


57 


.95 





12 


30* 








11 





38 


1 


4 


1 


1 


1. 


37. 


4. 


41. 


.89 


52 


.92 





47 


4 


1 





7 





47 








u 





0. 


38.14 


2.14 


40.28 


.94 


15 


.24 








36 


6 





10 


3 


53 





4 


1 (i 


1 


.99 


36.25 


2.58 


38.83 


.93 


15 


.26 








43 


1 





12 


1 


19 





3 


(1 





0. 


36.9 


3.14 


40.04 


.92 


16 


.26 





2 


47 








10 


1 


12 





1 








0. 


32.63 


3.85 


36.48 


.89 


19 


.29 


1 


42 


12 








9 


1 


9 








II 





0. 


22.42 


.8 


23.22 


.96 


5 


.18 








25 


1 





7 


1 


28 





2 


(l 





0. 


31. 


2. 


33. 


.94 


16 


.32 





11 


25 








7 





8 





2 








0. 


35.03 


3.02 


38.05 


.92 


37 


1.1 





46 


5 








7 





32 





2 


2 


2 


1. 


27. 


1. 


28. 


.96 


29 


.6 








34 


1 





11 


1 


15 





5 








0. 


37. 


2. 


39. 


.92 


40 


.7 





7 


36 








7 


1 


31 





3 


2 


2 


2. 


41. 


4. 


45. 


.91 


45 


.8 





43 


11 








15 


1 


75 





3 


3 2 


5 


3.22 


25.80 


1.79 


27.39 


.93 


48 


1.33 








21 


15 











68 





1 








0. 


21.49 


3.20 


24.69 


.87 


23 


.74 








27 








6 


1 


63 





1 


3 


3 


.19 


15.31 


1.53 


16.84 


.90 


9 


.38 





7 


14 








7 


1 


61 





3 


1 


1 


.32 


18.45 


2.88 


21.33 


.86 


22 


.78 





16 


6 








7 


1 


60 








1 


1 


1. 


32. 


3. 


35. 


.91 


24 


.43 





19 


15 








9 





55 









24 21 





0. 


37. 


4. 


41. 


.90 


26 


.48 


1 


41 


3 








9 





72 








45 


31.60 


1,318.13 


102.40 


1,540.20 


.92 


981 


.47 


2 


475 


1,150 


100 


4 


386 


34 


1,624 


4 


128 








0. 


42. S 


11.02 


53.8 


.79 


16 


.24 


11 


55 











12 


9 


121 





1 








0. 


20.67 


5.02 


25.69 


.75 


11 


.33 


5 


27 











8 


2 


63 














0. 


28. 


3. 


31. 


.90 


14 


.003 


5 


31 











8 


2 


71 














0. 


32. 


7. 


39. 


.80 


6 


.13 


5 


37 











4 


2 


95 








1 1 


2 


2. 


37. 


3. 


39. 


.92 


16 


.36 


22 


22 











5 


4 


73 








l~l 


2 


2. 


160.47 


29.04 


188.49 


.83 


63 


.21 


48 


172 











37 


19 


423 





1 


67 69 


136 


102.60 


2,371.35 


167.89 


2,656.89 


.92 


2,222 


.455 


50 


647 


1,370 


507 


344 


682 


62 


2,540 


4 


262 



124 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE. 



Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study, 
First Semester, 1916-1917. 





Group II. 


Group I. 




SUBJECTS. 


Class. 


Class. 






m.'n. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


s. 


T. 


U. 


U. 


Spe- 
cial. 


Post 
Grad. 


"c5 
o 


English 


L3S 


89 


159 


83 


109 


55 


110 

2 
23 

83 


53 

12 

30 
9 


85 
1 

15 

27 

6 

85 


56 

6 
11 
3 

48 


2 




939 




3 




39 


14 


32 

50 


25 

31 


16 
120 


13 

48 


1 


1 
1 


196 




402 








25 




138 


88 










1 




312 
















48 








77 


59 
















136 












40 
2 


43 
3 










83 












i; 


7 


1 




1 




28 








61 

138 


16 

72 


77 




138 


88 


61 


29 














526 








16 

24 


5 
10 




1 


22 




















34 
















66 


19 

1 






85 












22 


7 


11 


3 
31 






44 
















31 




















35 
30 






35 












38 
42 


19 


37 


15 


18 






157 
















42 












21 
Ifl 


29 
29 
37 


11 
11 
15 


24 
24 
30 


11 
11 
18 




4 
4 


100 














100 




106 


89 


27 


LO 


38 


389 











SCHOOL REPORT. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



125 





Group II. 


Group I. 




SUBJECTS. 


Class. 


Class. 






M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


Spe- 
cial. 


Post 
Grad. 


"t3 


Mechanic Arts. 


56 


43 


35 


18 

15 


















152 




20 


8 














43 










20 

20 

1 

14 
14 


12 
12 

2 

! 
4 


9 

18 
2 

9 

9 


5 
5 
2 

9 
9 






46 








35 
3 

20 

2i 
20 

20 


18 

1 

13 
13 
13 
13 


20 

8 

15 
15 
15 


8 
2 

7 
7 
7 






136 












21 


Domestic Arts. 










91 


Art 










91 




70 

76 


39 
40 






173 










9 






149 






10 












10 












11 










1 




12 




















5 


9 


















i 








4 


















7 
3 









7 




113 


75 


20 


13 


17 


8 


17 

ll 

77 

1 


6 


272 






1 




17 




13> 


81 


15S 
2 


83 
3 


61 
5 


3 


30 

1 


40 
1 


31 


752 








13 




138 

13- 


89 
89 








227 
























227 



























126 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 
June 16, 1916. 



SCHOOLS. 



-3l3 



Sewing. 



sU- 



Cooking. 






ja.2.2 >, 



Mechanic Arts. 



=3:= 






~"<3 t - 
— Is o 

° * CD 
<- in- 3 

•2'S.m 






Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame 

St. Mary's 

St. John's 

Sacred Heart. . . . 

Total 



41 

57 

108 

101 

23 

25 

89 

76 

31 

6 

34 

19 

5 

19 

15 



649 



170 



11 

53 

128 

36 

5 

6 



271 



183 



113 

77 
115 
49 
24 
14 
58 
52 



564 



97 
55 
67 
42 

20 
11 
3d 
33 



419 



NIGHT SCHOOL. 



Beginners in English 35 

Drawing 25 

Cooking 

60 



TABLE. 








Whole number different 

pupils attending. 
Male. Female Total. 


Average 
membership. 


Average 
absence. 


Average daily 
attendance. 


35 6 


41 


22.131 


3.754 


18.377 


25 4 


29 


20 


6 


14 


21 


21 


19 


4 


15 



31 



91 61.131 13.754 



47.377 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

None. 



NATIONALITIES. 

Canadian, 12. Finnish, 1. American, 38. 

Italian, 1. Albanian, 9. Russian, 2. 

Greek, 5. Norwegian, 2. Prince Edward Island, 1. 



Swedish, 8. 
English, 3. 
Turkish, 1. 
Portuguese, 4. French, 2. Scotch, 1. 



Ruthenian, 1. 



SCHOLARSHIP TABLE. 



SCHOOL. 


C3 


o. 

o, . 
o S 
o a 


-3 

'8. .• 
"S.S 

1' 


1 

< 

3 

S'S. 

a 

a °" 
P-, 


1 

- 

■2 "8. 

9 3 

Jz; 


1 

« 

o 

aS 
S'H, 

3 

J; P. 

Oh 


■a 





3 




"0 


O 

-*■ O 


"3 


.5 M 



p. 

*S . 

"S.o 



'3 

a . 

8S 

S3 ^ 
Pi 


High 


V 
V 
T 
S 
R 
Q 


99 
46 
25 
60 
118 
76 


7 
2 
11 
4 
6 
6 


7.07 
4.34 
11.57 
6.66 
5.08 
7.89 


47 
19 
55 
23 
60 
31 


47.47 
41.30 
57.89 
38.33 
50.84 
40.78 


1 
1 
4 
2 
9 
9 


3 
8 
6 
8 
5 
11 


1 

6 
4 
8 
3 

7 


12 

7 
20 

9 
20 

7 


98.98 
97.82 
95.78 
96.66 
91.52 
88.15 


1.01 




2.17 




4.21 
3.33 
7.62 
11.84 


Total 




494 


36 


7.32 


235 


47.57 


26 


41 


29 


75 


94.73 


5.26 








P 



139 

84 


20 

8 


14.38 
9.52 


86 
47 


61.87 
55.95 


6 
2 


13 

24 


6 
9 


15 
8 


95.68 
97.61 


4.31 




2.38 






Total 




223 


28 


12.55 


133 


59.64 


8 


37 


15 


23 


96.41 


3.58 








M 

N 


78 
82 


9 

16 


11.52 
19.51 


39 
30 


50.00 
36.58 


3 
2 


12 

14 


11 

8 




96.15 
97.56 


3.84 




2.43 






Total 




160 


25 


15. 


69 


43.12 


5 


26 


19 




96.87 


3.12 






Walker 


M 

N 


9 
28 



3 


0.00 
10.71 


3 

18 


33.33 
64.28 






7 
1 


4 

1 




100.00 
100.00 


0.00 




0.00 






Total 




37 


3 


8.10 


21 


56.75 





8 


5 




100.00 


0.00 






Garrison 

Group II 


M 

N 


11 

14 



1 


0.00 
7.14 


4 
9 


36.36 
64.28 


1 




1 
1 


1 
1 




90.90 
100.00 


9.09 
0.00 


Total 




25 


1 


4.00 


13 


52.00 


1 


2 


2 




96.00 


4.00 




M 

N 


2 
9 




1 


0.00 
11.11 




4 


0.00 
44.44 


2 

2 


1 



1 





00.00 
77.97 


100.00 


Group II 


22.00 


Total 




11 


1 


9.09 


4 


36.36 


4 


1 


1 




63.63 


36.36 


Grand H. S. Total 




950 


94 


9.89 


475 


50.00 


44 


115 


71 


98 


95.36 


4.64 



General average of high school entire, 79.47 per cent. 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


170 


16 


9.41 • 


49 


28.82 


16 


14 


6 .. 


.. 90.58 


9.41 




K 


125 


5 


4.00 


24 


19.20 


8 


10 


2 .. 


.. 92.80 


6.40 




J 


126 


12 


9.52 


47 


37.30 


9 


4 


1 .. 


.. 92.85 


7.14 




I 


128 


10 


7.81 


36 


28.12 


13 


2 


.. 


.. 89.84 


10.15 




H 


139 


15 


10.79 


49 


35.25 


10 


9 


2 .. 


.. 92.80 


7.19 




G 


119 


(i 


5.04 


24 


20.16 


10 


4 


.. 


.. 91.59 


8.40 




F 


140 


15 


10.71 


68 


48.55 


10 


2 


.. 


.. 92.85 


7.14 




E 


153 


3 


1.96 


34 


22.22 


20 


7 


.. 


.. 86.92 


13.07 


Total Elementary 




1,100 


82 


7.45 


331 


30.99 


96 


52 


11 .. 


.. 91.27 


8.72 


Grand Total— High School 
























and Elementary Schools 




2,050 


176 


8.58 


805 


39.26 


140 


167 


82 9 


8 93.17 


6.82 



Standards. 
Scholarship, 80% 

Number of A — pupils 10% of enrollment. 
Number of B- pupils 50% " 
Failures, 10% " 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



129 



SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings p„: + :„_ „_ j .„„_ 

and teachers. Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 



Group I. — High 

School. 

Charles F.Cook.... 

Charles E. Moors . . 

Roberts. Baker. . . . 



Edward W. Ellsworth 
Ralph B. Young 



Elisabeth AveriU 

May B. McLam 

Lillian Yeaton 

Elizabeth S. Sargent. 
Carrie E. Baker 



Headmaster 

Sub-Master, room 1 
Assistant, room 7 ... 



Mary K. Taylor. 



Mary E. Jenness. 
Helen W.Ford. . 



Carrie A. Hood 

Marion C. Hixson . . . 

AbbieM. Sanger. . . . 
Margaret E. Durgin . 
Katherine M. Quigley 



Elizabeth Fowler. 
Charles L.Harris. 



Blanche E. Field . , 
Fannie E. Lincoln , 



Group II. — Parker 

School. 
Luella A. Dickerman. 
Mabel I. Durivage. . . 
Helen 0. Stephenson. 

Jessie H. Nettleton . . 
Kathryn B.White. .. 
Gertrude Stone 



Vivia Stone. 



Mary W. Cross 

Grace E. Jefts 

Julia M. Melifant... 



U. S. History, Civics . . . 
Mathematics, Chemistry 
Bookkeeping, Economics, 

Commercial Law 

Physics, Mathematics.. . 

Commercial Arithmetic, 

Bookkeeping 

French, German 

Greek, History 

English 

Mathematics, Biology. . . 
French 



English. 



English 

Domestic Science. 



Clerk. 



Stenography, Typewrit- 
ing 

English, French 



French 

Latin 

Stenography, Typewrit- 
ing 



Librarian . 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7. 
" 4. 

" 6. 
" 5. 
" 1. 



2.. 



Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Resigned at end of spring 

term. 
Leave of absence. 



Mathematics 

English 

Mathematics, Latin. 



French, English 

English 

Literature, Ancient His- 
tory 



Commercial History, An- 
cient History 



Clerk. 



Mathematics, English. . 

Penmanship, Mathemat- 
ics, English, Latin. 



$2,500 
1,800 
1,200 

1,000 



1,100 
1,000 
900 
900 
900 
900 

900 



750 



900 



800 
750 



600 
350 



1,300 
900 
900 

750 
700 

800 



750 
850 



500 
450 



114 School St. 

8 Liberty St. 

6 Pleasant St. (West Har- 
wich, Mass.) 
76 Rumford St. (Northboro, 
Mass.) 

34 Thorndike St. 
Ill School St. 

35 Perley St. 
66i No. State St. 
101 Center St. 

Ill School St. (Lancaster, 

N.H.) 
3J Liberty St. (Cambridge, 

Mass.) 

9 Holt St. (Dover, N. H.) 

4 No. State St. (North Easton, 
Mass.) 

140 Rumford St. 

15 Rumford St. (Sharon 

Mass.) 
(197 Bow St. .Franklin, N.H.) 
13 Su mmi t. Ave. 

47 So. Spring St. (East Mil- 
ton, Mass.) 
51 Center St. 



28 So. Main St. 
40 No Spring St. 

40 No. Spring St. (Lowell. 
Vt.) 

41 South St. (Pembroke St.) 
7 Short St. 

61 Warren St. (Springfield, 
Vt.) 

61 Warren St. (Springfield, 

Vt.) 
(10 Webster St., Franklin, 

N.H.) 

37 Green St. (Lynn, Mass.) 
36 So. State St. 



130 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 



Chandler School. 
Harriet S. Emmons. . 



Cora T. Fletcher. 



Mary Flavin 

Elizabeth J. Donovan 
Emma G. Nickerson . 



Mary C.Caswell. 



Principal, room 1. 
Assistant, " 1. 



Mathematics, Grammar, 
Music 

Latin, English, Mathe- 
matics, Physiology . . . 

English, Latin, History . . 

Latin, English 

Physiology, Mathemat- 
ics, English D 



Clerk. 



Walker School. 
J. Elizabeth Talpey. . 



Viola J. Brock. 



Garrison School. 
Bertha L. Holbrook. 



Eastman School. 
Florence E. George . 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7. 

Principal, " 7. 
Principal, " 1. 



Latin, English Composi- 
tion 

History, Geography, Lit- 
erature, Hygiene 



H. S., Group II, M.. 
H. S., Group II, M... 



800 



800 
800 



400 



800 
800 



6 So. State St. 

41 School St. (Lawrence, 

Mass.) 
58 School St. 
28 Thorndike St. 

58 School St. (Gloucester, 

Mass.) 
121 Warren St. 



41 Warren St. 

99 No. State St. 

542 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. 

9 Gladstone St, 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 
J. Elizabeth Talpey. . 

Viola J. Brock 

Florence A. Chandler 



Mabel F. Lane 

Eva H.Tandy 

M. Gertrude Doherty 
Alice M . M . Phaneuf 

SaraE.McClure 

Agnes V. Sullivan. . . . 
Margaret Morrill. . . . 

Ada B. Martin. 

M . Louise Phillips . . . 



Garrison School. 
Bertha L. Holbrook. . 

Flossie L. Saltmarsh . 
May B. Thompson. . . 

A. Ruth Kelley 

Louisa Herbert 

Margaret T. Lynch. . 



Iyla Chamberlin. 
Charlotte White. 



Eastman School. 
Florence E. George . 
Vivien R. Morgan. . 
Stella M. French.. . 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7. 



Principal, room 7. 



Assistant, 



Principal, room 1. 

Assistant, " 2. 

" 4. 



High School 

Classes K, L, Arithmetic, 
English Composition, 
Literature, Music, 
Spelling 

Classes I, J 

" G, H 

" E, F 

" C,D 

" A,B 

Kindergarten 

Ungraded 

Resigned at end of spring 
term. 

High School 

Classes J, K 

" H, I 

" G, F 

" D, E 

" A,C 

Kindergarten 

" and Primary. . .. 



Class K... 

Classes 4, 5 

" 1,3 



800 
800 



750 

650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
450 
650 



650 
500 
650 
650 
650 



375 



800 
500 
650 



41 Warren St. 
99 No. State St. 



(20 Winter St., Penacook, 

N. H.) 
105 No. State St. 
66 High St. 
145 No. State St. 
90 Rumford St. 
11 Cummings Ave. 
49 Lyndon St. 
123 No. State St. 
27 Warren St. 



542 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. 

11 Chestnut St. 

74 Allison St. 

4 Harrod St. 

3 Rollins St. 

446 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. r* tn> 'viwi 

2 View St., West Concord, 
N. H. 

118 No. Main St. 



9 Gladstone St. 

10 Avon St. 

Concord N, H., Route 5. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



131 



SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 



Rumford School. 
Jessie N. Stimson. . . . 
Anna M. Keenan. . . . 

Annette Prescott. . . . 

Annie E. Saltmarsh. . 
Abbie T. McDonald. 
Mary M. Doherty. . . 
Gara E. McQuesten. . 
Katharine L. Remick 



Maude B. Binet 

Elizabeth M. McAfee 



Kimball School. 

Mary E. Melifant 

Mary A. McGuire. . . 
Harriet L. Megrath. . 
Edna M. Kennedy. . . 
Mary A. Coughlin. . . 
Helen K. Hallinan. . . 
Lottie E. Pearson. . . . 
Nellie T. Halloran. . . 



MyrtaB. Lowe. . . . 
Harriet C. Kimball . 



Penacook School. 
Annie M. Branon. . . , 

Clara E. Flanders 

Lillian M. Phaneuf . 
Hannah E. O'Brien. . 
AdaB. Martin 



Franklin School. 
Abbie A. Donovan. . 
Minnie E. Ladd. . . . 
Mabel Clark 

Dewey School. 

Addie F. Straw 

Helen L. Southgate. 

Susan M. Little. . . . 

A. Delia Shaw 

Alice M. Sargent. . . 
Belle E. Shepard. . . 
Helen L. Gibbs 



Principal, room 8. 
Assistant, " 7. 



Principal, room 6., 
Assistant, " 5. 

" 8.. 

" 7.. 

"4. 

" 1. 

" 3. 

"2 



Principal, room 4. 
Assistant, " 3 . 



Principal, room 3. 

Assistant, " 4. 

" 1. 



Principal, room 6. 
Assistant, " 1. 



Class L — Arithmetic 

" K — History, Geog- 
raphy, Hygiene 

Classes I, J — Language, 



Classes G, H 

' E, F 

' C,D 

' A,B _. 

Kindergarten and Pri- 
mary 

Kindergarten 

Special teacher 



Class L — Language 

Class K — Arithmetic 

Classes I, J 

' G,H 

' E,F 

* C,D 

' A.B 

Kindergarten and Pri- 
mary 

Kindergarten 

Special teacher 



Classes I, J 

' G. H 

' E, F 

' B, D 

Transferred to Walker 
School. 



Classes I, J 

' C,D 

' A,B 

Training teachers 

Supervisor of Kindergar 

tens 

Classes G, H 

" E, F 

" C,D 

" A,B 

Kindergarten , 



$650 

650 

650 
600 
650 
550 
650 

650 

450 
500 



650 
650 
650 
650 
550 
600 
650 

650 
450 
500 



650 
650 
450 
500 



650 
650 
600 



1,000 

700 
650 
650 
650 
650 
450 



9 Holt St. 

(93 High St . , Penacook, N .H.) 

25 Green St. 
60 Beacon St. 

Rumford St. 
11 Thorndike St. 
9 Wall St. 

4 Favette St. 
246 No. Main St. 
39 So. Spring St. 



36 So. State St. 
77 So. State St. 
(Hooksett, N. H.) 
10 Blanchard St. 
22 Albin St. 
281 Pleasant St. 
52 Beacon St. 

30 Perley St. 
60 No. Spring St. 
Hopkinton Road. 



55 Thorndike St. 
51 South St. 
90 Rumford St. 
60 Franklin St. 



84 Center St. 

72 Washington St. 

126 Warren St. 



101 No. State St. 

2 So. Spring St. 
90 School St. 
72 School St. 
78 Warren St. 
Ill School St. 

3 Liberty St. 



132 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 

TRAINING CLASSES. 

SENIORS. 

, {Graduates June, 1917.) 

Ellen H. S. Anderson 1 View St., West Concord, N. H. 

Florence M. Carroll 8 Perley St. 

Edith C. Ericson 226 No. State St. 

Gerda H. Ekstrom 16 Gladstone Ave., West Concord, N. H. 

Irene W. Hart 43 High St. 

Rose M. Keenan (93 High St., Penacook, N. H.) 

Kathleen M. Kelley 60 So. Main St. 

Minta A. Locke (Pembroke, N. H.) 

Ruth M. McCaig 13 Rockingham St. 

Eva R. Sanborn (Manchester, N. H., R. F. D. 1.) 

Marion R. Stebbins 23 Union St. 

Marguerite M. J. Tetrault 38 Concord St. 

Katherine J. Twomey (56 Summer St., Penacook, N. H.) 

Charlotte M. Young 47 Laurel St. 

JUNIORS. 

(Graduates June, 1918.) 

Ellen C. Doherty 11 Thorndike St. 

Rose E. Donovan 105 So. Main St. 

Julie A. Engel (53 Summer St., Penacook, N. H.) 

Margaretta B . Jackson 80 Allison St. 

Elsa R. Johnson Call St. 

Josephine Reynolds 28 So. Main St. 

Winifred J. Welch 22 Church St. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjec s 
taught. 


Salary 
per 
year. 


Residence ( ) Out of 
town. 


Harriet P. Dame 
School. 


Principal, room 4. . . 

Assistant, " 2. . . 
" 1... 




$650 

550 
500 

650 
650 

2,000 
1,100 
1,050 

900 

1,000 

800 

$2 a day 

$1.50 a 
day 






" 3,4 


N.H.) 
70 Rumford St. 




1, 2 


482 No. State St., West Con- 




Resigned at end of spring 
term. 

Class C 


cord, N. H. 


Cogswell School. 


Principal, room 1.. . 
Assistant, " 2. . 

Principal, room 6.. . 

Assistant, " 1. . . 

"4... 

" 3... 
" 2... 

Student assistant, 
rooms 6 and A . . . 

Assistant, rooms 2 
and 3 

Student assistant, 


3 South St. (Bristol, N. H.) 




" A 


75 South St. 


Morrill School. 
Arthur W. French. . . 
Raymond P. Gilman. 
C. Ellsworth Taylor. . 

Harold P. Johnson. . . 


Supervision and lectures . 
Machine Shop practice.. 
Drawing 

Elementary Manual 
Training, joinery pat- 
tern-making, foundry 


41 So. Spring St. 
10 Maple St. 

76 Washington St. (Rockland, 
Mass.) 


Jules Wiesmann, Jr.. . 


Joinery and advanced 
pattern-making, ele- 
mentary manual train- 


Mass.) 
3i Liberty St. (West Roxbury, 


Rolland R. Gove. . . . 
Harold C. Chamberlin 


Printing, blacksmithing 

Wood-turning, joinery 
and elementary man- 


Mass.) 
38 Monroe St. 

East Concord, N. H., Box 38 


Daniel H. Flint 


Elementary manual 
training, joinery and 














repairs 

Resigned at end of spring 
term. 













SCHOOL REPORT. 



133 



SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



N Tndttch^ ng H P - ti0nandr00m - 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary 
per 
year. 



Residence. ( ) Out of 
town. 



Sewing. 
(Parker School.) 
Louise C. Howe. . . . 
M. Hortense Berry . 
M. Emma Parsons. . 
P. Mildred Phillips . 

Cooking. 
Harriet B. Davis. . . . 

Ruth A. Faunce. 



Music. 
Charles S. Conant. 



Drawing. 

Faith C. Stalker. 



Mary A.Jones 

Military Drill 
George W. Morrill. . . 

Janitors. 
Albert W. Thompson 

Frank J. Boyd 

Charles Ada 

Arthur J. Taylor. . . . 

Harry R. Sturm 

James W. Powers.. . . 



Edgar D. Brown 

OlandM.Blodgett. . 
Charles M. Thomas. . 
Frank L. Dudley. . . . 

Henry D. Robinson. . 
Mrs. H. D. Robinson 

Otto J. Carlen 

William D. Merrick. . 
Special Repair Man, 
Wright C. Walker . . . 



Principal, room 3. 

Assistant, " 3. 
" 3 
" 3 



Principal . 



Sewing, Dressmaking. 
Millinery 



High School classes 

Resigned at end of spring 
term. 



Director . 



Director. 



Assistant. 



Instructor. 



High and Morrill. 



Parker. . . 
Chandler. 
Walker. . 
Garrison . 



Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook and Cogs- 
well 

Dewey and Franklin 
Harriet P. Dame . . . 



550 
500 
400 



650 

1,300 

900 
750 

100 



780 
624 
780 
300 
780 
624 

300 
650 
650 

650 
676 

228 



Resigned. 



167 No. Main St. 
32 So. Spring St. 
88 No. State St. 
148 Rumford St. 



15 Rumford St. (Everett 
Mass.) 



61 School St. 



27 Warren St. (Worcester, 
Mass.) 

(152 No. Main St., Pena- 
cook. N. H.) 



51 No. Spring St. 



74 Allison St. 
46 Perley St. 

5 Chapel St. 

6 Avon St. 

15 Court St. 

3 Fisher St., West Concord, 

N.H. 
East Concord , N . H . , Route 5. 
22 Pillsbury St. 

16 Gladstone St. 

20 Dakin St. 

Concord, N. H., Route 6. 

Concord, N. H., Route 6. 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1916. 



SUMMARY OF WARDS. 

Boys. Girls. Total. 

Number of children enumerated 1,521 1,543 3,064 

Increase since 1915 . . 86 

Number attending school since 1915 60 63 123 

Number attending public schools 1,195 1,209 2,404 

Number attending parochial schools 320 318 638 

Number attending private schools 6 16 22 

Number 5 to 16 not attending regularly ... 3 1 4 

Number 5 to 8 not attending regularly .... 2 1 3 

Number 8 to 14 not attending regularly ... 8 4 12 

Number 14 to 16 not attending regularly . . 2 3 5 
Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write 

the English language correctly 

Moved into the district since 1915 45 43 88 

NATIVITY OF PARENT. 

American born 1,291 

Foreign born 783 

Russia 22 

West Indies 7 

Italy 60 

New Brunswick 15 

England 57 

Poland 2 

Sweden 137 

Roumania 1 

Ireland 117 

Armenia •„ 3 

French Canadian 232 

Denmark . . . .' 1 

Turkey 6 

Germany 10 

Norway 1 

Nova Scotia 21 

Prince Edward Island 25 

Finland 46 

Scotland 12 

Albania % 1 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



135 



Cape Breton 1 

Holland 2 

Austria 1 

Switzerland 2 

Australia 1 

Greece 2 

India 3 



NATIVITY OF CHILD. 



Boys. Girls. Total. 



American born 1,450 

Foreign born 71 

Russia 4 

Italy 7 

England 10 

Sweden 7 

Ireland 4 

Armenia 

French Canadian 29 

Turkey 2 

Norway 

Prince Edward Island 

Scotland 1 

Albania 1 

Nova Scotia 1 

Finland 2 

Greece 2 



1,457 2,907 



86 


157 


7 


11 


3 


10 


15 


25 


6 


13 


7 


11 


1 


1 


28 


57 


1 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


6 


7 





1 


3 


4 


2 


4 


1 


3 



FIRE-DRILLS, 1915-1916. 



Oct. 


11. 


78 seconds. 


Nov. 


4. 


100 


Nov. 


12. 


110 


Dec. 


16. 


90 


Jan. 


12. 


150 


Feb. 


24. 


103 


April 


19. 


76 " 


May 


4. 


82 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

All doors. 

North door and stairs closed. 

South door and stairs to second floor closed. 

North door closed. 

All doors, all in hall. 

East door closed. 

All doors. 

North door closed. 



136 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COGSWELL SCHOOL. 



Oct. 25. 


25 seconds. 


Nov. 10. 


26 


Feb. 8. 


25 


March 16. 


32 


May 11. 


32 


June 8. 


28 



DEWEY SCHOOL. 

Sept. 14. Practice. Room 2 

Sept. 15. 

Sept. 16. 

Sept. 17. 

Sept. 20. 

Sept. 21. 

Sept. 22, 

Sept. 22. 



Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Nov, 
Jan. 



22. 
22. 

30. 50 seconds.* 
1. 55 



25. 70 
March 6. 70 
April 11. 50 
May l.f 
May 29. 50 seconds. 

KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

Oct. 18. 70 seconds. 

Nov. 12. 70 

Feb. 1. 78 

April 11. 66 

May 19. 72 

June 8. 63 

EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



1. 25 
1. 29J 



Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 24. 35 

March 27. 28 

April 21. 25 

June 12. 25 



25 seconds. 



WALKER SCHOOL. 


Oct. 1. 


65 seconds. 


Nov. 8. 


65 


Feb. 4. 


55 


April 20. 


55 


June. 


63 


PARKER SCHOOL. 


Nov. 4. 


70 seconds. 


Nov. 9. 


50 


Jan. 21. 


55 


Feb. 9. 


55 " 


May 8. 


50 


May 17. 


50 


HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 


Nov. 11. 


30 seconds. 


Dec. 3. 


30 


Jan. 20. 


40 


June 1 . 


28 " ' 



Several drills given but no time 
was taken as they were for practice. 
~Sot given by the janitor. 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 

Oct. 4. 42 seconds. 

Oct. 20. 42 

Jan. 24. 35 

March 31. 25 

May 25. 40 

June 7. 41 

PENACOOK SCHOOL. 

Oct. 19. 30 seconds. 

Nov. 9. 32 

Nov. 30. 33 

Jan. 25. 35 

March 14. 35 

April 25. 36 

June 1. 34 



• All Rooms. 



t Could not time, door would not open. 



1 1 middle door locked. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



137 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 

85 seconds. 

Nov. *. 70 
Nov. 8. 65 
Jan. 26. 60 
Feb. 1. 60 



MORRILL SCHOOL. 
Oct. 6. 63 seconds. 
Nov. 19. 45 
Feb. 24. 50 
May 8. 40 



March 3. 1 min. 50 sec* 


GARRISON SCHOOL 




Oct. 


13. 


45 seconds. 


CHANDLER SCHOOL. 


Oct. 


19. 


50 " 


Oct. 21. 55 seconds. 


Nov. 


10. 


50 


Nov. 17. 35 


Jan. 


24. 


45 


Feb. 17. 50 


May 


1. 


45 


April 12. 50 " 


May 


22. 


57 


April 27. 40 


June 


5. 


45 



May 



5. 40 



* All passed out south door. 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 



' 


Kind'n. 


ELEMENTARY 


YEAR. 




1 


2 


Class. 


1 and 2. 


A. 


B. 


C. 


D. 




P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 


































































Walker 


J 36 

1 22 

r 17 

I 8 


7 
2 


26 
17 


1 
3 


28 

21 
10 

31 

9 

17 

15 
23 
11 
29 


4 


5 
2 




3 
1 

10 
4 


30 

25 


5 
2 


22 

25 

7 

30 

23 


7 




2 









J 20 

he 
/ is 

\23 




4 
2 


41 

29 

14 

7 
20 


4 

4 

1 
5 



30 

13 

25 
10 
18 


2 

3 

2 
2 
1 


3 




1 






Franklin 






12 
18 
15 
47 


7 




15 





1 




3 








39 


3 


21 





5 










Total 


170 


15 


193 


21 


194 


29 


172 


17 


199 


29 








91 89 


9018 


86 99 


91 00 


8728 

























AVERAGE AGE 





Kind'n. 


A. 


B. 


C. 


D. 


High 




































Walker 


/ 4 yr. 9 m. 

i 6 1 
/5 10 

\5 


7 yr. m. 
6 11 


7 yr. 6 m. 

7 2 

6 10 

7 

7 5 
7 2 
7 5 

7 3 

7 4 
6 9 


8 yr. 8 m. 
8 8 


8 yr. 10 m. 




8 6 




8 5 




/6 

15 2 

5 3 


6 11 

7 8 
6 4 
6 3 

6 11 

7 1 
6 9 


8 

8 5 
8 6 

8 1 

8 


8 5 




8 7 










8 7 




(5 3 
{5 6 
1 4 10 


8 9 




9 7 








8 3 












5 4 


6 10 


7 2 


8 4 


8 7 







SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1916. 



139 



SCHOOLS. 



3 


4 


5 


6 


E. 


F. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


































































































20 
715 


6 
2 


31 

26 
10 
30 

24 
34 


2 

1 

3 


2 


39 
23 






30 

17 
6 
34 

13 

36 
10 
21 

8 


3 


1 
2 

3 

2 

4 
2 


32 
25 


6 



41 

16 
10 
36 

20 
32 


2 


1 
5 

6 



44 


2 


37 

11 
10 
75 

46 


1 










5 


29 

14 
37 


5 

4 
3 


31 

9 
32 


3 

1 
2 


33 

18 

36 
11 
9 


5 

3 

1 
3 
1 


67 
37 


8 



2 
9 












19 


1 


33 
9 


6 
1 


36 


3 


23 
6 
















16 

























































150 


21 


197 


15 


170 


9 


175 


17 


164 


19 


184 


14 


164 


10 


179 


17 



87.71 



92.92 



89.61 



92.92 



91.32 



PER CLASS. 



E. 


F. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


















































9 p. 5 m. 
9 3 


10 y. 2 m. 

16 

9 10 

9 5 

10 
8 11 


10 y. 8 m. 

11 2 


11 y. 3 m. 

11 5 

10 1 

11 1 

10 5 
10 11 
10 5 

10 7 

11 11 


12 y. 6 m. 
11 7 


11 y. 6 m. 

12 3 
11 3 

11 11 

12 1 
11 9 


12 y. 1 m. 
14 6 


12 yr. 9 m. 

12 4 

12 10 


9 6 

9 
9 1 


10 8 

10 5 
10 6 


11 8 

11 4 
11 8 
11 6 


13 
13 1 


13 3 
12 11 








8 11 


9 7 
10 4 


9 11 












12 8 




14 2 




























9 2 


9 9 


10 4 


10 10 


11 8 


11 11 


13 2 


13 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 



HIGH 


YEAR. 


7 


8 


Class. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 




P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 




























152 


2 


62 


6 




163 
37 

21 



3 


1 

2 


130 
54 

14 

7 


2 
2 


2 




Walker 








































Kimball 
































































































































Total 


221 


6 


205 


6 


152 


2 


62 


6 








97.35 


97.15 


97.40 


91.17 





















AVERAGE AGE 





M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


High 
















14 yr. 11m. 






14 jr. m. 

14 1 

13 9 

15 9 


14 yr. 1 m. 

13 11 

14 5 
14 2 




Walker 
































































































14 4 


14 1 


14 11 


15 6 







SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1916.— Continued. 



141 



SCHOOL 


9 


10 


11 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P 


63 


9 


107 


9 


53 


2 


81 


4 


41 


1 


99 


1 


































































































































































































































































































63 


9 


107 


9 


53 


2 


81 


4 


41 


1 


99 


1 


87.50 


92.24 


96.36 


95.29 


97.61 


99.00 



PER CLASS.— Continued. 



Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


15 yr. 5 m. 


15 yr. 5 m. 


15 yr. 8 m. 


16 yr. 8 m. 


18 yr. 6 m. 


18 yr. 7 m. 


















































































































































15 5 


15 5 


15 8 


16 8 


18 6 


18 7 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



High School. — Earl Fipphen, Paul Flanders, Daniel Flint, Laura 
Foote (2), Florence King (5), Roger Leavitt, Agnes Moberg (2), Ruth 
Morgan (2), Ethel Moulton, Bertha Stohrer, Gladys Wilcox, Mary- 
Willis, Doris Bartlett (3), Emeline Gage, Frank S. Merrill (2), Mary 
Stearns (3), Dorothy Brown (2), Hugh Cassidy (3), Nora Cotter (3), 
Russell Cushing, Nannie Dahlgren (3), George Houston (3), Ruth 
Peckham (3), Florence Prescott, Marie Roy (3), George Wooster (3), 
Helen Bunker (2), Marion Carroll (2), Agnes Levin (2), Marion Lith- 
gow (2), Ruth Tenney, Myra Woods (2), George Jones (2), Ralph Wel- 
don, Albert Blake, Ida Carlson, Elizabeth Chase, Marjorie Cheney, 
Gladys French (3), Philip Gove (3), Ellen Hackett, Clarence Hammond 
(3), Esther Haselton (2), Hilma Hokenson, Louise Home, Agnes John- 
ston, Cornelia Kimball (3), Marjorie Knight, Arthur Kunberger (5), 
Ida Mclntyre (2), Alice Newbold, Wallace Stearns, Guy Tabor, Gladys 
Towle, Doris White, Alice Carlson, Ruth E. Chase, Charles Foote, 
Rachel George, Eldon Heartz, Ruby Lawrence, Marcia Madisen, Lucile 
Nelson, Leola R,obinson, Cora Shepard, Altha Walker (7), Frank White. 

Parker School. — Harriet Albee, Harry Anderson, Elizabeth Ben- 
ton (2|), Aubrey Brown, Elizabeth Chalmers, Dean Colton, Rose 
Corriveau, Pauline Cutter, Harry Donovan, Myra Flanders, Edgar 
Hammond, W. Paul Heath, Alice Mathewson, Joseph Moulton, J. 
Barry O'Brien, William Odey, John Peckham, Field Perry, Ruth Robin- 
son, Jeannette Ryan, Eric Sandquist, Lily Silver, A. Corinne Tre- 
noweth, Herbert Tittemore, Marie Tremblay, Marie Turgeon, Frances 
Wason. 

Chandler School. — Ruth A. Anderson, Williain R. Augat, H. 
Horton Cameron, Anna E. Chapman, Henry M. Clay, Elsie B. Colby, 
Mary E. Crutchfield, Shirley E. Cummings, Harold W. Cutter, Oscar L. 
Drew, Gwendoline B. Goodwin, Lawrence D. Gordon (2), Lillian A. 
Haggett, Irene C. Haselton, Allen R. Hillsgrove (5), Clarence E. Hug- 
gins, Gertrude F. Knight, C. Edgar Kunberger (3), Stewart A. Lyford, 
Dorothy M. Martin, Ruth A. Morrow (3), John H. Nolan, E. Lillian 
Ranquist (3), Frederick Robinson, Ruth A. Saltmarsh, Rachel E. Sand- 
quist, Gertrude O. Smith, May E. Smith, William F. Smith, Emma E. 
Tucker. 

Walker School. — Ada Smith, Howard Hammar, Lawrence Ahern, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 143 

Theodore C. Reed, Frederick A. Daggett, Edward N. Lampron, Edward 
J. Odey, Engrid Rosendale, Georgia Lampron, Gertrude Weathers, 
Ernest Levesque, Charles Mayo, Edith Walker, Edward Twomey, 
Elizabeth Twomey, John Hobson, Martha Persons, Walter Stanley, 
Arthur Flanmand, Jessie Sanborn, Emma Levesque. 

Garrison School. — John N. Engel, Morrill F. Shepard, Edna I. 
Peterson, Carl A. Anderson, Carl A. Dahlgren, Oscar F. Forsberg, 
Helen E. Ryan, Henry W. Ekstrom, Leona D. Snow, Ethel V. M. 
Johnson. 

Eastman School. — Sadie E. Brown, Dorothy Swain, Mable Cate, 
Mary Cate, Vesta Morrison, Nellie French, Frederick Paige, George 
Stuart, Goldie M. Gage, Dorothy E. Staniels, Luella E. Powell, Ethel 
M. Cate, Harold B. Paige. 

Rumford School. — Elsie Davie, Harry E. Barrett, Eben B. Hutton, 
Alfred H. Hyland (2), G. Lyman Stratton, Danforth E. Gurley (2), 
Letitia E. George (2), Elizabeth Palmer, Stanley Benson, Alfred Kun- 
berger (2), Arthur R. Lee, Irving Welch, Helen L. Young, Clark W. 
Aldrich, Dana H. Lee, Byrnes McCaffrey, Harriett McLeod, John 
Watts, Martin H. Gurley, Dorothy Kiley, Crosby H. Lewis, Gardner 
Wales, Delmas Avell, Alice Haskell, Elmer Johnson, Lena Robinson (2), 
Madeline Roy (2), Leila Young, Esther Armstrong (3), Olive V. Hart- 
ford, Ruth M. Holt, Ethel E. Houston, Wilda O. Madisen, Georgia M. 
Osgood, Lillian Unwin, Lillian B. Wright, Leo J. Boisvert (2), Theodore 
Martell (2), Wilbur Tucker (2), Vina! R. Hurd. 

Kimball School. — Charles E. Dixson, Charlotte R. Pitts, Pearl 
Smith, William Quinn, Harold Bass, Ruby Bartlett, Thelma McDonald, 
Emma Flammand, Eleanor Diversi, Henry Saltmarsh, Doris Abbott, 
Eva Dearborn, Helen Foster (5), Florence Philbrick, Harry Bartlett, 
Carl Badger, Everett Benton, Edmund Gullage, Maurice Quinn, Clif- 
ford Woodward, Reginald Atkins, Madeline Haggett, Una Robinson, 
Edward Shannon, Dorothy Twomey, Charles Zambs. 

Penacook School. — Rocco Ceriello, Pearl Tabor, Lulu Gordon, 
Frances Smythe, Ruth Olson (2), Freeman Bachelder, Agnes Chalmers, 
Ruth Lord. 

Franklin School. — Carl Augat, Laura Moran, Florence M. Conn, 
Mary I. Fisher, James W. Moran, Robert A. Ritchie. 

Dewey School. — Marion E. Burleigh, Ida Crossland, Una G. 
Dearborn, Frank N. Hayford, Thomas F. Mulligan, James Murphy, 



144 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Robert J. Prowse, Ruth M. Prowse, Germain K. Shannon, Gertrude L. 
Shannon, Harold G. Vitagliano. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Helen E. Curtice, Charles F. Hillsgrove, 
Clifford A. Savoy, George R. Hillsgrove, Myrtle Hillsgrove. 

Cogswell School. — None. 



HONOR LIST— HIGH SCHOOL. 

Pupils Who Have Attained an Avekage op A — in Their Studies 
For the Past Year. 

High School. — Paul Flanders, Dorothy Kendall, Florence King, 
Fannie Kling, Gladys Wilcox, Mary Willis, Richard Pearson, Esther 
Calkin, Mary Stearns, Helen Barker, Miriam Batchelder, Caroline 
Cassidy, Marion Cheney, Nora Cotter, Hugh Cruikshank, Rebecca 
Merrill, Anna Murphy, Ruth Peckham, Amelia Pollard, Florence 
Prescott, Helen Bunker, Marion Lithgow, Astrid Olson, Nora Reardon, 
Elizabeth Chase, Haskell Cohn, Cornelia Kimball, Robert McCormick, 
Mary Shannon, Wallace Stearns, Marion Briggs, Marion Colby, Rachel 
George, Eva Hadley, Pauline Lane, Lois Rundlett. 

Parker School. — Arline Booth, Cecilia Conn, Katherine Crabbe, 
Grace Haskell, William Limprey, Freda Sargent, Nath. Sawyer, Dorothy 
Watson, Mary Wood, Elizabeth Benton, Hazel Clement, Gladys Cur- 
rier, Alfred Dogostino, Dora Drapeau, Joseph Gannon, Kathleen Heath, 
Ruth Lyford, Richard Henry, Helen Morgan, Anna Nordine, Barry 
O'Brien, Mary Otis, Jeannette Ryan, Eric Sandquist, Marie Tremblay, 
Jennie Turgeon, Bessie Waldman, Blanche Walker, Mary Walker. 

Chandler School. — Henry Clough, Elsie Colby, Mabel Dame, 
Pearl Parker, Ethel Ravitch, Ruth Saltmarsh, Leah Waldman, Ruth 
Whittier, Ruth Yeadon, John Allquist, Robert Brown, Ida Cate, Helen 
Curran, Harold Cutter, George Gordon, Gwendolyn Jones, George 
Kimball, Wendell Kimball, Elizabeth Morrill, Lillian Ranquist, Hazel 
Roy, May Smith, Doris Sturm, Marion White, Corinne Wilson. 

Walker School. — Linda Farnum, Edmund Laport, Harold Perkins, 
Dorothy Scott. 

Garrison School. — Morrill F. Shepard. 

Eastman School. — Honora J. E. Cate. 



10 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS— HONOR LIST. 

Pupils Who Have Attained a Mark of B — or Better for the Year. 

Walker School. — Douglas Everett, Theda LaFleur, Paul Otis, 
Ursula Sanders, Oramel Swain, Paul Tracey, Jessie Sanborn, Jennie 
Ford, Arthur Flammand, Albert Fifield, Richard Felton, Ruth Drew, 
Robert Reid, Robert Morrison, Ada Smith, Kathleen Wall, Florence 
Woods, Paul Lampron, Beatrice Tremblay, Bernice Berry, Domino 
Bianco, Marguerite Fernald, Ruth Lord, Frank George, Howard Ham- 
mar, Ralph Waters, Clifton Wilcox, Pauhne Ballard, Helen Burbank, 
Malcolm Flanders, Philip Guyol, Doris Hayford, Mary Lorden, May 
Cochrane, Reginald Livingston, Grover Paclat, Charles Paclat, Ger- 
maine Scully, Richard Datson, Ruth Swain, Oscar Sandquist, Viola 
Carlson, Irene Hartz, Edith Walker, Roland Robinson, Frederick 
Daggett, Dorothy LaFleur, Dorothy Hines, Madeline Hobson, Edward 
Lampron, Samuel Powers, Lillian Sanders, Elnor Smith, Murray Sawyer, 
Robert Walker, Lawrence Ahern, Ada Brown, Anna Clark, John Davis, 
Pauline Dunstane, Gladys Hickox, 'Gunnar Olson, Edward Ploude, 
Raymond Perkins, George Reilly, Helen Colby, Ethel Crowley, Cyril 
Datson, Durward Heath, Georgia Lampron, Raymond Neal, Oscar 
Leven, Sara Tousignant, Ruth Tyler, Gertrude Weathers, Edward G. 
Cummings, Delmar LaFleur, John Noble, M. Louise Belisle, Dorothy 
Hill, Howard Hickox, Virginia Otis, Engrid E,osendale, Frank Smith. 

Garrison School. — Gustaf W. Forsberg, Mary J. Henry, Helen E. 
Ryan, Carl A. Dahlgren, Axel C. Gustaf son, Helen T. Rylander, Maurice 
B. Abare, Carl A. Anderson, EllaV. M. Anderson, Oscar T. Forsberg, 
John F. Kupsola, Fannie M. Matson, Marjorie S. Matheson, Russell O. 
Shepard, Doris E. Toone, M. Esther Cushing, Milo Lindgren, Elsa 
Olson, Louise Shepard, Arnold Engel, Hilia Kangus, Anna Anderson, 
Raymond Danforth, Chester Larson, Olga Swenson, Ruth I. Swenson, 
Clara J. Henry, Harry Olson, Doris L. Robinson, Morrill Dakin, Paul 
E. Frost, Thomas S. Carr, Ida Peterson, Nils Soderstrom, Renaldo 
Mauritson, Frank G. L. Rossell, Ruth E. Sanders. 

Eastman School. — Ethel M. Brown, Caroline J. Cate, Lura A. 
French, Miriam E. French, Goldie M. Gage, P. Leon Mann, Lester A. 
Maynard, Warren S. McManis, Madeline S. Sargent, Dorothy E. 
Staniels, Hazel Blanchard, Ethelyn Kelley, Bertha LaCroix, Vesta 
Morrison, Mary Cate, Nellie French, George Stuart, Ruth Lewis, 
Pauline Tebbetts, Robert O. Cushing, Chester D. Floyd, Harold B. 
Huston, Emile Larochelle, Guy W. Mann, Louise Muzzey, Arlene M. 
Stuart. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 147 

Rtjmford School.— Hazel Grant, Esther Armstrong, Janet Chal- 
mers, Ethel Carpenter, Merton Messer, Donald Sampson, Lillian 
Unwin, Marion Wason, Emma Trudell, Russell Sawyer, Agnes Ring, 
Georgia Osgood, Clarence Morgan, Theodore Martell, Arnold Lewis, 
Olive Hartford, Vinal Hurd, Arnold Hill, Ethel Houston, Eldred Davie, 
Ida Cilley, Orrin Beane, Bernice Bennett, Rosa Wittenberg, Alice 
Haskell, Edward Sanel, Arlene Jellison, Eleanor Harris, Grace Rice, 
Jerome Leavitt, Gladys Towle, Jessie Cruikshank, Madeline Roy, 
Wihelming Wheeler, Lena Robinson, Paul Leary, Paul Maxham, Grace 
Melvin, Delmas Arell, Vivien Heath, Earl Sawyer, Kenneth Kimball, 
Elmer Johnson, Martin Gurley, Helen Hutton, Clyde Gray, Dorothy 
Kiley, Abraham Baer, Gardner Wales, Harry Parker, Bruce Duncan, 
Evelyn McAllister, Crosby Lewis, Jacob Rabinovitz, Bernard Towle, 
Charles Brewster, Stella Young, Emile Dupuis, Byrnes McCaffrey, 
Ernest Taylor, Clark Aldrich, Alice Levingston, Harriet McLeod, 
Edith Cruikshank, Laurence I. Duncan, Alberta Cate, Herbert Geary, 
Nathalie Hurd, Arthur R. Lee, Fannie Sannel, Daisy A. Wirell, Parker 
Hall, R. Stanley Benson, Alfred C. Kunberger, Arthur R. Lee, Irving 
E. Welch, Helen L. Young, Elizabeth Palmer, Letitia George, Eleanor 
Dutton, Danforth Gurley, Kenneth Buckminster, Jane Otterson, 
Florence Dustin, Winslow Melvin, Alfred Hyland, Alvin Symonds. 

Kimball School. — Leon Goldberg, Margaret S. Jackman, Martha 
A. Lane, Hugh S. Morrison, Allan Shapiro, Hilda Bushan, Gertrude 
Conn, Lena Corser, Gertrude Champigny, Grace M. Chase, Virginia 
Morrill, Beatrice Winch, Percival Eveleth, Agnes R. Fenton, Mortimer 
A. Chandler, E. Scranton Piatt, Elizabeth I. Dane, Emma A. Flammand, 
Edmund A. Trudell, Eleanor M. Diversi, Olive P. LaHar, Barbara 
Blake, Edmund Gullage, Mildred Dole, Isabel Nicoll, Harry Bartlett, 
Florence Philbrick, Doris Minor, Constance Woodworth, Helen Foster, 
Everett Benton, John Jones, Waldo Sanborn, Jack Mansur, Doris 
Abbott, Miriam Lowell, Edgarda Laird, Merton Rumrill, Marjorie 
Tenney, James A. Brooks, Katharine Graves, Stanley R. Pillsbury, 
M. Ethalind Cooper, Pauline Cushnie, Jean Gove, Madeline Haggett, 
Charlotte Jackman, Rae Laraba, Margaret Turner, David Lockard, 
John R. Gordon, Richard H. Keeler, Delia Virgin, Albert Barlow, Marion 
Brown, Florence Grant, Lois Calkin, Pearl Smith, Catherine Spain, 
Catherine Moore, Marguerite Bundy, Elizabeth Dyer, Morris Bur- 
roughs, Carlos Sanborn, George Dane, Sibley Morrill, Paul Blaisdell, 
Robert Hurd, Charlotte Pitts, Anita Jubinville, Elsie Kemp, Donald 
Harriott, Benjamin Jewell, Farwell Brown, Gerald Hayes, Edgar King, 
Frederick Fisher, Barbara Sleeper, Lydia Dyer, Marion Allen. 

Penacook School. — Frances Smythe, Lulu Gordon, Estelle Avery, 
Alvin Hussey, Grace Bacheller, Edwin Walker, Ruth Olson, Paul 



148 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Holbrook, Myrna Simpson, Ruel Colby, Earle Robinson, Ruth. Jack- 
man, Henry Carpenter, Eugene Olson, Nelson Rogers, Lloyd Simpson, 
Agnes Chalmers, Myrtle Moody, Constance Dimick, Irving Peabody, 
Grace Stickney, Helen Belrose, Rachel Hall, Evelyn Johnson, Raymond 
Roers, Gertrude Roy, Harry Rosendale, Thelma Silver, Pasquello 
Cierello, Dorothea Wheeler, Lester Holt, Elsie Belrose, John Jackman, 
Genevieve Kelly, Gladys Smythe, Marion Currier, Paul Bergstrom, 
Dorothy Robinson, Warren Cutting, Raymond McCaig, Lloyd Car- 
penter, Elwood Davis, Arnold Hayes, Garland Stearns, George Rice, 
E. Walter Hackshaw, Lois Chase, Carl Ronn, Margaret Lunberg, 
Beatrice Virgin, Joseph Cierello, Edwin Sanborn, George Lougee, 
Laura Cate. 

Franklin School. — Stanley Gray, Hoyt Reille, George Hodge, 
Elma Wallace, Laura Moran, Esther Thompson, Pauline Oyston, 
Laura Plummer, Maurice Conn, Martin Bengsch, Alice Bororian, 
Lucille Hodge, Vera Anderson. 

Dewey School. — Margaret McGuire, Mary E. Peckham, M. Helene 
Wheeler, Kingsley Batchelder, Marion E. Burleigh, Miriam E. Calla- 
han, Edward A. Cheney, Annie B. Evans, Barbara Everett, Frieda 
McGuire, Thomas F. Mulligan, James H. Niles, Edson E. Phelps, 
Jacques Van de Kieft, Harold G. Vitagliano, Margaret Watson, Theo- 
dore C. Ellis, Margaret A. Lyon, Robert J. Prowse, Grace A. Schon, 
Winnifred L. Wheeler, Harriett M. Barton, Ida Crossland, Una G. 
Dearborn, Mary Home, Robert D. Morrison, Sibyl Rawcliffe, Germaine 
K. Shannon. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Marguerite McDonnell, Origen Philips, 
Chester Silver, Ila Ashland, Walter Doe, Bertha Carroll, Melvina 
Boulay, Margaret Hansen, James Sweet, Walter Davis, Wiuiam Ma- 
honey, Ola L. Ashland, Mary H. Coleman, Madeline E. Cass, Vera 
H. Champigny, Rose Raduozo, Edmund Parenteau, Rodney Ashland, 
Edna Carroll, Flora Cherrette. 



GRADUATING CLASS, JUNE 16, 1916. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Names. 
Mildred Josephine Anderson, 
Perley Dustin Baker, 
Clara Anna Barrett, 
Edgar R. Bourke, 
Rachel Rice Bugbee, 
Mary Bernadine Callahan, 
Elsie Charlotte Carlson, 
Abbie Rosamond Carter, 
Paul Edward Casey, 
Helen Howe Davis, 
Beatrice Elvira Diversi, 
Ellen Clare Doherty, 
Arthur Bland Donovan, 
Rose Ellen Donovan, 
Clara Caroline Evans, 
Earl Edward Fipphen, 
Paul Beecher Flanders, 
Daniel H. Flint, 
Laura Irene Foote, 
Ruth Hildegarde Gonyer, 
Guy Eben Griffin, 
Hester Gorden Hamilton, 
Edmund Walker Hill, 
William Rodney Hill, 
Edith Mae Holmes, 
Margaretta Bertha Jackson, 
Elsa Rosella Johnson, 
Selma Eleonora Johnson, 
Hazel Ellen Jones, 
Florence Elizabeth Kilburn, 
Charlotte Irene Kiley, 
Ernest King, 
Florence Blanche King, 
Frances Kling, 
Ruth Bessie Kling, 
Roger Phelps Leavitt, 
Mederick J. LeBlanc, 



Course, 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Domestic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 



150 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Name. 
Ruth Isabel Lemmon, 
John Clement Marston, 
Agnes Irene Moberg, 
Ruth Grace Morgan, 
Ethel Marguerite Moulton, 
John Murphy, 
Charles Brown Nelson, 
Douglas Rudkin Newbold, 
Evelyn Rose Delia Noonan, 
Gladys Mabelle Nute, 
Edith Mae Ordway, 
Richard Metcalf Pearson, 
F. Raymond Potter, 
Alice May Prescott, 
James Garfield Reed, 
Margaret Louise Reen, 
Josephine Reynolds, 
Ai Trenoweth Ritchie, 
Murray Everton Rowe, 
Mildred Esther Ryan, 
Charlotte Mary Sawyer, 
Bernice Clara Silver, 
William Arthur Stevens, 
Bertha May Stohrer, 
Julius Sturm, 
Mary Ellen Sullivan, 
Olive Blanche Sweatt, 
Martha Jane Tippet, 
Milton Reynolds Vose, 
Winifred Josephine Welch, 
Gladys May Wilcox, 
Ruth Hungerford Wdcox, 
Irene Esther Williamson, 
Mary Elizabeth Willis, 
Ariel Remington Wood, 



Course. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Classical. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 
Chandler School. 



Francesca Abbott 
George Fredrick Abbott 
Ruth Alfild Anderson 



Henry Joseph Audet 

Ruth Bailey 

Clarence Edward Bartlett 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



151 



Herbert Earl Bombard 
Joseph Brooks 
Glen Oakes Burney 
Robert Joseph Byrne 
Sarah Mildred Cate 
Ellen Webster Chase 
George Luther Chesley 
Sally Clement 
Henry Putney Clough 
Elsie Belle Colby 
George Sanborn Copp 
Mary Elizabeth Crutchfield 
Shirley Elizabeth Cummings 
Mabel Knowlton Dame 
George Richard Davison 
Ansell John Dixon 
Lillian Elizabeth Douglass 
Ralph Albert Duemling 
Rene Theophile Dupont 
Beatrice Mary Feltault 
Sarah Goldman 
Lawrence Davis Gordon 
Janice Griffin 
Lillian Andrews Haggett 
Bertha Mae Hatfield 
Marjorie Florence Heath 
Harold William Adrian Henry 
Raymond Michael Joseph Henry 
Schuyler Maitland Holbrook 
Clarence Edward Huggins 
Doris Mabel Hurd 
Nettie Maud Jewell 
Harold Ludlow Johnson 
Clarence Victor Bracken Lange- 
vain 



Augustus Frank Lawrence 
Margaret Helena Love joy 
Sophia Melvina Lucia 
Herbert William MacDonald 
Ruth Mildred Mahoney 
Gertrude Estelle Marshall 
Cora Mayo 
Helen Gertrude Miller 
John Gardiner Mills 
Ruth Anna Morrow 
Robert Harrison Nelson 
Alphonse Andrew Normandeau 
Priscilla Dorothy Noyes 
Arthur Edward Nudd 
Marie Eva Palmer 
Pearl Edna Parker 
Roy Charles Perry 
Ethel Ravitch 
Joseph Ravitch 
Margaret Garven Robinson 
Alonzo Francis Saltmarsh 
Ruth Agnes Saltmarsh 
Rachel Eleanora Sandquist 
Gertrude Inez Smith 
William Francis Smith 
Ernest Frank Spaulding 
Merle Grace Tabor 
Earl Spencer Temple 
Llewellyn Watson Towle 
Ruth Elizabeth Virgin 
Theodora Olive Wahlstrom 
Leah Gertrude Waldman 
George Everett Welch 
Ruth Earline Whittier 
Ruth Ellen Yeadon 



Helen Agnes Abbott 
Clara Denis 
Lodore Joseph Denis 
Leonard Spead Drew 



Walker School. 

Alwilda Sadie Dutch 
Alfred Joseph Flamand 
Martha Day Persons 
Walter Henry Stanley 
Victor Alcied Tremblay 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Esther E. Muttart 
Freda A. Pearce 
Frederick A. Eastman 



Gakrison School. 

Samuel Hodgson 
Oscar J. Norsdtrom 
Robert F. Powers 
Emil H. Rylander 



Ruth M. Blan chard 



Eastman School. 

Florence A. Coapland 



GRADUATING CLASSES, JANUARY 26, 1917. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Name. 
Bradley Locke Baker, 
Harland Felch Baker, 
Doris Paige Bartlett, 
Mary Kathleen Beggs, 
Esther Addie Calkin, 
Mary Louise Cassidy, 
Leon David Cilley, 
Helen Theresa Clancy, 
Walter James Clark, 
Ruth Day, 

Daniel Leonard Doherty, 
Martha Sugden Dolloff, 
Lucy B. Donovan, 
Doris Estelle Fowler, 
Samuel Alexander Freshney, 
Emeline Page Gage, 
Charlotte Mabel Gardner, 
Robert Arthur George, 
Allen Joseph Giles, 
Elizabeth Leonard Giles, 
Charles Hildreth Gordon, 
Archie Norman Gourley, 
Bernice Teresa Greeley, 
Stuart Barlow Holbrook, 
Dorothy May Hook, 
Evelyn Cushman Howe, 
Katherine Frances Hurley, 
Philip Hiram Hutchinson, 
Florence Page Johonnott, 
Dorothy Pierce Kendall, 
Mary Agnes Lake, 
Allan Nathaniel Leavitt, 
Oscar Levingston, 
Edward Patrick McCann, 
Frank Stearns Merrill, 
Goldie Vera E. Morrison, 
Mary Elizabeth Morrison, 



Course. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Name. 

Edna Mason Osborne, 
Winfield John Phillips, 
Charles Edward Reardon, 
Edward Denis Reardon, 
Bernice Riford, 
Bertha Sandquist, 
Charlotte Seaver, 
Joseph Stephen Spain, 
Mary Everett Stearns, 
Helen Frances Stevens, 
Foster E. Sturtevant, 
Wells Ernest Tenney, 
Nellie Tippet, 
Lottie Elnora Tittemore, 



Course. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Chandler School. 



Esther Sarah Armstrong 

Myer George Baer 

Dorothy Barnard 

Bernice Madeline Bennett 

Elizabeth Blake 

Ruth Emerson Blake 

Edgar Telesphor Boisvert 

Leo Boisvert 

Hilda Alexandra Buchan 

Ruth Brew 

Ethel Marjorie Carpenter 

Bertha Louise Carroll 

Lena Casey 

Janet Goodhart Chalmers 

Gertrude Beatrice Champigny 

Grace Mabelle Chase 

Ida May Cilley 

Gertrude Naomi Conn 

Lena Elaine Corser 

Thelma Currier 

John Eldred Davie 

Ruth Adelaide Day 

Anthony Jeno Diversi 



Walter Herbert Doe 

Lena Ann Drapeau 

Ruth Helen Drew 

Edward Henry Dunstane 

Percival Howard P^veleth 

Agnes Rose Fenton 

Leon Joseph Goldberg 

Margaret Sarah Hansen 

Olive Vera Hartford 

Irene Inez Haselton 

Arnold Hill 

Myrtle Belle Hillsgrove 

Ruth Maria Holt 

Ethel Evelyn Houston 

Blanche Huneau 

Vinal Ray Hurd 

Margaret Sarah Jackman 

Martha Allison Lane 

Elida Lilly Langlois 

Arnold Gove Lewis 

Wilda Oliva Madisen 

William Fred Mahoney 

Joseph Wilfred Theodore M artel 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



155 



Ruth Elizabeth McFarland 
Merton William Messer 
Dorothy Ruth Moberg 
Clarence Harry Morgan 
Virginia Morrill 
Hugh Sinclair Morrison 
Andrew Mungall Nicoll 
Albert Sheldon Ordway 
Georgia Marion Osgood 
Richard William Pearce 
Raymond Leon Piper 
Agnes Irene Ring 
Una Effie Robinson 
Donald Kilgore Sampson 
Ralph Henry Sargent 
Russell Dwight Sawyer 

Cora Mayo 



Edward John Shannon 
Allan Shapiro 
Bernice Irene Smith 
James William Sweet 
Maud Evelyn Towle 
Emma Charlotte Trudell 
Wilbur Bringham Tucker 
Lillian Unwin 
Lillian Rose Virgin 
Marguerite Aileen Walker 
Marion Elizabeth Wason 
Rosa Lillian Wittenberg 
Clara Elvira Wohlstrom 
Florence Evelyn Woods 
Earl Alfred Woodward 
Lillian Beatrice Wright 
(June 15, 1916) 



Walker School. 



Carol Angwin 
Malcolm Severance Butler 
Paulita Ursula Clark 
Pauline Corliss 
Helen Gladys Davis 
Douglas Newton Everett 
Richard Henry Felton 
Albert William Fifield 
Arthur Joseph Flamand 
Jennie Ford 
Edith Heartz 
Gertrude May Hodge 
Arthur Benjamin Holmgren 
Paul Edward Lamprone 



Theda Mildred LaFleur 
Dorothy Rose Mannion 
Robert Richard Morrison 
Paul Stephen Otis 
Robert James Reid 
Ivy Helen Robbins 
Ursula Greeley Sanders 
Jessie Frances Sanborn 
Adah Smith 
Oramel Walter Swain 
Paul Emory Tracy 
Kathleen Wall 
Daniel Thurber Wdkins 
Beatrice Winch 
Marjorie Lowe 



Helen E. Ryan 
Mary J. Henry 
Flora J. McLeod 
Wallace H. Annis 



Garrison School. 

John Carlson 
Carl A. Dahlgren 
Gustaf W. Forsberg 
Axel C. Gustaf son 
Bernard S. Webster 



156 



Lester A. Maynard 
Earle R. Webber 
Ethel M. Brown 
Caroline J. Cate 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

Eastman School. 



Lura A. French 
Miriam E. French 
Goldie M. Gage 
Dorothy E. Staniels 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Concord: 

The trustee of the Public Library have the pleasure of 
calling your attention to the annexed report of the librarian, 
and to venture to suggest that it furnishes ample proof of 
the successful administration of this department during the 
past year, so far as present conditions will permit. The 
librarian and her assistants are entitled to much credit for 
their persistent and skilful efforts in behalf of the library. 

The trustees at their annual meeting in January voted to 
ask for an appropriation for the present year equal in 
amount to that of last year. A reduction of the appropria- 
tion would be unfortunate for the interests of the library. 

Respectfully submitted, 



REUBEN E. WALKER, 

President, Board of Trustees. 



February 1, 1917. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1916. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen : An annual report should be history rather 
than fiction, and as 1916 was an uneventful year at our 
library, this report will necessarily be brief. 

The city government favored us with a larger appropria- 
tion than usual and we were, therefore, able to buy 1,125 
volumes as against 885 in the previous twelve months. Of 
these 1,125 books, 730 were new titles, 235 were replace- 
ments, 160 were duplicates. 

We acquired 75 more volumes in bound periodicals; as 
always we received publications from institutions and 
societies, and a few works from their authors; Abba Goold 
Woolson, Rossiter Johnson and Scott Nearing thus remem- 
bered us in 1916. A number of books on the war sent by 
Sir Gilbert Parker to the Y. M. C. A. have been handed 
over to us. The late Giles Wheeler directed that we be 
given some of his valuable manuscript papers relating to 
Concord history and genealogy. To Mrs. H. H. Wright 
we are again indebted for many stories which meet with 
brisk demand. 

We discarded 398 worn-out volumes; the net gain to the 
library was 802 volumes, which added to the 29,378 already 
on our shelves, brings the total number of volumes, Decem- 
ber 31, 1916, to 30,180. I am grateful to Russell Cushing 
and Foster Sturtevant for the time they spent in examining 
our mechanical and electrical books, with subsequent advice 
as to which ones were too antiquated to be worth keeping. 

The cost of books is rising appreciably owing to scarcity 
of paper, and this fact will have an effect on our purchases 
in 1917. Lead also has gone up, and we now have a care 
that the writing-pads and pencils put out for use in the 
reference room are not wasted. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 159 

Our total circulation during the year was 94,927 volumes, 
of which 88,187 were charged at the desk for home reading, 
and 6,752 were consulted in the reference room: or, more 
strictly speaking, 6,752 persons came to Miss Brown with 
questions and to the majority she showed more than one 
book in answering their inquiries. We have filled 25 out- 
of-town applications for material on widely differing sub- 
jects, such as, drama, dynamos, birds, South America, 
psychic phenomena and manual training. 

It is interesting to note how a change in the school curric- 
ulum alters the line of books asked. for: for instance, local 
history which was studied so ardently that we were driven 
to making a detailed index to Bouton's History of Concord 
is now dropped, and pupils call for data on commercial 
topics. I should like to mention the very intelligent use 
by members of the Music Club of books bearing upon the 
composers and works on their program for the season. For 
a score of years interest in standard authors has languished, 
and we have been gratified to see this revived by Professor 
Childs's course of lectures. 

Notwithstanding that six books were stolen in three weeks 
from our new-book rack, we have continued the changing 
display there, because nowhere else in town can a person 
who really cares for literature drop down and examine a 
dozen recent inspirational, instructive or clever works in 
prose and poetry : the taking away of this privilege would be 
felt by some of the live minds in our city. Inferentially 
the thief was one of our better read citizens, for he purloined 
"Present Day China," "Our First War with Mexico," 
"The Lion's Share," "A Country Chronicle," "Ambulance 
No. 10," "The Third French Republic." 

As in previous years I have attended library conferences 
here and there to avoid getting into a rut professionally. 

The appointment of Miss Ruth Chase on the staff has 
been a benefit as lessening the strain of labor on the three 
faithful assistants of long standing. 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The Concord public, the trustees of this library, and my 
co-workers unite in making the years pass without friction 
and with good results. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

City Librarian. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The Board of Health submits the following report for 
the year ending December 31, 1916. The organization of 
the Board was as follows: Mayor Hobbs, ex-officio, chair- 
man; Dr. Charles H. Cook, city physician, secretary, and 
Dr. Fred A. Sprague, member. Dr. Charles Duncan was 
appointed milk inspector for the year and Mr. Charles E. 
Palmer was sanitary officer. Regular meetings were held 
on the first Monday of each month at 4 o'clock, p. m. 
These meetings were well attended and much interest was 
shown by the members in the matters presented for dis- 
cussion. 

At a conference between the medical members of the 
Board of Education of Union School District, Dr. E. E. 
Graves, Health Officer at Boscawen, and the medical mem- 
bers of the Board of Health, some changes were recom- 
mended in the rules and regulations pertaining to con- 
tagious disease in its relation to school attendance. These 
changes were approved by the full Board of Health. At the 
same time other changes seemed advisable in the Rules and 
Regulations concerning contagious diseases and vaccina- 
tion. Accordingly, the whole code was revised and it was 
thought made to conform with the most recent ideas of 
epidemiological science. The Rules and Regulations as 
revised were submitted to your Board and by your approval 
became operative September 11, 1916. 

In the latter part of May this Board, accompanied by 
Sanitary Officer Palmer and Superintendent Sanders of 
the Water Department, made a careful sanitary survey of 



162 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the catchment area of Penacook Lake. There was very 
little chance for criticism. However, it was suggested to 
Mr. Tandy of the State Hospital that a septic tank be 
installed at one of the cottages and a concrete container 
for the manure at Sunnyside Farm. Mr. Tandjr expressed 
himself as willing to undertake these improvements and a 
subsequent inspection of the premises by the Board showed 
that they had been made as suggested. It is believed that 
all danger from that quarter has thus been removed. The 
recent purchase of the Crowley property at the head of the 
Lake by the Water Board is strongly commended by this 
Board. Another possible source of slight contamination 
is thus removed from the catchment area. 

Owing to the epidemic of infantile paralysis during the 
summer and fall it was thought best to take some steps to 
prevent the dreadful malady from gaining a foothold in our 
community. Accordingly, some rules were drawn up 
which it was thought might serve a useful purpose without 
imposing hardship on any person concerned. Some opposi- 
tion was expected and encountered, but by far the larger 
portion of the community were anxious to cooperate in our 
efforts to keep the plague away. One of our leading daily 
papers is an editorial relative to the opposition to the regu- 
lations ended by saying it thought it was "better to be safe 
than sorry." This was the key-note to the Board's action 
in the matter very tersely expressed. Only one case of this 
disease was reported during the year. 

With respect to diphtheria we were not so fortunate, 54 
cases having been reported during the year. This number 
is considerably in excess of the average and is doubtless 
accounted for in a large measure by the mildness of the 
cases. Many of these mild cases were doubtless not seen 
by a physician and, being allowed to go at large, were 
constantly infecting others. In one instance the attention 
of the Board's physician was called to the fact that there 
was sickness in a family living near a quarantined case. 
In searching for the source of contagion this family was 
investigated and cultures taken. Two of the children were 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 163 

thus found to have diphtheria in the convalescent stage. 
This family had called in a physician who, owing to the 
mildness of the symptoms, had failed to make a diagnosis. 
This instance forcibly illustrates the vital necessity of 
taking cultures from the noses and throats of all sick chil- 
dren during the prevalence of diphtheria. Indeed, when 
there is the slightest doubt as to the exact nature of the 
trouble it is a good rule to follow at all times. 

Many cultures were taken from the throats and noses of 
school children by the city physician, and in this manner 
several "carriers" were detected. If parents would take 
the trouble to note the slight ailments (colds, sore noses, 
sore throats, feverishness, etc.) of their children, seeking 
the advice of a competent physician immediately, most 
outbreaks of contagious disease would be short-lived. 

Every practicing physician in the community is morally 
an unofficial member of the Board of Health and as such 
has definite duties to perform. One of these duties is to 
educate his patients along the lines outline above. Another 
duty is to furnish all possible information and cooperation 
to the official Board of Health. If a physician makes a 
sweeping statement that "the Board of Health is at fault 
because we are having so much diphtheria, " it is not appar- 
ent just how the community is benefited by the impeach- 
ment. On the other hand if he comes over to the office with 
some useful advice, information or criticism he will be doing 
a real service. It is hoped more of the "unofficial members " 
will come in and qualify during the next year. 

The reports of the sanitary officer and the milk inspector 
are appended to and made a part of this report, and should 
be consulted for details of the department's activities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 
CHAS. H. COOK, 
FRED A. SPRAGUE, 

. Board of Health. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: The examinations of milk made by the 
inspector appear in another part of the Board of Health 
report. All examinations except one, a sample found to be 
watered, were well up to the standard required by law, 
barring one or two samples which showed considerable 
dirt. 

During the year the changes in ownership of the different 
milk routes of the city have caused considerable unrest 
among the consumers and bother to the department. 
These changes are a result of the small profits the men enjoy 
as a result of the high price of feed and the scarcity of cattle 
as a result of the European war but in spite of the changes 
among the retailers the farms that supply our milk are prac- 
tically the same as last year. 

The price of milk has increased one cent a quart; this fact 
brings no complaints as people realize that it is in line with 
the increased cost of all other foods. It is still true, how- 
ever, that milk is the cheapest food we enjoy for price paid, 
nine cents a quart. 

The care of milk sold in Concord is a credit to the pro- 
ducers. There are many farms now that have conditions 
which are beyond just criticism; namely, a room with cement 
floors, away from the barn, where the milk is taken, cooled 
and put up in bottles washed and sterilized by steam. Here 
the milk is stored in cement troughs thoroughly iced till 
ready for delivery. Besides all this the herd that supplies 
the milk is housed in clean, well ventilated barns. 

The policy of the inspection work will continue the same 
as that laid down in previous reports. There is the best 
of cooperation among all concerned in the handling of milk. 
The association of milk men at the annual meeting has 
good, healthy discussions of everything pertaining to the 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 165 

business and gives the inspector every support in bringing 
about needed changes that will help the consumer. 

The bottling of all milk is a betterment we are hoping 
for in the near future when the business is more settled. 
This has the support of most of the men in the business and 
is looked forward to as a needed step in advance. ■ 

Respectfully, 

CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: Herewith is submitted the report of the 
sanitary officer for the year ending December 31, 1916, 
with tables showing the work of the department. 

There were 467 deaths during the year, one more than in 
1915, and organic diseases of the heart caused the largest 
number of deaths, 79, or 17.36 per cent of the total number, 
excluding stillbirths. Two hundred and twenty-four deaths 
occurred in the different wards of the city and 243 at the 
public institutions. Estimating the population at 22,000 
and excluding the non-resident deaths, 173, and the still- 
births, 12, this gave a death-rate of 12.81. Transit per- 
mits were issued for the removal of 167 bodies to other 
places for interment, and burial permits were granted for 
the interment of 88 bodies brought to Concord from out of 
town. 

The total number of cases of contagious diseases reported 
were 468, with 7 deaths. An epidemic of measles brought 
the total number of cases to 382. Included in this number 
were 65 cases at St. Paul's School. There were 54 cases of 
diphtheria including 4 carriers and 42 of these cases were 
reported after the first of September, a majority being 
school children. Three carrier cases were detected by 
Doctor Cook in the schools and the children were sent 
home and the school rooms disinfected. The fatalities 
from diphtheria totalled 4. There were 18 cases of scarlet 
fever during the year with no deaths. Concord was re- 
markably free from typhoid fever there being only 8 cases 
reported with one death. We were very fortunate during 
the outbreak of infantile paralysis in other communities 
to have only one case. Every precaution was taken to 
safeguard the health of our citizens. Whooping cough 
caused one death and there were five cases reported. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 167 

Numerous complaints of various character were received 
during the year and each given attention. These com- 
plaints were due "largely to dead animals, the keeping of 
hens and pigs, odors from stables, the throwing out of slops, 
swill and rubbish, uncleanly condition of premises and yards, 
plumbing out of repair or in an unsanitary condition, 
broken catch basin traps, offensive privy vaults and odors 
from various causes. Inspections were made from time to 
time of the alleyways in the rear of the business blocks and 
proprietors of stores and markets were requested to keep 
the rear of their establishments free from objectionable 
rubbish. 

Inspections were made during the summer of the stone 
sheds and in a number of cases notices were served to owners 
to improve the sanitary conditions. 

Several inspections of Long Pond were made and all 
suggestions mentioned by this department were carried out 
satisfactorily. The shores were never in better condition 
and the city's water supply well protected. 

With so little building during the year there was less 
plumbing installed than in former years, but water tests 
were made of all new work and 97 permits were granted. 

All public halls were inspected the latter part of the 
year and numerous improvements were suggested for the 
improvement of conditions in toilet room as well as in the 
general cleanliness of halls and ante-rooms. 

Sixty-one milk farms were visited and many improve- 
ments noted. A number of improvements were suggested 
which if carried out will bring still greater improvement. 

Our appropriation for the year was $3,400.00 and the 
total expenditures were S3, 122.03, leaving a balance of 
$277.97. The expense for the care of contagious disease 
patients was $346.37, a majority of the cases requiring as- 
sistance by this department during quarantine being cared 
for at the Foster Ward, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. The 
cost for fumigation supplies was somewhat more than in 
former years owing to the advance in the price of material 
used. Two hundred and six dollars and ninety-five cents 



168 CITY OF CONCORD. 

was received for milk license fees and $2.50 from the sale 
of fumigation supplies. 

I wish to express my thanks to the Mayor and the other 
members of the Board of Health, the members of the city 
government and all the city officials who have rendered 
assistance to this department during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



health department. 169 

Financial Statement of the Board of Health for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1916. 

appropriation. 

Salary, sanitary officer, $1,500.00 

Salary, milk inspector, 300 . 00 

Fumigation supplies, 100.00 

Contagious diseases, 700 . 00 

Incidental expenses, 800 . 00 



Total, 


$3,400.00 


EXPENDITURES. 




Salary, sanitary officer, 


$1,500.00 


Salary, milk inspector, 


300.00 


Fumigation supplies, 


130.68 


Contagious diseases, 


346.37 


Incidental expenses, 


844.98 


Balance, 


277.97 



Total, $3,400.00 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1916. 

Milk license fees, $206 . 95 

Sale of fumigation supplies, 2 . 50 

Total, $209.45 



170 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting thereform: 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Infantile 
paralysis. 


Measles. 


Whooping 
cough. 


Months. 


S 
o 


2 
Q 


- 1 1 
O | Q 


3 


Q 




"3 
Q 


G5 
O 


3 

"3 
Q 




d 

Q 




2 




4 
3 
2 












1 

69 
34 
39 
109 
95 
33 
1 






1 




























1 










1 




















5 

1 

1 

3 

7 

9 

13. 
13 


1 


1 




































July 






























1 
1 
2 






























4 






1 
1 
1 


4 
2 
2 




1 


1 


1 






















3 






1 






















Totals 


54* 


4 


18 




8 


1 


1 


1 


382 




5 


1 







* Including 4 carriers. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. . 171 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Infantile 

paralysis. 


Measles. 


Whooping 
cough. 


Total. 


Ward 1 






1 




2 




3 


Ward 2 












Ward 3 




6 






10 
60 
16 
59 
204* 
12 
19 




16 


Ward 4 


11 
8 
7 

23 
2 
3 


2 




2 


75 


Ward 5 




24 


Ward 6 


1 
5 
6 


2 
2 
1 






69 


Ward 7 


1 


3 


238 


Ward 8 


21 


Ward 9 






22 














Total 


54 


18 


8 


1 


382 


5 


468 







*65 cases at St. Paul's School included. 



172 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMPARATIVE TABLE. 



The following table contains the number of cases of 
contagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for 
the years since and including 1890: 





Opthalmia 
neonato- 
rum. 


Whooping 
cough. 


Infantile 
paralysis. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals. 




o 


"8 

Q 




-a 
Is 
P 


O 


Is 
Q 




Q 


. 
S 

03 

D 


"5 
Q 


3 

O 


J3 

'8 

Q 


C8 

o 


Q 




"cS 


3 
O 


1 

Q 


1890. . . 














6 
12 
13 
48 
17 
35 
55 
13 
4 
9 
29 
65 
29 
42 
55 
15 
14 
63 
44 
131 
30 
51 
17 
33 
30 
21 
54 


2 
3 
3 

7 
3 
8 
8 
1 

5 
5 
5 

2 
4 
3 
1 
2 
2 
4 
6 
1 
2 
1 
3 

4 


9 

7 
37 
41 
113 

44 
4 

22 
8 

99 

39 

11 

6 

39 
18 
80 
27 
26 

23 
10 
8 
7 

28 
28 
26 
18 


3 

6 

8 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 


17 
14 
7 
13 
13 
21 
15 
17 
8 
14 
18 
13 
23 
17 
12 
23 
32 
11 
6 
28 
16 
10 
15 
10 
7 
8 
8 


5 
6 
1 
2 
3 
3 
5 
2 
4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

1 
4 

3 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 


6 

2 

2 

300 

21 

158 

452 

13S 

126 

299 

476 

40 

27 

582 

31 

181 

101 

118 

100 

1168 

143 

26 

321 

687 

6 

9 

382 








38 
35 
59 

402 
164 
258 
526 
190 
146 
421 
562 
130 

87 
682 
116 
299 
175 
218 
157 
1350 
199 

95 
362 
763 

74 

94 
468 


7 

9 
7 
9 
12 
19 
13 
4 
4 
7 
7 
9 

6 
11 

4 

5 

6 

3 

5 

11 

2 

6 

8 


1891 




















1892 




















1893 




















1894 




















1895 




















1896 




















1897 




















1898 




















1899 




















1900 














1 
4 






1901 














1 
2 
2 


1 


1902 














1903 














1904 














1905 














1 

1 






1906 














1 




1907 














1908 




















1909 














1 






1910 


















1911 




















1912 










2 
5 
3 


1 
1 


2 






1913 














1914 
















?, 


1915 


1 




25 
5 


1 

1 




4 




?, 


1916 


1 


1 


7 




.... 













health department. 173 

Deaths Reported by Wards and Public Institutions. 

Ward 1, 34 

Ward 2, 8 

Ward 3, 12 

Ward 4, 43 

Ward 5, 30 

Ward 6, 28 

Ward 7, 38 

Ward 8, 16 

Ward 9, 15 

New Hampshire State Hospital, 159 

Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital, 61 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 14 

New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, 3 

New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged, 4 

New Hampshire State Prison, 2 

Deaths by Age. 

*Under 1 year, 40 

From 1 to 5 years, 17 

From 5 to 10 years, 8 

From 10 to 15 years, 2 

From 15 to 20 years, 16 

From 20 to 30 years, 22 

From 30 to 40 years, 32 

From 40 to 50 years, 56 

From 50 to 60 years, 52 

From 60 to 70 years, 78 

From 70 to 80 years, 84 

From 80 to 90 years, 51 

From 90 to 100 years, 7 

Not stated, 2 

Total number of deaths, 467 

♦Including 12 stillbirths. 



174 city of concord. 

Deaths During 1916 by Sex, Condition and Nativity. 

Sex: 

Males, 250 

Females, 217 

Condition : 

Married, 167 

Single, 172 

Widowed, 112 

Divorced, 11 

Not stated, 5 

Nativity : 

Concord, 103 

New Hampshire, 168 

Other states, 82 

Foreign, 105 

Not stated, 9 

Causes of Death for the Year Ending December 31, 

1916. 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Abscess, subphrenic, 1 

Accident, asphyxiation, 1 

automobile (delayed traumatic shock), 1 

burns from gasoline, 1 

drowning, 3 

gunshot wound, 1 

hit by automobile, 1 

probably hit by locomotive, 1 

strychnine poisoning, . 1 

Acidosis, 6 ' 

Anemia, pernicious, 3 

Anesthesia, surgical (tonsilectomy), 1 

Angina pectoris, 9 

Apoplexy, 8 

Appendicitis, 1 

Asthma, 1 

Atrophy, chronic spinal muscular, 1 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 175 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Auto infection, 1 

Bright's disease, 3 

Bronchitis, 3 

Cancer of breast, 2 

colon, 1 

inferior maxilla, 1 

intestine, 1 

neck, 1 



pancreas, 



spine, 



coronary, 



2 



pharynx, 1 

pylorus, 1 



1 



stomach, 5 

thigh, 1 

uterus, 5 

Chorea, acute, 1 

Congenital debility, 4 

Congestion of lungs, 3 

Convulsions (indigestion), 1 

Cystitis, 2 

Dementia, 4 

Diabetes, 5 

Diarrhea and enteritis, 1 

Diphtheria, 4 

Dysentery, 2 

Edema of brain, 2 

lungs, 3 

Embolism, cardiac, 4 

cerebral, 2 



2 



Empyema left lung, 1 

Endocarditis, 9 

Enteritis, 1 

gastro, 1 

Epilepsy, 3 

Erysipelas, 3 

Gastric ulcer, perforation of, 2 



176 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Hanging, legal, 1 

Heart, diseases of, . 70 

Hemiplegia, 1 

Hemorrhage, cerebral, 28 

from cord, 1 

of stomach, 1 

Hemorrhagica Purpura, 1 

Hodgkin's disease, 1 

Icterus neonatorum, 2 

Inanition (gastric ulcer), 1 

(under one year), 3 

Indigestion, acute, 1 

Infantile paralysis, 1 

Intestinal obstruction, 2 

Jaundice, 1 

LaGrippe, 1 

Leukemia, myelogenous, 1 

Liver, atrophy of, 1 

cirrhosis of, 5 

sclerosis of, 1 

Malformation, congenital, 2 

Mania, 1 

Melena neonatorum, 1 

Myocarditis, 9 

Nephritis, 17 

diffuse, 2 

interstitial, 10 

Parenchymatous, 3 

Paralysis, bulbar, 1 

progressive ascending, 1 

Paresis, 25 

Pellagra, 7 

Pericarditis, 2 

post pneumonic, 1 

Peritonitis, general, 2 

tubercular, 1 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



177 



Cause. No. of deaths. 

Pneumonia, 8 

broncho-, 5 

croupous, 5 

lobar, 12 

Premature birth, 5 

Prostatitis, 

Psychosis, acute exhaustive, 

exhaustion infective, 
Pyemia, 

Rheumatism, chronic articular, 
Sapreamia (cancer of uterus), 
Sclerosis, arterio,- 
Senile debility, 
Septicemia (abscess of jaw), 

general (carbuncle), 
(incomplete abortion), 
(injury), 
puerperal, 
streptococcus, 
Spina bifida, 

Stillborn, 12 

Suicide, 5 

Suppression of urine, acute, 
Surgical shock (hysterectomy), 

(perforating peptic ulcer), 
(septic gall bladder), 
Tabes dorsalis, 
Thrombosis, cerebral, 

of femoral artery, 
Thrombus of coronary artery, 
Tuberculosis, pulmonary, 29 

(typhoid form), 
Typhoid fever, 

Uremia from obstruction of kidney and bowels, 
Whooping cough, 

Total, 467 

12 



178 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Total number of deaths for the year 1916, 467, compared 
with 466 in 1915. 

Average death-rate for the year 1916, 12.81, compared 
with 13.63 in 1915. 

Total number of births for the year 1916, 377, compared 
with 429 in 1915. 

Total number of marriages for the year 1916, 187, com- 
pared with 181 in 1915. 

Report of Milk Examinations and Inspection of Milk 

Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 142 

Number of examinations above standard, 136 

Number of examinations below standard ordirty, 6 

Number of milk farms and milk rooms inspected, 61 

Conditions good, 38 

Conditions fair, 17 

Conditions poor, 6 

Improvements suggested, 18 

Summary. 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 612 

Burial permits issued, 467 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, 88 

Transit permits issued, 167 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were issued, 215 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, 57 
Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to the 

State Board of Health, 52 
Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, Public 

Health and Marine Hospital Service, 52 
Number of samples of water and ice collected for 

analysis, 6 

Number of nuisances, complaints and inspections, 230 

Number of rooms, etc., fumigated, 459 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 179 

Number of plumbing permits granted, 97 

Number of inspections of plumbing, 194 

Number of sewers connected, 28 

Number of public halls inspected, 20 

Number of stone sheds inspected, 12 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL 



Concord, N. H., January 1, 1917. 
To His Honor the Mayor and the Honorable Board of Alder- 
men: 
Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit herewith to 
your honorable board my eighth annual report of the work 
performed by the members of the police department of the 
City of Concord for the year ending December 31, 1916. 

ROSTER. 

City Marshal. 

George A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant City Marshal. 
Victor I. Moore. 

Captain. 
Samuel L. Bachelder. 

Sergeant. 
Christopher T. Wallace. 

Regular Patrolmen. 
Samuel Rodd, Harry L. Woodward, 

Irving B. Robinson, Fred N. Marden, 

George H. Silsby, Charles H. Guilbault, 

Edward J. McGirr, Frank B. McDaniels, 

Joseph E. Silva, John B. Long, 

James J. Halligan. 
Richard McGarey, Chauffeur No. 1. 
Axel Swanson, Chauffeur No. 2. 



Willie A. Little, 
Charles E. Kelley, 
George G. Allen, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
John McGirr, 
Nelson Forest, 
Thomas M. Hairison, 
Walter H. Beane, 



police department. 
Special Reserve Officers. 



Captain. 

Thomas P. Davis. 

Willie A. Flanders, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
Earl D. Gaskell, 
Frank S. Rogers, 
Arthur H. Rees, 
Jonas Welcome, 
Frank E. Brooks. 



181 



Financial Report. 



Total appropriation for 1916, 
Total expenditures for 1916, 



$21,394.06 
21,314.40 



Balance, 


$79.66 


Disbursements. 




Fuel, City Police Station, 


$492.76 


Fuel, Penacook Police Station, 


112.06 


Helmets and buttons, 


57.92 


Horse-hire, 


11.00 


Auto combination, 


457.46 


Lights, city, 


189.28 


Lights, Penacook, 


31.14 


Incidentals, 


1,150.84 


Salaries, regulars, 


17,315.20 


Salaries, special, 


1,253.38 


Police signal system, 


243.36 



Total, 



$21,314.40 



182 city of concord. 

Number of Arrests. 

1909, 281 

1910, 586 

1911, 1,076 

1912, 1,366 

1913, 1,556 

1914, 1,850 

1915, 1,599 

Whole Number of Arrests and Causes for the Year 

1916. 

Whole number of arrests, including Penacook, 1,106 

Whole number of arrests at Penacook, 136 

Brought before the court, 793 

Discharged by the court, 11 

Discharged without being brought before the court, 301 

Selling denatured alcohol without (poison) label, 1 

Fornication, 11 

Escaped boys from Industrial School, 1 

Playing cards on the Lord's day, 8 

Eloping, 2 

Escaped insane, 3 

Cruelty to animals, 3 

Selling a horse unfit for labor, 1 

Assault on police officer, 3 

Highway robbery, 1 

Running auto without rear light, 1 

Adultery, 11 

Assault, 20 

Obstructing an officer, 1 

Breaking and entering, 11 

Bastardy, 4 

Stopping auto on crosswalks, 1 

Gambling on the Lord's day with cards, 4 

Drunks, including Penacook, 730 

Escape from the Home for the Feeble-Minded, 5 

Failing to send child to school, 1 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 183 



Robbery, 


2 


Escape from the House of Correction, 


4 


Taking auto without permission, 


1 


Overspeeding auto, 


13 


Running auto when drunk, 


3 


For out-of-town officers, 


14 


Insane, 


5 


Disturbing a religious meeting, 


1 


Failure to report child-birth, 


1 


Larceny, 


27 


Disorderly conduct, 


3 


Selling adulterated milk, 


1 


Safekeeping, 


151 


Fighting in street, 


14 


Pawn-brokering without a license, 


1 


Out-of-town boys caught, 


2 


Idle person, 


1 


Begging, 


8 


Non-support, 


13 


Selling liquor without a license, 


1 


Embezzlement, 


1 


Disorderly house, 


1 


Arrested for out-of-town police, 


6 


Gambling, 


11 


Buying liquor for a man on the blacklist, 


1 


Overspeeding a horse, 


2 


Rape, 


1 


Driving auto through funeral procession, 


1 


Defrauding, 


3 


Miscellaneous. 




Held without bail, 


1 


Bound over to higher court, 


31 


Committed to jail, 


18 


Committed to House of Correction, 


310 


Committed to Asylum, 


5 


Mittimus not to issue until called for, 


19 


Appeal to higher court, 


1 



184 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Nol prossed, 11 

Sentence suspended, 135 

Mittimus called for by the judge, 1 

Runaway horses caught by police, 3 

Complaint about boys sliding across railroad track, 3 
Old persons strayed away from home, and taken home by 

police, 3 

Continued for a sentence, 6 

Runaway children, 6 

Officers attending fires, 53 

Placed on file, 3 

Number of paid fines, 258 

Discharged by the court, 11 

Runaway girls, 3 

Fires found by police, 2 

Complaint about dogs, 22 

Wires reported down, 11 

Officers called upon to remove people injured, 7 

Officers called upon to remove people dead, 4 

Runaway boys, 6 

Lost children found in the street and taken home, 17 

Holes in bridges reported to street department, 3 

Holes in street reported to street department, 7 

Holes in sidewalks reported to street department, 11 

Insane people found on street, 1 

Persons asphyxiated by gas, 2 

Limbs of trees reported down in street, 1 

People killed in auto accident, 3 

Complaints investigated, 203 

Complaints of dogs biting people, 2 

Dogs killed by police, 20 

Accidents investigated, 25 

Complaint about boys riding wheels on sidewalks, 21 

People found dead in rooms, 1 

Houses looked after during summer months, 25 

Windows found open by police, 31 

Complaints of autos running without lights, 52 

People given medical attendance at the station, 13 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 185 

Number of times doors of business places tried, 794,970 

Lodgers, 1,247 

Number of doors found open, 986 

Called to quell disturbances, 86 

Stray teams found, 10 

Stray horses found, 9 

Ambulance calls, 231 

Emergency calls for pulmotor, 7 

Number of calls on police boxes, 62,289 

Dead people taken from the river, 4 

Injured people cared for at the police station, 2 

Brush fires reported to the station, 2 

Complaints of roosters crowing nights, 4 

Dogs run over by autos, 6 

People run into by autos, 6 

Complaints of horses and cows in the street, 12 

Complaints about boys sliding on the sidewalk, 13 

Autos run into teams, 7 

Boys breaking windows, 15 

Animals reported to S. P. C. A., 7 

Officers assisted at drowning accidents, 12 

Parents abusing children, 1 

Lights reported out by police, 406 

Out-of-town runaway boys detained and sent home, 1 

Out-of-town runaway girls detained and sent home, 1 

Merchants notified of trouble in their stores, nights, 17 

Fire alarms rung in by officers, 1 

Location of Police Signal Boxes. 

Bridge Street and Stickney Avenue. 
South Main and West Streets. 
South Main and Concord Streets. 
South Main and Pleasant Streets. 
North Main and School Streets. 
North Main and Park Streets. 
Washington, between North Main and State 
Streets. 



Box 


1. 


Box 


2. 


Box 


3. 


Box 


4. 


Box 


5. 


Box 


6. 


Box 


7. 



186 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 8. North Main and Church Streets. 

Box 9. North State and Penacook Streets 

Box 10. Curtice Avenue and North State Street. 

Box 11. West Concord, opposite Shepard's store. 

Box 12. Penacook (square). 

Box 13. Center, opposite Union Street. 

Box 14. South and Perley Streets. 

Box 15. Broadway, corner Carter Street. 

Box 16. Center and Pine Streets. 

Box 17. Pleasant and South Streets. 

Box 18. School and Giles Streets. 

Box 19. Beacon and Rumford Streets. 

Recommendations. 

I renew my recommendation that a suitable room be 
constructed for the detention of women and juveniles, and 
that the old ward room be remodeled into a guard-room 
for the officers. 

I wish to thank His Honor, Mayor Nathaniel W. Hobbs, 
and the Honorable Board of Aldermen for their courteous 
treatment and support. I desire to thank His Honor Judge 
Clark, City Solicitor Alexander Murchie, County Solicitor 
Robert C. Murchie, Clerk of the Court Allan Robinson, and 
all others who have assisted this department during the 
year. To the officers of the department, I extend my 
appreciation for their hearty cooperation and faithfulness. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen: In presenting the annual report of the 
work of the highway department for 1916 I will say that 
there never has been a time when it has been so difficult to 
accomplish the necessary work as in this past year. Suffi- 
cient suitable labor c6uld not be found and it was impossible 
to obtain crushed stone and other road materials when 
needed. In several instances we were obliged to stop con- 
struction work on account of shortage in road materials and 
delays in shipping, etc. This was not only annoying, but 
expensive, and prevented the department from doing all 
the work that had been planned for the year. It made it 
very evident that storage bins for stone and tanks for road 
oils would be very practical. 

I do not consider that the highway department is properly 
and adequately equipped to perform the work required as 
promptly and efficiently as it should. We need some good 
horses. We have taken over several from the fire depart- 
ment and while we have been able to use them to better 
advantage than the fire department could have, still they 
are not first-class horses. There are times during the 
year when a truck cannot be used to as good advantage as 
horses but we need a light truck for emergency and repair 
work. There should be a new crusher, tar heater and a 
number of pieces of equipment added which would enable 
the department to perform the required work in a more up- 
to-date manner. And there should also be more shed room 
on the city lot to house the equipment. I called your 
attention in last year's report to this matter of shed room 



188 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and crusher. It is too expensive to repair the old crusher 
any longer and it does not do the work required. We 
certainly need a new one. 

For permanent work in 1916, Park Street from Main to 
State, South State from Fayette to Monroe, North Main on 
the west side from Pitman to Center were macadamized, 
North State Street from Call to Penacook Street recon- 
structed, a section of Pleasant Street near Pleasant View 
resurfaced and a portion of Washington Square in Penacook 
concreted. Sections of South, South Main and Penacook 
Street were to have been macadamized but the work could 
not be done owing to the difficulty of securing labor and 
materials. Neither were we able to complete the work on 
North State Street and from the cemetery to Penacook 
Street only one half of the roadway was rebuilt. 

I would recommend that next year North State Street 
and those other streets on which the work planned was not 
done be finished. There is but one section of Main Street 
through the business part that is not concreted, that being 
the east side from Park to Center. The granite block 
paving there is very rough and it should be removed and 
and street concreted. South State Street from Monroe 
Street south should be macadamized. Warren Street was 
macadamized a number of years ago and the constant 
traffic which that street receives has worn it badly and it 
should be reconstructed from Spring Street west. I believe 
that the petition for improving Auburn Street which was 
received this past year was considered and it was decided to 
do something there another season. However, I would not 
recommend laying out too extensive work in the line of 
permanent improvements as we shall doubtless have as 
much difficulty in obtaining materials and suitable labor as 
last season. 

A number of streets received surface treatment and a 
good deal more should be done in that line next summer. 
We received $760.13 from the state for maintenance work 
on the trunk lines. 

The usual amount of miscellaneous work has been done 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 189 

by the department during the year. Quite a number of 
street signs have been put up and we are making special 
effort to get all streets properly marked. No large number 
of petitions for new concrete walks were received but the 
calls for repairing concrete walks are increasing every year. 
Several new catch basins were built and frequent showers 
made it necessary to clean them all several times during the 
summer. 

Some of the new bridges that were recently erected are 
much in need of painting, especially the Pembroke bridge. 
The plank for the new floor of the Loudon bridge has been 
received and work will be begun there as soon as weather 
permits. 

The demand for driveways is the source of much trouble 
for the department. Whenever possible we have avoided 
putting in pipe driveways as they are constantly freezing 
up in winter and becoming filled during the summer months 
and in heavy rains flood the street and do considerable 
damage. 

Not as much work was necessary on trees last year as 
previously. We find that the brown-tail moth is disap- 
pearing but the number of gypsy moth nests is increasing. 
Nevertheless, the appropriation allowed some work to be 
done in planting trees. Only fifty were set out but if the 
work proves at all successful we hope to plant more another 
season. 

Oil was used again for dust laying last summer and I 
recommend its use another year. 

The use of a truck for collecting garbage has proved both 
practical and efficient. During the winter months when 
the snow is quite heavy we find it better to use the teams 
instead of the truck. During that time the truck is thor- 
oughly overhauled and is kept in good condition for service. 

For their continued interest in the work of this depart- 
ment I wish to thank the members of the board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK. 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 
Appropriation, $42,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Central District. 



Labor pay-rolls, general mainte- 




nance and repair, $13,278. 19 


Supplies, general maintenance and 




repair, 


7,250.39 


Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 


111.39 


repairing sidewalks, 


296.10 


building sidewalks, 


161.81 


signs, 


2.08 


Supplies, signs, 


181.38 


Labor pay-rolls, watering troughs 




and drinking fountains, 


23.13 


Supplies, watering troughs and 




drinking fountains, 


131.58 


Labor pay-rolls, cleaning gutters, 


2,681.40 


repairing and pav- 




ing gutters, 


82.97 


bridges, 


93.40 


Supplies, bridges, 


2,197.07 


Labor, pay-rolls, fences, 


51.82 


Supplies, fences, 


61.99 


Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 


469 . 68 


resurfacing macadam, 


627.28 


Supplies, repairing macadam, 


790.22 


resurfacing macadam, 


625.43 


Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 


3,185.31 


Supplies, winter expense, 


54.00 




$32,356.62 



board of public works. 191 

Penacook District. 



Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 




and repair, $1,408.94 


Supplies, general maintenance and 




repair, 


78.63 


Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 


85.11 


sidewalks, 


159.42 


watering troughs and 




drinking fountains, 


15.31 


Supplies, watering troughs and 




drinking fountains, 


49.42 


Labor pay-rolls, cleaning gutters, 


606.74 


bridges, 


40.49 


Supplies, bridges, 


55.78 


Labor pay-rolls, fences, 


22.45 


Supplies, fences, 


9.18 


Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 


44.05 


resurfacing macadam, 


144.16 


winter expense, 


648.78 



West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $731.68 
Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 5 . 30 

Labor pay-rolls, sidewalks, 66 . 17 

cleaning gutters, 179 . 86 

winter expense, 423 . 79 



East Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $1,417.43 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 57 . 15 



3,368.46 



1,406.80 



192 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Labor pay-rolls, culverts, $7 . 25 

winter expense, 238 . 66 



Egypt District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 
and repair, $162.31 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 3 . 80 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 71.77 



Hoit District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $110.80 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 5 . 30 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 39 . 98 



Virgin District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $107 . 70 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 56 . 66 



Sanborn District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $109.12 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 2 . 20 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 19 . 63 



Number Four District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repairs, $238 . 60 



L,720.49 



237.88 



156.08 



164.36 



130.95 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 193 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, $12.60 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 149 . 54 

'.74 



Total expenditures, $39,942.38 

Transferred to catch basins, 79 . 72 

permanent work, No. State St., 202.59 

Park St., 21.99 

Balance unexpended, 1,753.32 



$42,000.00 
CATCH BASINS. 

Appropriation, $1,300 . 00 

Transferred from general mainte- 
nance, 79 . 72 

$1,379.72 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $785 . 38 

repairing, 66.15 

building, 115.29 

Supplies, 225.91 

$1,192.73 

Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $136 . 30 

building, 15.08 

Supplies, 3.20 

154.58 

West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $27 . 35 

repairing, 5 . 06 

32.41 



Total expenditures, $1,379 . 72 

13 



194 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TREES. 
Appropriation, $4,000 . 00 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving trees, $369 . 50 
Labor pay-rolls, setting out new trees, 15.75 
care of moth pests, 767 . 82 
Supplies, 329.69 

$1,482.76 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving trees, $39 . 04 
Labor pay-rolls, care of moth pests, 127.75 



— — 166.79 

West Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, care of moth pests, $59 .30 59 . 30 

East Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, care of moth pests, $92. 17 92. 17 



Total expenditures, $1,801 . 02 

Balance unexpended, 2,198.98 



$4,000.00 
SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 

Appropriation , $ 1 ,000 . 00 . 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, setting edgestone, 

etc., $46.25 

Edgestone, 18.94 

Concrete, 546 . 53 

$611.72 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 195 



Penacook District. 



Labor pay-rolls, setting edgestone, 

etc., $11.52 

Concrete, 58 . 56 



70.08 



Total expenditures, $681 . 80 

Transferred to repairs sidewalks, 194 . 52 

Balance unexpended, 123 . 68 



$1,000.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $2,500.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and 

crossings, new, 194.52 



!,694.52 



Expenditures- 



Central District. 



Labor pay-rolls, resetting edgestone, $78 . 51 

Concrete, 2,231.30 

$2,309.81 

Penacook District. 
Concrete, $384.71 384.71 



Total expenditures, $2,694 . 52 

PERMANENT WORK. 

Park Street — Main to State. 

Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Transferred from general mainte- 
nance, 21 . 99 

$1,521.99 



196 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Expenditures — 
Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $996 . 32 

Supplies, 525 . 67 



Total expenditures, $1,521 . 99 

So. State St. — Fayette to Monroe. 

Appropriation, $2,800.00 

Expenditures — 
Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $1,433.64 

Supplies, 914.54 



Total expenditures, $2,348 . 18 

Balance unexpended, 451 . 82 



$2,800.00 

No. Main St. — West Side Pitman to Center. 

Appr opriatio n , $600 . 00 

Expenditures — 
Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $228 . 76 

Supplies, 356.88 



Total expenditures, $585.64 

Balance unexpended, 14 . 36 



$600.00 

No. State St. — Penacook St. to Call St. 

Appropriation, $3,200 . 00 
Transferred from general mainte- 
nance, 202 . 59 

$3,402.59 

Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, macadamizing, $1,450.64 

Supplies, 1,951.95 



Total expenditures, $3 ,402 . 59 



board of public works. 197 

Pleasant St. 
Appropriation, $1,825.00 

Expenditures — 
'Labor pay-rolls, resurfacing, $485 . 63 

Supplies, 668.07 



Total expenditures, $1 , 1 53 . 70 

Balance unexpended, 671.30 

$1,825.00 

Washington Square — Penacook. 
Appropriation, $400.00 

Expenditures — 
Concrete, $282 . 83 

Balance unexpended, 117.17 



Penacook St. 


■2T\JV . \J\J 


Appropriation, 
Balance unexpended, 


$500.00 
$500.00 


South St. 




Appropriation, 
Balance unexpended, 


$1,300.00 
$1,300.00 


So. Main St. to West. 




Appropriation, 
Balance unexpended, 


$300.00 
$300.00 



SALARY SUPERINTENDENT. 

Appropriation, $1,800.00 

Expenditures — 
Salary, $1,800.00 



198 CITY OF CONCORD. 

GARBAGE. 

Balance from 1915, $795 . 26 

Appropriation, 9,000.00 



$9,795.26 
By Joint Resolution No. 266, 122 . 18 



SPRINKLING. 

Balance from 1915, $1,575 . 60 

Appropriation, 8,000.00 

By Joint Resolution No. 266, 67 . 80 



Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing carts, $154.48 

repairing standpipes, 21 . 80 

sprinkling with water, 5,070 . 08 

sprinkling with oil, 171.25 

Oil, 2,831.32 

Supplies, 155 . 25 



),917.44 



Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, collecting garbage, 


$3,695.43 




collecting paper, 


844.12 




burning paper, 


135.56 




leveling ashes, 


698.87 




patrol carts, 


2,186.11 




Supplies, 


1,487.17 




Total expenditures. 




$9,047.26 


Balance to 1917, 




870.18 



),917.44 



),643.40 



Total expenditures, $8,404 . 18 

Balance to 1917, 1,239.22 

$9,643.40 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



199 



Penacook Sprinkling Precinct. 
Balance from 1915, $81 . 84 



Appropriation, 



425 . 00 



Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing carts, $12.93 

repairing standpipes, 19.35 

sprinkling streets, 323 . 94 

Supplies, 19 . 53 



Total expenditures, 
Balance to 1917, 



Deposited with the City Treasurer as follows. 

State aid, highways, $760 . 13 

Concrete, 260 . 09 

Trees, 211.09 

Labor, etc., 145.99 

Sprinkling, 67 . 80 

Garbage, 122 . 18 



$506.84 



$375.75 
131.09 

$506.84 



RESURFACING MACADAM. 


®±,U\JI . AO 


Penacook Road, 


$678.45* 


Hopkinton Road, 


337.12* 


South Pembroke Road, 


504.70* 


North State St., 


230 . 66 


North Main St., 


238.01 


South Main St., 


79.82 


South State St., 


28.27 


South St., 


163.14 


Penacook St., 


55.43 


Pleasant St. and Hopkinton Road, 


102.00 


Walnut St., Penacook, 


39.35 


Merrimack St., Penacook, 


89.03 


Bye St., Penacook, 


10.26 



* State aid. 



200 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



WARD ONE. 



Street. 



Expense. 



Borough Road .... 

Bye : 

Center 

Charles 

Church 

Cross 

East Canal 

Electric Ave 

Elm 

Fowler 

High 

Horse Hill Road . . . 

Lyndon 

Main 

Maple 

Mast Yard Road. . 
Merrimack 

Merrimack Ave.. . . 

Penacook 

Pleasant 

River Road 

Rolfe 

Runnell's Road. ... 

Spring 

Stark 

Summer 

Summit 

Sweatt Hill Road.. 

Union 

Walnut 

Washington 

Washington Square 

Webster Road 

West Canal 

West Main 

Winter 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

New concrete walks 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

New concrete walks. . . . 

Concreting 

General repairs 



$32.45 
13.19 
16.47 
31.27 
7.94 
17.77 
14.65 
17.72 
10.82 

149.82 
89.69 
13.57 
10.33 

112.98 

198.30 
2.19 
73.46 
25.20 
3.30 

214.56 

232.06 
36.68 
76.05 
18.83 
49.27 
21.85 

141.18 

46.05 

12.60 

28.24 

.97 

25.37 

11.93 

19.98 

7.63 

3.89 

*55.45 

113.05 
32.35 

282.83 

14.17 

1.49 

38.16 

4.11 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



201 



WARD TWO. 



Street. 


Work. 


Expense. 






$13.89 








• 


45.45 




• 


12.83 




• 


44.00 




• 


28.75 




• 


50.90 




« 


11.98 




• 


37.71 




« 


37.50 




< 


14.34 




« 


67.40 




« 


165.22 




• 


36.10 




• 


602.56 




• 


37.35 




• 


4.73 


Potter 


• 


310.39 




' 


47.81 




■ 


7.56 




• 


18.96 




• 


20.06 




• 


68.89 




< 


37.01 




« 


17.00 




■ 


25.50 











WARD THREE. 



Street. 


Work. 


Expense. 


Beech Hill Road . . 




$49.80 










76.72 


Carter Hill Road 


« 


85.93 


Clark 


' 


2.86 




• 


3.91 




< 


38.93 




• 


.98 




• 


7.91 




« 


83.58 


Knight 


« 


23.51 




• 


17.59 




« 


13.89 




« 


130.71 


North State 


• 


82.55 




Repairing c 




131.65 


Palm 




176.23 










43.35 




• 


12.70 


Pine Hill Road 


< 


23.58 




• 


3.65 




• 


24.00 




« 


82.95 




< 


14.25 




• 


37.16 




■ 


41.52 




< 


67.01 













202 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



WARD FOUR. 



Street. 



Expense. 



Auburn 

Beacon 

Bradley 

Cambridge. . . 
Center 

Chestnut. . . . 
Church 

Court 

Forest 

Fiske 

Franklin 

Gordon Court 
High 

Jackson 

Lyndon 

Maple 

North Main. . 

North Spring. 
North State. . 

Pearl 

Penacook. . . . 
Ridge Road . . 

Rumford. . . . 

Tremont 

Union 

Valley 

Walker 

Washington. . 

White 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

New 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 

Macadamizing. 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
" roadway 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
General repairs 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

New concrete walks 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
General repairs 



$114.31 
21.77 
54.35 
5.72 
33.29 
27.84 
28.92 
92.42 
35.19 
1.71 
33.25 
1.10 
15.28 
52.50 
43.67 
20.07 

280.98 
40.54 
38.06 
20.14 
14.50 
14.01 

143.23 
54.41 

585.64 

130.63 
14.10 
33.90 
81.47 

185.97 
3.34 
40.03 
38.96 
14.87 
82.30 
23.47 ■ 
26.68 
19.88 
30.97 
37.69 
6.51 
3.09 
80.56 
29.47 
13.03 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



203 



WARD FIVE. 



Street. 



Expense. 



Center , 

Durgin 

Fremont 

Garden 

Giles 

Green 

Hanover 

Holt 

Liberty 

Merrimack 

North Fruit 

North Main 

North Spring 

North State 

Odd Fellows' Ave 

Orchard 

Park 

Pine 

Pleasant 

Prince 

Rumford 

School 

Short 

f 
Tahanto 

Warren 

West Washington 

Woodman 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
" roadway 

walks. . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 

roadway 

" walks. . . 
roadway 

Macadamizing 

Repairing Concrete walks . . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 

" roadway 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 

General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 

" roadway 

General repairs 



$80.97 

28.68 

19.73 

21.93 

.60 

3.10 

39.81 

213.26 

10.34 

9.50 

14.90 

49.82 

43.02 

46.61 

5.06 

24.87 

57.81 

217.23 

18.93 

32.33 

46.91 

53.00 

27.69 

27.86 

60.35 

1,521.90 

66.48 

18.62 

23.47 

64.28 

177.18 

27.42 

149.76 

6.03 

46.80 

23.28 

116.59 

11.31 

- 34.14 

23.84 

2.61 

277.19 

138.05 

103.41 

9.02 

1.83 



204 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



WARD SIX. 



Street. 



Expense. 



Clinton 

Concord. . . . 

Downing. . . 

Elm 

Fayette 

Grove 

Laurel 

Marshall. . . . 
Monroe. . . . 

Oak 

Perley 

Pierce 

Pleasant. . . . 

South 

South Main . 

South Spring 

South State. 

Thompson. . 
Thorndike. . 

Wall 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks . . . 
General repairs ... I 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

" roadway 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

_ " roadway 
General repairs 

New concrete walks 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 

General repairs 

Macadamizing 

General repairs 

New concrete walks 

Repairing concrete walks. . . 



$27.34 

30.26 

36.71 

34.15 

5.86 

14.49 

32.28 

12.04 

4.32 

9.50 

4.77 

36.36 

125.28 
73.40 
31.91 
33.89 
93.86 
58.79 
18.44 
19.68 
35.92 
84.37 
48.38 
27.01 
94.66 

140.19 

166.68 

2,348.18 

24.40 

46.54 

140.45 
55.60 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



205 



WARD SEVEN. 



Street. 


Work. 


Expense. 






$10.20 






14.61 




•1 (i 


53.58 




ii ii 


14.49 


Birch 


ti . u 


36.88 




ii ii 


19.97 




ii ii 


300.11 




■ a n 


238.17 






35.73 






14.33 






128.32 




ii ii 


8.76 




ii ii 


38.95 




u ii 


18.63 






89.38 






12.40 






141.93 


Fruit 




82.93 


Gale... 




4.49 


Glen 




19.00 


Hall. 




42.34 






22.13 






14.59 


Holly 




29.32 






211.56 






30.29 






297.57 






6.61 






43.09 






3.11 


Kent 




73.77 






29.88 






119.11 






63.77 


Mills 




32.63 






82.38 






49.49 






20.64 






92.76 






139.96 






1,153.70 






14.44 






96.68 




ii u 


37.01 


Silk Farm Road. . . 


u ii 


21.48 


South 


u ii 


231.43 




ii it 


287.54 




• • ii 


30.35 






50.85 


Stickney Hill Road. . . 




126.76 






21.81 






19.52 


Tuttle 




8.94 


Water 




27.81 


West 


i< u 


245.89 






96.67 


Wiggin 




7.57 



206 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



WARD EIGHT. 



Street, 



Work. 



Expense. 



Break O'Day Road. . . 

Bridge 

Chandler 

Clough's Mill Road... 

Depot 

Ferry 

Freight 

Garvin's Falls Road . . 

Loudon Road , 

North Main 

North Pembroke Road 

Sexton's Ave , 

Sheep Road 

South Main 

South Pembroke Road 
Sugar Bowl Road .... 



General repairs . . 



Repairing concrete walks. . . 

roadway . 

General repairs 



Repairing concrete roadway. 
General repairs 



$22.10 

744.20 
11.00 
48.40 
21.37 
14.60 
18.76 

109.44 

477.41 

4.08 

6.52 

83.59 

100.71 

1.21 

49.05 

106.37 
30.97 

193.01 
55.73 



WARD NINE. 



Street. 



Expense. 



Albin 

Auburn 

Beacon 

Charles 

Church 

Curtice Ave 

Fiske Road 

Franklin 

Gladstone 

Granite Ave 

Highland 

Little Pond Road. . . . 
Long Pond Road. 

Martin 

North State 

Penacook 

Prospect 

Rumf ord 

Snow Shoe Club Road 

Walker 

Wyman 



General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Repairing concrete walks 
General repairs 

Reconstructing 

General repairs 



$9.16 
61.49 
1.38 
17.24 
15.63 
53.21 
19.23 
75.95 
84.11 
39.40 
15.39 
4.45 
15.95 

169.02 

117.88 
3.05 

234.88 
3,402.59 

157.27 
11.61 
32.01 
44.77 
14.44 
11.64 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 207 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1916. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

The sixth annual report to this board, showing work done 
under the superyision of the engineering department, for 
this board, is herewith submitted. 

Sewall's Falls Bridge. 

Late in December, 1915, work was suspended on this 
structure, leaving the coal-tar wearing surface to be laid 
on the floor and the painting of the metal above the floor 
level to complete it. 

In June the floor was cleared, the coal-tar wearing surface 
laid and the painting of the bridge completed in accordance 
with the terms of the contract. A final certificate of com- 
pletion was issued by your engineer on June 26, 1916. 

The completion of this structure gives safe bridges across 
the Merrimack River, for all traffic permissable upon the 
public highway, by whatever route one approaches the city. 

Sewers. 

It was impossible to complete the work planned for the 
past season, owing to the scarcity of labor. With the force 
we were able to secure it was possible to make necessary 
repairs and some additions to the manholes and lampholes 
which were badly needed. 

The Beacon Street sewer was not built but the material 
for the same was purchased and delivered at a point where 
it can be easily and economically distributed on the trench 
when needed for the work. The construction of this sewer 
should go on as soon as it is possible to secure the labor for 
this much needed improvement. 



208 CITY OF CONCORD. 

At the present time there appears to be no reason to 
expect any great change in the labor situation for the coming 
season and but two courses seem to be open to your board. 
Either to contract for the work of building the Beacon 
Street sewer, with some party or parties having an organ- 
ization for such work, or, to purchase, or lease machinery 
for this particular job and attempt to carry on the con- 
struction with such help as we can secure locally. 

We are having serious trouble in the smaller sewers with 
tree roots getting into them, and some means must be 
provided for either cleaning these sewers, or taking them 
up and relaying them at a great expense. 

I would advise the purchase of a cleaning machine and 
some action to stop the planting of such trees in the streets 
as cause the most of the trouble, notably the North Carolina 
poplar. These trees have caused much trouble in private 
sewers and are now reaching the public sewers wherever 
planted. 

The plans showing sewers and connections have been 
brought up to date, in the city precinct. 

There has been expended for maintenance and construc- 
tion the following amounts: 

REPAIRS. 

Valley Street, new manhole frame and cover, $15.91 

Holly Street, new lamphole frame and cover, 6 . 63 
Park Street, new manhole complete, on account 

of macadam, 36 . 56 . 

Bradley Street, cleaning sand from sewer, 35 . 13 

Ferry Street, cleaning sand from sewer, 5 . 59 

Blanchard Street, new lamphole frame and cover, 5 . 66 
Gladstone Street, new manhole complete, new 

lamphole cover, 35.32 

Thompson Street, new lamphole frame and cover, 4 . 75 

South Main Street, below McKinley .Street, 5.25 

School Street, new lamphole frame and cover, 4 . 75 
South Spring Street, two new lamphole frames 

and covers, 12.50 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 209 

West Street, coal-tar concrete, $5 . 59 
North State Street, near Fosterville, cleaning 
sticks and rubbish from catch-basin connec- 
tion and new manhole, 103 . 47 
Washington Street, cleaning sticks and rubbish 

from the catch-basin connection, 5 . 97 
Coal-tar concrete, 32.90 
Beacon Street, stoppage from sticks and rubbish, 23 . 77 
Downing Street, sticks from catch-basin con- 
nection, 6 . 42 
Prospect Street, sand and sticks from catch- 
basins, 1 • 39 
South State Street, account of macadam, 21 .33 
Dakin Street, new manhole complete, 57 . 83 
sticks and sand from catch-basin connection, 15 . 00 
Wall Street, sand and paper stoppage, 12.67 
Albin Street, new manhole complete, 39 . 79 
Walker Street, new manhole complete, 32 . 49 
Orchard Street, new manhole complete, 46 . 30 
Pillsbury Street, roots, 6 . 56 
Perry avenue, stoppage, 12.99 



Paid for tools, 

flushing, 
blue prints, 
book, 



Paid for right-of-way, 





$592.52 




$79.91 




405.77 




4.16 




1.25 




$491.09 


lCON street. 






$300.00 


, delivered, 


3,486.18 



1,786.18 



14 



210 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MCKINLEY STREET. 

The sewer in this street was found to be broken down 
where a soft bottom existed and 146 feet, at its westerly- 
end, had to be relaid and a foundation put in for 81 feet. 
Sixty-five feet at its westerly end was relaid at a higher 
level than the original sewer owing to the scarcity of labor. 
This 65 feet will have to be relaid at the old level when a 
sewer is laid in Broadway southerly from McKinley Street, 
or, when labor can be secured for this work. 

The expense incurred on this street was as follows : 

Paid for labor, $741 . 76 

pipe, 124.68 

brick, 22 . 50 

trucking, 36 . 50 

wrought-iron, 1 . 07 

castings, 13 . 50 

cement, 18 . 00 

pump supplies, 24 . 35 

hardware, . 50 

lumber, 5 . 20 

oil, 4.20 



$992 . 26 



Material excavated, sand and running sand. 
Average cost per foot, $6,795 + . 



LIBERTY STREET. 




148 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe laid. 




Paid for labor, 


$203 . 64 


pipe, 


44.62 


castings, 


.81 


trucking, 


10.25 


wrought-iron, 


.30 


oil, 


.60 



$260 . 22 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 211 



Material excavated, gravel and boulders. 




Average cost per foot, $1,758+. 




Expended for repairs, 


$592.52 


tools, etc., 


491.09 


Beacon Street sewer, 


3,786.18 


new work, 


260.22 


relay, McKinley Street, 


992.26 


Total expenditure, 


$6,122.27 


Appropriation and balance from 1915, 


$9,204.34 


Expended, 


6,122.27 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1916, $3,082.07 

New sewers laid 1916: 
Liberty Street, 148 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe. 

Sewers built in City Precinct to December 31, 1916: 

6-inch Akron pipe, 2,354 feet. 

8-inch Akron pipe, 25,657 " 

10-inch Akron pipe, 55,307 

12-inch Akron pipe, 39,663 " 

12-inch cement pipe, 415 " 

15-inch Akron pipe, 11,646 " 

18-inch Akron pipe, 7,134 " 

20-inch Akron pipe, 5,029 " 

24-inch Akron pipe, 4,064 " 

30-inch Akron pipe 1,780.5 " 

Brick, 12-inch x 14-inch, 2,758 " 
14-inch x 22-inch, 350 

16-inch x 24-inch, 1,848 " 

20-inch x 32-inch, 2,527 " 

24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 

28-inch x 48-inch, 883 " 

24-inch circular, 1,515.5 " 

30-inch circular, 402 " 

38-inch circular, 4,080 " 



1,576 


feet 


1,054.5 


u 


1,055 


a 


246 


a 


1,450 


a 



212 CITY OF CONCORD. 

24-inch cast-iron, 
30-inch cast-iron, 
42-inch segmental block, 
42-inch brick and concrete, 
60-inch brick and concrete, 



Total, 190,731.5 feet. 

Total miles of sewer in City Precinct, 36.123 + . 

West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

The entire sewer system in this precinct was flushed in 
the spring and fall. 

A break in the 20-inch outlet was repaired, on the interval 
near the residence of Charles B. Clarke. 

The expenditures for the season were as follows : 
Paid for flushing sewers, $26 . 33 

repairs to 20-inch outlet, 92 . 73 



Total expense, $119.06 

Funds available, $140.97 

Expended, 119.06 



Balance December 31, 1916, $21.91 

East Concord Sewer Precinct. 

No changes or repairs were made in this precinct and the 
balance on hand remains as one year ago, viz.: $127.53. 

Saint Paul's School Precinct. 

Repairs amounting to $4.00 were made on the Fisk Road 
during the season and no other expense was charged to this 
precinct. 

Funds available for repairs, $98.55 

Expended, 4.00 



Balance December 31,1916, $94 . 55 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 213 

Lines and grades were given the street department for 
sidewalk and street work whenever requested. 

Monthly measurements were made of coal-tar concrete 
laid on streets and sidewalks, statements of the square yards 
in place, cost and location of same shown and these state- 
ments turned over to the heads of departments paying for 
the same and to the committee on lands and buildings. 

Some time has been spent on the proposed road diversion 
at Saint Paul's School with their engineer, adjusting grades, 
alignment, bridge span and location and in looking up the 
old layouts of eixsting roads that were in the district cov- 
ered by this change. 

For the many courtesies extended this department by 
your board, I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1916. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

In accordance with the terms of the ordinance creating 
this department, I herewith submit the twenty-fourth 
annual report of the engineering department. 

The expenses for the year 1916 were as follows: 

Paid engineer and assistants, $3,274.38 

for supplies, 131.08 

telephone service, 21 . 71 

carfares and livery, 132 . 88 

repairs, 8 . 80 

express, 4.09 

labor, assessors' maps, $421.62 

supplies, assessors' maps, 116.83 

livery, assessors' maps, 32.00 

570.45 



convention expenses, 36 . 29 



Total expenditure, $4,179 . 68 

Appropriation, $4,275 . 00 

Expended, 4,179.68 



Unexpended balance, $95 . 32 

Sewers. 

The work done under this appropriation is detailed in the 
report of your engineer to the Board of Public Works, 
together with some recommendations concerning the sewers 
in the City precinct. 



report of the city engineer. 215 

Fire Department. 

Plans showing the location of all fire-alarm boxes and 
hydrants, in the city proper and in Penacook, have been 
made and delivered to the chief of this department. 

Building Petitions. 

Forty-seven petitions have been presented to the chief 
of the fire department and myself for consideration and 
action. 

We attended forty-six hearings and granted the petitions. 
One petition was abandoned by the petitioners before the 
date set for the hearing. 

This makes a total of three-hundred and seventy-one 
petitions which have come before us, for action, since June 
1901. 

Cemeteries. 

Block "B B" was laid out in lots in Blossom Hill Ceme- 
tery during the past season: plan and blueprints of same 
have been furnished the superintendent. 

Work on the much needed culvert in the northwesterly 
section of Blossom Hill Cemetery has been started and on 
its completion new blocks can be very economically laid 
out and made available for burial purposes in this section 
of the yard. 

We were able to secure much information from surveys 
during the past season, which will aid us in future work of 
development, in the section yet to be laid out and graded. 

The deed book of Blossom Hill Cemetery has been brought 
up to date, covering the lots sold and transferred as shown 
by the city deed books. 

Burials have been added to the book showing the occupa- 
tion of lots in the Old North Cemetery. 

Playgrounds. 

At the Kimball playground space was staked out for the 
construction of tennis courts, levels taken and such aid 
given the committee as we were able to render. 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Plans for a tool house were made for the Rollins' Park 
playground committee. 

At White Park stakes were set for the rough grading of 
the ball ground at its northerly end and some time spent in 
the effort to locate a roadway from the westerly end of 
Beacon Street to High Street with usable grades. 

Plans were also made for a stairway from the westerly 
end of Beacon Street to High Street, which plans are in the 
hands of the park commissioners. 

Water- Works. 

Surveys showing land areas have been made for this 
department near the head of the Lake and plans furnished 
the superintendent. 

Copies of plans were made for use in the suit of McQuilken 
against the city. 

Assessors' Maps. 

During the season we have practically completed the 
surveys for these maps. Some small details still remain 
to be worked out in the field, but they will not require the 
expenditure of much time or money. 

We expect to have the plans for the assessors' use com- 
pleted by April 1, 1917. 

There was appropriated for this work the sum of five 
hundred dollars; there was expended the sum of five hundred 
seventy dollars and forty-five cents. The balance above 
the appropriation was taken from the funds of the engi- 
neering department. 

Miscellaneous. 

The report of the board of examiners of plumbers and the 
hydrant commissioners has been placed before you in thei r 
respective reports to this board. 

Meetings of this board and the Board of Public Works 
have been attended when information was requested from 
this department. 

Plans for changes and improvements at the Good-Will 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 217 

Hose House were made for the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings, bids secured by the committee, and the work 
carried out under their direction. 

The changes made in this station give much better clear- 
ance for the apparatus housed therein, both in leaving and 
entering the premises. 

The floor in the Central Fire Station was strengthened 
to carry the new pumping engine. 

The employees of this department during the past season 
were: Fred W. Lang, principal assistant; Orion H. Hardy, 
transitman; Joseph H. Lane, rodman, whose services have 
been of value to the city in their respective positions. 

For the privilege of attending the annual meeting of the 
American Society of Municipal Improvements, and the 
uniform courtesy and interest shown this department by 
the Mayor and your Board, I wish to express my apprecia- 
tion. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1916. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The eleventh report of this board, for the year 1916, is 
herewith submitted. 

One meeting was held during the year and the location of 
a hydrant on the westerly side of South Main Street near 
the residence of Albert P. Davis was recommended. 

The hydrants left over from 1915 were set during the 
past season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 
W. G. GREEN, 
P. R. SANDERS, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1916. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The seventeenth annual report of this board is herewith 
submitted. 

The membership and organization of the board is as 
follows : 

Charles H. Cook, M. D., Frederick F. Converse, Chair- 
man, and Will B. Howe, City Engineer, Clerk. 

Two applicants were examined during the year, one for 
a master's license and one for a journeyman's license, both 
of whom passed their examinations and were granted 
licenses for their respective grades. 

The annexed table gives the names of all plumbers reg- 
istered by this board, their grades and the amounts paid, 
with dates of payments and the date of expiration of licenses 
and certificates. 

The total receipts of the board from all sources was $25.50. 

There has been expended for supplies and postage the 
sum of $1.96. 

We still have on hand $1, paid in 1915, for an examination, 
for which the applicant has never appeared. 



220 



CITY OF CONCOED. 



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FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1916. 

The department responded to 34 bell alarms and 239 still 
alarms. 

In addition, two fires occurred, entailing loss, for which 
no alarms were given, making a total of 275 for the year. 





Bell. 


Still. 


No alarm. Total. 


Precinct, 


18 


180 


1 199 


Penacook, 


9 


31 


1 41 


East Concord, 


6 


14 


20 


West Concord, 


1 


14 


15 



34 239 2 275 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete roll of 
the department with residence and occupation of each mem- 
ber, a record of all fires and alarms which have occurred 
during the year and the causes thereof as nearly as could 
be ascertained, with the names of the owners or occupants 
and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance recovered in 
each case. 

Nothing of importance occurred during the year, the 
city suffering less from fire loss than for a great many years. 

The apparatus is in good condition. The fire alarm 
system is also in good condition. The same can be truth- 
fully said of the system at Penacook. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

One box was purchased for the Penacook system, but 
not installed. 

An electric pump for testing hose was purchased during 
the year and found to be satisfactory. 

The duties incumbent on the undersigned in the line of 
inspection of wires and buildings have been performed. 

In compliance with instructions from your honorable 
body, the seating capacity of all halls in the city has been 
established, and notices to that effect have been posted in 
said halls. 

As more hose was condemned than purchased during the 
year, I would respectfully recommend the purchase of at 
least one thousand feet. 

During the month of August, I had the pleasure of at- 
tending the convention of the International Association of 
Fire Engineers held at Providence, R. I., a report of which 
I rendered at that time. 

I wish again to take occasion to thank your honorable 
body for the opportunity afforded me to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 



224 city of concord. 

Appropriations. 
Appropriation, $30,01 1 . 00 

Outstanding claims, 158.46 



Disbursements. 


Permanent men, 


$11,264.00 


Extra men, vacations, 


401.03 


Call men, 


9,190.00 


House man, 


100.00 


Rent Veterans' Association, 


150.00 


Forage, 


1,439.66 


Fuel, 


1,385.54 


Lights, 


651.53 


Incidentals, 


3,308.40 


Horse shoeing, 


285.52 


Horse hire, 


666.50 


Fire alarm, 


424.98 


Penacook fire alarm, 


200.36 


Supplies auto combinations, 


149.94 


Hose, 


500.00 


Laundry, 


52.00 



$30,169.46 



,169.46 



ALARMS. 

Precinct. 



Box 23. January 6, 4.34 a. m. Fire in small building 
used by teamsters employed by Tenney Coal Company 
at meal hours. Located in coal yard, Ferry Street. Caused 
by overheated stove. Five hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall 5.22 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $50.00 $15.00 None None 

Still. January 8, 8.37 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. John M. Hill, 50 So. Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

Still. January 8, 10.03 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Byrne, 11 Washington Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 8, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Peter Cassidy, 17 Walker Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still.' January 8, 2.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Levi Call, 26 Mills Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. January 8, 5.16 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Thomas Tandy, High Street Extension. Combination 
1 responded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. January 9, 7.27 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Morrill, 137 School Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 9, 10.29 a. m. Chimnej^ fire in resi- 
dence of A. B. Cross, 19 Merrimack Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $6,000.00 $14.00 $4,100.00 $14.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 15.00 1,500.00 15.00 

Still. January 9, 10.44 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. L. Dickerman, 11 Humphrey Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 3. No loss. 

Box 49. January 9, 8.46 p. m. False alarm. Recall 
8.54 p. m. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of N. J. Roberts, 199 No. State Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 5.48 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Georgie Cate, 8 So. Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 7.23 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Oini Sotoline, 12 Perkins Court. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 12, 5.57 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 

15 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of William Steele, 163 Rumford Street. Extinguished by- 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 12, 4.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Max Enton, 5 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 15, 8.23 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Thomas Nawn, 41 No. Spring Street." Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 8.01 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. N. Bryant, 30 Lyndon Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 2.32 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Clinton, 34 So. Spring Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 2.50 p. m. A call to examine chim- 
ney in clothing store of Hardy & McSwiney, 31 No. Main 
Street. Detail sent from Central Station. Chimney very 
hot, but no fire. 

Still. January 20, 12.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. Scott Owen, 79 Warren Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 20, 5.56 p. m. Chimney fire in the 
F. D. French store, Plains District. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 26, 7.39 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. G. Fogg, 78 Pillsbury Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 9.35 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Wilson, 3 Wyman Avenue: Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 3.50 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 58 
Hall Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 1, 8.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of S. Natuski, 10 Waverly Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Box 24. February 2, 6.25 p. m. Fire in residence at 
14 Montgomery Street, owned by Minnie E. Hall and 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 227 

occupied by David C. Taylor. Cause unknown. Two 
thousand six hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 7.27 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $887.00 $2,000.00 $887.00 

Contents, 400.00 300.00 None None 

Still. February 2, 7.11 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Alexander McDonald, 5 So. Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. February 3, 7.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of M. Parmenter, Grant Street, Plains District. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 4, 4.47 p. m. Fire in Toof Apartment 
Block, corner of Warren and Green Streets. Fire orig- 
inated in tenement occupied by W. H. Timm. Caused by 
upsetting of alcohol lamp. Extinguished by detail from 
Central Station. 





Value. 


Loss. Ins. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$28,000.00 


$25.05 $20,000.00 


$25.05 


Contents, 


3,000.00 


79.00 1,500.00 


79.00 



Still. February 6, 7.27 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. T. Champigny, Bridge Street, near Camp Ground. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 10.58 a. m. Fire in basement of 
sawmill, East Penacook Street. Owned by Concord 
Lumber Company. Extinguished by employees and Com- 
bination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. February 8, 12.11 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur Nevers, 78 No. Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 11.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. H. Welch, 49 Downing Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 11, 5.25 a. m. Slight fire in closet in 
barber shop, 6 Park Street. Occupied by A. J. Souza. 
Caused by spontaneous combustion in refuse. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 



228 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 14, 3.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. P. Blake, 70 No. Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 14, 6.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Byrne, 32 Washington Street. Extin- 
guished by members of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. February 15, 7.27 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence oi William Cutting, 207 So. Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 16, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. Haggerty, 1 Beaver Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. February 17, 9.47 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. J. Chadbourne, 3 Hanover Street. Combina- 
tion 1 responded. No assistance required. No loss. 

Still. February 17, 11.45 a. m. Fire in flooring of 
kitchen of residence, 44 School Street. Owned and occu- 
pied by Thomas G. Martin. Caused by overheated range. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $4,500.00 $10.00 $2,500.00 $10.00 

Still. February 17, 12.03 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of B. A. Beauchard, 107 So. State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 3.23 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Mayo, 145 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 3.26 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Byrne, Garvins Falls Road. Extin- 
guished by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 5.40 p. m. Chimney fire in Lee 
Block, corner of So. Main and Chandler Streets. Extin- 
guished by Combniations 1 and 3. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 5.45 p. m. Combination called to 
scene of preceding alarm to which Combination 3 had 
responded. Unnecessary call. Extinguished by Com- 
binations 1 and 3. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 229 

Still. February 20, 11.10 a. m. Fire in residence at 
69 So. Main Street. Owned and occupied by Laura S. 
Hill. Caused by overheated gas log. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $51.97 $2,000.00 $51.97 

Contents, 2,000.00 17.18 1,500.00 17.18 

Still. February 20, 11.48 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. P. Blake, Albin Road. Detail from Combina- 
tion 1 sent out in Chief's sleigh. No loss. 

Still. February 21, 8.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John McCann, 22 Concord Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. February 21, 6.10 p. m. Slight fire in residence, 
51 Green Street. Owned by the Gustavus Walker Estate 
and occupied by Thomas Foley. Caused by attempt to 
thaw water pipe with gasoline torch. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $132.09 $2,500.00 $132.09' 

2-2-2. February 25, 8.00 a. m. School signal. 

2-2-2. February 25, 1.00 p. m. School signal. 

Still. February 28, 3.59 a. m. Fire in passenger 
station, Railroad Square. Combination 1 responded, but 
the fire had assumed such proportions that a bell alarm 
was sent in. 

Box 5. February 28, 4.06 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Fire originated in employees' lockers in the 
basement in the south end and before it was extinguished 
had worked up to the attic in the partitions. One thousand 
four hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 7.04 a. m. 





Value. Loss. 


Ins. Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$235,161.00 $2,416.00 


$75,000.00 $2,416.00 


Contents, 


12,000.00 244.61 


10,000.00 244.61 



Still. February 29, 4.05 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

blowing off of boiler in residence of Reuben Cohn, 32 Mills 
Street. Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Still. March 1, 9.16 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Petro Paveghe, 16 Albin Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 1, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Walter Woods, 79 Broadway. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

11-11. March 3, 6.42 a. m. A call for assistance from 
Loudon. Combination 1, Engine 2 and detail from the 
department sent under command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. 
Engine worked two hours. Seven hundred feet of hose wet. 

Still. March 6, 5.40 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
B. B. Leighton, 101 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 3.53 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Dennery, Cottage Court. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 8, 8.08 p. m. Alarm occasioned by short 
circuit of wires on snow plough on electric street car line 
at Pleasant and Fremont Streets. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 11, 7.17 p. m. Chimney fire in C. H. 
Bunker's grocery store, 127 So. Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 13, 6.01 p. m. A call to investigate 
smoke in Fellow's Block, 4 No. State Street. Attended to 
by detail from Central Station. No fire. 

2-2-2. March 15, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. March 18, 1.40 p. m. Slight fire in residence of 
Frank Crowley on Long Pond Road. Combination 1 
responded but upon arrival at St. Paul's School, was stopped 
by telephone message stating that the fire had been extin- 
guished by occupants. Loss trifling. 

Still. March 19, 6.29 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Baker, 5 Foster Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 231 

Still. March 19, 10.01 p. m. Fire in residence. 93 No. 
State Street. Owned by Mrs. J. C. Allison and occupied 
by owner and John Duckers. Cause of fire unknown. 
Combination Company responded, but almost immedi- 
ately a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 21. March 19, 10.02 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Four hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 11.14 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,200.00 $200.00 $1,850.00 $200.00 

J. Duckers, 1,000.00 50.00 None None 

Still. March 23, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Nutting, 56 So. State Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 23, 9.26 p. m. Fire in frame building, 
22 Fremont Street. Owned by John Abrizzese and occupied 
by the Concord Heel Company. Cause unknown. Com- 
bination 1 responded, but upon arrival sent in a bell alarm 
as a precautionary measure. 

Box 36. March 23, 9.31 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. One hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 10.28 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Budding, $1,000.00 $96.25 $500.00 $96.25 

Contents, 3,000.00 250.00 2,300.00 250.00 

Still. March 25, 6.26 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Lapierre, 5 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 26, 12.26 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. A. McLaren, 56 Perley Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 30, 9.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Walter Hackshaw, 36 Mills Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 2, 6.45 p. m. Fire in rubbish in rear of the 
New England Cable Company plant, Bridge Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 8, 9.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 



232 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Bertha Ludlow, 16 Pleasant Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded, but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. J. A. Stickney, 16 Prince Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 11, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Miss Mary Pierce, 19 No. State Street. Extingushed by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 11, 10.58 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of B. S. Blackwood, 29 London Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 15, 4.44 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. D. Berryman, 17 West Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. April 16, 3.45 p. m. Grass fire on Gladstone 
Street. Small shed destroyed. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. April 19, 1.22 p. m. Grass fire reported, 31 
Merrimack Street. Combination 1 responded, but could 
find no fire. 

Still. April 20, 9. 18 p. m. Slight fire in rags in pumping 
station at State Hospital. It was apparent that someone 
had stolen the rags and secreted them in the building. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 9.21 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of W. J. Chadbourne, 3 Hanover 
Street. Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 11.50 a. m. Slight fire in grocery store 
of Gurley & Holt, 25 Warren Street. Caused by gas jet 
coming in contact with wooden column. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 9.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of S. G. Gilford, 75 So. Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 23, 7.53 p. m. Fire in Phenix Hall, 40 
No. Main Street. This still was followed almost immedi- 
ately by a bell alarm. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 233 

Box 35. April 23, 7.54 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Caused by throwing cigarette stub into wooden 
receptacle containing palm wound with felt. Extinguished 
with chemicals. Recall 8.20. p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $60,000.00 $18.30 $18,500.00 $18.30 

No Alarm. April 23, 7.54 p. m. Upon arrival at the 
scene of the preceding fire, it was discovered that another 
fire was in progress in Phenix Hotel ; 46 No. Main Street, 
the next block north. Caused by contact of cigarette and 
bed. This was also extinguished with chemicals. Building 
owned by Hill Associates. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $10,000.00 $18.00 $6,000.00 $18.00 

Still. April 26,. 9.36 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
W. D. Hutchinson, 30 So. State Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 10.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. L. M. Brown, 14 Tremont Street. Extinguished 
by members of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 7.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of B. Simms, 34 Thompson Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 29, 1.40 p. m. Brush north of Penacook 
and west of Rumford near stone crusher. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 1, 12.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John Coleman, 9 Bowery Avenue. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 2, 3.59 p. m. Brush fire Penacook Street, 
west of Rumford Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. May 3, 8.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
10 Waverly Street, owned by Miss Teresa Kenney. Com- 
bination 1 responded, but before arrival a bell alarm had 
been sent in. See next alarm. 



234 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 12. May 3, 8.47 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 9.12 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $10.00 $1,800.00 $10.00 

Still. May 4, 5.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Herbert Hanson, 18 Thompson Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. May 7, 2.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Richard Bo wen, 1 Wyman Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 9, 9.31 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
William Fousay, 23 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 9, 7.59 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
William Reed, Jr., Fan Road. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. May 11, 6.55 a. m. Slight fire in clothing in 
residence, 10 Downing Street, owned by E. H. Farrar and 
occupied by Clifford Penard. Cause, boy and matches. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. 





Value. 


Loss. Ins. 


Ins. paid. 


Building, 


$1,500.00 


$10.00 $1,000.00 


$10.00 


Contents, 


300.00 


25.00 None 


None 



Still. May 11, 11.31 a. m. Brush fire, St. Paul's 
School. Extinguished by Combination 1 and employees 
of School. Labored one hour. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 11, 11.48 a. m. Bell alarm given for pre- 
ceding fire in response to call for assistance. Detail and 
barge sent. Stopped by messenger before arrival. 

4-4-4. May 11, 7.48 p. m. Bell alarm given in response 
to call for assistance from East Concord in extinguishing 
forest fires on Penacook Road. Detail and barge sent under 
command of Capt. H. T. Dickerman. Labored four hours. 
See East Concord report. 

4-4-4. May 12, 7.18 a. m. Brush fire on Penacook 
Road, East Concord. Detail and barge sent under com- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 235 

mand of Fire Warden Eli Langlois. Labored four hours. 
See East Concord report. 

Still. May 12, 5.53 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of Frank Quimby, 15 Water Street. 
Hot ashes in ash barrel coming in contact with bunch of 
catnip. Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Box 14. May 12, 7.49 p. m. Slight fire in coal bin in 
residence, 26 Walker Street, owned by Louis Cozzi and 
occupied by owner. Cause unknown. Extinguished by 
occupants. Recall 8 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,200.00 $15.00 $1,000.00 $15.00 

Contents, 700.00 20.00 500.00 20.00 

Still. May 13, 9.21 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. E. Leahy, 38 Concord Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 15, 7.44 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
William Burnham, 63 Downing Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 15, 8.39 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dr. Sibley Morrill, 47 School Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 16, 3.07 p. m. Fire in flooring near fire- 
place in residence owned and occupied by Mrs. Nancy 
Dutton. Caused by brand flying from fireplace. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $11.36 $2,000.00 $11.36 

Contents, 1,500.00 64.79 1,000.00 64.79 

Still. May 16, 6.20 p. m. ■ Chimney fire in residence of 
Joseph Stoiti, 51 Penacook Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

2-2-2. May 17, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. May 21, 7.20 p. m. Automobile owned by 



236 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I. E. Gray damaged by fire at corner of South and Monroe 
Streets. Cause unknown. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Auto, $400.00 $200.00 None None 

Still. May 28, 9.25 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
James Adams, 4 Foster Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. May 30, 10.19 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. L. M. Brown, 14 Fremont Street. Extinguished 
by members of Alert Hose Company. No loss. 

Still. May 31, 9.09 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. T. Dickerman, 36 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. June 4, 8.59 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Henry Drouin, 22 West Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. June 11, 10.31 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. C. Niles, 119 School Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

3-1-2. June 19, 9.45 a. m. Military signal. 

Still. June 21, 8.10 a. m. Chimney fire in Parker 
School, School Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. June 23, 2.18 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
G. H. Whitcher, Albin Road. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. 

Still. June 25, 6.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
W. J. Chadbourne, 3 Hanover Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. July 1, 5.34 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. W. Richardson, 18 So. State Street. Extinguished by 
Combination. No loss. 

Box 37. July 6, 1.39 a. m. Set of buildings owned and 
occupied by Arthur J. Curtis, 4 Woodman Street. Dam- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 237 

aged. Cause unknown. Fire originated in barn. One 
thousand five hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 3.08 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. paid. 


Buildings, 


$1,000.00 


$500.00 


$600.00 


$500.00 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


331.15 


1,400.00 


331.15 



Still. July 6, 4.34 a. m. Re-kindling of debris at scene 
of preceding fire. Extinguished by Combination 1. No. 
loss. 

Still. August 1, 3.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Faro, 9^ Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 6, 3.32 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. White, 4 Railroad Square. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 19, 2.16 p. m. Residence, 276 No. 
Main Street, owned by Joseph B. Walker Estate, slightly 
damaged by fire. Cause, painters removing paint with 
torch. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $2,392.00 $1,300.00 $2,392,00' 

Contents 1,200.00 2.50 900.00 2.50 

Still. August 22, 11.47 a. m. Fire in pile of old boards 
in rear of 127 So. Main Street. Set by boys. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 23, 7.03 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in store of Brown & Batchelder, 50 No. Main 
Street. Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was 
required. No fire. 

Box 9. August 23, 3.22 p. m. Buildings, 324 No. 
State Street, owned and occupied by Cyrus R. Farnham. 
As the West Concord Department had the situation well in 
hand upon the arrival of the precinct apparatus, but one 
additional line was laid. Three hundred and fifty feet of 
precinct hose wet. Recall 4.15 p. m. See West Concord 
report. 

Still. August 23, 3.45 p. m. While at the preceding 



238 CITY OF CONCORD. 

fire, word was received that a set of buildings near Sunny- 
side Farm, west of Long Pond, was burning. Combination 
1 was immediately sent, but could do little except help to 
remove furniture. See West Concord report. 

Still. August 23, 5.22 p. m. Set of buildings owned 
and occupied by Catherine Gross on the Loudon Road near 
Break o' Day, struck by lightning and destroyed. Com- 
bination 1 being in service, Combination 3 was sent. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Buildings, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 2,000.00 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Still. August 23, 5.30 p. m. Reserve chemical engine 
sent to scene of preceding fire to assist Combination 3 in 
protecting neighboring buildings. 

Box 53. August 25, 1.12 p. m. Small residence south 
of Page Street owned and occupied by Dominic Nistico 
damaged. Caused by overheated chimney. Eight hun- 
dred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 1.49 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $600.00 $50.00 $400.00 $50.00 

Contents, 300.00 40.00 100.00 40.00 

Still. September 4, 12.58 p. m. A call for assistance 
from Bow. Set of buildings on the old turnpike destroyed. 
Combination 1 responded, but could do little toward saving 
the property. See Bow report. 

Still. September 9, 10.38 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 18 Walker Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. September 14, 11.40 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Stickney Block, 154 No. Main Street. 
Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. September 14, 12.55 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Chesley Apartment Block, 99 No. State 
Street. Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was 
required. No fire. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 239 

Still. September 14, 2.18 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Insurance Block, 18 School Street. Com- 
bination 1 responded, but no assistance was required. No 
fire. 

Still. September 22, 9.25 a. m. A call for assistance 
from Bow. Set of buildings on the Albin Road destroyed. 
Combination 1 responded, but could do little toward saving 
the property. See Bow Report. 

Still. October 1, 11.32 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. N. Sawyer, 221 No. Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 5, 11.46 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of E. B. Fresny, 30§ Center 
Street. Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was 
required. No fire. 

Still. October 8, 1.49 p. m. Slight fire on roof of 
Commercial House, 143 No. Main Street. Caused probably 
by sparks from chimney. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. October 8, 6.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. C. Walker, 8 Maple Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 10, 11.34 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. B. Wills, 42 Pillsbury Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 13, 2.38 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of B. J. Heath, 92 West Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 9.39 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Peter Lemay, 68 West Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 17, 8.05 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. S. Ash, 86 Broadway. Extinguished by Combination 
1. No loss. 

Still. October 17, 3.39 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Chateguay District of Bow. Alarm occasioned by burning 
of debris on site of sawmill destroyed a few days before. 
Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was required. 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 28, 10.55 a. m. A call for assistance 
from East Concord. Buildings owned by John Roach 
damaged. Combination 1 responded and rendered valu- 
able assistance. See East Concord report. 

Still. October 28, 4.57 p. m. Slight fire in room on 
second floor of residence, 107 School Street, owned by 
Zeb. F. Swain, and occupied by Helen Sibley. Caused by 
Hallowe'en decorations coming in contact with gas jet. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $8.85 $2,500.00 $8.85 

Contents, 100.00 25.00 None None 

Still. October 29, 7.07 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Manchileo, 40 Fremont Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 2, 7.28 p. m. Awning at 92 No. 
Main Street slightly damaged by fire. Caused by careless 
handling of red fire above. Combination 1 responded, but 
no assistance was required. Loss trifling. 

Still. November 3, 2.21 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. C. French, 21 School Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

.Still. November 4, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur E. Dow, 61 Concord Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 2.28 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Clinton Parker, 48 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 4.37 p. m. Plumbers' torch 
mistaken for fire in basement of residence, 14 Monroe Street. 
Combination 1 responded, but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. November 7, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Connors, 55 So. State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. November 9, 7.34 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 241 

dence of S. F. Newton, 15 No. Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 11, 8.57 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Bresnahan, 14 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 11, 11.53 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 
residence of Thomas Reed, East Penacook Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 15, 8.05 p. m. Small building used 
by boys as a clubhouse in rear of residence, 154 Rumford 
Street, destroyed. Caused by overheated stove. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. November 16, 6.11 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of P. C. Shute, 54 No. Spring Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 17, 8.58 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. C. Pickering, 51 Green Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 21, 9.37 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. C. Wood, 84 Center Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 22, 10.06 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Nora Kelley, 44 So. State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 23, 4.53 a. m. Fire in debris of old 
barn blown down west of Ridge Road. Caused by over- 
heated stove which boys had been playing with. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. November 23, 7.07 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of P. E. Gilmore, 83 So. Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 4.14 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Frank Green, Greeley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 4.25 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of F. L. Sweatt, 75 Hall Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. November 26, 7.18 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
le 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 

dence owned by John Jordan and occupied by Mrs. Walter 
Blair, 105 School Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,500 $8.50 $2,500.00 $8.50 

Still. December 2, 11.18 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. H. Wills, 42 Pillsbury Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 6, 7.36 p. m. Dump fire in rear of 
Cable Factory, Bridge Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 8.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Carpentier, 26 West Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 4.32 p. m. Three grass fires burning 
simultaneously on Hall Street opposite Hammond Street 
caused by sparks from locomotive. Combination 1 re- 
sponded. See next alarm. 

Still. December 7, 4.36 p. m. Combination 3 sent to 
assist at scene of preceding fires. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 11.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of 42 South Street, owned by Mary F. Gordon and 
occupied by H. C. Royce. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $5.50 $2,200.00 $5.50 

Still. December 9, 1.54 a. m. Slight fire in residence 
23 Lyndon Street, owned by Mrs. Nancy Dutton and 
occupied by A. F. Oyston. Caused by contact of gas jet 
and wall. Extinguished by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 
Unadjusted. 

Still. December 11, 5.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Peter Colletts, 32 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 12, 2.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. H. Smith, 229| No. Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 13, 8.03 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 243 

dence of Fred Boulay, on old Turnpike Road, Plains Dis- 
trict. Extinguished by Combination 1 . No loss. 

Still. December 16, 7.08 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
hot smokepipe from furnace to chimney in residence of 
Dr. Russell Wilkins, 149 No. Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 16, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. A. Pollard, 72 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 16, 7.52 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Peter Drouin, 10^ Tuttle Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, 12,000.00 $15.00 $1,500.00 $15.00 

Box 37. December 16, 7.59 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Needless alarm. Recall 8.38 p. m. 

Still. December 20, 7.31 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. B. Perry, 216 No. State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 521. December 22, 2.58 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of W. D. Nudd, 295 So. Main Street. Needless 
alarm. Recall 3.16 p. m. No loss. 

Still. December 23, 11.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred H. Wason, 124 South Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 23, 7.56 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank Donahue, 10 Jefferson Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 24, 6.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. E. Lovely, 65 Downing Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 24, 7.24 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Roy, 5 Granite Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 25, 4.31 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mark Jesault, 47 Stone Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



244 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. December 25, 7.41 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of S. M. Wilson, 27£ Franklin Street. Members of 
the Alert Company responded. See next alarm. 

Still. December 25, 7.57 p. m. A call for assistance 
from scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by Alert and 
Combination 1 Companies. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 7.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Dougherty, 10 Chapel Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 27, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of A. Henry, 46 School Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 27, 6.01 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. Henry, 46 School Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 3.33 p. m. Chimney fire in the 
H. H. Chamberlain market, 226 No. Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 4.51 p. m. Chimney fire in the 
H. K. Larsen carpenter shop, 4 Hall's Court. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 31, 10.06 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Dufresne, 2 Cottage Court. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 31, 11.57 a. m. A call for assistance 
from Deputy Chief French of the Manchester Department 
who, with a detail of Manchester firemen were working at 
a fire at Hooksett. Combinations 1 and 3 sent with details. 
Cataract 3 moved from West Concord to Central Station. 
Details returned from Hooksett at 3.15 p. m. 

Still. December 31, 12.15 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of E. E. Clarke, 33 Harvard Street. Run made 
with Cataract car and detail. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 245 



Penacook. 



Still. January 21, 3.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles A. Robertson, 44 W. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. January 22, 12.10 p. m. Chimney fire in block, 
111 So. Main St., owned by Mrs. Nellie Spicer. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
12 Washington Street, owned by Fred Chase. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 6.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
1 Union Street, owned by Mrs. Sarah Farrand. No loss. 

Still. February 7, 5.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Devlin, 36 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Box 35. February 16, 7.40 p. m. Fire in Central 
House, Main Street, owned by Isaac Baty and occupied by 
John La Vally as hotel. Fire originated in basement and 
worked through partitions to second floor. Caused prob- 
ably by overheated smokepipe. Eight hundred feet of hose 
wet. Recall 9.30 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $7,000.00 $784.04 $3,000.00 $784.04 

Contents, 

Furniture, 2,300.00 146.80 500.00 146.80 

Bar fixtures, 

and stock, 2,400.00 1,150.00 1,500.00 1,150.00 

Still. February 19, 11.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 16 Penacook Street, owned by C. M. and A. W. Rolfe. 
No loss. 

Box 47. February 20, 10.55 p. m. Fire in residence 
14 Rolfe Street, owned by John Ferrin and occupied by P. 
Simoneau. Caused by overheated furnace. Seven hundred 
and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 12.20 a. m. 21st inst. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. daid. 

Building, $1,800.00 $500.00 $1,600.00 $476.78 

Contents, 600.00 100.00 None None 

Still. February 24, 6.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 22 Spring Street, owned by Dr. Newell Bean. No 
loss. 



246 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 28, 8.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Dr. E. U. Sargent, 22 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. February 28, 11.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Dr. E. U. Sargent, 22 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. March 11, 1.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Connoly, 57 Main Street. No loss. 

Still. March 12, 8.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
14 Rolfe Street, owned by John Ferrin. No loss. 

Box 35. April 2, 6.00 p. m. Chimney fire Boscawen 
side. 

Still. April 5, 6.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Fred A. Barker, 137 So. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 1.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John Sessions, 73 High Street. No loss. 

Still. May 11, 1.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Robert Gordon, 36 Charles Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. May 11, 8.16 p. m. Brush fire near the Massie 
place, East Concord. Extinguished by detail from Pioneer 
Company. Labored four hours. Loss trifling. 

Still. May 26, 7.25 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. H. Mclntyre, 10 Union Street. No loss. 

Still. May 29, 9.00 a. m. Fire on roof of the E. L. 
Davis coal shed near depot. Caused probably by spark from 
locomotive. Loss trifling. 

Still. June 9, 6.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Samuel McClintock, 46 Rolfe Street. No loss. ■ 

Still. June 9, 12.48 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
F. G. Chandler, 31 Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. June 30, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
David Twomey, 56 Summer Street. No loss. 

Box 37. July 31, 7.32 p. m. Slight fire in residence of 
Edward Ames, 69 Washington Street. Fire originated in 
chamber, destroying bed. Caused probably by children 
playing with matches. Recall 7.40 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Contents, $500.00 $15.00 None None 

No Alarm. August 22, 5.45 p. m. Fire on roof of 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 247 

boiler house of Symonds Table Company plant. Extin- 
guished by employes. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $12,000.00 $100.00 $9,250.00 $100.00 

Box 35. September 23, 1.30 p. m. Barn on the Bor- 
ough Road owned and occupied by William Flanders 
struck by lightning and destroyed. House and shed saved. 
Two thousand three hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 
3.45 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $150.00 $150.00 $100.00 $100.00 

Contents, 100.00 100.00 None None 

Still. October 2, 8.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
14 Center Street, owned by J. E. Symonds. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $6.00 $3,000.00 $6.00 

Box 35. October 5, 9.25 a. m. Slight fire in residence 
of T. Lambrukos, 5 W. Canal Street. Fire originated in 
basement from gasoline stove. Extinguished with chem- 
icals. Recall 9.44 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,200.00 $12.00 $1,200.00 $12.00 

Box 38. October 6, 10.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Alex La Coy, 14 Pine Street. Sparks from chimney 
set roof afire. Extinguished with pail of water. Recall 
10.45 a. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. October 17, 12.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Robert Gordon, 36 Charles Street. No loss. 

Still. November 8, 11.20 a. m. Chimney fire in 
tenement house, 9 W. Canal Street. No loss. 

Still. November 11, 8.15 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house, 8 W. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
Block, Main Street. No loss. 



248 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. November 16, 4.20 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Washington House, Main Street. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 8.28 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Nelson Cluette, 41 Summer Street. No loss. 

Still. November 21, 10.48 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of J. Massie, 11 Bye Street. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 6.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Patrick Foley, 20 W. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 8.20 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house, 22 E. Canal Street. No loss. 

Box 45. December 11, 6.20 a. m. Chimney fire in 
tenement block, 32 Summer Street. Recall 6.50 a. m. 
No loss. 

Box 47. December 16, 1.22 p. m. Chimney fire in 
tenement house, 108 Merrimack Street. Recall 1.40 p. m. 
No loss. 

Still. December 22, 8.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence, 4 Charles Street. No loss. 

• Still. December 23, 7.48 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence, 12 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

East Concord. 

Still. January 14, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Thomas Reed, E. Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. February 6, 2.00 p. m. Chimney fire at the 
Major Stevens place on the Mountain. No loss. 

Still. February 7, 10.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Elbridge Emery, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. February 7, 4.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Roy on the Intervale. No loss. 

Still. February 21, 11.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank Powell, Clinton Street. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Alvin Smith, Clinton Street. No loss. 

Still. April 19, 10.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Abram Cushing, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. May 6, 3.15 p. m. Brush fire on land of Mrs. 
John T. Bachelder, Shawmut Street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 249 

Still. May 11, 11.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Ernest Floyd, Pecker Street. No loss. 

Bell. May 11, 1.30 p. m. Brush fire on land of David 
Morrill on the Mountain. No loss. 

Bell. May 11, 4.30 p. m. Brush fire on land of David 
Sanborn and others, on Penacook road. 

Bell. May 12, 10.20 a. m. Continuation of preceding 
fire. Loss $815.00. No insurance. 

Still. June 30, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Wesley Swain, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. October 16, 12.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harry Maynard, Shawmut Street. No loss. 

Bell. October 25, 1.00 p. m. Brush fire on land of 
Addison Bryant on the Mountain. No loss. 

Bell. October 28, 10.30 a. m. Fire in barn and shed 
owned by John Roach and occupied by James Houston. 
Barn and shed destroyed, house saved. Buildings located 
at junction of Potter and Appleton Streets. Combination 
1 from precinct responded to call for assistance. Cause of 
fire unknown. 

Value Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Buildings, $1,300.00 $310.00 $600.00 $60.00 

Contents, 100.00 100.00 None None 

Barn uninsured. 

Still. November 24, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Hiram Gardner, Pembroke Street. No loss. 

Still. November 26, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George O. Robinson, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. December 3, 10.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Alvin Smith, E. Clinton Street. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in the 
Stearns grocery store, Penacook Street. No loss. 



250 city of concord. 

West Concord. 

Still. March 2, 12.10 p. ra. Fire in closet in residence 
of John Hermenson, 4 Clark Street. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,200.00 $15.00 $2,200.00 $15.00 

Contents, 500.00 35.00 500.00 35.00 

Still. March 4, 12.00 m. Chminey fire in blacksmith 
shop of the Chandler Eastman Company plant, 502 No. 
State Street. No loss. 

Still. March 14, 8.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. O. Partridge, 426 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. March 19, 6.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Henry Fletcher, 6 Quaker Street. No loss. 

Still. April 4, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Gust Erickson, 6 Clark Street. No loss. 

Still. July 18, 4.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Elizabeth M. Murphy, 442 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. July 21, 10.20 a.m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. H. Rogers, Second Street. No loss. 

Bell. August 23, 3.30 p. m. Barn owned by Cyrus R. 
Farnum, 324 No. State Street, damaged by lightning. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $50.00 $1,500.00 $50.00 

Contents, 500.00 25.00 500.00 25.00 

Still. August 23, 3.50 p. m. Set of buildings on the 
Hopkinton road owned and occupied by Mrs. Frank Wood- 
bury struck by lightning and destroyed. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $1,500.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Contents, 1,000.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 

Still. September 7, 12.15 p. m. Barn on the N. H. 
State Hospital grounds on the Hopkinton road destroyed. 
Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $2,000.00 None None 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



251 



Still. November 1, 4.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 12 Gay Street, owned by John E. Gay and occupied 
by Alexander McLeod. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. paid. 

Building, $1,200.00 $7.00 $1,200.00 $7.00 



Still. November 26, 3.00 p. m. 
dence of Joel Kellom, 9 Lake Street. 

Still. December 14, 6.00 a. m. 
dence of H. B. Annis, Penacook road. 

Still. December 18, 6.00 a. m. 
dence of William Lynch, 446 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. December 20, 11.30 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of J. E. Shepard, 30 Hutchins Street. No loss. 



Chimney fire in resi- 

No loss. 
Chimney fire in resi- 

No loss. 
Chimney fire in resi- 



SUMMARY— YEAR 1916 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Insurance 
paid. 


Net loss. 


BUILDINGS. 


8374,111.00 

25,650.00 

1,300.00 

8,400.00 


$7,723.79 
1,552.04 
1,125.00 
3,572.00 


$147,250.00 

18,150.00 

600.00 

5,900.00 


$6,008.79 

1,478.. 82 

60.00 

1,072.00 


$1,715.00 
73 22 






1,065 00 




2,500.00 




CONTENTS. 


$409,461.00 

$41,000.00 

5,900.00 

100.00 

2,000.00 


$13,972.83 

$3,482.23 

1,511.80 

100.00 

560.00 


$171,900.00 

$28,200 00 
2,000.00 

1,500.00 


$8,619.61 

$2,582.23 
1,296.80 

560.00 


$5,353.22 
$900.00 




215.00 




100.00 










Total 


$49,000.00 
409,461.00 


85,654.03 
13,972.83 


$31,700.00 
171,900.00 


$4,439.03 
8,619.61 


$1,215.00 




5,353 22 






Buildings and contents 


$458,461.00 


819,626.86 


$203,600.00 


$13,058.64 


86,568.22 



252 city of concord. 

Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows: 

Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine. "Eagle," with modern hose 
wagon, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company- 
CIS men); one second-class Amoskeag engine, . " Kear- 
sarge," and modern hose wagon, attached to the Kear- 
sarge Steam Fire Engine Company (14 men); one second- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, in 
charge of an engineer and fireman; and one auto-combina- 
tion car in charge of five permanent men; one ladder truck, 
"City of Concord," attached to Hook and Ladder Com- 
pany (21 men); one house man at Central Fire Station. 
There are ten horses kept at this station. There are 10 
permanent men located at the Central Fire Station and 
one permanent man at each fire station within the precinct. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has a modern hose wagon with permanent 
man and two horses. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an auto- 
combination car with permanent man. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hook and ladder truck, one hose reel, one chemical 
engine, one hand engine and two wagons in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
an auto-combination car and a modern hose wagon. 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4|-inch cylin- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank, 
and one auto-combination car. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



253 



Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 
East Concord, 



Hose. 

10,650 feet cotton, rubber lined. 
3,200 " 
1,400 " 
500 " 



15,750 " 



Public Reservoirs. 

1. Main Street, rear Court House, 

2. State Street, corner Washington Street,* 

3. Rumford Street, near Mrs. Josiah Minot's, 

4. Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street,* 

5. School Street, corner of Summit Street,* 



Capacity 
Cubic Feet. 

2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
4,000 
3,500 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Number, Location, Etc. 

For the purpose of uniformity in numbering the fire- 
alarm boxes, the city is divided into six districts, viz. : 

District 1. Embraces that section of the city north and 
west of Washington Street, Box 17 of this division being 
located on the south side of the street. 

District 2. Embraces all between School and Washing- 
ton Streets. 

District 3. Embraces all between Pleasant and School 
Streets. 

Districts 4, 5 and 6. Embrace all south of Pleasant 
Street. 

The first figure of the box number will indicate the dis- 
trict. 

District No. 1. 

9. New Hampshire State Prison. 
12. Curtice Avenue. 



* Brick cemented. 



254 CITY OF CONCORD. 

13. Franklin and Rumford. 

14. Bradley and Walker. 

15. Main and Church. 

16. Franklin and Jackson. 

17. Alert Hose House. 

18. C. S. Gale's Store. 

19. Centre and Liberty. 
131. Franklin and Charles. 
191. Auburn and Granite. 

District No. 2. 

21. State, opposite Court. 

23. Main and Chapel. 

24. Main and Centre. 

25. Main and School. 

26. Centre and Union. 

27. School and Merrimack. 

28. School and Spring. 

29. Centre and Essex. 

District No. 3. 

32. Warren and Pine. 

34. Central Fire Station. 

35. Martin's Drug Store. 

36. Pleasant and Spring. 

37. Pleasant and North Fruit. 

38. Orchard and Merrimack. 

District No. 4. 

41. South and Thompson. 

42. Good Will Hose House. 

43. Main and Fayette. 

45. Nelson & Durrell's Store. 

46. Perley and Grove. 

47. South, opposite Downing. 

48. Thorndike and South. 

49. West and Mills. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 255 

412. Wall and Elm. 

413. Main, opposite Thorndike. 

414. State and West. 

471. Clinton and South Fruit. 

District No. 5. 

51. Boston & Maine Railroad, new shops. 

52. South Main and Allison. 

53. Hall and Hammond. 

54. Broadway and Pillsbury. 

56. St. Paul's School. 

57. Pleasant View. 

521. Broadway and Rockingham. 

522. South Main and Holly. 

District No. 6. 
62. South Main, opposite Holt Bros. 

Private Boxes. 

5. Boston & Maine Railroad, north end passenger depot. 

6. The Abbot & Downing Company. 

7. New Hampshire State Hospital. 

8. Page Belting Company. 

9. Three boxes inside New Hampshire State Prison. 
33. State House. 

39. Odd Fellows' Home. 

55. Boston & Maine Railroad, old repair shops. 

92. New England Box Company. 



FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 41, 42, 43, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 
412, 413, 414, 471, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 62, 521 and 
522, will not be responded to by the Alert Hose Company 
until signaled. The signal to proceed to the fire will be 
four blows or second alarm, excepting alarms rung in from 
Box 56. 



256 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
.18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 23, 26, 27, 29, 32, 37, 39, 92 and 56 will 
not be responded to by the Good Will Hose Company until 
signaled. It will be governed by the same signals govern- 
ing Alert Hose Company. The Alert Hose and Good Will 
Hose Companies will hitch up and remain in readiness 20 
minutes after the first alarm, to all boxes not responded 
to on first alarm. Then, receiving no signal, the officers 
in charge shall dismiss their companies. 

Alarms rung in from Boxes 12, 37, 53, 54, 57, 191, 471 
and 521 will not be responded to by the Kearsarge Com- 
pany on first alarm. 

The signal to proceed to the fire will be two blows, four 
blows, or second alarm, as circumstances may warrant. 

Kearsarge Steamer to all calls except 51. 

Eagle Hose Company to all calls. 

Eagle Steamer to Box 6, on first alarm; to Boxes 23, 24, 
25, 33, 34, 35, 42, 43, 45 and 413, on second; to all others 
on third, except 9 and 56. 

Governor Hill Steamer will respond to Boxes 7, 8, 9, 
39 and 92 on first alarm; to Boxes 5, 6, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19, 131, 191, 21, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37, 38, 41, 46, 47, 
48, 49, 412, 414, 471, 52, 54, 55, 57, 62, 521 and 522, on sec- 
ond; to all others on third. 

Combination Company will respond to all box alarms. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company will respond to all third 
alarms occurring before the recall, whether emanating 
from same box or not. 

Two rounds of 11 strokes each will signalize the re- 
quirement of assistance out of town, and will be responded 
to by a detail of three men from each company, appointed 
for the purpose, and by those alone. 

Two additional blows will indicate that the call for 
assistance emanates from East Concord. Such apparatus 
will be detailed as circumstances warrant. In case further 
aid is necessary, Box 34 (Central Station) will follow. 

All-out signal, three strokes of the bell. 



fire department. 257 

Brush Fire Signal. 
Three rounds of four strokes each will be sounded on 
the bells and will be responded to by a detail of four men 
from each company, appointed for the purpose, and by 
those alone. 

Military Signal. 

Two rounds of 3-1-2. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

Two strokes of the bell given three times, with a pause 
of 15 seconds between the rounds. 

The signal to close for the forenoon session will be given 
at 8 o'clock a. m. 

The signal to close for the afternoon session will be given 
at 1 o'clock p. m. 

The signal to close all schools for one session will be given 
at 11.30 a. m. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Monday afternoon at 4.30 o'clock precisely. It will be one 
single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 
is the "Gamewell" patent. It embraces 42 miles of wire. 

On the lines are 46 fire-alarm boxes belonging to the 
city, and 9 private boxes — in all, 55. There are three 
alarm bells, one of 3,724 pounds (bell metal), one of 3,740 
pounds (bell metal), and one of 2,000 pounds (American 
steel). There are also 16 mechanical tappers, 40 direct 
action tappers, one four-circuit repeater, and six indicators. 

The battery consists of 259 storage battery cells. 

The alarm system was installed in 1880 by the Gamewell 
Fire-Alarm Telegraph Company. 

17 



258 city of concord. 

Directions for Giving an Alarm. 

Above all things, keep cool. 

To obtain the key to the box, break the glass in the key- 
box located beneath the alarm box. 

In each box there is a small bell called a "tell-tale," 
designed expressly for the purpose of informing you whether 
an alarm is being transmitted the instant you open the 
door. 

Open the box, and if this bell is not heard, pull down 
the hook once only and let go. 

But if this bell should be heard, it would indicate that 
another box had been pulled, and it would be useless to at- 
tempt to pull another until the one already pulled had per- 
formed its mission. 

Wait until 20 seconds have elapsed after the "tell-tale" 
has stopped ringing, close the door, which will restore the 
armature to the position it left when the door was opened. 

Open the door, pull down the hook once only and let go. 

Should there be no response, pull it again. 

Then should there be no response, go to the next box. 

Unless your presence is most urgently required at the 
scene of the fire, remain at the box to direct the depart- 
ment. 

Never open the box or touch anything pertaining to it 
except in case of fire. 

Never given an alarm for a fire seen at a distance. 

Be reasonably sure that there is a fire before giving an 
alarm. 

Never give an alarm for a chimney fire unless there is 
imminent danger of the building catching. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 259 

PENACOOK FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 
Number, Location, Etc. 
W. C. Green, Chief Engineer: 

I herewith submit for your consideration the following 
report of the Penacook fire-alarm telegraph system: The 
system is the Gamewell patent, and consists of five miles 
of No. 9 iron wire. On the lines are fourteen boxes owned 
by the city, two private boxes, one 1,500-pound bell, one 
indicator, three mechanical gongs and 4 direct-action 
tappers. The battery consists of forty-two storage bat- 
tery cells. I would respectfully recommend the addition 
to the system of one new box the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED M. DODGE, 

Superintendent of Fire-Alarm. 

Location of Boxes. 

31. Elm Street, near S. N. Brown's house. 

34. Charles Street, near schoolhouse. 

35. Washington Square. 

36. Washington, near sawmill. 

37. Washington Street, near outlet. 

38. Junction of West Main and South Main Streets. 

39. South Main Street, near cemetery. 

41. Corner of Centre and East Canal Streets. 

42. High Street, opposite Maple Street. 

43. Spring and Centre Streets. 

45. Summer Street, opposite Church Street. 

46. Merrimack Street, opposite Cross Street. 

47. Merrimack Street, near Hose House. 

48. Corner Penacook and Rolfe Streets. 

Private Boxes. 

25. Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works. 
62. Concord Axle Works. 



260 city of concord. 

All-Out Signal. 
Three strokes of the bell. 

Brush Fire Signal. 
Three rounds of four strokes each. 

Out of Town Signal. 
Two rounds of eleven strokes each. 

For Fire on Boscawen Side. 
Box 35, with two additional strokes. 

Signals for Closing Schools. 

After this date the High School and Summer Street 
School will not be closed by signal. 

The Charles Street School and the Elementary Grades 
in Main Street School will be closed whenever the signal 
is sounded. When sounded at 7.30 a. m., there will be no 
morning session of these schools; when sounded at 12.15 
p. m., there will be no afternoon session. 

The signal used will be the same as heretofore: — Two 
strokes of the fire-alarm bell given three times with a pause 
of fifteen seconds between the rounds (2 — 2 — 2.) Jan. 25, 
1915. 

Testing Signals. 

For the purpose of testing the condition and accuracy of 
the fire-alarm telegraph, a box alarm will be rung in every 
Saturday afternoon at 12.50 o'clock precisely. It will be 
one single round only, indicating by the strokes on the bells 
the number of the box. The boxes used for this purpose 
will vary each week, alternating in the circuits. 

Upon each other week-day a single blow upon the bells 
will be rung in from a box, alternating as before mentioned. 

The Penacook fire-alarm system was installed in June, 
1908, under direction of the chief engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



261 



REVISED ORDINANCE. 
CHAPTER XVIII. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Section 

1. Fire department — how consti- 

tuted. 

2. Tenure of office, vacancies. 

3. Chief engineer, salary. 

4. Chief engineer, powers and duties. 

5. Assistant engineer, powers and 

duties in absence of chief. 

6. Foremen, duties of inspection, etc. 

7. Foremen, duties at fires. 

8. Stewards, Alert and Good Will 

Hose companies. 

9. Apparatus to be cleaned, etc. 

10. Badges and uniforms. 

11. Salaries and pay. 

12. Extra services, charges for. 

13. Apparatus and firemen to be kept 

in city. 

14. Engineers to inspect buildings; 

to take means for speedy ex- 
tinguishment of fires. 

15. Absence, neglect of duty. 

16. Volunteer companies. 

17. Parade, drill, and inspection. 

18. Engineers — full control at fire. 

19. Regulations concerning shavings 

and combustibles. 

20. Board of engineers to make reg- 

ulations. 



Section 

21. Disobedience and neglect of duty; 

qualifications of members. 

22. Applications for membership; offi- 

cers and members not to take part 
in political matters. 

23. Fire-alarm telegraph — chief engi- 

neer to have control. 

24. Vacation without loss of pay, 

when. 

25. Supplies, purchase of. 

26. Removal and protection of prop- 

erty endangered by fire. 

27. Hydrants to be personally ex- 

amined by chief engineer. 

28. Pay-roll of department. 

29. Care and control of fire depart- 

ment buildings in Wards 1, 2, 
and 3. 

30. Stewards of companies in out- 

side wards. 

31. Regulations concerning drivers 

and permanent men; chief engi- 
neer to be furnished with horse 
and wagon." 

32. Brush and forest fires. 

33. Veteran Firemen's Associations 

made auxiliary branch. 

34. Appropriation for. 



Section 1. The fire department shall consist of a chief 
engineer, two assistants within the precinct, one engineer 
each from Ward 1, Ward 2 and Ward 3; two steamer and 
hose companies, one company to consist of thirteen men, in- 
cluding driver, and one company to consist of fourteen 
men, including driver; one relief steamer (company) to 
consist of two men; two hose companies to consist of eleven 
men, including driver; [*a chemical engine company to 
consist of two men] ; a hook and ladder company to consist 
of twenty-one men, including driver; a house man at Cen- 



*Displaced by Combination Company No. 1, December 9, 1913. 



262 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tral Fire Station; steamer Pioneer, not less than twenty 
nor more than forty men; hand engine companies No. 2 
and No. 3, not less than twenty nor more than thirty men 
each. Each company shall be allowed three substitutes, 
except Hook and Ladder Company, No. 1, which shall 
have five, to be approved by the chief engineer. The 
engineers shall exercise the powers of fire-wards, and those 
within the precinct shall constitute the board of engineers. 

Sect. 2. The chief engineer and assistant engineers and 
all other members of the fire department shall hold their 
respective offices and places until they are removed, or their 
offices or places are otherwise vacated. The board of mayor 
and aldermen, for cause, and after a due hearing, may at 
any time remove from office or place the chief engineer, 
any assistant engineer, or any officer or member of the de- 
partment. In case of vacancies from any cause in the de- 
partment, of officers or men connected in any manner with 
the fire service, such vacancies shall be filled by the board 
of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 3. The chief engineer shall give his entire time 
to the duties of his office, unless herein otherwise pro- 
vided, and shall not engage in or be connected with any 
other business or occupation, and shall reside in a house 
to be furnished by the city free from rent. He shall re- 
ceive in full for his services as chief, in addition to the 
use of said house, rent free, the sum of twelve hundred and 
fifty dollars per annum. 

Sect. 4. The chief engineer shall have the sole command 
at fires over all persons, whether members of the fire de- 
partment or not. He shall direct all proper measures for 
extinguishing fires, protecting property, preserving order 
and enforcing the laws, ordinances, and regulations re- 
specting fires; and shall examine into the condition of the 
fire engines and all other fire apparatus, and of the fire en- 
gine houses and other houses belonging to the city and used 
by the department, and by the companies thereto attached, 
as often as once a week, and whenever directed to do so by 
the mayor, or the committee on fire department through its 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 263 

chairman. He shall certify all bills and submit the same 
for inspection monthly to the joint standing committee on 
fire department. He shall report to the board of aldermen 
annually a statement of the receipts and expenditures of 
the fire department, the condition of the fire engines and 
all other fire apparatus, a detailed schedule of the prop- 
erty in his charge, the names of the officers and members, 
and all other facts in relation to the department. When- 
ever the fire engines or other fire apparatus require repairs 
he shall, under the direction of the committee on fire de- 
partment, cause the same to be made, and as far as practi- 
cable he shall examine into the location and condition of 
fire apparatus belonging to corporations or private indi- 
viduals within the limits of the city. He shall require per- 
manent men, when not otherwise engaged, to perform such 
other duties and do such other work as in his judgment 
may be deemed proper. He shall be responsible for the 
proper care of all property connected with the fire depart- 
ment. He shall keep fair and exact rolls of the respective 
companies, specifying the time of admission and discharge, 
and the age of each member and shall report annually, or 
oftener if directed, all accidents by fire which may happen 
within the city, with the causes thereof, the number and 
description of the buildings destroyed or injured, and the 
amount of loss and insurance on the same, together with the 
names of owners or the occupants, and shall make returns 
as required by the public statutes. He shall visit each 
department house as often as practicable, and inspect 
the men, the books of the house, and see that the quarters 
are properly conducted and in good order. He shall have 
the power to suspend any officer or member of the depart- 
ment for insubordination, disorderly conduct or neglect 
of duty, said suspension to continue pending the action of 
the mayor and aldermen. The chief engineer shall ex- 
amine all places where shavings and other combustible 
materials may be collected or deposited, and cause the same 
to be removed by the tenants or occupants of such places, or 



264 CITY OF CONCORD. 

at their expense, whenever in his opinion such removal is 
necessary for the security of the city against fires. 

Sect. 5. In the absence of the chief engineer, the next 
assistant engineer in rank, who may be present, shall have 
the powers and perform the duties of the chief engineer 
and the seniority in rank of the engineers shall be deter- 
mined by the board of engineers at their first meeting. 

Sect. 6. The captain of each engine, hose, and hook 
and ladder company, immediately after every fire at which 
said company may have attended, shall examine into the 
condition of the fire apparatus belonging to his respective 
company, and report any deficiency which may exist to the 
chief engineer. He shall keep, or cause to be kept by the 
clerk of his company, exact rolls, specifying the time of ad- 
mission, discharge, and age of each member, and accounts 
of all city property entrusted to the care of the several 
members, and of all cases of absence and tardiness, in a 
book provided for that purpose by the city, which rolls and 
record books are always to be subject to the order of the 
chief engineer and mayor. They shall also make, or cause 
to be made, to the chief engineer, true and accurate returns 
of all members, with their ages, and of the apparatus en- 
trusted to their care, whenever called upon so to do. 

Sect. 7. The captain of each company shall, under the 
direction of the chief engineer, have charge and manage- 
ment of his company at fires; the lieutenant shall assist 
the captain in the discharge of his duties, and act as clerk 
of the company, and in the absence of the captain assume 
his authority. The captain and lieutenant shall be ap- 
pointed by the chief engineer. 

Sect. 8. The stewards of the Alert and Good Will Hose 
Companies shall act as drivers of hose carriages, take charge 
of and properly care for and exercise the horses used by 
each company. They shall be permanently engaged and 
devote their whole time to the department, and sleep in 
their respective stations at night; and for the proper exe- 
cution of all duties required of them shall be subject to 
the direction of the chief engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 265 

Sect. 9. It shall be the duty of every engine, hose, and 
hook and ladder company, to have its engine, hose and other 
apparatus cleaned, washed, oiled, reeled and housed imme- 
diately after its return from any fire or service, and at all 
times to maintain the same in good condition, and the mem- 
bers of the several companies shall perform any necessary 
duties which the chief engineer or their respective captain 
may direct. 

Sect. 10. All members of the department when on duty 
shall wear some suitable badge, to be designated by the 
board of engineers. The chief and permanent members 
shall wear at all times when on duty the regulation uniform 
worn by the fire department. 

Sect. 11. The pay-rolls for the board of engineers and 
the several fire companies shall be made up by the chief 
and clerk of the board of engineers semi-annually, on the 
first day of January and July. Captains and clerks of 
companies will forward their pay-rolls to the board of en- 
gineers for approval and after the action of said engineers 
and the committee on accounts and claims, said pay-rolls 
shall be passed over to the city tax collector, under whose 
sole direction all sums for services of call firemen shall 
be disbursed. 

Sect. 12. No charge for extra services will be allowed 
any member of the department unless upon an order of a 
member of the board of engineers. 

Sect. 13. No engine, hose, or hook and ladder carriage 
shall be taken to a fire out of the city without permission 
from the chief engineer, except steamer Pioneer, which may 
be taken to any fire in the village of Penacook, nor shall any 
apparatus of the fire department be taken from the city 
except in case of fire, without permission from the board 
of mayor and aldermen; and in sending any apparatus to 
aid in extinguishing fires in neigboring localities, the chief 
in all cases will authorize his assistant next in rank avail- 
able to take charge of the direction of such apparatus, and 
not allow any firemen, at such an emergency, to leave the 
city, except such a number as is actually required to man 



266 CITY OF CONCOED. 

the apparatus, and no member to leave without permission 
or direction from the chief engineer. 

Sect. 14. It shall be the duty of engineers and firemen, 
whenever there is an alarm of fire in the city, to repair im- 
mediately to the place of such fire, wearing a suitable badge, 
and the engineers shall take proper measures that the sev- 
eral engines and other apparatus be arranged and duly 
worked for the speedy and effectual extinguishment of the 
fire. The engineeis shall inspect and make themselves 
familiar with all shops, hotels, tenement blocks, and all pub- 
lic buildings, halls, churches, schoolhouses and asylums once 
in each six months and study the location of all hydrants 
and reservoirs in the city, and generally inform themselves 
in all matters pertaining to their duties as engineers. No 
engineer shall interfere with or attempt to give orders rela- 
tive to the location or use of a line of hose, when he has 
ascertained that another has command of it, unless by con- 
sent of the engineer in command of it, or by orders of the 
officer in command of the fire; and it shall be his duty to 
inquire if there is an officer in charge. 

Sect. 15. For each absence from fire, or neglect of duty, 
the chief engineer, the assistant engineers, and engineers of 
steamers shall be fined three dollars, and each other mem- 
ber of the department one dollar; provided, however, that 
any fireman liable as above may in case of sickness have 
power of substitution by giving notice, each assistant en- 
gineer to the chief, each captain to an engineer, and each 
other member to the captain of his company. All fines 
shall be paid to the clerks of respective companies at the 
first regular meeting after they are incurred. The clerks 
of companies shall disburse the fines to substitutes answer- 
ing for absent members in cases where there were sub- 
stitutes. In cases where there were no substitutes the fines 
shall be paid to the city. 

Sect. 16. Any volunteer company using the apparatus 
of the city at any fire shall be under the control and com- 
mand of the chief engineer and his assistants, agreeably to 
the foregoing provisions of this chapter. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 267 

Sect. 17. The department shall appear for public pa- 
rade, drill and inspection at such times as the chief engineer 
and committee on fire department shall order, for which 
purpose three hundred dollars may be expended annually. 
The companies in Wards 1, 2 and 3 will attend by invita- 
tion and voluntarily. Each company in the department 
under the direction of the chief engineer or assistants shall 
take out their respective engines and apparatus for exercise 
and drill as often as he shall direct, such exercise and drill 
to take place in public, not oftener than once a month, and 
at least once in two months, between the first of April and 
November. 

Sect. 18. The engineers shall have control of all per- 
sons appointed to serve in any company of the fire depart- 
ment and power to direct and control the labor of all per- 
sons present at any fire. An engineer may and shall cause 
any fire deemed by him to be dangerous in any place to be 
extingushed or removed. 

Sect. 19. The engineers may establish such regulations 
respecting the kindling, guarding and safe-keeping of fires 
and for the removal of shavings and other combustibles 
from any building or place, as they shall think expedient. 
Such regulations shall be signed by a majority of the en- 
gineers. Such regulations shall be approved by the mayor 
and aldermen, recorded by the city clerk, and copies at- 
tested by him posted up in two or more places in the city 
thirty days, when they shall take effect. Penalties not ex- 
ceeding twenty dollars for each offense may be prescribed 
by the engineers for the breach of such regulations, and 
such regulations shall remain in force until altered or an- 
nulled. 

Sect. 20. The board of engineers may from time to time 
make and enforce such regulations for the government of 
the department as may be deemed proper, subject to the 
approval of the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Sect. 21. If any member of any of the several com- 
panies shall wilfully neglect or refuse to discharge his duty, 
or shall be guilty of disorderly conduct or disobedience to 



268 CITY OF CONCORD. 

any officer or to any engineer, he shall for any such offense 
be forthwith dismissed from the department by direction 
of the chief engineer. No person shall be a member of, or 
serve in, the fire department, who is under the age of 
twenty years, and no person whose occupation is carried on 
outside the city shall be appointed a member of the fire 
department. 

Sect. 22. All applicants for membership shall be nom- 
inated by the chief engineer, and shall receive pay and be 
considered members of the department from the date of 
their confirmation by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

No person shall hereafter be appointed to any position in 
the fire department unless and until the committee on fire 
department shall have certified in writing to the board of 
mayor and aldermen that such person has been examined 
by them, or under their supervision, and is in their opinion 
qualified to perform the duties of the position to which he 
is nominated. 

No officer or member of the permanent, or officer of the 
call, force shall attend any political convention as a dele- 
gate, distribute tickets at any election, or take any part 
whatever in political matters other than to exercise the right 
of suffrage, and no political or religious discussion shall be 
permitted in any of the department houses. 

Sect. 23. The chief engineer shall have the care and 
management of the rooms, apparatus, machinery, wires, 
poles and signal boxes connected with the fire-alarm tele- 
graph. He shall prepare ' rules and directions for giving 
alarms of fire through the telegraph. He shall have the 
superintendence, and under the direction of the joint stand- 
ing committee on fire department have control of the several 
stations, the apparatus, the furniture therein, and all other 
property appertaining to the department. He shall, with 
the assistance of the permanent men at the Central Station, 
make the necessary repairs and take care of the fire-alarm 
system, including the batteries, all alarm boxes, and every- 
thing pertaining to the fire-alarm system. He shall per- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 269 

sonally be able to master the fire-alarm in every particular, 
and every permanent man at the Central Station shall be 
obliged to understand the fire-alarm system, in order that 
the chief engineer may call upon any of them to attend to 
and repair any part of the same. This provision shall not 
be construed to prevent the chief engineer from employing 
extra linemen when necessary, or from acting promptly in 
any emergency. 

Sect. 24. Permanent officers and men of the depart- 
ment shall be entitled to a vacation without loss of pay of 
fourteen days in each year. [In addition they shall be en- 
titled to be off duty without loss of pay two days in each 
month, such two days not to be taken in the same week. 
In the weeks that they are not off duty for a day, under 
the above provision, they shall be entitled to be off duty for 
one night without loss of pay.] All vacations and absences 
from duty under the above to be under the direction of 
the chief engineer. [Amended, One day in seven granted. 
Affective April 1st. 1916.] 

Sect. 25. The standing committee on fire depart- 
ment, subject to the board of mayor and aldermen, shall 
by themselves or agent purchase all supplies in connection 
with the fire department, and direct all repairs of appa- 
ratus; and all bills contracted for the department must 
receive their approval before being passed on by the com- 
mittee on accounts and claims. They shall hold stated 
meetings at least once each month at the Central fire sta- 
tion, and all communications to the city government from 
the fire department must come through said committee, 
and annually at the call of the finance committee, in con- 
nection with the chief engineer, they shall make recom- 
mendations as to the amount of appropriations the wants 
of the department will require for the coming year. 

Sect. 26. The city marshal and regular police officers 
shall have in charge all matters relating to the removal 
and protection of personal property endangered by fire, 
and any person entering a building or removing property 
contrary to the orders of the city marshal or such police 



270 CITY OF CONCORD. 

officers shall be fined five dollars; and in the absence of 
firemen at fires from their respective department houses, 
the policemen in that vicinity will take charge of said 
houses. 

Sect. 27. It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to 
cause all snow and ice or other obstructions to be removed 
from and around all fire hydrants owned by the city, so that 
at all times the fire department can make immediate con- 
nection of the hose to the hydrants. 

Sect. 28. The annual pay of the members of the fire 
department shall be as follows, and in full for all services 
in said department: 

Chief, twelve hundred and fifty dollars per annum and 
house-rent; permanent force at Central fire station, eight 
hundred and forty dollars each, drivers at Good Will and 
Alert hose houses, eight hundred and forty dollars each, 
the members of the chemical company nine hundred and 
twelve dollars each, per annum, payable semi-monthly; 
assistant engineers, within the precinct, one hundred and 
forty-five dollars each; engineers of steamers, within the 
precinct, one hundred and thirty-five dollars each; captains 
of companies, within the precinct, each one hundred and 
ten dollars per annum; lieutenants of companies, within 
the precinct, one hundred and five dollars per annum; 
members of steamer, hose, and hook and ladder companies, 
within the precinct, and house man at Central fire station 
one hundred dollars per annum; outside the precinct, 
engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, three hundred and forty 
dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer company No. 3 [*six 
hundred dollars], said sums to be divided among the mem- 
bers as each company shall direct; engineer of steamer at 
Penacook, seventy-five dollars per annum; assistant engi- 
neer at Penacook [ftwenty-five dollars]; assistant engineer 
at East Concord, twenty dollars; and assistant engineer at 
West Concord, twenty dollars. 

Sect. 29. The several engineers residing in Wards 1, 

♦Advanced to one thousand dollars. Effective January 1, 1913. 
t Advanced to seventy-five dollars. Effective July 1, 1913. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 271 

2 and 3 shall have the entire care and control, under the 
direction of the chief engineer, of the buildings and ap- 
purtenances occupied in part by the fire department 
situated in said wards, respectively, to whom all applica- 
tions for the use of the halls, or any other part of such 
building, shall be made. Said engineers may severally 
appoint janitors, at annual salaries not to exceed fifteen 
dollars, who shall serve under the exclusive direction of 
the engineer having the care and control of the building 
where said janitor shall be appointed. Each of said engi- 
neers shall annually, in the month of December, render 
a detailed statement, in writing, to the mayor and alder- 
men, of all receipts and expenditures for the preceding 
year on account of such buildings. 

Sect. 30. Stewards for the Pioneer Steamer Company 
and Engine Companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be appointed 
by the mayor and aldermen, and shall receive for all serv- 
ices performed by them in that capacity the following 
sums: For Pioneer Steamer Company, thirty dollars 
per annum, and when performing the duties of janitor 
of the building an additional sum of forty-five dollars per 
annum; and for stewards of Engine Companies Nos. 2 and 
3, thirty dollars per annum each. No steward shall be al- 
lowed to purchase supplies for such building, or for the 
department, unless by the authority and direction of the 
committee on fire department; and in no case shall he 
have any care or control of the building or its appurtenances 
occupied by the company of which he is a member, except 
in the immediate service of the company, unless he shall 
be appointed janitor thereof, when he shall be under the 
direction of the engineer, as provided in the foregoing 
section. 

Sect. 31. The permanent men and horses at all of the 
fire stations in Concord shall at all times be on duty at 
their respective stations to attend to fire-alarms calls; and 
neither the permanent men nor the permanent horses con- 
nected with the fire department shall engage in any work 
for any other department of the city. 



272 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The men at the different fire stations shall do such work 
in connection with the station and apparatus as the chief 
engineer or his assistants may direct. All permanent men 
shall lodge in their respective stations (except the chief), 
and in all cases of absence a substitute must be furnished; 
and in all cases when any extra service is required, the 
chief, with the sanction of the committee on fire depart- 
ment, shall have power to hire the same; the chief may 
also increase as far as possible the number of call men who 
wish to lodge at any fire station, subject to the regulations 
of the fire department. The chief engineer shall be fur- 
nished with a horse and wagon, to be maintained by the 
city, for his use at all times. 

Sect. 32. All alarms for brush or for forest fires shall 
be responded to by members of the fire department under 
such rules and regulations as shall be prescribed by the 
chief engineer. 

Sect. 33. The Veteran Firemen's Association is hereby 
constituted and made an auxiliary branch of the regular 
fire department of this city, the members of said associa- 
tion to be considered as honorary and to organize a co- 
operative working force to serve in emergency, without 
compensation, such service to be under the direction and 
control of the officers of the regular organization in alle- 
giance and compliance thereto. 

Sect. 34. The standing committee of the board of 
aldermen on fire department is authorized and directed 
to rent, at an expense not exceeding one hundred and fifty 
dollars a year, suitable rooms for the accommodation of 
said Veteran Firemen's Association, the same to be selected 
by said association, the same to be charged to the regular 
appropriation for fire department. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 273 

ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS. 

Article 1. Any engine or hose company running out a 
line of hose from a hydrant or steamer shall be entitled 
to the pipe, although the hose of other companies may be 
attached, in order to reach the fire. And any company 
coming to a fire, and finding an incompleted line of hose 
laid out from a hydrant or steamer, shall attach to and 
lengthen out such line, in lieu of laying a line of its own. 

Art. 2. When two or more engine companies are play- 
ing in a continuous line, the pipe shall belong to the com- 
pany attaching to hydrant or steamer as provided in the 
foregoing article; but any company furnishing the entire 
line, and receiving water from a steamer, the pipe shall 
belong to such company so receiving. 

Art. 3. Hose companies shall attach first lines to high 
pressure hydrants where accessible; steamers attaching 
to those of low pressure, or reservoir. 

Art. 4. No company shall take possession of a hydrant 
or reservoir unless their hose and apparatus for attaching 
to the same are at hand and ready for use. 

Art. 5. In proceeding to, working at, or returning 
from fires, noisy demonstrations are strictly prohibited, 
and it is required of officers of companies to maintain per- 
fect order and decorum in their respective commands dur- 
ing all such service. 

Art. 6. In case of fire the captain first arriving shall 
be in command until the arrival of an engineer. 

Art. 7. Drivers are strictly enjoined, in proceeding to 
a fire, to use the utmost care and caution consistent with 
promptness. Eacing between companies is forbidden un- 
der any circumstances. Any collision or casualty occur- 
ring to horses or apparatus will be considered a sufficient 
cause for the suspension of the driver in charge at the 
time. 

Art. 8. Fire hats are furnished by the city for the pro- 
tection and identification of the firemen, and they must be 

18 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 

worn at all times except in the severest weather, when 
caps may be worn. 

Art. 9. While attending fires it shall be the duty of 
members of the department, when not performing active 
service, to concentrate about their respective pieces of 
apparatus. 

Art. 10. All engine and hose companies responding to 
second or general alarms will connect, but will not lay 
their lines until they have reported to the officer in com- 
mand for orders. 

Art. 11. The wearing of badges shall not be regarded 
by members of the department as conveying to them the 
privilege of free' access to premises after fire has been 
extinguished. 

Art. 12. All members of the department shall address 
all officers by their respective titles while on duty at fires. 

Art. 13. The roll of each company shall be called as 
soon as the apparatus is housed, and no member will be 
excused except in case of sickness. Rolls must be called 
after every alarm. , No officer or member will be marked 
present on the company roll unless present at fires and 
returns to house with apparatus, unless excused by an 
engineer. 

Art. 14. All orders issued by the chief or an assistant 
engineer shall be promptly obeyed. At all fires occurring 
in the night, the chief engineer shall be identified by a 
red light, assistant engineers by blue lights. 

Art. 15. Members of the department are expected to 
cheerfully comply with all rules and regulations which 
are adopted or which may be adopted. Captains will be 
held responsible for all lack of promptness and efficiency 
in their commands. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



275 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1916. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

Walter J. Coffin, 1st Asst., Shipping clerk, 60 Pleasant Street. 

Sylvester T. Ford, 2d Asst., Molder, 41 So. Main Street. 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



Fred M. Dodge, 
Elbridge Emery, 
George W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 
Electrical Inst, maker, 61 Merrimack Street. 



WARD 2. 
Butcher, 



Potter St., East Concord. 



WARD 3. 
Overseer, 16 Fisher St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 
J. Edward Morrison, Captain. Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

1 J. Edward Morrison, 

2 Charles Powell, 

3 James H. Sanders, 

4 Thomas J. Morrison, 

5 George B. Davis, 

6 Herbert M. Sanders, 

7 Harry P. Blake, 

8 Harry L. Messer, 

9 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

10 George L. Livingston, 

11 Harry C. Taylor, 

12 George H. Abbott, 

13 Joseph H. Brunei, 

14 Henry E. Drew, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter, 
Carriage painter, 
Carriage painter, 
Collector, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage trimmer, 
Gas inspector, 
Machinist, 
Shipping clerk, 
Permanent driver, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 
32 Pleasant Street. 

2 No. State Street. 
12 Hanover Street. 

3 Broadway 

154 No. Main Street. 
38 Jackson Street. 
109 So. State Street. 
63 School Street. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



276 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1 



J. C. McGilveay, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 Charles H. Sanders, 

23 John M. Inman, 

24 John B. McLeod, 

26 Charles W. Bateman, 

28 Frank H. Fowler, 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 
22 Eli Langlois, Jr., 

27 Philip J. O'Connell, 

21 Charles W. Downing, 

29 Fred J. Johnston, 

30 C. Cunningham, 



OFFICERS. 



D. J. Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Jig-sawyer, 
Janitor, 
Machinist, 
Custodian, 
Electrician, 
Plumber, 
Electrician, 
Machinist, 
Painter, 
Silver-smith, 
Clerk, 
Gas fitter, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 

9 Pearl Street. 

107 No. Main Street. 

11 Chapel Street. 
16 Wall Street. 

5 Rumford Street. 

3 Maple Street. 

88 No. Main Street. 

102 So. State Street. 

5 Perry Avenue 

38 No. Spring Street. 

12 South Street. 

10 Abbott Street. 
Central Fire Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, 



RELIEF ENGINE. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 So. State Street. 
81 So. State Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 



Ernest E. Sabbn, Captain. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

36 E. E. Saben, 

37 C. C. Chesley, 

39 C. J. French, 

40 C. H. Rowell, 

42 F. P. McKenna, 

43 J. M. Davis, 

45 M. G. Davis, 

41 J. E. Howard, 

44 D. J. Murphy, 
8 E. E. Bartlett, 

46 F. H. Silver, 



OFFICERS. 

Charles C. Chesley, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
J. M. Davis, Treasurer. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Car-builder, 
Builder, 
Stonecutter, 
Builder, 
Clerk, 
Blacksmith, 
Builder, 
Wood-worker, 
Molder, 
Carpenter, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
88 No. State Street. 
11 Prince Street. 
5 Perkins Street. 

5 Abbott Court. 
19 Franklin Street. 
4 Tahanto Street. 

6 Beacon Street. 
31 Union Street. 

2 No. State Street. 
13 Prince Street. 
Alert Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



277 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

Hiram T. Dickerman, Captain. Frank S. Putnam, Lieutenant and Cltrk. 

Albert W. Thompson, Treasurer. 



Badge 

Noa. Names. 

50 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

51 Frank S. Putnam, 

52 George H. Sawyer, 

54 Jasper R. Mudgett, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

57 Albert W. Thompson, 

58 Harry L. Peacock, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 

53 John W. McGowan, 

56 J. E. Cochran, 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Painter, 
Wood-worker, 
Blacksmith, 
Wood-worker, 
Machinist, 
Janitor, 
Painter, 
Electrician, 
Plumber, 
Molder, 
Permanent Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
36 Broadway. 
48 So. Main Street 
5 Allison Street. 
98 So. State Street. 
23J Perley Street. 
74 Allison Street. 
36 Warren Street. 
104 So. State Street. 
Good Will Station. 
38 Downing Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 



Badge 

Noa. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

66 Frank T. Bean, 

67 Benjamin Ouillette, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Foster, 

73 Sam B. Morgan, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

76 D. Charles Parker, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

78 Carmi L. King, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 

82 William H. Reagan, 

83 Harry Leary, 

84 Oscar E. Eastman, 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Renovater, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 
Steam fitter, 
Plumber, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 
5 Fremont Street. 
16 Avon Street. 
10 Jefferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 

13 West Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 
10 Avon Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 

30 Green Street. 
63 South Street. 

"Ins. Blk., School Street. 
13 Warren Street. 
34 Downing Street. 
71 South Street. 
154 No. Main Street. 
53 So. Main Street. 
22 Fremont Street. 
Central Station. 



278 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1. 



M. S. Wakefield, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 C. G. Pinkham, 

93 M. J. Martin, 

94 L. D. Dunham, 

95 John Driscoll, 



OFFICERS. 



C. G. Pinkham, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Occupations. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
1st Chauffeur, 
2d Chauffeur, 
3d Chauffeur, 

House Man, 
A. L. Downing. 



Residences. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



Henry Rolfe, Captain. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Walter H. Rolfe, 

109 Alfred Beddow, 

111 Russell E. Rolfe, 

110 John B. Dodge, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

118 George A. Griffin, 

120 Harry F. Jones, 

123 William Corbett, 

103 Frank D. O'Brien, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

114 Henry E. Templeton, 

112 Ambrose Sweet, 

119 William H. Holbrook, 

116 Loren H. Emerson, 

117 Guy B. Chase, 

121 Albert Cassavaugh, 
105 Cornelius W. O'Brien, 
108 Alfred J. York, 

115 Carl G. Holmes, 



OFFICERS. 

Frank P. Robertson, Lieut., Clerk and Treas. 
John B. Dodge, Steward. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Highway agent, 
Machinist, 
Foreman, 

Stationary engineer, 
Clerk, 
Janitor, 
Table-maker, 
Painter, 
Teamster, 
Axle-maker, 
Teamster, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wine clerk, 
Laborer, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Table-maker, 
Hotel clerk, 
Spinner, 
Miller, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 
39 Centre Street. 
44 Elm Street. 
39 Centre Street. 

59 Merrimack Street. 

92 High Street. 

15 Washington Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
44 Centre Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 

41 Washington Street. 
4 Charles Street. 

10 Church Street. 
110 Merrimack Street. 
Union Street. 
9 Union Street. 
43 So. Main Street. 
36 Centre Street. 

42 Spring Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



279 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



George O. Robinson, Captain. 
C. E. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

120 George O. Robinson, 

121 C. E. Robinson, 

122 John C. Hutchins, 

125 Samuel G. Potter, 

126 William E. Virgin, 

127 Rufus C. Boynton, 

128 Shad Cate, 

129 Ross W. Cate, 

130 Herbert Knowles, 

131 Parker French, 

132 Westley Field, 

133 John W. Sanborn, 

134 Walter C. Sanborn, 

136 Arthur P. Swain, 

123 Michael Lacroix, 

137 Clarence Tibbetts, 

138 Reuben L. Cate, 

135 John T. Cate, 

140 C. A. Chamberlin, 

139 William F. Paige, 

143 H. A. Stuart, 

144 Hiram Gardner, 

145 John Canney, 

146 Thomas Morrison, 

147 Fred Gardner, 
149 Fred J. Carter, 

148 Claude H. Swain, 

142 William E. Batchelder, 

141 Herbert F. Piper, 

124 William Cate, 



Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Clerk, 
Engineer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Farmer, 
Horseshoer, 
Carpenter, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Wood-worker, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Storekeeper, 
Blacksmith 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Stonecutter, 
Clerk, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 



John C. Hutchins, Treasurer . 
Michael Lacroix, Steward. 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 



280 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 
West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



Alfred J. Fraskr, Captain. 

Abram D. Cushing, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Names. 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
A. D. Cushing, 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Andrew Abbott, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Edward Lovering, 
Joseph Daly, 
Robert Henry, { 
Benjamin Kemp, 
Frank Peterson, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Eckstrom, 
Oscar Johnson, 
Axel Swanson, 
Henry Richardson, 
William Nelson, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Stonecutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Stonecutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stonecutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stonecutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Silver-smith, 
Laborer, 
Stonecutter, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stationery engineer, 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 
Paving cutter, 
Foreman, 
Stonecutter, 
Stonecutter, 



Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 
Frank'^C. Blodgett, Steward. 



Residences. 
10 River Street. 
9 Lake Street. 
490 No. State Street. 
382 No. State Street. 

5 Engel Street. 

50 Hutchins Street. 
513 No. State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
455 No. State Street. 
513 No. State Street. 
3 River Street. 
346 No. State Street. 
14 View Street. 
9 Lake Street. 
Gladstone Avenue. 
516 No. State Street. 
434 No. State Street. 

6 Dam Street. 

556 No. State Street. 
436 No. State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 

OFFICERS. 
Frank F. Morse, Captain. S. S. Upham, First Lieutenant. 

Eben F. Richardson, Second Lieutenant. 



Dennis Halloran, 
Alber P. Davis, 
H. H. Carpenter, 
Edward D. Ashley, 
Elba F. Home, 
Arthur H. Britton, 



MEMBERS. 

Earl C. Bodwell, 
D. P. Wheeler, 
Henry Tucker, 
O. H. Thompson, 
W. K. Wingate, 
Fred L. Johnson, 



Fred O. Libby, 
M. F. Thompson, 
E. J. Brown, 
A. L. Dickerman, 
H. W. Hillson, 
Chas. C. Moore. 



Water department. 

1916. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 
NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, to March 31 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, to March 31 

EDSON J. HILL, to March 31 

CHARLES R. WALKER, to March 31 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, to March 31 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, to March 31 

SOLON A. CARTER, to March 31 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, to March 31 

SOLON A. CARTER, President. 
EDSON J. HILL, Clerk of Board. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R, SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



1920. 
1920. 
1919. 
1919. 
1918. 
1918. 
1917. 
1917. 



282 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members. 

Abraham G. Jones,* ex officio, 

1872 — three months. 
John M. Hill,* 1872-1878. 

Benjamin A. 'Kimball, 1872-1878. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

David A. Ward,* 1872-1874. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1872. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

Benjamin S. Warren,* 1872-1873. 

John Kimball,* ex officio, 1872-1876. 
John Abbot,* 1873-1876. 

John S. Russ,* 1874-1877. 

Abel B. Holt,* 1874-1877. 

Samuel S. Kimball,* 1875. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Geo. A. Pillsbury,*ez officio, 1876-1878. 
Luther P. Durgin,* 1876-1885. 

John Kimball,* 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William M. Chase, 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Horace A. Brown,* ex officio, 

1878-1880. 
James L. Mason,* 1878-1893. 

James R. Hill,* 1878. Died in 1884. 

Geo. A. Cummings,* ex officio, 

1880-1883. 
Edgar H. Woodman,* ex officio, 

1883-1887. 
Joseph H. Abbot,* 1884-1893. 

George A. Young,* 1885-1894. 

John E. Robertson, ex officio, 

.1887-1889. 
Stillman Humphrey,* ex officio, 

1889-1891. 
Henry W. Clapp,* ex officio, 1891-1893. 

* Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 283 

Willis D. Thompson, 1891-1895. 

William P. Fiske,* 1891-1902. 

James H. Chase,* 1891. Died in 1893. 

John Whitaker,* 1892. Died in 1903. 

Henry E. Conant,* 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

Parsons B. Cogswell,* ex officio, 

1893-1895. 
Solon A. Carter, 1893. Now in office. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William M. Mason,* 1893-1899. 

William E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Robinson, ex officio, 1895-1897. , 
Ebenezer B. Hutchinson,* 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 
Edson J. Hill, 1895. Now in office. 

Albert B. Wood worth,* ex officio, 

1897-1899. 
Nathaniel E. Martin, ex officio, 

1899-1901. 
Henry E. Conant,* 1899. Died in 1911. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 

Harry G. Sargent,* ex officio, 

1901-1903. 
Obadiah Morrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott, 1901-1915. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 

Charles R. Corning, ex officio, 

1903-1909. 
Henry C. Holbrook, 1903-1916. 

Harley B. Roby,* 1905. Resigned Jan. 24, 1911. 

Charles J. French, ex officio, 1909-1916. 
Nathan'lW. Hobbs, ex officio 1916. Now in office. 
Burns P. Hodgman, 1911. Now in office. 

Frank P. Quimby, 1911. Now in office. 

Charles R. Walker, 1915. Now in office. 

George T. Kenney, 1916. Now in office. 

♦Deceased. 



284 city of concord. 

Presidents of the Board. 



Josiah Minot,* 


1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 


Benjamin A. Kimball, 


1874-1875. 


Edward L. Knowlton,* 


1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875 


John Kimball,* 


1875-1876. 


Benjamin A. Kimball, 


1876-1878. 


John Kimball,* 


1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 


William P. Fiske,* 


1891-1902. 


Solon A. Carter, 


1902. Now in office. 


Superintendents. 


V. C. Hastings,* 


1873. Died March 14, 1907. 


P. R. Sanders, 


1907. Now in office. 



♦Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 285 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights : 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights, $60,000 . 00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000.00 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for 

kit-shop privilege, 5,000 . 00 

flowage rights around Pena- 
cook Lake, 4,375.61 

for land at Penacook Lake, 64,182.41 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000 . 00 

Cost of property and rights of 
Torrent Aqueduct Associ- 
ation, 20,000.00 

dam, gate-house and appur- 
tenances, 34, 146 . 05 

conduit and gate-houses, 29,818 . 94 

mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to 
the reservoir, fire main 
through North and South 
Main Streets, and high 
service main from Pena- 
cook Street to Stark 
Street, Penacook) , 182,241 . 70 

distribution pipe, 399,851.56 

service pipe, 66,395.27 

reservoir, including land, 45,044 . 09 



286 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cost of pumping station, shop, 
stable and storehouse, in- 
cluding land, $29,265.35 
pumping machinery, 17,000.42 
engineering and superin- 
tendence, 14,913 . 12 
incidentals, 6,531 . 19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1917, 
Less amount received for lumber, land and 
buildings sold, 



,072,265.71 
7,736.61 
$1,064,529.10 



Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding: 



When due. 


Jan. 


1 


1917, 


Jan. 


1 


1918, 


Jan. 


1 


1919, 


Nov. 


1, 


1920, 


Nov. 


1 


1921, 


April 


1 


, 1921, 


Jan. 


1, 


1922, 


Jan. 


1, 


1922, 


April 


1 


, 1922, 


Jan. 


1 


1923, 


Jan. 


1 


1924, 



Rate. 


Amount. 


4, 


2,000.00 


4, 


10,000.00 


4, 


10,000.00 


3, 


4,000.00 


3, 


3,000.00 


o 2 , 


5,000.00 


4 


333,000.00 


3|, 


8,000.00 


3^, 


26,000.00 


3|, 


3,000.00 


3f, 


15,000.00 




$419,00.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 287 



REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Office of the Board of Water Commissioners, 
Concord, N. H., February 16, 1917. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners has the honor to 
transmit herewith the report of the superintendent for the . 
calendar year 1916. His report is so comprehensive and in 
such detail as to furnish full and complete information in 
regard to the operations of the department for the period 
covered and it leaves little to be added. 

The Board, however, desires to express its appreciation of 
the faithful service rendered by the superintendent and all 
the employees under his supervision. 

We take pleasure in calling special attention to these 
features in the report of the superintendent : 

1st. In regard to the quantity and quality of the supply. 

2d. The reduction of the debt of the water precinct by 
the retirement of bonds. 

For many years, the Board has been embarrassed by 
questions in regard to the rights of the public to the use of 
the waters of Penacook Lake and its tributaries for certain 
purposes and in two instances litigation has resulted. One 
suit is still pending. The attitude of the Board has been 
to await the judicial determination of the questions, i. e., 
the rights of the public and the rights and duties of the Board 
in the premises. 

The questions at issue in the suit now pending were con- 
sidered by the late Chief Justice of the Superior Court, Hon. 
Robert G. Pike, and his finding of facts in the case filed with 



288 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the Superior Court apparently substantiate in full all of 
the contentions of the Board and it is expected that a decree 
based upon these findings will shortly be entered. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
CHARLES R. WALKER, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, ex-offitio, 
Board of Water Commissioners. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 289 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the forty-fifth annual report of 
the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement of 
the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1916. 

Receipts. 

For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates, $11,506.40 

For water, from consumers by meter 

rates, 62,984.85 

From delinquents, 99 . 73 

For water for building purposes, 45 . 50 

pipe and stock sold and labor, 253 . 04 

old brass and iron sold, 77 . 84 

hay, 130 . 00 

freight and insurance refunded, 16 . 98 



Deduct abatements, 


61.62 


Net receipts for 1916, 


$75,052.72 


There has also bean furnished the city free of charge the 


following use of water : 




Public buildings, 


$179.50 


Parks and playgrounds, 


60.00 


Cemeteries, 


108.00 


Street department, 


774.00 


Drinking fountains and water- 




ing troughs, 


280.00 


Sewer flush tanks, 


45.00 


455 fire hydrants at $25, 


11,375.00 

cpio 001 en 



19 



290 city of concord. 

Expenditures, 
maintenance account. 



General care and maintenance : 






Salaries and labor, 


$5,438.69 




Maintenance of team, 


122.57 




Maintenance of autos, 


762.98 




Teaming and livery, 


80.50 




Miscellaneous supplies and repairs, 339 . 42 




Tools, 


120.95 




Repairs of buildings, 


101.64 




Shrubbery at pumping 






station grounds, 


60.13 




Bond and liability insurance, 


497.08 




Telephones and lighting, 


83.50 




Incidentals, 


119.44 


$7,726.90 






Office expenses: 






Salaries, 


$950.72 




Postage and printing, 


314.14 




Miscellaneous supplies, 


155.00 




Telephone, 


33.85 


1,453.71 






Care and repair of hydrants, 






Stock, 


$71.11 




Labor, 


231.84 


302.95 


Care and repair of meters, 




Stock, 


$211.27 




Labor, 


564.20 


775.47 


Relaying service pipes, 




Stock, 


$39.82 




Labor, 


182.55 


999 27 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 291 



Repairing leaks, 






Stock, 


$6.38 




Labor, 


108.98 


$115.36 






Repairing culvert, 


285.72 




Work at Lake, 


629 . 56 




Care of wood-lots, 






Planting pines, 


$380.04 




General care, 


156.42 


536.46 


Protection of water supply, 


341.45 


Penacook Park, 


185.27 




Taxes, town of Webster, 


48.00 




Incidentals, 


29.13 




Pumping Station : 


• 




Salaries and labor, 


$2,335.94 




Fuel, 


1,152.69 




Supplies and repairs, 


548.75 




Telephone and lighting, 


44.87 


4,082.25 




i 


Total maintenance account, 


fi 16,734. 60 


CONSTRUCTION 


ACCOUNT. 




Distribution pipes, 






Stock, 


$2,322.60 




Labor, 


133.73 


$2,456.33 






Service Pipes, 






Stock, 


$241.01 




Labor, 


93.33 


334.34 


Hydrants, 




Stock, 


$517.18 




Labor, 


84.12 


AOI QA 



292 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Meters, 
Stock, 
Labor, 


$1,211.75 

103 . 77 


$1,315.52 






Total construction account, 


$4,707.49 


Auto truck, 




1,844.94 


LAND AT PENACOOK 


LAKE. 




Leary, Bartlett and Clement, 
John Jordan, 
Recording deeds, 


$1,800.00 

300.00 

3.24 


2,103.24 






Total expenditures for 1916, 


$25,390.27 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 293 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron distribution pipes have been laid and gates and 
hydrants set during the year as follows: 

In Dartmouth Street, 

extended south, 62 feet 6-inch pipe. 

On hydrant branches, 

21 feet 8-inch and 58 feet 6-inch pipe. 

There was also laid 892 feet of l\ inch pipe. 

Total amount laid during the year, 1,033 feet. 

Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 

374,357 feet, equal to 70.90 miles. 
There have been set during the year 8 gates. 
Total number of gates now in use, 1,047. 

Seven new hydrants have been set as follows: 
On Rumford Street, at Walker Street. 
On Fiske Street, at Walker School. 
On Rumford Street, at Morrill School. 
On North State Street, West Concord, at Andrew J. 

Abbott's. 
On Knight Street, West Concord, at Quaker Street. 
On Charles Street, Penacook, at school-house. 
On Cross Street, Penacook, at Spring Street. 
Total number of hydrants now in use, 455. 

SERVICE PIPES, 

There have been laid during the year and connected with 
the main pipes, 23 service pipes, consisting of 
18 |-inch, 421 feet. 

5 1-inch, 143 feet. 



23 564 feet. 

There have been discontinued, 8; total number of service 
pipes at the present time, 3,873; total length of service 
pipes, 91,585 feet, or 17.34 miles. 



294 CITY OF CONCORD. 

There have been relaid 22 services and 36 curbs have been 
placed on old services. 

We have set 74 meters during the year; removed, 5; total 
number now in use, 2,528. 

The following table shows the height of water in Penacook 
Lake on the first day of each month : 



January, 


180.70 


July, 


185.40 


February, 


181.20 


August, 


184.90 


March, 


182.00 


September, 


184.70 


April, 


183.00 


October, 


184.95 


May, 


184.90 


November, 


184.45 


June, 


185.20 


December, 


184.75 



The lowest point reached during the year was on January 
1, being 180 . 70; the highest was on July 11 and was 185 . 90; 
mean height for the year was 184.15, which was 4.15 feet 
higher than the mean height for the year 1915 and the highest 
record since 1904. Water was running over the overflow 
155 days during the year. 

The Venturi meter has now been in operation through out 
one year and tha use of water has averaged 2,362,000 gallons 
per day. 

Estimating the population of the city supplied with water 
from our system as 20,000, the daily consumption is about 
118 gallons per capita. 

Owing to the continued advance in prices of materials and 
the scarcity of labor, we have done very little construction 
work and the year has been occupied with the routine work 
of the maintenance of the system. 

We have continued the work of reforestation at Penacook 
Lake, setting out 27,000 additional pine seedlings procured 
from the state nurseries. 

We have purchased an auto truck of 2000 pounds' 
capacity built by Abbot & Downing Co. of this city which is 
giving excellent service. 

The rules and regulations of your Board governing boating 
and fishing on Penacook Lake have been strictly adhered to. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 295 

Buoys were placed one-quarter mile from the intake and no 
boating whatever was allowed on this part of Penacook 
Lake nor on Forge Pond. All persons fishing or boating on 
other parts of Penacook Lake have applied for permits which 
were granted and the conditions have been complied with 
satisfactorily. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



296 CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING 
STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water Works. 

P. R. Sanders. Superintendent: 

Sir: I would report that the pumping machinery at 
the pumping station is in good working condition. 

The boilers are in good condition, and will need but 
few repairs; the fire boxes will have to be relined in a few 
months. 

Following is a statement of coal and other supplies used 
at the pumping station during the year, with a table showing 
the work for each month. 

Statement. 

109.51 tons of New River coal. 

10 tons of Carbon Forge coal. 
105.26 tons of Beacon Smithing coal. 
107 gallons valve oil. 

6 gallons engine oil. 

22 pounds of waste. 

11 pounds of grease. 
2 cords of slab wood. 

23 gallons of peroline boiler compound. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

ENGINE RECORDS. 



297 



Months. 



— a 



>y. 

OS <, 

■a a 
o"3i 






39 
.2 § 

O 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November . . . 
December . . . 

Total 

Daily average 



H. M. 

275: 

273:30 

279: 

244:30 

270: 

264:30 

253: 

254:30 

239:30 

267: 

242:30 

252:30 



107 



207 



305 



3,115:30 



H. 


M. 












8:52 


23,614,844 


761,769 


46,804 


1,509 




9:25 


23,915,029 


771,465 


46,747 


1,507 




9: 


24,337,047 


785,066 


47,549 


1,533 




8 


5 


20,711,150 


690,038 


40,729 


1,357 


732 


8 


42 


23,537,292 


759,267 


44,117 


1,423 




8 


49 


22,047,587 


734,919 


42,594 


1,419 




8 


9 


20,537,883 


662,512 


38,493 


1,241 


767 


8 


20 


21,468,011 


692,516 


39,203 


1,264 




7 


59 


19,888,402 


662,946 


37,970 


1,265 


744 


8 


86 


22,946,691 


740,214 


41,981 


1,354 




8 


5 


20,390,386 


679,679 


37,746 


1,265 


645 


8 


8 


21,651,385 


698,431 


39,556 


1,276 


714 




265,045,707 




503,489 




3,602 


8 


33 




728,147 


1,383 







504 
511 
511 
508 
533 
517 
533 
547 
523 
546 
540 
547 



525 



Coal consumed for the year, 224.77 tons. 

Pounds of wood consumed 4- 3 = equivalent amount of 
coal, 3.602 pounds. 

Total equivalent coal consumed for the year includes that 
used for pumping, starting fires, banking fires and heating 
buildings, 226.38 tons. 

Amount of equivalent coal consumed per thousand gal- 
lons pumped, 1.91. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



298 CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 



Isaac Hill, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water 
Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1916, $25,331.70 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 75,052.72 



$100,384.42 

Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $17,888.78 

Bonds paid, 38,000.00 

Orders paid, 25,399.27 

Cash on hand, 19,096 . 37 



,384.42 



APPENDIX. 



300 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. 

Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of 
the Works. 

For the year ending January 31, 1874, $4,431. 10 

For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875, 17,535. 00 

For the year ending April 1, 1876, 16,921.24 

1877, 19,001.07 

1878, 20,763.03 

1879, 21,869.86 

1880, 22,451.53 

1881, 26,744.58 
For nine months ending December 31, 1881, 25,534.01 
For the year ending December 31, 1882, 27,243. 06 

1883, 28,255.48 

1884, 28,915.65 

1885, 30,222.54 

1886, 30,862.64 

1887, 34,047.52 

1888, 38,441.32 

1889, 40,237.53 

1890, 42,133.41 

1891, 46,075.16 

1892, 48,351.52 

1893, 52,299.66 

1894, 53,230.10 

1895, 55,343.19 

1896, 56,557.81 

1897, 55,156.42 

1898, 59,147.54 

1899, *53,953.13 

1900, *57,003.71 

1901, 62,253.61 

1902, 63,430.85 

1903, 65,088.45 

1904, 68,570.48 

1905, 71,076.44 



* No hydrant rental 



his year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



301 



Forth 


e year ending De 


cember31, 1906, 


$73,063.45 




t tt I 


1907, 


73,782.64 




I It t 


1908, 


71,362.67 




( tt i 


1909, 


*67,307.84 




( tt { 


1910, 


68,673.71 




I tt I 


1 1911, 


71,881.34 




( it t 


1912, 


76,145.13 




t tt t 


1913, 


76,154.45 




t tt t 


1914, 


74,422.15 




t tt I 


1915, 


78,940.06 




I It i 


1916, 


75,052.72 


Tot 


al receipts for 44 years, 


$2,149,934.80 




Mean Heigh 


B. 

r of Water Each Year. 


1873, 


175.86 


1895, 


171.15 


1874, 


179.50 


1896, 


178.96 


1875, 


180.00 


1897, 


183.33 


1876, 


180.28 


1898, 


184.31 


1877, 


176.46 


1899, 


183.49 


1878, 


179.50 


1900, 


183.09 


1879, 


179.74 


1901, 


183.86 


1880, 


175.30 


1902, 


184.98 


1881, 


174.70 


1903, 


184.75 


1882, 


179.15 


1904, 


184.40 


1883, 


176.40 


1905, 


183.37 


1884, 


178.18 


1906, 


183.94 


1885, 


176.80 


1907, 


183.59 


1886, 


178.10 


1908, 


183.41 


1887, 


179.04 


1909, 


181.40 


1888, 


181.96 


1910, 


180.22 


1889, 


180.91 


1911, 


177.60 


1890, 


181.90 


1912, 


178.86 


1891, 


180.00 


1913, 


179.20 


1892, 


174.32 


1914, 


179.55 


1893, 


173.38 


1915, 


180.00 


1894, 


172.81 


1916, 


184.15 



* No hydrant rental after 1908. 



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308 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



D. 

HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service; L, Low Service. 




North Main. 



South Main. 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Walker's 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin's store 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

East side, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner of Washington. . 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery , 

East side, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner of Centre , 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

East side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol , 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block , 

East side, opposite' Centennial Block 

East side, in rear Eagle Hotel , 

East side, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, at Central Block 

Northwest corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant , 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Freight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue . . 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. John's Church 

Northwest corner of Perley 

West side, near Abbot & Downing Co.'s 
East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s . 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co. . . 



L 
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L 

H 
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II 
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II 
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L 
II 
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II 
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II 
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II 
B 
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27 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



309 




South Main . . 



Water . 
Hall.. 



Hammond. . 
Railroad. . . 
Fiske 

Summer 

Durgin. . . . 
North State 



South State 



Mills . . . 

Dakin. . 
Dunklee 



Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

East side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops . 

West side, at Lamprey's 

West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Rolfe and Rumford Asylum . 

West side, near E. W. Robinson's 

West side, near W. A. Phillips' 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, opposite Roy's 

East side, near Rumford Field 

North side, near Bridge 

East side, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

West side, south line of Walker School 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

N orthwest corner of Walker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Southeast corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 

West side, near Levi Call's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

West side, near C. E. Harriman's. ........ 

West side, 150 feet south of West 



H 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

I, 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

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B 

L 

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L 

L 

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H 

L 

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20 
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14 



310 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Dunklee . . 
Broadway . 



Donovan 
Green. . . 

South . . . 



Bradley .... 

Union 

Jackson. . . 
Lyndon .... 

North Sprin 



South Spring . 



Academy . 
Hanover . 



Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

West side, at H. H. Metcalf's 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Carter 

Northwest corner of Stone 

West side, at' Rollins Park 

West side, opposite McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Rockingham 

Northeast corner of Wiggin 

Northwest corner of Prince 

East side, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, opposite Wall 

N orthwest corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

West side, opposite Monroe 

West side, opposite Laurel 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital 

West side, opposite Downing 

West side, opposite Allison 

West side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, near Paige's 

West side, opposite I. W. Bushey's 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Road .... 

East side, at Quint's 

West side, near Bow line 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

East side, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northeast corner of Church 

Southwest corner of Tremont 

East side, opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner of Maple 

Southwest corner of Centre 

West side, at High School 

East side, opposite High School 

Southwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Oak 

West side, opposite Thompson 

West side, opposite Concord 

West side, near Memorial Hospital 

East side, at F. E. Hook's 

West side, at No. 10 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



311 



Streets. 


Locations. 


CD 










3 



Rumford . 



Huntington 
Tahanto. . . 
Pine 

Holt 

High 

Valley 

Auburn. . . . 



Ridge Road. . . 
Westbourne Rd 
Dartmouth .... 
Princeton 

Fruit 

Minot 



Kensington Rd. 
Stevens Ave. . . 
Penacook 



Walker . 



West side, south of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Southeast corner of Walker 

Northeast corner of Albin 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

N ortheast corner of Cambridge 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School ' 

West side, at Morrill School 

West side, at head of Short 

Northwest corner of. School 

Southwest corner of Centre 

Southwest corner of Warren 

East side, at Nason's 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

Northeast corner of Forest . . . ." 

Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest 

North side, between Centre and Forest. . . . 

West side, opposite Mrs. Jackman's 

North side, north of Mrs. F. P. Hallett's. . . 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Northeast corner of Woodman 

West side, near V. A. Dearborn's 

East side, opposite W. W. Critchett's 

East side, opposite Kilburn's 

West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home . . . 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home . . , 

N orthwest corner of Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

South side, near Concord Lumber Co. . . . 
South side, east of P. B. Co.'s storehouse. 

South side, near P. B. Co.'s .' 

South side, near P. B. Co.'s office 

Southeast corner of North Main 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

North side, opposite T. Hannigan's 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue . . . 

Southwest corner of Martin 

South side, 500 feet west from Rumford . . 



11 
1 

1 

2 

1 



312 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Albin . . . 
Highland 

Church. . 
Franklin . 



Chestnut 
Tremont 

Pearl . . . 
Beacon . , 



Rowell. . . 
Blanchard 
Ferry. . . . 



Washington . 



Chapel 

Montgomery . 
Centre 



Bridge . 
Park . . 



North side, near D. Weathers' 

North side, between Bradley and Rumford . . . 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

South side, east of Bradley 

North side, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

South side, opposite W. J. Ahern's 

North side, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of High 

North side, east of Harrod 

Southwest corner of Jackson 

North side, at Kimball Flanders' 

North side, opposite Merrimack School 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Southwest corner of Lyndon 

North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner of White 

Northwest corner of Essex 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue 

North side, opposite Rollins 

Southwest corner of Union 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of North Essex 

North side, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side, near Methodist Church 

South side, opposite Minot's 

Northeast corner of North State 

Southwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Union 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

South side, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue 

South side, on east line of Dewey School lot. . 

Northeast corner of Ridge Road 

South side, near easterly barn 

North side, opposite Concord Coal Co.'s. . . . 
North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory. . 
North side, at St. Paul's Church 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



313 




Capitol 

Garden 
School . 



Warren 



Depot . . 

Blake . . 
Orchard 
Pleasant 



North side, at south gate of State House yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

North side, opposite E. B. Woodworth's 

Southeast corner of Giles 

Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue .... 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

Northeast corner of Giles 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at H. B. Boutwell's 

South side, opposite Sherburne's 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at South Congregational Church . 

Southeast corner of South 

Northeast corner of Fremont 

Southwest corner of Spring 

South side, opposite Rumford 

South side, opposite Merrimack 

South side, opposite Pine 

South side, opposite Liberty 

North side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite Mrs. Aiken's 

South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage 

South side, at Lavery's 

South side, opposite No. 270 

North side, near James Lane's 

North side, opposite No. 291 



11 



314 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Pleasant . 



Fiske Road . . . 
Hopkinton Rd , 
Mill Road, 
St. P. School . . 



Old Hopkinton 

Road 

Wall 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue. 

Fayette 

Thompson . . . 
Chandler .... 
Concord 

Monroe 

Thorndike . . . , 



Laurel. . 
Perley . . 

Downing 
Clinton . 



North side, near J. McC. Hammond's . . . . 

South side, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner of School Avenue 

North side, at chapel 

South side, opposite Lower School 

South side, near new Upper School 

East side, at Trask's 

South side, near new infirmary 

East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home 

South side, at tenement No. 7 

Junction of Hopkinton road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

No. side, at southwest corner pass, station 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Jefferson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Rumford School 

North side, between So. Main and So. State 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner of South Spring 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, near old brook 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Redwood Avenue . . . , 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near Snell's 

North side, at State Fair grounds 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



315 




West . 



Avon 

Harrison 

Humphrey 

Allison 

Pillsbury 

Carter 

Stone 

Holly 

McKinley 

Rockingham . . 

Iron Works Rd 
Prospect 

Curtice Ave. . . 
North State . . . 



Palm 

North State . . 



North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed exten'n. . . 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, near John C. Kenney's 

West side, at Water- Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side, near W. H. Perry's 

East side, near Oliver Racine's 

East side, near A. L. Colburh's 

East side, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side, at south line of prison wall 

West side, at north line of prison wall 

East side, near Asa L. Gay's 

North side, west of Fairbanks 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co. . . 

East side, near C. H. Farnum's 

East side, near Cyrus R. Farnum's 

East side, near John True's 

East side, opposite Dolan 

East side, opposite John H. Flood's 

West side, opposite A. J. Abbott's , 

East side, at A. J. Abbott's 



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316 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




North State . 



Fisher . 
View . . 
Electric 

Clarke . 
Lake. . 



Knight 

Hutchins 

Second 

Sewall's Falls 

Road 

Penacook Rd 



South Main . 



WEST CONCORD. 

Southeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at George Partridge's 

East side, near engine house 

East side, opposite Hodgson's 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co 

East side, opposite Simeon Partridge's 

East side, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side, opposite A. Hollis' 

East side, near Sewall's Falls Road 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kellom's 

West side, near H. C. Holden's 

West side, near Wilson's 

East side, near H. C. Holden's 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station 

South side at Quaker 

North side, near B. T. Putney's 

North side, near C. & C. Railroad 

North side, at Turcotte's 

North side, near A. H. Knight's 

East side, at north line of cemetery 

West side, opposite Frost's 

West side, opposite Blanchard's 

West side, near Warner Road 

PENACOOK. 

West side, at Harriman's 

West side, at Annis's 

West side, at Garvin's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'y . 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cem'y . 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt's garage 

West side, near Prescott's 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opp. Exchange Block . . . . 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



317 




South Main . 

West Main . 
High 



Washington . 



Fowler .... 

Electric Ave 

Elliott 

Charles .... 

West Canal . 
East Canal. 

Crescent . . . 

Walnut 

Merrimack . 



Summer 

Spring. . 
Maple . . 
Winter . 
Centre . 

Cross . . 



Northwest corner of Charles 

North side, opposite East Cana-l 

North side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Northwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northwest corner of Spring 

South side, near South Main 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, opposite John Whitaker's . . 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge 

North side, at Rolfe's sawmill 

West side, at Charles Holmes' 

East side, near Elliott's 

South side, junction of Washington 
Northeast corner of Electric Avenue . . . 

Southwest corner of Warren 

South side, at School-house 

North side, near George W. Corey's . . . . 

Southeast corner of Warren 

North side, near Contoocook Mfg. Co. 

North side, near Crescent 

West side, north of Canal 

North side, at Bye 

South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue 

North side, opposite D. W. Fox's 

North side, opposite Cross 

South side, opposite Bye 

South side, opposite Rolfe's shop 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory . 

North side, near road to Island 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

North side, opposite High 

Northeast corner of Centre 

North side, opposite Church 

Northeast corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

North side, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Spring 

West side, at Corbett's 

North west corner of Spring 

Southwest corner of Summer 



15 



318 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Concluded. 




Rolfe.... 
Penacook . 



North side, near James Corbett's . , 
Northwest corner of Penacook 
West side, opposite A. W. Rolfe's . 

West side, at E. L. Davis' 

East side, at McGirr's 

Whole number public hydrants 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Abbot & Downing Co 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard 

Boston & Maine Railroad, shops 

Boston & Maine Railroad, power house, West 

Concord 

Brampton Woolen Co 

Concord Gas Light Co 

Concord Shoe Factory 

Concord Worsted Mills 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Ford Foundry Co 

N. E. Box Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

N. H. State Hospital 

N. H. State Prison 

N. H. State Prison 

Page Belting Co 

Page Belting Co 

St. Paul's School 

Water-works pumping station 

Whole number private hydrants 



3 
455 



II 


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87 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 319 

E. 
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1916. 

In form recommended by the New England Water- 
Works Association. 



CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1910 — 21,497. 
Date of construction — 1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply— Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING. 

1. Builders of pumping machinery — Henry R. Worthing- 

ton, Harrison, N. J. 

2. Description of fuel used — a. Kind — bituminous. 

b. Brand of coal — Forge 

Coal. 

c. Average price of coal per 

gross ton delivered, 
$5.55. 

d. Percentage ash, 5.6%. 

3. Coal consumed for year — 224.77 tons. 

4. (Pounds of wood consumed) -4- 3 = equivalent amount 
of coal— 3,602 lbs. 



320 CITY OF CONCORD. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year for 
pumping purposes — 226.38 tons. 

6. Total pumpage for the year without allowance for 
slip— 265,045,707 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pump works — 
103.84 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pump works — 
105 feet. 

9. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent 
coal— 522.6. 

10. Duty = 

265.045,707 gallons pumped, X 8.34 (lbs.) X 100 X dynamic head, 105 _ . _ -,, . ~q~ 
Total fuel consumed, 507,091 pounds. ~~ 40,<04,USZ. 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses — 
$3,779.09. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $15.40. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0,146. 



CONSUMPTION. 

1. Total population, census of 1910, 21,497. 

2. Estimated population on lines of pipe, 20,000. 

3. Estimated population supplied, 20,000. 

4. Total consumption for the year, 862,130,000 gallons. 

5. Passed through meters, 541,635,150 gallons. 

6. Percentage of consumption metered, 62.8. 

7. Average daily consumption, 2,362,000 gallons. 

8. Gallons per day to each inhabitant (1), 109. 

9. Gallons per day to each consumer (3), 118. 

10. Gallons per day to each tap (taps in use), 609. 

11. Cost of supplying water per million gallons, figured on' 

total maintenance (Item CC), $19.41. 

12. Cost of supplying water per million gallons, figured on 

total maintenance plus interest on bonds (Items CC 
and DD), $40.16. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 321 

DISTRIBUTION. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 1,033 feet during year. 

4. Renewed — 000 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 000 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 70.90 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.31 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 7. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 455; pri- 
vate, 87. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 8. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,047. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 82. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 564 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 215 feet. 

20. Total now in use — 91,585 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 23. 

22. Number now in use — 3,873. 

23. Average length of service — 23.64 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — $10.04. 

25. Number of meters added during year — 74. 

26. Number now in use — 2,529. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 67.88. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 84.55. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 9. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 44. 



322 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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WATER DEPARTMENT. 323 

DISPOSITION OF BALANCE, CARRIED FOR- 
WARD TO 1917. 

0. Net cost of works to date, $1,064,529.10. 
P. Bonded debt at date, $419,000.00. 

Q. Value of Sinking Fund at date, $ 

R. Average rate' of interest, 3.89 per cent. 



324 CITY OF CONCORD. 



INVENTORY. 

Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
the Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1917. 



Water rights— land, etc., $1,071,093 . 44 

Water office — furniture, etc., 1,144.50 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 850.00 
Shop at pumping station: 

Machinery, tools, meters, service pipe, etc., 3,260.53 
Service truck, runabout, horse, wagons and 

supplies, 3,000.00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, special 

castings, etc., 2,257.91 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 3,880.00 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 15 . 00 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00 

$1,085,541.38 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



Concord, N. H., February 9, 1917. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The following report is made for the purpose of explaining 
specifically to the board the progress of the litigation during 
the past year in which the city has been interested. 

Boston & Maine Railroad v. Concord was a petition for 
the abatement of taxes assessed upon certain personal 
property located at the shops which consisted of about one- 
half million dollars worth of lumber and supplies of all 
kinds. The tax was assessed under the stock in trade 
statute, so-called. The case was referred by the superior 
court to the tax commission to find the facts. The tax 
commission found as a matter of fact, in accordance with 
our contention, that the railroad was engaged in manu- 
facturing at the local shops. Exceptions were taken to the 
finding of the commission and the case went to the supreme 
court where it was argued at the June term. The court 
held (1) that taxes cannot be assessed by towns or cities 
except by legislative authority, (2) the state has always 
retained the power to tax railroad property and never has 
delegated that power to towns and cities except in the case 
of real estate not used in the ordinary business of the road, 
and (3) towns and cities have no power to assess taxes on 
the personal property of railroads. 

Of course this case was in the nature of a test case for 
the purpose of finally determining whether the city or the 
state should tax this property. Since the above decision 
the attorney-general has intervened in behalf of the state 
and that action is now pending. 

In my report for 1915 I discussed the case of Archibald 
McClellan & a. Trustees, v. Concord, which was a petition 



326 CITY OF CONCORD. 

for the abatement of taxes assessed on the Eddy trust 
estate. At that time I drew attention to the statute which 
had been passed after the case arose and which would 
thereafter furnish statutory authority for the taxation of the 
whole of the trust. At the same time I drew attention to 
the possible question as to whether the statute was con- 
stitutional, as under the situation then existing it would 
have resulted in a double taxation of five-sixths of the 
property in view of the fact that Massachusetts was also 
taxing five-sixths of the estate. Since making my last 
report a similar case has arisen in Massachusetts involving 
the question of the right of Massachusetts under its statutes 
to tax a trust estate created in another commonwealth, 
but held by Massachusetts trustees. The supreme court 
of Massachusetts held that the Massachusetts statutes did 
not give the right of taxation of such estate in said Massa- 
chusetts. Accordingly, the Brookline, Massachusetts, 
assessors did not tax the Eddy estate at all for 1916 and the 
tax was paid to Concord. 

Ward v. City of Concord was a petition for mandamus to 
require the Board of Public Works to issue a permit to the 
plaintiff to install a sidewalk pump. The case was referred 
to Burns P. Hodgman, master, to find the facts. After a 
lengthy trial he reported that the board acted in perfect 
good faith and the case is now pending in the superior court 
on a motion filed by me for confirmation of the report and 
dismissal of the petition. 

Ordway v. Concord and Moore v. Concord, the first for 
personal and the second for property damage, arose out of 
the overturning of an automobile on the Loudon road in the 
summer of 1915. The injuries claimed by Ordway were 
very serious, including curvature of the spine. Moore 
claimed that his automobile was seriously damaged and that 
he was injured in his business by reason of not being able 
to use the automobile. Both cases were compromised 
for $1,700, which seemed good judgment in view of 
the fact that the bank over which the machine went was 
unrailed and the road in a sandy condition. The plaintiffs 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 327 

claimed that the machine struck a rock in the road which 
diverted the machine over the bank. 

Tilton v. Concord is a test case to determine whether the 
city of Concord is liable for the support of certain paupers 
now living in Tilton. The question is whether a city or 
town is liable for the support of paupers for a period greater 
than ten years from the time such people commenced to 
gain their settlement in such city or town. The case has 
gone to the supreme court on an agreed statement of facts 
without ruling and will be argued at the March session. 

State v. Robinson was a test case to determine whether 
automobile fines collected in the local municipal court 
belong to the city or the state. On March 4, 1915, the 
legislature enacted that all fines collected in police courts 
should belong to the municipalities and repealed all incon- 
sistent statutes. At that time the criminal law applicable 
to all courts of criminal jurisdiction provided that all fines 
imposed for violations of the automobile law should go to 
the state. The legislature apparently thought that a 
mistake had been made and the act of March 4, 1915, was 
amended at the same session twenty days later so as to 
except "cases where otherwise specifically fixed by statute." 
We took the position that the act of March 4, 1915, repealed 
the law then in force in regard to automobile fines and that 
the act passed twenty days later had no effect, upon the 
theory that the repeal of the act of March 4, 1915, did not 
revive the earlier provision repealed by said act, in accord- 
ance with the rule of the common law and of the statutes 
of New Hampshire. The supreme court, however, did not 
take this view. It held that the plain intent of the legis- 
lature was to remedy the situation created by inadvertence 
so as to permit such fines to go to the state as they had 
formerly gone. This was undoubtedly a correct determina- 
tion of the case and accomplished what was desired, the 
removal of a doubt in the minds of the officials of the munic- 
ipal courts throughout the state as to whom they could 
safely pay out the fines in their hands. 

Concord Manufacturing Company v. Concord is a petition 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

for abatement of taxes on the plaintiff's mill, situated in 
Ward 1. The case was referred by the superior court to the 
tax commission for a finding of fact and has been there for a 
considerable length of time. Acting under authority from 
the board, I secured the services of a mill expert to make a 
valuation of the plant in preparation for the trial. This 
the expert has done and has supplied me with a compre- 
hensive report which confirms the opinion of the assessors 
as to the value of the plant. I have endeavored to get a 
trial of the case for the past year, but the tax commission 
has not yet set a date for such trial. Of course the city 
has received the taxes on this property under protest and 
there is no very great harm in the delay attending the trial 
of the case. However, if it should prove that the assessors 
overvalued the property, to the rebate will be added six 
per cent interest for quite a period, and the detriment to 
the city comes in having to pay six per cent for money which 
it could borrow for four per cent or less. It is not a very 
serious matter, however. 

In addition to the foregoing, the usual routine business 
has been attended to, and I am now representing the city 
before committees of the legislature on matters of con- 
siderable importance to municipalities in general. These 
have to do with trust funds and water-works. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE, 

Solicitor. 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



1915. 


1916. 


108 


112 


39 


48 


41 


48 


27 


42 


197 


362 


149 


182 


28 


33 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The following is a report of the work of the city physician 
for the years ending December 31, 1915, and December 31, 
1916. 

House calls on city poor, 

Office calls on city poor, 

House calls, board of health work, 

Office calls, board of health work, 

Cultures taken in diphtheria epidemic work, 

Vaccinations and examinations made for 

issuance of certificate, 
Calls at police station, 
School-rooms inspected (individual examina- 
tion of each pupil in the room), 12 16 
No record has been kept of numerous conferences (almost 
daily) between the sanitary officer and the city physician. 
It is believed that these conferences have been mutually 
helpful and that, as a consequence, the community has been 
more promptly and efficiently served in the numerous 
emergencies that have arisen requiring co-operation be- 
tween these officials. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. COOK,- 

City Physician. 
February 3, 1917. 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMIS- 
SIONERS. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The amounts placed at our disposal have been prudently 
used in the care of the cemeteries, as but little new work has 
been done. 

The only new work at Blossom Hill Cemetery has been 
the beginning of a water-course for draining a section at the 
northwest part of the cemetery, also to take care of the 
large flow of water in the spring time. The cemetery has 
been in fine condition for the entire season. 

The burials in Blossom Hill Cemetery have been 168. 
The Chapel has been used 17 times. The burials in "The 
Old North Cemetery" have been 11. The Old North and 
Minot Cemeteries have been in excellent condition as far 
as the funds at our disposal would allow. The fence is still 
in a deplorable condition, because of its being so decayed. 

Whatever appropriations may be made for the coming 
year will be most carefully used for the care and improve- 
ment of the cemeteries. 

For the detailed account of the expenditures, would refer 
you to the City Treasurer's report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor. 
FRANK J. PILLSBURY, Ward 6. 
CHARLES G. REMICK, " 4. 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, " 5. 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, " 4. 

JOHN P. GEORGE, " 4. 

EDWARD A. MOULTON, Secretary, Ward 4. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council: 

The Park Commissioners present herewith their report 
for the year ending December 31, 1916. 

Receipts. 
General appropriation, $3,900.00 

Less unexpended, 250.04 

$3,649.96 



Expenditures. 
Salary of Superintendent, twelve months, $1,080.00 

white's park. 
Paid for labor, $912.63 
labor removing moths, 141 .65 
labor on ice, 32 . 50 
cash paid Mr. Atkinson, 32 . 30 
Thompson & Hoague, hard- 
ware and supplies, 267 . 68 
Clifford, labor and supplies, 4.20 
horse hire, 48 . 00 
dressing, 43 . 00 
teaming, 149.21 
grain, 38 . 45 
mason work, Mr. Lugg, 2 . 40 
Globe horseshoeing, repairs, 1 . 25 
J. Adams, sharpening lawn 

mower, 1 . 00 

1,674.27 



ROLLINS PARK. 

Paid for labor, $463 . 18 

shrubs, 39 . 10 

grain, 105 . 10 

Brunnel, for carrots, 5 . 50 



332 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dr. Burchstead $2.00 

rubber boots, 4 . 25 

Virgin, for lumber, 8.88 

dressing, 2 . 50 



SMALL PARKS. 

Fiske Park, $34 . 88 

Bradley, 37.13 

Court House Park, 54.00 

Ridge, 18.57 

Pecker, 19.50 

State Street Park, 101 . 10 



630.51 



265.18 

$3,649.96 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 

GARDNER B. EMMONS, 

BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Com missioners . 



REPORT OF JOHN KIMBALL PLAY- 
GROUND. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year 1916: 

The year's work has been carried on in much the same 
manner as last year, and with equally good results. The 
girls' department was again in charge of Miss Charlotte 
White, and her work has once more proved her ability as a 
playground instructor. The enthusiasm displayed by over 
one hundred girls not only in the games, but in the various 
handicrafts, the steadily increasing attendance during the 
summer, the friendly spirit of the girls and their general 
helpfulness, all testify to the good work of the playground. 

The Victrola has not only helped in the folk dances, but 
the beautiful records, donated by a generous friend of the 
playground, has been a source of pleasure to many. The 
playground needs more care during the hours when it is not 
used by the children. Mr. Harold Fraser proved an efficient 
and trusty caretaker during the hours when he was em- 
ployed, but the late evening visitors are far from careful 
of the playground property. Some arrangement ought to 
be made so that the playground could be under supervision 
at all hours. 

The closing exercises were very interesting and gave 
evidence of good work both in Miss White's and Mr. 
Fraser's department. It is very gratifying that the John 
Kimball Playground can furnish so many young people 
who are physically strong. Those who watched the races 
of that day realize that both boys and girls were profiting 
by the training. 

The doll, dressed by the girls, was given to the New 
Hampshire Memorial Hospital. The tennis courts will be 
ready for use the first of next summer and it is hoped that 
it will prove a pleasure to the older boys and girls. 



334 CITY OF CONCORD. 

JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 

Expenditures. 

June. Isaac Hill, pay-roll. $29.11 

Labor, 16.00 

July. Victrola and records, 15.00 

Benjamin Ahern, teaming, 3.00 

Baseballs, 10.50 

Capital Hardware Co., supplies, 6.20 

Thompson & Hoague Co., 3.37 

Aug. Isaac Hill, pay-roll, 32.00 

C. E. Tenney, supplies, 2.00 

Tenney Bros., supplies, .50 

Sept. Isaac Hill, pay-roll, 32 . 00 

Thompson & Hoague, supplies, 5 . 00 

Oct. Isaac Hill, pay-roll, 8.00 

Charlotte White, services and supplies, 95 . 00 

Concord Electric Co., 2 . 77 

Brown & Batchelder, supplies, 6 . 25 

Hawkes & Davis, supplies, 2.75 

Thorne Shoe Store Co. , 2 . 25 

Nov. Highway Dept., labor and supplies, 63.92 

W. Carpenter, repairs, 2.68 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, .98 

Dec. Concord Wiring & Supply Co., 13.59 

Isaac Hill, pay-roll, 3 . 00 

I. T. Chesley, labor and teaming, 125.45 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 4.59 



$485.91 



Appropriation , $500 . 00 

Total expenditures, 485 . 91 



Balance, $14.09 

Approved : 

ROY W. FRASER. 

R. A. BROWN. 

LUELLA A. DICKERMAN. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE 
SOUTH END PLAYGROUND. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

This committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year 1916: 

Early in the season the baseball grounds, tennis and 
croquet courts received the necessary repairs to put them 
in good condition for the' summer. 

Three large benches and fifteen small stools were pur- 
chased which added greatly to the comfort of the instructor 
and children in their class work. 

A building in which to store the equipment was also 
purchased this season as its need had been greatly felt by 
both players and workers. Our appropriation was not 
quite sufficient to cover the entire cost of this purchase but 
arrangements were made to pay the balance due from our 
1917 appropriation. , 

In addition to the usual gardens for the smaller children 
twenty large ones were laid out and assigned to the older 
boys and girls with very good results. 

A caretaker for the grounds was engaged for the season, 
devoting a part of each day with the exception of Sundays. 

Miss Marion Shepard began her work as instructor June 
15 and continued through September 2. Mr. J. S. Stevens 
and Mr. Louis Reycroft instructed the boys. 

The average daily attendance of girls and boys was fifty- 
eight. This does not include those present on July 4 and 
on Field Day, when the attendance was more than doubled. 

Tennis, croquet and volley ball were the most popular 
sports and the tests given by the American Playground 
Association were tried out the latter part of the season. 

The exhibition on Field Day included embroidery, bas- 
ketry, paper flower work, and a fine display of vegetables 
from the gardens. The usual prizes for. the season's work 
and for the sports were awarded at this time. 



66b CITY OF CONCORD. 




Statement. 




Salaries, 


$171.86 


Gardens, supplies and work, 


46.02 


Repairs, tennis and croquet courts, etc., 


64.92 


Upkeep, 


24.77 


Equipment, 


109.72 


Fourth of July and Field Day, 


75.81 



$493 . 10 
Appropriation, 500 . 00 



Unexpended balance, $6.90 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
SHUBAEL P. DEARBORN, 
ELSIE L. JOHNSON, 

Committee. 



REPORT OF THE PUBLIC BATH. 



Concord, N. H., February 18, 1917. 
To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: 

The season of 1916 which has just closed was one of the 
most successful ever enjoyed at the public bath. This is 
shown by the larger attendance and the increased interest 
shown by both men and women. It was also a source of 
great pleasure to the soldiers who made use of the public 
bath daily. 

The daily attendance was about the average and during 
the warm weather, it was doubled, due to the interest 
shown by the soldiers. The women bathers are showing 
an increased interest which compares favorably with the 
work carried on by other cities. 

The annual water carnival was run off on the closing 
days for the boys and girls. Much interest was shown in 
the carnival. The prizes for the different events were con- 
tributed by the merchants of the city. 

Record of Attendance: 
Total number of boys and girls, 18,500 

Average daily attendance, girls, 125 

Average daily attendance, boys, 250 

Largest number of girls present on any one day, 198 

Largest number of men and boys (soldiers), 700 

Number of boys saved from probable drowning, 4 

(Cause in each case, going beyond depth.) 
Number of boys who have learned to swim, 62 

Number of girls who have learned to swim, 38 

Recommendations. 

1. Lockers should be placed in the bath house. At the 
present time the facilities are very poor for the women. 

2. Appropriation should be increased. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JEREMIAH T. REARDON, 

22 Instructor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1916: 



From fees of all kinds, 


$447.45 


rent, Auditorium, 


70.00 


hack and job teams licenses, 


138.50 


bowling alley and pool tables licenses, 


460.00 


pawnbroker's license, 


25.00 


employment bureau license, 


5.00 


junk dealers' licenses, 


190.00 


tlog licenses, 


1,406.40 


rebate, municipal telephone, 


5.50 


police harness sold, 


5.00 


state primary, 


113.00 


grass sold by M. J. Lee, account 1915, 


8.00 


witness fee, J. H. Morris, 


1.37 


bounty on grasshoppers, 


29.50 


rent, city farm, I. Wilson, 


5.00 


old copper gutters from city hall, 


133.20 


proceeds city lot, Ward 3, 


30.75 


theatre licenses, 


726.00 


Merrimack County, aid to dependent 




soldiers, 


1,930.62 


Merrimack County, aid to county poor, 


13,547.41 



,277.70 

The foregoing amount has been paid into the city 
treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVERSEER 
OF THE POOR. 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the forty-ninth annual 
report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards One 
and Two, for the year ending December 31, 1916: 



City Poor. 



Appropriation, 
Resolution No. 266, 



$2,500.00 
639.62 



id groceries, 


$946.95 


milk, 


59.62 


fuel, 


524.27 


rents, 


501.00 


care children, 


340.00 


board and care, 


528.43 


medicine, 


36.60 


. shoes and rubbers, 


69.65 


burials, 


40.00 


miscellaneous, 


93.10 



1,139.62 



5,139.62 



Paid groceries, 
milk, 
fuel, 
rents, 



County Poor. 



$3,017.03 

429.95 

1,787.87 

3,939.49 



340 CITY OF CONCORD. 

care children, $2,501.91 

board and care, 1,866.50 

shoes, rubbers and clothing, 316.65 

transient account, 30.45 

burials, 162.00 

miscellaneous, 42 . 70 



$14,094.55 

Total amount paid for aid to poor, $17,234. 17 

Dependent Soldiers, City. 
Appropriation, $150.00 

Paid care, sickness, $106.00 

Dependent Soldiers, County. 

Paid groceries, $642.23 

milk, 29 . 89 

fuel, 719.94 

rents, 303 . 00 

board and care, 240 . 26 

burial, 25.00 

miscellaneous, 5 . 00 

clothing, 5 . 25 

$1,970.57 



Total amount paid for aid to dependent 

soldiers, $2,076.57 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The board of assessors submit to your consideration the 
following facts and figures showing the valuation of the 
city and its school districts and special precincts, with 
the amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the 
tax collector for collection. 

The appeal of the Boston & Maine Railroad from the 
taxation of materials which were to be used in the shops in 
this city (the shops being taxed and not included in the 
matter of appeal) was decided adversely to the city. The 
contention of the railroad is that neither the City of Concord 
nor the State of New Hampshire should tax the materials, 
and the matter is now before the supreme court in an action 
brought by Attorney-General James P. Tuttle as to whether 
said materials shall be taxed by the State Tax Commission. 

The supreme court of Massachusetts in a case embodying 
the same facts as the case of taxation of the funds held by 
the trustees of the estate of Mary Baker G. Eddy ruled that 
the domicile of the testator governed as to where the prop- 
erty should be taxed, and the funds were all taxed in this 
city for 1916. As they consist largely of taxable bonds, 
the amount will necessarily vary each year as the trustees 
convert them into non-taxable securities as rapidly as 
possible. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised for 
the years from 1906 to the present time which shows the 
increased amount spent by the city and the reason for an 
increased tax. 



342 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Tabulation of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 

Valuation of City and Precincts with 

Rate for Each in 1916. 



Warrant. 



Amount of 
warrants. 



Tax rate 
per $1,000. 



uation of 
city and pre- 
cincts. 



State 

County 

School required by law 

City 

Extra for schools: 

Union 

Town 



(No. 20. 
Penacook j 

I Union*. 



Precincts: 

Sprinkling 

Garbage 

Sewer 

Lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sprinkling . . . 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord lights. . . 
West Concord sewer . . . 
St. Paul's School sewer. 



$45,517.50 
34,716.50 
45,517.50 

85,000.00. 

91,969 60 
4,991 00 
1,023.00 

10,170.00 

8,000.00 

9,000.00 

10,750.00 

18,900.00 

1,500.00 

425.00 

825.00 

700.00 

63.00 

50.00 



$10.80 



5.50 

3.90 

.50 

5 30 

,55 
.65 
.70 
1.15 
.95 
.35 
.70 
.70 
.02 
.03 



$19,812,975 



16,979,930 
1,310,030 
1,513,315 
2,005,335 

14,423,425 

13,805,820 

15,257,775 

16,138,175 

1,541,065 

1.084,990 

1,190,565 

988,118 • 

347,983 

153,770 



*Penacook Union School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



assessors' report. 



343 



Number of shares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hamp- 
shire and credited to this city. 



Railroad. 



1913. 



Boston & Lowell 

Boston & Maine 

Concord & Montreal 

Concord & Portsmouth 

Connecticut River 

Dover, Somersworth & Rochester Street . 

Fitchburg 

Manchester & Lawrence 

Nashua & Lowell 

Nashua Street 

New Boston 

Northern 

Peterborough 

Pemigewasset Valley 

Suncook Valley 

Wilton 



398 

9,775 

118 

342 



379 



124 
342 



27 


27 


365 


371 


16 


16 


497 


488 


72 


72 


,205 


1,137 


8 


8 


168 


133 


46 


46 


5 


5 



380 
9,935 

107 

342 

468 

27 

373 

6 

477 

72 

1,236 

8 

168 

51 

4 



5 

357 

9,614 

107 



27 

378 

6 

484 

72 

1,239 

8 

168 

49 

4 



344 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Inventory of the City of Concord. 









No. 


Valuation. 


Polls, 






5,779 


$11,558 


Improved and unimproved land and 






buildings, 








16,220,065 


Horses, 






1,178 


134,485 


Oxen, 






32 


3,125 


Cows, 






1,180 


61,100 


Other neat stock, 






182 


6,675 


Sheep, 






94 


765 


Hogs, 






117 


1,960 


Fowls, 






840 


845 


Carriages and Automobiles, 








333,290 


Portable Mills, 








1,300 


Fur bearing animals, 






15 


7,500 


Boats and launches, 








1,975 


Wood and lumber, 








15,450 


Stock in public funds, 








986,155 


Stock in banks, 








248,620 


Money on hand, at interest, 


or on 


deposit, 


262,040 


Stock in trade, 








1,397,275 


Milling, carding machines, 


and 


factories 




and their machinery, 








120,650 



Total, $19,803,275 

Amount of taxes committed to tax collector, $382,352.47. 
Average rate per cent of taxation for all purposes, $1.87 + . 



assessors' report. 345 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and 
personal estate of Concord since 1906: 



Year. 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1906 




5,474 


11,768,897 


260,976.67 


1907 




5,757 


12,114,322 


273,045.74 


1908 




5,289 


12,342,190 


277,469.52 


1909 




5,442 


12,405,465 


301,281.72 


1910 




5,576 


12,543,822 


278,464.77 


1911 




5,784 


12,507,847 


296,074.27 


1912 




5,691 


18,701,591 


316,117.69 


1913 




5,687 


20,842,846 


305,460.56 


1914 




5,735 


19,177,428 


316,447.67 


1915 




5,806 


20,086,789 


339,781.64 


1916. 

Ward 


1 


592 


$1,597,140 


$28,975.09 




2 


211 


555,670 


8,888.93 




3 


359 


1,275,510 


21,375.57 




4 


1,050 


3,338,350 


64,106.86 




5 


670 


4,459,230 


86,276.98 




6 


916 


2,467,195 


47,741.37 




7 


1,097 


2,817,000 


51,145.34 




8 


351 


2,567,085 


48,002.76 




9 


533 


726,095 


13,516.72 




5,779 


$19,803,275 


$370,029.62 


Nor 


l-resident, 




764.85 




$370,794.47 



346 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



List of Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in 
Each Ward, 1915 and 1916. 



Wards. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Resident tax assessed. 


1915. 


1916. 


1915. 


1916. 


1915. 


1916. 


Ward 1 


597 


592 


$1,590,490 


$1,597,140 


$26,013.70 


$28,975.09 


Ward 2 


219 


211 


532,705 


555,670 


6,898.28 


8,888.93 


Ward 3 


367 


359 


1,254,110 


1,275,510 


18,339.78 


21,375.57 


Ward 4 


996 


1,050 


3,296,938 


3,338,350 


55,513 65 


64,106.86 


Ward 5 


685 


670 


4,800,031 


4,459,230 


81,587.44 


86,276.98 


Ward 6 


949 


916 


2,347,530 


2,467,195 


39,908.05 


47,741.37 


Ward 7 


1,105 


1,097 


3,096,725 


2,817,000 


48,255.42 


51,145.34 


Ward 8 


347 


351 


2,457,575 


2,567,085 


39,725.48 


48,002.76 


Ward 9 


541 


533 


710,685 


726,095 


11,361.66 


13,516.72 


Totals 


5,806 


5,779 


$20,086,789 


$19,803,275 


$327,603.46 


$370,029.62 



Totals submitted to tax collector 
In 1915- — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 

Total, 

In 1916 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 



$327,603.46 

566.18 

11,612.00 

$339,781.64 

$370,029.62 

764.85 

11,558.00 



Total, 



Respectfully submitted, 



,352.47 



JOSEPH E. SHEPARD. 
JAMES H. MORRIS. 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the annual report of 
the Collector of Taxes to the close of business December 
31, 1916. 

Tax Levy, 1912. 

♦ 

Resident list, $315,382 . 43 

Additions and corrections, 2, 128 . 95 

— $317,511.38 



Non-resident list, 735 . 26 

Received collection for moths, 172.50 

Received interest, 655 . 02 



$319,074.16 



Cash paid treasurer, $3 1 1 ,780 . 6 1 

Amount abated, 7,021. 17 

Amount refunded, 19. 19 

Uncollected, 253.19 



Tax Levy, 1913. 

Resident list, $304,820 . 42 

Additions and corrections, 1,205.51 



,074.16 



$306,025.93 



Non-resident list, 640. 16 

Received collections for moths, 157.45 

Received interest, 1,017.16 



$307,840.70 



Cash paid treasurer, $299,838.55 

Amount discounts, 3, 123 . 68 

Amount abated, 4,591 . 33 

Uncollected, 287.14 



$307,840.70 



348 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Resident list, 
Amount of poll taxes, 
Additions and corrections, 

Non-resident list, 
Collected, moth account, 
Collected, interest, 



Cash paid treasurer, 
Amount discounts, 
Amount abated, 
Amount refunded, 
Uncollected, 



Tax Levy, 1914. 

$304,363.00 



11,470.00 
940.33 



$309,822.81 

3,388.73 

4,374.42 

10.02 

982.79 



Resident list, 

Additions and corrections, 

Non-resident list, 
Collected, moth account, 
Collected, interest, 



Cash paid treasurer, 

Amount, discounts, 

Abatements : 

(Ordinary), $3,142.39 

(By order of court), 16,662.76 



Tax Levy, 1915. 

$339,215.46 



713.41 



Uncollected, 



$314,345.62 
3,119.08 



19,805.15 
4,313.00 



$316,773.33 

613.93 

154.95 

1,036.56 

$318,578.77 



$318,578.77 



$339,928.87 
566.18 
193.78 
894.02 

$341,582.85 



$341,582.85 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



349 



Tax Levy, 1916. 

Resident list, $370,029 . 62 

Amount of poll taxes, 11,558.00 

Additions and corrections, 360 . 78 



Non-resident list, 


• 


$381,948.40 
764.85 


Collected, moth account 




178.20 


Collected, interest, 




48.97 




$382,940.42 


Cash paid treasurer, 


$336,900.00 




Amount discounts, 


3,747.90 




Amount abated, 


1,872.89 




Amount cash on hand, 


204.99 




Uncollected, 


40,214.64 


$382,940.42 






Taxes sold the City of Concord in the office of the collec- 



tor for redemption: 



1912. 

Amount, $1,186.96 Paid treasurer, 

Interest, 122.74 Uncollected, 



$1,309.70 



$966.26 
343.44 

$1,309.70 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1913. 

,811.71 Paid treasurer, 
84.48 Uncollected, 



,896.19 



1914. 

,228.92 Paid treasurer, 
18.21 Uncollected, 



.,366.35 

529.84 

L,896.19 



71 
680.42 



,247.13 



,247.13 



350 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1915. 

48 Paid treasurer, 
11.22 Uncollected, 



$698.70 



$349.65 
349.65 

$698.70 



Taxes sold the City of Concord, N. H., for redemption 
as turned over by Mr. Ladd, former collector: 



For the years 1902 and 1903, 


$134.34 




For the year 1904, 


129.45 




For the year 1905, 


207.96 




For the year 1906, 


210.53 




1907. 






Amount, $539 . 65 Paid treasurer, 


$91 


15 


Interest, 39.36 Uncollected, 


487 


86 



Amount, 
Interest, 



$579.01 

1908. 

. 14 Paid treasurer, 
34.12 Uncollected, 



$292.26 



1909. 

Amount, $402 . 20 Paid treasurer, 

Interest, 29.90 Uncollected, 



$432.10 



$579.01 



1.51 
205.75 

$292.26 



$168.05 
264.05 

$432.10 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1910. 

. 17 Paid treasurer, 
40.77 Uncollected, 



$128.74 
749.20 



177.94 



$877.94 



assessors' report. 351 



1911. 



Amount, $483 . 34 Paid treasurer, $162.40 

Interest, 43.00 Uncollected, 363.94 

$526.34 $526.34 

SETH R. DOLE, 

Collector. 



REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL COURT. 



To His Honor, The Mayor, and The Board of Aldermen: 

I am transmitting herewith a statement of the receipts 
and expenditures of the Municipal Court for the year ending 
December 31, 1916, the same being prepared and submitted 
by Allan H. Robinson, clerk of the court. It has been 
deemed advisable to incorporate in this report only a 
general statement of the receipts and expenditures, monthly 
statements having been filed with the city clerk at whose 
office they may be seen by any interested citizen. 

Disposition of Fines. 

At the time the last report of this court was submitted 
there was pending in the superior court. of the state a friendly 
suit brought by the attorney-general against the clerk and 
justice of this court to determine the disposition of fines 
for the violation of certain special statutes, the act creating 
the municipal court having left the matter in doubt. This 
case has finally been decided and the funds have been paid 
to the proper parties. 

At the time of the last report fines received in the follow- 
ing cases for violation of the motor vehicle law had been 
withheld pending this decision:— 

State v.Cass, $100.00 

State v. Lambert, 100.00 

State v. Saben, 100.00 

State v. Inger soil, 100.00 

Slate v. Dickey, 5 . 00 

State v. Diversi, 10.00 

Total, $415.00 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 353 

During the past year the following fines for violation of 
the motor vehicle law were withheld: 

State v.Guay, $10.00 

State v. Jubenville, 100.00 

State v. Scott, 10.00 

State v. Robinson, 100 . 00 

State v. Morrison, 10 . 00 

State v. White, 10.00 

State v. Mcintosh, 10.00 

State v. Lemay, 10.00 

State v. Johnson, 10 . 00 

State v. Dtm's, 10 . 00 

State v. Moorhouse, 10.00 

State v. ^ate, 10 . 00 

State Y.Boyle, 100.00 

State v. Cullen, 10.00 



Total, $410.00 

Under the decision of the court the above fines, amount- 
ing to $825, have been paid to the State Motor Vehicle 
Department. 

At the time of the last report the fine in State v. Lassond 
for failure to send a child to school, and that in State v. 
Coburn, for violation of the pure food laws had been with- 
held. Under the decision of the court the former has been 
paid to the Union School District, and the latter to the 
state treasurer. 

During the past year the fine in State v. Weeks for failing 
to make a birth return in the town of Hooksett, and in 
State v. Boulay for cruelty to animals in a case brought by 
the agent of the Concord S. P. C. A., were withheld. The 
former has been paid to the town of Hooksett, and the 
latter to Harry H. Dudley, treasurer of the organization 
represented by the complainant. 



23 



354 city of concord. 

Non-Support. 

The court has continued to dispose of non-support cases, 
in some cases, by ordering the respondents to pay into 
court the whole or a part of their wages, and these sums 
have been expended under the direction of the court for the 
care of the families of the respondents. In some cases 
the money has been handled by persons appointed by the 
court for that purpose. The following is a statement of 
the cash which has actually passed through this court in 
these matters: 

Receipts. 



On hand January 1, 1916, 


$8.31 


Received in No. 454 (District Court Docket), 


260.00 


No. 233 (District Court Docket), 


67.50 


No. 503 (District Court Docket), 


92.00 


Juvenile Court matter by agreement, 


107.50 


No. 765, 


250.00 


No. 655, 


73.50 


No. 992, 


15.00 


Municipal Court matter (matter by 




agreement), 


4.00 


No. 1181, 


60.00 


No. 1507, 


35.00 



$972.81 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 355 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid Mrs. D. E. Lewis, board, $134.00 

Mrs. Reuben Cate, board, 134.00 

F. B. Clark, shoes, 1.75 

Hardy & McSwiney, clothing, 3.00 

Thorne Shoe Store, shoes, 3 . 60 

H. G. Emmons, clothing, 1.50 

Mrs. D. E. Lewis, cash paid for clothing, 11.61 

N. H. Orphans' Home, board, 55.50 

Wife of Respondent in No. 503, 92 . 00 

Millville Orphans' Home, board, 107 . 50 

Mrs. Warren Hall, board, 244.00 
Wife and children of Respondent in No. 655, 73 . 50 

Wife of Respondent in No. 992, 15.00 

Wife of Respondent in No. 1181, 60.00 

Wife of Respondent in No. 1507, 35.00 

Net balance on hand, . 85 



$972.81 



Harry F. Lake, who has served as probation officer both 
under the district court and the municipal court, has re- 
signed the position, his resignation taking effect December 
1. I have appointed Miss Elizabeth G. Lincoln, secretary 
of the Concord Charity Organization, to succeed Mr. Lake. 

The resignation of Allan H. Robinson as clerk of this 
court has also been received, the same having been made 
necessary by Mr. Robinson's appointment as postmaster of 
this city. I have appointed John W. Stanley to succeed 
Mr. Robinson. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. CHESTER CLARK, 

Justice. 



356 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF ALLEN H. ROBINSON, CLERK, 
MUNICIPAL COURT. 



Receipts. 




Received for fines and costs, $3,277.77 


sundry fees, 


40.02 


Expenditures. 




Paid for probation officer, 


120.00 


medical examinations of re- 




spondents, 


8.00 


acting justices, 


60.00 


postage, printing and other 




supplies, 


79.44 


fees of officers and witnesses, 




and complaints and warrants 


, 928.52 


clerk's bond, 


5.00 


County of Merrimack, District 




Court, fines and costs, 


16.67 


State of New Hampshire, fish 




and game fine, 


10.00 


L. J. Keenan, fine for conver- 




sion of horse, under special 




statute, 


29.00 


Held pending decision of court, 


455.00 


Balance paid city treasurer, 


1,606.16 



Respectfully submitted, 



5,317.79 



1,317.79 



ALLAN H. ROBINSON, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF TRUST 
FUNDS. 



NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
ISAAC HILL, 

Appointed September 13, 1915, in compliance with an act 
of the legislature approved April 21, 1915, entitled "An 
act relating to trust funds held by towns and cities." 

The City of Concord has at various times accepted trust 
funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots which have 
been used by the city in general account. The law pro- 
vides that the city may issue its note in replacement of such 
funds so used at 3| per cent, interest, and, in accordance 
with this provision, the City of Concord issued its demand 
note, dated January 1, 1916, for $52,176.43, payable to 
the trustees of trust funds. 



358 city of concord. 

Statement of Cash Account Cemetery Trusts. 



DR. 




1916. 




Jan. 1. To balance received from city treasurer, $2,689.36 


Income Hiram B. Tebbetts Trust, 


8.00 


Samuel C. Eastman Trust, 


7.00 


Seth Eastman Trust, 


5.00 


George G. Fogg Trust, 


12.00 


J. W. & E. J. Little Trust, 


6.00 


Mary D. Hart Trust, 


12.00 


Note dated January 1, 1916, 




one year at 3| per cent., 




$52,176.43, 


1,826.17 


Seth K. Jones Trust, 


12.00 


Sundry Trust Funds de- 




posited in Merrimack 




County Savings Bank — 




$2,596.61, 


38.62 



$4,616.15 

Cr. 
1916. 

Jan. 3. Paid Mary E. Bourne, account income 

Richard Collins Trust, $1 . 75 

July 24. E. H. Brown, account income, J. 

Arthur Bean Trust, 4 . 00 

Dec. 28. Nahum Prescott, account income 

Nancy Bradeen Trust, 5 . 00 

Dec. 31. E. H. Brown, treasurer, account 

Sundry Trusts, Woodlawn 
Cemetery, Penacook, 91.50 

Income Sundry Trust Funds to 
reimburse city for money ad- 
vanced for care of Blossom Hill 
Cemetery, 1,208, 50 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 359 

Dec. 31. Income Sundry Trust Funds to 

reimburse city for money ad- 
vanced for care of lots in Old 
North Cemetery, $267.00 

Income Sundry Trust Funds to 
reimburse city for money ad- 
vanced for care of lots in West 
Concord Cemetery, 26 . 00 

Income Sundry Trust Funds to 
reimburse city for money paid 
for care of lots in Old Fort Cem- 
etery, 11.75 

Income Sundry Trust Funds to 
reimburse city for money paid 
for care of lots in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, 105 . 12 

Income Sundry Trust Funds to 
reimburse city for money paid 
for care of lots in Millville 
Cemetery, . 59.00 

Income Minot Enclosure Trust 
paid to H. H. Dudley, treas- 
urer, 105.00 

George W. Waters, superintend- 
ent Calvary Cemetery, on ac- 
count labor on Sundry Trust 
lots, 42.25 

Balance, 2,689.28 

$4,616.15. 



TRUST FUNDS. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1916, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40 . 00 

Deposited in the Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be applied 
to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1916, 80.00 

Paid Margaretta L. Blake, treasurer of the 

society, 80.00 

Invested in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance income from last year, $398 . 07 

Income received, 1916, 23.88 

$421.95 

Paid Rev. George A. Demers, treasurer, $25 . 00 
Income on hand, January 1, 1917, 396.95 

$421.95 

Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank; income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 



TRUST FUNDS. 361. 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase of books 
of a biographical, geographical, historical and scientific character, and the books relating 
to science shall be those that give the latest developments and discoveries by scientific 
persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1916, 85.90 

Paid into the city treasury, 85 . 90 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500 . 00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145 . 00 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1916, 40.00 

Paid into city treasury, 40 . 00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1916, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40 . 00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 
Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500 . 00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1916, 20.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 20 . 00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital, $3,312.60 

Income received, 1916, 123.73 

Paid into the city treasury, 123 . 73 



362 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,000.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the City of Concord to be invested in some New England city bond, the 
income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping lot in Blossom 
Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition; six dollars each year to be deposited in 
some savings institution to create a monument fund; and the balance of the income to 
be expended each year in purchasing books for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1916, 35.00 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monument 

fund, $6.00 

Transferred to City of Concord general 

account for public library, 17 . 00 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

$35.00 

Capital invested in City of Concord 3| per cent. bond. 

SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. The 
entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new monument on 
his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1916, $466.45 

From S. K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1916, 18.50 

$490.95 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually by the 
superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellishment of the burial 
lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of the duly appointed officials, 
or members of the Minot Cemetery Association. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1916, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at 3| per cent.) with City of Concord, in gen- 
eral account. 



TRUST FUNDS. 363 

JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER TRUST. 

Income to be used as follows: — So much of income as is necessary to be used for the 
care of burial lot numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove Cemetery, East 
Concord, the balance of income not used as aforesaid to be added to principal till same 
amounts to $10,000.00, then the balance of income accruing each year after paying for 
care of said lot and monument, to be expended under the direction of the mayor for the 
general care and improvement of Pine Grove Cemetery, East Concord. 

Amount of capital, August 31, 1916, $5,000.00 

Received from income of fund, 1916, 46.66 



Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, $5,046.66 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $2,026 . 66 
Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,520.00 

I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the hands 
of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find such 
trust funds invested and the income thereof for the year 
1916 accounted for as shown by the books of the trustees 
kept for that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



SPECIAL FUNDS. 

City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Special 

Funds. 

blossom hill cemetery fund. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, $32,596.23 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1916, 1,299.83 

Received from income of fund, 1,295.88 

,191.94 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $1,295.88 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, 33,896.06 



,191.94 



Invested in City of Concord 4% 

bonds. $6,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 10,799.15 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 13,096.91 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 4,000.00 



$33,896.06 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an increase of the 
fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Cld North Ceme- 
tery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 35.93 

$850.93 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 365 

Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $35 . 93 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, 815.00 

$850.93 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and ornamentation of 
West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, $648.61 
Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1916, 399.89 
Received from income of fund, 1916, 41.83 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 12 . 50 

$1,102.83 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $41 . 83 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, 661.11 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1917, 399.89 



$1,102.83 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
County Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary Contributions of interested 
parties, and by the addition of one-half the amount received from the sale of lots. 
Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, $2,135.90 

Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1916, 

Received from income, 1916, 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 
1916, 

5,721.06 



473.40 


104. 


26 


7. 


.50 



366 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Capital, January 1, 1916, $2,135.90 

Capital increased from sale of lots, 7.50 



Capital, January 1, 1917, $2,143.40 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1917, 473.40 



Capital and income, January 1, 1917, $2,616 . 80 
Credited City of Concord, general 

account, 104.26 

$2,721.06 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Bank, $1,345.99 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $1,270 . 81 

EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received 
from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of 
East Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1916, $330.00 . 
Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1916, 382.01 
Received from income of fund, 1916, 28.45 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 5 . 00 

$745.46 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $28.45 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1917, 382.01 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, 335.00 

$745.46 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in New Hamp- 
shire Savings Bank. 

WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund the 
conditions of which have already been fulfilled. There is still outstanding two bonds of 
$500 each and one of $300. One of the $500 bonds matures each year until 1919, 
when the $300 bond is payable. The presumption is that these bonds will be paid each 
year from taxes assessed upon the property of the precinct. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 367 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1916, $506.62 

Income received, 1916, 20.24 



$526.86 



Transferred to City of Concord gen- 
eral account to pay bonds matur- 
ing 1916, $500.00 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1917, 26.86 



$526.86 



SOUCOOK CEMETERY FUND. 



This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received 
from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and ornamentation 
of Soucook Cemetery. 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 1916, $13.88 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $13.88 

PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook sewer precinct, and authorizing loans 
on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, which 
provided that the following amounts shpuld be raised annually upon the taxable prop- 
erty of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds as they mature, viz. : 

$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 
$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1916, $887.69 

Income received, 1916, 35.48 

$923.17 

Transferred to City of Concord gen- 
eral account to pay bonds matur- 
ing 1916, $500.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1917, 423.17 

$923.17 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $423.17 



368 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EAST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the East Concord sewer precinct, and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, which 
provided that the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) should be raised annually for 
twenty years from July 1, 1895, upon the taxable property of the precinct for the purpose 
of paying the bonds as they mature. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1916, $63.26 

Income received, 1916, 2.52 

$65.78 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1917, $65.78 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



CEMETERY FUNDS 



24 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 395 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the 
amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are 
paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made with 
the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1916. 

Richard Harvey, rent, 
T. H. Dunstane, rent, 
W. G. C. Kimball, care, 
Mrs. Minnietta B. Morrison estate, 

burial, 
Charles M. Brown estate, burial, 
Davidson (infant), burial, 
H. Lindgren (child), burial, 
Edna C. Wilson estate, burial, 
Ada Aspinwall, care, 
Mrs. Annie Benton estate, burial, 
David Young, Jr., care, 
Hannah Garland estate, burial, 
Marilla S. Schoolcraft estate, burial, 
William Cirves estate, burial, 
Alma A. Batchelder, burial, 
A. E. Ash (infant), burial, 
William E. Chandler, care, 
Charles E. Palmer, care, 
George W. Carter, care, 
Joseph S. Matthews, care, 
Cora Fuller Straw estate, burial, 
George B. Perry, burial, 
Clarence F. Eldridge, Labor, 
Lee S. Whidden, repairs, 
A. H. Wilson, lot 62£, south half, 

block M, 
Charles C. Schoolcraft, lot 8, block A A, 



$24. 


00 


20. 


00 


2. 


00 


5. 


00 


4. 


00 




50 


2. 


00 


4. 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


2 


.00 


4 


.00 


11 


.00 


4 


.00 


5 


.00 




.50 


10 


.00 


1 


.25 


3 


.00 


3 


.00 


4 


.00 


6 


.00 


2 


.00 


2 


.50 


15 


.00 


156 


.60 



396 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sumner H. Lawrence, lot 34, block Z, $96.00 
Maria F. Kelley estate, lot 95, block W, 42.00 
Heirs of Vesta L. Alexander, lot 39, 

block Y, 35 . 00 

Edgar R. Shaw, lot 75, block Y, 30.00 

Frank Betton, care, 1 . 00 

S. L. French, care, 1.00 

Frank G. Batchelder, care, 1.25 

S. Holt, care, 2 . 00 

Mrs. E. C. Senter, care, 1.00 

Vesta L. Alexander estate, burial, 5.00 

Flora E. Tenney estate, burial, 10.00 

Edgar R. Shaw, burial, 2.50 

Mary M. Watson estate, burial, 4.00 

Mary Rivard estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Cypres Shorian estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Oscar G. Leighton estate, burial, 6.00 

Charles E. Scorer (child), burial, 3.00 

William E. Dow estate, burial, 4.00 

Frank W. Rollins estate, burial, 15.00 

Eliza F. Todd estate, burial, 7.00 

John S. Blodgett estate, burial, 7.00 

William Hodge estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Sylvia A. Staniels estate, burial, 9.00 

John Ojia estate, burial, 3.00 

Celina Caswell estate, burial, 7.00 

Earl B. Holt estate, burial, 5.00 

Laura A. Bartlett estate, burial, 5.00 

Frank J. Sulloway, (child), burial, 13.00 
John C. Tilton (Helen B. Tilton), 

burial, 3.00 

George W. Brown, lot 36, block Y, 42.00 

Charles E. Scorer, lot 46, block Y, 25 . 00 

E. A. Newbold, care, 1 . 50 

Benjamin S. Rolfe, repairs, 4.00 

Eli Brunei estate, burial, 3.00 

Nettie M. Brown estate, burial, 4.00 

Mabel E. Quint estate, burial, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 397 

Mattie R. Hapgood estate, burial, $4 . 00 

William H. Gould estate, burial, 4.00 

Annie Dow estate, burial, 3.00 

Roach (infant), burial, .50 

Robert P. Dyment estate, burial, 8.00 

Gladys Wood, burial, . 50 

Helen G. Plummer estate, burial, 8.00 

John Carter, burial, 3.00 

Maki (infant), burial, .50 

N. F. Carter estate, burial, 9.00 

Mrs. Watson, burial, 4.00 

George W. Hill estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Joseph E. Hutchinson, burial, 11.00 

Charles Carr, burial, 3.00 

R. P. Sanborn estate, burial, 5.00 

Zelotus Stevens estate, burial, 6.00 

Charles C. Peaslee estate, burial, 5.00 

Susan Pickard estate, burial, 3.00 

Luella Young estate, burial, 3.00 

Sarah C. W. Thayer estate, burial, 12.00 

Elizabeth M. Thompson, burial, 12.00 

Jacob Haret, burial, 3.00 

Margaret M. Stetson, burial, 6.00 

Charles Dow, burial, 3.00 

John Dannor, burial, 3.00 

Hattie Sleeper, burial, 3 . 00 

Andrew S. Farnum, burial, 7.00 

Allen J. Dearborn, use of tomb, 1.00 

P. J. Parmenter, repairs, 5.00 

Fred E. Brown, lot 12, block AA, 72.00 

Eli Brunei estate, lot 58, block Z, 80 . 00 

Joseph Grant, lot 141, block Y, 58.80 

Mary J. Gould, lot 46; block BB, 30 . 00 

Gleason Davis (infant), burial, 2.00 

Robert Dyment estate, burial, 4 . 00 

William H. Hall estate, burial, 4.00 

Sarah L. Burbank estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Charles C. Crosby estate, burial, 4.00 



398 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary E. Chapman estate, burial, $4.00 

Wendel P. Ladd estate, burial, 4.00 

Mrs. Edward Adams estate, burial, 8.00 

Esther Whittier (child), burial, 2.00 

George E. Ballard estate, burial, 4.00 

William T. Trenoweth estate, burial, 6.00 

Octave Orville estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Clara Kayes estate, burial 4 . 00 

O. Morrill, care, 1 . 50 

Mary B. Clement, care, 1.50 

Cash for flowers, 2 . 25 

Ruth G. Converse estate, burial, 6.00 

Warren H. Ring, lot 48, block BB, 65. 10 

Mary E. Hall, lot 34, block BB, 30.00 

Earl Toof and H. B. and E. M. Quint, 

lot 57, block BB, 67.20 

Horace Chapman, lot 25, block BB, 30.00 

Ethel O., Lucia S., Lula and Luna 

Burbank, lot 71, block Y, 48.00 

George E. Ballard estate, lot 4, block 

BB, 
John Brooks, care, 
Charles E. Scorer, care, 
F. N. Hammond, care, 
Chas. F. Forsyth, care, 
Anna Henry, care, 
Sturtevant Post W. R. C, care, 
Miss Tressidder, care, 
Burns P. Hodgman, repairs, 
George H. Wilkins, repairs, 
C. Bridden, repairs, 
E. F. Chase, care, 
Flanders (infant), burial, 
Cummings Brothers, foundation, 
John Swenson Granite Company, 

foundation, 
Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 
Charles Varney estate, burial, 



45. 


00 


2. 


00 


1. 


50 


1. 


50 


5. 


00 


1 


50 


2 


.50 


1 


.00 


10 


.00 


3 


.50 


8 


.00 


2 


.00 




.50 


16 


.00 


62 


.00 


30 


.50 


3 


.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 399 

James Gould estate, burial, 13.00 

Fred Wellman estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Charles F. Osgood estate, burial, 7 . 00 

Charles H. Hall estate, burial, 7.00 

William Garland estate, burial, 3 . 00 

George F. Robinson estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Granville P. Conn estate, burial, 10.00 

Augusta Mitchell estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Amos Blanchard estate, burial, 10 . 00 

Armenia White estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Edward Millman estate, burial, 4.00 

Mary T. H. Low estate, burial, 10.00 

Lucy A. Hooper estate, burial, 5.00 

Levi Call estate, burial, 4.00 

Carl E. Carlson estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Charlotte J. Dorr estate, burial, 4.00 

Lydia F. Lund estate, burial, 11 .00 

Lydia F. Lund estate, care, 5.00 

Stina K. Lindquist estate, burial, 6.00 

Emmy L. Bergholtz, lot 40, block Y, 35 . 00 
Edward Millman estate, lot 38, block 

BB, 30.00 
Henry F. Piper and Ethel P. Tracy, 

lot 16, block AA, 158.40 

P. Campbell Duncan estate, lot 33, 

block BB, 30.00 
S. Hammond and G. L. Chamberlin, 

lot 47, block BB, 61 . 60 

Alfred E. Douglas, lot 31, block BB, 30.00 

Gleason Davis, lot 45, block BB, 30.00 

Charles E. Scorer, repairs, 10.35 

Mrs. A. W. Austin, care, 2.00 

Emmy Bergholtz, care, 1 . 00 

George B. Quimby, care, 2.00 

F. G. Elliott, care, 1.00 

E. A. Collins, care, 2.50 

J. L. Durgin, care, 1.00 

Ola Anderson, repairs, 8.00 



400 CITY OF CONCORD. 

J. H. Sanders, repairs, $8.00 

P. Campbell Duncan estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Carmen Bergholtz (infant), burial, 2.00 

Frances M. Johnson estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Mary E. Bates estate, burial, 9 . 00 

Gladys Dow estate, burial, 8 . 00 
Perley B. Phillips (infant), burial, .50 

Delia Marshall estate, burial, 1 1 . 00 

William McCauley estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Frances Bartlett estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Emily Carter estate, burial, 11.00 

Helen E. Mixer estate, burial, 7 . 00 

Ann E. Gale estate, burial, 4.00 

Joseph O. Hoit estate, burial, 3.00 
Shirley Gay (infant), burial, 1.00 

Harry Hale estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Ruth A. Gilson estate, burial, 5.00 

Eric Perry estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Corning estate, burial, 4 . 00 
Mr. Vose, use of tomb, 1 . 00 

Annie Freidland estate, burial, 8.00 

H. C. Brunei (child), burial, 2.00 

Beatrice Douglas estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Fred A. Colton, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. McBain, care, 1 . 00 

Ira Maxfield, care, 1 . 00 

Charles H. Young estate, burial, 3 . 00 

George L. Osgood estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Annie M. Grant estate, burial, 8.00 

C. A. Bailey, foundation, 45.00 

A. G. McAlpine, foundation, 84.50 

John B. McLeod, lot 4, block V, 45.00 

Florance E. Young, lot 32, block BB, 30.00 

Mrs. Jessie Killeen, care, 2.00 

N. A. Follansbee estate, care, 1 . 00 

Mabel Ordway, repairs, 9.00 

E. M. Shannon, repairs, 1.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 6.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 401 

Mrs. Hannah J. Cate estate, burial, $4.00 

Ethel J. Moore estate, burial, .6.00 

Elsie J. Gibney estate, burial, 4.00 

H. S. Elliott, labor, 5.00 

Margaret C. Sanders estate, burial, 11.00 

Byron Moore estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Frederick Hansen estate, burial, 6.00 

Cyrus F. Towle estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 18.00 
Margarette J. Dyment, lot 39, block 

BB, 30.00 

John Peterson, lot 10, block BB, 30.00 

Peter Hansen, lot 13, block BB, 30.00 

Florence E. Towle, lot 116, block W, 97.20 

Mrs. Martha Richardson, repairs, 5.00 

Delia Keyes, estate, burial, 3.00 

Mildred Grand, burial, 2.00 

Dyment (infant), burial, .50 

Hoagland (infant), burial, .50 

Helen R. Robinson estate, burial, 1 1 . 00 

Charles Vaughn estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Martha E. Durgin estate, burial, 11.00 

Augusta P. Carter estate, burial, 11.00 

Lydia J. Emerson estate, burial, 11.00 

Sarah A. White estate, burial, 11.00 

Carrie Clifford estate, use of tomb, 1 . 00 

Rowena Sweatt estate, use of tomb, 1 . 00 

Ernest Fitch estate, use of tomb, 1 . 00 

Frank T. Cheney estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Cora M. Brown estate, burial, 3.00 

George P. Frost (child), burial, 2.00 

Joseph W. Edgerly estate, burial, 4 . 00 

John H. White estate, burial, 4.00 

George R. Smith estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Amos L. Colburn estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Charles E. Fisher estate, burial, 4 . 00 

George H. Lull estate, burial, 4.00 

Frank A. Butterworth, reburial, 4 . 00 

26 



402 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Lucy Chase estate, use of tomb, $1 .00 

Arthur L. Willis,, estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Mrs. N. P. Moses, bulbs, 1 .00 

Herbert N. Dunbar estate, burial, 6 . 00 

George H. Little estate, burial, 4.00 

Patrick W. Bramswell estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Charles H. Tandy estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Miss Carrie Todd, care, 6 . 00 

Mrs. Pendergast, care, 1 . 00 
Lilla A. Osgood, south half, lot 159, 

block W, 86.00 
Jennie R., Arthur T. and Harold 

Cheney, lots 127 and 136 and walk 

between, block A A, 151 . 20 
Mrs. Arthur L. Willis, lot 11, block AA, 72.00 

Robert H. Little, lot 27, block BB, 30.00 
Andrew Harwood and heirs, lot 47, 

block Z, 96.00 

John F. Potter, lot 11, block Y, 55.00 

August Matson (infant), burial, 5.00 

Estelle O. Gardner estate, burial, 5.00 

George W. Bergstrom estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Francis A. Morgan estate, burial, 4.00 

Lucie (infant), burial, .50 

Cummings Brothers, foundation, 2 . 00 

E. G. Cummings, care, 2.00 
I. A. Watson, care, 2.00 
William M. Chase, care, 2.00 
J. H. Gallinger, care, 3.00 
George L. Stratton, care, 2 . 00 
William K. McFarland, care, 3.00 
J. B. Hussey, care, 1.50 
George M. Kimball, care, 5.00 
George H. Russ, care, 2.00 
A. P. Carpenter estate, care, 1 . 50 

F. S. Streeter, care, 1 . 50 
H. G. Sargent, care, 1.50 
S. F. Morrill, care, 2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 403 



E. Willis, care, 


$3.00 


Mrs. J. M. Minot, care, 


1.50 


Henry Burleigh estate, care, 


1.50 


Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 


11.00 


Edson J. Hill, care, 


8.00 


William E. Chandler, care, 


5.00 


William E. Hood, care, 


4.00 


Miss A. L. Merrill, care, 


5.00 


Solon A. Carter, care, 


4.00 


Mrs. A. Marshall, care, 


2.00 


Mrs. H. Brooks Day, care, 


3.00 


C. P. Bancroft, care, 


2.00 


C. W. Lane, care, 


1.50 


E. H. Schutz, care, 


6.00 


C. W. Bradlee, care, 


1.50 


Frank J. Sulloway, care, 


2.00 


John F. Webster, care, 


4.00 


Emma Shaw, care, 


1.00 


W. H. Thompson estate, care, 


1.00 


N. J. Millette, care, 


1.00 


J. McLaughlin, care, 


2.00 


H. Sammonds, burial, 


6.00 


Joseph Palmer, care, 


2.00 


H. P. Hammond, care, 


1.50 


Arthur Knowlton, care, 


2.00 


Miss Maria Woods, care, 


3.00 


Mrs. J. H. Chase, care, 


4.00 


John Swenson, care, 


2.00 


V. C. Hastings estate, care, 


1.50 


L. F. Lund estate, care, 


5.00 


0. B. Douglas, care, 


1.50 


Walter Maynard, care, 


1.00 


H. A. Rowell, care, 


1.50 


E. R. Newbold, care, 


1.00 


J. E. Hobson, care, 


1.00 


J. W. Ford, care, 


2.00 


Mrs. Charles Virgin, care, 


2.50 


C. W. Lynam, care, 


1.00 



404 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Walter Jenks, care, $1 . 50 

Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care, 1.00 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 2.00 

Mrs. G. W. Crockett, care, 1 . 50 

David Young, Jr., care, 1.00 

Mrs. R. Morgan, care, 6.00 

Mrs. Mary E. Hoit, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. N. A. Dimklee, care, 1 . 00 

W. A. Chesley, care, 1 . 50 

•D. C. Parker, care, 1.50 

J. R. H. Davis, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Anna Bickford, care, 3 . 00 

Mrs. F. P. Virgin, care, 2.00 

Mrs. E. Wells, care, 1 . 50 

C. N. Hall, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Hazen Griffin, care, 1.00 

C. F. Bunker, care, 1 . 50 
W. F. Gay, care, 1 . 00 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 1 . 00 
Mrs. S. A. Holt, care, 2.00 
G. N. Bartemus, care, 1 . 50 

D. D. Taylor, care, 4.50 
George Buswell, care, 1 . 50 
H. N. Shattuck estate, care, 1 . 50 
Charlotte Merrill, care, 2.00 
F. Crosby, care, 2.00 

E. Colburn, care, 1.50 
B. Dodge, care, 1.00 
R. F. Robinson, care, 1 . 50 
Dunlap & Jeffers, care, 4.00 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 1 . 00 
George Marston estate, care, 2 . 50 
Fred Ladd, care, 3.00 
George Connell, care, 2.00 
J. E. Fernald, care, 4.00 
Mrs. H. C. Sturtevant, care, 1 . 50 
H. A. Dodge, care, 1 . 50 
Fred Johnson, care, 2 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



405 



Charles N. Sinclair, care, $4.00 

L. A. Sanders, foundation, 20.63 

E. B. Hutchinson, care, 7.00 
W. F. Thayer, care, 2 . 00 
Warren Emerson, care, 2 . 50 
C. F. Batchelder, care, 2.00 
Cummings Brothers, foundation, 1 . 50 
W. W. Flint, care, 1 . 50 
Miss Wight, care, 1 . 00 
Mrs. N. White estate, care, 25.00 
Mrs. Cirves, care, 1 . 00 
J. H. Albin estate, care, 6.00 
Frank D. Abbott, care, 1.00 
C. P. Tucker, care, 1 . 50 
Mrs. H. Tarbox, care, 1.50 
Robert W. Cook estate, burial, 4 . 00 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

F. G. Holt, wood sold, 10.00 
Edgar C. Hoague, lot 15, block AA, 126 . 00 
Herbert G. Abbott, lot 62, block AA, 129 . 60 
Edwin A. Griffin estate, lot 50, block 

BB, 54 . 00 
Harvey H. Oakes estate, lot 14, block 

BB, 30.00 
Charles W. Simpson, lot 162, block W, 101 . 25 

W. A. Marshall, care, 10.00 

F. A. Stillings, care, 3 . 00 

W. J. Green, care, 2.00 

J. S. Mathews, care, 1.50 

Mary P. Woodworth, care, 3 . 00 

Allen Jenks estate, burial, 2.00 

Otis F. Carr estate, burial, 6.00 

Horace Chaplin, care, 1.00 

Lucy Poore, care, 1 . 50 

Frank Dudley, repairs, 6.00 

Florence Brown estate, burial, 6 . 00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 4.00 

Harvey H. Oakes estate, burial, 4.00 



406 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary Rivard estate, removal, $4 . 00 

Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 6.50 

E. K. George, care, 2.00 

J. F. Wilson, care, 1.00 

W. G. C. Kimball, care, 3 . 00 

W. E. Carpenter, care, 1 . 00 

C. R. Dame, care, 1.50 

J. Kennedy, care, 1 . 50 

B. Bilsborough, care, 1.00 

L. H. Carroll, care, 2.00 

A. Sprague, care, 1.50 

Charles Palmer, care, 1 . 25 

S. B. Dole, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Annie Walker, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. Jessie Killeen, care, 5.00 

Miss Addie Straw, care, 1 . 00 

Joseph A. Cochran estate, burial, 16.00 

P. A. Murphy, foundation, 3.00 

J. W. George, care, 1.00 

Betsy Pope estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Edwin A. Griffin estate, burial, 7 . 00 

Edward Sawyer estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Baren Belek estate, burial, 9 . 00 

John Runals estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Edith P. Knight estate, burial, 4 . 00 

West Upton estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Mary D. Perry estate, burial, 4.00 

Abbie L. Mudgett estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Annie A. Sanborn estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Lilla M. Dockery estate, burial, 5 . 00 

John Drew estate, burial, 4 . 00 

Sophia Strom estate, burial, 3 . 00 

Benjamin J. West estate, burial, 10.00 

E. F. Chase estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Harlan P. Flanders, burial, 4.00 

Flammond (infant), burial, .50 

George Foster estate, care, 2 . 00 

J. Follansbee, care, 1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 407 



John Swenson Granite Co., founda- 
tion, 
Richard Harvey, rent, 
T. H. Dunstane, rent, 
Fred Powell, care, 
Grace R. Towne estate, burial, 
Nettie M. Converse, lot 75, block BB, 
George W. Abbott, trust, 
Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 
Fidelia F. Adams, trust, 
Sarah J. Adams, trust, 
Sarah M. K. Adams, trust, 
Allen, Smith & Dimond, trust, 
Frederick Allison, trust, 
Mary B. Allison, trust, 
Lavinia Arlin, trust, 
Sarah S. Ash, trust, 
Alonzo Atherton, trust, 
T. D. Avery, trust, 
Lizzie Knight Badger, trust, 
Abbie L. Sanborn Bailey, trust, 
Oliver Ballou, trust, 
Charles Barker, trust, 
George W. Barnes, trust, 
James W. Barton, trust, 
Mary A. Bass, trust, 
Robert Bell, trust, 
Matilda Benson, trust, 
Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 
James D. Blaisdell, trust, 
James M. Blake, trust, 
William Blakeley, trust, 
Emily P. Blanchard, trust, 
Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 
Charles S. Boardman, trust, 
Annie L. Brown, trust, 
Charles L. Brown, trust, 
Mary N. P. Buntin, trust, 



(20 


.75 


24 


.00 


20 


.00 


2 


.00 


8 


.00 


63 


.70 


7 


.00 


1 


.75 


2 


.50 


7 


.00 


24 


.50 


3 


.50 


3 


.50 


1 


.7-5 


1 


.75 


1 


.75 


4 


.50 


3 


.50 


3 


.50 


3 


50 


1 


.75 


3 


.50 


1 


.'75 


3 


,50 


1 


,75 


1 


75 


1 


,75 


3 


,25 


3 


,50 


7. 


00 


3 


50 


9 


.00 


7, 


,00 


1 


,75 


3 


,50 


7, 


,00 


7, 


,00 



408 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Andrew Bunker, trust, $1 . 75 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 1 . 75 

Harriet W. Butters, trust, 3 . 50 

Mary A. Burnham, trust, 1.75 

Frank A. Burnham, trust, 1 . 50 

Benjamin F. Caldwell, trust, 9.00 

Levi Call, trust, 3.50 

Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 2.50 

Hiram J. Carter, trust, 5.00 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 4 . 00 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 1 . 75 

Harry M. Cavis, trust, 3 . 50 

Levi G. Chase, trust, 3 . 00 

A. P. & K. P. Chesley, trust, 3 . 50 

Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 3.50 

Caroline Clark, trust, 3 . 50 

Allen P. Clark, trust, 3 . 50 

Fannie O. Clark, trust, 2.50 

Rufus Clement, trust, 4 . 00 

William W. Cloud, trust, 3 . 50 

Frederick Clough, trust, 3 . 50 

George Clough, trust, 3 . 50 

Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 1 . 75 

Sarah L. Cloutman, trust, 1 . 75 

Weston Cofran, trust, 7.00 

Amos L. Colburn, trust, 1 . 75 

Sarah T. Colby, trust, 3 . 50 

Charles A. Cooke, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust, 2 . 50 

Mary Crow, trust, 12.00 

Charles H. Cummings, trust, 35.00 

Mary R. Cummings, trust, 7 . 00 

Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 5 . 00 

Silas Curtis, trust, 3.50 

Charles C. Danforth, trust, 5.50 

Charles S. Danforth, trust, 1 . 75 

Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 1.75 

Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



409 



Emma J. Dearborn, trust, $2.50 

Edward Dow, trust, 3 . 50 

Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 1 . 25 

Charles V. Dudley, trust, 4 . 00 

William B. Durgin, trust, 7.00 

J. B. Dyer, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 3.50 

Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 7.00 

Stephen B. Eaton, trust, 4.00 

Clara E. Edgerly, trust, 3 . 50 

Lydia F. Edgerly, trust, 3 . 50 

Georgianna P. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Ella M. Elliott, trust, 1.75 

Elizabeth G. Emerson, trust, 3.50 

George H. Emery, trust, 4.00 

David E. Everett, trust, 2.50 

Lydia A. Farley, trust, 3 . 50 

Mary M. Farnum, trust, 4.00 

Joeiah Farrar, trust, 1 . 75 

Alvah C. Ferrin, trust, 5.50 

Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, 1.75 

J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust, 1 . 75 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Flanders, trust, 3 . 50 

George G. Fogg, trust, 45.50 

Alice T. Ford, trust, 7 . 00 

Jerome Ford, trust, 3 . 50 

Asa Fowler, trust, 17.50 

Mary A. Gage, trust, 7 . 00 

Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 1.75 

John D. Gale, trustj 7.00 

John Gear, trust, 3.50 

Sarah L. Gear, trust, 3 . 50 

Caroline L. George, trust, 17.50 

Enoch Gerrish, trust, 3.50 

S. K. Gill, trust, 3 . 50 

G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, trust, 1 . 75 

Loren W. Glysson, trust, 2.75 

James T. Gordon, trust, 3 . 50 



410 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Hannah A. and Fannie A. Goss, trust, .f 8 . 00 

George N. Greeley, trust, 17.50 

Jessie E. Green, trust, 1 . 75 

John B. Green, trust, 3.50 

William E. Green, trust, 3 . 50 

Betsey Hadley, trust, 3 . 50 

George M. Harding, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary D. Hart, trust, 12.00 

Timothy Haynes, trust, 3 . 50 

Charles F. Hildreth, trust, 3 . 50 

Emma J. Hill, trust, 1 .75 

John M. Hill, trust, 7 . 00 

Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 1 . 75 

J. Frank Hoit, trust, 7.00 

Harriet F. Holman, trust, 3.50 

Elizabeth F. Holt, trust, 3 . 50 

Hoyt & Stetson, trust, 5 . 50 

George M. Hutton, trust, 1 . 75 

Sarah E. Irish, trust, 3 . 50 

Henry Ivy, trust, 1 . 75 

E. O. Jameson, trust, 3.50 

Herman E. Jewell, trust, 1 . 75 

Julia A. Jones, trust, 3.50 

John F. Jones, trust, 3.50 

Seth K. Jones, trust, 12.00 

John and Benjamin A. Kimball, trust, 7 . 00 

Ellen B. Kittredge, trust, 1.75 

Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 35.00 

William Ladd, trust, 2 . 50 

Lydia A. Lane, trust, 3 . 50 

Leete & Newman, trust, 3 . 50 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 5.25 

Lincoln & Forester, trust, 2 . 50 ' 

J. L. Lincoln, trust, 1 . 75 

J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 8.00 

William I. Lovely, trust, 2.50 

John McCauley, trust, 7 . 00 

Henry McFarland, trust, 7.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 411 

G. and E. McQuesten, trust, $3 . 50 

James McQuesten, trust, 7.00 

Henry A. Mann, trust, 3.50 

Martin and Brown, trust, 3.50 

Jennie P. Martin, trust, 3.50 

Phebe E. Mason, trust, 2 . 50 

H. W. and H. O. Mathews, trust, 3 . 50 

Charles S. Mellen, trust, 21 . 00 

Horace Merrill, trust, 1.75 

J. B. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

S. F. Merrill, trust, 4.00 

David E. Miller, trust, 3.50 

Sullivan G. Mills, trust, 7.00 

Charles Moody, trust, 3 . 50 

Charles W. Moore, trust, 3.50 

George H. Moore, trust, 3.50 

Morgan and Colby, trust, 5.00 

Alice Morrill, trust, 3 . 50 

C. B. and A. F. Moseley, trust, 7.00 

Caroline B. Murdock, trust, 3.50 

Mary J. Moses, trust, 3.50 

David L. Neal, trust, 3 . 50 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 6: 00 

E. S. Nutter, trust, 3 . 50 

Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 3 . 50 

Eugene Ordway, trust, 2 . 50 

H. S. Ordway and J. Sedgley, trust, 7.00 

George B. Packer, trust, 3.50 

George F. Page, trust, 1 ,75 

Moses W. and Mary A. Page, trust, 1 . 75 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 3 . 50 

Francis J. Paige, trust, 2.00 

John B. Palmer, trust, 2.00 

William H. Palmer, trust, 1.75 

Felicite Pengault, trust, 4 . 00 

Hamilton Perkins, trust, 7.00 

Lucy J. Perkins, trust, 1.50 



412 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary N. Perley, trust, $10.50 

Isabella Perry, trust, 1 . 75 

Hattie J. W. Peters, trust, " 3.50 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 3.50 

Eliza A. Pickering, trust, 7.00 

Irving L. Pickering, trust, 8.75 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 3.50 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 2.50 

Edwin F. Plummer, trust, 1 . 75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 3 . 50 

D. O. Rand and N. V. Libby, trust, 1.75 
James E. Rand, trust, 1 . 75 
Henry W. Ranlett, trust, 3 . 50 
George L. Reed, trust, 3.50 
Judith A. Richardson, trust, 3.50 
Mrs. James H. Rigney, trust, 1.75 
Francis K. Roberts, trust, 7.00 
Helen E. Robinson, trust, 7.00 
Moses F. Rogers, trust, 3 . 50 

E. H. Rollins, trust, 27.00 
David D. Rowe, trust, 1 .75 
James H. Rowell, trust, 7.00 
Moses W. Russell, trust, 7.00 
Mrs. Isaac S. R. Sanborn, trust, 1.75 
Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 3.50 
Frank A. Sargent, trust, 3 . 50 
John B. Sargent, trust, 3.50 
Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 7.00 
Edward Sawyer, trust, 4.00 
Gilbert H. Seavey, trust, 3 . 50 
Shackford and Dame, trust, 3 . 50 
Leland A. Smith, trust, 7.00 
William Smith, trust, 1.75 
Mary W. Smith, trust, 9 . 00 
Moses B. Smith, trust, 1 . 75 
Hattie R. Southmayd, trust, 1.75 
Hiram Stanyan, trust, 3 . 50 
Julia F. Stark, trust, 3.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 413 

Onslow Stearns, trust, $7 . 00 

Prescott F. Stevens, trust, 4.00 

Mary L. Stevenson, trust, 1.75 

Charles F. Stewart, trust, 1 . 75 

J. M. and M.' E. Stewart, trust, 8.00 

John W. Straw, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary J. Streeter, trust, 3 . 50 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 3 . 50 

E. E. Sturtevant Post No. 2 G. A. R., 

trust, 7 . 00 

Charles L. Tappen, trust, 2.50 

Hiram B. Tebbetts, trust, 9.00 

John H. Teel, trust, 1 . 75 

John S. Thompson, trust, 3.50 

John C. Thorne, trust, 3 . 50 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 1.75 

J. L. Tilton and A. D. Locke, trust, 1.75 

John H. Toof, trust, 3.50 

S. D. Trussell, trust, 1 . 75 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 9 . 00 

C. P. Virgin, trust, 1 . 25 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 3.50 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 7 . 00 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 2.75 

Eliza A. Wason, trust, 1 . 75 

B. F. and Frank L. Watson, trust, 2.00 

Pauline E. Wells, trust, 1 .75 

Mary E. West, trust, 7.00 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 1 . 75 

George P. Whittredge, trust, 3.50 

Mary Williams, trust, 1 . 75 

Sarah A. Williams, trust, 3 . 50 

Georgianna M. F. Wood, trust, 3 . 50 

Belinda D. Woods, trust, 7.00 

Robert Woodruff, trust, 1 1 . 00 

E. W. Woodward, trust, 3 . 50 

Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 3 . 50 

William Yeaton, trust, 2.50 _ _ _ 

<tp5,b50.oo 



414 city of concord. 

Credits. 
1916. 
December. One-half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $1,299.83 
Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, 1,208.50 
Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 3,142.05 



i,650.38 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds are added 
to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a spe- 
cial order from the mayor, from the income of individual deposits made with the city 
for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in 
each trust. 

Receipts. 

Mrs. Morrison, care, $1.50 

O. Godfrey estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Lavinia B. Kelley estate, burial, 5.00 

Melvina S. Caswell estate, burial, 7.00 

Fred Leighton estate, burial, 6.00 

Albert M. Carter estate, burial, 4.00 

Abbie McLean estate, burial, 4.00 

Mary T. H. Low, removal, 4.00 

Eliza A. Stearns estate, burial, 4.00 

Miss Nichols, care, 2 . 50 

Laura T. Baker estate, burial, 4.00 

Sarah Jackson estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Giles Wheeler estate, burial, 7 . 00 

Mary F. Jameson estate, burial, 7.00 

Lewis H. Grover estate, burial, 11.00 

L. A. Woodbury, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



415 



H. J. Alexander, care, $3.00 

B. F. Hardy, care, 1 . 50 

H. Thompson estate, care, 1 . 00 

H. C. Blakeley, care, 1.00 

Lydia Eastman estate, burial, 7 . 00 

Ann G. Kimball estate, care, 1 .00 

Edith M. Johnson, care, 1.00 

Frances E. Whitney estate, burial, 4.00 

Minot Cemetery Association, care, 116.00 

William Abbott, trust, 15 . 00 

Clara A. Abbott, trust, 1 . 75 

Samuel Alexander, trust, 6.50 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, 4.00 

Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, 9 . 00 

Richard Bradley, trust, 3 . 50 

John F. Chaffin, trust, 2.00 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 3.50 

Seth Eastman, trust, 5.00 

Samuel Evans, trust, 4.00 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 3.50 

S. N. Farnsworth, trust, 2.00 

Miles F. Farmer, trust, 3 . 50 

Hosea Fessenden, trust, 4.00 

John Flanders, trust, 1 . 75 

Lucia A. Flanders, trust, 3 . 50 

Theodore French, trust, 3.50 

Moses Gerould, trust, 2 . 00 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 2.00 

Mitchell Gilmore, trust, 3 . 50 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 2 . 75 

Betsey J. Gale, trust, 6.00 

Pamela L. Hall, trust, 2 . 50 

Frank S. Harraden, trust, 3.50 

William H. and Etta B. Horner, trust, 5.50 

L. Louisa Hoyt, trust, 5.00 

William T. Locke, trust, 3.50 

Asa McFarland, trust, 3 . 50 

Ida Moore, trust, 1.50 



416 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mary Ann Morrill, trust, S3. 50 

Mary R. Morrill, trust, 7.00 

Samuel and David L. Morrill, trust, 5.25 

Isaac H. Ordway, trust, 7.00 

True Osgood, trust, 3.50 
W. B. Palmer, Harriet and Susan B. 

Savory, trust, 3.50 

Alice W. Parker, trust, 4 . 00 

Asa Parker, trust, 2 . 00 

Samuel G. Parker, trust, 2.00 

Pearson-White-Savory, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust 7.00 

Henry J. Rhodes, trust, 1.75 

Hiram Richardson, trust, 17.50 

Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 12.25 

Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 1 . 75 

Joseph Stickney, trust, 17.50 

Nathan Stickney, trust, 1 . 75 

Abigail Sweetser, trust, 7.00 

Mrs. James M. Tilton, trust, 1 . 75 

Thomas W. Thompson, trust, 1 . 75 

Jane R. Twombly, trust, 3.50 

Sarah M. Wadleigh, trust, 7 . 00 

Timothy and Abigail Walker, trust, 7 . 00 

Albert Webster trust, 3 . 50 

Paul Wentworth, trust, 7 . 00 

Harriet E. Wheeler, trust, 3.50 

Sylvia A. Wolcott,. trust, 3 . 50 

Charlotte H. Woolson, trust, 3 . 50 



$481.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



417 



1916. 

December. 



Credits. 

Income from sundry 
trust funds as charged 
to this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, $267.00 

Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 214.00 



$481.00 



MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lot3 is added annually to the permanent 
fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, to- 
gether with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent 
fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on 
trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual 
deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for 
the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

Ernest Carlson, lot 64, west half, $25 . 00 

Mrs. Kate Smith estate, burial, 6.00 

Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Carter, burial, 5 . 50 

Wyman Holden estate, burial, 9 . 00 

Irving C. Webster, burial, 5 . 25 

Ernest Carlson (infant), burial, 2.00 

Simeon Partridge estate, burial, 3 . 75 

Rosselle, burial, 3.75 

A. Anderson, burial, 3 . 75 

Mrs. Daniel Blake, burial, 4 . 00 

Howard Crafts, burial, 5.00 

Charles Sanders, repairs, 17.50 

GeOrge A. Carter, care, 2 . 00 

William Annis, care, 1 . 00 

William Gile, care, 5 . 00 

Mrs. George Parmenter, care, 1 . 50 

27 



418 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Jeremiah Quinn, care, S3 . 25 

Mrs. Barrett, care, 1 . 50 

Abijah Hollis, care, 1.00 

Abial Abbott, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. Ernest Anderson, care, 1 . 00 

Mrs. Annie Darling, care, 1 . 50 

Henry Richardson, care, 2.00 

John Kemp, care, 1 . 00 

Mrs. Alvin Powell, care, 1 . 50 

Russell Shepard, care, 1.00 

Miss Mary K. Abbott, care, 2 . 30 

Fred Peabody, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Edward Haskell, care, 1 . 80 

Henry Chase — 2 lots, care, 2 . 60 

Albert McAlpine, care, 2 . 00 

Miss Gertrude Sawyer, care, 1 . 30 

Mrs. Grace Day, care, 1 . 30 

Mrs. Helen Williams, burial, 3.75 

Miss Carrie Wright, care, 1 . 20 

Walter Annis, care, 1.00 

Cyrus Farnum, care, 2.00 

Leon Emerson, care, 2.30 

Mrs. William Webster, care, 1 . 20 

George F. Smith, care, 1 .00 

Mrs. Nellie DuShan, care, 2 . 00 

Daniel Webber, burial, 4.50 

Miss Arizelia Abbott, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Julius Anderson, care, 1 . 50 

Thomas Cotterill, care, 2.00 

George Fellows, care, 2.00 

James Foote, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Hoyt Robinson, care, 3 . 00 

C. W. Morse, care, 1.50' 

Mrs. Cleveland Curtis, care, 1.50 

George Anderson, care, 1.50 

Miss Estella C. Tenney, burial, 4.00 

Miss Estella C. Tenney, grading lot, 3 . 50 

George Little, repairing lot, 2.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



419 



Frank Dimond, care, 


$2.00 


James Bradford, trust, 


1.50 


Stephen Carlton, trust, 


2.50 


Augustine C. Carter, trust, 


2.50 


Richard Emery, trust, 


2.00 


Asa L. Gay, trust, 


3.50 


Marshall P. Hall, trust, 


1.25 


George Partridge, trust, 


3.00 


Ira Rowell, trust, 


2.50 


Mary A. Rowell, trust, 


2.50 


Caleb M. Holden, trust, 


1.25 


Hazen E. Abbott, trust, 


3.50 


Credits. 





1916. 
December. 



One-half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $12.50 

Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to this 
account transferred to 
City of Concord gen- 
eral account, 26 . 00 

Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 163.50 



$202.00 



$202.00 



420 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the reeeipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 

The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the 
amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are 

paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made 
with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the 
lot specified in each trust 

Receipts. 

Harry E. Maynard, lot 21, block L, $5 . 00 

Edward S. Rand, lot 19, block M, 5.00 

Helen E. Melendy, care, 3 . 00 

David A. Morrill, care, 2 . 00 

Ernest Webber, care, 2 . 00 

Earl Sargent, care, 2 . 00 

William Crowther, care, 2.00 

Ruth K. Abbott, trust, 9 . 00 

Elizabeth A. Batchelder, trust, 1.75 

Orlando W. Coon, trust, 3.00 

Ann Emery, trust, 2 . 50 

Daniel E. Gale, trust, 4.00 

George Graham, trust, 3.00 

Crosby K. Haines, trust, 2.75 

Jacob Hoyt, trust, 5.50 

Mrs. Samuel Hutchins, trust, 4.00 

Lucilla Pierce Kelley, trust, 3 . 75 

Addie J. P. Kimball, trust, 8.75 

Joseph S. Kimball, trust, 4.00 

Benjamin L. Larkin, trust, 1.75 

Augusta A. Locke, trust, 2.25 

Reuben B. Locke, trust, 4.00 

Josiah S. Locke, trust, 1.75 

Burleigh A. Marden, trust, 1 . 75 

John H. Maynard, trust, 3.50 

Frank V. Osgood, trust, 1 . 75 

William Page, trust, .87 
Frank Potter and Lydia P. Perry, 

trust, 8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 421 

Isora H. Ring, trust, $1.75 

Charles D. Rowell, trust, 3 . 50 

John B. Sanborn, trust, 9 . 00 

Harriet "B. Sanders, trust, 2.25 

G. M. and F. E. Tallant, trust, 3 . 50 

Harriet N. Tenney, trust, 4.00 

Aaron B. Young, trust, 3.50 

$126.12 



Credits. 
1916. 
December. One-half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $5 . OOv 

Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to this 
account transferred to 
City of Concord gen- 
eral account, 105 . 12 
Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 16.00 



$126.12 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with 
the amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid 
on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the 
city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 

Eddie Sornberger, stone posts, $5.00 

Mrs. Fred E. Pike, care, 2.00 

Adelbert Taylor, lot 46, 15.00 

Walter W. Kimball, care, 1 . 00 

Eddie Sornberger, care, 2 . 00 

Eddie Sornberger, stone, 3 . 00 

I. N. Abbott, trust, 3.50 



422 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



John Corliss, trust, 

Annie G. Eaton, trust, 

C. E. H. Ela, trust, 

Charles Fisk, trust, 

Oliver P. Fowler, trust, 

Julia F. Frye, trust, 

Clara V. Stevens Glidden, trust, 

Moses Hall, trust, 

Robert Hall, trust, 

John McC. Hammond, trust, 

Ann A. Hazeltine, trust, 

Augusta A v Hazeltine, trust, 

Charles H. Merrill, trust, 

Andrew S. Smith, trust, 

Cynthia A. Weeks, trust, 

Martha R. Jones, trust, 



$3.50 
1.75 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 
1.75 
1.75 
7.00 

10.00 
1.75 
3.50 
3.50 
1.75 
3.50 
3.50 
1.75 





Credits. 




1916. 






Decembei 


•. One-half sale lots added 






to permanent fund, 


$7.50 




Income sundry trust 






funds as charged to this 






account transferred to 






City of Concord gen- 






eral account, 


59.00 




Transferred to City of 






Concord general ac- 






count, 


20.50 



$87.00 



$87.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 423 

OLD FORT CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Receipts. 
Abigail W. Lang, trust, $5 . 00 

Nelson Tenney, trust, 1 . 75 

A. L. Williams, trust, 5.00 

$11,75 



Credits. 
1916. 
December. Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to this 
account transferred to 
City of Concord gen- 
eral account, $11 . 75 



SOUCOOK CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with 
the amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid 
on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made with 
the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
Frank Moses, lot 82, $9.75 

William D. Welcome, lots 90 and 91, 18.00 

$27.75 



Credits. 
1916. 
December. One-half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $13.88 

Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 13.87 



$27.75 



424 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 



Municipal. 



Bonds. 

City Hall Building, 



Due. 



Public Park, 

U (I 

Bridge, 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept.. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

Dec. 

Dec. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 



1, 1916, 


1, 1918, 


1, 1919, 


1, 1920, 


1, 1921, 


1, 1922, 


1, 1923, 


1, 1924, 


1, 1925, 


1, 1926, 


1, 1927, 


1, 1928, 


1, 1929, 


1, 1931, 


1, 1933, 


1, 1917, 


1, 1918, 


1, 1919, 


1, 1920, 


1, 1921, 


1, 1922, 


1, 1923, 


1, 1924, 


1, 1925, 


1, 1926, 


1, 1927, 


1, 1928, 


1, 1929, 


1, 1930, 


1, 1931, 


1, 1932, 


1, 1933, 


1, 1934, 


1, 1935, 



Rate 

3* 



2 

3i 

:U 
■A] 
3i 
3i 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
1 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
, 4 



Amount. 

$300 

8,000 

8,000 

8,000 

7,000 

7,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

10,000 



$195,300 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



425 



Precinct. 



Bonds. 

Sewer, 



Due. Rate. Amount. 

July 1, 1917, 34, $25,000 
May 1, 1928, 34, 25,000 
Dec. 1, 1930, 4, 5,000 
Dec. 1, 1932, 4, 10,000 
Dec. 1, 1934, 4, 10,000 



Bonds. 



Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


ict, May 1 


1917, 


4, 


$8,000 


July 1 


1918 


3|, 


8,000 


July 1 


1919 


3i 


8,000 


" May 1 


1920 


4, 


2,000 


" July 1 


1920 


34, 


8,000 


May 1 


1921 


4, 


2,000 


July 1 


1921 


34, 


8,000 


" May 1 


1922 


4, 


2,000 


" July 1 


1922 


3*, 


8,000 


" July 1 


1923 


3*, 


10,000 


" May 1 


1924 


4, 


5,000 


" July 1 


1924 


34, 


5,000 


" May 1 


1925 


4, 


10,000 


July 1 


1925 


34, 


5,000 


" May 1 


1926 


4, 


5,000 


" July 1 


1926 


34, 


5,000 


July 1 


1927 


31, 


35,000 


May 1 


1928 


4, 


6,000 


July 1 


1928 


3*, 


4,000 


" July 1 


1929 


34, 


10,000 


" July 1 


, 1930 


, 34, 


10,000 


July 1 


1931 


34, 


9,000 


" May 1 


, 1932 


4, 


10,000 


" May 1 


, 1933 


4, 


10,000 


May 1 


, 1934 


, 4, 


10,000 



$75,000 



$203,000 



426 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount . 


School District No. 20 


Sept. 


1, 1917, 3|, 


$500 




Sept. 


1, 1918, 3|, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1919, 3|, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1920, 3|, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1921, 3|, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1922, 3|, 


500 




Sept. 


1, 1924, 3i 


4,300 


Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


West Concord Sewer, 


Oct. 


1, 1917, 3i 


$500 


a tt (• 


Oct. 


1, 1918, 3$, 


500 


a a a 


Oct. 


1, 1919, 3i 


300 


Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount 


Penacook Sewer, 


July 


1, 1917, 4, 


$500 


a a 


Oct. 


1, 1917, 3, 


500 


it a 


July 


1, 1918, 4, 


500 


i' it 


Oct. 


1, 1918, 3, 


500 


a tt 


July 


1, 1919, 4, 


500 



$7,300 



$1,300 



$2,500 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city, ex- 
clusive of water department, 



$484,400 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



427 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 

Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1916, 

municipal, $310.00 
Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1916, 

precinct, 312.50 
Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1916, 

Union School District, 200.00 
Due and unpaid Jan. 1, 1916, 

Penacook sewer, 32 . 50 

Due in 1916, municipal, 7,670.00 

'■ 1916, precinct, sewer, 2,750.00 

" 1916, Union School District, 7,735.00 

" 1916, Penacook sewer, 125.00 

" 1916, West Concord sewer, 63.00 
" 1916, School District No. 

20, 273.00 



Cr. 




Municipal, paid, 


$7,762.75 


Precinct, sewer, paid, 


2,790.00 


Union School District, paid, 


7,525.00 


Penacook sewer, paid, 


157.50 


West Concord sewer, paid, 


54.25 


School District No. 20, paid, 


273.00 


Municipal due, not presented, 


217.25 


Precinct due, not presented, 


272.50 


Union School District, due not pre- 




sented, 


410.00 


West Concord sewer due, not pre- 




sented, 


8.75 



,471.00 



$19,471.00 



428 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 

Isaac Hill, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water 
Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1916, $25,331.70 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 75,052.72 

$100,384 . 42 

Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $17,888 . 78 

Bonds paid, 38,000.00 

Orders paid, 25,399.27 

Cash on hand. 19,096.37 

,384.42 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT 



When 


due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


When du 


9. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1, 


1917, 


4, 


2,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1922, 


4, 


$333,000 


Jan. 1, 


1918, 


4, 


10,000 


Mar. 


1, 


1922, 


o 2 , 


8,000 


Jan. 1, 


1919, 


4, 


10,000 


Apr. 


1, 


1922, 


°2> 


26,000 


Nov. 1, 


1920, 


3, 


4,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1923, 


3 1 


3,000 


Nov. 1, 


1921, 


3, 


3,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1924, 


°2i 


15,000 


Apr. 1, 


1921, 


3|, 


5,000 













$419,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 429 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 

1 9 1 6, and not presented, $161.00 

To coupons due, 1916, - 17,733 . 18 

$17,894.18 



Cr. 
By coupons paid, 1916, $17,608. 18 

coupons due and not presented, 286 . 00 

$17,894.18 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing ac- 
count of Isaac Hill, city treasurer, for the year 1916, and 
find all items of receipt and expenditure therein properly 
recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouchers, and 
the several items correctly cast, and cash balance to be 
thirty-one thousand, six hundred seventy-four dollars and 
ninety-two cents ($31,674.92), and as treasurer of the city 
water department, cash balance to be nineteen thousand, 
ninety-six dollars and thirty-seven cents ($19,096.37). 

I have also verified the account of the special funds and 
sinking funds of the city in the hands of the city treasurer, 
and find such special and sinking funds invested, and the 
income thereof for the year 1916 accounted for, as .shown 
by the book of the city treasurer kept for that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City 'Clerk. 



430 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 431 



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432 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





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435 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY OF 
CONCORD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1916. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, City Poor: $2,500.00 



Resolution No. 266, 639.62 ' 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, City, 150.00 106.00 $44.00 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, County, 1,970.57 

Aid, County Poor, 14,094 .55 : . 

Bonds, City Hall, 8,000.00 7,700.00 300.00 

Bridge Bonds, 4,000 . 00 4,000 .00 

Cemeteries : 

Blossom Hill, 1 ,500 . 00 8, 1 16 . 70 

Balance, 1915, 234.91 

Transferred Cemetery Ac- 
count, 3,142.05 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1,295.88 

Income Trust Funds, 1,208 .50 



$7,381.34 $8,116.70 

old North, 200.00 * 702.14 

Balance, 1915, 31.78 

Transferred Cemetery Ac- 
count, 214.00 

Income Cemetery Fund, 35.93 

Income Trust Funds, 267.00 



$748.71 $702.14 $46.57 



Maple Grove, 100.00 303.82 
Balance, 1915, 14.11 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 437 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



Transferred Cemetery Ac- 
count, $163.50 
Income Trust Funds, 26 . 00 
Income Cemetery Fund, 41 .83 



$345.44 $303.82 $41.62 



Pine Grove, 150.00 270.68 
Transferred Cemetery Ac- 
count, 16.00 

Income Trust Funds, 105 . 12 

Income Cemetery Fund, 28 . 45 



$299.57 $270.68 $28 SO 



Old Fort, . 30.00 36.26 

Balance, 1915, .75 

Income Trust Funds, 11 .75 



$42 . 50 $36 . 26 $6 . 24 

Millville, 100.00 294.24 

Balance, 1915, 60.44 

Transferred Cemetery Ac- 
count, 20 . 50 

Income Trust Funds, 59.00 

Income Cemetery Fund, 104 .26 

$344.20 $294.24 $49.96 

Horse Hill, 10.00 10 00 

Soucook, 30.00 ' 30.00 

Transferred Cemetery Ac- 
count, 13.87 

$43.87 $30.00 $13.87 

Woodlawn, 25.00 25.00 

Concord Charity Organization 

Society: 200.00 200.00 

Concord District Nursing Asso- 
ciation: 300.00 300.00 



438 CITY OF CONCORD. 






Appropriation. 


Expended. Balance. 


Dental Clinic: 






Resolution No. 251, 


$500.00 


$500.00 


Dog Licenses, 




102.70 


Engineering Department : 






Salary Engineer, 


1,800.00 


1,800.00 


Salary Assistants, 


1,700.00 


1,474.38 


Supplies, 


100.00 


129.64 


Repairs, 


25.00 


8.80 


Incidentals, 


150.00 


196.41 


Assessor's Map, 


500.00 


570.45 




$4,275.00 


$4,179.68 $95.32 


E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 






Aid, 


450.00 


450.00 


Fire Department: 






Pay-Rolls, 


11,284.00 


11,765.03 


Pay-Rolls, Semi-annual, 


9,140.00 


9,190.00 


Rent Veterans' Association, 


150.00 


150.00 


Forage, 


1,750.00 


1,439.66 


Fuel and Lights, 


1,885.00 


2,037.07 


Fire Alarm, 


1,000.00 


424.98 


Horse Hire and Shoeing, 


1,100.00 


952.02 


Washing, 


52.00 


52.00 


Supplies, Auto Combination, 


200.00 


149.94 


Penacook Fire Alarm, 


250.00 


200.36 


Incidentals, 


2,700.00 


3,308.40 


New Hose, 


500 . 00 


500.00 


Resolution No. 266, 


158.46 






$30,169.46 


$30,169.46 


Motor Pumping Engine & 






Hose Wagon, 


8,500.00 


$8,500.00 


Health, Board of: 






Salary Sanitary Officer, 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


Milk Inspection, 


300.00 


300.00 


Fumigation Supplies, 


100.00 


130.68 


Incidentals, 


800.00 


846.98 


Contagious Diseases, 


700.00 


344.37 



$3,400.00 $3,122.03 $277.97 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 439 




Appropriation. 


Expended. Balance. 


Highway Department : 






Salary, Supt. of Streets, 


$1,800.00 


$1,800.00 


General Maintenance and 






Repair, 


42,000.00 


39,942 .38 


Permanent Work, So. Main 






Street, complete to West, 


300.00 




Permanent Work, South 






Street to Downing, 


1,300.00 




Permanent Work, No. Main 






Street, Pitman to Center, 






West Side, 


600.00 


585.64 


Permanent Work, No. State 






Street, Penacook to Call, 






Resurfacing, 


3,200.00 


3,402.59 


Permanent Work, Pleasant 






Street, Resurfacing to 2nd 






Crossing, 


1,825.00 


1,153.70 


Permanent Work, Park 






Street, Main to State, 


1,500.00 


1,521.99 


Permanent Work, South 






State Street, Fayette to 






Monroe, 


2,800.00 


2,348.18 


Permanent Work, East Pen- 






acook Street, 


500.00 




Permanent Work, Washing- 






ton Square, Penacook, 


400.00 


282.83 


Sidewalks and Crossings, 






New, 


1,000.00 


681.80 


Sidewalks and Crossings, 






Repair, 


2,500.00 


2,694 .52 


Catch Basins, 


1,300.00 


1,379.72 


Care of Trees, 


4,000.00 


1,801.02 




$65,025.00 


$57,594.37 $7,430.63 


Incidentals and Land Damages, 


8,000.00 1 


10,330.93 • 


Resolution No. 266, 


2,330.93 J 


Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds 


, 1,826.18 


1,826.17 $0.01 


Interest, Bonds, 


7,670.00 


7,762.75 


Interest, Temporary Loan, 


1,000.00 1 


1,620.47 


Resolution No. 266, 


620.47 J 


Land Sold for Taxes, 






Resolution No. 258, 


687.48 


687.48 



440 CITY 


OF CONCORE 


. 






Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Taxes on Land Sold City, 








Resolution No. 257, 


$339.00 


$339.00 




Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 




Memorial Day, 


460 00 


460.00 




Military Companies, aid of, 


250.00 


200.00 


$50.00 


N. H. Memorial Hospital, 


750.00 


750.00 




Open Air Concerts, 


325.00 


325.00 




Ward 8, Playground, 


50.00 


50.00 




John Kimball Playground, 


500.00 


485 . 91 


14.09 


Rollins Park Playground, 


500.00 


493 . 10 


6.90 


Parks, 


3,900.00 


3,649.96 


250.04 


Peck Athletic Field, 


25.00 


25.00 




Ordway and Moore Claim, 








Resolution No. 264, 


1,700.00 


1,700 00 




Sewall's Falls Bridge: 








Resolution No. 253, 


$1,000.00 


81,000.00 




Police and Watch: 








Salaries, 


18,843.50 


18,568.58 




Fuel, 


600.00 


610.82 




Horse Hire, Penacook, 


25.00- 


15.50 




Helmets and Buttons, 


50.00 


59.92 




Lights, 


225 . 00 


216.18 




Telephone, Private Line, 


250 . 56 


243.36 




Incidentals, 


1,000.00 


1,131.16 




Supplies, Patrol Wagon, 


400.00' 


468.88 






$21,394.06 


$21,314.40 


$79.66 


Precinct Garbage, 


9,000.00 ' 






Balance, 1915, 


795.26 


■ 9,047 . 26 


S70.18 


Resolution No. 266, Ac- 








count Earnings, 


122.18 







Precinct, Lighting Streets, City, 18,900.00 

Balance, 1915, 1,342.10 

Transferred from t 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, East 

Concord, 33.87 



20,097.59 



178.38 



FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT. 441 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



Precinct, Lighting Streets, 

Penacook, $1,500.00 

Balance, 1915, 350.00 



1,475.00 $375.00 



Precinct, Lighting Streets, West 

Concord, 700.00 700.00 

Precinct, Sewer, City: 

Construction and Repairs, 8,000 . 00 "> 

Balance, 1915, 1,204.34 J ' 

Interest, Bonds, 2,750.00 . 

Balance, 1915, 587.50 ' 

Resolution No. 266 Earnings, 40.66 



127 . 53 




200.00 


154.23 




59.16 


125.00 1 
32.50 j 


157.50 


500.00 ] 




| 


1,000.00 


500.00 J 





L, 357. 50 $1,370.89 



Precinct, Sewer, St. Paul's School: 

Construction and Repairs, 50 . 00 

Balance, 1915, 48.55 



Precinct, Sewer, West Concord: 
Construction and Repair, 
Balance, 1915, 
Interest on Bond, 
Bonds, 

Transferred from Sinking > 
Fund, 



$12,582.50 $8,912.27 $3,670.23 

Precinct, Sewer, East Concord: 

Construction and Repairs, 

Balance, 1915, 127.53 127.53 

Precinct, Sewer, Penacook: 

Construction and Repairs, 

Debit Balance, 1915, 

Interest on Bonds, 

Balance, 1915, 

Bond, 

Transferred from Sinking 
Fund, 



4 . 00 $94 . 55 



140.97 


119.06 


21.91 


63.00 


54.25 


8.75 


500.00 


500 . 00 





$703.97 $673.31 $30.66 



442 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 


$8,000.00' 






Balance, 1915, 

Resolution No. 266, earn: 


1,575.60 


• $8,404.18 


$1,239.22 


ings, 


67.80 






Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 








Penacook, 


425.00' 


375 . 75 


131.09 


Balance, 1915, 


81 . 84 j 






Printing and Stationery, 


3,000.00 


) 




Resolution No. 256, 


600.00 


> 3,725.21 




Resolution No. 266, 


125.21 


1 




Public Baths, 


325.00 


291.52 


33.48 


Public Library, 








Salaries, 


3,535.00 


3,359.70 




Incidentals, 


2,350.00 






Balance, 1915, 


15.48 


2,985.79 




Trust Funds, 


326.63 






Fines, 


213.50 








$6,440 . 61 


$6,345.49 


$95.12 


Repairs of Buildings, 


2,000.00 


1,742.67 


257.33 


Repairs, Good Will Hose House, 








Resolution No. 246, 


615.00 


615.00 




Salaries : 








Mayor, 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 




City Clerk, 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 




Clerk, Board of Public Works 


200.00 


200.00 




Overseers of Poor, 


390.00 


390.00 




Solicitor, 


S00.00 


800.00 




Treasurer, 


1,225.00 


1,225.00 




Messenger, 


900.00 


900.00 




Building Inspector, 


200.00 


200 . 00 




City Physicians, 


500 . 00 


500.00 




Care City Clocks, 


110.00 


110.00 




Assessors, 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 




Moderators, Ward Clerks, 


360.00 


360.00 




Supervisors and Inspectors 








of Election, 


960.00 


950.00 





FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 443 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Judge, Police Court, $1,200.00 $1,200.00 

Clerk, Police Court, 350 .00 350 . 00 

Collector of Taxes, 2,000 . 00 2,475 .00 

Resolution No. 266, 465 .00 

$15,360.00 $15,360.00 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, 1,905 .00 1,905 .00 

Schools : 

Union School District: 
General Fund, Balance, 

1915, 28,688.80 111,988.80 

Appropriation, 39,028 .09 

Amount Voted by District, 76,374.60 

Literary Fund, 2,035.20 

Dog Licenses, 1,117.83 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 34 . 30 

Interest, 7,595.00 



Balance, 1915, 2,667.50 f 

Bonds, 8,000.00 8,000.00 

$165,541.32 $127,513.80 $38,027.52 

Athletic Field, Balance, 

1915, 5,000.00 5,000.00 
Town District: 

General Fund, Balance, 

1915, 1,250.20 8,750.20 

Appropriation, 3,011 .08 

Amount Voted by District, 1,289.00 

Literary Fund, 157.02 

Dog Licenses, 86.24 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 2.64 

One half Salary Superintend- 
ent, 300.00 

Salaries, District Officers, 267 .00 

Repairs and Furniture, 2,000.00 

Text Books and Scholar 

Supplies, 225.00 

Flags and Appurtenances, 10 . 00 

High School Tuition, 1,200 .00 

$9,798.18 $8,750.20 $1,047.98 



444 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriation. Expended. 

Penacook District : 

General Fund, Balance, 1915, $2,207 . 74 $10,207 . 74 

Appropriation, 3,478.33 

Literary Fund, 181 . 38 

Dog Licenses, 99 . 63 

Amount Voted by District, 7,674.73 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 3 . 06 

One half Salary Superintend- 
ent, 600.00 



Balance. 





$14,244.87 


$10,207 . 74 


School District No. 20: 






Interest, 


273.00 


273.00 


Bonds, 


500.00 


500.00 


Sinking Fund, 


250.00 


250.00 




$1,023.00 


$1,023.00 


Temporary Loan: 






Resolution No. 227, 


50,000.00 1 


> 100,000.00 


Resolution No. 247, 


50,000.00 J 


County Tax, 




34,716.50 


State Tax, 




45,517.50 



1,037 . 13 



RECEIPTS. 

Receipts of the City for the year ending December 31, 1916: 



To Balance on hand, January 1, 1916, 
Taxes, 1909, 
" 1910, 

1911, 

1912, 

1913, 

1914, 

1915, 

1916, 
Fines, etc., City Marshal, 
Library Fines, 
Highway Department, 

" " State Aid, 



$10,149.40 

80.65 

53.78 

83.50 

308.95 

486.19 

1,578.15 

30,495.27 

336,900.00 

406.65 

213.50 

617.17 

760.13 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



445 



Garbage, 


$122.18 


Sprinkling, 


67.80 


Pawn Broker's License, 


25.00 


Fees, City Clerk, 


316.05 


Hack and Job Team Licenses, 


138.50 


Billiard and Pool Table Licenses, 


460.00 


Junk Dealer's Licenses, 


190.00 


Employment Bureau License, 


5.00 


Dog Licenses, 


1,406.40 


Dog License Fees, 


131.40 


Amusement Licenses, 


982.00 


Rent, Auditorium, 


1,235.00 


Municipal Court Fees, 


1,606.16 


County Paupers off Farm, 


13,547.41 


Dependent Soldiers, County, 


1,930.62 


Proceeds, City Wood Lot, 


30.75 


Bounty on Grasshoppers, 


29.50 


Milk Licenses, 


206.95 


Sewers, 


40.66 


State Primary, 


113.00 


Forest Fire Bills, 


76.42 


Excise Commission Fees: 




Balance 1915-16, 


1,308'. 18 


Account 1916-17, 


7,322.77 


Transferred, Maple Grove Cemetery Account, 


163.50 


" Soucook 


13.87 


Millville 


20.50 


" Blossom Hill 


3,142.05 


" Old North 


214.00 


i' Pine Grove 


16.00 


" Penacook Sewer Precinct, Sinking Fund, 


500.00 


" West Concord Sewer Precinct, Sinking 




Fund, 


500.00 


Interest, East Concord Cemetery Account, 


28.45 


Interest, Millville Cemetery Account, 


104.26 


Old North 


35.93 


" West Concord " " 


41.83 


" Blossom Hill " " 


1,295.88 


Income, Abial Walker Trust, Schools, 


40.00 


" Cogswell Public Library Trust, 


85.90 


" C. Parker Lyon Public Library Trust, 


40.00 


" Franklin Pierce Public Library Trust, 


40.00 


Thos. G. Valpey Public Library Trust, 


20.00 


" Joseph Hazeltine Public Library Trust, 


123.73 


" Seth K. Jones Public Library Trust, 


17.00 



446 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Income, Trust Funds 


, Millville Cemetery, 


$59.00 


it tt tt 


Pine Grove Cemetery, 


105.12 


a a a 


Old Fort Cemetery, 


11.75 


It tt tt 


West Concord Cemetery, 


26.00 


tt tt tt 


Old North Cemetery, 


267.00 


it it a 


Blossom Hill Cemetery, 


1,208.50 


Insurance Tax, 




2,638.87 


Railroad Tax, 




44,070.82 


Savings Bank Tax. 




60,004.87 


Literary Fund, 




2,373.60 


Proportion School Fund, 


900.00 


Building & Loan Association, 


310.57 


Interest, National State Capital Bank, 


1,292.84 


Temporary Loans, 




100,000.00 


Miscellaneous, 




312.94 




$633,449.87 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Disbursements : 

City Departments, 

City Poor and Soldiers, 

County Poor and Soldiers, 

City Notes, 

City Bonds, 

City Interest on Notes and Bonds, 

Interest Cemetery Trust Funds, 

Schools, 

Schools, Interest on Bonds, 

School Bonds, 

School District No. 20. Sinking Fund, 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 

" " " Penacook, 

" Lighting Streets, City, 

" " Penacook, 

" " West Concord, 

" Garbage, 

" Sewer, Interest on Bonds, 

" Repairs and Extensions, 

" Bonds, 

County Tax, 

State Tax, 



$181,192.75 

3,245.62 

16,065.12 

100,000.00 

11,700.00 

9,383.22 

•1,826.17 

130,946.74 

7,798.00 

8,500.00 

250.00 

8,404.18 

375.75 

20,097.59 

1,475.00 

700.00 

9,047.26 

3,001.75 

6,399.56 

1,500.00 

34,716.50 

45,517.50 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



447 



Paid Outstanding Orders, 
Treasury balance, January 1, 1917, 



Less outstanding orders unpaid January 1, 1917, 



$396.63 
31,674.92 

$634,214.26 
764.39 







$633,449.87 


CONCORD WATER WORKS. 






Receipts. 


Expenditures. 


Cash balance January 1, 1916, 


$25,331.70 




Receipts deposited with Treasurer, 


75,052.72 




Expended per orders, 




$25,390.27 


Bonds, 




38,000.00 


Interest, 




17,888.78 


Paid Outstanding Order, 1915, 




24.00 


Treasury balance January 1, 1917, 




19,096.37 




$100,399.42 


Less outstanding order unpaid January 






1, 1917, 




15.00 



$100,384.42 $100,384.42 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



448 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

City Hall bonds, $98,000 . 00 

State Library bonds, 15,000 . 00 

Bridge bonds, 82,000.00 

Cemetery trust fund note, 52,176.43 

— : $247,176.43 

Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding January 1, 

1917, $767.39 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 

municipal bonds, 1,787.50 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 217.25 

Due school districts, 48,112.63 

public library account trust 

funds, 95.12 

precinct sewer, East Concord, 127.53 
precinct sewer, city, 3,670.23 

precinct sewer, St. Paul's 

School, 94 . 55 

precinct sewer, West Con- 
cord, 
precinct garbage, 
precinct lighting streets, city, 
precinct lighting streets, 

Penacook, 
precinct sprinkling streets 

city, 
precinct sprinkling streets, 

Penacook, 
cemeteries, 

Total debt not funded, 

Total city indebtedness, 



30.66 




870.18 




178.38 




375 . 00 




1,239.22 




131.09 




187.15 






$57,883.88 




$305,060.31 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 449 



Available Assets. 



Treasurer's cash balance January 

1, 1917, $31,674.92 

Taxes, 1912, uncollected, 253 . 19 

Taxes, 1913, uncollected, 287.14 

Taxes, 1914, uncollected, 982.79 

Taxes, 1915, uncollected, 4,313.00 

Taxes, 1916, uncollected, 40,214.64 

Cash in hands of tax collector, 

January 1, 1917, 204.99 

Taxes bid in by city, 4,655 . 83 

Due puarry rent, 100.00 

Due highway department, 212.42 

Due Merrimack County, county 

poor, 6,962.51 

Due Merrimack County, depend- 
ent soldiers, 
Overdraft, Penacook sewer. 
Overdraft, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 



Indebtedness above assets, Janu- 
ary 1, 1917, 

Indebtedness above assets, Jan- 
uary 1, 1916, 



Decrease for the year, 



943.68 




13.39 




f, 735.36 






$91,553.86 






$213,506.45 




246,845.68 




$33,339.23 



29 



450 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PRECINCT DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

Water-works bonds, $419,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 75,000.00 

$494,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 

sewer bonds, $666 . 67 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 

water bonds, 7,814.58 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

water bonds, 286 . 00 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

sewer bonds, 272 . 50 

$9,039 . 75 



$503,039.75 



Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1917, $19,096.37 

Due garbage precinct, 136.03 

$19,232.40 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 

1917, $483,807.35 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 

1916, 516,156.40 

Decrease for the year, $32,349.05 



financial statement. 451 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, $203,000 . 00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,794. 16 

$205,794.16 

Penacook School District bonds, ' $7,300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 85.17 

7,385.17 



Net liability of school districts, $213,179 . 33 



West Concord sewer bonds, $1,300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 11 .38 



Penacook sewer bonds, $2,500 . 00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 37 . 50 



,311.38 
2,537.50 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $213,506.45 

precinct debt, 483,807.35 

school districts, 213,179.33 

West Concord sewer debt, 1,311.38 

Penacook sewer debt, 2,537 . 50 



$914,342.01 

Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1917, $914,342.01 

Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1916, 990,194.24 



Decrease for the year, $75,852 . 23 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Having Value But Not "Considered Available Assets. 



Water department, $1,085,541.38 


Fire department, 


147,084.00 


Highway department, 


32,200.00 


Engineering department, 


997.00 


Sewer department, 


609 . 50 


Penacook sewer, 


40.15 


West Concord sewer, 


23 . 65 


Health department, 


940.00 


Police department 


40,081.65 


City clerk's office, 


1,150.00 


Commissioner's office, 


140.17 


Mayor's office, 


250.00 


Assessor's office, 


600.00 


Tax collector's office, 


296.00 


Sealer of weights and measures, 


200.00 


City messenger's department, 


2,250.00 


Park commissioner's department, 


225.00 


Cemetery commissioner's depart- 




ment, 


250.00 


Public library, 


10,000.00 


Milk inspection, 


25.00 


City history commission, 


10.00 


Real estate, 


333,382.50 




$1,656,296.00 



1916. 

Population Of city (census 1910), 21,497 

Valuation of city, $19,803,275.00 

Tax assessed for the year, $370,794 . 47 

Rate of taxation, $10.80 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District, $5.50. 
Rate for precinct, $3.05. 
Total rate, $19.35 per $1,000. 



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INDEX. 



PAGE 

Assessors, board, of, report of 341 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 395 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 424 

Cemetery department, reports of 330 

City clerk, report of 338 

government, departments, personnel of 331 

assessors 34 

board of aldermen * 31 

board of public works 32 

building inspector • 41 

cemetery committees 43 

clerk 32 

collector of taxes 34 

commissioners of cemeteries 44 

committees of board of aldermen 33 

cullei of staves 46 

drain layers 49 

engineer ' 33 

fence-viewers 45 

fire department, officers of 40 

health officers 41 

hydrant commissioners 42 

inspector of petroleum 41 

mayor 33 

messenger 35 

overseers of poor 32 

park commissioners 45 

physician, city and assistant • 35 

plumbers, board of examiners of 50 

pound-keeper 45 

police department officers and members of police force 36 

public library, trustees of 38 

librarian and assistants 38 

registrar of vital statistics 42 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 34 

sealers of leather 46 

sealer of weights and measures 46 

solicitor 35 

street department, superintendent of streets 34 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 44 

superintendent of clocks 41 

City superintendent of parks 42 

surveyors of painting 47 

masonry 48 

wood, lumber and bark 48 

treasurer 33 

trustees of Trust funds 39 

undertakers 44 

ward officers 51 



510 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE 

"City water -works, city, commissioners 39 

superintendent 39 

weigher 47 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 46 

Coupon account, statement of 427 

Debts, recapitulation 451 

Engineer, city, report of 207 

Financial statement 436 

P ire department, chief engineer, report of 222 

fire alarm 253 

Penacook fire-alarm telegraph 259 

roll of members j 275 

Highways, financial statement of 190 

department, report of superintendent 187 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 218 

John Kimball Playground, report of committee on 333 

Maple Grove Cemetery, receipts of 417 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of '. 53 

Millville Cemetery, receipts of 421 

Municipal debt 448 

regulations 2 

Court, report of 352 

Old Fort Cemetery, receipts of 423 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 414 

Ordinances and resolutions 3 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 331 

Physician, city, report of 329 

Pine Grove Cemetery, receipts of 420 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 219 

Police department, report of city marshal 181 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1906 345 

Poor department, report of overseer 339 

Population 453 

Precincts, debts of 450 

Property, city, inventory of 452 

Public bath, report of 337 

Public library, report of trustees 157 

librarian 1 58 

Public Works, board of, report of 187 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 161 

contagious diseases 170 

milk inspector, report of 164 

sanitary officer, report of 166 

School reports 57 

Union School District, annual school meeting warrant 112 

annual school meeting 113 

attendance officer 59 

attendance officer, report of 98 

attendance, tables of 122 

award of Dartmouth Plaque Ill 

board of education 57 

board of education, report of 61 

census, 1916 134 

clerk 60 

demonstration in Domestic Arts 108 

drawing, report of 82 



INDEX. 511 

PAGE 

Union School Dicsricts, elocutionary contest 101 

English piize essay contest 104 

events of the year 110 

financial agent, repoit of 63 

fire drills 135 

graduating classes 149 

high school, repoit of 79 

honor, roll of 142 

military di ill, report of 91 

Morrill School of Mechanic Arts 94 

movement of pupils through grades 138 

music, leport of 92 

officers of the district 60 

school nurse 60 

school nurse, report of 88 

sewing, report of 84 

Shakespeare Festival 106 

stamp saving system 103 

superintendent 59 

superintendent, report of 67 

teachers, list of 129 

Town School District, report of 116 

Sewer department, report of 207 

Solicitor, report of 325 

Soucook Cemetery, receipts of 423 

South End Playground, report of committee on 335 

Tax collector, report of 347 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 430 

Treasury, report of 364 

Trust funds 360 

Trusts, individual cemetery 370 

Vital statistics, tables of 456 

Water department, repoit of 281 

commissioners, report of 287 

coupon, dccount of 429 

engineer's repoit 296 

fire hydrants 308 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 428 

receipts for each year 300 

schedule of pipes and gates 302 

summary of statistics 319 

superintendent, report of 289 

treasurer's report 298